Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03270

Full Text

Bittersweet: Gators lose QB in win over Tennesse


Mostly cloudy,
70% chance of
storms.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next
morning


SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


C ITRU S C 0 NT U TY





NICwww.chronicleonline.com
^& www.chronicleonline.com


EXCURSIONS:

r. A


To the market
Community Farmers
Markets are quickly
becoming a way of life
in many cities, towns
and villages./Page A13


'He had no


Peters just wanted time with

children, his sister says


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
He bought the girls
clothes and blankets.
They had help from
perfect strangers along
the way
And, according to fam-
ily members, Edward Pe-
ters' biggest regret isn't


the possibility of prison -
it's not knowing when he
will see his daughters
again.
Peters, 45, abducted
daughters Madison, 11


and Mckala, 6, from their
grandfather's driveway
the Sunday morning of
Sept. 8, Citrus County
Sheriff's officials said. He
traveled to Michigan,
where authorities say he
abandoned his Jeep and
stole an SUYV
The trek ended with his


. Page A7


Madison, left, and Mckala Peters spent 11 days on the
road with their dad, Edward. The trio are seen in an
undated family photo taken prior to the trip.
JILLIAN COUILLARD/Special to the Chronicle


Lifetime pilot
Tom Davis recounts his
time as a U.S. Navy Air
Force pilot./Page A16
SAVE OUR WATERS:
I "T '1


POW/MIA ceremony


Waters Week
Rep. Jimmie T Smith
and special columnist
"Toadly Ossum" write
about Save Our Waters
Week. Also see the
second-place winner of
the annual photo
contest./Page Cl
* See the third-place
winner of the photo
contest and read a list
of water-wise rules.
/HomeFront


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office motorcycle division escorts 100-plus motorcycles from the county fairgrounds in Inverness to the Inverness
Elks Lodge No. 2522 where a memorial service was held in recognition of the country's prisoners of war (POW) and missing in action (MIA).
Several surviving POWs were in attendance. Many members of Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 participated in the ride.

Hundreds turn out to show service members not forgotten in Citrus County


BUSINESS:


New iPhone
Read about Apple's
new product./Page Dl


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B4
Menus ...........A6
M ovies ..................... A14
Obituaries ................A9
Together...................A18
Veterans ........ A16


6 184g578 2007 11o


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS
Their eyes filled with tears, but their
heads were held high as nearly 200
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7
bikers and guests stood clapping as
ex-prisoners of war (POW) and those once
missing in action (MIA) made their walk
of honor to the front of the crowd.


Unemployment

drops in county as

labor force shrinks
Chronicle
Citrus County's August unemployment
rate dropped to 8.0 percent, down 0.4 per-
cent over the month. Figures released Fri-
day by the state show those numbers were
driven by a reduction in the labor force
rather than a hike in employment.
Citrus County's labor force decreased by
333 to 57,350, the number of employed fell
See Page A8


Almost everyone would agree that
these heroes deserved the grand welcom-
ing at the National POW/MIA Recognition
Day Saturday at the Inverness Elks Lodge
No. 2522 in Hernando.
"It is time that we set aside to look at
the future and to make a promise to all of
the families who have soldiers who are
unaccounted for that they will be ac-
counted for," said Rolling Thunder
Florida state liaison Ray Thompson. "We


* Levy County's labor force shrank by 89 to
16,362, those with jobs rose by 411 to
15,068 and the number of unemployed
dropped by 130 to 1,294, which is down 325
over last year when the unemployment rate
was 9.9 percent.
* Marion County's labor force decreased by
123 to 135,680, the number of employed
increased by 426 to 124,975 and those
without jobs fell by 549 to 10,705, a drop of
2,919 over last year when the unemploy-
ment rate was 10.1 percent.
* Florida's August unemployment rate was
the lowest since September 2008 (also
7.0 percent).
* Florida has gained jobs over the month for


want to thank all the ones who have
served and captured and prisoners of war
because of their sacrifice."
Their day began nearly an hour prior to
the ceremony at the Citrus County Fair-
grounds. They were escorted through In-
verness, up North Croft Avenue and then
across the newly renamed POW/MIA
Highway, part of County Road 486.


Page A5


23 of the last 26 months.
* Florida's housing starts were up 33.2
percent over the year in July.
* Florida's median household income in 2012
of more than $45,000 decreased slightly
from the previous year, but the change was
statistically insignificant.
* Florida's median household income is down
more than 11 percent from $50,700 in
2000. Only seven other states had larger
decreases in the past dozen years.
* Nationally, the median household income
was $51,371 in 2012. Of the nation's 10
most populous states, Florida's median
household income was the lowest.


VOL. 119 ISSUE 46


HIGH
87
LOW
73


/B1
i*


HIGHLIGHTS FROM STATE EMPLOYMENT REPORTS


iLO1



H~kk~IL ,f




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Preliminary flood maps on


display at Thursday meeting


Special to the Chronicle
Homeowners and business owners in
Citrus County should be aware of poten-
tial flood risk changes.
A public outreach open house is set
from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room
166, 3600 W Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
This is an informal event, open to every-
one. Attendees may arrive at any time
during the event and receive individual-
ized attention.
Attendees will see paper or digital ver-
sions of the preliminary flood maps. In-
formation tables will be set up around
the room, where staff from FEMA, local
communities and engineering contrac-
tors will answer questions about flood in-
surance, engineering and development
permit requirements. Attendees can also
pick up a variety of printed information.
The maps cover all of Citrus County in-


cluding Crystal River, Inverness and un-
incorporated areas of Citrus County.
A few weeks after the open house,
there will be a 90-day appeal and com-
ment period. Once all appeals and com-
ments have been addressed, the
community will have six months until the
maps become "effective." The communi-
ties will use this time to adopt the new
flood maps into their local ordinances.
Adopting the new flood maps means
that federally backed flood insurance will
continue to be available to the residents of
the community Property owners will be able
to purchase new policies and existing flood
policies may be renewed. It also means
federal disaster assistance may be pro-
vided to repair insurable buildings located
within the Special Flood Hazard Area.
For more information about the open
house or the proposed new flood maps,
call Carl Jones, county floodplain man-
ager, at 352-527-5310.


WIC available for moms in need


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County helps
meet the nutritional needs
of families and support
women breastfeeding
their infants for approxi-
mately 3,300 participants
monthly through its WIC
program.
Early participation in
WIC continues to show
positive influences on
early development and
birth outcomes and re-
duces the probability of
low-birth weight. WIC par-
ticipation is associated
with increased breastfeed-
ing initiation. The per-
centage of Florida WIC
infants ever breastfed has
steadily increased from


75.9 percent in June 2012
to 77.0 percent in June
2013. Citrus County has an
active breastfeeding pro-
motion program with
trained peer counselors to
assist new mothers and ba-
bies with breastfeeding
needs. These peer coun-
selors are available by
phone and for individual
counseling and can be con-
tacted through the local
Citrus County WIC offices.
To be eligible for WIC,
you must be a pregnant or
breastfeeding woman, a
woman up to six months
postpartum, an infant or a
child younger than age 5. In
addition, the applicant
must have a low or moder-
ate income, live in Florida,


and have a nutritional need
that can be helped by WIC
foods, along with nutri-
tional education and coun-
seling. WIC also provides
breastfeeding support and
referrals for health care.
Nutritionists work directly
with mothers to educate
them about what is best for
their baby and their fam-
ily's nutrition needs while
encouraging them to build
healthy habits.
To learn more about the
WIC program or to find out
if you are eligible, call toll-
free at 800-342-3556 or visit
the local county health of-
fices in Inverness (352-726-
5222), Lecanto (352-527-
8490) or Crystal River (352-
795-2261).


CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP
* To register for the Citrus County Sheriff's Office's CodeRED weather program,
visit www.sheriffcitrus.org/EM/ and click on the "Emergency Management"
menu item.
* Choose "CodeRED Registration" and enter the location to be monitored and your
contact details if using a cellphone, you may choose to receive text alerts, but
standard text messaging rates may apply.
* Those without computer access may call 352-746-6555 or visit a local library for
computer assistance.


The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees and the Citrus
Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. are coming together to ensure
that our hospital is funded and employees have job security.
Additionally, our goal is that all patients continue to receive
highest quality health care with state-of-the-art technology.
Together, both boards are committed to securing the best
alignment for Citrus Memorial.

The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees and the Citrus
Memorial Health Foundation invite you to join us at upcoming
joint meetings, as we move forward with an agreement on bid
selection and sign a letter of intent on the sale, lease or affiliation
of Citrus Memorial Health System.

Thursday, September 26,2013, at 7 p.m.
CMHS Historic Schoolhouse (adjacent to hospital)
Board Room (2nd floor)
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness,, FL 34452

Monday, September 30,2013, at 7 p.m.
CMHS Historic Schoolhouse (adjacent to hospital)
Board Room (2nd floor)
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452

This ad provided in cooperation with the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation.


City of Inverness presents


6:00 pm: Passport Inverness

7:00 pm: Live performance

by Save the Radio

A FREE Outdoor Concert with

Tampa cover band "Save the

Radio". Music from the 60's to

current and original works.

With Fox 96.7 DJ Morning JoE


S -
0
mE




~I


rf"~~ sy-T* *"- "c v a I v
iVwwjonklonbuom

f, INSIGHT
^ CREDIT UNION


NCK LINCOLNUS Lietwis
"FNICK NICHOLAS CeoiCrnifs eb


A2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


LOCAL


r





Page A3-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Seffner

Caretaker charged in
death of quadriplegic
The caretaker and
boyfriend of a quadriplegic
woman has been charged
in connection with her
death.
The Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office said
deputies responded to a
911 call in Seffner in Janu-
ary and discovered Mary
Baker lying on her back.
She was pronounced dead
shortly after their arrival.
Authorities interviewed
Timothy Harrison of Tampa
at the scene. He told them
he was responsible for tak-
ing care of Baker and dis-
pensing her medication.
Investigators said toxicol-
ogy tests indicated Baker
had extremely high levels of
the drugs fluoxetine and
bupropion in her system
and she died from prescrip-
tion medication toxicity.
Deputies announced Fri-
day Harrison is being
charged with felony murder
and aggravated abuse of a
disabled adult. They said he
intentionally gave his girl-
friend lethal amounts of the
prescription drugs.

Tallahassee

New protest
rules proposed
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement is rec-
ommending changes to
Capitol security in the wake
of a 31-day long protest.
A small group of protest-
ers upset by the acquittal of
George Zimmerman in
Trayvon Martin's killing re-
fused to leave the Capitol
for more than a month this
summer.
Some of the proposed
changes include prohibiting
anyone sleeping in public
portions of the Florida Capi-
tol. Additionally, food and
drink could not be stored or
prepared in Capitol
hallways without prior
approval.
People who are in the
Capitol after business hours
could be arrested for
trespassing.

Weston

School cleaned after
dozens fall ill
Cleaning crews are at
work at a South Florida ele-
mentary school where
dozens of students have
fallen ill.
WFOR-TV reported
clean-up crews are working
with the health department
to sanitize Manatee Bay
Elementary.
Students at the school in
Weston have reported
symptoms including vomit-
ing, diarrhea and fever.
The principal sent a letter
to parents urging them to
keep any sick kids home
and encourage their chil-
dren to wash their hands
frequently.

Gainesville

UF officials mull
online degrees
University of Florida's on-
line bachelor's degree pro-
gram will start off with a
small number of students
and it will operate in the red
for the first few years but
ramp up to 24,100 students
and millions in profits within
10 years.
The Gainesville Sun re-
ported university adminis-
trators told the Board of
Trustees this week that
budget projections show
the online program operat-
ing in the red for the first
four years, being self-suffi-
cient in the seventh year


and having a profit margin
of $14.5 million by the 10th
year.
UF was given a legisla-
tive mandate to create an
online baccalaureate
program.
From staff reports


Crystal River set to adopt budget


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER The city
council is expected to adopt the
city's budget and millage rate for
2013 on Monday
Council members also are set to
vote on the Community Redevel-
opment Agency budget
This is the fifth straight budget
year in which the city has kept the
millage rate at 3.8 mills despite a
dwindling property tax base.
The city's rollback rate is 3.9
mills. A rollback rate is the rate at
which the current tax base would
produce the same taxes.


The city's general fund budget
will be $3,995,084 and includes no
wage increases for city
employees.
The council will also:
Consider approval of a con-
tract award to Hoyle Tanner & As-
sociates for water treatment plant
upgrades in the amount of
$43,400.
Discuss the council's legisla-
tive priorities.
Discuss what to do with the
$50,000 of funding recently re-
ceived from Duke Energy
Discuss drafting a letter of
support for the efforts of Save
Crystal River to begin mechanical


harvesting of lyngbya in King's
Bay
City resident and Save Crystal
River member Steve Lamb wrote
a letter to the city seeking sup-
port from the panel and asking
that a letter of concern be sent to
the board of directors of the Save
the Manatee Club over the ac-
tions of the group's executive di-
rector challenging the
mechanical harvesting of lyngbya
in the bay
Lamb said in the letter he be-
lieves Rose's challenge to the me-
chanical harvesting was primarily
driven by Save Crystal River's ef-
forts to have U.S. Fish and


Wildlife Service downlist the
manatee from endangered to
threatened a move, Lamb
noted, that USFWS itself sug-
gested following a previous study
of manatee populations.
Lamb also said in the letter that
his group has applied for a new
permit they hope will allow for
turbidity or cloudiness above the
baseline during a cleanup. He
said the turbidity levels allowed
under an earlier agreement are
unworkable and doomed to
failure.
Contact Chronicle reporterAB.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Cleanup yields results


~~ip


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
As part of the Save Our Waters Week project, groups of volunteers are meeting to pick up trash along Florida waterways. Trash is
documented and added to local, regional, state national and global databases. Meeting Saturday morning at Cooter Pond in Inverness
were, from left, Rebecca Martin, Mark Yerman, Cora Lee, Drew Benefield, John Murphy, Kathryn Mayer and Dan Blair.


Teams fan out across county to collect trash and


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS
Wearing white rubber boots and
white T-shirts, members of the In-
verness Rotary Club waded along
the shores of Cooter Pond in Inverness
with trash bags in hand.
They were there picking up trash dur-
ing Citrus County's Adopt-A-Shore
cleanup day, part of Citrus County's
20/20's 18th annual Save Our Waters
Week, Sept. 20 to 28.
Approximately 500 volunteers divided
into 23 groups across Citrus County to
participate in the national Ocean Conser-
vancy's International Coastal Cleanup
event.
Ocean and waterway trash ranks as one
of the most serious pollution problems
choking our planet, according to informa-
tion from Ocean Conservancy
Their goal is to prevent trash from in-
vading and damaging the ecosystem.
Joining the hawks for an early morning
stretch, Inverness Rotarians stretched
around Cooter Pond as they tallied the
debris collected.
"There were all of kinds of beer bottles,
cornflake boxes, tackle boxes and all kind
of things you wouldn't expect to find
along your lake," said Judge Mark Yer-
man. "Now it is clean and a nice place to
be."
Rebecca Martin said Ocean Conser-
vancy compiles and analyzes the national
data and will publish an item-by-item,
location-by-location report of findings.
"What is interesting is that we can look


Documentation of what was picked up
around the Cooter Pond shoreline by the
Save Our Waters Week volunteers in Inver-
ness. Items include 158 cigarette butts, 38
food wrappers, 13 take-out containers,
117 beverage containers and 107 plastic
bags, to name just a few items picked up in
less than an hour.
through the past year of what has been
picked up in different areas in this county
and see whether we are increasing in our
trash or decreasing," Martin said.
The Rotarians collected six garbage
bags of trash and they know it made a dif-
ference in Cooter Pond.
"All of the water activities are one of
the many benefits of living here," said Ro-


restore nature's beauty


SAVE OUR WATERS WEEK
EVENTS
Monday, Sept. 23., Heritage-Eco Boat
Tours at Crystal River Preserve State
Park. Tours at 10:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. Guided interactive river tour
discussing ways pre-Columbian Indi-
ans may have used available marine
resources. Depart from Crystal River
Preserve State Park, 3266 N. Sailboat
Ave., Crystal River. For registration, call
352-795-3817 or 352-563-0450. Ca-
pacity: 15 people per tour.
Tuesday, Sept. 24, Homosassa River
Boat Tours at 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and
1 p.m. Interpretive tour aboard the
Miss Riverside. Depart from Riverside
Resort, 5297 S. Cherokee Way, Ho-
mosassa. For registration, call 352-
628-2474 or 800-442-2040. Capacity:
38 people per tour.
Tuesday, Sept. 24, Kayak Tours at
8 a.m., 10 a.m. and noon. Paddle
through quiet canals to Three Sisters
Springs and back. Launch from A
Crystal River Kayak Company, 1332
S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. For registra-
tion, call 352-795-2255. Capacity: 10
people per tour.

tarian Kathryn Mayer "Since I moved
here I have totally embraced the outdoor
lifestyle. The water is a big part of my
free time. I want to keep it clean for my-
self and the generations to come."
Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicleonline.com.


Guardian ad Litem program looking for volunteers


Special to the Chronicle
The 5th Judicial Cir-
cuit's Guardian ad Litem
is accepting applicants for
training.
There are about 1,600
children in the 5th Judicial
Circuit, which includes
Marion, Hernando, Lake,
Sumter and Citrus coun-
ties, who have been re-
moved from their homes
for alleged abuse, abandon-
ment or neglect, who are


now part of a dependency
court proceeding. These
children need someone
who will speak up for them.
A GAL is a volunteer ap-
pointed by the court to ad-
vocate for a child. The
volunteer works as part of
a team with a volunteer su-
pervisor and program at-
torney He/she becomes
familiar with the child and
the child's case and makes
recommendations to the
court to help ensure a safe,


caring, stable and perma-
nent environment.
The next training ses-
sion is Monday, Oct. 21, at
the Calvary Chapel of In-
verness. Call or email at
352-274-5231 or Lynn.
Sennett@gal.fl.gov. For
more information and an
application, visit the web-
site at www.guardian
adlitem.org. Calvary
Church is at 960 South U.S.
41, in Inverness.
Persons 21 years of age


and older (young adults
between the ages of 19 and
21 years of age are also el-
igible, working under the
guidance and partnership
with a certified volunteer
GAL), who successfully
complete the pre-service
training program, have a
clean criminal back-
ground check and are able
to be objective are eligible.
A GAL must successfully
complete 30 hours of pre-
service training. On aver-


age, volunteers spend 5 to
10 hours a month on a case.
Most cases last 10 months.
Applicants requiring a
reasonable accommoda-
tion, as defined by the
Americans with Disabili-
ties Act, must notify the
Guardian ad Litem Pro-
gram by calling 352-671-
5757. Notification to the
recruiter/trainer must be
made in advance to allow
sufficient time to provide
the accommodation.


ITRASH COLLECTED




A4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Revisit the past and use
the lessons you've learned to make a
positive move in the year ahead. Se-
cure your position by taking charge.
The way you budget and negotiate will
make a huge difference to the outcome
of your pursuits this year.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Look at
the fine print and check past records,
and you will discover exactly what you
need to know to make a difference.
Love will bring you greater happiness.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Much that
unfolds during this cycle of shifting
trends will be due to the way you have
handled your personal dealings.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Let your
emotions flow and your imagination
take over. How you present yourself to
others will be especially vital.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Pro-
gressive action could lead to many dif-
ferent outcomes. It will improve your
personal situation, but it may cost you
a friendship.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
can solidify a deal or develop a better
working relationship with someone you
love as long as you aren't pushy.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Talk
over your current position and the way
you would like to see things unfold.
Don't make concessions to avoid
controversy.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take on
a challenge and react to change as it
happens. Going with the current will
help you get the most return with the
least work.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You may
have trouble making up your mind
when it comes to certain relationships,
but your heart will lead you in the right
direction if you listen to it.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't fall
for it if someone tries to coerce you
into an argument. Assess the situation
before making a premature decision.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Share
your ideas with someone you have
worked with in the past or would like to
form a partnership with in the future.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Awork
development will boost your reputation
and put you in the running for a posi-
tion that could improve your lifestyle. A
celebration will lead to romance.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Proceed
with caution. Your emotions will be diffi-
cult to control, and someone is likely to
push you into an unwanted dispute if
you aren't careful.


ENTERTAINMENT


Bluegrass show
comes to NC
RALEIGH, N.C. Bluegrass
fans will converge on the state
where a key part of the high
lonesome sound was born when
the International Bluegrass
Music Association brings its
awards show to Raleigh.
It's a big move: The show pre-
viously was held in Nashville.
IBMA is moving it to Raleigh for
at least three years.
Next week's show is part of
what the IBMA and the city are
calling the World of Bluegrass. It
includes a business conference
that starts Tuesday, the awards
show Thursday and free and
ticketed weekend events billed
as Wide Open Bluegrass.
Some musicians and histori-
ans say the defining moment for
Bluegrass came in the 1940s,
when North Carolina's Earl
Scruggs brought his three-
finger banjo picking to the band
fronted by Bill Monroe the fa-
ther of bluegrass.
Keillor to read
poetry in St. Paul
ST. PAUL, Minn.--Author
and radio host Garrison Keillor
will read selections from his new
book of poetry in St. Paul next
month.
Keillor will read from his book
"0, What a Luxury: Verses Lyri-
cal, Vulgar, Pathetic & Pro-
found," at the Fitzgerald Theater
on Oct. 2 and 3.
The readings will be recorded
for an audio companion to be re-
leased later.
The events are free and open
to the public, but tickets must be
obtained ahead of time. Tickets
can be picked up at Keillor's
bookstore, Common Good
Books in St. Paul, or at the
Fitzgerald box office.
Keillor will hold a book signing


Associated Press
Willie Nelson, left, and Farm Aid Executive Director Carolyn
Mugar talk with reporters Saturday during a news conference
prior to the start of the Farm Aid 2013 concert at Saratoga
Performing Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.


immediately after each of the
readings.
Keillor's radio show, "A Prairie
Home Companion," draws about
4 million listeners weekly on
more than 600 public radio sta-
tions nationwide.
Klugman's son
slams Emmy snub
LOS ANGELES The exclu-
sion of Jack Klugman from an
Emmy Awards tribute that in-
cludes Cory Monteith is an in-
sult to the memory of the late TV
veteran and three-time Emmy
winner who starred in "The Odd
Couple" and "Quincy M.E.,"
Klugman's son says.
"I think it's criminal," said
Adam Klugman in an interview
with The Associated Press. "My
dad was at the inception of tele-
vision and helped build it in the
early days."
Ceremony producers an-
nounced this week that five indi-
vidual salutes would be included
on Sunday night's Emmy show
in addition to the traditional "in
memorial" segment that groups
together industry members who


died in the past year.
Besides Monteith, the "Glee"
star who died in July of a heroin
and drug overdose, those to be
honored include "The Sopranos"
star James Gandolfini; Jean
Stapleton of "All in the Family";
comedian and actor Jonathan
Winters; and "Family Ties" pro-
ducer Gary David Goldberg.
Monteith, who was 31 when
he died, is byfar the youngest of
the group. All the others are
Emmy winners, while he had yet
to be nominated in his abbrevi-
ated career.
Emmy nominees who died last
year and won't be accorded sep-
arate tributes include Larry Hag-
man of "Dallas" and Charles
During of "Evening Shade."
The ceremony at the Nokia
Theatre in Los Angeles airs at
8 p.m. Sunday on CBS.
"It's an insult and it really
seems typical of this youth-cen-
tric culture that has an extremely
short attention span and pan-
ders to only a very narrow de-
mographic" of young adults,
Adam Klugman said.
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 22, the
265th day of 2013. There are 100
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 22, 1776, Nathan Hale
was hanged as a spy by the British
during the Revolutionary War.
On this date:
In 1862, President Abraham Lin-
coln issued the preliminary Emanci-
pation Proclamation, declaring all
slaves in rebel states should be free
as of Jan. 1,1863.
In 1949, the Soviet Union ex-
ploded its first atomic bomb.
In 1975, Sara Jane Moore at-
tempted to shoot President Gerald
R. Ford outside a San Francisco
hotel, but missed. (Moore served
32 years in prison before being
paroled on Dec. 31,2007.)
In 1985, rock and country music
artists participated in "FarmAid," a
concert staged in Champaign, Ill., to
help the nation's farmers.
Ten years ago: A suicide car
bombing outside U.N. offices in
Baghdad killed an Iraqi policeman.
Five years ago: Marjorie Knoller,
whose dogs viciously attacked and
killed her neighbor, Dianne Whip-
ple, in their San Francisco apart-
ment building in 2001, was
sentenced to 15 years to life in
prison after her second-degree
murder conviction was reinstated.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama campaigned before a
crowd of 18,000 in Wisconsin, the
home of GOP vice presidential can-
didate Paul Ryan.
Today's Birthdays: Baseball
Hall of Fame manager Tommy La-
sorda is 86. NBA Commissioner
David Stern is 71. Rock singer
David Coverdale (Deep Purple,
Whitesnake) is 62. Singer Debby
Boone is 57. Classical crossover
singer Andrea Bocelli is 55. Singer-
musician Joan Jett is 55. Actor
Scott Baio is 53. Actress Mireille
Enos is 38. Actress Daniella Alonso
is 35.
Thought for Today: "Autumn,
the year's last, loveliest smile." -
William Cullen Bryant, American
poet (1794-1878).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR I -HI LO PR'H iI ii L
93 69 0.00 fiQ t2 9 88 68


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Showers and thunderstorms today.


90 -71 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ixclusvedaly
forecast by: Ig

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 73
Mostly cloudy, 70% chance for
showers and storms
W J71 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
'0 High: 87 Low: 72
Mostly cloudy, 50% chance for showers and
Storms
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 88 Low: 71
S Mostly cloudy, 60% chance for showers and
storms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 93/69
Record 98/56
Normal 90/68
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 5.05 in.
Total for the year 46.06 in.
Normal for the year 43.25 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 65
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 47%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, nettle, grasses
Today's count: 4.1/12
Monday's count: 6.5
Tuesday's count: 6.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/22 SUNDAY 8:22 2:09 8:46 2:34
9/23 MONDAY 9:17 3:05 9:42 3:29
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
( e ~ O SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:27P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:19A.M.
4 I 18 MOONRISE TODAY ...........................9:36P.M.
SEPT. 26 OCT.4 OCT. 11 OCT. 18 MOONSET TODAY .......................... 10:20 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:37 a/3:37 a 8:33 p/4:09 p
Crystal River" 5:58 a/12:59 a 6:54 p/1:31 p
Withlacoochee* 3:45 a/11:19 a 4:41 p/11:18 p
Homosassa*** 6:47 a/2:36 a 7:43 p/3:08 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:07 a/4:08 a 9:14 p/4:47 p
6:28 a/1:30 a 7:35 p/2:09 p
4:15 a/11:57 a 5:22 p/11:49 p
7:17 a/3:07 a 8:24 p/3:46 p


Gulf water
temperature


85
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.69 29.68 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.13 38.12 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.61 39.61 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.48 40.46 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


74 58
79 59
69 61 .92
86 69 trace
78 48
84 69
79 58 .30
86 46
75 67 .99
77 60
77 57
75 55 2.36
76 61
88 68
70 62 .87
76 66 .03
67 54
74 61 .48
70 61 .84
84 69
74 63 1.45
76 47
84 61
81 50
74 47
70 61 .08
80 62
74 57 .05
75 62 .05
76 52 .01
82 72 .02
73 54
79 71 3.80
95 74
82 60
72 65
75 61 .64
76 64
61 53
64 47
79 75 .15
79 73 .93
76 62 .75


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 82 73 2.21 ts 84 69
NewYorkCity 75 57 .18 pc 74 51
Norfolk 86 59 sh 76 57
Oklahoma City 81 54 s 80 56
Omaha 76 44 s 78 56
Palm Springs 96 65 s 89 67
Philadelphia 80 56 pc 74 50
Phoenix 10381 s 93 70
Pittsburgh 69 60 .88 pc 60 45
Portland, ME 66 54 sh 71 47
Portland, Ore 66 56 .09 r 64 57
Providence, R.I. 75 53 sh 73 47
Raleigh 76 66 .12 pc 78 55
Rapid City 92 39 ts 87 54
Reno 69 51 pc 70 48
Rochester, NY 72 61 .98 pc 56 43
Sacramento 70 60 .20 s 77 57
St. Louis 72 54 s 75 52
St. Ste. Marie 56 48 s 55 35
Salt Lake City 90 64 ts 64 49
San Antonio 89 72 s 86 65
San Diego 75 65 pc 72 64
San Francisco 68 62 .10 s 70 58
Savannah 85 67 ts 83 69
Seattle 70 56 r 62 55
Spokane 65 54 sh 65 48
Syracuse 72 59 .48 pc 59 42
Topeka 80 48 s 78 52
Washington 80 64 .12 pc 75 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 103 Phoenix, Ariz. LOW 25 Fraser, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/74As
Amsterdam 66/57/sh
Athens 77/62/c
Beijing 84/56/sh
Berlin 62/58/c
Bermuda 82/78/sh
Cairo 95/70/pc
Calgary 64/45/pc
Havana 81/76As
Hong Kong 87/75/r
Jerusalem 77/64/pc


Lisbon 89/64/s
London 73/54/c
Madrid 86/58/s
Mexico City 70/56/ts
Montreal 59/43/pc
Moscow 52/49/c
Paris 74/54/c
Rio 93/71/c
Rome 78/60/pc
Sydney 73/55/pc
Tokyo 79/69/sh
Toronto 57/43/pc
Warsaw 57/52/sh


Sit LEGAL NOTICES





Florida Turnpike

Enterprise ................................ All



Self Storage Notices......................0D6


S C I T RULI S COUNTY LNTY



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best CommunityN Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4I Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


U.S. Representative Rich Nugent was the guest speaker
at the POW/MIA memorial Saturday at the Inverness Elks
Lodge in Hernando. Co-author of the Leave Nobody
Behind Act, Nugent, who had two sons in Iraq at the
same time, stressed that "we must not forget those who
have not yet returned home."


CEREMONY
Continued from PageAl

Exalted Ruler of the In-
verness Elks Lodge Mike
Orndorff was flattered to
have the escorted parade
end on the Elks' grounds,
as veterans are a part of
the Elks' mission of
operation.
"The Elks fraternal or-
ganization is built on a pil-
lar of charity, justice,
brotherly love and fi-
delity," Orndorff said. "It is
very befitting that we are
gathered here today on the
Elks grounds to pay honor
and respect to our Ameri-
can veteran heroes, as the
Elks have a pledge which
reads, 'So long as there are
veterans, the benevolent


and protective order of
Elks will never forget
them."'
Veterans made personal
sacrifices that are incom-
prehensible to many, said
Commander Richard
"Bud" Allen of the Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart.
"Our POWs and MIAs
honorably served and
made personal sacrifices
about what we will never
fully comprehend," Allen
said. "These warriors
served effortlessly and did
whatever was necessary to
survive the ordeals of war
We all knew going into
combat that the possibility
did exist for us to become
POW or MIA. Fortunately
for most of us that didn't
happen. Today we honor


these veterans for their
ability to survive and to
honor and never forget
those still missing in
action."
On behalf of the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners, Commis-
sioner Scott Adams pro-
claimed Sept. 20, 2013,
National POW/MIA Recog-
nition Day in Citrus County.
"I want to thank all of
the veterans here today
and for everything they
have been through and
what they have sacrificed
for our country," Adams
said.


Congressman Richard
Nugent agreed with
Adams that our country
has the best military in the
world.
"My wife and I have
three sons serving our
country," Nugent said.
"What gave Wendy and
I hope was that we
have the best trained,
equipped and motivated
military on the face of the
earth. We could go to
sleep at night knowing that
our kids had a fighting
chance to come home. We
have an American duty
and obligation to make


sure that POWs and
MIAs are never forgotten.
We are the only country
that cares about their
military"
Without saying a word,
hundreds of attendees
formed an unbreakable
hand-to-hand link while
singing "God Bless the
USA' by Lee Greenwood.
Once the song was over
they dropped hands and


LOCAL


hP. Pritchyk DPM
XAn nou-ces the


ohi eu'w practice
Nature Coast
Foot And Ankle
Center, C
I "1 N. uncoast Blvd., Suite IE
II. L r\- l I% A rr

SiC ..mp chc.. vc .p,,,t .a a le..
eale ,I thile. t clfle fallilyv.

3I' [,i I JI'pp Jlll.n [ "


L ^ \ ^J~iB ~ BBBT








Blackshears !-
B3EST'

Aluminum
vfST

Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens
New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions
HWY. 44 7Q QT Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER 795-972 RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
B^B^3T^^^^^ 6. *.3 6^^^


Experience
SThe
Difference
S Free Second
Opinion
If you have been to
another dentist and
would like a second
opinion about your
treatment, bring your
xrays and I will do a
Complete evaluation
and develop a
treatment plan with
Syou that tits you
and your needs.


"We Cater to Cowards!"

L Ledger Dentistry
M rrm .. I '-.n-r n M ) P ,\


(352) 628-3443

i Ledgerdentistry.com
Ledg e rd en t istry.corn


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 A5

Surviving
POWs and
Families of
POWs are
encircled
by
veterans
c land other
well-
wishers
Saturday
S as they
are
honored
at the
POW/MIA
memorial
i n
Hernando.
STEPHEN E.
LASKO/For the
Chronicle


then stood in honor of the
POW/MIA Remembrance
Table Ceremony, which
concluded before the
cookout
Lecanto High School
Army ROTC presented the
colors. Angela Vick sang
the national anthem and
the Boy Scouts of America
presented the POWs and
MIAs roses during the Roll
Call.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg bis-
cuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: No school.
Lunch
Monday: Hot dog, hamburger sliders,
PB dippers, fresh garden salad, potato
smiles, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, Goldie's Grab N' Go (turkey),
turkey super salad with roll, yogurt par-
fait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy
baked beans, chilled strawberry cups,
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken nuggets with
ripstick, mozzarella maxstix, Italian
super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green beans,
chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: No school.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, milk and juice
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg bis-
cuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and


Sept. 23-27MENUS
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: No school.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella maxstix, fajita
chicken with rice and ripstick, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green
beans, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Hamburger sliders, turkey
wrap, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby
carrots, potato smiles, chilled strawberry
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken with ripstick, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh bar-
den salad, tangy baked beans, chilled
peach cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: No school.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ul-
timate breakfast round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: No school.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice burrito,
pizza, macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, green beans,
cucumber coins, potato roasters, apple-
sauce, juice, milk.


Tuesday: Orange chicken with rice,
turkey and gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sandwich,
Italian super salad with roll, maxstix, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad, cucum-
ber coins, peas, baby carrots, seasoned
potato wedges, strawberry cups, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken with rice, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey
super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt par-
fait plate, baby carrots, baked beans,
chilled baked beans, potato roasters
Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice
with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich,
ham super salad with roll, maxstix, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden salad, fresh
broccoli, steamed broccoli, baby car-
rots, seasoned potato wedges, peach
cup, juice, milk.
Friday: No school.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Italian meatballs in mari-
nara sauce hoagie on hot dog bun,
cheesy mashed potatoes, Italian beans,
raisins, margarine cup, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Blended juice, baked
chicken thigh, yellow rice with tomato
and pepper, black beans, white bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Grilled chicken breast
patty in marinara sauce, penne noodles
with garlic oil, Tuscan vegetables, slice
rye bread with margarine, peaches, low-
fat milk.
Thursday: Flame-broiled beef patty,
potatoes O'Brien, corn with diced
tomato, hamburger bun, ketchup and
mustard, fresh orange, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad, pea/cheese
salad, marinated broccoli salad, two
slices whole-grain bread, mayonnaise,
graham crackers, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto,
East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call Support Services
at 352-527-5975.


Shoes wisely,


grasshopper


hose first few steps
in the morning are
surprisingly painful.
It feels as if someone has
hammered a 10-pound nail
into the middle of your
heel. Usually, it goes away
quickly and as long as you
keep moving, everything's
fine. If you sit down to
watch a little TV and sud-
denly get up to answer the
phone, you will fall flat on
your face. Again, for about
three steps your feet feel
as if someone has beaten
them with a club.
The diagnosis is usually
plantar fasciitis, meaning
the ligament along the bot-
tom of the foot is no longer
doing its job correctly
Treatment is all over the
map. Surgery, rest, mas-
sage, orthotics, cortisone
injections, stretching, arch
supports, acupuncture, as-
pirin, ibuprofen, cold ther-
apy heat therapy always go
barefoot, never go barefoot,
sleep with a splint, ad in-
finitum. Everyone I know
seems to have had it or has
it, and they all have differ-
ent recommendations.
I decided to go with the
simplest plan first: to buy
some shoes with better
arch support than the
loafers I usually wear Sue
always told me they were
bad for my feet but I al-
ways had the same an-
swer: "If you play tennis,
you wear tennis shoes. If
you golf, you wear golf
shoes. If you run, you wear
running shoes. If you bowl,


Jim
Mullen

VILLAGE
IDIOT


you wear bowling shoes.
So you can see why I wear
loafers."
But it was time for a
change. I hobbled down to
the shoe store to invest in
a pair of trainers that
would offer my foot all the
love and support it
needed. From now on, my
aching feet would be ca-
ressed all day long by the
finest combination of sci-
ence and the shoemaker's
art. Shoes that would mag-
ically make all my prob-
lems disappear and let me
dance the fandango once
again. OK, so I never
danced the fandango. I
don't even know what a
fandango is, but you get my
drift.
But the shoe store didn't
They seemed to think I
was auditioning for a part
in "SpongeBob Square-
Pants." Each pair of sports
shoes was more cartoonish
than the last. It's bad
enough that the heel on
one had visible springs,
but it was also in lime
Jell-O green with orange
DayGlo stripes. I'm sure
they will look swell on the
SeeMULLEN/PageA7


RESORT STYLE
Sometimes you just need a little help
Stop in & see why relationships blosso m i,


8733 West Yulee Driv
352.621.8017
www.sunflowera If. corn


NEW PATIENT
FULL SRVICESPECIAL:


ORAL EXAM &
DIGITAL X-RAYS
-....................................


SMILESONCITRU


S.COM


AQASTAXMENRMTION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


Assisted Living Facility License #11566


STARTING OCTOBER 1, 2013

PREETI LEKHRA, M.D.
Board Certified Family Physician
105 North Osceola Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
Children and Adults Annual Health Care Visits
Annual Gyn Exam, Pap Smear
Well Child Visits Sick Visits Flu Shots (upon availability)
CALL 352-344-2440 FOR APPOINTMENT


A6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


COMMUNITY


Rfl~ffilCITRUS AVE^
E352-79518811 ''R'YTALRIVE, F


00OFZUL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PETERS
Continued from Page Al

arrest early Thursday
morning in a remote Mon-
tana state park near Inter-
state 90.
He is awaiting extradi-
tion to Florida, where he
faces two felonies and one
misdemeanor Peters' wife,
Kari, flew to Montana to
bring her daughters home.
Family members,
friends and his attorney
described Peters as some-
one whose life unraveled
in a hurry about two
months' time. They said he
felt betrayed by a judicial
system that locked him up
twice for what Peters be-
lieved were unfair domes-
tic-related charges.
"He really did lose
everything before this
happened," his sister,
Joanne Murphy said. "The
most important thing to
him was the girls."
MEN
An injunction for do-
mestic-violence protection
issued in early August kept
Peters from his home in
Terra Vista. A judge had
awarded temporary
guardianship to Kari Pe-
ters' father, Norman Peter-
son, who lives in the
Inverness Highlands.
Edward Peters was liv-
ing with his sister, Joanne,
in Inverness, or out of his
Jeep. He received $3,700 a
month in Social Security
disability which he lost,
Murphy said, after being
arrested on charges that
he violated the injunction
and interfered with child
custody While incarcer-
ated, he was unable to at-
tend a hearing to continue
the disability
The judge gave both Ed-
ward and Kari six hours
each unsupervised visita-
tion a week with the chil-
dren. Edward's visitation
held priority status, ac-
cording to court records,
so long as he cleared the
visit with Kari's father
That Sunday morning,
Edward arrived to take the
girls to church in Ocala.
Murphy said her brother



MULLEN
Continued from PageA6

villain in the next Super-
man movie, but I plan to
wear them around the
house, not with my match-
ing superhero cape.
Here was a nice pair, for
only $168, with good arch
support, a soft heel and
room for my toes. If only it
came in black or white or
brown and not in "safety
orange" with fluorescent
white stripes and a blink-
ing light on the back. The
soles were 3 inches thick in
Hulk green. As I recall, the
Hulk goes barefoot most of
the time. It seems even he
wouldn't be caught dead in
these things.
There was one pair of
all-white trainers that
caught my eye. Literally, it
caught my eye because it
was so big it hit me in the
face. This thing was the
size of a snow shoe. In-


Utotal Irngmg
Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire

TOP DOLLAR
0 PAID '
4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
000G5TE 527-9599


YOU ARE
NOT ALONE


sent a text message to Pe-
terson on Saturday to let
Peterson know he'd be by
the next day
He waited in his Jeep
across the street. Murphy
said he didn't go to the
door because he didn't
want to violate the injunc-
tion in case Kari was
there.
Kari Peters walked out
of the house with the girls,
planning to take them to
church and then a party.
She motioned for her hus-
band to drive away In-
stead, he pulled into the
driveway, blocking in her
car
"Don't do this here," she
told him, according to
reports.
He told the girls to climb
into his Jeep, which they
did willingly And off he
drove.
MEN
He knew right away it
was a mistake and consid-
ered turning around. Pe-
ters, who spoke to Murphy
by phone from a Montana
detention facility, said he
called a friend and asked
him to tell Kari he would
come back after church if
she didn't call the sheriff's
office.
That plan died a few
minutes later when a sher-
iff's deputy called Peters
on his cell phone, urging
him to return right away
"At that point Ed knew
he was done," Murphy
said.
The sheriff's office had
one significant surveil-
lance tool: Peters wore a
GPS ankle monitor, a
judge's requirement for
his release from jail.
Sheriff's deputies didn't
pursue Peters' Jeep be-
cause they knew of the
court order allowing six
hours of unsupervised vis-
itation a week. Still, they
could "ping" the monitor
and know his location:
State Road 200 north to-
ward Ocala, State Road
200 south, then Interstate
75 heading south from
Ocala.
Deputies discovered the
device along the north-
bound lanes of 1-75 in Her-
nando County.


stead of laces, it had Velcro
straps, one of which was
undone and flapping out of
the eye-level display Not
only do my feet hurt, now I
think I have a detached
retina. I would normally
like an all-white trainer,
but the only thing you
could wear with these that
would make sense at all
would be giant, white,
four-fingered Mickey
Mouse gloves.
Surgery is starting to
look better and better Is
there some good reason
that modern sports shoes
look so silly? Is there no
room for something that
doesn't make you look like
you were the life model for
Homer Simpson? I finally
settled for some over-the-
counter inserts in my
loafers and they seem to
help a bit, especially in the
daytime. But if they made
non-cartoon shoes, I'd
have bought them.
Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMuhllenBooks. corn.


Montana


Idaho


North
Dakota


South
Dakota


Wyoming


Nebraska


Utah


United States
Colorado Kansa


as Missouri


Oklahoma Arkansas


Arizona
e%


enix


(
ca


New
Mexico


Dallas
0


-~--.- "Texas
= ". ntSan o
SAntonio I

Gullof
Rlifornia Monterrey-.


Missis


West -
Viiginia ..
Kentucky ..Virginia\
Tennessee -.4 'North \
A. : Carolina \
5i..; South
'p Carolina District
Alabama Columt
Georgia


Louisiana
0ouston
louston


Florida


Gulf of


Google Maps


Edward Peters drove his children from Florida to Michigan, ending in Montana.


MEi
Peters just drove.
"He had no plan," Mur-
phy said.
Murphy said her brother
couldn't say what roads he
traveled. He bought
clothes, blankets and a
comforter for the girls.
They stayed in camp-
grounds, where the girls
washed every morning. He
made sure they were fed
properly
"He did everything he
could to take care of the
girls," Murphy said.
Peters had about $700 in
his pocket when he left In-
verness.
The 2003 Jeep Liberty
broke down at least twice.
Each time, a stranger
helped with repairs.
"Many people helped
him," she said. "He was
very worried about talking
to people. He knew he


wasn't doing right. He ran
out of gas, some guy
helped him. His car broke
down, somebody helped
him. People gave him
money He was amazed by
the way people were. He's
very appreciative of the
people who helped along
the way"
Seven days later, Peters
found himself off the free-
way in Sanilac County,
Mich., about 90 miles north
of Detroit. The Jeep came
to rest in a tiny roadside
state park. Peters noticed
someone who parked their
car for a walk left their
keys inside. Peters and the
girls jumped in and took
off.
"He felt lousy about
that," Murphy said.
That sighting of the
Jeep, and reports of the
See Page A8


HIGH OCTANE GRILL
DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS
MONDAY S1.00 Side Salad. Select S1.00 Menu Items
TUESDAY
CM E Flat Iron Steak w/2 sides... . . ...............7.95
V ISIT Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell...... Beef .79'... Chicken .99'
OU 1 WEDNESDAY All You Can Eat
[ [' f] Spaghetti & Garlic Bread (Add a side salad for $1.00)....... 8.95
[IN D [ THURSDAY 1 LB. PORK CHOPS
wN/potatoes & vegetable.. . . .............. S9. 95
[ ^ 1 FRIDAY Prime Rib Available at 4pm
*' SATURDAY
D ININ Sloppy Joe w/chip.... . . ...............3.95
A SUNDAY
Pot Roast ...........................................................S3.95


-U


OPEN 11AM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY- SUNDAY* OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Call or Text in your order Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373


I


Wensdy- e pt.25,2013


The Villages
Comfort Suites
1202 Avenida Central

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1 -888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


SLargo Medcal Center
ft ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


MANAGER'S SPECIALS]


-- I

K 7It/^T 2011FORD E250 0 LINCOLN K 2010 LINCOLN MKTI 213FORDC-MAXHYBRIDSEL
I$20,668 $6 ~8$29,968 $29,488
66 CR 486
ICK Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
Professional II( s2 2 -1 31 I
Profsio n al 1,i iY \44 Inverness
Hearing Centers CHOU 1 (352) 726-1231
www.lnvernessHearing.com _-' nicknicholasford.com 0 Nick Nicholas
726-HEAR (4327] ..... 1 SALE HOURS: Mon- Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 _____________



We Welcome You To Value Dental Care
Meet Dr. Santa Cruz, DMD
Originally from Miami, Dr. Cruz is
a veteran of Naval Aviation,
Serving overseas in Japan and the
Arabian Gulf. He currently serves S
Sin the reserves.
Dr. SantaCruz offers high quality 6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy, u
dentistry.6824Gulf To Lake Hwy.
,L'r Santa-Cruz was rewarded
Il.l' several scholastic awards, he Crystal River
Ill s certified in the C a River
administration of Botox/ 352-794-6139
lLI DysportCosmetic fillers.1 352-794-6139 Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


Cleaning Special f Porcelain Dentures A Second
New Patients Only $ 7 0 Fused to Nll Opinion
$ 9 FREE Exam & X-Rays Metal Crowns starting at 1 X-ray & Exam
Sw/Cleaning ', Upper & Lower VE (New Patients Only)
D0210 D0150 D1l110 (For first one) D0210.* D0150
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 Expires 9/30/13 D2751 Expires 9/30/13 D5510 -D5120 Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13
We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance.


.~~ ~~ -- .


-. I ,' 1. '. .
*:- . "" "": ^'s :, *,!: :,"1:' -"*..: : r ,'; -" '
",' :- i .. ^ ^ .:: .. ... ...:..^ ... ...
esota -' .. "'- . -, .: 1 '
...... '' " : '' ... Mon
"' ". *'" : ..* *.. . i, '' ," (
Wisconsin ...it Tolont.
,,__ \Toronio.
Michigany g 1111nf
0 ---"New York
Iowa oChicago "
Illinois Pennsylvania 0
Iinoi Ohio
Indiana New


LOCAL


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 A7


el


- Phoe
:go ---._




AS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


PETERS
Continued from Page A7

Jeep, and reports of the
stolen SUV, set about a
flurry of law enforcement
activity Authorities
alerted the U.S. Border
Patrol, as bridges to
Canada were only 30 miles
away They also alerted
Minnesota officials on the
belief Peters may have
been heading there.
The Sanilac County
Sheriff's Office made
phone calls to every
county between there and
the western Upper Penin-
sula of Michigan at the
Wisconsin state line.
Nothing turned up and
the trail grew cold once
again.
MEN
The big break came
Wednesday afternoon
when police were called
to a Laurel, Mont, gas sta-
tion where the driver did-
n't pay for gas. A security
camera caught the Michi-
gan license plate of the
stolen SUV, and alerts
were issued in surround-
ing counties for the vehi-
cle and its occupants.
Citrus County Sheriff's
officials were convinced
Peters was headed to
Washington state, where a
brother lives. Murphy said
Edward told her that was
never the idea.
"They haven't spoken in


CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


He was just driving and
driving. He just wanted to spend
time with the girls.
Joanne Murphy
sister of Edward Peters.


eight or nine years," she
said.
Instead, Peters and the
girls played. It snowed
Wednesday in that part of
Montana and the girls,
who rarely see snow, had
fun making snowmen.
"They had a great time,"
Murphy said, relating
what her brother said.
Too exhausted to con-
tinue on, they stopped for
the night at Prairie Dog
State Park in Greycliff,
just off 1-90 in Sweet Grass
County The park, known
for allowing visitors to
watch wild prairie dogs in
their natural habitat, is
not equipped for
overnight stays. Deputies
patrol the park at night
looking for law violators.
Sure enough, a deputy
spotted the vehicle. He
called for backup and,
weapons drawn, deputies
ordered Peters from the
vehicle even as his chil-
dren begged him to stay
Peters and his daugh-
ters were separated, with
Peters going to jail and his
daughters taken to a fos-
ter home until their
mother arrived later
Thursday to bring them


home to Citrus County
Sweet Grass County
Sheriff Don Tronrud said
deputies found a Montana
map in the car The girls
told deputies they were
headed to Yellowstone
National Park.
"My guess is he was
headed to the Canadian
border," Tronrud said.
Murphy said her
brother had no thought
about Canada or making
plans for a new life with
the children.
"He was just driving
and driving," she said.
"He just wanted to spend
time with the girls."
MEN
Peters, 45, isn't likely to
face additional charges
other than those directly
related to his Sept. 8 tak-
ing of the children. While


the FBI assisted with the
search and investigation,
Peters' attorney Mark Ro-
driguez hasn't heard fed-
eral charges are coming.
And the owner of the
stolen SUV in Michigan
doesn't seem interested in
retrieving it from Mon-
tana or pressing charges,
Sanilac County Sheriff
Biniecki said.
"The victim's not sure
she wants the car back,"
he said.
Murphy said her brother
told her he had no access
to the Internet nor did he
make a single phone call.
He was shocked to learn of
the publicity generated in
Citrus County during his
2,000-mile trek
"He never wanted this to
happen. He never wanted
to hurt anybody," she said.
"It wasn't the right thing,
but it was the only thought
he had. Ed knew it wasn't
an adventure and that it
would come to an end. He
wanted to be with his
daughters. He was going to
enjoy every moment he
could."


LABOR
Continued from PageAl

by 70 to 52,773, while the
number of those without
jobs dropped by 263 to
4,577. The unemployment
rate in August 2012 was
10.1 percent, when there
were 5,795 unemployed.
The regional jobless
rate dropped to 7.9 per-
cent in August, down 0.4
percent over the month.
There were 16,576 unem-
ployed out of a labor force
of 209,392. That rate is
down 2.2 percentage
points compared to a year
ago.
Workforce Connection
CEO Rusty Skinner said
that the August report
shows that the three-
county region experienced
a "summer neutral posi-
tion," which is not unex-
pected coming out of the
traditional summer slump.
"It's August, there are all
sorts of issues bounding
around," Skinner said.
"We have had some


growth, but we also see an
extension of the summer
doldrums."
Skinner said that in Cit-
rus and Levy counties,
drops in unemployment
rates were driven by ac-
tions in the labor force, in-
cluding college students
returning to school, high
school and college gradu-
ates moving out of the
area, people simply not
looking for work because
they are disengaged or
vacationing or others
moving out of the area for
"a variety of reasons."
Florida's unemploy-
ment rate, seasonally ad-
justed, is 7.0 percent and
not seasonally adjusted
rate is 7.1 percent. The na-
tional rate is 7.3 percent.
Rebecca Rust, DEO's
chief economist, said that
over the year all 67 coun-
ties' unemployment rates
fell while over the month
66 counties' rates dropped
and the other remained the
same. Citrus County's un-
employment rate ranked
17th, Levy County's 18th
and Marion County's 19th.


I ATTENTION

U.S. RESIDENTS


Our Story + Your Story =
Sunshine For Your Loved One
Our compassionate staff is ready to help.
Assisted Living just got a whole lot better.
Call us today! We want to share our story,
More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY.
Memory care Short term and long term stays
As


(352) 563-0235 A..,,F -? '12230
311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River www.sgwseniors.com


COLLEGE of CENTRAL FLORIDA

EPerforming

;Arts 4

Series


Tickets.CF.edu


352-873-5810


"Spencers: Theatre of Illusion"
A =SOUTH
Curtis Peterson Auditorium H.-A R T S
3810 W Educational Path, Lecanto
Sunday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.
Dassance Fine Arts Center
3800 S W College Road, Ocala
J..Monday, Sept. 30. 7:30 p_,


Iifor PIn a So Who Aeou BriyKd or Visulen ey Impaired" lpt. 19 No ueaon I
for People Who Are Blind or Visualy Impaired' SepL 19tv.1I


FRESdem

E C a l 6fo rS
t od y!


ThrdaSep.26 01


Crystal River
Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


*g Largo Medical Center
ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Andrew
Bolash, 78
HERNANDO
Andrew left this world
Sept. 11, 2013, after losing
a long battle with cancer,
but he has won the war He
was the only child born to
the late Andrew Bolash
and Mary Ritchie Bolash
on Nov 21, 1934, in
Newark, N.J. Andrew
worked very hard as a
farmer's son, which may
have inspired him to pur-
sue a less demanding ca-
reer After graduating high
school he spent two years
in the Army and then two
years in the Air Force dur-
ing the Korean Conflict.
Andrew (don't call him
Andy) graduated college,
receiving his degree in
civil engineering, paying
his tuition by working
years, on and off, in Green-
land. He then earned his
MBA from Rider Univer-
sity Andrew became a ris-
ing star working with Bell
South while residing in
Palm Beach County but
decided he would like to
experience working in
other countries. Working
usually as a project man-
ager, he traveled to Israel,
Egypt, Nigeria, Africa,
Saudi Arabia, Jamaica,
Haiti, Togo and Albania, to
name most of the coun-
tries. He retired in 2006
from Kuwait, Bahrain and
Jordan. Andrew enjoyed
visiting his mother's
homeland of Scotland and
sipping their most famous
beverage. He enjoyed
playing golf, "only for fun,"
being with his family, and
an occasional trip to the
Hard Rock Casinos. He
was a voracious reader of
newspapers and books, a
very knowledgeable sports
historian and was a faith-
ful fan of the New York Gi-
ants, Tampa Bay Bucs and
the Yankees. Also, Andrew
proudly volunteered as a
courier for Hospice of Cit-
rus County
Andrew leaves to
mourn, his adored wife,
Elaine Prouix Bolash; his
much-loved daughter,
Michelle Prouix Musto;
his son-in-law and drink-
ing buddy, Michael; and
his precious grandson,
George Andrew Grim-
wade. Also, goodbye to his
brother-in-law, Andrew
Ghosen, and his spouse,
Barbara. Andrew will also
be missed by his dear pets,
Coco, Ming and Jake.
Adieu dearest Andrew,
until we meet again.
A celebration of An-


"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"


Funeral Directors'
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE Hwv. 19 "*
CRYSTAL RIVER "
352-795-2678 'I
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


drew's life will take place
at his residence at 12 p.m.
Sept. 28, 2013. Friends are
invited to come, share and
enjoy as Andrew so
wished. Special thanks for
Andrew's care to Dr C.
Joseph Bennet, Dr.
William Harrer, and for
the outstanding nursing
care and comfort provided
Andrew at his time of need
by Hospice of Citrus
County. Arrangements are
by Heinz Funeral Home,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.
Dorothy
Bode, 92
FORMERLY OF
BEVERLY HILLS
Dorothy M. Bode, 92, for-
merly of Beverly Hills,
Fla., died Sept. 14,2013, in
Oregon.
Visitation is from 5 to
7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24,
2013, at Fero Funeral
Home. Funeral Mass is at
9 a.m. Wednesday Sept 25,
2013, at Our Lady of Grace.
Interment to follow at Fero
Memorial Gardens.
Shirley
Bonn, 91
FLORAL CITY
Shirley M. Bonn, 91, Flo-
ral City, died Thursday,
Sept 19,2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County Private
arrangements are by Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's polIicy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


CL.6. (
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

AR k
Cre tion, I
'-- ^ I,, n,..r ,.,.I .,,,."

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


S Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


Brown A"


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. m52
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhom


Joseph
Baker, 65
DUNNELLON
Joseph H. Baker, 65, of
Dunnellon, Fla., passed
away Sept. 18, 2013, under
the loving care of Cypress
Cove Care Center and
Hospice of Citrus County
BornJuly 6,1948, inAnnis-
ton, Ala., to Franklin and
Nell (Cook) Baker, Joseph
moved to Citrus County
35 years ago from Orlando.
He was the maintenance
director for Cypress Cove.
Joseph was a member of
the Twisted Oaks Golf and
Country Club and he was
active with the American
Cancer Society Relay for
Life. He loved bowling,
NASCAR and fishing.
In addition to his par-
ents, Joseph was preceded
in death by his son, Jason
T Baker Survived by his
wife and best friend, Bobbi
Gynan-Baker of Dunnel-
lon; daughter-in-law, Deb-
orah L. Baker of Crystal
River; one brother, Tony


and family of Satellite
Beach; one sister, Susan
and family of Bridgeville,
Pa.; his Piedmont, Ala.,
family; his Yankee family
from Massssachusetts; and
one granddaughter, Kaley
Jill Baker
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto. A celebration of
life will be announced at a
later date. Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory, Le-
canto, www.brownfuneral-
home.com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
U.S. flags denote
military service on
local obituaries.


Lyvelle
Palmer, 81
INVERNESS
Lyvelle Palmer, age 81,
Inverness, died Sept. 20,
2013, at her residence
under the
loving care
of her fam-
ily and
Hospice of
Citrus
County. ,;--7
Lyvelle
was born
Jan. 15, Lyvelle
1932, in Palmer
Starks,
La., to the late Curtis and
Maggie (Thompson)
Hatchell. She was a home-
maker and member of
First Baptist Church of In-
verness. She enjoyed gar-
dening; was a very
talented crafter, doing
macram6, ceramics and
needlepoint and loved
being with her dog
Princess.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her son Curtis


Michael Palmer and his
wife Bobbie, Inverness;
daughter Diana Paulette
Brooks, Lake Panasoffkee;
sister Delores Hatchell,
Louisiana; nine grandchil-
dren; 12 great-grandchil-
dren; and 8 great-
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
her husband of 44 years,
Herman; a son, Herman
Jr; and a great-grandson.
A funeral tribute to
Lyvelle's life will be at
2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26,
2013, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Burial will follow in
Hills of Rest Cemetery in
Floral City The family will
greet friends in visitation
from 1 p.m. until the hour
of service. Memorial dona-
tions are suggested to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
ww.chronicleonline. comn.


OUR PROMISE TO YOU...

* FREE No-obligation Hearing Screening

* FREE Digital Imaging of Eardrums

* FREE Better Hearing Consultation


www.gardneraudiology.com
www.gardneraudiology.com


Confused



about hearing aids?






u',re invited ToA Special f INt

To have all your hearing aid questions answered.


We'll clear up all the confusion about hearing aids.

If you or a loved one have experienced symptoms of

hearing loss, then don't miss this opportunity!


Tues,, Sept. 24th, Wed., Sept. 25th & Thurs. Sept. 26th

In the office of Rama Nathan, M.D.

820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness



RSVP TODAY! (3521419-6565


V


MIeet Our NVewest Associate




Dr. Angela SchenkAuD



Doctor of Audiology


Highest Degree of Hearing Knowledge


Hearing Aid Expert


New Patient Specials

Full Mouth X-Rayvs, Sf
Comprehensive Exam 4 9
We Me t All Yo Not in conjunction with insurance
We Miveet All Your Offer expires in 30 days
Dental Needs, In house denture lab
ts Free Denture Consults
IncludingImplan Financing available

Family Friendly Mosacc nce
Call today! 352-527-1614 ,
Alexsa Davila,
DMDDN 15390
Walton Van Hoose,
DMDDN18101
Citrus Hills Dental
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mm FeeADAcode D0210, D0150I


300G4N2


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 A9


-, I


Bgo y R




A O SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or
email the contact listed. Posts
and groups may email
changes or corrections to
community@chronicle
online.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
com; visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Aux-
iliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
N American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-
860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.
VFW
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,


352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.
OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498. Call JV Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.


Meridien

Research



352-597-8839


Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
Island X-23 meets at 9:30
a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at


16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601

James L. Andersen, MD
Family Medicine


I S ET RS URG AM A BR OK VI LE B AD NT N


Kally K's restaurant in Spring
Hill. Meeting dates are: Oct.
12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997
@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Mem-
bers can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call Charles
Lawrence at 352-527-3722.


5 area locations to serve you.
795.6100


SIn SERVICE


Daniel W. Mauldin
Cadet Daniel William
Mauldin, son of Kate
Lavorgna of Homosassa,
completed

Basic Train-
ing at
the U.S.
Military
Academy.
Mauldin
entered
Daniel W. West Point
Mauldin on July 1,
U.S. Army 2013, and
has suc-
cessfully completed part six
of CBT. CBT is one of the
most challenging events a
cadet will encounter over the
course of their four years at
the academy.
The initial military training
program provides cadets


with basic skills to instill dis-
cipline, pride, cohesion, con-
fidence and a high sense of
duty to prepare them for
entry into the Corps of
Cadets.
Areas of summer instruc-
tion included first aid, moun-
taineering, hand grenades,
rifle marksmanship and nu-
clear, biological and chemi-
cal training.
Mauldin began classes
Aug. 19. The West Point
curriculum offers 37 majors,
balancing physical sciences
and engineering with hu-
manities and social sciences
for a Bachelor of Science
degree.
Mauldin graduated from
Lecanto High School. He
plans to graduate from West
Point in 2017 and be com-
missioned as a second lieu-
tenant in the U.S. Army.


VETERANS NOTE

Office has help for vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans Services Department
offers help for veterans who have had their post-
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied within the past
two years are asked to contact the office to review
the case and discuss compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have been diagnosed by the
Lecanto VA Mental Health center and have been de-
nied are encouraged to contact the Citrus County
Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. Veterans will need to have a de-
nial letter and a copy of a compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. Veterans can get a copy of their
exam either by requesting it through the VA medical
records or from the primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto wwwbocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.


Capital City
0Bank


More than your bank. Your banker.

MEMBER FDIC t-Subject to mobile service availability. *Requires a Capital City Bank deposit account and is subject to
approval. Capital City Bank does not charge for the use of CCBMobile Deposit at this time. Fees charged by mobile service
provider may apply and are the responsibility of the user. A^Restrictions may apply Subjectto the Bank's Funds Availability Policy.


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


Caring for Someone



with Memory Loss?





Meridien Research is looking for volunteers

ages 60 and older, with memory loss who are

taking Aricept for a new clinical research study.


Qualified participants will receive at no cost
study-related:
* Evaluations, physical exams, routine lab work
* Investigational medication

Up to $700 in compensation may be available for the patient
and caregiver combined. No medical insurance is necessary.



i 9K .


DEPOSIT CHECKS


%-%







%%%%,% % '% %' % % N % % % .





AT CAPITAL CITY BANK
CCBG.COM/MOBILEDEPOSIT


ENHANCE YOUR MOBILE BANKING EXPERIENCE with our new
mobile app for depositing checks anywhere, at any time.t With Capital City
Bank Mobile Deposit, make quick, secure deposits to your Capital City
accounts. Simply use the new CCBMobile Deposit app to take a picture
of the front and back of your check and submit. It's easy and free*!

Self-service deposits save time and a trip to the bank.
Confirmation is provided immediately via e-mail.
Deposits made by 5 p.m. Eastern will be credited the same business dayA.

Download the CCBMobile Deposit app and enroll today at
ccbg.com/mobiledeposit.


Avialo the W* -


VETERANS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Blac^ert


Google- play


M Ar--




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a sin-
gular event or moment in your military
career that stands out to you. It can be
any type of event, from something from
the battlefield to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of service,
theater of war served, years served,
outfit and veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak
at 352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story

CCVC yard sale Oct. 12
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Satur-
day of the month Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day
before (typically Friday afternoon) and
are responsible for the security of their
own items overnight. The spots are typi-
cally 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

New veterans' pin available
Disabled American Veterans, Gerald
A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness an-
nounces the design and availability of
this year's Citrus County Veterans Ap-
preciation Commemorative Pin.
In keeping with this year's theme,
"Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan
Veterans," the pin is an outline of Citrus
County superimposed with the Iraq
Campaign and the Afghanistan Cam-
paign service medals.
Pins are available for a donation of $3
each and may be obtained by calling the
chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman
at 352-860-0123. Pins are also available
at the Citrus County Veterans Service
Office in Lecanto.

Vets to speak to classes
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will con-
duct its annual Veterans in the Class-
room program Nov. i to 12 as part of its
21st annual Veterans Appreciation
Week activities.
Coordinated by the Citrus County
Chapter of the Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA), the Veterans in
the Classroom program brings living
history to the classrooms of the county's


public and private schools, as well as
homeschool groups. Veterans share with
students their firsthand military experi-
ences and travels while serving our
country in uniform around the world.
The model Veterans in the Classroom
program was recognized in 2008 with a
Florida Education Foundation award.
The program's success has generated
the need for additional veterans to
share their experiences with students.
Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air
Force, National Guard and women vet-
erans are especially needed.
All interested veterans may contact
Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384, cmcleod
670@earthlink.net, or Bob Crawford at
352-270-9025, baddogusmc@tampa
bayrr.com.

Case manager aids vets
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday Coastal
Regional Library 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
DAV needs more drivers
The DAV transportation network
needs volunteer drivers for the two vans
assigned to the Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to Gainesville, the
other from Lecanto to The Villages.
While the Gainesville van goes each
weekday, there are not enough drivers
for The Villages run.
While The Villages trip is not an
everyday run (just when someone needs
to go there), more drivers are needed.
Volunteers must have a Florida dri-
ver's license and up-to-date car insur-
ance. No CDL is required.
Stop by the Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto for an application.
Call Joe Stephens at 352-489-5245 for
more information.

Free yoga classes for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is asso-
ciated with the national service organi-
zation, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom teaches free classes to
combat veterans at several locations
and at several different times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397.


I SAVED $150

ON MY AIR DUCT REPAIRS.

Plus, I lowered my electric bill.



You can too. Leaks in your
home's ductwork waste energy Duct Test and Repair:
and money. Duke Energy can Get 1/2 off a $60 duct test
help with air duct testing and Average repairs cost $300
repairs. It's easy and can make | Rebate for first $150 of repairs
a real difference in your bill. .


Visit duke-energy.com/save or call 888.456.7652.


a DUKE
E ENERGY.


Average costs for duct repair are based on actual work completed in Duke Energy's service territory, do not include system
replacement and will vary according to home size and needed repairs. Requirements for incentives: must be Duke Energy
customer, must use Duke Energy prequalified contractor who will provide estimate, must have Home Energy Check with
qualifying recommendations, must have centrally ducted electric heating and cooling. Other restrictions may apply.
2013 Duke Energy Corporation
OOOFVH4


Vets Journey Home


Sept. 28 golf outing to raise funds for

November event in Citrus County


JOHN MARQUA
Special to the Chronicle
Vets Journey Home is a weekend
open to all veterans who are looking to
start or continue their healing process.
The weekend is focused on assisting
veterans in healing the emotional trau-
mas they sustained during their time of
service.
In 1989, a group of Vietnam veterans
gathered to talk about their war expe-
riences. Most of the men had been in
and out of groups dealing with trauma
- some were facilitators or counselors
- and they began to notice a big differ-
ence in their ability to sleep and relax
in civilian life. This progressed into
scheduled weekends to help heal from
their military experiences, whether
they had been in combat or not.
The group set the precedent that
there is no fee for those who served;
lodging and food are free. That phi-
losophy still stands today, as it is the
feeling they have already paid the
price.
All weekends are paid for by dona-
tions and fundraising, such as an up-
coming golf outing slated for Saturday,


Sept. 28, at The Meadows course at Cit-
rus Hills Golf& Country Club. All ben-
efits from the outing will go to support
the Vets Journey Home weekend in Cit-
rus County, slated for Nov 15 in Floral
City
Vets Journey Home has grown from
its humble beginning in Maryland to a
national-level program with centers in
California, Maryland, Pennsylvania,
Texas and Wisconsin. Vets Journey
Home continues to grow and will be es-
tablishing a center in Florida.
The weekend gathering in Floral City
will be the first one held in the south-
eastern United States.
If you know of a veteran who has
served their country and who has not
returned fully whole, whether due to
sleeplessness, anger or other problems,
Vets Journey Home may be able to help
them. Go to vetsjoumeyhome.org for
more information and to register for
the weekend.
Call 352-476-9698 to donate or regis-
ter for the golf outing on Saturday in
Citrus Hills.
John T Marqua of Inverness is south-
east director of Vets Journey Home.


INAUGURAL GOLF OUTING


* WHAT: Inaugural Golf Outing.
* WHEN: Saturday, Sept. 28. ,
* WHERE: The Meadows course
at Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club.
* WHY: All proceeds will benefit the
November Vets Journey Home ever-t., rh
first to be staged in Florida. This y :';
event will be in Citrus County.
* FOR INFO: To participate, contrib.it-r.
or for more information, call
813-621-8319 or 352-476-9698.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP El

The Florida Department of Transportation is hosting a Toll Rate Rule
Development Workshop to provide the public an opportunity to review and
comment on proposed amendments to administrative rules regarding training
and qualifications standards for toll enforcement officers, video billing,
prosecution of unpaid toll violations, and vehicle classification. The workshop will
also present and solicit comments on administrative rules regarding express lane
tolling and the proposed toll rates for the First Coast Expressway in Duval and
Clay Counties.
The workshop will be held on:
DATE: Tuesday, October 1, 2013 TIME: 6:00 p.m.
The workshop will be conducted as a webinar, which is a live presentation over
the internet that allows attendance from a personal computer. Registration for the
webinar is required. Registration and additional information can be found at:
http://www.floridasturnpike.com/tools_tollratenotices.cfm
Site access locations are also available for those persons
without computer/internet access at the following locations:
Hillsborough County
Florida Department of Transportation
District 7 Auditorium
11201 North Malcolm McKinley Drive
Tampa, FL 33612
Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age,
sex, religion, disability or family status. If you have any questions, please
contact Chad Huff, Public Information Manager, at Florida's Turnpike Enterprise,
1-800-749-7453. Anyone requiring special accommodations for the meeting
under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1991 or in need of translation should
contact Carol Scott at Florida's Turnpike Enterprise (407) 264-3494 at least
seven calendar days prior to the meeting.
IOOOG5G2


..
S500FF( ...m ', ')
''' : mm C ^^ l l' m

ANY DENTAL TREATMENT ",
with FREE CONSULTATION

flrf i-i-- -- .1
^SSS^^^^^----------------- ----- -----g^^^ --------------


NEW PATIENT

$ 7 SPECIAL
HEALTHY SMILE, HEALTHY LIFEM DENTAL PLAN
ORAL EXAM & DIGITAL X-RAYS



FREE
SECOND
OPINION;




ILJENNIFER LEE, DMD
4 DENTISTRY YOUR SMILE
-~ DESERVES
SPECIAL
i m tTREATMENT
CALL US TODAY! "U Ln
352-795-1881 I,

ONLY THE BEST FOR OUR PATIENTS
V Best Dental Materials V Best Technology & Equipment V Best Treatment Plans
V Best Trained Staff V Best Complimentary Spa Amenities V Best Patient Rewards
SMILES ON CITRUS DENTISTRY I 535 N. CITRUS AVE I CRYSTAL RIVER I SMILESONCITRUS.COM


I Duct Repair Program


VETERANS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 All










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Winner


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obamacare divides 2016 field


GOP split on how to go forward opposing health care law


World BRIEFS


STUART PALLEY/
Orange County Register
Cassidy Campbell, 16, at-
tends the 2013 home-
coming football game for
Marina High School on
Friday in Huntington
Beach, Calif. Campbell, a
transgendered teen who
was born a boy, was
crowned 2013 Home-
coming Queen for Marina
High School.


Bleeding from
gunshot mistaken
for girl's period
HAYWARD, Calif. -A
Northern California couple
didn't report that their 10-
year-old daughter had been
shot for more than five
hours because they mis-
took her bleeding for a pe-
riod, police said Friday.
The girl was sleeping in
her Hayward home around
2 a.m. Thursday when a
stray bullet from drive-by
shooting wounded her in
the buttocks, Sgt. Mark
Ormsby said.
When the girl woke up in
pain and had blood in her
underwear, her parents
thought she had started her
period, police said. They
also found no indication she
had been shot.
Ormsby said when she
woke up for school and was
still in pain, her parents in-
spected her bed and saw
bullet holes.
Police don't have a mo-
tive for the shooting and no
arrest has been made.
Roads in northern
Colorado reopen
as floods recede
DENVER More high-
ways in northern Colorado
that were cut off because of
destructive flooding last
week are being reopened,
helping reduce the number
of people in need of emer-
gency shelters and, trans-
portation officials hope,
reducing traffic congestion
in heavily populated areas
along the Front Range.
"I think for a lot of people
it's not returning to normal,
per se, but it's starting to
get there with some of
these roads being re-
opened," said Amy Ford, a
spokeswoman with the Col-
orado Department of
Transportation.
The American Red Cross
said fewer people are using
their shelters now that they
have access to their homes
with some of the roads re-
opened. At the height of the
disaster, more than 1,000
people were in shelters,
compared to the 250 peo-
ple in shelters Saturday,
said Carmela Burke, a Red
Cross volunteer.
Car slams into
cyclists during
NH ride, killing 2
HAMPTON, N.H.--Acar
slammed into a group of bi-
cyclists Saturday during an
annual ride along the New
England coastline, killing
two riders and injuring two
others, police said.
The crash happened on
a two-lane bridge in Hamp-
ton at about 8:30 a.m.,
just after the start of the
40th annual Granite State
Wheelmen Tri-State Sea-
coast Century ride.
Police said two Massa-
chusetts women were
killed. They were identified
as Pamela Wells, 60, of
South Hamilton, and Elise
Bouchard, 52, of Danvers.
From wire reports


Associated Press

MACKINAC ISLAND,
Mich. A clear divide
over the health care law
separates the emerging
field of potential GOP can-
didates for the 2016 presi-
dential race, previewing
the battles ahead as they
try to rebuild their party
and seize the White
House.
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz says
he will fight "with every
breath" to stop President
Barack Obama's signature
domestic achievement,
even if that means shutting
down parts of the federal
government. It's an ap-
proach that former


Florida Gov Jeb Bush
calls "quite dicey" politi-
cally for Republicans.
Allied on one side are
Cruz, U.S. Sen. Marco
Rubio of Florida and oth-
ers who say they are mak-
ing a principled stand,
willing to oppose the law
at all costs.
Then there are those tak-
ing what they call a prag-
matic approach by
accepting the law, if grudg-
ingly, and moving on. This
group includes Govs. Chris
Christie of New Jersey and
Scott Walker of Wisconsin,
who says a shutdown would
violate the public trust
"The government we
have should work, so that's


why I don't believe we
should shut the govern-
ment down," Walker told
reporters Saturday after
speaking at a Republican
conference in Michigan.
The Republican-
controlled House passed a
short-term spending plan
Friday that would continue
funding government
operations through mid-
December while withhold-
ing money for the health law.
Even Sen. Rand Paul of
Kentucky was suggesting
there was little Congress
could do to stop Oba-
macare from taking effect
Paul said while attend-
ing the Michigan confer-
ence that Republicans


could force a vote in both
houses of Congress, then
negotiate changes to legis-
lation in a joint conference
committee. But, he added,
time is running out.
"I'm acknowledging we
probably can't defeat or
get rid of Obamacare," he
told reporters. "But by
starting with our position
of not funding it maybe we
get to a position where we
make it less bad."
Less than one-quarter of
Americans approve of the
job Congress is doing,
about the same as approve
of Republicans in Con-
gress, according to recent
national polls. Democrats
poll slightly higher


Horror in Kenya


Associated Press
Civilians who had been hiding inside flee from the Westgate Mall Saturday in Nairobi, Kenya. Gunmen threw
grenades and opened fire in the mall Saturday, killing at least 39 people in an attack targeting non-Muslims
at an upscale mall in Kenya's capital that was hosting a children's event.

Terrorists strike mall, murdering dozens; hostages held


Associated Press

NAIROBI, Kenya Terrified
shoppers huddled in back hall-
ways and prayed they would not
be found by the Islamic extremist
gunmen lobbing grenades and fir-
ing assault rifles inside Nairobi's
top mall Saturday When the way
appeared clear, crying mothers
clutching small children and
blood-splattered men sprinted
out of the four-story mall.
At least 39 people were killed
and more than 150 wounded in
the assault, Kenya's president an-
nounced on national TV, while
disclosing that his close family
members were among the dead.
Foreigners were among the ca-
sualties. France's president said
that two French women were
killed. Two Canadians were killed,
including a diplomat, said the Can-
dadian prime minister FourAmer-
ican citizens were reported injured
but not killed in the attack, the
State Department said Saturday
Early Sunday morning, 12
hours after the attack began, gun-
men remained holed up inside
the mall with an unknown num-
ber of hostages. President Uhuru
Kenyatta called the security op-
eration under way "delicate" and
said a top priority was to safe-


guard hostages.
As the attack began shortly
afternoon Saturday, the al-Qaida-
linked gunmen asked the victims
they had cornered if they were
Muslim: Those who answered yes
were free to go, several witnesses
said. The non-Muslims were not.
Somalia's Islamic extremist
group al-Shabab claimed respon-
sibility and said the attack was
retribution for Kenyan forces'
2011 push into Somalia. The
rebels threatened more attacks.
Al-Shabab said on its Twitter
feed that Kenyan security officials
were trying to open negotiations.
"There will be no negotiations


whatsoever," al-Shabab tweeted.
As night fell in Kenya's capital,
two contingents of army special
forces troops moved inside the
mall.
Police and military surrounded
the huge shopping complex as
helicopters buzzed overhead. An
Associated Press reporter said he
saw a wounded Kenyan soldier
put into an ambulance at night-
fall, an indication, perhaps, of a
continuing shoot-out inside.
Witnesses said at least five gun-
men including at least one
woman first attacked an out-
door cafe at Nairobi's Westgate
Mall, a shiny, new shopping center
that includes Nike, Adidas and
Bose stores. The mall's ownership
is Israeli, and security experts
have long said the structure made
an attractive terrorist target.
The attack began shortly after
noon with bursts of gunfire and
grenades. Shoppers expatri-
ates and affluent Kenyans fled
in any direction that might be
safe: into back corners of stores,
back service hallways and bank
vaults. Over the next several
hours, pockets of people trickled
out of the mall as undercover po-
lice moved in. Some of the
wounded were trundled out in
shopping carts.


Child recovering from Chicago shooting


Incident is latest in string of violenceplaguing Windy City


Associated Press


CHICAGO A 3-year-
old boy shot in the head
during this week's mass
shooting at a southwest
Chicago park was recover-
ing from surgery in inten-
sive care Saturday, a
family spokesman said.
Deonta Howard was
among 13 people wounded
late Thursday when an un-
known number of people
shot up a crowded basket-
ball court with an assault
rifle. The family's pastor,


the Rev Corey Brooks,
said the boy had surgery
Friday that went well.
"There's going to have to
be some plastic surgery
done later on," Brooks
said. "... Thankfully there
was no brain damage or
eye damage."
Police hadn't announced
any arrests as of Saturday
afternoon as the investiga-
tion continued into a
shooting that again placed
Chicago's gang violence in
a national spotlight. Shoot-
ings overnight killed four


people around the city and
injured four others, the
Chicago Sun-Times
reported.
The latest bloodshed
stretched from the upscale
Gold Coast neighborhood
to the Far South Side,
which experiences fre-
quent gang violence. Ac-
cording to the Cook County
medical examiner's office,
the dead included an 18-
year-old who was shot in
the chest and arm around
6 p.m. Friday in the South
Shore neighborhood.


The Sun-Times reported
that the Gold Coast inci-
dent involved a man who
was shot and injured dur-
ing an apparent argument
over a parking space.
Police have said they
think Thursday night's at-
tack at Cornell Square
Park in the Back of the
Yards neighborhood was
gang-related. Several gang
members were among
those shot, though it was
not yet clear who the in-
tended target was, police
said.


Associated Press
A woman celebrates the
opening of the "Hof-
braeuzelt" beer tent Sat-
urday at the 180th
Bavarian Oktoberfest
beer festival in Munich,
Germany. The world's
largest beer festival runs
through Oct. 6 and will at-
tract more than 6 million
guests from around the
world.


Chinese court set
to hand down
verdict in Bo case
JINAN, China -A Chi-
nese court was expected to
hand down a guilty verdict
today for corruption
charges against fallen politi-
cian Bo Xilai in one of the
country's most lurid political
scandals in decades.
The Jinan Intermediate
People's Court was to an-
nounce the verdict against
Bo, who was tried last
month on charges of taking
bribes, embezzlement and
abuse of power. The former
Politburo member and party
chief of the megacity
Chongqing vigorously de-
nied any criminal wrongdo-
ings during the trial, but
Chinese courts are not in-
dependent and a guilty ver-
dict is widely expected.
Bo, once a rising political
star, was removed from of-
fice in March and expelled
from the party in September.
Three US troops
killed in Afghan
insider attack
KABUL, Afghanistan -
An Afghan wearing a secu-
rity forces uniform turned
his weapon against U.S.
troops Saturday, killing
three in eastern
Afghanistan, officials said,
in another apparent attack
by a member of the Afghan
forces against their interna-
tional allies.
The shooting took place
in Gardez, capital of east-
ern Paktia province, Gen.
Mohammad ZahirAzimi, an
Afghan Defense Ministry
spokesman, said.
The attack took place in-
side a base of the Afghan
army in the city, according to
a security official in Gardez,
who spoke on condition of
anonymity because he was
not authorized to give details
while the incident was still
under investigation.
A U.S. Defense Depart-
ment official confirmed that
all three soldiers were
Americans, but that no fur-
ther details would be re-
leased until after their
relatives had been
notified.
Peru bishop
removed amid
abuse charges
LIMA, Peru Pope
Francis has removed a
Roman Catholic bishop in
Peru who an influential for-
mer prelate says is sus-
pected of sexually abusing
minors.
Gabino Miranda, 53, was
removed as part of the new
pope's "zero tolerance" pol-
icy against abuse, the Rev.
Luis Bambaren, the retired
former Peruvian bishops'
conference chief, told re-
porters on Friday.
Miranda is only the sec-
ond bishop known to have
been removed in recent
times by the Vatican over
sex abuse allegations.
From wire reports







E Travel & Leisure



EXCURSIONS


V, -''


Ken
McNally

CAR
CORNER


MATTHEW BECK/ Chronicle
TOP: Citrus County Locally Grown, LLC Market Manager
Michael Wilmshurst assists Maureen Lamb of Citrus
Springs with her basket of vegetables at the Dunnellon
Train Depot where goods are distributed. The market
offers vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, dairy and baked
goods to residents of Citrus and parts of southern Marion
Counties. ABOVE: Freshly prepared baskets of locally
grown and produced ingredients are available through
Citrus County Locally Grown LLC.


ectf ON.


communities

By Karen Kennedy-Hall
Chronicle Correspondent

V T hat originated as a way for
V farmers to connect and share
IAI [ their crops with neighbors,
S^ Community Farmers Markets
are quickly becoming a way of
life in many cities, towns and villages
nationwide.
But now, these weekly markets spotlight
not only farm products but also local arti-
sans and craftsman who share their talents
and creations in an expansive array of
products.
And each local market is different,
reflecting the local culture of its inhabitants
and the area.

