Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03273

Full Text

Warriors in 4: Seven Rivers volleyball downs Lecanto /B1


I IR IDAY


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
65


~_www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 51


Board

backs

sale to

HCA

Foundation

has yet to

weigh in

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS -
The Citrus County
Hospital Board voted
4-0 late Thursday to
award the Citrus Me-
morial bid to Hospital
Corp. of America
(HCA).
Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation
members offered no
opinion on their
choices, even after
hearing a detailed
breakdown of the
three bidders from
transaction consult-
ant Trey Crabb.
The foundation,
missing chairman
Bob Collins and long-
time board member
Joe Brannen, didn't
have a quorum to
vote. Vice chair-
woman Sandy Chad-
wick said foundation
members would not
discuss the bidders
until the two boards
meet again at 7 p.m.
Monday
Hospital board
trustees, however,
were unanimous in
their support for
HCA, pointing to the
Tennessee-based
company's commit-
ment to serving the
indigent, protecting
jobs and developing
strategies to prevent
Citrus County pa-
tients from seeking
health care in sur-
rounding counties.
HCAs bid is $145.6
million. Factoring in
debt, pension obliga-
tions and other is-
sues, HCAs net is
about $95 million to
the community for
purposes yet to be
determined.
The boards, which
must agree on the
same bidder and
transaction type, are
See Page A9


Classifieds ........ C9
Comics .......... C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ........ A14
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . . B4
Movies ........... C8
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C7


Boutin gets life in prison


Convicted ofmurdering teenager last December, dumping body in Levy County


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer


\INVERNESS The Ho-
mosassa man convicted of the
Christmas-day murder of a
Brooksville teenager has
been sentenced to life in
Byron prison.
Boutin Judge Ric Howard sen-


tenced Byron Lee Boutin, 42,
to the life term Thursday.
Florida does not have parole
for life sentences.
Boutin and his girlfriend
Crystal Brinson, 36, of
Brooksville were both
charged with first-degree
murder in the death of
DeAnna Stires, 18, around


Christmas of 2012. Brinson's
case is still pending, but
Boutin was convicted after a
four-day trial a month ago.
Boutin and Brinson are ac-
cused of overdosing Stires
with morphine the official
cause of death and dump-
ing her body in a hunting area
in Levy County


Recycling process


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Erin Ray, Single Stream Processors recycling education specialist, front center, explains to
a group of visitors Wednesday the complex, high-tech process the Lecanto recycling plant
uses to separate and process recyclable materials. The free tour is one of many educational
opportunities the public is invited to attend during the 18th Annual Save Our Waters Week.
One purpose of the tour is to show how recycling can help maintain clean, healthy waters.


This large bay is where much of the recyclable materials are collected and processed.


Stires was reported missing
on New Year's Day to the Her-
nando County Sheriff's Of-
fice. Her body was found Jan.
18 in a wooded area off State
Road 24 in the Levy County
community of Otter Creek.
Two hunters found Stires'
See Page A9


Nugent:


Delay flood

insurance


rate hikes

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
U.S. Rep. Rich Nugent plans to file a
bill today that could head off flood in-
surance premium hikes scheduled to hit
next week.
He characterized the
rate hikes as an unin-
tended consequence
and a huge hit for the
economy and residents
to absorb.
The pending hikes
and their impact on the
housing market have Rep. Rich
also been an issue with Nugent
the Realtors Association worried that
of Citrus County hikes could
The new rates were hurt Florida's
put in motion by the Big- economy.
gert Waters Flood Insur-
ance Reform Act of 2012, which had the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency change the way the National
Flood Insurance Program is run. It was
required to raise rates to reflect true
flood risk and make the program more
financially stable.
See Page A9



Politicians


head for


stalemate on


budget talks

Gov't shutdown feared

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Moving closer to
the brink of a government shutdown,
House Republicans vowed Thursday
they won't simply accept the stopgap leg-
islation that is likely to remain after
Senate Democrats strip away a plan to
dismantle President Barack Obama's
health care law
A sense of confusion settled over the
House, both over how to avoid a shut-
down and how to handle even more im-
portant legislation to increase the
government's borrowing ability to avert
a default on U.S. obligations. Short of


See Page AO10


Partly cloudy;
stray showers.
PAGE A4




A2 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dear Directors and Trustees,

In follow up to our presentation last week, I wanted to share an outline of the benefits that true collaboration between Citrus Memorial
Hospital and Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center would bring to Citrus County. My earnest objective is to bring coordination of care
rather than continued competition and focus all efforts on delivery of health care to Citrus County.

The resulting benefits include:
1. Establishment of Citrus Health network to include:
Citrus Memorial Health System
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
Munroe Regional Medical Center (affiliation for advanced specialty services)
UF Health (affiliation with Shands Teaching Hospital and University of Florida Health Sciences)

2. Promote our Citrus Health network through collaborative strategies and actions:
Service line development: Determine how to best promote operational performance for all services in Citrus County.
Utilize local management leadership within the new Citrus Health network in a manner that brings greater consistency and focus
on delivery of quality care and improved outcomes.
Enhance the relationship with the physician community to ensure their input in strategic development and execution including:
One collaborative environment to jointly enhance our quality agenda and outcome metrics
Physician recruitment into existing practices or establishing new independent practices
Employment of existing practices or recruit utilizing employment model
Capital allocation priorities across the entire new Citrus Health network
Provide a consistent wage and benefit plan across the system that ensures a competitive position in the market place. Our collective
goals would be to reduce both employee turnover and the use of contract/agency labor and provide a greater flexibility for
employees to work scheduled time within the Citrus Health network.

3. Capital deployment will be more effective as a Citrus Health network will avoid costly duplication and thereby have greater fiscal use
of capital resources. The system leadership with input from its department leaders and physicians can better prioritize how the capital
will be invested across the network for care to our entire county.

4. Development of a marketing strategy that provides a message that is more uniform and consistent for the community to see and hear.
Instead of competitive, opposing messages to target audiences, this new marketing focus will enforce an integrated, high quality, caring
delivery system throughout all of Citrus County. The Citrus Health network has a unique opportunity to redirect outmigration of
consumer utilization back to Citrus County medical providers and established facilities.

5. Improved discipline towards process improvement and quality will occur as we have consistent benchmarks and best demonstrated
practices that can be shared by each entity: Citrus Memorial, Seven Rivers Regional, Munroe Regional and the clinical affiliation
with UF Health. Key opportunities include:
ER operations and lengths of stay: Augment ER referral/follow up visits with the George A. Dame Community Health Centers
located throughout Citrus County. There is a potential to utilize the mobile van service staffed by our local Nature Coast EMS
'community paramedics' to ensure post-discharge care is completed and preventive care is ongoing.
Coordination of facility transfers for advanced expertise in cardiovascular services, stroke care, neuroscience and trauma.
An example is our alliance with UF Health for Stroke Emergency Specialists.
Utilization of appropriate clinical protocols that can provide greater consistency of care within our Citrus Health network in
conjunction with UF Health.
Participate in post-graduate education and serve as community training site for residents affiliated with UF Health.

6. Reposition our Citrus Health network to address the managed care challenges and opportunities and have flexibility in structure that
will be responsive to the predicted changes in the health care delivery system. Our result will ensure clinical quality, optimize access to
needed services locally, reduce costs and allow us to truly achieve clinical integration.

In closing, I appreciate your dedication to Citrus Memorial. My own tenure with Seven Rivers Regional for over 28 years is testament to
the commitment to caring for the medical needs of our community. This is our local health care system. This singular moment in time for
the decision to collaborate with both hospitals and take this unique opportunity to truly focus all efforts on delivering quality care to Citrus
County is now unison rather than division; collaboration rather than competition.

Thank you for your time and consideration.
Sincerely,





Joyce Brancato, RN, MBA
Chief Executive Officer
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center





Positively SEVEN RIVERS
sitive- REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

SevenRiversRegional.com Crystal River Your Life. Our Story.


Proud to be part of the Health Management Associates network
To learn more about Health Management, visit WhyHealthManagement.com






Page A3- FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013



TATE2& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE-


Around the

STATE

Citrus County

Maidoff boardwalk
to be dedicated
A ribbon-cutting cere-
mony has been set for the
opening of the Gary Maid-
hof Nature Walk boardwalk
at the Academy of Environ-
mental Science on Fort Is-
land Trail.
The event is at 11 a.m.
Saturday at the school, but
because of limited parking,
city officials are urging peo-
ple who attend to park at
Fort Island Trail Park,
12073 W. Fort Island Trail.
A shuttle will be available
from the park.
Alpaca farms open to
public this weekend
Alpaca farms around the
community will celebrate
National Alpaca Farm Days
by opening up farms to the
public on Saturday and
Sunday, Sept. 28 and 29.
Those include:
Alpaca Magic USA,
4920 Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa 352-
628-0156. Open 10a.m. to
4 p.m. both days. Farm is
located at the top of the hill.
Sun Spiced Alpacas,
5420 S. Farm Point, Ho-
mosassa 352-628-9980.
Open from 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Located off U.S.
19. Turn west on West Vil-
lage Drive, go right on West
Sasser Street, right on S.
Bob White Drive, left on
West Chablis Lane, left on
West Meadow Street, then
left on Farm Point.
Funny Farm Alpacas,
718 W. Rusk Lane, Lecanto
- 352-527-8951. Open
from 10 a.m. to4 p.m. If
driving from Inverness go
west on State Road 44, turn
north onto Thayer Street,
the first street past the light
at the landfill, and follow
signs. From Crystal River,
take State Road 44 east and
turn north on Thayer Street
before the light at the landfill.

Gainesville

Lead Gatorade
inventor honored
Gov. Rick Scott has hon-
ored the late Dr. Robert
Cade with the state's Great
Floridian Award.
The Gainesville Sun re-
ported Scott visited the
Cafe Museum for Creativity
and Invention and pre-
sented the award to Cade's
family on Thursday.
Cade was the lead inven-
tor of Gatorade. He was
also a professor of renal
medicine at University of
Florida and described him-
self as a "physician, scien-
tist, musician and inventor."
Thursday would have
been Cade's 86th birthday.
Cade is the 82nd recipi-
ent of the Great Floridian
Award. Previous honorees
include sports figures Steve
Spurrier and Tim Tebow, as
well as former governors,
civil rights activists, military
heroes and entrepreneurs.

Lakeland

Officer suspended
after bra search
A Lakeland Police De-
partment officer has been
suspended in connection
with an incident in which he
asked a woman pulled over
for a traffic stop to shake
out her bra to see if she
was hiding drugs.
The Lakeland Ledger re-
ported Officer Dustin Fetz
was suspended for a day
without pay for misusing
recording equipment. Inves-
tigators found the audio on
his recorder was off while
taping the incident because
Fetz didn't use the micro-
phone provided.


LPD spokesman Sgt.
Gary Gross said Fetz was
notified of his suspension
Wednesday.
Videotape of the bra-
shaking incident ignited
public outrage.
-From staff and wire reports


Zimmerman's wife conflicted


Associated Press

MIAMI Shellie Zim-
merman said Thursday
that she hasn't been able to
find her estranged
husband to serve
him divorce pa-
pers and that she
doesn't know what
he's capable of be-
cause he has L
changed since he
was acquitted in
the shooting death She
of Trayvon Martin. Zimme
Shellie Zimmerman
said on NBC's "Today"
Show on Thursday that
she is conflicted over her
George Zimmerman's as-
sertion that he killed the
17-year-old Martin in self-
defense. But she said she
believes the evidence and
respects the jury's verdict.


l1
e


Martin, who was un-
armed, was fatally shot in
February 2012 after get-
ting into a scuffle with
Zimmerman as he walked
home from a con-
venience store in
Sanford, Fla. Shel-
lie Zimmerman
R later pleaded guilty
Sto perjury for lying
About the couple's
finances after her
husband's arrest.
lie She was sentenced
.rman to probation and
community service.
'After standing by him,
he kind of left and I guess
kind of went on a victory
tour without me," Shellie
Zimmerman said. "I
thought I was living a life
with him and that we were
going to kind of rebuild
after all this, and he had


his hand in his shirt and
saying, 'Please step closer,
please step closer' So I
think that just logically I
assumed he had a gun on
him."
She added later: "This
person that I'm married to
and that I'm divorcing, I
kind of realize now that I
don't know him and I re-
ally don't know what he's
capable of."
George Zimmerman
hasn't stayed at the home
since then, and his where-
abouts are unknown even
to his wife and her attorney
No charges were filed in
that dispute, though
deputies are still trying to
retrieve footage of what
happened from an iPad
smashed by George Zim-
merman during the
argument.


other plans for me."
Zimmerman told Lauer
she doesn't believe her be-
lieve her husband profiled
Martin, who was black.
However, she said she now
"doubts" his innocence on
the self-defense claim.
Shellie Zimmerman, 26,
also said she stands by her
account of a Sept. 9 alter-
cation with her husband at
the house they shared in
Lake Mary She told a 911
dispatcher that her hus-
band was threatening her


with a gun.
The dispute took place
just days after she filed for
divorce. Shellie Zimmer-
man, her father and a
friend were removing
items from the home when
her husband showed up
and began taking photos.
"I didn't see a gun, but I
know my husband," she
said. "I saw him in a stance
and a look in his eyes that
I've never seen before. His
shirt was halfway unbut-
toned and he was putting


History unveiled at Fort Cooper


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Re-enactors Steven Creamer of Inverness, left, and Harvard and Laney Burney of Fanning Springs speak Thursday morning while the new
Seminole heritage display is unveiled at Fort Cooper State Park.

First offour Seminole Heritage Trail information kiosks completed


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS It took a
village.
That's what longtime Friends
of Fort Cooper member and
Seminole re-enactor Kate
Hughes said Thursday at the
unveiling of the "Seminole in
the Cove of the Withlacoochee"
information kiosk at Fort
Cooper State Park.
Hughes was one of a handful
of costumed Seminole re-enac-
tors, a dozen or so uniformed
Friends of Fort Cooper, park
staff and local officials who met
for the debut of the first of four
kiosks that will make up the
Seminole Heritage Trail, be-
ginning at the park and ending
at Fort Cooper
"We've been working for over
three years on this project to in-


stall a trail through the park
that will tell the history of what
happened in this area known as
the Cove of the Withlacoochee,"
she said.
The first and second (future)
panels, with artwork done by
renowned Seminole artist Guy
LaBree, focus on the early
Seminoles and their migration
from Georgia and Alabama to
Florida.
"Kiosk 3 will be about the
battles that happened, more
war-oriented," Hughes said.
She added that a significant
fact of Seminole history is that
they are the only unconquered
Indian tribe.
"The 200 that made it down
to the Everglades never signed
a treaty," she said. "So, this
story goes beyond just being a
story about the Indians."
JulieAnne Tabone, park pro-


grams development specialist,
said the kiosk project took so
many months to complete be-
cause of the vast wealth of in-
formation they sifted through.
"It's a big, robust and rich
story to tell," she said, "and the
challenge is finding ways to
paint a picture and engage peo-
ple, tell enough of the story to
make it complete, yet take them
beyond the exhibit to want to
continue learning. ... For us in
the park service, we want it to
be accessible and compelling
and something that will be here
for a long, long time, and that
takes a lot of hard work by a lot
of people."
Park Manager Harry Mitchell
said this is a "great addition to
the park," and his hope is that
school groups will come to the
park and use the trail as a
learning tool.


Before now, learning oppor-
tunities have been limited to
events like Fort Cooper Days.
Now the Seminole story is
available 365 days a year, sun
up to sun down.
On Oct. 5, the public is invited
to "Step Into Time" visit the
park on Old Floral City Road
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., see the
kiosk, sample Seminole pump-
kin fry bread, interact with liv-
ing historians and re-enactors,
hear stories and meet artist
Guy LaBree, who has been
nominated by the Friends of
Fort Cooper for the 2013
Florida Folk Heritage Award.
For information, call the Fort
Cooper State Park office at 352-
726-0315.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-
2927 or nkennedy@chronicle
online, corn


Mother of drowned Haitian KP Hole Park party

migrant seeks answers scheduled Saturday


Associated Press

MIAMI The mother of a young woman
who drowned while being smuggled by
boat to Florida wants answers about her
daughter's death.
Simone Jeanty said Thursday she wants
justice for her daughter and is asking local
and federal officials to investigate. Judith
Valentin was one of 10 people who paid to
be smuggled from Haiti, through the Ba-
hamas, to Florida on Aug. 28. She was hop-
ing to be reunited with her fiance, her
mother said. Nine people made it to shore
in Palm Beach and were immediately de-
tained by federal authorities. Valentin's
body washed ashore around the same
time.
Jeanty arrived in South Florida Monday
on a humanitarian visa to attend her
daughter's funeral. She said the family has
heard that some of the migrants claimed
Valentin was raped and thrown overboard.
"My beautiful baby died. No one can tell
me what happened to her She was a
human being ... a human being," she told


Associated Press
Simone Jeanty, from Haiti, sits in front of a
photo of her daughter Judith Valentin Thurs-
day during a news conferencein Miami, ask-
ing for an investigation into her daughter's
drowning death.
reporters through tears.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforce-
ment spokesman Nestor Yglesias said the
investigation into the smuggling is ongoing
but that ICE could not immediately say
whether the other individuals on the boat
remain in custody or are even still in the
country


Chronicle


For the past 60 years,
Marion County's KP
Hole Park has been the
launch point of sum-
mertime memories for
generations of area res-
idents and visitors.
From tubing and swim-
ming to snorkeling and
boating, enjoying the
pristine water and
shores of the Rainbow
River has started at the
sundeck, swimming
area or boat ramp of KP
Hole Park.
Marion County Parks
and Recreation will
mark KP Hole's 60th an-
niversary with a "Dia-
mond Jubilee"
celebration from 11 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Saturday at
the park at 9435 S.W
190th Avenue Road. Vis-


itors will enjoy free ad-
mission to the park, free
pizza, live entertain-
ment, face-painting,
giveaways and more
while supplies last.
Established as a boys
retreat in the early
1920s, KP Hole Park
was acquired by Marion
County and designated
as a public recreation
area in 1953. Today, KP
Hole Park offers swim-
ming, tubing, scuba div-
ing, boating, kayaking,
canoeing and paddle
boarding to thousands
of visitors.
To learn more about
this event and KP Hole
Park facilities, contact
Marion County Parks
and Recreation at 352-
671-8560 or email
gina.peebles@marion
countyfl.org.


After standing by him, he
kind of left and I guess went on a
victory tour without me.

Shellie Zimmerman
husband was acquitted in the Trayvon Martin shooting.




A4 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Follow your heart and
don't be afraid to do things differently
in the year ahead. Expect to face ob-
stacles, and prepare to make life-alter-
ing choices. Stabilize your position
while the trends favor you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't fold
under pressure. You'll get the most out
of your day and avoid complaints if you
try to do the best job possible.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You'll
have a clear picture of what you want
to see unfold today. Rely on your intu-
ition and your keen eye to guide you
through any uncertainties you face.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Cast
your fate to the wind. Pursue an adven-
ture that will take your mind off your
worries.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It's not
a good time to second-guess yourself.
Decide what needs to be done and do
it. It's the time for action, not talking.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You'll
see the need to bring about change,
but it may not be as easy you think.
Additional responsibilities will become
apparent and must be dealt with first.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Plan a
celebration. Delve into a creative inter-
est or spend time with children or loved
ones.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Do what
you can on your own in a work involve-
ment. Avoid depending on others, and
you'll be free of disappointment.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It's a
good day to spend time with friends or
people who inspire and motivate you.
An interesting proposal will come from
an unusual source.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Revisit
old ideas and peers, and you will gain
insight into an opportunity With a bit of
fine-tuning, you can get your place in
good shape and host an event.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Take
some time out; pampering will do you
good and give you a chance to let
some information sink in, allowing you
to make the most opportune choice.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Stay on top
of what's happening at home and at
work. Your reputation must be pro-
tected, and your decisions must be
based on accurate information.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Play the
game strategically Whether you are in-
volved in a personal or professional sit-
uation that requires hands-on input,
you must be cautious, attentive and
well-informed.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


Amber Tamblyn
shakes up season 11
of CBS' 'Men'
NEW YORK Amber Tam-
blyn plays Charlie Harper's pre-
viously unknown daughter,
Jenny, on the 11th season of
CBS' "Two and a Half Men," pre-
miering Thursday night.
Jenny and her father (who
was played by Charlie Sheen)
have something in common: a
love for women. She's a hard-
partying bisexual.
Tamblyn, whose TV credits in-
clude the dramas "General Hos-
pital," "Joan of Arcadia" and
"House M.D.," said she wasn't
sure if she was interested in join-
ing "Two and a Half Men."
She said her agent told her,
"Well, hang on. It's a genius role.
... She's very into alcohol and
women."
Tamblyn, who has yet to see
an episode of the show, said
she's amazed by its bawdy, sex-
ual humor.
"It is very fun to play," the 30-
year-old actress said of her char-
acter. "I am shocked at what
they get away with on the show.
It's kind of incredible."
Maya Angelou,
Junot Diaz to receive
Mailer prizes
NEW YORK Maya An-
gelou is receiving another hon-
orary prize for writing.
The Norman Mailer Center
and Writers Colony announced
Thursday that Angelou will be
given a lifetime achievement
award at a benefit gala Oct. 17.
Earlier this month, the National
Book Foundation announced
that the 85-year-old Angelou
would be given an honorary Na-
tional Book Award, her first
major literary prize.
The Mailer Center will also
give a distinguished writing prize


Associated Press
Street graffiti artist Jason Howarth, aka "Camden Care," ap-
plies finishing touches Thursday to an Amy Winehouse mural
in London in aid of the Amy Winehouse Foundation.


to Junot Diaz and an award for
the best emerging journalist to
the late Michael Hastings.
Hastings was killed in an auto
accident in June at age 33.
Brandt 'felt sick'
shooting last of
'Breaking Bad'
NEW YORK- Betsy Brandt
says the intensity of the final
"Breaking Bad" episodes "physi-
cally affected" her.
"There were days shooting -
these last eight episodes espe-
cially I just felt sick. My chest
would get all tight and I just felt
awful," she said.
Brandt plays Marie Schrader,
sister-in-law to chemistry teacher
turned drug lord Walter White
(Bryan Cranston) on the show,
which airs its series finale this
Sunday on AMC at 9 p.m. In an
interview Wednesday she said
she did a lot of crying, too.
"After we'd get a take then I'd
just sort of start sobbing be-
cause you gotta get it out before
you go home," she said.
The actress says the weighti-
ness of "Breaking Bad" had a lot
to do with her decision to take on


the comedy "The Michael J.
Fox" show as her next role. She
plays Annie Henry, wife of Fox's
character in the series that pre-
mieres Thursday at 9 p.m.
Detroit-area
law firm files suit
against Four Tops
PONTIAC, Mich. -A Detroit-
area law firm has filed suit
against the Four Tops, claiming
the singing group owes it
$109,000 in legal fees.
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Pat-
ton filed the lawsuit in Oakland
County Circuit Court.
According to The Detroit
News, the Southfield firm says it
has provided legal services on
behalf of the Four Tops, but the
group failed to pay an outstand-
ing balance of $109,156.73.
Four Tops spokesman Matt
Lee had no comment.
The group was a key member
of the Motown Records family of
artists during the Detroit label's
1960s heyday.
Abdul "Duke" Fakir is the
only original member still with the
group. He's named in the suit.
From wire reports


I


YESTERDAY'S
2_PR0 r
. P -HI LO
1.o00 NA NA N


WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc
ts
sh
pc
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
PC
pc
ts
s
pc
s
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly cloudy skies today.


85 74 0.90 -- 88 74 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by: Ig

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
L High: 90 Low: 65
Partly cloudy, stray shower, rain
chance 10%


SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 65
Partly cloudy, stray shower, rain chance 10%


_r __SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 66
i Partly cloudy, isolated showers, rain chance
2 ALMANAC
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 89/73
Record 95/55
Normal 89/67
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.10 in.
Total for the month 9.25 in.
Total for the year 50.26 in.
Normal for the year 44.13 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 67
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, nettle, grass
Today's count: 7.4/12
Saturday's count: 8.1
Sunday's count: 8.1
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/27 FRIDAY 12:19 6:32 12:43 6:55
9/28 SATURDAY 1:05 7:17 1:28 7:40
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT.............................7:20 M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:22A.M.
Ct1 OCT 4 MOONRISE TODAY .........................12:42A.M.
OCT. 4 OCT. 11 OCT. 18 OCT. 20 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 2:33 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Lov
12:02 a/6:50
9:25 a/4:12
7:12 a/2:00
10:14 a/5:49


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Friday
w High/Low
Oa 11:04a/8:23p
a 11:42p/5:45p
a 9:29 p/3:33 p
9 a ---/7:22 p


***At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
1:21 a/8:08 a 12:29 p/9:43 p
10:50 a/5:30 a ---/7:05 p
8:37a/3:18a 10:41 p/4:53 p
12:31 a/7:07 a 11:39 a/8:42 p


Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.22 30.20 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.38 38.40 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.88 39.90 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.67 40.68 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


)RECAST FOR 06PP.M.
FRIDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Thursday Friday Thursday Friday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


66 46 s
82 55 pc
72 57 s
67 62 .36 s
73 49 pc
91 61 pc
74 53 pc
49 38 .29 sh
84 66 s
59 44 .14 pc
63 55 pc
71 45 s
64 39 s
75 65 2.30 s
77 61 s
78 59 s
75 50 s
79 45 .01 s
72 46 s
81 64 s
81 52 s
70 45 pc
95 67 s
68 45 sh
85 61 pc
75 49 s
88 68 pc
84 59 s
76 47 pc
67 55 pc
92 68 s
80 52 s
87 60 s
74 60 s
87 61 s
74 62 s
81 58 s
88 68 s
71 50 s
82 56 pc
90 69 pc
85 68 s
82 64 s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 87 69 s 90 75
NewYorkCity 71 58 pc 73 55
Norfolk 75 60 s 73 59
Oklahoma City 93 63 pc 87 68
Omaha 88 63 pc 86 61
Palm Springs 83 62 s 86 63
Philadelphia 73 55 pc 75 54
Phoenix 97 72 s 89 65
Pittsburgh 76 48 s 72 53
Portland, ME 66 44 pc 70 49
Portland, Ore 67 48 sh 62 54
Providence, R.I. 66 54 pc 69 49
Raleigh 77 57 s 75 54
Rapid City 67 48 sh 49 41
Reno 54 38 s 66 43
Rochester, NY 70 43 s 70 51
Sacramento 77 53 s 78 56
St. Louis 85 62 s 85 66
St. Ste. Marie 72 43 s 73 51
Salt Lake City 58 48 .01 sh 55 43
San Antonio 94 70 pc 91 75
San Diego 71 64 s 78 61
San Francisco 71 53 s 76 57
Savannah 73 66 .03 s 81 63
Seattle 63 46 sh 59 56
Spokane 62 42 c 60 44
Syracuse 71 44 s 72 48
Topeka 90 60 s 88 65
Washington 77 59 pc 76 56
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 98 Laredo, Texas LOW 25 Truckee, Calif.

WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/75As
Amsterdam 64/43/s
Athens 85/66/s
Beijing 76/62/pc
Berlin 60/40/pc
Bermuda 78/73As
Cairo 89/67/s
Calgary 57/34/pc
Havana 83/74As
Hong Kong 81/73/pc
Jerusalem 78/60/s


Lisbon 74/65/sh
London 65/51/pc
Madrid 82/63/pc
Mexico City 75/55/ts
Montreal 72/50/pc
Moscow 40/35/c
Paris 73/55/pc
Rio 70/59/pc
Rome 74/63/s
Sydney 73/56/s
Tokyo 71/61/pc
Toronto 68/54/s
Warsaw 53/40/c


LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices..............................................C13

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices...................C13

Notice to Creditors/Administration.......3......C13

Self Storage Notices .......................................C13



CITRULIS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Who's in charge:
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M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
r Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Sept. 27, the
270th day of 2013. There are 95
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 27, 1991, President
George H.W. Bush announced in a
nationally broadcast address that he
was eliminating all U.S. battlefield
nuclear weapons and called on the
Soviet Union to match the gesture.
On this date:
In 1540, Pope Paul III issued a
papal bull establishing the Society
of Jesus, or Jesuits, as a religious
order.
In 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surren-
dered after weeks of resistance to
invading forces from Nazi Germany
and the Soviet Union during World
War II.
In 1964, the government publicly
released the report of the Warren
Commission, which found that Lee
Harvey Oswald had acted alone in
assassinating President John F.
Kennedy.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush and Russian Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin urged Iran and
North Korea to abandon suspected
nuclear-weapons programs but dis-
agreed over how to deal with both
countries; Putin also declined to
pledge any postwar help for Iraq.
Five years ago: China marked
its first spacewalk as astronaut Zhai
Zhigang floated outside the Shen-
zhou 7 for 13 minutes.
One year ago: Israeli Prime Min-
ister Benjamin Netanyahu, holding
a diagram of a cartoon-like bomb,
told the U.N. General Assembly that
the world had only a matter of
months to stop Iran before it could
build a nuclear bomb.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Wilford
Brimley is 79. Singer-musician
Randy Bachman (Bachman-Turner
Overdrive) is 70. Rock singer Meat
Loaf is 66. Actress Gwyneth Pal-
trow is 41. Singer Avril Lavigne
is 29.
Thought for Today: "Life is like
a coin. You can spend it any way
you wish, but you only spend it
once." Lillian Dickson, American
missionary (1901-1983).


..Paolo




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUALITY

CHARITY
COMMUNITY
COMMITMENT



YOUR HOSPITAL IS AN IMPORTANT
MEMBER OF YOUR COMMUNITY.
DON'T PUT THE VALUE OF THAT CONTRIBUTION
AT ZERO.


* 71%ofHCA
sured by The
excellence in


hospitals are Top Performers in Quality Care as mea-
Joint Commission, the nation's leading authority on
healthcare.


* Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) reports
that in 2012, HCA hospitals provided a higher percentage of self-
pay/uninsured care compared to non HCA hospitals, including
Tampa General.
* HCA will bring Citrus County $235 MILLION in combined upfront
lease payments and property taxes paid over the life of its lease of
Citrus Memorial, paying off the hospital's debts and bringing revenue
to the community.
* Tampa General proposes to pay ZERO upfront for the same lease.


Good for Citrus Memorial. Good for you.




HCA
H CAWestF I ori da. com /Citrus


COMMUNITY COMMITME QUALITCARTALBASEAD


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 AS




A6 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013

Obituaries


Robert 'Bob'
Norton, 77
INVERNESS
Robert E. "Bob" Norton,
77, Inverness, Fla., passed
away Sept. 25, 2013, at Cit-
rus Memorial Hospital. A
native of Jacksonville, he
was born Dec. 15, 1935, an
only child,
to the late
Loren and
Chrissie
(Jones)
N Norton
a n d
moved to
this area
Robert in 1978
Norton from Or-
lando. He spent his life in
the automobile industry
and was formerly the
owner-operator of Norton
Chevrolet. Bob was a
member of Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church and
active in the Chuck Colsen
Prison Fellowship for
many years. He received
the fellowship's Volunteer
of the Year Award.
Left to mourn his loss is
his wife of 54 years, Mary
Ann Norton; three daugh-
ters, Angela Blasl, Inver-
ness, Robin (James)
Martone, Inverness, Beth
(Jim) Dennis, Orlando; five
grandchildren, Kristopher,
Nicholas, Lena Rose,
Brooke, and Max.
Bob's life will be cele-
brated at the Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church at 11
a.m. Saturday, Sept 28,
2013, with the Rev Bran-
don Lauranzon officiating.
Interment will be private
in Oak Ridge Cemetery In-
verness. The family will
receive friends from 10
a.m., until the hour of serv-
ice in the church. In lieu of
flowers, memorials re-
quested to the Seven
Rivers Presbyterian
Church Deacon's Fund.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Patricia
Curry, 65
HERNANDO
Patricia Alliene Curry,
65, of Hernando, Fla., for-
merly of Largo, passed
away Saturday, Sept. 7,
2013. She was born March
24, 1948,
in Ponce
de Leon,
Fla., the
daughter
M of Kern
Curry and
Estelle
ICurry She
Patricia frequently
Curry v o 1 u n-
teered at community cen-
ters. Pat also loved
spending time with her
family and shopping and
baking with her grand-
daughter
She was preceded in
death by her parents; her
son, Michael Preston
Stevens; and her brother,
Gene Curry Survived by a
son, Dana Stevens; a
granddaughter, Emily
Stevens; and eight siblings,
Mattie Lou Surber, Char-
lene Young, Ruth Capps,
Hubert Curry, Roy Curry,
Joyce Jordan, Levida Tow-
son, and Charles Curry
A private family service
will be Saturday, Sept. 28,
2013, at Woodlawn
Memory Gardens in St.
Petersburg.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. con.


YOU ARE
NOT ALONE
= -r.w


p i .V P.-.1 11
22% of seniors
over the age of 70 suffer
from memory loss.
WE ARE HERE
TO HEPIR

$SU.PE RIOR
RESIDENCES
of Lecanto
kMEMORY CARE


Warren
Aamodt, 77
CRYSTAL RIVER
Warren Frederick
Aamodt, 77, of Crystal
River, Fla., passed away
Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, at
his home in Crystal River
He was born Nov 6, 1935,
in St. Paul, Minn., to
Clarence and Frances
(Rabel) Aamodt. He came
here 20 years ago from St.
Paul. He was of the
Lutheran faith and a mem-
ber of Seven Rivers Golf
and Country Club in Crys-
tal River
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 58 years, Dar-
leen Aamodt of Crystal
River; a son, Dean Aamodt
(Jeanne) of St Paul, Minn.;
two daughters, Kim Dueth-
man (Mike) and Lynn
Rohrbacher (Craig) all of
St. Paul, Minn.; two broth-
ers, Richard Aamodt
(Sally) and Gerald Aamodt
(Adelaide) all of St. Paul,
Minn.; and seven grand-
children.
A celebration of life will
be from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Sept 29,2013, at the Seven
Rivers Golf and Country
Club in Crystal River
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory Crystal
River, assisted the family
with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
Chronicle policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com,
fax 352-563-3280 or
call 352-563-5660 for
details.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


C6oA~. cE. 2WbAv
Funeral Home With Crematory
DONALD HARRISON
Service: Fri. 11:00 AM Chapel
JAMES M. HUNTER
Memorial Service: Sun. 3:00 PM
American Legion Post #155
ROBERT NORTON
Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
LUCY DRURY
Arrangements Pending
JAMES BROOKS |
Arrangements Pending
726-8323


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In Fellsmere, four elephants



call former citrus farm home


Associated Press

FELLSMERE, Fla. -
Forget peanuts. In the
heart of Florida's citrus
grove region, it's the or-
anges elephants are after
At the newly opened
National Elephant Center
in Fellsmere, Fla., the
pachyderms have discov-
ered how to pluck the fruit
from the trees with their
trunks and pop it into
their mouths.
Fresh Valencia oranges
are not the only thing that
makes the 200-acre center
unique. It is also the only
such site operated by the
U.S. zoo communityto house
displaced elephants.
The center is open to two
categories of the mammoth
mammals: those sent for a
limited stay by zoos that
need to temporarily free
up space for renovations
or breeding; and ele-
phants that need a perma-
nent home when their
previous institutional or
private owners can no
longer care for them.
The center's primary
goal is to ensure the ele-
phant's long-term sur-
vival. The animal is listed
as endangered, or at high
risk of extinction, in Asia,


4 ;
sj '

!,l^ ^^ lll "
Hi , ",


Associated Press
A young elephant makes its way through the remains of an old citrus farm Sept. 4 near
Fellsmere, Fla. Four African elephants are now living on 200 acres in the heart of
Florida's citrus grove region in the newly opened National Elephant Center.


and vulnerable in Africa.
"There's an estimate
that maybe 10 percent of
the entire African elephant
population was poached
for ivory last year," John
Lehnhardt said. "Give that
10 or 15 years, and there
may be nothing left."
Currently residing at the
center are four African
elephants whose permanent
home is Disney's Animal
Kingdom, located about an
hour north of the refuge.
Moyo, a 32-year-old fe-


male with only one tusk,
was the first to discover
and appreciate the or-
anges. She is accompanied
by her calves, 10-year-old
Tufani and 5-year-old
Tsavo; and Thandi, a 33-
year-old female.
Lehnhardt, who has
worked with elephants for
four decades, says he
hopes eventually to take
advantage of the site's full
225 acres.
The land was leased in
September 2011 from a


private citrus grove for 40
years at $1 a year That al-
lows for the bulk of fund-
ing, which comes mostly
from roughly 70 zoos, to
cover construction costs
estimated at least $2.4 mil-
lion, and operating costs
that reach about $50,000 a
month. Most of the operat-
ing expenses pay for sup-
plemental food for the
elephants, although the
property provides roughly
100 different varieties of
plants.


Auto parts makers to admit price fixing


Associated Press

WASHINGTON-Nine
Japanese auto parts
manufacturers and two
of their executives will
plead guilty and pay $740
million in criminal fines
for conspiring to fix the
prices of more than 30
products sold to many of
the world's largest automak-
ers operating in the U.S.,
the Justice Department
announced Thursday
The action is the latest
development in the largest
criminal investigation
the Justice Department's
criminal division has
ever carried out To date,
it has resulted in charges
against 20 companies and
21 executives, and the
companies have agreed
to pay $1.6 billion in



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563-3206
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criminal fines.
From steering assemblies
to seat belts, the price-fixing
conspiracies went on for
more than a decade and
affected more than $5 bil-
lion in auto parts sold to
U.S. car manufacturers
and installed in cars sold
in the United States and
elsewhere. In all, more
than 25 million cars pur-
chased by American con-
sumers have been affected
by the illegal conduct.
"As a result of these con-
spiracies, Americans paid
more for their cars," Attor-
ney General Eric Holder


told a news conference.
Holder said American
companies such as
Chrysler Group LLC, Ford
Motor Co. and General Mo-
tors Corp. were affected,
as were U.S. subsidiaries
of Honda Motor Co., Mazda
Motor Corp., Mitsubishi,
Nissan Motor Co., Subaru
and Toyota Motor Corp.
The government will
continue to "check every
hood and kick every tire"
to end the price fixing,
said Holder
Company executives used
code names and met face
to face in remote locations


in the U.S. and Japan to rig
bids, fix prices and allocate
the supply of auto parts,
the government alleged.
Seventeen of the 21 ex-
ecutives charged so far
have been sentenced to
serve prison terms in the
U.S. or have plea agree-
ments calling for signifi-
cant time behind bars.
The companies charged
Thursday are Hitachi Au-
tomotive Systems; Mit-
subishi Electric and
Mitsubishi Heavy Indus-
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


USDA to test new trap to catch Evergia


Associated Press
MIAMI Federal
wildlife officials alarmed
by an infestation of
Burmese pythons in the
Florida Everglades have
tried radio tracking devices,
a massive public hunt and
even snake-sniffing dogs to
control the invasive
species. Now there's talk of
snaring the elusive pythons
in specially designed traps.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture received a
patent in August for a trap
that resembles a long, thin
cage with a net at one end
for the live capture of
large, heavy snakes.
Researchers say Burmese
pythons regard the Ever-
glades as an all-you-can-eat
buffet, where native mam-
mals are easy prey and the
snakes have no natural
predators. The population
of Burmese pythons, which
are native to India and
other parts of Asia, likely
developed from pets re-
leased into the wild, either
intentionally or in the af-
termath of Hurricane An-
drew in 1992.
Wildlife officials are rac-
ing to control the python
population before it un-
dermines ongoing efforts
to restore natural water flow
through the Everglades.
According to a study released
last year, mammal sightings
in the Everglades are down
sharply in areas where
pythons are known to live.
The Gainesville field
station for the National
Wildlife Research Center,
which falls under the USDA,
is preparing to test the
trap in a natural enclosure
that contains five pythons.







Professional
Hearing Centers'
www.InvernessHearing.com
1726-HEAR (43271


Over the coming months,
the researchers will try
baiting the traps with the
scent of small mammals
such as rats, and they will
try camouflaging them as
pipes or other small, cov-
ered spaces where
pythons like to hide, said
John Humphrey, a biolo-
gist at the research center
Future tests may use python
pheromones as bait.
"There's still more to be
learned, there's still more
to be tested," Humphrey
said. "This is just one of
your tools that you have to
put together with other
things to get the problem
solved."
The trap was developed
to catch exotic snakes
without ensnaring smaller,
lighter native species,
Humphrey said.
The 5-foot-long trap is
made from galvanized
steel wire with a tightly
woven net secured to one
end. Two separate triggers
need to be tripped simul-
taneously for it to close,
which should keep it from
snapping shut on such na-
tive snakes as the eastern
diamondback rattlesnake
or the water moccasin.
'The largest native snakes
are generally somewhat
smaller than the youngest
of the pythons," Humphrey
said. "That was the impe-
tus of the design."
The longest python ever
caught in Florida was an
18-foot-8-inch specimen
found in May beside a rural
Miami-Dade County road.
Humphrey developed the
trap in collaboration with
Wisconsin-based Tomahawk
Live Trap, which is work-
ing on a licensing agree-




Iof Citrus County,


A python is caught in a test trap Nov. 18, 2011, at the USDA Wildlife Servic
facility in Gainesville, Fla.


ment to sell the traps along
with other snake-handling
equipment such as tongs,
hooks and secure bags.
"We don't expect to sell a
lot of them; it's not an
everybody thing, not like a
chipmunk or a squirrel
trap," said co-owner Jenny
Smith.
It's not clear where ex-
actly the traps would be
deployed, or whether they
would be effective in an
area as vast as Florida's
Everglades.
Everglades National
Park alone encompasses
1.5 million acres, and all
but roughly a hundred thou-
sand acres of that is largely
inaccessible swampland
and sawgrass, vital breed-
ing grounds for a variety of
protected species.
It might not make sense,
or even be possible, to
place and monitor traps in
hard-to-reach swamp-
lands, said park spokes-
woman Linda Friar.
Traps have been used in
the park to collect pythons


^ *'*g g'^.-


for research but not for
population control, Friar
said.
Most of the state and
federal efforts aimed at
pythons have focused on
learning how the elusive
snakes have adapted so
well in the wild, and that
learning process contin-
ues, she said.
"They're so difficult to
track and find," Friar said.
"What we do know is
they've adapted. We don't
know how many there are."
One of the challenges
facing wildlife officials is
that the tan, splotchy
snakes are incredibly diffi-
cult to spot in the wild,
even for seasoned hunters.
Researchers say they'll fail
to see a python they're
tracking with a radio
tracking device until


they're practice
ing on it.
The Florida
Wildlife C
Commission
hunters with s
mits to remo
and other exc
from some s
Earlier this ye
sanctioned hu
tracted world'
attention. Roi
amateur pyth
joined the per
for a month, ne
of 68 snakes.
In anAubun
experiment,
trained dogs f
pythons than t
counterparts,
searchers alsc
the dogs, muc
mans, would
longer they


&des pythons
South Florida's often op-
pressive humidity.
State wildlife officials
r* also try to catch pythons
through "exotic pet
amnesty days" where peo-
.:. ple can relinquish non-na-
,_... tive species with no
:--' questions asked. They also
urge residents to report
encounters with pythons
and other invasive species
Sto a hotline, www.
S* J IVEGOTL.org. Florida
El,.- prohibits the possession
or sale of pythons for use
as pets, and federal law
Ascated3 bans the importation and
Associated Press interstate sale of the
ces research species.
A prolonged cold snap
cally stand- has proven to be one of the
better methods of python
a Fish and population control, killing
conservation off large numbers of the
allows snakes in 2010. The popu-
special per- lation rebounded, though,
ve pythons because low temperatures
)tic reptiles aren't reliable in subtropi-
tate lands, cal South Florida and
ear, a state- because pythons repro-
mnt that at- duce quickly and in large
wide media numbers.
ugly 1,600 Other traps set for
on hunters pythons in the past haven't
'mit holders been effective, but traps
getting a total have been successfully
used to capture other ex-
n University otic species such as black-
specially and-white tegu lizards,
found more said conservation commis-
heir human sion spokeswoman Carli
but re- Segelson.
found that "It may be something
ch like hu- that if it doesn't work for
falter the the python, it may work for
worked in other species," she said.


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 A7




AS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013



Domestic battery arrest
William Weigelt, 63, of Crys-
tal River, at 10:03 a.m. Sept. 25 on
misdemeanor charges of domestic
battery and resisting an officer with-
out violence. Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
Harry Shears, 50, of South
Coleman Avenue, Homosassa, at
6:45 p.m. Sept. 25 on an active
warrant for knowingly driving while
license suspended or revoked (third
offense), and driving while intoxi-
cated. According to the arrest affi-
davit, Shears turned himself into to
authorities. Bond $3,000.
Kimberly Clement, 42, of
West Foxhill Lane, Homosassa, at
7:27 p.m. Sept. 25 on misde-
meanor charges of resisting an of-
ficer without violence, and
trespassing in a structure after
warning. According to her arrest af-
fidavit, Clement is accused of en-
tering her neighbor's home without
permission, then passing out on the
couch. She refused to leave when
a deputy advised her to do so, and
failed to obey his commands.
Bond $500.
Kourtenay Woerth, 23, of
North Cherry Lake Drive, Dunnel-
Ion, at 1:42 p.m. Sept. 25 on a mis-
demeanor charge of retail petit
theft. According to his arrest affi-
davit, Woerth is accused of shoplift-
ing a pair of Puma sneakers,
valued at $65, from the Bealls in
Crystal River. Woerth was arrested
with his brother Dakota Mosher for
the same offense. Bond $250.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD
Dakota Mosher, 19, of North
Cherry Lake Drive, Dunnellon, at
1:42 p.m. Sept. 25 on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit theft.
According to his arrest affidavit,
Mosher, along with his brother
Kourtenay Woerth, are accused of
shoplifting a pair of Puma sneakers,
valued at $65, from the Bealls in
Crystal River. Mosher wore the
shoes as he exited the store.
Bond $250.
Rebecca Bilby, 31, of North
Conant Avenue, Crystal River, at
11:51 a.m. Sept. 25 on an active
Lake County warrant for seven
counts of practicing nursing without
a license and uttering a forged in-
strument. Bond was denied.
Joseph Brooks, 53, of North
Nasturtiums Terrace, Dunnellon, at
10:46 a.m. Sept. 24 on felony
charges of trafficking in stolen prop-
erty, and grand theft. According to
his arrest affidavit, Brooks is ac-
cused of stealing furniture, a flat-
screen television, and a washer
and dryer, valued at $8,000, from a
residence on Hofstra Street in In-
verness. He went on to sell the tel-
evision set on Craigslist for $500.
Bond $7,000.
Gregory Schoonmaker, 43,
of South Barbour Street, Beverly
Hills, at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 24 on an
active warrant for a felony charge of
driving while license was sus-
pended or revoked as a habitual of-
fender, and a misdemeanor charge
of resisting an officer without vio-
lence. He was already incarcerated


at the Citrus County Detention Cen-
ter. Bond $2,500.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 11:18 a.m. Tuesday, Sept.
24, in the 3700 block of S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported at
9:33 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, in the
2300 block of S. Sandburg Point,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported at
12:43 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 1900
block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported at
1:31 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 200 block
of E. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
A petit theft was reported at
2:01 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 2800
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
A grand theft was reported at
3:31 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 10700 block
of N. Violet Terrace, Dunnellon.
A grand theft was reported at
4:46 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 700 block
of S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 6:26 p.m. Sept. 24 in the
1900 block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported at
9:15 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 3700
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.


Come out to celebrate


National Yoga Month


Special to the Chronicle
September is National Yoga
Month, and to celebrate, the public
is invited to participate in two free
classes starting at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 29, at Liberty Park in Inver-
ness. The classes will be led by
Lace Blue-McLean, owner of In-
verness Yoga & Wellness Center in
Inverness. Stay for one or both
classes. Wear comfortable clothing
and bring a yoga mat if you have
one. A limited number of mats will
be made available as well.
For information, call 352-201-0149
or visit www.yogawithlace.com.
What is yoga?
On any given week you will find
folks from all walks of life re-
tirees, professionals, parents, stu-
dents, athletes, even people who
may be recovering from injury or
surgery- "coming to the mat" be-
cause of yoga's health benefits
tothe body, mind and spirit.
A typical yoga class is 1.5 hours,
which allows for students to feel
the full benefit of a centering exer-
cise practice that promotes flexi-
bility, strength and stress release.
In our modem society, think of
how much time we spend sitting in
a prone position at work, in class,
TV watching, commuting, playing


video games, etc. Over time, this
repetitive pattern compromises our
bodies' health. The natural curves
of our spine become compressed
and stiff, our shoulders slump. Our
breathing capacity becomes less-
ened as we hunker down in our
chairs forgetting to breathe (think
shallow breathing). Our internal or-
gans become stagnant and com-
pressed in this position as well,
over time potentially impacting
their proper functioning.
Yoga "poses" bring bodies
through their natural range of mo-
tion, encouraging spines to flex,
bend and lengthen lubricating
vertebrae and contributing to a
healthy spine and skeletal system.
Muscles are strengthened by use
and contraction of body weight. We
coordinate our movements with
deep breaths to enhance the flow
of oxygen to our muscles which
at the same time naturally acti-
vates the body's calming response.
The practice and meaning of yoga
is "union," the bringing together of
our body, mind and spirit by cultivat-
ing steadiness and ease in our move-
ments. When we practice yoga we
are simultaneously building muscu-
lar strength and flexibility, while at
the same time encouraging calming
and mindfulness in breathing.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BOUTIN
Continued from Page Al

body wrapped in black
fabric near a dirt road
in the hunting area.
The medical exam-
iner characterized her
death as "acute mor-
phine intoxication" The
prosecutor, Pete Ma-
grino, said during the
trial he believed Boutin
and Brinson killed
Stires after becoming
furious with her for
stealing methampheta-
mines worth about
$1,800 from them. They
then hatched a plan to
dispose of her body
It took the jury of
five women and seven
men three-and-a-half
hours to return a guilty
verdict, but for second-
degree murder
The prosecution
was seeking the death
penalty with the first-


HIKES
Continued from Page Al

"We need to take a
deep breath and back
down a notch," said Nu-
gent "I think we agree
something needed to be
done about the subsidy
but it's hard to do cold
turkey
"People who have
homes might not be
able to sell them or
scale back, while peo-
ple who want to pur-
chase or move to a
nicer home could be
precluded; we need to
be responsive to miti-
gating that."
Thursday afternoon,
Nugent said they were
finishing up the bill
and working with
Florida and Louisiana
representatives. He
said Florida has al-
ways been a donor
state in the program,
putting in more than it
has taken out.
There are 2,848
properties in Citrus
County carrying feder-
ally subsidized flood
insurance. Overall,
there are more than


degree murder charge.
The defense team
of Charles Vaughn
and Cliff Travis -
using Boutin's own
police interview
audio tried to por-
tray him as a victim of
circumstance. Vaughn
said Boutin and Brin-
son were trying to
calm down a disrup-
tive, drug-crazed teen
when Brinson admin-
istered the fatal dose
of morphine to Stires.
They argued that the
morphine was
brought on Christmas
Day to Boutin's Ho-
mosassa home by a
man who was to have
sex with Stires in ex-
change for the drug.
The prosecution,
however, countered
by presenting the man
on the stand, who re-
futed the allegations.
The plan, Vaughn
said, was to have Stires
dress up like a male to

7,000 properties in the
county participating in
the national program.
Effective Tuesday,
subsides and dis-
counts are being
phased out, continu-
ing a process started
in July 2012.
As of Oct. 1, several
property categories
face 25 percent pre-
mium hikes each year,
until the cost reflects
the full risk rate. These
include businesses and
properties meeting a
prior loss threshold.
Properties pur-
chased after July 6,
2012, under subsi-
dized rates or policies
that have lapsed will
be subject to full-risk
rating at renewal.
Primary residences
will be able to keep
their subsidized rates,
with some annual in-
creases, unless, or
until, the property is
sold. Flood insurance
policy fees will in-
crease and 5 percent
will be added to premi-
ums for a reserve fund.
"The impact will be
tremendous in the
state of Florida," said
Cheryl Lambert, pres-


entertain the man. The
defense also blamed
all the lethal handi-
work of the murder on
Brinson, who they
claim not only admin-
istered the fatal dose
of morphine, but also
pistol-whipped Stires
about the head, caus-
ing several injuries.
Brinson was also
identified as the person
who gagged Stires and
helped restrain her in
Boutin's father's garage
in Brooksville. Stires re-
portedly died while re-
strained on a lounger in
the garage. The couple
then reportedly drove
around for two days at-
tending to their daily
business with Stires'
corpse in the trunk of
Boutin's car before dis-
posing of her body in re-
mote Levy County
Contact Chronicle
reporterAB. Sidibe at
352-564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline. corn.

ident of the Realtors
Association of Citrus
County "If it gets put
on, it will stunt the
growth of the state;
buyers are not going to
be able to purchase
here, and sellers will
be locked into homes."
She said Gov Rick
Scott and the House
are supporting a delay
and Sen. Bill Nelson
has taken up the issue.
Speaking to the
Florida Cabinet, Dean
Asher, president of
Florida Realtors,
cited the recent recov-
ery of the housing
market. But he
warned the Flood In-
surance Reform Act
could bring the posi-
tive momentum to a
screeching halt
Both Nugent and
Lambert also men-
tioned the flood insur-
ance mapping, which
is still going on in Cit-
rus and other counties.
They feel it should be
completed before any
rate hikes are enacted.
Contact Chronicle
reporter Pat Faherty
at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicle
online, corn.


Woman who fired gun at


husband to get new trial


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A
Florida woman serving 20
years in prison for firing a shot
at her estranged husband dur-
ing an argument will get a new
trial, though she will not be
able to invoke a "stand your
ground" defense, an appeals
court ruled Thursday
The case ofMarissaAlexan-
der, a Jacksonville mother of
three, has been used by critics
of Florida's "stand your
ground" law and mandatory
minimum sentences to argue
that the state's justice system
is skewed against defendants
who are black.
The 1st District Court ofAp-
peal ruled that Alexander de-
serves a new trial because the
trial judge handling her case
did not properly instruct the
jury regarding what is needed
to prove self-defense.
The ruling, written by Judge
Robert Benton, said the in-
structions constituted a "funda-
mental error" and required
Alexander to prove self-defense
"beyond a reasonable doubt"
But the court also made it
clear in its ruling that the
judge was right to block
Alexander from using the
state's "stand your ground"
law as a way to defend her ac-
tions. That law generally re-
moves people's duty to retreat
in the face of possible danger
and allows them to use of
deadly force if they believe
their lives are in danger
Faith Gay, one of the attor-
neys representing the 33-year-
old Alexander, said she was
grateful for the "thorough con-

BIDS
Continued from Page Al

expected to finalize the bid-
der Monday They must also
decide whether to sell or lease
the hospital, and attorneys are
expected to prepare by Mon-
day the advantages and disad-
vantages of either sale or
lease.
In supporting HCA, trustees
rejected both Health Manage-


sideration" provided by the
appeals court.
"We are looking forward to
taking the case back to trial,"
Gay said.
Alexander had never been
arrested before she fired a
bullet at a wall one day in 2010
to scare off her husband when
she felt he was threatening
her Nobody was hurt, but the
judge in the case said he was
bound by state law to sentence
her to 20 years in prison after
she was convicted of aggra-
vated assault with a deadly
weapon. Alexander has main-
tained that the shot fired was
a warning shot
The sentencing sparked
criticism from the local
NAACP chapter and the dis-
trict's African-American con-
gresswoman, who said blacks
more often are incarcerated
for long periods because of
overzealous prosecutors and
judges bound by mandatory
minimum sentences.
State Attorney Angela Corey
who oversaw the prosecution
of George Zimmerman in the
shooting death of Trayvon Mar-
tin, has stood by the handling of
Alexander's case. Corey said
she believes that Alexander
aimed the gun at the man and
his two sons, and that the bul-
let she fired could have rico-
cheted and hit any of them.
Jackelyn Barnard, a spokes-
woman for Corey said that the
conviction was reversed on a
legal technicality and that the
office was gratified that the
"stand your ground" ruling
was upheld.
Benjamin Jealous, presi-
dent and CEO of the NAACP,
ment Associates (HMA) and
Tampa General Hospital.
Trustees said they feared
HMA, which owns Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cen-
ter in Crystal River and pro-
posed a joint venture with the
hospitals, would put patients
and employees at a disadvan-
tage by killing health care
competition in Citrus County
And they were disinterested
in Tampa General's proposal
for a lease merger that offered
no cash up front.


called the ruling a "welcome
development in a case that
represents the double stan-
dards in our justice system."
"From the streets to the
courthouse, race continues to
influence the judicial process,
and it certainly seemed to have
played a role here," Jealous
said in a statement issued by
the civil rights organization.
The state's "10-20-life" law
was implemented in 1999 and
credited with helping to lower
the violent crime rate. Anyone
who shows a gun in the com-
mission of certain felonies
gets an automatic 10 years in
prison. Fire the gun, and it's
an automatic 20 years. Shoot
and wound someone, and it's
25 years to life.
On Aug. 1, 2010, Alexander
was working for a payroll soft-
ware company She was es-
tranged from her husband,
Rico Gray and had a restrain-
ing order against him, even
though they'd had a baby to-
gether just nine days earlier
Thinking he was gone, she
went to their former home to
retrieve the rest of her
clothes, family members said.
An argument ensued, and
Alexander said she feared for
her life when she went out to
her vehicle to get the gun she
legally owned. She came back
inside and ended up firing a
shot into the wall, which rico-
cheted into the ceiling.
Gray testified that he saw
Alexander point the gun at
him and looked away before
she fired the shot. He claimed
that she was the aggressor,
and that he had begged her to
put away the weapon.
"Tampa General is a poor
choice," trustee Dr Mark Fal-
lows said. "They've never done
this before. They don't seem to
know what they're doing."
The two boards have set an
Oct. 1 deadline to select a bid-
der to sign a letter of intent.
Closing on a final contract
would still be about six
months away
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline
.com.


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 A9




A10 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


BUDGET
Continued from PageAl

votes, House leaders
shelved a vote that had
been expected this week-
end on the debt limit
measure and gave frus-
trated GOP lawmakers few
clues about what they plan
to do to avoid a shutdown.
The chaos sets the stage
for weekend drama on
Capitol Hill, with the Sen-
ate planning to send the
fractious House a straight-
forward bill Friday to keep
the government operating
through Nov. 15 rather
than partly closing down at
midnight Monday
Speaker John Boehner
of Ohio and several rank-
and-file Republicans said
the House simply won't ac-
cept a "clean" spending
measure, even though
that's been the norm in
Congress on dozens of oc-
casions since the 1995-96
government closures that
bruised Republicans and
strengthened the hand of
Democratic President Bill
Clinton.
"I don't see that happen-
ing," Boehner said. Still,
he declared that "I have no
interest in a government
shutdown" and he doesn't
expect one to occur on
Tuesday
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid of Nevada said
the Democratic-led cham-
ber will not relent
"The Senate will never
pass a bill that guts the Af-
fordable Care Act," Reid
declared.
A partial government
shutdown would keep
hundreds of thousands of
federal workers offthe job,
close national parks and
generate damaging head-
lines for whichever side
the public held
responsible.
Washington faces two
deadlines: The Oct. 1 start
of the new budget year and
a mid-October date now
estimated for the 17th -
when the government can
no longer borrow money to
pay its bills on time and in
full.
The first deadline re-
quires Congress to pass a
spending bill to allow
agencies to stay open. The
mid-month deadline re-
quires Congress to in-
crease the government's
$16.7 trillion borrowing
cap to avoid a first-ever de-
fault on its payments,
which include interest ob-
ligations, Social Security
benefits, payments to thou-
sands of contractors large
and small, and salaries for
the military
The standoff just four
days before the end of the
fiscal year increased the
possibility of a shutdown,
with no signs of
compromise.
The No. 2 Democrat in
the Senate, Dick Durbin of
Illinois, said that because
of the time it takes the
Senate to approve even
non-controversial bills, if
the House amends a Sen-
ate-passed spending bill
and returns it to the Sen-
ate over the weekend,
"That is a concession on
their part that we're going
to shut down the
government."
Not far from the Capi-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tol, at a community col-
lege in Largo, Md., Obama
insisted he would not ne-
gotiate over his signature
domestic achievement, ei-
ther on a bill to keep the
government operating or
legislation to raise
the nation's borrowing
authority
"The entire world looks
to us to make sure that
the world economy is sta-
ble. You don't mess with
that," Obama said of the
debt ceiling/default
measure. "And that's why
I will not negotiate on
anything when it comes to
the full faith and credit of
the United States of
America."
Responding to Obama's
non-negotiable stand,
Boehner said, "Well, I'm
sorry but it just doesn't
work that way"
Meeting behind closed
doors, House Republican
leaders encountered re-
sistance from their rank
and file over the debt limit
measure even though they
were attaching a list of
other Republican favorites
such as green-lighting the
Keystone XL oil pipeline,
blocking federal regula-
tion of greenhouse gases
and boosting offshore oil
exploration.
Republicans who lost
the presidential election
and a shot at Senate con-
trol last year are trying to
use must-pass measures to
advance agenda items that
the Democratic-led Sen-
ate and Obama have
soundly rejected. The last-
ditch effort on "Oba-
macare" comes just days
before coast-to-coast en-
rollment in the plan's
health care exchanges be-
gins Oct. 1.
Despite the popular
items, the leadership was
struggling to win over its
recalcitrant GOP mem-
bers, especially tea party-
backed lawmakers
pressing for deeper,
deficit-cutting spending
measures. The spending
cuts the Republicans
would attach to the debt-
limit legislation would be
likely to represent a small
fraction of the almost $1
trillion in new borrowing
authority the bill would
permit
'Among conservatives,
there's a lot of angst about
that," said Rep. John
Fleming, R-La.
Proposed changes in-
clude requiring federal
workers to contribute
more to their pensions,
along with other items
from a failed 2011 deficit-
cutting effort.
Sen. Patty Murray, D-
Wash., the chairman of the
Senate Budget Commit-
tee, insisted that the
House accept the Senate
bill.
"Republicans have got
to put an end to the tea
party temper tantrums
and pass our bill without
any gimmicks and without
any games," she said.
In the Senate, top Demo-
crat Reid sought to sched-
ule a series of votes
Thursday night to speed
the short-term spending
bill to the House. Sens.
Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and
Mike Lee, R-Utah, blocked
the effort, however, saying
they wanted the vote on
Friday


BBB








SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning September 30, 2013
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


Waterbod Plant
Inverness Pool Duckweed / Torpedograss /
Willows / Floating / Tallow /
Pennywort / Nuphar / Cattail
Hernando Pool Duckweed / Torpedograss /
Willows / Tallow / Nuphar /
Cattail / Hydrilla
Floral City Pool Duckweed / Torpedograss /
Floating / Paspalum


Herbicide Used
Clipper/ Quest/ Diquat/
Glyphosate / 2,4D /
Element 3A
Clipper/ Quest/ Diquat/
Glyphosate / 2,4D /
Element 3A/Aquathol
Clipper / Quest /
Diquat / Glyphosate


MECHANICAL HARVESTING
Hernando Pool Tussocks / Bladderwort / Harvesting
Cabomba / Coontail
Inverness Pool Tussocks / Bladderwort / Harvesting
S. Naiad / Coontail
Floral City Tussocks Harvesting
All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality Treated areas will be identified
with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at httDp //www bocc citrus fl us/
pubworks/aauatics/a uaticservices htm Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services


Cruz and Lee take lead in



GOP assault on Obamacare


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Ted Cruz and
Mike Lee are the odd men out in
the Senate to both Republicans
and Democrats.
The GOP's frustration with the
tea party conservatives was on full
display Thursday in a remarkable,
rhetorical smackdown on the Sen-
ate floor moments after Democratic
leader Harry Reid with the
agreement of both parties tried
to move up the votes on a temporary
spending bill.
Reid wanted the votes on Thurs-
day night, and so do Republicans
who want to get the spending bill
back to the House to give Speaker
John Boehner more time with a
government shutdown looming on
Tuesday Reid is slated to strip the
bill of a provision unraveling Pres-
ident Barack Obama's health care
law and the House GOP is pressing
for a counteroffer
But Lee objected, and the votes
will occur as planned on Friday
Why? Republican Sen. Bob
Corker of Tennessee told col-
leagues that Cruz and Lee had noti-
fied conservative activists telling
them to make sure and watch the


vote on Friday He questioned their
rationale as only a gentleman of the
Senate would.
"It's my understanding again, rel-
ative to this vote tonight happening
tomorrow instead, is that my two
colleagues, who I respect, have sent
out e-mails around the world and
turned this into a show possibly, and
therefore, they want people around
the world to watch them and others
on the Senate floor," Corker said.
'"And that is taking priority over get-
ting legislation back to the House so
they can take action before the
country's government shuts down."
Corker didn't letup in gently excori-
ating Cruz and Lee, stars of summer-
time ads by the Senate Conservatives
Fund thathave put incumbent Repub-
licans on the defensive even though
they have consistently opposed the
health care law.
Cruz had waged a 21-hour, 19-
minute filibuster to delay action on
the temporary spending bill, then
turned around and voted with 99
other senators Wednesday to allow
the bill to move forward.
"I don't think we've had a 21-hour
filibuster and then the person carry-
ing out the filibuster voted for the
issue they were filibustering,"


Corker said. "I don't think that's hap-
pened in the history of our country"
Cruz responded that Corker was
wrong, that the Texas freshman had
said the critical vote was not the
first one but rather the next one
which would make clear where sen-
ators stood on the health care law
and could stop Reid from removing
the health care language.
"We are not going to be complicit
in giving Harry Reid the ability to
fund Obamacare," Cruz said.
Corker has been one of several
Republicans, including party lead-
ers, critical of the tactics by Cruz
and Lee. Many Republicans have
said the effort was futile and self-
serving, designed to boost their
public profile. Cruz has been men-
tioned as a possible presidential
candidate in 2016.
During the Cruz and Corker ex-
change, Reid and Democratic Sens.
Dick Durbin and Chris Coons sim-
ply sat and watched.
Reid complained that the de-
layed votes were "senseless" and a
"big, big stall."
Durbin complained about the Re-
publican delay Corker corrected
him, saying it was just two Cruz
and Lee.


Intelligence official sidesteps



questions on cellphone snooping


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
nation's top intelligence of-
ficial on Thursday side-
stepped questions from a
senator about whether the
National Security Agency
has ever used Americans
cellphone signals to collect
information on their
whereabouts that would
allow tracking of the move-
ments of individual callers.
Asked twice by Sen. Ron
Wyden, D-Ore., ifNSA had
ever collected or made
plans to collect such data,
NSA chief Gen. Keith
Alexander answered both
times by reading from a
letter provided to senators
who had asked the same
question last summer He
also cited a classified ver-
sion of the letter that was
sent to senators and said,
"What I don't want to do...
is put out in an unclassi-
fied forum anything that's
classified."


Wyden promised to
keep asking.
"I believe this is some-
thing the American peo-
ple have a right to know,
whether NSA has ever
collected or made plans to
collect cell site informa-
tion," Wyden said.
The testy exchange at a
Senate Intelligence Com-
mittee hearing illustrates
the wider tension that has
grown between the public
and the U.S. intelligence
community, following dis-
closures by Edward Snow-
den, a 29-year-old former
systems analyst on con-
tract to the NSA, about the
extensive NSA collection
of telephone and email
records of millions of
Americans.
The panel's bipartisan
leadership used the hear-
ing to promote their ver-
sion of legislation to
change the Federal Intelli-
gence Surveillance Act.
The lawmakers seek to


trim NSAs authority to ac-
cess and analyze U.S.
phone records and provide
new protections to Ameri-
cans' privacy They also
want to broaden the gov-
ernment's spying powers to
allow monitoring of terror
suspects who travel to the
U.S. after being tracked
overseas by the NSA
Sen. Dianne Feinstein,
D-Calif, chairwoman of
the committee, said the
legislation would "strictly
limit access to the ...
phone metadata records,
expressly prohibit the col-
lection of the content of
phone calls," and limit the
amount of time such U.S.
phone call data could be
kept.
Such records show the
date and length of calls,
and the numbers dialed.
But Feinstein's pro-
posed legislation would
not stop the bulk collec-
tion of telephone and
email records. A separate


bipartisan group of four
senators, including
Wyden, unveiled legisla-
tion earlier this week to
end those bulk collections.
Feinstein and the com-
mittee's top Republican,
Sen. Saxby Chambliss of
Georgia, defended U.S. in-
telligence efforts, as did
Alexander and Director of
National Intelligence
James Clapper insist-
ing that while they collect
U.S. bulk records, they do
not listen in on individual
Americans' phone calls or
read their emails without
a court order
Alexander and Clapper
spoke of wanting to coop-
erate with suggested
changes in order to win
back the public's trust
Clapper told the com-
mittee he was willing to
consider limiting both
how U.S. telephone and
email data collected by
NSA is used, and the
amount of time it is stored.


October 26 November 17, 2013


"Honoring our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans"


C Vii iiiE


Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal


Appreciation Week
River, FL 34429


For more information call
Chris Gregoriou 795-7000 or the
Citrus County Chronicle at 563-6363


r------------------------------------------ -----------------------
R g sr t FDeadline to register:
Registration Form ________
RegtonFFriday, October 18

Yes, we would like to participate in the following Veterans Appreciation Week 2013 events.
El Veterans Appreciation Concert, NCCB, Oct26 & 27 E Marine Corps Ball, Nov 10 ($40 pp. Call 795-7000 for tickets)
EI Operation Welcome Home Salute to Veterans, Nov 1 & Nov 3 Q Never Forget 5K Run, Nov 11
El Massing of the Colors, Nov 3 (Prior to parade)
Q Veterans in the Classroom, Nov 4 -15 Q Veterans Day Parade, Nov 11
Q Veterans Flea Market, Nov 6 El Veterans Day Monument Motorcycle Ride, Nov 11
(For VSOs. Call Dinah 746-7200) (Following parade)
QVeterans Program, Nov 7, IPS Q Memorial Service, Nov 11 (Following parade)
(Vets & guests invited) D Veterans Day Luncheon, Nov 11
Q Veterans Fair, Nov 8 (VSO cdrs. &Aux. presidents invited)
QVeterans Social, Nov 8 Q Women Veterans Luncheon, Nov 13
(Fish Fry $7 at door) (Women vets invited. Call 746-2396 for resv.)
Q Military Ball, Nov 9 Q Veterans Appreciation Program, Nov 17
($35 pp. Call 746-1135 for tickets) (Ice cream social follows)

Organization:
Mailing Address:
Description of participation for parade & fair (indicate no. & length of vehs/tris) Please attach separate sheet if necessary: __


Contact Name (Print): ___________________________________ Phone: _________
We, the above, release Citrus Publishing Inc. and the Veterans Appreciation Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee from any liability
That may be associated with Veterans Appreciation Week events.

Authorized Signature Date
Mail this form to: Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week
1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429
-----------------------------------------------------------------_


SMail your registration form to
Mail your registration form to


I I


WASHINGTON




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Farmers arrested in


fatal listeria outbreak


Associated Press
DENVER The owners
of a Colorado cantaloupe
farm were arrested Thurs-
day on charges stemming
from a 2011 listeria epi-
demic that killed 33 peo-
ple in one of the nation's
deadliest outbreaks of
foodborne illness.
Federal prosecutors
said brothers Eric and
Ryan Jensen were ar-
rested on misdemeanor
charges of introducing
adulterated food into in-
terstate commerce. Each
man faces six counts.
They pleaded not guilty in
federal court and were re-
leased on unsecured bonds.
Trial is scheduled for Dec. 2.
Prosecutors said the fed-
eral Food and DrugAdmin-
istration and the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention determined the
Jensens didn't adequately
clean the cantaloupe.
Criminal charges in food
poisoning cases are rare,
said attorney William Mar-
ler, who represents many of


Associated Press
Ryan Jensen, 33, right, and brother Eric Jensen, 37,
were arrested Thursday on misdemeanor charges of
introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce.


the listeria victims in civil
cases against Jensen Farms.
Only four other people have
faced such charges in the
past decade, he said.
The FDA has said the
melons likely were con-
taminated in Jensen
Farms' packing house. It
concluded that dirty water
on a floor, and old, hard-to-
clean equipment probably


were to blame.
The epidemic was the
deadliest outbreak of food-
borne illness in 25 years,
and it delivered a serious
blow to Colorado can-
taloupe farmers.
A number of lawsuits
were filed by people who
were sickened or who had
a family member die after
the outbreak.


Haunted house puts


clothes on 'naked event'


Associated Press
Naked and scared has
turned into semi-clothed
and kind of spooked.
A Halloween attraction's
heavily publicized plan to
allow guests to go through
one of its haunted houses in
the buff was revised Thurs-
day amid opposition from
local officials in southeast-
ern Pennsylvania.
Shocktoberfest, a popu-
lar seasonal attraction out-
side Reading, promoted
the "Naked and Scared
Challenge" as a way for
thrill-seekers 18 and over
to, um, expose their fears
and phobias by wandering
through a haunted house
completely nude.
But owner Pat Konopel-
ski said officials in nearby
Spring Township and
Sinking Spring borough
told him they weren't com-


fortable with it. So, for
now, he has agreed to re-
quire guests to wear
underwear
"We didn't really feel a
battle would have been
fruitful or help any of the
parties involved," he said.
Konopelski, who
launched Shockertober-
fest about two decades ago
and has seen it grow into
one of Pennsylvania's
largest Halloween attrac-
tions, said he was inspired
by cable TV's "Naked and
Afraid," in which two
strangers are dropped into
a challenging environment
without clothing, food or
water. He said that by al-
lowing guests to disrobe,
"they'll be very, very vul-
nerable," thus heightening
the fear factor
"Every year we keep
thinking we gotta go bigger,
we gotta go better, we gotta


impress them more.
Rather than going bigger
better, I could now scare
you with a feather," he
said.
Spring Township
awarded Konopelski a
public gathering permit in
May, but told him that al-
lowing guests to go nude
was a significant change to
his original application
and that he couldn't do it
without first getting the
township's approval. Sink-
ing Spring delivered a sim-
ilar message.
"We didn't have time to
react or fully think through
all the issues that could
arise from something like
this," said Spring Town-
ship Manager Jay
Vaughan. "He certainly
has the right next year to
make application and we
will react accordingly, but
that's next year"


Prisoner dials 911 to report escape


Associated Press
TULSA, Okla. Pris-
oner Joshua Silverman
passed up a taste of free-
dom this week and called
the police instead.
Silverman could have
fled with two other in-
mates who stole
the unattended /[
transport van he
was riding in, but
he dialed 911 and
alerted authorities
about the escape.
"Uh, yes, ma'am,
you're probably
not going to believe Jos
this, but I'm a pris- Silve


Mich
out a
andr
thek
moto
the p
air c
Bu
drove






I:
hiua
rnman


oner in a van, and I'm here throat
with a couple of these partii
other cats," Silverman po- with
litely explained to the 911 lieve
operator Tuesday 'A cou- in th(
ple of the guys that were in Du
the van jacked the van ... at minu
the hospital." Weat
Guards from a private lease
prison transport company man
had stopped in Weather- the
ford, about an hour west of After
Oklahoma City, to deliver asked
some ill inmates to a hos- tion,
pital. They left eight other teere
prisoners, including Sil- road
verman, in the van office
unsupervised. "W
With the guards gone, in- some
mates Lester Burns and becai










visit
S chronicleonline.com
dick features
S click enter contest

-I *
CHRCKINl


ael Coleman kicked
partition in the van
noved up front, where
eys remained and the
r was still running so
prisoners could have
conditioning.
rns and Coleman
e the van for about a
mile before ditch-
ing it and fleeing
on foot.
Silverman, one
of six inmates left
behind, was reluc-
tant to escape. Still
shackled, he some-
how managed to
get out of the van
perhaps
igh the kicked-out
tion and dialed 911
a cellphone police be-
he might have found
e vehicle.
ring the nearly four-
ite audio clip that
herford police re-
ed Thursday, Silver-
struggled to explain
van's whereabouts.
r the dispatcher
i for a specific loca-
the prisoner volun-
ed to walk to a nearby
to flag down an
er.
we're in Oklahoma
where. I don't know
use we're not on a


road and I'm not from
here," Silverman told the
dispatcher "I just don't
want to get shot by no cops
or nothing."
The dispatcher asked
Silverman where the rest
of the prisoners were. Five
other inmates remained
besides him.
"We're all in the van," he
said. "Two of the dudes
took off. The dudes that
were doing whatever they
were doing took off."
Silverman remained on
the phone until a patrol-
man arrived on the scene.
"The cops are right here!"
he told the dispatcher
Silverman was in cus-
tody on drug-related
charges and being taken to
Wisconsin on the day of
the escape, Weatherford
Assistant Police Chief
Louis Flowers said Thurs-
day Wisconsin court
records indicate Silver-
man was convicted of bail
jumping, drug manufac-
turing and disorderly con-
duct during the past
several years.
Flowers said Silver-
man's call Tuesday helped
police narrow their search
for Burns and Coleman,
who were taken back into
custody later that day


nline/divanight






GO


City of Inverness presents


flStrnflb





6:00 pm: Passport Inverness

7:00 pm: Live performance

by Save the Radio

A FREE Outdoor Concert with

Tampa cover band "Save the

Radio". Music from the 60's to

current and original works.

With Fox 96.7 DJ Morning JoE


R^ e *w u y ^*^\ o u T V "



f INSIGHT
RE DIT UNION


'a~f LINCOLNFE*W .

Call^ 352-726-2611 fo wjr detmais.~
"NICK NICHOLAS ,CLSIrEnS Grebo


NATION


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 All


4






A12 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


1.


