Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03265

Full Text

Upset alert: Hurricanes sweep past No. 12 G


TODAY
& next
morning


Isolated p.m.
storms; rain
chance 20%.
PAGE A4


J/B1


=CITR U S CI0UNT Y






NICwww.chronicleonline.com
^& www.chronicileonliine.com


SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 32


SO YOU KNOW
* An advertisement
on the front of
today's comics
section contains
the wrong date for
the Women's
Health and
Fitness Expo. The
event is from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday,
Sept. 28, at the
National Guard
Armory in Crystal
River.



IN THEIR WORDS:


Cold War
As a Navy pilot in the
1950s, Thomas Trout
remembers a close call
in the Medeterranean.
/Page A14
COMMENTARY:


DCF chief
The News Service of
Florida interviews the
interim secretary of
Florida's Department of
Children and Families,
Esther Jacobo./Page Cl
BUSINESS:
Health care
So, what will the new
plans from the health
care reform law cost
people? Read about two
studies that analyzed
it./Page Dl


'His legacy lives on'


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Chris Hedry, left, takes a punch to the face as he and Hayes Gray spar. Even though the boxers are
required to wear heavy-duty protective gear, a punch is still a punch. During his sparring with Gray, Hedry
lost a tooth.


A small building in
Hernando, at 2700 N.
Florida Ave., is home
to Lake Side Boxing.
Gym founder James
Collazo died July 4.
"Ever since I met him,
all he talked about was
owning his own gym.
He wanted to have a
place for children and
their parents to come
and learn boxing and
have fun. He looked at
the gym as a way of
giving to the kids," his
widow Linda Collazo
said.


,"Qvmpwm I


EXCURSIONS:


Foreclosures play large role in county home market


Maze master
Designer turns fields of
corn into mazes across
the country./Page All


Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................ D4
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus ...........A7
M ovies ..................... A14
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A16
Veterans ........ A14


I6 18478 200711o


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Fallout from the Great Recession
could continue to shape Citrus County's
real estate market for several years.
While the number of mortgage fore-
closures is declining, the number of fore-
closed homes and other distressed
properties on the market and those in
the pipeline will continue to reflect the
economic problems of previous years.
Distressed properties include "short
sales," a negotiated transaction where
the lender accepts less than is owned on
a property; mortgage-release properties
returned to the lender; and third-party
sales.
According to real estate broker Linda
Bega, of the 1,994 residential closings
from Jan. 1 through Aug. 31, 390 were
foreclosures and 117 were short sales.
That total of 507 distressed properties
represents slightly more than 25 percent
of all sales.
For July, a benchmark month for local
home sales, distressed sales were about
40 percent of the action, according to
data from the Realtors Association of Cit-
rus County Of 161 single-family home
sales, 52 were foreclosures and 12 were


The good news is
we have to get through
the process, you have
to get rid of the back
inventory, which is
holding down prices of
other property. It's huge
competition.
Linda Bega
owner of Landmark Realty.
short sales.
Bega is the owner of Landmark Realty,
which leads the county in the sale of
foreclosed homes. She works with a va-
riety of lenders and the various federal
agencies involved with housing.
She said her recent contacts with
Freddy Mac and Fannie Mae indicate the
county can expect another wave of hous-
ing inventory Fannie Mae currently has
97 foreclosure homes listed for sale in
See Page A8


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The actual number of
foreclosed homes in Cit-
rus County is subject to
interpretation.
Some databases and
websites amalgamate
numbers including pre-
foreclosures, homes in
foreclosure, short sales,
bank-owned homes,
homes being auctioned
and unspecified
properties.
Foreclosure cases turn
up in the circuit court
system when the lis pen-
dens suit pending pa-
perwork is filed and
are subsequently counted
as mortgage cases filed.
But those numbers can


seem small when com-
pared to the array of
foreclosure-related prop-
erties listed on Realty-
Trac, a real estate
website often quoted by
the media and public of-
ficials. Company officials
explained the difference.
Jennifer von
Pohlmann with Realty-
Trac detailed the com-
pany's methodology:
"The RealtyTrac U.S.
Foreclosure Market Re-
port provides a count of
the total number of prop-
erties with at least one
foreclosure filing en-
tered into the RealtyTrac
database during the
month broken out by
See Page A8


1 OR MORE AT THIS PRICE. $2gBl CASH OR TRADE EQ UIITY


Model#: 31013
VIN#: 752593


1 OR MORE AT THIS PRICE $2999 CASH OR TRADE EOUI"IT


Model#: 22113
VIN#: 531439









1 OR MORE AT THIS PRICE. $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUiITY.


1 OR MORE AT THIS PRICE. S2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY.


Ai ^n/CRYSTAL 937 SOUTH SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA, FL
o CNISSANL 866-425-1090


+INCLUDES $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITYAND ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE
WILL QUALIFY. WAC EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WAC. ONLY FOR
WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS. AMOUNT OF DOWN PAYMENT AND OTHER FACTORS MAY AFFECT
QUALIFICATION # ON SELECT YEARS MAKES AND MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SEE
DEALER FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES. OFFERS
CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


HIGH
92
LOW
69


Various factors add to

home foreclosure numbers


Gym'sfounder

passes on, but

leaves his

dream behind
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
HERNANDO
he sport of boxing has
a folkloric resonance
about it.
From the persistent
rhythms of speed bags,
punching bags and the
sweltering, dank gyms of
long ago to
the giant ...
historical
gladiators
the sport
has pro-
duced For video,
from Jack click on this
Johnson to story at
Rocky Mar- www.chronicle
Mar- online.com.
ciano to
Muhammad Ali boxing
has always maintained a
creed, the Queensberry
rules.
The rules have defined
See Page A5

WHAT: Lake Side
Boxing.
WHERE: 2700 N.
Florida Ave.
WHEN: 4 to 6:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday;
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
PHONE: 352-228-2314.
FEES: $40 per month
per person; family rates
are available.
See more photos from
the gym/Page A10.
See a video from Lake
Side Boxing with this
story online at www.
chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEFS


Sept. 11 artifacts on display Wednesday


One dead in
St. Pete shooting
ST. PETERSBURG -Six
St. Petersburg police officers
are on administrative leave
after the fatal shooting of an
armed man on a front porch
early Saturday.
Officers were called twice
to the neighborhood after resi-
dents reported hearing gun-
shots and loud music, said
police spokesman Mike
Puetz. While on the scene a
second time, officers heard a
gunshot and saw an armed
man standing on an enclosed
front porch.
The man initially responded
to officers' commands to
lower his weapon, but then
picked up a rifle that he
pointed at the officers in his
yard, Puetz said.
According to police, six offi-
cers fired at the man. He was
pronounced dead at the scene.
Police identified the man as
Lealann Russell Melder Coo-
ley. Investigators found other
weapons and ammunition in
Cooley's house, Puetz said.
Scott to tour state
to discuss tax cuts
TALLAHASSEE Gov
Rick Scott will make stops
throughout Florida to talk
about next year's budget.
Scott has announced plans
to cut taxes and fees for the
state by $500 million in the
next proposed budget.
The "It's Your Money" tour
will begin Tuesday morning in
West Palm Beach, followed
by a stop that afternoon in
Fort Lauderdale. Scott will
then stop in Jacksonville,
Tampa and Orlando during
the next three days.


No ticket wins
Mega Money
TALLAHASSEE No tick-
ets matched all four numbers
plus the Mega Ball in the
Mega Money game so the
jackpot has rolled over to $1.5
million, Florida Lottery officials
said Saturday.
Two tickets won $3,300 for
picking 4-of-4; 33 tickets won
$438 each for picking 3-of-4
plus the Mega Ball number;
675 tickets won $63.50 each
for picking 3-of-4; 976 tickets
won $30.50 each for
picking 2-of-4 plus the Mega
Ball; 9,032 won $3 each for
matching one number plus
the Mega Ball; 23,527
tickets won $2 each for
picking 2-of-4.
The numbers drawn Friday
night were 1-18-30-37 and the
Mega Ball was 2.
Airport adds
service to Mexico
FORT MYERS Mexico
will become Southwest
Florida International Airport's
third non-U.S. destination in
December.
That's when MetJet will
launch weekly seasonal
flights between Fort Myers
and Cancun, Mexico.
Airport officials say they
want to expand their interna-
tional reach even farther.
Canadian service began
nearly two decades ago. Non-
stops to Germany debuted
April 1994.
The airport already is in
rare company: Of the 429
commercial airports in the
United States, it's one of just
26 with nonstops to non-U.S.
destinations.
-From wire reports


Special to the Chronicle
Donations of artifacts from the 9/11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center will be on display from noon to
7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, at Inverness City Hall. The Citrus County Sheriff's Office partnered with the city of
Inverness and the National Association of Retired Law Enforcement Officers to travel to New York City to bring
back these artifacts. Some artifacts that will be on display are a piece of the sphere that rested between the
towers, doors from patrol cars (one being a K-9 officer), signs from locations around the city and other pieces. From
left are: Sgt. Dave Vincent, Dep. Joe Faherty, Dep. Todd Farnham, Joe Jurgins, NARLEO's Andy Tarpey, Inverness
City Manager Frank DiGiovanni and Gary Gersitz.



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A2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


LOCAL/STATE





Page A3 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2013



TATE 201& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
CR Council gets first
look at budget
The Crystal River City
Council will have its first
reading of the city's tenta-
tive budget for 2013-14 on
Monday evening.
The rollback rate for fis-
cal year 2013-14 was set
3.8945 mills. The millage
rate being proposed for is
3.8 mills, which is the same
rate as last year. The pro-
posed general fund budget
is $3,995,084.
The council also will have
a first hearing on adopting
the Community Redevelop-
ment Budget for 2013-14.
Council members have
slated for discussion possible
changes to the Three Sisters
Springs management plan.
It was continued from the
last month's meeting.
Water task force
to meet Monday
The Citrus/Hernando
Waterways Restoration
Council-Citrus County Task
Force will meet at 2 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9, in Room
166 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Business will include
Aquatic Habitat Enhancement
and Restoration, Water
Quality Report, and prepa-
ration for the annual report
to the state Legislature.
The public is invited and
public input is welcomed.
For information, call Al
Grubman at 352-726-2201
or Jennifer Nolan at 352-
796-7211
League to hear
about springs
The League of Women
Voters of Citrus County in-
vites the public to join them
at 10:15 a.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 10, for a presentation
and discussion on the
Florida Land and Water
Constitutional Amendment
Initiative, with land preser-
vationist Dr. K.C. Nayfield as
the guest speaker. The meet-
ing will be at the Central
Ridge Library in Beverly Hills.
The league is an educa-
tional, nonpartisan organiza-
tion that meets the second
Tuesday each month. For
information, call 352-746-
0655.
REC announces
guest speaker
The next meeting of the
Citrus County Republican
Executive Committee will be
at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9,
in the Board of Realtors
Building, 714 S. Scarboro
Ave., Lecanto.
Guest speaker will be
Randy Osbomrne, chairman of
the Marion County Republi-
can Executive Committee
and director of education for
Heartland Research Eagle
Forum, speaking about the
education initiative Com-
mon Core.

Palmetto
Donors help save
family's home
A Manatee County family
was on the verge of losing
their home because of a tax
bill glitch, but dozens of donors
have stepped forward.
The Herald Tribune re-
ported Karen Laffler and
her family were on the brink
of losing the home because
a developer failed to pay the
appropriate property taxes.
The home, valued at
$91,000, was custom-built
for their needs and donated
to them in 2006. Laffler is
wheelchair-bound from a
stroke that she suffered
several years ago. Her
daughter, Amanda, was
born with spina bifida and
also cannot walk.


After a story in the Her-
ald-Tribune, 58 area donors
raised $40,560 that the
family needed to buy back
the home from an investor
who had acquired it at the
recent tax auction.
-From staff and wire reports


Business shines at expo


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
GFWC Women's Club of Inverness member Judy Hrycaj introduces herself to
Garijo Stackhouse on Saturday at the Citrus County Chamber Business Expo.


INVERNESS

hundreds of people spent their
Saturday at the Citrus County
Auditorium for the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce Business Expo.
With more than 50 local vendors,
guests were handed a variety of opportu-
nities to answer their questions and in-
quiries while learning about local
resources and pet adoptions.
The family-centered expo also dedicated
10 booths to local nonprofits.
The event was sponsored by Bailey
Electric, the Citrus County Chronicle,
the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Insti-
tute, Suncoast Dermatology, Plantation
on Crystal River, WWJB News Radio
and Insight Credit Union.
-Eryn Worthington


Special to the Chronicle


Dragon boat races will take place on Lake Hernando on Saturday, Nov. 16.


Row, row, row your beast


Inaugural regional Dragon Boat Festival slatedfor Nov. 16


Special to the Chronicle
tart your Citrus County
"Outdoor Adventure" by
attending the first Lake
Hernando Dragon Boat Festi-
val on Saturday, Nov 16.
Capping off a week of activi-
ties in honor of America's vet-
erans, this regional festival
will raise money for the
Wounded Warrior Project, as
well as the Chamber of Com-
merce Scholarship/Outreach
Fund and Citrus County com-
munity youth programs.
Admission is free and there
will be fun for all family mem-
bers with food and crafts
booths, a kids' zone and dragon


boat racing on the lake. Lake
Hernando is at the junction of
U.S. 41 and County Road 486.
Described as the fastest-
growing watersport in the
world, dragon boating features
20 people paddling a 42-foot
boat to the beat of a drummer
sitting on the bow A steersper-
son stands in the stern to guide
the boat
Dragon boating can be a
purely recreational activity or
a highly competitive sport, and
began more than 2,000 years
ago in China.
The Lake Hernando Dragon
Boat Festival will feature club
and community teams compet-
ing for prizes and bragging


rights. Community teams are
forming now. All it takes is 21
people who want to have fun. No
prior experience is necessary
Teams may solicit pledges to
cover the registration fees and
to raise funds for the charities.
Sponsorship opportunities are
also available. Festival staff
will work with corporate or
other potential sponsors to
help form teams.
Practice sessions will be
held during the week before
the festival. Paddles, life vests,
boats, drums and steersper-
sons will be provided for the
practice sessions and all of the
races.
Spectator admission and


PSC plans follow-up meeting


about Duke Energy proposal


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The Florida Public Service
Commission has scheduled a
meeting on Duke Energy's pro-
posed revised settlement
agreement that terminates the
contract for the proposed Levy
County nuclear plant.
The other parties in the set-
tlement are the Office of Public
Counsel, representing Florida
ratepayers, the Florida Indus-
trial Power Users Group, the
Florida Retail Federation and
White Springs Agricultural
Chemicals.
The revisions to the 2012
settlement agreement relate to
the Crystal River nuclear plant
costs, the insurance settle-
ment, the proposed Levy proj-
ect, the future of Crystal River
units 1 and 2 and options for
meeting long-term power
needs.
Duke recently responded to
PSC staff requests for addi-
tional information regarding


the proposed revisions. Duke
acknowledged it received $835
million to settle its insurance
claims pertaining to the shut-
tered Crystal River area nu-
clear plant known as CR3.
The company also reiterated
its reasons for retiring rather
than attempting to repair the
plant. Duke stated it was not
confident the containment
building could be repaired
successfully and the attempted
repair was not cost-effective
for customers. Between Octo-
ber 2009 and March 2011, Duke
spent $176 million on repair
costs.
Aside from the repair issue,
the agreement covers the
planned power output in-
crease at CR3. Between March
1,2012, and July21, 2013, Duke
collected $28.1 million from its
customers under the nuclear
cost recovery law to pay for
that planned improvement.
Also under nuclear cost re-
covery, Duke will have col-
lected approximately $102.8


million by end of 2013 for the
Levy nuclear project. The com-
pany plans to recover a total of
$350 million for the project by
the end of 2017.
"The revised agreement rep-
resents an effective balance
between moderating rate im-
pacts to customers, providing
clarity on recovery of past in-
vestments and allowing us to
move forward with planning
for Florida's energy future,"
said Alex Glenn, Duke Energy
state president, last month
when the agreement was first
announced.
The Sept. 16 PSC meeting
will fall about a week short of
the fourth anniversary of CR3
going dark in 2009. The com-
pany announced it would re-
tire the plant in February of
this year The full commission
hearing on the revised settle-
ment is set for Oct. 16 and 17.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924
or pfaherty@chronicleonline
.com.


parking are free. Food, beer
and wine will be sold. Bring
blankets and chairs.
The event is made possible
through a partnership of Cit-
rus County Commission, the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and High Five
Dragon Boat LLC.
Official hosts for the festival
are Grandmasters Dragon
Boat Club of the Villages and
Nature Coast Dragon Boat
Club of Homosassa.
For further information
about forming a team or be-
coming a sponsor, visit www.
LakeHernandoDragonBoatcom
or call 352-400-0960 or 352-795-
3149.




Key's training

specialist to talk

behavioral help
Special to the Chronicle
Judy Brinkley, former area behavior
alyst for the Agency for Persons with
sabilities and currently training spe-
alist for the Key Training Center, will
eak about behavior issues as experi-
ced by persons with developmental
abilities at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday,
pt. 11, in the Chet Cole Life Enrich-
ent Center at the Key Training Center,
21 Buster Whitton Way, Lecanto.
The presentation is open to the public.
ditional meetings may be scheduled for
rents with individual concerns orquestions.
Teaching appropriate behavior is not
;t a concern for parents of young children,
t for caregivers of adults. Sometimes
rents of young children feel overwhelmed
the health, learning and communica-
n needs they must address, and behav-
ral problems are pushed to the end ofthe
t, especially if the child is very young.
the child matures, becomes bigger,
ore mobile and more verbal, teaching
scipline and the correct ways to interact
th society become a lot more important.
For more information, call Stephanie
)pper at 352-344-0288.


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"Lf(^' " -A- [




A4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday You may need to alter
some of the variables in your life in
order to ease stress and avoid loss in
the year ahead. The right move could
bring high returns, but temptation could
cost you dearly.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Get in-
volved in something that challenges
you. Someone you encounter will give
you an interesting point of view concern-
ing a project you are considering.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Your charm
will entice someone you want to get to
know better. Make plans that will allow
you to show off your smarts and skills,
but refrain from overindulging.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Draw
from your varied and colorful experience
and find a way to use your fund of
knowledge to explore new avenues.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You
should adapt to shifting trends and
make the most of whatever situation
you face. You will attract someone as
spirited as you, who will want to travel
down the same path.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You'll
find it easier to deal with life's many de-
mands if you take better care of your-
self. Working hard can be good, but not
at the expense of your health.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Look for
new ways to use your skills. A change in
the way you earn your living could prove
to be a turning point.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take a
look at interesting investments and pur-
sue the one that seems the best. Re-
open doors that may have been closed
in the past, and you will prosper.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -A partner-
ship will be on shaky ground if you over-
react. Question your reasoning before
you take action.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Do some-
thing you enjoy or spend time with a
person likely to make you laugh. Avoid
stressful situations.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do the
legwork and find out all you can before
pursuing someone or something that
may not be as it appears. False percep-
tions will lead to disappointment.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't
make personal changes that could alter
your looks without serious thought. Take
the path of least resistance until you
know you can achieve positive results.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Protect your
reputation. Uncertainty regarding your
status and personal relationships will
cause confusion.


ENTERTAINMENT


Giffords' rehab
in new music video
PHOENIX -A new music
video shows images of then-
Congresswoman Gabrielle Gif-
fords in the earliest days of her
recovery following injuries from a
2011 shooting.
Giffords is shown working with
a physical therapist in the video
version of the song "Overcomer,"
by gospel singer Mandisa, the
Arizona Republic reported. The
video shows Giffords taking ten-
tative steps in a hospital room
and sitting up in a bed wearing
protective headgear.
Those images had not been
previously released.
The video also features for-
mer Olympic skater Scott
Hamilton, who was treated for
testicular cancer and a benign
brain tumor, and Robin
Roberts, co-host of "Good
Morning America." Last year,
Roberts underwent a bone-mar-
row transplant.
Giffords said in a statement
she was inspired by the song
because its message is "one of
hope, perseverance and faith."

ON THE NET

m To see the video:
http://abcn.ws/15G8V9g


JFK museum to
display replica gown
BOSTON -A paper replica
of the gown worn by Jacqueline
Bouvier when she wed then-
U.S. Sen. John F. Kennedy will
be displayed in Boston to mark
the 60th anniversary of their
nuptials.
The bride wore an ivory silk
taffeta gown with a portrait neck-
line and bouffant skirt for the
Sept. 12, 1953, event in New-
port, R.I.
The gown's original designer


fatk
../ ,


Associated Press
Director Tsai Ming-liang holds the Grand Jury Prize for his film
"Straw Dogs" during the awards photo call Saturday at the
70th edition of the Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy.


was Ann Lowe.
The replica was created by
Belgian artist Isabelle de
Borchgrave with collaboration
from Rita Brown.
Marshall Field's department
store commissioned the replica
in 2004, later donating it to the
JFK Library and Museum.
The replica will be displayed
from Sept. 12 until Nov. 3 at the
John F. Kennedy Presidential Li-
brary and Museum.
The actual gown, now too
fragile for display, was last fea-
tured in a 2003 exhibit.
James Taylor teams
up with choir
SALT LAKE CITY-- It took a
while for it to happen, but James
Taylor has finally teamed up
with the Mormon Tabernacle
Choir on stage.
The pop star sang a dozen
songs Friday night in Salt Lake
City, some with the 360-person


choir, some with the Utah Sym-
phony and some with his touring
combo.
A capacity crowd of 21,000
cheered as he sang some of his
classics "Shower the People,"
"Fire and Rain," and "Carolina in
My Mind," among others.
Taylor raved about the choir,
calling it "a national treasure and
a great gift to the world."
After singing "Lonesome
Road," he said the song had
"died and gone to heaven" with
the choir singing backup to him.
Choir officials first approached
Taylor about performing together
in 2006. Taylor says it "just took
us a long time to find the date,
(but it) was worth the date."
The choir has performed with
other stars from outside the Mor-
mon church over the past
decade, including Sting, Sissel
and Rene Fleming.
-From wire reports


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR I HI LO PR1 HI L
90 71 0.00 NA NA NA K. 87 69


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
ts
ts
s
ts
s
ts
s
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
s
s
s
pc
s
s
pc
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 1 foot or less. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Mostly
sunny today.


89 69 000 '-- NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ixclusvedaly
forecast by: Ig

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
Li High: 92 Low: 69

7 TH MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING

SHigh: 91 Low: 70
Few PM storms, rain chance 30%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
THigh: 92 Low: 71
Few PM storms, rain chance 30%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 92/69
Record 96/64
Normal 91/70
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 1.20 in.
Total for the month 4.00 in.
Total for the year 45.01 in.
Normal for the year 40.40 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 70
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 54%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grasses
Today's count: 6.3/12
Monday's count: 7.9
Tuesday's count: 8.0
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/8 SUNDAY 8:18 2:05 8:43 2:30
9/9 MONDAY 9:14 3:01 9:40 3:27


SEPT. 12
SEPT.12


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:46 a/3:44 a 8:29 p/4:08 p
Crystal River** 6:07 a/1:06 a 6:50 p/1:30 p
Withlacoochee* 3:54 a/11:18 a 4:37 p/11:27 p
Homosassa*** 6:56 a/2:43 a 7:39 p/3:07 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:17a/4:17a 9:15 p/4:50 p
6:38a/1:39a 7:36 p/2:12p
4:25 a/l12:00 p 5:23 p/-
7:27 a/3:16 a 8:25 p/3:49 p


Gulf water
temperature


89
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.47 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.09 38.15 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.31 39.42 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.36 40.48 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


)RECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


pc
pc
pc
s
pc
.23 pc
pc
ts
s
s
pc
.25 pc
pc
s
pc
pc
.01 pc
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
.01 pc
s
ts
pc
pc
pc
ts
.01 s
pc
s
s
ts
s
.50 pc
pc
s
s
pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 90 76 s 92 74
NewYorkCity 80 59 pc 80 56
Norfolk 79 60 pc 88 67
Oklahoma City 98 70 s 97 70
Omaha 89 71 .01 pc 92 73
Palm Springs 96 81 pc 108 83
Philadelphia 79 55 pc 84 55
Phoenix 93 83 ts 97 80
Pittsburgh 80 47 pc 77 55
Portland, ME 79 48 pc 68 42
Portland, Ore 81 56 .26 s 85 61
Providence, R.I. 77 49 pc 77 47
Raleigh 82 59 pc 90 65
Rapid City 97 65 pc 87 63
Reno 90 53 s 88 58
Rochester, NY 66 53 .07 pc 68 47
Sacramento 98 55 s 100 67
St. Louis 94 70 pc 93 71
St. Ste. Marie 74 60 .08 s 64 50
Salt Lake City 87 68 .02 pc 85 67
San Antonio 99 76 pc 95 75
San Diego 84 70 s 84 70
San Francisco 88 62 s 79 63
Savannah 92 69 s 90 72
Seattle 74 63 pc 79 60
Spokane 69 54 pc 79 53
Syracuse 71 52 .01 pc 63 43
Topeka 10069 pc 98 72
Washington 82 60 pc 87 60
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 Mc Cook, Neb. LOW 29 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/75As
Amsterdam 66/52/sh
Athens 87/67/pc
Beijing 77/58/c
Berlin 80/58/pc
Bermuda 83/78/r
Cairo 96/70/s
Calgary 72/54As
Havana 89/74As
Hong Kong 85/77/sh
Jerusalem 81/63/s


Lisbon 76/60/s
London 67/48/sh
Madrid 84/57/pc
Mexico City 69/56/ts
Montreal 61/46/pc
Moscow 61/44/c
Paris 75/48/sh
Rio 79/64/s
Rome 80/72/pc
Sydney 76/60/sh
Tokyo 84/68/sh
Toronto 69/50/pc
Warsaw 74/52/s


X LEGAL NOTICES






Meeting Notices.................. D6



Miscellaneous Notices .......D6




y C IT RULI S COUNTY



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
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Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
0 SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:43P.M.
fSUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:12A.M.
0 7 4 0 MOONRISE TODAY..........................10:08A.M.
SEPT. 19 SEPT. 26 OCT. 4 MOONSET TODAY............................ 9:40 P.M.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 8, the
251st day of 2013. There are 114
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 8,1943, during World
War II, Gen. Dwight E. Eisenhower
announced Italy's surrender; Nazi
Germany denounced Italy's decision
as a cowardly act.
On this date:
In 1565, a Spanish expedition es-
tablished the first permanent Euro-
pean settlement in North America at
present-day St. Augustine, Fla.
In 1892, an early version of "The
Pledge of Allegiance," written by
Francis Bellamy, appeared in "The
Youth's Companion."
In 1951, a peace treaty with Japan
was signed by 49 nations in San
Francisco.
In 1974, President Gerald R. Ford
granted an unconditional pardon to
former President Richard Nixon.
Ten years ago: The Recording In-
dustry Association of America, the
music industry's largest trade group,
filed 261 copyright lawsuits across
the country against Internet users for
trading songs online.
Five years ago: In a pointed but
mostly symbolic expression of dis-
pleasure with Moscow, President
George W. Bush canceled a once-
celebrated civilian nuclear coopera-
tion deal with Russia.
One year ago: Strong storms
pummeled the East Coast, spawning
a pair of tornadoes in the New York
City boroughs of Brooklyn and
Queens.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian
Sid Caesar is 91. Ventriloquist Willie
Tyler is 73. Actor Alan Feinstein is
72. Actress Heather Thomas is 56.
Singer Aimee Mann is 53. Gospel
singer Darlene Zschech is 48. TV
personality Brooke Burke-Charvet is
42. Actor Martin Freeman is 42.
Actor David Arquette is 42. Actor
Larenz Tate is 38. Actor Nathan
Corddry is 36. Singer Pink is 34.
Actor Jonathan Taylor Thomas is 32.
Thought for Today: "Censorship
is the height of vanity." Martha
Graham, American modern dance
pioneer (1893-1991).




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BOXING
Continued from Page Al

boxing since 1867 and
there are 12 of them, but to
boxing purists, it is how
boxing is done pure and
simple.
Dream and crash
To purists like the late
Jaime Collazo of Her-
nando, there was no rea-
son to veer from those
rules.
In fact, his mission state-
ment was: "We teach box-
ing; the sport of fighting
with fists, with padded
gloves in a roped square
ring according to the
Queensberry Rules.
Strictly boxing."
And, for all his seven
decades of life, Collazo -
or Mr C, as his pupils
called him boxed,
trained, talked and dreamt
about opening a boxing
gym an old-school gym
- where families could
learn the finer points of
the sport.
In February 2013, and in
his 70th year, Collazo real-
ized his dream when he
purchased a building at
2700 N. Florida Ave. to
open Lake Side Boxing.
"We were opened May 1


and on June 3 he broke his
neck (C6 and 7) and died
July 4," said Collazo's
widow, Linda Collazo.
Collazo was riding his
scooter to the gym from
home when he ran over a
pebble and crashed.
She said her husband
was so excited about open-
ing the gym and "we all
thought he didn't have any
paralysis from the acci-
dent, but when we went
back to the doctor's for a
follow-up visit, they said
there was something
wrong and they needed to
operate," Mrs. Collazo said.
It was during that opera-
tion or soon after that Col-
lazo developed an infection,
pneumonia. A few days
later, he was dead.
Now what?
According to Mrs. Col-
lazo, she met Collazo 31
years ago and the two had
been married the past 25
and a half years.
"Ever since I met him,
all he talked about was
owning his own gym. He
wanted to have a place for
children and their parents
to come and learn boxing
and have fun. He looked at
the gym as a way of giving
to the kids," Mrs. Collazo
said.
She said Collazo was


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"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"


YOU ARE NOT ALONE
22% of seniors over the
age of 70 suffer from
memory loss.
WE ARE HERE
TO HELP.
SUPERIOR I
RESIDENCES
14 M] BB55B


When you come here to train,
we emphasize power punching
and cardio and people love it.
Bruce Lang
one of three trainers originally hired by
Lake Side Gym founder James Collazo.


MA'THEW BECK/Chronicle
James Collazo is pictured in his gym before his accident.
His wife said Collazo's life-long dream was to open a
boxing gym.


born in Puerto Rico but
moved to the Bronx at age
5, where he picked up his
passion for boxing. Collazo
later moved to Massachu-
setts, where they met, and
he worked for
Sealtest/Good Humor/


Breyer for 37 years.
Fifteen years ago, the
couple moved here, but
Collazo was still on the
lookout for young talent to
tutor
Mrs. Collazo said her
husband found what he


thought was the perfect
place and three trainers -
Aaron Rodriquez, Bruce
Lang and Corvin "Poncho"
Henry who became as
passionate about the gym
as Collazo.
"Those three kept visit-
ing him daily at the hospi-
tal and he would always
ask 'How is the gym?' But
after he passed, we all
kind of asked, 'What are
we going to do about the
gym?"' Mrs. Collazo said.
"The guys decided they
wanted to keep it going."
Legacy
Today, the gym contin-
ues to thrive. Families are
signing up, trainees can be
found pounding away at
the punching bags.
The gym has the feel of
an old-school facility
There is no air condition-
ing. The heat inside, heavy
and thick, attacks as you


enter; here, everyone
sweats.
The gym also has its first
professional fighter a
lightweight from Puerto
Rico, Hector Marengo. He
recently won a bout in Or-
lando via technical knock-
out in the second round.
"We are trying to keep
doing what Mr C. always
talked about," trainer
Lang said.
"When you come here to
train, we emphasize power
punching and cardio and
people love it. But every-
body is working well to-
gether to keep things
going," Lang added.
Henry, who was driving
by one day and saw Col-
lazo's vehicle parked at
the new building with box-
ing signage on the vehicle,
stopped and the two
chatted.
See LEGACY/Page A8


MANAGER'S SPECIALS


74/


2011 FORD E250 2010 LINCOLN MKX 2010 LINCOLN MKT 2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL
This one is work ready. N3T349B All the lincoln luxury. NP5876 Affordable lincoln. N3T401A Only 41 miles on t his hybrid. N3C188A
$20,668 $26,968 $29,968 29,988

E!Cu Hwy. 44 W. Inverness W CR4486 I
jQ "(352) 726-123144 Inverness
n NickNicholas N
000G02G SSALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 --_______________v__


BTASJA MEGTDIM

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 AS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Augustine
Ambrose, 77
SUMMERFIELD
Augustine R. Ambrose,
age 77, of Summerfield,
Fla., died Sept. 1,2013. Pri-
vate arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.

