Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03274

Full Text

Lecanto battles Belleview; Pirates take on Tigers /B1

I i % WE . . .-... .. ...


C I T K U


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
88
LOW
66


SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


S 'COUNTY-





ONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
SNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 52


Man dies
after medical
emergency
Shorty before 1 p.m.
Friday, an Inverness resi-
dent was injured and
subsequently died as a
result of injuries sus-
tained when his vehicle
left the roadway as he
was experiencing a med-
ical emergency, accord-
ing to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
Melvin Hutcherson, 65,
was traveling southbound
on Citrus Avenue (County
Road 495) near Red Val-
ley Court, north of Crystal
River, when he experi-
enced a medical emer-
gency, lost control and
left the roadway near
4570 N. Citrus Ave. His
vehicle struck a mailbox
and continued into a
wooded area, where it
came to rest.
Hutcherson was trans-
ported to Seven Rivers
hospital, where he later
died.
Activities
planned for
Estuaries Day
The St. Martins Marsh
Aquatic Preserve and the
Citrus County School Dis-
trict's Marine Science
Station invite the public to
celebrate National Estu-
aries Day from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. today.
The community event
will include guided boat
rides, children's activi-
ties, a hike up a 60-foot
estuary observation
tower, as well as walking
tours of waterfront edu-
cational and research
facilities.
Due to limited available
parking, visitors must
meet at the Crystal River
Preserve State Park at
3266 N. Sailboat Ave.,
Crystal River, for vehicle
parking. Guided boat
rides will take visitors to
the Marine Science Sta-
tion and back to the Crys-
tal River Preserve State
Park throughout the dura-
tion of the event. If neces-
sary, limited disabled
access parking will be
available at the Marine
Science Station, 12646
W. Fort Island Trail, Crys-
tal River.
This event is free to the
public and reservations
are not required.
-From staff reports


Classifieds ........ C8
Comics .......... C7
Community .......C5
Crossword ........ C6
Editorial ........ A10O
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C7
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C6


Gov't shutdown looming


Senate and House still at odds


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -Time
running short, the
Democratic-controlled
Senate passed legislation
Friday that would avert a
partial government shut-
down early next week But
the measure faced a swift
demise in the House at
the hands of tea party con-
servatives who are
adamantly opposed to
funding included for the
nation's 3-year-old health
care law
The Senate's 54-44 vote


was strictly along party
lines in favor of the meas-
ure, which would keep
the government operating
routinely through Nov 15
and prevent a shutdown
that could cause delays in
some services.
The bill's passage
masked a ferocious strug-
gle for control of the Re-
publican Party, pitting
Speaker John Boehner
and Senate Leader Mitch
McConnell against rebels
led by relatively junior
lawmakers, Sens. Ted
Cruz of Texas and Mike


Lee of Utah and a few
dozen allies in the House
among them.
The outcome of that
contest more than dif-
ferences between the two
political parties is
likely to determine
whether the government
shuts down at midnight
Monday for the first time
in nearly two decades.
"We now move on to the
next stage of this battle,"
Cruz said shortly after the Associated Press
Senate vote. He told re- Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, center, accompanied by Sen.
porters he had had nu- Marco Rubio, R-Fla., left, and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah,
merous conversations right, express their frustration Friday on Capitol Hill in
with fellow conservatives Washington after the Senate passed a bill to fund the
government, but stripped it of language that would
See Page A7 defund the Affordable Care Act, also called "Obamacare."


Chamber relocating


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle
Investor and longtime Inverness resident David Arthurs will soon buy the Hicks House, a historic home in
downtown Inverness. The home currently serves as an office for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.

Inverness businessman buying historic Hicks House


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS When the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Commerce
moved into its new offices in 2006,
there was cause for celebration.
Not only had the chamber
found a new home, its locale was
the historic Hicks House, built in
1900 by Robert 0. Hicks at 401
Tompkins St. in downtown
Inverness.


Chamber officials were ex-
cited about the May 18, 2006,
grand opening, since it also coin-
cided with the 100th birthday of
Bessie Hicks, the home's former
owner who moved in during the
1930s and was on hand to enjoy
cake and the festivities.
"It's been good. It's worked
well for us," chamber Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer Josh Wooten said.
Now the chamber is vacating
the house, leaving to join a coali-


tion with county economic and
tourism leaders in a welcome
center on U.S. 19 in Crystal River
The house wasn't even on the
market yet when David Arthurs
heard about the sale. The cham-
ber and Arthurs signed a con-
tract to purchase for about
$100,000, Wooten said.
Arthurs, an Inverness busi-
nessman and former publisher of


PageA2


Fire fee


hardship


claims


increase

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
INVERNESS The
number of taxpayers who
have applied for hardship
assistance on the Fire
Protection Assessment
fee has increased to 28 as
the deadline approaches.
"I've had 25 so far and
three more today," said
Heidi Blanchette, Hous-
ing Services operations
manager, on Thursday
Blanchette will
process applications
until 5 p.m. Monday for
people who wish to
prove through low in-
come they need relief
from the $54-per-year
fire protection fee, ap-
proved on July 23 by the
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC) as an MSBU -
Municipal Service Bene-
fit Unit. The assessment
is expected to generate
about $4.5 million for
fire services in the 2013-
14 county budget.
Those taxpayers who
are approved through the
hardship assistance pro-
gram will get the assess-
ment paid for them by the
county, which will transfer
the amount from the gen-
eral fund to fire protec-
tion services.
See Page A2


Nancy Sullivan: Everyone was her best friend


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS When you were with
Nancy Sullivan, you were the only per-
son who mattered.
Whether it was business or friend-
ship, when you sat at her desk at Citrus
Title Insurance Company in Inverness,
across the table at Stumpknockers or in
her living room, you had her complete
and genuine attention.


"She was my sanctuary," said Inver-
ness attorney Michael Mountjoy "If I
ever felt I was about to explode, I would
escape to the title company just to see
Nancy ... When she talked with you, you
felt you had a genuine friend and that
she heart-felt your problems. Profes-


sionally, too, you knew you could trust
her"
Nancy Sullivan died Sept 23. She was
76 years old.
Born and raised in Tampa, she came
to Citrus County in 1966, a city girl mov-
ing to the country to a 10-acre farm in
Homosassa.
"I don't know how she did it, but she
got up every morning to milk the cows
and feed the animals, process milk for
See Page A2


Nancy
Sullivan
came to the
county in 1966.


Isolated evening
showers.
PAGE A4




A2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


Governor honors veterans


Associated Press
Gov. Rick Scott, left, shakes hands with veteran Edwin Heyer, right, 91, as Donald Fulton, center, 73, looks on
during a ceremony Friday where Scott presented veterans at the Alexander "Sandy" Nininger State Veterans
Nursing Home with the "Governor's Veterans Service Award," in Pembroke Pines. "Our veterans are heroes that have
made countless sacrifices for Florida families. It's important that we don't just wait for the holidays to thank our men
and women," said Scott.




Beware the bufo toad after rain


Associated Press

TAMPA A Tampa dog
is being treated for poison-
ing by a Bufo toad, a
species known for its hal-
lucinogenic toxins and in-
creased activity during
periods of unusually heavy
rains.
The dog was "expected
to recover because it was
the second time this ani-
mal had a run-in with a
Bufo toad and the owners
knew what to do immedi-
ately," said James Judge, a
spokesman with BluePearl
Veterinary Partners.
However, the incident
- as well as the poisoning
death of a Jack Russell
Terrier in Temple Terrace
last October has area
veterinarians warning pet
owners about the dangers
of the huge toads. That
dog bit into a Bufo toad
and was killed by the
toxins.
The Tampa Tribune re-
ported the incident has
area pet owners on edge.
Tampa veterinarian
John Gicking said several
cases of toad poisoning are
treated every week during
periods of increased Bufo
toad activity
Curious dogs and cats
tend to lick or pick up Bufo



HOUSE
Continued from PageAl

the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, said the house is a
good investment
"It's a well-built house
with good lumber," he
said.
Arthurs owns another
former home on Tompkins
Street and leases it to an
attorney He said profes-
sionals such as lawyers
and accountants are a
good fit for what is becom-
ing a mix of commercial,
office and some residen-
tial along Tompkins Street
Wooten and chamber of
commerce president John
Murphy said the move to
Crystal River is designed to
attract more attention to the
services offered by the
chamber, Economic Devel-



SULLIVAN
Continued from PageAl

us to drink, make bread
and still take time to take
care of me, my three broth-
ers and my dad," said
daughter Susan Sullivan.
She sewed the family's
clothes, chaperoned
school events and drove
the boys to basketball
practice 20 miles away
In the 1980s, after she
and her husband divorced,
Nancy moved to Crystal
River with her daughter
and later by herself to In-
verness in 1985.
For more than 30 years,
Nancy Sullivan was the
face and the heart and
soul of Citrus Title as of-
fice manager It was there
she met Judge Patricia


Special to the Chronicle
Curious dogs and cats tend to lick the bufo toad, which
secretes a poison from glands on the back of its head.


toads with their mouths.
When this happens, the
toad secretes a poison
from glands on the back of
its head, which causes the
pets to have symptoms.
Symptoms of intoxica-
tion include "seizures,
drooling, really red gums,
pawing at their mouths,
stumbling, heart arryth-
mia, excitable behavior,
pacing and trembling,"
Gicking said.
Scientifically named
Bufo marinus, they are
known as giant toads, ma-
rine toads or cane toads,
and they generally distin-
guish themselves by their


opment Council and Tourist
Development Council.
"We're off the beaten
path here," Murphy said,
referring to the Hicks
House location. "We want
to be where the action is."
Both are excited that the
buyer is Arthurs, a protec-
tor of Inverness history
"Due to the delicate na-
ture of the Hicks House,
we wanted to make sure it
went to a good home,"
Wooten said. "We had Mr
Preservation come along."
The chamber is not va-
cating Inverness. It plans
to share space with the
Chronicle's storefront of-
fice on the Courthouse
Square.
The contract is expected
to close in 30 to 60 days.
Arthurs said he will allow
the chamber to continue
using the Hicks House
until it is ready to move.


large size. In Florida, the
females are larger than
the males and can grow to
10 to 15 centimeters
across.
The toads, which have
grayish brown, warty skin,
are not native to Florida,
but were introduced to eat
cane beetles. They became
established in Florida in
an accidental release of
about 100 specimens in
Miami in 1955 and further
release by pet dealers in
the 1960s, according to the
University of Florida
Wildlife Extension.
If pet owners suspect an
animal has bitten a Bufo


MSBU
Continued from Page Al

The extremely low level
of income to qualify for
assistance was questioned
by Page Bosworth of
Homosassa.
"The We Care Food
Pantry uses the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture as
its standard," Bosworth
pointed out. "I am quali-
fied for food assistance."
Bosworth said the
USDA sets its limit at
$14,937.
"If the county had been
likeminded, I would send
in an application for ex-
emption," Bosworth said.
To qualify for assis-
tance, the applicant's in-
come level would need to
be within the extremely
low limits established by


Thomas, who was an attor- people, and she was al-
ney at the time. ways concerned about her
"I spent a great deal of neighbors. She was kind,
time in her office," she was quiet, and she did
Thomas said. "I would sit things for people without
there and 'confess' and them knowing it was her"
she'd roll her eyes, Thomas called
but you knew that j ,her a ripple on a
whatever you told ., lake as opposed to a
her, it stayed with splashing ocean,
her ... I talked to preferring to be be-
her every day hind the scenes.
Something would She shunned the
happen and I'd say, limelight, but at the
'I've got to tell same time she had
Nancy about this Nancy a sparkle and a
one!"' Sullivan spark about her, es-
For Alida Lang- Citrus Title for pecially when
ley, Nancy was the more than doing something for
friend who never 30 years, someone else, said
saw color differ- cousin Sally Ream.
ence, who loved all her "Nancy was also very
friends equally-with her funny," she said. "I re-
whole heart and soul. member being in the
"We were 'sisters,"' Lan- kitchen squealing with
gley said. "She showed laughter with her"
neighborly kindness to all Nancy Sullivan was the


toad, rinse its mouth and
paws with water and seek
veterinary help immedi-
ately Use caution, how-
ever, so the pet does not
aspirate the water with
toxins, Gicking said.
Pet owners should also
be careful about being bit-
ten by animals who be-
come unruly while
intoxicated by the toxin, he
said. Pet owners should
wash their own hands
after rendering aid and be
careful not to get the toxin
in their own eyes or
mouth.
Gicking suggests vigi-
lance is the best course of
action to prevent toad
poisoning.
"Don't just leave dogs
out in the yard unsuper-
vised, especially people
who live near water
sources," he said. "Leash
walks during high incident
times are best."
The toads are omnivores
and consume insects and
other toads and frogs. If
you don't want to attract
them to your yard, remove
cat and dog food from the
vicinity
The most humane way
to kill a Bufo toad is to
place it in a plastic bag
and put it in the freezer for
three days.


the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban De-
velopment (HUD) that
starts at $10,100 per year
for one person ranging up
to $19,050 for an eight-per-
son family
Blanchette said the
HUD criteria are set out
in the county resolution
for the fire fee hardship
program. The BOCC could
decide if it should review
the criteria for future
budget years.
Some county residents
have told the Chronicle
that the application
process is difficult and
discouraging.
"It isn't the low income
levels, it's the process re-
quired," said one resident
who asked not to be
named and pointed out
that the application was
not stocked anywhere in
Crystal River


first person many people
turned to, whether it was
personal or professional.
Thomas said that after
the birth of her daughter,
Brittany, she stopped by
Citrus Title on the way
home from the hospital
just so Nancy could see the
baby And when she
learned she had been ap-
pointed as a judge, she
"hopped all the way" to
the title company to share
the news with her friend.
"She was the go-to per-
son with any question of
land title and property his-
tory," said Inverness City
Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni. "She was always
helpful and went out of her
way to make sure you un-
derstood the facts. I will al-
ways remember how hard
she worked. A jewel of a
person who will be missed


Bondi announces


effort to stop


human trafficking


Associated Press

TAMPA- The state of
Florida will place bill-
boards along streets, in
malls and on bus shelters
to raise awareness of
human trafficking.
During a news
conference Fri-
day, Attorney
General Pam
Bondi announced |Z
a statewide pro-
gram called
"From Instant
Message to In-
stant Nightmare," PamE I
aimed at helping Floi
parents spot sex- attoi
ual exploitation genE
of children online.
The billboards place an
emphasis on social media
and Internet use.
Bondi said parents and
adults can download a tip
sheet about Internet
safety and a pledge for
children to sign and print
The pledge instructs kids
not to share inappropri-
ate pictures, never accept
friend requests from
strangers on social media
networks and not to share
personal information.
The tip sheet urges par-
ents to talk to children
about sex trafficking and
friendingg" strangers
online.
Bondi, who was joined
at the conference by
heads of several Tampa
Bay area law enforce-
ment agencies, said that
human traffickers often
find their victims online.
She and the other offi-
cials said parents and
caretakers can help
thwart human trafficking
by being aware of what
kids are doing on the
Internet.


Officials gave examples
of recent cases where
young girls were lured
into prostitution after
talking to an older man
online.
"It makes it easier for
these predators to target
young kids who
are vulnerable,"
Tampa Police
Chief Jane Castor
said.
According to
the state Depart-
ment of Children
and Families, sex
Bond trafficking of
ida young victims is
ney among the most
iral. underreported


offenses.
The agency started a
statewide task force in
2009 because the majority
of sex trafficking victims
are foster youth.
Bondi said that in 2011,
the National Human
Trafficking Resource
Center ranked the state
third in the number of
calls received by the cen-
ter's hotline.
Florida lawmakers
passed the Safe Harbor
Act last year to ensure
that child sex trafficking
victims get help from
child welfare profession-
als instead of being
placed in juvenile
delinquency
Florida is particularly
vulnerable spot for traf-
ficking crimes because its
geography and being a va-
cation destination make
it an easy transit point for
predators to transport
victims.
"We need your help to
put these horrible people
out of business and send
them to prison," Bondi
said.


Man charged with
stabbing dog
HIALEAH Police in South
Florida said a man has been
arrested after he was caught
on video stabbing a dog.
The Miami Herald reported
surveillance footage shows
Jose Cespedes walking
along a sidewalk in Hialeah.
As Cespedes walked by a
chain linked fence, a dog
named Zoey jumped against
the fence and barked at him.
According to an arrest re-
port, Cespedes pulled a
knife out of his waistband
and stabbed the dog near its
shoulder.


Blanchette, however,
said all county libraries
can print an application
from the county's website
by going to www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/
housing/housing_
services.htm.
Another issue was send-
ing a Social Security state-
ment as proof of income.
Blanchette said a copy
would be acceptable.
An applicant also did
not know where to find
the tax parcel identifica-
tion number Blanchette
said it could be found on
the homeowner's TRIM
(truth in millage) notice
that is mailed in advance
of tax bills.
Yet another task that
some senior citizens
found difficult was find-
ing a notary public and
paying for the service.
Many package delivery


by all who knew her she
defined professionalism.
Loved this lady"
For 11-year-old grand-
daughter Bekkah, she was
her sewing partner who
took her to sewing lessons
at Alida Langley's shop
every Wednesday
To her younger brother
John, she was a tough act
to follow as a child but was
much-adored and re-
spected as his big sister-
mother-friend.
She was sweet and kind,
generous and selfless, con-
fident and competent. She
loved books and words and
people, loved sewing and
getting away to Anna
Maria Island with family
and friends.
She made the best po-
tato candy and "block
party" beans and she
had a passion for seeing


Zimmerman being
investigated
LAKE MARY Police of-
ficers in Lake Mary are in-
vestigating whether George
Zimmerman inappropriately
took items from his in-laws'
house where he had been
living.
Police spokesman Zach
Hudson said Friday that offi-
cers are investigating what
happened to a television,
couch and other pieces of
furniture that had been at the
house owned by Zimmer-
man's in-laws.
-From wire reports


stores offer the service
for $5 per stamp, accord-
ing to a response from
one store to a reporter's
inquiry
Also daunting was the
need to repeat the process
May 1, "meaning this ap-
plication is only good for
seven months," one appli-
cant said.
Blanchette responded
that the application is
good for a year; it's just
that the first year starts
late as the MSBU is com-
ing into use for the first
time.
For more information
about hardship assis-
tance, call Citrus County
Housing Services at 352-
527-7520.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer
at 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicle
online, corn.


Mount Carmel Methodist
Church in Floral City-
her friend Alida Langley's
church get its new roof.
The family requests in lieu
of flowers, donations can
be made to Mount Carmel
Methodist Church, 8004 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City,
FL 34436.
In addition to family and
friends, she leaves behind
Paul Richey, her partner of
30 years.
"The culture of Inverness
is one of loving acceptance
and that everybody is im-
portant no matter what
their station in life," Sally
Ream said. "That didn't just
happen. It was established
by wonderful people like
Nancy Sullivan."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


State BRIEF


STATE/LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E
[]
ri
)rr
ie






SPage A3 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Legislator wants to allow warning shots


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -A Florida
state legislator has filed a bill to
exempt anyone who fires a
warning shot in self-defense
from the state's minimum-
mandatory-sentencing laws.
Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk
City, filed the bill Thursday in
response to the conviction of a
woman who was sentenced to 20
years in prison after firing a gun
near her estranged husband
during an argument. His action
came the same day an appeals
court granted the woman,
Marissa Alexander, a new trial.
Under Combee's proposed
legislation, those in situations
such as Alexander's would be


exempt from the state's "10-20-
Life" law, which requires any-
one who shows a gun while
committing certain felonies to
be sentenced to 10 years in
prison. If someone is shot and
wounded during the commis-
sion of those crimes, the sen-
tence increases to 25 years to
life.
The law, implemented in 1999,
has been credited with helping
to lower Florida's violent-crime
rate.
Combee said Alexander's and
other cases in Florida convinced
him of the need to clarify the
state's mandatory minimum-
sentence law for gun-related
offenses.
"I can't imagine and don't be-


lieve anyone intended that '10-
20-Life' should apply to some-
one who felt they were
threatened," Combee said.
"What crime did she commit?
She wasn't robbing a store."
Combee filed an identical bill
during this year's legislative ses-
sion but it went nowhere. He
said the attention surrounding
Alexander's case convinced him
the measure has a chance of
moving forward during the ses-
sion that begins in March.
Alexander had never been ar-
rested before she fired a bullet
at a wall one day in 2010 to scare
off her husband when she felt he
was threatening her Nobody
was hurt, but the judge in the
case said he was bound by state


law to sentence her to 20 years
in prison after she was con-
victed of aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon. Alexander has
maintained that the shot fired
was a warning shot.
The 1st District Court of Ap-
peal ruled Thursday that
Alexander deserves a new trial
because the trial judge handling
her case did not properly in-
struct the jury regarding what is
needed to prove self-defense.
The ruling said the instructions
constituted a "fundamental
error" and required Alexander
to prove self-defense "beyond a
reasonable doubt"
But the court also made clear
in its ruling that the judge was
right to block Alexander from


using the state's "stand your
ground" law as a way to defend
her actions. The law, which at-
tracted international attention
during George Zimmerman's re-
cent murder trial, generally re-
moves a duty to retreat in the
face of possible danger and al-
lows people to use deadly force
if they believe their lives are in
danger
The judge threw out Alexan-
der's "stand your ground" claim,
noting she could have run out of
the house to escape her husband
but instead got the gun and went
back inside.
Alexander rejected a plea
deal that would have resulted in
a three-year prison sentence
and chose to go to trial.


Around the

COUNTY

Two events at Fort
Cooper State Park
From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
today, the public is invited to
National Parks Day at Fort
Cooper State Park on Old
Floral City Road in Inver-
ness. Walk the grounds and
have breakfast with park
rangers and park volunteers.
On Oct. 5, the public is
invited to "Step Into Time"
- visit the park from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., see a
new kiosk, sample Semi-
nole pumpkin fry bread, in-
teract with living historians
and re-enactors, hear sto-
ries and meet artist Guy
LaBree, who has been
nominated by the Friends of
Fort Cooper for the 2013
Florida Folk Heritage
Award.
For information, call the
Fort Cooper State Park of-
fice at 352-726-0315.
Angela Vick to speak
to voters' league
Citrus County Clerk of
Court and Comptroller An-
gela Vick will be guest
speaker of the League of
Women Voters of Citrus
County at 10:15 a.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 8, at the Central
Ridge Library in Beverly
Hills.
Vick has worked for the
Citrus County Clerk's Office
for 22 years. She will be ex-
plaining the duties of her
position and answering any
questions pertaining to her
work.
The league is a nonparti-
san, educational organiza-
tion that meets every second
Tuesday of the month. All in-
terested are invited. Feel
free to bring soft drinks.
For information, call 352-
746-0655.
Author to address
Republicans
Famed World War II au-
thor Adalbert Krei will be the
speaker at the Saturday,
Oct. 5, Ronald Reagan Re-
publican Assembly meeting.
He will speak about his
memoir, "Ten Guardian An-
gels and a Tin Tub," relating
through humor and heart
the trials and tribulations of
growing up in Germany dur-
ing World War II.
The meeting will begin at
1 p.m. at 938 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S.19), in the South
Square Plaza, Crystal
River. Books and refresh-
ments will be available.
For information, call 352-
257-5381. CASA donations
are accepted.
-From staff reports


Correction
Due to an editor's error, a
headline on Page Al of Fri-
day's Chronicle, "Board
backs sale to HCA," con-
tained incorrect information.
The hospital board chose
the HCA bid, but has not
decided yet on a sale or
lease.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Book lovers line up Friday for the start of the semi-annual sale. At 1:30 p.m. Sunday, bring your books with
pages falling out or broken spines and learn how to mend them. A team of book menders will have tools and
will show you how to do it. Purchase a ticket for $5 for a chance to win a Kindle RFire HD. All proceeds from
the drawing and book sale benefit the Friends of the Citrus County Library System (FOCCLS), which uses
the money to purchase books and materials for the libraries.




CHS grad earns Tallahassee honor


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County native and
Leon CountyAdministrator
Vincent S. Long was named
Leader of the Year by the
Leadership Tallahassee or-
ganization in the recent
2013 Distinguished Lead-
ership Awards ceremony
Long, a 1987 graduate of
Citrus High School, grew
up in Inverness.
The Distinguished Lead-
ership Award recognizes
an individual whose ideas,
vision and hard work
achieved significant, tangi-
ble benefits to the commu-
nity within the past year
"I am honored and hum-
bled to receive this recog-
nition from Leadership


Tallahassee," Long
said at the Sept. 19
ceremony "I'm
very fortunate to
serve the commu-
nity I love, to work
for an exceptional
Board of County
Commissioners Vince
and to leadV n
tremendously tal- 1987o g
of Citrt
ented people dedi- named
cated to of the'
exemplifying the Lead'
highest standards Tallah.
of public service."
Long has worked for
Leon County since 1995.
Since becoming county ad-
ministrator in 2011, he has
received national, state
and local recognition
for leadership, trans-


r
n
y
e
ia


parency in govern-
ment, citizen par-
ticipation and
fiscal stewardship.
Leon County
Commission Chair-
man Nick Maddox
called Long a true
S transformational
Long leader, according
sHhaduate to a press release.
s High "L
Leader "Long has over-
'ear by seen a complete
rship culture change in
issee. the organization
that I believe best
positions Leon County to
face the challenges and
seize the opportunities be-
fore us. We are very lucky
to have him," Maddox was
quoted as saying.
Under Long's leader-


ship, county leadership re-
structured county govern-
ment operations and
aligned resources to re-
flect the county commis-
sions priorities.
Long launched a na-
tional award-winning Citi-
zen Engagement Series.
The workshops give citi-
zens greater insight into
county government opera-
tions and help highlight
the role citizens play in the
decision-making process
that shapes policies, pro-
grams and services.
Long and wife, Julann,
have been married for 15
years and have three chil-
dren, Kellen, Jack and
Riley They live in
Tallahassee.


Haunted Halloween slated in Crystal River


Special to the Chronicle

Join the Friends of Crystal River
State Parks for the annual Haunted
Halloween for two days, Friday, Oct.
25, and Saturday, Oct 26. Tickets will
go on sale at 7 p.m. those days, with
the last tickets sold at 10 p.m.
Visitors can expect to be spooked
on the terrifying tram tour, creepy
clown fun house, piratical boat trips
and other ghoulish activities.
Fortunes will be told and Florida
Public Archaeology Network will


again host photographs of departed
loved ones in its "Mortuary Photog-
raphy" studio.
Food will be available for sale,
sponsored by Gulf Archaeology Re-
search Institute.
This fundraising event is spon-
sored by the Friends of Crystal River
State Parks. Admission is $5 per per-
son. Parking will be just west of Mu-
seum Pointe on State Park Street,
with a tram ride to the main area.
Children can enjoy free activities
from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26.


There will be Halloween games and
crafts, tricks, treats and eats and a
costume parade. Food for the chil-
dren will be provided by Gulf Ar-
chaeology Research Institute.
To learn more about Haunted
Halloween, visit wwwfloridastate
parks. org/crystalriverpreserve/
events.cfm or wwwfacebook.com
/pages/Crystal-River-State-Parks-
Friends/140902829298553.
To learn more about the park, visit
www.floridastateparks.org/crystal
riverpreserve.


Annual book sale kicks off in Inverness


Lawmaker

aims to

delay flood

insurance

rate hike

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

U.S. Rep. Rich Nugent
has introduced a bill
seeking to delay flood in-
surance rate hikes that
could take effect
Tuesday
Friday
after-
noon, he
recalled
the his- .
tory be- .*_7--*
hind the
issue.
I n Richard
J u l y Nugent
2 0 1 1 U.S. House.
Congress
finally reached an agree-
ment to institute reforms
to the program that
would make it sustain-
able, and that led to a
long-term agreement on
whether to continue hav-
ing a National Flood In-
surance Program at all,"
he said. 'At the time, the
bill passed in the House
with over 400 votes.
"The National Associ-
ation of Realtors called
its passage a 'major vic-
tory' for homeowners.
The Independent Com-
munity Bankers and oth-
ers hailed the victory
Congress and Realtors
all over the country
breathed a sigh of relief
"Fast forward two-
plus years and we now
have homeowners
across the country who
are looking at flood in-
surance premiums that
are going to skyrocket -
some going from $900 to
$15,000 or more. This, in
short, is not what Con-
gress intended.
"It is absolutely criti-
cal that Congress pauses
on this long enough to get
it right," he said. "Our
communities will be hit
hard. And even though
the vast majority of con-
gressional districts may
not have flood-prone
areas, I think everybody
can understand why this
country doesn't need an-
other major hit to the
housing market."
U.S Rep. Cathy Castor,
Tampa, was the lead
Democrat on the bill.



From the

CAPITAL

Citizen insurance
gets drop numbers
About one in six cus-
tomers of Citizens Property
Insurance Corp., fewer than
anticipated, should receive
letters next week telling
them they are being shifted
to private insurance
carriers.
And the state-backed in-
surer won't know until early
December how many of
those policyholders will
want to go with the new
companies or return to
Citizens.
-From wire reports


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Nearly 100 people lined up and filed in at the Citrus County Auditorium as the Friends of the Citrus County
Library System's 12th annual, 2013 Fall Book Sale got under way Friday evening. According to Sandy Price,
co-coordinator for the event, they are expecting nearly 400 to attend and browse the 1,250 banana boxes
filled with 43,750 books. And that's just the hardcovers. In addition to books, the sale offers jigsaw
puzzles, music CDs, audio books, movies and more. In the 11 years since the first event, the book sale as
raised $748,229 for the Citrus County Library System. Organizers hope to add $50,000 from this sale. The
next book sale will be in the spring of 2014. Hours for the remaining days: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, I to
4 p.m. Sunday, extended hours from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (also half-price day) Monday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Tuesday ($3 a bag day). Look for a "$2 off" coupon in Sunday's and Monday's Chronicles to use on a
purchase of $10 or more from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday. "That's half-price day anyway, so they'll be getting an
extra bargain," said FOCCLS vice president Lynne Boele.




A4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Accept the inevitable with
grace and aplomb in the year ahead.
Look out for your interests and let your
intelligence lead the way. Old talents
and skills will help you meet new de-
mands. Rein in your emotions and get
your budget under control.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It won't be
easy dealing with emotional uncertain-
ties. Be careful not to overreact; you
may not be able to afford it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Book a
trip or engage in something that in-
spires you. Awaken yourself to the
many opportunities for rejuvenation
and refreshment that surround you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Say
what you mean and do what you say. If
an endeavor requires physical risk, it
would be best to openly disengage
from it at the outset.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Let
the people you care about know what
you are up to. Including loved ones in
your plans will build strong bonds and
help you attain your goals.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Expect
delays and be prepared to find ways
around whatever setback you en-
counter. Being adaptable will help you
guard against negativity and complaints.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Plunge
forward with optimism. Engage in
events and activities that allow you to
show off. Romance is in the stars, and
socializing will lead to many new
opportunities.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
share your secrets. It's best to get
everything in order before you present
your plans. Emotions will escalate re-
garding financial and domestic mat-
ters. Don't tolerate a bully.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It's a
good day to entertain or make special
plans.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- See
what's required at work and set your
sights on the end results.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy
getting out today. Take time to go to
your local spa or a place that you find
relaxing.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't let
anyone bully you into something that
you don't care to do. Pick and choose
whom and what you pursue.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In a busi-
ness or partnership involvement, size
up what's being offered and counter
with something that you think is fair
and feasible.


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


New Orleans 88 70 s 89 70
NewYorkCity 69 57 s 71 56
Norfolk 74 66 s 73 60
Oklahoma City 90 64 ts 78 57
Omaha 90 69 .03 sh 71 48
Palm Springs 87 61 s 93 67
Philadelphia 73 59 s 74 54
Phoenix 87 69 s 91 68
Pittsburgh 74 50 s 73 53
Portland, ME 71 56 s 73 50
Portland, Ore 57 50 .02 r 67 56
Providence, R.I. 67 57 s 72 48
Raleigh 74 52 s 73 55
Rapid City 49 42 .01 pc 67 47
Reno 64 34 s 77 48
Rochester, NY 67 45 s 73 52
Sacramento 80 52 s 83 58
St. Louis 85 62 pc 84 61
St. Ste. Marie 72 47 pc 73 53
Salt Lake City 52 43 .03 pc 69 53
San Antonio 95 78 .09 ts 91 75
San Diego 76 59 s 82 64
San Francisco 77 54 s 75 57
Savannah 73 61 .02 s 79 62
Seattle 57 52 .03 r 64 54
Spokane 53 43 r 61 50
Syracuse 70 43 s 75 49
Topeka 89 69 sh 74 48
Washington 75 59 s 75 56
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 97 Cotulla, Texas LOW 21 Butte, Mont.

WORLD CITIES


Lisbon 71/65/sh
London 69/57/c
Madrid 74/60/r
Mexico City 77/57/ts
Montreal 73/52/s
Moscow 44/34/sh
Paris 71/59/sh
Rio 72/63/pc
Rome 73/67/pc
Sydney 77/66/pc
Tokyo 72/65/pc
Toronto 72/57/s
Warsaw 52/41/sh


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77As
Amsterdam 65/45/pc
Athens 82/66/s
Beijing 74/51/pc
Berlin 59/38/c
Bermuda 79/76/sh
Cairo 88/66/s
Calgary 54/48/sh
Havana 85/71As
Hong Kong 85/74/pc
Jerusalem 75/59/s


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
s
ts
s
ts
ts
ts


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


Gillian Anderson to
star in 'Streetcar'
LONDON Former "X-Files"
star Gillian Anderson is return-
ing to the London stage next
year as Blanche DuBois in "A
Streetcar Named Desire."
Anderson will play the fading
beauty who relies on the kindness
of strangers in a Young Vic pro-
duction of Tennessee Williams'
steamy southern drama.
The theater said Friday that
the production, directed by
Benedict Andrews, will open in
summer 2014. Dates have not
been announced.
Anderson was nominated for
an OlivierAward British the-
ater's highest honor for her
performance in Henrik Ibsen's
"A Doll's House" at London's
Donmar Warehouse in 2009.
She recently played a police offi-
cer in TV thriller 'The Fall" and re-
mains known to millions as Agent
Scully in the supernatural detective
series 'The X-Files."
Hollywood less gay-
friendly off-screen
LOS ANGELES -Anew
study suggests the proliferation
of gay and transgender charac-
ters in films and television shows
has not prevented gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transgender actors
from experiencing discrimination
in Hollywood.
The Screen Actors Guild-
American Federation of Television
and Radio Artists commissioned
the survey released Friday show-
ing that more than half of the ac-
tors who identify as gay, bisexual
and transgender say they had ex-
perienced discrimination from di-
rectors and producers because of
their sexual orientations and gen-
der identities.
More than one-third of the ac-
tors who don't fall into any of
those categories agreed the dis-


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO .PR r-H LO PR I LC
66 0.00 a 71 n n nn J84 61


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy
with a chance of thunderstorms today.


84 66 --- 82 68 000

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ixclus veday
forecast by:

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
,L High: 88 Low: 66
Isolated PM showers, rain chance
20%
__ .M H SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 66
Isolated PM showers, rain chance 20%

r-..-- MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 65
Isolated PM showers, rain chance 20%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 84/67
Record 96/51
Normal 89/67
Mean temp. 76
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 9.25 in.
Total for the year 50.26 in.
Normal for the year 44.31 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 65%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, elm, grasses
Today's count: 7.3/12
Sunday's count: 7.7
Monday's count: 7.2
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/28 SATURDAY 1:05 7:17 1:28 7:40
9/29 SUNDAY 1:48 7:59 2:11 8:22
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:19 M .
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:22 A.M.
Ct1 CT 0 4 MOONRISE TODAY ...........................1:33A.M
OCT.4 OCT. 11 OCT. 18 OCT. 20 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 3:15 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:21 a/8:08 a 12:29 p/9:43 p
Crystal River** 10:50 a/5:30 a ---/7:05 p
Withlacoochee* 8:37 a/3:18 a 10:41 p/4:53 p
Homosassa*** 12:31 a/7:07 a 11:39 a/8:42 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
2:33 a9:36 a 1:56 p/10:51 p
12:54 a/6:58 a 12:17 p/8:13 p
10:04 a/4:46a 11:35 p/6:01 p
1:43a/8:35a 1:06 p/9:50p


Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.20 30.17 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.40 38.41 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.90 39.91 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.68 40.69 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


s
s
s
s
s
ts
s
pc
s
c
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
.01 s
s
s
s
s
ts
.02 s
sh
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
pc
sh
s
s
s


Associated Press
A theater manager said the stuffed armadillo that was stolen
from Willie Nelson's band after a show in suburban New York
has been returned unharmed. He said the band isn't pressing
charges. The toy critter, known to the band as 01' Dillo,
disappeared from the stage after a Sept. 19 concert at the
Capitol Theatre in Port Chester.


crimination exists.
The online survey of 5,700
SAG/AFTRA members also found
that more than half of the gay
transgender and bisexual respon-
dents had heard producers and di-
rectors make anti-gay comments.
Lansbury to receive
playhouse's award
NEW HOPE, Pa. -The
Bucks County Playhouse will
honor five-time Tony Award win-
ner Angela Lansbury as the in-
augural inductee into a new hall
of fame to honor luminaries who
have performed on its stage.
The Oct. 28 event will include a
tribute performance by some of
Lansbury's Broadway colleagues.
Lansbury won four Tonys in
the best actress-musical cate-
gory and one for best supporting
actress in a play. Her most re-
cent was for her performance in
the 2009 play "Blithe Spirit."
Lansbury, 87, also has won
six Golden Globes, including for
her supporting role in the 1963
film "The Manchurian Candi-


date." She is perhaps best
known to TV viewers as Jessica
Fletcher from the popular mys-
tery show, "Murder, She Wrote."
The playhouse's producing di-
rector, Jed Bernstein, said Lans-
bury appeared there in 1952's
"Affairs of the State," years before
she performed on Broadway.
Prince George to be
christened in October
LONDON Palace officials
said Britain's youngest royal,
Prince George, will be chris-
tened next month in the Chapel
Royal at St. James's Palace.
George whose full name is
His Royal Highness Prince
George Alexander Louis of
Cambridge was born July 22.
He is the first child of the Duke
and Duchess of Cambridge and
third in line to the throne.
Kensington Palace an-
nounced Friday that George will
be christened on Oct. 23 by the
Archbishop of Canterbury,
Justin Welby.
-From wire reports


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Sept. 28, the
271th day of 2013. There are 94
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 28, 1787, the Congress
of the Confederation voted to send
the just-completed Constitution of
the United States to state legisla-
tures for their approval.
On this date:
In 1066, William the Conqueror
invaded England to claim the Eng-
lish throne.
In 1850, flogging was abolished
as a form of punishment in the U.S.
Navy.
In 1920, eight members of the
Chicago White Sox were indicted
for allegedly throwing the 1919
World Series against the Cincinnati
Reds in what became known as the
"Black Sox" scandal. Despite initial
confessions by several of the play-
ers, all were acquitted at trial; still,
all eight were banned from baseball
for life.
In 1924, two U.S. Army planes
landed in Seattle, having completed
the first round-the-world flight in 175
days.
Ten years ago: A massive black-
out struck almost all of Italy, leaving
millions of people without power.
Five years ago: Chinese astro-
nauts aboard the Shenzhou 7 re-
turned to Earth after completing their
country's first spacewalk mission.
One year ago: Citing national
security risks, President Barack
Obama blocked a Chinese com-
pany from owning four wind farm
projects in northern Oregon near a
Navy base where the U.S. military
flies unmanned drones and
electronic-warfare planes on train-
ing missions.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Brigitte Bardot is 79. Singer Ben E.
King is 75. Actress-comedian
Janeane Garofalo is 49. TV person-
ality Moon Zappa is 46. Rapper
Young Jeezy is 36. Actress Hilary
Duff is 26.
Thought for Today: "A great
truth is a truth whose opposite is
also a truth." Thomas Mann,
German writer (1875-1955).



LEGAL NOTICES


Meeting


Notices.........C13




I C IT R ULIS C O U N T Y



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Se ing Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The ViewflnderTV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3 -32 2 2
Trina Murphy............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
I" Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


Friday Saturday Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOOD FOR

CITRUS MEMORIAL.


GOOD FOR YOU.





YOUR HOSPITAL IS AN IMPORTANT
MEMBER OF YOUR COMMUNITY.
DON'T PUT THE VALUE OF THAT CONTRIBUTION
AT ZERO.


71% of HCA hospitals are Top Performers in Quality Care as
measured by The Joint Commission, the nation's leading authority
on excellence in healthcare.

Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) reports
that in 2012, HCA hospitals provided a higher percentage of self-
pay/uninsured care compared to non HCA hospitals, including
Tampa General.

HCA will bring Citrus County $235 MILLION in combined upfront
lease payments and property taxes paid over the life of its lease of
Citrus Memorial, paying off the hospital's debts and bringing revenue
to the community.

Tampa General proposes to pay ZERO upfront for the same lease.

Quality. Charity. Community Commitment.



HCA
Please show your support for the HCA bid by visiting
H CAWestF I ori da. com/Citrus


OOOG73PA ~ A A


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 AS




A6 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


Obituaries


I


Associated Press
From left, Wevellyn Antunes Rocha, Maria Deusaunira Borges, Uyara Borges, Nayara Borges (back), Daniella Klipe,
Gisele Candido and Ary Borges gather at the breakfast table Friday with tiger Tom in Maringa, Brazil. Ary Borges,
who cares for Tom, eight other tigers and two lionesses, is in a legal battle with federal wildlife officials to keep
his endangered animals from undergoing vasectomies and being taken away from him.




Big house cats


Brazilfamily

fights to keep

house-trained

tigers

Associated Press

MARINGA, Brazil -
Dan slurped desperately
on his pink nursing bottle
and spilled milk all over
the place, while his
brother Tom patiently
waited to take a swim in
the family pool.
It would be a typical
family scene if not for the
fact that Dan and Tom tip
the scales at 700 pounds,
have claws that could
slice a man in two and
were raised along with
seven other tigers sleep-
ing in the beds of Ary
Borges' three daughters.
The big cats still amble
about his humble home in
the middle of an indus-
trial neighborhood in this
southern Brazil city, even
if experts say the situation
is "crazy" and sure to
eventually lead to a maul-
ing, though one has yet to
occur
Borges also has two
lions, a monkey, and a pet
Chihuahua named Little
inside his makeshift ani-
mal sanctuary, where man
and beast live together in
his spacious red-dirt com-
pound, separated from
the outside world by tall
metal fences and high
wooden walls.
The Brazilian family is
now locked in a legal dis-
pute for the cats, with fed-
eral wildlife officials
working to take them
away While Borges does
have a license to raise the
animals, Brazilian
wildlife officials say he il-
legally bred the tigers,
creating a public danger
Borges says it all started
in 2005 when he first res-
cued two abused tigers
from a traveling circus.
He defends his right to
breed the animals and ar-
gues he gives them a bet-
ter home than they might
find elsewhere in Brazil.
"Sadly there are so
many animals dying in
zoos that have no over-

. I I *
Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
or pooi or plan
something
S .completely new!
r. ULI

YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPES
SPOOL AND PAVER LLC
I, d352-400-3188


I; I p TT








I I I I
FO 3.YAS WIT


Ary Borges feeds his tiger Dan at his home Thursday in Maringa, Brazil.


sight. My animals are
treated extremely well...
we're preserving and con-
serving the species," he
said. "We have a great
team of veterinarians. We
give them only the best,
but we're being
persecuted."
Ibama, Brazil's environ-
mental protection agency
that also oversees wildlife,
declined repeated re-
quests for comment.
The agency is working
through courts to force
Borges to have the male
tigers undergo vasec-
tomies so they can't repro-
duce. It also wants his
caretaker license confis-
cated and to obtain the
cats.
Borges appealed and
the matter is pending be-
fore a federal court
Borges has strong sup-
port in Maringa for his
cause, and earlier this
year the city council
passed a measure that
banned vasectomies on
wild animals within city
limits.
Next door to the tiger
compound, Marli Mendes
can see the big cats from
her office window "I have
nothing against them, they
really don't bother," she
said.
So far, there have been
no incidents with the

(igA. E. 2Wav
Funeral Home With Crematory
JAMES M. HUNTER
Memorial Service: Sun. 3:00 PM
American Legion Post #155
ROBERT NORTON
Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
LUCY DRURY
Arrangements Pending
DOROTHY JONES
Arrangements Pending
726-8323







Ym




1 chronideonline.o
c dick features
S click enter conte

- cni^QNIC
Q.'<4
^ ^ OOOGY


tigers turning aggressive,
which the Borges family
attributes to cats being
raised in such close prox-
imity with humans.
Ary's daughter Nayara
Borges, 20, who grew up
with the tiger cubs sleep-
ing in her bed until they
became too big, said she
thinks the big cats would
be mistreated if taken
away, "and our family
would go into a severe
depression."
Her sister Uyara, 23,
agreed, saying the cats are
family after spending so
many years with the
Borges.
'At first we were scared
of them, but as time went
on, we saw them every
day, fed them, gave them
baths and water, and we
started to fall in love with
them," Uyara said. "We
never thought we could
live with such ferocious
animals."
Uyara trusts the cats so
much, she even allows her
2-year-old daughter Ra-
yara to sit atop them.
Experts, however,
sharply question the
Borges family's efforts.
"It's crazy," said Patty
Finch, executive director
of the Washington-based
Global Federation of Ani-
mal Sanctuaries. "It's a
very dangerous situation,



S"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"


especially if there are
young children around,
they easily trigger a tiger's
hunting instinct."
Finch said that "you
will see people sometimes
get lucky for a while, but
sooner or later an acci-
dent is going to happen.
You never know what's
going to set these animals
off because they're wild."
Instead of promoting
the animal's welfare,
Finch said the Borges
have done the opposite.
"Breeding in captivity
doesn't help conserve the
tigers unless they're bred
in their native habitat and
there is a plan to release
them," she said. "They
can't get habituated to
people. They're condemn-
ing these tigers to a life of
captivity"
Upkeep for the tigers
and lions costs about
$9,000 per month. Borges
pays for it by renting the
tigers out for movie and
commercial shoots, charg-
ing $9,000 a day, and with
the money he makes in
running a dog kennel
within his compound.


To Place Your
"'In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com
Coin t imfo
pain adis*I
4 buinesday
L pio to rundae


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19 Mi
CRYSTAL RIVER ,,l
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Donna
Adams, 69
HOMOSASSA
Donna Adams, 69, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., died
Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013,
in Homosassa. Cremation
arrangements are under
the direction of the
Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory

Lucy Drury, 89
HOMOSASSA
Lucy V Drury, 89, Ho-
mosassa, died Wednesday,
Sept. 25, 2013, at her resi-
dence. Private arrange-
ments are by Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory Inverness.





John
Goddard, 72
DUNNELLON
John F Goddard, 72,
Dunnellon, died Sept. 26,
2013, in Ocala. Funeral
services will be 11 a.m.
Monday, Sept. 30, 2013, at
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon with a visita-
tion one hour prior

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


Dorthy
Jones, 77
INVERNESS
Dorthy Helen Jones, 77,
Inverness, Fla., died Sept.
26, 2013. Mrs. Jones was
born July 14, 1936, in
Breckenridge, Mich., to
the late George and Helen
(Marr) Story and came to
this area
36 years f
ago from
St. Louis,
Mich. She
was a W,
member of
the First
Church of ..
God in Dorthy
Inverness. Jones
She is
survived by her children,
Wallace Jones II and his
wife, Cindy, Inverness,
Robert E. Jones and fi-
ancee, Michelle Clark, In-
verness, Autumn Bowers
and her husband, John Jr,
Eustis; four sisters, Lois,
Shirley, Bonnie and Mary
Lou; and three grandchil-
dren, Gator, Leslie and
Kyndel. She was prede-
ceased by her husband of
38 years, Wallace Jones
Oct 9, 2002, and her sister,
Phyllis Story Other living
relatives include Clara
Jean Pitts and Judy Mann
and their families.
Funeral services will be
conducted at 10 a.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 30, 2013, from
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Pastor Tom
Walker officiating. Burial
will follow in Oak Ridge
Cemetery The family will
receive friends for viewing
at the time of service.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits free
and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home
or society in charge of arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name
of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death;
place of death; date, time and place of visitation
and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors,
memorial contributions or other information are
included, this will be designated as a paid obituary
and a cost estimate provided to the sender.
A flag will be included for free for those who served
in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when
submitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all
obituaries will be posted online at www.chronicle
online.com.
Non-local funeral homes and those without ac-
counts are required to pay in advance by credit
card, and the cost is a $25 base fee, then $10 per
column inch. Small photos of the deceased's face
can be included for an additional charge.
Additional days of publication or reprints due to
errors in submitted material are charged at the
same rates.
All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associ-
ated Press style unless a request to the contrary is
made.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the
next day's edition.
Phone 352-563-5660 for details.
The U.S. military consists of five active-duty
services and their respective guard and reserve
units: Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force and
Coast Guard.


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs! -

Brown.LA L


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhom


LIGHT SHINE 2013
Pre, latd BY. Shepha of the lhlls Episcopai Church


Telin' It Like ItWas TeDunelonConertSings
Aani vcfar nt w i mR ",ft n m FwmoifromtThekGrumAfmrknSmtgBook


S D IAY, ;COE 6-,*


Malsnn giovs
us truth, folklore
aind ory o
n-hal il was like Jlta t
torkin' callea
hundred yearN
ago in; Florid&. '* ^ ^


StAugustine:
%Wh oa Se wdIaluDwI

Sft^-iieif.d hr 7^ ^ ^
Th R.. N k

tk~ L. -N
0.HL-
-~w~ xr^a U^ H^^^
i^.isxt~ii^H u^^


vianrion LIiC Lnorale
The Sound of Christmas
h, ID | ,i ,


S a(,caordtift ,EpiuqiO. ( -. ." .
7W 6W.NmdlbyqiH||sr|C -6qLmm l 3. -.Y C.O.. .Na


6 rcl i


CiturS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bppfcj




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUDGET
Continued from Page Al

in recent days, adding, "I
am confident the House of
Representatives will con-
tinue to stand its ground,
continue to listen to the
American people and ...
stop this train wreck, this
nightmare that is
Obamacare."
The House is scheduled
to be in session both Sat-
urday and Sunday, but it is
unclear when it will vote
on a new bill to avert a
shutdown, and what
health care-related items
it will include.
Obama spoke more than
an hour later at the White
House, where he said it
was up to House Republi-
cans to follow the Senate's
lead and prevent a shut-
down. He said the struggle
has nothing to do with
budget deficits, and said if
Republicans "have spe-
cific ideas on how to gen-
uinely improve the (health
care) law rather than gut
it, rather than delay, it
rather than repeal it, I am
happy to work with them."
He also said even a shut-
down would not prevent
the scheduled opening of
so-called health care ex-
changes next Tuesday
through which millions of
Americans will be able to
shop for coverage. "That's
a done deal," he said
Brendan Buck, a
spokesman for Boehner,
issued a statement in re-
sponse that said, "The
House will take action that
reflects the fundamental
fact that Americans don't
want a government shut-
down and they don't want
the train wreck that is
Obamacare. Grandstand-
ing from the president,
who refuses to even be a
part of the process, won't
bring Congress any closer
to a resolution."
Republican lawmakers
said Boehner had made it
clear he would continue to
seek health care-related
concessions from the
White House when the
House passes its next shut-
down-prevention legisla-
tion. But the rank and file
rebelled on Thursday


SFor the RECORD


Associated Press
President Barack Obama pauses while making a
statement regarding the budget fight in Congress and
foreign policy challenges Friday in the James Brady Press
Briefing Room of the White House in Washington.


when leaders suggested
moving the main focus of
the effort to defund Oba-
macare to a separate bill
rather than continue to
flirt with a shutdown.
There is little or no dis-
agreement between the
House and Senate over
spending levels in the leg-
islation now moving from
one side of the Capitol to
the other, and except for
health care, passage might
well be routine. The bill
provides funds at an an-
nual rate of slightly more
than $986 billion, in keep-
ing with an agreement
Obama and Republicans
made two years ago to re-
strain the growth of a wide
swath of government
spending from the Penta-
gon to the nation's parks.
Without separate legisla-
tion to make further reduc-
tions, across-the-board cuts
will automatically take ef-
fect early next year that will
reduce the level to $967 bil-
lion, and Republicans are
fond of pointing out that the
government is on track to
spend less on those pro-
grams for the second year
in a row for the first time
since the Korean War
But Republicans voted
unanimously against the
health care law when it
passed Congress, backed
lawsuits to challenge its
constitutionality, and some
now seek to strangle it be-
fore its final implementa-
tion begins next Tuesday
Cruz, Lee and several
tea party groups seized on
the issue during Congress'


five-week summer vaca-
tion, turning "Defund Oba-
macare" into a rallying cry
backed by television com-
mercials, public rallies
and emails.
The result was a bruis-
ing week in the Senate in
which Cruz spoke for
slightly more than 21
hours straight in hopes of
swaying some votes his
way, only to lose by far on
the showdown that he de-
scribed as the crucial one.
That was a proposal by
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid to cut off debate
on the spending bill, a move
that also meant Democrats
needed a mere majority of
the votes to restore money
for the health care law that
the House had omitted.
The vote was 79-19, 19
more than the 60 needed to
cut off debate. All 52 De-
mocrats, two independents
and 25 of 44 Republicans
voted in favor That in-
cluded McConnell and
much of the GOP leader-
ship with the exception of
Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas,
who heads the party's cam-
paign committee.







Professional
Hearing Centers'
www.lnvernessHearing.com
726-HEAR (43271


Domestic
battery arrest
Ronald Hardin, 63, of
Crystal River, at 10:03 a.m.
Sept. 25 on misdemeanor
charges of domestic battery,
and resisting an officer without
violence. Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
William Wood, 32, of
West Horace Allen Street,
Lecanto, at 9:25 p.m. Sept. 26
on an active warrant for bat-
tery. Bond $1,000.
Jacob Lane, 24, of South
Suncoast Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa, at 7:45 p.m.
Sept. 26 on felony charges of
burglary to an unoccupied
structure and criminal mis-
chief. According to his arrest
affidavit, Lane is accused of
breaking into the Verizon Cel-
lular tower and stealing copper
wire. Bond $4,000.
Michael Richards, 45, of
South Roebuck Way, Ho-
mosassa, at 6:15 p.m.
Sept. 26 on a misdemeanor
charge of retail petit theft. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit
Richards is accused of shoplift-
ing dog food and two stacker
energy drinks from the Ho-
mosassa Walmart. Bond $500.
Bambi Wilmot, 34, of
West Homosassa Trail, Ho-
mosassa, at 2:03 p.m.
Sept. 26 on an active warrant
for violation of probation stem-
ming from an original charge
of making contradicting state-
ments in an official proceed-
ing, She was also charged
with failure to appear regard-
ing a petit theft arrest. Bond
was denied.
Billy Bishop, 33, of West
Van Buren Drive, Homosassa,
at 12:02 p.m. Sept. 26 on an
active warrant for violation of
probation stemming from an
original charge of selling,
manufacturing, or delivering
schedule I or II drugs. Bond
was denied.
James Rutledge Sr.,

CASH for
SCRAP
Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire


Metal Recycling
4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
00G5TE 527-9599


62, of Beverly Hills, at
8:14 a.m. Sept. 26 on a felony
charge of aggravated battery
with use of a deadly weapon.
Bond was denied.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 5:24 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 25, in the 2800 block of W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 8:17 p.m. Sept. 25
in the 6100 block of N. Rose-
wood Drive, Beverly Hills.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 10:21 a.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 26, in the 2800
block of N. Oakland Terrace,
Crystal River.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 3:32 p.m. Sept. 26
in the 8300 block of N. Dande-
lion Way, Dunnellon.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 10:48 p.m.
Sept. 26 in the 3400 block of
S. Kings Ave., Homosassa.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 12:36 a.m. Friday,
Sept. 27, in the 4400 block of
E. Van Ness Road, Hemando.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 12:27 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 25, in the 300 block of N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 1:57 p.m. Sept. 25 in
the 3600 block of W. Educa-
tional Path, Lecanto.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 7:41 p.m. Sept. 25 in
the 6800 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:17 a.m. Thursday,


.c--


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

Sept 26, in the 9700 block of
W. Arms Drive, Crystal River.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:49 a.m. Sept. 26
in the 6100 block of W. Cor-
porate Oaks Drive, Crystal
River.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 9:07 a.m. Sept. 26
in the 10400 block of S. Le
Baron Drive, Homosassa.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 9:49 a.m. Sept. 26 in
the 4100 block of N. Stewart
Way, Beverly Hills.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 11:51 a.m. Sept. 26
in the 6800 block of W. Wood-
bridge Drive, Homosassa.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 4:26 p.m. Sept. 26 in
the 200 block of Pine St.,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 5:13 p.m. Sept. 26 in the
6800 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 2:13 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27,
in the 1600 block of Tuttle St.,
Inverness.
Vandalism
EA vandalism was reported
at 1:41 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27,
in the 9700 block of W. Fort Is-
land Trail, Crystal River.


Model Close-Outs & Assorted Floor Models


Ccorn1orM" ->
ffi-> (MRSICANABDD, IN,
S3 /comfort ^,TEMPUR[ __________
Whatever you do In bed, Sleep System by Sea DEDICATED TO YOU2 TOTAL COMFORI
Sealy supports it. p S t y Medical Division I


* ALWAYS
Free Delivery
w/purchase of mattress set
*ALWAYS
Free Heavy Duly
Bed Frame
w/purchase of mattress set
*ALWAYS
Great Customer Semce


LAKE MOHAVE
PLUSH EPT

Full Set $499


T I


I I j 4 ,11

SNEWHAVEN
R$tPL COURT
"GEL" PLUSH EPT
Queen Set 999 King Set 129


OPEN MON. SAT


WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTER ,
Your Hometown Mattress Store Since 1994 WHOLESALE
A ^_-- SLEEP C-N-E-


ANDORA/
ABBOTT
Twin Set 249 Queen Set 349
Full Set 299 King Set 1529


CENTRAL FALLS
RPsturepeidc CLASSIC
Twin Set 5UU9 QueenSet$699
Full Set 659 KingSet 949


VENICE PT/
HANNAH PT
Twin Set 299 Queen Set'399
Full Set 49 KiQueen Set 399
Ful Set .349 King Set $599


FLORENCE/
FARMINGTON PLUSH

Twin Set u39o Queen Set'549
Full Set 449 King Set 149


CHAMPIONS
GATE PT
Twin Set 1439d een Set '59
Full Set 499 King Set 599
FuliSet 499 KingSet p799


-j


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 A7


i--fl


i dICN. Si.F11 iAKl' ., Si'., 1^^ i^Kl' ., Ii'., MI vIlJ .H VI'lIF A




AS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


Burial set for World War II


airman missing since 1944


Associated Press
ABOVE: Lorna Bird Snyder flies the POW/MIA flag in Springville, Utah, to honor her uncle, Vernal Bird, who was a
World War II pilot in Papua New Guinea when his A40 light bomber disappeared in the high mountains. BELOW:
The remains of U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Vernal J. Bird arrive in Salt Lake City Wednesday. Bird disappeared on a 1944
bombing run of Japanese airfields on Papua New Guinea. He was 25. His remains were found in 2001 and later
identified through DNA testing.


Pilot went

missing during

a bombing

mission

Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY-
Only a sole surviving sib-
ling has a distant memory
of a World War II pilot
whose recently identified
remains will be buried
Saturday with full military
honors in Utah.
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt.
Vernal J. Bird had more
than a dozen brothers and
sisters when he crashed
over a Pacific Ocean is-
land nearly 70 years ago.
He disappeared over
Papua New Guinea on a
1944 bombing run of
Japanese airfields there.
He was 25.
The crash site was dis-
covered 12 years ago, but it
wasn't until this summer
that the Air Force was able
to identify partial remains
found there as belonging
to Bird.
This week, about 150
distant relatives showed
up at the Salt Lake airport
as those remains only a
single leg bone was recov-
ered arrived inside a
flag-draped casket on an
airliner
None of them knew Bird
personally His younger
sister, Elaine Bird Jack of
Eugene, Ore., is his lone
surviving sibling and the
only one who has a mem-
ory of him, said Lorna Bird


Snyder, the airman's
66-year-old niece.
The 92-year-old Jack is
in Utah for the burial at
Evergreen Cemetery in
Springville, Snyder told
The Associated Press. She
was the 13th child of the
family; Bird was the 12th.
Jack provided a DNA
sample that was used to
identify her brother's
fibula, the outer and thin-
ner of the long bones of a
lower leg.
Relatives are hoping a
full excavation of the crash
site will yield more re-
mains, Snyder said.
The Air Force is moving
cautiously because a 500-
pound unexploded bomb
is still attached to the A-
20G Havoc bomber
The remains of Bird's
co-pilot, Staff Sgt. Roy
Davis from New Hamp-
shire, have not been found.
The crash site on a
forested mountainside
was discovered in 2001 by
a Papuan national, who
delivered the fibula along
with engine identification
plates of the bomber to an


American recovery team.
The Air Force identified
the bone as Bird's in July
In the airman's last let-
ter to his family, he de-
scribed how he flew his
light bomber barely above
tree-top level, saying "we
fly right in the leaves at
times." It was written two
days before his bomber
went down March 12, 1944.
His niece spent years re-
searching where over the
Pacific Ocean or New
Guinea his plane might
have gone down. She com-


pared boxes of the airman's
letters against records of
the American-Australian ef-
fort against the Japanese.
If not for Snyder's dogged
efforts, the recovered bone
might never have gotten a
DNA comparison.
Vernal Bird was born Oct
29,1918, in Lindon to Wal-
ter E and Christina Pears-
son Ash Bird. He attended
schools in Lindon and
Pleasant Grove. The family
later moved to Springville,
another Utah County town,
according to an obituary


Subpoenas


issued in WTC


naming probe


Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. The
state of New York has sub-
poenaed materials related
to the $10 sale of the rights
to the "World Trade Cen-
ter" name in the 1980s, an
official familiar with the
review said Friday
The subpoenas from the
New York attorney general
Eric Schneiderman in-
volve an investigation into
a 1986 deal in which the
PortAuthority of New York
and New Jersey sold the
naming rights to one of its
outgoing executives for use
by a nonprofit
The official spoke on
condition of anonymity
Friday because he was
not authorized to speak
publicly about the probe.
The Record newspaper
reported this month that
the Port Authority sold
the naming rights to Guy
Tozzoli in his role as head
of the nonprofit World
Trade Centers Associa-
tion. The Port Authority,
which owned the World
Trade Center towers and
the land they sat on in
lower Manhattan, is now
among hundreds of enti-
ties around the world that
pay to use the "World
Trade Center" name.
The WTCA didn't re-
turn a message seeking
comment Friday
At the agency's monthly


board meeting on
Sept. 18, Port Authority
executive director
Patrick Foye called the
naming rights deal "a
shameful episode" and
vowed an internal inves-
tigation in tandem with
the probe announced that
day by New York Gov An-
drew Cuomo.
Neither Foye nor Port
Authority board chair-
man David Samson was
able to say who had ap-
proved the deal. The
newspaper reported that
the contract, obtained
through a Freedom of In-
formation Act request,
bore the signature of a
secretary Foye said then-
Port Authority executive
director Stephen Berger
told him he had not ap-
proved the deal.
The Port Authority pays
$10,000 a year to use the
words "World Trade Cen-
ter," including on merchan-
dise it plans to sell in the
new World Trade Center
currently under construc-
tion. Those sales could
bring the Port Authority an
estimated $23 million to
$28 million annually the
newspaper reported. In ex-
change for the PortAuthor-
ity's use of the trademark,
the WTCA is requesting
free office space at the new
World Trade Center site
worth an estimated
$585,000 per year


-- BBS








Our Goal Is A

Healthier You
New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

B.K. Patel, M.D. H. Khan, M.D.
Internal Medicine Board Certified Family Medicine
Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, PA. Joseph Starnes, PA.

Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals


Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


I RESERVE
*tudoo d dsea t &!c
Advan ed ,n4a AdiissionJ- ThAe-Da
-4hAk jo.-T, e

i Ca l 35 -40 477r go to,,
STi 1kets Ia le 4CR
T1^_ k^ t^ 0p cki ^


SSheldo
Cryst
Mike Scott F


-. .
\ ,' : ; '*

sibeg :

SFerman Motai
Palnis Insurai|
I Community E.I
umbing, Inc'. .1


h I


TISB AVAILAB .
mpW:,i1.nt ry fbod
v: $6Mi 0de-Day: $2
razy ,4ou try.com
eNTAL Iss


'T H I- I,,,,\l__ .. P.R . 1 [B ,
---nRAP!i "^ affB j|
Car Company arl 1ds of Ne4ort
e, Inc. -Qollyga gers ,ikeBa: StattOrm
.T. D l Dpnis rilo.* Plantati Inn N re
ss Hamirock'ach William McOa elWe


. .. ...- 1 ; ],

CdikoNjiaE

ichey
insurance Agent
oast Financial a
dlow and Cash P.A


hP. Pritchyk DPM
Annif)moulces the


I o/f his newc practice
i := Nature Coast
I Foot And Ankle
Center, LLC
I11 N. "uncoast Blvd., Suite IE
! ,**.,.. *r .. -lR ..r
I ll. .1,l-,, ,I ,.l'r r I II l' ,r l

iC'i mpchc. Ill ip.itan dl nIkl
IIil t thll fil e Jl Jl i l y.le
O ll [lllu-:7[,


I


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


^1"I


.1


j.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1 760................................. S& P 500


Interestrates


Ut]
OE]



The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note fell to
2.63 percent on
Friday. Yields
affect interest
rates on con-
sumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
VEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Oil prices fell
Friday as diplo-
matic efforts
surrounding
Syria and Iran
eased concerns
about Middle
East supplies.
Metals rose, led
by aluminum.
Crops were
mostly lower.
Soybeans rose.


OE
r..s


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .01 +0.01 .08
6-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .13
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .16
2-year T-note .33 0.34 -0.01 .25
5-year T-note 1.40 1.44 -0.04 .65
10-year T-note 2.63 2.65 -0.02 1.66
30-year T-bond 3.69 3.70 -0.01 2.84


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.47 3.48 -0.01 2.51
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.09 5.09 ... 4.19
Barclays USAggregate 2.36 2.33 +0.03 1.56
Barclays US High Yield 6.11 6.10 +0.01 6.62
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.55 4.50 +0.05 3.33
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.57 1.59 -0.02 .91
Barclays US Corp 3.29 3.26 +0.03 2.81


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 102.87
Ethanol (gal) 1.98
Heating Oil (gal) 2.99
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.56
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.68
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1338.40
Silver (oz) 21.78
Platinum (oz) 1416.10
Copper (Ib) 3.33
Palladium (oz) 730.80
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.28
Coffee (Ib) 1.14
Corn (bu) 4.54
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 341.80
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.29
Soybeans (bu) 13.20
Wheat (bu) 6.83


PVS.
103.03
2.00
3.00
3.50
2.71
PVS.
1323.60
21.72
1410.70
3.30
722.15
PVS.
1.28
1.16
4.57
0.85
341.30
1.28
13.17
6.78


%CHG
-0.16
-0.50
-0.45
-0.14
-1.06
%CHG
+1.12
+0.29
+0.09
+0.64
+1.16
%CHG
+0.43
-1.69
-0.60
+1.37
+0.15
+1.29
+0.23
+0.70


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.92 -.05 +13.8 +14.9 +12.8 +9.0
CaplncBuA m 56.45 -.10 +9.8 +10.6 +9.4 +6.5
CpWIdGrIA m 42.59 -.05 +16.6 +20.3 +10.7 +7.1
EurPacGrA m 46.41 +.04 +12.6 +17.9 +7.2 +6.2
FnlnvA m 48.61 -.09 +20.2 +22.4 +15.1 +9.0
GrthAmA m 42.20 -.04 +22.9 +25.2 +15.9 +9.3
IncAmerA m 19.72 -.05 +12.0 +13.4 +11.6 +8.7
InvCoAmA m 35.96 -.11 +20.7 +20.9 +14.3 +8.6
NewPerspA m 36.75 -.04 +17.6 +21.5+12.7 +9.3
WAMutlnvA m 37.16 -.14 +20.8 +20.8 +16.4 +8.7
Dodge & Cox Income 13.50 +.01 -0.4 +0.6 +4.1 +7.7
IntlStk 40.97 -.08 +18.3 +26.6 +9.3 +7.1
Stock 151.97 -.21 +26.1 +28.7 +18.1 +9.8
Fidelity Contra 93.83 -.10 +22.1 +19.7 +15.7 +10.5
GrowCo 119.19 -.50 +27.8 +24.1 +19.4 +13.7
LowPriStk d 46.97 -.01 +24.8 +28.2 +18.2 +13.6
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 60.25 -.24 +20.5 +19.5 +16.4 +9.3
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.34 -.01 +9.0 +10.7 +10.2 +10.5
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 12.96 -.07 -0.5 +3.5 +4.5 +9.6
GIBondAdv 12.91 -.07 -0.4 +3.7 +4.7 +9.8
Harbor Intllnstl 69.78 -.19 +12.3 +19.2 +9.6 +6.7
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 31.31 -.15 +20.0 +21.7 +15.7 +8.5
GrowStk 47.12 -.12 +24.7 +22.7 +17.8 +12.4
Vanguard 500Adml 155.95 -.63 +20.5 +19.5 +16.4 +9.3
5001lnv 155.96 -.63 +20.4 +19.3 +16.3 +9.2
MulntAdml 13.77 ... -2.0 -1.3 +3.1 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.71 +.01 +0.4 +1.1 +2.3 +4.7
Tgtet2025 15.24 -.03 +12.1 +13.3 +10.9 +7.7
TotBdAdml 10.66 +.01 -2.0 -1.8 +2.8 +5.3
Totlntl 16.23 -.04 +10.5 +16.5 +6.2 +4.7
TotStlAdm 42.85 -.17 +21.9 +21.6 +17.1 +10.0
TotStldx 42.84 -.17 +21.8 +21.5 +16.9 +9.9
Welltn 37.54 -.07 +13.0 +13.8 +11.8 +9.2
WelltnAdm 64.84 -.12 +13.1 +13.9 +11.9 +9.3
WndsllAdm 61.94 -.13 +20.1 +21.0 +16.6 +9.0
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
... ................... Dow Jones industrials


-,, ,, Close: 1,691.75 -, ,:,. Close: 15,258.24
Change:-6.92 (-0.4%) S Change: -70.06 (-0.5%)
1,680......... 10 DAYS 15,200 ........10 DAYS
1,750 ... ..... .................. ..... ...... ......... ... ........... 16,000 ............. ............ ............. ............ ..... ......
1,700 : -1- ......
1 ,1 5 20 0 . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .- - .
7 0 0 ...................... ............ ............. ... . ........ .... ..




1550. ............. ............ ............. ....................... 14,800 ...... ........
1,500 ......4.. .......4...0.........^ ..j......... ... .......g .... 14,40 0 ...... ...... .. ... .... ..... ... ....A ...... ....


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 2,856
Pvs. Volume 2,737
Advanced 994
Declined 2019
New Highs 70
New Lows 29


NASD
1,654
1,757
943
1527
104
17


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15317.45
6628.78
485.69
9693.80
3788.35
1695.52
1246.87
18142.66
1078.37


LOW
15211.81
6563.26
480.89
9664.01
3762.67
1687.11
1240.88
18021.02
1070.85


CLOSE
15258.24
6597.59
482.19
9684.17
3781.59
1691.75
1244.18
18072.74
1074.19


%CHG.
-0.46%
-0.60%
-0.66%
-0.43%
-0.15%
-0.41%
-0.38%
-0.39%
-0.39%


*


YTD
+16.44%
+24.32%
+6.42%
+14.69%
+25.24%
+18.62%
+21.93%
+20.52%
+26.47%


Stocks
Stocks finished lower Friday, as
the risk of a partial U.S. govern-
ment shutdown weighed on in-
vestors. Congress needs to
pass a funding bill to keep the
government operating after Oct.
1. The government is expected
to reach its debt ceiling around
Oct. 17.

Nike NKE
Close:$73.64A3.30 or 4.7%
The athletic gear company beat es-
timates for its fiscal first-quarter with
strong sales at home and shares hit
a new all-time high.




J .A, ';
52-week range
$44.83 $75.25
Vol.:15.6m (4.0x avg.) PE:27.4
Mkt. Cap:$52.46 b Yield: 1.1%
Lumber Liquidators LL
Close:$107.13V-5.83 or -5.2%
Federal authorities raided the head-
quarters of the flooring retailer, re-
ferring only to the "importation of
certain products."




J .A ';
52-week range
$47.31 $115.59
Vol.: 4.3m (7.4x avg.) PE: 47.4
Mkt. Cap:$2.95 b Yield:...
J.C. Penney JCP
Close: $9.05 V-1.37 or -13.1 %
The retailer will raise $811 million
through a share offering and ex-
pects to have $1.3 billion in liquidity
by year's end.
IC.,


J A S
52-week range
$8.85 $27.00
Vol.: 256.2m (9.7x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $2 b Yield:...
AZZ AZZ
Close:$42.23TV-0.88 or -2.0%
The electrical products and services
specialist fell short of quarterly ex-
pectations and its outlook left inves-
tors wanting.
4ir


.11


J A- *;
52-week range
$34.61 $49.10
Vol.:1.2m (4.9x avg.) PE: 18.3
Mkt. Cap:$1.08 b Yield: 1.3%
Nektar NKTR
Close:$10.54V-3.31 or-23.9%
A recent study of a painkiller by the
pharmaceutical company failed to
meet its goals, though it says it re-
mains committed.


1'
10
J .A .
52-week range
$5.65 $14.47
Vol.:9.1m (7.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$1.22 b Yield:...


Stocks fall on gov't



shutdown worries


Associated Press

The budget fight may be
happening in Washington,
but it's investors on Wall
Street who keep getting
smacked.
Stocks fell Friday for the
sixth day out of the last
seven, and ended the week
with a decline. Investors
focused on the risk that the
government could shut
down on Tuesday unless
Congress agrees to a new
spending bill. And even if
that hurdle is cleared, the
dispute is poised to con-
tinue into the middle of
October as legislators de-
bate raising the nation's
borrowing limit.
There were a lot of mov-
ing parts for investors to
keep track of on Friday
The U.S. Senate approved


a spending bill that is al-
ready considered dead in
the House of Representa-
tives, where Republicans
want changes to President
Barack Obama's health
care law Obama spoke on
live television during the
closing minutes of trading.
And investors braced for
the possibility that when
markets reopen on Mon-
day, none of this will have
been resolved, even though
the House will be in ses-
sion over the weekend.
So how should an in-
vestor get ready for next
week?
"I don't know what's
going to happen 15 min-
utes from now," said
Stephen Carl, head of eq-
uity trading at The
Williams Capital Group.
He noted that volume on


Friday was low, suggesting
that some investors
were waiting for more
information.
Stocks moved little as
Obama spoke during the
final minutes of trading.
He reiterated a previous
vow not to negotiate with
Congress under the threat
of a shutdown.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average fell 70.06
points, or 0.5 percent, to
close at 15,258.24. The
Standard & Poor's 500
index fell 6.92 points, or 0.4
percent, to 1,691.75. The
Nasdaq composite was
down 5.83 points, or 0.15
percent, at 3,781.59.
Still, the indexes are off
only about 1 percent for
the week, and the S&P 500
is just 2 percent below its
record high set Sept. 18.