U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary Ed
Avalos in his Aug. 9 blog, in celebrating National Farm-
ers Market Week, said 'As a nation of immigrants, we
have many rich and complex influences woven into the
history of our country Foods we eat, holidays we cele-
brate, how we create goods or perform services these
are all things that are shaped by the cultural identities
of our families and the communities around us.
"For many communities, farmers markets are playing
a pivotal role in maintaining and enabling these cultural
ties."
In Citrus County, every Friday and Saturday, from now
through spring, three community farmers markets are
See Page A17


Area 'car nut'


likes to lend


helping hand

I have a friend in the Nature Coast
Mustang club who considers him-
self to be a real "car nut" since
birth, and I can say that I see signs of
this affliction. His name is Howard
Warner and he is the Parts Manager at
Nick Nicholas Ford in Inverness. He
has always worked in the automotive
related industry At a very young age,
he would call out the year, make and
model of passing cars while his dad
was driving. He still has many Match-
box and Hot Wheels cars that were
well-loved as he was growing up.
Howard currently owns a white 2007
Mustang GT California Special con-
vertible, but he has owned a number of
project cars over the years, including
several Chevy Corvairs. He is always
willing to help anyone with car issues
and, in his spare time, recently com-
pleted an engine, transmission and en-
gine bay restoration on a friend's 1965
baby blue Mustang convertible, which
took about four months. I can recall
once when the club was caravaning back
from a car show near Orlando, Howard
was following this 1965 Mustang because
the gas gauge was not working. Good
thing he did because the classic car ran
out of gas on route and Howard was
right there to help get gas.
Howard, as a representative of the
Ford dealership, was very instrumen-
tal in getting the Mustang club started
many years ago, along with Perry and
Jackie Unger. He and his wife Barbara,
who is the club treasurer, are very ac-
tive and supportive of the club. Barb
has held a number of positions during
her career and currently works as a
teacher's aide. She is also a car enthu-
siast and recently purchased her own
show car, which is a black 2001 SVT
Cobra convertible Mustang a real
beauty When buying the car, she didn't
even check to see if the radio worked
because she liked the sound of the ex-
haust so much.
Barb's dad has been a motorcycle
rider and car guy his whole life, so she
didn't stand a chance when she married
Howard. Howard does all of the repairs,
maintenance and cleaning on the cars -
Barb just drives them.
Howard and Barb moved from Buf-
falo, N.Y, to Florida in 1979, one
month after their wedding, to escape
the cold and snow Howard said that
cars do not last long in Buffalo as a re-
sult of the harsh winters and summer
falls on the 4th of July!! They have
lived in the Inverness area since 1999
and have two daughters Rachel and
Sarah. Rachel provides great help at
club events and cars shows. Sarah is
attends the U. S. Air Force Academy in
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Howard and Barb love to drive their
Mustangs to car shows and "Pony
Rides." They have attended many
shows in Florida and have won a num-
ber of awards. Howard said that the
best part of owning specialty cars is
the great people you meet who share
this hobby and, he also said, driving in a
caravan of Mustangs through the beauti-
ful Florida countryside on back roads to
an awesome restaurant isn't too bad ei-
ther Coincidentally today just happens
to be Howard and Barb's 35th wedding
anniversary congratulations.
CAR JOKE: A man was driving down
a country road when his car came to a
sudden halt As he lifted the hood to
check the engine, a brown and white
cow from an adjoining field lumbered
over to the car and stuck her head
under the hood next to the man's. After
a moment or two, the cow turned to the
man and said: "Looks like a bad carbu-
retor to me." Then she walked back
into the field and resumed her grazing.
Amazed, the man walked up to the
farmhouse and asked the farmer: "Is
that your cow in the field?" "The
brown and white one? Yes, that's old
Buttercup." "Well," continued the man,
"my car was broke down, and she just
said, 'Looks like a bad carburetor to
me."' The farmer shook his head and
said: "Don't mind old Buttercup. She
don't know a thing about cars."
See Page A17


farmers market


I




A14 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 2 2201 3 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/!: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
~CC B IDA I F H 6:00 6:30 7:001 7:301 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 110:30 111:00 11:30
i ESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night in America '14' NFL Football Chicago Bears at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N) N News
SP NewsHour WEDU Queen & Country Last Tango in Halifax Masterpiece Mystery! Mysterious Great As Time As Time
WkPBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus "Royal Visit"'G' (N) '14' BN military facility. (N)'PG' Romances Goes By Goes By
SWUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up Keeping Up Appearances'PG' Last Tango Masterpiece Mystery! (N) 'PG' The Bletchley Circle Austin
Sf NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Chicago Bears at Pittsburgh Steelers. From Heinz Field in News
o NBC 8 8 8 88LANews Stereo Live) '14' Pittsburgh. (N) (In Stereo Live) cc
o_ c ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (In Revenge "Truth" Emily is forced to evaluate her News Sports
B ABC20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo)'PG' quest. (In Stereo) 'PG' B Night
TPJ S 0 1 0 10 1 NFL Football Indianapolis Colts at San The 65th Pdmetime Emmy Awards Honoring excellence in television. (N) 10 News Paid
(B S CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Francisco 49ers. (N) (Live) N (In Stereo Live)'14' 11pm (NJ Program
F 1 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) American The The Bob's Family Guy Dads FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
S FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) B Dad'14' Simpsons Simpsons Burgers 14' Pilot"14' (InStereo) Notice'PG'
g) WCJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge "Truth" (In Stereo) 'PG' Bc News Inside Ed.
en r I ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken Know the Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Youngren Child G' Cause Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
S ABC 11 1 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (In Revenge "Truth" Emily is forced to evaluate her News Castle'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo)'PG' quest. (In Stereo) 'PG'
R ND 1 1 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Panic" (In Law & Order "Entitled" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
E C14'BIND 12 1216 '14' '14' Theory Theory Stereo)'14'B '14'm '*PG' *PG'
E CWTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *** "GoldenEye"(1995)'PG-13' B Seinfeld Seinfeld Republic of Doyle Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IE (W TBN 21 21 1 Dr. C.Stanle Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Brody Ministries
S 4 4 1 Fdends Fdends Two and Two and CSI: Miami "Cop Killer" CSI: Miami Criminal Minds "Coda" Criminal Minds "Today I
ED CW 4 4 4 12 12 'PG' 'PG' Half Men Half Men '14' m Counterfeiting.'14' PG' Do"'14' B
SF 1 1 1 Casita Big Rotary Family Healthy Your Citrus County Court ISpy'Y' Eye for an Fam Team
IM FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living Eye
EI WOX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Ban American Simpsons Simpsons |Burgers Fam. Guy I Dads'14' FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG'B
rnWEAUNI 15 15 15 15 14 Coined. Noticiero AquifyAhora (SS) Mira Quien Baila (N)'14'(SS) Sal y Pimienta'PG' Coined. Noticiero
SWXPX ION 17 Law Order: CI Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: CI Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
Bad Ink Bad Ink Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Bad k (N)Bad Ink Bad Ink Bad Ink
M ) 54 48 54 25 27 '14' '14'm Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty 14' 'PG' '14'c '14'c
S 6 ** "Shooter" (2007 Suspense) Mark Breaking Bad Breaking Bad A conclu- Low Winter Sun (N) Talking Breaking
_ 55 64 55 Wahlberg, Michael Pena. Premiere. R' "Ozymandias"'14' sion closes in.'14' 14'm Bad'14' Bad'14'
52 35 52 19 21n To Be Announced Gator Boys (In Stereo) To Be Announced Call of Call of Gator Boys (N) (In Call of Call of
52 35 52 19 21 *PG'B cWildman Wildman Stereo) 'PG' Wildman Wildman
S 96 19 96 ** "Why Did I Get Married?" (2007, ** "For Colored Girls" (2010, Drama) Kimberly Elise. Crises, heart- Real Husbands of
(t 96 19 96 Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry.'PG-13' B break and crimes bind together a group of women. R' Hollywood
RAV 254 51 254 Tamra--Wedding Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ NeNe--Wedding Happens Jersey
27 61 27 33 South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park (N) 'MA' B Tosh.O Bdckleberry
S27 61 27 33 MA 14' *MA' 'MA' *MA' *MA' *MA' '14'm
98 45 98 28 37 u To Be Announced Cops Cops Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the **** "Unforgiven" (1992, Western) Clint
MY_98 45 98 28 37 Reloaded Reloaded Hunt'14'BccHunt'14'Bc Eastwood. (In Stereo) 'R' B
Nj 43 42 43 Focus 25 Cook Debt/Part On American Greed Mob Money: American Greed Money Talks
NN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Crimes of the Inside Man (N)'14' Crimes of the
5H 4 4 Austin & Dog With a Good- Good- Liv & Austin & Wander- Jessie Good- Austin & Dog With a Jessie
S46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Blog'G' ChCharli eharlie Maddie Ally'G' Yonder 'G'M Charlie Ally'G' Blog'G' 'G'M
SPN 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)
PN 34 28 34 43 49 WNBA Basketball Baseball Tonight (N) SportCtr INHRA Drag Racing AAA Texas FallNationals. From Dallas. B NASCAR
WTiJ 95 70 95 __ 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Pme G.K. Rosary Dogmatic Theology |God Bookmark
An 29n 52 29 2n0 2 "Ratatuille' *** "The Incredibles" (2004, Comedy) Voices of Craig T. ** "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" (2011, Adventure)
M ) 29 52 29 20 28 Nelson, Holly Hunter. 'PG' Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz, lan McShane.'PG-13'
S 118 170 *** Ji"Billy Elliot" (2000 Drama) Julie Walters, *** "The Apostle" (1998) Robert Duvall. An outlaw Texas *** "Sling Blade" (1996) Billy
(118170 JamieBer (In Stereo) R c preacher attempts to redeem himself. 'PG-13' Bob Thornton.'R' Bc
fTNt 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
OD 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Kids Cook-Off Kids Cook-Off Food Truck Race Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Iron Chef America
JSjJ 732 112 732 Jones Moseley NASCAR UFC UFC Ultimate Ronda Rousey The Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
SNL 35 39 35 __ Bull Riding World Poker Tour World Poker Tour The Best of Pride (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
S*** "X-Men: First Class" (2011, Action) ***2 "Moneyball" (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill. A baseball man- *** "X-Men: First
1FX) 30 60 30 51 James McAvoy, Rose Byrne.'PG-13' ager challenges old-school traditions. 'PG-13' Class" (2011, Action)
OL 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf The Tour Championship, Final Round.
WALIJ 59 n "Be MyValentine"(2013 Romance)William Cedar Cove Jack may "Hope Floats" (1998, Romance) Sandra Frasier'PG'Frasier'PG
59 68 59 45 54 Baldwin, Natalie Brown. B get a job offer. Bullock. PG-13'mc
0 2 0 2 **' "Hitchcock" *** "Behind the Candelabra" (2013) Michael Boardwalk Empire (N) Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire
iJ 302 201 302 2 2 (2012)'PG-13' Douglas, Matt Damon. (In Stereo) B 'MA' 'MA'c 'MA'c
HO 3 2 30 ***2 "The Hurricane" Real Time With Bill *** "Argo" (2012 Historical Drama) Ben *** "The Descendants" (2011, Drama)
303 202 1303 (1999)'R' Maher'MA' B Affleck, Alan Arkin. (In Stereo) R' B George Clooney (In Stereo) R' B
HW 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters ~Hunt Intl Hunters HuntIntl Extreme Homes'G' Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Reno Hunters HuntIntl
i 51 51 2 4 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Mountain Men Mountain Men (N) The Great The Great American Pickers
51 25 51 32 42 PG PG' 'PG' 'PG' "Judgment Day"'PG' 'PG'B Santinis Santinis "Motor City"'PG'
S 24. 38 24., 31 Devious Maids'PG' Devious Maids'PG' Devious Maids'PG' Devious Maids'PG' Devious Maids "Totally Devious Maids "Totally
24 38 24 31 Clean"'PG' Clean"'PG'
S1 When a Child Kills (In Killer Kids Group kill- Killer Kids "Baby Killer Kids (In Stereo) I Killed My BFF "Silent I Killed My BFF "Silent
UVN 50 119 Stereo)'14' c ings.'14' c Killers"'14' '14' m Scream" (N)'14' Scream'14'
nIAJ 320 22 32 3 3~"'Dragonfly' ** "Varsity Blues" (1999) James ** "Tower Heist" (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. ** "Battleship" (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor
X 320 221 320 3 3 Van Der Beek. 'R' Bc (In Stereo)'PG-13' Bc *"aKitsch. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Scice
1t 4 4 4 Caught on Camera "A Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Lockup: Raw "Hell in Lockup: Raw "Killers
42 41 42 Hard Day's Work" Into the Deep" Invasion!"' a Cell" Among Us"
J 109 65 109 44 53 To Catch a Smuggler To Catch a Smuggler Drugs, Inc. "Rocky ,ij Inc. Miami Alaska State Troopers ';,.i ;i.. "Miami
'14' '14' Mountain High" ... (N) '14' (N) '14' 1 ,- ..
it 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. Sponge. Dora... PlayOut SeeDad |Wendell ** "The Karate Kid Part III" (1989) Ralph Macchio. Friends
WN 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Lifeclass
S44 123 Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped (N)'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG'
n' 30 241 3 **"Die Another Day" Dexter "Monkey in a Ray Donovan "Bucky Dexter "Remember the Ray Donovan "Same Ray Donovan "Same
340 241 340 4 (2002)'PG-13' Box" 'MA' F... Dent" Monsters?"'MA' Exactly"'MA' Exactly"'MA'
,S 3 2 3 Bar Rescue "Broke Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Barely Bar Rescue "Tears for Tattoo Rescue (In Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
37 43 37 27 36 Black Sheep"'PG' 'PG' Above Water' PG' Beers"'PG' Stereo) 'PG' 'PG'
Z 370 27 370 W*** "Looper"(2012, Science Fiction) Bruce TheWhite Queen (In TheWhite Queen (In **" "King Arthur" (2004 Histodcal Drama)
3730 271 370 Willis, Emi Blunt. (In Stereo) 'R' Bc Stereo) 'MA' B Stereo)'MA' Clive Owen. (In Stereo)'PG-13'Bc
J 36 31 36 c Addictive Ship Sprtsman College Football Bethune-Cookman at Flodda State. (Taped) Professional Tarpon Saltwater
BH 36 31 36 Fishing Shape TV Adv. _____________ __ Tournament Series Exp. __
Resident Evil: Afterlife **"Drive Angry" (2011 Action NicolasCage, ** "Ghost Rider" (2007) Nicolas Cage. A motorcycle stunt- *** "Sin
j 31 59 31 26 29 '14' Amber Heard, illiam Fichtner.'' man is a supernatural agent of vengeance.'PG-13 City"
TS 49 23 49 16 19 Pursuit ** "TylerPerry'sWhy Did I Get MarriedToo?" **'TylerPerry's I CanDoBadAll By Myself" Dupree
S5 1 9 0 3 *** "Torn Curtain" (1966 Suspense) Paul **** "The 39 Steps" (1935) *** "Sabotage" (1936, Suspense) Alfred Hitchcock 'PG'B
169 53 169 30 35 Newman, Julie Andrews.'PG'B Robert Donat.'NR'c Sylvia Sidney.NR' c
STickle Tickle Airplane Repo (In Airplane Repo "Mid-Air Airplane Repo No Airplane Repo "Flying Airplane Repo "No
53 34 53 24 26 14'N 14'B Stereo)'14'B Colision"'14' Rescue Repo"'14' Blind"'14'B Rescue Repo"'14'
T 50 46 50 29 30 Sister Wives 'PG' Sister Wives'PG' Sister Wives (N)'PG' Sister Wives (N)'PG' Breaking Amish: LA Sister Wives 'PG'
Niii 350 261 350 ** "How to Lose Friends & Alienate People" ** "Man ona Ledge" (2012, Suspense) Sam "The Darkest Hour" (2011) **
L J 350 261 350 (2008) Simon Pegg. 'R' BcWorthington. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Emile Hirsch.'PG-13' Bc"BrUno"
tn 4 3 8 3 3 **v "Swordfish" (2001, Suspense) John ** "Lethal Weapon 4" 1998) Mel Gibson. Detectives **2 "Rules of Engagement"
48 33 48 31 34 Travolta, Hugh Jackman.'R' Riggs and Murtaugh battle Chinese mercenaries.'R' (2000) Tommy Lee Jones.
TOON 38 58 38 33 1 "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs"'PG' Dragons Teen American Cleveland Fam.Gu Burgers Fam. Guy IChina, IL
RAV 9 54 9 44 Food Paradise'PG' Food Paradise'G' Mud People 'PG' Adam Adam Making Monsters Making Monsters
trTV 25 55 25 98 55 Top 20 Funniest'PG' Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Containtainerotainer Container Storage Storage
TVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGr ld GoidGrs Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls The Golden Girls Gold Girs Gold Girls
A 4 *** "Bridesmaids" (2011, Comedy) Kristen Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern *** "Bridesmaids"
47 32 47 17 18 Wiig, Maya Rudolph. 'R' (DVS) Family Family Family Family Family Family (2011)'R'i&
Wil & Wll & R Will & Will & WFily & l & Wiy all & Wil & Wil & Wll & Will & yWil &
t j 117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace
W 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay "Analyze This"'R'


Brother hiding


job from parents


D earAnnie: I just
found out that my
brother, who I
thought was in graduate
school studying to be a
teacher, is actually work-
ing as a prison guard. I'm
the only one in the fam-
ily who knows. When I
phoned him to get the
details, he told me that
he'd quit school after
one semester because he
never really
wanted to be
a teacher He
said our par-
ents bullied
him into
graduate
school when
he had trou-
ble finding
work after his -
college grad-
uation.
Prison guard
was the first ANN
job he could MAIL
get.
I asked him
why he is leading this
double life. He said our
parents told him that
graduate school was "not
negotiable." So he fig-
ures they can live with
their delusions. At family
dinners, Mom and Dad
ask him about school,
and he says, "Fine, but
dull." Then they drone
on and on about the im-
portance of attending
school since he couldn't
find a job, and our grand-
father makes a point of
telling him how easy he
has it compared to serv-
ing in Korea. Like we
care. If they don't want to


I
.I


hear what my brother
says, they shouldn't ask.
I agree with him that
my parents are narcis-
sists. They live in total
denial of their kids' lives.
For my 30th birthday,
they gave me a check
and said, "We didn't
know what to give you
since you don't want to
go to culinary school." I
never expressed a desire
to go to culi-
nary school. I
once taught
Myself to cook
something, and
S they became
obsessed with
the idea that I
should be a
chef I have
zero interest.
Here's my
concern: What
happens if my
E'S parents find
BOX out about my
bdo brother? He
says, "That's
their problem." I wonder
if he's doing this so he
can make them look like
idiots when the relatives
find out Should I keep
his secret? -New York
Dear New York: This
is your brother's secret
to divulge, not yours.
However, the two of you
seem overly focused on
your parents' reaction.
You are both too old to
be doing things behind
their backs or letting
them believe things that
are not true. Please be
honest with them and
urge your brother to do
the same.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-
6864
"Battle of the Year" (PG-13)
In 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Insidious: Chapter 2"
(PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler"
(PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Planes" (PG) 1:10 p.m.
"Planes" In 3D. (PG)
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Percy Jackson: Sea of
Monsters" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Percy Jackson: Sea of
Monsters" In 3D. (PG) 4 p.m.
No passes.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m.,
3:30 p.m.,7 p.m.
"Riddick" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.


"We're the Millers" (R)
1:55 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Insidious: Chapter 2"
(PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"One Direction: This Is Us -
The Extended Cut" (PG)
4:40 p.m.
"One Direction: This Is Us -
The Extended Cut" In 3D.
(PG) 1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Riddick" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"We're the Millers" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Caesar or Waldorf
6 Hookah
10 Brown pigment
15 NeighborofAriz.
18 "-Blue Gown"
19 Public enemy
21 Din
22 Dismounted
24 The Styx, e.g.
25 The Beaver State
26 City in Oklahoma
27 bean
28 Honest-
29 Fully grown
31 Picked out
33 Incite
35 Sibilant sound
37 Central idea
38 Marine creature
39 Crime
40 Throw with great effort
42 Magnificent
43 Boiled cornmeal
44 Scratch
46 Monster
47 Animal habitation
48 Bridge charge
52 Red shade
53 Allow
54 Grave
56 Mass of fish eggs
57 Equally
58 Average
59 Cover girl
60 Work by Rousseau
62 Factor in heredity
63 21-gun-
65 Wrath
66 Mountain lion
67 School subj.
68 Warty creature
69 Extensive
71 Lacking sharpness
73 Profound
75 Camrney or
Garfunkel
76 With-on
77 Steal from
78 Compass direction
82 Proportion in mathemat-
ics
84 Isle of exile
85 Rescue
86 Rob-
87 Determine


90 Go by plane
91 Pulled
93 Outer garment
94 Pleasant smell
95 Trendy store
97 Nosebag filler
98 British county
99 Central
100 Easygoing
102 Group of three
104 Oniony herbs
105 Chirp
107 Neck part
108 "Jaws" creature
109 Pressed
110 Endures
112 Kind of signal
113 Battery terminal
114 Stanza
117 Supply
118 Concerning
(2 wds.)
119 Adroit
123 Lunar landscape feature
124 Sudden increase
125 "- and Cleopatra"
127 Go team!
128 "-She Sweet"
129 Riverin France
131 "Mansfield Park" author
133 Swiftly
135 Storm
136 Appellations
137 Game official
138 Delayer's motto
139 Directed
140 Arab VIPs
141 Org. cousin
142 Lyric poem


DOWN
1 Palin or Bernhardt
2 Excuse
3 Dwells
4 Card in a hand
5 Skin (pref.)
6 Read
7 Sluggish
8 Knight's attendant
9 Writer Umberto-
10 Incalculable
11 PC peripheral
12 Liver secretion
13 A letter
14 State again


Most tranquil
Foreign
Draws
Incitement to act
Bewitch
London gallery
Standing wide open
Mitt
Frequently,
poetically
Screeching bird
Small bird
Bay window
Facilitate
Mammoth
Strong wind
Goddess of the moon
Cower
Impostor
Ore deposit
First (abbr.)
Montez or Falana
Lascivious look
Imprisoned
Italian ice cream
Kinds
Sign gas
New Zealand
native
Lose
Silent
Condition
Writer Waugh
Diced
Priest's vestment
Stopped a car
Adored
Prudish
Under
Get in
Skyrocketed
Uses a keyboard
"Madam, I'm -
Furtive one
Humid
Cleveland's lake
Cipher
Floating ice mass
Burning
Complained
Blackboard
European range
Wearing footgear
Hold sacred
Writer Henry David -
Libertine


Sing
Conspired
Urban pollution
Chant
Simian animal
Emphasize
Toward the back


Wound mark
Courtroom event
Extent
More confident
Opposing ones
One of the Muses
Confronted


Then and -
Partly (pref.)
Snakes
New Haven's school
Everyone's uncle
Actress Thurman
Food for babies


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


2013 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Can


measure


Yes, yc


you


quality?


can.


CMS Hospital Quality Alliance Grand Composite Score
(Four Quarters Ending Q3, 2012)
Current National Average = 96.03%


98.41%


98.01%
97.04%
---------------------------------------


93.72%


HCA HCA
Ocala Oak Hill
Regional
M HCA HOSPITALS


HCA


Cleveland
Clinic


HMA


OTHER LOCAL HOSPITALS


Citrus
Memorial


OUT-OF-MARKET HOSPITALS


*HQA Inpatient Composite Scores AHA 2011 Used for System Determination. Data are sourced from CMS Hospital Compare through 3Q2012.


So, what makes HCA quality different?
We use a team-based quality assurance approach with nursing, medical staff, pharmacy and
leadership, all working together toward creating a shared quality visit. We have a tracking
system in place to identify cases that require core measures, and we instill team huddles
to review those specific cases once, if not twice, daily. Then, an ongoing review of the
impending results is communicated to the necessary healthcare team.
Not only are HCA's CMS quality scores superior to others wanting to purchase Citrus Memorial
Hospital, they are among the best in the nation. We work hard every day to improve quality
and expand services because, above all else, we are committed to the care and improvement
of human life. And nothing's more important than your health.
Good for Citrus Memorial Hospital. Good for you.





HCA
HCAWest Florida .com


COMMUNITY COMMITMENT QUALITY HOSPITAL-BASE


99.80%


99.33%


100%

98%

96%-

94%

92%

90%


93.30%



Tampa
General


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 A15











CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

CF is military friendly
The College of Central Florida has been
recognized as a military-friendly school by
Victory Media. The designation ranks CF
as among the top 20 percent of schools na-
tionwide that deliver the best experience
for military students.
The list of military-friendly schools was
compiled through extensive research and
survey of more than 10,000 Veterans
Administration-approved schools nation-
wide. Criteria included military support
on campus, academic credibility, percent
of military students, academic credit for
military students, flexibility for military
students, veteran graduation rates,
student tuition assistance and more.
"The College of Central Florida is dedi-
cated to providing the best education and
support services possible to active service-
men and women, veterans and their fami-
lies," said Dr Tim Wise, vice president of
Student Affairs at CF
Victoria Media is a veteran-owned
media company that enjoins the military
community of troops, veterans and their
family members with content targeted to
unique needs at critical military life
stages.
To learn more about the rankings, visit
wwwmilitaryfriendlyschools.com. To
learn more about CF, visit www.CFedu.

Elks' vets' breakfast today
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando
will host a veterans' breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. today All are welcome.
There is no charge for veterans; dona-
tions are appreciated from all others.
For more information, call 352-464-2146.

Upcoming reunions
The Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Associa-
tion of Florida will have its 21st annual re-
union Sept. 26 to 29 at the Sheraton Tampa
East Hotel, 10221 Princess Palm Ave.,
Tampa. Contact Tom Rountree at
trountree@tampabayrr.com or 352-560-
7361 for details.
USS Chilton APA 38 will have a reunion
Oct 10,11 and 12 in New London, Conn.
Contact Joe Doherty at 352-341-5959 or
jdohertyl@tampabayrr com.

Post to serve baked chicken
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 invites
the public to a baked chicken dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27, at the post,
10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.
Donation is $8. Children younger than 6
eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Post 8189 to do Octoberfest
VFW Post 8189 invites everyone to
Octoberfest beginning at 4 p.m. Saturday,
Oct 5, at the post, 8856 Veterans Drive,
Homosassa, across from Harley-Davidson
on U.S. 19.
Come enjoy German food, music by
Rhonda, games and prizes. The event will
be hosted by the Military Order of the
Cootie and the MOC Auxiliary
Money raised will benefit hospitalized
veterans. For more information, contact
Anna Long at longmanatee@yahoo.com or
352-628-2643.

40&8 to offer breakfast Oct. 6
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Cooter Scooter Poker Run
The Cooter Scooter Poker Run will take
place Saturday, Oct. 12, starting and end-
ing at the Inverness VFW at 906 State
Road 44 East.
The schedule is:
8:30 a.m. Breakfast and registration
at the Inverness VFW
10 a.m. Kickstands up.
5 p.m. Prize winners announced
(must be present).
3 to 7 p.m. Party with Soggy Bottom
Bait Shop Boys at the end of the Freedom
Run.
Cost of $10 per person includes one
poker hand ($5 extra hand). Tickets are on
sale at Citrus County veterans'
organizations.
All net proceeds received from the city
of Inverness will be placed in the VFW
Post 4337 Veterans Relief Fund to benefit
local homeless/needy veterans and their
families.
The event is open to everyone, not just
veterans. Bikes and cars are welcome.
For details, call Victor at 352-220-3487.

Submit information for the Veterans page at
least two weeks before the event.


Lifetime in the cockpit

Former Navy aviator now airport manager


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
After flying in the U.S. Navy for 33 years, Tom Davis retired and moved to Crystal River, where he has been the airport's
manager since 1983. The airport operates a popular flight school and many of those training are foreigners. Flags fly
outside the airport and represent the home countries of the students who are training there.


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


Tom Davis, a lieutenant junior
grade at the time and a U.S.
Navy Air Force pilot, saw the
flash from the side of the hill
just after he had completed his first
strafing run over the area in his F4U
Corsair He and his wingman,
"Peaches" Lamb, did what they were
supposed to do on such occasions:


It was Aug. 10,1951, and Davis was
part of a squadron of Corsairs operat-
ing from the USS Boxer, an aircraft
carrier cruising in the Sea of Japan off
the coast of North Korea. Their targets
of the day were the bridges at Majon-
ni, the strike force consisting of four
"dogs," the nickname for Al Skyraider
bombers, and four "hogs," or Corsair
fighters. Davis and his fellow Corsair
pilots were to supply support and pro-
tection for the bombers.
Which is why he and Lamb were
taking another strafing run. What
Davis had spotted was a flash from an
antiaircraft gun, which could possibly
cause serious problems for the
bombers.
"Flak suppressors is what we were,"
Davis said. "I saw those tracers on my
first run, so on the second I knew
where they were. I came in for an-
other strafing run and we exchanged
fire. I guess you could say he won."
Davis' Corsair was hit and suffered
serious damage to its wing and airfoil.
"I said, 'Peaches, get up here and
find me a place to land.' I didn't think
I was going to make it," Davis said.
But he did make it, piloting his
banged-up Corsair to an air force base
outside Seoul in South Korea.
"That was the scariest thing that
happened to me," he said.
Davis continued to fly in the Navy
and stayed in the service for 33 years,
retiring in 1978. A native of Forrest
City, Ark., Davis and his family moved
to Crystal River after his discharge
and he started a flight training school
at Crystal River Airport. He got a lease
to operate the airport in 1983 and he
remains the airport's manager
"This Ii. been ii,\ Ii, .est diit'
station.h lie ,,jnid
Davis itiij.ill.\ Itried t-
enlist in the


..od;..........



They soared back up, banked their
Corsairs around, and came in for
another pass.
It proved to be a fateful decision,
one that nearly cost Davis his life.
= ........... ==========================================================================.........................................................============== ........................=====
., t..... .............................................................. ..................... .........................................................................................
.4Mrd ,,:i .......................................................

iiii ii J iiiiiiiii iiiiii ............................................................................................................................................................................................................

They soared back up, banked their
Corsairs around, and came in for
another pass.
It proved to be a fateful decision,
one that nearly cost Davis his life.


The old sailor
being piped over
the side upon
retirement in
1978. The two
young officers in
the foreground
on each side are
his daughter,
Lt. Teresa Davis,
and son, Ensign
Jeff Davis.

Special to the Chronicle


U.S. Army Air Corps in January 1945,
but he couldn't get in until he was out
of high school. By the time he gradu-
ated six months later, the war against
Germany was over and the program to
recruit and train pilots was shut down.
So Davis, whose older brother had
flown P-51 Mustangs against Germany,
decided to try the Navy.
"I thought I'd be a submariner,"
Davis said. "But the old chief at the
(enlistment) desk by old I mean he
was probably about 33 said I was
too tall for submarines. He said, 'Why
don't you try naval aviation?' So I
joined up."
Davis eventually got his wings in
1948, training on F6F Hellcats and the
Corsair He went into the Navy Re-
serve in January of 1950, but he didn't
remain there too long. When North
Korea invaded South Korea on June
25 of that year, he was recalled to
active duty
Davis' tour in Korea
w.uld l9st


Flak damage to the Corsair wing as
result of attack on major bridge
complex at Majon-ni.

eight months, during which he would
fly close air support missions for
troops and the escort bombers on mis-
sions. "Bridge strikes were big," he
said. "Then there were railroad inter-
dictions and depots that might have
. 11munition."
Davis was also on duty off the coast
-, Vietnam in 1967 and '68. He did not
1h\ any missions, but he planned and
,: heduled strikes while serving
. b ard the aircraft carrier USS
Intrepid. He was a captain when he
retired, and he had graduated from
t: I liege and had a master's degree
froimn George Washington University
Despite his near miss on his mission
lI Majon-ni, Davis is uncertain he is
Srthy of any special attention for
\iat he did fighting in two wars for
e tleU'S.
I"That's why I'm reluctant to tell
war stories," he said. "My
Experiences were nothing
compared to some of those other
guys."
Davis continues to fly to this day


* .iil-i.iri-t ,ri-itr1I i it Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Cr t, ri1 Pi.,r: i, fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
i rii ri ir i.', .hr .-.nicleonline.com .


* Early submission of timely material is




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE EXCURSIONS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 A17



Nature dictates art for some jewelry makers


JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press

Some jewelry makers take more than
inspiration from nature; they incorpo-
rate found objects from trails and
beaches in their work.
The result? Personal, one-of-a-kind
pieces that impart a natural beauty
Lisa Bernal, of Arvada, Colo., and her
business partner, Jennifer Buchanan, of
Keystone, Colo., have been making jew-
elry together for three years. First, they
used leather and small stones. Their
work now incorporates driftwood, tum-
bled smooth by nature.
"We were looking for fresh, unique
connector pieces for the leather and the
stones," recalls Bernal.
They build pieces around the drift-
wood, incorporating semi-precious
stones such as aquamarine and ama-
zonite, and sell them at their online
store, Elle Jay/ Natural Jewelry Design
House, and at select Colorado stores.
"We try to do as little as possible" to
the driftwood, said Bernal. "The most
we'll do is add mineral oil to bring out
the richness of the wood."
Often, the shape of the driftwood dic-
tates how it'll be used. "Each piece sort
of wants to be something and then you
just figure it out," said Buchanan.
"That's why I love it. I think it's fun to
play with something and then it be-
comes this amazing work of art."
The smooth stones, beach glass
and pottery shards which jewelry-
maker Karen Vesk of Erie, Pa., finds
along the shores of Lake Erie impart





MARKETS
Continued from Page A13

embedded into our social life as they
offer much more than farm products but
also a vehicle for local residents to con-
nect with neighbor artisans, local entre-
preneurs or to discover treasures and
learn a skill.
In going with the trend in farmers
markets, the downtown Crystal River
market, which reopened on Sept 14
after a summer hiatus, has changed its
name to Market Days with Art and
Treasures. And the newest market in
the Crystal River Mall calls its monthly
gathering of vendors, the West End
Market
From different locations throughout
the county each market is unique, giv-
ing residents a reason to visit them all.
Inverness Farmers Market is open
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the first and
third Saturdays at the Government
Plaza in the downtown area.
More vendors are invited to set up a
10-feet-by-10-feet space. The cost is $15.
Call 352-270-8559 for information. Two
free spaces are set aside each market
for nonprofit organizations but registra-
tion is required.
With at least 22 vendors, there's fresh
produce, local honey, custom-made jew-
elry, fresh cut flowers, stationery and
business cards made from recycled
paper, homemade dog biscuits, custom-
embroidered towels and aprons, home-
made pasta, Belgium ice cream,
cinnamon rolls, herbs, native plants, es-
sential oils and candles plus live music,
said organizer Patti Muscaro.
"We have a celebrity vendor too."
A farm in Floral City makes goat soap


Associated Press
Earrings made from surf-tumbled ceramic shards are shown. Karen Vesk, of Erie,
Penn., hunts for beach glass and pottery shards at the Lake Erie shoreline. She
visits Southern states' beaches for small shells and shell fragments, which she said
have "an almost sculptural, abstract look to them."


similar clues.
"I kind of wait for them to speak to me
after I get them back home," she said.
Vesk also uses small shells and bro-
ken shell pieces that she collects on
trips to Southern beaches.
Shell fragments have "an almost
sculptural, abstract look to them," she
said.
The tricky part is preparing found ob-
jects for stringing particularly the sea
glass, Vesk said.
"It's more breakable," she said. "If it




and insect repellent Her soap was se-
lected to be placed in the gift bags pre-
sented to celebrities at the "Grammy's,"
the nationally-broadcast music and
artists awards show
Muscaro plans to have themes for
some upcoming markets, such as "Busi-
ness Deals for Dogs," where there will
be dog gifts and items, dogs for adop-
tion.
She also plans, "Bike to the Market"
with biking clubs and bicycle vendors.
Look for a "Kids' Day" too with face
painters and other kids activities.
"It's an invitation for the community
to unite."
Beverly Hills Farmers Market is from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday at 77 Civic
Circle Drive.
Spaces are 10-feet by 10-feet and cost
$5 but vendors must bring their own ta-
bles, said organizer Bonnie Larson. If
interested, call (352) 746-2657.
The market includes vendors selling
produce, plants, miscellaneous crafts,
water soaps and jewelry to name a few
There's also a hot dog and other food
vendors.
The market has been open all sum-
mer long and last week Larson said
there were about 15 vendors but she ex-
pects the crowds and the vendors will
increase later in the fall and when the
snowbirds return.
"It's small town, good people who
meet and greet and have a good time."
Crystal River Market Days is open
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the second Sat-
urday off Citrus Avenue on the grounds
of Heritage Village in the downtown
area.
Spaces are 10-feet by 10-feet and cost
$20. To set aside a space, call (352) 564-
1400.
Organizer Laura Lou Tolle Fitzpatrick


shatters, it can go in your eye."
She wears safety glasses when
drilling holes with her Dremel
drill press, taking it slowly Vesk sells
pre-drilled pieces along with her jew-
elry at her Etsy store, Sunshine State-
ments.
Still, she recommends using real
beach glass rather than trying to tumble
your own, as she once tried, or buying it
at a crafts store.
"Real beach glass has a frosting to it,"
Vesk said. "It has more of a glow of a gem.




said the market has been going for a few
years.
The seasonal market has between
20 and 40 vendors. "It depends on what
events are going on and the time of the
season," she said.
Vendors offer such items as local
produce, plants, pantry items, art and
vintage collectibles.
The Shoppes at Heritage Village also
offer special sales for Market Days and
food tasting.
"We've had a good following of artists
and crafters who have been with me
for years," Tolle Fitzpatrick said.
"Obviously they sell or they wouldn't be
coming back."
She said on Friday nights before Mar-
ket Days, the Shoppes have 'Art on the
Avenue" hosted by three galleries. 'A lot
of artists participate," she said.
"(Market Days) gives people the con-
nectivity They enjoy the artists and pick
up their produce."
West End Market at the Crystal River
Mall is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the
fourth Saturday at the mall on U.S.
Route 19.
Spaces are $20 no matter what size
they want. Kids can set up a table for $5.
Products must be homemade.
The market is the newest and largest
addition to the genre, opening in July
The first month there were 62 vendors.
August brought 90 vendors, said mall
manager Millie Bresnahan.
"We're going to top it off at 80," she
said.
Offerings included fresh fruits
and vegetables, plants, lots of arts
and crafts, jewelry, unique flower
pots, basket-weaving, painting, water
color and pencil art and lots of wood-
working.
"We're adding a farm swap,"


And that's what's so very desirable."
Tumbled and artificial glass look like
etched glass, she said.
Funny thing about that beach glass,
too: It's harder to find when the skies
are blue. Vesk goes hunting when it's
stormy, which churns up the surf, kick-
ing up glass and other treasures, such as
hand-painted pottery shards from Lake
Erie's commercial heyday
"Normal people are inside by the fire-
place with a cup of hot cocoa or what-
ever they like, and I'm out on the
beach," said Vesk. "I look for the windi-
est weather I really enjoy it."
Jewelry made from found natural ob-
jects is often asymmetrical something
Lorelei Eurto of New Hartford,
N.Y, specializes in. In "Bohemian-In-
spired Jewelry" (Interweave, 2012), she
and co-author Erin Siegel, include
50 jewelry-making projects inspired by
nature.
They use a lot of leather cord,
silk ribbon and handmade beads, and
they recommend basic materials and
tools, such as various pliers, for getting
started.
Most folks can get by with basic jew-
elry-making skills, such as crimping,
stringing and using jump rings, said
Eurto, who sells her pieces online at
Lorelei Eurto Jewelry
When nature fashions your "beads,"
these artists say, you have to take to the
trails and shorelines frequently to re-
plenish supplies.
"I have a hard time going to the park
with my daughter now," said Bernal.
"It's like a giant jewelry box."




Bresnahan said. "It's a concept at Trac-
tor Supply in Dunnellon, a swap meet
with animals chickens, pigs, goats."
They are also offering a section for
child entrepreneurs, children who have
businesses or want to try selling
something that is homemade,
Bresnahan said so far there were two
child businesses.
Epic Sudz is operated by a couple of
girls, one high school and one middle
school, who make soap.
"They were trying their skills in sales-
manship ... it was quite interesting.
They gave me their card. It's a
really nice experience, total learning
lesson."
Another group of kids are home-
schooled. "They like to make things and
sell them," Bresnahan said. "It's a neat
thing."
She said the market has also opened
up other avenues at the mall, "spin-
offs," she said.
The mall is offering empty space for
artists.
"They come in and they do their
crafts in front of people."
She said one artist has been offering
classes using the coffee shop at the food
court.
The space is named an "Open Work-
shop," where they can offer classes or
they can sit and do their work. They can
come in when they want."
She said so far the endeavor has
been successful.
"It's been very nice to drive into the
parking lot and see if full. People want
to see the mall evolve."
She describes the West End Market
as an outdoor market "but inside, with
air-conditioning."
"It works well. Everybody's happy and
the vendors seem to be happy"


CAR
Continued from PageA13

Upcoming events
September 27: All American Muscle Night
cruise-in at 6 p.m. atArby's on U.S. 19 in Crystal River
September 28, October 5 and 12: Cruise-in at
6 p.m. hosted by Citrus County Cruisers at Wendy's on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River
October 1: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. High Octane Saloon
on U.S. 19 in Homosassa.
October 12: Nature Coast Mustang Club's Fourth
annual All Ford Powered Car & Truck Show from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Nick Nicholas Ford on U.S. 44 in


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


t 2013 UFS. Dist, by Universal LJclick for UFS


Inverness. Over 50 awards to be presented and pro-
ceeds benefit local charities. Register at www.nature
coastmustangs.com
November 9: Citrus MOPARS Club second annual
Beauties & Beasts Car Show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at
Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep on Cortez Blvd. in


Brooksville. Over 40 awards will be presented. Contact
me for registration info.

Ken McNally is a car columnist for the Chronicle.
Contact him at kenmcnally@tampabayrr.com or
352-341-1165.


"Ii"''-- ,_ ,1. '2 8 DAY BORA BORA BLISS Stop spending your own valuable time and energy making your own
FRaOM t2r698" travel arrangements.
L $ ............... . O 12 i .... As your personal travel consultant, we will book all of your
A.r DAY MOOREA MAGIC travel needs.
E FROM a.i9B" ... Our prices are the same if not better than you would find
I .1,, booking yourself.
..... ...* The value of working with us is our knowledge, expertise, relationship
1123 IVi Ra.,a Ivres FI-3445 with travel suppliers and our personal commitment to you.
1123 Sierhing Rd., Inverness, FL 34450 B FIEW OKFRADT SITN
*'rwnSTOP BAND VISIT US TO CHECKOUT CALL OR STOP BY OUR OFFICE- WE LOOK FORWARD TO ASSISTING YOU!
TA L LYlIl Z k~e THE DAILY PECILS! TO
LLigHFeesYs
352-860-2805
/wtalyh.vaationsc-mydmrui@tallyhovacabonsc m
Lw L IF I.iI I L Seller of Travel 10131 f


SA AD PI IP IE = U MBIER C AIL
MEN~C N LIT
RIVR ORE G0NTULSA L IMA
ABE MATURE CHOSE FOMENT
il G Is? MWIHALE O0FFFN5E
MH EJAIV EMGIRIAN D G R.ITso
SCRAPEMFIENDLAIR TOLL
CER I SEMGRANITSOLEMINROE
AL I K E M EAN mOEEl M IL E
GENE SA LUE IRE CUGART
ENt3 TOA VAST BLUNT
UEEP ART BELLSRIO LAS ST
RAT1O ELBASATVE ROY
0DFCTIDE M F IL IY Y A N KFD WIRA P
A RO MA S AILIONEFIEEIDESH IR E
MI6 MIELLOIW TRIAD CHIVES
PE EIPENAP ENSIHAR K IIRION EDM
ELIAIST S SMOKE ANJODE
STROPHE STORE ASTI DEFT
CRATER SURGEATIONY RAH
AINT 1$ER E AUTEN APACE
RAGE NAMES UMI RE LATER
LE0 E MI PSR AS N EIPODIE


SinlesTrael oo

Owre 'Married or not, but want to travel more!
_. t ~ Come have lunch, network with others.
Luncheon & Presentation
Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:00 am -$15 pp prepaid
"Tuscany on the Meadows"
Quality Inn Hotel, Hernando, FL
By reservation only. Call 352-746-7547
Mail check to:
The Travel Club, 727 E Gilchrist Ct. Hernando, FL JJJ- I
]] THE ^TRAVEL CLUB/g',i
nm. THE Pull Service Travel Agency I
P lr 746-7547 e -I
746-7547 ST36390 gerrystravelclub@aol.com rry JOnes, Ece


If you want to

advertise here in the

Great Getaways

call 563-5592


I




AIS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


70th ANNIVERSARY

The Paolillos

Ben and Frances Pao-
lillo of Beverly Hills will
celebrate 70 years of mar-
riage Sept. 26, 2013.
The couple were wed
Sept 26, 1943, at Lady of
Grace Church in
Brooklyn, N.Y
They will be
celebrating with their X. -)
four children, six grand-
children and six great-
grandchildren in New
York City .



GET TOGETHER

Jerseyans, friends plan trek
New Jersey and Friends of Citrus County will take a
bus trip to the Victory Casino Cruise ship on Wednes-
day, Nov 6.
Cost for the trip will include bus, admission, buffet
and play money The public is invited.
Call Mary Anne at 352-746-3386.

NYC club plans trip to Smokies
The New York Club of Citrus County will take a
seven-day/six-night trip to Pigeon Forge and Gatlin-
burg, Tenn., in the Smoky Mountains Sunday through
Saturday, Nov. 10 through 16.
Cost includes bus transportation, six nights' lodging
including four consecutive nights in the Smokies, four
evening shows and three morning shows.
Departure from Hernando is to be announced.
Call Paula Margies at 352-527-1433 or Sue Irish at
352-860-2956.

Literary Group to visit museum
The Crystal River Woman's Club invites the public
to join members on a one-day bus trip on Wednesday,
Oct 16, to visit Majorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic
State Park, followed by the Samuel P Ham Museum of
Art in Gainesville and the Museum of Natural History
Lunch will be at the Vellos Brickstreet Grill.
For cost and more information, and to reserve a
seat, call Jo Ann Ryan at 352-382-1138 or Joan Sweety
at 352-564-8773.

Group invites all on treks
The Meadowcrest Community Association will spon-
sor a bus trip to Bok Tower and Gardens on Thursday,
Oct 10.
In December, the group will travel to Ybor City
Price for both trips includes bus, admission, guided
tour, lunch, all gratuities (including driver) and "Fun
on the Bus."
The trips are open to the public. Call the Meadow-
crest social committee chairwoman, Sharon Ziemba,
at 352-795-4693 for price, deadlines, departure points
and times and other details.


64th ANNIVERSARY

The Frisbies


Arthur and Rita
Frisbie of Sugarmill
Woods will celebrate
their 64th wedding
anniversary on
Sept. 24,2013.
The couple were
married Sept 24, 1949, at
St. Joseph's Church,
Newton, N.J. Rita is a
retired beautician and
homemaker and Art is a
retired GMC/Buick
dealership owner They
have resided in
Sugarmill Woods for
13 years.
They have 10
children: Kathy Frisbie,
Homosassa; Eileen Kith-
cart, Newton, N.J.;
Sharon Benton,
deceased; Maureen
Iwanacki, Newton, N.J.;
Coleen Frisbie,
Homosassa; Arthur
Frisbie Jr, Newton, N.J.;


Thomas Frisbie,
Newton, N.J.; David
Frisbie, Canfield, Ohio;
Karen Frisbie, Newton,
N.J.; and Kevin Frisbie,
Seffner
The Frisbies have 21
grandchildren and 13
great-grandchildren.
They will celebrate
with a dinner with
family and friends.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Lytles

Bob and Geri Lytle of
Beverly Hills celebrated
their 50th wedding
anniversary Sept. 14,
2013.
The couple were
married Sept 14,1963, in
Altoona, Pa. Mr Lytle is Ou 5-,
the former manager of Ar. .
Bealls Department Store
Crystal River They have o, I
10 grandchildren.
Bob and Geri .
celebrated with their
family in Helen, Ga. ___


For the RECORD


Sept. 9-15, 2013

Marriages
Joseph Louis Joachim,
Inverness/Cynthia Lynne
Shepherd, Inverness
Patrick Michael Nichols,
Dunnellon/Christy Michelle
Romero, Dunnellon
Daniel Felipe Ortiz, Ocala/
Monica Johanna Reynolds,
Ocala
Arbelio Adam Perez,


Citrus Springs/Lisa Marie
Welch, Citrus Springs
Brian James Singh,
Dunnellon/Sara Grace
Mann, Dunnellon
Christopher Joseph
Warick, Crystal River/
Suzanne Marie Hook,
Crystal River
Nicholas Michael Wilson,
Homosassa/Jessica
Monique lannelli,
Homosassa


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Harveys


Albert and Corrine
Harvey celebrated
their 50th wedding
anniversary in Beverly
Hills on Saturday
Sept. 14, 2013.
The couple were
married Sept. 14,1963, at
St. Alphonus Church in
Dearborn, Mich. Al
worked for American
Motors and Chrysler
Engineering
departments, and
retired in 1994. He is a
life member of the VFW


and has been in the
Knights of Columbus in
Beverly Hills.
Corrine was a lingerie
consultant at the J.L.
Hudson's Co. for 35
years. She enjoys crafts
and homemaking.
They renewed their
wedding vows at Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church.
A celebration
followed at Tuscany on
the Meadows with
dinner and dancing.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Breeses


John and Ida Breese
celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary
Sept. 14, 2013.
The couple, who have
lived in Citrus County
for 26 years, were
married Sept. 14,1963, in
Bradenton. John is a fi-
nancial adviser with Ed-
ward Jones and Ida is a
homemaker
They have three


children: Belinda
Nettles of High Springs,
Janet Jones of Inverness
and Andrew Breese of
Ocala.
They have six grand-
children and one great-
grandchild.
John and Ida Breese
celebrated with a trip to
Orlando with their
children and grand-
children.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









SPORTS


Cobb's 12 K's,
Jennings' three-run
blast help keep
Rays atop Wild
Card standings/B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College football/B2
0 Golf/B3
0 NASCAR/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Baseball/B5
0 High school/B6
0 Adult recreation/B6


When Bucs meet Pats, equal but opposite problems

M". 7-.". Tampa Bay heads to Foxborough stillbhuntingfor win


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman throws a pass Sept.
15 as New Orleans Saints defensive tackle John Jenkins (92) gets past
guard Gabe Carimi (72) during the first half in Tampa.


Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. If
Tom Brady had Tampa Bay's
veteran receivers on his team,
the NFEs two-time MVP might
not have had so much trouble
winning his first two games.
If the Buccaneers had Brady
instead of struggling Josh
Freeman at quarterback, their
chances of being unbeaten in-
stead of winless would have
been infinitely better
On Sunday, Brady again will
try to get in sync with the New
England Patriots' crop of rookie
wide receivers, another test of
his admitted lackofpatience when
there is a game to be won.


"I think there's a real ur-
gency to what we do here," he
said. "This is not tiddlywinks.
This is real football and this is
a real job and we're held ac-
countable every single day for
what we do every single day
"This is about winning foot-
ball games, and we're doing
our best to do it, and that's why
we work hard. That's why you
make the commitments you
make to the players that you
play with, so that we can go out
and try to win, and win on a
consistent basis."
With Danny Amendola ex-
pected to be sidelined with a
groin injury, three of Brady's
top four wide receivers are


rookies. The Patriots also are
missing running back Shane
Vereen with a broken wrist,
but hope to have star tight end
Rob Gronkowski for the first
time after offseason forearm
and back surgery
Freeman has plenty of help
with running back Doug Mar-
tin and wide receivers Vincent
Jackson and Mike Williams.
But Freeman is 30th in the
NFL in passer rating and 33rd
in completion percentage.
"There's some good things
you look at the first two ball-
games, despite some that were
inconsistent or a little bit rocky
See Page B3


Seminoles


trounce

Bethune


54-6
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE No. 8
Florida State and quarterback
Jameis Winston defeated FCS
opponent Bethune-Cookman
54-6 despite plenty of sloppy
play on Saturday
The defending ACC champi-
ons (3-0, 1-0) will want to clean
up their offense before starting
a seven-game stretch against
conference foes next week.
Winston completed 10 of 19
passes for 148 yards and two
touchdowns. And Devonta
Freeman ran for a game-high
112 yards and a touchdown.
Karlos Williams finished with
83 yards rushing and two touch-
downs, and James Wilder, Jr
See Page B2



'Canes QB

goes down

with leg

injury
Associated Press
MIAMI GARDENS Dallas
Crawford and Gus Edwards
both scored three touchdowns
and No. 16 Miami got into the
end zone on its first seven pos-
sessions, rolling to a 77-7 victory
over Savannah State on Satur-
day night.
The Hurricanes set a school
record for points in a game, top-
ping the 75 scored against Ford-
ham in 1954.
Miami (3-0) lost quarterback
Stephen Morris to a lower right
leg injury with 8:51 left in the
opening quarter Hurricanes
coach Al Golden said in a tele-
vised halftime interview that
Morris was "fine" and X-rays
were negative.


Associated Press
Florida quarterback Tyler Murphy looks for a receiver Saturday as he is pressured by Tennessee defensive lineman Jacques
Smith during the first half in Gainesville.




A win and a loss


Gators lose QB Driskelfor season, but stay in






a -s^ -.f?^^ ^
-_-. . .. .. ."-- ^ -_-.-"
.. . o -% -- -- . .
I ~~ .* ... ..
-do,'
I -T-;"- .. ;:: K - -;6


:. ,..J,. t ,, I,;,
Tennessee defensive back Cameron Sutton breaks up a pass intended for Florida wide
receiver Quinton Dunbar.


step under Murphy

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE
After starting quarterback
Jeff Driskel was lost to a
season-ending ankle in-
jury, Tyler Murphy led
No. 19 Florida to five scores in a
somewhat ugly game, helping the
Gators open Southeastern Confer-
ence play with a 31-17 victory over
Tennessee on Saturday
Murphy had a 52-yard touch-
down throw to Solomon Patton, a
swing pass that went the distance,
and made several plays with his legs
as Florida (2-1, 1-0 SEC) won its
ninth consecutive game in the series.
Murphy's 7-yard TD scamper in
the fourth quarter made it 31-10 and
sent fans scrambling for the exits.
The Volunteers (2-2, 0-1) had
hoped to rebound from an embar-
rassing, 59-14 loss at No. 2 Oregon a
week ago. Instead, Tennessee and
first-year coach Butch Jones left
See Page B2


See Page B2


Baffedes Installed C'
up MD. su 5"FREE
a1RN Alignmenlt
I....f.. ..... Chtec1k R,, s g,9
L -J IL------. --' --' "' '--- - --. ---,-,


BUY 3 TIRES Winter Fuel Sevice'
AND GET ONE Llcktt F96 OW*10

FREE,' $4-""S
'- .-- -- ___
------------JIi.-------------------.1


r -----------------------,
N!
* i i
I I
I I
* I
I I
Cfteck & Top-Off ill Fluids
Check Tire Pressure an All 4 Tires
I I
27-Point Inspection
Battery Test g-
SNO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!WM
S All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere'
16 --------------- - - - ---


2219 S. Suncoast Bhlvd Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovelhox"cgL.coxn
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sles 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL: 9AM-6PM Sat.: 1 IAM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Fr: 8AM-2PM Sat.


jWYE


2209 Highway 44 West Invemrness, FL 34453
352.341.0018
lovechevysales.coom
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sa Jes 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL: 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt: 8AM-Noon Sat.


I qr


See Page B2


=


=


OOOFXAZI


mIltI I i : aII IH:I i 111t ,,I I"i tl 'l 4 -- ,,'I : -4 ,:lIA --i i"


SII J; : l III I I V l.C CO PO 0^ LOV :;'CE COUPON- II I


I owok
EM-AVVE




B2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


Associated Press
Michigan State running back Jeremy Langford battles for yardage with Notre Dame cornerback Bennett Jackson during the first half Saturday
in South Bend, Ind.





Irish avoid upset



Spartans make it competitive on a Saturday fll of blowouts


Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. Cam McDaniel
scored on a 7-yard run following a question-
able pass interference call, one of several
penalties that hurt Michigan State, as Notre
Dame beat the Spartans 17-13 for their 10th
straight home win.
The Irish (3-1) also took advantage of an-
other questionable pass interference in the
first half that set up a 2-yard touchdown pass
from Tommy Rees to TJ Jones and a holding
penalty that kept alive a drive that led to a
41-yard field goal by Kyle Brindza. The Spar-
tans (3-1) had 10 penalties for 115 yards by
the Big Ten officials.
But Michigan State made some costly mis-
takes on its own, including a trick play after
the Spartans appeared to be gaining mo-
mentum. After opening the second half with
a field goal, receiver R.J. Shelton threw a
pass that was intercepted by safety Matthias
Farley and led to Notre Dame's go-ahead
touchdown.
No. 1 Alabama 31,
Colorado St. 6
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -AJ McCarron passed
for 258 yards and threw a 30-yard touchdown to
DeAndrew White in the fourth quarter to lift No. 1
Alabama to a 31-6 victory over Colorado State on
Saturday night.
Kenyan Drake set up one touchdown with a
blocked punt and scored on a 3-yard touchdown
run for the Crimson Tide (3-0), which sputtered at
times. Alabama managed only one offensive
touchdown and no third-down conversions in the
first three quarters a week after winning a 49-42
shootout over Texas A&M.
Coached by former Tide offensive coordinator
Jim McElwain, the Rams (1-3) nursed hopes for a
monumental upset into the fourth quarter before
allowing two touchdowns. Trey DePriest stripped
the ball from quarterback Garrett Grayson and re-
covered the fumble.
The next play McCarron laced a perfect strike to
White in the end zone and restless Alabama fans
got something to cheer about.
No. 4 Ohio St. 76, FAMU 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio Kenny Guiton again
starred in place of the injured Braxton Miller, set-
ting a school record with six touchdown passes -
all in the first half to lead No. 4 Ohio State to a
76-0 victory against Florida A&M.
It was the most lopsided Ohio State win since 1935.
The Buckeyes (4-0) needed a total of four of-
fensive plays and 46 seconds to go up 21-0 in
the opening 6 minutes and never looked back. It
was an epic mismatch between a team with na-
tional-title aspirations and a Football Champi-
onship Subdivision member getting a $900,000
guarantee.
FAMU (1-3), which suffered its worst loss ever,
trailed 48-0 before picking up its initial first down in
the second quarter.
Guiton completed 24 of 34 passes for 215 yards.


No. 5 Stanford 42,
No. 23 Arizona State 28
STANFORD, Calif. Tyler Gaffney ran for 95
yards and two touchdowns, Anthony Wilkerson
added 68 yards and another score, and No. 5
Stanford started strong in a 42-28 victory over
No. 23 Arizona State in the Pac-12 opener for
both teams.
The defending conference champions controlled
every facet of the game to turn the only matchup
between ranked opponents this week into a 29-0
halftime lead. The Cardinal (3-0, 1-0) scored in the
air and on the ground, forced two turnovers,
blocked two punts, tallied 10 tackles for loss and
recorded three sacks.
No. 7 Louisville 72,
Florida International 0
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -Teddy Bridgewater threw four
touchdown passes and Louisville's defense allowed
a school-record 30 yards, helping the seventh-
ranked Cardinals blow out Florida International 72-0.
It was the highest scoring game for the Cardi-
nals (4-0) since a 73-10 victory over Murray State
in 2007. It also matched the school's fifth-largest
margin of victory.
Bridgewater hit DeVante Parker for two TD
passes and Gerald Christian and Eli Rogers for one
each before Will Gardner came in to throw another
touchdown to Michaelee Harris in the fourth quar-
ter. Dominique Brown, Senorise Perry, Michael
Dyer and Brandon Radcliff rushed for scores.
No. 9 Georgia 45, North Texas 21
ATHENS, Ga. -Aaron Murray threw for 408
yards and three touchdowns, ran for another
score, and led No. 9 Georgia to a 45-21 victory
over pesky North Texas.
Murray overcame an early interception in the
end zone, hooking up with freshman Reggie Davis
on a 98-yard TD the longest pass play in
school history. Arthur Lynch and Chris Conley also
had touchdown catches for the Bulldogs (2-1).
The Mean Green (2-2) came in as a 33-point
underdog, but big plays on special teams helped
make a game of it. Brelan Chancellor returned a
kickoff 99 yards for a touchdown, and Zac Whit-
field fell on a blocked punt in the end zone early in
the second half to stunningly tie the game at 21.
No. 10 Texas A&M 42, SMU 13
COLLEGE STATION, Texas Johnny Manziel
accounted for 346 yards with three touchdowns in
just more than a half to help No. 10 Texas A&M
cruise to a 42-13 win over SMU on Saturday night.
Texas A&M (3-1) was up 32-6 at halftime, and
Manziel led the Aggies to a touchdown on their
first drive of the third quarter before the Heisman
Trophy-winner went to the bench.
Manziel had 244 yards passing with a touch-
down and ran for 102 yards and two more scores.
Deshazor Everett returned a fumble 12 yards
for a touchdown and Ben Malena ran for 71 yards
and two scores. He got things going for A&M with
a 3-yard touchdown run in the first quarter.


No. 17 Washington 56,
Idaho State 0
SEATTLE Keith Price threw for 213 yards
and three touchdowns in less than a half, Deontae
Cooper scored his first career touchdown after
three major knee surgeries, and No. 17 Washing-
ton routed Idaho State 56-0 in the Huskies' final
tuneup before the start of Pac-12 Conference play.
Bishop Sankey, the national leader in yards
rushing per game, barely broke a sweat against
the Bengals (2-1) of the FCS. Sankey saw action
on the Huskies' (3-0) first three series and scored
on a 3-yard TD run in the first quarter. Sankey fin-
ished with 77 yards on four carries.
Price played a little more than 1 1/2 quarters,
throwing TD passes of 1,6 and 5 yards and adding
a 1-yard TD run as the Huskies led 42-0 at halftime.
No. 18 Northwestern 35,
Maine 21
EVANSTON, III. Linebacker Damien Proby
and defensive end Dean Lowry each had an inter-
ception return for a touchdown to lead No. 18
Northwestern to a 35-21 win over Maine.
Northwestern improved to 4-0 as it wrapped up
its non-conference slate, but this was not the con-
sistent, steady performance coach Pat Fitzgerald
was looking for heading into the Big Ten season. If
not for the interception returns for scores, Maine
(3-1) very well could have been shooting for an
upset down the stretch.
Running back Mike Trumpy and quarterback
Kain Colter each had rushing touchdowns for
Northwestern.
No. 20 Baylor 70,
Louisiana Monroe 7
WACO, Texas Bryce Petty threw for 351
yards with four touchdowns and ran 2 yards for
another score as No. 20 Baylor kept piling up the
points, beating Louisiana-Monroe 70-7.
The fast-paced Bears (3-0) had seven offensive
touchdowns in the 10 drives Petty played. Those
TD drives took a total of 6 minutes.
Baylor is the first FBS team since LSU in 1930
to open a season with at least 60 points in three
consecutive games, according to STATS. Those
Tigers had at least 70 points in each of those
games Baylor scored 69 in its opener before 70
points in each of its last two games.
ULM (2-2), coming off a victory at Wake Forest
of the ACC last week, suffered its worst loss since
a 73-7 loss at Auburn in 2003.
No. 24 Wisconsin 41, Purdue 10
MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gordon ran for three
touchdowns, James White added 145 yards and a
70-yard score, and No. 24 Wisconsin opened Big
Ten play with a 41-10 win over Purdue.
Gordon scored from 5 and 27 yards in the first half
before capping the opening drive of the second with
a 15-yard touchdown run for the Badgers (3-1, 1-0).
Nose guard Warren Herring had a sack, and
Chris Borland added six tackles to lead an active
defense.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


GATORS
Continued from Page BI

Gainesville with another double-
digit setback.
Jones' strangest decision
might have been to bench Justin
Worley and give redshirt fresh-
man Nathan Peterman his first
career start on the road and in
front of 90,000.
Peterman, who grew up in
nearby Jacksonville, had three
turnovers in a 17-minute span in
the first half and was benched at
the break.
Worley wasn't a whole lot better
Then again, no one was
perfect aside from Florida's
defense.


Murphy completed 8 of 14
passes for 134 yards. He also ran
10 times for 84 yards. His biggest
mistake was taking a snap off his
facemask, a botched play that re-
sulted in a fumble.
That was one of seven
turnovers on the day
The Volunteers had four all
in the first half. Peterman had
three, and Raijon Neal fumbled
on the team's second play Dante
Fowler Jr. wrecked the ex-
change, his first of several big
plays.
Florida had three turnovers in
the first half, including running
back Matt Jones' second in two
games. The Gators also botched
a snap on a punt, a miscue that
gave Tennessee great field posi-
tion before Neal's fumble.


The most worrisome one for
Florida was the one in which
Driskel got hurt.
Driskel, already playing with
a brace on his sprained left
knee, twisted his right ankle
while throwing an interception
in the first quarter
Devaun Swafford picked off
the pass and returned it 62 yards
for a touchdown and a 7-0 lead.
Marlon Walls pulled Driskel to the
ground as he released the ball.
Driskel tried to get up, but dropped
back to the turf and called for
trainers. He limped off the field
a few minutes later, got checked
on the sideline and then used
crutches to get to the locker room.
Driskel was then ruled out for
the rest of the season. Murphy
replaced him on the next drive.


The fourth-year junior had
never thrown a pass in college,
watching from the sideline as
Driskel, Jacoby Brissett, John
Brantley, Jordan Reed and Trey
Burton all took snaps ahead of
him.
An injury to Driskel was sup-
posed to significantly hamper
Florida's offense.
But the Gators hardly missed
a beat with Murphy running
things.
He led the offense to four
touchdowns and a field goal in
nine drives. Of course, it came
against Tennessee, which has
lost the last seven games in the
series by double digits. A couple
of those were downright one-
sided.
The Gators finished with 382


total yards, 162 more than Ten-
nessee.
The Volunteers got going in
the fourth, when Worley found
Pig Howard alone in the corner
of the end zone. It came with
Florida down three defensive
backs.
Cornerback Marcus Roberson
(knee) missed the game, and fel-
low cornerback Loucheiz Puri-
foy left after sustaining a thigh
bruise in the second half. Defen-
sive back Brian Poole was
ejected early in the fourth quar-
ter for targeting. The play was
upheld after review, meaning
Poole will miss the first half of
next week's game at Kentucky
With Driskel out, the Gators
surely feel much better after
Murphy's performance.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'NOLES
Continued from Page B1

added 56 yards and a
touchdown.
The Wildcats (3-1)
scored their lone touch-
down off a seven-yard run
from quarterback Jackie
Wilson with 8:21 left in the
third quarter.
Florida State ran away
in the second quarter, but
all three starting receivers
had dropped passes, in-
cluding two for touch-
downs. The defense also
missed several tackles.
Both teams committed
their share of unforced er-
rors in an odd first half.
Bethune-Cookman re-
turner Darian Baker
muffed two kickoffs that
left the offense starting
from the 2 and the 6.
Tackle Alex Monroe was
flagged for holding in the
end zone to give the Semi-
noles a safety. Quarterback
Quentin Williams stared
down and pointed to re-
ceiver Eddie Poole just be-
fore Telvin Smith picked
off the pass and returned it
68 yards for a touchdown.
Florida State receivers
entered the game without
a single drop this season.
Telvin Smith posted a
game-high 12 tackles and
had his first sack of the
season. The Seminoles'
three sacks matched their
total from the first three
games. Redshirt freshman
defensive end Chris Casher
finished with 10 tackles,
including two for loss.
Florida State will travel
to face Boston College next
Saturday
NOTES: Florida State's
Tyler Hunter sustained a
bruised neck contusion in
the first quarter and didn't
return. He was replaced in
the secondary by Keelin
Smith. .. Florida State
Sophomore Terrance Smith
made his first career start
in place of Jones and
recorded his first career
sack in the first quarter



'CANES
Continued from Pags B1

Stacy Coley had a kickoff
return for a score and a
touchdown catch for
Miami, which has won five
straight games for the first
time since 2008. Duke
Johnson, Allen Hums and
Beau Sandland all added a
touchdown for the Hurri-
canes, in a game that had
the final quarter shortened
to 12 minutes by mutual
agreement of the coaches.
DeQuan Daniels had a
75-yard touchdown run for
Savannah State (1-3).
Johnson opened the
game with a 95-yard kickoff
return, and Crawford ran in
from 4 yards out on Miami's
first snap. The Hurricanes
needed twice as many plays
that would be two to
score on their next posses-
sion, with Morris finding
Hums with an 80-yard
touchdown pass.
The third possession was
the one that went wrong
for Miami, which visits
winless South Florida (0-3)
next Saturday
Morris was under pres-
sure from Savannah
State's Alex Wierzbicki,
threw an incomplete pass
and ended up on the
ground for the next few
moments. He ended up
walking to the sideline
without assistance,
though he was sur-
rounded by Miami med-
ical personnel and moving
with a pronounced limp.
Trainers continued
checking his right ankle,
and Morris eventually left
the field so X-rays -
which were negative -
could be taken.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nineteen-year-old Blaney wins in Kentucky

Associated Press rookie Alex Bowman fifth in a Toyota.
Dillon shaved two points off Hornish's se-


SPARTA, Ky. Rookie Ryan Blaney earned
his first Nationwide Series victory and an-
other win for Penske Racing's No. 22 Ford,
holding offAustin Dillon and surviving several
late cautions to win Saturday night's 300-mile
race at Kentucky Speedway
Blaney, who drives for Sprint Cup champion
Brad Keselowski in the Camping World Truck
Series, used his second start in the Mustang to
claim the car's 10th victory of 2013 and a sea-
son sweep at Kentucky Keselowski drove the
car to victory in June.
Blaney's win included tense moments over
the final 40 laps, from beating Dillon off pit
road with a two-tire stop on lap 166 to re-
claiming the lead from Dillon after losing it on
the restart. More tests followed, including a
near-brush with teammate Sam Hornish Jr's
loose Ford and one final restart.
Matt Crafton was third, Hornish fourth and


ries lead and trails by just 15 with six races re-
maining.
Getting closer to Blaney was out of the ques-
tion for Dillon and just about anyone in con-
tention. Hornish gave it a shot late in the race
before that late wiggle left him settling for his
21st top-five finish of the season.
Dillon had hope on several restarts, only to
let the son of NASCAR veteran Dave Blaney
quickly snatch it away on several late restarts.
The final one typified the futility: Blaney
blasted out on lap 191 to open up a three car-
length lead and didn't look back.
Hornish led 65 laps after starting on the
pole, while Dillon led 32.
Beating the No. 22 has been tough for every-
body this season. Four other drivers have
reached victory lane in it this season, includ-
ing Keselowski, who's racing in this weekend's
Cup series race in Loudon, N.H.


Associated Press
Ryan Blaney (22) leads Sam Hornish Jr., left, during an early lap of the
NASCAR Nationwide Series race Saturday at Kentucky Motor Speedway in
Sparta, Ky.


Third Round:
Henrik Stenson 64-66-69
Dustin Johnson 68-68-67
Steve Stricker 66-71-68
Zach Johnson 69-68-69
Justin Rose 68-68-70
Billy Horschel 66-70-70
Jordan Spieth 68-67-71
Luke Donald 70-70-67
NickWatney 72-65-70
Webb Simpson 68-71-69
Sergio Garcia 68-71-69
Bill Haas 70-69-69
Phil Mickelson 71-67-70
Gary Woodland 70-67-71
Adam Scott 65-69-74
D.A. Points 72-67-70
Keegan Bradley 72-65-72
Jason Dufner 74-70-66
Jason Day 68-74-68
Hunter Mahan 70-69-71
Roberto Castro 67-71-72
Brandt Snedeker 69-75-67
Graham DeLaet 68-71-72
Jim Furyk 70-68-73
Matt Kuchar 69-74-69
TigerWoods 73-71-69
Brendon de Jonge 70-72-71
Kevin Streelman 69-72-74
Boo Weekley 70-75-73
Charl Schwartzel 68-79-77


Henrik Stenson eyes his putt Saturday on the sixth hole during the third round of play in the Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta.





Stenson takes 4-shot





lead into final round


Tour Championship

par scores
Saturday, At East Lake Golf Club, Atlanta,
Purse: $8 millionYardage: 7,307, Par: 70,


-213 +3
-213 +3
-215 +5
-218 +8
-224 +14


Open d'ltalia Lindt

Leading scores
Saturday, At Golf Club Torino, Turin, Italy,
Purse: $2 millionYardage: 7,208, Par: 72,
Third Round, a-amateur:


Associated Press

ATLANTA- Stepping in from rain that ru-
ined his rhythm and the back end of his
round, Henrik Stenson was more interested
in looking forward at the Tour Championship.
He still had a four-shot lead.
He was one round from capturing two tro-
phies worth $11.44 million, including the
FedEx Cup.
The Swede just made the final day of the
PGA Tour season a little more interesting
over the last two hours of a dreary Saturday
morning at East Lake. He had a nine-shot
lead at the turn and walked off the 18th green
with a three-putt bogey and his lead back to
where it was at the start of the day
"Of course, I want to win two," Stenson said
after a 1-under 69. "If I can't win two, I'll be
very pleased to win one. If I'm winning noth-
ing, it will probably be not so sweet from this
position. But I didn't have anything when I
came here, so we'll see what we'll leave with."
Stenson appeared to have both wrapped up
when he got up-and-down from a bunker on
the par-5 ninth for a tap-in birdie to reach 14
under, nine shots clear of Dustin Johnson.
Everything changed as the rain began to fall.


Stenson made four bogeys on the back
nine. It might have been worse if not for a
pair of 12-foot putts he made on the 14th hole
for bogey and the 17th hole for par Johnson
was five shots better on the back for a 67,
matching the low round of a tough day for
scoring and got into the last group.
Johnson and Steve Stricker, who had a 68
and was at 5-under 205, were the only players
within six shots of him.
Stenson, the No. 2 seed in the FedEx Cup, is
still in great shape to go home with a lot of money
- $10 million for winning the FedEx Cup,
$1.44 million forwinning the Tour Championship.
Even if he were to finish third, he still would
be in good shape to win golf's biggest payoff.
Tiger Woods, the No. 1 seed, didn't make a
birdie until he chipped in on the 14th hole.
He rallied for a 69, the first time he has bro-
ken par all week. Woods was at 3-over 213,14
shots behind in a tie for 26th.
Australia's Marcus Fraser
leads Italian Open
TURIN, Italy Marcus Fraser shot a 4-under 68
Saturday, giving the Australian a one-stroke lead
over Italy's Francesco Molinari, Belgium's Nicolas
Colsaerts and Sweden's Joakim Lagergren after


three rounds of the Italian Open.
Fraser had a chip-in birdie on the sixth hole in a
bogey-free round that left him at 11 under.
Molinari is trying to capture his national tourna-
ment for the second time, having won in Milan in
2006. He became a member of the Golf Club
Torino when he was 8 years old.
Americans stretch their
lead in PGA Cup
HEXHAM, England Rod Perry and Jeff
Sorenson contributed birdies on their last four holes
Saturday and the Americans took a 10 1/2 5 1/2
lead over Great Britain & Ireland in the PGA Cup.
Perry, who won the PGA Professional National
Championship this year, nearly holed out for eagle
from a bunker on the 13th hole and chipped in for
birdie on the 15th. Sorenson made seven birdies in
their 3-and-2 fourballs win over Nick Brennan and
Gareth Wright.
The teams split the morning foursome matches
at Slaley Hall. Greig Hutcheon and Scott Hender-
son of GB&I had an 8-up lead at the turn before
winning, 6 and 5. The Americans halved the next
fourballs match and won the other two.
The PGA Cup, for club professionals, ends Sun-
day with 10 singles matches.


Marcus Fraser, Australia 66-71-68
Joakim Lagergren, Sweden 72-67-67
NicolasColsaerts, Belgium 65-71-70
Francesco Molinari, Italy 68-67-71
Felipe Aguilar, Chile 69-66-72
SimonThornton, Ireland 68-67-72
Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 65-73-70
Hennie Otto, South Africa 71-67-70
RomainWattel, France 71-72-66
Scott Hend, Australia 72-71-66
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 69-72-68
Matteo Manassero, Italy 70-70-69
a-Renato Paratore, Italy 72-66-71
Julien Quesne, France 70-68-71
Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 65-72-72
David Higgins, Ireland 67-69-73
Steve Webster, England 67-69-73


-205
-206
-206
-206
-207
-207
-208
-208
-209
-209
-209
-209
-209
-209
-209
-209
-209


Also
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 71-68-74 213
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, Spain71 -70-73
-214
Retief Goosen, South Africa 70-72-74 216


BUCS
Continued from Page B1

along the way," offensive coordina-
tor Mike Sullivan said of Freeman's
play "It's not just one player, it's not
just one play, it's a combination of a
collective group of men going out
and executing. To this point, we
haven't done that."
Five things to look for when the
Bucs (0-2) visit the Patriots (2-0):
CLOSE CALLS: Tampa Bay's
losses have been by field goals in the
closing seconds, dropping coach
Greg Schiano to 0-5 in games de-
cided by three or fewer points.
"It's frustrating, sure. Just when
you lose, period, it's frustrating," he
said. "When you put 85-90 hours of
work into a week, and then you don't
achieve what you set out to achieve,
frustrating would be probably the
most mild word you could use."
MORE CLOSE CALLS: The Patriots
beat the Buffalo Bills 23-21 on a field
goal with 5 seconds left, then edged
the New York Jets 13-10 when Brady
completed fewer than half his
passes for the first time in 58 games,
including the postseason.
"I think everyone knows we're a


couple of plays away from losing
games and they were a couple of
plays away from winning games,"
Patriots safety Devin McCourty said,
"so you really can't always take a
team just from the record."
OLD-TIME QB: After facing rookie
quarterbacks in their first two games,
the Patriots will go against five-year
veteran Freeman. That gives them
more video to help prepare. But it
also makes it tougher to confuse a
player with plenty of experience.
BEITER D, BUT: With the addition
of backs Darrelle Revis and Dashon
Goldson, Tampa Bay's defense has
shown dramatic improvement over


Patriots
wide receiver
Aaron Dobson
tries, but
can't pull in
a pass from
Tom Brady
on Sept. 12
during the
second quarter
against the


Foxborough,



befoe tePtrits ewt Yorkuca
neers25-21inan etsibiion thme.
Mass.

Associated Press
last season, when it nearly set an
NFL for yards passing allowed. But
the Bucs have been unable to finish
offthe opposition.
SNEAK PREVIEW: The teams
held joint practices in Foxborough
before the Patriots beat the Bucca-
neers 25-21 in an exhibition game.
That experience likely had limited
value for the teams in getting ready
for Sunday because neither side re-
vealed much of what it would do in
the regular season.
"It was definitely not showing
them everything that we have in our
playbook. They'll sure see it this up-
coming week," Martin said.


34th Annual Citrus Sertoma


* Authentic German Food
* Live Music w/DeLeodsn
* 50/50 Priz Ves rWip .4





Sunday is CAR SHOW DAY/
Spn.rcdbly Thomas '&Ji "
Electric, LLC


SPORTS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 B3




B4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013




Citrus 63,
Ocala Forest 7
Hurricanes 7 28 21 7 63
Wildcats 7 0 0 0 7
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CH Juse 8-yd pass from Moore (Marsden kick)
OF -Tucker 1-yd run (Gilman kick)
Second Quarter
CH Pouncey 25-yd run (Marsden kick)
CH Moore 2-yd run (Marsden kick)
CH S. Franklin 31-yd pass from Moore (Marsden
kick)
CH Moore 1-yd run (Marsden kick)
Third Quarter
CH D. Franklin 19-yd pass from Moore (Marsden
kick)
CH -Vineyard 2-yd run (Marsden kick)
CH Clark 6-yd run (Marsden kick)
Fourth Quarter
CH Pouncey 71-yd run (Marsden kick)
Individual Leaders
Rushing CH: J. Pouncey 6-117-2; J. Clark 8-58-1;
T. Washington 10-42-0; D. Moore 10-38-2; OF: Q.
King 7-46-0; K. Tucker 11-20-1.
Passing CH: Moore 9-20-0-189; OF: C. Feagle 1-
15-2-(-9).
Receiving CH: S. Franklin 4-101-1; J. Juse 3-60-1;
D. Franklin 2-35-1.


Fivay 35, Lecanto 20
Panthers 14 0 6 0 20
Falcons 3 12 7 13 35
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
F -J. Jones 43-yard field goal
L -J. Nightengale 2-yard pass from T McGee (L.
Leiva kick)
L D. Growdon 1-yard run (L. Leiva kick)
Second Quarter
F -T Soto 30-yard pass from E. Vitale (pass failed)
F C. Coleman 17-yard pass from E. Vitale (kick
blocked)
Third Quarter
F T. Soto 54-yard pass from E. Vitale (J. Jones
kick)
L D. Growdon 1-yard run (pass failed)
Fourth Quarter
F D. Sutton 3-yard run (kick failed)
F D. Sutton 13-yard run (J. Jones kick)
Individual Leaders
Rushing: L -A. Anderson 11-110-0; J. Nightengale
6-51-0; D. Growdon 15-44-2; T McGee 3-32-0; D.
Johnson 6-21-0; F- D. Sutton 19-117-2; B. Poin-
sette 10-53-0.
Passing: L -T McGee 6-11-69-1-0; A. Anderson 1-
5-24-0-0; F -E. Vitale 11-20-210-3-1.
Receiving: L M. McKibbin 2-36-0; T Hopkins 2-
21-0; D. Horton 1-24-0; J. Lucas 1-7-0; J. Nighten-
gale 1-3-1; F--T Soto 3-96-2; C. Coleman 5-82-1.
Defense
Interceptions: L-J. Lucas (1).
Fumble recoveries: F- D. Sutton (1).


No. 19 Florida 31,

Tennessee 17
Tennessee 7 0 3 7- 17
Florida 3 14 7 7-- 31
First Quarter
Tenn-Swafford 62 interception return (Palardy
kick), 9:23.
Fla-FG Hardin 23, 1:43.
Second Quarter
Fla-Patton 52 passfrom Murphy (Hardin kick), 13:23.
Fla-M.Brown 3 run (Hardin kick), :37.
Third Quarter
Tenn-FG Palardy 44, 12:17.
Fla-Jones 4 run (Hardin kick), 7:08.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Murphy 7 run (Hardin kick), 13:52.
Tenn-Howard 18 pass from Worley (Palardy kick),


10:20.
A-90,074.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-lnt
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Tenn
12
23-66
154
14-34-4
62
3-41.7
2-2
3-25
20:23


Fla
20
56-215
167
11-20-1
66
3-37.0
6-2
6-44
39:37


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Tennessee, Neal 12-42, Lane 5-16,
North 1-9, Howard 2-2, Peterman 3-(minus 3).
Florida, M.Brown 24-86, Murphy 10-84, Jones 12-
49, Purifoy 1-15, Patton 2-5, Kel.Taylor 1-3, Team 5-
(minus 12), Christy 1-(minus 15).
PASSING Tennessee, Worley 10-23-2-149, Peter-
man 4-11-2-5. Florida, Murphy 8-14-0-134, Driskel
3-6-1-33.
RECEIVING Tennessee, Howard 4-75, North 4-43,
Croom 2-31, Neal 1-9, Jo.Smith 1-2, Downs 1-0,
Lane 1-(minus 6). Florida, Dunbar 4-63, Patton 3-
73, TBurton 3-27, Jones 1-4.

No. 8 Florida St. 54,

Bethune Cookman 6
Bethune-Cookman 0 0 6 0-- 6
Florida St. 10 2321 0- 54
First Quarter
FSU Tel.Smith 68 interception return (Aguayo
kick), 8:39.
FSU-FG Aguayo 45, 2:33.
Second Quarter
FSU-Safety, 13:50.
FSU-Benjamin 11 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 12:11.
FSU-Wilder 2 run (Aguayo kick), 5:49.
FSU-Freeman 1 run (Aguayo kick), 1:13.
Third Quarter
FSU-Greene 19 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
13:39.
Beth-Wilson 7 run (kick failed), 8:21.
FSU-K.Williams 3 run (Aguayo kick), 6:15.
FSU-K.Williams 1 run (Aguayo kick), :46.
A-74,841.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-lnt
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Beth
18
56-182
60
8-17-1
6
8-39.1
2-0
8-59
35:59


FSU
26
36-266
226
13-25-0
68
3-39.0
1-1
3-25
24:01


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Bethune-Cookman, Jordan 15-81, Wil-
son 12-41, M.Green 10-28, C.White 7-13,
Q.Williams 7-11, Dixon 5-8. Florida St., Freeman 10-
112, K.Williams 9-83, Wilder 8-56, Winston 3-11,
R.Green 5-8, Coker 1-(minus 4).
PASSING-Bethune-Cookman, Wilson 5-10-0-37,
Q.Williams 3-7-1-23.
Florida St., Winston 10-19-0-148, Coker 3-6-0-78.
RECEIVING-Bethune-Cookman, Poole 3-46, Mur-
phy 2-9, Baker 1-5, Monroe 1-0, Terry 1-0. Florida
St., Shaw 4-89, Greene 4-44, Benjamin 2-26,
C.Green 2-25, Whitfield 1-42.

No. 16 Miami 77,

Savannah St. 7
Savannah St. 0 0 7 0- 7
Miami 21 2828 0- 77
First Quarter
Mia-D.Crawford 4 run (Goudis kick), 14:35.
Mia-Hurns 80 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
12:03.
Mia-Du.Johnson 2 run (Goudis kick), 6:21.
Second Quarter
Mia-D.Crawford 5 pass from Williams (Goudis
kick), 13:06.
Mia-Coley 25 pass from Williams (Goudis kick),
10:43.
Mia-D.Crawford 16 run (Goudis kick), 7:19.
Mia-Edwards 1 run (Goudis kick), 3:49.
Third Quarter
Mia-Sandland 13 pass from Crow (Goudis kick),
9:55.
Mia-Edwards 3 run (Goudis kick), 2:22.
Sav-Daniels 75 run (Barren kick), 2:09.


SCOREBOARD


For thz)h record



= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
12 17 45 54 58
POWER BALL
13


CASH 3 (early)
8-8-0
CASH 3 (late)
9-1-6

PLAY 4 (early)
1-9-4-3
PLAY 4 (late)
2-5-3-4

FANTASY 5
4-7-31-32-35

LOTTERY
8-32-35-46-47-52
XTRA
5


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 1 7 25 -44
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $2 million
4-of-4 9 $1,779.50
3-of-4 MB 50 $700
3-of-4 976 $107
2-of-4 MB 1,506 $48.50
1-of-4 MB 12,265 $6
2-of-4 30,002 $4


Fantasy 5:2 -10 -12 -25 -29
5-of-5 5 winners $44,148.40
4-of-5 390 $91
3-of-5 10,869 $9


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Singapore Grand Prix
12 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR K&N Pro Series: Greenville (taped)
1 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series Circuit of the Americas
(taped)
1 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road San Bernardino (taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Sylvania 300
2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Late Model Dirt: Batesville (taped)
4:30 p.m. (ABC) Global Rallycross Championship
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAAA Texas FallNationals (same-day tape)
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Sylvania 300 (same-day tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) San Francisco Giants at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Atlanta Braves at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers (same-
day tape)
WNBA BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Eastern Conference Semifinal: Chicago Sky at
Indiana Fever. Game 2
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Western Conference Semifinal: Minnesota Lynx at
Seattle Storm. Game 2
BICYCLING
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Arctic Race of Norway (taped)
EQUESTRIAN
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) American Gold Cup (taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Tennessee at Florida (taped)
4:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Kansas State at Texas (taped)
4 a.m. (ESPNU) Utah at BYU (taped)
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Houston Texans at Baltimore Ravens
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New England Patriots
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Seattle Seahawks
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Indianapolis Colts at San Francisco 49ers
7:30 p.m. (SUN) College Football Bethune-Cookman at Florida State
(Taped)
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Bears at Pittsburgh Steelers
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Lindt Italian Open, final round
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: The Tour Championship, final round
1 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: The Tour Championship, final round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Champions: Pacific Links Hawaii
Championship, final round
HOCKEY
11 a.m. (NHL) Toronto Maple Leafs at Buffalo Sabres (taped)
1 p.m. (NHL) Columbus Blue Jackets at Pittsburgh Penguins (taped)
5 p.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (taped)
SOCCER
8 a.m. (CNBC) English Premier League: Arsenal FC vs Stoke City FC
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Manchester City FC vs
Manchester United FC
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Deportivo Toluca
FC vs Queretaro FC
10 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's college soccer: Stanford at Santa Clara
TENNIS
11 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Qatar Airways Tournament of
Champions, first semifinal (taped)
1 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Qatar Airways Tournament of
Champions, second semifinal (taped)
3 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Qatar Airways Tournament of
Champions, final (taped)
5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP St. Petersburg Open, final (same-day tape)
8 p.m. (TENNIS)ATP Metz, final (same-day tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Mia-Coley 88 kickoff return (Goudis kick), 1:56.
Mia-Edwards 9 run (Goudis kick), :20.


A-42,571.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-lnt
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Say
8
26-139
44
8-25-4
0
7-38.1
0-0
2-7
26:41


Mia
27
46-324
313
20-23-0
62
0-0.0
0-0
10-75
33:19


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Savannah St., Daniels 1-75, Heyward
2-28, S.Barnes 5-14,
Bostick 6-7, Simmons 6-7, Prunty 2-4, Hutcheson 3-
4, Ferrell 1-0. Miami, Edwards 12-113, Clements 11-
75, Du.Johnson 8-59, D.Crawford 5-48, De.Johnson
5-21, Labady 4-5, Crow 1-3.
PASSING-Savannah St., Bostick 3-11-2-23, Hutch-
eson 4-10-2-21, Prunty 1-3-0-0, S.Barnes 0-1-0-0.
Miami, Williams 11-13-0-176, Crow 6-6-0-55, Mor-
ris 3-4-0-82.
RECEIVING-Savannah St., Durham 2-18, Roo-
sevelt 2-9, Heyward 2-8, Criswell 1-9, Daniels 1-0.
Miami, Sandland 6-76, Coley 3-16,
Humrns 2-100, Walford 2-50, Waters 2-34, Dobard 1-
15, Kidd 1-11, M.Lewis 1-9, D.Crawford 1-5, Dorsett
1-(minus 3).