Joyce
Boothe, 49
OCALA
Joyce Boothe, age 49, of
Ocala, Fla., died Aug. 26,
2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.

Russell
Hadley, 61
HOMOSASSA
Russell W Hadley, 61, of
Homosassa, passed away
Aug. 29,2013. He was born
to Willis and Kathleen
(Surface) Hadley in Indi-
anapolis, Ind.,Jan. 21,1952.
Russell Hadley taught
soccer and Little League
baseball in Citrus County
He was a member of the
Fraternal
Order of
Eagles
Post 4272
and a SAL
member
of Ameri-
can Legion
Post 155.
Russell Russell
Hadley was an
employee of Progress En-
ergy for 39 years. He re-
tired as plant manager on
Sept 1, 2012.
He is survived by his
wife Lin Hadley; Russ's
two sons, John Hadley of
Providence, RI., and Chad
Hadley ofAntioch, Ill., and
their children, Keiran,
Liam and Jack Hadley;
two stepsons, Giuseppe
Cimmino of Lawton, Okla.,
and Gino Cimmino of
Glenville, N.Y, and their
children Angelina, Gio-
vanni and Nikko Cimmino.
His mother Kathleen
(Surface) Hadley was senior
regent of the Women of the
Moose Clearwater Chapter
995, where they lived until
moving to Inverness, Fla.
A memorial will be held
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept.
21 at VFW Post 8189 on
Veterans Road, 352-795-5012,
where his wife Lin Hadley
is a lifetime member In
lieu of flowers donations
to be sent to Crystal River
Little League, PO. Box 1775,
Crystal River, FL 34423.

Joseph
Leshinski, 80
HOMOSASSA
Joseph Leshinski, age
80, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Sept. 6, 2013. Private
cremation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.

James
Wilson Jr., 86
LECANTO
James Wilson Jr, age 86,
of Lecanto, Fla., died Sept 2,
2013. Private arrangements
are under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.

Eddy
Martinez, 57
BEVERLY HILLS
Eddy Martinez, 57, of Bev-
erly Hills, Fla., died Sept.
4, 2013, at his residence.
Visiting hours for Mr.
Martinez will be from 10 a.m.
until noon Monday, Sept. 9,
2013, with a service at 12
p.m. Burial will take place
at Hills of Rest Cemetery,
Floral City, Fla. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,'
Candy Phillips


563-3206
cphillipsgchronicleonfinecorn
Coin t imfo
pain ad *is
Fuins Iday
n g i sI '


Mark
Varney, 59
CRYSTAL RIVER
Award-winning journal-
ist, broadcaster, and musi-
cian Mark Nesbit Varney
died Aug.
^ ~26, 2013,
r ^in Home-
< rville, Ga.
He was 59
years old.
He was
Born Oct.
1, 1953, in
Mark Abbeville,
Varney S.C. His
family moved to Crystal
River, Fla., in 1958 and he
was a lifelong Citrus
County resident. He at-
tended Crystal River
School (K-12) and gradu-
ated in 1971. He studied
speech broadcasting at the
University of South
Florida in Tampa and, for
decades, was a familiar
voice on Citrus and Mar-
ion County radio stations.
He worked in local televi-
sion as well. As a journal-
ist, he reported for
newspapers in Citrus and
Hernando counties. As a
freelance writer, he wrote
on music and literature for
a number of regional, na-
tional and international
publications. As a musi-
cian, he played drums and
sang with touring blues
bands The Accelerators
and The James Peterson
Band. Most recently, he
was a member of Marion
County-based Sugar Bear,
and was active in the
Ocala music community
His interests included col-
lecting record albums and
books, painting, drawing,
writing songs, playing gui-
tar, reading, writing poetry
classic films, swimming,
snorkeling and bicycling.
He is survived by an
older brother, Russell Var-
ney (of Temple Terrace);
an older sister, Elaine
Varney-Panuska (of Eustis,
and Inverness, Nova Sco-
tia); a younger brother,
Brad Varney (of Crystal
River); nephews, Matthew
Panuska (of Cape Breton,
Nova Scotia) and Adam
Varney (of Temple Ter-
race); a niece, Cass
Panuska-Borsting (of San
Francisco, Calif); and two
grandnephews.
A member of the First
Baptist Church of Crystal
River, he was a practicing
New Testament Christian/
Zen Buddhist.

Manuel
Patino, 79
SPRING HILL
Manuel J. Patino, age 79,
of Spring Hill, Fla., died
Aug. 29, 2013. Private cre-
mation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.

Daniel
Rails, 82
CRYSTAL RIVER
Daniel Rails, 82, of Crys-
tal River, Fla., died Aug.
31,2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
Ernest
Stephenson, 59
INVERNESS
Ernest M. Stephenson,
age 59, of Inverness, Fla.,
died Aug. 18, 2013. Private
cremation is under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.


Launch successful, if shaky


Associated Press

NASAs newest robotic
explorer rocketed into
space late Friday in an
unprecedented moon-
shot from Virginia that
dazzled sky watchers
along the East Coast.
But the LADEE space-
craft quickly ran into
equipment trouble, and
while NASA assured
everyone early Saturday
that the lunar probe was
safe and on a perfect
track for the moon, offi-
cials acknowledged the
problem needs to be re-
solved in the next two to
three weeks.
S. Peter Worden, di-
rector of NASA's Ames
Research Center in Cali-
fornia, told reporters
he's confident everything
will be working properly
in the next few days.
LADEE's reaction
wheels were turned on to
orient and stabilize the
spacecraft, which was
spinning too fast after it
separated from the final
rocket stage, Worden said.
But the computer auto-
matically shut the wheels
down, apparently because
of excess current. He
speculated the wheels
may have been running
a little fast.
The LADEE space-
craft, which is charged
with studying the lunar
atmosphere and dust,
soared aboard an un-
manned Minotaur rocket
a little before midnight
from Virginia's Eastern
Shore.



IBM

moving

retirees off

health plan
Associated Press

IBM plans to move
many retired workers off
its health plan and give
them money to buy cov-
erage on a health-insur-
ance exchange. The move
is part of a corporate trend
away from providing tra-
ditional retiree health
benefits as costs rise.
The company said it
acted after projections
showed that costs under
its current plan for
Medicare-eligible re-
tirees will triple by 2020
and that the increases
would be paid by re-
tirees through premiums
and out-of-pocket costs.
An IBM spokesman
said Saturday that the
change will affect about
110,000 retirees.
Under the change,
IBM will make annual
contributions to health-
retirement accounts. Re-
tirees would use the money
to buy Medicare Advan-
tage or supplemental
Medigap policies through
a private exchange.
A Kaiser Family Foun-
dation report issued last
month found that among
companies with at least
200 workers, 28 percent
thatprovide health benefits
also offer retiree coverage.
The authors said there
could be "a significant
change in the way that
employers approach
health benefits and the
way employees get cov-
erage, with employers play-
inga less active role."


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The Lunar Atmosphere
and Dust Environment Ex-
plorer or LADEE, is taking
a roundabout path to the
moon, making three huge
laps around Earth before
getting close enough to
pop into lunar orbit. It is
expected to reach the
moon Oct. 6.
Scientists want to learn
the composition of the
moon's ever-so-delicate at-
mosphere and how it
might change over time.
Another puzzle, dating
back decades, is whether
dust actually levitates
from the lunar surface.
The $280 million moon-
orbiting mission will last
six months and end with a
suicide plunge into the
moon for LADEE.
The 844-pound spacecraft
has three science instru-
ments as well as laser com-
munication test equipment
that could revolutionize
data relay NASA hopes to
eventually replace its tra-
ditional radio systems with
laser communications, which
would mean faster band-
width using significantly less
power and smaller devices.


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An unmanned Minotaur rocket launches off from NASA's
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on Wallops Island, Va.


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Obituaries


A6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sept. 9to 13 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sau-
sage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal variety
and toast, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot dog, ham-
burger sliders, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, potato
smiles, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, Goldie's
Grab N Go (turkey), turkey
super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
chilled strawberry cups, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, moz-
zarella maxstix, Italian super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken Alfredo with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled strawberry cups,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, pepperoni pizza,
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
peach cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, milk and juice
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, fajita chicken with
rice and ripstick, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Hamburger slid-
ers, turkey wrap, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
baby carrots, potato smiles,
chilled strawberry cup, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken Al-
fredo with ripstick, pepperoni
pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled applesauce, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
garden salad, tangy baked
beans, chilled peach cups,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Hot dog, breaded
chicken sandwich, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, sweet po-
tato crosstrax, flavored Crai-
sins, fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate


breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage,
egg and cheese biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sau-
sage pizza, MVP breakfast, ce-


real variety and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese on loco bread, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, green beans, cucum-
bers, celery, potato roasters,
applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken


Buying Gold & Platinum
All items including charm
bracelets, old settings,
class rings, dental gold
and broken jewelry.


with rice, turkey and gravy
over noodles with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Italian super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, cucum-
ber coins, peas, baby carrots,
seasoned potato wedges,
strawberry cup, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, baked beans, chilled
baked beans, potato roasters,
flavored Craisins, juice, milk.


Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, fresh
broccoli, steamed broccoli,
baby carrots, seasoned po-
tato wedges, peach cup,
juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, chicken
Alfredo with ripstick, pizza,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, cold corn salad,
sweet corn, potato roasters,


strawberry cup, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbe-
cued chicken, Lyonnaise po-
tatoes, California-blend
vegetables, sugar cookie,
whole-grain wheat bun with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Macaroni and
cheese with turkey ham,
green peas, parslied carrots,
peaches, slice rye bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Lemon-
pepper baked chicken breast,
potatoes au gratin, mixed
vegetables, apple juice, gra-
ham crackers, slice rye bread


It's as easy as 1 2 3


SAFE
SMART


1. Bring any of the things below,
2. Our Estate Specialist will make an offer,


SIMPLE 3, If you decide to sell, we will pay you on the
spot, The more you sell, the better you'll feel!


~%.


Buying Diamonds
All sizes and shapes.
We even buy chipped and
broken stones.


Buying Old Sterling Buying Autographs &
All types of sterling. No need Vintage Photos


to polish it. Sorry, no silver
plated items.


Single pieces or collections,
Unusual images are best.


Buying All Jewelry
No matter what it is, if it's
real, we're interested. We
often buy silver jewelry but
we rarely buy costume items,


Buying Coins &
Old Paper Money
Please don't polish coins.
We'll help sort them for you.


Buying Old Watches
Most brands and types
of pocket watches and
wristwatches, They don't
need to be working.


Buying Old Paintings
Any subject (framed or
unframed). Even damaged
paintings can be OK.
Preferably Pre-1930,


F r me] i i a e ]m inf o r m a lt [Bio n l l ; 6 6 7 82:T3 2'1


The event is being held in conjunction with Lindstrom & McKenney, Inc., an international estate and buying organization.
All sales are confidential. For more information, visit www.lindstrommckenney.com. 2013 Lindstrom & McKenney, all rights reserved.


G02-1019831


with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Pork riblet with
barbecue sauce on hamburger
bun, baked beans, yellow
corn, mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chef salad with
ham, cheese, whole boiled
egg and tomato, French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
mixed fruit, slice whole-grain
bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


U /' nc MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.





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Tuesday through Thursday




September 10-12






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I I


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


High-stakes week on Syria LEGACY
Continued from PagesA5


Obama to speak

to nation Tuesday

Associated Press

WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama faces a high-stakes
week of trying to convince a skepti-
cal Congress and a war-wearyAmer-
ican public that they should back
him on a military strike against
Syria.
His administration came under
pressure Saturday from European
officials to delay possible action
until U.N. inspectors report their
findings about an Aug. 21 chemical
attack that Obama blames on the
Assad government
Foreign ministers meeting in
Lithuania with Secretary of State
John Kerry did endorse a "clear and
strong response" to an attack they
said strongly points to President
Bashar Assad's government
Kerry welcomed the "strong state-
ment about the need for accountabil-
ity" But the EU did not specify what
an appropriate response would be.
Obama received an update Satur-
day afternoon from his chief of staff,
Denis McDonough, on the adminis-
tration's latest outreach to members
of Congress, the White House said.
Obama called a bipartisan group
of lawmakers on Friday and was ex-
pected to make more calls this
weekend.
The days ahead represent one of
the most intense periods of congres-
sional outreach for Obama, who's
not known for investing heavily in
consultations with Capitol Hill.
Kerry held talks in Paris with


MARKET
Continued from PageAl

Citrus County The two
federally chartered com-
panies finance and pur-
chase mortgages, but do
not originate consumer
loans.
"Fannie Mae becomes
the investor after we buy
mortgages from lenders, so
(lenders) have more capi-
tal and can issue more
loans to homeowners,"
company spokeswoman
Callie Dosberg explained.
"So as the investor, we own
the loan and the risk."
Freddy Mac did not have
county-specific data avail-
able, but has a current
Florida inventory of ap-
proximately 6,700 homes.
"The good news is we
have to get through the
process, you have to get rid
of the back inventory,
which is holding down
prices of other property,"
Bega said. "It's huge com-
petition."
She added while prices
are less that other homes
on the market, some are
not in as good condition as
occupied homes.
For July 2013, the me-
dian sale price for a fore-
closed home was $61,250,
down 12.5 percent from
2012; while the median
price for a traditional sale


Associated Press
Waving a Syrian flag, protesters against U.S. military action in Syria march
to Capitol Hill on Saturday from the White House in Washington, D.C.


French Foreign Minister Laurent
Fabius, and said at a joint news con-
ference that "this is not the time to
be silent spectators to slaughter"
and "this is not the time to allow a
dictator unfettered use of some of
the heinous weapons on Earth."
Fabius said, "Punishment is not at
odds with a political solution. ...
BasharAssad will not participate in
any negotiation as long as he sees
himself as invincible."
Just back from a European trip,
Obama is working to salvage a pol-
icy whose fate he's placed in law-
makers' hands.
His administration's lobbying cam-
paign culminates Tuesday, the
evening before a critical vote is ex-
pected in the Senate. Obama will ad-
dress the nation from the White
House to make his case for military
action.
Dozens of people opposed to


was $122,000, up about 16
percent over last year
For real estate agents
and brokers, selling fore-
closed homes can be more
complicated.
"There's more paper-
work, it's more of a
process, you have to follow
the rules," Bega said.
And with that type of
sale, she said, there is no
emotion or owner
involvement
Lingering inventory
Bega explained Florida
will have lingering fore-
closure inventory because
the process takes longer
She said it can take more
than two years for a fore-
closed home to get to mar-
ket, which means it will
take longer to get through
the inventory in the
pipeline.
For example, using Cit-
rus County Circuit Court
figures, some of the 1,562
foreclosures filed in 2012
could be expected to hit
the real estate market in
2014. Another 727 foreclo-
sure cases were filed
through Aug. 31 of this
year County foreclosure
figures followed the state
trend, peaking in May with
107.
Cheryl Lambert, presi-
dent of the Realtors Asso-
ciation of Citrus County,
noted the local market had
been heavy with a lot of


Obama's call for military action
demonstrated outside the White
House. Speakers chanting "They say
more war We say no war," said the
picket line marks a line Congress
should not cross as it prepares to
vote on the issue.
Obama left the White House dur-
ing the protest, traveling by car to
Andrews Air Force Base to play golf
with three aides.
A passionate debate in Congress,
which returns to work Monday after
its summer break, already is under
way
On Wednesday, the first show-
down Senate vote is likely over a
resolution authorizing the "limited
and specified use" of U.S. armed
forces against Syria for no more
than 90 days and barring American
ground troops from combat A final
vote in the 100-member chamber is
expected at week's end.


bank foreclosures, but
they have moved a lot of
their inventory She said
there is a new way of pro-
cessing foreclosures
through the judicial sys-
tem a mediation
process to help people -
that is causing some delay
But the time it takes to
bring a foreclosed home to
market could speed up fol-
lowing a May ruling by the
Florida Supreme Court to
reduce the backlog of fore-
closure cases. It allows
chief circuit court judges
to appoint magistrates to
handle residential foreclo-
sure cases.
"Our foreclosure inven-
tory levels are down over-
all primarily because of a


reduction in delinquen-
cies," said Wells Fargo
spokeswoman Veronica
Clemons. "Many pro-
grams/assistance have
been put in place to help
people manage their fi-
nances: modifications,
principle reduction, etc."
Brad German with
Freddy Mac concurred.
"It's important to note
that our inventory is
steadily declining," he
said, "thanks to a combi-
nation of improving mar-
kets and sales promotions
by our Home Steps sales
division."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


After that, Henry came
back and kept coming
back, and is now one of
the main trainers at the
facility.
During an August
evening, he had his two
sons in tow, Chris, 7, and
C.J., 10.
The kids donned pro-
tective gear and were
sparring with other kids
in their respective age
groups.
"You know there are a
lot of kids out there who
do not have an outlet and
this place provides that
This is great for the kids
and parents, too. Like Mr
C used to say, if I can get
one kid out of the street, I
have done good," Henry
added.
Rodriquez said he was
one of those troublesome
kids who even spent some
time in prison.
"But this changed
everything for me. I love
boxing and it keeps your
mind focused and busy



FACTORS
Continued from Page Al

type of filing by state,
county and metropolitan
statistical area.
"Some foreclosure fil-
ings entered into the
database during the
month may have been
recorded in previous
months.
"RealtyTrac's report
incorporates documents
filed in all three phases of
foreclosure: default-
notice of default and lis
pendens; auction no-
tice of trustee sale and
notice of foreclosure sale;
and real estate owned, or
REO properties (that
have been foreclosed on
and repurchased by a
bank).
"If more than one fore-
closure document is re-
ceived for a property
during the month, only
the most recent filing is
counted in the report.
"The report also checks
if the same type of docu-
ment was filed against a
property in a previous


You don't have time to be
thinking about bad
things," Rodriquez said.
Andy McEwen, who is a
deputy with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
said he discovered the
gym by chance and
walked in and decided to
sign up.
This day, McEwen
brought along his son
Sam, 10, who is school-
mates with C.J. Between
sparring exercises,
McEwen said he is glad
he found the place.
"The atmosphere is
great. It is so family-
oriented and you get to
lose weight and get fit at
the same time," McEwen
said.
Mrs. Collazo said she is
glad the group is sticking
it out
"He must be looking
down and saying 'This is
exactly how I would have
done it' After the tragedy,
it's taken a life of its own.
His legacy lives on."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter AB. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.



month. If so, and if that
previous filing occurred
within the estimated fore-
closure timeframe for the
state the property is in,
the report does not count
the property in the cur-
rent month."
"Typically, when
pulling from the court
system, you are only get-
ting the initial foreclo-
sure notice," said Daren
Blomquist, RealtyTrac
vice president
He added that, particu-
larly in Florida, it's not
uncommon to see a
lender/attorney refile a
foreclosure notice if the
original notice was
kicked back for bad docu-
mentation.
"We don't count that
again as a new foreclo-
sure notice," Blomquist
said.
Shelley Sansone, with
the Citrus County Clerk of
Court and Comptroller
Office, confirmed the in-
dividual foreclosures do
not show up more than
once unless the lis pen-
dens is amended; then
the office would record
the amended lis pendens.


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AS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


NATION/LOCAL


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E-cigarettes as good


as nicotine patches


MARIA CHENG
AP medical writer

LONDON Electronic
cigarettes worked just as
well as nicotine patches to
help smokers quit, accord-
ing to the first study to
compare them.
E-cigarettes are battery-
operated products that
look like real cigarettes
and turn nicotine into a
vapor inhaled by the user
Since the devices hit the
market nearly a decade
ago, sales have spiked so
quickly some analysts pre-
dict they will outsell tradi-
tional cigarettes within a
decade. E-cigarettes are
often marketed as a less
harmful alternative to tra-
ditional smokes and come
in flavors including cinna-
mon, vanilla and cherry
"This research provides
an important benchmark
for e-cigarettes," said
Chris Bullen, director of
the National Institute for
Health Innovation at the
University of Auckland in
New Zealand, the study's
lead author Until now,
there has been little infor-
mation about the effective-
ness or safety of
e-cigarettes. "We have now
shown they are about as
effective as a standard
nicotine replacement
product."
Bullen and colleagues
recruited 657 adult smok-
ers in Auckland who
wanted to quit for the
study Nearly 300 got nico-
tine-containing e-ciga-
rettes while roughly the
same number got nicotine
patches. Just over 70 peo-
ple got placebo e-ciga-
rettes without any
nicotine. Each group used
the e-cigarettes or patches
for 13 weeks.
After six months, similar
rates of smokers 6 per-
cent to 7 percent man-
aged to quit after using
either the nicotine-contain-
ing e-cigarettes or patches.
Only 4 percent of smokers
using the placebo e-ciga-
rettes successfully quit.


Among smokers who
hadn't managed to quit,
nearly 60 percent of those
using e-cigarettes had cut
down the number of ciga-
rettes smoked by at least
half versus 41 percent of
those using nicotine
patches.
Smokers were also
much bigger fans of the e-
cigarettes; nearly 90 per-
cent of users said they
would recommend them to
a friend compared to just
over half of people who got
patches.
Researchers also found
similar rates of side effects
in smokers that used the e-
cigarettes and the patches.
The most common side ef-
fect in all groups was
breathing problems.
The study was published
online Sunday in the jour-
nal Lancet and presented
at a meeting of the Euro-
pean Respiratory Society
in Barcelona, Spain.
The e-cigarettes used in
the study were provided
free by the company and
the study was paid for by
the Health Research
Council of New Zealand, a
government founder


Egypt strikes at militants


Associated Press

CAIRO Egyptian helicopter
gunships and tanks pounded sus-
pected hideouts and weapon
caches of Islamic militants, killing
nine people Saturday in the north-
ern Sinai Peninsula in what locals
say is the largest operation in the
lawless region for years.
Officials say that the military is
hunting hundreds of militants be-
lieved to be responsible for a series
of attacks in the region they overran
after the fall of autocrat Hosni
Mubarak in 2011. The militants, the
officials say, belong to a number of
well-known al-Qaida-inspired
groups that seek the establishment
of an Islamic Caliphate in northern
Sinai, a region bordering Israel and
the Gaza Strip.
Attacks in the region have in-
creased following the July 3 mili-
tary coup that toppled President
Mohammed Morsi, an Islamist,
prompting the military offensive.
Early Saturday residents said they
saw winding columns of trucks and
armored vehicles pour into the area.
Some said they hadn't seen soldiers
on foot in their villages in decades.
Communications were jammed for
hours, as authorities seized control
of two telephone exchanges.
Military helicopters hovered
overhead in a dozen villages con-
centrated near two border towns of
Rafah and Sheikh Zuweyid, secu-


50 km

-gpHatck i.iat
acos seeavlae


rity officials said. Airstrikes tar-
geted shacks believed to be gather-
ing points of militants, they said.
Soldiers later stormed homes
searching for suspected fighters.
"Successive strikes are aimed at
causing paralysis of the militant
groups and cutting communications
between each other," a security offi-


cial said. "The offensive is carried
out within a timeframe where there
will be periods of calm for intelli-
gence before resuming once again."
"We aim for cleansing the whole
region of militants and prevent
them from coming back," he added.
The officials spoke on condition of
anonymity as they were not author-
ized to publicly brief journalists.
In a statement, Army spokesman
Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali said
nine suspected militants were killed
Saturday and nine others detained.
Earlier, another official said
"dozens" were wounded in the
Sinai offensive. Conflicting casualty
figures come from militants taking
away the corpses of their comrades
and treating their wounded, a secu-
rity official said. Smoke could be
seen rising from villages and troops
set up a cordon to prevent militants
from escaping as others combed the
area, he said.
Troops arrested a number of sus-
pected militants but others managed
to escape to mountainous areas in
central Sinai, an official said.
In the past, militants used a vast
network of underground tunnels
linking Egypt with Gaza as a way to
escape security crackdowns. How-
ever, over the past two months, the
military has destroyed more than
80 percent of them, stemming the
flow of weapons, militants and
goods into Gaza, a territory under
an Israeli-imposed blockade.


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WORLD


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Israel Torres keeps his eye on a bag used to hone hand-eye coordination in the sweltering Lake Side Boxing gym.





FOCUSED FURY


F or most of his life, Jaime Collazo aka "Mr. C" dreamed
of owning his own boxing gym. Earlier this year, he realized
that dream when he opened Lake Side Boxing in Hernando.
Collazo died following an accident just weeks after the gym
opened. But his legacy of teaching youngsters the art of boxing
lives on within the walls of the small, old-school gym.
Several trainers carry on Collazo's vision, educating their young
students on the sweet science and molding athletes who range
in skill level from beginner to professional. Students are held to
a strict set of rules intended to shape their character and teach
perseverance, endurance, commitment, hard work and patience.


Trainer Rick Mendigutia keeps a close eye on two of his young boxers as they spar.


Hayes Gray gets instruction on his form.


The lone professional who trains at Lake Side Boxing is Hector Marengo.
Here Marengo, right, works outside of the gym with his trainer Bruce Lang.



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RULES
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Josh Riemer hits the heavy bag during a workout at the gym, the rules of
the gym behind him a reminder of the discipline expected of the boxers.


AlO SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013



















uttinj




'Maze Master'


stalks fall fun


across country


ALLEN G. BREED -
AP National Writer . d
FUQUAY-VARINA, N.C. ... '
T--imothy Day ?
isn't exactly
sick of corn \ .
by the end of
the summer, but... 4 J


"If I had a penny every time I've
heard, 'This is a-MAZE-ing,' I'd cer-
tainly be rich by now," he said with a
chuckle.
During the past couple of months,
Day has cut more than 50 corn mazes.
Someone else does the designs, but
there's definitely some artistry in the
way he spins that steering knob.
"My paintbrush is a rototiller" Day
said. "And a tractor hooked to it."
Most people associate corn mazes
with Halloween, but the work starts
long before October
Day's season began the last week
in June. Since then, he and his part-
ner have been as far north as On-
tario, Canada, as far south as Florida,
and to "almost every state between
here and there."
"It's not out of the ordinary for us
to drive 3,000 or 4,000 miles in five
days and cut out 10 or 12 corn mazes
in that amount of time," said Day,
who lives in Edinburg, Va., and who's
been doing this since 2005. "Our
truck is our hotel. We actually sleep
in the truck most of the time. We
keep either the tractor driving or the


Timothy Day stops in a Fuquay-
Varina, N.C., corn field to check his
computer on Saturday, Aug. 24. The
Virginia man travels the country for
Maize Quest, using GPS equipment to
cut out elaborate mazes for the fall
tourist season.

truck driving, one or the other One of
us is driving something almost 24
hours a day"
Day cuts for Maize Quest out of
New Park, Pa. Company owner Hugh
McPherson said this season has been
a logistical nightmare.
"The rain has been sending us to
scheduling haywire for the cutting


DREAM
VACATIONS
t'Xo~o (oir^esC

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


- <*J
U 4
i*^ "


I 'rew.";
'- Said
f'" M,:Phers,:n. jkjl
*F MLizeM.ister"
A.I He id D.\ i Li
*^jl .'^ L',er le ittinLks
the iI 'it n,. I'
:I- : h 11 tile (O-1' A
l,2ht ,r'oi lth s.tj,
iiItine. ,the pLii
g 1'rowi 1k in Ithe
(lit
D, 1\ likes t,,- ii
Mmheln it'. ).iilt
wh he t-hie h. blit ti
les. t you can fe l t ae
He's Allerll -ii l




my eye willrunylh.low.
the p lie en t, :f: h
li .t Let .i ,'re lll. i
saiid [Di\. wh,,i ri
routil)Ielll tills e'll
Memphis, Tenn.
where the pollen is so thic
eyes ... you can feel the gri
eyeballs and, literally for t
my eyes will run yellow"
Once he gets to a farm, it
routine.
First, he drives around tl
perimeter to establish the
aries for the GPS system.']
the design into that shape,
computer does the rest.
"There's very little room
in our corn mazes," he said
tight-packed. The trails are
together So a little mistake
through a whole wall and c


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with
a brief description of the
trip.
If it's selected as a
winner, it will be pub-
lished in the Sunday
Chronicle. At the end of
the year, a panel of
judges will select the
best photo during the


a.2"


rthle vhi:l 'Il-iIJze"
\Vith e%% ic-le i11n.. D..-\ %- ihi:
I^l nn l n(Ii -, i pl ( f L' h)111 neI thle rest ,I
thle .ejr Ih.l t, ,'1 1 w ith i ljwn-
"The iiio\'er And o''imij' oIl\II he'll jrri\ e
to filled t ittht le fiel(d'-, not '|111ite bi
,i\e to I.tj, enll l'lh to jit 'ollll'(Iojte the jrtlt'i .
hedIIle ti \ i' fn
.t ist thle ".A d then 1 Let ti pl.\ a little bit of
`e If it'. t)ll (le-.iner on the tI.l" he si id "It'K
it \illI kind o fii liwhen thit hIppens. til-l
pjths hee's Most ,f ithe w: ork tLikes pli -e be-
tween ii1)lp jnd 1iindu ini Bult D. \
it tile 1o:0 hI been kno \1n to liut iin thle (ljrk
1isHt- or ioi'\e 'oIt to tri'it till iiiore" he
l t'- not Sild. hoist L. thle little lit:k I)-\ in
I rem','nlb hiH riLht hind
:e tlhe Orm SOiiietileS. LettiILt tilhe Iob Is tlhe
hirdet lpirt iln j reientl Sjtillird'\.
\wliere thlit DjL \ '. tnil :k liiped ilto tthil, little
es le, 1 bedloolll c ollllllllilt S.Aitllh A
tilI\ rj.sh." RileiLh i-.t ibetfre djL\n
n i ilto thAt He \% ..i. i|)ppI) ed to liut lthe field jt
l"Olltside N .\l.Iol" F- iIII.\ Fjr 'III O---i Aii o !i i. l- llt
"It gets to a band of thunderstorms turned him
'k in your away He was scheduled to do an-
t on your other maze in Chesnee, S.C., the fol-
three days lowing Friday morning, and decided
to hit Naylor before dusk.
t's all fairly But just outside Charlotte, Day's
pickup truck started giving him trou-
;he field's ble. He'd just swapped out the trans-
bound- mission a few days earlier, and now
Then he fits the new one was going out on him.
and the Not wanting to let Robert Naylor
down again, Day picked his way
a for error across the state driving 15 miles,
d. "They're stopping to let the truck cool down,
e close to then doing another 15 miles.
e breaks "It took me 15 hours to get here
changes when it should have taken four," the
bleary-eyed redhead with the day's
growth of beard said.
The majority of mazes Day cuts are
about 5 or 6 acres, though he's done
....... fields as large as 13 acres. The stand
of corn at Naylor Family Farms is
-. just shy of 10.
> Naylor went with a pirate theme
J last year This season, he chose a
AMj maze called "Escape from Egypt,"
4-,":. '. with pyramids, palm trees and a
; giant camel at the center
' This is Naylor's third year doing a
Smaze. He said it takes him a couple
Yy of weeks to memorize the path.
"It's easy to get disoriented, even if
you have your map," he said as
turkey buzzards circle overhead.
'And that's the point of it, I guess. It's
kind of fun when you get lost if
you're not in a hurry"
Day isn't just a Maize Quest em-
ployee. He's also a client
'At ~ His brother, Jonathan, runs Bridge-
mont Farm, a 500-acre spread in Vir-
ginia's picturesque Shenandoah
Valley, where the family raises corn,
soybeans and beef cattle. Day cut
their design in July
The 12-acre field is divided into
two interconnected mazes "The
Great Train Adventure," with a giant
steam locomotive, and "The Di-
nosaur Adventure," featuring a
Associated Press Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex.


year and that photo-
graph will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


The Idle-Hour Ranch has an African safari-themed corn maze made by Maize Quest in Troy, Ohio.