OOOFFFF


Winner
Ed Serra
www.edserra.com





Honorable Mention
Humphrey &
Saltmarsh, PI
352-341-3449



Winner
Bay Area Air
Conditioning
352-795-2095


* | J0
H*lEAT ERVCE


Winner
River Safaris & Gulf
Chapters
352-628-5222




Winner
The Cotton Club
352-563-2582




Winner
Deem's Kitchen And
Bath Showrooms
352-628-9480


ORIGNAUTO

Winner
All Prestige
Automotive
352-795-7000




Winner
Strickland Funeral
Home
352-795-2678


Winner
Badcock & More
Home Furnishings
www.badcock.com


FURNITURE^^
STOREj^^


Honorable Mention
Flynn Builders
www.flynnbuilders.com





Winner
Comfort Keepers
352-726-4547


Honorable Mention
S.E.T. Home Health
352-564-2738



-OME.RMDLN


Winner
Clover Lawn
352-746-4451





Winner
Porter's Locksmith
352-564-0668


Honorable Mention
John C Meyers
Locksmith
352-422-4770

MATTRESS^
STOREJ^^


Honorable Mention
Florida Pest Control &
Chemical Co.
352-795-3614


Honorable Mention
Pawfection Ranch
352-628-2828


L


Winner
Citrus Sports &
Apparel
352-564-9402


Winner
Key Training Center
Thrift Stores
www.keytrainingcenter.org


THRIFT STOR


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Rebecca Puljas-jones Sheirff's Ranches
Photography Thirft Store
ww.photographybyre sheriffsranchesenterprises.org
becca.com


Honorable Mention Winner Honorable Mention Winner Winner Honorable Mention
Senica Air Mr. B's Carwash Easy Livin Pinecrest Building Comfort Mattress Winner Crystal River
Conditioning 352-795-9274 352-527-2558 Corp 352-628-0808 Bob Tsacrios Firestone
352-795-9685 352-527-0225 352-Plumbling 352-795-5118
352-62 1-7705


Winner
Schlabach Security
And Sound
www.sssonline.biz




Winner
Blackshears II
Aluminum, Inc
352-795-9722




Winner
Cedar Creek
At Kings Bay
www.cedarcreeklife.com




Honorable Mention
Brentwood Retirement
Community
352-746-6611


Winner
Dave's Body Shop
352-628-4878





Winner
Crystal Automotive
crystalautos.com


Winner
Stanley Steemer
stanleysteemer.com





Honorable Mention
Servicemaster
Restore
352-794-0270




Winner
Joe's Carpet
www.joescarpet.com





Honorable Mention
Michael's Floor
Covering, Inc.
352-341-0813


CHRORATO


Honorable Mention
Tri-county Overhead
Door
352-726-0072




Winner
Color Country
352-746-6465





Honorable Mention
Anson's Nursery
352-628-4554





Winner
The Bow Wow
Boutique
352-795-1684


-ARDWARE
STOREuL^^^^


Honorable Mention
Will Construction Corp
www.beautifulresulltsnow.com





Winner
Plantation
On Crystal River
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


Winner
Citrus Memorial
Health System
www.citrusmh.com




Winner
Taylor Made Homes
352-621-9181


Wne Honorable Mention
Winner Prestige Home Center
Mcpherson's Archery Of Inverness
& Outdoor Pro 352-726-4009
www.mcphersonsarchery.com 352-726-4009


Winner Winner
Smart Interiors Home Mobil 1 Lube Express
Furnishings 352-795-2333
www.smartinteriorsfurn.com


Winner Winner Winner Winner
Citrus Chiropractic Kane's Ace Hardware Raymond James Mez Mer Eyes Optical
Group 352-628-3566 www.raymondjames.com/crl Boutique
352-795-5350 352-795-2020


Winner
Ledger Dentistry
352-628-3443


Winner
Ace Hardware
352-726-8811


Honorable Mention
Mike Scott Plumbing
www.mikescottplumbing.com




Winner
Authentic Pools
352-527-7946


Winner
Como Rv, Auto Sales
And Service
352-344-1411

RADIO0

Winner
Citrus 95.3
www.citrus953.com


RADIO0

Honorable Mention
The Fox 96.7
Classic Hits
www.thefox967.com


REAL ESTATE
OFFBd~ICE


0 *A^ ^^

Winner
Express Title Services
(352) 795-2691





Winner
Becky's Travel
352-527-8855


Winner
Lecanto Veterinary
Hospital
www.lecantovethospital.com




WINNER
FDS Disposal
352-746-0617





Honorable Mention
Waste Pro
352-624-3100


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Winner Winner
Investor's Choice Beverly Hills Eye Clinic/ Exit Realty Leaders Medical Weight Loss
Financial Group homosassa Eye www.exitrealtyleaders.com Center
352-563-0700 www.drsnewcomer.com 352-564-8245


PAIN


Winner Honorable Mention Winner Honorable Mention Winner Winner Winner
Fred's Barber Shop Complete Family, Anytime Fitness Whalen Jewelers Bud Sasada Painting AAA Roofing Tropical Window
864 Ne 5th St. Cosmetic & Implant 352-795-6161 352-726-4709 352-795-1448 352-563-0411 352-795-4226
Crystal River, FL Dentistry
www.rswansondental.com


BOAT

Winner
Apopka Marine
352-726-7773



BOAT

Honorable Mention
Crystal River Marine
352-795-2597





Winner
Gulf Coast Marine
352-628-5885


Winner
Howard's Flea Market
howardsflea@aol.com





Winner
Waverley Florist
Florist352-795-1424
135v2-r795-147241


Honorable Mention
Flower Basket
352-464-8743


HEATH elO

Winner
Rutabagas
352-344-0096


HA.INGAID

Winner
Audibel Hearing
Centers
352-436-4393

-EAINAI


Winner
Jim Green Jewelers
352-563-0633





Honorable Mention
Connolly's Sod And
Nursery
www.connollysod.com


LANDSCAPER


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Gardner Audiology Connolly's Sod
352-795-5700 And Nursery
www.connollysod.com


Honorable Mention
George Swedlige
352-794-0400





Winner
Pat's Pawn
352-794-6040




Winner
Citrus Pest
Management
352-563-6698


Honorable Mention
Cypress Cove
352-795-8832




Honorable Mention
Life Care Center
352-746-4434





Winner
Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab
diamondridgeheallhandrehab.com


Winner
Vertical Blinds Of
Homosassa
352-628-7888




Honorable
Mention
72 Hr Blinds
352-527-0012





Ci IION~iIE
N EWSPAP ERE/
WEBIT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


dinner's




Circle


li"')o


I PLUMBER I


TIRE^^^
STOREJ^^


INTERIOR
DECORATOR


OIL CHANGE
I SERVICE I


INVESTMENT
I FIRM I^


OPBTICAVVISI
CE-NTER--I


I DENTIST I


INVESTMENT
I FIRM I


OPTIBCAVVISIO
CENTER I--


I DENTIST I


JEWELRY
I STORE I


I ROOFER I


WINDOW
RIPLACIMINT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,760................................. S& P 500
Close: 1,698.67
1 680 10DAY Change: 5.90 (0.3%)
1,680.--10 DAYS.*****


Interestrates


SU


he yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
rose to 2.65
percent on
Thursday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Oil prices
snapped a five-
day slide, rising
as new figures
showed the
number of U.S.
workers seeking
unemployment
benefits fell.
Metals mostly
declined. Corn
and soybeans
rose.


OS
E222

EDr~g


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill 0.01 -0.01 .10
6-month T-bill .03 0.04 -0.01 .13
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .17
2-year T-note .34 0.34 .. .26
5-year T-note 1.44 1.39 +0.05 .61
10-year T-note 2.65 2.63 +0.02 1.62
30-year T-bond 3.70 3.65 +0.05 2.78


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.48 3.44 +0.04 2.49
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.09 5.09 ... 4.20
Barclays USAggregate 2.33 2.36 -0.03 1.60
Barclays US High Yield 6.10 6.08 +0.02 6.37
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.50 4.53 -0.03 3.41
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.59 1.57 +0.02 .91
Barclays US Corp 3.26 3.29 -0.03 2.82


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 103.03
Ethanol (gal) 2.00
Heating Oil (gal) 3.00
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.50
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.71
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1323.60
Silver (oz) 21.72
Platinum (oz) 1410.70
Copper (Ib) 3.30
Palladium (oz) 722.15
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.28
Coffee (Ib) 1.16
Corn (bu) 4.57
Cotton (Ib) 0.85
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 341.30
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.28
Soybeans (bu) 13.17
Wheat (bu) 6.78


PVS.
102.66
1.89
2.97
3.49
2.67
PVS.
1335.90
21.84
1428.80
3.28
724.20
PVS.
1.28
1.17
4.55
0.84
348.40
1.30
13.22
6.71


%CHG
+0.36
-0.37
+1.03
+0.14
+1.20
%CHG
-0.92
-0.54
-1.27
+0.72
-0.28
%CHG
+0.12
-1.36
+0.44
+0.92
-2.04
-2.07
-0.38
+1.16


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.97 +.06 +14.1 +15.9 +12.8 +9.0
CaplncBuA m 56.55 +.05 +10.0 +11.3 +9.4 +6.6
CpWIdGrIA m 42.64 +.06 +16.8 +21.6 +10.6 +7.1
EurPacGrA m 46.37 +.01 +12.5 +19.2 +7.1 +6.2
FnlnvA m 48.70 +.26 +20.4 +23.9 +14.9 +9.0
GrthAmA m 42.24 +.28 +23.0 +26.8 +15.7 +9.3
IncAmerA m 19.77 +.05 +12.3 +14.2 +11.7 +8.8
InvCoAmA m 36.07 +.15 +21.0 +22.2 +14.3 +8.7
NewPerspA m 36.79 +.08 +17.7 +22.9 +12.6 +9.3
WAMutlnvA m 37.30 +.16 +21.3 +22.1 +16.4 +8.8
Dodge & Cox Income 13.49 -.02 -0.5 +0.5 +4.2 +7.7
IntlStk 41.05 -.03 +18.5 +28.8 +9.2 +7.1
Stock 152.18 +.50 +26.3 +30.6 +17.8 +9.8
Fidelity Contra 93.93 +.68 +22.2 +21.2 +15.7 +10.5
GrowCo 119.69 +1.02 +28.4 +26.6+19.4 +13.8
LowPriStk d 46.98 +.08 +24.9 +29.3 +18.1 +13.6
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 60.49 +.22 +21.0 +21.1 +16.4 +9.4
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.35 ... +9.5 +11.7+10.4 +10.6
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.03 +.01 +0.1 +4.5 +4.8 +9.7
GIBondAdv 12.98 ... +0.2 +4.7 +5.0 +9.9
Harbor Intllnstl 69.97 -.02 +12.6 +20.9 +9.5 +6.7
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc x 31.46 -.07 +20.5 +23.3 +15.7 +8.6
GrowStk 47.24 +.52 +25.0 +24.7 +17.8 +12.5
Vanguard 500Adml 156.58 +.57 +21.0 +21.1 +16.4 +9.4
500lnv 156.59 +.58 +20.9 +21.0 +16.2 +9.3
MulntAdml 13.77 ... -2.0 -1.2 +3.1 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.70 -.01 +0.3 +1.1 +2.3 +4.7
Tgtet2025 15.27 +.03 +12.4 +14.3 +10.9 +7.8
TotBdAdml 10.65 -.02 -2.1 -2.0 +2.8 +5.3
Totlntl 16.27 +.04 +10.8 +18.2 +6.2 +4.7
TotStlAdm 43.02 +.17 +22.4 +23.3 +17.0 +10.1
TotStldx 43.01 +.17 +22.3 +23.2 +16.9 +10.0
Welltn x 37.61 -.20 +13.2 +14.6 +11.8 +9.2


*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


15,720- ". .... .....


15,240.. 10 oDAYS


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,328.30
Change: 55.04 (0.4%)


1 ,7 5 0 : ........... .. ........... ............. .. ........... ............. .......... 16,0 0 .i ............. :............ ... ....... 7 ............... 7 ............. ..........
1,700 1 560....................................... 0. .

15,15506 00 ...................................
1,65 00 A ............. 0 .... ...... ......... M
112 0 0 ..... .......... ............... ........I...... ....
165 00 .z 1..... .... . ............ ... .. ........................... ............ 4 8 0: V '

1 ,5 0 0 -..... .....; .... ....... "... ........ .. .......... ...........g .... 14 ,4 0 0 ` ... ... .. ..... *......... .... ......... .. ......... ........ ... .


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 2,737
Pvs. Volume 3,076
Advanced 1925
Declined 1107
New Highs 118
New Lows 23


NASD
1,757
1,761
1508
998
141
16


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15387.19
6659.95
487.83
9755.63
3795.72
1703.85
1251.61
18189.18
1081.32


LOW
15274.42
6615.47
483.49
9696.26
3772.80
1693.11
1242.87
18068.19
1073.12


CLOSE
15328.30
6637.51
485.37
9726.25
3787.43
1698.67
1248.91
18142.66
1078.41


CHG.
+55.04
+26.18
-1.09
+27.29
+26.33
+5.90
+6.39
+74.47
+4.90


%CHG.
+0.36%
+0.40%
-0.22%
+0.28%
+0.70%
+0.35%
+0.51%
+0.41%
+0.46%


YTD
+16.97%
+25.08%
+7.12%
+15.19%
+25.43%
+19.11%
+22.39%
+20.99%
+26.97%


Stocks
Stocks ended on an upswing on
Thursday. Investors were en-
couraged by a government re-
port showing that jobless claims
declined last week, and positive
reports from J.C. Penney and
Bed Bath & Beyond. The posi-
tive trends eased worries about
budget gridlock.

Hertz HTZ
Close:$21.63V-4.15 or -16.1%
Hertz cut its profit and revenue out-
look for the year due to softer-than-
expected demand for U.S. airport
car rentals.
$30



J
J .J. *;i
52-week range
$12.97 $27.75
Vol.:74.7m (10.8x avg.) PE: 28.1
Mkt. Cap: $8.68 b Yield:...
J.C. Penney JCP
Close: $10.42 A0.30 or 3.0%
Shares edged lower for the third
consecutive day despite assurances
of stronger sales from the troubled
retailer.




J
.-:_?.?,


52-week range
$9.52 $27.00


Vol.:112.2m (5.0x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $2.3 b


PE:...
Yield:...


Air Products & Chem. APD
Close: $109.78 A2.46 or 2.3%
The gas company announced the
departure of its CEO and also board
changes under pressure from Bill
Ackman's Pershing Square.



ll, J

52-week range
$76.78 $114.75
Vol.:3.5m (1.8x avg.) PE:23.5
Mkt. Cap: $23.01 b Yield: 2.6%
Jabil Circuit JBL
Close:$21.62TV-2.38 or -9.9%
The electronics and design compa-
ny, which has a lot of exposure to
troubled Blackberry, gave a weak
first-quarter forecast.


J -:_?*


52-week range
$16.39 $24.32
Vol.:12.5m (6.6x avg.) PE: 13.7
Mkt. Cap: $4.38 b Yield: 1.5%
Bed Bath & Beyond BBBY
Close:$77.54A3.32 or 4.5%
Profit at the home furnishings retailer
spiked 11 percent and revenue
jumped 9 percent on strong compa-
rable store sales.
$80


J J
52-week range
$54.33 $78.88
Vol.:4.3m (2.7x avg.) PE: 16.8
Mkt. Cap: $16.89 b Yield:...


Positive data gives




boost to stocks


Associated Press

NEW YORK Upbeat
news about jobs and re-
tailers helped the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
snap its longest losing
streak of the year on
Thursday
U.S. unemployment
claims fell close to their
lowest level in six years,
the government reported,
and J.C. Penney and Bed
Bath & Beyond delivered
encouraging news.
The positive trends out-
weighed worries about a
potential government
shutdown in Washington
next week. Those concerns
had led the S&P 500 index
to five consecutive days of
declines, the index's worst
run in 2013.
That ended Thursday
when the S&P 500 index
rose six points, or 0.4 per-
cent, to close at 1,698.67.
"There's a little bit of a
bounce here," said Robert
Pavlik, chief market strate-
gist at Banyan Partners. "It
may be a little bit of bar-
gain hunting."
The broad index is less
than two percent below its
all-time high from Sept. 18.
U.S. economic growth
rose to an annual rate of


2.5 percent from April
through June, the Com-
merce Department re-
ported Thursday That was
an increase from the 1.1
percent growth in the pre-
vious quarter
Applications for unem-
ployment benefits fell
5,000 to a seasonally ad-
justed 305,000 last week,
the government said, the
fewest since September
2007, three months before
the Great Recession
began.
While the economic
news was encouraging, it
wasn't spectacular Some
analysts said it justified
the Federal Reserve's sur-
prise decision last week to
keep up its economic
stimulus.
The U.S. central bank
has been buying $85 bil-
lion of bonds a month to
keep long-term interest
rates low, which has en-
couraged borrowing and
driven up stock prices.
Wall Street had ex-
pected the Fed to start eas-
ing back on its stimulus.
"It's fair to say that the
Fed got it right by delay-
ing," the cuts to stimulus,
said Ron Florance, deputy
chief investment officer
for Wells Fargo Private


Bank. "Growth is uninter-
esting and subdued."
Growth-sensitive retail
stocks were among the
best performers in the 10
industry groups that make
up the S&P 500 index.
The group got a lift from
the troubled department
store owner J.C. Penney,
which said it was pleased
with its turnaround efforts.
The company's stock
ended the day up 30 cents,
or 3 percent, at $10.42.
Shares, however, fell
more than 5 percent in
after-markets trading fol-
lowing the company's an-
nouncement that it
planned to sell up to 96.6
million shares of common
stock in a public offering.
It was the latest indication
the chain is looking to
shore up its cash reserves.
Bed Bath & Beyond also
gave the industry a boost.
The stock climbed $3.32, or
4 percent, to $77.54 after
the company said its quar-
terly profit increased 11
percent.
Other stock indexes
rose. The Dow Jones in-
dustrial average climbed
55 points, or 0.4 percent, to
15,328. The Nasdaq
climbed 26 points, or 0.7
percent, to 3,787.


Business B R I E FS


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -0-- 5.90 3.94 -.07 -1.7 V A A -14.3 -17.3 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0-- 39.00 34.23 +.18 +0.5 V A V +1.5 -5.8 26 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 32.67 -- 48.01 46.21 +.04 +0.1 A A A +23.0 +31.3 24 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 81.60 -- 103.85 100.21 +.75 +0.8 V A A +14.6 +17.2 2.21e
Bank of America BAG 8.70 15.03 14.08 -.06 -0.4 V V A +21.3 +58.9 25 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 9.04 --- 13.08 11.80 -.10 -0.8 V 7 A +3.8 +13.5 42
CenturyLink Inc CTL 31.85 0- 42.45 32.11 +.11 +0.3 V 7 7 -17.9 -18.1 19 2.16
Citigroup C 31.88 -- 53.56 48.93 -.33 -0.7 V A A +23.7 +50.0 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 --- 26.38 22.34 -.14 -0.6 V 7 7 +41.0 +60.8 80 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 --0- 67.89 65.24 +.79 +1.2 A A A +31.0 +24.1 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 -0- 75.46 67.65 +.39 +0.6 A A A +6.0 +9.3 20 3.12f
EPR Properties EPR 42.44 -0-- 61.18 49.90 +.17 +0.3 7 A 7 +8.2 +18.4 22 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 -0-- 95.49 87.07 -.07 -0.1 V 7 7 +0.6 -2.4 9 2.52
Ford Motor F 9.71 0 17.77 17.27 +.08 +0.5 V A A +33.4 +73.8 12 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.87 --0- 24.95 24.25 +.02 +0.1 A A A +15.5 +12.0 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 58.75 -- 81.56 76.07 +.55 +0.7 7 A 7 +23.0 +28.9 23 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 25.98 23.41 -.29 -1.2 7 A 7 +13.5 +9.2 13 0.90
IBM IBM 181.10 --- 215.90 190.22 +.75 +0.4 A A 7 -0.7 -5.8 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 17.16 0 32.29 31.68 +.34 +1.1 V A A +50.1 +63.2 34
Lowes Cos LOW 29.66 0 49.17 47.89 +.35 +0.7 A A A +34.8 +62.5 24 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -- 103.70 98.19 +.57 +0.6 A A V +11.3 +8.4 18 3.24f
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 --0- 36.43 32.77 +.26 +0.8 V 7 7 +22.7 +10.0 13 1.12f
Motorola Solutions MSI 49.49 --- 64.72 59.87 +.02 ... V A A +7.5 +19.9 17 1.24f
NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 --- 88.39 80.44 +.11 +0.1 V 7 7 +16.3 +19.1 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 9.93 0- 27.00 10.42 +.30 +3.0 V 7 7 -47.1 -59.0 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -- 21.09 17.68 +.12 +0.7 7 A 7 -2.0 +4.5 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 --0- 10.52 9.18 -.07 -0.8 V 7 7 +28.8 +29.4 11 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -- 68.77 60.38 +.66 +1.1 A A A +46.0 +16.3 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 81.60 -- 114.72 105.69 -.17 -0.2 V 7 A +22.6 +25.5 20 2.32f
Texas Instru TXN 26.94 0 40.94 40.38 +.06 +0.2 V A A +30.7 +48.4 25 1.20f
Time Warner TWX 42.61 0 66.01 64.87 +.90 +1.4 A A A +35.6 +44.7 18 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 65.85 -- 104.38 102.80 +1.00 +1.0 A A A +40.2 +51.6 19 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 -0- 54.31 47.67 +.73 +1.5 V 7 7 +10.2 +7.4 97 2.12f
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 34.93 35.05 +.28 +0.8 A A A +39.1 +25.8 1.57e
WalMart Strs WMT 67.37 -0- 79.96 74.62 -.03 ... V A A +9.4 +3.0 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 31.88 0 56.84 54.73 -.12 -0.2 V A A +47.9 +55.2 24 1.26f
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


substitute for french fries in its value meals.
The fast-food company also said it would
use the packaging for its Happy Meals to pro-
mote healthier options. It said all advertising to
kids will include a "fun nutrition or children's
well-being" message.
The world's biggest hamburger chain was
set to make the announcements at the Clinton
Global Initiative in New York City, where CEO
Don Thompson was slated to speak late in the
afternoon. The changes follow an announce-
ment by rival Burger King on Tuesday that it
would launch a new crinkle-cut french fry that
it says has about 20 percent fewer calories
than its regular fries.
The moves come as McDonald's faces criti-
cism from health advocates who say it pro-
motes bad eating habits. McDonald's, based
in Oak Brook, Ill., is also trying to shake its
fast-food image to keep up with shifting tastes.
Chains such as Chipotle and Panera, for ex-
ample, have become more popular because
they're seen as offering higher quality food for
a little extra money.
NY proposals would allow
new gas storage sites
ALBANY, N.Y New York regulators pro-
posed rules Thursday that would allow new
storage and truck fueling stations for liquefied
natural gas to be built in the state for the first
time since a 1973 explosion that killed 40
workers at a Staten Island storage facility.
The Department of Environmental Conser-
vation said the first permits would likely be is-
sued for smaller facilities supplying fuel to
long-haul and fleet trucks that use liquefied
natural gas as a cheaper substitute for diesel.
DEC Commissioner Joe Martens said lower
emissions from burning liquified natural gas as
a fuel instead of diesel "will provide significant
benefits to the environment and public health"
and will create jobs.
The proposal comes as New York remains
under a 5-year-old moratorium on shale gas
drilling with hydraulic fracturing that has pro-
duced abundant, low-cost natural gas else-
where in the country.
The state's 1973 moratorium on the siting of
new liquefied natural gas storage facilities was
lifted in 1999 for all locations except New York
City. But DEC hadn't drafted the regulations
needed to allow the siting of new facilities until
now. The state's only three facilities, all in New
York City, were grandfathered in when the
moratorium was imposed.
Russ Haven of the New York Public Interest
Research Group said he hasn't been able to
make a detailed evaluation yet of the pro-
posed regulations, but said it appears the pro-
posal would allow facilities of any size
throughout the state and allow more wide-
spread transportation of the fuel. Currently,
transportation of liquified natural gas is al-
lowed only on federal highways in New York
and on limited local roads.
From wire reports


EA Sports settles college
athlete likeness cases
NEW YORK Video game maker Elec-
tronic Arts and the Collegiate Licensing Com-
pany have settled all lawsuits brought against
the companies by former and current college
athletes over the unauthorized use of the play-
ers' images and likenesses in video games
and other merchandise.
The NCAA is not part of the settlements,
which includes the O'Bannon case. Brought
by former UCLA basketball star Ed O'Bannon,
that lawsuit was asking for the NCAA, EAand
CLC to share billions of dollars in revenues
with college athletes.
The settlement was submitted for approval
to the U.S. District Court in Northern California
and the terms were confidential.
Also Thursday, EA Sports announced it
wouldn't make a college football video game
next year because of the ongoing legal issues.
Google's 'Hummingbird'
hatches new search formula
MENLO PARK, Calif. Google has quietly
retooled the closely guarded formula running
its Internet search engine to give better an-
swers to the increasingly complex questions
posed by Web surfers.
The overhaul came as part of an update
called "Hummingbird" that Google Inc. has
gradually rolled out in the past month without
disclosing the modifications.
The changes could have a major impact on
traffic to websites. Hummingbird represents
the most dramatic alteration to Google's
search engine since it revised the way it in-
dexes websites three years ago as part of a
redesign called "Caffeine," according to Amit
Singhal, a senior vice president for the
company.
He estimates that the redesign will affect
the analysis of about 90 percent of the search
requests that Google gets.
Any reshuffling of Google's search rankings
can have sweeping ramifications because
they steer so much of the Internet's traffic.
Google fields about two of out every three
search requests in the U.S. and handles an
even larger volume in some parts of Europe.
The changes could also drive up the price of
Google ads tied to search requests if websites
whose rankings are demoted under the new
system feel they have to buy the marketing
messages to attract traffic.
The search ads and other commercial
pitches related to Web content account for
most of Google's revenue, which is expected
to approach $60 billion this year.
McDonald's to offer
salad, fruit as side
NEW YORK Want a side salad with that
Big Mac?
McDonald's says it will start giving customers
the choice of a salad, fruit or vegetable as a


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BUSINESS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 A13





Page A14. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013



PINION


"Human progress is furthered, not by
conformity, but by aberration."
H.L. Mencken, 1922


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.j Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ON THE RIGHT TRACK





EDC moves




to create




a plan


very county in America
is interested in local
economic development.
From a Citrus County per-
spective, that's
pretty stiff compe-
tition. THE I
And that's why
our local officials EDC tc
charged with the a r
responsibility of
economic devel- OUR 01
opment are taking Create t
a more serious and then
approach toward
creating a plan
that gives us a greater oppor-
tunity for success.
Make no mistake eco-
nomic development means
jobs and lower taxes for Cit-
rus County residents. Our
community needs both.
The county's Economic De-
velopment Council recently
contracted with an outside con-
sulting firm to develop a strate-
gic plan for economic growth.
The consultants are working
with EDC members and busi-
ness leaders to craft a plan that
recognizes our county's
strengths and weaknesses.
Once recognized, the com-
munity will have to deal with
the most important shortcom-
ings. The strategic plan will
also help us identify what
types of economic growth can
be supported by the strengths
of our community and then
target specific industries for
recruitment.


Unfair situation
I just wanted to address this
situation and maybe possibly see
if any other citizens would possi-
bly respond. Yes, I have a very
good friend. She's a single mom
with four kids and she's been di-
vorced. Her ex-husband owes ap-
proximately $80,000 in back
child support and he only pays
her about $25 a month just so he
doesn't get, you know, put in jail
or lose his driver's license. And
because of that unfortunate situ-
ation, she receives food stamps
and she tells me she gets $200 a
month. And her one daughter just
started a new job. She
makes, you know, mini- ot
mum wage and she
brings home approxi-
mately $40 to $50 a
week because she's also
in school, so she can't
work full time. Well, be-
cause she got the job
and brings home $40 to
$50 a week, the govern- C A
ment totally canceled 563-
her food stamps, which
she made about $200 a
month. Well, because the daugh-
ter now works, the government
expects the daughter to give her
mother the money for food. And,
you know, she got a job so she
could try to save up to go to col-
lege. I'm just thinking that it's re-
ally not fair, you know, the way the
government does that.
Waste of time
Congressman (Richard) Nu-
gent's so-called town hall meet-
ing was very disappointing. He
told of being able to keep his


Is
C


PI

tn
n


I

(


The recent success of EDC
executive Don Taylor, EDC
president Joe Meek and the
council to attract Duke En-
ergy's new gas
plant to Citrus is
ISUE: an incredible first
success.
create Economic de-
an. velopment is not
about bringing a
'INION: Walmart or Pan-
he plan, era Bread to Cit-
work it. rus County. Those
retail successes
happen because a
community's population and
demographics will finan-
cially support them.
Economic development is
about bringing companies
that create goods and serv-
ices that are sold outside of
our community and create
wealth for those who live
here.
Those companies are inter-
ested in ready sites for facili-
ties, a qualified workforce
and a government that acts as
a partner
Important community as-
sets are a good transportation
network, a strong education
system and a balance quality
of life.
Our EDC is finally on the
right track toward success.
We need to listen to the ex-
perts and aggressively deal
with our shortcomings. The
end result will be a stronger
local economy.


son on his and his wife's insur-
ance policy until the son turns
31 and he spoke of his $1,500
insurance payment for his fam-
ily. He considered that some of
those attending were uninsured
because of pre-existing condi-
tions and had come to hear his
advice on this matter. After fill-
ing up an hour with talking
points, he left time to answer
only three or four questions be-
fore making a speedy exit. Many
came with the hope of getting
some answers, but they left
empty-handed.
Where would we be?
JND Thank you, Ernie
J Porter, for your short,
AEE positive letter to the ed-
6- itor Monday morning
(Sept. 16). What a won-
derful way to start the
week. I agree with you.
I have a tendency to be
like you do. However,
we have these so-called
7 wannabe editors who
) write pages and a half,
columns and a half, of
letters to the editor with nothing
but negative. What would the
Chronicle do if these so-called
letter to the editor writers didn't
send in the bull that they send?
Enjoy kids in the pool
This is for the person who com-
plained about the swimming pool
last week at Bicentennial, that it
was full of kids and they couldn't
go swimming. If that swimming
program saves one child's life, it
will be more than worth it and
they can get over it.


Appeasement path not taken


BY DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
WASHINGTON
resident Obama is receiv-
ing flak from Republicans
and some Democrats, too,
over his attendance at the U.N.
general assembly meeting in
New York this week. They say it
was a bust because the Iranians
snubbed him and the Russians
are stringing him along in their
bid to keep Syrian President
Assad in power But particu-
larly cynical and dark view of
Obama's leadership, which is
now in its fifth year, is seeing
the brush strokes instead of the
picture the big picture.
It is wrong to measure
Obama's effectiveness by
whether the new Iranian presi-
dent deigned to meet with him
or not. What is important is that
Obama has opened up a line of
communication with President
Rouhani, and that direct talks
between the U.S. and Iran will
take place. Secretary of State
John Kerry is meeting with the
Iranian foreign minister in New
York Thursday, the first such
meeting in decades.
The last U.S. secretary of state
to have any exchange with his
Iranian counterpart was Colin
Powell in 2001, and that was just
a handshake. The last U.S. pres-
ident to meet with an Iranian
head of state was Jimmy Carter
in the 1970s when the Shah was
still in power
What happened in New York
is important, not a snub, not an
embarrassment, but forward
progress on a global relation-
ship that has been a longstand-
ing problem not only for the
U.S. but for our closest ally in


SOther VOICES


the Middle East, Israel, al-
though the Israeli leadership
warns that Obama is naive if he
expects Rouhani to be substan-
tially different than his prede-
cessor, who vowed to wipe
Israel off the face of the Earth.
Obama is innately cautious,
but in his first campaign for
president, he put his marker
down with a simple yes when
asked during a multicandidate
debate whether he would agree
to meet the leaders of Iran,
Syria, Venezuela, Cuba, and
North Korea "without precon-
dition during the first year of
your administration." Hillary
Clinton said no, and Obama ex-
ploited that difference between
them in a later debate, saying,
"I said early in this campaign I
would meet not just with our
friends, but with our enemies.
Not just with those we like, but
those that we don't ... Senator
Clinton said, 'Oh no, that'd be
naive, that'd be irresponsible.' I
said, 'Remember what John F
Kennedy said.' He said, 'You
should never negotiate out of
fear, but you should never fear
to negotiate."'
Six years later, Obama is de-
livering on his promise despite
heavy pressure to stick to the
same hard line that appears to
finally be bringing Iran to the
negotiating table. Rouhani cam-
paigned on a promise of more
engagement with the West and
he won in what was billed as a
major upset. There are legiti-
mate questions about how much
maneuvering room he has with
the mullahs ultimately in
charge, but Obama is right to


take advantage of this opening
The president was faulted for
going to New York without hav-
ing everything pre-scripted.
Aides hinted that Obama and
Rouhani might meet "at the
margins," meaning in diplo-
matic-speak that they might
bump into each other in the
halls, or at a luncheon for heads
of state. It turns out the Iranian
president as a devout Muslim
doesn't attend luncheons where
wine is served, and with so
much symbolism at stake, no
meeting would be accidental,
and it didn't happen.
Obama is being faulted for
what he calls "style points," but
diplomacy is a long, hard slog,
and so far he is getting more
things right than wrong. Just be-
cause he has taken the first
steps to engage with the new
Iranian president doesn't mean
he is going to cave in to all his
demands. It means diplomacy
may be taking root in an area of
the world where for too long it
has been absent.
Apparently his detractors be-
lieve that talking leads to ap-
peasement, when, in fact,
talking is the life blood of diplo-
macy It is rarely exciting, but it
is the tool of the true statesman.
And the true patriot knows that
diplomacy offers many options,
many paths, and appeasement
is the path not taken.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor
Clift author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column,
founded in 1932 by Drew
Pearson.





AiECtORY


7


LETTERS to the Editor


Don't wait, register
to vote now
In 2008, six million Ameri-
cans told the U.S. Census Bu-
reau that they hadn't voted
because they either didn't
know how to register or missed
the deadline.
Thus the idea for a national
day of action to push people to
register to vote was born.
The primaries may be al-
most a year away, but it is
never too early to protect your
Constitutional right to have a
say in how your city, county,
state and nation are run.
The League of Women Voters
encourages you to make sure
you can vote. We've made it
easy: go to www.vote411.org or
stop by your local Supervisor
of Elections Office, fill in the
form and tell everyone you
know to do it as well.
Your vote, your voice. Use it
Florida's future depends upon
it.
Marie Pettibone, president
Citrus County
League of Women Voters

HCA clear choice
for CMH future
Dear directors and trustees,
The Citrus County Medical
Society has met for the pur-
pose of assessing the alterna-
tives and legal consequences
of a lease or sale of our hospi-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

tal. We have held special meet-
ings with the suitors and
polled our membership.
We believe your organiza-
tions should break free from
the past and set a precedent
for a better future. We believe
a successful future will blos-
som from the sale of Citrus Me-
morial hospital. We believe the
appeal of "not-for-profit" or
medical school affiliations are
mirages. The facts, the presen-
tations, the energy level, the
money issues all point to a
long-term relationship with
HCA
Citrus Memorial hospital is a
wonderful facility with oppor-
tunity to become a true gem.
Please work with us in making
Citrus County the best possible


place to live. We believe that
HCA has the reputation, the
capital and experience neces-
sary to assist you and us on our
mission. Please ignore the
pipe dreams and let common
sense and wisdom guide your
decision.
Sincerely yours,
Dr. Jeff Wallis
president of CCMS
Dr. Meena Nathan
past president
Dr. Gustavo Fonseca
past president
Dr. William Harrer
past president

It depends on one's
point of view
The U.S. has a stockpile of
"nukes" to dissuade any nation
from attacking us and that's
OK
BasharAssad (Syria) has
chemical weapons to discour-
age any nation from attacking
Syria and that's not OK.?
Unless Syria threatens to at-
tack the U.S. leave them
alone.
We are not the world's police
department.
Pay attention, please.
Ed Mitrani
World War II combat
decorated veteran
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Don't get caught
up in class warfare
If you are born poor, it's
not your fault, but if you
stay poor, it's your fault,
because you had a choice.
The Chronicle printed
the names of some very
rich Americans and if you
want to see the top 400 or
so go to Forbes.com. It will
give you their names and
approximate gross worth.
It's pretty impressive.
Do I want to take some
of their money and enjoy
their wealth? Not really,
but I am jealous. Some-
times I wish I had their
ideas and would be will-
ing to take the risk, put
them to work and make a
fortune. One thing all
these people have in com-
mon is they had an idea,
they own a business or
are the head of a com-
pany They all have a lot
of people working for
them and as such, have
large payrolls and also
pay benefits.
I think that the stock
market determines, in a
large part, the gross value
of these individuals. I
don't think their money is
in bank accounts, maybe a
checking account, but cer-
tainly not a savings or CD
account. I think their
money is in brokerage ac-
counts, stocks, bonds and
mutual or index funds. In
other words, their money
is invested and at risk.
The amount of risk varies
with the type of invest-
ment and the company
The moral of the story is:
If your money is in the
bank, you will not become
rich and your growth will
be limited to your de-
posits and the interest
rate. If you invest your
money in the economy of
the U.S., through a stock
broker, you will have the
opportunity to grow with
the economy
Now, just what do you
think the bank does with
your deposits? They in-
vest it many different
ways, keep most of the
earnings and pay you a
pittance. Do you still
want to keep your money
in the bank so that it's
safe and FDIC insured? If
you do, it will not grow
with the economy, so
don't complain about how
much money someone
else has. Just be satisfied
with what you have, be-
cause that's the way you
want it.
You say those people
don't pay income tax. I
think that they do and lots
of it Remember, liars can
figure, but figures don't


lie. Check it out for your-
self and don't believe
everything someone tells
you. There is an awful lot
of embellishment and dis-
tortion in the statements
that come our way and it's
up to us to learn the truth,
sometimes the hard way
Some of these billion-
aires are very benevolent.
Next time you go into a
public library and there
are lots of them, look at
the computers that are
there for public use. I
think you will find that
they were donated by the
Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation. Also, remem-
ber that Bill Gates, Warren
Buffet and maybe others,
are donating billions to
various charities. You say
well they can afford it; yes
they can, but they don't
have to do it, they want to
give it away give back, and
do lots of good. We should
all be very thankful. If you
look at the list on
Forbes.com, look for Rock-
efeller He is not near the
top. Remember all the
money his family and their
foundation have donated
to various causes. Thanks
to the Rockefeller family
and others for their chari-
table giving.
What ever you do, don't
allow yourself to get roped
into class warfare; this
doesn't solve anything.
Alfred E. Mason
Crystal River

Restructuring
on the horizon
It appears Brad
Thorpe's administration
could be in for another re-
structuring.
Vince Cautero has ac-
cepted a job in Cape
Coral. When Cautero de-
parts, it will amount to
four upper level officials
from Thorpe's adminis-
tration who have sought
other opportunities in
local government. It is un-
clear whether these de-
partures are the result of
the county's difficult fi-
nancial condition or frus-
tration about the
administrator's manage-
ment style. If readers will
recall, Thorpe announced
his "retirement" and then
subsequently unretired
for unknown reasons.
Thorpe was allowed back
as the county administra-
tor, citing an insufficient
applicant field.
Obviously, Cape Coral
feels otherwise regarding
the qualifications of Mr
Cautero.
Claude Strass
Homosassa


IRANIAN
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A IP
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'w[P W TAw To TW goUS gePOicAUNS?"


Dangerous suspects
I'm reading in the paper Sept. 6
about the two drug addicts. One is
titled "A drug-addled man," and the
other is "Driver caught following
wild chase," and he was caught
with drug-making material in his
car. These guys are dangerous.
They need to be taken off the street
... They need to go to lockup and
get them off the street. They're
dangerous to the population, espe-
cially where children are involved.
Racing through the green
Hey, Sound Off, I'm from Crystal
River. I'm off (State Road) 44. Re-
cently they put a light at Meadow-
crest ... They need to have a sheriff
hiding around there because peo-
ple race through that to catch that
light green. They race. I can do over
the limit and they're flying by me.
Not good. We're in a small town.
Let's keep it healthy and safe. Well,
healthy is up to you, but safe,
please. Cars (are) racing to get
through that green light, even
through the red sometimes.
Take home more costly
In today's Chronicle I'd like to cri-
tique the "Take-home cars make
sense." First of all, the sheriff's
deputies' cars cost a lot to main-
tain, cost a lot for gas. I've already
shopped down in Hernando County
Super Walmart and I've seen Citrus
County deputy cars parked there


Sound OFF
while they were inside shopping.
I've been at doctors' offices, I've
been to dentists' offices and sher-
iff's deputies' cars were parked out-
side while they're inside getting
their medical problems taken care
of. And if you do the math, you
would see how much more expen-
sive it is for them to take their cars
home, especially if they're using it
for personal use. And get off this
kick that they're on duty 24 hours a
day, seven days a week. That's not
entirely true. Maybe detectives are,
but not the deputies.
Not worth the money
I just saw our great commissioner
by the name of Joseph Meek. Well, I
want to tell you something. I don't
think he's worth the money he gets
paid. For them to give him a county
vehicle, too, on top of his wages, I
think that's totally ridiculous. The
county taxpayers are paying for that
and I don't think that's right. He
doesn't need an automobile.
Editor's note: Commissioner Meek
doesn't have a county vehicle. He
drives his own vehicle. None of the
commissioners have county vehicles.
No support from courts
The state took my children away
in the year 2000, took them until
three years, eight months later. I fi-
nally got custody of them away
from an alcoholic mother who en-
dangered them the whole time. Lit-
tle that I said or did, did the courts


take into consideration. They just
have no consideration for the father
whatsoever. During that time, I paid
tens of thousands of dollars in
child support. I, on the other hand,
get no support, no action from the
courts, no nothing.
Thanks for showing up
I'm just calling to say thank you
to Mr. "JJ" Kenney for coming to a
special birthday party that we had
for Helen Nedelsky for her 100th
birthday. All the commissioners
were invited. But thank you, "JJ."
You were the only one who showed
up. You're a real classy guy. Can't
thank you enough. A very, very
grateful fan.
Enough drugs already
So the editorial staff of the Chron-
icle thinks it's time to legalize mari-
juana for medicinal purposes. It's
just going to open everything up to
abuse. You know that. Doctors are
going to give people scripts that say,
"Yup, you need it," when they don't
need it ... the Chronicle needs to
lighten up, man. God, don't we have
enough drugs out there right now?
Save our bottled water
I wonder if the company that's get-
ting our water for free to turn into
bottled water, I wonder if they're
going to help us celebrate Save Our
Waters Week. Why can they get
176,000 gallons a day and nobody's
metering it? Sure, let's save our water.


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OPINION


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 A15









NATION
ATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Light art


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Postmaster: Money woes


behind rate hike request


World BRIEFS

Protest


Associated Press
Pedestrians walk under
Particle Falls, a temporary
public art installation by
Andrea Polli, which is
being projected on the
face of the Wilma Theater
in Philadelphia. The light
display represents real
time air quality as
detected by a nearby
monitor and runs every
evening from Sept. 26
through Dec. 1.


Teacher freed
after 30-day term
for raping teen
BILLINGS, Mont.-A
former high school teacher
has been released from a
Montana prison after com-
pleting a 30-day sentence
for rape handed down by a
judge under fire for both the
sentence and his remarks
about the 14-year-old
victim.
Fifty-four-year-old Stacey
Rambold returned Thurs-
day to his hometown of
Billings, where he was seen
reporting to the local proba-
tion office after completing
his term for the 2007 rape
of Cherice Moralez.
Rambold will remain on
probation until 2028, and
has been registered as a
low-risk sex offender.
He was convicted after
violating terms of a deferred
prosecution agreement he
made after Moralez killed
herself in 2010.
Prosecutors are appeal-
ing District Judge G. Todd
Baugh's sentence. A com-
plaint has been filed by ad-
vocates seeking Baugh's
removal.
The judge said at an Au-
gust sentencing hearing
that Moralez seemed "older
than her chronological age."
Transformers
headed to
crippled NY rail
NEW YORK Officials
announced a plan to supply
partial power to a heavily
trafficked line of the nation's
second largest commuter
railroad as tens of thou-
sands of commuters took to
the highways and contin-
ued to scramble for alterna-
tive routes after a power
failure disrupted service
along the line serving the
densely populated Con-
necticut suburbs and New
York City.
New York-based utility
Consolidated Edison was
setting up three transform-
ers to try and supply 13,000
volts of power to a high-
voltage line that failed
Wednesday at a suburban
New York Metro-North Rail-
road station, Connecticut
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said
at a news conference in
New York City's Grand Cen-
tral Terminal Thursday
evening.
Gettysburg park
grants KKK
event permit
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -
The Ku Klux Klan has been
granted a permit to hold an
event at Gettysburg Na-
tional Military Park.
Park officials said the
special-use permit was ap-
proved for a Maryland-
based KKK group to
exercise its First Amend-
ment rights on Oct. 5. The
afternoon event will be held
on the lawn area north of
Gen. George Meade's
Headquarters.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Postmaster Gen-
eral Patrick Donahoe said Thursday
the Postal Service had no choice but
to ask for an emergency rate hike
given the agency's dire finances.
One day after his cash-strapped
agency proposed raising the first-
class stamp price to 49 cents, Dono-
hoe urged swift action by Congress
to overhaul the Postal Service and
fix its finances.
The post office expects to lose
$6 billion this year It wants to raise
stamp prices by 3 cents next year
The request must be approved by
the independent Postal Regulatory
Commission.
"We did not want to take this step,
but we had no choice due to our cur-
rent financial position," Donahoe
said.
Donahoe appeared before the Sen-
ate Homeland Security and Govern-
mental Affairs Committee to press for
approval of bipartisan legislation that
would allow his agency to end Satur-
day delivery after one year and cease
door-to-door delivery for new resi-


Associated Press
FRESNO, Calif. With the har-
vest in full swing on the West
Coast, farmers in California and
other states say they can't find
enough people to pick high value
crops such as grapes, peppers, ap-
ples and pears.
In some cases, workers have
walked off fields in the middle of
harvest, lured by offers of better
pay or easier work elsewhere.
The shortage and competition
for workers means labor ex-
penses have climbed, harvests
are getting delayed and less fruit
and vegetable products are being


Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe
testifies Thursday in Washington
before the Senate Homeland Security
and Governmental Affairs Committee
hearing on reforming and renewing
the U.S. Postal Service.
dential and business addresses. Many
lawmakers and postal worker unions
said the delivery changes would in-
convenience customers.
"The choice is simple: greater
flexibility and authority now, or mas-
sive taxpayer exposure and service
degradation later," Donahoe said.
Donahoe noted that his agency's
request for a price hike probably
won't be decided for three months, a
delay that he said hampers the


picked, prompting some growers
to say their income is suffering.
Experts say, however, the short-
age is not expected to affect
prices for consumers.
But farmworkers, whose in-
comes are some of the lowest in
the nation, have benefited, their
wages jumping in California to $2
to $3 over the $8 hourly minimum
wage and even more for those
working piece rate.
The shortage driven by a
struggling U.S. economy, more
jobs in Mexico, and bigger hur-
dles to illegal border crossings -
has led some farmers to offer un-
usual incentives: they're buying


Postal Service's ability to run an ef-
ficient and competitive business.
"That's not a good environment to
be in when you are fighting for your
life," he said.
The Senate bill also would pro-
vide greater flexibility for the Postal
Service to set prices on its own.
Under federal law, the post office
cannot raise its prices more than the
rate of inflation unless it gets ap-
proval from the commission. The
Senate proposal would have the in-
flationary rate cap expire in 2016.
For years, the Postal Service has
struggled with declining mail vol-
ume and a 2006 congressional re-
quirement that it make advance
payments to cover expected health
care costs for future retirees.
The bill would change how health
costs for future retirees are calcu-
lated. The Postal Service is seeking
to reduce its $5.6 billion annual pay-
ment for future retiree health bene-
fits. It missed two of those payments
in 2012, deferred one from the pre-
vious year and is expected to miss
another at the end of this month,
when its fiscal year ends.


meals for their workers, paying
for transportation to and from
fields, even giving bonuses to
those who stay for the whole
season.
And a few have stationed fore-
men near their crews to prevent
other farmers from wooing away
their workers.
"In the past, we were overrun
with farmworkers. But not any-
more," said labor contractor
Jesus Mateo, whose crews saw a
20 percent pay increase. "Em-
ployers have to do something to
attract them. The fastest workers
can now earn more than $1,000
per week."


Rescuers struggling after Pakistani quake


355 dead, nearly
700 injured

Associated Press
LABACH, Pakistan Sepa-
ratist militants fired two rockets
that narrowly missed a Pakistani
government helicopter surveying
a region devastated by an earth-
quake, underscoring the dangers
authorities face in helping vic-
tims in Baluchistan, the country's
most impoverished province.
The doctor in charge of the
main hospital in the area said the
facility doesn't even have an X-ray
machine or a laboratory and that
supplies of crucial medicines
were running low, as the death
toll from Tuesday's magnitude 7.7
quake climbed to 355, with nearly
700 people injured.
Survivors complained that aid
was not reaching remote areas.
"We don't even have tents to
cover my kids," said Haji Wajd
Ali, who lives in the village of
Labach, where every other house
was destroyed.


"There are no shops. There is
no food. There is no water," he
said as temperatures reached 100
degrees during the day
Labach lies just a few miles out-
side the capital of Awaran district
one of the poorest in Baluchistan.
In the town of Awaran, about
100 people demonstrated around
the district office to call attention
to the plight of those still waiting
for help. The quake flattened
wide sections of the district leav-
ing hundreds of people crushed
or injured beneath the crumbled
piles of mostly mud brick houses.
Helping the residents has been
made even harder by the danger
from Baluchistan separatists who
have been battling the Pakistani
government for years.
The militants fired two rockets
Thursday at a helicopter carrying
top Pakistani officials in charge of
relief operations, but missed their
target, said the deputy district
commissioner, Abdur Rasheed.
The helicopter was carrying the
head of the country's National
Disaster Management Authority, a
Pakistani Army general in charge
of relief operations and other
officials.


Associated Press
Pakistani women gather Thursday by the
window of a local clinic, waiting to receive
medical relief after an earthquake in
Labach, in the remote district of Awaran in
Baluchistan province, Pakistan.


Associated Press
Anti-government protesters
shout Thursday in front of
parliament as they hold a
portrait of Moroccan
editor Ali Anouzla, who
was arrested for posting
al-Qaida video last week
in Rabat, Morocco.

Triple bombing at
market near
Baghdad kills 14
BAGHDAD Iraqi offi-
cials said a triple bombing
at an outdoor market in a
village just north of Bagh-
dad has killed 14 people
and wounded 40.
Police officials said three
bombs went off on Thurs-
day as the market in the
Shiite village of Sabaa al-
Bour was packed with
shoppers. The village is
about 20 miles north of
Baghdad.
The officials said two
bombs exploded at the en-
trance of the village market
while the third one went off
inside.
The attack came shortly
after a bombing at an out-
door market in southern
Baghdad killed seven peo-
ple, including two women.
Court upholds 50
years for
Liberia's Taylor
LEIDSCHENDAM,
Netherlands -An interna-
tional war crimes court has
upheld the conviction and
50-year sentence of former
Liberian President Charles
Taylor for aiding rebels in
neighboring Sierra Leone,
saying Taylor's financial,
material and tactical sup-
port made possible horren-
dous crimes against
civilians.
The appeals chamber of
the Special Court for Sierra
Leone upheld the
65-year-old Taylor's convic-
tion on 11 counts of war
crimes and crimes against
humanity including terror-
ism, murder, rape and using
child soldiers.
Deal reached on
UN resolution on
Syria weapons
UNITED NATIONS -
The five permanent mem-
bers of the deeply divided
U.N. Security Council
reached agreement Thurs-
day on a resolution to elimi-
nate Syria's chemical
weapons, a major step in
taking the most controver-
sial weapon off the battle-
field of the world's deadliest
current conflict.
Senior U.S., Russian,
British and French diplo-
mats confirmed the agree-
ment, which also includes
China. Britain's U.N. Am-
bassador Mark Lyall Grant
said he would introduce
the text to the Security
Council's 10 non-perma-
nent members Thursday
night.
Hungarian makes
crib for Britain's
Prince George
BUDAPEST, Hungary-
A Hungarian Roma artisan
said a dream motivated him
to build a black walnut crib
for Prince George, the two-
month-old baby who is third
in line to the British throne.
Arpad Rostas, who has
done wood restoration
work at the Versailles
Palace in France and at
the Vatican, said he had a
dream in which Jesus and
the Virgin Mary appeared
with a crib, inspiring him to
build one.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Farmworkers pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground Tuesday and heap them onto a trailer in the final
step of raisin harvest near Fresno, Calif. This year, due to a labor shortage in California and other western
states, many growers increased farmworker wages by up to 20 percent pay and gave other incentives,
making this one of the best harvests for the workers.


Farmers face labor shortages










SPORTS


The Yankees
honor Mariano
Rivera, one of the
team's all-time
greats, Thursday
night against the
Rays./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


S.MLB/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Auto racing/B5
p 0 Football/B6


Warriors take care of Panthers in four


C.J. RISAK
Chronicle
LECANTO For the second time
this season, Lecanto went up
against a solid Seven Rivers Chris-
tian volleyball team, and as one
might anticipate, the first three sets
were all tightly contested. It wasn't
until the fourth set that a side
emerged dominant.
That side was Seven Rivers,
which swept past the Panthers in
three-straight in the teams first
meeting this season. It wouldn't be
that easy this time it required four
sets before the Warriors got the win,
25-22,23-25,25-21,25-14 Thursday at
Seven Rivers.
The win boosted Seven Rivers'
record to 14-3 overall and, in
matches against Citrus County ri-
vals, the Warriors are 4-1 overall
with a match to come against Crys-
tal River Their only loss came in the
season opener to Citrus.
Lecanto is 7-6 overall.
"They're playing well," Seven
Rivers coach Wanda Grey said of her
team's performance. "They're learn-
ing how to play with each other and
it shows."


What the Warriors put on display
often in this match was a confidence
in finding the right person and for
that matter, the right place to put
down a shot. Often that came from
either senior Alexis Zachar or jun-
ior Alyssa Gage.
But the confidence went beyond
those influences. It meant losing a
few points in a row won't result in a
complete derailment.
In the first set, Lecanto had an
early four-point lead and main-
tained it while the sides approached
the midpoint of the set. But by the
middle of the set, it was tied at 13-all.
Seven Rivers eventually opened up
a five-point cushion (20-15) and kept
it until two late kills by Lecanto's
Annalee Garcia narrowed the gap to
two. Narrowed it, but didn't elimi-
nate it: an Alyssa Gage kill ended
the set in Seven Rivers' favor
The set Lecanto did win did not
come easily The Panthers led 18-12
at one point, before Seven Rivers
stormed back to go up 20-19 on con-
secutive kills by Zachar It was tight
the remainder of that set until a cou-
ple of service aces by Lecanto gave
them just enough of an edge.
But that was the highlight for the


Panthers, who could not sufficiently
- or at least not consistently de-
fend the Warriors attack. Seven
Rivers opened up a six-point lead in
the third set at 19-13 before settling
on a 25-21 victory, then an early five-
point run allowed the Warriors to
open up a lead they would never re-
linquish in the decisive fourth set.
"I'm hoping by districts, we'll be
even keel," said Lecanto coach Alice
Christian. "But it's got to come from
them.
"We played really well Tuesday
against Citrus (a five-set Lecanto
win) and we played well against
West Port (Monday). Still, we're very
inconsistent. We have to play consis-
tently the same."
Seven Rivers is moving closer to-
ward that similar goal. Their coach
lauded their play in the win over
Lecanto, but wasn't completely sold.
"We played well," Grey said. "But
we can play even better than what
we showed."
Seven Rivers junior Kim Iwaniec
fields a return from Lecanto in the
first game of the volleyball match at
Seven Rivers Christian School on
Thursday evening in Lecanto.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


Ground and


Power is the

name of

Sims 'game
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
As Dunnellon has re-
turned to the ground-
and-pound approach it
made its signature for several
years under ninth-year head
coach Frank Beasley, junior
Devin "Bubba" Sims and his
Tigers have found a mutual fit
with one another. Sims gets
carries 91 in four games -
and the Tigers get plenty of
pound to go with the ground.
When asked to describe his
style, the 5-foot-10, 215-pound
Sims broke it down to a word:
power
"I'm a power back," he said.
"Speed, I got to get it there, but
I'm a big power back. That's all
I can really say about it."
Sims leads the area in rush-
ing with 610 yards (6.7 per
carry) and has five touch-
downs, while his Tigers have
jumped to a 3-1 start. In last
Friday's game at Santa Fe, he
rushed for 196 yards and a pair
of scores in helping his team
get off to a winning start in Dis-
trict 5A-5 with a 27-6 victory
"He's a big physical back and
he runs downhill pretty well,"
Dunnellon head coach Frank
Beasley said. "But the most im-
pressive thing about him is he
runs with great vision. We're
not real fancy on offense, and
we're really young at all our
skill positions, but our offen-
sive line's playing really well.
Bubba (Sims) and Josh
Williams (28 carries, 269 yards)
are doing a great job at finding
holes and kind of picking their
way through there."
Tonight's Tigers opponent,
rival Crystal River, has taken
notice of Sims.
"What's interesting about a
kid like that," Crystal River
See Page B3


u


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Dunnellon junior running back Devin "Bubba" Sims leads the area in carries (91), rushing yards (610)
and rushing touchdowns (5) for the 3-1 Tigers, who host Crystal River tonight.


CR heads


into


Tigers'lair


Areafootball

teams meet in

game of the week
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Crystal River (2-1, 0-0 in 5A-5)
at Dunnellon (3-1, 1-0 in 5A-5),
7:30 p.m. tonight
It's been a rivalry of streaks.
Long streaks. Dunnellon's cur-
rent 11-game winning streak
over Crystal River started on the
heels of a 16-game winning slate
for the Pirates in the series.
But both teams are young
enough this year to throw his-
tory even recent history -
out the window
Tonight's District 5A-5 tilt at
Ned Love Field represents
Nathan Varnadore's first game
against the Tigers as well as his
first district game as head
coach of the Pirates. His team
rested with a bye last week
after pulling out a 14-7 defense-
led victory against Lecanto.
"The kids have been very fo-
cused," Varnadore said. "The
close win at Lecanto, I think,
woke a lot of them up."
Crystal River senior Ty
Reynolds hauled in a couple of
late interceptions after scoring
on a 60-yard punt return in the
first quarter to clinch the win.
The sophomore-laden Pirates
(2-1, 0-0) have struggled offen-
sively, but have shown flashes
in the passing game under jun-
ior quarterback Collin Ryan.
"Defensively, their kids play
really hard," said Dunnellon
head coach Frank Beasley, who
is 8-0 versus Crystal River
"They've got two really big de-
fensive tackles that are obvi-
ously going to create some
problems for us trying to run
the ball between the tackles.
"They're young," he added. "I
think it's pretty standard with a
new coach coming in, espe-
cially a defensive coach, for a
See Page B6


Pirates golf continues to sweep through county


Kidd's 37 leads

CR boyspast

Lecanto
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER After a
week of intermittent rain show-
ers which cancelled several
practices and even a few meets,
a dual tournament between the
Crystal River Pirates and host
Lecanto Panthers went off with-
out a hitch Thursday evening at


the Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club.
Crystal River (10-2 overall
record, 7-1 district) cruised to a
meet victory over Lecanto 165-
189 in a District 2A-7 matchup.
The Pirates continue their
undefeated streak against
county rivals so far this season
after outdistancing the Pan-
thers (6-11 overall, 0-4 district)
by 24 strokes.
"It was nice to get out and get
a round in today," Crystal River
head coach Jere DeFoor said,
"after getting rained out the
first three days this week. We
lost one match this week


against Dunnellon (due) to
weather and another match last
week against Springstead for
the same thing.
"It's good to get these kids out
here to play and they did really
well," DeFoor added.
Pirates junior Kyle Kidd won
top medalist honors in the meet
with a 1-over par 37 on the 9-
hole course.
Kidd was pleased with the re-
sults of his performance on the
links but knows that many
tweaks are left to fix in his over-
all game before the postseason.
"I was hitting decent today
and finding some fairways,"


Kidd said. "But I'm still not a 110
percent confident in my swing in
every location on the course. My
short game is still saving me a lot
of the time. If I didn't have a
short game (right now), I'd be
shooting (in the) 90s."
Lecanto's Micah Sugioka (38)
finished just one stroke back in
second place, leading his Pan-
thers team. The junior was a bit
displeased with finishing be-
hind Kidd after tying him the
last time they met at the Planta-
tion Inn golf course.
"I played pretty well, just made
a few rookie mistakes and it cost
me," Sugioka said. "I'm kind of


sad that I didn't beat Kyle. That
was my goal for the day"
Crystal River's Matt Allen shot
a 6-over 42 to score second on his
team, followed byAdam Downey
(43) and Micah McDonald (43) in
the final two scoring positions.
Caleb Southey (50), Cameron
Wyckoff (50) and Zach Groff (51)
scored behind No. 1 Sugioka to
complete Lecanto's scoring
front-four
"We're really too inconsistent
and it costs us every match,"
Lecanto head coach Dave
Soluri said. "There are a lot of
things we need to practice in
the coming weeks."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEEKLY


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


x-Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto


w
x-Atlanta 94
Washington 84
NewYork 73
Philadelphia 72
Miami 59


East Division
GB WC


East Division
L Pct GB WC
65 .591 -
75 .528 10 6
86 .459 21 17
87 .453 22 18
100.371 35 31


NL

Braves 7, Phillies 1
Philadelphia Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
CHrndz cf 4 00 0 Heywrd cf 5 25 1
Rollinsss 4 03 0 EIJhns2b 3 2 1 0
DBrwnlf 4 0 0 0 FFrmnlb 3 1 2 1
Rufrf 4 0 0 0 Gattislf 5 1 2 3
Frndsnlb 4 0 1 0 Constnzl If 0 00 0
Asche3b 4 1 1 0 McCnnc 1 00 0
Kratz c 4 0 2 0 G.Laird ph-c 2 0 0 0
Galvis2b 4 00 0 CJhnsn3b 5 1 1 1
Cloydp 1 0 0 1 Janish3b 0 0 0 0
Roblesp 0 00 0 Smmnsss 4 00 0
Orrph 1 0 1 0 JSchafrrf 4 0 1 1
Saveryp 0 0 0 0 Halep 3 0 0 0
DeFrts p 0 00 0 A.Wood p 0 00 0
Mayrryph 1 0 1 0 RJhnsnph 1 00 0
JCRmrp 0 00 0 Ayalap 0 00 0
Rosnrgp 0 0 0 0 Avilanp 0 0 0 0
Ruppph 1 0 00
Totals 36 19 1 Totals 36712 7
Philadelphia 010 000 000 1
Atlanta 520 000 00x 7
E-C.Hernandez (4), EI.Johnson (3). LOB-
Philadelphia 8, Atlanta 11. 2B-Rollins (35),
Kratz (7), Heyward 3 (22), F.Freeman (27), Gat-
tis (21), C.Johnson (34). HR-Heyward (14).
SB-EI.Johnson (8).


IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
CloydL,2-7 1 8 7 7 2 2
Robles 3 2 0 0 2 4
Savery 1 1 0 0 1 1
DeFratus 1 0 0 0 0 1
J.C.Ramirez 1 1 0 0 1 1
Rosenberg 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
HaleW,1-0 6 7 1 1 0 5
A.Wood 1 1 0 0 0 0
Ayala 1 1 0 0 0 0
Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cloyd pitched to 4 batters in the 2nd.
WP-Robles.
Brewers 4, Mets 2
Milwaukee NewYork
ah r h hi h r h bI


Aoki cf-rf 4 0 0 0 EYong If
Gennett2b 4 0 1 2 DnMrp2b
Lucroyc 3 0 1 0 DWrght3b
KDavisIf 3 1 1 0 JuTrnrpr-3b
Gindlrf 4 1 1 0 Dudalb
Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0 Baxterrf
Hndrsnp 0 0 0 0 dnDkkrcf
YBtncr 3b 4 0 1 0 TdArnd c
JFrncslb 4 1 1 1 Quntnllss
Bianchiss 4 1 1 1 Geep
Hellwg p 1 0 0 0 Z.Lutz ph
Figaro p 0 0 0 0 Byrdakp
Haltonph 1 00 0 Ardsmp
Wootenp 0 00 0 Frncsc p
LSchfr cf 0 0 0 0 Satin ph
Totals 32 47 4 Totals
Milwaukee 040 000 000
NewYork 001 000 001


4110
4 1 1 0
501 1
1000
1 0 0 0
3020
2000
3000
4000
3020
4000
2000
1010
1 0 1 0
0000
0000
0000
1111
1 1 1 1
332 8 2
4
2


E-Lucroy (9). DP-Milwaukee 2. LOB-Mil-
waukee 6, New York 11. 2B-Lucroy (25),
Dan.Murphy (37), Ju.Turner (13). HR-Satin (3).
SB-Lucroy (8), E.Young 2 (44). S-Hellweg.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Hellweg 4 2 1 1 4 3
FigaroW,3-3 2 3 0 0 0 0
WootenH,7 1 1 0 0 1 0
KintzlerH,26 1 0 0 0 0 2
Henderson S,27-31 1 2 1 1 0 3
NewYork
GeeL,12-11 6 7 4 4 2 2
Byrdak 1 0 0 0 0 0
Aardsma 1 0 0 0 0 1
F.Francisco 1 0 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Hellweg (D.Wright, Duda), by Aardsma
(Lucroy). WP-Hellweg. Balk-Figaro.
Padres 3, D'backs 2,
11 innings
Arizona San Diego
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pollock cf 4 0 1 0 Venalecf 4 0 0 0
Blmqstl If 4 0 0 0 Denorfirf 5 1 1 0
Gldschlb 4 1 1 0 Gyorko2b 3 1 1 1
Prado2b 4 1 1 2 Headly3b 4 0 1 1
Davdsn3b 4 0 0 0 Medicalb 4 1 2 0
GParrarf 4 00 0 Kotsayl If 3 00 0
Owingsss 4 00 0 Streetp 0 00 0
Cllmntrp 0 00 0 Vincentp 0 00 0
Gswschc 4 00 0 JGzmnph 1 0 1 0
Cahillp 2 0 0 0 Hundlyc 4 0 1 0
Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 Amarst ss 5 0 1 1
Roep 0 0 0 0 Erlinp 2 0 0 0
ErChvzph 1 0 0 0 Forsyth ph 1 0 0 0
DHrndzp 0 0 0 0 Grgrsnp 0 00 0
WHarrsp 0 00 0 Fuentsl If 1 00 0
Pnngtnss 1 000
Totals 36 23 2 Totals 373 8 3
Arizona 000 200 000 00 2
San Diego 002 000 000 01 3
No outs when winning run scored.
LOB-Arizona 2, San Diego 11.2B-Headley
(33), J.Guzman (17). 3B-Pollock (5), Denorfia
(2). HR-Prado (14).
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
Cahill 52/35 2 2 4 3
Thatcher 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Roe 1 0 0 0 0 2
D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 1 3
W.Harris 1 0 0 0 0 1
Collmenter L,5-5 1 3 1 1 1 0
San Diego
Erlin 7 3 2 2 1 7
Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Street 1 0 0 0 0 2
VincentW,6-3 2 0 0 0 0 3
Collmenter pitched to 4 batters in the 11th.
HBP-by D.Hernandez (Headley). WP-Erlin.

Baseball Calendar
Oct. 23 -World Series begins, city of Amer-
ican League champion.
NovemberTBA- Deadline forteams to make
qualifying offers to their eligible former players
who became free agents, fifth day after World
Series.
NovemberTBA -Deadline forfree agents to
accept qualifying offers, 12th day afterWorld Se-
ries.
Nov. 11-13- General managers meeting, Or-
lando, Fla.
Nov. 13-14 -Owners meeting, Orlando, Fla.
Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2014 con-
tracts to unsigned players.
Dec. 2-5 Major League Baseball Players
Association executive board meeting, La Jolla,
Calif.
Dec. 9-12 -Winter meetings, Lake Buena
Vista, Fla.
Dec. 9 Hall of Fame expansion era com-
mittee (1973 and later) vote announced, Lake
Buena Vista, Fla.


Str Home Away
W-1 53-28 43-35
W-7 51-30 39-39
W-2 44-34 39-42
L-4 46-35 36-42
L-2 38-40 34-47



Str Home Away
W-1 54-24 40-41
L-3 47-34 37-41
L-1 32-46 41-40
L-2 43-38 29-49
W-1 33-45 26-55


x-Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
66 .585 7.
70 .557 4 /2 8
75 .528 9 4/2 6.
92 .418 26/2 22 2.
97 .390 31 26% 4.


Str Home
W-2 51-30
W-6 51-30
W-1 44-37
L-2 32-45
L-3 36-42


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
z-St. Louis 94 65 .591 - 7-3 W-3 51-27 43-38
z-Pittsburgh 91 68 .572 3 4-6 L-1 50-31 41-37
z-Cincinnati 90 69 .566 4 6-4 L-2 49-28 41-41
Milwaukee 72 87 .453 22 18 6-4 W-2 37-44 35-43
Chicago 66 93 .415 28 24 3-7 W-1 31-50 35-43
z-clinched playoff berth, x-clinched division


x-Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


x-L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
San Fran.
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC
65 .591 -
71 .551 6% 1
80 .494 15/2 10
89 .440 24 18/2
108.321 43 37%


West Division
t GB WC


Str Home
L-2 52-29
W-3 42-35
W-2 39-42
W-2 35-43
L-12 24-54



Str Home
L-1 46-32
L-2 44-34
W-2 45-36
W-1 39-39
L-1 45-36


Associated Press
New York Yankees relief pitcher Mariano Rivera acknowledges fans Thursday after receiving gifts prior to his
final appearance at Yankee Stadium against the Tampa Bay Rays in New York. Rivera is retiring at the end
of the season.




Last dance for Mo


Exit Sandman:

Rivera bids

goodbye to Bronx

Associated Press

NEW YORK Mariano Rivera
said goodbye to Yankee Stadium
with hugs, tears and cheers.
Baseball's most acclaimed re-
lief pitcher made an emotional
exit in his final appearance in the
Yankees' home pinstripes, when
captain Derek Jeter and Andy Pet-
titte came to the mound to remove
him with two outs in the ninth in-
ning of a 4-0 loss to the Tampa Bay
Rays on Thursday night.
"It's time to go," Jeter appeared
to tell Rivera.
Tampa Bay won its seventh
straight and leads the AL wild-
card race.
During four minutes of thun-
derous chanting from the sellout
crowd 48,675, an overcome Rivera
sobbed as he buried his head on
the shoulder of Pettitte, who also
is retiring when the season ends
Sunday, and then hugged Jeter
It was an extraordinary sight in
a sport where a manager almost al-
ways goes to the mound to make a
pitching change. Yankees manager
Joe Girardi checked with the um-
pires to make certain Jeter, who is
on the disabled list, could take part
"I was so thankful they came
out," Rivera said after the game.
Rivera, who retired four
straight batters, wiped his eyes
with both arms as he walked off


and blew a kiss to the first row be-
hind the Yankees dugout. He
hugged a tearful Girardi in the
dugout, grabbed a towel to dab the
tears, and came out again and
doffed his cap to the crowd. All
the while, the Rays remained in
their dugout applauding.
Throughout the stands, fans
blinked back tears.
When Rivera came off, Pettitte
came out for his own curtain call
as the Rays waited. After the last
out, Rivera remained on the
bench for a moment as "New
York, New York" played.
The 43-year-old Rivera then
took a final walk to the mound,
where he stood, rubbed his feet on
the rubber, kneeled and gathered
dirt as a keepsake.
Rivera had entered with one
out and two on in the eighth to a
recorded introduction by Bob
Sheppard, the longtime Yankees
public address announcer who
died three years ago.
Fans stood, applauded and
chanted his name as he jogged in
from the bullpen to Metallica's
"Enter Sandman" and continued
for two minutes as he took his
warmups. The entire Tampa Bay
bench emptied and stood on the
dirt warning track in front of the
dugout and applauded.
Fans remained on their feet,
chanting his name as he got two
quick outs on six pitches. In his first
appearance since the Yankees re-
tired his No. 42 during a 50-minute
ceremony Sunday, Rivera retired
Delmon Young on a groundout and
Sam FRild on a comebacker
He lingered on the dugout
bench when the eighth inning


ended and took in the whole sta-
dium scene as he teammates ran
onto the field. Rivera jogged out
last and was given another stand-
ing ovation. With the crowd shout-
ing at a postseason level, he
retired Jose Lobaton on a come-
backer and Yunel Escobar on a
popup to second before the fa-
mous, final scene.
The Yankees, eliminated from
playoff contention, finish the sea-
son with three games in Houston.
The oldest player in the major
leagues, Rivera record 314 of his
record 652 saves at home during a
19-year big league career, and 18
of his record 42 postseason saves
were at the old and new Yankee
Stadium.
Rivera helped the Yankees to
five World Series titles, getting the
final out in four of them.
Tampa Bay lowered to two its
magic number over Texas for
clinching an AL wild-card berth.
The Rays swept this three-game se-
ries, outscoring the Yankees 19-3.
Alex Cobb (11-3) took a one-hit
shutout into the eighth, retiring 15
in a row between walks to Curtis
Granderson in the second and
Robinson Cano in the seventh. He
wound up allowing three hits in
seven innings-plus.
Evan Longoria hit an RBI single
in the fourth against Ivan Nova (9-
6) and a two-run single off Dellin
Betances in the eighth. Young hit
a long solo homer to left-center in
the sixth.
New York has lost nine of 12, in-
cluding four in a row, and at 82-77
will have its fewest wins in a non-
shortened season in a long time.


Braves bash NL rival Phillies


Associated Press

ATLANTA Jason Heyward
had a career-high five hits, in-
cluding a leadoff home run, and
the Braves rode a five-run first in-
ning to post a 7-1 win over the
Phillies on Thursday night.
The win pulls the Braves even
with the idle Cardinals at 94-65 for
the best record in the National
League with three games to play
The Braves won the season-series
against the Cardinals and would
win the NL's No. 1 seed if the
teams finish tied.
Rookie David Hale (1-0) won his
first MLB game in his second ca-
reer start, allowing one run in six
innings while striking out five.
Phillies Rookie Tyler Cloyd (2-7)
took the loss after giving up seven
runs and eight hits in one inning.
Evan Gattis had two hits and
three RBIs for the Braves.
Jimmy Rollins went 3 for 4 for
the Phillies, who have lost seven
of eight.
National League

Brewers 4, Mets 2
NEW YORK Scooter Gennett
capped a four-run second inning with
a two-run single and the Milwaukee
Brewers overcame some wild pitching
that included the beaning of David
Wright for a 4-2 victory over the New
York Mets.
Wright was hit in the helmet by a


pitch from Johnny Hellweg with two
outs in the third inning. The All-Star
third baseman went down to his
hands and knees but he was able to
walk off the field unassisted. The Mets
said he was removed as a precaution.
Hellweg hit Lucas Duda with the
next pitch in the back of the leg -
and then loaded the bases with a four-
pitch walk. But the Mets, who entered
with a home record worse than all in
the National League except the Cubs
(31-50), could not take advantage.
Coming off a road trip in which they
won five of six, the Mets were 0 for 14
with runners in scoring position in
dropping to 32-46 at Citi Field.
Padres 3,
D'backs 2, 11 inns.
SAN DIEGO Alexi Amarista hit
an RBI single in the 11th inning and
the San Diego Padres outlasted the
Arizona Diamondbacks 3-2.
Tommy Medica led off the 11th with
a swinging bunt down the third-base
line for an infield single. Jesus Guz-
man batted for reliever Nick Vincent
(6-3) and hit a ground-rule double that
center fielder A.J. Pollock misplayed.
Josh Collementer (5-5) intentionally
walked Nick Hundley to load the
bases, and Amarista slapped a single
through a drawn-in infield.
American League

Orioles 3, Blue Jays 2
BALTIMORE Miguel Gonzalez


pitched seven innings of two-hit ball,
Matt Wieters homered and drove in
two runs, and the Baltimore Orioles
beat the Toronto Blue Jays 3-2.
Nick Markakis had two hits and an
RBI for the Orioles, who won the sea-
son series 10-9. Baltimore is 13-5 at
Camden Yards against the Blue Jays
since the start of the 2012 season.
Gonzalez (11-8) allowed one un-
earned run, struck out five and walked
one. The only hits were a single by
Kevin Pillar in the third inning and a
double by J.P. Arencibia in the seventh.
Gonzalez retired 13 straight batters
at one point. It was the first game this
season in which the right-hander
didn't give up a run.
Jim Johnson got three outs for his
AL-leading 48th save.

Royals 3, White Sox 2
CHICAGO Jeremy Guthrie
pitched seven strong innings, and
David Lough hit a two-run homer to
lead the Kansas City Royals to a 3-2
victory over the Chicago White Sox.
One day after being eliminated from
the postseason, the Royals earned
their 84th win, their most since 1993.
The Royals' 6-0 loss to Seattle on
Wednesday, combined with victories
from all three teams ahead of them
in the AL wild-card standings, offi-
cially eliminated them from playoff
contention.
Guthrie (15-12) became the Royals'
third 15-game winner since 1997.


AL


Rays 4, Yankees 0


Tampa Bay
ab
Zobrist ss-2b5
WMyrs rf 4
Loneylb 3
Longori 3b 4
DeJess cf-lf 3
DYong dh 3
Joyce If 3
Fuld cf 1
Loaton c 4
SRdrgz2b 2
Scott ph 1


NewYork
rhbi ab rhbi
12 0 ISuzukirf 4 00 0
1 1 0 Nunez3b-ss 4 0 1 0
1 3 0 Cano 2b 3 00 0
02 3 ASorindh 3 00 0
00 0 Grndrs cf 2 0 1 0
1 2 1 Overaylb 3 0 1 0
00 0 ZAImntl If 3 00 0
00 0 Ryanss 2 00 0
00 0 V.Wellsph 1 00 0
00 0 MrRynl3b 0 0 0 0
01 0 JMrphyc 3 00 0


YEscorss 1 000
Totals 34 4114 Totals 280 3 0
Tampa Bay 000 100 120 4
NewYork 000 000 000 0
DP Tampa Bay 2, NewYork 3. LOB-Tampa
Bay 6, NewYork 3.2B-Loney (32), Granderson
(12). HR-D.Young (2). SB-Granderson (8),
Overbay (2). CS-Scott(1).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
CobbW,11-3 7 3 0 0 2 4
Jo.PeraltaH,40 1 0 0 0 0 2
McGee 1 0 0 0 0 1
NewYork
NovaL,9-6 7 8 2 2 1 5
Betances 1/3 3 2 2 1 1
M.Rivera 11/30 0 0 0 0
Daley 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Cobb pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Nova (D.Young).