College football scores
EAST
American International 48, Pace 27
Amherst 23, Hamilton 7
Bloomsburg 31, Kutztown 12
BowieSt 16, Concord 10
Brown 45, Georgetown 7
CCSU 20, Albany (NY) 17
California (Pa) 20, Edinboro 7
Clarion 20, Mercyhurst 13
Colby 31, Williams 8
Cornell45, Bucknell 13
Cortland St 26, William Paterson 15
Delaware 49, Wagner 9
Delaware Valley 20, Albnright 17
Dickinson 24, Susquehanna 21
Fordham 52, Columbia 7
Framingham St 42, Fitchburg St 21
Frostburg St 36, Case Reserve 33
Gallaudet 37, Rochester 13
Gannon 38, Slippery Rock 27
Geneva 49, Thiel 28
Hampden-Sydney 49, Coast Guard 7
Hartwick 45, Becker 19
Hobart 34, Utica 21
Howard Payne 38, Wayland Baptist 34
Husson 13, Alfred 0
Indiana (Pa) 26, Seton Hill 0
Ithaca 17, Union (NY) 3
Johns Hopkins 52, Moravian 14
Juniata 38, Gettysburg 16
Kean 24, Endicott 17
Lebanon Valley 38, King's (Pa) 17
Lehigh 29, Pnrinceton 28
Lock Haven 12, Cheyney 10
Lycoming 52, Misenricordia 14
Mass Maritime 52, Maine Maritime 18


Merchant Marine 7, NY Maritime 6
Middlebury 27, Bowdomin 5
Monmouth (NJ) 21, Holy Cross 14
Morrisville St 28, St Lawrence 23
Muhlenberg 58, McDaniel 0
Norwich 31, WP1I14
Penn 27, Lafayette 21
Penn St 34, Kent St 0
RPI 23, Castleton St 8
Rutgers 28, Arkansas 24
Sacred Heart 78, Chowan 35
Shippensburg 41, East Stroudsburg 31
Springfield 41, Mount Ida 0
St Francis (Pa) 38, Lincoln (Pa) 7
Syracuse 52, Tulane 17
Thomas More 31, Westminster (Pa) 0
Trinity (Conn) 28, Bates 17
Ursinus 20, Franklin & Marshall 9
Vanderbilt 24, UMass 7
Villanova 35, Stony Brook 6
W Connecticut 35, Plymouth St 3
Wake Forest 25, Army 11
Washington & Jefferson 40, Grove City 19
Waynesburg 23, St Vincent 6
Wesleyan (Conn) 52, Tufts 9
West Chester 48, Millersville 3
Westfield St 36, Mass-Dartmouth 7
Widener 21, Wilkes 0
Wis -Whitewater 55, Buffalo St 14
Yale 39, Colgate 22
SOUTH
Alabama 31, Colorado St 6
Alabama St 52, Grambling St 21
Albany St (Ga) 34, Elizabeth City St 13
Appalachian St 31, Elon 21
Averett 30, Guilford 27
Birmingham-Southern 49, Stetson 34
Bnridgewater (Va) 51, Ferrum 28
Campbellsville 26, Bethel (Tenn) 0
Carson-Newman 41, Brevard 7
Centre 37, Washington & Lee 28
Charleston (WV) 38, Virginia-Wise 15
Charleston Southern 20, Norfolk St 12
Christopher Newport 34, Shenandoah 6
Coastal Carolina 50, Hampton 17
Cumberland (Tenn) 41, Belhaven 31
Delta St 37, North Alabama 34
E Kentucky 56, Morehead St 24
Emory & Henry 61, Methodist 22
Fayetteville St 21, Virginia Union 7
Florida 31, Tennessee 17
Florida St 54, Bethune-Cookman 6
Fort Valley St 12, Clark Atlanta 9
Gardner-Webb 3, Wofford O
Georgia 45, North Texas 21
Georgia Tech 28, North Carolina 20
Greensboro 34, Apprentice 21
Huntingdon 34, Louisiana College 27
Jacksonville 69, Warner 16
Jacksonville St 32, Georgia St 26, OT
James Madison 34, Charlotte 7
Johnson C Smith 35, Davidson 22
Kentucky Christian 38, Bluefield South 7
Lenoir-Rhyne 34, Wmingate 13
Lindsey Wilson 35, Pikeville 26
Louisville 72, FlU 0
Maryland 37, West Virginia 0
Maryville (Tenn) 42, Sewanee 30
Memphis 31, Arkansas St 7
Mercer 43, Berry 0
Miami 77, Savannah St 7
Middle Tennessee 42, FAU 35, OT
Millsaps 38, Point (Ga) 17
Mississippi St 62, Troy 7
Newberry 27, Catawba 0
Nicholls St 42, Langston 22
North Greenville 39, Tusculum 36
Old Dominion 59, The Citadel 58
Pittsburgh 58, Duke 55
Randolph-Macon 36, Bethany (WV) 28
Reminhardt 28, Faulkner 24
Richmond 30, Liberty 21
S Virginia 33, Va Lynchburg 30
SC State 59, Benedict 6
SE Louisiana 34, Samford 31
Salisbury 28, NC Wesleyan 10
Shepherd 28, Urbana 21
Southern U 17, MVSU 7
St Augustine's 35, Stillman 7
St Joseph's (Ind) 45, Alderson-Broaddus 17
Towson 35, NC Central 17
UAB 52, Northwestern St 28
UNC-Pembroke 41, Shaw 20
Valdosta St 40, Shorter 0
Virginia 49, VMI 0
Virginia St 41, Kentucky St 0
Virginia Tech 29, Marshall 21, 30T
W Carolina 30, Mars Hill 23
W Kentucky 58, Morgan St 17
Webber20, Umnion (Ky) 19
West Liberty 9, W Virginia St 0
William & Mary 20, Rhode Island 0
Winston-Salem 35, Tuskegee 13
MIDWEST
Adrian 48, Concordia (111) 0
Albion 38, Aurora 20
Augsburg 19, Gustavus 16
Augustana (111)35, Loras 10
Augustana (SD) 24, Bemidji St 0
Ball St 51, E Michigan 20
Beloit 38, Lawrence 21
Benedictine (111) 28, Kalamazoo 23
Benedictine (Kan) 42, Baker 28
Bethel (Minn) 47, Buena Vista 14
Bluffton 36, Earlham 21
Bowling Green 48, Murray St 7
Capital 42, Marietta 13
Carroll (Wis) 24, Knox 14
Cent Arkansas 17, Missouri St 13
Cent Methodist 37, Culver-Stockton 36
Cent Missouri 47, Lindenwood (Mo) 28
Chadron St 30, Mesa St 24
Chicago 10, Elmhurst O
Cincinnati 14, Miami (Ohio) 0
Coe 10, Washington (Mo) 0
Colorado Mines 62, Black Hills St 22
Concordia (Moor) 33, St Olaf 29
Concordia (Neb) 35, Midland 14
Dakota St 35, Presentation 28
Dartmouth 30, Butler 23
Doane 62, Hastings 7
Drake 31, Indianapolis 14
Evangel 43, Avila 20
Fernris St 34, Ashland 7
Franklin 48, Manchester 7
Friends 31, Sterling 0
Grand Valley St 42, Tiffin 17
Grand View 30, Marian (Ind) 7
Greenville 28, Eureka 27
Heidelberg 55, Ohio Northern 27
Hillsdale 41, Malone 16
Hiram 20, Allegheny 3
Hope 37, Wis Lutheran 7
Illinois St 31, Abilene Christian 17
Iowa 59, W Michigan 3
John Carroll 27, Baldwin-Wallace 7
Kansas 13, Louisiana Tech 10
Lake Enerie 35, Wayne (Mich) 17
Lake Forest 15, Gnrinnell 7
Lakeland 21, Alma 20
Lindenwood (111) 49, Kentucky Wesleyan 29
Louisiana-Lafayette 35, Akron 30
Macalester 30, Maranatha Baptist 6
Mary 17, Sioux Falls 10
Mayville St 46, Cole 0
McKendree 29, William Jewell 24
McPherson 24, Bethel (Kan) 10
Michigan Tech 29, Walsh 7
Minn St -Mankato 21, Minn Duluth 17
Minn -Morns 41, Iowa Wesleyan 24
Minnesota 43, San Jose St 24
Missouri S&T 27, Wis -LaCrosse 14
Missouri Southern 59, Lincoln (Mo) 10
Missouri Valley 33, Mid-Am Nazarene 9
Missouri Western 34, Nebraska-Kearney 19
Morehouse 42, Central St (Ohio) 20
Morningside 79, Dordt 14
Mount St Joseph 16, Hanover 13
Mount Union 37, Muskingum 0
N Dakota St 51, Delaware St 0
N Illinois 43, E Illinois 39
NW Missouri St 49, Fort Hays St 14
Nebraska 59, S Dakota St 20
Nebraska Wesleyan 31, Briar Cliff 7
North Central (111)41, Wis -Stout 14
Northwestern 35, Maine 21
Northwestern (Iowa) 49, Dakota Wesleyan 42
Northwestern (Min) 15, Martin Luther 8
Northwood (Mich) 42, Quincy 39
Notre Dame 17, Michigan St 13
Notre Dame Coll 34, WV Wesleyan 25
Ohio 38, Austin Peay 0
Ohio Dominican 30, N Michigan 23
Ohio St 76, Florida A&M 0
OhioWesleyan 20, Kenyon 13
Olivet 34, Rockford 7
Olivet Nazarene 24, Concordia (Mich) 7
Ottawa, Kan 41, Bethany(Kan) 15
Otterbem 30, Wilmington (Ohio) 14
Peru St 21, Graceland (lowa) 7
Rose-Hulman 23, Defiance 19
S Dakota Tech 41, Jamestown 22
S Illinois 36, SE Missouri 19
SW Assemblies of God 19, Haskell Indian Nations 8


Saginaw Valley St 35, Findlay 34
Siena Heights 30, Waldorf O
Simpson (Iowa) 35, Wis -River Falls 34
Southwestern (Kan) 24, Kansas Wesleyan 14
St Cloud St 34, Concordia (St P) 3
St Francis (Ind) 38, St Ambrose 37
St John's (Minn) 20, St Thomas (Minn) 18
St Norbert 33, Ripon 6
St Scholastica 24, Crown (Minn) 14
St Xavier 41, Robert Mornris-Chicago 10
Tabor 21, St Mary (Kan) 6
Taylor 27, Lane 21
Toledo 38, Cent Michigan 17
Trine 47, Concordia (Wis) 41
Truman St 24, William Penn 23
Upper Iowa 24, Northern St (SD) 17
Wabash 50, Denison 13
Wartburg 27, Carthage 10
Wayne (Neb) 41, Minn -Crookston 25
Westminster (Mo) 21, Mac Murray 14
Wheaton (111) 38, Luther 12
Winona St 65, Minn St -Moorhead 21
Wis-Stevens Pt 31, Dubuque 28
Wisconsin 41, Purdue 10
Wittenberg 45, DePauw 0
Wooster 39, Oberlin 21
Youngstown St 59, Duquesne 17


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Kentucky 300 results
Saturday at Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 200 laps, 147.7 rating, 0
points.
2. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 126.6, 43.
3. (5) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 200, 105.9, 0.
4. (1) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 124.6, 41.
5. (20) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 93.2, 39.
6. (7) Drew Herring, Toyota, 200, 108.6, 38.
7. (10) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 101.7, 37.
8. (13) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 200, 80.9, 0.
9. (18) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 81.1, 35.
10. (15) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 87.7, 34.
11. (4) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 107.8, 34.
12. (14) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 93.1, 32.
13. (21) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 200, 72.9, 0.
14. (12) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 98.8, 31.
15. (22)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 75.5, 29.
16. (36) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 200, 62.4, 28.
17. (9) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 79.9, 27.
18. (6) Joey Coulter, Toyota, 200, 72.2, 0.
19. (28) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 199, 62.5, 25.
20. (24) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 198, 55, 25.
21. (29) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 198, 55.3, 23.
22. (31) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 198, 49.5, 22.
23. (34) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 197, 49.6, 21.
24. (25) Eric McClure, Toyota, 197, 48.9, 20.
25. (26) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 197, 42.4, 19.
26. (23) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 196, 60.5, 18.
27. (16) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 194, 43.7, 17.
28. (32) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 194, 43.3, 16.
29. (11) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, accident, 187,
79.2, 15.
30. (17) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, accident, 161, 66.2,14.
31. (35) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, suspension, 113,
36.5, 13.
32. (39) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, engine, 100, 33.1, 12.
33. (19) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, brakes, 98, 68.5, 11.
34. (8)Travis Pastrana, Ford, accident, 59, 68.9, 10.
35. (38) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, vibration, 31, 34.1, 9.
36. (40) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, overheating,
8, 35.8, 8.
37. (30) Carl Long, Dodge, suspension, 8, 34.8, 7.
38. (37)TJ. Bell, Chevrolet, transmission, 6,33.7, 6.
39. (33) Blake Koch, Toyota, rear gear, 4, 32.9, 5.
40. (27) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 31.3, 4.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 121.131 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 28 minutes, 36 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.017 seconds.
Caution Flags: 9 for 44 laps.
Lead Changes: 6 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: S.Hornish Jr. 1-65; J.Clements 66-67;
B.Scott 68; A.Dillon 69-100; R.Blaney 101-107;
E.Sadler108-111; R.Blaney 112-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
R.Blaney, 2 times for 96 laps; S.Hornish Jr, 1 time
for 65 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 32 laps; E.Sadler, 1
time for 4 laps; J.Clements, 1 time for 2 laps; B.Scott,
1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. S.Hornish Jr., 962; 2. A.Dillon,
947; 3. R.Smith, 917; 4. E.Sadler, 908; 5. B.Vickers,
902; 6. J.AlIIgaier, 887; 7. B.Scott, 883; 8.T.Bayne,
868; 9. K.Larson, 822; 10. PKligerman, 783.



Glantz-Culver Line
For Sept. 22
Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atWash. -250 Miami +220
at Pittsburgh -110 Cincinnati +100
atPhila. -200 NewYork +185
at Chicago -105 Atlanta -105
Arizona -115 atColorado +105
Los Angeles -130 at San Diego +120
St. Louis -155 at Milwaukee +145
American League
at Cleveland -260 Houston +230
at Detroit -280 Chicago +240
at Boston -160 Toronto +150
atTampa Bay-105 Baltimore -105
atKan.City -135 Texas +125
at L. Angeles -125 Seattle +115
at Oakland -250 Minnesota +220
Interleague
atNewYork(AL)-140 San Francisco +130
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
atTennessee 3 3 (44) San Diego
at Minnesota 3 6/2 (40/2) Cleveland
atN. England 7 7 (44) Tampa Bay
Houston 2/2 1/2 (44/2) at Baltimore
at Dallas 3 3/2 (47) St. Louis
at N. Orleans 7/2 7 /2 (48/2) Arizona
at Washington 2/2 Pk (49) Detroit
Green Bay +1 2/2 (49/2) at Cincinnati
N.Y Giants +2 /21 (47) at Carolina
at Miami 1 2 (44/2) Atlanta
atSan Fran. 10/2 10 (46/2) Indianapolis
atSeattle 16/2 19 (40/2) Jacksonville
at N.Y Jets 2 2 (39) Buffalo
Chicago 2 2 (40/2) at Pittsburgh
Tomorrow
at Denver 14 /215 (49/2) Oakland


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Recalled LHPs Mike
Belfiore and LHP Zach Britton from Norfolk (IL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled RHP Jake Odor-
izzi and LHP Jeff Beliveau from Durham (IL). Traded
LHP Frank De Los Santos to the Chicago White Sox
for for cash or a player to be named.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES Reinstated OF Jason Hey-
ward from the 15-day DL.
NEWYORK METS -Recalled SSWilfredoTovar
from Binghamton (EL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Reinstated RHP
Michael Stutes from the 60-day DL.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALS Signed CB Chris
Lewis-Harris from the practice squad. Released S
Jeromy Miles.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed WR Je-
remy Ebert from the practice squad. Released G
Jacques McClendon.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed FB Toben Op-
urum to the practice squad. Released DL Jordan
Miller.



Blue Jays 4,

Red Sox 2
Toronto Boston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Reyesss 3 0 1 0 Drewss 4 1 2 0
Kawskdh 4 00 0 Victorncf 2 0 1 0
DRosa ph-dhl 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0
Lawrie3b 4 12 0 JGomslf 4 0 1 1
Lindlb 3 1 1 1 Navarf 4 00 0
Sierralf 4 1 1 0 Mdlrkslb 4 0 0 0
RDavisrf 2 1 1 1 Bogarts3b 3 1 0 0


Gosecf 3 0 1 0 D.Rossc 3 0 1 1
Arenciic 4 01 1 JMcDnl2b 2 00 0
Goins 2b 4 0 1 0 Pedroia ph-2b1 0 0 0
Totals 32 49 3 Totals 31 2 5 2
Toronto 000 300 001 4
Boston 000 001 100 2
E-Lawrie (12), Buchholz (2). DP Toronto 1.
LOB Toronto 7, Boston 4. 2B-Lind (26). CS-
Reyes (6), R.Davis (6), Gose (3). S-Gose, Vic-
torino.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
BuehrleW,12-9 6 5 1 1 0 5
McGowanH,6 1 0 1 0 0 2
S.SantosH,8 1 0 0 0 0 1
Janssen S,33-35 1 0 0 0 0 2
Boston
Buchholz L,11-1 6 6 3 2 2 2
D.Britton 1 1 0 0 0 1
Dempster 1 1 0 0 1 1
Thornton 2-3 1 1 1 2 0
R.DeLaRosa 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Buehrle (Victorino). WP-McGowan.
T-3:35. A-37,569 (37,499).




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


x-Boston
Tampa Bay
NewYork
Baltimore
Toronto


W
Atlanta 91
Washington 83
Philadelphia 71
NewYork 70
Miami 56


East Division
GB WC
3 -- --
2 8 -
9 11% 3
6 12 3/2
1 22 13/2


East Division
GB WC


NL

Cubs 3, Braves 1
Atlanta Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Smmnsss 4 00 0 StCastrss 4 1 2 0
J.Uptonrf-lf 4 0 1 0 Valuen3b 2 0 1 0
FFrmnlb 2 1 1 0 DMrphph-3b 1 1 1 0
CJhnsn3b 4 0 2 0 Rizzolb 4 1 1 1
Gattislf 4 0 1 0 DNavrrc 3 0 1 1
Heywrd rf 0 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 00 1
G.Laird c 4 00 0 Sweeny cf 4 0 1 0
Uggla2b 3 00 0 Bogsvc If 3 02 0
BUpton cf 3 00 0 Barney2b 3 00 0
Medlenp 2 00 0 TrWoodp 2 00 0
SDownsp 0 0 0 0 Villanvp 0 00 0
DCrpntp 0 0 0 0 Lakeph 1 00 0
Strop p 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 150 Totals 3039 3
Atlanta 000 100 000 1
Chicago 000 000 03x 3
E-Schierholtz (3). DP-Atlanta 2, Chicago 1.
LOB-Atlanta 7, Chicago 6. 2B-J.Upton (26),
Valbuena (15), Rizzo (38). S-Medlen. SF-
Schierholtz.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Medlen 71-36 1 1 2 6
Downs L,2-1 BS,1-1 0 2 2 2 0 0
D.Carpenter 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Tr.Wood 7 5 1 1 4 7
VillanuevaW,7-8 1 0 0 0 0 0
StropS,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3
Tr.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
S.Downs pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP-Medlen.
T-2:42.A-34,612(41,019).


Pirates 4, Reds 2


Cincinnati

DRonsn cf
BPhllps 2b
Votto lb
Ludwck If
Bruce rf
Cozart ss
Hannhn 3b
Hanign c
HBaily p
Duke p
Hoover p
HRdrgz ph
Simon p
SMrshll p
Totals
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh


i Pittsburgh
ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 Tabata If
S3 1 1 0 SMarte pr-lf
3 0 1 0 NWalkr2b
3 0 2 1 McCtch cf
4 0 0 0 Mornealb
4 1 1 1 Byrdrf
S3 0 0 0 PAIvrz3b
2 00 0 RMartn c
2 0 0 0 Barmes ss
0 00 0 AJBrntp
0 0 0 0 Snider ph
1 00 0 Morrisp
0 00 0 JuWlsn p
0 0 0 0 Grilli p
29 25 2 Totals
i 110 000 000
S 020 002 00x


ab r h bi
4020
0000
3000
3100
2100
3 1 0 0
2 1 0 0
301 1
4111
3112
3000
1000
1000
0000
0000
0000
274 1 1 15 4
3 1 1 2
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
274 5 4
2
4


E -Votto (14), H.Bailey (1). DP-Cincinnati 2,
Pittsburgh 3. LOB-Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 5.
HR-Cozart (12), R.Martin (15). SB-S.Marte
(37). SF-Byrd.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
H.BaileyL,11-11 52-33 4 2 4 3
Duke 0 1 0 0 0 0
Hoover 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Simon 1 1 0 0 1 0
S.Marshall 1 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,9-11 7 4 2 2 3 12
MorrisH,7 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Ju.WilsonH,14 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
GrilliS,31-33 1 1 0 0 0 0
Duke pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-A.J.Burnett.
T-3:01. A-39,425 (38,362).


Cardinals 7,
Brewers 2
St. Louis Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt2b 5 0 1 0 Aoki rf 5 02 0
Beltranrf 4 1 1 0 Gennett2b 5 1 2 0
Hollidyl If 5 2 2 0 Lucroy c 3 1 2 0
MAdmslb 4 22 2 CGomz cf 3000
YMolin c 2 1 0 1 KDavisl If 4 0 1 2
Jay cf 4 0 1 0 Bianchiss 4 0 0 0
Freese3b 4 0 1 2 Haltonib 4 0 0 0
Kzma pr-ss 0 1 0 0 YBtncr3b 3 0 0 0
Descls ss-3b3 0 1 2 Gallard p 1 0 0 0
Lynnp 2 00 0 Gindlph 0 00 0
Choatep 0 00 0 Wootenp 0 00 0
Chamrsph 1 00 0 Figarop 0 00 0
Manessp 0 00 0 JFrncsph 0 00 0
Siegristp 0 00 0 Maldndph 1 00 0
Totals 34 79 7 Totals 332 7 2
St. Louis 200 000 050 7
Milwaukee 100 000 010 2
E-Gennett (5). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-St.
Louis 5, Milwaukee 9. 2B-M.Carpenter (54),
Descalso (23), Gennett (10), Lucroy (23),
K.Davis (10). HR-Ma.Adams (16). SB-Jay
(10), Gennett (2). S-Lynn, Gallardo.
IP H RERBBSO


St. Louis
Lynn W,14-10
Choate H,13
Maness
Siegrist
Milwaukee
Gallardo L,11-10
Wooten
Figaro
T-3:12.A-35,0(


61-34 1
2-3 0 0
11-32 1
2-3 1 0


7 4 2 2 2 7
2-3 4 5 5 1 2
11-31 0 0 1 0
)08 (41,900).


Mets 5, Phillies 4
(6 innings)
NewYork Philadelphia


ab r h bi
EYonglIf 4 0 0 0 CHrndzcf
DnMrp2b 3 1 1 1 Rollinsss
DWrght3b 3 2 2 1 Utley2b
Duda lb 1 1 0 0 Ruizc
Lagarscf 3 1 1 2 DBrwn Ilf
dnDkkrrf 3 0 0 0 Ruflb
TdArnd c 3 02 1 Asche3b
Quntnll ss 2 0 1 0 Mayrry rf
Geep 3 00 0 Cloydp
EMartn p
Savery p
Totals 25 57 5 Totals
NewYork 000 104 0
Philadelphia 010 003 x


ab r h bi
3110
3111
3110
3001
3110
3020
1001
2000
2010
0000
0000
3 1 1 07 3
3 1 1 1
3 1 1 0
3 0 0 1
3 1 1 0
3 0 2 0
1 0 0 1
2 0 0 0
2 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
234 7 3
5
4


DP-New York 1, Philadelphia 1. LOB-New
York 6, Philadelphia 2. 2B T.d'Arnaud (3),
C.Hernandez (5), Rollins (31), Utley (25). 3B-
Lagares (5). HR-Dan.Murphy (12), D.Wright
(18). SB-Quintanilla (2). SF-Asche.
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Gee W,12-10
Philadelphia
Cloyd L,2-6
E.Martin
Savery


674403
565525
110013
1-306 7 4 4 0 31
5 6 5 5 2 5
1 1 0 0 1 3
1-3 0 0 0 1 0


Cloyd pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Cloyd (Duda). WP-Gee. Balk-
E.Martin.
T-2:00. A-36,650 (43,651).


Str Home Away
L-1 52-28 42-34
W-2 49-30 36-39
W-2 46-31 36-42
L-3 42-33 39-40
W-1 38-40 33-43



Str Home Away
L-1 52-22 39-41
W-2 46-33 37-38
L-3 43-37 28-46
W-2 32-45 38-39
L-2 31-44 25-54


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
64 .584 &8
70 .548 5 /2 8
73 .526 9 3/2 6.
89 .422 25 19/ 2.
93 .392 29% 24 2.


Str Home
W-2 50-29
W-3 48-30
L-1 43-37
L-3 31-43
L-2 35-41


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 91 64 .587 6-4 W-2 48-27 43-37
Pittsburgh 89 66 .574 2 5-5 W-1 50-30 39-36
Cincinnati 88 67 .568 3 6-4 L-1 48-26 40-41
Milwaukee 68 86 .442 22/2 19/2 6-4 L-3 36-44 32-42
Chicago 65 90 .419 26 23 3-7 W-1 30-47 35-43


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


W


x-Los Angeles 88 66
Arizona 77 76
San Diego 72 81
Colorado 71 84
San Francisco 71 84


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
63 .594 I
70 .545 7/ %/2
78 .490 16 9
87 .435 24/2 17/2 :
104.329 41 34 :


West Division
L Pct GB WC


Str Home
W-3 51-29
W-1 39-35
W-2 36-40
L-2 33-42
L-8 24-54



Str Home
L-1 46-32
L-2 44-34
W-1 42-33
W-2 44-33
L-2 38-38


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Alex Cobb tips his hat to the crowd Saturday after being taken out of the
game against the Baltimore Orioles in the eighth inning in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 5-1.




Cobb's 12 K's keep Rays in hunt


Jennings knocks


in four in 5-1 win


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG The
Tampa Bay Rays rode the mo-
mentum of a marathon victory to
another big win.
Desmond Jennings drove in
four runs, Alex Cobb took a three-
hit shutout into the ninth inning,
and the Rays beat the Baltimore
Orioles 5-1 in a matchup of ex-
hausted teams to maintain their
lead in the AL wild-card race.
The first pitch came 10 hours,
56 minutes after the Rays' 5-4, 18-
inning win over Baltimore that
ended at 2:05 a.m., a game that
stretched on for 6:54 a record
time for both teams.
Cobb didn't allow a hit until
Steve Clevenger lined a single to
right with two outs in the fifth.
Chris Davis tripled with one out
in the ninth off Cobb, a fly ball
David DeJesus struggled to locate
in left. Adam Jones followed with
an RBI single that chased Cobb,
who struck out 12 and walked two.
Closer Fernando Rodney com-
pleted the five-hitter
Tampa Bay went ahead in the
fifth when Jose Molina and Yunel
Escobar walked. One out later,
Jennings hit his career-high 14th
homer
Jennings added an RBI triple in
the seventh and scored on Ben
Zobrist's single off Francisco
Rodriguez.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Indians 4, Astros 1
CLEVELAND Scott Kazmir al-
lowed four hits in seven shutout in-
nings, Michael Brantley hit a two-run
homer and the Cleveland Indians
maintained their hold on an AL wild-
card spot with a 4-1 win over the
Houston Astros on Saturday night.
Cleveland began Saturday with a
half-game lead over Texas for the AL's
second wild card. The Indians, who have
won eight of their last 10, trail Tampa Bay
by a half-game for the wild-card lead.
The Indians passed Texas with Fri-
day's rain-shortened 2-1 win, moving
into a wild-card spot for the first time
since before play on Aug. 4.

Athletics 9, Twins 1
OAKLAND, Calif. -The Oakland
Athletics lowered their magic number
to one for clinching their second
straight AL West title, beating the Min-
nesota Twins 9-1 Saturday behind the
pitching of Jarrod Parker and hitting of
Alberto Callaspo.
The A's have won 12 of 15 and are
16 of their last 21, opening a season-
high 7 1/2-game lead over second-
place Texas entering Saturday.
Parker (12-7) allowed one run and
four hits in six innings, and Callaspo
matched his career highs with four hits
and had three RBIs. Kurt Suzuki and
Yoenis Cespedes homered for the A's.
The game started after a two-hour
rain delay. The visiting dugout was
flooded and sewage backed up in the
A's coaches' bathroom, the third such
incident at the Coliseum this season.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's late games
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 (18 innings)
Oakland 11, Minnesota 0
L.A. Angels 3, Seattle 2(11 innings)
Saturday's games
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 1
N.Y Yankees 6, San Francisco 0
Athletics 9, Twins 1
Indians 4, Astros 1
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, late
Rangers 3, Royals 1
Blue Jays 4, Red Sox 2
Seattle at L.A. Angels, late
Sunday's games
Houston (Bedard 4-11) at Cleveland (Kluber 9-5), 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Petit 4-0) atYankees (Pettitte 10-10), 1:05 p.m.
White Sox (Johnson 1-2) at Detroit (Sanchez 14-7), 1:08 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 13-12) at Boston (Doubront 10-6), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Feldman 5-4) at Tampa Bay (Hernandez 6-13),
1:40 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 7-4) at Kansas City (Shields 12-9), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Hernandez 12-9) at Angels (Wilson 17-6), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (De Vries 0-0) at Oakland (Gray 3-3), 4:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's games
N.Y Yankees 6, San Francisco 0
Cubs 3, Braves 1
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 2
Miami at Washington, late
Mets 7, Phillies 4
Cardinals 7, Brewers 2
Arizona at Colorado, late
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, late
Sunday's games
San Francisco (FPetit 4-0) atYankees (Pettitte 10-10), 1:05p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-11) at Pittsburgh (Locke 10-6), 1:35 p.m.
Miami (Flynn 0-2) at Washington (Haren 9-13), 1:35 p.m.
Mets (C.Torres 3-5) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 14-6), 1:35 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 12-8) at Cubs (Jackson 8-16), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 14-7) at Colorado (Nicasio 8-8), 4:10 p.m.
Dodgers (Greinke 15-3) at San Diego (Cashner 10-8), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Kelly 9-4) at Milwaukee (Peralta 10-15), 8:05 p.m.


Rangers 3, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Matt Garza
pitched eight impressive innings for
his first victory in six starts and the
Texas Rangers kept close in the play-
off race, beating the Kansas City Roy-
als 3-1 on Saturday night.
The Rangers won for only the fifth
time in 19 September games. They re-
mained a half-game behind Cleveland
for the second AL wild-card berth.
The Royals, out of the playoffs
since winning the 1985 World Series,
dropped 3 1/2 games in back of the
Indians.

Blue Jays 4, Red Sox 2
BOSTON Clay Buchholz lost for
the first time this season, and the AL
East champion Boston Red Sox fell to
Mark Buehrle and the Toronto Blue
Jays 4-2 Saturday night.
A day after the Red Sox clinched
the division title, they lost for just the
sixth time in 21 games.
Buchholz (11-1) gave up two
earned runs on six hits and two walks
in six innings. He had pitched 11
scoreless innings in his previous two
starts, his first since spending three
months on the disabled list with a
strained neck.
Buchholz was the first Boston
pitcher to start a season 11-0 in his ini-
tial 14 starts since Roger Clemens
went 13-0 in 1986.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cubs 3, Braves 1
CHICAGO Dioner Navarro hit a
tiebreaking single in a three-run eighth
inning, and the Chicago Cubs beat At-
lanta 3-1 to keep the Braves on the
brink of the NL East championship.
Atlanta's magic number remained
at one to clinch its first division title
since 2005.


Starlin Casto singled off Kris
Medlen with one out in the eighth,
pinch-hitter Donnie Murphy singled
against Scott Downs (4-4) and An-
thony Rizzo hit a tying double down
the left-field line.

Pirates 4, Reds 2
PITTSBURGH -A.J. Burnett scat-
tered four hits over seven strong in-
nings to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates
over the Cincinnati Reds 4-2 on Satur-
day night.
Burnett (9-11) struck out a season-
high 12 as the Pirates moved a game
in front of Cincinnati for the top spot in
the NLwild-card race. Jason Grilli
worked the ninth for his 31st save, his
first since going to the disabled list
with a strained right forearm in July.
Russell Martin hit a two-run homer
and Jose Tabata added two hits as the
Pirates bounced back from a late col-
lapse in a loss on Friday night.
Zach Cozart hit his 12th home run
of the season for Cincinnati and Ryan
Ludwick added an RBI.

Cardinals 7, Brewers 2
MILWAUKEE Matt Carpenter
broke Stan Musial's team record for
doubles by a left-handed batter in a
season, Lance Lynn won for the first
time since early August and the St.
Louis Cardinals beat the Milwaukee
Brewers 7-2 to maintain a two-game
lead in the NL Central.
Seeking their first division title since
2009, the Cardinals (91-64) have
surged ahead of Pittsburgh (89-66)
and Cincinnati (88-67).
St. Louis would clinch a playoff spot
for the third straight postseason if the
Washington Nationals lost to the
Miami Marlins later Saturday in a
game delayed by rain at the start. The
Cardinals have won for the 12th time
in 17 games and improved to 14-4
against the Brewers this year, includ-
ing 8-1 in Milwaukee.
Carpenter's fifth-inning double was
his 54th of the season, one more than
Musial's total in 1953.

Mets 5, Phillies 4
(6 1/2 innings)
PHILADELPHIA- David Wright
and Daniel Murphy hit solo home runs
and the New York Mets beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 in a game
called in the top of the seventh inning
because of rain.
The teams played in the rain before
the game was halted, and it was called
after a delay of 1 hour, 28 minutes.

INTERLEAGUE

Yankees 6, Giants 0
NEW YORK- Ivan Nova pitched a
six-hitter for his second career
shutout, Eduardo Nunez hit a two-run
homer and the New York Yankees
kept pace in the AL wild-card chase
with an 6-0 victory over the San Fran-
cisco Giants.
Alfonso Soriano connected for the
second straight day and Robinson
Cano had an RBI single in a three-run
third against Ryan Vogelsong (3-6),
helping New York win for just the third
time in eight games.
A day before New York honors retir-
ing closer Mariano Rivera in a
pregame ceremony, Nova (9-5) gave
the Yankees' bullpen a rest.


BASEBALL


Baltimore

McLoth If
Machd 3b
C.Davis 1 b
A.Jones cf
Markks rf
Hardy ss
Valenci dh
Clevngr c
ACasill 2b

Totals
Baltimore
Tampa Bay


Tampa Bay
ab r h bi
4 0 1 0 DeJess lf
3 00 0 DJnngs cf
4 1 1 0 Zobrist2b
3 0 1 1 Longori3b
4 01 0 WMyrs rf
4 00 0 Fuld rf
3 00 0 DYongdh
3 0 1 0 Loneylb
3 00 0 JMolinc
YEscor ss
31 15 1 Totals
000 000 001
000 030 20x


ab r h bi
3000
3224
401 1
3 0 1 0
4000
0000
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 1 0 0
2 2 1 0
305 7 5
1
5


E-Hardy (11). DP-Baltimore 2, Tampa Bay 1.
LOB-Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 6. 2B-D.Young
(2). 3B-C.Davis (1), De.Jennings (6), YEsco-
bar(1). HR-De.Jennings(14).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Mig.GonzalezL,10-8 6 2 3 3 5 2
Fr.Rodriguez 1 4 2 2 0 1
S.Johnson 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
CobbW,10-3 81-35 1 1 2 12
Rodney 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
WP-Fr.Rodriguez. PB-Clevenger.
T-2:51.A-23,835 (34,078).


Indians 4, Astros I


Houston


Cleveland


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Villarss 4 0 1 0 Bourn cf 4 1 2 0
Altuve2b 4 00 0 Swisherrf-lb3 1 1 0
MDmn3b 4 00 0 Kipnis2b 3 00 1
Carter lb 4 13 1 CSantnlb 5 00 0
B.Lairddh 3 00 0 MCarsn rf 0 00 0
Kraussph 0 00 0 Brantlyl If 4 1 1 2
JDMrtnlf 3 00 0 AsCarrss 4 03 0
Croweph 1 00 0 Giambidh 3 00 0
Hoes rf 2 01 0 JRmrzpr-dh 0 00 0
BBarns cf 3 00 0 YGomsc 3 1 2 0
C.Clarkc 2 00 0 Chsnhll3b 4 0 1 1
Corprn ph-cl 0 0 0
Totals 31 15 1 Totals 33410 4
Houston 000 000 001 1
Cleveland 300 100 00x 4
E-Harrell (1). DP-Houston 1, Cleveland 1.
LOB-Houston 5, Cleveland 12. 2B-Hoes (7),
Bourn 2 (21), As.Cabrera (33), YGomes (18).
HR-Carter (28), Brantley (9). SB-As.Cabrera
(9). SF-Kipnis.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Clemens L,4-6 42-38 4 4 3 4
Harrell 31-32 0 0 2 1
Cleveland
KazmirW,9-9 7 4 0 0 1 10
Allen 1 0 0 0 0 2
J.Smith 1 1 1 1 1 0
Kazmir pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Clemens (YGomes). WP-Harrell.
T-2:45.A-26,611 (42,241).


Athletics 9, Twins I


Minnesota
ab
Presley cf 4
Dozier 2b 4
Plouffe 3b 4
Arcia If 4
Doumitdh 4
Pinto c 3
Parmel rf 3
Colaelllb 3
Flormn ss 3
Totals 32
Minnesota
Oakland


Oakland
r h bi
0 1 0 CYoung cf
0 2 0 Lowrie ss
0 1 0 Dnldsn 3b
0 0 0 Cespds dh
0 0 0 Callasp2b
1 2 1 KSuzukc
00 0 Reddck rf
0 0 0 Choice If
0 0 0 Barton lb
16 1 Totals
000 010 000
150 000 21x


ab r h bi
4001
5130
5120
5223
5243
4112
3010
4120
4110
39916 9
4 0 0 1




5 1 3 0
-5 1 2 0
5 2 2 3
5 2 4 3
4 1 1 2
3 0 1 0
4 1 2 0
4 1 1 0
39916 9
1
9


E-Colabello (2), Florimon (17). DP-Oakland
1. LOB-Minnesota 4, Oakland 9. 2B-Dozier
(32), Lowrie (44), Donaldson (36), Reddick(18).
HR-Pinto (3), Cespedes (26), Callaspo (9),
K.Suzuki (2). SF-C.Young.
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
RHernandez L,3-2
Hendriks
Oakland
J.ParkerW,12-7
Otero
Blevins
T-2:53. A-26,393


286611
683317
2 8 6 6 1 1
6 8 3 3 1 7


6 4
1 1 c
2 1 C
3 (35,067).


Rangers 3, Royals 1
Texas Kansas City


ab
Kinsler 2b 4
Andrus ss 3
Rios rf 3
ABeltre 3b 4
Przyns c 3
Morlnd lb 4
Gentry If 4
DvMrpdh 3
JeBakrph 0
Aduci ph-dh 1


rhbi ab r h bi
1 1 0 AGordnl If 4 00 0
10 1 Bonifac2b 4 0 1 0
1 1 0 Hosmerib 4 1 1 1
02 1 BButlerdh 3 00 0
00 1 S.Perez c 4 00 0
00 0 Mostks3b 4 0 1 0
03 0 L.Cain rf 2 00 0
01 0 Loughph-rf 1 00 0
00 0 JDyson cf 3 0 1 0
00 0 AEscorss 3 0 1 0


LMartn cf 4 000
Totals 33 38 3 Totals 321 5 1
Texas 102 000 000 3
Kansas City 000 000 001 1
E-L.Cain (3). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB Texas
6, Kansas City 5. 2B-Dav.Murphy (26), A.Es-
cobar (20). 3B-Kinsler (2), J.Dyson (4). HR-
Hosmer(17). SB-Gentry (18). SF-Pierzynski.
P H RERBBSO
Texas
GarzaW,4-5 8 5 1 1 1 5
Nathan S,40-43 1 0 0 0 0 2
Kansas City
GuthrieL,14-12 6 7 3 3 2 1
Coleman 11-30 0 0 0 0
Bueno 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bueno pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Garza pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
T-2:36. A-36,575 (37,903).


Interleague

Yankees 6, Giants 0
San Francisco NewYork


ab
Pagan cf 3
GBIanc If 4
Belt lb 4
Posey c 4
Pence rf 4
Sandovl3b 3
Noonan 3b 1
HSnchzdh 3
Monell ph 1


r h bi
0 0 0 ISuzuki rf
0 1 0 ARdrgzdh
02 0 Cano 2b
0 0 0 ASorin If
0 0 0 Grndrs cf
02 0 Nunez3b
0 1 0 MrRynllb
00 0 Ryan ss
00 0 CStwrt c


ab r h bi
3001
4001
4021
4111
4110
3112
4110
3110
3 0 0 1
4 0 0 1
4 0 2 1
4 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
3 1 1 2
4 1 1 0
3 1 1 0
1 1 0 0


BCrwfrss 3 000
Abreu2b 3 000
Totals 33 06 0 Totals 306 7 6
San Francisco 000 000 000 0
NewYork 003 201 00x 6
LOB-San Francisco 7, NewYork 4. 2B-Belt
(35), Sandoval (25), Cano (37). HR-A.Soriano
(17), Nunez (2). SF-I.Suzuki.
P H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Vogelsong L,3-6 5 5 5 5 1 1
Moscoso 11-31 1 1 1 2
Kickham 11-31 0 0 1 1
Dunning 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
NovaW,9-5 9 6 0 0 1 7
T-2:32. A-42,420 (50,291).


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 BS



AL

Rays 5, Orioles I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pirates' Harris takes individual title at Celtic


RICHARD BURTON
Correspondent
OCALA- As he crossed the
finish line in Saturday morning's
Celtic Invitational, Crystal River
senior Brandon Harris knew he
was back.
Harris posted a time of 16
minutes and 48 seconds and
rolled to the individual boys title
on a humid morning at Ocala
Trinity Catholic High School.
"It wasn't as easy as I thought
it was going to be, but the course
was great and well cut and (this


race) was a great 5K," Harris
said. "I was happy to get the win.
I blew it in my first race (of the
year) and then my second race I
got back to 16:35.
"(Today), it was humid, even at
9 o'clock in the morning, but it
was nice to come and get the
win. I felt good about the way
things went."
Harris won by 15 seconds over
Trinity Catholic's Benjamin Waller
and helped the Pirates to a third-
place finish on the boys side.
Crystal River ended with a
team score of 114, six places be-


hind second-place Ocala Forest,
but well off the pace set by
champion Lecanto.
The Panthers ended with a
team score of 46, as it had three
of the top eight finishers and five
of the top 16 overall.
Michael Lindsey (third/17:05),
Sam Alford (fourthl/17:08),
Mackenzie Wood (eighth/17:45),
Chase Benoist (15th/18:19) and
Jack Clark (16th/18:24) paced
victorious Lecanto.
For Citrus, Cameron Grant
posted his team's top finish with
a time of 17:43, which was good


for seventh place.
The Hurricanes were seventh
overall for the boys with a team
score of 167, six places behind
Belleview
On the girls' side, Lecanto
nearly pulled out the individual
winner, as Claire Farnsworth
held the lead late before Sparr
North Marion's Leigha Torino
made a charge.
Farnsworth wound up finish-
ing second with a time of 20:10,
29 seconds off the winning effort
posted by Torino, who made her
push over the final half-mile.


"(Farnsworth) was pacing me
and that got me going," Torino said.
Citrus junior Alyssa Weber
(third/20:35), Lecanto's Katie
Mattingly (seventh/21:58) and
Crystal River's Alexis Ulseth
(10th/22:28) finished with top 10-
efforts on the girls' side.
Forest won the girls race with
a team score of 71, three better
than Ocala West Port and Lecanto.
Citrus was seventh with a team
score of 144 in the event which
saw 12 teams participate, but not
all field enough runners to post
a team score.


Associated Press


Looking for a safe scare on


Halloween? Parks & Rec


offers Movie in the Park


Special to the Chronicle

Movie in the Park
Parents don't forget to mark your cal-
endar for Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation's annual Halloween Movie in the Park
Event This year's event will be Saturday,
Oct. 26 at Lecanto Community Park. "Mars
Needs Moms" will be this year's movie,
and it will be shown on a two-story-tall air
screen. The movie will begin at dusk There
will once again be a pre-carved pumpkin
contest and several categories of costume
contests. Pre-movie festivities will begin
at 6 p.m. and will include a bounce house
and carnival games. Free popcorn will be
provided and there will also be snacks
and drinks available for purchase.
For more information, call 352-527-
7540 or visit www.citruscountyparks.com.
P.L.A.Y.
Citrus County Parks and Recreation is
offering a great sports opportunity for
your little one, who may be too young to
join the organized sports leagues within
the county The PL.A.Y Program was cre-
ated for those children who are "ready"
to play sports, but just aren't old enough.
The PL.A.Y programs offered in the
upcoming session include basketball,
which will be held at the Citrus County
Resource Center on Mondays or Wednes-
days; and flag football, located at Bicen-
tennial Park on Tuesdays or Thursdays.
The next session will begin the week of
Oct 21. Boys and girls ages 3 to 5 are en-
couraged to join the six-week program.
After enrollment, each child receives
age-appropriate sports equipment and a
team T-shirt.
Registration will open Friday, Oct. 4,
and spots fill up fast! Space is limited.


Please call Crysta Henry, Recreation
Program Specialist for Youth Programs,
at 352-527-7540 or visit wwwcitruscounty
parks.com.
All programs and activities offered by
the Division of Parks and Recreation are
available to all persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex, religion or na-
tional origin. For persons with disabili-
ties requiring special accommodations,
please contact our office five days prior
to the program so that proper considera-
tion may be given to the request. For
hearing-impaired, please call 352-527-
5901 (TTY) or 352-527-7540 (voice).
Par 4 Programs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
presents the first annual "Par 4 Pro-
grams" fall golf tournament Profits from
this tournament will go back into Parks &
Recreation to help continue and improve
our youth programs.
The tournament will be held on Satur-
day, Oct 12 at Citrus Hills Golf& Country
Club. Registration is now open for
golfers. On the day of the tournament reg-
istration will begin at 7:30 a.m. and the
shotgun start will be at 8:30 a.m. 50/50
Tickets will be sold, as will mulligan tick-
ets. Challenges include closest to the pin
and men's & ladies' longest drive. After
the tournament, lunch will be served in
the Grille Restaurant. There will also be
several raffles and silent auctions.
Citrus County Parks & Recreation is
currently seeking businesses and organ-
izations to help sponsor this worthwhile
event by offering a variety of advertising
platforms. You can show your support by
sponsoring a hole, providing items for gift
bags or by donating prizes that can be
given away or raffled off for additional
funds.


Head Shots take lead


in kickball standings


Special to the Chronicle

Kickball
Average Joes 3, Citrus Whiners 2
Both teams came out hot early in this
game, getting runners in scoring position,
but could not capitalize on the opportunity
to manufacture runs until the bottom of
the third inning, when the Whiners went
ahead two to nothing. But Average Joes
answered right back, scoring a run in
the fourth, fifth and sixth innings to take
the lead and the victory Average Joes are
sitting at 2-2 midway through the season.
Head Shots 10, Kickidn' Nutz 5
Early runs by both offenses left the
defenses tired and on the field for most
of the game. Going into the top of fifth
inning the game, was tied 5-5 until Head
Shots started to pull away due to three
costly error by the Nutz outfielders.
Heads Shots are 3-1 on the season.
Convictions 12, Misfits 2
The Convictions kept the ball rolling
with another win over the shorthanded
Misfits, who fielded only six players.
Playing great defense and scoring runs
in every inning, Convictions got their
record back to 2-2.
Come out to Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River to watch these teams go at
it! First game starts at 6:30 p.m. on Field 7.
Next week will feature the Head Shots
vs. the Convictions, the Average Joes vs.
the Misfits and Kickin' Nutz vs. the Cit-
rus Whiners.
Flag football
Registration started on Aug. 26 and
will end Oct. 11. A staff member for Cit-


rus County Parks & Recreation will be
calling all managers for the upcoming
season. Parks & Recreation would like
to see more teams join the league, and
for doing so, is offering a discount to the
teams that bring in additional teams.
The fees are determined by the number
of teams that we have signed up, so the
more teams, the better Teams can also
add 17-year-olds to their roster with a
signed parental consent form. A $50 de-
posit is required at the time of registra-
tion. Season begins Oct. 24.
Coed beach volleyball
This season coed beach volleyball is
being moved to Fat Daddy's BBQ
Restaurant south of Crystal River &
north of Homosassa on U.S 19. Fat
Daddy's provides a large Olympic-size
sand volleyball court with availability of
ordering food& drinks.
Registration is open for 17 & up. You
have until Oct. 11 to register at the office
of Citrus County Parks & Recreation.
Registration fee is $100 per team. Sea-
son begins Oct 23.
Men's softball
Registration opened Sept. 15 and will
end Oct. 18. Parks & Recreation would
like to see more teams join the league
and is offering a discount to the teams
that bring in additional teams. A $50 de-
posit is required at the time of registra-
tion. Season begins Nov 4.
Men's basketball
Registration will begin Oct. 1 and will
end Nov 1. A $50 deposit is required at
the time of registration. Season begins
Nov 13.


T


FREE

MSA v


Honoring Survivors and

Remembering Loved Ones.

Include your loved ones and those touched
by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake Edition
{ on October 1. This special edition
will be printed on pink newsprint.
*AII photos & information must be submitted by Tues., Sept. 24


(',,9



A:PER TRIBUTE


Will include a photo and
short bio, approximately
20 words or less.


Call Cand
563-3266
to reserve
your space.
,. U~


FREE

GAS CARD


OOOY9


One lucky winner
for 8 weeks
Grand Prize Winner
$200 Gas Card
Look for the entry form in
Wednesday's Newspaper
Enter as often as you would like
New winner each week
Grand Prize drawing from all
entries at the end of the contest
Pick up your copy of the
Citrus County Chronicle
Contest Begins
Wednesday, September 11



Must be over 18 year's old and legal resident in our
newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of
the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible.


B6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


SPORTS


w










COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SAVE OUR WATERS WEEK 2013


A






""--.; _A oM W


JILL LYLES/Special to the Chronicle
The second-place photo in the 18th annual Save Our Waters Week Photo Contest by Crystal River resident Jill Lyles of a young girl
enjoying the coastal waters of Citrus County's Fort Island Trail Beach illustrates the importance of saving our waters for future generations.


Hey


Mark Twain said once
that "Whiskey is for
drinking; water is for
fighting over" There surely is
some truth in those words.
I'm not old enough to remember when the Semi-
noles and other tribes before them wandered this
land, but they did it as much by canoe as by foot, if
the history books are true. We were once up to our
backsides in water here in Florida, but not any-
more. I'm not convinced
-that's a good thing, to tell
S" the truth.
It seems that a long
while back when the bub-
bas up in Washington dis-
covered Florida was
awash in water, they were
jealous, impetuous or just
plain simpleminded when
they decided to drain it.
Toadly Ossum Next thing you know, alli-
GUEST gators were homeless and
Yankees invaded us a sec-
COLUMN ond time. This was mostly
after the War of Northern
Aggression.
Well, we all sorta got used to the new, drier
Florida, and it was pretty good until about the time
that Florida jumped into a great big slobbering love
affair with Mickey Mouse and urban sprawl. There
was a governor back then called Bob Graham who
figured we could have both and who managed to get
some of the best laws on the books we've ever had to
protect our natural resources.


's our water!


Don't know if those laws were
perfect, but it was a start. What fol-
lowed was one of the biggest peri-
ods of growth and prosperity ever
seen in Florida. New policy agen-
das are gutting those laws, and
how's this economy working for you
these days, anyway?
So here we are today A fella can't
eat more than a meal or two a month
of freshwater fish from some of our
lakes and rivers because of mercury
pollution. Well, actually you can, but
it might make you simpleminded
like me, or worse, make your kids
simpleminded like me. But first you
got to catch 'em, and it's not as easy
as it used to be since it seems like all
the lakes and rivers are a mess with
algae. Mostly that's from everybody
using fertilizer and septic tanks,
and we all know water isn't the only
thing that flows downhill.
My daddy taught me to always
drink from upstream of the town
when I was a boy, but that's nigh
well impossible anymore. So I don't
drink from streams. Heck, I don't
even wash up in streams. Trying to
get clean with dirty water makes no
sense to me. Something else he told
me: "Son, when your number is up,
your number is up. If you do stupid
stuff you get a low number"
Heck, there be a whole lot of
things not making' any sense these
days, but in my once-in-awhile
humble opinion, this is one of the
most important reasons to roll up


your sleeves and get a little dirt on
your hands.
Now I'm not sayin' you and me
got the same things pushing us down
the path of life, but there can't be a
lot of argument about what that trail
will be like without clean water You
only have to look to India, Africa
and some of the other lands without
a good supply of water. First World
or Third World, that's the choice as
I see it. You get to vote for your kids
and grandkids, 'cause they're so young.
So here's what you do.
Most of you have your own ideas
and I'm guessing some of them are
really great. Our cousins in Talla-
hassee need to hear them so take a
minute or three and send some
common sense to our governor and
the rest. Lord knows they need a
transfusion of common sense up
there.
One of the places where they get
confused is when they get to looking'
at the little details and forget about
the big picture, as I see it. The big
picture is pretty simple to paint
when you think about it Tell Talla-
hassee that we are all downstream
of their little town and they are
downstream of our votes.
Thanks for your time, neighbor!

Toadly Ossum is a pseudonym for
native Floridian Dan Hilliard,
who is a director with the
Withlacoochee Area Residents Inc.


The promise of technology


This marks the 18th annual Save Our
Waters Week, and with that we
recognize the future of Citrus County,
without a doubt, depends on water


As someone who
wishes to provide a
future for my small
child here in Citrus
County, I recognize
the importance of
protecting our water
and the role it plays in
that future. Unlike is-
sues like transporta-
tion, the economy,
education or myriad
other matters, water
is the one thing that
directly affects each
and every one of us on


Jimmie T. Smith
GUEST
COLUMN


a daily basis. In the past, conserva-
tion has been the major push to
protect our water At the time this
priority was appropriate, and still
has its place, but the issues have be-
come more diverse and conse-
quently deserve a look into other
ways that we can protect our water
Agriculture, landscaping, resi-
dential development and manufac-
turing generally consume most of
our water, and each in their own
way have made great strides in con-
servation techniques. Thanks to the
implementation of reuse, drip irri-


gation and other best-
management prac-
tices, agriculture is
now predicted to
maintain a stabilized
consumption level for
the next 15 to 20
years. Residential de-
velopment and land-
scape management
have continually
worked to reach the
highest levels of con-
servation. Controlling
runoff, reuse, rain
sensors to prevent


watering during rain and retention
ponds are examples of steps taken
to improve conservation and re-
duce the amount of consumption
per person. Additionally, manufac-
turing inherently uses conservation
techniques as a way to reduce pro-
duction costs and increase profits.
The examples given are to illus-
trate that the conservation initia-
tive has been firmly grasped even
by those who consume the most.
That effort has gotten us to where
we are; now it is time to look at the
future of water It's time to not only


continue our conservation efforts but look toward
ways we can provide more clean, potable water As
this region grows, demand for fresh water is going to
grow, and with it we need to be prepared for growth
without compromising our precious resources.
It is time we, as a county and surrounding aquifer
recharge area, take desalinization seriously Re-
cently we have seen a huge global push to make
clean, potable water available, and I am proud to
say we, as the state of Florida, are taking it seriously
In south Florida, as the demand for clean water has
continued to grow, water utilities have turned to de-
salinization as an answer to the growing demand.
Advancements in technology have driven the costs
of implementation down dramatically and it is now
proving a viable source fit for human consumption,
irrigation, industrial use and other purposes. As of
2012, there were 35 desalination plants in south
Florida alone providing the region with hundreds
of millions of gallons of clean, potable water each
day Our region has the unique advantage of having
a large percentage of the infrastructure already in
place for this process and is primed to take advan-
tage of this opportunity
I recognize this is not the sole answer to the issue,
but as I have said above, the issues pertaining to
water are diverse and we need to make sure we do
everything we can to ensure a strong future for
water in this state. With proper vision and execu-
tion, Florida's future will have protected water
reservoirs, best management practices, and an
ample amount of clean usable water from a number
of sources.


Jimmie T Smith represents District 34,
which serves Citrus and northeast Hernando
counties, in the Florida House ofRepresentatives.
He lives in Inverness.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Some


things


worth


missing
ummer is my fa-
vorite time of the
year
I love the Florida sun.
I love the heat. I love the
beaches, the boats and
that relaxed feeling you
get when the population
thins out and Florida
slows down.
This year I'm going to
miss a few other things.
I am going to miss
Michael Lusk, the man-
ager of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife station in Citrus
County and one of the
key people responsible
for the public purchase
of Three Sisters Springs.
Some locals didn't like
Michael because he rep-
resented the federal
government and govern-
ment always means
more rules.
But Michael Lusk was
the most reasonable and
intelligent person we've
ever had running the
wildlife refuge and he
gave Citrus County
everything he had. Folks
will miss him when they
begin to realize what
we've lost.
After four years of
service, he is leaving us
to go run a larger refuge
in Georgia.
I am going to miss
Georgeanna Phelps of
Homosassa. Ms. Phelps
was a community organ-
izer in Homosassa be-
fore people began to use
the term "community or-
ganizer" in a negative
way
She helped organize
the community effort to
save Bluebird Springs
Park. She helped Diane
Toto organize and run
the community food
bank. She got mad and
vocal when the Freezer
opened up near her
home and changed the
peaceful neighborhood.
She was a gentle per-
son who made our com-
munity better
I'm going to miss Bob
England of Inverness.
He passed away this
summer
Bob ran banks, loved
to play golf and helped
make United Way suc-
cessful in Citrus County
He served our country
as a decorated veteran
and our community as a
leader of people.
I am going to miss
Richard Wesch, our
county attorney and for-
mer county administra-
tor Richard has spent
his entire career serving
Citrus County and he has
aggravated more people
than Jeff Dawsy and
Charlie Dean combined.
He has kept the
county out of trouble for
years and did such a
good job that a big
county in south Florida
has hired him away
Richard can speak the
language of the law the
same way a great chef
can pan-fry grouper. You
are never hungry for
more when either of
them are done serving
you.
I am going to miss
Liam Cash, the Chroni-
cle's student film critic
for the past four years.
Liam came to the Chron-
icle and asked to help


PageC3


I





Page C2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


interests masquerading as a contest ofprinciples."
Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary," 1911


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan....................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief


county Commissioner
Scott Adams makes a
lot of political hay in
Citrus County by alleging cor-
ruption and misdeeds by his
fellow politicians.
He wins support from ag-
gravated taxpayers when he
tells them just how awful his
fellow politicians are. He
tells one and all
that his top strat-
egy is get his fel- THE Il
low county Adams' a
commissioners d '
thrown out of of- proven ul
fice so more peo-
ple like himself OUR 01O
can get elected. Accus
Adams gives a not with
good campaign own
speech and
promises corrupt
practices will be uncovered.
But things don't always
work out for Commissioner
Adams, and if this week is
any example, the freshman
commissioner has some
questions to answer
Commissioner Adams, a
multimillionaire business-
man who is part owner of a
private landfill in Sumter
County, demanded an investi-
gation into the Citrus County
landfill because he said it
was full of corruption.
Adams demanded an inde-
pendent investigation of the
landfill, and he got just that.
Last week the state attorney
completed the independent
investigation and concluded
that nothing illegal happened.
In fact, the independent
state attorney concluded
county administrator Brad
Thorpe acted appropriately
when internal complaints
were made about a recycling
contractor who had weight
discrepancies with materials
flowing through the landfill.
At the time, Thorpe and the
county conducted their own
investigation and negotiated
a substantial financial settle-
ment with the contractor The
vendor did not bid on the
contract the next time it came
around.
Adams' supporters might
ask him to justify his previous
comments and see if the ex-


Plenty of ideas
I'm responding to the man
who wrote in about the harness
horseracing. I think that would be
an excellent thing to have here
in the Inverness area, especially
out by the fairgrounds.
And maybe kayaking
and fishing could be
pushed a little bit more
on Lake Henderson. I
know they come to see the
manatees, but originally
this was a fishing village
and people that came
here a long time ago,
that's what they came CAL
for, the fishing. And 563I
also, the industrial 5
park. I don't know what
happened to that idea. A lot of
my neighbors and I thought that
was an excellent idea.


5
nl



sa,
-1


P
ic
C


I

(


pense of this investigation
was worth the tax dollars
spent to conduct it.
During the same week,
Adams' propensity for scandal
produced another setback for
the freshman commissioner
and again cost the taxpayers
plenty of money
Adams complained that fel-
low commissioner
Rebecca Bays
;SUE: had a conflict of
lgin interest because
legations her husband,
founded. businessman Mike
INION Bays, had volun-
DINION: teered to serve on
nations a county board.
)ut their Bays left the
costs. room when a vote
was made on
Mike Bays' ap-
pointment, and told all pres-
ent that it was her husband
up for the volunteer board
appointment. When the issue
became controversial, Mike
Bays voluntarily stepped
down from the appointment
to avoid further conflict.
But Adams insisted the ac-
tion was inappropriate and
filed a complaint with the in-
dependent state Commission
of Ethics. The Ethics Com-
mission then spent tax dol-
lars to investigate the
complaint and concluded
that moving forward served
no public interest.
Adams' supporters should
ask the freshman board mem-
ber if this was another good
expenditure of tax dollars.
They might also ask him who
is going to pay Commissioner
Bays' legal fees.
Commissioner Adams likes
to ask open-ended questions
that hint at corruption but
stop short of slander The
questions are usually accom-
panied by a wink of the eye.
It's time for the commis-
sioner to answer a few ques-
tions about who is going to
pay for the cost of the accusa-
tions he keeps making.
There are plenty of problems
that need to be addressed by
our county commissioners. It's
time to dig deep and show some
leadership, find consensus,
and solve those problems.


Lack of skeeter spray
You know, I think I've just about
had it with the way our tax dol-
lars are being spent. They're
spraying for mosquitoes all up
around Citrus Hills, etc., all up
around where all those
J ND big-money homes are.
J But I live on Donna
W Street and I just want
S to say I haven't seen a
I mosquito truck come
l by here in the last few
years. We're all taxpay-
ers too. Come on, Cit-
rus County. Start
spraying everywhere,
)79 please.
I Editor's note: Citrus
County Mosquito Control
responds to citizen complaints
and concerns. Give the office a call
at352-527-7478.


Your demeanor outlives you


Founded
by Albert M.
Williamson


had a bout with cancer and
began to withdraw from the
family fearing he was dying and
not wanting the kids to miss
him when he was gone. And
how his mother firmly but lov-
ingly reminded her husband,
"How do you want us to re-
member you?" as a kind and


hat will they say
about you when you're
gone?
I attended a funeral last week
of a woman named Sarah
Lewis, the widow of my child-
hood rabbi, Albert Lewis. A 92-
year-old pillar of her
community, she was eloquent,
brilliant, devoted
and religious.
The service was
sparse and simple.
Mostly prayers and
thoughts. First, sev-
eral of her grand-
children spoke,
followed by her two
daughters and her
son. Mitch
Each of them Mith
mentioned something OTI
they had learned VOl
from their mother
or grandmother a life lesson
that was indelibly etched in
their hearts.
One grandson spoke about
her kindness and how she lent
him money to buy a car on
"very favorable terms" -
meaning when he could afford
to pay her back, he did.
Her eldest daughter spoke
abouthowher mother's wonderful
and devoted marriage set an ex-
ample for the next generation.
Her youngest daughter
laughed at how she used to get,
as a holiday gift, a book of
stamps, because, her mother
said, "they will come in very
handy when you send letters."
And her son told poignant
stories of how his mother
bravely broke up neighborhood
fights, made him wear a coat
even on a 75-degree day in the
winter-because, she said, "it's
a winter 75 degrees!" and in-
sisted he "Clap!" at a neighbor-
hood parade, to show recognition
for those marching, warning him
that TV was turning his genera-
tion into passive observers.
He also told of how his father,
early in his parents' marriage,


caring patriarch, or
a distant, removed
one?
By the end of the
service, everyone
had laughed and
cried. It was clear a
life had been well-
lived, had touched
countless others and
had left behind
warm and comfort-
ing memories.
Contrast that with
an obituary that ran


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


POINTING THE FINGER



Taxpayers'



money wasted



on scrutinizing



the mundane


Wow I guess "may she rest in
peace" is out of the question.
You wonder how awful this
woman had to be to be memori-
alized this way According to an
Associated Press account, the
children had been removed from
her care in the 1960s and had
been estranged for more than 30
years. Their case was so awful
that it helped lead to legislation
in Nevada allowing children to
sever ties to abusive parents.
"Everything in there was
completely true," Patrick Red-
dick told the AP He called his
mother a "wicked, wicked
witch" and said that while the
main purpose of the obituary
was to bring attention to child
abuse, it was also to "shame her
a little bit."
Still, this was three decades
since they'd had to deal with
her. The social norm when
someone dies is to shout the
good and whisper the bad or
at the very least, say nothing -
part of what is suggested by the
term "paying your respects."
But as Johnson-Reddick proves,
that doesn't govern every death.
Or every life. And the abuse you
dish out may come back to you.
Most of what we do in this
world is a rehearsal for our fu-
neral. No matter how much you
say, write or decree, in the end,
you are summed up in speech
and print by others, their mem-
ories, their impressions.
What will they say about you
after you're gone? The only
similarity between these two
mothers is that they were eulo-
gized not by a list of accom-
plishments, but by how they
treated others. Something to
keep in mind if you're thinking
about your legacy

Mitch Albom is nationally
syndicated columnist for the
Detroit Free Press, a best-selling
author and radio and television
personality


Kudos to
fire rescue, hazmat
It occurred to me that follow-
ing the recent, sometimes can-
tankerous discussions around
the millage rate increase issue
for fire rescue that a recent ex-
perience we had might be of
some interest to your readers.
Last evening when I went to
add chlorine tablets to our pool
chlorinator I found upon open-
ing our chlorine tablet box that
water had gotten into the con-
tainer and caused the tablets in-
side to begin converting into
chlorine gas, which is an ex-
tremely toxic substance.
First thing the next morning
I called the sheriff's depart-
ment. My call was properly di-
rected to the right person to
collect the necessary informa-
tion regarding our problem.
Within less than 20 minutes Lt.
Colin Brunner and Driver En-
gineer Reed Elwell from the
Sugarmill Woods Squad 181
(the firehouse on County Road
480) were examining the scene.
They immediately contacted Lt.
Vinny Lanzarone and Driver
Engineer Elliot Nieves of Ho-
mosassa's Engine 31 and Haz-
mat 31 team, who came within
another 25 minutes with all the
proper equipment to remove
the chlorine container from our
property


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board should call
352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

No big deal -though this is a
very dangerous gas. All these
members of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office various sections
conducted themselves with ex-
emplary professionalism, com-
petence and courtesy They were
a pleasure to deal with; they
identified with our community.
I'd say our fire rescue and
hazmat team is well worth the
money
Dick and Jeanine Hirsch
Sugarmill Woods


Verbal sparring
Attending the Sept. 12 budget
meeting for Citrus County was
like going to a boxing match.
Here we have in this corner
Mr Joe Meek and his opponent
Mr Scott Adams. As usual, the
first round came with Mr
Adams scoring a number ofjabs
at what is wrong with how this
county does business. Mr Meek
is on the defensive blocking
many jabs and waiting for an
opening for the knockout blow
It is the second round of the
budget meeting and Mr Meek
scores a major blow to the chin
of Mr Adams on the proposed
cuts to the sheriff's department
Mr Meek scores another blow
and Mr Adams is sent to the floor
with no response as the people
wait for Mr Adams to respond
to the question. Mr Adams
changes to the rope-a-dope style
of fighting but it is too late. It's a
TKO with Mr Meek the winner
My guess is if they charged an
entrance fee to this fight we
could solve our budget crisis in
this county On Sept. 24, there'll
be a rematch and I am betting
on Mr Meek. I lay 2 to 1 on all
bets. This entertaining fea-
ture is brought to you by the of-
fice of the Citrus County Board
of Commissioners.
Charles Knecht Sr.
Dunnellon


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I
Albom
IER
CES


in the Reno (Nev) Gazette-
Journal last week:
"Marianne Theresa Johnson-
Reddick born Jan. 4, 1935 and
died alone on (Aug.) 30, 2013.
She is survived by her 6 of 8
children whom she spent her
lifetime torturing in every way
possible."
The obituary, submitted by
her children, went on to blast the
woman as mean and abusive:
"Everyone she met, adult or
child, was tortured by her cru-
elty and exposure to violence,
criminal activity, vulgarity and
hatred of the gentle or kind
human spirit."
Far from the tears shed at the
funeral I attended, this
woman's offspring were glad
she was gone:
"We celebrate her passing
from this earth and hope she
lives in the afterlife reliving
each gesture of violence, cru-
elty and shame that she deliv-
ered on her children. Her
surviving children will now live
the rest of their lives with the
peace of knowing their night-
mare finally has some form of
closure."


SLETTERS to the Editor




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What to do when the motive hits too close to home


ike most folks our
age, Cheryl and I
watch television. We
probably watch it more
than we should.
We avoid those series or
movies with explicit lan-
guage and those that show
too much flesh. What this
means is we watch a lot of
old movies. Some of them
are well done and some
are not, but that's OK.
Cheryl really enjoys see-
ing now-famous actors in
their early, unknown days.
What we watch quite
often are mysteries.
Though we might not have


seen a particular film, it is
likely that we have seen
something similar Much of
the time they are easy to
figure out well before the
film ends, but that's where
the fun lies we chal-
lenge each other to see
who can identify the per-
petrator first.
We also like many of the
shows presented by the
PBS Masterpiece Mystery
series. A few nights ago we
were watching one such
who-done-it with innumer-
able clues as to means, mo-
tive and opportunity
It was more complex


than most and neither most likely; when the de-
Cheryl nor I could figure it ceased is the husband, the
out early on. .wife is at the
The victim was top of the list.
female and had As was to be
been shot, but expected, sus-
that was all that picion was first
seemed clear directed to-
There were ward the hus-
suspects ga- band. But his
lore, but as al- alibi was air-
ways, when tight. After a
someone is Fred Brannen number of
murdered, the B r anC wild-goose
first suspects A SLICE chases and ha-
are family OF LIFE rassment of
members and both the vie-
when the victim is female, tim's paramour and the
the husband is usually the husband's numerous ro-


mantic partners, the de-
tectives were right back
where they started.
There was no obvious
motive.
No life insurance.
No other apparent fi-
nancial gain for which the
old girl might have been
done in.
While going through the
investigatory process, as
they began to focus on a
potential motive, one of
the participants recalled a
previous case he had
worked when the husband
had shot the wife six times
because she wouldn't give


him the TV remote control
device.
Without saying a single
word, with a mock look of
horror on her face, Cheryl
handed me the remote.
Did the detectives solve
the case?
We never found out.
We both fell asleep.
Even so, I now feel a lit-
tle bit more secure about
our at least equally shar-
ing the TV clicker


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


Letters to THE EDITOR


A weird review of
American foreign policy
In his letter of Sept 6, Mr Del Vecchio
opens by stating, "In 2003, administra-
tion spokesmen told reporters that Sad-
dam Hussein moved his stockpiles of
chemical weapons to Syria in advance
of the Second Gulf War"
I followed the arguments for George
W Bush's war closely but I never heard
about the Syrian connection. I do remem-
ber that in his 2003 State of the Union
address he mentioned that British intel-
ligence had established a link between
Iraq and al-Qaida. He wasn't lying, exactly
It did come out that the CIA had informed
the president the Brits were mistaken.
But he didn't think that the American
people or Congress had the need to know
Saddam was not, however, on good
terms with either al-Qaida or Syria. But
pretending to believe that, he was sup-
porting George W's execution of the
"Pretext For War" plot developed by
Douglas Feith, Richard Perle, David
Wurmser, et al. Truth was singularly ir-
relevant to the Republican Party in ei-
ther foreign or domestic policy
Had the WMD already gone to Syria?
Why invade Iraq?
As for Obama's election promise to
permanently end the war, that level of
sarcasm is worthy of the hypocrisy of
the political right. I heard Obama's ac-
ceptance speech for the Nobel Peace
Prize. Contrary to Republican interpre-
tation, it brought out at some length that
sometimes military action, even war,
was necessary
As for Libya, it is regrettable that four
Americans, including a fine ambassa-
dor, lost their lives. Regrettable, but
minor compared to the massive loss of
life associated with Republican misad-
ventures. The terrorists were later
turned on by the citizens of Benghazi.
Del Vecchio further complains that
while Obama ended combat operations
in Iraq he "replaced them with indirect
and somewhat indiscriminate targeting
of civilians in Yemen."
In reality, the drone strikes have been
more precise and less indiscriminate than,
for example, tactical air strikes and con-
ventional artillery barrages. The drone
strikes have done more damage to the
leadership of al-Qaida than conven-
tional warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Intervention by Obama, and even Bill
Clinton, has generally been low-cost and
decisive. Little money (comparatively)
or American blood was spent on the
Balkans or Libya. But Iraq ... well, that's
a Republican thing.
Del Vecchio announces we have been
at war 10 years over WMD in Iraq and
Afghanistan we "knew existed and
thought might have been moved to
Syria." We knew in months that there
were no WMD of any substance in Iraq.
And this is the first I've heard even in
the funny papers or Fox News about
WMD in Afghanistan.
Nor did Obama promise "Peace in
Our Time." That was Neville Chamber-
lin. Obama made it clear in his Nobel
Prize acceptance speech that military
action would on occasion be necessary
Pat Condray
Ozello


It pays to turn left
A steady green left turn arrow indicates
the oncoming traffic is held up to allow
you to turn left. When the green arrow
is off you can still turn left, but you must
yield to oncoming traffic. Is there a single
driver who was not aware of this use of
traffic signals? So why did they come up
with a new system wherein the left turn
signal is blinking yellow when you must
yield to oncoming traffic? Is it safer? Does
it clear up a problem they were having
with people turning left? No, and no.
What the new signal is designed for is
to compliment red-light cameras. You can
expect the cameras to show up shortly
after the yellow blinking turn arrow is
installed. Here's how it works: You
come to the intersection and the yellow
arrow is blinking. You advance into the
intersection as you see a gap coming up
that will give you the opportunity to
turn. Surprise! That last yellow blink
was the one that meant the red light
was next. You just got a ticket mailed to
you for running the red light.
The county (along with some private
company in Texas) gets a very profitable
source of income and you get... well, you
know what you get It has absolutely
nothing to do with safety
Stephen C. Brown
Inverness

Just ask; they'll tell you
In a letter of Sept 11, J. Rising asks if
campsites for homeless are legally des-
ignated. People at one camp have been
asking me to get them a Dumpster so
they can keep their area tidy, but I have
been unsuccessful. They appreciate the
donations of clothing, but to keep them
clean they need rolls of quarters and
rides to the Laundromat. They need ac-
cess to showers and potable water
There is a way to find out exactly what
these people need to survive, ask them.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa

The business of scrap
There are many Chinese traders trav-
eling across the United States in search of
scrap metal. It is scrap metal that Amer-
ican recycling dealers won't bother with.
In 2012, China accounted for 43.1 percent
of copper demand worldwide and more
than five times the amount acquired by the
United States. One way to get copper is
to mine it; the other is recycled scrap.
Scrap accounts for more than half of
China's production of copper The
United States throws away more than
half of what we can use. Low-grade
scrap requires much manual work to be
clean enough to be melted in furnaces.
If low-grade scrap weren't exported, it
would wind up in landfills, because labor
in the U.S. is much more costly than in
China. Telephone cable oozes a vaseline-
like substance and hundreds of tiny wires,
which gum up recycling equipment Tons
of Christmas lights, elevator wire, cable
TV boxes, etc., are all recycled.
China's purchase of our scrap metal
serves a multi-purpose. Scrap dealers
make a profit and employ people and it
saves us a lot of landfill area.
Robert E. Blum
Homosassa


Government inefficiency
The Commentary of Sunday, Sept. 15,
was an interesting read. You raised sev-
eral issues and gave what I consider fair
coverage to each. I see an underlying
theme in the whole spectrum of issues.
The question is, "What is the role of
government?" It's pretty obvious gov-
ernment has grossly failed us in the hos-
pital issue. The board accepted some bad
legal advice years ago and created a
foundation in an attempt to save money
on the Florida retirement system. Maybe
a small public hospital is just not viable
in today's medical market, but to raise
the taxes tenfold suggests management
problems. I've sat through two 10-hour
episodes in the CMH ER and I will never
walk in the door again. They have man-
agement problems throughout the staff.
It was first reported in the Chronicle
that HCA led the bidding with an offer
of $133 million. The article today says
it's $291 million. That is a no-brainer; sell
the hospital to them and get the taxpayer
off the hook. Private industry can do a
much better job of running it than we can.
The sad thing is the local governments
never learn. If you look at the Three
Sisters Springs project, you see the
same dysfunctional arrangement as the
hospital evolved into. I see us keeping
the local lawyers working for years over
that mess. You now have $10 million in-
vested and two years and although it's
public money, the public can't use it.
Wait until the lawsuits start flying.
You had two articles about water
quality Somehow the local politicians
can't grasp the lesson of thousands of
years of human history that growth and
pristine waters are incompatible. It's
just not going to happen. When you throw
in a complete lack of infrastructure, no
storm sewers, no sanitary sewers, it's
impossible. I applaud recent efforts to
correct this problem, but you are 50
years too late. This is the septic system
capital of the world and if you keep
pushing growth at all costs, it's not
going to change.
The lead editorial was about a cost-
benefit analysis for the community cen-
ters to see if the benefits justify the cost.
I applaud Rebecca Bays for raising the
issue. It was reported in the Chronicle that
it was costing us about $240 a year for each
person using the community centers. I
have no idea if that number is correct, but
let's say that it is. My yearly member-
ship in the local Elks Lodge costs me
about $70. The Elks have so many social
groups, committees and charity functions
going on that you could not possibly par-
ticipate in more than just a select few
That's just another example of govern-
ment's inefficiency and expense.
I have already expounded on my
thoughts on the sheriff's air ambulance
service in another letter, so I won't bela-
bor it here other than to say that it must
be subjected to an even more rigorous
cost-benefit analysis than the commu-
nity center issue. I don't think the sher-
iff can provide the service cheaper than
private industry I'm guessing, but I'll
put his costs at two or three times what
private industry can do it for It's not a
valid function of local government.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


Don't ignore rest of city
You have been taking care of the
historical downtown Inverness. It
looks beautiful. But please don't for-
get the rest of the city of Inverness.
There are streets and there are cul-de-
sacs that are really, really in horrible
shape, especially in the development
behind the shopping center right here
on Hill Street. We really need some-
one to come in here and take a look
because it's getting worse. Again,
you're doing a beautiful job in down-
town historical Inverness. We enjoy
going there.
Thanks for saving Gator
I would like to thank the University
of Florida ER group of the Small Ani-
mals Veterinarian School at
Gainesville for saving our dog, Gator's,
life. He was almost in demise and
they took it upon themselves to bring
him back and did a fantastic job after
he went in (for)
O d IM^ major surgery on
4OUND whis spleen, and I
W do appreciate
Zp t everything they've
done. It's an out-
standing facility
and thank God
a that they were
/ able to do what
A i they did with the
563-0579 latest state-of-the-
"0 7 art equipment
and knowledge
that those people possess. I'd also
like to thank many of the neighbors,
friends in the area in Pine Ridge that
supported Gator with cards, phone
calls and some toys that they gave to
him. And it's really loving to see how
many neighbors and friends show
such a great interest and human
warmth towards one's animals and
themselves. So again, thank you all
and I appreciate everything you've
done for our boy, Gator.
Beautiful windows
I absolutely would love to see the
actual picture of the pelican and alli-
gator with the real alligator teeth. The
picture shown in Aug. 22's paper was
lovely as well with the small frog on
(the) lily pad and bird in the bushes.
Is the central bird a blue heron? (My
mom) and Kenneth Swade are so
lucky to live in a home with these
beautiful windows.
Don't pay? Volunteer
I see there's another Sound Off
about the volunteers for (the) fire de-
partment. For the people who don't
want to pay the extra taxes: First of
all, apply to become a volunteer,
pass the drug test, background
check, physical. Then take many,
many, many, many hours of training.
Then if you get in, get the rented
gear, take it home. When the alarm
goes off your beeper at 3 o'clock in
the morning Christmas morning,
your birthday, New Year's Eve, when
the family's coming to visit and
you're getting ready to go out to din-
ner, be sure to drop everything and
respond to the firehouse. Be sure to
kiss your loved ones goodbye be-
cause you're going to be a firefighter.
You may not come back (because)
firefighting is a dangerous job. I have
25 years as a professional firefighter,
including another four as a volunteer.
I am permanently handicapped from
fighting fires and getting hurt. So
those of you who don't want to pay
that extra money, just do what I just
said, OK? If not, then shut up and
pay the extra taxes.



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

out covering movies. Within a year he
was writing film reviews every week
and it became his passion. He has left
Citrus County to attend Florida State
University, and I have no doubt his re-
views (if not his movies) will one day
appear on the national stage.
I am going to miss J.C. Penney and
our nuclear plant and all the jobs that
went along with both.
But I won't miss love bugs, the last
few seconds of each Tampa Bay Bucs
game or the fighting over Citrus Me-
morial hospital. Just maybe the
change of season will bring an end to
all three of those transgressions.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline, com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SoundOFF


Printing the truth
Thank you, Chronicle, for finally
printing your editorial on the
"Cottage industry of Legislature
the hotbed of self-interest." That
is so true in this state down here.
Thank you again for printing the
truth and also about the Public
Service Commission, which is
nothing but a big joke down here.
Thank you again for printing it.
Shattering litterbug
Wednesday (Aug. 28) was
such a beautiful morning in Citrus
County; brilliant blue sky, low
humidity. It was a pleasure driv-
ing along Citrus Avenue driving
into Crystal River. Sharp-looking
red Mustang in front of me,
nice tan convertible top. A
lovely blond at the wheel adjust-
ing her hair, adjusting her sun-
glasses, making sure her
makeup looked beautiful. Then
the image was shattered. She
rolled down her window and
threw out a newspaper. A piece
of paper that floated back to-
wards my vehicle. The image
was shattered. Just another lit-
terbug. Oh, you know who you
were. Another litterbug despoil-
ing Citrus County.
Flying through yellow
Today is a half of a school
day for Crystal River and you're
going on (State Road) 44 and
there's that flashing yellow
light that means 20 mph. So
for the car that zipped through
completely doing 30, 35, 40, I
hope the sheriff's out there
next time. It's a half a day, the
kids are out there, those buses
are out here, us people picking
up kids are out there and you
people are still flying through.
Where's the sheriff on the half
days at that blinking, flashing
yellow light? It's aggravating to
all of us.


Grass is a disgrace
I was just wondering. On
South Park Avenue in Inverness,
the homes and grass are a dis-
grace. Where is the code en-
forcement board? They ought to
make people keep up their
homes. If they can't afford it,
move into an apartment where
they mow the grass for you. It's
pride for the other person, too,
plus yourself.
More down the drain
We have this hospital that's
sucked about $4 million of the
taxpayers' money down the
drain and now we're turning
right around and doing the
same thing with Duke Energy.
Something must be done about
this government, this local
government.


Think long-term Give Lee a five-for


For the young ladies thinking
about body art: Do they know
what a long-stem rose or a
butterfly looks like after 60
years? I'm sure your children
and grandchildren will be
impressed.
Pay attention to road
Just wanted to say what a
great job your paper's doing.
Also, I just witnessed a five-car
pileup accident in front of the
Firestone and (Our) Lady of Fa-
tima Church. And, you know, if
the people, you know, would
stay off their cellphones and
texting while driving and paying
attention and not tailgating
each other, accidents like this
wouldn't happen. Hopefully no
one got hurt.


Can anyone give me the
phone number to the Lee
County office building? Maybe
they're in need of a county ad-
ministrator and four county
commissioners. Maybe we
could do a package deal and
clean up things in Citrus
County.
Love the mall music
I was so happy to read that
other people enjoy the music
at the mall. It has been very
enjoyable. But then again, we
do need a Ross For Less and a
Michaels or maybe a Mar-
shalls something to bring
the young people. They love
Ross For Less. And just keep
up the music and it's just
been lovely.


Helicopter questions
Some questions on the
medevac helicopter proposal:
Will the copter respond to
emergencies outside the
county? Who or what will deter-
mine which trauma center it
flies to? Who will bill for the
services? Where will the money
received go? Who will employ
the additional EMTs needed?
Since several people have
stressed that Citrus County citi-
zens "own" the helicopter and
that this is to reduce the cost
of a flight, will Citrus County
residents be billed at a different
rate than noncitizens and possi-
bly snowbirds? Will all Florida
counties try to establish med-
ical evac capabilities? Has the
state of Florida ever considered
establishing a statewide emer-
gency medical services plan
with helicopters strategically
sited, mutual coverage, etc.? Fi-
nally, how can an ultraconserva-
tive tea party county like this
consider a government agency
competing with a private, for-
profit medical transport com-
pany? End of questions.
Citrus is the best!
This is for the lady that thinks
Citrus County has little to offer
and that the bad outweighs the
good and it may be time for her
to move on. Well, lady, go ahead
and move on because I beg to
differ. Citrus County has the
most more things to do; free
things, free concerts, beautiful
bike trails, the gorgeous waters
to fish on and boat on. You need
to get your head out of the dirt.
All of my friends who come
here from bigger towns marvel
at all the things that we have to
offer here the craft shows,
the music. It's just amazing
that somebody like her lives
here and doesn't see this.


..._-_n ......... Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
SITRUS C": O U N T Y i 1 2 3 4 5 6 7


CNIC E8 9 10 11 12 13 14
www.chronicleonline.com

..ML................_ 15 1 617 19 201 21
..::,m mpwqL1 i"


iASEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
", ^proiudl\ pnieznlt IhIN
i I ml I Cc Lm i t chamber of Commerce
I A LktBusiness Women's Alliance

NESS

Saturday, September 28,2013
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
National Guard Armorg
-. 1I ./Venable 5t., Crstal River
Health, fitness & wellness exhibits
FREE health screenings
Demos Product Samples & More
Live Remote Sheriffs FOCUS Car
LifeSouth Bloodmobile NCEMS Ambulance
S 5FA Zone 5rEAKELR5!
SMedi-Spa Pkg (S1000) Jazzercise ($500)* Travel Pkg
($500) Glamour Girls Pkg ($250) Skin Care Pkg ($250)
Exercise Eq ($250) Pamper Pkg ($250)

SSEvEN RR,. Advanced Urology Specialists. Citrus Memorial
Health System Genesis Women's Center & Med
coL'iTi Spa Tobacco Free Florida at Citrus County Health
--01 'Dpartment Flonda Cancer Specialists Citrus
ClRNiCJE 95Clssic Hiits the Fo< Publix Super Markets


C5Kgt 19th Annual

Rails to

Trails
UJn1K0 *E STRTE T B ike R ide!

Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013
on the Withlacoochee State Trail
Start Time:
7 a.m. 9 a.m. (No mass start) Rain or Shine.
Location: The ride will begin at the North Apopka
Avenue Trail Crossing in Inverness. Continental Breakfast
available, Lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Entry Fee: $25 per rider up to 10/04/13.
$15 for riders 12 and under.
Children under 12 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.
All Door Prizes will be randomly
f ~ selected and given to those
who are pre-registered by 12pm
i( ._ Oct. 4. At least one bike will be
0 ~ included in door prizes.
For more information
or applications log onto:
www.railstotrailsonline.com
For information call (352) 527-9535
or e-mail richg37s@tampabay.rr.com CI11 0 \ 0 I(1
-1 .OEFP7 -...-


Mi & l 2t2 23 24 25 26 27 28

.9 30
I Oo, ==MEN =C~tI









Ill





Sept 22 Oct 1



OldvCourtousetHeriage Museu
Joune StorisaisTEcompllin SmitsoniKlexhiitio
nnoinhrod Ceitra baJy)o golf anro.uh
















AccountspOferaiglerssThmselves Exprss The Hope
AndlPrmisesOf FrshnStrts'a GrimRealiiisaO
Of Personal Trave. BroughtnTo YouBdht Smithsonia
KidnstitutionlAndlTheeFeorida HumanitiesvCouncil.
lSept22-1:40gm
TeSneFonAuntirs
2013g- Fl0.ota e 0 t 0
$4ik5Rde& Een rieInlde dmsso AdRon-ti


















main ooSI ie
Tran spottinVa hrerdBs* S.PeTapByRys













ForMoeAnfdmtinMalre7-97
IT ISep 3- O ct 2
Cii)1 EitrsCutyCabr n\aue os ivrEet



Stiwe thle IDte TEE O~FFCnatPoe502073-49
,th Annu.. l TEE IT FIOR KIDS "ENT R 28-7:a
GOLF TotIRNAN1:NT T1a Hop
V&tC[ranS'CIII I-iig~i n~SoOu~r Ciili-eildrni\rjl) fOR IN Relay 4.LifeAmeia a ce-o it
TeamHope2ndAnna ea ie
Black Dianioiul Quarry' CouirseFishingTournamen
November 11, 2013 Hm-asaRierie-esr

Join KidIsCentral for a dlivof golf and lfullnRegis er a feet- 15prba
At the prestigious Bldlck I lion ion U 1Y 50% Prryed*Goes.o-Rely*4 Lie, 50- PrizeMoney
Golf Course in Lecarlto, Floridla. Turamn Bse n oitSyte-*ihig*aegris
AS da110% (t iki[to the dannua1 lf g i ll101101, neWeghI n 1Fih Pr-atgoy. rie- BaedOn10
Kids Central will Celebrate and honoriveterans. T B* PesntWih-hidrn' Atiites
Featuring: Limited 200.Boats. ApoiaeNme fAtnes 0- 300
-sI~ientAuction Cnat hn: 5-9722
*Putting Cg4)1(0~%t-9:0a
A 1nh1/ing IDooi I'lliA4.% -. s
An~id NMore! Ivrns lkLde 22

KIDSC[NTRA[INCLakesideCraftShow
WL n e &
. ..vetI o heBnftO TeEksChrte nTh ra h
VedrsAe.l Lcl*epl .it llHnm aeImsFrSlIts
Frm9 mTo3P.Th.. 0W iB oo&.in. lal s elA
Rafl Dains*houh u Te ayFr ontd tesFrm l


C4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


COMMENTARY









TE CHNOLOGY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


apples to apples?