Hump birthdayy

Steven and Sydelle Levy of Homosassa went on a vacation to Egypt to
celebrate Steven's birthday. The trip of a lifetime included tours of the Giza
pyramids and the Sphinx of Viator, a cruise on the River Nile and more.
Special to the Chronicle


L"te* -* r


EXCURSIONS
^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^~ <'1 I RI % K 1S <' < 11 I V ( 'I I R < rl I I ^ ^ ^ ^


.Ow


bft




A12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/1: Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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SD WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *** "GoldenEye"(1995)'PG-13' BmSeinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM f W TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanle Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Brody Ministries
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54 48 54 25 27 Dads'PG' Dads'PG Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty 14' 14' '14'm '14'"
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55 64 55 Nicolas Cage, Diane Kruger. Premiere. PG Dog"'14'N heatup orWalt.'l14' on the Way" Bad'14' Bad'14'
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) 52 35 52 19 21 Revenge*PG' N Viva Live Action! Wildman Wildman Blue" (N)'PG' Wildman Wildman
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7 2 3 ** "MacGruber" ** "The House Bunny" (2008, Comedy) Anna Tosh.0 The Comedy Central Roast "James Amy Schumer: Mostly
B 27 61 27 33 *(2010)'NR' Faris, Colin Hanks. PG-13 m '14'm Franco"'MA' NSex Stuff
98 45 98 28 37 Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Dallas Cowboys Cops Cops **"RV"(2006) Robin Williams. A dysfunctional Dog and Beth: On the
MY c 5 9 Cheerleaders Reloaded Reloaded family goes on vacation.'PG' Hunt'14'
4N.J 3 42 43 Hair Rest. Cook Debt/Part On CNBC Titans J. Crew and American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
NN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) Beyond 911 CNN Presents N The Flag The Flag
5S 4 4 Austin & A.N.T. Austin & Austin & **** "Cinderella" (1950) Voices Jessie Jessie Austin & A.N.T. Jessie
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PN 34 28 34 43 49 NHRA Profile: 60 Baseball Tonight (N) SportCtr SportsCenter (N) Strong Str on Strong MLS Soccer
WT 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime IG.K. Rosary With Cardinal Dolan God Bookmark
A 29 52 29 n0 28*** "Harry Potter and the Half- *** "Harry Potter andthe Deathly Hallows: Part 1" (2010, Fantasy) Daniel The Vineyard "Secret's
29 52 29 20 28 Blood Prince" (2009)'PG' Radcliffe. Harry sets out to destroy the secrets to Voldemort's power. 'PG-13' Out"'14'"
S** "Beaches"(1988, Drama) Bette Midler, *** "Twins"(1988, Comedy) Arnold *** "Man on the Moon"(1999, Biography)
118 170 John Heard. (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) 'PG' Jim Carrey (In Stereo)'R' N
ji 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
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(19 30 60 30 51 Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. PG-13 Jordi Molla, Lennie James.'PG-13' Jordi Molla, Lennie James.'PG-13'
(GOLF] 727 67 727 Central PGA Tour Golf I Golf Walker Cup, Final Day. PGA Tour Golf
I 5 "A Crush on You"(2011, Romance-Comedy) Cedar Cove'PG' *** "Just Desserts" (2004, Romance- Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
59 68 59 45 54 Bdgid Brannagh.'NR' cComedy) Lauren Holly .N
3 02 20 3 2 Re1 T",Ir *** "Argo" (2012 Historical Drama) Ben Boardwalk Empire The Newsroom (N) Boardwalk Empire
i.302201A302 2 2 ,,, :,C. Affleck, Alan Arkin. (In Stereo)'R' 'MA' 'MA' 'MA'N
O 3 2 3 Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire ***2 "Life of Pi" (2012, Adventure) Suraj "Phil Specter" (2013)
303202 303 'MA' 'MA' 'MA' m Sharma, Tabu. (In Stereo) 'PG' N Al Pacino. N
(HTVJ 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntlIntl Hunters |HuntlIntl Extreme Homes'G' Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Reno Hunters |HuntlIntl
iTi 51 25 1 3 Mountain Men "Thin Mountain Men "Going Mountain Men "Ticking Mountain Men Settling We're the We're the American Pickers
M 51 25 51 32 42 Ice"'PG'B cFor Broke" 'PG' Clock"'PG' the Score"'PG' Fugawis Fugawis 'PG'Nc
E 2' 8 2 3 **"Made of Honor" *** "Julie & Julia" (2009) Meryl Streep, Amy Adams. A woman vows Devious Maids (N) *** "Julie & Julia"
UJE 24 38 24 31 (2008) Nto make every recipe in Julia Child's cookbook. 'PG-13' 'PG'm c(2009)'PG-13
r hn 5 iii i, Deadly Killer Kids "Psychopath Kller Kds "Sexual Killer Kids (N) (In I Killed My BFF "Two My Life as a Gangster
50 119 ______H Killers"'14' Killers"'14'" Stereo) '14 N Cowboys"14' Girl 'PG,V' m
n 32 2 32 3 "The ** "U-571" (2000) Matthew McConaughey ** "Project X" (2012) Thomas *2 "The Sitter" (2011) Jonah Hill. Sin City
320221 320 3 3 Edge"'R' Bill Paxton. (In Stereo)'PG-13'm Mann. (In Stereo)'R' N (In Stereo)'R' Diaries 4
SN J 42 41 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Lockup: Raw ILockup: Raw
J 109/196 10 44 5 1: Where WereYou? eInside 9/11: War on America Investigation of Inside 9/11: Zero Hour Terrorist attacks of Sept. nsimde 9/11: War on
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I 28 36 28 35 25 "Swindle"(2013)JennetteMcCurdy'NR' SeeDad lWendell **" 'The Karate Kid" 1984) Ralph Macchio.'PG' N
W 103 62 103 lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life Oprah's Next Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
rDXYJ 44 123 ___ Snapped 'PG' m Snapped 'PG' m Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped PG' c Snapped 'PG'
W 34 4 ** "Stepmom" (1998) Dexter A murder hits Ray Donovan "Road Dexter "Goodbye Ray Donovan "Fite Ray Donovan "Fite
340 241 340 4 Julia Roberts. close to home.'MA' Tip"'MA' Miami" (N)'MA'N Nite" (N)'MA' Nite"'MA'
Rolex Sports Car Series Racing Laguna Seca. UFC Unleashed N The Ultimate Fighter (In Stereo) N FOX Sports Live (N)
L 732 112 732 (N) (Live) N (Live) N
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S37 43 37 27 36 Pockets" 'PG' bar.'PG' of Bull"'PG' Stereo)'PG' the Face!" (N)'PG' Its Back"'PG'
1** "TheWedding Planner" (2001) Jennifer The White Queen (In The White Queen (In ***2 "Zero Dark Thirty" (2012) Jessica
tA 370 271 370 Lopez. (In Stereo'PG-13' Stereo) 'MA' m Stereo) 'MA' m Chastain. (In Stereo) 'R'N
Marn6 3 6 Sh c MLB Baseball: Rays at Rays Live! Ship Sprtsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Mariners(N) Shape TV Adv. Sport Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue'G'
viJ 3 1 5 31 2 29 ) "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" ** "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008, ** "Godzilla" (1998)
31 59 31 26 29 (1989) Harrison Ford. 'PG-13' Adventure) Hardson Ford, Cate BlRnchett. 'PG-13' 'PG-13'
Ti 49 23 49 16 19 ** "You, Me and Dupree" (2006) *** "Wedding Crashers" (2005) Owen Wilson. 'R' I** "DueDate"(2010)'R'
9 n 16 3 *** "Saboteur"(1942, Suspense) Robert ***2 "Foreign Correspondent" (1940, **** "North by Northwest" (1959,
169 53 169 30 35 Cummings, Priscilla Lane. PG'm Suspense) Joel McCrea. NR' B Suspense) Cary Grant.'NR'B (DVS)
SJungle Gold "Armed Jungle Gold "Deal With Jungle Gold: Wild Ride Jungle Gold "Run for the Border" Neighbodng Jungle Gold "Run for
53 34 53 24 26 Robbery"'14'" the Devil"'PG' (N) 14, L,V' site is attacked by militia. (N) 'PG' the Border'PG'
T 50 46 50 29 :30 Who DoYou Breaking Amish: LA Sister ISister Sister Wives (N)'PG' IBreaking Amish: LA Sister Wives 'PG'
ii 350 21 ** "Dangerous Minds" (1995, Drama) *' "Brake"(2012) Stephen Dorff. ** "The Ninth Gate" (1999, Suspense) Johnny Depp,
350 261 350 Michelle Pfeiffer. (In Stereo) 'R' (In Stereo) 'R' Frank Langella, Lena Olin. (In Stereo) 'R'
** "Along Came a Spider" (2001, Mystery) **2 "Sherlock Holmes" (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., *., "Sherlock Holmes"(2009)
ItjJ 48 33 48 31 34 Morgan Freeman.'R' N (DVS) Jude Law. 'PG-13' (DVS) AtoRobert DowneyJr.l m 2
TOON 38 58 38 33 3 ** "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" (2010) Uncle MAD'PG' King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Burgers Fam.Gu
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Tastiest Places Food Paradise'G' RIDE. RIDE. Adam Bikinis Food Paradise'G' Food Paradise'PG'
truT 25 55 25 98 55 Jokers Jokers Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Container Container Container Container Storage Storage
32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Grls Gold GirL s Gold Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold GirL s Gold Giris Gold Girls Gold Grls
SLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Burn Notice "Sea
U 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Change"'PG'
m 117 69 117 CSI: Miami "Dissolved" '. :i i i, seeing g CSI: Miami "Out of CSI: Miami "Hostile CSI: Miami "Bolt Action" CSI: Miami Reality
117 9 17 '14'm :,.,i Time"'14'" Takeover"'14'" '14'" star's murder. '14'
rWGN3 18 18 18 18 20 Videos iBloopers! Bloopers! Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay "28 Days Later"'R'


Wife questions


hubby's tie to ex


D ear Annie: My
husband and I
have been mar-
ried for three years. It's
a second marriage for
both of us. We are in our
50s.
Here's my problem:
My husband still keeps
in close contact with his
ex-wife. I understand
that a certain amount of
communication is neces-
sary because
they have
grown chil-
dren together
But I recently
found out
that he sent
her money
for her car
loan and
bought her a
pair of sneak-
ers, and I saw
atextmes- ANN
sage in which MAIL
he asked MAlL
whether
there's any jewelry in
particular she's been
looking at. He also com-
mented that he thinks of
her often.
I feel betrayed. I keep
in touch with my ex
when it comes to the
kids, but that's as far as
it goes. I also tell my hus-
band when I've con-
tacted my ex and what
the conversation was
about. My husband is
closemouthed about
everything, including his
kids. I constantly have to
pry out of him how
they're doing and


I
.E


whether he's heard from
them. I receive short,
nondescript answers.
My husband is a kind
and generous man, but I
think this is too much.
What do you think? How
do I approach him about
it? Second Wife
Dear Wife: The fact
that your husband is
closemouthed about his
children is probably ir-
relevant. Many
guys are slow
to share that
type of infor-
mation. But he
should not be
buying his ex-
wife shoes and
asking whether
she wants jew-
elry Please
don't tiptoe
around this.
E'S Tell him what
o youfound out.
BOX Ask him why

he thinks this
behavior is OK and why
he kept it a secret If his
answers do not reassure
you, the next step is
counseling.
Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers col-
umn. Email anniesmail
box@comcast~net, or
write to: Annie's Mail-
box, c/o Creators Syndi-
cate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. Visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Riddick" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"One Direction: This Is Us"
(PG) 1:30 p.m.
"One Direction: This Is Us"
In 3D. (PG) 4:30 p.m.
"You're Next" (R) 1:25 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Mortal Instruments:
City of Bones" (PG-13)
4:05 p.m.
"Jobs" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Planes" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Planes" In 3D. (PG)
4:45 p.m.
"Percy Jackson: Sea of
Monsters" (PG) 1:55 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Percy Jackson: Sea of
Monsters" In 3D. (PG)


4:55 p.m.
"We're the Millers" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"This is the End" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Riddick" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
1:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"One Direction: This Is Us"
(PG) 4:40 p.m.
"One Direction: This Is Us"
In 3D. (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Mortal Instruments:
City of Bones" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler"
(PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Elysium" (R) 4:30 p.m.
"We're the Millers" (R)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Mend
6 Money substitute
11 Train
16 Different
21 Run off with a lover
22 Low-down fellow
23 Excessive
24 Idaho's capital
25 Primordial god
26 Citified
27 Domain
28 Jars
29 Ms. Longoria
30 Animal enclosure
31 Corpuscle
33 Vetch seed
35 Permit
36 Take pleasure in
39 Salad plant
43 -cit.
44 Upperclassmen
45 Mix up
47 Colossus
49 Part of NATO (abbr.)
51 Hang in folds
54 Gladden
57 Martin King Jr.
59 Behaves
63 Long time
64 Kid
66 Captain of fiction
68 Skin (pref.)
69 Central part
70 Fish in a can
72 Corvine cry
74 Pickle flavoring
76 Boulder
78 "Essays of-"
79 Disturbance
82 Hind
84 Traitor -Arnold
86 Molars
87 Alcove
89 City in Utah
91 Long fish
92 Recent (pref.)
93 So far
95 Canine tooth
97 Letter start
99 Breakfast item
101 Expert
104 Melody
106 Parka part
108 Worry
110 Graceful horses
114 Office machine
117 Howl
119 Round like a ball


121 Fraudulence
122 Sufficiently,
archaically
124 New Mexico town
126 Tolkien monster
127 Aqua-
128 Formerly, formerly
129 Eager
131 Do nothing
133 Continent
N. of Afr.
135 Weight unit
136 --do-well
137 Ingenious
139 Do a certain dance
141 Emissary
143 Fuss
145 Object from
antiquity
147 Hospital worker
149 Time of yr.
152 Classifieds
154 Hiss
157 Set in motion
161 Kind of dog or devil
162 Florida-
164 Tranquil
165 Bashful
167 Nest-egg letters
168 Fight (hyph.)
170 Water wheel
173 Maltreat
175 Repairs
177 Occurrence
178 Chimp's cousin
179 Measuring device
180 Take on
181 Seed layer
182 Ball
183 Mountain ridge
184 Indian princess (var.)


DOWN
1 Falk or Fonda
2 and well
3 Complete
4 Books expert (abbr.)
5 Farm bird
6 Skid
7 School in
Ithaca, N.Y
8 Massage
9 Newton orAsimov
10 Five (pref.)
11 Tumult
12 Dir. letters
13 Oklahoma city
14 Much-maligned religion


Of blood
Intent
Overly
Beverly -
Organic compound
Sleeps
Advanced degree
Assn.
Bellow
Mischievous child
Hard fat
Penn or Connery
Praise
Stage direction
Hold up
Pulsate
Spiked
Coup-
A cosmetic
Girl in the funnies
Spread to dry
Arab VIP
Man at the podium
Firth or Farrell
Instant
Defunct alliance
Calendar abbr.
Margarine
ABA mem.
Warp and -
Soft fat
Part of the leg
In front
Beery or Webster
Hazard to ships
British composer
Recognize
"- Needs Moms"
Ebb or neap
Homed animal
Loan-default
action, for short
Hold
Pale
Task
Rub out
Of the kidneys
Watch part
Ultimatum
Sharp
Powerful
businessman
Lean
Additional
Name for a hound
Fly up and around
Old French coin
Spouses
- Paulo


130 Sandwich shop, for short
132 Dart
134 -avis
137 Cipher
138 Thoracic structure (2
wds.)
140 Israel's parliament
142 Wildebeest
144 American Indian
146 NSA cousin
148 Tarzan portrayer Ron


149 Something of value
150 Annoy
151 Appraises
153 Council of churches
155 Andes animal
156 Fossil resin
158 Ford's
predecessor
159 Pancake
160 Hurriedness
163 Marsh bird


Present!
Explosive stuff
Tried for office
Abbr. in bus.
Western Indian
Remote
Crete's Mount-


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


-- Tod ay MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


New members
needed for DAV
A new chapter of
Disabled American
Veterans is being formed
in Crystal River
The group meets at
Crystal River Mall. The
next meeting will be at
6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21.
For more information,
call Duane Godrey at 352-
794-3104.

Post to celebrate
Recognition Day
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and auxiliaries
will celebrate National
POW/MIA Recognition
Day on Saturday, Sept. 21,
at the post home, 906
State Road 44 E.,
Inverness.
The ceremony begins at
11 a.m., to be followed by
a cookout and music by
Mark B.
The pubic is invited.
Call 352-344-3495.

POWs, MIAs to
be honored
National POW/MIA
Recognition Day will be
celebrated locally on Sat-
urday, Sept. 21, at Inver-
ness Elks Lodge, 3580
Lemon St., Hernando.
Sponsored by the Elks
and Rolling Thunder,
Florida Chapter 7, the
event will begin at 11 a.m.
with an escort for ex-
POWs departing from the
Citrus County Fair-
grounds on U.S. 41 in
Inverness.
The public is invited to
meet, greet and dine with
true American heroes.
The ceremony will begin
at the lodge at noon.
For more information,
call Ray Thompson at 813-
230-9750 or email ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.


The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
conduct its annual Veter-
ans in the Classroom pro-
gram Nov 1 to 12 as part
of its 21st annual Veterans
Appreciation Week
activities.
Coordinated by the Cit-
rus County Chapter of the
Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA),
the Veterans in the Class-
room program brings liv-
ing history to the
classrooms of the county's
public and private
schools, as well as home-
school groups. Veterans
share with students their
firsthand military experi-
ences and travels while
serving our country in
uniform around the
world.
The model Veterans in
the Classroom program
was recognized in 2008
with a Florida Education
Foundation award. The
program's success has
generated the need for


UO- SPECIAL
0;- NOTE


Elks Lodge slates vets'breakfast
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando will
host a veterans' breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m.
Sunday, Sept. 22. All are welcome.
There is no charge for veterans; donations are
appreciated from all others.
For more information, call 352-464-2146.


additional veterans to
share their experiences
with students. Persian
Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq,
Air Force, National Guard
and women veterans are
especially needed as
participants.
All interested veterans
may contact Mac McLeod
at 352-746-1384, cmcleod
670@earthlink.net, or
Bob Crawford at 352-270-
9025, baddogusmc@
tampabayrrcom.

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2p.m.
To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the
case manager, call 352-
527-5915.


Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

DAV needs
volunteer drivers
The DAV transportation
network needs volunteer
drivers for the two vans
assigned to the Lecanto
clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to
The Villages.
While the Gainesville
van goes each weekday
there are not enough driv-
ers for The Villages run.
While The Villages trip is
not an everyday run (just
when someone needs to
go there), more drivers
are needed.
Volunteers must have a
Florida driver's license
and up-to-date car insur-
ance. No CDL is required.
Stop by the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto
for an application. Call
Joe Stephens at 352-489-
5245 for information.

Assistance for
transitioning vets
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas.
Call 352-527-5915 to re-
serve a seat.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.


Lawi Sprikler
Net W6rki449?
We'll Fix It
$10Offwit5a


746-4451-18 "M!


vY.u. VVIUI IL J j. LJL
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in


HIGH OCTANE GRILL
DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS
MONDAY S1.00 Side Salad. Select S1.00 Menu Items
TUESDAY
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V ISIT Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell...... Beef .79'... Chicken .99
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w/potatoes & vegetable.............................................9..... 95
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[ Sloppy Joe w/Mac & Cheese.......................................... 5.95
S Baked Mac & Cheese Casserole .................................. 6.95
SUNDAY Pot Roast ..................................................3.95


-U


OPEN 11AM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY- SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373


COMPLETE DETAILS ARE IMPORTANT
OOOGOWK APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


I


Reserve for
trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, will lead the 2014
trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and
friends from Feb. 25 to
March 14. Signups are
being taken for the an-
nual trek, which includes
visits to several islands,
some golfing and a spe-
cial visit to the USS Ari-
zona Memorial and The
National Cemetery of the
Pacific.
Although the 2013 Sep-
tember trip is full, those
interested may register
now for 2014.
For more information,
call McLean at 352-637-
5131 or email dmclean8@
tampabayrrcom.


Memorial for vets
in Homosassa
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Hospice assists
with special care
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted-living facilities


and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also
provides caregiver
education.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.

Free yoga classes
offered for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with
the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes
to combat veterans.
Call Sandstrom at 352-
382-7397 for information.


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Vets sought for O f
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vIt.e -, tih 1r1ST1


TheIeto aIntue



Missing Teeth! Unstable Dentures?


J FREE SEMINAR
o Wed., Sept. 18, Starting at 4:30 PM

Location: 591 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto, FL 34461
0s.. ~Refreshments Served -
*B LIMITED SEATING
FEIplt ex CALL FOR RESERVATIONS NOW!
FREE Implant exam
voucher ($155.00) for 352-527-8000
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VETERANS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 A13



















VETERANS NOTES

Upcoming reunions
USS Mount McKinley Association will
have its 25th annual reunion Sept. 18 to 22
in Portland, Ore. Contact Dwight L. Janzen
at djanzen4@msn.com or 509-534-3649.
The Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Associa-
tion of Florida will have its 21st annual re-
union Sept. 26 to 29 at the Sheraton Tampa
East Hotel, 10221 Princess Palm Ave.,
Tampa. Contact Tom Rountree at
trountree@tampabayrr.com or 352-
560-7361 for details.
USS Chilton APA 38 will have a reunion
Oct 10,11 and 12 in New London, Conn.
Contact Joe Doherty at 352-341-5959 or
jdohertyl@tampabayrr com.

New veterans' pin available
Disabled American Veterans, Gerald A.
Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces
the design and availability of this year's
Citrus County Veterans Appreciation
Commemorative Pin.
In keeping with this year's theme, "Hon-
oring Our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans,"
the pin is an outline of Citrus County su-
perimposed with the Iraq campaign and
the Afghanistan campaign service medals.
Pins are available for a donation of $3
each and may be obtained by calling the
chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman at
352-860-0123.
Pins are also available at the Citrus
County Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto.

Ribs on menu for Sept. 13
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 invites
the public to a rib dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, Sept 13, at the post, 10199 N.
Citrus Springs Boulevard, Citrus Springs.
Donation is $8. Children younger than
6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Post 166 has new home
Due to the Labor Day holiday falling on
its regular meeting night, Arnold Vern
Allen American Legion Post 166 will meet
Monday
The post is now meeting at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial
Drive in Homosassa. All veterans in the
Homosassa/Homosassa Springs area are
welcome.
For more information, call Robert Scott,
commander, 352-860-2090.

Post slates special service
The American Legion Wall Rives Post 58
invites everyone to a special 9/11
Remembrance Service at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, followed by a Celebration of Life.
Refreshments will be served.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41 in
Dunnellon.

CCVC yard sale is Sept. 14
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

Purple Heart group to meet
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
conduct its bimonthly meeting at 1 p.m.,
Tuesday, Sept 17, at the Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto, a
half-mile south of State Road 44 on the
west side of CR 491.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member.
To learn more, visit the Chapter 776 web-
site at www.citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.

Vets planning group to meet
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct
its monthly coordination meeting for Cit-
rus County's 21st annual Veterans Appre-
ciation Week at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
18, in the conference room of the Citrus
County Chronicle building, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans' service organizations are
encouraged to send representatives to par-
ticipate in the planning process.
Individual veterans are also welcome.
For more information, call Chris
Gregoriou at 352-795-7000.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


CHRONICLE


One night

during the Cold



Veteran recalls
J e i r ii. .. ............................................. ......................................................

incident serving "Wiors- ,--

as Navy pilot


C.J. RISAK
For the Chronicle


Still in high
school in 1943,
Thomas Trout
qualified for and
signed on with the U.S.
Navy's reserve officers
training program. Not
willing and not feeling
ready to become an
officer at 18 years old,
Trout signed up for
flight training.
A native of Marietta, Ohio, Trout
(who lives in Homosassa) would com-
plete primary flight training in 1946.
Before going on to get his wings, how-
ever, he would leave the Navy for a
few months, anyway Trout would at-
tend Ohio State University from the
fall of 1946 to the spring of 1947 before
returning to the Navy to become a
midshipman at the U.S. Naval Acad-
emy in Annapolis.
It was a continuation of a nearly 27-
year Navy career for Trout. He would
be in the service through four wars,
but the one that would affect him the
greatest was one that gains little atten-
tion today It's one that lasted more
than 45 years, from the conclusion of
World War II until 1991, pitting the
United States and its allies against the
Soviet bloc.
"I wanted to emphasize the Cold
War," he said. "People don't realize
what we went through."
Trout would serve in various roles
during his Naval career, earning his
wings in 1953 and going on to fly Ban-
shees, Tigercats and Skyhawks from
carrier decks.
However, it was a single night dur-
ing a combat patrol mission flying just
outside of Soviet airspace, while serv-
ing aboard the USS Intrepid in 1954-
55, that Trout chose to reflect upon. It
was a time of extreme tension be-
tween the East and West, with nuclear
intervention always a possibility The
jets Trout flew were capable of carry-
ing nuclear weapons, although they
never carried them on patrols like
this one.
This is his story:
"The Soviet Union was what the
Cold War was all about. And for me as
a Naval aviator, that meant I had to
learn how to deliver atomic weapons,
to find the assigned target in the So-
viet Union while flying below radar
and then working out an escape route
because we couldn't carry enough fuel
to get back to the carrier
"In our 1954-55 cruise of the
Mediterranean Sea aboard the USS
Intrepid, our squadron was flying
Banshees. This is what happened on
one of our patrols.
"My wingman, Bill Macke and I
were assigned to a night combat pa-
trol with 15 other squadron aircraft


ar


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
United States Navy Lt. Comm. Thomas Warren Trout (retired) holds his lucky hat
he says has traveled all over the world with him. The Sugarmill Woods resident
served in the Navy for more than 26 years.

NAME & RANK Thomas Trout, Lt. Commander
BRANCH & YEARS SERVED U.S. Navy, 1943-1970
SHIPS USS Missouri, USS Worcester,
USS Intrepid, USS Saratoga, USS Boston, USS Cimarron
JOB Pilot aboard the Intrepid and Saratoga,
executive commander and commanding officer aboard the
Cimarron, Naval Intelligence, navigator aboard the Boston
AWARDS Two Navy commendation medals
VETERANS ORGANIZATIONS American Legion, Veterans of
Foreign Wars, Military Officers of America Association


performing other missions. We com-
pleted our mission without incident in
about 90 minutes and were in a land-
ing pattern above the Intrepid when a
jet nosed over on the deck and, unable
to land, we were diverted to Rome's
international airport. I was surprised,
considering how much fuel we lost cir-
cling the carrier while waiting to land.
Most of our reserve had been used. It
looked like it would be close.
"It was a clear night, so the city was
easy to spot, but not the airport. I had
to radio the control tower to put on all
the beacons and lights so we could
spot the field. My fuel gauge was near
zero when over the radio, 'Doc' Was-
sell, a classmate of mine, said he


Special to the Chronicle
Lt. Comm. Thomas Warren Trout, bottom right, and the rest of his squadron are
pictured in front of a Grumman Tigercat airplane. The photo above was taken in
1955 in Jacksonville.


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to


couldn't make it and he was going to
splash down in the Mediterranean.
"I had to make a decision. I was
thinking about bailing out when I
spotted the airport. I came in just
ahead of my wingman, but Bill was
waved off. He pulled up his landing
gear and went around for another at-
tempt. But he forgot to put down his
landing gear the second time and
crashed on the runway Lt. Com-
mander Morris was still aloft (at the
time, Rome's airport had one runway
that could accommodate jet aircraft)
and now this runway was blocked, and
thinking we were carrying atomic
weapons, the Italian officials wouldn't
clear it. Morris said, 'What am I sup-
posed to do?'
"I spotted the taxiway that ran par-
allel to the runway and radioed, 'Mor-
ris, taxiway with blue lights looks
good.' He responded, 'Here I come.'
"Then I saw a DC6 (airliner) parked
with its tail extended over the taxiway,
just as Morris' Banshee came in to
land. To my huge relief, the low-built
fighter swooped under the tail. As I
was taxiing to my parking spot, I
flamed out or ran out of fuel. It was
that close.
'A couple hours later, this raggedy-
dressed bald man walked into the air-
port waiting room: Doc Wassell. He
said a couple of fishermen had pulled
him out of the Mediterranean and he
was so grateful he gave them every-
thing he had, including his silk para-
chute. The next morning, Morris and I
flew our refueled Banshees back to
the carrier, while Macke and Wassell
were picked up by the carrier's mail
plane. We all had orders to see Capt.
Blackburn, our ship's captain, who
gave us a well done and said he was
happy no pilot was lost.
"And that's the way it was for me,
one night in the Cold War"


community@chronicleonline.com.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaran-


..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled ac-
tivities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or
email the contact listed.
Posts and groups may email
changes or corrections to
community@chronicle
online.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPost155
@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Aux-
iliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Call 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial
Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto
Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit
www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-476-
7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-
2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS
OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-
0440.
Edward W. Penno
VFW Post 4864,10199 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Aux-
iliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander
Victor Houston at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen


VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.


OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus
Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil
at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at Citrus Hills Country
Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959. Visit
www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detach-
ment 1139 meets at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087
on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills,
behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault
at 352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associ-
ation, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Sunday's PUZZLER


Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Mer-
chant Marine Veterans of
World War II meets at 11:30
a.m. at Kally K's restaurant in
Spring Hill. Meeting dates
are: Sept. 14, Oct. 12, Nov. 9
and Dec. 14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rollingth-
underfl7.com, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997
@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. Members can renew
with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. Call
employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org.