Empire State Building



owner, Potbelly going public


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE 0 CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -0-- 5.90 3.83 -.11 -2.8 V A A -16.7 -19.6 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0-- 39.00 33.98 -.25 -0.7 V A V +0.8 -5.4 26 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 32.67 -0- 48.01 45.64 -.57 -1.2 V A A +21.5 +31.7 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 81.60 -0- 103.85 99.61 -.60 -0.6 V A A +14.0 +16.6 2.21e
Bank of America BAG 8.70 -0- 15.03 13.90 -.18 -1.3 V V A +19.7 +60.2 25 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 9.04 -0- 13.08 11.73 -.07 -0.6 V V A +3.2 +11.2 42
CenturyLink Inc CTL 31.85 0- 42.45 31.78 -.33 -1.0 V V V -18.8 -16.4 18 2.16
Citigroup C 31.88 -0- 53.56 48.89 -.04 -0.1 V A A +23.6 +50.6 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -0- 26.38 21.81 -.53 -2.4 V V V +37.7 +61.5 78 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 -- 0- 67.89 65.19 -.05 -0.1 A A A +30.9 +27.1 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 -0- 75.46 66.90 -.75 -1.1 V A V +4.9 +9.9 20 3.12f
EPR Properties EPR 42.44 -0-- 61.18 49.39 -.51 -1.0 V A V +7.1 +19.1 21 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 -0-- 95.49 86.90 -.17 -0.2 V V V +0.4 -1.9 9 2.52
Ford Motor F 9.71 0 17.77 17.05 -.22 -1.3 V A A +31.7 +76.0 12 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.87 -- 0- 24.95 24.05 -.20 -0.8 A A A +14.6 +13.2 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 58.75 -0- 81.56 75.96 -.11 -0.1 V A V +22.8 +31.0 22 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0- 25.98 22.98 -.43 -1.8 V A V +11.4 +7.4 12 0.90
IBM IBM 181.10 -0-- 215.90 186.92 -3.30 -1.7 V A V -2.4 -5.0 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 17.16 0 32.29 31.56 -.12 -0.4 V A A +49.6 +68.9 34
Lowes Cos LOW 29.66 0 49.17 47.77 -.12 -0.3 V A A +34.5 +61.8 24 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -0- 103.70 97.12 -1.07 -1.1 A A V +10.1 +8.7 18 3.24f
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 --0- 36.43 33.27 +.50 +1.5 A V V +24.6 +11.7 13 1.12f
Motorola Solutions MSI 49.49 -0- 64.72 59.75 -.12 -0.2 V A A +7.3 +21.5 17 1.24f
NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 -0- 88.39 80.07 -.37 -0.5 V V V +15.7 +18.7 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 9.52 0-- 27.00 9.05 -1.37 -13.1 V V V -54.1 -57.6 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0- 21.09 17.59 -.09 -0.5 V A V -2.5 +5.2 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 --- 10.52 9.30 +.12 +1.3 A V V +30.4 +29.5 11 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0- 68.77 59.05 -1.33 -2.2 A A A +42.8 +18.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 81.60 -0- 114.72 104.79 -.90 -0.9 V V A +21.5 +25.6 20 2.32f
Texas Instru TXN 26.94 0 40.94 40.16 -.22 -0.5 V A A +30.0 +50.0 24 1.20f
Time Warner TWX 42.61 0 66.01 66.20 +1.33 +2.1 A A A +38.4 +47.8 18 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 65.85 -- 0 104.38 103.13 +.33 +0.3 A A A +40.7 +52.8 19 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 -0- 54.31 47.00 -.67 -1.4 V V V +8.6 +9.1 96 2.12f
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 35.09 35.00 -.05 -0.1 A A A +38.9 +27.3 1.57e
WalMart Strs WMT 67.37 -0- 79.96 74.36 -.26 -0.3 V A V +9.0 +3.0 14 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 31.88 0 56.84 54.51 -.22 -0.4 V A A +47.3 +56.0 24 1.26f
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate Ij -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Associated Press
The Empire State Building is one of four companies
expected to sell shares in initial public offerings.


cash, helping support eco-
nomic growth. And when
IPOs gain in their first day
of trading, that bodes well
for other companies that
may go public soon, such as
automaker Chrysler and so-
cial media company
Twitter
Investors are closely
watching next week's
lineup.
"Brand recognition will


always foster additional
attraction," said Scott
Sweet, a senior managing
partner at IPO Boutique,
which rates IPOs and in-
vests in them.
But worries about a
looming government shut-
down could hurt demand
for upcoming offerings,
warns David Menlow,
president of IPO analysis
firm IPOfinancialcom.


SBusiness HIGHLIGHTS

US consumers boost Exxon to offer benefits to
spending 0.3 pct. in August same-sex couples in US
WASHINGTON U.S. consumers in- NEW YORK- Exxon Mobil Corp. said Fri-
creased their spending slightly last month as day that it will begin offering benefits to legally
their income grew at the fastest pace in six married same-sex couples in the U.S. for the
months, first time starting next week.
Consumers' spending on goods and services The company said it will recognize "all legal
rose 0.3 percent in August, the Commerce De- marriages" when it determines eligibility for
apartment said Friday That's up from a 0.2 percent health care plans for the company's 77,000
gain in July, which was slightly more than the 0.1 employees and retirees in the U.S.
percent reported last month. -From wire reports


EXTRA'

am&O


Associated Press

NEW YORK Starting
next week, you could own
a piece of the Empire
State Building.
Or, if iconic New York
skyscrapers aren't your
thing, you could bite into
Potbelly a sandwich chain
with more than 280 shops.
Next week, these and
two more companies with
familiar names the
owner of budget-friendly
clothing store chain
Burlington Coat Factory
and Re/Max, one of the
country's largest real es-
tate agencies are ex-
pected to sell shares in
initial public offerings.
A surging stock market
is drawing investors to
IPOs. This past week, 12
companies went public.
That's the most in one
week since November
2007, said data provider
Dealogic. And there have
been 151 IPOs in the U.S.
this year, up 47 percent
from a year ago, said IPO
research firm Renais-
sance Capital.
A more active IPO mar-
ket signals confidence in
the economy because buy-
ing into IPOs is considered
a riskier investment than
investing in established
companies. Companies that
raise money in an IPO can
also hire more people and
make investments with the


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 A9





Page A10 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28,2013



PINION


"Learning is its own exceeding great
reward."
William Hazlitt, "On Old English
Writers and Speakers," 1826


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

MFL VS. OFW




Contradiction



of water laws



indisputable


he secretary of the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion has an opportunity to risk
political suicide but prove that
logic is not lost in the manage-
ment of water resources.
While the secretary wasn't
present when challenges to
the state's minimum flows law
for the Chassahowitzka and
Homosassa rivers were pre-
sented recently, it's his job to
rule if the law should be su-
perseded by the rivers' status
as Outstanding
Florida Waters THE I1
(OFWs).
In pondering the Reduci
situation, Secre- minimum
tary Herschel T.
Vinyard Jr should OUR OH
draw heavily on Sack
common sense aC
and political acOutst
perspective. oid
State policy to Florid
review flows in sta
rivers throughout
the state was initially viewed
- apparently naively as a
means to gauge the status of
the rivers' health. As it turns
out, that data has been con-
torted into a mechanism for
condoning reduced flows.
While water district officials -
responsible for setting the
minimum flows and levels
(MFLs) bristle at the reality,
flow reduction equates to in-
creased pollution.
Much political spin has been
offered in an attempt to sepa-
rate MFLs from OFW status -
but they are both law and bla-
tantly contradict each other
Reduced flow allows for
greater concentrations of pol-
luting nitrates and exacer-
bates saltwater intrusion.
History has made that evident.
The petitioners at the Sept.
10 hearing before the DEP
representative were in no way
a bunch of yahoos bellyaching
about some far-fetched con-
spiracy An attorney articu-
lated the contentions of three
environmental groups and
three individuals that re-
duced flows are contrary to
OFW status. Dr Bob Knight of
the Florida Springs Institute
supported their claim with sci-
entific data.
While the legal and scien-


Conflict for Adams
This has to do with "County
fears losing city's trash." I believe
that it's a total conflict of
interest if Scott Adams C 0
is in the bidding to (dis-
pose) trash for ... the city
and still be on the county
commission. That is total
conflict of interests and
it's absurd, competing i
with the county when /
you're a county commis- CAL.
sioner. I'm sorry but, 563
uh-uh. We should not 5 -(
have it.
Saves plenty of money
I can't believe the editor didn't
correct these people who called in
saying the sheriff wants another
helicopter. He only wants to look
into converting the present heli-
copter into a medical flight heli-


tific representatives from the
water district were earnest in
saying the approved reduction
of MFLs are consistent with
their dictates, they're seeking
cover by detaching reduced
flows from increased
pollution.
"The district's position is
that the rules are consistent
with the Water Resource Im-
plementation Rule and they
do not negatively impact any
water resource values and
are consistent with all rele-


ISSUE:
ng river
m flows.

PINION:
s in the
e of
handing
SWater
tus.


I
r


vant water qual-
ity standards,"
the water district
attorney stated.
That's fine, if
one dismisses the
degradation
reaped to date by
nitrate- and salt-
water-induced
degradation
on the Ho-
mosassa and
Chassahowitzka.


It's a simple question: How
will allowing reduced flow -
aka increased withdrawals
benefit the water quality
of the rivers?
That is the question the
DEP secretary must
evaluate.
While there's been much
publicity and praise for the
governor's $37 million
springs restoration initia-
tive, state agencies be it
the DEP or water districts -
are cogs in the political ma-
chine. With Gov. Rick Scott
driving that machine, they
are tasked with carrying out
the agenda of a leader who,
springs initiative aside, has
hardly been viewed as the
environmental governor
No doubt, balancing the
state's economic interests
with environmental con-
cerns is no easy task, and al-
lowing increased water
withdrawals hence re-
duced flow has major eco-
nomic overtones.
All of that aside, the matter
before the DEP secretary is
simple: Does Outstanding
Florida Water status over-
ride the condoned reduction
of water flow?
These are not issues that
can be separated.


copter. If you had to pay $20,000
to be transported to Tampa Gen-
eral, not covered by insurance,
you would rather have
|ND our own transportation,
JND saving a lot of money.
FF Stay with 'Nature
gCoast'
This is to whoever is in
charge of, or has input
fl4 into the renaming of the
L Nature Coast since we're
being made to re-identify
)579 Citrus County, in particu-
lar Crystal River, for at-
tracting tourists. Nothing
works better than the Nature
Coast. The Weather Channel
No. 9, the Klystron 9 weather re-
port shows, when they show Crys-
tal River, underneath on that logo,
it shows "Nature Coast." I think
we ought to hang with that.


Settling disputes with bullets,


an American tradition


In Missouri, two men got into
an argument over a gambling
debt. Later, the winner was
flaunting the gold watch that the
loser had used to pay him. So the
loser pulled a gun and
shot the winner dead.
In Kansas, two men
were arguing over
politics in a bar. One
got so upset he pulled
a gun and killed the
other A couple of
nights later, that gun-
man was shot dead by
the victim's friends.
In New Mexico, a Mitch
law officer warned a OTI
group of carousers in VOi
a bar that they were
not supposed to be
carrying weapons. They pulled
out their guns and shot him
down.
And in Ionia, Mich., two men
got into a road-rage incident
pulled off to a car wash, got out of
their cars and shot each other
to death.
These are all tragic cases. Peo-
ple were killed. Fathers, brothers
and sons were lost The only real
difference is this: The first three
incidents happened during the
Wild West of the late 1800s. And
the fourth happened last week
We settle our issues with bul-
lets in this country We've been
doing it since we rode horses.
And sadly, there is no end in
sight
So today, we will once again
enter combustible territory We
will talk about guns. And before
the ugly arguments break out (we
are fully braced for the nasty
comments, cringing curse words
and wild accusations that will ap-
pear in the comments online), let
us at least recognize that this is
not a new issue.
Not even close.
Whatever happened around
7 p.m. Wednesday in Ionia, it
seems clear that it was not worth
dying over Two men Robert
Taylor, 56, and James Pullum, 43
- got into something on the road


HI

(


(Pullum's wife would tell 911 that
Taylor, in a PT Cruiser, was tail-
gating Pullum's Taurus) and
when they pulled over, the anger
was boiling.
Moments later, both
were dead.
"Road rage," Pul-
lum's wife, Teri, cries
during a 911 call.
"They were fighting....
They both shot each
other"
Ionia County Prose-
cutor Ron Schafer
told mlive.com:
Albom "There was some sort
IER of oral confrontation."
DES He said they shot
E each other at fairly
close range.
Every gun-violence headline
emboldens some point of view
The tragedy at Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School last year saw
many pro-gun folks declare, "You
see? If those teachers had been
armed, this could have been
avoided."
The Ionia case, conversely is
like manna from heaven for the
anti-gun crowd. How many times
do you hear pro-gun voices
claim, "People getting CCWs are
responsible gun owners?"
Pullum and Taylor had li-
censes to carry concealed
weapons.
"People who get CCWs respect
guns because they have to learn
about them."
Again, both men had CCWs -
and Taylor knew plenty about
guns, as the prosecutor told
mlive.com that Taylor, appar-
ently a collector, might have
owned more than 100.
"Regular folks aren't the ones
you have to worry about with
guns it's the criminals."
So far, there is no indication
Pullum or Taylor have any seri-
ous criminal past Taylor did lose
his concealed weapons permit
for three years after a drunken-
driving misdemeanor But in
2010, he was able to get it back.
And the prosecutor described


him as "a polite, law-abiding
citizen."
So there are your basic facts.
The guns weren't illegally ob-
tained, this wasn't crossfire from
a drug war, and the shooters
weren't deranged lunatics walk-
ing through a defenseless
workplace.
Instead, this appears to be
about tempers flaring over an
everyday occurrence traffic
anger but culminating in two
deaths because, when the anger
peaked, each man had a gun
within reach and each used it to
try to settle matters.
Same as we did in the Wild
West
The fact that the Ionia shoot-
ings came the same week as a
disturbed man named Aaron
Alexis allegedly shot up the
Washington Navy Yard, killing 12
and wounding eight all with a
weapon he legally obtained de-
spite a troubling past made the
anti-gun lobby even angrier
But if you expect it to change
things, it won't Pro-gun folks will
somehow explain away Ionia.
Someone will claim it could have
been worse if they didn't shoot
each other Someone will say it's
the laws, not the guns. Someone
will scream "stupid liberals!"
and the whole thing will degen-
erate into name-calling
The National Rifle Association
will likely be silent
And we can only be happy that
people arguing through newspa-
pers or televisions can't fire bul-
lets at each other the way Taylor
and Pullum did. Scripture might
warn that those who live by the
sword die by the sword. But
we've been ignoring that for
centuries.
And my bet is, we're not stop-
ping anytime soon.

Mitch Albom is a best-selling a
uthor offiction and nonfiction, a
columnist for the Detroit Free
Press and a radio host and
television commentator


1 WI9M UPON AMERICA
A CC:IMANUO OF LCONMIC
COLW S AL-m 0SvJ
QISU AN W TtL&N-CW!


t, W[tr ":ln m _- -


' -. .'
. / '.'*


LETTERS to the Editor


Dancing in
the streets
Well, the bids for Citrus Me-
morial hospital are in, the two
governing bodies are analyzing
those bids and all we need now
is a miracle. The miracle you
ask? What miracle? It is simply
that those two governing bodies
that must agree, will agree, for
the first time in years. The fact
that those two bodies have run
up close to $10 million over the
past few years in legal fees, fight-
ing each other, leads one to be-
lieve they may have difficulty
agreeing on the final solution.
How many lawyers will be out of
work?
When you look at the sum-
mary of the bids in the
Chronicle, you can't help think-
ing, this is a no-brainer How
could they not agree? But then,
what is the objective of this sale.
When the governor decreed that
all county-owned hospitals
should be put up for bids to
lease or be sold outright, what
was he attempting to accom-
plish? Fbr that matter, Citrus
Memorial was already leased to
the Citrus Memorial Health


OPINIONS INVITED
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.

Foundation and look how well
that works! Here we sit with Cit-
rus Memorial around $60 mil-
lion in debt and unfunded
pension benefits, while consum-
ing $2 million to $6 million in ad
valorem taxes yearly Take a look
at HCAs record and you'll find
its stock has gone from $18 per
share in 2011 to $42 per share
today and its profit over the last
12 months amounted to $1.4 bil-
lion. Compare that to our hospi-
tal management having to
borrow money from Peter to pay
Paul (so to speak) to avoid de-
fault on a $10 million bond issue.
Maybe the governor, who has a
great deal of experience in hos-
pital management thought it
was time to get this millstone off
of the taxpayers' neck Maybe he
realized that a "for-profift" hospi-
tal would jump at the opportu-
nity to buy this albatross and


turn it into a profit center
Consider this: If you accepted
the HCA offer of $140 million
and you spent $60 million to pay
off the debts and pensions that
Citrus Memorial currently owes,
you would be left with $80 mil-
lion, cash. If that was placed in a
health care trust to be used only
for health care in the county, it
could easily fund the health de-
partment with the interest
alone. You would also eliminate
the $2 million plus the county
taxpayers are spending annu-
ally to support the hospital. On
top of that HCA would pay an
estimated $2 million in taxes
each year with a net reduction
in ad valorem taxes of $5 million
plus.
You could thank them for their
service and disband the Citrus
County Hospital Board. And last
but not least HCA would replace
the management of the hospital
with their management team
and the golden parachutes
would pop at Citrus Memorial
hospital. The war would be over
and there may be dancing in the
streets.
R.M. Sprott
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 All


Iran tries for diplomacy


Rouhani calls US

a 'great' nation

in sharp change

Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS Iranian
President Hassan Rouhani called
the United States a "great" nation
Friday in a sharp reversal from his
predecessors and expressed hope
that at the very least the two govern-
ments can stop the escalation of
tensions.
Wrapping up his first trip to the
United States as Iran's new leader,
Rouhani said President Barack
Obama struck a new tone in his U.N.
speech this week, which he
welcomed.
He said he believes the first step
to a meeting between the two lead-
ers was taken Thursday at a meeting
on Iran's nuclear program, where
the foreign ministers of both nations
talked for the first time in six years.
The White House announced Friday
afternoon that Rouhani and Obama
spoke on the phone.
"I want it to be the case that this
trip will be a first step, and a begin-
ning for better and constructive re-
lations with countries of the world
as well as a first step for a better re-
lationship between the two great na-
tions of Iran and the United States
of America," Rouhani told a press
conference at a hotel near U.N.
headquarters.
Iran and the United States have
traded harsh rhetoric for years.
During the 1979 Iranian revolu-
tion, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini
returned from exile, seized power
and declared the U.S., which was a
strong supporter of the ousted Shah
of Iran, the "Great Satan." He set the
tone for Iranian officials who came
after him. The U.S. was equally crit-
ical, with then-President George W
Bush, in his 2002 State of the Union
address, declaring Iran part of his
"axis of evil" along with North
Korea and Iraq.
Rouhani, looking to the future of
U.S.-Iranian relations, expressed
hope that "the views of our people,
the understanding of each other, will
grow, and at the level of the two gov-
ernments that at the very least we
can, as a first step, stop further es-
calation of tensions and then reduce
tension as a next step and then pave


r ~i. ,
1911b vp -



Associated Press
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani smiles Friday at the end of a news
conference at the Millennium Hotel in midtown Manhattan, N.Y.


the way for achieving of mutual
interests."
The Iranian president was upbeat
about his four-day visit to New York
to attend the U.N. General Assembly's
ministerial session, reeling off a long
list of leaders he met and saying "I be-
lieve that our success was greater
than our expectation, especially with
the European countries ... and I think
that the path really has been paved to
expand relations in various centers,
key world economies."
Iran's economy has been hit hard
by four rounds of U.N. sanctions for
its failure to suspend uranium en-
richment, a process that can be used
to make fuel for both nuclear
weapons and nuclear energy The
U.S. and its allies have taken even
more devastating measures targeting
Iran's ability to conduct international
bank transfers and to export oil.
Rouhani has come across as a
more moderate face of the hard-line
clerical regime in Tehran. He said
he has a mandate from the Iranian
people, who opposed "extremism"
and voted for "moderation." He said
this has created a "new environ-
ment" that could pave the way for
better relations with the West.
He said Iran would put forth a
proposal at talks in Geneva on Oct.
15-16 aimed at resolving the standoff
over his country's nuclear program
and easing international sanctions.
"We hope that an even more effec-
tive step will be taken in Geneva in
order to settle the nuclear issue,"
Rouhani said, without elaborating.
He expressed hope that with


"sufficient will on both sides and
I assure you that on the Iranian side
this will is there fully, 100 percent-
that within a very short time there
will be a settlement on the nuclear
file and ... I believe that in the not
too distant future, we'll be able to re-
solve and settle the nuclear issue."
Resolving the nuclear issue will
"pave the way for Iran's better rela-
tions with the West," including the
expansion of economic and cultural
ties, he said.
Rouhani said he was encouraged
by what he has heard recently from
Western officials.
"In speaking with senior Euro-
pean officials and also hearing Mr
Obama ... it seemed that they
sounded different compared to the
past, and I view that as a positive
step to the resettlement of the dif-
ferences between the Islamic Re-
public between the Republic of Iran
and the West," he said.
He said he did not meet with
Obama on the sidelines of the U.N.
General Assembly this week be-
cause "both sides were convinced
that the timetable was too short to
plan a meeting of two presidents"
and "ensure that its conclusion
would be solid."
"What matters to us is the result of
such a meeting," Rouhani said.
Iran watchers say Rouhani may
have limited time possibly a year
or less to reach a settlement on
the nuclear issue before Iran's
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei decides negotiations are
fruitless.


World BRIEFS


Ship crosses
NW Passage
TORONTO -A Danish-
owned coal-laden cargo ship
has sailed through the
Northwest Passage for the
first time and into the history
books as the second bulk
carrier to navigate the Arctic
route.
The Nordic Orion left Van-
couver, British Columbia,
Sept. 17 carrying 15,000
tons of coal. Ed Coil, CEO of
Bulk Partners, an opera-
tional partner of ship-owner
Nordic Bulk Carriers, said
Friday that the freighter has
passed through Greenland.
He says it is expected to
dock in Finland next week
after traversing waters once
impermeable with thick ice.
The Rev. Jackson
visiting Cuba
HAVANA- The Rev.
Jesse Jackson is in Cuba
and hoped to meet with
jailed American government
subcontractor Alan Gross.


Jackson said he is in town
for talks with religious lead-
ers about their concerns for
the poor, and peaceful rela-
tions between Cuba, the
United States and the rest of
the Caribbean.
Asked
whether
he would
meet with
Gross,
Jackson
said "I i
would like
to."
Gross The Rev.
Jessee
wasar- Jackson
rested in
2009 after being caught im-
porting restricted communi-
cations equipment into
Cuba. He said he was only
setting up Internet for island
Jewish groups, but he was
sentenced to 15 years.
Jackson has helped gain
freedom for U.S. citizens in
Yugoslavia, Syria and Iraq.
In 2011, he offered to reprise
that role in the Gross case.
-From wire reports


Sept 27 thru Oct 1

Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds *U.S. 41 S,, Inverness

- Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m.
with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day)
Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3abag)

Great bargains in recycled reading!
Thousands of best sellers, large print, crafts,
cooking, health, children's, travel, CDs, DVDs,
games, puzzles, treasures, etc.
Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region,
Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and
Citrus County Library System.
www.foccls.org ....
For book sale information call [| i ,,
746-1334 or 527-8405 )NIC


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORLD










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Honored


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Experts give warming warning


Associated Press
Malala Yousafzai waves
to onlookers Friday after
speaking at a news
conference on Harvard
University campus in
Cambridge, Mass. The
Pakistani teenager, an
advocate for education
for girls, survived a
Taliban assassination
attempt in 2012 on her
way home from school.


Food safety a
criminal case
DENVER Criminal
charges against two can-
taloupe farmers over a
deadly food-borne illness
send an emphatic message
to fruit and vegetable grow-
ers to crack down on safety,
federal regulators said
Friday.
Colorado farmers Eric
and Ryan Jensen appeared
in shackles in a Denver fed-
eral court this week and
pleaded not guilty to
charges of introducing adul-
terated food into interstate
commerce.
The federal Food and
Drug Administration has
said conditions at Jensen
Farms in southeast Col-
orado led to a 2011 listeria
outbreak that killed 33 peo-
ple. Officials said people in
28 states ate the contami-
nated fruit, and 147 re-
quired hospitalization.
The criminal prosecution
"sends the message that
absolute care must be
taken to ensure that deadly
pathogens do not enter our
food supply chain," the FDA
said in a statement Friday.
Military court
to hear HIV case
WICHITA, Kan. -The
highest court for the U.S.
armed forces has agreed to
hear the appeal of a
Kansas airman convicted of
assault for exposing multi-
ple sex partners to HIV at
swinger parties in Wichita.
The attorney for David
Gutierrez said Friday the
case will set the standard
across the military as to what
evidence is necessary to
prove someone can cause
"grievous bodily harm" after
testing positive for HIV.
The court in an order
Tuesday also agreed to de-
cide whether the airman
committed adultery since
his wife also joined in the
sex parties.
Gutierrez was a sergeant
serving at McConnell Air
Force base when he was
sentenced in 2011 to eight
years in prison and stripped
of his rank. He was con-
victed of aggravated assault
among other charges.
NJ judge rules for
gay marriage
New Jersey is unconsti-
tutionally denying federal
benefits to gay couples and
must allow them to marry, a
judge ruled Friday.
Superior Court Judge
Mary Jacobson sided al-
most entirely with a group
of same-sex couples and
gay rights groups who sued
the state in July days after
the U.S. Supreme Court
struck down key parts of a
law that blocked the federal
government from granting
benefits to gay couples.
Gov. Chris Christie, a Re-
publican in the midst of a
re-election campaign and a
possible presidential con-
tender, said through a
spokesman Friday he plans
to appeal the decision,
which he believes should
be determined by a popular
vote rather than a court.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

STOCKHOLM Scien-
tists now believe it's "ex-
tremely likely" that human
activity is the dominant
cause of global warming, a
long-term trend that is
clear despite a recent
plateau in the tempera-
tures, an international cli-
mate panel said Friday


Panel on Climate Change
used its strongest language
yet in a report on the
causes of climate change,
prompting calls for global
action to control emissions
of C02 and other green-
house gases.
"If this isn't an alarm
bell, then I don't know
what one is. If ever there
were an issue that de-


The Intergovernmental manded greater coopera-


tion, partnership, and
committed diplomacy, this
is it," said U.S. Secretary
of State John Kerry
The IPCC, which has 195
member countries,
adopted the report Friday
after all-night talks at a
meeting in Stockholm.
In its previous assess-
ment, in 2007, the U.N.-
sponsored panel said it
was "very likely" that
global warming was due to
human activity, particu-
larly the C02 emissions re-
sulting from the burning of
coal, oil and gas.
The change means that


scientists have moved from
being 90 percent sure to 95
percent about the same
degree of certainty they
have that smoking kills.
'At 90 percent, it means
there is a 10 percent prob-
ability that it's not entirely
correct," said Chris Field,
Carnegie Institution scien-
tist who is a leader in the
IPCC but wasn't involved
in the report released Fri-
day 'And now that's 5 per-
cent. So it's a doubling of
our confidence. That's ac-
tually a consequential
change in our level of
understanding."


Fuel falling


Associated Press
A gas pump is shown Friday in Montpelier, Vt. The national average price of gasoline has fallen throughout
the month, sliding to $3.42 per gallon from $3.59 at the start of the month. The price is at its lowest level
since Jan. 31, it's the lowest it's been at this time of year for three years, and it is expected to fall further
in the coming days.

Gas prices drop as weather, output calm markets


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Gasoline prices
have fallen steadily throughout
September, and drivers should
look forward to even cheaper fill-
ups in the weeks ahead.
The national average price for
a gallon of gasoline is now $3.42,
down from $3.59 on Sept. 1. The
price is the lowest it's been at this
time of year since 2010 and is
likely to keep falling.
"It's a layup for me to predict
lower prices until Columbus Day
weekend," says Tom Kloza, Chief
Oil Analyst at GasBuddycom and
Oil Price Information Service,
which tracks retail and wholesale
gasoline prices.
Wholesale gasoline prices have
fallen faster in recent days than
pump prices, so drivers can ex-
pect to pay even less as the pump
prices catch up.
Gas prices tend to decline soon
after Labor Day, but last year they
didn't start going down until mid-
October There are a number of
reasons for this fall's drop in
price, experts say:


Refiners can switch to
cheaper blends of gasoline in the
winter months as clean-air rules
are relaxed.
Gasoline demand declines in
the fall after the summer driving
season ends. At the same time
supplies rise, because refiners
are still making gasoline as they
keep operations humming to
make heating oil for winter and
diesel and jet fuel for shippers.
This year, refineries have
been relatively problem free.
There have been no hurricanes,
and few unexpected problems at
refineries or pipelines, unlike
last year
Even high oil prices haven't
stopped gasoline's decline. Oil
briefly topped $112 in late August
as a U.S. threat of military action
against Syria made the market
nervous about Middle East sup-
plies. The price of oil has since
fallen, but remains above $100 per
barrel. Still, gasoline has dropped
to its lowest price since Jan. 31.
Friday, oil fell 16 cents to close
at $102.87 per barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.


Last year at this time drivers
were paying 37 cents per gallon
more than they are this year, on
average, because Hurricane
Irene and refinery and pipeline
problems disrupted gasoline pro-
duction in August and September
California prices rose sharply in
late September, then hit a record
$4.67 per gallon in early October
There are no such problems
this year, though California driv-
ers are again paying the highest
average price outside of Hawaii
and Alaska, at $3.95 per gallon,
according to AAA, OPIS and
Wright Express. South Carolina
drivers are paying the least, at
$3.11 per gallon.
For the year, the national price
is on track to average $3.56 per
gallon, 7 cents less than last year's
record of $3.63. That would save
U.S. drivers $9 billion this year
Despite the recent drop, the na-
tional average is unlikely to fall
back to $3.29 per gallon this
year's low, set in early January-
unless the price of oil falls under
$100 per barrel, GasBuddy's
Kloza said.


Use of anesthetic for execution might cut supply


Associated Press


ST LOUIS The
planned use of a common
anesthetic in a Missouri
execution is raising con-
cerns that the anti-death
penalty European Union
could limit export of the
drug, endangering the sup-
ply of a vital medication
used every day in thou-
sands of American hospi-
tals and clinics.
The execution sched-
uled for Oct. 23 would be
the first to use propofol,
which is by far the nation's
most popular anesthetic.
About 50 million vials
are administered annually
in some 15,000 locations.
That's about four-fifths of
all anesthetic procedures,
according to the American
Society of Anesthesiolo-
gists. Propofol is popular
because it works quickly


and patients wake up
faster with fewer side ef-
fects such as post-operative
nausea.
Roughly 85 percent of
the U.S. supply ofpropofol
is made in Europe, where
capital punishment is out-
lawed, by the German
company Fresenius Kabi.
Export is controlled by the
European Union, which
prohibits trade in goods
that could be used for exe-
cutions. The EU is review-
ing whether to subject
propofol to that rule.
If it is added to the regu-
lation, propofol would be
subject to export controls,
not a complete ban, EU
spokeswoman Maja Koci-
jancic said.
Still, any change in ex-
port practices could have a
drastic effect on propofol's
availability in the U.S., said
Matt Kuhn, a spokesman


for Fresenius Kabi USA.
"It's a real concern,"
Kuhn said Friday "And it
could have enormous pub-
lic health implications."
Fresenius Kabi has
launched a website specif-
ically to address the rami-
fications of using propofol
in a U.S. execution,
http://propofol-info.com.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration is worried
about any move that could
affect access to propofol.
FDA spokeswoman Erica
Jefferson said the agency
is weighing how to reach
out to European officials
to ensure the drug re-
mains readily available.
"We do consider this a
critical need," Jefferson
said. "Without the drug,
we're concerned that sur-
geries would be delayed
and patients would be at
risk."


Associated Press
A bottle of the propofol, the
nation's most popular
anesthetic, is displayed
July 28, 2009, at Good
Samaritan Hospital in Los
Angeles. The common
anesthetic is planned for
use in a Missouri execution
scheduled for Oct. 23.


One of the most contro-
versial subjects in the re-
port was how to deal with
what appears to be a slow-
down in warming if you
look at temperature data
for the past 15 years.
Climate skeptics say this
"hiatus" casts doubt on the
scientific consensus on cli-
mate change, even though
the past decade was the
warmest on record.
Many governments had
objections about how the
issue was treated in ear-
lier drafts and some had
called for it to be deleted
altogether


World BRIEFS

Steamy


Associated Press
The London and North
Eastern Region A4 Pacific
class locomotive, Sir
Nigel Gresley, makes its
way Friday through
Darnholm, northeastern
England, on the North
Yorkshire Moors Railway
at the start of the
Autumn Steam Gala that
runs until Sunday. The
locomotive was built in
1937 and was withdrawn
from service by British
Railways on Feb. 1, 1966.


UN: Eliminate
Syria's weapons
UNITED NATIONS -
The U.N. Security Council
voted unanimously Friday
night to secure and destroy
Syria's chemical weapons
stockpile, a landmark deci-
sion aimed at taking poison
gas off the battlefield in the
2 1/2-year conflict.
The vote after two weeks
of intense negotiations
marked a major break-
through in the paralysis that
has gripped the council
since the Syrian uprising
began. Russia and China
previously vetoed three
Western-backed resolutions
pressuring President
BasharAssad's regime to
end the violence.
"Today's historic resolu-
tion is the first hopeful news
on Syria in a long time,"
U.N. Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon told the council im-
mediately after the vote.
For the first time, the
council endorsed the
roadmap for a political tran-
sition in Syria adopted by
key nations in June 2012
and called for an interna-
tional conference to be con-
vened "as soon as
possible" to implement it.
Ban said the target date
for a new peace conference
in Geneva is mid-
November.
German party
ready for talks
BERLIN Germany's
main center-left party said
Friday it is prepared to hold
preliminary talks with Chan-
cellor Angela Merkel's con-
servatives to explore the
possibility of a "grand coali-
tion" after both sides failed
to gain an absolute majority
in the general election.
Social Democratic Party
Chairman Sigmar Gabriel
said a majority of delegates
at a party meeting backed
the step late Friday, but
they would have another
say before any formal ne-
gotiations with Merkel's
Union bloc begin.
-From wire reports


Panel: Climate change

'extremely likely' man-made









SPORTS


The Tampa
Bay Rays lost
ground in the
AL wild-card
race Friday
night./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Baseball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Golf/B4
0 Football/B4, B5
0 Auto racing/B6


Panthers suffer tough loss to Rattlers


Lecanto football loses two leads

during 27-21 setback to Belleview


STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
LECANTO In a game that
equally highlighted its
strengths and its flaws, the
Lecanto football team could not
overcome the latter in the end,
suffering a tough third straight
loss, this one to visiting Belle-
view 27-21 on Friday night.
The Panthers offense showed
signs of improvement, mixing it
up more than previously seen.
Dmitry Growdon (18 rushes for
124 yards) and Ardante Ander-


son (27 carries, 107 yards) im-
pressed on the ground, and
sophomore quarterback Travis
McGee showed flashes, going 6-
for-9 for 94 yards passing.
But a key early mistake hurt
Lecanto in the late stages of this
close contest.
On Lecanto's second posses-
sion early in the opening quarter,
the Panthers marched 64 yards
down to the Rattlers' 5. On a
third-and-goal, McGee's pass to-
ward the end zone was tipped
near the line of scrimmage
and intercepted by Paul Mau-


rice, who raced 95 yards un-
touched for a stunning score, giv-
ing Belleview an early 7-0 edge.
Lecanto (2-3) responded
though, scoring twice in the sec-
ond period to take a 14-7 lead
into halftime.
The teams traded punches in
the third, as Belleview's Craig
Richie (25 carries for 254 yards
and three touchdowns) found
the end zone following an im-
pressive 62-yard run, twice
bursting through swarms of ..
would-be Panther tacklers ..
along the way .... /
'All of their touchdown runs .
were off broken tackles,"
Lecanto head coach McKinley MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Rolle said. "(Richie is) an D'Andre Horton of Lecanto drives into Belleview's Craig Riche and
tackles him for a three-yard loss in the first half in Lecanto. The Rat-
See Page B3 tiers rallied from a 14-7 halftime deficit for a 27-21 victory on the road.


agro


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Dunnellon's Kane Parks attempts to break through the tackle of Crystal River's Austin Stephens in the first quarter at Dunnellon High
School. The Tigers improved to 2-0 in District 5A-5 with a 34-7 rout of the Pirates.

Tigers wreck Pirates 34-7 in crucial District 5A-5 football clash


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
DUNNELLON Josh Williams ce-
mented his status as a freshman phenom,
while the stalwart Dunnellon defense,
which has now surrendered 27 points in
its last four games, was more of the same
in helping the Tigers continue to roll
through its early 5A-5 competition.
The 6-foot-1 Tigers freshman scored on
runs of 28 and 14 yards while posting a
game-high 105 yards one more yard
than the entire Pirate output-to help ex-
tend Dunnellon's winning streak over its
rival to 12 games with a 34-7 victory at Ned


Love Field on Friday
The Tigers (4-1 overall, 2-0 district) scored
on five of their first seven possessions in
building a 34-0 lead midway through the
third quarter Junior Bubba Sims, the area's
leading rusher, reached the century mark
for the fourth time this season with 104
yards and two scores on 20 carries.
Williams, who is averaging 9.6 yards per
carry on the season, reached the second
level of the Pirate defense on half a dozen
occasions off his 11 touches.
"Crystal River did a really good job of
stopping Bubba (Sims) and putting a lot of
guys in the box, and then we had to make
some adjustments to try to get on the


perimeter," Dunnellon head coach Frank
Beasley said. "Josh Williams came of age
tonight. I've been trying to tell people for
weeks he's got that 'it' in him.
"It's a big district, so we've got a long
ways to go," he continued. "It's a good win
for our kids and our community I'm proud
of our kids."
Sophomore quarterback Kobie Jones
completed five of his eight attempts, mostly
on roll outs, for 51 yards. He added an
11-yard touchdown pass to fellow Dunnel-
lon sophomore Matthew Livermore to
make it 28-0 with 41 seconds left in the half


PageB3


Bulldogs


bite


Warriors
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
MOUNT DORA With some
tough competition and bad
luck, Seven Rivers Christian's
football team fell to 0-5 on the
season with a 46-0 road loss to
Mount Dora Bible.
With some new faces on the
roster to make up for injuries to
starters, the Warriors were shut
out for the fourth consecutive
week. The Bulldogs (4-1) had
the size and matchups advan-
tage, testing Seven Rivers early
and often.
Less than three minutes into
the game, Bulldogs quarterback
Daniel Johnson ran for a 3-yard
touchdown and, on the ensuing
kickoff, the team recovered an
onside kick. A few plays later,
an 11-yard touchdown pass
from Johnson increased the
score to 14-0.
The Bulldogs were in cruise
control by the time running back
Jasper Pierre's 54-yard scamper
came with 1:59 left in the quar-
ter; Pierre added a 65-yard run
at the end of the third quarter to
finish with two touchdowns and
more than 125 yards rushing.
The Warriors' best scoring
chance of the night came late in
the third quarter when halfback
Justin Jiminez on a right side
halfback option pass had
Sterling Gardner wide open
down the right sideline. After
catching the ball and chugging
along toward the Mount Dora
35, a Bulldog defender caught
him from behind and, with a
hard hit, jarred the ball loose
and the Bulldogs recovered the
fumble on the 30-yard line.
Seven Rivers gets a much-
needed bye week next week be-
fore returning to district play
against Ocala Christian Acad-
emy Head coach David Iwaniec
said the team isn't playing good
ball right now, and a main prob-
lem is not being able to put an
80-yard drive together
Though disappointed with
the loss, quarterback Will Ellis
was happy to be given the
chance to start on the varsity
squad for the first time this sea-
son. With a smaller roster that
is a little banged up, he said he
hopes the team can stay healthy
and play their best


FIlkAIfMGODEL YEAR
y FiJ, ff


.V AIL-B


I II01 IDDG
Gn 'W gi:'I EE~


800-584-8755 ext. 10 +INCLUDES $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY AND ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WACEX-
CSJeep T A- 0 S -UN4T BLVD. HM S F ELUDES TAX, TAG, TITLEAND DEALER FEE$599.50 WAC. ONLY FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS. AMOUNT OF DOWN PAYMENT
iiJee.p 1 6, l l 1005S.SUNCOAST BLVD.HOMOSASSA,FL AND OTHER FACTORS MAY AFFECT QUALIFICATION. #ON SELECT YEARS MAKES AND MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SEE
-CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM Mom0191-T V 14358 CORTEZ BLVD. BROOKSVILLE, FL DEALER FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR
m^- CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RA U a yi 2077 HIGHWAY 44 W. INVERNESS, FL SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.




B2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


AMERICAN LEAGUE


East Division
GB WC


x-Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto




x-Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia
Miami


Atlanta


ab rhbi ab rhbi
CHrndzcf 4 0 1 0 Heywrdcf-rf 3 00 0
Rollinsss 3 00 0 RJhnsnlf 3 00 0
Utley2b 2 0 1 0 BUptoncf 0 0 0 0
Ruizc 2 00 0 J.Uptonrf-lf 3 00 0
DBrwnlf 3 0 0 0 FFrmnl1b 3 0 1 0
Ruflb 3 0 0 0 Gattisc 3 0 0 0
Asche3b 3 00 0 CJhnsn3b 3 1 1 1
Berndn rf 3 00 0 Janish3b 0 00 0
CI.Leep 2 00 0 Smmnsss 3 0 1 0
Frndsnph 1 00 0 Uggla2b 3 00 0
Medlenp 2 0 0 0
EIJhnsph 1 0 0 0
Kimrelp 0 00 0
Totals 26 0 2 0 Totals 27 1 3 1
Philadelphia 000 000 000 0
Atlanta 000 000 01x 1
DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Philadelphia 1, Atlanta 2.
HR-C.Johnson (12). CS-C.Hernandez (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
CI.LeeL,14-8 8 3 1 1 0 13
Atlanta
MedlenW,15-12 8 2 0 0 2 7
Kimbrel S,50-54 1 0 0 0 0 2
T-2:07. A-38,711 (49,586).
Brewers 4, Mets 2


NewYork


ab r h bi
4 1 2 1 EYonglf
b 4 1 0 0 Dudalb
4 00 0 DnMrp2b
4 1 2 2 JuTrnr3b
0 00 0 ABrwn rf
0 0 0 0 Lagarscf
3 00 0 TdArndc
4 00 0 Tovarss
4 0 0 0 CTorrs p
3 1 1 1 Atchisnp
2 0 0 0 Baxterph
1 0 0 0 Felicin p
0 0 0 0 Germn p
0000
33 454 Totals
S 300 000 100


NewYork 010
DP-Milwaukee 1. L
York5.2B-Duda(16
Aoki (8), K.Davis (1
K.Davis (3). SF-Lag

Milwaukee
GallardoW,12-10
Wooten H,8
Kintzler H,27
Henderson S,28-32
NewYork
C.Torres L,4-6
Atchison
Feliciano
Germen
WP-C.Torres. Balk-
T-2:40. A-25,276 (
Pirates
Pittsburgh
ab r h b
SMartelf 4 1 0 0
NWalkr2b 4 0 0
McCtchcf 3 1 0 0
Morneal 1b 3 0 0 0
Byrd rf 4 1 3 2
PAIvrz3b 4 1 2 2
RMartnc 2 00 0
Barmesss 4 0 1 0
AJBrntp 4 0 0 0
Grillip 0 0 0



Totals 32 464
Pittsburgh 002
Cincinnati 00(
DP-Pittsburgh 2, Cir
8, Cincinnati 4. 2B-
(35), Frazier (19). SB

Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,10-11
Grilli S,33-35
Cincinnati
H.Bailey L,11-12
Simon
Ondrusek
Hoover
H.Bailey pitched to 2
HBP-by H.Bailey (N
H.Bailey
T-2:53.A-40,107(
Inter
Marlins
Detroit
ab r h b
AJcksncf 4 0 1
Dirks rf 4 0 0
MiCarr3b 3 0 20
Tuiassp pr 1 1 00
Fielder lb 0 0 0
D.Kelly pr 3 0 00
JhPerltlf 4 0 1
Veras p 0 00
Avilac 3 1 2
HPerez2b 3 0 1
RSantgph 1 0 0
Iglesias ss 4 0 00
JAIvarzp 0 0 0
Porcellp 0 000
VMrtnzph 1 000
Putknnp 0 000
B.Penaph 1 000
E.Reedp 0 000
NCstlns If 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 272
Detroit 00(
Miami 003
DP-Detroit 1, Miam
5.2B-Jh.Peralta (30


ab r h bi
4000
4120
4010
4121
3010
3001
4010
3000
2000
0000
1010
0000
0000
324 12 2 0
4 0 1 0
4 1 2 1
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

322 8 2
4


001 000 2 TORONTO R.A. Dickey
LOB-Milwaukee 3, New TORONTO RAm B't ch
6), Dan.Murphy (38). HR- slowed Tampa Bay's stretch run,
1), Maldonado (4). SB- leading the Toronto Blue Jays to a
ares. 6-3 victory Friday night that
IP H R ERBBSO stopped the Rays' seven-game

winning streak.
6 7 2 2 1 6 Tampa Bay wasted a 2-0 lead
1 0 0 0 0 1 and committed a season-high
1 0 0 0 0 1 three errors, including a pair by
two-time Gold Glove third base-
6 4 3 3 1 7 man Evan Longoria. The Rays
1 1 1 1 0 1 began the night with a magic num-
1/3 0 0 0 0 0 ber of two over Texas for clinching
c12/30 0 0 0 1Torres an AL wild-card berth.
-C.Torres.
41,922). Dickey (14-13) allowed two runs
4, Reds i and five hits in 7 1/3 innings, retir-
ing 13 of 14 during one stretch.
Cincinnati Tampa Bay, which had won
S ab r h bi seven of its previous nine against
)Choocf 4010
SLudwck If 4 0 0 0 Toronto, went ahead on home
SVotto lb 4 0 2 0 runs by Ben Zobrist in the first
SBPhllps 2b 4 0 0 0 and Delmon Young in the second,
SBruce rf 4 0 0 0 his second in two games.
SFrazier 3b 2 1 1 1 Hellickson retired nine in a row
SCozartss 3 0 1 0 before Jose Reyes singled in the
SHanignc 3010 fr After srifi r
HBailyp 2 0 0 0 fourth. After a sacrifice, Brett
SSimon p 0 0 0 0 Lawrie reached on Longoria's
Ondrskp 0 0 0 0 fielding error and Moises Sierra
DRonsn ph 1 0 0 0 and Anthony Gose followed with
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 RBI singles.
Totals 3116 1 Ryan Goins grounded a go-
S002 000 4 ahead single up the middle, and
100 000 -- 1
icinnati 1. LOB-Pittsburgh center fielder Sam Fuld overran
Byrd (35). HR-P.AIvarez the ball, which went all the way to
-S.Marte(41). the wall. Sierra scored on the
IP H RERBBSO errorfor a 4-2 lead, and Goins was
thrown out at the plate on Zo-
8 5 1 1 1 6 brist's relay from shortstop.
Lawrie and Sierra added run-
5 4 4 4 4 3 scoring singles in the fifth.
2 0 0 0 1 2 Dickey left after two errors and
1 2 0 0 0 2 a walk helped the Rays load the
1 0 0 0 0 2 bases with one out in the eighth.
batters in the 6th.
N.Walker, S.Marte).WP- Sergio Santos came on and got
James Loney to ground into a dou-
42,319). ble play on the first pitch.
league Santos gave up Kelly Johnson's
l e RBI double in the ninth but struck
3, Tigers 2 out pinch-hitter Luke Scott for his
Miami first save in three chances.


ab rhbi
1 DSolan2b 4 0 1 0
0 Polanc3b 3 1 1 0
0 Yelichl If 3 1 1 0
0 Stanton rf 4 0 1 3
0 Ruggincf 4 0 0 0
0 Morrsnlb 2 0 1 0
1 Hchvrrss 3 0 0 0
0 K.Hillc 3 1 1 0
0 Koehlerp 1 0 0 0
0 R.Webbp 0 0 0 0
0 Pierre ph 1 0 0 0
0 Quallsp 0 00 0
0 Cishekp 0 00 0






Totals 283 6 3
0 011 000 2
3 000 00x 3
i 2. LOB-Detroit 6, Miami
), Stanton (26). SB Yelich


(10). S-Koehler.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
J.AlvarezL,1-5 22/32 3 3 2 3
Porcello 11/32 0 0 0 1
Putkonen 2 1 0 0 1 1
E.Reed 1 0 0 0 0 1
Veras 1 1 0 0 0 1
Miami
KoehlerW,5-10 51/35 2 2 3 3
R.WebbH,5 12/31 0 0 0 1
QuallsH,15 1 0 0 0 0 1
CishekS,34-36 1 1 0 0 0 1
T-2:51.A-26,992 (37,442).


American League
Indians 12, Twins 6
MINNEAPOLIS Carlos Santana
and Asdrubal Cabrera both had two
doubles and Jason Kipnis was a
homer short of the cycle as the Cleve-
land Indians had 17 hits in a 12-6 vic-
tory over the Minnesota Twins.
With the win and Tampa Bay's loss
at Toronto, the Indians moved into a
tie with the Rays for the top wild card
spot in the American League, one
game ahead of Texas, which beat Los
Angeles.
Indians starter Corey Kluber (11-5)
managed to win his fifth straight
decision.

Rangers 5, Angels 3
ARLINGTON, Texas -Alex Rios
had a tiebreaking RBI single in the sev-
enth inning, and the Texas Rangers fi-
nally gained some ground in the AL
wild-card race with a 5-3 victory over the
Los Angeles Angels.
For the first time during their five-
game winning streak the Rangers
moved closer in the wild-card standings.
Wild-card leader Tampa Bay lost at
Toronto, allowing the Rangers to move
within a game of the Rays and Cleve-
land, which beat Minnesota.


Str Home Away
W-2 53-28 44-35
L-1 51-30 39-40
L-1 44-35 39-42
W-1 46-35 37-42
W-1 39-40 34-47



Str Home Away
W-2 55-24 40-41
L-3 47-34 37-41
L-2 32-47 41-40
L-3 43-38 29-50
W-2 34-45 26-55


x-Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
67 .581 6-4 L-1 51-30
70 .563 3 9-1 W-8 51-30
75 .531 8 5 6-4 W-2 44-37
94 .413 27 24 2-8 L-4 32-47
98 .388 31 28 3-7 L-4 36-43


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
x-St. Louis 95 65 .594 - 8-2 W-4 52-27 43-38
y-Pittsburgh 92 68 .575 3 5-5 W-1 50-31 42-37
y-Cincinnati 90 70 .563 5 6-4 L-3 49-29 41-41
Milwaukee 73 87 .456 22 17 6-4 W-3 37-44 36-43
Chicago 66 94 .413 29 24 3-7 L-1 31-50 35-44


x-Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




x-LA
Arizona
San Diego
San Fran.
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
65 .591 -
71 .556 5/2 1 "
82 .488 16/2 12 5
89 .440 24 191/2
109.319 43/2 39 I


West Division
L Pct GB WC
68 .572 -
79 .503 11 9/2
84 .472 16 14/2
85 .465 17 15/2
87 .453 19 17/2


Str Home
L-2 52-29
W-5 44-35
L-2 39-42
W-2 35-43
L-13 24-55



Str Home
L-2 46-32
L-2 44-34
W-2 45-36
W-2 40-39
L-1 45-36


Associated Press
Tampa Bay starter Jeremy Hellickson, right, is pulled from the game Friday by manager Joe Maddon, left, as
catcher Jose Lobaton, center, looks on during the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays in Toronto. The
Rays lost 6-3.




Rays fall, give up ground


Milwaukee

Aoki rf
Gennett 2b
Lucroy lb
KDavis If
Kintzlr p
Hndrsn p
CGomz cf
Bianchi ss
YBtncr 3b
Maldnd c
Gallard p
JFrncs ph
Wooten p
LSchfr If
Totals
Milwaukee


National League
Braves 1, Phillies 0
ATLANTA- Chris Johnson led off
the eighth inning with a homer to spoil
an otherwise dominant start by Cliff
Lee, Kris Medlen allowed only two hits
in eight innings and the Atlanta Braves
beat the Philadelphia Phillies 1-0.
Johnson's homer to left field
snapped a streak of 16 consecutive
batters retired by Lee (14-8), who al-
lowed only three hits with no walks
and 13 strikeouts in eight innings.
Medlen (15-12) strengthened his
case to be the Braves' Game 1 starter
in the NL division series next week.
He allowed two hits with two walks
and seven strikeouts. He has won five
straight decisions.
Craig Kimbrel pitched a perfect
ninth for his 50th save.

Brewers 4, Mets 2
NEW YORK Norichika Aoki hit a
leadoff homer, Khris Davis connected
three batters later and Yovani Gallardo
pitched the Milwaukee Brewers to a 4-2
victory over the New York Mets.
Martin Maldonado also homered and
Gallardo (12-10) went six innings to end
his inconsistent season with a win. The
right-hander, who won 33 games over
the previous two years, finished 4-1 in
eight starts since returning from a
strained left hamstring.
Jim Henderson pitched a perfect
ninth for his 28th save in 32 tries.

Pirates 4, Reds 1
CINCINNATI Marion Byrd had
three hits, and PedroAlvarez hit a two-
run homer high off the batter's eye,
leading the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 4-1
victory over the Cincinnati Reds in a se-
ries that will decide which could host the
NL wild-card game.
Both teams clinched postseason
berths this week. Whoever wins the
three-game series would be assured of
hosting the one-game playoff on Tues-
day night.
The Pirates still had a long-shot
chance of overtaking St. Louis for the
NL Central title. They need to sweep in
Cincinnati while the Cardinals lose three
at home to the Cubs over the weekend.

Cardinals 7, Cubs 0
ST. LOUIS The St. Louis Cardi-
nals clinched their first NL Central title
in four years, beating the Chicago
Cubs 7-0 behind the strong pitching of
Lance Lynn and home runs by David
Freese and Matt Holliday.
St. Louis (95-65) has won six of
seven and is tied with Atlanta for the
best record in the NL. They are as-
sured of home-field advantage when
the NL division series starts Thursday.

Interleague
Marlins 3, Tigers 2
MIAMI Detroit's Jhonny Peralta
played in his first game since complet-
ing a 50-game suspension, going 1 for
4 with an RBI in the Tigers' 3-2 loss to
the Miami Marlins.
Peralta was suspended for his in-
volvement in the Miami-based Biogen-
esis performance-enhancing lab. His
run-scoring double chased Miami
starter Tom Koehler in the sixth and cut
the Marlins' lead to 3-2.
Giancarlo Stanton drove in three
runs for the Marlins and Koehler (5-10)
pitched 5 1/3 innings, allowing two runs
and five hits while walking three and
striking out three.
Steve Cishek pitched a scoreless
ninth for his 29th consecutive save and
34th in 36 opportunities.


AL


Blue Jays 6, Rays 3


Tampa Bay
ab
Joyce rf-lf 4
Zobrist ss 3
Loneylb 4
Longori 3b 4
DeJess If-cf 4
DYong dh 4
KJhnsn2b 4
Loaton c 3
Scott ph 1
Fuld cf 2
WMyrs ph-rfl1
Totals 34
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Toronto
rhbi ab r h bi
00 0 Reyesss 4 21 0
1 3 1 Kawskdh 2 1 0 0
0 0 0 Lawrie3b 3 1 1 1
1 1 0 Lngrhnlb 0 00 0
0 0 0 Sierra rf 3 12 2
1 1 1 Gosecf 4 1 1 1
0 1 1 DeRosa1b-3b4 00 0
00 0 Goins2b 4 02 1
00 0 Tholec 3 01 0
0 1 0 Pillar If 4 00 0


000
373 Totals
110 000 001
000 420 00x


31 6 8 5
3
6


E-Fuld (1), Longoria 2(11), Dickey (2), Reyes
(9). DP Toronto 2. LOB Tampa Bay 5, Toronto
7.2B-Ke.Johnson (12), Goins (5). HR-Zobrist
(12), D.Young (3). SB-Lawrie (9). S--Kawasaki.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
HellicksonL,12-10 42/36 6 3 2 5
WWright 1 1 0 0 0 3
B.Gomes 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
C.Ramos 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
Ro.Hernandez 0 0 0 0 1 0
Beliveau 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
Lueke 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Toronto
DickeyW,14-13 71/35 2 2 1 3
S.SantosS,1-3 12/32 1 1 0 3
Yankees 3, Astros 2
NewYork Houston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Grndrscf 4 00 0 Villarss 4 01 0
Nunez3b 4 00 0 Altuve2b 3 00 0
Canodh 4 1 1 0 MDmn3b 3 00 0
ASorinl If 3 1 1 0 Kraussdh 2 0 0 0
MrRynllb 4 1 2 1 Elmore pr-dh 0 00 0
DAdms2b 4 0 1 2 Carter lb-lf 3 10 0
ZAImnt rf 4 0 0 0 Crowel If-cf 4 00 0
Ryanss 3 00 0 Hoes rf 4 12 0
JMrphyc 3 0 1 0 Corprnc 4 00 0
BBarnscf 2 0 1 0
Wallac ph-lb 2 0 1 2
Totals 33 36 3 Totals 31 2 5 2
NewYork 000 300 000 3
Houston 000 000 200 2
E-M.Dominguez (16). LOB-New York 4,
Houston 7. 2B-A.Soriano (8), D.Adams (5),
J.Murphy (1), Wallace (14). SB-Villar (18).
CS-Elmore (6).


NewYork
Warren W,3-2
D.Phelps H,1
Chamberlain H,5
Claiborne H,4
D.Robertson S,3-5
Houston


IP H RERBBSO

5 2 0 0 1 4
12/31 2 2 2 1
1/3 2 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 1


OberholtzerL,4-5 51/35 3 2 1 4
Zeid 12/30 0 0 0 3
K.Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 1
Fields 1 1 0 0 0 2
Red Sox 12,
Orioles 3
Boston Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Ellsurycf 4 0 0 0 BRortsdh 4 1 2 0
BrdlyJrcf 0 1 0 0 Markks rf 3 00 0
Pedroia 2b 4 2 3 0 Pearce ph-rf 0 00 0
Holt2b 0 00 0 A.Jonescf 4 1 1 2
D.Ortizdh 5 22 3 Pridiecf 0 00 0
Napolilb 3 1 1 1 C.Davislb 3 12 1
BSnydr pr 0 0 0 0 Valenci ph-3b 1 0 1 0
Nava rf 5 22 3 Wietersc 4 00 0
JGomslf 4 3 3 1 DJhnsnlb 0 00 0
Sltlmchc 4 1 1 1 Hardyss 3 01 0
Lvrnwy ph-c 1 0 0 0 CSnydrc 1 00 0
Drewss 4 0 2 3 McLothl If 4 00 0
Bogartsph 1 0 1 0 Schoop2b 4 00 0
Mdlrks 3b 5 0 1 0 Flahrty 3b-ss 3 0 1 0
Totals 40121612 Totals 34 3 8 3
Boston 503 000 031 12
Baltimore 002 001 000 3
DP-Boston 1, Baltimore 2. LOB-Boston 6,
Baltimore 5. 2B-Napoli (37), Saltalamacchia
(40). 3B-Drew (8). HR-D.Ortiz (30), Nava (12),
J.Gomes (13), A.Jones (33), C.Davis (53).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
BuchholzW,12-1 7 7 3 3 0 4
Breslow 1 1 0 0 1 1
Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
FeldmanL,5-6 21/38 8 8 1 1
Z.Britton 32/35 0 0 0 2
S.Johnson 12/30 2 2 3 3
Belfiore 11/33 2 2 1 0
Rangers 5, Angels 3


Los Angeles
ab
Aybarss 4
Calhon rf 3
Trout dh 2
JHmltn cf 4
HKndrc 2b 4
Trumolb 3
Congerc 4
Cowgill If 3
Shuckph 1
AnRmn3b 3
Totals 31
Los Angeles
Texas


Texas
rhbi ab rhbi
0 1 0 Kinsler2b 2 2 0 0
1 2 1 Andrusss 4 12 0
0 0 0 Rios rf 3 21 2
0 1 2 ABeltre3b 3 00 0
0 1 0 Przynsc 3 0 1 2
00 0 JeBakrdh 2 00 0
0 1 0 Profarph-dh 1 00 0
00 0 Morlndlb 3 01 0
0 0 0 Gentry If 4 01 0
22 0 LMartncf 4 01 0
383 Totals 29 5 7 4
001 020 000 3
102 000 20x 5


E-J.Gutierrez (2). DP-Los Angeles 1, Texas 3.
LOB-Los Angeles 5, Texas 9. SB-R ios 2 (42),
L.Martin (35). CS-Calhoun (2), Rios (7). S-An-
drus. SF-Calhoun.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles


C.Wilson
J.Gutierrez L,1-5
Boshers
Cor.Rasmus
Brasier
Texas
Ogando
Frasor
Cotts W,7-3


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Boston 12, Baltimore 3
Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 3
Miami 3, Detroit 2
Texas 5, L.A. Angels 3
Cleveland 12, Minnesota 6
Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 1
N.Y Yankees 3, Houston 2
Oakland at Seattle, late
Today
L.A. Angels (Richards 7-7) at Texas (D.Holland 10-9),
12:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kazmir9-9) at Minnesota (DeVries 0-1), 1:05
p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 9-7) atToronto (Happ 4-7), 1:07 p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 12-7) at Seattle (Maurer 4-8), 4:10
p.m.
Boston (Lester 15-8) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-7), 7:05
p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 14-8) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-6), 7:10
p.m.
Kansas City (Ventura 0-0) at Chicago White Sox
(Er.Johnson 2-2), 7:10 p.m.
N.YYankees (Pettitte 10-11) at Houston (Clemens 4-6),
7:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Miami 3, Detroit 2
Milwaukee 4, N.Y Mets 2
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 1
Atlanta 1, Philadelphia 0
St. Louis 7, Chicago Cubs 0
Washington at Arizona, late
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late
San Diego at San Francisco, late
Today
Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 14-11),
1:05 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 10-13) at San Francisco (Petit
4-0), 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (J.Nelson 0-0) at N.Y Mets (Harang 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 14-8) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-6),
7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Undecided) at Atlanta (Minor 13-8),
7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 8-17) at St. Louis (J.Kelly
9-5), 7:15 p.m.
Washington (Haren 9-14) atArizona (McCarthy 5-10),
8:10 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 8-9) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke
15-3), 9:10 p.m.

With two games left in the regular
season, the Rangers still have a chance
to go to the postseason for the fourth
year in a row.

Red Sox 12, Orioles 3
BALTIMORE Clay Buchholz al-
lowed three runs over seven innings as
the AL East champion Boston Red Sox
routed the Baltimore Orioles 12-3 and
moved closer to securing home-field
advantage throughout the postseason.
Daniel Nava and David Ortiz hit
three-run homers, Jarrod Saltalamac-
chia had a three-run shot overturned by
replay.
Dustin Pedroia had three hits for the
Red Sox would clinch the AL's best
record with another win or a loss by
Oakland, which played Seattle later
Friday.

Yankees 3, Astros 2
HOUSTON David Robertson got
the save as Mariano Rivera looked on,
and the New York Yankees got a
glimpse of their future in a 3-2 win over
Houston that sent the Astros to their
team-record 13th consecutive loss.
David Adams hit a two-run double
and Mark Reynolds also drove in a run
for the Yankees, who stopped a four-
game losing streak.

Royals 6, White Sox 1
CHICAGO James Shields struck
out 10 and scattered four hits over
seven innings for his 100th career win,
and the Kansas City Royals beat
Chicago 6-1 to ensure the White Sox of
their worst record since 1970.
Shields (13-9) gave up just one run
and walked one.
Billy Butler led the Royals with three
hits and two RBIs, while Emilio Bonifa-
cio drove in two runs with two hits.


ScheppersH,25 1 0 0 0 0 2
Nathan S,42-45 1 0 0 0 0 0
Indians 12, Twins 6


Cleveland


Minnesota


ab r h bi
Brantly If 5 0 1 0 Presley cf
Swisherlb 6 1 2 0 Dozier2b
Kipnis2b 5 2 3 2 Doumitrf
CSantn dh 3 3 2 1 Arcia dh
Raburn rf 5 0 1 2 Pintoc
MCarsnrf 0 00 0 CHrmnc
AsCarr ss 5 2 3 1 Plouffe 3b
YGomsc 5 0 1 1 Parmellb
Aviles3b 5 1 2 2 Mstrnn If
Stubbscf 4 3 2 2 Flormnss
Totals 43121711 Totals
Cleveland 430 020 012


ab r h bi
5022
5000
5120
4000
1010
2000
3131
3100
4220
4113
366116
-5 1 2 0
4 0 0 0
1 0 1 0
2 0 0 0
3 1 3 1
3 1 0 0
4 2 2 0
4 1 1 3
366 11 6
12


Minnesota 000 123 000 6
DP-Cleveland 2, Minnesota 1. LOB-Cleveland
8, Minnesota 6. 2B-Swisher (26), Kipnis (36),
C.Santana 2 (38), As.Cabrera 2 (35). 3B-Kipnis
(4). HR-Stubbs (10), Florimon (9). SB-Stubbs
(17).


Cleveland
KluberW,11-5
R.Hill
C.C.Lee H,1
Rzepczynski H,5
Masterson
MAlbers
Minnesota
RHernandez L,3-3
Martis
Hendriks
Duensing


IP H RERBBSO

51/310 6 6 1 5
1/3 1 0 0 0 0
1/3 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 3
1 0 0 0 0 0

12/37 6 6 1 1
21/32 1 1 0 0
42/38 5 5 2 8
1/3 0 0 0 1 0


Rays schedule
Sept. 28 at Toronto
Sept. 29 at Toronto


East Division
L Pct GB WC
65 .594 -
75 .528 10/2 5/2
87 .456 22 17
88 .450 23 18
100.375 35 30


NL

Braves 1, Phillies 0


Philadelphia


51/38 3 3 3 4
2/3 0 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 2


Indians tie for

wild-card lead,

Rangers close in

Associated Press


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ie




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Royals 6,
White Sox 1
Kansas City Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
AGordnl If 4 1 1 1 JrDnkscf 4 00 0
Bonifac2b 4 1 2 2 GBckh2b 4 1 1 1
Hosmerib 5 1 2 0 AIRmrzss 4 0 2 0
BButlerdh 5 1 3 2 A.Dunndh 4 0 0 0
S.Perezc 4 0 1 0 Konerklb 2 00 0
Maxwllrf 4 00 0 AGarcirf 3 00 0
L.Caincf 4 02 1 Viciedol If 3 0 1 0
Carroll3b 3 1 1 0 Semien3b 3 00 0
AEscorss 4 1 2 0 Pheglyc 3 00 0
Totals 37 6146 Totals 301 4 1
Kansas City 300 102 000 6
Chicago 000 001 000 1
DP-Kansas City 1, Chicago 3. LOB-Kansas
City 7, Chicago 3.2B-A.Gordon (27), Hosmer
(34), B.Butler (27), Carroll (9). 3B-AI.Ramirez
(2). HR-G.Beckham (5). SB-Bonifacio (28),
A.Escobar (22). CS-Carroll (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
ShieldsW,13-9 7 4 1 1 1 10
W.Davis 2 0 0 0 0 2
Chicago
SaleL,11-14 51/39 4 4 1 5
Petricka 12/33 2 2 1 0
Troncoso 1 1 0 0 0 0
Leesman 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Sale (A.Gordon). WP-Leesman.
T-2:37. A-24,474 (40,615).
Cardinals 7, Cubs 0


Chicago

StCastr ss
DMrph 3b
Rizzo 1lb
DNavrr c
Schrhlt rf
Sweeny cf
Bogsvc If
Barney 2b
TrWood p
Raley p
Watkns ph
AlCarr p
BParkr p
HRndn p
Lake ph
Lim p
Totals
Chicago
St. Louis
E-D.Nava


St. Louis


ab r h bi
4 0 3 0 MCrpnt2b
4 0 1 0 Beltranrf
4 0 1 0 SRonsnrf
3 0 1 0 Hollidy If
4 00 0 MAdmslb
4 0 0 0 YMolinc
4 0 1 0 Freese3b
4 0 0 0 Jay cf
0 0 0 0 Kozma ss
1 0 0 0 Lynn p
1 0 0 0 Siegrist p
0 0 0 0 Mujica p
0 00 0 Wong ph
0 0 0 0 CMrtnz p
1 0 0 0 Rosnthlp
0000
34 070 Totals
000 000 000
301 201 00x
irro (5). DP-Chicago


ab r h bi
3110
2110
3 1 1 0
2 1 1 0
2000
2221
5110
4123
3111
4021
2000
3000
0000
0000
1000
0000
0000
2 2 2 1
5 1 1 0
4 1 2 3




3 1 1 106
4 0 2 1
2 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

31 7106
0
7
2. LOB-


Chicago 8, St. Louis 9. 2B-St.Castro (33),
YMolina (43), Jay (27). HR-Holliday (21),
Freese (9).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Tr.WoodL,9-12 1 4 3 3 2 1
Raley 3 3 3 2 3 3
AI.Cabrera 1 1 0 0 1 0
B.Parker 1 2 1 1 0 1
H.Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lim 1 0 0 0 2 1
St. Louis
LynnW,15-10 6 4 0 0 0 9
Siegrist 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Mujica 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Ca.Martinez 1 1 0 0 0 2
Rosenthal 1 2 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Raley (Holliday), by Lynn (D.Navarro).
T-2:54. A-44,030 (43,975).
Wild card glance
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct WCGB
Cleveland 90 70 .563 -
Tampa Bay 90 70 .563 -
Texas 89 71 .556 1
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct WCGB
z-Pittsburgh 92 68 .575 -
z-Cincinnati 90 70 .563 -
z-clinched playoff berth
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 3
Texas 5, L.A. Angels 3
Cleveland 12, Minnesota 6
Saturday's Games
L.A. Angels at Texas, 12:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Game
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 1
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m.



Glantz-Culver Line
For Sept. 28
NCAA Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Pittsburgh 6/2 5 (50/2) Virginia
N. Illinois 2/2 3/2 (59) at Purdue
atDuke 9 /2 11 /2 (69)Troy
UConn 2/2 Pk(48/2) at Buffalo
at Ball St. Pk 1/2 (67) Toledo
at NC State 24 24 (52) Cent. Michigan
Kent St. Pk 1 (49/2) atW Michigan
at N. Carolina 10 12/2 (61) E. Carolina
FSU 23 23/2 (53/2) at BC
atVanderbilt 23 20 (57) UAB
atl Illinois 24 25 (50/2) Miami(Ohio)
atTCU 192191 (52)SMU
at Missouri 21 21/2 (62/2) Arkansas St.
Iowa +3/2 1/2 (46) at Minnesota
at Colorado St. 11 14 (53) UTEP
at Georgia 3 3 (62) LSU
atWashington 7 9/2 (62) Arizona
atAlabama 13/2 14/2 (55/2) Mississippi
atOregon 31 37 (83) California
atArizona St. 5 4/2 (49) Southern Cal
Army-x +1 Pk(52/2) La. Tech
Texas A&M 14 /215 (62) atArkansas
Oklahoma 2/2 3 /2 (50/2) at N. Dame
at Boise St. 28/2 28 (56/2) So. Miss.
Miami 20 17/2 (47) at USF
at Clemson 28/2 28/2 (581/2) Wake Forest
Temple 101272 (56) at Idaho
atLa.-Monroe 10/2 13 (55/2)Tulane
Houston 3 2/2 (64)atUTSA
atB. Green 14 14/2 (54/2)Akron
at Oregon St. 10/2 11 (59/2) Colorado
S. Carolina 8/2 7 (53) at UCF
Florida 12/2 12/2 (47) at Kentucky
Stanford-y 10 92 (47)Washington St.
Wyoming 10 11/2 (552) atTexas St.
NavyPk 3 (58) at W Kentucky
at Rice 14 132 (52/2)FAU
atTennessee 21 19 (52/2) S. Alabama
at Nevada 7 10 (59/2) AirForce
Oklahoma St. 17 19 (57/2) atW.Virginia
atOhio St. 7/2 6 /2 (55/2) Wisconsin
UNLV Pk 2/2 (54) at New Mexico
San Diego St. 17 17 (54) at N. Mexico St.
Fresno St. 17/2 17/2 (58/2) at Hawaii
x-at Dallas
y-at Seattle
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Pittsburgh-x Pk 3 (42) Minnesota
Baltimore 3/2 3 (44) at Buffalo
Cincinnati 6 4 (42/2) at Cleveland
Indianapolis 7/2 8 (4212)atJ'ville
Seattle 3 2/2 (41/2) at Houston
atTampa Bay 3 2/2 (40/2)Arizona
at Detroit 2 3 (472) Chicago
at Kansas City 4/2 4 (44) N.Y Giants


F the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
4 P__ 4-3-2
SCASH 3 (late)
S5-4-5
fPLAY 4 (early)
i4-8-3-9
PLAY 4 (late)
7-1-7-8
TM
FANTASY 5
1-6-7-9-17
MEGA MONEY
Thursday's winning 10-15 38 40
Ths n MEGA BALL
numbers and payouts: 14
Fantasy 5:6 -11 -19 -24 -32 MEGA MILLIONS
5-of-5 1 winner $207,065.74 9 23 27 49 51
4-of-5 319 $104.50 MEGA BALL
3-of-5 9,106 $10 38
Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.



On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series
(taped)
2 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing (taped)
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Dover 200
8:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series: Las
Vegas
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing AAA Insurance Mid-
west Nationals, Qualifying (same-day tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals
BICYCLING
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) World Ports Classic (taped)
BOXING
10:15 p.m. (HBO) Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr. vs. Bryan Vera
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) South Carolina at Central Florida
12 p.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma State at West Virginia
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Northern Illinois at Purdue
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Miami at South Florida
12 p.m. (FS1) Southern Methodist at Texas Christian
12:30 p.m. (CW) East Carolina at North Carolina
12:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Virginia at Pittsburgh
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Oklahoma at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m. (CBS) LSU at Georgia
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Florida State at Boston College
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Iowa at Minnesota
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Wake Forest at Clemson
4 p.m. (FS1) Army vs. Louisiana Tech
4 p.m. (SUN) Houston at Texas-San Antonio
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Mississippi at Alabama
7 p.m. (FOX) Arizona at Washington
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas A&M at Arkansas
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Kentucky
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Brown at Harvard
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Alabama-Birmingham at Vanderbilt
8 p.m. (ABC) Wisconsin at Ohio State
10 p.m. (ESPN) Stanford at Washington State
10:15 p.m. (ESPNU) Southern Mississippi at Boise State
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) USC at Arizona State
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATourAlfred Dunhill Links
Championship, Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Web.com Tour Championship, Third
Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Champions: Nature Valley First
Tee Open, Second Round
NHL PRESEASON HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NHL) Los Angeles Kings vs. New York Rangers
(taped)
7 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Toronto Maple Leafs
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12:30 p.m. (SUN) BMX Supercross World Cup (taped)
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
7:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) Tottenham Hotspur FC vs Chelsea FC
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Aston Villa FC vs Manchester City FC
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Swansea City AFC vs Arsenal FC
5:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division CruzAzul
vs Club Leon
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Match of the Day (same-day tape)
TENNIS
2 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open, First Semifinal (same-
day tape)
4 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open, Second Semifinal
(same-day tape)
6 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Thailand Open, First Semifinal (same-
day tape)
8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Thailand Open, Second Semifinal
(same-day tape)

RADIO
12:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:07 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue
Jays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
VOLLEYBALL


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 B3


Report: Texas regent
insisted being Saban call
AUSTIN, Texas -A top University of
Texas booster who arranged a tele-
phone conversation with Alabama coach
Nick Saban's agent said the talk lasted
45 minutes.
Tom Hicks, who also is a former Uni-
versity of Texas System regent, told the
Austin American-Statesman this week
that he and Regent Wallace Hall Jr.
probed agent Jimmy Sexton on whether
Saban would be interested in the Long-
horns' football coaching job. Hicks said
Hall also insisted on participating in the
call last January.
The call was first reported last week by
The Associated Press.
Hicks lunched with Mack Brown two
days after the Sexton conversation and
asked if he had considered retirement.
Hicks told the American-Statesman
Brown "had a passion for wanting to
say." In Hicks words, "I said, 'Mack, I'm
glad to hear this passion.'"
Bengals LB Burfict hit
with $31,000 fine by NFL
NEW YORK- Cincinnati Bengals
linebacker Vontaze Burfict was fined
$31,000 by the NFL on Friday for two un-
necessary roughness violations.
Burfict had hit defenseless Packers re-
ceiver James Jones in the head and
neck area, which cost him $21,000, and
then struck Green Bay tight end Ryan
Taylor, costing him $10,000.
Bengals teammate George Iloka was
fined $15,000 for unnecessary rough-
ness when he struck a defenseless
player, tight end Jermichael Finley, in the
head and neck area.