How iPhone 5S, 5C and older iPhone 5 compare


ANICK JESDANUN
Associated Press

CUPERTINO, Calif. Where the phones differ
most is on the inside. The 5S has a faster chip, a fin-
gerprint sensor and a better camera, and both new
models are compatible with a greater range of 4G
LTE frequency bands. Both phones also come with
the new iOS 7 operating system, a major departure
in style and functionality from the iOS 6 that came
installed on the iPhone 5.

Here's a closer look at how features
in the three phones compare:
Only the iPhone 5S has a fingerprint sensor The
home button of the 5S recognizes your prints and
can use that instead of a four-digit passcode to un-
lock the phone.
The main camera on the 5S is better at picking
up light, which is useful for night and indoor shots.
Although all three phones have 8-megapixel cam-
eras, individual pixels on the 5S are larger, and the
See Page D2


Apart from new colors, the exterior of Apple's
new iPhones doesn't look much different
from last year's model. The iPhone 5S is
identical to the iPhone 5 in size and weight,
while the iPhone 5C is only slightly bigger
and heavier. The 5C also uses plastic instead


aluminum and glass.


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
BRUSSELS European Central
Bank President Mario Draghi
briefs European lawmakers on
monetary policies and the bloc's
economic situation.
HONG KONG HSBC releases
preliminary version of its purchas-
ing manager's index, a closely
watched early indicator of the
strength of China's huge manufac-
turing sector
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON -The Confer-
ence Board releases the Consumer
Confidence Index for September, 10
a.m.; Senate Budget Committee
hearing on the impact of uncertainty
on jobs and the economy
* THURSDAY
Freddie Mac, the mortgage com-
pany, releases weekly mortgage
rates, 10 a.m.; National Association
of Realtors releases pending home
sales index for August, 10 a.m.


BREE FOWLER
Associated Press
NEW YORK Sen. Al Franken is
asking Apple for more clarity on pri-
vacy and security concerns he has with
its use of fingerprint recognition tech-
nology in the new iPhone 5S.
The iPhone 5S, which went on sale
Friday, includes a fingerprint sensor
that lets users tap the phone's home
button to unlock their phone, rather
than enter a four-digit passcode.
But Franken said that the fingerprint
system could be potentially disastrous
for users if someone does eventually
hack it While a password can be kept a
secret and changed if it's hacked, he
said, fingerprints are permanent and
are left on everything a person touches,


making them far from a secret.
"Let me put it this way: if hackers
get a hold of your thumbprint, they
could use it to identify and imperson-
ate you for the rest of your life," the
Minnesota Democrat said in a letter to
Apple CEO Tim Cook.
But the Cupertino, Calif, company
has said that this kind of technology
significantly boosts security for
users.
According to Apple, the fingerprint
data is stored on the phone in a place
that's inaccessible to other apps and to
Apple's remote servers. In addition,
Apple says it's not possible to convert a
fingerprint from a police file into
something the phone will recognize, as
the sensor reads a sub-epidermal layer
of the finger


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil falls as another
budget battle looms
NEW YORK Oil fell more
than 1 percent Friday as fears of a
disruption to Middle East supplies
eased while concerns about a shut-
down of the U.S. government grew
stronger
Benchmark oil for October deliv-
ery dropped $1.72, or 1.4 percent,
to close at $104.67 per barrel on
the New York Mercantile Ex-
change. For the week, oil dropped
$3.54, or 3.3 percent. That's despite
a 2.5 percent increase on Wednes-
day, when the U.S. Federal Re-
serve announced it would keep its
stimulus policy in place.
Meanwhile, the average price for
a gallon of gasoline held steady at
$3.49, down 10 cents from where it
started the month.
Brent crude, the benchmark for
international crudes used by many
U.S. refineries, gained 46 cents to
$109.22 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange in London.

Fed-inspired global
rally fizzles out
LONDON The rally in global
stock markets fizzled out on Friday,
two days after the U.S. Federal Re-
serve buoyed sentiment by keeping
its monetary stimulus program in
place.
Britain's FTSE 100 fell 0.4 per-
cent to close at 6,596.43 while Ger-
many's DAX edged down 0.2
percent to 8,675.73. France's CAC-
40 ended almost 0.1 percent lower
at 4,203.66.
In Japan, the Nikkei 225 index
gave up early gains to close 0.2 per-
cent lower at 14,742.42. Australia's
S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.4 percent to
5,276.70. Benchmarks in Indonesia,
New Zealand, Thailand, the
Philippines and Singapore fell.
India's benchmark Sensex
dropped 2.2 percent to 20,203.96.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY





Extra


income


should be


enjoyed

EAR BRUCE: I am 66 years
old. My friends tell me to
start opening up, to spend a
little and enjoy it.
My house has been remodeled
and is ready to sell. It's valued at
$170,000. My only debt is a home
equity loan of $14,000. My invest-
ments and cash are $210,000. My
Social Security is $1,760 a month;
my pension is $1,557 and I'm draw-
ing $800 a month from investments.
So I deposit $4,117 in my checking
directly each month.
My budget allowance (including
taxes and insurance) is $3,104
monthly I also have a part-time job
that pays me $10,000 a year
Should I have a more free-
wheeling attitude about money? I
have physical twice a year, and
feel only the loss of my great wife
of 43 years.
Steve, via email
DEAR STEVE: I am with your
friends. Go out and enjoy your life.
Who are you saving it for? At 66
years old, you are a very young
man. I am not suggesting you go
out and spend more than what is
coming in, but you have close to
$1,000 a month plus the part-time
job over and above your monthly
expenses. By all means, take a
cruise, get a hobby, do something
See Page D2


of al
Photos by the Associated Press





Senator concerned about

new fingerprint technology




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


APPLE


Continued from Page Dl


Sprint joins rivals with upgrade program


camera's shutter can open wider Combined, Apple
says that translates to a 33 percent improvement in
light sensitivity.
The flash on the 5S is better, too. Unlike other
cameras, iPhones or otherwise, the flash on the 5S
shoots two different lights at once one whitish and
the other amber The iPhone adjusts the combination
automatically to account for ambient lighting condi-
tions. That results in better skin tones and more natu-
ral colors, as the normal flash sometimes overpowers
whatever light is naturally there.
The front-facing cameras on both the 5C and the
5S are better Although the cameras remain at 1.2
megapixels, the pixel sizes on both are larger
The 5S can shoot slow-motion video and take up to
10 photos per second. The 5 and the 5C can't do slow
motion. The 5C does allow for continuous shooting,
but only at about 2.5 shots per second.
The A7 processor used in the 5S is faster than the
A6 found in the 5 and the 5C. Apps and Web pages typ-
ically open a blink of an eye faster The 5S boots about
five seconds faster than the 5C.
The A7 on the 5S can handle data more efficiently
with a 64-bit format, akin to what's found on desktop
computers, rather than the 32 bits traditionally used
in phones. Games and other graphic-intensive apps
can take advantage of this. The 5S also has a compan-
ion processor, called M7, for motion-related tasks.
That allows for fitness apps to run without draining as
much battery Apps taking advantage of either of these
improvements are still being developed, though.
The 5S and the 5C are compatible with more 4G
LTE frequency bands -up to 13, instead of a maxi-
mum five before. That means the phone is more likely
to work with higher speeds wherever you go. However,
there are more than 40 cellular bands worldwide, the
bulk for LTE, so a version bought in one country might
not work for high speeds everywhere around the
world. If that happens, you'll need to use the slower
3G and GSM networks.
Both the 5C and the 5S come with iOS 7, which of-
fers a new look to icons along with new features such
as a Control Center for easy access to frequently used
settings and apps. Older phones can be upgraded to
iOS 7 for free, although Apple says some features
won't work with all models.


Associated Press
NEW YORK -Sprint is
launching a new program that
gives customers the chance to up-
grade their phones every 12
months, becoming the last of the
four national wireless carriers to
target customers who want the
latest devices.
Sprint Corp.'s new One Up plan
is most similar to Jump from T-Mo-
bile US Inc. T-Mobile allows for
more frequent upgrades, but re-
quires a $10 monthly fee to partici-
pate. Sprint's is free, but doesn't
include insurance, as Jump does.
Like T-Mobile, Sprint is reduc-
ing the monthly cost of voice, text



MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

that pleases you. You can't take it
with you.
DEAR BRUCE: Is it necessary
to have a child as executor? We
are 70 years old with three adult
children. We asked our oldest son
to be executor and have given
him power of attorney, as well. We
have an issue with one of the oth-
ers. She is very upset about him
being chosen, plus she does not
get along with the other two. Our
son says he doesn't want to do
this, but will anyway
Would it be wise to have an at-
torney as executor? We would
like to relieve the stress in our
family over this issue and do not
know which way to go. I can imag-
ine that an attorney might say it's
OK, but is it prudent in your opin-
ion? Any advice you can give will
be greatly appreciated.
-Alvin, via email
DEAR ALVIN: The direct an-
swer is you could have anyone
you choose be your executor The


and data services while charging
for the phone in installments. But
unlike T-Mobile, Sprint's discount
ends after the phone is paid off
over two years. T-Mobile cus-
tomers can keep the lower
service rates indefinitely
AT&T and Verizon Wireless also
allow customers to upgrade their
phones before the typical two years
are up. But neither Verizon's Edge
nor AT&T's Next program reduces
the monthly service fees, so cus-
tomers pay more overall. With the
iPhone 5S, for instance, a phone
company typically charges about
$200, or $450 less than the full re-
tail price of the phone. With Edge,
customers pay the entire $650, with


fact that your daughter doesn't get
along with the other two siblings
is lamentable, but that's the way
life is.
If your oldest son doesn't want
to do it, don't force him. On the
other side of that, it would be a
lot cheaper if he did because he
won't charge you. An attorney cer-
tainly will charge you to be the
executor
I don't think you are going to re-
lieve the stress in your family
very much. Maybe the other son
would be executor, but I don't see
any reason to pay an attorney to
try to avoid stress. It's going to be
there no matter what.
DEAR BRUCE: I enjoy reading
your column. I hope you can help
me figure out a way to set up a
monthly budget for myself. Do
you have any suggestions for
where I should start? I am tired
of feeling that my money is not
being used wisely
-D.E., via email
DEAR D.E.: The first thing you
have to do is sit down and write a
list of all the expenses that are
unavoidable, such as rent/mort-
gage payment, insurance, car pay-


no credit for not needing the sub-
sidy Next discounts the price to
$540, but that's still $340 more than
what customers normally pay
Sprint said the program is
available to new and existing cus-
tomers on Unlimited, My Way and
My All-in plans beginning on Fri-
day It is not yet available at
Sprint stores in Florida.
Customers who want to sign up
for the Sprint One Up program
must buy an eligible smartphone
or tablet and agree to two years of
installment payments. Sprint said
that once a customer makes 12
straight payments, or pays for half
of the phone's cost, they can up-
grade to a new phone or tablet.


ments, utility bills, food, etc. Then
assign a value to each of them.
Many are pretty constant
amounts. Others, such as food,
can be a little more difficult to
pin down.
Once you have that added up,
compare it to your monthly in-
come and you will see how much
money you can choose to spend
each month. Once you have this
budget, do your best to stick to it.
One trick is to condition your-
self not to go to the grocery store
hungry It will encourage you to
buy more things than necessary
You can also go to a library or the
Internet to find more information
on this subject that could help
you immensely
The most difficult thing is getting
started. It's also important to put
yourself first In other words, de-
cide how much to save each pay-
day and put that amount away first
Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


Service m TR Our Services: Carpet Protector
Se ICTlMASeE Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24 7'365 ReStOI Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

s7ROM- $qA95i UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
:311U0mS& $a1995: Have a couch and *.*
*uv UAIIIIIAV *1 loveseatcleaned. KEIKK
:1HALLWAY U.l. o h.csca cia.cd. RE :
:1 HALLWAY W I getachairor
n nreciiner cleaned Ih
i Expires 3013I ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13

352-794-0270 ."T
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com


_ www.AIIAboutBaths.com 1
Porcelain Fiberglass
* Tile Custom Colors
Acrylic Bath Systems
Chip Repairs & More


Liesd&Inue ameMsigl


Licensed & Insured Jaime Massingill
John Massingill
LAWN

REPLACEMENT
Complete Lawn & Patch Work
Drought Tolerant Lawns

J&J SOD (352) 302-6049




ir''*, Top Notch
/ p Appliance Repair i


fc352.586-9109
-~ ^-- Accepting Credit Cards ,
Robert
Member of Roik
Chamber of Commerce &eJed


I W |INOS


INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
S341-0813 MONFR830
a p pt p h d SAT 9-4
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
&NSURED www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMEN



QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE
STARTING AT $6000
Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly

C. AnMta www.CitrusPest.com r,
ayn For solutions to all your pest problems, call today!
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS
Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River



r&cdknce m &t o'990


quality Honesty Reasonable Prices
| www.eliteroofing-inc.com
i 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024
LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED


W INO CLN IN

Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!

WINDOW'
E5% GENIEE'*
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED
352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com



When mopping isn't enough call...

Q Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
A. Pools & Pavers
tj R *Clean, Seal & Repair
*Shower Maintenance & Grout Repair
I ^ ^, -* Grout Colorant
586-1816 746-9868


F- call

1-352-66-661
DrS.BHM


For information on
how your business can
advertise on the
Chronicle Website call
563-5592
C C; a T a V -*'- .o . a*f-

ON-,.IC


|son


D2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


BUSINESS


i


i









I


3


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801




Member Spotlight: Nature Coast Ministries


Nature Coast Ministries is
working feverishly to open
the doors to its new dental clinic,
Samaritans Dental, anticipating
an open date in November or
December. The clinic will serve
low-income and/or senior residents
with services such as fillings and


extractions. Given that the
health department is restricted to
serving children and emergency
rooms only provide pain medica-
tion, this clinic will reach those
who are in need of dental care.
The overall goal is to end needless
suffering and prevent cost-related


neglect from developing into long-
term dental and health issues.
The clinic operates by appoint-
ment and will start accepting ap-
pointments later this year. The
dental clinic is located at 9020
Atlas Drive, Homosassa. For more
information visit MYNCM.com.


N\7a ti~i jrt__/io
M S N I ^ T '-- E S

Be a part of helping this or-
ganization bring smiles to our
community. For a donation of


$37, the cost of providing one
patient much-needed dental care,
members of the community can
join Nature Coast Ministries' ranks
as a Healthcare Hero. Nature Coast
Ministries thanks the Citrus
County Hospital Authority for its
assistance in the startup process.


October is Industry

Appreciation Month

in Citrus County!


Upcoming Chamber
of Commerce events
Sept. 26 Business After Hours
HEALTHJ hosted by Emeritus at Barrington Place,
-FHNFSSu 5 Rp.m. to 7 p.m., 2341 W. Norvell
.. rBryant Hwy, Lecanto.
Sept. 28- Seventh annual Women's
Health and Fitness Expo presented by the Business Women's
Alliance (BWA), 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the National Guard Ar-
mory, 8551 W. Venable Ave., Crystal River
Oct. 3 Fire Up Citrus! 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. New kick-off event
for Industry Appreciation Month will be held at Tuscany on the
Meadow-Quality Inn 350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway Hernando.
Oct. 10- Industry Appreciation Mixer, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.,
hosted by Specialty Gems at 600 SE US Hwy 19, Crystal River


Oct. 11- Industry

NlI

re %r-


Appreciation Annual Awards Luncheon
with R. Alexander Glenn, state president
of Duke Energy, 11:30 to 1 p.m., Col-
lege of Central Florida, 3800 Lecanto
Hwy, Lecanto.
Check our complete calendar at
www.citruscountychamber.com or follow
the QR code to see the website on your
smartphone!


September luncheon
welcomes the Commish


Fire Up Industry
Citrus! Appreciation
Twelve presenters Mixer


each have 5 minutes
to fire up Citrus and
inspire economic
development!
Thursday, Oct. 3,
6 to 8:45 p.m.
at Tuscany on
the Meadows,
at the Quality
Inn Conference
Center, 350
E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando.

For questions about
these events, or to
make reservations,
contact Heather at
352-795-2000 or
heather@citrus
edc.com, or pay at
www.citrusedc.com
eventst. html


Specialty Gems of Crystal
River invites everyone to
join them in as they host
the Industry Appreciation
business mixer at their
wonderful store. Mixers are
a great business-to-business
networking opportunity in a
relaxed atmosphere, so be
certain to bring your busi-
ness cards. Admission is
free, but registration is
requested to give our host
an idea of how many will
attend.
We give our sincere
appreciation to Carol
Kimbrough, owner of
Specialty Gems, for
making this wonderful
event possible.
Thursday, Oct. 10,
5 to 7 p.m.
Specialty Gems
600 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.


Annual
Awards
Luncheon
Always the most popular
and well-attended business
luncheon of the year in
Citrus County, the annual
luncheon honors our local
businesses and industries
with awards for Outstand-
ing Small Business,
Outstanding Employer or
Corporate Citizen, and
Person of the Year. Our
featured speaker this year
is R. Alexander Glenn,
Florida president for Duke
Energy, who is certain
draw a large crowd. This
luncheon SOLD OUTlast
year, so we suggest that you
get your reservations early!
Friday, Oct. 11,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m,.
College of Central Florida,
3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.


EDC Barbecue
M&B Dairy, the largest
dairy farm in Citrus County,
will once again host over
800 people for an evening
of delicious barbecue pre-
pared by the Ag Alliance.
This beautiful location pro-
vides plenty of room to
spread out, chow down on
the best barbecue ever pre-
pared by the Citrus County
Agricultural Alliance, enjoy
libations at the open bar,
and kick up your heels with
great live music from the
best country band in the
south the Dan Story Band.
Dale McClellan, owner of
M&B Dairy, is the 2012
Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Ag
Expo Florida Farmer of the
Year, and we thank him for
opening his farm again this
year for this fun-filled event.
Thursday, Oct. 17,
6 to 10 p.m.
M&B Dairy, 8760
S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.


Gerry Mulligan, Carl Flanagan, Josh Wooten, Dr. Anthony
Schembri, John Murphy, Rob Wardlow and Don Taylor.

The inspiration for the 199os
comedy-drama "The Commish,"
Dr. Anthony Schembri, spoke at
the September Chamber luncheon
crowd about shaking things up
and focusing on what works.


Fire Up Citrus! Is a new event
added to Industry Apprecia-
tion Month, in which a diverse
group of 12 presenters will share
their ideas on how to get Citrus
County moving forward. This in-
augural event is sponsored by
Workforce Connection of Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties.
The event is free and open to
the public, and light refresh-
ments will be served by Tuscany
on the Meadows.


October is Industry Apprecia-
tion Month. It is a time when the
Citrus County Economic Devel-
opment Council (EDC) celebrates
the positive impact that our local
businesses and industries have
on the prosperity and quality of
life in Citrus County. As special
recognition, the EDC has a
month filled with events that we
invite you to participate in as we
all say "thank you" to our job and
service providers.


Event details
Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, 6 p.m.
to 8:45 at Tuscany on the
Meadows, at the Quality Inn
Conference Center, 350 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy, Hernando,
FL.

Please RSVP at http://www.
citruscountycha m ber.com/events/
eventdetail.aspx?Eventl D= 1183


:5-'SEVEN RIVERS
Budln s Women's AM-ianrf
.'^ifn,,'11 to na r "
fut~lt~. n Fm i sw3n to

HEALTH,

FITNESS
--7----

Saturday, September 28, 2013
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
N.bon4 G-JAwoj.H M.,$tp/VV6U.St.CnaR.-,


Well Zone
S He.alth, fitness, wellness exhibits
FREE health screenings
Demonstratiosns Product
Samples
Plu Shots'


Speaker
Zone

VA*-
d..na'n,
W7WT'^-r-


5pa Zone

Haes ,t1( I ,
Mil Fa1 IS &
*ltlxrapy
& Mor-


h i ''''N ON

k C.am 9FwAy~m~v~

-N avE-NG e


FSTPcDPRsNAim
BYC RU ONY TZN









..... ...... ....- 35.. .elB ya tH y H ra l F 4 4
II-0-Co pien. Lgh es 'ev e gg


Os~~r wnD -^ ^( CjgoaaiMfi'E 4j IiPutblix




New Image Award given
to Quality Inn and Suites


The Quality Inn and Suites Hernando accepted the New Image
Award for its beautification of its property.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY,
Chamber of Commerce


0




D4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax (32)56-56 1TolFe:(8)8224 1Emi:casfescrnceniecm Iwbie w choceniec


To the girl I met in
Publix's on 9/18 in
Homosassa Springs,
wearing a white jacket.
I would like to get to
know you. Call me
anytime. 422-0440


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111






I
w


How

To Make

Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966


Ci ihroNICi.E

www.chronicleonfine.com


BARGAIN!
1999, 26 x 52 DW
Meridian, bright, airy &
immaculate 3/2 in 55+
park new driveway &
new covered walkway
Bargain at $30,000 first
come first service
352-563-0500
FREE
King Size Mattress
pillow top, Almost new
(352) 637-6310
No calls before 8am

HAIR STYLIST

Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person

Proform Crosswalk 480
excel, cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $225.
352-382-5208
SEWING MACHINE
Brother, like new, in a
3 drawer wood cabi-
net. All accessories
$125 Cash
(352) 344-4070
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178

WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER

Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




FREE
I have a 400 ft. Long
strand of barb wire
Good Condition
Needs to be rolled up
(352) 344-1066
FREE MANURE.
No shavings,
Already bagged, Ready
for pick-up at our
pasture gate
(352) 249-7127
Free to Good Home
Hemingway
Cat & Kittens
kittens are 8 wks old,
2 males, 3 females
(352) 563-2125


KITTENS
2 Cute kittens
Free to good home
(352) 344-3927
KITTENS
8 wks old, black, white
wl blk spots, some with
no tails. Rescued out
of a rain storm when 1
day old. All very cute!
(352) 422-5401



3 cats missing within
several months.One
eyed catbobtail cat,both
black and a black with
white spots
Palm,Highland,Dixieland.
352-201-4522
CASH REWARD
Lost Black Cat,
w/ white paws, white
on right side of mouth
Pine Ridge Estates
430-5959
Lost 9/8/13
N. Lee street Beverly
Hills. Tn Colored beagle,
40 Ibs, special needs.
Please help our beloved
pet to come home.
Call 352-249-3107



Found Small Long hair
Terrier, white,
black head, /2 black
tail, Citrus Ave &
Turkey Oak
(352) 563-0816
Grey Terrier
Male, no chip
Found off of Gospel
Island Maggie rd 9/19.
(352) 364-7351
Small Dog
near Inglis Dam
call to identify
(352) 212-1428



Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339
TUPPERWARE
Many New items &
Oven ware Call Fran
352-746-3652


WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER

Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.




HAIR STYLIST

Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




DENTAL
HYGIENIST

P/T certified dental
hygienIst, experienced
only Fax Resume to
352-795-4606 or
Drop of Resume at
Christie Dental
6015W. Nordlng
Loop, Crystal River

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
Xahoo com


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Medical Assist.

Fulltime & Part time
Postions
Available at busy
Podiatry Practice
Call (352) 795-2142


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


CITRUS MEMORIAL
<



www.citrusmh.com/
career-opportunities


N












ATTENTION

Looking for
Representatives
To assist Medicare
Recipients
w/ enrolling For
Medicare Part D,
Medicare Advan-
tage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements/
Will be placed
In Local Pharmacies
to Assist w/these
programs
No exp. Necessary
Will provide Training
Call 352-726-7722
Fax 352-726-6813
i Citrus(ount$,




Here We row!

REAL ESTATE
BUYER AGENT
Seeking motivated and
talented professional Real
Estate agent with a track
record of honesty and integrity
ready to join a dynamic team.
Send resume:
FulureTopBuyerAgent@gmail.com.

Customer
Service
Specialist

Need outstanding
phone report. Good
judgement, Experi-
ence scheduling
mobile work force.
Established company
w/ great benefits.
Please mail resume
to: Blind Box 1830P
CC Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
FL 34429


Engineering
Director
Announcement
#13-51

Professional man-
agement position
supervising a division
consisting of four
distinct sections and
approximately 18
employees. Repre
sents the division in
meetings with the
public, engineering
consultants, County
management staff,
state agencies, etc.
Oversees the design
and construction of
multi-million dollar
roadway construc-
tion projects.
Prepares and man-
ages the County
roadway capital im-
provement pro-
gram. Requirements
are graduation from
a four year college
or university with
a degree in civil
engineering, consid-
erable experience
in professional
engineering and
registration as a
PE in the State of
Florida or able to
obtain Florida
Registration within
six months of
employment. Pay
range $2,297.23 to
$3,445.80 Bi-Weekly
DOQ. Must possess
a valid Florida driver
license.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Florida
34461 to apply.

This job is open until
filled. EOE/ADA.


Field Operations
Supervisor
Announcement
# 13-52
Coordination and
oversite of inspec-
tion duties for
County roadways
and Public Works
projects. Requires
at least five years of
experience in a
supervisory role with
civil construction
related projects:
road construction
projects, storm
water drainage,
project estimates
and customer serv-
ice. Bachelors
degree is preferred
or education and
training equivalent
to four years of
college. Must pos-
sess a valid Florida
driver license.
Starting salary
$1,429.27 B/W.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online
by Friday,
September 27, 2013
EOE/ADA.





Experienced
Telemarketer

Crystal River Office
call to inquire
352-410-6927

Licensed Realtor

CONTACT:
yankeetownrealty
.corn or Call
352-447-0007
No Fees. Great Pay
out. Weekends req.
Earning potential
unlimited.

TELEMARKETERS

Exp. Only. Write your
own Paycheck, Call
Brandon 503-6807





AC SERVICE
TECH/INSTALLERS

Top Pay, Benefits,
Sign on bonus. 40+
Hrs. must have EPA
Cert. & Dri. Lic.
Call (352) 628-5700

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

JOURNEYMAN
TRADESWORKER
Announcement
#13-53

Skilled work perform-
ing repairs and
maintenance in
County buildings
and facilities.
Knowledge of all
building trades
with emphasis on
Carpentry and
Plumbing. Must
have at least 4
years experience in
general building
trades work. Starting
pay $13.07 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, September
27,2013 EOE/ADA.

Now hiring:
CDL-A Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out, full Bene-
fits, and Achievable
Bonuses! Call tloday
for details
1-888-378-9691





FLOOR TECH

Arbor Trail Rehab
and Skilled Nursing
Center is accepting
applications for an
exp. Floor Tech,
Apply in person at
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness Fl. 34453
352-637-1130
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D


BtB

Installers Helper

Part time help to in-
stall window treat-
ments, Hourly pay.
Hours will vary. Must
have a professional
appearance. Apply
in person at:
72 Hour Blinds
Factory
1657 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.corn or Call
352-422-2160

ReStore Manaaer
Truck Driver
Donation
Processor
Habitat for Humanity
is filling 3 positions
in Citrus County
E-mail request for
detailed job descrip-
tion and instructions
for submitting to:
H4Hrestore@
yahoo.com
No calls or walk-ins

School Bus driver

Private Christian
organization needs
driver for Citrus
County bus route.
First pick up 7 AM,
only 4 stops. Same
PM route. Bus NO
a/c. $9.50/hr.
20-25 hours/week
plus opportunity
for more. 1 yr exp.
min. Must be fully
licensed/ no acci-
dents/ ready to
drive. /2 character
references. Family
oriented/patience/ki
ndness a plus.
Email to:
Christianbus@
tampabay.rr.com




Part-time
Part-time
Screen Printer &
Embroiderer

Experienced Only
Call 352-794-5402





AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!

Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, Excavators. 3
Weeks Hands On
Program. Local Job
Placement Assis-
tance. National
Certifications. GI Bill
Benefits Eligible!
1-866-362-6497

MEDICAL OF-
FICE TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
* A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
* All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic CCBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc~com


1971 Baseball cards,
200 cards $40.
1970 Baseball Cards
200 cards $40
(352) 344-9502


Barbie Olympic Gym
1996 $100.
Marlin Innaugral
Poster 1993
$75. obo
(352) 621-0778






APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030



*l.k^i^hf
GAS RANGE Andora5
black GE selfclean con-
vection oven, griddle,
power burner $500
OBO 228-4648


GE Space
Saver
Microwave
very little
usage
Bisque, $125.
(352) 302-9129


GOOD DRYER $100
works perfect. 30 day
written warranty call/text
352-364-6504


GOOD WASHER $100
works perfect. 30 day
written warranty, call/text
352-364-6504


HOUSEHOLD FREEZE
WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT
2'2"DEEP 2'4"WIDE
4'10.5"HIGH $250.00
352-382-0009


MAGTAG
2009 white Washing
Machine. In good
condition $250 obo
(352) 422-5579


MICROWAVE Black
over-the-stove Fnrigidaire
microwave $25.00
352-322-1160


Refrigerator
Kenmore, white
$110; Washing Mach.
white $85 Both work
good (352) 628-4766
No calls before 11:00a


REFRIGERATOR SIDE
BY SIDE Black
Jennaire. Runs Great.
Remodeling. $100.
228-4648


REFRIGERATOR W/
ICE MAKER G.E.
WHITE SIDE BY SIDE
2'3"DEEP2'11.5" WIDE
5'9"HIGH $300.00
352-382-0009


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


TOASTER OVEN
$25.00
352-795-1032


Washer & Dryer
Maytag- 2 washers, 1
dryer. All in good
working cond. $300
for all or $125 ea
(304) 544-8398


WASHER
Maytag
Front Load, 4 yrs. old,
$150. firm
(352) 634-4259


WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Condition.
Free Delivery, 60 Day
Written Guarantee
352 263-7398


Whirlpool Digital
Calypso Matching
WASHER/DRYER
Excel cond. $400.
Must See Call
(352) 212-1854


WHIRLPOOL DISH
WASHER Almond color,
older model. Works well.
From remodel. $50
352-621-1249


WHIRLPOOL ELEC
RANGE Older drop in
model. Almond color.
From remodel. $50
352-621-1249


White GE Glass-top
Stove and Dish-
washer!! 3 Years used,
works good Asking
$200.00 for the pair.
Chris(352)302-0951


AUCTIONS Roofing
Company Liquida-
tion, Online Auction
Only, Bid September
17 thru September
26, Items Located in
Maryland & Florida.
Motley's Auction &
Realty Group,
804-232-3300,
www.motleys.com,
VAAL #16.

AUCTIONS
Universal Health
Care Group, Inc.
American Man-
aged Care, LLC.
Bankruptcy Auction
Ordered by Soneet
Kapila, Trustee
Case No:
8:13-bk-01520-KRM/
Case No:
8:13-bk-05952-
KRM
Online & Onsite
Sept 24th & 25th
at 10am
Preview: 09/23
10-5pm
100 Central Avenue,
St. Petersburg, Fl
33701
400+ New & Used
Laptops & Comput-
ers, Quality Artwork
& Glass Sculptures,
Tons of High-end Of-
fice Furniture, Office
Equip., 1000+
Cubicles & more!
10% -13%BP
www.moeckerauctionsc
om for details,
photos & terms
Moecker Auctions
(800) 840-BIDS
$100 ref. cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HEAVY
DUTY METAL INVER-
NESS 419-5981



32 Sharp color TV
excellent condition
$35. 352-249-1085 or
352-212-5624
CASSETTE DECK Dou-
ble Deck JVC Cassette
with Remote $40.00
352-746-5421
Panasonic TV
42" Plasma Flat screen
with remote,
TV in excel cond.
$225., (908) 616-0620
Homosassa
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16 INCH 140 WATTS
2 9 INCH 60 WATTS &
1 5 INCH 80 WATTS
All $80. 352-613-0529



3 DOUBLE ROLLS
VINYL PREPASTED
WALL COVERING $25
NEW 165SQ FT
419-5981
CEILING FANS WHITE
FOUR @ $25 EACH
352 527-8993
FORMICA COUNTER-
TOPS ONE-9'LONG -
ONE 6'LONG -$100
352 527-8993
KITCHEN SINK double
basin with moen faucet
and spray. Good Shape
$35.00 Call 613-4279
PVC BLINDS
WHITE-TWO
SETS-79"W X 91"H
$100 352 527-8993



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
LAPTOP CART/TABLE
Black adjustable
tilt&height w/wheels $24
Can email pic
352-382-3650



Patio Recliner
Tan La-z-boy, like new
$140
(352) 564-8605
PICNIC TABLE/BENCH
WHITE, CONVERTS
TO TWO BENCHES
$45 352 527-8993
SAIL SHADE Tnriangu-
lar(11'10,11'10,11'10)
$75.00 352-513-4027,
after 12PM

Furniture

1-TV STAND 36" widex
26" tall w/ drawer cherry
color like new $40 can
text pic call Ron
352-746-0401
1-SIDE CHAIR Black &
gold wood, green pad-
ded seat can text pics
$45 Ron 352-746-0401
BEDROOM DRESS-
ERS 2 NIGHTSTANDS
White Formica, $100.
(352)344 2558
Bamboo Coffee Table
with glass top $55
860-2475
BED FULL SIZE
Matress, box spring,
Frame Very good condi
tion. Little used. $50.
(352)2574076
BED ROOM SET
Queen Size, mattress,
boxspring & triple
dresser, headboard
footboard, night
stands & lamps $825
obo (352) 628-3995
BED TWIN Mattress,
Box spring, frame. Ex-
cellent like new Chiro-
practor model. $75.
(352)2574076


Home o Finder

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


Your t'rwu,



Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED








BEDROOM SET
Headboard
Dresser,Nite Stand
$99.99
352-795-1032
BEDSIDE TABLES (3)
Excellent quality, Solid
wood, brown. Must see.
Each $30.
(352)257-4076
BOOK SHELVES
$45.00
352-795-1032
BROYHILL SOFA Per-
fect condition, like new.
3-seat sofa, includes 4
cushions and arm co-
vers. Off-white with floral
pattern. Paid $900, sell
for $150. 352-503-7125
or 410-227-9152
CHAIRS
5-light oak chairs with
padded seats on
casters $100
(352) 419-6383
CHANDELIER
$25.00
352-795-1032
CHEST OF DRAWER
$45.00
352-795-1032
CHEST OF DRAWERS
Large Six dovetailed
drawers. Brown Excel-
lent condition $100.
(352)257-4076
COFFEE & 2 END TA-
BLES Ex qual solid
wood, brown. Must see.
Coffee $30., Ends $20.
each (352)257-4076
COFFEE TABLE
WOOD One scratch,
but very usable. $10.
(352)257-4076
COUCH
Brown & Gold, curved,
two matching
otterman's. 1 yr old
$400 (352) 527-4247
DINING ROOM HUTCH
Large,beautiful high
quality, must see. $100.
(352)257-4076
DINING ROOM SET
Table,Chairs,
Server
$99.99
352-795-1032
Dining Room Set
Thomasville,
Cherry Table, 6
chairs, 2 ext, new
$2900, China Base &
Deck w/ glass
shelves, new $2595,
Moving-Will sacrifice
both for $1500 cash,
obo (352) 513-4516
DINING ROOM TABLE
Six chairs. Large super
excellent. High qual.
Must see.$100.
(352)257-4076


DRESSER W/ MIRROR
Large excellent quality
Basset Dovetail
drawers. $100.
(352)257-4076
END TABLES
$45.00
352-795-1032
r High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
KITCHEN SET,
45" Beveled glass top,
white base, 4 swivel
cushion chairs, on
casters, Excel. Cond.
$350. (352) 465-2237
Leave Message
KITCHEN TABLE 42"
FORMICA PLUS
LEAVE 4 chairs.
Very usable $20.
(352)257-4076
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
High quality brown ex-
cellent condition. $40.
Must see
(352)257-4076
LIVING ROOM CHAIRS
2 green high quality ex-
cellent condition. Must
see. Each $50.
(352)257-4076
LOVE SEAT Black Real
Leather, not Bonded,
Love Seat. Excellent
Condition $100.00
352-746-5421
Love Seat, chair, Bed-
room suite, oak furn.
Priced right! Ask for
Diana 352-637-4695
MATTRESS firm,
twin size
$50 OBO
352 419-8816
SECTIONAL 3 PIECE
High quality excellent
condition.
Must see.$100.
(352)257-4076
Sectional Couch
w/ queen hide a bed
and recliner built in
Good Condition
$175. obo
(352) 302-9129
Single Sofa Bed
Lazy Boy ,very nice
tan colored $175;
Corner TV and table.
$40 (352) 746-6996
Sofa & Loveseat all
recline, Brookshire,
teal, $250.
4 Kitchen Chairs
w/ castors $25 ea
(352) 382-3914



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019


BOLENS
New Lawn Tractor
13/2HP, 38", 6spd.
used 3 times, have
receipt paid $1,000
first $650. Laurel Ridge
BH(352) 634-3806
Craftsman 10 inch
Table saw $300
See in Crystal River
Village behind sweet-
bay Supermarket
1453 Lake Everly Ave.
(352) 794-0272
CRAFTSMAN RIDER
mower with bag unit
42" cut, exc. cond.
1-yr old $850
(352) 637-4718
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE
$20 352-613-0529
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



2 Professional
Nursery Seed or Plant
Tables All aluminum
$200.
Wood Cigar boxes
$20 (352) 621-0778



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri, Sat, Sun 9am-?
tools, golf clubs,
hsehold items & more.
1526 N Rock Cress Ph
CHERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Sat., Sept. 28th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020
HOMOSASSA
Sat. & Sun. 9am-5pm
Kindness Terrace



MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZE 34X30 & 36X30
$25 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS PANTS CAS-
UAL 3 SIZES 36X30 &
2 CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529


MENS SPORTS JACK-
ETS 4 SIZE 40R $10
EACH 352-613-0529



STEAM & VAC"
Rug Cleaner
By Hoover. Does A
Great Job Cleaning
All Rugs Asking $75.
(352) 628-2844
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45
352-628-0033
30 GALLON AQUAR-
IUM no leaks, includes
newer heater and filter,
light, glass top, gravel
$65.00 352-201-4522



Above

Ground Pool,

24 ft. up

and running
pump, filter, ladder,
very good cond.
$500. You must
remove 352-212-6433
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BEDSPREAD &
SHAMS King, like new,
mint green color $15.00
352-322-1160
BOYS BICYCLE SPI-
DERMAN 16" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with case $100.00
352-746-5421
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" ON WHEELS
WITH COVER $20
352-613-0529
Designer Jackets,
leather W 2 & 3X,
New, $80 ea
Ren. Chest Set,
Must See $1,200
352-465-3086
FORENZA set of 4
standard rims $40.00
Call 613-4279
Kitchen Aid Mixer
New $275.
Tiffany style Lamps
3 large $70 ea.
352-465-3086
PET CARRIER 23 long,
14 wide, 13 high, Small
dog or cat. $25.00, ex-
cel cond. call after 12
pm 352-513-4027


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



Queen size Mattress
pillow top, very com-
fortable like new $80.
3 in one Printer
Fax/Copier, $25.
(352) 637-6310
SPEAKERS 2 Optimus
Speakers $30.00
352-746-5421
Student desk Lamp
Never used
$20 613-2797
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
VACUUM CLEANER
Hoover Wind tunnel
Nearly New,
Asking $35.
(352) 628-2844
WOMEN RUBBER
RIDING BOOTS $15
LIKE NEW SIZE 43L
EUR MADE IN ISRAEL
419-5981



Back Packer
Chair Lift for Van
$200
Jazzi 1100
Electric Scooter $200
(352) 795-0049 Bob
Diabetic Shoes,
Beige, Women's
Size 8, Medium width,
never worn, $80
(352) 522-0107
New
Jazzy Electric Chair,
MUST SELL
Cost $5,000
Selling $1,300. obo
(352) 795-7513



ACCORDION
Santini 120 Base; Full
size, double chamber,
prestine $1500
(352) 794-6641
PIANO LESSONS


MI H lE-6-
Mikasa Garden Harvest
Dishes. Eight place set-
tings, soup bowls, oval
covered casserole, veg-
etable bowl, lasagna
bowl, serving platter with
dip bowl. Oven and mi-
crowavable. Barely
used.
$400 for set.
352-586-3842
NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call
for e-mail picture 40.00
linda 341-2271
SEWING MACHINE
Brother, like new, in a
3 drawer wood cabi-
net. All accessories
$125 Cash
(352) 344-4070



AB-LOUNGER
Used But a Few times,
Paid $150. at Sears
Asking $25.
(352) 628-2844
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
barely used,
$100.
(352) 726-4307
Proform Crosswalk 480
excel. cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $225.
352-382-5208



26" Schwin Ladies
Bike. Sierra 700
24 speed,
great cond.
$100
(352) 422-3297
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
Hi-Point & Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
Nike Sling Shots RH,
steel shaft,
Gap-through 4 iron
$125. firm
Call (352) 382-7473
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516



4x8 Heavy Duty
Utility Trailer
15" wheels, new tires,
good cond. $395.
(352) 586-3209


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Robin Long

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts
Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.
Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


utility

Utility Trailer
93, 6x 9 x 2 ft.
wood/steel, frame
$250. obo
(352) 465-3086

Sell r Swa


ANNE LISE
Anne Lise, a 7-8 y.o.
Blue Terrier/Bull dog
mix, spayed, house-
brkn, & homeless.
Family had to move
so she came to the
shelter. Weighs
about 65 Ibs, and is
a beautiful dog,
sweet, affectionate,
gentle, loyal,
good w/other dogs,
good w/children.
Playful & full of life.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.







fea-
BAILEY
Bailey, Chespeake
Bay hound mix, 2
y.o., HW-negative,
wt. 39 Ibs. Sits on
command, loves
treats, walks well on
leash, good w/other
dogs, attentive to
human friends.
Obeys well, wants to
please. #20731619.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$100
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219



Your World



- 9-OxN 49 E


C1 WipNc-LE


im
4 yr old Umbrella
cockatoo & Cockteil.
Both hand fed, very
tame, incl. cages, food,
toys. Lv Mg
(443) 690-7052


-J
CYRIL
Cyril, 1 y.o. Hound
mix, found as stray,
beautiful red-brown
coat, wt. 42 Ibs. Easy
to walk, gets along
w/other dogs.
Appears to be
housebroken,
healthy. Affection-
ate & friendly.
Good companion.
#20807791.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382









LOKIE
Lokie, a 3-y.o.
brown/white terrier
mix male, weight
about 65 Ibs. Came
to shelter d/t
owner's inability to
keep him. Lokie is a
shy, gentle, humble
dog, easy to walk
on leash, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
human friends. Ea-
ger to please. No
cats. A beautiful
dog, both physically
and behavior-wise.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.



1.Q4&k
MINI DACHSHUNDS--
Three male 13 week old
pups, UPT on shots,
CKC registration, crate
trained. Asking $250.
Call 503-6564 or
212-4952


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 D5


-I
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131



FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place setting,1
yellow,1 pink,1 light
green $15.00 each call
352-726-9009


..i.... Dw'y


A-HOME

The average home col-
lects up to 40 pounds of
dust and dirt per year.
Imagine how much dust
and dirt could be resting
in your air ducts.Lic/lns
Homeducts.com offers
duct cleaning at an af-
fordable rate. Click or
call. 352-362-5187.




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buy Quality Furniture
Non smoking homes.
352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352422-7279 -**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM






GE NE."C


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
*" FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Andersen HandyMan
Home Repairs, Lawn
Care. Cheaper Prices
352-453-6005
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447



A+ CLEANING
Res/Com. 27 yrs exp.
Lid/ bonded, client
focused 386-717-2929
Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174


A ROOFING
Call i'e "4cak6usties"
Free Written Estimate

:10O OFF;:

:Any Re-Roof;,
..7uto pres ntop n attm contract is signed I1
Lic./Ins. CCCO5753 000-FWNC








GENERAL a


Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-6 1-124


Home/Office Cleaning
catered to your needs,
reliable & exper.,lic/inms
796-4645 / 345-9329



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards



AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



MOBILE HOME
repair & remodeling
kitchens, baths,
floors, relevels,
cc.2211 (352)257-9056



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374


garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129


IX,
A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135

OF ", "'M


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. PaIning
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


Home Maintenance
Repairs & Remodels
Quality work at afford-
able prices 20 yrs exp.
Ref avail 573-723-2881
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



T"IERkLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844


ELITE ROOFING
Bay Leak Detection Excellence in Roofing!
for all Pools & Spa's EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic#G13000070891 Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins.
Ins. 352-433-6070 ***352-639-1024***


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard KNOCK OUT
01 pool 01 plan CLEANING SERVICE
something RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
K 'iS,' completely new! RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
n .tO ften awated, Licensed, Insured,
1 e d j Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST s g
COPES 352.942.6876
POOL AND PAVER LLC Ci1 ll Today for a
e 3524003al Today or a
&Insurd 352-400-3188 I00004Q, i Clean rr


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
.' Repairs
SSmall Carpentry
A i Fencing
Screening
( Clean Dryer
Vents
Allotdlhe & Dependable
Efq-,ince lifelong
352- 344-0905
cell 400-1722
-.sured Lic.#3 7761


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
JOH s0LiC#CCC1325497


MAM C JOHNSON
7 ROOFIN-G, 3649C



TOLL FREE

1866-376-4943


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


LAwr Spririnkler

Net Workiu,?

Wel/ Fix It









746-4451


M WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838











TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.







Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins












WWchronicleonlne.c0m


MATEEURMEN
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Kat's Kritter Kare
& Castle Kleaner
Relax wtihe you'm*e away kowing your pets
are OK at home safe in their own beds
All Kritters Big or Small
KathleenM.Dacey -3) ,


270-4672 o
BONDED &INSURED TrainingAvailable
Ikatskriterkare@yahoo.com





DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START
A FIRE!
SF 'Flal Rale No q
Hidden Co i


Se&?,,ce m




R3OOFUING|
Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices


www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352)639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


COCKER SPANIELS
4 Males, 2 Females w/
papers. 8 weeks old
Blonde & white $800
(352) 287-0519


Hom,^`ffi
Clean~ing


I CLEAINGI


)l




D6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CLASSIFIES CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


vvvvvvv
MINIATURE DACHS-
HUNDS -Male dachs-
hund pups, 21 weeks
old, up to date on shots,
house trained and crate
trained. Priced to sell.
Asking $150 each or the
pair for $250. Call
503-6564 or 212-4952






R

Pete
a 1-year-old mostly
white terrier/?hound
mix, Heartworm
negative & house-
broken. Came to
the shelter because
his family could no
longer afford him. A
very gentle,
well-behaved dog,
walks very well on a
leash & gets along
with other dogs.
Weighs 51 Ibs.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Quaker Parakeet
male 5-6 months old,
green w/ grey chest.
$200
(352) 464-3716


Sallie
Sallie, spayed
terrier/Dalmation
mix, wt. 35 Ibs.
HW-negative. Very
affectionate &
friendly, sits on
command, loves
treats. Gets along
very well w/other
dogs, housebrkn,
slim &trim in
appearance, would
like a yard to run in.
Sweet & joyful, has
brown polka-dots.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
Miniature Poodles
Small Mini 1 females
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males start @ $400.
Females start @ $600.
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


SIMON
well-mannered
retriever mix, 3 y.o.
Sits, gives his paw,
goes down for
treats, takes gently.
Walks well on leash,
behaves in public
places. High energy,
likes to run & play,
plays catch, plays in
pool. Good w/most
dogs. Call Christina
@ 352-464-3908.
Sweet 3yr old female
Lab. Spayed. Possible
PTSD dog. Sm adop-
tion fee (352) 794-6314








TOBY
Toby, black/white
terrier mix, neu-
tered, HW-negative.
Housebrkn, wt 45
Ibs,. Very friendly,
gets along with
other dogs well, also
cats. About 6 years
old, great shape,
intelligent, lively
walks well on leash,
likes kids. Great
companion-to-be.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


Ia m

ZOEY
Zoey, a 7-8 y.o.
blue/white Terrier/
Bulldog mix, spayed
and housebrkn.
Came to the shelter
after her family had
to move and could
not take her She is
sweet & exception-
ally gentle,
affectionate &
beautiful. Likes
other dogs & also
children. Very
playful. Weight
about 60 Ibs.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.




CHICKENS
10 Laying chickens
Make reasonable
offer
(352) 382-2350 LM



BOAT TRAILER,
fully galvanized,
heavy duty, like new,
upto17FT $550
352-637-3983
Outboard Motor
25HP, Evirude
with controls, very
good cond.
$750 obo
476-1113, 513-5135




** BUY, SELLt
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
t352-563-5510O

177 KEY WEST
2013zSkiff, Yamaha 70
4-stroke, Jack Plate,
Trolling Motor, Gauges,
GPS, Alum Trailer,
Transferrable Warranty,
Excellent $19,500
352 503-6668


BASS TRACKER
2005, 50HP Mercury
PT 175 Special Edition,
mint cond., Call for
info. (352) 400-9490
BOAT SLIP FOR RENT
HOMOSASSA RIVER
$125. mo.
352-220-2077
GALALEO
Duck Boat 17ft
fiberglass, 25HP
Go Devil, long shaft,
new trlr. Ready to Hunt,
$4,500 352-586-8946
MERC CRUISER
1993, 20ft, Stern Drive,
Sylvan, Barely used,
but runs great, org.
$12,000 Asking $6,500
obo (352) 228-1355
PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new vhf radio & gps
fishfinder. Gd Cond.
$6500. (352) 527-4247
SWEETWATER
1991, 15 ft., seats 8,
35HP, trailer, excellent
cond. $3,250
476-1113, 513-5135
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555"
boatsupercenter.com



Phoenix Cruiser
2004, Excellent Cond,
low miles, new tires,
with slideout.
(352) 270-8084



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Salem Cruise Lite
2011 Travel Trailer
28 ft bunk hse. slideout
non-smkers. Exc Cond
$10,000. 813-957-8605
SKYLINE 1995,
Slide in cab over
Camper Fully equip.
generator, fridge,
microwave, AC, &
elect, jacks Loaded.
$2,800 obo
(352) 422-4548
Travel Trailer
2011,20' Mini Lite. Fully
self contained. LRoom
Slide out. Many Extras.
Exc Cond. $15,400
obo (352) 527-0081
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



SOFT TOPPER
for Short bed pick-up.
Like New $250 obo
(352) 422-5579
TOW BAR
Roadmaster Falcon
Tow Bar. All
connections $250
(352) 795-5991



**BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267"

BIG SALE
cCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
Sell Your Classic!
Get top dollar for
your classic car at
Lake Mirror Classic
Auto Auction in
Lakeland, Fl on
October 19th! Call
1-800-257-4161 M.E.
Higgenbotham, FL
Lic#AU305AB158

Leek

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offenna lowest oprce


BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK REGAL
2001 LS, leather Inter.
very good cond., 6 cyl.
82k mi. One owner.
$4,500 352-746-6708
CADILLAC
2004 Seville SLS, full
power, runs great, like
new condition $3800
(352) 795-8986
CHEVROLET
2010 Malibu, LT,
1 owner $11,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
2000, Intrepid,
Very good cond.
85K miles, $2,000.
(352) 527-3188
FIAT
'79 Spider 2000 Conv.
58K miles, new roof,
good rubber, runs
$2,000 (352) 564-0364
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
Mustang Convertible,
23,600 miles, gray,
black top, $14,400.
(352) 503-7237


2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MAZDA
2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed,
4-door, one owner,
great condition, 141,000
miles $3,500.
352-860-2146
MERCURY
'94, Cougar, 125k mi.,
2 DR, runs great, cold
air, good tires, $1,400
(352) 344-0547
TOYOTA
2010, Yaris, 3 door,,
$9,995.
352-341-0018
VOLVO
2001,S40, leather,
clean $4,995.
352-341-0018

Classic

CHEVROLET
2009 CORVETTE
COUPE Z51: Jetstream
blue w/ebony int., 2LT,
Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3
eng., only 9500 mi., car
show winner, serious
inquiries only, first
$35K/OBO gets it. Lets
talk @ 352-249-7630

THIS OUT!
CHEVY
1981 Corvette
Under 50,000 ong. mi-
les, Shark Body Style,
Very Good Condition,
Garage stored
352-400-4704


ooxOGZ


Classic

DATSON 280ZX
Attention Z lovers '82
Datson, lnline6 turbo,
eng. & trans good,
nds loving restoration
$500 (352) 344-3080

FORD
Rat Rod Projects, 46
Ford PU Roadster, Ford
Model T, Boattail speed-
ster all steel., Inglis
352-949-7874







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





BIG SALE
'Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


DODGE
2500, 01, 6Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $8400. obo
(352) 465-3086
FORD
1992 Flairside 4x4, 302,
red, 4 lift traction bar,
chrome brush guard,
steps & bedrail. A
beauty in & out.
$5,500 (352) 344-8089
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control,
power windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tn-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319



CHEVROLET
2006, Suburban
4 x 4, $8,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2007, Escape
$7,995.
352-341-0018


I Tuk


HONDA
2007 VTX 1300C Origi-
nal owner, purchased
brand new, low mile-
age (2,371 miles).
CafA windshield, re-
movable saddlebags,
light-bar. Black &
chrome. Showroom
condition (mint).
Asking a "firm"
$5,050.00 Please con-
tact owner\seller via
Email: selfor@aol.com
Phone: (352)382-4422


I


I Motorcyc


HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
MAZDA
1998 6 pass. van
Select, all wheel, runs
well, looks good first
$1,475 (352) 637-2588




ONE OWNER


Personal Mini Storage 10-09 Uen Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO
SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE
FACILITY ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
#0042 Brian Hobbs;#0134 Kathleen Zimmerman;#0171 Katrina Snyder;#0222 Tracy
Shasteen Lipford;#0223 Allison Ford;#0261 Patricia Ann Seymour
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 22 & 29, 2013.


C CITRUS COUNTY
For more information on how to reach C T RUO -,TYTL

Citrus County readers call C R $\ 1 CLE

352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com

Scarborough 2010


1111111111

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Harley Davidson
2005, 1200 Custom, Ex-
tra Chrome, new tires,
just serv, 16,000 mi.
$3700 obo. Poss trade
for veh. (352) 220-8444


Harley Davidson

2011 FLTRU Road
Glide Ultra loaded
cruise, cd, cb,intercom,
abs, anti theif,6 speed,
and 103cc motor.
only 5886 miles $19,000
(352)212-4101




246-0929 SUCRN


HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2012 FLHTCUTG Tn
Glide Ultra Classic
AMFM/CD/AUX
w/speakers; CC, Fairing
Full, Alarm, Travel trunk
w/rack, stage 2 scream-
ing eagle high perfor-
mance exhaust & pipes;
ABS brakes, extra
chrome accents. Excel-
lent condition w/only
1250 mi. First $28.5K.
Lets talk @
352-249-7630.
KAWASAKI
2002 Vulcan 1500,
7500 mi, Exc Cond
$5000 (352) 341-5263
SNAPPER
2008 Riding 30 inch
cut 12.5 HP $500
(352) 341-5263




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

.... ........


I


.


LINCOLN


CERTI


FlED PRE-OWNED


AUTUMN


EVENT


Autumn. Shorter days, crisper air

and exceptional savings.


I .h'H


2009 LINCOLN MKS
Leather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate package. GP1681
$24,950


2010 LINCOLN MKX
Leather, moon roof, ultimate package. GP1653
$26,950


e


LINCOLN
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


WNoI ,l I.. I, ii ilil 1h.in Lincoln A tlomotive Financia Srvices lSmite-term financing. "i h. ,,from -ee r. 6 ,< .' 1-r. See denier for quaifications and detail "';I, .
t ea o; i lw I1 I .- Njiji I e i"i. )h-' 1. .T .I.


Nick Nicholasm


rystal River


Hwy. 19 N.
795-7371


Visit Us Online www.nicknicholaslincoln.com
Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.
Prices and payments good through 9/30/13.


Anna Cruz
Salesperson of the Month


LINCOLN


C


Nick i
Nicholas
Ford SE
Lincoln
oast Fod


I


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 D7


.... : ,'i :.


0EE6i


. ;. : *.. i
: .. ..... ..
........ ....... ...... ..... . .... .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$37,9889 31,4898 31,988


$31,BB $57,9fBB


2003 MERICURY


2003 MERCURY
SABLE WAGON


LS #STOCK
s4.aas


2006 HONDA 1997 HOLIDAY
CMC RAMBLER


BURG 4CYLAUTOTRANS ICE COLD A/C MOTOR HOME
#C3S207C #STOCK
sR.qRg sg.gBB


2003 CADILLAC
DEVLLE


63,000 MILES, WHITE, LOADED, CHROME,
1-OWNER #STOCK
$sg gg


2008 VOLKSWAGEN
BEETLE


AU, MILES
$ 1Dm RR


2000 FORD 2010 VOLKSWAGEN
F250 EXT CAB JETTA


7.3DIESEL,AUTOMATIC GY
$1D.BBB $sfn ciQ


2007 GMC 2006 ACURA 2008 FORD 2007 CHEVY 2005 FORD 1999 FORD 2006 TOYOTA
SIERRA 1500 SLE TSX MUSTANG SUBURBAN MUSTANG ESCORT AVALON


LOADED NAYOGREEN CONVEMBLE 7LTZ, BLUE, LOADED RED, 51,000 ORIGINAL MILES BEIGE 69,373 MILES,
EXIT CAB 74,891 MILES #STOCK AUTOMATIC #STOCK 62,209 MILES SOCKK POERWINDOWSAND LOCKS
s10,988 s12,388 p12,988 S22,188 $14,988 $4,999 $16,188
2004LEXUS 2009 BMW 2008 JEEP 2010 FORD 2008 CADILLAC 2008 HUMMER 2009 CADILLAC
RX330 335-1 WRANGLER EDGE DTS H3 DTS


SAHARA GREEN LOUALIRADEP W INDOWSUMITED, LOADED, C3A23SA 53,148 MILES DKMOCHA LEATHERINEROR LUXURYII PAKAGE
SILVERAWD BLACK 2 DR., BOTH TOPS#C383870A #C3X188A WIDE LOCAL TRADE QT3320A
$16,399 $25,788 $17,588 $18,588 $18,988 $19,999 2 ,788
W W W. E3 U =. L LIVAi-M 3 l 0E% F I LLA -. M 0 M
4040 W COLG ROA O LA FL 35=2-732-4700


Fe


DS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013




INSIDE


OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GC


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


I-J LI 1


The graceful beauty of a
family of swans captures a
moment in time at the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park. This photo by John
Funderburk of Hernando
won third place honors in
the 18th annual Save Our
Waters Week Photo
Contest.
JOHN FUNDERBURK/
Special to the Chronicle


Jewelry
inspired
by nature


&/jhI


NYLI


Y ~fl~I'~


L


ffz:;,' I ;
I U1 E I I
ul l.& LI

I E I t! .
4jM L Ii ^J


1 /67_


LWLW/ L llllt




E2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1..521^637 2,8A^
-28

^a~ii' III3


MAGNIFICENT VIEWS
* Black Creek & St Martins River ,3/2/2 Carport
* Beautiful Views Gorgeous FP in Great Room
*2 Sea Walls on Property Boathouse and Dock
* Elevator for Easy Access Hurricane Shutters!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
nuinii elliesullon, leinnux nel
ww w.F Iot iduLis Ing Inio.c oCn W


8180 H. HILLVIEW CIR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2005 Great Location/Lot
* Many Upgrades, All Appliances Neutral Tile
* Living RM + Family RM Ready For New Owners
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [-l
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


-m ill L ilai iiiii

2439 W. DEVON DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BD/1.5 BA Secluded Location
* Over 1,600 SF Living *2 Blocks from Park
* Large Family Rm Shed, Fruit Trees
PETER & MARVIA KOROL LW
(352) 527-7842 LlEi
(352) 422-3875


~LTEnter house #5915





POOL HOME OVER 1/2 ACRE LOT
*3 BR, 2 BATH ,2-Car Garage
* 1994 Built Self-Cleaning Pool
* Open Floor Plan Ceramic Tile
SEnclosed Florida RM Garden Tub & Showe

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


WM*


t


REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


3/2 1700+ SQ. FI. MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Crystal
River. Tons of space for your family. Fully-fenced & electric
gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large
storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio,
screened back porch, 2 car attached carport, BBQ
pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call
for your private showing and fall in love.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net a


BEAUTIFUL FENCED ACRE!
New Metal Roof New Air Conditioner
New Kitchen Manufactured 1998
New 18" Tile Stainless Steel Refrigerator
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotis@aol.com
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.corn


********* Tirt
NEW PRICE...CHARMING HOME...
This 2 bedroom, 2 bath home is situated on a corner lot with a
convenient location at the edge of Homosassa. Natural accents
with tile floors and carpeted bedrooms, newer appliances in the
kitchen, large living room and enclosed patio overlooking a
privacy fenced backyard. This home has a one-car garage and
a carport as well as utility building for extra storage.
Take a look. |
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 J
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


241N Leoo Hwy. Beel Hil 52-74 ww.IIXcmI0 ..Hy.4 neres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. Hon s 62-70 w wHurosielslecm54NHy.1,CsialRvr7524


POOL HOME IN INVERNESS
2 BEDROOM, 1.5 BATH HOME WITH
OPEN FLOOR PLAN. GARAGE, LARGE
KITCHEN, FAMILY ROOM AND LIVING
ROOM. ON A DOUBLE LOT, 1/2 ACRE.
1,873 TOTAL SQ. FT. UNDER ROOF.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 ]
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net 1


OVER

$90 MILLION
In Sales Volume
This Year
Call RE/MAX To Sell Your Home!




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Alan Rob
DeMichael Hard
ERA ERA
Suncoast American
Realty. Realty.

ERA
agents
still
climbing g
charts
ERASun- ara
Barbara
coast Realty Banks
is proud to an- ERA
nounce the American
latest produc- Realty.
tion level
achieved by one of its agents
for 2013.
Rod Kenner has sur-
passed the $3 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2013.
Reach him at the Crystal
River office at 352-795-6811.
ERA American Realty &
Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
level achieved by its agents
for 2013.
Barbara Banks has sur-
passed the $1 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2013.
She can be reached at the


Inverness office of ERAAmeri-
can Realty by calling 352-726-
5855 or by email at barbara
banksrealtor@yahoo.com.
Rob Hard has also sur-
passed the $1 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2013.
He can be reached at the
Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-746-3600.
Alan DeMichael has sur-
passed the $1 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2013.
Alan can be reached at the
Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-746-3600.

Venticinque hits
new high mark
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
pleased to announce that
Richard Ven-
ticinque has
qualified for
the 2013 mul-
timillion dollar
club.
He's been a
Realtor in Cit- Richard
rus County for Venticinque
more than 25 RE/MAX
years and an Realty One.
agent at
RE/MAX for nearly 20 years.
Richard works out of the
Crystal River office located on
U.S. 19.


SReal Estate DIGEST


LINDA CONLEY
Herald Journal

SPARTANBURG, S.C.
- A century ago, Jesse
Cleveland built his son a
beautiful Colonial-style
house as a wedding gift
on the outskirts of
Spartanburg.
Clevedale was a show-
place built for Conrad P
and Louise Cleveland in
1913 on Willis Road. They
used the property as a
summer retreat because
it was so far away from
downtown.
The house remained in
family hands for more
than 70 years until it was
sold. Current owners
Paul and Pontheolla
Mack Abernathy pur-
chased the house in Feb-
ruary 2012. They have
expanded and refur-
bished the homestead
and converted it into a
bed and breakfast with
an event facility
Clevedale Historic Inn
& Gardens, 1050 Willis
Road, has been restored
to reflect its original
glamour


Herald-Journal
One of the rooms of the the old homestead of the Conrad P. Cleveland family in Spar-
tanburg, S.C. Known today as the Clevedale House, the structure was built for Con-
rad P. and Louise Cleveland in 1913. The house remained in family hands for more than
70 years until it was sold.
"I saw the property on-
line and came down from D v
Washington, D.C., to see D v
it," Pontheolla said. W American Realty & Investments
"When I walked onto the *** 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
porch, I said, 'This is my E RA (352) 634-2371 Cell
house."' I jackie@bjdavis.com
Pontheolla, a native of For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com
Bishopville who worked W A'J: I ', : I O N :i MKT?
with S.C. ETV Radio and CUT SI BON! 1 h S
in public relations, and Take the circular
her husband, who is the driveway up to
gorgeous double
See HOME/Page E13 doors and enter a !"


KE" "Always There For You"
REA.-L GAIL COOPER
g1 Multimillion Dollar Realtor
"M Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700
f E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


-J


N--U A WIN I -K Kt I KtAI '
S2/2 villa in private location
* Entry is screened for ventilation
* Several appliances recently replaced
* Indoor laundry with bi-fold door
* Newer carpet and tile
* Exterior painted in 2013
#705309 $71,900


NO DETAIL HAS BEEN MISSED!
* 3+office/2.5/3 pool home built in 2008
* Electric fireplace in the family room
* Granite island kitchen
* Cherry cabinets SS appliances
* Dual pane windows and sliders
* Home Warranty Over 3,000 sq. ft. living space
#704573 $329,900


CAROLE LISTER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
cell: 422-4620 oY-I
EL Office: 382-1700


HAMMOCKS VILLA
* 2/2/2 Cathedral ceilings
* MBR w/sitting rm Eat-in kitchen
* Screened porch Enc porch
* Near comm. pool Lawn maint. inc
#704142 $138,500


SPACIOUS RANCH HOME
* 3/2/2 Florida room
* Vaulted ceiling Lg. eat-in kitchen
* Fireplace French doors
* Side entry garage Newer roof
#702610 $129,000


Historic home makes



woman's dream a reality


S V a." i urs @ iIw.III ..i.. IJ II.l .mIes4.. !I .Io i


I Iisterlistings.com


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 E3


-1 1R_








Collect your own seeds for next year's planting


LEE REICH
Associated Press

September finds me sav-
ing seeds of some of this
year's best sweet peppers
and most colorful flowers
to plant in next year's gar-
den.
Why?
Saving my own seeds
from year to year gives me
a bit of independence from
seed companies, which,
for one reason or another,
may stop offering certain
varieties. It's also a way to
maintain an annual supply
of seeds that seed compa-
nies never offer, such as
some of the so-called heir-
loom varieties handed
down for generations from
parents to children and
from neighbor to neighbor
And with a seed packet
often costing more than $3,
saving seeds is also
economical.
This year, for instance, I
grew a giant canning
tomato from seeds given to
me by a friend. Where did
my friend get them? From
another friend.
Avoid hybrids
Heirloom seeds are
from plants whose flowers
self-pollinate. Some vari-
eties of vegetables and
flowers may not have been
around long enough to be
called "heirlooms," but
still might be from self-
pollinating plants.
Hybrid seeds, in con-
trast, are produced when
the pollen of one selected
plant is made to fertilize
another selected plant.
Hybrid plants often are
more robust than their
parents they have so-
called "hybrid vigor"
Producing hybrid seed
of a known variety is be-
yond the capabilities of
most gardeners. Male and
female plants must be
known or chosen, and then
pollination effected with-
out contamination from


other plants or even the fe-
male plant itself
When it comes to flavor
or beauty, hybrid is not al-
ways "high-bred." New va-
rieties of sweetpeas have
beautiful flowers, but they
cannot match the intoxi-
cating fragrance of an
heirloom variety such as
Painted Lady, which was
introduced nearly two cen-
turies ago. The old Golden
Bantam corn may not be as
sweet as newer hybrids,
but it has much richer,
cornier flavor
Seeds taken from a hy-
brid plant will not, when
planted, yield plants the
same as the parent plant.
Take the seeds out of a hy-
brid sweet pepper, such as
Candy Apple, and you will
not get Candy Apple fruits
on those plants next year
So you must buy seeds of
hybrid varieties if you
want those specific
varieties.
Give seeds time
If you choose to save
seeds from your own gar-
den plants, select plants
that are healthy Let fruits
or flowers mature,
whether they are the dry
pods of bean plants or
radish plants, the fruits of
pepper or cucumber
plants, or the dry seed
heads of marigolds or
zinnias.
Mature pepper fruits
generally are red, al-
though some might be yel-
low or purple; the fruits
are very tasty at this point.
Mature cucumber fruits
are hardly edible, with
thick or hard skins and
hard seeds. Rinse well and
then dry the seeds from
juicy plants.
No need to do anything
with the dry seeds you pop
out of radish pods or rub
from the heads of
marigolds or daisies, ex-
cept to pack them away

See SEEDS/Page EO10


LEE REICH/Associated Press
A female cucumber flower in New Paltz, NY.

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
Fora FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$7.7 million closed byAugust 31, 20013.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
[ To Learn More -- -
1 (352) 746-9924 Pr"Etsz

Sherri C. Parker i
&R' Asoits I-TRLC.470
vrww~herrcparkr~co


7724W Glendale Ct., Dunnellon
Directions: N on Citrus Ave. past
Dunnellon Rd. to rt on Glendale
Ct, home on rt.
ROOM TO ROAM for you, the
dogs and even the horses! Just
minutes from downtown Crystal
River and the water, this
spectacular 4B,4 B, 2 car garage
has it all. Space for everyone!
See this one today and bring
your checkbook. Nicely
remodeled throughout on a 2.5
acre private lot. MLS # 704339.
Only $146,900


985 W Silver Meadow Loop,
Terra Vista
Directions: 486, S on Terra Vista
Blvd. through gate, first rt into
Woodview Villas on W Skyview
Crossing, left on 2nd Silver Meadow
Loop to home on left.
YOU DESERVE THE GOOD LIFE!
Everything you could wish for in an
affordable maintenance free 3/2/2
home in a great neighborhood is here!
The lovely gated community, wonderful
restaurants, golf, tennis, gym, world
class clubhouse, shows and activities
are just a part of living here! See this
home and move right in. MLS 702127.
Reduced to $199,900.


lte~xcuede
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OCE: (352) 795-6633
WWWVV.AIfRf.CM MI-AIT SAIf(WAI,~~IFnM


iA ENT ION Dn SEVEN DA A WEEK!


i ".-I
DEST7

A-I
Reaftor


q ------


E4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Don't overlook driveway design


Snazzy, eco-friendly

alternatives abound


Associated Press
The driveway that came
with the 1921 Craftsman-
style house that David
Ulick bought five years ago
was the original concrete
one, marred by cracks and
with tree roots starting to
break through.
"I didn't like the drive-
way," said Ulick, of
Pasadena, Calif "I wanted
something a little bit
nicer"
He looked through
books and drove through
the Craftsman-rich neigh-
borhoods of Pasadena to
get ideas before deciding
on a concrete drive with
an antique finish, ac-
cented with reclaimed red
bricks from the 1920s.
"I wanted this to look
like the original driveway,
an original, nice driveway,
and using used bricks gives
it a nice old-fashioned
look," Ulick said.
"It really makes it a
grand entrance for the
house," he added, noting
the brick walkway up one
side. "I figured I'd treat the
Craftsman the way it de-
serves to be treated, and
maintain its design style


and heritage."
While a driveway may
still be a utilitarian after-
thought for many home-
owners, others like Ulick
are adding some serious
curb appeal to their homes
by moving beyond basic
options like grass or
gravel, asphalt or
concrete.
"The driveway is com-
monly overlooked," con-
ceded Michael Keenan, an
adjunct assistant professor
of landscape architecture
at the University of Min-
nesota. "Driveways are not
cheap necessarily, but they
are completely functional
and necessary if you have
a car and a garage."
Doing up the driveway,
Keenan said, is a chance to
"celebrate the function be-
cause it is a piece of the
property you do use every
day"
The design options have
grown in the last decade or
so, he said, as pavers -
made from precast con-
crete, clay and natural
stone like granite are
being turned out in a range
of colors and sizes. Some

See DRIVEWAYS/Page E15


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffneyl ll
Real .-altor., A HOUSE Realtor@ I
o3023179 SOLuD Nae! 287.9022
m~~mm ~746-6700 lr
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.

102 Honey Palm,
Beverly Hills
Impressive Expanded Huntington
model featuring Double Door entry,
New interior paint, New Tile, New
Carpet. New Stainless Steel
Appliances, Eat in Kitchen, gas
fireplace, formal living and dining
room, huge 25 x 35 expanded
screened lanai. Workshop area ingarage with built in cabinets. Roof in 09'
Gorgeous view of walking park. Come Buy me today. You will fall in Love.
Price is reduced to $144,900. MILS # 704466


Associated Press
A so-called "living driveway" by Busk & Associates Inc. in Naples, Fla. Landscape architect W. Christian Busk
installs living driveways, which feature real grass interspersed among pavers, which reduces heat and glare and
provides some drainage.


J WINNING IAM!

En g a, ze Sae PrfsinasW ne


The premiere active-adult master-planned community
in West Central Florida wants you!
Unlimited earning potential.
New home sales experience preferred, not required.


Florida RE License is preferred.

(C VILLACES OF(m A, Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
itrUs (P 1lhlS nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707
1Q F G________________________________________________________________________________


Positive Attitude...

High Energy...

Professional Demeanor!


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 E5




E6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci II --i.Ehittnl.

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Firebush a useful,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Florida-friendly choice All


Fi rebush, Hamelia patens, is a na-
tive shrub useful in Central
Florida for attracting butterflies,
hummingbirds and berry-eating song-
birds. There are about 40 species of


Hamelia in tropical America,
but only Firebush can be used
in Central Florida gardens.
While it is evergreen in
South Florida, Zones 10-11, it
dies to the ground after the
first killing frost in Zones 8b
and 9a locally Snip off the
blackened, frozen stems and
cover the root zone with a pile
of pine needle mulch for win-
ter protection. It is futile to try
to keep the plant from going
dormant in winter
Although its natural habitat
is coastal hammocks and


Shoots emerge a few weeks after the
last frost in March. Older mature plants
reach about 5 feet tall locally, with a sim-
ilar diameter In South Florida, Firebush
can get 10 feet tall, as it does not freeze


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


plains, it is a well-behaved and adaptable ics, but
garden plant if sandy soil is amended frost-pro]
with sufficient organic humus or decayed Counties
vegetable material. It prefers well- inches lo
drained, slightly alkaline soil, but grows tips of tl
and flowers well in slightly acidic, humus-
rich soil in full sun.


back in winter
The shrub is multi-stemmed,
rounded in form and has sets of
opposite to whorled leaves
along the fleshy stems. There
can be as many as seven leaves
at a leaf node. Leaves are 5 to 8
inches long. Shiny green on
top, with reddish veins, leaves
are medium green. Firebush is
suitable for mixed borders,
wildlife buffer plantings and
specimen plants to attract pol-
linators and small birds.
Flowers are bright red to or-
ange year-round in the trop-
from June to October in


ne Citrus, Levy and Marion
STubular flowers are about 1.5
ng in branched bunches at the
he soft branch stems. Rich in
See JANE/Page E9


Driveway Delight
PAGE E5
Save Our Waters
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Pressback rocking chair; sizing up a bird picture


Dear John: You have wood by machine.
given me good infor- Chairs and rockers like
mation be- yours are called
fore and I now pressback by the
turn to you again general antiques
for your opinion marketplace. They
on our rocking were manufac-
chair It is an old -. .'- tured in massive
rocking chair that Bi quantities in
I bought at an es- America during
tate sale. It is all the last quarter of
original, has a lot the 19th century
of carving on it They have been re-
and has a leather John Sikorski produced for the
seat. It is in good SIKORSKI'S past 30-plus years.
condition. I am ATI'IC I can see in your
looking for some ___________ photo there is a
history and maybe small amount of
what its potential value is. surface wear on the rocker;
CP, Internet however, not enough for me
Dear C.P: You have a press- to think it was made in the
back rocker The ornate deco- 19th century
ration on the upper and Potential dollar value is
lower panels are not carved, catch-as-catch-can.
The detail is pressed into the DearJohn: I am attaching a


photo of a print of a bird. It is
offset, but the dot is very, very
fine. It is printed on high-
quality stock and I have
looked online at some collec-
tions, but was not able to find
anything that resembles it
and was wondering if you
might have some idea about
who printed it, how old it is
and what it might be worth.
Offset was developed about
1904, by Ira Washington
Rubel, so I know that it is at
least that old, but probably
later Any information would
be helpful, or perhaps you
might suggest someone or
place that might be able to
give me some information. -
D.C., Internet
Dear D.C.: I think your bird
print was produced during
the mid-20th century or later
The fine dot pattern indicates


it is a modern mass produced
picture and was likely cut out
of a book. I am not aware of
the artist. Have you exam-
ined the back of the print for
notations?
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have a few
things I have questions on.
Nice to know that there are
people who have an eye out
there for beautiful things.
I have a vase, low-style Ma-
jolica, brown glaze, with two
yellow and white roses, light
See AlTTIC/Page E7
Though at first glance it
looks like a carving, the back
of this rocking chair was
actually made by pressing the
pattern into the wood with
a machine.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
This handsome bird picture probably dates from the mid-2Oth century or later.
The quality of the print indicates that it was a mass-production item.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

purple flowers. The handles are dol-
phins with split tails. It is in good
shape; only a small piece off the rose.
I have a lunch dish set, Cottage by
Sylva. I have 11 dishes, 12 cups and
saucers, and 4 mugs. There are no
chips on the dishes. There is also a
teapot, sugar, and creamer
I also have another luncheon set
with blue and gold roses with trim
on the edge of the dishes, by Schmid,
West Germany There is a set for six,
with tall teapot, sugar, and creamer
There is also a sewing machine, by
Mason, made in Cleveland, Ohio,
during the late 1800s. It has nice-
looking legs and the head moves
easily
I have several other things what
beauty from the past. I would like to
downsize and say goodbye to some;
where is the best place to sell? -


S.S., Beverly Hills
Dear S.S.: Majolica is a popular
specific category of collector inter-
est. The china companies you ask
about are not important relative to
collector interest. Dollar value is
relative to pattern and style in the
replacement china market.
For further information on the
china, contact Replacements Ltd. at
wwwreplacements.com or 800-
737-5223.
The Mason Sewing Machine Com-
pany started manufacturing sewing
machines in 1903.
In order to help further I need
good clear photos.
----in
John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, P.O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


,II I 9 -


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


QSbPrudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A wOpen 7 Dasrties
A Week' Properties


TillC Ol .l 1 534 E Kniqhlsbridqe P1
J d^ 4792W Custer Dr r, &1 [.11 !1 rl 4 S1i900
06 MLS705312 $224,000 L I,,. .,,,,,,
3/2/2 (+ den). Directions: Rte 486to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on E
Directions: 491 or 486 to Pine Ridge Blvd, north Reehill St/Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St,
on Pinto, right on Custer Dr. Ron Knightsbridge PI.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

-......................


.l ZZZ t Joplin Ut
MLS 705515 $269,900
3bd/3ba pool home.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501
NEW LISTING


.T"oCH1 2456 N Brentwood Cir
UI l .'". S14. 700
3/2/2 home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947

SI L


Li, ~ 782 E Keller Ct
T MLS 700636 $289,000
3bd/2ba pool home.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


P9.-. 5iU5 N Pink Poppy Ur
1?ie1 MLS 705423 $218,000
S 3/2/2 with pool.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


l- ft"- b LC3 JUZU L DCIWIGK Wl
/',1t < MLS 703938 $120,000
3bd/2ba home.
Directions: Hwy 486 to main entrance of
Canterbury Lakes, R on N Chandler Dr.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING


MLS 705513 $184,900
2bd/2ba +den/office, pool.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


q


/'-.. -, 61 JUZ IM Lngpnoe r,
"O0,iWA MLS 705486 49,900
1/1/1 Villa.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261


509 N Fresno Ave
MLS 704188 $229,900
3/2/3 pool home.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


v~ Vl 213 S Barbour St
4-1,jt MLS 705480 $43,900
2bd/lba/lcg.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


- 3856 N Parkslde Villag.
MLS 701797 $4:
1/1 villa.
Lori Nickerson 352-220-8434


'Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
'First Time Home Seller


nume Duywr/ ouiimr .LUuy l--
I .. I I ,1 ,, I,, I I, I, I I hI I I h I, ,I II ,,,hI .
[E, I ,, I ,, I .. . .I .. i I0,h i . ,, .I I I ,, .. Ih h ,1,1 ,I I1 ,, ,,Sl l IH .. i i h ,,


'/.


~1~'~


(dP ~



r


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 E7


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROWD')




E8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013







II










-I
Co I
^H7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








*Lawn watering REMAINS at twice per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:

ODD addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday EVEN addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday


Maintaining an attractive landscape is important. Some residents choose to maintain their 'l-
own lawns, while others hire a lawn maintenance service. Whether you care for your i-M
landscape or hire a company to maintain your yard, it's important to follow these
recommended tips to protect the water resources. "
Everything you (and your landscape companies) put on your landscape can run off into a
water body when it rains. Pollutants such as fertilizer, pesticides and grass clippings wash directly into water
bodies, eventually leading to poor water quality, fish kills and green murky water. By following the tips below, or
by talking about them with the landscape professional you hire, you can do your part to ensure pollutants stay our
of nearby water bodies and protect the water resources for generations to come.
Did you k .. W r yu le d y on te w r or t y ms a yr f r p s cn a
our aquifer, lakes, springs and rivers .


Fertilizer
Read and follow the
instructions on the fertilizer
bag.
a Use slow-release fertilizers
that make nutrients available to
plants for a longer period of time.
* Use iron instead of nitrogen if you want to green-up
your lawn during the rainy season.
* Do not apply fertilizer before a heavy rain.
" Avoid excessive watering-in of fertilizer. Many fertilizers
specify 1/4", about 15 minutes, of irrigation per zone,
which gets the product to the root zone and keeps it out
of the aquifer.
* Use a deflection shield on spreaders near sidewalks,
driveways and water bodies to avoid fertilizer washing
off into or directly hitting the water.
" Only fertilize during the growing season, and no more
than twice a year. When grass is dormant, fertilizer is
not absorbed and seeps into our aquifer.
" Do not over-fertilize. Repeatedly using large amounts of
nitrogen fertilizer can increase pests and environmental
stress problems.


C


Protect the waterfront
* Fertilizer should not be applied by either
professional applicators or homeowners within
10 feet of a water body (such as a bay, lake,
stream, canal, wetland or pond) unless a
deflector shield is used.
" Waterfront property owners should establish a
six-foot low maintenance or "no mow" zone
adjacent to water bodies to reduce the
potential for fertilizer residuals entering bodies
of water.
" Keep grass clippings, vegetative
material and debris away from |
storm drains, ditches, water II
bodies and roadways. I
" Never hose down chemical
spills. Keep absorbent materials
such as "kitty litter" onsite for
spill cleanup.
* Select landscape plants that are well adapted
to your site and have low water requirements.
" Treat specific weedy areas rather than
resorting to general "weed and feed" mixtures.


&EF..