Veterans & Service GROUPS


Special to the Chronicle

The inaugural Horizon of Hope
Luncheon will be staged Saturday,
Sept. 14, at Citrus Hills Golf and Coun-
try Club in Hernando.
Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is
served at noon. Tickets are $25 and in-
clude lunch, a live auction featuring
"designer" purses, silent auction items,
raffles, door prizes and other goodies.
The purses are full of pampering items
and there is usually no minimum open-
ing bid. Alma Tankersley will host the
event, which benefits the Michelle-O-
Gram Fund.
The Michelle-O-Gram Fund was es-
tablished several years ago in Marion
County following the death of a Michelle
Blauser Standridge, who was diagnosed
with the BRCA gene breast cancer
She was the wife of a Marion County
EMT firefighter and the mother of two
boys ages 9 and 5, and throughout her
battle with breast cancer, she was al-
ways reminding women to get their
mammograms.
The Michelle-O-Gram started as a


Relay For Life event, raising money for
cancer research.
After her death, the focus changed
and the fund was established to provide
mammograms and other diagnostic test-
ing for women who do not have insur-
ance or are underinsured in the
community.
The Michelle-O-Gram Fund has al-
ready assisted nearly 600 women at a
cost of more than $150,000. There are no
overhead costs, no administrative fees
and the MOG Fund is run solely on vol-
unteerism and donations. Every dollar
donated and every dollar raised is used
for the women of the community
The MOG Fund has helped women in
Marion, Citrus and surrounding coun-
ties. It is the fund's vision to establish a
Michelle-O-Gram chapter in Citrus
County and work toward a chapter in
each surrounding county
The effort is also working on obtain-
ing diagnostic assistance from local
companies in Citrus County
For information, or to purchase tick-
ets, call Diana Sewak at 352-527-8831 or
the MOG Fund at 352-469-6006.


Aug. 19-25, 2013
Marriages
Ryan Andrew Balcomb,
Hernando/Kathrine Renee
Mahoney, Hernando
Donald Lee Dotson,
Homosassa/Kimberly Dawn
Hall, Homosassa
Earl Spencer Dow Jr.,
Bronx, N.Y/Daisy Velez,
Bronx, N.Y.
Caleb Joshua Oakes,
Lecanto/AmberAfzal Majid,
Coral Springs

Aug. 26 to Sept. 1, 2013
Divorces
Aeriel Lee Luce, Beverly
Hills vs. Robert Daniel Luce,
Tampa
Patricia Jane Riddle, Ocala
vs. Leo A. Riddle, Homosassa


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Marriages
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James Allen Milligan,
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Wayne Mack Terry, Aledo,
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For the RECORD


VETERANS & COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 A15


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


K]
Carol and William
Witchey of Inverness will
celebrate their 60th
wedding anniversary
Sept 12,2013.
The couple were mar-
ried Sept. 12, 1953, at
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Manhattan,
N.Y They have been res-
idents of Inverness for
20 years.
They raised three chil-
dren in Massapequa,
Long Island, N.Y They
are William Witchey Jr


Elizabeth and Joseph
Geosits were married on
Sunday, April 21, 1963,
on Long Island, N.Y
They celebrated their
50th wedding anniver-
sary on Sunday, April 21,
2013. Father Tom Spillett
officiated at the cere-
mony in the Hampton
Room at the Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club.
Their daughter,
Suzanne, and husband
Nat Mund, son Joseph
and wife Kimberly and
their three grand-
children watched as the
couple renewed their
wedding vows.
Their two grand-
daughters, Sarah Anne
Mund and Alexandra
Rose Geosits, both 7,
were flowergirls. Joseph
Geosits V, age 3, was
their ring-bearer, but fell
asleep during the cere-
mony They had 90 guests


-Li-
of Linderhurst, N.Y;
Carleen Policastro of
Pocono Mountain, Pa.;
and Juliann Kindierski
of Citrus Springs.
The Witcheys have
eight grandchildren:
Vicki, Jimmy Chrissy,
Jennifer, Johnny,
Daniella, Jesse and
Jillian.
They have eight great-
grandchildren: Adriana,
Breanna, Maddy, C.J.,
Jasmine, Jason, Emerson
and Samantha.


- family and friends -
coming from as far away
as Long Island, New
York, New Jersey, Vir-
ginia, North Carolina
and points in Florida. A
dinner dance followed
the ceremony
A celebration week-
end was held at their
house for their family
The following weekend,
Joe and Elizabeth flew to
Las Vegas to enjoy a few
days of relaxation at the
Bellagio Hotel.


George and Dolores
Wise of Inverness cele-
brated 70 years of mar-
riage on Sept. 7,2013.
The couple, who have
lived in Inverness for 32
years, wed in Great
Bend, Kan., and raised
their family on Long
Island, N.Y They are
members of Our Lady of
Fatima Roman Catholic
Church.
George is retired from
the Long Island Lighting
Co. and worked part
time at TG&Y and Inver-
ness Primary School.
Dolores worked for
Westhampton Beach
Schools in New York and
also TG&Y in Inverness,
along with Beall's Outlet.
They have five chil-
dren: Carol (Mike)
Stewart (Bay Shore,
N.Y), Mickey (River-
head, N.Y), Ginny (Bob)
Joseph (Hampton Bays,
N.Y), Patty (Matt) Van
Bourgondien (East
Hampton, Conn.) and
Dotti (Tom) Christiansen


(Inverness); 14 grand-
children and 13 great-
grandchildren.
Both George and
Dolores turned 90 this
past spring.


Kara Elyse Heckerman
and Matthew Scott Pepito
exchanged nuptial vows
June 29, 2013, at the
William Skelton House in
historic Key West.
Marcella of Southernmost
Brides officiated at the
ceremony
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Mike and Nancy
Heckerman of Plant City
Parents of the groom are
Tas and Marilee Pepito of
Lecanto.
The bride wore a strap-
less gown with an empire
waist and criss-cross
ruching on the bodice. It
was accented with a
sweeping train and
beaded sash. She carried
purple calla lilies with
white peonies and was
escorted by her father,
Mike Heckerman.
Stacey Heckerman at-
tended her sister as the
maid of honor She wore a
vintage lilac chiffon floor-
length dress accented
with lace, and carried a
long-stemmed purple
calla lily
Best man was the
groom's brother, Troy
Pepito.
A reception, given by
the bride's parents, fol-
lowed at the William
Skelton House. A cupcake
tower of caramel with
Dreamsicle frosting,
made by the bride's best
friend, was topped with
Lladro porcelain bride
and groom figurines.
Out-of-town guests in-
cluded friends and rela-
tives from California,


Nevada, Colorado and
Florida.
Following their
honeymoon trip to Amelia
Island, the couple are at
home in Plant City
The bride is a graduate
of Florida State
University and is a
speech therapist with the
Hillsborough County
School District.
Her husband is a
graduate of the University
of South Florida and is a
human resource manager
with Omni Hotels.


Bridal show slated for Nov. 2


Special to the Chronicle
Planning a wedding?
Come to the Bridal Show from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov 2, at
the Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
Free lunch will be served for


brides and their guests.
Vendors will be in attendance to
offer help with event solutions,
makeup and hair, jewelry, flowers,
cakes, photographs, specialty
desserts, catering stationery, dance,
limousines and more.
This is a one-stop shop for all
wedding needs hosted by Event


Solutions by Linda and Fruiti
Jiggle-uti.
More than 30 door prizes will be
awarded. The first 25 brides to ar-
rive will receive a free wedding
planning guide.
The event is open to the public.
For reservations, call Linda at 352-
464-0004 or Bonnie at 352-228-1807.


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U I9


Alene Wright, MD
Breast 6- General Surgery


Dr. Alene Wright, on staff at
Oak Hill Hospital, will discuss the
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cancer. Dr. Marc Polecrirti, also
on staff at Oak Hill Hospital,
will offer reconstructive surgical
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TOGETHER, PERFOMIN6 AT A HIGER STANDARD'


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Witcheys


70th ANNIVERSARY

The Wises


Wedding

Heckerman/Pepito


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Geositses


F


Sj5


S One lucky winner
for 8 weeks
Grand Prize Winner
$200 Gas Card
Look for the entry form in
Wednesday's Newspaper
Enter as often as you would like
New winner each week
Grand Prize drawing from all
entries at the end of the contest
Pick up your copy of the
Citrus County Chronicle
Contest Begins
Wednesday, September 11
/^ IT U* *"' -,.C 0 U N T V^^

Must be over 18 year's old and legal resident in our
newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of
the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible.


A16 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


TOGETHER


L FIEK


T,









SPORTS


For the full story on
the Lecanto football
team's 10-6 victory over
Wesley Chapel late Friday
night, see Page B6.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


X-C season off to rousing start at Lecanto

JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
LECANTO Lecanto High
School invited over 30 of the best
cross country teams in the state
of Florida to its campus Satur-
day morning for a big startup to
what hopes to be a highly com-
petitive year of running.
From as far away as Jack-
sonville and St. Augustine, the
teams came to the Lecanto hills .., -
and the results proved to be -'
worth the travel. C
Host Lecanto placed the
highest of the local teams in the "
boys meet with a team total of .. ...
260 points for seventh place
Crystal River took 10th (356) .
while Citrus jockeyed for 15th STEPHEN E. LASKO/Forthe Chronicle
The boys varsity cross country meet got off to a big start with 156 runners Saturday morning during the Lecanto Invitational at Lecanto
See Page B5 High School. The meet was attended by 32 schools.


The U' prevails


Associated Press
Miami's Shayon Green sacks Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel in the third quarter Saturday in Miami Gardens. Miami won 21-16.

Miami capitalizes on five turnovers to stun No. 12 Florida at home


Associated Press
MIAMI GARDENS Once again,
Florida flopped against Miami.
It just wasn't intentional this time
around.
The 12th-ranked Gators dominated
just about every statistical category -
including turnovers, and that ultimately
was what decided everything. Florida
turned the ball over five times, came up
empty on four red-zone trips and wound
up losing 21-16 to the Hurricanes on Sat-
urday in what's widely expected to be
the last time the one-time traditional ri-
vals meet for a long, long time.
"I can't give it to Miami," Gators of-


fensive lineman Jonotthan Harrison
said. "It is on us."
Stephen Morris threw two first-quar-
ter touchdown passes to put Miami
ahead, and the onslaught of Gator mis-
takes ensured that the Hurricanes
stayed there. The win almost certain as-
sures that the Hurricanes dogged for
the last 26 months by a still-unresolved
NCAA probe will return to the AP
Top 25 for the first time since 2010.
"It's been such a hard road," Miami
coach Al Golden said. "We've just been
battling this thing and obviously they're
one of the teams they've been battling
during this thing. I think you guys can
figure that out It was just a very cathar-


tic moment. It was a great moment for
our guys, all those guys that not only
chose the University of Miami during
this but stood there and fought"
In 1971, the Gators executed what's
forever known as the "Florida Flop,"
when the defense fell to the ground and
let Miami score, just so the offense
could get the ball back and allow John
Reaves to break Jim Plunkett's record
for NCAA career passing yards.
This one will just go down as an all-
day flop.
Jeff Driskel completed 22 of 33 passes
for a career-best 291 yards and a late
See I PageB3


Bucs open


today


with Jets

Tampa Bay on

road at New York

Associated Press
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- The thought of Darrelle
Revis wearing something other
than a green and white jersey
once seemed impossible to
New York Jets fans.
After all, he was easy to root
for: a shutdown cornerback
who frustrated the NFL's best
wide receivers on a weekly
basis.
And then, after six seasons,
Revis was gone.
With Revis coming off a major
knee injury and knowing that
the two
sides would Tampa Bay
never come Bc
close to a Bucsat
new con- New York
tract, new Jets
Jets general Time: 1 p.m.
manager Time: 1 p.m.
manager
John Idzik oday.
traded him 0 TV: FOX.
to Tampa
Bay Feeling
healthy after a long rehabilita-
tion process and hoping to play
Sunday in the season opener,
Revis makes his return to
MetLife Stadium against the
team that gave him his start.
"I moved on from those expe-
riences I had," Revis said. "I
had a great six years there. Now
I've just got to move on. I've got
a new start ahead of me, with a
new team and I'm excited to be
a Buccaneer."
Jets fans certainly aren't
thrilled, and it will be interest-
ing to see the reception he re-
ceives from the folks who once
cheered his every play
"I'm not concerned about
that," Revis said. "The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers will be coming
up there with 53 guys, including
the coaching staff and our
owner We're coming up there
with an army and we're coming
up there to get a win."
Hear that, Geno Smith?
The Buccaneers might be
licking their chops at facing the
Jets' rookie starting quarter-
back, who got the call with Mark
See Page B6


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


13 8
20/2 15/2
21/2 16/2
31/2 26/2


NL

Reds 4, Dodgers 3,
10 innings
Los Angeles Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crwfrdl f 5 01 0 Choocf 4 12 0
Puigrf 4 2 1 2 Clzturs2b 5 1 3 1
AdGnzllb 5 04 0 Vottolb 2 1 2 0
Punto pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Brucerf 5 0 1 1
HRmrzss 5 0 1 1 Ludwckl If 4 0 1 1
Ethiercf 4 0 0 0 BHmltn pr 0 1 0 0
MYong3b 5 0 1 0 Frazier3b 5 0 1 1
Schmkr2b 3 00 0 Cozartss 4 0 1 0
M.Ellis2b 1 00 0 Mesorcc 4 00 0
A.Ellisc 4 1 2 0 Latos p 2 0 0 0
Greinkp 2 00 0 DRonsnph 1 00 0
PRdrgzp 0 00 0 Dukep 0 00 0
Belisarip 0 00 0 Simonp 0 00 0
HrstnJrph 1 00 0 LeCurep 0 00 0
Howellp 0 00 0 Heisey ph 0 00 0
BWilsnp 0 00 0 Hooverp 0 00 0
Totals 39 3103 Totals 36411 4
L Angeles 120 000 000 0 3
Cincinnati 200 000 100 1 4
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Cozart (13). LOB-Los Angeles 9, Cincin-
nati 11. 2B-C.lzturis (6), Votto (28). HR-Puig
(15). SB-B.Hamilton (4). S-Greinke, Choo.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Greinke 6 8 2 2 1 9
PRodriguez 2/3 2 1 1 1 1
Belisario 11/30 0 0 0 1
Howell 1 0 0 0 2 0
B.Wilson L,1-1 0 1 1 1 1 0
Cincinnati
Latos 7 9 3 3 1 3
Duke 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Simon 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
LeCure 1 0 0 0 0 2
HooverW,4-5 1 1 0 0 0 1
B.Wilson pitched to 2 batters in the 10th.
HBP-by Latos (Puig).
Brewers 5, Cubs 3


Milwaukee Chicago
ab r h bi
Aoki rf 4 1 1 0 StCastrss
Segura ss 5 0 0 0 Barney 2b
Lucroyc 5 1 2 1 Rizzo 1b
ArRmr3b 2 1 0 0 Schrhltrf
Gennett2b 5 1 1 1 Sweeny cf
Gindl If 2 1 0 0 Bogsvc If
JFrncslb 1 00 0 Valuen3b
YBtncrlb 1 0 0 0 Castilloc
LSchfr cf 2 0 1 3 Arrieta p
CGomz cf 1 00 0 Watkns ph
Hellwg p 2 0 0 0 Raley p
Haltonph 0 00 0 Limp
Wootenp 0 00 0 Lakeph
KintzIlr p 0 0 0 0 AlCarr p
Bianchi ph 1 0 0 0 Rosscp p
Hndrsnp 0 00 0 BParkrp
Totals 31 55 5 Totals
Milwaukee 000 400 001
Chicago 020 001 000


ab r h bi
4000
3000
4020
4000
4000
321 1
3112
3 1 1 2
3000
1010
1 0 1 0
0000
0000
0000
1010
0000
0000
0000
1 0 1 06 3
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
303 6 3
5
3


E-Gindl (3), St.Castro (18). DP-Milwaukee 2,
Chicago 1. LOB-Milwaukee 9, Chicago 4.3B-
Lucroy (6), L.Schafer (3). HR-Bogusevic (4),
Valbuena (10). CS-Lake (4). S-L.Schafer.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
HellwegW,1-3 6 4 3 3 3 1
WootenH,3 1 1 0 0 0 1
KintzlerH,22 1 1 0 0 0 0
Henderson S,23-27 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
ArrietaL,2-2 5 3 4 4 3 4
Raley 11/30 0 0 0 1
Lim 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
AI.Cabrera 1/3 0 0 0 1 1
Rosscup 2/3 0 0 0 2 1
B.Parker 1 1 1 0 0 2
HBP-by Hellweg (Barney), by B.Parker
(Ar.Ramirez), by Arrieta (J.Francisco).
Cardinals 5, Pirates 0
Pittsburgh St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Tabatalf 4 0 1 0 MCrpnt2b 3 1 0 0
NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 SRonsn cf-lf 4 0 0 0
McCtchcf 4 02 0 Hollidyl If 3 00 1
Mornealb 3 0 0 0 Jaypr-cf 0 0 0 0
Byrdrf 3 0 0 0 Beltranrf 3 1 0 0
PAIvrz3b 3 00 0 YMolinc 3 22 0
RMartnc 2 00 0 Freese3b 2 1 1 2
Barmesss 2 00 0 Manessp 0 00 0
JHrrsn ph-ssl 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Lockep 2 0 0 0 BPtrsnlb 2 0 0 0
JGomzp 0 00 0 MAdmsph-1b2 00 0
Sniderph 1 00 0 Kozmass 3 0 1 1
Grillip 0 00 0 Wnwrgp 3 0 1 0
Watsonp 0 0 0 0 Rosnthlp 0 00 0
Descals ph-3b1 0 1 1
Totals 29 03 0 Totals 29 5 6 5
Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 000 211 01x 5
E-Barmes (11). DP-Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 1.
LOB-Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 8.2B-Tabata (16),
McCutchen (35),Y.Molina 2 (39), Wainwright (3).
HR-Freese (8). SF-Freese.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
LockeL,9-5 5 3 3 2 4 4
J.Gomez 2 1 1 1 1 1
Grilli 2/3 1 1 1 1 0
Watson 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
WainwrightW,16-9 7 2 0 0 2 8
Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 0 1
Maness 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Choate 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Locke (M.Carpenter). WP-Locke.
Nationals 9, Marlins 2
Washington Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Spancf 4 1 2 1 Coghln3b 4 01 0
Zmrmn3b 5 22 3 DSolan2b 4 01 0
Werthrf 5 13 0 Yelichl If 4 12 0
EPerezrf 0 00 0 Stantonrf 3 00 0
AdLRclb 4 1 2 1 Mrsnckcf 1 00 0
Clipprdp 0 00 0 Ruggincf-rf 4 01 0
Tracyph 1 00 0 Morrsnlb 4 10 0
Storen p 0 00 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 1 1
Dsmndss 5 21 0 Mathisc 3 01 1
WRamsc 4 01 2 Eovaldip 0 00 0
Ohlndrfp 0 00 0 Brantlyph 1 00 0
CBrwnl If 0 10 0 SDyson p 0 00 0
TMoorel If 5 12 2 Pierreph 1 01 0
Rendon2b 5 03 0 Hatchrp 0 00 0
Roarkp 3 0 0 0 Dobbsph 1 00 0
JSolanoc 1 00 0 ZPhllpsp 0 00 0
Caminrp 0 00 0
Totals 42 9169 Totals 342 8 2
Washington 203 001 102 9
Miami 000 000 200 2
DP Washington 1. LOB Washington 8, Miami
5.2B Werth 2 (17), Ad.LaRoche (18), Rendon
(21). HR-Zimmerman 2 (19). SF-Span.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
RoarkW,5-0 6 4 0 0 0 4
Ohlendorf 1 3 2 2 0 2
Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 0
Storen 1 1 0 0 0 1
Miami
EovaldiL,3-6 3 9 5 5 0 2
S.Dyson 3 2 1 1 0 2
Hatcher 1 2 1 1 0 0
Z.Phillips 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Caminero 11/32 2 2 1 1


Str Home Away
W-5 47-25 40-32
L-2 44-26 33-37
W-3 41-29 35-36
L-3 43-31 32-36
W-2 35-34 31-42



Str Home Away
L-3 51-20 34-36
W-1 40-31 32-38
W-2 38-33 27-44
L-2 28-38 35-39
L-1 30-40 23-47


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
60 .577 5-5 L-1 44-27
65 .539 5/2 1/2 5-5 W-4 44-27
68 .521 8 4 6-4 W-1 39-35
79 .436 20 16 4-6 L-3 28-38
85 .397 25% 21% 1-9 L-9 32-34


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
60 .577 4
60 .574 /2 5
62 .566 1/2 7
80 .433 20/2 19 3
81 .426 21/2 20 5


Str Home
W-2 43-25
L-3 45-25
W-3 46-24
W-1 31-40
L-1 29-45


W
Oakland 82
Texas 80
Los Angeles 66
Seattle 64
Houston 47


Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
San Fran.


West Division
L Pct GB WC
60 .577 -
60 .571 1 -
74 .471 15 11
77 .454 17% 13%
95 .331 35 31


West Division
t GB WC


11/2 8/2
17/2 14/2
19/2 16/2
20 17


Str Home
W-2 46-27
L-2 39-29
W-2 34-39
W-1 32-38
L-2 23-49



Str Home
L-3 43-28
L-1 40-31
L-1 41-31
W-1 39-33
W-1 35-36


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox batter Jonny Gomes rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run during the third
inning Saturday against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Red Sox won 13-9.



Red Sox's bats sink Yankees


Associated Press

NEW YORK Mike Napoli hit
two home runs, Jonny Gomes and
prized rookie Xander Bogaerts
also connected, and the Boston
Red Sox kept up their dizzying
scoring spree at Yankee Stadium,
bashing New York 13-9 Saturday
for their fifth straight win.
The AL East leaders became
the first visiting team in more
than a century to score at least
nine runs on three straight days
against the Yankees. In fact, the
last time it happened, they
weren't called the Yankees -
Boston did it in 1912 to the High-
landers at Hilltop Park.
Down 12-3, the Yankees rallied
with four runs in the sixth inning
and chased John Lackey (9-12).
Mark Reynolds added a two-run
double in the eighth off Red Sox
reliever Drake Britton that made
it 12-9.
David Ortiz and Dustin Pedroia
each contributed to Boston's five
doubles.
American League

Orioles 4, White Sox 3,
10 innings
BALTIMORE Matt Wieters hit a
two-run single in the 10Oth inning to
give the Baltimore Orioles a 4-3 vic-
tory over the Chicago White Sox.
Pinch-hitter Henry Urrutia started
the winning rally with a one-out infield
single against closer Addison Reed.
Pinch-runner Chris Dickerson then
went all the way to third on Nick
Markakis' base hit.
Reed bounced back with a strikeout
of Nate McLouth, but Markakis stole
second and both runners scored on
Wieters lined a single into right field.

Royals 4, Tigers 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Salvador
Perez hit a two-run homer off Justin
Verlander and the Kansas City Royals
beat the Detroit Tigers 4-3.
Perez drove a two-out pitch over
the left-field wall to put the Royals
ahead 4-2.
Verlander (12-11) is 0-3 with three
no-decisions in six starts since an
Aug. 6 victory at Cleveland.
The Tigers have dropped his past
six starts and are 13-17 in his 30
starts this season.

Athletics 2, Astros i1
OAKLAND, Calif. Dan Straily
pitched seven scoreless innings to
help the Oakland Athletics edge the
Houston Astros 2-1.
Yoenis Cespedes and Jed Lowrie
homered as the As won for the sev-
enth time in nine games to remain on
top of the AL West. They began the
day with a half-game lead over Texas.
Straily (9-7) allowed two hits, struck
out seven and walked one. Sean
Doolittle got four outs for his first save in
four chances, completing the five-hitter.

Blue Jays 11, Twins 2
MINNEAPOLIS -Adam Lind hit a
pair of three-run homers and J.A.
Happ snapped a three-game losing
streak, leading the Toronto Blue Jays
over the Minnesota Twins 11-2.
Lind's first home run highlighted a
five-run first inning a night after
Toronto posted five runs in the third
frame in a victory over Minnesota.
Lind went deep again in the eighth for
his second multi-homer game this
season and 10th of his career.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Boston 12, N.Y Yankees 8
Baltimore 4, Chicago White Sox 0
Cleveland 8, N.Y Mets 1
Detroit 16, Kansas City 2
Toronto 6, Minnesota 5
Oakland 7, Houston 5
L.A. Angels 6, Texas 5
Seattle 6, Tampa Bay 4
Saturday's Games
Boston 13, N.Y Yankees 9
Baltimore 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings
Oakland 2, Houston 1
Cleveland 9, N.Y Mets 4
Kansas City 4, Detroit 3
Toronto 11, Minnesota 2
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Tampa Bay at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Boston (Lester 13-8) at N.YYankees (Kuroda 11-10),
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Matsuzaka 0-3) at Cleveland (Salazar 1-2),
1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 1-1) at Baltimore (B.Nor-
ris 10-10), 1:35 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 12-7) at Kansas City (B.Chen 6-2), 2:10
p.m.
Toronto (Rogers 4-7) at Minnesota (A.Albers 2-2),
2:10 p.m.
Texas (Tepesch 4-6) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 8-6), 3:35
p.m.
Houston (Clemens 4-4) at Oakland (Colon 14-6), 4:05
p.m.
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 15-3) at Seattle (E.Ramirez 5-
1), 4:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 5
Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1
Cleveland 8, N.Y Mets 1
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Miami 7, Washington 0
St. Louis 12, Pittsburgh 8
San Diego 4, Colorado 3
San Francisco 3, Arizona 0
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati 4, L.A. Dodgers 3, 10 innings
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 3
Cleveland 9, N.Y Mets 4
Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 5
Washington 9, Miami 2
St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 0
Colorado at San Diego, late
Arizona at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
N.Y Mets (Matsuzaka 0-3) at Cleveland (Salazar 1-2),
1:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 6-9) at Miami (Ja.Turner3-5),
1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 10-10) at Philadelphia (Hamels 6-
13), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 7-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 2-0), 2:15
p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 10-9) at Chicago Cubs (S.Baker
0-0), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 9-10) at San Francisco (Bumgarner
11-9), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Bettis 0-3) at San Diego (Kennedy 6-9),
4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 14-8) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey
10-10), 8:05 p.m.


Happ (4-5), who entered the game
with a 7.71 ERA in his last three out-
ings, allowed an unearned run on five
hits while striking out four.

National League

Reds 4, Dodgers 3,
10 innings
CINCINNATI Billy Hamilton stole
second in the 10th inning to set up
Todd Frazier's game-winning single,
helping the Cincinnati Reds beat the
Los Angeles Dodgers 4-3.
Ryan Ludwick opened the Cincinnati
10Oth with a leadoff walk against Brian
Wilson (1-1). Reds manager Dusty
Baker then went to the dynamic Hamil-
ton, and the speedy prospect took sec-
ond as catcher A.J. Ellis dropped the
ball while taking it out of his glove.
Yasiel Puig hit a two-run homer for
NL West-leading Los Angeles.

Phillies 6, Braves 5
PHILADELPHIA- Freddy Galvis
hit a game-ending homer with one
out in the ninth inning to lift the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 6-5 win over
the Atlanta Braves.


Atlanta had trailed 5-3 going into
the ninth, butAndrelton Simmons hit a
two-out two-run homer off Jonathan
Papelbon (5-1), who blew his seventh
save in 32 opportunities.
Galvis, who had four hits, got Pa-
pelbon the win by connecting on a 1-0
pitch from Freddy Garcia (0-1) into the
seats in right field. It was the first four-
hit game for Galvis, who had been 0-
for-7 since being recalled from
Triple-A Lehigh Valley on Sept. 3. It
was his fifth homer of the season.
Carlos Ruiz singled, doubled and
drove in three runs, and Cesar Her-
nandez and Kevin Frandsen each had
three hits for the Phillies.

Cardinals 5, Pirates 0
ST. LOUIS -Adam Wainwright
bounced back from back-to-back sub-
par outings with seven shutout innings
and David Freese homered to lead
the St. Louis Cardinals to a 5-0 win
over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
The victory moved the Cardinals into
first place, a half-game ahead of the Pi-
rates in the NL Central with their third
win in four games. Pittsburgh has lost
four of six including the first two of the
three-game set. The Pirates remain
stuck on 81 wins, one shy of assuring
them a winning record for the first time
since they went 96-66 in 1992.
Wainwright (16-9) had given up 15
earned runs over his previous two
starts, both against Cincinnati. He al-
lowed a career-high nine runs in two
innings of a 10-0 loss Aug. 28. But he
regained his form against the Pirates
allowing just two hits.

Nationals 9, Marlins 2
MIAMI Ryan Zimmerman home-
red twice and drove in three runs,
powering the Washington Nationals to
a 9-2 victory over the Miami Marlins.
Zimmerman hit a two-run shot in
the first and a leadoff drive on Nathan
Eovaldi's first pitch of the third.
Tanner Roark (5-0) pitched six score-
less innings as the Nationals won for
the third time in four games to remain
on the fringe of the NL wild-card race.

Brewers 5, Cubs 3
CHICAGO Logan Schafer hit a
three-run triple and Johnny Hellweg
pitched six innings for his first career
major league victory in the Milwau-
kee Brewers' 5-3 win over the
Chicago Cubs.
Hellweg (1-3) allowed three runs on
four hits. He struck out one and
pitched around three walks to finally
earn his first victory after flourishing in
the minors.
Brewers relievers Rob Wooten and
Brandon Kintzler each pitched a
scoreless inning then Jim Henderson
pitched a perfect ninth for his 23rd
save in 27 opportunities.

Interleague

Indians 9, Mets 4
CLEVELAND-Asdrubal Cabrera
hit a three-run homer, Nick Swisher had
a solo shot and the surging Cleveland
Indians beat the New York Mets 9-4.
Cleveland has won four in a row for
the first time since it captured eight
straight from July 24-Aug. 1. Swisher
finished with two hits and two RBIs as
the Indians stayed in the hunt for the
AL's second wild-card slot.
Corey Kluber (8-5), the first of
seven Cleveland pitchers, allowed two
runs in five-plus innings. Kluber, pitch-
ing for the first time since Aug. 5 after
being sidelined by a sprained right
middle finger, was pulled after walking
the leadoff hitter in the sixth.