TOUGH
Continued from Page BI

incredible player, but we made him
look even better by not finishing
tackles."
Later in the third, Lecanto impressed
with an 80-yard drive, culminated by a
one-yard run byAnderson to go back up
by a touchdown. The Panthers utilized
the wildcat for much of the drive, as An-
derson consistently picked up short
yardage and Growdon had rushes of 22
and 20 yards.
But the Rattlers' next possession -
the last of the third quarter- started at
midfield, and Riche broke free for a
pair of solid gains on the ground, then
punched it in from one yard out to tie it
up again, 21-21.
Midway through the fourth, it was
Richie yet again, gaining 64 of Belle-
view's 68 yards on a drive that he would
cap off with another one-yard score,
dragging, busting through and outrun-
ning the Panther defense with each
carry, to put the Rattlers on top for the
27-21 final.
Lecanto had an excellent opportunity
with three minutes remaining, taking



AGROUND
Continued from Page BI

Crystal River (2-2 overall, 0-1 dis-
trict) had just 27 yards on 17 opening-
half plays.
"Our defense is pretty good," Beasley
said. "Our front guys are playing at a
high level. It's nice to be able to play
with six in the box and stop the run."
Senior Ty Reynolds helped spark a
51-yard Pirate drive late in the third
quarter when he took a pitch and re-
versed his field for a 25-yard run. The
drive came up empty, however, after
junior Collin Ryan was sacked on
fourth down at the Tigers' 21.
Penalties helped keep alive Crystal
River's lone scoring possession,
which culminated with an 11-yard run
up the middle by sophomore Antonio
Franklin, who had a team-high 64
yards on 11 carries.
Both Reynolds and Ryan shared


atTennessee 5 3% (40) N.Y Jets
Dallas 2/2 1/2 (47) at San Diego
Washington 2/2 3/2 (44) at Oakland
at Denver 11 10/2 (58) Philadelphia
atAtlanta 12 2 (50) New England
Monday
at New Orleans 52 6 /2 (48)Miami
x-at London



Top 25 Football
Schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)


Today, Sept. 28
No.1 Alabamavs. No. 21 Mississippi, 6:30 p.m.
No. 2 Oregon vs. California, 10:30 p.m.
No. 3 Clemson vs.Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. No. 23 Wisconsin, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Stanford at Washington State, 10 p.m.
No. 6 LSU at No. 9 Georgia, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Florida State at Boston College, 3:30 p.m.
No. 10TexasA&M at Arkansas, 7 p.m.
No. 11 Oklahoma State at West Virginia,
Noon
No. 12 South Carolina at UCF, Noon
No. 14 Oklahoma at No. 22 N. Dame, 3:30 p.m.
No. 15 Miami at South Florida, Noon
No. 16 Washington vs. Arizona, 7 p.m.
No. 20 Florida at Kentucky, 7 p.m.
No. 25 Fresno State at Hawaii, 12 Mid.


,..,,- ..^k ^..-w 9 ., .. .. ".. ... . -*- "^

STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Crystal River running back Antonio Franklin gains some valuable yardage in the
game against Dunnellon as Tigers defenders Cole Fagan (54) and William
Burgess (24) give chase at Dunnellon High School on Friday evening.


Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown
received $15,750 in fines for two unnec-
essary roughness violations: $7,875 for
a late hit on Bears safety Chris Conte,
and $7,875 for a face mask on Sherrick
McManis.
Titans linebacker Moise Fokou was
docked $7,875 for unnecessary rough-
ness for a face mask violation.
The NFL also fined Panthers quarter-
back Cam Newton $10,000 for wearing
clips on his helmet visor featuring the
Under Armour logo.
Although the clips that attach Newton's
clear visor to the helmet are small and
difficult to see, the league considers it a
violation of its equipment policy.
NFL rules state that "No visible identifi-
cation of a manufacturer's name or logo on
the exterior of a helmet or on any attach-
ment to a helmet is permitted unless pro-
vided for under a commercial arrangement
between the League and manufacturer."
Nike has a signed contract to be the
NFL's equipment provider. Newton is one
of Under Armour's main clients.
The violation was first pointed in an ar-
ticle Tuesday by Forbes.com.
NCAA turns down USC
request for relief
LOS ANGELES The NCAA has
turned down Southern California's re-
quest for possible relief from the sanc-
tions that have been imposed on the
football program since 2010.
Athletic director Pat Hayden had said
USC felt compelled to discuss the sanc-
tions after the NCAA's recent decision to
lessen the scholarship reductions that
Penn State was hit with after the Jerry
Sandusky scandal.
From wire reports



over at midfield, but turned the ball
over on downs.
"We competed hard, we've just got to
finish and get over the hump," Rolle
said. "At the end of the day, you really
have to execute, and I don't think we to-
tally did that When you don't make the
plays that are there to be made, things
like this happen."
Belleview was able to gain a first
down and have the luxury of running
out the clock to seal the win.
Rolle lamented on the significance of
the early McGee interception returned
for a score.
"That was huge. You start a drive
and you have that momentum, then the
game changes in a second," Rolle said.
'Also that turnover we had (a fumble in
the third quarter that would've re-
sulted in a Lecanto first down before
the ball was lost). It's the little things
that change the complexion of the
game."
D'Andre Horton had some key plays
on defense for Lecanto, including a
fumble recovery and a sack, while Matt
McKibbin caught four passes for 60
yards.
Lecanto heads into a bye week before
travelling to Mitchell on Friday, Oct 11
for a 7:30 p.m. start


time at quarterback, but persistent
pressure from Dunnellon, as well as a
few drops in traffic from their re-
ceivers, helped undermine their
cause and left the Pirates with 14
yards through the air on 13 attempts.
"Our kids were flat and unfocused,"
Crystal River head coach Nate Var-
nadore said. "Right now we've got to
find some people to take the bull by the
horns. We, as a staff, are trying to teach
them to be the right kind of leaders.
"There's not necessarily one thing
to pinpoint," he added. "We're not
where I would like for us to be. It's
part of the growing process, and that's
the way it works, unfortunately"
The Tigers were called for 14 penal-
ties for 115 yards.
Both teams stay in the district this
Friday: Dunnellon travels to Belle-
view, and Crystal River goes to North
Marion. The Colts were upset 13-10 at
Gainesville Eastside on Friday, mak-
ing the Rams and Tigers the only un-
defeated teams in 5A-5 play


I S P RTS B RI FS


TBA Lecanto in Edgewater and Dr. Phillips Tournament
TBA Seven Rivers in OVA Tournament
CROSS COUNTRY
8 a.m. Crystal River in River Ridge Invitational


SCOREBOARD




B4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


Players'


choice


Associated Press
Tiger Woods was voted the PGA Tour player of the year for the 11th time in his career.


Tiger Woods voted PGA player of the year by his peers


Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH -
Tiger Woods was voted PGA Tour
player of the year for the llth time
on the strength of his five big wins
and return to No. 1 in the world.
It was the third time Woods won
the Jack Nicklaus Award despite
not winning a major He made up
for that with two World Golf Cham-
pionships and The Players Cham-
pionship among his five wins. No
one else won more than twice this
year, and Woods won the Vardon
Trophy for lowest scoring average
and the PGA Tour money title.
"It's been an incredible year to
have won five times, two of those
World Golf Championships and
one Players," Woods said on a con-
ference call Friday "It's been just
a fantastic year all around. It's
also an incredible feeling to be
voted by your peers, and to have
that type of respect is something
that's very humbling."
The PGA Tour does not release
the percentage of votes won or
even who finished second.
Jordan Spieth was voted rookie of
the year in a race that likely was no
contest The 20-year-old Texan
began the year with no status on any
tour He won the John Deere Clas-
sic, lost in a playoffat another event,
reached the Tour Championship,
was chosen for the Presidents Cup
team and wound up 10th on the
money list with nearly $4 million.
He will be the youngest Ameri-
can and first PGA Tour rookie
- to play in the Presidents Cup
next week in Ohio.
"I don't know if it's a 'pinch me'
moment yet," Spieth said. "I think
my mind is still really on next week"
Woods was on the ballot with
British Open champion Phil Mick-
elson, Masters champion Adam
Scott, FedEx Cup champion Henrik
Stenson and Matt Kuchar Mickel-
son also won the Phoenix Open and


Jordan Spieth was voted the PGA Tour rookie of the year.


was runner-up in the U.S. Open for
the sixth time. Along with his first
major, Scott won The Barclays. If ei-
ther of them had won the Tour
Championship, three wins and a
major might have won some votes
over five big wins and no majors.
Mickelson, with more wins (42)
and majors (five) than any player
except for Woods dating to the
Tom Watson generation, has never
been PGA Tour player of the year,
No. 1 in the world ranking or won
a PGA Tour money title.
The Jack Nicklaus Award began
in 1990. In 24 years, Woods has
won it 11 times and only two other
players have won it twice Fred
Couples (1991, 1992) and Nick
Price (1993,1994). It was the fourth
time in the last five years that the
winner did not capture a major
Woods nearly made it a clean
sweep of all the awards. Steve
Stricker narrowly beat him out for
the Byron Nelson Award with a 65
on the final day at East Lake in the
Tour Championship. That award is
for lowest scoring average, though
it is not as prestigious as the Var-
don Trophy from the PGA ofAmer-


ica. The Vardon Trophy dates to
1937 and requires 60 rounds (in-
stead of 50 for the PGA Tour's ver-
sion of the award) with no
incomplete rounds.
It was the first time since 2009,
right before his personal life un-
raveled, that Woods won these
awards. Even though he has more
of them than anyone in history, he
said that it doesn't get old.
"I know how hard it is," Woods
said. "I've had to work my way
back from injuries on numerous
occasions throughout the years.
These last couple years is no ex-
ception to that There were a lot of
people saying I could never win
again, and two years later I've got
eight wins on our tour. I'm very
proud of where I've come from,
from being ranked outside the top
50 to being ranked where I am
now, and to have had the success
that I've had this year just makes
it all the more rewarding."
Woods said his biggest win this
year was at The Players Champi-
onship, mainly because it's the
one golf course he plays regularly
that has given him fits.


49ers regain footing


in rout of Rams


Associated Press

ST LOUIS Colin
Kaepernick threw two touch-
down passes, Frank Gore had
his first 100-yard game of the
season and the San Francisco
49ers' defense stepped up
without some of their stars in
a 35-11 rout over the St Louis
Rams on Thursday night.
Anquan Boldin had five
catches for 90 yards and a
touchdown, and Gore had
153 yards on 20 carries and a
34-yard score for San Fran-
cisco (2-2), which was
outscored 46-10 the previous
two games. Navarro Bow-
man had two of the 49ers'
five sacks with a strip lead-
ing to a fourth-quarter scor-
ing run by Anthony Dixon.
The Rams (1-3) had an
overtime win and tie against
San Francisco last year, and
took the early lead Thursday
before falling flat Greg Zuer-
lein banged in a 40-yard field
goal off the right upright to
end a nine-game scoring
drought in the first quarter,

NFL standings


New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh

Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y Giants
Washington

New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay

Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota

Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


AFC
East
W L T
3 0 0
3 0 0
2 1 0
1 2 0
South
W L T
2 1 0
2 1 0
2 1 0
0 3 0
North
W L T
2 1 0
2 1 0
1 2 0
0 3 0
West
W L T
3 0 0
3 0 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
NFC
East
W L T
2 1 0
1 2 0
0 3 0
0 3 0
South
W L T
3 0 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
0 3 0
North
W L T
3 0 0
2 1 0
1 2 0
0 3 0
West
W L T
3 0 0
2 2 0
1 2 0
1 3 0


Thursday's Game
San Francisco 35, St. Louis 11
Sunday's Games
N.Y Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets atTennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday's Game
Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m.


but the 49ers answered with
28 straight points.
The 49ers came close to a
Super Bowl title in February
and regained their footing
against the team that gave
them the most trouble last
season. Minus cornerback
Nnamdi Asomugha and line-
backers Patrick Willis and
Aldon Smith, they quieted a
raucous, hopeful crowd.
Kaepernick had no touch-
down passes and four inter-
ceptions the previous two
weeks and completed fewer
than 50 percent of his passes.
He was 15 for 23 for 167 yards.
Boldin had a monster
debut with the 49ers after
helping the Ravens beat San
Francisco in the Super Bowl,
but had been quiet along
with the rest of the offense
the previous two weeks. He
had two highlight catches in
the second quarter, a 42-
yarder despite Cortland
Finnegan getting flagged for
holding, and a 20-yard score
capped by a dive into the end
zone after barely avoiding
the sideline.

Thursday, Oct. 3
Buffalo at Cleveland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 6
Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Kansas City atTennessee, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Miami, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Wash-
ington
Monday, Oct. 7
N.Y Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m.
Late Thursday

49ers 35, Rams 11
San Francisco 0 14 7 14 35
St. Louis 3 0 0 8- 11
First Quarter
StL-FG Zuerlein 40, 7:09.
Second Quarter
SF-Boldin 20 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson
kick), 6:22.
SF-Gore 34 run (Dawson kick), :37.
Third Quarter
SF-V.Davis 12 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson
kick), 8:49.
Fourth Quarter
SF-Dixon 1 run (Dawson kick), 10:15.
StL-Kendricks 6 pass from Bradford (Cunning-
ham run), 5:44.
SF-Hunter 29 run (Dawson kick), 4:25.
A-56,640.
SF StL
First downs 19 14
Total Net Yards 370 188
Rushes-yards 40-219 19-18
Passing 151 170
Punt Returns 1-0 6-19
Kickoff Returns 0-0 3-74
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 15-23-0 19-41-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-16 5-32
Punts 7-54.7 11-44.5
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-1
Penalties-Yards 10-85 8-82
Time of Possession 31:45 28:15
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-San Francisco, Gore 20-153, Hunter
11-49, Kaepernick 3-11, Dixon 3-6, James 3-0.
St. Louis, Richardson 12-16, Cunningham 4-6,
Bradford 3-(minus 4).
PASSING-San Francisco, Kaepernick 15-23-0-
167. St. Louis, Bradford 19-41-1-202.
RECEIVING-San Francisco, Boldin 5-90, Miller
3-22, Baldwin 2-19, V.Davis 2-18, Hunter 1-9,
V.McDonald 1-9, Patton 1-0. St. Louis, Pettis 5-
59, Givens 4-49, Cook 4-45, Austin 2-6, Cun-
ningham 1-17, Quick 1-12, Richardson 1-8,
Kendricks 1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-San Francisco, Daw-
son 53 (WR), 71 (WL).


LSU-UGA highlights week to reshape rankings


Associated Press

Finally, a college football week-
end with real potential to reshape
the rankings and shake up the na-
tional championship race.
The fifth Saturday of the season
features four games matching
ranked teams, highlighted by No. 6
LSU at No. 9 Georgia. Eight more
ranked teams play road games of
varying degrees of difficulty
Last weekend's schedule pro-
duced mostly blowouts, and
when it was over it was as if it
never happened. The top 14
teams in the AP Top 25 held
their spots from the week be-
fore, and no team moved up
more than one place.
This Saturday could end with
a couple of teams saying good-
bye to their national champi-
onship hopes, and maybe a few
new teams being taken more se-
riously as contenders.
Georgia wraps up the toughest
September schedule in the
country with its third game
against a top-10 opponent.
The Bulldogs (2-1) split with
Clemson and South Carolina to
start the season and now face an
LSU team that is yet again look-
ing like a Southeastern Confer-
ence heavyweight, though the
Tigers are getting it done a little
differently this season.
For the first time in a few years,
LSU's passing game is a strength
instead of a question mark.
Zach Mettenberger has the
sixth best passer rating in the


Associated Press
Georgia head coach Mark Richt, left, leads his No. 9 Bulldogs at home
against No. 6 LSU and head coach Les Miles today in Athens, Ga.


country
"There's a big ceiling on him,"
Bulldogs coach Mark Richt said
of Mettenberger, who originally
attended Georgia but was dis-
missed from the team when, as a
redshirt freshman, he got into
legal trouble over his treatment
of a woman at a bar
LSU receivers Odell Beckham
and Jarvis Landry are making a
case for being the top tandem not
just in the SEC but in the nation.
That should lead to another
increasingly common occur-
rence: high-scoring SEC games.
Georgia, with quarterback
Aaron Murray and tailback Todd
Gurley leading the way, is sev-


enth in the nation in yards per
play at 7.83. LSU is ninth at 7.53.
The other big game in the SEC
takes place in Tuscaloosa, where
No. 1 Alabama faces No. 21
Mississippi.
The Rebels spread it out and
play fast like Texas A&M, but
Ole Miss presents very different
challenges.
"Even though the offenses
maybe similar, the philosophies
are not the same," Tide coach
Nick Saban said.
No. 4 Ohio State faces its first
stiff test of the season when No.
24 Wisconsin comes to Ohio Sta-
dium on Saturday night.
No. 22 Notre Dame is an un-


derdog for the second straight
season to Oklahoma. Of course,
that didn't stop the Fighting
Irish from beating the Sooners
in Norman last year Any hope
the Irish have of getting back to
the BCS title game would be
dashed with a second loss.
The picks:
MAIN EVENT
No. 6 LSU (plus 3) at No. 9 Georgia
Les Miles and Mark Richt have
split four meeting between Tigers
and 'Dawgs ... LSU 35-28.
MARQUEE MATCHUPS
No. 21 Mississippi (plus 16) at No.
1 Alabama
Tide has won nine straight against
Rebels ... ALABAMA 30-17.
No. 24 Wisconsin (plus 7) at No. 4
Ohio State
Buckeyes' depth chart lists QBs
Braxton Miller and Kenny Guiton as
co-starters ... OHIO STATE 28-20.
No. 14 Oklahoma (minus 3 1/2) at
No. 22 Notre Dame
Irish averaging only 114 yards
rushing ... OKLAHOMA 24-17.
UPSET SPECIAL
No. 12 South Carolina (minus 7)
atUCF
Blake Bortles might be best QB
Gamecocks face this season, and
their pass defense has been shaky
...UCF 31-24.
BEST BET
Arizona (plus 9) at No. 16
Washington ... Wildcats will gladly


play at Huskies' furious pace,
which is good news for UW
....WASHINGTON 45-24.
PLUCKY UNDERDOGS
No. 5 Stanford (minus 10) at
Washington State ... STANFORD
35-21.
No. 10 Texas A&M (off) at
Arkansas ... TEXAS A&M 47-21.
No. 20 Florida (minus 13) at Ken-
tucky ... FLORIDA 28-13.
Cougars are improved and Cardi-
nal will be without top OG David
Yankey (family issues) for full game
and star DB Ed Reynolds (targeting
ejection) for first half. Razorbacks
might not be so plucky if QB Bran-
don Allen (shoulder) misses second
straight game. Maybe a change at
quarterback for Gators gives Wild-
cats chance to snap 26-game losing
streak in series?
MISMATCHES
California (plus 36 1/2) at No. 2
Oregon ... OREGON 56-21.
Wake Forest (plus 28) at No. 3
Clemson ... CLEMSON 49-14.
No. 8 Florida State (minus 21 1/2)
at Boston College ... FLORIDA
STATE 38-10.
No. 11 Oklahoma State (minus
19) at West Virginia ... OKLAHOMA
STATE 42-17.
No. 15 Miami (minus 18 1/2) at
South Florida ... MIAMI 33-10.
No. 25 Fresno State (minus 18
1/2) at Hawaii ... FRESNO STATE
42-17.


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 8 FSU heads into Boston to fac


Associated Press

BOSTON It doesn't get any
easier for Boston College.
After a humbling 35-7 loss to
Southern California in their pre-
vious game, the Eagles return
from their bye week to play No. 8
Florida State on Saturday It will
be the first ranked opponent for
new BC coach Steve Addazio
since arriving in Chestnut Hill,
and the Seminoles (3-0, 1-0 At-
lantic Coast Conference) are the
defending conference champions.
BC defensive lineman Kasim
Edibali called it a perfect
opportunity
But the Eagles (2-1, 1-0) are
still trying to rebuild a program
that won just two games last sea-
son and posted double-digit


losses for just the second time in
school history Now they face a
Florida State team that won its
first three games by a combined
score of 157-26. Freshman quar-
terback Jameis Winston has
eight touchdown passes and
only 14 incompletions.
Here are five things to watch
on Saturday:
Stop the run
Florida State's biggest con-
cern on defense could be Andre
Williams, who is the leading
rusher in the ACC. He gained
318 yards in BC's first two games,
but the Seminoles will look at
what Southern Cal did on Sept.
14 to hold him to just 38 yards on
17 carries. "When teams have a
powerful running back, a great
0-line, then that's when we


come in and say, 'OK, it's on us to
win this game,"' Florida State
linebacker Telvin Smith said.
"It's on us to stop these boys up
front That's the challenge we're
presented with and that's what
we're going to go out and do."
'Noles on the ground
It could be a long day for
Boston College if the Florida
State running backs get loose.
Devonta Freeman leads the
team with 273 yards and two
touchdowns on only 28 carries,
with two games in a row of at
least 100 yards. The BC run de-
fense ranks No. 81 in FBS, al-
lowing more than 177 yards per
game.
Eagles in the air
The Boston College offense


works best when quarterback
Chase Rettig is finding receiver
Alex Amidon often. A first-team
All-ACC selection as a junior,
Amidon set a school record last
season with 1,210 receiving
yards. Rettig is completing more
than 60 percent of his passes, but
he threw for only 83 yards in the
loss to USC.
BC aggressive
Seminoles quarterback
Jameis Winston has eight touch-
down passes and only 14 incom-
pletions in three games, but the
Eagles think the key to slowing
him down is to put pressure on
him. In all, Winston is 50-for-64
for 718 yards. He has thrown one
interception and been sacked
three times. BC has four inter-
ceptions and eight sacks in its


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


hy's


IawUCF stands


l w in No. 12
a USC's way


UF QB makes

first career start

at Kentucky

Associated Press

LEXINGTON, Ky. Florida
players want to continue their
dominance over Kentucky The
Wildcats are determined to
snap their 26-game losing streak
to the 20th-ranked Gators.
Something has to give when
the schools meet in Saturday
night's Southeastern Confer-
ence game in Lexington, where
Florida (2-1, 1-0) will try to re-
group after a staggering week of
season-ending injuries to key
players. Kentucky (1-2) begins
SEC play after a bye motivated
to beat the Gators for the first
time since 1986 and put an end
to discussions about the losing
streak.
For added intrigue, former
Kentucky coach Joker Phillips
returns to face the school he led
for three seasons before being
fired last November Phillips
hasn't talked publicly about his
return and the Wildcats have
said their priority is beating the
Gators.
"We've talked about it some,"
Kentucky senior linebacker
Avery Williamson said of the
streak. "We just have to go in
there with an attitude and come
out with a win....
'Just going out there and wor-
rying about playing, that's the
biggest thing. We don't even
worry about it."
Florida's run against Ken-
tucky is the longest active streak
over a major opponent in an an-
nual series. The closest the Wild-
cats have come against the
Gators was a 45-37 outcome in
2007; blowouts have been the
norm since then including a 38-0
shutout last year in Gainesville.
Florida players don't want
anything to change, they like
things the way they are.
"Don't want to be on that
end," Gators right tackle Kyle
Koehne said. "I've gone 4-0
against UK in my career, so I'm
looking to keep it undefeated."
Added left tackle D.J.
Humphries, "Twenty-six
straight? Time to make it 27
then."


'" *" ... ". "I
Ih R A. 9 ". .-. ... ...: ~ *
Associated Press
Florida quarterback Tyler Murphy threw for 134 yards and a touchdown, rushed for 84 yards and another
TD in the Gators' 34-17 win over Tennessee last Saturday.


Here are some things to
watch as Florida's 26-game win-
ning streak against Kentucky
continues or ends on Saturday
night:
Filling big shoes
Florida's second-ranked de-
fense lost 6-foot-2, 285-pound
defensive tackle Dominique
Easley to a season-ending knee
injury this week. The Gators
now turn to junior Leon Orr and
senior Damien Jacobs with Dar-
ious Cummings and Jay-nard
Bostwick waiting on deck.
Easley's loss leaves them with-
out a disruptive line presence
who had four quarterback hur-
ries and two tackles for loss de-


spite being double teamed.
Kentucky's QB
The Wildcats' starting quarter-
back could be a game-time deci-
sion driven mostly by the
matchup against Florida's stingy
defense. Kentucky's bye week
gave Maxwell Smith more time
to recover from an injured shoul-
der sustained against Louisville
and a good week of practice
makes him probable to start.
That said, the Wildcats' desire to
establish the line of scrimmage
and create a dual threat might
lead to the mobile Jalen Whitlow
getting the nod to keep the
Gators guessing before alternat-
ing with Smith, the better passer


Murphy's law
Jeff Driskel's season-ending
leg injury thrust little-used red-
shirt junior Tyler Murphy into
action for Florida against Ten-
nessee, but he didn't look like
someone who had thrown just
one pass in four years in leading
the Gators' 34-17 victory Mur-
phy threw for 134 yards and
touchdown, rushed for 84 and
another TD in the Gators' win.
He will get his first career start
against the Wildcats. Kentucky
views Murphy as similar to
Driskel in his ability to run and
throw, not allowing the Wildcats
to focus on one aspect of his
game.


Knightspose

tough test for

Gamecocks

Associated Press

ORLANDO South Carolina
coach Steve Spurrier has fond
memories of the state of Florida.
At the University of Florida he
arguably set the standard in a
state that at the time also included
coaches like Bobby Bowden.
After a brief NFL stint,
Spurrier returned to the college
ranks in 2005 with South Carolina
and played his first game that
year against a Sunshine State
team, thumping a UCF program
that was then not even a blip on
college football's national stage.
Eight years later no one is sur-
prised with what Spurrier has
done with the No. 12 Gamecocks
(2-1). But a 3-0 start and upset
win over Penn State last week
puts the Knights in position to
garner some of that elusive na-
tional attention.
Spurrier recognizes the chal-
lenge and he isn't downplaying
this road game. He expects to be
a hostile environment for the
Knights' first sellout since 2011.
"Oh yeah, they know scenario.
They know the circumstances
that we're in," Spurrier said.
"They know it's going to be loud
and it's an opportunity for South
Carolina to take our football
show on the road and see what
we can do. Hopefully we can
play very well. It's the opportu-
nity that's out there for us."
UCF is just 1-24 all-time
against ranked teams and 2-14
opposite Southeastern Confer-
ence opponents. The Knights
led Missouri at home last season
before faltering late.
It's why UCF linebacker Ter-
rance Plummer said no one in
their locker room needs extra
incentive.
"It's what we worked so hard
for during the summer win-
ning these non-conference
games," Plummer said. "I think
you can see from our non-con-
ference schedule we've sched-
uled some good opponents.
We're going to go out there and
see how we match up with some
of the best"


USF eyes opportunity to surprise No. 15 Miami


Associated Press

TAMPA-Miami is off to
its best start in nine years,
and South Florida coach
Willie Taggart believes the
15th-ranked Hurricanes
are on the verge of re-
claiming a spot among the
nation's elite.
Taggart grew up in
nearby Bradenton, rooting
for Florida State during a
time when Miami (3-0) was
one of college football's
most dominant programs.
The 'Canes are looking
to begin a season with four
straight victories for the
first time since 2004 when
they face winless USF (0-
3), which is still chasing its
first win under Taggart.
Taggart concedes it will
be difficult to get it Satur-
day because Miami, in his
eyes, is a team that doesn't
have a real weakness.
"They're back... butwe'll
be ready," the first-year
USF coach said. "We're not
going to bow down to them,
that's for sure."


Miami's promising start
includes a 21-16 victory
over No. 20 Florida. The
Hurricanes are coming off
a 77-7 blowout of over-
matched Savannah State.
Taggart left Western
Kentucky last December to
take over a team that
dropped nine of its final 10
games under former coach
Skip Holtz. The Bulls (0-3)
opened with a lopsided
loss to Football Champi-
onship Subdivision foe
McNeese State, and con-
tinued to sputter offen-
sively in losses to Michigan
State and Florida Atlantic.
Still, Taggart is optimistic
about turning his struggling
program around. USF has
yielded five defensive
touchdowns on turnovers,
one more TD than the Bulls
have scored on offense.
Penn State transfer
Steven Bench becomes
USF's third starting quar-
terback in four games.
Miami boasts a defense
that has allowed three TDs
in three games.


Associated Press
Despite USF's 0-3 record, Miami running back Duke
Johnson lauded the Bulls' defensive front seven.


"You really haven't seen
our offense yet," Taggart
said. "We're not a team
built to come from behind
yet ... If we go out and play
like we're capable, I think
we have a shot."
Miami running back
Duke Johnson is expecting
a tough test.
"Their record doesn't
say anything about their
team, at all, especially on
the defensive side," John-


son said "Their front four
is their strength, but their
linebackers are no joke,
also. Their front seven,
they take pride in it and
they have good reason to."
Some things to look at
while Miami looks to build
on its best start since the
'Canes won six straight to
begin the season in 2004:
Off the bench
Matt Floyd lost USF's
starting quarterback job


during the season opener,
and Bobby Eveld was less
than a quarter into his sec-
ond start, when Taggart
turned to Bench, who had
limited success against
FAU, yet impressed the
coaching staff enough to
earn Saturday's start.
"He's still not there where
he knows our offense com-
pletely, so we've got to be
smart with what ask him to
do," Taggart said. "We
don't need him to be Tom
Brady We want him to be
Steven Bench."
Guessing game
Miami already had two
practices completed this
week, including one of its
major game plan-installa-
tion sessions, before get-
ting word that USF was
starting Bench. The bad
news for Miami is that
there simply isn't much
film on the sophomore.
But the good news is that
what film there is, it's pri-
marily against Florida At-
lantic a team the
Hurricanes are familiar


with, given that they beat
the Owls in Week 1.
Morris' ankle
Miami QB Stephen Mor-
ris got quite the initial
scare last weekend when
his right ankle got hit, and
when the Hurricanes
started practice this week
he wasn't able to fully par-
ticipate. But Miami ex-
pected all along that its
quarterback would be
ready to go against USF, a
team he threw for 413
yards against last season.
(That's nine more than he
has this season, total.) The
Hurricanes obviously
wouldn't complain if he got
rolling before the Atlantic
Coast Conference opener
against Georgia Tech next
weekend.
Emerging star
Running back Marcus
Shaw has been USF's most
consistent and produc-
tive player on offense,
rushing for 398 yards and
one touchdown, while av-
eraging 7 yards per carry


r


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 BS



e Eagles

first three games. "He's only a
freshman," BC defensive back
James McCaffrey said. "If you
get on him, he may make some
mistakes."
Don't look ahead
This is the easiest part of
Florida State's schedule, having
just beaten two non-conference
schools by a combined 100
points and heading into games
against BC and Maryland the
bottom two teams in the At-
lantic Division last season.
After a bye, the Seminoles visit
No. 3 Clemson, host No. 15
Miami two weeks after that and
then have two more ACC games
before finishing up with Idaho
and No. 20 Florida. BC faces
Army next weekend and then
goes to Clemson.


I ,




B6 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 AUTO RACING CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-% -s-&-



-2 ~*~'~"" -. -
* tk- .-. V


BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Shannon Kennedy (No. 20) battles Jason Terry in a recent race at the Citrus County Speedway. Kennedy earned his third Mini Stock feature
win last Saturday in the 10-car race, but hopes larger fields will soon return to the track.


Mini Stocks allow Shannon Kennedy to have fn while racing


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Shannon Kennedy's introduction to local
racing was an innocuous one. Random, even.
"I just saw (a stock car) on the side of the
road one day, and it looked fun," recalled
Kennedy who grew up attending NASCAR
events along the East Coast with his father "I
crashed it two races later and bought two
more the next week."
But Kennedy, a veterinarian who owns Flo-
ral City Animal Clinic, soon became more se-
riously invested. While intermittently driving
his No. 20 Mini Stock, he has two other Mini
Stocks and a Pure Stock that see action, and
he and his clinic are the major sponsor behind
today's 50-lap Mini Stock event
"I advertise here (at the Citrus County
Speedway)," Kennedy said, "and have my
signs here, and part of that deal is that I spon-
sor a race once a year and put a lot of the prize
money in."
The ultimate prize will be $600 to the win-
ner Other local businesses, including Save
Mart, Extreme Decals, Allen's R.V, Advance
Towing, Flanagan Enterprise and track pho-
tographer Butch Crawford, have chipped in
with Kennedy to help offer multiple prizes for
the race, including ones for Hard Charger and
Fast Qualifier awards. Bill Ryan's Signs has
supplied the T-shirts and signs.


Kennedy scored his third feature win as
well as third heat win of the season last Sat-
urday He started in the back row, but had the
lead for good by lap 9 in the roughly 10-car
race. Despite the impressive win, Kennedy
doesn't consider it a favorite moment in his
three years of competing. He prefers the bus-
tle of a more crowded race.
"Winning is fun," he said. "But probably
some of the best moments I've had are when
the car count was a lot higher I had a race out
here one week where I think we had 20 cars. It
was the biggest race I was ever in. I think I
crossed the finish the line three-wide with two
or three other drivers. I think I ended up fin-
ishing fourth or fifth, but that was probably
about the most fun I've ever had here."
Kennedy hopes the track can return to those
kinds of numbers.
"It's about cars and about passing cars and
about racing," he said. "I mean, tonight we
blew their doors off, but it probably wasn't the
most fun I've ever had. It's whenever there's a
big pack of cars, and that's something we don't
have right now We're way down on the num-
ber of cars that race here."
In order to juggle the work required for his
stable of cars, Kennedy has some helping
hands and has a Tuesday ritual at Ryan-
Markland Signs, Inc., across the street from the
Speedway where the cars get their treatment
"It's a pretty big crew of us that work on


them -Jerry Daniels, Justin 'Biggins' Wright,
Bill Ryan, Herb Hoeffler," Kennedy said. "We
have team night every Tuesday night We meet
over there, if we can, every Tuesday night and
try to fix, work on and put together, and make
sure everything's right for the next week"
Daniels often drives Flanagan's No. 11 mini
stock, and Ryan occasionally takes out his
No. 19 Pure Stock, as well as the 46 Mini Stock,
which Kennedy says is currently "in pieces."
Kennedy has also sponsored other cars, in-
cluding the No. 48 that Dora Thorne won a
Street Stock championship with in 2012.
Kennedy who lives in Summerfield, rides
when time allows.
"It depends on if my kids are doing some-
thing or what work is doing," he said. "I've
raced the past several weekends, but I don't
race every weekend. We're just having fun and
trying to be competitive."
Having fun is the doc's priority when it
comes to racing, and he said Mini Stocks are
an ideal fit
"I want to see more cars and people that
want to come race," he said. "The reason we
race the Mini Stock class, while we're all com-
petitive, there's not as much money in it
'A lot of these guys come out here and leave
angry, mad and pissed off at each other, but
we're out here just trying to have fun. I don't
know that (our team) will ever have 'race cars.'
We like stock car racing."


Specialty events tonight in Inverness


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

A slate of one-time spe-
cialty events Boat and
Trailer, Suitcase and Flag-
pole races join a 50-lap
Mini Stock feature that
promises a handful of
prizes for drivers tonight
at the Citrus County
Speedway
The Street Stock, Pure
Stock and regular Figure 8
(pure and street stocks)
classes are also on the
card.
A prize of $600 goes to
the winner of the Mini
Stock feature, sponsored


by Dr Shannon Kennedy's
Floral City Animal Clinic.
Save Mart and Extreme
Decals are each donating
$100 to the payout Allen's
R.V is offering $50 apiece
for the Hard Charger
award and the fastest qual-
ifier, while Advance Tow-
ing ($50 to fastest
qualifier), Flanagan Enter-
prise ($50 to Hard Charger)
and track photographer
Butch Crawford ($35 to
halfway leader) are also
adding to the allotment.
Kennedy came from the
back row to notch his third
Mini Stock feature win last
Saturday Dade City's


Kevin Stone sits atop the
standings with a 49-point
lead after collecting a divi-
sion-high four feature
wins. He's trailed by Jason
Terry (one feature win)
and 15-year-old Mark Pat-
terson (three feature wins,
two heats), respectively
In Street Stocks, Curtis
Flanagan of Inverness is
coming off his track-high
ninth feature victory and
sixth heat win, and stands
88 points ahead of Floral
City's Dora Thorne, who
finished second last week
Brooksville's J.D. Goff
(third place, two feature
wins, three heats) and Flo-


ral City's Tim Wilson (three
features, three heats) have
also been strong con-
tenders in the class.
The Pure Stock class has
seen four disqualifications
in the last three weeks.
Floral City's Karlin Ray
(six heat wins) was one of
those, but he reclaimed his
lead in the standings last
week with his seventh offi-
cial feature win. He leads
Brooksville's James John-
ston by 10 points and In-
verness' Jason Waller (four
feature wins, four heats)
by 17.
With two races to go and
a 10-point lead on Pnut


Higginbotham, defending
Figure 8 champion Jimmy
Kruse is on the verge of
capturing a second-
straight title. Higgin-
botham, who won the most
recent Figure 8 race two
weeks ago, Kruse and
Travis Nichols each have
a pair of feature wins this
season.
Races start at 5:30 p.m.
and grandstand gates
open at 4. Admission
prices are $13 for adults,
$9 for seniors and stu-
dents and $5 for children
age 11 and under (chil-
dren under 42 inches are
free).


Citrus County
Speedway schedule
KEY
SLM=Super Late Models
OWM=Open Wheel Modifieds
SP=Sportsman
MMS=Mod Mini Stocks
SS=Street Stocks
MS=Mini Stocks
Ps=Pure Stocks
HD=Hornet Division
PF8=Pro Figure-8s
F8=Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s
FUPS=Florida United Promoters Series
TBARA=Tampa Bay Area Racing Association
DAARA=Daytona Antique Auto Racing
Association
DWARFS
S.E.C.K.S.=South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS
Sept. 28: SS, FLAGPOLE, BOAT/TRAILER,
SUIT CASE RACE, F8, MS, PS
Oct. 5: FUPS, OWM, TRUCKS, SR DWARFs
Oct. 12: SLM, SS, MMS, MS, HD
Oct. 19:TBARA, SS, PS, F8, MIDGETS
Oct. 26: OWM, SP, SS, PS, MS, PF8 SPECIAL
Nov. 2: FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD, LEGENDS,
BANDOLEROS
Nov. 9: OWM, SP, MS, PS, DWARFs, PF8
Points standings
Super Late Models
Car# Name Points
98 Herb Neumann Jr. 520
1 Dale Sanders 507
23 Todd Brown 499
123 Jon Brown 451
110 Steve Dorer 421
Open Wheel Mods
Car# Name Points
01 Herb Neumann Jr. 928
0 Troy Robinson 903
2 Steven Hise 879
18 Shane Butler 857
43 Gator Hise 565
Mod Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
33 ChrisAllen 1,140
44 Michael Lawhorn 1,091
99 Leroy Moore 1,035
24 Phil Edwards 966
47 Richard Kuhn 962
Sportsman
Car# Name Points
17 Mike Bell 941
66 Andy Nicholls 876
114 John Buzinec 823
4 Jay Witforth 807
01 Tom Posavec 727
Street Stocks
Car# Name Points
3 Curtis Flanagan 1,781
48 Dora Throne 1,693
16 J.D.Goff 1,535
8 TimWilson 1,239
6 Phillip Robinson 746
Pure Stocks
Car# Name Points
72 Karlin Ray 1,553
45 James Johnston 1,543
3 Jason Waller 1,536
44 Glen Colyer 1,343
32 Mike Autenrieth 948
Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
98 Kevin Stone 1,738
73 Jason Terry 1,689
22 Mark Patterson 1,510
11 Jerry Daniels 1,481
20 Shannon Kennedy 1,216
Pro Figure-8s
Car# Name Points
6 Joey Catarelli 406
94 Charlie Meyer 394
15 William Stansbury 282
86 Justin Meyer 202
33 PnutHigginbotham 192
Reg. Figure-8s
Car# Name Points
82 Jimmy Kruse 588
5 PnutHigginbotham 578
6 Ronnie Schrefiels 570
51 Travis Nichols 474
01 Shannon Lengell 452


Points standings
Through Sept. 22
1. Matt Kenseth, 2,111.
2. Kyle Busch, 2,097.
3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,093.
4. Carl Edwards, 2,075.
5. Greg Biffle, 2,073.
6. Kevin Harvick, 2,072.
7. Kurt Busch, 2,071.
8. Jeff Gordon, 2,069.
9. Ryan Newman, 2,064.
10. Clint Bowyer, 2,063.
11. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,049.
12. Joey Logano, 2,042.
13. Kasey Kahne, 2,040.
14. Brad Keselowski, 792.
15. Jamie McMurray, 786.
16. Martin Truex Jr, 752.
17. Paul Menard, 742.
18. Aric Almirola, 719.
19. RickyStenhouseJr., 700.
20. Jeff Burton, 694.
Schedule
Sept. 29 AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 6 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 12- Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 Camping World RV Sales 500, Tal-
ladega, Ala.
Oct. 27 Goody's Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 3 -AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 10 -AdvoCare 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 17- Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead


Earnhardt wins Dover pole Izsponsorshipngtitleof
._________ I nI...,


DOVER, Del. Dale
Earnhardt Jr turned a
track record lap of 161.849
mph to win the pole at
Dover International
Speedway
The top four qualifiers
Friday are all from the
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship. Points
leader Matt Kenseth starts
second, Ryan Newman is
third and Carl Edwards
fourth.
Other Chase drivers in-
clude: Jimmie Johnson
starts eighth, Joey Logano
llth, Kevin Harvick 12th,
Kyle Busch 14th, Jeff Gor-
don 16th, Greg Biffle 19th,
Kasey Kahne 20th, and
Clint Bowyer starts 23rd.
AAA 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 161.849.


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. with the
pole award Friday at Dover
International Speedway in
Dover, Del.
2. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 161.805.
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 161.74.
4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 161.609.
5. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 161.609.
6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 161.594.
7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 161.493.
8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 161.341.
9. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 161.326.


10. (56) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 161.204.
11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 161.023.
12. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 160.8.
13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
160.736.
14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 160.721.
15. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 160.714.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 160.664.
17. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 160.65.
18. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 160.557.
19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 160.542.
20. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 160.371.
21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 160.249.
22. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 160.1.
23. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 159.851.
24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 159.645.
25. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 158.779.
26. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 158.611.
27. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 158.451.
28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 158.263.
29. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 157.992.
30. (93)Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 157.929.
31. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 157.563.
32. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 157.549.
33. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 157.336.
34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 156.883.
35. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 156.692.
36. (51) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 156.644.
37. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner
Points.
40. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.


inIuyvca
INDIANAPOLIS -
Izod will end its deal as
title sponsor of the Indy-
Car Series at the end of
the season.
Izod signed on as the
official apparel provider
of IndyCar in 2008 and
increased its involve-
ment to series entitle-
ment holder in 2010.
Izod said in a state-
ment Friday the com-
pany is shifting its
product focus and must
adjust its marketing
spending as well.
Hulman & Co. CEO
Mark Miles said as Indy-
Car and the Indianapolis
Motor Speedway com-
bine their commercial
functions, they will be
better positioned to ag-
gressively pursue new
partners.
-From wire reports


Associated Press Ia. I


The Floida Counri of the tmatoil Fedfraton of RyFlherm
Prsmets
Florida's 2013


The Plantation on Crystal River
Friday & Saturday. Oct. 18 & 19, 2013
$10 for BOTH DAYS (Kids Under 16 FREE)
be fl.iaRty Tgkee Ge A Odyfiwfyuu Sm*3W
e* C t w&SM meffFcbw w wIaeaMj FWuylig Ezmft
caft qi~Mwhza& CAM4Msa"b"aks
Rf rAV abI I & b RO0 T oSIwoucmW lAw AmUu E
Pafmada ft DTimamtch MNW& b U&.

More Into? Go to www.itf-larlda.org Cii I KNIClF










RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The Capitol is seen Monday
in Washington. D.C.


4


L


THEINTERSECTION



OFPOLITICS & FAITH


Federalijudges

FREDERIC J. FROMMER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Federal appeals court is con-
sidering whether for-profit
businesses can be ex-
empted from a contracep-
tive mandate in the health care law
because of the owners' religious
views.
The law already exempts houses
of worship from the requirement,
but two brothers who own busi-
nesses in Ohio argue they shouldn't
have to comply The brothers, Fran-
cis and Philip M. Gilardi, say the
requirement would force them to
violate their Roman Catholic reli-
gious beliefs and moral values by
providing contraceptives such as
the Plan B pill for their employees.
At a hearing on Tuesday, Judge
Harry T Edwards was skeptical of
the Gilardis' argument He told
their lawyer, Francis Manion, that
sometimes religious freedom has to
yield to the greater good. Edwards
stressed that the Giraldis' compa-
nies, Freshway Foods and Fresh-
way Logistics of Sidney, Ohio, are
not religious groups.
"I don't know see how the gov-
ernment doesn't prevail," said Ed-
wards, who was appointed by
President Jimmy Carter
The other two judges on the
panel didn't indicate how they are
leaning in the argument, but they


weigh


religious exemptions for health law


had more pointed questions for
Justice Department lawyer Alisa
Klein than they did for Manion.
Judge Janice Rogers Brown, an
appointee of President George W
Bush, asked Klein whether the gov-
ernment is asking the Giraldis to
give up their constitutional rights.
Klein responded that the Giraldis
weren't making a constitutional
claim, but rather seeking an in-
junction under the Religious
Freedom Restoration Act.
Brown asked Klein whether she's
saying that for religiously observant
owners of corporations there is no
right to free exercise of religion.
"There is no substantial burden
on shareholders," Klein re-
sponded, adding that it is the cor-
poration that has to meet the
obligation.
In dismissing the Giraldis' bid
for an injunction, trial court Judge
Emmet G. Sullivan had rejected
their contention that requiring the
companies to comply with the con-
traceptive mandate was the same
as requiring the Giraldis
themselves to do so.
"The Freshway Corporations are
engaged in purely commercial con-
duct and do not exercise religion"
under the applicable law, Sullivan
wrote.
In court papers, the Giraldis ar-
gued that corporations can and
often do engage in "quintessen-
tially religious acts such as tithing,


donating money to charities, and
committing to act in accordance
with the teachings of a religious
faith," as they contended their
businesses do. They say they face
more than $14.4 million in annual
penalties if they don't comply with
the contraceptive mandate.
A separate appeals court panel
has barred the government from en-
forcing the mandate against the Gi-
raldis while they appeal their case.
The case comes as other appeals
court circuits have issued conflict-
ing rulings in similar cases. The
Obama administration has asked
the U.S. Supreme Court to take up
a case involving the Hobby Lobby
craft store chain and its sister com-
pany, Mardel Christian bookstore.
The Oklahoma businesses won a
temporary exemption from having
to cover morning-after pills, simi-
lar emergency birth control meth-
ods and intrauterine devices, after
the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals ruled that the companies
were likely to prevail in the case.
But the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled against the Mennon-
ite owners of a Pennsylvania furni-
ture manufacturing company who
claimed that their constitutional
rights were violated by the contra-
ceptive requirement. And the 6th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also
ruled in favor of the administration
in another case involving
corporations.


The message of the front door


several weeks ago, one of the top
trending stories on the Internet
featured an email from a North
Carolina church pastor that was sent to
her parishioners.
Pastor Makeda Pennycooke of Free-
dom House Church in Charlotte, N.C.,
told church members that she wanted
"white greeters only" at the front door
before Sunday services. She said she
wanted "the best of the best" out front,
hoping to draw more people into the
church.
As Pennycooke, an African-Ameri-
can, explained in her email, "We are
continuing to work to bring our racial
demographic pendulum back to mid-
line. So we would like to ask that only
white people be on the front doors."
Freedom House Church's member-
ship is predominantly non-Caucasian.
As one church member, Carmen
Thomas, told a local news station, "You
can put a white face all over the front
door But when you come through
those doors, you're going to see
African-Americans; you're going to see
Asians. You're going to see people of
color"
The part of the story that most
caught my attention was the pastor's
reason for her request she wanted
the church to make a good first impres-
sion, because "first impressions
matter"
Yes, they do. But...
What is it that a church should say
about itself? What is it that we who are
Christians should say about ourselves?
How should we, for lack of a better
word, market ourselves in matters of
faith?


What should our "fron
message" say about us?
Putting only white greE
church front door makes
the photos that people p(
themselves. In a previous
mentioned the MTV shove
Posting fake or Photosho
to make a good first impi
whole basis of the catfish
- it's not real.
This church in North (
the only nor is it the first
present itself as somethi:
quite accurate.
Actually, I think that's
trait of just being humar
with Adam and Eve tryir
their nakedness with fig
carry that need to hide t
thing other than who we
into the church, from thE
down.
From my observations,
their teach "we become r
walking in righteousness
in righteousness because
eous," and that "our righ


given to us by God solely as a gift."
If a church teaches that righteous-
N Cy ness is a result of what we do, then the
ancy emphasis and focus will be on looking
Te e good, striving for moral excellence
Ken dy with the goal of putting on a good face
for Jesus, even "fake it until you make
it," believing that "if I don't look good,
GRACE God won't look good."
A church that teaches we are made
NOTES holy by keeping the rules only breeds
discouragement and insecurity and
guilt.
It's not so much "If you love God you
t-door would/should do this" as it is "Because
God loves you, you can do this, you are
meters at the able to." We want to please someone
me think of who loves us.
ost online of While we Christians are called to
s column, I live differently, to live holy lives, it's an
w "Catfish." inward thing not a cleaning up my out-
ipped photos sides thing. It's the Holy Spirit doing
session is the his work, changing me from the inside
ling problem until it shows on the outside.
If it's me adopting a faux holy exte-
Carolina isn't rior, I'm not fooling anyone but myself.
L to ever try to I'm as guilty as the old-time Pharisees
ng that's not whom Jesus called "white-washed
tombs full of dead men's bones" and
a common that wasn't a compliment.
i, beginning When it comes to my front-door mes-
ng to hide sage, I hope that people see that I am
leaves. We just an average person who knows her
behindd some- need for a Savior, who loves the mercy
Really are of God and who is awed by his grace.
e pastor on I want people to see that I struggle
with sin and repentance, that I'm not
churches ei- where I want to be, but that Jesus con-
ighteous by tinues to make me better than I once
;" or "we walk was.


e we are right-
teousness is


See Page C2


Noted performer to
appear in Inverness
Renowned actor and director
David Wasson will give a perform-
ance at 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at
Grace Bible Fellowship of Inver-
ness, 4979 E. Arbor Street.
The 90-minute theatrical and
musical presentation is free to the
public.
Wasson began his professional
career in 1972 when he was "dis-
covered" at Florida State Univer-
sity by Tony Award-winning
director Albert Marre.
Marre brought Wasson to New
York City to play a small part in the
revival of "Man of LaMancha" on
Broadway That cast included the
original stars Richard Kiley,
Joan Deiner and Irving Jacobson.
Wasson's association with "LaMan-
cha" lasted for almost 30 years. In
1979 he assumed the featured role
of the Padre, a role that he would
perform over 1,000 times.
In national tours and two more
Broadway revivals, he worked with
such stars as Howard Keel, John
Raitt, John Cullum, Robert Goulet,
Raul Julia and Sheena Easton, ac-
cording to biographical information
provided by Grace Bible Fellowship.
In 1980 he became associated
with another blockbuster musical,
'Annie." He traveled extensively
throughout the country in three
national tours, eventually assum-
ing the role of "Daddy Warbucks"
in the 4th National Company Was-
son went on to play that role in nu-
merous regional productions,
garnering a Drama Logue award in
San Diego.
Wasson was fortunate to connect
with two other popular shows -
"42nd Street" and "Evita," both of
which took him across the country
His portrayal of Julian Marsh in
"42nd Street" brought him another
Drama Logue award and in 1992
he took his Juan Peron in "Evita"
to Europe, where he played to crit-
ical and public acclaim.
Musical theater was not his only
love. He also appeared in numer-
ous plays and TV shows, including
such notable plays as 'A Russian
Romance" and "Barefoot in the
Park" and television shows "Fresh
Prince of Bel-Air" with Will Smith
and "Cybil" with Cybil Sheppard.
He also made guest appearances
on the daytime dramas 'As the
World Turns," "One Life to Live"
and "Loving."
From staff reports

RELIGION

BRIEFS

Chaplain prays budget
battle will be resolved
WASHINGTON -U.S. Senate
Chaplain Barry Black is asking
God to give senators the wisdom to
know how to pass a budget that
would avert a government shut-
down and "the backbone" to do it
Hours before Texas Republican
Ted Cruz began a filibuster in op-
position to President Barack
Obama's health care law, Black
used Tuesday's invocation to ex-
press what he called the American
people's "jitters" over a possible
shutdown next week.
Cruz is urging his colleagues to
oppose moving ahead on a bill that
would fund all of government ex-
cept Obamacare to prevent Major-
ity Leader Harry Reid from
stripping the health care provision
from the bill. A test vote could take
place Wednesday

School reschedules
pro-gay speaker
PROVIDENCE, R.I. The
provost of Providence College
says the Roman Catholic school
has rescheduled a talk by a na-
tionally-known proponent of gay
marriage.
Last Saturday, Provost Hugh
Lena announced that an appear-
ance by Wayne State University
professor John Corvino scheduled
for Thursday was canceled. The
move prompted concerns about ac-
ademic freedom from students and
faculty members.
But on Wednesday, Lena said in
a school-wide email that Corvino
had agreed to appear at the school
opposite SherifGirgis, a Ph.D. stu-
dent in philosophy at Princeton.
Girgis is a well-known opponent of
gay marriage.
Lena said the event will likely be
held during the spring semester.
Lena said he shouldn't have an-


nounced Corvino's appearance
was cancelled, because the
school's intent was to postpone it
until it could book someone of na-
tional repute to present opposing
arguments to Corvino's.
From wire reports


I


I




C2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


Religion NOTES


Fall fun
The Christian Women's
Outreach Ministry, "The
Bride's of Christ," serving all
churches of Citrus County, will
host the fourth annual fall
weekend retreat Friday
through Sunday, Oct. 4-6, at
the Life Enrichment Center in
Fruitland Park. The women-
only retreat is to offer a place
where women have the op-
portunity to share their lives
and love of God with each
other. The weekend will offer
a chance to rest, relax, have
fun, enjoy good food, make
new friends and renew faith.
For reservations, call retreat
coordinator Margi Elson at
352-249-7315 or email brides
ofchrist2011@gmail.com.
Inverness First United
Methodist Church's Pumpkin
Patch will be open Oct. 6-31
at 3896 S. Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness, ending with
the "Trunk or Treat" celebra-
tion from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 31. All proceeds from
pumpkin sales go toward the
church's community out-
reaches and missions. An
area will be set up for taking
family pictures while visiting
the patch. Different displays
and events from several com-
munity services, such as the
Citrus County Fire Depart-
ment, etc., and hayrides avail-
able for the public, all on
Saturday, Oct. 12, 19 and


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

And that he loves me in
the process.
Being confident in
that, I don't have to put
on a false face, be some-
thing that I'm not, pre-
tend to be different than
I am.
I've been given a right-


26. All events and display
times will be posted. Pumpkin
Patch hours are noon to
7:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday, 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Saturday (with events and
displays scheduled during
these times) and noon to
7:30 p.m. Sunday.
Hernando United
Methodist Church's old-fash-
ioned "Pumpkin Festival" is
from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 26, at 2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County
Road 486, Hernando. All chil-
dren are invited to come and
enjoy a safe and happy Hal-
loween featuring games, a
cupcake walk, hayride, pump-
kin painting and more. Come
in costume and bring your
parents (they can dress in
costume too). The event will
finish up with a "trunk or treat"
and hot dogs, all free.
Hernando United
Methodist Church will host its
"Fall Holidaze Craft Show"
and HUMW bake sale form
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16, at
2125 E Norvell Bryant High-
way, Hernando. Crafters wish-
ing to sell their handmade
items may call Robin at 352-
445-1487. Spaces are filled on
a first-come, first-served basis.
Sale away
The Crafters with a
Mission 4th Annual Craft
Bazaar and Bake Sale will

eousness that I didn't
earn and don't deserve,
and so I walk in it.
Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over, Vic-
toria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


continue from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
today in the gym at Crystal
River Church of God, 2180
N.W. 12th Ave., one mile
north of the Crystal River Mall,
one block west of U.S. 19. A
variety of homemade crafts
and home-baked goodies are
available for purchase. Admis-
sion is free. Proceeds of the
sale will benefit ministries
within the church. Call
352-795-3079.
Open hearts and open
minds of the Hernando United
Methodist church also in-
cludes open yards. It's that
time again for the "Sell Your
Own Treasures." No reser-
vations necessary to rent a
12-by-12 space for $5. The
sale is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today. For those that only


search for treasures, this is an
opportunity to make it a one-
stop shop. Have breakfast or
lunch and enjoy the fellowship
that abounds among the ven-
dors. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
First Christian Church of
Inverness will host its annual
"Inside Yard Sale" from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 5. Shop in the air-condi-
tioned Family Life Center and
enjoy a hotdog and drink at
an affordable price. Choose
items from jewelry, books,
glassware, knickknacks, elec-
tronics and furniture. The
church is behind the Race-
Trac gas station on State


LIGHT SHINE 2013
P i d B i Sheh.,l,0,ftM Hilh i 'i.-ii 'alChun.i


The DunnelHon Concert Singers
Favorites from The Great American Song Book



The "Singers"
return by popular
demand to
present a concert
of favorite
popular songs
that we all know
and love.

... .. .. .. .... .. .. CHi pN id li
,,,, ,, ,C H. ,,,


Shepherd of iThe Hills Epincopal Church.
2540 W. Nondll Br~dni Highway iCR 486,). Lcanio
For Mure InfJnnath.ii. all. .352.527-),052 m8a, to Ipm


Road 44 West in Inverness.
Call the church office at
352-344-1908.
A yard sale to benefit the
El Shaddai Food Ministry of
Crystal River Church of God
will take place from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5. Pro-
ceeds from the yard sale will
purchase food for the several
hundred families we feed
monthly throughout Citrus
County. Location of the sale is
7755 W. Homosassa Trail (in
front of Auto Analyst), in Ho-
mosassa. Directions: From
U.S. 19 and onto Homosassa
Trail, follow the curves and
pass the fire station, children's
park and Lions Club. Our lo-
cation is one mile further up
the road from the Lions Club.
Our Lady of Grace


Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly out-
door flea market from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, on
the church property at 6 Roo-
sevelt Boulevard in Beverly
Hills off North Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491).
Shoppers are welcome. Up to
50 commercial and private
vendors from throughout Cit-
rus County are expected to
display their wares. Commer-
cial vendors and private indi-
viduals are welcome to bring
and sell goods. Spaces are
available for $10 and should
be reserved in advance. Cof-
fee, sodas doughnuts and
hotdogs will be available for
breakfast and lunch.

See NOTES/Page C3


Liem SHINE 2013
Pn'se ,'d BR) Sheph'nJ o qhe Hills Eh !i.ul Churci



Teflin' It Like It Was
A CackerCowboy Poet P e btaionby Hank Matlson



Mattson gives
us truth, folklore
and poetry on
what it was like
working' cattle a ,,
hundred years
ago in Florida.

-' 1I",-.l=, t 041, .. r.InnnL --=..fl.,5 "'t* ... rt. Iax i r-..cgn & t.1,f. .2 n .. e; ,a

*" ,i,,,n r ,,e, f. T.u , ,, i. -I r,.. t 7 ,, ,, Jjh= ,, i,,, I.- .', v \ r I .-
!? ~i- A dm:.'t i ss i o nk-iL is F-ree!~i^-TT.LIrf-T~~-


Shepherd of bthe Hills Episcopal Church.
2540 W. Norell Bryani Highway (CR 486), Lecanto
.. For More Informanon. call: 352-527-0052 8am to Ipm


Places of worship


that offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

I Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship ihili Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive -Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AI Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


J ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
...............10:30 A.M.

628-7. 000 : ,l .. .. .ni, . ,-.
,h l H ,


0 0 a
mO

'The




Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"







St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


i Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034

Rabbi
Lemnny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


B Crystal
E River

Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



SCrystal River
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries &Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) Nuey
Provided


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.-' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239



West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19 D


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
SBob Dickey


SEveryone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

CASUAL
Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30, &
S 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 & 10:45 am
SOpen Hearts
S Open Minds
Open Doors
A Stephen
Ministry
Church
Office Hours
8:30 am
To
4:30 pm
S Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org


THE -1
SALVATION'
ARMY CITRUSoCOUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish









HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
SCAKIN G FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYXL
RIVEF y
VJNITCD
N-ACTHODIS1
CHUKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


, : ,


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

This church-sponsored flea
market takes place the first
Saturday monthly, September
through May. The next flea
market is Nov. 2. For more in-
formation or to reserve a
space, call Rose Mary at 352-
527-6459 or e-mail wjeselso
@tampabay.rr.com.
The Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church Youth
Group Estate Sale is from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 12, in the church fellow-
ship hall at 86 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills.
Joy Lutheran Church, at
S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala, will have its an-
nual indoor yard sale and
bake sale from 7:30 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, in
Swenson Hall. The public is
invited to donate furniture,
tools, gardening equipment,
sports-related items, kitchen
and house wares, linens,
books and craft supplies (no
clothes, shoes or electronics).
Bring yard sale to Swenson
Hall from 9 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, Oct. 16, or from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday or
Friday, Oct 17-18. Bring
baked goods on Friday


wrapped for sale and labeled,
particularly if they contain
nuts. There will be the "vin-
tage" table for special treas-
ures and a craft and quilt
section. Lunch will be served
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day. Call Edie Heinzen at
352-854-7817 in regards to
the bake sale and Patty Corey
at 352-854-0660 regarding
the yard sale.
The Agape House
fundraising sale is from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Oct. 25 and 26, at
First Baptist Church, 700 N.
CitrusAve., Crystal River.
Funds are used to purchase
Bibles, toiletries and miscella-
neous items. Call the Agape
House (Wednesdays) at
352-795-7064 or the church
at 352-795-3367.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Holiday Bazaar and Craft
Fair" from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 25, from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, and
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 27, in the Parish Life
Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Christmas and
holiday treasures, handmade
crafts, jewelry, live plants,
books, toys and games, and
an array of raffle prizes will be
featured. The raffle drawing is


at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. It is not
necessary to be present to
win. Other crafters displaying
their wares will be Stretchies
by Judith LLC, Embroidery
Etc. by Barb, BJ Crafts One
Stroke Painting, Chocolates
by Vanessa, All That Jazz and
It's Under Wraps. Call Fran
Wagner at 352-527-0723.
The Dunnellon Flea
Market will take place from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 1 and 2, at the
First United Methodist
Church, 21501 W. State Road
40. Bake sale, cafe, lots of
good items with great prices.
Furniture, jewelry, glassware,
clothes, shoes, handbags,
CDs and books.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Music & more
The River Jordan Quar-
tet is the featured musical
group at the "Homecoming"
celebration Sunday, Oct. 6, at
First Baptist Church of Her-
nando, 3790 E. Parsons Point
Road, Hernando. Sunday


school starts at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowed by the worship service
at 10:45, a covered-dish
luncheon at noon, and then a
concert by the River Jordan
Quartet. A love offering will be
collected for the musicians.
There will be no evening serv-
ice. Call 352-726-6734.
Pop country quartet Eter-
nal Vision will perform live at
7 tonight at First Baptist
Church of Floral City, 8545
E. Magnolia St. Eternal Vision
is an award-winning gospel
group out of Knoxville, Tenn.
The concert is free and every-
one is welcome. Light refresh-
ments will be served in the
fellowship hall following the
concert. For more information
on Eternal Vision visit
www.eternalvision.org. Call
the church at 352-726-4296
or visit www.fbcflc.org.
Hernando Church of the


Nazarene, at 2101 N. Florida
Ave. in Hernando, off U.S. 41,
will begin its concert series
with the Southern Gospel
quartet, River Jordan, on
Sunday, Oct. 27. Doors open
at 5 p.m. Celebration Sounds
choir and orchestra will open
the concert at 5:45. The public
is invited. A love offering will
be collected. Call the church
office at 352-726-6144. The
entire concert series can be
viewed on www.hernando
nazarene.org.
The "Amazzing" Steel
Drum Ensemble will be in
concert at 6:30 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 8, at First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River, 1501
S.E.U.S. 19 (next to Sweet-
bay Plaza). A freewill offering
will be collected. Refresh-
ments served after the con-
cert. Call 352-795-2259.
The Dunnellon Comn-


munity Chorale will present a
concert at 3 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 10, at Dunnellon Presby-
terian Church, to celebrate
Veteran's Day. Patriotic music
will be performed with guest
accompanist Harry Hershey.
The church is in the Dunnel-
Ion Historic District, 20641
Chestnut St. (corner of Chest-
nut and Ohio streets). The
pubic is invited.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church Concert Series pres-
ents Peter Rowan Bluegrass
Band featuring Yungchen
Lhamo at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 14, at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Get tickets in advance or at
the door. Suggested donation
is $10. Call 352-795-5325 or
352-634-2388.

See NOTES/Page C4


Pastor
Tom Walker INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln., Invernes. 44. -i 1


Saturday Nite Gospel Jubilee
Last Saturday of each month 6:00 P.NI.
Great Music, Fine Fellowship,
Good Food! _
Never A Charge,
0G9A Come prepared to participate!


Places of worship


that offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SHomosassa Springs
N'SVrTI-rI'rth[ AM'rTIT'CHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
nLif iv Up Jes us \
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org



Shepherd

L of the

SHills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offtiili known
for engaging all persons
in the love and triuhli
of Jesus Chrii.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'- 1- '-
714S.Scarbor --
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Hemando
CI 'chof
TheNazarene
Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
... Floral City, FL.


y "N
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am

Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church
ope

M",

onw


.........ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(F/ miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.


IS Faith
Lutheran

Church M
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
iet',,o,, ,l,...
9&".t1G-7wnt~wO/


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM.................. Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ......................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
IV mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


SFloral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


0

)


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA


Coe





Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

4. 1


RELIGION


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C3




C4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


NOTES
Continued from PageC3

All Citrus County musi-
cians are invited to join in the
community jam sessions at
7 p.m. Wednesday in Hilton
Hall at Floral City United
Methodist Church. Bring your
instruments/voices and join in
the fun. Call 352-344-1771.
The Saturday night
Gospel Jubilee takes place
the last Saturday night
monthly at First Church of
God 5510 Jasmine Lane, In-
verness. Everyone is invited
to come to enjoy or come and
participate. Prepare a num-
ber, bring your instrument if
you have one and join in this
full-filled evening. Great
music, fun, food, fellowship
and never a charge. Call
352-344-3700.
Food & fellowship
An "Open House -
Spaghetti Dinner" will take
place at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct.
6, at Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church, 2540
W. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto.
The WELCA Invitational





St. Raphael
Orthodox Church
in America
Divine Liturgy Sun. 10 am
Great Vespers Sat. 5 pm
Fr. David Balmer
(352) 201-1320
www.straphaelchurch.org
1277 N. Paul Dr.
INVERNESS
right off Hwy. 41 N.
Come to our
SLAVIC FESTIVAL
FOOD & CRAFTS
OCT. 12,10 am-2 pm


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .comn


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 A.
Sunday School.................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade... .7:00 P
Teens .................................. 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PJ. to 3:15 PJ. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
- .catholicweb.com .j


Luncheon will take place at
noon today at Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church on
County Road 486 opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
The Catholic Women's
Club of Our Lady of Fatima in-
vites everyone to celebrate
Octoberfest 2013 at 5 p.m.
today at Our Lady of Fatima,
550 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
Enjoy a menu of Beef
Rouladen (rolled stuffed
steak), Spaetzle (noodles),
Karrottes (carrots),
Apfelkuchen (apple spice
cake), Apfelmus (applesauce)
and Koffee (coffee). Door
prizes will be awarded. Tick-
ets are $10 each. For tickets
and information, call Millie
Reph at 352-344-1353.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
everyone to its Slavic Festi-
val from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 12, at 1277 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Enjoy
borscht, stuffed cabbage, po-
tato pierogi, kielbasa and
sauerkraut, cheese blini, cab-
bage and noodles, cucumber
salad, various desserts and
Slavic and traditional Ameri-
can crafts. Call 352-201-1320.
Beverly Hills Community






Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School .............9:00
W orship ..................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
' .' r '\'

'.' 4 '.''.'
PI'.isiii- ^ ^
352.4224,535 t


Todd
Langdon




S "First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESSI
We welcomeyou and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 p M. Bible Study











Hwy.44 E@
* Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services *
* Traditional
11:00 AM
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD' s Available U


* Sunday School for all ages
S 9:30 AM
* U
Nursery Provided
Fellowship & Youth Group
S Sunday Evening
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org
S Podcast: fpcinv.com
U

Church Office 637-0770
S Pastor James Capps


Church spaghetti suppers
are from 4 to 6 p.m. the third
Friday monthly (with the ex-
ception of December), in the
Jack Steele Hall at 88 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A dona-
tion of $8 per person includes
all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce,
Italian bread, dessert and cof-
fee or tea. Come and enjoy a
delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door or in the
church office.
Special events
Congregation Beth Is-
rael of Ocala announces a
change in meeting place from
the Collins Center to its new
home at the First Congrega-
tional Church, United Church
of Christ, 7171 State Road
200, Ocala. Services are in
the main building of the
church in the choir room to
the left of the main lobby. The
facility is handicapped acces-
sible. The church is southwest
of 1-75 at Exit 350. Call Judi at
352-237-8277 or Mary at
352-861-2056.
The Council of Catholic
Women at Our Lady of Grace
Church in Beverly Hills will
hold a Corporate Commun-
ion Mass at 4 p.m. today. A





First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor !1
Marple Lewis III -,ff "^
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com


| irsf ats
Chswck
of Lake Aoa;seaaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email: r.1,1, '"l' ".. I,h' I1",, III,.. ,I,,
Check us out on Facebook

F 47 Years of
SIRST Bringing Christ
FIRS to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 AM.
726-1637
SMissouri Synod
S www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson




First United

Methodist


hChurch
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
Senior Pastor


Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM-All Ages

SundayWorship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM-Vertical Kids
10:30 AM-Traditional

WednesdayWorship
6:00 PM-Vertical Youth


dinner catered by Brooklyn
Deli Too will follow in the
Parish Life Center. The youth
group will have a presentation
on the St. Leo Retreat Min-
istry Training program. Mem-
bers, spouses and Catholic
women are invited to attend.
For tickets ($12), call Char
Fontaine at 352-746-9490 be-
fore 8 p.m. or the church
office at 352-746-2144.
In May of 1893, eight
founding families met to form
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church and on Sept. 29,1895,
the original sanctuary was
dedicated. One hundred and
twenty years later and on the
118th anniversary of the dedi-
cation of the original sanctuary,
the members of Dunnellon
Presbyterian Church invite
the community to join us as we
celebrate the completion of re-
pairs to the bell tower and ren-
ovation of the sanctuary. An
open house and fellowship
time will begin at 9:45 a.m.
Sunday including member led
tours. At 10:30 a.m., a special
service will take place to honor
our history and the people vital
to our newest renovations. Fol-
lowing a short break, the for-
mal worship service will begin
at 11 a.m. wherein the


members will rededicate the
buildings and themselves to
the continuation of the Lord's
work.
Blessing of the Ani-
mals will take place Friday at
the First Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River Prayer Gar-
den. Gathering is at 10 a.m.
and the service is at 11.
352-795-2259.
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Church Council of
Catholic Women's 23rd an-
nual Tricky Tray is Saturday,
Oct. 5, in the parish hall, 1401
W. Country Club Blvd., Citrus
Springs.. Doors open at
10 a.m. Drawings begin at
11:30 a.m. Free admission.
Complimentary drinks and
snacks available.
Father J. James Gerhart
will conduct the 5th annual
"Blessing of the Animals" at
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, in the
Pet Memorial Garden at Holy
Faith Episcopal Church in
Blue Cove, Dunnellon. All area
pet owners are welcome.
The public is invited to a
Military Card Party on Mon-
day, Oct. 14, at St. Margaret's
Episcopal Church, 114 N.
Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Lunch will be served at
12:15 p.m. Card play begins


at 1 p.m. Cost is $12 per
player. Make up your table of
four or come as a single and
we will pair you. For more in-
formation or to make a reser-
vation, call Dottie at
352-382-3656 or Marilyn at
352-746-6583.
Cornerstone Baptist
Church will host the "Send
Them to Serve" four-person
golf scramble Saturday,
Oct. 19, at Inverness Golf and
Country Club. All proceeds go
directly to the CBC Youth
Fund for Mission Trips and
Summer Camps. Registration
begins at 7:30 a.m. and tee-
off is at 8:30 a.m. with a shot-
gun start. Registration fee of
$50 per golfer includes 18
holes, cart and steak lunch at
Cornerstone. Call Bruce
Wenger at 352-726-7335.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church offers Bingo
at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and
5:30 p.m. Wednesday featur-
ing regular, double and spe-
cial bingos, together with a
jackpot and "pickle" game.
Doors open at 10 a.m. Tues-
day and 4 p.m. Wednesday.
Kitchen features "homemade"
soups and sandwiches. The
church is on U.S. 41, three
miles north of Dunnellon.


Places of worship



that offer love, peace



and harmony to all.,

Come on over to "His house, your iis will lihi


.......... II Timothy j
...tof 2:15 l



Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15 AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............77:00PM
Nursery and
play yard. 13
Pastor John Fredericksen

Come To El
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siuid., Evening 6:00 PM


Wednesday


7:00 PM


Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to, I.' 1, 1 .',,.


kPastor
Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.







All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033


oad
tist



ch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


SPRIMERAIGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30,9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670



^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

LPastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0)





Page C5 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28,2013 -- \ :- -:



"-OMMUN IT-Y _C -
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Lions Club to serve roast pork
The Beverly Hills Lions, 72 Civic Circle Drive, will
serve a roast pork loin dinner from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday
The meal will consist of roast pork loin with gravy,
potatoes, green beans, salad, dessert, coffee or iced
tea. Cost is $8 per person.
To reserve a table or for more information, call
352-897-4899. To purchase tickets, see any Lion
member, or they are available at bingo on Monday
evening or Thursday during the day at the club.

Festival needs help to stage social
The Inverness Festival of the Arts Committee asks
area businesses to donate products or services to be
auctioned at its annual Scholarship Social to be
held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Historic
Inverness Courthouse.
The social benefits both the Festival of the Arts
Scholarship Fund and HPH Hospice. Donations are
tax deductible.
To submit donations, call Jaret Lubowiecki at 352-
726-0366. Tickets for the Scholarship Social are $25
each and can be obtained at the Finance Depart-
ment on the first floor of the Inverness Government
Center, 212 N. Main St., or call 352-726-2611,
ext. 1201.