Full Text

PAGE 1

ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESS Their eyes filled with tears, but their heads were held high as nearly 200 Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 bikers and guests stood clapping as ex-prisoners of war (POW) and those once missing in action (MIA) made their walk of honor to the front of the crowd. Almost everyone would agree that these heroes deserved the grand welcoming at the National POW/MIA Recognition Day Saturday at the Inverness Elks Lodge No. 2522 in Hernando. It is time that we set aside to look at the future and to make a promise to all of the families who have soldiers who are unaccounted for that they will be accounted for, said Rolling Thunder Florida state liaison Ray Thompson. We want to thank all the ones who have served and captured and prisoners of war because of their sacrifice. Their day began nearly an hour prior to the ceremony at the Citrus County Fairgrounds. They were escorted through Inverness, up North Croft Avenue and then across the newly renamed POW/MIA Highway, part of County Road 486. INSIDE SEPTEMBER 22, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 46 $1 CITRUS COUNTYBittersweet: Gators lose QB in win over Tennessee /B1 EXCURSIONS:To the marketCommunity Farmers Markets are quickly becoming a way of life in many cities, towns and villages./ Page A13www.chronicleonline.com IN THEIR WORDS:Lifetime pilotTom Davis recounts his time as a U.S. Navy Air Force pilot./ Page A16 BUSINESS:New iPhoneRead about Apples new product./Page D1 SAVE OUR WATERS:Waters WeekRep. Jimmie T. Smith and special columnist Toadly Ossum write about Save Our Waters Week. Also see the second-place winner of the annual photo contest./Page C1See the third-place winner of the photo contest and read a list of water-wise rules. /HomeFront Annies Mailbox......A14 Classifieds................D4 Crossword..............A14 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........A4 Horoscope................A4 Lottery Numbers......B4 Lottery Payouts........B4 Menus . . . . . .A6 Movies....................A14 Obituaries................A9 Together..................A18 Veterans . . . .A16 INDEX HIGH87LOW73Mostly cloudy, 70% chance of storms.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SUNDAY 000G2NF He had no plan MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerHe bought the girls clothes and blankets. They had help from perfect strangers along the way. And, according to family members, Edward Peters biggest regret isnt the possibility of prison its not knowing when he will see his daughters again. Peters, 45, abducted daughters Madison, 11 and Mckala, 6, from their grandfathers driveway the Sunday morning of Sept. 8, Citrus County Sheriffs officials said. He traveled to Michigan, where authorities say he abandoned his Jeep and stole an SUV. The trek ended with his Unemployment drops in county as labor force shrinks ChronicleCitrus Countys August unemployment rate dropped to 8.0 percent, down 0.4 percent over the month. Figures released Friday by the state show those numbers were driven by a reduction in the labor force rather than a hike in employment. Citrus Countys labor force decreased by 333 to 57,350, the number of employed fell See LABOR/ Page A8 See CEREMONY/ Page A5 POW/MIA ceremony STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleCitrus County Sheriffs Office motorcycle division escorts 100-plus motorcycles from the county fairgrounds in Inverness to the Inverness Elks Lodge No. 2522 where a memorial service was held in recognition of the countrys prisoners of war (POW) and missing in action (MIA). Several surviving POWs were in attendance. Many members of Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 perticipated in the ride. Hundreds turn out to show service members not forgotten in Citrus County Levy Countys labor force shrank by 89 to 16,362, those with jobs rose b y 411 to 15,068 and the number of unemployed dropped by 130 to 1,294, which is down 325 over last year when the unemployment rate was 9.9 percent. Marion Countys labor force decreased by 123 to 135,680, the n umber of employed increased by 426 to 124,975 and those without jobs fell by 549 to 10,705, a drop of 2,919 over last year when the unemployment rate was 10.1 percent. Floridas August unemployment rate was the lo west since September 2008 (also 7.0 percent). Florida has gained jobs over the month for 23 of the last 26 months. Floridas housing starts were up 33.2 per cent over the year in July. Floridasmedian household income in 2012 of more than $45,000 decreased slightly from the previous year, but the change was statistically insignificant. Floridasmedian household income is down mor e than 11 percent from $50,700 in 2000. Only seven other states had larger decreases in the past dozen years. Nationally, the median household income w as $51,371 in 2012. Of the nations 10 most populous states,Floridasmedian household income was the lowest.HIGHLIGHTS FROM STATE EMPLOYMENT REPORTS Peters just wanted time with children, his sister says Madison, left, and Mckala Peters spent 11 days on the road with their dad, Edward. The trio are seen in an undated family photo taken prior to the trip.JILLIAN COUILLARD/Special to the Chronicle See PETERS/ Page A7

PAGE 2

Special to the ChronicleCitrus County helps meet the nutritional needs of families and support women breastfeeding their infants for approximately 3,300 participants monthly through its WIC program. Early participation in WIC continues to show positive influences on early development and birth outcomes and reduces the probability of low-birth weight. WIC participation is associated with increased breastfeeding initiation. The percentage of Florida WIC infants ever breastfed has steadily increased from 75.9 percent in June 2012 to 77.0 percent in June 2013. Citrus County has an active breastfeeding promotion program with trained peer counselors to assist new mothers and babies with breastfeeding needs. These peer counselors are available by phone and for individual counseling and can be contacted through the local Citrus County WIC offices. To be eligible for WIC, you must be a pregnant or breastfeeding woman, a woman up to six months postpartum, an infant or a child younger than age 5. In addition, the applicant must have a low or moderate income, live in Florida, and have a nutritional need that can be helped by WIC foods, along with nutritional education and counseling. WIC also provides breastfeeding support and referrals for health care. Nutritionists work directly with mothers to educate them about what is best for their baby and their familys nutrition needs while encouraging them to build healthy habits. To learn more about the WIC program or to find out if you are eligible, call tollfree at 800-342-3556 or visit the local county health offices in Inverness (352-7265222), Lecanto (352-5278490) or Crystal River (352795-2261). A2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL 000G0NX 000G4YT WIC available for moms in need Special to the ChronicleHomeowners and business owners in Citrus County should be aware of potential flood risk changes. A public outreach open house is set from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, at the Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, 3600 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. This is an informal event, open to everyone. Attendees may arrive at any time during the event and receive individualized attention. Attendees will see paper or digital versions of the preliminary flood maps. Information tables will be set up around the room, where staff from FEMA, local communities and engineering contractors will answer questions about flood insurance, engineering and development permit requirements. Attendees can also pick up a variety of printed information. The maps cover all of Citrus County, including Crystal River, Inverness and unincorporated areas of Citrus County. A few weeks after the open house, there will be a 90-day appeal and comment period. Once all appeals and comments have been addressed, the community will have six months until the maps become effective. The communities will use this time to adopt the new flood maps into their local ordinances. Adopting the new flood maps means that federally backed flood insurance will continue to be available to the residents of the community. Property owners will be able to purchase new policies and existing flood policies may be renewed. It also means federal disaster assistance may be provided to repair insurable buildings located within the Special Flood Hazard Area. For more information about the open house or the proposed new flood maps, call Carl Jones, county floodplain manager, at 352-527-5310. Preliminary flood maps on display at Thursday meeting CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP To register for the Citrus County Sheriffs Offices CodeRED weather program, visit www .sheriffcitrus.org/EM/ and click on the Emergency Management menu item. Choose CodeRED Registration and enter the location to be monitored and your contact details if using a cellphone, you may choose to receive text alerts, but standard text messaging rates may apply. Those without computer access may call 352-746-6555 or visit a local library for computer assistance

PAGE 3

Around theSTATE SeffnerCaretaker charged in death of quadriplegicThe caretaker and boyfriend of a quadriplegic woman has been charged in connection with her death. The Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office said deputies responded to a 911 call in Seffner in January and discovered Mary Baker lying on her back. She was pronounced dead shortly after their arrival. Authorities interviewed Timothy Harrison of Tampa at the scene. He told them he was responsible for taking care of Baker and dispensing her medication. Investigators said toxicology tests indicated Baker had extremely high levels of the drugs fluoxetine and bupropion in her system and she died from prescription medication toxicity. Deputies announced Friday Harrison is being charged with felony murder and aggravated abuse of a disabled adult. They said he intentionally gave his girlfriend lethal amounts of the prescription drugs.TallahasseeNew protest rules proposedThe Florida Department of Law Enforcement is recommending changes to Capitol security in the wake of a 31-day long protest. A small group of protesters upset by the acquittal of George Zimmerman in Trayvon Martins killing refused to leave the Capitol for more than a month this summer. Some of the proposed changes include prohibiting anyone sleeping in public portions of the Florida Capitol. Additionally, food and drink could not be stored or prepared in Capitol hallways without prior approval. People who are in the Capitol after business hours could be arrested for trespassing.WestonSchool cleaned after dozens fall illCleaning crews are at work at a South Florida elementary school where dozens of students have fallen ill. WFOR-TV reported clean-up crews are working with the health department to sanitize Manatee Bay Elementary. Students at the school in Weston have reported symptoms including vomiting, diarrhea and fever. The principal sent a letter to parents urging them to keep any sick kids home and encourage their children to wash their hands frequently.GainesvilleUF officials mull online degreesUniversity of Floridas online bachelors degree program will start off with a small number of students and it will operate in the red for the first few years but ramp up to 24,100 students and millions in profits within 10 years. The Gainesville Sun reported university administrators told the Board of Trustees this week that budget projections show the online program operating in the red for the first four years, being self-sufficient in the seventh year and having a profit margin of $14.5 million by the 10th year. UF was given a legislative mandate to create an online baccalaureate program. From staff reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER The city council is expected to adopt the citys budget and millage rate for 2013 on Monday. Council members also are set to vote on the Community Redevelopment Agency budget. This is the fifth straight budget year in which the city has kept the millage rate at 3.8 mills despite a dwindling property tax base. The citys rollback rate is 3.9 mills. A rollback rate is the rate at which the current tax base would produce the same taxes. The citys general fund budget will be $3,995,084 and includes no wage increases for city employees. The council will also: Consider approval of a contract award to Hoyle Tanner & Associates for water treatment plant upgrades in the amount of $43,400. Discuss the councils legislative priorities. Discuss what to do with the $50,000 of funding recently received from Duke Energy. Discuss drafting a letter of support for the efforts of Save Crystal River to begin mechanical harvesting of lyngbya in Kings Bay. City resident and Save Crystal River member Steve Lamb wrote a letter to the city seeking support from the panel and asking that a letter of concern be sent to the board of directors of the Save the Manatee Club over the actions of the groups executive director challenging the mechanical harvesting of lyngbya in the bay. Lamb said in the letter he believes Roses challenge to the mechanical harvesting was primarily driven by Save Crystal Rivers efforts to have U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service downlist the manatee from endangered to threatened a move, Lamb noted, that USFWS itself suggested following a previous study of manatee populations. Lamb also said in the letter that his group has applied for a new permit they hope will allow for turbidity or cloudiness above the baseline during a cleanup. He said the turbidity levels allowed under an earlier agreement are unworkable and doomed to failure.Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@chronicleonline.com. Crystal River set to adopt budget ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESSWearing white rubber boots and white T-shirts, members of the Inverness Rotary Club waded along the shores of Cooter Pond in Inverness with trash bags in hand. They were there picking up trash during Citrus Countys Adopt-A-Shore cleanup day, part of Citrus Countys 20/20s 18th annual Save Our Waters Week, Sept. 20 to 28. Approximately 500 volunteers divided into 23 groups across Citrus County to participate in the national Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Cleanup event. Ocean and waterway trash ranks as one of the most serious pollution problems choking our planet, according to information from Ocean Conservancy. Their goal is to prevent trash from invading and damaging the ecosystem. Joining the hawks for an early morning stretch, Inverness Rotarians stretched around Cooter Pond as they tallied the debris collected. There were all of kinds of beer bottles, cornflake boxes, tackle boxes and all kind of things you wouldnt expect to find along your lake, said Judge Mark Yerman. Now it is clean and a nice place to be. Rebecca Martin said Ocean Conservancy compiles and analyzes the national data and will publish an item-by-item, location-by-location report of findings. What is interesting is that we can look through the past year of what has been picked up in different areas in this county and see whether we are increasing in our trash or decreasing, Martin said. The Rotarians collected six garbage bags of trash and they know it made a difference in Cooter Pond. All of the water activities are one of the many benefits of living here, said Rotarian Kathryn Mayer. Since I moved here I have totally embraced the outdoor lifestyle. The water is a big part of my free time. I want to keep it clean for myself and the generations to come.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@chronicleonline.com. Cleanup yields results STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleAs part of the Save Our Waters Week project, groups of volunteers are meeting to pick up trash along Florida waterways. Trash i s documented and added to local, regional, state national and global databases. Meeting Saturday morning at Cooter Pond in Invern ess were, from left, Rebecca Martin, Mark Yerman, Cora Lee, Drew Benefield, John Murphy, Kathryn Mayer and Dan Blair. Teams fan out across county to collect trash and restore natures beauty Special to the ChronicleThe 5th Judicial Circuits Guardian ad Litem is accepting applicants for training. There are about 1,600 children in the 5th Judicial Circuit, which includes Marion, Hernando, Lake, Sumter and Citrus counties, who have been removed from their homes for alleged abuse, abandonment or neglect, who are now part of a dependency court proceeding. These children need someone who will speak up for them. A GAL is a volunteer appointed by the court to advocate for a child. The volunteer works as part of a team with a volunteer supervisor and program attorney. He/she becomes familiar with the child and the childs case and makes recommendations to the court to help ensure a safe, caring, stable and permanent environment. The next training session is Monday, Oct. 21, at the Calvary Chapel of Inverness. Call or email at 352-274-5231 or Lynn. Sennett@gal.fl.gov. For more information and an application, visit the website at www.guardian adlitem.org. Calvary Church is at 960 South U.S. 41, in Inverness. Persons 21 years of age and older (young adults between the ages of 19 and 21 years of age are also eligible, working under the guidance and partnership with a certified volunteer GAL), who successfully complete the pre-service training program, have a clean criminal background check and are able to be objective are eligible. A GAL must successfully complete 30 hours of preservice training. On average, volunteers spend 5 to 10 hours a month on a case. Most cases last 10 months. Applicants requiring a reasonable accommodation, as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act, must notify the Guardian ad Litem Program by calling 352-6715757. Notification to the recruiter/trainer must be made in advance to allow sufficient time to provide the accommodation. Guardian ad Litem program looking for volunteers SAVE OUR WATERS WEEK EVENTS Monday, Sept. 23., Heritage-Eco Boat Tours at Crystal River Preserve State Park. Tours at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Guided interactive river tour discussing ways pre-Columbian Indians may have used available marine resources. Depart from Crystal River Preserve State Park, 3266 N. Sailboat Ave., Crystal River. For registration, call 352-795-3817 or 352-563-0450. Capacity: 15 people per tour. Tuesday, Sept. 24, Homosassa River Boat Tours at 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Interpretive tour aboard the Miss Riverside. Depart from Riverside Resort, 5297 S. Cherokee Way, Homosassa. For registration, call 352628-2474 or 800-442-2040. Capacity: 38 people per tour. Tuesday, Sept. 24, Kayak Tours at 8 a.m., 10 a.m. and noon. Paddle through quiet canals to Three Sisters Springs and back. Launch from A Crystal River Kayak Company, 1332 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. For registration, call 352-795-2255. Capacity: 10 people per tour. Documentation of what was picked up around the Cooter Pond shoreline by the Save Our Waters Week volunteers in Inverness. Items include 158 cigarette butts, 38 food wrappers, 13 take-out containers, 117 beverage containers and 107 plastic bags, to name just a few items picked up in less than an hour.

PAGE 4

Birthday Revisit the past and use the lessons youve learned to make a positive move in the year ahead. Secure your position by taking charge. The way you budget and negotiate will make a huge difference to the outcome of your pursuits this year. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Look at the fine print and check past records, and you will discover exactly what you need to know to make a difference. Love will bring you greater happiness. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Much that unfolds during this cycle of shifting trends will be due to the way you have handled your personal dealings. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Let your emotions flow and your imagination take over. How you present yourself to others will be especially vital. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Progressive action could lead to many different outcomes. It will improve your personal situation, but it may cost you a friendship. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You can solidify a deal or develop a better working relationship with someone you love as long as you arent pushy. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Talk over your current position and the way you would like to see things unfold. Dont make concessions to avoid controversy. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take on a challenge and react to change as it happens. Going with the current will help you get the most return with the least work. Aries (March 21-April 19) You may have trouble making up your mind when it comes to certain relationships, but your heart will lead you in the right direction if you listen to it. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Dont fall for it if someone tries to coerce you into an argument. Assess the situation before making a premature decision. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Share your ideas with someone you have worked with in the past or would like to form a partnership with in the future. Cancer (June 21-July 22) A work development will boost your reputation and put you in the running for a position that could improve your lifestyle. A celebration will lead to romance. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Proceed with caution. Your emotions will be difficult to control, and someone is likely to push you into an unwanted dispute if you arent careful.TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Sunday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2013. There are 100 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Sept. 22, 1776, Nathan Hale was hanged as a spy by the British during the Revolutionary War. On this date: In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of Jan. 1, 1863. In 1949, the Soviet Union exploded its first atomic bomb. In 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. (Moore served 32 years in prison before being paroled on Dec. 31, 2007.) In 1985, rock and country music artists participated in FarmAid, a concert staged in Champaign, Ill., to help the nations farmers. Ten years ago: A suicide car bombing outside U.N. offices in Baghdad killed an Iraqi policeman. Five years ago: Marjorie Knoller, whose dogs viciously attacked and killed her neighbor, Dianne Whipple, in their San Francisco apartment building in 2001, was sentenced to 15 years to life in prison after her second-degree murder conviction was reinstated. One year ago: President Barack Obama campaigned before a crowd of 18,000 in Wisconsin, the home of GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan. Todays Birthdays: Baseball Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda is 86. NBA Commissioner David Stern is 71. Rock singer David Coverdale (Deep Purple, Whitesnake) is 62. Singer Debby Boone is 57. Classical crossover singer Andrea Bocelli is 55. Singermusician Joan Jett is 55. Actor Scott Baio is 53. Actress Mireille Enos is 38. Actress Daniella Alonso is 35. Thought for Today: Autumn, the years last, loveliest smile. William Cullen Bryant, American poet (1794-1878).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 92 69 0.00 HI LO PR 93 69 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 89 69 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 88 68 trace YESTERDAYS WEATHER Mostly cloudy, 70% chance for showers and stormsTHREE DAY OUTLOOK Mostly cloudy, 50% chance for showers and storms Mostly cloudy, 60% chance for showers and stormsHigh: 87 Low: 73 High: 87 Low: 72 High: 88 Low: 71TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Saturday 93/69 Record 98/56 Normal 90/68 Mean temp. 81 Departure from mean +2 PRECIPITATION* Saturday 0.00 in. Total for the month 5.05 in. Total for the year 46.06 in. Normal for the year 43.25 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 7 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in. DEW POINT Saturday at 3 p.m. 65 HUMIDITY Saturday at 3 p.m. 47% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Saturday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:27 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:19 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................9:36 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:20 A.M. SEPT. 26OCT. 4OCT. 11OCT. 18 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 86 75 ts Ft. Lauderdale 90 79 ts Fort Myers 91 76 ts Gainesville 85 69 ts Homestead 90 76 ts Jacksonville 84 71 ts Key West 87 80 ts Lakeland 90 73 ts Melbourne 88 75 ts City H L Fcast Miami 90 79 ts Ocala 86 71 ts Orlando 89 74 ts Pensacola 84 69 ts Sarasota 89 76 ts Tallahassee 85 69 ts Tampa 89 75 ts Vero Beach 90 75 ts W. Palm Bch. 90 77 ts FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSouthwest winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Showers and thunderstorms today. Gulf water temperature85 LAKE LEVELSLocation Fri. Sat. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 29.69 29.68 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.13 38.12 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.61 39.61 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.48 40.46 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H L L L L L L L L L 84/61 63/52 81/49 87/67 71/53 71/63 66/57 78/56 73/48 62/55 74/51 63/48 76/64 90/79 85/68 75/53 THE NATION Albany 74 58 sh 64 40 Albuquerque 79 59 pc 82 54 Asheville 69 61 .92 s 71 53 Atlanta 86 69 trace pc 76 64 Atlantic City 78 48 pc 73 55 Austin 84 69 pc 87 64 Baltimore 79 58 .30 pc 74 50 Billings 86 46 c 73 48 Birmingham 75 67 .99 pc 78 61 Boise 77 60 pc 69 47 Boston 77 57 sh 71 50 Buffalo 75 55 2.36 pc 57 41 Burlington, VT 76 61 sh 62 41 Charleston, SC 88 68 ts 82 68 Charleston, WV 70 62 .87 s 69 48 Charlotte 76 66 .03 pc 79 59 Chicago 67 54 s 63 52 Cincinnati 74 61 .48 s 67 44 Cleveland 70 61 .84 pc 61 47 Columbia, SC 84 69 ts 79 62 Columbus, OH 74 63 1.45 s 66 46 Concord, N.H. 76 47 sh 69 42 Dallas 84 61 s 84 61 Denver 81 50 pc 81 49 Des Moines 74 47 s 76 54 Detroit 70 61 .08 s 63 48 El Paso 80 62 s 87 67 Evansville, IN 74 57 .05 s 72 47 Harrisburg 75 62 .05 pc 69 46 Hartford 76 52 .01 sh 71 44 Houston 82 72 .02 pc 85 68 Indianapolis 73 54 s 69 47 Jackson 79 71 3.80 s 83 58 Las Vegas 95 74 s 82 64 Little Rock 82 60 s 78 55 Los Angeles 72 65 pc 71 63 Louisville 75 61 .64 s 72 49 Memphis 76 64 s 78 57 Milwaukee 61 53 s 58 50 Minneapolis 64 47 s 71 53 Mobile 79 75 .15 pc 84 65 Montgomery 79 73 .93 pc 82 66 Nashville 76 62 .75 s 76 51 New Orleans 82 73 2.21 ts 84 69 New York City 75 57 .18 pc 74 51 Norfolk 86 59 sh 76 57 Oklahoma City 81 54 s 80 56 Omaha 76 44 s 78 56 Palm Springs 96 65 s 89 67 Philadelphia 80 56 pc 74 50 Phoenix 103 81 s 93 70 Pittsburgh 69 60 .88 pc 60 45 Portland, ME 66 54 sh 71 47 Portland, Ore 66 56 .09 r 64 57 Providence, R.I. 75 53 sh 73 47 Raleigh 76 66 .12 pc 78 55 Rapid City 92 39 ts 87 54 Reno 69 51 pc 70 48 Rochester, NY 72 61 .98 pc 56 43 Sacramento 70 60 .20 s 77 57 St. Louis 72 54 s 75 52 St. Ste. Marie 56 48 s 55 35 Salt Lake City 90 64 ts 64 49 San Antonio 89 72 s 86 65 San Diego 75 65 pc 72 64 San Francisco 68 62 .10 s 70 58 Savannah 85 67 ts 83 69 Seattle 70 56 r 62 55 Spokane 65 54 sh 65 48 Syracuse 72 59 .48 pc 59 42 Topeka 80 48 s 78 52 Washington 80 64 .12 pc 75 53YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 103 Phoenix, Ariz. LOW 25 Fraser, Colo. SUNDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 85/74/ts Amsterdam 66/57/sh Athens 77/62/c Beijing 84/56/sh Berlin 62/58/c Bermuda 82/78/sh Cairo 95/70/pc Calgary 64/45/pc Havana 81/76/ts Hong Kong 87/75/r Jerusalem 77/64/pc Lisbon 89/64/s London 73/54/c Madrid 86/58/s Mexico City 70/56/ts Montreal 59/43/pc Moscow 52/49/c Paris 74/54/c Rio 93/71/c Rome 78/60/pc Sydney 73/55/pc Tokyo 79/69/sh Toronto 57/43/pc Warsaw 57/52/sh WORLD CITIES Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Sunday MondayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 7:37 a/3:37 a 8:33 p/4:09 p 8:07 a/4:08 a 9:14 p/4:47 p Crystal River** 5:58 a/12:59 a 6:54 p/1:31 p 6:28 a/1:30 a 7:35 p/2:09 p Withlacoochee* 3:45 a/11:19 a 4:41 p/11:18 p 4:15 a/11:57 a 5:22 p/11:49 p Homosassa*** 6:47 a/2:36 a 7:43 p/3:08 p 7:17 a/3:07 a 8:24 p/3:46 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 9/22 SUNDAY 8:22 2:09 8:46 2:34 9/23 MONDAY 9:17 3:05 9:42 3:29 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SUNDAY HI LO PR 90 71 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Ragweed, nettle, grasses Todays count: 4.1/12 Mondays count: 6.5 Tuesdays count: 6.2 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Bluegrass show comes to NCRALEIGH, N.C. Bluegrass fans will converge on the state where a key part of the high lonesome sound was born when the International Bluegrass Music Association brings its awards show to Raleigh. Its a big move: The show previously was held in Nashville. IBMA is moving it to Raleigh for at least three years. Next weeks show is part of what the IBMA and the city are calling the World of Bluegrass. It includes a business conference that starts Tuesday, the awards show Thursday and free and ticketed weekend events billed as Wide Open Bluegrass. Some musicians and historians say the defining moment for Bluegrass came in the 1940s, when North Carolinas Earl Scruggs brought his threefinger banjo picking to the band fronted by Bill Monroe the father of bluegrass.Keillor to read poetry in St. PaulST. PAUL, Minn. Author and radio host Garrison Keillor will read selections from his new book of poetry in St. Paul next month. Keillor will read from his book O, What a Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound, at the Fitzgerald Theater on Oct. 2 and 3. The readings will be recorded for an audio companion to be released later. The events are free and open to the public, but tickets must be obtained ahead of time. Tickets can be picked up at Keillors bookstore, Common Good Books in St. Paul, or at the Fitzgerald box office. Keillor will hold a book signing immediately after each of the readings. Keillors radio show, A Prairie Home Companion, draws about 4 million listeners weekly on more than 600 public radio stations nationwide.Klugmans son slams Emmy snubLOS ANGELES The exclusion of Jack Klugman from an Emmy Awards tribute that includes Cory Monteith is an insult to the memory of the late TV veteran and three-time Emmy winner who starred in The Odd Couple and Quincy M.E., Klugmans son says. I think its criminal, said Adam Klugman in an interview with The Associated Press. My dad was at the inception of television and helped build it in the early days. Ceremony producers announced this week that five individual salutes would be included on Sunday nights Emmy show in addition to the traditional in memoriam segment that groups together industry members who died in the past year. Besides Monteith, the Glee star who died in July of a heroin and drug overdose, those to be honored include The Sopranos star James Gandolfini ; Jean Stapleton of All in the Family; comedian and actor Jonathan Winters; and Family Ties producer Gary David Goldberg Monteith, who was 31 when he died, is by far the youngest of the group. All the others are Emmy winners, while he had yet to be nominated in his abbreviated career. Emmy nominees who died last year and wont be accorded separate tributes include Larry Hagman of Dallas and Charles Durning of Evening Shade. The ceremony at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles airs at 8 p.m. Sunday on CBS. Its an insult and it really seems typical of this youth-centric culture that has an extremely short attention span and panders to only a very narrow demographic of young adults, Adam Klugman said. From wire reports Associated PressWillie Nelson, left, and Farm Aid Executive Director Carolyn Mugar talk with reporters Saturday during a news conference prior to the start of the Farm Aid 2013 concert at Saratoga Performing Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. A4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 000FUXO in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICESFlorida Turnpike Enterprise................................A11 Self Storage Notices......................D6

PAGE 5

Exalted Ruler of the Inverness Elks Lodge Mike Orndorff was flattered to have the escorted parade end on the Elks grounds, as veterans are a part of the Elks mission of operation. The Elks fraternal organization is built on a pillar of charity, justice, brotherly love and fidelity, Orndorff said. It is very befitting that we are gathered here today on the Elks grounds to pay honor and respect to our American veteran heroes, as the Elks have a pledge which reads, So long as there are veterans, the benevolent and protective order of Elks will never forget them. Veterans made personal sacrifices that are incomprehensible to many, said Commander Richard Bud Allen of the Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart. Our POWs and MIAs honorably served and made personal sacrifices about what we will never fully comprehend, Allen said. These warriors served effortlessly and did whatever was necessary to survive the ordeals of war. We all knew going into combat that the possibility did exist for us to become POW or MIA. Fortunately for most of us that didnt happen. Today we honor these veterans for their ability to survive and to honor and never forget those still missing in action. On behalf of the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, Commissioner Scott Adams proclaimed Sept. 20, 2013, National POW/MIA Recognition Day in Citrus County. I want to thank all of the veterans here today and for everything they have been through and what they have sacrificed for our country, Adams said. Congressman Richard Nugent agreed with Adams that our country has the best military in the world. My wife and I have three sons serving our country, Nugent said. What gave Wendy and I hope was that we have the best trained, equipped and motivated military on the face of the earth. We could go to sleep at night knowing that our kids had a fighting chance to come home. We have an American duty and obligation to make sure that POWs and MIAs are never forgotten. We are the only country that cares about their military. Without saying a word, hundreds of attendees formed an unbreakable hand-to-hand link while singing God Bless the USA by Lee Greenwood. Once the song was over they dropped hands and then stood in honor of the POW/MIA Remembrance Table Ceremony, which concluded before the cookout. Lecanto High School Army ROTC presented the colors. Angela Vick sang the national anthem and the Boy Scouts of America presented the POWs and MIAs roses during the Roll Call.LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 A5 000G0WC License #DN 17606 Most Insurance Accepted Ledgerdentistry.com Next to ACE in Homosassa( 352 ) 628-3443Se habla espaolLedgerdentistry.com000G0WC If you have been to another dentist and would like a second opinion about your treatment, bring your xrays and I will do a complete evaluation and develop a treatment plan with you that fits you and your needs.Free Second Opinion 000G4PA GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Blackshears II Aluminum 795-9722 Free Estimates www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer 000FWND HWY. 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 2013 2013 2013 2013 Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions 000G4SV Let the Energy Savings Pay for your New Unit! Buy a new 16 SEER 3-Ton 2-Speed Variable Heat Pump for only $135/mo. MINUS Energy Savings of $60/mo. NET COST $ 75.00 Call Bay Area Air Conditioning Today 795-0526 ACT NOW! LIMITED TIME OFFER!! UNDER NORMAL USAGE These 2-speed variable heat pumps not only control the temperature, but also the humidity in your home. The use of multiple sensors allows this system to use the least amount of electricity possible... every second of every day!! FIRST TIME EVER!! 60 Month 0% Financing $1,000 Rebate Federal Tax Credits 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000FYRY U.S. Representative Rich Nugent was the guest speaker at the POW/MIA memorial Saturday at the Inverness Elks Lodge in Hernando. Co-author of the Leave Nobody Behind Act, Nugent, who had two sons in Iraq at the same time, stressed that we must not forget those who have not yet returned home. CEREMONYContinued from Page A1 Surviving POWs and families of POWs are encircled by veterans and other wellwishers Saturday as they are honored at the POW/MIA memorial in Hernando.STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle

PAGE 6

Those first few steps in the morning are surprisingly painful. It feels as if someone has hammered a 10-pound nail into the middle of your heel. Usually, it goes away quickly, and as long as you keep moving, everythings fine. If you sit down to watch a little TV and suddenly get up to answer the phone, you will fall flat on your face. Again, for about three steps your feet feel as if someone has beaten them with a club. The diagnosis is usually plantar fasciitis, meaning the ligament along the bottom of the foot is no longer doing its job correctly. Treatment is all over the map. Surgery, rest, massage, orthotics, cortisone injections, stretching, arch supports, acupuncture, aspirin, ibuprofen, cold therapy, heat therapy, always go barefoot, never go barefoot, sleep with a splint, ad infinitum. Everyone I know seems to have had it or has it, and they all have different recommendations. I decided to go with the simplest plan first: to buy some shoes with better arch support than the loafers I usually wear. Sue always told me they were bad for my feet but I always had the same answer: If you play tennis, you wear tennis shoes. If you golf, you wear golf shoes. If you run, you wear running shoes. If you bowl, you wear bowling shoes. So you can see why I wear loafers. But it was time for a change. I hobbled down to the shoe store to invest in a pair of trainers that would offer my foot all the love and support it needed. From now on, my aching feet would be caressed all day long by the finest combination of science and the shoemakers art. Shoes that would magically make all my problems disappear and let me dance the fandango once again. OK, so I never danced the fandango. I dont even know what a fandango is, but you get my drift. But the shoe store didnt. They seemed to think I was auditioning for a part in SpongeBob Square Pants. Each pair of sports shoes was more cartoonish than the last. Its bad enough that the heel on one had visible springs, but it was also in lime Jell-O green with orange DayGlo stripes. Im sure they will look swell on the CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS Elementary school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Friday: No school. Lunch Monday: Hot dog, hamburger sliders, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, potato smiles, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken, Goldies Grab N Go (turkey), turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled strawberry cups, juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken nuggets with ripstick, mozzarella maxstix, Italian super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken alfredo with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: No school. Middle school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, milk and juice variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: No school. Lunch Monday: Mozzarella maxstix, fajita chicken with rice and ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Hamburger sliders, turkey wrap, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby carrots, potato smiles, chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken alfredo with ripstick, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh barden salad, tangy baked beans, chilled peach cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: No school. High school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: No school. Lunch Monday: Chicken and rice burrito, pizza, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, green beans, cucumber coins, potato roasters, applesauce, juice, milk. Tuesday: Orange chicken with rice, turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, cucumber coins, peas, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, strawberry cups, juice, milk. Wednesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with rice, spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, baked beans, chilled baked beans, potato roasters Craisins, juice, milk. Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, ham super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, fresh broccoli, steamed broccoli, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, peach cup, juice, milk. Friday: No school. SENIOR DINING Monday: Italian meatballs in marinara sauce hoagie on hot dog bun, cheesy mashed potatoes, Italian beans, raisins, margarine cup, low-fat milk. Tuesday: Blended juice, baked chicken thigh, yellow rice with tomato and pepper, black beans, white bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Grilled chicken breast patty in marinara sauce, penne noodles with garlic oil, Tuscan vegetables, slice rye bread with margarine, peaches, lowfat milk. Thursday: Flame-broiled beef patty, potatoes OBrien, corn with diced tomato, hamburger bun, ketchup and mustard, fresh orange, low-fat milk. Friday: Tuna salad, pea/cheese salad, marinated broccoli salad, two slices whole-grain bread, mayonnaise, graham crackers, low-fat milk. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. A6SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMUNITY 000G5JE PREETI LEKHRA, M.D. Board Certified Family Physician STARTING OCTOBER 1, 2013 105 North Osceola Ave., Inverness, FL 34450 CALL 352-344-2440 FOR APPOINTMENT Children and Adults Annual Health Care Visits Annual Gyn Exam, Pap Smear Well Child Visits Sick Visits Flu Shots (upon availability) 000FZUL 000FXFO Like us on Facebook352.621.8017www.sunfloweralf.comRESORT STYLEAssistedLiving Assisted Living Facility License #11566Sometimes you just need a little help. Stop in & see why relationships blossom daily.8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa000FVGC Sept. 23-27MENUS Jim MullenVILLAGE IDIOT Shoes wisely, grasshopper See MULLEN/ Page A7

PAGE 7

arrest early Thursday morning in a remote Montana state park near Interstate 90. He is awaiting extradition to Florida, where he faces two felonies and one misdemeanor. Peters wife, Kari, flew to Montana to bring her daughters home. Family members, friends and his attorney described Peters as someone whose life unraveled in a hurry about two months time. They said he felt betrayed by a judicial system that locked him up twice for what Peters believed were unfair domestic-related charges. He really did lose everything before this happened, his sister, Joanne Murphy said. The most important thing to him was the girls. An injunction for domestic-violence protection issued in early August kept Peters from his home in Terra Vista. A judge had awarded temporary guardianship to Kari Peters father, Norman Peterson, who lives in the Inverness Highlands. Edward Peters was living with his sister, Joanne, in Inverness, or out of his Jeep. He received $3,700 a month in Social Security disability which he lost, Murphy said, after being arrested on charges that he violated the injunction and interfered with child custody. While incarcerated, he was unable to attend a hearing to continue the disability. The judge gave both Edward and Kari six hours each unsupervised visitation a week with the children. Edwards visitation held priority status, according to court records, so long as he cleared the visit with Karis father. That Sunday morning, Edward arrived to take the girls to church in Ocala. Murphy said her brother sent a text message to Peterson on Saturday to let Peterson know hed be by the next day. He waited in his Jeep across the street. Murphy said he didnt go to the door because he didnt want to violate the injunction in case Kari was there. Kari Peters walked out of the house with the girls, planning to take them to church and then a party. She motioned for her husband to drive away. Instead, he pulled into the driveway, blocking in her car. Dont do this here, she told him, according to reports. He told the girls to climb into his Jeep, which they did willingly. And off he drove. He knew right away it was a mistake and considered turning around. Peters, who spoke to Murphy by phone from a Montana detention facility, said he called a friend and asked him to tell Kari he would come back after church if she didnt call the sheriffs office. That plan died a few minutes later when a sheriffs deputy called Peters on his cell phone, urging him to return right away. At that point Ed knew he was done, Murphy said. The sheriffs office had one significant surveillance tool: Peters wore a GPS ankle monitor, a judges requirement for his release from jail. Sheriffs deputies didnt pursue Peters Jeep because they knew of the court order allowing six hours of unsupervised visitation a week. Still, they could ping the monitor and know his location: State Road 200 north toward Ocala, State Road 200 south, then Interstate 75 heading south from Ocala. Deputies discovered the device along the northbound lanes of I-75 in Hernando County. Peters just drove. He had no plan, Murphy said. Murphy said her brother couldnt say what roads he traveled. He bought clothes, blankets and a comforter for the girls. They stayed in campgrounds, where the girls washed every morning. He made sure they were fed properly. He did everything he could to take care of the girls, Murphy said. Peters had about $700 in his pocket when he left Inverness. The 2003 Jeep Liberty broke down at least twice. Each time, a stranger helped with repairs. Many people helped him, she said. He was very worried about talking to people. He knew he wasnt doing right. He ran out of gas, some guy helped him. His car broke down, somebody helped him. People gave him money. He was amazed by the way people were. Hes very appreciative of the people who helped along the way. Seven days later, Peters found himself off the freeway in Sanilac County, Mich., about 90 miles north of Detroit. The Jeep came to rest in a tiny roadside state park. Peters noticed someone who parked their car for a walk left their keys inside. Peters and the girls jumped in and took off. He felt lousy about that, Murphy said. That sighting of the Jeep, and reports of the villain in the next Superman movie, but I plan to wear them around the house, not with my matching superhero cape. Here was a nice pair, for only $168, with good arch support, a soft heel and room for my toes. If only it came in black or white or brown and not in safety orange with fluorescent white stripes and a blinking light on the back. The soles were 3 inches thick in Hulk green. As I recall, the Hulk goes barefoot most of the time. It seems even he wouldnt be caught dead in these things. There was one pair of all-white trainers that caught my eye. Literally, it caught my eye because it was so big it hit me in the face. This thing was the size of a snow shoe. Instead of laces, it had Velcro straps, one of which was undone and flapping out of the eye-level display. Not only do my feet hurt, now I think I have a detached retina. I would normally like an all-white trainer, but the only thing you could wear with these that would make sense at all would be giant, white, four-fingered Mickey Mouse gloves. Surgery is starting to look better and better. Is there some good reason that modern sports shoes look so silly? Is there no room for something that doesnt make you look like you were the life model for Homer Simpson? I finally settled for some over-thecounter inserts in my loafers and they seem to help a bit, especially in the daytime. But if they made non-cartoon shoes, Id have bought them.Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 A7 Always A Fair Price TOP DOLLAR PAID Crystal River Crystal River Metal Recycling Metal Recycling 4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599 000G5TE Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. The Villages Comfort Suites 1202 Avenida Central Attend a FREE Seminar: KNEE PAIN? 000FYIR MANAGERS SPECIALS 000G1OF Hwy. 44 W. Inverness (352) 726-1231 nicknicholasford.com SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 Inverness CR 486 Hwy 44 Hwy 41 H w y 4 90 Nick Nicholas Hwy 491 Hwy. 19 2007 FORD EXPLORER Low mileage Eddie Bauer. NP5860 $18,668 2010 LINCOLN MKT Affordable lincoln. N3T401A $29,968 2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL Only 4k miles on this hybrid. N3C188A $29,988 2010 FORD FOCUS SES Great fuel economy. N3C166A $14,868 2012 FORD FUSION SE A must see. NP5893 $20,668 2011 FORD FIESTA SES Come with benefits. NP5861 $17,968 2010 LINCOLN MKX All the lincoln luxury. NP5876 $26,968 2011 FORD E250 This one is work ready. N3T349B $20,668 OPEN 11AM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373 HIGH OCTANE GRILL DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS MONDAY $1.00 Side Salad, Select $1.00 Menu Items TUESDAY Flat Iron Steak w/2 sides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 7.95 Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell ...... Beef .79 . Chicken .99 WEDNESDAY All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread (Add a side salad for $1.00) . . . $ 8.95 THURSDAY 1 LB. PORK CHOPS w/potatoes & vegetable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9.95 FRIDAY Prime Rib Available at 4pm SATURDAY Sloppy Joe w/chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 SUNDAY Pot Roast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 Valid Monday Friday on regular price menu items only. Coupon Expires 9/30/13 $ 1 00 OFF LUNCH 11am 3pm 000G4P3 C OME V ISIT O UR N EW INDOOR N ON S MOKING D INING A REA C OME V ISIT O UR N EW INDOOR N ON S MOKING D INING A REA INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, exa mination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discou nted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICAN MADE! We do not ship to China! $ 59 00 Cleaning Special New Patients Only FREE Exam & X-Rays w/Cleaning D0210 D0150 D1110 Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 $ 579 00 Porcelain Fused to Metal Crowns (For first one) Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 D2751 $ 690 00 Dentures starting at Upper & Lower Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 D5510 D5120 FREE Second Opinion X-ray & Exam (New Patients Only) D0210 D0150 If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy. Crystal River 352-794-6139 Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD We Welcome You To Value Dental Care NEW LOCATION! 000FUFK Meet Dr. Santa Cruz, DMD Dr. Santa-Cruz offers high quality dentistry. Dr. Santa-Cruz was rewarded several scholastic awards, he is certified in the administration of Botox/ Dysport/Cosmetic fillers. Originally from Miami, Dr. Cruz is a veteran of Naval Aviation, serving overseas in Japan and the Arabian Gulf. He currently serves in the reserves. Professional Hearing Centers www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR (4327) 000FYU4 HEAR BETTER NOW, GUARANTEED! 4 Year Warranty FREE Batteries 4 Life www.superioralf.com 4865 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto 352.746.5483 000G4CG Assisted Living Facility License # 12256 22% of seniors over the age of 70 suffer from memory loss. YOU ARE NOT ALONE WE ARE HERE TO HELP. MULLENContinued from Page A6 Google MapsEdward Peters drove his children from Florida to Michigan, ending in Montana. PETERSContinued from Page A1 See PETERS/ Page A8

PAGE 8

by 70 to 52,773, while the number of those without jobs dropped by 263 to 4,577. The unemployment rate in August 2012 was 10.1 percent, when there were 5,795 unemployed. The regional jobless rate dropped to 7.9 percent in August, down 0.4 percent over the month. There were 16,576 unemployed out of a labor force of 209,392. That rate is down 2.2 percentage points compared to a year ago. Workforce Connection CEO Rusty Skinner said that the August report shows that the threecounty region experienced a summer neutral position, which is not unexpected coming out of the traditional summer slump. Its August, there are all sorts of issues bounding around, Skinner said. We have had some growth, but we also see an extension of the summer doldrums. Skinner said that in Citrus and Levy counties, drops in unemployment rates were driven by actions in the labor force, including college students returning to school, high school and college graduates moving out of the area, people simply not looking for work because they are disengaged or vacationing or others moving out of the area for a variety of reasons. Floridas unemployment rate, seasonally adjusted, is 7.0 percent and not seasonally adjusted rate is 7.1 percent. The national rate is 7.3 percent. Rebecca Rust, DEOs chief economist, said that over the year all 67 counties unemployment rates fell while over the month 66 counties rates dropped and the other remained the same. Citrus Countys unemployment rate ranked 17th, Levy Countys 18th and Marion Countys 19th. Jeep, and reports of the stolen SUV, set about a flurry of law enforcement activity. Authorities alerted the U.S. Border Patrol, as bridges to Canada were only 30 miles away. They also alerted Minnesota officials on the belief Peters may have been heading there. The Sanilac County Sheriffs Office made phone calls to every county between there and the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan at the Wisconsin state line. Nothing turned up and the trail grew cold once again. The big break came Wednesday afternoon when police were called to a Laurel, Mont., gas station where the driver didnt pay for gas. A security camera caught the Michigan license plate of the stolen SUV, and alerts were issued in surrounding counties for the vehicle and its occupants. Citrus County Sheriffs officials were convinced Peters was headed to Washington state, where a brother lives. Murphy said Edward told her that was never the idea. They havent spoken in eight or nine years, she said. Instead, Peters and the girls played. It snowed Wednesday in that part of Montana and the girls, who rarely see snow, had fun making snowmen. They had a great time, Murphy said, relating what her brother said. Too exhausted to continue on, they stopped for the night at Prairie Dog State Park in Greycliff, just off I-90 in Sweet Grass County. The park, known for allowing visitors to watch wild prairie dogs in their natural habitat, is not equipped for overnight stays. Deputies patrol the park at night looking for law violators. Sure enough, a deputy spotted the vehicle. He called for backup and, weapons drawn, deputies ordered Peters from the vehicle even as his children begged him to stay. Peters and his daughters were separated, with Peters going to jail and his daughters taken to a foster home until their mother arrived later Thursday to bring them home to Citrus County. Sweet Grass County Sheriff Don Tronrud said deputies found a Montana map in the car. The girls told deputies they were headed to Yellowstone National Park. My guess is he was headed to the Canadian border, Tronrud said. Murphy said her brother had no thought about Canada or making plans for a new life with the children. He was just driving and driving, she said. He just wanted to spend time with the girls. Peters, 45, isnt likely to face additional charges other than those directly related to his Sept. 8 taking of the children. While the FBI assisted with the search and investigation, Peters attorney Mark Rodriguez hasnt heard federal charges are coming. And the owner of the stolen SUV in Michigan doesnt seem interested in retrieving it from Montana or pressing charges, Sanilac County Sheriff Biniecki said. The victims not sure she wants the car back, he said. Murphy said her brother told her he had no access to the Internet nor did he make a single phone call. He was shocked to learn of the publicity generated in Citrus County during his 2,000-mile trek. He never wanted this to happen. He never wanted to hurt anybody, she said. It wasnt the right thing, but it was the only thought he had. Ed knew it wasnt an adventure and that it would come to an end. He wanted to be with his daughters. He was going to enjoy every moment he could.A8SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart) Must present coupon. Any make or model. In office only. One week only.FREEHEARING TEST BATTERY REPLACEMENT HEARING AID REPAIRS BATTERIESPREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES99Limit 1 Coupon Per Visit. Limit 2 Packs Per Visit. Must present coupon. One week only. 0%FINANCINGONE WEEK ONLY!12 MONTHS SAME AS CASH CHECK QUALIFICATION CALL352-795-1484 22 YEARS IN CITRUS COUNTY!Owner Rickey RichardsonLicensed Hearing Aid SpecialistBrian LazioLicensed Hearing Aid Specialist ATTENTION U.S. RESIDENTS Travel With Confidence . Miracle Ear Will Be There.Over 1,200 Miracle Ear Locations! WALK-INS WELCOME! Call for a FREE demo today! FREE HEARING AIDS Fits Hearing Loss of 30 DB If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 45 days of the completion of fitting, i n satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG. Limited Time Discount. No other offers or discounts apply. Discount does not apply to prior sales. 000FXI8 Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart) 352-795-1484 OPEN: Mon.-Fri. 10AM-5PMALSO IN OCALA9570 SW Hwy. 200 (Corner of Hwy. 484 & 200)(352) 291-1467Paddock Mall(352) 237-1665 Inside Inside RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Crystal River Plantation on Crystal River 9301 W. Fort Island Trail Attend a FREE Seminar: KNEE PAIN? 000FYIS 000G3WL 000FXP4 Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays PETERSContinued from Page A7 LABORContinued from Page A1 He was just driving and driving. He just wanted to spend time with the girls.Joanne Murphysister of Edward Peters.

PAGE 9

Andrew Bolash, 78HERNANDOAndrew left this world Sept. 11, 2013, after losing a long battle with cancer, but he has won the war. He was the only child born to the late Andrew Bolash and Mary Ritchie Bolash on Nov. 21, 1934, in Newark, N.J. Andrew worked very hard as a farmers son, which may have inspired him to pursue a less demanding career. After graduating high school he spent two years in the Army and then two years in the Air Force during the Korean Conflict. Andrew (dont call him Andy) graduated college, receiving his degree in civil engineering, paying his tuition by working years, on and off, in Greenland. He then earned his MBA from Rider University. Andrew became a rising star working with Bell South while residing in Palm Beach County but decided he would like to experience working in other countries. Working usually as a project manager, he traveled to Israel, Egypt, Nigeria, Africa, Saudi Arabia, Jamaica, Haiti, Togo and Albania, to name most of the countries. He retired in 2006 from Kuwait, Bahrain and Jordan. Andrew enjoyed visiting his mothers homeland of Scotland and sipping their most famous beverage. He enjoyed playing golf, only for fun, being with his family, and an occasional trip to the Hard Rock Casinos. He was a voracious reader of newspapers and books, a very knowledgeable sports historian and was a faithful fan of the New York Giants, Tampa Bay Bucs and the Yankees. Also, Andrew proudly volunteered as a courier for Hospice of Citrus County. Andrew leaves to mourn, his adored wife, Elaine Prouix Bolash; his much-loved daughter, Michelle Prouix Musto; his son-in-law and drinking buddy, Michael; and his precious grandson, George Andrew Grim wade. Also, goodbye to his brother-in-law, Andrew Ghosen, and his spouse, Barbara. Andrew will also be missed by his dear pets, Coco, Ming and Jake. Adieu dearest Andrew, until we meet again. A celebration of Andrews life will take place at his residence at 12 p.m. Sept. 28, 2013. Friends are invited to come, share and enjoy as Andrew so wished. Special thanks for Andrews care to Dr. C. Joseph Bennet, Dr. William Harrer, and for the outstanding nursing care and comfort provided Andrew at his time of need by Hospice of Citrus County. Arrangements are by Heinz Funeral Home, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dorothy Bode, 92FORMERLY OF BEVERLY HILLSDorothy M. Bode, 92, formerly of Beverly Hills, Fla., died Sept. 14, 2013, in Oregon. Visitation is from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, at Fero Funeral Home. Funeral Mass is at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, at Our Lady of Grace. Interment to follow at Fero Memorial Gardens.Shirley Bonn, 91FLORAL CITYShirley M. Bonn, 91, Floral City, died Thursday, Sept 19, 2013, at Hospice of Citrus County. Private arrangements are by Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. Joseph Baker, 65DUNNELLONJoseph H. Baker, 65, of Dunnellon, Fla., passed away Sept. 18, 2013, under the loving care of Cypress Cove Care Center and Hospice of Citrus County. Born July 6, 1948, in Anniston, Ala., to Franklin and Nell (Cook) Baker, Joseph moved to Citrus County 35 years ago from Orlando. He was the maintenance director for Cypress Cove. Joseph was a member of the Twisted Oaks Golf and Country Club and he was active with the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. He loved bowling, NASCAR and fishing. In addition to his parents, Joseph was preceded in death by his son, Jason T. Baker. Survived by his wife and best friend, Bobbi Gynan-Baker of Dunnellon; daughter-in-law, Deborah L. Baker of Crystal River; one brother, Tony and family of Satellite Beach; one sister, Susan and family of Bridgeville, Pa.; his Piedmont, Ala., family; his Yankee family from Massssachusetts; and one granddaughter, Kaley Jill Baker. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto. A celebration of life will be announced at a later date. Brown Funeral Home and Crematory, Le canto, www.brownfuneralhome.com. Lyvelle Palmer, 81INVERNESSLyvelle Palmer, age 81, Inverness, died Sept. 20, 2013, at her residence under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. Lyvelle was born Jan. 15, 1932, in Starks, La., to the late Curtis and Maggie (Thompson) Hatchell. She was a homemaker and member of First Baptist Church of Inverness. She enjoyed gardening; was a very talented crafter, doing macram, ceramics and needlepoint and loved being with her dog Princess. Left to cherish her memory is her son Curtis Michael Palmer and his wife Bobbie, Inverness; daughter Diana Paulette Brooks, Lake Panasoffkee; sister Delores Hatchell, Louisiana; nine grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and 8 greatgreat-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 44 years, Herman; a son, Herman Jr.; and a great-grandson. A funeral tribute to Lyvelles life will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Burial will follow in Hills of Rest Cemetery in Floral City. The family will greet friends in visitation from 1 p.m. until the hour of service. Memorial donations are suggested to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of flowers. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 A9 000G4N2 Youre Invited To A Special Event To have all your hearing aid questions answered. Well clear up all the confusion about hearing aids. If you or a loved one have experienced symptoms of hearing loss, then dont miss this opportunity! RSVP TODAY! (352) 419-6565 Tues., Sept. 24th, Wed., Sept. 25th & Thurs. Sept. 26th OUR PROMISE TO YOU . FREE No-obligation Hearing Screening FREE Digital Imaging of Eardrums FREE Better Hearing Consultation Dr. Angela Schenk Au.D. Doctor of Audiology Highest Degree of Hearing Knowledge Hearing Aid Expert Meet Our Newest Associate In the office of Rama Nathan, M.D. 820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness www.gardneraudiology.com Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000FX8G For Information and costs,call 726-8323 Burial Shipping CremationFuneral HomeWith Crematory000EHVX 000FXBH $ 49 It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or treatment. Min. Fee ADA code D0210, D0150 Not in conjunction with insurance. Offer expires in 30 days Full Mouth X-Rays, Comprehensive Exam New Patient Specials Call today! 352-527-1614 Alexsa Davila DMD DN 15390 Walton Van Hoose DMD DN 18101 In house denture lab Free Denture Consults Financing available Most insurance accepted. Family Friendly Citrus Hills Dental 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando Located in the Hampton Square Plaza We Meet All Your Dental Needs, Including Implants 000FXJH Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000FWQJ Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 2013 2013 2013 2013 SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. FREE OBITUARIES Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. U.S. flags denote military service on local obituaries. Lyvelle Palmer Obituaries

PAGE 10

A10SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEVETERANS This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or corrections to community@chronicle online.com.AMERICANLEGION Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352795-6526, email blanton thompsonPost155@gmail. com; visit www.flPost155.org. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit President Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233. American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email boosc29@gmail.com. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call 352-746-5018. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call Commander Norm Brumett at 352-4762134 or Auxiliary president Alice Brummett at 352476-7001. American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call Commander Robert Scott at 352860-2090. Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.VFW H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 County Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352746-0440. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-7263339, email vfw4252@ tampabay.rr.com and Google VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352-637-0100. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352447-3495.OTHERGROUPS AMVETS William Crow Post 447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352447-1816; email Amvet447 @comcast.net. Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104. Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352860-2400. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-5632496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA) Island X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy Staples at 352697-5565. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959. Visit www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus purpleheart.org or call 352382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352344-0727. Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Dennys in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting dates are: Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019. VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-3021037, or email geneusawo @tampabay.rr.com. Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rolling thunderfl7.com, call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell) or email ultraray1997 @yahoo.com. Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association meets at Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328. Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on the DAV property in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encouraged by calling 352-400-8952. Members can renew with Gary Williamson at 352-527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org. Hunger and Homeless Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at 352-382-0876. Warrior Bridge, developed by nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is to meet the needs of wounded veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722.VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS VETERANS NOTE Daniel W. MauldinCadet Daniel William Mauldin, son of Kate Lavorgna of Homosassa, completed Cadet Basic Training at the U.S. Military Academy. Mauldin entered West Point on July 1, 2013, and has successfully completed part six of CBT. CBT is one of the most challenging events a cadet will encounter over the course of their four years at the academy. The initial military training program provides cadets with basic skills to instill discipline, pride, cohesion, confidence and a high sense of duty to prepare them for entry into the Corps of Cadets. Areas of summer instruction included first aid, mountaineering, hand grenades, rifle marksmanship and nuclear, biological and chemical training. Mauldin began classes Aug. 19. The West Point curriculum offers 37 majors, balancing physical sciences and engineering with humanities and social sciences for a Bachelor of Science degree. Mauldin graduated from Lecanto High School. He plans to graduate from West Point in 2017 and be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. In SERVICE Daniel W. MauldinU.S. Army 352-597-8839 James L. Andersen, MD Family Medicine ST. PETERSBURG TAMPA BROOKSVILLE BRADENTON 16176 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34601 000G23B Caring for Someone Caring for Someone with Memory Loss? with Memory Loss? ALZ10040C-1 Meridien Research is looking for volunteers ages 60 and older, with memory loss who are taking Aricept for a new clinical research study. Qualified participants will receive at no cost study-related: Evaluations, physical exams, routine lab work Investigational medication Up to $700 in compensation may be available for the patient and caregiver combined. No medical insurance is necessary. 000FQJU Office has help for vets with PTSDThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department offers help for veterans who have had their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied. Veterans who have been denied within the past two years are asked to contact the office to review the case and discuss compensation/pension examination. All veterans who have been diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health center and have been denied are encouraged to contact the Citrus County Veterans Office. To schedule an appointment to discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. Veterans will need to have a denial letter and a copy of a compensation examination by Gainesville. Veterans can get a copy of their exam either by requesting it through the VA medical records or from the primary care window in Lecanto. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus. fl.us/commserv/vets.

PAGE 11

In Their WordsThe Chroniclefeatures stories of local veterans. The stories will be about a singular event or moment in your military career that stands out to you. It can be any type of event, from something from the battlefield to a fun excursion while on leave. We also ask that you provide us with your rank, branch of service, theater of war served, years served, outfit and veterans organization affiliations. To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or email him at cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put together your stories and help set up obtaining then and now photos to publish with your story.CCVC yard sale Oct. 12The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split. Sellers may come and set up the day before (typically Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the security of their own items overnight. The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10. For more information and to make reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.New veterans pin availableDisabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces the design and availability of this years Citrus County Veterans Appreciation Commemorative Pin. In keeping with this years theme, Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans, the pin is an outline of Citrus County superimposed with the Iraq Campaign and the Afghanistan Campaign service medals. Pins are available for a donation of $3 each and may be obtained by calling the chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also available at the Citrus County Veterans Service Office in Lecanto.Vets to speak to classesThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its annual Veterans in the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12 as part of its 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week activities. Coordinated by the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), the Veterans in the Classroom program brings living history to the classrooms of the countys public and private schools, as well as homeschool groups. Veterans share with students their firsthand military experiences and travels while serving our country in uniform around the world. The model Veterans in the Classroom program was recognized in 2008 with a Florida Education Foundation award. The programs success has generated the need for additional veterans to share their experiences with students. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, National Guard and women veterans are especially needed. All interested veterans may contact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384, cmcleod 670@earthlink.net, or Bob Crawford at 352-270-9025, baddogusmc@tampa bay.rr.com. Case manager aids vetsThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department has a case manager who is available to assist veterans to apply for benefits and provide information about benefits. The monthly schedule is: First Wednesday Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Second Wednesday Homosassa Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa. Third Wednesday Coastal Regional Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make an appointment to meet with the case manager, call 352-527-5915. DAV needs more driversThe DAV transportation network needs volunteer drivers for the two vans assigned to the Lecanto clinic one going from Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from Lecanto to The Villages. While the Gainesville van goes each weekday, there are not enough drivers for The Villages run. While The Villages trip is not an everyday run (just when someone needs to go there), more drivers are needed. Volunteers must have a Florida drivers license and up-to-date car insurance. No CDL is required. Stop by the Veterans Service Office in Lecanto for an application. Call Joe Stephens at 352-489-5245 for more information. Free yoga classes for vetsYoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is associated with the national service organization, Yoga For Vets. Sandstrom teaches free classes to combat veterans at several locations and at several different times. Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397. JOHNMARQUA Special to the ChronicleVets Journey Home is a weekend open to all veterans who are looking to start or continue their healing process. The weekend is focused on assisting veterans in healing the emotional traumas they sustained during their time of service. In 1989, a group of Vietnam veterans gathered to talk about their war experiences. Most of the men had been in and out of groups dealing with trauma some were facilitators or counselors and they began to notice a big difference in their ability to sleep and relax in civilian life. This progressed into scheduled weekends to help heal from their military experiences, whether they had been in combat or not. The group set the precedent that there is no fee for those who served; lodging and food are free. That philosophy still stands today, as it is the feeling they have already paid the price. All weekends are paid for by donations and fundraising, such as an upcoming golf outing slated for Saturday, Sept. 28, at The Meadows course at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. All benefits from the outing will go to support the Vets Journey Home weekend in Citrus County, slated for Nov. 15 in Floral City. Vets Journey Home has grown from its humble beginning in Maryland to a national-level program with centers in California, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wisconsin. Vets Journey Home continues to grow and will be establishing a center in Florida. The weekend gathering in Floral City will be the first one held in the southeastern United States. If you know of a veteran who has served their country and who has not returned fully whole, whether due to sleeplessness, anger or other problems, Vets Journey Home may be able to help them. Go to vetsjoumeyhome.org for more information and to register for the weekend. Call 352-476-9698 to donate or register for the golf outing on Saturday in Citrus Hills. John T. Marqua of Inverness is southeast director of Vets Journey Home.VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 A11 VETERANS NOTES Sept. 28 golf outing to raise funds for November event in Citrus County INAUGURAL GOLF OUTING WHAT: Inaugur al Golf Outing. WHEN: Satur day, Sept. 28. WHERE: The Meadows course at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. WHY: All proceeds will benefit the No vember Vets Journey Home event, the first to be staged in Florida. This years event will be in Citrus County. FOR INFO: T o participate, contribute, or for more information, call 813-621-8319 or 352-476-9698. 000G2E8 000G5C2 NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP The Florida Department of Transportation is hosting a Toll Rate Rule Development Workshop to provide the public an opportunity to review and comment on proposed amendments to administrative rules regarding training and qualifications standards for toll enforcement officers, video billing, prosecution of unpaid toll violations, and vehicle classification. The workshop will also present and solicit comments on administrative rules regarding express lane tolling and the proposed toll rates for the First Coast Expressway in Duval and Clay Counties. The workshop will be held on: DATE: Tuesday, October 1, 2013 TIME: 6:00 p.m. The workshop will be conducted as a webinar, which is a live presentation over the internet that allows attendance from a personal computer. Registration for the webinar is required. Registration and additional information can be found at: http://www.floridasturnpike.com/tools_tollratenotices.cfm Site access locations are also available for those persons without computer/internet access at the following locations: Hillsborough County Florida Department of Transportation District 7 Auditorium 11201 North Malcolm McKinley Drive Tampa, FL 33612 Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. If you have any questions, please contact Chad Huff, Public Information Manager, at Floridas Turnpike Enterprise, 1-800-749-7453. Anyone requiring special accommodations for the meeting under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1991 or in need of translation should contact Carol Scott at Floridas Turnpike Enterprise (407) 264-3494 at least seven calendar days prior to the meeting. 000FVH4

PAGE 12

Winner STUART PALLEY/ Orange County RegisterCassidy Campbell, 16, attends the 2013 homecoming football game for Marina High School on Friday in Huntington Beach, Calif. Campbell, a transgendered teen who was born a boy, was crowned 2013 Homecoming Queen for Marina High School. Bleeding from gunshot mistaken for girls periodHAYWARD, Calif. A Northern California couple didnt report that their 10year-old daughter had been shot for more than five hours because they mistook her bleeding for a period, police said Friday. The girl was sleeping in her Hayward home around 2 a.m. Thursday when a stray bullet from drive-by shooting wounded her in the buttocks, Sgt. Mark Ormsby said. When the girl woke up in pain and had blood in her underwear, her parents thought she had started her period, police said. They also found no indication she had been shot. Ormsby said when she woke up for school and was still in pain, her parents inspected her bed and saw bullet holes. Police dont have a motive for the shooting and no arrest has been made.Roads in northern Colorado reopen as floods recedeDENVER More highways in northern Colorado that were cut off because of destructive flooding last week are being reopened, helping reduce the number of people in need of emergency shelters and, transportation officials hope, reducing traffic congestion in heavily populated areas along the Front Range. I think for a lot of people its not returning to normal, per se, but its starting to get there with some of these roads being reopened, said Amy Ford, a spokeswoman with the Colorado Department of Transportation. The American Red Cross said fewer people are using their shelters now that they have access to their homes with some of the roads reopened. At the height of the disaster, more than 1,000 people were in shelters, compared to the 250 people in shelters Saturday, said Carmela Burke, a Red Cross volunteer.Car slams into cyclists during NH ride, killing 2HAMPTON, N.H. A car slammed into a group of bicyclists Saturday during an annual ride along the New England coastline, killing two riders and injuring two others, police said. The crash happened on a two-lane bridge in Hampton at about 8:30 a.m., just after the start of the 40th annual Granite State Wheelmen Tri-State Seacoast Century ride. Police said two Massachusetts women were killed. They were identified as Pamela Wells, 60, of South Hamilton, and Elise Bouchard, 52, of Danvers. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Drink up! Associated PressA woman celebrates the opening of the Hofbraeuzelt beer tent Saturday at the 180th Bavarian Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich, Germany. The worlds largest beer festival runs through Oct. 6 and will attract more than 6 million guests from around the world. Chinese court set to hand down verdict in Bo caseJINAN, China A Chinese court was expected to hand down a guilty verdict today for corruption charges against fallen politician Bo Xilai in one of the countrys most lurid political scandals in decades. The Jinan Intermediate Peoples Court was to announce the verdict against Bo, who was tried last month on charges of taking bribes, embezzlement and abuse of power. The former Politburo member and party chief of the megacity Chongqing vigorously denied any criminal wrongdoings during the trial, but Chinese courts are not independent and a guilty verdict is widely expected. Bo, once a rising political star, was removed from office in March and expelled from the party in September.Three US troops killed in Afghan insider attackKABUL, Afghanistan An Afghan wearing a security forces uniform turned his weapon against U.S. troops Saturday, killing three in eastern Afghanistan, officials said, in another apparent attack by a member of the Afghan forces against their international allies. The shooting took place in Gardez, capital of eastern Paktia province, Gen. Mohammad Zahir Azimi, an Afghan Defense Ministry spokesman, said. The attack took place inside a base of the Afghan army in the city, according to a security official in Gardez, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to give details while the incident was still under investigation. A U.S. Defense Department official confirmed that all three soldiers were Americans, but that no further details would be released until after their relatives had been notified.Peru bishop removed amid abuse chargesLIMA, Peru Pope Francis has removed a Roman Catholic bishop in Peru who an influential former prelate says is suspected of sexually abusing minors. Gabino Miranda, 53, was removed as part of the new popes zero tolerance policy against abuse, the Rev. Luis Bambaren, the retired former Peruvian bishops conference chief, told reporters on Friday. Miranda is only the second bishop known to have been removed in recent times by the Vatican over sex abuse allegations. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressMACKINAC ISLAND, Mich. A clear divide over the health care law separates the emerging field of potential GOP candidates for the 2016 presidential race, previewing the battles ahead as they try to rebuild their party and seize the White House. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz says he will fight with every breath to stop President Barack Obamas signature domestic achievement, even if that means shutting down parts of the federal government. Its an approach that former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush calls quite dicey politically for Republicans. Allied on one side are Cruz, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and others who say they are making a principled stand, willing to oppose the law at all costs. Then there are those taking what they call a pragmatic approach by accepting the law, if grudgingly, and moving on. This group includes Govs. Chris Christie of New Jersey and Scott Walker of Wisconsin, who says a shutdown would violate the public trust. The government we have should work, so thats why I dont believe we should shut the government down, Walker told reporters Saturday after speaking at a Republican conference in Michigan. The Republicancontrolled House passed a short-term spending plan Friday that would continue funding government operations through midDecember while withholding money for the health law. Even Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky was suggesting there was little Congress could do to stop Obamacare from taking effect. Paul said while attending the Michigan conference that Republicans could force a vote in both houses of Congress, then negotiate changes to legislation in a joint conference committee. But, he added, time is running out. Im acknowledging we probably cant defeat or get rid of Obamacare, he told reporters. But by starting with our position of not funding it maybe we get to a position where we make it less bad. Less than one-quarter of Americans approve of the job Congress is doing, about the same as approve of Republicans in Congress, according to recent national polls. Democrats poll slightly higher. Obamacare divides 2016 field GOP split on how to go forward opposing health care law Associated PressCHICAGO A 3-yearold boy shot in the head during this weeks mass shooting at a southwest Chicago park was recovering from surgery in intensive care Saturday, a family spokesman said. Deonta Howard was among 13 people wounded late Thursday when an unknown number of people shot up a crowded basketball court with an assault rifle. The familys pastor, the Rev. Corey Brooks, said the boy had surgery Friday that went well. Theres going to have to be some plastic surgery done later on, Brooks said. ... Thankfully there was no brain damage or eye damage. Police hadnt announced any arrests as of Saturday afternoon as the investigation continued into a shooting that again placed Chicagos gang violence in a national spotlight. Shootings overnight killed four people around the city and injured four others, theChicago Sun-Timesreported. The latest bloodshed stretched from the upscale Gold Coast neighborhood to the Far South Side, which experiences frequent gang violence. According to the Cook County medical examiners office, the dead included an 18year-old who was shot in the chest and arm around 6 p.m. Friday in the South Shore neighborhood.The Sun-Timesreported that the Gold Coast incident involved a man who was shot and injured during an apparent argument over a parking space. Police have said they think Thursday nights attack at Cornell Square Park in the Back of the Yards neighborhood was gang-related. Several gang members were among those shot, though it was not yet clear who the intended target was, police said. Child recovering from Chicago shooting Incident is latest in string of violence plaguing Windy City Horror in Kenya Terrorists strike mall, murdering dozens; hostages held Associated PressCivilians who had been hiding inside flee from the Westgate Mall Saturday in Nairobi, Kenya. Gunmen threw grenades and opened fire in the mall Saturday, killing at least 39 people in an attack targeting non-Muslims at an upscale mall in Kenyas capital that was hosting a childrens event. Associated PressNAIROBI, Kenya Terrified shoppers huddled in back hallways and prayed they would not be found by the Islamic extremist gunmen lobbing grenades and firing assault rifles inside Nairobis top mall Saturday. When the way appeared clear, crying mothers clutching small children and blood-splattered men sprinted out of the four-story mall. At least 39 people were killed and more than 150 wounded in the assault, Kenyas president announced on national TV, while disclosing that his close family members were among the dead. Foreigners were among the casualties. Frances president said that two French women were killed. Two Canadians were killed, including a diplomat, said the Candadian prime minister. Four American citizens were reported injured but not killed in the attack, the State Department said Saturday. Early Sunday morning, 12 hours after the attack began, gunmen remained holed up inside the mall with an unknown number of hostages. President Uhuru Kenyatta called the security operation under way delicate and said a top priority was to safeguard hostages. As the attack began shortly after noon Saturday, the al-Qaidalinked gunmen asked the victims they had cornered if they were Muslim: Those who answered yes were free to go, several witnesses said. The non-Muslims were not. Somalias Islamic extremist group al-Shabab claimed responsibility and said the attack was retribution for Kenyan forces 2011 push into Somalia. The rebels threatened more attacks. Al-Shabab said on its Twitter feed that Kenyan security officials were trying to open negotiations. There will be no negotiations whatsoever, al-Shabab tweeted. As night fell in Kenyas capital, two contingents of army special forces troops moved inside the mall. Police and military surrounded the huge shopping complex as helicopters buzzed overhead. An Associated Press reporter said he saw a wounded Kenyan soldier put into an ambulance at nightfall, an indication, perhaps, of a continuing shoot-out inside. Witnesses said at least five gunmen including at least one woman first attacked an outdoor cafe at Nairobis Westgate Mall, a shiny, new shopping center that includes Nike, Adidas and Bose stores. The malls ownership is Israeli, and security experts have long said the structure made an attractive terrorist target. The attack began shortly after noon with bursts of gunfire and grenades. Shoppers expatriates and affluent Kenyans fled in any direction that might be safe: into back corners of stores, back service hallways and bank vaults. Over the next several hours, pockets of people trickled out of the mall as undercover police moved in. Some of the wounded were trundled out in shopping carts. AP Indian OceanNairobiETHIOPIASOMALIA 100 mi 0 0100 km Gunmen threw grenades and opened fire in a mall AFRICA Detail 100 mi 0 0100 kmKENYA Nairobi ETHIOPIASOMALIAIndian Ocean

PAGE 13

EXCURSIONSPage A13-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 Travel & Leisure Ken McNallyCAR CORNER Area car nut likes to lend helping hand Ihave a friend in the Nature Coast Mustang club who considers himself to be a real car nut since birth, and I can say that I see signs of this affliction. His name is Howard Warner and he is the Parts Manager at Nick Nicholas Ford in Inverness. He has always worked in the automotive related industry. At a very young age, he would call out the year, make and model of passing cars while his dad was driving. He still has many Matchbox and Hot Wheels cars that were well-loved as he was growing up. Howard currently owns a white 2007 Mustang GT California Special convertible, but he has owned a number of project cars over the years, including several Chevy Corvairs. He is always willing to help anyone with car issues and, in his spare time, recently completed an engine, transmission and engine bay restoration on a friends 1965 baby blue Mustang convertible, which took about four months. I can recall once when the club was caravaning back from a car show near Orlando, Howard was following this 1965 Mustang because the gas gauge was not working. Good thing he did because the classic car ran out of gas on route and Howard was right there to help get gas. Howard, as a representative of the Ford dealership, was very instrumental in getting the Mustang club started many years ago, along with Perry and Jackie Unger. He and his wife Barbara, who is the club treasurer, are very active and supportive of the club. Barb has held a number of positions during her career and currently works as a teachers aide. She is also a car enthusiast and recently purchased her own show car, which is a black 2001 SVT Cobra convertible Mustang a real beauty. When buying the car, she didnt even check to see if the radio worked because she liked the sound of the exhaust so much. Barbs dad has been a motorcycle rider and car guy his whole life, so she didnt stand a chance when she married Howard. Howard does all of the repairs, maintenance and cleaning on the cars Barb just drives them. Howard and Barb moved from Buffalo, N.Y., to Florida in 1979, one month after their wedding, to escape the cold and snow. Howard said that cars do not last long in Buffalo as a result of the harsh winters and summer falls on the 4th of July!! They have lived in the Inverness area since 1999 and have two daughters Rachel and Sarah. Rachel provides great help at club events and cars shows. Sarah is attends the U. S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Howard and Barb love to drive their Mustangs to car shows and Pony Rides. They have attended many shows in Florida and have won a number of awards. Howard said that the best part of owning specialty cars is the great people you meet who share this hobby and, he also said, driving in a caravan of Mustangs through the beautiful Florida countryside on back roads to an awesome restaurant isnt too bad either. Coincidentally, today just happens to be Howard and Barbs 35th wedding anniversary congratulations. CAR JOKE: A man was driving down a country road when his car came to a sudden halt. As he lifted the hood to check the engine, a brown and white cow from an adjoining field lumbered over to the car and stuck her head under the hood next to the mans. After a moment or two, the cow turned to the man and said: Looks like a bad carburetor to me. Then she walked back into the field and resumed her grazing. Amazed, the man walked up to the farmhouse and asked the farmer: Is that your cow in the field? The brown and white one? Yes, thats old Buttercup. Well, continued the man, my car was broke down, and she just said, Looks like a bad carburetor to me. The farmer shook his head and said: Dont mind old Buttercup. She dont know a thing about cars. See CAR/ Page A17 farmers markets of communities hat originated as a way for farmers to connect and share their crops with neighbors, Community Farmers Markets are quickly becoming a way of life in many cities, towns and villages nationwide. But now, these weekly markets spotlight not only farm products but also local artisans and craftsman who share their talents and creations in an expansive array of products. And each local market is different, reflecting the local culture of its inhabitants and the area.U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary Ed Avalos in his Aug. 9 blog, in celebrating National Farmers Market Week, said As a nation of immigrants, we have many rich and complex influences woven into the history of our country. Foods we eat, holidays we celebrate, how we create goods or perform services these are all things that are shaped by the cultural identities of our families and the communities around us. For many communities, farmers markets are playing a pivotal role in maintaining and enabling these cultural ties. In Citrus County, every Friday and Saturday, from now through spring, three community farmers markets are By Karen Kennedy-Hall Chronicle Correspondent See MARKETS/ Page A17 MATTHEW BECK / ChronicleTOP: Citrus County Locally Grown, LLC Market Manager Michael Wilmshurst assists Maureen Lamb of Citrus Springs with her basket of vegetables at the Dunnellon Train Depot where goods are distributed. The market offers vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, dairy and baked goods to residents of Citrus and parts of southern Marion Counties. ABOVE: Freshly prepared baskets of locally grown and produced ingredients are available through Citrus County Locally Grown LLC.

PAGE 14

A14SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT Dear Annie: I just found out that my brother, who I thought was in graduate school studying to be a teacher, is actually working as a prison guard. Im the only one in the family who knows. When I phoned him to get the details, he told me that hed quit school after one semester because he never really wanted to be a teacher. He said our parents bullied him into graduate school when he had trouble finding work after his college graduation. Prison guard was the first job he could get. I asked him why he is leading this double life. He said our parents told him that graduate school was not negotiable. So he figures they can live with their delusions. At family dinners, Mom and Dad ask him about school, and he says, Fine, but dull. Then they drone on and on about the importance of attending school since he couldnt find a job, and our grandfather makes a point of telling him how easy he has it compared to serving in Korea. Like we care. If they dont want to hear what my brother says, they shouldnt ask. I agree with him that my parents are narcissists. They live in total denial of their kids lives. For my 30th birthday, they gave me a check and said, We didnt know what to give you since you dont want to go to culinary school. I never expressed a desire to go to culinary school. I once taught myself to cook something, and they became obsessed with the idea that I should be a chef. I have zero interest. Heres my concern: What happens if my parents find out about my brother? He says, Thats their problem. I wonder if hes doing this so he can make them look like idiots when the relatives find out. Should I keep his secret? New York Dear New York: This is your brothers secret to divulge, not yours. However, the two of you seem overly focused on your parents reaction. You are both too old to be doing things behind their backs or letting them believe things that are not true. Please be honest with them and urge your brother to do the same. ANNIES MAILBOX ACROSS 1Caesar or Waldorf 6Hookah 10Brown pigment 15Neighbor of Ariz. 18 Blue Gown 19Public enemy 21Din 22Dismounted 24The Styx, e.g. 25The Beaver State 26City in Oklahoma 27 bean 28Honest 29Fully grown 31Picked out 33Incite 35Sibilant sound 37Central idea 38Marine creature 39Crime 40Throw with great effort 42Magnificent 43Boiled cornmeal 44Scratch 46Monster 47Animal habitation 48Bridge charge 52Red shade 53Allow 54Grave 56Mass of fish eggs 57Equally 58Average 59Cover girl 60Work by Rousseau 62Factor in heredity 6321-gun 65Wrath 66Mountain lion 67School subj. 68Warty creature 69Extensive 71Lacking sharpness 73Profound 75Carney or Garfunkel 76With on 77Steal from 78Compass direction 82Proportion in mathematics 84Isle of exile 85Rescue 86Rob 87Determine 90Go by plane 91Pulled 93Outer garment 94Pleasant smell 95Trendy store 97Nosebag filler 98British county 99Central 100Easygoing 102Group of three 104Oniony herbs 105Chirp 107Neck part 108Jaws creature 109Pressed 110Endures 112Kind of signal 113Battery terminal 114Stanza 117Supply 118Concerning (2 wds.) 119Adroit 123Lunar landscape feature 124Sudden increase 125 and Cleopatra 127Go team! 128 She Sweet 129River in France 131Mansfield Park author 133Swiftly 135Storm 136Appellations 137Game official 138Delayers motto 139Directed 140Arab VIPs 141Org. cousin 142Lyric poem DOWN 1Palin or Bernhardt 2Excuse 3Dwells 4Card in a hand 5Skin (pref.) 6Read 7Sluggish 8Knights attendant 9Writer Umberto 10Incalculable 11PC peripheral 12Liver secretion 13A letter 14State again 15Most tranquil 16Foreign 17Draws 19Incitement to act 20Bewitch 23London gallery 30Standing wide open 32Mitt 34Frequently, poetically 36Screeching bird 38Small bird 39Bay window 41Facilitate 42Mammoth 43Strong wind 44Goddess of the moon 45Cower 46Impostor 47Ore deposit 49First (abbr.) 50Montez or Falana 51Lascivious look 52Imprisoned 53Italian ice cream 54Kinds 55Sign gas 58New Zealand native 59Lose 61Silent 63Condition 64Writer Waugh 66Diced 70Priests vestment 71Stopped a car 72Adored 74Prudish 76Under 79Get in 80Skyrocketed 81Uses a keyboard 83Madam, Im 85Furtive one 87Humid 88Clevelands lake 89Cipher 90Floating ice mass 92Burning 93Complained 95Blackboard 96European range 98Wearing footgear 101Hold sacred 102Writer Henry David 103Libertine 104Sing 106Conspired 108Urban pollution 109Chant 111Simian animal 112Emphasize 113Toward the back 114Wound mark 115Courtroom event 116Extent 117More confident 118Opposing ones 120One of the Muses 121Confronted 122Then and 124Partly (pref.) 125Snakes 126New Havens school 130Everyones uncle 132Actress Thurman 134Food for babies SundayPUZZLER Brother hiding job from parents (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug h t on C amera A Hard Days Work C aug h t on C amera Into the Deep C aug h t on C amera Invasion! C aug h t on C amera L oc k up: R aw H e ll i n a Cell L oc k up: R aw Kill ers Among Us (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53To Catch a Smuggler To Catch a Smuggler Drugs, Inc. Rocky Mountain High Drugs, Inc. Miami Vices (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. Miami Vices (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Dora...Play OutSee DadWendell The Karate Kid Part III (1989) Ralph Macchio.Friends (OWN) 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs LifeclassOprahs Lifeclass (N)Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs Lifeclass (OXY) 44 123 Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped (N) PGSnapped PG Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Die Another Day (2002) PG-13 Dexter Monkey in a Box MA Ray Donovan Bucky F... Dent Dexter Remember the Monsters? MA Ray Donovan Same Exactly MA Ray Donovan Same Exactly MA (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Bar Rescue Broke Black Sheep PG Bar Rescue (In Stereo) PG Bar Rescue Barely Above Water PG Bar Rescue Tears for Beers PG Tattoo Rescue (In Stereo) PG Bar Rescue (In Stereo) PG (STARZ) 370 271 370 Looper (2012, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Emily Blunt. (In Stereo) R The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA King Arthur (2004, Historical Drama) Clive Owen. (In Stereo) PG-13 (SUN) 36 31 36 Addictive Fishing Ship Shape TV Sprtsman Adv. College Football Bethune-Cookman at Florida State. (Taped)Professional Tarpon Tournament Series Saltwater Exp. (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Resident Evil: Afterlife Drive Angry (2011, Action) Nicolas Cage, Amber Heard, William Fichtner. R Ghost Rider (2007) Nicolas Cage. A motorcycle stuntman is a supernatural agent of vengeance. PG-13 Sin City (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19Pursuit Tyler Perrys Why Did I Get Married Too? Tyler Perrys I Can Do Bad All By MyselfDupree (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Torn Curtain (1966, Suspense) Paul Newman, Julie Andrews. PG The 39 Steps (1935) Robert Donat. NR Sabotage (1936, Suspense) Sylvia Sidney. NR Alfred Hitchcock PG (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Tickle Tickle Airplane Repo (In Stereo) Airplane Repo Mid-Air Collision Airplane Repo No Rescue Repo Airplane Repo Flying Blind Airplane Repo No Rescue Repo (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Sister Wives PGSister Wives PGSister Wives (N) PGSister Wives (N) PGBreaking Amish: LASister Wives PG (TMC) 350 261 350 How to Lose Friends & Alienate People (2008) Simon Pegg. R Man on a Ledge (2012, Suspense) Sam Worthington. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Darkest Hour (2011) Emile Hirsch. PG-13 Brno (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Swordfish (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman. R Lethal Weapon 4 (1998) Mel Gibson. Detectives Riggs and Murtaugh battle Chinese mercenaries. R Rules of Engagement (2000) Tommy Lee Jones. (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs PGDragonsTeenAmericanClevelandFam. GuyBurgersFam. GuyChina, IL (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Food Paradise PGFood Paradise GMud People PGAdam Adam Making MonstersMaking Monsters (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Top 20 Funniest PGPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnContainerContainerContainerStorageStorage (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsThe Golden GirlsGold GirlsGold Girls (USA) 47 32 47 17 18 Bridesmaids (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. R (DVS) Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Bridesmaids (2011) R (WE) 117 69 117 Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace Will & Grace (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplayAnalyze This R SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsFootball Night in America NFL Football Chicago Bears at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N) News # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk WEDU Arts Plus Queen & Country Royal Visit G Last Tango in Halifax (N) Masterpiece Mystery! Mysterious military facility. (N) PG Great Romances As Time Goes By As Time Goes By % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpKeeping Up Appearances PGLast Tango Masterpiece Mystery! (N) PGThe Bletchley CircleAustin ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Football Night in America (N) (In Stereo Live) NFL Football Chicago Bears at Pittsburgh Steelers. From Heinz Field in Pittsburgh. (N) (In Stereo Live) News ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time (In Stereo) PG Revenge Truth Emily is forced to evaluate her quest. (In Stereo) PG NewsSports Night (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10NFL Football Indianapolis Colts at San Francisco 49ers. (N) (Live) The 65th Primetime Emmy Awards Honoring excellence in television. (N) (In Stereo Live) 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) American Dad The Simpsons The Simpsons Bobs Burgers Family Guy Dads Pilot FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsBurn Notice PG 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Funny Home VideosOnce Upon a TimeRevenge Truth (In Stereo) PG NewsInside Ed. 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileStakel/ Terror Peter Youngren Great AwakeningLove a Child G UnspokenKnow the Cause Daniel Kolinda Jesse Duplantis Bridging the Gap Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time (In Stereo) PG Revenge Truth Emily is forced to evaluate her quest. (In Stereo) PG NewsCastle PG @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order Panic (In Stereo) Law & Order Entitled How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 GoldenEye (1995) PG-13 SeinfeldSeinfeldRepublic of DoyleOur IsWhackedBorn/RideHonor H (WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the LordConnecPassion!Turning Point GJourneyJim RaleyBrody Ministries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12Friends PG Friends PG Two and Half Men Two and Half Men CSI: Miami Cop Killer CSI: Miami Counterfeiting. Criminal Minds Coda PG Criminal Minds Today I Do O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Casita Big Dog Rotary Club Family Solutions Healthy Living Your Citrus County CourtI Spy YEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7Big BangBig BangAmericanSimpsonsSimpsonsBurgersFam. GuyDads FOX 35 News at 10TMZ (N) PG (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroAqu y Ahora (SS)Mira Quin Baila (N) (SS) Sal y Pimienta PGComed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Law Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CI (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Bad Ink Bad Ink Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Bad Ink (N) Bad Ink PG Bad Ink Bad Ink (AMC) 55 64 55 Shooter (2007, Suspense) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Pea. Premiere. R Breaking Bad Ozymandias Breaking Bad A conclusion closes in. Low Winter Sun (N) Talking Bad Breaking Bad (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedGator Boys (In Stereo) PG To Be AnnouncedCall of Wildman Call of Wildman Gator Boys (N) (In Stereo) PG Call of Wildman Call of Wildman (BET) 96 19 96 Why Did I Get Married? (2007, Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry. PG-13 For Colored Girls (2010, Drama) Kimberly Elise. Crises, heartbreak and crimes bind together a group of women. R Real Husbands of Hollywood (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Tamra--WeddingHousewives/NJHousewives/NJHousewives/NJNeNe--WeddingHappensJersey (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park South Park MA South Park South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA South Park (N) MA Tosh.0 Brickleberry (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37To Be AnnouncedCops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Unforgiven (1992, Western) Clint Eastwood. (In Stereo) R (CNBC) 43 42 43 Focus 25Cook Debt/PartOn American GreedMob Money: American GreedMoney Talks (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46CNN Newsroom (N)CNN Newsroom (N)Anthony Bourd.Crimes of theInside Man (N) Crimes of the (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G Dog With a Blog G GoodCharlie GoodCharlie Liv & Maddie Austin & Ally G WanderYonder Jessie G GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G Dog With a Blog G Jessie G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)SportsCenter (N)MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers. (N) (Live)SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49WNBA BasketballBaseball Tonight (N)SportCtrNHRA Drag Racing AAA Texas FallNationals. From Dallas. NASCAR (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DevotionsCrossingWorld Over LiveSunday Night PrimeG.K.RosaryDogmatic TheologyGodBookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Ratatouille The Incredibles (2004, Comedy) Voices of Craig T. Nelson, Holly Hunter. PG Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011, Adventure) Johnny Depp, Penlope Cruz, Ian McShane. PG-13 (FLIX) 118 170 Billy Elliot (2000, Drama) Julie Walters, Jamie Bell. (In Stereo) R The Apostle (1998) Robert Duvall. An outlaw Texas preacher attempts to redeem himself. PG-13 Sling Blade (1996) Billy Bob Thornton. R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee FOX News SpecialStossel Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped G Kids Cook-OffKids Cook-OffFood Truck RaceCutthroat Kitchen GIron Chef America (FS1) 732 112 732 Jones MoseleyNASCARUFCUFC UltimateRonda RouseyThe Ultimate FighterFOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker TourWorld Poker TourThe Best of Pride (N)World Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 X-Men: First Class (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Rose Byrne. PG-13 Moneyball (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill. A baseball manager challenges old-school traditions. PG-13 X-Men: First Class (2011, Action) (GOLF) 727 67 727 Golf Central (N)PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf The Tour Championship, Final Round. (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Be My Valentine (2013, Romance) William Baldwin, Natalie Brown. Cedar Cove Jack may get a job offer. Hope Floats (1998, Romance) Sandra Bullock. PG-13 Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Hitchcock (2012) PG-13 Behind the Candelabra (2013) Michael Douglas, Matt Damon. (In Stereo) Boardwalk Empire (N) MA Boardwalk Empire MA Boardwalk Empire MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 The Hurricane (1999) R Real Time With Bill Maher MA Argo (2012, Historical Drama) Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin. (In Stereo) R The Descendants (2011, Drama) George Clooney. (In Stereo) R (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlExtreme Homes GLove It or List It, TooHouse Hunters RenoHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Mountain Men Judgment Day PG Mountain Men (N) PG The Great Santinis The Great Santinis American Pickers Motor City PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Devious Maids PG Devious Maids PG Devious Maids PG Devious Maids PG Devious Maids Totally Clean PG Devious Maids Totally Clean PG (LMN) 50 119 When a Child Kills (In Stereo) Killer Kids Group killings. Killer Kids Baby Killers Killer Kids (In Stereo) I Killed My BFF Silent Scream (N) I Killed My BFF Silent Scream (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3Dragonfly Varsity Blues (1999) James Van Der Beek. R Tower Heist (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. (In Stereo) PG-13 Battleship (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor Kitsch. (In Stereo) PG-13 TodaysMOVIES Crystal River Mall 9; 5646864 Battle of the Year (PG-13) In 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. The Family (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:15p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 1:10p.m., 4:10p.m., 7:10p.m. Planes (PG) 1:10p.m. Planes In 3D. (PG) 4:20p.m. No passes. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters (PG) 1:20p.m., 7:20p.m. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters In3D. (PG) 4p.m. No passes. Prisoners (R) 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Riddick (R) 1:30p.m., 4:45p.m., 7:50p.m. Were the Millers (R) 1:55p.m., 4:40p.m., 7:35p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:30p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. The Family (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m. One Direction: This Is Us The Extended Cut (PG) 4:40p.m. One Direction: This Is Us The Extended Cut In3D. (PG) 1:40p.m., 7:40p.m. Nopasses. Riddick (R) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7:10p.m. Were the Millers (R) 1:15p.m., 4:10p.m., 7:20p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Puzzle answer is on Page A17.