Odoles 3, Blue Jays 2
Toronto Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Reyesss 4 0 1 0 BRortsdh 4 1 2 0
Kawskdh 3 1 0 0 Markksrf 4 1 2 1
Lawrie3b 4 01 1 Valenci3b 4 0 1 0
Sierrarf 4 00 0 A.Jones cf 3 0 1 0
Gose cf 4 00 0 Wieters c 2 1 1 2
Arencii c 4 0 1 0 Hardyss 3 0 0 0
Lngrhnlb 4 00 0 Pearcelb 2 0 1 0
Goins2b 4 0 1 0 Flahrty ph-lb 1 0 0 0
Pillar If 4 1 2 0 Pridiel If 3 0 1 0
Schoop2b 3 00 0
Totals 35 26 1 Totals 293 9 3
Toronto 100 000 010 2
Baltimore 012 000 00x 3
E-Pridie (1), Schoop (1). DP Toronto 3.
LOB Toronto 7, Baltimore 3.2B-Lawrie (17),
Arencibia (18), Markakis (23), Valencia (14),
Pearce (5). HR-Wieters (22). SF-Wieters.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
BuehrleL,12-10 31/38 3 3 0 1
Jenkins 32/31 0 0 0 4
Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 0
Baltimore
GonzalezW,11-8 7 2 1 0 1 5
Tom.Hunter H,21 1 3 1 1 0 2
Ji.Johnson S,48-57 1 1 0 0 0 1

Royals 3,
White Sox 2


Kansas City
ab
AGordn If 3
Ciriaco ss 4
Hosmerlb 4
BButlerdh 4
Mostks3b 4
Maxwll cf-rf 4
Lough rf 2
JDyson cf 1
Kottars c 4


Chicago
r h bi
00 0 DeAza cf
0 0 0 Semien ss
0 0 0 Gillaspi 3b
0 1 0 Konerklb
1 2 0 A.Dunndh
1 1 0 AGarcirf
1 2 2 Viciedo If
00 0 GBckh2b
01 0 BryAndc


ab r h bi
3010
3 0 1 0
4000
4000
4111
3121
4010
4010
3000
3000
4 1 1 1
3 1 2 1
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0


S.Perez c 0 000
Getz 2b 4 000
Totals 34 37 2 Totals 322 6 2
Kansas City 000 200 100 3
Chicago 010 001 000 2
E-Bry.Anderson (1). LOB-Kansas City 6,
Chicago 5. 2B-Viciedo (23). HR-Lough (5),
Konerko (12), A.Dunn (33). CS-De Aza (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
GuthrieW,15-12 7 4 2 2 1 4
HochevarH,8 1 1 0 0 0 1
G.Holland S,46-49 1 1 0 0 0 2
Chicago
RienzoL,2-3 6 4 3 2 1 4
Veal 2/3 2 0 0 0 1
D.Webb 11/31 0 0 0 1
Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 1
Rienzo pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Guthrie (De Aza), by Rienzo (Lough).
WP-Rienzo.

Schedule
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 4, N.YYankees 0
Baltimore 3, Toronto 2
Kansas City 3, Chicago White Sox 2
L.A. Angels at Texas, late
Cleveland at Minnesota, late
Today's Games
Boston (Buchholz 11-1) at Baltimore (Feldman
5-5), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 12-9) atToronto (Dickey
13-13), 7:07 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 13-8) at Miami (Koehler 4-10),
7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 17-7) at Texas (Ogando
7-4), 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 10-5) at Minnesota (PHer-
nandez 3-2), 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 12-9) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 11-13), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Undecided) at Houston (Ober-
holtzer4-4), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Colon 17-6) at Seattle (F.Hernandez
12-9), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
N.YYankees at Houston, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Boston at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
N.YYankees at Houston, 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels atTexas, 3:05 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
San Diego 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings
Milwaukee 4, N.Y Mets 2
Atlanta 7, Philadelphia 1
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
Detroit (Porcello 13-8) at Miami (Koehler 4-10),
7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 11-10) at N.Y Mets (C.Tor-
res 4-5), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 11-11), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 14-7) at Atlanta (Medlen
14-12), 7:30 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (TWood 9-11) at St. Louis (Lynn
14-10), 8:15 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 7-9) at Arizona (Corbin
14-7), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (McHugh 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Ker-
shaw 15-9), 10:10 p.m.
San Diego (B.Smith 1-2) at San Francisco (Vo-
gelsong 3-6), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.


BASEBALL


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 B3


aD r n Di


aD r n Di


bi




B4 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013



NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 34
Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 53
N.YJets 2 1 0 .667 55 50
Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 65 73
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 70 82
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 68 48
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 60 56
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 28 92
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 75 64
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 71 64
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 47 64
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 42 76
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 0 0 1.000 127 71
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 78 81
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 57 67
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 55
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.YGiants 0 3 0 .000 54 115
Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 98
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 70 38
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 74
Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 34 57
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 74
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 69
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 96
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 27
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 58 86
San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 44 84
Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 79
Today's Game
Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16
Sunday's Games
Tennessee 20, San Diego 17
New Orleans 31, Arizona 7
Dallas 31, St. Louis 7
Cleveland 31, Minnesota 27
Baltimore 30, Houston 9
Carolina 38, N.Y Giants 0
Detroit 27, Washington 20
New England 23, Tampa Bay 3
Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 30
Miami 27, Atlanta 23
Indianapolis 27, San Francisco 7
Seattle 45, Jacksonville 17
N.Y Jets 27, Buffalo 20
Chicago 40, Pittsburgh 23
Monday's Game
Denver 37, Oakland 21
Thursday, Sep. 26
San Francisco at St. Louis, late
Sunday, Sep. 29
N.Y Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets atTennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday, Sep. 30
Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m.



AL leaders
G AB R H Pct.
MiCabreraDet 146 548 103 189 .345
MauerMin 113 445 62 144 .324
Trout LAA 153 578 108 187 .324
ABeltreTex 156 612 85 194 .317
CanoNYY 158 597 80 187 .313
DOrtizBos 135 508 80 156 .307
DonaldsonOak 155 571 88 174 .305
TorHunterDet 143 602 90 183 .304
LoneyTB 154 535 53 162 .303
HKendrickLAA 118 460 55 139 .302
Home Runs
CDavis, Baltimore, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 44;
Encarnacion, Toronto, 36; Trumbo, Los Ange-
les, 34; ADunn, Chicago, 33;AJones, Baltimore,
32; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 31.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 137; CDavis, Baltimore,
137; Cano, NewYork, 106; Fielder, Detroit, 106;
AJones, Baltimore, 106; Encarnacion, Toronto,
104; DOrtiz, Boston, 100.
Pitching
Scherzer, Detroit, 21-3; Colon, Oakland, 17-
6; CWilson, Los Angeles, 17-7; MMoore, Tampa
Bay, 16-4; Tillman, Baltimore, 16-7; Lester,
Boston, 15-8; Guthrie, Kansas City 15-12.
NL leaders
G AB R H Pct.
CuddyerCol 128 480 74 161 .335
CJohnsonAtl 140 507 53 164 .323
MCarpenterStL 154 616 125 198 .321
McCutchenPit 155 575 95 183 .318
FFreemanAtl 144 539 87 171 .317
WerthWas 127 456 82 144 .316
CraigStL 134 508 71 160 .315
YMolinaStL 133 499 66 157 .315
Tulowitzki Col 123 435 71 136 .313
VottoCin 159 573 100 174 .304
Home Runs
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; PAIvarez, Pitts-
burgh, 34; Bruce, Cincinnati, 30; DBrown,
Philadelphia, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26;
JUpton, Atlanta, 26; Zimmerman, Washington,
26.
Runs Batted In
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 124; Bruce, Cincinnati,
107; FFreeman, Atlanta, 107; BPhillips, Cincin-
nati, 102; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 98; PAI-
varez, Pittsburgh, 97; Craig, St. Louis, 97.
Pitching
Zimmermann, Washington, 19-9;Wainwright,
St. Louis, 18-9; JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 16-6;
Liriano, Pittsburgh, 16-8;Greinke, Los Angeles,
15-3; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 15-9; SMiller, St.
Louis, 15-9.


BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL-Announced
the retirement of commissioner Bud Selig in


January 2015. Suspended Milwaukee OF Car-
los Gomez and Atlanta OF Reed Johnson one
game and fined them and Atlanta 1B Freddie
Freeman and Atlanta C Brian McCann undis-
closed amounts for their actions during
Wednesday's game.
American League
DETROIT TIGERS-Placed SS Danny
Worth on the 60-day DL. Reinstated SS Jhonny
Peralta from the restricted list.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Transferred LHP
Brett Cecil to the 60-day DL. Selected the con-
tract of OF Ryan Langerhans from Buffalo (IL).
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Placed C Welington
Castillo on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept.
20.
NEWYORK METS Transferred RHP Matt
Harvey to the 60-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NEW YORK KNICKS-Named Steve Mills
president and general manager. Reassigned
Glen Grunwald to adviser.


Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fo the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
0 5-3-7
CASH 3 (late)
0 7-2-2

PLAY 4 (early)
6-6-4-2
PLAY 4 (late)
germ. TM 5-0-0-2

FANTASY 5
6-11-19-24-32

Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 2 7 17 -49 -53
Powerball: 23
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 1 winner $1,000,000
No Florida winners
Fantasy 5:2 3 4 11 -29
5-of-5 1 winner $231,795.99
4-of-5 362 $103.00
3-of-5 12,207 $8.50


Lotto: 1
6-of-6
5-of-6
4-of-6
3-of-6


2-25-43-48-53
No winner
19 $7,023.00
1,180 $81.50
25,146 $5.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (FS1) Sprint Cup: AAA 400 practice
12:30 p.m. (FS1) Nationwide Series: Dover 200 practice
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: AAA 400 qualifying
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m. (ESPN) Utah State at San Jose State
9 p.m. (ESPNU) Middle Tennessee State at BYU
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
10 p.m. (FS1) Edison (CA) vs. Mater Dei (CA)
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Alfred Dunhill Links
Championship, Second Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com Tour Championship, Second Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Nature Valley First Tee
Open, First Round
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (NHL) Philadelphia Flyers at Washington Capitals
10:30 p.m. (NHL) Los Angeles Kings vs. New York Rangers
SOCCER
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Philadelphia Union at Sporting
Kansas City
8:25 p.m. (ESPN2) Mexico Primera Division: Queretaro FC
vs Tigres UANL
TENNIS
4 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open quarterfinal (Taped)
6 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open quarterfinal (Taped)
12 a.m. (TENNIS) WTAToray Pan Pacific Open final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
FOOTBALL
7 p.m. Seven Rivers at Mount Dora Bible
7:30 p.m. Belleview at Lecanto
7:30 p.m. Crystal River at Dunnellon
VOLLEYBALL
TBA Lecanto in Edgewater and Dr. Phillips Tournament
TBA Seven Rivers in OVA Tournament
CROSS COUNTRY
9 a.m. Lecanto at FL Runners meet in Titusville
RADIO
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
7:15 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Crystal River at Dunnellon


FOOTBALL
National Football League
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Promoted Cathy
Dworak to director of community outreach and
player/alumni relations.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DETROIT RED WINGS-Assigned C Riley
Sheahan and RW Teemu Pulkkinen to Grand
Rapids (AHL). Recalled C Luke Glendening and
RWTomas Jurco from Grand Rapids.
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Signed GTimThomas
to a one-year contract. Loaned D Mike Mottau to
San Antonio (AHL). Recalled G Michael Houser
from San Antonio.
MONTREAL CANADIENS-Assigned Fs Mike
Blunden, Martin St. Pierre, ChristianThomas, Nick


Lightning top
Panthers 3-2 in OT
ESTERO Nikita
Kucherov's goal at 4:04 of
overtime gave the Tampa
Bay Lightning a 3-2 presea-
son win over the Florida
Panthers on Thursday night.
Tim Thomas, signed to a
one-year deal by the Pan-
thers on Thursday, started
the game. Jacob Markstrom
finished the game.
"I think it was a necessary
step to do it now rather than
waiting," Thomas said. "I
feel ready now."
Kucherov's goal capped a
rally from a 2-0 deficit for
Tampa Bay.
Tyler Johnson and
Richard Panik also scored
for the Lightning.
Panik and Martin St.
Louis exchanged great
passes on the game-tying
goal at 6:30 of the third pe-
riod.
Florida took a 2-0 lead on
two power-play goals by
Jonathan Huberdeau. I
Ben Bishop earned the


Tarnasky and Patrick Holland and D Magnus Ny-
gren, Darren Dietz and Greg Pateryn to Hamilton
(AHL).
NEWYORK RANGERS-Agreed to terms with
C Derek Stepan on a two-year contract.
PHOENIX COYOTES-Assigned Fs Andy
Miele and Jordan Szwarz to Portland (AHL). Re-
leased F Gilbert Brule.
American Hockey League
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE-Released D Drew
Daniels, David MacDonald and Martin Schumnig.
ECHL
STOCKTON THUNDER-Agreed to terms with
F Andrew Clark.
Western Hockey League
VICTORIA ROYALS-Acquired D Jake
Kohlhauser from Vancouver.


Bud Selig says he will
retire in Jan. 2015
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig
says he plans to retire in January 2015.
The 79-year-old Selig has repeatedly
said since 2003 that his retirement was
imminent, but Thursday marked the first
time he issued a formal statement.
He says he will announce a transition
plan shortly that will include a reorganiza-
tion of central baseball management.
Selig bought the Seattle Pilots in bank-
ruptcy court in 1970 and moved the team
to Milwaukee. He was part of the group
that forced Fay Vincent's resignation.
Selig took over as acting commis-
sioner on Sept. 9,1992, in his role as
chairman of the executive council. He re-
peatedly said he would not take the job
full time but was formally elected com-
missioner July 9,1998. He agreed to
new contracts in 2001,2004, 2008 and
2012.
Virginia Tech shuts down
Georgia Tech, 17-10
ATLANTA- Logan Thomas passed
and ran for touchdowns in the first half,
Virginia Tech's defense shut down Geor-
gia Tech's running game and the Hokies
beat the Yellow Jackets 17-10 on Thurs-
day night.
Thomas completed 19 of 25 passes
for 221 yards and a touchdown and had
16 carries for 58 yards and a touchdown.
Virginia Tech (4-1, 1-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) earned its fourth straight
win over Georgia Tech (3-1,2-1).
Virginia Tech's defense, led by defen-
sive tackle Derrick Hopkins, stopped run-
ning back David Sims on back-to-back
plays, including a fourth-and-2 run mid-
way through the fourth quarter.
Cody Journell was wide left on a 25-
yard field goal for Virginia Tech with 5:37
remaining to keep Georgia Tech's hopes
alive. Kendall Fuller intercepted Vad
Lee's fourth-down pass from near mid-
field to clinch the win.
Georgia Tech's fourth-ranked rushing
offense was held to 129 yards more
than 200 yards below its average.
Pirates swing past
Eagles, Hornets
The Crystal River girls golf team shot
220 to defeat Springstead (247) and
Weeki Wachee (271).
Maycee Mullarkey's 47 lead all golfers
for Crystal River. Also for the Pirates,
Marissa Wilder (57), Tori Cunningham
(57) and Hadley Gilman (59) rounded out
the scoring.
CR (3-2 overall) plays Monday at
South Sumter.
Richardson, Wimberly carry
Iowa State past Tulsa
TULSA, Okla. Sam Richardson
completed 26 of 41 passes for 255 yards
and two touchdowns, and Aaron Wim-




POUND
Continued from Page BI

head coach Nate Varnadore said,
"and what frustrates me as a defen-
sive guy, you look at him and go, 'wow,
it's going to take about three guys to
take him down.' He's like a bull in a
china shop. There's been games we've
seen where he's literally had two guys
on him and he's still going and gets
two extra yards.
"When we did the numbers," Var-
nadore continued, "Sims touched the
ball 80 percent of the plays over two
games. I'm sure all the other coaches
they've played are fully aware of that,
but he still has over 600 yards, and
that's impressive. There's not too
much scheming you can do against
that. He's going to get at least two
yards when he touches the ball."
Sims started playing football at 10
year old first at fullback- and said
college is a goal. He played varsity last
year, but had a minor role with senior
J'von Swoll as the feature back. He
didn't exactly expect this many


Tffli


I


berly ran for 137 yards on 19 carries to
help Iowa State beat Tulsa 38-21 on
Thursday night.
Jeff Woody had for three short scores,
and the Cyclones took advantage of four
Tulsa turnovers to improve to 1-2. Tulsa
dropped to 1-3.
Tulsa quarterback Cody Green lost
control twice on exchanges with a run-
ning back in the first half, then dropped a
ball behind him attempting to pass on the
first possession of the second half. He
was replaced a series later by redshirt
freshman Dane Evans, who failed to
generate any offense. Green returned in
the fourth quarter, throwing a 26-yard
touchdown pass to Thomas Roberson
before being intercepted on his next pos-
session.
Green finished 18 of 31 for 237 yards
with two touchdowns and the intercep-
tion.
Tackling a problem for
Dolphins despite 3-0 start
DAVIE -The Miami Dolphins know
they won't keep winning if their tacklers
keep whiffing.
Missed tackles by Miami have resulted
in mediocre defense against the run,
which was expected to be the team's
strength this season. Instead, the Dol-
phins are giving up rushing yardage at a
disturbing rate, which makes their 3-0
record even more surprising.
"We have to tackle better," coach Joe
Philbin said. "We are not going to invent
a whole lot of new defenses. We've just
got to execute our techniques and funda-
mentals better, and our No. 1 fundamen-
tal that we work on every single day is
tackling. We've got to do it better."
Wrapping up will be especially impor-
tant when the Dolphins play high-pow-
ered New Orleans on Monday night. The
Saints claim they haven't noticed the
Dolphins being poor tacklers.
"Hopefully, they are and it works out to
my advantage," said Pierre Thomas, a
hard-churning runner who can be tough
to bring down. "I kind of do have that
unique talent of breaking tackles, and I'm
going to use that to the best of my ability."
In defense of Miami's defense, it has
been depleted by injuries, with four
starters missing most or all of last week's
win over Atlanta. The status of two-time
Pro Bowl end Cameron Wake, tackle
Paul Soliai and cornerback Dimitri Patter-
son for the Saints game is uncertain.
Reserves played well enough to limit
the Falcons to three points over the
final 27 minutes in a come-from-behind
27-23 victory. The Dolphins have al-
lowed only one touchdown in the sec-
ond half this year.
"We've risen to the occasion to make
plays when we've needed to," line-
backer Phillip Wheeler said. "That's
what we've done best. When we need a
stop, we get it."
From staff, wire reports



touches this year
He said he's just doing what his line
makes possible.
"I didn't really think it would be like
this," he said, "but I guess it's work-
ing. The offensive line does their job
in pushing the d-line out of the way,
and I just go behind them and make
plays.
"It's a big responsibility to carry the
ball for Dunnellon," Sims added. "I
can't drop it no more."
With Dunnellon narrowly missing
the playoffs two straight seasons after
winning back-to-back district titles,
Sims said his team needs to keep its
focus and continue to improve to get
back into the postseason.
"Our whole team needs to keep
pushing ourselves every day and
make sure we do what we're sup-
posed to do so we can come out here
and win district," he said. "Our team's
doing well, we've just got to keep
pushing it and bring more effort
against Crystal River.
'All my teammates are a big influ-
ence on me," he added. "They do their
job and I do mine, and that's a big part
of the deal."


Saturday, Sept. 28 7:30 a.m.
in Historic Downtown Inverness
Registration forms are available at any Citrus County Sheriffs
Office location or register online at any of the following websites:
www.citrusroadrunners.org www.jessiesplacecitrus.org
www.raceit.com www.sheriffcitrus.org


















All proceeds will benefit "Jessie's Place."
To be a sponsor or make a donation visit
www.jessiesplacecitrus.org. i'iliki Uii
| For more information call 726-4488. G"\-O2! i',E


I S P RTS B RI FS-


Dragon BoatJ
Fest],val



November 16
2013
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SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IRace SCHEDULETakn ts toll
Sprint CupTa iE ts ol
x-non-points raceT kig ts ol


Feb. 16 x-The Sprint Unlimited (Kevin
Harvick)
Feb. 21 -x-Budweiser Duel 1 (Kevin Harvick)
Feb. 21 x-Budweiser Duel 2 (Kyle Busch)
Feb. 24 Daytona 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
March 3 Subway Fresh Fit 500, Avondale,
Ariz. (Carl Edwards)
March 10 Kobalt Tools 400, Las Vegas (Matt
Kenseth)
March 17 -Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Kasey
Kahne)
March 24 -Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif. (Kyle
Busch)
April 7 STP Gas Booster 500, Ridgeway, Va.
(Jimmie Johnson)
April 13 NRA 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Kyle
Busch)
April 21 STP 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Matt
Kenseth)
April 27 -Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va.
(Kevin Harvick)
May 5 Aaron's 499, Talladega, Ala. (David
Ragan)
May 11 Bojangles' Southern 500, Darlington,
S.C. (Matt Kenseth)
May 18- x-Sprint Showdown (Jamie McMurray)
May 18 x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race
(Jimmie Johnson)
May 26 Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. (Kevin
Harvick)
June 2 Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Tony Stewart)
June 9 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. (Jimmie
Johnson)
June 16- Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
(Greg Biffle)
June 23 Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma,
Calif (Martin Truex Jr.)
June 30 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. (Matt
Kenseth)
July 6 Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola,
Daytona Beach (Jimmie Johnson)
July 14 Camping World RV Sales 301,
Loudon, N.H. (Brian Vickers)
July 28 -Your Hero's Name Here 400 at The
Brickyard, Indianapolis (Ryan Newman)
Aug. 4 GoBowling.com 400 Long Pond, Pa.
(Kasey Kahne)
Aug. 11 Cheez-lt 355 at The Glen, Watkins
Glen, N.Y (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 18 Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
(Joey Logano)
Aug. 24 -Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
(Matt Kenseth)
Sept. 1 AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta, Hampton,
Ga. (Kyle Busch)
Sept. 7 Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond,
Va. (Carl Edwards)
Sept. 15 GEICO 400, Joliet, I II. (Matt Kenseth)
Sept. 22 Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H. (Matt
Kenseth)
Sept. 29 -AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 6 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City,
Kan.
Oct. 12 Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 Camping World RV Sales 500,
Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 27 Goody's Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway,
Va.
Nov. 3- AAA Texas 500, FortWorth, Texas
Nov 10 -AdvoCare 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov 17 -Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead.
Nationwide Series
Feb. 23 DRIVE4COPD 300 (Tony Stewart)
March 2 Dollar General 200, Avondale, Ariz.
(Kyle Busch)
March 9 Sam's Town 300, Las Vegas (Sam
Hornish Jr.)
March 16 Jeff Foxworthy's Grit Chips 300,
Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle Busch)
March 23 Royal Purple 300, Fontana, Calif.
(Kyle Busch)
April 12 -O'Reilly Auto Parts 300, FortWorth,
Texas (Kyle Busch)
April 26 -ToyotaCare 250, Richmond, Va. (Brad
Keselowski)
May 4 -AARON'S 312, Talladega, Ala. (Regan
Smith)
May 10 Darlington 200, Darlington, S.C. (Kyle
Busch)
May 25 History 300, Concord, N.C. (Kyle
Busch)
June 1 5-Hour Energy 200, Dover, Del. (Joey
Logano)
June 9 DuPont Pioneer 250, Newton, Iowa
(Trevor Bayne)
June 15 -Alliance Truck Parts 250, Brooklyn,
Mich. (Regan Smith)
June 22 Road America 200, Elkhart Lake,
Wis. (A J Allmendinger)
June 28 Feed The Children 300, Sparta, Ky.
(Brad Keselowski)
July 5 Subway Firecracker 250, Daytona
Beach (Matt Kenseth)
July 13 CNBC Prime's The Profit 200,
Loudon, N.H. (Kyle Busch)
July 21 STP 300, Joliet, III. (Joey Logano)
July 27 Indiana 250, Speedway, Ind. (Kyle
Busch)
Aug. 3 U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa (Brad
Keselowski)
Aug. 10 ZIPPO 200, Watkins Glen, N.Y (Brad
Keselowski)
Aug. 17 Nationwide Children's Hospital 200,
Lexington, Ohio (A J Allmendinger)
Aug. 23 Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle
Busch)
Aug. 31 Great Clips/Grit Chips 300,
Hampton, Ga. (Kevin Harvick)
Sept. 6 Virginia 529 College Savings 250,
Richmond, Va. (Brad Keselowski)
Sept. 14 Dollar General 300, Joliet, III. (Kyle
Busch)
Sept. 21 Kentucky 300, Sparta, Ky. (Ryan
Blaney)
Sept. 28 Dover 200, Dover, Del.
Oct. 5 Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 11 Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C.
Nov. 2 O'Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, Fort
Worth, Texas
Nov 9 ServiceMaster 200, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov 16 Ford EcoBoost 300, Homestead.
Camping World
Feb. 22 NextEra Energy Resources 250
(Johnny Sauter)
April 6 Kroger 250, Ridgeway, Va. (Johnny
Sauter)
April 14 North Carolina Education Lottery 200
atThe Rock, Rockingham, N.C. (Kyle Larson)
April 20 SFP 250, Kansas City, Kan. (Matt
Crafton)
May 17- North Carolina Education Lottery 200,
Concord, N.C. (Kyle Busch)
May 31 Lucas Oil 200, Dover, Del. (Kyle
Busch)
June 7 WinStar World Casino 400k, Fort
Worth, Texas (Jeb Burton)
June 27 UNOH 225, Sparta, Ky. (Ty Dillon)
July 13-American Ethanol 200, Newton, Iowa
(Timothy Peters)
July 24 Mudsummer Classic, Rossburg, Ohio
(Austin Dillon)
Aug. 3 Pocono Mountains 125, Long Pond,
Pa. (Ryan Blaney)
Aug. 17 Michigan 200, Brooklyn, Mich.
(James Buescher)
Aug. 21 UNOH 200, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle


Busch)
Sep. 1 -Chevrolet Silverado 250, Bowmanville,
Ontario (Chase Elliott)
Sept. 8 Iowa 200, Newton, Iowa (James
Buescher)
Sept. 13-Enjoylllinois.com 225, Joliet, III. (Kyle
Busch)
Sept. 28 -Smith's 350, LasVegas
Oct. 19 Fred's 250 powered by Coca-Cola,
Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 26 Kroger 200, Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 1 WinStar World Casino 350k, Fort
Worth, Texas
Nov. 8- Lucas Oil 150, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 15 Ford EcoBoost 200, Homestead.


Clint Bowyer leads Kasey Kahne during last Saturday's practice in Loudon, N.H.


Earnhardt believes spin has weighed heavily on Bowyer


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. From
afar, Dale Earnhardt Jr has
watched Martin Truex Jr's body
language to see how his former
teammate is handling the fallout
from Michael Waltrip Racing
race-fixing fiasco at Richmond.
He's had a much closer view of
the toll it's taken on Clint Bowyer,
who triggered the entire contro-
versy when he spun in the Sept 7
race with seven laps remaining.
NASCAR said it could not prove
the spin was intentional; should
Bowyer admit that, he risks
retroactive penalties.
NASCAR did have evidence that
MWR attempted to manipulate the
finish of the race to get Truex into
the Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship. It issued harsh
sanctions against the organization
that included knocking Truex out
of the Chase. In response, Truex
sponsor NAPA Auto Parts said it's
ending its association with the
team at the end of the year
"It's almost been as hard to
watch Clint go through this as it
has been to watch Truex go


through it, because Clint is a good
guy and obviously was just fol-
lowing orders," Earnhardt said.
"He did some things that were
out of character and regrettable
and he feels terrible to have any
involvement in it. I know that for
a fact I know that to be genuine.
"It's been tough watching him
go through that process, too, be-
cause he's not that kind of guy to
go starting that kind of mess."
Earnhardt was penalized by
NASCAR in 2004 for intentionally
spinning to bring out a caution he
needed. He admitted his guilt
and NASCAR punished him.
Bowyer and MWR have main-
tained from the very beginning
that his spin was not deliberate,
but it was the act that set in mo-
tion the chain of events that could
put Truex out of work at the end
of the season. With NAPA pulling
its sponsorship, MWR could be
forced to shutter the No. 56 team
and let go up to 100 employees if
funding can't be found in the next
two months.
Earnhardt has a long relation-
ship with Truex, who won two ti-
tles driving for him when


Earnhardt co-owned Chance 2
Motorsports in the Nationwide
Series. They then became team-
mates when Truex moved up to
Dale Earnhardt Inc.
Earnhardt was also teammates
with Michael Waltrip, and DEI
was run by MWR general man-
ager Ty Norris, who was sus-
pended indefinitely by NASCAR
for the Richmond incident. Earn-
hardt said he hasn't spoken to
Waltrip or Norris.
"I don't really think that there's
anything I can share with them
that could help them, so I'm not
wanting to interject," Earnhardt
said. "I get annoyed when people
do that, so I don't want to be that
guy ."
As for Truex, he feels for his
old friend.
"I haven't had a chance to talk
to Truex, but I've kept an eye on
him and just seeing his body lan-
guage, he seems to be handling it
pretty well, as good as he can,"
Earnhardt said. "None of us re-
ally know what opportunities are
being presented to him. I cer-
tainly think he is one of the best
drivers in the sport."


SPRINT CUP
AAA 400
* Site: Dover, Del.
* Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox
Sports 1, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), qualify-
ing (ESPN, 3-4:30 p.m.); Saturday,
practice (Fox Sports 2, 11 a.m.-noon);
Sunday, 2 p.m. (ESPN, 1-6 p.m.).
* Track: Dover International Speed-
way (oval, 1.0 miles).
* Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.
* Last year: Brad Keselowski raced to
the last of his five 2012 victories en
route to the season title. Keselowski
failed to qualify for the Chase this
season.
* Last week: Matt Kenseth improved
to 2 for 2 in the Chase, holding off
Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle
Busch at New Hampshire. Kenseth
has a series-high seven victories.
* Fast facts: Kenseth has a 14-point
lead over Busch. Jimmie Johnson
(18 points back) is third, followed by
Carl Edwards (-36), Greg Biffle (-
38), Kevin Harvick (-39), Kurt Busch
(-40), Jeff Gordon (-42), Ryan New-
man (-47), Clint Bowyer (-48), Dale
Earnhardt Jr. (-62), Joey Logano (-
69) and Kasey Kahne (-71)....
Kenseth has two victories at the
track, the last in the 2011 spring
race. ... Tony Stewart, sidelined by a
broken leg, won in June at the track.
* Next race: Hollywood Casino 400,
Oct. 6, Kansas Speedway Kansas
City, Kan.

NATIONWIDE
5-HOUR ENERGY 200
* Site: Dover, Del.
* Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports


1, 12:30-3 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying
(Fox Sports 2, noon-1:30 p.m.), race,
3:45 p.m. (ESPN, 3:30-6 p.m.).
* Track: Dover International Speed-
way (oval, 1.0 miles).
* Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
* Last year: Joey Logano completed a
season sweep at the track, leading
184 of 200 laps. He ran his Dover se-
ries winning streak to three in June.
* Last week: Truck Series driver Ryan
Blaney raced to his first Nationwide
victory, winning at Kentucky Speed-
way in Penske Racing's No. 22 Ford.
* Fast facts: Kyle Busch, coming off a
victory two weeks ago at Chicagoland,
has won 10 times this season to push
his series record to 61.... Logano is
driving the No. 22 Mustang.... Sam
Hornish Jr. leads the season stand-
ings, 15 points ahead of Austin Dillon.
* Next race: Kansas Lottery 300, Oct. 5,
Kansas Speedway Kansas City, Kan.

CAMPING
WORLD TRUCK
SMITH'S 350
* Site: LasVegas.
* Schedule: Saturday, practice, quali-
fying, race, 8:30 p.m. (Fox Sports 1,
8-11 p.m.)
* Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
* Race distance: 219 miles, 146 laps.
* Last year: Nelson Piquet Jr. raced to
his second victory of the year, pass-
ing Matt Crafton on the final lap. The
Brazilian also won at Road America.
* Last race: Kyle Busch won at
Chicagoland on Sept. 14 for his


fourth series victory of the year and
34th overall. He won the Nationwide
race the following day.
* Fast facts: Crafton leads the sea-
son standings, 41 points ahead of
James Buescher... Ryan Blaney
won the Nationwide race last week
at Kentucky Speedway.... Ron Hor-
naday Jr. won the 2011 race for the
last of his series-record 51 victories.
... Chad Hackenbracht is making his
fourth start of the season in Kyle
Busch Motorsports' No. 51 Toyota.
* Next race: Fred's 250, Oct. 19, Tal-
ladega Superspeedway Talladega, Ala.

NHIRA
DRAG RACING
NHRA MIDWEST NATIONALS
* Site: Madison, II1.
* Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Satur-
day, qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday,
3:30 p.m.-5 a.m.), Sunday, final elim-
inations (ESPN2, 8:30-11:30 p.m.).
* Track: Gateway Motorsports Park.
* Last year: Antron Brown raced to
the last of his six 2012 Top Fuel vic-
tories en route to the season title.
Jack Beckman won in Funny Car,
Erica Enders in Pro Stock, and Eddie
Krawiec in Pro Stock Motorcycle.
* Last week: Doug Kalitta won the
NHRA Fall Nationals atTexas Motor-
plex to end a 71-race Top Fuel vic-
tory drought. Cruz Pedregon won in
Funny Car, Jason Line in Pro Stock,
and Krawiec in Pro Stock Motorcycle.
* Fast facts: The event is the third in
the six-race Countdown. The top 10
in each class qualified for the play-
offs. Kalitta and Shawn Langdon are
tied for the Top Fuel lead, two points
ahead of Spencer Massey. Matt


Hagan tops the Funny Car stand-
ings, 51 points ahead of Pedregon.
Line has an eight-point lead over
Jeg Coughlin in Pro Stock, and Hec-
tor Arana Jr. has an 11-point advan-
tage over Matt Smith in Pro Stock
Motorcycle.
* Next event: Auto-Plus NHRA Na-
tionals, Oct. 3-6, Maple Grove Race-
way, Reading, Pa.

IZOD INDYCAR
* Next races: Grand Prix of Houston,
Oct. 5 and 6, Streets of Houston,
Houston.
* Last race: Simon Pagenaud won
the Grand Prix of Baltimore on Sept.
1 for his second victory of the year
for Schmidt Hamilton Motorsports.

FORMULA ONE
* Next race: Korean Grand Prix, Oct.
6, Korean International Circuit,
Yeongam, South Korea.
* Last week: Red Bull's Sebastian
Vettel won the Singapore Grand Prix
for his third straight victory and sev-
enth of the year.

OTHER RACES
* GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR
SERIES: Championship Weekend,
Saturday (Fox Sports 2, 1:30-4:30
p.m.; Sunday, Fox Sports 1, noon-3
p.m.), Lime Rock Park, Lakeville,
Conn.
* WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car:
Saturday, Fremont Speedway, Fre-
mont, Ohio.
* U.S. AUTO RACING CLUB: Sprint
Car: Saturday, Lawrenceburg
Speedway, Lawrenceburg, Ind.


AUTO RACING


Hamlin recipient of March of Dimes award


Associated Press

Denny Hamlin had seen first-
hand through his work with the
March of Dimes the effects pre-
mature births have on children's
long-term health.
He'd also seen the toll it can
take on a family unable to bring
their newborn home during the
many hospital visits he'd made
with sponsor FedEx as part of its
longtime support of the March of
Dimes foundation. It didn't hit
him, though, until this year when
he became a father to a healthy
baby girl.
"Now that I do have Taylor,
and I am so blessed that she's
healthy and was born on time
with no issues, no complications,
you really get a clear under-
standing," Hamlin said. "When
you are at the hospital and you


walk into the nursery and there
are two or three premature ba-
bies who are a month or two
months early, you feel so lucky
that yours is 100 percent and you
get to go home in two days."
Hamlin was being honored by
the March of Dimes on Thursday
night with the prestigious
"Champion for Babies" award in
recognition of his work raising
awareness for the foundation's
signature fundraiser Hamlin
joined Arnold Palmer, Joe Na-
math and Greg Gumbel as the
fourth recipient of the award,
presented at the March of Dimes
Volunteer Leadership Confer-
ence gala in Washington, D.C.
"It's an honor to recognize the
great work that Denny has pro-
vided the March of Dimes," said
Dr Jennifer Howse, president
for the March of Dimes.


Associated Press
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., right, meets with Sprint Cup
driver Denny Hamlin in Cantor's Capitol Hill office Thursday in Wash-
ington. Hamlin is in Washington to accept the March of Dimes "Cham-
pion for Babies" award. Hamlin met with several congressional
members to help raise awareness for March of Dimes initiatives to
give all babies a healthy start in life.


Around the TRACKS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 B5


Points
STANDINGS


Sprint Cup
Through Sept. 22
1. MattKenseth, 2,111.
2. Kyle Busch, 2,097.
3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,093.
4. Carl Edwards, 2,075.
5. Greg Biffle, 2,073.
6. Kevin Harvick, 2,072.
7. Kurt Busch, 2,071.
8. Jeff Gordon, 2,069.
9. Ryan Newman, 2,064.
10. Clint Bowyer, 2,063.
11. Dale Earnhardt Jr, 2,049.
12. Joey Logano, 2,042.
13. Kasey Kahne, 2,040.
14. Brad Keselowski, 792.
15. Jamie McMurray, 786.
16. Martin Truex Jr, 752.
17. Paul Menard, 742.
18. Aric Almirola, 719.
19. RickyStenhouseJr., 700.
20. Jeff Burton, 694.

Nationwide Series
Through Sept. 21
1. Sam Hornish Jr., 962.
2. Austin Dillon, 947.
3. Regan Smith, 917.
4. Elliott Sadler, 908.
5. Brian Vickers, 902.
6. Justin Allgaier, 887.
7. Brian Scott, 883.
8. Trevor Bayne, 868.
9. Kyle Larson, 822.
10. Parker Kligerman, 783.
11. Alex Bowman, 739.
12. Nelson Piquet Jr., 709.
13. Mike Bliss, 664.
14.Travis Pastrana, 617.
15. Jeremy Clements, 528.
16. Reed Sorenson, 517.
17. Michael Annett, 513.
18. Mike Wallace, 496.
19. Eric McClure, 419.
20. Joe Nemechek, 409.

Camping World
Through Sept. 13
1. Matt Crafton, 609.
2. James Buescher, 568.
3. Ty Dillon, 550.
4. Jeb Burton, 539.
5. Ryan Blaney, 527.
6. Miguel Paludo, 526.
7. Timothy Peters, 512.
8. Johnny Sauter, 499.
9. Darrell Wallace Jr., 498.
10. Brendan Gaughan, 483.
11. Ron Hornaday Jr., 480.
12. Dakoda Armstrong, 462.
13. Joey Coulter, 457.
14. German Quiroga, 453.
15. John Wes Townley, 446.
16. Max Gresham, 399.
17. Ryan Sieg, 343.
18. Brennan Newberry, 319.
19. Ross Chastain, 300.
20. Bryan Silas, 265.

NHRA
Through Sept. 22
Top Fuel
1. Doug Kalitta, 2,251.
1. Shawn Langdon, 2,251.
3. Spencer Massey, 2,249.
4. Morgan Lucas, 2,216.
5. Tony Schumacher, 2,163.
Funny Car
1. Matt Hagan, 2,272.
2. Cruz Pedregon, 2,221.
3. Robert Hight, 2,209.
4. John Force, 2,208.
5. Jack Beckman, 2,196.
Pro Stock
1. Jason Line, 2,264.
2. Jeg Coughlin, 2,256.
3. Mike Edwards, 2,230.
4. Shane Gray, 2,207.
5. Allen Johnson, 2,190.
Pro Stock Motorcycle
1. Hector Arana Jr, 2,261.
2. Matt Smith, 2,250.
3. Hector Arana, 2,228.
4. Eddie Krawiec, 2,199.
5. Michael Ray, 2,191.

IndyCar
Through Sept. 1
1. Helio Castroneves, 501.
2. Scott Dixon, 452.
3. Simon Pagenaud, 431.
4. Marco Andretti, 430.
5. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 427.
6. Justin Wilson, 393.
7. Dario Franchitti, 388.
8. James Hinchcliffe, 376.
9. Will Power, 371.
10. Charlie Kimball, 363.
11.Tony Kanaan, 346.
12. E.J.Viso, 304.
13. Sebastien Bourdais, 297.
14. Josef Newgarden, 291.
15.Takuma Sato, 278.
16. Simona de Silvestro, 278.
17. Ed Carpenter, 277.
18. Graham Rahal, 266.
19. James Jakes, 244.
20. Tristan Vautier, 230.

Formula One
Through Sept. 22
1. Sebastian Vettel, 247.
2. Fernando Alonso, 187.
3. Lewis Hamilton, 151.
4. Kimi Raikkonen, 149.
5. Mark Webber, 130.
6. Nico Rosberg, 116.
7. Felipe Massa, 87.
8. Remain Grosjean, 57.
9. Jenson Button, 54.
10. Paul di Resta, 36.
11. Adrian Sutil, 26.
12. Sergio Perez, 22.
13. Nico Hulkenberg, 19.
14. Daniel Ricciardo, 18.
15. Jean-Eric Vergne, 13.
16. Pastor Maldonado, 1.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Canes rude hosts


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

In what was only their
fifth meeting, and first
since 2002, Citrus (4-0, 1-0)
wasn't a very hospitable
host last Friday in bashing
first-year District 6A-5 op-
ponent Ocala Forest 63-7.
Hurricanes senior quar-
terback
D e ion
M o o r e
(204 total
yards, five
TDs) more
than dou-
bled the
Wildcats'
Sam yardage in
Franklin the game,
and found
junior Sam Franklin four
times for 101 yards and a
touchdown.
The 'Cane defense held
Forest to -
1 yard (not
including
a botched
1 9 punt snap
that
't h a t
carved 29
y a r d s
from the
Frankie Wildcats'
Bartley total) in
the open-
ing half. Seniors Steven
Knowles and Jaimee Juse
registered three tackles
for losses and 13 total
tackles apiece, and senior
Frankie Bartley was in on
a game-high 15 tackles.
Assistant coach Chris
Stephenson's defense
would have pitched a
shutout if not for an early
78-yard kickoff return that
set up a 4-yard Wildcat
scoring drive.
It was Citrus' first all-
time win over Forest (1-3,
0-1), which was initially
placed back into a 7A dis-
trict in January, but won
an appeal to join 6A-5.
The Wildcats had previ-
ously defeated West Port


by two touchdowns and
lost 23-16 in the opener to
area power North Marion
under first-year head
coach Skip Austin.
With a highly-antici-
pated showdown with
Vanguard (3-1) next Fri-
day at Booster Stadium,
the resting 'Canes appear
in serious contention to
earn their first playoff
berth since 2006, when
Rik Haines led them to
their third straight tour-
nament appearance. Cit-
rus, which is ranked No.
12 in 6A after outscoring
its four opponents by a
combined 145-35, is also
vying for its first district
title since 2005 and sec-
ond since 1987.
Vanguard has yet to play
a district game, and trav-
els north tonight to play
11-time state champion
Jacksonville Bolles. Last
week, Bolles suffered a
45-31 upset loss against
district and area rival
Jacksonville Raines.
Bolles and Raines have
combined to make the
state playoffs 60 times,
dating back to the 1970s.
Tiger tally
Dunnellon has prevailed in
11 straight meetings against
annual rival Crystal River
since losing 16 straight to the
Pirates. Ninth-year Tigers
head coach Frank Beasley is
8-0 in the series, but said his
teams have often been the
beneficiaries of good fortune
in the rivalry.
"To be honest, we don't put
a lot of stock in that," said
Beasley, who was 12-0
against Citrus County teams
before his Tigers fell 14-8 to
Citrus three weeks ago. "If you
look at the last 14 to 15 years
and the epic battles we've had
with CR, have we been fortu-
nate to come out on the good
end of that lately? Sure. But
some of those games are


Chronicle file photo
Citrus head coach Rayburn Greene, left, and quarterback
Deion Moore, right, helped lead the Hurricanes to their
first-ever victory over Ocala Forest in five career meetings.


one-score games that could
have gone either way with a
turnover here or there."
5A-5 clash in
Gainesville
While fellow 5A-5 foes
Crystal River and Dunnellon
tussle at Ned Love Field
tonight, defending district
champion Gainesville East-
side (1-3, 1-0) faces peren-
nial power North Marion (3-1,
1-0) at Citizens Field. With a
district-clinching 42-41 over-
time victory against the Colts
last October, the Rams
snapped the Colts' streak of
nine straight titles. Before the
loss, North Marion had pre-
vailed in 24 consecutive dis-
trict tilts since losing 24-19 at
Dunnellon in 2006.
Eastside avoided an 0-4
start in last Friday's district
opener by eking out a 34-31
win over an improved Belle-
view squad (2-1, 0-1). Mean-
while, North Marion got by
new 5A-5 member Suwan-
nee 27-14.
Former Tigers
coach turns around
Chiefland program
When we last checked in


with Chiefland head coach
Aaron Richardson, a Citrus
High School graduate and
former offensive and defen-
sive coordinator under
Beasley at Dunnellon, his In-
dians snapped a 23-game
losing streak with a 3-0 start
to the 2012 season. With a
series of tough battles in a
difficult District 1A-7, includ-
ing a 12-6 loss to then No. 1
Union County, Chiefland fin-
ished 0-4 in league play
(5-5 overall).
With last Friday's 34-0
victory over Newberry,
Richardson's bunch turned
another corner, delivering
the program's first district
win since 2009.
"I think last week was a
signature win for him,"
Beasley said. "He's done an
outstanding job. Coach Rich
taught me a lot about how to
coach football. I could tell you
that I'm surprised, but I'm not.
He's just got a way with kids."
Chiefland moved to sixth in
the 1A rankings, while fellow
1A-7 members Union County
(No. 1) and Dixie County (No.
4) sit in the top five, making a
strong case it's the most for-
midable district in Class 1 A.


High School FootballSTATISTICS


Scoring
Pts
Deion Moore, Cit 60
Desmond Franklin, Cit 30
Kane Parks, Dunn 30
Bubba Sims, Dunn 30
James Pouncey, Cit 24
Dmitry Growdon, Lec 18
Kobie Jones, Dunn 18
Jonah Nightengale, Lec 18
Collin Ryan, CR 18
Josh Williams, Dunn 18
Passing
CompAttTD IntYds
Deion Moore, Cit 29 62 5 1 520
KobieJones, Dunn 18 32 3 3 329
Collin Ryan, CR 16 35 2 0 188
Travis McGee, Lec 22 33 2 2 173
S. Gardner, SR 11 29 1 4 99
Rushing
RushYds Avg TD
Bubba Sims, Dunn 91 610 6.7 5
James Pouncey, Cit 45 345 7.7 3
Josh Williams, Dunn 28 269 9.6 3
Dmitry Growdon, Lec 59 211 3.6 2
Javian Clark, Cit 33 186 5.6 2
J. Nightengale, Lec 25 186 7.4 2
A. Anderson, Lec 18 174 9.7 1
Tyric Washington, Cit 39 172 4.4 0
Justin Jimenez, SR NA 165 NA 0
Deion Moore, Cit 18 139 7.7 4
KaneParks, Dunn 17 97 5.7 3


Receiving
Rec Yds Avg
Kane Parks, Dunn 10 248 24.8


TD
2


Desmond Franklin, Cit 11 205 18.E
Sam Franklin, Cit 10 200 20.C
Jaimee Juse, Cit 7 101 14.z
Ty Reynolds, CR 6 92 15.:
Allen Rivers, SR 5 62 12.z
TeAndre Hopkins, Lec 6 63 10.1
Keshawn Hopkins, CR 2 60 30.C
D'Andre Horton, Lec 2 47 23.
Chase Brattin, Dunn 5 45 9.0
Tackles
Solo
Jaimee Juse, Cit 29
Tyler Pollard 25
Steven Knowles, Cit 24
Travis Blotz, Cit 22
Cole Fagan, Dunn 21
Keiwan Jones, Dunn 20
Zahid Hujurat, Dunn 19
Austin Stephens, CR 19
Frankie Bartley, Cit 18
Eddie Bennis, CR 16
Dmitry Growdon, Lec 16
Interceptions
Jeremiah Lucas, Lec 2
Desmond Franklin, Cit 2
Justin Hamm, Dunn 2
Nicolai Kortendick, Lec 2
Ty Reynolds, CR 2
GabeWilcox, Cit 2
Sacks
Steven Knowles, Cit
Keiwan Jones, Dunn
Jesse Vineyard, Cit
Ardante Anderson, Lec
Travis Blotz, Cit
JaimeeJuse, Cit
Jacob LaFleur, CR


Citrus Hurricanes
Gainesville Hurricanes
Ocala Vanguard Knights
Ocala Forest Wildcats
Lake Weir Hurricanes



Dunnellon Tigers
North Marion Colts
Gainesville Eastside Rams
Crystal River Pirates
Suwannee Bulldogs
Belleview Rattlers
Santa Fe Raiders


Lecanto Panthers

Windermere Prep Lakers
First Academy-Leesburg Ea(
Mount Dora Bible Bulldogs
Central Florida Christian Eac
Legacy Charter Eagles
Ocala Christian Crusaders
Seven Rivers Christian Warnri


Dist
W L
1 0
1 0
0 0
0 1
0 1
District
Dist
W L
1 0
1 0
1 0
0 0
1 1
0 1
0 2


Ovr
W L T
4 0 0
3 1 0
3 1 0
1 3 0
0 3 1
5A-5
Ovr
W L
3 1
3 1
1 3
2 1
2 1
2 1
1 3


Independent
W L WL
NA NA 2 2
Sunshine State North Division
W L WL
3 0 3 1
gles 2 0 3 0
2 0 3 1
gles 1 1 3 1
1 2 1 3
0 3 0 4
ors 0 3 0 4


PF PA
57 68


Continuing to shine Continued


QB Winston

producingfor

No. 8 Seminoles

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Quarterback
Jameis Winston hasn't made many
mistakes in a Florida State uni-
form. When he does, the redshirt
freshman knows why That's how
the teenager with the shoulder-
shrug smile earned the trust of
coaches and teammates.
"There's no age limit on knowl-
edge," Florida State coach Jimbo
Fisher said. "There's no age limit
on knowing what to do and being a
good player
"Each player, what he can absorb
at that present time of his career,
matters as to how much leeway you
give him. And (Winston) gets more
than most have."
The 19-year-old Winston made a
wrong read during the 54-6 win
against Bethune-Cookman last
week. He missed the hot receiver as
the defense blitzed and was forced
to spin out of the clutches of defen-
sive end LeBrand Richardson. Win-
ston simultaneously dipped from
defensive end Erik Williams. The
busted play ended with a falling
down Winston throwing an 11-yard
touchdown to Kelvin Benjamin.
Fisher's quarterback tutorial
hinges on one question: Why
Why did you make this decision?
Why was this the outcome?
Winston tends to ace the '"why"
test.
He's completed 50 of 64 passes for
718 yards, eight touchdowns and one
interception with a 210.49 passing
efficiency that ranks No. 2 in FBS.
Winston (6-foot-4, 228 pounds) also
has two touchdowns rushing within
the No. 5 scoring offense in FBS.
"You can't rely on ability, as far as
letting it bail you out all the time,"
Fisher said. "If you don't know why
you made a mistake then that's crit-
ical and we have to fix that.
"Some guys make plays and peo-
ple assume they know why ... He
understands that and puts a lot of
time in it."
The previous week Winston threw
his lone interception on a forced,
high pass against Nevada. He took
responsibility and moved on.
"He keeps his same personality,
which is really goofy and loose and
just very competitive," FSU safety
Terrence Brooks said. "He's just
going out there being very comfort-
able in his own skin and just know-


Associated Press
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston's mastery of the offense and a
jovial, yet business-like persona has allowed him to become the centerpiece
of the program.


ing his abilities. I feel like that right
there is what's going to take him
very far in this game."
That comfort has allowed him to
deal with the "Famous Jameis" nick-
name, "J-Dub" T-shirts and another
with Winston's face on the body of
Jesus and the words ,"The Chosen
One." Ego has not been a problem.
Buffalo Bills quarterback EJ
Manuel was drawn to Winston's
playful demeanor last year despite
being a senior NFL prospect. Indi-
anapolis Colts linebacker Bjoern
Werner was named 2012 ACC de-
fensive player of the year and took
notice, too.
"He's comfortable in every situa-
tion they put him in, and that's why
he's so successful now," Werner
said. "He's just really open, he talks
a lot and that's what makes him so
comfortable."
Winston even exuded a level of
calm as a freshman at Hueytown
High School.
'A lot of that has to do with him
having so much attention on him
when he was a freshman," said An-


drew Bone, Rivals.com recruiting
reporter 'A lot of these high-profile
recruits coming out of high school,
they don't get the attention put on
them until their junior, maybe their
senior year"
Winston and Fisher's relation-
ship isn't always lovey-dovey Fisher
is known for his outbursts toward
his quarterbacks. Winston was crit-
icized in high school for berating
teammates.
The common pursuit of perfec-
tion has enhanced the bond. The
next test comes Saturday at Boston
College.
"I'm a competitor till the day I
die," Winston said. "When he says
I'm getting too aggressive, that means
I'm making decisions off of emotions
and not off of business. .. That's
when mistakes start to happen.
"When coach Fisher tries to yell
at me and intimidate me, he knows
that I'm a look at him like, 'Coach, I
know you're trying to get up under
my skin.'... But when I know he's se-
rious, I get a different type of atti-
tude. I've got to lock in."


from Page Bl


team to struggle with their
offensive identity That
tends to get sorted out
down the road.
"Reynolds is really a dy-
namic kid that does some
good things with the ball."
With six points allowed
over its past two contests,
Dunnellon's formula has
been stout defense led
by senior Keiwan Jones
and linebackers Cole
Fagan and Zahid Hujurat
-and a strong ground at-
tack featuring junior
Bubba Sims and freshman
Josh Williams. The Tigers
(3-1, 1-0) opened their dis-
trict play last Friday with a
27-6 road win over Santa
Fe (1-3,0-2).
Varnadore's especially
concerned with Sims and
junior receiver Kane
Parks (10 catches, 248
yards) as well as Dunnel-
lon's defensive front.
"I would assume they'll
come out with the same
formula of great defense,
clock control and great
special teams, and try to
just pound our teeth in. I
would do that if I were
them," he said. "You look
at them against Santa Fe,
which knew the trap play
was coming, but Dunnel-
lon was getting that trap
off, and Sims can pop it.
"They have talent,
there's no doubt about it.
They have a lot of weapons.
But what's interesting
about them is they're young
like us. Coach Beasley does
a great job with those kids
over there."
Varnadore considers the
game a crucial measuring
stick in the district for his
team.
"I really believe Dunnel-
lon is one of the best teams
in the district," he said. "I
told our guys that if we
come out and have a great
game and win this one, you
can get serious about dis-
cussing playoffs. That's
how highly I think of Dun-
nellon and the way they're
playing right now"
Beasley is pleased with
where his team is at, but
realizes it will take a sus-
tained effort to succeed
this year
"Our guys are working
hard at getting better at
the little things," Beasley
said. "Defensively, we're


playing really well, I'm not
going to say they're not.
We've just got to maintain
our kids' focus, because
they are high school kids."
Belleview (2-1) at Lecanto
(2-2), 7:30 p.m. tonight
After being held to
under 100 yards against
Crystal River, Lecanto's of-
fense found a spark with a
hurry-up attack against
Fivay last Friday Unfortu-
nately, an injury to sopho-
more quarterback Travis
McGee and an effective
Falcon passing attack
helped Fivay hand the
Panthers their second loss.
Ardante "DeDe" Anderson
became the third Panther
back to surpass 100 rush-
ing yards in a game this
season.
Belleview has lost six
straight to Citrus County
schools, but figures to be
improved this year under
senior running back Craig
Riche (58 carries, 458
yards, five TDs) and junior
quarterback Erik Pitts (472
total yards, five TDs). In
District 5A-5 play last Fri-
day, the Rattlers suffered
their first loss in a tough
34-31 home defeat to de-
fending district champion
Eastside.
Belleview and Lecanto
haven't met since 1996,
when the Rattlers im-
proved to 2-0 all-time ver-
sus the Panthers.
Seven Rivers Christian
Warriors (0-4,0-3 in SSAC
North) at Mount Dora
Bible Bulldogs (3-1,2-0),
7 p.m. tonight
A young and under-
manned Seven Rivers
squad, which barely
dressed 11 players last
week, continues to take its
lumps. The Warriors have
been outscored 129-0 the
last three games, and fell
to 0-3 in the Sunshine
State North division in los-
ing 45-0 at Windermere
Prep last Friday With
freshman John Mazza and
junior Allen Rivers each
surpassing 60 yards rush-
ing for the Warriors, sec-
ond-year head coach Dave
Iwaniec was encouraged
by his team's improvement
in the running game.
Mount Dora improved to
2-0 in conference play last
week by downing previ-
ously unbeaten Central
Florida Christian Academy
48-22 on the road. The Bull-
dogs are led by senior sig-
nal-caller Ben Moore (26
for 41 passing, 305 yards).


Standings

District 6A-5


B6 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


FOOTBALL


%mo









SCENE


Inside:
AMC's "Breaking Bad"
going out looking good/C4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


RIVERLAND NEWS/Special to the Chronicle
Jen McDoughald hoists a pumpkin into the air while her daughter, Erin, holds the clippers last year during a visit to The Pickin' Patch. The Homosassa family spent
a portion of their afternoon at the u-pick field.


Pick


your


tradition


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

our years ago, the Thomases and Dixons
sought to carve out a Florida Fall tradition
unlike any offered in the Sunshine State.
Little did they know, at the time, how popular their venture would blossom among folks
in search of a family friendly event that would not only give people a chance to enjoy the
outdoors, but not put a huge dent in their checkbooks.
So, for the fourth straight year, residents in the area will get the chance to prepare for
Halloween as well as the Fall season by trekking through an approximately 11-acre tract of
land in search of the perfect pumpkin.
Yes, folks, the long wait is over The Pickin' Patch opens its gate at 10 a.m. Saturday Hal-
loween is a little more than a month away
"It's a neat fall addition," said Scott Thomas, who along with his wife, Sarah Joe, and
Scott and Andy Dixon, will open their field to people seeking to enjoy the experience of
cutting their own pumpkins, gourds and other agriculture-based items straight from the
field. "It's really been a neat evolution over the past three years. First, mom and dad and


r.'.. ~
S & ',..~..s

-- .-
Y~.
.i.


See Page C3 Jordon Tier leaps from the top of a hay fort.




Spencers bring award-winning magic show to Lecanto


Special to the Chronicle
Award-winning magical per-
formers The Spencers are
bringing their "Theatre of Illu-
sion" to Curtis Peterson Audito-
rium in Lecanto at3 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 29.
Magician Kevin Spencer and
his wife Cindy have been named
Performing Arts Entertainers of
the Year six times, and in 2009,
they received magic's highest
honor: the Merlin Award for In-
ternational Magicians of the Year
The Spencers promise an ex-
perience unique from the tradi-
tional magic show
"The illusions we perform
aren't the razzle-dazzle ... kind


of magic. It's magic that combines
theater, storytelling, movement
and music," Kevin Spencer said.
The "Theater of Illusion" is a
family-friendly show, with en-
tertainment designed to amaze
children and adults alike.
A highlight of the show is the
"Walking Through a Wall" illu-
sion, made famous by Harry
Houdini in 1914.
At the front of the stage will
rest eight concrete blocks. The
audience will be able to inspect
the blocks before the show to
ensure they are real. A member
of the audience will be selected
to assist Spencer as he walks
through the wall and emerges
on the other side.


Believing that magic becomes
more real and alive when expe-
rienced up close, Spencer will
perform an illusion which will
invite the participation of the
entire audience. The Spencers
say they want everyone to feel
like a part of the show
For those interested in meet-
ing The Spencers, a meet-and-
greet is scheduled after the
performance.
When not on stage, Kevin
Spencer is working magic through
his programs The Healing of
Magic and Hocus Focus.
Designed to aid individuals
recovering from various dis-
abilities, the Healing of Magic
uses simple magic tricks to im-


prove motor, cognitive and per-
ceptual skills. Spencer said the
therapy program is utilized in
roughly 2,000 hospitals and
rehab centers around the world.
Out of the therapy program
grew Hocus Focus: a curricu-
lum developed to motivate and
engage children with emotional
disorders and learning disabili-
ties. While Spencer loves being
on stage, he said, "I think work-
ing the Hocus Focus and Heal-
ing of Magic programs are
probably the most satisfying
part of everything that I do."
For tickets, call 352-873-5810 or
visit http://cfuuniversitytickets.com.
Admission is $20. Approximate
run time is 105 minutes.


If you go:
WHAT: "Theatre of
Illusion" magic show
featuring Kevin and
Cindy Spencer.
WHEN: 3 p.m.
WHERE: Curtis Peterson
Auditorium, 3810 W. Ed-
ucational Path, Lecanto.
COST: $20.
TICKETS: 352-873-5810
or http://cfuniversity
tickets.com.







Review: 'Baggage Claim' lost on arrival


PETER DEBRUGE
Variety
LOS ANGELES Some-
times you have to travel 30,000
miles just to appreciate the guy
who lives down the hall or so
goes "Baggage Claim," a movie
about a Flight Attendant Barbie
type who runs herself ragged
chasing romantic prospects
while her perfect suitor may as
well be waving lighted wands
from the runway the entire
time. "Girl, open your eyes!"
That kind of talk-back is typical
of playwright David E. Talbert's
popular urban theater shows,
though this watered-down
adaptation of his 2003 novel is
too worried about attracting
white audiences to let its black
attitude take off.
As a book, "Baggage Claim"
allowed Talbert to entertain his
female following with corny ad-


vice on finding the ideal man.
After years of world travel,
Montana Moore has developed
a theory that all guys fall into
one of five categories, ranging
from "overnight bag" (no-strings
fling) to "trunk" (old and worn),
but the perfect man is like the
perfect set of luggage: "FRill of
compartments. So many that
just when you think you've figured
him out, he surprises you with a
hidden nook or a forbidden
cranny" So if you're onboard
with Talbert's tortured metaphor
and want to know the right match
for Montana, just look for the
one with the forbidden cranny
The trouble with "Baggage
Claim" the movie is that it
makes immediately obvious
which man Montana (Paula Pat-
ton) should wind up with. Back
in elementary school, neighbor
William Wright (Derek Luke)
proposed marriage with a ring


retrieved from the bottom of a
Cracker Jack box, and now,
whenever Montana needs
cheering up, good old Mr
Wright is just across the hall,
ready to boil a lobster and mix
apple martinis until she feels
better But Montana is hope-
lessly slow on the uptake.
While it's not unusual to want
a man, Montana's reasons are
all wrong: Her altar-obsessed
mother (Jenifer Lewis) has
been married five times, and
she's been pressuring Montana
to get hitched as well. Now that
her much younger sister (Lau-
ren London) is engaged, Mon-
tana calculates that she has 30
days to find a fiance of her own
or risk irreparably disappoint-
ing her mother And while her
latest beau (Boris Kodjoe) has
awesome abs, the rest of the
package is far from perfect
That's where Montana's boy-


crazy best friends, fellow flight
attendants Gail (Jill Scott) and
Sam (Adam Brody), hatch the
scheme to find her a husband in
one month's time: They will track
the travel itineraries of all
Montana's exes and arrange for
her to bump into them en route,
hoping that these men have ma-
tured into worthier suitors in
the time since they split up.
And so the film pretends that
any of Montana's exes stands a
chance: There's the hip-hop
star (Tremaine Neverson, aka
Trey Songz), the aspiring Con-
gressman (Taye Diggs) and the
international businessman (Dji-
mon Hounsou), all of whom
seem desperate to pick up
where they left off the last time
around. However handsome
they may be, these characters
just aren't the right fit for Mon-
tana's baggage.
Chemistry you can fake, but


charm is far harder to pull off,
and "Baggage Claim" never
quite succeeds on that front.
Talbert has clearly studied
what makes similar films click,
but instead of finding a fresh
spin on old cliches, he merely
repeats them.
While it's nice to see Patton
at the center of such a strong
black ensemble, Talbert hasn't
quite figured out how to adjust
his directing technique from
stage to screen. Reduced to
making cutesy faces through-
out, Patton doesn't act so much
as mug. Perhaps fitting for a tale
of missed connections, "Bag-
gage Claim" leaves one wonder-
ing what might have been.
"Baggage Claim," a Fox-
Searchlight release, is rated
PG-13 by the Motion Picture As-
sociation of America for "sex-
ual content and some language."
Running time: 96 minutes.


EN SMIININt NOTIONt


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The establishment is family owned and
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Located at 1787 W. Main Street in Inverness, the restaurant is open
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Entertainment is provided Friday and Sunday nights.
For more information, call 341-6262.


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C2 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


ON THE SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


qa,
\1 0


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I F


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE ON THE SCENE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C3


Muppet magic


revealed in new


bio of Jim Henson


RIVERLAND NEWS/Special to the Chronicle
Mary Massey surveys rows of sunflowers last year at The Pickin' Patch. Sunflowers will again be offered at
The Pickin' Patch.


PATCH
Continued from Page C1

kids would come out. Then mom
told grandma and grandpa about
this neat thing they found. As the
word spreads through families, it
gets bigger and bigger There's
nothing really in Florida that cele-
brates fall, and we wanted to pro-
vide that opportunity
"We've had a lot of folks who've
come through who've grown up in
the Northeast and the Midwest
who enjoyed an experience similar
to this who've come out and talked
about their experiences doing this
when they were kids. They've re-
ally enjoyed having it here."
And it's the smiles on the faces of
the children, the laughter and the
stories from visitors to The Pickin'
Patch that keep the Thomases and
Dixons going through the long, hot
summer days tending to the field.
Because, as Scott Thomas explained,
growing pumpkins in Florida is no
small feat due to the climate.
"You have to remind yourself,
when it's 90 to 95 degrees, of the
smiles and the joy and happiness
these kids have on their face," he
said. "You've got to dig down, it's
brutal, there's no doubt about it.
Because of the obscene costs and
extreme weather, extreme insect
pressure. The rainy season is a de-
terrent to us. We got a tremendous
amount of rain in August. It re-
quires us to be more attentive to
bug populations. Things happen
much more rapidly when it's wet.


"But, oh yeah, it's worth it seeing
the kids come out and be a part of
what we started. I think, at times,
we begin to take that for granted.
We can, at any time, take our kids
out to the field and ride around on
a pasture and see deer and
turkeys. There are so many kids
that don't get to experience that
We want to share our life and our
world of agriculture with families
who don't get to experience that
We want to share our love of farm-
ing with everyone."
For those who've been to The
Pickin' Patch or those who've yet to
discover it, there's plenty to be
found, or had. In addition to the 11-
acre pumpkin field, which offers
the traditional carving pumpkins,
there's also 2 acres worth of orna-
mental offerings, including white
pumpkins, which can grow up to 80
pounds, and Cinderella pumpkins.
Thomas also said they've expanded
two new varieties of gourds.
The Pickin' Patch also offers a
Sunflower Garden, which is about
2 acres in size, but spread out this
year, Thomas said, to allow visitors
to navigate their way through the
rows of brightly colored flowers.
Thomas said the ever popular hay
fort, with a slide, and hayrides will
be available for young and old
alike, and the Kiddie Cornmaze,
which is about an acre in size.
"It's about a 7- to 10-minute trip
through it," Thomas said. "The kids
certainly enjoy it but our focal
point here is the pumpkins."
There's ample parking, Thomas
said, and for those who prefer to
just come by and purchase a pump-


kin without doing it themselves,
there will be a supply under the
4,000-square-foot tent where visi-
tors can snap pictures of their kids
and families next to a vintage 1950
Ford F-1 pickup truck, the antique
wagon and waterwheel.
Admission to The Pickin' Patch
is $2 for those 3 and older; how-
ever, as Thomas explained, visi-
tors can save their wristbands
throughout the month and return
for free as many times as they
wish. He also stressed families
are welcome to just come out and
explore the offerings without pur-
chasing a pumpkin.
"We have a lot of families who
come out and spread a blanket out
and have a picnic lunch, we really
don't mind," he said. "If you want to
come out and enjoy a picnic lunch
in the warm fall sun, you're welcome
too. If it gets too hot, we have a
4,000-square-foot tent set up and
plenty of places to rest, have a cool
drink of water and get out of the
immediate sun."
The Pickin' Patch, 11100 Rolling
Hills Road, to get there, go west on
State Road 40 and turn right on
Rolling Hills Road, which is di-
rectly across from the Dunnellon
water tower Gates are on the right.
The Pickin' Patch will be open
from 3 to 7 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m.
to 7 p.m. Saturday and noon to
7 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 27.
The Pickin' Patch will officially
open at 10 a.m. Saturday For infor-
mation, call 352-533-4344 or visit
dunnellonpumpkinpatch. com
or email thepickinpatch@
bellsouth.net


MATT SEDENSKY
AP Book Review
"Jim Henson: The
Biography" (Ballantine
Books), by Brian Jay
Jones.
If ever you had a sin-
gle question about the
felt magic Jim Henson
managed to create,
chances are Brian Jay
Jones' sweeping new bi-
ography of the pup-
peteer will answer it.
Wondered why Miss
Piggy is the way she is?
Consider that her father
was killed in a tractor
accident, at least in the
elaborate character
back story created by
the Muppets' masters.
Thought Kermit was
always synonymous with
frog? Fact is, he had not
taken on an amphibious
identity in initial ap-
pearances, and was not
green but the milky blue
of an old coat of Hen-
son's mother
Jones offers a meticu-
lously researched tome
chock-full of gems about
the Muppets and the most
thorough portrait of
their creator ever
crafted. Henson's story,
from his birth in the
Mississippi Delta, to his


first forays into pup-
petry as a teenager, to
his sudden death in 1990
at the age of 53, is docu-
mented in depth.
We're taken along to
the creation of iconic
characters, the birth of
"Sesame Street," the
strain in Henson's mar-
riage, friction with
revered children's au-
thors Roald Dahl and
Maurice Sendak, and
unending merger talks
with Disney We learn
Henson's first choice to
cast in the central goblin
king character of
"Labyrinth" was Sting,
not David Bowie. We're
told of Henson collaps-
ing in fits of laughter on
the set of"The Muppet
Show," of him spending
hours underwater to
film the "Rainbow Con-
nection" scene of "The
Muppet Movie," and
how the puppets were so
real they could be dis-
arming to crew members.
It is, in a word, ex-
haustive, and at times,
exhausting. But at its
best, it gives a glimpse of
the silliness on Muppet
sets, of Henson's drive and
his soft-spoken genius that
in such a short life man-
aged to create so much.

-MIRNEECF
S3O23R3-OPEN.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Breaking Bad' ending run still looking good


FRAZIER MOORE
Associated Press
NEW YORK The supply is
running low and you know
there won't be more. "Breaking
Bad" stands to leave its fans
reeling.
For five seasons of wicked-
ness this AMC drama has set
viewers face-to-face with the
repellant but irresistible Walter
White and the dark world he
embraced as he spiraled into
evil. With the end imminent
(Sunday at 9 p.m.), who can say
what fate awaits this teacher-
turned-drug-lord for the havoc
he has wreaked on everyone
around him.
This is more than the end of a
TV series. It's a cultural mo-
ment, arriving as the show has
logged record ratings, bagged a
best-drama Emmy and even
scored this week's cover of The
New Yorker magazine.
Up through the penultimate
episode, "Breaking Bad" has
been as potent and pure as the
"blue sky" crystal meth Walter
cooked with such skill. Judging
from that consistency in story-
telling and in performances by
such stars as Bryan Cranston
(Walter White), Aaron Paul (his
sidekick Jesse Pinkman), Anna
Gunn (who just won an Emmy
as Walt's wife) and Betsy
Brandt, the end will likely pack
unforgiving potency
But one thing is dead sure: It
will be beautiful.
"Breaking Bad" has often
been described as addictive,
and if that's so, the look of the
show is its own habit-forming
drug. Michael Slovis, the series'
four-times-Emmy-nominated
director of photography, has
been cooking up that look since
the series' sophomore season.
"I go for the emotion in the
scene, not to overtake it, but to
help it along," said Slovis over a
recent lunch in Manhattan.
"With 'Breaking Bad,' I recog-
nized very early that I had a
story and performances that
could stand up to a bold look."
The action is centered in Al-


Associated Press
Cinematographer Michael Slovis takes a measurement as Bryan Cranston, center, and co-star Aaron
Paul stand by on the set of "Breaking Bad." The series finale will air on Sunday.


buquerque, N.M., which invites
sprawling desert shots and tidy
manicured neighborhoods;
washes of light and jagged sun-
drenched expanses.
The look of the show makes
the most of its setting, and also
the technology by which view-
ers see it: In an age of digital
video, with the smallest detail
and the sharpest resolution vis-
ible to the audience, Walter's
battered mobile meth lab could
be clearly discerned as a speck
against a vista of deserts and
mountains. A doll's disembod-
ied eyeball bobbing in a swim-
ming pool had chilling
vividness.
And don't forget the show's
visual signature: "Breaking
Bad" was never afraid of the
dark.
Slovis recalls how, his first
week as DP, he was shooting in
Jesse's basement.
'Jesse and Walter are down
there cooking meth, and I turn
off all the lights and turn the


back lights on. There's smoke
and shafts of light coming
through the basement door and
I go, 'This is what I came to
do!"'
"We have some interesting
extremes in lighting, thanks to
Michael and his fearlessness,"
said "Breaking Bad" creator
Vince Gilligan from Los Ange-
les. He invoked the fancy artis-
tic term for this, "chiaroscuro,"
which means the use of strong
contrasts between light and
dark.
'"Breaking Bad' has become
known for beautiful bold light-
ing," he said, "and Michael be-
came an indispensable part of
the 'Breaking Bad' equation."
The imagery of "Breaking
Bad" is second-nature to its
viewers, whether or not they
are conscious of Slovis' work.
So when they swoon at the
beauty of the desert outside Al-
buquerque, they may not know
the complexion of this badlands
was created in his camera.


"The desert on the show has
a tonality that doesn't exist in
real life," he said with a laugh.
This color is achieved with a
so-called "tobacco filter"
clamped on the lens. "I don't
pay much attention to reality
when I light or even when
I shoot exteriors. But nobody
questions the color, because
it becomes part of the
storytelling."
You would have a hard time
finding many stylistic links be-
tween "Breaking Bad" and
some of Slovis' other credits,
which include "CSI" (for which
he won an Emmy), "Fringe,"
AMC's short-lived noir thriller
"Rubicon," and lighter fare in-
cluding "Running Wilde" and
"Royal Pains." (Nor his addi-
tional credits as a director,
which range from four episodes
of "Breaking Bad" to "Chicago
Fire" and "30 Rock.")
Instead, he said he strives to
let each project suggest its own
look.


Now 58, Slovis is soft-voiced
and lanky, with a head whose
baldness rivals Walt White's in
Heisenberg mode.
He got the photography bug
while growing up in Plainview,
N.J., where he became the school
photographer and won a state
photography contest. He was in-
vited to study at the Rochester
Institute of Technology
He imagined himself a fine-
arts photographer but he loved
movies and storytelling, and, after
graduate school at New York
University, landed jobs shooting
music videos and commercials,
then got nibbles from feature films.
But in 2001 he found movie
offers drying up, and, though he
had never seen TV in his fu-
ture, he gratefully accepted a
call from the NBC series "Ed."
The timing was terrific. For
decades, TV's hasty, assembly-
line production schedule
proved an obstacle to giving a
series its own visual style.
"Film had been just a way to
record the TV picture," Slovis
said. A further barrier to get-
ting too creative was the low
resolution and squarish shape
of the old TV receivers, which
conversely had a negative im-
pact on theatrical films, whose
wide-screen format was forced
to conform (with lots of medium
and close-up shots) to movies'
eventual small-screen telecast.
Slovis hails pioneering ex-
ceptions such as "Twin Peaks,"
"Law & Order" and "The X-
Files," and credits "CSI" as
"one of the first times that cine-
matography became a real
character on a show TV began
changing around us."
Gilligan agreed that "the ad-
vent of flat-screen TV really al-
lowed Michael's work to shine
in a way it wouldn't have, 20
years ago."
Now the end of "Breaking
Bad" is nigh. But through Sun-
day's final fade-out, Slovis' in-
fluence will remain, capturing
the "Bad" times you can't turn
your eyes from. He's a series
star who's out of sight, yet con-
trolling what you see.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Theater
"Les Miserables,"
through Oct. 13 at Ocala
Civic Theatre, 4337 E. Sil-
ver Springs Blvd., Ocala.
7:30 p.m.; matinees at
2 p.m. Adults $28; students
$10. 352-236-2274 or
ocalacivictheatre.com.
"Fiddler on the Roof,"
produced by the Live Oak
Theatre Company. Oct. 18,
19, 25, 26 and 27 at Faith
Evangelical Presbyterian
Church, 200 Mount Fair
Ave., Brooksville. 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturdays and
3 p.m. Sunday. Adults $18;
children 13 and under $5
with purchase of adult ticket.
Coffee/tea and dessert in-
cluded. 352-593-0027 or
liveoaktheatre.org.
"Betting on Death,"
the Greater Dunnellon his-
torical Society's murder-
mystery event. 7 p.m. at
Oct. 18, 19, 25 and 26 at
Dunnellon's historic depot,
12061 S. Williams Street.
$25; includes full meal. 352-
465-5005.
Central Florida Lyric
Opera's 2013-14 series. All
performances at Paul P.
Williams Fine Arts Audito-
rium, 9501 U.S. 441 and
College Drive, Leesburg.
$15 and up. 352-753-3229 or
centralfloridalyricopera.org.
"Viva Verdi," 3 p.m.
Oct. 20.
"Opera Thunder II: An
Encore Performance,"
3 p.m. Nov. 3.
"Lucia de Lammer-
moor," 3 p.m. Jan. 19.
"Barber of Seville,"
3p.m. Feb. 16.
"Great Opera Scenes,"
3 p.m. March 16.
Arts & Crafts
Artists sought for
mall show. Cafe Impres-
sions hosting showcase at
mall from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Oct. 5 and Oct. 19. Artists in
oils, acrylics, mixed media,
watercolor, drawings, pho-
tography, three-dimensional
fine art (sculpture), stained
glass, jewelry and pottery
invited to participate.
Spaces limited. 772-480-
7427 or ashleymcdermott
photo@gmail.com.
Applications for the
Beverly Hills Foundation
16th annual Craft Fair will
be accepted through Oct.
19 for the Nov. 2 event. Fee
is $20 per table/space. A
table and two chairs will be
provided. Lion Shirley Bel-
liveau, 352-527-1943.
Participants sought
for annual Artisan's Bou-
tique. Pre-screening under
way; call 352-746-2889 or
352-344-1275 for details.
Botique will be Oct. 18 and 19.
All Day Art Club, 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Old Ho-
mosassa Civic Center, 5530
S. Mason Creek Drive, be-
hind the fire station. $10.
Bring supplies. Intermediate
and advanced artists wel-
come. 352-795-8774.
Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200
Mount Fair Ave.,
Brooksville. Bring lunch.
352-621-6680 (Citrus), 352-
666-8350 (Hernando).
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly,
Wildwood Public Library,
310 S. Palmer Drive, Wild-
wood. 352-748-1158.
els34785@yahoo.com.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. first Satur-
day monthly at Weeki
Wachee Senior Center off
U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail,
Spring Hill. Short meeting,
show-and-tell and birthday
raffle. 352-688-4106 or 352-
527-2778. naturecoast
decorativeartists.com.
Community Needle-


works Crafters meet at
10 a.m. first Wednesday. All
quilters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Ozello Arts and Craft
Festival, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Nov. 30. Openings available
for interested artists and
crafters. 352-634-0563 or
ozello.net.
"The Knight House
Menagerie," monthlong ex-
hibit of paintings and photo-
graphs of animals by Florida
Artists Gallery members.
Live menagerie planned for
Oct. 5. Free. 352-344-9300
or floridaartistsgallery.com.