'My Sister's Keeper' to be shown
"My Sister's Keeper" a 2009 drama directed by
Nick Cassavetes and starring Cameron Diaz and
Abigail Breslin, will be presented at 2 p.m. Monday
at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education
Center, 8471 W Periwinkle Lane, Suite A,
Homosassa.
"My Sister's Keeper" is an immediate audience
grabber and provides insight into various family dy-
namics when coping with end-of-life issues.
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast's Monday
Movie Matinee will be presented to the community
at no cost. Discussion time will follow the movie and
there will be popcorn and snacks available to all.
For more information or to make a reservation,
call Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500. Visit Hospice of
Citrus County on Facebook or on the Web at
www.hospiceofcitrus.org.

Arbor Trail begins food drive
Arbor Trail Rehab is having its fifth annual can
food drive for Thanksgiving, from Nov 1 through
Nov 20. Donations can be dropped off at Arbor Trail
Rehab & Skilled Nursing Center, 611 Turner Camp
Road, Inverness.
All donations will go to Citrus United Basket, an
organization that helps feed more than 25,000 indi-
viduals. Canned goods, boxed goods and such
nonperishable items are accepted.
For more information, call 352-637-1130.

Eagles Auxiliary to vote on by-laws
Crystal River Eagles Auxiliary 4272 will meet
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1.
Members will hear the third reading on by-law
changes and additions. Discussion and voting
will follow

Yoga, bend, stretch at center
Citrus County Park & Recreation, with instructor
Kathy Harrica, will offer four weeks of free Begin-
ners' Yoga: Bend & Stretch classes starting Oct. 7 at
the Citrus Springs Community Center
All are welcome. Items to bring to class are: a yoga
mat is preferable, but a large bath- or beach towel
will work, a small square pillow and water
There will be a total of eight free classes in Octo-
ber; four weeks on Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. and
Thursday mornings at 10 a.m. No pre-registration is
required. For more information, call Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-465-7007 or Kathy at 352-249-8244.

Model A enthusiasts to gather
The Citrus As Model A club will meet at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 1, at the Floral City Lion's Club.
Interested persons are welcome; new members
are encouraged.
Call secretary Denise Brimmage at 352-848-0810,
or visit wwwcitrusas.com.

Humanitarians OF FLORIDA

Wisteria
Wisteria is cute as a
button with her bobtail
and silver tabby coat.
This kitten would make a
great addition to your
home and keep it warm
and cozy during fall. We
are also running a
September adoption ofou
special on kittens, and
all adoption fees include
microchip, spay/neuter
and all required
vaccinations, including
rabies. There are many
varieties of felines to
choose from. Drop by and
enjoy our felines in their
cage-free, homestyle
environment from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Hardin
Haven on the corner of State Road 44 and North
Conant Avenue, east of Crystal River. Call the Haven
at 352-613-1629 for adoptions, or view most of our
felines online at www.petflnder.com/
shelters/f1186.html.


Special to the Chronicle

* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


Value of a i

Determining a community's return on investment


TEDDIANNE GOSHORN
Special to the Chronicle
It has been said that libraries
have historically served as our
nation's great equalizer of knowl-
edge. Thus, public libraries have
always been gathering places that
encourage people to share ideas,
learn something new and foster
their culture.
The public library is a uniquely
American creation, bringing great
value to the communities it serves.
The Florida Department of
State's Division of Library Informa-


tion Services is partnering with the
Haas Center for Business Research
and Economic Development of the
University of West Florida to de-
velop a return on investment study
and determine just how deep the
value of public libraries truly runs.
Today's library provides a broad
offering of classes and programs
for self-enrichment as well as a di-
versity of materials in both tradi-
tional and digital formats to meet
ever-evolving needs of a commu-
nity With a fundamental mission to
promote the pursuit of knowledge
and deliver quality educational op-


portunities, the public library
strives to promote reading and
learning in all its forms.
The public is invited to partici-
pate in an online survey designed
to gather information on just how
much the library is worth to you.
Through the end of October, access
the statewide survey through
www.citruslibraries.org and click
on the survey link on the right side
of the page.

Teddianne Goshorn is the
communications facilitator for the
Citrus County Library System.


Boating safety program begins Oct. 7


Special to the Chronicle

The United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary, Ho-
mosassa Flotilla 15-4, will
conduct an eight-session
boating safety program
starting Oct. 7.
Boating Skills and Sea-
manship is the most com-
prehensive of the Coast
Guard Auxiliary's public
boating education pro-


grams. It covers the sub-
jects of boat design,
equipment, trailering,
boat handling and anchor-
ing, aids to navigation,
navigation rules and
more. The program is for
the boater who wants a
more complete discussion
of what may be encoun-
tered on the water and
how to operate a vessel
more safely


Boating Skills and Sea-
manship also forms the
basis for the instruction of
officer trainees at the
Coast Guard Academy
during the summer, prior
to attending the Officer
Candidate School.
At the completion of the
program, participants
passing the final exam
will be eligible to receive
the Florida boater ID


card. Total cost is $35 for
materials.
The program will be
presented from 7 to 9 p.m.
Monday and Thursdays,
Oct. 7 through 31, at the
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive, Homosassa. To reg-
ister, contact Anna
McQuade at 352-621-6963
or ajmcquade@tampabay
rr.com.


Reserve by Oct. 3for luncheon meeting


Special to the Chronicle
The New York Club of Citrus
County will meet at noon Thursday,
Oct. 10, at Tuscany on the Meadows,
350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486) at the
Quality Inn.
Marianne Desimone of Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park will be guest speaker for Octo-
ber On the menu are chicken


marsala or eggplant rollatini,
served with bread and salad.
Dessert is chocolate fudge cake.
Cost is $14, which includes tax
and tips. Mail your check to: New
York Club, PO. Box 641261, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Lunch reservations
must be received by Oct. 3. Write
meal choice on your check.
Visitors are welcome, but must
join after two visits. Annual dues
are $6 per person for the season of


October to May Meetings are held
the second Thursday monthly
The club supports CASA, helping
women and children who are vic-
tims of domestic violence. Item do-
nations and cash are appreciated.
Members also collect unopened
bags and cans of dog food and cat
food for seniors' pets, as part of the
Home Delivered Meals Program of
Citrus County.
For more information, call 352-
445-1997 or visit the website at
wwwnewyorkclubofcitrus
county, com.


Get together with Jerseyans, friends


Annualpicnic coming up in October


Special to the Chronicle
The New Jersey and Friends
Club will meet at 1 p.m. Monday
Oct. 7, at VFW Post 4252 on State
Road 200 in Hernando. October is
Ice Cream Social time.
Upcoming activities include:
The annual picnic at Whisper-
ing Pines Park in Inverness at 10


a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9.
Lunch at Casa di Norma on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River at 4 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct 23.
The Victory Casino Cruise trip
on Wednesday, Nov 6. Cost for the
trip will include bus, admission,
buffet and play money The public
is invited.
For more information, call Mary


Anne at 352-746-3386.
The club bowls Thursdays at 10
a.m. at Sportsmen's Bowl, 100
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41) in Inverness.
All are welcome; being from New
Jersey is not a requirement. For
more information, call 352-527-3568
or visit on Facebook. The club
meets at 1 p.m. the first Monday of
each month, unless there is a holi-
day (Then it's the second Monday)
Meetings are at VFW Post 4252 on
State Road 200, Hernando.


Blast into the past with Eagles cover band concert


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will present
an Alter Eagles concert at
7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at


the Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center
The Alter Eagles will
take the stage with a live
musical re-creation of
The Eagles' many


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


legendary songs.
Tickets must be pur-
chased in advance. Gen-
eral admission is $15 per
person, and limited VIP
seating tickets are $25.


Call 352-465-7007 or
352-527-7540 for more in-
formation. The concert is
sponsored by Citrus
County Parks & Recre-
ation and the Chronicle.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Graduate award


Special to the Chronicle
Family, friends and members of the Citrus County Sheriff's Citizens Academy alumni were in attendance at the
graduation of the Criminal Justice Academy Law Enforcement Class at the Withlacoochee Technical Institute
recently. A $500 award was presented to graduate Roscoe Watts, center, by the association. Presenting the
check are academy alumni president Jonna Wing, right, and Pat Konick, treasurer.



New Yorkers begin new season


-\


El




C6SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C: .Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D/1..Comcast, Dunnellonl & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
lCWSJNBC 19 19 College Football Entertainment 'Night Chicago Fire '14' The Blacklist'14' Saturday Night Live News SNL
PBS 3 3 14 6 -NewsHour Charlie The Lawrence Welk Keeping Keeping As Time AsTime Waiting for Yes Globe Trekker "Greek
OCEWPBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Rose Show'G' Up Up Goes By Goes By God Minister PG Islands"'G'
O EWIFJ PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Doc Martin'PG' Movie'PG' The National Parks: America's Best Idea Austin City Limits
W FL_ NBC 8 8 8 8 8 ._College Football Bucs NewsChannel Chicago Fire "A The Blacklist "Pilot" (In Saturday Night Live (In News Saturday
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 Bonus 8 Problem House"'14' Stereo)'14'c Stereo)'14' m Night Live
S c ABC 20 20 20 College Football Teams News Wheel of College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N News
o (IATBJ 2 0TBA.N& Fortune
S S 1 0 0 1 College Football Teams Wheel of Jeopardy! To Be Announced To Be Announced 48 Hours (Season 10 News, Paid
( )CBS 10 10 10 10 10 TBA.N) Fortune 'G'c Premiere) (N) N 11pmr(N) Program
S FX 13 1 1 3 1 News FOX College Football (N) (In Stereo Live) c News Animation Domination
E) CWTViFOX 13 13 13 13 College High-Def MA
F WCJBABC 11 11 4 College Football Entertainment'Night College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N |News
E WLFIND 2 2 2 22 22 Soul Purpose Telethone
E WFTS )ABC 11 1 1 College Football Teams ABC Action Let's Ask College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N News
Ij I S ABC 11 11 11 TBA.&N) News America
S1 1 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Leverage'PG' Leverage Tainted food. ***y, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"
ED IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory 'PG' 1(2000) ChowYun-Tat.'PG-13'm
SWTT MNT 6 6 6 9 9 House Operation Health Paid Bloopers Bloopers Futurama Futurama Ring of Honor Wrest. Bones'14'mc
(1 WA1" TBN 21 21 -Paid Blair Jim Raley Life Center Church RabbiMesser Paid Gaither Homecoming Chosen Paid
S1 King of King of Two and Two and White Collar "Pilot (Part White Collar "On Engagement Engagement The Arsenic Hall Show
MM M CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men HalfMen 1)"'PG'. Guard"'PG'c '14',c
A 6 6 16 15 Ford-Fast School Your Citrus County Court Da Vinci's Inquest (In ISpy'Y' Eyeforan Fai Team
Mi M FAM 16 16 16 15 Lane Zone Stereo)'14' cEye
ED C(WOX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang FOX College Football (N) (In Stereo Live) N News Animation Dom
Cr MWV UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) Corned. Noticiero
M tWXPX) ION 17 Monk'PG' c Monk'PG' c Monk'PG' c Monk'PG' c Monk'PG' n Monk'PG' n
SStorage Storage Storage Storage Storage- Storage- Storage- Storage- Storage- Storage- Storage- Storage-
54 48 54 25 27 WarsIPG' WarsaPG' WarsPG Wars'PG' Texas Texas Texas Texas Texas Texas Texas Texas
AM**5, "Shooter" (2007 Suspense) Mark Wahlberg. A wounded sniper Hell on Wheels Hell on Wheels Breaking Bad "Live
55 64 55 plots revenge against those who betrayed him. R N "Fathers and Sins" (N) "Fathers and Sins" Freeor Die"'14'
( i 52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced America's Cutest (In Too Cute! "Top 20 Too Cute! (In Stereo) Treehouse Masters Too Cute! (In Stereo)
S2 35 52 19 21 Stereo)'PG' Puppies"'PG' 'PG' m "Sky High Spa"'PG' 'PG'
fBJ 9*61 9 "Woman Thou Art Loosed: On the 7th **/ "Luv" (2012) Common. A boy travels with his shady *** "The Rosa Parks Story"
(j 96 19 96 Day" (2012) Blair Underwood. 'PG-13' uncle as the man arranges a drug deal. 'R' c (2002) Angela Bassett. N
BRAV 254 51 254 Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ *** "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" (2008) 'R' "Forgetting Sarah Marshall"R'
** "Without a Paddle" (2004, Comedy) Seth *** "Hot Tub Time Machine" (2010, Comedy) John *** "Hot Tub Time Machine"
C 27 61 27 33 Green, Matthew Lillard.'PG-13' cm Cusack, Rob Corddry Craig Robinson. 'NR' cc (2010) John Cusack.'NR'
i 98 45 9 2 37*** "A League of Their Own" (1992) Tom Hanks, Madonna. A Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the
98 45 98 28 37 women's professional baseball league debuts in 1943.'PG' Hunt'14' Hunt'14' Hunt'14'
[ B 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Secret Secret Buried Treasure'PG' Suze Orman Show Treasure Treasure Buried Treasure'PG'
f J 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) Anderson Cooper To Be Announced Stroumboulopoulos
j 4 4 Austin & Good- Jessie Dog With a **n, "Cars 2" (2011) Voices of Owen Wilson. Lab Rats Kickin' It Wander- Liv &
46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Charlie 'G'Ic Blog'G' Premiere. (In Stereo)'G' Y7 'Y7 c Yonder Maddie
( P4 33 27 33 21 17 College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N |College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) N
ESPN 34 28 34 43 49 Football Score College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) cN Score College Football Teams TBA.
WT 95 70 95 48 Living The Table Mother Angelica Live The War of the Vendee MA Rosary A Day at the Council Campus Lectio
** "Cheaper by the Dozen 2"'(2005, ** "Ice Age: The Meltdown" (2006, Comedy) *** "DespicableMe"(2010 Comedy)Voices
29 52 29 20 28 Comedy) Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt.'PG' Voices of Ray Romano.'PG' of Steve Carell, Jason Segel. PG
*Y2 "Autumn in New York"(2000) Richard ** "Beaches" (1988, Drama) Bette Midler, *** "Twins" (1988, Comedy) Arnold
1118 170 Gere. (InStereo)'PG-13' cc John Heard. (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) PG' cc
(IT4J C 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Jeanine Geraldo at Large (N) Red Eye (N)
TOI 26 56 26 Food Truck Race Diners Diners Cupcake Wars'G' Cutthroat Kitchen'G' Chopped'G' Iron Chef America
(TMJ 732 112 732 -College Football (N) Live ) College Setup INASCAR Racing FOX Sports Live (N)
Ij4 35 39 35 Bunch |Marlins MLB Baseball Detroit Ti ers at Miami Marlins. (N) (Live) |Marlins Marlins College Football
S 3 **0 5 "The Twilight Saga: New Moon" (2009, **n2 "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart. Anger Louie
30 60 30 51 Romance) Kristen Stewart.'PG-13' Bella must choose between Edward and Jacob. 'PG-13'I
LF 727 67 727 Central IPGA Tour Golf IPGA Tour Golf Web.com Tour Championship, Third Round. Central
"Meet My Mom" (2010, Romance) Lori Cedar Cove *** "Honeymoon for One" (2011, Romance) CedarCove
5HL 9 68 59 45 54 Loughlin, Johnny Messner. "Stormfront" (N)'G' c Nicollette Sheridan.'NR' "Stormfront"'G'c
hii 302 201 32 2 **2 "Two Weeks Notice" (2002) Sandra **ni "This Is 40" (2012) Paul Rudd, Leslie Boxing Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr. vs. Bryan Vera.
302 201 302 2 2 Bullock. (In Stereo)'PG-13'[c Mann. Premiere. (In Stereo)'R' cc (N) (In Stereo Live) cN
hiI 303 20 33 "Life of ***y2 "Les Misdrables"(2012, Musical) Hugh Jackman, Eastbound **n "Fora GoodTime, Call..." Treme (In Stereo)
303 202 303 Pi"(2012) Russell Crowe. (In Stereo)'PG-13'm (2012)AnrGraynor'R' 'MA'c
(GTVJ 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt nt Hunters Hut Intlnt Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It'G' Hunters IHuntIntl Hunters |HuntlIntl
Mountain Men "The Mountain Men "This Is To Be Announced To Be Announced
(IST 51 25 51 32 42 Final Stand" the End" c
Fi 2' 38 24 1 Girl Flght" (2011, Docudrama) Anne Heche, "The Cheating Pact" (2013, Suspense) "Gone Missing" (2013, Suspense) Daphne
24 38 24 31 James upper, Jodelle Ferland.NR' c Daniela Bobadilla. Premiere. NR' Zuniga, Gage Golightly. NR'
** "Not Easily Bmroken" (2009, Drama) Morris ** "The Perfect Family" (2011) Kathleen "Dirty Laundry" (2006)Rockmond Dunbar.
1L 50 119w Chestnut. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Turner. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Premere. (In Stereo)'PG-13'
fi 30 21 3 3 **3 Y "Dark Shadows" (2012) *, "The Watch" (2012) Ben Stiller. Strike Back (In Stereo) **Y, "Con Air" (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious
320 221 320 3 3 Johnny Depp.'PG-13' (In Stereo)'R' c 'MA' cc convicts hijack their flight. 'R' cN
MNC 42 41 42 Uaugnt on camera Uaugnt on camera Uaugnt on camera LocKup 'U' LOCKUp 'U' LOCKUp 'U'
S 109 65 109 44 53 Barrett-Jackson (N) Alaska State Troopers
'14'
NiD 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. Sam & Haunted Drake |Drake See Dad Nanny Friends Friends
WI 103 62 103 Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's McGhees McGhees Sweetie Pie's
f(XY 44 123 ** "A Cinderella Story" (2004) 'PG' **** "Ever After: A Cinderella Story" ** "A Cinderella Story" (2004) 'PG'
El ii D n 0 4 3 Dexter "Remember the Ray Donovan "Same ***y2 "Lincoln" (2012) Daniel Day-Lewis. Lincoln takes ***rn "Gangs of New York" (2002)
340 241 340 4 Monsters?"'MA' Exactly"'MA' measures to ensure the end of slavery forever. Leonardo DiCaprio.
f ,-Cops'PG' Cops Cops4 'PG' Cops C3s(N) I' Is 'PG Cops PG Cops Cops Cops 'PG' ** "Along Came
37 43 37 27 36 14 N N '14cc PG' IN '14cc '14 c c Polly" (2004) 'PG-13'
STAH 70 **2 3 "King Arthur" (2004, Historical Drama) The White Queen (In The White Queen (N) The White Queen (In The White Queen (In
370 271 370 Clive Owen. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' m Stereo)'MA' 'MA' c Stereo)'MA' c Stereo)'MA' c
i 36 31 36 College Football (N) (Live) College Football (N) (Live) Stable Underthe Under the
SWars Helmet Helmet
fv 31 59 31 26 29 *** "The Abyss" (1989, Science Fiction) Ed *** "X-Men2"(2003, Fantasy) Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman. ** "Godzilla"(1998)
1 5l 9 1 2629 ~Harris, Michael Biehn.'PG-13' Premiere. A power-mad militarist pursues the mutants. 'PG-13' 'PG-13'
(1TBS 49 23 49 16 19 Raymond RmonRa ond m ond Ra ond m ond Ramond Big Bang BigBang BigBang Big Bang I Big Bang I Big Bang "Zoolander"(2001)
n' "Butterfield S" (1960, Drama) Elizabeth *** "Gun Crazy"(1950) Peggy **nY "Hell Drivers" (1957, Drama) Stanley "Curse-
169 53 169 30 35 Taylor, Eddie Fisher. 'NR' c (DVS) Cummins.'NR' c Baker, Herbert Lomn.'NR' Demon"
J 53 oic n n Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Tickle Tickle Ti Tickle k Tickle Voodoo Shark (In Dixie Divers (N) (In Voodoo Shark (In
53 34 53 24 26 14'N Stereo) N Stereo) N Stereo) N
TL 50 46 50 29 30 Hoard-Buried Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER
r*n 350 261 30 "Brake" (2012) Stephen Dorff. *Y 'The Darkest Hour" (2011) **n2 "Rubber" (2010, Comedy) "Botched" (2007) Stephen Dorff.
350 261 350 (In Stereo) H' A -Emile Hirsch.'PG-13'c Stephen Spinella.'R' (In Stereo)'NR' cc
T 48 3 8 3 3 ** "Lara Cmroft: Tomb Raider" (2001, *** "l Am Legend"(2007, Science Fiction) **n, "The Forbidden Kingdom"(2008, Action)
48 33 48 31 34 Adventure) Angelina Jolie.'PG-13' c Will Smith.'PG-13' B (DVS) Jackie Chan, Jet Li. PG-13'm
TON 38 58 38 33 Gumball Gumball ***rn "Shrek" (2001, Comedy)'PG' King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Cleveland |Boon
[A 9 54 9 44 Weird Travels'G' Ghost |Ghost Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
Qjiijjj 25 55 25 98 55 Wipeout 'PG'c Wipeout'PG' m World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
[TVL 32 49 32 34 24 *** "Love Actually" (2003) Hugh Grant. Raymond 1Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond
i 47 s NCIS: Los Angeles "Tin NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS: Los Angeles N"l \,, "i.-il ... NC I_ -i.-il, NCIS: Los Angeles
C 47 32 47 17 18 Soldiers"'14' "Empty Quiver"'14' "Personal"'141 "1,,-. 1 "E,-,,,'."', .. i4 "The Job"14'
David Tutera: Unveiled David Tutera: Unveiled David Tutera: Unveiled David Tutera: Unveiled David Tutera: Unveiled David Tutera: Unveiled
E 117 69 117 'PG' 'G' 'G' (N)'G' 'G' 'G'
WG A 18 18 18 18 20 Bones '14' MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals. (N) 110th Inn. WGN News at Nine Mother Rules


West
A 10 6 2
IV 1 3
* A K 8 6 3
46 9 5 2


North 09-28-13
+ Q93
V K 10 6 5
952 2
SA K3
East
A K 8 7 5
V 98
J 10 7
4Q86
South
* J 4
V A Q 7 4 2
4 Q4
4 J 10 7 4


East
Pass
All pass
All pass


Opening lead: + A


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

In the last two days, we have looked at deals
in which a lot of errors were made. Let's end
the week with one where the bidding was sane
and the defense excellent
After three passes, North opened because
her hand satisfied the Rule of 15. If high-card
points plus spade length equal at least 15,
open; otherwise, pass out the deal.
South, who would have responded two
hearts anyway, was even happier here because
he was a passed hand; North wasn't going to
assume that his partner had a lot of points.
West contested with two spades (a makable
contract), and North competed to three hearts
with four-card support, despite her minimum
count and flat hand. South passed, knowing
that if game was good, North would have bid it
West led the diamond ace. Then she did very
well, shifting to the spade 10, denying the jack.
That made it easy for East to win with his king
and return the diamond jack. West won with
her king and led another diamond, which de-
clarer ruffed.
South drew two rounds of trumps ending on
the board and called for the spade nine. East
went in with his ace, but what did he do next?
Some players would have shifted fatally to a
club. But East worked out declarer's distribu-
tion. South was known to have started with two
spades, five hearts, two diamonds and, there-
fore, four clubs. East could not gain by leading
a club, so he returned a spade and waited for
his club queen to defeat the contract.

3Yr;'T r THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
~JV 1by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, I put my Arey
one letter to each square, fortune into Ary'o
.... crazy!
to form four ordinary words. m.kIn T hey ase Those will
,- sI'hid s bad give him
SOJITE ; d .am
ET '4d"re a m ba dram.s

2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC m . '
All Rights Reserved J \ -ft
P O R D O _- -'-, -'*"
-T ^ ^ r* -" '-'' ,I





H, WOUL- P NP UP GOING
Em | ROKE AS A RESULT
GLOONB k o0 F --- ,-
- -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A:111
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: UPEND HUMID RATHER ODDEST
Answer: The aliens' maternity ward was located on
the MOTHER SHIP


ACROSS
1 Short snoozes
5 Arctic
10 Horse's gait
12 Excite
13 Clean one's
desk
14 Meal
15 Gaze dreamily
16 Close
companion
18 Salt Lake City
player
19 Gets dingy
23 Talk
26 Wrigley Field
player
27 Fraud
30 Musical beat
32 Turned
quickly
34 Proportions
35 Mechanic's
concern
36 Nota -
37 Have debts
38 Apprehend a
suspect
39 Most nervous


9-28


42 Stomach
muscles
45 Bracket type
46 - no ideal
50 Association
53 Tempt
55 Hitching
posts?
56 Stun with
noise
57 Mug with a lid
58 Sooner city

DOWN
1 iPod variety
2 Dog chow
brand
3 Roman
naturalist
4 Earth's star
5 Before, in
combos
6 Comic strip
caveman
7 Hawaiian
cookout
8 Type of mgr,
9 Nerve network


Answer to Previous Puzzle


10 Candy
counter buy
11 Dress
features
12 Woody's son
17 Priest's
vestment


20 Reverberated
21 Complains
22 Melody
23 Watchdog's
warning
24 Moby Dick foe
25 Eight bits
28 Comparable
29 TV warrior
princess
31 Prong
32 Like a tiara
33 Cotillion
honoree
37 Artist's paint
40 The Bee -
41 Powerful
magnate
42 Woe is me!
43 Suspenders
alternative
44 Overindulge
47 LP player
(hyph.)
48 More than
passed
49 Lair
51 Moo goo
pan
52 Coffee brewer
54 Alumni news
word


(; 2013 ULIFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for Urs


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I am a 64-
year-old male with de-
cent looks and of
average height I'm a few
pounds overweight, but I am
not sloppy I was married be-
fore, but have not
had very much
luck when it comes
to the fairer sex.
What sets me apart
are two very obvi-
ous facts: One, I am
disabled. When a
woman looks at
me, she focuses on
my cane. Two, I live
in a senior com-
plex on a limited
income from social AN m
security It doesn't
matter that I can MAIL
offer a woman
warmth, tenderness, kindness
and love. Once more, I have
been used and dumped by an-
other woman who promised
the moon and then shattered
my lonely heart. I have had
enough. I am tired. I just
wanted you to know that
there is one nice guy left out
here. -Jay
Dear Jay: We are certain
you aren't the only one, and
we sympathize. It is hard to
be alone when you crave inti-
macy We are undoubtedly
going to be inundated with
letters from equally lonely
women who want to meet
you. They, too, are looking for
companionship, warmth, ten-
derness, kindness and love.
However, even with your
disability and your living situ-
ation, you apparently have
been able to attract women.
Why they keep breaking your
heart is not explained by
those issues. It might be enor-
mously helpful to ask one of
them to give you an honest


m
I
L


critique of why she left. Lis-
ten with an open mind in-
stead of a wounded heart,
and you may learn something
about yourself It might help.
Dear Annie: I never under-
stood why my
mother didn't like
me. I did every-
thing possible to
get her to love me,
but it never hap-
pened. She even
helped my ex-hus-
S band kidnap my
son. I forgave each
hurt but learned
S not to trust her. Fi-
nally, at the age of
HE'S 56, I looked up her
personality traits
.BOX on the Internet,
and there she was:
a "narcissistic parent."
I recently was diagnosed
with terminal cancer When I
explained the bone pain, my
mother suddenly complained
of similar pain and insisted
on numerous tests that
showed nothing. She could
not tolerate the attention I
was receiving. She even told
me she "had to" put down her
dog a month earlier than nec-
essary because, of course, she
"needed" to be with me. This
is the kind of love I get from
her
When I was a child, she
convinced everyone that I
was evil. Now my mother has
started forgetting her lies,
and people have figured her
out
Several family members
have apologized to me for not
seeing through her I don't
blame them. She is very good
at what she does.
But I am finally free of her
I also know I am a good per-
son. I only wish I had had this


information years ago. I hope
this helps some other adult
child learn how to deal with a
nasty, vindictive parent. -
Not an Evil Child Anymore
Dear Not: We are so sorry
that you've had such a stress-
ful relationship with your dif-
ficult mother, and that at a
time in your life when you
could use the comfort of a
loving parent, you cannot
turn to her Please know our
thoughts are with you.
DearAnnie: This is in re-
sponse to "Begging for
Mummy and Daddy" I am a
heroin addict who has been
clean for 20 years. Going to
Narcotics Anonymous meet-
ings is the best thing he can
do. I went to six meetings a
week and met the nicest and
most caring people. These
people will help you get clean
if you want it.
Please don't give up be-
cause your parents don't un-
derstand. When you do get
clean, look better and start to
work, your parents will real-
ize the mistake they made.
Living clean has been noth-
ing but a blessing.
I have a great wife and two
beautiful children, so any-
thing is possible.
- Twenty Years Clean
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit
www creators. com.


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North

Pass Pass 1 4
2V 2L 3V


SHRTUTG


T I E|R|AJO R A|C L E
Am B mVo0iLmE
C|C|S R E EL ED
L A pH I R ANEV] I N E
A BIR A SIT|T I TA R A
R AAY N ENUUAlTOR
LK N 0TuIsAmLsL


A|SIL E PEP N I T|W I T
TRIEN SC|HmS N EIE RS
1~~~~~ IL Iii| B 1|I i


IWant more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OQuillDriver Books.comrn


BIT 7zI_--i
EWA R I LtY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


CASA FROf (El c5LOT / i .LUCKY(, TOO...
r CHIU& "ff[KL'! ".I l 5 /
|"- ...-_ T -- .. ___ ^ I ,---


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


I must say, Leonard, those mutton chops
are definitely you."


Doonesbury Flashback


M5 Are kr fr FOtA erw cUL-
rut kMrft-wcri fo5
M54 MZUCS. iWAMYS~f"
YOUR FA1 Tjmg clOT


&t1T


Big Nate


MAYBE M Y ULTRA-
AMAZILNG SENSE OcF
SMELL WILL HELP
ME FIGURE OUT
WHO WROTE TmSHI
XJ'JNOTE \ j






Arlo and Janis

5,B HOHW 'DWIC TeFY
1eruPZ VATSTrCHK
17NtC DEfO.PSE OUT'


1A-


LET'S SEE-.. -I MELL
PAPER,.. INK UMM
A SLI-4"fr HINT OF
HAND SOAP.. A FAINT
SCENT OF LAVENDER
PERFUME ..


'E ID.A r5BToopm
VERTICAL S-AM,
,RF7f,6)e\TO 1 torr!


AND'..AGHW I SMELL
SOMETHING NASTY!
IT'S. 'KOFF'i V IT'S
LUKE ROreNl E&GS'
CR. A EAD
ANIM pAL-'
N~r~-



pn N5 *


WELCOME -
TO OUPg I
WORLD> W^T)


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Baggage Claim" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Battle of the Year" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG) In
3D. 1:45 p.m. No passes.
"Don Jon" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 1:20 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.


"Rush" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
1 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m. No passes.
"Don Jon" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:40 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Riddick" (R) 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


"S LIKE WF IR4PAM PARTieS Z:SE 5YOU-FT
ICE CREAM AN7 CAKE WITHOUT I4AV1N TO
EFAT PtINN.E FIRST."


"You have to learn to be patient, PJ.
You can have some of my popsicle
when I'm done eating it all."


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X syenbs -J


"EJ HFNHAE KCUH EJ EYHGE MJB DJJL


CT UJJKCTP GT PJNCOD G VBKK RJO'E


PCE MJB VHAGBTH MJB GYH G


XHDHEGYCGO." YJTHGOOH VGYY

Previous Solution: "I've worked in a factory ... I worked in a post office ... I like
to think that I'm just a regular guy." Denzel Washington
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-28


Peanuts


Pickles


COMICS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C7




C8 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


To place an ad, call 563-5966


,, .. ., t

.. .^ a -*r^ .
-^ -'4." "


.F-* ,.* < .
r^,,..-

r -.,<"


low


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35) .63565 TllFre:(88)85-240 1 mal:clssfidschonclon ie om0 w-0 0 *chonclonlin 0


IT 1- M 7F

To the girl I met in
Publix's on 9/18 in
Homosassa Springs,
wearing a white jacket.
I would like to get to
know you. Call me
anytime. 422-0440


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





2 Patio Lounge Chairs
& Cushions
$25. ea
Glass toptable &
2 chair $50
(352) 621-0778

97 Club Car w/lights,
48v, back seat,
batteries, exc. cond.
$2000. (352)527-3125


Bass Tracker
17', 50 hsp. Mercury
w/tilt, includes trailer,
trolling motor, $1500.
(352) 560-0068


CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 28, & Sun. 29, 7am
Electronics, craft sup-
ply MISC. Household
8621 N. Buscetta Lp
Citrus Ave. to Basilico
St., turn West


CRYSTAL RIVER
SUPER YARD SALE
Saturday 28, 8am-?
6046 W. Woodside Cir,

Dinning Room Set
$200. obo
Server $150. obo
Both Dark wood
Excellent condition
352-586-3380


Exp. Helper
for Handyman
Service
(352) 746-3777


Garden Tractor,
Murray Heavy Duty
18.5 HP V-Twin 46 inch
cut $400.
(352) 507-1490


Golf Cart
exc. condition, has
headlights
exc. batteries w/
charger. $1500.
(352) 527-3125


Saturday, 28th, 9am-?
1526 N Rock Cress Pth
HAVANESE PUPPIES
9 wks. Champ. Bid.
Lines, Non Shedding
3 males, black &
white, shots, Wormed
$650. OBO 613-5818
INVERNESS
Beautifully Remodeled
on golf course, 2/2/2
$850. 352-895-0744
INVERNESS
Tsala Gardens E Shore
Dr 7586, 7615, 7616,
7686 & 1810 Mandarin
Kids,yard,fishing,bikes,
tools,home Sat 8-1
352-560-0191
Kenmore Refrigerator
side by side, thru door
ice, 33" wide, White
exc. cond. $350. obo
(352) 465-9186
LECANTO
1/1, off Hwy44
between 491 & Croft
Rd. Recent Remodel,
quiet area
$450/mo. $250 sec.
(352) 302-6551
Microwave Oven
$50.
(352) 628-4254
TOYOTA
'05, Avalon, Limited
49k mi., excell shape,
garage kept. $15,500
Call (352) 634-0101
Wicker Patio Set
2 chairs, cushions,
ottoman & glass top
table $175. obo
Leather wing back
chair burgundy $175.
obo, Excel. cond.
352-586-3380



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Look
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



6 Roosters
Rhode Isl. Reds 6,
5 months old
(352) 621-3929
Free Cedar Trees
perfect shape, approx.
20ft tall, You dig,
remove and haul
call between 8am &
8pm (352) 249-7812
FREE
Cut Fire Wood
Dried Oak
Easy Access
(352) 419-6067
Free Kittens
Gray Tabby
8 wks old, litter trained
352-212-0667
Free to good Home
4 Kittens, 2 males,
2 females, 8 wks
(352) 777-1256
Manure.
Bring your bucket,
trailer or truck.
352-513-5400



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct < $5.00lb.
Stone Crabdi)$6.001b
delivered352-897-5388


1 male, 1 female,
traveling, Inverness
N. Highlands
Near Dawson
REWARD
(352) 344-2232
CAT
female,1 yr old, gray,
medium hair. Missing
in the Vicinity of Red
Rose off Apopka in
the Highlands, has
been micro-chipped
(352) 445-0747
Lost 2 Hand Trucks,
fell from
Potato Chip Truck
Crystal River area
Need desperately for
work. (352) 637-0188
Lost Cat gray with
white markings, black
spot on nose, Near
Rockcrusher Canyon
RV Park 607-434-0328
Lost hummingbird
gps/fishfinder model
597ci hd by hwy 44 e
boatramp in inverness if
found call 726-0257 or
476-7047
Lost Lab Coonhound
Mix, Puppy
10 wks old
Mini Farms Area
(352) 246-7557
Lost Male Beagle
Tri color,
Name "Brason"
Pine Ridge Area
Sacramento Rd
(352) 364-1385
(352) 287-2121
Lost Quaker Bird
Green, Citrus Hills
around Sept. 20th
(352) 302-6710
Missing 9/8/13 JoJo Tn
colored beagle. Missing
from N. Lee Street Bev-
erly Hills. 40 Ib neutered
male. JoJo is a special
needs pet. We miss him
terribly. Microchipped.
Please call Donna at
352 249 3107 or e-mail
hillsdonnar@aol.com
Missing 9/8/13
Tn-Colored Beagle 40
Lbs. Special needs pet.
Name: JoJo. Please
help JoJo to come
home. He is terribly
missed. Last seen on N.
Lee Street, Beverly Hills
at 10:30 pm. Please call
352-249-3107. Reward



Found Set of Keys
Around august 30th
Beverly Hills
Come to house
Identify Keys
230 S. Harrison St
FOUND
Silver Mongoose
Bicycle w/whitewall
tires, found in my
garden!
(352) 400-6100



HOWARD'S
FLEA MARKET
IS HOSTING
SAT. SEPT 28. 9-2a
MUSTANG AUTO
SHOW Nature Coast
Mustang Club
will be bringing Ford
Mustangs from Past
to Present, if you have
a Mustang Come Out
and Show It. If you
have mustang parts
come out and sell
For Information
Call (352) 628-4656
Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL10580



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.OOlb.
Stone Crab$L6.00lb
delivered352-897-5388



TEACHER
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222

WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.




Experienced
Legal Secretary
/Bookkeeper
Part time Mon.-Thurs
Family law
and probate.
Experience in
Wordperfect and
Quickbooks.
Send Resume to:
amackerell@
live.com




EXP'D. BARBER
For Busy Shop.
high comm.
call George at
(352) 344-1881
after 5pm 228-7592

HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966









Wen er

Busy Medical
Practice Seeks
1. Experienced
Paramedic/LPN/
Medical Asst.
2. Check In/Out
Front Desk
3. Cat Scan Tech.
Experience is a must
Competitive Pay/
Benefits. References
Preferred
call for immediate
response
352-586-0632
or email: tawfik.
eihab@gmail.com

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
ahvahoocor


I B=Sa


F/T DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry

FIT PIT
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST

For Primary Care
office in
Homosassa
FAX RESUME TO:
352-628-1120

Medical Assist.
Fulltime & Part time
Postions
Available at busy
Podiatry Practice
Call (352) 795-2142

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

SURGICAL TECH
for ASC located in
Citrus County.
Must be certified
or eligible. Flexible
scheduling excel-
lent pay. FULL OR
POOL POSITIONS. No
weekends or call.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1 827

TWO MEDICAL
ASSISTANT'S

Fax resume to:
352-746-5784





REAL ESTATE
AGENT
For Property
Management
FAX: Resume to
352-795-1667
CALL: 352-302-8088
email: action.rental
@yahoo.com
walk-ins are
welcome
Action Rental
Management Realty





SERVERS

Must be experienced
in Fine dining with Bar
knowledge. All others
need not apply.
Must pass drug and
background. Ap ply
Tue.-Fnri.10am-4pm at
Sugarmill Woods Ctry.
Club, 1 Douglas St





LAWN TECH

Exp. preferred,
but not neccessry.
APPLY IN PERSON
3447 E. Gulf to lake
Hwy. Inverness

TELEMARKETERS
Exp. Only. Write your
own Paycheck, Call
Brandon 503-6807


Traes/^
Skills

AC SERVICE
TECH/INSTALLERS
Top Pay, Benefits,
Sign on bonus.
40+ Hrs. must have
EPA Cert. & Dri. Lic.
Call (352) 628-5700








ELECTRI-

CIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab,
lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042CR 124A
Wildwood

Exp. Helper
for Handyman
Service
(352) 746-3777


DRIVERS-
TRACTOR TRAILER
DUMP
Cypress Truck Lines
seeks 5 TT Dump
Drivers (150 mile
radius) Company
Drivers Only
*Assigned Tractors
*Medical/Dental/VMon'P
aid Orientatbn
*Paid Training*6
Paid Holidays. 6 Mo
TT Dump Exp &
Class A CDL Req!
Call 1-888 235-8862
www.
cypresstruck.com


Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.corn or Call
352-422-2160

ReStore Manaaer
Truck Driver
Donation
Processor
Habitat for Humanity
is filling 3 positions
in Citrus County
E-mail request for
detailed job descrip-
tion and instructions
for submitting to:
H4Hrestore@
yahoo.com
No calls or walk-ins





MEDICAL OF-
FICE TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





1971 Baseball cards,
200 cards $40.
1970 Baseball Cards
200 cards $40
(352) 344-9502


2 Person Jacuzzi
with cover
$300 obo
(352) 302-2366



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Electric Range, GE,
$380.
Black flat ceramic with
5 burners, like new
Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
ELECTRIC STOVE
White electric stove
price $85.00 Phone
352-860-2858


GAS RANGE Andora5
black GE selfclean con-
vection oven, griddle,
power burner $500
OBO 228-4648
GE Space Saver
Microwave
very liffle
usage
Bisque, $125.
(352) 302-9129
GOOD DRYER$100
Works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER$100
works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
HOUSEHOLD FREEZE
WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT
2'2"DEEP 2'4"WIDE
4'10.5"HIGH $250.00
352-382-0009
JUICE EXTRACTOR
Cuisinart brand
NEVER USED Great
Gift $99. 352-621-0175
Kenmore Refrigerator
side by side, thru door
ice, 33" wide, White
exc. cond. $350. obo
(352) 465-9186
MICROWAVE Black
Fnrigidaire over the
stove. Looks and works
great. A steal @ $15
352-322-1160
REFRIGERATOR W/
ICE MAKER G.E.
WHITE SIDE BY SIDE
2'3"DEEP2'11.5" WIDE
5'9"HIGH $300.00
352-382-0009
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


Air Compressor
8 gallon, 1.5 HP,
$125.
(352) 503-9188

ELECTRIC CHAIN
SAW McCulloch 2.5 HP,
14" electric chain saw
$50 352-628-3899

Power Boss Generator
Briggs & straton 10HP
eng. Running watts
5250, starting watts
7350 excel, cond.
Starts easily. $275.
(908) 616-0620
Homosassa


VYouif\\rld first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!


CHfpNicLE
( i. 1 ',.

0 *0 S


3 85 6j4 1 2 9 7
2 7 4 3i8,9 5 1. 6


1521 7 6 9 3 8
6 4 819 3 5 1 7 2
7 3 918 1 2 645
8 2-7 15'3 4"669

493 2!6 8 751
5 1 6719 4 823


It s your right to know.



NOTICE what s going on in your community.





School District Budgets



Property Auctions



Public Hearings



Local Tax Changes



Adoptions







--







/ C I ,^i-- ^. lk06 0 N- lo Cu TIT |^^^^f' ^^










Find out about public notices in:


Citrus County Chronicle

Or search online at:



www.floridapublicnotikes.com


Washer & Dryer
Maytag- 2 washers, 1
dryer. All in good
working cond. $300
for all or $125 ea
(304) 544-8398
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Condition.
Free Delivery, 60 Day
Written Guarantee
352 263-7398









DUDLEY'S
"AUECTI'ON

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3prm,
(inside) 6pmr Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S 10,'05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-site Boat Manu-
facturina Liauidation
122 N Cedarview Tr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6
cw HUGEALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for info
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.corn
10%BP Au2267


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIEFIEDS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 9


CART Two wheel
moving cart. $15
352-628-3899



ANTENNA radio shack
amplified digital TV/FM,
great shape ($10)
352-212-1596
BLU-RAY PLAYER
Samsung BD-P1500
Blu-ray player.
Excellent Condition. $20
352 3822591
SANYO 20" TV Older
type model. Great pic-
ture and sound. $35.
352-621-0175
TV 55'projection TV on
wheels works fine
$25.00 w/remote. DVD
player $10 w/remote.
352-586-2582



LIGHT BULBS
flourescant T40, new,
total of 9, all for ($5)
352-212-1596



CAMERA Panasonic
Lumix Camera FH20
w/extra battery-like new,
$30 Call 352 3822591
CAMERA TRIPOD
Velbon VE-3 Camera
Tripod VG condition $15
352-382-2591
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP 15.4", LAPTOP
DVD writer, $180
DELL DESK TOP
P4, HT Lcd monitor,
DVD + RW $150
352-628-6806
WIFI RANGE
EXTENDER amped
REC10 wireless range
extender 600 mW Like
new $40 352-382-2591

Outdoor

2 Patio Lounge Chairs
& Cushions
$25.ea
Glass toptable &
2 chair $50
(352) 621-0778
9 Piece Patio Furniture
PVC 72" table, 4 chairs,
2 reclining chairs, 2 ot-
tomans, w/cushions,
$200.obo
(352) 274-1940
Patio Recliner
Tan La-z-boy, like new
$140
(352) 564-8605
PATIO TABLE Glass
top 5' x 38" & 4 beige
chairs Like New $75.
352-270-3909




2 Bedroom Sets
King & Queen
Table & chairs
Like New
$250 ea.
(352) 634-1489
6' LEATHER COUCH
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, $250.
(352) 419-6782
Bedroom Set, Double
whitewash $350.
Dinette Set, 4 chairs
w/coasters $350.
Very Good Cond.
(352) 628-4254
CHAIRS
5-light oak chairs with
padded seats on
casters $100
(352) 419-6383
COMPUTER DESK
Black. 29"H 18"D 41"W.
Storage area w/door,
keyboard tray. Good
cond. $35. 527-1239
COUCH
Brown & Gold, curved,
two matching
otterman's. 1 yr old
$400 (352) 527-4247
Dining Room Set
Thomasville,
Cherry Table, 6
chairs, 2 ext, new
$2900, China Base &
Deck w/ glass
shelves, new $2595,
Moving-Will sacrifice
both for $1500 cash,
obo (352) 513-4516


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690.
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL10580




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Your World







CHK)pN IlJ


Din. Rm. Set, Broyhill,
Table 4 padded
chairs, black lacquer
w/ side table
MUST SEE $250.
(352) 465-2237
Dining Room Set
w/Hutch
beveled glass, lighted
cabinet $400.
352) 628-4254
Dinning Room Set
$200. obo
Server $150. obo
Both Dark wood
Excellent condition
352-586-3380
FURNITURE DOLLY,
ETC. 2 & 4 wheel with
base. Pneumatic tires.
$25.00 352-746-4160
HOOKER ENTERTAIN
MENT CENTER Oak
with (2)22 inch sides,
center that expands
from 45-60 inches. Me-
dium brown $300 OBO
352-382-3387
KITCHEN SET,
45" Beveled glass top,
white base, 4 swivel
cushion chairs, on
casters, Excel. Cond.
$200. (352) 465-2237
Leave Message
NICE CHINA CABINET!
$100 Firm Very nice 2
glass doors 2 cabinets 3
drawers 352-302-7214
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress, & Box Spring
Like New Antique
white chest, matching
head board & night
Stand, mattress cover,
matching bed spread
& draperies. $325.
(352) 465-2709
Recliner & Loveseat
recliner, end table &
1 coffee table, micro-
fiber, color sage, elec-
tric auto recliner w/
battery backup $650.
(352) 860-0158
Sectional Couch
w/ queen hide a bed
and recliner built in
Good Condition
$175. obo
(352) 302-9129
TV TABLE/CONSOLE
Cherry wood 48"L 21 "w
20"h 2 cabinets/2
shelves Good Condi-
tion $45. 352-621-0175
Wicker Patio Set
2 chairs, cushions,
ottoman & glass top
table $175. obo
Leather wing back
chair burgundy $175.
obo, Excel. cond.
352-586-3380




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
CRAFTSMAN
33" Walk behind.
Brand New, Never
Used $800. obo
352-613-8453
Garden Tractor,
Murray Heavy Duty
18.5 HP V-Twin 46 inch
cut $400.
(352) 507-1490
Sears LT 2000 Riding
Mower 5 yrs. old low
hrs. 19.5 HP, 42" cut
$400.(352) 507-1490
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362




2 Very Large
Staghorn Ferns
$100 ea
(352) 489-6212




BEVERLY HILLS
ESTATE SALE
216 w. hollyfern
Sat. Sept. 28th 7-1 &
Sun. Sept. 29th 8-1

BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
SAT. OCT 5TH
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd

BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. 9/28, 9a-4p
End of Summer Sale
31 S. Wadsworth Ave.


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


CITRUS HILLS
1873 W. REDDING ST
SAT ONLY 7:30 ?
MULTI FAMILY SALE

CITRUS HILLS
250 E. Hartford Stre
Thurs. & Fri. 8a-5p
Saturday 8a-3p
LADIES
WE ARE BACK with
ALL Sizes, 99% New &
Home Acces., MISC.
Furniture & More!

Citrus Springs
Fri, Sat 9/29 & 9/28
8am to 1pm
Body by Jake equip,
AB coaster, new sml
tiller, hshld items, tools
& garden equip,
kitchen apple, etc..
7861 N Cricket Dr.

YOU'LL v THIS!

CRYSTAL RIVER
Craft Bazaar & Bake
Sale at
CR Church of God,
2180 NW 12th Ave,
Fri 9-7 and Sat 9-5,
Free Admission
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. 27, & Sat. 28, 8a-?
VARIETY OF ITEMS*
9875 W. Orchard St,.
Behind Mall
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 9a-until
ESTATE SALE
10% to Salvation Army
9090 W. Ft. Island TrI.
on Country Clb. Dr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 9a-until
ESTATE SALE
10% to Salvation Army
9090 W. Ft. Island TrI.
on Country Clb. Dr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 28, & Sun. 29, 7am
Electronics, craft sup-
ply MISC. Household
8621 N. Buscetta Lp
Citrus Ave. to Basilico
St., turn West
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday, 28th, 9am-?
1526 N Rock Cress Pth
CRYSTAL RIVER
SUPER YARD SALE
Saturday 28, 8am-?
6046 W. Woodside Cir,
HOMOSASSA
Riverhaven,
4547 S Sawgrass Cir,
Fri-Sat 8am-llam,
Kayak/Paddle, Bike,
Bike Rack,
Fishing gearBoat,
Household items.
INVERNESS
Tsala Gardens E Shore
Dr 7586, 7615, 7616,
7686 & 1810 Mandarin
Kids,yard,fishing, bikes,
tools,home Sat 8-1
352-560-0191
LECANTO
Side Walk Sale
Saturday 9am-5pm,
Home Again Resale
Store 1980 N. Future
Terr.(486 across form
Chevron)


Al1(4W
MOVING SALE
Fri, Sat, Sun, 27, 28, 29
9am to 3pm
quality furn, misc.
2372 S Sandburg Pt.
WILDWOOD
Hiz & Herz Stop& Shop
11-6p, closed Wed
25% off: Tools, an-
tiques, collectibles,
furniture, clothing, art
work and much more!
400 E Gulf Atlantic
Hwy (4 bldgs E of 301
on SR 44) Wildwood




MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945




3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2
CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$10 EACH
352-613-0529


MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



BILL TRIPP FENCE
All Types of Fence
Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096
(352) 425-4365




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
/V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


BOOTS ladies size 7
tan work, size 7 1/2
black dress, nice, both
for ($10) 352-613-7493
Boys winter clothing
size 5/6 4 pants 7
shirts & 2 lightweight
jackets $45
352-613-0529
CHILDREN'S HAL-
LOWEEN COSTUMES
1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1
LION SIZE 5/6 $8
EACH 352-613-0529
JEANS 2 pair, size 10
women's,embroidered,
blue, 1 daises, 1 roses,
new, both for ($25)
352-613-7493
MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZE 36X30 & 34X30
$25 EACH
352-613-0529
NECKLACE s/s,
biker-chick style, en-
gravable heart, new,
paid $150, sacrifice for
($40) 352-613-7493
PURPLE CLOTHES
20 pieces of dresses,
pants, top set, blouses.
Size 12 to 18 $100.00.
897-5410
WHITE STAG PANTS
SUIT Tropical colors,
red, background
&flowers. ex. Large
,$5.oo00, 897-5410




1 Full Size Bed
Complete, mattress
frame $125.
Washing Machine $50.
No calls before 11am
(352) 628-4766
18 to 20 SPEAKERS
6" to 8"
Commercial w/
switches & Hardware
$250. obo for all
(352) 249-3259
20 Chairs for Daycare
$80.00
Baby Accessories
$120.00
(352) 795-7254
180 Gallon Fish Tank
solid wood base
includes top and filter
up and running with
fish, $1,000 obo
(352) 302-9845



Above

Ground Pool,

24 ft. up

and running
pump, filter, ladder,
very good cond.
$500. You must
remove 352-212-6433
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BAR STOOLS Two
swivel, solid light wood
w/back. A++ Cond.
$45.00 for both.
352-513-4027
BASSETT MATTRESS
Twin bed size like new
no stains. $35.00 obo
352 621 0248
BEAR WHITETAIL II
COMPOUND BOW-
RH, Bear Sight, 5 set-
tings, needs pull string,
$20 352-628-0033
BLINDS 4'WIDE Vinyl
porch beige color
Good condition (six)
$6.00 each
352-621-0175
BLOOD SUGAR MONI-
TOR Bayer, new, with
case and strips, ($5)
352-613-7493
Boys winter clothing 6
outfits 1 size 4t 4 size
5t 1 size 6 & 1 pajama
set size 5t $35
352-613-0529
CAGES&CRATES-ferret$
10,Bunny$3,Yorke$10,Shete$
5,$8&$10
352-586-2582
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" ON WHEELS
WITH COVER $20
352-613-0529
COASTAL HORSE
HAY. 12 Bales. $60.00
takes all. 352-513-5400
Craft Items
$300 value for $150.
assorted 352-746-4613


1+TEiHN: LI'E'
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Andersen HandyMan
Home Repairs, Lawn
Care. Cheaper Prices
352-453-6005
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447




A+ CLEANING
Res/Com. 27 yrs exp.
Lic/ bonded, client
focused 386-717-2929
Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174
CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


REEL- 6-1/2ft Rod,
PENN 320 GTi Reel,
nice condition, $60.
352-628-0033
Designer Jackets,
leather W 2 & 3X,
New, $80 ea
Ren. Chest Set,
Must See $1,200
352-465-3086
DESK large wooden for
computer with drawers
$20.00 352 6372499
DOG CARRIER NYLON
& mesh zipper bag.
Small size pet. BRAND
NEW ONLY $20.
352-621-0175
DOG CARRIER X
LARGE plastic airline
type. Clean Excellent
Condition $45.
352-270-3909
DOG STEPS BRAND
NEW by Petmate
Brn/Beige Plastic 19"H
X 12"W $25.(cost $55.)
352-621-0175
EMBROIDERY HOOP
4X4 Brother, fits many
machines, new-still in
package 352-613-5240
$40.00
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.001lb.
Stone Crab@ff.00lb
delivered352-897-5388
Girls winter clothing 4
JEANS 1 pants 5
shirts 2 pajama sets
size 14/16 2 hoodies
$60 352-613-0529
HOMELITE ELECTRIC
POLE CHAIN SAW- 8ft
length, 8 inch cut,
works great, $45.
352-628-0033
Industrial Grill 2 tanks,
many extras $300.
Kitchen aid 5 quart
mixer, $175.
(352) 503-9188
Kitchen Aid Mixer
New $275.
Tiffany style Lamps
3 large $70 ea.
352-465-3086
Large Dog Crate
26 x 36, black wire
$35.
(352) 382-1000
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM
SIZE $20 352-613-0529
Life StriderArm & Leg
Excenriser bike w/ moni-
tor $65 Oak & Glass
cabinet, w/ 3 oak &
glass drs 24x38 $40.
352-794-3907
MANS BIKE-
MAGNA EXCITOR 26"
alum. frame 7
speed..$38.00
352-637-2499
PET TAXI Reduced,
excel, cond. $20.00,
L-23,W-14,H-13
352-513-4027
PICTURE FRAMES 4
nice large frames, all for
($10) 352-613-7493
REGULATION SIZE
POOL TABLE
1" slate in good shape
but may want to put a
new felt on it $200.00.
Citrus County.
401-440-8922
SAIL
SHADE-REDUCED
Reduced-$65.00, Tnan-
gle-11'10/11'10/11'10
352-513-4027
SEARS GAS LAWN
EDGER 3 1/2 HP
Excellent cond. $75.00
352-746-4160
SIX CEILING FANS. 4
Brass 52", 1 brass 30",
1 white 42". $10 ea.
527-1239
SONY DIGITAL VIDEO
CAMERA/RECORDER
All Acessones Like
new.$100.00
352-746-4160
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529




Two Copy Printers
$25 to $75
352-634-4329




Diabetic Shoes,
Beige, Women's
Size 8, Medium width,
never worn, $80
(352) 522-0107


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards




GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com

Lawnricare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570





A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131


"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR BEAUTIFUL
PURE WHITE
W/TURQUOISE TRIM
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" EDEN 20W
BASS AMP
LIGHTWEIGHT(UNDER
15LBS)AND POW-
ERFUL! $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER
SQUIRE JAGUAR SS
BASS METALLIC
RED&BLACK,$100
352-601-6625
"NEW" OSCAR
SCHMIDT ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG&CORD,HI&LO
WZ INPUTS $150
352-601-6625
"NEWACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC CUTAWAY
GUITAR W/STAND OR
WALL HANGER,$80
352-601-6625
"NEW"CRATE FLEX
WAVE AMP
W/REVERB&
OVERDRIVE,12"SPEAK-
ER $90 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
A STYLE MANDOLIN
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $50
352-601-6625
BLACK LES PAUL
SPECIAL II
W/GIGBAGCORD,STAND&
WALLHANGER
$100 352-601-6625
ELECTRONIC PIANO
Yamaha portable piano.
Good condition,36"x13"
$35 352-628-3899
GUITAR AMP
Peavey Valve King
Half Stack Tube Amp
Like New, $700. obo
(352)860-1195
LYON BY WASHBURN
NYLON STRING
GUITAR, EASY TO
PLAYMELLOW TONE
$30 352-601-6625
PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
STRAT STYLE BASS
UKE ELECTRIC POLY
STRINGS, PIEZO
WHITE ON WHITE $75
352-601-6625
STUDENT?"NEW"
CLASSICAL GUITAR
BYWASHBURN
W/GIGBAG&BOOK/CD
$40 352-601-6625




CHANDELIER Beautiful,
large antique looking.
Paid $400, moved &
must sell. $75.00
352-322-1160
MIXER Westinghouse
White LIKE NEW
Hand or counter top
$15. 352-621-0175




Air Bike 950
Like New $35.
Exercise AB Lounge
Spout, with manuals
$35.
(352) 621-0778
Proform Crosswalk 480
excel, cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $225.
352-382-5208
TREADMILL, Prosport
285T Walk to
fitness,,digital all speed
/flat/slant.Good condi-
tion. $100.00 897-5410

Sgorting


97 Club Car w/lights,
48v, back seat,
batteries, exc. cond.
$2000.(352)527-3125


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


"Stop me when I get to something

I can borrow."

Aditon I aae ithn ah


Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Golf Cart
exc. condition, has
headlights
exc. batteries w/
charger. $1500.
(352) 527-3125
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516




2013 Enclosed
Trailer, 5x8,
v-nose, w/ramp door,
$1600. firm
(352) 513-5436
Utility Trailer
'93, 6x 9 x 2 ft.
wood/steel, frame
$250. obo
(352) 465-3086




COSTUME JEWELRY 5
necklaces, 1 pair ear-
rings, nice, all for ($15)
352-613-7493


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
OnlI $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441














Home Maintenance
Repairs/Painting/Power
Washing, Quality work
at affordable prices
Ref avail 573-723-2881
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



S'LRLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
*-352-639-1024***


RV Service


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
All chases of Tile NATURE COAST RV
Handicap Showers, RV service, parts, sales
Safety Bars, Firs. Mobile Repair/Maint.
422-2019 Lic. #2713 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Robin Long

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment













fU
BAILEY
Bailey, Chespeake
Bay hound mix, 2
y.o., HW-negative,
wt. 39 Ibs. Sits on
command, loves
treats, walks well on
leash, good w/other
dogs, attentive to
human friends.
Obeys well, wants to
please. #20731619.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838















TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


BOXER STUD AKC
WANTED. Must be tall,
Email: Belladonnahay
@yahoo.com



COCKER SPANIELS
4 Males, 2 Females w/
papers. 8 weeks old
Blonde & white $800
(352) 287-0519


-i
CYRIL
Cyril, 1 y.o. Hound
mix, found as stray,
beautiful red-brown
coat, wt. 42 Ibs. Easy
to walk, gets along
w/other dogs.
Appears to be
housebroken,
healthy. Affection-
ate & friendly.
Good companion.
#20807791.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


a. pha
Dojha
Dojha approx. 3
y.o., a yellow/white
lab retriever mix,
medium size, came
to shelter because
family lost their
home & could not
keep him. Gentle,
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs,
beautiful in color,
great shape.
Pen #25.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Li/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


D Laughingstock International Inc Dist by Universal UCick for UFS, 2013


9-28


^ -. cry *




CIO SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013

lt'Xl!,r3-:,Ti M v^^
^^H-^^H *jV^H~j


Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382
HAVANESE PUPPIES
9 wks. Champ. Bid.
Lines, Non Shedding
3 males, black &
white, shots, Wormed
$650. OBO, 613-5818


OZZIE
Ozzie, a 2-y.o. neu-
tered Black Mouth
Cur mix, handsome
boy, wt. 61 Ibs, a
little bit shy, good
with kids, good with
cats, should be the
only dog. Walks well
on leash, needs
fenced yard to run
in. Housebroken.
Call Brenda @
352-746-1423.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male $300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males start @ $400.
Females start @ $600.
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


SIMON
well-mannered
retriever mix, 3 y.o.
Sits, gives his paw,
goes down for
treats, takes gently.
Walks well on leash,
behaves in public
places. High energy,
likes to run & play,
plays catch, plays in
pool. Good w/most
dogs. Call Christina
@ 352-464-3908.





BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


HOMOSASSA
2/1'/2, $500 mo., 1st,
last, 352-628-2678
INVERNESS
SW 2/1/2, Great Loca-
tion, all new inside,
wtr. Incl. $550 mo 1st &
Sec. (352) 464-1169
LECANTO
1/1, off Hwy 44
between 491 & Croft
Rd. Recent Remodel,
quiet area
$450/mo. $250 sec.
(352) 302-6551
LECANTO
2/2, Doublewide $575.
(352)212-9682




7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, $2,000 down
$732. mo.
877-499-8065

$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182

ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

BAD CREDIT?
FORECLOSURE?
BANKRUPTCY?
Want your own
home? I can help!!
35% down cash or
land and you
are approved.
No gimmick,
386-546-5833

Singing Forest 46'
2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile
Home, fixer upper,
$6000. 352-344-1365

Tired of Renting?
Super clean 2004
3BR/2BA, on /2 acre
ready to move in!!!
$3,500 down,
$380.03/mo. W.A.C.
Call 386-546-5833 for
details Won't last!

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 w/ carport,
3 storage shed
$85,900.
Agent (352) 382-1000


NIMrBFTIT, I


TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




BEAUTIFUL D/W 3/2
with porch & deck.
Wynnhaven is a 55
plus park. Owner is
very motivated and
will consider all offers.
Priced at $45,000.
Call Willard Pickrel at
J.W. Morton Real
Estate for full details.
352-726-6668 or
352-201-9871.
Doublewide,
2 BR, 2BA,
Recent shingle roof
New AC, MUCH MORE
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, mcl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




-ACTION

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.GlrusCounlyHomeRenlals.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
10941 W. Gem St....................$550
2/1 Large duplex dose to hospital
9660 W. Comphor Li. ................$800
3/2/2 Clen home on comer lot
16 BeKh Ln. #102.................. $900
1/1 Furnmshedsltudio oprtment
BEVERLY HILLS
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2150 Austin Dr. (CS)................$550
2/15 Cute home, some furniture, fenced yard
2332W. Silverhill Ln. (L) ...........$550
2/1 Affordable apartment, ground floor
9047 N. Travis Dr. (CS)..............$625
2/2 Roomyduplex, net and clean
HOMOSASSA
4800 S. Wood Way...................$900
3/2/1 Riverhaen, fully furnished
1101 ClearwaterCt..............$1000
2/2 Wuterfront morle home
INVERNESS
1314Cypress Cove (Inv) ..........$650
2/2, Waterfront townhouse, screen porch




FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628


Furn. Apt Seasonal
2/1, clean, w/d
(352) 563-2626
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kitchen Appl, furn,
1137 N.E. 3rd. Ave. Apt
3, Near CR Primary,
Middle, High School
352-795-3006
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs. 352-726-9570
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb.,
maint. Incl., peaceful
No pets, $600. plus
mo. 628-6700
HOMOSASSA
2/2, clean, quiet, center
location $550., 352-
563-2114,257-6461



CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. Incl Waterjlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 /2, Unfurn.$550,
Furn. $600.+sec clean,
quite. Small Pet 828 5th
Ave. NE. 727-455-8998
727-343-3965






LISTINGS
CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001

Duplexes

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs. 352-726-9570


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
Lovely 2400SF home
3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for
the golf cart. $1200
month plus security.
(352) 464-3905
CRYSTAL RIVER
2-3 BR $200-$250/mo
552-2637, 527-6566
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HERNANDO 31212
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07 $850/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818



Homosassa

Spg
2/2 on Canal, new
paint, flooring, w/d,
pets ok $800 mthly,
8928 W. White Dog-
wood Dr.
619-301-5442

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

INVERNESS
Beautifully Remodeled
on golf course, 2/2/2
$850. 352-895-0744
INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/2
Near Anna Jo Rd.By
appt 786- 423-0478
or (352) 637-1142
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Apt. Waterfront
$650. mo. 1st sec.
Inclds dock, water,
trash. No pets.
772-240-6180
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
Inverness
2/1 Fla rm clean quiet
fishing dock, $450.
860-2452, 201-4559




HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07, $850/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818




INVERNESS
Room for rent, pry.
bath $350., 613-9135


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUWITV



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


WORDY GIJRDBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Apply wind to winter flurries (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
Iand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. True sense or touch (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Rip up food baked in a loaf (1) syllables in each word.
- 02013J FS,Dist. by Univ. Ucick forJ FS
4. Ark builder's squeezing snakes (2)


5. Berliner mice and roaches (2)


6. Obviously preciously (2)


7. One's bro or sis writing messily (2)


OMI'aIflfllos ON11is 'i h[V Q n Kva ava'I3 9 NII'IHHA TNVNH3O 's
SVOf SHVON i' oV3T l M IRUHS Tf1 121Ivd ' MAONSA OII '
9-28-13 SHMs1Nv


BEVERLY HILLS 324 S
Monroe. Sunday 12-3p
Completely Remodeled
Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2
ba, 2 gar. NEW: Roof,
kitchen w/stainless,
baths, flooring etc. $79k.
527-1239






211 Northeast 4th
Street, Chiefland, FL
BANK OWNED
ABSOLUTE AUCTION
6,400+/- SF of space in
2 Buildings on 1.16 Ac-
res. One vacant single
family home and a sec-
ond bldg. used as a
daycare facility.
Inspect: Sept. 30th @
11AM
Onsite Auction with
Webcast bidding on
October 2nd @ 3 PM
Local contact: Julian
Howell, 877-980-9565.
More info at
www.auctionEbid.com
FLBKR#CQ1029847
Auction MGMT Corp.
Jeb@auctionEbid.com


HERNANDO
1000+ sf.of office
space. Heat/Elec
incld, ample pkg $750
(352) 726-3339


3/1, fenced yard,
corner lot. Needs
some repairs. As is
$39,500 Negotiable
2081 W Gardenia Dr
(352) 465-0623








Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina

q


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me


Hoe

Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
$139,000 Call Gwen
795-1520 or 634-1725





Citrus Hills 3/2/2
caged pool, 1 acre,
great neighborhood,
call for details
(352) 746-6552





2 BR, 2BA, Den,
lanai, Scrn'd heated
pool, Cen. AC, poll
barn, 1 AC, fenced,
well, many extras. By
Appt. $129,900 firm
(352)444-2371 or
(352) 586-7602


YOU'LL 4 THIS!
117 S Lunar
Terrace
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
c/h/a,Totally Updated!
Block home, Clean,
Over-sized Garage,
W/Carport. $79,500
Negotiable
Call 352-344-9290


IJI1W(-P M01 ANAJM6WM
SAF 866 443-52183
STS p0,995 1ML- I BULS 2,495 1 5 Sales: Mtn s 9am7p Ca rMR4 SAN $ m1




4ae:MnTus a-p r-a:9m6m evc:MnFi7m6m a a-p


2005 BMW ITK# 139005


203b ASK#13803


Offers only valid for qualified buyers with 720 beacon score. Includes all rebates and incentives. May not be combined with any other promotions. Expires 10-03-13.


AN -WI 7kOk*S


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIEFIEDS


00G40A




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 Cll


I 3:1


--


CE NA T E R


(tgr-A (yeTCA
: n aaLb14


ALL VEHICLES LISTED MARKED WAY UNDER BOOK VALUE!


K 1~


2010 Triumph
Thunderbird
1700 ABS
Reduced
_: ...$10,F993


2009
VN 900
Classic LT
Now
$5999


2009 Kawasaki
Versys
Now $4995


2011 Kawasaki 2002 T-R 125L Now 2003 Honda Goldwing
Ninja 250R $13 999QQ Trike 1800
Now $3995 Now $1299 1 ____ Now 23,999

Ask About Extended Warranties I Ask About Our Maintenance Program

W 2005 ( * -Chevv 1 B iJ 1


Silverado V8
only 24k miles!
a rare gem
Reducd
$12,995


2007 Chevy Silverado
Low Miles...Liike a Rock
Now $13,888


2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee
this is a low mile must see beauty
Now $13,973


2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SE
The original and still number one in minivans
Now $9995


N- 2003
Mil Honda


r -4 ` .
2008 Ford F150 Workhorse
Designed for work and to play
Now $ 13,699


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


&a


IL




C12 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


8535 E Gospel island
Rd inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively
rennovated including
wood and tile floors.
Granite and new roof
and kitchen. Over 2000
Sqft Living area.
$139,900 352-817-5875
or miksh@earthlink.net

INVERNESS
2002, Custom Built
3/2/2
With Extra Lot
$114.500.
352-344-3112

RENT TO OWNH
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM







b


HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TOA
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME ISA FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com









TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!





For SaleI B,. i
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

S= 11^^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL



I




DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com








A
LaWanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
century21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.
MINI FARMS AREA
4/2 on 10 ACRES
20 x 40 Pole Barn
Move in Condition
$139,900.
352-249-1248
RENT TO OWN
no bank, smalldown
pimt. 2/1, $53,579k
take over payments
352-503-3245


Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712


Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bkyard $19,900
obo 352-444-2272




Outboard Motor
25HP, Evirude
with controls, very
good cond.
$750 obo
476-1113, 513-5135
Pontoon Boat Trailer
Can accommodate
up to 24 ft boat,
Very good cond.
$1,500
(609) 509-6021 cell


** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"

17'7 KEY WEST
2013 Skiff, Yamaha 70
4-stroke, Jack Plate,
Trolling Motor, Gauges,
GPS, Alum Trailer,
Transferable Warranty,
Excellent $20,900
352 503-6668
Bass Tracker
17', 50 hsp. Mercury
w/tilt, includes trailer,
trolling motor, $1500.
(352) 560-0068
MERC CRUISER
1993, 20ft, Stern Drive,
Sylvan, Barely used,
but runs great, org.
$12,000 Asking $6,500
obo (352) 228-1355
PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new vhf radio & gps
fishfinder. Gd Cond.
$6500. (352) 527-4247
Sea Eagle
2.5 power, stroke
ouboard & inflatable
Suzuki $1100. for both
(352) 425-7020
SWEETWATER
1991, 15 ft., Pontoon
seats 8, 35HP, trailer,
excellent cond. $3,250
476-1113, 513-5135
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SKYLINE 1995,
Slide in cab over
Camper Fully equip.
generator, fridge,
microwave, AC, &
elect, jacks Loaded.
$2,800 obo
(352) 422-4548
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



Complete Auto Audio
System, Kicker KX,
1200.1, CrossfireVR602,
600watt, Kicker KX
350.2, 2 Kicker KS60, 4
OHM and more $450.
(352) 860-1195

Vehicles

**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**

BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


CLASSIFIED



CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
First Car for Daughter
sml car, autoac, 4 cyl
good cond.under 2k
NO Dealers please
(352) 621-0248

Look
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUICK REGAL
2001 LS, leather Inter.
very good cond., 6 cyl.
82k mi. One owner.
$4,100 352-746-6708
Cadillac
'01, Eldorado, 117K
mi., runs great & looks
great, Candy apple red
$6,000 352-422-2516
CHEVROLET
'09, Malibu LS
8,700 mi. 1 owner,
Gorgeous Car $14,500
(352) 527-0022
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt
4 door, $3,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600






DUDLEY'S
"A-UCTI'C1r

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(inside) 6pm Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S10,'05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-site Boat Manu-
facturina Liauidation
122 N CedarviewTr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for info
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10o%BP Au2267


00, Intrepid 3.5 mag-
num RT, w/ sunrf. Runs
great needs battery
700(352) 860-0158
FORD
2004, Mustang, Deluxe
leather, CD player,
pwr windows, $7,888.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MAZDA
2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed,
4-door, one owner,
great condition, 141,000
miles $3,500.
352-860-2146
MERCURY
2006, Grand Marquis,
LS, $8,988
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
'01, Grand Am, 4 cyl.,
156k mi., cold AC,
standard, runs excel.
$2,800 obo, 476-8690
TOYOTA
'05, Avalon, Limited
49k mi. excell shape,
garage kept. $15,500
Call (352) 634-0101
TOYOTA
2010, Yaris, 3 door,,
$7,795.
352-341-0018



CHEVROLET
2009 CORVETTE
COUPE Z51: Jetstream
blue w/ebony int., 2LT,
Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3
eng., only 9500 mi., car
show winner, serious
inquiries only, first
$35K/OBO gets it. Lets
talk @ 352-249-7630

,THIS OUT!
CHEVY
1981 Corvette
Under 50,000 orig. mi-
les, Shark Body Style,
Very Good Condition,
Garage stored
352-400-4704
FIAT
'79 Spider 2000 Cony.
58K miles, new roof,
good rubber, runs
$2,000 (352) 564-0364
FORD
Rat Rod Projects, 46
Ford PU Roadster, Ford
Model T, Boattail speed-
ster all steel., Inglis
352-949-7874
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
cond. $32,000 obo
352-302-8265





11111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Onfy $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44,CR
461-4518& 795-4440








DUDLEY'S
"A'I3CTI"W1

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(inside) 6pm Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @ 7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy SO0,'05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-site Boat Manu-
facturing Liauidation
122 N Cedarview Tr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
flp://youlu.be/F9bqANqi6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for info
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BP Au2267


GMC
1986 SIERRA
1500
LONG BED
LOOKS
GREAT, RUNS
GREAT!
GOOD OLE
STANDBY
TRUCK,, $3500
O.B.O
CALL JOHN
386-264-0274

I n al.


2500, 01,6 Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $7700.
(352) 465-3086
FORD
1992 Flairside 4x4, 302,
red, 4 lift traction bar,
chrome brush guard,
steps & bedrail. A
beauty in & out.
$5,500 (352) 344-8089
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control,
power windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl trin-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319



CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 5 spd $3,994.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

SOLD
Dodge
Ram Charger, 1987
4x4, w/new engine
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 4X4
Abso-
lutely mint con-
dtion,
the airwill freeze
you
out! This is a must
see
and great on
gas!
$4800 O.B.O
Call
john386-264-0
274

Meeting^^
Notrices


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment


Harley Davidson
2011 FLTRU Road
Glide Ultra loaded
cruise, cd, cb,intercom,
abs, anti theif,6 speed,
and 103cc motor.
only 5886 miles $19,000
(352)212-4101

HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2012 FLHTCUTG Tn
Glide Ultra Classic
AMFM/CD/AUX
w/speakers; CC, Fairing
Full, Alarm, Travel trunk
w/rack, stage 2 scream-
ing eagle high perfor-
mance exhaust & pipes;
ABS brakes, extra
chrome accents. Excel-
lent condition w/only
1250 mi. First $28.5K.
Lets talk @
352-249-7630.