PAGE 15

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 A15 000G5V6

PAGE 16

Submit information for the Veterans page at least two weeks bef ore the event. Early submission of timely material is appr eciated, but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. VETERANS NOTES VETERANSPage A16SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE CF is military friendlyThe College of Central Florida has been recognized as a military-friendly school by Victory Media. The designation ranks CF as among the top 20 percent of schools nationwide that deliver the best experience for military students. The list of military-friendly schools was compiled through extensive research and survey of more than 10,000 Veterans Administration-approved schools nationwide. Criteria included military support on campus, academic credibility, percent of military students, academic credit for military students, flexibility for military students, veteran graduation rates, student tuition assistance and more. The College of Central Florida is dedicated to providing the best education and support services possible to active servicemen and women, veterans and their families, said Dr. Tim Wise, vice president of Student Affairs at CF. Victoria Media is a veteran-owned media company that enjoins the military community of troops, veterans and their family members with content targeted to unique needs at critical military life stages. To learn more about the rankings, visit www.militaryfriendlyschools.com. To learn more about CF, visit www.CF.edu. Elks vets breakfast todayInverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando will host a veterans breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. today. All are welcome. There is no charge for veterans; donations are appreciated from all others. For more information, call 352-464-2146.Upcoming reunionsThe Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association of Florida will have its 21st annual reunion Sept. 26 to 29 at the Sheraton Tampa East Hotel, 10221 Princess Palm Ave., Tampa. Contact Tom Rountree at trountree@tampabay.rr.com or 352-5607361 for details. USS Chilton APA 38 will have a reunion Oct. 10, 11 and 12 in New London, Conn. Contact Joe Doherty at 352-341-5959 or jdoherty1@tampabay.rr.com.Post to serve baked chickenVFW Edward W. Penno Post 4864 invites the public to a baked chicken dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. Donation is $8. Children younger than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For more information, call 352-465-4864. Post 8189 to do OctoberfestVFW Post 8189 invites everyone to Octoberfest beginning at 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at the post, 8856 Veterans Drive, Homosassa, across from Harley-Davidson on U.S. 19. Come enjoy German food, music by Rhonda, games and prizes. The event will be hosted by the Military Order of the Cootie and the MOC Auxiliary. Money raised will benefit hospitalized veterans. For more information, contact Anna Long at longmanatee@yahoo.com or 352-628-2643.40&8 to offer breakfast Oct. 6Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. the first Sunday each month at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). Donation is $6 for adults; special on kids (8 and younger) meals. Specialty drinks available for $1. Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8. Cooter Scooter Poker RunThe Cooter Scooter Poker Run will take place Saturday, Oct. 12, starting and ending at the Inverness VFW at 906 State Road 44 East. The schedule is: 8:30 a.m. Breakfast and registration at the Inverness VFW. 10 a.m. Kickstands up. 5 p.m. Prize winners announced (must be present). 3 to 7 p.m. Party with Soggy Bottom Bait Shop Boys at the end of the Freedom Run. Cost of $10 per person includes one poker hand ($5 extra hand). Tickets are on sale at Citrus County veterans organizations. All net proceeds received from the city of Inverness will be placed in the VFW Post 4337 Veterans Relief Fund to benefit local homeless/needy veterans and their families. The event is open to everyone, not just veterans. Bikes and cars are welcome. For details, call Victor at 352-220-3487. It was Aug. 10, 1951, and Davis was part of a squadron of Corsairs operating from the USS Boxer, an aircraft carrier cruising in the Sea of Japan off the coast of North Korea. Their targets of the day were the bridges at Majonni, the strike force consisting of four dogs, the nickname for A1 Skyraider bombers, and four hogs, or Corsair fighters. Davis and his fellow Corsair pilots were to supply support and protection for the bombers. Which is why he and Lamb were taking another strafing run. What Davis had spotted was a flash from an antiaircraft gun, which could possibly cause serious problems for the bombers. Flak suppressors is what we were, Davis said. I saw those tracers on my first run, so on the second I knew where they were. I came in for another strafing run and we exchanged fire. I guess you could say he won. Davis Corsair was hit and suffered serious damage to its wing and airfoil. I said, Peaches, get up here and find me a place to land. I didnt think I was going to make it, Davis said. But he did make it, piloting his banged-up Corsair to an air force base outside Seoul in South Korea. That was the scariest thing that happened to me, he said. Davis continued to fly in the Navy and stayed in the service for 33 years, retiring in 1978. A native of Forrest City, Ark., Davis and his family moved to Crystal River after his discharge and he started a flight training school at Crystal River Airport. He got a lease to operate the airport in 1983 and he remains the airports manager. This has been my longest duty station, he said. Davis actually tried to enlist in the U.S. Army Air Corps in January 1945, but he couldnt get in until he was out of high school. By the time he graduated six months later, the war against Germany was over and the program to recruit and train pilots was shut down. So Davis, whose older brother had flown P-51 Mustangs against Germany, decided to try the Navy. I thought Id be a submariner, Davis said. But the old chief at the (enlistment) desk by old I mean he was probably about 33 said I was too tall for submarines. He said, Why dont you try naval aviation? So I joined up. Davis eventually got his wings in 1948, training on F6F Hellcats and the Corsair. He went into the Navy Reserve in January of 1950, but he didnt remain there too long. When North Korea invaded South Korea on June 25 of that year, he was recalled to active duty. Davis tour in Korea would last eight months, during which he would fly close air support missions for troops and the escort bombers on missions. Bridge strikes were big, he said. Then there were railroad interdictions and depots that might have ammunition. Davis was also on duty off the coast of Vietnam in 1967 and He did not fly any missions, but he planned and scheduled strikes while serving aboard the aircraft carrier USS Intrepid. He was a captain when he retired, and he had graduated from college and had a masters degree from George Washington University. Despite his near miss on his mission to Majon-ni, Davis is uncertain he is worthy of any special attention for what he did fighting in two wars for the U.S. Thats why Im reluctant to tell war stories, he said. My experiences were nothing compared to some of those other guys. Davis continues to fly to this day. Flak damage to the Corsair wing as result of attack on major bridge complex at Majon-ni. Former Navy aviator now airport manager MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleAfter flying in the U.S. Navy for 33 years, Tom Davis retired and moved to Crystal River, where he has been the airports manager since 1983. The airport operates a popular flight school and many of those training are foreigners. Flags fly outside the airport and represent the home countries of the students who are training there. C.J. RISAK CorrespondentTom Davis, a lieutenant junior grade at the time and a U.S. Navy Air Force pilot, saw the flash from the side of the hill just after he had completed his first strafing run over the area in his F4U Corsair. He and his wingman, Peaches Lamb, did what they were supposed to do on such occasions: They soared back up, banked their Corsairs around, and came in for another pass. It proved to be a fateful decision, one that nearly cost Davis his life. NAME:Tom Davis RANK: Captain BRANCH:U.S. Navy TIMESERVED: 33 years, from 1945 to 1978 SHIPS:USS Boxer during Korean War; USS Intrepid during Vietnam War JOBS: Pilot with Fighter Squadron 173 in the Atlantic; pilot with Fighter Squadron 791 in Korean War; gunnery instructor with Fleet Air Gunnery Unit; pilot with Fighter Squadron 101; strike operations officer aboard USS Intrepid in Vietnam; Chief of Naval Operations Plans and Policy Division; deputy chief of staff, Naval Air Force Atlantic Fleet; commanding officer, Training Squadron Nine, Fleet Tactical Support Squadron One and Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Awards: Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, three air medals, Meritorious Service Medal, Commendation Medal The old sailor being piped over the side upon retirement in 1978. The two young officers in the foreground on each side are his daughter, Lt. Teresa Davis, and son, Ensign Jeff Davis.Special to the Chronicle

PAGE 17

Upcoming eventsSeptember 27: All American Muscle Night cruise-in at 6 p.m. at Arbys on U.S. 19 in Crystal River. September 28, October 5 and 12: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. hosted by Citrus County Cruisers at Wendys on U.S. 19 in Crystal River. October 1: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. High Octane Saloon on U.S. 19 in Homosassa. October 12: Nature Coast Mustang Clubs Fourth annual All Ford Powered Car & Truck Show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Nick Nicholas Ford on U.S. 44 in Inverness. Over 50 awards to be presented and proceeds benefit local charities. Register at www.nature coastmustangs.com November 9: Citrus MOPARS Club second annual Beauties & Beasts Car Show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep on Cortez Blvd. in Brooksville. Over 40 awards will be presented. Contact me for registration info.Ken McNally is a car columnist for the Chronicle. Contact him at kenmcnally@tampabay.rr.com or 352-341-1165. EXCURSIONSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 A17 648073If you want to advertise here in theGreat Getawayscall 563-5592 SundaysPUZZLER Puzzle is on Page A14. 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com (352) 726-6623 Stop spending your own valuable time and energy making your own travel arrangements. As your personal travel consultant, we will book all of your travel needs. Our prices are the same if not better than you would find booking yourself. The value of working with us is our knowledge, expertise, relationship with travel suppliers and our personal commitment to you. CALL OR STOP BY OUR OFFICE WE LOOK FORWARD TO ASSISTING YOU! ac cent travel SINCE 1972 000G4FE 000G53T #ST36390Full Service Travel Agency746-7547gerrystravelclub@aol.comGerry Jones, Ecc Pat Muller 746-7547 Married or not, but want to travel more!Come have lunch, network with others.Singles Travel Too!Youre Invited!Luncheon & PresentationThursday, October 17, 2013, 11:00 am $15 pp prepaidTuscany on the Meadows Quality Inn Hotel, Hernando, FL By reservation only. Call 352-746-7547 Mail check to: The Travel Club, 727 E Gilchrist Ct. Hernando, FL 34442 FL Seller of Travel: 10131 TALLY-HO 352-860-2805 000G4FF www.tallyhovacations.com dmuir@tallyhovacations.com No Hidden Fees 8 DAY BORA BORA BLISS Includes: Air from Los Angeles or Vancouver on Air Tahiti Nui, meet and greet, inter-island flights, transfers, 5 nights at Hilton Bora Bora Lagoon Resort and Spa in a Lagoon View Suite with breakfast daily. FROM $ 2,698* ex Los Angeles 8 DAY MOOREA MAGIC Includes: Air from Los Angeles or Vancouver on Air Tahiti Nui, meet and greet, inter-island ferry transportation, transfers, 5 nights at the InterContinental Moorea Resort & Spa in a Lanai rm. w/breakfast daily. FROM $ 1,998* ex Los Angeles Prices are per person, twin, and include all carrier imposed charges and government taxes. Price is based on double occupancy, two people travelling together and sharing a room. Travel 11/01/13-5/31/14 and higher prices apply 12/15/13-01/06/14. Sub ject to availability. Conditions apply. Book by 3/31/14. Bora Bora trip code: 188278. Moorea trip code: 188274 1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450 S TOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS T AHITI T AHITI THE ISLANDS OF THE ISLANDS OF GREAT GETAWAY embedded into our social life as they offer much more than farm products but also a vehicle for local residents to connect with neighbor artisans, local entrepreneurs or to discover treasures and learn a skill. In going with the trend in farmers markets, the downtown Crystal River market, which reopened on Sept. 14 after a summer hiatus, has changed its name to Market Days with Art and Treasures. And the newest market in the Crystal River Mall calls its monthly gathering of vendors, the West End Market. From different locations throughout the county, each market is unique, giving residents a reason to visit them all. Inverness Farmers Market is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the first and third Saturdays at the Government Plaza in the downtown area. More vendors are invited to set up a 10-feet-by-10-feet space. The cost is $15. Call 352-270-8559 for information. Two free spaces are set aside each market for nonprofit organizations but registration is required. With at least 22 vendors, theres fresh produce, local honey, custom-made jewelry, fresh cut flowers, stationery and business cards made from recycled paper, homemade dog biscuits, customembroidered towels and aprons, homemade pasta, Belgium ice cream, cinnamon rolls, herbs, native plants, essential oils and candles plus live music, said organizer Patti Muscaro. We have a celebrity vendor too. A farm in Floral City makes goat soap and insect repellent. Her soap was selected to be placed in the gift bags presented to celebrities at the Grammys, the nationally-broadcast music and artists awards show. Muscaro plans to have themes for some upcoming markets, such as Business Deals for Dogs, where there will be dog gifts and items, dogs for adoption. She also plans, Bike to the Market, with biking clubs and bicycle vendors. Look for a Kids Day too with face painters and other kids activities. Its an invitation for the community to unite. Beverly Hills Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday at 77 Civic Circle Drive. Spaces are 10-feet by 10-feet and cost $5 but vendors must bring their own tables, said organizer Bonnie Larson. If interested, call (352) 746-2657. The market includes vendors selling produce, plants, miscellaneous crafts, water soaps and jewelry to name a few. Theres also a hot dog and other food vendors. The market has been open all summer long and last week Larson said there were about 15 vendors but she expects the crowds and the vendors will increase later in the fall and when the snowbirds return. Its small town, good people who meet and greet and have a good time. Crystal River Market Days is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the second Saturday off Citrus Avenue on the grounds of Heritage Village in the downtown area. Spaces are 10-feet by 10-feet and cost $20. To set aside a space, call (352) 5641400. Organizer Laura Lou Tolle Fitzpatrick said the market has been going for a few years. The seasonal market has between 20 and 40 vendors. It depends on what events are going on and the time of the season, she said. Vendors offer such items as local produce, plants, pantry items, art and vintage collectibles. The Shoppes at Heritage Village also offer special sales for Market Days and food tastings. Weve had a good following of artists and crafters who have been with me for years, Tolle Fitzpatrick said. Obviously they sell or they wouldnt be coming back. She said on Friday nights before Market Days, the Shoppes have Art on the Avenue hosted by three galleries. A lot of artists participate, she said. (Market Days) gives people the connectivity. They enjoy the artists and pick up their produce. West End Market at the Crystal River Mall is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the fourth Saturday at the mall on U.S. Route 19. Spaces are $20 no matter what size they want. Kids can set up a table for $5. Products must be homemade. The market is the newest and largest addition to the genre, opening in July. The first month there were 62 vendors. August brought 90 vendors, said mall manager Millie Bresnahan. Were going to top it off at 80, she said. Offerings included fresh fruits and vegetables, plants, lots of arts and crafts, jewelry, unique flower pots, basket-weaving, painting, water color and pencil art and lots of woodworking. Were adding a farm swap, Bresnahan said. Its a concept at Tractor Supply in Dunnellon, a swap meet with animals chickens, pigs, goats. They are also offering a section for child entrepreneurs, children who have businesses or want to try selling something that is homemade, Bresnahan said so far there were two child businesses. Epic Sudz is operated by a couple of girls, one high school and one middle school, who make soap. They were trying their skills in salesmanship it was quite interesting. They gave me their card. Its a really nice experience, total learning lesson. Another group of kids are homeschooled. They like to make things and sell them, Bresnahan said. Its a neat thing. She said the market has also opened up other avenues at the mall, spinoffs, she said. The mall is offering empty space for artists. They come in and they do their crafts in front of people. She said one artist has been offering classes using the coffee shop at the food court. The space is named an Open Workshop, where they can offer classes or they can sit and do their work. They can come in when they want. She said so far the endeavor has been successful. Its been very nice to drive into the parking lot and see if full. People want to see the mall evolve. She describes the West End Market as an outdoor market but inside, with air-conditioning. It works well. Everybodys happy and the vendors seem to be happy. CARContinued from Page A13 MARKETSContinued from Page A13 JENNIFERFORKER Associated PressSome jewelry makers take more than inspiration from nature; they incorporate found objects from trails and beaches in their work. The result? Personal, one-of-a-kind pieces that impart a natural beauty. Lisa Bernal, of Arvada, Colo., and her business partner, Jennifer Buchanan, of Keystone, Colo., have been making jewelry together for three years. First, they used leather and small stones. Their work now incorporates driftwood, tumbled smooth by nature. We were looking for fresh, unique connector pieces for the leather and the stones, recalls Bernal. They build pieces around the driftwood, incorporating semi-precious stones such as aquamarine and amazonite, and sell them at their online store, Elle Jay/ Natural Jewelry Design House, and at select Colorado stores. We try to do as little as possible to the driftwood, said Bernal. The most well do is add mineral oil to bring out the richness of the wood. Often, the shape of the driftwood dictates how itll be used. Each piece sort of wants to be something and then you just figure it out, said Buchanan. Thats why I love it. I think its fun to play with something and then it becomes this amazing work of art. The smooth stones, beach glass and pottery shards which jewelrymaker Karen Vesk of Erie, Pa., finds along the shores of Lake Erie impart similar clues. I kind of wait for them to speak to me after I get them back home, she said. Vesk also uses small shells and broken shell pieces that she collects on trips to Southern beaches. Shell fragments have an almost sculptural, abstract look to them, she said. The tricky part is preparing found objects for stringing particularly the sea glass, Vesk said. Its more breakable, she said. If it shatters, it can go in your eye. She wears safety glasses when drilling holes with her Dremel drill press, taking it slowly. Vesk sells pre-drilled pieces along with her jewelry at her Etsy store, Sunshine Statements. Still, she recommends using real beach glass rather than trying to tumble your own, as she once tried, or buying it at a crafts store. Real beach glass has a frosting to it, Vesk said. It has more of a glow of a gem. And thats whats so very desirable. Tumbled and artificial glass look like etched glass, she said. Funny thing about that beach glass, too: Its harder to find when the skies are blue. Vesk goes hunting when its stormy, which churns up the surf, kicking up glass and other treasures, such as hand-painted pottery shards from Lake Eries commercial heyday. Normal people are inside by the fireplace with a cup of hot cocoa or whatever they like, and Im out on the beach, said Vesk. I look for the windiest weather. I really enjoy it. Jewelry made from found natural objects is often asymmetrical something Lorelei Eurto of New Hartford, N.Y., specializes in. In Bohemian-Inspired Jewelry (Interweave, 2012), she and co-author Erin Siegel, include 50 jewelry-making projects inspired by nature. They use a lot of leather cord, silk ribbon and handmade beads, and they recommend basic materials and tools, such as various pliers, for getting started. Most folks can get by with basic jewelry-making skills, such as crimping, stringing and using jump rings, said Eurto, who sells her pieces online at Lorelei Eurto Jewelry. When nature fashions your beads, these artists say, you have to take to the trails and shorelines frequently to replenish supplies. I have a hard time going to the park with my daughter now, said Bernal. Its like a giant jewelry box. Nature dictates art for some jewelry makers Associated PressEarrings made from surf-tumbled ceramic shards are shown. Karen Vesk, of Erie, Penn., hunts for beach glass and pottery shards at the Lake Erie shoreline. She visits Southern states beaches for small shells and shell fragments, which she said have an almost sculptural, abstract look to them.

PAGE 18

Jerseyans, friends plan trekNew Jersey and Friends of Citrus County will take a bus trip to the Victory Casino Cruise ship on Wednesday, Nov. 6. Cost for the trip will include bus, admission, buffet and play money. The public is invited. Call Mary Anne at 352-746-3386.NYC club plans trip to SmokiesThe New York Club of Citrus County will take a seven-day/six-night trip to Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg, Tenn., in the Smoky Mountains Sunday through Saturday, Nov. 10 through 16. Cost includes bus transportation, six nights lodging including four consecutive nights in the Smokies, four evening shows and three morning shows. Departure from Hernando is to be announced. Call Paula Margies at 352-527-1433 or Sue Irish at 352-860-2956.Literary Group to visit museumThe Crystal River Womans Club invites the public to join members on a one-day bus trip on Wednesday, Oct. 16, to visit Majorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park, followed by the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville and the Museum of Natural History. Lunch will be at the Vellos Brickstreet Grill. For cost and more information, and to reserve a seat, call Jo Ann Ryan at 352-382-1138 or Joan Sweety at 352-564-8773.Group invites all on treksThe Meadowcrest Community Association will sponsor a bus trip to Bok Tower and Gardens on Thursday, Oct. 10. In December, the group will travel to Ybor City. Price for both trips includes bus, admission, guided tour, lunch, all gratuities (including driver) and Fun on the Bus. The trips are open to the public. Call the Meadowcrest social committee chairwoman, Sharon Ziemba, at 352-795-4693 for price, deadlines, departure points and times and other details. Sept. 9-15, 2013 Marriages Joseph Louis Joachim, Inverness/Cynthia Lynne Shepherd, Inverness Patrick Michael Nichols, Dunnellon/Christy Michelle Romero, Dunnellon Daniel Felipe Ortiz, Ocala/ Monica Johanna Reynolds, Ocala Arbelio Adam Perez, Citrus Springs/Lisa Marie Welch, Citrus Springs Brian James Singh, Dunnellon/Sara Grace Mann, Dunnellon Christopher Joseph Warick, Crystal River/ Suzanne Marie Hook, Crystal River Nicholas Michael Wilson, Homosassa/Jessica Monique Iannelli, Homosassa For theRECORDA18SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 70thANNIVERSARY The Paolillos Ben and Frances Paolillo of Beverly Hills will celebrate 70 years of marriage Sept. 26, 2013. The couple were wed Sept. 26, 1943, at Lady of Grace Church in Brooklyn, N.Y. They will be celebrating with their four children, six grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren in New York City. 50thANNIVERSARY The Breeses John and Ida Breese celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Sept. 14, 2013. The couple, who have lived in Citrus County for 26 years, were married Sept. 14, 1963, in Bradenton. John is a financial adviser with Edward Jones and Ida is a homemaker. They have three children: Belinda Nettles of High Springs, Janet Jones of Inverness and Andrew Breese of Ocala. They have six grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. John and Ida Breese celebrated with a trip to Orlando with their children and grandchildren. 64thANNIVERSARY The Frisbies Arthur and Rita Frisbie of Sugarmill Woods will celebrate their 64th wedding anniversary on Sept. 24, 2013. The couple were married Sept. 24, 1949, at St. Josephs Church, Newton, N.J. Rita is a retired beautician and homemaker and Art is a retired GMC/Buick dealership owner. They have resided in Sugarmill Woods for 13 years. They have 10 children: Kathy Frisbie, Homosassa; Eileen Kithcart, Newton, N.J.; Sharon Benton, deceased; Maureen Iwanacki, Newton, N.J.; Coleen Frisbie, Homosassa; Arthur Frisbie Jr., Newton, N.J.; Thomas Frisbie, Newton, N.J.; David Frisbie, Canfield, Ohio; Karen Frisbie, Newton, N.J.; and Kevin Frisbie, Seffner. The Frisbies have 21 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. They will celebrate with a dinner with family and friends. 50thANNIVERSARY The Lytles Bob and Geri Lytle of Beverly Hills celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Sept. 14, 2013. The couple were married Sept. 14, 1963, in Altoona, Pa. Mr. Lytle is the former manager of Bealls Department Store Crystal River. They have 10 grandchildren. Bob and Geri celebrated with their family in Helen, Ga. 50thANNIVERSARY The Harveys Albert and Corrine Harvey celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in Beverly Hills on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. The couple were married Sept. 14, 1963, at St. Alphonus Church in Dearborn, Mich. Al worked for American Motors and Chrysler Engineering departments, and retired in 1994. He is a life member of the VFW and has been in the Knights of Columbus in Beverly Hills. Corrine was a lingerie consultant at the J.L. Hudsons Co. for 35 years. She enjoys crafts and homemaking. They renewed their wedding vows at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church. A celebration followed at Tuscany on the Meadows with dinner and dancing. GET TOGETHER See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers AND trade-in allowances from $50 up to $1,000 valid on qualifying systems only sold from September 16 November 15, 2013. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where p rohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special t erms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special t erms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. Reduced Rate APR: M onthly payments of at least 1.75% of the purchase balance are required during the special terms period. 0% APR: The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary with t he market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 1/1/2013. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. If you use the card f or cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly paymen t if shown based on $xx purchase. 352-746-0098 H.E. Smith Co. Inc 1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 www.trane.com LICENSE # RA0035171 Dont let this offer pass you by. Unstoppable savings now thru November 15th. Its tough to find a fall value more unstoppable. Trade-up to Trane, the number one name in reliability. September 16 through November 15, 2013, get renowned Trane efficiency at the best value ever. Pay 0% interest for 36 months, plus a trade-in cash allowance up to $1000. Call today and enjoy the colors of fall. And save green. Energy prices have skyrocketed and so has demand for systems that cut usage. Tranes XLi high efficiency systems are among the most cost-effective options available today. Maximum comfort and lower heating and cooling costs-thats the Trane difference. Dont get left behind in the cold. Offer only lasts thru November 15th. 000G2WS We take customer satisfaction to the highest degree.

PAGE 19

College football/B2 Golf/B3 NASCAR/ B3 Scoreboard/B4 Baseball/ B5 High school/B6 Adult recreation/ B6 Cobbs 12 Ks, Jennings three-run blast help keep Rays atop Wild Card standings/B5 Section BSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000FXAZ When Bucs meet Pats, equal but opposite problems Associated PressTampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman throws a pass Sept. 15 as New Orleans Saints defensive tackle John Jenkins (92) gets past guard Gabe Carimi (72) during the first half in Tampa. Associated PressFOXBOROUGH, Mass. If Tom Brady had Tampa Bays veteran receivers on his team, the NFLs two-time MVP might not have had so much trouble winning his first two games. If the Buccaneers had Brady instead of struggling Josh Freeman at quarterback, their chances of being unbeaten instead of winless would have been infinitely better. On Sunday, Brady again will try to get in sync with the New England Patriots crop of rookie wide receivers, another test of his admitted lack of patience when there is a game to be won. I think theres a real urgency to what we do here, he said. This is not tiddlywinks. This is real football and this is a real job and were held accountable every single day for what we do every single day. This is about winning football games, and were doing our best to do it, and thats why we work hard. Thats why you make the commitments you make to the players that you play with, so that we can go out and try to win, and win on a consistent basis. With Danny Amendola expected to be sidelined with a groin injury, three of Bradys top four wide receivers are rookies. The Patriots also are missing running back Shane Vereen with a broken wrist, but hope to have star tight end Rob Gronkowski for the first time after offseason forearm and back surgery. Freeman has plenty of help with running back Doug Martin and wide receivers Vincent Jackson and Mike Williams. But Freeman is 30th in the NFL in passer rating and 33rd in completion percentage. Theres some good things you look at the first two ballgames, despite some that were inconsistent or a little bit rocky Tampa Bay heads to Foxborough still hunting for win See BUCS/ Page B3 Associated PressFlorida quarterback Tyler Murphy looks for a receiver Saturday as he is pressured by Tennessee defensive lineman Jacques Smith during the first half in Gainesville. Tennessee defensive back Cameron Sutton breaks up a pass intended for Florida wide receiver Quinton Dunbar. Associated PressGAINESVILLEAfter starting quarterback Jeff Driskel was lost to a season-ending ankle injury, Tyler Murphy led No. 19 Florida to five scores in a somewhat ugly game, helping the Gators open Southeastern Conference play with a 31-17 victory over Tennessee on Saturday. Murphy had a 52-yard touchdown throw to Solomon Patton, a swing pass that went the distance, and made several plays with his legs as Florida (2-1, 1-0 SEC) won its ninth consecutive game in the series. Murphys 7-yard TD scamper in the fourth quarter made it 31-10 and sent fans scrambling for the exits. The Volunteers (2-2, 0-1) had hoped to rebound from an embarrassing, 59-14 loss at No. 2 Oregon a week ago. Instead, Tennessee and first-year coach Butch Jones left Gators lose QB Driskel for season, but stay in step under Murphy See GATORS/ Page B2 Associated PressTALLAHASSEE No. 8 Florida State and quarterback Jameis Winston defeated FCS opponent Bethune-Cookman 54-6 despite plenty of sloppy play on Saturday. The defending ACC champions (3-0, 1-0) will want to clean up their offense before starting a seven-game stretch against conference foes next week. Winston completed 10 of 19 passes for 148 yards and two touchdowns. And Devonta Freeman ran for a game-high 112 yards and a touchdown. Karlos Williams finished with 83 yards rushing and two touchdowns, and James Wilder, Jr. Associated PressMIAMI GARDENS Dallas Crawford and Gus Edwards both scored three touchdowns and No. 16 Miami got into the end zone on its first seven possessions, rolling to a 77-7 victory over Savannah State on Saturday night. The Hurricanes set a school record for points in a game, topping the 75 scored against Fordham in 1954. Miami (3-0) lost quarterback Stephen Morris to a lower right leg injury with 8:51 left in the opening quarter. Hurricanes coach Al Golden said in a televised halftime interview that Morris was fine and X-rays were negative. Canes QB goes down with leg injury Seminoles trounce Bethune 54-6 See NOLES/ Page B2 See CANES/ Page B2

PAGE 20

B2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE COLLEGEFOOTBALL Associated PressMichigan State running back Jeremy Langford battles for yardage with Notre Dame cornerback Bennett Jackson during the first half Saturday in South Bend, Ind. Associated PressSOUTH BEND, Ind. Cam McDaniel scored on a 7-yard run following a questionable pass interference call, one of several penalties that hurt Michigan State, as Notre Dame beat the Spartans 17-13 for their 10th straight home win. The Irish (3-1) also took advantage of another questionable pass interference in the first half that set up a 2-yard touchdown pass from Tommy Rees to TJ Jones and a holding penalty that kept alive a drive that led to a 41-yard field goal by Kyle Brindza. The Spartans (3-1) had 10 penalties for 115 yards by the Big Ten officials. But Michigan State made some costly mistakes on its own, including a trick play after the Spartans appeared to be gaining momentum. After opening the second half with a field goal, receiver R.J. Shelton threw a pass that was intercepted by safety Matthias Farley and led to Notre Dames go-ahead touchdown.No. 1 Alabama 31, Colorado St. 6TUSCALOOSA, Ala. AJ McCarron passed for 258 yards and threw a 30-yard touchdown to DeAndrew White in the fourth quarter to lift No. 1 Alabama to a 31-6 victory over Colorado State on Saturday night. Kenyan Drake set up one touchdown with a blocked punt and scored on a 3-yard touchdown run for the Crimson Tide (3-0), which sputtered at times. Alabama managed only one offensive touchdown and no third-down conversions in the first three quarters a week after winning a 49-42 shootout over Texas A&M. Coached by former Tide offensive coordinator Jim McElwain, the Rams (1-3) nursed hopes for a monumental upset into the fourth quarter before allowing two touchdowns. Trey DePriest stripped the ball from quarterback Garrett Grayson and recovered the fumble. The next play McCarron laced a perfect strike to White in the end zone and restless Alabama fans got something to cheer about.No. 4 Ohio St. 76, FAMU 0COLUMBUS, Ohio Kenny Guiton again starred in place of the injured Braxton Miller, setting a school record with six touchdown passes all in the first half to lead No. 4 Ohio State to a 76-0 victory against Florida A&M. It was the most lopsided Ohio State win since 1935. The Buckeyes (4-0) needed a total of four offensive plays and 46 seconds to go up 21-0 in the opening 6 minutes and never looked back. It was an epic mismatch between a team with national-title aspirations and a Football Championship Subdivision member getting a $900,000 guarantee. FAMU (1-3), which suffered its worst loss ever, trailed 48-0 before picking up its initial first down in the second quarter. Guiton completed 24 of 34 passes for 215 yards.No. 5 Stanford 42, No. 23 Arizona State 28STANFORD, Calif. Tyler Gaffney ran for 95 yards and two touchdowns, Anthony Wilkerson added 68 yards and another score, and No. 5 Stanford started strong in a 42-28 victory over No. 23 Arizona State in the Pac-12 opener for both teams. The defending conference champions controlled every facet of the game to turn the only matchup between ranked opponents this week into a 29-0 halftime lead. The Cardinal (3-0, 1-0) scored in the air and on the ground, forced two turnovers, blocked two punts, tallied 10 tackles for loss and recorded three sacks.No. 7 Louisville 72, Florida International 0LOUISVILLE, Ky. Teddy Bridgewater threw four touchdown passes and Louisvilles defense allowed a school-record 30 yards, helping the seventhranked Cardinals blow out Florida International 72-0. It was the highest scoring game for the Cardinals (4-0) since a 73-10 victory over Murray State in 2007. It also matched the schools fifth-largest margin of victory. Bridgewater hit DeVante Parker for two TD passes and Gerald Christian and Eli Rogers for one each before Will Gardner came in to throw another touchdown to Michaelee Harris in the fourth quarter. Dominique Brown, Senorise Perry, Michael Dyer and Brandon Radcliff rushed for scores.No. 9 Georgia 45, North Texas 21ATHENS, Ga. Aaron Murray threw for 408 yards and three touchdowns, ran for another score, and led No. 9 Georgia to a 45-21 victory over pesky North Texas. Murray overcame an early interception in the end zone, hooking up with freshman Reggie Davis on a 98-yard TD the longest pass play in school history. Arthur Lynch and Chris Conley also had touchdown catches for the Bulldogs (2-1). The Mean Green (2-2) came in as a 33-point underdog, but big plays on special teams helped make a game of it. Brelan Chancellor returned a kickoff 99 yards for a touchdown, and Zac Whitfield fell on a blocked punt in the end zone early in the second half to stunningly tie the game at 21.No. 10 Texas A&M 42, SMU 13COLLEGE STATION, Texas Johnny Manziel accounted for 346 yards with three touchdowns in just more than a half to help No. 10 Texas A&M cruise to a 42-13 win over SMU on Saturday night. Texas A&M (3-1) was up 32-6 at halftime, and Manziel led the Aggies to a touchdown on their first drive of the third quarter before the Heisman Trophy-winner went to the bench. Manziel had 244 yards passing with a touchdown and ran for 102 yards and two more scores. Deshazor Everett returned a fumble 12 yards for a touchdown and Ben Malena ran for 71 yards and two scores. He got things going for A&M with a 3-yard touchdown run in the first quarter.No. 17 Washington 56, Idaho State 0SEATTLE Keith Price threw for 213 yards and three touchdowns in less than a half, Deontae Cooper scored his first career touchdown after three major knee surgeries, and No. 17 Washington routed Idaho State 56-0 in the Huskies final tuneup before the start of Pac-12 Conference play. Bishop Sankey, the national leader in yards rushing per game, barely broke a sweat against the Bengals (2-1) of the FCS. Sankey saw action on the Huskies (3-0) first three series and scored on a 3-yard TD run in the first quarter. Sankey finished with 77 yards on four carries. Price played a little more than 1 1/2 quarters, throwing TD passes of 1, 6 and 5 yards and adding a 1-yard TD run as the Huskies led 42-0 at halftime.No. 18 Northwestern 35, Maine 21EVANSTON, Ill. Linebacker Damien Proby and defensive end Dean Lowry each had an interception return for a touchdown to lead No. 18 Northwestern to a 35-21 win over Maine. Northwestern improved to 4-0 as it wrapped up its non-conference slate, but this was not the consistent, steady performance coach Pat Fitzgerald was looking for heading into the Big Ten season. If not for the interception returns for scores, Maine (3-1) very well could have been shooting for an upset down the stretch. Running back Mike Trumpy and quarterback Kain Colter each had rushing touchdowns for Northwestern.No. 20 Baylor 70, Louisiana Monroe 7WACO, Texas Bryce Petty threw for 351 yards with four touchdowns and ran 2 yards for another score as No. 20 Baylor kept piling up the points, beating Louisiana-Monroe 70-7. The fast-paced Bears (3-0) had seven offensive touchdowns in the 10 drives Petty played. Those TD drives took a total of 6 minutes. Baylor is the first FBS team since LSU in 1930 to open a season with at least 60 points in three consecutive games, according to STATS. Those Tigers had at least 70 points in each of those games Baylor scored 69 in its opener before 70 points in each of its last two games. ULM (2-2), coming off a victory at Wake Forest of the ACC last week, suffered its worst loss since a 73-7 loss at Auburn in 2003.No. 24 Wisconsin 41, Purdue 10MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gordon ran for three touchdowns, James White added 145 yards and a 70-yard score, and No. 24 Wisconsin opened Big Ten play with a 41-10 win over Purdue. Gordon scored from 5 and 27 yards in the first half before capping the opening drive of the second with a 15-yard touchdown run for the Badgers (3-1, 1-0). Nose guard Warren Herring had a sack, and Chris Borland added six tackles to lead an active defense. Gainesville with another doubledigit setback. Jones strangest decision might have been to bench Justin Worley and give redshirt freshman Nathan Peterman his first career start on the road and in front of 90,000. Peterman, who grew up in nearby Jacksonville, had three turnovers in a 17-minute span in the first half and was benched at the break. Worley wasnt a whole lot better. Then again, no one was perfect aside from Floridas defense. Murphy completed 8 of 14 passes for 134 yards. He also ran 10 times for 84 yards. His biggest mistake was taking a snap off his facemask, a botched play that resulted in a fumble. That was one of seven turnovers on the day. The Volunteers had four all in the first half. Peterman had three, and Raijon Neal fumbled on the teams second play. Dante Fowler Jr. wrecked the exchange, his first of several big plays. Florida had three turnovers in the first half, including running back Matt Jones second in two games. The Gators also botched a snap on a punt, a miscue that gave Tennessee great field position before Neals fumble. The most worrisome one for Florida was the one in which Driskel got hurt. Driskel, already playing with a brace on his sprained left knee, twisted his right ankle while throwing an interception in the first quarter. Devaun Swafford picked off the pass and returned it 62 yards for a touchdown and a 7-0 lead. Marlon Walls pulled Driskel to the ground as he released the ball. Driskel tried to get up, but dropped back to the turf and called for trainers. He limped off the field a few minutes later, got checked on the sideline and then used crutches to get to the locker room. Driskel was then ruled out for the rest of the season. Murphy replaced him on the next drive. The fourth-year junior had never thrown a pass in college, watching from the sideline as Driskel, Jacoby Brissett, John Brantley, Jordan Reed and Trey Burton all took snaps ahead of him. An injury to Driskel was supposed to significantly hamper Floridas offense. But the Gators hardly missed a beat with Murphy running things. He led the offense to four touchdowns and a field goal in nine drives. Of course, it came against Tennessee, which has lost the last seven games in the series by double digits. A couple of those were downright onesided. The Gators finished with 382 total yards, 162 more than Tennessee. The Volunteers got going in the fourth, when Worley found Pig Howard alone in the corner of the end zone. It came with Florida down three defensive backs. Cornerback Marcus Roberson (knee) missed the game, and fellow cornerback Loucheiz Purifoy left after sustaining a thigh bruise in the second half. Defensive back Brian Poole was ejected early in the fourth quarter for targeting. The play was upheld after review, meaning Poole will miss the first half of next weeks game at Kentucky. With Driskel out, the Gators surely feel much better after Murphys performance. GATORSContinued from Page B1 Irish avoid upset Spartans make it competitive on a Saturday full of blowouts added 56 yards and a touchdown. The Wildcats (3-1) scored their lone touchdown off a seven-yard run from quarterback Jackie Wilson with 8:21 left in the third quarter. Florida State ran away in the second quarter, but all three starting receivers had dropped passes, including two for touchdowns. The defense also missed several tackles. Both teams committed their share of unforced errors in an odd first half. Bethune-Cookman returner Darian Baker muffed two kickoffs that left the offense starting from the 2 and the 6. Tackle Alex Monroe was flagged for holding in the end zone to give the Seminoles a safety. Quarterback Quentin Williams stared down and pointed to receiver Eddie Poole just before Telvin Smith picked off the pass and returned it 68 yards for a touchdown. Florida State receivers entered the game without a single drop this season. Telvin Smith posted a game-high 12 tackles and had his first sack of the season. The Seminoles three sacks matched their total from the first three games. Redshirt freshman defensive end Chris Casher finished with 10 tackles, including two for loss. Florida State will travel to face Boston College next Saturday. NOTES: Florida States Tyler Hunter sustained a bruised neck contusion in the first quarter and didnt return. He was replaced in the secondary by Keelin Smith. ... Florida State Sophomore Terrance Smith made his first career start in place of Jones and recorded his first career sack in the first quarter. NOLESContinued from Page B1 Stacy Coley had a kickoff return for a score and a touchdown catch for Miami, which has won five straight games for the first time since 2008. Duke Johnson, Allen Hurns and Beau Sandland all added a touchdown for the Hurricanes, in a game that had the final quarter shortened to 12 minutes by mutual agreement of the coaches. DeQuan Daniels had a 75-yard touchdown run for Savannah State (1-3). Johnson opened the game with a 95-yard kickoff return, and Crawford ran in from 4 yards out on Miamis first snap. The Hurricanes needed twice as many plays that would be two to score on their next possession, with Morris finding Hurns with an 80-yard touchdown pass. The third possession was the one that went wrong for Miami, which visits winless South Florida (0-3) next Saturday. Morris was under pressure from Savannah States Alex Wierzbicki, threw an incomplete pass and ended up on the ground for the next few moments. He ended up walking to the sideline without assistance, though he was surrounded by Miami medical personnel and moving with a pronounced limp. Trainers continued checking his right ankle, and Morris eventually left the field so X-rays which were negative could be taken. CANESContinued from Page B1

PAGE 21

SPORTSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 B3 000G4NC along the way, offensive coordinator Mike Sullivan said of Freemans play. Its not just one player, its not just one play, its a combination of a collective group of men going out and executing. To this point, we havent done that. Five things to look for when the Bucs (0-2) visit the Patriots (2-0): CLOSE CALLS: Tampa Bays losses have been by field goals in the closing seconds, dropping coach Greg Schiano to 0-5 in games decided by three or fewer points. Its frustrating, sure. Just when you lose, period, its frustrating, he said. When you put 85-90 hours of work into a week, and then you dont achieve what you set out to achieve, frustrating would be probably the most mild word you could use. MORE CLOSE CALLS: The Patriots beat the Buffalo Bills 23-21 on a field goal with 5 seconds left, then edged the New York Jets 13-10 when Brady completed fewer than half his passes for the first time in 58 games, including the postseason. I think everyone knows were a couple of plays away from losing games and they were a couple of plays away from winning games, Patriots safety Devin McCourty said, so you really cant always take a team just from the record. OLD-TIME QB: After facing rookie quarterbacks in their first two games, the Patriots will go against five-year veteran Freeman. That gives them more video to help prepare. But it also makes it tougher to confuse a player with plenty of experience. BETTER D, BUT: With the addition of backs Darrelle Revis and Dashon Goldson, Tampa Bays defense has shown dramatic improvement over last season, when it nearly set an NFL for yards passing allowed. But the Bucs have been unable to finish off the opposition. SNEAK PREVIEW: The teams held joint practices in Foxborough before the Patriots beat the Buccaneers 25-21 in an exhibition game. That experience likely had limited value for the teams in getting ready for Sunday because neither side revealed much of what it would do in the regular season. It was definitely not showing them everything that we have in our playbook. Theyll sure see it this upcoming week, Martin said. BUCSContinued from Page B1 Patriots wide receiver Aaron Dobson tries, but cant pull in a pass from Tom Brady on Sept. 12 during the second quarter against the New York Jets in Foxborough, Mass.Associated Press Associated PressHenrik Stenson eyes his putt Saturday on the sixth hole during the third round of play in the Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta. Associated PressATLANTA Stepping in from rain that ruined his rhythm and the back end of his round, Henrik Stenson was more interested in looking forward at the Tour Championship. He still had a four-shot lead. He was one round from capturing two trophies worth $11.44 million, including the FedEx Cup. The Swede just made the final day of the PGA Tour season a little more interesting over the last two hours of a dreary Saturday morning at East Lake. He had a nine-shot lead at the turn and walked off the 18th green with a three-putt bogey and his lead back to where it was at the start of the day. Of course, I want to win two, Stenson said after a 1-under 69. If I cant win two, Ill be very pleased to win one. If Im winning nothing, it will probably be not so sweet from this position. But I didnt have anything when I came here, so well see what well leave with. Stenson appeared to have both wrapped up when he got up-and-down from a bunker on the par-5 ninth for a tap-in birdie to reach 14 under, nine shots clear of Dustin Johnson. Everything changed as the rain began to fall. Stenson made four bogeys on the back nine. It might have been worse if not for a pair of 12-foot putts he made on the 14th hole for bogey and the 17th hole for par. Johnson was five shots better on the back for a 67, matching the low round of a tough day for scoring and got into the last group. Johnson and Steve Stricker, who had a 68 and was at 5-under 205, were the only players within six shots of him. Stenson, the No. 2 seed in the FedEx Cup, is still in great shape to go home with a lot of money $10 million for winning the FedEx Cup, $1.44 million for winning the Tour Championship. Even if he were to finish third, he still would be in good shape to win golfs biggest payoff. Tiger Woods, the No. 1 seed, didnt make a birdie until he chipped in on the 14th hole. He rallied for a 69, the first time he has broken par all week. Woods was at 3-over 213, 14 shots behind in a tie for 26th.Australias Marcus Fraser leads Italian OpenTURIN, Italy Marcus Fraser shot a 4-under 68 Saturday, giving the Australian a one-stroke lead over Italys Francesco Molinari, Belgiums Nicolas Colsaerts and Swedens Joakim Lagergren after three rounds of the Italian Open. Fraser had a chip-in birdie on the sixth hole in a bogey-free round that left him at 11 under. Molinari is trying to capture his national tournament for the second time, having won in Milan in 2006. He became a member of the Golf Club Torino when he was 8 years old.Americans stretch their lead in PGA CupHEXHAM, England Rod Perry and Jeff Sorenson contributed birdies on their last four holes Saturday and the Americans took a 10 1/2 5 1/2 lead over Great Britain & Ireland in the PGA Cup. Perry, who won the PGA Professional National Championship this year, nearly holed out for eagle from a bunker on the 13th hole and chipped in for birdie on the 15th. Sorenson made seven birdies in their 3-and-2 fourballs win over Nick Brennan and Gareth Wright. The teams split the morning foursome matches at Slaley Hall. Greig Hutcheon and Scott Henderson of GB&I had an 8-up lead at the turn before winning, 6 and 5. The Americans halved the next fourballs match and won the other two. The PGA Cup, for club professionals, ends Sunday with 10 singles matches. Stenson takes 4-shot lead into final round Tour Championship par scoresSaturday, At East Lake Golf Club, Atlanta, Purse: $8 million, Yardage: 7,307, Par: 70, Third Round: Henrik Stenson64-66-69 199-11 Dustin Johnson68-68-67 203-7 Steve Stricker66-71-68 205-5 Zach Johnson69-68-69 206-4 Justin Rose 68-68-70 206-4 Billy Horschel66-70-70 206-4 Jordan Spieth68-67-71 206-4 Luke Donald 70-70-67 207-3 Nick Watney 72-65-70 207-3 Webb Simpson68-71-69 208-2 Sergio Garcia68-71-69 208-2 Bill Haas 70-69-69 208-2 Phil Mickelson71-67-70 208-2 Gary Woodland70-67-71 208-2 Adam Scott 65-69-74 208-2 D.A. Points 72-67-70 209-1 Keegan Bradley72-65-72 209-1 Jason Dufner74-70-66 210E Jason Day 68-74-68 210E Hunter Mahan70-69-71 210E Roberto Castro67-71-72 210E Brandt Snedeker69-75-67 211+1 Graham DeLaet68-71-72 211+1 Jim Furyk 70-68-73 211+1 Matt Kuchar 69-74-69 212+2 Tiger Woods 73-71-69 213+3 Brendon de Jonge70-72-71 213+3 Kevin Streelman69-72-74 215+5 Boo Weekley 70-75-73 218+8 Charl Schwartzel68-79-77 224+14Open dItalia Lindt Leading scoresSaturday, At Golf Club Torino, Turin, Italy, Purse: $2 million, Yardage: 7,208, Par: 72, Third Round, a-amateur: Marcus Fraser, Australia66-71-68 205 Joakim Lagergren, Sweden72-67-67 206 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium65-71-70 206 Francesco Molinari, Italy68-67-71 206 Felipe Aguilar, Chile69-66-72 207 Simon Thornton, Ireland68-67-72 207 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina65-73-70 208 Hennie Otto, South Africa71-67-70 208 Romain Wattel, France71-72-66 209 Scott Hend, Australia72-71-66 209 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria69-72-68 209 Matteo Manassero, Italy70-70-69 209 a-Renato Paratore, Italy72-66-71 209 Julien Quesne, France70-68-71 209 Maximilian Kieffer, Germany65-72-72 209 David Higgins, Ireland67-69-73 209 Steve Webster, England67-69-73 209 Also Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain71-68-74 213 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, Spain71-70-73 214 Retief Goosen, South Africa70-72-74 216 Associated PressRyan Blaney (22) leads Sam Hornish Jr., left, during an early lap of the NASCAR Nationwide Series race Saturday at Kentucky Motor Speedway in Sparta, Ky. Associated PressSPARTA, Ky. Rookie Ryan Blaney earned his first Nationwide Series victory and another win for Penske Racings No. 22 Ford, holding off Austin Dillon and surviving several late cautions to win Saturday nights 300-mile race at Kentucky Speedway. Blaney, who drives for Sprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski in the Camping World Truck Series, used his second start in the Mustang to claim the cars 10th victory of 2013 and a season sweep at Kentucky. Keselowski drove the car to victory in June. Blaneys win included tense moments over the final 40 laps, from beating Dillon off pit road with a two-tire stop on lap 166 to reclaiming the lead from Dillon after losing it on the restart. More tests followed, including a near-brush with teammate Sam Hornish Jr.s loose Ford and one final restart. Matt Crafton was third, Hornish fourth and rookie Alex Bowman fifth in a Toyota. Dillon shaved two points off Hornishs series lead and trails by just 15 with six races remaining. Getting closer to Blaney was out of the question for Dillon and just about anyone in contention. Hornish gave it a shot late in the race before that late wiggle left him settling for his 21st top-five finish of the season. Dillon had hope on several restarts, only to let the son of NASCAR veteran Dave Blaney quickly snatch it away on several late restarts. The final one typified the futility: Blaney blasted out on lap 191 to open up a three carlength lead and didnt look back. Hornish led 65 laps after starting on the pole, while Dillon led 32. Beating the No. 22 has been tough for everybody this season. Four other drivers have reached victory lane in it this season, including Keselowski, whos racing in this weekends Cup series race in Loudon, N.H. Nineteen-year-old Blaney wins in Kentucky

PAGE 22

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SCOREBOARD On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Singapore Grand Prix 12 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR K&N Pro Series: Greenville (taped) 1 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series Circuit of the Americas (taped) 1 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road San Bernardino (taped) 2 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Sylvania 300 2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Late Model Dirt: Batesville (taped) 4:30 p.m. (ABC) Global Rallycross Championship 8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA AAA Texas FallNationals (same-day tape) 1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Sylvania 300 (same-day tape) BASEBALL 1 p.m. (TBS) San Francisco Giants at New York Yankees 1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals 1:30 p.m. (SUN) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays 2 p.m. (WGN-A) Atlanta Braves at Chicago Cubs 8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers 3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers (sameday tape) WNBA BASKETBALL 3 p.m. (ESPN2) Eastern Conference Semifinal: Chicago Sky at Indiana Fever. Game 2 5 p.m. (ESPN2) Western Conference Semifinal: Minnesota Lynx at Seattle Storm. Game 2 BICYCLING 2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Arctic Race of Norway (taped) EQUESTRIAN 4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) American Gold Cup (taped) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 a.m. (SUN) Tennessee at Florida (taped) 4:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Kansas State at Texas (taped) 4 a.m. (ESPNU) Utah at BYU (taped) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. (CBS) Houston Texans at Baltimore Ravens 1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New England Patriots 4:25 p.m. (CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Seattle Seahawks 4:25 p.m. (CBS) Indianapolis Colts at San Francisco 49ers 7:30 p.m. (SUN) College Football Bethune-Cookman at Florida State (Taped) 8:20 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Bears at Pittsburgh Steelers GOLF 8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Lindt Italian Open, final round 12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: The Tour Championship, final round 1 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: The Tour Championship, final round 7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Champions: Pacific Links Hawaii Championship, final round HOCKEY 11 a.m. (NHL) Toronto Maple Leafs at Buffalo Sabres (taped) 1 p.m. (NHL) Columbus Blue Jackets at Pittsburgh Penguins (taped) 5 p.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings RODEO 6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (taped) SOCCER 8 a.m. (CNBC) English Premier League: Arsenal FC vs Stoke City FC 11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Manchester City FC vs Manchester United FC 12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Deportivo Toluca FC vs Queretaro FC 10 p.m. (ESPNU) Womens college soccer: Stanford at Santa Clara TENNIS 11 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Qatar Airways Tournament of Champions, first semifinal (taped) 1 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Qatar Airways Tournament of Champions, second semifinal (taped) 3 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA International Qatar Airways Tournament of Champions, final (taped) 5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP St. Petersburg Open, final (same-day tape) 8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Metz, final (same-day tape) Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: POWERBALL 12 17 45 54 58 POWER BALL 13Fridays winning numbers and payouts: Mega Money: 1 7 25 44 Mega Ball: 13 4-of-4 MB1 winner$2 million 4-of-49$1,779.50 3-of-4 MB50$700 3-of-4976$107 2-of-4 MB1,506$48.50 1-of-4 MB12,265$6 2-of-430,002$4 Fantasy 5: 2 10 12 25 29 5-of-55 winners$44,148.40 4-of-5390$91 3-of-510,869$9Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 8 8 0 CASH 3 (late) 9 1 6 PLAY 4 (early) 1 9 4 3 PLAY 4 (late) 2 5 3 4 FANTASY 5 4 7 31 32 35 LOTTERY8 32 35 46 47 52XTRA 5B4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 Citrus 63, Ocala Forest 7Hurricanes7 28 21 7 63 Wildcats 7 0 0 0 7 Scoring Summary First Quarter CH Juse 8-yd pass from Moore (Marsden kick) OF Tucker 1-yd run (Gilman kick) Second Quarter CH Pouncey 25-yd run (Marsden kick) CH Moore 2-yd run (Marsden kick) CH S. Franklin 31-yd pass from Moore (Marsden kick) CH Moore 1-yd run (Marsden kick) Third Quarter CH D. Franklin 19-yd pass from Moore (Marsden kick) CH Vineyard 2-yd run (Marsden kick) CH Clark 6-yd run (Marsden kick) Fourth Quarter CH Pouncey 71-yd run (Marsden kick) Individual Leaders Rushing CH: J. Pouncey 6-117-2; J. Clark 8-58-1; T. Washington 10-42-0; D. Moore 10-38-2; OF: Q. King 7-46-0; K. Tucker 11-20-1. Passing CH: Moore 9-20-0-189; OF: C. Feagle 115-2-(-9). Receiving CH: S. Franklin 4-101-1; J. Juse 3-60-1; D. Franklin 2-35-1.Fivay 35, Lecanto 20Panthers 14 0 6 0 20 Falcons 3 12 7 13 35 Scoring Summary First Quarter F J. Jones 43-yard field goal L J. Nightengale 2-yard pass from T. McGee (L. Leiva kick) L D. Growdon 1-yard run (L. Leiva kick) Second Quarter F T. Soto 30-yard pass from E. Vitale (pass failed) F C. Coleman 17-yard pass from E. Vitale (kick blocked) Third Quarter F T. Soto 54-yard pass from E. Vitale (J. Jones kick) L D. Growdon 1-yard run (pass failed) Fourth Quarter F D. Sutton 3-yard run (kick failed) F D. Sutton 13-yard run (J. Jones kick) Individual Leaders Rushing: L A. Anderson 11-110-0; J. Nightengale 6-51-0; D. Growdon 15-44-2; T. McGee 3-32-0; D. Johnson 6-21-0; F D. Sutton 19-117-2; B. Poinsette 10-53-0. Passing: L T. McGee 6-11-69-1-0; A. Anderson 15-24-0-0; F E. Vitale 11-20-210-3-1. Receiving: L M. McKibbin 2-36-0; T. Hopkins 221-0; D. Horton 1-24-0; J. Lucas 1-7-0; J. Nightengale 1-3-1; F T. Soto 3-96-2; C. Coleman 5-82-1. Defense Interceptions: L J. Lucas (1). Fumble recoveries: F D. Sutton (1).No. 19 Florida 31, Tennessee 17Tennessee 703717 Florida 3147731 First Quarter TennSwafford 62 interception return (Palardy kick), 9:23. FlaFG Hardin 23, 1:43. Second Quarter FlaPatton 52 pass from Murphy (Hardin kick), 13:23. FlaM.Brown 3 run (Hardin kick), :37. Third Quarter TennFG Palardy 44, 12:17. FlaJones 4 run (Hardin kick), 7:08. Fourth Quarter FlaMurphy 7 run (Hardin kick), 13:52. TennHoward 18 pass from Worley (Palardy kick), 10:20. A,074. TennFla First downs 1220 Rushes-yards23-6656-215 Passing 154167 Comp-Att-Int14-34-411-20-1 Return Yards6266 Punts-Avg. 3-41.73-37.0 Fumbles-Lost2-26-2 Penalties-Yards3-256-44 Time of Possession20:2339:37 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGTennessee, Neal 12-42, Lane 5-16, North 1-9, Howard 2-2, Peterman 3-(minus 3). Florida, M.Brown 24-86, Murphy 10-84, Jones 1249, Purifoy 1-15, Patton 2-5, Kel.Taylor 1-3, Team 5(minus 12), Christy 1-(minus 15). PASSINGTennessee, Worley 10-23-2-149, Peterman 4-11-2-5. Florida, Murphy 8-14-0-134, Driskel 3-6-1-33. RECEIVINGTennessee, Howard 4-75, North 4-43, Croom 2-31, Neal 1-9, Jo.Smith 1-2, Downs 1-0, Lane 1-(minus 6). Florida, Dunbar 4-63,Patton 373, T.Burton 3-27, Jones 1-4.No. 8 Florida St. 54, Bethune Cookman 6Bethune-Cookman00606 Florida St.102321054 First Quarter FSUTel.Smith 68 interception return (Aguayo kick), 8:39. FSUFG Aguayo 45, 2:33. Second Quarter FSUSafety, 13:50. FSUBenjamin 11 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 12:11. FSUWilder 2 run (Aguayo kick), 5:49. FSUFreeman 1 run (Aguayo kick), 1:13. Third Quarter FSUGreene 19 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 13:39. BethWilson 7 run (kick failed), 8:21. FSUK.Williams 3 run (Aguayo kick), 6:15. FSUK.Williams 1 run (Aguayo kick), :46. A,841. BethFSU First downs1826 Rushes-yards56-18236-266 Passing60226 Comp-Att-Int8-17-113-25-0 Return Yards668 Punts-Avg.8-39.13-39.0 Fumbles-Lost2-01-1 Penalties-Yards8-593-25 Time of Possession35:5924:01 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGBethune-Cookman, Jordan 15-81, Wilson 12-41, M.Green 10-28, C.White 7-13, Q.Williams 7-11, Dixon 5-8. Florida St., Freeman 10112, K.Williams 9-83, Wilder 8-56, Winston 3-11, R.Green 5-8, Coker 1-(minus 4). PASSINGBethune-Cookman, Wilson 5-10-0-37, Q.Williams 3-7-1-23. Florida St., Winston 10-19-0-148, Coker 3-6-0-78. RECEIVINGBethune-Cookman, Poole 3-46, Murphy 2-9, Baker 1-5, Monroe 1-0, Terry 1-0. Florida St., Shaw 4-89, Greene 4-44,Benjamin 2-26, C.Green 2-25, Whitfield 1-42.No. 16 Miami 77, Savannah St. 7Savannah St. 00707 Miami 212828077 First Quarter MiaD.Crawford 4 run (Goudis kick), 14:35. MiaHurns 80 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 12:03. MiaDu.Johnson 2 run (Goudis kick), 6:21. Second Quarter MiaD.Crawford 5 pass from Williams (Goudis kick), 13:06. MiaColey 25 pass from Williams (Goudis kick), 10:43. MiaD.Crawford 16 run (Goudis kick), 7:19. MiaEdwards 1 run (Goudis kick), 3:49. Third Quarter MiaSandland 13 pass from Crow (Goudis kick), 9:55. MiaEdwards 3 run (Goudis kick), 2:22. SavDaniels 75 run (Barron kick), 2:09. MiaColey 88 kickoff return (Goudis kick), 1:56. MiaEdwards 9 run (Goudis kick), :20. A,571. SavMia First downs827 Rushes-yards26-13946-324 Passing44313 Comp-Att-Int8-25-420-23-0 Return Yards062 Punts-Avg.7-38.10-0.0 Fumbles-Lost0-00-0 Penalties-Yards2-710-75 Time of Possession26:4133:19 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSavannah St., Daniels 1-75, Heyward 2-28, S.Barnes 5-14, Bostick 6-7, Simmons 6-7, Prunty 2-4, Hutcheson 34, Ferrell 1-0. Miami, Edwards 12-113, Clements 1175, Du.Johnson 8-59, D.Crawford 5-48, De.Johnson 5-21, Labady 4-5, Crow 1-3. PASSINGSavannah St., Bostick 3-11-2-23, Hutcheson 4-10-2-21, Prunty 1-3-0-0, S.Barnes 0-1-0-0. Miami, Williams 11-13-0-176, Crow 6-6-0-55, Morris 3-4-0-82. RECEIVINGSavannah St., Durham 2-18, Roosevelt 2-9, Heyward 2-8, Criswell 1-9, Daniels 1-0. Miami, Sandland 6-76, Coley 3-16, Hurns 2-100, Walford 2-50, Waters 2-34, Dobard 115, Kidd 1-11, M.Lewis 1-9, D.Crawford 1-5, Dorsett 1-(minus 3). College football scoresEAST American International 48, Pace 27 Amherst 23, Hamilton 7 Bloomsburg 31, Kutztown 12 Bowie St. 16, Concord 10 Brown 45, Georgetown 7 CCSU 20, Albany (NY) 17 California (Pa.) 20, Edinboro 7 Clarion 20, Mercyhurst 13 Colby 31, Williams 8 Cornell 45, Bucknell 13 Cortland St. 26, William Paterson 15 Delaware 49, Wagner 9 Delaware Valley 20, Albright 17 Dickinson 24, Susquehanna 21 Fordham 52, Columbia 7 Framingham St. 42, Fitchburg St. 21 Frostburg St. 36, Case Reserve 33 Gallaudet 37, Rochester 13 Gannon 38, Slippery Rock 27 Geneva 49, Thiel 28 Hampden-Sydney 49, Coast Guard 7 Hartwick 45, Becker 19 Hobart 34, Utica 21 Howard Payne 38, Wayland Baptist 34 Husson 13, Alfred 0 Indiana (Pa.) 26, Seton Hill 0 Ithaca 17, Union (NY) 3 Johns Hopkins 52, Moravian 14 Juniata 38, Gettysburg 16 Kean 24, Endicott 17 Lebanon Valley 38, Kings (Pa.) 17 Lehigh 29, Princeton 28 Lock Haven 12, Cheyney 10 Lycoming 52, Misericordia 14 Mass. Maritime 52, Maine Maritime 18 Blue Jays 4, Red Sox 2Toronto Boston abrhbi abrhbi Reyes ss3010Drew ss4120 Kawsk dh4000Victorn cf2010 DRosa ph-dh1000D.Ortiz dh4000 Lawrie 3b4120JGoms lf4011 Lind 1b3111Nava rf4000 Sierra lf4110Mdlrks 1b4000 RDavis rf2111Bogarts 3b3100 Gose cf3010D.Ross c3011 Arencii c4011JMcDnl 2b2000 Goins 2b4010Pedroia ph-2b1000 Totals32493Totals31252 Toronto0003000014 Boston0000011002 ELawrie (12), Buchholz (2). DPToronto 1. LOBToronto 7, Boston 4. 2BLind (26). CS Reyes (6), R.Davis (6), Gose (3). SGose, Victorino. IPHRERBBSO Toronto Buehrle W,12-9651105 McGowan H,6101002 S.Santos H,8100001 Janssen S,33-35100002 Boston Buchholz L,11-1663222 D.Britton110001 Dempster 110011 Thornton 2-311120 R.De La Rosa1-300000 HBPby Buehrle (Victorino). WPMcGowan. T:35. A,569 (37,499). Kentucky 300 resultsSaturday at Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Ky. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 200 laps, 147.7 rating, 0 points. 2. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 126.6, 43. 3. (5) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 200, 105.9, 0. 4. (1) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 124.6, 41. 5. (20) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 93.2, 39. 6. (7) Drew Herring, Toyota, 200, 108.6, 38. 7. (10) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 101.7, 37. 8. (13) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 200, 80.9, 0. 9. (18) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 81.1, 35. 10. (15) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 87.7, 34. 11. (4) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 107.8, 34. 12. (14) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 93.1, 32. 13. (21) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 200, 72.9, 0. 14. (12) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 98.8, 31. 15. (22) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 75.5, 29. 16. (36) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 200, 62.4, 28. 17. (9) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 79.9, 27. 18. (6) Joey Coulter, Toyota, 200, 72.2, 0. 19. (28) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 199, 62.5, 25. 20. (24) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 198, 55, 25. 21. (29) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 198, 55.3, 23. 22. (31) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 198, 49.5, 22. 23. (34) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 197, 49.6, 21. 24. (25) Eric McClure, Toyota, 197, 48.9, 20. 25. (26) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 197, 42.4, 19. 26. (23) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 196, 60.5, 18. 27. (16) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 194, 43.7, 17. 28. (32) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 194, 43.3, 16. 29. (11) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, accident, 187, 79.2, 15. 30. (17) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, accident, 161, 66.2, 14. 31. (35) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, suspension, 113, 36.5, 13. 32. (39) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, engine, 100, 33.1, 12. 33. (19) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, brakes, 98, 68.5, 11. 34. (8) Travis Pastrana, Ford, accident, 59, 68.9, 10. 35. (38) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, vibration, 31, 34.1, 9. 36. (40) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, overheating, 8, 35.8, 8. 37. (30) Carl Long, Dodge, suspension, 8, 34.8, 7. 38. (37) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, transmission, 6, 33.7, 6. 39. (33) Blake Koch, Toyota, rear gear, 4, 32.9, 5. 40. (27) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 31.3, 4. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 121.131 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 28 minutes, 36 seconds. Margin of Victory: 2.017 seconds. Caution Flags: 9 for 44 laps. Lead Changes: 6 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: S.Hornish Jr. 1-65; J.Clements 66-67; B.Scott 68; A.Dillon 69-100; R.Blaney 101-107; E.Sadler 108-111; R.Blaney 112-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Blaney, 2 times for 96 laps; S.Hornish Jr., 1 time for 65 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 32 laps; E.Sadler, 1 time for 4 laps; J.Clements, 1 time for 2 laps; B.Scott, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. S.Hornish Jr., 962; 2. A.Dillon, 947; 3. R.Smith, 917; 4. E.Sadler, 908; 5. B.Vickers, 902; 6. J.Allgaier, 887; 7. B.Scott, 883; 8. T.Bayne, 868; 9. K.Larson, 822; 10. P.Kligerman, 783. Merchant Marine 7, NY Maritime 6 Middlebury 27, Bowdoin 5 Monmouth (NJ) 21, Holy Cross 14 Morrisville St. 28, St. Lawrence 23 Muhlenberg 58, McDaniel 0 Norwich 31, WPI 14 Penn 27, Lafayette 21 Penn St. 34, Kent St. 0 RPI 23, Castleton St. 8 Rutgers 28, Arkansas 24 Sacred Heart 78, Chowan 35 Shippensburg 41, East Stroudsburg 31 Springfield 41, Mount Ida 0 St. Francis (Pa.) 38, Lincoln (Pa.) 7 Syracuse 52, Tulane 17 Thomas More 31, Westminster (Pa.) 0 Trinity (Conn.) 28, Bates 17 Ursinus 20, Franklin & Marshall 9 Vanderbilt 24, UMass 7 Villanova 35, Stony Brook 6 W. Connecticut 35, Plymouth St. 3 Wake Forest 25, Army 11 Washington & Jefferson 40, Grove City 19 Waynesburg 23, St. Vincent 6 Wesleyan (Conn.) 52, Tufts 9 West Chester 48, Millersville 3 Westfield St. 36, Mass.-Dartmouth 7 Widener 21, Wilkes 0 Wis.-Whitewater 55, Buffalo St. 14 Yale 39, Colgate 22 SOUTH Alabama 31, Colorado St. 6 Alabama St. 52, Grambling St. 21 Albany St. (Ga.) 34, Elizabeth City St. 13 Appalachian St. 31, Elon 21 Averett 30, Guilford 27 Birmingham-Southern 49, Stetson 34 Bridgewater (Va.) 51, Ferrum 28 Campbellsville 26, Bethel (Tenn.) 0 Carson-Newman 41, Brevard 7 Centre 37, Washington & Lee 28 Charleston (WV) 38, Virginia-Wise 15 Charleston Southern 20, Norfolk St. 12 Christopher Newport 34, Shenandoah 6 Coastal Carolina 50, Hampton 17 Cumberland (Tenn.) 41, Belhaven 31 Delta St. 37, North Alabama 34 E. Kentucky 56, Morehead St. 24 Emory & Henry 61, Methodist 22 Fayetteville St. 21, Virginia Union 7 Florida 31, Tennessee 17 Florida St. 54, Bethune-Cookman 6 Fort Valley St. 12, Clark Atlanta 9 Gardner-Webb 3, Wofford 0 Georgia 45, North Texas 21 Georgia Tech 28, North Carolina 20 Greensboro 34, Apprentice 21 Huntingdon 34, Louisiana College 27 Jacksonville 69, Warner 16 Jacksonville St. 32, Georgia St. 26, OT James Madison 34, Charlotte 7 Johnson C. Smith 35, Davidson 22 Kentucky Christian 38, Bluefield South 7 Lenoir-Rhyne 34, Wingate 13 Lindsey Wilson 35, Pikeville 26 Louisville 72, FIU 0 Maryland 37, West Virginia 0 Maryville (Tenn.) 42, Sewanee 30 Memphis 31, Arkansas St. 7 Mercer 43, Berry 0 Miami 77, Savannah St. 7 Middle Tennessee 42, FAU 35, OT Millsaps 38, Point (Ga.) 17 Mississippi St. 62, Troy 7 Newberry 27, Catawba 0 Nicholls St. 42, Langston 22 North Greenville 39, Tusculum 36 Old Dominion 59, The Citadel 58 Pittsburgh 58, Duke 55 Randolph-Macon 36, Bethany (WV) 28 Reinhardt 28, Faulkner 24 Richmond 30, Liberty 21 S. Virginia 33, Va. Lynchburg 30 SC State 59, Benedict 6 SE Louisiana 34, Samford 31 Salisbury 28, NC Wesleyan 10 Shepherd 28, Urbana 21 Southern U. 17, MVSU 7 St. Augustines 35, Stillman 7 St. Josephs (Ind.) 45, Alderson-Broaddus 17 Towson 35, NC Central 17 UAB 52, Northwestern St. 28 UNC-Pembroke 41, Shaw 20 Valdosta St. 40, Shorter 0 Virginia 49, VMI 0 Virginia St. 41, Kentucky St. 0 Virginia Tech 29, Marshall 21, 3OT W. Carolina 30, Mars Hill 23 W. Kentucky 58, Morgan St. 17 Webber 20, Union (Ky.) 19 West Liberty 9, W. Virginia St. 0 William & Mary 20, Rhode Island 0 Winston-Salem 35, Tuskegee 13 MIDWEST Adrian 48, Concordia (Ill.) 0 Albion 38, Aurora 20 Augsburg 19, Gustavus 16 Augustana (Ill.) 35, Loras 10 Augustana (SD) 24, Bemidji St. 0 Ball St. 51, E. Michigan 20 Beloit 38, Lawrence 21 Benedictine (Ill.) 28, Kalamazoo 23 Benedictine (Kan.) 42, Baker 28 Bethel (Minn.) 47, Buena Vista 14 Bluffton 36, Earlham 21 Bowling Green 48, Murray St. 7 Capital 42, Marietta 13 Carroll (Wis.) 24, Knox 14 Cent. Arkansas 17, Missouri St. 13 Cent. Methodist 37, Culver-Stockton 36 Cent. Missouri 47, Lindenwood (Mo.) 28 Chadron St. 30, Mesa St. 24 Chicago 10, Elmhurst 0 Cincinnati 14, Miami (Ohio) 0 Coe 10, Washington (Mo.) 0 Colorado Mines 62, Black Hills St. 22 Concordia (Moor.) 33, St. Olaf 29 Concordia (Neb.) 35, Midland 14 Dakota St. 35, Presentation 28 Dartmouth 30, Butler 23 Doane 62, Hastings 7 Drake 31, Indianapolis 14 Evangel 43, Avila 20 Ferris St. 34, Ashland 7 Franklin 48, Manchester 7 Friends 31, Sterling 0 Grand Valley St. 42, Tiffin 17 Grand View 30, Marian (Ind.) 7 Greenville 28, Eureka 27 Heidelberg 55, Ohio Northern 27 Hillsdale 41, Malone 16 Hiram 20, Allegheny 3 Hope 37, Wis. Lutheran 7 Illinois St. 31, Abilene Christian 17 Iowa 59, W. Michigan 3 John Carroll 27, Baldwin-Wallace 7 Kansas 13, Louisiana Tech 10 Lake Erie 35, Wayne (Mich.) 17 Lake Forest 15, Grinnell 7 Lakeland 21, Alma 20 Lindenwood (Ill.) 49, Kentucky Wesleyan 29 Louisiana-Lafayette 35, Akron 30 Macalester 30, Maranatha Baptist 6 Mary 17, Sioux Falls 10 Mayville St. 46, Cole 0 McKendree 29, William Jewell 24 McPherson 24, Bethel (Kan.) 10 Michigan Tech 29, Walsh 7 Minn. St.-Mankato 21, Minn. Duluth 17 Minn.-Morris 41, Iowa Wesleyan 24 Minnesota 43, San Jose St. 24 Missouri S&T 27, Wis.-LaCrosse 14 Missouri Southern 59, Lincoln (Mo.) 10 Missouri Valley 33, Mid-Am Nazarene 9 Missouri Western 34, Nebraska-Kearney 19 Morehouse 42, Central St. (Ohio) 20 Morningside 79, Dordt 14 Mount St. Joseph 16, Hanover 13 Mount Union 37, Muskingum 0 N. Dakota St. 51, Delaware St. 0 N. Illinois 43, E. Illinois 39 NW Missouri St. 49, Fort Hays St. 14 Nebraska 59, S. Dakota St. 20 Nebraska Wesleyan 31, Briar Cliff 7 North Central (Ill.) 41, Wis.-Stout 14 Northwestern 35, Maine 21 Northwestern (Iowa) 49, Dakota Wesleyan 42 Northwestern (Minn.) 15, Martin Luther 8 Northwood (Mich.) 42, Quincy 39 Notre Dame 17, Michigan St. 13 Notre Dame Coll. 34, WV Wesleyan 25 Ohio 38, Austin Peay 0 Ohio Dominican 30, N. Michigan 23 Ohio St. 76, Florida A&M 0 Ohio Wesleyan 20, Kenyon 13 Olivet 34, Rockford 7 Olivet Nazarene 24, Concordia (Mich.) 7 Ottawa, Kan. 41, Bethany (Kan.) 15 Otterbein 30, Wilmington (Ohio) 14 Peru St. 21, Graceland (Iowa) 7 Rose-Hulman 23, Defiance 19 S. Dakota Tech 41, Jamestown 22 S. Illinois 36, SE Missouri 19 SW Assemblies of God 19, Haskell Indian Nations 8 Saginaw Valley St. 35, Findlay 34 Siena Heights 30, Waldorf 0 Simpson (Iowa) 35, Wis.-River Falls 34 Southwestern (Kan.) 24, Kansas Wesleyan 14 St. Cloud St. 34, Concordia (St.P.) 3 St. Francis (Ind.) 38, St. Ambrose 37 St. Johns (Minn.) 20, St. Thomas (Minn.) 18 St. Norbert 33, Ripon 6 St. Scholastica 24, Crown (Minn.) 14 St. Xavier 41, Robert Morris-Chicago 10 Tabor 21, St. Mary (Kan.) 6 Taylor 27, Lane 21 Toledo 38, Cent. Michigan 17 Trine 47, Concordia (Wis.) 41 Truman St. 24, William Penn 23 Upper Iowa 24, Northern St. (SD) 17 Wabash 50, Denison 13 Wartburg 27, Carthage 10 Wayne (Neb.) 41, Minn.-Crookston 25 Westminster (Mo.) 21, Mac Murray 14 Wheaton (Ill.) 38, Luther 12 Winona St. 65, Minn. St.-Moorhead 21 Wis.-Stevens Pt. 31, Dubuque 28 Wisconsin 41, Purdue 10 Wittenberg 45, DePauw 0 Wooster 39, Oberlin 21 Youngstown St. 59, Duquesne 17 Glantz-Culver Line For Sept. 22 Major League Baseball National League FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Wash.-250Miami+220 at Pittsburgh-110Cincinnati+100 at Phila.-200New York+185 at Chicago-105Atlanta-105 Arizona-115at Colorado+105 Los Angeles-130at San Diego+120 St. Louis-155at Milwaukee+145 American League at Cleveland-260Houston+230 at Detroit-280Chicago+240 at Boston-160Toronto+150 at Tampa Bay-105Baltimore-105 at Kan. City-135Texas+125 at L. Angeles-125Seattle+115 at Oakland-250Minnesota+220 Interleague at New York (AL)-140San Francisco+130 NFL Today FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Tennessee33(44) San Diego at Minnesota36(40) Cleveland at N. England77(44) Tampa Bay Houston21(44) at Baltimore at Dallas33(47) St. Louis at N. Orleans77(48) Arizona at Washington2Pk (49) Detroit Green Bay+12(49) at Cincinnati N.Y. Giants+21(47) at Carolina at Miami12(44) Atlanta at San Fran.1010(46) Indianapolis at Seattle1619(40) Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets22(39) Buffalo Chicago22(40) at Pittsburgh Tomorrow at Denver1415(49) Oakland BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Recalled LHPs Mike Belfiore and LHP Zach Britton from Norfolk (IL). TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled RHP Jake Odorizzi and LHP Jeff Beliveau from Durham (IL). Traded LHP Frank De Los Santos to the Chicago White Sox for for cash or a player to be named. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Reinstated OF Jason Heyward from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK METS Recalled SS Wilfredo Tovar from Binghamton (EL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Reinstated RHP Michael Stutes from the 60-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS Signed CB Chris Lewis-Harris from the practice squad. Released S Jeromy Miles. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed WR Jeremy Ebert from the practice squad. Released G Jacques McClendon. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed FB Toben Opurum to the practice squad. Released DL Jordan Miller.