ON THE SCENE


The Buzz

An evening of American standards


Special to the Chronicle
The Dunnellon Concert singers, as part of the 2013-2014 Light Shine series,
will be performing songs from The American Songbook at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6
at Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 2450 W. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto. Admission is free; donations will be accepted. For more information,
call 352-419-8796. The singers, pictured above from left, are contralto Sue
Koppler, baritone Bill Thomas, soprano Mary Mahoney and pianist Bob Cubbage.


BEST BETS THIS WEEKEND


Crafters, take to

Lake Hernando
Join the Inverness Elks Lodge in
celebrating the fall season as they
present the annual Lakeside Craft
Show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
at the lodge located on Lake Hernando.
Parking is free, dozens of vendors
will be on-site selling handmade fab-
ric creations, soaps, photography,
embroidery and lots more. Food and
beverages are available. Raffles will
take place every 30 minutes and guests
do not need to be present to win.
The Inverness Elks is located off
U.S. 41 at 3580 Lemon St. in Her-
nando, between the tackle shop and
martial arts studio, behind Ace
Hardware. For information, call 352-
860-2598.


Rock the Block kicks

off with 'Save the Radio'
Come out and Rock the Block with
Save the Radio, starting at 6 p.m. on
Saturday
On Saturday, the City of Inverness
will present Rock the Block for the
first time this season, and will offer
guests a free street party that in-
cludes live music from the '60s and
up, drawings for prizes and the op-
portunity to enjoy the many things
downtown Inverness has to offer
"Save the Radio" takes the stage at
7 p.m. with its original music and
sounds from the 1960s through today
Save the Radio is a four-member
band that formed in 2008 in St. Pe-
tersburg that specializes in rock, al-
ternative and acoustic music.

Annual women's expo

taking over armory
Listen up, ladies. In an effort to
improve those statistics (and im-
prove the lives of women in Citrus
County the Business Women's Al-
liance of the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce is hosting its annual
Women's Health and Fitness Expo
Saturday at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River Hours are
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is
free, and in addition to health advice
and services, the expo promises a
slate of speakers, giveaways of get-
aways, massage stations, product
samples and more.


Beat the Sheriff

returns to Inverness
On Saturday, the streets of down-
town Inverness will come alive when
the annual Beat the Sheriff race re-
turns to town. Hosted by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, the race is
scheduled to kick into high gear at
7:30 a.m. Saturday from the court-
house square.
The USA Track & Field-certified
5K (3.1 mile) course takes runners
through scenic venues in historic,
downtown Inverness. The route is all
asphalt, with slightly rolling hills.
Like last year and the year before,
all proceeds from the Beat the Sher-
iff race will benefit Jessie's Place,
Citrus County's child advocacy cen-
ter The center is named in honor of
9-year-old Jessica Marie Lunsford,
the Homosassa youngster who was
abducted from her family's home
and murdered in early 2005.
Runners may pre-register by mail
at a reduced cost by visiting the
Jessie's Place website at
wwwjessiesplacecitrus.org and
downloading an application. Just fill
it out and include a check for $20 (or
$18 if you're a member of the Citrus
Road Runners club), made payable
to Jessie's Place. Special student
pricing also is available, plus the
entry fee for the Kids Fun Run (no
T-shirt) is $2. Make sure all advanced
registrations are received no later
than Wednesday, Sept. 26, by mailing
them to Jessie's Place, Beat the
Sheriff, 4465 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Registration on the day of the race
will start at 6:30 a.m. at Courthouse
Square. Same-day registrants will
pay $30 to compete.
For more information, call 352-
270-8814.


'Cracker Cowboy Poet'

moseys into Lecanto
"Cracker Cowboy Poet" Hank
Mattson will perform at 4 p.m. Sun-
day at Shepherd of the Hills Episco-
pal Church, 2450 W Norvell Bryant
Highway Mattson, who lives in
Florida, crafts his work to preserve
the memory and traditions of Old
Florida. For information, call 352-
382-4748 or visit crackercowboy
poetcom.


WANT YOUR EVENT IN THE BUZZ? Email newsdesk@chronicleonline.com and
include the name of the event; the time, date and place; ticket prices; a contact
person's name, phone number and email address; and any other pertinent
information. In the subject line of the email, type "Attention Buzz." I Photos
needs to be high resolution. Identify the people in the photo and the event.
Please include a contact name, phone number and email address. Photos will
run close to the date of the event. I Deadlines for Buzz submissions are 5
p.m. Friday for the following Friday's edition. I The Chronicle reserves the right
to edit notices. I For more information, call 352-563-5660.


Art Classes
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand,
9 a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10. citruscountyfl.org, click
on Parks & Recreation to
register. 352-465-7007.
Hobby Haven classes:
Acrylic painting with
Lois, noon every Friday. $15.
Classes are at Hobby
Haven & gifts, 1239 S. Sun-
coast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Ho-
mosassa, in Nottingham
Square next to GMC Buick.
352-794-6032.
Lorna Jean Gallery art
classes:
Learn to Draw for ages


6 to adult. $15 for group les-
sons. Ages 6 to 11,4 p.m. to
5 p.m. Wednesday and
11 a.m. to noon Saturday.
Ages 12 to 18, 4 p.m. to
5 p.m. Thursday. Adult
classes 11 a.m. to noon
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Watercolor Painting for
Beginners, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesdays.
$15 per session. Four students
per session. 352-564-2781.
Art & craft classes for
children ages 6 to 10,
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Satur-
days and 4 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. Wednesday. Ages 11
to 16, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday. $60 per month.
Materials included. Classes


limited to eight students.
352-564-2781.
Learn to design and
create sterling silver jewelry,
1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Satur-
days in four-week intervals.
$140 for four weeks. Materi-
als and use of tools in-
cluded. 352-564-2781.
Voice lessons. Ages 10
to adult, by appointment. $15
per lesson. 352-564-2781.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Crystal River. 352-564-2781.
Sculptural Tile Mak-
ing Workshop, 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Oct. 12,19 and
26. $67.50; materials in-
cluded. Instructor Jan Hitch-
cock. 352-613-6746 or


ozziehitchcock@yahoo.co.uk.
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers art
classes. 352-344-9300.
Floridaartistsgallery.com.
September and October
classes:
Fearless Painting with
Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
with lunch noon to 1 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 14. Instructor
Susi LaForsch. In one-day
workshop, students will cre-
ate an 18-inch-by-24-inch
acrylic painting. $75 per
workshop. Materials included.
Deposit required. laforsch@
tampabay.rr.com, 352-726-
8710 or 352-344-9300.
Advanced Fearless
Painting with Acrylics, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. with lunch noon to
1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28. In-
structor Susi LaForsch. Lim-
ited to four students. $55 per
workshop; bring materials.
Deposit required. laforsch@
tampabay.rr.com, 352-726-
8710 or 352-344-9300.
Paint Santa's portrait in
oil, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 29 and Sun-
day, Oct. 27. Tone-on-tone,
rub-out painting of Santa on
16-inch-by-20-inch canvas.
Instructor Carol Basso. $55.
352-344-9300.
*Drawing 101, 10:15
a.m. to noon Thursdays. In-
structor Keith Gum. Media
will include charcoal, pen-
cils, and pen and ink. Class
size is limited to permit indi-
vidualized instruction. $15
per class or $50 for four
classes in advance. 352-
400-9778 or ifugaopaper-
craft@gmail.com.
Sterling silver and wire
rings, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Oct.
19. Instructor Lynda Ryan.
Participants will learn basic
wire sculpture skills, then
complete two pendants.
Bring flat-nose and round-
nose pliers and flush/close
cutters. $45 includes materi-
als. 352-344-9300, 352-
489-0959 or lyndasmac@
me.com.
Ongoing classes:
Drawing with Ann,
10:15 to noon Thursdays.
Instructor Ann Covington.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-344-
9300.
Painting with Acrylics, 1
to 3 p.m. every Friday. In-
structor Connie Townsend.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown
@aol.com.
Painting with Oils, 1 to
3 p.m. every Tuesday. In-
structor Connie Townsend.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown
@aol.com.
Photography Critique
Session, 1 to 3 p.m., sec-
ond Thursday monthly. In-
structor Larry Jordan.
Critique of images. $10 per
year. Call Larry at 352-344-
0518.
Small, private art class
for home-schoolers, time
varies by age. $15. Instruc-
tor Keith Gum. 352-344-
9300.
The gallery is open from
10 a.m. to4 p.m. Wednes-
day through Saturdays, and
noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Sundays. 352-344-
9300 or floridaartists-
gallerycom.
Festivals
Floral City BarBQ
Cookoff, featuring six hours
of music and dozens of ven-
dors cooking barbecue from
scratch. All day Oct. 5.
floralcitymerchants.com.
Museums
"Artifacts Exquisite &
Extraordinary," until Sept.
28, Thomas Center Gal-
leries, 302 N.E. Sixth Ave.,
Gainesville. Diverse range
of objects including ancient
Chinese jade, pre-
Columbian textiles, me-
dieval sheet music,
17th-century letters, natural
history specimens and me-
teorites. Galleries open 8


a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday. gvlcultural
affairs.org.
Music
2013 "Free Fridays"
concert series, 8 and 10
p.m. Friday nights, from
April 5 through Nov. 8, at Bo
Diddley Community Plaza,
111 E. UniversityAve.,
Gainesville. gvlcultural
affairs.org or 352-393-8746.
Musical acts include:
Today Tropix
Oct. 4-The Relic,


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C5

Woodstock-era tribute band
Karaoke at the Mall,
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 28
at the Crystal River Mall,
feat. Roger Carrier.
SoundArt concert se-
ries atAppleton Museum of
Art combines art and music.
Interactive experience in-
cludes entry to museum.
Concerts held at 3 p.m. at
museum, 4333 E. Silver
Springs Blvd., Ocala.
ocalasymphonycom or 352-
351-1606.
Sept. 29 "Those En-
dearing Edwardians," Eng-
lish music of the early 20th
century.
Fall Out Boy, 7:30
p.m. Sept. 29 at USF Sun
Dome. Tickets on sale at 10
a.m. April 5, $29.50 and
$39.50, via Ticketmastercom,
by calling 800-745-3000.
The Isley Brothers, 8
p.m. Oct. 5 at USF Sun
Dome. Opening acts KEM
and Nephew Tommy. $30 to
$80. 800-745-3000 or ticket-
master.com.
Monthly open jam ses-
sion of the Citrus Jazz Soci-
ety, 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 6, at the Catholic Chari-
ties Citrus Community Out-
reach Center in Homosassa
Springs. Public invited; $7
donation at the door for non-
members is requested. 352-
382-1875.
"America, A Brave
New Frontier," a concert of
the Ocala Symphony Or-
chestra, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5
and 3 p.m. Oct 6, Ocala
Breeders' Sales Auditorium,
1701 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala.
Feat. Wagner's "Columbus
Overture," William Perry's
"Jamestown Concerto,"
Dvorak's Symphony No. 9.
$5 and up. 352-351-1606 or
ocalasymphonycom.
Kellie Pickler, 8 p.m.
Oct. 11 at Ruth Eckerd Hall.
$29 to $55. 727-791-7400
or rutheckerdhall.com.
Dance
Beginners' line
dancing classes. 1 p.m. to
2 p.m. Tuesday at Central
Citrus Community Center,
2804 W. Mark Knighton
Court, Lecanto. $3. Instruc-
tor Cher Mason. Closed-toe
shoes preferred, soc-
dancer.org. 352-527-5993.
Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom
music, hosted by deejay
Sapphire. Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Dance basics at
1:30 p.m. and advanced at
2:45 p.m.352-527-5993. In-
structor is June Queripel.
$5. 352-527-5993 or 352-
795-3831.
Sunday Night Dances
every week at Knights of
Columbus, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Lecanto.
Doors open at 6 p.m. Music
starts at 7 p.m. Coffee, tea
and soda available.
Spirit of Citrus
Dances. All dances 7 p.m.
to 10 p.m. at KellnerAudito-
rium Jewish Center, 92 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, unless
otherwise indicted.
socdancer.org.
Special Interest
The Sunshine State
Romance Authors Inc.
meetings, 10 a.m. fourth
Saturday monthly, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa. 352-726-0162.
Crafters with a Mis-
sion's fourth annual Craft
Bazaar and Bake Sale will
be from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sept. 27 and from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Sept. 28 in the gym
at Crystal River Church of
God, 2180 NW 12th Ave.,
Crystal River. Admission is
free. 352-795-3079.
Farmers' Markets
Herry's Market Day, 8
a.m. to noon, last Saturday
of the month at Hospice
Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W. Peri-
winkle Lane, Homosassa
(behind Wendy's, east of


U.S. 19). Herry's Market
Day is offering free vendor
space. Space is limited.
352-527-2020.
Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Mar-
ket, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every
Friday at Lake Beverly Park.
Vendor spaces $5. bhcivic
association.com. 352-746-
2657.
West End Market at
the Crystal River Mall, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. the fourth Satur-
day of every month. Fea-
tures fresh produce, plants
and other local food-related
items, as well as handmade
arts and crafts. Air-condi-
tioned. 352-795-2585.






Page C6 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Woman's Club to host card party
The Crystal River Woman's Club will host a Mili-
tary Card Party and Luncheon on Thursday Oct. 10,
at the clubhouse at 320 N. Citrus Ave.
Doors open at 11:30 a.m.
Tickets are $12 and it is recommended to make
reservations for tables of four Money is given to the
first-, second- and third-place winners. Two entry
tickets will be drawn for two foursomes to attend
the Military Card Party free on Feb. 20.
Tickets may be purchased by calling Lois Thomas
at 352-382-0777.

Participants welcome for fun show
Just Horse'n Around riding stable will have a fun
horse show Sunday Registration is at 1 p.m.; events
begin at 2 p.m.
Participation cost is $4 for each event: ride a
buck, barrels, arena race, poles, keyhole and
catalog race.
To pre-register or for more information, call 352-
563-7017. The public is welcome.
All concession proceeds benefit the Floral City
Team Green 4-H Club.

Charity Air Show in Brooksville
The Hernando Aero Modelers HAM R/C Club will
host a Charity Air Show Saturday, Oct. 12, at the
HAM flying field, 3 miles east of the Suncoast
Parkway on U.S. 98. Gates open at 8 a.m.
The event, to benefit the Hernando County Cattle-
men's Association Scholarship Fund, will include a
high-speed Delta demo, pattern and pylon racing
demos, static aircraft displays, scale aircraft, com-
bat flying, skilled flying events and more. Rolando
Perez will present a 3D helicopter demonstration.
Admission for spectators is $3 per person or $5
per carload. There will be free parking; food and
drinks will be available.
For more information, call Bill Panzeter at 352-
346-9948.

Romance authors gather Saturday
The Sunshine State Romance Authors Inc.
(SSRA) is a chapter of Romance Writers of America.
Through monthly meetings, specialized speakers
and educational workshops, SSRA offers opportuni-
ties for writers of romance fiction and every sub-
genre to learn and improve upon the skills and
knowledge necessary to thrive in today's fast-paced
publishing industry
Readers, beginning writers and published au-
thors are all welcome to attend meetings except
those specifically designated for "members only"
SSRA meets from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the fourth
Saturday monthly at the Homosassa Public Library,
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.
For more information, call Marian Fox at 352-
726-0162.

Park to host Volunteer Fair
In honor of National Public Lands Day, Fort
Cooper State Park and the Friends of Fort Cooper
will host a Volunteer Fair and Breakfast with the
rangers and park volunteers from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday
There will be no park entrance fees during the
event.
Visitors can talk with rangers and volunteers to
learn more about the park and what volunteer op-
portunities are available at Fort Cooper State Park,
and why volunteers are so important to it.
A pancake, sausage and beverage breakfast will
be served from 9 to 11 a.m. while supplies last. For
more information, call 352-726-0315.

Take Stock car wash Saturday
Take Stock in Children student scholars will have
a car wash from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, 1 Dr Martin Luther
King Jr Ave., Inverness.
Donation is $5 per car Proceeds will be used to
support Take Stock in Children student activities.
The program is sponsored by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
For more information, call Pat Lancaster,
program coordinator, at 352-422-2348.


Spot Family Center celebrates 10 years of service


EVELYN VISSICCHIO
Special to the Chronicle

In December 2003, The Spot
launched its first Christmas pro-
gram, "The Spot Christmas Jam:
The Reason for the Season."
That year, The Spot Family Cen-
ter served 60 families a hot Christ-
mas dinner and also distributed
groceries and more than 300 toys to
children on Christmas Eve. Since
then, hundreds of new programs
and services have been provided to
more than 1,800 families and
children in Citrus County
Continuing in the same spirit and
passion that they started with 10
years ago, The Spot is now provid-
ing even more services to bring
hope to the families of Citrus
County, with multiple programs for
youths and adults.
The Spot offers daily programs
such as mentoring/leadership
training, family support resources


and The Spot's Kids' Club, an after-
school program geared toward edu-
cational advancement with a
tutoring component involved for
students in kindergarten through
seventh grade.
In addition to the daily programs,
The Spot Family Center also offers
its monthly 'Jam" a gathering
which includes free hot meals,
clothing, grocery giveaways and a
life skills message for participants.
As a faith-based ministry The Spot
also offers monthly Bible study
groups and other community sup-
port groups at the facility
Each year during the Christmas
season, The Spot Family Center
conducts its annual Toy Drive and
gift-wrapping parties, where many
residents across the county assist
in collecting toys for local families
in need. These toys are then dis-
tributed at the annual "Spot Christ-
mas Jam" on Christmas Eve.
This year, The Spot will celebrate


its first 10 years with a special
event A Night of Hope on
Friday, Nov 8. The event will be
from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Realtors As-
sociation of Citrus County and will
feature a silent auction, as well as
fabulous food. The Spot Family
Center invites everyone to come
out and do some early Christmas
shopping while supporting a local
charity.
You may support The Spot Fam-
ily Center by donating an item for
the auction, or you can make a fi-
nancial contribution toward the
event by sending a check payable
to: The Spot Family Center, PO. Box
2046 Lecanto, FL 34460.
For more information, call The
Spot at 352-794-3870 or visit
www.TheSpotFamilyCenter.org.

Evelyn Vissicchio is program
director at The Spot Family
Center, 405 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River


Sprucing up the bunkhouse


Special to the Chronicle
Last year, the Friends of the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Friends of Chazz) purchased a
bunkhouse for the many interns who work at the refuge throughout the year. Shown sprucing up the residence,
front, are board members Jo Claycomb and Shirley Knudsen. In back are Friends President Ross Knudsen, Bob
Claycomb, Tom Gotterup, Bob Quarles and wildlife refuge staff member/intern Dan Bove. The Friends were able to
buy this bunkhouse through their many fundraisers and were able to use $22,000 for the purchase and for
furnishings. The Friends also donated an extra $2,000 in more furnishings and put in approximately 40 hours of
labor into getting it up and running. The facility has become home to interns from all over the world, including
England, China and France. Having this bunkhouse allows for clean and comfortable accommodations for these
young people, who work along with the refuge staff and learn while they donate their labor in the field of wildlife
management and care. To learn more about the Friends, visit www.friendsofchazz or call 352-563-2088, ext. 215.



Plant clinics focus on cold protection


Animal Shelter ADOPTABLES

Bitsey and Ursa


Special to the Chronicle

The UF-IFAS Citrus County
Extension master gardeners free
plant clinics for October will
address cold-weather plant
protection.
Plants like gradual cool-downs;
this gives them a chance to accli-
mate (go into dormancy). Unfortu-
nately, Citrus County winters
usually have extreme temperature
changes occurring over short peri-
ods of time. Rapidly falling temper-
atures do not allow dormancy to
establish. This means we must pro-
tect the tropical and sub-tropical
plants in our landscapes.


The October plant clinics will ex-
plain the types of freezes we
experience and provide actions
gardeners can take before, during
and after cold weather to protect
plants. The schedule for these free
plant clinics is:
Wednesday, Oct. 2 -2 p.m. at
Floral City Library;
Tuesday, Oct, 8 1 p.m. at
Lakes Region Library Inverness;
Wednesday, Oct. 9 -1:30 p.m.
at Central Ridge Library, Beverly
Hills;
Friday, Oct. 11 -1:30 p.m. at
Coastal Region Library, Crystal
River;
Tuesday, Oct. 22 -2 p.m. at


Homosassa Library
Those who want to attend the
clinic normally held at the Citrus
Springs Library may call the Exten-
sion Office at 352-527-5700 for
details about its continuation.
Master gardener volunteers will
be available at all sessions to
address other plant questions, offer
solutions to problems and address
gardening concerns in general.
Those who cannot attend ses-
sions are welcome to contact Citrus
County master gardeners via email.
Questions or pictures can be sent to
MasterGl@bocc.citrus.fl.us. Master
gardeners will research any
questions and respond.


Special to the Chronicle
Poor Bitsey has been at the shelter since mid-May.
She is a white and gray spayed cat, is very gentle and
gets along with other cats. She loves her cat condo
and is waiting to meet you. Right now any spayed or
neutered feline at the shelter can be adopted for $15,
which includes all vaccinations, microchip and de-
worming. Ursa is an 8-month-old retriever mix and
weighs 40 pounds. She's very sweet, loves people, is
great with kids and other dogs. If you come near her,
she rolls over and offers her belly for a scratch. Help
find this precious pup a home of her own. The shelter
offers six weeks of free obedience classes. Bitsey
and Ursa are at Citrus County Animal Services, 4030
S. Airport Road, Inverness, behind the fairgrounds.
View more adoptable pets at www.citruscritters.com.
Call 352-746-8400.

* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


BH Fishing Club invites all to enjoy activities


RSVP now for trips, parties


Special to the Chronicle

The Beverly Hills
Fishing Club has several
activities coming up in
the next several weeks.
Everyone is invited to
participate; you do not


have to be a member to
attend.
Sunday, Oct. 6 Trip
to Biloxi. Space is limited.
Saturday, Oct. 26 -
Mount Dora Craft Fair
About 350 vendors are ex-
pected to line the streets.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


There will be lots of food
and rest areas available
to sit and "people watch."
The group will be home
early
Saturday, Oct. 26 -
Halloween party The
Halloween party will be
held at VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills. Doors open
at 5 p.m. and food will be


served at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Nov 7 -
Military card party The
military card party will be
held at VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills.
All activities require
reservations.
To RSVP and for more
information, call Patricia
at 352-257-9328.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C7


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SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Anne Tyler said, "People always call it luck
when you've acted more sensibly than they
have."
That is often true, but there can still be mat-
ters out of your control. Take today's deal, for
example. Look at only the North-South hands.
In which contract would you choose to play?
When the deal was originally played, the
bidding went as shown. North-South were
using two-over-one game-forcing. On the third
round, South broke a golden rule of Blackwood
by using the convention with two fast losers in
both unbid suits, with no guarantee that part-
ner had a first- or second-round control in
those suits. South should have bid four spades.
Then, North probably would have passed, al-
though with controls in both hearts and clubs,
there would have been a good case for his
using Blackwood.
Six diamonds and six spades are both excel-
lent contracts, apparently losing only one club
trick. However, at the table, against six dia-
monds, West led the club jack. East won with
her king and realized that, unless West had a
slow trump trick like jack-fourth, there was
only one way to defeat the slam shift to a
spade. West happily ruffed and South unhap-
pily wrote minus 100 on her scoresheet.
Then North pointed out that six spades was
making. Against that slam, East's best lead is a
low club! If North carelessly plays low from the
board, West wins and gives his partner a dia-
mond ruff.

3 ijfJS THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
J JA by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, :
to form four ordinary words.
I PUDEN 1- A3


HERTAR _-_ |



DOSTED __
^"RT
^ iEm_ ^-


7



THE AL-IEN5' MATEF-RNITY
WARP WAS LOCATED ON
THE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer
here: T
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: USURP AGENT ABRUPT ODDITY
I Answer: The number of billboards along the highway
was ADDING UP


ACROSS
1 Cousteau
invention
6 pie
11 Indifferent
gestures
13 With caution
14 del Fuego
15 Prophet
16 Chocolate-
colored dog
17 TV knob
18 Hypo units
21 Force back
23 Lipstick color
26 Racetrack
circuit
27 Persia, today
28 Creeping
plant
29 Alongside
31 Pageant
crown
32 Synthetic
fabric
33 Earth circler
35 Leg joint


36 Disagreeable
task
37 Completely
38 Hearing aid?
39 Makes
mention of
40 Cunning
41 Vigor's
partner
42 Yale student
44 Slumbering
47 Blockhead
51 Long, narrow
ditch
52 Dirty looks
53 Dull surface
54 Euclid or
Plato

DOWN


Answer to Previous Puzzle


GIY|MMjRIE|B ABNN0 V|A
RODEEVI LEATEN
LAR~sENA|LsEs HEIA
AR|E SE N|O A LSl -E A*
DEIEDEDQOATER
MBA WE SWF'I R'S
KARMANANTE
|OARORL |REAL
Acli D LJRLS TH I
ERIEBELAND
V I SA DELE
OM IlT SE JE TE R
AQGAR ELECTRIC
LUGEOPACTlARM
FEED TorT PEP


1 Retired flier 6 Christmas
2 T'ai ch'uan song
3 Suffix for 7 Europe-Asia
forfeit range
4 Knot on a tree 8 -tac-toe
5 Rural 9 Chicago's st,


10 Potato bud
12 Cavalry
weapons
13 Made on a
loom
18 Author Arthur
19 Poolside
shelter
20 More agile
22 Shiny leather
23 Lassos
24 Register
25 Very much
28 Travel word
30 Want ad
letters
31 Roughhousing
34 Chess pieces
36 Pizzazz
39 Dorothy,
to Em
41 Blow oft
steam
43 Livy's route
44 PIN prompter
45 Tijuana "Mrs."
46 Permit
48 Itty-bitty
49 Vexation
50 My, my!


9-27 (0 2P013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UrFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: My wife of
25 years feels that
mailing and texting
male friends is nothing to be
concerned about. By acci-
dent, I discovered she had
visited one of these men
when she was supposed to be
at her girlfriend's
for the weekend.
She swears nothing
happened. But I
checked her laptop
and found photo-
graphs of the two of
them.
When I asked
about the pictures,
she claimed she
was planning to
send them to me
but never got AN I
around to it. We
went for counsel- MAILI
ing after the week-
end trip, and things calmed
down for a while. She ceased
communication with that guy,
as far as I can tell. But I re-
cently found email evidence
that she is still communicat-
ing with the other guy she
knew from high school. They
close their emails with "love
you bunches" or
"xxxoooxxx," and I found one
that said, "Good night Sexy"
My wife has no idea how
much this drives me crazy
She sees nothing wrong with
this communication. Could
you expound on this type of
affair and the potential harm
it can cause? What should we
do? Emotionally Drained
Dear Drained: An emo-
tional affair is one of emo-
tional, rather than physical,
intimacy There is no sex.
However, there is deception,
betrayal, intimate communi-
cation (texts, emails, phone
calls) and an emotional con-
nection to the other person at


I
L


the expense of the marriage.
Often, the person involved
denies that it is any kind of
affair, claiming it's "only
friendship." But healthy
friendships do not involve se-
crecy and lies and do not
threaten the marriage. Please
go back to counsel-
ing. Your wife
S needs to under-
stand how her ac-
tions undermine
your trust, and you
both must work on
ways to put your
marriage back
together
DearAnnie: My
friend and I enjoy
writing letters and
HE'S receiving things
via regular mail.
BOX For my birthday,
she told me to
watch the mailbox because
she was sending me
something.
Well, long story short, noth-
ing arrived. I did get cards
from other people in the
mail. She also has my email
address, but no birthday
greetings came that way ei-
ther I don't know what to do.
Do I mention that nothing
ever came in the mail, or
should I let it go?
She's always good about
sending Christmas presents,
and I send her things in the
mail, as well, but this has me
perplexed. -Mailbox Mary
Dear Mary: Since this
friend specifically told you to
watch the mailbox, it means
something was either lost in
the mail or she forgot to send
it. If the former, she probably
is wondering why you haven't
said anything. If the latter,
she is likely embarrassed.
How good a friend? If you can
casually say that whatever


she meant to send never ar-
rived, do so. Otherwise, say
nothing. If she wonders why
you haven't acknowledged a
card or gift, she will ask.
DearAnnie: This is for "R,"
whose mother is type AB and
whose grandmother is type 0.
A person with Group 0 blood
does not carry either the A
gene or the B gene. There-
fore, none of that person's bi-
ological children can be AB.
However, your advice about
everyone involved getting
tested was right on. As a per-
son who performs blood typ-
ing, I can attest to the fact
that I have surprised a few
people who thought they
were one type when in fact
they were another -
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Fla.: Thanks for cor-
recting us. You are right that
a Type 0 cannot produce a
Type AB. But in exceedingly
rare circumstances, an indi-
vidual's blood type can
change. (This most commonly
occurs after a bone marrow
transplant). Mom could have
been adopted, or more likely,
either Mom or Grandma is
mistaken about their blood
type. Our main concern is the
granddaughter's desire that
Grandma be unrelated. But
even if Mom were adopted,
Grandma still raised her As
far as we're concerned, that
makes her the mother
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Email
questions to anniesmailbox
@comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.
To find out more, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
a t www. creators. com.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuilloDriver Books.com




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse -

"VrH ,, I FINALLY | O Tc 5rOME.
GOTf-rHFS 10 Time I HmRVofGHr
S1RTPIfcMl1CH -IN ifl lDI RFPi.
RIMNDP "Z#A -\\\1 E PlDIT!


SeLe'Wa~lS .i.<


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Blondie

H4Y, WAIT. IOLD ivt LSMM6 PAY
FOP tHAT.' I/4 myEST FPRIENQ!



It. A:


Ir MUST BE FUN HAVING VOU2 N
E$ST FRIEND LIVE- '--- '
3i4HT NJEXT.. ,/ '-C YJ4AVE
0002' !' h\NOIOEAM
,4'-" ; I i !;
~ -13 1 >r 't,- -- ,'


AREN'T VOJ GOING '-AAAJ>
TO PAy OAWOO (\I A
FOR OUq PIZZA? ,- --
*-- -'. "_~ .-/ "-'- 'i '
C --.^t ;;r.
r 5,




Rp. .,-.i.TA 9
.^^^^


Kit 'N' Carlyle


Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Yes, we're overpopulating, end yes. we
could all starve because there won't be
enough food to feed us all. And yes, it's
because most of our natural predators
have all but disappeared. But not to worry,
son.... That's why they made the interstate,"


"We have one of those in our
kitchen to let us know when
our daddy's cooking."


Doonesbury Flashback


UA4, F'M AFP4f
U64P O fWOP'S ANT
5P.AKTO W YCT,
YOUR PAP A M OWk -
AM TOU Kiu..,.
BU, -

1 dII1 ^' ^j--


WmeMa uH ctneueer s
t'IM T10,1.50 OUT ro #E
A PACA CdAUC&bE#
t~it~eOWCiS
2BlUrV6.
!^^2
*1^l


/ ''*


Big Nate


THE QUUESTION15. WHAT
M'STEPS GRL WROTE
T-r < NQT7
HOW DOU 1u
KNOW IT'S A


LArlo and Janis


Arlo and Janis


BECAu5E &oYs
DON'T USE TtE
wORD *ADO)RAFLE,'
OLD SPORT


T14EY ALSO DON'T
DPE5$ LtKE HERLOCh
HOLMES AND 5MOkE
BUMLE P PES,.
fC CHAT'CKLES
HA' r{OW
o ADOREALE'
Col o-- ^ as,


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Baggage Claim" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Battle of the Year" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
In 3D. 1:45 p.m.
"Don Jon" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 1:20 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Lee Daniels'The Butler" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.


"Rush" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
1 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m.
"Don Jon" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:40 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Riddick" (R) 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: sjenba)l


"G'JL VSTRLY GM D EDKXSTP ... G


VSTRLY GM D ZSWX SEEGKL ... G


OGRL XS XFGMR XFDX G'I AHWX D


TLNHODT NHP." YLMULO


VDWFGMNXSM

Previous Solution: "What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as
what you become by achieving your goals." Ashley Benson
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-27


Peanuts


Pickles


CS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


COMICS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


Classifieds


To the girl I met in
Publix's on 9/18 in
Homosassa Springs,
wearing a white jacket.
I would like to get to
know you. Call me
anytime. 422-0440


w*




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




20 Chairs for Daycare
$80.00
Baby Accessories
$120.00
(352) 795-7254
$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644
BLU-RAY PLAYER
Samsung BD-P1500
Blu-ray player.
Excellent Condition. $20
352 3822591
CAMERA Panasonic
Lumix Camera FH20
w/extra battery-like new,
$30 Call 352 3822591
CAMERA TRIPOD
Velbon VE-3 Camera
Tripod VG condition $15
352-382-2591
CHANDELIER Beautiful,
large antique looking.
Paid $400, moved &
must sell. $75.00
352-322-1160
CITRUS HILLS
1873W. REDDING ST
SAT ONLY 7:30 ?
MULTI FAMILY SALE

CITRUS HILLS
250 E. Hartford Stre
Thurs. & Fri. 8a-5p
Saturday 8a-3p
LADIES!!
WE ARE BACK with
ALL Sizes, 99% New &
Home Acces., MISC.
Furniture & More!


Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
centurv21.com
Century 21 JW
Morton Real Estate


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


In Print


and


Online
i p All



Th e Tim e


-h-o -ie I 5 2 7
Conncti2 I N J~s 'Fre Sevics-L1t Anounem' Medcal Sale He


Craft Items
$300 value for $150.
assorted 352-746-4613

YOU'LL THIS!
CRYSTAL RIVER
Craft Bazaar & Bake
Sale at
CR Church of God,
2180 NW 12th Ave,
Fri 9-7 and Sat 9-5,
Free Admission
ELECTRIC CHAIN
SAW McCulloch 2.5 HP,
14" electric chain saw
$50 352-628-3899
ELECTRONIC PIANO
Yamaha portable piano.
Good condition,36"x13"
$35 352-628-3899
HAVANESE PUPPIES
9 wks. Champ. Bid.
Lines, Non Shedding
3 males, black &
white, shots, Wormed
$650. OBO 613-581810
HOMOSASSA
Riverhaven,
4547 S Sawgrass Cir,
Fri-Sat 8-12,
Kayak/Paddle, Bike,
Bike Rack,
Fishing gear,Boat,
Household items.
HP 15.4", LAPTOP
DVD writer, $180
DELL DESK TOP
P4, HT Lcd monitor,
DVD + RW $150
352-628-6806
Inverness
2bd,ba, IIfl room, dock
fish, parfurn. $450.
860-2452, 201-4559
LECANTO
Side Walk Sale
Saturday 9am-5pm,
Home Again Resale
Store 1980 N. Future
Terr.(486 across form
Chevron)
MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945
MICROWAVE Black
Frigidaire over the
stove. Looks and works
great. A steal @ $15
352-322-1160
Microwave Oven
$50.
(352) 628-4254
PET TAXI Reduced,
excel, cond. $20.00,
L-23,W-14,H-13
352-513-4027
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress, & Box Spring
Like New Antique
white chest, matching
head board & night
Stand, mattress cover,
matching bed spread
& draperies. $325.
(352) 465-2709
Sea Eagle
2.5 power, stroke
ouboard & inflatable
Suzuki, $1100. for both
(352) 425-7020
SMW/Homosassa
Fri. 27 &Sat. 28, 8a-12
BMW Z4, 60' pet fence
Furn., Pool tble., Excer.
Equip, Brick & Brack
150 Pine St., 503-2552
TWO WHEEL MOVING
CART Two wheel
moving cart. $15
352-628-3899
WIFI RANGE
EXTENDER amped
REC10 wireless range
extender 600 mW Like
new $40 352-382-2591



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087


FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



6 Roosters
Rhode Isl. Reds 6,
5 months old
(352) 621-3929
Free Cedar Trees
perfect shape, approx.
20ft tall, You dig,
remove and haul
call between 8am &
8pm (352) 249-7812
Free Kittens
Gray Tabby
8 wks old, litter trained
352-212-0667


2 Red Dobermans
1 male, 1 female,
traveling, Inverness
N. Highlands
Near Dawson
REWARD
(352) 344-2232
CAT
female,1 yr. old, gray,
medium hair. Missing
in the Vicinity of Red
Rose off Apopka in
the Highlands, has
been micro-chipped
(352) 445-0747
Lost 2 Hand Trucks,
fell from
Potato Chip Truck
Crystal River area
Need desperately for
work. (352) 637-0188
Lost Cat gray with
white markings, black
spot on nose, Near
Rockcrusher Canyon
RV Park 607-434-0328
Lost hummingbird
gps/fishfinder model
597ci hd by hwy 44 e
boatramp in inverness if
found call 726-0257 or
476-7047
Lost Male Beagle
Tri color,
Name "Brason"
Pine Ridge Area
Sacramento Rd
(352) 364-1385
(352) 287-2121
Missing 9/8/13 JoJo Tri
colored beagle. Missing
from N. Lee Street Bev-
erly Hills. 40 Ib neutered
male. JoJo is a special
needs pet. We miss him
terribly. Microchipped.
Please call Donna at
352 249 3107 or e-mail
hillsdonnar@aol.com
Missing 9/8/13
Tri-Colored Beagle 40
Lbs. Special needs pet.
Name: JoJo. Please
help JoJo to come
home. He is terribly
missed. Last seen on N.
Lee Street, Beverly Hills
at 10:30 pm. Please call
352-249-3107. Reward
Red and blue
Scooby-Doo wallet lost
on the sidewalk some-
where between
Winn-Dixie in Downtown
Inverness and Fort
Cooper Mobile Home
Park. Call 352-419-7003


$$CASH PAID$$ I Lost Quaker Bird Special Occasion? I5 C5 Z 1 Z3 Z.-i J-- I


Green, Citrus Hills
around Sept. 20th
(352) 302-6710
REWARD Large
Siamese cat. lost
6/15/13 in the area of
hwy 200 and orchid dr.
He was wearing a black
collar with no tags.
please call or text
239-287-0953



Found Set of Keys
Around august 30th
Beverly Hills
Come to house
Identify Keys
230 S. Harrison St
FOUND
Silver Mongoose
Bicycle w/whitewall
tires, found in my
garden!
(352) 400-6100




HOWARD'S
FLEA MARKET
IS HOSTING
SAT. SEPT. 28. 9-2o
MUSTANG AUTO
SHOW Nature Coast
Mustang Club
will be bringing Ford
Mustangs from Past
to Present, if you have
a Mustang Come Out
and Show It. If you
have mustang parts
come out and sell
For Information
Call (352) 628-4656


^M4E Sflc/







PET ADOPTION
Saturday, 1Oa-12
PET
SUPERMARKET
Inverness
(352) 527-9050 to
rehome small dogs
www.ahumanesocie
typetrescue.com

^*#
Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
florida.com
Crystal River Mall
Thursday-Sunday
12pm-4pm
Greta's Touch
Grooming Floral City,
Sat 10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
Low Cost
spay/neuter vouch-
ers are avail.
726-4700 for Info.


Adopt a
rescued Pet i









View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.com or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday, 10a 12p
PetSupermarket
(exceptions below)
Sat. 10/5
9am 2pm
Shepherd of the
Hills Church
Blessing of the Pets
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS


COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home
style environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kit-
tens are
micro-chipped, al-
tered, & tested for
Feline Luk and
Aids. Up to date
on vaccines for
age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw
prints.


Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


-I.lS^


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
wit a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL10580




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Crabj$6.001b
delivered352-897-5388




TEACHER

Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222

WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.




Experienced
Legal Secretary
/Bookkeeper

Part time Mon.-Thurs
Family law
and probate.
Experience in
Wordperfect and
Quickbooks.
Send Resume to:
amackerell@
live.com




EXP'D. BARBER

For Busy Shop.
high comm.
call George at
(352) 344-1881
after 5pm 228-7592

HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person











Tell that special
person
,Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Ony $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966









enar


Busy Medical
Practice Seeks
1. Experienced
Paramedic/LPN/
Medical Asst.
2. Check In/Out
Front Desk
3. Cat Scan Tech.
Experience is a must
Competitive Pay/
Benefits. References
Preferred
call for immediate
response
352-586-0632
or email: tawfik.
eihab@gmail.com


F/T DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry


Medical Assist.
Fulltime & Part time
Postions
Available at busy
Podiatry Practice
Call (352) 795-2142


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience req'd for
very busy medical
office. Includes
benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


TWO MEDICAL
ASSISTANT'S

Fax resume to:
352-746-5784






Non-Profit
Organization
Client Services
Counselor
The Board of
Directors of the Early
Learning Coalition of
the Nature Coast,
servingCitrus/Dixie/
Gilchrist/Levy and
Sumter Counties
announces the follow-
ing employment
opportunity: Full Time
(40 Hours) Client
Services Counselor in
the Citrus County
service area. This
position includes
performing child care
eligibility and case
management. Mini-
mum qualifications:
Applicants must be
detail oriented, with
the ability to multi task
and work independ-
ently. Computer skills
and a strong
Customer Service
Background are
required. Client Case
Management experi-
ence, and Bilingual
speaking (Spanish and
English) preferred.
Qualified applicants
should fax resume to
352-563-5933 on or
before October 4,
2013. Must include
cover page that
states "Applying
for Client Services
Counselor".
An EEO Employer.


REAL ESTATE
AGENT

For Property
Management
FAX: Resume to
352-795-1667
CALL: 352-302-8088
email: action.rental
@yahoo.com
walk-ins are
welcome
Action Rental
Management Realty






SERVERS

Must be experienced
in Fine dining with Bar
knowledge. All others
need not apply.
Must pass drug and
background. Ap ply
Tue.-Fri.O10am4pm at
Sugarmill Woods Ctry.
Club, 1 Douglas St






Licensed Realtor

CONTACT:
yankeetownrealty
.corn or Call
352-447-0007
No Fees. Great Pay
out. Weekends req.
Earning potential
unlimited.


SALES HELP

Looking for a self
motivated person
with a sales back-
ground. Position has
a base salary and a
large commission
structure on a large
ticket item $80K to
S100K potential
Call 352-302-8216
For more Info


SALES PERSON
WANTED

MANUFACTURED
HOME (modular)
Salary and large
commission.
Send resume to
ataylormadehome@
aol.com,
Chiefland office.













ELECTRI-

CIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab,
lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wlldwood






DRIVERS-
TRACTOR TRAILER
DUMP

Cypress Truck Lines
seeks 5 TT Dump
Drivers (150 mile
radius) Company
Drivers Only
*Assigned Tractors
*Medial/Dental/Visbn*P
aid Orientation
*Paid Training*6
Paid Holidays. 6 Mo
TT Dump Exp &
Class A CDL Req!
Call 1-888 235-8862
cypresstruck.com



Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.corn or Call
352-422-2160


ReStore Manaaer
Truck Driver
Donation
Processor

Habitat for Humanity
is filling 3 positions
in Citrus County
E-mail request for
detailed job descrip-
tion and instructions
for submitting to:
H4Hrestore@
vahoo.com
No calls or walk-ins






MEDICAL OF-
FICE TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


324
648
251
973
815
796
432


7'.5 1
927
384
615
27,9

1413
5618


1971 Baseball cards,
200 cards $40.
1970 Baseball Cards
200 cards $40
(352) 344-9502



2 Person Jacuzzi
with cover
$300 obo
(352) 302-2366



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Electric Range, GE,
$380.
Black flat ceramic with
5 burners, like new
Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
ELECTRIC STOVE
White electric stove
price $85.00 Phone
352-860-2858


GAS RANGE Andora5
black GE selfclean con-
vection oven, griddle,
power burner $500
OBO 228-4648
GE Space
Saver
Microwave
very little
usage
Bisque, $125.
(352) 302-9129
GOOD DRYER$100
Works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER$100
works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
HOUSEHOLD FREEZE
WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT
2'2"DEEP 2'4"WIDE
4'10.5"HIGH $250.00
352-382-0009
MAGTAG
2009 white Washing
Machine. In good
condition $250 obo
(352) 422-5579
MICROWAVE Black
Frigidaire over the
stove. Looks and works
great. A steal @ $15
352-322-1160
REFRIGERATOR W/
ICE MAKER G.E.
WHITE SIDE BY SIDE
2'3"DEEP 2'11.5" WIDE
5'9"HIGH $300.00
352-382-0009
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
Maytag- 2 washers, 1
dryer. All in good
working cond. $300
for all or $125 ea
(304) 544-8398



go :, =. ;

*&. .'. S.


968
153

6 79
842
436
285
791


JUICE EXTRACTOR
Cuisinart brand
NEVER USED Great
Gift $99. 352-621-0175
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Condition.
Free Delivery, 60 Day
Written Guarantee
352 263-7398









DUDLEY'S
-AUCTrOW

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3prm,
(Inside) 6pmr Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S 10, '05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C 10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-slte Boat Manu-
facturina Llauidation
122 N Cedarvlew Tr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANql6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auctlon.com
10%BP Au2267

Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC

*ESTATE AUCTION*
Fri. Sept 27, 6:00pm

628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
estateliauidations
andauctions.com
AU 4381 /AB 3202




Air Compressor
8 gallon, 1.5 HP,
$125.
(352) 503-9188
ELECTRIC CHAIN
SAW McCulloch 2.5 HP,
14" electric chain saw
$50 352-628-3899
TWO WHEEL MOVING
CART Two wheel
moving cart. $15
352-628-3899



ANTENNA radio shack
amplified digital TV/FM,
great shape ($10)
352-212-1596
Panasonic TV
42" Plasma Flat screen
with remote,
TV in excel cond.
$225., (908) 616-0620
Homosassa


At home or


on the go...



We got you covered.






SYour News


cYour Town


_Your Way


www.chronicleonline.com


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C9




C10 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013 CLASSIFIEIDS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BLU-RAY PLAYER
Samsung BD-P1500
Blu-ray player.
Excellent Condition. $20
352 3822591
SANYO 20" TV Older
type model. Great pic-
ture and sound. $35.
352-621-0175
TV 55'projection TV on
wheels works fine
$25.00 w/remote. DVD
player $10 w/remote.
352-586-2582



LIGHT BULBS
flourescant T40, new,
total of 9, all for ($5)
352-212-1596



CAMERA Panasonic
Lumix Camera FH20
w/extra battery-like new,
$30 Call 352 3822591
CAMERA TRIPOD
Velbon VE-3 Camera
Tripod VG condition $15
352-382-2591
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP 15.4", LAPTOP
DVD writer, $180
DELL DESK TOP
P4, HT Lcd monitor,
DVD + RW $150
352-628-6806
WIFI RANGE
EXTENDER amped
REC10 wireless range
extender 600 mW Like
new $40 352-382-2591



9 Piece Patio Furniture
PVC 72" table, 4 chairs,
2 reclining chairs, 2 ot-
tomans, w/cushions,
$200. obo
(352) 274-1940
Patio Recliner
Tan La-z-boy, like new
$140
(352) 564-8605
PATIO TABLE Glass
top 5' x 38" & 4 beige
chairs Like New $75.
352-270-3909

Furniture

2 Bedroom Sets
King & Queen
Table & chairs
Like New
$250 ea.
(352) 634-1489
6' LEATHER COUCH
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, $250.
(352) 419-6782
Bedroom Set, Double
whitewash $350.
Dinette Set, 4 chairs
w/coasters $350.
Very Good Cond.
(352) 628-4254
BROYHILL SOFA Per-
fect condition, like new.
3-seat sofa, includes 4
cushions and arm co-
vers. Off-white with floral
pattern. Paid $900, sell
for $150. 352-503-7125
or 410-227-9152
CHAIRS
5-light oak chairs with
padded seats on
casters $100
(352) 419-6383
COMPUTER DESK
Black. 29"H 18"D 41"W.
Storage area w/door,
keyboard tray. Good
cond. $35. 527-1239
COUCH
Brown & Gold, curved,
two matching
otterman's. 1 yr old
$400 (352) 527-4247
Din. Rm. Set, Broyhill,
Table 4 padded
chairs, black lacquer
w/ side table
MUST SEE $250.
(352) 465-2237
Dining Room Set
Thomasville,
Cherry Table, 6
chairs, 2 ext, new
$2900, China Base &
Deck w/ glass
shelves, new $2595,
Moving-Will sacrifice
both for $1500 cash,
obo (352) 513-4516
Dining Room Set
w/Hutch
beveled glass, lighted
cabinet $400.
352) 628-4254


FURNITURE DOLLY,
ETC. 2 & 4 wheel with
base. Pneumatic tires.
$25.00 352-746-4160
HOOKER ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER Oak
with (2)22 inch sides,
center that expands
from 45-60 inches. Me-
dium brown $300 OBO
352-382-3387
KITCHEN SET,
45" Beveled glass top,
white base, 4 swivel
cushion chairs, on
casters, Excel. Cond.
$200. (352) 465-2237
Leave Message
NICE CHINA CABINET!
$100 Firm Very nice 2
glass doors 2 cabinets 3
drawers 352-302-7214
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress, & Box Spring
Like New Antique
white chest, matching
head board & night
Stand, mattffress cover,
matching bed spread
& draperies. $325.
(352) 465-2709
Recliner & Loveseat
recliner, end table &
1 coffee table, micro-
fiber, color sage, elec-
tric auto recliner w/
battery backup $650.
(352) 860-0158
Sectional Couch
w/ queen hide a bed
and recliner built in
Good Condition
$175. obo
(352) 302-9129
TV TABLE/CONSOLE
Cherry wood 48"L 21"w
20"h 2 cabinets/2
shelves Good Condi-
tion $45. 352-621-0175



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
CRAFTSMAN
33" Walk behind.
Brand New, Never
Used $800. obo
352-613-8453
Garden Tractor,
Murray Heavy Duty
18.5 HP V-Twin 46 inch
cut $400.
(352) 507-1490
Sears LT 2000 Riding
Mower 5 yrs. old low
hrs. 19.5 HP, 42" cut
$400.(352) 507-1490

SOLD
BOLENS
New Lawn Tractor
13/2HP, 38", 6 spd.
used 3 times, have
receipt paid $1,000
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362




2 Very Large
Staghorn Ferns
$100 ea
(352) 489-6212




BEVERLY HILLS
ESTATE SALE
216 w. hollyfern
Sat. Sept. 28th 7-1 &
Sun. Sept. 29th 8-1
BEVERLY HILLS
ESTATE SALE
216 w. hollyfern
Sat. Sept. 28th 7-1 &
Sun. Sept. 29th 8-1
BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-1pm
5936 N. Oakmont Dr
BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
SAT. OCT 5TH
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd

BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. 9/28, 9a-4p
End of Summer Sale
31 S. Wadsworth Ave.
CITRUS HILLS
250 E. Hartford Stre
Thurs. & Fri. 8a-5p
Saturday 8a-3p
LADIES!
WE ARE BACK with
ALL Sizes, 99% New &
Home Acces., MISC.
Furniture & More!


CITRUS HILLS
1873W. REDDING ST
SAT ONLY 7:30 ?
MULTI FAMILY SALE
Citrus Springs
Fri, Sat 9/29 & 9/28
8am to 1pm
Body by Jake equip,
AB coaster, new sml
tiller, hshld items, tools
& garden equip,
kitchen apple, etc..
7861 N Cricket Dr.

YOU'LL v THIS!
CRYSTAL RIVER
Craft Bazaar & Bake
Sale at
CR Church of God,
2180 NW 12th Ave,
Fri 9-7 and Sat 9-5,
Free Admission
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. 27, & Sat. 28, 8a-?
VARIETY OF ITEMS*
9875 W. Orchard St.
Behind Mall
DUNNELLON
Thurs. Fri Sat. & Sun.
9am LARGE SALE
Things added ea. day
20249 SW 54th Street
HERNANDO
390 W Britain St.
Power Tools: Shop
Smith, Tool boxes, hand
tools. Furniture grade
lumber. Frrniture.
Friday & Saturday 7:00
am to 2:00 pm
HOMOSASSA
Riverhaven,
4547 S Sawgrass Cir,
Fri-Sat 8-12,
Kayak/Paddle, Bike,
Bike Rack,
Fishing gear,Boat,
Household items.
LECANTO
Side Walk Sale
Saturday 9am-5pm,
Home Again Resale
Store 1980 N. Future
Terr.(486 across form
Chevron)

AlLeend
MOVING SALE
Fri, Sat, Sun, 27, 28, 29
9am to 3pmr
quality furn, misc.
2372 S Sandburg Pt.
WILDWOOD
Hiz & Herz Stop& Shop
11-6p, closed Wed
25% off: Tools, an-
tiques, collectibles,
furniture, clothing, art
work and much more!
400 E Gulf Atlantic
Hwy (4 bldgs E of 301
on SR 44) Wildwood



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945
SMW/Homosassa
Fri. 27 &Sat. 28, 8a-12
BMW Z4, 60' pet fence
Furn., Pool tble., Excer.
Equip, Brick & Brack
150 Pine St., 503-2552
Sugarmill Woods
Fri. 27 & Sat. 28, 8a-I p
Various Hsehold Items
154 Pine Street



3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2
CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$10 EACH
352-613-0529
BOOTS ladies size 7
tan work, size 7 1/2
black dress, nice, both
for ($10) 352-613-7493
Boys winter clothing
size 5/6 4 pants 7
shirts & 2 lightweight
jackets $45
352-613-0529
CHILDREN'S HAL-
LOWEEN COSTUMES
1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1
LION SIZE 5/6 $8
EACH 352-613-0529
JEANS 2 pair, size 10
women's,embroidered,
blue, 1 daises, 1 roses,
new, both for ($25)
352-613-7493
MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZE 36X30 & 34X30
$25 EACH
352-613-0529


NECKLACE s/s,
biker-chick style, en-
gravable heart, new,
paid $150, sacrifice for
($40) 352-613-7493
PURPLE CLOTHES
20 pieces of dresses,
pants, top set, blouses.
Size 12 to 18 $100.00.
897-5410
WHITE STAG PANTS
SUIT Tropical colors,
red, background
&flowers. ex. Large
,$5.oo00, 897-5410



1 Full Size Bed
Complete, mattress
frame $125.
Washing Machine $50.
No calls before 11am
(352) 628-4766
18 to 20 SPEAKERS
6" to 8"
Commercial w/
switches & Hardware
$250. obo for all
(352) 249-3259
20 Chairs for Daycare
$80.00
Baby Accessories
$120.00
(352) 795-7254
180 Gallon Fish Tank
solid wood base
includes top and filter
up and running with
fish $1,000 obo
(352) 302-9845

-I^^


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BEAR WHITETAIL II
COMPOUND BOW-
RH, Bear Sight, 5 set-
tings, needs pull string,
$20 352-628-0033
BLINDS 4' WIDE Vinyl
porch beige color
Good condition (six)
$6.00 each
352-621-0175
BLOOD SUGAR MONI-
TOR Bayer, new, with
case and strips, ($5)
352-613-7493
Boys winter clothing 6
outfits 1 size 4t 4 size
5t 1 size 6 & 1 pajama
set size 5t $35
352-613-0529
CAGES&CRATES-ferret$
10,Bunny$3,Yorke$10,Shelte$
5,$8&$10
352-586-2582
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" ON WHEELS
WITH COVER $20
352-613-0529
Craft Items
$300 value for $150.
assorted 352-746-4613
DEEP SEA ROD &
REEL- 6-1/2ft Rod,
PENN 320 GTi Reel,
nice condition, $60.
352-628-0033
Designer Jackets,
leather W 2 & 3X,
New, $80 ea
Ren. Chest Set,
Must See $1,200
352-465-3086
DOG CARRIER NYLON
& mesh zipper bag.
Small size pet. BRAND
NEW ONLY $20.
352-621-0175
DOG CARRIER X
LARGE plastic airline
type. Clean Excellent
Condition $45.
352-270-3909


DOG STEPS BRAND
NEW by Petmate
Brn/Beige Plastic 19"H
X 12" W $25.(cost $55.)
352-621-0175
EMBROIDERY HOOP
4X4 Brother, fits many
machines, new-still in
package 352-613-5240
$40.00
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct @ $5.001b.
Stone Crab@$6.001b
delivered352-897-5388
Girls winter clothing 4
JEANS 1 pants 5
shirts 2 pajama sets
size 14/16 2 hoodies
$60 352-613-0529
HOMELITE ELECTRIC
POLE CHAIN SAW- 8ft
length, 8 inch cut,
works great, $45.
352-628-0033
Industrial Grill 2 tanks,
many extras $300.
Kitchen aid 5 quart
mixer, $175.
(352) 503-9188
Kitchen Aid Mixer
New $275.
Tiffany style Lamps
3 large $70 ea.
352-465-3086
Large Dog Crate
26 x 36, black wire
$35.
(352) 382-1000
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM
SIZE $20 352-613-0529
Life StriderArm & Leg
Exceriser bike w/ moni-
tor $65 Oak & Glass
cabinet, w/ 3 oak &
glass drs 24x38 $40.
352-794-3907
PET TAXI Reduced,
excel, cond. $20.00,
L-23,W-14,H-13
352-513-4027
PICTURE FRAMES 4
nice large frames, all for
($10) 352-613-7493


9-27 Laughingstock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2013

"She changed her mind."



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(352) 563-5966 A '


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S'Si^^^I^^ UST 41P iF^^ ^~


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690.
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL10580





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Paios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
mv,]

#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**


BILL TRIPP FENCE
All Types of Fence
Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096
(352) 425-4365



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
1 FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144


Andersen HandyMan
Home Repairs, Lawn
Care. Cheaper Prices
352-453-6005
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447



A+ CLEANING
Res/Com. 27 yrs exp.
Lie/ bonded, client
focused 386-717-2929
Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174
CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards


GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS








Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570









Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


Y iL -i lil 1 11 st.


CHR CaNICLE
Class-fieds


Home Maintenance
Repairs/Painting/Power
Washing, Quality work
at affordable prices
Ref avail 573-723-2881

Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Yl ERLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.corn
Lic# Cccl 327656 /ins.
-352-639-1024-




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




-, ..









TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yvrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I Reodelng:




CITRUS COUNTY (TL) CHRONICLE




WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKYKANE
1. Erie or Huron boat-made waves (1) Every answer isa rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
Iand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Highly uncommon matched duo (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Wrigley team's hedgerow plants (1) syllables in each word.

I12013UFS,Dist byUniv UclickforUFS
4. Failed to meet composer Franz (1)


5. Spoiled crop that is ginned (2)


6. British party members' motortrucks (2)


7. Pretending to hit hard on the skull (2)


9NINIVaH O9INOI3AM L s831N0Sr183110 "9 NOJILO3 N1101 "s
1ZSI cI3SSIW snLTUHS S3 HIM aIVd a1a T g vA 3XVA i 3 *T'
9-27-13 SIASNKV


REGULATION SIZE
POOL TABLE
1" slate in good shape
but may want to put a
new felt on it $200.00.
Citrus County.
401-440-8922
SAIL
SHADE-REDUCED
Reduced-$65.00, Trian-
gle-11'10/11'10/11'10
352-513-4027
SEARS GAS LAWN
EDGER 3 1/2 HP
Excellent cond. $75.00
352-746-4160
SIX CEILING FANS. 4
Brass 52", 1 brass 30",
1 white 42". $10 ea.
527-1239
SONY DIGITAL VIDEO
CAMERA/RECORDER
All Acessories Like
new.$100.00
352-746-4160
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529



Two Copy Printers
$25 to $75
352-634-4329



Diabetic Shoes,
Beige, Women's
Size 8, Medium width,
never worn, $80
(352) 522-0107
New
Jazzy Electric Chair,
MUST SELL
Cost $5,000
Selling $1,300. obo
(352) 795-7513



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR BEAUTIFUL
PURE WHITE
W/TURQUOISE TRIM
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" EDEN 20W
BASS AMP
UGHTWEIGHT(UNDER
15LBS)AND POW-
ERFUL! $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER
SQUIRE JAGUAR SS
BASS METALLIC
RED&BLACK,$100
352-601-6625
"NEW" OSCAR
SCHMIDT ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG&CORD,HI&LO
WZ INPUTS $150
352-601-6625
"NEW"ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC CUTAWAY
GUITAR W/STAND OR
WALL HANGER,$80
352-601-6625
"NEWCRATE FLEX
WAVE AMP
W/REVERB&
OVERDRIVE,12"SPEAK-
ER $90 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
A STYLE MANDOLIN
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $50
352-601-6625
BLACK LES PAUL
SPECIAL II
W/GIGBAGCORD,STAND&
WALLHANGER
$100 352-601-6625
ELECTRONIC PIANO
Yamaha portable piano.
Good condition,36"x13"
$35 352-628-3899
GUITAR AMP
Peavey Valve King
Half Stack Tube Amp
Like New, $700. obo
(352)860-1195
PIANO LESSONS


-of
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
STRAT STYLE BASS
UKE ELECTRIC POLY
STRINGS, PIEZO
WHITE ON WHITE $75
352-601-6625
STUDENT?"NEW"
CLASSICAL GUITAR
BY WASHBURN
W/GIGBAG&BOOK/CD
$40 352-601-6625



CHANDELIER Beautiful,
large antique looking.
Paid $400, moved &
must sell. $75.00
352-322-1160
MIXER Westinghouse
White LIKE NEW
Hand or counter top
$15. 352-621-0175



Proform Crosswalk 480
excel, cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $225.
352-382-5208


TREADMILL, Prosport
285T Walk to
fitness,,digital all speed
/flat/slant.Good condi-
tion. $100.00 897-5410



BICYCLE Trek Series 3,
3500,16", 41 cm. moun-
tain bike, with Bontrager
computer and bike bag,
$100.00 352 503-6668
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516



6 1/2 x 12 Utiltiy Trailer,
drop gate, 2 Ft. Mesh
Sides 3 mos. old,
black, $900.
352-302-8265
2013 Enclosed
Trailer, 5x8,
v-nose, w/ramp door,
$1600. firm
(352) 513-5436
Utility Trailer
'93,6x9x2 ft.
wood/steel, frame
$250. obo
(352) 465-3086



COSTUME JEWELRY 5
necklaces, 1 pair ear-
rings, nice, all for ($15)
352-613-7493


Sell or Swa


A- V



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts
Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.
Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment











BAILEY
Bailey, Chespeake
Bay hound mix, 2
y.o., HW-negative,
wt. 39 Ibs. Sits on
command, loves
treats, walks well on
leash, good w/other
dogs, attentive to
human friends.
Obeys well, wants to
please. # 20731619.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$100
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219

BOXER STUD AKC
WANTED. Must be tall,
Email: Belladonnahay
@yahoo.com

COCKER SPANIELS
4 Males, 2 Females w/
papers. 8 weeks old
Blonde & white $800
(352) 287-0519




t




CYRIL
Cyril, 1 y.o. Hound
mix, found as stray,
beautiful red-brown
coat, wt. 42 Ibs. Easy
to walk, gets along
w/other dogs.
Appears to be
housebroken,
healthy. Affection-
ate & friendly.
Good companion.
#20807791.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288







r..

Dojha
Dojha, approx. 3
y.o.,a yellow/white
lab retriever mix,
medium size, came
to shelter because
family lost their
home & could not
keep him. Gentle,
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs,
beautiful in color,
great shape.
Pen #25.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382

HAVANESE PUPPIES
9wks. Champ. Bid.
Lines, Non Shedding
3 males, black &
white, shots, Wormed
$650. OBO 613-581810








OZZIE
Ozzie, a 2-y.o. neu-
tered Black Mouth
Cur mix, handsome
boy, wt. 61 Ibs, a
little bit shy, good
with kids, good with
cats, should be the
only dog. Walks well
on leash, needs
fenced yard to run
in. Housebroken.
Call Brenda @
352-746-1423.








Pete
a 1-year-old mostly
white terrier/?hound
mix, Heartworm
negative & house-
broken. Came to
the shelter because
his family could no
longer afford him. A
very gentle,
well-behaved dog,
walks very well on a
leash & gets along
with other dogs.
Weighs 51 Ibs.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Quaker Parakeet
male 5-6 months old,
reen w/ grey chest.
125. includes cage
(352) 464-3716

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male $300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males start @ $400.
Females start @ $600.
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


CLASSIFIED

L il l 0


SIMON
well-mannered
retriever mix, 3 y.o.
Sits, gives his paw,
goes down for
treats, takes gently.
Walks well on leash,
behaves in public
places. High energy,
likes to run & play,
plays catch, plays in
pool. Good w/most
dogs. Call Christina
@ 352-464-3908.

Sweet 3yr old female
Lab. Spayed. Possible
PTSD dog. Sm adop-
tion fee (352) 794-6314




CHICKENS
10 Laying chickens
Make reasonable
offer
(352) 382-2350 LM


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!



p


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


I Pets
IMWW4.mi


I


l


2/ 12'A, $500 mo., 1st,
last, 352-628-2678
LECANTO
2/2, Doublewide $575.
(352) 212-9682



7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, $2,000 down
$732. mo.
877-499-8065
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182
ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

BAD CREDIT?
FORECLOSURE?
BANKRUPTCY?
Want your own
home? I can help!!
35% down cash or
land and you
are approved.
No gimmick,
386-546-5833

Tired of Renting?
Super clean 2004
3BR/2BA, on /2 acre
ready to move in!!!
$3,500 down,
$380.03/mo. W.A.C.
Call 386-546-5833 for
details Won't last!

LII ll' .i '

L..-,> L'-,

CI LpONICLE
Classified


Singing Forest 46'
2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile
Home, fixer upper,
$6000. 352-344-1365
USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 w/ carport,
3 storage shed
$85,900.
Agent (352) 382-1000




TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




BEAUTIFUL D/W 3/2
with porch & deck.
Wynnhaven is a 55
plus park. Owner is
very motivated and
will consider all offers.
Priced at $45,000.
Call Willard Pickrel at
J.W. Morton Real
Estate for full details.
352-726-6668 or
352-201-9871.


Doublewide,
2 BR, 2BA,
Recent shingle roof
New AC, MUCH MORE
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274

LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


a


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


*(Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; myfwc.corn/wildlifehabitats/AlligatorlncidentsFactsSheet.htm) Scarborough 2010


IOaXGS


1w CIT RUS __*' C0 U N T Y -

CHCOUNICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C2-2



FLORAL CITY CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/ Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
Sec. Includes Cable hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo.
septic water, trash. No FREE with $600. no
pets. (352) 344-5628 dogs. 352-726-9570
FLORAL CITY CRYSTAL RIVER
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 628-2815
(352) 344-1025
1 ,,%ArCA 00 A


-ACTIONv
S RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHonmeRentals.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
10941 W. Gem St.................... $550
2/1 large duplex close to hospital
9660 W. Campior Ln .................$800
3/1/2 2 Cleonlho e on corner lot
16 Beah Ln. #102.................. $900
1/1 Furnishedstudio oportment
BEVERLY HILLS
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2150 Austin Dr. (CS)................$550
2/15 Cute home, some furniture, fenced yard
2332W. Silverhill Li.(L)...........$550
2/1 Affordable apartment, ground floor
9041 N. Travis Dr. (CS)...... $625
2/2 Roomny duplex, nent and clean
HOMOSASSA
4800 S. Wood Way...................$900
3/2/1 river en, fully furnished
1101 ClearwaterC...............$1000
2/2Waterrontemobilehhome
INVERNESS
1314 Cypress Cove (Inv) ..........$650
2/2, Waterfront townhouse, screen porch





Crystal River
Furn. Apt Seasonal
2/1 clean, w/d
(352) 563-2626


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI /1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kitchen Appl, turn,
1137 N.E. 3rd. Ave. Apt
3, Near CR Primary,
Middle, High School
352-795-3006
PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 BDRM. APT. HOMES
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to
qualified applicants.
If qualified, pay no
more than 30% of
your households
adjusted monthly
income for rent
and utilities.
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer


OPPORTUSNP*
OPPORTUNITy *-'


I-HMU USASSA
2/1 Pool, Garb.,
maint. Incl., peaceful
No pets, $600. plus
mo. 628-6700
HOMOSASSA
2/2, clean, quiet, center
location $550., 352-
563-2114,257-6461
INVERNESS
Beautifully Remodeled
on golf course, 2/2/2
$875 352-895-0744




CRYSTAL RIVER
NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. Incl Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/12, Unfurn.$550,
Furn. $600.+sec clean,
quite. Small Pet 828 5th
Ave. NE. 727-455-8998
727-343-3965






LISTINGS
CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001




C12 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs. 352-726-9570




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
Lovely 2400SF home
3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for
the golf cart. $1200
month plus security.
(352) 464-3905
CRYSTAL RIVER
2-3 BR $200-$250/mo
552-2637, 527-6566
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HERNANDO 31212
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07 $850/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/2
NearAnna Jo Rd.By
appt 786- 423-0478
or (352) 637-1142
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Apt. Waterfront
$650. mo. 1st sec.
Inclds dock, water,
trash. No pets.
772-240-6180
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic/cottage all utilities
incl'd. $595 no smoking
352-422-2994
Inverness
2bd,ba, fl room, dock
fish, par.turn. $450.
860-2452, 201-4559




HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07, $850/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818




INVERNESS
Room for rent, pry.
bath $350, 613-9135




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


211 Northeast 4th
Street, Chiefland, FL
BANK OWNED
ABSOLUTE AUCTION
6,400+/- SF of space in
2 Buildings on 1.16 Ac-
res. One vacant single
family home and a sec-
ond bldg. used as a
daycare facility.
Inspect: Sept. 30th @
11AM
Onsite Auction with
Webcast bidding on
October 2nd @ 3 PM
Local contact: Julian
Howell, 877-980-9565.
More info at
www.auctionEbid.com
FLBKR#CQ1029847
Auction MGMT Corp.
Jeb@auctionEbid.com
HERNANDO
1000+ sf.of office
space. Heat/Elec
incld, ample pkg $750
(352) 726-3339



3/1, fenced yard,
corner lot. Needs
some repairs. As is
$39,500 Negotiable
2081 W Gardenia Dr
(352) 465-0623




Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buving or Sellina

6 ra


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me




Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
$139,000 Call Gwen
795-1520 or 634-1725



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
caged pool, 1 acre,
great neighborhood,
call for details
(352) 746-6552



2 BR, 2BA, Den,
lanai, Scrn'd heated
pool, Cen. AC, poll
barn, 1 AC, fenced,
well, many extras. By
Appt. $129,900 firm
(352)444-2371 or
(352) 586-7602

YOU'LLv THIS!
117 S Lunar
Terrace
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
c/h/a,Totally Updated!
Block home, Clean,
Over-sized Garage,
W/Carport. $79,500
Negotiable
Call 352-344-9290
8535 E Gospel Island
Rd Inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively
rennovated including
wood and tile floors.
Granite and new roof
and kitchen. Over 2000
Sqft Living area.
$139,900 352-817-5875
or miksh@earthlink.net
INVERNESS
2002, Custom Built
3/2/2
With Extra Lot
$114.500.
352-344-3112

RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM


boe




HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!





For SaleI),*
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

S= 11^^^B


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


M^IFUS CLM^ty
Homes^^*


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $19,900
obo 352-444-2272




Outboard Motor
25HP, Evirude
with controls, very
good cond.
$750 obo
476-1113, 513-5135
Pontoon Boat Trailer
Can accommodate
up to 24 ft boat,
Very good cond.
$1,500
(609) 509-6021 cell




OCEAN KAYAK
2010 Caper Like New,
11 foot, Kayak with
paddle and many
extra's. Used less than
five times. $300.00
352-503-6668




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510-

177 KEY WEST
2013 Skiff, Yamaha 70
4-stroke, Jack Plate,
Trolling Motor, Gauges,
GPS, Alum Trailer,
Transferrable Warranty,
Excellent $20,900
352 503-6668
MERC CRUISER
1993, 20fft Stern Drive,
Sylvan, Barely used,
but runs great, org.
$12,000 Asking $6,500
obo (352) 228-1355


-Home Finder -


www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Cirs.o


CLASSIFIED
Waerfon


PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new vhf radio & gps
fishfinder. Gd Cond.
$6500. (352) 527-4247
Sea Eagle
2.5 power, stroke
ouboard & inflatable
Suzuki, $1100. for both
(352) 425-7020
SWEETWATER
1991, 15 ft., Pontoon
seats 8, 35HP, trailer,
excellent cond. $3,250
476-1113, 513-5135
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SKYLINE 1995,
Slide In cab over
Camper Fully equip.
generator, fridge,
microwave, AC, &
elect, jacks Loaded.
$2,800 obo
(352) 422-4548

SOLD
Salem Cruise Lite
2011 Travel Trailer
28 ft bunk hse. slideout
non-smkers. Exc Cond
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



Complete Auto Audio
System, Kicker KX,
1200.1, CrossfireVR602,
600watt, Kicker KX
350.2, 2 Kicker KS60, 4
OHM and more $450.
(352)860-1195
SOFT TOPPER
for Short bed pick-up.
Like New $250 obo
(352) 422-5579

Vehicles

"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**

BIG SALE
aCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
First Car for Daughter
sml car, autoac, 4 cyl
good cond.under 2k
NO Dealers please
(352) 621-0248



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


2001 LS, leather Inter.
very good cond., 6 cyl.
82k mi. One owner.
$4,100 352-746-6708
Cadillac
'01, Eldorado, 117K
mi., runs great & looks
great, Candy apple red
$6,000 352-422-2516
CHEVROLET
'09, Malibu LS,
8,700 mi. 1 owner,
Gorgeous Car $14,500
(352) 527-0022
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt
4 door, $3,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
'00, Intrepid 3.5 mag-
num RT, w/ sunrf. Runs
reat needs battery
700(352)860-0158






DUDLEY'S

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(Inside) 6pmr Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles@ 7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S1 0,'05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-slte Boat Manu-
facturina Llauidation
122 N Cedarview Tr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youlu.be/F9bqANql6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for Info
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BP Au2267
FIAT
'79 Spider 2000 Cony.
58K miles, new roof,
good rubber, runs
$2,000 (352) 564-0364
FORD
2004, Mustang, Deluxe
leather, CD player,
pwr windows, $7,888.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MAZDA
2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed,
4-door, one owner,
great condition, 141,000
miles $3,500.
352-860-2146
MERCURY
2006, Grand Marquis,
LS, $8,988
352-341-0018
MERCURY
'94, Cougar, 125k mi.,
2 DR, runs great, cold
air, good tires, $1.400
(352) 344-0547
PONTIAC
'01, Grand Am, 4 cyl.,
156k mi., cold AC,
standard, runs excel.
$2,800 obo, 476-8690
TOYOTA
2010, Yaris, 3 door,,
$7,795.
352-341-0018


CHEVROLET
2009 CORVETTE
COUPE Z51: Jetstream
blue w/ebony int., 2LT,
Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3
eng., only 9500 mi., car
show winner, serious
inquiries only, first
$35K/OBO gets it. Lets
talk @ 352-249-7630

s THIS OUT!
CHEVY
1981 Corvette
Under 50,000 orig. mi
les, Shark Body Style,
Very Good Condition,
Garage stored
352-400-4704
FORD
Rat Rod Projects, 46
Ford PU Roadster, Ford
Model T, Boattail speed-
ster all steel., Inglis
352-949-7874
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
cond. $32,000 obo
352-302-8265





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
2500, 01, 6Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $7700.
(352) 465-3086






DUDLEY'S
AUCTIO5W

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(Inside) 6pm Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S10, '05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C 10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-slte Boat Manu-
facturina Llauidation
122 N CedarviewTr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ftp.//youtu.be/F9bqANql6
cw HUGEALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BP Au2267
FORD
1992 Flairside 4x4,302,
red, 4 lift traction bar,
chrome brush guard,
steps & bedrail. A
beauty in & out.
$5,500 (352) 344-8089


HONDA
2007 VTX 1300C Origi-
nal owner, purchased
brand new, low mile-
age (2,371 miles).
CafA windshield, re-
movable saddlebags,
light-bar. Black &
chrome. Showroom
condition (mint).
Asking a "firm"
$5,050.00 Please con-
tact ownerkseller via
Email: selfor@aol.com
Phone: (352)382-4422
SNAPPER
2008 Riding 30 inch
cut 12.5 HP $500
(352) 341-5263


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




BEVERLY HILLS 324 S
Monroe. Sunday 12-3p
Completely Remodeled
Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2
ba, 2 gar. NEW: Roof,
kitchen w/stainless,
baths, flooring etc. $79k.
527-1239


Fi-j Your DreAw fowm

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

7S3572


NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control,
power windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tri-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319




CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 5 spd $3,994.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

SOLD
Dodge
Ram Charger, 1987
4x4, w/new engine




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment


Harley Davidson

2011 FLTRU Road
Glide Ultra loaded
cruise, cd, cb,intercom,
abs, anti theif,6 speed,
and 103cc motor.
only 5886 miles $19,000
(352)212-4101
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2012 FLHTCUTG Tri
Glide Ultra Classic
AMFM/CD/AUX
w/speakers; CC, Fairing
Full, Alarm, Travel trunk
w/rack, stage 2 scream-
ing eagle high perfor-
mance exhaust & pipes;
ABS brakes, extra
chrome accents. Excel-
lent condition w/only
1250 mi. First $28.5K.
Lets talk @
352-249-7630.
Harley Davidson
Road King, 2006
1450cc,32k,exc.cond.
asking $12,500.
(352) 628-9487
HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition asking
$1200.00 352-637-3254

ONE OWNER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Codo




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


804-0927 FCRN
Konetsky, Chad N. 2013-DR-819 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2013-DR-819
IN RE: THE MATTER OF: KRISTI A. BRANDT,
Petitioner/Mother
and
CHAD N. KONETSKY,
Respondent/Father.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PATERNITY
TO: CHAD N. KONETSKY
25 North Lincoln Avenue, Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Counsel for Petitioner,
J. MICHAEL BLACKSTONE, P.A., 7655 W. Gulf to Lake Highway, Suite 1, Crystal River,
Florida 34429 on or before the 7TH day of October 2013, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the pe-
tition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of The Circuit Court's office notified of you r current address.
(You may file Notice, of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit w ill be mailed to the address on rec-
ord at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain auto-
matic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanc-
tions; including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
DATED this 27th day of August, 2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
BY: /S/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2013.