Harley Davidson
Road King, 2006
1450cc,32k,exc.cond.
asking $12,500.
(352) 503-7057

HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition asking
$1200.00 352-637-3254

ONE OWNER


HONDA
2007 VTX 1300C Origi-
nal owner, purchased
brand new, low mile-
age (2,371 miles).
CafA windshield, re-
movable saddlebags,
light-bar. Black &
chrome. Showroom
condition (mint).
Asking a "firm"
$5,050.00 Please con-
tact ownerkseller via
Email: selfor@aol.com
Phone: (352)382-4422

1 1 I .
- 1-1 IrK


246-0921 SACRN
9/30 Shade Meeting- Attny/Client Session
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in a SPECIAL SHADE meet-
ing for the purpose of commencing an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION pursuant to Sec-
tion 286.011(8), Florida Statutes, on Monday, September 30, 2013, at 12:00 Noon, in
the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System
Administration Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inver-
ness, Florida. The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to discuss global
settlement issues of all pending litigation between Citrus Memorial Health Founda-
tion, Inc, and the Citrus County Hospital Board, a political body of the State of Flor-
ida. Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and subsequently
commence the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION which is estimated to be approximately
one (1) hour in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION, the
meeting shall be reopened to the public.
Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows:
V. Alugubelli, M.D., Joseph Brannen, Sandra Chadwick, Robert Collins, Carlton Fair-
banks, DMD, David Langer, James Sanders, V. Reddy, M.D., Ryan Beaty, Chief Exec-
utive Officer, Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Founda-
tion, Inc., James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation,
Inc., Richard Oliver, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.,
and Court Reporter.
There will also be a SPECIAL meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation, Inc., held on Monday, September 30, 2013, immediately follow-
ing the SPECIAL SHADE meeting, in the Board Room, located on the second floor of
the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital,
502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, to discuss:
Sale/lease/affiliation of the hospital
Other
Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing
to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered
at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
September 28, 2013.

923-1003 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Reese Jr, John D 2013-CA-000629 NOS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2013-CA-000629
DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK, a Florida
Banking Corporation, as successor in interest
to PERKINS STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs
JOHN D. REESE, JR,
Defendant
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 12, 2013, entered in Civil Case No 2013-CA-000629 of the Circuit Court
of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of Court, An-
gela Vick, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale on October 17,
2013, at 10'00 am at www citrus realforeclose com the following described property
The South '/ of the South '/ of the West '/4 of the North '/ of the SE '/4 of the SW '/4 of
Section 16, Township 17 South Range 17 East, Public Records of Citrus County, Flor-
ida.
And
The West /4 of the South '/ of the SE /4 of the SW /4 of Section 16, Township 17 South,
Range 17 East, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
LESS and EXCEPT the South 361.5 feet thereof.
TOGETHER WITH a 1985 MANS mobile home ID #3B48M41749A& 3B48M41749B.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Attention: Persons with Disabilities
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days of
your receipt of your notice to appear in court at: Citrus County, John Sullivan, (352)
341-6700.
By/s/ Norm D Fugate, Florida Bar Number 0044458,
NORM D. FUGATE, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff
Post Office Box 98, Williston, FL 32696, Phone 352 528-0019, Fax 352 528-4919
E-Mail norm@normdfugatepa corn, Secondary E-Mail celia@normdfugatepa corn
September 28 & October 3, 2012


I 2013XCURSIONXK19F
-.. .FISH MODEL PONTOON
Honda BF75 EFI Four Stroke
SDeluxe Helm Console 4 Fishing Seats

(Deck, Cross Members, Tubes, Rails & Transom)
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


WEST COMPACT PONTOONS
Now Available! From 14' to 20'
SYamaha & Honda Powered Easily Trailered w/Most Small Cars SUVs
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
563-5510


S2014 EXCURSION
X 23RFCTRITOON



CRYSAL RVER ARINFuel efficient Yamaha F`150 EFI Four Stroke
PLUS PERFORMANCE
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597




XTREME 15,000
Boat, motor, trailer, all aluminum
1442 River Skiff w/15hp electric start

AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR
S 1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768
S aaaoutboardmotors.cornm aaaoutboardmotors@embarqmail.com


-- 2013 EXCURSION X19F
.'A FISH MODEL PONTOON
w' l =f;ii -- *Honda BF75 EFI Four Stroke
** 4 Fishing Seats
CALL FOR CLOSEOUT
PRICING
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


OTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C13


Introducing the 2014 Acura MDX


New 2014
Acura ILX
Luxury Starts Here!

^(B!"1**1^^4
a~c


New 2013
Acura TL
Aggressive Yet Elegant!


New 2014
Acura RDX
Urban Achiever/


New 2014
Acura MDX
Sftte-Of-The-At Togetherness!


TOE1F3EJNW MJABF2DJW fTB3H3EJNW SYD3H2EJNW
Eff:- 9
Lease for $21 9 per mo. Lease for $349 per mo. Lease for $399 per mo. Lease for $459 per mo.
36 month lease 36 month lease 36 month lease 36 month lease
$219 mo x 36 months. $2,999 Due At Signing Includes Down Payment $349 mo. x 36 months. $1,999 Due At Signing Includes Down Payment with No $399 mo x 36 months. $1,999 Due At Signing Includes Down Payment $459 no x 36 months. $3,499 Due At Signing Indudes Down Payment
with No Security Deposit; Excludes Tax, Title & Tag, Security Deposit; Excludes Tax, Title & Tag. For well-qualfled lessees,. with No Security Deposit; Excludes Tax, Title & Tag. For well-qualified with No Security Deposit; Excludes Tax, Title & Tag. For well-qualified
With Approved Credit lessees, lessees.
Thank you for reading this. prices ar e plus tax, tag & t title. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Limit 1 trade-in p er purchase. Cannot be combine d with any other advertised offers. See dealer for complete details.Programms subject to change without notice.* Star ratings are part of the U.S. Department ofTransportation's Saferar.gov program (www.safercar.gov). Models tested with
standard aide-impact airbaga (SABs). t Based on ALG's 200- 2013 Residual Value Awards for a Lcury Brand.* Subject to limited availability. Through aSept. 30, 2013, to approved lesaees by Acura Financial Seavices, DBA of American Honda Finance Corp.
............................................................NW SRP ..4...1 ... .................. 3 ... ..3. .8..Tot .l ......... 16.52.......... unch...t.Ineem... d.. 28.070.25.... ...... I...... or.21.113 .TL6 .............................. .....MSR ..... .......nt ..............at S....... ...................- &1.....


AVAILABLE ON SELECT CERTIFIED PRE.OWNED MODELS*
* On Select Models. See Dealer For Detailsa. Good Thru 09/30/13.


2012 TOYOTA YARIS


NICE SEDAN


-,844


7 Yr /100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty*
12 Month / 12,OOOMile Comprehensive Warranty
150 Point Inspection
24 Hour Emergency Roadside Assistance Trip Interruption
BsExpense Reimbursement
Rental Vehicle
Reimbursement & More A
*Powertfrain warranty begins from
date of new car sale and zero mileage


YEAR MAKE MODEL


LI t ,:,.::
... .c ti',.V


S11,984


(ACURA
CERTIFIED
S Pre-Osaned Vehiclesi I


2011 SUBARU OUTBACK


wK^uBu


GREAT FOR 1 6L 08
THE FAMILY I 0 A704


2006 KIA SPECTRA $4994
A06545A .......................................... $ 4 ,9 9 4


2008 TOYOTA CAMRY
A M 7844 ..........................................


$9,874


2008 HYUNDAI AZERA $10,984
A3536A. ........ ............ .......... $ 1 0 ,9 8 4

2012 TOYOTA YARIS $12,194
P4005.. .. ........ ..


2009 TOYOTA TUNDRA
P5598 .................................. . ..

2009 FORD F-150
AP5669C .... .... . ........


2008 CHEVY SILVERADO $13,964
PM 8555 ..........................................

2006 LEXUS GX470 $14,986
A 4158A ..........................................

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $16,884
M 8779 ........... ............. ............ .

2010 MERCURY MARINER $1 8,984
AM 2622A ....... ........ ....

2011 CHEVY CAMARO $1 9,444
A 4050B ........... ............. ................


$12,754

$12,984


2009 ACURA RDX
P4001.. ........ ......

2013 FORD TAURUS
A M P3883 ...... ............ ....................


2007 BMW 328 $13 894
A 4197A .................. ............ ..........



UU, =\1\I\\\ \\


$19,844

$23,444


All prices are plus tax, tag & title All offers are with approved credit. Vehicles are subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice. Cash doubling comes in the form of price
reduction. Offer not available on internet specials or on vehicles with reduced price already marked on the windshield. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase. Jenkins will double your trade, cash up to
$2500 for a total of $5000. Programs subject to change without notice. Limit I trade-in per purchase. Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers.


OS
F,____Fpp"r rst Ye Dr"" ---L,
IInc-lue With
All Pre-Owned
Voshiclm
eomem


Now Double Your Down Worlm
$3000 = $4000 = $5000


ma


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




C14 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


im~


:p:


V


^CRUZELS
i:Seed Transmission
@ ............................................ $17.955
S--------------$956
-$1,500
Wfs -------- $2,500


1N VW .U It'
LE CAB SILVERADO
LT PACKAGE
. MSRP $34,685
i!TO Down, plus tax and tag.
Security deposit ifyou qualfv.


New 2014
CHEVY TRAVERSE LS
C14016
M SRP: ........................................................................$32,235
DEALER DISCOUNT: -..-S1.000
REBATE. ----------$500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY.--$2.500


Ne; 04
CHEVY EQUINOX LS
$4.'0 Dovwrn, plus lax and tag.
No se: uitvdeposit ifyou qualifv.


New 2013
CHEVY SPARK LT
C13361
M SRP:............................................................. ............$14 ,145
DEALER DISCOUNT:- .-----_$300
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:__-- :-$2,5zsOO


New 2013 Chevy
MALIBU ECO
M SRP:........................................................................ $26,905
DEALER DISCOUNT: -- $600
REBATE: -.. ... $2,00
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY: _____-- $2,500


OVER 90
Used & Certified
LPre-Loved Vehicles!


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTYt


2 YEARSon
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE
FREE OF CHARGE!


Plus, a FREE
PIT-STOP
PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


W 10TOYOTAYARIS
1216,3DOOR,
15$5.295


08 CHEVROLET COBALT
12059,4 DOOR,
5SPEED
$3,998


05 FORD MUSTANG DLX CPE
12150.LEATHr
POWER WINDOWS
s6o288


cc,9oo
%'We PP


I CHEROKEE4X4 07 CHEVROLET TAHOE LT 13 CHEVROLET MALIBU 2LT
EUHlNISSEAT 12121,LEATHER, P12171, LEATHER, MY LINK
JaISCREEN RADIO ALLOUWHEELS TOUCH SCREEN
S$169 $17W8
"* -E R^^^^I^H m^^'---A


10 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB
121277,4 LEAITHER,
POWER WINDOWS, LOCKS
$20.A98


11 BUICK LACROSSE C(L
12179, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
COOLED SEATS, KEIESS START
$ 998


13CHEVROLETEQUINOXLT 11 GMCTERRAIN SLT
P120, 12006, LEATHER,
ONSTA TOW HITCH
$20/488 $2O388


$9,988 $10,024

ft|^^MANY
MORE70
11OIEVM.ETSI lRADOCREWC E
P12038,6"LIFr,20"WHEELS CHOOSE
Wl35"PRRESM
$29,67 FROM!


Do For You!
S0018
"k &JI-.Tv l 1 h'j


Usw-
*1V w/S

CHE~yjE~


months with $2.470 cash down. plus
j .vl incentives to obtain prices Umited
and:accessories additional cost. Offer


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L IJ
rIHf




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C15


anda


FG3B5DEW
Transmission!


fLes

U


)raNew2013Honda 1
CORD LX SEDAN;%
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


ans-


...for a New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Model TF3H3DJW Best Selling Compact
SUVN In America! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...or a New 2013 Honda
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


Model RM3H3CEW-Come SeeWhy The CR-V Is The Best
Selling Compact SUV In America! Save WhileThey Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW,
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%. OVER 90 s5oo MIUTARY
60MONThSUs & CR iR APPRECIATION OFFER
X 60 MONTHS Used &a etie f ied To eligible members of the US Military & their
on select new Honda models Pre-Owned Vehicles! spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
ona pro'@W drEit. finance or lease thru H FS. See dealer for details.


AUll Pre-Owned Vehicles include
6 MONTH/
6 000 MILE
Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
Se Geadi to, comolere neuiV.


Check Out Our REALLY BIG Selection
of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


PiSCAMRY
J5095


$$7$995


Nru
2003 MIATA 2001 HONDA
$4,995 $5,995


2005 BEETLE
CONV.
$6,995


2008 HONDA 2007 TOYOTA 2005 RANGER
FIT RAV4 EDGE
$8,995 $8,995 $9,995


AArNDA 2010 KIA
~9I95 AHBRID SEDONA
|g99?S $10,995 S131,995


2012 CHEVY
MALIBU
$15.995


2UUt ALLUKL
4DRLX-P
$12,495


2010 CIVIC
LX
$44,495


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of Honda CERTIFIED Vehicles!


) 2011 CIVIC 2010 CIVIC 2009 ACC(
COUPE 4DRLX 4DRLX
$12,995 $13,495 $13,99


2012 FIT 2011 CIVIC 2012 CM
,BASE 4DR$LX LX$2DR
$15,495 S15,995 $15.991


2008 ELEMENT
SC
$15,995


2010 ACCORD 2011 CRV
4DREX SE
$16,995 $18,495


IC
'5


2011 ACCORD 2012 FIT
4DR LX SPORT
$16,495 $16,595


2008 RIDGEUNE 2011 CRV
EX-L
S19,995 $21,995


Come See'What LOVE Can Do For Youl
OUS19,.2Mies 3 2 M I
h"Rh .".,..352.628.4600
aulf of Cystal River J O 0.0U

Lo-veHonda.com

Ap|i~jjb Caetsa ea.r& Iodas I wh sametrinm el. Must bnngin currentadvertisemernt trom local dealer sowing lower price on
J,' et $=0 guarantee of.e Excludes priorsales. See dealerfor details 1.36 month closM end 1i9 with approved credit
AHe t'r 15 cents per mietherafter. $2995 cash orade equity plus taxes, tag & fees first payment, tag and lease ard state fees
dul ae.ndfinslel equipnetataddtiaocost. 'Nota lease 2.36 month closed end oe-pay Lease ot $9.976 with approve
&! 4C.'C09iles per ar 15 cents per mile thereafter. 12000 cash or trade equity Payment is plus ta, tag and leaseand state ees due at
b tlll^ at adeinoalcost tUsedasa imo payment or cap cost reduction lord the purchase or ease ol any new Honda autlorotbi.
V':,IAI5R f R, oda Leadership Lease, on Honda Leadership Purchase Plar program through HFS (extludes Zero Due at Signing
,un#,'fi ^ t neTurcei t critnere estabished by HFS, and vehicle must be eligible for nw-vehie rates tftCovers internal
% i ji aSeeeafeloro details Al pie-owned vehdes include $2500 cash down or trade equity Offers valid thru date ol publicabton


11


r O
a-^^ ^


--- ii-.On.,,-.


CR-V LX 2WD


I <,l(,rs




C16 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


BMW in Ocala


0


The Ultimate
bmwinocala.com Driving Machine


KICKOFF

TO SAVINGS
EVENT
BMW Ultimate ServiceTM:
Pay Nothing 4 years or 50,000 Miles Total Maintenance Charges: $0

New 2014 BMW XI sDrive28i


Starting At

$30,800*


Lease For
OR $349
Per MonthA


New 2013 BMW 320i Sedan


Starting At

32,550*


Lease For
OR $329
Per MonthA


*Starting MSRP from BMW. Excludes destination and options. A36 month lease with $3574 due at
signing (320i = $3804) including $500 Conquest Cash or $500 Loyalty Cash (320i = $2000 Build-
Out Cash & $500 Conquest Cash or $500 Loyalty Cash) and $0 security deposit with approved
credit for well-qualified consumers through BMW Financial Services. 10,000 miles per year
allowed, 200 per mile thereafter. All factory rebates and incentives to dealer. Offers exclude tax,
tag, title, registration and dealer fee. Prior sales excluded. Photos for illustration only. Offers cannot
be combined. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 9/30/2013.

E Certified Pre-Owned E
by BMW
Every Certified Pre-Owned BMW comes with both
24/7 Complimentary Roadside Assistance and an
up to 6-Year/100l,OOO-Mile Protection Plan.A


2011 BMW
328i Sedan
STK#MP1638

$25,992

2011 BMW
328i Sedan
STK#MP1605

$26,994

2011 BMW
335i Sedan
STK#MP1636

$32,991


i-I
- - --


A^For full details about the Protection Plan, visit www.bmwusa.com/cpo. For more information, call
1-800-334-4BMW. Financing available through BMW Financial Services. Offers exclude tax, tag,
title, registration and dealer fee. Vehicles subject to prior sale. See dealer for complete details.
Offers expire end of day 9/30/2013.


BMW
.402 of Ocala


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234
BMWinOcala.com


KICKOFF

TO SAVINGS
EVENT
THROUGH SUNDAY ONLY!

0% APR Financing
For Up To 60 Months Available
On Any New 2013 Volkswagen!f

STK#W375382


,v, r ...... .ii/,-,tu Sl 4 9 9 *
Savings .... -$3941 $ A l l
Sale Price 1347

STK#W129853





STK#W649387



MSRP................. $28,345 -Mo FS60
Savings ..........-$856]
Sale $234
Price.. S im i
L- ------I-- 0 S

STK#W493875
MSRP ............. $26,335
Savings.............-$3836



Sa9le
Price 043ATTHIS SALE PRICE!
New 2013 .ii!kwae.- I iGjI a


Savings ................-$5181] MMWW W
Price $0
SPrice A41499 5ATTHIS SALE PRICE!


STK#W516611
MSRP ................. $36,950
Savings...........-$6951
Sale s2 ,9
Price... 9J 99


STK#W005314
MSRP ................. $42,920
Savings ................-$5421
Sale $3 ,
Price.. 7,499
^ 0% APR is $16.67 per month per $1000 borrowed with $0 down and approved credit through Volkswagen Credit.
*Sale price applies to the following models only: Jetta 2.0L base model with manual transmission and no a/c -
VIN#3VW2K7AJ1DM375382, and Golf Hatchback. All factory incentives to dealer. All offers exclude tax, tag, title, registration
and dealer fee. Offers cannot be combined. Photos for display only. Prior sales excluded. Vehicles subject to prior sale. See
dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 9/30/2013.


Volkswagen
of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd., Ocala On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352.861-0234 VWofOcala.com


Das Auto.


SUNROOF!


STK#W043916


MSRP................. $29,680


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C17


0 l FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


1o9%o


FALL


SALES


EVENT


I


Relax, It's Covered.T
* 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians
* 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage**
* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage**


. ... .:..:...... .......... ...... :.:....::...

Fodi Motor m any II
-k-
Ford Motor Company


*Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 60 months at $17.48
per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment. Take
delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/13. See dealer for qualifications
and complete details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty
coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership.


Go Further


2009 FORD
FOCUS SE
Cerl it- & ,a3Ir pri t-c ..J4T i46A
$12,816


2010 FORD
EDGE AWD SEL
Certified & sale priced NP5915
$26,442


2011 FORD
FIESTA SES
Cerified & sale priced NP5861
$15,996


2010 FORD
FUSION HYBRID
Ct-rlifi-c & .saItm- pritm-e j1 C 1 1D
$19,626
1AX r .I--ws-


2010 FORD RANGER 2012 FORD
XLT EXT CAB MUSTANG COUPE
Ct-riiFr-e &. eair prl t-d Nri..3C 1j36A Cerlified & sale pr red NP5856
$19,633 $19,988
p r "-
t7L .~


2013 FORD
EXPLORER LIMITED
Certified & sale priced NP5917
$35,927


S2012 CHRYSLER 300 LIMITED
Don't miss this one. NP5913
$26,968


2010 FORD F150 FX2 SUPER CAB
One owner & only 28k miles. NP5909A
$26,668


I


201 0 LINCOLN MKT 2009 FORD F350 4X4 CREW 2013 FORD C.MAX HYBRID SEI
Affordable lolnN3T401A Loaded CABELLA's truck. N4TO30A Only4 ilesnthishbid. N 88A
$29,968 $29,968 $29,488


L 2012 CHEVY SILVERADO C1500 CREW
Only 16k mi,9les. N3T1 13A
$29,968


j FORD CREDIT


BLUE OVAL RT


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00


GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness a Springs Hwy. 98
------ 726-1231 tu-i
SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT Michelle Russo Spring Hwy. 50
www.nicknicholasford.com Salesperson of the Month Hill _________Brooksville
Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Trade-In Assistance Bonus
Customer Cash available to those who currently own or lease a 1998 or newer Ford/LM/Competitieve Car, Truck or SUV who trades in or have a lease expiring by Sept. 30, 2013. Model Select Vehicles Trade-in
Assistance Bonus Customer Cash (PGM#33368) (National). Offers expires Sept. 30, 2013.


I


2012 FORD
EXPEDITION XLT
Cerlified & sale priced N3C205A
$34,367


2013 FORD
FLEX SEL
$ 68L'l.2 ._ l,. p,:.?,j '1., II mil.- '.,-
$36,832


APR for 60 months*


'I




CIS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013


www.VI LLAG ETOYOTA. com


ii A


NEW '13 TOYOTA


I


NEW '14 TOYOTA


2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE STK#13090061 ........................$6,955
2004 LINCOLN TOWNCAR STK#13090221 .......................$8,395
2001 HONDA ODYSSEY LX STK#13090151 ......................$8,600
2004 BUICK LESABRE STK#13080147........................... $10,350
2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS STK#13090083.............. $12,495
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE STK#13090205.................... $12,495
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY STK#13080524 ............................$13,725
2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU STK#13090101.................... $13,858
2006 CADILLAC STS V6 STK#13090037........................ $13,985
2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE STK#13090070....................... $14,455
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY STK#13080370........................... $14,995
2013 KIA RIO SX STK#13080340 ....................................$15,750
2011 TOYOTA COROLLA LE STK#13080305 ....................$15,910
2012 TOYOTA COROLLA LE STK#13089006................... $16,850
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY HYBRID STK#13080255.............. $16,900
2012 TOYOTA COROLLA LE STK#13090197.................... $16,985
2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HB STK#13090165........................ $16,988
2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT STK#13090129.............. $16,995
2008 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080344 ...........................$17,450
2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HB STK#13090060.........................$17,455


m T1It


2011 TOYOTA PRIUS HB STK#13090195 .........................$17,680
2007 LINCOLN MKX STK#13080426...............................$17,825
2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA LIMITED STK#13090090........ $18,455
2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK#13090187...... $18,675
2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER STK#13090181.................. $19,625
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA SE STK#13080064....................$19,750
2013 KIA OPTIMA LX STK#13080331............................. $19,800
2011 HONDA CR-V EX STK#13080149............................ $20,855
2009 TOYOTA VENZA V6 STK#13080232....................... $21,300
2010 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080537........................... $23,225
2009 INFINITI G37 STK#13080124.................................$23,950
2013 TOYOTA RAV4 XLE STK#13090108........................ $24,295
2011 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080519........................... $24,450
2013 TOYOTA CAMRY SE STK#13070479....................... $25,495
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY SE STK#13080067...................... $25,888
2012 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER STK#13089003 ..................$25,925
2011 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080229...........................$26,900
2011 CHEVROLET TAHOE 1500 LS STK#13080542 .........$27,325
2010 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLE STK#13090148................. $27,688
2012 TOYOTA PRIUS V STK#13070528........................... $27,995


olo


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


46641


23m


lwqll


o 'r




Full Text

PAGE 1

SEPTEMBER 28, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community50www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Classifieds . . . .C8 Comics . . . . .C7 Community . . . .C5 Crossword . . . .C6 Editorial . . . .A10 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C7 Obituaries . . . .A6 TV Listings . . . .C6 NEWS BRIEFS HIGH88LOW66Isolated evening showers. PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SATURDAY 000G2NF VOL. 119 ISSUE 52 CITRUS COUNTY Lecanto battles Belleview; Pirates take on Tigers /B1 Man dies after medical emergencyShorty before 1 p.m. Friday, an Inverness resident was injured and subsequently died as a result of injuries sustained when his vehicle left the roadway as he was experiencing a medical emergency, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Melvin Hutcherson, 65, was traveling southbound on Citrus Avenue (County Road 495) near Red Valley Court, north of Crystal River, when he experienced a medical emergency, lost control and left the roadway near 4570 N. Citrus Ave. His vehicle struck a mailbox and continued into a wooded area, where it came to rest. Hutcherson was transported to Seven Rivers hospital, where he later died. Activities planned for Estuaries DayThe St. Martins Marsh Aquatic Preserve and the Citrus County School Districts Marine Science Station invite the public to celebrate National Estuaries Day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today. The community event will include guided boat rides, childrens activities, a hike up a 60-foot estuary observation tower, as well as walking tours of waterfront educational and research facilities. Due to limited available parking, visitors must meet at the Crystal River Preserve State Park at 3266 N. Sailboat Ave., Crystal River, for vehicle parking. Guided boat rides will take visitors to the Marine Science Station and back to the Crystal River Preserve State Park throughout the duration of the event. If necessary, limited disabled access parking will be available at the Marine Science Station, 12646 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. This event is free to the public and reservations are not required. From staff reports Govt shutdown looming Associated PressWASHINGTON Time running short, the Democratic-controlled Senate passed legislation Friday that would avert a partial government shutdown early next week. But the measure faced a swift demise in the House at the hands of tea party conservatives who are adamantly opposed to funding included for the nations 3-year-old health care law. The Senates 54-44 vote was strictly along party lines in favor of the measure, which would keep the government operating routinely through Nov. 15 and prevent a shutdown that could cause delays in some services. The bills passage masked a ferocious struggle for control of the Republican Party, pitting Speaker John Boehner and Senate Leader Mitch McConnell against rebels led by relatively junior lawmakers, Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah and a few dozen allies in the House among them. The outcome of that contest more than differences between the two political parties is likely to determine whether the government shuts down at midnight Monday for the first time in nearly two decades. We now move on to the next stage of this battle, Cruz said shortly after the Senate vote. He told reporters he had had numerous conversations with fellow conservatives Senate and House still at odds Associated PressSen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, center, accompanied by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., left, and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, right, express their frustration Friday on Capitol Hill in Washington after the Senate passed a bill to fund the government, but stripped it of language that would defund the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare. See BUDGET/ Page A7 Chamber relocating MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerINVERNESS When the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce moved into its new offices in 2006, there was cause for celebration. Not only had the chamber found a new home, its locale was the historic Hicks House, built in 1900 by Robert O. Hicks at 401 Tompkins St. in downtown Inverness. Chamber officials were excited about the May 18, 2006, grand opening, since it also coincided with the 100th birthday of Bessie Hicks, the homes former owner who moved in during the 1930s and was on hand to enjoy cake and the festivities. Its been good. Its worked well for us, chamber Chief Executive Officer Josh Wooten said. Now the chamber is vacating the house, leaving to join a coalition with county economic and tourism leaders in a welcome center on U.S. 19 in Crystal River. The house wasnt even on the market yet when David Arthurs heard about the sale. The chamber and Arthurs signed a contract to purchase for about $100,000, Wooten said. Arthurs, an Inverness businessman and former publisher of MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleInvestor and longtime Inverness resident David Arthurs will soon buy the Hicks House, a historic home in downtown Inverness. The home currently serves as an office for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Inverness businessman buying historic Hicks House Fire fee hardship claims increase CHRISVANORMER Staff writerINVERNESS The number of taxpayers who have applied for hardship assistance on the Fire Protection Assessment fee has increased to 28 as the deadline approaches. Ive had 25 so far and three more today, said Heidi Blanchette, Housing Services operations manager, on Thursday. Blanchette will process applications until 5 p.m. Monday for people who wish to prove through low income they need relief from the $54-per-year fire protection fee, approved on July 23 by the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) as an MSBU Municipal Service Benefit Unit. The assessment is expected to generate about $4.5 million for fire services in the 201314 county budget. Those taxpayers who are approved through the hardship assistance program will get the assessment paid for them by the county, which will transfer the amount from the general fund to fire protection services. NANCYKENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS When you were with Nancy Sullivan, you were the only person who mattered. Whether it was business or friendship, when you sat at her desk at Citrus Title Insurance Company in Inverness, across the table at Stumpknockers or in her living room, you had her complete and genuine attention. She was my sanctuary, said Inverness attorney Michael Mountjoy. If I ever felt I was about to explode, I would escape to the title company just to see Nancy. ... When she talked with you, you felt you had a genuine friend and that she heart-felt your problems. Professionally, too, you knew you could trust her. Nancy Sullivan died Sept. 23. She was 76 years old. Born and raised in Tampa, she came to Citrus County in 1966, a city girl moving to the country to a 10-acre farm in Homosassa. I dont know how she did it, but she got up every morning to milk the cows and feed the animals, process milk for Nancy Sullivan: Everyone was her best friend See SULLIVAN/ Page A2 See MSBU/ Page A2 Nancy Sullivancame to the county in 1966. See HOUSE/ Page A2

PAGE 2

A2SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESTATE/LOCAL us to drink, make bread and still take time to take care of me, my three brothers and my dad, said daughter Susan Sullivan. She sewed the familys clothes, chaperoned school events and drove the boys to basketball practice 20 miles away. In the 1980s, after she and her husband divorced, Nancy moved to Crystal River with her daughter and later by herself to Inverness in 1985. For more than 30 years, Nancy Sullivan was the face and the heart and soul of Citrus Title as office manager. It was there she met Judge Patricia Thomas, who was an attorney at the time. I spent a great deal of time in her office, Thomas said. I would sit there and confess and shed roll her eyes, but you knew that whatever you told her, it stayed with her ... I talked to her every day. Something would happen and Id say, Ive got to tell Nancy about this one! For Alida Langley, Nancy was the friend who never saw color difference, who loved all her friends equally with her whole heart and soul. We were sisters, Langley said. She showed neighborly kindness to all people, and she was always concerned about her neighbors. She was kind, she was quiet, and she did things for people without them knowing it was her. Thomas called her a ripple on a lake as opposed to a splashing ocean, preferring to be behind the scenes. She shunned the limelight, but at the same time she had a sparkle and a spark about her, especially when doing something for someone else, said cousin Sally Ream. Nancy was also very funny, she said. I remember being in the kitchen squealing with laughter with her. Nancy Sullivan was the first person many people turned to, whether it was personal or professional. Thomas said that after the birth of her daughter, Brittany, she stopped by Citrus Title on the way home from the hospital just so Nancy could see the baby. And when she learned she had been appointed as a judge, she hopped all the way to the title company to share the news with her friend. She was the go-to person with any question of land title and property history, said Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni. She was always helpful and went out of her way to make sure you understood the facts.I will always remember how hard she worked. A jewel of a person who will be missed by all who knew her she defined professionalism. Loved this lady. For 11-year-old granddaughter Bekkah, she was her sewing partner who took her to sewing lessons at Alida Langleys shop every Wednesday. To her younger brother John, she was a tough act to follow as a child but was much-adored and respected as his big sistermother-friend. She was sweet and kind, generous and selfless, confident and competent. She loved books and words and people, loved sewing and getting away to Anna Maria Island with family and friends. She made the best potato candy and block party beans and she had a passion for seeing Mount Carmel Methodist Church in Floral City her friend Alida Langleys church get its new roof. The family requests in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Mount Carmel Methodist Church, 8004 S. Florida Ave., Floral City, FL 34436. In addition to family and friends, she leaves behind Paul Richey, her partner of 30 years. The culture of Inverness is one of loving acceptance and that everybody is important no matter what their station in life, Sally Ream said. That didnt just happen. It was established by wonderful people like Nancy Sullivan.Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or nkennedy @chronicleonline.com. SULLIVANContinued from Page A1 the Citrus County Chronicle,said the house is a good investment. Its a well-built house with good lumber, he said. Arthurs owns another former home on Tompkins Street and leases it to an attorney. He said professionals such as lawyers and accountants are a good fit for what is becoming a mix of commercial, office and some residential along Tompkins Street. Wooten and chamber of commerce president John Murphy said the move to Crystal River is designed to attract more attention to the services offered by the chamber, Economic Development Council and Tourist Development Council. Were off the beaten path here, Murphy said, referring to the Hicks House location. We want to be where the action is. Both are excited that the buyer is Arthurs, a protector of Inverness history. Due to the delicate nature of the Hicks House, we wanted to make sure it went to a good home, Wooten said. We had Mr. Preservation come along. The chamber is not vacating Inverness. It plans to share space with theChroniclesstorefront office on the Courthouse Square. The contract is expected to close in 30 to 60 days. Arthurs said he will allow the chamber to continue using the Hicks House until it is ready to move. Nancy Sullivanworked at Citrus Title for more than 30 years. HOUSEContinued from Page A1 The extremely low level of income to qualify for assistance was questioned by Page Bosworth of Homosassa. The We Care Food Pantry uses the U.S. Department of Agriculture as its standard, Bosworth pointed out. I am qualified for food assistance. Bosworth said the USDA sets its limit at $14,937. If the county had been likeminded, I would send in an application for exemption, Bosworth said. To qualify for assistance, the applicants income level would need to be within the extremely low limits established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that starts at $10,100 per year for one person ranging up to $19,050 for an eight-person family. Blanchette said the HUD criteria are set out in the county resolution for the fire fee hardship program. The BOCC could decide if it should review the criteria for future budget years. Some county residents have told the Chroniclethat the application process is difficult and discouraging. It isnt the low income levels, its the process required, said one resident who asked not to be named and pointed out that the application was not stocked anywhere in Crystal River. Blanchette, however, said all county libraries can print an application from the countys website by going to www.bocc. citrus.fl.us/commserv/ housing/housing_ services.htm. Another issue was sending a Social Security statement as proof of income. Blanchette said a copy would be acceptable. An applicant also did not know where to find the tax parcel identification number. Blanchette said it could be found on the homeowners TRIM (truth in millage) notice that is mailed in advance of tax bills. Yet another task that some senior citizens found difficult was finding a notary public and paying for the service. Many package delivery stores offer the service for $5 per stamp, according to a response from one store to a reporters inquiry. Also daunting was the need to repeat the process May 1, meaning this application is only good for seven months, one applicant said. Blanchette responded that the application is good for a year; its just that the first year starts late as the MSBU is coming into use for the first time. For more information about hardship assistance, call Citrus County Housing Services at 352527-7520.Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer@chronicle online.com. MSBUContinued from Page A1 Associated PressGov. Rick Scott, left, shakes hands with veteran Edwin Heyer, right, 91, as Donald Fulton, center, 73, looks on during a ceremony Friday where Scott presented veterans at the Alexander Sandy Nininger State Veterans Nursing Home with the Governor's Veterans Service Award, in Pembroke Pines. Our veterans are heroes that have made countless sacrifices for Florida families. Its important that we dont just wait for the holidays to thank our men and women, said Scott. Governor honors veterans Associated PressTAMPA The state of Florida will place billboards along streets, in malls and on bus shelters to raise awareness of human trafficking. During a news conference Friday, Attorney General Pam Bondi announced a statewide program called From Instant Message to Instant Nightmare, aimed at helping parents spot sexual exploitation of children online. The billboards place an emphasis on social media and Internet use. Bondi said parents and adults can download a tip sheet about Internet safety and a pledge for children to sign and print. The pledge instructs kids not to share inappropriate pictures, never accept friend requests from strangers on social media networks and not to share personal information. The tip sheet urges parents to talk to children about sex trafficking and friending strangers online. Bondi, who was joined at the conference by heads of several Tampa Bay area law enforcement agencies, said that human traffickers often find their victims online. She and the other officials said parents and caretakers can help thwart human trafficking by being aware of what kids are doing on the Internet. Officials gave examples of recent cases where young girls were lured into prostitution after talking to an older man online. It makes it easier for these predators to target young kids who are vulnerable, Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor said. According to the state Department of Children and Families, sex trafficking of young victims is among the most underreported offenses. The agency started a statewide task force in 2009 because the majority of sex trafficking victims are foster youth. Bondi said that in 2011, the National Human Trafficking Resource Center ranked the state third in the number of calls received by the centers hotline. Florida lawmakers passed the Safe Harbor Act last year to ensure that child sex trafficking victims get help from child welfare professionals instead of being placed in juvenile delinquency. Florida is particularly vulnerable spot for trafficking crimes because its geography and being a vacation destination make it an easy transit point for predators to transport victims. We need your help to put these horrible people out of business and send them to prison, Bondi said. Bondi announces effort to stop human trafficking Associated PressTAMPA A Tampa dog is being treated for poisoning by a Bufo toad, a species known for its hallucinogenic toxins and increased activity during periods of unusually heavy rains. The dog was expected to recover because it was the second time this animal had a run-in with a Bufo toad and the owners knew what to do immediately, said James Judge, a spokesman with BluePearl Veterinary Partners. However, the incident as well as the poisoning death of a Jack Russell Terrier in Temple Terrace last October has area veterinarians warning pet owners about the dangers of the huge toads. That dog bit into a Bufo toad and was killed by the toxins. The Tampa Tribune reported the incident has area pet owners on edge. Tampa veterinarian John Gicking said several cases of toad poisoning are treated every week during periods of increased Bufo toad activity. Curious dogs and cats tend to lick or pick up Bufo toads with their mouths. When this happens, the toad secretes a poison from glands on the back of its head, which causes the pets to have symptoms. Symptoms of intoxication include seizures, drooling, really red gums, pawing at their mouths, stumbling, heart arrythmia, excitable behavior, pacing and trembling, Gicking said. Scientifically named Bufo marinus, they are known as giant toads, marine toads or cane toads, and they generally distinguish themselves by their large size. In Florida, the females are larger than the males and can grow to 10 to 15 centimeters across. The toads, which have grayish brown, warty skin, are not native to Florida, but were introduced to eat cane beetles. They became established in Florida in an accidental release of about 100 specimens in Miami in 1955 and further release by pet dealers in the 1960s, according to the University of Florida Wildlife Extension. If pet owners suspect an animal has bitten a Bufo toad, rinse its mouth and paws with water and seek veterinary help immediately. Use caution, however, so the pet does not aspirate the water with toxins, Gicking said. Pet owners should also be careful about being bitten by animals who become unruly while intoxicated by the toxin, he said. Pet owners should wash their own hands after rendering aid and be careful not to get the toxin in their own eyes or mouth. Gicking suggests vigilance is the best course of action to prevent toad poisoning. Dont just leave dogs out in the yard unsupervised, especially people who live near water sources, he said. Leash walks during high incident times are best. The toads are omnivores and consume insects and other toads and frogs. If you dont want to attract them to your yard, remove cat and dog food from the vicinity. The most humane way to kill a Bufo toad is to place it in a plastic bag and put it in the freezer for three days. Beware the bufo toad after rain Special to the ChronicleCurious dogs and cats tend to lick the bufo toad, which secretes a poison from glands on the back of its head. Pam BondiFlorida attorney general. State BRIEF Man charged with stabbing dogHIALEAH Police in South Florida said a man has been arrested after he was caught on video stabbing a dog. The Miami Herald reported surveillance footage shows Jose Cespedes walking along a sidewalk in Hialeah. As Cespedes walked by a chain linked fence, a dog named Zoey jumped against the fence and barked at him. According to an arrest report, Cespedes pulled a knife out of his waistband and stabbed the dog near its shoulder.Zimmerman being investigatedLAKE MARY Police officers in Lake Mary are investigating whether George Zimmerman inappropriately took items from his in-laws house where he had been living. Police spokesman Zach Hudson said Friday that officers are investigating what happened to a television, couch and other pieces of furniture that had been at the house owned by Zimmermans in-laws. From wire reports

PAGE 3

Book lovers line up Friday for the start of the semi-annual sale. At 1:30 p.m. Sunday, bring your books with pages falling out or broken spines and learn how to mend them. A team of book menders will have tools and will show you how to do it. Purchase a ticket for $5 for a chance to win a Kindle Fire HD. All proceeds from the drawing and book sale benefit the Friends of the Citrus County Library System (FOCCLS), which uses the money to purchase books and materials for the libraries. PATFAHERTY Staff writerU.S. Rep. Rich Nugent has introduced a bill seeking to delay flood insurance rate hikes that could take effect Tuesday. Friday afternoon, he recalled the history behind the issue. In July 2011, Congress finally reached an agreement to institute reforms to the program that would make it sustainable, and that led to a long-term agreement on whether to continue having a National Flood Insurance Program at all, he said. At the time, the bill passed in the House with over 400 votes. The National Association of Realtors called its passage a major victory for homeowners. The Independent Community Bankers and others hailed the victory. Congress and Realtors all over the country breathed a sigh of relief. Fast forward twoplus years and we now have homeowners across the country who are looking at flood insurance premiums that are going to skyrocket some going from $900 to $15,000 or more. This, in short, is not what Congress intended. It is absolutely critical that Congress pauses on this long enough to get it right, he said.Our communities will be hit hard. And even though the vast majority of congressional districts may not have flood-prone areas, I think everybody can understand why this country doesnt need another major hit to the housing market. U.S Rep. Cathy Castor, Tampa, was the lead Democrat on the bill. Associated PressTALLAHASSEE A Florida state legislator has filed a bill to exempt anyone who fires a warning shot in self-defense from the states minimummandatory-sentencing laws. Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk City, filed the bill Thursday in response to the conviction of a woman who was sentenced to 20 years in prison after firing a gun near her estranged husband during an argument. His action came the same day an appeals court granted the woman, Marissa Alexander, a new trial. Under Combees proposed legislation, those in situations such as Alexanders would be exempt from the states -20Life law, which requires anyone who shows a gun while committing certain felonies to be sentenced to 10 years in prison. If someone is shot and wounded during the commission of those crimes, the sentence increases to 25 years to life. The law, implemented in 1999, has been credited with helping to lower Floridas violent-crime rate. Combee said Alexanders and other cases in Florida convinced him of the need to clarify the states mandatory minimumsentence law for gun-related offenses. I cant imagine and dont believe anyone intended that 20-Life should apply to someone who felt they were threatened, Combee said. What crime did she commit? She wasnt robbing a store. Combee filed an identical bill during this years legislative session but it went nowhere. He said the attention surrounding Alexanders case convinced him the measure has a chance of moving forward during the session that begins in March. Alexander had never been arrested before she fired a bullet at a wall one day in 2010 to scare off her husband when she felt he was threatening her. Nobody was hurt, but the judge in the case said he was bound by state law to sentence her to 20 years in prison after she was convicted of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Alexander has maintained that the shot fired was a warning shot. The 1st District Court of Appeal ruled Thursday that Alexander deserves a new trial because the trial judge handling her case did not properly instruct the jury regarding what is needed to prove self-defense. The ruling said the instructions constituted a fundamental error and required Alexander to prove self-defense beyond a reasonable doubt. But the court also made clear in its ruling that the judge was right to block Alexander from using the states stand your ground law as a way to defend her actions. The law, which attracted international attention during George Zimmermans recent murder trial, generally removes a duty to retreat in the face of possible danger and allows people to use deadly force if they believe their lives are in danger. The judge threw out Alexanders stand your ground claim, noting she could have run out of the house to escape her husband but instead got the gun and went back inside. Alexander rejected a plea deal that would have resulted in a three-year prison sentence and chose to go to trial. Around theCOUNTY Two events at Fort Cooper State ParkFrom 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today, the public is invited to National Parks Day at Fort Cooper State Park on Old Floral City Road in Inverness. Walk the grounds and have breakfast with park rangers and park volunteers. On Oct. 5, the public is invited to Step Into Time visit the park from 10a.m. to 3p.m., see a new kiosk, sample Seminole pumpkin fry bread, interact with living historians and re-enactors, hear stories and meet artist Guy LaBree, who has been nominated by the Friends of Fort Cooper for the 2013 Florida Folk Heritage Award. For information, call the Fort Cooper State Park office at 352-726-0315. Angela Vick to speak to voters leagueCitrus County Clerk of Court and Comptroller Angela Vick will be guest speaker of the League of Women Voters of Citrus County at 10:15a.m. Tuesday, Oct.8, at the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills. Vick has worked for the Citrus County Clerks Office for 22 years. She will be explaining the duties of her position and answering any questions pertaining to her work. The league is a nonpartisan, educational organization that meets every second Tuesday of the month. All interested are invited. Feel free to bring soft drinks. For information, call 352746-0655. Author to address RepublicansFamed World War II author Adalbert Krei will be the speaker at the Saturday, Oct.5, Ronald Reagan Republican Assembly meeting. He will speak about his memoir, Ten Guardian Angels and a Tin Tub, relating through humor and heart the trials and tribulations of growing up in Germany during World War II. The meeting will begin at 1 p.m. at 938 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.19), in the South Square Plaza, Crystal River. Books and refreshments will be available. For information, call 352257-5381. CASA donations are accepted. From staff reports From theCAPITAL Citizen insurance gets drop numbersAbout one in six customers of Citizens Property Insurance Corp., fewer than anticipated, should receive letters next week telling them they are being shifted to private insurance carriers. And the state-backed insurer won't know until early December how many of those policyholders will want to go with the new companies or return to Citizens. STATE& LOCAL Page A3SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Correction Due to an editors error, a headline on Page A1 of Fridays Chronicle Board backs sale to HCA, contained incorrect information. The hospital board chose the HCA bid, but has not decided yet on a sale or lease. The Chronicle regrets the error. Readers can alert the Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660. From wire reports STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleNearly 100 people lined up and filed in at the Citrus County Auditorium as the Friends of the Citrus County Library Systems 12th annual, 2013 Fall Book Sale got under way Friday evening. According to Sandy Price, co-coordinator for the event, they are expecting nearly 400 to attend and browse the 1,250 banana boxes filled with 43,750 books. And thats just the hardcovers. In addition to books, the sale offers jigsaw puzzles, music CDs, audio books, movies and more. In the 11 years since the first event, the book sale as raised $748,229 for the Citrus County Library System. Organizers hope to add $50,000 from this sale. The next book sale will be in the spring of 2014. Hours for the remaining days: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, extended hours from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (also half-price day) Monday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday ($3 a bag day). Look for a $2 off coupon in Sundays and Mondays Chronicles to use on a purchase of $10 or more from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday. Thats half-price day anyway, so theyll be getting an extra bargain, said FOCCLS vice president Lynne Boele. Annual book sale kicks off in Inverness Legislator wants to allow warning shots Richard NugentU.S. House. CHS grad earns Tallahassee honor Special to the ChronicleCitrus County native and Leon County Administrator Vincent S. Long was named Leader of the Year by the Leadership Tallahassee organization in the recent 2013 Distinguished Leadership Awards ceremony. Long, a 1987 graduate of Citrus High School, grew up in Inverness. The Distinguished Leadership Award recognizes an individual whose ideas, vision and hard work achieved significant, tangible benefits to the community within the past year. I am honored and humbled to receive this recognition from Leadership Tallahassee, Long said at the Sept. 19 ceremony. Im very fortunate to serve the community I love, to work for an exceptional Board of County Commissioners and to lead tremendously talented people dedicated to exemplifying the highest standards of public service. Long has worked for Leon County since 1995. Since becoming county administrator in 2011, he has received national, state and local recognition for leadership, transparency in government, citizen participation and fiscal stewardship. Leon County Commission Chairman Nick Maddox called Long a true transformational leader, according to a press release. Long has overseen a complete culture change in the organization that I believe best positions Leon County to face the challenges and seize the opportunities before us. We are very lucky to have him, Maddox was quoted as saying. Under Longs leadership, county leadership restructured county gov ernment operations and aligned resources to reflect the county commissions priorities. Long launched a national award-winning Citizen Engagement Series. The workshops give citizens greater insight into county government operations and help highlight the role citizens play in the decision-making process that shapes policies, programs and services. Long and wife, Julann, have been married for 15 years and have three children, Kellen, Jack and Riley. They live in Tallahassee. Vince Long1987 graduate of Citrus High named Leader of the Year by Leadership Tallahassee. Haunted Halloween slated in Crystal River Special to the ChronicleJoin the Friends of Crystal River State Parks for the annual Haunted Halloween for two days, Friday, Oct. 25, and Saturday, Oct. 26. Tickets will go on sale at 7 p.m. those days, with the last tickets sold at 10 p.m. Visitors can expect to be spooked on the terrifying tram tour, creepy clown fun house, piratical boat trips and other ghoulish activities. Fortunes will be told and Florida Public Archaeology Network will again host photographs of departed loved ones in its Mortuary Photography studio. Food will be available for sale, sponsored by Gulf Archaeology Research Institute. This fundraising event is sponsored by the Friends of Crystal River State Parks. Admission is $5 per person. Parking will be just west of Museum Pointe on State Park Street, with a tram ride to the main area. Children can enjoy free activities from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26. There will be Halloween games and crafts, tricks, treats and eats and a costume parade. Food for the children will be provided by Gulf Archaeology Research Institute. To learn more about Haunted Halloween, visit www.floridastate parks.org/crystalriverpreserve/ events.cfm or www.facebook.com /pages/Crystal-River-State-ParksFriends/140902829298553. To learn more about the park, visit www.floridastateparks.org/crystal riverpreserve. Lawmaker aims to delay flood insurance rate hike

PAGE 4

Birthday Accept the inevitable with grace and aplomb in the year ahead. Look out for your interests and let your intelligence lead the way. Old talents and skills will help you meet new demands. Rein in your emotions and get your budget under control. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It wont be easy dealing with emotional uncertainties. Be careful not to overreact; you may not be able to afford it. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Book a trip or engage in something that inspires you. Awaken yourself to the many opportunities for rejuvenation and refreshment that surround you. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Say what you mean and do what you say. If an endeavor requires physical risk, it would be best to openly disengage from it at the outset. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Let the people you care about know what you are up to. Including loved ones in your plans will build strong bonds and help you attain your goals. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Expect delays and be prepared to find ways around whatever setback you encounter. Being adaptable will help you guard against negativity and complaints. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Plunge forward with optimism. Engage in events and activities that allow you to show off. Romance is in the stars, and socializing will lead to many new opportunities. Aries (March 21-April 19) Dont share your secrets. Its best to get everything in order before you present your plans. Emotions will escalate regarding financial and domestic matters. Dont tolerate a bully. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Its a good day to entertain or make special plans. Gemini (May 21-June 20) See whats required at work and set your sights on the end results. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy getting out today. Take time to go to your local spa or a place that you find relaxing. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Dont let anyone bully you into something that you dont care to do. Pick and choose whom and what you pursue. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In a business or partnership involvement, size up whats being offered and counter with something that you think is fair and feasible. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Saturday, Sept. 28, the 271th day of 2013. There are 94 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Sept. 28, 1787, the Congress of the Confederation voted to send the just-completed Constitution of the United States to state legislatures for their approval. On this date: In 1066, William the Conqueror invaded England to claim the English throne. In 1850, flogging was abolished as a form of punishment in the U.S. Navy. In 1920, eight members of the Chicago White Sox were indicted for allegedly throwing the 1919 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds in what became known as the Black Sox scandal. Despite initial confessions by several of the players, all were acquitted at trial; still, all eight were banned from baseball for life. In 1924, two U.S. Army planes landed in Seattle, having completed the first round-the-world flight in 175 days. Ten years ago: A massive blackout struck almost all of Italy, leaving millions of people without power. Five years ago: Chinese astronauts aboard the Shenzhou 7 returned to Earth after completing their countrys first spacewalk mission. One year ago: Citing national security risks, President Barack Obama blocked a Chinese company from owning four wind farm projects in northern Oregon near a Navy base where the U.S. military flies unmanned drones and electronic-warfare planes on training missions. Todays Birthdays: Actress Brigitte Bardot is 79. Singer Ben E. King is 75. Actress-comedian Janeane Garofalo is 49. TV personality Moon Zappa is 46. Rapper Young Jeezy is 36. Actress Hilary Duff is 26. Thought for Today: A great truth is a truth whose opposite is also a truth. Thomas Mann, German writer (1875-1955).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 82 70 0.00 HI LO PR 86 66 0.00 HI LO PR 84 67 0.00 HI LO PR 84 66 0.00 HI LO PR 82 68 0.00 HI LO PR 84 66 0.00 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Isolated PM showers, rain chance 20%THREE DAY OUTLOOK Isolated PM showers, rain chance 20% Isolated PM showers, rain chance 20%High: 88 Low: 66 High: 88 Low: 66 High: 89 Low: 65TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Friday 84/67 Record 96/51 Normal 89/67 Mean temp. 76 Departure from mean -2 PRECIPITATION* Friday 0.00 in. Total for the month 9.25 in. Total for the year 50.26 in. Normal for the year 44.31 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 8 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in. DEW POINT Friday at 3 p.m. 69 HUMIDITY Friday at 3 p.m. 65% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Friday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:19 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:22 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................1:33 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................3:15 P.M. OCT. 4OCT. 11OCT. 18OCT. 26 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 86 71 ts Ft. Lauderdale 88 78 ts Fort Myers 90 70 ts Gainesville 84 62 pc Homestead 87 74 ts Jacksonville 82 66 pc Key West 87 78 pc Lakeland 90 67 ts Melbourne 86 74 ts City H L Fcast Miami 89 76 ts Ocala 86 64 ts Orlando 89 69 ts Pensacola 85 65 s Sarasota 90 69 ts Tallahassee 86 58 s Tampa 90 72 ts Vero Beach 87 72 ts W. Palm Bch. 88 75 ts FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNortheast winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy with a chance of thunderstorms today. Gulf water temperature82 LAKE LEVELSLocation Thu. Fri. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 30.20 30.17 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.40 38.41 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.90 39.91 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.68 40.69 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H L 88/67 82/58 71/43 83/60 67/48 84/61 71/57 73/50 69/45 64/54 71/56 73/61 77/57 89/76 90/74 75/56 THE NATION Albany 62 42 s 73 47 Albuquerque 73 59 s 70 48 Asheville 75 52 s 70 50 Atlanta 78 62 s 77 57 Atlantic City 70 49 s 70 55 Austin 91 75 ts 91 74 Baltimore 73 56 s 74 53 Billings 52 40 pc 69 45 Birmingham 83 62 s 80 57 Boise 61 39 c 71 54 Boston 66 57 s 70 52 Buffalo 70 49 s 72 55 Burlington, VT 66 54 s 72 48 Charleston, SC 82 62 s 79 61 Charleston, WV 78 53 s 77 55 Charlotte 77 53 s 76 54 Chicago 81 52 pc 82 58 Cincinnati 80 48 .01 s 81 59 Cleveland 73 48 s 75 60 Columbia, SC 79 60 s 79 57 Columbus, OH 79 50 s 79 58 Concord, N.H. 69 52 s 74 44 Dallas 90 71 ts 88 67 Denver 54 46 .02 s 71 43 Des Moines 87 67 sh 72 49 Detroit 74 50 s 73 61 El Paso 87 72 s 83 60 Evansville, IN 82 53 s 84 65 Harrisburg 74 58 s 74 50 Hartford 65 52 s 74 47 Houston 88 70 pc 90 74 Indianapolis 81 54 s 81 63 Jackson 87 64 s 87 61 Las Vegas 75 60 s 81 60 Little Rock 87 64 pc 87 66 Los Angeles 81 58 s 84 61 Louisville 81 57 s 84 64 Memphis 87 67 s 89 70 Milwaukee 74 50 pc 76 55 Minneapolis 86 65 sh 67 48 Mobile 85 68 s 86 63 Montgomery 85 62 s 81 60 Nashville 83 55 s 83 61 New Orleans 88 70 s 89 70 New York City 69 57 s 71 56 Norfolk 74 66 s 73 60 Oklahoma City 90 64 ts 78 57 Omaha 90 69 .03 sh 71 48 Palm Springs 87 61 s 93 67 Philadelphia 73 59 s 74 54 Phoenix 87 69 s 91 68 Pittsburgh 74 50 s 73 53 Portland, ME 71 56 s 73 50 Portland, Ore 57 50 .02 r 67 56 Providence, R.I. 67 57 s 72 48 Raleigh 74 52 s 73 55 Rapid City 49 42 .01 pc 67 47 Reno 64 34 s 77 48 Rochester, NY 67 45 s 73 52 Sacramento 80 52 s 83 58 St. Louis 85 62 pc 84 61 St. Ste. Marie 72 47 pc 73 53 Salt Lake City 52 43 .03 pc 69 53 San Antonio 95 78 .09 ts 91 75 San Diego 76 59 s 82 64 San Francisco 77 54 s 75 57 Savannah 73 61 .02 s 79 62 Seattle 57 52 .03 r 64 54 Spokane 53 43 r 61 50 Syracuse 70 43 s 75 49 Topeka 89 69 sh 74 48 Washington 75 59 s 75 56YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 97 Cotulla, Texas LOW 21 Butte, Mont. SATURDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 87/77/ts Amsterdam 65/45/pc Athens 82/66/s Beijing 74/51/pc Berlin 59/38/c Bermuda 79/76/sh Cairo 88/66/s Calgary 54/48/sh Havana 85/71/ts Hong Kong 85/74/pc Jerusalem 75/59/s Lisbon 71/65/sh London 69/57/c Madrid 74/60/r Mexico City 77/57/ts Montreal 73/52/s Moscow 44/34/sh Paris 71/59/sh Rio 72/63/pc Rome 73/67/pc Sydney 77/66/pc Tokyo 72/65/pc Toronto 72/57/s Warsaw 52/41/sh WORLD CITIES Friday Saturday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Friday Saturday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Saturday SundayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 1:21 a/8:08 a 12:29 p/9:43 p 2:33 a/9:36 a 1:56 p/10:51 p Crystal River** 10:50 a/5:30 a /7:05 p 12:54 a/6:58 a 12:17 p/8:13 p Withlacoochee* 8:37 a/3:18 a 10:41 p/4:53 p 10:04 a/4:46 a 11:35 p/6:01 p Homosassa*** 12:31 a/7:07 a 11:39 a/8:42 p 1:43 a/8:35 a 1:06 p/9:50 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 9/28 SATURDAY 1:05 7:17 1:28 7:40 9/29 SUNDAY 1:48 7:59 2:11 8:22 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SATURDAY HI LO PR 84 66 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Ragweed, elm, grasses Todays count: 7.3/12 Sundays count: 7.7 Mondays count: 7.2 ENTERTAINMENT Gillian Anderson to star in StreetcarLONDON Former X-Files star Gillian Anderson is returning to the London stage next year as Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire. Anderson will play the fading beauty who relies on the kindness of strangers in a Young Vic production of Tennessee Williams steamy southern drama. The theater said Friday that the production, directed by Benedict Andrews, will open in summer 2014. Dates have not been announced. Anderson was nominated for an Olivier Award British theaters highest honor for her performance in Henrik Ibsens A Dolls House at Londons Donmar Warehouse in 2009. She recently played a police officer in TV thriller The Fall and remains known to millions as Agent Scully in the supernatural detective series The X-Files.Hollywood less gayfriendly off-screenLOS ANGELES A new study suggests the proliferation of gay and transgender characters in films and television shows has not prevented gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender actors from experiencing discrimination in Hollywood. The Screen Actors GuildAmerican Federation of Television and Radio Artists commissioned the survey released Friday showing that more than half of the actors who identify as gay, bisexual and transgender say they had experienced discrimination from directors and producers because of their sexual orientations and gender identities. More than one-third of the actors who dont fall into any of those categories agreed the discrimination exists. The online survey of 5,700 SAG/AFTRA members also found that more than half of the gay, transgender and bisexual respondents had heard producers and directors make anti-gay comments.Lansbury to receive playhouses awardNEW HOPE, Pa. The Bucks County Playhouse will honor five-time Tony Award winner Angela Lansbury as the inaugural inductee into a new hall of fame to honor luminaries who have performed on its stage. The Oct. 28 event will include a tribute performance by some of Lansburys Broadway colleagues. Lansbury won four Tonys in the best actress-musical category and one for best supporting actress in a play. Her most recent was for her performance in the 2009 play Blithe Spirit. Lansbury, 87, also has won six Golden Globes, including for her supporting role in the 1963 film The Manchurian Candidate. She is perhaps best known to TV viewers as Jessica Fletcher from the popular mystery show, Murder, She Wrote. The playhouses producing director, Jed Bernstein, said Lansbury appeared there in 1952s Affairs of the State, years before she performed on Broadway.Prince George to be christened in OctoberLONDON Palace officials said Britains youngest royal, Prince George, will be christened next month in the Chapel Royal at St. Jamess Palace. George whose full name is His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge was born July 22. He is the first child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and third in line to the throne. Kensington Palace announced Friday that George will be christened on Oct. 23 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby From wire reports Associated PressA theater manager said the stuffed armadillo that was stolen from Willie Nelson's band after a show in suburban New York has been returned unharmed. He said the band isn't pressing charges. The toy critter, known to the band as Ol Dillo, disappeared from the stage after a Sept. 19 concert at the Capitol Theatre in Port Chester. A4SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community 000FUY8 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . C13

PAGE 5

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 A5 000G73P

PAGE 6

Brazil family fights to keep house-trained tigers Associated PressMARINGA, Brazil Dan slurped desperately on his pink nursing bottle and spilled milk all over the place, while his brother Tom patiently waited to take a swim in the family pool. It would be a typical family scene if not for the fact that Dan and Tom tip the scales at 700 pounds, have claws that could slice a man in two and were raised along with seven other tigers sleeping in the beds of Ary Borges three daughters. The big cats still amble about his humble home in the middle of an industrial neighborhood in this southern Brazil city, even if experts say the situation is crazy and sure to eventually lead to a mauling, though one has yet to occur. Borges also has two lions, a monkey, and a pet Chihuahua named Little inside his makeshift animal sanctuary, where man and beast live together in his spacious red-dirt compound, separated from the outside world by tall metal fences and high wooden walls. The Brazilian family is now locked in a legal dispute for the cats, with federal wildlife officials working to take them away. While Borges does have a license to raise the animals, Brazilian wildlife officials say he illegally bred the tigers, creating a public danger. Borges says it all started in 2005 when he first rescued two abused tigers from a traveling circus. He defends his right to breed the animals and argues he gives them a better home than they might find elsewhere in Brazil. Sadly there are so many animals dying in zoos that have no oversight. My animals are treated extremely well ... were preserving and conserving the species, he said. We have a great team of veterinarians. We give them only the best, but were being persecuted. Ibama, Brazils environmental protection agency that also oversees wildlife, declined repeated requests for comment. The agency is working through courts to force Borges to have the male tigers undergo vasectomies so they cant reproduce. It also wants his caretaker license confiscated and to obtain the cats. Borges appealed and the matter is pending before a federal court. Borges has strong support in Maringa for his cause, and earlier this year the city council passed a measure that banned vasectomies on wild animals within city limits. Next door to the tiger compound, Marli Mendes can see the big cats from her office window. I have nothing against them, they really dont bother, she said. So far, there have been no incidents with the tigers turning aggressive, which the Borges family attributes to cats being raised in such close proximity with humans. Arys daughter Nayara Borges, 20, who grew up with the tiger cubs sleeping in her bed until they became too big, said she thinks the big cats would be mistreated if taken away, and our family would go into a severe depression. Her sister Uyara, 23, agreed, saying the cats are family after spending so many years with the Borges. At first we were scared of them, but as time went on, we saw them every day, fed them, gave them baths and water, and we started to fall in love with them, Uyara said. We never thought we could live with such ferocious animals. Uyara trusts the cats so much, she even allows her 2-year-old daughter Rayara to sit atop them. Experts, however, sharply question the Borges familys efforts. Its crazy, said Patty Finch, executive director of the Washington-based Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. Its a very dangerous situation, especially if there are young children around, they easily trigger a tigers hunting instinct. Finch said that you will see people sometimes get lucky for a while, but sooner or later an accident is going to happen. You never know whats going to set these animals off because theyre wild. Instead of promoting the animals welfare, Finch said the Borges have done the opposite. Breeding in captivity doesnt help conserve the tigers unless theyre bred in their native habitat and there is a plan to release them, she said. They cant get habituated to people. Theyre condemning these tigers to a life of captivity. Upkeep for the tigers and lions costs about $9,000 per month. Borges pays for it by renting the tigers out for movie and commercial shoots, charging $9,000 a day, and with the money he makes in running a dog kennel within his compound. Donna Adams, 69HOMOSASSADonna Adams, 69, of Homosassa, Fla., died Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, in Homosassa. Cremation arrangements are under the direction of the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Lucy Drury, 89HOMOSASSALucy V. Drury, 89, Homosassa, died Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, at her residence. Private arrangements are by Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness.John Goddard, 72DUNNELLONJohn F. Goddard, 72, Dunnellon, died Sept. 26, 2013, in Ocala. Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 30, 2013, at Roberts Funeral Home of Dunnellon with a visitation one hour prior.Dorthy Jones, 77INVERNESSDorthy Helen Jones, 77, Inverness, Fla., died Sept. 26, 2013. Mrs. Jones was born July 14, 1936, in Breckenridge, Mich., to the late George and Helen (Marr) Story and came to this area 36 years ago from St. Louis, Mich. She was a member of the First Church of God in Inverness. She is survived by her children, Wallace Jones II and his wife, Cindy, Inverness, Robert E. Jones and fiance, Michelle Clark, Inverness, Autumn Bowers and her husband, John Jr., Eustis; four sisters, Lois, Shirley, Bonnie and Mary Lou; and three grandchildren, Gator, Leslie and Kyndel. She was predeceased by her husband of 38 years, Wallace Jones Oct. 9, 2002, and her sister, Phyllis Story. Other living relatives include Clara Jean Pitts and Judy Mann and their families. Funeral services will be conducted at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 30, 2013, from the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Pastor Tom Walker officiating. Burial will follow in Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family will receive friends for viewing at the time of service.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. A6SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000FMDW 000FXJH Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000FX8G 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000FWQJ Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 2013 2013 2013 2013 000G5YW 000FYSCFuneral HomeWith Crematory 726-8323 JAMES M. HUNTER Memorial Service: Sun. 3:00 PM American Legion Post #155 ROBERT NORTON Service: Sat. 11:00 AM Seven Rivers Presbyterian LUCY DRURY Arrangements Pending DOROTHY JONES Arrangements Pending FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000FXYP 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills Lic. & Insured 352-400-3188 YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST IS IT TIME TO REFI NISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PAVERS Often imitated, never duplicated Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC 000G78O Copes Pool & Pavers SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Dorthy Jones Obituaries Associated PressFrom left, Wevellyn Antunes Rocha, Maria Deusaunira Borges, Uyara Borges, Nayara Borges (back), Daniella Klipe, Gisele Candido and Ary Borges gather at the breakfast table Friday with tiger Tom in Maringa, Brazil. Ary Borges, who cares for Tom, eight other tigers and two lionesses, is in a legal battle with federal wildlife officials to keep his endangered animals from undergoing vasectomies and being taken away from him. Big house cats Ary Borges feeds his tiger Dan at his home Thursday in Maringa, Brazil. OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will be posted online at www.chronicle online.com. Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is a $25 base fee, then $10 per column inch. Small photos of the deceaseds face can be included for an additional charge. Additional days of publication or reprints due to errors in submitted material are charged at the same rates. All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated Press style unless a request to the contrary is made. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. Phone 352-563-5660 for details. The U.S. military consists of five active-duty services and their respective guard and reserve units: Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard.

PAGE 7

in recent days, adding, I am confident the House of Representatives will continue to stand its ground, continue to listen to the American people and ... stop this train wreck, this nightmare that is Obamacare. The House is scheduled to be in session both Saturday and Sunday, but it is unclear when it will vote on a new bill to avert a shutdown, and what health care-related items it will include. Obama spoke more than an hour later at the White House, where he said it was up to House Republicans to follow the Senates lead and prevent a shutdown. He said the struggle has nothing to do with budget deficits, and said if Republicans have specific ideas on how to genuinely improve the (health care) law rather than gut it, rather than delay, it rather than repeal it, I am happy to work with them. He also said even a shutdown would not prevent the scheduled opening of so-called health care exchanges next Tuesday through which millions of Americans will be able to shop for coverage. Thats a done deal, he said Brendan Buck, a spokesman for Boehner, issued a statement in response that said, The House will take action that reflects the fundamental fact that Americans dont want a government shutdown and they dont want the train wreck that is Obamacare. Grandstanding from the president, who refuses to even be a part of the process, wont bring Congress any closer to a resolution. Republican lawmakers said Boehner had made it clear he would continue to seek health care-related concessions from the White House when the House passes its next shutdown-prevention legislation. But the rank and file rebelled on Thursday when leaders suggested moving the main focus of the effort to defund Obamacare to a separate bill rather than continue to flirt with a shutdown. There is little or no disagreement between the House and Senate over spending levels in the legislation now moving from one side of the Capitol to the other, and except for health care, passage might well be routine. The bill provides funds at an annual rate of slightly more than $986 billion, in keeping with an agreement Obama and Republicans made two years ago to restrain the growth of a wide swath of government spending from the Pentagon to the nations parks. Without separate legislation to make further reductions, across-the-board cuts will automatically take effect early next year that will reduce the level to $967 billion, and Republicans are fond of pointing out that the government is on track to spend less on those programs for the second year in a row for the first time since the Korean War. But Republicans voted unanimously against the health care law when it passed Congress, backed lawsuits to challenge its constitutionality, and some now seek to strangle it before its final implementation begins next Tuesday. Cruz, Lee and several tea party groups seized on the issue during Congress five-week summer vacation, turning Defund Obamacare into a rallying cry backed by television commercials, public rallies and emails. The result was a bruising week in the Senate in which Cruz spoke for slightly more than 21 hours straight in hopes of swaying some votes his way, only to lose by far on the showdown that he described as the crucial one. That was a proposal by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to cut off debate on the spending bill, a move that also meant Democrats needed a mere majority of the votes to restore money for the health care law that the House had omitted. The vote was 79-19, 19 more than the 60 needed to cut off debate. All 52 Democrats, two independents and 25 of 44 Republicans voted in favor. That included McConnell and much of the GOP leadership with the exception of Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas, who heads the partys campaign committee. Domestic battery arrest Ronald Hardin, 63, of Crystal River, at 10:03 a.m. Sept. 25 on misdemeanor charges of domestic battery, and resisting an officer without violence. Bond $1,000.Other arrests William Wood, 32, of West Horace Allen Street, Lecanto, at 9:25 p.m. Sept. 26 on an active warrant for battery. Bond $1,000. Jacob Lane, 24, of South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa, at 7:45 p.m. Sept. 26 on felony charges of burglary to an unoccupied structure and criminal mischief. According to his arrest affidavit, Lane is accused of breaking into the Verizon Cellular tower and stealing copper wire. Bond $4,000. Michael Richards, 45, of South Roebuck Way, Homosassa, at 6:15 p.m. Sept. 26 on a misdemeanor charge of retail petit theft. According to his arrest affidavit Richards is accused of shoplifting dog food and two stacker energy drinks from the Homosassa Walmart. Bond $500. Bambi Wilmot, 34, of West Homosassa Trail, Homosassa, at 2:03 p.m. Sept. 26 on an active warrant for violation of probation stemming from an original charge of making contradicting statements in an official proceeding, She was also charged with failure to appear regarding a petit theft arrest. Bond was denied. Billy Bishop, 33, of West Van Buren Drive, Homosassa, at 12:02 p.m. Sept. 26 on an active warrant for violation of probation stemming from an original charge of selling, manufacturing, or delivering schedule I or II drugs. Bond was denied. James Rutledge Sr., 62, of Beverly Hills, at 8:14 a.m. Sept. 26 on a felony charge of aggravated battery with use of a deadly weapon. Bond was denied. Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A vehicle burglary was reported at 5:24 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, in the 2800 block of W. Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon. A residential burglary was reported at 8:17 p.m. Sept. 25 in the 6100 block of N. Rosewood Drive, Beverly Hills. A residential burglary was reported at 10:21 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, in the 2800 block of N. Oakland Terrace, Crystal River. A residential burglary was reported at 3:32 p.m. Sept. 26 in the 8300 block of N. Dandelion Way, Dunnellon. A residential burglary was reported at 10:48 p.m. Sept. 26 in the 3400 block of S. Kings Ave., Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 12:36 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27, in the 4400 block of E. Van Ness Road, Hernando.Thefts A petit theft was reported at 12:27 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, in the 300 block of N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. A grand theft was reported at 1:57 p.m. Sept. 25 in the 3600 block of W. Educational Path, Lecanto. A grand theft was reported at 7:41 p.m. Sept. 25 in the 6800 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 8:17 a.m. Thursday, Sept 26, in the 9700 block of W. Arms Drive, Crystal River. A grand theft was reported at 8:49 a.m. Sept. 26 in the 6100 block of W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River. A larceny petit theft was reported at 9:07 a.m. Sept. 26 in the 10400 block of S. Le Baron Drive, Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 9:49 a.m. Sept. 26 in the 4100 block of N. Stewart Way, Beverly Hills. A larceny petit theft was reported at 11:51 a.m. Sept. 26 in the 6800 block of W. Woodbridge Drive, Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 4:26 p.m. Sept. 26 in the 200 block of Pine St., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 5:13 p.m. Sept. 26 in the 6800 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 2:13 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27, in the 1600 block of Tuttle St., Inverness.Vandalism A vandalism was reported at 1:41 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27, in the 9700 block of W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 A7 Always A Fair Price CASH for SCRAP Crystal River Metal Recycling 4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599 000G5TE Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire Professional Hearing Centers www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR (4327) 000FYU4 HEAR BETTER NOW, GUARANTEED! 4 Year Warranty FREE Batteries 4 Life 000G3BU Policies set by local retailer, See store for details. Excludes delivery and set up fees. Other charges may apply. Offer does not apply to Serta Motion PerfectAdjustable Foundations, iComfort Pillows and other iComfort accessories. Void in the state of Tennessee. Model Close-Outs & Assorted Floor ModelsON SALE NOW! 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Unit A (Hwy. 486) Hernando344-8882 LAKE MOHAVE PLUSH EPTFull Set $499DOWNEY PLUSHFull Set $599CHAMPIONS GATE PTTwin Set$439Queen Set$599Full Set$499King Set$799FLORENCE/ FARMINGTON PLUSHTwin Set$379Queen Set$549Full Set$449King Set$749VENICE PT/ HANNAH PTTwin Set$299Queen Set$399Full Set$349King Set$599ANDORA/ ABBOTTTwin Set$249Queen Set$349Full Set$299King Set$529 CLOSEOUT CLOSEOUT SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE CENTRAL FALLS CLASSICTwin Set$569Queen Set$699Full Set$659King Set$949Queen Set$999King Set$1299 NEWHAVEN COURT GEL PLUSH EPT www.WholesalesleepCenter.com For the RECORD ON THE NET For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports. 352-513-5944 Corner of Hwy 44 & Homosassa Trail000G6R0Facebook.com/ QsPub44 $1.00 Drafts 50 Pool Band This Weekend The Joes BUDGETContinued from Page A1 Associated PressPresident Barack Obama pauses while making a statement regarding the budget fight in Congress and foreign policy challenges Friday in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington.