PAGE 23

Associated PressST. PETERSBURG The Tampa Bay Rays rode the momentum of a marathon victory to another big win. Desmond Jennings drove in four runs, Alex Cobb took a threehit shutout into the ninth inning, and the Rays beat the Baltimore Orioles 5-1 in a matchup of exhausted teams to maintain their lead in the AL wild-card race. The first pitch came 10 hours, 56 minutes after the Rays 5-4, 18inning win over Baltimore that ended at 2:05 a.m., a game that stretched on for 6:54 a record time for both teams. Cobb didnt allow a hit until Steve Clevenger lined a single to right with two outs in the fifth. Chris Davis tripled with one out in the ninth off Cobb, a fly ball David DeJesus struggled to locate in left. Adam Jones followed with an RBI single that chased Cobb, who struck out 12 and walked two. Closer Fernando Rodney completed the five-hitter. Tampa Bay went ahead in the fifth when Jose Molina and Yunel Escobar walked. One out later, Jennings hit his career-high 14th homer. Jennings added an RBI triple in the seventh and scored on Ben Zobrists single off Francisco Rodriguez.AMERICAN LEAGUE Indians 4, Astros 1CLEVELAND Scott Kazmir allowed four hits in seven shutout innings, Michael Brantley hit a two-run homer and the Cleveland Indians maintained their hold on an AL wildcard spot with a 4-1 win over the Houston Astros on Saturday night. Cleveland began Saturday with a half-game lead over Texas for the ALs second wild card. The Indians, who have won eight of their last 10, trail Tampa Bay by a half-game for the wild-card lead. The Indians passed Texas with Fridays rain-shortened 2-1 win, moving into a wild-card spot for the first time since before play on Aug. 4.Athletics 9, Twins 1OAKLAND, Calif. The Oakland Athletics lowered their magic number to one for clinching their second straight AL West title, beating the Minnesota Twins 9-1 Saturday behind the pitching of Jarrod Parker and hitting of Alberto Callaspo. The As have won 12 of 15 and are 16 of their last 21, opening a seasonhigh 7 1/2-game lead over secondplace Texas entering Saturday. Parker (12-7) allowed one run and four hits in six innings, and Callaspo matched his career highs with four hits and had three RBIs. Kurt Suzuki and Yoenis Cespedes homered for the As. The game started after a two-hour rain delay. The visiting dugout was flooded and sewage backed up in the As coaches bathroom, the third such incident at the Coliseum this season.Rangers 3, Royals 1KANSAS CITY, Mo. Matt Garza pitched eight impressive innings for his first victory in six starts and the Texas Rangers kept close in the playoff race, beating the Kansas City Royals 3-1 on Saturday night. The Rangers won for only the fifth time in 19 September games. They remained a half-game behind Cleveland for the second AL wild-card berth. The Royals, out of the playoffs since winning the 1985 World Series, dropped 3 1/2 games in back of the Indians.Blue Jays 4, Red Sox 2BOSTON Clay Buchholz lost for the first time this season, and the AL East champion Boston Red Sox fell to Mark Buehrle and the Toronto Blue Jays 4-2 Saturday night. A day after the Red Sox clinched the division title, they lost for just the sixth time in 21 games. Buchholz (11-1) gave up two earned runs on six hits and two walks in six innings. He had pitched 11 scoreless innings in his previous two starts, his first since spending three months on the disabled list with a strained neck. Buchholz was the first Boston pitcher to start a season 11-0 in his initial 14 starts since Roger Clemens went 13-0 in 1986.NATIONAL LEAGUE Cubs 3, Braves 1CHICAGO Dioner Navarro hit a tiebreaking single in a three-run eighth inning, and the Chicago Cubs beat Atlanta 3-1 to keep the Braves on the brink of the NL East championship. Atlantas magic number remained at one to clinch its first division title since 2005. Starlin Casto singled off Kris Medlen with one out in the eighth, pinch-hitter Donnie Murphy singled against Scott Downs (4-4) and Anthony Rizzo hit a tying double down the left-field line.Pirates 4, Reds 2PITTSBURGH A.J. Burnett scattered four hits over seven strong innings to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates over the Cincinnati Reds 4-2 on Saturday night. Burnett (9-11) struck out a seasonhigh 12 as the Pirates moved a game in front of Cincinnati for the top spot in the NL wild-card race. Jason Grilli worked the ninth for his 31st save, his first since going to the disabled list with a strained right forearm in July. Russell Martin hit a two-run homer and Jose Tabata added two hits as the Pirates bounced back from a late collapse in a loss on Friday night. Zach Cozart hit his 12th home run of the season for Cincinnati and Ryan Ludwick added an RBI.Cardinals 7, Brewers 2MILWAUKEE Matt Carpenter broke Stan Musials team record for doubles by a left-handed batter in a season, Lance Lynn won for the first time since early August and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-2 to maintain a two-game lead in the NL Central. Seeking their first division title since 2009, the Cardinals (91-64) have surged ahead of Pittsburgh (89-66) and Cincinnati (88-67). St. Louis would clinch a playoff spot for the third straight postseason if the Washington Nationals lost to the Miami Marlins later Saturday in a game delayed by rain at the start. The Cardinals have won for the 12th time in 17 games and improved to 14-4 against the Brewers this year, including 8-1 in Milwaukee. Carpenters fifth-inning double was his 54th of the season, one more than Musials total in 1953.Mets 5, Phillies 4 (6 1/2 innings)PHILADELPHIA David Wright and Daniel Murphy hit solo home runs and the New York Mets beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 in a game called in the top of the seventh inning because of rain. The teams played in the rain before the game was halted, and it was called after a delay of 1 hour, 28 minutes. AL Associated PressTampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Alex Cobb tips his hat to the crowd Saturday after being taken out of the game against the Baltimore Orioles in the eighth inning in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 5-1. Cobbs 12 Ks keep Rays in hunt Jennings knocks in four in 5-1 win AMERICAN LEAGUEFridays late games Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4 (18 innings) Oakland 11, Minnesota 0 L.A. Angels 3, Seattle 2 (11 innings) Saturdays games Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 1 N.Y. Yankees 6, San Francisco 0 Athletics 9, Twins 1 Indians 4, Astros 1 Chicago White Sox at Detroit, late Rangers 3, Royals 1 Blue Jays 4, Red Sox 2 Seattle at L.A. Angels, late Sundays gamesHouston (Bedard 4-11) at Cleveland (Kluber 9-5), 1:05 p.m. San Francisco (Petit 4-0) at Yankees (Pettitte 10-10), 1:05 p.m. White Sox (Johnson 1-2) at Detroit (Sanchez 14-7), 1:08 p.m. Toronto (Dickey 13-12) at Boston (Doubront 10-6), 1:35 p.m. Baltimore (Feldman 5-4) at Tampa Bay (Hernandez 6-13), 1:40 p.m. Texas (Ogando 7-4) at Kansas City (Shields 12-9), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (Hernandez 12-9) at Angels (Wilson 17-6), 3:35 p.m. Minnesota (De Vries 0-0) at Oakland (Gray 3-3), 4:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUESaturdays games N.Y. Yankees 6, San Francisco 0 Cubs 3, Braves 1 Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 2 Miami at Washington, late Mets 7, Phillies 4 Cardinals 7, Brewers 2 Arizona at Colorado, late L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, late Sundays gamesSan Francisco (Petit 4-0) at Yankees (Pettitte 10-10), 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-11) at Pittsburgh (Locke 10-6), 1:35 p.m. Miami (Flynn 0-2) at Washington (Haren 9-13), 1:35 p.m. Mets (C.Torres 3-5) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 14-6), 1:35 p.m. Atlanta (Teheran 12-8) at Cubs (Jackson 8-16), 2:20 p.m. Arizona (Corbin 14-7) at Colorado (Nicasio 8-8), 4:10 p.m. Dodgers (Greinke 15-3) at San Diego (Cashner 10-8), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Kelly 9-4) at Milwaukee (Peralta 10-15), 8:05 p.m. Rays 5, Orioles 1Baltimore Tampa Bay abrhbi abrhbi McLoth lf4010DeJess lf3000 Machd 3b3000DJnngs cf3224 C.Davis 1b4110Zobrist 2b4011 A.Jones cf3011Longori 3b3010 Markks rf4010WMyrs rf4000 Hardy ss4000Fuld rf0000 Valenci dh3000DYong dh4010 Clevngr c3010Loney 1b4010 ACasill 2b3000JMolin c3100 YEscor ss2210 Totals31151Totals30575 Baltimore0000000011 Tampa Bay00003020x5 EHardy (11). DPBaltimore 2, Tampa Bay 1. LOBBaltimore 5, Tampa Bay 6. 2BD.Young (2). 3BC.Davis (1), De.Jennings (6), Y.Escobar (1). HRDe.Jennings (14). IPHRERBBSO Baltimore Mig.Gonzalez L,10-8623352 Fr.Rodriguez142201 S.Johnson 110000 Tampa Bay Cobb W,10-381-3511212 Rodney 2-300000 WPFr.Rodriguez. PBClevenger. T:51. A,835 (34,078).Indians 4, Astros 1Houston Cleveland abrhbi abrhbi Villar ss4010Bourn cf4120 Altuve 2b4000Swisher rf-1b3110 MDmn 3b4000Kipnis 2b3001 Carter 1b4131CSantn 1b5000 B.Laird dh3000MCarsn rf0000 Krauss ph0000Brantly lf4112 JDMrtn lf3000AsCarr ss4030 Crowe ph1000Giambi dh3000 Hoes rf2010JRmrz pr-dh0000 BBarns cf3000YGoms c3120 C.Clark c2000Chsnhll 3b4011 Corprn ph-c1000 Totals31151Totals334104 Houston0000000011 Cleveland30010000x4 EHarrell (1). DPHouston 1, Cleveland 1. LOBHouston 5, Cleveland 12. 2BHoes (7), Bourn 2 (21), As.Cabrera (33), Y.Gomes (18). HRCarter (28), Brantley (9). SBAs.Cabrera (9). SFKipnis. IPHRERBBSO Houston Clemens L,4-642-384434 Harrell 31-320021 Cleveland Kazmir W,9-97400110 Allen 100002 J.Smith 111110 Kazmir pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBPby Clemens (Y.Gomes). WPHarrell. T:45. A,611 (42,241).Athletics 9, Twins 1MinnesotaOakland abrhbiabrhbi Presley cf4010CYoung cf4001 Dozier 2b4020Lowrie ss5130 Plouffe 3b4010Dnldsn 3b5120 Arcia lf4000Cespds dh5223 Doumit dh4000Callasp 2b5243 Pinto c3121KSuzuk c4112 Parmel rf3000Reddck rf3010 Colaell 1b3000Choice lf4120 Flormn ss3000Barton 1b4110 Totals32161Totals399169 Minnesota0000100001 Oakland15000021x9 EColabello (2), Florimon (17). DPOakland 1. LOBMinnesota 4, Oakland 9. 2BDozier (32), Lowrie (44), Donaldson (36), Reddick (18). HRPinto (3), Cespedes (26), Callaspo (9), K.Suzuki (2). SFC.Young. IPHRERBBSO Minnesota P.Hernandez L,3-2286611 Hendriks683317 Oakland J.Parker W,12-7641101 Otero110001 Blevins210002 T:53. A,393 (35,067).Rangers 3, Royals 1Texas Kansas City abrhbi abrhbi Kinsler 2b4110AGordn lf4000 Andrus ss3101Bonifac 2b4010 Rios rf3110Hosmer 1b4111 ABeltre 3b4021BButler dh3000 Przyns c3001S.Perez c4000 Morlnd 1b4000Mostks 3b4010 Gentry lf4030L.Cain rf2000 DvMrp dh3010Lough ph-rf1000 JeBakr ph0000JDyson cf3010 Aduci ph-dh1000AEscor ss3010 LMartn cf4000 Totals33383Totals32151 Texas 1020000003 Kansas City0000000011 EL.Cain (3). DPKansas City 1. LOBTexas 6, Kansas City 5. 2BDav.Murphy (26), A.Escobar (20). 3BKinsler (2), J.Dyson (4). HR Hosmer (17). SBGentry (18). SFPierzynski. IPHRERBBSO Texas Garza W,4-5851115 Nathan S,40-43100002 Kansas City Guthrie L,14-12673321 Coleman 11-300000 Bueno 2-310001 Crow 100001 Bueno pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Garza pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T:36. A,575 (37,903). NL Cubs 3, Braves 1Atlanta Chicago abrhbi abrhbi Smmns ss4000StCastr ss4120 J.Upton rf-lf4010Valuen 3b2010 FFrmn 1b2110DMrph ph-3b1110 CJhnsn 3b4020Rizzo 1b4111 Gattis lf4010DNavrr c3011 Heywrd rf0000Schrhlt rf3001 G.Laird c4000Sweeny cf4010 Uggla 2b3000Bogsvc lf3020 BUpton cf3000Barney 2b3000 Medlen p2000TrWood p2000 SDowns p0000Villanv p0000 DCrpnt p0000Lake ph1000 Strop p0000 Totals30150Totals30393 Atlanta0001000001 Chicago00000003x3 ESchierholtz (3). DPAtlanta 2, Chicago 1. LOBAtlanta 7, Chicago 6. 2BJ.Upton (26), Valbuena (15), Rizzo (38). SMedlen. SF Schierholtz. IPHRERBBSO Atlanta Medlen 71-361126 Downs L,2-1 BS,1-1022200 D.Carpenter2-310000 Chicago Tr.Wood 751147 Villanueva W,7-8100000 Strop S,1-1100003 Tr.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. S.Downs pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. WPMedlen. T:42. A,612 (41,019).Pirates 4, Reds 2Cincinnati Pittsburgh abrhbi abrhbi DRonsn cf4000Tabata lf4020 BPhllps 2b3110SMarte pr-lf0000 Votto 1b3010NWalkr 2b3000 Ludwck lf3021McCtch cf3100 Bruce rf4000Mornea 1b2100 Cozart ss4111Byrd rf3011 Hannhn 3b3000PAlvrz 3b4111 Hanign c2000RMartn c3112 HBaily p2000Barmes ss3000 Duke p0000AJBrnt p1000 Hoover p0000Snider ph1000 HRdrgz ph1000Morris p0000 Simon p0000JuWlsn p0000 SMrshll p0000Grilli p0000 Totals29252Totals27454 Cincinnati1100000002 Pittsburgh02000200x4 EVotto (14), H.Bailey (1). DPCincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 3. LOBCincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 5. HRCozart (12), R.Martin (15). SBS.Marte (37). SFByrd. IPHRERBBSO Cincinnati H.Bailey L,11-1152-334243 Duke 010000 Hoover 1-300000 Simon 110010 S.Marshall 100000 Pittsburgh A.J.Burnett W,9-117422312 Morris H,7 1-300010 Ju.Wilson H,142-300000 Grilli S,31-33110000 Duke pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. WPA.J.Burnett. T:01. A,425 (38,362).Cardinals 7, Brewers 2St. Louis Milwaukee abrhbi abrhbi MCrpnt 2b5010Aoki rf5020 Beltran rf4110Gennett 2b5120 Hollidy lf5220Lucroy c3120 MAdms 1b4222CGomz cf3000 YMolin c2101KDavis lf4012 Jay cf4010Bianchi ss4000 Freese 3b4012Halton 1b4000 Kzma pr-ss0100YBtncr 3b3000 Descls ss-3b3012Gallard p1000 Lynn p2000Gindl ph0000 Choate p0000Wooten p0000 Chamrs ph1000Figaro p0000 Maness p0000JFrncs ph0000 Siegrist p0000Maldnd ph1000 Totals34797Totals33272 St. Louis2000000507 Milwaukee1000000102 EGennett (5). DPMilwaukee 1. LOBSt. Louis 5, Milwaukee 9. 2BM.Carpenter (54), Descalso (23), Gennett (10), Lucroy (23), K.Davis (10). HRMa.Adams (16). SBJay (10), Gennett (2). SLynn, Gallardo. IPHRERBBSO St. Louis Lynn W,14-1061-341147 Choate H,132-300000 Maness 11-321101 Siegrist 2-310000 Milwaukee Gallardo L,11-10742227 Wooten 2-345512 Figaro 11-310010 T:12. A,008 (41,900).Mets 5, Phillies 4 (6 innings)New York Philadelphia abrhbi abrhbi EYong lf4000CHrndz cf3110 DnMrp 2b3111Rollins ss3111 DWrght 3b3221Utley 2b3110 Duda 1b1100Ruiz c3001 Lagars cf3112DBrwn lf3110 dnDkkr rf3000Ruf 1b3020 TdArnd c3021Asche 3b1001 Quntnll ss2010Mayrry rf2000 Gee p3000Cloyd p2010 EMartn p0000 Savery p0000 Totals25575Totals23473 New York00010405 Philadelphia010003x4 DPNew York 1, Philadelphia 1. LOBNew York 6, Philadelphia 2. 2BT.dArnaud (3), C.Hernandez (5), Rollins (31), Utley (25). 3B Lagares (5). HRDan.Murphy (12), D.Wright (18). SBQuintanilla (2). SFAsche. IPHRERBBSO New York Gee W,12-10674403 Philadelphia Cloyd L,2-6565525 E.Martin 110013 Savery 1-300010 Cloyd pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. HBPby Cloyd (Duda). WPGee. Balk E.Martin. T:00. A,650 (43,651). West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Oakland9263.5948-2W-351-2941-34 Texas8470.54573-7W-139-3545-35 Los Angeles7578.4901698-2W-236-4039-38 Seattle6787.43524172-8L-233-4234-45 Houston51104.32941342-8L-824-5427-50 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway x-Boston9462.6036-4L-152-2842-34 Tampa Bay8569.55287-3W-249-3036-39 New York8273.5291135-5W-246-3136-42 Baltimore8173.5261234-6L-342-3339-40 Toronto7183.46122134-6W-138-4033-43 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Atlanta9163.5914-6L-152-2239-41 Washington8371.539848-2W-246-3337-38 Philadelphia7183.46120165-5L-343-3728-46 New York7084.45521176-4W-232-4538-39 Miami5698.36435312-8L-231-4425-54 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway St. Louis9164.5876-4W-248-2743-37 Pittsburgh8966.57425-5W-150-3039-36 Cincinnati8867.56836-4L-148-2640-41 Milwaukee6886.44222196-4L-336-4432-42 Chicago6590.41926233-7W-130-4735-43 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAwayx-Los Angeles8866.5713-7L-146-3242-34 Arizona7776.50310105-5L-244-3433-42 San Diego7281.47115156-4W-142-3330-48 Colorado7184.45817175-5W-244-3327-51San Francisco7184.45817176-4L-238-3833-46 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit9064.5848-2W-250-2940-35 Cleveland8570.54858-2W-348-3037-40 Kansas City8173.526936-4L-143-3738-36 Minnesota6589.42225192-8L-331-4334-46 Chicago6093.39229242-8L-235-4125-52 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBASEBALL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 B5 Interleague Yankees 6, Giants 0San FranciscoNew York abrhbiabrhbi Pagan cf3000ISuzuki rf3001 GBlanc lf4010ARdrgz dh4001 Belt 1b4020Cano 2b4021 Posey c4000ASorin lf4111 Pence rf4000Grndrs cf4110 Sandovl 3b3020Nunez 3b3112 Noonan 3b1010MrRynl 1b4110 HSnchz dh3000Ryan ss3110 Monell ph1000CStwrt c1100 BCrwfr ss3000 Abreu 2b3000 Totals33060Totals30676 San Francisco0000000000 New York00320100x6 LOBSan Francisco 7, New York 4. 2BBelt (35), Sandoval (25), Cano (37). HRA.Soriano (17), Nunez (2). SFI.Suzuki. IPHRERBBSO San Francisco Vogelsong L,3-6555511 Moscoso11-311112 Kickham11-310011 Dunning1-300000 New York Nova W,9-5960017 T:32. A,420 (50,291). INTERLEAGUE Yankees 6, Giants 0NEW YORK Ivan Nova pitched a six-hitter for his second career shutout, Eduardo Nunez hit a two-run homer and the New York Yankees kept pace in the AL wild-card chase with an 6-0 victory over the San Francisco Giants. Alfonso Soriano connected for the second straight day and Robinson Cano had an RBI single in a three-run third against Ryan Vogelsong (3-6), helping New York win for just the third time in eight games. A day before New York honors retiring closer Mariano Rivera in a pregame ceremony, Nova (9-5) gave the Yankees bullpen a rest.

PAGE 24

Special to the ChronicleKickballAverage Joes 3, Citrus Whiners 2 Both teams came out hot early in this game, getting runners in scoring position, but could not capitalize on the opportunity to manufacture runs until the bottom of the third inning, when the Whiners went ahead two to nothing. But Average Joes answered right back, scoring a run in the fourth, fifth and sixth innings to take the lead and the victory. Average Joes are sitting at 2-2 midway through the season. Head Shots 10, Kickin Nutz 5 Early runs by both offenses left the defenses tired and on the field for most of the game. Going into the top of fifth inning the game, was tied 5-5 until Head Shots started to pull away due to three costly error by the Nutz outfielders. Heads Shots are 3-1 on the season. Convictions 12, Misfits 2 The Convictions kept the ball rolling with another win over the shorthanded Misfits, who fielded only six players. Playing great defense and scoring runs in every inning, Convictions got their record back to 2-2. Come out to Bicentennial Park in Crystal River to watch these teams go at it! First game starts at 6:30 p.m. on Field 7. Next week will feature the Head Shots vs. the Convictions, the Average Joes vs. the Misfits and Kickin Nutz vs. the Citrus Whiners.Flag footballRegistration started on Aug. 26 and will end Oct. 11. A staff member for Citrus County Parks & Recreation will be calling all managers for the upcoming season. Parks & Recreation would like to see more teams join the league, and for doing so, is offering a discount to the teams that bring in additional teams. The fees are determined by the number of teams that we have signed up, so the more teams, the better. Teams can also add 17-year-olds to their roster with a signed parental consent form. A $50 deposit is required at the time of registration. Season begins Oct. 24.Coed beach volleyballThis season coed beach volleyball is being moved to Fat Daddys BBQ Restaurant south of Crystal River & north of Homosassa on U.S 19. Fat Daddys provides a large Olympic-size sand volleyball court with availability of ordering food& drinks. Registration is open for 17 & up. You have until Oct. 11 to register at the office of Citrus County Parks & Recreation. Registration fee is $100 per team. Season begins Oct. 23.Mens softballRegistration opened Sept. 15 and will end Oct. 18. Parks & Recreation would like to see more teams join the league and is offering a discount to the teams that bring in additional teams. A $50 deposit is required at the time of registration. Season begins Nov. 4.Mens basketballRegistration will begin Oct. 1 and will end Nov. 1. A $50 deposit is required at the time of registration. Season begins Nov. 13. Special to the ChronicleMovie in the ParkParents dont forget to mark your calendar for Citrus County Parks and Recreations annual Halloween Movie in the Park Event. This years event will be Saturday, Oct. 26 at Lecanto Community Park. Mars Needs Moms will be this years movie, and it will be shown on a two-story-tall air screen. The movie will begin at dusk. There will once again be a pre-carved pumpkin contest and several categories of costume contests. Pre-movie festivities will begin at 6 p.m. and will include a bounce house and carnival games. Free popcorn will be provided and there will also be snacks and drinks available for purchase. For more information, call 352-5277540 or visit www.citruscountyparks.com.P.L.A.Y.Citrus County Parks and Recreation is offering a great sports opportunity for your little one, who may be too young to join the organized sports leagues within the county. The P.L.A.Y. Program was created for those children who are ready to play sports, but just arent old enough. The P.L.A.Y. programs offered in the upcoming session include basketball, which will be held at the Citrus County Resource Center on Mondays or Wednesdays; and flag football, located at Bicentennial Park on Tuesdays or Thursdays. The next session will begin the week of Oct. 21. Boys and girls ages 3 to 5 are encouraged to join the six-week program. After enrollment, each child receives age-appropriate sports equipment and a team T-shirt. Registration will open Friday, Oct. 4, and spots fill up fast! Space is limited. Please call Crysta Henry, Recreation Program Specialist for Youth Programs, at 352-527-7540 or visit www.citruscounty parks.com. All programs and activities offered by the Division of Parks and Recreation are available to all persons without regard to race, color, handicap, sex, religion or national origin. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, please contact our office five days prior to the program so that proper consideration may be given to the request. For hearing-impaired, please call 352-5275901 (TTY) or 352-527-7540 (voice).Par 4 ProgramsCitrus County Parks & Recreation presents the first annual Par 4 Programs fall golf tournament. Profits from this tournament will go back into Parks & Recreation to help continue and improve our youth programs. The tournament will be held on Saturday, Oct. 12 at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. Registration is now open for golfers. On the day of the tournament registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. and the shotgun start will be at 8:30 a.m. 50/50 Tickets will be sold, as will mulligan tickets. Challenges include closest to the pin and mens & ladies longest drive. After the tournament, lunch will be served in the Grille Restaurant. There will also be several raffles and silent auctions. Citrus County Parks & Recreation is currently seeking businesses and organizations to help sponsor this worthwhile event by offering a variety of advertising platforms. You can show your support by sponsoring a hole, providing items for gift bags or by donating prizes that can be given away or raffled off for additional funds. B6SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS FREE GAS! FREE FREE GAS! GAS! G I V E A W A Y 000FY9X $ 5 0 FREE GAS CARD One lucky winner for 8 weeks Grand Prize Winner $200 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Wednesdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest Pick up your copy of the Citrus County Chronicle Contest Begins Wednesday, September 11 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. 000FSGG Honoring Survivors and Remembering Loved Ones. Include your loved ones and those touched by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake Edition on October 1. This special edition will be printed on pink newsprint. *All photos & information must be submitted by Tues., Sept. 24 PER TRIBUTE Will include a photo and short bio, approximately 20 words or less. Call Candy 563-3206 to reserve your space. RICHARDBURTON CorrespondentOCALA As he crossed the finish line in Saturday mornings Celtic Invitational, Crystal River senior Brandon Harris knew he was back. Harris posted a time of 16 minutes and 48 seconds and rolled to the individual boys title on a humid morning at Ocala Trinity Catholic High School. It wasnt as easy as I thought it was going to be, but the course was great and well cut and (this race) was a great 5K, Harris said. I was happy to get the win. I blew it in my first race (of the year) and then my second race I got back to 16:35. (Today), it was humid, even at 9 oclock in the morning, but it was nice to come and get the win. I felt good about the way things went. Harris won by 15 seconds over Trinity Catholics Benjamin Waller and helped the Pirates to a thirdplace finish on the boys side. Crystal River ended with a team score of 114, six places behind second-place Ocala Forest, but well off the pace set by champion Lecanto. The Panthers ended with a team score of 46, as it had three of the top eight finishers and five of the top 16 overall. Michael Lindsey (third/17:05), Sam Alford (fourth/17:08), Mackenzie Wood (eighth/17:45), Chase Benoist (15th/18:19) and Jack Clark (16th/18:24) paced victorious Lecanto. For Citrus, Cameron Grant posted his teams top finish with a time of 17:43, which was good for seventh place. The Hurricanes were seventh overall for the boys with a team score of 167, six places behind Belleview. On the girls side, Lecanto nearly pulled out the individual winner, as Claire Farnsworth held the lead late before Sparr North Marions Leigha Torino made a charge. Farnsworth wound up finishing second with a time of 20:10, 29 seconds off the winning effort posted by Torino, who made her push over the final half-mile. (Farnsworth) was pacing me and that got me going, Torino said. Citrus junior Alyssa Weber (third/20:35), Lecantos Katie Mattingly (seventh/21:58) and Crystal Rivers Alexis Ulseth (10th/22:28) finished with top 10efforts on the girls side. Forest won the girls race with a team score of 71, three better than Ocala West Port and Lecanto. Citrus was seventh with a team score of 144 in the event which saw 12 teams participate, but not all field enough runners to post a team score. Pirates Harris takes individual title at Celtic Head Shots take lead in kickball standings Looking for a safe scare on Halloween? Parks & Rec offers Movie in the Park Associated Press

PAGE 25

Some things worth missing Summer is my favorite time of the year. I love the Florida sun. I love the heat. I love the beaches, the boats and that relaxed feeling you get when the population thins out and Florida slows down. This year Im going to miss a few other things. I am going to miss Michael Lusk, the manager of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife station in Citrus County and one of the key people responsible for the public purchase of Three Sisters Springs. Some locals didnt like Michael because he represented the federal government and government always means more rules. But Michael Lusk was the most reasonable and intelligent person weve ever had running the wildlife refuge and he gave Citrus County everything he had. Folks will miss him when they begin to realize what weve lost. After four years of service, he is leaving us to go run a larger refuge in Georgia. I am going to miss Georgeanna Phelps of Homosassa. Ms. Phelps was a community organizer in Homosassa before people began to use the term community organizer in a negative way. She helped organize the community effort to save Bluebird Springs Park. She helped Diane Toto organize and run the community food bank. She got mad and vocal when the Freezer opened up near her home and changed the peaceful neighborhood. She was a gentle person who made our community better. Im going to miss Bob England of Inverness. He passed away this summer. Bob ran banks, loved to play golf and helped make United Way successful in Citrus County. He served our country as a decorated veteran and our community as a leader of people. I am going to miss Richard Wesch, our county attorney and former county administrator. Richard has spent his entire career serving Citrus County and he has aggravated more people than Jeff Dawsy and Charlie Dean combined. He has kept the county out of trouble for years and did such a good job that a big county in south Florida has hired him away. Richard can speak the language of the law the same way a great chef can pan-fry grouper. You are never hungry for more when either of them are done serving you. I am going to miss Liam Cash, the Chroniclesstudent film critic for the past four years. Liam came to the Chronicleand asked to help See WINDOW/ Page C3 Gerry MulliganOUT THE WINDOW Section CSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Mark Twain said once that Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over. There surely is some truth in those words.Im not old enough to remember when the Seminoles and other tribes before them wandered this land, but they did it as much by canoe as by foot, if the history books are true. We were once up to our backsides in water here in Florida, but not anymore. Im not convinced thats a good thing, to tell the truth. It seems that a long while back when the bubbas up in Washington discovered Florida was awash in water, they were jealous, impetuous or just plain simpleminded when they decided to drain it. Next thing you know, alligators were homeless and Yankees invaded us a second time. This was mostly after the War of Northern Aggression. Well, we all sorta got used to the new, drier Florida, and it was pretty good until about the time that Florida jumped into a great big slobbering love affair with Mickey Mouse and urban sprawl. There was a governor back then called Bob Graham who figured we could have both and who managed to get some of the best laws on the books weve ever had to protect our natural resources. JILL LYLES /Special to the ChronicleThe second-place photo in the 18th annual Save Our Waters Week Photo Contest by Crystal River resident Jill Lyles of a young gi rl enjoying the coastal waters of Citrus County's Fort Island Trail Beach illustrates the importance of saving our waters for future generations. SAVE OUR WATERS WEEK 2013 Dont know if those laws were perfect, but it was a start. What followed was one of the biggest periods of growth and prosperity ever seen in Florida. New policy agendas are gutting those laws, and hows this economy working for you these days, anyway? So here we are today. A fella cant eat more than a meal or two a month of freshwater fish from some of our lakes and rivers because of mercury pollution. Well, actually you can, but it might make you simpleminded like me, or worse, make your kids simpleminded like me. But first you got to catch em, and its not as easy as it used to be since it seems like all the lakes and rivers are a mess with algae. Mostly thats from everybody using fertilizer and septic tanks, and we all know water isnt the only thing that flows downhill. My daddy taught me to always drink from upstream of the town when I was a boy, but thats nigh well impossible anymore. So I dont drink from streams. Heck, I dont even wash up in streams. Trying to get clean with dirty water makes no sense to me. Something else he told me: Son, when your number is up, your number is up. If you do stupid stuff you get a low number. Heck, there be a whole lot of things not makin any sense these days, but in my once-in-awhile humble opinion, this is one of the most important reasons to roll up your sleeves and get a little dirt on your hands. Now Im not sayin you and me got the same things pushing us down the path of life, but there cant be a lot of argument about what that trail will be like without clean water. You only have to look to India, Africa and some of the other lands without a good supply of water. First World or Third World, thats the choice as I see it. You get to vote for your kids and grandkids, cause theyre so young. So heres what you do. Most of you have your own ideas and Im guessing some of them are really great. Our cousins in Tallahassee need to hear them so take a minute or three and send some common sense to our governor and the rest. Lord knows they need a transfusion of common sense up there. One of the places where they get confused is when they get to lookin at the little details and forget about the big picture, as I see it. The big picture is pretty simple to paint when you think about it. Tell Tallahassee that we are all downstream of their little town and they are downstream of our votes. Thanks for your time, neighbor!Toadly Ossum is a pseudonym for native Floridian Dan Hilliard, who is a director with the Withlacoochee Area Residents Inc. Toadly OssumGUEST COLUMN continue our conservation efforts but look toward ways we can provide more clean, potable water. As this region grows, demand for fresh water is going to grow, and with it we need to be prepared for growth without compromising our precious resources. It is time we, as a county and surrounding aquifer recharge area, take desalinization seriously. Recently we have seen a huge global push to make clean, potable water available, and I am proud to say we, as the state of Florida, are taking it seriously. In south Florida, as the demand for clean water has continued to grow, water utilities have turned to desalinization as an answer to the growing demand. Advancements in technology have driven the costs of implementation down dramatically and it is now proving a viable source fit for human consumption, irrigation, industrial use and other purposes. As of 2012, there were 35 desalination plants in south Florida alone providing the region with hundreds of millions of gallons of clean, potable water each day. Our region has the unique advantage of having a large percentage of the infrastructure already in place for this process and is primed to take advantage of this opportunity. I recognize this is not the sole answer to the issue, but as I have said above, the issues pertaining to water are diverse and we need to make sure we do everything we can to ensure a strong future for water in this state. With proper vision and execution, Floridas future will have protected water reservoirs, best management practices, and an ample amount of clean usable water from a number of sources. Jimmie T. Smith represents District 34, which serves Citrus and northeast Hernando counties, in the Florida House of Representatives. He lives in Inverness. As someone who wishes to provide a future for my small child here in Citrus County, I recognize the importance of protecting our water and the role it plays in that future. Unlike issues like transportation, the economy, education or myriad other matters, water is the one thing that directly affects each and every one of us on a daily basis. In the past, conservation has been the major push to protect our water. At the time this priority was appropriate, and still has its place, but the issues have become more diverse and consequently deserve a look into other ways that we can protect our water. Agriculture, landscaping, residential development and manufacturing generally consume most of our water, and each in their own way have made great strides in conservation techniques. Thanks to the implementation of reuse, drip irrigation and other bestmanagement practices, agriculture is now predicted to maintain a stabilized consumption level for the next 15 to 20 years. Residential development and landscape management have continually worked to reach the highest levels of conservation. Controlling runoff, reuse, rain sensors to prevent watering during rain and retention ponds are examples of steps taken to improve conservation and reduce the amount of consumption per person. Additionally, manufacturing inherently uses conservation techniques as a way to reduce production costs and increase profits. The examples given are to illustrate that the conservation initiative has been firmly grasped even by those who consume the most. That effort has gotten us to where we are; now it is time to look at the future of water. Its time to not only Jimmie T. SmithGUEST COLUMN The promise of technology This marks the 18th annual Save Our Waters Week, and with that we recognize the future of Citrus County, without a doubt, depends on water.

PAGE 26

Page C2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 Kudos to fire rescue, hazmat It occurred to me that following the recent, sometimes cantankerous discussions around the millage rate increase issue for fire rescue that a recent experience we had might be of some interest to your readers. Last evening when I went to add chlorine tablets to our pool chlorinator I found upon opening our chlorine tablet box that water had gotten into the container and caused the tablets inside to begin converting into chlorine gas, which is an extremely toxic substance. First thing the next morning I called the sheriffs department. My call was properly directed to the right person to collect the necessary information regarding our problem. Within less than 20 minutes Lt. Colin Brunner and Driver Engineer Reed Elwell from the Sugarmill Woods Squad 181 (the firehouse on County Road 480) were examining the scene. They immediately contacted Lt. Vinny Lanzarone and Driver Engineer Elliot Nieves of Homosassas Engine 31 and Hazmat 31 team, who came within another 25 minutes with all the proper equipment to remove the chlorine container from our property. No big deal though this is a very dangerous gas. All these members of the Citrus County Sheriffs Office various sections conducted themselves with exemplary professionalism, competence and courtesy. They were a pleasure to deal with; they identified with our community. Id say our fire rescue and hazmat team is well worth the money.Dick and Jeanine Hirsch Sugarmill WoodsVerbal sparringAttending the Sept. 12 budget meeting forCitrus County was like going to a boxing match. Here we have in thiscorner Mr. Joe Meek and his opponent Mr. Scott Adams. As usual, the firstround came with Mr. Adams scoring a number of jabs at what is wrong with howthis county does business. Mr. Meek is on the defensive blocking many jabsand waiting for an opening for the knockout blow. It is the second round ofthe budget meeting and Mr. Meek scores a major blow to the chin of Mr. Adamson the proposed cuts to the sheriffs department. Mr. Meek scores anotherblow and Mr. Adams is sent to the floor with no response as the people waitfor Mr. Adams to respond to the question. Mr. Adams changes to the rope-a-dope style of fighting but it is too late. Its a TKO with Mr. Meek thewinner. My guess is if they charged an entrance fee to this fight we couldsolve our budget crisis in this county. On Sept. 24, therell be arematch and I am betting on Mr. Meek. I lay 2 to 1 on all bets. This entertaining featureis brought to you by the office of the Citrus County Board of Commissioners.Charles Knecht Sr. Dunnellon What will they say about you when youre gone? I attended a funeral last week of a woman named Sarah Lewis, the widow of my childhood rabbi, Albert Lewis. A 92year-old pillar of her community, she was eloquent, brilliant, devoted and religious. The service was sparse and simple. Mostly prayers and thoughts.F irst, several of her grandchildren spoke, followed by her two daughters and her son. Each of them mentioned something they had learned from their mother or grandmother a life lesson that was indelibly etched in their hearts. One grandson spoke about her kindness and how she lent him money to buy a car on very favorable terms meaning when he could afford to pay her back, he did. Her eldest daughter spoke about how her mothers wonderful and devoted marriage set an example for the next generation. Her youngest daughter laughed at how she used to get, as a holiday gift, a book of stamps, because, her mother said, they will come in very handy when you send letters. And her son told poignant stories of how his mother bravely broke up neighborhood fights, made him wear a coat even on a 75-degree day in the winter because, she said, its a winter 75 degrees! and insisted he Clap! at a neighborhood parade, to show recognition for those marching, warning him that TV was turning his generation into passive observers. He also told of how his father, early in his parents marriage, had a bout with cancer and began to withdraw from the family, fearing he was dying and not wanting the kids to miss him when he was gone. And how his mother firmly but lovingly reminded her husband, How do you want us to remember you? as a kind and caring patriarch, or a distant, removed one? By the end of the service, everyone had laughed and cried. It was clear a life had been welllived, had touched countless others and had left behind warm and comforting memories. Contrast that with an obituary that ran in the Reno(Nev.) GazetteJournallast week: Marianne Theresa JohnsonReddick born Jan. 4, 1935 and died alone on (Aug.) 30, 2013. She is survived by her 6 of 8 children whom she spent her lifetime torturing in every way possible. The obituary, submitted by her children, went on to blast the woman as mean and abusive: Everyone she met, adult or child, was tortured by her cruelty and exposure to violence, criminal activity, vulgarity and hatred of the gentle or kind human spirit. Far from the tears shed at the funeral I attended, this womans offspring were glad she was gone: We celebrate her passing from this earth and hope she lives in the afterlife reliving each gesture of violence, cruelty and shame that she delivered on her children. Her surviving children will now live the rest of their lives with the peace of knowing their nightmare finally has some form of closure. Wow. I guess may she rest in peace is out of the question. You wonder how awful this woman had to be to be memorialized this way. According to an Associated Press account, the children had been removed from her care in the 1960s and had been estranged for more than 30 years. Their case was so awful that it helped lead to legislation in Nevada allowing children to sever ties to abusive parents. Everything in there was completely true, Patrick Reddick told the AP. He called his mother a wicked, wicked witch and said that while the main purpose of the obituary was to bring attention to child abuse, it was also to shame her a little bit. Still, this was three decades since theyd had to deal with her. The social norm when someone dies is to shout the good and whisper the bad or at the very least, say nothing part of what is suggested by the term paying your respects. But as Johnson-Reddick proves, that doesnt govern every death. Or every life. And the abuse you dish out may come back to you. Most of what we do in this world is a rehearsal for our funeral. No matter how much you say, write or decree, in the end, you are summed up in speech and print by others, their memories, their impressions. What will they say about you after youre gone? The only similarity between these two mothers is that they were eulogized not by a list of accomplishments, but by how they treated others. Something to keep in mind if youre thinking about your legacy.Mitch Albom is nationally syndicated columnist for the Detroit Free Press, a best-selling author and radio and television personality. Politics, n. A strife of interests masquerading as a contest of principles.Ambrose Bierce, The Devils Dictionary, 1911 Your demeanor outlives you CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief Taxpayers money wasted on scrutinizing the mundane County Commissioner Scott Adams makes a lot of political hay in Citrus County by alleging corruption and misdeeds by his fellow politicians. He wins support from aggravated taxpayers when he tells them just how awful his fellow politicians are. He tells one and all that his top strategy is get his fellow county commissioners thrown out of office so more people like himself can get elected. Adams gives a good campaign speech and promises corrupt practices will be uncovered. But things dont always work out for Commissioner Adams, and if this week is any example, the freshman commissioner has some questions to answer. Commissioner Adams, a multimillionaire businessman who is part owner of a private landfill in Sumter County, demanded an investigation into the Citrus County landfill because he said it was full of corruption. Adams demanded an independent investigation of the landfill, and he got just that. Last week the state attorney completed the independent investigation and concluded that nothing illegal happened. In fact, the independent state attorney concluded county administrator Brad Thorpe acted appropriately when internal complaints were made about a recycling contractor who had weight discrepancies with materials flowing through the landfill. At the time, Thorpe and the county conducted their own investigation and negotiated a substantial financial settlement with the contractor. The vendor did not bid on the contract the next time it came around. Adams supporters might ask him to justify his previous comments and see if the expense of this investigation was worth the tax dollars spent to conduct it. During the same week, Adams propensity for scandal produced another setback for the freshman commissioner and again cost the taxpayers plenty of money. Adams complained that fellow commissioner Rebecca Bays had a conflict of interest because her husband, businessman Mike Bays, had volunteered to serve on a county board. Bays left the room when a vote was made on Mike Bays appointment, and told all present that it was her husband up for the volunteer board appointment. When the issue became controversial, Mike Bays voluntarily stepped down from the appointment to avoid further conflict. But Adams insisted the action was inappropriate and filed a complaint with the independent state Commission of Ethics. The Ethics Commission then spent tax dollars to investigate the complaint and concluded that moving forward served no public interest. Adams supporters should ask the freshman board member if this was another good expenditure of tax dollars. They might also ask him who is going to pay Commissioner Bays legal fees. Commissioner Adams likes to ask open-ended questions that hint at corruption but stop short of slander. The questions are usually accompanied by a wink of the eye. Its time for the commissioner to answer a few questions about who is going to pay for the cost of the accusations he keeps making. There are plenty of problems that need to be addressed by our county commissioners. Its time to dig deep and show some leadership, find consensus, and solve those problems. THE ISSUE:Adams allegations proven unfounded.OUR OPINION:Accusations not without their own costs. LETTERSto the Editor Plenty of ideasIm responding to the man who wrote in about the harness horseracing. I think that would be an excellent thing to have here in the Inverness area, especially out by the fairgrounds. And maybe kayaking and fishing could be pushed a little bit more on Lake Henderson. I know they come to see the manatees, but originally this was a fishing village and people that came here a long time ago, thats what they came for, the fishing. And also, the industrial park. I dont know what happened to that idea. A lot of my neighbors and I thought that was an excellent idea.Lack of skeeter sprayYou know, I think Ive just about had it with the way our tax dollars are being spent. Theyre spraying for mosquitoes all up around Citrus Hills, etc., all up around where all those big-money homes are. But I live on Donna Street and I just want to say I havent seen a mosquito truck come by here in the last few years. Were all taxpayers too. Come on, Citrus County. Start spraying everywhere, please.Editors note:Citrus County Mosquito Control responds to citizen complaints and concerns. Give the office a call at 352-527-7478. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE POINTING THE FINGER Mitch AlbomOTHER VOICES OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Persons wishing to address the editorial board should call 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com

PAGE 27

COMMENTARYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 C3 Like most folks our age, Cheryl and I watch television. We probably watch it more than we should. We avoid those series or movies with explicit language and those that show too much flesh. What this means is we watch a lot of old movies. Some of them are well done and some are not, but thats OK. Cheryl really enjoys seeing now-famous actors in their early, unknown days. What we watch quite often are mysteries. Though we might not have seen a particular film, it is likely that we have seen something similar. Much of the time they are easy to figure out well before the film ends, but thats where the fun lies we challenge each other to see who can identify the perpetrator first. We also like many of the shows presented by the PBS Masterpiece Mystery series. A few nights ago we were watching one such who-done-it with innumerable clues as to means, motive and opportunity. It was more complex than most and neither Cheryl nor I could figure it out early on. The victim was female and had been shot, but that was all that seemed clear. There were suspects galore, but as always, when someone is murdered, the first suspects are family members and when the victim is female, the husband is usually the most likely; when the deceased is the husband, the wife is at the top of the list. As was to be expected, suspicion was first directed toward the husband. But his alibi was airtight. After a number of wild-goose chases and harassment of both the victims paramour and the husbands numerous romantic partners, the detectives were right back where they started. There was no obvious motive. No life insurance. No other apparent financial gain for which the old girl might have been done in. While going through the investigatory process, as they began to focus on a potential motive, one of the participants recalled a previous case he had worked when the husband had shot the wife six times because she wouldnt give him the TV remote control device. Without saying a single word, with a mock look of horror on her face, Cheryl handed me the remote. Did the detectives solve the case? We never found out. We both fell asleep. Even so, I now feel a little bit more secure about our at least equally sharing the TV clicker.Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. What to do when the motive hits too close to home Fred BrannenA SLICE OF LIFE out covering movies. Within a year he was writing film reviews every week and it became his passion. He has left Citrus County to attend Florida State University, and I have no doubt his reviews (if not his movies) will one day appear on the national stage. I am going to miss J.C. Penney and our nuclear plant and all the jobs that went along with both. But I wont miss love bugs, the last few seconds of each Tampa Bay Bucs game or the fighting over Citrus Memorial hospital. Just maybe the change of season will bring an end to all three of those transgressions.Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan@chronicleonline.com. WINDOWContinued from Page C1 Dont ignore rest of cityYou have been taking care of the historical downtown Inverness. It looks beautiful. But please dont forget the rest of the city of Inverness. There are streets and there are cul-desacs that are really, really in horrible shape, especially in the development behind the shopping center right here on Hill Street. We really need someone to come in here and take a look because its getting worse. Again, youre doing a beautiful job in downtown historical Inverness. We enjoy going there. Thanks for saving GatorI would like to thank the University of Florida ER group of the Small Animals Veterinarian School at Gainesville for saving our dog, Gators, life. He was almost in demise and they took it upon themselves to bring him back and did a fantastic job after he went in (for) major surgery on his spleen, and I do appreciate everything theyve done. Its an outstanding facility and thank God that they were able to do what they did with the latest state-of-theart equipment and knowledge that those people possess. Id also like to thank many of the neighbors, friends in the area in Pine Ridge that supported Gator with cards, phone calls and some toys that they gave to him. And its really loving to see how many neighbors and friends show such a great interest and human warmth towards ones animals and themselves. So again, thank you all and I appreciate everything youve done for our boy, Gator.Beautiful windowsI absolutely would love to see the actual picture of the pelican and alligator with the real alligator teeth. The picture shown in Aug. 22s paper was lovely as well with the small frog on (the) lily pad and bird in the bushes. Is the central bird a blue heron? (My mom) and Kenneth Swade are so lucky to live in a home with these beautiful windows.Dont pay? VolunteerI see theres another Sound Off about the volunteers for (the) fire department. For the people who dont want to pay the extra taxes: First of all, apply to become a volunteer, pass the drug test, background check, physical. Then take many, many, many, many hours of training. Then if you get in, get the rented gear, take it home. When the alarm goes off your beeper at 3 oclock in the morning Christmas morning, your birthday, New Years Eve, when the familys coming to visit and youre getting ready to go out to dinner, be sure to drop everything and respond to the firehouse. Be sure to kiss your loved ones goodbye because youre going to be a firefighter. You may not come back (because) firefighting is a dangerous job. I have 25 years as a professional firefighter, including another four as a volunteer. I am permanently handicapped from fighting fires and getting hurt. So those of you who dont want to pay that extra money, just do what I just said, OK? If not, then shut up and pay the extra taxes. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 Letters toTHE EDITOR A weird review of American foreign policyIn his letter of Sept. 6, Mr. Del Vecchio opens by stating, In 2003, administration spokesmen told reporters that Saddam Hussein moved his stockpiles of chemical weapons to Syria in advance of the Second Gulf War. I followed the arguments for George W. Bushs war closely, but I never heard about the Syrian connection. I do remember that in his 2003 State of the Union address he mentioned that British intelligence had established a link between Iraq and al-Qaida. He wasnt lying, exactly. It did come out that the CIA had informed the president the Brits were mistaken. But he didnt think that the American people or Congress had the need to know. Saddam was not, however, on good terms with either al-Qaida or Syria. But pretending to believe that, he was supporting George W.s execution of the Pretext For War plot developed by Douglas Feith, Richard Perle, David Wurmser, et al. Truth was singularly irrelevant to the Republican P arty in either foreign or domestic policy. Had the WMD already gone to Syria? Why invade Iraq? As for Obamas election promise to permanently end the war, that level of sarcasm is worthy of the hypocrisy of the political right. I heard Obamas acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize. Contrary to Republican interpretation, it brought out at some length that sometimes military action, even war, was necessary. As for Libya, it is regrettable that four Americans, including a fine ambassador, lost their lives. Regrettable, but minor compared to the massive loss of life associated with Republican misadventures. The terrorists were later turned on by the citizens of Benghazi. Del Vecchio further complains that while Obama ended combat operations in Iraq he replaced them with indirect and somewhat indiscriminate targeting of civilians in Yemen. In reality, the drone strikes have been more precise and less indiscriminate than, for example, tactical air strikes and conventional artillery barrages. The drone strikes have done more damage to the leadership of al-Qaida than conventional warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan. Intervention by Obama, and even Bill Clinton, has generally been low-cost and decisive. Little money (comparatively) or American blood was spent on the Balkans or Libya. But Iraq well, thats a Republican thing. Del Vecchio announces we have been at war 10 years over WMD in Iraq and Afghanistan we knew existed and thought might have been moved to Syria. We knew in months that there were no WMD of any substance in Iraq. And this is the first Ive heard even in the funny papers or Fox News about WMD in Afghanistan. Nor did Obama promise Peace in Our Time. That was Neville Chamberlin. Obama made it clear in his Nobel Prize acceptance speech that military action would on occasion be necessary.Pat Condray OzelloIt pays to turn leftA steady green left turn arrow indicates the oncoming traffic is held up to allow you to turn left. When the green arrow is off you can still turn left, but you must yield to oncoming traffic. Is there a single driver who was not aware of this use of traffic signals? So why did they come up with a new system wherein the left turn signal is blinking yellow when you must yield to oncoming traffic? Is it safer? Does it clear up a problem they were having with people turning left? No, and no. What the new signal is designed for is to compliment red-light cameras. You can expect the cameras to show up shortly after the yellow blinking turn arrow is installed. Heres how it works: You come to the intersection and the yellow arrow is blinking. You advance into the intersection as you see a gap coming up that will give you the opportunity to turn. Surprise! That last yellow blink was the one that meant the red light was next. You just got a ticket mailed to you for running the red light. The county (along with some private company in Texas) gets a very profitable source of income and you get ... well, you know what you get. It has absolutely nothing to do with safety.Stephen C. Brown InvernessJust ask; theyll tell youIn a letter of Sept. 11, J. Rising asks if campsites for homeless are legally designated. People at one camp have been asking me to get them a Dumpster so they can keep their area tidy, but I have been unsuccessful. They appreciate the donations of clothing, but to keep them clean they need rolls of quarters and rides to the Laundromat. They need access to showers and potable water. There is a way to find out exactly what these people need to survive, ask them.Mary B. Gregory Homosassa The business of scrapThere are many Chinese traders traveling across the United States in search of scrap metal. It is scrap metal that American recycling dealers wont bother with. In 2012, China accounted for 43.1 percent of copper demand worldwide and more than five times the amount acquiredby the United States. One way to get copper is to mine it; the other is recycled scrap. Scrap accounts for more than half of Chinas production of copper. The United States throws away more than half of what we can use. Low-grade scrap requires much manual work to be clean enough to be melted in furnaces. If low-grade scrap werent exported, it would wind up in landfills, because labor in the U.S. is much more costly than in China. Telephone cable oozes a vaselinelike substance and hundreds of tiny wires, which gum up recycling equipment. Tons of Christmas lights, elevator wire, cable TV boxes, etc., are all recycled. Chinas purchase of our scrap metal serves a multi-purpose. Scrap dealers make a profit and employ people and it saves us a lot of landfill area.Robert E. Blum HomosassaGovernment inefficiencyThe Commentary of Sunday, Sept. 15, was an interesting read. You raised several issues and gave what I consider fair coverage to each. I see an underlying theme in the whole spectrum of issues. The question is, What is the role of government? Its pretty obvious government has grossly failed us in the hospital issue. The board accepted some bad legal advice years ago and created a foundation in an attempt to save money on the Florida retirement system. Maybe a small public hospital is just not viable in todays medical market, but to raise the taxes tenfold suggests management problems. Ive sat through two 10-hour episodes in the CMH ER and I will never walk in the door again. They have management problems throughout the staff. It was first reported in the Chroniclethat HCA led the bidding with an offer of $133 million. The article today says its $291 million. That is a no-brainer; sell the hospital to them and get the taxpayer off the hook. Private industry can do a much better job of running it than we can. The sad thing is the local governments never learn. If you look at the Three Sisters Springs project, you see the same dysfunctional arrangement as the hospital evolved into. I see us keeping the local lawyers working for years over that mess. You now have $10 million invested and two years and although its public money, the public cant use it. Wait until the lawsuits start flying. You had two articles about water quality. Somehow the local politicians cant grasp the lesson of thousands of years of human history that growth and pristine waters are incompatible. Its just not going to happen. When you throw in a complete lack of infrastructure, no storm sewers, no sanitary sewers, its impossible. I applaud recent efforts to correct this problem, but you are 50 years too late. This is the septic system capital of the world and if you keep pushing growth at all costs, its not going to change. The lead editorial was about a costbenefit analysis for the community centers to see if the benefits justify the cost. I applaud Rebecca Bays for raising the issue. It was reported in the Chroniclethat it was costing us about $240 a year for each person using the community centers. I have no idea if that number is correct, but lets say that it is. My yearly membership in the local Elks Lodge costs me about $70. The Elks have so many social groups, committees and charity functions going on that you could not possibly participate in more than just a select few. Thats just another example of governments inefficiency and expense. I have already expounded on my thoughts on the sheriffs air ambulance service in another letter, so I wont belabor it here other than to say that it must be subjected to an even more rigorous cost-benefit analysis than the community center issue. I dont think the sheriff can provide the service cheaper than private industry. Im guessing, but Ill put his costs at two or three times what private industry can do it for. Its not a valid function of local government.Harley Lawrence Homosassa

PAGE 28

Printing the truthThank you, Chronicle, for finally printing your editorial on the Cottage industry of Legislature the hotbed of self-interest. That is so true in this state down here. Thank you again for printing the truth and also about the Public Service Commission, which is nothing but a big joke down here. Thank you again for printing it.Shattering litterbugWednesday (Aug. 28) was such a beautiful morning in Citrus County; brilliant blue sky, low humidity. It was a pleasure driving along Citrus Avenue driving into Crystal River. Sharp-looking red Mustang in front of me, nice tan convertible top. A lovely blond at the wheel adjusting her hair, adjusting her sunglasses, making sure her makeup looked beautiful. Then the image was shattered. She rolled down her window and threw out a newspaper. A piece of paper that floated back towards my vehicle. The image was shattered. Just another litterbug. Oh, you know who you were. Another litterbug despoiling Citrus County.Flying through yellowToday is a half of a school day for Crystal River and youre going on (State Road) 44 and theres that flashing yellow light that means 20 mph. So for the car that zipped through completely doing 30, 35, 40, I hope the sheriffs out there next time. Its a half a day, the kids are out there, those buses are out here, us people picking up kids are out there and you people are still flying through. Wheres the sheriff on the half days at that blinking, flashing yellow light? Its aggravating to all of us.Grass is a disgraceI was just wondering. On South Park Avenue in Inverness, the homes and grass are a disgrace. Where is the code enforcement board? They ought to make people keep up their homes. If they cant afford it, move into an apartment where they mow the grass for you. Its pride for the other person, too, plus yourself.More down the drainWe have this hospital thats sucked about $4 million of the taxpayers money down the drain and now were turning right around and doing the same thing with Duke Energy. Something must be done about this government, this local government. Think long-termFor the young ladies thinking about body art: Do they know what a long-stem rose or a butterfly looks like after 60 years? Im sure your children and grandchildren will be impressed.Pay attention to roadJust wanted to say what a great job your papers doing. Also, I just witnessed a five-car pileup accident in front of the Firestone and (Our) Lady of Fatima Church. And, you know, if the people, you know, would stay off their cellphones and texting while driving and paying attention and not tailgating each other, accidents like this wouldnt happen. Hopefully no one got hurt.Give Lee a five-forCan anyone give me the phone number to the Lee County office building? Maybe theyre in need of a county administrator and four county commissioners. Maybe we could do a package deal and clean up things in Citrus County.Love the mall musicI was so happy to read that other people enjoy the music at the mall. It has been very enjoyabl e. But then again, we do need a Ross For Less and a Michaels or maybe a Marshalls something to bring the young people. They love Ross For Less. And just keep up the music and its just been lovely.Helicopter questionsSome questions on the medevac helicopter proposal: Will the copter respond to emergencies outside the county? Who or what will determine which trauma center it flies to? Who will bill for the services? Where will the money received go? Who will employ the additional EMTs needed? Since several people have stressed that Citrus County citizens own the helicopter and that this is to reduce the cost of a flight, will Citrus County residents be billed at a different rate than noncitizens and possibly snowbirds? Will all Florida counties try to establish medical evac capabilities? Has the state of Florida ever considered establishing a statewide emergency medical services plan with helicopters strategically sited, mutual coverage, etc.? Finally, how can an ultraconservative tea party county like this consider a government agency competing with a private, forprofit medical transport company? End of questions.Citrus is the best!This is for the lady that thinks Citrus County has little to offer and that the bad outweighs the good and it may be time for her to move on. Well, lady, go ahead and move on because I beg to differ. Citrus County has the most more things to do; free things, free concerts, beautiful bike trails, the gorgeous waters to fish on and boat on. You need to get your head out of the dirt. All of my friends who come here from bigger towns marvel at all the things that we have to offer here the craft shows, the music. Its just amazing that somebody like her lives here and doesnt see this. SoundOFFC4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMENTARY 000G4UL Sept 22 Oct 12 Citrus County Historical Society Journey Stories Old Courthouse Heritage Museum Journey Stories is a compelling Smithsonian exhibition that shows how our evolving mobility changed a young nation and how transportation made us grow. The Accounts Of Travelers Themselves Express The Hopes And Promises Of Fresh Starts, The Grim Realities Of Forced Migrations And Difficult Journeys, And The Thrills Of Personal Travel. Brought To You By The Smithsonian Institution And The Florida Humanities Council. Sept 22 1:40 pm The Senior Foundation of Citrus County 2013 Florida Rays Baseball vs. Baltimore Orioles Bus Leaves 9:30am From Citrus County Resource Center $45 Event Price Includes Admission And Round-trip Transportation Via Chartered Bus. Per Tampa Bay Rays, Game Times Are Subject To Change. For More Information Call 527-5975 Sept 23 Oct 20 Citrus County Chamber and\Nature Coast River Events International Ethnic Festival Fun, Food, Music On The Homosassa River. Authentic Food And Entertainment. Enjoy The Best In International Flavors And Sounds. 9/23-9/29: Irish, 9/30-10/6: German, 10/7-10/13: Italian, 10/14-10/20: Polish Contact Phone: 503-2007, 322-7479 Sept 28 7:30 am Team Hope Relay 4 Life American Cancer Society Team Hope 2nd Annual Relay 4 LifeFishing Tournament Homosassa Riverside Resort Pre register $100 per boat Register day of event $125 per boat Team Hope 2nd Annual Relay 4 Life Fishing Tournament 50% Proceeds Goes To Relay 4 Life, 50% Prize Money. Tournament Based On Point SystemFishing CategoriesOne Weigh In1 Fish Per Category. Prize $ Based On 100 BoatsAdults & Childrens Division. Game Fish & Wildlife To Be Present With Childrens Activities. Limited 200 Boats. Approximate Number Of Attendees: 100-300 Contact Phone: 352-697-2220 Sept 28 9:00 am Inverness Elk Lodge #2522 Lakeside Craft Show 3580 Lemon St., Hernando Free admit & parking This Event Is For The Benefit Of The Elks Charities In The Area. The Vendors Are All Local People With All Handmade Items For Sale It Is From 9 Am To 3 Pm. There Will Be Food & Drink Available As Well As Raffle Drawings Through Out The Day For Donated Items From All Of Our Vendors Bring A Friend. It Is Open To The Public.

PAGE 29

TECHNOLOGYSection DSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE BUSINESS BRIEFS Bruce WilliamsSMART MONEY From wire reports MONDAYBRUSSELS European Central Bank President Mario Draghi briefs European lawmakers on monetary policies and the blocs economic situation. HONG KONG HSBC releases preliminary version of its purchasing manager's index, a closely watched early indicator of the strength of China's huge manufacturing sector. TUESDAYWASHINGTON The Conference Board releases the Consumer Confidence Index for September, 10 a.m.; Senate Budget Committee hearing on the impact of uncertainty on jobs and the economy. THURSDAYFreddie Mac, the mortgage company, releases weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.; National Association of Realtors releases pending home sales index for August, 10 a.m. Senator concerned about new fingerprint technology BREEFOWLER Associated PressNEW YORK Sen. Al Franken is asking Apple for more clarity on privacy and security concerns he has with its use of fingerprint recognition technology in the new iPhone 5S. The iPhone 5S, which went on sale Friday, includes a fingerprint sensor that lets users tap the phones home button to unlock their phone, rather than enter a four-digit passcode. But Franken said that the fingerprint system could be potentially disastrous for users if someone does eventually hack it. While a password can be kept a secret and changed if its hacked, he said, fingerprints are permanent and are left on everything a person touches, making them far from a secret. Let me put it this way: if hackers get a hold of your thumbprint, they could use it to identify and impersonate you for the rest of your life, the Minnesota Democrat said in a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook. But the Cupertino, Calif., company has said that this kind of technology significantly boosts security for users. According to Apple, the fingerprint data is stored on the phone in a place thats inaccessible to other apps and to Apples remote servers. In addition, Apple says its not possible to convert a fingerprint from a police file into something the phone will recognize, as the sensor reads a sub-epidermal layer of the finger. Oil falls as another budget battle looms NEW YORK Oil fell more than 1 percent Friday as fears of a disruption to Middle East supplies eased while concerns about a shutdown of the U.S. government grew stronger. Benchmark oil for October delivery dropped $1.72, or 1.4 percent, to close at $104.67 per barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. For the week, oil dropped $3.54, or 3.3 percent. Thats despite a 2.5 percent increase on Wednesday, when the U.S. Federal Reserve announced it would keep its stimulus policy in place. Meanwhile, the average price for a gallon of gasoline held steady at $3.49, down 10 cents from where it started the month. Brent crude, the benchmark for international crudes used by many U.S. refineries, gained 46 cents to $109.22 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange in London. Fed-inspired global rally fizzles out LONDON The rally in global stock markets fizzled out on Friday, two days after the U.S. Federal Reserve buoyed sentiment by keeping its monetary stimulus program in place. Britains FTSE 100 fell 0.4 percent to close at 6,596.43 while Germanys DAX edged down 0.2 percent to 8,675.73. Frances CAC40 ended almost 0.1 percent lower at 4,203.66. In Japan, the Nikkei 225 index gave up early gains to close 0.2 percent lower at 14,742.42. Australias S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.4 percent to 5,276.70. Benchmarks in Indonesia, New Zealand, Thailand, the Philippines and Singapore fell. Indias benchmark Sensex dropped 2.2 percent to 20,203.96. ANICKJESDANUN Associated PressCUPERTINO, Calif. Where the phones differ most is on the inside. The 5S has a faster chip, a fingerprint sensor and a better camera, and both new models are compatible with a greater range of 4G LTE frequency bands. Both phones also come with the new iOS 7 operating system, a major departure in style and functionality from the iOS 6 that came installed on the iPhone 5.Heres a closer look at how features in the three phones compare:Only the iPhone 5S has a fingerprint sensor. The home button of the 5S recognizes your prints and can use that instead of a four-digit passcode to unlock the phone.The main camera on the 5S is better at picking up light, which is useful for night and indoor shots. Although all three phones have 8-megapixel cameras, individual pixels on the 5S are larger, and the How iPhone 5S, 5C and older iPhone 5 compare Apart from new colors, the exterior of Apples new iPhones doesnt look much different from last years model. The iPhone 5S is identical to the iPhone 5 in size and weight, while the iPhone 5C is only slightly bigger and heavier. The 5C also uses plastic instead of aluminum and glass. Photos by the Associated Press Extra income should be enjoyed DEAR BRUCE: I am 66 years old. My friends tell me to start opening up, to spend a little and enjoy it. My house has been remodeled and is ready to sell. Its valued at $170,000. My only debt is a home equity loan of $14,000. My investments and cash are $210,000. My Social Security is $1,760 a month; my pension is $1,557 and Im drawing $800 a month from investments. So I deposit $4,117 in my checking directly each month. My budget allowance (including taxes and insurance) is $3,104 monthly. I also have a part-time job that pays me $10,000 a year. Should I have a more freewheeling attitude about money? I have physicals twice a year, and feel only the loss of my great wife of 43 years. Steve, via email DEAR STEVE: I am with your friends. Go out and enjoy your life. Who are you saving it for? At 66 years old, you are a very young man. I am not suggesting you go out and spend more than what is coming in, but you have close to $1,000 a month plus the part-time job over and above your monthly expenses. By all means, take a cruise, get a hobby, do something See MONEY/ Page D2 See APPLE/ Page D2

PAGE 30

D2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBUSINESS INTERNET ADVERTISING For information on how your business can advertise on the Chronicle Website call563-5592 000G4YB DRYER VENT CLEANING DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. Vent 1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Years Licensed, Bonded, Insured $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000FXJ8 When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile Cleaner Showers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Clean, Seal & Repair Shower Maintenance & Grout Repair Grout Colorant 586-1816 746-9868 000G2MO WINDOW CLEANINGDirty Windows? Window Cleaning Window TintingBONDED & INSURED Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates! 352.503.8465www.windowgenie.comNew customer special Min. order $100 ROOFING 000G3VG Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices LIC#CC1327656 www.eliteroofing-inc.com 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429 (352) 639-1024 LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE STARTING AT $ 60 00 Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! www.CitrusPest.com 000FX7O (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS PEST CONTROL Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River 2013 2013 2013 2013 LICENSED & INSURED 000G2JI www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net FLOORING WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER 685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowes on Hwy. 44) Lecanto 341-0813 MON-FRI 8:30-5 SAT 9-4 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT Visit Us WE BEAT THE COMPETITION!! With Same or BETTER Windows! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED LICENSE #CCL002604 WINDOWS UNLIMITED 352-795-8772 1-800-600-HEAT (4328) www.windowsfla.com WINDOWS 000FX7T 000FX1M APPLIANCE REPAIR Top Notch Appliance Repair Over 30 Years Experience 352-586-9109 Accepting Credit Cards Licensed & Insured Robert Roik Member of Chamber of Commerce 000FZE9 SOD Licensed & Insured Jaime Massingill John Massingill LAWN REPLACEMENT Complete Lawn & Patch Work Drought Tolerant Lawns J&J SOD (352) 302-6049 Tub & Tile RefinishingServing Citrus Since 1989ALL ABOUT BATHSWarranty Porcelain Fiberglass Tile Custom Colors Acrylic Bath Systems Chip Repairs & Morewww.AllAboutBaths.com352 637-2299 Check us out!BATHTUB REFINISHING000FYKY 000FNUL 352-794-0270 www.smcflorida.com CARPET CLEANING Our Services: Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Spot Removal 24/7/365 EMERGENCY SERVICE CR-C057844 Expires 11/30/13 Have a couch and loveseat cleaned, get a chair or recliner cleaned FREE ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13 $ 79 95 3 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL 000FZ5J cameras shutter can open wider. Combined, Apple says that translates to a 33 percent improvement in light sensitivity.The flash on the 5S is better, too. Unlike other cameras, iPhones or otherwise, the flash on the 5S shoots two different lights at once one whitish and the other amber. The iPhone adjusts the combination automatically to account for ambient lighting conditions. That results in better skin tones and more natural colors, as the normal flash sometimes overpowers whatever light is naturally there.The front-facing cameras on both the 5C and the 5S are better. Although the cameras remain at 1.2 megapixels, the pixel sizes on both are larger.The 5S can shoot slow-motion video and take up to 10 photos per second. The 5 and the 5C cant do slow motion. The 5C does allow for continuous shooting, but only at about 2.5 shots per second.The A7 processor used in the 5S is faster than the A6 found in the 5 and the 5C. Apps and Web pages typically open a blink of an eye faster. The 5S boots about five seconds faster than the 5C.The A7 on the 5S can handle data more efficiently with a 64-bit format, akin to whats found on desktop computers, rather than the 32 bits traditionally used in phones. Games and other graphic-intensive apps can take advantage of this. The 5S also has a companion processor, called M7, for motion-related tasks. That allows for fitness apps to run without draining as much battery. Apps taking advantage of either of these improvements are still being developed, though.The 5S and the 5C are compatible with more 4G LTE frequency bands up to 13, instead of a maximum five before. That means the phone is more likely to work with higher speeds wherever you go. However, there are more than 40 cellular bands worldwide, the bulk for LTE, so a version bought in one country might not work for high speeds everywhere around the world. If that happens, youll need to use the slower 3G and GSM networks.Both the 5C and the 5S come with iOS 7, which offers a new look to icons along with new features such as a Control Center for easy access to frequently used settings and apps. Older phones can be upgraded to iOS 7 for free, although Apple says some features wont work with all models. that pleases you. You cant take it with you. DEAR BRUCE: Is it necessary to have a child as executor? We are 70 years old with three adult children. We asked our oldest son to be executor and have given him power of attorney, as well. We have an issue with one of the others. She is very upset about him being chosen, plus she does not get along with the other two. Our son says he doesnt want to do this, but will anyway. Would it be wise to have an attorney as executor? We would like to relieve the stress in our family over this issue and do not know which way to go. I can imagine that an attorney might say its OK, but is it prudent in your opinion? Any advice you can give will be greatly appreciated. Alvin, via email DEAR ALVIN: The direct answer is you could have anyone you choose be your executor. The fact that your daughter doesnt get along with the other two siblings is lamentable, but thats the way life is. If your oldest son doesnt want to do it, dont force him. On the other side of that, it would be a lot cheaper if he did because he wont charge you. An attorney certainly will charge you to be the executor. I dont think you are going to relieve the stress in your family very much. Maybe the other son would be executor, but I dont see any reason to pay an attorney to try to avoid stress. Its going to be there no matter what. DEAR BRUCE: I enjoy reading your column. I hope you can help me figure out a way to set up a monthly budget for myself. Do you have any suggestions for where I should start? I am tired of feeling that my money is not being used wisely. D.E., via email DEAR D.E.: The first thing you have to do is sit down and write a list of all the expenses that are unavoidable, such as rent/mortgage payment, insurance, car payments, utility bills, food, etc. Then assign a value to each of them. Many are pretty constant amounts. Others, such as food, can be a little more difficult to pin down. Once you have that added up, compare it to your monthly income and you will see how much money you can choose to spend each month. Once you have this budget, do your best to stick to it. One trick is to condition yourself not to go to the grocery store hungry. It will encourage you to buy more things than necessary. You can also go to a library or the Internet to find more information on this subject that could help you immensely. The most difficult thing is getting started. Its also important to put yourself first. In other words, decide how much to save each payday and put that amount away first. Send questions to bruce@ brucewilliams.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. APPLEContinued from Page D1 MONEYContinued from Page D1 Sprint joins rivals with upgrade program Associated PressNEW YORK Sprint is launching a new program that gives customers the chance to upgrade their phones every 12 months, becoming the last of the four national wireless carriers to target customers who want the latest devices. Sprint Corp.s new One Up plan is most similar to Jump from T-Mobile US Inc. T-Mobile allows for more frequent upgrades, but requires a $10 monthly fee to participate. Sprints is free, but doesnt include insurance, as Jump does. Like T-Mobile, Sprint is reducing the monthly cost of voice, text and data services while charging for the phone in installments. But unlike T-Mobile, Sprints discount ends after the phone is paid off over two years. T-Mobile customers can keep the lower service rates indefinitely. AT&T and Verizon Wireless also allow customers to upgrade their phones before the typical two years are up. But neither Verizons Edge nor AT&Ts Next program reduces the monthly service fees, so customers pay more overall. With the iPhone 5S, for instance, a phone company typically charges about $200, or $450 less than the full retail price of the phone. With Edge, customers pay the entire $650, with no credit for not needing the subsidy. Next discounts the price to $540, but thats still $340 more than what customers normally pay. Sprint said the program is available to new and existing customers on Unlimited, My Way and My All-in plans beginning on Friday. It is not yet available at Sprint stores in Florida. Customers who want to sign up for the Sprint One Up program must buy an eligible smartphone or tablet and agree to two years of installment payments. Sprint said that once a customer makes 12 straight payments, or pays for half of the phones cost, they can upgrade to a new phone or tablet.

PAGE 31

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013Chamber Connection 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801D3 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce. Upcoming Chamber of Commerce eventsSept. 26 Business After Hours hosted by Emeritus at Barrington Place, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 2341 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Lecanto. Sept. 28 Seventh annual Womens Health and Fitness Expo presented by the Business Womens Alliance (BWA), 9 a.m.to 2 p .m. at the National Guard Armory, 8551 W. Venable Ave., Crystal River. Oct. 3 Fire Up Citrus! 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. New kick-off event for Industry Appr eciation Month will be held at Tuscany on the Meadow Quality Inn 350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Oct. 10 Industry Appreciation Mixer, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., hosted by Specialty Gems at 600 SE US Hwy 19, Crystal River. Oct. 11 Industry Appreciation Annual Awards Luncheon with R. Alexander Glenn, state president of Duke Energy, 11:30 to 1 p.m., College of Central Florida, 3800 Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto. Check our complete calendar at www.citruscountychamber.com or follow the QR code to see the website on your smartphone! October is Industry Appreciation Month in Citrus County! Fire Up Citrus!Twelve presenters each have 5 minutes to fire up Citrus and inspire economic development! Thursday, Oct. 3, 6 to 8:45 p.m. at Tuscany on the Meadows, at the Quality Inn Conference Center, 350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Annual Awards LuncheonAlways the most popular and well-attended business luncheon of the year in Citrus County, the annual luncheon honors our local businesses and industries with awards for Outstanding Small Business, Outstanding Employer or Corporate Citizen, and Person of the Year. Our featured speaker this year is R. Alexander Glenn, Florida president for Duke Energy, who is certain draw a large crowd. This luncheon SOLD OUT last year, so we suggest that you get your reservations early! Friday, Oct. 11, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m,. College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. EDC BarbecueM&B Dairy, the largest dairy farm in Citrus County, will once again host over 800 people for an evening of delicious barbecue prepared by the Ag Alliance. This beautiful location provides plenty of room to spread out, chow down on the best barbecue ever prepared by the Citrus County Agricultural Alliance, enjoy libations at the open bar, and kick up your heels with great live music frome the best country band in the south the Dan Story Band. Dale McClellan, owner of M&B Dairy, is the 2012 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Ag Expo Florida Farmer of the Year, and we thank him for opening his farm again this year for this fun-filled event. Thursday, Oct. 17, 6 to 10 p.m. M&B Dairy, 8760 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. For questions about these events, or to make reservations, contact Heather at 352-795-2000 or heather@citrus edc.com, or pay at www.citrusedc.com /events.html Industry Appreciation MixerSpecialty Gems of Crystal River invites everyone to join them in as they host the Industry Appreciation business mixer at their wonderful store. Mixers are a great business-to-business networking opportunity in a relaxed atmosphere, so be certain to bring your business cards. Admission is free, but registration is requested to give our host an idea of how many will attend. We give our sincere appreciation to Carol Kimbrough, owner of Specialty Gems, for making this wonderful event possible. Thursday, Oct. 10, 5 to 7 p.m. Specialty Gems 600 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. btnf btnf fr fr t t n ntnf tnf f f b b tn tn n nf fr r fft fft f f tf tf f f b b t t bf bf ft ft t t b b btnfrn btnfrn rbt b! rbt b! b"b#$t%&'r& b"b#$t%&'r& ()*##+tb,!tn ()*##+tb,!tn ,bn-. ,bn-. &#$bt.$/,f* &#$bt.$/,f* 1$$-2*b34 1$$-2*b34 -*b3b%'b3n&b## -*b3b%'b3n&b## 67 67 8t 9rt %t 1r$b3 8t b ,b#:;##rb *$r'-#$b Nature Coast Ministries is working feverishly to open the doors to its new dental clinic, Samaritans Dental, anticipating an open date in November or December. The clinic will serve low-income and/or senior residents with services such as fillings and extractions. Given that the health department is restricted to serving children and emergency rooms only provide pain medication, this clinic will reach those who are in need of dental care. The overall goal is to end needless suffering and prevent cost-related neglect from developing into longterm dental and health issues. The clinic operates by appointment and will start acceptingappointments later this year. The dental clinic is located at 9020 Atlas Drive, Homosassa. For more information visit MYNCM.com. Be a part of helping this organization bring smiles to our community. For a donation of $37, the cost of providing one patient much-needed dental care, members of the community can join Nature Coast Ministries ranks as a Healthcare Hero. Nature Coast Ministries thanks the Citrus County Hospital Authority for its assistance in the startup process. Member Spotlight: Nature Coast Ministries The Quality Inn and Suites Hernando accepted the New Image Award for its beautification of its property. New Image Award given to Quality Inn and Suites Gerry Mulligan, Carl Flanagan, Josh Wooten, Dr. Anthony Schembri, John Murphy, Rob Wardlow and Don Taylor. September luncheon welcomes the Commish The inspiration for the 1990s comedy-drama The Commish, Dr. Anthony Schembri, spoke at the September Chamber luncheon crowd about shaking things up and focusing on what works. Fire Up Citrus! Is a new event added to Industry Appreciation Month, in which a diverse group of 12 presenters will share their ideas on how to get Citrus County moving forward. This inaugural event is sponsored by Workforce Connection of Citrus, Levy and Marion counties. The event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served by Tuscany on the Meadows. October is Industry Appreciation Month. It is a time when the Citrus County Economic Development Council (EDC) celebrates the positive impact that our local businesses and industries have on the prosperity and quality of life in Citrus County. As special recognition, the EDC has a month filled with events that we invite you to participate in as we all say thank you to our job and service providers. Event detailsThursday, Oct. 3, 2013, 6 p.m. to 8:45 at Tuscany on the Meadows, at the Quality Inn Conference Center, 350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Hernando, FL. Please RSVP at http://www. citruscountychamber.com/events/ eventdetail.aspx?EventID=1183

PAGE 32

D4SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER22,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699185 783572 AUCTIONS-Roofing Company Liquidation, Online Auction Only, Bid September 17 thru September 26, Items Located in Maryland & Florida. MotleysAuction & Realty Group, 804-232-3300, www.motleys.com, VAAL#16. AUCTIONS Universal Health Care Group, Inc. American Managed Care, LLC. Bankruptcy Auction Ordered by Soneet Kapila, Trustee Case No: 8:13-bk-01520-KRM / Case No: 8:13-bk-05952KRM Online & Onsite Sept 24th & 25th at 10am Preview: 09/23 10-5pm 100 Central Avenue, St. Petersburg, Fl 33701 400+ New & Used Laptops & Computers, Quality Artwork & Glass Sculptures, Tons of High-end Office Furniture, Office Equip., 1000+ Cubicles & more! 10%-13%BP www.moeckerauctions.c om for details, photos & terms Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $100 HEAVY DUTYMETALINVERNESS 419-5981 32 Sharp color TV excellent condition $35. 352-249-1085 or 352-212-5624 CASSETTE DECK Double Deck JVC Cassette with Remote $40.00 352-746-5421 Panasonic TV 42 Plasma Flat screen with remote, TV in excel cond. $225., (908) 616-0620 Homosassa YAMAHASPEAKERS 5 2 16 INCH 140 WATTS 2 9 INCH 60 WATTS & 1 5 INCH 80 WATTS All $80. 352-613-0529 3 DOUBLE ROLLS VINYLPREPASTED WALLCOVERING $25 NEW 165SQ FT 419-5981 CEILING FANS WHITE -FOUR @ $25 EACH 352 527-8993 FORMICACOUNTERTOPS ONE-9LONGONE 6LONG-$100 352 527-8993 KITCHEN SINK double basin with moen faucet and spray. Good Shape $35.00 Call 613-4279 PVC BLINDS WHITE-TWO SETS-79W X 91H $100 352 527-8993 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 LAPTOPCART/TABLE Black adjustable tilt&height w/wheels $24 Can email pic 352-382-3650 Patio Recliner Tan La-z-boy, like new $140 (352) 564-8605 PICNICTABLE/BENCH WHITE, CONVERTS TOTWO BENCHES $45 352 527-8993 SAILSHADETriangular(11,11,11) $75.00 352-513-4027, after 12 PM 1TV STAND 36 wide x 26 tall w/ drawer cherry color like new $40 can text pic call Ron 352-746-0401 1SIDE CHAIR Black & gold wood, green padded seat can text pics $45 Ron 352-746-0401 2BEDROOM DRESSERS 2 NIGHTSTANDS White Formica, $100. (352)344 2558 Bamboo CoffeeTable with glass top $55 860-2475 BED FULLSIZE Matress, box spring, Frame Very good condition. Little used. $50. (352)257-4076 BED ROOM SET Queen Size, mattress, boxspring & triple dresser, headboard footboard, night stands & lamps $825 obo (352) 628-3995 BEDTWIN Mattress, Box spring, frame. Excellent like new Chiropractor model. $75. (352)257-4076 1971 Baseball cards, 200 cards $40. 1970 Baseball Cards 200 cards $40 (352) 344-9502 Barbie Olympic Gym 1996 $100. Marlin Innaugral Poster 1993 $75. obo (352) 621-0778 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 GAS RANGE Andora5 black GE selfclean convection oven, griddle, power burner $500 OBO 228-4648 GE Space Saver Microwave very little usage Bisque, $125.(352) 302-9129 GOOD DRYER $100 works perfect. 30 day written warranty call/text 352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day written warranty. call/text 352-364-6504 HOUSEHOLD FREEZE WHITE G.E. UPRIGHT 2DEEP2WIDE 4.5HIGH $250.00 352-382-0009 MAGTAG 2009 white Washing Machine. In good condition $250 obo (352) 422-5579 MICROWAVE Black over-the-stove Frigidaire microwave $25.00 352-322-1160 Refrigerator Kenmore, white $110; Washing Mach. white $85 Both work good (352) 628-4766 No calls before 11:00a REFRIGERATOR SIDE BYSIDE Black Jennaire. Runs Great. Remodeling. $100. 228-4648 REFRIGERATOR W/ ICE MAKER G.E. WHITE SIDE BYSIDE 2DEEP21.5 WIDE 5HIGH $300.00 352-382-0009 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 TOASTER OVEN $25.00 352-795-1032 Washer & Dryer Maytag-2 washers, 1 dryer.All in good working cond. $300 for all or $125 ea (304) 544-8398 WASHER Maytag Front Load, 4 yrs. old, $150. firm (352) 634-4259 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Condition. Free Delivery, 60 Day Written Guarantee 352 263-7398 Whirlpool Digital Calypso Matching WASHER/DRYER Excel cond. $400. Must See Call (352) 212-1854 WHIRLPOOLDISH WASHERAlmond color, older model. Works well. From remodel. $50 352-621-1249 WHIRLPOOLELEC RANGE Older drop in model.Almond color. From remodel. $50 352-621-1249 White GE Glass-top Stove and Dishwasher!! 3 Years used, works good Asking $200.00 for the pair. Chris(352)302-0951 Installers HelperPart time help to install window treatments, Hourly pay. Hours will vary. Must have a professional appearance. Apply in person at: 72 Hour Blinds Factory 1657 W Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 ReStor e Manager T ruck Driver Donation Pr ocessor Habitat for Humanity is filling 3 positions in Citrus County Email request for detailed job description and instructions for submitting to: H4Hr estor e@ yahoo.com No calls or walk-ins School Bus driverPrivate Christian organization needs driver for Citrus County bus route. First pick up 7 AM, only 4 stops. Same PM route. Bus NO a/c. $9.50/hr. 20-25 hours/week plus opportunity for more. 1 yr exp. min. Must be fully licensed/ no accidents/ ready to drive. /2 character references. Family oriented/patience/ki ndness a plus. Email to:Christianbus@ tampabay.rr.com Part-time Screen Printer &EmbroidererExperienced Only Call 352-794-5402 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approvedAviation MaintenanceTechnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CallAIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 29 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com Field Operations SupervisorAnnouncement # 13-52 Coordination and oversite of inspection duties for County roadways and Public Works projects. Requires at least five years of experience in a supervisory role with civil construction related projects: road construction projects, storm water drainage, project estimates and customer service. Bachelors degree is preferred or education and training equivalent to four years of college. Must possess a valid Florida driver license. Starting salary $1,429.27 B/W. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Citrus County Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, September 27, 2013 EOE/ADA. Experienced TelemarketerCrystal River Office call to inquire 352-410-6927 Licensed RealtorCONTACT: yankeetownrealty .com or Call 352-447-0007 No Fees. Great Pay out. Weekends req. Earning potential unlimited. TELEMARKETERSExp. Only. Write your own Paycheck, Call Brandon 503-6807 AC SERVICE TECH/INSTALLERSTop Pay, Benefits, Sign on bonus. 40+ Hrs. must have EPA Cert. & Dri. Lic. Call (352) 628-5700 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 JOURNEYMAN TRADESWORKERAnnouncement #13-53 Skilled work performing repairs and maintenance in County buildings and facilities. Knowledge of all building trades with emphasis on Carpentry and Plumbing. Must have at least 4 years experience in general building trades work. Starting pay $13.07 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, September 27, 2013 EOE/ADA. Now hiring: CDL-A DriversNew Pay Package and $2500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call tloday for details 1-888-378-9691 FLOOR TECHArbor Trail Rehab and Skilled Nursing Centeris accepting applications for an exp. Floor Tech, Apply in person at 611 Turner Camp Rd Inverness Fl. 34453 352-637-1130 An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D Medical Assist.Fulltime & Part time Postions Available at busy Podiatry Practice Call (352) 795-2142 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 www.citrusmh.com/ career-opportunities ATTENTIONLooking for RepresentativesTo assist Medicare Recipients w/ enrolling For Medicare Part D, Medicare Advantage Programs & Medicare Supplements/ Will be placed In Local Pharmacies to Assist w/these programs No exp. Necessary Will provide Training Call 352-726-7722 Fax 352-726-6813 000G5LF Customer Service SpecialistNeed outstanding phone repor. Good judgement, Experience scheduling mobile work force. Established company w/ great benefits. Please mail resume to: Blind Box 1830P CC Chronicle 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL34429 Engineering DirectorAnnouncement # 13-51 Professional management position supervising a division consisting of four distinct sections and approximately 18 employees. Represents the division in meetings with the public, engineering consultants, County management staff, state agencies, etc. Oversees the design and construction of multi-million dollar roadway construction projects. Prepares and manages the County roadway capital improvement program. Requirements are graduation from a four year college or university with a degree in civil engineering, considerable experience in professional engineering and registration as a PE in the State of Florida or able to obtain Florida Registration within six months of employment. Pay range $2,297.23 to $3,445.80 Bi-Weekly DOQ. Must possess a valid Florida driver license. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Florida 34461 to apply. This job is open until filled. EOE/ADA. WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for employment.Childcare work exp. required Apply M-F,12pm-2pm No Phone Calls. HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 DENTAL HYGIENISTP/Tcertified dental hygienist, experienced only Fax Resume to 352-795-4606 or Drop of Resume at Christie Dental 6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips KITTENS2 Cute kittens Free to good home (352) 344-3927 KITTENS 8 wks old, black, white wl blk spots, some with no tails. Rescued out of a rain storm when 1 day old. All very cute! (352) 422-5401 3 cats missing within several months.One eyed cat,bobtail cat,both black and a black with white spots Palm,Highland,Dixieland. 352-201-4522 CASH REWARD Lost Black Cat, w/ white paws, white on right side of mouth Pine Ridge Estates 430-5959 Lost 9/8/13 N. Lee street Beverly Hills.Tri Colored beagle, 40 lbs, special needs. Please help our beloved pet to come home. Call 352-249-3107 Found Small Long hair Terrier, white, black head, black tail, Citrus Ave & Turkey Oak (352) 563-0816 Grey Terrier Male, no chip Found off of Gospel Island Maggie rd 9/19. (352) 364-7351 Small Dog near Inglis Dam call to identify (352) 212-1428 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 TUPPERWAREMany New items & Oven ware Call Fran 352-746-3652 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads BARGAIN!1999, 26 x 52 DW Meridian, bright, airy & immaculate 3/2 in 55+ park new driveway & new covered walkway Bargain at $30,000 first come first servce 352-563-0500 FREE King Size Mattress pillow top, Almost new (352) 637-6310 No calls before 8am HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $225. 352-382-5208 SEWING MACHINE Brother, like new, in a 3 drawer wood cabinet. All accessories $125 Cash (352) 344-4070 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for employment.Childcare work exp. required Apply M-F,12pm-2pm No Phone Calls. BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 FREE I have a 400 ft. Long strand of barb wire Good Condition Needs to be rolled up (352) 344-1066 FREE MANURE. No shavings, Already bagged, Ready for pick-up at our pasture gate (352) 249-7127 Free to Good Home Hemingway Cat & Kittens kittens are 8 wks old, 2 males, 3 females (352) 563-2125 To the girl I met in Publixs on 9/18 in Homosassa Springs, wearing a white jacket. I would like to get to know you. Call me anytime. 422-0440 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I (352) 563-5966www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Dining Room Set Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly!640985A

PAGE 33

SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER22,2013D 5 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000G56V PET/HOUSESITTINGBONDED & INSURED(352)270-4672Kathleen M. Daceykatskritterkare@yahoo.com Training AvailableAll Kritters Big or SmallRelax while youre away knowing your pets are OK at home safe in their own beds PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000FG53 DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000G0V1 000G0ZNLawn Sprinkler Not Working?Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 IRRIGATION CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000G4QIRESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000G4UK Copes Pool & Pavers 000FWNC ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000FX26 0 0 0 F X 2 1 TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMA TES 000FX5Twww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 9/30/13LIC#CC1327656 000FGCQ METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer SatisfactionLic.#CCC1325497 0 0 0 F X 1 U HANDYMANRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000FV68 Stand Alone Generator 000FX5E WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins Need a JOB?#1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Home Maintenance Repairs & Remodels Quality work at affordable prices 20 yrs exp. Ref avail 573-723-2881 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 Home/Office Cleaning catered to your needs, reliable & exper.,lic/ins 796-4645 / 345-9329 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Cuts $10 & Up Res./Comm., Lic/Ins. 563-9824, 228-7320 GROUND CONTROL Lawn Service Pressure washing Ken 352-316-1571 kenheffley2@gmail.com Lawncare -N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 MOBILE HOME repair & remodeling kitchens, baths, floors, relevels, cc.2211 (352)257-9056 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Andersen HandyMan Home Repairs, Lawn Care. Cheaper Prices 352-453-6005 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 A+ CLEANING Res/Com. 27 yrs exp. Lic/ bonded, client focused 386-717-2929 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-W ALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buy Quality Furniture Non smoking homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 The average home collects up to 40 pounds of dust and dirt per year. Imagine how much dust and dirt could be resting in your air ducts.Lic/Ins Homeducts.com offers duct cleaning at an affordable rate. Click or call. 352-362-5187. SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 COCKER SPANIELS 4 Males, 2 Females w/ papers. 8 weeks old Blonde & white $800 (352) 287-0519 CYRILCyril, 1 y.o. Hound mix, found as stray, beautiful red-brown coat, wt. 42 lbs. Easy to walk, gets along w/other dogs. Appears to be housebroken, healthy. Affectionate & friendly. Good companion. # 20807791. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 LOKIELokie, a 3-y.o. brown/white terrier mix male, weight about 65 lbs. Came to shelter d/t owners inability to keep him. Lokie is a shy, gentle, humble dog, easy to walk on leash, gets along w/other dogs, loves human friends. Eager to please. No cats. A beautiful dog, both physically and behavior-wise. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. MINI DACHSHUNDS Three male 13 week old pups, UPTon shots, CKC registration, crate trained.Asking $250. Call 503-6564 or 212-4952 4 yr old Umbrella cockatoo & Cockteil. Both hand fed, very tame, incl. cages, food, toys. Lv Mg (443) 690-7052 ANNE LISEAnne Lise, a 7-8 y.o. Blue Terrier/Bull dog mix, spayed, housebrkn, & homeless. Family had to move so she came to the shelter. Weighs about 65 lbs, and is a beautiful dog, sweet, affectionate, gentle, loyal, good w/other dogs, good w/children. Playful & full of life. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. BAILEYBailey, Chespeake Bay hound mix, 2 y.o., HW-negative, wt. 39 lbs. Sits on command, loves treats, walks well on leash, good w/other dogs, attentive to human friends. Obeys well, wants to please. # 20731619. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 BEAGLE PUPPIES$100 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Utility Trailer 6 x 9 x 2 ft. wood/steel. frame $250. obo (352) 465-3086 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment MIKASADISHES Mikasa Garden Harvest Dishes. Eight place settings, soup bowls, oval covered casserole, vegetable bowl, lasagna bowl, serving platter with dip bowl. Oven and microwavable. Barely used. $400 for set. 352-586-3842 NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call for e-mail picture 40.00 linda 341-2271 SEWING MACHINE Brother, like new, in a 3 drawer wood cabinet. All accessories $125 Cash (352) 344-4070 AB-LOUNGER Used But a Few times, Paid $150. at Sears Asking $25. (352) 628-2844 ELECTRIC TREADMILL barely used, $100. (352) 726-4307 Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $225. 352-382-5208 26 Schwin Ladies Bike. Sierra 700 24 speed, great cond. $100 (352) 422-3297 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Fear No-Evil GunsHi-Point & Beretta Concealed Classes 352-447-5595 Nike Sling Shots RH, steel shaft, Gap-through 4 iron $125. firm Call (352) 382-7473 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 4x8 Heavy Duty Utility Trailer15 wheels, new tires, good cond. $395. (352) 586-3209 Queen size Mattress pillow top, very comfortable like new $80. 3 in one Printer Fax/Copier, $25. (352) 637-6310 SPEAKERS 2 Optimus Speakers $30.00 352-746-5421 Student desk Lamp Never used $20 613-2797 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 VACUUM CLEANER Hoover Wind tunnel Nearly New, Asking $35. (352) 628-2844 WOMENS RUBBER RIDING BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW SIZE 43L EUR MADE IN ISRAEL 419-5981 Back Packer Chair Lift for Van $200 Jazzi 1100 Electric Scooter $200 (352) 795-0049 Bob Diabetic Shoes, Beige, Womens Size 8, Medium width, never worn, $80 (352) 522-0107 New Jazzy Electric Chair, MUSTSELL Cost $5,000 Selling $1,300. obo (352) 795-7513 ACCORDION Santini 120 Base; Full size, double chamber, prestine $1500 (352) 794-6641 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 FIESTADISHES 4 piece place setting,1 yellow,1 pink,1 light green $15.00 each call 352-726-9009 MENS SPORTS JACKETS 4 SIZE 40R $10 EACH 352-613-0529 STEAM & VAC Rug Cleaner By Hoover. Does A Great Job Cleaning All Rugs Asking $75. (352) 628-2844 4 WHEELWALKERseat, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $45 352-628-0033 30 GALLON AQUARIUM no leaks, includes newer heater and filter, light, glass top, gravel $65.00 352-201-4522 Above Ground Pool, 24 ft. up and runningpump, filter, ladder, very good cond. $500. You must remove 352-212-6433 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BEDSPREAD & SHAMS King, like new, mint green color $15.00 352-322-1160 BOYS BICYCLE SPIDERMAN 16 WITH TRAINING WHEELS $30 352-613-0529 CAMCORDER Panasonic Camcorder with case $100.00 352-746-5421 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 Designer Jackets, leather W 2 & 3X, New, $80 ea Ren. Chest Set, Must See $1,200 352-465-3086 FORENZAset of 4 standard rims $40.00 Call 613-4279 Kitchen Aid Mixer New $275. Tiffany style Lamps 3 large $70 ea. 352-465-3086 PETCARRIER 23 long, 14 wide, 13 high, Small dog or cat. $25.00, excel cond. call after 12 pm 352-513-4027 BOLENS New Lawn Tractor 13HP, 38, 6 spd. used 3 times, have receipt paid $1,000 first $650. Laurel Ridge BH(352) 634-3806 Craftsman 10 inch Table saw $300 See in Crystal River Village behind sweetbay Supermarket 1453 Lake Everly Ave. (352) 794-0272 CRAFTSMAN RIDER mower with bag unit 42 cut, exc. cond. 1-yr. old $850 (352) 637-4718 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 2 Professional Nursery Seed or Plant TablesAll aluminum $200. Wood Cigar boxes $20 (352) 621-0778 CRYSTAL RIVERFri, Sat, Sun 9am-? tools, golf clubs, hsehold items & more. 1526 N Rock Cress Ph HERRYS MARKET DAYFREE VENDOR SPACE! Produce, Seafood, Floral Needed! Outdoor Flea Market held on the grounds 8471 W Periwinkle Ln HOMOSASSA (Behind Wendys) Last Saturday Every Month 8am -NoonSat., Sept. 28thCall Caroline at 352-527-2020 HOMOSASSASat. & Sun. 9am-5pm Kindness Terrace MENS 2 PIECE SUITS SIZE 34X30 & 36X30 $25 EACH 352-613-0529 MENS PANTS CASUAL3 SIZES 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 DRESSER W/ MIRROR Large excellent quality Basset Dovetail drawers. $100. (352)257-4076 ENDTABLES $45.00 352-795-1032 High End Used Furniture 2NDTIME AROUND RESALES 270-8803,2165 Hy 491 KITCHEN SET, 45 Beveled glass top, white base, 4 swivel cushion chairs, on casters, Excel. Cond. $350. (352) 465-2237 Leave Message KITCHENTABLE 42 FORMICAPLUS LEAVE 4 chairs. Very usable $20. (352)257-4076 LIVING ROOM CHAIR High quality brown excellent condition. $40. Must see (352)257-4076 LIVING ROOM CHAIRS 2 green high quality excellent condition. Must see. Each $50. (352)257-4076 LOVE SEATBlack Real Leather, not Bonded, Love Seat. Excellent Condition $100.00 352-746-5421 Love Seat, chair, Bedroom suite, oak furn. Priced right! Ask for Diana 352-637-4695 MATTRESS firm, twin size $50 OBO 352 419-8816 SECTIONAL3 PIECE High quality excellent condition. Must see.$100. (352)257-4076 Sectional Couch w/ queen hide a bed and recliner built in Good Condition $175. obo (352) 302-9129 Single Sofa Bed Lazy Boy,very nice tan colored $175; Corner TV and table. $40 (352) 746-6996 Sofa & Loveseat all recline, Brookshire, teal, $250. 4 Kitchen Chairs w/ castors $25 ea (352) 382-3914 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 BEDROOM SET Headboard Dresser,Nite Stand $99.99 352-795-1032 BEDSIDETABLES (3) Excellent quality, Solid wood, brown. Must see. Each $30. (352)257-4076 BOOK SHELVES $45.00 352-795-1032 BROYHILLSOFAPerfect condition, like new. 3-seat sofa, includes 4 cushions and arm covers. Off-white with floral pattern. Paid $900, sell for $150. 352-503-7125 or 410-227-9152 CHAIRS 5-light oak chairs with padded seats on casters $100 (352) 419-6383 CHANDELIER $25.00 352-795-1032 CHESTOF DRAWER $45.00 352-795-1032 CHESTOF DRAWERS Large Six dovetailed drawers. Brown Excellent condition $100. (352)257-4076 COFFEE & 2 END TABLES Ex qual solid wood, brown. Must see. Coffee $30., Ends $20. each (352)257-4076 COFFEETABLE WOOD One scratch, but very usable. $10. (352)257-4076 COUCH Brown & Gold, curved, two matching ottermans. 1 yr old $400 (352) 527-4247 DINING ROOM HUTCH Large,beautiful high quality, must see. $100. (352)257-4076 DINING ROOM SET Table,Chairs, Server $99.99 352-795-1032 Dining Room Set Thomasville, Cherry Table, 6 chairs, 2 ext, new $2900, China Base & Deck w/ glass shelves, new $2595, Moving-Will sacrifice both for $1500 cash, obo (352) 513-4516 DINING ROOM TABLE Six chairs. Large super excellent. High qual. Must see.$100. (352)257-4076

