Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03271

Full Text

Home finale: Rays finish four-game sweep of Orioles /B1


Cloudy, with an
80 percent
chance of rain.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next
morning


SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 48


Panera Bread
coming to
Inverness
Panera Bread con-
firmed Monday that a
new store will open in
spring 2014 in the same
shopping center as the
new Publix on State
Road 44 in Inverness.
Publix is scheduled to
open Oct. 24.
"This is huge, and we
take this as a compliment
to the Inverness commu-
nity," said Inverness City
Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni. "Panera Bread is a
high-quality, well-estab-
lished, well-known eatery,
and we know that when
you deal with businesses
like this, they look at loca-
tion carefully. So, they see
the potential in downtown
Inverness, what's been
done and where our future
lies in moving forward.
This is huge ... and it'll go
a long way in helping the
other establishments that
are here already."
CCSO looking
for missing
woman
The Citrus County
Sheriffs Office is asking
residents to be on the
lookout for a missing 75-
year-old woman, Eileen
Nuismer. She is approxi-
mately 5 feet 7 inches tall
and
/ *'** 120
Pounds.
She
has
white
hair and
blue
Eileen eyes.
Nuismer She
was last seen at her resi-
dence on Silverlake Point
in Dunnellon on Sept. 19.
Residents should check
their home, including
porches and sheds. Call
911 with information.
-From staff reports
I I 1111 .--]11 l]I =


NATION & WORLD:


Battle rages
Kenyan security forces
continue to battle
al-Qaida-linked
terrorists./Page Cl


Classifieds ........ C9
Comics .......... C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ........ A10O
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C8
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C7


Planner takes job in Cape Coral


Vince Cautero leavingfor similar, better-payingjob in southwest Fla.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
As director of planning
and development, Vince
Cautero touched many proj-
ects and initiatives as Citrus
County positioned itself to
transition from recession
back to growth.
In the past three years, he
has been involved in the per-


mitting process, comprehen-
sive plan amendments, Port
Citrus, budget cuts, bicycle
trails, impact fees, economic
development, the enterprise
zone, environmental issues,
the land development code
and the proposed medical
corridor on County Road 491.
As head of the high-profile
department, he has been a
familiar face at all types of


public meetings and occa-
sional controversy
But his last day on the job
here is Oct 11, when he will
leave for a similar position
with the city of Cape Coral.
This was Cautero's second
stint in local government. He
had worked in the Citrus
County Department of Devel-
opment Services from 1985-
95, serving as its director for


five years. From there he fv. JA .
went on to Collier County ,. .
and consultant work, return-
ing to Citrus in 2010.
Cautero said he is going to
miss the interesting projects, Vince
a good staff, having good re- Cautero
lations with the business last day as the
community and his involve- county's
director of
ment with the Economic planning and
development is
See PageA9 Oct. 11.


State's bridges among safest in US
0f9,1yl57structures,


/,, only1/found to be

in need of repair
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
From the Golden Gate to the Brooklyn
Bridge to the 1945 Pistol Point Canal bridge
on County Road 39 that 40 vehicles travel
across each day, Americans rely on the na-
tion's hundreds of thousands of bridges to
-. .help get them from one place to another
Recently, the Associated Press analyzed
the federal National Bridge Inventory, fo-
cusing on the thousands of bridges that
are both "structurally deficient" and
"fracture critical" a dangerous and po-
tentially deadly combination that indi-
cates "significant disrepair and an
increased risk of collapse."
In 2007, the 1-35W Mississippi River
bridge in Minneapolis, Minn., an eight-
lane steel truss arch bridge, collapsed
during the evening rush hour on Aug. 1,
killing 13 and injuring 145. A design flaw
was cited as the cause of the collapse.
Just this past May, a bridge over the
Skagit River in a rural area of Washington
state, collapsed, sending at least two cars
into the water
The Seattle Times reported that, "ac-
cording to federal records, the bridge in
question had a sufficiency rating of 57.4
W out of 100, which is well below the state av-
erage of 80. Yet 759 other bridges have
S..~ ,even worse marks."
In Florida, the 4.1-mile Sunshine Sky-
way Bridge over the Tampa Bay- named
-.'; among the "Top 10 Bridges in the World"
by the Travel Channel was partially
damaged May 9,1980, when the MV Sum-
mit Venture freighter collided with a sup-
port column during a severe
,'thunderstorm, causing six cars, a truck
6..See PageAll

The bridge on U.S. 41 in Inverness is the
J-; ,oldest in the county. It was originally built
in 1925 and rebuilt 25 years later. The
Withlacoochee State Trail now passes
under it.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Governor makes changes to Common Core plan


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov Rick
Scott caught in the debate over the fu-
ture of Florida's public schools is trying
to respond to critics of new education stan-
dards slated to go into effect next year
Instead of rejecting or wholly endors-
ing the standards as former Gov Jeb Bush
has Scott on Monday called for public
hearings and possible changes to the Com-
mon Core State Standards.
The Republican governor also said the


state will pull out of a national test for
school children to see if they are reaching
standards in certain subjects.
Scott, in an executive order and letters to
top state education officials, said he re-
mains in favor of the "highest academic
standards," but wants to make sure there
isn't any "federal intrusion" into education
policy
That has been a constant refrain of Com-
mon Core critics, many of whom are Re-
publican Party activists. Common Core
See Page A7


Scott fills seat on education board
TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick Scott on
Monday tapped a former public school teacher to
take a spot on the panel that oversees the state's
public schools.
Scott appointed Rebecca Fishman Lipsey to a
four-year term on the State Board of Education.
Lipsey, who is from Aventura, taught in New York
City for two years. She also worked as executive di-
rector in Miami-Dade County for Teach for America.
-From wire reports


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A2 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


QUALITY

CHARITY
COMMUNITY
COMMITMENT



YOUR HOSPITAL IS AN IMPORTANT
MEMBER OF YOUR COMMUNITY.
DON'T PUT THE VALUE OF THAT CONTRIBUTION
AT ZERO.


71% of HCA hospitals are Top Performers in Quality Care as mea-
sured by The Joint Commission, the nation's leading authority on
excellence in healthcare.
Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) reports
that in 2012, HCA hospitals provided a higher percentage of self-
pay/uninsured care compared to non HCA hospitals, including
Tampa General.
HCA will bring Citrus County $235 MILLION in combined upfront
lease payments and property taxes paid over the life of its lease of
Citrus Memorial, paying off the hospital's debts and bringing revenue
to the community.
Tampa General proposes to pay ZERO upfront for the same lease.


Good for Citrus Memorial. Good for you.




HCA
HCAWestFIorida.com/Citrus


COMUNIY OMMTMET UALTY AR HOPIAL-BASED LADESI


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Page A3-TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Democratic clubs
host dinner today
The Combined Demo-
cratic Clubs of Citrus
County will meet today at 7
Rivers Golf and Country
Club in Crystal River.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy will be
the speaker.
For those wishing cock-
tails and dinner before the
meeting, arrive no later than
6 p.m., since the meeting is
scheduled to begin by
7:15 p.m.
All Democrats are wel-
come. For details, call 352-
795-5384 or 352-795-4119.
Candlelight vigil for
slain man moves
The candlelight vigil by
friends and family of a Her-
nando man killed by an off-
duty sheriffs office deputy-in-
training is moving to Fort Is-
land Beach on Fort Island
Trail. The event will begin at
8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Deputy Greg Entrekin
shot and killed Derrick Vac-
cianna, 28, after a struggle
Sept. 26, 2012, in the bed-
room of an Inverness
woman they both were pur-
portedly dating.
According to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, En-
trekin and his girlfriend at
the time were confronted by
Vaccianna after he entered
the residence on Eden Drive
in Inverness through a bed-
room window. Entrekin shot
Vaccianna when he report-
edly charged at him. Vac-
cianna died at the scene.
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement
cleared Entrekin in January
of any wrongdoing in Vac-
cianna's death, but ac-
knowledged the existence
of a love triangle.
The theme of the event
is: Light Up The Sky.
TOO FAR to host
dinner meeting
Wayne Sawyer of the
Citrus/Hernando Water-
ways Restoration Council is
the guest speaker for TOO
FAR's spaghetti dinner
meeting fundraiser at
6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26,
at the East Citrus Civic
Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
Meal costs $7 and in-
cludes salad, pasta, garlic
bread and dessert.
Contact Pat Brady at
psbrady@tampabay.rr.com
or 352-419-8030.

Tallahassee
Pro-Scott website
takes aim at Crist
The Republican Party of
Florida has launched a new
website that touts Gov. Rick
Scott's handling of the
economy and slams for-
mer Republican Gov. Char-
lie Crist, who is widely
expected to run for gover-
nor as a Democrat in 2014.
The website, itsworking
fl.com, focuses on issues
such as job creation, the
state's unemployment rate
and Scott's proposal to cut
$500 million in taxes and
fees next year. It also has a
"Before & After" section that
attempts to juxtapose
Scott's performance with
the time Crist was governor
- a time that Florida and
the rest of the country got
hammered by the economic
recession.

Jacksonville
Store owner shoots
would-be robber
A Jacksonville store
owner shot and injured a
masked man who jumped
over the counter and de-
manded money from the


clerk.
The shooting happened
about 9 p.m. Sunday at the
Holiday Grocery.
Jacksonville Sheriff's offi-
cials said the suspect was in
serious but stable condition
at UF Health Jacksonville.
-From staff and wire reports


Man threatens roommates with knife


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
A day of drinking culminated
with felony charges of aggravated
assault with intent to commit a
felony for Thomas Culver of Crys-
tal River
Culver, 36, reportedly bran-
dished a steak knife at one of his
roommates and threatened to kill
not only him, but the other two
roommates, as well.
According to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, the victim was


sleeping in his bedroom a Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
little after midnight Sat- f ice patrol vehicle, ex-
urday, Sept. 21, when he plaining to the deputy that
was awoken by Culver. Culver was in a foul mood
When he entered the hall- from a day of drinking.
way, Culver made threats A deputy spotted Culver
while wielding a steak about50 feet away, standing
knife, stating he was going on the sidewalk on North
to kill everyone in the res- Thomas Citrus Avenue, and as he
idence. Alarmed by the Culver approached, it became
angry threats, all three faces assault clear that Culver was heav-
roommates exited the charges. ily intoxicated. The deputy
home and ran into the said Culver shouted he was
street. The three roommates re- drunk and ifhe was not taken to jail
quested assistance from a passing he was goingto go backto the house


to hurt everyone. Culver went on to
say he had been using a knife to
threaten his roommates, but had
hidden it somewhere, and refused
to tell the deputy where he had
placed it Culver continued with his
threats, stating when the deputy
left he was going to grab the knife
and go back to the residence to hurt
everyone in there.
Deputies discovered the knife
nearby in some mulch and Culver
was taken into custody without
further incident His bond was set
at $5,000.


Teen who


killed St. Pete


police officer to


be resentenced


Victim David Crawford

lived in Citrus County

Associated Press

LARGO Some two dozen police officers
crowded into a Largo courtroom Monday for
the resentencing of a teenager who killed a St.
Petersburg officer
Nicholas Lindsey was 16 when he shot Offi-
S- "" .cer David S. Crawford five times on Feb. 21,
2011. He was sentenced to life in prison after
his trial last year
After the sentencing, the
U.S. Supreme Court ruled
that automatic life-without-
parole sentences for juveniles
are not constitutional. The
court mandated that other wt
factors must be considered,
including the youths'
.... ...... '[mental development and David
S background. C rawfordt
This summer, a Pinellas- St. Petersburg
Pasco Circuit Court granted a officer lived in
motion allowing Lindsey to be Citrus County
resentenced. before being
shot and killed
St. Petersburg Chief Chuck Feb. 21, 2011.
Harmon told the Tampa Bay
aTimes he wanted to show support for Craw-
ford and make sure that Lindsey gets "the ap-
propriate sentence, and that's life."
Arrangements were made for the overflow
crowd to watch the proceedings from a TV in
a conference room.
Officers from several agencies joined Har-
mon on Monday morning.
Jurors deliberated four hours last year be-
fore finding Lindsey guilty of first-degree mur-
der His attorneys didn't deny that he killed
the officer Rather, they claimed he fired at the
officer out of panic and should have been con-
victed of manslaughter instead. That way, he
would have been eligible for a 30-year prison
sentence instead of life without the possibil-
ity of early release.
During the trial, defense attorneys said the
teen was illegally armed to protect himself
....,..'.. .. against neighborhood gangs. But prosecutors
said he knew exactly what he was doing when
he fired at Crawford. The officer was trying to
stop him for questioning.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle Crawford, 46, was a 25-year department vet-
Jennie Greening of Ocala spends a wet Monday morning fishing at Fort Island Trail eran and assigned to District 2 on the city's
Park on the banks of the Crystal River. Greening keeps a close eye above on a sea gull north side near Tropicana Field.
attempting to pluck the angler's shrimp from her hook. Rain is once again forecast for He made the commute to his nightly patrol
Tuesday with chances for rain greater than 50 percent over the next three days, job from Crystal River, more than a 75-mile
according to Bay News 9 forecasters. An unorganized mass of storms and showers is trip each way In 2011, a neighbor said Craw-
drifting northwest across the Gulf of Mexico directly into the Nature Coast, dumping ford lived in Citrus County because he prom-
heavy rainfall and causing some low-lying areas to flood, ised to take care of the house when his father
passed away a few years prior



Veteran changes mind about new home


MATT REINIG
Hernando Today
BROOKSVILLE A veteran
critically wounded in the war in
Afghanistan, who applied for and
received a customized home from
Houston-based HelpingaHero.org
Home Program, withdrew from
the program about two weeks ago.
Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt.
Ken Patterson declined the offer
via email one day before home
builder, Pulte Homes in Tampa,
was to begin construction on the
home in the Trillium subdivision.
"Pulte Homes was just amazing,
and they did everything they com-
mitted to, and we certainly did
everything we committed to," said
Meredith Iler, national chairman,
founder and volunteer of Helping
aHero.org, "We certainly wish Mr
Patterson well, but he just
changed his mind."
Patterson, who currently re-
sides in Citrus County, could not
be reached for comment
Patterson lost much of his right
leg, along with his left foot, four
years ago in the war in
Afghanistan while aboard a CH-47


We certainly
wish Mr. Patterson
well, but he
just changed
his mind.
Meredith Iler
founder of HelpingaHero.org
Chinook helicopter, which came
under heavy fire by Taliban forces.
"Looking back on it, if I had
known I would have missed (the
Army) this much, I would have
stayed, because they could have
put me in a special unit," Patter-
son said back in July 'As long as I
find some land to ride my four-
wheeler on, I'll be all right."
A groundbreaking ceremony was
conducted back in mid-July The
four-bedroom, 2,600-square-foot
home with 2.5 baths and full wheel-
chair accessibility, was 400 square
feet larger than any home in Tril-
lium. The home was expected to be
complete by Thanksgiving.
Applications for 2014 homes are
available at HelpingaHero.org.


Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Ken Patterson served four combat tours in
Iraq and Afghanistan. Patterson, who currently resides in Citrus County,
withdrew from the Houston-based HelpingaHero.org Home Program just
before construction was to start on a customized home in the Trillium
subdivision in Hernando County.


Rainy days and Mondays




A4 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Look at the big picture in
the coming months. Consider what's
available to you and how you can
reach your goals. Learn all you can
and question anything that isn't clear.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Communi-
cation will be your ticket to information
that can help you advance. Do your re-
search, and you will avoid making a
mistake. Don't give in to pressure.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It's a
good day to get in touch with an old
friend. The memories you share will
help prevent you from making a finan-
cial mistake.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Ex-
press your thoughts and follow through
with your plans. An emotional situation
may deter you if you allow it to. Assess
the situation, make adjustments and
complete whatever you are doing.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Pro-
tect your name and position. Listen to
what others say, but don't make alter-
ations to your plan based on hearsay.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Stick
close to home and look over your prop-
erty and papers. Fixing up your place
will make you feel good and give you a
reason to entertain someone special.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Look
over contracts, settlements or any per-
sonal information that can help you ex-
pand an interest or project.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Use
your intelligence and creative talent in
the workplace today. Employing your
skills diversely will create a stir.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Learn all
you can. The more information you
have, the easier it will be to impress
your peers.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Emo-
tions will escalate causing uncertainty
Don't believe everything you hear. Go
directly to the source.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Live a lit-
tle. Get out and enjoy new interests or
try developing a skill or talent that you
find engaging. Romance will develop if
you make plans with someone special.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your ability
to adapt will be crucial when dealing
with an ongoing domestic situation.
Someone you least expect will come to
the rescue.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Mixed
emotions are likely to confuse you.
Rely on past experience and old
friends to help you make wise choices.
An unusual route will offer the best
destination.


ENTERTAINMENT


Miss. court hears
dispute over photos
of bluesman
JACKSON, Miss. -A Missis-
sippi Supreme Court panel has
heard arguments about who
should make money from the
only two known photographs of
the late Robert Johnson, a
bluesman who, myth has it, sold
his soul to the devil for guitar
prowess.
Johnson was destitute when
he died in 1938 at age 27. His
estate is valuable, partly be-
cause of a collection of his
recordings that won a Grammy
in 1990.
Three justices heard argu-
ments Monday in the photo
dispute.
On one side are descendants
of Johnson's late half-sister, Car-
rie Harris Thompson. Their at-
torney argues the photos were
Thompson's personal property
but that others profited from
them.
On the other side are Sony
Music Entertainment Inc.; John-
son's only heir, his son Claud
Johnson; and a promoter who
had a 1974 contract with
Thompson.
US honors
Ray Charles with
limited-edition stamp
ATLANTA-The U.S. Postal
Service is planning to add soul
singer Ray Charles to its "Music
Icons Forever" stamp series.
Postal officials say the agency
is releasing a stamp featuring
the Albany, Ga., native on Mon-
day along with one of the artist's
previously unreleased songs.
Charles was a singer and
songwriter who pioneered the
soul and rhythm-and-blues gen-
res. He died in 2004.
Events are being planned in At-
lanta and Los Angeles to celebrate


AflacfAssociated Press
Lance Bass, left, the Aflac duck and Joey Fatone take a
"selfie" Monday while enjoying the New York City skyline. The
Aflac Duck was celebrating his comeback from injuries that
left him unable to quack.


Charles' inclusion in the series.
R&B singer Ashanti and the
Morehouse College Glee Club
are scheduled to perform at the
Atlanta school's Ray Charles
Performing Arts Center. Chaka
Khan is headlining an event at
the Grammy Museum.
The U.S. Postal Service hon-
ors music legends each year by
featuring them on limited-edition
stamps.

Newport Folk
Festival heads
to Santa Monica
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -The
Newport Folk Festival is taking
its resurgent brand on the road
with plans for a two-day festival
in California.
Known as Newport Folk Pres-
ents Way Over Yonder, the
Oct. 5-6 event will feature per-
formances from Conor Oberst,
Neko Case and several other
performers playing on two
stages on the pier in Santa Mon-
ica, Calif., the seaside tourist
mecca adjacent to Los Angeles.
Plans for the event came
about after a California-based


promoter attending the 2012
Newport Folk Festival ap-
proached organizers with the
idea of holding a similar event on
the West Coast. Newport Folk
Festival producer Jay Sweet
said that while he hopes the
Santa Monica festival could be-
come an annual event, he's not
trying to clone Newport.
"It's not going to be Newport
Folk Festival-West," Sweet told
The Associated Press. "It can't
be, because you can't just recre-
ate Newport. I want this to be its
own thing."
There will be some obvious
similarities. Like Newport's Fort
Adams State Park, the pier will
provide a stunning seaside
backdrop for the music. The
lineup at Santa Monica will fea-
ture alumni of Newport, as festi-
val organizers refer to them. And
Sweet said he hopes the new
event shares Newport's empha-
sis on intimate performances.
The Newport Folk Festival has
experienced a resurgence in re-
cent years, with this year's festi-
val selling out five months early.

From wire reports


COnIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 24, the
267th day of 2013. There are 98
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 24, 1976, former
hostage Patricia Hearst was sen-
tenced to seven years in prison for
her part in a 1974 bank robbery in
San Francisco carried out by the
Symbionese Liberation Army.
Hearst was released after 22
months after receiving clemency
from President Jimmy Carter.
On this date:
In 1869, thousands of business-
men were ruined in a Wall Street
panic known as Black Friday after
financiers Jay Gould and James
Fisk attempted to corner the gold
market.
In 1961, "Walt Disney's Wonder-
ful World of Color" premiered on
NBC.
In 1991, Children's author
Theodor Seuss Geisel, better
known as Dr. Seuss, died in La
Jolla, Calif., at age 87.
Ten years ago: After four turbu-
lent months, three special legisla-
tive sessions and two Democratic
walkouts, both houses of the
Republican-controlled Texas Legis-
lature adopted redistricting plans fa-
voring the GOP.
Five years ago: Officials re-
opened Galveston, Texas, to resi-
dents who were warned about
Hurricane Ike's debris and disrup-
tion of utilities.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama told the ABC talk show "The
View" that the deadly attack earlier
in the month on the U.S. diplomatic
compound in Benghazi, Libya, was
not the result of mob violence; he
said "there's no doubt" that the as-
sault wasn't spontaneous.
Today's Birthdays: News an-
chor Lou Dobbs is 68. Actor Kevin
Sorbo is 55. Actress-writer Nia
Vardalos is 51. Actor Justin Bruen-
ing is 34.
Thought for Today: "History is
mostly guessing, the rest is preju-
dice." Will (1885-1981) and Ariel
Durant (1898-1981), American
historians.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR jH l LO PR I [LZ
1.20 / 7 75 1 In ,.. J85 7;


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Mostly cloudy with showers and thun-
derstorms likely today.


80 74 -1.20 82 73 1.30

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclus vedaly
forecast by: Ig

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 88 Low: 73
Cloudy with an 80% chance of
thunderstorms, heavy rain likely.
Sr y High: 88 Low: 73
Mostly cloudy with a 70% chance of rain.

i THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
L High: 89 Low: 72
i Decreasing clouds, still a 30% chance of
f ^showers.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 84/74
Record 96/62
Normal 89/68
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 1.00 in.
Total for the month 7.15 in.
Total for the year 48.16 in.
Normal for the year 43.61 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 100%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Nettle, Grasses
Today's count: 0.8/12
Wednesday's count: 5.2
Thursday's count: 6.7
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/24 TUESDAY 10:12 3:59 10:36 4:24
9/25 WEDNESDAY 11:05 4:53 11:29 5:17
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
( e ~ O SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:24P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:20 A.M.
4E C MOONRISE TODAY ......................... 11:05 P.M.
SEPT. 2 OCT.4 OCT. 11 OCT. 18 MOONSET TODAY .......................... 12:10 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:40 a/4:39 a 10:00 p/5:28 p
Crystal River" 7:01 a/2:01 a 8:21 p/2:50 p
Withlacoochee* 4:48 a/12:38 p 6:08 p/--
Homosassa*** 7:50 a/3:38 a 9:10 p/4:27 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
9:17a/5:13a 10:54 p/6:15 p
7:38 a/2:35 a 9:15 p/3:37 p
5:25 a/12:23 a 7:02 p/1:25 p
8:27a/4:12a 10:04 p/5:14p


Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.73 29.76 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.15 38.19 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.62 39.67 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.45 40.48 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION
L -%M


"AST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Monday Tuesday Monday Tuesday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


s
s
pc
PC
pc
s
s
s
pc
ts
sh
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
.01 s
s
s
s
s





PC
s
.48 s

pc
s

s
pc
s
s
ts
s
ts
s
pc
s
pc
pc
s
pc
ts
ts
ts


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 87 73 .01 ts 87 76
NewYorkCity 66 50 s 72 54
Norfolk 66 61 s 73 56
Oklahoma City 83 57 s 83 59
Omaha 78 57 pc 74 53
Palm Springs 97 64 s 97 66
Philadelphia 67 50 s 72 52
Phoenix 93 68 s 95 74
Pittsburgh 57 51 s 68 44
Portland, ME 59 42 pc 66 43
Portland, Ore 63 56 .02 sh 61 50
Providence, R.I. 65 49 s 69 47
Raleigh 72 55 s 78 57
Rapid City 61 54 .22 s 72 52
Reno 79 42 pc 76 42
Rochester, NY 59 46 s 63 45
Sacramento 84 53 s 79 55
St. Louis 77 55 pc 78 61
St. Ste. Marie 59 38 s 66 45
Salt Lake City 71 53 pc 83 59
San Antonio 91 57 s 93 66
San Diego 80 62 s 76 63
San Francisco 76 57 s 69 56
Savannah 77 66 .11 pc 82 68
Seattle 60 55 .10 sh 60 49
Spokane 59 46 sh 61 42
Syracuse 56 44 s 65 41
Topeka 80 53 pc 77 54
Washington 68 55 s 75 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 97 Thermal, Calif. LOW 25 Wolf Creek,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/76/pc
Amsterdam 67/49/pc
Athens 81/63/s
Beijing 71/58/pc
Berlin 59/54/sh
Bermuda 82/75As
Cairo 89/65/s
Calgary 57/43/pc
Havana 83/75/pc
Hong Kong 78/76As
Jerusalem 73/63/sh


Lisbon 73/67/c
London 71/54/pc
Madrid 85/62/s
Mexico City 72/57/ts
Montreal 63/46/pc
Moscow 46/43/sh
Paris 76/54/s
Rio 81/62/ts
Rome 75/62/s
Sydney 84/59/s
Tokyo 81/70/sh
Toronto 66/46/s
Warsaw 60/40/pc


LEGAL NOTICES






Town of Inglis..................................C4


Notice to

Creditors/Administration ........C12



CITRULIS COUNTY



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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 AS




A6 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


Obituaries


Andrew
Bolash, 78
HOMOSASSA
Andrew left this world
Sept 11, 2013, after losing
a long battle with cancer,
but he has won the war He
was the only child born to
the late Andrew Bolash
and Mary Ritchie Bolash
Nov 21, 1934, in Newark,
N.J. Andrew worked very
hard as a farmer's son,
which may have inspired
him to pursue a less de-
manding career. After
graduating high school, he
spent two years in the
Army and then two years
in the Air Force during the
Korean Conflict. Andrew
(don't call him Andy) grad-
uated college, receiving
his degree in civil engi-
neering, paying his tuition
by working years, on and
off, in Greenland. He then
earned his MBA from
Rider University Andrew
became a rising star work-
ing with Bellsouth while
residing in Palm Beach
County, but decided he
would like to experience
working in other coun-
tries. Working usually as a
project manager, he trav-
eled to Israel, Egypt, Nige-
ria, Africa, Saudi Arabia,
Jamaica, Haiti, Togo and
Albania, to name most of
the countries. He retired
in 2006 from Kuwait,
Bahrain and Jordan. An-
drew enjoyed visiting his
mother's homeland of
Scotland and sipping their
most famous beverage. He
enjoyed playing golf, "only
for fun," being with his
family, and an occasional
trip to the Hard Rock Casi-
nos. He was a voracious
reader of newspapers and
books, a very knowledge-
able sports historian and
was a faithful fan of the
New York Giants, Tampa
Bay Bucs and the Yankees.
Also, Andrew proudly vol-
unteered as a courier for
Hospice of Citrus County
Andrew leaves to
mourn, his adored wife,
Elaine Prouix Bolash; his
much-loved daughter,
Michelle Prouix Musto;
his son-in-law and drink-
ing buddy, Michael; and

Muo. E. Zavias
Funeral Home With Crematory
SHIRLEY BONN
Private Arrangements
AUDREY DESKINS
Private Arrangements
LESTER ELY
Private Arrangements
LYVELLE PALMER
Viewing: Thurs. 1:00 PM
Service: Thurs. 2:00 PM
ROSE PATE
Private Arrangements
DONALD HARRISON
Pending Arrangements
726-8323


his precious grandson,
George Andrew
Grimwade. Also, goodbye
to his brother-in-law, An-
drew, and his spouse, Bar-
bara. Andrew will also be
missed by his dear pets,
Coco, Ming and Jake.
Adieu dearest Andrew,
until we meet again.
A celebration of An-
drew's life will take place
at his residence at 12 p.m.
Sept. 28, 2013. Friends are
invited to come, share and
enjoy as Andrew so
wished. Special thanks for
Andrew's care to Dr C.
Joseph Bennett, Dr
William Harrer, and for the
outstanding nursing care
and comfort provided An-
drew at his time of need by
Hospice of Citrus County
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Wayne
Chapel Sr., 73
FLORAL CITY
Wayne Edward Chapel
Sr, 73, of Floral City, Fla.,
passed on to be with the
Lord on Saturday Sept. 21,
2013, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital, Inverness.
Wayne was born Sept. 11,
1940, in Charleston, WVa.,
the son of Edward and
Marie Chapel. He worked
for D.A.B., where he was a
heavy equipment operator
He moved to Floral City in
1972 from Ashtabula, Ohio.
Wayne loved fishing,
NASCAR and watching TV
He was a member of the
Citrus County Community
Church, Lecanto.
Survivors include his
wife, Barbara Chapel, Flo-
ral City; seven children,
Lottie Chapel, Lecanto,
Wayne Chapel Jr, Lecanto,
Tammy Chapel, Floral
City, Diana Chapel, Floral
City, Rose Marie Bertram,
Helen Watson, Ron Olding;
five brothers and sisters;
15 grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren
The family will receive
friends from 2 to 3 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013.
The funeral service will
begin at 3 p.m. with Pastor
Byron Freeman officiat-
ing. Heinz Funeral Home
& Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


Kathryn 'Kay'
Danielson, 84
HOMOSASSA
Kathryn "Kay" Etheridge
Danielson, 84, a resident of
Homosassa, Fla., died Sun-
day Sept 22, 2013, at Seven
Rivers Re-
g i o n a 1If
Medical
Center in
Crystal ,
River A ,
native of iy
Scituate, L4
Mass., Kay
and her Kathryn
husband Danielson
Richard
(Dick) moved to Citrus
County in 1986. In Massa-
chusetts they spent lots of
happy time sailing on the
"Volare." She always loved
and appreciated the beauty
of the New England coast-
line. Kay graduated from
Thayer Academy and at-
tended Colby College. She
served her church as
church secretary for 22
years. After moving to Ho-
mosassa she was an active
member of the First Pres-
byterian Church of Crystal
River, where she had
served as an elder, a dea-
con and a member of the
choir She was a member of
PE.O. and the Red Hats.
She had a way of adding
brightness and optimism to
any situation.
Kay was preceded in
death by her husband, Dick
in 1993. She is survived by
her daughter, Deborah
Kenney of Homosassa; two
sons, Robert of Homosassa
and John of Scituate, Mass.;
five grandchildren, Rachel
Brown (Josh), Melissa Ken-
ney, Colleen Gilman
(Jordan), Lea Danielson
and Derick Danielson.
A memorial service for
Kay will be at 10 a.m. Fri-
day, Sept. 27, 2013, at the
First Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River with Pas-
tor Dr Jack Allwood and
Parish Associate Sheryle
Lyman officiating. In lieu
of flowers, those who wish
may make a memorial con-
tribution to the First Pres-
byterian Church of Crystal
River or to Hospice of Cit-
rus County Strickland Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Crystal River,
assisted the family with
arrangements.


CASH for
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Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire

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Metal Recycling
4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
000G5TE 527-9599


Sign the guest book at Sara Turner, 81
wwwchronicleonline.com. DU N N E L L 0 N


George
Robb, 89
HOMOSASSA
Mr. George W Robb, age
89 of Homosassa, Florida,
died Sunday, September
22,2013 in Homosassa, FL.
He was
born June
27, 1924 in
New York,
NY, son of
the late
Max and
Gladys
(N agy)
Robb. He George
was a Robb
Navy vet-
eran serving during World
War II, serving on the
U.S.S. Angler He was the
owner of the Angler Motel
in Clearwater Beach, FL
and moved to Homosassa
from Clearwater Beach in
1991. He was an avid
Sailor and Yachtsman and
sailed competitively Mr
Robb was Past Com-
mander of the VEW in Lit-
tle Ferry, NJ and a
member of the Submarine
Veterans.
Survivors include his
wife, Charlotte Robb of
Homosassa, son, Rocco
Rao of Dunedin, 3 daugh-
ters, Donna Lacey of Bel-
leair Beach, Debbie
Tamplin of Tampa, and
Dawn Robb of Lecanto, 9
grandchildren and 1 great
grandchild.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com. Private
arrangements are by the
Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

0 Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Sara L. Turner, 81, of
Dunnellon, Fla., was re-
united with her husband,
William Turner, in Heaven
Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013,
from the Legacy House of
Ocala. She was born May
30, 1932, in Bennett
Switch, Ind., daughter to
the late Walter and
Thelma (Meister) Zehring.
Sara was of the Methodist
faith and served her Lord
throughout her life. She
spent her life in Indiana
until moving to Clearwater
in 1978 where, along with
William, managed a mo-
bile home park in Largo.
They retired to Dunnellon
in 1989. She worked at var-
ious stores throughout her
life, the last seven years as
a deli clerk for Walmart of
Dunnellon.
Her husband of 42 years,
William Turner, passed
away Jan. 19,2002, and she
lost one son, Rick Turner
in 1992, and her brother,
Bob Zehring, in 2012. Sara
is survived by her sister-
in-law, Margie Schaffer
and her husband Ken of
Milo, Iowa; children, Billy
E. Turner and his wife
Janet of Dunnellon and
Peggy Sue Lynch and her
husband Donald of
Kissimmee; seven grand-
children; nine great-
grandchildren; and three
g r e a t g r e a t-
grandchildren.
Condolences may be ex-
pressed at wwwhiers-
baxleycom. Arrangements
are under the care of
Hiers-Baxley Timber-
Ridge Chapel, 9695 S.W
110th St. Ocala, FL 34482.

* U.S. flags denote
military service.


To Place Your

r"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips


563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


Clsmving time fortH


William
Graff Jr., 71
HOMOSASSA
William Louis Graft Jr.,
71, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Saturday, Sept. 21,
2013, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital in Inverness. Pri-
vate cremation arrange-
ments are under the care
of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory
Crystal River

Vonda
Varkett, 67
HOMOSASSA
Vonda Rachael Varkett,
67, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Monday, Sept. 23,
2013, at her home in Ho-
mosassa. Private crema-
tion arrangements are
under the care of Strick-
land Funeral Home with
Crematory Crystal River

Louis
Williams, 77
HERNANDO
Louis G Williams, 77, of
Hernando, Fla., died Sept.
22, 2013, under the care of
his family and Hospice of
Citrus County in Her-
nando. Arrangements are
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. M
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


Brashear's
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Mon-Fri 8:30-6 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness........637-2079
Sat 8:30-1 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness


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or update your Voter Record


Crystal River Mall
1801 US 19
11 AM-2PM


Inverness Elections Office
120 N. Apopka Ave.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DUI arrests
Michele Campbell, 35,
of Inverness, at 8:43 p.m.
Sept. 21 on misdemeanor
charges of driving under the
influence, and knowingly driv-
ing while license is sus-
pended or revoked. According
to her arrest affidavit, Camp-
bell was involved in a single
car crash on East Gospel Is-
land Road in Inverness. She
was asked to perform field so-
briety tests and did poorly.
Tests of her breath showed
her blood alcohol concentra-
tion was 0.134 and 0.128 per-
cent. The legal limit is
0.08 percent. She was also
arrested on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery
stemming from a complaint
made earlier in the evening
and a misdemeanor failure to
appear stemming from an
original charge of trespassing
after warning. Bond $10,550.
Donald Hamilton, 53, of
North Hamilton Road, Dun-
nellon, at 8:22 p.m. Sept. 20
on a misdemeanor charge of
driving under the influence.
According to his arrest


affidavit, Hamilton was in-
volved in a car accident and
showed signs of being im-
paired. He was asked to per-
form field sobriety tests and
did poorly. Tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.172 and
0.174 percent. The legal limit
is 0.08 percent. Bond $500.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary
was reported at 2:03 a.m. Fri-
day, Sept. 20, in the 7400
block of S. Forte Evans Point,
Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 9:33 p.m. Sept. 20
in the 9300 block of N. Cacalia
Drive, Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 8:05 a.m. Friday, Sept. 20, in
the 1000 block of Middle School
Drive, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 9:14 a.m. Sept. 20
in the 5000 block of N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills.


For the RECORD


TEST
Continued from PageAl

supporters said that is a
mischaracterization of how
the standards were devel-
oped and will be used.
"What Floridians need
to know is not our leaders
are 'for Common Core' or
'against Common Core,"'
Scott wrote in a letter to
State Board of Education
Chairman Gary Chartrand.
He added that as gover-
nor, "I support Florida's
high academic standards
and strongly reject over-
reach into those stan-
dards and other areas of
our education system by
the federal government."


The Republican gover-
nor also on Monday wrote
U.S. Department of Educa-
tion Secretary Arne Dun-
can and told him Florida
would pull out of the na-
tional testing consortium
developing high-stakes
tests that would measure
the new standards.
Scott called on Educa-
tion Commissioner Pam
Stewart and the State
Board of Education to in-
stead issue a bid to deter-
mine what tests should be
used to replace the cur-
rent test known as the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test. The
widely used FCAT is not
aligned to the new Com-
mon Core standards and
must be replaced by the


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2014-15 school year
Scott is taking these
steps amid a growing rift
in his own party about ed-
ucation policy
His moves also come just
one day after former Gov
Charlie Crist a likely
challenger to Scott as a De-
mocrat wrote a critical
opinion piece in the Tampa
Bay Times about Scott's
handling of education and
said he was capitulating to
tea party members on the
standards.
"This is a nonsensical
reason to reject them,"
Crist wrote. "Scott needs
to stand with Florida stu-
dents and no one else.
This is not a time for rank
partisanship."
Legislative leaders said


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 A7

Monday they were gener-
ally supportive of Scott's
actions. But a more cau-
tious stance came from
education groups that had
supported Common Core.
Patricia Levesque, execu-
tive director of the Foun-
dation for Florida's
Future, praised the stan-
dards and said they were
challenging children.
Levesque, whose organ-
ization was started by
Bush, called on state offi-
cials to "move quickly and
carefully" on finding a
new test. Education Com-
missioner Pam Stewart, in
a conference call, insisted
that the state had until
March to make a decision.
But Levesque said "deci-
sions must be made soon."




A8 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1 760................................. S& P 500
-,,,, Close: 1,701.84
Change: -8.07 (-0.5%)


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
15,720 ........ Dow Jones industrials
15 Close: 15,401.38
1- Change:-49.71 (-0.3%)


1,640 .. .. 10 DAYS ......... :,: IO DAYS ....
1 7 5 0 . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 ,0 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . .. . . . .
1,650 .1'70,.0..0. ......-.. ... .. ...... ..... .. ......... 15,200156600 ........... ................................. ..


1 700 ........... .... ..... ... ......... ........ .................. ,00 ... ............ .......
1650 AL...... / L . ..'
1600 I^150'iIV V^^^^^/
1 550^ 'V 14,800^^^^^
1 ,5 0 0 .......... ..... ........... ............. ........ ... 14 ,8 0 0 .. ..... ........... ........ ... .......... ............. ....... ...


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,059
Pvs. Volume 4,764
Advanced 1289
Declined 1760
New Highs 81
New Lows 37


NASD
1,575
2,373
1082
1431
135
27


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15466.95
6687.08
491.94
9757.19
3787.14
1711.44
1244.28
18222.01
1073.59


LOW
15368.25
6619.03
482.83
9704.89
3745.54
1697.10
1234.46
18070.07
1063.90


CLOSE
15401.38
6651.30
490.56
9733.02
3765.29
1701.84
1239.92
18132.42
1072.13


%CHG.
-0.32%
-0.61%
+1.08%
-0.38%
-0.25%
-0.47%
-0.44%
-0.46%
-0.06%


YTD
+17.53%
+25.34%
+8.27%
+15.27%
+24.70%
+19.33%
+21.51%
+20.92%
+26.23%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 5.90 4.02 -.07 -1.6 V A A -12.6 -22.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0-- 39.00 34.22 -.10 -0.3 V A V +1.5 -4.8 26 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 32.67 48.01 46.03 +.03 +0.1 A A A +22.5 +27.7 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 81.60 - 103.85 99.55 -1.01 -1.0 V A A +13.9 +17.8 2.21e
Bank of America BAG 8.70 15.03 14.14 -.30 -2.1 V V A +21.8 ... 25 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 9.04 -- 13.08 12.12 +.13 +1.1 A A A +6.6 +20.4 43
CenturyLink Inc CTL 31.85 0-- 42.45 32.24 -.04 -0.1 V 7 7 -17.6 -18.1 19 2.16
Citigroup C 31.88 --0- 53.56 49.57 -1.64 -3.2 V 7 A +25.3 +51.6 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -- 26.38 22.54 ... ... 7 +42.3 +56.5 81 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 --0- 67.89 64.75 -.26 -0.4 V A A +30.0 +24.9 19 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 -0- 75.46 67.73 +.37 +0.5 A A A +6.2 +10.2 20 3.12f
EPR Properties EPR 42.44 -0- 61.18 50.18 -.18 -0.4 V 7 7 +8.8 +15.7 22 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 -0-- 95.49 87.75 -.91 -1.0 7 A 7 +1.4 -0.5 9 2.52
Ford Motor F 9.71 0 17.77 17.20 -.19 -1.1 V A A +32.8 +69.9 12 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.87 --0- 24.95 24.28 +.27 +1.1 A A A +15.7 +10.4 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 58.75 -- 81.56 75.91 -1.09 -1.4 7 A 7 +22.7 +32.4 22 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 25.98 23.62 -.15 -0.6 7 A 7 +14.5 +6.4 13 0.90
IBM IBM 181.10 -0-- 215.90 190.99 +.97 +0.5 A A 7 -0.3 -6.1 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 17.16 0 32.29 31.87 -.05 -0.2 V A A +51.0 +68.9 35
Lowes Cos LOW 29.66 0 49.17 47.27 -.57 -1.2 V A A +33.1 +61.7 24 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 --- 103.70 97.28 +.38 +0.4 A A V +10.3 +7.3 18 3.24f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --0- 36.43 32.74 -.05 -0.2 V 7 7 +22.6 +7.2 13 1.12f
Motorola Solutions MSI 49.49 -- 64.72 60.37 -.02 ... A A +8.4 +23.4 17 1.24f
NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 --- 88.39 81.22 +.53 +0.7 A A V +17.4 +22.4 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 12.12 0-- 27.00 12.36 -.60 -4.6 V 7 7 -37.3 -49.8 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -- 21.09 17.66 -.12 -0.7 7 A 7 -2.2 +4.4 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 --0- 10.52 9.07 -.22 -2.4 V 7 7 +27.2 +23.6 11 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 68.77 57.84 -.63 -1.1 V A A +39.8 +9.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 81.60 -- 114.72 106.56 -.58 -0.5 V 7 A +23.6 +25.5 21 2.32f
Texas Instru TXN 26.94 0 40.94 40.47 -.05 -0.1 V A A +31.0 +43.8 25 1.20f
Time Warner TWX 42.61 66.01 63.46 -.84 -1.3 V A A +32.7 +42.9 17 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 65.85 104.38 102.45 +.78 +0.8 A A A +39.7 +51.0 19 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 -0- 54.31 47.98 +.20 +0.4 A A V +10.9 +9.6 98 2.12f
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 34.25 33.72 +.14 +0.4 A A A +33.9 +23.1 1.57e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 -- 79.96 76.42 +.59 +0.8 A A A +12.0 +3.9 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 31.88 0 56.26 56.23 +.71 +1.3 A A A +51.9 +59.4 25 1.26f
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


U"
OE]



The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
slipped to 2.70
percent on
Monday. Yields
affect interest
rates on
consumer loans.


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Oil slid to a
six-week low on
Monday, as
Syrian President
Bashar Assad
pledged to honor
an agreement to
surrender Syria's
stockpile of
chemical
weapons. Metals
fell. Crops were
mixed.


OS
E222

EDr~g


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .01 0.01 ... .10
6-month T-bill .05 0.04 +0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .10 0.10 ... .17
2-year T-note .33 0.33 .. .26
5-year T-note 1.45 1.48 -0.03 .67
10-year T-note 2.70 2.74 -0.04 1.75
30-year T-bond 3.73 3.76 -0.03 2.94


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.54 3.56 -0.02 2.64
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.14 5.14 ... 4.23
Barclays USAggregate 2.41 2.42 -0.01 1.73
Barclays US High Yield 6.02 5.99 +0.03 6.24
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.62 4.66 -0.04 3.50
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.64 1.64 ... .98
Barclays US Corp 3.34 3.36 -0.02 2.87


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 103.59
Ethanol (gal) 1.88
Heating Oil (gal) 2.96
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.60
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.62
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1326.90
Silver (oz) 21.81
Platinum (oz) 1425.90
Copper (Ib) 3.31
Palladium (oz) 716.30
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.27
Coffee (Ib) 1.17
Corn (bu) 4.53
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 355.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.26
Soybeans (bu) 13.08
Wheat (bu) 6.54


PVS.
104.67
1.86
3.00
3.69
2.68
PVS.
1332.50
21.88
1432.60
3.33
720.30
PVS.
1.26
1.15
4.51
0.83
354.20
1.26
13.15
6.46


%CHG
-1.11
-0.59
-1.60
-2.31
-2.28
%CHG
-0.42
-0.32
-0.47
-0.59
-0.56
%CHG
+0.52
+2.09
+0.50
-0.38
+0.37
+0.60
-0.57
+1.12


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.97 -.08 +14.1 +14.7 +13.3 +9.3
CaplncBuA m 56.69 -.10 +10.3 +10.6 +9.9 +6.9
CpWIdGrIA m 42.69 -.21 +16.9 +19.7 +11.3 +7.5
EurPacGrA m 46.28 -.12 +12.3 +16.9 +7.6 +6.3
FnlnvA m 48.56 -.23 +20.1 +21.1 +15.6 +9.1
GrthAmA m 42.03 -.28 +22.4 +23.4 +16.2 +9.3
IncAmerA m 19.77 -.04 +12.3 +13.1 +12.1 +8.9
InvCoAmA m 36.06 -.17 +21.0 +20.0 +15.0 +9.0
NewPerspA m 36.76 -.17 +17.6 +20.5 +13.3 +9.6
WAMutlnvA m 37.35 -.15 +21.5 +20.7 +17.2 +9.4
Dodge & Cox Income 13.56 +.01 -0.7 +0.5 +4.1 +7.2
IntlStk 41.04 -.03 +18.5 +25.2 +10.1 +7.3
Stock 152.34 -1.01 +26.1 +27.2 +18.8 +9.9
Fidelity Contra 93.51 -.64 +21.7 +18.4 +16.2 +10.5
GrowCo 119.29 -.76 +28.0 +22.3 +20.2 +13.8
LowPriStk d 46.68 -.03 +24.1 +26.3 +18.6 +13.4
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 60.58 -.29 +21.1 +19.1 +17.2 +9.8
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.35 ... +9.5 +10.7 +10.7 +10.2
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.12 -.01 +0.7 +4.7 +5.1 +9.8
GIBondAdv 13.08 -.01 +0.9 +5.0 +5.4 +10.0
Harbor Intllnstl 70.07 -.24 +12.8 +18.4 +10.5 +7.0
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 31.62 -.10 +20.6 +21.3 +16.5 +9.2
GrowStk 46.84 -.35 +24.0 +21.1 +18.4 +12.5
Vanguard 500Adml 156.82 -.74 +21.2 +19.1 +17.3 +9.9
5001lnv 156.83 -.74 +21.1 +19.0 +17.1 +9.8
MulntAdml 13.74 ... -2.3 -1.2 +3.0 +5.1
STGradeAd 10.70 +.01 +0.3 +1.1 +2.3 +4.4
Tgtet2025 15.25 -.03 +12.2 +12.8 +11.4 +8.0
TotBdAdml 10.63 +.02 -2.3 -1.8 +2.7 +5.1
Totlntl 16.25 ... +10.6 +15.8 +6.9 +5.0
TotStlAdm 43.00 -.19 +22.3 +20.9 +17.9 +10.4
TotStldx 42.98 -.20 +22.2 +20.7 +17.7 +10.3
Welltn 37.85 -.10 +13.3 +13.8 +12.2 +9.4
WelltnAdm 65.38 -.17 +13.3 +13.9 +12.3 +9.5
WndsllAdm 62.25 -.30 +20.7 +20.7 +17.4 +9.6
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks ended lower on Monday
amid growing unease about the
strength of the economy and a
brewing budget and debt show-
down in Washington. The feder-
al government's debt ceiling
must be raised by Oct. 1 to
avoid a partial government
shutdown.

Citigroup C
Close:$49.57V-1.64 or -3.2%
There was heavy trading volume af-
ter the Financial Times reported the
bank experienced a drop in bond-
trading revenue.



4 J A S
52-week range
$31.88 $53.56
Vol.:34.4m (1.4x avg.) PE: 15.7
Mkt. Cap: $150.74 b Yield: 0.1%
Pandora P
Close:$24.26V-2.73 or -10.1%
The Internet radio company was
feeling a lot of pressure from Apple,
which introduced a competing ser-
vice called iRadio.

13O
$30 T ----- | ---- | ---


SJ A S
52-week range
$7.08 $27.50


Vol.: 35.6m (3.7x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $4.28 b


PE:...
Yield:...


J.C. Penney JCP
Close:$12.36V-0.60 or -4.6%
CNBC reported that the retailer has
met with banks over the past several
weeks to determine how it can raise
more money.

I-
I-I
J A S
52-week range
$12.12 $27.00
Vol.:24.5m (1.3x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $2.73 b Yield:...
Walgreen WAG
Close: $56.23A0.71 or 1.3%
The drugstore announced it will shift
more responsibility for insurance to
employees, and Morgan Stanley up-
graded the stock.





52-week range
$31.88 $56.84
Vol.:9.4m (1.7x avg.) PE:24.9
Mkt. Cap:$53.14 b Yield: 2.2%
Sealed Air SEE
Close:$27.01 V-1.55 or -5.4%
The food safety company and maker
of Bubble Wrap was downgraded to
"Equal Weight" from "Overweight" at
Barclays.





52-week range
$15.10 $31.20
Vol.:7.5m (3.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $5.29 b Yield: 1.9%


Stocks fall on concern


about economy, budget fight


Associated Press

NEW YORK Con-
cerns about the strength of
the economy and the po-
tential for a budget fight in
Washington pushed down
the stock market Monday
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average and the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
fell for a third straight day
Investors initially
cheered the Federal Re-
serve's decision last
Wednesday to keep its
huge stimulus program in
place. But they've since fo-
cused on the central
bank's gloomier outlook
for growth.
William Dudley, the
President of the Fed's
New York Branch said
Monday that while the
economy was improving,
"the headwinds" created
by the financial crisis were
only easing slowly
"At first blush (the stim-
ulus) looks positive," said
Kate Warne, an investment
strategist at Edward Jones,
a financial advisor "But at


second blush, it says con-
ditions weren't as strong as
we were previously think-
ing. Markets are now re-
sponding to that."
The Dow jumped 147
points last Wednesday to
close at an all-time high.
But the gain from that rally
has been erased.
On Monday, the S&P 500
index dropped 8.07 points,
or 0.5 percent, to close at
1,701.84. The index was
fractionally lower than its
level before the Fed's de-
cision last Wednesday
The Dow fell 49.71
points, or 0.3 percent, to
15,401.38 The Nasdaq com-
posite fell 9.44 points, or
0.3 percent, to 3,765.29.
Financial stocks fell the
most among the 10 indus-
trial groups in the S&P 500
index. Investors sold fi-
nancial stocks on concerns
that their earnings would
be hurt by lower trading
volumes of bonds and for-
eign currencies.
Citigroup fell $1.64, or 3
percent, to $49.57 after the
Financial Times reported


that the bank had suffered
a "significant decline" in
trading revenues that
would crimp its earnings.
Goldman Sachs, which
began trading on the Dow
Monday, also fell. The
stock slipped $4.50, or 3
percent, to $165.20.
Utilities were the best
performing industry group
in the S&P 500 index, as
investors sought less risky
places to put their money
The threat of a looming
political showdown over
the budget also weighed
on investors.
The U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives voted to de-
fund President Barack
Obama's health care law on
Friday, a gesture that re-
minded Wall Street that the
Republican-led House and
the Democratic-controlled
Senate are poised for a
showdown over spending.
The debt ceiling must be
raised by Oct. 1 to avoid a
government shutdown,
and a potential default on
payments, including debt,
later in the month.


BlackBerry agrees to $4.7 billion sale


Associated Press

TORONTO Black-
Berry has agreed to sell it-
self for $4.7 billion to a
group led by largest share-
holder, Fairfax Financial
Holdings Ltd.
BlackBerry said Monday
that a letter of intent has
been signed and its share-
holders will receive $9 in
cash for each share.
Fairfax head, Prem
Watsa, a former board
member, owns 10 percent of
BlackBerry Watsa stepped
down last month when
BlackBerry announced it
was considering a sale.
Watsa is one of Canada's
best-known value in-
vestors and the billionaire
founder of Fairfax Finan-
cial Holdings Ltd. He has
been compared to Warren
Buffett because of his in-
vesting approach. Black-
Berry founder Mike
Lazaridis recruited Watsa
to join the company's
board when Lazaridis and


Associated Press
Thorsten Heins introduces the BlackBerry ZIO in January
in Toronto. Fairfax Financial Holdings has offered to buy
BlackBerry Monday in a deal that values the Canadian
smartphone company at about US$4.7 billion.


Jim Balsillie stepped
aside as its co-CEOs in
January 2012.
Trading of the com-
pany's stock was halted
ahead of the news. Black-
Berry shares plunged
after the company an-
nounced Friday a loss of


nearly $1 billion and lay-
offs of 4,500 workers.
The BlackBerry, pio-
neered in 1999, was once
the dominant smartphone
for on-the-go business peo-
ple and other consumers
before Apple's iPhone de-
buted in 2007.


iPhone sales off
to fast start
SAN FRANCISCO -
Apple Inc. said Monday that it
sold 9 million units of its top-
of-the-line iPhone 5S and
less-expensive iPhone 5C
during their first three days on
sale. That trounced the per-
formance of last year's model,
the iPhone 5, which sold 5
million units in its opening
weekend.
The iPhone 5S and 5C's
quick start also surpassed ana-
lyst forecasts that predicted
Apple would sell somewhere




CAUTERO
Continued from PageA1

Development Council.
"Those are my regrets,"
he said, especially citing
the 491 corridor "I will not
be able to see it finished,
but I'm glad I had a chance
to work on it."
As for the hurdles facing
his successor?
"I think the biggest chal-
lenge will be continuing to
bridge the gap between
trying to preserve what
people have come to ex-
pect in the county, not


from 6 million to 8 million mod-
els during the first weekend.
Long, strange trip
ending for VW van
SAO PAULO --The long,
strange trip of the Volkswagen
van is ending.
Brazil is the last place in
the world still producing the
iconic vehicle, or "bus" as it's
known by aficionados, but
VW says production will end
Dec. 31. Safety regulations
mandate that every vehicle in
Brazil must have air bags and
anti-lock braking systems
starting in 2014, and the com-


urban, not rural," he said.
"It's to balance rural with
growth and development
and making it possible for
more businesses to come
and take the tax burden off
residents."
He also noted the con-
tinuing challenge of bal-
ancing environmental
protection of sensitive
areas with development
for public use such as
Three Sisters Springs.
As for adjusting to his
new position, Cautero has
about 15 years working in
that part of state and is
used to the more metro-
politan surroundings. He


pany said it cannot change
production to meet the law.
Although output will halt in
Brazil, there should be plenty
of VW vans rolling along for
decades if only because there
are so many, and they are so
durable. VW produced more
than 10 million Volkswagen
Transporter vans globally
since the model was intro-
duced 63 years ago in Ger-
many, though not all resemble
the classic hippie machine.
More than 1.5 million have
been produced in Brazil since
1957.
-From wire reports


said the city of 155,000 is
the largest in Southwest
Florida.
His immediate chal-
lenges there will include a
development review
process, defining relation-
ships the department has
with other agencies and
developing a sign code.
Cape Coral spokesper-
son Connie Barron con-
firmed Cautero will start
Oct. 22 as the city's director
of community development
as a salary of $122,000.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


Business HIGHLIGHTS


s Crystal River

rating 12 Years


PA rg Tues. Sp L24th OniL



I b.. Seec











bmclu'Af profits a Soiwi et bi One DaD
&Y U 9 tmiWermary Steak Speci w m benefit
30 w-- 4Co1nmunlg Fbod Bank of Citrus Count.
Offer good Tuis. 9/24/13 at Crystal River location only.


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 A9


1% -






Page A10 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013



PINION


"People who enjoy meetings should not
be in charge of anything."
Thomas Sowell


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................citizen m em ber
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


M ICROMANAGED




Reorganization



plan runs into



opposition


he recent vote on
county staff reorganiza-
tion is a clear reflec-
tion of the change of tone
within the commission that
has occurred in the past year
and half
In early 2012, County Ad-


ministrator Brad
Thorpe presented
the county com-
mission a reor-
ganization plan
that replaced for-
mer assistant
county adminis-
trator Eber Brown
by reassigning his
duties to two de-
partment man-
agers, naming
them assistant
county adminis-
trators and giving
them raises, but


THE IS
Split com
vote
county
reorgan

OUR OF
A neg
comme
relatior
within c
govern


still paying them less than the
departing assistant adminis-
trator The proposal passed
on a unanimous vote.
Earlier this month, after
the departure of one of the
two assistant county adminis-
trators, Thorpe presented the
commission with a plan that
would appoint the other one
as the sole assistant county
administrator and promote
two others to department
managers. The proposal
passed on a split 3-2 vote after
considerable discussion.
In the first reorganization,
the commission took the posi-
tion that the administrator
should structure the county
organization in a way he or
she believes is most efficient,
and they approved the
changes with little discussion.
In the second, despite the
initial comment by the chair
along the same lines, that the
role of the commission was


Regular lights in rain
I was calling about the article
on the fickle weather and how
people should drive
with their lights on dur-
ing heavy rain and not '
their hazard lights dur-
ing inclement weather.u
I'd just like to say that I
am very pleased to see
that you are printing
that because there are
way too many people
driving with their haz- CALL
ard lights on out there. ;9Q


Help tortoises


I

(


tuUU-k


Our turtles. You people with
automobiles: Do not try to
straddle a turtle in the road.
Slow down and go around him,
because these new cars are too
low and all you do is mash them
into the pavement. So slow
down and go around them.
Just wondering...
I just want to know, why is it
we can keep strip clubs out of
our small little nice little com-
munities but we can't keep
stores that sell dangerous drugs
out of our communities? Seems
like even the strip clubs would
be better than they are ... I just
wonder why.
Left-lane lesson
It completely escapes me as
to why and how many people


not to micromanage specific
administrative decisions,
there was considerable dis-
cussion about duties and
salaries. The discussion in-
cluded public questions
about salaries and raises, and
in the end two commissioners
voted against ap-
proving the
ISUE: organization.
mission Both of these re-
nssion organizations
staff were advertised
ization. as increasing or-
ganizational effi-
lNION:N ciency, and
|NON incidentally sav-
ative ing money Both
ent on created a shift in
ships organizational du-
county ties that led to
ment. changes in pay
grades, and while
savings were men-
tioned as part of the dialogue,
neither was justified solely on
monetary savings.
The organization of county
government should reflect
the needs of the time and the
capabilities of those in the or-
ganization, and it is reason-
able for the needs and
capabilities to change when
people join or leave the or-
ganization. The appropriate
role of the administrator is to
adjust his or her organization
accordingly
It is a negative comment on
the relationships within
county government when dis-
cussion of organizational
changes focuses more on
whether individual employ-
ees may or may not receive
increases in pay and whether
relatively minor savings will
be achieved rather than on
whether this organization
will best meet the needs of
the citizens of the county.


think they have the right to drive
in the left-hand lane. The left-
hand lane is described in the
state statute as a passing lane.
Regardless of what
JND speed you're driving in
the left-hand lane, if a
OFF car comes up behind
b you, you are required to
move over and let him
pass you legally. Some
of you people ought to
S t Vtake the AARP driver
fe# training course and
wake up.
)579 It's surprising how
many people don't
know what lane to drive
in when you're on a three-lane
road. Normal traffic is supposed
to be in the center lane. The left-
hand outside lane is passing.
Come on, people. Do your
homework.
Shade for your dog
This call is in regard to this
hot summer heat and the ani-
mals that are left out in it. I had
to call Animal Control the other
day as I was driving through my
neighborhood I saw a dog out-
side with no shelter. It was very
hot that day 93 degrees. Ani-
mal Control came out and made
them put some shade up for
this poor animal. If you're going
to have a dog, have him inside,
please. This weather is horrible
right now.


Water quality at Hunter's Spring


Editor's note: This f
is the second of three
guest columns by
Commissioner Den-
nis Damato that pro-
vide an update on .
current projects to
protect Citrus
County's water qual-
ity and supply. The
columns are part of Dennis
the Chronicle's Save GUI
Our Waters Week COL
coverage.
An important
initiative for Citrus
County is the Hunter's
Spring water quality improve-
ment project
About two years ago, State
Sen. Charles Dean challenged a
group of us to formulate a local
water quality project that could
be supported by funding from
the Southwest Florida Water
Management District's seven
volunteer basin boards that
were disbanded in 2011 on the
orders of Gov Rick Scott.
A local project proposal was
formulated, which was further
defined by our county staff to
recapture the funding from the
disbanded basin boards. The
total project cost is estimated to
be $350,000.
Citrus County has requested
funding assistance in the
amount of $175,000 from the
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District through the
District Cooperative Funding
Initiative. The application was
approved for funding and the
county anticipates execution of
the funding contract and start
of the project design very soon.
The scope of this project is to
expand the collection and treat-
ment of stormwater runoff from
U.S. 19 and nearby existing res-
idential and commercial devel-


[
E
1


opments before it en-
ters Hunter's Spring.
; Keep in mind, un-
treated stormwater
runoff contains de-
bris, chemicals, sedi-
ment and pollutants
that adversely affect
water quality if dis-
charged directly into
Damato our local waterways.
EST This scenario was
UN exposed to our com-
JMN munity in a recent
Chronicle article en-
titled ,"The bay is less fresh."
The Hunter's Spring Water
Quality Improvement Project is
an important first step in the re-
mediation of this existing
deficiency
On July 23, the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
voted unanimously to purchase
three vacant lots to expand the
existing water quality treatment
area at the intersection of
Northeast Second Street and
Northeast Third Avenue in
Crystal River This expanded
treatment area will result in a
40 percent increase in the avail-
able treatment pond volume.
Treated stormwater flows
from the expanded treatment
pond will flow over a discharge
structure and into a culvert that
discharges into the Hunter's
Spring area of Crystal River
Redirecting untreated
stormwater from existing de-
velopments to new treatment
systems is one way to improve
the water quality of our surface
waters, which are important en-
vironmental and recreational
resources for Citrus County
This project, along with the
drainage improvements on the
Cutler Spur roadway project,
which is currently under con-
struction, and the water quality


projects at the Three Sisters
Springs property, will treat
stormwater from a basin of
more than 100 acres by improv-
ing water quality before it en-
ters Crystal River waterways.
These projects, along with
the potential of sediment re-
moval similar to the Chassa-
howitzka Springs Remediation
Project currently being per-
formed by the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District, should be viewed as
the model for the cleanup of
our local waterways:
Store and treat stormwater
before it enters our local
waterways.
Remove exotic vegetative
species like lyngbya with asso-
ciated water quality monitoring.
Remove sediment where
necessary from waterways.
Replant with proper
vegetation.
Restoration of waterways
through the use of accepted
best management practices.
Monitor and record the re-
sults of these coordinated
efforts.
Citrus County residents are
strongly urged to support this
water enhancement project
and the model proposed for the
cleanup and restoration of our
local waterways.

Dennis Damato has resided in
Citrus County for more than
four decades and is in his third
term as the District 1 Citrus
County Commissioner He also
chairs the Withlachoochee Re-
gional Planning Council and
the Withlachoochee Regional
WaterAuthority and serves as
the liaison to the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District


SLETTER jto the Editor


Time for everyone to
support Obamacare
When thinking of the opera-
tion of the United States
House of Representatives, I
am reminded of my toddler
grandchild when he throws a
temper tantrum. When told by
his parents it is time to do
something that he does not
want to do, my grandchild
shouts gibberish, runs in cir-
cles, kicks furniture, throws
toys and pounds the floor
House Republican represen-
tatives have engaged in temper
tantrums 42 times by voting to
repeal Obamacare.
Congressman Nugent and his
Republican colleagues, led by
the know-nothing tea party an-
archists, are performing the fig-
urative equivalent of shouting
gibberish, running in circles,
kicking furniture, throwing toys
and pounding the floor
Grow up and accept that the
Affordable Care Act is the law!
Obamacare has been the law
for more than three years.
The ACA has been deemed
constitutional by the Supreme
Court.
In 2012, the people of the
United States reaffirmed their
approval of Obamacare in the
Presidential, Senatorial and
Congressional elections.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Please be reminded that the
only branch that the Republi-
can Party controls is the
House of Representatives,
which is a perversion of our
election process, as House De-


mocrat candidates received
nearly 2 million more votes na-
tionally than the Republican
candidates.
Examples of Obamacare suc-
cess already abound, and are
readily found with the most
basic Google search.
Likewise, most lies, distor-
tions, and misrepresentations
of Obamacare are also readily
dispelled through meager re-
search of non-ideological infor-
mation sources.
As a conservative commenta-
tor previously reported follow-
ing the 2012 presidential
election, "Republicans have
been fleeced and exploited,
and lied to by a conservative
entertainment complex."
The national deficit is drop-
ping at a record pace, prima-
rily due to increased revenues.
Stop damaging the economy!
End the sequester!
Raise the debt limit to pay
our bills!
Extend the budget authoriza-
tions at current levels (minus
sequester) in order to negoti-
ate with Democrats and the
president in good faith!
Compromise!
Stop throwing temper
tantrums!
William Bandhauer
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 All


BRIDGES
Continued from Page Al

and a Greyhound bus to
fall 150 feet into the water,
killing 35 people.
Even so, Florida's
bridges continue to be
among the sturdiest in the
nation, according to AP's
findings.
Information from the
Florida Department of
Transportation shows that
of the 6,661 bridges it main-
tains (plus 2,496 bridges
owned by local municipali-
ties that the agency in-
spected in 2012), only 17
were found to have "struc-
tural deficiencies" and two
are "fracture critical," both
in the Miami area.
The term "structurally
deficient" means the
bridge is in need of reha-
bilitation or replacement
because at least one major
component is deemed in
"poor" or "worse" condi-
tion. "Fracture critical"
refers to bridges without
redundant protections and
is at risk of collapse if any


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
More than 11,000 vehicles every day traverse the bridge over the Withlacoochee River
at the Marion County border.


one, vital component fails.
Neither category indi-
cates imminent danger of
collapse, but either rating
is a sign of risk.
Wondering about the
condition of the bridges
you normally travel
across? Of the 41 identi-
fied bridges in Citrus
County, here are the re-
sults of how some of them
fared in the study:
Best: Pistol Point Canal
on County Road 39 built in
1945 the highest rated
bridge with a 100 *health
index rating and 98.2


**sufficiency rating.
Oldest/Worst: U.S. 41
Florida Nature Trail north
of Inverness Middle School
built in 1925, rebuilt in
1950 39 sufficiency rat-
ing, 90.50 health index.
Iconic/Picturesque:
State Road 200 bridge at
the Citrus-Marion County
line over the Withla-
coochee River built in
1935. An estimated 11,300
vehicles travel across it
daily; 65 sufficiency rating,
88.31 health index.
Newest U.S. 19 Cross
Florida Barge Canal built


in 2011, traveled by 4,300 ve-
hicles daily; 99.3 sufficiency
rating, 99.84 health index.
Busiest: Brittan Alexan-
der bridge on U.S. 41 that
crosses over the Withla-
coochee River in Dunnel-
lon, built in 1987; 85
sufficiency rating, 95.50
health index.
Least-Traveled: East
Hampton Point Road
canal bridge built in 1980.
Only five vehicles travel
this bridge daily; 94 suffi-
ciency rating, 41.50 health
index.
Good Fishing Spot:


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County Road 470 (Gospel
Island Road) over Tsala
Apopka Lake in Inverness,
built in 1961. In addition to
dozens of people fishing
from this bridge each day,
5,450 vehicles travel over
it; 71.7 sufficiency rating,
98.39 health index.
Best for Spotting
Manatees:
County Road 490A over
Halls River, built in 1954 -
43.6 sufficiency rating,
84.14 health index;
Fish Bowl Drive over
Homosassa River, built in
1973 66.3 sufficiency rat-
ing, 98.36 health index;
King's Bay Drive over
Spring Run Canal, built in
1991 97.8 sufficiency rat-
ing, 85.47 health index.
*Health Index measures
the overall condition of a
bridge and typically in-
cludes between 10 to12 dif-
ferent areas of evaluation. A
lower health index means
more work is required to
bring the bridge to an ideal
condition. A health index
below 85 generally indi-
cates that some repairs are
needed but not necessarily


that it is unsafe. A low
health index may indicate
that it would be more eco-
nomical to replace the
bridge than to repair it
"Sufficiency Rating is
the overall rating of a
bridge's fitness for the duty
that it performs based on
such factors as: structural
evaluation, functional obso-
lescence and its essentiality
to the public. A low suffi-
ciency rating may be due to
structural defects, narrow
lanes, low vertical clear-
ance, or any of many possi-
ble issues information
from the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation.








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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


oiBRIEFS Illegal immigration rising again
tKE n..... Ea...J


I1E^W lust


LOssevatore Romano/
Associated Press
Pope Francis wears a
coal miner's helmet he
was given Sunday by a
miner during his visit to
the island of Sardinia, in
Cagliari, Italy. Pope Fran-
cis traveled to one of
Italy's poorest regions to
offer hope to the unem-
ployed and entrepreneurs
struggling to hang on.


Greek police
replaced in
far-right probe
ATHENS, Greece Five
senior police officers in
Greece were replaced Mon-
day after the government
ordered urgent inquiries into
alleged links between the
far-right Golden Dawn party
and the country's police and
military.
The Public Order Ministry
said the heads of the po-
lice's special forces, internal
security, organized crime,
firearms and explosives,
and a rapid-response mo-
torcycle division had been
moved to other posts pend-
ing an investigation into
weekend reports in the
Greek media that police
provided the party with as-
sistance in alleged criminal
activity.
Golden Dawn won nearly
7 percent of the vote in gen-
eral elections last year, but
is currently the subject of a
criminal investigation follow-
ing the murder last week of
an anti-fascist rapper.
Muslim
Brotherhood
banned by court
CAIRO -An Egyptian
court on Monday ordered
the banning of the Muslim
Brotherhood and the confis-
cation of its assets, opening
the door for authorities to
dramatically accelerate a
crackdown on the extensive
network of schools, hospi-
tals, charities and other so-
cial institutions that was the
foundation of the group's
political power.
Security forces have al-
ready been moving against
the Brotherhood's social net-
works, raiding schools and
hospitals run by the group
since the military's July 3
ouster of Islamist President
Mohammed Morsi.
The sweep points to the
ambitions of Egypt's new
leaders to go beyond the
arrests of top Brotherhood
figures to strike a long-term,
even mortal, blow to the
group by hitting the pillars of
its grassroots organization.
Doing so could cripple the
group's political prospects
far into the future.
Police held in
Mexico City mass
kidnap, murder
MEXICO CITY-- Mexico
City officials say two more
police officers have been
arrested in connection with
the May kidnapping and
killing of 12 young people
from an after-hours bar in
the capital.
There are now three po-
lice officers in total among
the 15 arrested in connection
with the crime, which author-
ities have linked to rivalry be-
tween two gangs over the
rights to sell drugs in bars
and nightclubs in some up-
scale neighborhoods.
Officials say the mass
slaying was revenge for one
gang's killing of a dealer be-
longing to another gang.
From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
number of immigrants
crossing the border illegally
into the U.S. appears to be
on the rise again after drop-
ping during the recession.
The total number of im-
migrants living in this
country unlawfully edged
up from 11.3 million in
2009 to 11.7 million last
year, with those from coun-
tries other than Mexico at
an apparent all-time high,
according to a report re-
leased Monday by the Pew
Research Center's His-
panic Trends Project.
The change is within the
margin of error, and there
will be a more precise cen-
sus measure released later
this year Still, based in
part on other factors such


Associated Press


NAIROBI, Kenya Kenyan se-
curity forces battled al-Qaida-
linked terrorists in an upscale mall
for a third day Monday in what they
said was a final push to rescue the
last few hostages in a siege that has
left at least 62 people dead.
While the government an-
nounced Sunday that "most"
hostages had been released, a se-
curity expert with contacts inside
the mall said at least 10 were still
being held by a band of attackers
described as "a multinational col-
lection from all over the world."
The expert, who insisted on
anonymity to talk freely about the
situation, said many hostages had
been freed or escaped in the pre-
vious 24-36 hours, including some
who were in hiding.
However, there were at least 30
hostages when the assault by al-
Shabab militants began Saturday
he said, and "it's clear" that
Kenyan security officials "haven't
cleared the building fully"
Flames and dark plumes of
smoke rose Monday above the
Westgate shopping complex for
more than an hour after four large
explosions rocked the surround-
ing neighborhood. The smoke was
pouring through a large skylight
inside the mall's main department


Illegal immigration
A preliminary analysis of
census data suggests the
number of people living
illegally in the U.S. grew
slightly last year but re-
mains off its 2007 peak:
15 m million .. .... .... .... .... ...... .... ..
2007:
12.2 million *...s
10............I
S2012:
11.7 million
5 ............ ............. n.. ill.o.
0.
'95 '00 '05 '10

SOURCE. Pew Research Ctr. AP
as increased U.S. border
apprehensions, the sharp
decline in illegal immigra-
tion from 2007-2009 has
clearly bottomed out, with
signs the numbers are now


rising, Pew said.
Pew said that among the
six states with the largest
numbers of immigrants
here illegally, only Texas
had a consistent increase
in illegal immigration
from 2007 to 2011, due in
part to its stronger econ-
omy Its number was un-
changed from 2011 to 2012.
Two states Florida and
New Jersey had an ini-
tial drop but then in-
creases during the same
2007-2011 period. Three
states California, Illi-
nois and New York -
showed only declines.
'As a whole, with the re-
cession ending, the de-
crease in illegal
immigration has stopped,"
said Jeffrey Passel, a sen-
ior demographer at Pew
Passel noted that histor-


ically, the level of illegal
immigration has been
closely tied to the strength
of the U.S. economy and
availability of jobs. Since
2009, the average U.S. un-
employment rate has
dropped from 9.3 percent
to 8.1 percent last year,
with signs of strength in
the construction industry,
which yields jobs gener-
ally attractive to newly ar-
rived Latino immigrants.
The Pew analysis is
based on census data
through March 2012. Be-
cause the Census Bureau
does not ask people about
their immigration status,
the estimate on illegal im-
migrants is derived largely
by subtracting the esti-
mated legal immigrant
population from the total
foreign-born population.