AL


Boston


Victorn rf
JGoms If
Pedroia 2b
JMcDnl 2b
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli lb
Mdlrks 3b
BrdlyJr cf
Lvrnwy c
Bogarts ss


Red Sox 13,
Yankees 9
NewYork


rhbi ab rhbi
2 1 1 Gardnrcf 3 32 2
2 3 4 Jeterss 4 0 1 1
0 1 0 MrRynlpr-3b 1 1 1 2
00 0 Cano2b 5 02 1
1 1 1 ASorinlf 4 1 1 1
22 3 Grndrsdh 4 00 0
1 2 0 Nunez3b-ss 4 2 1 0
2 1 0 Overaylb 4 01 1
1 1 1 ISuzukirf 4 02 1
22 3 AuRmnc 2 00 0


JMrphy ph-c 2 2 1 0
V.Wells ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 39131413 Totals 38912 9
Boston 023 520 001 13
NewYork 011 104 020 9
DP-NewYork 1. LOB-Boston 4, NewYork 9.
2B-Victorino (24), Pedroia (38), D.Ortiz (31),
Lavarnway (7), Bogaerts (1), Gardner (32),
Mar.Reynolds (12), Nunez (14), I.Suzuki (15).
HR-J.Gomes (12), Napoli 2 (21), Bogaerts (1).
S-Granderson. SF-D.Ortiz.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
LackeyW,9-12 52/38 7 7 3 6
Thornton 1/3 2 0 0 0 0
D.Britton 11/32 2 2 1 0
TazawaH,23 1 0 0 0 1 0
Breslow 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
HuffL,2-1 31/38 9 9 0 2
Ji.Miller 11/33 3 3 1 0
B.Marshall 41/33 1 1 1 3
Orioles 4,
White Sox 3,10 inns.
Chicago Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
LeGarc cf-2b5 0 1 0 BRorts 2b 4 1 1 1
Bckhm2b 3 00 0 Machd3b 5 12 0
JrDnks ph-cfl 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 5 0 2 0
AIRmrzss 4 1 1 0 C.Davislb 5 01 1
Konerklb 4 0 2 1 Hardyss 5 00 0
AGarcirf 4 0 0 0 Valencidh 4 03 0
Kppngrdh 4 0 0 0 ACasill pr-dh 0 0 0 0
Viciedol If 3 1 2 1 Urrutiaph 1 01 0
A.Dunnph 1 00 0 ChDckrpr 0 10 0
BryAndc 0 00 0 Markksrf 5 1 1 0
Pheglyc 3 0 0 0 Morse If 2 0 0 0
DeAzal If 1 00 0 McLothph-lf 3 01 0
Semien3b 3 00 0 CSnydrc 2 00 0
Gillaspi 3b 1 1 1 1 Wieters ph-c 2 0 1 2
Totals 37 37 3 Totals 43 413 4
Chicago 000 110 000 1 3
Baltimore 100 010 000 2 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Le.Garcia (2), Phegley 2 (4), Hardy (10).
LOB-Chicago 5, Baltimore 12.2B-
AI.Ramirez (37), Konerko (16), Viciedo (20),
Machado (47), C.Davis (39), Valencia 2(11),
McLouth (27). HR-Viciedo (12), Gillaspie (12),
B.Roberts (5). SB-A.Jones (13), Markakis (1),
McLouth (30). CS-Jor.Danks (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
H.Santiago
Petricka
Lindstrom
Purcey
N.Jones
A.Reed L,5-3
Baltimore
W.Chen
O'Day
Ji.Johnson


662208
200011
100001
6 6 2 2 0 8
2 0 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 1


Tom.HunterW,4-3 1 1 1 1 0 2
A's 2, Astros I


Houston

Villar ss
Altuve 2b
Crowe rf
JCastro dh
MDmn3b
Carter If
Wallac lb
Pagnzz c
Krauss ph
Keuchl pr
C.CIark c
BBarns cf
Totals
Houston
Oakland


Oakland
rhbi ab rhbi
0 1 0 Lowriess 4 12 1
0 1 0 CYoungcf 4 02 0
00 0 Dnldsn3b 4 02 0
0 0 0 Cespdsl If 4 12 1
0 1 0 Freimnib 3 01 0
00 0 Barton lb 1 00 0
1 1 0 Callasp2b 4 0 1 0
00 0 DNorrsdh 3 00 0
0 1 0 S.Smith ph-dhl 0 0 0
00 0 Choicerf 2 00 0
00 0 Mossph-rf 1 00 0
00 1 KSuzukc 3 00 0
15 1 Totals 34210 2
000 000 010 1
000 100 l10x 2


E-M.Dominguez (13). LOB-Houston 3, Oak-
land 8. 2B-M.Dominguez (21), Wallace (13),
C.Young (15), Donaldson (34). HR-Lowrie (11),
Cespedes (22). SB-B.Barnes (11), Cespedes
(7). CS-B.Barnes (11).
IP H RERBBSO


Houston
Oberholtzer L,4-2
Zeid


671105
131100
6 7 1 1 0 5
1 3 1 1 0 0


Lo 1 0 0 0 0 0
Oakland
StrailyW,9-7 7 2 0 0 1 7
OteroH,6 2/3 2 1 1 0 0
DoolittleS,1-6 11/31 0 0 0 0
Royals 4, Tigers 3
Detroit Kansas City


ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 3 1 1 0 AGordn If
TrHntrrf 4 0 0 0 Bonifac2b
MiCarr3b 2 0 1 2 Hosmerib
Fielder 1lb 4 0 1 1 BButlerdh
VMrtnzdh 4 0 0 0 Mostks3b
Infante2b 4 0 0 0 S.Perezc
NCstlnsIf 2 1 1 0 Lough rf
Dirks ph-lf 2 0 0 0 L.Cain rf
B.Penac 4 1 1 0 JDysoncf
RSantgss 1 0 0 0 AEscorss
Avilaph 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 35 3 Totals
Detroit 100 010 100


ab r h bi
4010
4021
3110
4010
4000
3112
3010
0000
4 0 1 0



3111
4 0 2 148 4
3 1 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 1 2
3 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
3 1 1 1

294 8 4
3


Kansas City 001 012 00x 4
DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 7, Kansas City 4.
2B-Hosmer (30), Lough (17). HR-S.Perez
(11). SB-J.Dyson (30). CS-R.Santiago (1),
Bonifacio (7). S-J.Dyson.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VerlanderL,12-11 7 8 4 4 1 7
Coke 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
Veras 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
Kansas City
Duffy 41/32 2 2 5 1
W.DavisW,7-10 12/30 0 0 1 1
W.SmithH,4 1/3 2 1 1 0 1
HochevarH,5 12/31 0 0 0 1
G.Holland S,39-42 1 0 0 0 0 2
Blue Jays 11, Twins 2


Toronto


Minnesota


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Reyesss 5 2 2 0 Presleycf 5 02 0
Kawsk2b 4 1 2 2 Mstrnnrf 4 0 1 0
DeRosaph 1 00 0 Doumitph-rf 1 00 0
Goins2b 0 00 0 Dozier2b 4 02 0
Encrncdh 3 20 0 Wlnghdh 3 10 0
Lind lb 5 2 2 6 Plouffe3b 5 1 2 0
Lawrie3b 5 1 3 1 Arcial If 4 02 1
Sierrarf 2 1 1 0 Colaelllb 3 0 0 0
RDavisrf 3 1 2 0 Pintoc 4 01 1
Arenciic 5 0 1 1 Flormnss 4 01 0
Gosecf 4 0 1 1
Pillar If 4 1 1 0
Totals 41111511 Totals 37211 2
Toronto 500 000 213 11
Minnesota 000 100 010 2
E-Lawrie (10). DP Toronto 2, Minnesota 1.
LOB-Toronto 5, Minnesota 13. 2B-Reyes 2
(12), Sierra (6). 3B-Gose (3). HR-Lind 2 (19),
Lawrie (11).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
HappW,4-5 52/35 1 0 3 4
Wagner H,9 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Loup 2/3 3 0 0 0 1
S.Santos 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Drabek 0 3 1 1 1 0
Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 2
Jeffress 1 0 0 0 1 2
Minnesota
CorreiaL,9-11 6 7 5 5 1 4
Roenicke 12/35 3 3 0 2
Thielbar 2/3 2 3 3 1 0
Fien 2/31 0 0 0 0


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE


B2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


BASEBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Glantz-Culver Line
For Sept. 8
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
NewEngland 6% 10 (51) at Buffalo
at Pittsburgh 6/2 7 (42)Tennessee
at New Orleans 3 3 (55) Atlanta
Tampa Bay 21 3 /2 (39/2) at N.Y Jets
Kansas City 21' 4 (42'/2) at Jacksonville
at Chicago 3 3 (42) Cincinnati
at Cleveland Pk 1 (41) Miami
Seattle 3'/2 3'/2 (45) at Carolina
at Detroit 3 5 (46/2) Minnesota
at Indianapolis 6/2 10 (47) Oakland
atSt. Louis 5/2 4 /2 (41/2) Arizona
atSan Fran. 5/2 4/2 (49) Green Bay
at Dallas 3 3/2 (49) N.Y Giants
Tomorrow
atWashington 4/2 3/2 (52) Philadelphia
Houston 2'/2 4 (44'/2) at San Diego



NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New England 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.Y Jets 0 0 0 .000 0 0
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 0
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.Y Giants 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 0
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 0
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Thursday's Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Today's Games
Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia atWashington, 6:55 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.

Miami 21,
No. 12 Florida 16
Florida 6 0 3 7- 16
Miami 14 0 0 7- 21
First Quarter
Mia-Waters 7 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 7:24.
Fla-Driskel 9 run (pass failed), 3:43.
Mia-Dorsett 52 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
1:47.
Third Quarter
Fla-FG Hardin 33, 8:40.
Fourth Quarter
Mia-Du.Johnson 2 run (Goudis kick), 3:29.
Fla-Patton 21 pass from Driskel (Hardin kick), 2:08.


A-76,968.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Fla
22
44-122
291
22-33-2
57
4-42.5
4-3
10-70
38:20


Mia
10
28-50
162
12-25-1
70
9-43.6
0-0
5-58
21:40


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Jones 18-47, M.Brown 10-29,
Showers 4-27, Driskel 9-19, Patton 2-4, T.Burton 1-
(minus 4). Miami, Du.Johnson 21-59, Hagens 1-7,
Team 1-(minus 2), Waters 1-(minus 5), Morris 4-
(minus 9).
PASSING-Florida, Driskel 22-33-2-291. Miami,
Morris 12-25-1-162.
RECEIVING-Florida, Dunbar 7-98, Patton 6-118,
T.Burton 6-64, Ajagbe 1-7, Showers 1-3, Jones 1-1.
Miami, Hums 4-60, Waters 3-14, Walford 2-24,
Du.Johnson 2-12, Dorsett 1-52.

Michigan State 21,
South Florida 6
South Florida 0 6 0 0- 6
Michigan St. 0 7 7 7- 21
Second Quarter
MSU-Calhoun 4 fumble return (Muma kick), 9:30.
USF-FG Kloss 49, 2:06.
USF-FG Kloss 21,:03.
Third Quarter
MSU-Calhoun 56 interception return (Muma kick),
6:51.
Fourth Quarter
MSU-Langford 2 run (Muma kick), 10:12.


A-70,401.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


MSU
16
38-171
94
12-24-0
75
7-45.6
2-2
9-94
30:39


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Shaw 23-94, Pierre 5-15,
Bench 1-4, Eppes 1-1, B.Eveld 5-(minus 25). Michi-
gan St., Hill 9-63, Langford 9-38, R.Bullough 6-36,
Burbridge 1-21, Cook 9-10, Shelton 2-7, O'Connor
2-(minus 4).
PASSING-South Florida, B.Eveld 6-25-1-66, Bench
0-1-0-0. Michigan St., Cook 6-11-0-32, Maxwell 4-9-
0-40, O'Connor 2-4-0-22.
RECEIVING-South Florida, A.Davis 2-41, Hopkins
2-14, Eppes 2-11. Michigan St., Langford 5-21, Kings
3-24, Burbridge 1-20, Mumphery 1-18, Hill 1-10,
R.Bullough 1-1.

College football scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 37, Colgate 34
Bryant 34, Assumption 7


SCOREBOARD


R.Hill 2/30 1 1 1 2
Pestano 0 2 1 1 0 0
FrHro J=HagadoneH,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Shaw H,10 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Foi LO T R RzepczynskiH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Corid LOTTERY Carrasco 11/30 0 0 0 0
Kluber pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Pestano pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.

Here are the winningnumbers selected Phillies 6, Braves 5


Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
2-19-22-26-45
POWER BALL
24


CASH 3 (early)
8-6-6
CASH 3 (late)
7-1-7

PLAY 4 (early)
4-5-2-0
PLAY 4 (late)
5-0-0-8

FANTASY 5
17-19-26-29-31

LOTTERY
7-16-31-38-39-42
XTRA
2


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 1 18 30 37
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 2
3-of-4 MB 33
3-of-4 675
2-of-4 MB 976
1-of-4 MB 9,032
2-of-4 23,527


$3,330.00
$438.00
$63.50
$30.50
$3.00
$2.00


Fantasy 5:4 9 11 -12 -32
5-of-5 1 winner $226,054.79
4-of-5 378 $96.00
3-of-5 11,649 $8.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Gran Premio D'ltalia race
11:30 a.m. (FS1) K&N Pro Series: Monroe. West racing (Taped)
12:30 p.m. (FS1) Camping World Truck Series: Iowa qualifying
(Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (FS1) Camping World Truck Series: Iowa race
5 p.m. (FS1) Rolex Sports Car Series: Laguna Seca
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (TBS) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Milwaukee Brewers at Chicago Cubs
4 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at Cincinnati Reds
BICYCLING
3 p.m. (NBC) Cycling Vuelta a Espana, Stage 15 (Same-day Tape)
BOWLING
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's USBC Queens (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Miami (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Cleveland Browns
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New York Jets
4:25 p.m. (FOX) Green Bay Packers at San Francisco 49ers
8:20 p.m. (NBC) New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Omega European Masters,
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Chiquita Classic, Final Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) Walker Cup, Final Day
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Montreal Championship, Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (SUN) Women's College: Oklahoma State at Florida
11 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: Philadelphia Union at San Jose Earthquakes
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) 2013 U.S. Open: Men's Doubles Final
4:30 p.m. (CBS) 2013 U.S. Open: Women's Final
TRACK AND FIELD
2 p.m. (NBC) IAAF Diamond League: Brussels (Taped)

RADIO
BASEBALL
3:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game
4:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Bucknell27, Marist 14
Delaware 42, Delaware St. 21
Fordham 27, Villanova 24
Georgetown 42, Davidson 6
Houston 22, Temple 13
Lehigh 51, CCSU 44, 20T
Maine 24, UMass 14
Penn St. 45, E. Michigan 7
Robert Morris 31, Morgan St. 14
Rutgers 38, Norfolk St. 0
Sacred Heart 26, Lafayette 24
Stony Brook 24, Rhode Island 0
Towson 49, Holy Cross 7
SOUTH
Bethune-Cookman 66, Virginia Union 7
Campbell 56, Virginia-Wise 21
Charleston Southern 23, Shorter 15
Charlotte 47, Chowan 7
Chattanooga 42, Georgia St. 14
Clemson 52, SC State 13
Coastal Carolina 35, Furman 28
Delta St. 24, MVSU 14
Duke 28, Memphis 14
Elon 49, WV Wesleyan 7
Georgia 41, South Carolina 30
Georgia Southern 59, St. Francis (Pa.) 17
Howard 27, Morehouse 16
Jackson St. 30, Alabama St. 23
Kentucky 41, Miami (Ohio) 7
Louisville 44, E. Kentucky 7
Marshall 55, Gardner-Webb 0
Maryland 47, Old Dominion 10
Miami 21, Florida 16
Mississippi St. 51, Alcorn St. 7
NC A&T 24, Appalachian St. 21
NC Central 23, St. Augustine's 20, 20T
NC State 23, Richmond 21
North Carolina 40, Middle Tennessee 20
Oregon 59, Virginia 10
Presbyterian 42, Brevard 24
South Alabama 41, Tulane 39
Tennessee 52, W. Kentucky 20
Tennessee St. 27, Florida A&M 7
Tuskegee 23, Alabama A&M 7
VMI 34, Glenville St. 27
Virginia Tech 45, W Carolina 3
Wofford 21, The Citadel 10
MIDWEST
Akron 35, James Madison 33
Ball St. 40, Army 14
Bowling Green 41, Kent St. 22
Butler 49, Wittenberg 24
Cent. Michigan 24, New Hampshire 21
Dayton 23, Duquesne 20
Illinois 45, Cincinnati 17
Iowa 28, Missouri St. 14
Michigan St. 21, South Florida 6
Missouri 38, Toledo 23


N. Dakota St. 56, Ferris St. 10
N. Iowa 45, Drake 14
Navy 41, Indiana 35
Nebraska 56, Southern Miss. 13
Northwestern 48, Syracuse 27
Ohio St. 42, San Diego St. 7
Purdue 20, Indiana St. 14
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 34, Valparaiso 31
W. Illinois 34, Quincy 6
Wisconsin 48, Tennessee Tech 0
Youngstown St. 67, Morehead St. 13
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 70, Buffalo 13
Oklahoma St. 56, UTSA 35
TCU 38, SE Louisiana 17
FAR WEST
Boise St. 63, UT-Martin 14
CSU-Pueblo 41, N. Colorado 36
California 37, Portland St. 30
Idaho St. 40, Dixie St. 14
Utah 70, Weber St. 7
Utah St. 52, Air Force 20
Wyoming 42, Idaho 10



Indians 9, Mets 4


NewYork


Cleveland


ab rhbi ab rhbi
EYonglf 2 1 1 0 Bourncf 5 1 1 0
DnMrp2b 4 0 0 0 Swisherib 4 22 2
Z.Lutzdh 4 00 0 Kipnis2b 3 2 1 0
Dudalb 3 1 0 0 JRmrz2b 0 00 0
JuTrnr3b 4 22 2 CSantndh 4 1 1 1
Lagarsrf 4 0 1 1 YGomsc 2 21 0
dnDkkrcf 4 02 1 AsCarrss 4 1 1 3
TdArndc 4 0 0 0 Raburnl If 2 01 3
Quntnll ss 3 0 2 0 MCarsn pr-lf 1 0 1 0
Aviles3b 4 0 2 0
Stubbsrf 4 00 0
Totals 32 48 4 Totals 33911 9
NewYork 010 003 000 4
Cleveland 510 000 30x 9
E-Niese (2). DP-NewYork 2, Cleveland 2. LOB-
New York 4, Cleveland 5. 2B-Ju.Turner (11),
Swisher (24), Raburn (16), Aviles (14). HR-Swisher
(17), As.Cabrera (10). SB-E.Young (36), Bourn
(22), Kipnis 2 (26), M.Carson (1). S-E.Young, Kip-
nis.
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Niese L,6-7
Atchison
Aardsma
Cleveland
KluberW,8-5


696525
123321
100002

552215
6 9 6 5 2 5
1 2 3 3 2 1
1 0 0 0 0 2

5 5 2 2 1 5


Atlanta Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
BUptoncf 4 00 0 CHrndzcf 5 2 3 0
J.Uptonrf 3 0 0 0 Frndsnlb 5 1 3 1
FFrmnlb 4 12 2 Papelnp 0 00 0
Gattisl If 3 0 0 0 Utley2b 5 1 2 0
McCnnc 4 00 0 Ruizc 4 1 2 3
CJhnsn3b 4 1 2 1 RuflIf-lb 2 00 0
Uggla2b 1 00 0 Asche3b 4 00 0
DCrpntp 0 00 0 Galvisss 5 1 4 2
Avilanp 0 00 0 Mayrryrf-lf 4 0 1 0
Varvarp 0 00 0 Kndrckp 2 0 0 0
Trdslvcph 1 0 0 0 Orrph 1 00 0
FGarcip 0 00 0 DeFrtsp 0 00 0
Smmnsss 4 23 2 Diekmnp 0 00 0
A.Woodp 2 10 0 Berndnph-rf 1 00 0
Ayala p 0 0 00
SDownsp 0 0 0 0
EIJhns2b 2 000
Totals 32 57 5 Totals 38615 6
Atlanta 002 001 002 5
Philadelphia 002 020 011 6
One out when winning run scored.
DP-Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 1. LOB-Atlanta 4,
Philadelphia 12.2B-C.Johnson (30), C.Hernan-
dez (3), Frandsen (8), Utley (22), Ruiz (13), May-
berry (23). HR-Simmons (15), Galvis (5).
CS-Simmons (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
A.Wood 42139 4 4 3 4
Ayala 1 1 0 0 0 2
S.Downs 0 1 0 0 0 0
D.Carpenter 11/31 0 0 1 0
Avilan 2/3 2 1 1 0 1
Varvaro 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
F.GarciaL,0-1 1/3 1 1 1 0 0
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick 6 4 3 3 3 8
DeFratusH,8 11/31 0 0 0 2
DiekmanH,7 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
PapelbonW,5-1 1 2 2 2 0 0
S.Downs pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by K.Kendrick (Uggla). PB-Ruiz.

AL leaders
G AB R H Pct.
MiCabreraDet 130 492 96 175 .356
Trout LAA 136 520 95 176 .338
MauerMin 113 445 62 144 .324
ABeltreTex 138 544 80 174 .320
DOrtizBos 120 454 67 141 .311
CanoNYY 141 531 76 163 .307
LoneyTB 135 462 46 140 .303
HKendrickLAA 108 419 48 126 .301
TorHunterDet 128 539 82 162 .301
NavaBos 117 393 67 118 .300
Home Runs
CDavis, Baltimore, 48; MiCabrera, Detroit, 43; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 36; ADunn, Chicago, 30; AJones, Balti-
more, 30; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 30; Bautista, Toronto,
28; ABeltre, Texas, 28; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 28.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 133; CDavis, Baltimore, 124;
Encarnacion, Toronto, 104; AJones, Baltimore, 100;
Fielder, Detroit, 97; Cano, New York, 95; DOrtiz,
Boston, 90.
Pitching
Scherzer, Detroit, 19-2; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 15-
3; Tillman, Baltimore, 15-5; CWilson, Los Angeles,
15-6; Colon, Oakland, 14-6; Masterson, Cleveland,
14-10; AniSanchez, Detroit, 13-7.

NL leaders


CJohnson Atl
Cuddyer Col
YMolina StL
McCutchen Pit
Werth Was
MCarpenter StL
Craig StL
Posey SF
DWright NYM
Beltran StL


G AB R
123 443 48
115 429 67
118 440 59
138 519 87
109 392 70
137 546 110
134 508 71
130 459 53
105 408 60
127 491 74
Home Runs


PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 32; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
31; DBrown, Philadelphia, 27; Bruce, Cincinnati, 27;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; JUpton, Atlanta, 24; Bel-
tran, St. Louis, 23.
Runs Batted In
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 106; Phillips, Cincinnati,
101; Craig, St. Louis, 97; FFreeman, Atlanta, 96;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 91; PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 87; Ad-
Gonzalez, Los Angeles, 87.
Pitching
JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 16-6; Zimmermann,
Washington, 16-8; Wainwright, St. Louis, 16-9; Liri-
ano, Pittsburgh, 15-7; Greinke, Los Angeles, 14-3;
Latos, Cincinnati, 14-5; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 14-8.



Sprint Cup

Federated Auto Parts
400 Results
Saturday
At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond, Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (26) C. Edwards, Ford, 400 laps, 111.2 rating, 47 points.
2. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 129.6, 43.
3. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 100.9, 42.
4. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 114.1,41.
5. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 90, 40.
6. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 104.3, 39.
7. (11) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 87.8, 37.
8. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 101.9, 37.
9. (16) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 400, 75.9, 35.
10. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 400, 77.2, 34.
11. (17) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 92.1, 33.
12.(9) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 99.3, 32.
13.(14) Dale EarnhardtJr., Chevrolet, 400, 81.8, 31.
14. (18) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 78.8, 30.
15. (34) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 400, 71.2, 29.
16. (12) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 400, 81.5, 28.
17. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 118.9, 29.
18. (19) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 400, 97.2, 26.
19. (13) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 92.3, 25.
20. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 83.4, 24.
21. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 399, 73.3, 23.
22. (8) Joey Logano, Ford, 399, 67.6, 22.
23. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 399, 60, 21.
24. (20) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 399, 62.9, 0.
25. (4) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 398, 104.5, 20.
26. (25) Casey Mears, Ford, 397, 53.8, 18.
27. (32) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 397, 56.6, 17.
28. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 397, 45.8, 16.
29. (23) David Ragan, Ford, 397, 57.2, 15.
30. (36) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 396, 39.1, 14.
31. (40) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 396, 47, 13.
32. (35) David Reutimann, Toyota, 395, 46, 12.
33. (41) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 395, 36.6, 0.
34. (28) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 395, 46.3, 0.
35. (38) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 395, 34.1,0.
36. (43) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 393, 32.9, 8.
37. (42) Ken Schrader, Ford, 393, 36.8, 7.
38. (29) David Stremme, Toyota, 391, 30.8, 6.
39. (31) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 388, 31.6, 0.
40. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 372, 46.8, 4.
41. (27) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 142, 43, 0.
42. (39) Reed Sorenson, Ford, brakes, 126, 25.8, 0.
43. (30) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 76, 31.9, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 105.028 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 51 minutes, 23 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.668 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 29 laps.
Lead Changes: 17 among 9 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Gordon 1-49; B.Keselowski 50-65;
Ku.Busch 66-94; J.McMurray 95-96; B.Keselowski
97-104; M.Kenseth 105-109; Ku.Busch 110-137;
J.McMurray 138-141; B.Keselowski 142-208;
Ku.Busch 209-217; B.Keselowski 218-268; Ku.Busch
269; C.Bowyer 270-341; Ku.Busch 342-347; C.Ed-
wards 348-390; R.Newman 391-394; PMenard 395-
397; C.Edwards 398-400.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 B3




USF shut



down in



21-6 loss



Michigan St.

scores two TDs

on defense

Associated Press

EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Bobby Eveld has his coach's
endorsement as South
Florida's quarterback even
if his performance at Michigan
State was a forgettable one.
"Bobby can't throw the ball
when he's on his back, and he
can't complete passes when
you drop the ball," coach
Willie Taggart said. "Right now
he's our guy Things change but
right now he's our guy"
Shilique Calhoun scored on
a fumble return and an inter-
ception return, enabling Michi-
gan State to overcome its own
poor offensive performance in
a 21-6 victory over South
Florida on Saturday Eveld was
6 of 25 for 66 yards with a fum-
ble and an interception.
South Florida (0-2) was
routed in its opener by Mc-
Neese State, and the Bulls
couldn't get anything going of-
fensively Saturday
"It's very frustrating," Eveld
said. "Obviously you talk about
not turning the ball over, pe-
riod, and then having the other
defense score just kind of ruins
it for you."
The Spartans (2-0) rotated
Connor Cook, Tyler O'Connor
and Andrew Maxwell at quar-
terback, but their offense con-
tributed only one touchdown.
The defense has scored four of
their six TDs this year
Michigan State's offense fi-
nally scored in the fourth quar-
ter when Jeremy Langford ran
2 yards for a touchdown. That
drive was only 33 yards after a
short South Florida punt.
Michigan State's defense
scored two of the team's three
touchdowns in a season-
opening win over Western
Michigan.



THEU
Continued from Page B1


touchdown for Florida (1-1),
which had gotten off to 2-0 starts
in each of the previous eight
seasons. But he had two inter-
ceptions, fumbled once and was
stopped on a fourth-down try
for another giveaway all part of
a messy effort by the Gators.
"It started with me," Driskel
said. "I was careless with the
ball."
Duke Johnson added a
2-yard touchdown run for a 21-
9 lead with 3:29 left for Miami
(2-0), which has won four
straight dating back to last sea-
son, the longest such streak for
the Hurricanes since 2008.
The offensive numbers were
ridiculously one-sided, in favor
of the Gators. Florida out-
gained Miami 413-212, had a
22-10 edge in first downs, out-
ran the Hurricanes 122-50, en-
joyed nearly a 2-to-i edge in
time of possession and held
Miami to an abysmal 1-for-ll
effort on third-down chances.
And the Gators still lost, only
blaming themselves afterward.
"You cannot keep shooting
yourself in the foot, especially
on the road," Florida coach
Will Muschamp said.
Miami had 143 yards in the
first quarter, averaging 7.9
yards per play The rest of the
way: 69 yards, 2.0 per play It
was Miami's lowest yardage
total in a victory since Oct. 26,
1996, when the Hurricanes
managed only 162 against then-
No. 12 West Virginia.
"There was nothing easy on
that field," Golden said. "For
either team."
For Florida, that was partic-
ularly true when it got inside
the Miami 20.
The one touchdown Florida


had in the red zone was a gift,
set up by a blocked punt in the
first quarter The other Florida
trips deep into Miami territory
ended thusly:
Interception by Miami's
Rayshawn Jenkins.
Driskel stopped on downs
by Miami's Denzel Perryman
and Olsen Pierre.
Fumble by Trey Burton
that was forced by the Hurri-
canes' Jimmy Gaines.
Field goal by Florida's
Austin Hardin.
Interception by Miami's
Tracy Howard.
"I'm putting it on myself,"
Burton said. "I made many
mistakes."









No. 11 Bulldogs triumph


Georgia downs

No. 6 Gamecocks

in early SEC game

Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Aaron Mur-
ray threw for 309 yards and four
touchdowns, Georgia's belea-
guered defense finally came up
with a stop, and the Bulldogs de-
feated South Carolina 41-30 for
an early edge in the Southeast-
ern Conference East.
Coming off a 38-35 loss at
Clemson, Georgia could not af-
ford another defeat if it wanted
to remain a serious contender
for a national title.
Murray took care of that, turn-
ing in one of the best games of
his career The fifth-year senior
capped his stellar day for the
Bulldogs (1-1, 1-0 SEC) with an
85-yard touchdown pass to
Justin Scott-Wesley with 13 min-
utes remaining.
The defense made sure it stood
up, stuffing Mike Davis on fourth-
and-goal from inside the 1.
Davis led the Gamecocks (1-1,
0-1) with 149 yards rushing on 16
carries.
No. 2 Oregon 59,
Virgina 10
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -
De'Anthony Thomas ran for 124
yards and three touchdowns, Mar-
cus Mariota threw for two touch-
downs and ran 71 yards for another
score, and Oregon started fast and
completely manhandled Virginia.
The Ducks (2-0), who gained a
school-record 772 yards last week in
beating Nicholls State, looked capable
of doing it again against a Virginia de-
fense that hoped to keep the Cava-
liers in the game. Oregon finished with
557 yards and did all its scoring while
possessing the ball for just 21:25.
Virginia (1-1) got an early look at
what it was up against as Mariota
dropped back on a third-and-5 on
the opening series, then bolted up
the middle untouched, going 71
yards for a touchdown.
No. 3 Ohio St. 42,
San Diego St. 7
COLUMBUS, Ohio Kenny Gui-
ton took over when Braxton Miller
left with a sprained left knee, running
for one touchdown and passing for
two while leading Ohio State over
San Diego State.
Miller watched the last three quar-
ters from the sideline after being
sandwiched between two tacklers on
the Buckeyes' seventh offensive play.
The Buckeyes (2-0) didn't need him.
Guiton, who helped save Ohio
State's 12-0 season a year ago, had
the most playing time he's ever had
in a game. He set career bests with
19 of 28 passing for 152 yards and
83 rushing yards.
Guiton came in having completed
14 of 25 passes for 144 yards and two
touchdowns with two interceptions in
his 16 career games. He had totaled
59 yards rushing on 14 attempts.
No. 4 Clemson 52,
South Carolina St. 13
CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd ran
for a touchdown and Clemson re-
turned two interceptions for scores
for the first time in program history in
a win over FCS opponent South


Associated Press
Georgia running back Todd Gurley works against the South Carolina defense during the second half
Saturday in Athens, Ga. The No. 11 Bulldogs knocked off the No. 6 Gamecocks 41-30.