818-0927 FCRN
10/5/13 LIEN SALE
Out-Back Self Storage
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given
that on October 6, 2013
at 1:00 P.M. the under-

N00esto reit I.'
Adinstaio


signed Stop & Store LLC.
DBA Outback Self Stor-
age will sell at public sale
by competitive bidding,
the personal property,
stored with the under-
signed Stop&Store LLC.
DBA Outback Self Stor-

) I -. I I


age, 19545 West Hwy 40,
Dunnellon FL. 34432.
Tenants and units:
Unit#R692 Agnes Wolfe-
Travel Trailer
We reserve the right to
refuse any and all bids.
September 20 & 27, 2013

r. I I


821-1004 FCRN
Bobrowski, Dolores 2013-CP-525 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No.: 2013-CP-525
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOLORS JEAN BOBROWSKI
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DOLORS JEAN BOBROWSKI deceased, whose
date of death was March 10, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this courtWITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is September 27, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas Bobrowski
184 West Joliet Road, Valparaiso, IN 46385
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Dawn Ellis My Florida Probate, P.A.Florida Bar No. 091979
P.O. Box 952, Floral City, Florida 34436-0952
Telephone: (352) 726-5444 E-mail: dawn myfloridaprobate.com
Published two times in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 27 & October 4,2013.


822-1004 FCRN
Clinker, Shelia 2013-CP-72 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013-CP-72
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHEILA DOREEN CLINKER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS


CLASSIFIED

Noics t Ceitr


The ancillary administration of the estate of SHEILA DOREEN CLINKER, deceased,
whose date of death was January 9, 2012 File Number 2013-CP-72, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: September 27
Personal Representative:
/s/ Michele Cline
Personal Representative
315 S. Hyde Park Ave, Tampa, FL 33606
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
/s/ James P. Hines, Jr., Florida Bar No. 0413550
Hines Norman Hines, P.L.
315 S. Hyde Park Ave, Tampa, FL 33606
Telephone: (813) 251-8659 Email: jhinesjrdhnh-law.com
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, September 27 & October 4, 2013.


FoeloueS- e'


823-1004 FCRN
Owens, Marilyn 2013-CA-000777-A
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000777-A
WESTSTAR MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARILYN OWENS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARILYN OWENS,
ALL UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS OR INHABITANTS OF
2834 NORTH WHEATON PT, HERNANDO, FL 34442; and COUNTY
OF CITRUS, a political subdivision of the State of Florida,
Defendants.
ALIAS SUMMONS
To: MARILYN OWENS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARILYN OWENS
2834 North Wheaton Pt.
Hernando, FL 34442
NOTICE OF ACTION
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property
in Citrus County, Florida:
Lots 32, 33, 34 and 35, Block 7, PARSONS POINT ADDITION TO HERNANDO, according
to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 19, Public Records of Cit-
rus County, Florida.
More specifically described as: 2834 North Wheaton Pt., Hernando, Florida 34442
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses if any, to it on plaintiff's attorney, Stephen H. Price, Esquire, CRAMER, PRICE &
de ARMAS, P.A., whose address is 1411 Edgewater Drive, Suite 200, Orlando, Florida
32804; Telephone (407) 843-3300, on or before 30 days from the date of the first
publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
DATED on September 20, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, CLERK OF COURT
By:Cheryl Bailey. Deputy Clerk
(SEAL)
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Ad-
ministrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-
pearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, September 27 & October 4, 2013.


824-1004 FCRN
Hoos, Stephanie 2012-CA-1675 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:2012-CA-1675
BANK OF AMERICA, NA, acting by and through
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, as Servicing Agent,
7360 S. Kyrene Road
Tempe, AZ 85283
Plaintiff,
v.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEESCREDITORS,
LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS, DECEASED,
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS,
RANDY PILCHER, JUDY PILCHER,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEESCREDI-
TORS,
LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS, DECEASED,


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C13


Foecosr Sa


F S


THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS,
RANDY PILCHER, JUDY PILCHER,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court,
County of Citrus, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOT(S) 23-24,
BLOCK 41 OF APACHE SHORES, UNIT 11 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE
36,ET SEQ., OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO
RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, EASEMENTS, COVENANTS, OIL, GAS OR MINERAL
RIGHTS OF RECORD, IF ANY.

Commonly known as: 4030 NORTH LASSO TERRACE, HERNANDO, FL 34442
You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30)
days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
Dated this 13thday of August, 2013.
CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
September 27 & October 4, 2013.

922-1003 F/THCRN
Baker, Sherry 09-2010-CA-000338 NOS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-2010-CA-000338
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
SHERRY L. BAKER A/K/A SHERRY LYNN BAKER;
CHARLES E. BAKER, JR. A/K/A CHARLES EDWARD
BAKER, JR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; WORLDWIDE
ASSET PURCHASING, L.L.C., AS ASSIGNEE OF
HOUSEHOLD AUTO FINANCE CORP.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pLursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated
September 9, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 09-2010-CA-000338 of the Circuit Court
of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the
Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 10th day of October, 2013,
by electronic sale beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the prescribed date at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com relative to the following described property as set
forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 5, BLOCK 459, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST, SECOND ADDITION, ACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 68 AND 69, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court
Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
By: /s/ Stephen Orsillo, Esq. FBN: 89377
Morris I Hardwick I Schneider, LLC
5110 Eisenhower Blvd., Suite 120, Tampa, Florida 33634
Customer Service (866)-503-4930, MHSinbox&closingsource.net
September 27 & October 3, 2013 *FL-97003284-09"


820-1004 FRCRN
BOCC 10/8/13 Public Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will meet in regular session in the Board of County Commissioners'
Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450 on October 8, 2013 beginning at 1:00 pm to approve the sale of property
at 35 S. Davis Street Beverly Hills, FL to Jason Haworth under the Neighborhood Stabi-
lization Program. This notice is given pursuant to Section 125.35(3), Florida Statutes.
Anyone not attending the meeting but who wishes to make comments shall do so in
writing and address same to the Department of Community Services, Housing Ser-
vices Section, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, Florida 34461. Said comments
must be received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, October 7, 2013.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public meeting he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of d a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
published one (1) time, in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 27, 2013.


866-443-5218&OrAt
Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat 8am-4pm



www.VILLAECADILLA .co


200 CHEVROLETU&f21L


21TOOA STI10 8


Offers only valid for qualified buyers with 720 beacon score. Includes all rebates and incentives. May not be combined with any other promotions. Expires 10-03-13.


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2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE STK#13090061 ........................$6,955
2004 LINCOLN TOWNCAR STK#13090221 .......................$8,395
2001 HONDA ODYSSEY LX STK#13090151 ......................$8,600
2004 BUICK LESABRE STK#13080147........................... $10,350
2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS STK#13090083.............. $12,495
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE STK#13090205.................... $12,495
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY STK#13080524 ............................$13,725
2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU STK#13090101.................... $13,858
2006 CADILLAC STS V6 STK#13090037........................ $13,985
2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE STK#13090070....................... $14,455
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY STK#13080370........................... $14,995
2013 KIA RIO SX STK#13080340 ....................................$15,750
2011 TOYOTA COROLLA LE STK#13080305 ....................$15,910
2012 TOYOTA COROLLA LE STK#13089006................... $16,850
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY HYBRID STK#13080255.............. $16,900
2012 TOYOTA COROLLA LE STK#13090197.................... $16,985
2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HB STK#13090165........................ $16,988
2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT STK#13090129.............. $16,995
2008 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080344........................... $17,450
2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HB STK#13090060.........................$17,455


2011 TOYOTA PRIUS HB STK#13090195 .........................$17,680
2007 LINCOLN MKX STK#13080426...............................$17,825
2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA LIMITED STK#13090090........ $18,455
2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK#13090187...... $18,675
2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER STK#13090181.................. $19,625
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA SE STK#13080064....................$19,750
2013 KIA OPTIMA LX STK#13080331............................. $19,800
2011 HONDA CR-V EX STK#13080149............................ $20,855
2009 TOYOTA VENZA V6 STK#13080232....................... $21,300
2010 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080537........................... $23,225
2009 INFINITI G37 STK#13080124................................. $23,950
2013 TOYOTA RAV4 XLE STK#13090108........................ $24,295
2011 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080519........................... $24,450
2013 TOYOTA CAMRY SE STK#13070479....................... $25,495
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY SE STK#13080067 ......................$25,888
2012 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER STK#13089003 ..................$25,925
2011 TOYOTA AVALON STK#13080229........................... $26,900
2011 CHEVROLET TAHOE 1500 LS STK#13080542 .........$27,325
2010 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLE STK#13090148................. $27,688
2012 TOYOTA PRIUS V STK#13070528........................... $27,995


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PAGE 1

SEPTEMBER 27, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 51 50 CITRUS COUNTYWarriors in 4: Seven Rivers volleyball downs Lecanto /B1 www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Classifieds . . . .C9 Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . .A14 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B4 Lottery Payouts . .B4 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 TV Listings . . . .C7 HIGH90LOW65Partly cloudy; stray showers.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning FRIDAY 000G2NF A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerINVERNESS The Homosassa man convicted of the Christmas-day murder of a Brooksville teenager has been sentenced to life in prison. Judge Ric Howard sentenced Byron Lee Boutin, 42, to the life term Thursday. Florida does not have parole for life sentences. Boutin and his girlfriend Crystal Brinson, 36, of Brooksville were both charged with first-degree murder in the death of DeAnna Stires, 18, around Christmas of 2012. Brinsons case is still pending, but Boutin was convicted after a four-day trial a month ago. Boutin and Brinson are accused of overdosing Stires with morphine the official cause of death and dumping her body in a hunting area in Levy County. Stires was reported missing on New Years Day to the Hernando County Sheriffs Office. Her body was found Jan. 18 in a wooded area off State Road 24 in the Levy County community of Otter Creek. Two hunters found Stires Boutin gets life in prison Convicted of murdering teenager last December, dumping body in Levy County Byron Boutin See BOUTIN/ Page A9 Recycling process MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleErin Ray, Single Stream Processors recycling education specialist, front center, explains to a group of visitors Wednesday the complex, high-tech process the Lecanto recycling plant uses to separate and process recyclable materials. The free tour is one of many educational opportunities the public is invited to attend during the 18th Annual Save Our Waters Week. One purpose of the tour is to show how recycling can help maintain clean, healthy waters. This large bay is where much of the recyclable materials are collected and processed. PATFAHERTY Staff writerU.S. Rep. Rich Nugent plans to file a bill today that could head off flood insurance premium hikes scheduled to hit next week. He characterized the rate hikes as an unintended consequence and a huge hit for the economy and residents to absorb. The pending hikes and their impact on the housing market have also been an issue with the Realtors Association of Citrus County The new rates were put in motion by the Biggert Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012, which had the Federal Emergency Management Agency change the way the National Flood Insurance Program is run. It was required to raise rates to reflect true flood risk and make the program more financially stable. Nugent: Delay flood insurance rate hikes Rep. Rich Nugentworried that hikes could hurt Floridas economy. See HIKES/ Page A9 Associated PressWASHINGTON Moving closer to the brink of a government shutdown, House Republicans vowed Thursday they wont simply accept the stopgap legislation that is likely to remain after Senate Democrats strip away a plan to dismantle President Barack Obamas health care law. A sense of confusion settled over the House, both over how to avoid a shutdown and how to handle even more important legislation to increase the governments borrowing ability to avert a default on U.S. obligations. Short of Politicians head for stalemate on budget talks Govt shutdown feared See BUDGET/ Page A10 MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerINVERNESS The Citrus County Hospital Board voted 4-0 late Thursday to award the Citrus Memorial bid to Hospital Corp. of America (HCA). Citrus Memorial Health Foundation members offered no opinion on their choices, even after hearing a detailed breakdown of the three bidders from transaction consultant Trey Crabb. The foundation, missing chairman Bob Collins and longtime board member Joe Brannen, didnt have a quorum to vote. Vice chairwoman Sandy Chadwick said foundation members would not discuss the bidders until the two boards meet again at 7 p.m. Monday. Hospital board trustees, however, were unanimous in their support for HCA, pointing to the Tennessee-based companys commitment to serving the indigent, protecting jobs and developing strategies to prevent Citrus County patients from seeking health care in surrounding counties. HCAs bid is $145.6 million. Factoring in debt, pension obligations and other issues, HCAs net is about $95 million to the community for purposes yet to be determined. The boards, which must agree on the same bidder and transaction type, are Board backs sale to HCA Foundation has yet to weigh in See BIDS/ Page A9

PAGE 2

A2FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G7E5

PAGE 3

Around theSTATE Citrus County Maidoff boardwalk to be dedicatedA ribbon-cutting ceremony has been set for the opening of the Gary Maidhof Nature Walk boardwalk at the Academy of Environmental Science on Fort Island Trail. The event is at 11 a.m. Saturday at the school, but because of limited parking, city officials are urging people who attend to park at Fort Island Trail Park, 12073 W. Fort Island Trail. A shuttle will be available from the park. Alpaca farms open to public this weekendAlpaca farms around the community will celebrate National Alpaca Farm Days by opening up farms to the public on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 28 and 29. Those include: Alpaca Magic USA, 4920 Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa 352628-0156. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Farm is located at the top of the hill. Sun Spiced Alpacas, 5420 S. Farm Point, Homosassa 352-628-9980. Open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Located off U.S. 19. Turn west on West Village Drive, go right on West Sasser Street, right on S. Bob White Drive, left on West Chablis Lane, left on West Meadow Street, then left on Farm Point. Funny Farm Alpacas, 718 W. Rusk Lane, Lecanto 352-527-8951. Open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. If driving from Inverness go west on State Road 44, turn north onto Thayer Street, the first street past the light at the landfill, and follow signs. From Crystal River, take State Road 44 east and turn north on Thayer Street before the light at the landfill. GainesvilleLead Gatorade inventor honoredGov. Rick Scott has honored the late Dr. Robert Cade with the states Great Floridian Award. The Gainesville Sun reported Scott visited the Cafe Museum for Creativity and Invention and presented the award to Cades family on Thursday. Cade was the lead inventor of Gatorade. He was also a professor of renal medicine at University of Florida and described himself as a physician, scientist, musician and inventor. Thursday would have been Cades 86th birthday. Cade is the 82nd recipient of the Great Floridian Award. Previous honorees include sports figures Steve Spurrier and Tim Tebow, as well as former governors, civil rights activists, military heroes and entrepreneurs.LakelandOfficer suspended after bra searchA Lakeland Police Department officer has been suspended in connection with an incident in which he asked a woman pulled over for a traffic stop to shake out her bra to see if she was hiding drugs. The Lakeland Ledger reported Officer Dustin Fetz was suspended for a day without pay for misusing recording equipment. Investigators found the audio on his recorder was off while taping the incident because Fetz didnt use the microphone provided. LPD spokesman Sgt. Gary Gross said Fetz was notified of his suspension Wednesday. Videotape of the brashaking incident ignited public outrage. From staff and wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Zimmermans wife conflicted Associated PressMIAMI Shellie Zimmerman said Thursday that she hasnt been able to find her estranged husband to serve him divorce papers and that she doesnt know what hes capable of because he has changed since he was acquitted in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. Shellie Zimmerman said on NBCs Today Show on Thursday that she is conflicted over her George Zimmermans assertion that he killed the 17-year-old Martin in selfdefense. But she said she believes the evidence and respects the jurys verdict. Martin, who was unarmed, was fatally shot in February 2012 after getting into a scuffle with Zimmerman as he walked home from a convenience store in Sanford, Fla. Shellie Zimmerman later pleaded guilty to perjury for lying about the couples finances after her husbands arrest. She was sentenced to probation and community service. After standing by him, he kind of left and I guess kind of went on a victory tour without me, Shellie Zimmerman said. I thought I was living a life with him and that we were going to kind of rebuild after all this, and he had other plans for me. Zimmerman told Lauer she doesnt believe her believe her husband profiled Martin, who was black. However, she said she now doubts his innocence on the self-defense claim. Shellie Zimmerman, 26, also said she stands by her account of a Sept. 9 altercation with her husband at the house they shared in Lake Mary. She told a 911 dispatcher that her husband was threatening her with a gun. The dispute took place just days after she filed for divorce. Shellie Zimmerman, her father and a friend were removing items from the home when her husband showed up and began taking photos. I didnt see a gun, but I know my husband, she said. I saw him in a stance and a look in his eyes that Ive never seen before. His shirt was halfway unbuttoned and he was putting his hand in his shirt and saying, Please step closer, please step closer. So I think that just logically I assumed he had a gun on him. She added later: This person that Im married to and that Im divorcing, I kind of realize now that I dont know him and I really dont know what hes capable of. George Zimmerman hasnt stayed at the home since then, and his whereabouts are unknown even to his wife and her attorney. No charges were filed in that dispute, though deputies are still trying to retrieve footage of what happened from an iPad smashed by George Zimmerman during the argument. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleRe-enactors Steven Creamer of Inverness, left, and Harvard and Laney Burney of Fanning Springs speak Thursday morning while the new Seminole heritage display is unveiled at Fort Cooper State Park. NANCYKENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS It took a village. Thats what longtime Friends of Fort Cooper member and Seminole re-enactor Kate Hughes said Thursday at the unveiling of the Seminole in the Cove of the Withlacoochee information kiosk at Fort Cooper State Park. Hughes was one of a handful of costumed Seminole re-enactors, a dozen or so uniformed Friends of Fort Cooper, park staff and local officials who met for the debut of the first of four kiosks that will make up the Seminole Heritage Trail, beginning at the park and ending at Fort Cooper. Weve been working for over three years on this project to install a trail through the park that will tell the history of what happened in this area known as the Cove of the Withlacoochee, she said. The first and second (future) panels, with artwork done by renowned Seminole artist Guy LaBree, focus on the early Seminoles and their migration from Georgia and Alabama to Florida. Kiosk 3 will be about the battles that happened, more war-oriented, Hughes said. She added that a significant fact of Seminole history is that they are the only unconquered Indian tribe. The 200 that made it down to the Everglades never signed a treaty, she said. So, this story goes beyond just being a story about the Indians. JulieAnne Tabone, park programs development specialist, said the kiosk project took so many months to complete because of the vast wealth of information they sifted through. Its a big, robust and rich story to tell, she said, and the challenge is finding ways to paint a picture and engage people, tell enough of the story to make it complete, yet take them beyond the exhibit to want to continue learning. ... For us in the park service, we want it to be accessible and compelling and something that will be here for a long, long time, and that takes a lot of hard work by a lot of people. Park Manager Harry Mitchell said this is a great addition to the park, and his hope is that school groups will come to the park and use the trail as a learning tool. Before now, learning opportunities have been limited to events like Fort Cooper Days. Now the Seminole story is available 365 days a year, sun up to sun down. On Oct. 5, the public is invited to Step Into Time visit the park on Old Floral City Road from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., see the kiosk, sample Seminole pumpkin fry bread, interact with living historians and re-enactors, hear stories and meet artist Guy LaBree, who has been nominated by the Friends of Fort Cooper for the 2013 Florida Folk Heritage Award. For information, call the Fort Cooper State Park office at 352726-0315. Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy at 352-5642927 or nkennedy@chronicle online.com History unveiled at Fort Cooper First of four Seminole Heritage Trail information kiosks completed Shellie Zimmerman After standing by him, he kind of left and I guess went on a victory tour without me.Shellie Zimmermanhusband was acquitted in the Trayvon Martin shooting. Mother of drowned Haitian migrant seeks answers Associated PressMIAMI The mother of a young woman who drowned while being smuggled by boat to Florida wants answers about her daughters death. Simone Jeanty said Thursday she wants justice for her daughter and is asking local and federal officials to investigate. Judith Valentin was one of 10 people who paid to be smuggled from Haiti, through the Bahamas, to Florida on Aug. 28. She was hoping to be reunited with her fianc, her mother said. Nine people made it to shore in Palm Beach and were immediately detained by federal authorities. Valentins body washed ashore around the same time. Jeanty arrived in South Florida Monday on a humanitarian visa to attend her daughters funeral. She said the family has heard that some of the migrants claimed Valentin was raped and thrown overboard. My beautiful baby died. No one can tell me what happened to her. She was a human being ... a human being, she told reporters through tears. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Nestor Yglesias said the investigation into the smuggling is ongoing but that ICE could not immediately say whether the other individuals on the boat remain in custody or are even still in the country. ChronicleFor the past 60 years, Marion Countys KP Hole Park has been the launch point of summertime memories for generations of area residents and visitors. From tubing and swimming to snorkeling and boating, enjoying the pristine water and shores of the Rainbow River has started at the sundeck, swimming area or boat ramp of KP Hole Park. Marion County Parks and Recreation will mark KP Holes 60th anniversary with a Diamond Jubilee celebration from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday at the park at 9435 S.W. 190th Avenue Road. Visitors will enjoy free admission to the park, free pizza, live entertainment, face-painting, giveaways and more while supplies last. Established as a boys retreat in the early 1920s, KP Hole Park was acquired by Marion County and designated as a public recreation area in 1953. Today, KP Hole Park offers swimming, tubing, scuba diving, boating, kayaking, canoeing and paddle boarding to thousands of visitors. To learn more about this event and KP Hole Park facilities, contact Marion County Parks and Recreation at 352671-8560 or email gina.peebles@marion countyfl.org. KP Hole Park party scheduled Saturday Associated PressSimone Jeanty, from Haiti, sits in front of a photo of her daughter Judith Valentin Thursday during a news conferencein Miami, asking for an investigation into her daughter's drowning death.

PAGE 4

Birthday Follow your heart and dont be afraid to do things differently in the year ahead. Expect to face obstacles, and prepare to make life-altering choices. Stabilize your position while the trends favor you. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Dont fold under pressure. Youll get the most out of your day and avoid complaints if you try to do the best job possible. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Youll have a clear picture of what you want to see unfold today. Rely on your intuition and your keen eye to guide you through any uncertainties you face. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Cast your fate to the wind. Pursue an adventure that will take your mind off your worries. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Its not a good time to second-guess yourself. Decide what needs to be done and do it. Its the time for action, not talking. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Youll see the need to bring about change, but it may not be as easy you think. Additional responsibilities will become apparent and must be dealt with first. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Plan a celebration. Delve into a creative interest or spend time with children or loved ones. Aries (March 21-April 19) Do what you can on your own in a work involvement. Avoid depending on others, and youll be free of disappointment. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Its a good day to spend time with friends or people who inspire and motivate you. An interesting proposal will come from an unusual source. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Revisit old ideas and peers, and you will gain insight into an opportunity. With a bit of fine-tuning, you can get your place in good shape and host an event. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Take some time out; pampering will do you good and give you a chance to let some information sink in, allowing you to make the most opportune choice. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Stay on top of whats happening at home and at work. Your reputation must be protected, and your decisions must be based on accurate information. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Play the game strategically. Whether you are involved in a personal or professional situation that requires hands-on input, you must be cautious, attentive and well-informed. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Friday, Sept. 27, the 270th day of 2013. There are 95 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Sept. 27, 1991, President George H.W. Bush announced in a nationally broadcast address that he was eliminating all U.S. battlefield nuclear weapons and called on the Soviet Union to match the gesture. On this date: In 1540, Pope Paul III issued a papal bull establishing the Society of Jesus, or Jesuits, as a religious order. In 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surrendered after weeks of resistance to invading forces from Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union during World War II. In 1964, the government publicly released the report of the Warren Commission, which found that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin urged Iran and North Korea to abandon suspected nuclear-weapons programs but disagreed over how to deal with both countries; Putin also declined to pledge any postwar help for Iraq. Five years ago: China marked its first spacewalk as astronaut Zhai Zhigang floated outside the Shenzhou 7 for 13 minutes. One year ago: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, holding a diagram of a cartoon-like bomb, told the U.N. General Assembly that the world had only a matter of months to stop Iran before it could build a nuclear bomb. Todays Birthdays: Actor Wilford Brimley is 79. Singer-musician Randy Bachman (Bachman-Turner Overdrive) is 70. Rock singer Meat Loaf is 66. Actress Gwyneth Paltrow is 41. Singer Avril Lavigne is 29. Thought for Today: Life is like a coin. You can spend it any way you wish, but you only spend it once. Lillian Dickson, American missionary (1901-1983).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 84 72 1.00 HI LO PR 89 73 0.10 HI LO PR 85 73 1.50 HI LO PR 88 74 0.00 HI LO PR 87 71 0.00 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly cloudy, stray shower, rain chance 10%THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly cloudy, stray shower, rain chance 10% Partly cloudy, isolated showers, rain chance 20%High: 90 Low: 65 High: 89 Low: 65 High: 90 Low: 66TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Thursday 89/73 Record 95/55 Normal 89/67 Mean temp. 81 Departure from mean +3 PRECIPITATION* Thursday 0.10 in. Total for the month 9.25 in. Total for the year 50.26 in. Normal for the year 44.13 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 9 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Thursday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in. DEW POINT Thursday at 3 p.m. 67 HUMIDITY Thursday at 3 p.m. 52% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Thursday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:20 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:22 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY .........................12:42 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................2:33 P.M. OCT. 4OCT. 11OCT. 18OCT. 26 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 85 74 ts Ft. Lauderdale 87 75 pc Fort Myers 90 71 pc Gainesville 84 65 pc Homestead 88 73 pc Jacksonville 82 68 ts Key West 88 79 sh Lakeland 88 67 pc Melbourne 85 76 ts City H L Fcast Miami 88 75 pc Ocala 86 67 pc Orlando 88 71 ts Pensacola 85 66 s Sarasota 90 70 pc Tallahassee 86 62 s Tampa 88 71 pc Vero Beach 86 74 pc W. Palm Bch. 87 75 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNortheast winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy skies today. Gulf water temperature82 LAKE LEVELSLocation Wed. Thu. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 30.22 30.20 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.38 38.40 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.88 39.90 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.67 40.68 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H L L L L 90/73 79/61 66/39 86/62 84/66 78/61 73/57 86/67 55/39 59/56 73/55 73/58 79/58 88/75 92/76 76/56 THE NATION Albany 66 46 s 71 48 Albuquerque 82 55 pc 74 46 Asheville 72 57 s 72 51 Atlanta 67 62 .36 s 79 58 Atlantic City 73 49 pc 71 59 Austin 91 61 pc 91 75 Baltimore 74 53 pc 74 51 Billings 49 38 .29 sh 55 39 Birmingham 84 66 s 81 58 Boise 59 44 .14 pc 60 40 Boston 63 55 pc 66 51 Buffalo 71 45 s 71 53 Burlington, VT 64 39 s 71 46 Charleston, SC 75 65 2.30 s 80 62 Charleston, WV 77 61 s 78 53 Charlotte 78 59 s 77 56 Chicago 75 50 s 79 61 Cincinnati 79 45 .01 s 80 53 Cleveland 72 46 s 73 54 Columbia, SC 81 64 s 81 56 Columbus, OH 81 52 s 80 54 Concord, N.H. 70 45 pc 71 43 Dallas 95 67 s 90 73 Denver 68 45 sh 66 39 Des Moines 85 61 pc 87 67 Detroit 75 49 s 73 58 El Paso 88 68 pc 86 62 Evansville, IN 84 59 s 83 58 Harrisburg 76 47 pc 74 48 Hartford 67 55 pc 72 47 Houston 92 68 s 92 76 Indianapolis 80 52 s 80 57 Jackson 87 60 s 89 63 Las Vegas 74 60 s 76 57 Little Rock 87 61 s 88 68 Los Angeles 74 62 s 78 61 Louisville 81 58 s 83 60 Memphis 88 68 s 86 67 Milwaukee 71 50 s 72 61 Minneapolis 82 56 pc 84 66 Mobile 90 69 pc 87 64 Montgomery 85 68 s 83 59 Nashville 82 64 s 84 59 New Orleans 87 69 s 90 75 New York City 71 58 pc 73 55 Norfolk 75 60 s 73 59 Oklahoma City 93 63 pc 87 68 Omaha 88 63 pc 86 61 Palm Springs 83 62 s 86 63 Philadelphia 73 55 pc 75 54 Phoenix 97 72 s 89 65 Pittsburgh 76 48 s 72 53 Portland, ME 66 44 pc 70 49 Portland, Ore 67 48 sh 62 54 Providence, R.I. 66 54 pc 69 49 Raleigh 77 57 s 75 54 Rapid City 67 48 sh 49 41 Reno 54 38 s 66 43 Rochester, NY 70 43 s 70 51 Sacramento 77 53 s 78 56 St. Louis 85 62 s 85 66 St. Ste. Marie 72 43 s 73 51 Salt Lake City 58 48 .01 sh 55 43 San Antonio 94 70 pc 91 75 San Diego 71 64 s 78 61 San Francisco 71 53 s 76 57 Savannah 73 66 .03 s 81 63 Seattle 63 46 sh 59 56 Spokane 62 42 c 60 44 Syracuse 71 44 s 72 48 Topeka 90 60 s 88 65 Washington 77 59 pc 76 56YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 98 Laredo, Texas LOW 25 Truckee, Calif. FRIDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 87/75/ts Amsterdam 64/43/s Athens 85/66/s Beijing 76/62/pc Berlin 60/40/pc Bermuda 78/73/ts Cairo 89/67/s Calgary 57/34/pc Havana 83/74/ts Hong Kong 81/73/pc Jerusalem 78/60/s Lisbon 74/65/sh London 65/51/pc Madrid 82/63/pc Mexico City 75/55/ts Montreal 72/50/pc Moscow 40/35/c Paris 73/55/pc Rio 70/59/pc Rome 74/63/s Sydney 73/56/s Tokyo 71/61/pc Toronto 68/54/s Warsaw 53/40/c WORLD CITIES Thursday Friday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Thursday Friday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Friday SaturdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 12:02 a/6:50 a 11:04 a/8:23 p 1:21 a/8:08 a 12:29 p/9:43 p Crystal River** 9:25 a/4:12 a 11:42 p/5:45 p 10:50 a/5:30 a /7:05 p Withlacoochee* 7:12 a/2:00 a 9:29 p/3:33 p 8:37 a/3:18 a 10:41 p/4:53 p Homosassa*** 10:14 a/5:49 a /7:22 p 12:31 a/7:07 a 11:39 a/8:42 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 9/27 FRIDAY 12:19 6:32 12:43 6:55 9/28 SATURDAY 1:05 7:17 1:28 7:40 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. FRIDAY HI LO PR 85 74 0.90 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Ragweed, nettle, grass Todays count: 7.4/12 Saturdays count: 8.1 Sundays count: 8.1 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Amber Tamblyn shakes up season 11 of CBS MenNEW YORK Amber Tamblyn plays Charlie Harpers previously unknown daughter, Jenny, on the 11th season of CBS Two and a Half Men, premiering Thursday night. Jenny and her father (who was played by Charlie Sheen) have something in common: a love for women. Shes a hardpartying bisexual. Tamblyn, whose TV credits include the dramas General Hospital, Joan of Arcadia and House M.D., said she wasnt sure if she was interested in joining Two and a Half Men. She said her agent told her, Well, hang on. Its a genius role. ... Shes very into alcohol and women. Tamblyn, who has yet to see an episode of the show, said shes amazed by its bawdy, sexual humor. It is very fun to play, the 30year-old actress said of her character. I am shocked at what they get away with on the show. Its kind of incredible.Maya Angelou, Junot Diaz to receive Mailer prizesNEW YORK Maya Angelou is receiving another honorary prize for writing. The Norman Mailer Center and Writers Colony announced Thursday that Angelou will be given a lifetime achievement award at a benefit gala Oct. 17. Earlier this month, the National Book Foundation announced that the 85-year-old Angelou would be given an honorary National Book Award, her first major literary prize. The Mailer Center will also give a distinguished writing prize to Junot Diaz and an award for the best emerging journalist to the late Michael Hastings. Hastings was killed in an auto accident in June at age 33.Brandt felt sick shooting last of Breaking BadNEW YORK Betsy Brandt says the intensity of the final Breaking Bad episodes physically affected her. There were days shooting these last eight episodes especially I just felt sick. My chest would get all tight and I just felt awful, she said. Brandt plays Marie Schrader, sister-in-law to chemistry teacher turned drug lord Walter White ( Bryan Cranston) on the show, which airs its series finale this Sunday on AMC at 9 p.m. In an interview Wednesday she said she did a lot of crying, too. After wed get a take then Id just sort of start sobbing because you gotta get it out before you go home, she said. The actress says the weightiness of Breaking Bad had a lot to do with her decision to take on the comedy The Michael J. Fox show as her next role. She plays Annie Henry, wife of Foxs character in the series that premieres Thursday at 9 p.m.Detroit-area law firm files suit against Four TopsPONTIAC, Mich. A Detroitarea law firm has filed suit against the Four Tops, claiming the singing group owes it $109,000 in legal fees. Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton filed the lawsuit in Oakland County Circuit Court. According to The Detroit News, the Southfield firm says it has provided legal services on behalf of the Four Tops, but the group failed to pay an outstanding balance of $109,156.73. Four Tops spokesman Matt Lee had no comment. The group was a key member of the Motown Records family of artists during the Detroit labels 1960s heyday. Abdul Duke Fakir is the only original member still with the group. Hes named in the suit. From wire reports Associated PressStreet graffiti artist Jason Howarth, aka Camden Care, applies finishing touches Thursday to an Amy Winehouse mural in London in aid of the Amy Winehouse Foundation. A4FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 000FUY8 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C13 Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices . . . . . . . . . C13 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . . . . . . C13 Self Storage Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C13

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 A5 000G73T

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criminal fines. From steering assemblies to seat belts, the price-fixing conspiracies went on for more than a decade and affected more than $5 billion in auto parts sold to U.S. car manufacturers and installed in cars sold in the United States and elsewhere. In all, more than 25 million cars purchased by American consumers have been affected by the illegal conduct. As a result of these conspiracies, Americans paid more for their cars, Attorney General Eric Holder told a news conference. Holder said American companies such as Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. were affected, as were U.S. subsidiaries of Honda Motor Co., Mazda Motor Corp., Mitsubishi, Nissan Motor Co., Subaru and Toyota Motor Corp. The government will continue to check every hood and kick every tire to end the price fixing, said Holder. Company executives used code names and met face to face in remote locations in the U.S. and Japan to rig bids, fix prices and allocate the supply of auto parts, the government alleged. Seventeen of the 21 executives charged so far have been sentenced to serve prison terms in the U.S. or have plea agreements calling for significant time behind bars. The companies charged Thursday are Hitachi Automotive Systems; Mitsubishi Electric and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries; Mitsuba; Jtekt; NSK; T.RAD; Valeo Japan and Yamashita Rubber. Associated PressWASHINGTON Nine Japanese auto parts manufacturers and two of their executives will plead guilty and pay $740 million in criminal fines for conspiring to fix the prices of more than 30 products sold to many of the worlds largest automakersoperating in the U.S., the Justice Department announced Thursday. The action is the latest development in the largest criminal investigation the Justice Departments criminal division has ever carried out. To date, it has resulted in charges against 20 companies and 21 executives, and the companies have agreed to pay $1.6 billion in Robert Bob Norton, 77INVERNESSRobert E. Bob Norton 77, Inverness, Fla., passed away Sept. 25, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital. A native of Jacksonville, he was born Dec. 15, 1935, an only child, to the late Loren and Chrissie (Jones) Norton and moved to this area in 1978 from Orlando. He spent his life in the automobile industry and was formerly the owner-operator of Norton Chevrolet. Bob was a member of Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church and active in the Chuck Colsen Prison Fellowship for many years. He received the fellowships Volunteer of the Year Award. Left to mourn his loss is his wife of 54 years, Mary Ann Norton; three daughters, Angela Blasl, Inverness, Robin (James) Martone, Inverness, Beth (Jim) Dennis, Orlando; five grandchildren, Kristopher, Nicholas, Lena Rose, Brooke, and Max. Bobs life will be celebrated at the Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept 28, 2013, with the Rev. Brandon Lauranzon officiating. Interment will be private in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Inverness. The family will receive friends from 10 a.m., until the hour of service in the church. In lieu of flowers, memorials requested to the Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church Deacons Fund. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is assisting the family. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Patricia Curry, 65HERNANDOPatricia Alliene Curry, 65, of Hernando, Fla., formerly of Largo, passed away Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013. She was born March 24, 1948, in Ponce de Leon, Fla., the daughter of Kern Curry and Estelle Curry. She frequently volunteered at community centers. Pat also loved spending time with her family and shopping and baking with her granddaughter. She was preceded in death by her parents; her son, Michael Preston Stevens; and her brother, Gene Curry. Survived by a son, Dana Stevens; a granddaughter, Emily Stevens; and eight siblings, Mattie Lou Surber, Charlene Young, Ruth Capps, Hubert Curry, Roy Curry, Joyce Jordan, Levida Towson, and Charles Curry. A private family service will be Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, at Woodlawn Memory Gardens in St. Petersburg. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Warren Aamodt, 77CRYSTAL RIVERWarren Frederick Aamodt, 77, of Crystal River, Fla., passed away Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, at his home in Crystal River. He was born Nov. 6, 1935, in St. Paul, Minn., to Clarence and Frances (Rabel) Aamodt. He came here 20 years ago from St. Paul. He was of the Lutheran faith and a member of Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club in Crystal River. He is survived by his loving wife of 58 years, Darleen Aamodt of Crystal River; a son, Dean Aamodt (Jeanne) of St. Paul, Minn.; two daughters, Kim Duethman (Mike) and Lynn Rohrbacher (Craig) all of St. Paul, Minn.; two brothers, Richard Aamodt (Sally) and Gerald Aamodt (Adelaide) all of St. Paul, Minn.; and seven grandchildren. A celebration of life will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, at the Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club in Crystal River. Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory Crystal River, assisted the family with arrangements. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.A6FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Get your tickets at the following locationsSaturday, October 12, 2013 VIP Preview 5-6pm Event 6-9pm Citrus Ave. Crystal River 563-2572 Hwy 44 Inverness 341-4867 Citrus Ave. Crystal River 563-2582 NE 4th St. Crystal River 794-3859 Highland Blvd. Inverness 726-4709 Hwy 19. Crystal River 795-5131 Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River 563-6363 www.chronicleonline.com\divanightFor more information call 352-563-5592 VIP Tickets (limited availability) $42 General Admission $20 000G2M5 000G2M5 Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000FX8G 000FXJL AUDIOLOGY Crystal River Inverness Call For A Free Consultation (352) 795-5700 Our Patients Are Super Hearos Conquer Your Hearing Loss! 000FXJH Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000FYSCFuneral HomeWith Crematory 726-8323 DONALD HARRISON Service: Fri. 11:00 AM Chapel JAMES M. HUNTER Memorial Service: Sun. 3:00 PM American Legion Post #155 ROBERT NORTON Service: Sat. 11:00 AM Seven Rivers Presbyterian LUCY DRURY Arrangements Pending JAMES BROOKS Arrangements Pending www.superioralf.com 4865 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto 352.746.5483 000G4CG Assisted Living Facility License # 12256 22% of seniors over the age of 70 suffer from memory loss. YOU ARE NOT ALONE WE ARE HERE TO HELP. 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000FWQJ Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 2013 2013 2013 2013 Obituaries Robert Norton Patricia Curry OBITUARIES Chronicle policy permits free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of the arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Obituaries will be posted online at www. chronicleonline.com. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. Email obits@ chronicleonline.com, fax 352-563-3280 or call 352-563-5660 for details. All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated Press style unless a request to the contrary is made. Auto parts makers to admit price fixing Associated PressFELLSMERE, Fla. Forget peanuts. In the heart of Floridas citrus grove region, its the oranges elephants are after. At the newly opened National Elephant Center in Fellsmere, Fla., the pachyderms have discovered how to pluck the fruit from the trees with their trunks and pop it into their mouths. Fresh Valencia oranges are not the only thing that makes the 200-acre center unique. It is also the only such site operated by the U.S. zoo community to house displaced elephants. The center is open to two categories of the mammoth mammals: those sent for a limited stay by zoos that need to temporarily free up space for renovations or breeding; and elephants that need a permanent home when their previous institutional or private owners can no longer care for them. The centers primary goal is to ensure the elephants long-term survival. The animal is listed as endangered, or at high risk of extinction, in Asia, and vulnerable in Africa. Theres an estimate that maybe 10 percent of the entire African elephant population was poached for ivory last year, John Lehnhardt said. Give that 10 or 15 years, and there may be nothing left. Currently residing at the center are four African elephants whose permanent home is Disneys Animal Kingdom, located about an hour north of the refuge. Moyo, a 32-year-old female with only one tusk, was the first to discover and appreciate the oranges. She is accompanied by her calves, 10-year-old Tufani and 5-year-old Tsavo; and Thandi, a 33year-old female. Lehnhardt, who has worked with elephants for four decades, says he hopes eventually to take advantage of the sites full 225 acres. The land was leased in September 2011 from a private citrus grove for 40 years at $1 a year. That allows for the bulk of funding, which comes mostly from roughly 70 zoos, to cover construction costs estimated at least $2.4 million, and operating costs that reach about $50,000 a month. Most of the operating expenses pay for supplemental food for the elephants, although the property provides roughly 100 different varieties of plants. Associated PressA young elephant makes its way through the remains of an old citrus farm Sept. 4 near Fellsmere, Fla. Four African elephants are now living on 200 acres in the heart of Floridas citrus grove region in the newly opened National Elephant Center. In Fellsmere, four elephants call former citrus farm home

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Associated PressMIAMI Federal wildlife officials alarmed by an infestation of Burmese pythons in the Florida Everglades have tried radio tracking devices, a massive public hunt and even snake-sniffing dogs to control the invasive species. Now theres talk of snaring the elusive pythons in specially designed traps. The U.S. Department of Agriculture received a patent in August for a trap that resembles a long, thin cage with a net at one end for the live capture of large, heavy snakes. Researchers say Burmese pythons regard the Everglades as an all-you-can-eat buffet, where native mammals are easy prey and the snakes have no natural predators. The population of Burmese pythons, which are native to India and other parts of Asia, likely developed from pets released into the wild, either intentionally or in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Wildlife officials are racing to control the python population before it undermines ongoing efforts to restore natural water flow through the Everglades. According to a study released last year, mammal sightings in the Everglades are down sharply in areas where pythons are known to live. The Gainesville field station for the National Wildlife Research Center, which falls under the USDA, is preparing to test the trap in a natural enclosure that contains five pythons. Over the coming months, the researchers will try baiting the traps with the scent of small mammals such as rats, and they will try camouflaging them as pipes or other small, covered spaces where pythons like to hide, said John Humphrey, a biologist at the research center. Future tests may use python pheromones as bait. Theres still more to be learned, theres still more to be tested, Humphrey said. This is just one of your tools that you have to put together with other things to get the problem solved. The trap was developed to catch exotic snakes without ensnaring smaller, lighter native species, Humphrey said. The 5-foot-long trap is made from galvanized steel wire with a tightly woven net secured to one end. Two separate triggers need to be tripped simultaneously for it to close, which should keep it from snapping shut on such native snakes as the eastern diamondback rattlesnake or the water moccasin. The largest native snakes are generally somewhat smaller than the youngest of the pythons, Humphrey said. That was the impetus of the design. The longest python ever caught in Florida was an 18-foot-8-inch specimen found in May beside a rural Miami-Dade County road. Humphrey developed the trap in collaboration with Wisconsin-based Tomahawk Live Trap, which is working on a licensing agreement to sell the traps along with other snake-handling equipment such as tongs, hooks and secure bags. We dont expect to sell a lot of them; its not an everybody thing, not like a chipmunk or a squirrel trap, said co-owner Jenny Smith. Its not clear where exactly the traps would be deployed, or whether they would be effective in an area as vast as Floridas Everglades. Everglades National Park alone encompasses 1.5 million acres, and all but roughly a hundred thousand acres of that is largely inaccessible swampland and sawgrass, vital breeding grounds for a variety of protected species. It might not make sense, or even be possible, to place and monitor traps in hard-to-reach swamplands, said park spokeswoman Linda Friar. Traps have been used in the park to collect pythons for research but not for population control, Friar said. Most of the state and federal efforts aimed at pythons have focused on learning how the elusive snakes have adapted so well in the wild, and that learning process continues, she said. Theyre so difficult to track and find, Friar said. What we do know is theyve adapted. We dont know how many there are. One of the challenges facing wildlife officials is that the tan, splotchy snakes are incredibly difficult to spot in the wild, even for seasoned hunters. Researchers say theyll fail to see a python theyre tracking with a radio tracking device until theyre practically standing on it. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission allows hunters with special permits to remove pythons and other exotic reptiles from some state lands. Earlier this year, a statesanctioned hunt that attracted worldwide media attention. Roughly 1,600 amateur python hunters joined the permit holders for a month, netting a total of 68 snakes. In an Auburn University experiment, specially trained dogs found more pythons than their human counterparts, but researchers also found that the dogs, much like humans, would falter the longer they worked in South Floridas often oppressive humidity. State wildlife officials also try to catch pythons through exotic pet amnesty days where people can relinquish non-native species with no questions asked. They also urge residents to report encounters with pythons and other invasive species to a hotline, www. IVEGOT1.org. Florida prohibits the possession or sale of pythons for use as pets, and federal law bans the importation and interstate sale of the species. A prolonged cold snap has proven to be one of the better methods of python population control, killing off large numbers of the snakes in 2010. The population rebounded, though, because low temperatures arent reliable in subtropical South Florida and because pythons reproduce quickly and in large numbers. Other traps set for pythons in the past havent been effective, but traps have been successfully used to capture other exotic species such as blackand-white tegu lizards, said conservation commission spokeswoman Carli Segelson. It may be something that if it doesnt work for the python, it may work for other species, she said.STATECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 A7 000G6DY Are Moles and Gophers Killing Your Lawn? WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES GUARANTEED! Call today for a free lawn analysis. The Gopher & Mole Patrol 352-279-9444 000FZLX TEXT . CITRUS + Your Tip to 274637 (CRIMES) CLICK . www.CrimeStoppersCitrus.com CALL . 1-888-ANY-TIPS (1-888-269-8477) Funded by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund of Citrus County, Inc. YOU COULD RECEIVE A REWARD UP TO $ 1,000 000G3BU Policies set by local retailer, See store for details. Excludes delivery and set up fees. Other charges may apply. Offer does not apply to Serta Motion PerfectAdjustable Foundations, iComfort Pillows and other iComfort accessories. Void in the state of Tennessee. Model Close-Outs & Assorted Floor ModelsON SALE NOW! 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Unit A (Hwy. 486) Hernando344-8882 LAKE MOHAVE PLUSH EPTFull Set $499DOWNEY PLUSHFull Set $599CHAMPIONS GATE PTTwin Set$439Queen Set$599Full Set$499King Set$799FLORENCE/ FARMINGTON PLUSHTwin Set$379Queen Set$549Full Set$449King Set$749VENICE PT/ HANNAH PTTwin Set$299Queen Set$399Full Set$349King Set$599ANDORA/ ABBOTTTwin Set$249Queen Set$349Full Set$299King Set$529 CLOSEOUT CLOSEOUT SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE SPECIAL SALE CENTRAL FALLS CLASSICTwin Set$569Queen Set$699Full Set$659King Set$949Queen Set$999King Set$1299 NEWHAVEN COURT GEL PLUSH EPT www.WholesalesleepCenter.com Professional Hearing Centers www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR (4327) 000FYU4 HEAR BETTER NOW, GUARANTEED! 4 Year Warranty FREE Batteries 4 Life Associated PressA python is caught in a test trap Nov. 18, 2011, at the USDA Wildlife Services research facility in Gainesville, Fla. USDA to test new trap to catch Everglades pythons

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Special to the ChronicleSeptember is National Yoga Month, and to celebrate, the public is invited to participate in two free classes starting at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, at Liberty Park in Inverness. The classes will be led by Lace Blue-McLean, owner of Inverness Yoga & Wellness Center in Inverness. Stay for one or both classes. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat if you have one. A limited number of mats will be made available as well. For information, call 352-201-0149 or visit www.yogawithlace.com. What is yoga? On any given week you will find folks from all walks of life retirees, professionals, parents, students, athletes, even people who may be recovering from injury or surgery coming to the mat because of yogas health benefits tothe body, mind and spirit. A typical yoga class is 1.5 hours, which allows for students to feel the full benefit of a centering exercise practice that promotes flexibility, strength and stress release. In our modern society, think of how much time we spend sitting in a prone position at work, in class, TV watching, commuting, playing video games, etc. Over time, this repetitive pattern compromises our bodies health. The natural curves of our spine become compressed and stiff, our shoulders slump. Our breathing capacity becomes lessened as we hunker down in our chairs forgetting to breathe (think shallow breathing). Our internal organs become stagnant and compressed in this position as well, over time potentially impacting their proper functioning. Yoga poses bring bodies through their natural range of motion, encouraging spines to flex, bend and lengthen lubricating vertebrae and contributing to a healthy spine and skeletal system. Muscles are strengthened by use and contraction of body weight. We coordinate our movements with deep breaths to enhance the flow of oxygen to our muscles which at the same time naturally activates the bodys calming response. The practice and meaning of yoga is union, the bringing together of our body, mind and spirit by cultivating steadiness and ease in our movements. When we practice yoga we are simultaneously building muscular strength and flexibility, while at the same time encouraging calming and mindfulness in breathing. Domestic battery arrest William Weigelt, 63, of Crystal River, at 10:03 a.m. Sept. 25 on misdemeanor charges of domestic battery and resisting an officer without violence. Bond $1,000.Other arrests Harry Shears, 50, of South Coleman Avenue, Homosassa, at 6:45 p.m. Sept. 25 on an active warrant for knowingly driving while license suspended or revoked (third offense), and driving while intoxicated. According to the arrest affidavit, Shears turned himself into to authorities. Bond $3,000. Kimberly Clement, 42, of West Foxhill Lane, Homosassa, at 7:27 p.m. Sept. 25 on misdemeanor charges of resisting an officer without violence, and trespassing in a structure after warning. According to her arrest affidavit, Clement is accused of entering her neighbors home without permission, then passing out on the couch. She refused to leave when a deputy advised her to do so, and failed to obey his commands. Bond $500. Kourtenay Woerth, 23, of North Cherry Lake Drive, Dunnellon, at 1:42 p.m. Sept. 25 on a misdemeanor charge of retail petit theft. According to his arrest affidavit, Woerth is accused of shoplifting a pair of Puma sneakers, valued at $65, from the Bealls in Crystal River. Woerth was arrested with his brother Dakota Mosher for the same offense. Bond $250. Dakota Mosher, 19, of North Cherry Lake Drive, Dunnellon, at 1:42 p.m. Sept. 25 on a misdemeanor charge of retail petit theft. According to his arrest affidavit, Mosher, along with his brother Kourtenay Woerth, are accused of shoplifting a pair of Puma sneakers, valued at $65, from the Bealls in Crystal River. Mosher wore the shoes as he exited the store. Bond $250. Rebecca Bilby, 31, of North Conant Avenue, Crystal River, at 11:51 a.m. Sept. 25 on an active Lake County warrant for seven counts of practicing nursing without a license and uttering a forged instrument. Bond was denied. Joseph Brooks, 53, of North Nasturtiums Terrace, Dunnellon, at 10:46 a.m. Sept. 24 on felony charges of trafficking in stolen property, and grand theft. According to his arrest affidavit, Brooks is accused of stealing furniture, a flatscreen television, and a washer and dryer, valued at $8,000, from a residence on Hofstra Street in Inverness. He went on to sell the television set on Craigslist for $500. Bond $7,000. Gregory Schoonmaker, 43, of South Barbour Street, Beverly Hills, at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 24 on an active warrant for a felony charge of driving while license was suspended or revoked as a habitual offender, and a misdemeanor charge of resisting an officer without violence. He was already incarcerated at the Citrus County Detention Center. Bond $2,500. Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglary A vehicle burglary was reported at 11:18 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, in the 3700 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.Thefts A petit theft was reported at 9:33 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, in the 2300 block of S. Sandburg Point, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 12:43 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 1900 block of N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. A petit theft was reported at 1:31 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 200 block of E. Highland Blvd., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 2:01 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 3:31 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 10700 block of N. Violet Terrace, Dunnellon. A grand theft was reported at 4:46 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 700 block of S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto. A larceny petit theft was reported at 6:26 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 1900 block of N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. A petit theft was reported at 9:15 p.m. Sept. 24 in the 3700 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.A8FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL ADVERTISING For information about how your business can advertise on this page please call 352-563-5592. ADVERTISING For information about how your business can advertise on this page please call 352-563-5592. LICENSED & INSURED 000G2JI www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net FLOORING WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER 685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowes on Hwy. 44) Lecanto 341-0813 MON-FRI 8:30-5 SAT 9-4 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT Visit Us RJ RJ ROOFING ROOFING Toll Free 888-726-7006 rjroofinginc@yahoo.com Citrus County 352-726-7006 Marion County 352-622-7006 FAX 352-726-7031 000G2JF Authorized Installer CCC1327264 INC HI2378 ROOFING GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. 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expected to finalize the bidder Monday. They must also decide whether to sell or lease the hospital, and attorneys are expected to prepare by Monday the advantages and disadvantages of either sale or lease. In supporting HCA, trustees rejected both Health Management Associates (HMA) and Tampa General Hospital. Trustees said they feared HMA, which owns Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River and proposed a joint venture with the hospitals, would put patients and employees at a disadvantage by killing health care competition in Citrus County. And they were disinterested in Tampa Generals proposal for a lease merger that offered no cash up front. Tampa General is a poor choice, trustee Dr. Mark Fallows said. Theyve never done this before. They dont seem to know what theyre doing. The two boards have set an Oct. 1 deadline to select a bidder to sign a letter of intent. Closing on a final contract would still be about six months away.Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicleonline .com. We need to take a deep breath and back down a notch, said Nugent. I think we agree something needed to be done about the subsidy, but its hard to do cold turkey. People who have homes might not be able to sell them or scale back, while people who want to purchase or move to a nicer home could be precluded; we need to be responsive to mitigating that. Thursday afternoon, Nugent said they were finishing up the bill and working with Florida and Louisiana representatives. He said Florida has always been a donor state in the program, putting in more than it has taken out. There are 2,848 properties in Citrus County carrying federally subsidized flood insurance. Overall, there are more than 7,000 properties in the county participating in the national program. Effective Tuesday, subsides and discounts are being phased out, continuing a process started in July 2012. As of Oct. 1, several property categories face 25 percent premium hikes each year, until the cost reflects the full risk rate. These include businesses and properties meeting a prior loss threshold. Properties purchased after July 6, 2012, under subsidized rates or policies that have lapsed will be subject to full-risk rating at renewal. Primary residences will be able to keep their subsidized rates, with some annual increases, unless, or until, the property is sold. Flood insurance policy fees will increase and 5 percent will be added to premiums for a reserve fund. The impact will be tremendous in the state of Florida, said Cheryl Lambert, president of the Realtors Association of Citrus County. If it gets put on, it will stunt the growth of the state; buyers are not going to be able to purchase here, and sellers will be locked into homes. She said Gov. Rick Scott and the House are supporting a delay and Sen. Bill Nelson has taken up the issue. Speaking to the Florida Cabinet, Dean Asher, president of Florida Realtors, cited the recent recovery of the housing market. But he warned the Flood Insurance Reform Act could bring the positive momentum to a screeching halt. Both Nugent and Lambert also mentioned the flood insurance mapping, which is still going on in Citrus and other counties. They feel it should be completed before any rate hikes are enacted. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle online.com. LOCAL/STATECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 A9 000G786 352-726-2999 www.furniturepalacecitruscounty.com NEW HOURS: MON.-FRI. 9AM-7PM SAT. 9AM-5PM SUN. 11AM-5PM 3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness (Hwy. 41) North of Fairgrounds FREE SAME DAY DELIVERY ON ALL IN STOCK ITEMS FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT Twin . . . $ 199 95 Full . . . . . $ 299 95 Queen . $ 399 95 King . . . . $ 499 95 PALERMO POSTURE COMFORT SETS AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT EXTRA PLUSH TWO-SIDED FLIPPABLE SETS MATTRESS SALE Twin . . . . $ 399 95 Full . . . . . . . $ 499 95 Queen . . . $ 599 95 King . . . . . $ 799 95 CLASSIC DELUXE EUROTOP LATEX & INTERSPRING Twin . . . $ 399 95 Full . . . . . $ 499 95 Queen . $ 599 95 King . . . . $ 699 95 Twin . . . $ 449 95 Full . . . . . $ 649 95 Queen . $ 749 95 King . $ 1099 95 Made in America. Proud of It. BEDROOM SET $ 649 95 DRESSER, MIRROR, HEADBOARD AND NITESTAND Stress-Free Chairs $ 349 95 Includes Rebate $ 40 OFF ANY TWIN SET WITH COUPON $ 60 OFF ANY FULL SET WITH COUPON $ 80 OFF ANY QUEEN SET WITH COUPON $ 100 OFF ANY KING SET WITH COUPON NEW MEMORY FOAM GEL BEDS Queen $ 799 95 JUST ARRIVED! TOP QUALITY King $ 999 95 Recliners & StressF ree Chairs 10 YR. NON-PRORATED Tired of One-Sided Mattresses? We Have New 2-Sided Mattresses Orthopedic & Plush CLOSEOUT Model Home King Sets $ 199 00 body wrapped in black fabric near a dirt road in the hunting area. The medical examiner characterized her death as acute morphine intoxication. The prosecutor, Pete Magrino, said during the trial he believed Boutin and Brinson killed Stires after becoming furious with her for stealing methamphetamines worth about $1,800 from them. They then hatched a plan to dispose of her body. It took the jury of five women and seven men three-and-a-half hours to return a guilty verdict, but for seconddegree murder. The prosecution was seeking the death penalty with the firstdegree murder charge. The defense team of Charles Vaughn and Cliff Travis using Boutins own police interview audio tried to portray him as a victim of circumstance. Vaughn said Boutin and Brinson were trying to calm down a disruptive, drug-crazed teen when Brinson administered the fatal dose of morphine to Stires. They argued that the morphine was brought on Christmas Day to Boutins Homosassa home by a man who was to have sex with Stires in exchange for the drug. The prosecution, however, countered by presenting the man on the stand, who refuted the allegations. The plan, Vaughn said, was to have Stires dress up like a male to entertain the man. The defense also blamed all the lethal handiwork of the murder on Brinson, who they claim not only administered the fatal dose of morphine, but also pistol-whipped Stires about the head, causing several injuries. Brinson was also identified as the person who gagged Stires and helped restrain her in Boutins fathers garage in Brooksville. Stires reportedly died while restrained on a lounger in the garage. The couple then reportedly drove around for two days attending to their daily business with Stires corpse in the trunk of Boutins car before disposing of her body in remote Levy County.Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or asidibe @chronicleonline.com. BOUTINContinued from Page A1 HIKESContinued from Page A1 Associated PressTALLAHASSEE A Florida woman serving 20 years in prison for firing a shot at her estranged husband during an argument will get a new trial, though she will not be able to invoke a stand your ground defense, an appeals court ruled Thursday. The case of Marissa Alexander, a Jacksonville mother of three, has been used by critics of Floridas stand your ground law and mandatory minimum sentences to argue that the states justice system is skewed against defendants who are black. The 1st District Court of Appeal ruled that Alexander deserves a new trial because the trial judge handling her case did not properly instruct the jury regarding what is needed to prove self-defense. The ruling, written by Judge Robert Benton, said the instructions constituted a fundamental error and required Alexander to prove self-defense beyond a reasonable doubt. But the court also made it clear in its ruling that the judge was right to block Alexander from using the states stand your ground law as a way to defend her actions. That law generally removes peoples duty to retreat in the face of possible danger and allows them to use of deadly force if they believe their lives are in danger. Faith Gay, one of the attorneys representing the 33-yearold Alexander, said she was grateful for the thorough consideration provided by the appeals court. We are looking forward to taking the case back to trial, Gay said. Alexander had never been arrested before she fired a bullet at a wall one day in 2010 to scare off her husband when she felt he was threatening her. Nobody was hurt, but the judge in the case said he was bound by state law to sentence her to 20 years in prison after she was convicted of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Alexander has maintained that the shot fired was a warning shot. The sentencing sparked criticism from the local NAACP chapter and the districts African-American congresswoman, who said blacks more often are incarcerated for long periods because of overzealous prosecutors and judges bound by mandatory minimum sentences. State Attorney Angela Corey, who oversaw the prosecution of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, has stood by the handling of Alexanders case. Corey said she believes that Alexander aimed the gun at the man and his two sons, and that the bullet she fired could have ricocheted and hit any of them. Jackelyn Barnard, a spokeswoman for Corey, said that the conviction was reversed on a legal technicality and that the office was gratified that the stand your ground ruling was upheld. Benjamin Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP called the ruling a welcome development in a case that represents the double standards in our justice system. From the streets to the courthouse, race continues to influence the judicial process, and it certainly seemed to have played a role here, Jealous said in a statement issued by the civil rights organization. The states -20-life law was implemented in 1999 and credited with helping to lower the violent crime rate. Anyone who shows a gun in the commission of certain felonies gets an automatic 10 years in prison. Fire the gun, and its an automatic 20 years. Shoot and wound someone, and its 25 years to life. On Aug. 1, 2010, Alexander was working for a payroll software company. She was estranged from her husband, Rico Gray, and had a restraining order against him, even though theyd had a baby together just nine days earlier. Thinking he was gone, she went to their former home to retrieve the rest of her clothes, family members said. An argument ensued, and Alexander said she feared for her life when she went out to her vehicle to get the gun she legally owned. She came back inside and ended up firing a shot into the wall, which ricocheted into the ceiling. Gray testified that he saw Alexander point the gun at him and looked away before she fired the shot. He claimed that she was the aggressor, and that he had begged her to put away the weapon. Woman who fired gun at husband to get new trial BIDSContinued from Page A1

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Associated PressWASHINGTON The nations top intelligence official on Thursday sidestepped questions from a senator about whether the National Security Agency has ever used Americans cellphone signals to collect information on their whereabouts that would allow tracking of the movements of individual callers. Asked twice by Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., if NSA had ever collected or made plans to collect such data, NSA chief Gen. Keith Alexander answered both times by reading from a letter provided to senators who had asked the same question last summer. He also cited a classified version of the letter that was sent to senators and said, What I dont want to do ... is put out in an unclassified forum anything thats classified. Wyden promised to keep asking. I believe this is something the American people have a right to know, whether NSA has ever collected or made plans to collect cell site information, Wyden said. The testy exchange at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing illustrates the wider tension that has grown between the public and the U.S. intelligence community, following disclosures by Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old former systems analyst on contract to the NSA, about the extensive NSA collection of telephone and email records of millions of Americans. The panels bipartisan leadership used the hearing to promote their version of legislation to change the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act. The lawmakers seek to trim NSAs authority to access and analyze U.S. phone records and provide new protections to Americans privacy. They also want to broaden the governments spying powers to allow monitoring of terror suspects who travel to the U.S. after being tracked overseas by the NSA. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., chairwoman of the committee, said the legislation would strictly limit access to the ... phone metadata records, expressly prohibit the collection of the content of phone calls, and limit the amount of time such U.S. phone call data could be kept. Such records show the date and length of calls, and the numbers dialed. But Feinsteins proposed legislation would not stop the bulk collection of telephone and email records. A separate bipartisan group of four senators, including Wyden, unveiled legislation earlier this week to end those bulk collections. Feinstein and the committees top Republican, Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, defended U.S. intelligence efforts, as did Alexander and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper insisting that while they collect U.S. bulk records, they do not listen in on individual Americans phone calls or read their emails without a court order. Alexander and Clapper spoke of wanting to cooperate with suggested changes in order to win back the publics trust. Clapper told the committee he was willing to consider limiting both how U.S. telephone and email data collected by NSA is used, and the amount of time it is stored. votes, House leaders shelved a vote that had been expected this weekend on the debt limit measure and gave frustrated GOP lawmakers few clues about what they plan to do to avoid a shutdown. The chaos sets the stage for weekend drama on Capitol Hill, with the Senate planning to send the fractious House a straightforward bill Friday to keep the government operating through Nov. 15 rather than partly closing down at midnight Monday. Speaker John Boehner of Ohio and several rankand-file Republicans said the House simply wont accept a clean spending measure, even though thats been the norm in Congress on dozens of occasions since the 1995-96 government closures that bruised Republicans and strengthened the hand of Democratic President Bill Clinton. I dont see that happening, Boehner said. Still, he declared that I have no interest in a government shutdown and he doesnt expect one to occur on Tuesday. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada said the Democratic-led chamber will not relent. The Senate will never pass a bill that guts the Affordable Care Act, Reid declared. A partial government shutdown would keep hundreds of thousands of federal workers off the job, close national parks and generate damaging headlines for whichever side the public held responsible. Washington faces two deadlines: The Oct. 1 start of the new budget year and a mid-October date now estimated for the 17th when the government can no longer borrow money to pay its bills on time and in full. The first deadline requires Congress to pass a spending bill to allow agencies to stay open. The mid-month deadline requires Congress to increase the governments $16.7 trillion borrowing cap to avoid a first-ever default on its payments, which include interest obligations, Social Security benefits, payments to thousands of contractors large and small, and salaries for the military. The standoff just four days before the end of the fiscal year increased the possibility of a shutdown, with no signs of compromise. The No. 2 Democrat in the Senate, Dick Durbin of Illinois, said that because of the time it takes the Senate to approve even non-controversial bills, if the House amends a Senate-passed spending bill and returns it to the Senate over the weekend, That is a concession on their part that were going to shut down the government. Not far from the Capitol, at a community college in Largo, Md., Obama insisted he would not negotiate over his signature domestic achievement, either on a bill to keep the government operating or legislation to raise the nations borrowing authority. The entire world looks to us to make sure that the world economy is stable. You dont mess with that, Obama said of the debt ceiling/default measure. And thats why I will not negotiate on anything when it comes to the full faith and credit of the United States of America. Responding to Obamas non-negotiable stand, Boehner said, Well, Im sorry but it just doesnt work that way. Meeting behind closed doors, House Republican leaders encountered resistance from their rank and file over the debt limit measure even though they were attaching a list of other Republican favorites such as green-lighting the Keystone XL oil pipeline, blocking federal regulation of greenhouse gases and boosting offshore oil exploration. Republicans who lost the presidential election and a shot at Senate control last year are trying to use must-pass measures to advance agenda items that the Democratic-led Senate and Obama have soundly rejected. The lastditch effort on Obamacare comes just days before coast-to-coast enrollment in the plans health care exchanges begins Oct. 1. Despite the popular items, the leadership was struggling to win over its recalcitrant GOP members, especially tea partybacked lawmakers pressing for deeper, deficit-cutting spending measures. The spending cuts the Republicans would attach to the debtlimit legislation would be likely to represent a small fraction of the almost $1 trillion in new borrowing authority the bill would permit. Among conservatives, theres a lot of angst about that, said Rep. John Fleming, R-La. Proposed changes include requiring federal workers to contribute more to their pensions, along with other items from a failed 2011 deficitcutting effort. Sen. Patty Murray, DWash., the chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, insisted that the House accept the Senate bill. Republicans have got to put an end to the tea party temper tantrums and pass our bill without any gimmicks and without any games, she said. In the Senate, top Democrat Reid sought to schedule a series of votes Thursday night to speed the short-term spending bill to the House. Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Mike Lee, R-Utah, blocked the effort, however, saying they wanted the vote on Friday.A10FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWASHINGTON Marine Corps Ball, Nov 10 ($40 pp. Call 795-7000 for tickets) Never Forget 5K Run, Nov 11 (Prior to parade) Veterans Day Parade, Nov 11 Veterans Day Monument Motorcycle Ride, Nov 11 (Following parade) Memorial Service, Nov 11 (Following parade) Veterans Day Luncheon, Nov 11 (VSO cdrs. & Aux. presidents invited) Women Veterans Luncheon, Nov 13 (Women vets invited. Call 746-2396 for resv.) Veterans Appreciation Program, Nov 17 (Ice cream social follows) Veterans Appreciation Concert, NCCB, Oct 26 & 27 Operation Welcome Home Salute to Veterans, Nov 1 & Nov 3 Massing of the Colors, Nov 3 Veterans in the Classroom, Nov 4 15 Veterans Flea Market, Nov 6 (For VSOs. Call Dinah 746-7200) Veterans Program, Nov 7, IPS (Vets & guests invited) Veterans Fair, Nov 8 Veterans Social, Nov 8 (Fish Fry $7 at door) Military Ball, Nov 9 ($35 pp. Call 746-1135 for tickets) Organization: Mailing Address: Description of participation for parade & fair (indicate no. & length of vehs/tris) Please attach se parate sheet if necessary: Contact Name (Print): Phone: We, the above, release Citrus Publishing Inc. and the Veterans Appreciation Ad Hoc Coordinating Comm ittee from any liability that may be associated with Veterans Appreciation Week events. Authorized Signature Date Mail this form to: Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week 1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429 Honoring our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Veterans Appreciation Week TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL October 26 November 17, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY Mail your registration form to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 For more information call Chris Gregoriou 795-7000 or the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-6363 Registration Form Deadline to register: Friday, October 18 000FIQT Yes, we would like to participate in the following Veterans Appreciation Week 2013 events. 000FZP3 All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated areas will be ident ified with Warning Signs indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions. For further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/ pubworks/aquatics/aquatic services.htm. Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY Citrus Countys Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic weed control activities for the week beginning September 30, 2013 HERBICIDE TREATMENTS Waterbody Plant Herbicide Used Inverness Pool Duckweed / Torpedograss / Willows / Floating / Tallow / Pennywort / Nuphar / Cattail Clipper / Quest / Diquat / Glyphosate / 2,4D / Element 3A Hernando Pool Clipper / Quest / Diquat / Glyphosate / 2,4D / Element 3A / Aquathol Duckweed / Torpedograss / Willows / Tallow / Nuphar / Cattail / Hydrilla MECHANICAL HARVESTING Inverness Pool Tussocks / Bladderwort / S. Naiad / Coontail Harvesting Tussocks / Bladderwort / Cabomba / Coontail Harvesting Hernando Pool Floral City Pool Clipper / Quest / Diquat / Glyphosate Duckweed / Torpedograss / Floating / Paspalum Floral City Tussocks Harvesting 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000FYRY BUDGETContinued from Page A1 Associated PressWASHINGTON Ted Cruz and Mike Lee are the odd men out in the Senate to both Republicans and Democrats. The GOPs frustration with the tea party conservatives was on full display Thursday in a remarkable, rhetorical smackdown on the Senate floor moments after Democratic leader Harry Reid with the agreement of both parties tried to move up the votes on a temporary spending bill. Reid wanted the votes on Thursday night, and so do Republicans who want to get the spending bill back to the House to give Speaker John Boehner more time with a government shutdown looming on Tuesday. Reid is slated to strip the bill of a provision unraveling President Barack Obamas health care law and the House GOP is pressing for a counteroffer. But Lee objected, and the votes will occur as planned on Friday. Why? Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee told colleagues that Cruz and Lee had notified conservative activists telling them to make sure and watch the vote on Friday. He questioned their rationale as only a gentleman of the Senate would. Its my understanding again, relative to this vote tonight happening tomorrow instead, is that my two colleagues, who I respect, have sent out e-mails around the world and turned this into a show possibly, and therefore, they want people around the world to watch them and others on the Senate floor, Corker said. And that is taking priority over getting legislation back to the House so they can take action before the countrys government shuts down. Corker didnt let up in gently excoriating Cruz and Lee, stars of summertime ads by the Senate Conservatives Fund that have put incumbent Republicans on the defensive even though they have consistently opposed the health care law. Cruz had waged a 21-hour, 19minute filibuster to delay action on the temporary spending bill, then turned around and voted with 99 other senators Wednesday to allow the bill to move forward. I dont think weve had a 21-hour filibuster and then the person carrying out the filibuster voted for the issue they were filibustering, Corker said. I dont think thats happened in the history of our country. Cruz responded that Corker was wrong, that the Texas freshman had said the critical vote was not the first one but rather the next one which would make clear where senators stood on the health care law and could stop Reid from removing the health care language. We are not going to be complicit in giving Harry Reid the ability to fund Obamacare, Cruz said. Corker has been one of several Republicans, including party leaders, critical of the tactics by Cruz and Lee. Many Republicans have said the effort was futile and selfserving, designed to boost their public profile. Cruz has been mentioned as a possible presidential candidate in 2016. During the Cruz and Corker exchange, Reid and Democratic Sens. Dick Durbin and Chris Coons simply sat and watched. Reid complained that the delayed votes were senseless and a big, big stall. Durbin complained about the Republican delay. Corker corrected him, saying it was just two Cruz and Lee. Cruz and Lee take lead in GOP assault on Obamacare Intelligence official sidesteps questions on cellphone snooping

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NATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 A11 000G0NX 000G5YW Associated PressTULSA, Okla. Prisoner Joshua Silverman passed up a taste of freedom this week and called the police instead. Silverman could have fled with two other inmates who stole the unattended transport van he was riding in, but he dialed 911 and alerted authorities about the escape. Uh, yes, maam, youre probably not going to believe this, but Im a prisoner in a van, and Im here with a couple of these other cats, Silverman politely explained to the 911 operator Tuesday. A couple of the guys that were in the van jacked the van ... at the hospital. Guards from a private prison transport company had stopped in Weatherford, about an hour west of Oklahoma City, to deliver some ill inmates to a hospital. They left eight other prisoners, including Silverman, in the van unsupervised. With the guards gone, inmates Lester Burns and Michael Coleman kicked out a partition in the van and moved up front, where the keys remained and the motor was still running so the prisoners could have air conditioning. Burns and Coleman drove the van for about a mile before ditching it and fleeing on foot. Silverman, one of six inmates left behind, was reluctant to escape. Still shackled, he somehow managed to get out of the van perhaps through the kicked-out partition and dialed 911 with a cellphone police believe he might have found in the vehicle. During the nearly fourminute audio clip that Weatherford police released Thursday, Silverman struggled to explain the vans whereabouts. After the dispatcher asked for a specific location, the prisoner volunteered to walk to a nearby road to flag down an officer. Were in Oklahoma somewhere. I dont know because were not on a road and Im not from here, Silverman told the dispatcher. I just dont want to get shot by no cops or nothing. The dispatcher asked Silverman where the rest of the prisoners were. Five other inmates remained besides him. Were all in the van, he said. Two of the dudes took off. The dudes that were doing whatever they were doing took off. Silverman remained on the phone until a patrolman arrived on the scene. The cops are right here! he told the dispatcher. Silverman was in custody on drug-related charges and being taken to Wisconsin on the day of the escape, Weatherford Assistant Police Chief Louis Flowers said Thursday. Wisconsin court records indicate Silverman was convicted of bail jumping, drug manufacturing and disorderly conduct during the past several years. Flowers said Silvermans call Tuesday helped police narrow their search for Burns and Coleman, who were taken back into custody later that day. Prisoner dials 911 to report escape Joshua Silverman Associated PressNaked and scared has turned into semi-clothed and kind of spooked. A Halloween attractions heavily publicized plan to allow guests to go through one of its haunted houses in the buff was revised Thursday amid opposition from local officials in southeastern Pennsylvania. Shocktoberfest, a popular seasonal attraction outside Reading, promoted the Naked and Scared Challenge as a way for thrill-seekers 18 and over to, um, expose their fears and phobias by wandering through a haunted house completely nude. But owner Pat Konopelski said officials in nearby Spring Township and Sinking Spring borough told him they werent comfortable with it. So, for now, he has agreed to require guests to wear underwear. We didnt really feel a battle would have been fruitful or help any of the parties involved, he said. Konopelski, who launched Shockertoberfest about two decades ago and has seen it grow into one of Pennsylvanias largest Halloween attractions, said he was inspired by cable TVs Naked and Afraid, in which two strangers are dropped into a challenging environment without clothing, food or water. He said that by allowing guests to disrobe, theyll be very, very vulnerable, thus heightening the fear factor. Every year we keep thinking we gotta go bigger, we gotta go better, we gotta impress them more. Rather than going bigger better, I could now scare you with a feather, he said. Spring Township awarded Konopelski a public gathering permit in May, but told him that allowing guests to go nude was a significant change to his original application and that he couldnt do it without first getting the townships approval. Sinking Spring delivered a similar message. We didnt have time to react or fully think through all the issues that could arise from something like this, said Spring Township Manager Jay Vaughan. He certainly has the right next year to make application and we will react accordingly, but thats next year. Haunted house puts clothes on naked event Associated PressDENVER The owners of a Colorado cantaloupe farm were arrested Thursday on charges stemming from a 2011 listeria epidemic that killed 33 people in one of the nations deadliest outbreaks of foodborne illness. Federal prosecutors said brothers Eric and Ryan Jensen were arrested on misdemeanor charges of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. Each man faces six counts. They pleaded not guilty in federal court and were released on unsecured bonds. Trial is scheduled for Dec. 2. Prosecutors said the federal Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determined the Jensens didnt adequately clean the cantaloupe. Criminal charges in food poisoning cases are rare, said attorney William Marler, who represents many of the listeria victims in civil cases against Jensen Farms. Only four other people have faced such charges in the past decade, he said. The FDA has said the melons likely were contaminated in Jensen Farms packing house. It concluded that dirty water on a floor, and old, hard-toclean equipment probably were to blame. The epidemic was the deadliest outbreak of foodborne illness in 25 years, and it delivered a serious blow to Colorado cantaloupe farmers. A number of lawsuits were filed by people who were sickened or who had a family member die after the outbreak. Farmers arrested in fatal listeria outbreak Associated PressRyan Jensen, 33, right, and brother Eric Jensen, 37, were arrested Thursday on misdemeanor charges of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce.