Joseph Ole Lenku said the evacu-
ation of hostages had gone "very,
very well" and that Kenyan offi-
cials were "very certain" that few
if any hostages were left in the
building.
But with the mall cordoned off
and under heavy security it was
not possible to independently ver-
ify the assertions. Similar claims
of a quick resolution were made
by Kenyan officials on Sunday
and the siege continued. Authori-
ties have also not provided any
details on how many hostages
were freed or how many still re-
main captive.
Three attackers were killed in
the fighting Monday, Kenyan au-
thorities said, and more than 10
suspects arrested. Eleven Kenyan
soldiers were wounded in the
running gun battles.
Somalia's al-Qaida-linked rebel
group, al-Shabab, which claimed
responsibility for the attack, said
the hostage-takers were well-
armed and ready to take on the
Kenyan forces.
An al-Shabab spokesman,
Sheik Ali Mohamud Rage, said in
an audio file posted on a militant
website that the attackers had
been ordered to "take punitive
action against the hostages" if
force was used to try to rescue
them.


Vv


IL
-rI


People donate blood Monday in
Uhuru Park in Nairobi, Kenya, for
people injured in the attack at the
Westgate Mall.
and grocery store, where mat-
tresses and other flammable
goods appeared to have been set
on fire, a person with knowledge
of the rescue operation told The
Associated Press.
The explosions were followed
by volleys of gunfire as police hel-
icopters and a military jet circled
overhead, giving the neighbor-
hood the feel of a war zone.
By evening, Kenyan security of-
ficials claimed the upper hand.
"Taken control of all the floors.
We're not here to feed the attack-
ers with pastries but to finish and
punish them," Police Inspector
General David Kimaiyo said on
Twitter
Kenya's Interior Minister


GOP


offers


smaller


budget


cuts

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
House Republicans are
far less ambitious this
week in their demands
for spending cuts to
erase new debt issued to
pay the government's
bills than they were dur-
ing a budget battle two
years ago.
The list of cuts under
consideration now tallies
up to a fraction of the al-
most $1 trillion in addi-
tional borrowing that
would be permitted
under a GOP proposal for
enabling the government
to pay its bills through
December of next year
Two years ago, House
Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, insisted on
spending cuts totaling
$2.1 trillion over a
decade as the price to
meet President Barack
Obama's demand for a
like-sized increase in the
government's borrowing
cap, also known as the
debt ceiling.
Those cuts involved
tighter "caps" on agency
operating budgets, as
well as the automatic,
across-the-board cuts
known as sequestration
triggered by the failure
of a deficit "supercom-
mittee" to reach a deal.
The problem now is
that there isn't a roster of
big, politically palatable
cuts ready to go. Instead,
Republicans have put to-
gether a grab bag of
smaller savings ideas,
like higher pension con-
tributions for federal
workers, higher premi-
ums for upper-income
Medicare beneficiaries,
caps on medical malprac-
tice verdicts and reduced
payments to hospitals
that treat more poor peo-
ple than average.
A leading set of pro-
posals comes from a
House GOP leadership
office and was circulat-
ing on Washington's K
Street lobbying corridor
on Monday It includes a
plan to increase pension
contributions of federal
civilian workers by up to
5 percentage points and
lowering the federal
match accordingly, which
could help defray the
deficit by up to $84 bil-
lion over a decade. An-
other, to block
immigrants in the coun-
try illegally from claim-
ing the child tax credit
would save just $7 billion
over the same period.
Eliminating the Social
Services Block Grant, a
flexible funding stream
for states to help with day
care, Meals on Wheels,
and drug treatment facil-
ities, would save less
than $2 billion a year
Taken together, these
proposals and others
could cut spending by
perhaps $200 billion
over the coming decade.
While GOP aides say de-
tails aren't set, House
leaders are looking at an
increase in the current
$16.7 trillion debt ceiling
sufficient to cover the
government's bills until
the beginning of 2015.
According to calcula-
tions by the Bipartisan
Policy Center think tank
in Washington, that
would require raising
the borrowing cap by al-
most $1 trillion.
Boehner insists that
any increase in the bor-


rowing cap be matched
by budget cuts and other
reforms to produce sav-
ings of an equal amount,
though not on a dollar-
for-dollar basis over 10
years like in 2011.


Battle rages in Kenya


Associated Press
Heavy smoke rises Monday from the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Multiple large blasts rocked the mall
where a hostage siege was in its third day. Security forces were attempting to rescue an unknown number
of hostages inside the mall held by al-Qaida-linked terrorists.

Securityforcesprepforfinalpush to clear out terrorists


= k Z W-










SPORTS


* Murphy
ready for
his shot
as Florida
QB./B4


0 Baseball/B2
0 Sports soundoff/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Football/B3, B4
0 Volleyball/B3
0 Lottery, TV/B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Rays finish off four-game sweep of Orioles


Loney delivers

walk-offhomer

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Wil
Myers tied it with a two-run sin-
gle on a jarring play in the sev-
enth inning then pinch-hitter
James Loney stunned the Orioles
with a leadoff homer in the ninth,
and the Tampa Bay Rays com-
pleted a four-game sweep that
put a serious damper in Balti-
more's wild-card hopes with a 5-4
victory Monday
The Orioles also lost All-Star
third baseman Manny Machado
to a leg injury in the top of the
seventh. Machado's left leg buck-
led when he stepped on first base


running out an infield single. He
was taken off on a stretcher
The win pushed the Rays a full
game ahead of idle Cleveland for
the top AL wild card. Baltimore
fell five games back of the Indi-
ans with six games to go for both
teams.
With the bases loaded, two outs
and trailing 4-2 in the seventh,
Myers, a rookie, sent a flare be-
hind second base. Second base-
man Alexi Casilla, who entered
the game in the eighth, made a
fully extended diving catch but
he collided with Nick Markakis,
racing in toward the ball from
right field. The ball came loose
and two runs scored.
Casilla was shaken up on the
play, but remained in the game.
However, he left one inning later
Hitting for Sean Rodriguez,
Loney lined an 0-1 pitch from


Tommy Hunter (6-5) down the
right field line.
Joel Peralta (3-8) pitched a per-
fect ninth for the Rays.
Chris Davis hit his major
league-best 52nd homer for
Baltimore.
Tim Beckham, taken first over-
all in the 2008 draft, put the Rays
up 1-0 on a sacrifice fly in the sec-
ond. It was the rookie's first major
league RBI.
Chris Archer gave up four runs
and five hits in 4 1/3 innings. Bal-
timore left-hander Wei-Yin Chen
also went 4 1/3 innings, allowing
two runs and six hits.
Going back to the final 11 in-
nings of the Orioles' 5-4,18-inning
loss to the Rays Friday night Bal-
timore had just two runs and
10 hits over 32 innings before get-
ting three runs on four hits in the
fourth.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's James Loney, right, greets teammates Yunel Escobar,
left, and Luke Scott, second from left, after hitting a ninth-
inning, game-winning home run Monday off Baltimore relief pitcher
Tommy Hunter, right rear, in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 5-4.


Settin the


Phillips of Crystal River

leads county in assists
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
Patience has paid dividends for Aspen
Phillips.
The senior setter at Crystal River High
School has finally emerged, not just in a start-
ing role for the Pirates, but as a standout
player on a team in the midst of another dis-
trict title race. Phillips was good enough to
start on nearly any team last
season; the problem was, Crys-
tal River had two very strong IV
senior setters in Sabrina Scott
and Kylie Sisk. That left an all-
Phillips as the odd man out. good p
"Last year, we had the two
senior setters," Pirates coach
Mike Ridley said. "But Asp
(Phillips) had a tremendous at- CrystalI
titude. She would play when- voile
ever I asked her to. She loves
the game and it shows. I can't say enough good
4 Q)things about her"
4 bBut with Phillips, it isn't just attitude. Her
setting skills have been outstanding on a team
that is tied for the top spot in District 5A-6
with a 2-1 mark. Her 333 assists to kills is best
in the county, an average of 23.8 per match.
"I've really focused on my sets," Phillips
said. 'And I've had people help me."
That meant her coaches, including those
with her travel teams, something she's been
involved in for four years.
"I want to be an all-around good player,"
Phillips added.


pace

Crystal River lost eight seniors from last
year's team, leaving quite a vacuum to fill. Al-
though Phillips' was a part-time player last
year, she has accepted her new status and
emerged as a team leader
"If you want to talk about the heart and soul
of the team, she's it," Ridley said. "Her leader-
ship has been tremendous, and she's taken on
the role as the team's primary setter"
These aren't easy positions to assume. They
require equal attention Phillips must use
her physical skills on the court and her strong
attitude, on and off it
"I try to trust all my teammates, we have to
work together," she said. "When we lose a


rant to be
*around
ayer.
pen Phillips
River High School
yball senior setter.


point, we need to shake it off,
put it in the past and focus on
the next one."
If her Crystal River team has
displayed anything, it's re-
silience. Gone from last year's
powerhouse the Pirates
were 21-7 overall and were dis-
trict champions, posting a 9-1
mark is Casidy Newcomer, a
formidable power as an outside
hitter who was the Chronicle's


player of the year Replacing her hasn't been
easy The Pirates have been developing their
hitters, but as Ridley noted, "Our hitting is
coming along, but it hasn't gotten there yet."
This means keeping the ball in play, some-
thing else Phillips has shown a prowess in. On
a team noted for defense, she's second in digs
with 147, averaging 10.5 per match.
"She's much better at everything," Ridley
said of his rising star "She's really worked on
her skills."
Crystal River's success may depend on how
quickly her teammates' skills develop.
Phillips will certainly be there to assist


High School Volleyball NOTEBOOK


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Aspen Phillips of Crystal River sets the ball up for a teammate
during recent action. The senior setter for the Pirates has
flourished in the starting role this season.


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
It's no secret: In volleyball,
power is prevalent. Strong
passing and defense is al-
ways a great benefit, but hav-
ing someone on the front row
- or, better yet, two or three
people who can put a kill
down and provide shot-alter-
ing blocking on defense will
be decisive.
The county's three 5A-6
teams should all remain in
the district title mix, and all
three have players with po-
tential to provide the above-
mentioned skills. Citrus has
Amy Abramowich, while
Lecanto has Annalee Garcia
and Crystal River has Olivia
Hudson. They are their re-
spective teams' first choices.
But for these teams to ad-


vance, one won't be enough.
They must develop second
and even third options.
For Citrus, that means
players like Jordan Josey and
Kendra Kirby Setter Kelly
Abramowich can put shots
down too, and when she sets
to her sister it's a danger to
opponents. Both Josey and
Kirby could be difference-
makers down the stretch.
At Lecanto, Garcia, to-
gether with Shannon Fernan-
dez and Olivia Grey, can
cause problems for any de-
fense. Add someone like Mor-
gan Christian into that mix
and the chances for success
on a kill opportunity multiply
Hudson may be Crystal
River's most consistent
threat, but other options exist
in Marissa Pool and Cassidy
Wardlow. Consistency is all


that's lacking in their game; if
Kaylan Simms and Allie
Whited continue to con-
tribute, the Pirates will be
dangerous.
On target
Seven Rivers Christian is
off to a superb start, with 11
wins in its first 14 matches
and with the best record
against county foes. Problem
is, the Warriors are in 2A-3 -
and so is Gainesville Corner-
stone, a team that advanced
to the 2A quarterfinals in
each of the last two seasons
and seems capable of doing
the same this year One of
Seven Rivers' three losses
was at Cornerstone.
With Alexis Zachar and
Alyssa Gage, Seven Rivers
has front-row power and
See. Page B3


Dolphins get extra day to bask in 3-0 record


Associated Press
MIAMI GARDENS -As the Miami Dolphins prepare
for a rare prime-time appearance next Monday night at
New Orleans, the extra day between games will be
welcome.
It gives the Dolphins a few additional hours to enjoy
being 3-0, more time for an injury-depleted defense to
mend, and another practice to address serious problems
with pass protection.
The surprising Dolphins took another step toward end-
ing their streak of four consecutive losing seasons by ral-
lying past Atlanta 27-23 Sunday
"We're making the most of the present, and hopefully
we can snowball that into the future," said long snapper
John Denney, whose nine years with Miami give him


locker room seniority
The Dolphins have won their first three games 12 other
times, and none of those teams finished with a losing
record. Nine of them made the playoffs, and Miami's
quick start has stirred speculation about a run to the
postseason.
Such optimism is a big change in South Florida, be-
cause the Dolphins haven't been 3-0 since 2002, and
they've reached the playoffs only once since 2001. That's
why they haven't played in prime time much lately
See Page B3
Miami tight end Dion Sims scores the
game-winning touchdown Sunday against the Atlanta
Falcons at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens.
Associated Press




B2 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
65 .583 7-3 L-1 51-30
70 .551 5 8-2 W-4 49-30
73 .529 8/2 3/2 6-4 W-1 44-37
90 .419 25/2 20/2 2-8 L-4 31-43
94 .397 29 24 4-6 W-2 36-41


x-Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


East Division
GB WC
5 - E
8 71/2 -
6 12/2 4
9 13/2 5
5 23 /2 15


East Division
GB WC


Str Home Away
W-1 53-28 42-34
W-4 51-30 36-39
L-1 46-32 36-42
L-5 42-33 39-42
L-2 38-40 33-45



Str Home Away
L-1 52-23 40-41
L-1 47-34 37-39
L-1 32-45 39-40
L-5 43-38 28-47
W-1 32-44 26-55


Str Home
W-1 49-27
W-2 49-26
W-1 50-31
W-2 37-44
L-2 30-49


x-LA
Arizona
San Diego
San Fran.
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
63 .596 8
71 .545 8 1 ,
79 .490 16% 91/2
88 .436 25 18 3
106.325 42/2 351/2


West Division
L Pct GB WC
66 .577 -
76 .510 10/2 10
83 .465 17/2 17
84 .462 18 17/2
86 .452 19/2 19


Str Home
W-4 52-29
W-1 40-35
L-1 37-41
W-1 33-42
L-1024-54



Str Home
W-2 46-32
W-2 44-34
L-2 42-35
W-1 38-38
L-2 44-35


NL

Brewers 5, Braves 0
Milwaukee Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Aokirf 5 1 1 0 Heywrd cf 4 0 0 0
CGomz cf 5 1 1 1 JSchafrrf 3 00 0
Lucroyc 4 1 1 2 J.UptonlIf 3 0 1 0
ArRmr3b 4 1 3 1 CJhnsn3b 4 00 0
KDavisl If 4 0 1 0 Gattisc 4 00 0
Haltonib 4 1 1 0 Smmnsss 2 0 1 0
Wootenp 0 0 0 0 Trdslvc lb 3 00 0
Blazekp 0 0 0 0 Janish2b 3 0 0 0
YBtncr2b-1b4 0 1 0 Minorp 2 0 0 0
Bianchiss 4 00 0 Varvarp 0 00 0
Estrad p 3 0 2 0 EIJhnsph 1 0 1 0
Gennett2b 1 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 5114 Totals 29 0 3 0
Milwaukee 100 020 020 5
Atlanta 000 000 000 0
E-Simmons (14). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-Mil-
waukee 6, Atlanta 5. 2B-Aoki (18), Halton (4).
3B-Simmons (6). HR-C.Gomez (22), Lucroy
(18), Ar.Ramirez (12). SB-J.Schafer(22).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
EstradaW,7-4 7 2 0 0 3 6
Wooten 1 1 0 0 0 0
Blazek 1 0 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
MinorL,13-8 7 8 3 3 0 6
Varvaro 1 3 2 1 0 1
Loe 1 0 0 0 0 1
Marlins 4, Phillies 0


Philadelphia Miami
ab r h bi
CHrndz cf 3 0 0 0 DSolan 2b
Rollinsss 4 0 1 0 Lucas lb
Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 Yelich If
Ruiz c 4 0 0 0 Stantonrf
DBrwnl If 4 0 1 0 Ruggin cf
Ruflb-rf 4 0 1 0 Polanc3b
Asche 3b 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss
Berndnrf 2 0 1 0 Mathis c
DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Eovaldi p
EMartnp 0 00 0 MDunnp
Mrtnzph 1 00 0 Dobbsph
Rosnrgp 0 00 0 Cishekp
CJimnzp 0 000
Halladyp 0 000
LuGarc p 1 000
Saveryp 0 00 0
Frndsnlb 2 000
Totals 31 040 Totals
Philadelphia 000 000 000
Miami 100 000 03x


DP-Philadelphia 1. LOB-Philadelphia 6,
Miami 13. 2B-Rollins (33), Polanco (12),
Hechavarria (14). SB Yelich (9), Polanco (2).
S-Eovaldi. SF Yelich.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Halladay L,4-5 1/3 0 1 1 2 0
Lu.Garcia 22/33 0 0 3 1
Savery 12/30 0 0 0 3
DeFratus 11/32 0 0 1 2
E.Martin 1 1 0 0 0 2
Rosenberg 1/3 3 3 3 2 0
C.Jimenez 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
Miami
EovaldiW,4-6 72/33 0 0 2 5
M.DunnH,18 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Cishek 1 1 0 0 0 1
Reds 3, Mets 2,10 im.
NewYork Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
EYongl If 5 0 2 0 Choo cf 6 03 2
DnMrp2b 4 0 1 0 BPhllps2b 4 0 1 0
DWrght3b 2 00 0 Votto 1 b 0 00 1
Dudalb 3 1 1 2 Ludwcklf 5 0 0 0
ABrwnrf 4 00 0 MParrp 0 00 0
Lagars cf 4 00 0 Brucerf 4 00 0
TdArnd c 3 0 1 0 Frazier3b 4 1 1 0
Quntnllss 3 00 0 Cozartss 4 00 0
Satin ph 1 0 1 0 Hanign c 4 1 2 0
Burke p 0 0 0 0 BHmltn pr 0 0 0 0
Hennp 0 00 0 Mesorc c 1 1 1 0
Harangp 2 1 0 0 Cuetop 3 0 1 0
Baxterph 1 00 0 LeCurep 0 00 0
Germnp 0 00 0 SMrshllp 0 00 0
Felicin p 0 0 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0
Frncsc p 0 00 0 AChpmp 0 00 0
Byrdakp 0 00 0 DRonsnl If 1 0 1 0
Ardsmp 0 000
Tovar ph-ss 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 262 Totals 373103
NewYork 001 001 000 0 2
Cincinnati 020 000 000 1 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-Frazier (9). DP-Cincinnati 2. LOB-New
York 5, Cincinnati 15.2B-Choo (34), Frazier
(28). HR-Duda (15). SB-E.Young (41), Choo
2 (20), B.Hamilton (13). CS-E.Young (11),
Frazier (5). S-Tovar. SF-Duda.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Harang 6 5 2 2 6 1
Germen 2/3 0 0 0 1 1
Feliciano 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
F.Francisco 1 1 0 0 0 1
Byrdak 0 1 0 0 0 0
Aardsma 1 0 0 0 2 0
BurkeL,0-3 1/3 2 1 1 0 0
Henn 0 1 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
Cueto 7 3 2 1 3 5
LeCure 1/3 2 0 0 0 1
S.Marshall 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
A.Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 3
M.ParraW,2-3 1 1 0 0 0 0


Associated Press
Pittsburgh's Starling Marte celebrates his home run Monday off Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Kevin Gregg
during the ninth inning in Chicago. The blast gave the Pirates a 2-1 victory.



Marte's blast leads Pirates


Pittsburgh, Reds

earn playoffspots


Associated Press

CHICAGO -The Pittsburgh Pi-
rates are going to the playoffs for
the first time in 21 years.
After two consecutive decades
of losing, the Pirates (90-67)
clinched at least a National
League wild card Monday night
when they beat the Chicago Cubs
2-1 and the Washington Nationals
lost to St. Louis 4-3.
It will be Pittsburgh's first trip
to the postseason since Barry
Bonds, Jim Leyland and Co. won
three straight NL East titles from
1990-92. Bonds then left for San
Francisco as a free agent, and the
small-budget Pirates piled up 20
consecutive losing records the
longest streak in the four major
professional sports.
Starling Marte hit a tiebreaking
homer in the ninth inning Monday
night at Wrigley Field, and the Pi-
rates threw out a runner at the
plate for the final out.
American League
Blue Jays 3, White Sox 2
CHICAGO Jose Quintana threw
7 1/3 strong innings, Marcus Semien
hit a two-run home run and Avisail
Garcia added a solo shot to lead the
Chicago White Sox to a 3-2 victory
over the Toronto Blue Jays.
Quintana (9-6), who entered the
game with the most no-decisions in
the American League at 17, allowed
two runs and five hits. Addison Reed
pitched the ninth inning to record his
39th save.

Rangers 12, Astros 0
ARLINGTON, Texas -Alex Rios hit
for the cycle, Derek Holland struck out
nine in his second shutout of the season
and the Texas Rangers started their
final push for a playoff spot with a 12-0
victory over the Houston Astros.
The Rangers pulled within a game of


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4
Texas 12, Houston 0
Chicago White Sox 3, Toronto 2
Detroit at Minnesota, late
Oakland at L.A. Angels, late
Kansas City at Seattle, late
Today
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 4-9) at Cleveland
(U.Jimenez 12-9), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 15-4) at N.Y Yankees (Kuroda
11-12), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Redmond 4-2) at Baltimore (Tillman 16-7),
7:05 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 5-5) atTexas (Darvish 13-9), 8:05
p.m.
Detroit (Fister 13-9) at Minnesota (Diamond 6-11),
8:10 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 10-12) at Colorado (Chatwood 7-5),
8:40 p.m.
Oakland (Griffin 14-9) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 8-7),
10:05 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 8-3) at Seattle (Paxton 2-0),
10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 0
Cincinnati 3, N.Y Mets 2, 10 innings
Miami 4, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 2, Chicago Cubs 1
St. Louis 4, Washington 3
Arizona at San Diego, late
Today
Milwaukee (Thornburg 3-1) at Atlanta (FGarcia 1-2),
7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Niese 7-8) at Cincinnati (Leake 14-6), 7:10
p.m.
Philadelphia (Miner 0-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 4-5),
7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 9-7) at Chicago Cubs (Rusin 2-5),
8:05 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 11-7) at St. Louis (Wacha
3-1), 8:15 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 10-12) at Colorado (Chatwood 7-5),
8:40 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 10-10) at San Diego (TRoss 3-8),
10:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 13-7) at San Francisco (M.Cain
8-9), 10:15 p.m.

idle Cleveland for the second AL wild-
card berth with six games remaining.
Rios finished off the cycle with a triple
to right-center field in the sixth inning,
and later scored to put Texas up 11-0.
He doubled in the first inning, had an in-
field single in the third and hit his 18th
homer in the fourth.

National League
Brewers 5, Braves 0
ATLANTA- Marco Estrada pitched
seven innings, Carlos Gomez and


Jonathan Lucroy homered and the
Milwaukee Brewers beat the Atlanta
Braves 5-0.
The NL East champion Braves
began the night with the league's best
record, 1 1/2 games ahead of the St.
Louis Cardinals. The Los Angeles
Dodgers, who did not play Monday,
moved two games back.

Marlins 4, Phillies 0
MIAMI Nathan Eovaldi pitched into
the eighth inning to help the Miami Mar-
lins beat the Philadelphia Phillies 4-0.
Justin Ruggiano drew a bases
loaded walk in the first inning and the
Marlins scored three runs in the eighth
on RBI singles by Donovan Solando
and Ed Lucas and a sacrifice fly by
Christian Yelich.
Eovaldi (4-6) allowed three hits over
7 2/3 innings. He struck out five and
walked two.
Reds 3, Mets 2, 10 inn.
CINCINNATI Shin-Soo Choo
drove in the winning run with a single off
the wall in the 10th inning, and the
Cincinnati Reds earned a wild-card
berth by beating the New York Mets 3-2.
Second-place Cincinnati clinched a
playoff spot with a loss by Washington
to St. Louis on Monday night.
David Aardsma pitched out of a
bases-loaded threat in the ninth, retiring
Todd Frazier on a flyout. Greg Burke
(0-3) gave up a one-out single by Devin
Mesoraco in the 10th, and Derrick
Robinson singled him to third.

Cardinals 4, Nationals 3
ST. LOUIS Carlos Beltran home-
red, Adam Wainwright earned his 18th
win and the St. Louis Cardinals beat
Washington 4-3, eliminating the Nation-
als from playoff contention.
Looking for their first NL Central title
since 2009, the Cardinals maintained a
two-game lead over Cincinnati and
Pittsburgh and reduced their magic
number to four.
All three teams are headed to the
postseason. The Reds and Pirates
both won Monday night, clinching at
least a wild-card berth when Washing-
ton lost.


AL


Rays 5, Orioles 4


x-Boston
Tampa Bay
NewYork
Baltimore
Toronto


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Fuld cf 2 0 0 0
Loaton ph-c 1 1 0 0
Totals 35 4104 Totals 305 9 5
Baltimore 000 310 000 4
TampaBay 010 100 201 5
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Baltimore 2. LOB-Baltimore 8, Tampa
Bay 8.2B-Wieters (29), McLouth (29), S.Ro-
driguez (10), J.Molina (14). HR-B.Roberts (6),
C.Davis (52), Loney (13). SF T.Beckham.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
WChen 41/36 2 2 2 4
Stinson 12/30 0 0 0 1
MatuszH,18 2/3 1 2 2 1 1
O'DayBS,4-6 1/3 1 0 0 1 0
Tom.HunterL,6-5 1 1 1 1 2 0
Tampa Bay
Archer 41/35 4 4 2 7
WWright 0 0 0 0 1 0
B.Gomes 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
AI.Torres 11/31 0 0 0 2
McGee 1 2 0 0 1 1
J.Wright 1 2 0 0 0 0
Jo.PeraltaW,3-8 1 0 0 0 0 1
WWright pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
Tom.Hunter pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-McGee.
Umpires-Home, Dan Bellino; First, Bruce
Dreckman; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Tim
Welke.
T-3:46.A-17,830 (34,078).

White Sox 3,
Blue Jays 2
Toronto Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
RDavisrf 4 0 1 0 DeAza cf 4 01 0
Kawsk2b 3 0 1 0 AIRmrzss 3 00 0
Lindph-lb 1 00 0 Kppngrdh 2 0 1 0
Lawrie3b 4 00 0 Konerklb 4 01 0
Sierradh 3 0 0 0 AGarcirf 4 1 1 1
DeRosalb 3 0 0 0 Viciedol If 4 1 1 0
Arenciic 4 1 1 1 GBckh2b 4 01 0
Pillar If 4 1 1 0 Semien3b 4 12 2
Goinsss 3 0 2 1 Pheglyc 4 0 0 0
Gose cf 3 000
Totals 32 26 2 Totals 33 3 8 3
Toronto 000 010 010 2
Chicago 020 010 00x 3
E-Arencibia (11). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-
Toronto 5, Chicago 10. 2B-Pillar (3), G.Beck-
ham (22). HR-Arencibia (21), A.Garcia (6),
Semien (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
HappL,4-7 5 8 3 3 3 5
Jeffress 2 0 0 0 1 2
Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
QuintanaW,9-6 71/35 2 2 1 6
Lindstrom 0 1 0 0 0 0
Veal H,12 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
N.Jones H,15 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
A.Reed S,39-46 1 0 0 0 1 0
Lindstrom pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, MarkWegner; First, Tim Tim-
mons; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mike Much-
linski.
T-2:46.A-19,122 (40,615).

Rangers 12,
Astros 0


Houston


Texas


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Villarss 4 0 0 0 Kinsler2b 4 2 2 1
Altuve2b 3 0 1 0 Profar2b-ss 1 00 0
Elmore 2b 1 00 0 Andrus ss 4 23 1
MDmn3b 3 0 1 0 Adducilb 0 00 0
MGnzlz3b 1 00 0 Riosrf 4 34 4
Carter dh 2 0 0 0 EBeltrerf 1 00 0
JDMrtnph 2 0 1 0 ABeltre3b 3 00 1
B.Lairdlb 4 0 0 0 Rosales 3b-2b1 0 0 0
Hoes rf-lf 4 0 0 0 Przyns c 5 22 0
Crowelf-cf 2 0 2 0 Morlndlb 2 1 1 1
Corprn c 2 0 1 0 Chirins3b 1 0 0 0
Stassi c 1 0 0 0 Gentry If 3 1 0 0
BBarnscf 2 00 0 DvMrpdh 3 1 1 1
Paredsrf 1 00 0 LMartn cf 4 01 3
Totals 32 060 Totals 36121412
Houston 000 000 000 0
Texas 214 203 00x 12
E-M.Dominguez (15), Villar (14). DP Texas 1.
LOB-Houston 6, Texas 6. 2B-Kinsler (30),
Rios (30), Pierzynski (23), L.Martin (19). 3B-
Rios (4). HR-Rios (18). SB-Gentry (19). SF-
A.Beltre, Moreland.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
LylesL,7-9 3 7 7 7 3 2
D.Martinez 4 7 5 4 0 2
Lo 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fields 1 0 0 0 1 2
Texas
D.HollandW,10-9 9 6 0 0 1 9
WP-D.Martinez.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, Paul
Emmel; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Gary Dar-
ling.
T-2:39.A-33,743 (48,114).


Rays schedule
Sept. 24 at N.Y Yankees
Sept. 25 at N.Y Yankees
Sept. 26 at N.Y Yankees
Sept. 27 at Toronto
Sept. 28 at Toronto
Sept. 29 at Toronto


NASCAR's decline
If you watch the NASCAR race this week-
end, you'll see why NASCAR is going down
the toilet. Bowyer's been accused of stag-
ing a spinout so his teammate, Truex,
could make a chase,
knocking out Newman OOUND
and knocking out Jeff 4 U
Gordon and it's so if
ridiculous. And I guess
the rumor is that
Michael Waltrip's team
has been fined a lot of
money for that and I'm
glad and it's about time
because he was a little CA
bit too big for his pants 563-0579
and he thinks he's such
a big, big benefactor in
terms of NASCAR racing and he's really
not that much. He couldn't produce a legit-
imate, honest team if he had to. The only
way they know how to win is just by being
crooked and cheating and they've been
caught several times and I'm so glad to
see that he's out of it, Truex is out of it
and this is going to make a big difference.
And maybe now NASCAR will be a more le-
gitimate sport than it is and more people
will go to the tracks and see the races.


Tebow to the Bucs Gator fans and all these Tebow followers.
I have a great idea for the Tampa Bay Tell the Glazers (to) grab the boy. Then we
I have a great idea for the Tampa Bay wo hav no more blackouts.
Buccaneers and their blackout games and won't have no more blackouts.
nobody wants to fill their stadium. Tebow's Needs some points clarity
a free agent. Bring him in and I guarantee After moving to Florida a few years ago,
their stadium will fill up with all these about 10 years, my wife and I have gotten


interested in the NASCAR races. However,
we don't understand their point system
or how they rate their drivers. I would ap-
preciate if somebody could let us know
how they do that or if the Chronicle would
even print an article about it. We find the
NASCAR races are very interesting and
we'd like to understand them a little bit
more.
NAPA 'no' how, no way
Finally somebody on the outside is tak-
ing a move to really try to straighten up
NASCAR. NAPA has dropped the funding
for Michael Waltrip racing, which is the
best thing that could happen to that
clown. He was pretty cocky and smart
and now that his brother's in the position
he is, he thinks he's above the law and
the rules and they can do whatever they
want. Well good, I'm glad they got
burned good. They deserve it. They de-
serve to get kicked out of racing for a
whole year because this sport has turned
sour. It used to be an interesting, fun
thing to watch at one time. Now it's all
about money, money, money. Nobody
cares about anything but how much they
make and earn. Thank you, NAPA, for
pulling the plug and standing up and fi-
nally doing something to straighten up
NASCAR.


Baltimore
ab
BRorts dh 5
Machd 3b 4
ACasill pr-2b0
Valenci 3b 1
C.Davis 1lb 3
A.Jones cf 3
Markks rf 4
Wieters c 4
McLoth If 3
Hardy ss 4
Flahrty 2b 4


x-Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia
Miami


Tampa Bay
rhbi ab rhbi
1 1 1 SRdrgzlb 3 01 0
1 2 0 Loneyph 1 1 1 1
00 0 Zobristlf-2b 4 1 1 0
00 0 Longori3b 3 00 0
1 1 2 WMyrsrf 4 12 2
00 0 DYongdh 3 01 0
1 2 0 YEscorss 3 00 0
02 0 TBckh2b 2 1 1 1
0 1 0 Joyceph-lf 0 00 0
0 1 1 JMolinc 2 02 1
0 0 0 DeJess ph-cf 2 0 0 0


NATIONAL LEAGUE


8/2 6
21 18/2
21 18/2
34/2 32


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
65 .586 6
67 .573 2 7
67 .573 2 5
86 .449 21/2 19/2 6
92 .414 27 25 2


z-St. Louis
z-Cincinnati
z-Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago


ab r h bi
4111
5021
3021
2000
401 1

3110
4020
3100
2000
0000
0100
5 0 2 1000
3 0 2 1
2 0 0 0
4 0 1 1
3 1 1 0
4 0 2 0
3 1 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0


304 9 4
0
4


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 34
Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 53
N.Y.Jets 2 1 0 .667 55 50
Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 65 73
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 70 82
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 68 48
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 60 56
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 28 92
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 75 64
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 71 64
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 47 64
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 42 76
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 0 0 1.000 127 71
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 57 67
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 78 81
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 55
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.Y.Giants 0 3 0 .000 54 115
Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 98
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 70 38
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 74
Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 34 57
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 74
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 69
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 96
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 27
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 58 86
San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 44 84
Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 79
Thursday's Game
Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16
Sunday's Games
Tennessee 20, San Diego 17
New Orleans 31, Arizona 7
Dallas 31, St. Louis 7
Cleveland 31, Minnesota 27
Baltimore 30, Houston 9
Carolina 38, N.Y Giants 0
Detroit 27, Washington 20
New England 23, Tampa Bay 3
Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 30
Miami 27, Atlanta 23
Indianapolis 27, San Francisco 7
Seattle 45, Jacksonville 17
N.Y Jets 27, Buffalo 20
Chicago 40, Pittsburgh 23
Monday's Game
Denver 37, Oakland 21
Thursday, Sep. 26
San Francisco atSt. Louis, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 29
N.Y Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday, Sep. 30
Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m.
Broncos 37,
Raiders 21
Oakland 0 7 7 7-21
Denver 10 17 3 7- 37
First Quarter
Den-Decker 2 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 10:28.
Den-FG Prater 53, :47.
Second Quarter
Den-Welker 12 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 7:27.
Oak-D.Moore 73 pass from Pryor (Janikowski
kick), 5:57.
Den-J.Thomas 13 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 3:40.
Den-FG Prater 41, :19.
Third Quarter
Den-FG Prater 40, 8:41.
Oak-Reece 16 pass from McFadden
(Janikowski kick), :17.
Fourth Quarter
Den-Hillman 1 run (Prater kick), 11:27.
Oak-McFadden 1 run (Janikowski kick), 1:15.
A-76,978.
Oak Den
First downs 13 31
Total NetYards 342 536
Rushes-yards 17-49 35-164
Passing 293 372
Punt Returns 0-0 3-34
Kickoff Returns 2-45 1-8
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 21-31-0 32-37-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 1-2
Punts 6-52.5 1-37.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-2
Penalties-Yards 8-77 5-40
Time of Possession 24:36 35:24
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Oakland, Pryor 4-36, McFadden
12-9, Ford 1-4. Denver, Hillman 9-66, Ball 11-
61, Moreno 12-39, Manning 3-(minus 2).
PASSING-Oakland, Pryor 19-28-0-281, Flynn
1-2-0-19, McFadden 1-1-0-16. Denver, Manning
32-37-0-374.
RECEIVING-Oakland, D.Moore 6-124, Reece
4-45, Butler 3-54, Streater 3-42, Rivera 2-21,
Jennings 2-15, Ford 1-15. Denver, D.Thomas
10-94, Decker 8-133, Welker 7-84, J.Thomas 3-
37, Hillman 1-12, Moreno 1-6, Tamme 1-5,
Green 1-3.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.

College schedule
(Subject to change)
Thursday, Sept. 26
SOUTH
Va. Tech (3-1) at Georgia Tech (3-0), 7:30 p.m.
Howard (1-2) at NC A&T (2-0), 7:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Iowa St. (0-2) atTulsa (1-2), 7:30 p.m.
FAR WEST


Cal Poly (1-2) at Portland St. (3-1), 10:15 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 27
FAR WEST
Middle Tennessee (3-1) at BYU (1-2), 9 p.m.
Utah St. (2-2) at San Jose St. (1-2), 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 28
EAST
Fordham (4-0) at St. Francis (Pa.) (1-2), Noon
Oklahoma St. (3-0) atWest Virginia (2-2), Noon
Cornell (1-0) atYale (1-0), Noon
Monmouth (1-3) at Columbia (0-1), 12:30 p.m.
New Hamp. (1-1) at Lehigh (3-0), 12:30 p.m.
Virginia (2-1) at Pittsburgh (2-1), 12:30 p.m.
CCSU (1-3) at Rhode Island (1-3), 1 p.m.
Bryant(2-1)atWagner (1-3), 1 p.m.
Princeton (0-1) at Georgetown (1-3), 2 p.m.
Fla. St. (3-0) at Boston College (2-1), 3:30 p.m.
UConn (0-3) at Buffalo (1-2), 3:30 p.m.
Penn (1-0) atVillanova (1-2), 5 p.m.
Sacred Heart (4-0) at Bucknell (1-1), 6 p.m.
Towson (4-0) at Stony Brook (1-2), 6 p.m.
Holy Cross (1-3) at Dartmouth (1-0), 7 p.m.
James Madison (3-1) at Delaware (3-1), 7 p.m.
Brown (1-0) at Harvard (1-0), 7:30 p.m.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 B3


For their record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
O0 9o0-1-3
0 oV CASH 3 (late)
15-7-1


PLAY 4 (early)
2-1-4-3
PLAY 4 (late)
,-M 9-7-9-2

FANTASY 5
2-10-33-34-35


Sunday's winning numbers and payouts:


Fantasy 5:9 -13-
5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 312
3-of-5 8,572


15-18-26
$175,907.95
$90.50
$9


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Phillies at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees or
Toronto Blue Jays at Baltimore Orioles
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Eastern Conference Semifinal: Indiana Fever
at Chicago Sky, game 3 (if necessary)
NHL PRESEASON HOCKEY
11 a.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at Pittsburgh Penguins
(taped)
3 p.m. (NHL) Winnipeg Jets at Edmonton Oilers (taped)
7 p.m. (NHL) New Jersey Devils at Philadelphia Flyers
10:30 p.m. (NHL) Vancouver Canucks at San Jose Sharks
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League Soccer FC
Barcelona vs Ajax (taped)
RADIO
6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
7:05 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at New York
Yankees

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS GOLF
4 p.m. Seven Rivers at Lecanto (Course: Seven Rivers)
GIRLS GOLF
3:30 p.m. The Villages at Citrus (Course: LakeSide)
VOLLEYBALL
5 p.m. Academy at the Lakes at Seven Rivers
6 p.m. Citrus at Lecanto


SOUTH
Butler (2-2) at Jacksonville (2-2), Noon
Miami (3-0) at South Florida (0-3), Noon
South Carolina (2-1) at UCF (3-0), Noon
S. Ala. (2-1) atTennessee (2-2), 12:21 p.m.
E. Carolina (2-1) at N. Carolina (1-2), 12:30 p.m.
Drake (1-2) at Mercer (3-0), 1 p.m.
Davidson (0-3) at Morehead St. (0-4), 1 p.m.
Norfolk St. (0-3) at Morgan St. (0-4), 1 p.m.
San Diego (1-2) at Stetson (1-2), 1 p.m.
Coastal Carolina (4-0) at Elon (1-3), 1:30 p.m.
Robert Morris (1-2) atVMI (1-3), 1:30 p.m.
Charlotte (2-2) at Presbyterian (1-2), 2 p.m.
Hampton (0-4) atSC State (2-2), 2 p.m.
Navy (2-0) atW. Kentucky (2-2), 2 p.m.
Troy (2-2) at Duke (2-2), 3 p.m.
W. Carolina (1-3) atSamford (2-2), 3 p.m.
Charleston So. (4-0) atApp. St. (1-2), 3:30 p.m.
Wake Forest (2-2) at Clemson (3-0), 3:30 p.m.
LSU (4-0) at Georgia (2-1), 3:30 p.m.
Cent. Mich. (1-3) at NC State (2-1), 3:30 p.m.
Murray St. (2-2) at Jacksonville St. (4-0), 4 p.m.
Maine (3-1) at Richmond (2-2), 4 p.m.
Alcorn St. (3-1) at Alabama St. (2-2), 6 p.m.
Point(Ga.) (2-1) atGardner-Webb (3-1), 6 p.m.
Chattanooga (2-1) atGa. Southern (2-1), 6 p.m.
Albany (NY) (1-3) atOld Dominion (2-2), 6 p.m.
Delaware St. (0-3) at Savannah St. (1-3), 6 p.m.
Furman (1-2) atThe Citadel (1-3), 6 p.m.
Mississippi (3-0) atAlabama (3-0), 6:30 p.m.
Texas So. (0-3) atAlabama A&M (1-3), 7 p.m.
Lamar (2-2) atGrambling St. (0-4), 7 p.m.
Florida (2-1) at Kentucky (1-2), 7 p.m.
Kentucky Wesleyan (0-3) at Liberty (2-2), 7 p.m.
Tulane (2-2) at Louisiana-Monroe (2-2), 7 p.m.
ArkansasTech (2-1) at Nicholls St. (2-2), 7 p.m.
Langston (0-3) at Northwestern St. (2-2), 7 p.m.
Jackson St. (2-2) at Southern U. (2-2), 7 p.m.
UAB (1-2) atVanderbilt (2-2), 7:30 p.m.
Indiana St. (1-2) atTenn.Tech (2-2), 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Miami (Ohio) (0-3) at Illinois (2-1), Noon
N. Illinois (3-0) at Purdue (1-3), Noon
Marist (1-2) at Dayton (2-1), 1 p.m.
Illinois St. (1-2) at Missouri St. (0-4), 2 p.m.
Campbell (1-2) at Valparaiso (0-3), 2 p.m.
Akron (1-3) at Bowling Green (3-1), 2:30 p.m.
E. Kentucky (2-2) at E. Illinois (3-1), 2:30 p.m.
Toledo (2-2) at Ball St. (3-1), 3 p.m.
Tenn. St. (3-1) vs. Central St. (0-3), 3 p.m.
N. Dakota St. (3-0) at S. Dakota St. (3-1), 3 p.m.
Iowa (3-1) at Minnesota (4-0), 3:30 p.m.
Montana St. (2-2) at N. Dakota (1-2), 3:30 p.m.
Oklahoma (3-0) at Notre Dame (3-1), 3:30 p.m.
South Dakota (1-2) atW. Illinois (2-2), 4 p.m.
McNeese St. (4-0) at N. Iowa (3-0), 5 p.m.
Youngstown St. (3-1) at S. Illinois (2-2), 7 p.m.
UT-Martin (2-1) atSE Missouri (0-3), 7 p.m.
Kent St. (1-3) atW. Michigan (0-4), 7 p.m.
Arkansas St. (2-2) at Missouri (3-0), 7:30 p.m.
Wisconsin (3-1) at Ohio St. (4-0), 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
SMU (1-2) atTCU (1-2), Noon
E.Wash. (2-1) atSam Houston St. (3-1), 3 p.m.
Army (1-3) vs. La. Tech (1-3) at Dallas, 4 p.m.
Houston (3-0) at UTSA (2-2), 4 p.m.
Texas A&M (3-1)at Arkansas (3-1), 7 p.m.
FAU (1-3) at Rice (1-2), 7 p.m.
Prairie View (2-2) at St. F Austin (2-2), 7 p.m.
Wyoming (3-1) atTexas St. (2-1), 7 p.m.
FAR WEST
Colorado (2-0) at Oregon St. (3-1), 3 p.m.
UTEP (1-2) at Colorado St. (1-3), 3:30 p.m.
S. Utah (3-1) at N. Colorado (1-3), 3:35 p.m.
Temple (0-3) at Idaho (0-4), 5 p.m.
Arizona (3-0) at Washington (3-0), 7 p.m.
UNLV (2-2) at New Mexico (1-2), 8 p.m.
SD St. (0-3) at New Mexico St. (0-4), 8 p.m.
Sacramento St. (1-3) atWeber St. (1-3), 8 p.m.
Air Force (1-3) at Nevada (2-2), 8:05 p.m.
Montana (3-0) at N. Arizona (2-1), 9 p.m.
Idaho St. (2-1) at UC Davis (0-4), 9 p.m.
Stanford (3-0) atWashington St. (3-1), 10 p.m.
So. Miss. (0-3) at Boise St. (2-2), 10:15 p.m.
USC (3-1) at Arizona St. (2-1), 10:30 p.m.
California (1-2) at Oregon (3-0), 10:30 p.m.


Fresno State (3-0) at Hawaii (0-3), 12 Mid.



Pirates 2, Cubs I


Pittsburgh


Chicago


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Tabata If 4 0 0 0 StCastrss 4 0 1 0
SMartel If 1 1 1 1 Valuen3b 4 00 0
NWalkr2b 5 1 1 1 Rizzolb 4 00 0
McCtchcf 3 0 1 0 DNavrrc 3 01 0
Mornealb 3 0 0 0 Watknspr 0 00 0
Byrdrf 4 0 0 0 Schrhltrf 4 00 0
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Watsonp 0 00 0 Greggp 0 00 0
Grillip 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 262 Totals 301 6 1
Pittsburgh 100 000 001 2
Chicago 000 000 010 1
E Valbuena (7). DP-Pittsburgh 2. LOB-
Pittsburgh 9, Chicago 5. 2B-Bogusevic (7).
HR-S.Marte (12), N.Walker (14).
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
Morton
Melancon W,3-2
Watson H,22
Grilli S,32-34
Chicago
Samardzija
Villanueva
H.Rondon
Gregg L,2-6


7 3 0
1 2 1
1/3 0 0
2/3 1 0


Cardinals 4,
Nationals 3
Washington St. Louis
ab r h bi a


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Zmrmn3b
Werth rf
Harper If
Dsmnd ss
AdLRc lb
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0 00 0 Choatep 0 00 0
CMrtnzp 0 00 0
Kozmass 0 00 0
31 373 Totals 334114


Washington 200 000 010 3
St. Louis 100 120 00x 4
DP Washington 1, St. Louis 1. LOB Wash-
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(24). S-Span, Roark, Wainwright.
IP H RERBBSO
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RoarkL,7-1 5 9 4 4 1 5
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ChoateH,14 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Ca.MartinezH,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
SiegristH,10 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
RosenthalS,1-6 2/3 0 0 0 0 1


BASEBALL
American League
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Designated RHP J.D.
Martin for assignment. Reinstated RHP Jesse
Crain from the 60-day DL.


Broncos rout Raiders


Associated Press

DENVER Peyton Manning
clapped his hands four, five, six times
and barked out the signals. A few sec-
onds later, Wes Welker was all alone,
cradling the quarterback's latest
touchdown pass.
All part of another impeccably
crafted victory for Manning and the
Denver Broncos, who rolled over the
Oakland Raiders 37-21 Monday night.
Denver's 127 points lead the league
and are 31 more than second-place
Green Bay
Manning went 32 for 37 for 374 yards
and set a few more records while out-
witting the overmatched Raiders (1-2).
His 12 touchdown passes are one
more than Tom Brady's old record for
the first three games, set in 2011. Man-


ning still has yet to throw an intercep-
tion, which matches a record held by
Michael Vick, who also threw 12
touchdowns before his first pick in
2010.
As much as the numbers, it was Man-
ning's deciphering of the Oakland de-
fense that made jaws drop in this one.
His first touchdown, a 2-yard pass to
Eric Decker, came after a subtle play
action fake that froze the defense and
left Decker wide open in the back of
the end zone.
Manning's targets for the next two
touchdowns Welker and Julius
Thomas didn't have defenders
within three steps of them. Wide open.
A sure sign that Manning had diag-
nosed the defense he was looking at
well before the snap and knew exactly
where he wanted to go with the ball.


I VOLLEYBALL -BRIEFS I


Crystal River spikers
sweep Central
The Crystal River volleyball team im-
proved to 8-7 on the season with a
25-11, 25-18, 25-10 victory Monday at
home against Central.
Aspen Phillips had 15 assists, six digs
and two aces, Sam Pauley added 15
digs and five aces, Cassidy Wardlow had
10 kills and six digs, Olivia Hudson
chipped in five kills and six blocks, Kay-
lan Simms had five kills and Marissa
Pool added six digs and five aces.
Crystal River is back in action tonight
at Dunnellon in a district match.
Big district victory
for Seven Rivers
Seven Rivers Christian earned a huge
Class 2A-3 win at home Monday, with a
25-21, 25-22, 14-25, 25-19 triumph over
St. John Lutheran.
The victory improves the Warriors to



NOTEBOOK
Continued from Page BI

defense (both rank among the top
three hitters in the county). Will it be
enough? Two of these three teams -
Cornerstone, St. John and Seven
Rivers -will advance to the regional
tournament. Question is, which two?
Scrambling ability
Matches involving Crystal River
usually take a good deal of time, sim-
ply because the Pirates often rely on
their defense to wear opponents
down. But here's a warning: Anyone
planning on attending the next Citrus
vs. Crystal River contest should bring
plenty of provisions.
It could take a while.
When the 5A-6 rivals met last week,
Citrus nearly matched the Pirates de-
fensively It went four sets with the
losing side scoring at least 20 points
every time. Neither team had more
than a six-point lead the entire match.
There were plenty of double-digit
rallies before Crystal River emerged
with the win. No reason to believe it
will be any different in round two.
Season leaders
TEAM RECORDS: Seven Rivers Chris-
tian, 11-3 overall, 3-1 in 2A-3; Citrus, 6-4
overall, 2-1 in 5A-6; Lecanto, 6-4 overall,
2-1 in 5A-6; Crystal River, 7-7 overall, 2-1
in 5A-6.
KILLS: Alexis Zachar (Seven Rivers),




DOLPHINS
Continued from Page B1

But a buzz about the Dolphins is
building, and to sustain it they'll need to
address issues on both sides of the ball.
Injuries have left uncertain the status
of four defensive starters, including Pro
Bowl end Cameron Wake, and shaky
blocking threatens the health of quar-
terback Ryan Tannehill.
Wake was sidelined Sunday after he
hurt his left knee in the first quarter
Tests determined he avoided serious
injury but it's uncertain whether he'll
be available against the Saints.
"We're going to wait and see how the
week progresses," defensive coordina-
tor Kevin Coyle said Monday "We have
a long week here ahead of us, and I
think we'll make that determination at
the end of the week"
Linebacker Koa Misi left Sunday's
game with a shoulder injury, and de-
fensive tackle Paul Soliai (knee) and
cornerback Dimitri Patterson (groin) sat
out Even so, the defense was at its best
down the stretch, a testament to
Miami's improved depth.
"You never want anybody to go down,
but you know it's bound to happen in
this game," cornerback Brent Grimes
said. "You have to have people step up."
Wake's injury means the Dolphins
may be forced to accelerate the devel-
opment of top draft pick Dion Jordan,
who came off the bench in the first
three games. The No. 3 overall pick
from Oregon saw his most extensive ac-
tion Sunday including when Miami
forced consecutive three-and-outs by
high-powered Atlanta in the second
half.
"We're seeing more and more of
Dion, and he's getting better," Coyle
said. "We want to expand his role. He
showed things in the game Sunday
which lead us to believe we can keep


12-3 overall and 4-1 in district action.
Alyssa Gage had 15 kills, 16 assists,
four digs, one ace and one block for
Seven Rivers. Alexis Zacher added 12
kills, three blocks and two aces and
Tessa Kacer had 25 successful serve re-
ceives, five assists and three digs.
The Warriors return to action tonight at
home at 5 p.m. for a non-district match
against Academy of the Lakes.
Citrus makes quick work
of Nature Coast
It was a quick night in the gym Monday
night for Citrus, as the Hurricanes swept
visiting Nature Coast in non-district ac-
tion, 25-9, 25-8, 25-9.
KellyAbramowich had a team-high 12
assists, Kylie Philips added seven as-
sists, Adriana Espinosa had nine digs
and AmyAbramowich served in five aces.
The Hurricanes (7-4) return to district
play tonight at Lecanto.
-From staff reports


113 (8.0 per match); Annalee Garcia
(Lecanto), 80 (8.0 per match); Alyssa
Gage (Seven Rivers), 102 (7.3 per match);
Kayla King (Citrus), 46 (6.6 per match);
Amy Abramowich (Citrus), 44 (6.2 per
match).
KILL PERCENTAGE: Zachar (Seven
Rivers), .426; Kaylan Simms (Crystal
River), .322; Gage (Seven Rivers), .319;
Allie Whited (Crystal River), .291; Hudson
(Crystal River), .287; A. Abramowich (Cit-
rus), 275.
BLOCKS: Kendra Kirby (Citrus), 31 (4.4
per match); Kelly Abramowich (Citrus), 29
(4.1 per match); Hudson (Crystal River),
35 (2.5 per match); Simms (Crystal River),
31 (2.2); Zachar (Seven Rivers), 28 (2.0
per match); Gage (Seven Rivers), 25 (1.8
per match).
DIGS: Sam Pauley (Crystal River), 325
(23.2 per match); Adriana Espinoza (Cit-
rus), 96 (13.7 per match); Pool (Crystal
River), 161 (11.5 per match); Aspen
Phillips (Crystal River), 147 (10.5 per
match); Mikaela Zoucha (Lecanto), 96 (9.6
per match).
ASSISTS: Phillips (Crystal River), 333
(23.8 per match); Jessika Ray (Lecanto),
133 (13.3 per match); K. Abramowich (Cit-
rus), 79 (11.3 per match); Iwaniec (Seven
Rivers), 149 (10.7 per match); Gage
(Seven Rivers), 136 (9.7 per match).
SERVICE ACES: Iwaniec (Seven
Rivers), 61 (4.4 per match); Pool (Crystal
River), 49 (3.5 per match); Gage (Seven
Rivers), 41 (3.0 per match); Olivia Grey
(Lecanto), 28 (2.8 per match); Garcia
(Lecanto), 23 (2.3 per match).



feeding him more."
Miami's struggling offensive line was
also at its best late, protecting Tan-
nehill on every throw as he went 9 for
12 to lead the game-winning 75-yard
touchdown drive.
But Tannehill endured five sacks
earlier, giving him 14 this season, three
more than any other NFL quarterback
He's on pace for 75 sacks, one shy of
the league record, but probably would-
n't last the full season if that pace
continues.
The sacks have been a team effort
that goes beyond the line, offensive co-
ordinator Mike Sherman said, includ-
ing play-calling mistakes for which he
took the blame. Tannehill has held
onto the ball too long at times, and the
running back or tight end has missed a
block on occasion, Sherman said.
"We're giving up a lot of sacks, more
than we ought to give up," he said. "But
it's not all on the offensive line."
The Dolphins' statistics make their
record a head-scratcher They've been
outgained by 158 yards, and their rush-
ing attack (3.3 yards per attempt) and
run defense (4.7) are both significantly
worse than last year, when they went
7-9.
But they've showed a flair for big
plays, something missing in recent
seasons. They lead the NFL in red-
zone scoring, and they've already
come up with five interceptions, half
of last season's total.
Perhaps the biggest play Sunday
was Denney's fumble recovery on a
punt return, which set up a pivotal
touchdown for Miami. The recovery
was just the second ever for
Denney, but he didn't bask in the
accomplishment.
"I'm more excited about being 3-0,"
he said. "That hasn't happened a
whole lot in my career."
Actually, it has never happened in
Denney's career But then he has only
been with the Dolphins since 2005.


SCOREBOARD


D0
10
D0


D0
D0




B4 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


Jaguars to start
QB Gabbert
against Colts
JACKSONVILLE -
Blaine Gabbert is back
under center for the win-
less Jacksonville Jaguars.
Gabbert, who missed
the last two games after
slicing open the back of
his throwing hand, will
start Sunday against the
Indianapolis Colts.
Coach Gus Bradley
said "we feel good about
him going into this week."
Gabbert needed 15
stitches to close the
wound, which he sus-
tained when he got his
hand caught on a de-
fender's facemask. He
got the final stitches out
before Sunday's 45-17
loss at Seattle.
Gabbert completed 16
of 35 passes for 121
yards and two intercep-
tions in the season
opener against Kansas
City. He was sacked six
times in the 28-2 loss, the
worst opener in franchise
history.
49ers prepare
to move forward
without Smith
SANTA CLARA, Calif.
- The San Francisco
49ers placed linebacker
Aldon Smith on the re-
serve non-football injury
list Monday as he enters
rehab for substance abuse
and begins what team
CEO Jed York has termed
an indefinite absence.
San Francisco didn't im-
mediately announce a cor-
responding roster move.
Smith played Sunday
and had five tackles just
two days after he was ar-
rested and jailed Friday
morning on suspicion of
DUI and marijuana pos-
session. Smith apolo-
gized after the 27-7 home
loss to the Colts, and now
his team moves forward
without him heading to St.
Louis on Thursday.
Smith had previously
been arrested on suspi-
cion of DUI in January
2012 in Miami shortly
after the 49ers lost in the
NFC championship
game.
He is expected to re-
main in the Bay Area for
treatment.
Bills RB Spiller
expects to play
after hurting leg
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y
- Buffalo Bills running
back C.J. Spiller doesn't
expect an injury to his right
leg to keep him from play-
ing against the Baltimore
Ravens this weekend.
Though still experienc-
ing some soreness, Spiller
walked without a limp on
Monday. He anticipates he
should "be good" to play
Sunday, when Buffalo
(1-2) hosts Baltimore (2-1).
Spiller was hurt a day
earlier on a 2-yard run in
the second quarter of a
27-20 loss at the New York
Jets. He returned for the
start of the third quarter
before pulling himself from
the game.
He was escorted to the
locker room with his right
leg heavily wrapped.
Spiller finished with 9
yards on 10 carries, and a
1-yard catch.
Packers release
returned Jeremy
Ross after muff
GREEN BAY, Wis.-
The Packers have re-
leased receiver and return
man Jeremy Ross a day
after the second-year
player muffed a kickoff that
set up a touchdown in the
wild 34-30 loss to the
Bengals.
Ross failed to make a
significant impact in the re-
turn game. BenJarvus
Green-Ellis ran for a 2-yard


score to give Cindnnati a
14-0 lead on the play after
Ross muffed the kickoff
early in the first quarter.
Ross also fumbled a
punt return in the second
quarter of the Packers' 45-
31 loss to the 49ers in the
NFC playoffs last year. San
Francisco recovered and
scored three players later.
-From wire reports


Next Gator in


Florida turns to

Murphy following

Driskel's injury

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida never
really recruited Tyler Murphy
The junior quarterback from
Wethersfield, Conn., had scholarship
offers from Connecticut, Syracuse and
Temple in 2009 when he decided to
send his high school highlights about
1,000 miles south to Gainesville. It
turned out to be a good move al-
though it took four years, Jacoby Bris-
sett'fs transfer and Jeff Driskel's
season-ending leg injury for Murphy
to land the starting quarterback job.
In between, Murphy had people
questioning whether he should
change positions and/or schools.
"It was tough," Murphy said. "Sit-
ting on the sidelines is never fun. But
sometimes you have to be patient
when you come to a big football school
like this."
Murphy's wait ended in the first
quarter of Saturday's 31-17 victory
against Southeastern Conference
rival Tennessee.
Driskel broke a bone in his lower
right leg against the Volunteers and
was scheduled to have surgery Sun-
day Murphy took over and performed
better than anyone could have pre-
dicted. Sure, there were a few hic-
cups. But Murphy gave the
20th-ranked Gators (2-1,1-0 SEC) hope
that their goals are still within reach.
He completed 8 of 14 passes for 134
yards and a touchdown. He also ran
for 84 yards and a score as Florida ex-
tended its winning streak in the series
to nine.
It was a solid debut for a career
backup who had thrown just one pass
in four years and it didn't even
count in the stats because it came on
a 2-point conversion.
"It was always in the back of my
mind I might never play, but I just kept
working hard and just kept fighting,
kept faith in myself and kept praying
for an opportunity," Murphy said.
"Luckily, I was able to get it It wasn't
the way I wanted it, you know, but an
opportunity is an opportunity You've
got to make the best of it"
Murphy will make his first career
start Saturday night at Kentucky,
which has dropped 26 in a row in the
series.
How did Murphy get to this point?
Well, it was mostly about fortitude and
fortune.
Murphy wasn't highly recruited
coming out of Wethersfield High
School. He had verbally committed to


Associated Press
Florida quarterback Tyler Murphy throws a pass Saturday over Tennessee
linebacker Dontavis Sapp during the first half in Gainesville.


Temple, but also could see what was
going on at Florida. Former coach
Urban Meyer led the Gators to the
2008 national championship, the pro-
gram's second in three years, and
quarterback Tim Tebow had become
a star running the spread-option
offense.
John Brantley was waiting to take
over for Tebow, but the pocket passer
hardly fit Meyer's scheme.
So Murphy sent some game tape to
the Gators. A few weeks later, he got a
call from offensive coordinator Steve
Addazio, who handled recruiting in
the northeast, and then another from
Meyer Murphy scheduled a visit and
then got a scholarship offer one he
accepted on the spot
Florida desperately needed a
backup, but coaches felt Murphy was-
n't ready as a freshman. He redshirted
in 2010, watching from the sideline as
tight end Jordan Reed and versatile
receiver Trey Burton shared quarter-
back snaps alongside Brantley
Things got worse for Murphy after
Meyer and Addazio left Driskel and
Brissett signed with Florida in 2011,
and both immediately jumped Mur-
phy on the depth chart
Murphy went from fourth team in


2011 to third-string quarterback in
2012. Some friends and family mem-
bers advised him to transfer, and he
even considered joining Addazio at
Temple. Others suggested he switch
positions.
"I just didn't want to give up," he
said. "I felt like if I changed positions,
I would have gave up on myself and I
probably wouldn't have been able to
live with myself."
Murphy stuck it out, and he became
the backup this year when Brissett
transferred to North Carolina State.
He also got significant work with the
first-team offense early in fall prac-
tice, while Driskel recovered from an
appendectomy
Still, most believed the Gators
would be doomed if Driskel got hurt,
and it remains to be seen how Murphy
will play against better competition.
But the poise and presence he
showed against the Volunteers were
promising signs.
"One man's misfortune is another
man's opportunity," Florida coach
Will Muschamp said. "Everybody
wants it now He's a guy that's worked
extremely hard and cashed in on his
opportunity, and I look forward to see-
ing him play the rest of the year"


Schiano sticking with Freeman


Bucs head

coach also gives

Lindell vote of

confidence

Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -
Kenbrell Thompkins and
Aaron Dobson had a huge
challenge as the Patriots'
rookie starting receivers.
With veteran Danny
Amendola injured, they
were replacing Wes Welker
and Brandon Lloyd, who
combined for 192 catches
last year. And no NFL
player had more than
Welker's 672 receptions
over the past six seasons.
"I just feel like you can't
think about it," Dobson said
after New England beat the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
23-3 Sunday "You just have
to go out there and have fun.
We've been playing this
game since we were little
kids."
Five things to know from
the Patriots' rout of the
Buccaneers:
1. HAVE A IYTLEr
FAITH: Tom Brady is show-
ing enough faith in his rook-
ies to throw to them in key
situations. As if he has a
choice.
Amendola is sidelined
with a groin injury so three
of Brady's top four wide re-
ceivers are rookies. In the
first two games, he com-
pleted 20 passes to veteran
Julian Edelman. But on
Sunday, Thompkins caught
his first two touchdown
passes and Dobson led the
Patriots with seven catches
and 54 yards receiving.
In their previous game, a
13-10 win over the New
York Jets, Brady showed his
displeasure with the rook-
ies, raising his hands to his
helmet and speaking ani-


Associated Press
Tampa Bay quarterback Josh Freeman passes Sunday
against the New England Patriots in the first half in
Foxborough, Mass.


matedly on the sideline.
"Mistakes are going to
happen, but you just have to
learn from it," Dobson said.
He and Thompkins are,
after combining for just
nine catches in the first two
games.
"They've worked really
hard to understand what
we're trying to do," Brady
said. "We did a good job of
adjusting (during the
game)."
2. UNBEATEN, BUT...:
OK, so the Patriots are 3-0
for the first time in six
years. But look who they
beat The Buffalo Bills and
New York Jets with rookie
quarterbacks. And now the
Bucs, who have struggling
veteran quarterback Josh
Freeman. Not exactly the
best teams in the NFL.


That changes starting
next Sunday with a tough
three-game stretch road
games at Atlanta and
Cincinnati and a home
game against New Orleans.
Regardless of the oppo-
nent, the Patriots are 3-0.
"It's the best we can be
right now," safety Devin Mc-
Courty said. "Everyone will
continue to pick apart what
we do well and what we
don't do, but coming into the
season if you said after the
first three games, 'Where
would you want to be?' we
would want to be 3-0. We've
got to keep building and get-
ting better because the
games get harder and
harder"
3. WINLEsS AND GET-
TING WORSE: The Bucs
lost their first two games by


a total of three points, losing
on a field goal with 2 sec-
onds left and on another on
the final play On Sunday
they never threatened after
Rian Lindell's 30-yard field
goal late in the first quarter
Now coach Greg Schiano
may have to worry about his
players' attitude.
"I have great confidence
this team will stick to-
gether," he said. "We have a
lot of football to play and I
am confident that we will
improve and we will win."
4. STICKING WITH 'EM:
Schiano is sticking with
Freeman and Lindell
despite their shaky
performances.
Freeman completed 19 of
41 passes for 236 yards and
one interception and has
connected on 45.7 percent
of his passes this year But
Schiano isn't ready to
switch to rookie Mike
Glennon.
Asked if Freeman gives
Tampa Bay the best chance
to win and whether any
consideration was given to
pulling him, Schiano said,
"He does. And, no, there
wasn't"
But Freeman couldn't
come up with big plays. The
Bucs managed just three
points despite getting inside
the Patriots 40 six times.
On one of those trips, Lin-
dell missed a 38-yard field
goal attempt
"I like Rian," Schiano
said. "I think he is going to
be our kicker"
5. TOUGH DEFENSE:
The Patriots have allowed
34 points, their fewest
through three games since
1979. Former Bucs cormer-
backAqib Talib intercepted
his third pass of the season
in the final minute of the
first half, leading to
Stephen Gostkowski's
53-yard field goal.
"Three weeks in a row
we've raised our level of
play," defensive tackle
Vince Wilfork said.


COLLEGE
FOTBL
BRESI


Florida dealing
with red zone
issues
As if it weren't bad
enough No. 20 Florida
lost quarterback Jeff
Driskell for the season to
a broken leg in a 31-17
win over Tennessee, the
Gators are having a dick-
ens of a time getting into
the end zone when they
move inside the oppo-
nent's 20-yard line.
Florida has been into
the red zone 17 times in
three games and has
come away with just
seven touchdowns. That's
41 percent, which ranks
113th outof 125 FBS
teams.
Add in the three field
goals they've settled for
inside the 20, and that
raises their scoring effi-
ciency to 58.8 percent.
Only Southern Missis-
sippi, Louisiana-Monroe,
SMU and Miami (Ohio)
are worse.
Miami expects
Morris to play
against USF
CORAL GABLES -
Miami expects Stephen
Morris to play when the
15th-ranked Hurricanes
visit winless South Florida
on Saturday.
Morris was knocked out
of Miami's 77-7 win over
Savannah State in the first
quarter with a lower right
leg injury. It was originally
thought to be a sprained
ankle, though coach Al
Golden said Sunday that it
subsequently was diag-
nosed as a bone bruise.
Morris was in Miami's
training room on Sunday
for treatment. Golden says
he "absolutely" thinks Mor-
ris will play this weekend.
Golden expects that
Morris may be limited
when Miami (3-0) practices
Monday, though is hoping
to have him fully ready by
Tuesday's workout.
Morris' backups, Ryan
Williams and Gray Crow,
completed 17 of 19 passes
for 231 yards and three
touchdowns in the Savan-
nah State win.
Kentucky begins
preparations for
No. 20 Florida
LEXINGTON, Ky.-
Kentucky hopes having the
weekend off provides en-
ergy for the toughest part of
its season.
The Wildcats (1-2) re-
turned to practice Monday
to prepare for Saturday
night's Southeastern Con-
ference opener against No.
20 Florida (2-1, 1-0), the
first of three straight against
ranked league opponents
including No. 12 South
Carolina next week and
No. 1 Alabama on Oct. 12.
Saturday also marks the
return of former Kentucky
coach Joker Phillips, fired
last fall after three seasons
and now Florida's wide re-
ceivers coach. Mark
Stoops' hiring followed, but
the rookie coach doesn't
believe that subplot gives
the Wildcats added incen-
tive to end a 26-game
drought against the Gators.
However, Stoops'
knowledge of Florida that
he garnered as Florida
State's former defensive
coordinator has him
preparing the Wildcats to
be more physical.
SEC honors
Florida defensive
lineman Fowler
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -
LSU running back Jeremy
Hill, Florida defensive line-
man Dante Fowler and
Arkansas longsnapper
Alan D'Appollonio are
Southeastern Conference
players of the week.
The SEC announced
the winners on Monday.
Hill rushed for career-


highs of 184 yards and
three touchdowns on 25
carries in a win over
Auburn. Fowler won de-
fensive honors by forcing
two fumbles and recover-
ing one in a victory over
Tennessee.
Fowler also had a sack.
-From wire reports


FOOTBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Section C TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


George Washington Carver
reunion begins Friday/C6


Of women in the U.S. age 18 and older:
14.2 percent are in fair or poor health
44.6 percent do not meet the 2008
federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic
activity


13.6 percent have consumed five or more
alcoholic drinks in one day during the past year
17.3 percent currently smoke
35.9 percent are obese
32.8 percent have hypertension


Cancer & Blood Disease/C2
Ear, Nose & Throat/C3
Navigating Cancer/C2


Dr. Frank
Vascimini
SOUND
BITES


In an effort to improve those statistics, and improve the lives of women in
Citrus County, the Business Women's Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce is hosting its annual Women's Health and Fitness Expo,
Saturday at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River.
Hours are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free.













SFrom free admission to goodie bags for
1 )^ the first 500 attendees, you won't walk
away empty-handed. Door prizes include
a medi-spa package, Jazzercise, travel /
package, skin care package and exercise
equipment, plus lots of swag at the more
\than 60 exhibitor booths pens, candy,
refrigerator magnets, etc.






Local medical professionals will address
Indulge your senses, lower your topics of interest to women, including:
stress level and get pampered with a "Laser Treatment for Nail Fungus"
a mini massage, mini facial or "Women's Heart Health"
manicure; experience essential oils "The Healing Power of Low-Level /
therapy and more. Laser"
"\\oiinien & Heart Disease: Know
the Facts"
S"A Clear Path to a Healthier
Lifestyle"




Flu shots, product samples, demonstrations
and free health screenings. Visit the health, Look inside a Nature Coast EMS
fitness and wellness exhibits for everything ambulance (and ask about a career as an
you need to help you take control of your EMT or paramedic), do a good deed by
health and well-being. donating blood at the LifeSouth
Bloodmobile, peek inside the sheriff's /
FOCUS car and find out how to quit
Smoking from Tobacco Prevention
Specialist Elizabeth Wood with Tobacco
^ Feaur nteFree Florida.