PAGE 34

D6SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER22,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 246-0929 SUCRN Personal Mini Storage 10-09 Lien Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807: PERSONAL MINI STORAGE -DUNNELLON #0042 Brian Hobbs;#0134 Kathleen Zimmerman;#0171 Katrina Snyder;#0222 Tracy Shasteen Lipford;#0223 Allison Ford;#0261 Patricia Ann Seymour CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS, GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC. THERES NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE. OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS. LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013. VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY. PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON 11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878 Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 22 & 29, 2013. 0 0 0 8 X G Z For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. HARLEYDAVIDSON2012 FLHTCUTG Tri Glide Ultra Classic AMFM/CD/AUX w/speakers; CC, Fairing Full,Alarm,Travel trunk w/rack, stage 2 screaming eagle high performance exhaust & pipes; ABS brakes, extra chrome accents. Excellent condition w/only 1250 mi. First $28.5K. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630. KAWASAKI2002 Vulcan 1500, 7500 mi, Exc Cond $5000 (352) 341-5263 SNAPPER 2008 Riding 30 inch cut 12.5 HP $500 (352) 341-5263 Harley Davidson2005, 1200 Custom, Extra Chrome, new tires, just serv, 16,000 mi. $3700 obo. Poss trade for veh. (352) 220-8444 Harley Davidson2011 FLTRU Road Glide Ultra loaded cruise, cd, cb,intercom, abs, anti theif,6 speed, and 103cc motor. only 5886 miles $19,000 (352)212-4101 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment MAZDA1998 6 pass. van Select, all wheel, runs well, looks good first $1,475 (352) 637-2588 HONDA2007 VTX 1300C Original owner, purchased brand new, low mileage (2,371 miles). Caf windshield, removable saddlebags, light-bar. Black & chrome. Showroom condition (mint). Asking a firm $5,050.00 Please contact owner\seller via Email: selfor@aol.com Phone: (352)382-4422 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $8400. obo (352) 465-3086 FORD1992 Flairside 4x4, 302, red, 4 lift traction bar, chrome brush guard, steps & bedrail. A beauty in & out. $5,500 (352) 344-8089 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB SV 20122012 Frontier CC SV: This white Nissan Frontier Crew Cab SV is in excellent condition with only 8,500 miles. It has cruise control, power windows/door locks/outside mirrors. It has a factory installed bed liner and I added a vinyl tri-fold bed cover and trailer hitch.The truck is in perfect condition with a full factory warranty.The asking price is $21,900. Phone: 352-601-1319 CHEVROLET2006, Suburban 4 x 4, $8,995. 352-341-0018 FORD2007, Escape $7,995. 352-341-0018 DATSON 280ZXAttention Z lovers Datson, Inline6 turbo, eng. & trans good, nds loving restoration $500 (352) 344-3080 FORDRat Rod Projects, 46 Ford PU Roadster, Ford ModelT, Boattail speedster all steel., Inglis 352-949-7874 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 MAZDA2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed, 4-door, one owner, great condition, 141,000 miles $3,500. 352-860-2146 MERCURY, Cougar, 125k mi., 2 DR, runs great, cold air, good tires, $1,400 (352) 344-0547 TOYOTA2010, Yaris, 3 door, $9,995. 352-341-0018 VOLVO2001,S40, leather, clean $4,995. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2009 CORVETTE COUPE Z51: Jetstream blue w/ebony int., 2LT, Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3 eng., only 9500 mi., car show winner, serious inquiries only, first $35K/OBO gets it. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630 CHEVY1981 Corvette Under 50,000 orig. miles, Shark Body Style, Very Good Condition, Garage stored 352-400-4704 BASS TRACKER2005, 50HP Mercury PT 175 Special Edition, mint cond., Call for info. (352) 400-9490 BOAT SLIP FOR RENT HOMOSASSA RIVER $125. mo. 352-220-2077 GALALEODuck Boat 17ft fiberglass, 25HP Go Devil. long shaft, new trlr. Ready to Hunt, $4,500 352-586-8946 MERC CRUISER1993, 20ft, Stern Drive, Sylvan, Barely used, but runs great. org. $12,000Asking $6,500 obo (352) 228-1355 PONTOON20 FT, 1994 Monarck new vhf radio & gps fishfinder. Gd Cond. $6500. (352) 527-4247 SWEETWATER1991, 15 ft., seats 8, 35HP, trailer, excellent cond. $3,250 476-1113, 513-5135 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com Phoenix Cruiser 2004, Excellent Cond, low miles, new tires, with slideout. (352) 270-8084 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Salem Cruise Lite2011 Travel Trailer 28 ft bunk hse. slideout non-smkers. Exc Cond $10,000. 813-957-8605 SKYLINE 1995, Slide in cab over Camper Fully equip. generator, fridge, microwave, AC, & elect. jacks Loaded. $2,800 obo (352) 422-4548 Travel Trailer2011, 20 Mini Lite. Fully self contained. LRoom Slide out. Many Extras. Exc Cond. $15,400 obo (352) 527-0081 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 SOFT TOPPER for Short bed pick-up. Like New $250 obo (352) 422-5579 TOW BAR Roadmaster Falcon Tow Bar. All connections $250 (352) 795-5991 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 SellYour Classic! Get top dollar for your classic car at Lake Mirror Classic AutoAuction in Lakeland, Fl on October 19th! Call 1800-257-4161 M.E. Higgenbotham, FL Lic#AU305AB158 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest UPull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUICK REGAL2001 LS, leather Inter. very good cond., 6 cyl. 82k mi. One owner. $4,500 352-746-6708 CADILLAC2004 Seville SLS, full power, runs great, like new condition $3800 (352) 795-8986 CHEVROLET2010 Malibu, LT, 1 owner $11,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 DODGE2000, Intrepid, Very good cond. 85K miles, $2,000. (352) 527-3188 FIAT Spider 2000 Conv. 58K miles, new roof, good rubber, runs $2,000 (352) 564-0364 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORDMustang Convertible, 23,600 miles, gray, black top, $14,400. (352) 503-7237 MINIATURE DACHSHUNDSMale dachshund pups, 21 weeks old, up to date on shots, house trained and crate trained. Priced to sell. Asking $150 each or the pair for $250. Call 503-6564 or 212-4952 Petea 1-year-old mostly white terrier/?hound mix, Heartworm negative & housebroken. Came to the shelter because his family could no longer afford him. A very gentle, well-behaved dog, walks very well on a leash & gets along with other dogs. Weighs 51 lbs. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Quaker Parakeet male 5-6 months old, green w/ grey chest. $200 (352) 464-3716 SallieSallie, spayed terrier/Dalmation mix, wt. 35 lbs. HW-negative. Very affectionate & friendly, sits on command, loves treats. Gets along very well w/other dogs, housebrkn, slim & trim in appearance, would like a yard to run in. Sweet & joyful, has brown polka-dots. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male Miniature Poodles Small Mini 1 females (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS,Available RegisteredLots of Colors Males start @ $400. Females start @ $600. Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 SIMONwell-mannered retriever mix, 3 y.o. Sits, gives his paw, goes down for treats, takes gently. Walks well on leash, behaves in public places. High energy, likes to run & play, plays catch, plays in pool. Good w/most dogs. Call Christina @ 352-464-3908. Sweet 3yr old female Lab. Spayed. Possible PTSD dog. Sm adoption fee (352) 794-6314 TOBYToby, black/white terrier mix, neutered, HW-negative. Housebrkn, wt 45 lbs,. Very friendly, gets along with other dogs well, also cats. About 6 years old, great shape, intelligent, lively, walks well on leash, likes kids. Great companion-to-be. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 ZOEYZoey, a 7-8 y.o. blue/white Terrier/ Bulldog mix, spayed and housebrkn. Came to the shelter after her family had to move and could not take her. She is sweet & exceptionally gentle, affectionate & beautiful. Likes other dogs & also children. Very playful. Weight about 60 lbs. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. CHICKENS 10 Laying chickens Make reasonable offer (352) 382-2350 LM BOAT TRAILER, fully galvanized, heavy duty, like new, up to 17FT $550 352-637-3983 Outboard Motor 25HP, Evirude with controls, very good cond. $750 obo 476-1113, 513-5135 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 17 KEYWEST2013 Skiff,Yamaha 70 4-stroke, Jack Plate, Trolling Motor, Gauges, GPS,AlumTrailer, Transferrable Warranty, Excellent $19,500 352 503-6668 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

PAGE 35

CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 D7 Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illus tration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 9/30/13.Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371Crystal RiverNick Nicholas S.R. 44 Crystal River MallU.S. 19U.S. 98Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Visit Us Online www.nicknicholaslincoln.com Anna CruzSalesperson of the Month Formerly Gulf Coast Ford000G24V 2009 LINCOLN MKSLeather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate package. GP1681$24,9502010 LINCOLN MKXLeather, moon roof, ultimate package. GP1653$26,950

PAGE 36

D8SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G5ND

PAGE 37

E16SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G4FS 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Email: info@citruscountycentury21.com www.citruscountycentury21.com SALES 352-726-6668 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OPEN SUNDAY SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR OVER 37 YEARS. HOW MUCH IS YOUR HOME WORTH? Call T oday For A F ree Market Analysis! $69,900 PRIVACY! 3 bedroom, 2 bath country home with converted garage for an office/den! Clean and ready to move into. Shady backyard and private location easy to see! MLS #704928. Call today Mary Parsons 352-634-1273 Inverness 3/2/2 pool home Corner lot, nice landscapi ng LR, FR & DR, split plan City water, storage s hed Pavers on lanai & pool MLS #705386 ONLY $110,000 Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387 Foxwood Estates, 1/2 acre 3BR, 2 bath, split plan Nicely maintained, great neighborhood! MLS #357210 $100,000 Jeanne & Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com CITRUS SPRINGS Elegant 3/2/2 with formal living & dining rooms, great room Fenced yard & beautiful landscaping invite you into this home. MLS #705409 $139,900 Lorraine ORegan 586-0075 Heatherwood 4BR, 2 bath MH 2 sheds MLS #704912 $79,700 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 CitrusCountySold.com OPEN WATERFRONT 2 W ithlacoochee riverfront lots O ne with 2/1 DWMH with built on breezeway, utility room/workshop and screened porch S torage building on property D ock. 2 nd lot is vacant. T his property is perfect for the buyers looking for the laid back lifestyle in old F lorida setting MLS #703987 ASKING $89,000 Pat Davis 352-212-7280 V iew listing at: www.c21patdavis.com GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY T his home brings the outdoors in. I mmaculate 2/2/2 split plan 2 M aster suites G reat room, formal dining B eautiful views from every room V ery open and inviting N ice office and spacious utility/laundry room P erfect for fisherman/golfer S hort cart ride to clubhouse and course S potless and move-in ready MLS #705498 ASKING $158,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View Listings: www.c21patdavis.com 3BR, 3 bath POOL home Fenced backyard Storage shed FAMILY ROOM MLS #701422 $195,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com HOMOSASSA Mobile home, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, move-in condition. Open floor plan with large kitchen and large lanai. Fenced yard on .90 acres. Bonus guest house with large kitchen, full bath and bedroom. In addition storage shed (12x10). MLS #704400 $54,000 David Kurtz cell 954-383-8786 off: 352-726-6668. 3 BED/2 BATH HOME ZONED GEN. COMMERCIAL This would make a great home right in Inverness or could be converted to an office. Newer roof and AC just needs some work. ONLY $65,000 Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699 BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED 3/2/2 PLUS POOL BATH THIS HOME HAS ALMOST AN ACRE. ALMOST 2000 LIVING AREA. Large breakfast bar dividing fam. room from kitchen. Florida room leads to lanai & newer caged pool. 2 ample bedrooms. Large closets. 2 1/2 car garage with loads of storage. Newer roof. No appliances included except pool equip. & micro Extra garage/shed with carport. MLS #705462 $159,000 Call Doris Miner for appt. 352-422-4627 (cell) or 352-726-6668 (Office) Dont Miss This Deal! LOVELY! 2BR, 2 bath 1716 Sq. Ft. LA, A/C, Fla Rm. P erfectly maintained all newer appliances, Newer A/C, newer roof, beautiful Quiet and convenient MLS #703457 $110,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com NICE 3/2/2 IN INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WES T Neat and clean home with skylight and cathedr al ceiling in living room. New AC in 2 01 2, new roof in 2003. Double paned window s for energy ef ficiency. MLS #7 041 64 ASKING $84,900 Call Stefan Stuart 352-21 2-021 1 NEW SHOPPING CENTER LISTING ON HWY 19 10,52 6 SF CBS 10 Units Professional/R et ail 40 + Parking Spaces 2.97 Ac res High Intensity Commercial (str eet to str eet) High visibility with great road access. Big upside potential OFFERED A T ONLY $5 90,000 Call Elias G. Kirallah for more information at 352-400-2635 THREE BEDROOM, TW O BA TH IN CRYS TAL MANOR Upgr aded floor tiles and kitchen cabinets. L ots of room for boats and RVs. Owne r will look at all of fers. MLS #7 021 15 $1 55,000 Call Tim Dono van or Isaac Ba ylon 3 52-726-6668 OPEN WA TERFRONT 3/2/2 W ith caged, inground pool/spa G olf course community E asy car t ride to clubhouse C eiling to floor window s in LR provide panoramic lak efront views O ve rsized caged lanai featuring heated pool & spa provide a pe rfect ente rt ainment area C ov er ed boathouse and full proper ty length seaw all comple te this per fect F lorida-living picture MLS #7 03689 ASKING $198,000 Pa t Da vis 352-21 2-7280 V iew listing at: www.c21pa tdavis.com MOVE-IN READ Y 3/2 MOBILE ON OVER 3 A CRES! F eatures new carpe t and paint, w orkshop and carport $5 9,900 for home on 3 ac res or $49,000 for mobile home and 1 ac re Call Quade F eeser 352-302-7 699 SUPER LOCA TION MAINTENANCE FREE LIFEST YLE T his 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage villa in community near W hispering P ines park. M inutes to shopping dining, medical MLS #7 0292 9 ASKING $5 5,900 Pa t Da vis (352) 2 12-7 280 V iew Listing A t: www.c21pa tdavis.com LEA VE ALL WORRIES & CARES BEHIND IN THIS 5 5+GREA T NEIGHBORHOOD! Villa. 2 full baths, in this 1 master bedroom & 1 guest room/den/of fice, plus bath. HOA takes care of lawn, ou tside maintenance, water pest control and much more. Community pool & exe rcise. Librar y. Light & bright eat-in kitchen. Newe r appliances. One car gar age with scr een & door on r emotes. Monthly fee is $180. MLS #805494. Call Doris Miner @ 3 52-422-4627 ( c ell) o r 726-6668 Office CELINA HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath and 2 car gar age,p lus a pool/spa on a 1/2 acr e. Open floor plan with eat-in kitchen, and Florida room. Dual-pane, ene rgy-efficienct window s, central w ater Only minu tes to all conveniences. MLS #7 027 06 $160,000 Call Jim Morton 422-21 73 to see this lov ely home A GREAT L OCATION for a doctor s of fice or medical lab next to the hospital. 3 Examination rooms, nurses st ation, doctors of fice and storage p lus ample parking spaces ar e only a few of the amenities offe red. MLS #354432 ASKING $188,000 Call Jim Morton 422-21 73 to see this office space JUST LISTED 5 ACRES NEW LISTING PINE RIDGE REDUCED WA TERFRONT REDUCED HOMEFRONT Section ESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLEREALESTATEGUIDE INSIDESikorskis AtticPAGE E6 ON THE COVER:SAVE OUR WATERS WEEK, E8HOME AND GARDEN:FIREBUSH, E6REAL ESTATE:SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS The graceful beauty of a family of swans captures a moment in time at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. This photo by John Funderburk of Hernando won third place honors in the 18th annual Save Our Waters Week Photo Contest.JOHN FUNDERBURK / Special to the Chronicle Jewelry inspired by naturePAGE E14

PAGE 38

Associated PressA Nelco Landscaping permeable driveway pavement. For a contemporary, environmentally green home, Michael Keenan, an adjunct assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Minnesota, might choose light-colored, permeable pavers, which are more environmentally conscious because they let water absorb back into the earth under the driveway rather than running off and collecting debris along the way to bodies of water.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E15 E2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 2421 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 8375 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 628-7800 1101 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Inverness 637-6200 504 NE Hwy. 19, Crystal River 795-2441 www. REMAX .com www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com 000G4FT ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net 1 Buyer calls exclusive 24/7 Info Line 637-2828 2 Buyer enters house number when prompted 3 Buyer listens to property presentation in English or Spanish 24/7 INFO LINE 637-2828 HERES HOW: REALTY ONE SPECTACULAR LOT!! On the 3rd Green 3/2/2 Split Plan Comm. Pool/Rec Hall Nice Screened Lanai Great Kit. w/Island Nice Treed Lot Really Nice Master Bath New Shingles 2010 VERY PRIVATE! Family Rm. + Great Rm. 4/2 Mobile Over An Acre Formal Dining All Neutral Tones Large Kitchen Shed for Storage Move Right In! ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM (352) 637-6200 Email: kcunningham@remax.net MAGNIFICENT VIEWS Black Creek & St. Martins River 3/2/2 Carport Beautiful Views Gorgeous FP in Great Room 2 Sea Walls on Property Boathouse and Dock Elevator for Easy Access Hurricane Shutters! JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: team@citrusrealty.com SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840 Email: debrapilny@remax.net NEW PRICECHARMING HOME... This 2 bedroom, 2 b ath home is situated on a corner lot with a convenient location at the edge of Homosass a. Natural accents with tile floors and carpeted bedrooms, newer appliances in the kitchen, large living room and enclosed patio overlooking a privacy fenced backyard. T his home has a one-car garage and a carpor t as well as utility building for extra storage. T ake a look. POOL HOME OVER 1/2 ACRE LOT 3 BR, 2 BATH 2-Car Garage 1994 Built Self-Cleaning Pool Open Floor Plan Ceramic Tile Enclosed Florida RM Garden Tub & Shower 715 E. SAVOY ST., KENSINGTON ESTATES Beautiful 3BR/2BA/3CG Home Great Rm./Dining Rm./Office Kitchen w/Eat-In Area Enclosed Florida Rm. Nice Wood/Tile Floors Covered Patio Area w/Fire Pit Private Landscaped Acre 9375 E. MISTWOOD, INVERNESS 3/2/2 Recently Painted In & Out Shingles, HVAC & Hot Water Heater Replaced Within Last Few Years Fenced Room for Pool Quiet Neighborhood (352) 637-2828 Enter house #14207 MLS #705449 $595,000 $595,000 $595,000 WATERFRONT LAUREL RIDGE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #4665 MLS #359010 $164,900 $164,900 $164,900 HOMOSASSA (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5534 MLS #704732 $89,900 $89,900 $89,900 $69,800 $69,800 $69,800 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 2439 W. DEVON DR. CITRUS SPRINGS 3BD/1.5 BA Secluded Location Over 1,600 SF Living 2 Blocks from Park Large Family Rm. Shed, Fruit Trees MLS #701907 $64,900 $64,900 $64,900 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #2439 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 8180 N. HILLVIEW CIR. CITRUS SPRINGS 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2005 Great Location/Lot Many Upgrades, All Appliances Neutral Tile Living RM + Family RM Ready For New Owners MLS #704443 $144,500 $144,500 $144,500 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #8180 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net MO TIVA TEDBRING YOUR OFFER Privacy personified with this move-in ready 3/2 2005 mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide open floor plan w/split bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area, covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. All appliances, window treatments and some furnishings are included. MLS #M704319 $74,900 $74,900 $74,900 MLS #705134 $124,900 $124,900 $124,900 HOMOSASSA 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5915 REDUCED OVER $4,000 $189,900 $189,900 $189,900 MLS #703834 OPEN HOUSE SUND AY 11-3PM A LAMEDA ESTATES MLS #704815 $87,900 $87,900 $87,900 BEAUTIFUL FENCED ACRE! New Metal Roof New Air Conditioner New Kitchen Manufactured 1998 New 18 Tile Stainless Steel Refrigerator DEAL FELL THROUGH 3/2/1 o n Nice Lot 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath in the Main House 1 Bedroom o r Office, Behind the Garage w/B ath in Garage L arge Trees and Mature Foliage Recently ReR oofed. L arge Kitchen, Nice Size Living Spaces $74,500 $74,500 $74,500 CRYSTAL MANOR MLS #704004 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1242 CITY OF INVERNESS CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net 3/2 1700+ SQ FT. MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Cryst al River. T ons of space for your family. F ully-fenced & electric gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio, screened back porch, 2 car att ached carport, B BQ pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call for your private showing and fall in love. $119,000 $119,000 $119,000 MLS #703787 PRICE SLASHED $26,000 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net NEW LISTING 3/2/2 pool home ready for your family! Split bedrooms, formal dining, large living room, breakfast bar, laundry room, PLUS covered, screened pool. Lovely landscaping and situated on a quiet street in Citrus Springs. Dont miss this one, because at this price it wont last long at all. $110,000 $110,000 $110,000 MLS #R704323 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1000 POOL HOME IN INVERNESS 2 BEDROOM, 1.5 BATH HOME WITH OPEN FLOOR PLAN. GARAGE, LARGE KITCHEN, FAMILY ROOM AND LIVING ROOM. ON A DOUBLE LOT, 1/2 ACRE. 1,873 TOTAL SQ. FT. UNDER ROOF. STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net 14 A CRE RANCH! Fenced and cross-fenced, this pristine property has a spacious 3 bedroom, 3 bath home with fireplace and private office. Gorgeous inground pool and summer kitchen for fun summer days. Huge RV garage for equipment and storage. Horse stalls, paved road and so much more. $289,900 $289,900 $289,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #3079 OVER $90 MILLION In Sales Volume This Year Call RE/MAX To Sell Your Home! $84,900 $84,900 $84,900 MLS #704147 0008SQK CENTURY 21 J .W. MORTON REAL EST ATE CENTURY 21 J .W. MORTON REAL EST ATE CENTURY 21 J .W. MORTON REAL EST ATE CENTURY 21 J .W. MORTON REAL EST ATE CENTURY 21 J .W. MORTON REAL EST ATE CENTURY 21 J .W. MORTON REAL EST ATE 000G4FN J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450 and Century 21 Real Estate Corporation Equal Housing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED KAREN E. MORTON (352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595 TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 Hall of Fame Centurion Member E-mail: kemorton@tampabay.rr.com Website: karenemorton.com CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CHASSAHOWITZKA Quiet neighborhood in Chassahowitzka just off US 19 4 bedroom, 2 bath open kitchen split bedrooms wood deck on front and rear of home Affordable Family Home Nearby boat ramp close to shopping MLS #705176 $65,000 INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH ** SWIMMING POOL PLUS WORKSHOP/2ND GARAGE Mrs. Clean lives here Spotless 2 bedroom home with den/office both bedrooms are suites Huge master bedroom 20 x 15 endless storage everywhere Bright and Cheery kitchen all newer appliances Florida Room Oversized caged in-ground swimming pool 2 car garage on home PLUS detached 2 car garage for vehicles or workshop RV parking area This home is move-in ready!! Convenient to Inverness. MLS #704557 $159,900. BEST OF THE BEST!!! Sweetwater home on 5 acres Gorgeous hickory cabinets 2800+ living area 3 BR, 2.5 Baths plus den/library 3-car garage Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances Engineered maple flooring and ceramic tile Spacious family room with glass windows overlooking the Florida natural backyard with wildlife feeding at your doorstep. Owners feeders bring the birds and wildlife in your backyardtruly amazing. 45x28 RV storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and truly better than new. MLS #704048. $324,900. FRESH W ATER CANAL TO CHAIN OF LAKES 2 bedr ooms 2 baths, cathedr al ceiling, updated kit chen, glassed-in Florida room, master suit e with lar ge walk-in closet and jett ed tub, 2car gar age with workshop area. Ne w roof and heat and air 2 011. Great boat dock. MLS# 7 03 23 6 $89,900 REDUCED CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME 4BR PLUS office, 2.5BAs, original owner, decorator upgrades. Formal living and casual areas, quality tile floors. Fam. rm. w/gas fpl. Caged inground pool, volume ceilings, Transom windows for natural lighting. Master suite with lg. walk-in shower, garden tub. This home has over 2860 sq. ft. living area and 3 car gar. All neutral colors. Retired owner has maintained this homelooks like new!! Price below replacement at $289,900. MLS #357668 4BR, W/POOL OPEN WATERFRONT *JAMES ISLAND Lake Henderson premier location 3 BR, 3 BA Pool Home Fireplace Formal and casual area with large game room Updates throughout Caged in-ground swimming pool Boat house with lift. Owner sacrifice MLS #702113 $489,000 REDUCED DIVORCE FORCES SALE ** Kensington Estates ** Only $58.58 per sq. ft. OWNER SACRIFICE!! Splash into summer in the 3700 + sq ft under roof Formal living and dining Massive all tiled family room adjoins Updated kitchen with wood cabinets Pantry Volume ceilings Master suite opens to pool area 2-car garage PLUS DETACHED WORKSHOP!! THIS HOME IS MOVE-IN READY!!! MLS #701391 $214,900 WATERFRONT HOME GOLFING COMMUNITY SWIMMING POOL MAINTENANCE FREE* 3BR, 2BA, 2 CAR GARAGE New Kitchen & Cabinets New Appliances 2012 Side by Side Refrigerator Newer Vinyl Windows 2011 in Florida Room Walk to Golf Course Community Pool Community Boat Ramp RV and Boat Storage Enjoy Waterview from Super-sized FL Room. MLS #700705. $119,900. Call Karen Morton 212-7595 REDU CED $11 9 ,900 FAIRVIEW ESTATES 3BR, 2BA, 2-CAR GARAGE, full acre on a cul-desac. Eat-in Kitchen Formal Dining Great Room Glass Doors to Pool Area Outdoor Fireplace Area Perfect for Your Florida Lifestyle. MLS #705095 $174,900 BAYMEADOWS BEAUTIFUL 3BR 3BA 2 Car Garage Family Room Master Bedroom with Office & Beautiful Master Bath Updated in 2012* Great Kitchen with Newer Appliances Beautiful Wood Flooring Bookcase Fireplace French Doors Lead to Large Screened Lanai with Hot Tub Heat Pump/AC replaced in 2008 Grapefruit, Tangerine and Orange Trees Located on a Full Acre MLS #705303 $269,900 Jewelry made from found natural objects is often asymmetrical something Lorelei Eurto of New Hartford, N.Y., specializes in. In Bohemian-Inspired Jewelry (Interweave, 2012), she and co-author Erin Siegel, include 50 jewelrymaking projects inspired by nature. They use a lot of leather cord, silk ribbon and handmade beads, and they recommend basic materials and tools, such as various pliers, for getting started. Most folks can get by with basic jewelry-making skills, such as crimping, stringing and using jump rings, says Eurto, who sells her pieces online at Lorelei Eurto Jewelry. When nature fashions your beads, these artists say, you have to take to the trails and shorelines frequently to replenish supplies. I have a hard time going to the park with my daughter now, says Bernal. Its like a giant jewelry box. have rounded edges for an older look; others are mottled to add color variation to the driveway. Installing a customized driveway is a way to put your own stamp on the hardscape and set your house apart from the rest. Depending on the neighborhood, the materials and the quality of the craftsmanship, Keenan said, a driveway also could increase a homes resale value. It does become a point of distinction, he said. It is something people notice. It is elegant. The least expensive paved driveways are made of asphalt, which cost about $12 to $15 a square foot, and concrete, costing about $14 to $18 a square foot, Keenan said. Though concrete is more resilient and lasts longer, both materials will crack over time, he said. Pavers, which start at about $20 to $25 a square foot, should last a lifetime, Keenan said. The key is the fact that the pavement acts as flexible fabric and it can move with the earth, and isnt a rigid system and isnt prone to cracking, he said. Pavers can be used to make traditional patterns like basket-weave or herringbone, or be fashioned into a custom look. For a less traditional look, use a paver that comes in three or four sizes and lay them out at random, Keenan said. Or get a custom design without breaking the bank by using concrete pavers accented with more expensive natural stone pavers. Keenan is also the co-founder and design director of reGEN Land Design in Minneapolis. He works with homeowners to find the best driveway for their home. People are most concerned with the color, which might be chosen by looking at the homes roof, siding or trim color. I dont think you can make a value judgment on which one is the best, Keenan said of driveway designs. Its got to fit the building that youre paving next to. He might recommend, for example, a traditional red-brick driveway to go with a light blue Colonial home. For a contemporary, environmentally green home, he might choose light-colored, permeable pavers a more environmentally sound choice because they let water back through to the earth under the driveway, rather than forcing it to run off and collect debris on the way to bodies of water. In Naples, Fla., landscape architect W. Christian Busk installs living driveways that feature real grass interspersed among pavers. That reduces heat and glare and provides some drainage. We blur the lines between where driveway ends and where landscape begins, says Busk, president of Busk & Associates. It always looks beautiful. Back in Pasadena, the concreteand-brick option that Ulick chose is popular among the many Craftsman and other historical homes in the area, said Mark Peters, the chief estimator for Boston Brick & Stone, which helped create Ulicks driveway. Its a very rich feel and its understated, Peters said. Since he got his driveway in 2009, Ulick said, he has received many compliments, and people sometimes stop to ask if his driveway is the original. Thats a bigger compliment, he said, that it looks like its been done years and years and years ago. NATUREContinued from Page E14 DRIVEWAYSContinued from Page E5

PAGE 39

Associated PressSome jewelry makers take more than inspiration from nature; they incorporate found objects from trails and beaches in their work. The result? Personal, one-ofa-kind pieces that impart a natural beauty. Lisa Bernal, of Arvada, Colo., and her business partner, Jennifer Buchanan, of Keystone, Colo., have been making jewelry together for three years. First, they used leather and small stones. Their work now incorporates driftwood, tumbled smooth by nature. We were looking for fresh, unique connector pieces for the leather and the stones, recalls Bernal. They build pieces around the driftwood, incorporating semiprecious stones such as aquamarine and amazonite, and sell them at their online store, Elle Jay/ Natural Jewelry Design House, and at select Colorado stores. We try to do as little as possible to the driftwood, says Bernal. The most well do is add mineral oil to bring out the richness of the wood. Often, the shape of the driftwood dictates how itll be used. Each piece sort of wants to be something and then you just figure it out, says Buchanan. Thats why I love it. I think its fun to play with something and then it becomes this amazing work of art. The smooth stones, beach glass and pottery shards which jewelry-maker Karen Vesk of Erie, Pa., finds along the shores of Lake Erie impart similar clues. I kind of wait for them to speak to me after I get them back home, she says. Vesk also uses small shells and broken shell pieces that she collects on trips to Southern beaches. Shell fragments have an almost sculptural, abstract look to them, she says. The tricky part is preparing found objects for stringing particularly the sea glass, Vesk says. Its more breakable, she says. If it shatters, it can go in your eye. She wears safety glasses when drilling holes with her Dremel drill press, taking it slowly. Vesk sells pre-drilled pieces along with her jewelry at her Etsy store, Sunshine Statements. Still, she recommends using real beach glass rather than trying to tumble your own, as she once tried, or buying it at a crafts store. Real beach glass has a frosting to it, Vesk says. It has more of a glow of a gem. And thats whats so very desirable. Tumbled and artificial glass look like etched glass, she says. Funny thing about that beach glass, too: Its harder to find when the skies are blue. Vesk goes hunting when its stormy, which churns up the surf, kicking up glass and other treasures, such as hand-painted pottery shards from Lake Eries commercial heyday. Normal people are inside by the fireplace with a cup of hot cocoa or whatever they like, and Im out on the beach, says Vesk. I look for the windiest weather. I really enjoy it. LINDACONLEY Herald JournalSPARTANBURG, S.C. A century ago, Jesse Cleveland built his son a beautiful Colonial-style house as a wedding gift on the outskirts of Spartanburg. Clevedale was a showplace built for Conrad P and Louise Cleveland in 1913 on Willis Road. They used the property as a summer retreat because it was so far away from downtown. The house remained in family hands for more than 70 years until it was sold. Current owners Paul and Pontheolla Mack Abernathy purchased the house in February 2012. They have expanded and refurbished the homestead and converted it into a bed and breakfast with an event facility. Clevedale Historic Inn & Gardens, 1050 Willis Road, has been restored to reflect its original glamour. I saw the property online and came down from Washington, D.C., to see it, Pontheolla said. When I walked onto the porch, I said, This is my house. Pontheolla, a native of Bishopville who worked with S.C. ETV Radio and in public relations, and her husband, who is the ERA agents still climbing chartsERA Suncoast Realty is proud to announce the latest production level achieved by one of its agents for 2013. Rod Kenner has surpassed the $3 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. Reach him at the Crystal River office at 352-795-6811. ERA American Realty & Investments is proud to announce the latest production level achieved by its agents for 2013. Barbara Banks has surpassed the $1 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. She can be reached at the Inverness office of ERA American Realty by calling 352-7265855 or by email at barbara banksrealtor@yahoo.com. Rob Hard has also surpassed the $1 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. He can be reached at the Beverly Hills office of ERA American Realty by calling 352-746-3600. Alan DeMichael has surpassed the $1 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. Alan can be reached at the Beverly Hills office of ERA American Realty by calling 352-746-3600.Venticinque hits new high markThe associates and staff of RE/MAX Realty One are pleased to announce that Richard Venticinque has qualified for the 2013 multimillion dollar club. Hes been a Realtor in Citrus County for more than 25 years and an agent at RE/MAX for nearly 20 years. Richard works out of the Crystal River office located on U.S. 19.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E3 E14SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE B ILL D ECKER 352-464-0647 S USAN M ULLEN 352-422-2133 V ICTORIA F RANKLIN 352-427-3777 000G3XA Terms 6 Months or More Social Membership included with all Rentals Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Enjoy maintenance-free living in this 2/2/2 with office in Terra Vista. Dual-pane sliding glass pocket doors lead out to a beautiful screened private inground pool and lanai. Its the perfect place to enjoy your morning coffee in the fresh Florida air. MLS 358772 . . . . . . . $229,900 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD Immaculate 3 bedroom 2 bath split plan home in Brentwood. Great room, dining room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy nook, inside laundry room and a 2-car garage. NO monthly maintenance fee with this single family home. Access to the Citrus Hills and Terra Vista amenities too! MLS 704406 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $123,000 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Maintenance-free villa with an open floor plan design with great use of the space. Driftwood Model 3 bedroom, 2 bath villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, living room, family room, formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2-car oversized garage, all situated in beautiful Terra Vista. MLS 703250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,000 BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR This is maintenance-free, Florida living at its BEST! This 3 bed room, 2.5 bath, 1-car garage townhome is located in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Great room with living and dining combo, eat-in kitchen. Spacious bedrooms upstairs, master suite with walk-in closet Nice open floor plan, screened lanai, pro fessionally decorated, furniture negotiable. MLS 359587 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,900 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS This lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is the ideal place for any occasion, whether seasonal use, retirement, or full-time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what youve been looking for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoy the social life that comes with the social membership! MLS 703807 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $288,000 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, SOUTHGATE VILLAS Detached Villa in Terra Vista. 2 bedrooms 2 bath with a den. Fully furnished Ready to move into. Enjoy maintenance-free living. Social membership included #3322 . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR, BRENTWOOD Brentwood Town Home unfurnished 2 bed 2.5 baths 1-car garage. Half bath down stairs. Lanai very private with no neighbors behind it. Social membership included. #1659 . . . $900 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Luxurious unfurnished home in Terra Vista for rent. Formal living areas with a spacious open family room. Upgraded SS appliances with a gas stove and granite countertops in this gourmet kitchen. Social Club Membership Included. #1245 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800 EXCEPTIONAL AND FABULOUS DESCRIBE THIS 3 BEDROOM (plus a den), 3 bath, 2-car, 5375 sq ft pool home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen great space for entertaining Enjoy a relaxing retreat o n the extended screened Lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. #5375 . . . . . . . . . $2,300 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS 2 bedroom with den model home with everything upgraded! 12x24 salt water pool, solar heated with wat er fall. 10 ft. ceilings. 8 ft. inside doors. T ray ceiling in master bedroom with his & hers closets. M aster shower with glass block. doub le sink with J acuzzi tub. C rown moulding through out. D en with hard wood floors. island sink & bar in kitchen. T op-of-the -line W hirlpool refrigerator, dishwasher, convection microwave, and gas stove with grill top. U pgraded cabinets, tankless water heater. L ocated at the end of a cul-de-sac. M ature landscaping with many palm trees. MLS 704233 . . . . $234,900 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Light bright and open describe this fabulous golf course ho me. Inside you have lots of room with upgrades such as Corian countertops, dual-pane windows, energy-efficient radiant barrier. Nice neutral colors complement this model. You will fall in love with the views from your oversized lanai which overlooks a Koi pond with waterfall. The backdrop is a lushes landscape of majestic oaks and greenery. Located in a maintenance-free section of Terra Vista. MLS 702401 . . $291,000 DETACHED VILL A, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOOD VIEW VILLAS W ell-maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage plus den. An expanded Laurel model with extensive oak molding around windows, crown molding in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry, oak cabinets with crown molding, extra footage in bedrooms and den, a must see at this price in T erra Vista. MLS 357742 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $228,952 ERA Jackie Davis Always there for you. (352) 634-2371 Cell jackie@bjdavis.com American Realty & Investments 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL Jackie Davis For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bjdavis.com 000G4FP WHATS NEW ON THE MARKET? WHAT A PARTY HOME 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths Large great room Hardwood, tile floors 41 Florida room 43 Deck w/grilling station Circular driveway 4-Car garage, 16x21 workshop On an acre $235,000 MLS703660 SO NEW, SO CLEAN 3 bedrooms, 2 baths Model doublewide C/H/A in 2012 Detached 2-car garage 2 Outbuildings 4.69 Acres $85,000 MLS 705404 ALSO FEATURING ... CEST SI BON! Take the circular driveway up to gorgeous double doors and enter a world of wonder. 2,920 SFLA that offers 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, an office, a family room, an eat-in kitchen (V iking gas range), corian counters, formal living and dining rooms. Hardwood floors, a 10 x 5 storage closet, a walk-in pantry, interior laundry with soak sink. T ile roof, sur round sound, central vac, tray ceilings, crown moldings, security system. The lanai looks out onto a 34 x 36 screened atrium with faux stone floor and plant areas. On an acre. $275,000 MLS 705501 000G4T1 Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-17 00 REALTY, INC. CAROLE LIS TER Multi-Million Dollar Realtor H AMMOCKS VILLA 2/2/2 Cathedral ceilings MBR w/sitting rm Eat-in kitchen Screened porch Enc porch Near comm. pool Lawn maint. inc #704142 $138,500 www.lister listings.com SP ACIOUS RANCH HOME 3/2/2 Florida room V aulted ceiling Lg. eat-in kitchen Fireplace French doors Side entry garage Newer roof #702610 $129,000 See Vi rtual Tours @ www .resalehomes4u.com Cell: (352) 634-4346 Office : (352) 382-1700 GAIL COOPER Always T here F or You REALTY E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com 000G4R3 Multimillion Dollar Realtor NEED A WINTER RETREA T? 2/2 villa in private location Entry is screened for ventilation Several appliances recently replaced Indoor laundry with bi-fold door Newer carpet and tile Exterior painted in 2013 #705309 $71,900 NO DETAIL HAS BEEN MISSED! 3+office/2.5/3 pool home built in 2008 Electric fireplace in the family room Granite island kitchen Cherry cabinets SS appliances Dual pane windows and sliders Home Warranty Over 3,000 sq. ft. living space #704573 $329,900 Real EstateDIGEST Barbara BanksERA American Realty. Alan DeMichaelERA Suncoast Realty. Rob HardERA American Realty. Richard VenticinqueRE/MAX Realty One. Historic home makes womans dream a reality Herald-JournalOne of the rooms of the the old homestead of the Conrad P. Cleveland family in Spartanburg, S.C. Known today as the Clevedale House, the structure was built for Conrad P. and Louise Cleveland in 1913. The house remained in family hands for more than 70 years until it was sold. See HOME / Page E13 For some jewelry designers, nature is inspiration See NATURE / Page E15

PAGE 40

rector at St. Marks Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill, were looking for a place to purchase. They took a trip driving down the Blue Ridge Parkway and decided to settle in the Upstate. The couple looked at several properties in Greenville County, but decided against purchasing them. They decided to move to Spartanburg after visiting Clevedale because the property would allow Pontheolla to pursue her dream of owning a bed and breakfast with an event facility. We used an Excel spreadsheet to measure things, Pontheolla said. The Upstate won out because it has an international airport and a large, diverse international community. I saw the diverse pictures on the (Spartanburg) Music Trail, and it showed me that this community embraces its black heritage. Visitors drive up to the house on a road lined with heirloom crepe myrtles. There are also old magnolias, pecan and evergreen trees throughout the property. The couple is working with a landscape architect to maintain and care for the trees and gardens. They have spent about a year renovating and expanding the house, which now has about 4,200 square feet. The expansion includes adding bathrooms and enlarging the bedrooms. We spent a fortune on termite damage, Pontheolla said. The support and vertical beams had to be redone and insulation added. From the foyer, guests walk into the parlor and then the dining room. Both are furnished with antiques the couple had in their home in Washington, D.C. Other pieces were bought after they purchased the house, but there are also a few collectibles they found while renovating. A decorative fireplace surround adorns the fireplace in the parlor. It was discovered in an old icehouse on the property. Another treasure found was two Dalmatian dog statues. They were found in an old kennel just beyond the gardens. Pontheolla said she has been told Conrad Cleveland Jr. had a love for Dalmatians and raised them on the grounds. The statues didnt have a scratch on them, she said. They were in perfect condition. A third piece found in the house was a large, ornate mirror. It hangs over the fireplace in the dining room. The couple hopes to find someone who can restore it. At the back of the house is a large, updated kitchen that had to be equipped as a commercial kitchen to accommodate events and functions. The couples plans are to create a much larger catering kitchen on the property. Guests can stay in three bedrooms upstairs. The couple spent time decorating the rooms to reflect some of their favorite colors and themes. The Wren Room is named for South Carolinas state bird and is decorated in the colors of navy, light blue and white. The colors are in honor of Pauls alma mater, Westminster College in Fulton, Mo. The Ohana Room has a Hawaiian theme and is decorated in bold colors, but there is an added surprise. Inside the room is a door that says Elisabeths Studio. It is a small room to accommodate more guests. The room is named in honor of some of the women in the Cleveland family. The final room is the Westmoreland Bridal Suite named after Spartanburg native Gen. William C. Westmoreland. Pontheolla said the name was selected because Westmoreland was a close friend of the Cleveland family. Beyond the house are a variety of gardens filled with English boxwoods and other plants and flowers. The couple hasnt completed work on the grounds and hope to have it restored to accommodate weddings and other functions. I had this dream of owning my own bed and breakfast and event facility during my early years in college at USC (University of South Carolina), Pontheolla said. When all of the other students wanted to go to Myrtle Beach during spring break, I went to historic places like Beaufort and Hilton Head, and I always stayed in bed and breakfasts because they were homey and I enjoyed it so much. This also rose out of my entrepreneurial spirit. LEE REICH/Associated PressA female cucumber flower in New Paltz, NY. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E13 E4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G4Q7 5569 W. G ULF TO L AKE H WY C RYSTAL R IVER FL 34429 O FFICE : (352) 795-6633 Alexander AGENT ON DUTY SEVEN DAYS A WEEK! REAL ESTATE, INC. WWW ALEXRE COM EMAIL : SALES @ ALEXRE COM Realtor HERNANDO waterfront 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath S/W M/H, needs some work, canal leads to T sala A popka out fall canal to W ithlacoochee river B oat ramp on property O wner financing with 20% down. #702276 $32,900 HERNANDO 2 bedroom, 1 bath, S/W M/H R ear yard chain link fence w/dog pen. metal shed w/concrete floor central electric A/C propane central heating, gas range/oven. #702262 $24,900 INVERNESS neat as a pin, 1985 single wide mobile home with 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 lots, concrete drive, corner lot w/nice shade trees, newer central heat & air. N ewer refrigerator #704966 $35,000 SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H handyman/woman special, needs lots of work, roof does not leak, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, private well & septic, no appliances or outside A/C unit. O n 0.40 acres. #702483 $34,900 CRYST AL RIVER ready to move in condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage home is in cul-de-sac. H as pool & spa, patio for barbecuing, fully fenced back yard. 14 x 30 shop. W ell maintained. #359466 $104,900 HOMOSASSA 1991, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on 1+ acre corner lot w/inground caged pool. B eautiful tile floors except 1 bedroom. C athedral ceiling in living rm & dining rm. S creen porch has summer kitchen. C ountry kitchen w/built-in china cabinet. #702082 $130,000 BEVERLY HILLS totally renovated 2 bedrm, 1 bath, family rm & laundry new central A/C carpets, interior paint, ceiling fans w/lights. F enced yard. N eat, clean, bright, airy #700983 $89,900 DUNNELLON 1 99 8 b ea ut if ul 4 bedroom, 2 bath, D/W mobile, 5 + acres, dual faced fireplace between family & living rm. dbl glazed windows w/air space, fenced, excellent water #701494 PRICE REDUCED $88,000 000G5S9 WONDERING IF YOU SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME! WONDER NO LONGER Call DEBBIE RECTORS TEAM Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors) For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan $7.7 million closed by August 31, 20013. Call Debbie Rectors Team or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com To Learn More (352) 746-9924 Sherri C. Parker & Associates, REAL TORS, LLC www .sherricparker.com See all our listings at: www.pineridgehorseproperties.com 000G4XA OPEN SUNDA Y 11-1:15 PM 7724 W Glendale Ct., Dunnellon Directions: N on Citrus A ve. past Dunnellon Rd. to rt on Glendale Ct, home on rt. ROOM TO ROAM for you, the dogs and even the horses! Just minutes from downtown Crystal River and the water, this spectacular 4B,4 B, 2 car garage has it all. Space for everyone! See this one today and bring your checkbook. Nicely remodeled throughout on a 2.5 acre private lot. MLS # 704339. Only $146,900 OPEN SUNDA Y 2:30 4 PM 985 W Silver Meado w Loop, Terr a Vi sta Directions: 486, S on Terra Vista Blvd. through gate, first rt into Woodview Villas on W Skyview Crossing, left on 2nd Silver Meadow Loop to home on left. YOU DESERVE THE GOOD LIFE! Everything you could wish for in an affordable maintenance free 3/2/2 home in a great neighborhood is here! The lovely gated community, wonderful restaurants, golf, tennis, gym, world class clubhouse, shows and activities are just a part of living here! See this home and move right in. MLS 702127. Reduced to $199,900. CITRUS RIDGE REALTY 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100 www.citrusbestbuy.com T om Balfour REALT OR Amanda & Kirk Johnson BROKER/ASSOC. REALT OR, GRI Art Paty REALT OR Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner REALT OR BROKER 746-9000 000G53G 87 S. L UCILLE 2/2/2 703454 $79,500 BEVERL Y HILLS BEVERL Y HILLS 59 S. J ACKSON 2/2/1 703481 $49,900 HERNANDO 4210 E. L AKE PARK DR. 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 2435 W ERIC 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 WATERFRONT WATERFRONT WA TERFRONT 45 S. DESOTO 2/1/1 704027 $42,900 BEVERL Y HILLS BEVERL Y HILLS 9 N. W ADSWORTH 3/1.5 704088 $54,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING CITRUS HILL S 2275 N. EUSTIS PT 2/2/1 703801 $84,900 VILLA PINE RIDGE 3050 W MUSTANG 3/3/3 702967 $379,900 2011 POOL High traffic area for this 75 seat restaurant, with plenty of parking & great visibility in the Citrus Springs community. This restaurant has ALL EQUIPMENT like-new. Some of the equipment includes two doubledoor refrigerators, two large freezers & one of the best exhaust systems with fire suppression and much more. Full page of nice new equipment that goes with the sale of this restaurant. Camera Security system. So, if you have been thinking of opening a restaurant, this is the place for you. Owner financing 20% down, 6% interest, 5 year balloon. 9576 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BL VD. 75 Seats 702233 $199,000 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING BEVERL Y HILLS 19 N. AD AMS 2/1.5 704683 $56,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING BEVERL Y HILLS 38 S COL UMBUS 2/2 704687 $58,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING 137 N. FRESNO 3/2/2 701884 $119,900 1.3 ACRE CITRUS HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS POOL 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 52 S. FILLMORE 2/1/1 704090 $49,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING 9142 N AKOLA WAY 3/2/2 702470 $120,900 CITRUS SPRINGS COMMER CIAL REST AURANT BEVERL Y HILLS BEVERL Y HILLS SUGARMILL W OODS 4 BL ACK WILLOW CT 4/2/2 705564 $137,500 213 S. TYLER 2/1.5/1 702531 $67,500 of FL & MA 352-270-3255 J OAN N M ARTIN Br oker A ssociate 000G53F www .pre fm.net 228 Ple asant Gro ve Rd. In verness Great Investment opportunity Nice 4 family with 2 bedrooms in each unit. Close to Hospitals and shopping. Coin-op Laundry on site. Of f street parking. Can be purchased with 224 Pleasant Grove MLS#700512. Priced at $149,900 224 Ple asant Gr ov e Rd. In verness Nice 4 family with 2 bedrooms in each unit. Close to Hospitals and shopping. Coin-op Laundry on site. Of f street parking. Can be purchased with 228 Pleasant Grove. MLS#700606. Priced at $170,000 GREAT INVES TMENT OPPORTUNITY OR O WNER OCCUPIED. LEEREICH Associated PressSeptember finds me saving seeds of some of this years best sweet peppers and most colorful flowers to plant in next years garden. Why? Saving my own seeds from year to year gives me a bit of independence from seed companies, which, for one reason or another, may stop offering certain varieties. Its also a way to maintain an annual supply of seeds that seed companies never offer, such as some of the so-called heirloom varieties handed down for generations from parents to children and from neighbor to neighbor. And with a seed packet often costing more than $3, saving seeds is also economical. This year, for instance, I grew a giant canning tomato from seeds given to me by a friend. Where did my friend get them? From another friend.Avoid hybridsHeirloom seeds are from plants whose flowers self-pollinate. Some varieties of vegetables and flowers may not have been around long enough to be called heirlooms, but still might be from selfpollinating plants. Hybrid seeds, in contrast, are produced when the pollen of one selected plant is made to fertilize another selected plant. Hybrid plants often are more robust than their parents they have socalled hybrid vigor. Producing hybrid seed of a known variety is beyond the capabilities of most gardeners. Male and female plants must be known or chosen, and then pollination effected without contamination from other plants or even the female plant itself. When it comes to flavor or beauty, hybrid is not always high-bred. New varieties of sweetpeas have beautiful flowers, but they cannot match the intoxicating fragrance of an heirloom variety such as Painted Lady, which was introduced nearly two centuries ago. The old Golden Bantam corn may not be as sweet as newer hybrids, but it has much richer, cornier flavor. Seeds taken from a hybrid plant will not, when planted, yield plants the same as the parent plant. Take the seeds out of a hybrid sweet pepper, such as Candy Apple, and you will not get Candy Apple fruits on those plants next year. So you must buy seeds of hybrid varieties if you want those specific varieties.Give seeds timeIf you choose to save seeds from your own garden plants, select plants that are healthy. Let fruits or flowers mature, whether they are the dry pods of bean plants or radish plants, the fruits of pepper or cucumber plants, or the dry seed heads of marigolds or zinnias. Mature pepper fruits generally are red, although some might be yellow or purple; the fruits are very tasty at this point. Mature cucumber fruits are hardly edible, with thick or hard skins and hard seeds. Rinse well and then dry the seeds from juicy plants. No need to do anything with the dry seeds you pop out of radish pods or rub from the heads of marigolds or daisies, except to pack them away. Collect your own seeds for next years planting See SEEDS / Page E10 HOMEContinued from Page E3

PAGE 41

Associated PressA so-called living driveway by Busk & Associates Inc. in Naples, Fla. Landscape architect W. Christian Busk installs living driveways, which feature real grass interspersed among pavers, which reduces heat and glare and provides some drainage. Associated PressThe driveway that came with the 1921 Craftsmanstyle house that David Ulick bought five years ago was the original concrete one, marred by cracks and with tree roots starting to break through. I didnt like the driveway, said Ulick, of Pasadena, Calif. I wanted something a little bit nicer. He looked through books and drove through the Craftsman-rich neighborhoods of Pasadena to get ideas before deciding on a concrete drive with an antique finish, accented with reclaimed red bricks from the 1920s. I wanted this to look like the original driveway, an original, nice driveway, and using used bricks gives it a nice old-fashioned look, Ulick said. It really makes it a grand entrance for the house, he added, noting the brick walkway up one side. I figured Id treat the Craftsman the way it deserves to be treated, and maintain its design style and heritage. While a driveway may still be a utilitarian afterthought for many homeowners, others like Ulick are adding some serious curb appeal to their homes by moving beyond basic options like grass or gravel, asphalt or concrete. The driveway is commonly overlooked, conceded Michael Keenan, an adjunct assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Minnesota. Driveways are not cheap necessarily, but they are completely functional and necessary if you have a car and a garage. Doing up the driveway, Keenan said, is a chance to celebrate the function because it is a piece of the property you do use every day. The design options have grown in the last decade or so, he said, as pavers made from precast concrete, clay and natural stone like granite are being turned out in a range of colors and sizes. SomeCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E5 E12SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000FYGD The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD. Jason Gaffney Realtor 287-9022 302-3179 746-6700 Jackie Gaffney Realtor 000G53C wesellrealestatefast@yahoo.com A HOUSE SOLD Name! 102 Honey Palm, Beverly Hills Impressive Expanded Huntington model featuring Double Door entry, New interior paint, New Tile, New Carpet. New Stainless Steel Appliances, Eat in Kitchen, gas fireplace, formal living and dining room, huge 25 x 35 expanded screened lanai. Workshop area in garage with built in cabinets. Roof in 09 Gorgeous view of walking park. Come Buy me today. You will fall in Love. Price is reduced to $144,900 MLS # 704466 OAK RIDGE $144,900 189 SHEARER ST, INGLISImproved 1 acre lot, no impact fees, well (city water available), septic, electric, shaded with oaks & pines, motivated seller, asking $9,000 OBO Cell phone 352-428-0930 211 Northeast 4th Street, Chiefland, FL BANK OWNED ABSOLUTE AUCTION 6,400+/-SF of space in 2 Buildings on 1.16 Acres. One vacant single family home and a second bldg. used as a daycare facility. Inspect: Sept. 30th @ 11 AM Onsite Auction with Webcast bidding on October 2nd @ 3 PM Local contact: Julian Howell, 877-980-9565. More info at www.auctionEbid.com FLBKR#CQ1029847 Auction MGMTCorp. Jeb@auctionEbid.com HERNANDO1000+ sf.of office space. Heat/Elec incld, ample pkg $750 (352) 726-3339 MEDICAL OFFICE FOR SALE Totally r enovated 700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5 Crystal River. $120K 352-422-2293 USED CAR LOT4500 SF Bldg, 417 ft frontage, 1.34 Acr es, all fenced ready to go. Located at 7039 W Grover Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa $225,000. (603) 860-6660 3/1, fenced yard, corner lot. Needs some repairs. As is $39,500 Negotiable 2081 W Gardenia Dr (352) 465-0623 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience 352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Timberlane Estates! 3/2/2, w/ screen pool, Located on 1 AC 2690 W. Express Lane $139,000 Call Gwen 795-1520 or 634-1725 Citrus Hills 3/2/2 caged pool, 1 acre, great neighborhood, call for details (352) 746-6552 2 BR, 2BA, Den, lanai, Scrnd heated pool, Cen. AC, poll barn, 1 AC, fenced, well, many extras. By Appt. $129,900 firm (352) 444-2371 or (352) 586-7602 117 S Lunar Terrace2 bedroom. 2 bath. c/h/a,Tot ally Updated! Block home, Clean, Over-sized Garage, W/Carport. $79,500 Negotiable Call 352-344-9290 8535 E Gospel Island Rd Inverness 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Water front living and all the luxuries. 30 Ft glass porch, cathedral ceilings. Extensively rennovated including wood and tile floors. Granite and new roof and kitchen. Over 2000 Sqft Living area. $139,900 352-817-5875 or miksh@earthlink.net INVERNESS2002, Custom Built 3/2/2 With Extra Lot $114.500.352-344-3112 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Sugarmill Woods 3/2/2 Den, Fam Rm, Wood Floors, 1 YR W arranty 31 Pine St, Homosassa $149,000 Realty Connect 212-1446 HOMOSASSA5+ DEN, BEDROOMS. 3 BATH. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STOR YHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPT O A NATURE PRESER VE HOME IS A FORECLOSURE SHORT SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILT IN 2005 dennis_neff @yahoo.com TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKING TO SELL ? CALLME T ODAY HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALT ORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunt s homes.com. Phyllis StricklandRealtorBest Time To Buy!Prices are going up. So is interest.BUY NOW!Owner Financing Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments CUSTOM Built LUXURY HOME 3/2/3, Family Rm, gourmet kit, pool & much more! 2,653 LivSF $319K www.81woodfield. CanBY ours.com Realty Connect Teri Paduano 352-212-1446 I Buy Houses Cash ANY CONDITION Over Financed ok! call ** 352-503-3245** MINI FARMS AREA 4/2 on 10 ACRES 20 x 40 Pole Barn Move in Condition $139,900. 352-249-1248 RENT TO OWNno bank, smalldown pmt. 2/1, $53,579k take over p ayments 352-503-3245 I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including w/d. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 Blue Ridge Mountain Land Liquidation! 1.37 acres, national forest access, only $9,800. Was $74,900. Hardwood setting, breathtaking mountain/ valley views. Mild climate, Tr emendous 4 season recr eation. Paved rds, UG utilities, water. Excellent financing Call 1-866-952-5303, x21 MUSTSEE Properties WNC Mountainviews for only $19,900 Water Electric, Paved Roads. Starting at $7,900. Lots available for liquidation Oct. 12th only. Call 877-717-5263 ext91 UNRESTRICTED ACREAGE ON CUMBERLAND PLATEAU! 50-89 Acres Starting at $78,000. Heavily Wooded, Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN River. Call 877-282-4409 WESTERN NORTH Car olina -Huge V iews, Creek, Paved Roads ready to build. Pick your lot starting $7,900, cash discounts. Liquidating on Oct. 12. Call 877-717-5263 ext91 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Old Homosassa 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Newly renovated: new floors, cabinets, appliances. 2 car garage/workshop. Large double corner lot in Old Homosassas best area. Deep water Gulf access with no bridges. Private boat launch ramp, dock with elec. Minutes to The Freezer & McCreas. Documented $3,000+ monthly vacation rental income. Owners downsizing. E-mail: docgpax3@aol.com or call: 352.634.2534 Listed @ $259,500. YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $19,900 obo 352-444-2272 Dont overlook driveway design Snazzy, eco-friendly alternatives abound See DRIVEWAYS / Page E15

PAGE 42

Dear John: You have given me good information before and I now turn to you again for your opinion on our rocking chair. It is an old rocking chair that I bought at an estate sale. It is all original, has a lot of carving on it and has a leather seat. It is in good condition. I am looking for some history and maybe what its potential value is. C.P., InternetDear C.P .: You have a pressback rocker. The ornate decoration on the upper and lower panels are not carved. The detail is pressed into the wood by machine. Chairs and rockers like yours are called pressback by the general antiques marketplace. They were manufactured in massive quantities in America during the last quarter of the 19th century. They have been reproduced for the past 30-plus years. I can see in your photo there is a small amount of surface wear on the rocker; however, not enough for me to think it was made in the 19th century. Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-can. Dear John: I am attaching a photo of a print of a bird. It is offset, but the dot is very, very fine. It is printed on highquality stock and I have looked online at some collections, but was not able to find anything that resembles it and was wondering if you might have some idea about who printed it, how old it is and what it might be worth. Offset was developed about 1904, by Ira Washington Rubel, so I know that it is at least that old, but probably later. Any information would be helpful, or perhaps you might suggest someone or place that might be able to give me some information. D.C., InternetDear D.C.: I think your bird print was produced during the mid-20th century or later. The fine dot pattern indicates it is a modern mass produced picture and was likely cut out of a book. I am not aware of the artist. Have you examined the back of the print for notations? Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-can. Dear John: I have a few things I have questions on. Nice to know that there are people who have an eye out there for beautiful things. I have a vase, low-style Majolica, brown glaze, with two yellow and white roses, light Firebush, Hamelia patens,is a native shrub useful in Central Florida for attracting butterflies, hummingbirds and berry-eating songbirds. There are about 40 species ofHamelia in tropical America, but only Firebush can be used in Central Florida gardens. While it is evergreen in South Florida, Zones 10-11, it dies to the ground after the first killing frost in Zones 8b and 9a locally. Snip off the blackened, frozen stems and cover the root zone with a pile of pine needle mulch for winter protection. It is futile to try to keep the plant from going dormant in winter. Although its natural habitat is coastal hammocks and plains, it is a well-behaved and adaptable garden plant if sandy soil is amended with sufficient organic humus or decayed vegetable material. It prefers welldrained, slightly alkaline soil, but grows and flowers well in slightly acidic, humusrich soil in full sun. Shoots emerge a few weeks after the last frost in March. Older mature plants reach about 5 feet tall locally, with a similar diameter. In South Florida, Firebush can get 10 feet tall, as it does not freeze back in winter. The shrub is multi-stemmed, rounded in form and has sets of opposite to whorled leaves along the fleshy stems. There can be as many as seven leaves at a leaf node. Leaves are 5 to 8 inches long. Shiny green on top, with reddish veins, leaves are medium green. Firebush is suitable for mixed borders, wildlife buffer plantings and specimen plants to attract pollinators and small birds. Flowers are bright red to orange year-round in the tropics, but from June to October in frost-prone Citrus, Levy and Marion Counties. Tubular flowers are about 1.5 inches long in branched bunches at the tips of the soft branch stems. Rich inCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E11 E6SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! CRYSTALRIVER2/2, inclds H2O, sew, trash. (352) 584-3348 CRYSTALRIVER3/2, $450.mo., & 4/2 $550. No Dogs 352-795-9738 HOMOSASSAAttractive 2BR, 2BA DW on 1 AC, carport scrn. por. completely well furni. $600 mo. $600 dep 352-628-1723 7677 West Chassahowitzka St. 2BD, 2BA, Mobile Detached Garage Scrn. porch, lease or Sale, $2,000 down $732. mo. 877-499-8065 $11,094, DISCOUNT New Jacobsen, 2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA yr. Warranty. No down payment, use land or trade in. Payment only, $471.18 P & I, WAC Call 352-621-9182 Singing Forest 46 2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile Home, fixer upper, $6000. 352-344-1365 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 BAD CREDIT? FORECLOSURE? BANKRUPTCY? Want your own home? I can help!! 35% down cash or land and you are approved. No gimmick, 386-546-5833 Tired of Renting? Super clean 2004 3BR/2BA, on acre ready to move in!!! $3,500 down, $380.03/mo. W.A.C. Call 386-546-5833 for details Wont last! USED HOMESSingle, Double & Triple Wides Starting at $6,500 Call (352) 621-9183 2011 Live Oak 4BR/2BA $46,900, 28x60 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details HOMOSASSAOwner Financing, 3/2, older MH on 2 acres, inside remodeled, fenced yard, $4k down $535 per mo. 352-302-9217 TAYLOR MADE HOMESLOT MODEL BLOWOUT All Homes Discounted $4,000 to $8,000 Even up to $12.000 off Sticker Price Call 352-621-3807 BARGAIN!1999, 26 x 52 DW Meridian, bright, airy & immaculate 3/2 in 55+ park new driveway & new covered walkway Bargain at $30,000 first come first servce 352-563-0500 Doublewide, 2 BR, 2BA, Recent shingle roof New AC, MUCH MORE 55+ Park $15,500 (352) 634-0274 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 Floral City 8080 S Lake 3/2 rent2own, SW, Nice,Fam rm,scr pch, fenced yard, carport $495/mo727-582-9000 CASTRO REALTY & Property Management Inc333 N. Croft Avenue Inverness FL34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS ALLAREASCall For Details 352-341-4663 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000G4MS www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com CRYSTAL RIVER 10941 W.Gem St. . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 Large duplex close to hospital 9660 W.Camphor Ln. . . . . . . . . $8003/2/2 Clean home on corner lot 16 Beach Ln. #102 . . . . . . . . . $9001/1 Furnished studio apartmentBEVERLY HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO 2150 Austin Dr. (CS) . . . . . . . . $5502/1.5 Cute home, some furniture, fenced yard 2332 W.Silverhill Ln. (L) . . . . . $5502/1 Affordable apartment, ground floor 9047 N. Travis Dr. (CS) . . . . . . . $6252/2 Roomy duplex, neat and cleanHOMOSASSA 4800 S. Wood Way . . . . . . . . . $9003/2/1 Riverhaven, fully furnished 11701 Clearwater Ct. . . . . . . . $1000 2/2 Waterfront mobile home INVERNESS 1314 Cypress Cove (Inv) . . . . . $6502/2, Waterfront townhouse, screen porch J.W.MORTON PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC.1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FL000G4FO Jennif er F udge Cheryl S cruggs Pr oper t y Manager / R e alt o rAs s o ciat e s 3 5 2 7 2 6-9010 CALLING ALL OWNERS NEED A GOOD TENANT?Bring us your vacant home and watch us work for you! INVERNESS 2/2/1. . . . . . . . . . $700 2/1/1 . . . . . . . . . $600 2/1/1 Pool CareI nclude d. . $750 3/2/2Lawn Care Included$850 BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1 . . . . . . . . . $550 3/1. . . . . . . . . . . $600 CITRUS HILLS 2/2.5/ C arport. . . $725 2/2/ C arport. . . . . $700 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALEST ATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500, ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AV AILABLE CRYST ALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 CRYST AL RIVERQuiet, 1/1, $425. mo. (352) 628-2815 HOMOSASSA2/2, clean, quiet, centr location $550., 352563-2114, 257-6461 INVERNESSBeautifully Remodeled on golf course, 2/2/2 $875 352-895-0744 PELICAN BAY APARTMENTS2 BDRM. APT. HOMES Carpet, Appliances, Central Heat & Air Rental assistance available to qualified applicants. If qualified, pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. FOR RENTAL INFO. & APPLICATION 9826 West Arms Dr Crystal River, 352-795-7793 TDD#1-800-955-8771 Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:00PEqual Housing Opportunity Provider & Employer CRYST ALRIVER2/1, Unfurn.$550, Furn. $600.+sec clean, quite. Small Pet 828 5th Ave. NE. 727-455-8998 727-343-3965 CRYST ALRIVERBUSINESS. LOC. FOR RENTHwy 19 Downtown exec. location,1000 sf Very Clean remodeled 352-634-2528 Sugarmill W oods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 CRYST ALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $590/mo.1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs. 352-726-9570 CRYST AL RIVERFully Furnished Studio efficiency w/ equip ped kit. All util., cable, Internet, & cleaning provided. $599.mo 352-586-1813 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 CRYST AL RIVER2-3 BR $200-$250/mo 552-2637, 527-6566 CRYST AL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 INVERNESS3/2/2 St arting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-403-4646 or 352-403-4648 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 Near Anna Jo Rd. By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 LECANTOKensington Est. 3/2, 1 Acre, new remodel. $825.+ dep. 352-513-5053 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM CRYST AL RIVER1/1, Apt. Water front $650. mo. 1st sec. Inclds dock, water, trash. No pets. 772-240-6180 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INGLISCharming furn or unfurn effic/cott age all utilities incld. $595 no smoking 352-422-2994 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $850/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW T O LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. BEVERLY HILLS 324 S Monroe. Sunday 12-3p Completely Remodeled Imperial Exec. 2 br, 2 ba, 2 gar. NEW : Roof, kitchen w/stainless, baths, flooring etc. $79k. 527-1239 Driveway Delight PAGE E5 Save Our Waters PAGE E8 Real Estate Digest PAGE E3 See JANE / Page E9 Pressback rocking chair; sizing up a bird picture John SikorskiSIKORSKIS ATTIC Inside... For current property transactions, use the search features on the website for the Citrus County Property Appraisers Office: www.pa.citrus.fl.us. HOMEFRONTS REAL ESTATE DIGEST Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352563-3280, attention HomeFront. News notes submitted without photos will not be reprinted if the photo is provided later. Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront. Digest photos are kept on file for future use. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for space and/or clarity. For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660. HomeFront is a weekly real estate section published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle. Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592 ............................................advertising@chronicleonline.com Classified advertising information.....................352-563-5966 News information.............................................352-563-5660 ..............................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.comThe market leader in real estate information Firebush a useful, Florida-friendly choice See ATTIC / Page E7 Though at first glance it looks like a carving, the back of this rocking chair was actually made by pressing the pattern into the wood with a machine.Special to the Chronicle Jane WeberJANES GARDEN

PAGE 43

(Botanically, the pod of radish or other members of the cabbage family is not a pod, but a siliques, which is a pod-like structure with a membrane separating its two halves.) Cool, dry conditions keep seeds at their best in storage. Small envelopes are good for storing small seeds such as tomato, pepper and radish. A jar is a good long-term home for larger seeds such as beans and corn.Next yearWhat kind of plants you end up growing next year will depend on whether the seeds you collect are from hybrid plants, and whether the seeds were from plants that self-pollinate or cross-pollinate. Cucumbers, for example, have separate male and female flowers, so they readily cross-pollinate. To perpetuate a non-hybrid cucumber variety, either grow the plants in isolation from other cucumber varieties or else bag and hand-pollinate a few female flowers with male flowers on the same plant. A female cucumber or squash flower is easily recognizable by the small fruit at the base of the flower. The most predictable outcomes from saved seeds will be from those taken from non-hybrid plants that have not cross-pollinated or do not do so readily such as heirloom varieties of tomatoes and peppers. Expect some interesting results with the others.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E7 E10SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY 000G4FQ 311 W. Main St., Inverness 352-726-5263 www.landmarkinverness.com HOW SWEET IT IS! Charming Sugarmill Woods 2/2/1 villa, private backyard setting. Great deal, $75,900! 5 Dogwood Dr., #704290. Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983. NO DETAIL SPARED, THIS IMPRESSIVE, qualitybuilt 3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods pool home, move-in ready! $184,000. 2 Speceberry Ct. S., #704291. Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983. BIG LAKE HENDERSON OPEN WATER 2/2 paradise, boat house, dock, shed, fenced. Needs TLC. ONLY $49,900 #705390 8538 Aquarius Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 1981 S/W OPEN FLOOR PLAN, RV Parking, utility bldgs, fenced. $35,000 #704143 6548 E Lakato Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 OPEN WATERFRONT Fabulous 2/2private paradise w/bi-level deck, boat house, screened lanai. ONLY $88,500 #704263 3762 N Webb PtJean Cassese 352-201-7034 MAGICAL DEAL ON MICHAEL. 2/1 perfect for retirement or someone just starting out. PRICE SLASHED TO$49,900 #358130 HOLY MOLY PSO zoning on Homosassa Trail, 263 Foot of road frontage. 1987 Doublewide, 2/2, great condition, new ac. SMASHING GOOD PRICE OF $60,000. #705216 COME CHECK OUT THIS REAL STEAL! Inverness 3/2/2 built in 1985 with 1,319 living. Fenced yard, split & open floor plan, dining area, screen porch, partial appliances, and in need of TLC. ONLY $71,070 #705264 Tomika Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598 IT S HAPPY HOUR!!! 2 houses for the price of 1...2/2/1, 2 car detached garage, screen porch, 1.07 AC, family room, fireplace. Plus a 1987 2/2 mobile. $64,900 #703165 Tomika Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598 OWNING A HOME MAY SEEM LIKE A DREAM? Check out this fantastic Citrus Springs 2/2/1 buy! Home has living & family rooms, NEW paintAC, Flooring! $54,900 #705031 Tomika Spires Hanssen 586-6598 WATERFRONT CHECK IT OUT! ONLY $59,900! Charming 2/1.5 home on large lot nestled in nature but minutes to town! Features large Florida Room, newer dock, new well, multiple sheds, and even furnish ed if you want it to be! #704207 Tomika Spires Hanssen 586-6598 HOLD YOUR HORSES AND HANG ON TO YOUR WALLET... this great buy will accommodate both! Inverness 3/2/2, nestled on 2.16 AC. Asking $94,500 #705430 Tomika Spires Hanssen 5866598 LOOKING FOR AFFORDABLE INVERNESS WATERFRONT? 2/2/1, 1,025 living. Screen porch, boat dock, appliances, TLC needed. $78,900 #705243 Tomika Spires Hanssen 5866598 REDUCED!! We Say....Don t Delay! Citrus Springs 4/2/2, built in 2006, 1,811 living. NEW interior paint & carpet, family room, vaulted ceilings, wood cabinets. $99,900 #704762 Tomika Spires Hanssen 586-6598 APPETITE BIG BUT YOUR BANK ROLL THIN? 3/1.5/1 Crystal River home built in 1995 w/1,000 living. Close to shopping, medical, and schools. ONLY $59,900 #704982 Tomika Spires Hanssen 586-6598 CHARACTER PLUS CHARM! Kensington Estates 3/3/ 2 Pool home, a gorgeous kitchen, hickory cabinets, fireplace, workshop, large screen porch, S/S appliances, 2398 living. A one year home warranty! $218,500 #701079 Tomika Spires Hanssen 586-6598 CUSTOM COUNTRY HOME, 1 AC, 3/2, stone fireplace, in beautiful Citrus Hills. $179,900. 1795 W. Tacoma #703912Sheila Bensinger 352-476-5403 CASHIERS CT. Spotless 3/2/2, built 2007 on 0.55ac close to Davis Lake. Desirable Inverness Golf Estate and IGCC neighborhood. Super high efficiency A/C system, City water & sewer. $119,900 Investors Realty of Citrus County, Inc. Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com REALT OR Cell: (352) 220-0466 gbarth@myflorida-house.com GITT A BARTH 000BOSH 000G4FR LIVING ON THE W ATER! This classic contemporary pool home is the right setting for living the Florida lifestyle. Open and airy with the plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of room to dock all the water toys imaginable! MLS #354435 $489,000 COUNTR Y ESTA TE PLEASANT GRO VE Magnificent 451 1 sq. ft. estate, custom built 2007 on 5 acres MOL. Exceptional quality throughout: vaulted tongue & groove ceilings, fireplace; granite counters & custom cabinetry; family room, den/of fice, 2 + 2 car garage. Exquisite outdoor entertaining: Jenn-Air summer kitchen, covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings. $549,900 ROOM TO ROAM! Spectacular 3/2/2 pool home w/lar ge lanai on 2.14 ac! HUGE 25x40 detached garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for your R V. Nicely landscaped with pretty oaks and well maintained, too. New roof (2013), 14 Seer HV AC (2009), generator & perimeter alarm. $249,895 NICELY WOODED 5 ACRE LOT of f Rosehill, very private, deeded access. The perfect place to build your retreat. The short distance to the Withlacoochee State Forest (T illis Hill T rail) makes it a desirable location for the horse and country lover $55,000 CRYST AL RIVER SOLITUDE A taste of unspoiled nature: secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, ponds, mature oak trees. The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully positioned in a beautiful setting! This Shangri-La can be yours for $800,000 Get a taste of it & visit http://www .mycrystalriverfarm.com/ for an interactive tour. LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE! 2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+ community on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for privacy Y ou will love to call this comfy house your home! MLS703427 $79,000 REDUCED www.FloridaSho wcasePr operties.com SERVING ALL OF CITRUS COUNTY 000G53H PINE RIDGE 1481 W Pine Ridge Blvd. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 527-1820 CITRUS HILL S 20 W Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 746-0744 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with n o other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-2 NEW LISTING Pr ud en ti al R ea l Es ta te Ta ke s TH RE E of F ou r Ca te go ri es i n J. D. P ow er an d As so ci at es 20 13 Ho me B uy er /S el le r St ud y! Re pe at H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Se ll er OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 NEW LISTING OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 P in e R id ge P in e Pine R id ge Ridge 4792 W Custer Dr MLS 705312 $224,000 3/2/2 (+ den). Directions: 491 or 486 to Pine Ridge Blvd, north on Pinto, right on Custer Dr. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Open 7 Da ys A W eek! K en si ng to n Es ta te s K en si ng to n Kensington Es ta te s Estates 534 E Knightsbridge Pl MLS 704309 $141,900 3bd/2ba home. Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on E. Reehill St/Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St, R on Knightsbridge Pl. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 3020 E Berwick Ct MLS 703938 $120,000 3bd/2ba home. Directions: Hwy 486 to main entrance of Canterbury Lakes, R on N Chandler Dr Maria Fleming 352-422-1976 C an te rb ur y La ke E st at es C an te rb ur y Canterbur y La ke E st at es Lake Estat es NEW LISTING 5150 N Pink Poppy Dr MLS 705423 $218,000 3/2/2 with pool. Joy Holland 352-464-4952 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING C it ru s H il ls C it ru s Citrus H il ls Hills 782 E Keller Ct MLS 700636 $289,000 3bd/2ba pool home. Jane OGwynn 352-302-1926 P ar ks id e Vi ll ag e P ar ks id e Parkside Vi ll ag e Village 3826 N Parkside V illage Ter MLS 701797 $42,900 1/1 villa. Lori Nickerson 352-220-8434 C it ru s H il ls C it ru s Citrus H il ls Hills 222 E Joplin Ct MLS 705515 $269,900 3bd/3ba pool home. Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 P in e R id ge P in e Pine R id ge Ridge C am br id ge Gr ee ns Ci tr us H il ls C am br id ge Cambridge Gr ee ns Greens Ci tr us H il ls Citrus H ills 1566 E Saint Charles Pl MLS 705513 $184,900 2bd/2ba +den/office, pool. JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 B re nt wo od B re nt wo od Brentw ood 2456 N Brentwood Cir MLS 705457 $140,700 3/2/2 home. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 L ak es id e Vi ll ag e L ak es id e Lakeside Vi ll ag e Village 3605 N Longpine Pt MLS 705486 $49,900 1/1/1 V illa. Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261 B ev er ly H il ls B ev er ly Bev erly H il ls Hills 213 S Barbour St MLS 705480 $43,900 2bd/1ba/1cg. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 C it ru s H il ls C it ru s Citrus H il ls Hills 509 N Fresno A ve MLS 704188 $229,900 3/2/3 pool home. Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 purple flowers. The handles are dolphins with split tails. It is in good shape; only a small piece off the rose. I have a lunch dish set, Cottage by Sylva. I have 11 dishes, 12 cups and saucers, and 4 mugs. There are no chips on the dishes. There is also a teapot, sugar, and creamer. I also have another luncheon set with blue and gold roses with trim on the edge of the dishes, by Schmid, West Germany. There is a set for six, with tall teapot, sugar, and creamer. There is also a sewing machine, by Mason, made in Cleveland, Ohio, during the late 1800s. It has nicelooking legs and the head moves easily. I have several other things what beauty from the past. I would like to downsize and say goodbye to some; where is the best place to sell? S.S., Beverly HillsDear S.S.: Majolica is a popular specific category of collector interest. The china companies you ask about are not important relative to collector interest. Dollar value is relative to pattern and style in the replacement china market. For further information on the china, contact Replacements Ltd. at www.replacements.com or 800737-5223. The Mason Sewing Machine Company started manufacturing sewing machines in 1903. In order to help further I need good clear photos. John Sikorski has been a professional in the antiques business for 30 years. He hosts a call-in radio show, Sikorskis Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorskis Attic, P.O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or asksikorski@aol.com. ATTICContinued from Page E6 Special to the ChronicleThis handsome bird picture probably dates from the mid-20th century or later. The quality of the print indicates that it was a mass-production item. GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message. SEEDSContinued from Page E4

PAGE 44

sweet nectar, Firebush flowers attract Swallowtail and larger butterflies with a long proboscis to reach the nectar at the bottom end of the tube. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds particularly relish the rich nectar and will chase off competing drinkers. Pollinated flowers develop seeds in a juicy, rounded, oval fruit. These are mostly a quarter-inch diameter here, but can grow an inch wide in the tropics. Eastern Bluebirds and Northern Mockingbirds eat most of the berries in my garden, leaving few for the smaller songbirds. The seeds rarely survive to sprout elsewhere in the garden without human protection. Plants are generally cloned from softwood cuttings in summer and grown under mist until roots develop. New plants need to be watered several times a week until established. Older plants can survive on natural rainfall except during drought or our dry months of April and May. A newer, more compact form has been developed, with smaller leaves and size. It flowers well in full sun of at least six hours a day. Firebush is not a host to any of the 190-plus species of Florida butterfly caterpillars, but leaves are chewed by other insects. Scale, whiteflies and mites can be a problem in over-irrigated gardens. Resident summer hummingbirds snap up insects to feed the protein to their chicks. Smaller local nurseries like Hobsons and Color Country stock or can get this desirable native perennial for gardeners, butterfliers and birders. It is seldom available in the big box outlets.Jane Weber is a professional gardener and consultant. Semi-retired, she grows thousands of native plants. Visitors are welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion County, garden. For an appointment, call 352-249-6899 or contact JWeber12385 @gmail.com.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013E9 E8SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER22, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G55T EXIT Realty Leaders 2013 2013 2013 2013 The Wade Team 352-794-0888 352-527-1112 352-447-2595 ***Foreclosure List*** 2/1 in Yankeetown. 704923 $26,000 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 3/1 Handymans Delight in Beverly Hills. 705153 $41,550 Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Cozy 2/1/1 in Beverly Hills. 704381 $49,900 Nancy Little Lewis 352-302-6082 Immaculate 3/2/1 on half an acre. 705068 $82,900 Michelle Cavalieri 352-220-4211 Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs. 705093 $99,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen. 704264 $124,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 3/2/2 on over an acre. 705142 $124,900 Nancy Little Lewis 352-302-6082 Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on an acre. 705087 $149,900 Becky Paradiso 352-634-4581 Custom built 3/3/3 on 1.11 acre. 705148 $235,000 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Spectacular 3/3.5/3 pool home in Sugarmill on dbl. lot 704938 $349,900 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Desirable Brentwood Estates 3/2/2 det. villa. 704862 $119,900 Gary Ayers 352-302-9329 Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 mobile on 1 acre. 704257 $22,900 Peggy Price 352-302-5633 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres. 704781 $38,000 Becky Paradiso 352-634-4581 Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over two acres! 705223 $89,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 (352) 726-2471 After Hours (352) 302-6714 All Citrus Realty INC CALL Roy Bass TODAY Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com 000G55G GROUND FLOOR CONDO-INVERNESS, FL Regency Park 2BR/2BA with fireplace & hardwood floors. Clubhouse & pool. $49,000 MLS#703767 BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL V ery nice 2BR/1.5 bath home with fenced yard. Fireplace. $52,000 MLS#704852 OPEN W ATERFRONT DOUBLEWIDE-INVERNESS, FL East Cove 3BR/2BA with fishing & boating from your back yard. $54,995 MLS#704944 BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL Over 3000 sq, ft of living in Sugar mill Woods. 4BR/3BA/2 Car Garage. $160,000 MLS#702836 AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS Always There For You hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Robert & Holly Jones 352-287-5020 ONE ACRE GOLF COURSE POOL HOME $259,900 Sugarmill Woods. 2789/4192 sq. ft. Private pool courtyard, spa, fountain, waterfall and guest suite. A separate back yard lanai. 4/3 plus den. MLS#702574. See it today 12:30-3pm. Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd., to 40 Seagrape St., Homosassa, FL 34446 000G4C7 OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE REDUCED OPEN HOUSE r e t a W r l u R e s i w s e JANE WEBER/Special to the ChronicleFirebush is a native shrub useful in Central Florida for attracting butterflies, hummingbirds and berry-eating songbirds. Although its natural habitat is coastal hammocks and plains, it is a well-behaved and adaptable garden plant. JANEContinued from Page E6