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A12FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE ACCOUNTANT Winner Ed Serra www .edserra.com ACCOUNTANT Honorable Mention Humphrey & Saltmarsh, Pl 352-341-3449 AUTOMOTIVE REP AIR Winner Crystal Automotive crystalautos.com ALARM/SECURITY SYSTEM Winner Schlabach Security And Sound www .sssonline.biz ALUMINUM CONTRACTOR/SCREEN ENCLOSURE Winner Blackshears II Aluminum, Inc 352-795-9722 ASSISTED LIVING F ACILITY Winner Cedar Creek At Kings Bay www.cedarcreeklife.com ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY Honorable Mention Brentwood Retirement Community 352-746-6611 AIR CONDITIONING/ HEA T SERVICES Honorable Mention Senica Air Conditioning 352-795-9685 AUTO BOD Y Winner Daves Body Shop 352-628-4878 AIR CONDITIONING/ HEA T SERVICES W inner Bay Area Air Conditioning 352-795-2095 BARBER SHOP Winner Freds Barber Shop 864 Ne 5th St. Crystal River FL BOAT DEALER Winner Apopk a Marine 352-726-7773 BOAT & MOTOR REP AIR Winner Gulf Coast Marine 352-628-5885 BOUTIQUE Winner The Cotton Club 352-563-2582 CABINET STORE/ DEALER Winner Deems Kitchen And Bath Showrooms 352-628-9480 CAR W ASH Winner Mr Bs Carwash 352-795-9274 CARPET & RUG CLEANER Winner Stanley Steemer stanleysteemer .com CARPET & RUG CLEANER Honorable Mention Servicemaster R estore 352-794-0270 CARPET/FLOOR CO VERING Winner Joes Carpet www .joescarpet.com CARPET/FLOOR CO VERING Honorable Mention Michaels Floor Covering Inc. 352-341-0813 CHIROPRACTOR Winner Citrus Chiropractic Group 352-795-5350 DENTIST Winner Ledger Dentistry 352-628-3443 DENTIST Honorable Mention Complete Family Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry www.rswansondental.com FLEA MARKET Winner Howards Flea Mark et howardsflea@aol.com FLORIST Winner W averley Florist 352-795-1424 FLORIST Honorable Mention Flower Bask et 352-464-8743 PEST CONTROL Honorable Mention Florida P est Control & Chemical Co. 352-795-3614 TITLE COMP ANY Winner Express Title Services (352) 795-2691 TRAVEL A GENCY Winner Beckys T ravel 352-527-8855 VETERINARIAN Winner Lecanto V eterinary Hospital www.lecantovethospital.com WASTE DISPOSAL WINNER FDS Disposal 352-746-0617 WASTE DISPOSAL Honorable Mention W aste Pro 352-624-3100 WEIGHT LOSS CENTER Winner Medical W eight Loss Center 352-564-8245 WINDOW REPLA CEMENT Winner T ropical Window 352-795-4226 WINDOW TREA TMENTS Winner V ertical Blinds Of Homosassa 352-628-7888 WINDOW TREATMENTS Honorable Mention 72 Hr Blinds 352-527-0012 NEWSPAPER/ WEBSITE T-SHIRT COMPANY Winner Citrus Sports & Apparel 352-564-9402 THRIFT STORE Winner Key T raining Center Thrift Stores www.keytrainingcenter.org THRIFT STORE Honorable Mention Sheirffs Ranches Thirft Store sheriffsranchesenterprises.org TIRE STORE Honorable Mention Crystal River Firestone 352-795-5118 BOAT DEALER Honorable Mention Crystal River Marine 352-795-2597 POOLS BUILDER Winner Authentic P ools 352-527-7946 RV DEALER Winner Como Rv Auto Sales And Service 352-344-1411 RADIO ST ATION Winner Citrus 95.3 www .citrus953.com RADIO ST ATION Honorable Mention The Fo x 96.7 Classic Hits www.thefox967.com REAL ESTATE OFFICE Winner Exit R ealty Leaders www.exitrealtyleaders.com ROOFER Winner AAA R oofing 352-563-0411 SKILLED NURSING CARE F ACILITY Honorable Mention Cypress Cove 352-795-8832 SKILLED NURSING CARE F ACILITY Honorable Mention Life Care Center 352-746-4434 SKILLED NURSING F ACILITY Winner Diamond Ridge Health & R ehab diamondridgehealthandrehab.com PET GROOMING Honorable Mention P awfection Ranch 352-628-2828 PLUMBER Winner Bob T sacrios Plumbling 352-621-7705 PLUMBER Honorable Mention Mik e Scott Plumbing www.mikescottplumbing.com PHOTOGRAPHER Honorable Mention R ebecca Puljas-jones Photography www.photographybyre becca.com GARDEN NURSERY Winner Color Country 352-746-6465 GARDEN NURSERY Honorable Mention Ansons Nursery 352-628-4554 GROOMING AND PET SHOP Winner The Bow W ow Boutique 352-795-1684 HARDWARE ST ORE Winner Kanes Ace Hardware 352-628-3566 HARDWARE ST ORE Winner Ace Hardware 352-726-8811 HEALTH FOOD ST ORE Winner Rutabagas 352-344-0096 HEALTH & FITNESS CLUB Winner Anytime Fitness 352-795-6161 HEARING AID ST ORE Winner Audibel Hearing Centers 352-436-4393 HEARING AID ST ORE Honorable Mention Gardner Audiology 352-795-5700 GARAGE DOOR INST ALLER Honorable Mention T ri-county Overhead Door 352-726-0072 FURNITURE ST ORE Honorable Mention Easy Livin 352-527-2558 FURNITURE ST ORE Winner Badcock & More Home Furnishings www .badcock.com FUNERAL HOME Winner Strickland Funeral Home 352-795-2678 HOTEL/MOTEL Winner Plantation On Crystal River www.plantationoncrystalriver.com HUNTING & FISHING SUPPLIES Winner Mcphersons Archery & Outdoor Pro www.mcphersonsarchery.com INTERIOR DECORATOR Winner Smart Interiors Home Furnishings www.smartinteriorsfurn.com HOME REMODELING CONTRACTOR Honorable Mention W ill Construction Corp www.beautifulresulltsnow.com INVESTMENT FIRM Winner Raymond James www.raymondjames.com/cr1 INVESTMENT FIRM Honorable Mention Investors Choice Financial Group 352-563-0700 JEWELRY ST ORE Honorable Mention Whalen Jewelers 352-726-4709 JEWLERY ST ORE Winner Jim Green Jewelers 352-563-0633 LANDSCAPER Honorable Mention Connollys Sod And Nursery www .connollysod.com LANDSCAPER Honorable Mention Connollys Sod And Nursery www .connollysod.com HOME REMODELING CONTRA CTOR Winner Pinecrest Building Corp 352-527-0225 HOME HEALTH SERVICE Honorable Mention S. E.T. Home Health 352-564-2738 HOME HEALTH SERVICE Winner Comfort Keepers 352-726-4547 MEDICAL CENTER Winner Citrus Memorial Health System www .citrusmh.com MOBILE HOME DEALER Winner T aylor Made Homes 352-621-9181 MOBILE HOME DEALER Honorable Mention Prestige Home Center Of Inverness 352-726-4009 OIL CHANGE SERVICE Winner Mobil 1 Lube Express 352-795-2333 OPTICAL/VISION CENTER Winner Mez Mer Eyes Optical Boutique 352-795-2020 OPTICAL/VISION CENTER Honorable Mention Beverly Hills Eye Clinic/ homosassa Eye www.drsnewcomer.com PAINT CONTRACTOR Winner Bud Sasada P ainting 352-795-1448 PAINT CONTRA CTOR Honorable Mention George Swedlige 352-794-0400 PAWNBROKER Winner P ats Pawn 352-794-6040 PEST CONTROL Winner Citrus P est Management 352-563-6698 MATTRESS ST ORE Winner Comfort Mattress 352-628-0808 LOCKSMITH Honorable Mention John C Meyers Locksmith 352-422-4770 LOCKSMITH Winner P orters Locksmith 352-564-0668 Winners Circle 000FFFF 2013 2013 LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPING Winner Clover Lawn 352-746-4451 HOME BUILDER Honorable Mention Flynn Builders www.flynnbuilders.com FOREIGN AUTO REPAIR Winner All Prestige Automotive 352-795-7000 BOAT T OUR Winner River Safaris & Gulf Chaters 352-628-5222

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EA Sports settles college athlete likeness casesNEW YORK Video game maker Electronic Arts and the Collegiate Licensing Company have settled all lawsuits brought against the companies by former and current college athletes over the unauthorized use of the players images and likenesses in video games and other merchandise. The NCAA is not part of the settlements, which includes the OBannon case. Brought by former UCLA basketball star Ed OBannon, that lawsuit was asking for the NCAA, EA and CLC to share billions of dollars in revenues with college athletes. The settlement was submitted for approval to the U.S. District Court in Northern California and the terms were confidential. Also Thursday, EA Sports announced it wouldnt make a college football video game next year because of the ongoing legal issues.Googles Hummingbird hatches new search formulaMENLO PARK, Calif. Google has quietly retooled the closely guarded formula running its Internet search engine to give better answers to the increasingly complex questions posed by Web surfers. The overhaul came as part of an update called Hummingbird that Google Inc. has gradually rolled out in the past month without disclosing the modifications. The changes could have a major impact on traffic to websites. Hummingbird represents the most dramatic alteration to Googles search engine since it revised the way it indexes websites three years ago as part of a redesign called Caffeine, according to Amit Singhal, a senior vice president for the company. He estimates that the redesign will affect the analysis of about 90 percent of the search requests that Google gets. Any reshuffling of Googles search rankings can have sweeping ramifications because they steer so much of the Internets traffic. Google fields about two of out every three search requests in the U.S. and handles an even larger volume in some parts of Europe. The changes could also drive up the price of Google ads tied to search requests if websites whose rankings are demoted under the new system feel they have to buy the marketing messages to attract traffic. The search ads and other commercial pitches related to Web content account for most of Googles revenue, which is expected to approach $60 billion this year.McDonalds to offer salad, fruit as sideNEW YORK Want a side salad with that Big Mac? McDonalds says it will start giving customers the choice of a salad, fruit or vegetable as a substitute for french fries in its value meals. The fast-food company also said it would use the packaging for its Happy Meals to promote healthier options. It said all advertising to kids will include a fun nutrition or childrens well-being message. The worlds biggest hamburger chain was set to make the announcements at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York City, where CEO Don Thompson was slated to speak late in the afternoon. The changes follow an announcement by rival Burger King on Tuesday that it would launch a new crinkle-cut french fry that it says has about 20 percent fewer calories than its regular fries. The moves come as McDonalds faces criticism from health advocates who say it promotes bad eating habits. McDonalds, based in Oak Brook, Ill., is also trying to shake its fast-food image to keep up with shifting tastes. Chains such as Chipotle and Panera, for example, have become more popular because theyre seen as offering higher quality food for a little extra money.NY proposals would allow new gas storage sitesALBANY, N.Y. New York regulators proposed rules Thursday that would allow new storage and truck fueling stations for liquefied natural gas to be built in the state for the first time since a 1973 explosion that killed 40 workers at a Staten Island storage facility. The Department of Environmental Conservation said the first permits would likely be issued for smaller facilities supplying fuel to long-haul and fleet trucks that use liquefied natural gas as a cheaper substitute for diesel. DEC Commissioner Joe Martens said lower emissions from burning liquified natural gas as a fuel instead of diesel will provide significant benefits to the environment and public health and will create jobs. The proposal comes as New York remains under a 5-year-old moratorium on shale gas drilling with hydraulic fracturing that has produced abundant, low-cost natural gas elsewhere in the country. The states 1973 moratorium on the siting of new liquefied natural gas storage facilities was lifted in 1999 for all locations except New York City. But DEC hadnt drafted the regulations needed to allow the siting of new facilities until now. The states only three facilities, all in New York City, were grandfathered in when the moratorium was imposed. Russ Haven of the New York Public Interest Research Group said he hasnt been able to make a detailed evaluation yet of the proposed regulations, but said it appears the proposal would allow facilities of any size throughout the state and allow more widespread transportation of the fuel. Currently, transportation of liquified natural gas is allowed only on federal highways in New York and on limited local roads.BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 A13 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,500 1,550 1,600 1,650 1,700 1,750 S AMJJA 1,680 1,720 1,760 S&P 500Close: 1,698.67 Change: 5.90 (0.3%) 10 DAYS 14,400 14,800 15,200 15,600 16,000 S AMJJA 15,240 15,480 15,720 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 15,328.30 Change: 55.04 (0.4%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1925 Declined1107 New Highs118 New Lows23 Vol. (in mil.)2,737 Pvs. Volume3,076 1,757 1,761 1508 998 141 16 NYSE NASD DOW 15387.1915274.4215328.30+55.04+0.36%+16.97% DOW Trans.6659.956615.476637.51+26.18+0.40%+25.08% DOW Util.487.83483.49485.37-1.09-0.22%+7.12% NYSE Comp.9755.639696.269726.25+27.29+0.28%+15.19% NASDAQ3795.723772.803787.43+26.33+0.70%+25.43% S&P5001703.851693.111698.67+5.90+0.35%+19.11% S&P4001251.611242.871248.91+6.39+0.51%+22.39% Wilshire 500018189.1818068.1918142.66+74.47+0.41%+20.99% Russell 20001081.321073.121078.41+4.90+0.46%+26.97% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7645.90 3.94-.07 -1.7tss-14.3-17.3dd... AT&T Inc T32.71339.00 34.23+.18 +0.5tst+1.5-5.8261.80 Ametek Inc AME32.67948.01 46.21+.04 +0.1sss+23.0+31.3240.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD81.609103.85 100.21+.75 +0.8tss+14.6+17.22.21e Bank of America BAC8.70915.03 14.08-.06 -0.4tts+21.3+58.9250.04 Capital City Bank CCBG9.04713.08 11.80-.10 -0.8tts+3.8+13.542... CenturyLink Inc CTL31.85142.45 32.11+.11 +0.3ttt-17.9-18.1192.16 Citigroup C31.88853.56 48.93-.33 -0.7tss+23.7+50.0130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46726.38 22.34-.14 -0.6ttt+41.0+60.8801.00 Disney DIS46.53967.89 65.24+.79 +1.2sss+31.0+24.1200.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63675.46 67.65+.39 +0.6sss+6.0+9.3203.12f EPR Properties EPR42.44461.18 49.90+.17 +0.3tst+8.2+18.4223.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM84.70395.49 87.07-.07 -0.1ttt+0.6-2.492.52 Ford Motor F9.71017.77 17.27+.08 +0.5tss+33.4+73.8120.40 Gen Electric GE19.87924.95 24.25+.02 +0.1sss+15.5+12.0180.76 Home Depot HD58.75881.56 76.07+.55 +0.7tst+23.0+28.9231.56 Intel Corp INTC19.23725.98 23.41-.29 -1.2tst+13.5+9.2130.90 IBM IBM181.103215.90 190.22+.75 +0.4sst-0.7-5.8133.80 LKQ Corporation LKQ17.16032.29 31.68+.34 +1.1tss+50.1+63.234... Lowes Cos LOW29.66049.17 47.89+.35 +0.7sss+34.8+62.5240.72 McDonalds Corp MCD83.318103.70 98.19+.57 +0.6sst+11.3+8.4183.24f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26736.43 32.77+.26 +0.8ttt+22.7+10.0131.12f Motorola Solutions MSI49.49764.72 59.87+.02 ...tss+7.5+19.9171.24f NextEra Energy NEE66.05788.39 80.44+.11 +0.1ttt+16.3+19.1202.64 Penney JC Co Inc JCP9.93127.00 10.42+.30 +3.0ttt-47.1-59.0dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62521.09 17.68+.12 +0.7tst-2.0+4.5360.80 Regions Fncl RF6.19710.52 9.18-.07 -0.8ttt+28.8+29.4110.12 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40868.77 60.38+.66 +1.1sss+46.0+16.3dd... Smucker, JM SJM81.608114.72 105.69-.17 -0.2tts+22.6+25.5202.32f Texas Instru TXN26.94040.94 40.38+.06 +0.2tss+30.7+48.4251.20f Time Warner TWX42.61066.01 64.87+.90 +1.4sss+35.6+44.7181.15 UniFirst Corp UNF65.850104.38 102.80+1.00 +1.0sss+40.2+51.6190.15 Verizon Comm VZ40.51654.31 47.67+.73 +1.5ttt+10.2+7.4972.12f Vodafone Group VOD24.42034.93 35.05+.28 +0.8sss+39.1+25.81.57e WalMart Strs WMT67.37679.96 74.62-.03 ...tss+9.4+3.0151.88 Walgreen Co WAG31.88056.84 54.73-.12 -0.2tss+47.9+55.2241.26f 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. Profit at the home furnishings retailer spiked 11 percent and revenue jumped 9 percent on strong comparable store sales. The electronics and design company, which has a lot of exposure to troubled Blackberry, gave a weak first-quarter forecast. The gas company announced the departure of its CEO and also board changes under pressure from Bill Ackmans Pershing Square. Shares edged lower for the third consecutive day despite assurances of stronger sales from the troubled retailer. Hertz cut its profit and revenue outlook for the year due to softer-thanexpected demand for U.S. airport car rentals. Stocks ended on an upswing on Thursday. Investors were encouraged by a government report showing that jobless claims declined last week, and positive reports from J.C. Penney and Bed Bath & Beyond. The positive trends eased worries about budget gridlock. 20 25 $30 S JA HertzHTZ Close: $21.63 -4.15 or -16.1% $12.97$27.75 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 74.7m (10.8x avg.) $8.68 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 28.1 ... 10 15 $20 S JA J.C. PenneyJCP Close: $10.42 0.30 or 3.0% $9.52$27.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 112.2m (5.0x avg.) $2.3 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 90 100 110 $120 S JA Air Products & Chem.APD Close: $109.78 2.46 or 2.3% $76.78 $114.75 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 3.5m (1.8x avg.) $23.01 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 23.5 2.6% 20 22 24 $26 S JA Jabil CircuitJBL Close: $21.62 -2.38 or -9.9% $16.39$24.32 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 12.5m (6.6x avg.) $4.38 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 13.7 1.5% 70 75 $80 S JA Bed Bath & BeyondBBBY Close: $77.54 3.32 or 4.5% $54.33$78.88 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 4.3m (2.7x avg.) $16.89 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 16.8 ... he yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.65 percent on Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill 0.01-0.01.10 6-month T-bill.030.04-0.01.13 52-wk T-bill.090.09....17 2-year T-note.340.34....26 5-year T-note1.441.39+0.05.61 10-year T-note2.652.63+0.021.62 30-year T-bond3.703.65+0.052.78 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx3.483.44+0.042.49 Bond Buyer Muni Idx5.095.09...4.20 Barclays USAggregate2.332.36-0.031.60 Barclays US High Yield6.106.08+0.026.37 Moodys AAACorp Idx4.504.53-0.033.41 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.591.57+0.02.91 Barclays US Corp3.263.29-0.032.82 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities Oil prices snapped a fiveday slide, rising as new figures showed the number of U.S. workers seeking unemployment benefits fell. Metals mostly declined. Corn and soybeans rose.Crude Oil (bbl)103.03102.66+0.36+12.2 Ethanol (gal)2.001.89-0.37-8.7 Heating Oil (gal)3.002.97+1.03-1.4 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.503.49+0.14+4.4 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.712.67+1.20-3.8 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz) 1323.601335.90-0.92-21.0 Silver (oz) 21.7221.84-0.54-28.0 Platinum (oz)1410.701428.80-1.27-8.3 Copper (lb) 3.303.28+0.72-9.3 Palladium (oz)722.15724.20-0.28+2.8 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb) 1.281.28+0.12-1.7 Coffee (lb) 1.161.17-1.36-19.6 Corn (bu) 4.574.55+0.44-34.6 Cotton (lb) 0.850.84+0.92+12.5 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)341.30348.40-2.04-8.7 Orange Juice (lb)1.281.30-2.07+10.1 Soybeans (bu)13.1713.22-0.38-7.2 Wheat (bu) 6.786.71+1.16-12.8 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 22.97+.06 +14.1+15.9+12.8+9.0 CapIncBuAm 56.55+.05 +10.0+11.3+9.4+6.6 CpWldGrIAm 42.64+.06 +16.8+21.6+10.6+7.1 EurPacGrAm 46.37+.01 +12.5+19.2+7.1+6.2 FnInvAm 48.70+.26 +20.4+23.9+14.9+9.0 GrthAmAm 42.24+.28 +23.0+26.8+15.7+9.3 IncAmerAm 19.77+.05 +12.3+14.2+11.7+8.8 InvCoAmAm 36.07+.15 +21.0+22.2+14.3+8.7 NewPerspAm 36.79+.08 +17.7+22.9+12.6+9.3 WAMutInvAm 37.30+.16 +21.3+22.1+16.4+8.8 Dodge & Cox Income 13.49-.02 -0.5+0.5+4.2+7.7 IntlStk 41.05-.03 +18.5+28.8+9.2+7.1 Stock 152.18+.50 +26.3+30.6+17.8+9.8 Fidelity Contra 93.93+.68 +22.2+21.2+15.7+10.5 GrowCo 119.69+1.02 +28.4+26.6+19.4+13.8 LowPriStk d 46.98+.08 +24.9+29.3+18.1+13.6 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 60.49+.22 +21.0+21.1+16.4+9.4 FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeAm 2.35... +9.5+11.7+10.4+10.6 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAm 13.03+.01 +0.1+4.5+4.8+9.7 GlBondAdv 12.98... +0.2+4.7+5.0+9.9 Harbor IntlInstl 69.97-.02 +12.6+20.9+9.5+6.7 T Rowe Price EqtyInc x 31.46-.07 +20.5+23.3+15.7+8.6 GrowStk 47.24+.52 +25.0+24.7+17.8+12.5 Vanguard 500Adml 156.58+.57 +21.0+21.1+16.4+9.4 500Inv 156.59+.58 +20.9+21.0+16.2+9.3 MuIntAdml 13.77... -2.0-1.2+3.1+5.3 STGradeAd 10.70-.01 +0.3+1.1+2.3+4.7 Tgtet2025 15.27+.03 +12.4+14.3+10.9+7.8 TotBdAdml 10.65-.02 -2.1-2.0+2.8+5.3 TotIntl 16.27+.04 +10.8+18.2+6.2+4.7 TotStIAdm 43.02+.17 +22.4+23.3+17.0+10.1 TotStIdx 43.01+.17 +22.3+23.2+16.9+10.0 Welltn x 37.61-.20 +13.2+14.6+11.8+9.2 WelltnAdm x 64.96-.35 +13.3+14.7+11.9+9.3 WndsIIAdm 62.07+.14 +20.4+22.3+16.5+9.0 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates 000G770 Crystal River 305 S.E. US 19 352-795-7223 Associated PressNEW YORK Upbeat news about jobs and retailers helped the Standard & Poors 500 index snap its longest losing streak of the year on Thursday. U.S. unemployment claims fell close to their lowest level in six years, the government reported, and J.C. Penney and Bed Bath & Beyond delivered encouraging news. The positive trends outweighed worries about a potential government shutdown in Washington next week. Those concerns had led the S&P 500 index to five consecutive days of declines, the indexs worst run in 2013. That ended Thursday when the S&P 500 index rose six points, or 0.4 percent, to close at 1,698.67. Theres a little bit of a bounce here, said Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist at Banyan Partners. It may be a little bit of bargain hunting. The broad index is less than two percent below its all-time high from Sept. 18. U.S. economic growth rose to an annual rate of 2.5 percent from April through June, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. That was an increase from the 1.1 percent growth in the previous quarter. Applications for unemployment benefits fell 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 305,000 last week, the government said, the fewest since September 2007, three months before the Great Recession began. While the economic news was encouraging, it wasnt spectacular. Some analysts said it justified the Federal Reserves surprise decision last week to keep up its economic stimulus. The U.S. central bank has been buying $85 billion of bonds a month to keep long-term interest rates low, which has encouraged borrowing and driven up stock prices. Wall Street had expected the Fed to start easing back on its stimulus. Its fair to say that the Fed got it right by delaying, the cuts to stimulus, said Ron Florance, deputy chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank. Growth is uninteresting and subdued. Growth-sensitive retail stocks were among the best performers in the 10 industry groups that make up the S&P 500 index. The group got a lift from the troubled department store owner J.C. Penney, which said it was pleased with its turnaround efforts. The companys stock ended the day up 30 cents, or 3 percent, at $10.42. Shares, however, fell more than 5 percent in after-markets trading following the companys announcement that it planned to sell up to 96.6 million shares of common stock in a public offering. It was the latest indication the chain is looking to shore up its cash reserves. Bed Bath & Beyond also gave the industry a boost. The stock climbed $3.32, or 4 percent, to $77.54 after the company said its quarterly profit increased 11 percent. Other stock indexes rose. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 55 points, or 0.4 percent, to 15,328. The Nasdaq climbed 26 points, or 0.7 percent, to 3,787. Positive data gives boost to stocks BusinessBRIEFS From wire reports

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OPINION Page A14FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 Dont wait, register to vote nowIn 2008, six million Americans told the U.S. Census Bureau that they hadnt voted because they either didnt know how to register or missed the deadline. Thus the idea for a national day of action to push people to register to vote was born. The primaries may be almost a year away, but it is never too early to protect your Constitutional right to have a say in how your city, county, state and nation are run. The League of Women Voters encourages you to make sure you can vote. Weve made it easy: go to www.vote411.org or stop by your local Supervisor of Elections Office, fill in the form and tell everyone you know to do it as well. Your vote, your voice. Use it. Floridas future depends upon it.Marie Pettibone, president Citrus County League of Women VotersHCA clear choice for CMH futureDear directors and trustees, The Citrus County Medical Society has met for the purpose of assessing the alternatives and legal consequences of a lease or sale of our hospital. We have held special meetings with the suitors and polled our membership. We believe your organizations should break free from the past and set a precedent for a better future. We believe a successful future will blossom from the sale of Citrus Memorial hospital. We believe the appeal of not-for-profit or medical school affiliations are mirages. The facts, the presentations, the energy level, the money issues all point to a long-term relationship with HCA. Citrus Memorial hospital is a wonderful facility with opportunity to become a true gem. Please work with us in making Citrus County the best possible place to live. We believe that HCA has the reputation, the capital and experience necessary to assist you and us on our mission. Please ignore the pipe dreams and let common sense and wisdom guide your decision. Sincerely yours, Dr. Jeff Wallis president of CCMS Dr. Meena Nathan past president Dr. Gustavo Fonseca past president Dr. William Harrer past presidentIt depends on ones point of viewThe U.S. has a stockpile of nukes to dissuade any nation from attacking us and thats OK. Bashar Assad (Syria) has chemical weapons to discourage any nation from attacking Syria and thats not OK.? Unless Syria threatens to attack the U.S. leave them alone. We are not the worlds police department. Pay attention, please. Ed Mitrani World War II combat decorated veteran Beverly Hills BYDOUGLASCOHN ANDELEANORCLIFTWASHINGTON President Obama is receiving flak from Republicans and some Democrats, too, over his attendance at the U.N. general assembly meeting in New York this week. They say it was a bust because the Iranians snubbed him and the Russians are stringing him along in their bid to keep Syrian President Assad in power. But particularly cynical and dark view of Obamas leadership, which is now in its fifth year, is seeing the brush strokes instead of the picture the big picture. It is wrong to measure Obamas effectiveness by whether the new Iranian president deigned to meet with him or not. What is important is that Obama has opened up a line of communication with President Rouhani, and that direct talks between the U.S. and Iran will take place. Secretary of State John Kerry is meeting with the Iranian foreign minister in New York Thursday, the first such meeting in decades. The last U.S. secretary of state to have any exchange with his Iranian counterpart was Colin Powell in 2001, and that was just a handshake. The last U.S. president to meet with an Iranian head of state was Jimmy Carter in the 1970s when the Shah was still in power. What happened in New York is important, not a snub, not an embarrassment, but forward progress on a global relationship that has been a longstanding problem not only for the U.S. but for our closest ally in the Middle East, Israel, although the Israeli leadership warns that Obama is nave if he expects Rouhani to be substantially different than his predecessor, who vowed to wipe Israel off the face of the Earth. Obama is innately cautious, but in his first campaign for president, he put his marker down with a simple yes when asked during a multicandidate debate whether he would agree to meet the leaders of Iran, Syria, Venezuela, Cuba, and North Korea without precondition during the first year of your administration. Hillary Clinton said no, and Obama exploited that difference between them in a later debate, saying, I said early in this campaign I would meet not just with our friends, but with our enemies. Not just with those we like, but those that we dont. ... Senator Clinton said, Oh no, thatd be nave, thatd be irresponsible. I said, Remember what John F. Kennedy said. He said, You should never negotiate out of fear, but you should never fear to negotiate. Six years later, Obama is delivering on his promise despite heavy pressure to stick to the same hard line that appears to finally be bringing Iran to the negotiating table. Rouhani campaigned on a promise of more engagement with the West, and he won in what was billed as a major upset. There are legitimate questions about how much maneuvering room he has with the mullahs ultimately in charge, but Obama is right to take advantage of this opening. The president was faulted for going to New York without having everything pre-scripted. Aides hinted that Obama and Rouhani might meet at the margins, meaning in diplomatic-speak that they might bump into each other in the halls, or at a luncheon for heads of state. It turns out the Iranian president as a devout Muslim doesnt attend luncheons where wine is served, and with so much symbolism at stake, no meeting would be accidental, and it didnt happen. Obama is being faulted for what he calls style points, but diplomacy is a long, hard slog, and so far he is getting more things right than wrong. Just because he has taken the first steps to engage with the new Iranian president doesnt mean he is going to cave in to all his demands. It means diplomacy may be taking root in an area of the world where for too long it has been absent. Apparently, his detractors believe that talking leads to appeasement, when, in fact, talking is the life blood of diplomacy. It is rarely exciting, but it is the tool of the true statesman. And the true patriot knows that diplomacy offers many options, many paths, and appeasement is the path not taken. Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift author the Washington Merry-Go-Round column, founded in 1932 by Drew Pearson. Human progress is furthered, not by conformity, but by aberration.H.L. Mencken, 1922 Appeasement path not taken CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief ON THE RIGHT TRACK EDC moves to create a plan Every county in America is interested in local economic development. From a Citrus County perspective, thats pretty stiff competition. And thats why our local officials charged with the responsibility of economic development are taking a more serious approach toward creating a plan that gives us a greater opportunity for success. Make no mistake economic development means jobs and lower taxes for Citrus County residents. Our community needs both. The countys Economic Development Council recently contracted with an outside consulting firm to develop a strategic plan for economic growth. The consultants are working with EDC members and business leaders to craft a plan that recognizes our countys strengths and weaknesses. Once recognized, the community will have to deal with the most important shortcomings. The strategic plan will also help us identify what types of economic growth can be supported by the strengths of our community and then target specific industries for recruitment. The recent success of EDC executive Don Taylor, EDC president Joe Meek and the council to attract Duke Energys new gas plant to Citrus is an incredible first success. Economic development is not about bringing a Walmart or Panera Bread to Citrus County. Those retail successes happen because a communitys population and demographics will financially support them. Economic development is about bringing companies that create goods and services that are sold outside of our community and create wealth for those who live here. Those companies are interested in ready sites for facilities, a qualified workforce and a government that acts as a partner. Important community assets are a good transportation network, a strong education system and a balance quality of life. Our EDC is finally on the right track toward success. We need to listen to the experts and aggressively deal with our shortcomings. The end result will be a stronger local economy. THE ISSUE:EDC to create a plan.OUR OPINION:Create the plan, and then work it. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor Unfair situationI just wanted to address this situation and maybe possibly see if any other citizens would possibly respond. Yes, I have a very good friend. Shes a single mom with four kids and shes been divorced. Her ex-husband owes approximately $80,000 in back child support and he only pays her about $25 a month just so he doesnt get, you know, put in jail or lose his drivers license. And because of that unfortunate situation, she receives food stamps and she tells me she gets $200 a month. And her one daughter just started a new job. She makes, you know, minimum wage and she brings home approximately $40 to $50 a week because shes also in school, so she cant work full time. Well, because she got the job and brings home $40 to $50 a week, the government totally canceled her food stamps, which she made about $200 a month. Well, because the daughter now works, the government expects the daughter to give her mother the money for food. And, you know, she got a job so she could try to save up to go to college. Im just thinking that its really not fair, you know, the way the government does that.Waste of timeCongressman (Richard) Nugents so-called town hall meeting was very disappointing. He told of being able to keep his son on his and his wifes insurance policy until the son turns 31 and he spoke of his $1,500 insurance payment for his family. He considered that some of those attending were uninsured because of pre-existing conditions and had come to hear his advice on this matter. After filling up an hour with talking points, he left time to answer only three or four questions before making a speedy exit. Many came with the hope of getting some answers, but they left empty-handed.Where would we be?Thank you, Ernie Porter, for your short, positive letter to the editor Monday morning (Sept. 16). What a wonderful way to start the week. I agree with you. I have a tendency to be like you do. However, we have these so-called wannabe editors who write pages and a half, columns and a half, of letters to the editor with nothing but negative. What would the Chronicle do if these so-called letter to the editor writers didnt send in the bull that they send?Enjoy kids in the poolThis is for the person who complained about the swimming pool last week at Bicentennial, that it was full of kids and they couldnt go swimming. If that swimming program saves one childs life, it will be more than worth it and they can get over it. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE OtherVOICES

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OPINIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 A15 000FXJC LOCASH LOCASH COWBOYS COWBOYS AND AND SPECIAL GUEST SPECIAL GUEST TOM JACKSON TOM JACKSON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THE BELLAMY THE BELLAMY BROTHERS BROTHERS CHRIS CHRIS JANSON JANSON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 TOTAL NET PROCEEDS BENEFIT: FOR CAMPING CALL ROCK CRUSHER CANYON RV PARK 352-564-9350 LIMITED 3-DAY OR 1-DAY RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE includes up front reserved seat & complimentary food Advanced General Admission Three-Day: $65 One-Day: $25 Call 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com Tickets also available at CRYSTAL NISSAN SPONSORS Ferman Motor Car Company Harley Davidson of New Port Richey Sheldon Palms Insurance, Inc./Lollygaggers Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Agent Crystal Community E.N.T. Dr. Denis Grillo Plantation Inn Nature Coast Financial Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc. Ross Hammock Ranch Williams, McCarnie, Wardlow and Cash, P.A. COMED Y TOUR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 000FZ1M 000G725 GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dont get caught up in class warfareIf you are born poor, its not your fault, but if you stay poor, its your fault, because you had a choice. The Chronicleprinted the names of some very rich Americans and if you want to see the top 400 or so go to Forbes.com. It will give you their names and approximate gross worth. Its pretty impressive. Do I want to take some of their money and enjoy their wealth? Not really, but I am jealous. Sometimes I wish I had their ideas and would be willing to take the risk, put them to work and make a fortune. One thing all these people have in common is they had an idea, they own a business or are the head of a company. They all have a lot of people working for them and as such, have large payrolls and also pay benefits. I think that the stock market determines, in a large part, the gross value of these individuals. I dont think their money is in bank accounts, maybe a checking account, but certainly not a savings or CD account. I think their money is in brokerage accounts, stocks, bonds and mutual or index funds. In other words, their money is invested and at risk. The amount of risk varies with the type of investment and the company. The moral of the story is: If your money is in the bank, you will not become rich and your growth will be limited to your deposits and the interest rate. If you invest your money in the economy of the U.S., through a stock broker, you will have the opportunity to grow with the economy. Now, just what do you think the bank does with your deposits? They invest it many different ways, keep most of the earnings and pay you a pittance. Do you still want to keep your money in the bank so that its safe and FDIC insured? If you do, it will not grow with the economy, so dont complain about how much money someone else has. Just be satisfied with what you have, because thats the way you want it. You say those people dont pay income tax. I think that they do and lots of it. Remember, liars can figure, but figures dont lie. Check it out for yourself and dont believe everything someone tells you. There is an awful lot of embellishment and distortion in the statements that come our way and its up to us to learn the truth, sometimes the hard way. Some of these billionaires are very benevolent. Next time you go into a public library, and there are lots of them, look at the computers that are there for public use. I think you will find that they were donated by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Also, remember that Bill Gates, Warren Buffet and maybe others, are donating billions to various charities. You say, well they can afford it; yes they can, but they dont have to do it, they want to give it away, give back, and do lots of good. We should all be very thankful. If you look at the list on Forbes.com, look for Rockefeller. He is not near the top. Remember all the money his family and their foundation have donated to various causes. Thanks to the Rockefeller family and others for their charitable giving. What ever you do, dont allow yourself to get roped into class warfare; this doesnt solve anything.Alfred E. Mason Crystal RiverRestructuring on the horizonIt appears Brad Thorpes administration could be in for another restructuring. Vince Cautero has accepted a job in Cape Coral. When Cautero departs, it will amount to four upper level officials from Thorpes administration who have sought other opportunities in local government. It is unclear whether these departures are the result of the countys difficult financial condition or frustration about the administrators management style. If readers will recall, Thorpe announced his retirement and then subsequently unretired for unknown reasons. Thorpe was allowed back as the county administrator, citing an insufficient applicant field. Obviously, Cape Coral feels otherwise regarding the qualifications of Mr. Cautero.Claude Strass Homosassa Dangerous suspectsIm reading in the paper Sept. 6 about the two drug addicts. One is titled A drug-addled man, and the other is Driver caught following wild chase, and he was caught with drug-making material in his car. These guys are dangerous. They need to be taken off the street They need to go to lockup and get them off the street. Theyre dangerous to the population, especially where children are involved.Racing through the greenHey, Sound Off, Im from Crystal River. Im off (State Road) 44. Recently they put a light at Meadowcrest They need to have a sheriff hiding around there because people race through that to catch that light green. They race. I can do over the limit and theyre flying by me. Not good. Were in a small town. Lets keep it healthy and safe. Well, healthy is up to you, but safe, please. Cars (are) racing to get through that green light, even through the red sometimes.Take home more costlyIn todays Chronicle Id like to critique the Take-home cars make sense. First of all, the sheriffs deputies cars cost a lot to maintain, cost a lot for gas. Ive already shopped down in Hernando County Super Walmart and Ive seen Citrus County deputy cars parked there while they were inside shopping. Ive been at doctors offices, Ive been to dentists offices and sheriffs deputies cars were parked outside while theyre inside getting their medical problems taken care of. And if you do the math, you would see how much more expensive it is for them to take their cars home, especially if theyre using it for personal use. And get off this kick that theyre on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Thats not entirely true. Maybe detectives are, but not the deputies.Not worth the moneyI just saw our great commissioner by the name of Joseph Meek. Well, I want to tell you something. I dont think hes worth the money he gets paid. For them to give him a county vehicle, too, on top of his wages, I think thats totally ridiculous. The county taxpayers are paying for that and I dont think thats right. He doesnt need an automobile.Editors note:Commissioner Meek doesnt have a county vehicle. He drives his own vehicle. None of the commissioners have county vehicles.No support from courtsThe state took my children away in the year 2000, took them until three years, eight months later. I finally got custody of them away from an alcoholic mother who endangered them the whole time. Little that I said or did, did the courts take into consideration. They just have no consideration for the father whatsoever. During that time, I paid tens of thousands of dollars in child support. I, on the other hand, get no support, no action from the courts, no nothing. Thanks for showing upIm just calling to say thank you to Mr. JJ Kenney for coming to a special birthday party that we had for Helen Nedelsky for her 100th birthday. All the commissioners were invited. But thank you, JJ. You were the only one who showed up. Youre a real classy guy. Cant thank you enough. A very, very grateful fan.Enough drugs alreadySo the editorial staff of the Chronicle thinks its time to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes. Its just going to open everything up to abuse. You know that. Doctors are going to give people scripts that say, Yup, you need it, when they dont need it the Chronicle needs to lighten up, man. God, dont we have enough drugs out there right now?Save our bottled waterI wonder if the company thats getting our water for free to turn into bottled water, I wonder if theyre going to help us celebrate Save Our Waters Week. Why can they get 176,000 gallons a day and nobodys metering it? Sure, lets save our water. SoundOFF Letters toTHE EDITOR

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Light art Associated PressPedestrians walk under Particle Falls, a temporary public art installation by Andrea Polli, which is being projected on the face of the Wilma Theater in Philadelphia. The light display represents real time air quality as detected by a nearby monitor and runs every evening from Sept. 26 through Dec. 1. Teacher freed after 30-day term for raping teenBILLINGS, Mont. A former high school teacher has been released from a Montana prison after completing a 30-day sentence for rape handed down by a judge under fire for both the sentence and his remarks about the 14-year-old victim. Fifty-four-year-old Stacey Rambold returned Thursday to his hometown of Billings, where he was seen reporting to the local probation office after completing his term for the 2007 rape of Cherice Moralez. Rambold will remain on probation until 2028, and has been registered as a low-risk sex offender. He was convicted after violating terms of a deferred prosecution agreement he made after Moralez killed herself in 2010. Prosecutors are appealing District Judge G. Todd Baughs sentence. A complaint has been filed by advocates seeking Baughs removal. The judge said at an August sentencing hearing that Moralez seemed older than her chronological age.Transformers headed to crippled NY railNEW YORK Officials announced a plan to supply partial power to a heavily trafficked line of the nations second largest commuter railroad as tens of thousands of commuters took to the highways and continued to scramble for alternative routes after a power failure disrupted service along the line serving the densely populated Connecticut suburbs and New York City. New York-based utility Consolidated Edison was setting up three transformers to try and supply 13,000 volts of power to a highvoltage line that failed Wednesday at a suburban New York Metro-North Railroad station, Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said at a news conference in New York Citys Grand Central Terminal Thursday evening.Gettysburg park grants KKK event permitGETTYSBURG, Pa. The Ku Klux Klan has been granted a permit to hold an event at Gettysburg National Military Park. Park officials said the special-use permit was approved for a Marylandbased KKK group to exercise its First Amendment rights on Oct. 5. The afternoon event will be held on the lawn area north of Gen. George Meades Headquarters. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A16FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Protest Associated PressAnti-government protesters shout Thursday in front of parliament as they hold a portrait of Moroccan editor Ali Anouzla, who was arrested for posting al-Qaida video last week in Rabat, Morocco. Triple bombing at market near Baghdad kills 14BAGHDAD Iraqi officials said a triple bombing at an outdoor market in a village just north of Baghdad has killed 14 people and wounded 40. Police officials said three bombs went off on Thursday as the market in the Shiite village of Sabaa alBour was packed with shoppers. The village is about 20 miles north of Baghdad. The officials said two bombs exploded at the entrance of the village market while the third one went off inside. The attack came shortly after a bombing at an outdoor market in southern Baghdad killed seven people, including two women.Court upholds 50 years for Liberias TaylorLEIDSCHENDAM, Netherlands An international war crimes court has upheld the conviction and 50-year sentence of former Liberian President Charles Taylor for aiding rebels in neighboring Sierra Leone, saying Taylors financial, material and tactical support made possible horrendous crimes against civilians. The appeals chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone upheld the 65-year-old Taylors conviction on 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity including terrorism, murder, rape and using child soldiers.Deal reached on UN resolution on Syria weaponsUNITED NATIONS The five permanent members of the deeply divided U.N. Security Council reached agreement Thursday on a resolution to eliminate Syrias chemical weapons, a major step in taking the most controversial weapon off the battlefield of the worlds deadliest current conflict. Senior U.S., Russian, British and French diplomats confirmed the agreement, which also includes China. Britains U.N. Ambassador Mark Lyall Grant said he would introduce the text to the Security Councils 10 non-permanent members Thursday night.Hungarian makes crib for Britains Prince GeorgeBUDAPEST, Hungary A Hungarian Roma artisan said a dream motivated him to build a black walnut crib for Prince George, the twomonth-old baby who is third in line to the British throne. Arpad Rostas, who has done wood restoration work at the Versailles Palace in France and at the Vatican, said he had a dream in which Jesus and the Virgin Mary appeared with a crib, inspiring him to build one. World BRIEFS From wire reports Postmaster: Money woes behind rate hike request Associated PressWASHINGTON Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said Thursday the Postal Service had no choice but to ask for an emergency rate hike given the agencys dire finances. One day after his cash-strapped agency proposed raising the firstclass stamp price to 49 cents, Donohoe urged swift action by Congress to overhaul the Postal Service and fix its finances. The post office expects to lose $6 billion this year. It wants to raise stamp prices by 3 cents next year. The request must be approved by the independent Postal Regulatory Commission. We did not want to take this step, but we had no choice due to our current financial position, Donahoe said. Donahoe appeared before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee to press for approval of bipartisan legislation that would allow his agency to end Saturday delivery after one year and cease door-to-door delivery for new residential and business addresses. Many lawmakers and postal worker unions said the delivery changes would inconvenience customers. The choice is simple: greater flexibility and authority now, or massive taxpayer exposure and service degradation later, Donahoe said. Donahoe noted that his agencys request for a price hike probably wont be decided for three months, a delay that he said hampers the Postal Services ability to run an efficient and competitive business. Thats not a good environment to be in when you are fighting for your life, he said. The Senate bill also would provide greater flexibility for the Postal Service to set prices on its own. Under federal law, the post office cannot raise its prices more than the rate of inflation unless it gets approval from the commission. The Senate proposal would have the inflationary rate cap expire in 2016. For years, the Postal Service has struggled with declining mail volume and a 2006 congressional requirement that it make advance payments to cover expected health care costs for future retirees. The bill would change how health costs for future retirees are calculated. The Postal Service is seeking to reduce its $5.6 billion annual payment for future retiree health benefits. It missed two of those payments in 2012, deferred one from the previous year and is expected to miss another at the end of this month, when its fiscal year ends. Associated PressFRESNO, Calif. With the harvest in full swing on the West Coast, farmers in California and other states say they cant find enough people to pick high value crops such as grapes, peppers, apples and pears. In some cases, workers have walked off fields in the middle of harvest, lured by offers of better pay or easier work elsewhere. The shortage and competition for workers means labor expenses have climbed, harvests are getting delayed and less fruit and vegetable products are being picked, prompting some growers to say their income is suffering. Experts say, however, the shortage is not expected to affect prices for consumers. But farmworkers, whose incomes are some of the lowest in the nation, have benefited, their wages jumping in California to $2 to $3 over the $8 hourly minimum wage and even more for those working piece rate. The shortage driven by a struggling U.S. economy, more jobs in Mexico, and bigger hurdles to illegal border crossings has led some farmers to offer unusual incentives: theyre buying meals for their workers, paying for transportation to and from fields, even giving bonuses to those who stay for the whole season. And a few have stationed foremen near their crews to prevent other farmers from wooing away their workers. In the past, we were overrun with farmworkers. But not anymore, said labor contractor Jesus Mateo, whose crews saw a 20 percent pay increase. Employers have to do something to attract them. The fastest workers can now earn more than $1,000 per week. 355 dead, nearly 700 injured Associated PressLABACH, Pakistan Separatist militants fired two rockets that narrowly missed a Pakistani government helicopter surveying a region devastated by an earthquake, underscoring the dangers authorities face in helping victims in Baluchistan, the countrys most impoverished province. The doctor in charge of the main hospital in the area said the facility doesnt even have an X-ray machine or a laboratory and that supplies of crucial medicines were running low, as the death toll from Tuesdays magnitude 7.7 quake climbed to 355, with nearly 700 people injured. Survivors complained that aid was not reaching remote areas. We dont even have tents to cover my kids, said Haji Wajd Ali, who lives in the village of Labach, where every other house was destroyed. There are no shops. There is no food. There is no water, he said as temperatures reached 100 degrees during the day. Labach lies just a few miles outside the capital of Awaran district, one of the poorest in Baluchistan. In the town of Awaran, about 100 people demonstrated around the district office to call attention to the plight of those still waiting for help. The quake flattened wide sections of the district, leaving hundreds of people crushed or injured beneath the crumbled piles of mostly mud brick houses. Helping the residents has been made even harder by the danger from Baluchistan separatists who have been battling the Pakistani government for years. The militants fired two rockets Thursday at a helicopter carrying top Pakistani officials in charge of relief operations, but missed their target, said the deputy district commissioner, Abdur Rasheed. The helicopter was carrying the head of the countrys National Disaster Management Authority, a Pakistani Army general in charge of relief operations and other officials. Rescuers struggling after Pakistani quake Associated PressPakistani women gather Thursday by the window of a local clinic, waiting to receive medical relief after an earthquake in Labach, in the remote district of Awaran in Baluchistan province, Pakistan. Associated PressPostmaster General Patrick Donahoe testifies Thursday in Washington before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on reforming and renewing the U.S. Postal Service. Associated PressFarmworkers pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground Tuesday and heap them onto a trailer in the final step of raisin harvest near Fresno, Calif. This year, due to a labor shortage in California and other western states, many growers increased farmworker wages by up to 20 percent pay and gave other incentives, making this one of the best harvests for the workers. Farmers face labor shortages

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MLB/B3 Scoreboard/B4 TV, lottery/B4 Auto racing/B5 Football/B6 The Yankees honor Mariano Rivera, one of the teams all-time greats, Thursday night against the Rays./ B3 SPORTSSection BFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Warriors take care of Panthers in four C.J. RISAK ChronicleLECANTO For the second time this season, Lecanto went up against a solid Seven Rivers Christian volleyball team, and as one might anticipate, the first three sets were all tightly contested. It wasnt until the fourth set that a side emerged dominant. That side was Seven Rivers, which swept past the Panthers in three-straight in the teams first meeting this season. It wouldnt be that easy this time it required four sets before the Warriors got the win, 25-22, 23-25, 25-21, 25-14 Thursday at Seven Rivers. The win boosted Seven Rivers record to 14-3 overall and, in matches against Citrus County rivals, the Warriors are 4-1 overall with a match to come against Crystal River. Their only loss came in the season opener to Citrus. Lecanto is 7-6 overall. Theyre playing well, Seven Rivers coach Wanda Grey said of her teams performance. Theyre learning how to play with each other and it shows. What the Warriors put on display often in this match was a confidence in finding the right person and for that matter, the right place to put down a shot. Often that came from either senior Alexis Zachar or junior Alyssa Gage. But the confidence went beyond those influences. It meant losing a few points in a row wont result in a complete derailment. In the first set, Lecanto had an early four-point lead and maintained it while the sides approached the midpoint of the set. But by the middle of the set, it was tied at 13-all. Seven Rivers eventually opened up a five-point cushion (20-15) and kept it until two late kills by Lecantos Annalee Garcia narrowed the gap to two. Narrowed it, but didnt eliminate it: an Alyssa Gage kill ended the set in Seven Rivers favor. The set Lecanto did win did not come easily. The Panthers led 18-12 at one point, before Seven Rivers stormed back to go up 20-19 on consecutive kills by Zachar. It was tight the remainder of that set until a couple of service aces by Lecanto gave them just enough of an edge. But that was the highlight for the Panthers, who could not sufficiently or at least not consistently defend the Warriors attack. Seven Rivers opened up a six-point lead in the third set at 19-13 before settling on a 25-21 victory, then an early fivepoint run allowed the Warriors to open up a lead they would never relinquish in the decisive fourth set. Im hoping by districts, well be even keel, said Lecanto coach Alice Christian. But its got to come from them. We played really well Tuesday against Citrus (a five-set Lecanto win) and we played well against West Port (Monday). Still, were very inconsistent. We have to play consistently the same. Seven Rivers is moving closer toward that similar goal. Their coach lauded their play in the win over Lecanto, but wasnt completely sold. We played well, Grey said. But we can play even better than what we showed. Seven Rivers junior Kim Iwaniec fields a return from Lecanto in the first game of the volleyball match at Seven Rivers Christian School on Thursday evening in Lecanto.STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle Kidds 37 leads CR boys past LecantoJAMESBLEVINS CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER After a week of intermittent rain showers which cancelled several practices and even a few meets, a dual tournament between the Crystal River Pirates and host Lecanto Panthers went off without a hitch Thursday evening at the Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club. Crystal River (10-2 overall record, 7-1 district) cruised to a meet victory over Lecanto 165189 in a District 2A-7 matchup. The Pirates continue their undefeated streak against county rivals so far this season after outdistancing the Panthers (6-11 overall, 0-4 district) by 24 strokes. It was nice to get out and get a round in today, Crystal River head coach Jere DeFoor said, after getting rained out the first three days this week. We lost one match this week against Dunnellon (due) to weather and another match last week against Springstead for the same thing. Its good to get these kids out here to play and they did really well, DeFoor added. Pirates junior Kyle Kidd won top medalist honors in the meet with a 1-over par 37 on the 9hole course. Kidd was pleased with the results of his performance on the links but knows that many tweaks are left to fix in his overall game before the postseason. I was hitting decent today and finding some fairways, Kidd said. But Im still not a 110 percent confident in my swing in every location on the course. My short game is still saving me a lot of the time. If I didnt have a short game (right now), Id be shooting (in the) 90s. Lecantos Micah Sugioka (38) finished just one stroke back in second place, leading his Panthers team. The junior was a bit displeased with finishing behind Kidd after tying him the last time they met at the Plantation Inn golf course. I played pretty well, just made a few rookie mistakes and it cost me, Sugioka said. Im kind of sad that I didnt beat Kyle. That was my goal for the day. Crystal Rivers Matt Allen shot a 6-over 42 to score second on his team, followed by Adam Downey (43) and Micah McDonald (43) in the final two scoring positions. Caleb Southey (50), Cameron Wyckoff (50) and Zach Groff (51) scored behind No. 1 Sugioka to complete Lecantos scoring front-four. Were really too inconsistent and it costs us every match, Lecanto head coach Dave Soluri said. There are a lot of things we need to practice in the coming weeks. Pirates golf continues to sweep through county Power is the name of Sims gameSEANARNOLD CorrespondentAs Dunnellon has returned to the groundand-pound approach it made its signature for several years under ninth-year head coach Frank Beasley, junior Devin Bubba Sims and his Tigers have found a mutual fit with one another. Sims gets carries 91 in four games and the Tigers get plenty of pound to go with the ground. When asked to describe his style, the 5-foot-10, 215-pound Sims broke it down to a word: power. Im a power back, he said. Speed, I got to get it there, but Im a big power back. Thats all I can really say about it. Sims leads the area in rushing with 610 yards (6.7 per carry) and has five touchdowns, while his Tigers have jumped to a 3-1 start. In last Fridays game at Santa Fe, he rushed for 196 yards and a pair of scores in helping his team get off to a winning start in District 5A-5 with a 27-6 victory. Hes a big physical back and he runs downhill pretty well, Dunnellon head coach Frank Beasley said. But the most impressive thing about him is he runs with great vision. Were not real fancy on offense, and were really young at all our skill positions, but our offensive lines playing really well. Bubba (Sims) and Josh Williams (28 carries, 269 yards) are doing a great job at finding holes and kind of picking their way through there. Tonights Tigers opponent, rival Crystal River, has taken notice of Sims. Whats interesting about a kid like that, Crystal River STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleDunnellon junior running back Devin Bubba Sims leads the area in carries (91), rushing yards (610) and rushing touchdowns (5) for the 3-1 Tigers, who host Crystal River tonight. See POUND/ Page B3 CR heads into Tigers lair Area football teams meet in game of the weekSEANARNOLD CorrespondentCrystal River (2-1, 0-0 in 5A-5) at Dunnellon (3-1, 1-0 in 5A-5), 7:30 p.m. tonight Its been a rivalry of streaks. Long streaks. Dunnellons current 11-game winning streak over Crystal River started on the heels of a 16-game winning slate for the Pirates in the series. But both teams are young enough this year to throw history even recent history out the window. Tonights District 5A-5 tilt at Ned Love Field represents Nathan Varnadores first game against the Tigers as well as his first district game as head coach of the Pirates. His team rested with a bye last week after pulling out a 14-7 defenseled victory against Lecanto. The kids have been very focused, Varnadore said. The close win at Lecanto, I think, woke a lot of them up. Crystal River senior Ty Reynolds hauled in a couple of late interceptions after scoring on a 60-yard punt return in the first quarter to clinch the win. The sophomore-laden Pirates (2-1, 0-0) have struggled offensively, but have shown flashes in the passing game under junior quarterback Collin Ryan. Defensively, their kids play really hard, said Dunnellon head coach Frank Beasley, who is 8-0 versus Crystal River. Theyve got two really big defensive tackles that are obviously going to create some problems for us trying to run the ball between the tackles. Theyre young, he added. I think its pretty standard with a new coach coming in, especially a defensive coach, for a See HOST/ Page B6

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B2FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE WIN Pro-Football Weekly Contest WEEKLY PRIZES000G0KM000G0KM 0 10 6 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 10 11 6 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 10 10 6 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 12 9 9 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Citrus Pest 9 11 8 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Nick Nicholas 10 9 6 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Furniture Palace 12 11 6 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NAt Love Honda 12 9 7 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Eagle Buick 12 10 9 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Eagle Buick Citrus Sports Plantation on CR Plantation on CR

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BASEBALLCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 B3 Exit Sandman: Rivera bids goodbye to Bronx Associated PressNEW YORK Mariano Rivera said goodbye to Yankee Stadium with hugs, tears and cheers. Baseballs most acclaimed relief pitcher made an emotional exit in his final appearance in the Yankees home pinstripes, when captain Derek Jeter and Andy Pettitte came to the mound to remove him with two outs in the ninth inning of a 4-0 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday night. Its time to go, Jeter appeared to tell Rivera. Tampa Bay won its seventh straight and leads the AL wildcard race. During four minutes of thunderous chanting from the sellout crowd 48,675, an overcome Rivera sobbed as he buried his head on the shoulder of Pettitte, who also is retiring when the season ends Sunday, and then hugged Jeter. It was an extraordinary sight in a sport where a manager almost always goes to the mound to make a pitching change. Yankees manager Joe Girardi checked with the umpires to make certain Jeter, who is on the disabled list, could take part. I was so thankful they came out, Rivera said after the game. Rivera, who retired four straight batters, wiped his eyes with both arms as he walked off and blew a kiss to the first row behind the Yankees dugout. He hugged a tearful Girardi in the dugout, grabbed a towel to dab the tears, and came out again and doffed his cap to the crowd. All the while, the Rays remained in their dugout applauding. Throughout the stands, fans blinked back tears. When Rivera came off, Pettitte came out for his own curtain call as the Rays waited. After the last out, Rivera remained on the bench for a moment as New York, New York played. The 43-year-old Rivera then took a final walk to the mound, where he stood, rubbed his feet on the rubber, kneeled and gathered dirt as a keepsake. Rivera had entered with one out and two on in the eighth to a recorded introduction by Bob Sheppard, the longtime Yankees public address announcer who died three years ago. Fans stood, applauded and chanted his name as he jogged in from the bullpen to Metallicas Enter Sandman and continued for two minutes as he took his warmups. The entire Tampa Bay bench emptied and stood on the dirt warning track in front of the dugout and applauded. Fans remained on their feet, chanting his name as he got two quick outs on six pitches. In his first appearance since the Yankees retired his No. 42 during a 50-minute ceremony Sunday, Rivera retired Delmon Young on a groundout and Sam Fuld on a comebacker. He lingered on the dugout bench when the eighth inning ended and took in the whole stadium scene as he teammates ran onto the field. Rivera jogged out last and was given another standing ovation. With the crowd shouting at a postseason level, he retired Jose Lobaton on a comebacker and Yunel Escobar on a popup to second before the famous, final scene. The Yankees, eliminated from playoff contention, finish the season with three games in Houston. The oldest player in the major leagues, Rivera record 314 of his record 652 saves at home during a 19-year big league career, and 18 of his record 42 postseason saves were at the old and new Yankee Stadium. Rivera helped the Yankees to five World Series titles, getting the final out in four of them. Tampa Bay lowered to two its magic number over Texas for clinching an AL wild-card berth. The Rays swept this three-game series, outscoring the Yankees 19-3. Alex Cobb (11-3) took a one-hit shutout into the eighth, retiring 15 in a row between walks to Curtis Granderson in the second and Robinson Cano in the seventh. He wound up allowing three hits in seven innings-plus. Evan Longoria hit an RBI single in the fourth against Ivan Nova (96) and a two-run single off Dellin Betances in the eighth. Young hit a long solo homer to left-center in the sixth. New York has lost nine of 12, including four in a row, and at 82-77 will have its fewest wins in a nonshortened season in a long time. AL Associated PressNew York Yankees relief pitcher Mariano Rivera acknowledges fans Thursday after receiving gifts prior to his final appearance at Yankee Stadium against the Tampa Bay Rays in New York. Rivera is retiring at the end of the season. Last dance for Mo Rays 4, Yankees 0Tampa BayNew York abrhbiabrhbi Zobrist ss-2b5120ISuzuki rf4000 WMyrs rf4110Nunez 3b-ss4010 Loney 1b3130Cano 2b3000 Longori 3b4023ASorin dh3000 DeJess cf-lf3000Grndrs cf2010 DYong dh3121Overay 1b3010 Joyce lf3000ZAlmnt lf3000 Fuld cf1000Ryan ss2000 Loaton c4000V.Wells ph1000 SRdrgz 2b2000MrRynl 3b0000 Scott ph1010JMrphy c3000 YEscor ss1000 Totals344114Totals28030 Tampa Bay0001001204 New York0000000000 DPTampa Bay 2, New York 3. LOBTampa Bay 6, New York 3. 2BLoney (32), Granderson (12). HRD.Young (2). SBGranderson (8), Overbay (2). CSScott (1). IPHRERBBSO Tampa Bay Cobb W,11-3730024 Jo.Peralta H,40100002 McGee100001 New York Nova L,9-6782215 Betances1/332211 M.Rivera11/300000 Daley1/300001 Cobb pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBPby Nova (D.Young).Orioles 3, Blue Jays 2Toronto Baltimore abrhbi abrhbi Reyes ss4010BRorts dh4120 Kawsk dh3100Markks rf4121 Lawrie 3b4011Valenci 3b4010 Sierra rf4000A.Jones cf3010 Gose cf4000Wieters c2112 Arencii c4010Hardy ss3000 Lngrhn 1b4000Pearce 1b2010 Goins 2b4010Flahrty ph-1b1000 Pillar lf4120Pridie lf3010 Schoop 2b3000 Totals35261Totals29393 Toronto1000000102 Baltimore01200000x3 EPridie (1), Schoop (1). DPToronto 3. LOBToronto 7, Baltimore 3. 2BLawrie (17), Arencibia (18), Markakis (23), Valencia (14), Pearce (5). HRWieters (22). SFWieters. IPHRERBBSO Toronto Buehrle L,12-1031/383301 Jenkins 32/310004 Delabar 100000 Baltimore Gonzalez W,11-8721015 Tom.Hunter H,21131102 Ji.Johnson S,48-57110001Royals 3, White Sox 2Kansas CityChicago abrhbiabrhbi AGordn lf3000De Aza cf3010 Ciriaco ss4000Semien ss4000 Hosmer 1b4000Gillaspi 3b4000 BButler dh4010Konerk 1b4111 Mostks 3b4120A.Dunn dh3121 Maxwll cf-rf4110AGarci rf4010 Lough rf2122Viciedo lf4010 JDyson cf1000GBckh 2b3000 Kottars c4010BryAnd c3000 S.Perez c0000 Getz 2b4000 Totals34372Totals32262 Kansas City0002001003 Chicago0100010002 EBry.Anderson (1). LOBKansas City 6, Chicago 5. 2BViciedo (23). HRLough (5), Konerko (12), A.Dunn (33). CSDe Aza (8). IPHRERBBSO Kansas City Guthrie W,15-12742214 Hochevar H,8110001 G.Holland S,46-49110002 Chicago Rienzo L,2-3643214 Veal2/320001 D.Webb11/310001 Lindstrom100001 Rienzo pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBPby Guthrie (De Aza), by Rienzo (Lough). WPRienzo.ScheduleAMERICAN LEAGUE Thursdays Games Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Yankees 0 Baltimore 3, Toronto 2 Kansas City 3, Chicago White Sox 2 L.A. Angels at Texas, late Cleveland at Minnesota, late Todays Games Boston (Buchholz 11-1) at Baltimore (Feldman 5-5), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 12-9) at Toronto (Dickey 13-13), 7:07 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 13-8) at Miami (Koehler 4-10), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 17-7) at Texas (Ogando 7-4), 8:05 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 10-5) at Minnesota (P.Hernandez 3-2), 8:10 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 12-9) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 11-13), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Undecided) at Houston (Oberholtzer 4-4), 8:10 p.m. Oakland (Colon 17-6) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 12-9), 10:10 p.m. Saturdays Games Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Houston, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Sundays Games Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Houston, 2:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Thursdays Games San Diego 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings Milwaukee 4, N.Y. Mets 2 Atlanta 7, Philadelphia 1 L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, late Todays Games Detroit (Porcello 13-8) at Miami (Koehler 4-10), 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 11-10) at N.Y. Mets (C.Torres 4-5), 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 11-11), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 14-7) at Atlanta (Medlen 14-12), 7:30 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 9-11) at St. Louis (Lynn 14-10), 8:15 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 7-9) at Arizona (Corbin 14-7), 9:40 p.m. Colorado (McHugh 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 15-9), 10:10 p.m. San Diego (B.Smith 1-2) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-6), 10:15 p.m. Saturdays Games Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 8:10 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m. NL Braves 7, Phillies 1PhiladelphiaAtlanta abrhbiabrhbi CHrndz cf4000Heywrd cf5251 Rollins ss4030ElJhns 2b3210 DBrwn lf4000FFrmn 1b3121 Ruf rf4000Gattis lf5123 Frndsn 1b4010Constnz lf0000 Asche 3b4110McCnn c1000 Kratz c4020G.Laird ph-c2000 Galvis 2b4000CJhnsn 3b5111 Cloyd p1001Janish 3b0000 Robles p0000Smmns ss4000 Orr ph1010JSchafr rf4011 Savery p0000Hale p3000 DeFrts p0000A.Wood p0000 Mayrry ph1010RJhnsn ph1000 JCRmr p0000Ayala p0000 Rosnrg p0000Avilan p0000 Rupp ph1000 Totals36191Totals367127 Philadelphia0100000001 Atlanta52000000x7 EC.Hernandez (4), El.Johnson (3). LOB Philadelphia 8, Atlanta 11. 2BRollins (35), Kratz (7), Heyward 3 (22), F.Freeman (27), Gattis (21), C.Johnson (34). HRHeyward (14). SBEl.Johnson (8). IPHRERBBSO Philadelphia Cloyd L,2-7187722 Robles320024 Savery110011 De Fratus100001 J.C.Ramirez110011 Rosenberg100001 Atlanta Hale W,1-0671105 A.Wood110000 Ayala110000 Avilan100000 Cloyd pitched to 4 batters in the 2nd. WPRobles.Brewers 4, Mets 2MilwaukeeNew York abrhbiabrhbi Aoki cf-rf4000EYong lf4110 Gennett 2b4012DnMrp 2b5011 Lucroy c3010DWrght 3b1000 KDavis lf3110JuTrnr pr-3b3020 Gindl rf4110Duda 1b2000 Kintzlr p0000Baxter rf3000 Hndrsn p0000dnDkkr cf4000 YBtncr 3b4010TdArnd c3020 JFrncs 1b4111Quntnll ss4000 Bianchi ss4111Gee p2000 Hellwg p1000Z.Lutz ph1010 Figaro p0000Byrdak p0000 Halton ph1000Ardsm p0000 Wooten p0000Frncsc p0000 LSchfr cf0000Satin ph1111 Totals32474Totals33282 Milwaukee0400000004 New York0010000012 ELucroy (9). DPMilwaukee 2. LOBMilwaukee 6, New York 11. 2BLucroy (25), Dan.Murphy (37), Ju.Turner (13). HRSatin (3). SBLucroy (8), E.Young 2 (44). SHellweg. IPHRERBBSO Milwaukee Hellweg421143 Figaro W,3-3230000 Wooten H,7110010 Kintzler H,26100002 Henderson S,27-31121103 New York Gee L,12-11674422 Byrdak100000 Aardsma100001 F.Francisco100010 HBPby Hellweg (D.Wright, Duda), by Aardsma (Lucroy). WPHellweg. BalkFigaro.Padres 3, Dbacks 2, 11 inningsArizona San Diego abrhbi abrhbi Pollock cf4010Venale cf4000 Blmqst lf4000Denorfi rf5110 Gldsch 1b4110Gyorko 2b3111 Prado 2b4112Headly 3b4011 Davdsn 3b4000Medica 1b4120 GParra rf4000Kotsay lf3000 Owings ss4000Street p0000 Cllmntr p0000Vincent p0000 Gswsch c4000JGzmn ph1010 Cahill p2000Hundly c4010 Thtchr p0000Amarst ss5011 Roe p0000Erlin p2000 ErChvz ph1000Forsyth ph1000 DHrndz p0000Grgrsn p0000 WHarrs p0000Fuents lf1000 Pnngtn ss1000 Totals36232Totals37383 Arizona000200000002 San Diego002000000013 No outs when winning run scored. LOBArizona 2, San Diego 11. 2BHeadley (33), J.Guzman (17). 3BPollock (5), Denorfia (2). HRPrado (14). IPHRERBBSO Arizona Cahill 52/352243 Thatcher 1/300001 Roe 100002 D.Hernandez100013 W.Harris 100001 Collmenter L,5-5131110 San Diego Erlin 732217 Gregerson 100000 Street 100002 Vincent W,6-3200003 Collmenter pitched to 4 batters in the 11th. HBPby D.Hernandez (Headley). WPErlin.Baseball CalendarOct. 23 World Series begins, city of American League champion. November TBA Deadline for teams to make qualifying offers to their eligible former players who became free agents, fifth day after World Series. November TBA Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 12th day after World Series. Nov. 11-13 General managers meeting, Orlando, Fla. Nov. 13-14 Owners meeting, Orlando, Fla. Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2014 contracts to unsigned players. Dec. 2-5 Major League Baseball Players Association executive board meeting, La Jolla, Calif. Dec. 9-12 Winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Dec. 9 Hall of Fame expansion era committee (1973 and later) vote announced, Lake Buena Vista, Fla. West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Oakland9465.5916-4L-252-2942-36 Texas8771.551616-4W-342-3545-36 Los Angeles7880.49415107-3W-239-4239-38 Seattle7089.44024184-6W-235-4335-46 Houston51108.32143370-10L-1224-5427-54 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Boston9663.6046-4W-153-2843-35 Tampa Bay9069.56668-2W-751-3039-39 Baltimore8376.5221354-6W-244-3439-42 New York8277.5161463-7L-446-3536-42 Toronto7287.45324164-6L-238-4034-47 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Atlanta9465.5915-5W-154-2440-41 Washington8475.5281065-5L-347-3437-41 New York7386.45921176-4L-132-4641-40 Philadelphia7287.45322183-7L-243-3829-49 Miami59100.37135314-6W-133-4526-55 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway z-St. Louis9465.5917-3W-351-2743-38 z-Pittsburgh9168.57234-6L-150-3141-37 z-Cincinnati9069.56646-4L-249-2841-41 Milwaukee7287.45322186-4W-237-4435-43 Chicago6693.41528243-7W-131-5035-43 z-clinched playoff berth, x-clinched division West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-L. Angeles9167.5765-5L-146-3245-35 Arizona8079.50311104-6L-244-3436-45 San Diego7584.47216156-4W-245-3630-48 San Fran.7385.46218166-4W-139-3934-46 Colorado7287.45319184-6L-145-3627-51 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Detroit9366.5857-3W-251-3042-36 Cleveland8870.55748-2W-651-3037-40 Kansas City8475.528946-4W-144-3740-38 Minnesota6692.41826222-8L-232-4534-47 Chicago6297.39031264-6L-336-4226-55 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE Associated PressATLANTA Jason Heyward had a career-high five hits, including a leadoff home run, and the Braves rode a five-run first inning to post a 7-1 win over the Phillies on Thursday night. The win pulls the Braves even with the idle Cardinals at 94-65 for the best record in the National League with three games to play. The Braves won the season-series against the Cardinals and would win the NLs No. 1 seed if the teams finish tied. Rookie David Hale (1-0) won his first MLB game in his second career start, allowing one run in six innings while striking out five. Phillies Rookie Tyler Cloyd (2-7) took the loss after giving up seven runs and eight hits in one inning. Evan Gattis had two hits and three RBIs for the Braves. Jimmy Rollins went 3 for 4 for the Phillies, who have lost seven of eight.National League Brewers 4, Mets 2NEW YORK Scooter Gennett capped a four-run second inning with a two-run single and the Milwaukee Brewers overcame some wild pitching that included the beaning of David Wright for a 4-2 victory over the New York Mets. Wright was hit in the helmet by a pitch from Johnny Hellweg with two outs in the third inning. The All-Star third baseman went down to his hands and knees but he was able to walk off the field unassisted. The Mets said he was removed as a precaution. Hellweg hit Lucas Duda with the next pitch in the back of the leg and then loaded the bases with a fourpitch walk. But the Mets, who entered with a home record worse than all in the National League except the Cubs (31-50), could not take advantage. Coming off a road trip in which they won five of six, the Mets were 0 for 14 with runners in scoring position in dropping to 32-46 at Citi Field.Padres 3, Dbacks 2, 11 inns.SAN DIEGO Alexi Amarista hit an RBI single in the 11th inning and the San Diego Padres outlasted the Arizona Diamondbacks 3-2. Tommy Medica led off the 11th with a swinging bunt down the third-base line for an infield single. Jesus Guzman batted for reliever Nick Vincent (6-3) and hit a ground-rule double that center fielder A.J. Pollock misplayed. Josh Collementer (5-5) intentionally walked Nick Hundley to load the bases, and Amarista slapped a single through a drawn-in infield.American League Orioles 3, Blue Jays 2BALTIMORE Miguel Gonzalez pitched seven innings of two-hit ball, Matt Wieters homered and drove in two runs, and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Toronto Blue Jays 3-2. Nick Markakis had two hits and an RBI for the Orioles, who won the season series 10-9. Baltimore is 13-5 at Camden Yards against the Blue Jays since the start of the 2012 season. Gonzalez (11-8) allowed one unearned run, struck out five and walked one. The only hits were a single by Kevin Pillar in the third inning and a double by J.P. Arencibia in the seventh. Gonzalez retired 13 straight batters at one point. It was the first game this season in which the right-hander didnt give up a run. Jim Johnson got three outs for his AL-leading 48th save.Royals 3, White Sox 2CHICAGO Jeremy Guthrie pitched seven strong innings, and David Lough hit a two-run homer to lead the Kansas City Royals to a 3-2 victory over the Chicago White Sox. One day after being eliminated from the postseason, the Royals earned their 84th win, their most since 1993. The Royals 6-0 loss to Seattle on Wednesday, combined with victories from all three teams ahead of them in the AL wild-card standings, officially eliminated them from playoff contention. Guthrie (15-12) became the Royals third 15-game winner since 1997. Braves bash NL rival Phillies