Feature content compiled by Nancy Kennedy


Taking

10 years

off your

outlook
an you really take
10 years off of some-
one's appearance
with a new set of dentures?
I am willing to bet that
this is the shortest question
I have ever had for publica-
tion in the Citrus County
Chronicle.
That being said, I am
going to give the shortest
answer I have ever given in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. Yes (but of course there
is more to it).
I have seen time and time
again a new set of teeth
make someone look consid-
erably younger In fact, just
a few weeks ago I wrote a
column that mentioned the
changes I noticed in a pa-
tient of mine who had a set
of dentures made. In her
case it was a first set of den-
tures replacing very de-
cayed and unaesthetic
teeth. She looked so much
younger and more attrac-
tive that the boost in confi-
dence was extremely
obvious.
You might ask, why?
There are a lot of reasons
for looking years younger It
can be the color of the
teeth, the placement of the
teeth, the support of the lip,
the shape of the teeth,
and/or the relationship of
the upper and lower jaws.
The list goes on and on.
I can honestly say I have
seen a new set of teeth do
more for someone's overall
facial appearance than
even a face lift can do at
times. For this to be the
case a lot has to do with the
age of the patient, the con-
dition of their skin and
muscle tone. I bet many
people think a trip to the
cosmetic surgeon is the best
place for a better appear-
ance. Maybe you should
talk to your dentist about
what he or she can do for
you as well. Also, for those
of you who do not wear den-
tures, don't think the same
thing does not hold true for
you. Cosmetic dentistry can
make a huge difference in
your appearance. When
your appearance is en-
hanced you usually fell bet-
ter about yourself and your
See Page C4




C2 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


Excessive coffee drinking could prove hazardous


A s per one statistic, more
than half of adult Ameri-
I Aans drink coffee every
day In moderation, drinking
coffee can help, but some drink
a cup of coffee every few hours.
Whether coffee drinking is
harmful or not, is heavily de-
bated. Most researchers believe
that occasional coffee drinking
or drinking in moderation daily
does not hurt
The question is, what about
those who drink coffee heavily?
At the least, heavy caffeine use
- on the order of four to seven
cups of coffee a day can
cause problems such as rest-
lessness, anxiety, irritability
and sleeplessness, particularly
in susceptible individuals. Re-
cent study suggests those who


W / Dr. Sunil
Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


drink four cups of coffee a day
or 28 a week have more chance
of death. As far as I know, this is
the first such study to suggest
that heavy coffee consumption
increases death rate from all
causes.
In this latest study, which was
published online Aug. 15 in the
Mayo Clinic Proceedings,
lead investigator Dr. Junxiu


Liu (University of South Car-
olina, Columbia) and col-
leagues assessed the data from
the Aerobics Center Longitu-
dinal Study. The retrospective
analysis included almost 44,000
participants who were followed
for 17 years, during which time
2,512 deaths occurred. Of these
deaths, one-third were the re-
sult of cardiovascular disease.
Remember, a cup of coffee as
measured is an 8-ounce cup,
and not the supersized 20-
ounce cups typical of Starbucks
and other coffee chains.
The risk was highest among
men and women younger than
55.
This study has many limita-
tions it is retrospective, and
it included subset analysis that


is not ideal. There was some
strength in the study a large
number of participants who
were followed for a long time.
There are lots of studies
about coffee consumption. High
consumption of unfiltered cof-
fee is associated with mild ele-
vations in cholesterol levels.
And another study found that
two or more cups of coffee a
day can increase the risk of
heart disease in people with a
specific and fairly common
- genetic mutation that slows
the breakdown of caffeine in
the body
So, how quickly you metabo-
lize coffee may affect your
health risk.
In some other studies, moder-
ate consumption of coffee may


protect against diabetes and
Parkinson's disease.
In short, the study is not con-
clusive. The debate about
health effects of coffee will
not be placed to rest by this
study
In, my opinion, there is noth-
ing harmful to drinking one to
two cups of coffee a day,
but avoid drinking four cups
or more every day of the
week.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a hema-
tologist and oncologist. He is
the volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit ofAmerican
Cancer Society. Write to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, email sgandhi@tampa
bayrrcom or call 352-746-0707.


Herbal treatments may affect PSA


It is estimated 238,590 men will
be diagnosed with prostate can-
cer in the year 2013. Most pa-
tients are screened for prostate
cancer with a blood test that de-
tects a substance called Prostate
Specific Antigen (PSA).
Screening for PSA has been so
successful that most cases of
prostate cancer are picked up by
this screening test, and patients are
being diagnosed at earlier stages of
disease, thus their chance of cure
is much better
However, there is a concern re-
garding screening. I hear it every
week, "It's herbal and I buy it over
the counter, it can't be bad for you!"
This can be very far from the
truth.
With an increased utilization of
herbal therapies, it has been found
that a number of these natural sup-
plements may affect the PSA blood
test. Most of these herbs are touted
as "supporters of prostate health."
You can see the advertisements on
television, read them in the press,
and hear them on the radio.
Because these herbal therapies
are natural supplements, they are
not regulated by the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA). The only re-
quirement is that they do not claim
effectiveness against a particular
disease. So the manufacturers use
vague claims such as "supporting
male wellness" or "supporting
prostate health."
Unfortunately, several of these
herbal therapies can also lower the
PSA blood test and possibly lead to
a delay in the diagnosis of prostate
cancer These herbal remedies in-


Dr


elude saw palmetto,.
copene and other coi
herbs that we call ph
or plant like estrogen
As a reader, I hope
alize that these natui
are medications. The
number of processes
body Because they fa
heading of"supplem
not undergo the rigor
testing expected of n
approved by the FDA
Also, since they ar
lated, supplements fr
companies may have
different content. In
quently there are vari
centration of herbal
the same company
Many men take the
ments without know
these herbs can affect
blood test used to de
cancer early There i
some of these medic,
cause a delay in diag
prostate cancer
It is important for y
to know if you are tak
pies because they may
liance on the tradition
for normal PSA Also,


more importance on regular prostate
physical examinations.
SC. Josephi If there is a slight trend upward
r. J osep the PSA, even when it is in the
Bennett normal range, your physician may
be more likely to recommend a
NAVIGATING biopsy to rule out a cancer If you
CANCER are taking supplements, your physi-
cian needs to know, and the normal
thresholds used by physicians for
further evaluation may need to be
PC-SPES, ly- changed when patients are using
mbinations of therapies that may cause a
iytoestrogens, decrease in the PSA.
ns. And, for those patients treated for
* all of you re- prostate cancer with surgery or radi-
ral therapies ation, using herbal therapies without
ey can affect a the knowledge of your physician may
within the cause them to make false assump-
all under the tions of effectiveness of a conven-
rents," they do tional therapy This may cause a
rous scientific delay in the evaluation of recurrence
medications of prostate cancer and the institution
k. of appropriate therapy
e not regu- I know I have said this many
rom different times before, but always discuss
Completely the utilization of unconventional
fact, fre- medical therapies with your physi-
riations of con- cian. This will allow informed rec-
batches from ommendations to be made for
management of your condition.


ese supple-
ing some of
ct the PSA
tect prostate
s a possibility
nations will
xnosis of
our physician
ing these thera-
y place less re-
nlal values used
they may place


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a board-
certified radiation oncologist and a
member of the Citrus County Unit
of the American Cancer Society
Watch "Navigating Cancer" on
WYKE TVat 7:30p.m. Tuesday
and at 10 a.m. Thursday. Ifyou
have any suggestions for topics, or
have any questions, contact him at
522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461, or email cjbennett
@rboi.com.


HEALTH NOTES


Access Health Care sets series

SPRING HILL-Access Health Care, LLC an-
nounces the following lecture will be held during
the month of October
Oct 3 Diabetes: A preventable disease
Oct 17- Weight reduction: Awareness is
the first step
Oct 31 Food of Life: Your choice can
change it all
All lectures are at 5:15 p.m. at Access Health
Care's main office at 5350 Spring Hill Drive,
Spring Hill, and are conducted by Maria
Scunziano-Singh, M.D.
Dr Scunziano-Singh's practice focuses on
combining traditional medicine with holistic
treatments to maximize patients' health care
and nutrition.
For information and to register, 352-688-8116.

Register for We Can Weekend'

Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute (RBOI)
will feature speakers Patrick Acevedo, M.D.,
medical oncologist with Florida Cancer Special-
ists; Torr Carmain, M.D., with Inverness Surgical
Association; and motivational speaker Donald
Prendergast at the 15th "We Can Weekend" in
Citrus County.
This year's event is Sept. 28 at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club from 8 a.m. to noon. Lunch,
prizes, booths to visits and refreshments are
included in the event.
The "We Can Weekend" is presented for indi-
viduals who have been diagnosed with cancer
and their families to have support and the
latest information on cancer treatment and
prevention.
Registration is free, but you should call RBOI
at 352-527-0106 by Sept. 25 to register
See Page C4



Our Goal Is A

Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

B.K. Patel, M.D. H. Khan, M.D.
Internal Medicine Board Certified Family Medicine
Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, PA. Joseph Starnes, PA.

Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals



Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


Saturday, Oct. 26,2013
Reception 6p.m.
Dinner and Dueling Piano Show 7p.m.
Tickets avaifabfe onfine www.CF.edu/Foundation

Coffllege of Centralf Florida
Citrus Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto H{ighway, Lecanto, fL 34461-9026
Mlproceeds to benefit STEPS to CF, Schowarships Taking
Tlementaryn Promising Students to Cfin Citrus County
For more information caffthe CF Foundation 352-873-5808


Soeiia ft mT~o
sponsor" fll


Founder's CRYSTAL
Sponsro AUTOMOTIVE


IM.A.W.
0., G-Mlt A-
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HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


p




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fall allergy season brings ragweed to forefront


ost people, when they
think of allergies, think
of the spring season, but
the fall allergy season can be
just as nasty as the spring.
Since we live in Florida, we ex-
perience pollen season year
round. There are times when
the pollen count is down. All
the rain we have had recently
will knock the airborne pollen
count down but the additional
water can contribute to faster
growth and production of more
pollen and a longer bloom,
which interprets to more days
of suffering.
The big three fall pollen cul-
prits are ragweed, mold and
dust mites. Ragweed pollen
season which is more wide-
spread in the northeast, Mid-
west, northern plain states as
well as out west can be here in


*Dr. Denis
Grillo
EAR,
NOSE &
R THROAT

the south but to a lesser degree
between July and November
The peak pollen release is mid-
August until the first frost,
which as we know can be well
into December/January around
here.
About 75 million Americans
suffer with ragweed allergy. It
is a difficult one to avoid be-
cause it is in the air out of
doors. There are some simple
measures that you can utilize
which will help wash your


hands, take a shower and sham-
poo your hair before bed, and
keep your windows closed.
Nasal rinses and antihista-
mines are helpful, and so are
allergy shots.
Mold is the second big fall al-
lergen. We know Florida is very
humid and mold is everywhere,
indoors and out It, too, is very
difficult to escape.
It peaks in July in the
warmer states and in the north-
ern states it peaks a little bit
later because of deciduous tree
leaves becoming rotten and de-
composing, as well as rotting
limbs and logs and plants; they
have a little bit more of a prob-
lem than we do down here in
Florida.
The things that you can do for
ragweed avoidance are also
helpful for mold. Make sure


when you are out of doors mow-
ing the lawn, use a dust mask
and keep your yard cleaned up
of debris that can decompose
and turn into mold pollen.
Dust mites are the third big
culprit for fall allergies. They
are tiny little critters that love
to live in house dust and they
multiply and live happily in
more humid places like
Florida. Not only are they a big
problem in the fall, but here in
Florida, they are a problem
nearly year round. Patients who
have respiratory problems such
as asthma can also be affected
by these little bugs.
Because they are very small,
these little microscopic bugs can
easily get collected in porous
surfaces such as fabric, so pil-
lows, mattresses, carpeting, up-
holstered furniture is a big


collection site for these bugs.
Their concentrations will stay
high until about December when
the humidity starts changing
around and until that time it is a
good idea to have a clean home,
good filters on the air condi-
tioner, vacuum frequently with a
HEPA filter and when dusting
use a type of apparatus that
holds the dust or use a damp
cloth and you can buy encase-
ments for pillows and mattresses
that will not let the dust mites es-
cape. Bed linens should be
washed in hot water at least once
a week to keep the dust mites to
a low level.

Denis Grillo, D.O0., FOCOO, is
an ear, nose and throat special-
ist in Crystal River Call him at
352-795-0011 or visit Crystal
CommunityENTcom.


MONTHLY SUPPORT GROUPS


SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
the Florida Cancer Institute-
New Hope's Spring Hill Cen-
ter, 10441 Quality Drive,
Suite 203 in the Medical Arts
Building next to Spring Hill
Hospital. Call Jeff Haight,
R.N., group facilitator, at 352-
688-7744.
Caregivers' Support
and Information meeting,
1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Peg Weston, financial associ-
ate for Thrivent Financial, will
be guest speaker. Call Gail
Sirak at 352-795-1618 for di-
rections/information.
Refreshments served.
OCALA- Ocala Health
Stroke Support Group
meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Senior Wellness Community
Center (9850 S.W. 84th
Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call
800-530-1188 to register.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group, 3 p.m. fourth
Tuesday monthly at Crystal
Gem Manor, 10845 W. Gem
St., Crystal River, facilitated
by Debbie O'Leary, a group
leader trained by the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion. Call 352-794-7601.
Respite care available.
Alzheimer's caregiver


support group, 2 p.m. the
last Thursday monthly at
Highland Terrace ALF, 700
Medical Court E., Inverness,
facilitated by Debbie O'Leary,
a group leader trained by the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion. Call 352-860-2525.
Respite care available.
Support for People
with Oral and Head and
Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at
Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute at the Allen
Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N.
Lecanto Highway in Lecanto.
The Citrus Memorial
Diabetes Support Group,
10:30 a.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly on the
campus of Citrus Memorial
Health System in the
auditorium.
Call Amy Freeman at 352-
341-6110. No reservation is
required.
The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society Suncoast
Chapter, Cancer Support
Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner
Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is
no charge and light refresh-
ments are provided. Contact:
Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient
services manager, at 813-963-
6461 ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo
@lls.org or visit The Leukemia
& Lymphoma Society website
at www.lls.org.
Alzheimer's caregiver


support group byAlzheimer's
Family Organization, 2 p.m.
the fourth Wednesday monthly
at Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Call Bevin Brayton at 352-302-
9066.
Look Good ... Feel Bet-
ter, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radia-
tion or chemotherapy, at
3 p.m. the second Wednes-
day monthly at the Cancer &
Blood Disease Center,
Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann
Brown at 352-341-7741 or the
American Cancer Society at
800-395-5665 to register.
Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boule-
vard and Roosevelt, in Bev-
erly Hills. Call Meg at
352-527-2443.
PINELLAS PARK-
"Connections" fireside-dis-
cussion-style support group
for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the
last Thursday monthly, Well-
Spring Oncology, 6600 66th
St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-
343-0600; www.wellspring
oncology.org.
SPRING HILL-Stroke
Support Group, noon the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining


room. Call Pam McDonald at
352-346-6359.
Celiac/Gluten Sensitiv-
ity Support Group meeting
for all people who have celiac
disease or dermatitis herpeti-
formis, 10 a.m. to noon the
fourth Saturday monthly, re-
turning Sept. 28, in the Com-
munity Room at the Coastal
Region Library, 8619 W. Crys-
tal St., Crystal River. Call Ken
Kral at 352-684-4064 or Mar-
cia Treber at 352-794-3217.
SPRING HILL-Am-
putee support group, 7 p.m.
the last Monday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Eva Baker at 352-
592-7232.
Alzheimer's Associa-
tion-Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter support groups are
attended by caregivers of
loved ones with dementia or
Alzheimer's disease. All sup-
port groups are free of charge
to caregivers. Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church, 550
U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m.
first Tuesday monthly.
Call Anne Black at 352-527-
4600.
BROOKSVILLE -
Women's breast cancer
support group, 6 to
7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at Florida Cancer In-
stitute-New Hope Center at
7154 Medical Center Drive,
Spring Hill. Call Tambra Ran-
dazzo, R.T, at 352-592-8128.


SUPPORT
ORGANIZATIONS

Alzheimer's Association-Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter affiliated support groups are for family members,
caregivers and others interested in learning more about
Alzheimer's disease. Meetings are open to everyone
and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you
can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352-688-
4537 or 800-772-8672.
Website: www.alzsupport.com Live chat every
Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times
to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimer's
Association online community at
www.alz.org/living_ with alzheimers_ messageboards_
Iwa.asp.
Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136
N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2 p.m. third Saturday
monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044.
Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238
Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry
Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners,
11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140
Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane
Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-683-
9009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve.
First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All
groups are open to the public and free of charge, and
meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration
Building:
First Monday: diabetic support group.
Second Monday: Alzheimer's/dementia caregivers
support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group.
Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people
with Alzheimer's/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one
for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out in-
formation forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates.
See SUPPORT/Page C4


R.I. Discovery (Recov-
ery International) Abraham
Low, M.D., self-help systems
for mental health depres-
sion, obsession, stress, fears,
anger. Meetings are 2 to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Call Jackie, 352-563-5182.
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group,
6:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Room 204 in office building,
use right-side entrance across
from the Memorial Garden;
Nar-Anon is for family and
friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to
www.NARANONFL.org.
Food Addicts in Re-
covery Anonymous (FA) is a
free 12-step recovery pro-
gram for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeat-
ing, undereating or bulimia.
For details or a list of meet-
ings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit www.foodaddicts.org.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Depression and anxiety
peer support group meets at
10 a.m. Thursday at Central
Ridge Library.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the back hall, St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19 south of
Cardinal Street. Group is
composed of men and
women who are experiencing
grief and are convinced "Life
can be good again." Open to
all. Come or call Anne at 352-
220-1959.
AI-Anon groups meet
regularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.


Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41.
0 6 p.m. Monday at Club
Recovery, corner of County
Road 486 and Anvil Terrace,
Hernando.
Crystal RiverAFG:
8 p.m. Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S.
Suncoast Blvd.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG:
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
YANA Club, 147 Seventh St.
(off Citrus Avenue), Crystal
River.
0 Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church, 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Beginners AI-Anon:
10 a.m. Saturday atYana
Club, 147 Seventh St. (off
Citrus Avenue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Seren-


ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics
Anonymous: If you drink,
and want to stop, call Alco-
holics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 352-621-
0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
10:30 a.m. Sunday,
10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chas-
sahowitzka Community Cen-
ter, 1 mile west of U.S. 19 on
Miss Maggie Drive, turn left,
two blocks.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
A 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living
Waters Ministries, 12 N. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills. Call

See WEEKLY/Page C4


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What does your family's diet consist of?
A lot of red meat? Maybe foods with a high amount of saturated fats and even
processed foods? The men in your family could be at a higher risk for developing
prostate cancer. Learn how to prevent prostate cancer with diet changes
recommended at this physician-led presentation.

Free Seminar: The Link Between Diet and Prostate Cancer
Friday, September 27, at 1:00 p.m.
Featuring: Udaya Kumar, M.D., Board Certified in Urology
SRRMC Medical Offices Building, Community Room
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River

Registration is required 352.795.1234


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WEEKLY SUPPORT MEETINGS


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 C3




C4 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C2


Hospice of Citrus

presents grief workshop

Hospice of Citrus and the Nature
Coast will present "Grief Mythology"
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept 25,
at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings
Education Center located at 8471 W
Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
There is no one "right" way to grieve,
no timetable; and the ups and downs
during grieving can be unpredictable.
This workshop will explore a variety of
myths about grief and loss.
For information on this special event,
or to make a reservation, call Lynn
Miller at 352-621-1500 or 866-642-0962.
Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Face-
book or on the Web at wwwhospice
ofcitrus.org.


Gregory von Mering, M.D.: Women
& Heart Disease: Know the Facts (spon-
sored by Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center)
Judi Tear, public information offi-
cer, DOH: 3x3 -A Clear Path to a
Healthier Lifestyle (sponsored by the
Florida Department of Health Citrus
County)
Presenting sponsor is Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center Major spon-
sors are Advanced Urology Specialists;
Citrus Memorial Health System; Gene-
sis Women's Center & Medical Spa; To-
bacco Free Florida of the Citrus County
Health Department; and Florida Can-
cer Specialists. Media sponsors are the
Citrus County Chronicle and Citrus
95/Classic Hits the Fox. A number of
other businesses also are sponsoring at
varying lower levels.
Proceeds fund scholarships for fe-
male high school and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute students. In seven
years, $43,000 in scholarships has been
awarded to Citrus County students.
Call 352-795-3149 or visit www.citrus
countychamber com.


Oak Hill Partners Club SHARE club to host


set upcoming events

SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital
H2U Partner's Club events. The hospital
is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9
miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50.
Visit OakHillHospital.com.
H2U Partner's Club events and activi-
ties are open to members only Member-
ship is open to Hernando, Pasco and
Citrus County residents for $20 a year,
which includes membership in the HCA
national H2U program.
Sept 26 Smoking Cessation
Support- 1 p.m.
Sept 28 Suncoast Drive School -
8:30 a.m.

Oak Hill Partners Club

set upcoming events

Oak Hill Hospital plans seminar in
Homosassa
SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital's
For Your Health Community Education
Series from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept 25, will present a panel discussion
titled, "Comprehensive Care for Women
of All Ages" at the First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W Bradshaw
St., Homosassa. The panel will feature
Alene Wright, M.D., breast and general
surgeon, and Marc Polecritti, D.O., of
the Julian Institute of Plastic Surgery
Dr Wright will discuss the gene test for
breast and ovarian cancer Dr Polecritti
will offer reconstructive surgical op-
tions for breast cancer patients.
Admission is free and a complimen-
tary hot meal will be served. Seating is
limited and reservations are required,
call 352-628-6060 in Citrus or register
online at OakHillHospital.com/
ForYourHealth.

Workshops slated at

women's health expo

Five mini-workshops are being of-
fered as an added benefit for attendees
at the free Women's Health and Fitness
Expo, hosted by the Business Women's
Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce. This year's expo will be
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept 28,
at the National Guard Armory in Crystal
River
The first 30-minute session will begin
at 9:30 a.m., with the final session begin-
ning at 12:30 p.m. Speakers scheduled
so far include:
Carlos Rodriguez, M.D.: Laser
Treatment for Nail Fungus (sponsored
by Genesis Women's Center Med Spa)
Roxanne Maldunas, R.N.: Women's
Heart Health (sponsored by Citrus
Memorial Heart & Vascular Center)
Dr Kevin Hoffman, D.C.: The Heal-
ing Power of Low-level Laser (spon-
sored by Citrus Chiropractic Group)





VASCIMINI
Continued from Page Cl

confidence level gets a boost
Whether natural teeth or dentures,
your dentist can make a significant
change for the better if you give him or


women s neaiLn panel
The Citrus Memorial Health System
SHARE Club is offering a free Women's
Health Panel at 5 p.m. Monday, Sept 30,
in the Auditorium on the main hospital
campus.
Cardiac Cath Lab Manager C.J.
Hosea, Obstetrician/Gynecologist Dr Ar-
mando Rojas and others will present a
special Q & A discussion about women's
health including menopause, thyroid
disease, diabetes, gynecological proce-
dures, incontinence and heart health.
The floor will then open for questions
from the audience.
Refreshments and educational mate-
rials will be available during the discus-
sion. Seating is limited so an RSVP is
required to attend. Register online at
www.citrusmh. com/events.

Upcoming blood drives

in Citrus County

LifeSouth Community Blood Centers:
With summer upon us, there's a sharp
increase in the need for blood. To find a
donor center or a blood drive near you,
call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental permission,
weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be
in good health to be eligible to donate. A
photo ID is required.
The Lecanto branch office is at 1241
S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at 2629 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, open from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays), 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept 24,
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center,
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept
25, AAA Roofing, 1000 N.E. Fifth St.,
Crystal River
Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept 26,
Sumter Electric Cooperative, U.S. 301
and Sumter County Road 471, Sumter-
ville.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Sept 27,
Walmart Supercenter 2461 W Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday Sept
28, Business Women's Alliance Women's
Health and Fitness Expo, 8551 W
Venable St., Crystal River
E 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept 28, Wal-
mart Supercenter 3826 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept 29,
Walmart Supercenter 2461 W Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Sept 30,
College of Central Florida, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.




her a chance. Go ahead and make that
call.

Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist prac-
ticing in Homosassa. Send your ques-
tions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to
him at info@MasterpieceDental
Studio.com.


* So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not
intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug
interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace
consultation with a physician.


VOTE

1 0111l



visit
chronidcleonline.com
click features
dick enter contest



N0G5YW


SUPPORT
Continued from Page C3

Citrus Memorial Health System is a
198-bed, not-for-profit community hospital
that provides health care services to resi-
dents of Citrus County and surrounding
communities. Support group meetings are
in the CMHS Administration Building unless
indicated.
RBOI Prostate Cancer Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, 522 N. Lecanto Highway. Call
352-527-0106.
AHEC Quit Smoking: 3 p.m. Tuesday
at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000,
ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support: 11:30 a.m. the
second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer
Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-
4389.
Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext.
3329.
Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment
Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for
date and time.
Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh,
R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details.
Head and Neck Cancer Support:
Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Con-
tact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106.
Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30
to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other
month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call
352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register.
Look Good Feel Better: monthly at
Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, the Cosmetology As-





WEEKLY
Continued from Page C3

Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to
the public.
DUNNELLON Grief support
group, 6 p.m. Thursday at the First Bap-
tist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
It Works How and Why, noon to 1 p.m.
Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7
to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Satur-
day, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St.,
Crystal River.
Men's RAW (Recovery at Work) Men's
Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto
Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Lecanto.
More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Health System
Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness.
Recovery on the River, 7 to 8 p.m.
Monday; 8 to 9 p.m. Friday and Sunday;


sociation and the Personal Care Products
Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present
to advise women about many issues. For
dates, times, more information or to regis-
ter, call the American Cancer Society at
800-395-5665.
Mended Hearts Support: 10 a.m. sec-
ond Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic
Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at
352-344-6416.
Ostomy Support Group: 2 p.m. third
Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS His-
toric Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness.
Call Steve at 352-229-4202 or Sue at 352-
560-7918.
Stroke Support Group of Citrus
County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly,
CMHS Annex Building conference room,
State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call
352-344-6596 or 352-344-1646.
Hospice of Citrus County support
groups and workshops. Call 866-642-0962
or 352-527-2348 for information.
Grief workshops:
0 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus
County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave.,
Inverness.
0 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly
Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Educa-
tion Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
Grief support groups:
0 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
0 9 a.m. Wednesday Grief's Journey
... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park
(Parking Area E).
0 10 a.m. Thursday- Wings Education
Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
0 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of
the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County
Road 40 E., Inglis.
10:30 a.m. Saturday- First United
Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.




Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe
Terrace, Lecanto.
Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m. Thursday,
Citrus County Family Resource Center's
outreach center: 3848 E. Parsons Point
Road, Hernando.
Women United Ladies Meeting,
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday Citrus Memorial
Health System Historic School House:
135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness.
Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated
with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call
the 24-hour Helpline: 352-508-1604.
Information about NAis also available at
NatureCoastNA.org.
Overeaters Anonymous:
0 5 p.m. Tuesday at Club Recovery,
corner of County Road 486 and Anvil
Terrace, Hernando.
Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Monday at the Senior Center (V.A. build-
ing) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call
Dolores at 352-746-5019.
The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Thursday at Our Lady of Grace Church in
Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call
Carolyn at 352-341-0777.


0924-TUCRN
NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING
The Town of Inglis has tentatively adopted a budget for 2013/2014
A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget
AND TAXES will be held on:
September 26th, 2013
6:00 PM
At
Commission Room, Town of Inglis
06 135 Hwy. 40 West, Inglis Florida 34449
OOOG689

0924 TUCRN
BUDGET SUMMARY

TOWN OF INGLIS-FISCAL YEAR 2013/2014
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE TOWN OF INGLIS ARE
30.379 % LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.


SPECIAL
GENERAL REVENUE ENTERPRISE
FUND FUND FUND


ESTIMATED REVENUES & SOURCES
TAXES: Millage Per $1,000
Ad Valorem Taxes @4.5 mills
Sales and Use Taxes
Charges for Service
Intergovernmental
Permits, fees & Special Assessments
Fines and Forfeitures
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance


275,234
243,247
56,869
47,122
127,993
3,000
4,895
176,554


28,328

15,199


109
97,000


TOTAL
BUDGET


275,234
271,575
446,087 502,956
62,321
127,993
3,000
600 5,604
320,252 593,806


TOTAL REVENUES & SOURCES $934,914 $140,636 $766,939 $1,842,489
Fund Balances/Reserves/net Assets 580,927 7,952 371,860 960,739
TOTAL REVENUES AND BALANCES $1,515,841 $148,588 $1,138,799 $2,803,228
EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES:
General Government 247,219 247,219
Public Safety 527,703 527,703
Culture and Recreation 35,290 35,290
Transportation 126,900 126,900
Physical Environment 641,939 641,939
Contingency 124,702 13,736 125,000 263,438
TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES $934,914 $140,636 $766,939 $1,842,489
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets 580,927 7,952 371,860 960,739
TOTAL APPROPRIATED
EXPENDITURES & RESERVES $1,515,841 $148,588 $1,138,799 $2,803,228
THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND /OR FINAL BUDGET ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE
ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.
PUBLICATION DATE SEPT. 24th, 2013


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE COMMUNITY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 C5


NEWS NOTES

Bird walk set at Rainbow Springs
Citrus County Audubon president Fred Hileman
will lead a birding walk beginning at 8 a.m. from the
Rainbow Springs State Park parking lot Saturday
Participants will meet in the parking lot, where
there can be migrating warblers busily feeding on
insects in the tree tops, and continue to the spring-
head where egrets, anhingas, cormorants and other
water birds can be found; then on to the Butterfly
Garden. The walk will last approximately two to
three hours.
Pre-registration is not necessary and participants
with all levels of birding skills are welcome. Bring
water, binoculars and wear comfortable walking
shoes, as it will involve some moderate walking. No
RSVP is necessary A few pairs of binoculars are
available for use. The regular $2 admission fee to
the park applies.
Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunnellon is at
19158 S.W 81st Place Road.

Retired law officers group to meet
The National Association of Retired Law Enforce-
ment Officers will begin a new season at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday at American Legion Post 155, 6585 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River
NARLEO is open to both active and retired law
enforcement officers, including federal and state
agents, probation, parole and corrections officers.
Bring law enforcement ID.
Meetings are the fourth Thursday monthly
For more information, call Andrew J. Tarpey at
352-344-9313.

Doll club to get together
The Central Florida Sugar Babes Doll Club will
open its 2013-14 year Wednesday at the Central
Community Center, Room 115. This facility is off
County Road 491 behind Diamond Ridge
onvalescent Facility
The meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., followed by
lunch at the Main Street Restaurant in Beverly
Hills. The September program will be a discussion
of the annual UFDC Convention, which took place
in Washington, D.C. Three club members will share
the programs and activities from the convention.
The club welcomes visitors. Sugar Babes Doll
Club is a member of the United Federation of Doll
Clubs. For information, call Laurie at 352-382-2299
or Barbara at 352-344-1423.

View 'forgotten'flick Thursday
The Forgotten Film Festival's last of its Septem-
ber movies will be shown at 3 p.m. Thursday at the
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (County Road 41), Citrus Springs. Everyone is
welcome; a $3 donation is appreciated.
"Salmon Fishing in Yemen" will be the offering. A
fisheries expert is approached by a consultant to
help realize a sheik's vision of bringing the sport of
fly-fishing to the desert and embarks on an up-
stream journey of faith and fish to prove the impos-
sible possible. Cast: Amr Waked, Emily Blunt and
Ewan McGregor
For more information, call 352-465-4225 or visit
naturecoastuu.org.

Guided archaeo-eco kayak tour
Join the Florida Public Archaeology Network
(FPAN) and the St. Martins Marsh Aquatic Preserve
for a guided kayak tour from 9 a.m. to noon Friday
Come learn about the local environment and
archeology of the Crystal River and its tributaries.
The tour departs at 9 a.m. from the kayak launch
at the Crystal River Preserve State Park, 3266 N.
Sailboat Ave., Crystal River Kayaks are available for
a $20 donation or bring your own. Space is limited.
Call Jeff Moates at 813-396-2327 for more
information and to reserve a space.

Audition to sing anthem at rodeo
The Citrus Stampede Rodeo will take place
Nov 22 and 23. Gates open at 5:30 p.m.
Do you have what it takes to sing the national an-
them at the Citrus Stampede Rodeo? Enter the
karaoke contest from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at
Mama's Kuntry Kafe, 1787 W Main St., Inverness.
Signup begins at 4:30 p.m.
Guidelines for the contest are:
Participants must sing the National Anthem.
All singers may bring their own karaoke disc
with graphics.
Amateur participation only
Participants will only sing one song, unless a
tiebreaker is needed.
The judge's decision is final. For more informa-
tion, call 352-527-5700.

Reiki group gathers at library
Reiki Gentle Touch Circle meets from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Homosassa Library
Everyone is welcome. For more information, call
352-628-5537.







Sept 27 thru Oct 1

a Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds U.S. 41 S,, Inverness
0m Sale Hours

Fri. 5-8 p.m.


with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day)
Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3abag)

Great bargains in recycled reading!
Thousands of best sellers, large print, crafts,
cooking, health, children's, travel, CDs, DVDs,
games, puzzles, treasures, etc.
Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region,
Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and
Citrus County Library System.
www.foccls.org ....
For book sale information call C o [ i /- i c.EI
746-1334 or 527-8405 C IlI (i


Senior Center Month


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed September 2013 as "Senior Center Month" in
Citrus County. Senior community centers have acted as a catalyst for mobilizing the creativity, energy, vitality
and commitment of the older residents of Citrus County. Through the wide array of services, programs and
activities, senior community centers empower older citizens of Citrus County to contribute to their own health
and well-being and the health and well-being of their fellow citizens of all ages. The programs offered at these
centers affirm the dignity, self-worth and independence of older persons by facilitating their decisions and actions,
tapping their experiences, skills and knowledge, and enabling their continued contributions to the community. For
more information about senior centers in our community, please call 352-527-5975. Back, from left are:
Commissioners John "JJ" Kenney, Rebecca Bays, Dennis Damato, Scott Adams and Joe Meek, with senior
centers participants from across Citrus County.



Explore locally on estuaries day


Special to the Chronicle

The St. Martins Marsh Aquatic
Preserve and the Citrus County
School District's Marine Science
Station invites the public to cele-
brate National Estuaries Day from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
The community event will in-
clude guided boat rides, children's
activities, a hike up a 60-foot estu-


Scouts' car wash
Boy Scout Troop 462
will have a car wash from
8 a.m. to noon Saturday at
Bay Area Air Condition-
ing & Heating, 8021 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River

Benefit for K-9s
The public is invited to
attend the 832 K-9's
Deputy Dogs 12th annual
fundraiser from 4 to
10 p.m. Saturday at the
Plantation on Crystal
River
The gala will off an
evening of fun with din-
ner and music, awards,
prizes and the not-so-
silent auction. Karen Ann
Wilson will be signing her
new book, "Wrinkles in
Time."
Attendees may even get
a sloppy kiss or two from
some of the heroic blood-
hounds that will be there
with their handlers from
across the U.S.
Tickets are $50 per per-
son, available online at
www.deputydogs.org, by
mailing 11565 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness,
FL 34450, or by calling
352-382-5486.

'Save the Shelter'
The Humane Society of
Citrus County's $10 Poker
Run and Benefit to "Save
the Shelter" will be Sun-
day, Oct 6. Sign in at
10 a.m. at Heads & Tails
Lounge, 9211 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City Kick-
stands go up at 11 a.m.;
the benefit begins at
noon.


ary observation tower, as well as
walking tours of waterfront educa-
tional and research facilities.
Due to limited available parking,
visitors must meet at the Crystal
River Preserve State Park at 3266
N. Sailboat Ave. Crystal River, for
vehicle parking. Guided boat rides
will take visitors to the Marine Sci-
ence Station and back to the
Crystal River Preserve State Park


FUNDRAISERS


Stops will be at Thun-
der Inn, Sparrows Tavern,
CC Riders MC of Citrus
County Mike's Friendly
Pub and ending at Heads
& Tails Lounge for a
fundraiser and party
Barbecue and steak
dinners are $5 each. En-
tertainment will be by the
Soggy Bottom Bait Shop
Boys. There will be a
silent auction, 50/50
drawing and raffles.
For information, call
Chrissy at 352-642-3429.

Camp to do meal
Eckerd E-Nini-Hassee,
a not-for-profit organiza-
tion for at-risk girls, will
host its annual spaghetti
dinner from 3:30 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7027
E. Stage Coach Trail,
Floral City
Donations are $8 per
person, which includes
salad, bread, spaghetti
(with assorted homemade
sauces), dessert and
drink.
Call 352-726-3883 for
more information.

Poker run coming
The Cooter Scooter
Poker Run will take place
Saturday, Oct. 12, starting
and ending at the Inver-
ness VFW at 906 State
Road 44 E.
The schedule is:
8:30 a.m. Breakfast
and registration at the
Inverness VFW
10 a.m. Kickstands
up.
5 p.m. Prize win-
ners announced (must be
present).
3 to 7 p.m. -Party


LiaTrr SHINE 2013
Presented By Shepherd o f the Hils Episoipal Church


Te 'It Like ItWas TehndlonConwetSigrs
ACrakwtrCB6PoshPeiabytlbkm Fa, iles from The Girt Ameirmn Sog BoOk


Matson gives
us trulh, folklore
and poetry on
what it was like
working' cattle a r
hundred years
ago in Florida.


St Augustine:
WhtatuInaSee and \\atVIb Dont
B s *gE*


I*SUDAY OCOBE.6...p


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hccwncEirh_ *^nH^^ ltf-rbeH'
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^ ^7 ^- ^Z ^ + concert that will include Vivaldis 'GLORIA"



.254OWNBdiSWWh .(M4U I [b46...1 .....-.. .. UioNil


with Soggy Bottom Bait
Shop Boys at the end of
the Freedom Run.
Cost of $10 per person
includes one poker hand
($5 extra hand). Tickets
are on sale at Citrus
County veterans' organi-
zations. All net proceeds
received from the city of
Inverness will be placed
in the VFW Post 4337 Vet-
erans Relief Fund to ben-
efit local homeless/needy
veterans and families.
The event is open to
everyone, not just veter-
ans. Bikes and cars are


throughout the duration of the
event. If necessary, limited dis-
abled access parking will be avail-
able at the Marine Science
Station, 12646 W Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
For more information, contact
Jamie Letendre via email at
Jamie.Letendre@dep.state.fl.us or
phone at 352-563-0450. This event is
free to the public.


welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Victor at 352-
220-3487.


MASTERPIECE
D E NTAL-STU DIO
The art of optimum quality dentistry.
W Always
elcomin,
w Patients
FRANK J.I \( MINI.
4805 S Suncoast B
Homosassa, FL 34- a '
35'2-628-0012 I'


34th Annual Citrus Sertoma


SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
t',' __ _proudly presents the
14| -/ | | | Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
1 rf^L | iBusiness Women's Alliance


NESS


Saturday, September 28,2013
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
National Guard Armoj
Hwy. I 5/Venable 5t, Cy-Jtal Kivcr
Health, fitness & wellness exhibits
FREE health screenings
Demos Product Samples & More
Live Remote Sheriffs FOCUS Car
LifeSouth Bloodmobile NCEMS Ambulance
SPA Zone 5FEAKRKS'
SMedi-Spa Pkg ($1000) Jazzercise ($500) Travel Pkg
($500) Glamour Girls Pkg ($250) Skin Care Pkg ($250)
Exercise Eq ($250) Pamper Pkg ($250)
Mqor Sposots
SEVEN.RIVERs Advanced Urology Specialists, Citrus Memorial
SE N Ri Health Systems Genesis Women's Center & Med
nCS 0 Spa Tobacco Free Florida at Citrus County Health
--CON Department Florida Cancer Specialists Citrus
CHOONICLE 95/Classic Hits the Fox Publix Super Markets





Page C6 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUIS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEW NOTES

Research jobs at mall
Workforce Connection's Mobile Resource Unit will
be at Crystal River Mall from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday
The 40-foot mobile resource unit (MRU) known as
MOBY1 will be available to assist job seekers. Self-
service and staff-supported services include: search
and apply for jobs; resume assistance; research ca-
reers; information about workshops and job fairs;
information about workforce connection services.
For details, call 800-434-5627, ext. 1933.

CASA bunco party slated Oct. 13
In conjunction with Domestic Violence awareness
Month in October, Citrus Abuse Shelter Association
(CASA) will host a Bunco Blast fundraiser Sunday,
Oct. 13, at Catholic Charities Community Center Out-
reach, 9020 W Atlas Drive, Homosassa. Doors open
at 12:15 p.m. and games begin at 1.
Cost is $12 per person, a nonrefundable charitable
donation. Refreshments, game prizes and door
prizes are included. Make reservations by calling
Janet at 352-527-2304 or mailing janetbl95@
gmail.com. All proceeds will go to CASA for victims
of domestic violence.

Westend Market to be Saturday
The Crystal River Mall Westend Market (old Sears
location) will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
This is an indoor fresh market with produce and
other local food-related items, plants and handmade
arts and crafts. It is an outdoor market experience
inside an air-conditioned facility.
All vendors must register with the mall office by
calling 352-795-2585 and supply their own setups and
pay the vendor fee. This is a free event for the
public.
Also in the mall, from 1 to 4 p.m., Roger Carrier
provides music for listening and dancing. He has
more than 170,000 songs in his karaoke library and
everyone is welcome to participate.

Camera Club to do workshop
The Citrus County Art Center Camera Club,
2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Hernando, will have a work-
shop at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30.
It will be a hands-on workshop covering macro
and close-up photography Participants will need a
camera to photograph the different presentations
prepared by Pete Gumaskas and Dick Coffman. They
will also assist anyone needing help in taking photos.
This workshop will be in preparation for the fol-
lowing photo competition on Monday, Oct 7, "Pho-
tographing Anything Smaller than a Dollar" The
workshop will be helpful to anyone taking part in the
October competition.
The workshop is $5 for members and $10 for non-
members. First-time guests are welcome. Anyone
wishing to become a club member after the first visit
may call the Art Center at 352-400-4466.

'Chickin' BBQ' set for Saturday
Voiture & Cabane 1219 will present its third an-
nual "Chickin' BBQ" from 2 to 7 p.m. Saturday at
American Legion Post 155, 6586 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River
Menu includes one-half chicken, baked beans and
coleslaw for $7. Help raise money for the Citrus
County Youth Sports Program. There will be games
set up inside and outside and a TV at the back bar to
watch college football games. There will also be a
50/50 raffle.
Everyone is invited. For more information, call
Larry Pine, local Voiture 1219 youth sports director,
at 352-563-5451.

Cruising for a Cause
Enjoy cruising with friends while supporting local
seniors on Royal Caribbean's "Freedom Of The
Seas" seven-night Eastern Caribbean Cruise.
The cruise leaves from Port Canaveral Oct. 20
and visits Coco Cay, St. Thomas and St. Maarten.
Passports are required. Proceeds benefit the Senior
Foundation of Citrus County and the Citrus County
Meals on Wheels Program.
For more information about prices and to book a
cruise, call 352-628-0668.

Precious Paws ADOPTABLES


Pretty tabbies


Special to the Chronicle
Several young adult tabbies, both male and female,
are available for adoption. All are sweet and social,
a few are lap trained and others just want to be your
best friend. Most tolerate dogs and all are used to
being with other cats. Kittens and cats are available
for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road
44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The
Crystal River Mall adoption center has new hours. We
are open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday
and Sunday. Our Floral City adoption center at
Greta's Touch on U.S. 41 is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday. Visit www.preciouspawsflorida.com or call
352-726-4700.

* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


'Coming Home 2013'


Reunion raising funds for

Special to the Chronicle The op
"Coming
The George Washington Carver with a mi
reunion, which begins Friday and followed
runs all weekend, will be a fundrais- 11 p.m. F
ing event for the George Washington Copeland
Carver Community Center building Second S
as construction continues. The pub- There
lic is invited to attend the festivities. "Walk to


George Washington Carver center


opening ceremonies for
Home 2013" will begin
set-and-greet at 5 p.m.,
by a block party from 6 to
ridayat the Marjorie
i residence, 673 N.E.
t., Crystal River
will be a 5K (3.1-mile)
Succeed" from 7 to 11 a.m.


Saturday, followed by a picnic from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Copeland Park.
The reunion will conclude Sun-
day at worship services at 11 a.m. at
Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
Church, 2105 Georgia Road, Crystal
River
For more information, call Edna
Foster at 352-795-2746.


National Public Lands Day


Volunteers sought to

Special to the Chronicle
Join the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Crystal
River Preserve State Park from
8 a.m. to noon Saturday for the Na-
tional Public Lands Day Project.
Meet at Churchhouse Hammock
Trailhead for maintenance and
trail improvement. Volunteers will


clean up Churchhouse Hammock Trail


expand and mulch the primitive
trail, trim trees in public use and
the picnic areas, reset landscape
timbers, plant native species in the
area and remove weeds from sig-
nage areas. Bring water, gloves,
sunscreen, bug spray and a snack,
if desired. Wear long pants, a hat
and sturdy, closed-toed shoes.
Lunch will be provided as a thank-


you for supporting National Public
Lands Day
To learn more about National
Public Lands Day at Churchhouse
Hammock, visit www.floridastate
parks.org/crystalriverpreserve/
events.cfm, or www.publiclands
dayorg. To learn more about the
park, visit www.floridastateparks.
org/crystalriverpreserve.


Donation to CREST


I "INEon /1 -- m


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Inverness Sertoma member Barry Pendry presented Citrus Resources for Exceptional Students in Transition
(CREST) in Lecanto a check for $100. Principal Lee Mulder was contacted by the Inverness Sertoma Club about
wanting to Adopt a Class. Mulder held a drawing at the beginning of the day Sept. 18 with students to see which
class would be adopted. Proudly accepting the donation was Bradley Pugh's second-grade class. Pictured front,
from left, are: Brandon Segarra, Lyle Poling and Connor Ramsey. In back, from left, are: Pugh, Pendry, Mulder and
teacher's aide Lisa Grotjahn.



Local pair offer fun times at social dances


Allan O'Neal and Linda's
monthly dances out at the
Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation Banquet Hall are on hold
for now, but will resume in the near
future.
The couple are a most delightful
team. Allan provides the music,
taking requests. Dance lessons are
provided free. Linda prepares
sumptuous snacks, including suc-
culent Swedish meatballs, relish
trays, fresh fruit trays, crackers and
dips, and mouthwatering desserts.
Coffee, tea and soft drinks are pro-
vided for a small fee.
Their stated goal is to provide a
form of entertainment that retirees
can afford; a place where friends
meet friends and socialize and
learn different dances.
The floor is usually crowded with
dancers doing the Electric Slide,
romantic waltz numbers, the cha-
cha and smooth tangos.
Allan is a gifted artist who sings
all of the songs we love to hear,
songs made famous by such artists
as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin,
Barbra Streisand, Tony Orlando
and Dawn, Patsy Cline, Elvis, Jim
Reeves and others.
Linda always decorates the hall
and the tables with an inviting
theme.
I attended a patriotic dance this
summer and, just last month, a fall


Ruth
Levins

AROUND THE
COMMUNITY


dance. Allan sang one of my fa-
vorite songs, "More," then the
crowd took to the floor for his med-
ley of waltzes. Soon we heard
Allan's rendition of Elvis Presley's
"Good Luck Charm" and Lou
Rawls' "You're Gonna Miss My
Lovin."'
Next, he favored the cha-cha fans
with a medley Al Martino's "Span-
ish Eyes" filled the dance floor and
the dancers lingered around for
"The Way You Look Tonight." Pick-
ing up the pace with "Kansas City,
Here I Come" for the rockers
crowd, we waited for Keith Whit-
ley's "Don't Close Your Eyes" be-
fore we ventured out on the floor
The line dancers took to the floor
in abandon, some still learning
from others.
"Ole Time Rock and Roll," a
perennial favorite, saw dancers
showing off their 1950s routines in
wild enthusiasm.
The hauntingly beautiful "It's All


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


in the Game" and "Maria" from
"West Side Story" slowed the pace
and saw still others enjoying the
dance. "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown"
and Bobby Darin's "Mack the
Knife" are always crowd-pleasing
dance numbers.
Englebert Humperdinck's "After
the Lovin'" saw smooth romantic
dance form at its finest.
"We Are Family" brought out a
variety of moves followed by some
"Proud Mary" energy-filled rou-
tines. Slowing down a bit with Ray
Price's hit "Best Thing That Ever
Happened to Me," was a relief to
those needing to catch their breath.
Following a great "Electric
Slide" piece and "Begin the Be-
guine," it was time to thank Allan
and Linda for a lovely way to spend
an evening.
Coming soon, Linda's Event Solu-
tions will hold a Brides Luncheon
and wedding informational event
at the hall Nov 2, with a free lunch
for prospective brides.
Vendors will be on hand to pro-
vide information about the services
they offer for upcoming weddings.

Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community Let her know about
your group's upcoming activities by
writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal
River, FL 34423.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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51 25 51 32 42 ars'PG' CarsPG Cars'PG' Cars Cars Cars'PG' Cars PG Cars'PG' Cars'PG'
S3 3 Abby's Ultimate Dance Abby's Ultimate Dance Abby's Ultimate Dance Abby's Ultimate Dance Double Double Double Double
24 38 24 31 Competition Competition Competition Competition Divas'14' Divas'14' Divas'14' Divas 14'
5** 12 "Painful Secrets" (2000, Drama) Sean "No One Would Tell" (1996, Drama) Candace ** "Moment of Truth: Cradle of Conspiracy"
S 50 119 Young. (In Stereo)'NR' Cameron. (In Stereo) (1994) Danica McKellar. N
fn 320 21 30 3 *** "The Five-Year Engagement" (2012) *** "Pitch Perfect" (2012 Musical Comedy) ** "Taken 2" (2012) Liam Neeson. Girl's
320 221 320 3 3 Jason Segel. (In Stereo) "'m Anna Kendrick. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c (In Stereo)'NR'c Guide
NC 42 41 42 HoiiticsNation (N) Hardbaii witn Unris All in witn unris Hayes i ne Hacnei Maddow i ne Last Word witn A in w itn nnris Hayes
S41 42 Matthews (N) N (N) Show (N) Lawrence O'Donnell
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109 65 109 44 53 Salvation Salvation Salvation Salvation (N) '14' Salvation Salvation
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fOi 103 62 103 -Beverly's Full House Beverly's Full House The Haves, Nots The Haves, Nots The Haves, Nots The Haves, Nots
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370 271 370 Jennifer Garner. (In Stereo)'PG'[] Stereo) 'MA' B Stereo) 'MA' B Kevin James. (In Stereo) 'PG' B
36i 31 36n Inside the Rays Live! MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at NewYorkYankees. From Yankee Rays Live! Inside the FOX Sports Live (N)
36 31 36 Rays (N) Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. (N) (Live) (N) Rays (Live)
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31 59 31 26 29 Action) ChanningTatum. PG-13' iconic characters. Up, Stan" iconic characters.
TR 49 23 49 16 19 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Cleveland Fam.Guy IFam.Guy Fam. Guy |Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N)'14' c
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169 53 169 30 35 Widow" Rogers. NR' Conduct" (1933) NR' Romance) Jean Dast e.'NR' Pierre Fresnay'NR'
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i 35 21 3 "See Girl "Apollo 18" (2011) Lloyd Owen. *Y, "Halloween: Resurrection" "Barricade" (2012) Eric "Southern Gothic"
350 261 350 Run"'NR' (InStereo) PG-13'c (2002) Jamie Lee Curtis. McCormack. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c (2007) Yul Vazquez.
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TV 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Boston Legal'14' Boston Legal'14' Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Kin
**B "Bridesmaids"O(2011, Comedy) Kristen Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Law & Order: Special
47 32 47 17 18 Wiig, Maya Rudolph. 'R' (DVS) Family Family Family Family Family Family Victims Unit'14
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j 117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace
WN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos ***y2,"Insomnia"(2002)AIPacino.'R'H Mother Mother Rules


West
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Deal
Vuln,
South w
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4* P


ENTERTAINMENT


er: South
erabic: Both
Vest North
ass 2 NT
ass 44
ass 6 V


East
Pass
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: 46 Q


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Alexandre Dumas, the father, not his son,
said, '"All human wisdom is summed up in two
words wait and hope."
At the bridge table, one wishes that all wis-
dom isn't summed up in two words play and
hope. Yes, you will often be hoping for the best,
but ideally you find a 100 percent line of play
or defense.
In yesterday's deal, declarer had two
chances to make his contract. Today's is simi-
lar South is in six hearts. West leads the club
queen. What are declarer's two chances? How
should he play to combine them?
North's two-no-trump response was the Ja-
coby Forcing Raise, guaranteeing at least four-
card heart support and game-going values.
South's three-spade rebid indicated a single-
ton (or void) in that suit Then, after two con-
trol-bids (cue-bids), North made a very
aggressive jump to slam.
If you bid the spots off the cards, you had
better play them off, too and get lucky
South can see two possible losers: one dia-
mond and one club. He has only 11 top tricks:
one spade, six hearts, one diamond, two clubs
and a spade ruff in South, the shorter trump
hand. Declarer's first thought is probably that
the diamond finesse needs to work. But he
might also find clubs 3-3. And that should be
tried first.
South takes the first trick, draws trumps, and
plays two more rounds of clubs. Here, they di-
vide evenly and declarer can claim, stating
that he will discard one of dummy's diamonds
on his last club. But if the clubs were not 3-3,
the diamond finesse would still be available.

Jpcm j4 T THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
pJ1 I by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
L- 1^ ~yf -
Unscramble these four Jumbles, 11' --n ,
one letter to each square, S 1 V1 1
to form four ordinary words. I -' ,
I LEFTE / --,
DiarIn -
@2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC :. ye -r i
All Rights Reserved
CLUGH / '
.r 2 ", -4= "This is the
*--^ -----_ -T -I t". : 1 Ilithhne
slowest he
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PALPOT |



NECCAL __
7 1 ~ ^^


FOR THE #1 RANKFP
RUNNER, FINISHING IN
L-AST PLACE WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: AW
(Answers tomorrow)
....I Jumbles: BOGUS LLAMA DISMAY CASHEW


When she suggested her dad talk to a lawyer
about estate planning, he said WILL DO


ACROSS
1 Ayres or
Wallace
4 Fiery gem
8 Nerve cell
part
12 Mouths
13 Bright star
14 Pulpit
15 Made suds
17 Successor
18 Late summer
flower
19 High-Ib group
20 AAA
suggestion
22 Tyke
23 In that case
(2 wds.)
26 Ski mecca
28 Cookie holder
31 Turf
32 Mantra chants
33 -,amas,amat
34 NASA
counterpart
35 Kipling hero
36 With, in
Cannes


37 Pigpen
38 Grant
39 Status
40 Belly dance
instrument
41 Hull sealant
43 Herb
46 Forbidden
50 Bee colony
51 Siberian sled
dogs
54 Jeannie
portrayer
Barbara
55 Genghis or
Kublai
56 Abner
57 Army fare
58 Sturdy lock
59 Sign before
Virgo

DOWN
1 Ms. Falana
2 Periods
3 Light bulb
unit
4 Blatant


Answer to Previous Puzzle


6 Improve, as
wine
7 Youngster
8 Cohed and -
9 Mutant heroes
(hyph.)


9-24 ,: 2013 LUFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


DearAnnie: My fiance's
mother has a rocky re-
lationship with both of
her sons. We see her infre-
quently, but still, my fiance
loses his patience with her
quickly
At first I was OK
with her, but now
she annoys me, as
well. She brags
about things,
pleads to get her
way, plans visits
without checking
with us, is sensitive
to being told no or
to anything she
perceives as criti-
cism, and is very
demanding. She
also recently ANI
pulled a childish MAIL
trick. When my fi-
ance told her no re-
peatedly, she simply called
me to plead her case, know-
ing I am uncomfortable
saying no.
She is in her late 60s and
continues to blame her ac-
tions on a rocky childhood.
My mother says to just be po-
lite to her, which I try hard to
do. But now that she is in my
home for a week, conversa-
tions with her are impossible,
and I feel I need to walk
away She has a psychiatric
disorder, although I am not
sure of the diagnosis. My fi-
ance's grandmother indicates
it is schizophrenia, so I don't
want to push her too far
We are getting married
soon at a courthouse. During
this unplanned and uninvited
trip, she said it is too expen-
sive for her and my fiance's
father to travel to see us get
married. I am fine with this,
but my fiance is upset that his
parents do not care enough to


I
L


make it work. They can afford
the airline tickets.
I think it is my fiance's
place to explain his hurt feel-
ings to them. Do I continue to
be polite about it? I am cur-
rently working long hours to
avoid being in my
h-- ome while she is
visiting. Is there a
better way to han-
dle this?-Z.
Dear Z.: Yes,
please continue to
be polite. We rec-
ognize that his
mother's behavior
is difficult, but you
see her infre-
quently so try to
tolerate her as best
IE'S you can for your fi-
BOX ance's sake. He ob-
viously cares a
great deal about
his parents. He should tell
them how important it is to
him that they attend the wed-
ding, but he cannot control
their response. We hope they
will make the effort to be
there, and we hope you will
be supportive without com-
miserating too much.
DearAnnie: Lately, it
seems as if my siblings have
been ignoring me, except for
the eldest I'm a teenager, and
my siblings are older The
eldest tries to involve me in
everything she can, but she's
moved out of the house. The
other two go off and have fun,
and when I try to join in, they
give me nasty looks and tell
me to go away What should I
do about them? Indiana
Teen
Dear Teen: You should re-
calibrate your expectations.
Your siblings are not respon-
sible for your social life. We
know it hurts when they go


off without you, but such
rudeness is not uncommon.
Learn to ignore them. When
they leave, casually wave
goodbye and be occupied
with something else. As you
grow up, this situation will
improve, but it will take time.
Meanwhile, phone or text
your friends and schedule
some activities so you are
less focused on what your sib-
lings are doing. It also will
make you much more inter-
esting to them if you seem in-
dependently busy and happy
If you need help doing this,
talk to your parents, your
school counselor, a favorite
teacher or other trusted
adult.
Dear Annie: I'm respond-
ing to the comment from
"Germantown, Tenn.," about
store employees being forced
to stand all day That's part of
their job description and how
products get to the shelves. In
the store that I manage, the
older employees never have
complained about standing
all day The Manager
Dear Manager: The fact
that your employees don't
complain doesn't mean they
aren't suffering. Standing is
OK if you get to walk around,
but otherwise, it is hard on
the feet and back.

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www. creators. comn.


[QjT 'SEGBIBE RE FW|D'
TE A L I OA R
RR EGU L A*IA
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MTAIS. E N S I I T

Y I I N A L 0 G I 'D E
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10 Kimono
sashes
1i Asta's
mistress
16 Leggy bird
19 Wire measure
21 Called forth
22 Fate
23 Seine vistas
24 Quick
25 Move in the
breeze
27 In the thick of
28 Diner coffee
29 Word from the
pews
30 Music genre
36 Orderly
grouping
38 Billiards stick
40 Signs
42 Make
restitution
43 Those people
44 Stash away
45 Designer
Saint Laurent
47 Steeple
feature
48 Garfield's
victim
49 Peace Prize
city
51 Starry vista
52 Gleeful cry
53 de mer


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 C7

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CS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


Peanuts


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Pickles


For Better or For Worse


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Beetle Bailey


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PROBABLY Ne D SCHOOL, HiL. O T mHIs FAMILY.
MY hELP AFTER
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MY T"EAC.HER
I WONT BES
COMOINe IJN
FOR A


Dilbert

DOGBET THE
EXECUTIVE COACH


BUT I NEED A COACH
WHO WONT A5K IME
TO DO ANYTHING
DIFFERENTLY.
\^


The Born Loser


The Grizzwells


I LWJASN'T PERFECT
PLANNING HOW MUCH
TO SHOW OJ
UP FOP, OUR, OO I OWE
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HONEY, TmyE LDN'T 4AVE ANY.
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L C-EIRY- ILAVOEO .
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PI, NO- C:. Y. .
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>JAVE YO SEN .H'S UPSTrAIRS
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Kit 'N' Carlyle


Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"I'm warning you, boy. This had better not be
any more of your silly crop circle nonsense."


Doonesbury Flashback


YOUACWU- 5w,w w'
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Big Nate


OBVIOUSLY. WHOEV.-z
ROTE THIS NOTE
WAS TALciN6
I A1OUT ME'
POSS adLITY .n






Arlo and Janis


BUT WHO blO
WRITE 1FT? TKAT$,
>THE IMYSTE
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SUSPENSE)
isP
SKILLUMN
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CHAS.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Battle of the Year" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Lee Daniels'The Butler (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Planes" (PG) 1:10 p.m.
"Planes" In 3D. (PG) 4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" In 3D. (PG)
4 p.m. No passes.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Riddick" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"We're the Millers" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"One Direction: This Is Us The Extended Cut"
(PG) 4:40 p.m.
"One Direction: This Is Us The Extended Cut"
In 3D. (PG) 1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Riddick" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"We're the Millers" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: ,I Nsnba -7


"D PFJV EWF HJR EWJE EFGWKZNZIR


SDNN TMVYJTT ZMV WMLJK


DKEFVJGEDZK. EWF SZVNH SDNN


WJXF J IFKFVJEDZK ZP DHDZET."-


JNAFVE FDKTEFDK

Previous Solution: "Karen Black was my mentor and a second mother to me.
She inspired everyone she came in contact with." -Juliette Lewis
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-24


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


COMICS


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Park to celebrate National Public Lands Day


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park will


celebrate National Public
Lands Day on Saturday
In addition to all the regular
exhibits and programs, the
park will feature additional
conservation messages at all


I.
-j
I~' -a..
,--. [~~9



'~Afl~* ~ J7~c S -~


the daily programs.
Volunteers will also have spe-
cial interpretive carts out along
the Wildlife Walk with opportu-
nities to see and learn about
some of the park's outreach


animals.
Rocky the costumed manatee
character, will make appear-
ances throughout the day The
park will also collect cans for
recycling.


Regular park admission will
apply
For more information, call
Tricia Fowler at 352- 628-5445,
ext. 1006, or Susan Strawbridge
at 352-628-5445, ext. 1002.


Nurturing our

waters

Students of Cynthia Hendrick
and Briget Brothers of the
Renaissance Center in Lecanto
teach a three-week unit
sponsored by the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) to their
middle- and high school
students. The teachers said
their goal has been to develop
and nurture an appreciation in
the students to be protective of
their home and livelihood. "All of
our students live on or near
waterways in our county. It's so
rewarding to hear them use the
terms such as estuary,
preservation and conservation,"
Brothers said. "Our students live
from Floral City to Crystal River
and Chassahowitzka to
Dunnellon. In line with this unit,
our students have developed a
respect for the importance of
our waterways with regard to
our environment and economy."

Special to the Chronicle


NEWS NOTES


Afterschool care at Spot
Need a safe place for the kids during
the afterschool hours? Children in
kindergarten through seventh grade are
invited to come be a part of The Spot
Kids Club from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday at the Spot Family Cen-
ter, 405 S.E. Seventh Ave., Crystal River
Bus service is provided from Crystal
River Primary and Middle schools.
The program features educational
fun, outdoor activities, arts and crafts,
computer lab, homework support, per-
sonalized reading and math tutoring,
and learning adventures.
Healthy snacks are provided. Gro-
ceries are available on Fridays to fami-
lies who qualify Registration is
required (free if you qualify). If you re-
ceive free school lunch, you automati-
cally qualify Sign-up space is limited.
Applications are available at The Spot.
Ten scholarships are still available
for the program.
For more information, call 352-794-
3870 or visit www.TheSpotFamilyCen-
terorg.
The program is made possible with
the support of the Department of Chil-
dren and Families and Kids Central Inc.


Help sought for fundraiser
Volunteers are sought to solicit prizes
by phone from local merchants and help
host the American Cancer Society raf-
fles during the Floral City Bluegrass &
County Music fundraiser from 2 to
9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5.
This will be during Bikes & BBQ fes-
tivities in Floral City Any time or help
anyone can give will be appreciated.
Call Dave Neihoff at 352-560-7379 for
more information.

Park to host volunteer fair
On Sept. 28, in honor of National Pub-
lic Lands Day, Fort Cooper State Park
and the Friends of Fort Cooper will host
a Volunteer Fair and Breakfast with the
rangers and park volunteers from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
There will be no park entrance fees
during the event. Visitors can talk with
rangers and volunteers to learn more
about the park and what volunteer op-
portunities are available at Fort Cooper
State Park, and why volunteers are so
important to it
A pancake, sausage and beverage
breakfast will be served from 9 to 11


a.m. while supplies last. For more infor-
mation, call 352-726-0315.

Citizens' group welcomes all
Organizing for Citrus is a group of
concerned citizens that meets to inform
the public and help them to advocate in
their best interests.
The group will meet from noon to
3 p.m. Saturday at the Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills. Participants will
join groups to discuss issues and will
formulate communications with appro-
priate elected officials.
Bring electronics, paper, pencils and
ideas. For more information, call Vicky
at 352-563-2651.

Tech volunteers are needed
Tax-Aide services of the AARP in Cit-
rus County needs technical coordinator
volunteers for the season.
"These are the people who support
the computers and computer networks
for the free program," said John Clarke,
area Tax-Aide coordinator "They are
far from complex, primarily consisting
of simple "peer-to-peer" networks, un-
derstanding relatively simple Routers


and their configuration and linking a
network to the Internet through site-
supplied dedicated IPs.
"While, in general, we would antici-
pate these folks also avail themselves of
our tax counselor training, which is of
course at no cost, it is not a requirement
of the position," Clarke said.
Clarke said this need in no way down-
plays the continuing critical need for
tax preparation counselors and volun-
teers to fill administrative positions.
The needs are significant there, as well.
"Fully 98 percent of our volunteers re-
turn year after year," Clarke said. "It's,
to put it simply a gratifying, fulfilling
and super feeling to know you are help-
ing your friends and neighbors who,
through no fault of their own, are strug-
gling on a limited income. There is no
charge for our services, ever"
Volunteer technical coordinators po-
sition, must have some basic technical
background. Beyond that, AARP will
provide the one-on-one counseling and
other tools needed.
Visit wwwaarp.org/tavolunteer and
register to be an AARP Tax-Aide volun-
teer Or, call John Clarke at 352-270-8162,
or e-mail johnwc741taxaide
@gmail.com.


Classifieds Q


To place an ad, call 563=5966



Classifieds
In Print



and


Online

All

Thle Tim e


Fa: 32)53-65 Tl Fe: 88)82-34 E al:ca*ifes *honce. lneco **it:ww crnilonie0o


To the girl I met in
Publix's on 9/18 in
Homosassa Springs,
wearing a white jacket.
I would like to get to
know you. Call me
anytime. 422-0440


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


2 Person Jacuzzi
with cover
$300. obo
(352) 302-2366
9 Piece Patio Furniture
PVC 72" table, 4 chairs,
2 reclining chairs, 2 ot-
tomans, w/cushions,
$200. obo
(352) 274-1940
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-87
71


OPPORTUKMTY


Need a:JB

#1 Employment source is








www chronicleonline.com


6' LEATHER COUCH
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, $250.
(352) 419-6782
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DODGE
'00, Intrepid 3.5 mag-
num RT, w/ sunrf. Runs
reat needs battery
700 (352) 860-0158
DODGE
2500, 01, 6Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $7700.
(352) 465-3086
Dodge
Ram Charger, 1987
4x4. w/new engine
$2500. obo
(352) 422-1155
Electric Range, GE,
$380.
Black flat ceramic with
5 burners, like new
Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
cond. $32,000 obo
352-302-8265
Pontoon Boat Trailer
Can accommodate
up to 24 ft boat,
Very good cond.
$1,500
(609) 509-6021 cell
SKYLINE 1995,
Slide In cab over
Camper Fully equip.
generator, fridge,
microwave, AC, &
elect, jacks Loaded.
$2,800 obo
(352) 422-4548


BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



FREE MANURE.
No shavings,
Already bagged, Ready
for pick-up at our
pasture gate
(352) 249-7127



3 cats missing within
several months.One
eyed cat,bobtail cat,both
black and a black with
white spots
Palm,Highland,Dixieland.
352-201-4522
CASH REWARD
Lost Black Cat,
w/ white paws, white
on right side of mouth
Pine Ridge Estates
430-5959
Lost Quaker Bird
Green, Citrus Hills
around Sept. 20th
(352) 302-6710


47811
3297
6514
5842
1369
2975
9158
8436
7623


iVlssing 9/8/13
Tri-Colored Beagle 40
Lbs. Special needs pet.
Name: JoJo. Please
help JoJo to come
home. He is terribly
missed. Last seen on N.
Lee Street, Beverly Hills
at 10:30 pm. Please call
352-249-3107. Reward



FOUND
Silver Mongoose
Bicycle w/whitewall
tires, found in my
garden!
(352) 400-6100
Grey Terrier
Male, no chip
Found off of Gospel
Island Maggie rd 9/19.
(352) 364-7351
Nice Reward
Lost 9/17, 50 Ib white
Female pitbull terrier
brindle ears & base of
tails, Homosassa Area
Sorely Missed
(352) 563-2280
Small Dog
near Inglis Dam
call to identify
(352) 212-1428


59|3 2 6
68541
23798
31967
87452
46813
72634
15279
94185


Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+ Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


** ,., **'A .i .- -.. 1 .. " *-- ,

"', - 4 ,*


COMMUNITY


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 C9




C10 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 DECLASSIFIED CwITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C^hid Care


WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls




HAIR STYLIST
Full time /Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoocorm



Your World

,I 9tw4 9e4a


CHioN.CLE


i 17.


Medical Assist.

Fulltime & Part time
Postions
Available at busy
Podiatry Practice
Call (352) 795-2142

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience req'd for
very busy medical
office. Includes
benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

TWO MEDICAL
ASSISTANT'S

Fax resume to:
352-746-5784




ATTENTION
Looking for
Representatives
To assist Medicare
Recipients
w/ enrolling For
Medicare Part D,
Medicare Advan-
tage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements/
Will be placed
In Local Pharmacies
to Assist w/these
programs
No exp. Necessary
Will provide Training
Call 352-726-7722
Fax 352-726-6813




Licensed Realtor

CONTACT:
yankeetownrealty
.com or Call
352-447-0007
No Fees. Great Pay
out. Weekends req
Earning potential
unlimited.


Experienced
Telemarketer

Crystal River Office
call to inquire
352410-6927




Installers Helper
Part time help to in-
stall window treat-
ments, Hourly pay.
Hours will vary. Must
have a professional
appearance. Apply
in person at:
72 Hour Blinds
Factory
1657 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.corn mor Call
352-422-2160

ReStore Manaaer
Truck Driver
Donation
Processor
Habitat for Humanity
is filling 3 positions
in Citrus County
E-mail request for
detailed job descrip-
tion and instructions
for submitting to:
H4H restore@
vahoo.com
No calls or walk-ins




MEDICAL OF-
FICE TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547




1971 Baseball cards,
200 cards $40.
1970 Baseball Cards
200 cards $40
(352) 344-9502


2 Person Jacuzzi
with cover
$300 obo
(352) 302-2366




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Electric Range, GE,
$380.
Black flat ceramic with
5 burners, like new
Call Walter
(352) 527-3552


GAS RANGE Andora5
black GE selfclean con-
vection oven, griddle,
power burner $500
OBO 2284648

GE Space
Saver
Microwave
very little
usage
Bisque, $125.
(352) 302-9129
GOOD DRYER $100
works perfect. 30 day
written warranty call/text
352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER $100
works perfect. 30 day
written warranty, call/text
352-364-6504
HOUSEHOLD FREEZE
WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT
2'2"DEEP 2'4"WIDE
4'10.5"HIGH $250.00
352-382-0009
MAGTAG
2009 white Washing
Machine. In good
condition $250 obo
(352) 422-5579
REFRIGERATOR SIDE
BY SIDE Black
Jennaire. Runs Great.
Remodeling. $100.
2284648
REFRIGERATOR W/
ICE MAKER G.E.
WHITE SIDE BY SIDE
2'3"DEEP 2'11.5" WIDE
5'9"HIGH $300.00
352-382-0009
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
Maytag- 2 washers, 1
dryer. All in good
working cond. $300
for all or $125 ea
(304) 544-8398


-ppia
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Condition.
Free Delivery, 60 Day
Written Guarantee
352 263-7398
Whirlpool Digital
Calypso Matching
WASHER/DRYER
Excel cond. $400.
Must See Call
(352) 212-1854









DUDLEY'S
AUCTFGW
Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(Inside) 6pm Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles@ 7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S10, '05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C 10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-slte Boat Manu-
facturina Llauidation
122 N Cedarvlew Tr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANql6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auctlon.com
10%BP Au2267




ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HEAVY
DUTY METAL INVER-
NESS 419-5981




Panasonic TV
42" Plasma Flat screen
with remote,
TV in excel cond.
$225., (908) 616-0620
Homosassa


ble Deck JVC Cassette
with Remote $40.00
352-746-5421


3 DOUBLE ROLLS
VINYL PREPASTED
WALL COVERING $25
NEW 165SQ FT
419-5981
CEILING FANS WHITE
- FOUR @ $25 EACH
352 527-8993
FORMICA COUNTER-
TOPS ONE-9'LONG -
ONE 6' LONG $100
352 527-8993
KITCHEN SINK double
basin with moen faucet
and spray. Good Shape
$35.00 Call 613-4279
PVC BLINDS
WHITE-TWO
SETS-79"WX 91"H
$100 352 527-8993



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
LAPTOP CART/TABLE
Black adjustable
tilt&height w/wheels $24
Can email pic
352-382-3650



9 Piece Patio Furniture
PVC 72" table, 4 chairs,
2 reclining chairs, 2 ot-
tomans, w/cushions,
$200. obo
(352) 274-1940
Patio Recliner
Tan La-z-boy, like new
$140
(352) 564-8605
PICNIC TABLE/BENCH
WHITE, CONVERTS
TO TWO BENCHES
$45 352 527-8993



6' LEATHER COUCH
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, $250.
(352) 419-6782
BED FULL SIZE
Matress, box spring,
Frame Very good condi-
tion. Little used. $50.
(352)2574076
BED TWIN Mattress,
Box spring, frame. Ex-
cellent like new Chiro-
practor model. $75.
(352)2574076
BEDSIDE TABLES (3)
Excellent quality, Solid
wood, brown. Must see.
Each $30.
(352)2574076


Il .:


9-24 @ Laughingstock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCick for UFS, 2013

"Not again!"