Carolina State.
Boyd finished 14-of-23 passing for
169 yards after accounting for five
TDs a week ago and becoming a
prime Heisman Trophy contender as
the Tigers (2-0) defeated No. 11
Georgia 38-35.
In this one, Boyd scored Clem-
son's first touchdown and played
only a half against the Bulldogs (0-2)
before finding a spot on the Death
Valley sidelines next to offensive co-
ordinator Chad Morris. That was
more than enough, though, for
Clemson to move to 27-0 all-time
against FCS teams.
Cornerbacks Martin Jenkins and
Darius Robinson each had pick-6
scores to help the Tigers to a 38-7
lead by halftime.
No. 7 Texas A&M 65,
Sam Houston St. 28
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Johnny Manziel threw for 426 yards
and three touchdowns and ran for
another score in less than three quar-
ters to give No. 7 Texas A&M to a 65-
28 win over Sam Houston State.
The Heisman Trophy-winner
played about a quarter more than he
did last week when he sat out the
first half serving a suspension for
what the school called an "inadver-
tent" violation of NCAA rules involv-
ing signing autographs.
Texas A&M's suspension-depleted
defense was burned for several big
plays by the Bearkats, the FCS run-
ner-up the last two seasons, in the
final tuneup before next week's re-
match with top-ranked Alabama.
No. 8 Louisville 44,
E. Kentucky 7
LOUISVILLE, Ky.- Teddy
Bridgewater threw for 397 yards and
four touchdowns, and Louisville
routed Eastern Kentucky on a day
the Cardinals' defense just missed it
second straight shutout.
Linebacker Preston Brown had
two sacks for Louisville, and Calvin
Pryor had an interception as
Louisville limited Eastern Kentucky
(1-1) to 76 yards of total offense in
the first half.
Following the noon kickoff,
Louisville (2-0) settled for a pair of
field goals from John Wallace after
turnovers gave the offense short


No. 14 Notre Dame at Cowboys led 35-7 at halftime.
No. 14 Notre Dame at ^
No. 17 Michigan No. 16 Oklahoma 16,
Weft Virginia 7


* Michigan defeated Notre
Dame 41-30 late Saturday
night in Ann Arbor. A small
story will appear in
Monday's sport section.

fields. The Cardinals also settled for a
third field goal in the third quarter de-
spite reaching Eastern Kentucky's 4.
Bridgewater hit his first five
passes and wound up 23 of 32 with
no interceptions after throwing five
touchdowns with one interception
in the opener.
No. 9 LSU 56, UAB 17
BATON ROUGE, La.-Zach
Mettenberger passed for an LSU
single-game record five touch-
downs, receiver Odell Beckham Jr.
scored one of his four touchdowns
on a 100-yard field goal return, and
the ninth-ranked Tigers over-
whelmed UAB 56-17.
LSU coach Les Miles also decided
to end running back Jeremy Hill's
benching in the second quarter of the
second game of the season. Hill, who
was arrested last spring for landing a
punch outside a bar, scored on a
3-yard run on his first carry.
Mettenberger finished 16 of 19
for 282 yards and was not inter-
cepted. Beckham's 136 yards and
three TDs receiving were both ca-
reer highs. He led LSU (2-0) with
331 all-purpose yards.
No. 13 Oklahoma St. 56,
UTSA 35
SAN ANTONIO New starter
J.W. Walsh completed his first 10
passes and finished 24-of-27 for 326
yards with four touchdowns to lead
Oklahoma State over UTSA.
It's the fourth start for the sopho-
more Walsh, his first this season after
a quick relief performance for Clint
Chelf last week. With his speedy start
against a Roadrunners team entering
its third season of football, Walsh led
the Cowboys (2-0) to TDs on five of
six first-half possessions.
UTSA (1-1) tied the score 7-7
when Kenny Bias scored on a 6-
yard run with 4:22 left in the first
quarter. But Walsh scored from 4
yards out in the second and the


NORMAN, Okla. Brennan Clay
had career-high 170 yards rushing
as Oklahoma overcame a second-
half quarterback switch defeat West
Virginia 16-7.
The No. 16 Sooners (2-0, 1-0 Big
12) scored the game's final 16
points after trailing 7-0 in the first
quarter. Freshman quarterback
Trevor Knight threw a pair of third-
quarter interceptions, leading to jun-
ior Blake Bell taking over in the
fourth quarter.
Clay finished with 22 carries, lead-
ing an Oklahoma offense that had
323 yards rushing and topping his
previous best of 157 yards rushing
against Iowa State in 2012.
Paul Millard was 21-of-42 passing
for 218 yards for the Mountaineers
(1-1,0-1).
No. 19 Northwestern 48,
Syracuse 27
EVANSTON, III. -Trevor
Siemian threw for 259 yards and a
career-high three touchdowns, and
Kain Colter passed for a score and
ran for another to lead Northwestern
over Syracuse.
Tony Jones added a personal-
best 185 yards receiving and a 47-
yard TD, and the Wildcats (2-0)
racked up 581 yards on offense.
They also intercepted Syracuse's
Drew Allen four times.
Northwestern scored the game's
first 20 points and led 34-7 at the
half after amassing 387 yards, with
their quarterbacks picking apart
Syracuse (0-2).
No. 21 Wisconsin 48,
Tennessee Tech 0
MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gor-
don ran for 140 yards and a score,
and Wisconsin's overpowering de-
fense got its second straight shutout
with a win over FCS school
Tennessee Tech.
Joel Stave was 24 of 29 for 219
yards with three touchdowns and an
interception, while defensive back
Darius Hillary set the tone early by
forcing a fumble that set up a score
for the Badgers (2-0).
The early-season tuneup went


about as well as could be expected
for first-year coach Gary Andersen,
who's breaking in a new 3-4 defense
in Madison. Wisconsin had no prob-
lems against the Golden Eagles (1-
1), whose spread offense got
outmuscled by the bigger Badgers.
Including Gordon, three backs
went over 100 yards for the second
straight game. Gordon accumulated
all his stats in the first half on nine
carries. He had more yards rushing
by himself than Tennessee Tech had
in total offense (83) at halftime.
No. 22 Nebraska 56,
S. Mississippi 13
LINCOLN, Neb. Stanley Jean-
Baptiste and Ciante Evans returned
first-quarter interceptions for touch-
downs and Nebraska made quick
work of Southern Mississippi in the
victory.
Taylor Martinez threw for three
touchdowns and AmeerAbdullah
ran for two more for the Corn-
huskers (2-0), who now turn their at-
tention to next week's home game
against No. 18 UCLA.
Jean-Baptiste jumped in front of
Rickey Bradley Jr. just as Allan
Bridgford's pass arrived on the third
play of the game and ran it back 43
yards. Evans put the Huskers up 21-
3 with the first of his two intercep-
tions, catching a ball tipped by
Tyre'oune Holmes and going 22
yards to the end zone.
No. 23 Baylor 70,
Buffalo 13
WACO, Texas Bryce Petty
threw for 338 yards and two touch-
downs, Lache Seastrunk ran for 150
yards with three scores and Baylor's
first-team offense had 576 total
yards in only 11 minutes with the ball
in a rout of Buffalo.
The starters for the Bears (2-0)
had eight touchdowns in their nine
drives. The only non-scoring drive
was when they had the ball at the
end of the first half.
Baylor finished with a school-
record 781 total yards and topped
the 69 points scored a week earlier
in what had been the most for the
Bears since 1929.
Alex Neutz had six catches for a
career-high 197 yards for Buffalo
(0-2).
Petty completed 13 of 16 passes,
and two of his incompletions were
balls caught but ruled out of bounds.
He also ran for a score.
No. 24 TCU 38,
SE Louisiana 17
FORT WORTH, Texas Trevone
Boykin led three straight scoring
drives after starter Casey Pachall
left with an injury game, and TCU
pulled away from Southeastern
Louisiana.
Pachall appeared to injure his left
arm or wrist at the end of a running
play late in the second quarter.
Boykin ran 16 yards on the next
play, and Jaden Oberkrom ended
the first half with a 46-yard field goal
that put the Horned Frogs (1-1)
ahead 17-14.
Boykin completed a 29-yard pass
to Brandon Carter on the first play of
the second half, and Carter finished
that drive with a 5-yard scoring run.
Then Boykin threw 27 yards to Josh
Doctson for a 31-14 lead.
Bryan Bennett had 132 yards
passing and another 132 rushing for
the Lions (1-1).


Top billing for Novak, Nadal


Djokovic, Razfa in

US Open final

Associated Press

NEW YORK The game took 21
minutes. It lasted 30 points.
Novak Djokovic squandered five
break points and lost that instant clas-
sic of a game but made Stanislas
Wawrinka pay an awfully heavy price.
After dropping the epic third
game of the final set Saturday,
Djokovic broke the next time
Wawrinka served, then didn't falter
once he had the lead. The top-
seeded Serb withstood a 4-hour, 9-
minute onslaught of Wawrinka's
massive groundstrokes to pull out a
2-6, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory and ad-
vance to his fourth straight final at
the U.S. Open.
"Well, I was thinking I guess
everybody was thinking 'Whoever
wins this game is going to win the
match,"' Djokovic said. 'After he
won the game, I thought to myself,
'OK, I guess I have to fight against
those odds."'
He did, to improve to 20-7 in five-
set matches, and now the 2011 cham-
pion will go for his second U.S. Open
title Monday against No. 2 Rafael
Nadal, who had a much easier time
in a 6-4, 7-6 (1), 6-2 victory over
eighth-seeded Richard Gasquet.


Associated Press
Rafael Nadal hits autographed balls to fans Saturday after beating Richard
Gasquet during the semifinals of the 2013 U.S. Open in New York.


It will be the third Nadal-Djokovic
final at Flushing Meadows in the
last four years, the only break com-
ing last year when Nadal was out
with a knee injury They split the
first two meetings.
"Novak is an amazing competitor,"
Nadal said. "His results say that he
is probably one of the best players
that I have ever seen."
Nadal won easily despite drop-
ping his first service game of the


tournament. He had extended his
streak to 73 when Gasquet broke
him in the fourth game of the second
set. Both men held until a second-
set tiebreaker, which Nadal won 7-1
to end what little drama existed in
the afternoon's second match.
Fans certainly got their money's
worth in the first one.
"I managed to find my way
through, to adjust, and to win,"
Djokovic said. "That's what counts."


Edwards wins



at Richmond


Keselowski

out of Chase

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. -
NASCAR will have a new
champion at the end of
the season. For now, it has
yet another conspiracy
Reigning champion
Brad Keselowski failed to
make the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship
Saturday night when an ill-
timed caution ruined his
run at Richmond Interna-
tional Raceway Same
thing happened to Ryan
Newman, who used a pass
on eventual winner Carl
Edwards with 10 laps to go
to take the lead for what
should have been enough
to get him into the Chase.
Then Clint Bowyer
spun three laps later to
bring out a caution that
ruined Newman's race.
The benefactor? Martin
Truex Jr, Bowyer's team-


mate at Michael Waltrip
Racing, who struggled
the entire race.
Newman and Truex
were locked into a race
for the second of two wild
cards in the 12-driver
Chase field, and the race
win would give it to New-
man. Only he lost the lead
on pit road, wound up fin-
ishing third, and Truex
grabbed the final spot in
the Chase.
Conspiracy theorists
immediately accused
Bowyer of spinning on
purpose to help his
teammate.
A despondent Newman
wasn't sure.
"They are teammates. I
don't know if he looked at
the scoring pylon, knew I
was leading, it doesn't
matter," Newman said. "If
that was the case, I'll find
out one way or the other
At the same time we still
had the opportunity to
make our own destiny
and win it on pit road,
and we didn't. That being
said, we're out."


B4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Packers goal in opener: stop


Associated Press

The last time the Packers saw
Colin Kaepernick in person, he
was a meteor bolting through a
flimsy defense. When Green Bay
journeys to San Francisco for
Sunday's marquee matchup
with the NFC champion 49ers,
the defense better be a lot
stingier or the Packers will get
smashed up again.
Kaepernick set a postseason
record for quarterbacks by rush-
ing for 181 yards in San Fran-
cisco's 45-32 divisional-round
victory Green Bay, which has a
pretty effective passer of its own
in Aaron Rodgers, looked inept
when it came to slowing down
Kaepernick and the Niners'
read option.
As Packers star linebacker
Clay Matthews said, the read op-
tion "has become a big part of
the league, and it causes you
problems because it can make
you unsure what to do."
Packers defensive coordinator
Dom Capers wants his guys to be
aggressive and force the issue
with Kaepernick and the versa-
tile 49ers offense. That's not
easy, of course, with Frank Gore
at running back, Vernon Davis at
tight end and Anquan Boldin at
wide receiver, all working with a
stout line.
Rodgers actually is one of the
better scrambling quarterbacks
in the league, and no one throws
on the run better, not even
Kaepernick. He could keep off-
balance a staunch 49ers defense
led by linebackers Patrick Willis,
NaVorro Bowman and Aldon
Smith.
On Thursday night in the sea-
son opener, Peyton Manning
matched the NFL record with
seven touchdown passes in Den-
ver's 49-27 home victory over
Super Bowl champion Baltimore.
Today, it's Atlanta at New Or-
leans, Minnesota at Detroit,
Tampa Bay at the New York Jets,
Seattle at Carolina, Cincinnati at
Chicago, New England at Buf-
falo, Oakland at Indianapolis, the
New York Giants at Dallas, Ten-
nessee at Pittsburgh, Kansas City
at Jacksonville, Miami at Cleve-
land, and Arizona at St Louis.
Monday night has Philadel-
phia at Washington, then Hous-
ton at San Diego.
Atlanta at New Orleans
Welcome back, Sean Payton.
Now let's see how much your
presence means for the Saints.
New Orleans lost its first four
games last season while Payton
was suspended for the entire
schedule due to the bounty scan-
dal. He doesn't want his return
to be the focus at the Super-
dome, especially with the divi-
sion rival Falcons and their
equally prolific offense in town.
Sorry, Sean, it's the big story-
line in the Big Easy


San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick runs against the Green Bay Packers
divisional playoff NFL football game last year in San Francisco. The last time the Packe
nick in person, he was a meteor tearing through their flimsy defense. When Green Bayj
Francisco for today's marquee matchup with the NFC champion 49ers, that defense
stingier, or the Packers will get smashed up again.


Philadelphia at
Washington, Monday
Here's one to savor: Robert
Griffin III, back from major knee
surgery running the read option.
And this: Chip Kelly's fast-
paced, versatile offense trying to
match points with RG3 and the
Redskins.
The furor over Griffin's injury
- and whether he should have
been on the field in the playoff
game against Seattle last Janu-
ary was followed by daily, if
not hourly, reports on his recov-
ery The reigning Offensive
Rookie of the Year is back.
Kelly's Philly version of the
Quack Attack already is without
receivers Jeremy Maclin and Ar-
relious Benn. But he does have
DeSean Jackson, do-everything
running back LeSean McCoy and
Michael Vick to run the show
Houston at San Diego,
Monday
Finishing off the opening
weekend will be the Texans,
who have never beaten the
Chargers, but are favored over
rebuilding San Diego.
Houston is built around stars
like a RB Arian Foster, WR
Andre Johnson, DE J.J. Watt and
LB Brian Cushing, who just got a
huge contract extension.
San Diego has few stars left
and has concentrated on im-
proving the defense, although
new coach Mike McCoy is an of-
fensive master One thing to look
for: How many sacks does
Dwight Freeney have left as he
comes over from Indianapolis
through free agency?
Minnesota at Detroit
This one is simple: If the Lions
can neutralize Adrian Peterson,
then their high-powered offense
could have a field day, particu-
larly if Reggie Bush ignites the


running game. That, of course, is
an IF the size of Ford Field.
Peterson rushed for 273 yards
in two games against Detroit in
his MVP 2012 season. He could
reach that number on Sunday if
he matches the way he per-
formed down the stretch as Min-
nesota won four straight to get a
wild card last year
Detroit has its own record set-
ter, of course, in WR Calvin
Johnson. "Megatron" had 1,964
yards receiving on 122 catches.
Seattle at Carolina
Historically, the Seahawks
don't travel to the East Coast too
successfully That really
shouldn't be a factor to start the
season, though, and this is one of
Seattle's best squads.
While versatile quarterbacks
Cam Newton and Russell Wilson
are focal points, how much the
defenses can slow down the op-
position will decide this one.
Newton will face a superb sec-
ondary led by All-Pros Richard
Sherman and Earl Thomas, and
each side has a terrific line-
backer, Bobby Wagner in Seattle
and 2012 Defensive Rookie of the
Year Luke Kuechly in Carolina.
Cincinnati at Chicago
A very intriguing game out of
the gate for the Bengals, who
many see as a Super Bowl con-
tender or at the very least, an
AFC North winner A win at Sol-
dier Field over the revamped
Bears under new coach Marc
Trestman could stamp Cincin-
nati as a force.
To get it, the Bengals will need
a big effort from star DT Geno
Atkins, who just got a huge con-
tract. If he can unnerve Bears
QB Jay Cutler, who can be rat-
tled, Cincinnati would prosper
Two standout wideouts, Cincy's
A.J. Green and Chicago's Bran-
don Marshall, will be on display


Kaepernick

all your weapons out there, one
of your top receivers," Manning
said. "It's good to get him run-
ning around. I'm excited he'll be
back for this opening game."
Tennessee at Pittsburgh
Yes, the NFL is a passing
league, and when Ben Roethlis-
berger is healthy, the Steelers
can do major damage through
the air
Still, this has the look of what-
ever team runs most effectively
will take charge. While the
Steelers' backfield is a jumble
after the presumed starter,
rookie Le'Veon Bell, sprained
his right foot, the Titans have
Chris Johnson, a one-time 2,000-
yard rusher.
Pittsburgh has won 10 straight
-...-....-;t home openers, longest active
S- *streak in the league.
"- Kansas City
Associated Press
s d,,uring n ICp at Jacksonville


* um,,, cmiir,, =
Drs saw Kaeper-
journeys to San
better be a lot


New England at Buffalo
The Patriots, winners of nine
straight openers, dominate the
Bills like no one else, winning 18
of the last 19 meetings and 23 of
25. Don't look for Tom Brady's
streak of games with TD passes
(48, second only to Drew Brees'
54) to end against an injury-
depleted secondary
Plus, there's Buffalo's
quandary at quarterback, where
it can only hope first-round pick
EJ Manuel, who will start, has
fully recovered from his presea-
son left knee injury
Oakland at Indianapolis
The Raiders have the look of
the worst team in football. The
Colts look like they could push
Houston to the limit in the AFC
South.
Oakland, with nearly $50 mil-
lion going to players no longer
on the roster, is playing it coy
about its starting QB, Terrelle
Pryor or Matt Flynn. Unless Ken
Stabler is coming back in his
prime, it might not matter
against an Indianapolis team
that went from 2-14 in 2011,
earning it the top draft pick (An-
drew Luck), to 11-5.
The uncertainty at quarter-
back means the Raiders will
force feed RB Darren McFad-
den, who when healthy is very
dangerous. Indy was 29th
against the run last year
N.Y. Giants at Dallas
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones
loves the idea of his team being
featured in prime time. He must
hate the idea of playing the Gi-
ants, who have never lost in
Jerry's billion-dollar house,
going 4-0.
Breakaway receiver Victor
Cruz is back from a bruised left
heel, something Eli Manning
finds critical for New York.
"Definitely, it's good to have


Both of these teams were 2-14
on merit last year Only one,
Kansas City, seems ready to dis-
tance itself from the cellar
Andy Reid is following an ap-
proach in KC that is similar to
the one that helped him turn the
Eagles from doormats to con-
tenders. He brought in a quar-
terback, Alex Smith, who has a
good grasp of his West Coast of-
fense, and he inherits a lot more
talent with the Chiefs than new
coach Gus Bradley does with the
Jaguars.
Jacksonville's best chance is
for Maurice Jones-Drew to be
unstoppable in the ground
game.
Miami at Cleveland
The Browns have won four
straight over Miami. To get to
five, new coach Rob Chudzinski
needs his offense to pound the
ball with Trent Richardson.
The Dolphins are considered a
potential challenger to New Eng-
land in the AFC East but after a
difficult preseason, expectations
might have been tempered. They
brought in Mike Wallace as a
deep threat to complement Brian
Hartline in the passing game, but
with Bush gone to Detroit who
will run the ball?
Arizona at St. Louis
The Rams went 4-1-1 in the di-
vision, and considering how
strong San Francisco and Seat-
tle were last season, that's
impressive.
If St. Louis truly is on the up-
swing in its second season under
Jeff Fisher, it will get more pro-
duction in the deep passing
game. The tools are there with
QB Sam Bradford and first-
round pick Tavon Austin.
Bruce Arians parlayed an in-
terim coaching gig in Indianapo-
lis after Chuck Pagano
underwent treatment for
leukemia into NFL Coach of the
Year honors. And now, at age 60,
his first head coaching assign-
ment with a Cardinals team that
fell apart after a 4-0 start in 2012.


CROSS
Continued from Page Bl

place (491).
"I'm really ecstatic with
the boys' times today,"
Lecanto boys coach
Roselle Lattin said. "Our
goal is always to run in a
pack and I think we did
that today"
Jacksonville Mandarin
took home the first place
trophy with 53 points
while Lecanto and Citrus'
district rival Land 0'
Lakes finished second
with 78 points.
The Lady Panthers took
top county honors in the
girls meet finishing ninth
with 269 points. Only one
point separated Lecanto


and eighth place district
rival Springstead.
Citrus finished in 18th
place (464), a mere three
points ahead of 19th place
Crystal River (467).
Ocala Vanguard won the
girls meet with 61 points.
Lecanto sophomore
Claire Farnsworth was the
top-county finisher in the
varsity girls' race, placing
ninth with a time of 20:38
over the 5K distance.
Farnsworth locked in
her top 10 placing early in
the race and held on to it
through to the finish.
"We were all pretty
spread out," Farnsworth
said of her race. "I wasn't
too close to the girls ahead
of me and the girl behind
me was pretty far away I
pretty much stayed where


I was."
Lecanto junior Sam Al-
ford was the county boys'
top finisher in 29th place
(17:52), followed closely by
teammate Michael Lind-
sey in 35th place (18:07).
Crystal River's Brandon
Harris (18:08) came in
right on Lindsey's heels
for 36th place.
Alexis Ulseth took 55th
and was the Lady Pirates
top finisher in a time of
24:15.
Citrus' junior Cameron
Grant (18:49) finished 60th
as the top 'Cane boys run-
ner while junior Alyssa
Weber (22:22) finished as
the No. 1 Lady 'Cane in
23rd place.
Seven Rivers Christian
competed solely in the
junior varsity races. The


Warrior boys finished in
the 16th and last place
with 468 points while the
girls took the runner-up


trophy with 75 points.
Efforts from sophomore
Olivia Huegel (24:21) and
freshman Paige Eckart


(24:22) who finished 8th
and 9th respectively -
helped the Lady Warriors
score low enough.


Honoring Survivors and


Remembering Loved Ones.

Include your loved ones and those touched

by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake Edition

.; on October 1. This special edition

will be printed on pink newsprint.


*AII photos & information must be submitted by Tues., Sept. 24


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505 E. Hartford St Hemando, FL 34442
Saturday, September 14, 2013 @ 11 AM

Designer Purse Auction, Silent Auctions, Raffles,
Great Lunch, Brief testimonials, something for
everyone to enjoy. Purses are stuffed with
personal 'pampering items'!


^ i Tickets are only $25.00, call for reservations
352 527-8831 or 352 469-6006



ALL proceeds to benefit the Michelle-O-Gram.
A local organization assisting women with mammograms and breast ultrasounds
O00FZDZ


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 B5









Defensive gem Friday-night
D f.n I V,. geo


Lecanto gives up no

points on defense

in 10-6 victory

STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent

LECANTO In what is develop-
ing into an early-season trend, the
Lecanto Panthers defense was the
signature key to its 10-6 win over
visiting Wesley Chapel on Friday
night, as an interception by Nicolai
Kortendick put an end to a last-
minute threat by the Wildcats.
Lecanto (2-0) trailed 6-0 early in
the first quarter before scoring 10
unanswered points,
Iall in the second
period, and shut-
ting out Wesley
fChapel the rest of
the way
Dmitry Growdon
led the Panthers'
offensive attack
McKinley with 111 yards
Rolle rushing on 19 car-
Lecanto coach ries, plowingin for
starts the re
season 2-0 a 6-yard touchdown
for first time. run midway
through the second
quarter to give Lecanto a 7-6 lead.
The Panthers were put in favor-
able field position when a Wesley
Chapel punt attempt from midfield
resulted in a fumbled snap, and
Lecanto took over possession 38
yards away from the end zone. A 28-
yard dash by Growdon coupled with
a Wildcat penalty set the running
back up for his scoring plunge.
In addition to Growdon, the de-
fense took on the workload from
there.
"I think at the end of the day, what
really helped us was our defensive
play," Lecanto head coach McKin-
ley Rolle said. "They didn't let Wes-
ley Chapel in the end zone, they had
multiple takeaways, they played ag-
gressively toward the ball. I was just


MATT PFIFFNER/Chromnicle
Lecanto junior running back Dmitry Growdon runs behind of the block of
junior teammate Ardante "DeDe" Anderson on Friday night against Wesley
Chapel at Lecanto High School. The Panthers waited out a long lightning
delay to down the Wildcats 10-6 and improve to 2-0 on the season.


really proud of their effort"
In fact, the Wildcats' only points
came from their defensive side of
the ball. On Lecanto's second pos-
session of the game, a Travis McGee
pass was read and picked off at the
line of scrimmage by Eric Bennett,
who raced untouched 45 yards to
the end zone. The ensuing extra
point attempt was blocked by
McGee.
Leading 10-6 with 4:29 remaining
in the game, the Lecanto defense
forced a Wesley Chapel punt. But
the kick was fumbled, the Wildcats
recovered at their own 47 yard line
and they had late life.
Wesley Chapel looked poised to
take full advantage of the opportunity
after converting on a 4th-and-15, as
Jase Williams found Travis Ragle for
a 30-yard gain down to the Panthers'
32. But three snaps later, Williams'
pass over the middle was deflected
off the hands of a receiver and into
the arms of a waiting Kortendick with


1:11 remaining. Two McGee kneels
later ended the contest
Lecanto held Wesley Chapel to 67
yards of offense, including just 20 on
the ground and none in the first
half. The Panthers defense also re-
covered three of six Wildcat fum-
bles. Ardante Anderson had a pair
of sacks and was big in key
moments.
Luis Leiva connected on a 21-
yard field goal in the second quar-
ter for Lecanto.
A banged-up Jonah Nightengale
gained 27 yards on nine carries for
the Panthers. So on this night, it was
Growdon's turn to carry the load.
"Dmitry's effort is incredible,"
Rolle said. "He doesn't go down after
first contact, he's pumping those
legs, he doesn't assume he's down.
He keeps going, he runs extremely
hard and I'm proud as heck of that
kid."
Lecanto hosts rival Crystal River
this Friday for a 7:30 p.m. start.


Nicolai
Kortendick
Staff


uilluULLI


Jamiee
Juse


Players of
the week
Deion Moore, Citrus
senior quarterback
Moore accounted for both
touchdowns in the Hurri-
canes' 14-8 victory over
Dunnellon on Friday night
The upperclassman
scored Citrus' first touch-
down to give his team a
7-2 lead in the second
quarter on a 20-yard quar-
terback keeper
Although Moore went
just 8 of 20 for 122 yards
passing, he got better in the
second half In the final 24
minutes, the Hurricane was
6 of 10 for 93 yards and the
eventual game-winning
score on a 40-yard touch-
down pass to junior wide
receiver Desmond Franklin
in the third quarter
Dmitry Growdon, Lecanto
junior running back
Growdon was the only
area player to hit triple-
digit rushing yards by tak-
ing his 19 carries for 119
yards and a touchdown dur-
ing the Panthers' 10-6 home
victory over Wesley Chapel.
Growdon's 6-yard touch-
down in the second quar-
ter was the only offensive
touchdown of the game for
either team.


Keiwan
Jones


Desmond Franklin,
Citrus junior WR/DB
Franklin caught three
balls for 64 yards and a TD.
Got behind Tiger defense
for the 40-yard score. He
also intercepted a pass with
20 seconds left to clinch a
14-8 win, Citrus' first over
Dunnellon since 1990s.
Keiwan Jones, Dunnellon
senior defensive tackle
Jones was a big part in
Dunnellon holding Citrus
to 199 yards of total rush-
ing yards. He had multiple
stuffs in the run game,
pressured the quarterback
consistently and recovered
a Hurricanes fumble.
Jaimee Juse, Citrus
senior linebacker
Juse was a thorn in the
Tigers' side Friday night.
He intercepted a pass and
was all over the field in
helping limit Dunnellon to
174 yards of total offense.
For good measure, Juse
also caught a 12-yard pass.
Nicolai Kortendick,
Lecanto senior DB
For the second week in a
row, the Panthers needed a
huge defensive play to pre-
serve a win, and Kortendick
was the one to deliver it
Kortendick's intercep-
tion off a deflection with
1:11 left deep in his own
territory helped Lecanto
hold on to a 10-6 victory
against Wesley Chapel.


High School Football BOXES


Munroe 36,
Seven Rivers 0
SR 0 0 0 0 -0
RFM 0 23 13 0 36
Scoring Summary
Second Quarter
RFM Bailey 63-yd run (Harris pass to
Skipper)
RFM Lewis 3-yd run (Harris pass to
Edwards)
RFM Edwards 49-yd run (kick failed)
Third Quarter
RFM Skipper 15-yd pass from Harris
(Skipper kick)
RFM Lewis 47-yd run (kick failed)
Individual Leaders
Rushing SR: Jimenez 10-20-0; RFM: Bai-
ley 5-112-1; Lewis 6-73-2; Winburn 6-52-0;
Edwards 1-49-1.
Passing- SR: Gardner 3-12-0-1; RFM: Har-
ris 4-10-1-1.
Receiving SR: Mazza 1-20-0; Rivers 2-7-
0; RFM: Skipper 3-44-1; Winburn 1-8-0.
South Sumter 38,
Crystal River 0
CR 0 0 0 0 -0
SS 7 21 10 0 38
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
SS J. Taylor 20-yd run (kick good)
Second Quarter
SS J. Taylor 5-yd run (kick good)
SS A. Faulk 3-yd run (kick good)
SS-A. Faulk 13-yd run (kick good)
Third Quarter
SS- W. Moir 27-yd FG
SS S. Marcus 5-yd run (kick good)
Individual leaders
Rushing CR: A. Franklin 12-22-0. SS: J.
Taylor 11-144-2.
Passing CR: C. Ryan 4-13-52-0; SS: L.
Sapp 8-12-104-0-0.
Receiving SS: C. Hernderson 2-30-0.