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESCOREBOARD On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 11 a.m. (FS1) Sprint Cup: AAA 400 practice 12:30 p.m. (FS1) Nationwide Series: Dover 200 practice 3 p.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: AAA 400 qualifying BASEBALL 7 p.m. (FSNFL) Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins 7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays COLLEGE FOOTBALL 9 p.m. (ESPN) Utah State at San Jose State 9 p.m. (ESPNU) Middle Tennessee State at BYU HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL 10 p.m. (FS1) Edison (CA) vs. Mater Dei (CA) GOLF 8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, Second Round 3 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com Tour Championship, Second Round 6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Nature Valley First Tee Open, First Round HOCKEY 7 p.m. (NHL) Philadelphia Flyers at Washington Capitals 10:30 p.m. (NHL) Los Angeles Kings vs. New York Rangers SOCCER 8 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Philadelphia Union at Sporting Kansas City 8:25 p.m. (ESPN2) Mexico Primera Division: Queretaro FC vs Tigres UANL TENNIS 4 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open quarterfinal (Taped) 6 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Malaysian Open quarterfinal (Taped) 12 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA Toray Pan Pacific Open final Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS FOOTBALL 7 p.m. Seven Rivers at Mount Dora Bible 7:30 p.m. Belleview at Lecanto 7:30 p.m. Crystal River at Dunnellon VOLLEYBALL TBA Lecanto in Edgewater and Dr. Phillips Tournament TBA Seven Rivers in OVA Tournament CROSS COUNTRY 9 a.m. Lecanto at FL Runners meet in Titusville RADIO HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL 7:15 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Crystal River at Dunnellon NFL standingsAMERICAN CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA New England3001.0005934 Miami 3001.0007453 N.Y. Jets210.6675550 Buffalo 120.3336573 South WLTPctPFPA Houston210.6677082 Indianapolis210.6676848 Tennessee210.6676056 Jacksonville030.0002892 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati210.6677564 Baltimore210.6677164 Cleveland120.3334764 Pittsburgh030.0004276 West WLTPctPFPA Denver3001.00012771 Kansas City3001.0007134 San Diego120.3337881 Oakland120.3335767 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA Dallas 210.6678355 Philadelphia120.3337986 N.Y. Giants030.00054115 Washington030.0006798 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans3001.0007038 Carolina120.3336836 Atlanta 120.3337174 Tampa Bay030.0003457 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago3001.0009574 Detroit 210.6678269 Green Bay120.3339688 Minnesota030.0008196 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 3001.0008627 St. Louis120.3335886 San Francisco120.3334484 Arizona120.3335679 Todays Game Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16 Sundays Games Tennessee 20, San Diego 17 New Orleans 31, Arizona 7 Dallas 31, St. Louis 7 Cleveland 31, Minnesota 27 Baltimore 30, Houston 9 Carolina 38, N.Y. Giants 0 Detroit 27, Washington 20 New England 23, Tampa Bay 3 Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 30 Miami 27, Atlanta 23 Indianapolis 27, San Francisco 7 Seattle 45, Jacksonville 17 N.Y. Jets 27, Buffalo 20 Chicago 40, Pittsburgh 23 Mondays Game Denver 37, Oakland 21 Thursday, Sep. 26 San Francisco at St. Louis, late Sunday, Sep. 29 N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m. New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m. Open: Carolina, Green Bay Monday, Sep. 30 Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m.AL leadersGABRHPct. MiCabrera Det146548103189.345 Mauer Min11344562144.324 Trout LAA153578108187.324 ABeltre Tex15661285194.317 Cano NYY15859780187.313 DOrtiz Bos13550880156.307 Donaldson Oak15557188174.305 TorHunter Det14360290183.304 Loney TB15453553162.303 HKendrick LAA11846055139.302 Home Runs CDavis, Baltimore, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 44; Encarnacion, Toronto, 36; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 34; ADunn, Chicago, 33; AJones, Baltimore, 32; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 31. Runs Batted In MiCabrera, Detroit, 137; CDavis, Baltimore, 137; Cano, New York, 106; Fielder, Detroit, 106; AJones, Baltimore, 106; Encarnacion, Toronto, 104; DOrtiz, Boston, 100. Pitching Scherzer, Detroit, 21-3; Colon, Oakland, 176; CWilson, Los Angeles, 17-7; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 16-4; Tillman, Baltimore, 16-7; Lester, Boston, 15-8; Guthrie, Kansas City, 15-12.NL leadersGABRHPct. Cuddyer Col12848074161.335 CJohnson Atl14050753164.323 MCarpenter StL154616125198.321 McCutchen Pit15557595183.318 FFreeman Atl14453987171.317 Werth Was12745682144.316 Craig StL13450871160.315 YMolina StL13349966157.315 Tulowitzki Col12343571136.313 Votto Cin159573100174.304 Home Runs Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 34; Bruce, Cincinnati, 30; DBrown, Philadelphia, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; JUpton, Atlanta, 26; Zimmerman, Washington, 26. Runs Batted In Goldschmidt, Arizona, 124; Bruce, Cincinnati, 107; FFreeman, Atlanta, 107; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 102; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 98; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 97; Craig, St. Louis, 97. Pitching Zimmermann, Washington, 19-9; Wainwright, St. Louis, 18-9; JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 16-6; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 16-8; Greinke, Los Angeles, 15-3; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 15-9; SMiller, St. Louis, 15-9. BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLAnnounced the retirement of commissioner Bud Selig in January 2015. Suspended Milwaukee OF Carlos Gomez and Atlanta OF Reed Johnson one game and fined them and Atlanta 1B Freddie Freeman and Atlanta C Brian McCann undisclosed amounts for their actions during Wednesdays game. American League DETROIT TIGERSPlaced SS Danny Worth on the 60-day DL. Reinstated SS Jhonny Peralta from the restricted list. TORONTO BLUE JAYSTransferred LHP Brett Cecil to the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of OF Ryan Langerhans from Buffalo (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBSPlaced C Welington Castillo on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept. 20. NEW YORK METSTransferred RHP Matt Harvey to the 60-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW YORK KNICKSNamed Steve Mills president and general manager. Reassigned Glen Grunwald to adviser. FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERSPromoted Cathy Dworak to director of community outreach and player/alumni relations. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGSAssigned C Riley Sheahan and RW Teemu Pulkkinen to Grand Rapids (AHL). Recalled C Luke Glendening and RW Tomas Jurco from Grand Rapids. FLORIDA PANTHERSSigned G Tim Thomas to a one-year contract. Loaned D Mike Mottau to San Antonio (AHL). Recalled G Michael Houser from San Antonio. MONTREAL CANADIENSAssigned Fs Mike Blunden, Martin St. Pierre, Christian Thomas, Nick Tarnasky and Patrick Holland and D Magnus Nygren, Darren Dietz and Greg Pateryn to Hamilton (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERSAgreed to terms with C Derek Stepan on a two-year contract. PHOENIX COYOTESAssigned Fs Andy Miele and Jordan Szwarz to Portland (AHL). Released F Gilbert Brule. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGEReleased D Drew Daniels, David MacDonald and Martin Schumnig. ECHL STOCKTON THUNDERAgreed to terms with F Andrew Clark. Western Hockey League VICTORIA ROYALSAcquired D Jake Kohlhauser from Vancouver. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Thursday in the Florida Lottery: Wednesdays winning numbers and payouts: Powerball: 2 7 17 49 53 Powerball: 23 5-of-5 PBNo winner No Florida winner 5-of-51 winner$1,000,000 No Florida winners Fantasy 5: 2 3 4 11 29 5-of-51 winner$231,795.99 4-of-5362$103.00 3-of-512,207$8.50 Lotto: 1 2 25 43 48 53 6-of-6No winner 5-of-619$7,023.00 4-of-61,180$81.50 3-of-625,146$5.00Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 5 3 7 CASH 3 (late) 7 2 2 PLAY 4 (early) 6 6 4 2 PLAY 4 (late) 5 0 0 2 FANTASY 5 6 11 19 24 32B4FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 000G18D 17th Annual BEAT THE SHERIFF 5K Saturday, Sept. 28 ~ 7:30 a.m. in Historic Downtown Inverness To be a sponsor or make a donation visit www.jessiesplacecitrus.org. For more information call 726-4488. All proceeds will benefit Jessies Place. www.citrusroadrunners.org www.jessiesplacecitrus.org www.raceit.com www.sheriffcitrus.org Registration forms are available at any Citrus County Sheriffs Office location or register online at any of the following websites: 000FXOX head coach Nate Varnadore said, and what frustrates me as a defensive guy, you look at him and go, wow, its going to take about three guys to take him down. Hes like a bull in a china shop. Theres been games weve seen where hes literally had two guys on him and hes still going and gets two extra yards. When we did the numbers, Varnadore continued, Sims touched the ball 80 percent of the plays over two games. Im sure all the other coaches theyve played are fully aware of that, but he still has over 600 yards, and thats impressive. Theres not too much scheming you can do against that. Hes going to get at least two yards when he touches the ball. Sims started playing football at 10 year old first at fullback and said college is a goal. He played varsity last year, but had a minor role with senior Jvon Swoll as the feature back. He didnt exactly expect this many touches this year. He said hes just doing what his line makes possible. I didnt really think it would be like this, he said, but I guess its working. The offensive line does their job in pushing the d-line out of the way, and I just go behind them and make plays. Its a big responsibility to carry the ball for Dunnellon, Sims added. I cant drop it no more. With Dunnellon narrowly missing the playoffs two straight seasons after winning back-to-back district titles, Sims said his team needs to keep its focus and continue to improve to get back into the postseason. Our whole team needs to keep pushing ourselves every day and make sure we do what were supposed to do so we can come out here and win district, he said. Our teams doing well, weve just got to keep pushing it and bring more effort against Crystal River. All my teammates are a big influence on me, he added. They do their job and I do mine, and thats a big part of the deal. POUNDContinued from Page B1 Lightning top Panthers 3-2 in OTESTERO Nikita Kucherovs goal at 4:04 of overtime gave the Tampa Bay Lightning a 3-2 preseason win over the Florida Panthers on Thursday night. Tim Thomas, signed to a one-year deal by the Panthers on Thursday, started the game. Jacob Markstrom finished the game. I think it was a necessary step to do it now rather than waiting, Thomas said. I feel ready now. Kucherovs goal capped a rally from a 2-0 deficit for Tampa Bay. Tyler Johnson and Richard Panik also scored for the Lightning. Panik and Martin St. Louis exchanged great passes on the game-tying goal at 6:30 of the third period. Florida took a 2-0 lead on two power-play goals by Jonathan Huberdeau. Ben Bishop earned the Bud Selig says he will retire in Jan. 2015Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig says he plans to retire in January 2015. The 79-year-old Selig has repeatedly said since 2003 that his retirement was imminent, but Thursday marked the first time he issued a formal statement. He says he will announce a transition plan shortly that will include a reorganization of central baseball management. Selig bought the Seattle Pilots in bankruptcy court in 1970 and moved the team to Milwaukee. He was part of the group that forced Fay Vincents resignation. Selig took over as acting commissioner on Sept. 9, 1992, in his role as chairman of the executive council. He repeatedly said he would not take the job full time but was formally elected commissioner July 9, 1998. He agreed to new contracts in 2001, 2004, 2008 and 2012.Virginia Tech shuts down Georgia Tech, 17-10ATLANTA Logan Thomas passed and ran for touchdowns in the first half, Virginia Techs defense shut down Georgia Techs running game and the Hokies beat the Yellow Jackets 17-10 on Thursday night. Thomas completed 19 of 25 passes for 221 yards and a touchdown and had 16 carries for 58 yards and a touchdown. Virginia Tech (4-1, 1-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) earned its fourth straight win over Georgia Tech (3-1, 2-1). Virginia Techs defense, led by defensive tackle Derrick Hopkins, stopped running back David Sims on back-to-back plays, including a fourth-and-2 run midway through the fourth quarter. Cody Journell was wide left on a 25yard field goal for Virginia Tech with 5:37 remaining to keep Georgia Techs hopes alive. Kendall Fuller intercepted Vad Lees fourth-down pass from near midfield to clinch the win. Georgia Techs fourth-ranked rushing offense was held to 129 yards more than 200 yards below its average.Pirates swing past Eagles, HornetsThe Crystal River girls golf team shot 220 to defeat Springstead (247) and Weeki Wachee (271). Maycee Mullarkeys 47 lead all golfers for Crystal River. Also for the Pirates, Marissa Wilder (57), Tori Cunningham (57) and Hadley Gilman (59) rounded out the scoring. CR (3-2 overall) plays Monday at South Sumter.Richardson, Wimberly carry Iowa State past TulsaTULSA, Okla. Sam Richardson completed 26 of 41 passes for 255 yards and two touchdowns, and Aaron Wimberly ran for 137 yards on 19 carries to help Iowa State beat Tulsa 38-21 on Thursday night. Jeff Woody had for three short scores, and the Cyclones took advantage of four Tulsa turnovers to improve to 1-2. Tulsa dropped to 1-3. Tulsa quarterback Cody Green lost control twice on exchanges with a running back in the first half, then dropped a ball behind him attempting to pass on the first possession of the second half. He was replaced a series later by redshirt freshman Dane Evans, who failed to generate any offense. Green returned in the fourth quarter, throwing a 26-yard touchdown pass to Thomas Roberson before being intercepted on his next possession. Green finished 18 of 31 for 237 yards with two touchdowns and the interception.Tackling a problem for Dolphins despite 3-0 startDAVIE The Miami Dolphins know they wont keep winning if their tacklers keep whiffing. Missed tackles by Miami have resulted in mediocre defense against the run, which was expected to be the teams strength this season. Instead, the Dolphins are giving up rushing yardage at a disturbing rate, which makes their 3-0 record even more surprising. We have to tackle better, coach Joe Philbin said. We are not going to invent a whole lot of new defenses. Weve just got to execute our techniques and fundamentals better, and our No. 1 fundamental that we work on every single day is tackling. Weve got to do it better. Wrapping up will be especially important when the Dolphins play high-powered New Orleans on Monday night. The Saints claim they havent noticed the Dolphins being poor tacklers. Hopefully, they are and it works out to my advantage, said Pierre Thomas, a hard-churning runner who can be tough to bring down. I kind of do have that unique talent of breaking tackles, and Im going to use that to the best of my ability. In defense of Miamis defense, it has been depleted by injuries, with four starters missing most or all of last weeks win over Atlanta. The status of two-time Pro Bowl end Cameron Wake, tackle Paul Soliai and cornerback Dimitri Patterson for the Saints game is uncertain. Reserves played well enough to limit the Falcons to three points over the final 27 minutes in a come-from-behind 27-23 victory. The Dolphins have allowed only one touchdown in the second half this year. Weve risen to the occasion to make plays when weve needed to, linebacker Phillip Wheeler said. Thats what weve done best. When we need a stop, we get it. From staff, wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS

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AUTORACINGCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 B5 Race SCHEDULE Points STANDINGS Sprint Cupx-non-points race Feb. 16 x-The Sprint Unlimited (Kevin Harvick) Feb. 21 x-Budweiser Duel 1 (Kevin Harvick) Feb. 21 x-Budweiser Duel 2 (Kyle Busch) Feb. 24 Daytona 500 (Jimmie Johnson) March 3 Subway Fresh Fit 500, Avondale, Ariz. (Carl Edwards) March 10 Kobalt Tools 400, Las Vegas (Matt Kenseth) March 17 Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Kasey Kahne) March 24 Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif. (Kyle Busch) April 7 STP Gas Booster 500, Ridgeway, Va. (Jimmie Johnson) April 13 NRA 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Kyle Busch) April 21 STP 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Matt Kenseth) April 27 Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va. (Kevin Harvick) May 5 Aarons 499, Talladega, Ala. (David Ragan) May 11 Bojangles Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. (Matt Kenseth) May 18 x-Sprint Showdown (Jamie McMurray) May 18 x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race (Jimmie Johnson) May 26 Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. (Kevin Harvick) June 2 Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Tony Stewart) June 9 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. (Jimmie Johnson) June 16 Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Greg Biffle) June 23 Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. (Martin Truex Jr.) June 30 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. (Matt Kenseth) July 6 Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola, Daytona Beach (Jimmie Johnson) July 14 Camping World RV Sales 301, Loudon, N.H. (Brian Vickers) July 28 Your Heros Name Here 400 at The Brickyard, Indianapolis (Ryan Newman) Aug. 4 GoBowling.com 400 Long Pond, Pa. (Kasey Kahne) Aug. 11 Cheez-It 355 at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. (Kyle Busch) Aug. 18 Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Joey Logano) Aug. 24 Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. (Matt Kenseth) Sept. 1 AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta, Hampton, Ga. (Kyle Busch) Sept. 7 Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va. (Carl Edwards) Sept. 15 GEICO 400, Joliet, Ill. (Matt Kenseth) Sept. 22 Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H. (Matt Kenseth) Sept. 29 AAA 400, Dover, Del. Oct. 6 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 12 Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C. Oct. 20 Camping World RV Sales 500, Talladega, Ala. Oct. 27 Goodys Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway, Va. Nov. 3 AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 10 AdvoCare 500, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 17 Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead.Nationwide SeriesFeb. 23 DRIVE4COPD 300 (Tony Stewart) March 2 Dollar General 200, Avondale, Ariz. (Kyle Busch) March 9 Sams Town 300, Las Vegas (Sam Hornish Jr.) March 16 Jeff Foxworthys Grit Chips 300, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle Busch) March 23 Royal Purple 300, Fontana, Calif. (Kyle Busch) April 12 OReilly Auto Parts 300, Fort Worth, Texas (Kyle Busch) April 26 ToyotaCare 250, Richmond, Va. (Brad Keselowski) May 4 AARONS 312, Talladega, Ala. (Regan Smith) May 10 Darlington 200, Darlington, S.C. (Kyle Busch) May 25 History 300, Concord, N.C. (Kyle Busch) June 1 5-Hour Energy 200, Dover, Del. (Joey Logano) June 9 DuPont Pioneer 250, Newton, Iowa (Trevor Bayne) June 15 Alliance Truck Parts 250, Brooklyn, Mich. (Regan Smith) June 22 Road America 200, Elkhart Lake, Wis. (A J Allmendinger) June 28 Feed The Children 300, Sparta, Ky. (Brad Keselowski) July 5 Subway Firecracker 250, Daytona Beach (Matt Kenseth) July 13 CNBC Primes The Profit 200, Loudon, N.H. (Kyle Busch) July 21 STP 300, Joliet, Ill. (Joey Logano) July 27 Indiana 250, Speedway, Ind. (Kyle Busch) Aug. 3 U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa (Brad Keselowski) Aug. 10 ZIPPO 200, Watkins Glen, N.Y. (Brad Keselowski) Aug. 17 Nationwide Childrens Hospital 200, Lexington, Ohio (A J Allmendinger) Aug. 23 Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle Busch) Aug. 31 Great Clips/Grit Chips 300, Hampton, Ga. (Kevin Harvick) Sept. 6 Virginia 529 College Savings 250, Richmond, Va. (Brad Keselowski) Sept. 14 Dollar General 300, Joliet, Ill. (Kyle Busch) Sept. 21 Kentucky 300, Sparta, Ky. (Ryan Blaney) Sept. 28 Dover 200, Dover, Del. Oct. 5 Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 11 Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C. Nov. 2 OReilly Auto Parts Challenge, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 9 ServiceMaster 200, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 16 Ford EcoBoost 300, Homestead.Camping WorldFeb. 22 NextEra Energy Resources 250 (Johnny Sauter) April 6 Kroger 250, Ridgeway, Va. (Johnny Sauter) April 14 North Carolina Education Lottery 200 at The Rock, Rockingham, N.C. (Kyle Larson) April 20 SFP 250, Kansas City, Kan. (Matt Crafton) May 17 North Carolina Education Lottery 200, Concord, N.C. (Kyle Busch) May 31 Lucas Oil 200, Dover, Del. (Kyle Busch) June 7 WinStar World Casino 400k, Fort Worth, Texas (Jeb Burton) June 27 UNOH 225, Sparta, Ky. (Ty Dillon) July 13 American Ethanol 200, Newton, Iowa (Timothy Peters) July 24 Mudsummer Classic, Rossburg, Ohio (Austin Dillon) Aug. 3 Pocono Mountains 125, Long Pond, Pa. (Ryan Blaney) Aug. 17 Michigan 200, Brooklyn, Mich. (James Buescher) Aug. 21 UNOH 200, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle Busch) Sep. 1 Chevrolet Silverado 250, Bowmanville, Ontario (Chase Elliott) Sept. 8 Iowa 200, Newton, Iowa (James Buescher) Sept. 13 EnjoyIllinois.com 225, Joliet, Ill. (Kyle Busch) Sept. 28 Smiths 350, Las Vegas Oct. 19 Freds 250 powered by Coca-Cola, Talladega, Ala. Oct. 26 Kroger 200, Ridgeway, Va. Nov. 1 WinStar World Casino 350k, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 8 Lucas Oil 150, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 15 Ford EcoBoost 200, Homestead. Sprint CupThrough Sept. 22 1. Matt Kenseth, 2,111. 2. Kyle Busch, 2,097. 3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,093. 4. Carl Edwards, 2,075. 5. Greg Biffle, 2,073. 6. Kevin Harvick, 2,072. 7. Kurt Busch, 2,071. 8. Jeff Gordon, 2,069. 9. Ryan Newman, 2,064. 10. Clint Bowyer, 2,063. 11. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,049. 12. Joey Logano, 2,042. 13. Kasey Kahne, 2,040. 14. Brad Keselowski, 792. 15. Jamie McMurray, 786. 16. Martin Truex Jr., 752. 17. Paul Menard, 742. 18. Aric Almirola, 719. 19. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 700. 20. Jeff Burton, 694.Nationwide SeriesThrough Sept. 21 1. Sam Hornish Jr., 962. 2. Austin Dillon, 947. 3. Regan Smith, 917. 4. Elliott Sadler, 908. 5. Brian Vickers, 902. 6. Justin Allgaier, 887. 7. Brian Scott, 883. 8. Trevor Bayne, 868. 9. Kyle Larson, 822. 10. Parker Kligerman, 783. 11. Alex Bowman, 739. 12. Nelson Piquet Jr., 709. 13. Mike Bliss, 664. 14. Travis Pastrana, 617. 15. Jeremy Clements, 528. 16. Reed Sorenson, 517. 17. Michael Annett, 513. 18. Mike Wallace, 496. 19. Eric McClure, 419. 20. Joe Nemechek, 409.Camping WorldThrough Sept. 13 1. Matt Crafton, 609. 2. James Buescher, 568. 3. Ty Dillon, 550. 4. Jeb Burton, 539. 5. Ryan Blaney, 527. 6. Miguel Paludo, 526. 7. Timothy Peters, 512. 8. Johnny Sauter, 499. 9. Darrell Wallace Jr., 498. 10. Brendan Gaughan, 483. 11. Ron Hornaday Jr., 480. 12. Dakoda Armstrong, 462. 13. Joey Coulter, 457. 14. German Quiroga, 453. 15. John Wes Townley, 446. 16. Max Gresham, 399. 17. Ryan Sieg, 343. 18. Brennan Newberry, 319. 19. Ross Chastain, 300. 20. Bryan Silas, 265.NHRAThrough Sept. 22 Top Fuel 1. Doug Kalitta, 2,251. 1. Shawn Langdon, 2,251. 3. Spencer Massey, 2,249. 4. Morgan Lucas, 2,216. 5. Tony Schumacher, 2,163. Funny Car 1. Matt Hagan, 2,272. 2. Cruz Pedregon, 2,221. 3. Robert Hight, 2,209. 4. John Force, 2,208. 5. Jack Beckman, 2,196. Pro Stock 1. Jason Line, 2,264. 2. Jeg Coughlin, 2,256. 3. Mike Edwards, 2,230. 4. Shane Gray, 2,207. 5. Allen Johnson, 2,190. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. Hector Arana Jr, 2,261. 2. Matt Smith, 2,250. 3. Hector Arana, 2,228. 4. Eddie Krawiec, 2,199. 5. Michael Ray, 2,191.IndyCar Through Sept. 1 1. Helio Castroneves, 501. 2. Scott Dixon, 452. 3. Simon Pagenaud, 431. 4. Marco Andretti, 430. 5. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 427. 6. Justin Wilson, 393. 7. Dario Franchitti, 388. 8. James Hinchcliffe, 376. 9. Will Power, 371. 10. Charlie Kimball, 363. 11. Tony Kanaan, 346. 12. E.J. Viso, 304. 13. Sebastien Bourdais, 297. 14. Josef Newgarden, 291. 15. Takuma Sato, 278. 16. Simona de Silvestro, 278. 17. Ed Carpenter, 277. 18. Graham Rahal, 266. 19. James Jakes, 244. 20. Tristan Vautier, 230.Formula OneThrough Sept. 22 1. Sebastian Vettel, 247. 2. Fernando Alonso, 187. 3. Lewis Hamilton, 151. 4. Kimi Raikkonen, 149. 5. Mark Webber, 130. 6. Nico Rosberg, 116. 7. Felipe Massa, 87. 8. Romain Grosjean, 57. 9. Jenson Button, 54. 10. Paul di Resta, 36. 11. Adrian Sutil, 26. 12. Sergio Perez, 22. 13. Nico Hulkenberg, 19. 14. Daniel Ricciardo, 18. 15. Jean-Eric Vergne, 13. 16. Pastor Maldonado, 1. SPRINT CUPAAA 400Site: Dover, Del.Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), qualifying (ESPN, 3-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Fox Sports 2, 11 a.m.-noon); Sunday, 2 p.m. (ESPN, 1-6 p.m.).Track: Dover International Speedway (oval, 1.0 miles).Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.Last year: Brad Keselowski raced to the last of his five 2012 victories en route to the season title. Keselowski failed to qualify for the Chase this season.Last week: Matt Kenseth improved to 2 for 2 in the Chase, holding off Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch at New Hampshire. Kenseth has a series-high seven victories.Fast facts: Kenseth has a 14-point lead over Busch. Jimmie Johnson (18 points back) is third, followed by Carl Edwards (-36), Greg Biffle (38), Kevin Harvick (-39), Kurt Busch (-40), Jeff Gordon (-42), Ryan Newman (-47), Clint Bowyer (-48), Dale Earnhardt Jr. (-62), Joey Logano (69) and Kasey Kahne (-71). ... Kenseth has two victories at the track, the last in the 2011 spring race. ... Tony Stewart, sidelined by a broken leg, won in June at the track.Next race: Hollywood Casino 400, Oct. 6, Kansas Speedway, Kansas City, Kan.NATIONWIDE5-HOUR ENERGY 200Site: Dover, Del.Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 12:30-3 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Fox Sports 2, noon-1:30 p.m.), race, 3:45 p.m. (ESPN, 3:30-6 p.m.).Track: Dover International Speedway (oval, 1.0 miles).Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.Last year: Joey Logano completed a season sweep at the track, leading 184 of 200 laps. He ran his Dover series winning streak to three in June.Last week: Truck Series driver Ryan Blaney raced to his first Nationwide victory, winning at Kentucky Speedway in Penske Racings No. 22 Ford.Fast facts: Kyle Busch, coming off a victory two weeks ago at Chicagoland, has won 10 times this season to push his series record to 61. ... Logano is driving the No. 22 Mustang. ... Sam Hornish Jr. leads the season standings, 15 points ahead of Austin Dillon.Next race: Kansas Lottery 300, Oct. 5, Kansas Speedway, Kansas City, Kan.CAMPING WORLD TRUCKSMITHS 350Site: Las Vegas.Schedule: Saturday, practice, qualifying, race, 8:30 p.m. (Fox Sports 1, 8-11 p.m.)Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway (oval, 1.5 miles).Race distance: 219 miles, 146 laps.Last year: Nelson Piquet Jr. raced to his second victory of the year, passing Matt Crafton on the final lap. The Brazilian also won at Road America.Last race: Kyle Busch won at Chicagoland on Sept. 14 for his fourth series victory of the year and 34th overall. He won the Nationwide race the following day.Fast facts: Crafton leads the season standings, 41 points ahead of James Buescher. ... Ryan Blaney won the Nationwide race last week at Kentucky Speedway. ... Ron Hornaday Jr. won the 2011 race for the last of his series-record 51 victories. ... Chad Hackenbracht is making his fourth start of the season in Kyle Busch Motorsports No. 51 Toyota.Next race: Freds 250, Oct. 19, Talladega Superspeedway, Talladega, Ala.NHRA DRAG RACINGNHRA MIDWEST NATIONALSSite: Madison, Ill.Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 3:30 p.m.-5 a.m.), Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN2, 8:30-11:30 p.m.).Track: Gateway Motorsports Park.Last year: Antron Brown raced to the last of his six 2012 Top Fuel victories en route to the season title. Jack Beckman won in Funny Car, Erica Enders in Pro Stock, and Eddie Krawiec in Pro Stock Motorcycle.Last week: Doug Kalitta won the NHRA Fall Nationals at Texas Motorplex to end a 71-race Top Fuel victory drought. Cruz Pedregon won in Funny Car, Jason Line in Pro Stock, and Krawiec in Pro Stock Motorcycle.Fast facts: The event is the third in the six-race Countdown. The top 10 in each class qualified for the playoffs. Kalitta and Shawn Langdon are tied for the Top Fuel lead, two points ahead of Spencer Massey. Matt Hagan tops the Funny Car standings, 51 points ahead of Pedregon. Line has an eight-point lead over Jeg Coughlin in Pro Stock, and Hector Arana Jr. has an 11-point advantage over Matt Smith in Pro Stock Motorcycle.Next event: Auto-Plus NHRA Nationals, Oct. 3-6, Maple Grove Raceway, Reading, Pa.IZOD INDYCARNext races: Grand Prix of Houston, Oct. 5 and 6, Streets of Houston, Houston.Last race: Simon Pagenaud won the Grand Prix of Baltimore on Sept. 1 for his second victory of the year for Schmidt Hamilton Motorsports.FORMULA ONENext race: Korean Grand Prix, Oct. 6, Korean International Circuit, Yeongam, South Korea.Last week: Red Bulls Sebastian Vettel won the Singapore Grand Prix for his third straight victory and seventh of the year.OTHER RACESGRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR SERIES: Championship Weekend, Saturday (Fox Sports 2, 1:30-4:30 p.m.; Sunday, Fox Sports 1, noon-3 p.m.), Lime Rock Park, Lakeville, Conn.WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car: Saturday, Fremont Speedway, Fremont, Ohio.U.S. AUTO RACING CLUB: Sprint Car: Saturday, Lawrenceburg Speedway, Lawrenceburg, Ind. Around theTRACKS Hamlin recipient of March of Dimes award Associated PressDenny Hamlin had seen firsthand through his work with the March of Dimes the effects premature births have on childrens long-term health. Hed also seen the toll it can take on a family unable to bring their newborn home during the many hospital visits hed made with sponsor FedEx as part of its longtime support of the March of Dimes foundation. It didnt hit him, though, until this year when he became a father to a healthy baby girl. Now that I do have Taylor, and I am so blessed that shes healthy and was born on time with no issues, no complications, you really get a clear understanding, Hamlin said. When you are at the hospital and you walk into the nursery and there are two or three premature babies who are a month or two months early, you feel so lucky that yours is 100 percent and you get to go home in two days. Hamlin was being honored by the March of Dimes on Thursday night with the prestigious Champion for Babies award in recognition of his work raising awareness for the foundations signature fundraiser. Hamlin joined Arnold Palmer, Joe Namath and Greg Gumbel as the fourth recipient of the award, presented at the March of Dimes Volunteer Leadership Conference gala in Washington, D.C. Its an honor to recognize the great work that Denny has provided the March of Dimes, said Dr. Jennifer Howse, president for the March of Dimes. Associated PressHouse Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., right, meets with Sprint Cup driver Denny Hamlin in Cantors Capitol Hill office Thursday in Washington. Hamlin is in Washington to accept the March of Dimes Champion for Babies award. Hamlin met with several congressional members to help raise awareness for March of Dimes initiatives to give all babies a healthy start in life. Taking its toll Associated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. From afar, Dale Earnhardt Jr. has watched Martin Truex Jr.s body language to see how his former teammate is handling the fallout from Michael Waltrip Racing race-fixing fiasco at Richmond. Hes had a much closer view of the toll its taken on Clint Bowyer, who triggered the entire controversy when he spun in the Sept. 7 race with seven laps remaining. NASCAR said it could not prove the spin was intentional; should Bowyer admit that, he risks retroactive penalties. NASCAR did have evidence that MWR attempted to manipulate the finish of the race to get Truex into the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. It issued harsh sanctions against the organization that included knocking Truex out of the Chase. In response, Truex sponsor NAPA Auto Parts said its ending its association with the team at the end of the year. Its almost been as hard to watch Clint go through this as it has been to watch Truex go through it, because Clint is a good guy and obviously was just following orders, Earnhardt said. He did some things that were out of character and regrettable and he feels terrible to have any involvement in it. I know that for a fact. I know that to be genuine. Its been tough watching him go through that process, too, because hes not that kind of guy to go starting that kind of mess. Earnhardt was penalized by NASCAR in 2004 for intentionally spinning to bring out a caution he needed. He admitted his guilt and NASCAR punished him. Bowyer and MWR have maintained from the very beginning that his spin was not deliberate, but it was the act that set in motion the chain of events that could put Truex out of work at the end of the season. With NAPA pulling its sponsorship, MWR could be forced to shutter the No. 56 team and let go up to 100 employees if funding cant be found in the next two months. Earnhardt has a long relationship with Truex, who won two titles driving for him when Earnhardt co-owned Chance 2 Motorsports in the Nationwide Series. They then became teammates when Truex moved up to Dale Earnhardt Inc. Earnhardt was also teammates with Michael Waltrip, and DEI was run by MWR general manager Ty Norris, who was suspended indefinitely by NASCAR for the Richmond incident. Earnhardt said he hasnt spoken to Waltrip or Norris. I dont really think that theres anything I can share with them that could help them, so Im not wanting to interject, Earnhardt said. I get annoyed when people do that, so I dont want to be that guy. As for Truex, he feels for his old friend. I havent had a chance to talk to Truex, but Ive kept an eye on him and just seeing his body language, he seems to be handling it pretty well, as good as he can, Earnhardt said. None of us really know what opportunities are being presented to him. I certainly think he is one of the best drivers in the sport. Associated PressClint Bowyer leads Kasey Kahne during last Saturdays practice in Loudon, N.H. Earnhardt believes spin has weighed heavily on Bowyer

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B6FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFOOTBALL ScoringPts Deion Moore, Cit60 Desmond Franklin, Cit30 Kane Parks, Dunn30 Bubba Sims, Dunn30 James Pouncey, Cit24 Dmitry Growdon, Lec18 Kobie Jones, Dunn18 Jonah Nightengale, Lec18 Collin Ryan, CR 18 Josh Williams, Dunn18PassingComp Att TD Int Yds Deion Moore, Cit29 62 5 1 520 Kobie Jones, Dunn18 32 33 329 Collin Ryan, CR163520188 Travis McGee, Lec223322173 S. Gardner, SR11291499 RushingRush YdsAvgTD Bubba Sims, Dunn91 610 6.7 5 James Pouncey, Cit45 345 7.7 3 Josh Williams, Dunn28 269 9.6 3 Dmitry Growdon, Lec59 211 3.6 2 Javian Clark, Cit331865.62 J. Nightengale, Lec251867.42 A. Anderson, Lec18 174 9.7 1 Tyric Washington, Cit39 172 4.4 0 Justin Jimenez, SRNA 165 NA 0 Deion Moore, Cit18 139 7.7 4 Kane Parks, Dunn17 97 5.7 3ReceivingRec YdsAvg TD Kane Parks, Dunn10 248 24.8 2 Desmond Franklin, Cit11 205 18.6 4 Sam Franklin, Cit10 200 20.0 1 Jaimee Juse, Cit7 101 14.4 1 Ty Reynolds, CR6 92 15.3 1 Allen Rivers, SR5 62 12.4 1 TeAndre Hopkins, Lec6 63 10.5 0 Keshawn Hopkins, CR2 60 30.0 1 DAndre Horton, Lec2 47 23.5 0 Chase Brattin, Dunn5 45 9.0 0TacklesSoloTotal Jaimee Juse, Cit29 47 Tyler Pollard 25 NA Steven Knowles, Cit24 41 Travis Blotz, Cit22 35 Cole Fagan, Dunn21 36 Keiwan Jones, Dunn20 36 Zahid Hujurat, Dunn19 38 Austin Stephens, CR19 NA Frankie Bartley, Cit18 40 Eddie Bennis, CR16 NA Dmitry Growdon, Lec16 36InterceptionsJeremiah Lucas, Lec 2 Desmond Franklin, Cit 2 Justin Hamm, Dunn 2 Nicolai Kortendick, Lec 2 Ty Reynolds, CR 2 Gabe Wilcox, Cit 2SacksSteven Knowles, Cit 5 Keiwan Jones, Dunn 4 Jesse Vineyard, Cit 4 Ardante Anderson, Lec 3 Travis Blotz, Cit 2 JaimeeJuse, Cit 2 Jacob LaFleur, CR 2 High School Football STATISTICS Standings District 6A-5Dist Ovr W L W L T PF PA Citrus Hurricanes1040014535 Gainesville Hurricanes1 0 3 1 0 92 75 Ocala Vanguard Knights 0 0 3 1 0 144 90 Ocala Forest Wildcats0 1 1 3 0 82 154 Lake Weir Hurricanes0 1 0 31 3388District 5A-5DistOvr W L W LPF PA Dunnellon Tigers1 0 3 1 108 48 North Marion Colts 1 0 3 1 85 100 Gainesville Eastside Rams1 0 1 3 40 119 Crystal River Pirates0 0 2 1 28 53 Suwannee Bulldogs1 1 2 1 45 39 Belleview Rattlers0 1 2 1 86 71 Santa Fe Raiders0 2 1 3 65 68IndependentW L W L PF PA Lecanto Panthers NA NA2 2 57 68 Sunshine State North Division W L W L PF PA Windermere Prep Lakers 3 0 3 1 146 48 First Academy-Leesburg Eagles2 0 3 0 148 27 Mount Dora Bible Bulldogs 2 0 3 1 120 97 Central Florida Christian Eagles1 1 3 1 114 99 Legacy Charter Eagles 1 2 1 3 85 126 Ocala Christian Crusaders 0 3 0 4 39 155 Seven Rivers Christian Warriors0 3 0 4 16 168 SEANARNOLD CorrespondentIn what was only their fifth meeting, and first since 2002, Citrus (4-0, 1-0) wasnt a very hospitable host last Friday in bashing first-year District 6A-5 opponent Ocala Forest 63-7. Hurricanes senior quarterback Deion Moore (204 total yards, five TDs) more than doubled the Wildcats yardage in the game, and found junior Sam Franklin four times for 101 yards and a touchdown. The Cane defense held Forest to 1 yard (not including a botched punt snap that carved 29 yards from the Wildcats total) in the opening half. Seniors Steven Knowles and Jaimee Juse registered three tackles for losses and 13 total tackles apiece, and senior Frankie Bartley was in on a game-high 15 tackles. Assistant coach Chris Stephensons defense would have pitched a shutout if not for an early 78-yard kickoff return that set up a 4-yard Wildcat scoring drive. It was Citrus first alltime win over Forest (1-3, 0-1), which was initially placed back into a 7A district in January, but won an appeal to join 6A-5. The Wildcats had previously defeated West Port by two touchdowns and lost 23-16 in the opener to area power North Marion under first-year head coach Skip Austin. With a highly-anticipated showdown with Vanguard (3-1) next Friday at Booster Stadium, the resting Canes appear in serious contention to earn their first playoff berth since 2006, when Rik Haines led them to their third straight tournament appearance. Citrus, which is ranked No. 12 in 6A after outscoring its four opponents by a combined 145-35, is also vying for its first district title since 2005 and second since 1987. Vanguard has yet to play a district game, and travels north tonight to play 11-time state champion Jacksonville Bolles. Last week, Bolles suffered a 45-31 upset loss against district and area rival Jacksonville Raines. Bolles and Raines have combined to make the state playoffs 60 times, dating back to the 1970s.Tiger tallyDunnellon has prevailed in 11 straight meetings against annual rival Crystal River since losing 16 straight to the Pirates. Ninth-year Tigers head coach Frank Beasley is 8-0 in the series, but said his teams have often been the beneficiaries of good fortune in the rivalry. To be honest, we dont put a lot of stock in that, said Beasley, who was 12-0 against Citrus County teams before his Tigers fell 14-8 to Citrus three weeks ago. If you look at the last 14 to 15 years and the epic battles weve had with CR, have we been fortunate to come out on the good end of that lately? Sure. But some of those games are one-score games that could have gone either way with a turnover here or there.5A-5 clash in Gainesville While fellow 5A-5 foes Crystal River and Dunnellon tussle at Ned Love Field tonight, defending district champion Gainesville Eastside (1-3, 1-0) faces perennial power North Marion (3-1, 1-0) at Citizens Field. With a district-clinching 42-41 overtime victory against the Colts last October, the Rams snapped the Colts streak of nine straight titles. Before the loss, North Marion had prevailed in 24 consecutive district tilts since losing 24-19 at Dunnellon in 2006. Eastside avoided an 0-4 start in last Fridays district opener by eking out a 34-31 win over an improved Belleview squad (2-1, 0-1). Meanwhile, North Marion got by new 5A-5 member Suwannee 27-14.Former Tigers coach turns around Chiefland programWhen we last checked in with Chiefland head coach Aaron Richardson, a Citrus High School graduate and former offensive and defensive coordinator under Beasley at Dunnellon, his Indians snapped a 23-game losing streak with a 3-0 start to the 2012 season. With a series of tough battles in a difficult District 1A-7, including a 12-6 loss to then No. 1 Union County, Chiefland finished 0-4 in league play (5-5 overall). With last Fridays 34-0 victory over Newberry, Richardsons bunch turned another corner, delivering the programs first district win since 2009. I think last week was a signature win for him, Beasley said. Hes done an outstanding job. Coach Rich taught me a lot about how to coach football. I could tell you that Im surprised, but Im not. Hes just got a way with kids. Chiefland moved to sixth in the 1A rankings, while fellow 1A-7 members Union County (No. 1) and Dixie County (No. 4) sit in the top five, making a strong case its the most formidable district in Class 1A. Frankie Bartley Sam Franklin Chronicle file photoCitrus head coach Rayburn Greene, left, and quarterback Deion Moore, right, helped lead the Hurricanes to their first-ever victory over Ocala Forest in five career meetings. team to struggle with their offensive identity. That tends to get sorted out down the road. Reynolds is really a dynamic kid that does some good things with the ball. With six points allowed over its past two contests, Dunnellons formula has been stout defense led by senior Keiwan Jones and linebackers Cole Fagan and Zahid Hujurat and a strong ground attack featuring junior Bubba Sims and freshman Josh Williams. The Tigers (3-1, 1-0) opened their district play last Friday with a 27-6 road win over Santa Fe (1-3, 0-2). Varnadores especially concerned with Sims and junior receiver Kane Parks (10 catches, 248 yards) as well as Dunnellons defensive front. I would assume theyll come out with the same formula of great defense, clock control and great special teams, and try to just pound our teeth in. I would do that if I were them, he said. You look at them against Santa Fe, which knew the trap play was coming, but Dunnellon was getting that trap off, and Sims can pop it. They have talent, theres no doubt about it. They have a lot of weapons. But whats interesting about them is theyre young like us. Coach Beasley does a great job with those kids over there. Varnadore considers the game a crucial measuring stick in the district for his team. I really believe Dunnellon is one of the best teams in the district, he said. I told our guys that if we come out and have a great game and win this one, you can get serious about discussing playoffs. Thats how highly I think of Dunnellon and the way theyre playing right now. Beasley is pleased with where his team is at, but realizes it will take a sustained effort to succeed this year. Our guys are working hard at getting better at the little things, Beasley said. Defensively, were playing really well, Im not going to say theyre not. Weve just got to maintain our kids focus, because they are high school kids. Belleview (2-1) at Lecanto (2-2), 7:30 p.m. tonight After being held to under 100 yards against Crystal River, Lecantos offense found a spark with a hurry-up attack against Fivay last Friday. Unfortunately, an injury to sophomore quarterback Travis McGee and an effective Falcon passing attack helped Fivay hand the Panthers their second loss. Ardante DeDe Anderson became the third Panther back to surpass 100 rushing yards in a game this season. Belleview has lost six straight to Citrus County schools, but figures to be improved this year under senior running back Craig Riche (58 carries, 458 yards, five TDs) and junior quarterback Erik Pitts (472 total yards, five TDs). In District 5A-5 play last Friday, the Rattlers suffered their first loss in a tough 34-31 home defeat to defending district champion Eastside. Belleview and Lecanto havent met since 1996, when the Rattlers improved to 2-0 all-time versus the Panthers. Seven Rivers Christian Warriors (0-4, 0-3 in SSAC North) at Mount Dora Bible Bulldogs (3-1, 2-0), 7 p.m. tonight A young and undermanned Seven Rivers squad, which barely dressed 11 players last week, continues to take its lumps. The Warriors have been outscored 129-0 the last three games, and fell to 0-3 in the Sunshine State North division in losing 45-0 at Windermere Prep last Friday. With freshman John Mazza and junior Allen Rivers each surpassing 60 yards rushing for the Warriors, second-year head coach Dave Iwaniec was encouraged by his teams improvement in the running game. Mount Dora improved to 2-0 in conference play last week by downing previously unbeaten Central Florida Christian Academy 48-22 on the road. The Bulldogs are led by senior signal-caller Ben Moore (26 for 41 passing, 305 yards). HOSTContinued from Page B1 Continuing to shine QB Winston producing for No. 8 Seminoles Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Quarterback Jameis Winston hasnt made many mistakes in a Florida State uniform. When he does, the redshirt freshman knows why. Thats how the teenager with the shouldershrug smile earned the trust of coaches and teammates. Theres no age limit on knowledge, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said. Theres no age limit on knowing what to do and being a good player. Each player, what he can absorb at that present time of his career, matters as to how much leeway you give him. And (Winston) gets more than most have. The 19-year-old Winston made a wrong read during the 54-6 win against Bethune-Cookman last week. He missed the hot receiver as the defense blitzed and was forced to spin out of the clutches of defensive end LeBrand Richardson. Winston simultaneously dipped from defensive end Erik Williams. The busted play ended with a falling down Winston throwing an 11-yard touchdown to Kelvin Benjamin. Fishers quarterback tutorial hinges on one question: Why Why did you make this decision? Why was this the outcome? Winston tends to ace the why test. Hes completed 50 of 64 passes for 718 yards, eight touchdowns and one interception with a 210.49 passing efficiency that ranks No. 2 in FBS. Winston (6-foot-4, 228 pounds) also has two touchdowns rushing within the No. 5 scoring offense in FBS. You cant rely on ability, as far as letting it bail you out all the time, Fisher said. If you dont know why you made a mistake then thats critical and we have to fix that. Some guys make plays and people assume they know why. ... He understands that and puts a lot of time in it. The previous week Winston threw his lone interception on a forced, high pass against Nevada. He took responsibility and moved on. He keeps his same personality, which is really goofy and loose and just very competitive, FSU safety Terrence Brooks said. Hes just going out there being very comfortable in his own skin and just knowing his abilities. I feel like that right there is whats going to take him very far in this game. That comfort has allowed him to deal with the Famous Jameis nickname, J-Dub T-shirts and another with Winstons face on the body of Jesus and the words ,The Chosen One. Ego has not been a problem. Buffalo Bills quarterback EJ Manuel was drawn to Winstons playful demeanor last year despite being a senior NFL prospect. Indianapolis Colts linebacker Bjoern Werner was named 2012 ACC defensive player of the year and took notice, too. Hes comfortable in every situation they put him in, and thats why hes so successful now, Werner said. Hes just really open, he talks a lot and thats what makes him so comfortable. Winston even exuded a level of calm as a freshman at Hueytown High School. A lot of that has to do with him having so much attention on him when he was a freshman, said Andrew Bone, Rivals.com recruiting reporter. A lot of these high-profile recruits coming out of high school, they dont get the attention put on them until their junior, maybe their senior year. Winston and Fishers relationship isnt always lovey-dovey. Fisher is known for his outbursts toward his quarterbacks. Winston was criticized in high school for berating teammates. The common pursuit of perfection has enhanced the bond. The next test comes Saturday at Boston College. Im a competitor till the day I die, Winston said. When he says Im getting too aggressive, that means Im making decisions off of emotions and not off of business. ... Thats when mistakes start to happen. When coach Fisher tries to yell at me and intimidate me, he knows that Im a look at him like, Coach, I know youre trying to get up under my skin. ... But when I know hes serious, I get a different type of attitude. Ive got to lock in. Associated PressFlorida State quarterback Jameis Winstons mastery of the offense and a jovial, yet business-like persona has allowed him to become the centerpiece of the program.

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Section CFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE RIVERLAND NEWS/Special to the ChronicleJen McDoughald hoists a pumpkin into the air while her daughter, Erin, holds the clippers last year during a visit to The Pickin Patch. The Homosassa family spent a portion of their afternoon at the u-pick field. JEFFBRYAN Riverland NewsFour years ago, the Thomases and Dixons sought to carve out a Florida Fall tradition unlike any offered in the Sunshine State.Little did they know, at the time, how popular their venture would blossom among folks in search of a family friendly event that would not only give people a chance to enjoy the outdoors, but not put a huge dent in their checkbooks. So, for the fourth straight year, residents in the area will get the chance to prepare for Halloween as well as the Fall season by trekking through an approximately 11-acre tract of land in search of the perfect pumpkin. Yes, folks, the long wait is over. The Pickin Patch opens its gate at 10 a.m. Saturday. Halloween is a little more than a month away. Its a neat fall addition, said Scott Thomas, who along with his wife, Sarah Joe, and Scott and Andy Dixon, will open their field to people seeking to enjoy the experience of cutting their own pumpkins, gourds and other agriculture-based items straight from the field. Its really been a neat evolution over the past three years. First, mom and dad and Jordon Tier leaps from the top of a hay fort. Special to the ChronicleAward-winning magical performers The Spencers are bringing their Theatre of Illusion to Curtis Peterson Auditorium in Lecanto at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29. Magician Kevin Spencer and his wife Cindy have been named Performing Arts Entertainers of the Year six times, and in 2009, they received magics highest honor: the Merlin Award for International Magicians of the Year. The Spencers promise an experience unique from the traditional magic show. The illusions we perform arent the razzle-dazzle ... kind of magic. Its magic that combines theater, storytelling, movement and music, Kevin Spencer said. The Theater of Illusion is a family-friendly show, with entertainment designed to amaze children and adults alike. A highlight of the show is the Walking Through a Wall illusion, made famous by Harry Houdini in 1914. At the front of the stage will rest eight concrete blocks. The audience will be able to inspect the blocks before the show to ensure they are real. A member of the audience will be selected to assist Spencer as he walks through the wall and emerges on the other side. Believing that magic becomes more real and alive when experienced up close, Spencer will perform an illusion which will invite the participation of the entire audience. The Spencers say they want everyone to feel like a part of the show. For those interested in meeting The Spencers, a meet-andgreet is scheduled after the performance. When not on stage, Kevin Spencer is working magic through his programs The Healing of Magic and Hocus Focus. Designed to aid individuals recovering from various disabilities, the Healing of Magic uses simple magic tricks to improve motor, cognitive and perceptual skills. Spencer said the therapy program is utilized in roughly 2,000 hospitals and rehab centers around the world. Out of the therapy program grew Hocus Focus: a curriculum developed to motivate and engage children with emotional disorders and learning disabilities. While Spencer loves being on stage, he said, I think working the Hocus Focus and Healing of Magic programs are probably the most satisfying part of everything that I do. For tickets, call 352-873-5810 or visit http://cf.universitytickets.com. Admission is $20. Approximate run time is 105 minutes. Inside:AMCs Breaking Bad going out looking good/ C4 If you go: WHAT: Theatre of Illusion magic show featuring Kevin and Cindy Spencer. WHEN: 3 p.m. WHERE: Curtis Peterson Auditorium, 3810 W. Educational Path, Lecanto. COST: $20. TICKETS: 352-873-5810 or http://cfuniversity tickets.com. Spencers bring award-winning magic show to Lecanto Pick your tradition See PATCH / Page C3

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PETERDEBRUGE VarietyLOS ANGELES Sometimes you have to travel 30,000 miles just to appreciate the guy who lives down the hall or so goes Baggage Claim, a movie about a Flight Attendant Barbie type who runs herself ragged chasing romantic prospects while her perfect suitor may as well be waving lighted wands from the runway the entire time. Girl, open your eyes! That kind of talk-back is typical of playwright David E. Talberts popular urban theater shows, though this watered-down adaptation of his 2003 novel is too worried about attracting white audiences to let its black attitude take off. As a book, Baggage Claim allowed Talbert to entertain his female following with corny advice on finding the ideal man. After years of world travel, Montana Moore has developed a theory that all guys fall into one of five categories, ranging from overnight bag (no-strings fling) to trunk (old and worn), but the perfect man is like the perfect set of luggage: Full of compartments. So many that just when you think youve figured him out, he surprises you with a hidden nook or a forbidden cranny. So if youre onboard with Talberts tortured metaphor and want to know the right match for Montana, just look for the one with the forbidden cranny. The trouble with Baggage Claim the movie is that it makes immediately obvious which man Montana (Paula Patton) should wind up with. Back in elementary school, neighbor William Wright (Derek Luke) proposed marriage with a ring retrieved from the bottom of a Cracker Jack box, and now, whenever Montana needs cheering up, good old Mr. Wright is just across the hall, ready to boil a lobster and mix apple martinis until she feels better. But Montana is hopelessly slow on the uptake. While its not unusual to want a man, Montanas reasons are all wrong: Her altar-obsessed mother (Jenifer Lewis) has been married five times, and shes been pressuring Montana to get hitched as well. Now that her much younger sister (Lauren London) is engaged, Montana calculates that she has 30 days to find a fiance of her own or risk irreparably disappointing her mother. And while her latest beau (Boris Kodjoe) has awesome abs, the rest of the package is far from perfect. Thats where Montanas boycrazy best friends, fellow flight attendants Gail (Jill Scott) and Sam (Adam Brody), hatch the scheme to find her a husband in one months time: They will track the travel itineraries of all Montanas exes and arrange for her to bump into them en route, hoping that these men have matured into worthier suitors in the time since they split up. And so the film pretends that any of Montanas exes stands a chance: Theres the hip-hop star (Tremaine Neverson, aka Trey Songz), the aspiring Congressman (Taye Diggs) and the international businessman (Djimon Hounsou), all of whom seem desperate to pick up where they left off the last time around. However handsome they may be, these characters just arent the right fit for Montanas baggage. Chemistry you can fake, but charm is far harder to pull off, and Baggage Claim never quite succeeds on that front. Talbert has clearly studied what makes similar films click, but instead of finding a fresh spin on old cliches, he merely repeats them. While its nice to see Patton at the center of such a strong black ensemble, Talbert hasnt quite figured out how to adjust his directing technique from stage to screen. Reduced to making cutesy faces throughout, Patton doesnt act so much as mug. Perhaps fitting for a tale of missed connections, Baggage Claim leaves one wondering what might have been. Baggage Claim, a FoxSearchlight release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for sexual content and some language. Running time: 96 minutes. C2FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE ONTHESCENE FREE DESSERT With entree purchase. Coupon required. Code VC 000G75H 000G749 Bangkok Thai Restaurant Authentic Thai Food Mon Fri Lunch 11:30am-3:00pm Dinner 4:30pm-8:30pm Saturday Lunch 12:00pm-3:00pm Dinner 4:30pm-8:30pm 4025 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 352-746-0443 Anytime lunch or dinner purchase of $30 or more RECEIVE $5 OFF Lunch BUY 1 GET 1 HALF OFF with purchase of two beverages. Now Open on Mondays! Bangkok Thai Restaurant Expires 10/7/13 Valid on Monday only. Coupon required. Expires 10/7/13 Valid on Monday only. Coupon required. Bangkok Thai Restaurant 000G73Z Haddock Sandwich With side kick. $ 7.99 Come visit our second location on the square in Historic Downtown Inverness Tuesday-Sunday 12:00pm-9:00pm 352-726-2212 And Citrus Countys Best Open Flame Grilled Thick Juicy Steaks Pork Chops Tender Chicken Breasts S.R. 200 on the Withlacoochee River 352-854-2288 for the month of September at our Withlacoochee River location! Tues.Fri. open at 2:00pm Sat. & Sun. open at 12:00pm 25th Anniversary! Serving the Finest & Freshest Seafood All You Can Eat Catfish Shrimp Florida Gator Frog Legs Oysters To thank you for 25 great years of the finest and freshest Florida fare, were offering 25% Off All Entrees Anastasias2494 N. Heritage Oaks PathHernando, FL(Heritage Hills Plaza)352-513-4860 Mon-Thurs 7am-8pm Fri-Sat 7am-9pm Sunday 7am-2pm000G66WThe Place To Eat FRIDAY Lamb Shanks, Athenian Cod, Spinach RavioliSATURDAY Portabella Mushroom Ravioli, Gyro PlatterShrimp AthenianPrivate functions of 15 or more, contact us. Join us for our Dinner Specials Now Featuring Saganaki Appetizer (Flaming Cheese)Full Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Menu FRIED FISH OR CALAMARI COMBO PLATTERS: FRIED FISH & CALAMARI $9.50 FRIED FISH & SHRIMP $10.50 per person All served with coleslaw, sweet corn fritters and potato. $ 8.00 Other Foods $8.50 to $12.50 PORK LOIN with Greek style potatoes, salad and dessert. STUFFED PEPPERS with Greek style potatoes, salad and dessert. FRIED SHRIMP $ 9.50 FRIDAY FISH FRY 4:00PM-8:00PM ARCHANGEL MICHAEL GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH 4705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, Florida (352) 527-0766 at the CANTONIS PARISH CENTER BYOB Complimentary Glass of Wine with meal order 4:00-5:00pm & 7:00-8:00pm 000G5LJ Eat In or Carry Out Available Having A Banquet, Party or Meeting? Call 352-746-1177 Leave Name, Phone Number and a Brief Message Greek Pastry Items Available For Sale! 000G623 Beckys Cafe Beckys Cafe WE DELIVER MONDAY SPECIAL $ 4 95 WITH COUPON EXPIRES 9/30/13 A LL -Y OU C AN -E AT FISH FRY $ 5 95 C ORNER OF H WY 44 & NE 8 TH A VE .C RYSTAL R IVER C ORNER OF H WY 44 & NE 8 TH A VE .C RYSTAL R IVER 352-228-4969 352-228-4969 M ON -S AT 6 AM 7 PM M ON -S AT 6 AM 7 PM S UNDAY 6 AM 2 PM S UNDAY 6 AM 2 PM $ 8 95 BAKED LASAGNA EVERY FRIDAY N EW E NGLAND C LAMCAKES & C HOWDER Beckys Cafe Beckys Cafe Beckys Cafe Beckys Cafe MAMAS KUNTRY KAFEMom and Pop restaurants are the backbone of culinary America, and Mamas Kuntry Kafe in Inverness fits right into that category with its good home cooking and friendly, family atmosphere. Its breakfast in the morning with Mama and Karaoke in the evening with Papa. The establishment is family owned and operated and, in fact, opening such an eatery was the dream of owners Dale White and Lisa White for more than 14 years before Mamas opened four years ago. The biggest draw is the homemade style food served in large portions at reasonable prices. Entrees run from $4.00 to $7.00. Freshly brewed Sweet Tea is always available and there are daily specials for desserts. Some things I wont compromise on, and that includes the quality of the food we serve, White said. Located at 1787 W. Main Street in Inverness, the restaurant is open Monday through Thursday from 6:00 am to 2:00 pm; Fridays 6:00 am to 10:00 pm; Saturday 6:00 am to 2:00 pm; and Sunday 7:00 am to 9:00 pm. Entertainment is provided Friday and Sunday nights. For more information, call 341-6262. 000DM1X D unnellon R oad Ozello Trail Turner Camp Rd. Halls River Grover ClevelandCitrus Avenue Kings Bay Drive CR 581 CR 491 CR 490 CR 486 CR 48 Ft. Island TrailFishbowl Dr.Yulee Dr.N US 41N N. Citrus Springs Blvd. SR 200 SR 44E SR 44W SR 44W Follow That Dream Hwy.Hwy. 40 Dans Clam Stand Dans Clam Stand Mamas Kuntry Kafe Mama Sallys Old World Restaurant Plantation CR 491The Olive Tree Skeets Family Barbeque Enricos Italian Restaurant Mama Sallys South Heidis Italian Restaurant Chefs of Napoli High Octane McLeod House The Honey Hole US 41S US 19 US 41SSamanthas Cafe Shrimp LandingPub 44 Stumpknockers DECO Cafe Stumpknockers on the River Highland Family Restaurant Review: Baggage Claim lost on arrival

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MATTSEDENSKY AP Book ReviewJim Henson: The Biography (Ballantine Books), by Brian Jay Jones.If ever you had a single question about the felt magic Jim Henson managed to create, chances are Brian Jay Jones sweeping new biography of the puppeteer will answer it. Wondered why Miss Piggy is the way she is? Consider that her father was killed in a tractor accident, at least in the elaborate character back story created by the Muppets masters. Thought Kermit was always synonymous with frog? Fact is, he had not taken on an amphibious identity in initial appearances, and was not green but the milky blue of an old coat of Hensons mother. Jones offers a meticulously researched tome chock-full of gems about the Muppets and the most thorough portrait of their creator ever crafted. Hensons story, from his birth in the Mississippi Delta, to his first forays into puppetry as a teenager, to his sudden death in 1990 at the age of 53, is documented in depth. Were taken along to the creation of iconic characters, the birth of Sesame Street, the strain in Hensons marriage, friction with revered childrens authors Roald Dahl and Maurice Sendak, and unending merger talks with Disney. We learn Hensons first choice to cast in the central goblin king character of Labyrinth was Sting, not David Bowie. Were told of Henson collapsing in fits of laughter on the set of The Muppet Show, of him spending hours underwater to film the Rainbow Connection scene of The Muppet Movie, and how the puppets were so real they could be disarming to crew members. It is, in a word, exhaustive, and at times, exhausting. But at its best, it gives a glimpse of the silliness on Muppet sets, of Hensons drive and his soft-spoken genius that in such a short life managed to create so much. kids would come out. Then mom told grandma and grandpa about this neat thing they found. As the word spreads through families, it gets bigger and bigger. Theres nothing really in Florida that celebrates fall, and we wanted to provide that opportunity. Weve had a lot of folks whove come through whove grown up in the Northeast and the Midwest who enjoyed an experience similar to this whove come out and talked about their experiences doing this when they were kids. Theyve really enjoyed having it here. And its the smiles on the faces of the children, the laughter and the stories from visitors to The Pickin Patch that keep the Thomases and Dixons going through the long, hot summer days tending to the field. Because, as Scott Thomas explained, growing pumpkins in Florida is no small feat due to the climate. You have to remind yourself, when its 90 to 95 degrees, of the smiles and the joy and happiness these kids have on their face, he said. Youve got to dig down, its brutal, theres no doubt about it. Because of the obscene costs and extreme weather, extreme insect pressure. The rainy season is a deterrent to us. We got a tremendous amount of rain in August. It requires us to be more attentive to bug populations. Things happen much more rapidly when its wet. But, oh yeah, its worth it seeing the kids come out and be a part of what we started. I think, at times, we begin to take that for granted. We can, at any time, take our kids out to the field and ride around on a pasture and see deer and turkeys. There are so many kids that dont get to experience that. We want to share our life and our world of agriculture with families who dont get to experience that. We want to share our love of farming with everyone. For those whove been to The Pickin Patch or those whove yet to discover it, theres plenty to be found, or had. In addition to the 11acre pumpkin field, which offers the traditional carving pumpkins, theres also 2 acres worth of ornamental offerings, including white pumpkins, which can grow up to 80 pounds, and Cinderella pumpkins. Thomas also said theyve expanded two new varieties of gourds. The Pickin Patch also offers a Sunflower Garden, which is about 2 acres in size, but spread out this year, Thomas said, to allow visitors to navigate their way through the rows of brightly colored flowers. Thomas said the ever popular hay fort, with a slide, and hayrides will be available for young and old alike, and the Kiddie Cornmaze, which is about an acre in size. Its about a 7to 10-minute trip through it, Thomas said. The kids certainly enjoy it, but our focal point here is the pumpkins. Theres ample parking, Thomas said, and for those who prefer to just come by and purchase a pumpkin without doing it themselves, there will be a supply under the 4,000-square-foot tent, where visitors can snap pictures of their kids and families next to a vintage 1950 Ford F-1 pickup truck, the antique wagon and waterwheel. Admission to The Pickin Patch is $2 for those 3 and older; however, as Thomas explained, visitors can save their wristbands throughout the month and return for free as many times as they wish. He also stressed families are welcome to just come out and explore the offerings without purchasing a pumpkin. We have a lot of families who come out and spread a blanket out and have a picnic lunch, we really dont mind, he said. If you want to come out and enjoy a picnic lunch in the warm fall sun, youre welcome too. If it gets too hot, we have a 4,000-square-foot tent set up and plenty of places to rest, have a cool drink of water and get out of the immediate sun. The Pickin Patch, 11100 Rolling Hills Road, to get there, go west on State Road 40 and turn right on Rolling Hills Road, which is directly across from the Dunnellon water tower. Gates are on the right. The Pickin Patch will be open from 3 to 7 p.m. Fridays and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays and noon to 7 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 27. The Pickin Patch will officially open at 10 a.m. Saturday. For information, call 352-533-4344 or visit dunnellonpumpkinpatch.com or email thepickinpatch@ bellsouth.net. ONTHESCENECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 C3 000FYGR 2 LOCATIONS 7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa 352-628-9588 Highway 44, Crystal River 352-795-9081 DANS FAMOUS BURGER & FRIES $ 5.95 1 POUND SNOW CRABS $ 9.99 LIVE MAINE LOBSTER $ 14.99 10 FRIED SHRIMP AND FRIES $ 8.99 3:00 6:00 PM EARLY BIRDS $ 9.95 SEAFOOD AT ITS BEST WHOLE BELLY CLAMS & N.E. STEAMERS 000G3Q9 Next to ABC Liquor 341-MAMA 341-MAMA Valid with coupon only. Not combined w/any other offer. Expires 9/30/13 FISH FRY *FRI. NIGHTS ONLY $ 6.39 GIFT CERTIFICATES 000G4KK Home of the Large Portions MAMAS KUNTRY KAFE MAMAS KUNTRY KAFE FRIDAY NIGHT: KARAOKE FRIDAY NIGHT: KARAOKE POKER NIGHT 3RD SATURDAY OF THE MONTH FROM 6-9 Benefitting the Inverness Lions Club Serving Citrus County for 33 Years Behind Burger King in Homosassa. Homestyle Country Breakfast Fantastic Lunch Buffet$6.49Sunday $7.49 Huge Dinner Menu Steaks, Chops & Fresh Local Seafood Italian SpecialtiesComing SoonEvening Country Style BuffetWed. Thurs Nights(352) 628-5544Friday & Saturday4 8 pmItalian Buffet complete with salad bar and roast beef carving section$10.95 000G6GX Authentic Neapolitan Cuisine We Look Forward to Seeing You Soon! 1546 US HWY 41, INVERNESS 352.419.6554 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! MON-THURS 11AM-9PM FRI 11AM-10PM SAT 12PM-10PM SUN 12-9PM Pizzeria & Ristorante ITALIANO Come Try Our Daily Specials! 14277 POWELL RD., SPRING HILL 352.544-1234 Gift Ce rtifica tes Let Chefs of Napoli Cater Your Special Event! Large 1 Topping Pizza 1/2 Doz. Garlic Knots 2 Liter Soda Must present original coupon. Not valid w/other offers. Expires 10/3/13 $ 14 75 TAKE OUT ONLY! 000DM2B RIVERLAND NEWS/Special to the ChronicleMary Massey surveys rows of sunflowers last year at The Pickin Patch. Sunflowers will again be offered at The Pickin Patch. PATCHContinued from Page C1 Muppet magic revealed in new bio of Jim Henson 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd. HOMOSASSA (352) 601-1373 Open 11am Midnight Monday Through Sunday Open Til 3am Fri & Sat Call or Text in your order. Catering Available 000G76Y FREE Dance Lessons Every Tuesday 6-8pm, learn swing, cha-cha & disco! After your lessons, go show off your new moves to B ILL C ASTNER T HE K ING OF S WING & D ANCE Live Concert Performing Your Favorites from the 50s & 60s Every Tuesday 7pm ROCK N ROLL DUELING PIANOS! 2 ND WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH 8PM 12AM YOUR REQUESTS & FAVORITE SONGS PERFORMED BY TWO OF THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS! NO COVER CHARGE! Nightclub Nightclub Nightclub INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. 000G74U Peppermint Patties Peppermint Patties Peppermint Patties New Location New Location New Location 859 US Hwy 41, S., Inverness, FL 419-4878 We accept all major credit cards NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM -7 PM or until last customer leaves WICKED GOOD NEW ENGLAND SEAFOOD WICKED GOOD NEW ENGLAND SEAFOOD WICKED GOOD NEW ENGLAND SEAFOOD Buy one dinner get one HALF OFF equal or lesser value Excludes fish & chips. With coupon. Expires on Thursday, Oct. 3.

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FRAZIERMOORE Associated PressNEW YORK The supply is running low and you know there wont be more. Breaking Bad stands to leave its fans reeling. For five seasons of wickedness this AMC drama has set viewers face-to-face with the repellant but irresistible Walter White and the dark world he embraced as he spiraled into evil. With the end imminent (Sunday at 9 p.m.), who can say what fate awaits this teacherturned-drug-lord for the havoc he has wreaked on everyone around him. This is more than the end of a TV series. Its a cultural moment, arriving as the show has logged record ratings, bagged a best-drama Emmy and even scored this weeks cover of The New Yorker magazine. Up through the penultimate episode, Breaking Bad has been as potent and pure as the blue sky crystal meth Walter cooked with such skill. Judging from that consistency in storytelling and in performances by such stars as Bryan Cranston (Walter White), Aaron Paul (his sidekick Jesse Pinkman), Anna Gunn (who just won an Emmy as Walts wife) and Betsy Brandt, the end will likely pack unforgiving potency. But one thing is dead sure: It will be beautiful. Breaking Bad has often been described as addictive, and if thats so, the look of the show is its own habit-forming drug. Michael Slovis, the series four-times-Emmy-nominated director of photography, has been cooking up that look since the series sophomore season. I go for the emotion in the scene, not to overtake it, but to help it along, said Slovis over a recent lunch in Manhattan. With Breaking Bad, I recognized very early that I had a story and performances that could stand up to a bold look. The action is centered in Albuquerque, N.M., which invites sprawling desert shots and tidy manicured neighborhoods; washes of light and jagged sundrenched expanses. The look of the show makes the most of its setting, and also the technology by which viewers see it: In an age of digital video, with the smallest detail and the sharpest resolution visible to the audience, Walters battered mobile meth lab could be clearly discerned as a speck against a vista of deserts and mountains. A dolls disembodied eyeball bobbing in a swimming pool had chilling vividness. And dont forget the shows visual signature: Breaking Bad was never afraid of the dark. Slovis recalls how, his first week as DP, he was shooting in Jesses basement. Jesse and Walter are down there cooking meth, and I turn off all the lights and turn the back lights on. Theres smoke and shafts of light coming through the basement door and I go, This is what I came to do! We have some interesting extremes in lighting, thanks to Michael and his fearlessness, said Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan from Los Angeles. He invoked the fancy artistic term for this, chiaroscuro, which means the use of strong contrasts between light and dark. Breaking Bad has become known for beautiful bold lighting, he said, and Michael became an indispensable part of the Breaking Bad equation. The imagery of Breaking Bad is second-nature to its viewers, whether or not they are conscious of Slovis work. So when they swoon at the beauty of the desert outside Albuquerque, they may not know the complexion of this badlands was created in his camera. The desert on the show has a tonality that doesnt exist in real life, he said with a laugh. This color is achieved with a so-called tobacco filter clamped on the lens. I dont pay much attention to reality when I light or even when I shoot exteriors. But nobody questions the color, because it becomes part of the storytelling. You would have a hard time finding many stylistic links between Breaking Bad and some of Slovis other credits, which include CSI (for which he won an Emmy), Fringe, AMCs short-lived noir thriller Rubicon, and lighter fare including Running Wilde and Royal Pains. (Nor his additional credits as a director, which range from four episodes of Breaking Bad to Chicago Fire and Rock.) Instead, he said he strives to let each project suggest its own look. Now 58, Slovis is soft-voiced and lanky, with a head whose baldness rivals Walt Whites in Heisenberg mode. He got the photography bug while growing up in Plainview, N.J., where he became the school photographer and won a state photography contest. He was invited to study at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He imagined himself a finearts photographer but he loved movies and storytelling, and, after graduate school at New York University, landed jobs shooting music videos and commercials, then got nibbles from feature films. But in 2001 he found movie offers drying up, and, though he had never seen TV in his future, he gratefully accepted a call from the NBC series Ed. The timing was terrific. For decades, TVs hasty, assemblyline production schedule proved an obstacle to giving a series its own visual style. Film had been just a way to record the TV picture, Slovis said. A further barrier to getting too creative was the low resolution and squarish shape of the old TV receivers, which conversely had a negative impact on theatrical films, whose wide-screen format was forced to conform (with lots of medium and close-up shots) to movies eventual small-screen telecast. Slovis hails pioneering exceptions such as Twin Peaks, Law & Order and The XFiles, and credits CSI as one of the first times that cinematography became a real character on a show. TV began changing around us. Gilligan agreed that the advent of flat-screen TV really allowed Michaels work to shine in a way it wouldnt have, 20 years ago. Now the end of Breaking Bad is nigh. But through Sundays final fade-out, Slovis influence will remain, capturing the Bad times you cant turn your eyes from. Hes a series star whos out of sight, yet controlling what you see. C4FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Breaking Bad ending run still looking good Associated PressCinematographer Michael Slovis takes a measurement as Bryan Cranston, center, and co-star Aaron Paul stand by on the set of Breaking Bad. The series finale will air on Sunday. 000G6GG The Best in Casual Fine Dining 419-6511 www.restaurantLakeSide.com Tues.-Sat. 10am-10pm Sun. & Mon. 10am-5pm 4543 E. W INDMILL D RIVE I NVERNESS FL 34453 H WY 41 B ETWEEN I NVERNESS AND H ERNANDO LakeSide Bar & Grill Like us on Facebook FOOTBALL SUNDAYS! 8 TV S TO V IEW I NCLUDING P ATIO Ask About Food Specials! Sunday Brunch $ 15 95 11-3 PM INTRODUCING $ 10 Buckets (Domestic) $ 2 Drafts (Domestic) 000DM2B 000G6GJ HIGHLANDS 341-3030 3066 S. 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ONTHESCENECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 C5 Theater Les Miserables, through Oct. 13 at Ocala Civic Theatre, 4337 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. 7:30 p.m.; matinees at 2 p.m. Adults $28; students $10. 352-236-2274 or ocalacivictheatre.com. Fiddler on the Roof, produced by the Live Oak Theatre Company. Oct. 18, 19, 25, 26 and 27 at Faith Evangelical Presbyterian Church, 200 Mount Fair Ave., Brooksville. 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays. Adults $18; children 13 and under $5 with purchase of adult ticket. Coffee/tea and dessert included. 352-593-0027 or liveoaktheatre.org. Betting on Death, the Greater Dunnellon historical Societys murdermystery event. 7 p.m. at Oct. 18, 19, 25 and 26 at Dunnellons historic depot, 12061 S. Williams Street. $25; includes full meal. 352465-5005. Central Florida Lyric Operas 2013-14 series All performances at Paul P. Williams Fine Arts Auditorium, 9501 U.S. 441 and College Drive, Leesburg. $15 and up. 352-753-3229 or centralfloridalyricopera.org. Viva Verdi, 3 p.m. Oct. 20. Opera Thunder II: An Encore Performance, 3 p.m. Nov. 3. Lucia de Lammermoor, 3 p.m. Jan. 19. Barber of Seville, 3 p.m. Feb. 16. Great Opera Scenes, 3 p.m. March 16.Arts & Crafts Artists sought for mall show. Caf Impressions hosting showcase at mall from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 5 and Oct. 19. Artists in oils, acrylics, mixed media, watercolor, drawings, photography, three-dimensional fine art (sculpture), stained glass, jewelry and pottery invited to participate. Spaces limited. 772-4807427 or ashleymcdermott photo@gmail.com. Applications for the Beverly Hills Foundation 16th annual Craft Fair will be accepted through Oct. 19 for the Nov. 2 event. Fee is $20 per table/space. A table and two chairs will be provided. Lion Shirley Belliveau, 352-527-1943. Participants sought for annual Artisans Boutique. Pre-screening under way; call 352-746-2889 or 352-344-1275 for details. Botique will be Oct. 18 and 19. All Day Art Club, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Old Homosassa Civic Center, 5530 S. Mason Creek Drive, behind the fire station. $10. Bring supplies. Intermediate and advanced artists welcome. 352-795-8774. Sandhill Crane Chapter of the Embroiderers Guild of America, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., first Wednesday monthly at Faith Evangelical Presbyterian Church, 200 Mount Fair Ave., Brooksville. Bring lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus), 352666-8350 (Hernando). Needlework Fun Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and third Saturdays monthly, Wildwood Public Library, 310 S. Palmer Drive, Wildwood. 352-748-1158. els34785@yahoo.com. Nature Coast Decorative Artists Chapter of the Society of Decorative Artists meets at 9 a.m. first Saturday monthly at Weeki Wachee Senior Center off U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail, Spring Hill. Short meeting, show-and-tell and birthday raffle. 352-688-4106 or 352527-2778. naturecoast decorativeartists.com. Community Needleworks Crafters meet at 10 a.m. first Wednesday. All quilters, knitters and crochet crafters are welcome. Call Terri at 352-746-1973. Ozello Arts and Craft Festival, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 30. Openings available for interested artists and crafters. 352-634-0563 or ozello.net. The Knight House Menagerie, monthlong exhibit of paintings and photographs of animals by Florida Artists Gallery members. Live menagerie planned for Oct. 5. Free. 352-344-9300 or floridaartistsgallery.com.Art Classes Watercolor classes with instructor Pat Sistrand, 9 a.m. Tuesdays, Citrus Springs Community Center. $10. citruscountyfl.org, click on Parks & Recreation to register. 352-465-7007. Hobby Haven classes: Acrylic painting with Lois, noon every Friday. $15. Classes are at Hobby Haven & gifts, 1239 S. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Homosassa, in Nottingham Square next to GMC Buick. 352-794-6032. Lorna Jean Gallery art classes: Learn to Draw for ages 6 to adult. $15 for group lessons. Ages 6 to 11, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and 11 a.m. to noon Saturday. Ages 12 to 18, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday. Adult classes 11 a.m. to noon Tuesday and Wednesday. Watercolor Painting for Beginners, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. $15 per session. Four students per session. 352-564-2781. Art & craft classes for children ages 6 to 10, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays and 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Ages 11 to 16, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays. $60 per month. Materials included. Classes limited to eight students. 352-564-2781. Learn to design and create sterling silver jewelry, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays in four-week intervals. $140 for four weeks. Materials and use of tools included. 352-564-2781. Voice lessons. Ages 10 to adult, by appointment. $15 per lesson. 352-564-2781. Lorna Jean Gallery is at 6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. 352-564-2781. Sculptural Tile Making Workshop 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Oct. 12, 19 and 26. $67.50; materials included. Instructor Jan Hitchcock. 352-613-6746 or ozziehitchcock@yahoo.co.uk. The Florida Artists Gallery, historic Knight House, 8219 Orange Ave., Floral City, offers art classes. 352-344-9300. Floridaartistsgallery.com. September and October classes: Fearless Painting with Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with lunch noon to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14. Instructor Susi LaForsch. In one-day workshop, students will create an 18-inch-by-24-inch acrylic painting. $75 per workshop. Materials included. Deposit required. laforsch@ tampabay.rr.com, 352-7268710 or 352-344-9300. Advanced Fearless Painting with Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with lunch noon to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28. Instructor Susi LaForsch. Limited to four students. $55 per workshop; bring materials. Deposit required. laforsch@ tampabay.rr.com, 352-7268710 or 352-344-9300. Paint Santas portrait in oil, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29 and Sunday, Oct. 27. Tone-on-tone, rub-out painting of Santa on 16-inch-by-20-inch canvas. Instructor Carol Basso. $55. 352-344-9300. Drawing 101, 10:15 a.m. to noon Thursdays. Instructor Keith Gum. Media will include charcoal, pencils, and pen and ink. Class size is limited to permit individualized instruction. $15 per class or $50 for four classes in advance. 352400-9778 or ifugaopapercraft@gmail.com. Sterling silver and wire rings, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 19. Instructor Lynda Ryan. Participants will learn basic wire sculpture skills, then complete two pendants. Bring flat-nose and roundnose pliers and flush/close cutters. $45 includes materials. 352-344-9300, 352489-0959 or lyndasmac@ me.com. Ongoing classes: Drawing with Ann, 10:15 to noon Thursdays. Instructor Ann Covington. For beginners to advanced. $15 per session. 352-3449300. Painting with Acrylics, 1 to 3 p.m. every Friday. Instructor Connie Townsend. For beginners to advanced. $15 per session. 352-4009757 or ConnieTown @aol.com. Painting with Oils, 1 to 3 p.m. every Tuesday. Instructor Connie Townsend. For beginners to advanced. $15 per session. 352-4009757 or ConnieTown @aol.com. Photography Critique Session, 1 to 3 p.m., second Thursday monthly. Instructor Larry Jordan. Critique of images. $10 per year. Call Larry at 352-3440518. Small, private art class for home-schoolers, time varies by age. $15. Instructor Keith Gum. 352-3449300. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturdays, and noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Sundays. 352-3449300 or floridaartistsgallery.com. Festivals Floral City BarBQ Cookoff, featuring six hours of music and dozens of vendors cooking barbecue from scratch. All day Oct. 5. floralcitymerchants.com.Museums Artifacts Exquisite & Extraordinary, until Sept. 28, Thomas Center Galleries, 302 N.E. Sixth Ave., Gainesville. Diverse range of objects including ancient Chinese jade, preColumbian textiles, medieval sheet music, 17th-century letters, natural history specimens and meteorites. Galleries open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. gvlcultural affairs.org.Music 2013 Free Fridays concert series 8 and 10 p.m. Friday nights, from April 5 through Nov. 8, at Bo Diddley Community Plaza, 111 E. University Ave., Gainesville. gvlcultural affairs.org or 352-393-8746. Musical acts include: Today Tropix Oct. 4 The Relic, Woodstock-era tribute band Karaoke at the Mall, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 28 at the Crystal River Mall, feat. Roger Carrier. SoundArt concert series at Appleton Museum of Art combines art and music. Interactive experience includes entry to museum. Concerts held at 3 p.m. at museum, 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. ocalasymphony.com or 352351-1606. Sept. 29 Those Endearing Edwardians, English music of the early 20th century. Fall Out Boy 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29 at USF Sun Dome. Tickets on sale at 10 a.m. April 5, $29.50 and $39.50, via Ticketmaster.com, by calling 800-745-3000. The Isley Brothers, 8 p.m. Oct. 5 at USF Sun Dome. Opening acts KEM and Nephew Tommy. $30 to $80. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. Monthly open jam session of the Citrus Jazz Society, 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, at the Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center in Homosassa Springs. Public invited; $7 donation at the door for nonmembers is requested. 352382-1875. America, A Brave New Frontier, a concert of the Ocala Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5 and 3 p.m. Oct 6, Ocala Breeders Sales Auditorium, 1701 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Feat. Wagners Columbus Overture, William Perrys Jamestown Concerto, Dvoraks Symphony No. 9. $5 and up. 352-351-1606 or ocalasymphony.com. Kellie Pickler, 8 p.m. Oct. 11 at Ruth Eckerd Hall. $29 to $55. 727-791-7400 or rutheckerdhall.com.Dance Beginners line dancing classes. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays at Central Citrus Community Center, 2804 W. Mark Knighton Court, Lecanto. $3. Instructor Cher Mason. Closed-toe shoes preferred. socdancer.org. 352-527-5993. Afternoon tea dances and classical ballroom music, hosted by deejay Sapphire. Central Citrus Community Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Dance basics at 1:30 p.m. and advanced at 2:45 p.m.352-527-5993. Instructor is June Queripel. $5. 352-527-5993 or 352795-3831. Sunday Night Dances every week at Knights of Columbus, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Lecanto. Doors open at 6 p.m. Music starts at 7 p.m. Coffee, tea and soda available. Spirit of Citrus Dances. All dances 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Kellner Auditorium Jewish Center, 92 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, unless otherwise indicted. socdancer.org.Special Interest The Sunshine State Romance Authors Inc. meetings, 10 a.m. fourth Saturday monthly, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa. 352-726-0162. Crafters with a Missions fourth annual Craft Bazaar and Bake Sale will be from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 27 and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 28 in the gym at Crystal River Church of God, 2180 NW 12thAve., Crystal River. Admission is free. 352-795-3079.Farmers Markets Herrys Market Day 8 a.m. to noon, last Saturday of the month at Hospice Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa (behind Wendys, east of U.S. 19). Herrys Market Day is offering free vendor space. Space is limited. 352-527-2020. Beverly Hills Arts, Crafts and Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday at Lake Beverly Park. Vendor spaces $5. bhcivic association.com. 352-7462657. West End Market at the Crystal River Mall, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. the fourth Saturday of every month. Features fresh produce, plants and other local food-related items, as well as handmade arts and crafts. Air-conditioned. 352-795-2585. An evening of American standards Special to the ChronicleThe Dunnellon Concert singers, as part of the 2013-2014 Light Shine series, will be performing songs from The American Songbook at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 at Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 2450 W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto. Admission is free; donations will be accepted. For more information, call 352-419-8796. The singers, pictured above from left, are contralto Sue Koppler, baritone Bill Thomas, soprano Mary Mahoney and pianist Bob Cubbage. WANT YOUR EVENT IN THE BUZZ? Email newsdesk@chronicleonline.com and include the name of the event; the time, date and place; ticket prices; a contact persons name, phone number and email address; and any other pertinent information. In the subject line of the email, type Attention Buzz. | Photos needs to be high resolution. Identify the people in the photo and the event. Please include a contact name, phone number and email address. Photos will run close to the date of the event. | Deadlines for Buzz submissions are 5 p.m. Friday for the following Fridays edition. | The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices. | For more information, call 352-563-5660. Crafters, take to Lake HernandoJoin the Inverness Elks Lodge in celebrating the fall season as they present the annual Lakeside Craft Show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the lodge located on Lake Hernando. Parking is free, dozens of vendors will be on-site selling handmade fabric creations, soaps, photography, embroidery and lots more. Food and beverages are available. Raffles will take place every 30 minutes and guests do not need to be present to win. The Inverness Elks is located off U.S. 41 at 3580 Lemon St. in Hernando, between the tackle shop and martial arts studio, behind Ace Hardware. For information, call 352860-2598. Rock the Block kicks off with Save the RadioCome out and Rock the Block with Save the Radio, starting at 6 p.m. on Saturday. On Saturday, the City of Inverness will present Rock the Block for the first time this season, and will offer guests a free street party that includes live music from the s and up, drawings for prizes and the opportunity to enjoy the many things downtown Inverness has to offer. Save the Radio takes the stage at 7 p.m. with its original music and sounds from the 1960s through today. Save the Radio is a four-member band that formed in 2008 in St. Petersburg that specializes in rock, alternative and acoustic music. Annual womens expo taking over armoryListen up, ladies. In an effort to improve those statistics (and improve the lives of women in Citrus County, the Business Womens Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is hosting its annual Womens Health and Fitness Expo Saturday at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free, and in addition to health advice and services, the expo promises a slate of speakers, giveaways of getaways, massage stations, product samples and more.Beat the Sheriff returns to InvernessOn Saturday, the streets of downtown Inverness will come alive when the annual Beat the Sheriff race returns to town. Hosted by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, the race is scheduled to kick into high gear at 7:30 a.m. Saturday from the courthouse square. The USA Track & Field-certified 5K (3.1 mile) course takes runners through scenic venues in historic, downtown Inverness. The route is all asphalt, with slightly rolling hills. Like last year and the year before, all proceeds from the Beat the Sheriff race will benefit Jessies Place, Citrus Countys child advocacy center. The center is named in honor of 9-year-old Jessica Marie Lunsford, the Homosassa youngster who was abducted from her familys home and murdered in early 2005. Runners may pre-register by mail at a reduced cost by visiting the Jessies Place website at www.jessiesplacecitrus.org and downloading an application. Just fill it out and include a check for $20 (or $18 if youre a member of the Citrus Road Runners club), made payable to Jessies Place. Special student pricing also is available, plus the entry fee for the Kids Fun Run (no T-shirt) is $2. Make sure all advanced registrations are received no later than Wednesday, Sept. 26, by mailing them to Jessies Place, Beat the Sheriff, 4465 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465. Registration on the day of the race will start at 6:30 a.m. at Courthouse Square. Same-day registrants will pay $30 to compete. For more information, call 352270-8814. Cracker Cowboy Poet moseys into LecantoCracker Cowboy Poet Hank Mattson will perform at 4 p.m. Sunday at Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 2450 W. Norvell Bryant Highway. Mattson, who lives in Florida, crafts his work to preserve the memory and traditions of Old Florida. For information, call 352382-4748 or visit crackercowboy poet.com.BEST BETS THIS WEEKEND