PAGE 8

Pilot went missing during a bombing mission Associated PressSALT LAKE CITY Only a sole surviving sibling has a distant memory of a World War II pilot whose recently identified remains will be buried Saturday with full military honors in Utah. U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Vernal J. Bird had more than a dozen brothers and sisters when he crashed over a Pacific Ocean island nearly 70 years ago. He disappeared over Papua New Guinea on a 1944 bombing run of Japanese airfields there. He was 25. The crash site was discovered 12 years ago, but it wasnt until this summer that the Air Force was able to identify partial remains found there as belonging to Bird. This week, about 150 distant relatives showed up at the Salt Lake airport as those remains only a single leg bone was recovered arrived inside a flag-draped casket on an airliner. None of them knew Bird personally. His younger sister, Elaine Bird Jack of Eugene, Ore., is his lone surviving sibling and the only one who has a memory of him, said Lorna Bird Snyder, the airmans 66-year-old niece. The 92-year-old Jack is in Utah for the burial at Evergreen Cemetery in Springville, Snyder told The Associated Press. She was the 13th child of the family; Bird was the 12th. Jack provided a DNA sample that was used to identify her brothers fibula, the outer and thinner of the long bones of a lower leg. Relatives are hoping a full excavation of the crash site will yield more remains, Snyder said. The Air Force is moving cautiously because a 500pound unexploded bomb is still attached to the A20G Havoc bomber. The remains of Birds co-pilot, Staff Sgt. Roy Davis from New Hampshire, have not been found. The crash site on a forested mountainside was discovered in 2001 by a Papuan national, who delivered the fibula along with engine identification plates of the bomber to an American recovery team. The Air Force identified the bone as Birds in July. In the airmans last letter to his family, he described how he flew his light bomber barely above tree-top level, saying we fly right in the leaves at times. It was written two days before his bomber went down March 12, 1944. His niece spent years researching where over the Pacific Ocean or New Guinea his plane might have gone down. She compared boxes of the airmans letters against records of the American-Australian effort against the Japanese. If not for Snyders dogged efforts, the recovered bone might never have gotten a DNA comparison. Vernal Bird was born Oct. 29, 1918, in Lindon to Walter F. and Christina Pearsson Ash Bird. He attended schools in Lindon and Pleasant Grove. The family later moved to Springville, another Utah County town, according to an obituary.A8SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLENATION 000G725 GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM 000FXJC LOCASH LOCASH COWBOYS COWBOYS AND AND SPECIAL GUEST SPECIAL GUEST TOM JACKSON TOM JACKSON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THE BELLAMY THE BELLAMY BROTHERS BROTHERS CHRIS CHRIS JANSON JANSON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 TOTAL NET PROCEEDS BENEFIT: FOR CAMPING CALL ROCK CRUSHER CANYON RV PARK 352-564-9350 LIMITED 3-DAY OR 1-DAY RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE includes up front reserved seat & complimentary food Advanced General Admission Three-Day: $65 One-Day: $25 Call 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com Tickets also available at CRYSTAL NISSAN SPONSORS Ferman Motor Car Company Harley Davidson of New Port Richey Sheldon Palms Insurance, Inc./Lollygaggers Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Agent Crystal Community E.N.T. Dr. Denis Grillo Plantation Inn Nature Coast Financial Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc. Ross Hammock Ranch Williams, McCarnie, Wardlow and Cash, P.A. COMED Y TOUR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, P.A. Joseph Starnes, P.A. 000FYM4 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000FYRY Burial set for World War II airman missing since 1944 Associated PressABOVE: Lorna Bird Snyder flies the POW/MIA flag in Springville, Utah, to honor her uncle, Vernal Bird, who was a World War II pilot in Papua New Guinea when his A-40 light bomber disappeared in the high mountains. BELOW: The remains of U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Vernal J. Bird arrive in Salt Lake City Wednesday. Bird disappeared on a 1944 bombing run of Japanese airfields on Papua New Guinea. He was 25. His remains were found in 2001 and later identified through DNA testing. Subpoenas issued in WTC naming probe Associated PressNEWARK, N.J. The state of New York has subpoenaed materials related to the $10 sale of the rights to the World Trade Center name in the 1980s, an official familiar with the review said Friday. The subpoenas from the New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman involve an investigation into a 1986 deal in which the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey sold the naming rights to one of its outgoing executives for use by a nonprofit. The official spoke on condition of anonymity Friday because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the probe. The Record newspaper reported this month that the Port Authority sold the naming rights to Guy Tozzoli in his role as head of the nonprofit World Trade Centers Association. The Port Authority, which owned the World Trade Center towers and the land they sat on in lower Manhattan, is now among hundreds of entities around the world that pay to use the World Trade Center name. The WTCA didnt return a message seeking comment Friday. At the agencys monthly board meeting on Sept. 18, Port Authority executive director Patrick Foye called the naming rights deal a shameful episode and vowed an internal investigation in tandem with the probe announced that day by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Neither Foye nor Port Authority board chairman David Samson was able to say who had approved the deal. The newspaper reported that the contract, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, bore the signature of a secretary. Foye said thenPort Authority executive director Stephen Berger told him he had not approved the deal. The Port Authority pays $10,000 a year to use the words World Trade Center, including on merchandise it plans to sell in the new World Trade Center currently under construction. Those sales could bring the Port Authority an estimated $23 million to $28 million annually, the newspaper reported. In exchange for the Port Authoritys use of the trademark, the WTCA is requesting free office space at the new World Trade Center site worth an estimated $585,000 per year.

PAGE 9

BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 A9 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,500 1,550 1,600 1,650 1,700 1,750 S AMJJA 1,680 1,720.0 1,760 S&P 500Close: 1,691.75 Change: -6.92 (-0.4%) 10 DAYS 14,400 14,800 15,200 15,600 16,000 S AMJJA 15,200 1.546E+4 15,720 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 15,258.24 Change: -70.06 (-0.5%) 10 DAYSAdvanced994 Declined2019 New Highs70 New Lows29 Vol. (in mil.)2,856 Pvs. Volume2,737 1,654 1,757 943 1527 104 17 NYSE NASD DOW 15317.4515211.8115258.24-70.06-0.46%+16.44% DOW Trans.6628.786563.266597.59-39.92-0.60%+24.32% DOW Util.485.69480.89482.19-3.18-0.66%+6.42% NYSE Comp.9693.809664.019684.17-42.09-0.43%+14.69% NASDAQ3788.353762.673781.59-5.84-0.15%+25.24% S&P5001695.521687.111691.75-6.92-0.41%+18.62% S&P4001246.871240.881244.18-4.73-0.38%+21.93% Wilshire 500018142.6618021.0218072.74-69.92-0.39%+20.52% Russell 20001078.371070.851074.19-4.22-0.39%+26.47% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7645.90 3.83-.11 -2.8tss-16.7-19.6dd... AT&T Inc T32.71339.00 33.98-.25 -0.7tst+0.8-5.4261.80 Ametek Inc AME32.67948.01 45.64-.57 -1.2tss+21.5+31.7230.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD81.609103.85 99.61-.60 -0.6tss+14.0+16.62.21e Bank of America BAC8.70915.03 13.90-.18 -1.3tts+19.7+60.2250.04 Capital City Bank CCBG9.04713.08 11.73-.07 -0.6tts+3.2+11.242... CenturyLink Inc CTL31.85142.45 31.78-.33 -1.0ttt-18.8-16.4182.16 Citigroup C31.88853.56 48.89-.04 -0.1tss+23.6+50.6130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46726.38 21.81-.53 -2.4ttt+37.7+61.5781.00 Disney DIS46.53967.89 65.19-.05 -0.1sss+30.9+27.1200.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63575.46 66.90-.75 -1.1tst+4.9+9.9203.12f EPR Properties EPR42.44461.18 49.39-.51 -1.0tst+7.1+19.1213.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM84.70395.49 86.90-.17 -0.2ttt+0.4-1.992.52 Ford Motor F9.71017.77 17.05-.22 -1.3tss+31.7+76.0120.40 Gen Electric GE19.87924.95 24.05-.20 -0.8sss+14.6+13.2180.76 Home Depot HD58.75881.56 75.96-.11 -0.1tst+22.8+31.0221.56 Intel Corp INTC19.23625.98 22.98-.43 -1.8tst+11.4+7.4120.90 IBM IBM181.102215.90 186.92-3.30 -1.7tst-2.4-5.0133.80 LKQ Corporation LKQ17.16032.29 31.56-.12 -0.4tss+49.6+68.934... Lowes Cos LOW29.66049.17 47.77-.12 -0.3tss+34.5+61.8240.72 McDonalds Corp MCD83.317103.70 97.12-1.07 -1.1sst+10.1+8.7183.24f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26736.43 33.27+.50 +1.5stt+24.6+11.7131.12f Motorola Solutions MSI49.49764.72 59.75-.12 -0.2tss+7.3+21.5171.24f NextEra Energy NEE66.05788.39 80.07-.37 -0.5ttt+15.7+18.7202.64 Penney JC Co Inc JCP9.52127.00 9.05-1.37 -13.1ttt-54.1-57.6dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62521.09 17.59-.09 -0.5tst-2.5+5.2360.80 Regions Fncl RF6.19810.52 9.30+.12 +1.3stt+30.4+29.5110.12 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40768.77 59.05-1.33 -2.2sss+42.8+18.5dd... Smucker, JM SJM81.608114.72 104.79-.90 -0.9tts+21.5+25.6202.32f Texas Instru TXN26.94040.94 40.16-.22 -0.5tss+30.0+50.0241.20f Time Warner TWX42.61066.01 66.20+1.33 +2.1sss+38.4+47.8181.15 UniFirst Corp UNF65.850104.38 103.13+.33 +0.3sss+40.7+52.8190.15 Verizon Comm VZ40.51554.31 47.00-.67 -1.4ttt+8.6+9.1962.12f Vodafone Group VOD24.42035.09 35.00-.05 -0.1sss+38.9+27.31.57e WalMart Strs WMT67.37679.96 74.36-.26 -0.3tst+9.0+3.0141.88 Walgreen Co WAG31.88056.84 54.51-.22 -0.4tss+47.3+56.0241.26f 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A recent study of a painkiller by the pharmaceutical company failed to meet its goals, though it says it remains committed. The electrical products and services specialist fell short of quarterly expectations and its outlook left investors wanting. The retailer will raise $811 million through a share offering and expects to have $1.3 billion in liquidity by years end. Federal authorities raided the headquarters of the flooring retailer, referring only to the importation of certain products. The athletic gear company beat estimates for its fiscal first-quarter with strong sales at home and shares hit a new all-time high. Stocks finished lower Friday, as the risk of a partial U.S. government shutdown weighed on investors. Congress needs to pass a funding bill to keep the government operating after Oct. 1. The government is expected to reach its debt ceiling around Oct. 17. 60 65 70 $75 S JA NikeNKE Close: $73.64 3.30 or 4.7% $44.83$75.25 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 15.6m (4.0x avg.) $52.46 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 27.4 1.1% 60 80 100 $120 S JA Lumber LiquidatorsLL Close: $107.13 -5.83 or -5.2% $47.31 $115.59 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 4.3m (7.4x avg.) $2.95 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 47.4 ... 5 10 15 $20 S JA J.C. PenneyJCP Close: $9.05 -1.37 or -13.1% $8.85$27.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 256.2m (9.7x avg.) $2 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 35 40 $45 S JA AZZAZZ Close: $42.23 -0.88 or -2.0% $34.61$49.10 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.2m (4.9x avg.) $1.08 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 18.3 1.3% 10 12 $14 S JA NektarNKTR Close: $10.54 -3.31 or -23.9% $5.65$14.47 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 9.1m (7.6x avg.) $1.22 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.63 percent on Friday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.01 +0.01.08 6-month T-bill.030.03....13 52-wk T-bill.090.09....16 2-year T-note.330.34-0.01.25 5-year T-note1.401.44-0.04.65 10-year T-note2.632.65-0.021.66 30-year T-bond3.693.70-0.012.84 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx3.473.48-0.012.51 Bond Buyer Muni Idx5.095.09...4.19 Barclays USAggregate2.362.33+0.031.56 Barclays US High Yield6.116.10+0.016.62 Moodys AAACorp Idx4.554.50+0.053.33 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.571.59-0.02.91 Barclays US Corp3.293.26+0.032.81 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities Oil prices fell Friday as diplomatic efforts surrounding Syria and Iran eased concerns about Middle East supplies. Metals rose, led by aluminum. Crops were mostly lower. Soybeans rose.Crude Oil (bbl)102.87103.03-0.16+12.0 Ethanol (gal)1.982.00-0.50-9.6 Heating Oil (gal)2.993.00-0.45-1.8 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.563.50-0.14+6.3 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.682.71-1.06-4.8 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz) 1338.401323.60+1.12-20.1 Silver (oz) 21.7821.72+0.29-27.8 Platinum (oz)1416.101410.70+0.09-8.0 Copper (lb) 3.333.30+0.64-8.7 Palladium (oz)730.80722.15+1.16+4.0 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb) 1.281.28+0.43-1.3 Coffee (lb) 1.141.16-1.69-20.9 Corn (bu) 4.544.57-0.60-35.0 Cotton (lb) 0.860.85+1.37+14.0 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)341.80341.30+0.15-8.6 Orange Juice (lb)1.291.28+1.29+11.5 Soybeans (bu)13.2013.17+0.23-7.0 Wheat (bu) 6.836.78+0.70-12.2 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 22.92-.05 +13.8+14.9+12.8+9.0 CapIncBuAm 56.45-.10 +9.8+10.6+9.4+6.5 CpWldGrIAm 42.59-.05 +16.6+20.3+10.7+7.1 EurPacGrAm 46.41+.04 +12.6+17.9+7.2+6.2 FnInvAm 48.61-.09 +20.2+22.4+15.1+9.0 GrthAmAm 42.20-.04 +22.9+25.2+15.9+9.3 IncAmerAm 19.72-.05 +12.0+13.4+11.6+8.7 InvCoAmAm 35.96-.11 +20.7+20.9+14.3+8.6 NewPerspAm 36.75-.04 +17.6+21.5+12.7+9.3 WAMutInvAm 37.16-.14 +20.8+20.8+16.4+8.7 Dodge & Cox Income 13.50+.01 -0.4+0.6+4.1+7.7 IntlStk 40.97-.08 +18.3+26.6+9.3+7.1 Stock 151.97-.21 +26.1+28.7+18.1+9.8 Fidelity Contra 93.83-.10 +22.1+19.7+15.7+10.5 GrowCo 119.19-.50 +27.8+24.1+19.4+13.7 LowPriStk d 46.97-.01 +24.8+28.2+18.2+13.6 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 60.25-.24 +20.5+19.5+16.4+9.3 FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeAm 2.34-.01 +9.0+10.7+10.2+10.5 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAm 12.96-.07 -0.5+3.5+4.5+9.6 GlBondAdv 12.91-.07 -0.4+3.7+4.7+9.8 Harbor IntlInstl 69.78-.19 +12.3+19.2+9.6+6.7 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 31.31-.15 +20.0+21.7+15.7+8.5 GrowStk 47.12-.12 +24.7+22.7+17.8+12.4 Vanguard 500Adml 155.95-.63 +20.5+19.5+16.4+9.3 500Inv 155.96-.63 +20.4+19.3+16.3+9.2 MuIntAdml 13.77... -2.0-1.3+3.1+5.3 STGradeAd 10.71+.01 +0.4+1.1+2.3+4.7 Tgtet2025 15.24-.03 +12.1+13.3+10.9+7.7 TotBdAdml 10.66+.01 -2.0-1.8+2.8+5.3 TotIntl 16.23-.04 +10.5+16.5+6.2+4.7 TotStIAdm 42.85-.17 +21.9+21.6+17.1+10.0 TotStIdx 42.84-.17 +21.8+21.5+16.9+9.9 Welltn 37.54-.07 +13.0+13.8+11.8+9.2 WelltnAdm 64.84-.12 +13.1+13.9+11.9+9.3 WndsIIAdm 61.94-.13 +20.1+21.0+16.6+9.0 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates 000G7F4 SPEEDY DELIVERY EXTRA! EXTRA! Stocks fall on govt shutdown worries Associated PressThe budget fight may be happening in Washington, but its investors on Wall Street who keep getting smacked. Stocks fell Friday for the sixth day out of the last seven, and ended the week with a decline. Investors focused on the risk that the government could shut down on Tuesday unless Congress agrees to a new spending bill. And even if that hurdle is cleared, the dispute is poised to continue into the middle of October as legislators debate raising the nations borrowing limit. There were a lot of moving parts for investors to keep track of on Friday. The U.S. Senate approved a spending bill that is already considered dead in the House of Representatives, where Republicans want changes to President Barack Obamas health care law. Obama spoke on live television during the closing minutes of trading. And investors braced for the possibility that when markets reopen on Monday, none of this will have been resolved, even though the House will be in session over the weekend. So how should an investor get ready for next week? I dont know whats going to happen 15 minutes from now, said Stephen Carl, head of equity trading at The Williams Capital Group. He noted that volume on Friday was low, suggesting that some investors were waiting for more information. Stocks moved little as Obama spoke during the final minutes of trading. He reiterated a previous vow not to negotiate with Congress under the threat of a shutdown. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 70.06 points, or 0.5 percent, to close at 15,258.24. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell 6.92 points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,691.75. The Nasdaq composite was down 5.83 points, or 0.15 percent, at 3,781.59. Still, the indexes are off only about 1 percent for the week, and the S&P 500 is just 2 percent below its record high set Sept. 18. US consumers boost spending 0.3 pct. in AugustWASHINGTON U.S. consumers increased their spending slightly last month as their income grew at the fastest pace in six months. Consumers spending on goods and services rose 0.3 percent in August, the Commerce Department said Friday. Thats up from a 0.2 percent gain in July, which was slightly more than the 0.1 percent reported last month.Exxon to offer benefits to same-sex couples in USNEW YORK Exxon Mobil Corp. said Friday that it will begin offering benefits to legally married same-sex couples in the U.S. for the first time starting next week. The company said it will recognize all legal marriages when it determines eligibility for health care plans for the companys 77,000 employees and retirees in the U.S. BusinessHIGHLIGHTS From wire reports Associated PressNEW YORK Starting next week, you could own a piece of the Empire State Building. Or, if iconic New York skyscrapers arent your thing, you could bite into Potbelly, a sandwich chain with more than 280 shops. Next week, these and two more companies with familiar names the owner of budget-friendly clothing store chain Burlington Coat Factory and Re/Max, one of the countrys largest real estate agencies are expected to sell shares in initial public offerings. A surging stock market is drawing investors to IPOs. This past week, 12 companies went public. Thats the most in one week since November 2007, said data provider Dealogic. And there have been 151 IPOs in the U.S. this year, up 47 percent from a year ago, said IPO research firm Renaissance Capital. A more active IPO market signals confidence in the economy, because buying into IPOs is considered a riskier investment than investing in established companies. Companies that raise money in an IPO can also hire more people and make investments with the cash, helping support economic growth. And when IPOs gain in their first day of trading, that bodes well for other companies that may go public soon, such as automaker Chrysler and social media company Twitter. Investors are closely watching next weeks lineup. Brand recognition will always foster additional attraction, said Scott Sweet, a senior managing partner at IPO Boutique, which rates IPOs and invests in them. But worries about a looming government shutdown could hurt demand for upcoming offerings, warns David Menlow, president of IPO analysis firm IPOfinancial.com. Empire State Building owner, Potbelly going public Associated PressThe Empire State Building is one of four companies expected to sell shares in initial public offerings.

PAGE 10

OPINION Page A10SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 Dancing in the streetsWell, the bids for Citrus Memorial hospital are in, the two governing bodies are analyzing those bids and all we need now is a miracle. The miracle you ask? What miracle? It is simply that those two governing bodies that must agree, will agree, for the first time in years. The fact that those two bodies have run up close to $10 million over the past few years in legal fees, fighting each other, leads one to believe they may have difficulty agreeing on the final solution. How many lawyers will be out of work? When you look at the summary of the bids in theChronicle, you cant help thinking, this is a no-brainer. How could they not agree? But then, what is the objective of this sale. When the governor decreed that all county-owned hospitals should be put up for bids to lease or be sold outright, what was he attempting to accomplish? For that matter, Citrus Memorial was already leased to the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation and look how well that works! Here we sit with Citrus Memorial around $60 million in debt and unfunded pension benefits, while consuming $2 million to $6 million in ad valorem taxes yearly. Take a look at HCAs record and youll find its stock has gone from $18 per share in 2011 to $42 per share today, and its profit over the last 12 months amounted to $1.4 billion. Compare that to our hospital management having to borrow money from Peter to pay Paul (so to speak) to avoid default on a $10 million bond issue. Maybe the governor, who has a great deal of experience in hospital management, thought it was time to get this millstone off of the taxpayers neck. Maybe he realized that a for-profit hospital would jump at the opportunity to buy this albatross and turn it into a profit center. Consider this: If you accepted the HCA offer of $140 million and you spent $60 million to pay off the debts and pensions that Citrus Memorial currently owes, you would be left with $80 million, cash. If that was placed in a health care trust, to be used only for health care in the county, it could easily fund the health department with the interest alone. You would also eliminate the $2 million plus the county taxpayers are spending annually to support the hospital. On top of that, HCA would pay an estimated $2 million in taxes each year with a net reduction in ad valorem taxes of $5 million plus. You could thank them for their service and disband the Citrus County Hospital Board. And last, but not least, HCA would replace the management of the hospital with their management team and the golden parachutes would pop at Citrus Memorial hospital. The war would be over and there may be dancing in the streets.R.M. Sprott Crystal River In Missouri, two men got into an argument over a gambling debt. Later, the winner was flaunting the gold watch that the loser had used to pay him. So the loser pulled a gun and shot the winner dead. In Kansas, two men were arguing over politics in a bar. One got so upset, he pulled a gun and killed the other. A couple of nights later, that gunman was shot dead by the victims friends. In New Mexico, a law officer warned a group of carousers in a bar that they were not supposed to be carrying weapons. They pulled out their guns and shot him down. And in Ionia, Mich., two men got into a road-rage incident, pulled off to a car wash, got out of their cars and shot each other to death. These are all tragic cases. People were killed. Fathers, brothers and sons were lost. The only real difference is this: The first three incidents happened during the Wild West of the late 1800s. And the fourth happened last week. We settle our issues with bullets in this country. Weve been doing it since we rode horses. And sadly, there is no end in sight. So today, we will once again enter combustible territory. We will talk about guns. And before the ugly arguments break out (we are fully braced for the nasty comments, cringing curse words and wild accusations that will appear in the comments online), let us at least recognize that this is not a new issue. Not even close. Whatever happened around 7 p.m. Wednesday in Ionia, it seems clear that it was not worth dying over. Two men Robert Taylor, 56, and James Pullum, 43 got into something on the road (Pullums wife would tell 911 that Taylor, in a PT Cruiser, was tailgating Pullums Taurus) and when they pulled over, the anger was boiling. Moments later, both were dead. Road rage, Pullums wife, Teri, cries during a 911 call. They were fighting. ... They both shot each other. Ionia County Prosecutor Ron Schafer told mlive.com: There was some sort of oral confrontation. He said they shot each other at fairly close range. Every gun-violence headline emboldens some point of view. The tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School last year saw many pro-gun folks declare, You see? If those teachers had been armed, this could have been avoided. The Ionia case, conversely, is like manna from heaven for the anti-gun crowd. How many times do you hear pro-gun voices claim, People getting CCWs are responsible gun owners? Pullum and Taylor had licenses to carry concealed weapons. People who get CCWs respect guns because they have to learn about them. Again, both men had CCWs and Taylor knew plenty about guns, as the prosecutor told mlive.com that Taylor, apparently a collector, might have owned more than 100. Regular folks arent the ones you have to worry about with guns its the criminals. So far, there is no indication Pullum or Taylor have any serious criminal past. Taylor did lose his concealed weapons permit for three years after a drunkendriving misdemeanor. But in 2010, he was able to get it back. And the prosecutor described him as a polite, law-abiding citizen. So there are your basic facts. The guns werent illegally obtained, this wasnt crossfire from a drug war, and the shooters werent deranged lunatics walking through a defenseless workplace. Instead, this appears to be about tempers flaring over an everyday occurrence traffic anger but culminating in two deaths because, when the anger peaked, each man had a gun within reach and each used it to try to settle matters. Same as we did in the Wild West. The fact that the Ionia shootings came the same week as a disturbed man named Aaron Alexis allegedly shot up the Washington Navy Yard, killing 12 and wounding eight all with a weapon he legally obtained despite a troubling past made the anti-gun lobby even angrier. But if you expect it to change things, it wont. Pro-gun folks will somehow explain away Ionia. Someone will claim it could have been worse if they didnt shoot each other. Someone will say its the laws, not the guns. Someone will scream stupid liberals! and the whole thing will degenerate into name-calling. The National Rifle Association will likely be silent. And we can only be happy that people arguing through newspapers or televisions cant fire bullets at each other the way Taylor and Pullum did. Scripture might warn that those who live by the sword die by the sword. But weve been ignoring that for centuries. And my bet is, were not stopping anytime soon. Mitch Albom is a best-selling a uthor of fiction and nonfiction, a columnist for the Detroit Free Press and a radio host and television commentator. Learning is its own exceeding great reward.William Hazlitt, On Old English Writers and Speakers, 1826 Settling disputes with bullets, an American tradition CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief MFL VS. OFW Contradiction of water laws indisputable The secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has an opportunity to risk political suicide but prove that logic is not lost in the management of water resources. While the secretary wasnt present when challenges to the states minimum flows law for the Chassahowitzka and Homosassa rivers were presented recently, its his job to rule if the law should be superseded by the rivers status as Outstanding Florida Waters (OFWs). In pondering the situation, Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. should draw heavily on common sense and political perspective. State policy to review flows in rivers throughout the state was initially viewed apparently naively as a means to gauge the status of the rivers health. As it turns out, that data has been contorted into a mechanism for condoning reduced flows. While water district officials responsible for setting the minimum flows and levels (MFLs) bristle at the reality, flow reduction equates to increased pollution. Much political spin has been offered in an attempt to separate MFLs from OFW status but they are both law and blatantly contradict each other. Reduced flow allows for greater concentrations of polluting nitrates and exacerbates saltwater intrusion. History has made that evident. The petitioners at the Sept. 10 hearing before the DEP representative were in no way a bunch of yahoos bellyaching about some far-fetched conspiracy. An attorney articulated the contentions of three environmental groups and three individuals that reduced flows are contrary to OFW status. Dr. Bob Knight of the Florida Springs Institute supported their claim with scientific data. While the legal and scientific representatives from the water district were earnest in saying the approved reduction of MFLs are consistent with their dictates, theyre seeking cover by detaching reduced flows from increased pollution. The districts position is that the rules are consistent with the Water Resource Implementation Rule and they do not negatively impact any water resource values and are consistent with all relevant water quality standards, the water district attorney stated. Thats fine, if one dismisses the degradation reaped to date by nitrateand saltwater-induced degradation on the Homosassa and Chassahowitzka. Its a simple question: How will allowing reduced flow aka increased withdrawals benefit the water quality of the rivers? That is the question the DEP secretary must evaluate. While theres been much publicity and praise for the governors $37 million springs restoration initiative, state agencies be it the DEP or water districts are cogs in the political machine. With Gov. Rick Scott driving that machine, they are tasked with carrying out the agenda of a leader who, springs initiative aside, has hardly been viewed as the environmental governor. No doubt, balancing the states economic interests with environmental concerns is no easy task, and allowing increased water withdrawals hence reduced flow has major economic overtones. All of that aside, the matter before the DEP secretary is simple: Does Outstanding Florida Water status override the condoned reduction of water flow? These are not issues that can be separated. THE ISSUE:Reducing river minimum flows.OUR OPINION:Smacks in the face of Outstanding Florida Water status. OPINIONS INVITED Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.LETTERSto the Editor Conflict for AdamsThis has to do with County fears losing citys trash. I believe that its a total conflict of interest if Scott Adams is in the bidding to (dispose) trash for ... the city and still be on the county commission. That is total conflict of interests and its absurd, competing with the county when youre a county commissioner. Im sorry but, uh-uh. We should not have it.Saves plenty of moneyI cant believe the editor didnt correct these people who called in saying the sheriff wants another helicopter. He only wants to look into converting the present helicopter into a medical flight helicopter. If you had to pay $20,000 to be transported to Tampa General, not covered by insurance, you would rather have our own transportation, saving a lot of money.Stay with Nature CoastThis is to whoever is in charge of, or has input into the renaming of the Nature Coast since were being made to re-identify Citrus County, in particular Crystal River, for attracting tourists. Nothing works better than the Nature Coast. The Weather Channel No. 9, the Klystron 9 weather report shows, when they show Crystal River, underneath on that logo, it shows Nature Coast. I think we ought to hang with that. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 Mitch AlbomOTHER VOICES CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE

PAGE 11

Rouhani calls US a great nation in sharp change Associated PressUNITED NATIONS Iranian President Hassan Rouhani called the United States a great nation Friday in a sharp reversal from his predecessors and expressed hope that at the very least the two governments can stop the escalation of tensions. Wrapping up his first trip to the United States as Irans new leader, Rouhani said President Barack Obama struck a new tone in his U.N. speech this week, which he welcomed. He said he believes the first step to a meeting between the two leaders was taken Thursday at a meeting on Irans nuclear program, where the foreign ministers of both nations talked for the first time in six years. The White House announced Friday afternoon that Rouhani and Obama spoke on the phone. I want it to be the case that this trip will be a first step, and a beginning for better and constructive relations with countries of the world as well as a first step for a better relationship between the two great nations of Iran and the United States of America, Rouhani told a press conference at a hotel near U.N. headquarters. Iran and the United States have traded harsh rhetoric for years. During the 1979 Iranian revolution, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned from exile, seized power and declared the U.S., which was a strong supporter of the ousted Shah of Iran, the Great Satan. He set the tone for Iranian officials who came after him. The U.S. was equally critical, with then-President George W. Bush, in his 2002 State of the Union address, declaring Iran part of his axis of evil along with North Korea and Iraq. Rouhani, looking to the future of U.S.-Iranian relations, expressed hope that the views of our people, the understanding of each other, will grow, and at the level of the two governments that at the very least we can, as a first step, stop further escalation of tensions and then reduce tension as a next step and then pave the way for achieving of mutual interests. The Iranian president was upbeat about his four-day visit to New York to attend the U.N. General Assemblys ministerial session, reeling off a long list of leaders he met and saying I believe that our success was greater than our expectation, especially with the European countries ... and I think that the path really has been paved to expand relations in various centers, key world economies. Irans economy has been hit hard by four rounds of U.N. sanctions for its failure to suspend uranium enrichment, a process that can be used to make fuel for both nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. The U.S. and its allies have taken even more devastating measures targeting Irans ability to conduct international bank transfers and to export oil. Rouhani has come across as a more moderate face of the hard-line clerical regime in Tehran. He said he has a mandate from the Iranian people, who opposed extremism and voted for moderation. He said this has created a new environment that could pave the way for better relations with the West. He said Iran would put forth a proposal at talks in Geneva on Oct. 15-16 aimed at resolving the standoff over his countrys nuclear program and easing international sanctions. We hope that an even more effective step will be taken in Geneva in order to settle the nuclear issue, Rouhani said, without elaborating. He expressed hope that with sufficient will on both sides and I assure you that on the Iranian side this will is there fully, 100 percent that within a very short time there will be a settlement on the nuclear file and ... I believe that in the not too distant future, well be able to resolve and settle the nuclear issue. Resolving the nuclear issue will pave the way for Irans better relations with the West, including the expansion of economic and cultural ties, he said. Rouhani said he was encouraged by what he has heard recently from Western officials. In speaking with senior European officials and also hearing Mr. Obama ... it seemed that they sounded different compared to the past, and I view that as a positive step to the resettlement of the differences between the Islamic Republic between the Republic of Iran and the West, he said. He said he did not meet with Obama on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly this week because both sides were convinced that the timetable was too short to plan a meeting of two presidents and ensure that its conclusion would be solid. What matters to us is the result of such a meeting, Rouhani said. Iran watchers say Rouhani may have limited time possibly a year or less to reach a settlement on the nuclear issue before Irans Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei decides negotiations are fruitless. Ship crosses NW PassageTORONTO A Danishowned coal-laden cargo ship has sailed through the Northwest Passage for the first time and into the history books as the second bulk carrier to navigate the Arctic route. The Nordic Orion left Vancouver, British Columbia, Sept. 17 carrying 15,000 tons of coal. Ed Coll, CEO of Bulk Partners, an operational partner of ship-owner Nordic Bulk Carriers, said Friday that the freighter has passed through Greenland. He says it is expected to dock in Finland next week after traversing waters once impermeable with thick ice.The Rev. Jackson visiting CubaHAVANA The Rev. Jesse Jackson is in Cuba and hoped to meet with jailed American government subcontractor Alan Gross. Jackson said he is in town for talks with religious leaders about their concerns for the poor, and peaceful relations between Cuba, the United States and the rest of the Caribbean. Asked whether he would meet with Gross, Jackson said I would like to. Gross was arrested in 2009 after being caught importing restricted communications equipment into Cuba. He said he was only setting up Internet for island Jewish groups, but he was sentenced to 15 years. Jackson has helped gain freedom for U.S. citizens in Yugoslavia, Syria and Iraq. In 2011, he offered to reprise that role in the Gross case.WORLDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 A11 Citrus County Auditorium Citrus County Fairgrounds U.S. 41 S., Inverness Sale Hours Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation No admission charge for the following Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day) Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3 a bag) Great bargains in recycled reading! Thousands of best sellers, large print, crafts, cooking, health, childrens, travel, CDs, DVDs, games, puzzles, treasures, etc. Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region, Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and Citrus County Library System. www.foccls.org For book sale information call 746-1334 or 527-8405 Sept 27 thru Oct 1 Friends of the Library MEGA BOOK SALE Fundraiser 000FGPR 000G4SV Let the Energy Savings Pay for your New Unit! Buy a new 16 SEER 3-Ton 2-Speed Variable Heat Pump for only $135/mo. MINUS Energy Savings of $60/mo. NET COST $ 75.00 Call Bay Area Air Conditioning Today 795-0526 ACT NOW! LIMITED TIME OFFER!! UNDER NORMAL USAGE These 2-speed variable heat pumps not only control the temperature, but also the humidity in your home. The use of multiple sensors allows this system to use the least amount of electricity possible... every second of every day!! FIRST TIME EVER!! 60 Month 0% Financing $1,000 Rebate Federal Tax Credits WorldBRIEFS From wire reports Iran tries for diplomacy Associated PressIranian President Hassan Rouhani smiles Friday at the end of a news conference at the Millennium Hotel in midtown Manhattan, N.Y. The Rev. Jessee Jackson

PAGE 12

Associated PressNEW YORK Gasoline prices have fallen steadily throughout September, and drivers should look forward to even cheaper fillups in the weeks ahead. The national average price for a gallon of gasoline is now $3.42, down from $3.59 on Sept. 1. The price is the lowest its been at this time of year since 2010 and is likely to keep falling. Its a layup for me to predict lower prices until Columbus Day weekend, says Tom Kloza, Chief Oil Analyst at GasBuddy.com and Oil Price Information Service, which tracks retail and wholesale gasoline prices. Wholesale gasoline prices have fallen faster in recent days than pump prices, so drivers can expect to pay even less as the pump prices catch up. Gas prices tend to decline soon after Labor Day, but last year they didnt start going down until midOctober. There are a number of reasons for this falls drop in price, experts say: Refiners can switch to cheaper blends of gasoline in the winter months as clean-air rules are relaxed. Gasoline demand declines in the fall after the summer driving season ends. At the same time supplies rise, because refiners are still making gasoline as they keep operations humming to make heating oil for winter and diesel and jet fuel for shippers. This year, refineries have been relatively problem free. There have been no hurricanes, and few unexpected problems at refineries or pipelines, unlike last year. Even high oil prices havent stopped gasolines decline. Oil briefly topped $112 in late August as a U.S. threat of military action against Syria made the market nervous about Middle East supplies. The price of oil has since fallen, but remains above $100 per barrel. Still, gasoline has dropped to its lowest price since Jan. 31. Friday, oil fell 16 cents to close at $102.87 per barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Last year at this time drivers were paying 37 cents per gallon more than they are this year, on average, because Hurricane Irene and refinery and pipeline problems disrupted gasoline production in August and September. California prices rose sharply in late September, then hit a record $4.67 per gallon in early October. There are no such problems this year, though California drivers are again paying the highest average price outside of Hawaii and Alaska, at $3.95 per gallon, according to AAA, OPIS and Wright Express. South Carolina drivers are paying the least, at $3.11 per gallon. For the year, the national price is on track to average $3.56 per gallon, 7 cents less than last years record of $3.63. That would save U.S. drivers $9 billion this year. Despite the recent drop, the national average is unlikely to fall back to $3.29 per gallon this years low, set in early January unless the price of oil falls under $100 per barrel, GasBuddys Kloza said. Associated PressST. LOUIS The planned use of a common anesthetic in a Missouri execution is raising concerns that the anti-death penalty European Union could limit export of the drug, endangering the supply of a vital medication used every day in thousands of American hospitals and clinics. The execution scheduled for Oct. 23 would be the first to use propofol, which is by far the nations most popular anesthetic. About 50 million vials are administered annually in some 15,000 locations. Thats about four-fifths of all anesthetic procedures, according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists. Propofol is popular because it works quickly and patients wake up faster with fewer side effects such as post-operative nausea. Roughly 85 percent of the U.S. supply of propofol is made in Europe, where capital punishment is outlawed, by the German company Fresenius Kabi. Export is controlled by the European Union, which prohibits trade in goods that could be used for executions. The EU is reviewing whether to subject propofol to that rule. If it is added to the regulation, propofol would be subject to export controls, not a complete ban, EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said. Still, any change in export practices could have a drastic effect on propofols availability in the U.S., said Matt Kuhn, a spokesman for Fresenius Kabi USA. Its a real concern, Kuhn said Friday. And it could have enormous public health implications. Fresenius Kabi has launched a website specifically to address the ramifications of using propofol in a U.S. execution, http://propofol-info.com. The Food and Drug Administration is worried about any move that could affect access to propofol. FDA spokeswoman Erica Jefferson said the agency is weighing how to reach out to European officials to ensure the drug remains readily available. We do consider this a critical need, Jefferson said. Without the drug, were concerned that surgeries would be delayed and patients would be at risk. Honored Associated PressMalala Yousafzai waves to onlookers Friday after speaking at a news conference on Harvard University campus in Cambridge, Mass. The Pakistani teenager, an advocate for education for girls, survived a Taliban assassination attempt in 2012 on her way home from school. Food safety a criminal caseDENVER Criminal charges against two cantaloupe farmers over a deadly food-borne illness send an emphatic message to fruit and vegetable growers to crack down on safety, federal regulators said Friday. Colorado farmers Eric and Ryan Jensen appeared in shackles in a Denver federal court this week and pleaded not guilty to charges of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. The federal Food and Drug Administration has said conditions at Jensen Farms in southeast Colorado led to a 2011 listeria outbreak that killed 33 people. Officials said people in 28 states ate the contaminated fruit, and 147 required hospitalization. The criminal prosecution sends the message that absolute care must be taken to ensure that deadly pathogens do not enter our food supply chain, the FDA said in a statement Friday.Military court to hear HIV caseWICHITA, Kan. The highest court for the U.S. armed forces has agreed to hear the appeal of a Kansas airman convicted of assault for exposing multiple sex partners to HIV at swinger parties in Wichita. The attorney for David Gutierrez said Friday the case will set the standard across the military as to what evidence is necessary to prove someone can cause grievous bodily harm after testing positive for HIV. The court in an order Tuesday also agreed to decide whether the airman committed adultery since his wife also joined in the sex parties. Gutierrez was a sergeant serving at McConnell Air Force base when he was sentenced in 2011 to eight years in prison and stripped of his rank. He was convicted of aggravated assault among other charges.NJ judge rules for gay marriageNew Jersey is unconstitutionally denying federal benefits to gay couples and must allow them to marry, a judge ruled Friday. Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobson sided almost entirely with a group of same-sex couples and gay rights groups who sued the state in July days after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down key parts of a law that blocked the federal government from granting benefits to gay couples. Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican in the midst of a re-election campaign and a possible presidential contender, said through a spokesman Friday he plans to appeal the decision, which he believes should be determined by a popular vote rather than a court. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Steamy Associated PressThe London and North Eastern Region A4 Pacific class locomotive, Sir Nigel Gresley, makes its way Friday through Darnholm, northeastern England, on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway at the start of the Autumn Steam Gala that runs until Sunday. The locomotive was built in 1937 and was withdrawn from service by British Railways on Feb. 1, 1966. UN: Eliminate Syrias weaponsUNITED NATIONS The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Friday night to secure and destroy Syrias chemical weapons stockpile, a landmark decision aimed at taking poison gas off the battlefield in the 2 1/2-year conflict. The vote after two weeks of intense negotiations marked a major breakthrough in the paralysis that has gripped the council since the Syrian uprising began. Russia and China previously vetoed three Western-backed resolutions pressuring President Bashar Assads regime to end the violence. Todays historic resolution is the first hopeful news on Syria in a long time, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told the council immediately after the vote. For the first time, the council endorsed the roadmap for a political transition in Syria adopted by key nations in June 2012 and called for an international conference to be convened as soon as possible to implement it. Ban said the target date for a new peace conference in Geneva is midNovember.German party ready for talksBERLIN Germanys main center-left party said Friday it is prepared to hold preliminary talks with Chancellor Angela Merkels conservatives to explore the possibility of a grand coalition after both sides failed to gain an absolute majority in the general election. Social Democratic Party Chairman Sigmar Gabriel said a majority of delegates at a party meeting backed the step late Friday, but they would have another say before any formal negotiations with Merkels Union bloc begin. World BRIEFS From wire reports Experts give warming warning Associated PressSTOCKHOLM Scientists now believe its extremely likely that human activity is the dominant cause of global warming, a long-term trend that is clear despite a recent plateau in the temperatures, an international climate panel said Friday. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used its strongest language yet in a report on the causes of climate change, prompting calls for global action to control emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. If this isnt an alarm bell, then I dont know what one is. If ever there were an issue that demanded greater cooperation, partnership, and committed diplomacy, this is it, said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. The IPCC, which has 195 member countries, adopted the report Friday after all-night talks at a meeting in Stockholm. In its previous assessment, in 2007, the U.N.sponsored panel said it was very likely that global warming was due to human activity, particularly the CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of coal, oil and gas. The change means that scientists have moved from being 90 percent sure to 95 percent about the same degree of certainty they have that smoking kills. At 90 percent, it means there is a 10 percent probability that its not entirely correct, said Chris Field, Carnegie Institution scientist who is a leader in the IPCC but wasnt involved in the report released Friday. And now thats 5 percent. So its a doubling of our confidence. Thats actually a consequential change in our level of understanding. One of the most controversial subjects in the report was how to deal with what appears to be a slowdown in warming if you look at temperature data for the past 15 years. Climate skeptics say this hiatus casts doubt on the scientific consensus on climate change, even though the past decade was the warmest on record. Many governments had objections about how the issue was treated in earlier drafts and some had called for it to be deleted altogether. Panel: Climate change extremely likely man-made Fuel falling Associated PressA gas pump is shown Friday in Montpelier, Vt. The national average price of gasoline has fallen throughout the month, sliding to $3.42 per gallon from $3.59 at the start of the month. The price is at its lowest level since Jan. 31, its the lowest its been at this time of year for three years, and it is expected to fall further in the coming days. Gas prices drop as weather, output calm markets Use of anesthetic for execution might cut supply Associated PressA bottle of the propofol, the nations most popular anesthetic, is displayed July 28, 2009, at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles. The common anesthetic is planned for use in a Missouri execution scheduled for Oct. 23.

PAGE 13

Baseball/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 TV, lottery/B3 Golf/B4 Football/B4, B5 Auto racing/B6 The Tampa Bay Rays lost ground in the AL wild-card race Friday night./B3 SPORTSSection BSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000G2N3 Panthers suffer tough loss to Rattlers STEVEMCGUNNIGLE CorrespondentLECANTO In a game that equally highlighted its strengths and its flaws, the Lecanto football team could not overcome the latter in the end, suffering a tough third straight loss, this oneto visiting Belleview 27-21 on Friday night. The Panthers offense showed signs of improvement, mixing it up more than previously seen. Dmitry Growdon (18 rushes for 124 yards) and Ardante Anderson (27 carries, 107 yards) impressed on the ground, and sophomore quarterback Travis McGee showed flashes, going 6for-9 for 94 yards passing. But a key early mistake hurt Lecanto in the late stages of this close contest. On Lecantos second possession early in the opening quarter, the Panthers marched 64 yards down to the Rattlers 5. On a third-and-goal, McGees pass toward the end zone was tipped near the line of scrimmage andintercepted by Paul Maurice, who raced 95 yards untouched for a stunning score, giving Belleview an early 7-0 edge. Lecanto (2-3) responded though, scoring twice in the second period to take a 14-7 lead into halftime. The teams traded punches in the third, as Belleviews Craig Richie (25 carries for 254 yards and three touchdowns) found the end zone following an impressive 62-yard run, twice bursting through swarms of would-be Panther tacklers along the way. All of their touchdown runs were off broken tackles, Lecanto head coach McKinley Rolle said. (Richie is) an MATT PFIFFNER /ChronicleDAndre Horton of Lecanto drives into Belleviews Craig Riche and tackles him for a three-yard loss in the first half in Lecanto. The Rattlers rallied from a 14-7 halftime deficit for a 27-21 victory on the road. Run aground SEANARNOLD CorrespondentDUNNELLON Josh Williams cemented his status as a freshman phenom, while the stalwart Dunnellon defense, which has now surrendered 27 points in its last four games, was more of the same in helping the Tigers continue to roll through its early 5A-5 competition. The 6-foot-1 Tigers freshman scored on runs of 28 and 14 yards while posting a game-high 105 yards one more yard than the entire Pirate output to help extend Dunnellons winning streak over its rival to 12 games with a 34-7 victory at Ned Love Field on Friday. The Tigers (4-1 overall, 2-0 district) scored on five of their first seven possessions in building a 34-0 lead midway through the third quarter. Junior Bubba Sims, the areas leading rusher, reached the century mark for the fourth time this season with 104 yards and two scores on 20 carries. Williams, who is averaging 9.6 yards per carry on the season, reached the second level of the Pirate defense on half a dozen occasions off his 11 touches. Crystal River did a really good job of stopping Bubba (Sims) and putting a lot of guys in the box, and then we had to make some adjustments to try to get on the perimeter, Dunnellon head coach Frank Beasley said. Josh Williams came of age tonight. Ive been trying to tell people for weeks hes got that it in him. Its a big district, so weve got a long ways to go, he continued. Its a good win for our kids and our community. Im proud of our kids. Sophomore quarterback Kobie Jones completed five of his eight attempts, mostly on roll outs, for 51 yards. He added an 11-yard touchdown pass to fellow Dunnellon sophomore Matthew Livermore to make it 28-0 with 41 seconds left in the half. STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleDunnellons Kane Parks attempts to break through the tackle of Crystal Rivers Austin Stephens in the first quarter at Dunnello n High School. The Tigers improved to 2-0 in District 5A-5 with a 34-7 rout of the Pirates. Tigers wreck Pirates 34-7 in crucial District 5A-5 football clash Bulldogs bite Warriors DAVIDPIEKLIK CorrespondentMOUNT DORA With some tough competition and bad luck, Seven Rivers Christians football team fell to 0-5 on the season with a 46-0 road loss to Mount Dora Bible. With some new faces on the roster to make up for injuries to starters, the Warriors were shut out for the fourth consecutive week. The Bulldogs (4-1) had the size and matchups advantage, testing Seven Rivers early and often. Less than three minutes into the game, Bulldogs quarterback Daniel Johnson ran for a 3-yard touchdown and, on the ensuing kickoff, the team recovered an onside kick. A few plays later, an 11-yard touchdown pass from Johnson increased the score to 14-0. The Bulldogs were in cruise control by the time running back Jasper Pierres 54-yard scamper came with 1:59 left in the quarter; Pierre added a 65-yard run at the end of the third quarter to finish with two touchdowns and more than 125 yards rushing. The Warriors best scoring chance of the night came late in the third quarter when halfback Justin Jiminez on a right side halfback option pass had Sterling Gardner wide open down the right sideline. After catching the ball and chugging along toward the Mount Dora 35, a Bulldog defender caught him from behind and, with a hard hit, jarred the ball loose and the Bulldogs recovered the fumble on the 30-yard line. Seven Rivers gets a muchneeded bye week next week before returning to district play against Ocala Christian Academy. Head coach David Iwaniec said the team isnt playing good ball right now, and a main problem is not being able to put an 80-yard drive together. Though disappointed with the loss, quarterback Will Ellis was happy to be given the chance to start on the varsity squad for the first time this season. With a smaller roster that is a little banged up, he said he hopes the team can stay healthy and play their best. Lecanto football loses two leads during 27-21 setback to Belleview See TOUGH/ Page B3 See AGROUND/ Page B3

PAGE 14

Associated PressTORONTO R.A. Dickey slowed Tampa Bays stretch run, leading the Toronto Blue Jays to a 6-3 victory Friday night that stopped the Rays seven-game winning streak. Tampa Bay wasted a 2-0 lead and committed a season-high three errors, including a pair by two-time Gold Glove third baseman Evan Longoria. The Rays began the night with a magic number of two over Texas for clinching an AL wild-card berth. Dickey (14-13) allowed two runs and five hits in 7 1/3 innings, retiring 13 of 14 during one stretch. Tampa Bay, which had won seven of its previous nine against Toronto, went ahead on home runs by Ben Zobrist in the first and Delmon Young in the second, his second in two games. Hellickson retired nine in a row before Jose Reyes singled in the fourth. After a sacrifice, Brett Lawrie reached on Longorias fielding error and Moises Sierra and Anthony Gose followed with RBI singles. Ryan Goins grounded a goahead single up the middle, and center fielder Sam Fuld overran the ball, which went all the way to the wall. Sierra scored on the error for a 4-2 lead, and Goins was thrown out at the plate on Zobrists relay from shortstop. Lawrie and Sierra added runscoring singles in the fifth. Dickey left after two errors and a walk helped the Rays load the bases with one out in the eighth. Sergio Santos came on and got James Loney to ground into a double play on the first pitch. Santos gave up Kelly Johnsons RBI double in the ninth but struck out pinch-hitter Luke Scott for his first save in three chances.American League Indians 12, Twins 6MINNEAPOLIS Carlos Santana and Asdrubal Cabrera both had two doubles and Jason Kipnis was a homer short of the cycle as the Cleveland Indians had 17 hits in a 12-6 victory over the Minnesota Twins. With the win and Tampa Bay's loss at Toronto, the Indians moved into a tie with the Rays for the top wild card spot in the American League, one game ahead of Texas, which beat Los Angeles. Indians starter Corey Kluber (11-5) managed to win his fifth straight decision. Rangers 5, Angels 3ARLINGTON, Texas Alex Rios had a tiebreaking RBI single in the seventh inning, and the Texas Rangers finally gained some ground in the AL wild-card race with a 5-3 victory over the Los Angeles Angels. For the first time during their fivegame winning streak the Rangers moved closer in the wild-card standings. Wild-card leader Tampa Bay lost at Toronto, allowing the Rangers to move within a game of the Rays and Cleveland, which beat Minnesota. With two games left in the regular season, the Rangers still have a chance to go to the postseason for the fourth year in a row.Red Sox 12, Orioles 3BALTIMORE Clay Buchholz allowed three runs over seven innings as the AL East champion Boston Red Sox routed the Baltimore Orioles 12-3 and moved closer to securing home-field advantage throughout the postseason. Daniel Nava and David Ortiz hit three-run homers, Jarrod Saltalamacchia had a three-run shot overturned by replay. Dustin Pedroia had three hits for the Red Sox would clinch the ALs best record with another win or a loss by Oakland, which played Seattle later Friday.Yankees 3, Astros 2HOUSTON David Robertson got the save as Mariano Rivera looked on, and the New York Yankees got a glimpse of their future in a 3-2 win over Houston that sent the Astros to their team-record 13th consecutive loss. David Adams hit a two-run double and Mark Reynolds also drove in a run for the Yankees, who stopped a fourgame losing streak.Royals 6, White Sox 1CHICAGO James Shields struck out 10 and scattered four hits over seven innings for his 100th career win, and the Kansas City Royals beat Chicago 6-1 to ensure the White Sox of their worst record since 1970. Shields (13-9) gave up just one run and walked one. Billy Butler led the Royals with three hits and two RBIs, while Emilio Bonifacio drove in two runs with two hits.National League Braves 1, Phillies 0ATLANTA Chris Johnson led off the eighth inning with a homer to spoil an otherwise dominant start by Cliff Lee, Kris Medlen allowed only two hits in eight innings and the Atlanta Braves beat the Philadelphia Phillies 1-0. Johnsons homer to left field snapped a streak of 16 consecutive batters retired by Lee (14-8), who allowed only three hits with no walks and 13 strikeouts in eight innings. Medlen (15-12) strengthened his case to be the Braves Game 1 starter in the NL division series next week. He allowed two hits with two walks and seven strikeouts. He has won five straight decisions. Craig Kimbrel pitched a perfect ninth for his 50th save.Brewers 4, Mets 2NEW YORK Norichika Aoki hit a leadoff homer, Khris Davis connected three batters later and Yovani Gallardo pitched the Milwaukee Brewers to a 4-2 victory over the New York Mets. Martin Maldonado also homered and Gallardo (12-10) went six innings to end his inconsistent season with a win. The right-hander, who won 33 games over the previous two years, finished 4-1 in eight starts since returning from a strained left hamstring. Jim Henderson pitched a perfect ninth for his 28th save in 32 tries.Pirates 4, Reds 1CINCINNATI Marlon Byrd had three hits, and Pedro Alvarez hit a tworun homer high off the batters eye, leading the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 4-1 victory over the Cincinnati Reds in a series that will decide which could host the NL wild-card game. Both teams clinched postseason berths this week. Whoever wins the three-game series would be assured of hosting the one-game playoff on Tuesday night. The Pirates still had a long-shot chance of overtaking St. Louis for the NL Central title. They need to sweep in Cincinnati while the Cardinals lose three at home to the Cubs over the weekend.Cardinals 7, Cubs 0ST. LOUIS The St. Louis Cardinals clinched their first NL Central title in four years, beating the Chicago Cubs 7-0 behind the strong pitching of Lance Lynn and home runs by David Freese and Matt Holliday. St. Louis (95-65) has won six of seven and is tied with Atlanta for the best record in the NL. They are assured of home-field advantage when the NL division series starts Thursday.Interleague Marlins 3, Tigers 2MIAMI Detroits Jhonny Peralta played in his first game since completing a 50-game suspension, going 1 for 4 with an RBI in the Tigers 3-2 loss to the Miami Marlins. Peralta was suspended for his involvement in the Miami-based Biogenesis performance-enhancing lab. His run-scoring double chased Miami starter Tom Koehler in the sixth and cut the Marlins lead to 3-2. Giancarlo Stanton drove in three runs for the Marlins and Koehler (5-10) pitched 5 1/3 innings, allowing two runs and five hits while walking three and striking out three. Steve Cishek pitched a scoreless ninth for his 29th consecutive save and 34th in 36 opportunities. AL Associated PressTampa Bay starter Jeremy Hellickson, right, is pulled from the game Friday by manager Joe Maddon, left, as catcher Jose Lobaton, center, looks on during the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays in Toronto. The Rays lost 6-3. Rays fall, give up ground Indians tie for wild-card lead; Rangers close in AMERICAN LEAGUEFridays Games Boston 12, Baltimore 3 Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 3 Miami 3, Detroit 2 Texas 5, L.A. Angels 3 Cleveland 12, Minnesota 6 Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 1 N.Y. Yankees 3, Houston 2 Oakland at Seattle, late Today L.A. Angels (Richards 7-7) at Texas (D.Holland 10-9), 12:05 p.m. Cleveland (Kazmir 9-9) at Minnesota (De Vries 0-1), 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Archer 9-7) at Toronto (Happ 4-7), 1:07 p.m. Oakland (J.Parker 12-7) at Seattle (Maurer 4-8), 4:10 p.m. Boston (Lester 15-8) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-7), 7:05 p.m. Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 14-8) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-6), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (Ventura 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Er.Johnson 2-2), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 10-11) at Houston (Clemens 4-6), 7:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEFridays Games Miami 3, Detroit 2 Milwaukee 4, N.Y. Mets 2 Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 1, Philadelphia 0 St. Louis 7, Chicago Cubs 0 Washington at Arizona, late Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late San Diego at San Francisco, late Today Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 14-11), 1:05 p.m. San Diego (Stults 10-13) at San Francisco (Petit 4-0), 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (J.Nelson 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Harang 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 14-8) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-6), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Undecided) at Atlanta (Minor 13-8), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 8-17) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 9-5), 7:15 p.m. Washington (Haren 9-14) at Arizona (McCarthy 5-10), 8:10 p.m. Colorado (Nicasio 8-9) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 15-3), 9:10 p.m. Blue Jays 6, Rays 3Tampa BayToronto abrhbiabrhbi Joyce rf-lf4000Reyes ss4210 Zobrist ss3131Kawsk dh2100 Loney 1b4000Lawrie 3b3111 Longori 3b4110Lngrhn 1b0000 DeJess lf-cf4000Sierra rf3122 DYong dh4111Gose cf4111 KJhnsn 2b4011DeRosa 1b-3b4000 Loaton c3000Goins 2b4021 Scott ph1000Thole c3010 Fuld cf2010Pillar lf4000 WMyrs ph-rf1000 Totals34373Totals31685 Tampa Bay1100000013 Toronto00042000x6 EFuld (1), Longoria 2 (11), Dickey (2), Reyes (9). DPToronto 2. LOBTampa Bay 5, Toronto 7. 2BKe.Johnson (12), Goins (5). HRZobrist (12), D.Young (3). SBLawrie (9). SKawasaki. IPHRERBBSO Tampa Bay Hellickson L,12-1042/366325 W.Wright110003 B.Gomes1/300001 C.Ramos2/300002 Ro.Hernandez000010 Beliveau2/310010 Lueke2/300000 Toronto Dickey W,14-1371/352213 S.Santos S,1-312/321103Yankees 3, Astros 2New York Houston abrhbi abrhbi Grndrs cf4000Villar ss4010 Nunez 3b4000Altuve 2b3000 Cano dh4110MDmn 3b3000 ASorin lf3110Krauss dh2000 MrRynl 1b4121Elmore pr-dh0000 DAdms 2b4012Carter 1b-lf3100 ZAlmnt rf4000Crowe lf-cf4000 Ryan ss3000Hoes rf4120 JMrphy c3010Corprn c4000 BBarns cf2010 Wallac ph-1b2012 Totals333 63Totals31 252 New York0003000003 Houston0000002002 EM.Dominguez (16). LOBNew York 4, Houston 7. 2BA.Soriano (8), D.Adams (5), J.Murphy (1), Wallace (14). SBVillar (18). CSElmore (6). IPHRERBBSO New York Warren W,3-2520014 D.Phelps H,112/312221 Chamberlain H,51/320010 Claiborne H,4100011 D.Robertson S,3-5100001 Houston Oberholtzer L,4-551/353214 Zeid 12/300003 K.Chapman100001 Fields 110002Red Sox 12, Orioles 3Boston Baltimore abrhbi abrhbi Ellsury cf4000BRorts dh4120 BrdlyJr cf0100Markks rf3000 Pedroia 2b4230Pearce ph-rf0000 Holt 2b0000A.Jones cf4112 D.Ortiz dh5223Pridie cf0000 Napoli 1b3111C.Davis 1b3121 BSnydr pr0000Valenci ph-3b1010 Nava rf5223Wieters c4000 JGoms lf4331DJhnsn 1b0000 Sltlmch c4111Hardy ss3010 Lvrnwy ph-c1000CSnydr c1000 Drew ss4023McLoth lf4000 Bogarts ph1010Schoop 2b4000 Mdlrks 3b5010Flahrty 3b-ss3010 Totals40121612Totals34383 Boston50300003112 Baltimore0020010003 DPBoston 1, Baltimore 2. LOBBoston 6, Baltimore 5. 2BNapoli (37), Saltalamacchia (40). 3BDrew (8). HRD.Ortiz (30), Nava (12), J.Gomes (13), A.Jones (33), C.Davis (53). IPHRERBBSO Boston Buchholz W,12-1773304 Breslow 110011 Uehara 100001 Baltimore Feldman L,5-621/388811 Z.Britton 32/350002 S.Johnson 12/302233 Belfiore 11/332210Rangers 5, Angels 3Los AngelesTexas abrhbiabrhbi Aybar ss4010Kinsler 2b2200 Calhon rf3121Andrus ss4120 Trout dh2000Rios rf3212 JHmltn cf4012ABeltre 3b3000 HKndrc 2b4010Przyns c3012 Trumo 1b3000JeBakr dh2000 Conger c4010Profar ph-dh1000 Cowgill lf3000Morlnd 1b3010 Shuck ph1000Gentry lf4010 AnRmn 3b3220LMartn cf4010 Totals31383Totals29574 Los Angeles0010200003 Texas10200020x5 EJ.Gutierrez (2). DPLos Angeles 1, Texas 3. LOBLos Angeles 5, Texas 9. SBRios 2 (42), L.Martin (35). CSCalhoun (2), Rios (7). SAndrus. SFCalhoun. IPHRERBBSO Los Angeles C.Wilson643346 J.Gutierrez L,1-52/312211 Boshers010000 Cor.Rasmus110001 Brasier1/300010 Texas Ogando51/383334 Frasor2/300002 Cotts W,7-3100002 Scheppers H,25100002 Nathan S,42-45100000Indians 12, Twins 6Cleveland Minnesota abrhbi abrhbi Brantly lf5010Presley cf5022 Swisher 1b6120Dozier 2b5000 Kipnis 2b5232Doumit rf5120 CSantn dh3321Arcia dh4000 Raburn rf5012Pinto c1010 MCarsn rf0000CHrmn c2000 AsCarr ss5231Plouffe 3b3131 YGoms c5011Parmel 1b3100 Aviles 3b5122Mstrnn lf4220 Stubbs cf4322Flormn ss4113 Totals43121711Totals366116 Cleveland43002001212 Minnesota0001230006 DPCleveland 2, Minnesota 1. LOBCleveland 8, Minnesota 6. 2BSwisher (26), Kipnis (36), C.Santana 2 (38), As.Cabrera 2 (35). 3BKipnis (4). HRStubbs (10), Florimon (9). SBStubbs (17). IPHRERBBSO Cleveland Kluber W,11-551/3106615 R.Hill 1/310000 C.C.Lee H,11/300001 Rzepczynski H,5100001 Masterson 100013 M.Albers 100000 Minnesota P.Hernandez L,3-312/376611 Martis 21/321100 Hendriks 42/385528 Duensing 1/300010 NL Braves 1, Phillies 0PhiladelphiaAtlanta abrhbi abrhbi CHrndz cf4010Heywrd cf-rf3000 Rollins ss3000RJhnsn lf3000 Utley 2b2010BUpton cf0000 Ruiz c2000J.Upton rf-lf3000 DBrwn lf3000FFrmn 1b3010 Ruf 1b3000Gattis c3000 Asche 3b3000CJhnsn 3b3111 Berndn rf3000Janish 3b0000 Cl.Lee p2000Smmns ss3010 Frndsn ph1000Uggla 2b3000 Medlen p2000 ElJhns ph1000 Kimrel p0000 Totals26020Totals27131 Philadelphia0000000000 Atlanta00000001x1 DPAtlanta 2. LOBPhiladelphia 1, Atlanta 2. HRC.Johnson (12). CSC.Hernandez (3). IPHRERBBSO Philadelphia Cl.Lee L,14-88311013 Atlanta Medlen W,15-12820027 Kimbrel S,50-54100002 T:07. A,711 (49,586).Brewers 4, Mets 2MilwaukeeNew York abrhbi abrhbi Aoki rf4121EYong lf4000 Gennett 2b4100Duda 1b4120 Lucroy 1b4000DnMrp 2b4010 KDavis lf4122JuTrnr 3b4121 Kintzlr p0000ABrwn rf3010 Hndrsn p0000Lagars cf3001 CGomz cf3000TdArnd c4010 Bianchi ss4000Tovar ss3000 YBtncr 3b4000CTorrs p2000 Maldnd c3111Atchisn p0000 Gallard p2000Baxter ph1010 JFrncs ph1000Felicin p0000 Wooten p0000Germn p0000 LSchfr lf0000 Totals33454Totals32282 Milwaukee3000001004 New York0100010002 DPMilwaukee 1. LOBMilwaukee 3, New York 5. 2BDuda (16), Dan.Murphy (38). HR Aoki (8), K.Davis (11), Maldonado (4). SB K.Davis (3). SFLagares. IPHRERBBSO Milwaukee Gallardo W,12-10672216 Wooten H,8110001 Kintzler H,27100001 Henderson S,28-32100001 New York C.Torres L,4-6643317 Atchison 111101 Feliciano 1/300000 Germen 12/300001 WPC.Torres. BalkC.Torres. T:40. A,276 (41,922).Pirates 4, Reds 1PittsburghCincinnati abrhbi abrhbi SMarte lf4100Choo cf4010 NWalkr 2b4000Ludwck lf4000 McCtch cf3100Votto 1b4020 Mornea 1b3000BPhllps 2b4000 Byrd rf4132Bruce rf4000 PAlvrz 3b4122Frazier 3b2111 RMartn c2000Cozart ss3010 Barmes ss4010Hanign c3010 AJBrnt p4000HBaily p2000 Grilli p0000Simon p0000 Ondrsk p0000 DRonsn ph1000 Hoover p0000 Totals324 64Totals31161 Pittsburgh0020020004 Cincinnati0001000001 DPPittsburgh 2, Cincinnati 1. LOBPittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 4. 2BByrd (35). HRP.Alvarez (35), Frazier (19). SBS.Marte (41). IPHRERBBSO Pittsburgh A.J.Burnett W,10-11851116 Grilli S,33-35110000 Cincinnati H.Bailey L,11-12544443 Simon 200012 Ondrusek 120002 Hoover 100002 H.Bailey pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. HBPby H.Bailey (N.Walker, S.Marte). WP H.Bailey. T:53. A,107 (42,319).Interleague Marlins 3, Tigers 2Detroit Miami abrhbi abrhbi AJcksn cf4011DSolan 2b4010 Dirks rf4000Polanc 3b3110 MiCarr 3b3020Yelich lf3110 Tuiassp pr1100Stanton rf4013 Fielder 1b0000Ruggin cf4000 D.Kelly pr3000Morrsn 1b2010 JhPerlt lf4011Hchvrr ss3000 Veras p0000K.Hill c3110 Avila c3120Koehler p1000 HPerez 2b3010R.Webb p0000 RSantg ph1000Pierre ph1000 Iglesias ss4000Qualls p0000 JAlvarz p0000Cishek p0000 Porcell p0000 VMrtnz ph1000 Putknn p0000 B.Pena ph1000 E.Reed p0000 NCstlns lf0000 Totals32272Totals28363 Detroit0000110002 Miami 00300000x3 DPDetroit 1, Miami 2. LOBDetroit 6, Miami 5. 2BJh.Peralta (30), Stanton (26). SBYelich (10). SKoehler. IPHRERBBSO Detroit J.Alvarez L,1-522/323323 Porcello 11/320001 Putkonen 210011 E.Reed 100001 Veras 110001 Miami Koehler W,5-1051/352233 R.Webb H,512/310001 Qualls H,15100001 Cishek S,34-36110001 T:51. A,992 (37,442). Rays scheduleSept. 28 at Toronto Sept. 29 at Toronto West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Oakland9465.5916-4L-252-2942-36 Texas8971.556517-3W-544-3545-36 Los Angeles7882.48816125-5L-239-4239-40 Seattle7089.44024194-6W-235-4335-46 Houston51109.31943390-10L-1324-5527-54 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Boston9763.6066-4W-253-2844-35 Tampa Bay9070.56378-2L-151-3039-40 Baltimore8377.5191473-7L-144-3539-42 New York8377.5191474-6W-146-3537-42 Toronto7387.45624174-6W-139-4034-47 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Atlanta9565.5946-4W-255-2440-41 Washington8475.5281055-5L-347-3437-41 New York7387.45622176-4L-232-4741-40 Philadelphia7288.45023182-8L-343-3829-50 Miami60100.37535305-5W-234-4526-55 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-St. Louis9565.5948-2W-452-2743-38 y-Pittsburgh9268.57535-5W-150-3142-37 y-Cincinnati9070.56356-4L-349-2941-41 Milwaukee7387.45622176-4W-337-4436-43 Chicago6694.41329243-7L-131-5035-44 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-LA9168.5725-5L-246-3245-36 Arizona8079.5031194-6L-244-3436-45 San Diego7584.47216146-4W-245-3630-48 San Fran.7485.46517156-4W-240-3934-46 Colorado7287.45319174-6L-145-3627-51 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Detroit9367.5816-4L-151-3042-37 Cleveland9070.56339-1W-851-3039-40 Kansas City8575.531856-4W-244-3741-38 Minnesota6694.41327242-8L-432-4734-47 Chicago6298.38831283-7L-436-4326-55 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEMAJORLEAGUEBASEBALL B2SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013