BUCS
Continued from Page BI

Sanchez out with an injured
shoulder The second-round
pick out of West Virginia
played only 69 snaps in the
preseason, but he's ready
for his NFL debut
"I always dreamed of
being in the NFL, but it
was always a long shot,"
Smith said. "You can't re-
ally put too much into those
things, especially as a kid.
Yeah, there's dreams, but
at the same time you have
to go out and chase it To be
here and to have an oppor-
tunity to start is great But,
I'm not here to celebrate."
Here are some things to
watch for in the season
opener for the Buccaneers
and Jets:
Geno's debut
The Jets organization might
have been hoping for Smith to
win the quarterback competi-
tion all along, but the way it ulti-
mately came about with
Sanchez's injury-- clouded
things. There are plenty of
questions, with the top being
whether the rookie is anywhere
close to being ready to start as
an NFL quarterback. It will be
offensive coordinator Marty
Momhinweg's task to tailor a


Lecanto 10,
Wesley Chapel 6
LEC 0 10 0 0 10
WES 6 0 0 0- 6
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
WES E. Bennett 45-yd INT return (kick
blocked)
Second Quarter
LEC D. Growdon 6-yd run (kick good)
LEC -L. Leiva 21-yd FG
Individual Leaders
Rushing LEC: D. Growdon 19-111-1; J.
Nightengale 9-27; WES: T Ragle 4-13-0.
Passing LEC: T. McGee 2-4-0-1-13; WES:
S. Edwards 3-8-0-1-39; J.Williams 2-7-0-1-28.
Receiving LEC: J. Lucas 1-9; J. Nightengale
1-4; WES: E. Bennett 3-29; T. Ragle 1-30.
Citrus at Dunnellon box
Citrus 14,
Dunnellon 8
CIT 0 7 7 0 14
DUN 2 0 0 6- 6
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
DUN -Safety
Second Quarter
CIT Moore 20-yd run (Marsden kick)
Third Quarter
CIT D. Franklin 40-yd pass from Moore
(Marsden kick)
Fourth Quarter
DUN Parks 3-yd run (pass failed)
Individual Leaders
Rushing CIT: J. Pouncey 15-57-0; T Wash-
ington 10-45-0; J. Clark6-41-0; DUN: J.Williams
8-54-0; Parks 8-42-1; D. Sims 13-39-0.
Passing --CIT: D. Moore 8-20-1-0-122; DUN:
K. Jones 2-9-0-3-36; J. Hamm 1-1-0-34.
Receiving CIT: D. Franklin 3-64-1; S.
Franklin 3-35-0; DUN: M. Livermoore 1-34-0;
K. Parks 1-26-0.

game plan around Smith,
which means there could be
lots of plays out of the shotgun
and some read option.
Revis reception
All signs are pointing to
Revis playing for the first time
in nearly a year, since he tore
the anterior cruciate ligament
in his left knee at Miami. Bucs
coach Greg Schiano gradu-
ally increased his workload
during training camp and held
Revis out of preseason
games. If he does play, and
start, as expected, Revis will
have no restrictions, Schiano
said. That means the Jets will
find out quickly if the "Revis
Rules" Rex Ryan's term
for not throwing in Revis' di-
rection are in effect.
Dee instead
of Darrelle
With Revis' departure, the
Jets were down a shutdown
corner. But they're hoping An-
tonio Cromartie will play as
well as he did while Revis was
injured last season, when Cro-
martie established himself as a
true No. 1 cornerback. The
Jets used their first pick in the
draft No. 9 overall to se-
lect former Alabama star Dee
Milliner with the hope that he'll
be able to step into the lineup
opposite Cromartie.


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B6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









COMMENTARY
CITRUIS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Esther Jacobo, right, interim secretary of the Department of Children and Families, speaks Aug. 20 during a town hall meeting at the
Broward College South Campus in Pembroke Pines. DCF officials say nine children have died this year after having some sort of involvement
with the agency. At left is Florida Sen. Eleanor Sobel.


TOUGH


TIMES


AT


A


TOUGH POST


FIVE QUESTIONS FOR INTERIM
DCF SECRETARY ESTHER JACOBO

sther Jacobo was tapped as interim
secretary of the Florida Department
of Children and Families last month
after David Wilkins resigned amid a
series of children's deaths, with the
number now topping 20 since April.
An attorney, Jacobo has been with
the department since 2008, most re-
cently as head of its Miami region.
Before that, she was deputy director of Children's Legal
Services and chief of the Miami-Dade domestic crimes unit
under state attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle.
Jacobo earned her law degree from St. Thomas University
in Miami in 1992. She's married with three children.
The News Service of Florida has five questions for her:


Q. We've heard criticism that
judges aren't getting full
records including prior offenses
- before making critical depend-
ency decisions for families. What
can be done about that?
A. Remember, I was a lawyer
and I was in court with the
judges, so I'm not sure that they are
not getting all of the priors. I do
think that priors are not necessarily
being discussed in court.
And so I think we need to do two
things. We need to work in partner-
ship with the judges, number one.
The protective investigators and the
lawyers need to make sure they are
bringing that forward. But the
judges can also do their part by ask-
ing the questions about the priors
and having the PIs (protective in-
vestigators) go thoroughly through
the priors. The PIs have all the pri-
ors before they file a case. So it's a
matter of communicating it
For example, Judge (Jeri Beth)
Cohen would always ask the court to
look for every case that this person
had before. And by the way, the
judges also have access to (the
Florida Safe Families Network),
and so they can look at the priors.
It is a matter, in my mind, of coor-
dination. Rather than not getting it,
I think we need to coordinate how
they can get it better and what rele-
vant things they need to glean from
those priors.
Q. Talk about the Florida Safe
SFamilies Network. You said
recently the federal government will
help FSFN come into compliance -
how will that serve the child-welfare
system?
A. What happened is that the
S federal government funded
the creation of FSFN our one
child-welfare record. They gave us
the money to build it. In order for
them not to ask us for that money
back, they want us to meet certain


See Page C3




We know what works; don't abandon it


DR. PARESH DESAI
his is in response to the
editorial published on
Aug. 28 and Rebecca Bays'
resultant column. The Citrus
County Tourism Council is in the
process of rebranding the county
to tourists. In attempts to replace
"Visit Citrus" to "Visit Crystal
River," there were some political
hurdles that appeared to polar-
ize businesspeople within the
county It's important to under-
stand that the goal here isn't to
divide businesses, but to actually
bring in more revenue and expo-
sure to the entire area.
Let us rationalize why Crystal
River should be used as the main
reason to bring tourists to the
area: Have you ever heard of
Clark County in Nevada, or Mon-
roe, Orange and Osceola Coun-
ties in Florida? Likely not.
However, I'm sure you've heard
of Las Vegas in Nevada, and Key
West and Disney World in
Florida. No famous landmarks
in the United States are mar-
keted by their counties to visitors


Have you ever heard of Clark County
in Nevada, or Monroe, Orange and
Osceola Counties in Florida? Likely
not. However, I'm sure you've heard
of Las Vegas in Nevada, and Key
West and Disney World.


as Citrus County has chosen to
do for years. It's always the city
that is the famous destination of
interest. And when you visit any
of these cities as a tourist, you
find other nearby attractions
that are available for your
enjoyment.
Why not use something which
is unique only to our area and
which brings people here from
all over the world? People from
around the world come to Crys-
tal River seeking to get a glimpse
of an animal that was once tee-
tering on the brink of extinction.
Crystal River has made its mark


on the world map because of this
precious mammal. It has been
recognized on the Discovery
Channel, in National Geographic
Magazine, as well as in U.S. Air
Magazine, which circulates to 1.5
million people annually
Crystal River has more than
700 hotel rooms available to our
visitors and it pays the lion's
share of its bed tax. I would sus-
pect that businesspeople in the
surrounding areas would actu-
ally welcome the increased rev-
enue and hotel traffic brought in
by our friendly manatees that re-
side in the Crystal River Once


our out-of-town guests arrive to
our quaint town, it should be the
responsibility of the TDC as well
as the local hoteliers to inter-
nally market what its neighbor-
ing towns have to offer, whether
it's hiking and birdwatching on
the Withlacoochee State Trail,
strawberry picking in Floral City,
boating on the Homosassa River
or camping in Inverness. The
TDC should be providing our
local businesses with marketing
products to increase their
exposure.
Keep in mind that the human
brain recognizes and then selects
or deselects images in fewer than
3 seconds. Since Crystal River al-
ready has national and interna-
tional exposure, why shouldn't
we use it to help optimize the
success of it's nearby towns and
local businesses? It would be ill-
mannered not to do so.

Dr Paresh Desai is a member
of the Citrus County Tourist
Development Council.


The


Disney


cycle
s expected, life
does come full
circle.
There is a ritual for
people who come of age
in Florida.
For the most part,
adults who live and
work in Florida do not
go to Disney World. The
vacation destination is
for the tourists. We
Floridians don't go to
Disney!
Give us the beach,
give us the islands and
give us a rest.
Until we have
children.
Once Floridians have
children, they too find
themselves drawn to
the Magic Kingdom. It
just can't be helped.
The marketing is in-
tense. The allure over-
whelming. We all make
the trip with our kids,
but we're so tired most
of us don't even remem-
ber what happened.
Then, when our chil-
dren became
teenagers, the magic
gets sucked out of the
Kingdom. Teenagers
often reach the conclu-
sion that it is no longer
cool to spend time with
Goofy, Donald and the
gang.
In fact, for many of
our kids, it was no
longer cool to spend
time with us.
So for a decade,
there are no visits to
Disney
But then a funny
thing happens. Our kids
have kids and the
magic is restored. Our
grown-up kids can't
wait for their kids to
meet Mickey
Suddenly the mouse
with the big ears isn't a
geek with a squeaky
voice. He becomes a
cool dude with an
attitude.
So that explains why,
a few weeks back, we
found ourselves packed
up with six grandkids
and four adult children
to once again make
the trek to the Magic
Kingdom.
And the Kingdom
was magic.
Mary Poppins had
her bounce, Donald
Duck his quack and
Cinderella her beauty
It was through the eyes
of Izzabella Grace Mul-
ligan on her eighth
birthday that we could
once again experience
the joy of Disney
While it had been a
generation since we
have visited, things had
not changed that much.
Some rides had been
updated and there
were some new things
happening. The cam-
pus of tied-in resorts
now stretches for many
miles.
But for Izzy, her
brothers and her
cousins, the magic was
a first-time experience.
For the adults, it was
the comforting knowl-
edge that some things
are repeated with each
generation.
And that's good.

Gerry Mulligan
is the publisher of
the Chronicle. Email
him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.





OPage C2- SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013



PINION


"He who is too much afraid of being duped
has lost the power of being magnanimous."
Henri Frederic Amiel, Journal, Dec. 26, 1868


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PSST




Stop butting




heads and




fund park


We have long advo-
cated that county
government has a re-
sponsibility to provide fund-
ing for Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness.
Whispering Pines is the
jewel of our park system and
has been the center of activi-
ties in the county
seat for more than THE I
three decades.
While the huge County
regional park is for Wh
located in Inver- Pit
ness, more than
75 percent of OUR 01
those who make
use of the park are Show le.
county residents reach
and don't pay taxes
in the city. For that reason,
county government has kicked
in a portion of the funding for
the park for many years.
The relationship between
the county and city has been
rocky since a misguided
group of county commission-
ers tried to move the county
seat to Lecanto about a decade
ago. (None of those county
commissioners remain on the
board). That lack of trust has
led to disagreements in recent
years over the amount of money
the county should pay the city
for the operation of the park.
Last year the county faced
a fiscal crisis of its own and the
Whispering Pines funding was
held up. County Commission
chairman Joe Meek has tried
to extend the olive branch in
recent weeks by officially of-
fering Inverness $300,000 in
funding from the county.
But Chairman Meek got a
funny response from the city
- he has had a hard time get-
ting them to accept the money
Chairman Meek was insis-
tent so he showed up unan-
nounced at Monday's city
council meeting to make the
$300,000 offer to the council.
Council members were po-
lite, but City Manager Frank
DiGiovanni said later in the
week that Inverness does not
want an interlocal agreement
with the county
The problem apparently
stems from the county want-
ing to have a contract with
the City of Inverness about
what the county funds can be
used for. The county wants
the funds to be used at Whis-
pering Pines and for services
county residents utilize.
The county wants some
documentation for how the
money would be used. The
city manager would prefer


L563-0579
563-0579


Is
C
fl
lis
ne
IP
F
a
a


the county simply reimburse
the city for its efforts.
The problem is the county
operates its parks at a much
lower cost than the city of In-
verness. The city manager
does not want county recre-
ation leaders looking over
his shoulder and having
input on spend-
ISUE: ing decisions.
Whispering
funding Pines does offer a
spring higher level of
es. service than the
county parks, but
'INION: we don't believe
semantics should
dership; be a permanent
a deal. stumbling block
to the city accept-
ing county funding.
After all, if the Inverness
council doesn't take county
funding, then city taxpayers
are unfairly being charged to
cover all of the costs at Whis-
pering Pines. No one thinks
that's fair
The members of the Inver-
ness City Council need to
show some leadership and
work out an agreement to ac-
cept funding from county gov-
ernment for the park. It may
not be at the level the Inver-
ness administration thinks it
deserves, but $300,000 is a lot
of money and city taxpayers
shouldn't be forced to pick
up that tab just because the
council can't work through the
details.
At the same time, the county
needs to relinquish its desire
to micromanage activities at
Whispering Pines. This city
park operates with a higher
level of service because that's
what the city wants.
The city council needs to
agree to the details of a con-
tract with the county. For their
$300,000, the county deserves
to have an explanation pro-
vided for what services are
being delivered. For the
record, we're not too con-
cerned about the details of the
contract, but county taxpayers
deserve to have some record
that documents how their
money is being spent.
In these days of shrinking
government budgets, citizens
expect elected and appointed
officials to have the ability to
work together toward the
greater good. Chairman Meek
did the right thing by forcing
the issue at the council
meeting. The elected council
members need to accept
that challenge and solve the
problem.


Take closer look at closer
In regards to the libraries' heavy doors: Why
is it the public library has these doors extremely
heavy? It's not the doors that are heavy. I'm a
retired locksmith and I went to handy ADA
applicator schools and all, I know the codes,
and the door closer are not adjusted properly.
They should make their doors light as a feather
if they're adjusted at 4.5 pounds inside, 5.5
out for weather. And if the doors were adjusted
properly, you wouldn't even know you were
opening them. As for the handles, they have to
be ADA certified at a certain height, certain
type. So it's not the door, it's the closer.


Now wanted: an accomplice


WASHINGTON
because Syria's convul-
sion has become as seri-
ous as Barack Obama
has been careless in speaking
about it, he is suddenly and un-
characteristically insisting that
Congress partici-
pate in governance. f
Regarding institu-
tional derangements,
he is the infection
against which he
pretends to be an /
immunization. -
In the Illinois Leg-
islature, he voted
"present" 129 times Georg
to avoid difficulties; OTH
now he stoops from
his executive VOl
grandeur to tutor
Congress on accountability In
Washington, where he conde-
scends as a swan slumming
among starlings, he insists that,
given the urgency of everything
he desires, he "can't waif't" for
Congress to vote on his pro-
grams or to confirm persons he
nominates to implement them.
The virtues of his policies and
personnel are supposedly patent
and sufficient to justify impos-
ing both by executive decrees.
In foreign policy, too, he lux-
uriates in acting, as most mod-
em presidents have
improvidently done, without
the tiresome persuasion re-
quired to earn congressional
ratifications. Without even a
precipitating event such as
Syria's poison gas attack, and
without any plausible argument
that an emergency precluded
deliberation, he waged pro-
tracted war against Libya with
bombers and cruise missiles
but without Congress.
Now, concerning Syria, he
lectures Congress, seeking an
accomplice while talking about
accountability Perhaps he de-
serves Congress' complicity-
if he can convince it that he can
achieve a success he can de-
fine. If success is a "shot across
the bow" of Syria's regime, he
cannot fail: By avoiding the
bow, such a shot merely warns
of subsequent actions.


ge
H
(


Gen. Martin E. Dempsey,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, has advertised his skepti-
cism about intervening in Syria.
His very public intrusion in a
policy debate may exceed what
is proper for the uniformed mil-
itary, but he seems
to have played
Obama as dexter-
ously as Duke
Ellington played a
piano. Dempsey as-
sured Obama that
U the military mission
could be accom-
plished a month
e Will from now. (Because
I the bow will still be
-ER there to be shot
DES across?) This en-
abled Obama to say
that using the military to affirm
an international norm (about
poison gas), although urgent
enough to involve Congress, is
not so urgent that Congress' re-
cess required abbreviation.
Britain's Parliament inadver-
tently revived the constitutional
standing of the U.S. Congress
when Prime Minister David
Cameron's incompetent man-
agement of the vote resulted in
Parliament refusing to author-
ize an attack. His fumble was a
function of Obama's pressuring
him for haste. If Parliament had
authorized an attack seven
switched votes would have suf-
ficed Obama probably would
already have attacked, without
any thought about Congress'
prerogatives. The Financial
Times' Gideon Rachman re-
ports that in an Aug. 24 tele-
phone conversation with
Cameron, Obama "made it
clear that he wanted a swift
military response before
global outrage dissipated and
Bashar al-Assad's regime had
the chance to prepare its
defenses."
Many Republicans are reluc-
tant to begin yet another mili-
tary intervention in a distant
and savage civil war Other Re-
publicans, whose appetite for
such interventions has not been
satiated by recent feasts of fail-
ure, will brand reluctance as


"isolationism." Reluctant Re-
publicans can invoke Dwight
Eisenhower
He, who in 1961 enriched
America's lexicon with the
phrase "military-industrial
complex," sought the presi-
dency in 1952 to prevent its cap-
ture by what he considered an
isolationist, or at least insuffi-
ciently internationalist, Repub-
lican faction represented by
"Mr Republican," Ohio Sen.
Robert Taft. Yet after one look
as president-elect at the front
line in Korea, Eisenhower
ended that war To advisers urg-
ing intervention on France's be-
half in Vietnam, he said (this
from his memoirs): "Employ-
ment of airstrikes alone to sup-
port French troops in the jungle
would create a double jeop-
ardy: it would comprise an act
of war and would also entail the
risk of having intervened and
lost." He was not an interven-
tionist regarding the 1956 Hun-
garian revolution, and he not
only refused to support the 1956
British-French-Israeli attack on
Egypt, he ruthlessly forced its
termination. About his brief
and tranquil intervention in
Lebanon, he wrote: "I had been
careful to use (about U.S.
forces) the term 'stationed in'
Lebanon."
Obama's sanctimony about
his moral superiority to a Con-
gress he considers insignificant
has matched his hypocrisy re-
garding his diametrically op-
posed senatorial and
presidential understandings of
the proper modalities regard-
ing uses of military force. Now
he asks from the Congress he
disdains an authorization he
considers superfluous. By ask-
ing, however reluctantly he be-
gins the urgent task of lancing
the boil of executive presump-
tion. And surely he understands
the perils of being denied an
authorization he has sought,
then treating the denial as
irrelevant.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. corn.


LETTERS to the Editor


Stay out of Syria
I cannot see any national in-
terest in being involved in
Syria. None.
Assad is not our guy, and nei-
ther are the Muslim/Iran/
brotherhood rebels.
Let them kill each other off
Killing is killing and dead is
dead, whether a machete,
sarin gas or Tomahawk mis-
siles are involved.
More than 100,000 Syrians
are dead, so other than to save
Obama's pride, why should
1,400 more be cause to involve
ourselves in a civil war which
we cannot understand?
If we use $1.2 million each
Tomahawk missiles, we will see
pictures of killed and maimed
women and children and we
have no goal or strategy anyway
Oh, and we are broke. Those
200 missiles equal more than
$200 million, and with no pur-
pose stated.
I would further state that our
only real interest in the Middle
East is the oil, and that given the
new finds in the rest of the world
and particularly the United States
in the form of natural gas and
shale oil, we could be well on


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

our way from exiting that part of
the world, energy self-sufficiency
and create a booming economy
The EPA, DOE and the regu-
latory morass they enforce with
federal blessing keeps them in
business at the expense of our
tax dollars, while those poli-
cies cripple our economy and
support involvement in foreign
lands, which our Constitution
clearly warns us against.
Robin Humphrey
Crystal River


Making changes
In my past, if I didn't like the
clerk in a store, I'd go to another
and not go back to that store
again. If someone in church was
too loud or knew all the answers,
I went to another church. If
hotdogs were cheaper on the
other end of town, I'd spend $1
worth of gas to save 5 cents.
In my new life of sobriety, I
find old habits coming into my
mind. If I don't like the person
conducting the meeting, do I
stop going there? If a speaker
doesn't say what I want to hear,
do I leave? If there is someone
who knows all the answers or
is too loud, do I stop going to
that meeting? When I drank if
there were people like that, I
didn't stop going to that bar
I have to be flexible. If I get
too stiff, I'll break. When I go to
heaven yes, I plan to go to
heaven- if there is someone
there you don't like, do I say I
think I'll try the other place? I
find if the speaker doesn't say
what I want to hear, the next
might just save my life. God
bless and thanks for listening.
Ernie Porter
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A Slice of Life: Twenty-fifth


ime flies when you
are having fun, but
my Cheryl accuses
me of trying to make it go
faster than it actually
does. I'm inclined to begin
using the next number
right after we pass the
previous one with our
wedding anniversaries.
I've been thinking and
even saying occasionally
that we have been mar-
ried for 47 years, but the
truth is, we won't make 47
until Sept. 24.
The same has been true
of my comments about this
column. I know I've been
guilty of referring to this as
being the column's 25th
year, which it has been, but
today, Sept 8, is in fact the
anniversary edition. It ap-


peared for the very first
time on Sept 4,1988.
We're older now. I'm
specifically talking about
Gerry Mulligan and me.
I'm not sure, but I suspect
I'm a tad older than he is.
Back in 1988, I was only 43
and he was no doubt
younger
Just how did 'A Slice of
Life" come to be? I've told
this story before, but it
seems appropriate to tell it
again, especially today
Technology invaded my
world. I'd always done my
own typing, which meant I
didn't have to deal with a
Dictaphone or a stenogra-
pher In mid-1988, my em-
ployer was strongly
suggesting that I learn to
use a computer instead of


a typewriter I needed to
master the touch of the
computer's keyboard. It
was boring to simply copy
things, so I
began writing
out stories I
had told all of
my life little
slices of life.
I allowed
family and -
friends to read
some of these
very short sto- Fred B
ries. Several A S
folks said I A l
should have OF I
them published.
Published? Where, and
as what?
After a bit of thought, I
realized these vignettes
were about the right length


for a newspa
Gerry, mea
n't bothering
was just sittii
be
0
itc
-- ha
it,
be
qu
ah
it:
co
rannen wl
ICE ci
so
LIFE Hi
he
came a little
when I called
I could visi
Being the n
guy that he


W
L
L


anniversary

per column, mediately said, "Sure, Y
anwhile, was- Fred. Come on by and we'll
g a soul. He have a cup of coffee." i
rig at his desk I then told him that be-
eing the fore I came I should tell
chronicle's ed- him what I wanted to talk i
or. As fortune about and did precisely I
ad arranged that. As any reasonably in- s
he and I had telligent person in his po- (
become ac- sition would have done, he I
Liainted. I'll go began to back up. "Uh, y
head and say Fred, why don't you bring t
We had be- some samples of your work (
)me friends by, I'll look at it and get Y
while he was back with you." I
)aching my I took a half-dozen or so (
)n in T-ball. potential columns for his
is not-so- review and left them. One 2
ectic day be- week, then two, passed. I
More hectic decided to let him off of
id and asked if the hook and called late
it with him. one Friday afternoon to do
ice, outgoing so, to tell him to just dis-
is, Gerry im- card my manuscripts. He


COMMENTARY


4k --
_oA *-


Special to the Chronicle
Florida Home Builders Association President-
elect Ron Lieberman met recently with Gov.
Rick Scott to pledge his industry's support for
Enterprise Florida's job-creating initiatives.


In Florida,


homebuilding


equals jobs

RON LIEBERMAN
s incoming president of the Florida
Home Builders Association (FHBA), I
am anxious to fulfill my volunteer lead-
ership responsibilities. Presiding at meetings and
conferences, serving as the "voice" for our in-
dustry on legislative issues, and working to
provide safe and affordable housing for our
citizens are all part of my job description.
But one of the things I feel most strongly
about is sending a message to all who will lis-
ten: Housing has been and always will be the
backbone of the Florida and national
economies, and the way to get our economy
really humming is through a healthy home-
building/construction industry
That's why even before I officially take over
as FHBA president in October, I met with Gov.
Rick Scott to pledge our industry's support for
his job-creating initiatives and made a connection
with Enterprise Florida, the private-public
partnership designed to expand existingbusinesses
and bring new ones to the Sunshine State.
I attended the most recent Enterprise Florida
board of directors meeting in Destin and came
away mightily impressed with the work of the
group, as well as the support they receive from
the business community and our state gov-
ernment leaders. Every member of the Florida
Cabinet was in attendance along with a Who's
Who of the men and women leading the largest
and most influential businesses in our state.
Everyone should understand the economics
of housing. For every new home built in Florida,
three full-time jobs are created for builders,
building suppliers, trades professionals and
others connected to our industry Housing
generates millions of dollars in tax revenues are
generated for the state and local government
And, remember, housing is the gift that
keeps on giving, with each new home creat-
ing a ripple effect of jobs and revenues
through the sale of furniture, appliances,
landscape services, among many others.
Gov Scott knows these facts well, and as the
Chairman of Enterprise Florida's board of di-
rectors, he can play an important role in sup-
porting the homebuilding industry and
fueling our job-creating capacity.
Under his leadership, Florida's unemploy-
mentrate has dropped from more than 11 percent
when he took office in 2010 to 7.1 percent this
summer During that span, more than 300,000
private-sector jobs were added in Florida.
In addition, Florida has enjoyed some high-
profile success stories in getting companies to
move to our state (in May Hertz established its
worldwide headquarters in Lee County) and
Enterprise Florida is today in direct contact
with 180 other companies considering a move.
When you combine that effort with the fact
that 500 people a day are moving to Florida
and 100 million people visit Florida each year,
the economic future is bright for our state.
I plan to stay closely involved in the work
of Enterprise Florida during my tenure as
president to offer the housing industry's sup-
port for their work and spread the simple
message: "Housing = Jobs."

Ron Lieberman, ofLecanto, is set to become
the 61st president of the Florida Home
Builders Association (FHBA) on Oct. 19.


C MA.M N WKeR 20B3


Come together,
resolve CMH issues
Dear Ms. Ressler and Mr Collins:
During the recent Citrus County
Economic Development Council
Board meeting, the EDC board di-
rected me to send a letter urging both
the Citrus County Hospital Board and
the Citrus Memorial Health Founda-
tion to set aside your differences,
agendas and politics and come to a
resolution on the issues that have be-
leaguered your boards for more than
four years.
While the EDC is attempting to



JACOBO
Continued from Page C1

criteria that meet with their require-
ments.
So it's not that it's not working right
or we don't have things that we need to
track, necessarily but the government
wants to make sure that because they
invested money it complies with what
they would like to see. There are about
46 items they gave us when they came
down and said, "You need to fix these
things."
We plan to be fully compliant by fis-
cal year 2014.
It's really important to have it in
place, not just because the federal gov-
ernment invested money in it, but be-
cause having one system allows all of
us to be able to access the notes, the
prior records. So if the family moves,
say from Miami to Pensacola, the Pen-
sacola protective investigators and
(community-based care organization)
will have the full and complete record
through the FSFN system. It tracks
when children go to the doctor It
tracks when children have a dental ap-
pointment. It tracks all kinds of court
issues ... the issues around reunifica-
tion or adoption. So it is the record.
The other thing it allows us to do is
get statistics about what's happening.
So for example, we can pull by CBC
(community-based care organization).
So let's say, in (community-based care
region) X, there's children who are not
going to the doctor We have a high
number of children that are not seeing
physicians or dentists. We can then
hone in on that area or that CBC and
say, "What's happening and how can
we fix it?" So in addition to being a
good information system for particular
children, it also allows us to use it for
quality assurance of kids' well-being.
. Advocates say child protective
Investigations should be multi-
disciplinary Do you agree?
A. Yes, I think we need a multidis-
ciplinary approach to investiga-
tions and, partly, case management as
well. To some extent and it should
be more we do have that.


Letter to THE EDITOR
move forward to diversify and ex-
pand our local economy, we are con-
cerned that our major health care
provider institution in this area is
embroiled in ongoing rhetoric be-
tween the two boards to the detri-
ment of our county population.
Hopefully you can understand, this is
not the image we want to project to
new business prospects when they in-
quire about our major health care in-
stitution in the county. Further, it is
our understanding; nearly 95 percent
of our area doctors report a loss in
billing revenues because patients are
going elsewhere due to their con-


For example, we're not all employed
by DCF We're fortunate that we have
many partners in the community that
provide assistance. The Child Protec-
tion Team they're not funded by
DCF, they're (Department of Health).
But they provide a review of cases, and
they have criteria. They help us make
decisions about whether there's abuse
or neglect on a case.
We have a working agreement with
the Florida Coalition Against Domes-
tic Violence, and their experts are
available to us not just to provide
services for DV (domestic violence)
victims through their own funding, but
also to advise our protective investigators
and case managers about the integrated
issues around domestic violence.
(DCF has) the managing entities,
which deal with substance abuse and
mental health all across the state. We
have privatized experts in substance
abuse and mental health, and recently,
we added to both the CBC contracts
and the managing entity contracts that
there must be an integration between
the managing entity and child welfare,
so that child welfare clients are served
first, to make sure we are serving the
needy population.
I think we can still do much more
multidisciplinary staffing on these
cases, but we're well on our way We all
have recognized, I think, the importance
of not making these decisions alone.
Q You said earlier this week that
You're looking to revise the
scorecard by which the community-
based care agencies are rated monthly
What revisions do you foresee?
A. Yes, we are actually meeting.
0.Casey Family Programs is com-
ing in with their experts and statisti-
cians. They have helped other child
welfare systems around the country
develop the right measures, and we
begin the conversation with the (com-
munity-based care organizations),
DCF and Casey
We have to make sure we're meas-
uring, right? Things that don't get
measured people don't pay atten-
tion to them. Human nature, right? So
it's important for us to measure the
right things. And some of the com-
plaints CBCs had with the prior score-


cerns with the CMH situation.
The EDC implores your boards to
now show your leadership in coming
together to choose the best business
option for CMH, the Citrus County
residents, and the health care com-
munity It is past time to bring the
boards together to move forward to a
resolution that will provide financial
security to the hospital and maintain
the important level of care for which
CMH has been known.
Don Taylor
executive director, Citrus County
Economic Development Council

card is they didn't feel it was measur-
ing the right things. They felt there
were unintended consequences to
some of the measures that drove bad
decisions even though you were doing
well on the measures.
I certainly am not an expert on what
measures are the right measures,
which is why I wanted national ex-
perts to come and help us. And that's
what I'm hoping we'll start with this
conversation. And hopefully we'll end
with a really good way to measure our
performance here in Florida.
DOF. Are you concerned that the Leg-
islature will move too fast to fix
D 's troubles? What advice do you
have for lawmakers?
A. Well, I love this question. This is
such a complex area of practice.
And to think that you could have hear-
ings and then, in a month or two, put a
fix in place, is not just naive but irre-
sponsible.
But I'm really confident that our
Legislature is going to look at this in a
deliberate and thoughtful way And
the reason I say this is because I had
the honor of being at that (Aug. 20)
town hall meeting with Sen. Sobel and
the tri-county delegation from Miami-
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
Counties. And I'm encouraged be-
cause it was very much focused on so-
lutions. There was truly, in my mind,
a recognition that this is complex
work, and it is not as easy as "remove
more," "remove less" and "throw
money at it," right? It's a lot of com-
plex and difficult items that we need
to resolve.
I would not think of advising the
Legislature how they should act nec-
essarily, but I do think they are very
committed, at least from my experi-
ence and the legislators I've met, to re-
ally look at this deliberately
I'm hopeful that some of the things
we've already put in place, once we
explain it to them, and that are coming
down the pike, will make them com-
fortable with what the future of the de-
partment looks like. And also if there
are suggestions of what we can do to
make it better, then I'm hopeful we can
work together with the Legislature to
make that happen.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 C3



edition

wasn't in, so I left a mes-
sage asking that he call
me.
To my surprise, when I
arrived in my office the
next Monday morning my
)hone was ringing. I an-
swered it and Gerry was
on the line. He said, "Fred,
I just read those articles
you left with me. Half of
he people in Citrus
County think they can
vrite, but you really can!
Let's begin to do a weekly
column."
And the rest is history:
25 years of life in 1,300
slices.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.