Addiion Garages T' L[z-- K,,it[Rchens- 1Baths


Thank You For 16 Yearsofi etesl




iWJWILLALIT
NSTAUCTION CORP.
MIT).__ I
1985


BROYHILL SOFA Per-
fect condition, like new.
3-seat sofa, includes 4
cushions and arm co-
vers. Off-white with floral
pattern. Paid $900, sell
for $150. 352-503-7125
or 410-227-9152

CHAIRS
5-light oak chairs with
padded seats on
casters $100
(352) 419-6383

CHEST OF DRAWERS
Large Six dovetailed
drawers. Brown Excel-
lent condition $100.
(352)257-4076


Bamboo Coffee Table
with glass top $55
860-2475
COFFEE & 2 END TA-
BLES Ex qual solid
wood, brown. Must see.
Coffee $30., Ends $20.
each (352)257-4076
COFFEE TABLE
WOOD One scratch,
but very usable. $10.
(352)257-4076
COUCH
Brown & Gold, curved,
two matching
otterman's. 1 yr old
$400 (352) 527-4247
DINING ROOM HUTCH
Large,beautiful high
quality, must see. $100.
(352)257-4076


Dining Room Set
Thomasville,
Cherry Table, 6
chairs, 2 ext, new
$2900, China Base &
Deck w/ glass
shelves, new $2595,
Moving-Will sacrifice
both for $1500 cash,
obo (352) 513-4516

DINING ROOM TABLE
Six chairs. Large super
excellent. High qual.
Must see.$100.
(352)2574076
DRESSER W/MIRROR
Large excellent quality
Basset Dovetail
drawers. $100.
(352)2574076


a D'nfl r


*-HOME
H XMxta-oo

The average home col-
lects up to 40 pounds of
dust and dirt per year.
Imagine how much dust
and dirt could be resting
in your air ducts.Lic/Ins
Homeducts.com offers
duct cleaning at an af-
fordable rate. Click or
call. 352-362-5187.



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buy Quality Furniture
Non smoking homes.
352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


GENERAL 5
Stand Alone _
Generator 4

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
General Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
ER0015377







Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
N L r #CCC1325497

IBlA JOHNSON
rM C ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

1866-376-4943


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V'RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
IV FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Andersen HandyMan
Home Repairs, Lawn
Care. Cheaper Prices
352-453-6005
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)5374144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447


*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill




Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S Repairs
S" Small Carpentry
F'A "i '.Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
AL! ,Vents
R 4ttodole & Dependable
EIperience lifelong
352.-344-0905
L cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


A+ CLEANING
Res/Com. 27 yrs exp.
Lie/ bonded, client
focused 386-717-2929
Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174


Home/Office Cleaning
catered to your needs,
reliable & exper.,lic/ins
7964645 / 345-9329



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHEL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070


AAA ROOFING
CGil the "e4ak6use."
Free Written Estimate

$100OFF
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
|Lic./Ins. CCC057537 00FWNC


llg.fMjIg


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile ]
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


\ I r t- n U
Home Maintenance
Repairs & Remodels
Quality work at afford-
able prices 20 yrs exp.
Ref avail 573-723-2881
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


YI ERALING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.comn
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
***352-639-1024***


DON'T LET YOUR


DRYER START
A FIREg
jFlal .Rale- No *


Dr.iddentC~











BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old OneT
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


Carol's



Airport Transport
352-746-7595
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


r .








TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


Lawn Sprnkler

Not Wrkirig9?

Well Fix It




EEE~iBEST




L746-4451 n


F I I 1 11]JA
Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
P 'M or pool or plan
Something
completely new!
n ~ ~ "Often injtured,








& Insur 352-400-3188




Kat's Kritter Kare

& Kastle Kleaner
Relax while you're away knowing your pets
are OK at home safe in their own beds
All Kritters Big or Small

^~ Kathleen M. D.,ey '^\
& (nurd 352-4038








"fy 2704672 J
BONDED&INSURED Training Available S|
katskritterkare@yahoo.com


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yvrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


S KNOCKOUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, insured,
S) Workers Comp.
S Pressure
,. Washing Too


352.942.6876
Coll oday tor o
000G4Q1^ ^ Cleon Tomorrow




-.V
&Tdclncc in f/oo//nyf



IR!OOFIING |
o Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroo ing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

WORDy GURDy I ,o ,.....


W R GURDY1 v BY TRICKY RICKYKANE
1. Boxing match unsure feeling (1) Every answer is rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
[and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Waiter's handout locale (2) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Nerd's highest points (1) syllables in each word.
11 12013UFS,Dist. by Univ. UcickforUFS
4. More despicable grinner (2)


5. Nun's headdress indentation (2)


6. Hispaniola nation's TV channel (2)


7. Unskillful mender's car signal lights (2)


SI3XNI'IH SH2)INIt 'L NOIJVJS NVLLIVH '9 'IdIA(t 3'IdMIAM s
T113IIS l31IA A T sitvada SI9T "flN3A flNlN*'9 LflO 1inOf *T
9-24-13 SHASKNV


W Hiah End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
KITCHEN TABLE 42"
FORMICA PLUS
LEAVE 4 chairs.
Very usable $20.
(352)257-4076
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
High quality brown ex-
cellent condition. $40.
Must see
(352)257-4076
LIVING ROOM CHAIRS
2 green high quality ex-
cellent condition. Must
see. Each $50.
(352)257-4076
LOVE SEAT Black Real
Leather, not Bonded,
Love Seat. Excellent
Condition $100.00
352-746-5421
MATTRESS firm,
twin size
$50 OBO
352 419-8816
Recliner & Loveseat
recliner, end table &
1 coffee table, micro-
fiber, color sage, elec-
tric auto recliner w/
battery backup $650.
(352) 860-0158
SECTIONAL 3 PIECE
High quality excellent
condition.
Must see.$100.
(352)257-4076
Sectional Couch
w/ queen hide a bed
and recliner built in
Good Condition
$175. obo
(352) 302-9129
Sofa & Loveseat all
recline, Brookshire,
teal, $250.
4 Kitchen Chairs
w/ castors $25 ea
(352) 382-3914



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2
CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$10 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZE 36X30 & 34X30
$25 EACH
352-613-0529
PURPLE CLOTHES
20 pieces of dresses,
pants, top set, blouses.
Size 12 to 18 $100.00.
897-5410
WHITE STAG PANTS
SUIT Tropical colors,
red, background
&flowers. ex. Large
,$5.oo00, 897-5410



"STEAM & VAC"
Rug Cleaner
By Hoover. Does A
Great Job Cleaning
All Rugs Asking $75.
(352) 628-2844
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45
352-628-0033
30 GALLON AQUAR-
IUM no leaks, includes
newer heater and filter,
light, glass top, gravel
$65.00 352-2014522



Above

Ground Pool,

24 ft. up

and running
pump, filter, ladder,
very good cond.
$500. You must
remove 352-212-6433
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with case $100.00
352-746-5421
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" ON WHEELS
WITH COVER $20
352-613-0529
Designer Jackets,
leather W 2 & 3X,
New, $80 ea
Ren. Chest Set,
Must See $1,200
352-465-3086
FORENZA set of 4
standard rims $40.00
Call 613-4279
Kitchen Aid Mixer
New $275.
Tiffany style Lamps
3 large $70 ea.
352-465-3086


LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM
SIZE $20 352-613-0529
Life StriderArm & Leg
Exceriser bike w/ moni-
tor $65 Oak & Glass
cabinet, w/ 3 oak &
glass drs 24x38 $40.
352-794-3907
Queen size Mattress
pillow top, very com-
fortable like new $80.
3 in one Printer
Fax/Copier, $25.
(352) 637-6310
REGULATION SIZE
POOL TABLE
1" slate in good shape
but may want to put a
new felt on it $200.00.
Citrus County.
401-440-8922
SPEAKERS 2 Optimus
Speakers $30.00
352-746-5421
Student desk Lamp
Never used
$20 613-2797
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
VACUUM CLEANER
Hoover Wind tunnel
Nearly New,
Asking $35.
(352) 628-2844
WOMEN RUBBER
RIDING BOOTS $15
LIKE NEW SIZE 43L
EUR MADE IN ISRAEL
419-5981



Back Packer
Chair Lift for Van
$200
Jazzi 1100
Electric Scooter $200
(352) 795-0049 Bob
Diabetic Shoes,
Beige, Women's
Size 8, Medium width,
never worn, $80
(352) 522-0107
New
Jazzy Electric Chair,
MUST SELL
Cost $5,000
Selling $1,300. obo
(352) 795-7513



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR BEAUTIFUL
PURE WHITE
W/TURQUOISE TRIM
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" EDEN 20W
BASS AMP
ULIGHTWEIGHT(UNDER
15LBS)AND POW-
ERFUL! $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER
SQUIRE JAGUAR SS
BASS METALLIC
RED&BLACK,$100
352-601-6625
"NEWACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC CUTAWAY
GUITAR W/STAND OR
WALL HANGER,$80
352-601-6625
"NEW"CRATE FLEX
WAVE AMP
W/REVERB&
OVERDRIVE,12"SPEAK-
ER $90 352-601-6625
ACCORDION
Santini 120 Base; Full
size, double chamber,
prestine $1500
(352) 794-6641
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
A STYLE MANDOLIN
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $50
352-601-6625
BLACK LES PAUL
SPECIAL II
W/GIGBAGCORD,STAND&
WALLHANGER
$100 352-601-6625
PIANO LESSONS








Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
STRAT STYLE BASS
UKE ELECTRIC POLY
STRINGS, PIEZO
WHITE ON WHITE $75
352-601-6625
STUDENT?"NEW"
CLASSICAL GUITAR
BY WASHBURN
W/GIGBAG&BOOK/CD
$40 352-601-6625



SEWING MACHINE
Brother, like new, in a
3 drawer wood cabi-
net. All accessories
$125 Cash
(352) 344-4070



AB-LOUNGER
Used But a Few times,
Paid $150. at Sears
Asking $25.
(352) 628-2844


Proform Crosswalk 480
excel, cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $225.
352-382-5208
TREADMILL, Prosport
285T Walk to
fitness,,digital all speed
/flat/slant.Good condi-
tion. $100.00 897-5410

S orting

BICYCLE Trek Series 3,
3500,16", 41 cm. moun-
tain bike, with Bontrager
computer and bike bag,
$100.00 352 503-6668
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
Hi-Point & Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516




4x8 Heavy Duty
Utility Trailer
15" wheels, new tires,
good cond. $395.
(352) 586-3209
Utility Trailer
'93,6 x 9x 2 ft.
wood/steel, frame
$250. obo
(352) 465-3086


CLASSIFIED


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onil $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Robin Long
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts
Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.
Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


ANNE LISE
Anne Lise, a 7-8 y.o.
Blue Terrier/Bull dog
mix, spayed, house-
brkn, & homeless.
Family had to move
so she came to the
shelter. Weighs
about 65 Ibs, and is
a beautiful dog,
sweet, affectionate,
gentle, loyal,
good w/other dogs,
good w/children.
Playful & full of life.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


BAILEY
Bailey, Chespeake
Bay hound mix, 2
y.o., HW-negative,
wt. 39 Ibs. Sits on
command, loves
treats, walks well on
leash, good w/other
dogs, attentive to
human friends.
Obeys well, wants to
please. # 20731619.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$100
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
COCKER SPANIELS
4 Males, 2 Females w/
papers. 8 weeks old
Blonde & white $800
(352) 287-0519


Ani


-,J
CYRIL
Cyril, 1 y.o. Hound
mix, found as stray,
beautiful red-brown
coat, wt. 42 Ibs. Easy
to walk, gets along
w/other dogs.
Appears to be
housebroken,
healthy. Affection-
ate & friendly.
Good companion.
#20807791.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.






1^^ _ailmift

Dojha
Dojha, approx. 3
y.o., a yellow/white
lab retriever mix,
medium size, came
to shelter because
family lost their
home & could not
keep him. Gentle,
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs,
beautiful in color,
great shape.
Pen #25.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.




Your World


0---49 al


_Sl or S a I


SIMON
well-mannered
retriever mix, 3 y.o.
Sits, gives his paw,
goes down for
treats, takes gently.
Walks well on leash,
behaves in public
places. High energy,
likes to run & play,
plays catch, plays in
pool. Good w/most
dogs. Call Christina
@ 352-464-3908.


Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382








LOKIE
Lokie, a 3-y.o.
brown/white terrier
mix male, weight
about 65 Ibs. Came
to shelter d/t
owner's inability to
keep him. Lokie is a
shy, gentle, humble
dog, easy to walk
on leash, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
human friends. Ea-
ger to please. No
cats. A beautiful
dog, both physically
and behavior-wise.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288








OZZIE
Ozzie, a 2-y.o. neu-
tered Black Mouth
Cur mix, handsome
boy, wt. 61 Ibs, a
little bit shy, good
with kids, good with
cats, should be the
only dog. Walks well
on leash, needs
fenced yard to run
in. Housebroken.
Call Brenda @
352-746-1423








Pete
a 1-year-old mostly
white terrier/?hound
mix, Heartworm
negative & house-
broken. Came to
the shelter because
his family could no
longer afford him. A
very gentle,
well-behaved dog,
walks very well on a
leash & gets along
with other dogs.
Weighs 51 Ibs.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 CLL


male 5-6 months old,
1reen w/ grey chest.
125. includes cage
(352) 464-3716
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males start @ $400.
Females start @ $600.
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
Sweet 3yr old female
Lab. Spayed. Possible
PTSD dog. Sm adop-
tion fee (352) 794-6314




or


TOBY
Toby, black/white
terrier mix, neu-
tered, HW-negative.
Housebrkn, wt 45
Ibs,. Very friendly,
gets along with
other dogs well, also
cats. About 6 years
old, great shape,
intelligent, lively,
walks well on leash,
likes kids. Great
companion-to-be.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288









ZOEY
Zoey, a 7-8 y.o.
blue/white Terrier/
Bulldog mix, spayed
and housebrkn.
Came to the shelter
after her family had
to move and could
not take her. She is
sweet & exception-
ally gentle,
affectionate &
beautiful. Likes
other dogs & also
children. Very
playful. Weight
about 60 Ibs.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.




CHICKENS
10 Laying chickens
Make reasonable
offer
(352) 382-2350 LM




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, inclds H20, sew,
trash. (352) 584-3348
HOMOSASSA
Attractive 2BR, 2BA
DW on 1 AC, carport
scrn. por. completely
well furni. $600 mo.
$600 dep 352-628-1723

LECANTO
2/2, Doublewide $575.
(352) 212-9682




7677 West
Chassahowitzka St.
2BD, 2BA, Mobile
Detached Garage
Scrn. porch, lease
or Sale, $2,000 down
$732. mo.
877-499-8065

$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182

ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

BAD CREDIT?
FORECLOSURE?
BANKRUPTCY?
Want your own
home? I can help!!
35% down cash or
land and you
are approved.
No gimmick,
386-546-5833

Singing Forest 46'
2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile
Home, fixer upper,
$6000. 352-344-1365

Tired of Renting?
Super clean 2004
3BR/2BA, on /2 acre
ready to move in!!!
$3,500 down,
$380.03/mo. W.A.C.
Call 386-546-5833 for
details Won't last!

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




HOMOSASSA
Owner Financing, 3/2,
older MH on 2 acres, in-
side remodeled, fenced
yard, $4k down $535
per mo. 352-302-9217


~~1


CHIII(ONICLE







(352) 563-594


i6". >>~^^


14
I'


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online


TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807





Doublewide,
2 BR, 2BA,
Recent shingle roof
New AC, MUCH MORE
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf&A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, incd
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-87

71






PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 BDRM. APT. HOMES
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to
qualified applicants.
If qualified, pay no
more than 30% of
your households
adjusted monthly
income for rent
and utilities.
FOR RENTAL INFO.
& APPLICATION
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer



5PPORTUNTY


*F4
e4, '"^




C12 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI /1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs. 352-726-9570
HOMOSASSA
2/2, clean, quiet, center
location $550., 352-
563-2114, 257-6461
INVERNESS
Beautifully Remodeled
on golf course, 2/2/2
$875 352-895-0744



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1%, Unfurn.$550,
Furn. $600.+sec clean,
quite. Small Pet 828 5th
Ave. NE. 727-455-8998
727-343-3965






UISTINGS
CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




Sugarmill Woods
2/21/2/I, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001



CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs. 352-726-9570



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Rent- ous- '

BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/1, $650.
352-464-2514
CRYSTAL RIVER
2-3 BR $200-$250/mo
552-2637, 527-6566
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07 $850/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648
RENT TO OWNI
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1I, Apt. Waterfront
$650. mo. 1Ist sec.
Inclds dock, water,
trash. No pets.
772-240-6180
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic/cottage all utilities
incl'd. $595 no smoking
352-422-2994



HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07, $850/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


EQUAL KOU51NS
OMPRTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW,
crosslandrealty.comrn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




BEVERLY HILLS 324 S
Monroe. Sunday 12-3p
Completely Remodeled
Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2
ba, 2 gar. NEW: Roof,
kitchen w/stainless,
baths, flooring etc. $79k.
527-1239



211 Northeast 4th
Street, Chiefland, FL
BANK OWNED
ABSOLUTE AUCTION
6,400+/- SF of space in
2 Buildings on 1.16 Ac-
res. One vacant single
family home and a sec-
ond bldg. used as a
daycare facility.
Inspect: Sept. 30th @
11 AM
Onsite Auction with
Webcast bidding on
October 2nd @ 3 PM
Local contact: Julian
Howell, 877-980-9565.
More info at
www.auctionEbid.com
FLBKR#CQ1029847
Auction MGMT Corp.
Jeb@auctionEbid.com
HERNANDO
1000+ sf.of office
space. Heat/Elec
incid, ample pkg $750
(352) 726-3339



3/1, fenced yard,
corner lot. Needs
some repairs. As is
$39,500 Negotiable
2081 W Gardenia Dr
(352) 465-0623




Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buving or Sellina

I T'- q


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www. Realty
Connect.me




Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
$139,000 Call Gwen
795-1520 or 634-1725



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
caged pool, 1 acre,
great neighborhood,
call for details
(352) 746-6552



2 BR, 2BA, Den,
lanai, Scrn'd heated
pool, Cen. AC, poll
barn, 1 AC, fenced,
well, many extras. By
Appt. $129,900 firm
(352)444-2371 or
(352) 586-7602

YOU'LL w THIS!
117 S Lunar
Terrace
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
c/h/aTotally Updated!
Block home, Clean,
Over-sized Garage,
W/Carport. $79,500
Negotiable
Call 352-344-9290
8535 E Gospel Island
Rd Inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively
rennovated including
wood and tile floors.
Granite and new roof
and kitchen. Over 2000
Sqft Living area.
$139,900 352-817-5875
or miksh@earthlink.net

INVERNESS
2002, Custom Built
3/2/2
With Extra Lot
$114.500.
352-344-3112

RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM


I'UIVAIUortr O'"
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TOA
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


Hoe



L.Q4lc
Sugarmill Woods 3/2/2
Den, Fain Rm, Wood
Floors, 1 YR Warranty
31 Pine St, Homosassa
$149,000 Realty
Connect 212-1446


Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!







For Sale 9,m1
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell



NMI^^^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
















Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!

Owner
Financing
Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503














BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




CUSTOM Built
LUXURY HOME
3/2/3, Family Rm,
gourmet kit, pool
& much more!
2,653 LivSF $319K
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
352-212-1446


I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
call ** 352-503-3245**


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
MINI FARMS AREA
4/2 on 10 ACRES
20 x 40 Pole Barn
Move in Condition
$139,900.
352-249-1248
RENT TO OWN
no bank, smalldown
pmt. 2/1, $53,579k
take over payments
352-503-3245










SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855












Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

For SIesloAA
Old Homosassa 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Newly
renovated: new floors,
cabinets, appliances. 2
car garage/workshop.
Large double corner lot
in Old Homosassa's
best area. Deep water
Gulf access with no
bridges. Private boat
launch ramp, dock with
elec. Minutes to The
Freezer & McCrea's.
Documented $3,000+
monthly vacation rental
income. Owners
downsizing. E-mail:
docgpax3@aol.com or
call: 352.634.2534
Listed @ $259,500.

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
'To view
great waterfront
properties"


_HmsisCut


BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK REGAL
2001 LS, leather Inter.
very good cond., 6 cyl.
82k mi. One owner.
$4,100 352-746-6708
CADILLAC
2004 Seville SLS, full
power, runs great, like
new condition $3800
(352) 795-8986
CHEVROLET
2010 Mallbu, LT,
1 owner $11,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $19,900
obo 352-444-2272



189 SHEARER ST,
INGLIS
Improved 1 acre lot, no
impact fees, well (city
water available), septic,
electric, shaded with
oaks & pines, motivated
seller, asking $9,000
OBO Cell phone
352-428-0930



Outboard Motor
25HP, Evirude
with controls, very
good cond.
$750 obo
476-1113, 513-5135
Pontoon Boat Trailer
Can accommodate
up to 24 ft boat,
Very good cond.
$1,500
(609) 509-6021 cell




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510-
177 KEY WEST
2013 Skiff, Yamaha 70
4-stroke, Jack Plate,
Trolling Motor, Gauges,
GPS, Alum Trailer,
Transferrable Warranty,
Excellent $20,900
352 503-6668
BASS TRACKER
2005, 50HP Mercury
PT 175 Special Edition,
mint cond., Call for
info. (352) 400-9490
GALALEO
Duck Boat 17ft
fiberglass, 25HP
Go Devil, long shaft,
new trlr. Ready to Hunt,
$4,500 352-586-8946
MERC CRUISER
1993, 20ft, Stern Drive,
Sylvan, Barely used,
but runs great, org.
$12,000 Asking $6,500
obo (352) 228-1355
PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new vhf radio & gps
fishfinder. Gd Cond.
$6500. (352) 527-4247
SWEETWATER
1991, 15 ft., seats 8,
35HP, trailer, excellent
cond. $3,250
476-1113, 513-5135
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Salem Cruise Lite
2011 Travel Trailer
28 ft bunk hse. slideout
non-smkers. Exc Cond
$10,000.813-957-8605
SKYLINE 1995,
Slide In cab over
Camper Fully equip.
generator, fridge,
microwave, AC, &
elect, jacks Loaded.
$2,800 obo
(352) 422-4548
Travel Trailer
2011,20' Mini Lite. Fully
self contained. LRoom
Slide out. Many Extras.
ExcCond. $15400
obo (352) 527-0081
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



SOFT TOPPER
for Short bed pick-up.
Like New $250 obo
(352) 422-5579



-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
"352.426.4267**

BIG SALE
.'Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Look
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


Chevy S10, '05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-slte Boat Manu-
facturina Llauidation
122 N CedarviewTr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANql6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auctlon.com
10%BP Au2267


'00, Intrepid 3.5 mag-
num RT, w/ sunrf. Runs
great needs battery
700(352)860-0158





04
DUDLEY'S

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(Inside) 6pm Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94
Chevy S10 '05 Kla
Sportage, '93 Chevy
C10, Hall is full
Saturday 9-28
On-slte Boat Manu-
facturina Llauidation
122 N CedarviewTr.
Inverness: 9am New
boats, antique boats
& vintage out-
boards, Tools, sup-
plies & equipment
virtual tour
ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANql6
cw HUGE ALL
DAY AUCTION
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BP Au2267

FIAT
'79 Spider 2000 Cony.
58K miles, new roof,
good rubber, runs
$2,000 (352) 564-0364
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
Mustang Convertible,
23,600 miles, gray,
black top, $14,400.
(352) 503-7237
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MAZDA
2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed,
4-door, one owner,
great condition, 141,000
miles $3,500.
352-860-2146
MERCURY
'94, Cougar, 125k mi.,
2 DR, runs great, cold
air, good tires, $1,400
(352) 344-0547
TOYOTA
2010, Yaris, 3 door,,
$9,995.
352-341-0018
VOLVO
200 1,S40, leather,
clean $4,995.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
2009 CORVETTE
COUPE Z51: Jetstream
blue w/ebony int., 2LT,
Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3
eng., only 9500 mi., car
show winner, serious
inquiries only, first
$35K/OBO gets it. Lets
talk @ 352-249-7630

* THIS OUT!
CHEVY
1981 Corvette
Under 50,000 orig. mi-
les, Shark Body Style,
Very Good Condition,
Garage stored
352-400-4704
DATSON 280ZX
Attention Z lovers '82
Datson, lnline6 turbo,
eng. & trans good,
nds loving restoration
$500 (352) 344-3080
FORD
Rat Rod Projects, 46
Ford PU Roadster, Ford
Model T, Boattail speed-
ster all steel., Inglis
352-949-7874
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
cond. $32,000 obo
352-302-8265






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
H person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII










DUDLEY'S

Thursday 9- 26
Estate Adventure
Auction
Outside 3pm,
(Inside) 6pm Thom-
asville furniture,
2000 dvd's, like new
Appliances, boat,
8 vehicles @7:15
'12 Gr Cherokee
1199mi '13 Fusion
Hybrid 3858 mi, '01
Impala, '95 Chevy
PU, '06 Cobalt, '94


miti I


BIG SALE
Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
2500, 01, 6Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $7700.
(352) 465-3086
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control,
power windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tri-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319


Harley Davidson

2011 FLTRU Road
Glide Ultra loaded
cruise, cd, cb,intercom,
abs, anti theif,6 speed,
and 103cc motor.
only 5886 miles $19,000
(352)212-4101


FORD
1992 Flairside 4x4,302,
red, 4 lift traction bar,
chrome brush guard,
steps & bedrail. A
beauty in & out.
$5,500 (352) 344-8089




CHEVROLET
2006, Suburban
4 x 4, $8,995.
352-341-0018
Dodge
Ram Charger, 1987
4x4, w/new engine
$2500. obo
(352) 422-1155
FORD
2007, Escape
$7,995.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment


Motorcycles


HONDA
2007 VTX 1300C Origi-
nal owner, purchased
brand new, low mile-
age (2,371 miles).
CafA windshield, re-
movable saddlebags,
light-bar. Black &
chrome. Showroom
condition (mint).
Asking a "firm"
$5,050.00 Please con-
tact owner\seller via
Email: selfor@aol.com
Phone: (352)382-4422

KAWASAKI
2002 Vulcan 1500,
7500 mi, Exc Cond
$5000 (352) 341-5263

SNAPPER
2008 Riding 30 inch
cut 12.5 HP $500
(352) 341-5263

Noice to reitor


585-0924 TUCRN
Hoyt, James R. 2013-CP-263 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.:2013-CP-263
IN RE: ESTATE OF: JAMES R. HOYT, SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the Estate of JAMES R. HOYT, SR., deceased, whose date of
death was January 24, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 N. ApopkaAvenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's At-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's Estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's Estate must file their claims with this Court. WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is September 17, 2013.
Personal Representative
/s/JAMES R. HOYT, JR.
104 Hyde Ave., Pawtucket, RI 02861
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ KAREN 0. GAFFNEY, Esquire Florida Bar No.: 500682
Karen 0. Gaffney, P.A., Attorney for the Personal Representative
205 West Dampier Street, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-9222
Email: karengaffney@tampabay.rr.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronice, September 12 & 19, 2013.

586-0924 TUCRN
Estate of Ellen Franzwa 2013-CP-400 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013-CP-400
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELLEN FRANZWA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
An Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ELLEN
FRANZWA, deceased, whose date of death was December 17, 2012, by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450. The name of the petitioner and his attorney is set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their objections with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is: September 17, 2013
/s/ Raymond Riggs, Petitioner
2267 N. Donovan Avenue, Crystal River, FL 34428
Johnston & Sasser, P.A.
/s/ David C. Sasser, Florida Bar #297720
P. 0. Box 997, Brooksville, FL 34605-0997, Telephone 352-796-5123
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle September 17 & 24, 2013.


586-1001 TUCRN
Collazo, Jaime 2013-CP-000484 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2013-CP-000484
IN RE: THE ESTATE OFJAIME COLLAZO,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Jaime Collazo, deceased, whose date of death was
July 4, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, File
Number 2013-CP-000484; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
ACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is September 24, 2013.
Personal Representative:
Lynda M. Collazo
1229 East Rockefeller Lane, Hemrnando, FL 34442
Attorneyfor Personal Representative:
/s/Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq., Florida Bar No. 0857750, VanNess & VanNess, P.A.,
1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 352-795-1444
tmv(avannessoa.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle September 24 & October 1, 2013


587-0924 TUCRN
Estate of ELEANOR R. O'MALLEY 2013-CP-487 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF File No.
2013-CP-487
ELEANOR R. O'MALLEY
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDLTORS
(Ancillary Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Ancillary Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of ELEANOR R. O'MALLEY, deceased. File Number
2013-CP-487, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 110 N Apopka Ave. Inverness, FL 34452; that the decedent's date of
death was August 9,2012; that the total value of the estate is $4,700.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Charles F. O'Malley 13359 Glen Taylor Lane, Herndon,VA 20171
John J. OMalley 1317 S. 36th St, Philadelphia, PA 19146
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first pubhcation of this Notice is September 17, 2013
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ CHARLES F. O'MALLEY, Petitioner
13359 Glen Taylor Lane, HemdonVA 20171
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ Marie T. Blume, Attorney for Petitioner, Florida Bar Number: 0493181,
blumelaw&earthlink.net, P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, Florida 34451
Phone: (352) 726-7778 Fax (352)726-7798
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, September 17 & 24, 2013


Harley Davidson
2005, 1200 Custom, Ex-
tra Chrome, new tires,
just serv, 16,000 mi.
$3700 obo. Poss trade
for veh. (352) 220-8444

HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2012 FLHTCUTG Tri
Glide Ultra Classic
AMFM/CD/AUX
w/speakers; CC, Fairing
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w/rack, stage 2 scream-
ing eagle high perfor-
mance exhaust & pipes;
ABS brakes, extra
chrome accents. Excel-
lent condition w/only
1250 mi. First $28.5K.
Lets talk @
352-249-7630.

HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition asking
$1200.00 352-637-3254


ONE OWNER




; Cdnty's

i es


Medical Nutrition Wellness
CITRUS -COUNTY
HRQONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com




G2 Tuesday, September 24, 2013 PROFILES IN HEALTH CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement


Get Moraut 0iL


-For more than 10 years,
Superior Residences has cared
for people with Alzheimer's
and other memory disorders.
The team at Superior
Residences of Lecanto offers a


ior living experience


life enrichment
residential des
trained staff
grounds, every
Superior Reside
the unique an(
needs of the
residents. The s
in compassion


+"..+ ." "- .' T ". .


lifestyle they deserve.
Memory Care is a very
specialized area of assisted
living which includes therapies
and activities that stimulate
residents with Alzheimer's and
other dementia related
disorders. From the therapy and


moment, love
reminds the s
residents in c
enjoying each m
At Superior
Lecanto, the
provides ilwria
monitoring and


programs to the personal care assistance and
ign, specially more. The staff is available
and secure around the clock, working to
element of make each day comfortable
ences caters to and enjoyable for all residents.
d personalized Superior Residences takes
memory care pride in giving their residents a
staff specializes sense of family and community
iate dementia while encouraging them to
care and is maintain as much
1,, ., to independence as possible.
--. ,nd When your loved one is in
age Superior Residences of
I, i r Lecanto, you can be confident
-, and in knowing they are not only
i n th receiving the best care
h i e available; but also that they are
in living a happy, enriched, and
I %.i., i0' onal comfortable life.
I e y The new Superior
Ih. o"'otto, Residences at Lecanto offers
"Live the studio apartments, on-site
the moment", barber and salon services,
taff to assist outdoor activity areas,
celebrating and scheduled transportation
moment. daystay and respite care. Each
Residences of resident has a therapy program
trained staff and social schedule that meets
ics healthcare their own needs and
management, preferences.


T he sister community,
Sunflower Springs, was
conceived by and built by a
group of local doctors who
wanted to set the standard for
assisted living. Executive
Director, Melissa Rogers, RN,
and Director of Community
Relations, Amy Holaday, are
excited for you to visit their
community.
A visit to Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living will show you
why they are filled with happy
people and currently have a
waiting list to get in. As Melissa
Rogers phrased it, "This is like a
fun-filled, all-inclusive cruise
ship that never leaves the port."
There are numerous diverse
activities to choose from each
day, including crafts, exercise,
Happy Hour, trips, local events
and even volunteer
opportunities.
As one resident, Rose,
explained, "My daughter looked
all around and really researched
to find a place where I would
enjoy to live. Everyone here is


I F
J1 _V
so happy. There is no back-
stabbing and no gossiping
going on. Everyone gets along.
I am very happy here."
"I moved here to be near my
daughter," Nola Clay Atkinson
told us. "I have lots of friends
here and I know all of the
residents.
Everyone g. i .
along. I ha '
recommend- m]
this place to ,i I
of my friend.
They real '.
spoil me her. '
Nola .
involved ., '" i
most of the
social activities; and in spite of
being visually challenged, she
enjoys the activities; and is
organizing a group to teach
them her favorite card game of
'hand and foot'.
Shari Billings wanted her
Dad, who is 90, to move close
to her after losing her mother
last year. "This experience was
very difficult but ended up
better than I could have
expected. Everyone has made


Dad feel like family and they
offer so many activities to help
him adjust. My Dad's every
need is met and he is so well
cared for. It is such a comfort to
me."
Sunflower Springs is a
resort-style senior community
conveniently
-"- '- ,...* i in a
I- < .i.. ,l, tranquil
', ii. Sunflower
provd.e presents a
hi' I..i, active
I J lifestyle
I. irus County
The
., naunity
provides a premier
resident focused environment
with the warmth of home and
peace of mind. A 24-hour
compassionate staff are highly
trained and committed to
serving the residents.
"Residents don't have to live
here they want to", explains
Melissa Rogers. "If you think
moving to assisted living would
slow you down, think again!
Come see how active OUR
seniors are!!".


van


i SUPERIOR

S P RESIDENCE
^^jof Lecanto
MEMORY CARE
4865 Gulf to Lake Highway, Lecar
352.746.5483
www.superioralf.com
3FYpF Assisted Living Facility License #12256


You are not alone
we understand 4






WE ARE FAMILY






S _1

- Like us on
Facebook 87

no I


^zre


S

i i i /' II I 1 l/ ii; '


'33 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa
352.621.8017
www. sunflower If. corn
Assisted Living Facility License #11566


truly super
that gives
an ,d, !
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1




Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G3


Citrus County's



Pro fi les



Health


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher


Trina Murphy
Advertising/Operations Director


Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager

Splember 24, 2013

1alth


Medical Nutrition Wellness)

Advertising Supplement l


We are excited to present this
special advertising section providing
you with a better knowledge about a
variety of local health related
businesses. In these advertisements,
readers will learn about the rich history
of these businesses and about the
products and services they offer. These
businesses provide an excellent choice
for customers to meet their health
needs. They make our community a
better place to live with their choices
of products and services and serve as
an integral part of the community
through participation in community
events and fundraisers.
The feature articles contained in
this publication were written by
Advertising Features Correspondent


Rita Johnson, who has been a freelance
writer with the Chronicle for seven
years. She has written hundreds of
advertising feature articles about Citrus
County businesses and the Nature
Coast. Her background includes more
than 20 years of writing while working
in nutrition, alternative medicine and
quantum physics. After receiving her
doctorate in Alternative Medicine, Rita
completed her PhD in Integrative
Medicine so that she can now publish
articles in medical journals and teach
college level courses.
We are confident you will find this
publication useful and interesting and
we encourage your support of these
local businesses as they help our
community grow and prosper.


Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429


HPH Hospice offers a great advantage. Our hospice
physicians make house calls and work in partnership
with your doctor to ensure that you receive the best
possible care.
Equipment and medication related to your life-limiting
illness will also be delivered right to your door.
And, our caring staff and volunteers are with you and
your loved ones every step of the way. Right here when
you need us most.


HP hospice
anot-for-profit organization initially licensed in 1984
a not-for-profit organization initially licensed in 1984


527-4600
3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
www.HPH-Hospice.org


HPH MISSION STATEMENT
HPH is where excellence in compassionate care maximizes quality of life.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PROFILES IN HEALTH




G4 Tuesday, September 24, 2013 PROFILES IN HEALTH CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT




Protect Your Vision

There are many things you can do yourself to protect your eyes and retain eye health and function;

but, there are times you need the services of a highly trained professional.


Most people over the age of 60 expe-
rience some level of blurry vision due to
cataracts, and almost everyone over 50
loses their ability to read comfortably with-
out glasses.
The professionals at Suncoast Eye
Clinic offer the ability to care for your eyes
from the initial exam through surgery, if
required. The satellite office in Crystal
River makes it convenient to schedule a
comprehensive eye exam. If it is necessary
to schedule surgery to remove cataracts or
remove excess eyelid folds to improve your
vision, their surgery center in Hudson,
Florida, can complete the job. Bus trans-
portation is even provided for your conven-
ience. Suncoast Eye Clinic maintains total
control of every step of the process to
ensure your protection and desired out-
come.

What can I do for myself?
Incorporate healthy eye habits.
Many eye health and vision problems
occur naturally with age and with no obvi-
ous signs or symptoms. The most important
way to prevent eye health issues from
becoming unmanageable is by scheduling
an annual exam with Suncoast Eye Clinic.
More than 80 percent of all visual impair-
ment is treatable, preventable or curable, so
early diagnosis and proper care is critical.
In addition to regular eye exams, the fol-
lowing habits can help maintain healthy
eyes and vision:
Obtain the right glasses or contact
lenses to correct visual impairment and
always disinfect and replace contact lenses
as recommended
Wear sunglasses or hats to block
harmful UV rays and glare
Avoid smoking
Maintain a healthy weight to avoid
systemic conditions-such as diabetes-
-, n i ri. lead to impaired vision
Monitor chronic health conditions
(diabetes and high blood pressure)
Reduce computer-induced eye strain
by practicing the 20-20-20 rule: look 20
feet away for 20 seconds, every 20 minutes
Eat a healthy diet for plenty of anti-
oxidant rich foods and omega-3 fatty acids,
and include dietary supplements that boost
your intake of vitamins and minerals that
support eye health
Antioxidants are nutrients that protect
cells from damage caused by free radi-


cals-molecules caused by aging, poor
diet, stress and disease. Too many free radi-
cals can cause eye disease, including
advanced age-related macular degeneration
(AMD). Common antioxidants include
vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A, selenium
and zinc. They are generally found in foods
with strong colors, particularly orange, yel-
low, red, purple and dark green fruits and
vegetables.
Selenium is found in Brazil nuts, whole
grains, tuna, beef and dark meat turkey.
Zinc is abundant in oysters, nuts, seafood,
red meat, beans and dairy. Eating dark
green leafy vegetables also provides lutein
and zeaxanthin. These nutrients are impor-
tant to eye health because they help protect
against harmful UV rays and lower the risk
of developing age-related macular degen-
eration. They also act as antioxidants.
Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty
acids that your body uses to support
Ic iii:. C ii production and overall macular
health. Several studies suggest that omega-
3 fatty acids may help protect your eyes
from age-related macular degeneration
(AMD) and dry eye syndrome. Your body
cannot produce omega-3 fatty acids, so you
must get them from your food or supple-
ments.
The foods richest in omega-3 fatty acids
are cold-water fish such as sardines, her-
ring, salmon and tuna. Other foods contain-
ing omega-3 fatty acids are flaxseeds, wal-
nuts and dark green leafy vegetables. You
also need to limit omega-6 fatty acids,
which interfere with your body's ability to
absorb and use the "good" omega-3 fats.
Foods high in omega-6 fatty acids include
fried and highly processed foods such as
those made with most cooking oils and
trans-fats.

When is it time for a professional?
Are you experiencing signs
of cataracts?
Difficulty driving at night
Difficulty reading, especially in low
light
Difficulty viewing a computer screen
Colors appear dim and faded
The appearance of glare or starbursts
around lights
Frequent change needed in prescrip-
tion glasses
Cataracts are a result of the natural lens
inside the eye becoming cloudy, even


brown or yellow, preventing light from
passing through and inhibiting images from
focusing on the retina. Cataracts form
naturally as we get older, but they can
develop at any age as the result of an injury
or a disease, or from taking certain medi-
cations.
When these symptoms are so severe that
they interfere with daily activities, the doc-
tor may recommend removing the natural
lens that has become cloudy and replace it
with an intraocular lens. The good news is
that cataracts are the leading cause of treat-
able vision loss in adults and cataract sur-
gery is one of the safest and easiest pro-
cedures for patients to undergo.

"Truly words cannot express my gratitude for
the cataract surgery. You gave me my sign
and my hope back. Thank you!"

At the Suncoast Eye Center, home of the
premium lenses, cataracts are treated with
the most advanced surgical procedure
available: a small incision, no-stitch sur-
gery. The clouded natural lens of the eye is
removed and replaced with an advanced,
artificial multifocal Lens. This unique mul-
tifocal implantable lens is proven to pro-
vide excellent vision at near, intermediate
and far distances without glasses; under all
lighting conditions day and night.
The Multifocal Lens procedure is per-
formed over 15 million times per year
worldwide and is recognized for its safety
and predictability. The beauty of using this
type of lens is that is relies on the eyes
working together, as they are designed to
do. By having both eyes processing all vis-
ual information in the same way, the mul-
tifocal lens gives people natural vision at
all distances, much like they had when they
were young. Therefore, the implants must
be put in both eyes.
If cataracts are affecting your lifestyle,
now is the time to call the Suncoast Eye
Center and find out your best option.
"I just wanted to thank you so much for
the fantastic job done on my eyes. You did
- c-n. r;,. ri, you said you would do. It's
so great to be able to see clearly again.
T i ... "

EYELID SURGERY- You not only look
younger but you can see better!
Eyelid surgery produces very pleasing
results and has become a popular outpatient


procedure. Patients experience improved
peripheral vision, greater ocular comfort
and boast a more youthful appearance after
surgery.
Often a sign of aging, sagging eyelids
may impair vision, cause eye irritation, and
convey a tired, weary appearance. Many
patients report headaches are eliminated
because they had unconsciously used brow
muscles to lift the sagging skin around their
eyes in order to see.
It is important to discuss your expec-
tations and to discuss your expectations and
to ask any questions you may have during
an initial visit. The examination will
include a comprehensive vision analysis
and appropriate treatment will be rec-
ommended based on your results. Insurance
may cover your surgery if vision is
impaired.
Eyelid surgery involves tightening loose
muscles and removing sagging skin and
excess fat tissue from around the eyes.
Incisions are made along the natural lines
of the eyelids, and are hidden by natural
folds of the skin after surgery.
Surgery is performed on an outpatient
basis under local anesthesia and lasts
approximately 40 minutes. As a patient of
the Suncoast Eye Center, your surgery is
performed in the privacy of their special-
ized Eye Surgery Institute.
Following surgery, you will be
instructed to apply cold compresses inter-
mittently for 24-36 hours to ease discom-
fort and to reduce swelling. Excessive tear-
ing and sensitivity to light may occur for a
few days and sunglasses will protect your
eyes from sunlight and wind. You can
resume your normal activities one week
after surgery.
Call Suncoast Eye Center today and find
out how we can help you protect your
vision.

"I want to thank Dr. Seigel for everything he
has done for me. Without his generous and
compassionate nature, the vast improvements
to my vision and well being would not have
been accomplished. Thank you."

Suncoast Eye Center is located at 14003
Lakeshore Blvd, Hudson, FL 34667[Phone:
(727) 868-9442JToll Free: (800) 282-6341.
The Crystal River OfficeEis at 221 NE Hwy
19, Crystal River, FL 34429T352) 795-
2526.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

rob i;,

I


Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G5


When Experience Counts Most... LAWREN'. CEA. ,, ALANM.
Adjvanced Cat jraut Surger) with SEIGEL FREEDMAN
Mulilocal IOL Premium Lens Implanis M.D. M.D.
Droop) Ejelid Surger .
Glaucoma & Dijbetic Eecajre Specialists
Eye Exams
221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341
www.suncoasteyecenter.com




G6 Tuesday September 24, 2013


Our family
is here
to give comfort
to your family.
I ,,I. I... i, I ,,, e, 1" ,. M manager,
,,,,I ,,,,i ,, I ,,' ,,,,.dstrator


Gailen, Jennifer
& Lindsey
discussing
quality care.
Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner,
Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison,
Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner


I
Deborah & Bart
will help you
when you call.
Deborah Spinka, Office Manager
and Bart Hailer


Comfort

Keepers
Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888


In-Home Care Services that help people maintain
full and independent lives
Companionship Escort for Shopping and
Meal Preparation Doctor's Appointments
Laundry Bathing and
Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care
Medication Reminders Alzheimer's/Dementia Care
224 Hwy 44 WetnensFL(5)7644

00G4 wwwseioseviesnvrnssloidaco


We Are Comfort Keepers_


"4
|.


, .. A

L_ .f^


Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes
in-home care to a new level. Since the
business opened in 2004, their mission
has been to transform day-to-day
caregiving into opportunities for
meaningful conversation and activities
that engage and enrich the lives of
seniors physically, mentally, socially
and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels
that the practice of "Interactive Care-
giving"' contributes to longer,
healthier, more purposeful lives for
seniors.
Comfort Keepers caregivers are well
trained, professional caregivers who are
set apart by their natural gift of caring
for others. To work with Comfort
Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent
screening and interviewing processes
and must show a strong devotion to
others.
Only a few special people who pass
this process go on to complete the
training necessary to deliver this special
brand of care and become Comfort
Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass
extensive background checks that
exceed both state and franchise
requirements and also must complete
continuing education.
In-home care is a growing need for
seniors who desire to stay in their own
homes with familiar surroundings, but
can no longer take care of the necessary
requirements of the home. Sometimes,
all that is needed is a little assistance to
enable a senior to stay in their own
home and function safely for many
more years.
Whether it is only a few hours a
week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers
at Comfort Keepers make it possible for
seniors to continue to live in their own
home and enjoy a quality of life that
they thought was going to change
forever. This care reinforces seniors self
value by allowing them to continue their
daily activities with as much
independence as possible. The focus is


PROFILES IN HEALTH


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

In home care for


longer, healthier, and


more purposeful life


providing solutions for the normal
transition of aging.
In order to achieve the most
favorable outcome for each client,
Comfort Keepers carefully matches
caregivers and clients by personalities,
interests, skills and needs. This extra
consideration forms the basis of strong,
healthful relationships. Comfort
Keepers Care Coordinators work as
partners with our client's family to
provide their loved one a complete in-
homecare solution to promote
independent living.
Comfort Keepers provides
companionship and assistance through:
Meal Preparation
Laundry & Linen Washing
Light Housekeeping
Grooming & Dressing Support
Errand Services
Bathing & Hygiene Care
Grocery Shopping
Respite Care
Transportation
Alzheimer's/Dementia Care
All Comfort Keepers caregivers are
employees of the company and not
independent contractors. All of our
caregivers are bonded and covered with
Worker's Compensation and Liability
Insurance.
Comforts Keepers is locally-owned
and family operated by Deborah and
Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey
Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively
involved in the community and
participates and sponsors local
organizations like, Chamber of
Commerce, Womens Business Alliance,
Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business
Masters and various health expos.
For in-depth information about
Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at
www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com
or stop by the local office at 2244
Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida.
Phone: 352-726-4547




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE PROFILES IN HEALTH Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G7


PAID ADVERTISING

Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the

Nature Coast since 1984.


It is the largest medical facility
in Hernando and Citrus County
with 262 acute care beds. It is
also one of the area's largest
private employers, and offers
Hernando County's only
comprehensive cardiovascular
program, including open heart
surgery. Approximately 300
physicians, 950 associates, and
over 350 volunteers comprise
Oak Hill Hospital's healthcare
delivery team.
Oak Hill Hospital's $52
million OR & Bed Tower
expansion project recently added
70,000 new square feet on the
hospital's north side.
Renovations to another 30,000
square feet make this the largest
project of its kind in Hernando
County history. The total spent in
construction is $40 million and
the total amount for design/
engineering and permits, etc. is
$12 million, bringing the total
cost of the project to $52 million.
The expansion provides eight
new operating rooms and a two-
story in-patient bed tower with
36 private Intensive Care Rooms
and expanded parking for
patients and their families.
Not only is Oak Hill Hospital
the largest hospital in the area,
but they also offer the most
current state-of-the-art
technology. Oak Hill Hospital
has recently acquired the newly
refined da Vinci Si Robotic
Assisted Minimally Invasive
Surgical System by Intuitive.
This is the region's most
advanced robotic assisted
surgical system and will be used
in procedures in the areas of:
Gynecology, Oncology, Thoracic
Surgery, General Surgery and
Urology.
The newly refined da Vinci' Si
Surgical System is a system that
allows for minimally invasive


and single-site surgery.
It includes:
* Advanced 3D HD
visualization,
* EndoWrisr instrumentation
with dexterity and range of
motion far greater than
the human hand,
* Intuitive' Motion
technology, which replicates
the experience of open
surgery by preserving natural
eye-hand-instrument
alignment and intuitive
instrument control.
* Together, these technological
advancements provide
unparalleled precision,
dexterity, and control
that enable a minimally
invasive approach to
many complex procedures.
This more advanced robotic
assisted surgical system now allows
for increased surgeon control,
resulting in increased patient safety.
The 3D visualization provides a
higher quality HD imagery for the
physician. This all results in a faster
recovery for the patient and a
quicker return to life as usual.
Oak Hill has achieved
distinction as the:
* First and Only open heart
surgery hospital in
Hernando County.
First Chest Pain Center with
PCI (heart catheterization) in
Hernando County accredited
by the Society of Chest
Pain Centers.
First and Only advanced
level primary stroke center
in Hernando County to be
fully accredited by The Joint
Commission, the leading
accreditor of health care
organizations in America.
First comprehensive
Women's Imaging Center


in Hernando County and the
first imaging center offering
digital mammography with
computer aided detection.
SFirst hospital in the area to
be recognized as an accredited
cancer institute by the
Commission on Cancer (CoC)
of the American College of
Surgeons (ACoS).
* First hospital in the region to
achieve Heart Failure
accreditation with the
Society of Chest Pain Centers.
* First hospital in the region to
offer a comprehensive
Orthopaedic & Spine
Institute and first to achieve
national certification by The
Joint Commission for its Hip
& Knee replacement and
spinal fusion programs.
* First in the nation to have
achieved 100% Board
Certified Emergency Nurses,
CEN's.
Only Emergency Care
Center in Florida, and one of
only 20 nationwide, honored
by the Emergency Nurses
Association for its first-ever
Lantern Award exemplifying
exceptional and innovative
performance in the core
areas of leadership, practice,
education, advocacy, and
research.

Oak Hill Hospital is located at:
11375 Cortez Blvd. (SR 50),
Spring Hill, FL 34613
Browse the website at
OakHillHospital.com to learn
about the physicians, services,
medical information, class
registrations, and much more.
In Hernando County call:
352-597-6333
In Citrus County call:
352-628-6060


Chest Pain Center, Primary Stroke Center,
Heart Institute with Open Heart Surgery
& Pediatric Emergency.


11375 Cortez Blvd. (SR 50),
Spring Hill, FL 34613
352-628-6441 Citrus or
log onto OakHillHospital.com
In an emergency, call 911


When you need emergency care, Oak
Hill Hospital is a short distance up, up
and away. Plus, faster Door-to-Balloon
times that consistently beat the National
Standard.

For super technology, super facilities
and super board-certified doctors and
nurses... insist on the Super Heroes of
Oak Hill Hospital.


Insist on Oak Hill Hospital.



C Oak Hill

Hospital





G8 Tuesday, September 24, 2013 PROFILES IN HEALTH CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Luis R. Annoni, MD Darshan V. Patel, MD Huang-Ta Lin, MD

Medical Director












Raul Jimenez, MD Rajiva Goyal, MD Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD




727-869-5565 toll-free 855-534-4325

14000 Fivay Road, Hudson, FL 34667 YourHeartBeat.com


5 EI Rgomal Medical Carter Bayeonet Paidt
Medical Center o Tiity
A Oak mi Hoespital

TOGETHER. PROVilOING CAOVASCULAR SER VICES AT A HIGHER STANDARr








Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Arrhythmia Center of Florida is dedicated to

providing quality and timely care.


Ever notice your heart skip a beat? Maybe you feel it race faster than
normal or seem out of rhythm? Should you be concerned? It's just normal,
isn't it? It's called Arrbythmia. Find out what that means.
A cardiac arrbythmia is an abnormality in the heartbeat whether the
rhythm is too slow, too fast, or irregular. In some cases, a cardiac
arrhythmia could be nothing to worry about. For other patients, an
arrhythmia could turn life threatening. Even a harmless irregularity in the
heartbeat should be carefully observed in case the situation changes.
Arrhythmias can be caused by any change or complication that forms
in the electrical pathway that runs from the upper chambers of the heart to
the lower chambers. Sometimes this can result in a heart beating under 60
beats per minute, or a heart that beats over 100 times in a minute. Some
irregular heartbeats will vary chaotically between the two extremes without
a discernible pattern.
Arrhythmia patients will often notice a racing heartbeat or a peculiar
fluttering sensation in their chest or neck. Other symptoms of an
arrhythmia include:
Dizziness or fainting
Fatigue
Weakness
Difficulty breathing
Chest pain
An arrhythmia is when the heart's electrical systems do -
work properly. Each year, over 850,000 Americans are hospitalized for
an arrhythmia.
"Having a local full service facility that's focused solely on treating
arrhythmias means patients won't have to go out of the area to
receive specialized care," said Julie Lallanilla, Director of
f I h ,I. 1 ,, .. 1 1 1 1 . I t ...I
The Arrhythmia Center of Florida (ACOF) is open to diagnose and
treat patients who suffer from cardiac Is ii, .1'1 i ..1 i ii.
nationally recognized Heart Institute at Regional Medical Center Bayonet
Point.' ii, .1 i ii 1 'I . lab and full service facility,

Arrhythmia Center of Florida is dedicated to providing quality and
timely care. They are fully staffed with expert physicians and healthcare
professionals who are committed to giving their patients the care they need
while experiencing a cardiac arrhythmia. They possess a state of the art lab
that is fully equipped with the latest technology used to diagnose and
effectively treat cardiac patients. Along with making high quality cardiac
care available to the community, this center works toward promoting
awareness and education about arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and other
cardiac complications.
The ACOF's physicians and healthcare professionals have served
patients in West Central Florida since 1995 and perform over 1,000
electrophysiology procedures annually. Medical Director Luis R. Annoni,
MD leads the ACOF's team of six electrophysiologists (cardiologists who
specialize in arrhythmias). Along with Dr. Annoni, ACOF
electrophysiologists include: Rajiva Goyal, MD; Raul Jimenez, MD;
Huang Ta Lin, MD; Darshan V. Patel, MD; and Kenneth H. Yamamura,
MD.
"For some patients, an arrhythmia may be nothing to worry about.
For others, it may be a life threatening medical condition," said Dr.
Annoni. .. ...an arrhythmia should see a physician right
away."
Depending on the state of your arrhythmia, you may be recommended
to undergo a variety of different treatments. Some of your options could be
. ... I 1 1 I I ... . ..I. h 1.. ..
There are several approaches for diagnosing and observing a cardiac
arrhythmia. Some methods include:
Electrocardiogram (EKG)
Echocardiogram
Electrophysiology Study (EP Study)
Cardiac Stress Test
Tilt Table Test
Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE)
Event Recorder, Holter Monitor or Implantable Loop Recorder
Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point has been serving the
community since 1981. They are a 290 bed acute care hospital located in
Hudson, FL and home of the nationally acclaimed Heart Institute. They
have m ore i ... -'I .... '. 11. .... 1'' I I .......
integrated healthcare delivery team. RMCBP has been approved by the
Florida Department of Health, Office of Trauma, as a Provisional Level 2
Traum aC G ,, I .. .. I .,.. ,-...... .. h .'1 ,I - ,
access to treatment in the "golden hour." This is the first hour after a
serious injury in' hi h , ih h1 i hi hi *h .1 h 1 .. I I,, .. .1. .I
attention will prevent death. Through an affiliation with the University of
South Florida Health, RMCBP has the support of a major academic


university and medical school. A Trauma Center in our community means
faster treatment to improve patient outcomes and keep patients close to
home and their loved ones.

Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point has achieved distinction in the
following areas:
Recipient of the 2012 American Heart Association (AHA)/American
Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines Gold Plus
Performance Achievement Award in both heart failure and stroke.
Recipient of theAHA's Mission: Lifeline Bronze Quality Achievement
Award for implementing a higher standard of heart attack care that
improves the survival and outcomes for STEMI (ST Elevation
Myocardial Infarction) patients.
American Heart Association's 2009 Stroke Silver Plus Performance
Award Winner (1st in State of Florida)
Top Performing Hospital, the Joint Commission recognized as one of
the nation's top performing hospitals in quality
I measurements for heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia,
and surgical care.
S Certified Advance Primary Stroke Center Joint
Commission
SAccredited Chest Pain Center, with PCI Society of Chest
S Pain Centers for Cycle I, I and III
SHeart & Stroke Champions Award Winner 1998 2011
MRI, CT, Ultrasound, and Nuclear Medicine Accredited American
College of Radiology
Approved, with Commendation, Community Cancer Program -
American College of Surgeons.
10 Joint Commission Disease Specific Certification: primary stroke
center, acute myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease (COPD), coronary artery bypass graft, heart failure, joint
replacement hip, joint replacement knee, lung cancer, pneumonia,
wound care!
Certified Advanced Heart Failure Joint Commission (1 st in the State of
Florida 1/2010)
Designated a 100 Top Hospital seven years by Thomson Reuters
Named twice (1999 & 2002) by U.S. News & World Report as one of
.. .. I- i ii, 1 ,1 ,,, 1 ,,i ,,,,1 1 ,i ,,,I
1 i'- ,ii d I. 1i 1 ,1 1 areatoachievetheGoldPlus
standard in both heart failure and stroke.
On June 14, 2012, The Leapfrog Group recently made public its Safe
Hospital Scores. The scores are derived from Leapfrog's key questions and
publicly reported data. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point received an
A rating for safety.
"This recognition has very special meaning for us," said Shayne
George, CEO of Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. "It is a
recognition of our entire staff's effort to ensure our service area of the safest
hospital experience possible". "What is most important is that this is
another objective recognition of the quality of care provided here at
RMCBP," he added.
According to the Leapfrog .... i i .i die
because of hospital errors the equivalent of a jet crashing every day and
killing all aboard. In response to this silent epidemic, over 2,600 US
hospitals now receive an A, B, C, D or F score based on patient safety. A
panel of the nation's top patient safety experts provides guidance to The
Leapfrog Group, an independent national nonprofit run by employers and
other large purchasers of health benefits, to develop the Hospital Safety
Score. The Hospital Safety Score is calculated using publicly available data
,,,i ,h ,I,,I ... .. h I ,,,, I,, i,h ,.... .. ... I,,I I. .
"The Leapfrog Group's goal is to give patients the vital information
they need and deserve before even entering a hospital," said Leah Binder,
president and CEO, The Leapfrog Group. "We hope people will use this
score to talk with their doctor, make informed decisions about where to seek
care, and take the right precautions during a hospital stay." For the first time
the Hospital Safety Score highlights the country's best hospitals and warns
against the worst to save lives and bring attention to the nation's silent
safety epidemic. The Hospital Safety Score website
I i, .1 i.1 . . ,. visitors to search hospital scores for
free and provides information for the public to protect themselves and loved
ones during a hospital stay.
The Hospital Safety Score exclusively measures safety meaning
errors, accidents, and infections. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point
received a near perfect score in all of the areas of "safe practice measures."
The Arrhythmia Center of Florida is located at 14000 Fivay Road in
Hudson near the intersection of US 19 and Hudson Avenue. To learn more
about cardiac arrhythmias, diagnostic procedures, and treatments, visit the
ACOF website at www.yourheartbeat.com or call 727 869 5565 or toll free
at 855 534 4325.




Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G9


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PROFILES IN HEALTH




G10O Tuesday, September 24, 2013 PROFILES IN HEALTH CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

Suncoast Primary Care:


Providing Modern Medicine,


the Old Fashioned Way


From a one-physician practice, Suncoast
Primary Care Specialists has evolved over the
past ten years to a formidable name in health
care in Citrus County. Together with the
gradual growth of the community and the
increasing number of countless highly
satisfied patients, the practice has extended its
reach by opening centers in three strategic
locations: Citrus Springs/Dunnellon,
Inverness and Homosassa, easily becoming a
household name.
Led by its founder, Dr. Alex T. Villacastin,
Suncoast Primary Care Specialists currently
accepts new patients with comfort and
convenience in mind. These are reflected by
the well-appointed office spaces, ample
parking lots, availability of ancilliary services
like Bone Density Tests, EKGs, labs and X-
rays, to the exemplary services of three
highly-trained doctors and four mid-level
providers, all of whom rotate among the
centers to address Citrus County's family
medicine, general practice, and internal
medicine needs.
The goal at Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists revolves around the principle that
better coordination of patient care throughout
his or her treatment results to a healthier and
happier patient, hence the unified team
approach of the providers. With the aid of
modem technology and seamless
communication, Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists is able to afford its patients the
best care possible by eliminating unnecessary
duplication of procedures; doing away with
unnecessary travel time by arranging
treatments, appointments and referrals; and
reinforcing proper and correct prescriptions
and respective dosages. Because some
services are already done in-house, the
patient's time and convenience are
emphasized.
The staff of doctors at Suncoast Primary
Care Specialists includes Dr. Catherine
Navarro, Board Certified in Family Practice;
Dr. Alistair Co, Board Certified in Family
Practice; and Dr. Alex Villacastin, Board
Certified in Internal Medicine. Mid-level
Providers include Alexander Villacastin,
ARNP-C, Sheila Villacastin, ARNP-C, Maria
Villacastin, ARNP-C, and Lawrence
Stawkowski, PA-C. Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists is also supported by doctors and
providers in other areas of medicine who
rotate at a Multi-specialty Clinic on-site, so
patient care continuity and convenience are
addressed.
In his 15 years of practice, Dr. Villacastin
has identified that patient care breakdown
usually occurs when a patient is seen by
different doctors during the course of his or
her treatment. The time spent coordinating
simple procedures and requesting for results
on top of a provider's busy schedule
aggravates the situation, resulting in time and
productivity wasted, and adversely, sacrificing
efficient patient care. He went on to adapt best
practices and tailor a system for patients' flow
of care commencing during their hospital


stay; extending to their discharge in the
community, rehabilitation or nursing facility;
to the coordination of their therapy and home
health care, and follow-up visits, if necessary.
Ensuring continuity of care, Dr. Villacastin
maintains hospital privileges at both Citrus
Memorial Hospital and Seven Rivers
Regional Hospital. He is also the Medical
Director of both Diamond Ridge Healthcare
& Rehabilitation Center and Crystal River
Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center. In
addition, along with the other providers at
Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, he rotates
in the nursing and rehab facilities in the
county to monitor the care of the practice's
patients. This system is effective in reassuring
patients that their health and well-being are
continuously taken care of, regardless of
which location, state and stage in life they
may be in.
Amid the rapid but calculated growth of
Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, Dr.
Villacastin strives to maintain a nourishing
culture by putting the patients first and
valuing them like a family member. This
psyche is ingrained among the providers and
office staff who work for the practice as well.
They strive within reason, to know a patient,
not just their physical condition. Dr.
Villacastin sums up this environment by
stating, "When you understand the whole
patient, they will open up and work with their
doctor, and follow their treatment plan better."
Looking forward, Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists works proactively to stay ahead of
the changes in healthcare and insurance
regulations. With the ever-changing face of
the healthcare industry, challenges are nigh.
But Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is
constantly adapting and reinventing so that
amidst these challenges, its priority of putting
patient care first, is never affected. It is now a
member of an Accountable Care Organization
(ACO), which, as defined by Medicare, is an
organization of healthcare providers that
agrees to be accountable for the quality, cost
and overall care of Medicare beneficiaries
who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-
service program. This program emphasizes
patient outcome, benefitting the patient's
health and well-being.
Growth is a beautiful thing. But it only if
growth stands for something. As Suncoast
Primary Care Specialists grows hand in hand
with the community, it remains true in
standing by its roots. Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists will always be providing modem
medicine, the old fashioned way. Always.
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL
(352) 382-8282

3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL
(352) 341-5520

10489 N. Florida Ave.
Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, FL
(352) 489-2486




Tuesday September 24, 2013 G11


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Cypress Cove Care Center is a communicate not only between exercise classes.
skilled nursing facility that has families but within the J i 1. ,..i- Therapy is also making use of the
served the short term and long term Understanding that relatives are new technology. For example,
care needs for residents of Citrus tied up with work schedules and residents with communication
County and the surrounding area for busy 11 ... ,. ii ii i.., cannot travel deficits are learning to communicate
over 20 years. Throughout this as often as they would like, Cypress using apps on Kindle devices.
time, Cypress Cove Care Center has Cove has made it possible to plan Using pictures for words helps the
continuously provided the highest visits with the residents via the residents speak to others.
level of quality care to residents, as internet. Cypress Cove Care Center has
evidenced by the many awards they
have received. They are proud to Using SKYPE and Face Time begun to integrate the new programs
have received the Five Star Rating allows residents to communicate into all areas of the center. Resident
from the Centers from Medicare and with family members who are out of Council, the Activity Department
Medicaid (CMS); a Five Star Rating state, Residents can watch their and Therapy have joined together in
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Healthcare (AHCA); as well as speak with them, and their loved additional iPads and Kindles.
being listed as one of the top nursing ones can see them, too. Before you choose a skilled
homes in America in US News and Activities have also been enhanced nursing facility for your loved one,
World Report. Recent awards also and expanded by bringing games to visit Cypress Cove at their website
include the New Image Award from the big screen TV There are many cypresscovecare.com. They also
the Citrus County Chamber and Best computer applications (apps) encourage you to call and ask to
of the Best Honorable Mention. In available to entertain and increase speak to the Admissions
addition, Cypress Cove Care Center the activity of the residents. Some Department. Someone is always
was acknowledged by the Governor favorite ones are 3D horse racing, available to answer any of your
of Florida for Safety Achievement Musical Bingo and various questions or schedule a tour of the
Recognition Program (SHARP), exercise programs. Apps are less facility.
At Cypress Cove, they are taking expensive than traditional board Cypress Cove Care Center is a
advantage of all of the new games and the selections are nonprofit facility located at 700 SE
technological advances and have seemingly endless. Along with all of 8th Avenue in Crystal River, Florida
incorporated many new innovations, the new choices, residents still enjoy 34429.
Technology has opened new ways to the Wii for tennis, bowling and PHONE: (352) 795-8832


Paid Advertisement

What does the Department

of Health offer?