PAGE 15

SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS TV AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series (taped) 2 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing (taped) 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Dover 200 8:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series: Las Vegas 3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing AAA Insurance Midwest Nationals, Qualifying (same-day tape) BASEBALL 1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays 7 p.m. (FSNFL) Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins 7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals BICYCLING 2 a.m. (NBCSPT) World Ports Classic (taped) BOXING 10:15 p.m. (HBO) Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr. vs. Bryan Vera COLLEGE FOOTBALL 12 p.m. (ABC) South Carolina at Central Florida 12 p.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma State at West Virginia 12 p.m. (ESPN2) Northern Illinois at Purdue 12 p.m. (ESPNU) Miami at South Florida 12 p.m. (FS1) Southern Methodist at Texas Christian 12:30 p.m. (CW) East Carolina at North Carolina 12:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Virginia at Pittsburgh 3:30 p.m. (NBC) Oklahoma at Notre Dame 3:30 p.m. (CBS) LSU at Georgia 3:30 p.m. (ABC) Florida State at Boston College 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Iowa at Minnesota 3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Wake Forest at Clemson 4 p.m. (FS1) Army vs. Louisiana Tech 4 p.m. (SUN) Houston at Texas-San Antonio 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Mississippi at Alabama 7 p.m. (FOX) Arizona at Washington 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas A&M at Arkansas 7 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Kentucky 7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Brown at Harvard 7:30 p.m. (SUN) Alabama-Birmingham at Vanderbilt 8 p.m. (ABC) Wisconsin at Ohio State 10 p.m. (ESPN) Stanford at Washington State 10:15 p.m. (ESPNU) Southern Mississippi at Boise State 10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) USC at Arizona State GOLF 8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, Third Round 3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Web.com Tour Championship, Third Round 6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Nature Valley First Tee Open, Second Round NHL PRESEASON HOCKEY 12 p.m. (NHL) Los Angeles Kings vs. New York Rangers (taped) 7 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Toronto Maple Leafs MOTORCYCLE RACING 12:30 p.m. (SUN) BMX Supercross World Cup (taped) ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER 7:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) Tottenham Hotspur FC vs Chelsea FC 10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Aston Villa FC vs Manchester City FC 12:30 p.m. (NBC) Swansea City AFC vs Arsenal FC 5:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Cruz Azul vs Club Leon 11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Match of the Day (same-day tape) TENNIS 2 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open, First Semifinal (sameday tape) 4 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open, Second Semifinal (same-day tape) 6 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Thailand Open, First Semifinal (sameday tape) 8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Thailand Open, Second Semifinal (same-day tape) RADIO 12:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame 1:07 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS VOLLEYBALL TBA Lecanto in Edgewater and Dr. Phillips Tournament TBA Seven Rivers in OVA Tournament CROSS COUNTRY 8 a.m. Crystal River in River Ridge Invitational Royals 6, White Sox 1Kansas CityChicago abrhbi abrhbi AGordn lf4111JrDnks cf4000 Bonifac 2b4122GBckh 2b4111 Hosmer 1b5120AlRmrz ss4020 BButler dh5132A.Dunn dh4000 S.Perez c4010Konerk 1b2000 Maxwll rf4000AGarci rf3000 L.Cain cf4021Viciedo lf3010 Carroll 3b3110Semien 3b3000 AEscor ss4120Phegly c3000 Totals376 146Totals30141 Kansas City3001020006 Chicago0000010001 DPKansas City 1, Chicago 3. LOBKansas City 7, Chicago 3. 2BA.Gordon (27), Hosmer (34), B.Butler (27), Carroll (9). 3BAl.Ramirez (2). HRG.Beckham (5). SBBonifacio (28), A.Escobar (22). CSCarroll (1). IPHRERBBSO Kansas City Shields W,13-97411110 W.Davis 200002 Chicago Sale L,11-1451/394415 Petricka 12/332210 Troncoso 110000 Leesman 110001 HBPby Sale (A.Gordon). WPLeesman. T:37. A,474 (40,615).Cardinals 7, Cubs 0Chicago St. Louis abrhbi abrhbi StCastr ss4030MCrpnt 2b3110 DMrph 3b4010Beltran rf2110 Rizzo 1b4010SRonsn rf2000 DNavrr c3010Hollidy lf2221 Schrhlt rf4000MAdms 1b5110 Sweeny cf4000YMolin c4123 Bogsvc lf4010Freese 3b3111 Barney 2b4000Jay cf4021 TrWood p0000Kozma ss2000 Raley p1000Lynn p3000 Watkns ph1000Siegrist p0000 AlCarr p0000Mujica p0000 BParkr p0000Wong ph1000 HRndn p0000CMrtnz p0000 Lake ph1000Rosnthl p0000 Lim p0000 Totals340 70Totals317 106 Chicago0000000000 St. Louis30120100x7 ED.Navarro (5). DPChicago 2. LOB Chicago 8, St. Louis 9. 2BSt.Castro (33), Y.Molina (43), Jay (27). HRHolliday (21), Freese (9). IPHRERBBSO Chicago Tr.Wood L,9-12143321 Raley 333233 Al.Cabrera 110010 B.Parker121101 H.Rondon 100000 Lim 100021 St. Louis Lynn W,15-10640009 Siegrist 2/300000 Mujica 1/300000 Ca.Martinez110002 Rosenthal 120002 HBPby Raley (Holliday), by Lynn (D.Navarro). T:54. A,030 (43,975).Wild card glanceAll Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE WLPctWCGB Cleveland 9070.563 Tampa Bay9070.563 Texas 8971.5561 NATIONAL LEAGUE WLPctWCGB z-Pittsburgh9268.575 z-Cincinnati9070.563 z-clinched playoff berth AMERICAN LEAGUE Fridays Games Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 3 Texas 5, L.A. Angels 3 Cleveland 12, Minnesota 6 Saturdays Games L.A. Angels at Texas, 12:05 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Fridays Game Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 1 Saturdays Games Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m.Glantz-Culver LineFor Sept. 28 NCAA Football FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Pittsburgh65(50) Virginia N. Illinois23(59) at Purdue at Duke911(69) Troy UConn2Pk (48) at Buffalo at Ball St. Pk1(67) Toledo at NC State2424(52) Cent. Michigan Kent St. Pk1(49) at W. Michigan at N. Carolina1012(61) E. Carolina FSU2323(53) at BC at Vanderbilt2320(57) UAB at Illinois2425(50) Miami (Ohio) at TCU1919(52) SMU at Missouri2121(62) Arkansas St. Iowa+31(46) at Minnesota at Colorado St.1114(53) UTEP at Georgia33(62) LSU at Washington79(62) Arizona at Alabama1314(55) Mississippi at Oregon3137(83) California at Arizona St.54(49) Southern Cal Army-x+1Pk (52) La. Tech Texas A&M1415(62) at Arkansas Oklahoma23(50) at N. Dame at Boise St.2828(56) So. Miss. Miami2017(47) at USF at Clemson2828(58) Wake Forest Temple107(56) at Idaho at La.-Monroe1013(55) Tulane Houston32(64) at UTSA at B. Green1414(54) Akron at Oregon St.1011(59) Colorado S. Carolina87(53) at UCF Florida1212(47) at Kentucky Stanford-y109(47) Washington St. Wyoming1011(55) at Texas St. Navy Pk3(58) at W. Kentucky at Rice1413(52) FAU at Tennessee2119(52) S. Alabama at Nevada710(59) Air Force Oklahoma St.1719(57) at W. Virginia at Ohio St.76(55) Wisconsin UNLV Pk2(54) at New Mexico San Diego St.1717(54) at N. Mexico St. Fresno St.1717(58) at Hawaii x-at Dallas y-at Seattle NFL Tomorrow FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Pittsburgh-x Pk3(42) Minnesota Baltimore33(44) at Buffalo Cincinnati64(42) at Cleveland Indianapolis78(42) at Jville Seattle32(41) at Houston at Tampa Bay32(40) Arizona at Detroit23(47) Chicago at Kansas City44(44) N.Y. Giants at Tennessee53(40) N.Y. Jets Dallas21(47) at San Diego Washington23(44) at Oakland at Denver1110(58) Philadelphia at Atlanta12(50) New England Monday at New Orleans56(48) Miami x-at LondonTop 25 Football ScheduleAll Times EDT (Subject to change) Today, Sept. 28 No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 21 Mississippi, 6:30 p.m. No. 2 Oregon vs. California, 10:30 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m. No. 4 Ohio State vs. No. 23 Wisconsin, 8 p.m. No. 5 Stanford at Washington State, 10 p.m. No. 6 LSU at No. 9 Georgia, 3:30 p.m. No. 8 Florida State at Boston College, 3:30 p.m. No. 10 Texas A&M at Arkansas, 7 p.m. No. 11 Oklahoma State at West Virginia, Noon No. 12 South Carolina at UCF, Noon No. 14 Oklahoma at No. 22 N. Dame, 3:30 p.m. No. 15 Miami at South Florida, Noon No. 16 Washington vs. Arizona, 7 p.m. No. 20 Florida at Kentucky, 7 p.m. No. 25 Fresno State at Hawaii, 12 Mid. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Friday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 4 3 2 CASH 3 (late) 5 4 5 PLAY 4 (early) 4 8 3 9 PLAY 4 (late) 7 1 7 8 FANTASY 5 1 6 7 9 17 MEGA MONEY 10 15 38 40 MEGA BALL 14 MEGA MILLIONS 9 23 27 49 51 MEGA BALL 38 Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Thursdays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 6 11 19 24 32 5-of-51 winner$207,065.74 4-of-5319$104.50 3-of-59,106$10SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 B3 incredible player, but we made him look even better by not finishing tackles. Later in the third, Lecanto impressed with an 80-yard drive, culminated by a one-yard run by Anderson to go back up by a touchdown. The Panthers utilized the wildcat for much of the drive, as Anderson consistently picked up short yardage and Growdon had rushes of 22 and 20 yards. But the Rattlers next possession the last of the third quarter started at midfield, andRiche broke free for a pair of solid gains on the ground, then punched it in from one yard out to tie it up again, 21-21. Midway through the fourth, it was Richie yet again, gaining 64 of Belleviews 68 yards ona drive that he would cap off with another one-yard score, dragging, busting through and outrunning the Panther defense with each carry, to put the Rattlers on top for the 27-21 final. Lecanto had an excellent opportunity with three minutes remaining, taking over at midfield, but turned the ball over on downs. We competed hard, weve just got to finish and get over the hump, Rolle said. At the end of the day, you really have to execute, and I dont think we totally did that. When you dont make the plays that are there to be made, things like this happen. Belleview was able to gain a first down and have the luxury of running out the clock to seal the win. Rolle lamented on the significance of the early McGee interception returned for a score. That was huge. You start a drive andyou have that momentum, then the game changes in a second, Rolle said. Also that turnover we had (a fumble in the third quarter that wouldve resulted in a Lecanto first down before the ball was lost). Its the little things that change the complexion of the game. DAndre Horton had some key plays on defense for Lecanto, including a fumble recovery and a sack, while Matt McKibbin caught four passes for 60 yards. Lecanto heads into a bye week before travelling to Mitchell on Friday, Oct. 11 for a 7:30 p.m. start. Crystal River (2-2 overall, 0-1 district) had just 27 yards on 17 openinghalf plays. Our defense is pretty good, Beasley said. Our front guys are playing at a high level. Its nice to be able to play with six in the box and stop the run. Senior Ty Reynolds helped spark a 51-yard Pirate drive late in the third quarter when he took a pitch and reversed his field for a 25-yard run. The drive came up empty, however, after junior Collin Ryan was sacked on fourth down at the Tigers 21. Penalties helped keep alive Crystal Rivers lone scoring possession, which culminated with an 11-yard run up the middle by sophomore Antonio Franklin, who had a team-high 64 yards on 11 carries. Both Reynolds and Ryan shared time at quarterback, but persistent pressure from Dunnellon, as well as a few drops in traffic from their receivers, helped undermine their cause and left the Pirates with 14 yards through the air on 13 attempts. Our kids were flat and unfocused, Crystal River head coach Nate Varnadore said. Right now weve got to find some people to take the bull by the horns. We, as a staff, are trying to teach them to be the right kind of leaders. Theres not necessarily one thing to pinpoint, he added. Were not where I would like for us to be. Its part of the growing process, and thats the way it works, unfortunately. The Tigers were called for 14 penalties for 115 yards. Both teams stay in the district this Friday: Dunnellon travels to Belleview, and Crystal River goes to North Marion. The Colts were upset 13-10 at Gainesville Eastside on Friday, making the Rams and Tigers the only undefeated teams in 5A-5 play. STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleCrystal River running back Antonio Franklin gains some valuable yardage in the game against Dunnellon as Tigers defenders Cole Fagan (54) and William Burgess (24) give chase at Dunnellon High School on Friday evening. AGROUNDContinued from Page B1 TOUGHContinued from Page B1 Report: Texas regent insisted being Saban callAUSTIN, Texas A top University of Texas booster who arranged a telephone conversation with Alabama coach Nick Sabans agent said the talk lasted 45 minutes. Tom Hicks, who also is a former University of Texas System regent, told the Austin American-Statesman this week that he and Regent Wallace Hall Jr. probed agent Jimmy Sexton on whether Saban would be interested in the Longhorns football coaching job. Hicks said Hall also insisted on participating in the call last January. The call was first reported last week by The Associated Press. Hicks lunched with Mack Brown two days after the Sexton conversation and asked if he had considered retirement. Hicks told the American-Statesman Brown had a passion for wanting to say. In Hicks words, I said, Mack, Im glad to hear this passion.Bengals LB Burfict hit with $31,000 fine by NFLNEW YORK Cincinnati Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict was fined $31,000 by the NFL on Friday for two unnecessary roughness violations. Burfict had hit defenseless Packers receiver James Jones in the head and neck area, which cost him $21,000, and then struck Green Bay tight end Ryan Taylor, costing him $10,000. Bengals teammate George Iloka was fined $15,000 for unnecessary roughness when he struck a defenseless player, tight end Jermichael Finley, in the head and neck area. Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown received $15,750 in fines for two unnecessary roughness violations: $7,875 for a late hit on Bears safety Chris Conte, and $7,875 for a face mask on Sherrick McManis. Titans linebacker Moise Fokou was docked $7,875 for unnecessary roughness for a face mask violation. The NFL also fined Panthers quarterback Cam Newton $10,000 for wearing clips on his helmet visor featuring the Under Armour logo. Although the clips that attach Newtons clear visor to the helmet are small and difficult to see, the league considers it a violation of its equipment policy. NFL rules state that No visible identification of a manufacturers name or logo on the exterior of a helmet or on any attachment to a helmet is permitted unless provided for under a commercial arrangement between the League and manufacturer. Nike has a signed contract to be the NFLs equipment provider. Newton is one of Under Armours main clients. The violation was first pointed in an article Tuesday by Forbes.com.NCAA turns down USC request for reliefLOS ANGELES The NCAA has turned down Southern Californias request for possible relief from the sanctions that have been imposed on the football program since 2010. Athletic director Pat Hayden had said USC felt compelled to discuss the sanctions after the NCAAs recent decision to lessen the scholarship reductions that Penn State was hit with after the Jerry Sandusky scandal. From wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS

PAGE 16

B4SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Associated PressFinally, a college football weekend with real potential to reshape the rankings and shake up the national championship race. The fifth Saturday of the season features four games matching ranked teams, highlighted by No. 6 LSU at No. 9 Georgia. Eight more ranked teams play road games of varying degrees of difficulty. Last weekends schedule produced mostly blowouts, and when it was over it was as if it never happened. The top 14 teams in the AP Top 25 held their spots from the week before, and no team moved up more than one place. This Saturday could end with a couple of teams saying goodbye to their national championship hopes, and maybe a few new teams being taken more seriously as contenders. Georgia wraps up the toughest September schedule in the country with its third game against a top-10 opponent. The Bulldogs (2-1) split with Clemson and South Carolina to start the season and now face an LSU team that is yet again looking like a Southeastern Conference heavyweight, though the Tigers are getting it done a little differently this season. For the first time in a few years, LSUs passing game is a strength instead of a question mark. Zach Mettenberger has the sixth best passer rating in the country. Theres a big ceiling on him, Bulldogs coach Mark Richt said of Mettenberger, who originally attended Georgia but was dismissed from the team when, as a redshirt freshman, he got into legal trouble over his treatment of a woman at a bar. LSU receivers Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry are making a case for being the top tandem not just in the SEC but in the nation. That should lead to another increasingly common occurrence: high-scoring SEC games. Georgia, with quarterback Aaron Murray and tailback Todd Gurley leading the way, is seventh in the nation in yards per play at 7.83. LSU is ninth at 7.53. The other big game in the SEC takes place in Tuscaloosa, where No. 1 Alabama faces No. 21 Mississippi. The Rebels spread it out and play fast like Texas A&M, but Ole Miss presents very different challenges. Even though the offenses may be similar, the philosophies are not the same, Tide coach Nick Saban said. No. 4 Ohio State faces its first stiff test of the season when No. 24 Wisconsin comes to Ohio Stadium on Saturday night. No. 22 Notre Dame is an underdog for the second straight season to Oklahoma. Of course, that didnt stop the Fighting Irish from beating the Sooners in Norman last year. Any hope the Irish have of getting back to the BCS title game would be dashed with a second loss. The picks:MAIN EVENTNo. 6 LSU (plus 3) at No. 9 Georgia Les Miles and Mark Richt have split four meeting between Tigers and Dawgs ... LSU 35-28.MARQUEE MATCHUPSNo. 21 Mississippi (plus 16) at No. 1 Alabama Tide has won nine straight against Rebels ... ALABAMA 30-17. No. 24 Wisconsin (plus 7) at No. 4 Ohio State Buckeyes depth chart lists QBs Braxton Miller and Kenny Guiton as co-starters ... OHIO STATE 28-20. No. 14 Oklahoma (minus 3 1/2) at No. 22 Notre Dame Irish averaging only 114 yards rushing ... OKLAHOMA 24-17.UPSET SPECIALNo. 12 South Carolina (minus 7) at UCF Blake Bortles might be best QB Gamecocks face this season, and their pass defense has been shaky ... UCF 31-24.BEST BETArizona (plus 9) at No. 16 Washington ... Wildcats will gladly play at Huskies furious pace, which is good news for UW ....WASHINGTON 45-24.PLUCKY UNDERDOGSNo. 5 Stanford (minus 10) at Washington State ... STANFORD 35-21. No. 10 Texas A&M (off) at Arkansas ... TEXAS A&M 47-21. No. 20 Florida (minus 13) at Kentucky ... FLORIDA 28-13. Cougars are improved and Cardinal will be without top OG David Yankey (family issues) for full game and star DB Ed Reynolds (targeting ejection) for first half. Razorbacks might not be so plucky if QB Brandon Allen (shoulder) misses second straight game. Maybe a change at quarterback for Gators gives Wildcats chance to snap 26-game losing streak in series?MISMATCHESCalifornia (plus 36 1/2) at No. 2 Oregon ... OREGON 56-21. Wake Forest (plus 28) at No. 3 Clemson ... CLEMSON 49-14. No. 8 Florida State (minus 21 1/2) at Boston College ... FLORIDA STATE 38-10. No. 11 Oklahoma State (minus 19) at West Virginia ... OKLAHOMA STATE 42-17. No. 15 Miami (minus 18 1/2) at South Florida ... MIAMI 33-10. No. 25 Fresno State (minus 18 1/2) at Hawaii ... FRESNO STATE 42-17. Associated PressGeorgia head coach Mark Richt, left, leads his No. 9 Bulldogs at home against No. 6 LSU and head coach Les Miles today in Athens, Ga. NFL standingsAFC East WLTPctPFPA New England3001.0005934 Miami3001.0007453 N.Y. Jets210.6675550 Buffalo120.3336573 South WLTPctPFPA Houston210.6677082 Indianapolis210.6676848 Tennessee210.6676056 Jacksonville030.0002892 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati210.6677564 Baltimore210.6677164 Cleveland120.3334764 Pittsburgh030.0004276 West WLTPctPFPA Denver3001.00012771 Kansas City3001.0007134 San Diego120.3337881 Oakland120.3335767 NFC East WLTPctPFPA Dallas210.6678355 Philadelphia120.3337986 N.Y. Giants030.00054115 Washington030.0006798 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans3001.0007038 Carolina120.3336836 Atlanta120.3337174 Tampa Bay030.0003457 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago3001.0009574 Detroit 210.6678269 Green Bay120.3339688 Minnesota030.0008196 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 3001.0008627 San Francisco220.5007995 Arizona120.3335679 St. Louis130.25069121 Thursdays Game San Francisco 35, St. Louis 11 Sundays Games N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m. New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m. Open: Carolina, Green Bay Mondays Game Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3 Buffalo at Cleveland, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at St. Louis, 1 p.m. New England at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Seattle at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Miami, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Carolina at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m. Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington Monday, Oct. 7 N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m.Late Thursday 49ers 35, Rams 11San Francisco 01471435 St. Louis 300811 First Quarter StLFG Zuerlein 40, 7:09. Second Quarter SFBoldin 20 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 6:22. SFGore 34 run (Dawson kick), :37. Third Quarter SFV.Davis 12 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 8:49. Fourth Quarter SFDixon 1 run (Dawson kick), 10:15. StLKendricks 6 pass from Bradford (Cunningham run), 5:44. SFHunter 29 run (Dawson kick), 4:25. A,640. SFStL First downs 1914 Total Net Yards370188 Rushes-yards40-21919-18 Passing 151170 Punt Returns1-06-19 Kickoff Returns0-03-74 Interceptions Ret.1-00-0 Comp-Att-Int15-23-019-41-1 Sacked-Yards Lost2-165-32 Punts 7-54.711-44.5 Fumbles-Lost2-22-1 Penalties-Yards10-858-82 Time of Possession31:4528:15 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Gore 20-153, Hunter 11-49, Kaepernick 3-11, Dixon 3-6, James 3-0. St. Louis, Richardson 12-16, Cunningham 4-6, Bradford 3-(minus 4). PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 15-23-0167. St. Louis, Bradford 19-41-1-202. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Boldin 5-90, Miller 3-22, Baldwin 2-19, V.Davis 2-18, Hunter 1-9, V.McDonald 1-9, Patton 1-0. St. Louis, Pettis 559, Givens 4-49, Cook 4-45, Austin 2-6, Cunningham 1-17, Quick 1-12, Richardson 1-8, Kendricks 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALSSan Francisco, Dawson 53 (WR), 71 (WL). 49ers regain footing in rout of Rams Associated PressST. LOUIS Colin Kaepernick threw two touchdown passes, Frank Gore had his first 100-yard game of the season and the San Francisco 49ers defense stepped up without some of their stars in a 35-11 rout over the St. Louis Rams on Thursday night. Anquan Boldin had five catches for 90 yards and a touchdown, and Gore had 153 yards on 20 carries and a 34-yard score for San Francisco (2-2), which was outscored 46-10 the previous two games. Navarro Bowman had two of the 49ers five sacks with a strip leading to a fourth-quarter scoring run by Anthony Dixon. The Rams (1-3) had an overtime win and tie against San Francisco last year, and took the early lead Thursday before falling flat. Greg Zuerlein banged in a 40-yard field goal off the right upright to end a nine-game scoring drought in the first quarter, but the 49ers answered with 28 straight points. The 49ers came close to a Super Bowl title in February and regained their footing against the team that gave them the most trouble last season. Minus cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha and linebackers Patrick Willis and Aldon Smith, they quieted a raucous, hopeful crowd. Kaepernick had no touchdown passes and four interceptions the previous two weeks and completed fewer than 50 percent of his passes. He was 15 for 23 for 167 yards. Boldin had a monster debut with the 49ers after helping the Ravens beat San Francisco in the Super Bowl, but had been quiet along with the rest of the offense the previous two weeks. He had two highlight catches in the second quarter, a 42yarder despite Cortland Finnegan getting flagged for holding, and a 20-yard score capped by a dive into the end zone after barely avoiding the sideline. Players choice Associated PressTiger Woods was voted the PGA Tour player of the year for the 11th time in his career. Tiger Woods voted PGA player of the year by his peers Associated PressPONTE VEDRA BEACH Tiger Woods was voted PGA Tour player of the year for the 11th time on the strength of his five big wins and return to No. 1 in the world. It was the third time Woods won the Jack Nicklaus Award despite not winning a major. He made up for that with two World Golf Championships and The Players Championship among his five wins. No one else won more than twice this year, and Woods won the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average and the PGA Tour money title. Its been an incredible year to have won five times, two of those World Golf Championships and one Players, Woods said on a conference call Friday. Its been just a fantastic year all around. Its also an incredible feeling to be voted by your peers, and to have that type of respect is something thats very humbling. The PGA Tour does not release the percentage of votes won or even who finished second. Jordan Spieth was voted rookie of the year in a race that likely was no contest. The 20-year-old Texan began the year with no status on any tour. He won the John Deere Classic, lost in a playoff at another event, reached the Tour Championship, was chosen for the Presidents Cup team and wound up 10th on the money list with nearly $4 million. He will be the youngest American and first PGA Tour rookie to play in the Presidents Cup next week in Ohio. I dont know if its a pinch me moment yet, Spieth said. I think my mind is still really on next week. Woods was on the ballot with British Open champion Phil Mickelson, Masters champion Adam Scott, FedEx Cup champion Henrik Stenson and Matt Kuchar. Mickelson also won the Phoenix Open and was runner-up in the U.S. Open for the sixth time. Along with his first major, Scott won The Barclays. If either of them had won the Tour Championship, three wins and a major might have won some votes over five big wins and no majors. Mickelson, with more wins (42) and majors (five) than any player except for Woods dating to the Tom Watson generation, has never been PGA Tour player of the year, No. 1 in the world ranking or won a PGA Tour money title. The Jack Nicklaus Award began in 1990. In 24 years, Woods has won it 11 times and only two other players have won it twice Fred Couples (1991, 1992) and Nick Price (1993, 1994). It was the fourth time in the last five years that the winner did not capture a major. Woods nearly made it a clean sweep of all the awards. Steve Stricker narrowly beat him out for the Byron Nelson Award with a 65 on the final day at East Lake in the Tour Championship. That award is for lowest scoring average, though it is not as prestigious as the Vardon Trophy from the PGA of America. The Vardon Trophy dates to 1937 and requires 60 rounds (instead of 50 for the PGA Tours version of the award) with no incomplete rounds. It was the first time since 2009, right before his personal life unraveled, that Woods won these awards. Even though he has more of them than anyone in history, he said that it doesnt get old. I know how hard it is, Woods said. Ive had to work my way back from injuries on numerous occasions throughout the years. These last couple years is no exception to that. There were a lot of people saying I could never win again, and two years later Ive got eight wins on our tour. Im very proud of where Ive come from, from being ranked outside the top 50 to being ranked where I am now, and to have had the success that Ive had this year just makes it all the more rewarding. Woods said his biggest win this year was at The Players Championship, mainly because its the one golf course he plays regularly that has given him fits. Jordan Spieth was voted the PGA Tour rookie of the year.

PAGE 17

COLLEGEFOOTBALLCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 B5 No. 8 FSU heads into Boston to face Eagles Associated PressBOSTON It doesnt get any easier for Boston College. After a humbling 35-7 loss to Southern California in their previous game, the Eagles return from their bye week to play No. 8 Florida State on Saturday. It will be the first ranked opponent for new BC coach Steve Addazio since arriving in Chestnut Hill, and the Seminoles (3-0, 1-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) are the defending conference champions. BC defensive lineman Kasim Edibali called it a perfect opportunity. But the Eagles (2-1, 1-0) are still trying to rebuild a program that won just two games last season and posted double-digit losses for just the second time in school history. Now they face a Florida State team that won its first three games by a combined score of 157-26. Freshman quarterback Jameis Winston has eight touchdown passes and only 14 incompletions. Here are five things to watch on Saturday:Stop the runFlorida States biggest concern on defense could be Andre Williams, who is the leading rusher in the ACC. He gained 318 yards in BCs first two games, but the Seminoles will look at what Southern Cal did on Sept. 14 to hold him to just 38 yards on 17 carries. When teams have a powerful running back, a great O-line, then thats when we come in and say, OK, its on us to win this game, Florida State linebacker Telvin Smith said. Its on us to stop these boys up front. Thats the challenge were presented with and thats what were going to go out and do.Noles on the groundIt could be a long day for Boston College if the Florida State running backs get loose. Devonta Freeman leads the team with 273 yards and two touchdowns on only 28 carries, with two games in a row of at least 100 yards. The BC run defense ranks No. 81 in FBS, allowing more than 177 yards per game.Eagles in the airThe Boston College offense works best when quarterback Chase Rettig is finding receiver Alex Amidon often. A first-team All-ACC selection as a junior, Amidon set a school record last season with 1,210 receiving yards. Rettig is completing more than 60 percent of his passes, but he threw for only 83 yards in the loss to USC.BC aggressiveSeminoles quarterback Jameis Winston has eight touchdown passes and only 14 incompletions in three games, but the Eagles think the key to slowing him down is to put pressure on him. In all, Winston is 50-for-64 for 718 yards. He has thrown one interception and been sacked three times. BC has four interceptions and eight sacks in its first three games. Hes only a freshman, BC defensive back James McCaffrey said. If you get on him, he may make some mistakes.Dont look aheadThis is the easiest part of Florida States schedule, having just beaten two non-conference schools by a combined 100 points and heading into games against BC and Maryland the bottom two teams in the Atlantic Division last season. After a bye, the Seminoles visit No. 3 Clemson, host No. 15 Miami two weeks after that and then have two more ACC games before finishing up with Idaho and No. 20 Florida. BC faces Army next weekend and then goes to Clemson. Associated PressTAMPA Miami is off to its best start in nine years, and South Florida coach Willie Taggart believes the 15th-ranked Hurricanes are on the verge of reclaiming a spot among the nations elite. Taggart grew up in nearby Bradenton, rooting for Florida State during a time when Miami (3-0) was one of college footballs most dominant programs. The Canes are looking to begin a season with four straight victories for the first time since 2004 when they face winless USF (03), which is still chasing its first win under Taggart. Taggart concedes it will be difficult to get it Saturday because Miami, in his eyes, is a team that doesnt have a real weakness. Theyre back. ... but well be ready, the first-year USF coach said. Were not going to bow down to them, thats for sure. Miamis promising start includes a 21-16 victory over No. 20 Florida. The Hurricanes are coming off a 77-7 blowout of overmatched Savannah State. Taggart left Western Kentucky last December to take over a team that dropped nine of its final 10 games under former coach Skip Holtz. The Bulls (0-3) opened with a lopsided loss to Football Championship Subdivision foe McNeese State, and continued to sputter offensively in losses to Michigan State and Florida Atlantic. Still, Taggart is optimistic about turning his struggling program around. USF has yielded five defensive touchdowns on turnovers, one more TD than the Bulls have scored on offense. Penn State transfer Steven Bench becomes USFs third starting quarterback in four games. Miami boasts a defense that has allowed three TDs in three games. You really havent seen our offense yet, Taggart said. Were not a team built to come from behind yet. ... If we go out and play like were capable, I think we have a shot. Miami running back Duke Johnson is expecting a tough test. Their record doesnt say anything about their team, at all, especially on the defensive side, Johnson said Their front four is their strength, but their linebackers are no joke, also. Their front seven, they take pride in it and they have good reason to. Some things to look at while Miami looks to build on its best start since the Canes won six straight to begin the season in 2004:Off the benchMatt Floyd lost USFs starting quarterback job during the season opener, and Bobby Eveld was less than a quarter into his second start, when Taggart turned to Bench, who had limited success against FAU, yet impressed the coaching staff enough to earn Saturdays start. Hes still not there where he knows our offense completely, so weve got to be smart with what ask him to do, Taggart said. We dont need him to be Tom Brady. We want him to be Steven Bench.Guessing gameMiami already had two practices completed this week, including one of its major game plan-installation sessions, before getting word that USF was starting Bench. The bad news for Miami is that there simply isnt much film on the sophomore. But the good news is that what film there is, its primarily against Florida Atlantic a team the Hurricanes are familiar with, given that they beat the Owls in Week 1.Morris ankleMiami QB Stephen Morris got quite the initial scare last weekend when his right ankle got hit, and when the Hurricanes started practice this week he wasnt able to fully participate. But Miami expected all along that its quarterback would be ready to go against USF, a team he threw for 413 yards against last season. (Thats nine more than he has this season, total.) The Hurricanes obviously wouldnt complain if he got rolling before the Atlantic Coast Conference opener against Georgia Tech next weekend.Emerging starRunning back Marcus Shaw has been USFs most consistent and productive player on offense, rushing for 398 yards and one touchdown, while averaging 7 yards per carry. USF eyes opportunity to surprise No. 15 Miami Associated PressDespite USFs 0-3 record, Miami running back Duke Johnson lauded the Bulls defensive front seven. UF QB makes first career start at Kentucky Associated PressLEXINGTON, Ky. Florida players want to continue their dominance over Kentucky. The Wildcats are determined to snap their 26-game losing streak to the 20th-ranked Gators. Something has to give when the schools meet in Saturday nights Southeastern Conference game in Lexington, where Florida (2-1, 1-0) will try to regroup after a staggering week of season-ending injuries to key players. Kentucky (1-2) begins SEC play after a bye motivated to beat the Gators for the first time since 1986 and put an end to discussions about the losing streak. For added intrigue, former Kentucky coach Joker Phillips returns to face the school he led for three seasons before being fired last November. Phillips hasnt talked publicly about his return and the Wildcats have said their priority is beating the Gators. Weve talked about it some, Kentucky senior linebacker Avery Williamson said of the streak. We just have to go in there with an attitude and come out with a win. ... Just going out there and worrying about playing, thats the biggest thing. We dont even worry about it. Floridas run against Kentucky is the longest active streak over a major opponent in an annual series. The closest the Wildcats have come against the Gators was a 45-37 outcome in 2007; blowouts have been the norm since then including a 38-0 shutout last year in Gainesville. Florida players dont want anything to change, they like things the way they are. Dont want to be on that end, Gators right tackle Kyle Koehne said. Ive gone 4-0 against UK in my career, so Im looking to keep it undefeated. Added left tackle D.J. Humphries, Twenty-six straight? Time to make it 27 then. Here are some things to watch as Floridas 26-game winning streak against Kentucky continues or ends on Saturday night:Filling big shoesFloridas second-ranked defense lost 6-foot-2, 285-pound defensive tackle Dominique Easley to a season-ending knee injury this week. The Gators now turn to junior Leon Orr and senior Damien Jacobs with Darious Cummings and Jay-nard Bostwick waiting on deck. Easleys loss leaves them without a disruptive line presence who had four quarterback hurries and two tackles for loss despite being double teamed.Kentuckys QBThe Wildcats starting quarterback could be a game-time decision driven mostly by the matchup against Floridas stingy defense. Kentuckys bye week gave Maxwell Smith more time to recover from an injured shoulder sustained against Louisville and a good week of practice makes him probable to start. That said, the Wildcats desire to establish the line of scrimmage and create a dual threat might lead to the mobile Jalen Whitlow getting the nod to keep the Gators guessing before alternating with Smith, the better passer.Murphys lawJeff Driskels season-ending leg injury thrust little-used redshirt junior Tyler Murphy into action for Florida against Tennessee, but he didnt look like someone who had thrown just one pass in four years in leading the Gators 34-17 victory. Murphy threw for 134 yards and touchdown, rushed for 84 and another TD in the Gators win. He will get his first career start against the Wildcats. Kentucky views Murphy as similar to Driskel in his ability to run and throw, not allowing the Wildcats to focus on one aspect of his game. Murphys law Associated PressFlorida quarterback Tyler Murphy threw for 134 yards and a touchdown, rushed for 84 yards and another TD in the Gators 34-17 win over Tennessee last Saturday. UCF stands in No. 12 USCs way Knights pose tough test for Gamecocks Associated PressORLANDO South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier has fond memories of the state of Florida. At the University of Florida he arguably set the standard in a state that at the time also included coaches like Bobby Bowden. After a brief NFL stint, Spurrier returned to the college ranks in 2005 with South Carolina and played his first game that year against a Sunshine State team, thumping a UCF program that was then not even a blip on college footballs national stage. Eight years later no one is surprised with what Spurrier has done with the No. 12 Gamecocks (2-1). But a 3-0 start and upset win over Penn State last week puts the Knights in position to garner some of that elusive national attention. Spurrier recognizes the challenge and he isnt downplaying this road game. He expects to be a hostile environment for the Knights first sellout since 2011. Oh yeah, they know scenario. They know the circumstances that were in, Spurrier said. They know its going to be loud and its an opportunity for South Carolina to take our football show on the road and see what we can do. Hopefully we can play very well. Its the opportunity thats out there for us. UCF is just 1-24 all-time against ranked teams and 2-14 opposite Southeastern Conference opponents. The Knights led Missouri at home last season before faltering late. Its why UCF linebacker Terrance Plummer said no one in their locker room needs extra incentive. Its what we worked so hard for during the summer winning these non-conference games, Plummer said. I think you can see from our non-conference schedule weve scheduled some good opponents. Were going to go out there and see how we match up with some of the best.

PAGE 18

B6SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEAUTORACING 000FV8Z Citrus County Speedway scheduleKEY SLM=Super Late Models OWM=Open Wheel Modifieds SP=Sportsman MMS=Mod Mini Stocks SS=Street Stocks MS=Mini Stocks Ps=Pure Stocks HD=Hornet Division PF8=Pro Figure-8s F8=Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s FUPS=Florida United Promoters Series TBARA=Tampa Bay Area Racing Association DAARA=Daytona Antique Auto Racing Association DWARFS S.E.C.K.S.=South East Champ Kart Series MIDGETS Sept. 28: SS, FLAGPOLE, BOAT/TRAILER, SUIT CASE RACE, F8, MS, PS Oct. 5: FUPS, OWM, TRUCKS, SP, DWARFs Oct. 12: SLM, SS, MMS, MS, HD Oct. 19: TBARA, SS, PS, F8, MIDGETS Oct. 26: OWM, SP, SS, PS, MS, PF8 SPECIAL Nov. 2: FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD, LEGENDS, BANDOLEROS Nov. 9: OWM, SP, MS, PS, DWARFs, PF8Points standingsSuper Late Models Car #NamePoints 98Herb Neumann Jr.520 1Dale Sanders507 23Todd Brown499 123Jon Brown451 110Steve Dorer421 Open Wheel Mods Car #NamePoints 01Herb Neumann Jr.928 0Troy Robinson903 2Steven Hise879 18Shane Butler857 43Gator Hise565 Mod Mini Stocks Car #NamePoints 33Chris Allen1,140 44Michael Lawhorn1,091 99Leroy Moore1,035 24Phil Edwards966 47Richard Kuhn962 Sportsman Car #NamePoints 17Mike Bell941 66Andy Nicholls876 114John Buzinec823 4Jay Witforth807 01Tom Posavec727 Street Stocks Car #NamePoints 3Curtis Flanagan1,781 48Dora Throne1,693 16J.D. Goff1,535 8Tim Wilson1,239 6Phillip Robinson746 Pure Stocks Car #NamePoints 72Karlin Ray1,553 45James Johnston1,543 3Jason Waller1,536 44Glen Colyer1,343 32Mike Autenrieth948 Mini Stocks Car #NamePoints 98Kevin Stone1,738 73Jason Terry1,689 22Mark Patterson1,510 11Jerry Daniels1,481 20Shannon Kennedy1,216 Pro Figure-8s Car #NamePoints 6Joey Catarelli406 94Charlie Meyer394 15William Stansbury282 86Justin Meyer202 33Pnut Higginbotham192 Reg. Figure-8s Car #NamePoints 82Jimmy Kruse588 5Pnut Higginbotham578 6Ronnie Schrefiels570 51Travis Nichols474 01Shannon Lengell452 Associated PressDOVER, Del. Dale Earnhardt Jr. turned a track record lap of 161.849 mph to win the pole at Dover International Speedway. The top four qualifiers Friday are all from the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. Points leader Matt Kenseth starts second, Ryan Newman is third and Carl Edwards fourth. Other Chase drivers include: Jimmie Johnson starts eighth, Joey Logano 11th, Kevin Harvick 12th, Kyle Busch 14th, Jeff Gordon 16th, Greg Biffle 19th, Kasey Kahne 20th, and Clint Bowyer starts 23rd.AAA 400 LineupAfter Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 161.849. 2. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 161.805. 3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 161.74. 4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 161.609. 5. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 161.609. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 161.594. 7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 161.493. 8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 161.341. 9. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 161.326. 10. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 161.204. 11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 161.023. 12. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 160.8. 13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 160.736. 14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 160.721. 15. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 160.714. 16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 160.664. 17. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 160.65. 18. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 160.557. 19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 160.542. 20. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 160.371. 21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 160.249. 22. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 160.1. 23. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 159.851. 24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 159.645. 25. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 158.779. 26. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 158.611. 27. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 158.451. 28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 158.263. 29. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 157.992. 30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 157.929. 31. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 157.563. 32. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 157.549. 33. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 157.336. 34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 156.883. 35. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 156.692. 36. (51) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 156.644. 37. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points. Points standingsThrough Sept. 22 1. Matt Kenseth, 2,111. 2. Kyle Busch, 2,097. 3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,093. 4. Carl Edwards, 2,075. 5. Greg Biffle, 2,073. 6. Kevin Harvick, 2,072. 7. Kurt Busch, 2,071. 8. Jeff Gordon, 2,069. 9. Ryan Newman, 2,064. 10. Clint Bowyer, 2,063. 11. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,049. 12. Joey Logano, 2,042. 13. Kasey Kahne, 2,040. 14. Brad Keselowski, 792. 15. Jamie McMurray, 786. 16. Martin Truex Jr., 752. 17. Paul Menard, 742. 18. Aric Almirola, 719. 19. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 700. 20. Jeff Burton, 694.ScheduleSept. 29 AAA 400, Dover, Del. Oct. 6 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 12 Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C. Oct. 20 Camping World RV Sales 500, Talladega, Ala. Oct. 27 Goodys Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway, Va. Nov. 3 AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 10 AdvoCare 500, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 17 Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead Earnhardt wins Dover pole Specialty events tonight in Inverness SEANARNOLD CorrespondentA slate of one-time specialty events Boat and Trailer, Suitcase and Flagpole races join a 50-lap Mini Stock feature that promises a handful of prizes for drivers tonight at the Citrus County Speedway. The Street Stock, Pure Stock and regular Figure 8 (pure and street stocks) classes are also on the card. A prize of $600 goes to the winner of the Mini Stock feature, sponsored by Dr. Shannon Kennedys Floral City Animal Clinic. Save Mart and Extreme Decals are each donating $100 to the payout. Allens R.V. is offering $50 apiece for the Hard Charger award and the fastest qualifier, while Advance Towing ($50 to fastest qualifier), Flanagan Enterprise ($50 to Hard Charger) and track photographer Butch Crawford ($35 to halfway leader) are also adding to the allotment. Kennedy came from the back row to notch his third Mini Stock feature win last Saturday. Dade Citys Kevin Stone sits atop the standings with a 49-point lead after collecting a division-high four feature wins. Hes trailed by Jason Terry (one feature win) and 15-year-old Mark Patterson (three feature wins, two heats), respectively. In Street Stocks, Curtis Flanagan of Inverness is coming off his track-high ninth feature victory and sixth heat win, and stands 88 points ahead of Floral Citys Dora Thorne, who finished second last week. Brooksvilles J.D. Goff (third place, two feature wins, three heats) and Floral Citys Tim Wilson (three features, three heats) have also been strong contenders in the class. The Pure Stock class has seen four disqualifications in the last three weeks. Floral Citys Karlin Ray (six heat wins) was one of those, but he reclaimed his lead in the standings last week with his seventh official feature win. He leads Brooksvilles James Johnston by 10 points and Inverness Jason Waller (four feature wins, four heats) by 17. With two races to go and a 10-point lead on Pnut Higginbotham, defending Figure 8 champion Jimmy Kruse is on the verge of capturing a secondstraight title. Higginbotham, who won the most recent Figure 8 race two weeks ago, Kruse and Travis Nichols each have a pair of feature wins this season. Races start at 5:30 p.m. and grandstand gates open at 4. Admission prices are $13 for adults, $9 for seniors and students and $5 for children age 11 and under (children under 42 inches are free). BUTCH CRAWFORD /Special to the ChronicleShannon Kennedy (No. 20) battles Jason Terry in a recent race at the Citrus County Speedway. Kennedy earned his third Mini Stock feature win last Saturday in the 10-car race, but hopes larger fields will soon return to the track. SEANARNOLD CorrespondentShannon Kennedys introduction to local racing was an innocuous one. Random, even. I just saw (a stock car) on the side of the road one day, and it looked fun, recalled Kennedy, who grew up attending NASCAR events along the East Coast with his father. I crashed it two races later and bought two more the next week. But Kennedy, a veterinarian who owns Floral City Animal Clinic, soon became more seriously invested. While intermittently driving his No. 20 Mini Stock, he has two other Mini Stocks and a Pure Stock that see action, and he and his clinic are the major sponsor behind todays 50-lap Mini Stock event. I advertise here (at the Citrus County Speedway), Kennedy said, and have my signs here, and part of that deal is that I sponsor a race once a year and put a lot of the prize money in. The ultimate prize will be $600 to the winner. Other local businesses, including Save Mart, Extreme Decals, Allens R.V., Advance Towing, Flanagan Enterprise and track photographer Butch Crawford, have chipped in with Kennedy to help offer multiple prizes for the race, including ones for Hard Charger and Fast Qualifier awards. Bill Ryans Signs has supplied the T-shirts and signs. Kennedy scored his third feature win as well as third heat win of the season last Saturday. He started in the back row, but had the lead for good by lap 9 in the roughly 10-car race. Despite the impressive win, Kennedy doesnt consider it a favorite moment in his three years of competing. He prefers the bustle of a more crowded race. Winning is fun, he said. But probably some of the best moments Ive had are when the car count was a lot higher. I had a race out here one week where I think we had 20 cars. It was the biggest race I was ever in. I think I crossed the finish the line three-wide with two or three other drivers. I think I ended up finishing fourth or fifth, but that was probably about the most fun Ive ever had here. Kennedy hopes the track can return to those kinds of numbers. Its about cars and about passing cars and about racing, he said. I mean, tonight we blew their doors off, but it probably wasnt the most fun Ive ever had. Its whenever theres a big pack of cars, and thats something we dont have right now. Were way down on the number of cars that race here. In order to juggle the work required for his stable of cars, Kennedy has some helping hands and has a Tuesday ritual at RyanMarkland Signs, Inc., across the street from the Speedway, where the cars get their treatment. Its a pretty big crew of us that work on them Jerry Daniels, Justin Biggins Wright, Bill Ryan, Herb Hoeffler, Kennedy said. We have team night every Tuesday night. We meet over there, if we can, every Tuesday night and try to fix, work on and put together, and make sure everythings right for the next week. Daniels often drives Flanagans No. 11 mini stock, and Ryan occasionally takes out his No. 19 Pure Stock, as well as the 46 Mini Stock, which Kennedy says is currently in pieces. Kennedy has also sponsored other cars, including the No. 48 that Dora Thorne won a Street Stock championship with in 2012. Kennedy, who lives in Summerfield, rides when time allows. It depends on if my kids are doing something or what work is doing, he said. Ive raced the past several weekends, but I dont race every weekend. Were just having fun and trying to be competitive. Having fun is the docs priority when it comes to racing, and he said Mini Stocks are an ideal fit. I want to see more cars and people that want to come race, he said. The reason we race the Mini Stock class, while were all competitive, theres not as much money in it. A lot of these guys come out here and leave angry, mad and pissed off at each other, but were out here just trying to have fun. I dont know that (our team) will ever have race cars. We like stock car racing. Mini Stocks allow Shannon Kennedy to have fun while racing Izod ending title sponsorship of IndyCarINDIANAPOLIS Izod will end its deal as title sponsor of the IndyCar Series at the end of the season. Izod signed on as the official apparel provider of IndyCar in 2008 and increased its involvement to series entitlement holder in 2010. Izod said in a statement Friday the company is shifting its product focus and must adjust its marketing spending as well. Hulman & Co. CEO Mark Miles said as IndyCar and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway combine their commercial functions, they will be better positioned to aggressively pursue new partners.From wire reports Associated PressDale Earnhardt Jr. with the pole award Friday at Dover International Speedway in Dover, Del.

PAGE 19

RELIGION Section CSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Several weeks ago, one of the top trending stories on the Internet featured an email from a North Carolina church pastor that was sent to her parishioners. Pastor Makeda Pennycooke of Freedom House Church in Charlotte, N.C., told church members that she wanted white greeters only at the front door before Sunday services. She said she wanted the best of the best out front, hoping to draw more people into the church. As Pennycooke, an African-American, explained in her email, We are continuing to work to bring our racial demographic pendulum back to midline. So we would like to ask that only white people be on the front doors. Freedom House Churchs membership is predominantly non-Caucasian. As one church member, Carmen Thomas, told a local news station, You can put a white face all over the front door. But when you come through those doors, youre going to see African-Americans; youre going to see Asians. Youre going to see people of color. The part of the story that most caught my attention was the pastors reason for her request she wanted the church to make a good first impression, because first impressions matter. Yes, they do. But ... What is it that a church should say about itself? What is it that we who are Christians should say about ourselves? How should we, for lack of a better word, market ourselves in matters of faith? What should our front-door message say about us? Putting only white greeters at the church front door makes me think of the photos that people post online of themselves. In a previous column, I mentioned the MTV show Catfish. Posting fake or Photoshopped photos to make a good first impression is the whole basis of the catfishing problem its not real. This church in North Carolina isnt the only nor is it the first to ever try to present itself as something thats not quite accurate. Actually, I think thats a common trait of just being human, beginning with Adam and Eve trying to hide their nakedness with fig leaves. We carry that need to hide behind something other than who we really are into the church, from the pastor on down. From my observations, churches either teach we become righteous by walking in righteousness or we walk in righteousness because we are righteous, and that our righteousness is given to us by God solely as a gift. If a church teaches that righteousness is a result of what we do, then the emphasis and focus will be on looking good, striving for moral excellence with the goal of putting on a good face for Jesus, even fake it until you make it, believing that if I dont look good, God wont look good. A church that teaches we are made holy by keeping the rules only breeds discouragement and insecurity and guilt. Its not so much If you love God you would/should do this as it is Because God loves you, you can do this, you are able to. We want to please someone who loves us. While we Christians are called to live differently, to live holy lives, its an inward thing not a cleaning up my outsides thing. Its the Holy Spirit doing his work, changing me from the inside until it shows on the outside. If its me adopting a faux holy exterior, Im not fooling anyone but myself. Im as guilty as the old-time Pharisees whom Jesus called white-washed tombs full of dead mens bones and that wasnt a compliment. When it comes to my front-door message, I hope that people see that I am just an average person who knows her need for a Savior, who loves the mercy of God and who is awed by his grace. I want people to see that I struggle with sin and repentance, that Im not where I want to be, but that Jesus continues to make me better than I once was. See GRACE/ Page C2 Nancy KennedyGRACE NOTES RELIGION BRIEFS Chaplain prays budget battle will be resolvedWASHINGTON U.S. Senate Chaplain Barry Black is asking God to give senators the wisdom to know how to pass a budget that would avert a government shutdown and the backbone to do it. Hours before Texas Republican Ted Cruz began a filibuster in opposition to President Barack Obamas health care law, Black used Tuesdays invocation to express what he called the American peoples jitters over a possible shutdown next week. Cruz is urging his colleagues to oppose moving ahead on a bill that would fund all of government except Obamacare to prevent Majority Leader Harry Reid from stripping the health care provision from the bill. A test vote could take place Wednesday.School reschedules pro-gay speakerPROVIDENCE, R.I. The provost of Providence College says the Roman Catholic school has rescheduled a talk by a nationally-known proponent of gay marriage. Last Saturday, Provost Hugh Lena announced that an appearance by Wayne State University professor John Corvino scheduled for Thursday was canceled. The move prompted concerns about academic freedom from students and faculty members. But on Wednesday, Lena said in a school-wide email that Corvino had agreed to appear at the school opposite Sherif Girgis, a Ph.D. student in philosophy at Princeton. Girgis is a well-known opponent of gay marriage. Lena said the event will likely be held during the spring semester. Lena said he shouldnt have announced Corvinos appearance was cancelled, because the schools intent was to postpone it until it could book someone of national repute to present opposing arguments to Corvinos. The message of the front door From wire reports FREDERICJ. FROMMER Associated PressWASHINGTON federal appeals court is considering whether for-profit businesses can be exempted from a contraceptive mandate in the health care law because of the owners religious views. The law already exempts houses of worship from the requirement, but two brothers who own businesses in Ohio argue they shouldnt have to comply. The brothers, Francis and Philip M. Gilardi, say the requirement would force them to violate their Roman Catholic religious beliefs and moral values by providing contraceptives such as the Plan B pill for their employees. At a hearing on Tuesday, Judge Harry T. Edwards was skeptical of the Gilardis argument. He told their lawyer, Francis Manion, that sometimes religious freedom has to yield to the greater good. Edwards stressed that the Giraldis companies, Freshway Foods and Freshway Logistics of Sidney, Ohio, are not religious groups. I dont know see how the government doesnt prevail, said Edwards, who was appointed by President Jimmy Carter. The other two judges on the panel didnt indicate how they are leaning in the argument, but they had more pointed questions for Justice Department lawyer Alisa Klein than they did for Manion. Judge Janice Rogers Brown, an appointee of President George W. Bush, asked Klein whether the government is asking the Giraldis to give up their constitutional rights. Klein responded that the Giraldis werent making a constitutional claim, but rather seeking an injunction under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Brown asked Klein whether shes saying that for religiously observant owners of corporations there is no right to free exercise of religion. There is no substantial burden on shareholders, Klein responded, adding that it is the corporation that has to meet the obligation. In dismissing the Giraldis bid for an injunction, trial court Judge Emmet G. Sullivan had rejected their contention that requiring the companies to comply with the contraceptive mandate was the same as requiring the Giraldis themselves to do so. The Freshway Corporations are engaged in purely commercial conduct and do not exercise religion under the applicable law, Sullivan wrote. In court papers, the Giraldis argued that corporations can and often do engage in quintessentially religious acts such as tithing, donating money to charities, and committing to act in accordance with the teachings of a religious faith, as they contended their businesses do. They say they face more than $14.4 million in annual penalties if they dont comply with the contraceptive mandate. A separate appeals court panel has barred the government from enforcing the mandate against the Giraldis while they appeal their case. The case comes as other appeals court circuits have issued conflicting rulings in similar cases. The Obama administration has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a case involving the Hobby Lobby craft store chain and its sister company, Mardel Christian bookstore. The Oklahoma businesses won a temporary exemption from having to cover morning-after pills, similar emergency birth control methods and intrauterine devices, after the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the companies were likely to prevail in the case. But the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against the Mennonite owners of a Pennsylvania furniture manufacturing company who claimed that their constitutional rights were violated by the contraceptive requirement. And the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also ruled in favor of the administration in another case involving corporations. Noted performer to appear in InvernessRenowned actor and director David Wasson will give a performance at 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Grace Bible Fellowship of Inverness, 4979 E. Arbor Street. The 90-minute theatrical and musical presentation is free to the public. Wasson began his professional career in 1972 when he was discovered at Florida State University by Tony Award-winning director Albert Marre. Marre brought Wasson to New York City to play a small part in the revival of Man of LaMancha on Broadway. That cast included the original stars Richard Kiley, Joan Deiner and Irving Jacobson. Wassons association with LaMancha lasted for almost 30 years. In 1979 he assumed the featured role of the Padre, a role that he would perform over 1,000 times. In national tours and two more Broadway revivals, he worked with such stars as Howard Keel, John Raitt, John Cullum, Robert Goulet, Raul Julia and Sheena Easton, according to biographical information provided by Grace Bible Fellowship. In 1980 he became associated with another blockbuster musical, Annie. He traveled extensively throughout the country in three national tours, eventually assuming the role of Daddy Warbucks in the 4th National Company. Wasson went on to play that role in numerous regional productions, garnering a Drama Logue award in San Diego. Wasson was fortunate to connect with two other popular shows nd Street and Evita, both of which took him across the country. His portrayal of Julian Marsh in nd Street brought him another Drama Logue award and in 1992 he took his Juan Peron in Evita to Europe, where he played to critical and public acclaim. Musical theater was not his only love. He also appeared in numerous plays and TV shows, including such notable plays as A Russian Romance and Barefoot in the Park and television shows Fresh Prince of Bel-Air with Will Smith and Cybil with Cybil Sheppard. He also made guest appearances on the daytime dramas As the World Turns, One Life to Live and Loving. Federal judges weigh religious exemptions for health lawThe Capitol is seen Monday in Washington, D.C.Associated Press From staff reports

PAGE 20

Fall fun The Christian Womens Outreach Ministry, The Brides of Christ, serving all churches of Citrus County, will host the fourth annual fall weekend retreat Friday through Sunday, Oct. 4-6, at the Life Enrichment Center in Fruitland Park. The womenonly retreat is to offer a place where women have the opportunity to share their lives and love of God with each other. The weekend will offer a chance to rest, relax, have fun, enjoy good food, make new friends and renew faith. For reservations, call retreat coordinator Margi Elson at 352-249-7315 or email brides ofchrist2011@gmail.com. Inverness First United Methodist Churchs Pumpkin Patch will be open Oct. 6-31 at 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, ending with the Trunk or Treat celebration from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31. All proceeds from pumpkin sales go toward the churchs community outreaches and missions. An area will be set up for taking family pictures while visiting the patch. Different displays and events from several community services, such as the Citrus County Fire Department, etc., and hayrides available for the public, all on Saturdays, Oct. 12, 19 and 26. All events and display times will be posted. Pumpkin Patch hours are noon to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays (with events and displays scheduled during these times) and noon to 7:30 p.m. Sundays. Hernando United Methodist Churchs old-fashioned Pumpkin Festival is from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486, Hernando. All children are invited to come and enjoy a safe and happy Halloween featuring games, a cupcake walk, hayride, pumpkin painting and more. Come in costume and bring your parents (they can dress in costume too). The event will finish up with a trunk or treat and hot dogs, all free. Hernando United Methodist Church will host its Fall Holidaze Craft Show and HUMW bake sale form 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16, at 2125 E Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Crafters wishing to sell their handmade items may call Robin at 352445-1487. Spaces are filled on a first-come, first-served basis.Sale away The Crafters with a Mission 4th Annual Craft Bazaar and Bake Sale will continue from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today in the gym at Crystal River Church of God, 2180 N.W. 12th Ave., one mile north of the Crystal River Mall, one block west of U.S. 19. A variety of homemade crafts and home-baked goodies are available for purchase. Admission is free. Proceeds of the sale will benefit ministries within the church. Call 352-795-3079. Open hearts and open minds of the Hernando United Methodist church also includes open yards. Its that time again for the Sell Your Own Treasures. No reservations necessary to rent a 12-by-12 space for $5. The sale is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. For those that only search for treasures, this is an opportunity to make it a onestop shop. Have breakfast or lunch and enjoy the fellowship that abounds among the vendors. The church is at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Hernando. Call 352-726-7245. First Christian Church of Inverness will host its annual Inside Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5. Shop in the air-conditioned Family Life Center and enjoy a hotdog and drink at an affordable price. Choose items from jewelry, books, glassware, knickknacks, electronics and furniture. The church is behind the RaceTrac gas station on State Road 44 West in Inverness. Call the church office at 352-344-1908. A yard sale to benefit the El Shaddai Food Ministry of Crystal River Church of God will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5. Proceeds from the yard sale will purchase food for the several hundred families we feed monthly throughout Citrus County. Location of the sale is 7755 W. Homosassa Trail (in front of Auto Analyst), in Homosassa. Directions: From U.S. 19 and onto Homosassa Trail, follow the curves and pass the fire station, childrens park and Lions Club. Our location is one mile further up the road from the Lions Club. Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church in Beverly Hills will host its monthly outdoor flea market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, on the church property at 6 Roosevelt Boulevard in Beverly Hills off North Lecanto Highway (County Road 491). Shoppers are welcome. Up to 50 commercial and private vendors from throughout Citrus County are expected to display their wares. Commercial vendors and private individuals are welcome to bring and sell goods. Spaces are available for $10 and should be reserved in advance. Coffee, sodas doughnuts and hotdogs will be available for breakfast and lunch. And that he loves me in the process. Being confident in that, I dont have to put on a false face, be something that Im not, pretend to be different than I am. Ive been given a righteousness that I didnt earn and dont deserve, and so I walk in it. Nancy Kennedy is the author of Move Over, Victoria I Know the Real Secret, Girl on a Swing, and her latest book, Lipstick Grace. She can be reached at 352-564-2927, Monday through Thursday, or via email at nkennedy @chronicleonline.com. C2SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLERELIGION 000DJIO SEEKING? SEEKING? SEEKING? Here, youll find a caring family in Christ! 4801 N. Citrus Ave. (2 Mi. N Of US 19) 795-3148 www.crumc.com Rev. David Rawls, Pastor Sunday Worship 9:00 am Traditional Service 10:30 am Contemporary Service with Praise Team Bible Study A t 9:00 & 10:30 F or all ages. Wednesday 6:30 Nursery available at all services. Youth Fellowship Sunday 4:00 Wednesday 6:30 Bright Beginnings Preschool 6 Weeks-VPK Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm. 795-1240 A Stephen Ministry Provider C rystal R iver U nited M ethodist C hurch THE SALVATION ARMY CITRUS COUNTY CORPS. SUNDAY Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Morning Worship Hour 11:00 A.M. TUESDAY: Home League 11:30 A.M. Capt. Phillip Irish Capt. Lynn Irish 712 S. School Ave. Lecanto 513-4960 000DJGW 000ETXP H ERNANDO S EVENTH DAY A DVENTIST C HURCH 1880 N. Trucks Ave. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 344-2008 Sabbath Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 am Worship 11:00 am Wednesday Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm Pastor Dale Wolfe www.hernandoadventist.com 000DJCO Come, Fellowship & Grow With Us In Jesus 000FYS4 SERVICES Sunday AM Bible Study 9:30 Worship 10:30 Sunday PM Worship 6:00 Wednesday PM Bible Study 7:00 EVANGELIST Bob Dickey 000DJIV 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. Crystal River, FL 34465 352-564-8565 www.westcitruscoc.com Church of Christ West Citrus CR 495/Citrus Ave. US Hwy. 19 W. Deep Woods Dr. West Citrus Church of Christ Crystal River CHURCH OF CHRIST A Friendly Church With A Bible Message. Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East Sunday Services 10:00 A M 11:00 A M 6:00 P M Wednesday 7:00 P M Come Worship With Us! Bible Questions Please Call Ev. George Hickman 795-8883 746-1239 000DIWM Nursery Provided 2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd. (12th Ave.) Crystal River Church of Go d Church Phone 795-3079 000DIXH Sunday Morning Adult & Childrens Worship 8:30 & 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:45 AM Evening Service 6:00 PM Wednesday Life Application Service Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM 1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave. 795-6720 A FULL GOSPEL FELLOWSHIP Sunday 10:30 A M Wednesday Christian Ed 7:00 P M Prayer Sat. 4-6pm Pastor John Hager Crystal River Foursquare Gospel Church 000DJ95 Saturday Informal Worship w/Communion 5:00 PM Sunday Early Service w/Communion 8:00 AM Sunday School All Ages 9:30 AM (Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM) Sunday Traditional Service w/Communion 10:30 AM Special services are announced. Nursery provided. St. Timothy Lutheran Church ELCA 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River For more information call 795-5325 www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor 000DJI2 000FYSM 13158 Antelope St. Spring Hill, FL 34609 352-686-7034 Rabbi Lenny Sarko Services Fridays 8PM Saturdays 10AM Religious School Sundays 9AM-Noon Temple Beth David 000DJI8 000DJH8 795-4479 St. Benedict Catholic Church U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd. MASSES Vigil: 5:00pm Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am DAILY MASSES Mon. Fri.: 8:00am HOLY DAYS As Announced CONFESSION Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm The Church in the Heart of the Community with a Heart for the Community MOUNT OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 000DJE8 2105 N. Georgia Rd., PO Box 327 Crystal River, FL 34423 Church Phone (352)563-1577 SUNDAY SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 A M Morning Service 11:00 A M Wed. Prayer Mtg. & Bible Study~ 6:30 P M ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH Serving Southwest Citrus County MASSES: Saturday . . 4:30 P M Sunday . . . 8:00 A M . . . . . . . . . 10:30 A M 000DJI1 U.S. 19 1 4 mile South of West Cardinal St., Homosassa 628-7000 000DJH3 S T A NNE S C HURCH A Parish in the Anglican Communion Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m. Morning Prayer & Daily Masses 4th Sunday 6:00p.m. Gospel Sing A long 9870 West Fort Island Trail Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn 352-795-2176 www.stannescr.org To be one in Christ in our service, as His servants, by proclaiming His love. Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple First Baptist Church of Homosassa Come Worship with Us 10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa 628-3858 Rev. J. Alan Ritter Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries Sunday 9:00 am Sunday School (All Age Groups) 10:30 am Worship Celebration Choir / Special Music / Kidz Worship Sunday Night 6 pm Worship Celebration Wednesday Night 6:30 pm Worship Celebration Childrens Awanas Group Youth Activities www.fbchomosassa.org 000DJ71 Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!!000DJMK GRACEContinued from Page C1 ReligionNOTES See NOTES / Page C3

PAGE 21

This church-sponsored flea market takes place the first Saturday monthly, September through May. The next flea market is Nov. 2. For more information or to reserve a space, call Rose Mary at 352527-6459 or e-mail wjeselso @tampabay.rr.com. The Beverly Hills Community Church Youth Group Estate Sale is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, in the church fellowship hall at 86 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Joy Lutheran Church, at S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd Place, Ocala, will have its annual indoor yard sale and bake sale from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, in Swenson Hall. The public is invited to donate furniture, tools, gardening equipment, sports-related items, kitchen and house wares, linens, books and craft supplies (no clothes, shoes or electronics). Bring yard sale to Swenson Hall from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Oct. 16, or from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday or Friday, Oct 17-18. Bring baked goods on Friday wrapped for sale and labeled, particularly if they contain nuts. There will be the vintage table for special treasures and a craft and quilt section. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Call Edie Heinzen at 352-854-7817 in regards to the bake sale and Patty Corey at 352-854-0660 regarding the yard sale. The Agape House fundraising sale is from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25 and 26, at First Baptist Church, 700 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Funds are used to purchase Bibles, toiletries and miscellaneous items. Call the Agape House (Wednesdays) at 352-795-7064 or the church at 352-795-3367. The Council of Catholic Women of Our Lady of Grace Church will host its annual Holiday Bazaar and Craft Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27, in the Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Christmas and holiday treasures, handmade crafts, jewelry, live plants, books, toys and games, and an array of raffle prizes will be featured. The raffle drawing is at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. It is not necessary to be present to win. Other crafters displaying their wares will be Stretchies by Judith LLC, Embroidery Etc. by Barb, BJ Crafts One Stroke Painting, Chocolates by Vanessa, All That Jazz and Its Under Wraps. Call Fran Wagner at 352-527-0723. The Dunnellon Flea Market will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1 and 2, at the First United Methodist Church, 21501 W. State Road 40. Bake sale, cafe, lots of good items with great prices. Furniture, jewelry, glassware, clothes, shoes, handbags, CDs and books. Helping Hands Thrift Store, a ministry of Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund the food pantry. The store accepts donations of household items, clothing and small appliances. Call 352-726-1707.Music & more The River Jordan Quartet is the featured musical group at the Homecoming celebration Sunday, Oct. 6, at First Baptist Church of Hernando, 3790 E. Parsons Point Road, Hernando. Sunday school starts at 9:30 a.m. followed by the worship service at 10:45, a covered-dish luncheon at noon, and then a concert by the River Jordan Quartet. A love offering will be collected for the musicians. There will be no evening service. Call 352-726-6734. Pop country quartet Eternal Vision will perform live at 7 tonight at First Baptist Church of Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia St. Eternal Vision is an award-winning gospel group out of Knoxville, Tenn. The concert is free and everyone is welcome. Light refreshments will be served in the fellowship hall following the concert. For more information on Eternal Vision visit www.eternalvision.org. Call the church at 352-726-4296 or visit www.fbcflc.org. Hernando Church of the Nazarene, at 2101 N. Florida Ave. in Hernando, off U.S. 41, will begin its concert series with the Southern Gospel quartet, River Jordan, on Sunday, Oct. 27. Doors open at 5 p.m. Celebration Sounds choir and orchestra will open the concert at 5:45. The public is invited. A love offering will be collected. Call the church office at 352-726-6144. The entire concert series can be viewed on www.hernando nazarene.org. The Amazzing Steel Drum Ensemble will be in concert at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, at First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 (next to Sweetbay Plaza). A freewill offering will be collected. Refreshments served after the concert. Call 352-795-2259. The Dunnellon Community Chorale will present a concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10, at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, to celebrate Veterans Day. Patriotic music will be performed with guest accompanist Harry Hershey. The church is in the Dunnellon Historic District, 20641 Chestnut St. (corner of Chestnut and Ohio streets). The pubic is invited. St. Timothy Lutheran Church Concert Series presents Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band featuring Yungchen Lhamo at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14, at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Get tickets in advance or at the door. Suggested donation is $10. Call 352-795-5325 or 352-634-2388.RELIGIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 C3 000DJC6 Reverend Kenneth C. Blyth Pastor 439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, Florida Building is Barrier-Free gshernando.org Worship 8:30 am 11:00 am Fellowship After Worship Weekly Communion Sunday School 9:45 am Nursery Provided 000DJID Floral City United Methodist Church 8478 East Marv in St. (across from Floral City School) Sunday School 9:05 A M Sunday Worship Service 10:30 A M Sanctuary 8:00 A M Service in the 1884 Church Bible Study Tuesday 10:00 A M Wednesday 6:00 P M Wheel Chair Access Nursery Available Rev. Mary Gestrich Church 344-1771 WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com We strive to make newcomers feel at home. www.gracebiblehomosassa.org email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS, Infant & Toddler Nursery 000DJCL 1 1 2 mi. east of U.S. 19 6382 W. Green Acres St. P.O. Box 1067 Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067 Pastor: Rev. Ray Herriman (352) 628-5631 Sunday 9:30 AM . . . . . . . . . . Discovery Time 11:00 AM . . . . . . . . . Praise & Worship 6:00 PM . . . . . . . . . . Evening Service Monday 6:15 PM . . . . . . . . . . Teens Tuesday 6:15 PM........Awana (Sept. Apr.) Wednesday 7:00 PM . . . . . . . . . . Bible Study & Prayer Meeting 935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto Crystal Glen Subdivision Hwy. 44 just E. of 490 527-3325 (L.C .M.S.) COME WORSHIP WITH US Sunday Service 9:30 A.M. Sunday Bible Study & Childrens Sunday School 11 A.M. Saturday Service 6:00 P.M. Weekly Communion Fellowship after Sunday Worship Calendar of events Audio of sermons available at www.faithlecanto.com 000DIY5 Rev. Stephen Lane 00070P2 Faith Lutheran Church A Heart From God... A Heart For Others. 000DJD7 HERNANDO Sunday School 8:45 AM 9:30 AM Fellowship 9:30 AM Worship Service 10:00 AM Nursery is Provided. Individual Hearing Devices Ministries and Activities for all Ages. 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486) (1 1 2 miles from Hwy. 41) For information call (352) 726-7245 www.hernandoumcfl.org Reverend Jerome Jerry Carris United Methodist Church A Safe Sanctuary for Children and Families Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors Catholic Church St. Scholastica St. Scholastica 4301 W. Homosassa Trail Lecanto, Florida www.stscholastica.org Sunday Masses 9:00 am 11:30 am Saturday Vigil 4:00 pm Weekday Masses 8:30 am Confessions Saturday 2:45 -3:30 pm (352) 746-9422 000DJHX 000DJ8Y COME Worship With The Church of Christ Floral City, Florida Located at Marvin & Church streets. Established in 33 A.D. in Jerusalem by Jesus Christ. A warm welcome always awaits you where we teach the true New Testament Christian Faith. Sunday Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Steve Heneghan, Minister CHURCH OF CHRIST Floral City, FL. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed./Eve. Bible Study 6:00 p.m. 2101 N. Florida Ave. Hernando FL 726-6144 Nursery Provided CHILDREN YOUTH SENIORS Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Praise & Worship 10:40 A.M. Praise Service 6:00 P M Praise & Prayer (Wed.) 7:00 P M Randy T. Hodges, Pastor 000DIW5 www.hernandonazarene.org The New Church Without Walls An Exciting & Growing Multi-Cultural Non-Denominational Congregation Ministering to the Heart of Citrus County Senior Pastors & Founders Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr. & Lady T Alexander Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Service 11:00 am Wednesday Bible Study 7pm 3962 N. Roscoe Rd. Hernando, FL Ph: 352-344-2425 www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com Email:cwow@embarqmail.com The perfect church for people who arent 000FZTS SUNDAY 10:00 AM Family Worship (Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00) 000DJEJ N ORTH R IDGE CHURCH Non-Denominational Church Citrus County Realtors Association Building. 714 S. Scarboro Ave. & SR 44 Pastor Kennie Berger 352-302-5813 WEDNESDAY 7:00 PM Home Bible Study (Call for location) Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today! 3790 E. Parsons Point Rd. Hernando, FL 34442 352-726-6734 Visit us on the Web at www.fbchernando.com 000DJ6X Reaching and restoring lives through Jesus Christ Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.. Wednesday Prayer Meeting/Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Rev. Keith Dendy First Baptist Church Of Hernando First Baptist Church Of Hernando Shepher d of the Hills E PISCOPAL C HURCH Our mission is to be a beacon of faith known for engaging all persons in the love and truth of Jesus Christ. 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (CR 486) Lecanto, Florida (4/10 mile east of CR 491) www.SOTHEC.org Services: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday 8:00 & 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am Healing Service Wednesday 10:00 am 000DJGZ First Baptist Church 8545 Magnolia 726-4296 Sunday Schedule 8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Traditional Worship 6:00 PM Worship Wednesday 6:30 PM Music, Youth, Fellowship A warm, friendly Church Nursery Available www.fbcfloralcity.org 000DJ6D of Floral City Rev. John Rothra Come, Fellowship & Grow With Us In Jesus 5863 W. Cardinal St. Homosassa Springs, FL 34446 Telephone: (352) 628-7950 Pastor Dale Wolfe Tuesday Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm Sabbath-Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am www.homosassaadventist.com 000DJHR Homosassa Springs Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! 000DJMR NOTESContinued from Page C2 See NOTES / Page C4 000G89A Pastor Tom Walker I NVERNESS First C HURCH OF G OD 5510 E. Jasmine Ln., Inverness_344-3700 Saturday Nite Gospel Jubilee Last Saturday of each month 6:00 P.M. Great Music, Fine Fellowship, Good Food! Never A Charge, Come prepared to participate! JOIN IN THE FUN JOIN IN JOIN IN THE FUN THE FUN

PAGE 22

All Citrus County musicians are invited to join in the community jam sessions at 7 p.m. Wednesdays in Hilton Hall at Floral City United Methodist Church. Bring your instruments/voices and join in the fun. Call 352-344-1771. The Saturday night Gospel Jubilee takes place the last Saturday night monthly at First Church of God 5510 Jasmine Lane, Inverness. Everyone is invited to come to enjoy or come and participate. Prepare a number, bring your instrument if you have one and join in this full-filled evening. Great music, fun, food, fellowship and never a charge. Call 352-344-3700.Food & fellowship An Open House Spaghetti Dinner will take place at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, at Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto. The WELCA Invitational Luncheon will take place at noon today at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church on County Road 486 opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard in Hernando. Call 352-746-7161. The Catholic Womens Club of Our Lady of Fatima invites everyone to celebrate Octoberfest 2013 at 5 p.m. today at Our Lady of Fatima, 550 U.S. 41 South, Inverness. Enjoy a menu of Beef Rouladen (rolled stuffed steak), Spaetzle (noodles), Karrottes (carrots), Apfelkuchen (apple spice cake), Apfelmus (applesauce) and Koffee (coffee). Door prizes will be awarded. Tickets are $10 each. For tickets and information, call Millie Reph at 352-344-1353. St. Raphael Orthodox Church in America invites everyone to its Slavic Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at 1277 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Enjoy borscht, stuffed cabbage, potato pierogi, kielbasa and sauerkraut, cheese blini, cabbage and noodles, cucumber salad, various desserts and Slavic and traditional American crafts. Call 352-201-1320. Beverly Hills Community Church spaghetti suppers are from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday monthly (with the exception of December), in the Jack Steele Hall at 88 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation of $8 per person includes all-you-can-eat salad, spaghetti with meat sauce, Italian bread, dessert and coffee or tea. Come and enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets are available at the door or in the church office.Special events Congregation Beth Israel of Ocala announces a change in meeting place from the Collins Center to its new home at the First Congregational Church, United Church of Christ, 7171 State Road 200, Ocala. Services are in the main building of the church in the choir room to the left of the main lobby. The facility is handicapped accessible. The church is southwest of I-75 at Exit 350. Call Judi at 352-237-8277 or Mary at 352-861-2056. The Council of Catholic Women at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills will hold a Corporate Communion Mass at 4 p.m. today. A dinner catered by Brooklyn Deli Too will follow in the Parish Life Center. The youth group will have a presentation on the St. Leo Retreat Ministry Training program. Members, spouses and Catholic women are invited to attend. For tickets ($12), call Char Fontaine at 352-746-9490 before 8 p.m. or the church office at 352-746-2144. In May of 1893, eight founding families met to form Dunnellon Presbyterian Church and on Sept. 29, 1895, the original sanctuary was dedicated. One hundred and twenty years later and on the 118th anniversary of the dedication of the original sanctuary, the members of Dunnellon Presbyterian Church invite the community to join us as we celebrate the completion of repairs to the bell tower and renovation of the sanctuary. An open house and fellowship time will begin at 9:45 a.m. Sunday including member led tours. At 10:30 a.m., a special service will take place to honor our history and the people vital to our newest renovations. Following a short break, the formal worship service will begin at 11 a.m. wherein the members will rededicate the buildings and themselves to the continuation of the Lords work. Blessing of the Animals will take place Friday at the First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River Prayer Garden. Gathering is at 10 a.m. and the service is at 11. 352-795-2259. The St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church Council of Catholic Womens 23rd annual Tricky Tray is Saturday, Oct. 5, in the parish hall, 1401 W. Country Club Blvd., Citrus Springs.. Doors open at 10 a.m. Drawings begin at 11:30 a.m. Free admission. Complimentary drinks and snacks available. Father J. James Gerhart will conduct the 5th annual Blessing of the Animals at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, in the Pet Memorial Garden at Holy Faith Episcopal Church in Blue Cove, Dunnellon. All area pet owners are welcome. The public is invited to a Military Card Party on Monday, Oct. 14, at St. Margarets Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Lunch will be served at 12:15 p.m. Card play begins at 1 p.m. Cost is $12 per player. Make up your table of four or come as a single and we will pair you. For more information or to make a reservation, call Dottie at 352-382-3656 or Marilyn at 352-746-6583. Cornerstone Baptist Church will host the Send Them to Serve four-person golf scramble Saturday, Oct. 19, at Inverness Golf and Country Club. All proceeds go directly to the CBC Youth Fund for Mission Trips and Summer Camps. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and teeoff is at 8:30 a.m. with a shotgun start. Registration fee of $50 per golfer includes 18 holes, cart and steak lunch at Cornerstone. Call Bruce Wenger at 352-726-7335. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church offers Bingo at 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays and 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays featuring regular, double and special bingos, together with a jackpot and pickle game. Doors open at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m. Wednesday. Kitchen features homemade soups and sandwiches. The church is on U.S. 41, three miles north of Dunnellon.C4SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLERELIGION Pastor, Dairold & Bettye Rushing 4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd. (Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452 OFFICE: (352) 726-1107 Where everyone is special! Jesus Christ-central theme of our worship Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m & 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship 7:00 p.m. Ministries for all ages Nursery Available 000DIYG First Assembly of God Our Lady of Fatima C ATHOLIC C HURCH 726-1670 550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness, Florida 000DJEX Weekday Mass: 8 A.M. Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M. Saturday Confessions: 2:30 3:30 P.M. Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule 7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Sunday Masses: Summer Schedule (June August) 9:00 and 11:00 A.M. 1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451 Telfono: (352) 341-1711 ORDEN DE SERVICIOS: DOMINGOS: 9:30 AM Escuela Biblica Dominical 10:30 AM Adoracin y Prdica MARTES: 7:00 PM Culto de Oraci n JUEVES: 7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos Les Esperamos! PRIMERA IGLESIA HISPANA DE CITRUS COUNTY Inverness, Florida Asambleas de Dios David Pinero, Pastor ~ 000DJ7I Pastor Terry Roberts Ph: 726-0201 Independent Fundamental Cross road Bap tist Chu rch 000DIWC Youre invited to our Services Sunday School 10:00 AM Sunday 10:45 AM & 6:00 PM Wednesday 7:00 PM 5335 E. J asmine Lane, Inverness 1 2 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41 North (Formally Calvary Bible Church Location) 000DIVY All are invited to our Healing Services 352-726-4033 First Church of Christ, Scientist Inverness 224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday Services 10:30 AM Sunday School 10:30 AM Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM 000DJ75 Pastor Tom WalkerINVERNESSFirst CHURCH OF GOD5510 E. Jasmine Ln.Non-denominationalSunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM Wed: 6:00 Bible StudyDo you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners, singing the old hymns? Then youll enjoy this Church family. 000DJIS A place to belong. A place to become. Victory Baptist Church At Sunday School 9:45 AM Worship 10:45 AM Sunday Evening 6:00 PM Wednesday 7:00 PM Choir Practice 8:00 PM Highway 41 North, turn at Sportsman Pt. Quality Child Care Pastor Gary Beehler 352-465-8866 5040 N Shady Acres Dr. 726-9719 General Conference Come To S T M ARGARET S E PISCOPAL C HURCH In Historic Downtown Inverness 1 Block N.W. Of City Hall 114 N. Osceola Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 726-3153 Services: Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M. Wednesday 12:30 P M Morning Prayer 9:00 A M MonFri Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor Celebrating 120 years 000DJHC www.stmaggie.org Pastor John Fredericksen Rightly dividing the word of truth II Timothy 2:15 Grace Bible Fellowship 4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL 352-726-9972 Sunday Bible Study . . . . . . 9:15 AM Worship Service . 10:15 AM Wednesday Bible Study . . . . . . 7:00 PM 000G293 Nursery and play yard. Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! 000DJMO 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. Inverness, FL 34452 (2 mi. so. of Applebees) Come as you are. (352) 726-2522 REV. SARAH CAMPBELL Senior Pastor of Inverness Sunday School 9:00 AM Adults 10:30 AM All Ages Sunday Worship 9:00 AM Contemporary 9:00 AM Vertical Kids 10:30 AM Traditional Wednesday Worship 6:00 PM Vertical Youth 000DJE6 Holy Communion Every Sunday at 7:45am & 10:00am The Rev. Thomas Beaverson F IRST L UTHERAN C HURCH 47 Years of Bringing Christ to Inverness Sunday School & Bible Class 9:00 A M 726-1637 Missouri Synod www.1stlutheran.net 1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness 000DJDD 000FFNI First Baptist Church of Lake Rousseau SBC Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder, Pastor SERVICES Sunday 11:00am & 6:00pm Wednesday 6:00pm Magnifying Gods name by bringing people to Jesus 7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488) Ph. 352-795-5651 Cell 352-812-8584 Email: pastorjoe10@gmail.com Check us out on Facebook 000EPSH Sunday Bible Study 9:15 am Worship 11:00 am Wednesday Prayer 6 pm Youth 6-8 pm (352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com First Baptist Church Of Beverly Hills 4950 N. Lecanto Hwy Pastor Marple Lewis III First Presbyterian Stephen Ministry Congregation 000DJDT Hwy. 44 E @ Washington Ave., Inverness Sunday Services Traditional 11:00 AM Casual Service 9:30 AM 11:00 AM Service Tapes & CDs Available Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM Nursery Provided Fellowship & Youth Group Sunday Evening Web Site: www.fpcinv.org Podcast: fpcinv.com Church Office 637-0770 Pastor James Capps Dr. Ray Kelley Minister Sunday: 9:00 A M Sunday School 10:15 A M Worship Service Wednesday: 6:00 P M Bible Study First For Christ...John 1:41 F IRST C HRISTIAN C HURCH O F I NVERNESS 000dje1 We welcome you and invite you to worship with our family. 2018 Colonade St., Inverness 344-1908 www.fccinv.com Redemption Christian Church SUNDAY Bible School . . . . . . 9:00 Worship . . . . . . . . . 10:15 WEDNESDAY Bible School . . . . . . 6:30 Currently meeting at East Citrus Community Center 9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway Pastor Todd Langdon For more information call 352-422-6535 000DJGV Beverly Hills Community Church 82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida (352) 746-3620 Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m. Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m. Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m. Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly Where Christ is Proclaimed! 000DIW3 Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills 746-2144 (1 Block East of S.R. 491) Holy Days To Be Announced VIGIL MASSES: 4:00 P M & 6:00 P M ************ SUNDAY MASSES: 8:00 A M & 10:30 A M ************* SPANISH MASS: 12:30 P M ************* CONFESSIONS: 2:30 P M to 3:15 P M Sat. or By Appointment ************* WEEKDAY MASSES: 8:00 A M www.ourladyofgracefl .catholicweb.com 000DJFB Sunday Services: Traditional Service . . . . . 8:30 AM Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 AM Contemporary Service . 10:30 AM Wednesday Night: Adult Classes . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 PM Boys and Girls Brigade . . 7:00 PM Teens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 PM Rev. Larry Powers Senior Pastor I NVERNESS C HURCH OF G OD Welcome Home Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South in Inverness Just Past Burger King Church Office 726-4524 Also on Site Little Friends Daycare and Learning Center 000DJDV Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church ELCA Pastor Lynn Fonfara 9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Citrus Springs Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 8:30 a.m. Communion Every Sunday Information: 489-5511 Go To Our Web Page hopelutheranelca.com 000DJD9 000G49M St. Raphael Orthodox Church in America Divine Liturgy Sun. 10 am Great Vespers Sat. 5 pm Fr. David Balmer (352) 201-1320 www.straphaelchurch.org 1277 N. Paul Dr. INVERNESS right off Hwy. 41 N. Come to our SLAVIC FESTIVAL FOOD & CRAFTS OCT. 12, 10 am-2 pm NOTESContinued from Page C3