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. NEWS NOTES Womans Club to host card partyThe Crystal River Womans Club will host a Military Card Party and Luncheon on Thursday, Oct. 10, at the clubhouse at 320 N. Citrus Ave. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $12 and it is recommended to make reservations for tables of four. Money is given to the first-, secondand third-place winners. Two entry tickets will be drawn for two foursomes to attend the Military Card Party free on Feb. 20. Tickets may be purchased by calling Lois Thomas at 352-382-0777.Participants welcome for fun showJust Horsen Around riding stable will have a fun horse show Sunday. Registration is at 1 p.m.; events begin at 2 p.m. Participation cost is $4 for each event: ride a buck, barrels, arena race, poles, keyhole and catalog race. To pre-register or for more information, call 352563-7017. The public is welcome. All concession proceeds benefit the Floral City Team Green 4-H Club.Charity Air Show in BrooksvilleThe Hernando Aero Modelers HAM R/C Club will host a Charity Air Show Saturday, Oct. 12, at the HAM flying field, 3 miles east of the Suncoast Parkway on U.S. 98. Gates open at 8 a.m. The event, to benefit the Hernando County Cattlemens Association Scholarship Fund, will include a high-speed Delta demo, pattern and pylon racing demos, static aircraft displays, scale aircraft, combat flying, skilled flying events and more. Rolando Perez will present a 3D helicopter demonstration. Admission for spectators is $3 per person or $5 per carload. There will be free parking; food and drinks will be available. For more information, call Bill Panzeter at 352346-9948. Romance authors gather SaturdayThe Sunshine State Romance Authors Inc. (SSRA) is a chapter of Romance Writers of America. Through monthly meetings, specialized speakers and educational workshops, SSRA offers opportunities for writers of romance fiction and every subgenre to learn and improve upon the skills and knowledge necessary to thrive in todays fast-paced publishing industry. Readers, beginning writers and published authors are all welcome to attend meetings except those specifically designated for members only. SSRA meets from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the fourth Saturday monthly at the Homosassa Public Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave. For more information, call Marian Fox at 352726-0162.Park to host Volunteer FairIn honor of National Public Lands Day, Fort Cooper State Park and the Friends of Fort Cooper will host a Volunteer Fair and Breakfast with the rangers and park volunteers from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. There will be no park entrance fees during the event. Visitors can talk with rangers and volunteers to learn more about the park and what volunteer opportunities are available at Fort Cooper State Park, and why volunteers are so important to it. A pancake, sausage and beverage breakfast will be served from 9 to 11 a.m. while supplies last. For more information, call 352-726-0315.Take Stock car wash SaturdayTake Stock in Children student scholars will have a car wash from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, 1 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Inverness. Donation is $5 per car. Proceeds will be used to support Take Stock in Children student activities. The program is sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office. For more information, call Pat Lancaster, program coordinator, at 352-422-2348. COMMUNITYPage C6FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Animal ShelterADOPTABLES Bitsey and Ursa Special to the ChroniclePoor Bitsey has been at the shelter since mid-May. She is a white and gray spayed cat, is verygentle and gets along with other cats. She loves her cat condo and is waiting to meet you. Right now any spayed or neutered feline at the shelter can be adopted for $15, which includes all vaccinations, microchip and deworming. Ursa is an 8-month-old retriever mix and weighs 40 pounds. Shes very sweet, loves people, is great with kids and other dogs. If you come near her, she rolls over and offers her belly for a scratch. Help find this precious pup a home of her own. The shelter offers six weeks of free obedience classes. Bitsey and Ursa are at Citrus County Animal Services, 4030 S. Airport Road, Inverness, behind the fairgrounds. View more adoptable pets at www.citruscritters.com. Call 352-746-8400. Special to the ChronicleThe UF-IFAS Citrus County Extension master gardeners free plant clinics for October will address cold-weather plant protection. Plants like gradual cool-downs; this gives them a chance to acclimate (go into dormancy). Unfortunately, Citrus County winters usually have extreme temperature changes occurring over short periods of time. Rapidly falling temperatures do not allow dormancy to establish. This means we must protect the tropical and sub-tropical plants in our landscapes. The October plant clinics will explain the types of freezes we experience and provide actions gardeners can take before, during and after cold weather to protect plants. The schedule for these free plant clinics is: Wednesday, Oct. 2 2 p.m. at Floral City Library; Tuesday, Oct, 8 1 p.m. at Lakes Region Library, Inverness; Wednesday, Oct. 9 1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills; Friday, Oct. 11 1:30 p.m. at Coastal Region Library, Crystal River; Tuesday, Oct. 22 2 p.m. at Homosassa Library. Those who want to attend the clinic normally held at the Citrus Springs Library may call the Extension Office at 352-527-5700 for details about its continuation. Master gardener volunteers will be available at all sessions to address other plant questions, offer solutions to problems and address gardening concerns in general. Those who cannot attend sessions are welcome to contact Citrus County master gardeners via email. Questions or pictures can be sent to MasterG1@bocc.citrus.fl.us. Master gardeners will research any questions and respond. Special to the ChronicleThe Beverly Hills Fishing Club has several activities coming up in the next several weeks. Everyone is invited to participate; you do not have to be a member to attend. Sunday, Oct. 6 Trip to Biloxi. Space is limited. Saturday, Oct. 26 Mount Dora Craft Fair. About 350 vendors are expected to line the streets. There will be lots of food and rest areas available to sit and people watch. The group will be home early. Saturday, Oct. 26 Halloween party. The Halloween party will be held at VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills. Doors open at 5 p.m. and food will be served at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7 Military card party. The military card party will be held at VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills. All activities require reservations. To RSVP and for more information, call Patricia at 352-257-9328. EVELYNVISSICCHIO Special to the ChronicleIn December 2003, The Spot launched its first Christmas program, The Spot Christmas Jam: The Reason for the Season. That year, The Spot Family Center served 60 families a hot Christmas dinner and also distributed groceries and more than 300 toys to children on Christmas Eve. Since then, hundreds of new programs and services have been provided to more than 1,800 families and children in Citrus County. Continuing in the same spirit and passion that they started with 10 years ago, The Spot is now providing even more services to bring hope to the families of Citrus County, with multiple programs for youths and adults. The Spot offers daily programs such as mentoring/leadership training, family support resources and The Spots Kids Club, an afterschool program geared toward educational advancement with a tutoring component involved for students in kindergarten through seventh grade. In addition to the daily programs, The Spot Family Center also offers its monthly Jam a gathering which includes free hot meals, clothing, grocery giveaways and a life skills message for participants. As a faith-based ministry, The Spot also offers monthly Bible study groups and other community support groups at the facility. Each year during the Christmas season, The Spot Family Center conducts its annual Toy Drive and gift-wrapping parties, where many residents across the county assist in collecting toys for local families in need. These toys are then distributed at the annual Spot Christmas Jam on Christmas Eve. This year, The Spot will celebrate its first 10 years with a special event A Night of Hope on Friday, Nov. 8. The event will be from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Realtors Association of Citrus County and will feature a silent auction, as well as fabulous food. The Spot Family Center invites everyone to come out and do some early Christmas shopping while supporting a local charity. You may support The Spot Family Center by donating an item for the auction, or you can make a financial contribution toward the event by sending a check payable to: The Spot Family Center, P.O. Box 2046 Lecanto, FL 34460. For more information, call The Spot at 352-794-3870 or visit www.TheSpotFamilyCenter.org.Evelyn Vissicchio is program director at The Spot Family Center, 405 S.E. Seventh Ave., Crystal River. Spot Family Center celebrates 10 years of service Special to the ChronicleLast year, the Friends of the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Friends of Chazz) purchased a bunkhouse for the many interns who work at the refuge throughout the year. Shown sprucing up the residence, front, are board members Jo Claycomb and Shirley Knudsen. In back are Friends President Ross Knudsen, Bob Claycomb, Tom Gotterup, Bob Quarles and wildlife refuge staff member/intern Dan Bove. The Friends were able to buy this bunkhouse through their many fundraisers and were able to use $22,000 for the purchase and for furnishings. The Friends also donated an extra $2,000 in more furnishings and put in approximately 40 hours of labor into getting it up and running. The facility has become home to interns from all over the world, including England, China and France. Having this bunkhouse allows for clean and comfortable accommodations for these young people, who work along with the refuge staff and learn while they donate their labor in the field of wildlife management and care. To learn more about the Friends, visit www.friendsofchazz or call 352-563-2088, ext. 215. Sprucing up the bunkhouse Plant clinics focus on cold protection BH Fishing Club invites all to enjoy activities RSVP now for trips, parties

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013 C7CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.Anne Tyler said, People always call it luck when youve acted more sensibly than they have. That is often true, but there can still be matters out of your control. Take todays deal, for example. Look at only the North-South hands. In which contract would you choose to play? When the deal was originally played, the bidding went as shown. North-South were using two-over-one game-forcing. On the third round, South broke a golden rule of Blackwood by using the convention with two fast losers in both unbid suits, with no guarantee that partner had a firstor second-round control in those suits. South should have bid four spades. Then, North probably would have passed, although with controls in both hearts and clubs, there would have been a good case for his using Blackwood. Six diamonds and six spades are both excellent contracts, apparently losing only one club trick. However, at the table, against six diamonds, West led the club jack. East won with her king and realized that, unless West had a slow trump trick like jack-fourth, there was only one way to defeat the slam shift to a spade. West happily ruffed and South unhappily wrote minus 100 on her scoresheet. Then North pointed out that six spades was making. Against that slam, Easts best lead is a low club! If North carelessly plays low from the board, West wins and gives his partner a diamond ruff. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 P o liti cs N a ti on (N)H ar db a ll With Ch r i s Matthews (N) All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (N) Th e R ac h e l M a dd ow Show (N) L oc k up G L oc k up G (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Secret Life of Predators Stealth PG Secret Life of Predators Naked PG Secret Life of Predators Stealth PG Secret Life of Predators Exposed PG Secret Life of Predators Wet (N) PG Secret Life of Predators Exposed PG (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.KorraTurtlesTurtlesTurtlesFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 The Bucket List (2007) PG-13 Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now? (OXY) 44 123 Fun With Dick and Jane (1977) Sex and the City (2008) Sarah Jessica Parker. RDick and Jane (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Die Another Day (2002) PG-13 Step Up Revolution (2012) Ryan Guzman. (In Stereo) PG-13 Roman Polanski: Odd Man Out (2012, Documentary) NR Ray Donovan Same Exactly MARoman (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Cops Cops Cops PG Cops PG Cops PG Cops PG Bellator MMA Live Stacked lightweight tournament; from Portland, Ore. (N) Bellator MMA Live (In Stereo) (STARZ) 370 271 370 The Haunted Mansion (2003) PG The Vow (2012, Romance) Rachel McAdams. (In Stereo) PG-13 Hello I Must Be Going (2012) Melanie Lynskey. R The White Queen (In Stereo) MA Ghost Rider (SUN) 36 31 36 Sport Fishing Rays Live! (N) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays. From Rogers Centre in Toronto. (N) (Live) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays T.B. Lightning Preseason Special (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 The Covenant (2006) PG-13 Fangasm Beam Me Up, Stan WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) (In Stereo) PG, V Haven Series of corpses in Haven. (N) Fangasm Beam Me Up, Stan (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldCleveland Killers (2010) Ashton Kutcher. Life as We Know It (2010) PG-13 (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Fort Massacre (1958, Western) Joel McCrea, Forrest Tucker. NR The Time Machine (1960, Science Fiction) Rod Taylor. G (DVS) World Without End (1956) Hugh Marlowe. NR The Omega Man (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Fast N Loud (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) G Gold Rush (In Stereo) G Gold Rush (In Stereo) G Gold Rush (In Stereo) G Gold Rush (In Stereo) G (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30GownGownGownGownSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesWhat Not to WearSay YesSay Yes (TMC) 350 261 350 Spy Kids Knucklehead (2010) Mark Feuerstein. PG-13 The Reunion (2011, Action) John Cena, Ethan Embry. (In Stereo) PG-13 Man on a Ledge (2012, Suspense) Sam Worthington. (In Stereo) PG-13 (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Supernatural (In Stereo) Supernatural Let It Bleed 300 (2007, Action) Gerard Butler. Badly outnumbered Spartan warriors battle the Persian army. R 10,000 B.C. (2008) Steven Strait. PG-13 (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Cloudy-MtballsUncle AdvenTeenMAD PGKing/HillClevelandAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Dest. Dest. Ghost AdventuresGhost AdventuresGhost AdventuresDead Files RevisitedDead Files Revisited (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Most ShockingMost ShockingMost ShockingWorlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HBoston Legal Boston Legal RaymondRaymondRaymondRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS The Tell PG (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles (DVS) Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (WE) 117 69 117 Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Bridezillas Mai-Lee & Angela Bridezillas Angela & Adrianne (N) Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineMotherRules Dear Annie: My wife of 25 years feels that emailing and texting male friends is nothing to be concerned about. By accident, I discovered she had visited one of these men when she was supposed to be at her girlfriends for the weekend. She swears nothing happened. But I checked her laptop and found photographs of the two of them. When I asked about the pictures, she claimed she was planning to send them to me but never got around to it. We went for counseling after the weekend trip, and things calmed down for a while. She ceased communication with that guy, as far as I can tell. But I recently found email evidence that she is still communicating with the other guy she knew from high school. They close their emails with love you bunches or xxxoooxxx, and I found one that said, Good night, Sexy. My wife has no idea how much this drives me crazy. She sees nothing wrong with this communication. Could you expound on this type of affair and the potential harm it can cause? What should we do? Emotionally Drained Dear Drained: An emotional affair is one of emotional, rather than physical, intimacy. There is no sex. However, there is deception, betrayal, intimate communication (texts, emails, phone calls) and an emotional connection to the other person at the expense of the marriage. Often, the person involved denies that it is any kind of affair, claiming its only friendship. But healthy friendships do not involve secrecy and lies and do not threaten the marriage. Please go back to counseling. Your wife needs to understand how her actions undermine your trust, and you both must work on ways to put your marriage back together. Dear Annie: My friend and I enjoy writing letters and receiving things via regular mail. For my birthday, she told me to watch the mailbox because she was sending me something. Well, long story short, nothing arrived. I did get cards from other people in the mail. She also has my email address, but no birthday greetings came that way, either. I dont know what to do. Do I mention that nothing ever came in the mail, or should I let it go? Shes always good about sending Christmas presents, and I send her things in the mail, as well, but this has me perplexed. Mailbox Mary Dear Mary: Since this friend specifically told you to watch the mailbox, it means something was either lost in the mail or she forgot to send it. If the former, she probably is wondering why you havent said anything. If the latter, she is likely embarrassed. How good a friend? If you can casually say that whatever she meant to send never arrived, do so. Otherwise, say nothing. If she wonders why you havent acknowledged a card or gift, she will ask. Dear Annie: This is for R, whose mother is type AB and whose grandmother is type O. A person with Group O blood does not carry either the A gene or the B gene. Therefore, none of that persons biological children can be AB. However, your advice about everyone involved getting tested was right on. As a person who performs blood typing, I can attest to the fact that I have surprised a few people who thought they were one type when in fact they were another. Jacksonville, Fla. Dear Fla.: Thanks for correcting us. You are right that a Type O cannot produce a Type AB. But in exceedingly rare circumstances, an individuals blood type can change. (This most commonly occurs after a bone marrow transplant). Mom could have been adopted, or more likely, either Mom or Grandma is mistaken about their blood type. Our main concern is the granddaughters desire that Grandma be unrelated. But even if Mom were adopted, Grandma still raised her. As far as were concerned, that makes her the mother.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email questions to anniesmailbox @comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) USURPAGENTABRUPTODDITY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The number of billboards along the highway was ADDING UP Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. PUDEN MUDHI HERTAR DOSTED Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Answer here: FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessFox ShowFox ShowDateline NBC (Season Premiere) (N) NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Washington WeekFloridaGreat Performances The Hollow Crown: Henry IV, Part 1 The Battle of Shrewsbury. (N) Visa Dreams % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)WashCharlieGreat Performances (N) WorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Michael J. Fox Michael J. Fox Dateline NBC (Season Premiere) (N) (In Stereo) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Last Man Standing NeighborsShark Tank (N) PG (DVS) 20/20 (N) (In Stereo) PG Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G Undercover Boss Twin Peaks Hawaii Five-0 (In Stereo) Blue Bloods Unwritten Rules 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) MasterChef Junior PG (DVS) Sleepy Hollow Blood Moon FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Last ManNeighShark Tank (N) PG20/20 (N) PG NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Soul Purpose Telethone < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Last Man Standing NeighborsShark Tank (N) PG (DVS) 20/20 (N) (In Stereo) PG NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudMonk PG Monk PG Cops Rel.Cops Rel.SeinfeldCommun H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PresentThe 700 Club (N) GLive WithConnectJumpPaidPaidMooreFranklinPaidPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Perfect Score Perfect Score Americas Next Top Model (N) PG EngagementEngagementThe Arsenio Hall Show O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court Florida Naturally Zorro PGBeverly Hillbillies Livin La Vida Treasure Hunters Friday Night Friday Night Friday Drive-In Friday Drive-In S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangMasterChef JuniorSleepy Hollow FOX 35 News at 10SimpsonsAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corazn IndomablePorque el Am.La Tempestad Qu Bonito Amor (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Cold Case Cold Case PGCold Case PGCold Case Cold Case PGCold Case PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27 The Imposter (2012, Documentary) Premiere. R Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG (AMC) 55 64 55 Breaking Bad Breaking Bad Walt and Skyler share a secret. Breaking Bad Jesse goes missing. Breaking Bad Cornered Breaking Bad Problem Dog Breaking Bad Hermanos (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be Announced Tanked: Unfiltered (N) (In Stereo) PG To Be Announced (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Freestyle Friday (N) PG Jasons Lyric (1994, Drama) Allen Payne, Jada Pinkett. R Men in Black (1997) Tommy Lee Jones. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial activity on Earth. (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/NJNeNe--WeddingNeNe--Wedding 50 First Dates (2004) Adam Sandler.50 First Dates (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowTosh.0 Tosh.0 Community PG Community PG Community Community Tosh.0 Without a Paddle (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Bewitched (2005, Romance-Comedy) Nicole Kidman, Will Ferrell. PG-13 (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportMillionsMillionsMarijuana: IndustryAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46SituationCrossfireErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers Morgan LiveAnderson CooperStroumboulopoulos (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Dog With a Blog G WanderYonder Liv & Maddie Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G GoodCharlie (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)SportsCenter SpecialCollege Football LiveCollege Football Utah State at San Jose State. (N) (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49SportsNation (N)NFL Kickoff (N) PardonMexico Primera Division Soccer BaseballSportsCenter (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48FaithCarriganDaily Mass Life on the RockCampusRosaryCrossingEvangeParablesWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28The Middle PG The Middle PG The Middle PG The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005, Fantasy) Tilda Swinton, Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes. PG The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 White Fang (1991, Adventure) Klaus Maria Brandauer. (In Stereo) PG Blue Car (2002, Drama) David Strathairn. R But Im a Cheerleader (1999) Natasha Lyonne. R Amys Orgasm (2001) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 DinersDinersRestaurant: Im.DinersDinersDinersDinersDinersDinersMy. DinThieves (FS1) 732 112 732 FOX Football DailyBarrett-Jackson Automobile Auction (N) (Live) PG, L High School Football (FSNFL) 35 39 35 BunchMarlinsMLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins. (N) (Live) MarlinsMarlinsWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Moneyball (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill. A baseball manager challenges old-school traditions. PG-13 Moneyball (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Web.com Tour Championship, Second Round. Central (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Little House on the Prairie PG Little House on the Prairie PG The Watsons Go to Birmingham (2013, Drama) Anika Noni Rose. PG Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier G Frasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2We Bought Oceans Twelve (2004) George Clooney. Indebted criminals plan an elaborate heist in Europe. Boardwalk Empire MA Real Time With Bill Maher (N) MA Real Time With Bill Maher MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 The Hurricane (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel PG Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011) Robert Downey Jr. Boardwalk Empire MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Hunt IntlHunt IntlHunt IntlHunt IntlExtreme HomesExtreme HomesHuntersHunt IntlHunt IntlHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Cowboys & Outlaws PG American Pickers PG American Pickers PG American Pickers PG American Pickers Step Right Up PG Were the Fugawis Were the Fugawis (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap Kraut/ Hardin PG Wife Swap Tassie/ Tyson PG Hocus Pocus (1993, Comedy) Bette Midler, Kathy Najimy. PG Hocus Pocus (1993, Comedy) Bette Midler, Kathy Najimy. PG (LMN) 50 119 Live Once, Die Twice (2006, Suspense) Kellie Martin. (In Stereo) NR Absolute Deception (2013) Cuba Gooding Jr. Premiere. (In Stereo) R Her Husbands Betrayal (2013) Jacqueline MacInnes Wood. (In Stereo) NR (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 U-571 (2000) Matthew McConaughey, Bill Paxton. (In Stereo) PG-13 War of the Worlds (2005, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise. (In Stereo) PG-13 Strike Back (N) (In Stereo) MA Strike Back (In Stereo) MA WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Pickles Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Baggage Claim (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Battle of the Year (PG-13)In 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) In 3D.1:45 p.m. Don Jon (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. The Family (R) 1:20 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:40p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 1:05p.m., 4p.m., 7:05p.m., 10 p.m. Prisoners (R) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m. Rush (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 1 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) In 3D.1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m. Don Jon (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:20p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m. The Family (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Riddick (R) 7:10p.m., 10:05 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Flashback Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO GJL VSTRLY GM D EDKXSTP ... G VSTRLY GM D ZSWX SEEGKL ... G OGRL XS XFGMR XFDX GI AHWX D TLNHODT NHP. YLMULO VDWFGMNXSMPrevious Solution: What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals. Ashley Benson (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-27

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FRIDAY,SEPTEMBER27,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699187 000FUYL 000FUYE 000EXJX JUICE EXTRACTOR Cuisinart brand NEVER USED Great Gift $99. 352-621-0175 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Condition. Free Delivery, 60 Day Written Guarantee 352 263-7398 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 Estate Liquidations and Auctions LLC ESTATE AUCTION Fri. Sept 27, 6:00pm 628 SE HWY19 Crystal River 352-228-4920 est ateliquidations andauctions.com AU 4381 /AB 3202 Air Compressor8 gallon, 1.5 HP, $125. (352) 503-9188 ELECTRIC CHAIN SAW McCulloch 2.5 HP, 14 electric chain saw $50 352-628-3899 TWO WHEELMOVING CARTT wo wheel moving cart. $15 352-628-3899 ANTENNAradio shack amplified digitalTV/FM, great shape ($10) 352-212-1596 Panasonic TV 42 Plasma Flat screen with remote, TV in excel cond. $225., (908) 616-0620 Homosassa 1971 Baseball cards, 200 cards $40. 1970 Baseball Cards 200 cards $40 (352) 344-9502 2 Person Jacuzziwith cover $300 obo (352) 302-2366 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Electric Range, GE, $380. Black flat ceramic with 5 burners, like new Call Walter (352) 527-3552 ELECTRIC STOVE White electric stove price $85.00 Phone 352-860-2858 GAS RANGE Andora5 black GE selfclean convection oven, griddle, power burner $500 OBO 228-4648 GE Space Saver Microwave very little usage Bisque, $125.(352) 302-9129 GOOD DRYER$100 Works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER$100 works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 HOUSEHOLD FREEZE WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT 2DEEP2WIDE 4.5HIGH $250.00 352-382-0009 MAGTAG 2009 white Washing Machine. In good condition $250 obo (352) 422-5579 MICROWAVE Black Frigidaire over the stove. Looks and works great.Asteal @ $15 352-322-1160 REFRIGERATOR W/ ICE MAKER G.E. WHITE SIDE BYSIDE 2DEEP21.5 WIDE 5HIGH $300.00 352-382-0009 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Washer & Dryer Maytag-2 washers, 1 dryer.All in good working cond. $300 for all or $125 ea (304) 544-8398 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the SALES PERSON WANTEDMANUFACTURED HOME (modular) Salary and large commission. Send r esume to ataylormadehome@ aol.com, Chiefland office. ELECTRICIANSRESIDENTIALNEW CONSTRUCTION Exp. preferred. Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service. Full benefits, paid holidays & vacation /EOE APPLY AT: Exceptional Electric 4042 CR 124A Wildwood DRIVERS-TRACTOR TRAILER DUMP Cypress Truck Lines seeks 5 TT Dump Drivers (150 mile radius) Company Drivers Only *Assigned Tractors *Medical/Dental/Vision*P aid Orientation *Paid Training*6 Paid Holidays. 6 Mo TT Dump Exp & Class A CDL Req! Call 1-888 235-8862 www. cypresstruck.com Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 ReStor e Manager T ruck Driver Donation Pr ocessor Habitat for Humanity is filling 3 positions in Citrus County E-mail request for detailed job description and instructions for submitting to: H4Hr estor e@ yahoo.com No calls or walk-ins MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 F/T DENTAL FRONT DESKRECEPTIONISTGreat Customer Service, Telephone Skills,Professional Appearance Up Beat Multi Task, Team Player, Good Work Ethics. FAX Resume to 352-628-9199 OR Drop off at office Ledger Dentistry Medical Assist.Fulltime & Part time Postions Available at busy Podiatry Practice Call (352) 795-2142 MEDICAL ASSISTANTExperience reqd for very busy medical office. Includes benefits. Fax Resume to: (352) 563-2512 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 TWO MEDICAL ASSISTANTSFax resume to: 352-746-5784 Non-Profit OrganizationClient Services CounselorThe Board of Directors of the Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast, servingCitrus/Dixie/ Gilchrist/Levy and Sumter Counties announces the following employment opportunity:Full Time (40 Hours) Client Services Counselor in the Citrus County service area. This position includes performing child care eligibility and case management. Minimum qualifications: Applicants must be detail oriented, with the ability to multi task and work independently. Computer skills and a strong Customer Service Background are required. Client Case Management experience, and Bilingual speaking (Spanish and English) preferred. Qualified applicants should fax resume to 352-563-5933 on or before October 4, 2013. Must include cover page that states Applying for Client Services Counselor. An EEO Employer. REAL ESTATE AGENTFor Property Management FAX: Resume to 352-795-1667 CALL: 352-302-8088 email: action.rental @yahoo.com walk-ins are welcome Action Rental Management Realty SERVERSMust be experienced in Fine dining with Bar knowledge.All others need not apply. Must pass drug and background.Ap ply Tue.-Fri.10am-4pm at Sugarmill Woods Ctry. Club, 1 Douglas St Licensed RealtorCONTACT: yankeetownrealty .com or Call 352-447-0007 No Fees. Great Pay out. Weekends req. Earning potential unlimited. SALES HELPLooking for a self motivated person with a sales background. Position has a base salary and a large commission structure on a large ticket item $80K to $100K potential Call 352-302-8216 For more Info Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5388 TEACHERExp. Req. CDAPref. TADPOLES EARLYLEARNING (352) 560-4222 WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for employment.Childcare work exp. required Apply M-F,12pm-2pm No Phone Calls. Experienced Legal Secretary /BookkeeperPart time Mon.-Thurs Family law and probate. Experience in Wordperfect and Quickbooks .Send Resume to: amackerell@ live.com EXPD. BARBERFor Busy Shop. high comm. call George at (352) 344-1881 after 5pm 228-7592 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Busy Medical Practice Seeks1. Experienced Paramedic/LPN/ Medical Asst. 2. Check In/Out Front Desk 3. Cat Scan Tech. Experience is a must Competitive Pay/ Benefits. References Preferred call for immediate response 352-586-0632 or email: tawfik. eihab@gmail.com Lost Quaker Bird Green, Citrus Hills around Sept. 20th (352) 302-6710 REWARD Large Siamese cat. lost 6/15/13 in the area of hwy 200 and orchid dr. He was wearing a black collar with no tags. please call or text 239-287-0953 Found Set of Keys Around august 30th Beverly Hills Come to house Identify Keys 230 S. Harrison St FOUND Silver Mongoose Bicycle w/whitewall tires, found in my garden! (352) 400-6100 HOWARDS FLEAMARKETIS HOSTING SA T SEPT 28, 9 2p MUSTANGAUTO SHOW Nature Coast Mustang Club will be bringing Ford Mustangs from Past to Present, if you have a Mustang Come Out and Show It. If you have mustang parts come out and sell For Information Call (352) 628-4656 PET ADOPTIONSaturday,10a-12PET SUPERMARKETInverness (352) 527-9050 to rehome small dogs www.ahumanesocie typetrescue.com Precious Paws Rescue, Inc. www.preciouspaws florida.com Crystal River Mall Thursday-Sunday 12pm-4pm Gretas Touch Grooming Floral City, Sat 10-2pm Pet Supermarket-Inv (Cats & Kittens only) Low Cost spay/neuter vouchers are avail. 726-4700 for Info. View our adoptable dogs @ www adopt arescued pet .com or call 352-795-9550ADOPTIONSare held every Saturday, 10a -12pPetSupermarket(exceptions below) Sat. 10/5 9am 2pm Shepherd of the Hills Church Blessing of the Pets W e are in NEED of Fosters to save more dogs. To foster or volunteer please contact us or visit PetSupermarket, Inverness CAT ADOPTIONSCOME SEEour adorable cats and kittens that are available for adoption. In their cage free home style environment. WEARE OPEN 10:00AM. till 1:00 PM. & 200 PM -4PM Monday-Saturday. All Cats and Kittens are micro-chipped, altered, & tested for Feline Luk and Aids. Up to date on vaccines for age appropriate. Phone 352-613-1629 Visit us at www .hofspha.org, or stop by our offices at 1149 N ConantAve. Corner of 44 and Conant.Look for the big white building with the bright paw prints. $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 6 Roosters Rhode Isl. Reds 6, 5 months old (352) 621-3929 Free Cedar Trees perfect shape, approx. 20ft tall,You dig, remove and haul call between 8am & 8pm (352) 249-7812 Free Kittens Gray Tabby 8 wks old, litter trained 352-212-0667 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5388 2 Red Dobermans 1 male, 1 female, traveling, Inverness N. Highlands Near Dawson REWARD (352) 344-2232 CAT female,1 yr. old, gray, medium hair. Missing in the Vicinity of Red Rose off Apopka in the Highlands, has been micro-chipped (352) 445-0747 Lost 2 Hand Trucks fell from Potato Chip Truck Crystal River area Need desperately for work. (352) 637-0188 Lost Cat gray with white markings, black spot on nose, Near Rockcrusher Canyon RV Park 607-434-0328 Lost hummingbird gps/fishfinder model 597ci hd by hwy 44 e boatramp in inverness if found call 726-0257 or 476-7047 Lost Male Beagle Tri color, Name Brason Pine Ridge Area Sacramento Rd (352) 364-1385 (352) 287-2121 Missing 9/8/13 JoJo Tri colored beagle. Missing from N. Lee Street Beverly Hills. 40 lb neutered male. JoJo is a special needs pet. We miss him terribly. Microchipped. Please call Donna at 352 249 3107 or e-mail hillsdonnar@aol.com Missing 9/8/13 Tri-Colored Beagle 40 Lbs. Special needs pet. Name: JoJo. Please help JoJo to come home. He is terribly missed. Last seen on N. Lee Street, Beverly Hills at 10:30 pm. Please call 352-249-3107. Reward Red and blue Scooby-Doo wallet lost on the sidewalk somewhere between Winn-Dixie in Downtown Inverness and Fort Cooper Mobile Home Park. Call 352-419-7003 Todays New Ads Craft Items $300 value for $150. assorted 352-746-4613 CRYSTALRIVERCraft Bazaar & Bake Sale at CR Church of God, 2180 NW 12th Ave, Fri 9-7 and Sat 9-5, FreeAdmission ELECTRIC CHAIN SAW McCulloch 2.5 HP, 14 electric chain saw $50 352-628-3899 ELECTRONIC PIANO Yamaha portable piano. Good condition,36x13 $35 352-628-3899 HAVANESE PUPPIES 9 wks. Champ. Bld. Lines, Non Shedding 3 males, black & white, shots, Wormed $650. OBO 613-581810 HOMOSASSARiverhaven, 4547 S Sawgrass Cir, Fri-Sat 8-12, Kayak/Paddle, Bike, Bike Rack, Fishing gear,Boat, Household items. HP 15.4, LAPTOP DVD writer, $180 DELL DESK TOP P4, HT Lcd monitor, DVD + RW $150 352-628-6806 Inverness2bd,ba, fl room, dock fish, par.furn. $450. 860-2452, 201-4559 LECANTO Side Walk Sale Saturday 9am-5pm, HomeAgain Resale Store 1980 N. Future Terr.(486 across form Chevron) MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 MICROWAVE Black Frigidaire over the stove. Looks and works great.Asteal @ $15 352-322-1160 Microwave Oven $50. (352) 628-4254 PETTAXI Reduced, excel. cond. $20.00, L-23,W-14,H-13 352-513-4027 Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress, & Box Spring Like New Antique white chest, matching head board & night Stand, mattress cover, matching bed spread & draperies. $325. (352) 465-2709 Sea Eagle2.5 power, 4stroke ouboard & inflatable Suzuki, $1100. for both (352) 425-7020 SMW/HomosassaFri. 27 & Sat. 28, 8a-12 BMW Z4, 60 pet fence Furn., Pool tble., Excer. Equip, Brick & Brack 150 Pine St., 503-2552 TWO WHEELMOVING CARTTwo wheel moving cart. $15 352-628-3899 WIFI RANGE EXTENDER amped REC10 wireless range extender 600 mW Like new $40 352-382-2591 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 To the girl I met in Publixs on 9/18 in Homosassa Springs, wearing a white jacket. I would like to get to know you. Call me anytime. 422-0440 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads 20 Chairs for Daycare $80.00 BabyAccessories $120.00 (352) 795-7254 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BEVERLYHILLS1 Room Efficiency + Kitchen,All Utilities, Cable incld. $525/mo Pet ok 352-228-2644 BLU-RAYPLAYER Samsung BD-P1500 Blu-ray player. Excellent Condition. $20 352 3822591 CAMERAPanasonic Lumix Camera FH20 w/extra battery-like new, $30 Call 352 3822591 CAMERATRIPOD Velbon VE-3 Camera Tripod VG condition $15 352-382-2591 CHANDELIER Beautiful, large antique looking. Paid $400, moved & must sell. $75.00 352-322-1160 CITRUS HILLS1873 W. REDDING ST SAT ONLY7:30-? MULTI FAMILYSALE CITRUS HILLS250 E. Hartford Stre Thurs. & Fri. 8a-5p Saturday 8a-3pLADIES!!WE ARE BACK with ALL Sizes, 99% New & Home Acces., MISC. Furniture & More! Customer Service is My Specialty! I want to work for you! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 JW Morton Real Estate

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C10FRIDAY,SEPTEMBER27,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Home Maintenance Repairs/Painting/Power Washing, Quality work at affordable prices Ref avail 573-723-2881 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds GROUND CONTROL Lawn Service Pressure washing Ken 352-316-1571 kenheffley2@gmail.com Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 Andersen HandyMan Home Repairs, Lawn Care. Cheaper Prices 352-453-6005 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 A+ CLEANING Res/Com. 27 yrs exp. Lic/ bonded, client focused 386-717-2929 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 CLEANING BY PENNY Residential Only Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. Call 352-476-3820 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 BILL TRIPP FENCE All Types of Fence Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096 (352) 425-4365 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690. 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 000FUYN DOG STEPS BRAND NEW by Petmate Brn/Beige Plastic 19H X 12 W $25.(cost $55.) 352-621-0175 EMBROIDERYHOOP 4X4 Brother, fits many machines. new-still in package 352-613-5240 $40.00 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5388 Girls winter clothing 4 JEANS 1 pants 5 shirts 2 pajama sets size 14/16 2 hoodies $60 352-613-0529 HOMELITE ELECTRIC POLE CHAIN SAW-8ft length, 8 inch cut, works great, $45. 352-628-0033 Industrial Grill 2 tanks, many extras $300. Kitchen aid 5 quart mixer, $175. (352) 503-9188 Kitchen Aid Mixer New $275. Tiffany style Lamps 3 large $70 ea. 352-465-3086 Large Dog Crate 26 x 36, black wire $35. (352) 382-1000 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 Life StriderArm & Leg Exceriser bike w/ monitor $65 Oak & Glass cabinet, w/ 3 oak & glass drs 24x38 $40. 352-794-3907 PETTAXI Reduced, excel. cond. $20.00, L-23,W-14,H-13 352-513-4027 PICTURE FRAMES 4 nice large frames, all for ($10) 352-613-7493 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BEAR WHITETAILII COMPOUND BOWRH, Bear Sight, 5 settings, needs pull string, $20 352-628-0033 BLINDS 4WIDE Vinyl porch beige color Good condition (six) $6.00 each 352-621-0175 BLOOD SUGAR MONITOR Bayer, new, with case and strips, ($5) 352-613-7493 Boys winter clothing 6 outfits 1 size 4t 4 size 5t 1 size 6 & 1 pajama set size 5t $35 352-613-0529 CAGES&CRATES-ferret$ 10,Bunny$3,Yorkie$10,Sheltie$ 5,$8&$10 352-586-2582 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 Craft Items $300 value for $150. assorted 352-746-4613 DEEPSEAROD & REEL-6-1/2ft Rod, PENN 320 GTi Reel, nice condition, $60. 352-628-0033 Designer Jackets, leather W 2 & 3X, New, $80 ea Ren. Chest Set, Must See $1,200 352-465-3086 DOG CARRIER NYLON & mesh zipper bag. Small size pet. BRAND NEW ONLY$20. 352-621-0175 DOG CARRIER X LARGE plastic airline type. Clean Excellent Condition $45. 352-270-3909 NECKLACE s/s, biker-chick style, engravable heart, new, paid $150, sacrifice for ($40) 352-613-7493 PURPLE CLOTHES 20 pieces of dresses, pants, top set, blouses. Size 12 to 18 $100.00 897-5410 WHITE STAG PANTS SUITTropical colors, red, background &flowers. ex. Large ,$5.oo, 897-5410 1 Full Size Bed Complete, mattress frame $125. Washing Machine $50. No calls before 11am (352) 628-4766 18 to 20 SPEAKERS 6 to 8 Commercial w/ switches & Hardware $250. obo for all (352) 249-3259 20 Chairs for Daycare $80.00 BabyAccessories $120.00 (352) 795-7254 180 Gallon Fish Tank solid wood base includes top and filter up and running with fish $1,000 obo (352) 302-9845 Above Ground Pool, 24 ft. up and runningpump, filter, ladder, very good cond. $500. You must remove 352-212-6433 CITRUS HILLS1873 W. REDDING ST SAT ONLY7:30-? MULTI FAMILYSALE Citrus SpringsFri, Sat 9/29 & 9/28 8am to 1pm Body by Jake equip, AB coaster, new sml tiller, hshld items, tools & garden equip, kitchen appl, etc.. 7861 N Cricket Dr. CRYSTALRIVERCraft Bazaar & Bake Sale at CR Church of God, 2180 NW 12th Ave, Fri 9-7 and Sat 9-5, FreeAdmission CRYSTAL RIVERFri. 27, & Sat. 28, 8a-? VARITY OF ITEMS 9875 W. Orchard St,. Behind Mall DUNNELLONThurs. Fri Sat. & Sun. 9am LARGE SALE Things added ea. day 20249 SW 54th Street HERNANDO390 W Britain St. PowerTools: Shop Smith,Tool boxes, hand tools. Furniture grade lumber. Frrniture. Friday & Saturday 7:00 am to 2:00 pm HOMOSASSARiverhaven, 4547 S Sawgrass Cir, Fri-Sat 8-12, Kayak/Paddle, Bike, Bike Rack, Fishing gear,Boat, Household items. LECANTO Side Walk Sale Saturday 9am-5pm, HomeAgain Resale Store 1980 N. Future Terr.(486 across form Chevron) MOVING SALE Fri, Sat, Sun, 27, 28, 29 9am to 3pm quality furn, misc. 2372 S Sandburg Pt. WILDWOODHiz & Herz Stop& Shop 11-6p, closed Wed 25% off: Tools, antiques, collectibles, furniture, clothing, art work and much more! 400 E Gulf Atlantic Hwy (4 bldgs E of 301 on SR 44) Wildwood MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 SMW/HomosassaFri. 27 & Sat. 28, 8a-12 BMW Z4, 60 pet fence Furn., Pool tble., Excer. Equip, Brick & Brack 150 Pine St., 503-2552 Sugarmill WoodsFri. 27 & Sat. 28, 8a-1p V arious Hsehold Items 154 Pine Street 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 4 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R $10 EACH 352-613-0529 BOOTS ladies size 7 tan work, size 7 1/2 black dress, nice, both for ($10) 352-613-7493 Boys winter clothing size 5/6 4 pants 7 shirts & 2 lightweight jackets $45 352-613-0529 CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION SIZE 5/6 $8 EACH 352-613-0529 JEANS 2 pair, size 10 womens,embroidered, blue, 1 daises, 1 roses, new, both for ($25) 352-613-7493 MENS 2 PIECE SUITS SIZE 36X30 & 34X30 $25 EACH 352-613-0529 FURNITURE DOLLY, ETC. 2 & 4 wheel with base. Pneumatic tires. $25.00 352-746-4160 HOOKER ENTERTAINMENTCENTER Oak with (2)22 inch sides, center that expands from 45-60 inches. Medium brown $300 OBO 352-382-3387 KITCHEN SET, 45 Beveled glass top, white base, 4 swivel cushion chairs, on casters, Excel. Cond. $200. (352) 465-2237 Leave Message NICE CHINACABINET! $100 Firm Very nice 2 glass doors 2 cabinets 3 drawers 352-302-7214 Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress, & Box Spring Like New Antique white chest, matching head board & night Stand, mattress cover, matching bed spread & draperies. $325. (352) 465-2709 Recliner & Loveseat recliner, end table & 1 coffee table, microfiber, color sage, electric auto recliner w/ battery backup $650. (352) 860-0158 Sectional Couch w/ queen hide a bed and recliner built in Good Condition $175. obo (352) 302-9129 TVTABLE/CONSOLE Cherry wood 48L21w 20h 2 cabinets/2 shelves Good Condition $45. 352-621-0175 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 CRAFTSMAN 33 Walk behind. Brand New, Never Used $800. obo 352-613-8453 Garden Tractor, Murray Heavy Duty 18.5 HPV-Twin 46 inch cut $400. (352) 507-1490 Sears LT 2000 Riding Mower 5 yrs. old low hrs. 19.5 HP, 42 cut $400.(352) 507-1490 SOLDBOLENS New Lawn Tractor 13HP, 38, 6 spd. used 3 times, have receipt paid $1,000 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 2 Very Large Staghorn Ferns$100 ea (352) 489-6212 BEVERLYHILLSESTATE SALE 216 w. hollyfern Sat. Sept. 28th 7-1 & Sun. Sept. 29th 8-1 BEVERLYHILLSESTATE SALE 216 w. hollyfern Sat. Sept. 28th 7-1 & Sun. Sept. 29th 8-1 BEVERLY HILLSFri. & Sat. 8am-1pm 5936 N. Oakmont Dr BEVERLYHILLSOUR LADYOF GRACE CHURCH FLEAMARKET SA T OCT 5TH 8AM to 1PM.6 Roosevelt Blvd BEVERLY HILLSSat. 9/28, 9a-4p End of Summer Sale 31 S. Wadsworth Ave. CITRUS HILLS250 E. Hartford Stre Thurs. & Fri. 8a-5p Saturday 8a-3pLADIES!!WE ARE BACK with ALL Sizes, 99% New & Home Acces., MISC. Furniture & More! BLU-RAYPLAYER Samsung BD-P1500 Blu-ray player. Excellent Condition. $20 352 3822591 SANYO 20 TV Older type model. Great picture and sound. $35. 352-621-0175 TV 55projection TV on wheels works fine $25.00 w/remote. DVD player $10 w/remote. 352-586-2582 LIGHTBULBS flourescantT40, new, total of 9, all for ($5) 352-212-1596 CAMERAPanasonic Lumix Camera FH20 w/extra battery-like new, $30 Call 352 3822591 CAMERATRIPOD Velbon VE-3 Camera Tripod VG condition $15 352-382-2591 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HP 15.4, LAPTOP DVD writer, $180 DELL DESK TOP P4, HT Lcd monitor, DVD + RW $150 352-628-6806 WIFI RANGE EXTENDER amped REC10 wireless range extender 600 mW Like new $40 352-382-2591 9 Piece Patio Furniture PVC 72 table, 4 chairs, 2 reclining chairs, 2 ottomans, w/cushions, $200. obo (352) 274-1940 Patio Recliner Tan La-z-boy, like new $140 (352) 564-8605 PATIOTABLE Glass top 5x 38 & 4 beige chairs Like New $75. 352-270-3909 2 Bedroom Sets King & Queen Table & chairs Like New $250 ea. (352) 634-1489 6LEATHER COUCH 2 end tables, 1 coffee table, $250. (352) 419-6782 Bedroom Set, Double whitewash $350. Dinette Set, 4 chairs w/coasters $350. Very Good Cond. (352) 628-4254 BROYHILLSOFAPerfect condition, like new. 3-seat sofa, includes 4 cushions and arm covers. Off-white with floral pattern. Paid $900, sell for $150. 352-503-7125 or 410-227-9152 CHAIRS 5-light oak chairs with padded seats on casters $100 (352) 419-6383 COMPUTER DESK Black. 29H 18D 41W. Storage area w/door, keyboard tray. Good cond. $35. 527-1239 COUCH Brown & Gold, curved, two matching ottermans. 1 yr old $400 (352) 527-4247 Din. Rm. Set, Broyhill, Table 4 padded chairs, black lacquer w/ side table MUST SEE $250. (352) 465-2237 Dining Room Set Thomasville, Cherry Table, 6 chairs, 2 ext, new $2900, China Base & Deck w/ glass shelves, new $2595, Moving-Will sacrifice both for $1500 cash, obo (352) 513-4516 Dining Room Set w/Hutch beveled glass, lighted cabinet $400. 352) 628-4254

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FRIDAY,SEPTEMBER27,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000FUYB 0 0 0 8 X G S For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 CRYSTAL RIVERQuiet, 1/1, $425. mo. (352) 628-2815 HOMOSASSA2/1 Pool, Garb., maint. Incl., peaceful No pets, $600. plus mo.628-6700 HOMOSASSA2/2, clean, quiet, centr location $550., 352563-2114, 257-6461 INVERNESSBeautifully Remodeled on golf course, 2/2/2 $875 352-895-0744 CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apts. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 CRYSTALRIVER2/1, Unfurn.$550, Furn. $600.+sec clean, quite. Small Pet 828 5th Ave. NE. 727-455-8998 727-343-3965 CRYSTALRIVERBUSINESS. LOC. FOR RENTHwy 19 Downtown exec. location,1000 sf Very Clean remodeled 352-634-2528 Sugarmill Woods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 FLORALCITY1/1, $450/Mo. $400/ Sec. Includes Cable septic water, trash. No pets. (352) 344-5628 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE BEVERLYHILLS1 Room Efficiency + Kitchen,All Utilities, Cable incld. $525/mo Pet ok 352-228-2644 CRYSTAL RIVERKitchen Appl, furn, 1137 N.E. 3rd. Ave. Apt 3, Near CR Primary, Middle, High School 352-795-3006 PELICAN BAY APARTMENTS2 BDRM. APT. HOMES Carpet, Appliances, Central Heat & Air Rental assistance available to qualified applicants. If qualified, pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. FOR RENTAL INFO. & APPLICATION 9826 West Arms Dr. Crystal River, 352-795-7793 TDD#1-800-955-8771 Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:00P Equal Housing Opportunity Provider & Employer Doublewide, 2 BR, 2BA, Recent shingle roof New AC, MUCH MORE 55+ Park $15,500 (352) 634-0274 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $17,900 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $245 mo, incl water, sewer, trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000G72W www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com CRYSTAL RIVER 10941 W.Gem St. . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 Large duplex close to hospital 9660 W.Camphor Ln. . . . . . . . . $8003/2/2 Clean home on corner lot 16 Beach Ln. #102 . . . . . . . . . $9001/1 Furnished studio apartmentBEVERLY HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO 2150 Austin Dr. (CS) . . . . . . . . $5502/1.5 Cute home, some furniture, fenced yard 2332 W.Silverhill Ln. (L) . . . . . $5502/1 Affordable apartment, ground floor 9047 N. Travis Dr. (CS) . . . . . . . $6252/2 Roomy duplex, neat and cleanHOMOSASSA 4800 S. Wood Way . . . . . . . . . $9003/2/1 Riverhaven, fully furnished 11701 Clearwater Ct. . . . . . . . $1000 2/2 Waterfront mobile home INVERNESS 1314 Cypress Cove (Inv) . . . . . $6502/2, Waterfront townhouse, screen porch Crystal RiverFurn. Apt Seasonal 2/1, clean, w/d (352) 563-2626 Singing Forest 46 2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile Home, fixer upper, $6000. 352-344-1365 USED HOMESSingle, Double & Triple Wides Starting at $6,500 Call (352) 621-9183 2011 Live Oak 4BR/2BA $46,900, 28x60 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details CHASSAHOWITZKA 3/2 w/ carport, 3 storage shed $85,900. Agent (352) 382-1000 TAYLOR MADE HOMESLOT MODEL BLOWOUT All Homes Discounted $4,000 to $8,000 Even up to $12.000 off Sticker Price Call 352-621-3807 BEAUTIFUL D/W 3/2 with porch & deck. Wynnhaven is a 55 plus park. Owner is very motivated and will consider all offers. Priced at $45,000. Call Willard Pickrel at J.W. Morton Real Estate for full details. 352-726-6668 or 352-201-9871. HOMOSASSA2/1, $500 mo., 1st, last, 352-628-2678 LECANTO2/2, Doublewide $575. (352) 212-9682 7677 West Chassahowitzka St. 2BD, 2BA, Mobile Detached Garage Scrn. porch, lease or Sale, $2,000 down $732. mo. 877-499-8065 $11,094, DISCOUNT New Jacobsen, 2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA yr. Warranty. No down payment, use land or trade in. Payment only, $471.18 P & I, WAC Call 352-621-9182 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 BAD CREDIT? FORECLOSURE? BANKRUPTCY? Want your own home? I can help!! 35% down cash or land and you are approved. No gimmick, 386-546-5833 Tired of Renting? Super clean 2004 3BR/2BA, on acre ready to move in!!! $3,500 down, $380.03/mo. W.A.C. Call 386-546-5833 for details Wont last! Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds SIMONwell-mannered retriever mix, 3 y.o. Sits, gives his paw, goes down for treats, takes gently. Walks well on leash, behaves in public places. High energy, likes to run & play, plays catch, plays in pool. Good w/most dogs. Call Christina @ 352-464-3908. Sweet 3yr old female Lab. Spayed. Possible PTSD dog. Sm adoption fee (352) 794-6314 CHICKENS 10 Laying chickens Make reasonable offer (352) 382-2350 LM BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! BEAGLE PUPPIES$100 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 BOXER STUD AKC WANTED. Must be tall, Email: Belladonnahay @yahoo.com COCKER SPANIELS 4 Males, 2 Females w/ papers. 8 weeks old Blonde & white $800 (352) 287-0519 CYRILCyril, 1 y.o. Hound mix, found as stray, beautiful red-brown coat, wt. 42 lbs. Easy to walk, gets along w/other dogs. Appears to be housebroken, healthy. Affectionate & friendly. Good companion. # 20807791. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 DojhaDojha, approx. 3 y.o., a yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, came to shelter because family lost their home & could not keep him. Gentle, easy-going, gets along w/other dogs, beautiful in color, great shape. Pen #25. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 HAVANESE PUPPIES 9 wks. Champ. Bld. Lines, Non Shedding 3 males, black & white, shots, Wormed $650. OBO 613-581810 OZZIEOzzie, a 2-y.o. neutered Black Mouth Cur mix, handsome boy, wt. 61 lbs, a little bit shy, good with kids, good with cats, should be the only dog. Walks well on leash, needs fenced yard to run in. Housebroken. Call Brenda @ 352-746-1423. Petea 1-year-old mostly white terrier/?hound mix, Heartworm negative & housebroken. Came to the shelter because his family could no longer afford him. A very gentle, well-behaved dog, walks very well on a leash & gets along with other dogs. Weighs 51 lbs. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Quaker Parakeet male 5-6 months old, green w/ grey chest. $125. includes cage (352) 464-3716 Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male $300 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS,Available RegisteredLots of Colors Males start @ $400. Females start @ $600. Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 TREADMILL, Prosport 285TWalk to fitness,,digital all speed /flat/slant.Good condition. $100.00 897-5410 BICYCLETrek Series 3, 3500,16, 41 cm. mountain bike, with Bontrager computer and bike bag, $100.00 352 503-6668 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 6 1/2 x 12 Utiltiy Trailer, drop gate, 2 Ft. Mesh Sides 3 mos. old, black, $900. 352-302-8265 2013 Enclosed Trailer, 5x8, vnose, w/ramp door, $1600. firm (352) 513-5436 Utility Trailer 6 x 9 x 2 ft. wood/steel. frame $250. obo (352) 465-3086 COSTUME JEWELRY5 necklaces, 1 pair earrings, nice, all for ($15) 352-613-7493 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment BAILEYBailey, Chespeake Bay hound mix, 2 y.o., HW-negative, wt. 39 lbs. Sits on command, loves treats, walks well on leash, good w/other dogs, attentive to human friends. Obeys well, wants to please. # 20731619. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 REGULATION SIZE POOLTABLE 1 slate in good shape but may want to put a new felt on it $200.00. Citrus County. 401-440-8922 SAIL SHADE-REDUCED Reduced-$65.00,Triangle-11/11/11 352-513-4027 SEARS GAS LAWN EDGER 3 1/2 HP Excellent cond. $75.00 352-746-4160 SIX CEILING FANS. 4 Brass 52, 1 brass 30, 1 white 42. $10 ea. 527-1239 SONYDIGITALVIDEO CAMERA/RECORDER AllAcessories Like new.$100.00 352-746-4160 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 Two Copy Printers $25 to $75 352-634-4329 Diabetic Shoes, Beige, Womens Size 8, Medium width, never worn, $80 (352) 522-0107 New Jazzy Electric Chair, MUSTSELL Cost $5,000 Selling $1,300. obo (352) 795-7513 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR BEAUTIFUL PURE WHITE W/TURQUOISE TRIM $100 352-601-6625 NEW EDEN 20W BASSAMP LIGHTWEIGHT(UNDER 15LBS)AND POWERFUL! $85 352-601-6625 NEW FENDER SQUIRE JAGUAR SS BASS METALLIC RED&BLACK,$100 352-601-6625 NEW OSCAR SCHMIDTACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR W/GIGBAG&CORD,HI&LO W Z INPUTS $150 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC CUTAWAY GUITAR W/STAND OR WALLHANGER,$80 352-601-6625 NEWCRATE FLEX WA VEAMP W/REVERB& OVERDRIVE,12SPEAKER $90 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC ASTYLE MANDOLIN PLAYS&SOUNDS GREAT $50 352-601-6625 BLACK LES PAUL SPECIALII W/GIGBAG,CORD,STAND& WALLHANGER $100 352-601-6625 ELECTRONIC PIANO Yamaha portable piano. Good condition,36x13 $35 352-628-3899 GUITAR AMP Peavey Valve King Half Stack Tube Amp Like New, $700. obo (352) 860-1195 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 STRAT STYLE BASS UKE ELECTRIC POLY STRINGS, PIEZO WHITE ON WHITE $75 352-601-6625 STUDENT?NEW CLASSICALGUITAR BYWASHBURN W/GIGBAG&BOOK/CD $40 352-601-6625 CHANDELIER Beautiful, large antique looking. Paid $400, moved & must sell. $75.00 352-322-1160 MIXER Westinghouse White LIKE NEW Hand or counter top $15. 352-621-0175 Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $225. 352-382-5208

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C12FRIDAY,SEPTEMBER27,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 000G7YH THE VEHICLES LISTED BELOW,THAT ARE ADVERTISED ON THECITRUS KIA INSERT, ARE OWNED BY: CLARIFICATION CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE btnfrrtt btnttnrr tntttt ntf ntfnt fbrfnr tntrtn EAGLE BUICK/GMC !nftrnr tntrtnf t bntrnr"t !nrfn t bn#nr"t nfftnr$ "t %fnnr !nrfn "t bnftrrt&fnrtt ntrfn 783572 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB SV 20122012 Frontier CC SV: This white Nissan Frontier Crew Cab SV is in excellent condition with only 8,500 miles. It has cruise control, power windows/door locks/outside mirrors. It has a factory installed bed liner and I added a vinyl tri-fold bed cover and trailer hitch.The truck is in perfect condition with a full factory warranty.The asking price is $21,900. Phone: 352-601-1319 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 5 spd $3,994. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 SOLDDodgeRam Charger, 1987 4x4, w/new engine CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment Harley Davidson2011 FLTRU Road Glide Ultra loaded cruise, cd, cb,intercom, abs, anti theif,6 speed, and 103cc motor. only 5886 miles $19,000 (352)212-4101 HARLEYDAVIDSON2012 FLHTCUTG Tri Glide Ultra Classic AMFM/CD/AUX w/speakers; CC, Fairing Full,Alarm,Travel trunk w/rack, stage 2 screaming eagle high performance exhaust & pipes; ABS brakes, extra chrome accents. Excellent condition w/only 1250 mi. First $28.5K. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630. Harley DavidsonRoad King, 2006 1450cc,32k,exc.cond. asking $12,500. (352) 628-9487 HONDA1985 Shadow 500 CC good condition asking $1200.00 352-637-3254 HONDA2007 VTX 1300C Original owner, purchased brand new, low mileage (2,371 miles). Caf windshield, removable saddlebags, light-bar. Black & chrome. Showroom condition (mint). Asking a firm $5,050.00 Please contact owner\seller via Email: selfor@aol.com Phone: (352)382-4422 SNAPPER 2008 Riding 30 inch cut 12.5 HP $500 (352) 341-5263 CHEVROLET2009 CORVETTE COUPE Z51: Jetstream blue w/ebony int., 2LT, Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3 eng., only 9500 mi., car show winner, serious inquiries only, first $35K/OBO gets it. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630 CHEVY1981 Corvette Under 50,000 orig. miles, Shark Body Style, Very Good Condition, Garage stored 352-400-4704 FORDRat Rod Projects, 46 Ford PU Roadster, Ford ModelT, Boattail speedster all steel., Inglis 352-949-7874 PLYMOUTH, GTX Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $32,000 obo 352-302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $7700. (352) 465-3086 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 FORD1992 Flairside 4x4, 302, red, 4 lift traction bar, chrome brush guard, steps & bedrail. A beauty in & out. $5,500 (352) 344-8089 BUICK REGAL2001 LS, leather Inter. very good cond., 6 cyl. 82k mi. One owner. $4,100 352-746-6708 Cadillac, Eldorado, 117K mi., runs great & looks great, Candy apple red $6,000352-422-2516 CHEVROLET, Malibu LS 8,700 mi. 1 owner, Gorgeous Car $14,500 (352) 527-0022 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt 4 door, $3,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 DODGE, Intrepid 3.5 magnum RT, w/ sunrf. Runs great needs battery $700 (352) 860-0158 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 FIAT Spider 2000 Conv. 58K miles, new roof, good rubber, runs $2,000 (352) 564-0364 FORD2004, Mustang, Deluxe leather, CD player, pwr windows, $7,888. 352-341-0018 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 MAZDA2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed, 4-door, one owner, great condition, 141,000 miles $3,500. 352-860-2146 MERCURY2006, Grand Marquis, LS, $8,988 352-341-0018 MERCURY, Cougar, 125k mi., 2 DR, runs great, cold air, good tires, $1,400 (352) 344-0547 PONTIAC, Grand Am 4 cyl., 156k mi., cold AC, standard, runs excel. $2,800 obo,476-8690 TOYOTA2010, Yaris, 3 door, $7,795. 352-341-0018 PONTOON20 FT, 1994 Monarck new vhf radio & gps fishfinder. Gd Cond. $6500. (352) 527-4247 Sea Eagle2.5 power, 4stroke ouboard & inflatable Suzuki, $1100. for both (352) 425-7020 SWEETWATER1991, 15 ft., Pontoon seats 8, 35HP, trailer, excellent cond. $3,250 476-1113, 513-5135 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. SKYLINE 1995, Slide in cab over Camper Fully equip. generator, fridge, microwave, AC, & elect. jacks Loaded. $2,800 obo (352) 422-4548 SOLDSalem Cruise Lite2011 Travel Trailer 28 ft bunk hse. slideout non-smkers. Exc Cond WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 Complete Auto Audio System, Kicker KX, 1200.1, CrossfireVR602, 600watt, Kicker KX 350.2, 2 Kicker KS60, 4 OHM and more $450. (352) 860-1195 SOFT TOPPER for Short bed pick-up. Like New $250 obo (352) 422-5579 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 First Car for Daughter sml car, auto,ac, 4 cyl good cond.under 2k NO Dealers please (352) 621-0248 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $19,900 obo 352-444-2272 Outboard Motor 25HP, Evirude with controls, very good cond. $750 obo 476-1113, 513-5135 Pontoon Boat Trailer Can accommodate up to 24 ft boat, Very good cond. $1,500 (609) 509-6021 cell OCEAN KAYAK2010 Caper Like New, 11 foot, Kayak with paddle and many extras. Used less than five times. $300.00 352-503-6668 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 17 KEYWEST2013 Skiff,Yamaha 70 4-stroke, Jack Plate, Trolling Motor, Gauges, GPS,AlumTrailer, Transferrable Warranty, Excellent $20,900 352 503-6668 MERC CRUISER1993, 20ft, Stern Drive, Sylvan, Barely used, but runs great. org. $12,000Asking $6,500 obo (352) 228-1355 Phyllis StricklandRealtorBest Time To Buy!Prices are going up. So is interest.BUY NOW!Owner Financing Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MINI FARMS AREA 4/2 on 10 ACRES 20 x 40 Pole Barn Move in Condition $139,900. 352-249-1248 RENT TO OWNno bank, smalldown pmt. 2/1, $53,579k take over payments 352-503-3245 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including w/d. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 HOMOSASSA5+ DEN, BEDROOMS. 3 BATH.THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STORYHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPTOA NATURE PRESERVE HOME IS AFORECLOSURE SHORTSALEANDTHE BANK IS WORKING WITHTHE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILTIN 2005 dennis_neff @yahoo.com TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKINGTO SELL? CALLMETODAY! HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAWAPT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments 211 Northeast 4th Street, Chiefland, FL BANK OWNED ABSOLUTEAUCTION 6,400+/-SF of space in 2 Buildings on 1.16 Acres. One vacant single family home and a second bldg. used as a daycare facility. Inspect: Sept. 30th @ 11AM OnsiteAuction with Webcast bidding on October 2nd @ 3 PM Local contact: Julian Howell, 877-980-9565. More info at www.auctionEbid.com FLBKR#CQ1029847 Auction MGMTCorp. Jeb@auctionEbid.com HERNANDO1000+ sf.of office space. Heat/Elec incld, ample pkg $750 (352) 726-3339 3/1, fenced yard, corner lot. Needs some repairs. As is $39,500 Negotiable 2081 W Gardenia Dr (352) 465-0623 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Timberlane Estates! 3/2/2, w/ screen pool, Located on 1 AC 2690 W. Express Lane $139,000 Call Gwen 795-1520 or 634-1725 Citrus Hills 3/2/2 caged pool, 1 acre, great neighborhood, call for details (352) 746-6552 2 BR, 2BA, Den, lanai, Scrnd heated pool, Cen. AC, poll barn, 1 AC, fenced, well, many extras. By Appt. $129,900 firm (352) 444-2371 or (352) 586-7602 117 S Lunar Terrace2 bedroom. 2 bath. c/h/a,Totally Updated! Block home, Clean, Over-sized Garage, W/Carport. $79,500 Negotiable Call 352-344-9290 8535 E Gospel Island Rd Inverness 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Water front living and all the luxuries. 30 Ft glass porch, cathedral ceilings. Extensively rennovated including wood and tile floors. Granite and new roof and kitchen. Over 2000 Sqft Living area. $139,900 352-817-5875 or miksh@earthlink.net INVERNESS2002, Custom Built 3/2/2 With Extra Lot $114.500.352-344-3112 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BLACK DIAMONDLovely 2400SF home 3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for the golf cart. $1200 month plus security.(352) 464-3905 CRYSTAL RIVER2-3 BR $200-$250/mo 552-2637, 527-6566 CRYSTAL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 INVERNESS3/2/2 Starting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-403-4646 or 352-403-4648 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 NearAnna Jo Rd.By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM CRYSTAL RIVER1/1, Apt. Waterfront $650. mo. 1st sec. Inclds dock, water, trash. No pets. 772-240-6180 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INGLISCharming furn or unfurn effic/cottage all utilities incld. $595 no smoking 352-422-2994 Inverness2bd,ba, fl room, dock fish, par.furn. $450. 860-2452, 201-4559 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 INVERNESSRoom for rent, prv. bath $350., 613-9135 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. BEVERLYHILLS 324 S Monroe. Sunday 12-3p Completely Remodeled Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2 ba, 2 gar. NEW: Roof, kitchen w/stainless, baths, flooring etc. $79k. 527-1239

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FRIDAY,SEPTEMBER27,2013C 13 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 820-1004 FRCRN BOCC 10/8/13 Public Meeting PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will meet in regular session in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450 on October 8, 2013 beginning at 1:00 pm to approve the sale of property at 35 S. Davis Street Beverly Hills, FL to Jason Haworth under the Neighborhood Stabilization Program. This notice is given pursuant to Section 125.35(3), Florida Statutes. Anyone not attending the meeting but who wishes to make comments shall do so in writing and address same to the Department of Community Services, Housing Services Section, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, Florida 34461. Said comments must be received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, October 7, 2013. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public meeting he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrators Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580. JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA published one (1) time, in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 27, 2013. 823-1004 FCRN Owens, Marilyn 2013-CA-000777-A PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000777-A WESTSTAR MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN OWENS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARILYN OWENS, ALL UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS OR INHABITANTS OF 2834 NORTH WHEATON PT, HERNANDO, FL 34442; and COUNTY OF CITRUS, a political subdivision of the State of Florida Defendants. ALIAS SUMMONS To: MARILYN OWENS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARILYN OWENS 2834 North Wheaton Pt. Hernando, FL 34442 NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Citrus County, Florida: Lots 32, 33, 34 and 35, Block 7, PARSONS POINT ADDITION TO HERNANDO, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 19, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida. More specifically described as: 2834 North Wheaton Pt., Hernando, Florida 34442 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses if any, to it on plaintiffs attorney, Stephen H. Price, Esquire, CRAMER, PRICE & de ARMAS, P.A., whose address is 1411 Edgewater Drive, Suite 200, Orlando, Florida 32804; Telephone (407) 843-3300, on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED on September 20, 2013. ANGELA VICK, CLERK OF COURT By:Cheryl Bailey. Deputy Clerk (SEAL) NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILTIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, September 27 & October 4, 2013. 824-1004 FCRN Hoos, Stephanie 2012-CA-1675 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, INAND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2012-CA-1675 BANK OF AMERICA, NA, acting by and through GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC as Servicing Agent, 7360 S. Kyrene Road Tempe,AZ 85283 Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORSAND TRUSTEES OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS, DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS, RANDYPILCHER, JUDYPILCHER, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORSAND TRUSTEES OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS, DECEASED, 922-1003 F/THCRN Baker, Sherry 09-2010-CA-000338 NOS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-2010-CA-000338 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. SHERRY L. BAKER A/K/A SHERRY LYNN BAKER; CHARLES E. BAKER, JR. A/K/A CHARLES EDWARD BAKER, JR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; WORLDWIDE ASSET PURCHASING, L.L.C., AS ASSIGNEE OF HOUSEHOLD AUTO FINANCE CORP. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated September 9, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 09-2010-CA-000338 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 10th day of October, 2013 by electronic sale beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the prescribed date at www.citrus.r ealfor eclose.com relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 459, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST, SECOND ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 68 AND 69, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. By: /s/ Stephen Orsillo, Esq. FBN: 89377 Morris|Hardwick|Schneider, LLC 5110 Eisenhower Blvd., Suite 120, Tampa, Florida 33634 Customer Service (866)-503-4930, MHSinbox@closingsource.net September 27 & October 3, 2013 FL-97003284-09 THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEPHANIE L. HOOS, RANDYPILCHER, JUDYPILCHER, YOUARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Citrus, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: ALLTHAT CERTAIN LAND IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOT(S) 23-24, BLOCK 41 OF APACHE SHORES, UNIT 11AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 36,ET SEQ., OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, EASEMENTS, COVENANTS, OIL, GAS OR MINERAL RIGHTS OF RECORD, IF ANY. Commonly known as: 4030 NORTH LASSO TERRACE, HERNANDO, FL34442 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312 at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 13thday of August, 2013. CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk September 27 & October 4, 2013. 821-1004 FCRN Bobrowski, Dolores 2013-CP-525 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No.: 2013-CP-525 IN RE: ESTATE OF DOLORS JEAN BOBROWSKI Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DOLORS JEAN BOBROWSKI deceased, whose date of death was March 10, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 27, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Thomas Bobrowski 184 West Joliet Road, Valparaiso, IN 46385 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Dawn Ellis My Florida Probate, P.A.Florida Bar No. 091979 P.O. Box 952, Floral City, Florida 34436-0952 Telephone: (352) 726-5444 E-mail: dawn@myfloridaprobate.com Published two times in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 27 & October 4, 2013. 822-1004 FCRN Clinker, Shelia 2013-CP-72 Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-72 IN RE: ESTATE OF SHEILA DOREEN CLINKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The ancillary administration of the estate of SHEILA DOREEN CLINKER deceased, whose date of death was January 9, 2012 ; File Number 2013-CP-72, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 Apopka A venue ,Inver ness ,FL 34450 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 27 Personal Representative: /s/ Michele Cline Personal Representative 315 S. Hyde Park Ave, Tampa, FL 33606 Attorney for Personal Representatives: /s/ James P. Hines, Jr., Florida Bar No. 0413550 Hines Norman Hines, P.L. 315 S. Hyde Park Ave, Tampa, FL 33606 Telephone: (813) 251-8659 Email: jhinesjr@hnh-law.com Published in Citrus County Chronicle, September 27 & October 4, 2013. 818-0927 FCRN 10/5/13 LIEN SALE Out-Back Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that on October 5, 2013 at 1:00 P.M. the underage, 19545 West Hwy 40, Dunnellon FL. 34432. Tenants and units: Unit#R692 Agnes WolfeTravel Trailer We reserve the right to refuse any and all bids. September 20 & 27, 2013 signed Stop & Store LLC. DBA Outback Self Storage will sell at public sale by competitive bidding, the personal property, stored with the undersigned Stop&Store LLC. DBA Outback Self Stor804-0927 FCRN Konetsky, Chad N. 2013-DR-819 NOA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-DR-819 IN RE: THE MATTER OF: KRISTI A. BRANDT, Petitioner/Mother, and CHAD N. KONETSKY, Respondent/Father. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR P A TERNITY TO: CHAD N. KONETSKY 25 North Lincoln Avenue, Beverly Hills, Florida 34465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Counsel for Petitioner, J. MICHAEL BLACKSTONE, P.A., 7655 W. Gulf to Lake Highway, Suite 1, Crystal River, Florida 34429 on or before the 7TH day of October ,2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of The Circuit Courts office notified of you r current address. (You may file Notice. of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit w ill be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions; including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 27th day of August, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT [COURT SEAL] BY: /S/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2013. Terminationo RightsNoti Terminationo RightsNoti Terminationo RightsNoti 000G4O3

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C14FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER27, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G4O6