The Florida Department of
Health Citrus County (DOH) has
offices geographically situated
throughout the county and
conveniently located on the bus
routes. There isn't room to list all
of the information and services
available to the residents, but it
would be worth your time to stop
by the main office or browse their
website.
Here is a brief highlight of some
of the programs being offered:
SCommunity Health Center
provides primary care medical
services, including: physical
exams, health screening, x-ray
referrals, well/sick care, medical
follow-up, and referral to
specialists, immunizations and
more. Central appointment
scheduling for all three service
sites: (352) 527-0247. Clinic
Hours: Mon-Fri 7:00-5:30
Two walk-in clinics offering
excellent ER alternative care and
cost effective treatment with no
appointment necessary. Mon-Fri
7:00-12:30 and 1:00-5:30
Dental Services for children.
DOH- Citrus partners with the
school system to place a sealant on
the permanent molars of second


grade children to prevent decay.
Last year this service provided 867
sealant applications. Limited
dental services are available to
adults on an emergency basis. Mon
- Fri 7:00am- 5:00pm. Please call
for an appointment (352)249-9258
Press option 1 then type ext 249
Provide birth and death
certificates
Partner with mosquito control
to monitor mosquito borne
diseases
Provided over 5,000
immunizations annually
Offer OB services and
typically sees over 400 pregnant
women a year.
W.I.C. Women, Infant and
Children Program typically see
2,900 residents a month
Staff visits new mothers at
both hospitals to assist with
breastfeeding.
Work closely with the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention
i I i to monitor outbreaks of
infectious disease. Coordinate with
community partners (hospitals,
private healthcare providers, day
cares, school system) on illness
investigations.
Partner with Animal Services


and community partners for Rabies
Prevention
Offer environmental health
services to help protect Citrus
County
Onsite sewage inspections for
new construction, repairs and
existing buildings
Work with Sheriff Dept., Red
Cross, EMS, private partners and
school board to prepare for
disasters through an "all hazard
approach" plan and train for
disaster preparedness. Teach
residents to prepare for disasters.
S Tobacco prevention -
S.W.A.T. teams Students
Working Against Tobacco.
Quitline 1-877-822-6669. The
Quitline is a service of the Florida
Department of Health and is
accessible to any Florida resident
who is ready to make the
commitment to quit smoking.
The DOH Citrus is working
hard for the residents of Citrus
County. Call or stop by to see
what they can do for you.
The DOH Citrus Administrative
Office is located at:
3700 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Website:
www.citruscountyhealth.org


Making A Difference


With Every Life We Touch


,, "AFive-StarIRatedFacility*

j Inpatient & Outpatient

Skilled Care
aPost Surgery Care
Stroke Rehab
S^Cardiac Program
.. -Superior Woundcare
S I.V. Therapy



,.- Cypress COve


-"^"d *www.cypresscovecare.com
700 Soulheasl 81h Ave. (352) 795-8832
"...:-..r Crystal River r3J2 79 -8 32


Florida

HEALTH
C' L. ,_-.'. ; ';r t


SERVICES
* Adult Health Care Family Planning/Women's Health
* Birth and Death Certificates Health Education


* Children's Care
* Dental Care
* Disaster Preparedness
* Disease Prevention
* Environmental Health


* Healthy Start/Mom Care
* Illness Investigation
* Tobacco Prevention
* Walk in Clinics
* WlC/Nutrition


Medical appointment 352-527-0247
Dental appointment 352-249-9258
www.citruscountyhealth.org


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PROFILES IN HEALTH




G12 Tuesday, September 24, 2013


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PROFILES IN HEALTH


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Full Text

PAGE 1

SEPTEMBER 24, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community50www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Classifieds . . . .C9 Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . .A10 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 TV Listings . . . .C7 HIGH88LOW73Cloudy, with an 80 percent chance of rain.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY 000G2GK CITRUS COUNTY Home finale: Rays finish four-game sweep of Orioles /B1VOL. 119 ISSUE 48 NEWS BRIEFS Panera Bread coming to InvernessPanera Bread confirmed Monday that a new store will open in spring 2014 in the same shopping center as the new Publix on State Road 44 in Inverness. Publix is scheduled to open Oct. 24. This is huge, and we take this as a compliment to the Inverness community, said Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni. Panera Bread is a high-quality, well-established, well-known eatery, and we know that when you deal with businesses like this, they look at location carefully. So, they see the potential in downtown Inverness, whats been done and where our future lies in moving forward. This is huge ... and itll go a long way in helping the other establishments that are here already.CCSO looking for missing woman The Citrus County Sheriffs Office is asking residents to be on the lookout for a missing 75year-old woman, Eileen Nuismer. She is approximately 5 feet 7 inches tall and 120 pounds. She has white hair and blue eyes. She was last seen at her residence on Silverlake Point in Dunnellon on Sept. 19. Residents should check their home, including porches and sheds. Call 911 with information. Eileen Nuismer INSIDE From staff reports NATION & WORLD:Battle ragesKenyan security forces continue to battle al-Qaida-linked terrorists./ Page C1 Planner takes job in Cape Coral PATFAHERTY Staff writerAs director of planning and development, Vince Cautero touched many projects and initiatives as Citrus County positioned itself to transition from recession back to growth. In the past three years, he has been involved in the permitting process, comprehensive plan amendments, Port Citrus, budget cuts, bicycle trails, impact fees, economic development, the enterprise zone, environmental issues, the land development code and the proposed medical corridor on County Road 491. As head of the high-profile department, he has been a familiar face at all types of public meetings and occasional controversy. But his last day on the job here is Oct. 11, when he will leave for a similar position with the city of Cape Coral. This was Cauteros second stint in local government. He had worked in the Citrus County Department of Development Services from 198595, serving as its director for five years. From there he went on to Collier County and consultant work, returning to Citrus in 2010. Cautero said he is going to miss the interesting projects, a good staff, having good relations with the business community and his involvement with the Economic Vince Cauterolast day as the countys director of planning and development is Oct. 11. Vince Cautero leaving for similar, better-paying job in southwest Fla. See CAUTERO/ Page A9 States bridges among safest in US Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick Scott caught in the debate over the future of Floridas public schools is trying to respond to critics of new education standards slated to go into effect next year. Instead of rejecting or wholly endorsing the standards as former Gov. Jeb Bush has Scott on Monday called for public hearings and possible changes to the Common Core State Standards. The Republican governor also said the state will pull out of a national test for school children to see if they are reaching standards in certain subjects. Scott, in an executive order and letters to top state education officials, said he remains in favor of the highest academic standards, but wants to make sure there isnt any federal intrusion into education policy. That has been a constant refrain of Common Core critics, many of whom are Republican Party activists. Common Core See TEST/ Page A7 Governor makes changes to Common Core plan Of 9,157 structures, only 17 found to be in need of repairNANCYKENNEDY Staff writerFrom the Golden Gate to the Brooklyn Bridge to the 1945 Pistol Point Canal bridge on County Road 39 that 40 vehicles travel across each day, Americans rely on the nations hundreds of thousands of bridges to help get them from one place to another. Recently, the Associated Press analyzed the federal National Bridge Inventory, focusing on the thousands of bridges that are both structurally deficient and fracture critical a dangerous and potentially deadly combination that indicates significant disrepair and an increased risk of collapse. In 2007, the I-35W Mississippi River bridge in Minneapolis, Minn., an eightlane steel truss arch bridge, collapsed during the evening rush hour on Aug. 1, killing 13 and injuring 145. A design flaw was cited as the cause of the collapse. Just this past May, a bridge over the Skagit River in a rural area of Washington state, collapsed, sending at least two cars into the water. The Seattle Timesreported that, according to federal records, the bridge in question had a sufficiency rating of 57.4 out of 100, which is well below the state average of 80. Yet 759 other bridges have even worse marks. In Florida, the 4.1-mile Sunshine Skyway Bridge over the Tampa Bay named among the Top 10 Bridges in the World by the Travel Channel was partially damaged May 9, 1980, when the MV Summit Venture freighter collided with a support column during a severe thunderstorm, causing six cars, a truck Scott fills seat on education boardTALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Monday tapped a former public school teacher to take a spot on the panel that oversees the states public schools. Scott appointed Rebecca Fishman Lipsey to a four-year term on the State Board of Education. Lipsey, who is from Aventura, taught in New York City for two years. She also worked as executive director in Miami-Dade County for Teach for America. From wire reports See BRIDGES/ Page A11 The bridge on U.S. 41 in Inverness is the oldest in the county. It was originally built in 1925 and rebuilt 25 years later. The Withlacoochee State Trail now passes under it.MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle

PAGE 2

A2TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G5ZX

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MATTREINIG Hernando Today BROOKSVILLE A veteran critically wounded in the war in Afghanistan, who applied for and received a customized home from Houston-based HelpingaHero.org Home Program, withdrew from the program about two weeks ago. Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Ken Patterson declined the offer via email one day before home builder, Pulte Homes in Tampa, was to begin construction on the home in the Trillium subdivision. Pulte Homes was just amazing, and they did everything they committed to, and we certainly did everything we committed to,said Meredith Iler, national chairman, founder and volunteer of Helping aHero.org, We certainly wish Mr. Patterson well, but he just changed his mind. Patterson, who currently resides in Citrus County, could not be reached for comment. Patterson lost much of his right leg, along with his left foot, four years ago in the war in Afghanistan while aboard a CH-47 Chinook helicopter, which came under heavy fire by Taliban forces. Looking back on it, if I had known I would have missed (the Army) this much, I would have stayed, because they could have put me in a special unit,Patterson said back in July. As long as I find some land to ride my fourwheeler on, Ill be all right. A groundbreaking ceremony was conducted back in mid-July. The four-bedroom, 2,600-square-foot home with 2.5 baths and full wheelchair accessibility, was 400 square feet larger than any home in Trillium. The home was expected to be complete by Thanksgiving. Applications for 2014 homes are available at HelpingaHero.org. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleJennie Greening of Ocala spends a wet Monday morning fishing at Fort Island Trail Park on the banks of the Crystal River. Greening keeps a close eye above on a sea gull attempting to pluck the anglers shrimp from her hook. Rain is once again forecast for Tuesday with chances for rain greater than 50 percent over the next three days, according to Bay News 9 forecasters. An unorganized mass of storms and showers is drifting northwest across the Gulf of Mexico directly into the Nature Coast, dumping heavy rainfall and causing some low-lying areas to flood. Rainy days and MondaysAround theSTATE Citrus CountyDemocratic clubs host dinner todayThe Combined Democratic Clubs of Citrus County will meet today at 7 Rivers Golf and Country Club in Crystal River. Sheriff Jeff Dawsy will be the speaker. For those wishing cocktails and dinner before the meeting, arrive no later than 6p.m., since the meeting is scheduled to begin by 7:15p.m. All Democrats are welcome.For details, call 352795-5384 or 352-795-4119.Candlelight vigil for slain man movesThe candlelight vigil by friends and family of a Hernando man killed by an offduty sheriffs office deputy-intraining is moving to Fort Island Beach on Fort Island Trail. The event will begin at 8p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25. Deputy Greg Entrekin shot and killed Derrick Vaccianna, 28, after a struggle Sept.26, 2012, in the bedroom of an Inverness woman they both were purportedly dating. According to the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, Entrekin and his girlfriend at the time were confronted by Vaccianna after he entered the residence on Eden Drive in Inverness through a bedroom window. Entrekin shot Vaccianna when he reportedly charged at him. Vaccianna died at the scene. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement cleared Entrekin in January of any wrongdoing in Vacciannas death, but acknowledged the existence of a love triangle. The theme of the event is: Light Up The Sky. TOO FAR to host dinner meetingWayne Sawyer of the Citrus/Hernando Waterways Restoration Council is the guest speaker for TOO FARs spaghetti dinner meeting fundraiser at 6p.m. Thursday, Sept.26, at the East Citrus Civic Center, 9907 E. Gulf-toLake Highway, Inverness. Meal costs $7 and includes salad, pasta, garlic bread and dessert. Contact Pat Brady at psbrady@tampabay.rr.com or 352-419-8030. TallahasseePro-Scott website takes aim at CristThe Republican Party of Florida has launched a new website that touts Gov. Rick Scotts handling of the economy and slams former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist, who is widely expected to run for governor as a Democrat in 2014. The website, itsworking fl.com, focuses on issues such as job creation, the states unemployment rate and Scotts proposal to cut $500 million in taxes and fees next year. It also has a Before & After section that attempts to juxtapose Scotts performance with the time Crist was governor a time that Florida and the rest of the country got hammered by the economic recession. JacksonvilleStore owner shoots would-be robberA Jacksonville store owner shot and injured a masked man who jumped over the counter and demanded money from the clerk. The shooting happened about 9 p.m. Sunday at the Holiday Grocery. Jacksonville Sheriffs officials said the suspect was in serious but stable condition at UF Health Jacksonville. From staff and wire reports Victim David Crawford lived in Citrus County Associated PressLARGO Some two dozen police officers crowded into a Largo courtroom Monday for the resentencing of a teenager who killed a St. Petersburg officer. Nicholas Lindsey was 16 when he shot Officer David S. Crawford five times on Feb. 21, 2011. He was sentenced to life in prison after his trial last year. After the sentencing, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that automatic life-withoutparole sentences for juveniles are not constitutional. The court mandated that other factors must be considered, including the youths mental development and background. This summer, a PinellasPasco Circuit Court granted a motion allowing Lindsey to be resentenced. St. Petersburg Chief Chuck Harmon told the Tampa Bay Timeshe wanted to show support for Crawford and make sure that Lindsey gets the appropriate sentence, and thats life. Arrangements were made for the overflow crowd to watch the proceedings from a TV in a conference room. Officers from several agencies joined Harmon on Monday morning. Jurors deliberated four hours last year before finding Lindsey guilty of first-degree murder. His attorneys didnt deny that he killed the officer. Rather, they claimed he fired at the officer out of panic and should have been convicted of manslaughter instead. That way, he would have been eligible for a 30-year prison sentence instead of life without the possibility of early release. During the trial, defense attorneys said the teen was illegally armed to protect himself against neighborhood gangs. But prosecutors said he knew exactly what he was doing when he fired at Crawford. The officer was trying to stop him for questioning. Crawford, 46, was a 25-year department veteran and assigned to District 2 on the citys north side near Tropicana Field. He made the commute to his nightly patrol job from Crystal River, more than a 75-mile trip each way. In 2011, a neighbor said Crawford lived in Citrus County because he promised to take care of the house when his father passed away a few years prior. STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Man threatens roommates with knife SEANARNOLD CorrespondentA day of drinking culminated with felony charges of aggravated assault with intent to commit a felony for Thomas Culver of Crystal River. Culver, 36, reportedly brandished a steak knife at one of his roommates and threatened to kill not only him, but the other two roommates, as well. According to the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, the victim was sleeping in his bedroom a little after midnight Saturday, Sept. 21, when he was awoken by Culver. When he entered the hallway, Culver made threats while wielding a steak knife, stating he was going to kill everyone in the residence. Alarmed by the angry threats, all three roommates exited the home and ran into the street. The three roommates requested assistance from a passing Citrus County Sheriffs Office patrol vehicle, explaining to the deputy that Culver was in a foul mood from a day of drinking. A deputy spotted Culver about 50 feet away, standing on the sidewalk on North Citrus Avenue, and as he approached, it became clear that Culver was heavily intoxicated. The deputy said Culver shouted he was drunk and if he was not taken to jail he was going to go back to the house to hurt everyone. Culver went on to say he had been using a knife to threaten his roommates, but had hidden it somewhere, and refused to tell the deputy where he had placed it. Culver continued with his threats, stating when the deputy left, he was going to grab the knife and go back to the residence to hurt everyone in there. Deputies discovered the knife nearby in some mulch and Culver was taken into custody without further incident. His bond was set at $5,000. Thomas Culverfaces assault charges. David CrawfordSt. Petersburg officer lived in Citrus County before being shot and killed Feb. 21, 2011. Teen who killed St. Pete police officer to be resentenced Veteran changes mind about new home Hernando TodayRetired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Ken Patterson served four combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Patterson, who currently resides in Citrus County, withdrew from the Houston-based HelpingaHero.org Home Program just before construction was to start on a customized home in the Trillium subdivision in Hernando County. We certainly wish Mr. Patterson well, but he just changed his mind. Meredith Ilerfounder of HelpingaHero.org

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Birthday Look at the big picture in the coming months. Consider whats available to you and how you can reach your goals. Learn all you can and question anything that isnt clear. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Communication will be your ticket to information that can help you advance. Do your research, and you will avoid making a mistake. Dont give in to pressure. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Its a good day to get in touch with an old friend. The memories you share will help prevent you from making a financial mistake. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Express your thoughts and follow through with your plans. An emotional situation may deter you if you allow it to. Assess the situation, make adjustments and complete whatever you are doing. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Protect your name and position. Listen to what others say, but dont make alterations to your plan based on hearsay. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Stick close to home and look over your property and papers. Fixing up your place will make you feel good and give you a reason to entertain someone special. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Look over contracts, settlements or any personal information that can help you expand an interest or project. Aries (March 21-April 19) Use your intelligence and creative talent in the workplace today. Employing your skills diversely will create a stir. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Learn all you can. The more information you have, the easier it will be to impress your peers. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Emotions will escalate causing uncertainty. Dont believe everything you hear. Go directly to the source. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Live a little. Get out and enjoy new interests or try developing a skill or talent that you find engaging. Romance will develop if you make plans with someone special. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your ability to adapt will be crucial when dealing with an ongoing domestic situation. Someone you least expect will come to the rescue. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Mixed emotions are likely to confuse you. Rely on past experience and old friends to help you make wise choices. An unusual route will offer the best destination. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, Sept. 24, the 267th day of 2013. There are 98 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Sept. 24, 1976, former hostage Patricia Hearst was sentenced to seven years in prison for her part in a 1974 bank robbery in San Francisco carried out by the Symbionese Liberation Army. Hearst was released after 22 months after receiving clemency from President Jimmy Carter. On this date: In 1869, thousands of businessmen were ruined in a Wall Street panic known as Black Friday after financiers Jay Gould and James Fisk attempted to corner the gold market. In 1961, Walt Disneys Wonderful World of Color premiered on NBC. In 1991, Childrens author Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, died in La Jolla, Calif., at age 87. Ten years ago: After four turbulent months, three special legislative sessions and two Democratic walkouts, both houses of the Republican-controlled Texas Legislature adopted redistricting plans favoring the GOP. Five years ago: Officials reopened Galveston, Texas, to residents who were warned about Hurricane Ikes debris and disruption of utilities. One year ago: President Barack Obama told the ABC talk show The View that the deadly attack earlier in the month on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, was not the result of mob violence; he said theres no doubt that the assault wasnt spontaneous. Todays Birthdays: News anchor Lou Dobbs is 68. Actor Kevin Sorbo is 55. Actress-writer Nia Vardalos is 51. Actor Justin Bruening is 34. Thought for Today: History is mostly guessing, the rest is prejudice. Will (1885-1981) and Ariel Durant (1898-1981), American historians.Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 87 75 1.10 HI LO PR 87 76 1.20 HI LO PR 84 74 1.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 82 73 1.30 HI LO PR 85 73 0.45 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Cloudy with an 80% chance of thunderstorms, heavy rain likely.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Mostly cloudy with a 70% chance of rain. Decreasing clouds, still a 30% chance of showers.High: 88 Low: 73 High: 88 Low: 73 High: 89 Low: 72TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 84/74 Record 96/62 Normal 89/68 Mean temp. 79 Departure from mean +0 PRECIPITATION* Monday 1.00 in. Total for the month 7.15 in. Total for the year 48.16 in. Normal for the year 43.61 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 6 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 71 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 100% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:24 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:20 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY .........................11:05 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ..........................12:10 P.M. SEPT. 26OCT. 4OCT. 11OCT. 18 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 86 74 ts Ft. Lauderdale 89 77 ts Fort Myers 88 76 ts Gainesville 84 71 ts Homestead 90 75 ts Jacksonville 83 72 ts Key West 88 81 ts Lakeland 87 74 ts Melbourne 88 74 ts City H L Fcast Miami 90 78 ts Ocala 86 72 ts Orlando 88 74 ts Pensacola 86 74 ts Sarasota 88 78 ts Tallahassee 86 71 ts Tampa 87 77 ts Vero Beach 89 75 ts W. Palm Bch. 89 75 ts FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSouthwest winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Mostly cloudy with showers and thunderstorms likely today. Gulf water temperature84 LAKE LEVELSLocation Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 29.73 29.76 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.15 38.19 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.62 39.67 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.45 40.48 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H L L L L L L L 90/64 71/60 77/48 88/64 71/54 76/62 66/55 76/56 70/46 60/49 72/54 67/50 79/65 90/78 91/70 75/53 THE NATION Albany 61 43 s 66 42 Albuquerque 73 48 s 80 57 Asheville 72 51 pc 73 56 Atlanta 82 60 pc 79 65 Atlantic City 68 43 s 72 57 Austin 89 55 s 92 66 Baltimore 67 51 s 72 48 Billings 71 52 pc 70 46 Birmingham 84 61 ts 81 66 Boise 73 52 sh 66 44 Boston 65 50 s 67 51 Buffalo 60 45 s 64 46 Burlington, VT 52 45 s 62 43 Charleston, SC 82 63 s 81 66 Charleston, WV 67 48 s 76 55 Charlotte 75 55 s 80 60 Chicago 67 46 s 71 60 Cincinnati 69 44 .01 s 75 56 Cleveland 61 51 s 64 47 Columbia, SC 81 55 s 81 61 Columbus, OH 64 47 s 73 53 Concord, N.H. 59 45 s 66 40 Dallas 85 59 s 90 64 Denver 66 50 .48 s 77 48 Des Moines 77 54 pc 72 53 Detroit 62 45 s 67 50 El Paso 85 70 s 88 64 Evansville, IN 76 50 pc 78 60 Harrisburg 65 53 s 72 46 Hartford 63 48 s 69 45 Houston 88 71 ts 91 70 Indianapolis 71 49 s 76 58 Jackson 85 55 ts 85 69 Las Vegas 86 64 s 92 68 Little Rock 82 56 pc 84 62 Los Angeles 80 61 s 76 62 Louisville 74 52 pc 81 62 Memphis 83 59 pc 82 65 Milwaukee 61 48 s 64 56 Minneapolis 74 53 pc 71 54 Mobile 87 66 ts 86 72 Montgomery 83 65 ts 83 68 Nashville 80 52 ts 80 63 New Orleans 87 73 .01 ts 87 76 New York City 66 50 s 72 54 Norfolk 66 61 s 73 56 Oklahoma City 83 57 s 83 59 Omaha 78 57 pc 74 53 Palm Springs 97 64 s 97 66 Philadelphia 67 50 s 72 52 Phoenix 93 68 s 95 74 Pittsburgh 57 51 s 68 44 Portland, ME 59 42 pc 66 43 Portland, Ore 63 56 .02 sh 61 50 Providence, R.I. 65 49 s 69 47 Raleigh 72 55 s 78 57 Rapid City 61 54 .22 s 72 52 Reno 79 42 pc 76 42 Rochester, NY 59 46 s 63 45 Sacramento 84 53 s 79 55 St. Louis 77 55 pc 78 61 St. Ste. Marie 59 38 s 66 45 Salt Lake City 71 53 pc 83 59 San Antonio 91 57 s 93 66 San Diego 80 62 s 76 63 San Francisco 76 57 s 69 56 Savannah 77 66 .11 pc 82 68 Seattle 60 55 .10 sh 60 49 Spokane 59 46 sh 61 42 Syracuse 56 44 s 65 41 Topeka 80 53 pc 77 54 Washington 68 55 s 75 53YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 97 Thermal, Calif. LOW 25 Wolf Creek, Colo. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 86/76/pc Amsterdam 67/49/pc Athens 81/63/s Beijing 71/58/pc Berlin 59/54/sh Bermuda 82/75/ts Cairo 89/65/s Calgary 57/43/pc Havana 83/75/pc Hong Kong 78/76/ts Jerusalem 73/63/sh Lisbon 73/67/c London 71/54/pc Madrid 85/62/s Mexico City 72/57/ts Montreal 63/46/pc Moscow 46/43/sh Paris 76/54/s Rio 81/62/ts Rome 75/62/s Sydney 84/59/s Tokyo 81/70/sh Toronto 66/46/s Warsaw 60/40/pc WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 8:40 a/4:39 a 10:00 p/5:28 p 9:17 a/5:13 a 10:54 p/6:15 p Crystal River** 7:01 a/2:01 a 8:21 p/2:50 p 7:38 a/2:35 a 9:15 p/3:37 p Withlacoochee* 4:48 a/12:38 p 6:08 p/ 5:25 a/12:23 a 7:02 p/1:25 p Homosassa*** 7:50 a/3:38 a 9:10 p/4:27 p 8:27 a/4:12 a 10:04 p/5:14 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 9/24 TUESDAY 10:12 3:59 10:36 4:24 9/25 WEDNESDAY 11:05 4:53 11:29 5:17 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 80 74 1.20 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen:Ragweed, Nettle, Grasses Todays count: 0.8/12 Wednesdays count: 5.2 Thursdays count: 6.7 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Miss. court hears dispute over photos of bluesmanJACKSON, Miss. A Mississippi Supreme Court panel has heard arguments about who should make money from the only two known photographs of the late Robert Johnson, a bluesman who, myth has it, sold his soul to the devil for guitar prowess. Johnson was destitute when he died in 1938 at age 27. His estate is valuable, partly because of a collection of his recordings that won a Grammy in 1990. Three justices heard arguments Monday in the photo dispute. On one side are descendants of Johnsons late half-sister, Carrie Harris Thompson. Their attorney argues the photos were Thompsons personal property but that others profited from them. On the other side are Sony Music Entertainment Inc.; Johnsons only heir, his son Claud Johnson; and a promoter who had a 1974 contract with Thompson.US honors Ray Charles with limited-edition stampATLANTA The U.S. Postal Service is planning to add soul singer Ray Charles to its Music Icons Forever stamp series. Postal officials say the agency is releasing a stamp featuring the Albany, Ga., native on Monday along with one of the artists previously unreleased songs. Charles was a singer and songwriter who pioneered the soul and rhythm-and-blues genres. He died in 2004. Events are being planned in Atlanta and Los Angeles to celebrate Charles inclusion in the series. R&B singer Ashanti and the Morehouse College Glee Club are scheduled to perform at the Atlanta schools Ray Charles Performing Arts Center. Chaka Khan is headlining an event at the Grammy Museum. The U.S. Postal Service honors music legends each year by featuring them on limited-edition stamps.Newport Folk Festival heads to Santa MonicaPROVIDENCE, R.I. The Newport Folk Festival is taking its resurgent brand on the road with plans for a two-day festival in California. Known as Newport Folk Presents Way Over Yonder, the Oct. 5-6 event will feature performances from Conor Oberst, Neko Case and several other performers playing on two stages on the pier in Santa Monica, Calif., the seaside tourist mecca adjacent to Los Angeles. Plans for the event came about after a California-based promoter attending the 2012 Newport Folk Festival approached organizers with the idea of holding a similar event on the West Coast. Newport Folk Festival producer Jay Sweet said that while he hopes the Santa Monica festival could become an annual event, hes not trying to clone Newport. Its not going to be Newport Folk Festival-West, Sweet told The Associated Press. It cant be, because you cant just recreate Newport. I want this to be its own thing. There will be some obvious similarities. Like Newports Fort Adams State Park, the pier will provide a stunning seaside backdrop for the music. The lineup at Santa Monica will feature alumni of Newport, as festival organizers refer to them. And Sweet said he hopes the new event shares Newports emphasis on intimate performances. The Newport Folk Festival has experienced a resurgence in recent years, with this years festival selling out five months early. From wire reports Aflac/Associated PressLance Bass, left, the Aflac duck and Joey Fatone take a selfie Monday while enjoying the New York City skyline. The Aflac Duck was celebrating his comeback from injuries that left him unable to quack. A4TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 000FUY8 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Town of Inglis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C4 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . . . C12

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 A5 TM 000G4L0 Tuesday, Sept. 24 Saturday, Sept. 28

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Andrew Bolash, 78HOMOSASSAAndrew left this world Sept. 11, 2013, after losing a long battle with cancer, but he has won the war. He was the only child born to the late Andrew Bolash and Mary Ritchie Bolash Nov. 21, 1934, in Newark, N.J. Andrew worked very hard as a farmers son, which may have inspired him to pursue a less demanding career. After graduating high school, he spent two years in the Army and then two years in the Air Force during the Korean Conflict. Andrew (dont call him Andy) graduated college, receiving his degree in civil engineering, paying his tuition by working years, on and off, in Greenland. He then earned his MBA from Rider University. Andrew became a rising star working with Bellsouth while residing in Palm Beach County, but decided he would like to experience working in other countries. Working usually as a project manager, he traveled to Israel, Egypt, Nigeria, Africa, Saudi Arabia, Jamaica, Haiti, Togo and Albania, to name most of the countries. He retired in 2006 from Kuwait, Bahrain and Jordan. Andrew enjoyed visiting his mothers homeland of Scotland and sipping their most famous beverage. He enjoyed playing golf, only for fun, being with his family, and an occasional trip to the Hard Rock Casinos. He was a voracious reader of newspapers and books, a very knowledgeable sports historian and was a faithful fan of the New York Giants, Tampa Bay Bucs and the Yankees. Also, Andrew proudly volunteered as a courier for Hospice of Citrus County. Andrew leaves to mourn, his adored wife, Elaine Prouix Bolash; his much-loved daughter, Michelle Prouix Musto; his son-in-law and drinking buddy, Michael; and his precious grandson, George Andrew Grimwade. Also, goodbye to his brother-in-law, Andrew, and his spouse, Barbara. Andrew will also be missed by his dear pets, Coco, Ming and Jake. Adieu dearest Andrew, until we meet again. A celebration of Andrews life will take place at his residence at 12 p.m. Sept. 28, 2013. Friends are invited to come, share and enjoy as Andrew so wished. Special thanks for Andrews care to Dr. C. Joseph Bennett, Dr. William Harrer, and for the outstanding nursing care and comfort provided Andrew at his time of need by Hospice of Citrus County. Arrangements by Heinz Funeral Home, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Wayne Chapel Sr., 73FLORAL CITYWayne Edward Chapel Sr., 73, of Floral City, Fla., passed on to be with the Lord on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital, Inverness. Wayne was born Sept. 11, 1940, in Charleston, W.Va., the son of Edward and Marie Chapel. He worked for D.A.B., where he was a heavy equipment operator. He moved to Floral City in 1972 from Ashtabula, Ohio. Wayne loved fishing, NASCAR and watching TV. He was a member of the Citrus County Community Church, Lecanto. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Chapel, Floral City; seven children, Lottie Chapel, Lecanto, Wayne Chapel Jr., Lecanto, Tammy Chapel, Floral City, Diana Chapel, Floral City, Rose Marie Bertram, Helen Watson, Ron Olding; five brothers and sisters; 15 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren The family will receive friends from 2 to 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013. The funeral service will begin at 3 p.m. with Pastor Byron Freeman officiating. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Kathryn Kay Danielson, 84HOMOSASSAKathryn Kay Etheridge Danielson, 84, a resident of Homosassa, Fla., died Sunday Sept. 22, 2013, at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River. A native of Scituate, Mass., Kay and her husband Richard (Dick) moved to Citrus County in 1986. In Massachusetts they spent lots of happy time sailing on the Volare. She always loved and appreciated the beauty of the New England coastline. Kay graduated from Thayer Academy and attended Colby College. She served her church as church secretary for 22 years. After moving to Homosassa she was an active member of the First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River, where she had served as an elder, a deacon and a member of the choir. She was a member of P .E.O. and the Red Hats. She had a way of adding brightness and optimism to any situation. Kay was preceded in death by her husband, Dick in 1993. She is survived by her daughter, Deborah Kenney of Homosassa; two sons, Robert of Homosassa and John of Scituate, Mass.; five grandchildren, Rachel Brown (Josh), Melissa Kenney, Colleen Gilman (Jordan), Lea Danielson and Derick Danielson. A memorial service for Kay will be at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, at the First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River with Pastor Dr. Jack Allwood and Parish Associate Sheryle Lyman officiating. In lieu of flowers, those who wish may make a memorial contribution to the First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River or to Hospice of Citrus County. Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory, Crystal River, assisted the family with arrangements.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. George Robb, 89HOMOSASSAMr. George W. Robb, age 89 of Homosassa, Florida, died Sunday, September 22, 2013 in Homosassa, FL. He was born June 27, 1924 in New York, NY, son of the late Max and Gladys (Nagy) Robb. He was a Navy veteran serving during World War II, serving on the U.S.S. Angler. He was the owner of the Angler Motel in Clearwater Beach, FL and moved to Homosassa from Clearwater Beach in 1991. He was an avid Sailor and Yachtsman and sailed competitively. Mr. Robb was Past Commander of the V.F.W. in Little Ferry, NJ and a member of the Submarine Veterans. Survivors include his wife, Charlotte Robb of Homosassa, son, Rocco Rao of Dunedin, 3 daughters, Donna Lacey of Belleair Beach, Debbie Tamplin of Tampa, and Dawn Robb of Lecanto, 9 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneralHome.com. Private arrange ments are by the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory. Sara Turner, 81DUNNELLONSara L. Turner, 81, of Dunnellon, Fla., was reunited with her husband, William Turner, in Heaven Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013, from the Legacy House of Ocala. She was born May 30, 1932, in Bennett Switch, Ind., daughter to the late Walter and Thelma (Meister) Zehring. Sara was of the Methodist faith and served her Lord throughout her life. She spent her life in Indiana until moving to Clearwater in 1978 where, along with William, managed a mobile home park in Largo. They retired to Dunnellon in 1989. She worked at various stores throughout her life, the last seven years as a deli clerk for Walmart of Dunnellon. Her husband of 42 years, William Turner, passed away Jan. 19, 2002, and she lost one son, Rick Turner in 1992, and her brother, Bob Zehring, in 2012. Sara is survived by her sisterin-law, Margie Schaffer and her husband Ken of Milo, Iowa; children, Billy E. Turner and his wife Janet of Dunnellon and Peggy Sue Lynch and her husband Donald of Kissimmee; seven grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren; and three great-greatgrandchildren. Condolences may be expressed at www.hiersbaxley.com. Arrangements are under the care of Hiers-Baxley TimberRidge Chapel, 9695 S.W. 110th St. Ocala, FL 34482. William Graff Jr., 71HOMOSASSAWilliam Louis Graff Jr., 71, of Homosassa, Fla., died Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital in Inverness. Private cremation arrangements are under the care of Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory Crystal River. Vonda Varkett, 67HOMOSASSAVonda Rachael Varkett, 67, of Homosassa, Fla., died Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, at her home in Homosassa. Private cremation arrangements are under the care of Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory Crystal River. Louis Williams, 77HERNANDOLouis G Williams,77, of Hernando, Fla., diedSept. 22, 2013,under the care of his family andHospice of Citrus County in Hernando. Arrangements are by McGan Cremation Service LLC, Hernando. A6TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000FXP4 Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays 000FXJH Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000G5UC 000G2ES Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000FX8G Always A Fair Price CASH for SCRAP Crystal River Metal Recycling 4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599 000G5TE Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000FXYP 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills If you have any questions call the Elections Office at (352) 341-6740 Brought to you by the Citrus County Supervisor of Elections with the League of Women Voters of Citru s County 000FWLB Crystal River Mall 1801 US 19 11 AM 2 PM Inverness Elections Office 120 N. Apopka Ave. 8 AM 5 PM www.votecitrus.com Sign up to be a poll worker or volunteer plus get information on the upcoming 2014 elections Sept. 24, 2013 TODAY IS REGISTER to VOTE or update your Voter Record Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 PHARMACY www.BrashearsPharmacy.com 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . . 746-3420 Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness . . . . 637-2079 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness Brashears 000FZM2 Covered By Medicare FLU SHOTS 8:30 AM 6:00 PM Walk-Ins Welcome! 000FYSCFuneral HomeWith Crematory 726-8323 SHIRLEY BONN Private Arrangements AUDREY DESKINS Private Arrangements LESTER ELY Private Arrangements LYVELLE PALMER Viewing: Thurs. 1:00 PM Service: Thurs. 2:00 PM ROSE PATE Private Arrangements DONALD HARRISON Pending Arrangements SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Obituaries will be posted online at www. chronicleonline.com. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. U.S. flags denote military service. George Robb Kathryn Danielson Obituaries

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supporters said that is a mischaracterization of how the standards were developed and will be used. What Floridians need to know is not our leaders are for Common Core or against Common Core, Scott wrote in a letter to State Board of Education Chairman Gary Chartrand. He added that as governor, I support Floridas high academic standards and strongly reject overreach into those standards and other areas of our education system by the federal government. The Republican governor also on Monday wrote U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan and told him Florida would pull out of the national testing consortium developing high-stakes tests that would measure the new standards. Scott called on Education Commissioner Pam Stewart and the State Board of Education to instead issue a bid to determine what tests should be used to replace the current test known as the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. The widely used FCAT is not aligned to the new Common Core standards and must be replaced by the 2014-15 school year. Scott is taking these steps amid a growing rift in his own party about education policy. His moves also come just one day after former Gov. Charlie Crist a likely challenger to Scott as a Democrat wrote a critical opinion piece in the Tampa Bay Timesabout Scotts handling of education and said he was capitulating to tea party members on the standards. This is a nonsensical reason to reject them, Crist wrote. Scott needs to stand with Florida students and no one else. This is not a time for rank partisanship. Legislative leaders said Monday they were generally supportive of Scotts actions. But a more cautious stance came from education groups that had supported Common Core. Patricia Levesque, executive director of the Foundation for Floridas Future, praised the standards and said they were challenging children. Levesque, whose organization was started by Bush, called on state officials to move quickly and carefully on finding a new test. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart, in a conference call, insisted that the state had until March to make a decision. But Levesque said decisions must be made soon.LOCAL/STATECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 A7 Allen Ridge Professional Village 525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461 Participating with: Medicare, BCBS, United Healthcare, Cigna, Humana, Aetna. Total Skin Care www.dermatologyonline.com SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER 352-746-2200 352-873-1500 Board Certified American Board of Dermatology; American Society for Dermatology Surgery, Member American Association of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Fellow American Society f or MOHS Surgery Skin Cancer Diagnosis & Treatment Cosmetic/Plastic Surgery Skin Repairs MOHS Micrographic Surgery Age Management Medicine Growth Removal Chemical Peeling Esthetics Laser Surgery Botox Therapy Laser Hair Removal Photofacial Rejuvenation Juvederm Obagi We offer a safe medical approach to cosmetic issues! 000FZSW JUVDERM WITH FREE BOTOX! During the month of September, we are offering a skin-tastic special. Buy 1 syringe of JUVDERM and receive 20 units of Botox (a $200 value) FREE 000G02V Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. Stanley Steemer. Expires 9/30/13. Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. charge. Residential only Can be used on Duct Cleaning only Stanley Steemer. Expires 9/30/13. Stanley Steemer. Expires 9/30/13. DUCT CLEANING DUCT CLEANING 000FSK2 TESTContinued from Page A1 For the RECORD DUI arrests Michele Campbell, 35, of Inverness, at 8:43 p.m. Sept. 21 on misdemeanor charges of driving under the influence, and knowingly driving while license is suspended or revoked. According to her arrest affidavit, Campbell was involved in a single car crash on East Gospel Island Road in Inverness. She was asked to perform field sobriety tests and did poorly. Tests of her breath showed her blood alcohol concentration was 0.134 and 0.128 percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. She was also arrested on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery stemming from a complaint made earlier in the evening and a misdemeanor failure to appear stemming from an original charge of trespassing after warning. Bond $10,550. Donald Hamilton 53, of North Hamilton Road, Dunnellon, at 8:22 p.m. Sept. 20 on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Hamilton was involved in a car accident and showed signs of being impaired. He was asked to perform field sobriety tests and did poorly. Tests of his breath showed his blood alcohol concentration was 0.172 and 0.174 percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. Bond $500.Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A residential burglary was reported at 2:03 a.m. Friday, Sept. 20, in the 7400 block of S. Forte Evans Point, Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 9:33 p.m. Sept. 20 in the 9300 block of N. Cacalia Drive, Crystal River.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 8:05 a.m. Friday, Sept. 20, in the 1000 block of Middle School Drive, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 9:14 a.m. Sept. 20 in the 5000 block of N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.

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A8TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G4IY

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BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 A9 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,500 1,550 1,600 1,650 1,700 1,750 MS AMJJA 1,640 1,700 1,760 S&P 500Close: 1,701.84 Change: -8.07 (-0.5%) 10 DAYS 14,400 14,800 15,200 15,600 16,000 MS AMJJA 15,040 15,380 15,720 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 15,401.38 Change: -49.71 (-0.3%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1289 Declined1760 New Highs81 New Lows37 Vol. (in mil.)3,059 Pvs. Volume4,764 1,575 2,373 1082 1431 135 27 NYSE NASD DOW 15466.9515368.2515401.38-49.71-0.32%+17.53% DOW Trans.6687.086619.036651.30-40.96-0.61%+25.34% DOW Util.491.94482.83490.56+5.23+1.08%+8.27% NYSE Comp.9757.199704.899733.02-36.71-0.38%+15.27% NASDAQ3787.143745.543765.29-9.44-0.25%+24.70% S&P5001711.441697.101701.84-8.07-0.47%+19.33% S&P4001244.281234.461239.92-5.48-0.44%+21.51% Wilshire 500018222.0118070.0718132.42-84.11-0.46%+20.92% Russell 20001073.591063.901072.13-0.70-0.06%+26.23% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7655.90 4.02-.07 -1.6tss-12.6-22.9dd... AT&T Inc T32.71339.00 34.22-.10 -0.3tst+1.5-4.8261.80 Ametek Inc AME32.67948.01 46.03+.03 +0.1sss+22.5+27.7230.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD81.609103.85 99.55-1.01 -1.0tss+13.9+17.82.21e Bank of America BAC8.70915.03 14.14-.30 -2.1tts+21.8...250.04 Capital City Bank CCBG9.04813.08 12.12+.13 +1.1sss+6.6+20.443... CenturyLink Inc CTL31.85142.45 32.24-.04 -0.1ttt-17.6-18.1192.16 Citigroup C31.88953.56 49.57-1.64 -3.2tts+25.3+51.6130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46826.38 22.54... ...rtt+42.3+56.5811.00 Disney DIS46.53967.89 64.75-.26 -0.4tss+30.0+24.9190.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63675.46 67.73+.37 +0.5sss+6.2+10.2203.12f EPR Properties EPR42.44561.18 50.18-.18 -0.4ttt+8.8+15.7223.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM84.70395.49 87.75-.91 -1.0tst+1.4-0.592.52 Ford Motor F9.71017.77 17.20-.19 -1.1tss+32.8+69.9120.40 Gen Electric GE19.87924.95 24.28+.27 +1.1sss+15.7+10.4180.76 Home Depot HD58.75881.56 75.91-1.09 -1.4tst+22.7+32.4221.56 Intel Corp INTC19.23725.98 23.62-.15 -0.6tst+14.5+6.4130.90 IBM IBM181.103215.90 190.99+.97 +0.5sst-0.3-6.1133.80 LKQ Corporation LKQ17.16032.29 31.87-.05 -0.2tss+51.0+68.935... Lowes Cos LOW29.66049.17 47.27-.57 -1.2tss+33.1+61.7240.72 McDonalds Corp MCD83.317103.70 97.28+.38 +0.4sst+10.3+7.3183.24f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26736.43 32.74-.05 -0.2ttt+22.6+7.2131.12f Motorola Solutions MSI49.49864.72 60.37-.02 ...rss+8.4+23.4171.24f NextEra Energy NEE66.05788.39 81.22+.53 +0.7sst+17.4+22.4202.64 Penney JC Co Inc JCP12.12127.00 12.36-.60 -4.6ttt-37.3-49.8dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62521.09 17.66-.12 -0.7tst-2.2+4.4360.80 Regions Fncl RF6.19710.52 9.07-.22 -2.4ttt+27.2+23.6110.12 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40768.77 57.84-.63 -1.1tss+39.8+9.5dd... Smucker, JM SJM81.608114.72 106.56-.58 -0.5tts+23.6+25.5212.32f Texas Instru TXN26.94040.94 40.47-.05 -0.1tss+31.0+43.8251.20f Time Warner TWX42.61966.01 63.46-.84 -1.3tss+32.7+42.9171.15 UniFirst Corp UNF65.850104.38 102.45+.78 +0.8sss+39.7+51.0190.15 Verizon Comm VZ40.51654.31 47.98+.20 +0.4sst+10.9+9.6982.12f Vodafone Group VOD24.42034.25 33.72+.14 +0.4sss+33.9+23.11.57e WalMart Strs WMT67.37879.96 76.42+.59 +0.8sss+12.0+3.9151.88 Walgreen Co WAG31.88056.26 56.23+.71 +1.3sss+51.9+59.4251.26f 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. The food safety company and maker of Bubble Wrap was downgraded to Equal Weight from Overweight at Barclays. The drugstore announced it will shift more responsibility for insurance to employees, and Morgan Stanley upgraded the stock. CNBC reported that the retailer has met with banks over the past several weeks to determine how it can raise more money. The Internet radio company was feeling a lot of pressure from Apple, which introduced a competing service called iRadio. There was heavy trading volume after the Financial Times reported the bank experienced a drop in bondtrading revenue. Stocks ended lower on Monday amid growing unease about the strength of the economy and a brewing budget and debt showdown in Washington. The federal governments debt ceiling must be raised by Oct. 1 to avoid a partial government shutdown. 45 50 $55 S JA CitigroupC Close: $49.57 -1.64 or -3.2% $31.88$53.56 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 34.4m (1.4x avg.) $150.74 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 15.7 0.1% 15 20 25 $30 S JA PandoraP Close: $24.26 -2.73 or -10.1% $7.08$27.50 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 35.6m (3.7x avg.) $4.28 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 12 14 16 $18 S JA J.C. PenneyJCP Close: $12.36 -0.60 or -4.6% $12.12$27.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 24.5m (1.3x avg.) $2.73 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 40 50 $60 S JA WalgreenWAG Close: $56.23 0.71 or 1.3% $31.88$56.84 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 9.4m (1.7x avg.) $53.14 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 24.9 2.2% 20 25 30 $35 S JA Sealed AirSEE Close: $27.01 -1.55 or -5.4% $15.10$31.20 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 7.5m (3.6x avg.) $5.29 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... 1.9% The yield on the 10-year Treasury note slipped to 2.70 percent on Monday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.010.01....10 6-month T-bill.050.04+0.01.14 52-wk T-bill.100.10....17 2-year T-note.330.33....26 5-year T-note1.451.48-0.03.67 10-year T-note2.702.74-0.041.75 30-year T-bond3.733.76-0.032.94 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx3.543.56-0.022.64 Bond Buyer Muni Idx5.145.14...4.23 Barclays USAggregate2.412.42-0.011.73 Barclays US High Yield6.025.99+0.036.24 Moodys AAACorp Idx4.624.66-0.043.50 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.641.64....98 Barclays US Corp3.343.36-0.022.87 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities Oil slid to a six-week low on Monday, as Syrian President Bashar Assad pledged to honor an agreement to surrender Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. Metals fell. Crops were mixed.Crude Oil (bbl)103.59104.67-1.11+12.8 Ethanol (gal)1.881.86-0.59-14.4 Heating Oil (gal)2.963.00-1.60-2.9 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.603.69-2.31+7.5 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.622.68-2.28-6.7 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz) 1326.901332.50-0.42-20.8 Silver (oz) 21.8121.88-0.32-27.7 Platinum (oz)1425.901432.60-0.47-7.3 Copper (lb) 3.313.33-0.59-9.2 Palladium (oz)716.30720.30-0.56+1.9 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb) 1.271.26+0.52-2.5 Coffee (lb) 1.171.15+2.09-18.6 Corn (bu) 4.534.51+0.50-35.1 Cotton (lb) 0.830.83-0.38+10.5 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)355.50354.20+0.37-4.9 Orange Juice (lb)1.261.26+0.60+8.8 Soybeans (bu)13.0813.15-0.57-7.8 Wheat (bu) 6.546.46+1.12-16.0 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 22.97-.08 +14.1+14.7+13.3+9.3 CapIncBuAm 56.69-.10 +10.3+10.6+9.9+6.9 CpWldGrIAm 42.69-.21 +16.9+19.7+11.3+7.5 EurPacGrAm 46.28-.12 +12.3+16.9+7.6+6.3 FnInvAm 48.56-.23 +20.1+21.1+15.6+9.1 GrthAmAm 42.03-.28 +22.4+23.4+16.2+9.3 IncAmerAm 19.77-.04 +12.3+13.1+12.1+8.9 InvCoAmAm 36.06-.17 +21.0+20.0+15.0+9.0 NewPerspAm 36.76-.17 +17.6+20.5+13.3+9.6 WAMutInvAm 37.35-.15 +21.5+20.7+17.2+9.4 Dodge & Cox Income 13.56+.01 -0.7+0.5+4.1+7.2 IntlStk 41.04-.03 +18.5+25.2+10.1+7.3 Stock 152.34-1.01 +26.1+27.2+18.8+9.9 Fidelity Contra 93.51-.64 +21.7+18.4+16.2+10.5 GrowCo 119.29-.76 +28.0+22.3+20.2+13.8 LowPriStk d 46.68-.03 +24.1+26.3+18.6+13.4 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 60.58-.29 +21.1+19.1+17.2+9.8 FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeAm 2.35... +9.5+10.7+10.7+10.2 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAm 13.12-.01 +0.7+4.7+5.1+9.8 GlBondAdv 13.08-.01 +0.9+5.0+5.4+10.0 Harbor IntlInstl 70.07-.24 +12.8+18.4+10.5+7.0 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 31.62-.10 +20.6+21.3+16.5+9.2 GrowStk 46.84-.35 +24.0+21.1+18.4+12.5 Vanguard 500Adml 156.82-.74 +21.2+19.1+17.3+9.9 500Inv 156.83-.74 +21.1+19.0+17.1+9.8 MuIntAdml 13.74... -2.3-1.2+3.0+5.1 STGradeAd 10.70+.01 +0.3+1.1+2.3+4.4 Tgtet2025 15.25-.03 +12.2+12.8+11.4+8.0 TotBdAdml 10.63+.02 -2.3-1.8+2.7+5.1 TotIntl 16.25... +10.6+15.8+6.9+5.0 TotStIAdm 43.00-.19 +22.3+20.9+17.9+10.4 TotStIdx 42.98-.20 +22.2+20.7+17.7+10.3 Welltn 37.85-.10 +13.3+13.8+12.2+9.4 WelltnAdm 65.38-.17 +13.3+13.9+12.3+9.5 WndsIIAdm 62.25-.30 +20.7+20.7+17.4+9.6 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates 000G65F Stocks fall on concern about economy, budget fight Associated PressNEW YORK Concerns about the strength of the economy and the potential for a budget fight in Washington pushed down the stock market Monday. The Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poors 500 index fell for a third straight day. Investors initially cheered the Federal Reserves decision last Wednesday to keep its huge stimulus program in place. But theyve since focused on the central banks gloomier outlook for growth. William Dudley, the President of the Feds New York Branch said Monday that while the economy was improving, the headwinds created by the financial crisis were only easing slowly. At first blush (the stimulus) looks positive, said Kate Warne, an investment strategist at Edward Jones, a financial advisor. But at second blush, it says conditions werent as strong as we were previously thinking. Markets are now responding to that. The Dow jumped 147 points last Wednesday to close at an all-time high. But the gain from that rally has been erased. On Monday, the S&P 500 index dropped 8.07 points, or 0.5 percent, to close at 1,701.84. The index was fractionally lower than its level before the Feds decision last Wednesday. The Dow fell 49.71 points, or 0.3 percent, to 15,401.38 The Nasdaq composite fell 9.44 points, or 0.3 percent, to 3,765.29. Financial stocks fell the most among the 10 industrial groups in the S&P 500 index. Investors sold financial stocks on concerns that their earnings would be hurt by lower trading volumes of bonds and foreign currencies. Citigroup fell $1.64, or 3 percent, to $49.57 after theFinancial Timesreported that the bank had suffered a significant decline in trading revenues that would crimp its earnings. Goldman Sachs, which began trading on the Dow Monday, also fell. The stock slipped $4.50, or 3 percent, to $165.20. Utilities were the best performing industry group in the S&P 500 index, as investors sought less risky places to put their money. The threat of a looming political showdown over the budget also weighed on investors. The U.S. House of Representatives voted to defund President Barack Obamas health care law on Friday, a gesture that reminded Wall Street that the Republican-led House and the Democratic-controlled Senate are poised for a showdown over spending. The debt ceiling must be raised by Oct. 1 to avoid a government shutdown, and a potential default on payments, including debt, later in the month. Development Council. Those are my regrets, he said, especially citing the 491 corridor. I will not be able to see it finished, but Im glad I had a chance to work on it. As for the hurdles facing his successor? I think the biggest challenge will be continuing to bridge the gap between trying to preserve what people have come to expect in the county, not urban, not rural, he said. Its to balance rural with growth and development and making it possible for more businesses to come and take the tax burden off residents. He also noted the continuing challenge of balancing environmental protection of sensitive areas with development for public use such as Three Sisters Springs. As for adjusting to his new position, Cautero has about 15 years working in that part of state and is used to the more metropolitan surroundings. He said the city of 155,000 is the largest in Southwest Florida. His immediate challenges there will include a development review process, defining relationships the department has with other agencies and developing a sign code. Cape Coral spokesperson Connie Barron confirmed Cautero will start Oct. 22 as the citys director of community development as a salary of $122,000. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. Business HIGHLIGHTS BlackBerry agrees to $4.7 billion sale Associated PressTORONTO BlackBerry has agreed to sell itself for $4.7 billion to a group led by largest shareholder, Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. BlackBerry said Monday that a letter of intent has been signed and its shareholders will receive $9 in cash for each share. Fairfax head, Prem Watsa, a former board member, owns 10 percent of BlackBerry. Watsa stepped down last month when BlackBerry announced it was considering a sale. Watsa is one of Canadas best-known value investors and the billionaire founder of Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. He has been compared to Warren Buffett because of his investing approach. BlackBerry founder Mike Lazaridis recruited Watsa to join the companys board when Lazaridis and Jim Balsillie stepped aside as its co-CEOs in January 2012. Trading of the companys stock was halted ahead of the news. BlackBerry shares plunged after the company announced Friday a loss of nearly $1 billion and layoffs of 4,500 workers. The BlackBerry, pioneered in 1999, was once the dominant smartphone for on-the-go business people and other consumers before Apples iPhone debuted in 2007. Associated PressThorsten Heins introduces the BlackBerry Z10 in January in Toronto. Fairfax Financial Holdings has offered to buy BlackBerry Monday in a deal that values the Canadian smartphone company at about US$4.7 billion. CAUTEROContinued from Page A1 iPhone sales off to fast startSAN FRANCISCO Apple Inc. said Monday that it sold 9 million units of its topof-the-line iPhone 5S and less-expensive iPhone 5C during their first three days on sale. That trounced the performance of last years model, the iPhone 5, which sold 5 million units in its opening weekend. The iPhone 5S and 5Cs quick start also surpassed analyst forecasts that predicted Apple would sell somewhere from 6 million to 8 million models during the first weekend.Long, strange trip ending for VW vanSAO PAULO The long, strange trip of the Volkswagen van is ending. Brazil is the last place in the world still producing the iconic vehicle, or bus as its known by aficionados, but VW says production will end Dec. 31. Safety regulations mandate that every vehicle in Brazil must have air bags and anti-lock braking systems starting in 2014, and the company said it cannot change production to meet the law. Although output will halt in Brazil, there should be plenty of VW vans rolling along for decades if only because there are so many, and they are so durable. VW produced more than 10 million Volkswagen Transporter vans globally since the model was introduced 63 years ago in Germany, though not all resemble the classic hippie machine. More than 1.5 million have been produced in Brazil since 1957. From wire reports

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OPINION Page A10TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 Time for everyone to support ObamacareWhen thinking of the operation of the United States House of Representatives, I am reminded of my toddler grandchild when he throws a temper tantrum. When told by his parents it is time to do something that he does not want to do, my grandchild shouts gibberish, runs in circles, kicks furniture, throws toys and pounds the floor. House Republican representatives have engaged in temper tantrums 42 times by voting to repeal Obamacare. Congressman Nugent and his Republican colleagues, led by the know-nothing tea party anarchists, are performing the figurative equivalent of shouting gibberish, running in circles, kicking furniture, throwing toys and pounding the floor. Grow up and accept that the Affordable Care Act is the law! Obamacare has been the law for more than three years. The ACA has been deemed constitutional by the Supreme Court. In 2012, the people of the United States reaffirmed their approval of Obamacare in the Presidential, Senatorial and Congressional elections. Please be reminded that the only branch that the Republican Party controls is the House of Representatives, which is a perversion of our election process, as House Democrat candidates received nearly 2 million more votes nationally than the Republican candidates. Examples of Obamacare success already abound, and are readily found with the most basic Google search. Likewise, most lies, distortions, and misrepresentations of Obamacare are also readily dispelled through meager research of non-ideological information sources. As a conservative commentator previously reported following the 2012 presidential election, Republicans have been fleeced and exploited, and lied to by a conservative entertainment complex. The national deficit is dropping at a record pace, primarily due to increased revenues. Stop damaging the economy! End the sequester! Raise the debt limit to pay our bills! Extend the budget authorizations at current levels (minus sequester) in order to negotiate with Democrats and the president in good faith! Compromise! Stop throwing temper tantrums!William Bandhauer Homosassa Editors note: This is the second of three guest columns by Commissioner Dennis Damato that provide an update on current projects to protect Citrus Countys water quality and supply. The columns are part of the ChroniclesSave Our Waters Week coverage.An important initiative for Citrus County is the Hunters Spring water quality improvement project. About two years ago, State Sen. Charles Dean challenged a group of us to formulate a local water quality project that could be supported by funding from the Southwest Florida Water Management Districts seven volunteer basin boards that were disbanded in 2011 on the orders of Gov. Rick Scott. A local project proposal was formulated, which was further defined by our county staff to recapture the funding from the disbanded basin boards. The total project cost is estimated to be $350,000. Citrus County has requested funding assistance in the amount of $175,000 from the Southwest Florida Water Management District through the District Cooperative Funding Initiative. The application was approved for funding and the county anticipates execution of the funding contract and start of the project design very soon. The scope of this project is to expand the collection and treatment of stormwater runoff from U.S. 19 and nearby existing residential and commercial developments before it enters Hunters Spring. Keep in mind, untreated stormwater runoff contains debris, chemicals, sediment and pollutants that adversely affect water quality if discharged directly into our local waterways. This scenario was exposed to our community in a recentChroniclearticle entitled ,The bay is less fresh. The Hunters Spring Water Quality Improvement Project is an important first step in the remediation of this existing deficiency. On July 23, the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners voted unanimously to purchase three vacant lots to expand the existing water quality treatment area at the intersection of Northeast Second Street and Northeast Third Avenue in Crystal River. This expanded treatment area will result in a 40 percent increase in the available treatment pond volume. Treated stormwater flows from the expanded treatment pond will flow over a discharge structure and into a culvert that discharges into the Hunters Spring area of Crystal River. Redirecting untreated stormwater from existing developments to new treatment systems is one way to improve the water quality of our surface waters, which are important environmental and recreational resources for Citrus County. This project, along with the drainage improvements on the Cutler Spur roadway project, which is currently under construction, and the water quality projects at the Three Sisters Springs property, will treat stormwater from a basin of more than 100 acres by improving water quality before it enters Crystal River waterways. These projects, along with the potential of sediment removal similar to the Chassahowitzka Springs Remediation Project currently being performed by the Southwest Florida Water Management District, should be viewed as the model for the cleanup of our local waterways: Store and treat stormwater before it enters our local waterways. Remove exotic vegetative species like lyngbya with associated water quality monitoring. Remove sediment where necessary from waterways. Replant with proper vegetation. Restoration of waterways through the use of accepted best management practices. Monitor and record the results of these coordinated efforts. Citrus County residents are strongly urged to support this water enhancement project and the model proposed for the cleanup and restoration of our local waterways. Dennis Damato has resided in Citrus County for more than four decades and is in his third termas the District 1 Citrus County Commissioner. He also chairs the Withlachoochee Regional Planning Council and the Withlachoochee Regional Water Authority and serves as the liaison to the Southwest Florida Water Management District. People who enjoy meetings should not be in charge of anything.Thomas Sowell Water quality at Hunters Spring CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief MICROMANAGED Reorganization plan runs into opposition The recent vote on county staff reorganization is a clear reflection of the change of tone within the commission that has occurred in the past year and half. In early 2012, County Administrator Brad Thorpe presented the county commission a reorganization plan that replaced former assistant county administrator Eber Brown by reassigning his duties to two department managers, naming them assistant county administrators and giving them raises, but still paying them less than the departing assistant administrator. The proposal passed on a unanimous vote. Earlier this month, after the departure of one of the two assistant county administrators, Thorpe presented the commission with a plan that would appoint the other one as the sole assistant county administrator and promote two others to department managers. The proposal passed on a split 3-2 vote after considerable discussion. In the first reorganization, the commission took the position that the administrator should structure the county organization in a way he or she believes is most efficient, and they approved the changes with little discussion. In the second, despite the initial comment by the chair along the same lines, that the role of the commission was not to micromanage specific administrative decisions, there was considerable discussion about duties and salaries. The discussion included public questions about salaries and raises, and in the end two commissioners voted against approving the organization. Both of these reorganizations were advertised as increasing organizational efficiency, and incidentally saving money. Both created a shift in organizational duties that led to changes in pay grades, and while savings were mentioned as part of the dialogue, neither was justified solely on monetary savings. The organization of county government should reflect the needs of the time and the capabilities of those in the organization, and it is reasonable for the needs and capabilities to change when people join or leave the organization. The appropriate role of the administrator is to adjust his or her organization accordingly. It is a negative comment on the relationships within county government when discussion of organizational changes focuses more on whether individual employees may or may not receive increases in pay and whether relatively minor savings will be achieved rather than on whether this organization will best meet the needs of the citizens of the county. THE ISSUE:Split commission vote on county staff reorganization.OUR OPINION:A negative comment on relationships within county government. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTER to the Editor Regular lights in rainI was calling about the article on the fickle weather and how people should drive with their lights on during heavy rain and not their hazard lights during inclement weather. Id just like to say that I am very pleased to see that you are printing that because there are way too many people driving with their hazard lights on out there.Help tortoisesOur turtles. You people with automobiles: Do not try to straddle a turtle in the road. Slow down and go around him, because these new cars are too low and all you do is mash them into the pavement. So slow down and go around them. Just wondering...I just want to know, why is it we can keep strip clubs out of our small little nice little communities but we cant keep stores that sell dangerous drugs out of our communities? Seems like even the strip clubs would be better than they are I just wonder why.Left-lane lessonIt completely escapes me as to why and how many people think they have the right to drive in the left-hand lane. The lefthand lane is described in the state statute as a passing lane. Regardless of what speed youre driving in the left-hand lane, if a car comes up behind you, you are required to move over and let him pass you legally. Some of you people ought to take the AARP driver training course and wake up. Its surprising how many people dont know what lane to drive in when youre on a three-lane road. Normal traffic is supposed to be in the center lane. The lefthand outside lane is passing. Come on, people. Do your homework.Shade for your dogThis call is in regard to this hot summer heat and the animals that are left out in it. I had to call Animal Control the other day as I was driving through my neighborhood I saw a dog outside with no shelter. It was very hot that day 93 degrees. Animal Control came out and made them put some shade up for this poor animal. If youre going to have a dog, have him inside, please. This weather is horrible right now. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Dennis DamatoGUEST COLUMN

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and a Greyhound bus to fall 150feet into the water, killing 35 people. Even so, Floridas bridges continue to be among the sturdiest in the nation, according to APs findings. Information from the Florida Department of Transportation shows that of the 6,661 bridges it maintains (plus 2,496 bridges owned by local municipalities that the agency inspected in 2012), only 17 were found to have structural deficiencies and two are fracture critical, both in the Miami area. The term structurally deficient means the bridge is in need of rehabilitation or replacement because at least one major component is deemed in poor or worse condition. Fracture critical refers to bridges without redundant protections and is at risk of collapse if any one, vital component fails. Neither category indicates imminent danger of collapse, but either rating is a sign of risk. Wondering about the condition of the bridges you normally travel across? Of the 41 identified bridges in Citrus County, here are the results of how some of them fared in the study: Best: Pistol Point Canal on County Road 39 built in 1945 the highest rated bridge with a 100 *health index rating and 98.2 **sufficiency rating. Oldest/Worst: U.S. 41 Florida Nature Trail north of Inverness Middle School built in 1925, rebuilt in 1950 39 sufficiency rating, 90.50 health index. Iconic/Picturesque: State Road 200 bridge at the Citrus-Marion County line over the Withlacoochee River built in 1935. An estimated 11,300 vehicles travel across it daily; 65 sufficiency rating, 88.31 health index. Newest: U.S. 19 Cross Florida Barge Canal built in 2011, traveled by 4,300 vehicles daily; 99.3 sufficiency rating, 99.84 health index. Busiest: Brittan Alexander bridge on U.S. 41 that crosses over the Withlacoochee River in Dunnellon, built in 1987; 85 sufficiency rating, 95.50 health index. Least-Traveled: East Hampton Point Road canal bridge built in 1980. Only five vehicles travel this bridge daily; 94 sufficiency rating, 41.50 health index. Good Fishing Spot: County Road 470 (Gospel Island Road) over Tsala Apopka Lake in Inverness, built in 1961. In addition to dozens of people fishing from this bridge each day, 5,450 vehicles travel over it; 71.7 sufficiency rating, 98.39 health index. Best for Spotting Manatees: County Road 490A over Halls River, built in 1954 43.6 sufficiency rating, 84.14 health index; Fish Bowl Drive over Homosassa River, built in 1973 66.3 sufficiency rating, 98.36 health index; Kings Bay Drive over Spring Run Canal, built in 1991 97.8 sufficiency rating, 85.47 health index. *Health Index measures the overall condition of a bridge and typically includes between 10 to12 different areas of evaluation. A lower health index means more work is required to bring the bridge to an ideal condition. A health index below 85 generally indicates that some repairs are needed but not necessarily that it is unsafe. A low health index may indicate that it would be more economical to replace the bridge than to repair it. **Sufficiency Rating is the overall rating of a bridges fitness for the duty that it performs based on such factors as: structural evaluation, functional obsolescence and its essentiality to the public. A low sufficiency rating may be due to structural defects, narrow lanes, low vertical clearance, or any of many possible issues information from the Florida Department of Transportation.LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 A11 Professional Hearing Centers www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR (4327) 000FYU4 HEAR BETTER NOW, GUARANTEED! 4 Year Warranty FREE Batteries 4 Life 000G4PA GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. 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MINUS Energy Savings of $60/mo. NET COST $ 75.00 Call Bay Area Air Conditioning Today 795-0526 ACT NOW! LIMITED TIME OFFER!! UNDER NORMAL USAGE These 2-speed variable heat pumps not only control the temperature, but also the humidity in your home. The use of multiple sensors allows this system to use the least amount of electricity possible... every second of every day!! FIRST TIME EVER!! 60 Month 0% Financing $1,000 Rebate Federal Tax Credits 000G2VC BRIDGESContinued from Page A1 MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleMore than 11,000 vehicles every day traverse the bridge over the Withlacoochee River at the Marion County border.