PAGE 23

Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. NEWS NOTES Lions Club to serve roast porkThe Beverly Hills Lions, 72 Civic Circle Drive, will serve a roast pork loin dinner from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday. The meal will consist of roast pork loin with gravy, potatoes, green beans, salad, dessert, coffee or iced tea. Cost is $8 per person. To reserve a table or for more information, call 352-897-4899. To purchase tickets, see any Lion member, or they are available at bingo on Monday evening or Thursday during the day at the club.Festival needs help to stage socialThe Inverness Festival of the Arts Committee asks area businesses to donate products or services to be auctioned at its annual Scholarship Social to be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Historic Inverness Courthouse. The social benefits both the Festival of the Arts Scholarship Fund and HPH Hospice. Donations are tax deductible. To submit donations, call Jaret Lubowiecki at 352726-0366. Tickets for the Scholarship Social are $25 each and can be obtained at the Finance Department on the first floor of the Inverness Government Center, 212 N. Main St., or call 352-726-2611, ext. 1201.My Sisters Keeper to be shownMy Sisters Keeper a 2009 drama directed by Nick Cassavetes and starring Cameron Diaz and Abigail Breslin, will be presented at 2 p.m. Monday at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. My Sisters Keeper is an immediate audience grabber and provides insight into various family dynamics when coping with end-of-life issues. Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coasts Monday Movie Matinee will be presented to the community at no cost. Discussion time will follow the movie and there will be popcorn and snacks available to all. For more information or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Facebook or on the Web at www.hospiceofcitrus.org.Arbor Trail begins food driveArbor Trail Rehab is having its fifth annual can food drive for Thanksgiving, from Nov. 1 through Nov. 20. Donations can be dropped off at Arbor Trail Rehab & Skilled Nursing Center, 611 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. All donations will go to Citrus United Basket, an organization that helps feed more than 25,000 individuals. Canned goods, boxed goods and such nonperishable items are accepted. For more information, call 352-637-1130.Eagles Auxiliary to vote on by-lawsCrystal River Eagles Auxiliary 4272 will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1. Members will hear the third reading on by-law changes and additions. Discussion and voting will follow.Yoga, bend, stretch at centerCitrus County Park & Recreation, with instructor Kathy Harrica, will offer four weeks of free Beginners Yoga: Bend & Stretch classes starting Oct. 7 at the Citrus Springs Community Center. All are welcome. Items to bring to class are: a yoga mat is preferable, but a large bathor beach towel will work, a small square pillow and water. There will be a total of eight free classes in October; four weeks on Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. and Thursday mornings at 10 a.m. No pre-registration is required. For more information, call Parks & Recreation at 352-465-7007 or Kathy at 352-249-8244. Model A enthusiasts to gatherThe Citrus As Model A club will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1, at the Floral City Lions Club. Interested persons are welcome; new members are encouraged. Call secretary Denise Brimmage at 352-848-0810, or visit www.citrusas.com. COMMUNITYPage C5SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Humanitarians OF FLORIDA Wisteria Wisteria is cute as a button with her bobtail and silver tabby coat. This kitten would make a great addition to your home and keep it warm and cozy during fall. We are also running a September adoption special on kittens, and all adoption fees include microchip, spay/neuter and all required vaccinations, including rabies. There are many varieties of felines to choose from. Drop by and enjoy our felines in their cage-free, homestyle environment from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the Humanitarians Hardin Haven on the corner of State Road 44 and North Conant Avenue, east of Crystal River. Call the Haven at 352-613-1629 for adoptions, or view most of our felines online at www.petfinder.com/ shelters/fl186.html.Special to the Chronicle TEDDIANNEGOSHORN Special to the ChronicleIt has been said that libraries have historically served as our nations great equalizer of knowledge. Thus, public libraries have always been gathering places that encourage people to share ideas, learn something new and foster their culture. The public library is a uniquely American creation, bringing great value to the communities it serves. The Florida Department of States Division of Library Information Services is partnering with the Haas Center for Business Research and Economic Development of the University of West Florida to develop a return on investment study and determine just how deep the value of public libraries truly runs. Todays library provides a broad offering of classes and programs for self-enrichment, as well as a diversity of materials in both traditional and digital formats to meet ever-evolving needs of a community. With a fundamental mission to promote the pursuit of knowledge and deliver quality educational opportunities, the public library strives to promote reading and learning in all its forms. The public is invited to participate in an online survey designed to gather information on just how much the library is worth to you. Through the end of October, access the statewide survey through www.citruslibraries.org and click on the survey link on the right side of the page.Teddianne Goshorn is the communications facilitator for the Citrus County Library System. Special to the ChronicleThe United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Homosassa Flotilla 15-4, will conduct an eight-session boating safety program starting Oct. 7. Boating Skills and Seamanship is the most comprehensive of the Coast Guard Auxiliarys public boating education programs. It covers the subjects of boat design, equipment, trailering, boat handling and anchoring, aids to navigation, navigation rules and more. The program is for the boater who wants a more complete discussion of what may be encountered on the water and how to operate a vessel more safely. Boating Skills and Seamanship also forms the basis for the instruction of officer trainees at the Coast Guard Academy during the summer, prior to attending the Officer Candidate School. At the completion of the program, participants passing the final exam will be eligible to receive the Florida boater ID card. Total cost is $35 for materials. The program will be presented from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, Oct. 7 through 31, at the West Citrus Community Center, 8940 Veterans Drive, Homosassa. To register, contact Anna McQuade at 352-621-6963 or ajmcquade@tampabay. rr.com. Boating safety program begins Oct. 7 Special to the ChronicleFamily, friends and members of the Citrus County Sheriffs Citizens Academy alumni were in attendance at the graduation of the Criminal Justice Academy Law Enforcement Class at the Withlacoochee Technical Institute recently. A $500 award was presented to graduate Roscoe Watts, center, by the association. Presenting the check are academy alumni president Jonna Wing, right, and Pat Konick, treasurer. Graduate award Special to the ChronicleThe New York Club of Citrus County will meet at noon Thursday, Oct. 10, at Tuscany on the Meadows, 350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486) at the Quality Inn. Marianne Desimone of Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park will be guest speaker for October. On the menu are chicken marsala or eggplant rollatini, served with bread and salad. Dessert is chocolate fudge cake. Cost is $14, which includes tax and tips. Mail your check to: New York Club, P.O. Box 641261, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Lunch reservations must be received by Oct. 3. Write meal choice on your check. Visitors are welcome, but must join after two visits. Annual dues are $6 per person for the season of October to May. Meetings are held the second Thursday monthly. The club supports CASA, helping women and children who are victims of domestic violence. Item donations and cash are appreciated. Members also collect unopened bags and cans of dog food and cat food for seniors pets, as part of the Home Delivered Meals Program of Citrus County. For more information, call 352445-1997 or visit the website at www.newyorkclubofcitrus county.com. Special to the ChronicleThe New Jersey and Friends Club will meet at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7, at VFW Post 4252 on State Road 200 in Hernando. October is Ice Cream Social time. Upcoming activities include: The annual picnic at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9. Lunch at Casa di Norma on U.S. 19 in Crystal River at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23. The Victory Casino Cruise trip on Wednesday, Nov. 6. Cost for the trip will include bus, admission, buffet and play money. The public is invited. For more information, call Mary Anne at 352-746-3386. The club bowls Thursdays at 10 a.m. at Sportsmens Bowl, 100 Florida Ave. (U.S. 41) in Inverness. All are welcome; being from New Jersey is not a requirement. For more information, call 352-527-3568 or visit on Facebook. The club meets at 1 p.m. the first Monday of each month, unless there is a holiday. (Then its the second Monday.) Meetings are at VFW Post 4252 on State Road 200, Hernando. New Yorkers begin new season Reserve by Oct. 3 for luncheon meeting Get together with Jerseyans, friends Annual picnic coming up in October Special to the ChronicleCitrus County Parks & Recreation will present an Alter Eagles concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Citrus Springs Community Center. The Alter Eagles will take the stage with a live musical re-creation of The Eagles many legendary songs. Tickets must be purchased in advance. General admission is $15 per person, and limited VIP seating tickets are $25. Call 352-465-7007 or 352-527-7540 for more information. The concert is sponsored by Citrus County Parks & Recreation and the Chronicle. Blast into the past with Eagles cover band concert Determining a communitys return on investment

PAGE 24

C6SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.In the last two days, we have looked at deals in which a lot of errors were made. Lets end the week with one where the bidding was sane and the defense excellent. After three passes, North opened because her hand satisfied the Rule of 15. If high-card points plus spade length equal at least 15, open; otherwise, pass out the deal. South, who would have responded two hearts anyway, was even happier here because he was a passed hand; North wasnt going to assume that his partner had a lot of points. West contested with two spades (a makable contract), and North competed to three hearts with four-card support, despite her minimum count and flat hand. South passed, knowing that if game was good, North would have bid it. West led the diamond ace. Then she did very well, shifting to the spade 10, denying the jack. That made it easy for East to win with his king and return the diamond jack. West won with her king and led another diamond, which declarer ruffed. South drew two rounds of trumps ending on the board and called for the spade nine. East went in with his ace, but what did he do next? Some players would have shifted fatally to a club. But East worked out declarers distribution. South was known to have started with two spades, five hearts, two diamonds and, therefore, four clubs. East could not gain by leading a club, so he returned a spade and waited for his club queen to defeat the contract. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug ht on C amera C aug ht on C amera C aug ht on C amera L oc k up G L oc k up G L oc k up G (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Barrett-Jackson (N) Alaska State Troopers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Sam & HauntedDrakeDrakeSee DadNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Sweetie PiesSweetie PiesSweetie PiesSweetie PiesMcGheesMcGheesSweetie Pies (OXY) 44 123 A Cinderella Story (2004) PG Ever After: A Cinderella Story A Cinderella Story (2004) PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4Dexter Remember the Monsters? MA Ray Donovan Same Exactly MA Lincoln (2012) Daniel Day-Lewis. Lincoln takes measures to ensure the end of slavery forever. Gangs of New York (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio. (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Cops PG Cops Cops PG Cops Cops (N) PG Cops PG Cops PG Cops Cops Cops PG Along Came Polly (2004) PG-13 (STARZ) 370 271 370 King Arthur (2004, Historical Drama) Clive Owen. (In Stereo) PG-13 The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (N) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA (SUN) 36 31 36 College Football (N) (Live)College Football (N) (Live) Stable Wars Under the Helmet Under the Helmet (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 The Abyss (1989, Science Fiction) Ed Harris, Michael Biehn. PG-13 X-Men 2 (2003, Fantasy) Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman. Premiere. A power-mad militarist pursues the mutants. PG-13 Godzilla (1998) PG-13 (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19RaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangZoolander (2001) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Butterfield 8 (1960, Drama) Elizabeth Taylor, Eddie Fisher. NR (DVS) Gun Crazy (1950) Peggy Cummins. NR Hell Drivers (1957, Drama) Stanley Baker, Herbert Lom. NRCurseDemon (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Tickle Tickle Tickle Tickle Voodoo Shark (In Stereo) Dixie Divers (N) (In Stereo) Voodoo Shark (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Hoard-BuriedUntold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ER (TMC) 350 261 350 Brake (2012) Stephen Dorff. (In Stereo) R The Darkest Hour (2011) Emile Hirsch. PG-13 Rubber (2010, Comedy) Stephen Spinella. R Botched (2007) Stephen Dorff. (In Stereo) NR (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001, Adventure) Angelina Jolie. PG-13 I Am Legend (2007, Science Fiction) Will Smith. PG-13 (DVS) The Forbidden Kingdom (2008, Action) Jackie Chan, Jet Li. PG-13 (TOON) 38 58 38 33 GumballGumball Shrek (2001, Comedy) PG King/HillClevelandFam. GuyFam. GuyClevelandBoon (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Weird Travels GGhostGhostGhost AdventuresGhost AdventuresGhost AdventuresGhost Adventures (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Wipeout PG Wipeout PG Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24 Love Actually (2003) Hugh Grant.RaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymond (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS: Los Angeles Tin Soldiers NCIS: Los Angeles Empty Quiver NCIS: Los Angeles Personal NCIS: Los Angeles Harms Way NCIS: Los Angeles Enemy Within NCIS: Los Angeles The Job (WE) 117 69 117 David Tutera: Unveiled PG David Tutera: Unveiled G David Tutera: Unveiled G David Tutera: Unveiled (N) G David Tutera: Unveiled G David Tutera: Unveiled G (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Bones MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals. (N)10th Inn.WGN News at NineMotherRules Dear Annie: I am a 64year-old male with decent looks and of average height. Im a few pounds overweight, but I am not sloppy. I was married before, but have not had very much luck when it comes to the fairer sex. What sets me apart are two very obvious facts: One, I am disabled. When a woman looks at me, she focuses on my cane. Two, I live in a senior complex on a limited income from social security. It doesnt matter that I can offer a woman warmth, tenderness, kindness and love. Once more, I have been used and dumped by another woman who promised the moon and then shattered my lonely heart. I have had enough. I am tired. I just wanted you to know that there is one nice guy left out here. Jay Dear Jay: We are certain you arent the only one, and we sympathize. It is hard to be alone when you crave intimacy. We are undoubtedly going to be inundated with letters from equally lonely women who want to meet you. They, too, are looking for companionship, warmth, tenderness, kindness and love. However, even with your disability and your living situation, you apparently have been able to attract women. Why they keep breaking your heart is not explained by those issues. It might be enormously helpful to ask one of them to give you an honest critique of why she left. Listen with an open mind instead of a wounded heart, and you may learn something about yourself. It might help. Dear Annie: I never understood why my mother didnt like me. I did everything possible to get her to love me, but it never happened. She even helped my ex-husband kidnap my son. I forgave each hurt but learned not to trust her. Finally, at the age of 56, I looked up her personality traits on the Internet, and there she was: a narcissistic parent. I recently was diagnosed with terminal cancer. When I explained the bone pain, my mother suddenly complained of similar pain and insisted on numerous tests that showed nothing. She could not tolerate the attention I was receiving. She even told me she had to put down her dog a month earlier than necessary because, of course, she needed to be with me. This is the kind of love I get from her. When I was a child, she convinced everyone that I was evil. Now my mother has started forgetting her lies, and people have figured her out. Several family members have apologized to me for not seeing through her. I dont blame them. She is very good at what she does. But I am finally free of her. I also know I am a good person. I only wish I had had this information years ago. I hope this helps some other adult child learn how to deal with a nasty, vindictive parent. Not an Evil Child Anymore Dear Not: We are so sorry that youve had such a stressful relationship with your difficult mother, and that at a time in your life when you could use the comfort of a loving parent, you cannot turn to her. Please know our thoughts are with you. Dear Annie: This is in response to Begging for Mummy and Daddy. I am a heroin addict who has been clean for 20 years. Going to Narcotics Anonymous meetings is the best thing he can do. I went to six meetings a week and met the nicest and most caring people. These people will help you get clean if you want it. Please dont give up because your parents dont understand. When you do get clean, look better and start to work, your parents will realize the mistake they made. Living clean has been nothing but a blessing. I have a great wife and two beautiful children, so anything is possible. Twenty Years CleanAnnies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers Monday) UPEND HUMID RATHER ODDEST Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The aliensmaternity ward was located on the MOTHER SHIP Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. SOJIT PORDO MULHEB GLOONB Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags A: SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 28, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 College FootballEntertainment NightChicago Fire The Blacklist Saturday Night LiveNewsSNL # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk Charlie Rose The Lawrence Welk Show G Keeping Up Keeping Up As Time Goes By As Time Goes By Waiting for GodYes, Minister PGGlobe Trekker Greek Islands G % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Lawrence WelkDoc Martin PGMovie PG The National Parks: Americas Best IdeaAustin City Limits ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8College FootballBucs BonusNewsChannel 8Chicago Fire A Problem House The Blacklist Pilot (In Stereo) Saturday Night Live (In Stereo) NewsSaturday Night Live ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 College Football Teams TBA. (N) NewsWheel of Fortune College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10College Football Teams TBA. (N) Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! G To Be AnnouncedTo Be Announced48 Hours (Season Premiere) (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NewsFOX College College Football (N) (In Stereo Live) NewsAnimation Domination High-Def MA 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 College FootballEntertainment NightCollege Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Soul Purpose Telethone < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11College Football Teams TBA. (N) ABC Action News Lets Ask America College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Leverage PG Leverage Tainted food. PG Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) Chow Yun-Fat. PG-13 F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9HouseOperationHealth PaidBloopersBloopersFuturamaFuturamaRing of Honor Wrest.Bones H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PaidBlairJim RaleyLife Center ChurchRabbi MesserPaidGaither HomecomingChosenPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men White Collar Pilot (Part 1) PG White Collar On Guard PG EngagementEngagementThe Arsenio Hall Show O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Ford-Fast Lane School Zone Your Citrus County CourtDa Vincis Inquest (In Stereo) I Spy Y Eye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7Big BangFOXCollege Football (N) (In Stereo Live) NewsAnimation Dom (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Ftbol Mexicano Primera Divisin Sbado Gigante (N) PG (SS) Comed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas (AMC) 55 64 55 Shooter (2007, Suspense) Mark Wahlberg. A wounded sniper plots revenge against those who betrayed him. R Hell on Wheels Fathers and Sins (N) Hell on Wheels Fathers and Sins Breaking Bad Live Free or Die (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedAmericas Cutest (In Stereo) PG Too Cute! Top 20 Puppies PG Too Cute! (In Stereo) PG Treehouse Masters Sky High Spa PG Too Cute! (In Stereo) PG (BET) 96 19 96 Woman Thou Art Loosed: On the 7th Day (2012) Blair Underwood. PG-13 Luv (2012) Common. A boy travels with his shady uncle as the man arranges a drug deal. R The Rosa Parks Story (2002) Angela Bassett. (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/NJHousewives/NJ Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008) RForgetting Sarah Marshall R (CC) 27 61 27 33 Without a Paddle (2004, Comedy) Seth Green, Matthew Lillard. PG-13 Hot Tub Time Machine (2010, Comedy) John Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson. NR Hot Tub Time Machine (2010) John Cusack. NR (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 A League of Their Own (1992) Tom Hanks, Madonna. A womens professional baseball league debuts in 1943. PG Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Dog and Beth: On the Hunt (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidPaidSecretSecretBuried Treasure PGSuze Orman ShowTreasureTreasureBuried Treasure PG (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N)Anderson CooperTo Be Announced Stroumboulopoulos (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G GoodCharlie Jessie G Dog With a Blog G Cars 2 (2011) Voices of Owen Wilson. Premiere. (In Stereo) G Lab Rats Y7 Kickin It Y7 WanderYonder Liv & Maddie (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49FootballScoreCollege Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) ScoreCollege Football Teams TBA. (EWTN) 95 70 95 48LivingThe TableMother Angelica LiveThe War of the Vendee MARosaryA Day at the CouncilCampusLectio (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Cheaper by the Dozen 2 (2005, Comedy) Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. PG Ice Age: The Meltdown (2006, Comedy) Voices of Ray Romano. PG Despicable Me (2010, Comedy) Voices of Steve Carell, Jason Segel. PG (FLIX) 118 170 Autumn in New York (2000) Richard Gere. (In Stereo) PG-13 Beaches (1988, Drama) Bette Midler, John Heard. (In Stereo) PG-13 Twins (1988, Comedy) Arnold Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) PG (FNC) 44 37 44 32Americas News HQFOX Report (N)Huckabee (N)Justice With JeanineGeraldo at Large (N)Red Eye (N) (FOOD) 26 56 26 Food Truck RaceDinersDinersCupcake Wars GCutthroat Kitchen GChopped G Iron Chef America (FS1) 732 112 732 College Football (N) (Live) CollegeSetupNASCAR Racing FOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 BunchMarlinsMLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins. (N) (Live) MarlinsMarlinsCollege Football (FX) 30 60 30 51 The Twilight Saga: New Moon (2009, Romance) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart. Bella must choose between Edward and Jacob. PG-13 AngerLouie (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Web.com Tour Championship, Third Round. Central (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Meet My Mom (2010, Romance) Lori Loughlin, Johnny Messner. Cedar Cove Stormfront (N) G Honeymoon for One (2011, Romance) Nicollette Sheridan. NR Cedar Cove Stormfront G (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Two Weeks Notice (2002) Sandra Bullock. (In Stereo) PG-13 This Is 40 (2012) Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann. Premiere. (In Stereo) R Boxing Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr. vs. Bryan Vera. (N) (In Stereo Live) (HBO2) 303 202 303 Life of Pi (2012) Les Misrables (2012, Musical) Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe. (In Stereo) PG-13 Eastbound For a Good Time, Call... (2012) Ari Graynor. R Treme (In Stereo) MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlLove It or List It, TooLove It or List It GHuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Mountain Men The Final Stand Mountain Men This Is the End To Be Announced To Be Announced (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Girl Fight (2011, Docudrama) Anne Heche, James Tupper, Jodelle Ferland. NR The Cheating Pact (2013, Suspense) Daniela Bobadilla. Premiere. NR Gone Missing (2013, Suspense) Daphne Zuniga, Gage Golightly. NR (LMN) 50 119 Not Easily Broken (2009, Drama) Morris Chestnut. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Perfect Family (2011) Kathleen Turner. (In Stereo) PG-13 Dirty Laundry (2006) Rockmond Dunbar. Premiere. (In Stereo) PG-13 (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Dark Shadows (2012) Johnny Depp. PG-13 The Watch (2012) Ben Stiller. (In Stereo) R Strike Back (In Stereo) MA Con Air (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their flight. R WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

PAGE 25

COMICSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 C7 Pickles Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Baggage Claim (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Battle of the Year (PG-13)In 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)In 3D.1:45 p.m. No passes. Don Jon (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. The Family (R) 1:20 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:40p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 1:05p.m., 4p.m., 7:05p.m., 10 p.m. Prisoners (R) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m. Rush (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 1 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) In 3D.1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m. No passes. Don Jon (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:20p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m. The Family (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Riddick (R) 7:10p.m., 10:05 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Flashback Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO EJ HFNHAE KCUH EJ EYHGE MJB DJJL CT UJJKCTP GT PJNCOD G VBKK RJOE PCE MJB VHAGBTH MJB GYH G XHDHEGYCGO. YJTHGOOH VGYYPrevious Solution: Ive worked in a factory ... I worked in a post office ... I like to think that Im just a regular guy. Denzel Washington (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-28

PAGE 26

C8SATURDAY,SEPTEMBER28,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comToplace an ad, call563-5966Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time ChronicleClassifieds637551 000FUYE 000FUYL Citrus County Chronicle Air Compressor8 gallon, 1.5 HP, $125. (352) 503-9188 ELECTRIC CHAIN SAW McCulloch 2.5 HP, 14 electric chain saw $50 352-628-3899 Power Boss Generator Briggs & straton 10HP eng. Running watts 5250, starting watts 7350 excel. cond. Starts easily. $275. (908) 616-0620 Homosassa Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! Washer & Dryer Maytag-2 washers, 1 dryer.All in good working cond. $300 for all or $125 ea (304) 544-8398 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Condition. Free Delivery, 60 Day Written Guarantee 352 263-7398 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 2 Person Jacuzziwith cover $300 obo (352) 302-2366 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Electric Range, GE, $380. Black flat ceramic with 5 burners, like new Call Walter (352) 527-3552 ELECTRIC STOVE White electric stove price $85.00 Phone 352-860-2858 GAS RANGE Andora5 black GE selfclean convection oven, griddle, power burner $500 OBO 228-4648 GE Space SaverMicrowave very little usage Bisque, $125.(352) 302-9129 GOOD DRYER$100 Works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER$100 works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 HOUSEHOLD FREEZE WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT 2DEEP2WIDE 4.5HIGH $250.00 352-382-0009 JUICE EXTRACTOR Cuisinart brand NEVER USED Great Gift $99. 352-621-0175 Kenmore Refrigerator side by side, thru door ice, 33 wide, White exc. cond. $350. obo (352) 465-9186 MICROWAVE Black Frigidaire over the stove. Looks and works great.Asteal @ $15 352-322-1160 REFRIGERATOR W/ ICE MAKER G.E. WHITE SIDE BYSIDE 2DEEP21.5 WIDE 5HIGH $300.00 352-382-0009 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 DRIVERS-TRACTOR TRAILER DUMP Cypress Truck Lines seeks 5 TT Dump Drivers (150 mile radius) Company Drivers Only *Assigned Tractors *Medical/Dental/Vision*P aid Orientation *Paid Training*6 Paid Holidays. 6 Mo TT Dump Exp & Class A CDL Req! Call 1-888 235-8862 www. cypresstruck.com Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 ReStor e Manager T ruck Driver Donation Pr ocessor Habitat for Humanity is filling 3 positions in Citrus County E-mail request for detailed job description and instructions for submitting to: H4Hr estor e@ yahoo.com No calls or walk-ins MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 1971 Baseball cards, 200 cards $40. 1970 Baseball Cards 200 cards $40 (352) 344-9502 F/T DENTAL FRONT DESKRECEPTIONISTGreat Customer Service, Telephone Skills,Professional Appearance Up Beat Multi Task, Team Player, Good Work Ethics. FAX Resume to 352-628-9199 OR Drop off at office Ledger Dentistry F/T P/T MEDICAL ASSISTANT FRONT DESK RECEPTIONISTFor Primary Care office in Homosassa F AX RESUME T O: 352-628-1120 Medical Assist.Fulltime & Part time Postions Available at busy Podiatry Practice Call (352) 795-2142 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 SURGICAL TECHfor ASC located in Citrus County. Must be certified or eligible. Flexible scheduling-excellent pay. FULL OR POOL POSITIONS. No weekends or call. Fax Resume to: 352-527-1827 TWO MEDICAL ASSISTANTSFax resume to: 352-746-5784 REAL ESTATE AGENTFor Property Management FAX: Resume to 352-795-1667 CALL: 352-302-8088 email: action.rental @yahoo.com walk-ins are welcome Action Rental Management Realty SERVERSMust be experienced in Fine dining with Bar knowledge.All others need not apply. Must pass drug and background.Ap ply Tue.-Fri.10am-4pm at Sugarmill Woods Ctry. Club, 1 Douglas St LAWN TECHExp. preferred, but not neccessry. APPL Y IN PERSON 3447 E. Gulf to lake Hwy. Inverness TELEMARKETERSExp. Only. Write your own Paycheck, Call Brandon 503-6807 AC SERVICE TECH/INSTALLERSTop Pay, Benefits, Sign on bonus. 40+ Hrs. must have EPA Cert. & Dri. Lic. Call (352) 628-5700 ELECTRICIANSRESIDENTIALNEW CONSTRUCTION Exp. preferred. Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service. Full benefits, paid holidays & vacation /EOE APPLY AT: Exceptional Electric 4042 CR 124A Wildwood Exp. HelperforHandyman Service (352) 746-3777 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5388 TEACHERExp. Req. CDAPref. TADPOLES EARLYLEARNING (352) 560-4222 WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for employment.Childcare work exp. required Apply M-F,12pm-2pm No Phone Calls. Experienced Legal Secretary /BookkeeperPart time Mon.-Thurs Family law and probate. Experience in Wordperfect and Quickbooks .Send Resume to: amackerell@ live.com EXPD. BARBERFor Busy Shop. high comm. call George at (352) 344-1881 after 5pm 228-7592 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Busy Medical Practice Seeks1. Experienced Paramedic/LPN/ Medical Asst. 2. Check In/Out Front Desk 3. Cat Scan Tech. Experience is a must Competitive Pay/ Benefits. References Preferred call for immediate response 352-586-0632 or email: tawfik. eihab@gmail.com DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com 2 Red Dobermans 1 male, 1 female, traveling, Inverness N. Highlands Near Dawson REWARD (352) 344-2232 CAT female,1 yr. old, gray, medium hair. Missing in the Vicinity of Red Rose off Apopka in the Highlands, has been micro-chipped (352) 445-0747 Lost 2 Hand Trucks, fell from Potato Chip Truck Crystal River area Need desperately for work. (352) 637-0188 Lost Cat gray with white markings, black spot on nose, Near Rockcrusher Canyon RV Park 607-434-0328 Lost hummingbird gps/fishfinder model 597ci hd by hwy 44 e boatramp in inverness if found call 726-0257 or 476-7047 Lost Lab Coonhound Mix, Puppy 10 wks old Mini Farms Area (352) 246-7557 Lost Male Beagle Tri color, Name Brason Pine Ridge Area Sacramento Rd (352) 364-1385 (352) 287-2121 Lost Quaker Bird Green, Citrus Hills around Sept. 20th (352) 302-6710 Missing 9/8/13 JoJo Tri colored beagle. Missing from N. Lee Street Beverly Hills. 40 lb neutered male. JoJo is a special needs pet. We miss him terribly. Microchipped. Please call Donna at 352 249 3107 or e-mail hillsdonnar@aol.com Missing 9/8/13 Tri-Colored Beagle 40 Lbs. Special needs pet. Name: JoJo. Please help JoJo to come home. He is terribly missed. Last seen on N. Lee Street, Beverly Hills at 10:30 pm. Please call 352-249-3107. Reward Found Set of Keys Around august 30th Beverly Hills Come to house Identify Keys 230 S. Harrison St FOUND Silver Mongoose Bicycle w/whitewall tires, found in my garden! (352) 400-6100 HOWARDS FLEAMARKETIS HOSTING SA T SEPT 28, 9 2p MUSTANGAUTO SHOW Nature Coast Mustang Club will be bringing Ford Mustangs from Past to Present, if you have a Mustang Come Out and Show It. If you have mustang parts come out and sell For Information Call (352) 628-4656 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 Todays New Ads CRYSTAL RIVERSaturday, 28th, 9am-? 1526 N Rock Cress Pth HAVANESE PUPPIES 9 wks. Champ. Bld. Lines, Non Shedding 3 males, black & white, shots, Wormed $650. OBO 613-5818 INVERNESSBeautifully Remodeled on golf course, 2/2/2 $850. 352-895-0744 INVERNESSTsala Gardens E Shore Dr 7586, 7615, 7616, 7686 & 1810 Mandarin Kids,yard,fishing,bikes, tools,home Sat 8-1 352-560-0191 Kenmore Refrigerator side by side, thru door ice, 33 wide, White exc. cond. $350. obo (352) 465-9186 LECANTO1/1, off Hwy 44 between 491 & Croft Rd. Recent Remodel, quiet area $450/mo. $250 sec. (352) 302-6551 Microwave Oven $50. (352) 628-4254 TOYOTA, Avalon, Limited 49k mi., excell shape, garage kept. $15,500 Call (352) 634-0101 Wicker Patio Set 2 chairs, cushions, ottoman & glass top table $175. obo Leather wing back chair burgundy $175. obo, Excel. cond. 352-586-3380 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest UPull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 6 Roosters Rhode Isl. Reds 6, 5 months old (352) 621-3929 Free Cedar Trees perfect shape, approx. 20ft tall,You dig, remove and haul call between 8am & 8pm (352) 249-7812 FREE Cut Fire Wood Dried Oak Easy Access (352) 419-6067 Free Kittens Gray Tabby 8 wks old, litter trained 352-212-0667 Free to good Home 4 Kittens, 2 males, 2 females, 8 wks (352) 777-1256 Manure. Bring your bucket, trailer or truck. 352-513-5400 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5388 To the girl I met in Publixs on 9/18 in Homosassa Springs, wearing a white jacket. I would like to get to know you. Call me anytime. 422-0440 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads 2 Patio Lounge Chairs & Cushions $25. ea Glass toptable & 2 chair $50 (352) 621-0778 97 Club Car w/lights, 48v, back seat, batteries. exc. cond. $2000. (352)527-3125 Bass Tracker17, 50 hsp. Mercury w/tilt, includes trailer, trolling motor, $1500. (352) 560-0068 CRYSTAL RIVERSat. 28, & Sun. 29, 7am Electronics, craft supply MISC. Household 8621 N. Buscetta Lp Citrus Ave. to Basilico St., turn West CRYSTALRIVERSUPERYARD SALE Saturday 28, 8am-? 6046 W. Woodside Cir, Dinning Room Set $200. obo Server $150. obo Both Dark wood Excellent condition 352-586-3380 Exp. HelperforHandyman Service (352) 746-3777 Garden Tractor, Murray Heavy Duty 18.5 HPV-T win 46 inch cut $400. (352) 507-1490 Golf Cartexc. condition, has headlights exc. batteries w/ charger $1500. (352) 527-3125

PAGE 27

SATURDAY,SEPTEMBER28,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Home Maintenance Repairs/Painting/Power Washing, Quality work at affordable prices Ref avail 573-723-2881 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards GROUND CONTROL Lawn Service Pressure washing Ken 352-316-1571 kenheffley2@gmail.com Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Andersen HandyMan Home Repairs, Lawn Care. Cheaper Prices 352-453-6005 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 A+ CLEANING Res/Com. 27 yrs exp. Lic/ bonded, client focused 386-717-2929 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 CLEANING BY PENNY Residential Only Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. Call 352-476-3820 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 BILL TRIPP FENCE All Types of Fence Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096 (352) 425-4365 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-W ALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690. 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com 000FUYN BOXER STUD AKC WANTED. Must be tall, Email: Belladonnahay @yahoo.com COCKER SPANIELS 4 Males, 2 Females w/ papers. 8 weeks old Blonde & white $800 (352) 287-0519 CYRILCyril, 1 y.o. Hound mix, found as stray, beautiful red-brown coat, wt. 42 lbs. Easy to walk, gets along w/other dogs. Appears to be housebroken, healthy. Affectionate & friendly. Good companion. # 20807791. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 DojhaDojha, approx. 3 y.o., a yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, came to shelter because family lost their home & could not keep him. Gentle, easy-going, gets along w/other dogs, beautiful in color, great shape. Pen #25. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment BAILEYBailey, Chespeake Bay hound mix, 2 y.o., HW-negative, wt. 39 lbs. Sits on command, loves treats, walks well on leash, good w/other dogs, attentive to human friends. Obeys well, wants to please. # 20731619. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Golf Cartexc. condition, has headlights exc. batteries w/ charger $1500. (352) 527-3125 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 2013 Enclosed Trailer, 5x8, v-nose, w/ramp door, $1600. firm (352) 513-5436 Utility Trailer 6 x 9 x 2 ft. wood/steel. frame $250. obo (352) 465-3086 COSTUME JEWELRY5 necklaces, 1 pair earrings, nice, all for ($15) 352-613-7493 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR BEAUTIFUL PURE WHITE W/TURQUOISE TRIM $100 352-601-6625 NEW EDEN 20W BASSAMP LIGHTWEIGHT(UNDER 15LBS)AND POWERFUL! $85 352-601-6625 NEW FENDER SQUIRE JAGUAR SS BASS METALLIC RED&BLACK,$100 352-601-6625 NEW OSCAR SCHMIDTACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR W/GIGBAG&CORD,HI&LO W Z INPUTS $150 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC CUTAWAY GUITAR W/STAND OR WALLHANGER,$80 352-601-6625 NEWCRATE FLEX WAVEAMP W/REVERB& OVERDRIVE,12SPEAKER $90 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC ASTYLE MANDOLIN PLAYS&SOUNDS GREAT $50 352-601-6625 BLACK LES PAUL SPECIALII W/GIGBAG,CORD,STAND& WALLHANGER $100 352-601-6625 ELECTRONIC PIANO Yamaha portable piano. Good condition,36x13 $35 352-628-3899 GUITAR AMP Peavey Valve King Half Stack Tube Amp Like New, $700. obo (352) 860-1195 LYON BYWASHBURN NYLON STRING GUITAR, EASYTO PLAY,MELLOW TONE $30 352-601-6625 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 STRAT STYLE BASS UKE ELECTRIC POLY STRINGS, PIEZO WHITE ON WHITE $75 352-601-6625 STUDENT?NEW CLASSICALGUITAR BYWASHBURN W/GIGBAG&BOOK/CD $40 352-601-6625 CHANDELIER Beautiful, large antique looking. Paid $400, moved & must sell. $75.00 352-322-1160 MIXER Westinghouse White LIKE NEW Hand or counter top $15. 352-621-0175 Air Bike 950 Like New $35. ExerciseAB Lounge Spout, with manuals $35. (352) 621-0778 Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $225. 352-382-5208 TREADMILL, Prosport 285TWalk to fitness,,digital all speed /flat/slant.Good condition. $100.00 897-5410 97 Club Car w/lights, 48v, back seat, batteries. exc. cond. $2000. (352)527-3125 DEEPSEAROD & REEL-6-1/2ft Rod, PENN 320 GTi Reel, nice condition, $60. 352-628-0033 Designer Jackets, leather W 2 & 3X, New, $80 ea Ren. Chest Set, Must See $1,200 352-465-3086 DESK large wooden for computer with drawers $20.00 352 6372499 DOG CARRIER NYLON & mesh zipper bag. Small size pet. BRAND NEW ONLY$20. 352-621-0175 DOG CARRIER X LARGE plastic airline type. Clean Excellent Condition $45. 352-270-3909 DOG STEPS BRAND NEW by Petmate Brn/Beige Plastic 19H X 12 W $25.(cost $55.) 352-621-0175 EMBROIDERYHOOP 4X4 Brother, fits many machines. new-still in package 352-613-5240 $40.00 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5388 Girls winter clothing 4 JEANS 1 pants 5 shirts 2 pajama sets size 14/16 2 hoodies $60 352-613-0529 HOMELITE ELECTRIC POLE CHAIN SAW-8ft length, 8 inch cut, works great, $45. 352-628-0033 Industrial Grill 2 tanks, many extras $300. Kitchen aid 5 quart mixer, $175. (352) 503-9188 Kitchen Aid Mixer New $275. Tiffany style Lamps 3 large $70 ea. 352-465-3086 Large Dog Crate 26 x 36, black wire $35. (352) 382-1000 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 Life StriderArm & Leg Exceriser bike w/ monitor $65 Oak & Glass cabinet, w/ 3 oak & glass drs 24x38 $40. 352-794-3907 MANS BIKE MAGNAEXCITOR 26 alum. frame 7 speed..$38.00 352-637-2499 PETTAXI Reduced, excel. cond. $20.00, L-23,W-14,H-13 352-513-4027 PICTURE FRAMES 4 nice large frames, all for ($10) 352-613-7493 REGULATION SIZE POOLTABLE 1 slate in good shape but may want to put a new felt on it $200.00. Citrus County. 401-440-8922 SAIL SHADE-REDUCED Reduced-$65.00,Triangle-11/11/11 352-513-4027 SEARS GAS LAWN EDGER 3 1/2 HP Excellent cond. $75.00 352-746-4160 SIX CEILING FANS. 4 Brass 52, 1 brass 30, 1 white 42. $10 ea. 527-1239 SONYDIGITALVIDEO CAMERA/RECORDER AllAcessories Like new.$100.00 352-746-4160 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 Two Copy Printers $25 to $75 352-634-4329 Diabetic Shoes, Beige, Womens Size 8, Medium width, never worn, $80 (352) 522-0107 BOOTS ladies size 7 tan work, size 7 1/2 black dress, nice, both for ($10) 352-613-7493 Boys winter clothing size 5/6 4 pants 7 shirts & 2 lightweight jackets $45 352-613-0529 CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION SIZE 5/6 $8 EACH 352-613-0529 JEANS 2 pair, size 10 womens,embroidered, blue, 1 daises, 1 roses, new, both for ($25) 352-613-7493 MENS 2 PIECE SUITS SIZE 36X30 & 34X30 $25 EACH 352-613-0529 NECKLACE s/s, biker-chick style, engravable heart, new, paid $150, sacrifice for ($40) 352-613-7493 PURPLE CLOTHES 20 pieces of dresses, pants, top set, blouses. Size 12 to 18 $100.00 897-5410 WHITE STAG PANTS SUITTropical colors, red, background &flowers. ex. Large ,$5.oo, 897-5410 1 Full Size Bed Complete, mattress frame $125. Washing Machine $50. No calls before 11am (352) 628-4766 18 to 20 SPEAKERS 6 to 8 Commercial w/ switches & Hardware $250. obo for all (352) 249-3259 20 Chairs for Daycare $80.00 BabyAccessories $120.00 (352) 795-7254 180 Gallon Fish Tank solid wood base includes top and filter up and running with fish $1,000 obo (352) 302-9845 Above Ground Pool, 24 ft. up and runningpump, filter, ladder, very good cond. $500. You must remove 352-212-6433 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BAR STOOLSTwo swivel, solid light wood w/back.A++ Cond. $45.00 for both. 352-513-4027 BASSETT MATTRESS Twin bed size like new no stains. $35.00 obo 352 621 0248 BEAR WHITETAILII COMPOUND BOWRH, Bear Sight, 5 settings, needs pull string, $20 352-628-0033 BLINDS 4WIDE Vinyl porch beige color Good condition (six) $6.00 each 352-621-0175 BLOOD SUGAR MONITOR Bayer, new, with case and strips, ($5) 352-613-7493 Boys winter clothing 6 outfits 1 size 4t 4 size 5t 1 size 6 & 1 pajama set size 5t $35 352-613-0529 CAGES&CRATES-ferret$ 10,Bunny$3,Yorkie$10,Sheltie$ 5,$8&$10 352-586-2582 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 COASTALHORSE HAY. 12 Bales. $60.00 takes all. 352-513-5400 Craft Items $300 value for $150. assorted 352-746-4613 CITRUS HILLS1873 W. REDDING ST SAT ONLY7:30-? MULTI FAMILYSALE CITRUS HILLS250 E. Hartford Stre Thurs. & Fri. 8a-5p Saturday 8a-3pLADIES!!WE ARE BACK with ALL Sizes, 99% New & Home Acces., MISC. Furniture & More! Citrus SpringsFri, Sat 9/29 & 9/28 8am to 1pm Body by Jake equip, AB coaster, new sml tiller, hshld items, tools & garden equip, kitchen appl, etc.. 7861 N Cricket Dr. CRYSTALRIVERCraft Bazaar & Bake Sale at CR Church of God, 2180 NW 12th Ave, Fri 9-7 and Sat 9-5, FreeAdmission CRYSTAL RIVERFri. 27, & Sat. 28, 8a-? VARITY OF ITEMS 9875 W. Orchard St,. Behind Mall CRYSTAL RIVERSat. & Sun. 9a-until ESTATE SALE 10% to Salvation Army 9090 W. Ft. Island Trl. on Country Clb. Dr. CRYSTAL RIVERSat. & Sun. 9a-until ESTATE SALE 10% to Salvation Army 9090 W. Ft. Island Trl. on Country Clb. Dr. CRYSTAL RIVERSat. 28, & Sun. 29, 7am Electronics, craft supply MISC. Household 8621 N. Buscetta Lp Citrus Ave. to Basilico St., turn West CRYSTAL RIVERSaturday, 28th, 9am-? 1526 N Rock Cress Pth CRYSTALRIVERSUPERYARD SALE Saturday 28, 8am-? 6046 W. Woodside Cir, HOMOSASSARiverhaven, 4547 S Sawgrass Cir, Fri-Sat 8am-11am, Kayak/Paddle, Bike, Bike Rack, Fishing gear,Boat, Household items. INVERNESSTsala Gardens E Shore Dr 7586, 7615, 7616, 7686 & 1810 Mandarin Kids,yard,fishing,bikes, tools,home Sat 8-1 352-560-0191 LECANTO Side Walk Sale Saturday 9am-5pm, HomeAgain Resale Store 1980 N. Future Terr.(486 across form Chevron) MOVING SALE Fri, Sat, Sun, 27, 28, 29 9am to 3pm quality furn, misc. 2372 S Sandburg Pt. WILDWOODHiz & Herz Stop& Shop 11-6p, closed Wed 25% off: Tools, antiques, collectibles, furniture, clothing, art work and much more! 400 E Gulf Atlantic Hwy (4 bldgs E of 301 on SR 44) Wildwood MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 4 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R $10 EACH 352-613-0529 Din. Rm. Set, Broyhill, Table 4 padded chairs, black lacquer w/ side table MUST SEE $250. (352) 465-2237 Dining Room Set w/Hutch beveled glass, lighted cabinet $400. 352) 628-4254 Dinning Room Set $200. obo Server $150. obo Both Dark wood Excellent condition 352-586-3380 FURNITURE DOLLY, ETC. 2 & 4 wheel with base. Pneumatic tires. $25.00 352-746-4160 HOOKER ENTERTAINMENTCENTER Oak with (2)22 inch sides, center that expands from 45-60 inches. Medium brown $300 OBO 352-382-3387 KITCHEN SET, 45 Beveled glass top, white base, 4 swivel cushion chairs, on casters, Excel. Cond. $200. (352) 465-2237 Leave Message NICE CHINACABINET! $100 Firm Very nice 2 glass doors 2 cabinets 3 drawers 352-302-7214 Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress, & Box Spring Like New Antique white chest, matching head board & night Stand, mattress cover, matching bed spread & draperies. $325. (352) 465-2709 Recliner & Loveseat recliner, end table & 1 coffee table, microfiber, color sage, electric auto recliner w/ battery backup $650. (352) 860-0158 Sectional Couch w/ queen hide a bed and recliner built in Good Condition $175. obo (352) 302-9129 TVTABLE/CONSOLE Cherry wood 48L21w 20h 2 cabinets/2 shelves Good Condition $45. 352-621-0175 Wicker Patio Set 2 chairs, cushions, ottoman & glass top table $175. obo Leather wing back chair burgundy $175. obo, Excel. cond. 352-586-3380 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 CRAFTSMAN 33 Walk behind. Brand New, Never Used $800. obo 352-613-8453 Garden Tractor, Murray Heavy Duty 18.5 HPV-Twin 46 inch cut $400. (352) 507-1490 Sears LT 2000 Riding Mower 5 yrs. old low hrs. 19.5 HP, 42 cut $400.(352) 507-1490 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 2 Very Large Staghorn Ferns$100 ea (352) 489-6212 BEVERLYHILLSESTATE SALE 216 w. hollyfern Sat. Sept. 28th 7-1 & Sun. Sept. 29th 8-1 BEVERLYHILLSOUR LADYOF GRACE CHURCH FLEAMARKET SA T OCT 5TH 8AM to 1PM.6 Roosevelt Blvd BEVERLY HILLSSat. 9/28, 9a-4p End of Summer Sale 31 S. Wadsworth Ave. TWO WHEELMOVING CARTTwo wheel moving cart. $15 352-628-3899 ANTENNAradio shack amplified digitalTV/FM, great shape ($10) 352-212-1596 BLU-RAYPLAYER Samsung BD-P1500 Blu-ray player. Excellent Condition. $20 352 3822591 SANYO 20 TV Older type model. Great picture and sound. $35. 352-621-0175 TV 55projection TV on wheels works fine $25.00 w/remote. DVD player $10 w/remote. 352-586-2582 LIGHTBULBS flourescantT40, new, total of 9, all for ($5) 352-212-1596 CAMERAPanasonic Lumix Camera FH20 w/extra battery-like new, $30 Call 352 3822591 CAMERATRIPOD Velbon VE-3 Camera Tripod VG condition $15 352-382-2591 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HP 15.4, LAPTOP DVD writer, $180 DELL DESK TOP P4, HT Lcd monitor, DVD + RW $150 352-628-6806 WIFI RANGE EXTENDER amped REC10 wireless range extender 600 mW Like new $40 352-382-2591 2 Patio Lounge Chairs & Cushions $25. ea Glass toptable & 2 chair $50 (352) 621-0778 9 Piece Patio Furniture PVC 72 table, 4 chairs, 2 reclining chairs, 2 ottomans, w/cushions, $200. obo (352) 274-1940 Patio Recliner Tan La-z-boy, like new $140 (352) 564-8605 PATIOTABLE Glass top 5x 38 & 4 beige chairs Like New $75. 352-270-3909 2 Bedroom Sets King & Queen Table & chairs Like New $250 ea. (352) 634-1489 6LEATHER COUCH 2 end tables, 1 coffee table, $250. (352) 419-6782 Bedroom Set, Double whitewash $350. Dinette Set, 4 chairs w/coasters $350. Very Good Cond. (352) 628-4254 CHAIRS 5light oak chairs with padded seats on casters $100 (352) 419-6383 COMPUTER DESK Black. 29H 18D 41W. Storage area w/door, keyboard tray. Good cond. $35. 527-1239 COUCH Brown & Gold, curved, two matching ottermans. 1 yr old $400 (352) 527-4247 Dining Room Set Thomasville, Cherry Table, 6 chairs, 2 ext, new $2900, China Base & Deck w/ glass shelves, new $2595, Moving-W ill sacrifice both for $1500 cash, obo (352) 513-4516

PAGE 28

C10SATURDAY,SEPTEMBER28,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 000G4OA 000FUYB Timberlane Estates! 3/2/2, w/ screen pool, Located on 1 AC 2690 W. Express Lane $139,000 Call Gwen 795-1520 or 634-1725 Citrus Hills 3/2/2 caged pool, 1 acre, great neighborhood, call for details (352) 746-6552 2 BR, 2BA Den, lanai, Scrnd heated pool, Cen. AC, poll barn, 1 AC, fenced, well, many extras. By Appt. $129,900 firm (352) 444-2371 or (352) 586-7602 117 S Lunar Terrace2 bedroom. 2 bath. c/h/a,Totally Updated! Block home, Clean, Over-sized Garage, W/Carport. $79,500 Negotiable Call 352-344-9290 3/1, fenced yard, corner lot. Needs some repairs. As is $39,500 Negotiable 2081 W Gardenia Dr (352) 465-0623 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me BEVERLYHILLS 324 S Monroe. Sunday 12-3p Completely Remodeled Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2 ba, 2 gar. NEW: Roof, kitchen w/stainless, baths, flooring etc. $79k. 527-1239 211 Northeast 4th Street, Chiefland, FL BANK OWNED ABSOLUTEAUCTION 6,400+/-SF of space in 2 Buildings on 1.16 Acres. One vacant single family home and a second bldg. used as a daycare facility. Inspect: Sept. 30th @ 11AM OnsiteAuction with Webcast bidding on October 2nd @ 3 PM Local contact: Julian Howell, 877-980-9565. More info at www.auctionEbid.com FLBKR#CQ1029847 Auction MGMTCorp. Jeb@auctionEbid.com HERNANDO1000+ sf.of office space. Heat/Elec incld, ample pkg $750 (352) 726-3339 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BLACK DIAMONDLovely 2400SF home 3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for the golf cart. $1200 month plus security.(352) 464-3905 CRYSTAL RIVER2-3 BR $200-$250/mo 552-2637, 527-6566 CRYSTAL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 Homosassa Spg2/2 on Canal, new paint, flooring, w/d, pets ok $800 mthly, 8928 W. White Dogwood Dr. 619-301-5442 INVERNESS3/2/2 Starting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-403-4646 or 352-403-4648 INVERNESSBeautifully Remodeled on golf course, 2/2/2 $850. 352-895-0744 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 NearAnna Jo Rd.By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM CRYSTAL RIVER1/1, Apt. Waterfront $650. mo. 1st sec. Inclds dock, water, trash. No pets. 772-240-6180 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 Inverness2/1 Fla rm clean quiet fishing dock, $450. 860-2452, 201-4559 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 INVERNESSRoom for rent, prv. bath $350., 613-9135 Crystal RiverFurn. Apt Seasonal 2/1, clean, w/d (352) 563-2626 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE BEVERLYHILLS1 Room Efficiency + Kitchen,All Utilities, Cable incld. $525/mo Pet ok 352-228-2644 CRYSTAL RIVERKitchen Appl, furn, 1137 N.E. 3rd. Ave. Apt 3, Near CR Primary, Middle, High School 352-795-3006 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 CRYSTAL RIVERQuiet, 1/1, $425. mo. (352) 628-2815 HOMOSASSA2/1 Pool, Garb., maint. Incl., peaceful No pets, $600. plus mo.628-6700 HOMOSASSA2/2, clean, quiet, centr location $550., 352563-2114, 257-6461 CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apts. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 CRYSTALRIVER2/1, Unfurn.$550, Furn. $600.+sec clean, quite. Small Pet 828 5th Ave. NE. 727-455-8998 727-343-3965 CRYSTALRIVERBUSINESS. LOC. FOR RENTHwy 19 Downtown exec. location,1000 sf Very Clean remodeled 352-634-2528 Sugarmill Woods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 CHASSAHOWITZKA 3/2 w/ carport, 3 storage shed $85,900. Agent (352) 382-1000 TAYLOR MADE HOMESLOT MODEL BLOWOUT All Homes Discounted $4,000 to $8,000 Even up to $12.000 off Sticker Price Call 352-621-3807 BEAUTIFUL D/W 3/2 with porch & deck. Wynnhaven is a 55 plus park. Owner is very motivated and will consider all offers. Priced at $45,000. Call Willard Pickrel at J.W. Morton Real Estate for full details. 352-726-6668 or 352-201-9871. Doublewide, 2 BR, 2BA, Recent shingle roof New AC, MUCH MORE 55+ Park $15,500 (352) 634-0274 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $17,900 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $245 mo, incl water, sewer, trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000G72W www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com CRYSTAL RIVER 10941 W.Gem St. . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 Large duplex close to hospital 9660 W.Camphor Ln. . . . . . . . . $8003/2/2 Clean home on corner lot 16 Beach Ln. #102 . . . . . . . . . $9001/1 Furnished studio apartmentBEVERLY HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO 2150 Austin Dr. (CS) . . . . . . . . $5502/1.5 Cute home, some furniture, fenced yard 2332 W.Silverhill Ln. (L) . . . . . $5502/1 Affordable apartment, ground floor 9047 N. Travis Dr. (CS) . . . . . . . $6252/2 Roomy duplex, neat and cleanHOMOSASSA 4800 S. Wood Way . . . . . . . . . $9003/2/1 Riverhaven, fully furnished 11701 Clearwater Ct. . . . . . . . $1000 2/2 Waterfront mobile home INVERNESS 1314 Cypress Cove (Inv) . . . . . $6502/2, Waterfront townhouse, screen porch FLORALCITY1/1, $450/Mo. $400/ Sec. Includes Cable septic water, trash. No pets. (352) 344-5628 HOMOSASSA2/1, $500 mo., 1st, last, 352-628-2678 INVERNESSSW 2/1, Great Location, all new inside, wtr. Incl. $550 mo 1st & Sec. (352) 464-1169 LECANTO1/1, off Hwy 44 between 491 & Croft Rd. Recent Remodel, quiet area $450/mo. $250 sec. (352) 302-6551 LECANTO2/2, Doublewide $575. (352) 212-9682 7677 West Chassahowitzka St. 2BD, 2BA, Mobile Detached Garage Scrn. porch, lease or Sale, $2,000 down $732. mo. 877-499-8065 $11,094, DISCOUNT New Jacobsen, 2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA yr. Warranty. No down payment, use land or trade in. Payment only, $471.18 P & I, WAC Call 352-621-9182 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 BAD CREDIT? FORECLOSURE? BANKRUPTCY? Want your own home? I can help!! 35% down cash or land and you are approved. No gimmick, 386-546-5833 Singing Forest 46 2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile Home, fixer upper, $6000. 352-344-1365 Tired of Renting? Super clean 2004 3BR/2BA, on acre ready to move in!!! $3,500 down, $380.03/mo. W.A.C. Call 386-546-5833 for details Wont last! USED HOMESSingle, Double & Triple Wides Starting at $6,500 Call (352) 621-9183 2011 Live Oak 4BR/2BA $46,900, 28x60 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 HAVANESE PUPPIES 9 wks. Champ. Bld. Lines, Non Shedding 3 males, black & white, shots, Wormed $650. OBO, 613-5818 OZZIEOzzie, a 2-y.o. neutered Black Mouth Cur mix, handsome boy, wt. 61 lbs, a little bit shy, good with kids, good with cats, should be the only dog. Walks well on leash, needs fenced yard to run in. Housebroken. Call Brenda @ 352-746-1423. Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male $300 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS,Available RegisteredLots of Colors Males start @ $400. Females start @ $600. Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 SIMONwell-mannered retriever mix, 3 y.o. Sits, gives his paw, goes down for treats, takes gently. Walks well on leash, behaves in public places. High energy, likes to run & play, plays catch, plays in pool. Good w/most dogs. Call Christina @ 352-464-3908. BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details!

PAGE 29

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 C11 352.527.0979 | 352.527.0129 *Savings on cars & trucks are based on Kelley Bluebook, payments, W.A.C with tax, tag & title. Now $4988 Was$5999 Now $5999 Was$6499 Now $3988 Was$5499 Now $7888 Was$9999 4 doors, low miles, loadedNow $10,793 SAVE$3069 Low Miles...Liike a RockNow $13,888 SAVE$3125 Designed for work and to playNow $13,699 SAVE$1890 only 24k miles! a rare gemReducd $12,995 SAVE$2100 this is a low mile must see beautyNow $13,973 SAVE$2675 half the price it is new low milesNow $19,883 SAVE$4100 thats right this one has it all!Now $16,834 SAVE$4200 only 48k miles a beauty!Reduced $17,993 SAVE$2780 Now $3995 Was$5999 Reduced $10,993 Was$11,995 Now $4995 Was$4999 Now $4888 Was$5499 Now $3995 Was$4999 Now $13,999 Was$15,999 Now $1299 Was$2999 Now $23,999 Was$26,999 Immaculate and low miles.Now $2995 SAVE$1200 The original and still number one in minivansNow $9995 SAVE$2200 Low Miles, great on gasNow $7995 SAVE$2650 Moms Taxi to the extreme!Reduced $7995 SAVE$3311 leather, loaded ,roofNow $9995 loaded to the gillsNow $10,750 SAVE$1936 absolutely gorgeousNow $9995 SAVE$2640 Now $10,995 SAVE$1820 SAVE$2790

PAGE 30

C12SATURDAY,SEPTEMBER28,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 246-0921 SACRN 9/30 Shade Meeting-Attny/Client Session PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in a SPECIAL SHADE meeting for the purpose of commencing an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes, on Monday, September 30, 2013, at 12:00 Noon in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to discuss global settlement issues of all pending litigation between Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc, and the Citrus County Hospital Board, a political body of the State of Florida. Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and subsequently commence the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION which is estimated to be approximately one (1) hour in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION, the meeting shall be reopened to the public. Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows: V. Alugubelli, M.D., Joseph Brannen, Sandra Chadwick, Robert Collins, Carlton Fairbanks, DMD, David Langer, James Sanders, V. Reddy, M.D., Ryan Beaty, Chief Executive Officer, Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., Richard Oliver, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., and Court Reporter. There will also be a SPECIAL meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., held on Monday, September 30, 2013, immediately following the SPECIAL SHADE meeting, in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, to discuss: Sale/lease/affiliation of the hospital Other Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. September 28, 2013. 923-1003 THCRN PUBLIC NOTICE Reese Jr., John D. 2013-CA-000629 NOS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, INAND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-CA-000629 DRUMMOND COMMUNITYBANK a Florida Banking Corporation, as successor in interest to PERKINS STATE BANK Plaintiff, vs. JOHN D. REESE, JR ., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000629 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of Court, Angela Vick, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale on October 17, 2013, at 10:00 am at www.citrus.realforeclose.com the following described property: The South of the South of the West of the North of the SE of the SW of Section 16, Township 17 South Range 17 East, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida. And The West of the South of the SE of the SW of Section 16, Township 17 South, Range 17 East, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida. LESS and EXCEPT the South 361.5 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH a 1985 MANS mobile home ID #3B48M41749A& 3B48M41749B. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Attention: Persons with Disabilities If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator for the Courts within 2 working days of your receipt of your notice to appear in court at: Citrus County, John Sullivan, (352) 341-6700. By:/s/ Norm D. Fugate,Florida Bar Number: 0044458, NORM D. FUGATE, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff Post Office Box 98, Williston, FL32696, Phone: 352 528-0019, Fax: 352 528-4919 E-Mail: norm@normdfugatepa.com, Secondary E-Mail: celia@normdfugatepa.com September 28 & October 3, 2012. 000FZP7 000G7KGAAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768 aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@embarqmail.com XTREME $ 5,000Boat, motor, trailer, all aluminum, 1442River Skiff w/15hp electric start THREE RIVERS MARINE1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510QWEST COMPACT PONTOONSNow Available! From 14 to 20000G7JX Yamaha & Honda Powered Easily Trailered w/Most Small Cars SUVs I N S T O C K IN STOCK 2014 XCURSION X23RFC TRITOONCRYSTAL RIVER MARINE990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597000G7K2 TOP QUALIT Y PLUS PERFORMANCE Fuel efficient Yamaha F150 EFI Four Stroke 2013 XCURSION X19F FISH MODEL PONTOONCRYSTAL RIVER MARINE990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597000G7K9 Honda BF75 EFI Four Stroke 4 Fishing SeatsCALL FOR CL OSEOUT PRICING 2013 XCURSION X19F FISH MODEL PONTOON Honda BF75 EFI Four Stroke Deluxe Helm Console 4 Fishing Seats Lifetime Chassis Warranty (Deck, Cross Members, Tubes, Rails & Transom)CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597000G7KA 000G8CE THE CITRUS KIA INSERT CONTAINS SOME VEHICLES OWNED BY THESE LOCAL DEALERS: CLARIFICATION NOTICEbtntbfrfb fntfnfn nfft nf tnr nnttnntbffbt CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment Harley Davidson2011 FLTRU Road Glide Ultra loaded cruise, cd, cb,intercom, abs, anti theif,6 speed, and 103cc motor. only 5886 miles $19,000 (352)212-4101 HARLEYDAVIDSON2012 FLHTCUTG Tri Glide Ultra Classic AMFM/CD/AUX w/speakers; CC, Fairing Full,Alarm,Travel trunk w/rack, stage 2 screaming eagle high performance exhaust & pipes; ABS brakes, extra chrome accents. Excellent condition w/only 1250 mi. First $28.5K. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630. Harley DavidsonRoad King, 2006 1450cc,32k,exc.cond. asking $12,500. (352) 503-7057 HONDA1985 Shadow 500 CC good condition asking $1200.00 352-637-3254 HONDA2007 VTX 1300C Original owner, purchased brand new, low mileage (2,371 miles). Caf windshield, removable saddlebags, light-bar. Black & chrome. Showroom condition (mint). Asking a firm $5,050.00 Please contact owner\seller via Email: selfor@aol.com Phone: (352)382-4422 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $7700. (352) 465-3086 FORD1992 Flairside 4x4, 302, red, 4 lift traction bar, chrome brush guard, steps & bedrail. A beauty in & out. $5,500 (352) 344-8089 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB SV 20122012 Frontier CC SV: This white Nissan Frontier Crew Cab SV is in excellent condition with only 8,500 miles. It has cruise control, power windows/door locks/outside mirrors. It has a factory installed bed liner and I added a vinyl tri-fold bed cover and trailer hitch.The truck is in perfect condition with a full factory warranty.The asking price is $21,900. Phone: 352-601-1319 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 5 spd $3,994. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 SOLDDodgeRam Charger, 1987 4x4, w/new engine SUZUKI2002, XL7 4X4 Absolutely mint condition, the air will freeze you out! This is a must see and great on gas! $4800 O.B.O Call john386-264-0 274 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 GMC1986 SIERRA 1500 LONG BED LOOKS GREAT, RUNS GREAT! GOOD OLE STANDBY TRUCK..$3500 O.B.O CALL JOHN 386-264-0274 DODGE, Intrepid 3.5 magnum RT, w/ sunrf. Runs great needs battery $700 (352) 860-0158 FORD2004, Mustang, Deluxe leather, CD player, pwr windows, $7,888. 352-341-0018 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 MAZDA2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed, 4-door, one owner, great condition, 141,000 miles $3,500. 352-860-2146 MERCURY2006, Grand Marquis, LS, $8,988 352-341-0018 PONTIAC, Grand Am 4 cyl., 156k mi., cold AC, standard, runs excel. $2,800 obo,476-8690 TOYOTA, Avalon, Limited 49k mi., excell shape, garage kept. $15,500 Call (352) 634-0101 TOYOTA2010, Yaris, 3 door, $7,795. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2009 CORVETTE COUPE Z51: Jetstream blue w/ebony int., 2LT, Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3 eng., only 9500 mi., car show winner, serious inquiries only, first $35K/OBO gets it. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630 CHEVY1981 Corvette Under 50,000 orig. miles, Shark Body Style, Very Good Condition, Garage stored 352-400-4704 FIAT Spider 2000 Conv. 58K miles, new roof, good rubber, runs $2,000 (352) 564-0364 FORDRat Rod Projects, 46 Ford PU Roadster, Ford ModelT, Boattail speedster all steel., Inglis 352-949-7874 PLYMOUTH, GTX Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $32,000 obo 352-302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 First Car for Daughter sml car, auto,ac, 4 cyl good cond.under 2k NO Dealers please (352) 621-0248 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUICK REGAL2001 LS, leather Inter. very good cond., 6 cyl. 82k mi. One owner. $4,100 352-746-6708 Cadillac, Eldorado, 117K mi., runs great & looks great, Candy apple red $6,000352-422-2516 CHEVROLET, Malibu LS 8,700 mi. 1 owner, Gorgeous Car $14,500 (352) 527-0022 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt 4 door, $3,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 17 KEYWEST2013 Skiff,Yamaha 70 4-stroke, Jack Plate, Trolling Motor, Gauges, GPS,AlumTrailer, Transferrable Warranty, Excellent $20,900 352 503-6668 Bass Tracker17, 50 hsp. Mercury w/tilt, includes trailer, trolling motor, $1500. (352) 560-0068 MERC CRUISER1993, 20ft, Stern Drive, Sylvan, Barely used, but runs great. org. $12,000Asking $6,500 obo (352) 228-1355 PONTOON20 FT, 1994 Monarck new vhf radio & gps fishfinder. Gd Cond. $6500. (352) 527-4247 Sea Eagle2.5 power, 4stroke ouboard & inflatable Suzuki, $1100. for both (352) 425-7020 SWEETWATER1991, 15 ft., Pontoon seats 8, 35HP, trailer, excellent cond. $3,250 476-1113, 513-5135 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. SKYLINE 1995, Slide in cab over Camper Fully equip. generator, fridge, microwave, AC, & elect. jacks Loaded. $2,800 obo (352) 422-4548 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 Complete Auto Audio System, Kicker KX, 1200.1, CrossfireVR602, 600watt, Kicker KX 350.2, 2 Kicker KS60, 4 OHM and more $450. (352) 860-1195 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including w/d. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $19,900 obo 352-444-2272 Outboard Motor 25HP, Evirude with controls, very good cond. $750 obo 476-1113, 513-5135 Pontoon Boat Trailer Can accommodate up to 24 ft boat, Very good cond. $1,500 (609) 509-6021 cell BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda WattCustomer Service is My Specialty! I want to work for you! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. MINI FARMS AREA 4/2 on 10 ACRES 20 x 40 Pole Barn Move in Condition $139,900. 352-249-1248 RENT TO OWNno bank, smalldown pmt. 2/1, $53,579k take over payments 352-503-3245 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com 8535 E Gospel Island Rd Inverness 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Water front living and all the luxuries. 30 Ft glass porch, cathedral ceilings. Extensively rennovated including wood and tile floors. Granite and new roof and kitchen. Over 2000 Sqft Living area. $139,900 352-817-5875 or miksh@earthlink.net INVERNESS2002, Custom Built 3/2/2 With Extra Lot $114.500.352-344-3112 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM HOMOSASSA5+ DEN, BEDROOMS. 3 BATH.THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STORYHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPTOA NATURE PRESERVE HOME IS AFORECLOSURE SHORTSALEANDTHE BANK IS WORKING WITHTHE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILTIN 2005 dennis_neff @yahoo.com TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKINGTO SELL? CALLMETODAY! HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAWAPT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Phyllis StricklandRealtorBest Time To Buy!Prices are going up. So is interest.BUY NOW!Owner Financing Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503

PAGE 31

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 C13 000FZUS

PAGE 32

C14SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G2MW

PAGE 33

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 C15 000G2MT

PAGE 34

C16SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G4O2

PAGE 35

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013 C17 SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00 Hwy. 44 W. Inverness 726-1231 www.nicknicholasford.com GENUINE PARTS. GENUINE SERVICE. GENUINE PEACE OF MIND. S EE O UR E NTIRE I NVENTORY AT : nicknicholasford.com Ocala Inverness Brooksville Spring Hill Homosass a Springs Crystal River Inglis Dunnellon 486 Hwy 44 Hwy. 41 Hwy. 98 Hwy. 50 US 19 Hwy 490 H wy 2 00 Nick Nicholas Ford Nick Nicholas Floral City Hwy 491 Beverly Hills 000G6RM Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Deale r is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Trade-In Assistance Bonus Customer Cash available to those who currently own or lease a 1998 or newer Ford/LM/Competitieve Car Truck or SUV who trades in or have a lease expiring by Sept. 30, 2013. Model Select Vehicles T rade-in Assistance Bonus Customer Cash (PGM#33368) (National). Offers expires Sept. 30, 2013. Michelle Russo Salesperson of the Month CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 2013 FORD FLEX SEL Certified & sale priced only 1k miles. N3T257A $36,832 2013 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED Certified & sale priced. NP5917 $35,927 2012 FORD EXPEDITION XLT Certified & sale priced. N3C205A $34,367 2012 FORD MUSTANG COUPE Certified & sale priced. NP5856 $19,988 2011 FORD FIESTA SES Certified & sale priced. NP5861 $15,996 2010 FORD RANGER XLT EXT CAB Certified & sale priced. N3C136A $19,633 2010 FORD EDGE AWD SEL Certified & sale priced. NP5915 $26,442 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID Certified & sale priced. N3C191D $19,626 2009 FORD FOCUS SE Certified & sale priced. N4T046A $12,816 1. 9 % APR for 60 months *Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 60 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment. Take delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/13. See dealer for qualifications and complete details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership. Relax, Its Covered. 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage** 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage** NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER 2006 FORD FIVE HUNDRED SEL A lot of car for the money. NP5850 $12,668 2009 MAZDA SPORT Great little car. N3T497A $14,668 2009 HONDA CRV EX-L This EXL is like new. NP5838 $23,268 2002 FORD MUSTANG GT Saleen tribute for a fraction of a real one. N3T379D $11,968 2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX The old reliable. NP5878D $9,968 2006 CHRYSLER PACIFICA Low mileage crossover. NP5875 $12,568 2005 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LT Leather and loaded. NP5892 $12,968 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY Looking for a new family & loves kids. N3T411B $21,868 2012 KIA SEDONA LX Loaded people hauler, only 3k miles. N3T499A $23,968 2010 LINCOLN MKZ Lincoln luxury at an affordable price. NP5896 $22,868 2010 LINCOLN MKX All the lincoln luxury. NP5876 $26,968 1998 TOYOTA CAMRY LE Power Windows, C D Player, Cruise N3C228B $3,968 1986 WINNEBAGO CHEIFTAIN Handyman special, dont miss it. NP5857A $5,968 1996 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN Inexpensive transportation. N4T014C $2,968 2009 FORD FOCUS SE High gas mileage, low price. NP5919 $9,968 2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LTD Very nice limited cruiser. N2C025C $9,968 2006 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4 Super clean & 4x4 too. N4T018B $9,968 2007 FORD MUSTANG PREMIUM Top down wind in the hair fun. NP5901A $15,668 2009 HONDA CIVIC LX Cream puff, only 12k miles. NP5902 $17,868 2009 PONTIAC TORRENT Right size SUV. NP5855A $17,668 2007 FORD EXPLORER Low mileage Eddie Bauer. NP5860 $18,668 2011 TOYOTA COROLLA LE Fuel saver. NP5904 $17,968 2007 MERCEDES-BENZ E350 Luxury that is easy on the pocketbook. N3C147A $20,968 2012 HONDA CROSSTOUR EX-L Only 2k miles on this beauty. NP5865A 26,668 2012 CHRYSLER 300 LIMITED Dont miss this one. NP5913 $26,968 2012 CHEVY SILVERADO C1500 CREW Only 16k miles. N3T113A $29,968 2009 FORD F350 4X4 CREW Loaded CABELLAs truck. N4T030A $29,968 2010 FORD F150 FX2 SUPER CAB One owner & only 28k miles. NP5909A $26,668 2010 LINCOLN MKT Affordable lincoln. N3T401A $29,968 2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL Only 4k miles on this hybrid. N3C188A $29,988

PAGE 36

C18SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G4O7