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New hat LOssevatore Romano/ Associated PressPope Francis wears a coal miners helmet he was given Sunday by a miner during his visit to the island of Sardinia, in Cagliari, Italy. Pope Francis traveled to one of Italys poorest regions to offer hope to the unemployed and entrepreneurs struggling to hang on. Greek police replaced in far-right probeATHENS, Greece Five senior police officers in Greece were replaced Monday after the government ordered urgent inquiries into alleged links between the far-right Golden Dawn party and the countrys police and military. The Public Order Ministry said the heads of the polices special forces, internal security, organized crime, firearms and explosives, and a rapid-response motorcycle division had been moved to other posts pending an investigation into weekend reports in the Greek media that police provided the party with assistance in alleged criminal activity. Golden Dawn won nearly 7 percent of the vote in general elections last year, but is currently the subject of a criminal investigation following the murder last week of an anti-fascist rapper.Muslim Brotherhood banned by courtCAIRO An Egyptian court on Monday ordered the banning of the Muslim Brotherhood and the confiscation of its assets, opening the door for authorities to dramatically accelerate a crackdown on the extensive network of schools, hospitals, charities and other social institutions that was the foundation of the groups political power. Security forces have already been moving against the Brotherhoods social networks, raiding schools and hospitals run by the group since the militarys July 3 ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. The sweep points to the ambitions of Egypts new leaders to go beyond the arrests of top Brotherhood figures to strike a long-term, even mortal, blow to the group by hitting the pillars of its grassroots organization. Doing so could cripple the groups political prospects far into the future.Police held in Mexico City mass kidnap, murderMEXICO CITY Mexico City officials say two more police officers have been arrested in connection with the May kidnapping and killing of 12 young people from an after-hours bar in the capital. There are now three police officers in total among the 15 arrested in connection with the crime, which authorities have linked to rivalry between two gangs over the rights to sell drugs in bars and nightclubs in some upscale neighborhoods. Officials say the mass slaying was revenge for one gangs killing of a dealer belonging to another gang. From wire reports NATION& WORLD Page A12TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Associated PressWASHINGTON House Republicans are far less ambitious this week in their demands for spending cuts to erase new debt issued to pay the governments bills than they were during a budget battle two years ago. The list of cuts under consideration now tallies up to a fraction of the almost $1 trillion in additional borrowing that would be permitted under a GOP proposal for enabling the government to pay its bills through December of next year. Two years ago, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, insisted on spending cuts totaling $2.1 trillion over a decade as the price to meet President Barack Obamas demand for a like-sized increase in the governments borrowing cap, also known as the debt ceiling. Those cuts involved tighter caps on agency operating budgets, as well as the automatic, across-the-board cuts known as sequestration triggered by the failure of a deficit supercommittee to reach a deal. The problem now is that there isnt a roster of big, politically palatable cuts ready to go. Instead, Republicans have put together a grab bag of smaller savings ideas, like higher pension contributions for federal workers, higher premiums for upper-income Medicare beneficiaries, caps on medical malpractice verdicts and reduced payments to hospitals that treat more poor people than average. A leading set of proposals comes from a House GOP leadership office and was circulating on Washingtons K Street lobbying corridor on Monday. It includes a plan to increase pension contributions of federal civilian workers by up to 5 percentage points and lowering the federal match accordingly, which could help defray the deficit by up to $84 billion over a decade. Another, to block immigrants in the country illegally from claiming the child tax credit would save just $7 billion over the same period. Eliminating the Social Services Block Grant, a flexible funding stream for states to help with day care, Meals on Wheels, and drug treatment facilities, would save less than $2 billion a year. Taken together, these proposals and others could cut spending by perhaps $200 billion over the coming decade. While GOP aides say details arent set, House leaders are looking at an increase in the current $16.7 trillion debt ceiling sufficient to cover the governments bills until the beginning of 2015. According to calculations by the Bipartisan Policy Center think tank in Washington, that would require raising the borrowing cap by almost $1 trillion. Boehner insists that any increase in the borrowing cap be matched by budget cuts and other reforms to produce savings of an equal amount, though not on a dollarfor-dollar basis over 10 years like in 2011. World BRIEFS Associated PressWASHINGTON The number of immigrants crossing the border illegally into the U.S. appears to be on the rise again after dropping during the recession. The total number of immigrants living in this country unlawfully edged up from 11.3 million in 2009 to 11.7 million last year, with those from countries other than Mexico at an apparent all-time high, according to a report released Monday by the Pew Research Centers Hispanic Trends Project. The change is within the margin of error, and there will be a more precise census measure released later this year. Still, based in part on other factors such as increased U.S. border apprehensions, the sharp decline in illegal immigration from 2007-2009 has clearly bottomed out, with signs the numbers are now rising, Pew said. Pew said that among the six states with the largest numbers of immigrants here illegally, only Texas had a consistent increase in illegal immigration from 2007 to 2011, due in part to its stronger economy. Its number was unchanged from 2011 to 2012. Two states Florida and New Jersey had an initial drop but then increases during the same 2007-2011 period. Three states California, Illinois and New York showed only declines. As a whole, with the recession ending, the decrease in illegal immigration has stopped, said Jeffrey Passel, a senior demographer at Pew. Passel noted that, historically, the level of illegal immigration has been closely tied to the strength of the U.S. economy and availability of jobs. Since 2009, the average U.S. unemployment rate has dropped from 9.3 percent to 8.1 percent last year, with signs of strength in the construction industry, which yields jobs generally attractive to newly arrived Latino immigrants. The Pew analysis is based on census data through March 2012. Because the Census Bureau does not ask people about their immigration status, the estimate on illegal immigrants is derived largely by subtracting the estimated legal immigrant population from the total foreign-born population. Illegal immigration rising again SOURCE: Pew Research Ctr.APIllegal immigrationA preliminary analysis of census data suggests the number of people living illegally in the U.S. grew slightly last year but remains off its 2007 peak: 0 5 10 15 million 2012: 11.7 million 2007: 12.2 million Associated PressNAIROBI, Kenya Kenyan security forces battled al-Qaidalinked terrorists in an upscale mall for a third day Monday in what they said was a final push to rescue the last few hostages in a siege that has left at least 62 people dead. While the government announced Sunday that most hostages had been released, a security expert with contacts inside the mall said at least 10 were still being held by a band of attackers described as a multinational collection from all over the world. The expert, who insisted on anonymity to talk freely about the situation, said many hostages had been freed or escaped in the previous 24-36 hours, including some who were in hiding. However, there were at least 30 hostages when the assault by alShabab militants began Saturday, he said, and its clear that Kenyan security officials havent cleared the building fully. Flames and dark plumes of smoke rose Monday above the Westgate shopping complex for more than an hour after four large explosions rocked the surrounding neighborhood. The smoke was pouring through a large skylight inside the malls main department and grocery store, where mattresses and other flammable goods appeared to have been set on fire, a person with knowledge of the rescue operation told The Associated Press. The explosions were followed by volleys of gunfire as police helicopters and a military jet circled overhead, giving the neighborhood the feel of a war zone. By evening, Kenyan security officials claimed the upper hand. Taken control of all the floors. Were not here to feed the attackers with pastries but to finish and punish them, Police Inspector General David Kimaiyo said on Twitter. Kenyas Interior Minister Joseph Ole Lenku said the evacuation of hostages had gone very, very well and that Kenyan officials were very certain that few if any hostages were left in the building. But with the mall cordoned off and under heavy security it was not possible to independently verify the assertions. Similar claims of a quick resolution were made by Kenyan officials on Sunday and the siege continued. Authorities have also not provided any details on how many hostages were freed or how many still remain captive. Three attackers were killed in the fighting Monday, Kenyan authorities said, and more than 10 suspects arrested. Eleven Kenyan soldiers were wounded in the running gun battles. Somalias al-Qaida-linked rebel group, al-Shabab, which claimed responsibility for the attack, said the hostage-takers were wellarmed and ready to take on the Kenyan forces. An al-Shabab spokesman, Sheik Ali Mohamud Rage, said in an audio file posted on a militant website that the attackers had been ordered to take punitive action against the hostages if force was used to try to rescue them. Battle rages in Kenya Associated PressHeavy smoke rises Monday from the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Multiple large blasts rocked the mall where a hostage siege was in its third day. Security forces were attempting to rescue an unknown number of hostages inside the mall held by al-Qaida-linked terrorists. Security forces prep for final push to clear out terrorists People donate blood Monday in Uhuru Park in Nairobi, Kenya, for people injured in the attack at the Westgate Mall. GOP offers smaller budget cuts

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Baseball/ B2 Sports soundoff/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Football/ B3, B4 Volleyball/ B3 Lottery, TV/B3 Murphy ready for his shot as Florida QB./B4 SPORTSSection BTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Rays finish off four-game sweep of Orioles Loney delivers walk-off homer Associated PressST. PETERSBURG Wil Myers tied it with a two-run single on a jarring play in the seventh inning then pinch-hitter James Loney stunned the Orioles with a leadoff homer in the ninth, and the Tampa Bay Rays completed a four-game sweep that put a serious damper in Baltimores wild-card hopes with a 5-4 victory Monday. The Orioles also lost All-Star third baseman Manny Machado to a leg injury in the top of the seventh. Machados left leg buckled when he stepped on first base running out an infield single. He was taken off on a stretcher. The win pushed the Rays a full game ahead of idle Cleveland for the top AL wild card. Baltimore fell five games back of the Indians with six games to go for both teams. With the bases loaded, two outs and trailing 4-2 in the seventh, Myers, a rookie, sent a flare behind second base. Second baseman Alexi Casilla, who entered the game in the eighth, made a fully extended diving catch but he collided with Nick Markakis, racing in toward the ball from right field. The ball came loose and two runs scored. Casilla was shaken up on the play, but remained in the game. However, he left one inning later. Hitting for Sean Rodriguez, Loney lined an 0-1 pitch from Tommy Hunter (6-5) down the right field line. Joel Peralta (3-8) pitched a perfect ninth for the Rays. Chris Davis hit his major league-best 52nd homer for Baltimore. Tim Beckham, taken first overall in the 2008 draft, put the Rays up 1-0 on a sacrifice fly in the second. It was the rookie's first major league RBI. Chris Archer gave up four runs and five hits in 4 1/3 innings. Baltimore left-hander Wei-Yin Chen also went 4 1/3 innings, allowing two runs and six hits. Going back to the final 11 innings of the Orioles 5-4, 18-inning loss to the Rays Friday night, Baltimore had just two runs and 10 hits over 32 innings before getting three runs on four hits in the fourth. Associated PressTampa Bays James Loney, right, greets teammates Yunel Escobar, left, and Luke Scott, second from left, after hitting a ninthinning, game-winning home run Monday off Baltimore relief pitcher Tommy Hunter, right rear, in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 5-4. Dolphins get extra day to bask in 3-0 record Associated PressMIAMI GARDENS As the Miami Dolphins prepare for a rare prime-time appearance next Monday night at New Orleans, the extra day between games will be welcome. It gives the Dolphins a few additional hours to enjoy being 3-0, more time for an injury-depleted defense to mend, and another practice to address serious problems with pass protection. The surprising Dolphins took another step toward ending their streak of four consecutive losing seasons by rallying past Atlanta 27-23 Sunday. Were making the most of the present, and hopefully we can snowball that into the future, said long snapper John Denney, whose nine years with Miami give him locker room seniority. The Dolphins have won their first three games 12 other times, and none of those teams finished with a losing record. Nine of them made the playoffs, and Miamis quick start has stirred speculation about a run to the postseason. Such optimism is a big change in South Florida, because the Dolphins havent been 3-0 since 2002, and theyve reached the playoffs only once since 2001. Thats why they havent played in prime time much lately. Miami tight end Dion Sims scores the game-winning touchdown Sunday against the Atlanta Falcons at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens.Associated Press See DOLPHINS/ Page B3 High School VolleyballNOTEBOOK Phillips of Crystal River leads county in assistsC.J. RISAK CorrespondentPatience has paid dividends for Aspen Phillips. The senior setter at Crystal River High School has finally emerged, not just in a starting role for the Pirates, but as a standout player on a team in the midst of another district title race. Phillips was good enough to start on nearly any team last season; the problem was, Crystal River had two very strong senior setters in Sabrina Scott and Kylie Sisk. That left Phillips as the odd man out. Last year, we had the two senior setters, Pirates coach Mike Ridley said. But (Phillips) had a tremendous attitude. She would play whenever I asked her to. She loves the game and it shows. I cant say enough good things about her. But with Phillips, it isnt just attitude. Her setting skills have been outstanding on a team that is tied for the top spot in District 5A-6 with a 2-1 mark. Her 333 assists to kills is best in the county, an average of 23.8 per match. Ive really focused on my sets, Phillips said. And Ive had people help me. That meant her coaches, including those with her travel teams, something shes been involved in for four years. I want to be an all-around good player, Phillips added. Crystal River lost eight seniors from last years team, leaving quite a vacuum to fill. Although Phillips was a part-time player last year, she has accepted her new status and emerged as a team leader. If you want to talk about the heart and soul of the team, shes it, Ridley said. Her leadership has been tremendous, and shes taken on the role as the teams primary setter. These arent easy positions to assume. They require equal attention Phillips must use her physical skills on the court and her strong attitude, on and off it. I try to trust all my teammates, we have to work together, she said. When we lose a point, we need to shake it off, put it in the past and focus on the next one. If her Crystal River team has displayed anything, its resilience. Gone from last years powerhouse the Pirates were 21-7 overall and were district champions, posting a 9-1 mark is Casidy Newcomer, a formidable power as an outside hitter who was the Chroniclesplayer of the year. Replacing her hasnt been easy. The Pirates have been developing their hitters, but as Ridley noted, Our hitting is coming along, but it hasnt gotten there yet. This means keeping the ball in play, something else Phillips has shown a prowess in. On a team noted for defense, shes second in digs with 147, averaging 10.5 per match. Shes much better at everything, Ridley said of his rising star. Shes really worked on her skills. Crystal Rivers success may depend on how quickly her teammates skills develop. Phillips will certainly be there to assist.C.J. RISAK CorrespondentIts no secret: In volleyball, power is prevalent. Strong passing and defense is always a great benefit, but having someone on the front row or, better yet, two or three people who can put a kill down and provide shot-altering blocking on defense will be decisive. The countys three 5A-6 teams should all remain in the district title mix, and all three have players with potential to provide the abovementioned skills. Citrus has Amy Abramowich, while Lecanto has Annalee Garcia and Crystal River has Olivia Hudson. They are their respective teams first choices. But for these teams to advance, one wont be enough. They must develop second and even third options. For Citrus, that means players like Jordan Josey and Kendra Kirby. Setter Kelly Abramowich can put shots down too, and when she sets to her sister its a danger to opponents. Both Josey and Kirby could be differencemakers down the stretch. At Lecanto, Garcia, together with Shannon Fernandez and Olivia Grey, can cause problems for any defense. Add someone like Morgan Christian into that mix and the chances for success on a kill opportunity multiply. Hudson may be Crystal Rivers most consistent threat, but other options exist in Marissa Pool and Cassidy Wardlow. Consistency is all thats lacking in their game; if Kaylan Simms and Allie Whited continue to contribute, the Pirates will be dangerous.On targetSeven Rivers Christian is off to a superb start, with 11 wins in its first 14 matches and with the best record against county foes. Problem is, the Warriors are in 2A-3 and so is Gainesville Cornerstone, a team that advanced to the 2A quarterfinals in each of the last two seasons and seems capable of doing the same this year. One of Seven Rivers three losses was at Cornerstone. With Alexis Zachar and Alyssa Gage, Seven Rivers has front-row power and STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleAspen Phillips of Crystal River sets the ball up for a teammate during recent action. The senior setter for the Pirates has flourished in the starting role this season. I want to be an all-around good player.Aspen PhillipsCrystal River High School volleyball senior setter.See NOTEBOOK/ Page B3

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Associated PressCHICAGO The Pittsburgh Pirates are going to the playoffs for the first time in 21 years. After two consecutive decades of losing, the Pirates (90-67) clinched at least a National League wild card Monday night when they beat the Chicago Cubs 2-1 and the Washington Nationals lost to St. Louis 4-3. It will be Pittsburghs first trip to the postseason since Barry Bonds, Jim Leyland and Co. won three straight NL East titles from 1990-92. Bonds then left for San Francisco as a free agent, and the small-budget Pirates piled up 20 consecutive losing records the longest streak in the four major professional sports. Starling Marte hit a tiebreaking homer in the ninth inning Monday night at Wrigley Field, and the Pirates threw out a runner at the plate for the final out.American League Blue Jays 3, White Sox 2CHICAGO Jose Quintana threw 7 1/3 strong innings, Marcus Semien hit a two-run home run and Avisail Garcia added a solo shot to lead the Chicago White Sox to a 3-2 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. Quintana (9-6), who entered the game with the most no-decisions in the American League at 17, allowed two runs and five hits. Addison Reed pitched the ninth inning to record his 39th save.Rangers 12, Astros 0ARLINGTON, Texas Alex Rios hit for the cycle, Derek Holland struck out nine in his second shutout of the season and the Texas Rangers started their final push for a playoff spot with a 12-0 victory over the Houston Astros. The Rangers pulled within a game of idle Cleveland for the second AL wildcard berth with six games remaining. Rios finished off the cycle with a triple to right-center field in the sixth inning, and later scored to put Texas up 11-0. He doubled in the first inning, had an infield single in the third and hit his 18th homer in the fourth.National League Brewers 5, Braves 0ATLANTA Marco Estrada pitched seven innings, Carlos Gomez and Jonathan Lucroy homered and the Milwaukee Brewers beat the Atlanta Braves 5-0. The NL East champion Braves began the night with the leagues best record, 1 1/2 games ahead of the St. Louis Cardinals. The Los Angeles Dodgers, who did not play Monday, moved two games back.Marlins 4, Phillies 0MIAMI Nathan Eovaldi pitched into the eighth inning to help the Miami Marlins beat the Philadelphia Phillies 4-0. Justin Ruggiano drew a bases loaded walk in the first inning and the Marlins scored three runs in the eighth on RBI singles by Donovan Solando and Ed Lucas and a sacrifice fly by Christian Yelich. Eovaldi (4-6) allowed three hits over 7 2/3 innings. He struck out five and walked two.Reds 3, Mets 2, 10 inn.CINCINNATI Shin-Soo Choo drove in the winning run with a single off the wall in the 10th inning, and the Cincinnati Reds earned a wild-card berth by beating the New York Mets 3-2. Second-place Cincinnati clinched a playoff spot with a loss by Washington to St. Louis on Monday night. David Aardsma pitched out of a bases-loaded threat in the ninth, retiring Todd Frazier on a flyout. Greg Burke (0-3) gave up a one-out single by Devin Mesoraco in the 10th, and Derrick Robinson singled him to third.Cardinals 4, Nationals 3ST. LOUIS Carlos Beltran homered, Adam Wainwright earned his 18th win and the St. Louis Cardinals beat Washington 4-3, eliminating the Nationals from playoff contention. Looking for their first NL Central title since 2009, the Cardinals maintained a two-game lead over Cincinnati and Pittsburgh and reduced their magic number to four. All three teams are headed to the postseason. The Reds and Pirates both won Monday night, clinching at least a wild-card berth when Washington lost. AL Associated PressPittsburghs Starling Marte celebrates his home run Monday off Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Kevin Gregg during the ninth inning in Chicago. The blast gave the Pirates a 2-1 victory. Martes blast leads Pirates Pittsburgh, Reds earn playoff spots AMERICAN LEAGUEMondays Games Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 Texas 12, Houston 0 Chicago White Sox 3, Toronto 2 Detroit at Minnesota, late Oakland at L.A. Angels, late Kansas City at Seattle, late Today Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 4-9) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez 12-9), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 15-4) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 11-12), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Redmond 4-2) at Baltimore (Tillman 16-7), 7:05 p.m. Houston (Peacock 5-5) at Texas (Darvish 13-9), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Fister 13-9) at Minnesota (Diamond 6-11), 8:10 p.m. Boston (Lackey 10-12) at Colorado (Chatwood 7-5), 8:40 p.m. Oakland (Griffin 14-9) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 8-7), 10:05 p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 8-3) at Seattle (Paxton 2-0), 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEMondays Games Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 0 Cincinnati 3, N.Y. Mets 2, 10 innings Miami 4, Philadelphia 0 Pittsburgh 2, Chicago Cubs 1 St. Louis 4, Washington 3 Arizona at San Diego, late Today Milwaukee (Thornburg 3-1) at Atlanta (F.Garcia 1-2), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-8) at Cincinnati (Leake 14-6), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Miner 0-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 4-5), 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Cole 9-7) at Chicago Cubs (Rusin 2-5), 8:05 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 11-7) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-1), 8:15 p.m. Boston (Lackey 10-12) at Colorado (Chatwood 7-5), 8:40 p.m. Arizona (Miley 10-10) at San Diego (T.Ross 3-8), 10:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 13-7) at San Francisco (M.Cain 8-9), 10:15 p.m. Rays 5, Orioles 4Baltimore Tampa Bay abrhbi abrhbi BRorts dh5111SRdrgz 1b3010 Machd 3b4120Loney ph1111 ACasill pr-2b0000Zobrist lf-2b4110 Valenci 3b1000Longori 3b3000 C.Davis 1b3112WMyrs rf4122 A.Jones cf3000DYong dh3010 Markks rf4120YEscor ss3000 Wieters c4020TBckh 2b2111 McLoth lf3010Joyce ph-lf0000 Hardy ss4011JMolin c2021 Flahrty 2b4000DeJess ph-cf2000 Fuld cf2000 Loaton ph-c1100 Totals354104Totals30595 Baltimore0003100004 Tampa Bay0101002015 No outs when winning run scored. DPBaltimore 2. LOBBaltimore 8, Tampa Bay 8. 2BWieters (29), McLouth (29), S.Rodriguez (10), J.Molina (14). HRB.Roberts (6), C.Davis (52), Loney (13). SFT.Beckham. IPHRERBBSO Baltimore W.Chen 41/362224 Stinson 12/300001 Matusz H,182/312211 ODay BS,4-61/310010 Tom.Hunter L,6-5111120 Tampa Bay Archer 41/354427 W.Wright000010 B.Gomes1/300001 Al.Torres 11/310002 McGee 120011 J.Wright 120000 Jo.Peralta W,3-8100001 W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Tom.Hunter pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. WPMcGee. UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Bruce Dreckman; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Tim Welke. T:46. A,830 (34,078).White Sox 3, Blue Jays 2Toronto Chicago abrhbi abrhbi RDavis rf4010De Aza cf4010 Kawsk 2b3010AlRmrz ss3000 Lind ph-1b1000Kppngr dh2010 Lawrie 3b4000Konerk 1b4010 Sierra dh3000AGarci rf4111 DeRosa 1b3000Viciedo lf4110 Arencii c4111GBckh 2b4010 Pillar lf4110Semien 3b4122 Goins ss3021Phegly c4000 Gose cf3000 Totals322 62Totals33383 Toronto0000100102 Chicago02001000x3 EArencibia (11). DPChicago 1. LOB Toronto 5, Chicago 10. 2BPillar (3), G.Beckham (22). HRArencibia (21), A.Garcia (6), Semien (1). IPHRERBBSO Toronto Happ L,4-7583335 Jeffress 200012 Delabar 100001 Chicago Quintana W,9-671/352216 Lindstrom 010000 Veal H,12 1/300000 N.Jones H,151/300000 A.Reed S,39-46100010 Lindstrom pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T:46. A,122 (40,615).Rangers 12, Astros 0Houston Texas abrhbi abrhbi Villar ss4000Kinsler 2b4221 Altuve 2b3010Profar 2b-ss1000 Elmore 2b1000Andrus ss4231 MDmn 3b3010Adduci 1b0000 MGnzlz 3b1000Rios rf4344 Carter dh2000EBeltre rf1000 JDMrtn ph2010ABeltre 3b3001 B.Laird 1b4000Rosales 3b-2b1000 Hoes rf-lf4000Przyns c5220 Crowe lf-cf2020Morlnd 1b2111 Corprn c2010Chirins 3b1000 Stassi c1000Gentry lf3100 BBarns cf2000DvMrp dh3111 Pareds rf1000LMartn cf4013 Totals32060Totals36121412 Houston0000000000 Texas 21420300x12 EM.Dominguez (15), Villar (14). DPTexas 1. LOBHouston 6, Texas 6. 2BKinsler (30), Rios (30), Pierzynski (23), L.Martin (19). 3B Rios (4). HRRios (18). SBGentry (19). SF A.Beltre, Moreland. IPHRERBBSO Houston Lyles L,7-9 377732 D.Martinez475402 Lo 000000 Fields 100012 Texas D.Holland W,10-9960019 WPD.Martinez. UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Paul Emmel; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Gary Darling. T:39. A,743 (48,114). NL Brewers 5, Braves 0MilwaukeeAtlanta abrhbiabrhbi Aoki rf5110Heywrd cf4000 CGomz cf5111JSchafr rf3000 Lucroy c4112J.Upton lf3010 ArRmr 3b4131CJhnsn 3b4000 KDavis lf4010Gattis c4000 Halton 1b4110Smmns ss2010 Wooten p0000Trdslvc 1b3000 Blazek p0000Janish 2b3000 YBtncr 2b-1b4010Minor p2000 Bianchi ss4000Varvar p0000 Estrad p3020ElJhns ph1010 Gennett 2b1000Loe p0000 Totals385 114Totals29030 Milwaukee1000200205 Atlanta0000000000 ESimmons (14). DPMilwaukee 1. LOBMilwaukee 6, Atlanta 5. 2BAoki (18), Halton (4). 3BSimmons (6). HRC.Gomez (22), Lucroy (18), Ar.Ramirez (12). SBJ.Schafer (22). IPHRERBBSO Milwaukee Estrada W,7-4720036 Wooten110000 Blazek100000 Atlanta Minor L,13-8783306 Varvaro132101 Loe100001Marlins 4, Phillies 0PhiladelphiaMiami abrhbiabrhbi CHrndz cf3000DSolan 2b4111 Rollins ss4010Lucas 1b5021 Utley 2b4000Yelich lf3021 Ruiz c4000Stanton rf2000 DBrwn lf4010Ruggin cf4011 Ruf 1b-rf4010Polanc 3b3110 Asche 3b2000Hchvrr ss4020 Berndn rf2010Mathis c3100 DeFrts p0000Eovaldi p2000 EMartn p0000MDunn p0000 Mrtnz ph1000Dobbs ph0100 Rosnrg p0000Cishek p0000 CJimnz p0000 Hallady p0000 LuGarc p1000 Savery p0000 Frndsn 1b2000 Totals31040Totals30494 Philadelphia0000000000 Miami10000003x4 DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 6, Miami 13. 2BRollins (33), Polanco (12), Hechavarria (14). SBYelich (9), Polanco (2). SEovaldi. SFYelich. IPHRERBBSO Philadelphia Halladay L,4-51/301120 Lu.Garcia22/330031 Savery12/300003 De Fratus11/320012 E.Martin110002 Rosenberg1/333320 C.Jimenez2/300010 Miami Eovaldi W,4-672/330025 M.Dunn H,181/300000 Cishek110001Reds 3, Mets 2, 10 inn.New York Cincinnati abrhbi abrhbi EYong lf5020Choo cf6032 DnMrp 2b4010BPhllps 2b4010 DWrght 3b2000Votto 1b0001 Duda 1b3112Ludwck lf5000 ABrwn rf4000MParr p0000 Lagars cf4000Bruce rf4000 TdArnd c3010Frazier 3b4110 Quntnll ss3000Cozart ss4000 Satin ph1010Hanign c4120 Burke p0000BHmltn pr0000 Henn p0000Mesorc c1110 Harang p2100Cueto p3010 Baxter ph1000LeCure p0000 Germn p0000SMrshll p0000 Felicin p0000Heisey ph1000 Frncsc p0000AChpm p0000 Byrdak p0000DRonsn lf1010 Ardsm p0000 Tovar ph-ss0000 Totals32262Totals373103 New York00100100002 Cincinnati02000000013 One out when winning run scored. EFrazier (9). DPCincinnati 2. LOBNew York 5, Cincinnati 15. 2BChoo (34), Frazier (28). HRDuda (15). SBE.Young (41), Choo 2 (20), B.Hamilton (13). CSE.Young (11), Frazier (5). STovar. SFDuda. IPHRERBBSO New York Harang 652261 Germen 2/300011 Feliciano 1/300000 F.Francisco110001 Byrdak 010000 Aardsma 100020 Burke L,0-31/321100 Henn 010000 Cincinnati Cueto 732135 LeCure 1/320001 S.Marshall 2/300000 A.Chapman100003 M.Parra W,2-3110000 Rays scheduleSept. 24 at N.Y. Yankees Sept. 25 at N.Y. Yankees Sept. 26 at N.Y. Yankees Sept. 27 at Toronto Sept. 28 at Toronto Sept. 29 at Toronto West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Oakland9363.5968-2W-452-2941-34 Texas8571.545814-6W-140-3545-36 Los Angeles7679.4901697-3L-137-4139-38 Seattle6888.43625183-7W-133-4235-46 Houston51106.32542350-10L-1024-5427-52 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Boston9562.6056-4W-153-2842-34 Tampa Bay8769.55877-3W-451-3036-39 New York8274.5261244-6L-146-3236-42 Baltimore8175.5191354-6L-542-3339-42 Toronto7185.45523154-6L-238-4033-45 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Atlanta9264.5904-6L-152-2340-41 Washington8473.535866-4L-147-3437-39 New York7185.45521186-4L-132-4539-40 Philadelphia7185.45521183-7L-543-3828-47 Miami5899.36934323-7W-132-4426-55 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway z-St. Louis9265.5866-4W-149-2743-38 z-Cincinnati9067.57327-3W-249-2641-41 z-Pittsburgh9067.57325-5W-150-3140-36 Milwaukee7086.44921196-4W-237-4433-42 Chicago6592.41427252-8L-230-4935-43 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-LA9066.5774-6W-246-3244-34 Arizona7976.51010106-4W-244-3435-42 San Diego7283.46517176-4L-242-3530-48 San Fran.7284.46218176-4W-138-3834-46 Colorado7186.45219194-6L-244-3527-51 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit9165.5837-3L-151-3040-35 Cleveland8670.55158-2W-449-3037-40 Kansas City8273.529836-4W-144-3738-36 Minnesota6590.41925202-8L-431-4334-47 Chicago6294.39729244-6W-236-4126-53 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS B2TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 NASCARs declineIf you watch the NASCAR race this weekend, youll see why NASCAR is going down the toilet. Bowyers been accused of staging a spinout so his teammate, Truex, could make a chase, knocking out Newman and knocking out Jeff Gordon and its so ridiculous. And I guess the rumor is that Michael Waltrips team has been fined a lot of money for that and Im glad and its about time because he was a little bit too big for his pants and he thinks hes such a big, big benefactor in terms of NASCAR racing and hes really not that much. He couldnt produce a legitimate, honest team if he had to. The only way they know how to win is just by being crooked and cheating and theyve been caught several times and Im so glad to see that hes out of it, Truex is out of it and this is going to make a big difference. And maybe now NASCAR will be a more legitimate sport than it is and more people will go to the tracks and see the races.Tebow to the BucsI have a great idea for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and their blackout games and nobody wants to fill their stadium. Tebows a free agent. Bring him in and I guarantee their stadium will fill up with all these Gator fans and all these Tebow followers. Tell the Glazers (to) grab the boy. Then we wont have no more blackouts.Needs some points clarityAfter moving to Florida a few years ago, about 10 years, my wife and I have gotten interested in the NASCAR races. However, we dont understand their point system or how they rate their drivers. I would appreciate if somebody could let us know how they do that or if the Chronicle would even print an article about it. We find the NASCAR races are very interesting and wed like to understand them a little bit more.NAPA nohow, no wayFinally somebody on the outside is taking a move to really try to straighten up NASCAR. NAPA has dropped the funding for Michael Waltrip racing, which is the best thing that could happen to that clown. He was pretty cocky and smart and now that his brothers in the position he is, he thinks hes above the law and the rules and they can do whatever they want. Well good, Im glad they got burned good. They deserve it. They deserve to get kicked out of racing for a whole year because this sport has turned sour. It used to be an interesting, fun thing to watch at one time. Now its all about money, money, money. Nobody cares about anything but how much they make and earn. Thank you, NAPA, for pulling the plug and standing up and finally doing something to straighten up NASCAR. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 B3 defense (both rank among the top three hitters in the county). Will it be enough? Two of these three teams Cornerstone, St. John and Seven Rivers will advance to the regional tournament. Question is, which two?Scrambling abilityMatches involving Crystal River usually take a good deal of time, simply because the Pirates often rely on their defense to wear opponents down. But heres a warning: Anyone planning on attending the next Citrus vs. Crystal River contest should bring plenty of provisions. It could take a while. When the 5A-6 rivals met last week, Citrus nearly matched the Pirates defensively. It went four sets with the losing side scoring at least 20 points every time. Neither team had more than a six-point lead the entire match. There were plenty of double-digit rallies before Crystal River emerged with the win. No reason to believe it will be any different in round two.Season leadersTEAM RECORDS: Seven Rivers Christian, 11-3 overall, 3-1 in 2A-3; Citrus, 6-4 overall, 2-1 in 5A-6; Lecanto, 6-4 overall, 2-1 in 5A-6; Crystal River, 7-7 overall, 2-1 in 5A-6. KILLS: Alexis Zachar (Seven Rivers), 113 (8.0 per match); Annalee Garcia (Lecanto), 80 (8.0 per match); Alyssa Gage (Seven Rivers), 102 (7.3 per match); Kayla King (Citrus), 46 (6.6 per match); Amy Abramowich (Citrus), 44 (6.2 per match). KILL PERCENTAGE: Zachar (Seven Rivers), .426; Kaylan Simms (Crystal River), .322; Gage (Seven Rivers), .319; Allie Whited (Crystal River), .291; Hudson (Crystal River), .287; A. Abramowich (Citrus), 275. BLOCKS: Kendra Kirby (Citrus), 31 (4.4 per match); Kelly Abramowich (Citrus), 29 (4.1 per match); Hudson (Crystal River), 35 (2.5 per match); Simms (Crystal River), 31 (2.2); Zachar (Seven Rivers), 28 (2.0 per match); Gage (Seven Rivers), 25 (1.8 per match). DIGS: Sam Pauley (Crystal River), 325 (23.2 per match); Adriana Espinoza (Citrus), 96 (13.7 per match); Pool (Crystal River), 161 (11.5 per match); Aspen Phillips (Crystal River), 147 (10.5 per match); Mikaela Zoucha (Lecanto), 96 (9.6 per match). ASSISTS: Phillips (Crystal River), 333 (23.8 per match); Jessika Ray (Lecanto), 133 (13.3 per match); K. Abramowich (Citrus), 79 (11.3 per match); Iwaniec (Seven Rivers), 149 (10.7 per match); Gage (Seven Rivers), 136 (9.7 per match). SERVICE ACES: Iwaniec (Seven Rivers), 61 (4.4 per match); Pool (Crystal River), 49 (3.5 per match); Gage (Seven Rivers), 41 (3.0 per match); Olivia Grey (Lecanto), 28 (2.8 per match); Garcia (Lecanto), 23 (2.3 per match). But a buzz about the Dolphins is building, and to sustain it theyll need to address issues on both sides of the ball. Injuries have left uncertain the status of four defensive starters, including Pro Bowl end Cameron Wake, and shaky blocking threatens the health of quarterback Ryan Tannehill. Wake was sidelined Sunday after he hurt his left knee in the first quarter. Tests determined he avoided serious injury, but its uncertain whether hell be available against the Saints. Were going to wait and see how the week progresses, defensive coordinator Kevin Coyle said Monday. We have a long week here ahead of us, and I think well make that determination at the end of the week. Linebacker Koa Misi left Sundays game with a shoulder injury, and defensive tackle Paul Soliai (knee) and cornerback Dimitri Patterson (groin) sat out. Even so, the defense was at its best down the stretch, a testament to Miamis improved depth. You never want anybody to go down, but you know its bound to happen in this game, cornerback Brent Grimes said. You have to have people step up. Wakes injury means the Dolphins may be forced to accelerate the development of top draft pick Dion Jordan, who came off the bench in the first three games. The No. 3 overall pick from Oregon saw his most extensive action Sunday, including when Miami forced consecutive three-and-outs by high-powered Atlanta in the second half. Were seeing more and more of Dion, and hes getting better, Coyle said. We want to expand his role. He showed things in the game Sunday which lead us to believe we can keep feeding him more. Miamis struggling offensive line was also at its best late, protecting Tannehill on every throw as he went 9 for 12 to lead the game-winning 75-yard touchdown drive. But Tannehill endured five sacks earlier, giving him 14 this season, three more than any other NFL quarterback. Hes on pace for 75 sacks, one shy of the league record, but probably wouldnt last the full season if that pace continues. The sacks have been a team effort that goes beyond the line, offensive coordinator Mike Sherman said, including play-calling mistakes for which he took the blame. Tannehill has held onto the ball too long at times, and the running back or tight end has missed a block on occasion, Sherman said. Were giving up a lot of sacks, more than we ought to give up, he said. But its not all on the offensive line. The Dolphins statistics make their record a head-scratcher. Theyve been outgained by 158 yards, and their rushing attack (3.3 yards per attempt) and run defense (4.7) are both significantly worse than last year, when they went 7-9. But theyve showed a flair for big plays, something missing in recent seasons. They lead the NFL in redzone scoring, and theyve already come up with five interceptions, half of last seasons total. Perhaps the biggest play Sunday was Denneys fumble recovery on a punt return, which set up a pivotal touchdown for Miami. The recovery was just the second ever for Denney, but he didnt bask in the accomplishment. Im more excited about being 3-0, he said. That hasnt happened a whole lot in my career. Actually, it has never happened in Denneys career. But then he has only been with the Dolphins since 2005. DOLPHINSContinued from Page B1 NOTEBOOKContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS TV BASEBALL 7 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Phillies at Miami Marlins 7 p.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees or Toronto Blue Jays at Baltimore Orioles 7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees WNBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Eastern Conference Semifinal: Indiana Fever at Chicago Sky, game 3 (if necessary) NHL PRESEASON HOCKEY 11 a.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at Pittsburgh Penguins (taped) 3 p.m. (NHL) Winnipeg Jets at Edmonton Oilers (taped) 7 p.m. (NHL) New Jersey Devils at Philadelphia Flyers 10:30 p.m. (NHL) Vancouver Canucks at San Jose Sharks SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League Soccer FC Barcelona vs Ajax (taped) RADIO 6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame 7:05 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS GOLF 4 p.m. Seven Rivers at Lecanto (Course: Seven Rivers) GIRLS GOLF 3:30 p.m. The Villages at Citrus (Course: LakeSide) VOLLEYBALL 5 p.m. Academy at the Lakes at Seven Rivers 6 p.m. Citrus at Lecanto NFL standingsAMERICAN CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA New England3001.0005934 Miami 3001.0007453 N.Y. Jets210.6675550 Buffalo 120.3336573 South WLTPctPFPA Houston210.6677082 Indianapolis210.6676848 Tennessee210.6676056 Jacksonville030.0002892 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati210.6677564 Baltimore210.6677164 Cleveland120.3334764 Pittsburgh030.0004276 West WLTPctPFPA Denver3001.00012771 Kansas City3001.0007134 Oakland120.3335767 San Diego120.3337881 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA Dallas 210.6678355 Philadelphia120.3337986 N.Y. Giants030.00054115 Washington030.0006798 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans3001.0007038 Carolina120.3336836 Atlanta 120.3337174 Tampa Bay030.0003457 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago3001.0009574 Detroit 210.6678269 Green Bay120.3339688 Minnesota030.0008196 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 3001.0008627 St. Louis120.3335886 San Francisco120.3334484 Arizona120.3335679 Thursdays Game Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16 Sundays Games Tennessee 20, San Diego 17 New Orleans 31, Arizona 7 Dallas 31, St. Louis 7 Cleveland 31, Minnesota 27 Baltimore 30, Houston 9 Carolina 38, N.Y. Giants 0 Detroit 27, Washington 20 New England 23, Tampa Bay 3 Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 30 Miami 27, Atlanta 23 Indianapolis 27, San Francisco 7 Seattle 45, Jacksonville 17 N.Y. Jets 27, Buffalo 20 Chicago 40, Pittsburgh 23 Mondays Game Denver 37, Oakland 21 Thursday, Sep. 26 San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Sep. 29 N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Arizona at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m. New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m. Open: Carolina, Green Bay Monday, Sep. 30 Miami at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m.Broncos 37, Raiders 21Oakland 077721 Denver 10173737 First Quarter DenDecker 2 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 10:28. DenFG Prater 53, :47. Second Quarter DenWelker 12 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 7:27. OakD.Moore 73 pass from Pryor (Janikowski kick), 5:57. DenJ.Thomas 13 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 3:40. DenFG Prater 41, :19. Third Quarter DenFG Prater 40, 8:41. OakReece 16 pass from McFadden (Janikowski kick), :17. Fourth Quarter DenHillman 1 run (Prater kick), 11:27. OakMcFadden 1 run (Janikowski kick), 1:15. A,978. OakDen First downs 1331 Total Net Yards342536 Rushes-yards17-4935-164 Passing 293372 Punt Returns0-03-34 Kickoff Returns2-451-8 Interceptions Ret.0-00-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-31-032-37-0 Sacked-Yards Lost3-231-2 Punts 6-52.51-37.0 Fumbles-Lost1-03-2 Penalties-Yards8-775-40 Time of Possession24:3635:24 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGOakland, Pryor 4-36, McFadden 12-9, Ford 1-4. Denver, Hillman 9-66, Ball 1161, Moreno 12-39, Manning 3-(minus 2). PASSINGOakland, Pryor 19-28-0-281, Flynn 1-2-0-19, McFadden 1-1-0-16. Denver, Manning 32-37-0-374. RECEIVINGOakland, D.Moore 6-124, Reece 4-45, Butler 3-54, Streater 3-42, Rivera 2-21, Jennings 2-15, Ford 1-15. Denver, D.Thomas 10-94, Decker 8-133, Welker 7-84, J.Thomas 337, Hillman 1-12, Moreno 1-6, Tamme 1-5, Green 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.College schedule(Subject to change) Thursday, Sept. 26 SOUTH Va. Tech (3-1) at Georgia Tech (3-0), 7:30 p.m. Howard (1-2) at NC A&T (2-0), 7:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Iowa St. (0-2) at Tulsa (1-2), 7:30 p.m. FAR WEST Cal Poly (1-2) at Portland St. (3-1), 10:15 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27 FAR WEST Middle Tennessee (3-1) at BYU (1-2), 9 p.m. Utah St. (2-2) at San Jose St. (1-2), 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28 EAST Fordham (4-0) at St. Francis (Pa.) (1-2), Noon Oklahoma St. (3-0) at West Virginia (2-2), Noon Cornell (1-0) at Yale (1-0), Noon Monmouth (1-3) at Columbia (0-1), 12:30 p.m. New Hamp. (1-1) at Lehigh (3-0), 12:30 p.m. Virginia (2-1) at Pittsburgh (2-1), 12:30 p.m. CCSU (1-3) at Rhode Island (1-3), 1 p.m. Bryant (2-1) at Wagner (1-3), 1 p.m. Princeton (0-1) at Georgetown (1-3), 2 p.m. Fla. St. (3-0) at Boston College (2-1), 3:30 p.m. UConn (0-3) at Buffalo (1-2), 3:30 p.m. Penn (1-0) at Villanova (1-2), 5 p.m. Sacred Heart (4-0) at Bucknell (1-1), 6 p.m. Towson (4-0) at Stony Brook (1-2), 6 p.m. Holy Cross (1-3) at Dartmouth (1-0), 7 p.m. James Madison (3-1) at Delaware (3-1), 7 p.m. Brown (1-0) at Harvard (1-0), 7:30 p.m. SOUTH Butler (2-2) at Jacksonville (2-2), Noon Miami (3-0) at South Florida (0-3), Noon South Carolina (2-1) at UCF (3-0), Noon S. Ala. (2-1) at Tennessee (2-2), 12:21 p.m. E. Carolina (2-1) at N. Carolina (1-2), 12:30 p.m. Drake (1-2) at Mercer (3-0), 1 p.m. Davidson (0-3) at Morehead St. (0-4), 1 p.m. Norfolk St. (0-3) at Morgan St. (0-4), 1 p.m. San Diego (1-2) at Stetson (1-2), 1 p.m. Coastal Carolina (4-0) at Elon (1-3), 1:30 p.m. Robert Morris (1-2) at VMI (1-3), 1:30 p.m. Charlotte (2-2) at Presbyterian (1-2), 2 p.m. Hampton (0-4) at SC State (2-2), 2 p.m. Navy (2-0) at W. Kentucky (2-2), 2 p.m. Troy (2-2) at Duke (2-2), 3 p.m. W. Carolina (1-3) at Samford (2-2), 3 p.m. Charleston So. (4-0) at App. St. (1-2), 3:30 p.m. Wake Forest (2-2) at Clemson (3-0), 3:30 p.m. LSU (4-0) at Georgia (2-1), 3:30 p.m. Cent. Mich. (1-3) at NC State (2-1), 3:30 p.m. Murray St. (2-2) at Jacksonville St. (4-0), 4 p.m. Maine (3-1) at Richmond (2-2), 4 p.m. Alcorn St. (3-1) at Alabama St. (2-2), 6 p.m. Point (Ga.) (2-1) at Gardner-Webb (3-1), 6 p.m. Chattanooga (2-1) at Ga. Southern (2-1), 6 p.m. Albany (NY) (1-3) at Old Dominion (2-2), 6 p.m. Delaware St. (0-3) at Savannah St. (1-3), 6 p.m. Furman (1-2) at The Citadel (1-3), 6 p.m. Mississippi (3-0) at Alabama (3-0), 6:30 p.m. Texas So. (0-3) at Alabama A&M (1-3), 7 p.m. Lamar (2-2) at Grambling St. (0-4), 7 p.m. Florida (2-1) at Kentucky (1-2), 7 p.m. Kentucky Wesleyan (0-3) at Liberty (2-2), 7 p.m. Tulane (2-2) at Louisiana-Monroe (2-2), 7 p.m. Arkansas Tech (2-1) at Nicholls St. (2-2), 7 p.m. Langston (0-3) at Northwestern St. (2-2), 7 p.m. Jackson St. (2-2) at Southern U. (2-2), 7 p.m. UAB (1-2) at Vanderbilt (2-2), 7:30 p.m. Indiana St. (1-2) at Tenn. Tech (2-2), 8 p.m. MIDWEST Miami (Ohio) (0-3) at Illinois (2-1), Noon N. Illinois (3-0) at Purdue (1-3), Noon Marist (1-2) at Dayton (2-1), 1 p.m. Illinois St. (1-2) at Missouri St. (0-4), 2 p.m. Campbell (1-2) at Valparaiso (0-3), 2 p.m. Akron (1-3) at Bowling Green (3-1), 2:30 p.m. E. Kentucky (2-2) at E. Illinois (3-1), 2:30 p.m. Toledo (2-2) at Ball St. (3-1), 3 p.m. Tenn. St. (3-1) vs. Central St. (0-3), 3 p.m. N. Dakota St. (3-0) at S. Dakota St. (3-1), 3 p.m. Iowa (3-1) at Minnesota (4-0), 3:30 p.m. Montana St. (2-2) at N. Dakota (1-2), 3:30 p.m. Oklahoma (3-0) at Notre Dame (3-1), 3:30 p.m. South Dakota (1-2) at W. Illinois (2-2), 4 p.m. McNeese St. (4-0) at N. Iowa (3-0), 5 p.m. Youngstown St. (3-1) at S. Illinois (2-2), 7 p.m. UT-Martin (2-1) at SE Missouri (0-3), 7 p.m. Kent St. (1-3) at W. Michigan (0-4), 7 p.m. Arkansas St. (2-2) at Missouri (3-0), 7:30 p.m. Wisconsin (3-1) at Ohio St. (4-0), 8 p.m. SOUTHWEST SMU (1-2) at TCU (1-2), Noon E. Wash. (2-1) at Sam Houston St. (3-1), 3 p.m. Army (1-3) vs. La. Tech (1-3) at Dallas, 4 p.m. Houston (3-0) at UTSA (2-2), 4 p.m. Texas A&M (3-1) at Arkansas (3-1), 7 p.m. FAU (1-3) at Rice (1-2), 7 p.m. Prairie View (2-2) at St. F. Austin (2-2), 7 p.m. Wyoming (3-1) at Texas St. (2-1), 7 p.m. FAR WEST Colorado (2-0) at Oregon St. (3-1), 3 p.m. UTEP (1-2) at Colorado St. (1-3), 3:30 p.m. S. Utah (3-1) at N. Colorado (1-3), 3:35 p.m. Temple (0-3) at Idaho (0-4), 5 p.m. Arizona (3-0) at Washington (3-0), 7 p.m. UNLV (2-2) at New Mexico (1-2), 8 p.m. SD St. (0-3) at New Mexico St. (0-4), 8 p.m. Sacramento St. (1-3) at Weber St. (1-3), 8 p.m. Air Force (1-3) at Nevada (2-2), 8:05 p.m. Montana (3-0) at N. Arizona (2-1), 9 p.m. Idaho St. (2-1) at UC Davis (0-4), 9 p.m. Stanford (3-0) at Washington St. (3-1), 10 p.m. So. Miss. (0-3) at Boise St. (2-2), 10:15 p.m. USC (3-1) at Arizona St. (2-1), 10:30 p.m. California (1-2) at Oregon (3-0), 10:30 p.m. Fresno State (3-0) at Hawaii (0-3), 12 Mid.Pirates 2, Cubs 1PittsburghChicago abrhbiabrhbi Tabata lf4000StCastr ss4010 SMarte lf1111Valuen 3b4000 NWalkr 2b5111Rizzo 1b4000 McCtch cf3010DNavrr c3010 Mornea 1b3000Watkns pr0000 Byrd rf4000Schrhlt rf4000 PAlvrz 3b4010Sweeny cf3010 RMartn c3010Bogsvc lf3120 Mercer ss2000Barney 2b2000 Barmes ss1000Smrdzj p2000 Morton p3010Villanv p0000 Melncn p0000HRndn p0000 Snider ph1000DMrph ph1011 Watson p0000Gregg p0000 Grilli p0000 Totals34262Totals30161 Pittsburgh1000000012 Chicago0000000101 EValbuena (7). DPPittsburgh 2. LOB Pittsburgh 9, Chicago 5. 2BBogusevic (7). HRS.Marte (12), N.Walker (14). IPHRERBBSO Pittsburgh Morton730015 Melancon W,3-2 121101 Watson H,221/300000 Grilli S,32-342/310010 Chicago Samardzija651147 Villanueva100001 H.Rondon100000 Gregg L,2-6111103Cardinals 4, Nationals 3WashingtonSt. Louis abrhbiabrhbi Span cf3110MCrpnt 2b3110 Zmrmn 3b4001Jay cf4110 Werth rf4112Beltran rf4122 Harper lf4010MAdms 1b4020 Dsmnd ss4010YMolin c4011 AdLRc 1b4000Freese 3b4110 WRams c3010Siegrist p0000 Rendon 2b3110Rosnthl p0000 Roark p1000Descals ss-3b4010 Abad p0000SRonsn lf4011 Lmrdzz ph1010Wnwrg p2010 Matths p0000Choate p0000 CMrtnz p0000 Kozma ss0000 Totals31373Totals334 114 Washington2000000103 St. Louis10012000x4 DPWashington 1, St. Louis 1. LOBWashington 3, St. Louis 7. HRWerth (24), Beltran (24). SSpan, Roark, Wainwright. IPHRERBBSO Washington Roark L,7-1594415 Abad220000 Mattheus100000 St. Louis Wainwright W,18-9773305 Choate H,141/300000 Ca.Martinez H,12/300000 Siegrist H,101/300000 Rosenthal S,1-62/300001 BASEBALL American League TAMPA BAY RAYSDesignated RHP J.D. Martin for assignment. Reinstated RHP Jesse Crain from the 60-day DL. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 9 13 15 18 26 5-of-51 winner$175,907.95 4-of-5312$90.50 3-of-58,572$9 CASH 3 (early) 0 1 3 CASH 3 (late) 5 7 1 PLAY 4 (early) 2 1 4 3 PLAY 4 (late) 9 7 9 2 FANTASY 5 2 10 33 34 35 Crystal River spikers sweep CentralThe Crystal River volleyball team improved to 8-7 on the season with a 25-11, 25-18, 25-10 victory Monday at home against Central. Aspen Phillips had 15 assists, six digs and two aces, Sam Pauley added 15 digs and five aces, Cassidy Wardlow had 10 kills and six digs, Olivia Hudson chipped in five kills and six blocks, Kaylan Simms had five kills and Marissa Pool added six digs and five aces. Crystal River is back in action tonight at Dunnellon in a district match.Big district victory for Seven RiversSeven Rivers Christian earned a huge Class 2A-3 win at home Monday, with a 25-21, 25-22, 14-25, 25-19 triumph over St. John Lutheran. The victory improves the Warriors to 12-3 overall and 4-1 in district action. Alyssa Gage had 15 kills, 16 assists, four digs, one ace and one block for Seven Rivers. Alexis Zacher added 12 kills, three blocks and two aces and Tessa Kacer had 25 successful serve receives, five assists and three digs. The Warriors return to action tonight at home at 5 p.m. for a non-district match against Academy of the Lakes.Citrus makes quick work of Nature CoastIt was a quick night in the gym Monday night for Citrus, as the Hurricanes swept visiting Nature Coast in non-district action, 25-9, 25-8, 25-9. Kelly Abramowich had a team-high 12 assists, Kylie Philips added seven assists, Adriana Espinosa had nine digs and Amy Abramowich served in five aces. The Hurricanes (7-4) return to district play tonight at Lecanto.From staff reports VOLLEYBALL BRIEFS Broncos rout Raiders Associated PressDENVER Peyton Manning clapped his hands four, five, six times and barked out the signals. A few seconds later, Wes Welker was all alone, cradling the quarterbacks latest touchdown pass. All part of another impeccably crafted victory for Manning and the Denver Broncos, who rolled over the Oakland Raiders 37-21 Monday night. Denvers 127 points lead the league and are 31 more than second-place Green Bay. Manning went 32 for 37 for 374 yards and set a few more records while outwitting the overmatched Raiders (1-2). His 12 touchdown passes are one more than Tom Bradys old record for the first three games, set in 2011. Manning still has yet to throw an interception, which matches a record held by Michael Vick, who also threw 12 touchdowns before his first pick in 2010. As much as the numbers, it was Mannings deciphering of the Oakland defense that made jaws drop in this one. His first touchdown, a 2-yard pass to Eric Decker, came after a subtle play action fake that froze the defense and left Decker wide open in the back of the end zone. Mannings targets for the next two touchdowns Welker and Julius Thomas didnt have defenders within three steps of them. Wide open. A sure sign that Manning had diagnosed the defense he was looking at well before the snap and knew exactly where he wanted to go with the ball.

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B4TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEFOOTBALL NFL BRIEFSJaguars to start QB Gabbert against ColtsJACKSONVILLE Blaine Gabbert is back under center for the winless Jacksonville Jaguars. Gabbert, who missed the last two games after slicing open the back of his throwing hand, will start Sunday against the Indianapolis Colts. Coach Gus Bradley said we feel good about him going into this week. Gabbert needed 15 stitches to close the wound, which he sustained when he got his hand caught on a defenders facemask. He got the final stitches out before Sundays 45-17 loss at Seattle. Gabbert completed 16 of 35 passes for 121 yards and two interceptions in the season opener against Kansas City. He was sacked six times in the 28-2 loss, the worst opener in franchise history.49ers prepare to move forward without SmithSANTA CLARA, Calif. The San Francisco 49ers placed linebacker Aldon Smith on the reserve non-football injury list Monday as he enters rehab for substance abuse and begins what team CEO Jed York has termed an indefinite absence. San Francisco didnt immediately announce a corresponding roster move. Smith played Sunday and had five tackles just two days after he was arrested and jailed Friday morning on suspicion of DUI and marijuana possession. Smith apologized after the 27-7 home loss to the Colts, and now his team moves forward without him heading to St. Louis on Thursday. Smith had previously been arrested on suspicion of DUI in January 2012 in Miami shortly after the 49ers lost in the NFC championship game. He is expected to remain in the Bay Area for treatment.Bills RB Spiller expects to play after hurting legORCHARD PARK, N.Y. Buffalo Bills running back C.J. Spiller doesnt expect an injury to his right leg to keep him from playing against the Baltimore Ravens this weekend. Though still experiencing some soreness, Spiller walked without a limp on Monday. He anticipates he should be good to play Sunday, when Buffalo (1-2) hosts Baltimore (2-1). Spiller was hurt a day earlier on a 2-yard run in the second quarter of a 27-20 loss at the New York Jets. He returned for the start of the third quarter before pulling himself from the game. He was escorted to the locker room with his right leg heavily wrapped. Spiller finished with 9 yards on 10 carries, and a 1-yard catch.Packers release returner Jeremy Ross after muffGREEN BAY, Wis. The Packers have released receiver and return man Jeremy Ross a day after the second-year player muffed a kickoff that set up a touchdown in the wild 34-30 loss to the Bengals. Ross failed to make a significant impact in the return game. BenJarvus Green-Ellis ran for a 2-yard score to give Cincinnati a 14-0 lead on the play after Ross muffed the kickoff early in the first quarter. Ross also fumbled a punt return in the second quarter of the Packers 4531 loss to the 49ers in the NFC playoffs last year. San Francisco recovered and scored three players later.From wire reports COLLEGE FOOTBALL BRIEFSFlorida dealing with red zone issuesAs if it werent bad enough No. 20 Florida lost quarterback Jeff Driskell for the season to a broken leg in a 31-17 win over Tennessee, the Gators are having a dickens of a time getting into the end zone when they move inside the opponents 20-yard line. Florida has been into the red zone 17 times in three games and has come away with just seven touchdowns. Thats 41 percent, which ranks 113th out of 125 FBS teams. Add in the three field goals theyve settled for inside the 20, and that raises their scoring efficiency to 58.8 percent. Only Southern Mississippi, Louisiana-Monroe, SMU and Miami (Ohio) are worse.Miami expects Morris to play against USFCORAL GABLES Miami expects Stephen Morris to play when the 15th-ranked Hurricanes visit winless South Florida on Saturday. Morris was knocked out of Miamis 77-7 win over Savannah State in the first quarter with a lower right leg injury. It was originally thought to be a sprained ankle, though coach Al Golden said Sunday that it subsequently was diagnosed as a bone bruise. Morris was in Miamis training room on Sunday for treatment. Golden says he absolutely thinks Morris will play this weekend. Golden expects that Morris may be limited when Miami (3-0) practices Monday, though is hoping to have him fully ready by Tuesdays workout. Morris backups, Ryan Williams and Gray Crow, completed 17 of 19 passes for 231 yards and three touchdowns in the Savannah State win.Kentucky begins preparations for No. 20 FloridaLEXINGTON, Ky. Kentucky hopes having the weekend off provides energy for the toughest part of its season. The Wildcats (1-2) returned to practice Monday to prepare for Saturday nights Southeastern Conference opener against No. 20 Florida (2-1, 1-0), the first of three straight against ranked league opponents including No. 12 South Carolina next week and No. 1 Alabama on Oct. 12. Saturday also marks the return of former Kentucky coach Joker Phillips, fired last fall after three seasons and now Floridas wide receivers coach. Mark Stoops hiring followed, but the rookie coach doesnt believe that subplot gives the Wildcats added incentive to end a 26-game drought against the Gators. However, Stoops knowledge of Florida that he garnered as Florida States former defensive coordinator has him preparing the Wildcats to be more physical.SEC honors Florida defensive lineman FowlerBIRMINGHAM, Ala. LSU running back Jeremy Hill, Florida defensive lineman Dante Fowler and Arkansas longsnapper Alan DAppollonio are Southeastern Conference players of the week. The SEC announced the winners on Monday. Hill rushed for careerhighs of 184 yards and three touchdowns on 25 carries in a win over Auburn. Fowler won defensive honors by forcing two fumbles and recovering one in a victory over Tennessee. Fowler also had a sack.From wire reports Associated PressGAINESVILLE Florida never really recruited Tyler Murphy. The junior quarterback from Wethersfield, Conn., had scholarship offers from Connecticut, Syracuse and Temple in 2009 when he decided to send his high school highlights about 1,000 miles south to Gainesville. It turned out to be a good move although it took four years, Jacoby Brissetts transfer and Jeff Driskels season-ending leg injury for Murphy to land the starting quarterback job. In between, Murphy had people questioning whether he should change positions and/or schools. It was tough, Murphy said. Sitting on the sidelines is never fun. But sometimes you have to be patient when you come to a big football school like this. Murphys wait ended in the first quarter of Saturdays 31-17 victory against Southeastern Conference rival Tennessee. Driskel broke a bone in his lower right leg against the Volunteers and was scheduled to have surgery Sunday. Murphy took over and performed better than anyone could have predicted. Sure, there were a few hiccups. But Murphy gave the 20th-ranked Gators (2-1, 1-0 SEC) hope that their goals are still within reach. He completed 8 of 14 passes for 134 yards and a touchdown. He also ran for 84 yards and a score as Florida extended its winning streak in the series to nine. It was a solid debut for a career backup who had thrown just one pass in four years and it didnt even count in the stats because it came on a 2-point conversion. It was always in the back of my mind I might never play, but I just kept working hard and just kept fighting, kept faith in myself and kept praying for an opportunity, Murphy said. Luckily, I was able to get it. It wasnt the way I wanted it, you know, but an opportunity is an opportunity. Youve got to make the best of it. Murphy will make his first career start Saturday night at Kentucky, which has dropped 26 in a row in the series. How did Murphy get to this point? Well, it was mostly about fortitude and fortune. Murphy wasnt highly recruited coming out of Wethersfield High School. He had verbally committed to Temple, but also could see what was going on at Florida. Former coach Urban Meyer led the Gators to the 2008 national championship, the programs second in three years, and quarterback Tim Tebow had become a star running the spread-option offense. John Brantley was waiting to take over for Tebow, but the pocket passer hardly fit Meyers scheme. So Murphy sent some game tape to the Gators. A few weeks later, he got a call from offensive coordinator Steve Addazio, who handled recruiting in the northeast, and then another from Meyer. Murphy scheduled a visit and then got a scholarship offer one he accepted on the spot. Florida desperately needed a backup, but coaches felt Murphy wasnt ready as a freshman. He redshirted in 2010, watching from the sideline as tight end Jordan Reed and versatile receiver Trey Burton shared quarterback snaps alongside Brantley. Things got worse for Murphy after Meyer and Addazio left. Driskel and Brissett signed with Florida in 2011, and both immediately jumped Murphy on the depth chart. Murphy went from fourth team in 2011 to third-string quarterback in 2012. Some friends and family members advised him to transfer, and he even considered joining Addazio at Temple. Others suggested he switch positions. I just didnt want to give up, he said. I felt like if I changed positions, I would have gave up on myself and I probably wouldnt have been able to live with myself. Murphy stuck it out, and he became the backup this year when Brissett transferred to North Carolina State. He also got significant work with the first-team offense early in fall practice, while Driskel recovered from an appendectomy. Still, most believed the Gators would be doomed if Driskel got hurt, and it remains to be seen how Murphy will play against better competition. But the poise and presence he showed against the Volunteers were promising signs. One mans misfortune is another mans opportunity, Florida coach Will Muschamp said. Everybody wants it now. Hes a guy thats worked extremely hard and cashed in on his opportunity, and I look forward to seeing him play the rest of the year. Florida turns to Murphy following Driskels injury Associated PressFlorida quarterback Tyler Murphy throws a pass Saturday over Tennessee linebacker Dontavis Sapp during the first half in Gainesville. Bucs head coach also gives Lindell vote of confidence Associated PressFOXBOROUGH, Mass. Kenbrell Thompkins and Aaron Dobson had a huge challenge as the Patriots rookie starting receivers. With veteran Danny Amendola injured, they were replacing Wes Welker and Brandon Lloyd, who combined for 192 catches last year. And no NFL player had more than Welkers 672 receptions over the past six seasons. I just feel like you cant think about it, Dobson said after New England beat the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 23-3 Sunday. You just have to go out there and have fun. Weve been playing this game since we were little kids. Five things to know from the Patriots rout of the Buccaneers: 1. HAVE A LITTLE FAITH: Tom Brady is showing enough faith in his rookies to throw to them in key situations. As if he has a choice. Amendola is sidelined with a groin injury so three of Bradys top four wide receivers are rookies. In the first two games, he completed 20 passes to veteran Julian Edelman. But on Sunday, Thompkins caught his first two touchdown passes and Dobson led the Patriots with seven catches and 54 yards receiving. In their previous game, a 13-10 win over the New York Jets, Brady showed his displeasure with the rookies, raising his hands to his helmet and speaking animatedly on the sideline. Mistakes are going to happen, but you just have to learn from it, Dobson said. He and Thompkins are, after combining for just nine catches in the first two games. Theyve worked really hard to understand what were trying to do, Brady said. We did a good job of adjusting (during the game). 2. UNBEATEN, BUT ... : OK, so the Patriots are 3-0 for the first time in six years. But look who they beat. The Buffalo Bills and New York Jets with rookie quarterbacks. And now the Bucs, who have struggling veteran quarterback Josh Freeman. Not exactly the best teams in the NFL. That changes starting next Sunday with a tough three-game stretch road games at Atlanta and Cincinnati and a home game against New Orleans. Regardless of the opponent, the Patriots are 3-0. Its the best we can be right now, safety Devin McCourty said. Everyone will continue to pick apart what we do well and what we dont do, but coming into the season if you said after the first three games, Where would you want to be? we would want to be 3-0. Weve got to keep building and getting better because the games get harder and harder. 3. WINLESS AND GETTING WORSE: The Bucs lost their first two games by a total of three points, losing on a field goal with 2 seconds left and on another on the final play. On Sunday, they never threatened after Rian Lindells 30-yard field goal late in the first quarter. Now coach Greg Schiano may have to worry about his players attitude. I have great confidence this team will stick together, he said. We have a lot of football to play and I am confident that we will improve and we will win. 4. STICKING WITH EM: Schiano is sticking with Freeman and Lindell despite their shaky performances. Freeman completed 19 of 41 passes for 236 yards and one interception and has connected on 45.7 percent of his passes this year. But Schiano isnt ready to switch to rookie Mike Glennon. Asked if Freeman gives Tampa Bay the best chance to win and whether any consideration was given to pulling him, Schiano said, He does. And, no, there wasnt. But Freeman couldnt come up with big plays. The Bucs managed just three points despite getting inside the Patriots 40 six times. On one of those trips, Lindell missed a 38-yard field goal attempt. I like Rian, Schiano said. I think he is going to be our kicker. 5. TOUGH DEFENSE: The Patriots have allowed 34 points, their fewest through three games since 1979. Former Bucs cornerback Aqib Talib intercepted his third pass of the season in the final minute of the first half, leading to Stephen Gostkowskis 53-yard field goal. Three weeks in a row weve raised our level of play, defensive tackle Vince Wilfork said. Schiano sticking with Freeman Associated PressTampa Bay quarterback Josh Freeman passes Sunday against the New England Patriots in the first half in Foxborough, Mass.

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HEALTH& LIFE Section CTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES Community:George Washington Carver reunion begins Friday/ C6Inside: Cancer & Blood Disease/ C2 Ear, Nose & Throat/ C3 Navigating Cancer/ C2 Taking 10 years off your outlook Can you really take 10 years off of someones appearance with a new set of dentures? I am willing to bet that this is the shortest question I have ever had for publication in the Citrus County Chronicle.That being said, I am going to give the shortest answer I have ever given in the Citrus County Chronicle. Yes (but of course there is more to it). I have seen time and time again a new set of teeth make someone look considerably younger. In fact, just a few weeks ago I wrote a column that mentioned the changes I noticed in a patient of mine who had a set of dentures made. In her case it was a first set of dentures replacing very decayed and unaesthetic teeth. She looked so much younger and more attractive that the boost in confidence was extremely obvious. You might ask, why? There are a lot of reasons for looking years younger. It can be the color of the teeth, the placement of the teeth, the support of the lip, the shape of the teeth, and/or the relationship of the upper and lower jaws. The list goes on and on. I can honestly say I have seen a new set of teeth do more for someones overall facial appearance than even a face lift can do at times. For this to be the case a lot has to do with the age of the patient, the condition of their skin and muscle tone. I bet many people think a trip to the cosmetic surgeon is the best place for a better appearance. Maybe you should talk to your dentist about what he or she can do for you as well. Also, for those of you who do not wear dentures, dont think the same thing does not hold true for you. Cosmetic dentistry can make a huge difference in your appearance. When your appearance is enhanced you usually fell better about yourself and yourOf women in the U.S. age 18 and older:14.2 percent are in fair or poor health44.6 percent do not meet the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity13.6 percent have consumed five or more alcoholic drinks in one day during the past year17.3 percent currently smoke35.9 percent are obese32.8 percent have hypertensionDid you know? Listen up, ladies.In an effort to improve those statistics, and improve the lives of women in Citrus County, the Business Womens Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is hosting its annual Womens Health and Fitness Expo, Saturday at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free. Things you dont want to miss at this years expo 1. Free stuff 2. Spa zoneFrom free admission to goodie bags for the first 500 attendees, you wont walk away empty-handed. Door prizes include a medi-spa package, Jazzercise, travel package, skin care package and exercise equipment, plus lots of swag at the more than 60 exhibitor booths pens, candy, refrigerator magnets, etc. Indulge your senses, lower your stress level and get pampered with a mini massage, mini facial or manicure; experience essential oils therapy and more. Local medical professionals will address topics of interest to women, including: 3. Speaker zoneLaser Treatment for Nail Fungus Womens Heart Health The Healing Power of Low-Level Laser Women & Heart Disease: Know the Facts A Clear Path to a Healthier Lifestyle Flu shots, product samples, demonstrations and free health screenings. Visit the health, fitness and wellness exhibits for everything you need to help you take control of your health and well-being. 4. Well zone 5. Lots of extras Look inside a Nature Coast EMS ambulance (and ask about a career as an EMT or paramedic), do a good deed by donating blood at the LifeSouth Bloodmobile, peek inside the sheriffs FOCUS car and find out how to quit smoking from Tobacco Prevention Specialist Elizabeth Wood with Tobacco Free Florida. See VASCIMINI/ Page C4 Feature content compiled by Nancy Kennedy 000G56T

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It is estimated 238,590 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in the year 2013. Most patients are screened for prostate cancer with a blood test that detects a substance called Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). Screening for PSA has been so successful that most cases of prostate cancer are picked up by this screening test, and patients are being diagnosed at earlier stages of disease, thus their chance of cure is much better. However, there is a concern regarding screening. I hear it every week, Its herbal and I buy it over the counter, it cant be bad for you! This can be very far from the truth. With an increased utilization of herbal therapies, it has been found that a number of these natural supplements may affect the PSA blood test. Most of these herbs are touted as supporters of prostate health. You can see the advertisements on television, read them in the press, and hear them on the radio. Because these herbal therapies are natural supplements, they are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The only requirement is that they do not claim effectiveness against a particular disease. So the manufacturers use vague claims such as supporting male wellness or supporting prostate health. Unfortunately, several of these herbal therapies can also lower the PSA blood test and possibly lead to a delay in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. These herbal remedies include saw palmetto, PC-SPES, lycopene and other combinations of herbs that we call phytoestrogens, or plant like estrogens. As a reader, I hope all of you realize that these natural therapies are medications. They can affect a number of processes within the body. Because they fall under the heading of supplements, they do not undergo the rigorous scientific testing expected of medications approved by the FDA. Also, since they are not regulated, supplements from different companies may have completely different content. In fact, frequently there are variations of concentration of herbal batches from the same company. Many men take these supplements without knowing some of these herbs can affect the PSA blood test used to detect prostate cancer early. There is a possibility some of these medications will cause a delay in diagnosis of prostate cancer. It is important for your physician to know if you are taking these therapies because they may place less reliance on the traditional values used for normal PSA. Also, they may place more importance on regular prostate physical examinations. If there is a slight trend upward in the PSA, even when it is in the normal range, your physician may be more likely to recommend a biopsy to rule out a cancer. If you are taking supplements, your physician needs to know, and the normal thresholds used by physicians for further evaluation may need to be changed when patients are using therapies that may cause a decrease in the PSA. And, for those patients treated for prostate cancer with surgery or radiation, using herbal therapies without the knowledge of your physician may cause them to make false assumptions of effectiveness of a conventional therapy. This may cause a delay in the evaluation of recurrence of prostate cancer and the institution of appropriate therapy. I know I have said this many times before, but always discuss the utilization of unconventional medical therapies with your physician. This will allow informed recommendations to be made for management of your condition. Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a boardcertified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett @rboi.com.C2TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE 000FM9D Founders Sponsor: Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 Reception 6 p.m. Dinner and Dueling Piano Show 7 p.m. Tickets available online www.CF.edu/Foundation College of Central Florida Citrus Learning and Conference Center 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461-9026 All proceeds to benefit STEPS to CF, Scholarships Taking Elementary Promising Students to CF in Citrus County For more information call the CF Foundation 352-873-5808 Media Sponsor: B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, P.A. Joseph Starnes, P.A. 000FYM4 000FXJC OCTOBER 24-26, 2013 TOTAL NET PROCEEDS BENEFIT: Three-Day General Admission Ticket: $65 Single-Day Advanced Ticket $25General Admission & Reserved Tickets available at CRYSTAL NISSANLimited 3-day or One-Day Reserved Tickets available.includes reserved up front reserved seat, complimentary foodFOR TICKET SALES AND EVENT INFORMATIONCall 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com FOR CAMPING CALLROCK CRUSHER CANYON RV PARK352-564-9350 Excessive coffee drinking could prove hazardous As per one statistic, more than half of adult Americans drink coffee every day. In moderation, drinking coffee can help, but some drink a cup of coffee every few hours. Whether coffee drinking is harmful or not, is heavily debated. Most researchers believe that occasional coffee drinking or drinking in moderation daily does not hurt. The question is, what about those who drink coffee heavily? At the least, heavy caffeine use on the order of four to seven cups of coffee a day can cause problems such as restlessness, anxiety, irritability and sleeplessness, particularly in susceptible individuals. Recent study suggests those who drink four cups of coffee a day or 28 a week have more chance of death. As far as I know, this is the first such study to suggest that heavy coffee consumption increases death rate from all causes. In this latest study, which was published online Aug. 15 in theMayo Clinic Proceedings, lead investigator Dr. Junxiu Liu(University of South Carolina, Columbia) and colleagues assessed the data from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. The retrospective analysis included almost 44,000 participants who were followed for 17 years, during which time 2,512 deaths occurred. Of these deaths, one-third were the result of cardiovascular disease. Remember, a cup of coffee as measured is an 8-ounce cup, and not the supersized 20ounce cups typical of Starbucks and other coffee chains. The risk was highest among men and women younger than 55. This study has many limitations it is retrospective, and it included subset analysis that is not ideal. There was some strength in the study a large number of participants who were followed for a long time. There are lots of studies about coffee consumption. High consumption of unfiltered coffee is associated with mild elevations in cholesterol levels. And another study found that two or more cups of coffee a day can increase the risk of heart disease in people with a specific and fairly common genetic mutation that slows the breakdown of caffeine in the body. So, how quickly you metabolize coffee may affect your health risk. In some other studies, moderate consumption of coffee may protect against diabetes and Parkinsons disease. In short, the study is not conclusive. The debate about health effects of coffee will not be placed to rest by this study. In, my opinion, there is nothing harmful to drinking one to two cups of coffee a day, but avoid drinking four cups or more every day of the week.Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampa bay.rr.com or call 352-746-0707. Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER HEALTH NOTES Herbal treatments may affect PSA Access Health Care sets seriesSPRING HILL Access Health Care, LLC announces the following lecture will be held during the month of October. Oct. 3 Diabetes:A preventable disease Oct. 17 Weight reduction:Awareness is the first step Oct. 31 Food of Life:Your choice can change it all All lectures are at 5:15p.m. at Access Health Cares main office at 5350 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill, and are conducted by Maria Scunziano-Singh, M.D. Dr. Scunziano-Singhs practice focuses on combining traditional medicine with holistic treatments to maximize patients health care and nutrition. For information and to register, 352-688-8116.Register for We Can WeekendRobert Boissoneault Oncology Institute (RBOI) will feature speakers Patrick Acevedo, M.D., medical oncologist with Florida Cancer Specialists; Torr Carmain, M.D., with Inverness Surgical Association; and motivational speaker Donald Prendergast at the 15th We Can Weekend in Citrus County. This years event is Sept.28 at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club from 8 a.m. to noon. Lunch, prizes, booths to visits and refreshments are included in the event. The We Can Weekend is presented for individuals who have been diagnosed with cancer and their families to have support and the latest information on cancer treatment and prevention. Registration is free, but you should call RBOI at 352-527-0106 by Sept. 25 to register. See NOTES/ Page C4

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R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low, M.D., self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-563-5182. Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S.19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352220-1959. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.41. 6 p.m. Mondays at Club Recovery, corner of County Road 486 and Anvil Terrace, Hernando. Crystal River AFG: 8p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Lecanto AFG: 8p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous: If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-6210599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. 10:30a.m. Sundays, 10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chassahowitzka Community Center, 1mile west of U.S.19 on Miss Maggie Drive, turn left, two blocks. AC Group, 7p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilitator, at 352688-7744. Caregivers Support and Information meeting, 1p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Peg Weston, financial associate for Thrivent Financial, will be guest speaker. Call Gail Sirak at 352-795-1618 for directions/information. Refreshments served. OCALA Ocala Health Stroke Support Group meets 9:30 to 11:30a.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Senior Wellness Community Center (9850 S.W. 84th Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call 800-530-1188 to register. Alzheimers caregiver support group 3 p.m. fourth Tuesday monthly at Crystal Gem Manor, 10845 W. Gem St., Crystal River, facilitated by Debbie OLeary, a group leader trained by the Alzheimers Family Organization. Call 352-794-7601. Respite care available. Alzheimers caregiver support group 2 p.m. the last Thursday monthly at Highland Terrace ALF, 700 Medical Court E., Inverness, facilitated by Debbie OLeary, a group leader trained by the Alzheimers Family Organization. Call 352-860-2525. Respite care available. Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. The Citrus Memorial Diabetes Support Group, 10:30a.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly on the campus of Citrus Memorial Health System in the auditorium. Call Amy Freeman at 352341-6110. No reservation is required. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Suncoast Chapter, Cancer Support Group (including Multiple Myeloma), 6p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no charge and light refreshments are provided. Contact: Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient services manager, at 813-9636461 ext.11, Lourdes.Arvelo @lls.org or visit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society website at www.lls.org. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. Call Bevin Brayton at 352-3029066. Look Good ... Feel Better, a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-341-7741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. PINELLAS PARK Connections fireside-discussion-style support group for cancer patients, 7p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727343-0600; www.wellspring oncology.org. SPRING HILL Stroke Support Group noon the fourth Thursday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Pam McDonald at 352-346-6359. Celiac/Gluten Sensitivity Support Group meeting for all people who have celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, 10a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday monthly, returning Sept.28, in the Community Room at the Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Ken Kral at 352-684-4064 or Marcia Treber at 352-794-3217. SPRING HILL Amputee support group 7p.m. the last Monday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Eva Baker at 352592-7232. Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-5274600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer Institute-New Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 C3 Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000G4UF 000FXD3 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330 Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Fast Braces Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open Fridays Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! $ 150 00 Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion? FREE Consultation With the Dentist Senior Citizens Discount (Ask For Details) Value $ 215 EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS $ 1,995 000G0LF Fall allergy season brings ragweed to forefront Most people, when they think of allergies, think of the spring season, but the fall allergy season can be just as nasty as the spring. Since we live in Florida, we experience pollen season year round. There are times when the pollen count is down. All the rain we have had recently will knock the airborne pollen count down but the additional water can contribute to faster growth and production of more pollen and a longer bloom, which interprets to more days of suffering. The big three fall pollen culprits are ragweed, mold and dust mites. Ragweed pollen season which is more widespread in the northeast, Midwest, northern plain states as well as out west can be here in the south but to a lesser degree between July and November. The peak pollen release is midAugust until the first frost, which as we know can be well into December/January around here. About 75 million Americans suffer with ragweed allergy. It is a difficult one to avoid because it is in the air out of doors. There are some simple measures that you can utilize which will help wash your hands, take a shower and shampoo your hair before bed, and keep your windows closed. Nasal rinses and antihistamines are helpful, and so are allergy shots. Mold is the second big fall allergen. We know Florida is very humid and mold is everywhere, indoors and out. It, too, is very difficult to escape. It peaks in July in the warmer states and in the northern states it peaks a little bit later because of deciduous tree leaves becoming rotten and decomposing, as well as rotting limbs and logs and plants; they have a little bit more of a problem than we do down here in Florida. The things that you can do for ragweed avoidance are also helpful for mold. Make sure when you are out of doors mowing the lawn, use a dust mask and keep your yard cleaned up of debris that can decompose and turn into mold pollen. Dust mites are the third big culprit for fall allergies. They are tiny little critters that love to live in house dust and they multiply and live happily in more humid places like Florida. Not only are they a big problem in the fall, but here in Florida, they are a problem nearly year round. Patients who have respiratory problems such as asthma can also be affected by these little bugs. Because they are very small, these little microscopic bugs can easily get collected in porous surfaces such as fabric, so pillows, mattresses, carpeting, upholstered furniture is a big collection site for these bugs. Their concentrations will stay high until about December when the humidity starts changing around and until that time it is a good idea to have a clean home, good filters on the air conditioner, vacuum frequently with a HEPA filter and when dusting use a type of apparatus that holds the dust or use a damp cloth and you can buy encasements for pillows and mattresses that will not let the dust mites escape. Bed linens should be washed in hot water at least once a week to keep the dust mites to a low level.Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit Crystal CommunityENT.com. Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS WEEKLY SUPPORT MEETINGS MONTHLY SUPPORT GROUPS Alzheimers Association-Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352-6884537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alzsupport.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz.org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_ lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. See SUPPORT / Page C4 See WEEKLY / Page C4

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Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: It Works How and Why, noon to 1p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Mens RAW (Recovery at Work) Mens Meeting, 7 to 8p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8p.m. Monday; 8 to 9p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Parsons Point Road, Hernando. Women United Ladies Meeting, 6:30 to 7:30p.m. Thursday Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352-508-1604. Information about NA is also available at NatureCoastNA.org. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Tuesdays at Club Recovery, corner of County Road 486 and Anvil Terrace, Hernando. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777.C4TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE SPECIAL GENERAL REVENUE ENTERPRISE TOTAL FUND FUND FUND BUDGET ESTIMATED REVENUES & SOURCES TAXES: Millage Per $1,000 Ad Valorem Taxes @4.5 mills 275,234 275,234 Sales and Use Taxes 243,247 28,328 271,575 Charges for Service 56,869 446,087 502,956 Intergovernmental 47,122 15,199 62,321 Permits, fees & Special Assessments 127,993 127,993 Fines and Forfeitures 3,000 3,000 Miscellaneous 4,895 109 600 5,604 Fund Balance 176,554 97,000 320,252 593,806 TOTAL REVENUES & SOURCES $ 934,914 $ 140,636 $ 766,939 $ 1,842,489 Fund Balances/Reserves/net Assets 580,927 7,952 371,860 960,739 TOTAL REVENUES AND BALANCES $ 1,515,841 $ 148,588 $ 1,138,799 $ 2,803,228 EXPENDITURES/ EXPENSES: General Government 247, 219 247,219 Public Safety 527,703 527,703 Culture and Recreation 35,290 35,290 Transportation 126,900 126,900 Physical Environment 641,939 641,939 Contingency 124,702 13,736 125,000 263,438 TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES $ 934,914 $ 140,636 $ 766,939 $ 1,842,489 Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets 580,927 7,952 371,860 960,739 TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES & RESERVES $ 1,515,841 $ 148,588 $ 1,138,799 $ 2,803,228 THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND /OR FINAL BUDGET ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD. PUBLICATION DATE SEPT. 24th, 2013 000G68P BUDGET SUMMARY TOWN OF INGLIS-FISCAL YEAR 2013/2014 THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE TOWN OF INGLIS ARE 30.379 % LESS THAN LAST YEARS TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES. 0924 TUCRN 000G6890924-TUCRNNOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe Town of Inglis has tentatively adopted a budget for 2013/2014 A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on: September 26th, 2013 6:00 PM At Commission Room, Town of Inglis 135 Hwy. 40 West, Inglis Florida 34449 000G5YW So you know: T he information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. confidence level gets a boost. Whether natural teeth or dentures, your dentist can make a significant change for the better if you give him or her a chance. Go ahead and make that call.Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@MasterpieceDental Studio.com. VASCIMINIContinued from Page C1 Hospice of Citrus presents grief workshopHospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast will present Grief Mythology from 2 to 3:30p.m. Wednesday, Sept.25, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center located at 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. There is no one right way to grieve, no timetable; and the ups and downs during grieving can be unpredictable. This workshop will explore a variety of myths about grief and loss. For information on this special event, or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500 or 866-642-0962. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Facebook or on the Web at www.hospice ofcitrus.org.Oak Hill Partners Club set upcoming eventsSPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events. The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital.com. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco and Citrus County residents for $20 a year, which includes membership in the HCA national H2U program. Sept. 26 Smoking Cessation Support 1 p.m. Sept. 28 Suncoast Drive School 8:30 a.m. Oak Hill Partners Club set upcoming eventsOak Hill Hospital plans seminar in Homosassa SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospitals For Your Health Community Education Series from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, will present a panel discussion titled, Comprehensive Care for Women of All Ages at the First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. The panel will feature Alene Wright, M.D., breast and general surgeon, and Marc Polecritti, D.O., of the Julian Institute of Plastic Surgery. Dr. Wright will discuss the gene test for breast and ovarian cancer. Dr. Polecritti will offer reconstructive surgical options for breast cancer patients. Admission is free and a complimentary hot meal will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus or register online at OakHillHospital.com/ ForYourHealth. Workshops slated at womens health expoFive mini-workshops are being offered as an added benefit for attendees at the free Womens Health and Fitness Expo, hosted by the Business Womens Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. This years expo will be from 9a.m. to 2p.m. Saturday, Sept.28, at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River. The first 30-minute session will begin at 9:30 a.m., with the final session beginning at 12:30p.m. Speakers scheduled so far include: Carlos Rodriguez, M.D.: Laser Treatment for Nail Fungus (sponsored by Genesis Womens Center Med Spa) Roxanne Maldunas, R.N.: Womens Heart Health (sponsored by Citrus Memorial Heart & Vascular Center) Dr. Kevin Hoffman, D.C.: The Healing Power of Low-level Laser (sponsored by Citrus Chiropractic Group) Gregory von Mering, M.D.: Women & Heart Disease: Know the Facts (sponsored by Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center) Judi Tear, public information officer, DOH: 3x3 A Clear Path to a Healthier Lifestyle (sponsored by the Florida Department of Health Citrus County) Presenting sponsor is Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center. Major sponsors are Advanced Urology Specialists; Citrus Memorial Health System; Genesis Womens Center & Medical Spa; Tobacco Free Florida of the Citrus County Health Department; and Florida Cancer Specialists. Media sponsors are theCitrus County Chronicleand Citrus 95/Classic Hits the Fox. A number of other businesses also are sponsoring at varying lower levels. Proceeds fund scholarships for female high school and Withlacoochee Technical Institute students. In seven years, $43,000 in scholarships has been awarded to Citrus County students. Call 352-795-3149 or visit www.citrus countychamber.com. SHARE club to host womens health panelThe Citrus Memorial Health System SHARE Club is offering a free Womens Health Panel at 5p.m. Monday, Sept.30, in the Auditorium on the main hospital campus. Cardiac Cath Lab Manager C.J. Hosea, Obstetrician/Gynecologist Dr.Armando Rojas and others will present a special Q & A discussion about womens health including menopause, thyroid disease, diabetes, gynecological procedures, incontinence and heart health. The floor will then open for questions from the audience. Refreshments and educational materials will be available during the discussion. Seating is limited so an RSVP is required to attend. Register online at www.citrusmh.com/events. Upcoming blood drives in Citrus CountyLifeSouth Community Blood Centers: With summer upon us, theres a sharp increase in the need for blood. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30a.m. to 5p.m. weekdays (7p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30a.m. to 2p.m. Saturdays and 10a.m. to 2p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 2629 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, open from 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. weekdays, (6:30p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays), 8a.m. to 5p.m. Saturdays and 10a.m. to 5p.m. Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.24, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, AAA Roofing, 1000 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River. Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, Sumter Electric Cooperative, U.S. 301 and Sumter County Road 471, Sumterville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Inverness. 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, Business Womens Alliance Womens Health and Fitness Expo, 8551 W. Venable St., Crystal River. 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, Walmart Supercenter, 3826 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Inverness. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30, College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. NOTESContinued from Page C2 Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-for-profit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. RBOI Prostate Cancer Support Group: 11:30a.m. the second Wednesday monthlyat Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, 522 N. Lecanto Highway. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext.213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-5274389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext.6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352-229-4202 or Sue at 352560-7918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352-344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-642-0962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. SUPPORTContinued from Page C3 WEEKLYContinued from Page C3

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Scouts car washBoy Scout Troop 462 will have a car wash from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday at Bay Area Air Conditioning & Heating, 8021 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.Benefit for K-9sThe public is invited to attend the 832 K-9s Deputy Dogs 12th annual fundraiser from 4 to 10 p.m. Saturday at the Plantation on Crystal River. The gala will off an evening of fun with dinner and music, awards, prizes and the not-sosilent auction. Karen Ann Wilson will be signing her new book, Wrinkles in Time. Attendees may even get a sloppy kiss or two from some of the heroic bloodhounds that will be there with their handlers from across the U.S. Tickets are $50 per person, available online at www.deputydogs.org, by mailing 11565 E. Gulf-toLake Highway, Inverness, FL 34450, or by calling 352-382-5486.Save the ShelterThe Humane Society of Citrus Countys $10 Poker Run and Benefit to Save the Shelter will be Sunday, Oct. 6. Sign in at 10 a.m. at Heads & Tails Lounge, 9211 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Kickstands go up at 11 a.m.; the benefit begins at noon. Stops will be at Thunder Inn, Sparrows Tavern, CC Riders MC of Citrus County, Mikes Friendly Pub and ending at Heads & Tails Lounge for a fundraiser and party. Barbecue and steak dinners are $5 each. Entertainment will be by the Soggy Bottom Bait Shop Boys. There will be a silent auction, 50/50 drawing and raffles. For information, call Chrissy at 352-642-3429.Camp to do mealEckerd E-Nini-Hassee, a not-for-profit organization for at-risk girls, will host its annual spaghetti dinner from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7027 E. Stage Coach Trail, Floral City. Donations are $8 per person, which includes salad, bread, spaghetti (with assorted homemade sauces), dessert and drink. Call 352-726-3883 for more information.Poker run comingThe Cooter Scooter Poker Run will take place Saturday, Oct. 12, starting and ending at the Inverness VFW at 906 State Road 44 E. The schedule is: 8:30 a.m. Breakfast and registration at the Inverness VFW. 10 a.m. Kickstands up. 5 p.m. Prize winners announced (must be present). 3 to 7 p.m. Party with Soggy Bottom Bait Shop Boys at the end of the Freedom Run. Cost of $10 per person includes one poker hand ($5 extra hand). Tickets are on sale at Citrus County veterans organizations. All net proceeds received from the city of Inverness will be placed in the VFW Post 4337 Veterans Relief Fund to benefit local homeless/needy veterans and families. The event is open to everyone, not just veterans. Bikes and cars are welcome. For more information, call Victor at 352220-3487. Special to the ChronicleThe St. Martins Marsh Aquatic Preserve and the Citrus County School Districts Marine Science Station invites the public to celebrate National Estuaries Day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The community event will include guided boat rides, childrens activities, a hike up a 60-foot estuary observation tower, as well as walking tours of waterfront educational and research facilities. Due to limited available parking, visitors must meet at the Crystal River Preserve State Park at 3266 N. Sailboat Ave. Crystal River, for vehicle parking. Guided boat rides will take visitors to the Marine Science Station and back to the Crystal River Preserve State Park throughout the duration of the event. If necessary, limited disabled access parking will be available at the Marine Science Station,12646 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. For more information, contact Jamie Letendre via email at Jamie.Letendre@dep.state.fl.us or phone at 352-563-0450. This event is free to the public. Bird walk set at Rainbow SpringsCitrus County Audubon president Fred Hileman will lead a birding walk beginning at 8 a.m. from the Rainbow Springs State Park parking lot Saturday. Participants will meet in the parking lot, where there can be migrating warblers busily feeding on insects in the tree tops, and continue to the springhead where egrets, anhingas, cormorants and other water birds can be found; then on to the Butterfly Garden. The walk will last approximately two to three hours. Pre-registration is not necessary and participants with all levels of birding skills are welcome. Bring water, binoculars and wear comfortable walking shoes, as it will involve some moderate walking. No RSVP is necessary. A few pairs of binoculars are available for use. The regular $2 admission fee to the park applies. Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunnellon is at 19158 S.W. 81st Place Road. Retired law officers group to meetThe National Association of Retired Law Enforcement Officers will begin a new season at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at American Legion Post 155, 6585 E. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. NARLEO is open to both active and retired law enforcement officers, including federal and state agents, probation, parole and corrections officers. Bring law enforcement ID. Meetings are the fourth Thursday monthly. For more information, call Andrew J. Tarpey at 352-344-9313.Doll club to get togetherThe Central Florida Sugar Babes Doll Club will open its 2013-14 year Wednesday at the Central Community Center, Room 115. This facility is off County Road 491 behind Diamond Ridge onvalescent Facility. The meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., followed by lunch at the Main Street Restaurant in Beverly Hills. The September program will be a discussion of the annual UFDC Convention, which took place in Washington, D.C. Three club members will share the programs and activities from the convention. The club welcomes visitors. Sugar Babes Doll Club is a member of the United Federation of Doll Clubs. For information, call Laurie at 352-382-2299 or Barbara at 352-344-1423.View forgotten flick ThursdayThe Forgotten Film Festivals last of its September movies will be shown at 3 p.m. Thursday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida Ave. (County Road 41), Citrus Springs. Everyone is welcome; a $3 donation is appreciated. Salmon Fishing in Yemen will be the offering. A fisheries expert is approached by a consultant to help realize a sheiks vision of bringing the sport of fly-fishing to the desert and embarks on an upstream journey of faith and fish to prove the impossible possible. Cast: Amr Waked, Emily Blunt and Ewan McGregor. For more information, call 352-465-4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.Guided archaeo-eco kayak tour Join the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) and the St. Martins Marsh Aquatic Preserve for a guided kayak tour from 9 a.m. to noon Friday. Come learn about the local environment and archeology of the Crystal River and its tributaries. The tour departs at 9 a.m. from the kayak launch at the Crystal River Preserve State Park, 3266 N. Sailboat Ave., Crystal River. Kayaks are available for a $20 donation or bring your own. Space is limited. Call Jeff Moates at 813-396-2327 for more information and to reserve a space. Audition to sing anthem at rodeoThe Citrus Stampede Rodeo will take place Nov. 22 and 23. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. Do you have what it takes to sing the national anthem at the Citrus Stampede Rodeo? Enter the karaoke contest from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at Mamas Kuntry Kafe, 1787 W. Main St., Inverness. Signup begins at 4:30 p.m. Guidelines for the contest are: Participants must sing the National Anthem. All singers may bring their own karaoke disc with graphics. Amateur participation only. Participants will only sing one song, unless a tiebreaker is needed. The judges decision is final. For more information, call 352-527-5700.Reiki group gathers at libraryReiki Gentle Touch Circle meets from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Homosassa Library. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call 352-628-5537. COMMUNITYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 C5 NEWS NOTES Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed September 2013 as Senior Center Month in Citrus County. Senior community centers have acted as a catalyst for mobilizing the creativity, energy, vitality and commitment of the older residents of Citrus County. Through the wide array of services, programs and activities, senior community centers empower older citizens of Citrus County to contribute to their own health and well-being and the health and well-being of their fellow citizens of all ages. The programs offered at these centers affirm the dignity, self-worth and independence of older persons by facilitating their decisions and actions, tapping their experiences, skills and knowledge, and enabling their continued contributions to the community. For more information about senior centers in our community, please call 352-527-5975. Back, from left are: Commissioners John JJ Kenney, Rebecca Bays, Dennis Damato, Scott Adams and Joe Meek, with senior centers participants from across Citrus County. Senior Center Month Explore locally on estuaries day FUNDRAISERS 000FX98 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS 000E4ZX 000G4NC 000FMDW Citrus County Auditorium Citrus County Fairgrounds U.S. 41 S., Inverness Sale Hours Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation No admission charge for the following Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day) Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3 a bag) Great bargains in recycled reading! Thousands of best sellers, large print, crafts, cooking, health, childrens, travel, CDs, DVDs, games, puzzles, treasures, etc. Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region, Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and Citrus County Library System. www.foccls.org For book sale information call 746-1334 or 527-8405 Sept 27 thru Oct 1 Friends of the Library MEGA BOOK SALE Fundraiser 000FGPR

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. NEW NOTES Research jobs at mallWorkforce Connections Mobile Resource Unit will be at Crystal River Mall from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday. The 40-foot mobile resource unit (MRU) known as MOBY1 will be available to assist job seekers. Selfservice and staff-supported services include: search and apply for jobs; resume assistance; research careers; information about workshops and job fairs; information about workforce connection services. For details, call 800-434-5627, ext. 1933.CASA bunco party slated Oct. 13In conjunction with Domestic Violence awareness Month in October, Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA) will host a Bunco Blast fundraiser Sunday, Oct. 13, at Catholic Charities Community Center Outreach, 9020 W. Atlas Drive, Homosassa. Doors open at 12:15 p.m. and games begin at 1. Cost is $12 per person, a nonrefundable charitable donation. Refreshments, game prizes and door prizes are included. Make reservations by calling Janet at 352-527-2304 or emailing janetb195@ gmail.com. All proceeds will go to CASA for victims of domestic violence.Westend Market to be SaturdayThe Crystal River Mall Westend Market (old Sears location) will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. This is an indoor fresh market with produce and other local food-related items, plants and handmade arts and crafts. It is an outdoor market experience inside an air-conditioned facility. All vendors must register with the mall office by calling 352-795-2585 and supply their own setups and pay the vendor fee. This is a free event for the public. Also in the mall, from 1 to 4 p.m., Roger Carrier provides music for listening and dancing. He has more than 170,000 songs in his karaoke library and everyone is welcome to participate.Camera Club to do workshopThe Citrus County Art Center Camera Club, 2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Hernando, will have a workshop at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30. It will be a hands-on workshop covering macro and close-up photography. Participants will need a camera to photograph the different presentations prepared by Pete Gumaskas and Dick Coffman. They will also assist anyone needing help in taking photos. This workshop will be in preparation for the following photo competition on Monday, Oct. 7, Photographing Anything Smaller than a Dollar. The workshop will be helpful to anyone taking part in the October competition. The workshop is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. First-time guests are welcome. Anyone wishing to become a club member after the first visit may call the Art Center at 352-400-4466.Chickin BBQ set for SaturdayVoiture & Cabane 1219 will present its third annual Chickin BBQ from 2 to 7 p.m. Saturday at American Legion Post 155, 6586 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Menu includes one-half chicken, baked beans and coleslaw for $7. Help raise money for the Citrus County Youth Sports Program. There will be games set up inside and outside and a TV at the back bar to watch college football games. There will also be a 50/50 raffle. Everyone is invited. For more information, call Larry Pine, local Voiture 1219 youth sports director, at 352-563-5451. Cruising for a CauseEnjoy cruising with friends while supporting local seniors on Royal Caribbeans Freedom Of The Seas seven-night Eastern Caribbean Cruise. The cruise leaves from Port Canaveral Oct. 20 and visits Coco Cay, St. Thomas and St. Maarten. Passports are required. Proceeds benefit the Senior Foundation of Citrus County and the Citrus County Meals on Wheels Program. For more information about prices and to book a cruise, call 352-628-0668. COMMUNITYPage C6TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Precious Paws ADOPTABLES Pretty tabbies Special to the ChronicleSeveral young adult tabbies, both male and female, are available for adoption. All are sweet and social, a few are lap trained and others just want to be your best friend. Most tolerate dogs and all are used to being with other cats. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center has new hours. We are open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Our Floral City adoption center at Gretas Touch on U.S. 41 is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Visit www.preciouspawsflorida.com or call 352-726-4700. Special to the ChronicleThe George Washington Carver reunion, which begins Friday and runs all weekend, will be a fundraising event for the George Washington Carver Community Center building as construction continues. The public is invited to attend the festivities. The opening ceremonies for Coming Home 2013 will begin with a meet-and-greet at 5 p.m., followed by a block party from 6 to 11 p.m. Fridayat the Marjorie Copeland residence, 673 N.E. Second St., Crystal River. There will be a 5K (3.1-mile) Walk to Succeed from 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday, followed by a picnic from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Copeland Park. The reunion will conclude Sunday at worship services at 11 a.m. at Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church, 2105 Georgia Road, Crystal River. For more information, call Edna Foster at 352-795-2746. Coming Home 2013 Reunion raising funds for George Washington Carver center National Public Lands Day Special to the ChronicleJoin the Florida Department of Environmental Protections Crystal River Preserve State Park from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday for the National Public Lands Day Project. Meet at Churchhouse Hammock Trailhead for maintenance and trail improvement. Volunteers will expand and mulch the primitive trail, trim trees in public use and the picnic areas, reset landscape timbers, plant native species in the area and remove weeds from signage areas. Bring water, gloves, sunscreen, bug spray and a snack, if desired. Wear long pants, a hat and sturdy, closed-toed shoes. Lunch will be provided as a thankyou for supporting National Public Lands Day. To learn more about National Public Lands Day at Churchhouse Hammock, visit www.floridastate parks.org/crystalriverpreserve/ events.cfm, or www.publiclands day.org. To learn more about the park, visit www.floridastateparks. org/crystalriverpreserve. Volunteers sought to clean up Churchhouse Hammock Trail Allan ONeal and Lindas monthly dances out at the Citrus County Builders Association Banquet Hall are on hold for now, but will resume in the near future. The couple are a most delightful team. Allan provides the music, taking requests. Dance lessons are provided free. Linda prepares sumptuous snacks, including succulent Swedish meatballs, relish trays, fresh fruit trays, crackers and dips, and mouthwatering desserts. Coffee, tea and soft drinks are provided for a small fee. Their stated goal is to provide a form of entertainment that retirees can afford; a place where friends meet friends and socialize and learn different dances. The floor is usually crowded with dancers doing the Electric Slide, romantic waltz numbers, the chacha and smooth tangos. Allan is a gifted artist who sings all of the songs we love to hear, songs made famous by such artists as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Barbra Streisand, Tony Orlando and Dawn, Patsy Cline, Elvis, Jim Reeves and others. Linda always decorates the hall and the tables with an inviting theme. I attended a patriotic dance this summer and, just last month, a fall dance. Allan sang one of my favorite songs, More, then the crowd took to the floor for his medley of waltzes. Soon we heard Allans rendition of Elvis Presleys Good Luck Charm and Lou Rawls Youre Gonna Miss My Lovin. Next, he favored the cha-cha fans with a medley. Al Martinos Spanish Eyes filled the dance floor and the dancers lingered around for The Way You Look Tonight. Picking up the pace with Kansas City, Here I Come for the rockers crowd, we waited for Keith Whitleys Dont Close Your Eyes before we ventured out on the floor. The line dancers took to the floor in abandon, some still learning from others. Ole Time Rock and Roll, a perennial favorite, saw dancers showing off their 1950s routines in wild enthusiasm. The hauntingly beautiful Its All in the Game and Maria from West Side Story slowed the pace and saw still others enjoying the dance. Bad, Bad Leroy Brown and Bobby Darins Mack the Knife are always crowd-pleasing dance numbers. Englebert Humperdincks After the Lovin saw smooth romantic dance form at its finest. We Are Family brought out a variety of moves followed by some Proud Mary energy-filled routines. Slowing down a bit with Ray Prices hit Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me, was a relief to those needing to catch their breath. Following a great Electric Slide piece and Begin the Beguine, it was time to thank Allan and Linda for a lovely way to spend an evening. Coming soon, Lindas Event Solutions will hold a Brides Luncheon and wedding informational event at the hall Nov. 2, with a free lunch for prospective brides. Vendors will be on hand to provide information about the services they offer for upcoming weddings.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY Local pair offer fun times at social dances ERYN WORTHINGTON/ChronicleInverness Sertoma member Barry Pendry presented Citrus Resources for Exceptional Students in Transition (CREST) in Lecanto a check for $100. Principal Lee Mulder was contacted by the Inverness Sertoma Club about wanting to Adopt a Class. Mulder held a drawing at the beginning of the day Sept. 18 with students to see which class would be adopted. Proudly accepting the donation was Bradley Pughs second-grade class. Pictured front, from left, are: Brandon Segarra, Lyle Poling and Connor Ramsey. In back, from left, are: Pugh, Pendry, Mulder and teachers aide Lisa Grotjahn. Donation to CREST

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 C7CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.Alexandre Dumas, the father, not his son, said, All human wisdom is summed up in two words wait and hope. At the bridge table, one wishes that all wisdom isnt summed up in two words play and hope. Yes, you will often be hoping for the best, but ideally you find a 100 percent line of play or defense. In yesterdays deal, declarer had two chances to make his contract. Todays is similar. South is in six hearts. West leads the club queen. What are declarers two chances? How should he play to combine them? Norths two-no-trump response was the Jacoby Forcing Raise, guaranteeing at least fourcard heart support and game-going values. Souths three-spade rebid indicated a singleton (or void) in that suit. Then, after two control-bids (cue-bids), North made a very aggressive jump to slam. If you bid the spots off the cards, you had better play them off, too and get lucky. South can see two possible losers: one diamond and one club. He has only 11 top tricks: one spade, six hearts, one diamond, two clubs and a spade ruff in South, the shorter trump hand. Declarers first thought is probably that the diamond finesse needs to work. But he might also find clubs 3-3. And that should be tried first. South takes the first trick, draws trumps, and plays two more rounds of clubs. Here, they divide evenly and declarer can claim, stating that he will discard one of dummys diamonds on his last club. But if the clubs were not 3-3, the diamond finesse would still be available. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 P o liti cs N a ti on (N)H ar db a ll With Ch r i s Matthews (N) All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (N) Th e R ac h e l M a dd ow Show (N) Th e L as t W or d With Lawrence ODonnell All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Doomsday Castle Doomsday CastleSnake Salvation Snake Salvation Snake Salvation Snake Salvation Doomsday Castle (N) Snake Salvation Snake Salvation (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.VictoriousDrakeNick Full HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Beverlys Full HouseBeverlys Full HouseThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, Nots (OXY) 44 123 BGC: Miami BGC: Miami BGC: Miami My Big Fat RevengeBGC: Miami My Big Fat Revenge (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Mandela and de Klerk (1997) Sidney Poitier. (In Stereo) PG-13 LT: The Life and Times MA, L Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic (2013) NR Web Therapy Dexter MA (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ink Master Allies become enemies. PG Ink Master Baby Dont Go Ink Master Skulls and Villains Ink Master Eyelid tattoos. Ink Master Heroes & Heads (N) Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. (STARZ) 370 271 370 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (2012) Jennifer Garner. (In Stereo) PG The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA Here Comes the Boom (2012, Comedy) Kevin James. (In Stereo) PG (SUN) 36 31 36 Inside the Rays Rays Live! (N) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees. From Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. (N) (Live) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays FOX Sports Live (N) (Live) (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009, Action) Channing Tatum. PG-13 Face Off Face Off Artists create iconic characters. Fangasm Beam Me Up, Stan Face Off Artists create iconic characters. (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldClevelandFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35Black Widow Roxie Hart (1942) Ginger Rogers. NR Zero for Conduct (1933) NR LAtalante (1934, Romance) Jean Dast. NR Grand Illusion (1937) Pierre Fresnay. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia: The Devils Cut (N) Amish Mafia (N) (In Stereo) Tickle (N) Tickle (N) Amish Mafia (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Toddlers & TiarasCoupleCouple19 Kids-Count19 Kids19 KidsCoupleCouple19 Kids19 Kids (TMC) 350 261 350 See Girl Run NR Apollo 18 (2011) Lloyd Owen. (In Stereo) PG-13 Halloween: Resurrection (2002) Jamie Lee Curtis.Barricade (2012) Eric McCormack. (In Stereo) PG-13 Southern Gothic (2007) Yul Vazquez. (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle (In Stereo) PG (DVS) Castle The Blue Butterfly PG Rizzoli & Isles In Over Your Head Rizzoli & Isles But I Am a Good Girl Cold Justice Hit and Run (N) The Mentalist Red Menace (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularTotalGumballUncle AdvenKing/HillClevelandAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodBizarre FoodsExtreme RVs PGExtreme RVs GExtreme RVs G (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55PawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnWorlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HBoston Legal Boston Legal RaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18 Bridesmaids (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. R (DVS) Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home Videos Insomnia (2002) Al Pacino. R MotherMotherRules Dear Annie: My fiances mother has a rocky relationship with both of her sons. We see her infrequently, but still, my fiance loses his patience with her quickly. At first I was OK with her, but now she annoys me, as well. She brags about things, pleads to get her way, plans visits without checking with us, is sensitive to being told no or to anything she perceives as criticism, and is very demanding. She also recently pulled a childish trick. When my fiance told her no repeatedly, she simply called me to plead her case, knowing I am uncomfortable saying no. She is in her late 60s and continues to blame her actions on a rocky childhood. My mother says to just be polite to her, which I try hard to do. But now that she is in my home for a week, conversations with her are impossible, and I feel I need to walk away. She has a psychiatric disorder, although I am not sure of the diagnosis. My fiances grandmother indicates it is schizophrenia, so I dont want to push her too far. We are getting married soon at a courthouse. During this unplanned and uninvited trip, she said it is too expensive for her and my fiances father to travel to see us get married. I am fine with this, but my fiance is upset that his parents do not care enough to make it work. They can afford the airline tickets. I think it is my fiances place to explain his hurt feelings to them. Do I continue to be polite about it? I am currently working long hours to avoid being in my home while she is visiting. Is there a better way to handle this? Z. Dear Z.: Yes, please continue to be polite. We recognize that his mothers behavior is difficult, but you see her infrequently, so try to tolerate her as best you can for your fiances sake. He obviously cares a great deal about his parents. He should tell them how important it is to him that they attend the wedding, but he cannot control their response. We hope they will make the effort to be there, and we hope you will be supportive without commiserating too much. Dear Annie: Lately, it seems as if my siblings have been ignoring me, except for the eldest. Im a teenager, and my siblings are older. The eldest tries to involve me in everything she can, but shes moved out of the house. The other two go off and have fun, and when I try to join in, they give me nasty looks and tell me to go away. What should I do about them? Indiana Teen Dear Teen: You should recalibrate your expectations. Your siblings are not responsible for your social life. We know it hurts when they go off without you, but such rudeness is not uncommon. Learn to ignore them. When they leave, casually wave goodbye and be occupied with something else. As you grow up, this situation will improve, but it will take time. Meanwhile, phone or text your friends and schedule some activities so you are less focused on what your siblings are doing. It also will make you much more interesting to them if you seem independently busy and happy. If you need help doing this, talk to your parents, your school counselor, a favorite teacher or other trusted adult. Dear Annie: Im responding to the comment from Germantown, Tenn., about store employees being forced to stand all day. Thats part of their job description and how products get to the shelves. In the store that I manage, the older employees never have complained about standing all day. The Manager Dear Manager: The fact that your employees dont complain doesnt mean they arent suffering. Standing is OK if you get to walk around, but otherwise, it is hard on the feet and back.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) BOGUS LLAMADISMAYCASHEW Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: When she suggested her dad talk to a lawyer about estate planning, he said WILLDO Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. LEFTE CLUGH PALPOT NECCAL Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags A:A TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 24, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessThe Voice As blind auditions continue. (N)Chicago Fire NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Latino Americans Latino Americans serve in World War II. (N) PG (DVS) Frontline Assisted living company. PG History of Science (In Stereo) G % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Latino Americans (N) PG (DVS) Frontline PG TBAT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.The Voice The Blind Auditions, Part 2 As blind auditions continue. (N) Chicago Fire A Problem House NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. PG The Goldbergs Trophy Wife PG Lucky 7 Pilot (In Stereo) PG Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Whiskey Tango Foxtrot NCIS: Los Angeles Ascension Person of Interest Liberty 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Dads (N) Brooklyn Nine-Nine New Girl (N) Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.S.H.I.E.L.D. GoldTrophyLucky 7 Pilot PGNewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Soul Purpose Telethone < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. PG The Goldbergs Trophy Wife PG Lucky 7 Pilot (In Stereo) PG NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse Paralysis. House Frozen Cops Rel.Cops Rel.SeinfeldCommun H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PresentThe 700 Club (N) GBabersPaidMannaPaidPaidPaidStudioHealingMinistries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Whose Line Is It? Whose Line Is It? Capture Sabotage! (N) (In Stereo)EngagementEngagementThe Arsenio Hall Show O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute Beverly Hillbillies Crook & Chase (In Stereo) G Cold Squad (DVS) Eye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangDads BrooklynNew GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10SimpsonsAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corazn IndomablePorque el Am.La Tempestad Qu Bonito Amor (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars Barter Kings Tazed and Confused PG Barter Kings Puppy Love PG (AMC) 55 64 55 Bad Boys II (2003, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. Premiere. R Pulp Fiction (1994, Crime Drama) John Travolta. Criminals cross paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. R The Departed (2006) R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedFrozen Planet Winter PG Frozen Planet (In Stereo) PG Frozen Planet Summer PG Frozen Planet On Thin Ice PG Frozen Planet (In Stereo) PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown (N) PG Diary of a Mad Black Woman (2005) Kimberly Elise. A woman starts over after her husband leaves her. PG-13 Lavell Crawford: Can a Brother Get Some Love? L (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.NeNe--WeddingNeNe--WeddingThe New Atlanta HappensNeNe (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowWorkaholicsTosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) Brickleberry (N)Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba Pilot PG Reba PG Reba PG A League of Their Own (1992) Tom Hanks, Madonna. A womens professional baseball league debuts in 1943. PG Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportAmerican GreedTreasureTreasureBuried Treasure PGMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46SituationCrossfireErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers Morgan LiveAC 360 Later (N)Erin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G Liv & Maddie Dog With a Blog G A.N.T. Farm G GoodCharlie A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G GoodCharlie A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)E:60 (N) SEC Storied (N) 2013 World Series of PokerSportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonNFL Live (N) WNBA Basketball Baseball Tonight (N)Olbermann (N) (Live) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48FaithTouchDaily Mass Mother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopeThoughtWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28The Middle PG The Middle PG When in Rome (2010, Romance-Comedy) Kristen Bell. PG-13 You Again (2010, Romance-Comedy) Kristen Bell. PG The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Heathers (1989, Comedy) Winona Ryder. (In Stereo) R Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde (2003) Camp (2003, Musical Comedy) Daniel Letterle. (In Stereo) PG-13 Roger Dodger (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped G DonutDonutChopped G Chopped G Chopped (N) GCutthroat Kitchen G (FS1) 732 112 732 FOX Football DailyFox 1 on Fox 1 on Fox 1 on MissionThe Ultimate FighterBeing (N)Being (N)FOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 UFCMarlinsMLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Miami Marlins. (N) (Live) MarlinsUFCFOX Sports Live (N) (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Colombiana (2011, Action) Zoe Saldana, Jordi Moll, Lennie James. PG-13 Sons of Anarchy Poenitentia MA Sons of Anarchy Poenitentia MA (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA TourGolfLearningGolfs Greatest Rounds (N) In PlayCentralGolf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Little House on the Prairie G Little House on the Prairie G Puppy Love (2012, Romance) Candace Cameron Bure, Victor Webster. Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Dennis Quaid. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA Hitchcock (2012) Anthony Hopkins. PG-13 Face Off, Max Boardwalk Empire MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Howards End (1992, Drama) Anthony Hopkins. (In Stereo) PG The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011) Judi Dench. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA Les Misrables (2012) (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Income Property GHunt IntlHuntersPropertyPropertyIncome Property GHuntersHunt IntlIncome Property G (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Top Gear (N) PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Top Gear PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Abbys Ultimate Dance Competition Abbys Ultimate Dance Competition Abbys Ultimate Dance Competition Abbys Ultimate Dance Competition Double Divas Double Divas Double Divas Double Divas (LMN) 50 119 Painful Secrets (2000, Drama) Sean Young. (In Stereo) NR No One Would Tell (1996, Drama) Candace Cameron. (In Stereo) Moment of Truth: Cradle of Conspiracy (1994) Danica McKellar. (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 The Five-Year Engagement (2012) Jason Segel. (In Stereo) R Pitch Perfect (2012, Musical Comedy) Anna Kendrick. (In Stereo) PG-13 Taken 2 (2012) Liam Neeson. (In Stereo) NR Girls Guide WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Pickles Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Battle of the Year (PG-13) In 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. The Family (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Planes (PG) 1:10 p.m. Planes In 3D. (PG) 4:20 p.m. No passes. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters (PG) 1:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters In 3D. (PG) 4 p.m. No passes. Prisoners (R) 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Riddick (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m. Were the Millers (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:35 p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. The Family (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m. One Direction: This Is Us The Extended Cut (PG) 4:40 p.m. One Direction: This Is Us The Extended Cut In 3D. (PG) 1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes. Riddick (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Were the Millers (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Flashback Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO D PFJV EWF HJR EWJE EFGWKZNZIR SDNN TMVYJTT ZMV WMLJK DKEFVJGEDZK. EWF SZVNH SDNN WJXF J IFKFVJEDZK ZP DHDZET. JNAFVE FDKTEFDKPrevious Solution: Karen Black was my mentor and a second mother to me. She inspired everyone she came in contact with. Juliette Lewis (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-24

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Afterschool care at SpotNeed a safe place for the kids during the afterschool hours? Children in kindergarten through seventh grade are invited to come be a part of The Spot Kids Club from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Spot Family Center, 405 S.E. Seventh Ave., Crystal River. Bus service is provided from Crystal River Primary and Middle schools. The program features educational fun, outdoor activities, arts and crafts, computer lab, homework support, personalized reading and math tutoring, and learning adventures. Healthy snacks are provided. Groceries are available on Fridays to families who qualify. Registration is required (free if you qualify). If you receive free school lunch, you automatically qualify. Sign-up space is limited. Applications are available at The Spot. Ten scholarships are still available for the program. For more information, call 352-7943870 or visit www.TheSpotFamilyCenter.org. The program is made possible with the support of the Department of Children and Families and Kids Central Inc.Help sought for fundraiserVolunteers are sought to solicit prizes by phone from local merchants and help host the American Cancer Society raffles during the Floral City Bluegrass & County Music fundraiser from 2 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5. This will be during Bikes & BBQ festivities in Floral City. Any time or help anyone can give will be appreciated. Call Dave Neihoff at 352-560-7379 for more information.Park to host volunteer fairOn Sept. 28, in honor of National Public Lands Day, Fort Cooper State Park and the Friends of Fort Cooper will host a Volunteer Fair and Breakfast with the rangers and park volunteers from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be no park entrance fees during the event. Visitors can talk with rangers and volunteers to learn more about the park and what volunteer opportunities are available at Fort Cooper State Park, and why volunteers are so important to it. A pancake, sausage and beverage breakfast will be served from 9 to 11 a.m. while supplies last. For more information, call 352-726-0315.Citizens group welcomes allOrganizing for Citrus is a group of concerned citizens that meets to inform the public and help them to advocate in their best interests. The group will meet from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills. Participants will join groups to discuss issues and will formulate communications with appropriate elected officials. Bring electronics, paper, pencils and ideas. For more information, call Vicky at 352-563-2651.Tech volunteers are neededTax-Aide services of the AARP in Citrus County needs technical coordinator volunteers for the season. These are the people who support the computers and computer networks for the free program, said John Clarke, area Tax-Aide coordinator. They are far from complex, primarily consisting of simple peer-to-peer networks, understanding relatively simple Routers and their configuration and linking a network to the Internet through sitesupplied dedicated IPs. While, in general, we would anticipate these folks also avail themselves of our tax counselor training, which is of course at no cost, it is not a requirement of the position, Clarke said. Clarke said this need in no way downplays the continuing critical need for tax preparation counselors and volunteers to fill administrative positions. The needs are significant there, as well. Fully 98 percent of our volunteers return year after year, Clarke said. Its, to put it simply, a gratifying, fulfilling and super feeling to know you are helping your friends and neighbors who, through no fault of their own, are struggling on a limited income. There is no charge for our services, ever. Volunteer technical coordinators position, must have some basic technical background. Beyond that, AARP will provide the one-on-one counseling and other tools needed. Visit www.aarp.org/tavolunteer and register to be an AARP Tax-Aide volunteer. Or, call John Clarke at 352-270-8162, or e-mail johnwc741taxaide @gmail.com. COMMUNITYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER24, 2013 C9 Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle ClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699186 000FUYL 000FUYE Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Missing 9/8/13 Tri-Colored Beagle 40 Lbs. Special needs pet. Name: JoJo. Please help JoJo to come home. He is terribly missed. Last seen on N. Lee Street, Beverly Hills at 10:30 pm. Please call 352-249-3107. Reward FOUND Silver Mongoose Bicycle w/whitewall tires, found in my garden! (352) 400-6100 Grey Terrier Male, no chip Found off of Gospel Island Maggie rd 9/19. (352) 364-7351 Nice Reward Lost 9/17, 50 lb white Female pitbull terrier brindle ears & base of tails, Homosassa Area Sorely Missed (352) 563-2280 Small Dog near Inglis Dam call to identify (352) 212-1428 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 FREE MANURE. No shavings, Already bagged, Ready for pick-up at our pasture gate (352) 249-7127 3 cats missing within several months.One eyed cat,bobtail cat,both black and a black with white spots Palm,Highland,Dixieland. 352-201-4522 CASH REWARD Lost Black Cat, w/ white paws, white on right side of mouth Pine Ridge Estates 430-5959 Lost Quaker Bird Green, Citrus Hills around Sept. 20th (352) 302-6710 Todays New Ads 6LEATHER COUCH 2 end tables, 1 coffee table, $250. (352) 419-6782 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DODGE, Intrepid 3.5 magnum RT, w/ sunrf. Runs great needs battery $700 (352) 860-0158 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $7700. (352) 465-3086 DodgeRam Charger, 1987 4x4, w/new engine $2500. obo (352) 422-1155 Electric Range, GE, $380. Black flat ceramic with 5 burners, like new Call Walter (352) 527-3552 PLYMOUTH, GTX, Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $32,000 obo 352-302-8265 Pontoon Boat Trailer Can accommodate up to 24 ft boat, Very good cond. $1,500 (609) 509-6021 cell SKYLINE 1995, Slide in cab over Camper Fully equip. generator, fridge, microwave, AC, & elect. jacks Loaded. $2,800 obo (352) 422-4548 Todays New Ads 2 Person Jacuzziwith cover $300. obo (352) 302-2366 9 Piece Patio Furniture PVC 72 table, 4 chairs, 2 reclining chairs, 2 ottomans, w/cushions, $200. obo (352) 274-1940 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. Starting@$433/mo Income Restricts Apply Inverness Heron Wood 352-726-3476 Lecanto Magnolia Village 352-746-0373 Crystal River Nature Walk 352-563-0890 TTY1-800-955-87 71 To the girl I met in Publixs on 9/18 in Homosassa Springs, wearing a white jacket. I would like to get to know you. Call me anytime. 422-0440 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Need a JOB? #1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds NEWS NOTES Nurturing our watersStudents of Cynthia Hendrick and Briget Brothers of the Renaissance Center in Lecanto teach a three-week unit sponsored by the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) to their middleand high school students. The teachers said their goal has been to develop and nurture an appreciation in the students to be protective of their home and livelihood. All of our students live on or near waterways in our county. Its so rewarding to hear them use the terms such as estuary, preservation and conservation, Brothers said. Our students live from Floral City to Crystal River and Chassahowitzka to Dunnellon. In line with this unit, our students have developed a respect for the importance of our waterways with regard to our environment and economy.Special to the Chronicle Special to the ChronicleThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park will celebrate National Public Lands Day on Saturday. In addition to all the regular exhibits and programs, the park will feature additional conservation messages at all the daily programs. Volunteers will also have special interpretive carts out along the Wildlife Walk with opportunities to see and learn about some of the parks outreach animals. Rocky, the costumed manatee character, will make appearances throughout the day. The park will also collect cans for recycling. Regular park admission will apply. For more information, call Tricia Fowler at 352628-5445, ext. 1006, or Susan Strawbridge at 352-628-5445, ext. 1002. Park to celebrate National Public Lands Day

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C10TUESDAY,SEPTEMBER24,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000FG53 000G0ZNLawn Sprinkler Not Working?Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 IRRIGATION CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000G4QIRESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH Y OUR POOL? POOLS AND PAVERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000G4UK Copes Pool & Pavers 000G56V PET/HOUSESITTINGBONDED & INSURED(352)270-4672Kathleen M. Daceykatskritterkare@yahoo.com Training AvailableAll Kritters Big or SmallRelax while youre away knowing your pets are OK at home safe in their own beds DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000G4Y7 000FWNC ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000FX26 0 0 0 F X 2 1 TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMA TES 000FX5Twww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 9/30/13LIC#CC1327656 000FGCQ METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer SatisfactionLic.#CCC1325497 0 0 0 F X 1 U HANDYMANRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000FV68 Stand Alone Generator 000FX5E WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tr ee Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Carols Airport T ransport 352-746-7595 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare -N -More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Home Maintenance Repairs & Remodels Quality work at affordable prices 20 yrs exp. Ref avail 573-723-2881 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** Lawncare -N -More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTING ASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 A+ CLEANING Res/Com. 27 yrs exp. Lic/ bonded, client focused 386-717-2929 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 Home/Office Cleaning catered to your needs, reliable & exper.,lic/ins 796-4645 / 345-9329 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURB APPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Lawncare -N -More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1 A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Andersen HandyMan Home Repairs, Lawn Care. Cheaper Prices 352-453-6005 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1 A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buy Quality Furniture Non smoking homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 The average home collects up to 40 pounds of dust and dirt per year. Imagine how much dust and dirt could be resting in your air ducts.Lic/Ins Homeducts.com offers duct cleaning at an affordable rate. Click or call. 352-362-5187. SMITTYS APPLIANCE REPAIR. Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURB APPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 000FUYN Dining Room Set Thomasville, Cherry Table, 6 chairs, 2 ext, new $2900, China Base & Deck w/ glass shelves, new $2595, Moving-Will sacrifice both for $1500 cash, obo (352) 513-4516 DINING ROOM TABLE Six chairs. Large super excellent. High qual. Must see.$100. (352)257-4076 DRESSER W/ MIRROR Large excellent quality Basset Dovetail drawers. $100. (352)257-4076 Bamboo Coffee Table with glass top $55 860-2475 COFFEE & 2 END TABLES Ex qual solid wood, brown. Must see. Coffee $30., Ends $20. each (352)257-4076 COFFEE TABLE WOOD One scratch, but very usable. $10. (352)257-4076 COUCH Brown & Gold, curved, two matching ottermans. 1 yr old $400 (352) 527-4247 DINING ROOM HUTCH Large,beautiful high quality, must see. $100. (352)257-4076 BROYHILLSOFAPerfect condition, like new. 3-seat sofa, includes 4 cushions and arm covers. Off-white with floral pattern. Paid $900, sell for $150. 352-503-7125 or 410-227-9152 CHAIRS 5-light oak chairs with padded seats on casters $100 (352) 419-6383 CHESTOF DRAWERS Large Six dovetailed drawers. Brown Excellent condition $100. (352)257-4076 CASSETTE DECK Double Deck JVC Cassette with Remote $40.00 352-746-5421 3 DOUBLE ROLLS VINYLPREPASTED WALLCOVERING $25 NEW 165SQ FT 419-5981 CEILING FANS WHITE -FOUR @ $25 EACH 352 527-8993 FORMICACOUNTERTOPS ONE-9LONG ONE 6LONG -$100 352 527-8993 KITCHEN SINK double basin with moen faucet and spray. Good Shape $35.00 Call 613-4279 PVC BLINDS WHITE-TWO SETS-79W X 91H $100 352 527-8993 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 LAPTOPCART/TABLE Black adjustable tilt&height w/wheels $24 Can email pic 352-382-3650 9 Piece Patio Furniture PVC 72 table, 4 chairs, 2 reclining chairs, 2 ottomans, w/cushions, $200. obo (352) 274-1940 Patio Recliner Tan La-z-boy, like new $140 (352) 564-8605 PICNIC TABLE/BENCH WHITE, CONVERTS TO TWO BENCHES $45 352 527-8993 6LEATHER COUCH 2 end tables, 1 coffee table, $250. (352) 419-6782 BED FULLSIZE Matress, box spring, Frame Very good condition. Little used. $50. (352)257-4076 BED TWIN Mattress, Box spring, frame. Excellent like new Chiropractor model. $75. (352)257-4076 BEDSIDE TABLES (3) Excellent quality, Solid wood, brown. Must see. Each $30. (352)257-4076 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Condition. Free Delivery, 60 Day Written Guarantee 352 263-7398 Whirlpool Digital Calypso Matching WASHER/DRYER Excel cond. $400. Must See Call (352) 212-1854 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $100 HEAVY DUTYMETALINVERNESS 419-5981 Panasonic TV 42 Plasma Flat screen with remote, TV in excel cond. $225., (908) 616-0620 Homosassa 2 Person Jacuzziwith cover $300 obo (352) 302-2366 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Electric Range, GE, $380. Black flat ceramic with 5 burners, like new Call Walter (352) 527-3552 GAS RANGE Andora5 black GE selfclean convection oven, griddle, power burner $500 OBO 228-4648 GE Space Saver Microwave very little usage Bisque, $125.(352) 302-9129 GOOD DRYER $100 works perfect. 30 day written warranty call/text 352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day written warranty. call/text 352-364-6504 HOUSEHOLD FREEZE WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT 2DEEP2WIDE 4.5HIGH $250.00 352-382-0009 MAGTAG 2009 white Washing Machine. In good condition $250 obo (352) 422-5579 REFRIGERATOR SIDE BYSIDE Black Jennaire. Runs Great. Remodeling. $100. 228-4648 REFRIGERATOR W/ ICE MAKER G.E. WHITE SIDE BYSIDE 2DEEP21.5 WIDE 5HIGH $300.00 352-382-0009 SMITTYS APPLIANCE REPAIR. Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Washer & Dryer Maytag-2 washers, 1 dryer. All in good working cond. $300 for all or $125 ea (304) 544-8398 Experienced TelemarketerCrystal River Office call to inquire 352-410-6927 Installers HelperPart time help to install window treatments, Hourly pay. Hours will vary. Must have a professional appearance. Apply in person at: 72 Hour Blinds Factory 1657 W Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 ReStor e Manager T ruck Driver Donation Pr ocessor Habitat for Humanity is filling 3 positions in Citrus County E-mail request for detailed job description and instructions for submitting to: H4Hr estor e@ yahoo.com No calls or walk-ins MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 1971 Baseball cards, 200 cards $40. 1970 Baseball Cards 200 cards $40 (352) 344-9502 Medical Assist.Fulltime & Part time Postions Available at busy Podiatry Practice Call (352) 795-2142 MEDICAL ASSISTANTExperience reqd for very busy medical office. Includes benefits. Fax Resume to: (352) 563-2512 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offered LOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 TWO MEDICAL ASSISTANTSFax resume to: 352-746-5784 ATTENTIONLooking for RepresentativesTo assist Medicare Recipients w/ enrolling For Medicare Part D, Medicare Advantage Programs & Medicare Supplements/ Will be placed In Local Pharmacies to Assist w/these programs No exp. Necessary Will provide Training Call 352-726-7722 Fax 352-726-6813 Licensed RealtorCONTACT: yankeetownrealty .com or Call 352-447-0007 No Fees. Great Pay out. Weekends req. Earning potential unlimited. www.twitter.com/Follow the WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for employment.Childcare work exp. required Apply M-F,12pm-2pm No Phone Calls. HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com

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TUESDAY,SEPTEMBER24,2013 C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000FUYB TAYLOR MADE HOMESLOT MODEL BLOWOUT All Homes Discounted $4,000 to $8,000 Even up to $12.000 off Sticker Price Call 352-621-3807 Doublewide, 2 BR, 2BA, Recent shingle roof New AC, MUCH MORE 55+ Park $15,500 (352) 634-0274 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $17,900 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $245 mo, incl water, sewer, trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. St arting@$433/mo Income Restricts Apply Inverness Heron Wood 352-726-3476 Lecanto Magnolia Village 352-746-0373 Crystal River Nature Walk 352-563-0890 TTY1-800-955-87 71 PELICAN BAY APARTMENTS2 BDRM. APT. HOMES Carpet, Appliances, Central Heat & Air Rental assistance available to qualified applicants. If qualified, pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. FOR RENTAL INFO. & APPLICATION 9826 West Arms Dr. Crystal River, 352-795-7793 TDD#1-800-955-8771 Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:00P Equal Housing Opportunity Provider & Employer CRYSTALRIVER2/2, inclds H2O, sew, trash. (352) 584-3348 HOMOSASSAAttractive 2BR, 2BA DW on 1 AC, carport scrn. por. completely well furni. $600 mo. $600 dep 352-628-1723 LECANTO2/2, Doublewide $575. (352) 212-9682 7677 West Chassahowitzka St. 2BD, 2BA, Mobile Detached Garage Scrn. porch, lease or Sale, $2,000 down $732. mo. 877-499-8065 $11,094, DISCOUNT New Jacobsen, 2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA yr. Warranty. No down payment, use land or trade in. Payment only, $471.18 P & I, WAC Call 352-621-9182 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 BAD CREDIT? FORECLOSURE? BANKRUPTCY? Want your own home? I can help!! 35% down cash or land and you are approved. No gimmick, 386-546-5833 Singing Forest 46 2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile Home, fixer upper, $6000. 352-344-1365 Tired of Renting? Super clean 2004 3BR/2BA, on acre ready to move in!!! $3,500 down, $380.03/mo. W.A.C. Call 386-546-5833 for details Wont last! USED HOMESSingle, Double & Triple Wides Starting at $6,500 Call (352) 621-9183 2011 Live Oak 4BR/2BA $46,900, 28x60 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details HOMOSASSAOwner Financing, 3/2, older MH on 2 acres, inside remodeled, fenced yard, $4k down $535 per mo. 352-302-9217 Quaker Parakeet male 5-6 months old, green w/ grey chest. $125. includes cage (352) 464-3716 SHIH-TZU PUPS,Available RegisteredLots of Colors Males start @ $400. Females start @ $600. Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 Sweet 3yr old female Lab. Spayed. Possible PTSD dog. Sm adoption fee (352) 794-6314 TOBYToby, black/white terrier mix, neutered, HW-negative. Housebrkn, wt 45 lbs,. Very friendly, gets along with other dogs well, also cats. About 6 years old, great shape, intelligent, lively, walks well on leash, likes kids. Great companion-to-be. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 ZOEYZoey, a 7-8 y.o. blue/white Terrier/ Bulldog mix, spayed and housebrkn. Came to the shelter after her family had to move and could not take her. She is sweet & exceptionally gentle, affectionate & beautiful. Likes other dogs & also children. Very playful. Weight about 60 lbs. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. CHICKENS 10 Laying chickens Make reasonable offer (352) 382-2350 LM BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 LOKIELokie, a 3-y.o. brown/white terrier mix male, weight about 65 lbs. Came to shelter d/t owners inability to keep him. Lokie is a shy, gentle, humble dog, easy to walk on leash, gets along w/other dogs, loves human friends. Eager to please. No cats. A beautiful dog, both physically and behavior-wise. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. OZZIEOzzie, a 2-y.o. neutered Black Mouth Cur mix, handsome boy, wt. 61 lbs, a little bit shy, good with kids, good with cats, should be the only dog. Walks well on leash, needs fenced yard to run in. Housebroken. Call Brenda @ 352-746-1423. Petea 1-year-old mostly white terrier/?hound mix, Heartworm negative & housebroken. Came to the shelter because his family could no longer afford him. A very gentle, well-behaved dog, walks very well on a leash & gets along with other dogs. Weighs 51 lbs. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. SIMONwell-mannered retriever mix, 3 y.o. Sits, gives his paw, goes down for treats, takes gently. Walks well on leash, behaves in public places. High energy, likes to run & play, plays catch, plays in pool. Good w/most dogs. Call Christina @ 352-464-3908. BAILEYBailey, Chespeake Bay hound mix, 2 y.o., HW-negative, wt. 39 lbs. Sits on command, loves treats, walks well on leash, good w/other dogs, attentive to human friends. Obeys well, wants to please. # 20731619. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 BEAGLE PUPPIES$100 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 COCKER SPANIELS 4 Males, 2 Females w/ papers. 8 weeks old Blonde & white $800 (352) 287-0519 CYRILCyril, 1 y.o. Hound mix, found as stray, beautiful red-brown coat, wt. 42 lbs. Easy to walk, gets along w/other dogs. Appears to be housebroken, healthy. Affectionate & friendly. Good companion. # 20807791. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 DojhaDojha, approx. 3 y.o., a yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, came to shelter because family lost their home & could not keep him. Gentle, easy-going, gets along w/other dogs, beautiful in color, great shape. Pen #25. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment ANNE LISEAnne Lise, a 7-8 y.o. Blue Terrier/Bull dog mix, spayed, housebrkn, & homeless. Family had to move so she came to the shelter. Weighs about 65 lbs, and is a beautiful dog, sweet, affectionate, gentle, loyal, good w/other dogs, good w/children. Playful & full of life. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $225. 352-382-5208 TREADMILL, Prosport 285TWalk to fitness,,digital all speed /flat/slant.Good condition. $100.00 897-5410 BICYCLE Trek Series 3, 3500,16, 41 cm. mountain bike, with Bontrager computer and bike bag, $100.00 352 503-6668 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Fear No-Evil GunsHi-Point & Beretta Concealed Classes 352-447-5595 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 4x8 Heavy Duty Utility Trailer15 wheels, new tires, good cond. $395. (352) 586-3209 Utility Trailer 6 x 9 x 2 ft. wood/steel. frame $250. obo (352) 465-3086 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 Life Strider Arm & Leg Exceriser bike w/ monitor $65 Oak & Glass cabinet, w/ 3 oak & glass drs 24x38 $40. 352-794-3907 Queen size Mattress pillow top, very comfortable like new $80. 3 in one Printer Fax/Copier, $25. (352) 637-6310 REGULATION SIZE POOLTABLE 1 slate in good shape but may want to put a new felt on it $200.00. Citrus County. 401-440-8922 SPEAKERS 2 Optimus Speakers $30.00 352-746-5421 Student desk Lamp Never used $20 613-2797 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 VACUUM CLEANER Hoover Wind tunnel Nearly New, Asking $35. (352) 628-2844 WOMENS RUBBER RIDING BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW SIZE 43L EUR MADE IN ISRAEL 419-5981 Back Packer Chair Lift for Van $200 Jazzi 1100 Electric Scooter $200 (352) 795-0049 Bob Diabetic Shoes, Beige, Womens Size 8, Medium width, never worn, $80 (352) 522-0107 New Jazzy Electric Chair, MUSTSELL Cost $5,000 Selling $1,300. obo (352) 795-7513 NEW ACOUSTIC GUITAR BEAUTIFUL PURE WHITE W/TURQUOISE TRIM $100 352-601-6625 NEW EDEN 20W BASS AMP LIGHTWEIGHT(UNDER 15LBS) AND POWERFUL! $85 352-601-6625 NEW FENDER SQUIRE JAGUAR SS BASS METALLIC RED&BLACK,$100 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC CUTAWAY GUITAR W/STAND OR WALLHANGER,$80 352-601-6625 NEWCRATE FLEX WAVE AMP W/REVERB& OVERDRIVE,12SPEAKER $90 352-601-6625 ACCORDION Santini 120 Base; Full size, double chamber, prestine $1500 (352) 794-6641 ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC ASTYLE MANDOLIN PLAYS&SOUNDS GREAT $50 352-601-6625 BLACK LES PAUL SPECIALII W/GIGBAG,CORD,STAND& WALLHANGER $100 352-601-6625 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 STRAT STYLE BASS UKE ELECTRIC POLY STRINGS, PIEZO WHITE ON WHITE $75 352-601-6625 STUDENT?NEW CLASSICALGUITAR BYWASHBURN W/GIGBAG&BOOK/CD $40 352-601-6625 SEWING MACHINE Brother, like new, in a 3 drawer wood cabinet. All accessories $125 Cash (352) 344-4070 AB-LOUNGER Used But a Few times, Paid $150. at Sears Asking $25. (352) 628-2844 High End Used Furniture 2NDTIME AROUND RESALES 270-8803,2165 Hy 491 KITCHEN TABLE 42 FORMICAPLUS LEAVE 4 chairs. Very usable $20. (352)257-4076 LIVING ROOM CHAIR High quality brown excellent condition. $40. Must see (352)257-4076 LIVING ROOM CHAIRS 2 green high quality excellent condition. Must see. Each $50. (352)257-4076 LOVE SEATBlack Real Leather, not Bonded, Love Seat. Excellent Condition $100.00 352-746-5421 MATTRESS firm, twin size $50 OBO 352 419-8816 Recliner & Loveseat recliner, end table & 1 coffee table, microfiber, color sage, electric auto recliner w/ battery backup $650. (352) 860-0158 SECTIONAL3 PIECE High quality excellent condition. Must see.$100. (352)257-4076 Sectional Couch w/ queen hide a bed and recliner built in Good Condition $175. obo (352) 302-9129 Sofa & Loveseat all recline, Brookshire, teal, $250. 4 Kitchen Chairs w/ castors $25 ea (352) 382-3914 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 4 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R $10 EACH 352-613-0529 MENS 2 PIECE SUITS SIZE 36X30 & 34X30 $25 EACH 352-613-0529 PURPLE CLOTHES 20 pieces of dresses, pants, top set, blouses. Size 12 to 18 $100.00 897-5410 WHITE STAG PANTS SUITTropical colors, red, background &flowers. ex. Large ,$5.oo, 897-5410 STEAM & VAC Rug Cleaner By Hoover. Does A Great Job Cleaning All Rugs Asking $75. (352) 628-2844 4 WHEELWALKERseat, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $45 352-628-0033 30 GALLON AQUARIUM no leaks, includes newer heater and filter, light, glass top, gravel $65.00 352-201-4522 Above Ground Pool, 24 ft. up and runningpump, filter, ladder, very good cond. $500. You must remove 352-212-6433 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CAMCORDER Panasonic Camcorder with case $100.00 352-746-5421 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 Designer Jackets, leather W 2 & 3X, New, $80 ea Ren. Chest Set, Must See $1,200 352-465-3086 FORENZAset of 4 standard rims $40.00 Call 613-4279 Kitchen Aid Mixer New $275. Tiffany style Lamps 3 large $70 ea. 352-465-3086

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C12TUESDAY,SEPTEMBER24,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 585-0924 TUCRN Hoyt, James R. 2013-CP-263 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.:2013-CP-263 IN RE: ESTATE OF: JAMES R. HOYT, SR., Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The Administration of the Estate of JAMES R. HOYT, SR. deceased, whose date of death was January 24, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court. WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is September 17, 2013. Personal Representative /s/ JAMES R. HOYT, JR. 104 Hyde Ave., Pawtucket, RI 02861 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ KAREN O. GAFFNEY, Esquire Florida Bar No.: 500682 Karen O. Gaffney, P.A., Attorney for the Personal Representative 205 West Dampier Street, Inverness, FL34450 Telephone: (352) 726-9222 Email: karengaffney@tampabay.rr.com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronice, September 12 & 19, 2013. 586-0924 TUCRN Estate of Ellen Franzwa 2013-CP-400 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-400 IN RE:ESTATE OF ELLEN FRANZWA, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS An Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ELLEN FRANZWA, deceased, whose date of death was December 17, 2012, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave. Inverness, FL 34450. The name of the petitioner and his attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is: September 17, 2013 /s/ Raymond Riggs, Petitioner 2267 N. Donovan Avenue, Crystal River, FL 34428 Johnston & Sasser, P.A. /s/ David C. Sasser, Florida Bar #297720 P. O. Box 997, Brooksville, FL 34605-0997, Telephone 352-796-5123 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle September 17 & 24, 2013. 586-1001 TUCRN Collazo, Jaime 2013-CP-000484 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. 2013-CP-000484 IN RE: THE ESTATE OFJAIME COLLAZO, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jaime Collazo, deceased, whose date of death was July 4, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2013-CP-000484; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 24, 2013. Personal Representative: Lynda M. Collazo 1229 East Rockefeller Lane, Hernando, FL34442 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq., Florida Bar No. 0857750, VanNess & VanNess, P.A. 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL34429 352-795-1444 tmv@vannessp a.com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle September 24 & October 1, 2013 587-0924 TUCRN Estate of ELEANOR R. OMALLEY 2013-CP-487 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE:ESTATE OF File No. 2013-CP-487 ELEANOR R. OMALLEY Deceased NOTICE TO CREDLTORS (Ancillary Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Ancillary Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ELEANOR R. OMALLEY deceased. File Number 2013-CP-487, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N Apopka Ave. Inverness, FL 34452; that the decedents date of death was August 9, 2012; that the total value of the estate is $4,700.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Charles F. OMalley 13359 Glen Taylor Lane, Herndon,VA 20171 John J. OMalley 1317 S. 36th St, Philadelphia, PA 19146 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pubhcation of this Notice is September 17, 2013 Person Giving Notice: /s/ CHARLES F. OMALLEY, Petitioner 13359 Glen Taylor Lane, Hemdon,VA 20171 Attorney for Persons Giving Notice: /s/ Marie T. Blume Attorney for Petitioner, Florida Bar Number: 0493181, blumelaw@earthlink.net, P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, Florida 34451 Phone: (352) 726-7778 Fax (352)726-7798 Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, September 17 & 24, 2013 Harley Davidson2005, 1200 Custom, Extra Chrome, new tires, just serv, 16,000 mi. $3700 obo. Poss trade for veh. (352) 220-8444 HARLEYDAVIDSON2012 FLHTCUTG Tri Glide Ultra Classic AMFM/CD/AUX w/speakers; CC, Fairing Full, Alarm, Travel trunk w/rack, stage 2 screaming eagle high performance exhaust & pipes; ABS brakes, extra chrome accents. Excellent condition w/only 1250 mi. First $28.5K. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630. HONDA1985 Shadow 500 CC good condition asking $1200.00 352-637-3254 HONDA2007 VTX 1300C Original owner, purchased brand new, low mileage (2,371 miles). Caf windshield, removable saddlebags, light-bar. Black & chrome. Showroom condition (mint). Asking a firm $5,050.00 Please contact owner\seller via Email: selfor@aol.com Phone: (352)382-4422 KAWASAKI2002 Vulcan 1500, 7500 mi, Exc Cond $5000 (352) 341-5263 SNAPPER 2008 Riding 30 inch cut 12.5 HP $500 (352) 341-5263 FORD1992 Flairside 4x4, 302, red, 4 lift traction bar, chrome brush guard, steps & bedrail. A beauty in & out. $5,500 (352) 344-8089 CHEVROLET2006, Suburban 4 x 4, $8,995. 352-341-0018 DodgeRam Charger, 1987 4x4, w/new engine $2500. obo (352) 422-1155 FORD2007, Escape $7,995. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment Harley Davidson2011 FLTRU Road Glide Ultra loaded cruise, cd, cb,intercom, abs, anti theif,6 speed, and 103cc motor. only 5886 miles $19,000 (352)212-4101 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT -BUY-SELL CAR -TRUCK -BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $7700. (352) 465-3086 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB SV 20122012 Frontier CC SV: This white Nissan Frontier Crew Cab SV is in excellent condition with only 8,500 miles. It has cruise control, power windows/door locks/outside mirrors. It has a factory installed bed liner and I added a vinyl tri-fold bed cover and trailer hitch. The truck is in perfect condition with a full factory warranty. The asking price is $21,900. Phone: 352-601-1319 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips DODGE, Intrepid 3.5 magnum RT, w/ sunrf. Runs great needs battery $700 (352) 860-0158 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 FIAT Spider 2000 Conv. 58K miles, new roof, good rubber, runs $2,000 (352) 564-0364 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORDMustang Convertible, 23,600 miles, gray, black top, $14,400. (352) 503-7237 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 MAZDA2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed, 4-door, one owner, great condition, 141,000 miles $3,500. 352-860-2146 MERCURY, Cougar, 125k mi., 2 DR, runs great, cold air, good tires, $1,400 (352) 344-0547 TOYOTA2010, Yaris, 3 door, $9,995. 352-341-0018 VOLVO2001,S40, leather, clean $4,995. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2009 CORVETTE COUPE Z51: Jetstream blue w/ebony int., 2LT, Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3 eng., only 9500 mi., car show winner, serious inquiries only, first $35K/OBO gets it. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630 CHEVY1981 Corvette Under 50,000 orig. miles, Shark Body Style, Very Good Condition, Garage stored 352-400-4704 DATSON 280ZXAttention Z lovers Datson, Inline6 turbo, eng. & trans good, nds loving restoration $500 (352) 344-3080 FORDRat Rod Projects, 46 Ford PU Roadster, Ford Model T, Boattail speedster all steel., Inglis 352-949-7874 PLYMOUTH, GTX Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $32,000 obo 352-302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 9-26 Estate Adventur e Auction Outside 3pm, (inside) 6pm Thomasville furniture, 2000 dvds, like new Appliances, boat, 8 vehicles @ 7:15 Gr Cherokee 1199mi Fusion Hybrid 3858 mi, Impala, Chevy PU, Cobalt, Chevy S10, KIa Sportage, Chevy C10, Hall is full Saturday 9-28 On site Boat Manu facturing Liquidation 122 N Cedarview Tr. Inverness: 9am New boats, antique boats & vintage outboards, Tools, supplies & equipment virtual tour ttp://youtu.be/F9bqANqi6 cw HUGE ALL DAY AUCTION Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $19,900 obo 352-444-2272 189 SHEARER ST, INGLISImproved 1 acre lot, no impact fees, well (city water available), septic, electric, shaded with oaks & pines, motivated seller, asking $9,000 OBO Cell phone 352-428-0930 Outboard Motor 25HP, Evirude with controls, very good cond. $750 obo 476-1113, 513-5135 Pontoon Boat Trailer Can accommodate up to 24 ft boat, Very good cond. $1,500 (609) 509-6021 cell ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 17 KEYWEST2013 Skiff, Yamaha 70 4-stroke, Jack Plate, Trolling Motor, Gauges, GPS, Alum Trailer, Transferrable Warranty, Excellent $20,900 352 503-6668 BASS TRACKER2005, 50HP Mercury PT 175 Special Edition, mint cond., Call for info. (352) 400-9490 GALALEODuck Boat 17ft fiberglass, 25HP Go Devil. long shaft, new trlr. Ready to Hunt, $4,500 352-586-8946 MERC CRUISER1993, 20ft, Stern Drive, Sylvan, Barely used, but runs great. org. $12,000Asking $6,500 obo (352) 228-1355 PONTOON20 FT, 1994 Monarck new vhf radio & gps fishfinder. Gd Cond. $6500. (352) 527-4247 SWEETWATER1991, 15 ft., seats 8, 35HP, trailer, excellent cond. $3,250 476-1113, 513-5135 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Salem Cruise Lite2011 Travel Trailer 28 ft bunk hse. slideout non-smkers. Exc Cond $10,000. 813-957-8605 SKYLINE 1995, Slide in cab over Camper Fully equip. generator, fridge, microwave, AC, & elect. jacks Loaded. $2,800 obo (352) 422-4548 Travel Trailer2011, 20 Mini Lite. Fully self contained. LRoom Slide out. Many Extras. Exc Cond. $15,400 obo (352) 527-0081 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 SOFT TOPPER for Short bed pick-up. Like New $250 obo (352) 422-5579 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT -BUY-SELL CAR -TRUCK -BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 Larrys Auto Sales 352-564-8333 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT -BUY-SELL CAR -TRUCK -BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUICK REGAL2001 LS, leather Inter. very good cond., 6 cyl. 82k mi. One owner. $4,100 352-746-6708 CADILLAC2004 Seville SLS, full power, runs great, like new condition $3800 (352) 795-8986 CHEVROLET2010 Malibu, LT, 1 owner $11,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 MINI FARMS AREA 4/2 on 10 ACRES 20 x 40 Pole Barn Move in Condition $139,900. 352-249-1248 RENT TO OWNno bank, smalldown pmt. 2/1, $53,579k take over payments 352-503-3245 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including w/d. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Old Homosassa 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Newly renovated: new floors, cabinets, appliances. 2 car garage/workshop. Large double corner lot in Old Homosassas best area. Deep water Gulf access with no bridges. Private boat launch ramp, dock with elec. Minutes to The Freezer & McCreas. Documented $3,000+ monthly vacation rental income. Owners downsizing. E-mail: docgpax3@aol.com or call: 352.634.2534 Listed @ $259,500. YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties Sugarmill Woods 3/2/2 Den, Fam Rm, Wood Floors, 1 YR Warranty 31 Pine St, Homosassa $149,000 Realty Connect 212-1446 TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKING TO SELL? CALLME TODAY! HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Phyllis StricklandRealtorBest Time To Buy!Prices are going up. So is interest.BUY NOW!Owner Financing Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments CUSTOM Built LUXURY HOME 3/2/3, Family Rm, gourmet kit, pool & much more! 2,653 LivSF $319K www.81woodfield. CanBY ours.com Realty Connect Teri Paduano 352-212-1446 I Buy Houses Cash ANY CONDITION Over Financed ok! call ** 352-503-3245** I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. BEVERLYHILLS 324 S Monroe. Sunday 12-3p Completely Remodeled Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2 ba, 2 gar. NEW: Roof, kitchen w/stainless, baths, flooring etc. $79k. 527-1239 211 Northeast 4th Street, Chiefland, FL BANK OWNED ABSOLUTE AUCTION 6,400+/-SF of space in 2 Buildings on 1.16 Acres. One vacant single family home and a second bldg. used as a daycare facility. Inspect: Sept. 30th @ 11 AM Onsite Auction with Webcast bidding on October 2nd @ 3 PM Local contact: Julian Howell, 877-980-9565. More info at www.auctionEbid.com FLBKR#CQ1029847 Auction MGMTCorp. Jeb@auctionEbid.com HERNANDO1000+ sf.of office space. Heat/Elec incld, ample pkg $750 (352) 726-3339 3/1, fenced yard, corner lot. Needs some repairs. As is $39,500 Negotiable 2081 W Gardenia Dr (352) 465-0623 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience 352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Timberlane Estates! 3/2/2, w/ screen pool, Located on 1 AC 2690 W. Express Lane $139,000 Call Gwen 795-1520 or 634-1725 Citrus Hills 3/2/2 caged pool, 1 acre, great neighborhood, call for details (352) 746-6552 2 BR, 2BA, Den, lanai, Scrnd heated pool, Cen. AC, poll barn, 1 AC, fenced, well, many extras. By Appt. $129,900 firm (352) 444-2371 or (352) 586-7602 117 S Lunar Terrace2 bedroom. 2 bath. c/h/a,Totally Updated! Block home, Clean, Over-sized Garage, W/Carport. $79,500 Negotiable Call 352-344-9290 8535 E Gospel Island Rd Inverness 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Water front living and all the luxuries. 30 Ft glass porch, cathedral ceilings. Extensively rennovated including wood and tile floors. Granite and new roof and kitchen. Over 2000 Sqft Living area. $139,900 352-817-5875 or miksh@earthlink.net INVERNESS2002, Custom Built 3/2/2 With Extra Lot $114.500.352-344-3112 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM HOMOSASSA5+ DEN, BEDROOMS. 3 BATH. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STORYHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPTO A NATURE PRESERVE HOME IS AFORECLOSURE SHORTSALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILTIN 2005 dennis_neff @yahoo.com ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500, ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 HOMOSASSA2/2, clean, quiet, centr location $550., 352563-2114, 257-6461 INVERNESSBeautifully Remodeled on golf course, 2/2/2 $875 352-895-0744 CRYSTALRIVER2/1, Unfurn.$550, Furn. $600.+sec clean, quite. Small Pet 828 5th Ave. NE. 727-455-8998 727-343-3965 CRYSTALRIVERBUSINESS. LOC. FOR RENTHwy 19 Downtown exec. location,1000 sf Very Clean remodeled 352-634-2528 Sugarmill Woods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BEVERLYHILLS3/2/1, $650. 352-464-2514 CRYSTAL RIVER2-3 BR $200-$250/mo 552-2637, 527-6566 CRYSTAL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 INVERNESS3/2/2 Starting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-403-4646 or 352-403-4648 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM CRYSTAL RIVER1/1, Apt. Waterfront $650. mo. 1st sec. Inclds dock, water, trash. No pets. 772-240-6180 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INGLISCharming furn or unfurn effic/cottage all utilities incld. $595 no smoking 352-422-2994 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com

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G12 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH 000G3MR in Medical Nutrition Wellness Advertising Supplement

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G11 P ROFILESINH EALTH G2 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Dad feel like family and they offer so many activities to help him adjust. My Dads every need is met and he is so well cared for. It is such a comfort to me. Sunflower Springs is a resort-style senior community conveniently nestled in a beautiful, tranquil setting. Sunflower Springs presents a unique, active assisted lifestyle for Citrus County seniors. The community provides a premier resident focused environment with the warmth of home and peace of mind. A 24-hour compassionate staff are highly trained and committed to serving the residents. Residents dont have to live here they want to, explains Melissa Rogers. If you think moving to assisted living would slow you down, think again! Come see how active OUR seniors are!!. or more than 10 years, Superior Residences has cared for people with Alzheimers and other memory disorders. The team at Superior Residences of Lecanto offers a truly superior living experience that gives family members the confidence that their loved ones are receiving the care, comfort, and lifestyle they deserve. Memory Care is a very specialized area of assisted living which includes therapies and activities that stimulate residents with Alzheimers and other dementia related disorders. From the therapy and life enrichment programs to the residential design, specially trained staff and secure grounds, every element of Superior Residences caters to the unique and personalized needs of the memory care residents. The staff specializes in compassionate dementia care and is there to console and encourage their residents, and to join the resident in their personal journey. Their motto, Live the moment, love the moment, reminds the staff to assist residents in celebrating and enjoying each moment. AtSuperior Residences of Lecanto, the trained staff provides therapies, healthcare monitoring and management, personal care assistance and more. The staff is available around the clock, working to make each day comfortable and enjoyable for all residents. Superior Residences takes pride in giving their residents a sense of family and community while encouraging them to maintain as much independence as possible. When your loved one is in Superior Residences of Lecanto, you can be confident in knowing they are not only receiving the best care available; but also that they are living a happy, enriched, and comfortable life. The new Superior Residences at Lecanto offers studio apartments, on-site barber and salon services, outdoor activity areas, scheduled transportation daystay and respite care. Each resident has a therapy program and social schedule that meets their own needs and preferences. 000FY8F W E A RE F AMILY Like us on Facebook 4865 Gulf to Lake Highway, Lecanto 352.746.5483 www.superioralf.comAssisted Living Facility License #12256 8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa352.621.8017 www.sunfloweralf.comAssisted Living Facility License #11566 Let Us Help! You are not alone we understand Paid Advertisement Get More Life! Out Of T he sister community, Sunflower Springs, was conceived by and built by a group of local doctors who wanted to set the standard for assisted living. Executive Director, Melissa Rogers, RN, and Director of Community Relations, Amy Holaday, are excited for you to visit their community. A visit to Sunflower Springs Assisted Living will show you why they are filled with happy people and currently have a waiting list to get in. As Melissa Rogers phrased it, This is like a fun-filled, all-inclusive cruise ship that never leaves the port. There are numerous diverse activities to choose from each day, including crafts, exercise, Happy Hour, trips, local events and even volunteer opportunities. As one resident, Rose, explained, My daughter looked all around and really researched to find a place where I would enjoy to live. Everyone here is so happy. There is no backstabbing and no gossiping going on. Everyone gets along. I am very happy here. I moved here to be near my daughter, Nola Clay Atkinson told us. I have lots of friends here and I know all of the residents. Everyone gets along. I have recommended this place to all of my friends. They really spoil me here. Nola is involved in most of the social activities; and in spite of being visually challenged, she enjoys the activities; and is organizing a group to teach them her favorite card game of hand and foot. Shari Billings wanted her Dad, who is 90, to move close to her after losing her mother last year. This experience was very difficult but ended up better than I could have expected. Everyone has madeF Medical appointment 352-527-0247 Dental appointment 352-249-9258 www.citruscountyhealth.org Adult Health Care Birth and Death Certificates Childrens Care Dental Care Disaster Preparedness Disease Prevention Environmental Health SERVICES Family Planning/Womens Health Health Education Healthy Start/Mom Care Illness Investigation Tobacco Prevention Walk in Clinics WIC/Nutrition What does the Department of Health offer? 000G0LB The Florida Department of Health Citrus County (DOH) has offices geographically situated throughout the county and conveniently located on the bus routes. There isnt room to list all of the information and services available to the residents, but it would be worth your time to stop by the main office or browse their website. Here is a brief highlight of some of the programs being offered: Community Health Center provides primary care medical services, including: physical exams, health screening, x-ray referrals, well/sick care, medical follow-up, and referral to specialists, immunizations and more. Central appointment scheduling for all three service sites: (352) 527-0247. Clinic Hours: Mon-Fri 7:00-5:30 Two walk-in clinics offering excellent ER alternative care and cost effective treatment with no appointment necessary. Mon-Fri 7:00-12:30 and 1:00-5:30 Dental Services for children. DOHCitrus partners with the school system to place a sealant on the permanent molars of second grade children to prevent decay. Last year this service provided 867 sealant applications. Limited dental services are available to adults on an emergency basis. Mon Fri 7:00am5:00pm. Please call for an appointment (352)249-9258 Press option 1 then type ext 249 Provide birth and death certificates Partner with mosquito control to monitor mosquito borne diseases Provided over 5,000 immunizations annually Offer OB services and typically sees over 400 pregnant women a year. W.I.C. Women, Infant and Children Program typically see 2,900 residents a month Staff visits new mothers at both hospitals to assist with breastfeeding. Work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to monitor outbreaks of infectious disease. Coordinate with community partners (hospitals, private healthcare providers, day cares, school system) on illness investigations. Partner with Animal Services and community partners for Rabies Prevention Offer environmental health services to help protect Citrus County Onsite sewage inspections for new construction, repairs and existing buildings Work with Sheriff Dept., Red Cross, EMS, private partners and school board to prepare for disasters through an all hazard approach plan and train for disaster preparedness. Teach residents to prepare for disasters. Tobacco prevention S.W.A.T. teams Students Working Against Tobacco. Quitline 1-877-822-6669. The Quitline is a service of the Florida Department of Health and is accessible to any Florida resident who is ready to make the commitment to quit smoking. The DOH Citrus is working hard for the residents of Citrus County. Call or stop by to see what they can do for you. The DOH Citrus Administrative Office is located at: 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461. Website: www.citruscountyhealth.org Paid Advertisement Post Surgery Care Stroke Rehab Cardiac Program Superior Woundcare I.V. Therapy www.cypresscovecare.com (352) 795-8832 700 Southeast 8th Ave. Crystal River A Five-Star Rated Facility *Rating by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 000G23T Inpatient & Outpatient Skilled Care Making A Difference With Every Life We Touch New technology being used to advance care. PAID ADVERTISING Cypress Cove Care Center is a skilled nursing facility that has served the short term and long term care needs for residents of Citrus County and the surrounding area for over 20 years. Throughout this time, Cypress Cove Care Center has continuously provided the highest level of quality care to residents, as evidenced by the many awards they have received. They are proud to have received the Five Star Rating from the Centers from Medicare and Medicaid (CMS); a Five Star Rating from the Florida Agency for Healthcare (AHCA); as well as being listed as one of the top nursing homes in America in US News and World Report. Recent awards also include the New Image Award from the Citrus County Chamber and Best of the Best Honorable Mention. In addition, Cypress Cove Care Center was acknowledged by the Governor of Florida for Safety Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP). At Cypress Cove, they are taking advantage of all of the new technological advances and have incorporated many new innovations. Technology has opened new ways to communicate not only between families but within the facility itself. Understanding that relatives are tied up with work schedules and busy lives and that they cannot travel as often as they would like, Cypress Cove has made it possible to plan visits with the residents via the internet. Using SKYPE and Face Time allows residents to communicate with family members who are out of state. Residents can watch their children and grandchildren as they speak with them, and their loved ones can see them, too. Activities have also been enhanced and expanded by bringing games to the big screen TV. There are many computer applications (apps) available to entertain and increase the activity of the residents. Some favorite ones are 3D horse racing, Musical Bingo and various exercise programs. Apps are less expensive than traditional board games and the selections are seemingly endless. Along with all of the new choices, residents still enjoy the Wii for tennis, bowling and exercise classes. Therapy is also making use of the new technology. For example, residents with communication deficits are learning to communicate using apps on Kindle devices. Using pictures for words helps the residents speak to others. Cypress Cove Care Center has begun to integrate the new programs into all areas of the center. Resident Council, the Activity Department and Therapy have joined together in an effort to raise funds to purchase additional iPads and Kindles. Before you choose a skilled nursing facility for your loved one, visit Cypress Cove at their website cypresscovecare.com. They also encourage you to call and ask to speak to the Admissions Department. Someone is always available to answer any of your questions or schedule a tour of the facility. Cypress Cove Care Center is a nonprofit facility located at 700 SE 8th Avenue in Crystal River, Florida 34429. PHONE: (352) 795-8832

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G3 P ROFILESINH EALTH 000G3AS Profiles Health in Citrus Countys Gerry Mulligan Publisher Trina MurphyAdvertising/Operations DirectorTrista StokesAdvertising Sales Manager Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429We are excited to present this special advertising section providing you with a better knowledge about a variety of local health related businesses. In these advertisements, readers will learn about the rich history of these businesses and about the products and services they offer. These businesses provide an excellent choice for customers to meet their health needs. They make our community a better place to live with their choices of products and services and serve as an integral part of the community through participation in community events and fundraisers. The feature articles contained in this publication were written by Advertising Features Correspondent Rita Johnson, who has been a freelance writer with the Chronicle for seven years. She has written hundreds of advertising feature articles about Citrus County businesses and the Nature Coast. Her background includes more than 20 years of writing while working in nutrition, alternative medicine and quantum physics. After receiving her doctorate in Alternative Medicine, Rita completed her PhD in Integrative Medicine so that she can now publish articles in medical journals and teach college level courses. We are confident you will find this publication useful and interesting and we encourage your support of these local businesses as they help our community grow and prosper. G10 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way Now Accepting New Patients Now Accepting New Patients 000FY0I Alistair Co, MD Family Practice Alex Villacastin, MD Internal Medicine Catherine Sembrano-Navarro, MD Family Practice Maria Villacastin, ARNP Shiela Villacastin, ARNP Alexander Villacastin, ARNP Lawrence Stawkowski PA Paid Advertisement Inverness 3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N Florida Ave. 489-2486 Same Day Appointments Available! From a one-physician practice, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists has evolved over the past ten years to a formidable name in health care in Citrus County. Together with the gradual growth of the community and the increasing number of countless highly satisfied patients, the practice has extended its reach by opening centers in three strategic locations: Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, Inverness and Homosassa, easily becoming a household name. Led by its founder, Dr. Alex T. Villacastin, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists currently accepts new patients with comfort and convenience in mind. These are reflected by the well-appointed office spaces, ample parking lots, availability of ancilliary services like Bone Density Tests, EKGs, labs and Xrays, to the exemplary services of three highly-trained doctors and four mid-level providers, all of whom rotate among the centers to address Citrus Countys family medicine, general practice, and internal medicine needs. The goal at Suncoast Primary Care Specialists revolves around the principle that better coordination of patient care throughout his or her treatment results to a healthier and happier patient, hence the unified team approach of the providers. With the aid of modern technology and seamless communication, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is able to afford its patients the best care possible by eliminating unnecessary duplication of procedures; doing away with unnecessary travel time by arranging treatments, appointments and referrals; and reinforcing proper and correct prescriptions and respective dosages. Because some services are already done in-house, the patients time and convenience are emphasized. The staff of doctors at Suncoast Primary Care Specialists includes Dr. Catherine Navarro, Board Certified in Family Practice; Dr. Alistair Co, Board Certified in Family Practice; and Dr. Alex Villacastin, Board Certified in Internal Medicine. Mid-level Providers include Alexander Villacastin, ARNP-C, Sheila Villacastin, ARNP-C, Maria Villacastin, ARNP-C, and Lawrence Stawkowski, PA-C. Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is also supported by doctors and providers in other areas of medicine who rotate at a Multi-specialty Clinic on-site, so patient care continuity and convenience are addressed. In his 15 years of practice, Dr. Villacastin has identified that patient care breakdown usually occurs when a patient is seen by different doctors during the course of his or her treatment. The time spent coordinating simple procedures and requesting for results on top of a providers busy schedule aggravates the situation, resulting in time and productivity wasted, and adversely, sacrificing efficient patient care. He went on to adapt best practices and tailor a system for patients flow of care commencing during their hospital Suncoast Primary Care: Providing Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way stay; extending to their discharge in the community, rehabilitation or nursing facility; to the coordination of their therapy and home health care, and follow-up visits, if necessary. Ensuring continuity of care, Dr. Villacastin maintains hospital privileges at both Citrus Memorial Hospital and Seven Rivers Regional Hospital. He is also the Medical Director of both Diamond Ridge Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center and Crystal River Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center. In addition, along with the other providers at Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, he rotates in the nursing and rehab facilities in the county to monitor the care of the practices patients. This system is effective in reassuring patients that their health and well-being are continuously taken care of, regardless of which location, state and stage in life they may be in. Amid the rapid but calculated growth of Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, Dr. Villacastin strives to maintain a nourishing culture by putting the patients first and valuing them like a family member. This psyche is ingrained among the providers and office staff who work for the practice as well. They strive within reason, to know a patient, not just their physical condition. Dr. Villacastin sums up this environment by stating, When you understand the whole patient, they will open up and work with their doctor, and follow their treatment plan better. Looking forward, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists works proactively to stay ahead of the changes in healthcare and insurance regulations. With the ever-changing face of the healthcare industry, challenges are nigh. But Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is constantly adapting and reinventing so that amidst these challenges, its priority of putting patient care first, is never affected. It is now a member of an Accountable Care Organization (ACO), which, as defined by Medicare, is an organization of healthcare providers that agrees to be accountable for the quality, cost and overall care of Medicare beneficiaries who are enrolled in the traditional fee-forservice program. This program emphasizes patient outcome, benefitting the patients health and well-being. Growth is a beautiful thing. But it only if growth stands for something. As Suncoast Primary Care Specialists grows hand in hand with the community, it remains true in standing by its roots. Suncoast Primary Care Specialists will always be providing modern medicine, the old fashioned way. Always. 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL (352) 382-8282 3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Inverness, FL (352) 341-5520 10489 N. Florida Ave. Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, FL (352) 489-2486

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G9 P ROFILESINH EALTH G4 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Paid Advertisement Face to face hearing care from 60 miles away 7 Locations in Tampa Bay 700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River, FL 352-795-5700 000FZPL Audiologist Jodi Conter has been having face to face conversations, inspecting ear canals, and making hearing aid adjustments for her patients in Zephyrhills while she is in her Crystal River office. Now, Gardner Audiology is looking for partners to implement its new tele-audiology service. This teleaudiology service will become a separate division that will expand throughout central Florida. Dan Gardner M.S., master audiologist and CEO of Gardner Audiology, has been planning this concept for several years. He knows there is a need, because a 30 to 60 minute drive to visit an audiologist for a simple otoscopic inspection of your ear canals, having a face to face conversation, or getting a hearing aid adjustment is impractical. These follow-up visits are the single most important part of a successful hearing aid experience. In other instances, the audiologist may not available on a day that is convenient for the patient. If the audiology assistant is available, you can then have access remotely via tele-audiology. Dans teleaudiology services will be more convenient and save you money on the purchase and follow up care for major brand hearing aids. Here is an example of how it works right now. An assistant, under supervision of an audiologist or doctor, connects your hearing aids to a computer at a remote location. A Gardner Audiologist can evaluate and adjust those hearing aids from a different location while they are having a face to face conversation with you via the internet. Dan thinks that this process may eventually be done from the privacy of your own home. At this time, the initial exam and interview must be in person with the audiologist. Customers who have already taken advantage of this tele-audiology service by Gardner Audiology remarked that they instantly had their problem solved, were impressed with this application of live time technology, and they give it an emphatic two thumbs up. Gardner Audiology is interviewing people to become licensed as audiology assistant trainees for this project. Audiologist Jodi Conter M.S., converses with a patient in Zephyrhills from her Crystal River office while inspecting a transmitted image of their eardrum. Jodi can talk face to face with this patient and also adjust her hearing aids from remote locations. They are also looking for partners such as physicians offices and other healthcare facilities. To learn more about this great application of todays technological advances and how you can receive quality access to an audiologist from a remote access, contact Gardner Audiology. 000FZPU PAID ADVERTISEMENT Protect Your Vision Most people over the age of 60 expe rience some level of blurry vision due to cataracts, and almost everyone over 50 loses their ability to read comfortably with out glasses. The professionals at Suncoast Eye Clinic offer the ability to care for your eyes from the initial exam through surgery, if required. The satellite office in Crystal River makes it convenient to schedule a comprehensive eye exam. If it is necessary to schedule surgery to remove cataracts or remove excess eyelid folds to improve your vision, their surgery center in Hudson, Florida, can complete the job. Bus trans portation is even provided for your conven ience. Suncoast Eye Clinic maintains total control of every step of the process to ensure your protection and desired out come. What can I do for myself? Incorporate healthy eye habits. Many eye health and vision problems occur naturally with age and with no obvi ous signs or symptoms. The most important way to prevent eye health issues from becoming unmanageable is by scheduling an annual exam with Suncoast Eye Clinic. More than 80 percent of all visual impair ment is treatable, preventable or curable, so early diagnosis and proper care is critical. In addition to regular eye exams, the fol lowing habits can help maintain healthy eyes and vision: Obtain the right glasses or contact lenses to correct visual impairment and always disinfect and replace contact lenses as recommended Wear sunglasses or hats to block harmful UV rays and glare Avoid smoking Maintain a healthy weight to avoid systemic conditionssuch as diabetes that may lead to impaired vision Monitor chronic health conditions (diabetes and high blood pressure) Reduce computer-induced eye strain by practicing the 20-20-20 rule: look 20 feet away for 20 seconds, every 20 minutes Eat a healthy diet for plenty of anti oxidant rich foods and omega-3 fatty acids, and include dietary supplements that boost your intake of vitamins and minerals that support eye health Antioxidants are nutrients that protect cells from damage caused by free radi calsmolecules caused by aging, poor diet, stress and disease. Too many free radi cals can cause eye disease, including advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Common antioxidants include vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A, selenium and zinc. They are generally found in foods with strong colors, particularly orange, yel low, red, purple and dark green fruits and vegetables. Selenium is found in Brazil nuts, whole grains, tuna, beef and dark meat turkey. Zinc is abundant in oysters, nuts, seafood, red meat, beans and dairy. Eating dark green leafy vegetables also provides lutein and zeaxanthin. These nutrients are impor tant to eye health because they help protect against harmful UV rays and lower the risk of developing age-related macular degen eration. They also act as antioxidants. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that your body uses to support healthy tear production and overall macular health. Several studies suggest that omega3 fatty acids may help protect your eyes from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and dry eye syndrome. Your body cannot produce omega-3 fatty acids, so you must get them from your food or supple ments. The foods richest in omega-3 fatty acids are cold-water fish such as sardines, her ring, salmon and tuna. Other foods contain ing omega-3 fatty acids are flaxseeds, wal nuts and dark green leafy vegetables. You also need to limit omega-6 fatty acids, which interfere with your bodys ability to absorb and use the good omega-3 fats. Foods high in omega-6 fatty acids include fried and highly processed foods such as those made with most cooking oils and trans-fats. When is it time for a professional? Are you experiencing signs of cataracts? Difficulty driving at night Difficulty reading, especially in low light Difficulty viewing a computer screen Colors appear dim and faded The appearance of glare or starbursts around lights Frequent change needed in prescrip tion glasses Cataracts are a result of the natural lens inside the eye becoming cloudy, even brown or yellow, preventing light from passing through and inhibiting images from focusing on the retina. Cataracts form naturally as we get older, but they can develop at any age as the result of an injury or a disease, or from taking certain medi cations. When these symptoms are so severe that they interfere with daily activities, the doc tor may recommend removing the natural lens that has become cloudy and replace it with an intraocular lens. The good news is that cataracts are the leading cause of treat able vision loss in adults and cataract sur gery is one of the safest and easiest pro cedures for patients to undergo. Truly words cannot express my gratitude for the cataract surgery. You gave me my sign and my hope back. Thank you! At the Suncoast Eye Center, home of the premium lenses, cataracts are treated with the most advanced surgical procedure available: a small incision, no-stitch sur gery. The clouded natural lens of the eye is removed and replaced with an advanced, artificial multifocal Lens. This unique mul tifocal implantable lens is proven to pro vide excellent vision at near, intermediate and far distances without glasses; under all lighting conditions day and night. The Multifocal Lens procedure is per formed over 15 million times per year worldwide and is recognized for its safety and predictability. The beauty of using this type of lens is that is relies on the eyes working together, as they are designed to do. By having both eyes processing all vis ual information in the same way, the mul tifocal lens gives people natural vision at all distances, much like they had when they were young. Therefore, the implants must be put in both eyes. If cataracts are affecting your lifestyle, now is the time to call the Suncoast Eye Center and find out your best option. I just wanted to thank you so much for the fantastic job done on my eyes. You did everything that you said you would do. Its so great to be able to see clearly again. Thank you! EYELID SURGERY You not only look younger but you can see better! Eyelid surgery produces very pleasing results and has become a popular outpatient procedure. Patients experience improved peripheral vision, greater ocular comfort and boast a more youthful appearance after surgery. Often a sign of aging, sagging eyelids may impair vision, cause eye irritation, and convey a tired, weary appearance. Many patients report headaches are eliminated because they had unconsciously used brow muscles to lift the sagging skin around their eyes in order to see. It is important to discuss your expec tations and to discuss your expectations and to ask any questions you may have during an initial visit. The examination will include a comprehensive vision analysis and appropriate treatment will be rec ommended based on your results. Insurance may cover your surgery if vision is impaired. Eyelid surgery involves tightening loose muscles and removing sagging skin and excess fat tissue from around the eyes. Incisions are made along the natural lines of the eyelids, and are hidden by natural folds of the skin after surgery. Surgery is performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia and lasts approximately 40 minutes. As a patient of the Suncoast Eye Center, your surgery is performed in the privacy of their special ized Eye Surgery Institute. Following surgery, you will be instructed to apply cold compresses inter mittently for 24-36 hours to ease discom fort and to reduce swelling. Excessive tear ing and sensitivity to light may occur for a few days and sunglasses will protect your eyes from sunlight and wind. You can resume your normal activities one week after surgery. Call Suncoast Eye Center today and find out how we can help you protect your vision. I want to thank Dr. Seig el for everything he has done for me. Without his generous and compassionate nature, the vast improvements to my vision and well being woul d not have been accomplished. Thank you. Suncoast Eye Center is located at 14003 Lakeshore Blvd, Hudson, FL 34667 Phone: (727) 868-9442 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341. The Crystal River Office is at 221 NE Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34429 (352) 7952526 There are many things you can do yourself to protect your eyes and retain eye health and function; but, there are times you need the services of a highly trained professional.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G5 P ROFILESINH EALTH G8 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Arrhythmia Center of Florida is dedicated to providing quality and timely care. 000G2P9 Some hearts occasionally change pace, making the heartbeat too slow, too fast, or irregular. When this happens, Its called a cardiac arrhythmia. An arrhythmia may feel like a racing heartbeat or a mild fluttering sensation in your chest or heart it could even feel like your heart is skipping a beat. Other symptoms of an arrhythmia include Dizziness or fainting Fatigue Weakness Difficulty breathing Chest pain The Arrhythmia Center of Florida at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point offers a full service program to diagnose and treat patients who experience cardiac arrhythmias. To learn more about the Arrhythmia Center of Florida, please visit our web site at YourHeartBeat.com or call 727-869-5565 or toll free 855-534-4325 to speak with a health care professional. PAID ADVERTISEMENT Ever notice your heart skip a beat? Maybe you feel it race faster than normal or seem out of rhythm? Should you be concerned? Its just normal, isnt it? Its called Arrhythmia. Find out what that means. A cardiac arrhythmia is an abnormality in the heartbeatwhether the rhythm is too slow, too fast, or irregular. In some cases, a cardiac arrhythmia could be nothing to worry about. For other patients, an arrhythmia could turn life threatening. Even a harmless irregularity in the heartbeat should be carefully observed in case the situation changes. Arrhythmias can be caused by any change or complication that forms in the electrical pathway that runs from the upper chambers of the heart to the lower chambers. Sometimes this can result in a heart beating under 60 beats per minute, or a heart that beats over 100 times in a minute. Some irregular heartbeats will vary chaotically between the two extremes without a discernible pattern. Arrhythmia patients will often notice a racing heartbeat or a peculiar fluttering sensation in their chest or neck. Other symptoms of an arrhythmia include: Dizziness or fainting Fatigue Weakness Difficulty breathing Chest pain An arrhythmia is when the hearts electrical systems do not work properly. Each year, over 850,000 Americans are hospitalized for an arrhythmia. Having a local full-service facility thats focused solely on treating arrhythmias means patients wont have to go out of the area to receive specialized care, said Julie Lallanilla, Director of Electrophysiology at RMC Bayonet Point. The Arrhythmia Center of Florida (ACOF) is open to diagnose and treat patients who suffer from cardiac arrhythmias. The ACOF is part of the nationally recognized Heart Institute at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. With a state-of-the-art electrophysiology lab and full-service facility, the ACOF is able to diagnose and treat all types of arrhythmias. Arrhythmia Center of Florida is dedicated to providing quality and timely care. They are fully staffed with expert physicians and healthcare professionals who are committed to giving their patients the care they need while experiencing a cardiac arrhythmia. They possess a state-of-the-art lab that is fully equipped with the latest technology used to diagnose and effectively treat cardiac patients. Along with making high-quality cardiac care available to the community, this center works toward promoting awareness and education about arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and other cardiac complications. The ACOFs physicians and healthcare professionals have served patients in West Central Florida since 1995 and perform over 1,000 electrophysiology procedures annually. Medical Director Luis R. Annoni, MD leads the ACOFs team of six electrophysiologists (cardiologists who specialize in arrhythmias). Along with Dr. Annoni, ACOF electrophysiologists include: Rajiva Goyal, MD; Raul Jimenez, MD; Huang-Ta Lin, MD; Darshan V. Patel, MD; and Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD. For some patients, an arrhythmia may be nothing to worry about. For others, it may be a life threatening medical condition, said Dr. Annoni. Anyone experiencing an arrhythmia should see a physician right away. Depending on the state of your arrhythmia, you may be recommended to undergo a variety of different treatments. Some of your options could be as simple as lifestyle changes or medications. There are several approaches for diagnosing and observing a cardiac arrhythmia. Some methods include: Electrocardiogram (EKG) Echocardiogram Electrophysiology Study (EP Study) Cardiac Stress Test Tilt Table Test Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE) Event Recorder, Holter Monitor or Implantable Loop Recorder Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point has been serving th e community since 1981. They are a 290-bed acute care hospital located in Hudson, FL and home of the nationally acclaimed Heart Institute. They have more than 350 physicians, 900 employees and 500 volunteers on our integrated healthcare delivery team. RMCBP has been approved by the Florida Department of Health, Office of Trauma, as a Provisional Level 2 Trauma Center. This designation means critically injured patients may have access to treatment in the golden hour. This is the first hour after a serious injury in which there is the highest likelihood that prompt medical attention will prevent death. Through an affiliation with the University of South Florida Health, RMCBP has the support of a major academic university and medical school. A Trauma Center in our community means faster treatment to improve patient outcomes and keep patients close to home and their loved ones. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point has achieved distinction in the following areas: Recipient of the 2012 American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Associations Get With The Guidelines Gold Plus Performance Achievement Award in both heart failure and stroke. Recipient of the AHAs Mission: Lifeline Bronze Quality Achievement Award for implementing a higher standard of heart attack care that improves the survival and outcomes for STEMI (ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction) patients. American Heart Associations 2009 Stroke Silver Plus Performance Award Winner (1st in State of Florida) Top Performing Hospital, the Joint Commission recognized as one of the nations top performing hospitals in quality measurements for heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, and surgical care. Certified Advance Primary Stroke Center Joint Commission Accredited Chest Pain Center, with PCI Society of Chest Pain Centers for Cycle I, II and III Heart & Stroke Champions Award Winner 1998 2011 MRI, CT, Ultrasound, and Nuclear Medicine Accredited American College of Radiology Approved, with Commendation, Community Cancer Program American College of Surgeons. 10 Joint Commission Disease-Specific Certification: primary stroke center, acute myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary artery bypass graft, heart failure, joint replacement hip, joint replacement knee, lung cancer, pneumonia, wound care! Certified Advanced Heart Failure Joint Commission (1st in the State of Florida 1/2010) Designated a 100 Top Hospital seven years by Thomson Reuters Named twice (1999 & 2002) by U.S. News & World Report as one of Americas Best Hospitals in Heart and Heart Surgery. RMCBP is the only hospital in Tampa Bay area to achieve the Gold Plus standard in both heart failure and stroke. On June 14, 2012, The Leapfrog Group recently made public its Safe Hospital Scores. The scores are derived from Leapfrogs key questions and publicly reported data. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point received an A rating for safety. This recognition has very special meaning for us, said Shayne George, CEO of Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. It is a recognition of our entire staffs effort to ensure our service area of the safest hospital experience possible. What is most important is that this is another objective recognition of the quality of care provided here at RMCBP, he added. According to the Leapfrog Group approximately 400 people daily die because of hospital errors the equivalent of a jet crashing every day and killing all aboard. In response to this silent epidemic, over 2,600 US hospitals now receive an A, B, C, D or F score based on patient safety. A panel of the nations top patient safety experts provides guidance to The Leapfrog Group, an independent national nonprofit run by employers and other large purchasers of health benefits, to develop the Hospital Safety Score. The Hospital Safety Score is calculated using publicly available data on patient injuries, medical and medication errors, and infections. The Leapfrog Groups goal is to give patients the vital information they need and deserve before even entering a hospital, said Leah Binder, president and CEO, The Leapfrog Group. We hope people will use this score to talk with their doctor, make informed decisions about where to seek care, and take the right precautions during a hospital stay. For the first time the Hospital Safety Score highlights the countrys best hospitals and warns against the worst to save lives and bring attention to the nations silent safety epidemic. The Hospital Safety Score website www.HospitalSafetyScore.org allows visitors to search hospital scores for free and provides information for the public to protect themselves and loved ones during a hospital stay. The Hospital Safety Score exclusively measures safety meaning errors, accidents, and infections. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point received a near perfect score in all of the areas of safe practice measures. The Arrhythmia Center of Florida is located at 14000 Fivay Road in Hudson near the intersection of US 19 and Hudson Avenue. To learn more about cardiac arrhythmias, diagnostic procedures, and treatments, visit the ACOF website at www.yourheartbeat.com or call 727-869-5565 or toll free at 855-534-4325. A Lens For Every Lifestyle At Suncoast Eye Center Our Most Important Patient Is You! 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com 000FZPQ When Experience Counts Most Advanced Cataract Surgery with Multifocal IOL Premium Lens Implants Droopy Eyelid Surgery Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecare Specialists Eye Exams LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D Board Certified Ophthalmologist ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Board Certified Ophthalmologist

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G7 P ROFILESINH EALTH G6 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH In home care for longer, healthier, and more purposeful life Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes in-home care to a new level. Since the business opened in 2004, their mission has been to transform day-to-day caregiving into opportunities for meaningful conversation and activities that engage and enrich the lives of seniors physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that the practice of Interactive Caregiving TM contributes to longer, healthier, more purposeful lives for seniors. Comfort Keepers caregivers are well trained, professional caregivers who are set apart by their natural gift of caring for others. To work with Comfort Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent screening and interviewing processes and must show a strong devotion to others. Only a few special people who pass this process go on to complete the training necessary to deliver this special brand of care and become Comfort Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass extensive background checks that exceed both state and franchise requirements and also must complete continuing education. In-home care is a growing need for seniors who desire to stay in their own homes with familiar surroundings, but can no longer take care of the necessary requirements of the home. Sometimes, all that is needed is a little assistance to enable a senior to stay in their own home and function safely for many more years. Whether it is only a few hours a week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at Comfort Keepers make it possible for seniors to continue to live in their own home and enjoy a quality of life that they thought was going to change forever. This care reinforces seniors self value by allowing them to continue their daily activities with as much independence as possible. The focus is providing solutions for the normal transition of aging. In order to achieve the most favorable outcome for each client, Comfort Keepers carefully matches caregivers and clients by personalities, interests, skills and needs. This extra consideration forms the basis of strong, healthful relationships. Comfort Keepers Care Coordinators work as partners with our clients family to provide their loved one a complete inhomecare solution to promote independent living. Comfort Keepers provides companionship and assistance through: Meal Preparation Laundry & Linen Washing Light Housekeeping Grooming & Dressing Support Errand Services Bathing & Hygiene Care Grocery Shopping Respite Care Transportation Alzheimers/Dementia Care All Comfort Keepers caregivers are employees of the company and not independent contractors. All of our caregivers are bonded and covered with Workers Compensation and Liability Insurance. Comforts Keepers is locally-owned and family operated by Deborah and Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively involved in the community and participates and sponsors local organizations like, Chamber of Commerce, Womens Business Alliance, Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters and various health expos. For in-depth information about Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com or stop by the local office at 2244 Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida. Phone: 352-726-4547 Paid Advertisement 2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL (352) 726-4547 www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888 Companionship Escort for Shopping and Meal Preparation Doctors Appointments Laundry Bathing and Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care Medication Reminders Alzheimers/Dementia Care In-Home Care Services that help people maintain full and independent lives We Are Comfort Keepers 000G34X Our family is here to give comfort to your family. Gailen, Jennifer & Lindsey discussing quality care. Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager, Gailen Spinka, General Manager and Lindsey Haller, Administrator Deborah & Bart will help you when you call. Deborah Spinka, Office Manager and Bart Haller Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner, Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison, Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner 000FX5M Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County with 262 acute care beds. It is also one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates, and over 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals healthcare delivery team. Oak Hill Hospitals $52 million OR & Bed Tower expansion project recently added 70,000 new square feet on the hospitals north side. Renovations to another 30,000 square feet make this the largest project of its kind in Hernando County history. The total spent in construction is $40 million and the total amount for design/ engineering and permits, etc. is $12 million, bringing the total cost of the project to $52 million. The expansion provides eight new operating rooms and a twostory in-patient bed tower with 36 private Intensive Care Rooms and expanded parking for patients and their families. Not only is Oak Hill Hospital the largest hospital in the area, but they also offer the most current state-of-the-art technology. Oak Hill Hospital has recently acquired the newly refined da Vinci Si Robotic Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgical System by Intuitive This is the regions most advanced robotic assisted surgical system and will be used in procedures in the areas of: Gynecology, Oncology, Thoracic Surgery, General Surgery and Urology. The newly refined da Vinci Si Surgical System is a system that allows for minimally invasive and single-site surgery. It includes: Advanced 3D HD visualization, EndoWrist instrumentation with dexterity and range of motion far greater than the human hand, Intuitive Motion technology, which replicates the experience of open surgery by preserving natural eye-hand-instrument alignment and intuitive instrument control. Together, these technological advancements provide unparalleled precision, dexterity, and control that enable a minimally invasive approach to many complex procedures. This more advanced robotic assisted surgical system now allows for increased surgeon control, resulting in increased patient safety. The 3D visualization provides a higher quality HD imagery for the physician. This all results in a faster recovery for the patient and a quicker return to life as usual. Oak Hill has achieved distinction as the: First and Only open heart surgery hospital in Hernando County. First Chest Pain Center with PCI (heart catheterization) in Hernando County accredited by the Society of Chest Pain Centers. First and Only advanced level primary stroke center in Hernando County to be fully accredited by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in America. First comprehensive Womens Imaging Center in Hernando County and the first imaging center offering digital mammography with computer aided detection. First hospital in the area to be recognized as an accredited cancer institute by the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS). First hospital in the region to achieve Heart Failure accreditation with the Society of Chest Pain Centers. First hospital in the region to offer a comprehensive Orthopaedic & Spine Institute and first to achieve national certification by The Joint Commission for its Hip & Knee replacement and spinal fusion programs. First in the nation to have achieved 100% Board Certified Emergency Nurses, CENs. Only Emergency Care Center in Florida, and one of only 20 nationwide, honored by the Emergency Nurses Association for its first-ever Lantern Award exemplifying exceptional and innovative performance in the core areas of leadership, practice, education, advocacy, and research. Oak Hill Hospital is located at: 11375 Cortez Blvd. (SR 50), Spring Hill, FL 34613 Browse the website at OakHillHospital.com to learn about the physicians, services, medical information, class registrations, and much more. In Hernando County call: 352-597-6333 In Citrus County call: 352-628-6060 PAID ADVERTISING

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G7 P ROFILESINH EALTH G6 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH In home care for longer, healthier, and more purposeful life Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes in-home care to a new level. Since the business opened in 2004, their mission has been to transform day-to-day caregiving into opportunities for meaningful conversation and activities that engage and enrich the lives of seniors physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that the practice of Interactive Caregiving TM contributes to longer, healthier, more purposeful lives for seniors. Comfort Keepers caregivers are well trained, professional caregivers who are set apart by their natural gift of caring for others. To work with Comfort Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent screening and interviewing processes and must show a strong devotion to others. Only a few special people who pass this process go on to complete the training necessary to deliver this special brand of care and become Comfort Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass extensive background checks that exceed both state and franchise requirements and also must complete continuing education. In-home care is a growing need for seniors who desire to stay in their own homes with familiar surroundings, but can no longer take care of the necessary requirements of the home. Sometimes, all that is needed is a little assistance to enable a senior to stay in their own home and function safely for many more years. Whether it is only a few hours a week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at Comfort Keepers make it possible for seniors to continue to live in their own home and enjoy a quality of life that they thought was going to change forever. This care reinforces seniors self value by allowing them to continue their daily activities with as much independence as possible. The focus is providing solutions for the normal transition of aging. In order to achieve the most favorable outcome for each client, Comfort Keepers carefully matches caregivers and clients by personalities, interests, skills and needs. This extra consideration forms the basis of strong, healthful relationships. Comfort Keepers Care Coordinators work as partners with our clients family to provide their loved one a complete inhomecare solution to promote independent living. Comfort Keepers provides companionship and assistance through: Meal Preparation Laundry & Linen Washing Light Housekeeping Grooming & Dressing Support Errand Services Bathing & Hygiene Care Grocery Shopping Respite Care Transportation Alzheimers/Dementia Care All Comfort Keepers caregivers are employees of the company and not independent contractors. All of our caregivers are bonded and covered with Workers Compensation and Liability Insurance. Comforts Keepers is locally-owned and family operated by Deborah and Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively involved in the community and participates and sponsors local organizations like, Chamber of Commerce, Womens Business Alliance, Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters and various health expos. For in-depth information about Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com or stop by the local office at 2244 Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida. Phone: 352-726-4547 Paid Advertisement 2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL (352) 726-4547 www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888 Companionship Escort for Shopping and Meal Preparation Doctors Appointments Laundry Bathing and Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care Medication Reminders Alzheimers/Dementia Care In-Home Care Services that help people maintain full and independent lives We Are Comfort Keepers 000G34X Our family is here to give comfort to your family. Gailen, Jennifer & Lindsey discussing quality care. Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager, Gailen Spinka, General Manager and Lindsey Haller, Administrator Deborah & Bart will help you when you call. Deborah Spinka, Office Manager and Bart Haller Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner, Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison, Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner 000FX5M Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County with 262 acute care beds. It is also one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates, and over 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals healthcare delivery team. Oak Hill Hospitals $52 million OR & Bed Tower expansion project recently added 70,000 new square feet on the hospitals north side. Renovations to another 30,000 square feet make this the largest project of its kind in Hernando County history. The total spent in construction is $40 million and the total amount for design/ engineering and permits, etc. is $12 million, bringing the total cost of the project to $52 million. The expansion provides eight new operating rooms and a twostory in-patient bed tower with 36 private Intensive Care Rooms and expanded parking for patients and their families. Not only is Oak Hill Hospital the largest hospital in the area, but they also offer the most current state-of-the-art technology. Oak Hill Hospital has recently acquired the newly refined da Vinci Si Robotic Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgical System by Intuitive This is the regions most advanced robotic assisted surgical system and will be used in procedures in the areas of: Gynecology, Oncology, Thoracic Surgery, General Surgery and Urology. The newly refined da Vinci Si Surgical System is a system that allows for minimally invasive and single-site surgery. It includes: Advanced 3D HD visualization, EndoWrist instrumentation with dexterity and range of motion far greater than the human hand, Intuitive Motion technology, which replicates the experience of open surgery by preserving natural eye-hand-instrument alignment and intuitive instrument control. Together, these technological advancements provide unparalleled precision, dexterity, and control that enable a minimally invasive approach to many complex procedures. This more advanced robotic assisted surgical system now allows for increased surgeon control, resulting in increased patient safety. The 3D visualization provides a higher quality HD imagery for the physician. This all results in a faster recovery for the patient and a quicker return to life as usual. Oak Hill has achieved distinction as the: First and Only open heart surgery hospital in Hernando County. First Chest Pain Center with PCI (heart catheterization) in Hernando County accredited by the Society of Chest Pain Centers. First and Only advanced level primary stroke center in Hernando County to be fully accredited by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in America. First comprehensive Womens Imaging Center in Hernando County and the first imaging center offering digital mammography with computer aided detection. First hospital in the area to be recognized as an accredited cancer institute by the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS). First hospital in the region to achieve Heart Failure accreditation with the Society of Chest Pain Centers. First hospital in the region to offer a comprehensive Orthopaedic & Spine Institute and first to achieve national certification by The Joint Commission for its Hip & Knee replacement and spinal fusion programs. First in the nation to have achieved 100% Board Certified Emergency Nurses, CENs. Only Emergency Care Center in Florida, and one of only 20 nationwide, honored by the Emergency Nurses Association for its first-ever Lantern Award exemplifying exceptional and innovative performance in the core areas of leadership, practice, education, advocacy, and research. Oak Hill Hospital is located at: 11375 Cortez Blvd. (SR 50), Spring Hill, FL 34613 Browse the website at OakHillHospital.com to learn about the physicians, services, medical information, class registrations, and much more. In Hernando County call: 352-597-6333 In Citrus County call: 352-628-6060 PAID ADVERTISING

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G5 P ROFILESINH EALTH G8 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Arrhythmia Center of Florida is dedicated to providing quality and timely care. 000G2P9 Some hearts occasionally change pace, making the heartbeat too slow, too fast, or irregular. When this happens, Its called a cardiac arrhythmia. An arrhythmia may feel like a racing heartbeat or a mild fluttering sensation in your chest or heart it could even feel like your heart is skipping a beat. Other symptoms of an arrhythmia include Dizziness or fainting Fatigue Weakness Difficulty breathing Chest pain The Arrhythmia Center of Florida at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point offers a full service program to diagnose and treat patients who experience cardiac arrhythmias. To learn more about the Arrhythmia Center of Florida, please visit our web site at YourHeartBeat.com or call 727-869-5565 or toll free 855-534-4325 to speak with a health care professional. PAID ADVERTISEMENT Ever notice your heart skip a beat? Maybe you feel it race faster than normal or seem out of rhythm? Should you be concerned? Its just normal, isnt it? Its called Arrhythmia. Find out what that means. A cardiac arrhythmia is an abnormality in the heartbeatwhether the rhythm is too slow, too fast, or irregular. In some cases, a cardiac arrhythmia could be nothing to worry about. For other patients, an arrhythmia could turn life threatening. Even a harmless irregularity in the heartbeat should be carefully observed in case the situation changes. Arrhythmias can be caused by any change or complication that forms in the electrical pathway that runs from the upper chambers of the heart to the lower chambers. Sometimes this can result in a heart beating under 60 beats per minute, or a heart that beats over 100 times in a minute. Some irregular heartbeats will vary chaotically between the two extremes without a discernible pattern. Arrhythmia patients will often notice a racing heartbeat or a peculiar fluttering sensation in their chest or neck. Other symptoms of an arrhythmia include: Dizziness or fainting Fatigue Weakness Difficulty breathing Chest pain An arrhythmia is when the hearts electrical systems do not work properly. Each year, over 850,000 Americans are hospitalized for an arrhythmia. Having a local full-service facility thats focused solely on treating arrhythmias means patients wont have to go out of the area to receive specialized care, said Julie Lallanilla, Director of Electrophysiology at RMC Bayonet Point. The Arrhythmia Center of Florida (ACOF) is open to diagnose and treat patients who suffer from cardiac arrhythmias. The ACOF is part of the nationally recognized Heart Institute at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. With a state-of-the-art electrophysiology lab and full-service facility, the ACOF is able to diagnose and treat all types of arrhythmias. Arrhythmia Center of Florida is dedicated to providing quality and timely care. They are fully staffed with expert physicians and healthcare professionals who are committed to giving their patients the care they need while experiencing a cardiac arrhythmia. They possess a state-of-the-art lab that is fully equipped with the latest technology used to diagnose and effectively treat cardiac patients. Along with making high-quality cardiac care available to the community, this center works toward promoting awareness and education about arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and other cardiac complications. The ACOFs physicians and healthcare professionals have served patients in West Central Florida since 1995 and perform over 1,000 electrophysiology procedures annually. Medical Director Luis R. Annoni, MD leads the ACOFs team of six electrophysiologists (cardiologists who specialize in arrhythmias). Along with Dr. Annoni, ACOF electrophysiologists include: Rajiva Goyal, MD; Raul Jimenez, MD; Huang-Ta Lin, MD; Darshan V. Patel, MD; and Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD. For some patients, an arrhythmia may be nothing to worry about. For others, it may be a life threatening medical condition, said Dr. Annoni. Anyone experiencing an arrhythmia should see a physician right away. Depending on the state of your arrhythmia, you may be recommended to undergo a variety of different treatments. Some of your options could be as simple as lifestyle changes or medications. There are several approaches for diagnosing and observing a cardiac arrhythmia. Some methods include: Electrocardiogram (EKG) Echocardiogram Electrophysiology Study (EP Study) Cardiac Stress Test Tilt Table Test Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE) Event Recorder, Holter Monitor or Implantable Loop Recorder Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point has been serving th e community since 1981. They are a 290-bed acute care hospital located in Hudson, FL and home of the nationally acclaimed Heart Institute. They have more than 350 physicians, 900 employees and 500 volunteers on our integrated healthcare delivery team. RMCBP has been approved by the Florida Department of Health, Office of Trauma, as a Provisional Level 2 Trauma Center. This designation means critically injured patients may have access to treatment in the golden hour. This is the first hour after a serious injury in which there is the highest likelihood that prompt medical attention will prevent death. Through an affiliation with the University of South Florida Health, RMCBP has the support of a major academic university and medical school. A Trauma Center in our community means faster treatment to improve patient outcomes and keep patients close to home and their loved ones. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point has achieved distinction in the following areas: Recipient of the 2012 American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Associations Get With The Guidelines Gold Plus Performance Achievement Award in both heart failure and stroke. Recipient of the AHAs Mission: Lifeline Bronze Quality Achievement Award for implementing a higher standard of heart attack care that improves the survival and outcomes for STEMI (ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction) patients. American Heart Associations 2009 Stroke Silver Plus Performance Award Winner (1st in State of Florida) Top Performing Hospital, the Joint Commission recognized as one of the nations top performing hospitals in quality measurements for heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, and surgical care. Certified Advance Primary Stroke Center Joint Commission Accredited Chest Pain Center, with PCI Society of Chest Pain Centers for Cycle I, II and III Heart & Stroke Champions Award Winner 1998 2011 MRI, CT, Ultrasound, and Nuclear Medicine Accredited American College of Radiology Approved, with Commendation, Community Cancer Program American College of Surgeons. 10 Joint Commission Disease-Specific Certification: primary stroke center, acute myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary artery bypass graft, heart failure, joint replacement hip, joint replacement knee, lung cancer, pneumonia, wound care! Certified Advanced Heart Failure Joint Commission (1st in the State of Florida 1/2010) Designated a 100 Top Hospital seven years by Thomson Reuters Named twice (1999 & 2002) by U.S. News & World Report as one of Americas Best Hospitals in Heart and Heart Surgery. RMCBP is the only hospital in Tampa Bay area to achieve the Gold Plus standard in both heart failure and stroke. On June 14, 2012, The Leapfrog Group recently made public its Safe Hospital Scores. The scores are derived from Leapfrogs key questions and publicly reported data. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point received an A rating for safety. This recognition has very special meaning for us, said Shayne George, CEO of Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. It is a recognition of our entire staffs effort to ensure our service area of the safest hospital experience possible. What is most important is that this is another objective recognition of the quality of care provided here at RMCBP, he added. According to the Leapfrog Group approximately 400 people daily die because of hospital errors the equivalent of a jet crashing every day and killing all aboard. In response to this silent epidemic, over 2,600 US hospitals now receive an A, B, C, D or F score based on patient safety. A panel of the nations top patient safety experts provides guidance to The Leapfrog Group, an independent national nonprofit run by employers and other large purchasers of health benefits, to develop the Hospital Safety Score. The Hospital Safety Score is calculated using publicly available data on patient injuries, medical and medication errors, and infections. The Leapfrog Groups goal is to give patients the vital information they need and deserve before even entering a hospital, said Leah Binder, president and CEO, The Leapfrog Group. We hope people will use this score to talk with their doctor, make informed decisions about where to seek care, and take the right precautions during a hospital stay. For the first time the Hospital Safety Score highlights the countrys best hospitals and warns against the worst to save lives and bring attention to the nations silent safety epidemic. The Hospital Safety Score website www.HospitalSafetyScore.org allows visitors to search hospital scores for free and provides information for the public to protect themselves and loved ones during a hospital stay. The Hospital Safety Score exclusively measures safety meaning errors, accidents, and infections. Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point received a near perfect score in all of the areas of safe practice measures. The Arrhythmia Center of Florida is located at 14000 Fivay Road in Hudson near the intersection of US 19 and Hudson Avenue. To learn more about cardiac arrhythmias, diagnostic procedures, and treatments, visit the ACOF website at www.yourheartbeat.com or call 727-869-5565 or toll free at 855-534-4325. A Lens For Every Lifestyle At Suncoast Eye Center Our Most Important Patient Is You! 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com 000FZPQ When Experience Counts Most Advanced Cataract Surgery with Multifocal IOL Premium Lens Implants Droopy Eyelid Surgery Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecare Specialists Eye Exams LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D Board Certified Ophthalmologist ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Board Certified Ophthalmologist

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G9 P ROFILESINH EALTH G4 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Paid Advertisement Face to face hearing care from 60 miles away 7 Locations in Tampa Bay 700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River, FL 352-795-5700 000FZPL Audiologist Jodi Conter has been having face to face conversations, inspecting ear canals, and making hearing aid adjustments for her patients in Zephyrhills while she is in her Crystal River office. Now, Gardner Audiology is looking for partners to implement its new tele-audiology service. This teleaudiology service will become a separate division that will expand throughout central Florida. Dan Gardner M.S., master audiologist and CEO of Gardner Audiology, has been planning this concept for several years. He knows there is a need, because a 30 to 60 minute drive to visit an audiologist for a simple otoscopic inspection of your ear canals, having a face to face conversation, or getting a hearing aid adjustment is impractical. These follow-up visits are the single most important part of a successful hearing aid experience. In other instances, the audiologist may not available on a day that is convenient for the patient. If the audiology assistant is available, you can then have access remotely via tele-audiology. Dans teleaudiology services will be more convenient and save you money on the purchase and follow up care for major brand hearing aids. Here is an example of how it works right now. An assistant, under supervision of an audiologist or doctor, connects your hearing aids to a computer at a remote location. A Gardner Audiologist can evaluate and adjust those hearing aids from a different location while they are having a face to face conversation with you via the internet. Dan thinks that this process may eventually be done from the privacy of your own home. At this time, the initial exam and interview must be in person with the audiologist. Customers who have already taken advantage of this tele-audiology service by Gardner Audiology remarked that they instantly had their problem solved, were impressed with this application of live time technology, and they give it an emphatic two thumbs up. Gardner Audiology is interviewing people to become licensed as audiology assistant trainees for this project. Audiologist Jodi Conter M.S., converses with a patient in Zephyrhills from her Crystal River office while inspecting a transmitted image of their eardrum. Jodi can talk face to face with this patient and also adjust her hearing aids from remote locations. They are also looking for partners such as physicians offices and other healthcare facilities. To learn more about this great application of todays technological advances and how you can receive quality access to an audiologist from a remote access, contact Gardner Audiology. 000FZPU PAID ADVERTISEMENT Protect Your Vision Most people over the age of 60 expe rience some level of blurry vision due to cataracts, and almost everyone over 50 loses their ability to read comfortably with out glasses. The professionals at Suncoast Eye Clinic offer the ability to care for your eyes from the initial exam through surgery, if required. The satellite office in Crystal River makes it convenient to schedule a comprehensive eye exam. If it is necessary to schedule surgery to remove cataracts or remove excess eyelid folds to improve your vision, their surgery center in Hudson, Florida, can complete the job. Bus trans portation is even provided for your conven ience. Suncoast Eye Clinic maintains total control of every step of the process to ensure your protection and desired out come. What can I do for myself? Incorporate healthy eye habits. Many eye health and vision problems occur naturally with age and with no obvi ous signs or symptoms. The most important way to prevent eye health issues from becoming unmanageable is by scheduling an annual exam with Suncoast Eye Clinic. More than 80 percent of all visual impair ment is treatable, preventable or curable, so early diagnosis and proper care is critical. In addition to regular eye exams, the fol lowing habits can help maintain healthy eyes and vision: Obtain the right glasses or contact lenses to correct visual impairment and always disinfect and replace contact lenses as recommended Wear sunglasses or hats to block harmful UV rays and glare Avoid smoking Maintain a healthy weight to avoid systemic conditionssuch as diabetes that may lead to impaired vision Monitor chronic health conditions (diabetes and high blood pressure) Reduce computer-induced eye strain by practicing the 20-20-20 rule: look 20 feet away for 20 seconds, every 20 minutes Eat a healthy diet for plenty of anti oxidant rich foods and omega-3 fatty acids, and include dietary supplements that boost your intake of vitamins and minerals that support eye health Antioxidants are nutrients that protect cells from damage caused by free radi calsmolecules caused by aging, poor diet, stress and disease. Too many free radi cals can cause eye disease, including advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Common antioxidants include vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A, selenium and zinc. They are generally found in foods with strong colors, particularly orange, yel low, red, purple and dark green fruits and vegetables. Selenium is found in Brazil nuts, whole grains, tuna, beef and dark meat turkey. Zinc is abundant in oysters, nuts, seafood, red meat, beans and dairy. Eating dark green leafy vegetables also provides lutein and zeaxanthin. These nutrients are impor tant to eye health because they help protect against harmful UV rays and lower the risk of developing age-related macular degen eration. They also act as antioxidants. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that your body uses to support healthy tear production and overall macular health. Several studies suggest that omega3 fatty acids may help protect your eyes from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and dry eye syndrome. Your body cannot produce omega-3 fatty acids, so you must get them from your food or supple ments. The foods richest in omega-3 fatty acids are cold-water fish such as sardines, her ring, salmon and tuna. Other foods contain ing omega-3 fatty acids are flaxseeds, wal nuts and dark green leafy vegetables. You also need to limit omega-6 fatty acids, which interfere with your bodys ability to absorb and use the good omega-3 fats. Foods high in omega-6 fatty acids include fried and highly processed foods such as those made with most cooking oils and trans-fats. When is it time for a professional? Are you experiencing signs of cataracts? Difficulty driving at night Difficulty reading, especially in low light Difficulty viewing a computer screen Colors appear dim and faded The appearance of glare or starbursts around lights Frequent change needed in prescrip tion glasses Cataracts are a result of the natural lens inside the eye becoming cloudy, even brown or yellow, preventing light from passing through and inhibiting images from focusing on the retina. Cataracts form naturally as we get older, but they can develop at any age as the result of an injury or a disease, or from taking certain medi cations. When these symptoms are so severe that they interfere with daily activities, the doc tor may recommend removing the natural lens that has become cloudy and replace it with an intraocular lens. The good news is that cataracts are the leading cause of treat able vision loss in adults and cataract sur gery is one of the safest and easiest pro cedures for patients to undergo. Truly words cannot express my gratitude for the cataract surgery. You gave me my sign and my hope back. Thank you! At the Suncoast Eye Center, home of the premium lenses, cataracts are treated with the most advanced surgical procedure available: a small incision, no-stitch sur gery. The clouded natural lens of the eye is removed and replaced with an advanced, artificial multifocal Lens. This unique mul tifocal implantable lens is proven to pro vide excellent vision at near, intermediate and far distances without glasses; under all lighting conditions day and night. The Multifocal Lens procedure is per formed over 15 million times per year worldwide and is recognized for its safety and predictability. The beauty of using this type of lens is that is relies on the eyes working together, as they are designed to do. By having both eyes processing all vis ual information in the same way, the mul tifocal lens gives people natural vision at all distances, much like they had when they were young. Therefore, the implants must be put in both eyes. If cataracts are affecting your lifestyle, now is the time to call the Suncoast Eye Center and find out your best option. I just wanted to thank you so much for the fantastic job done on my eyes. You did everything that you said you would do. Its so great to be able to see clearly again. Thank you! EYELID SURGERY You not only look younger but you can see better! Eyelid surgery produces very pleasing results and has become a popular outpatient procedure. Patients experience improved peripheral vision, greater ocular comfort and boast a more youthful appearance after surgery. Often a sign of aging, sagging eyelids may impair vision, cause eye irritation, and convey a tired, weary appearance. Many patients report headaches are eliminated because they had unconsciously used brow muscles to lift the sagging skin around their eyes in order to see. It is important to discuss your expec tations and to discuss your expectations and to ask any questions you may have during an initial visit. The examination will include a comprehensive vision analysis and appropriate treatment will be rec ommended based on your results. Insurance may cover your surgery if vision is impaired. Eyelid surgery involves tightening loose muscles and removing sagging skin and excess fat tissue from around the eyes. Incisions are made along the natural lines of the eyelids, and are hidden by natural folds of the skin after surgery. Surgery is performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia and lasts approximately 40 minutes. As a patient of the Suncoast Eye Center, your surgery is performed in the privacy of their special ized Eye Surgery Institute. Following surgery, you will be instructed to apply cold compresses inter mittently for 24-36 hours to ease discom fort and to reduce swelling. Excessive tear ing and sensitivity to light may occur for a few days and sunglasses will protect your eyes from sunlight and wind. You can resume your normal activities one week after surgery. Call Suncoast Eye Center today and find out how we can help you protect your vision. I want to thank Dr. Seig el for everything he has done for me. Without his generous and compassionate nature, the vast improvements to my vision and well being woul d not have been accomplished. Thank you. Suncoast Eye Center is located at 14003 Lakeshore Blvd, Hudson, FL 34667 Phone: (727) 868-9442 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341. The Crystal River Office is at 221 NE Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34429 (352) 7952526 There are many things you can do yourself to protect your eyes and retain eye health and function; but, there are times you need the services of a highly trained professional.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G3 P ROFILESINH EALTH 000G3AS Profiles Health in Citrus Countys Gerry Mulligan Publisher Trina MurphyAdvertising/Operations DirectorTrista StokesAdvertising Sales Manager Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429We are excited to present this special advertising section providing you with a better knowledge about a variety of local health related businesses. In these advertisements, readers will learn about the rich history of these businesses and about the products and services they offer. These businesses provide an excellent choice for customers to meet their health needs. They make our community a better place to live with their choices of products and services and serve as an integral part of the community through participation in community events and fundraisers. The feature articles contained in this publication were written by Advertising Features Correspondent Rita Johnson, who has been a freelance writer with the Chronicle for seven years. She has written hundreds of advertising feature articles about Citrus County businesses and the Nature Coast. Her background includes more than 20 years of writing while working in nutrition, alternative medicine and quantum physics. After receiving her doctorate in Alternative Medicine, Rita completed her PhD in Integrative Medicine so that she can now publish articles in medical journals and teach college level courses. We are confident you will find this publication useful and interesting and we encourage your support of these local businesses as they help our community grow and prosper. G10 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way Now Accepting New Patients Now Accepting New Patients 000FY0I Alistair Co, MD Family Practice Alex Villacastin, MD Internal Medicine Catherine Sembrano-Navarro, MD Family Practice Maria Villacastin, ARNP Shiela Villacastin, ARNP Alexander Villacastin, ARNP Lawrence Stawkowski PA Paid Advertisement Inverness 3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N Florida Ave. 489-2486 Same Day Appointments Available! From a one-physician practice, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists has evolved over the past ten years to a formidable name in health care in Citrus County. Together with the gradual growth of the community and the increasing number of countless highly satisfied patients, the practice has extended its reach by opening centers in three strategic locations: Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, Inverness and Homosassa, easily becoming a household name. Led by its founder, Dr. Alex T. Villacastin, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists currently accepts new patients with comfort and convenience in mind. These are reflected by the well-appointed office spaces, ample parking lots, availability of ancilliary services like Bone Density Tests, EKGs, labs and Xrays, to the exemplary services of three highly-trained doctors and four mid-level providers, all of whom rotate among the centers to address Citrus Countys family medicine, general practice, and internal medicine needs. The goal at Suncoast Primary Care Specialists revolves around the principle that better coordination of patient care throughout his or her treatment results to a healthier and happier patient, hence the unified team approach of the providers. With the aid of modern technology and seamless communication, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is able to afford its patients the best care possible by eliminating unnecessary duplication of procedures; doing away with unnecessary travel time by arranging treatments, appointments and referrals; and reinforcing proper and correct prescriptions and respective dosages. Because some services are already done in-house, the patients time and convenience are emphasized. The staff of doctors at Suncoast Primary Care Specialists includes Dr. Catherine Navarro, Board Certified in Family Practice; Dr. Alistair Co, Board Certified in Family Practice; and Dr. Alex Villacastin, Board Certified in Internal Medicine. Mid-level Providers include Alexander Villacastin, ARNP-C, Sheila Villacastin, ARNP-C, Maria Villacastin, ARNP-C, and Lawrence Stawkowski, PA-C. Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is also supported by doctors and providers in other areas of medicine who rotate at a Multi-specialty Clinic on-site, so patient care continuity and convenience are addressed. In his 15 years of practice, Dr. Villacastin has identified that patient care breakdown usually occurs when a patient is seen by different doctors during the course of his or her treatment. The time spent coordinating simple procedures and requesting for results on top of a providers busy schedule aggravates the situation, resulting in time and productivity wasted, and adversely, sacrificing efficient patient care. He went on to adapt best practices and tailor a system for patients flow of care commencing during their hospital Suncoast Primary Care: Providing Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way stay; extending to their discharge in the community, rehabilitation or nursing facility; to the coordination of their therapy and home health care, and follow-up visits, if necessary. Ensuring continuity of care, Dr. Villacastin maintains hospital privileges at both Citrus Memorial Hospital and Seven Rivers Regional Hospital. He is also the Medical Director of both Diamond Ridge Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center and Crystal River Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center. In addition, along with the other providers at Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, he rotates in the nursing and rehab facilities in the county to monitor the care of the practices patients. This system is effective in reassuring patients that their health and well-being are continuously taken care of, regardless of which location, state and stage in life they may be in. Amid the rapid but calculated growth of Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, Dr. Villacastin strives to maintain a nourishing culture by putting the patients first and valuing them like a family member. This psyche is ingrained among the providers and office staff who work for the practice as well. They strive within reason, to know a patient, not just their physical condition. Dr. Villacastin sums up this environment by stating, When you understand the whole patient, they will open up and work with their doctor, and follow their treatment plan better. Looking forward, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists works proactively to stay ahead of the changes in healthcare and insurance regulations. With the ever-changing face of the healthcare industry, challenges are nigh. But Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is constantly adapting and reinventing so that amidst these challenges, its priority of putting patient care first, is never affected. It is now a member of an Accountable Care Organization (ACO), which, as defined by Medicare, is an organization of healthcare providers that agrees to be accountable for the quality, cost and overall care of Medicare beneficiaries who are enrolled in the traditional fee-forservice program. This program emphasizes patient outcome, benefitting the patients health and well-being. Growth is a beautiful thing. But it only if growth stands for something. As Suncoast Primary Care Specialists grows hand in hand with the community, it remains true in standing by its roots. Suncoast Primary Care Specialists will always be providing modern medicine, the old fashioned way. Always. 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL (352) 382-8282 3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Inverness, FL (352) 341-5520 10489 N. Florida Ave. Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, FL (352) 489-2486

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, September 24, 2013 G11 P ROFILESINH EALTH G2 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Dad feel like family and they offer so many activities to help him adjust. My Dads every need is met and he is so well cared for. It is such a comfort to me. Sunflower Springs is a resort-style senior community conveniently nestled in a beautiful, tranquil setting. Sunflower Springs presents a unique, active assisted lifestyle for Citrus County seniors. The community provides a premier resident focused environment with the warmth of home and peace of mind. A 24-hour compassionate staff are highly trained and committed to serving the residents. Residents dont have to live here they want to, explains Melissa Rogers. If you think moving to assisted living would slow you down, think again! Come see how active OUR seniors are!!. or more than 10 years, Superior Residences has cared for people with Alzheimers and other memory disorders. The team at Superior Residences of Lecanto offers a truly superior living experience that gives family members the confidence that their loved ones are receiving the care, comfort, and lifestyle they deserve. Memory Care is a very specialized area of assisted living which includes therapies and activities that stimulate residents with Alzheimers and other dementia related disorders. From the therapy and life enrichment programs to the residential design, specially trained staff and secure grounds, every element of Superior Residences caters to the unique and personalized needs of the memory care residents. The staff specializes in compassionate dementia care and is there to console and encourage their residents, and to join the resident in their personal journey. Their motto, Live the moment, love the moment, reminds the staff to assist residents in celebrating and enjoying each moment. AtSuperior Residences of Lecanto, the trained staff provides therapies, healthcare monitoring and management, personal care assistance and more. The staff is available around the clock, working to make each day comfortable and enjoyable for all residents. Superior Residences takes pride in giving their residents a sense of family and community while encouraging them to maintain as much independence as possible. When your loved one is in Superior Residences of Lecanto, you can be confident in knowing they are not only receiving the best care available; but also that they are living a happy, enriched, and comfortable life. The new Superior Residences at Lecanto offers studio apartments, on-site barber and salon services, outdoor activity areas, scheduled transportation daystay and respite care. Each resident has a therapy program and social schedule that meets their own needs and preferences. 000FY8F W E A RE F AMILY Like us on Facebook 4865 Gulf to Lake Highway, Lecanto 352.746.5483 www.superioralf.comAssisted Living Facility License #12256 8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa352.621.8017 www.sunfloweralf.comAssisted Living Facility License #11566 Let Us Help! You are not alone we understand Paid Advertisement Get More Life! Out Of T he sister community, Sunflower Springs, was conceived by and built by a group of local doctors who wanted to set the standard for assisted living. Executive Director, Melissa Rogers, RN, and Director of Community Relations, Amy Holaday, are excited for you to visit their community. A visit to Sunflower Springs Assisted Living will show you why they are filled with happy people and currently have a waiting list to get in. As Melissa Rogers phrased it, This is like a fun-filled, all-inclusive cruise ship that never leaves the port. There are numerous diverse activities to choose from each day, including crafts, exercise, Happy Hour, trips, local events and even volunteer opportunities. As one resident, Rose, explained, My daughter looked all around and really researched to find a place where I would enjoy to live. Everyone here is so happy. There is no backstabbing and no gossiping going on. Everyone gets along. I am very happy here. I moved here to be near my daughter, Nola Clay Atkinson told us. I have lots of friends here and I know all of the residents. Everyone gets along. I have recommended this place to all of my friends. They really spoil me here. Nola is involved in most of the social activities; and in spite of being visually challenged, she enjoys the activities; and is organizing a group to teach them her favorite card game of hand and foot. Shari Billings wanted her Dad, who is 90, to move close to her after losing her mother last year. This experience was very difficult but ended up better than I could have expected. Everyone has madeF Medical appointment 352-527-0247 Dental appointment 352-249-9258 www.citruscountyhealth.org Adult Health Care Birth and Death Certificates Childrens Care Dental Care Disaster Preparedness Disease Prevention Environmental Health SERVICES Family Planning/Womens Health Health Education Healthy Start/Mom Care Illness Investigation Tobacco Prevention Walk in Clinics WIC/Nutrition What does the Department of Health offer? 000G0LB The Florida Department of Health Citrus County (DOH) has offices geographically situated throughout the county and conveniently located on the bus routes. There isnt room to list all of the information and services available to the residents, but it would be worth your time to stop by the main office or browse their website. Here is a brief highlight of some of the programs being offered: Community Health Center provides primary care medical services, including: physical exams, health screening, x-ray referrals, well/sick care, medical follow-up, and referral to specialists, immunizations and more. Central appointment scheduling for all three service sites: (352) 527-0247. Clinic Hours: Mon-Fri 7:00-5:30 Two walk-in clinics offering excellent ER alternative care and cost effective treatment with no appointment necessary. Mon-Fri 7:00-12:30 and 1:00-5:30 Dental Services for children. DOHCitrus partners with the school system to place a sealant on the permanent molars of second grade children to prevent decay. Last year this service provided 867 sealant applications. Limited dental services are available to adults on an emergency basis. Mon Fri 7:00am5:00pm. Please call for an appointment (352)249-9258 Press option 1 then type ext 249 Provide birth and death certificates Partner with mosquito control to monitor mosquito borne diseases Provided over 5,000 immunizations annually Offer OB services and typically sees over 400 pregnant women a year. W.I.C. Women, Infant and Children Program typically see 2,900 residents a month Staff visits new mothers at both hospitals to assist with breastfeeding. Work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to monitor outbreaks of infectious disease. Coordinate with community partners (hospitals, private healthcare providers, day cares, school system) on illness investigations. Partner with Animal Services and community partners for Rabies Prevention Offer environmental health services to help protect Citrus County Onsite sewage inspections for new construction, repairs and existing buildings Work with Sheriff Dept., Red Cross, EMS, private partners and school board to prepare for disasters through an all hazard approach plan and train for disaster preparedness. Teach residents to prepare for disasters. Tobacco prevention S.W.A.T. teams Students Working Against Tobacco. Quitline 1-877-822-6669. The Quitline is a service of the Florida Department of Health and is accessible to any Florida resident who is ready to make the commitment to quit smoking. The DOH Citrus is working hard for the residents of Citrus County. Call or stop by to see what they can do for you. The DOH Citrus Administrative Office is located at: 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461. Website: www.citruscountyhealth.org Paid Advertisement Post Surgery Care Stroke Rehab Cardiac Program Superior Woundcare I.V. Therapy www.cypresscovecare.com (352) 795-8832 700 Southeast 8th Ave. Crystal River A Five-Star Rated Facility *Rating by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 000G23T Inpatient & Outpatient Skilled Care Making A Difference With Every Life We Touch New technology being used to advance care. PAID ADVERTISING Cypress Cove Care Center is a skilled nursing facility that has served the short term and long term care needs for residents of Citrus County and the surrounding area for over 20 years. Throughout this time, Cypress Cove Care Center has continuously provided the highest level of quality care to residents, as evidenced by the many awards they have received. They are proud to have received the Five Star Rating from the Centers from Medicare and Medicaid (CMS); a Five Star Rating from the Florida Agency for Healthcare (AHCA); as well as being listed as one of the top nursing homes in America in US News and World Report. Recent awards also include the New Image Award from the Citrus County Chamber and Best of the Best Honorable Mention. In addition, Cypress Cove Care Center was acknowledged by the Governor of Florida for Safety Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP). At Cypress Cove, they are taking advantage of all of the new technological advances and have incorporated many new innovations. Technology has opened new ways to communicate not only between families but within the facility itself. Understanding that relatives are tied up with work schedules and busy lives and that they cannot travel as often as they would like, Cypress Cove has made it possible to plan visits with the residents via the internet. Using SKYPE and Face Time allows residents to communicate with family members who are out of state. Residents can watch their children and grandchildren as they speak with them, and their loved ones can see them, too. Activities have also been enhanced and expanded by bringing games to the big screen TV. There are many computer applications (apps) available to entertain and increase the activity of the residents. Some favorite ones are 3D horse racing, Musical Bingo and various exercise programs. Apps are less expensive than traditional board games and the selections are seemingly endless. Along with all of the new choices, residents still enjoy the Wii for tennis, bowling and exercise classes. Therapy is also making use of the new technology. For example, residents with communication deficits are learning to communicate using apps on Kindle devices. Using pictures for words helps the residents speak to others. Cypress Cove Care Center has begun to integrate the new programs into all areas of the center. Resident Council, the Activity Department and Therapy have joined together in an effort to raise funds to purchase additional iPads and Kindles. Before you choose a skilled nursing facility for your loved one, visit Cypress Cove at their website cypresscovecare.com. They also encourage you to call and ask to speak to the Admissions Department. Someone is always available to answer any of your questions or schedule a tour of the facility. Cypress Cove Care Center is a nonprofit facility located at 700 SE 8th Avenue in Crystal River, Florida 34429. PHONE: (352) 795-8832

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G12 Tuesday, September 24, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH 000G3MR in Medical Nutrition Wellness Advertising Supplement