C4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013



Thanks, Dr. McGill
I would like to give a big
hearty thanks to Dr. McGill -
he's a veterinarian at Citrus
Animal Hospital in Crystal
River for the outstanding job
he did on removing a large
tumor from my German shep-
herd Gator. And basically it
was benign and hopefully he'll
recover and he is back to
health again. And I truly appre-
ciate that because I was fearful
we were going to lose this
great dog, and Dr. McGill and
his staff did an outstanding
job and I really appreciate
everything that they have done.
Thank you.
Concentration of power
Front page, Aug. 18: "Sheriff
ponders air ambulance serv-
ice." For crying out loud. Don't
give the sheriff any more power
than what he's already got. He's
getting to a point where we're
not going to have any say-so in
Citrus County because the sher-
iff is going to be Big Brother.
Think about it, folks. Think
about it.
Make casinos legal
In today's paper, if casinos
are illegal in Florida without ap-
proval by the Legislature, why
don't our county commission-
ers get off the port and get
onto the legislators to legalize
this?
Bring casino to mall
I agree with the person in
today's paper (Aug. 22) about
putting a casino in the Crystal
River Mall. Let's give people
something to do that will help
make money for the county and
give people jobs and fill empty
spaces. Get legislators to ap-
prove. Do something for the
people.


I hope the people in this
county wake up in time to see
that Dawsy is trying to take
over every function in this
county. And if you give all that
power to one person, then he
will dictate what he wants to do
with the money, where it goes
and what you can and cannot
have. A monopoly is the worst
thing we can do in Citrus
County. This county cannot
handle a monopoly or monopo-
listic type of control of the peo-
ple. So I hope the citizens of
this county will wake up and
start taking charge of their own
destiny.


Could you please put this in
the paper? I just was told that
there's so much products out
there that they took fructose
out of for the people that are
complaining about too much
of that in there. But what they
did, when I went to buy a
product that didn't have any
fructose, they doubled the salt
in it. From the 200, 300
grams of salt, they put 1,500
grams of salt. So we can't fig-
ure out what to do. We can't
have salt and we don't want
the fructose. Come on, you
manufacturers. Stop doing
that to us.


I just want to say to the peo-
ple that are calling in on their
neighbors for very minor of-
fenses, I do not call in on my
neighbors because sometimes
in these economic times, they
can't mow their grass. Maybe
there's lightning. Maybe their
mower broke. Maybe they
can't afford to have a com-
pany. And I think some of
these people should realize
that their neighbors are their
neighbors and they just
should be realistic. And unless
they're doing some crime or
something, that they just be
neighbors.


COMMENTARY


.... .......
I T R U S U N T Y


I RKNICI-.E|
S.iKoNic lie.
.www.chronicleonline.com .


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday


1 2 3 4 5 6 7


8 9 10 11 12 13 14


15 16 17 18 19 20 21


22 23 24 25 26 27 28


EVEN RKJVERS K EGioNAL, VIEDIC AL IEJNTJEK
Woen' proudly presents the
| |Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
HlT Business Women's Alliance

flNESS

Saturday, September 28,2013
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
National GCjuard Armor
Hw. 1 9/Venable 5t., Crstal River
Health, fitness & wellness exhibits
FREE health screenings
Demos Product Samples & More
Flu Shots (Free-Medicare B; $31.99 CA/CK, $39-Nasal Spray, >18)
Live Remote o Sheriffs FOCUS Car
LifeSouth Bloodmobile NCEMS Ambulance
.5rA Zone 5VEAKLK5!
# s Medi-Spa Pkg ($1000) Jazzercise ($500) Travel Pkg
($500) Skin Care Pkg ($250) ,* Exercise Eq ($250)
Major Sponsors
; [ E N R I % E Advanced Urology Specialists Citrus Memorial
Health System Genesis Women's Center & Med
irmN (IRNII Spa, Tobacco Free Florida at Citrus County Health
-. Department Florida Cancer Specialists Citrus
CHRNIICLE 95/Classic Hits the Fox Publix Super Markets



Z, TL 19th Annual


lAl Rails to

Trails
UJIThULRBOOO*E STTf B TWk e P. B R ide!

Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013
on the Withlacoochee State Trail
Start Time:
7 a.m. 9 a.m. (No mass start) Rain or Shine.
Location: The ride will begin at the North Apopka
Avenue Trail Crossing in Inverness. Continental Breakfast
available, Lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Entry Fee: $25 per rider up to 10/04/13.
$15 for riders 12 and under.
Children under 12 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.
All Door Prizes will be randomly
!selected and given to those
who are pre-registered by 12pm
SOct. 4. At least one bike will be
included in door prizes.
For more information
or applications log onto:
www.railstotrailsonline.com
For information call (352) 527-9535
or e-mail richg37s@tampabay.rr.com C[| I )\ I( 1.
1.OOEFP7... r


L 03- 3IN


rec


Enjoy the sounds of the popular ": .......i
Susanne Smith Band! (Local entertainers that
feature a variety of your favorite cover tunes)
To be held at the
Plantation on Crystal River
Thursday, September 19, 2013
at 6:00pm
This Premier United Way Kick-off party will be an EVENT to remember
S LIVE UNITED while you eat, drink and dance the night away.
1$75 per person Tickets on Sale Nowl
includes: 6 oz. sirloin steak q Limiled sealing. .gel your icKels loday.
and snow crab claws with ro purchase lickels. go online:
ONE drink ticket 1 vww.cirusunileOway.org
I icashbaravailabe) NC TICKET SALES AT THE DOOR'
pJ Oen seating, but it you'd like to reserve a table
r ra br of 8. call Cindl or Jennifer at 352-795-5483

What do YOU aspire for Citrus County?

tIj =Flj~ mIxm wml k tM m M lmlr 3tglmI


by Dillard's at Citrus Park Tampa

Cilr us Couniy "Celebrily" Models

Sadlurday, October 12,2013

Citrl us Hills Goff and Countlry Club


8 Doors open at 11:00 a.m.
Lunch & Fashion Show
4' at 12:00 p.m.

i$25 per person
non-refundable
donation

Benefiting: Citrus County Meals
on Wheels & Senior Foundation

For ticket information contact
Lois at 352-382-0777


Di.laftN Ca


JornyStorie
AtOl outoueHeitg Msumi Ivenss-Fre

Joune Soresisa omelin .Sithoinehbto











pesnltae. Brugt tS. u y.Te mitsoia


Fundraser -0uncheo


Fall Card Party
AtWetCirs lk. H ms. sC *5



Enrac e$1 Aprxiae umerofAtenee:.0
LitofCartes oy. ndGrs.Cub oo.Pnry. ms as
Elmnar colIaahFudtin lesns


AtIn ere.s ovrnmntCeter-. re. 0
A memril ehiit aks oe teConi6Cabe n







At nvrnes ovenmnt ener Fee

Fihig or.wih..zemoe....ryadKe rann


Sound OFF


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



They pave, you pay
This is in regards to "County
needs to pave the roads." Be
careful what you wish for. We,
off of Grand Circle, only have
three roads in here. They peti-
tioned one road, which we did
not sign, the third road. And
it's cost us $500 a year for the
last 10 years for a quarter-
mile pervious- not paved,
mind you. This money goes
straight to our board of
county commissioners, but we
paid for it and everyone uses
this road in the whole com-
plex. Everyone else's taxes are
only $40 a year. Ours on the
third road that is paved or per-
vious, is $540. Those roads
will cost you, not the county.
Please check into this before
you decide to get your roads
paved.
Mow the hayfield
I'm calling about the grass
ordinance they have in the
county. I understand through
code enforcement, the grass
has got to be over 18 inches
tall. Well, that's no longer a
lawn, that's a hayfield. And I
understand the county commis-
sioners are thinking about
changing the grass law to a
shorter distance. I sure hope
they do it because it's way over
and above what it should be.
The snowbirds come from up
North, they buy property down
here and then they don't want
to maintain their lawns and us
permanent residents have to
look at it. And I've been trying
to get a hold of "JJ" Kenney or
any of the county commission-
ers and they don't call you back
at all. And when you call the of-
fice, there's never nobody in
there. I don't know why they
even need that office. They're
never there.


Building an empire Fructose out, salt in Be neighborly


Friday Saturday









BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


L ';VU ffI
Associated Press
A basket of medical supplies await storage Oct. 11, 2012, in Brookhaven, Miss. The No. 1 question about President
Barack Obama's health care law is whether consumers will be able to afford the coverage. Now the answer is coming
in: The biggest study yet of premiums posted publicly by states finds that the sticker price will average about $270 a
month if you're a 21-year-old buying a mid-range policy. That's before government tax credits that will act like a discount
for most people, bringing down the cost based on their income.




New system,





familiar trend


P


Associated Press
WASHINGTON
resident Barack Obama's
health care law appears
to mirror a trend in
job-based insurance,


where employees are being
nudged into cost-saving plans
that require them to pay a bigger
share of their medical expenses.
Two independent studies out this week
highlighted attractive prices for less-gener-
ous "bronze" plans that will offer low
monthly premiums but require patients to
pick up more of the cost if they get sick.
Consumers might avoid "rate shock"
over premiums, but some could end up
struggling with bigger bills for the care
they receive.
The Obama plans will be available start-
ing Oct. 1 for people who don't have access
to coverage on the job.
Studies by the nonpartisan Kaiser Fam-
ily Foundation and Avalere Health pro-
vided the first look at rates filed by
insurers around the country, ahead of the
Oct 1 opening of new state insurance mar-
kets under the law
Consumers will use the markets to find
out if they qualify for tax credits to help
pay their premiums, and to pick a private
insurance plan from a range of coverage
levels: bronze, silver, gold and platinum.
Come Jan. 1, virtually everyone in the
United States will be required to have cov-
erage, or face fines if they don't. At the
same time, insurance companies no longer
can turn away people in poor health.
See Page D2


"A bronze plan is a very basic plan.
It will enable consumers to pay very
low premiums up front, zero in some
cases. But when they actually need
medical care, they will pay higher
costs out of their own pockets."
- Larry Levitt, Kaiser Family Foundation vice president

Health insurance premiums by age
A new study compares insurance premiums for three age
groups under the new health care law in selected states.*
Estimated cost for nonsmokers for mid-level coverage
known under the law as a "silver" plan:


21 years of age


jOl 060


$ 8 0 0 ...........................................................................................................
70 0 .. .... ... ......I . . .. ............................................
700 ...... ... ..._ ..

500 ....


300 .
200
100 ....

Calif. Conn. D.C. Ind. Md. Ohio R.I. S.D. Va. Wash.
*Carriers are prohibited from rating based on age in Vermont and New York.
SOURCE: Avalere Health analysis of health insurance rate filings AP


Can your ideas change Citrus?


Here's your chance to share them


o you believe cre-
ative thinking,
mixed with life ex-
periences, can be the spark
that ignites a successful en-
deavor? If so, here is your
opportunity to move Citrus
County forward with your
great idea. The Citrus
County EDC and Chamber
of Commerce invite you to
present your thoughts at a
kickoff event for Industry
Appreciation Month. The
event is called "Fire Up Cit-
rus" and will be held on
Thursday, Oct. 3, at Tuscany
on the Meadows located in
the new Quality Inn Confer-
ence Center in Hernando.
The program will run from
6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.


be obtained by accessing
Dr. the EDC web site, calling
Frederick 352-795-2000 or mailing ei-
Herzo their Heather Gibson
^ Herzog, (heather@citrusedc.com) or
Ph.D. Ardath Prendergast
(ardath@citrusedc.com).
E"XPERIENCE All presenters must follow
S MATERS the ground rules.
The ground rules
Purpose, eligibility Your thoughts and the im-
and ground rules ages presented must be
an groun rues positive. No negative com-
"Fire Up Citrus" is your ments or criticism ofpeo-
chance to present your ideas ple, places or other
to county officials, business programs. You may not be-
leaders and the public. Pre- little, demean or depreciate
senting participants will be anyone or anything, only
required to submit a "Fire positive thoughts, please!
Up Citrus" presenter appli- Make them new, different,
cation form. The form can fun and original. What-ifs


and why-nots are welcome.
You'll never know when an
inspirational thought will
generate significant change
or improvement. Nothing
ventured, nothing gained.
Your ideas will have no
conceptual restrictions. It's
OK to think big and outside of
the box! All presentations will
have a total time limit of 5
minutes from start to finish.
A 20-slide/image/show
presentation is required
with slides/images each ap-
pearing in a 15-second se-
quence. Help is available
to put your ideas in presen-
tation format Call either
Ardath Prendergast or
See Page D2


BUSINESS

BRIEFS

Oil hits 2-year high on
US jobs report, Syria
NEW YORK -The price of oil
closed at a two-year high Friday on
a combination of fear of escalating
tension in the Middle East and hope
for continued stimulus measures
from the U.S. Federal Reserve.
Benchmark oil for October delivery
rose $2.16, or 2 percent, to close at
$110.53 a barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. That's the
highest closing price since May 3,2011.
In the U.S., the average price of a
gallon of gasoline slipped 1 penny
to $3.58. That's unchanged from a
week ago, but down 24 cents from
this time last year
In other energy futures trading
on Nymex:
Wholesale gasoline rose 2
cents to $2.85 per gallon.
Natural gas fell 5 cents to $3.53
per 1,000 cubic feet.
Heating oil added 2 cents to
$3.16 per gallon.

Regulator OKs
Smithfield sale
SMITHFIELD, Va. Smithfield
Foods Inc. said a U.S. committee
that reviews mergers between
American companies and those
overseas has given clearance to
the pork producer's proposed sale
to a Chinese company
Smithfield said Friday the U.S.
Committee on Foreign Investment in
the United States gave clearance
to its proposed sale to Shuanghui
International Holdings Ltd.
Hong Kong-based Shuanghui
agreed to in May to buy Smithfield
in a deal valued at $7.1 billion, in-
cluding debt.
Smithfield shareholders are
scheduled to vote on the transac-
tion on Sept. 24.
Shares of Smithfield rose about
3 percent in after-market trading.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY



Daughter can

be responsible

without being

responsible for

cost of school
EAR BRUCE: I am paying
for my daughter's schooling
to ensure she has a great fu-
ture. The school is rated one of the
top private schools in the country
I can afford to pay this expense,
but I am unsure that I am teaching
her responsibilities. Should I stop
paying and let her get a part-time
job to pay her school loans herself?
-Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Since you can
afford the expense of private school,
I have no problem with you paying.
There are other ways your daugh-
ter can exercise responsibility
You might suggest that she gets a
job on campus for 10 or 15 hours a
week for the experience. And of
course, during vacations, she
should not only be encouraged but
obligated to find employment.
I salute your idea of teaching
your daughter to have some re-
sponsibility. If you couldn't afford
to pay for the school, it would be a
different matter, but on balance, if
she is enjoying herself, keeping
good grades, and you can afford it
without jeopardizing your retire-
ment, I see no problem with it
DEAR BRUCE: My husband and
I want to build a new home in
Texas. We are unsure how to pay
for the home. Should we get a
mortgage or pay cash for the
house? If we pay cash, we will end
up closing our savings account. We
heard that we should finance a


home to make our credit score go
up. We have no debt and maintain
two good incomes. What do you
think?
-Reader, via email
See Page D2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS

DIGEST


Speed Networking McFarland-Bryant
at Crystal River mall completes training


The Crystal River Mall is Dr. Chei
sponsoring an evening of has just cc
business matchmaking. "Speed apartment o
Networking" will take place Certificatic
from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, examinatki
Sept. 5, at the west end. Class A, B
This event is a way to pro- DOT phys
mote a business and make require thiE
some new business contacts, examiners
For more information and to
register, call the mall office at ,j
352-795-2585 and speak to
Millie or Linda. Registration
fee is $10.
Lewandowski
joins Better Health
Better Health Chiropractic Chery
of Crystal River is proud to McFarla
announce the addition of Rus- Bryan
sell Lewandowski, D.C. Dr. inflammat
Lewandowski is formerly of ulcers, alley
Russell Chiropractic in Inver- disorders, i
ness. He is Crohn's di,
a certified colitis. Dr.
computer- Better Hea
assisted CF
pro-adjuster
for post sur- mee
gical pa- The Coil
tients and a Foundatiol
Russell certified mittee will
Lewandowski workman's Sept. 11 at
comp provider. He also has of the CF I
the DOT physical exam certifi- 3001 S.W.
cation. He is joined in our The comrr
practice by daughter general bL
Shannon. ing is opera





HERZOG
Continued from Page Dl

Heather Gibson at 352-795-2000 to
make the arrangement for assistance.
The source of your ideas can come
from your job, business, life experi-
ence, hobby, and/or a vision for the fu-
ture for Citrus County.
You can partner up with another
person, but must stay within the guide-
lines of 20 images/PowerPoint, etc.,
and the five-minute time limit.
A committee has been chosen to re-
view all presentations prior to Oct. 3.
Twelve presentations will be selected.
The EDC will contact the 12 presen-


ryl McFarland-Bryant
)mpleted the De-
)f Transportation
n Training for the
on of interstate and
3 and C drivers.
ical exams will soon
s certification by the
s. While attending
the Florida
Chiropractic
Association
convention,
she also at-
tended the
seminar
"Mega-
'l Spore Probi-
and- otics" for the
t calming of
ory states such as
orgies, autoimmune
rritable bowel disease,
ease and ulcerative
Bryant practices at
ilth Chiropractic.
committee
ts Sept. 11
ege of Central Florida
n Executive Corn-
meet at 4:30 p.m.
the Foundation Office
Enterprise Center,
College Road, Ocala.
nittee will discuss
isiness. The meet-
i to the public.


PREMIUMS
Continued from Page Dl

"What was really strik-
ing as we dug into the
numbers is how inexpen-
sive the bronze plans
are," said Larry Levitt, a
Kaiser vice president
Avalere, a private data
analysis firm, found the
average monthly premium
for a bronze plan is $274,
compared with $336 for
the next level of coverage,
a silver plan. The savings
from going with bronze
adds up to $744 annually,
and that's off the sticker
price, before federal tax
credits that will reduce
premiums for an estimated
4 out of 5 customers in the
new markets.
It's "likely to entice
healthier enrollees to opt
for a less generous benefit
package," said Caroline
Pearson, a lead author of
the study
The law's tax credits
will make low-cost plans
more appealing. By pair-
ing their tax credit with a
bronze policy, some
younger consumers can
bring their premiums
down to the range of $100
to $140 a month, the
Kaiser study found. Older
people can drive their
monthly cost even lower
- well below $100, and
zero in some cases if
they are willing to take a
chance with higher de-
ductibles and copays.
It's a trade-off consumers
unfamiliar with insurance
might not fully grasp.


ters letting them know they have been
selected to present their ideas. The
deadline to submit presentations to
the EDC office is Sept. 27.
The EDC and Chamber are in
charge of this event It is designed
with the purpose of potentially discov-
ering a unique and/or great idea(s)
which might move Citrus forward. The
event will be videotaped.
There will be a break after each
group of four presentations, giving
those in the audience time to socialize.
Once the event has started, the audi-
ence and presenters are asked to re-
main for the entire program.
All presenters are encouraged to re-
hearse their presentation until they
are comfortable with providing a


'A bronze plan is a very
basic plan," explained
Levitt. It "will enable con-
sumers to pay very low
premiums up front, zero
in some cases. But when
they actually need med-
ical care, they will pay
higher costs out of their
own pockets."
Job-based plans have
been shifting costs to em-
ployees for some time. In
2009, when Obama took
office, 22 percent of work-
ers were in plans with an
annual deductible of $1,000
or more for single coverage,
according to Kaiser By this
year, the share had nearly
doubled, to 38 percent, in-
cluding 3 out of 5 employ-
ees of small companies.
People with modest in-
comes may still come out
ahead by sticking with a
silver plan instead of going
for bronze. That's because
additional help with out-
of-pocket costs such as co-
pays will only be available
to people enrolling in a
silver plan.
The tax credits work by
limiting what you pay for
premiums to a given per-
centage of your income.
For example, someone
making $23,000 would pay
no more than 6.3 percent
of his or her annual income
- $1,450 for a benchmark
silver plan. The amount
you pay stays the same
whether the total pre-
mium is $3,000 or $9,000.
But those tax credits
taper off rapidly for people
with solid middle-class in-
comes, above $30,000 for
an individual and $60,000
for a family of four


smooth performance.
Final thoughts
Your presentation will be reviewed
by a selection committee. Presenters
are asked not to deviate from their
presentation once they have been
approved for the event. Final
thought: This event is designed to
be constructive. Any negatives coming
out during the presentation could
cause the facilitator to stop the
presentation!
Good luck to all!

Dr Frederick JHerzog, PhD is the
immediate past president and chairman
of Citrus County SCORE. He can be
reached at therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

DEAR READER: You didn't men-
tion your age, but I assume that you
are relatively young. I would certainly
not deprive myself by paying cash for
the house, especially since mortgage
rates are so low right now As these
words are being written, somewhere
around 2.9 percent is available for 15-
year financing. How in the world can
you say no to that?
I congratulate you on having a good
income and having no debt, but I would
not pay out all of my savings under the
conditions you have outlined. As to the
credit score, I wouldn't worry, assuming
that you pay your bills on time and meet
your obligations in a proper manner
DEAR BRUCE: I have a bill for
$13,000 that needs to be paid as soon
as possible. My question is, where
should I take the money: from my CD
401(k), which has no penalty, or use
my savings account, which has $15,000?
-R.S. Via Email
DEAR RS.: You mentioned that you
have a 401(k) with a bank CD. How much
can that be paying you? I wouldn't take
the money out of the 401(k) because it is
tax-protected, but I most certainly
wouldn't leave it sitting in a CD. The
market is the only place that I would
recommend.
As to your savings, pay the bill and
keep the $2,000 in your account, then pay
yourself back as quickly as you can. As
you will come to find out, it goes in very
slowly and comes out enormously fast.
DEAR BRUCE: My husband and I are
having a disagreement regarding Roth
IRAs. Together we earn around $100,000.
I was told that we should open a Roth
IRA and my husband says we shouldn't
Can you tell me who is correct?
-Cynthia, via email
DEAR CYNTHIA: You haven't told
me much about your and your hus-
band's ages and individual incomes.
But, by and large, a Roth has many ad-
vantages. Not the least of these is that
you put money in a Roth with taxes
having already been paid. From that
point forward, until such time as you
cash it in, there are no taxes and noth-
ing on the interest that is earned. The
younger you are, the smarter this is.
There will be more time for your
money to work hard for you without
paying taxes on those returns.
I am assuming that you will put the
money in the Roth in a reasonably
solid investment, one that should return
somewhere between 7 percent and 8
percent a year That's a goal that is
relatively easy to obtain in the market

Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions of general
interest will be answered in future
columns.


', Top Notch

C Appliance Repair


352.586-9109
-. -- Accepting Credit Cards
Robert
Member of Roik
Chamber of Commerce &Lic




QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE
STARTING AT $6000
Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly


TT~fn& MCONTROL.
Angf lt www.CitrusPest.com r LSn
As For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! '
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS
Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River

| |^Kl^is ^p11


S16'i-7' SLiDING DON'T LET YOUR,
GARAGE Starting at DRYER START
- SCREEN S A FIRE!
OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES.



465-4629O


When
C,


mopping isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers. Floors. Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Clean, Seal & Repair
Shower Maintenance & Grout Repair
Grout Colorant
586-1816 746-9868


A A

ServiceH TR Our Services: Carpet Protector
SerZ Ge ATEle Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24,7'365 RPStO1e Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

;1 ROOMS & $qA95 UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
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'.1 UALLW .I .. loveseat cleaned. E
1HALLUWAYR I get a chair or 1
iii recliner cleaned Ih
i Expires 3013I ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13

352-794-0270 .
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com r


Licensed & Insured


Jaime Massingill
John Massingill


LAWN

REPLACEMENT
Complete Lawn & Patch Work
Drought Tolerant Lawns

J&J SOD (352) 302-6049


D2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


BUSINESS


TILE CLEANING









D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


October is Industry



Appreciation Month



in Citrus County!


Upcoming Chamber
of Commerce events


Anthony
Schembri

HEALTH',
-,F TNESS





Iir


Sept. 13 Chamber Luncheon with
speaker Dr. Anthony Schembri, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Plantation Inn of
Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
Sept. 26 Business After Hours
hosted by Emeritus at Barrington Place,
5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 2341 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Lecanto.
Sept. 28 Seventh annual Women's
Health and Fitness Expo presented by the
Business Women's Alliance (BWA), 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the National Guard Armory,
8551 W. Venable Ave., Crystal River
Oct. 3 Fire Up Citrus! 6 p.m. to
8:45 p.m. New kick-off event for
Industry Appreciation Month will be
held at Tuscany on the Meadow -
Quality Inn 350 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando.
Check our complete calendar at
www.citruscountychambercom or follow
the QR code to see the website on your
smartphone!


Fire Up Industry
Citrus! Appreciation
Twelve presenters Mixer


each have 5 minutes
to fire up Citrus and
inspire economic
development!
Thursday, Oct. 3,
6 to 8:45 p.m.
at Tuscany on
the Meadows,
at the Quality
Inn Conference
Center, 350
E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando.


Specialty Gems of Crystal
River invites everyone to
join them in as they host
the Industry Appreciation
business mixer at their
wonderful store. Mixers are
a great business-to-business
networking opportunity in a
relaxed atmosphere, so be
certain to bring your busi-
ness cards. Admission is
free, but registration is
requested to give our host
an idea of how many will
attend.
We give our sincere
appreciation to Carol
Kimbrough, owner of
Specialty Gems, for
making this wonderful
event possible.
Thursday, Oct. 10,
5 to 7 p.m.
Specialty Gems
600 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.


Veronica Massey
West Coast Insurers, Crystal River



Lake
-a! Hernando

Dragon Boat Festival

Dragon Boat

Festival slated

for Nov. 16
he inaugural dragon boat race to
be held on Lake
Hernando will take place on Satur-
day, Nov. 16, 2013.
A committee of dragon boat paddlers
and event planners, county repre-
sentatives and tourism professionals
are bringing fun, competition and
recreation to one of Citrus County's
beautiful parks.
The event will begin at 9 am and
conclude at approximately 4 pm.
Spectators are encouraged to come
to Lake Hernando Park with their
lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy the
festivities. Food vendors and music
will keep the event lively for all
throughout the day.
This festival is focused community
involvement and charitable giving.
Enter a team or sponsor the event
at http://www.lakehernandodragon
boat.com/about.html.


Annual
Awards
Luncheon
Always the most popular
and well-attended business
luncheon of the year in
Citrus County, the annual
luncheon honors our local
businesses and industries
with awards for Outstand-
ing Small Business,
Outstanding Employer or
Corporate Citizen, and
Person of the Year. Our
featured speaker this year
is R. Alexander Glenn,
Florida president for Duke
Energy, who is certain
draw a large crowd. This
luncheon SOLD OUTlast
year, so we suggest that you
get your reservations early!
Friday, Oct. 11,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m,.
College of Central Florida,
3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.


EDC Barbecue
The EDC Barbecue is one
of the best events of the
year in Citrus County!
M&B Dairy, the largest
dairy farm in Citrus County,
will once again host over
800 people for an evening
of delicious barbecue pre-
pared by the Ag Alliance.
This beautiful location
backs up to a small lake,
but provides plenty of room
to spread out, chow down
on the best barbecue ever
prepared by the Citrus County
Agricultural Alliance, enjoy
libations at the open bar,
and kick up your heels with
great live music from the
best country band in the
south the Dan Story Band.
It is truly the place to be seen
in Citrus County in October.
Dale McClellan, owner of
M&B Dairy, is the 2012
Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Ag
Expo Florida Farmer of the
Year, and we thank him for
opening his farm again this
year for this fun-filled event.
Thursday, Oct. 17,
6 to 10 p.m.
M&B Dairy, 8760
S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.


Steve Fitzgerald
Bay Area A/C & Heating


INTERNATIONAL ETHNIC
FESTIVAL
FUN FOOD & MUSIC ON THE
HOMOSASSA RIVER



FlJ JOY TiHE M T IN
a INTEWMIONA. FliAVORS AND
A! SOEWDS.
f- r 94P. NNWT2-WsT 29


G1 WqA SEPT 30 OGT6

j@. rrmuocr7-ocri3

PoUW oCT 14 ocrao
w te- *-252 ~a O .LN S ~fl (a-35 O M1LJ~- 6a8-Ut
RIVETI WD O RO 9- 6282474 SIEGASS WATiW"ONT 503-2007
SPWMALL PACKAGEw D IP AMTSAVILABiE
WWW.NA Tj4R9.ASTIEVEW$.CO(1


New Image Award for
business beautification
presented to Cypress
Cove Care Center, LLC


Laura Sullivan, Director at Cypress Cove, and Chamber ambas-
sador Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


Mini-workshops offered at Business


Women's Health and Fitness Expo


Five mini-workshops are
being offered as an added
benefit for attendees at the
free Women's Health and Fit-
ness Expo, hosted by the Busi-
ness Women's Alliance of the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce. This year's Expo
will be on Saturday, Sept. 28,
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
National Guard Armory in
Crystal River.
The first 30-minute session
will begin at 9:30 a.m., with
the final session beginning at
12:30 p.m. Speakers sched-
uled so far include:
Carlos Rodriguez, MD:
Laser treatment for Nail Fun-
gus / Sponsor: Genesis
Women's Center Med Spa
Roxanne Maldunas, RN:
Women's Heart Health /
Sponsor: Citrus Memorial
Heart & Vascular Center
Dr. Kevin Hoffman, D.C.:
The Healing Power of Low-
Level Laser / Sponsor: Citrus
Chiropractic Group
Gregory von Mering, MD:


A woman has her carbon dioxide levels tested.


Women & Heart Disease: Know
the Facts / Sponsor: Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
Judi Tear, PIO: 3x3 -
A Clear Path to a Healthier
Lifestyle / Sponsor: The
Florida Department of Health
- Citrus County


Thank you to the Expo's pre-
senting sponsor Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center, plus
these major sponsors: Ad-
vanced Urology Specialists;
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem; Genesis Women's Center
& Medical Spa; Tobacco Free


Florida of the Citrus County
Health Department; and
Florida Cancer Specialists. Our
generous media sponsors are
the Citrus County Chronicle
and Citrus 95/Classic Hits the
Fox. A number of other busi-
nesses also are sponsoring at
varying lower levels.
Proceeds from BWA's
Women's Health and Fitness
Expo fund scholarships for fe-
male high school and WTI stu-
dents. In seven years, $43,000
in scholarships has been awarded
to Citrus County students.
Our mission is to empower
and develop women through
education, networking, men-
toring and partnerships; and
to promote opportunities for
all women throughout Citrus
County. For more information
about the Business Women's
Alliance, find us at Facebook
.com/bwacitrus or contact the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce at 352-795-3149 or
at the Chamber's website, www.
citruscountychamber.com.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


For questions about these events, or to make reservations,
contact Heather at 352-795-2000 or heather@citrusedc. com,
or pay at www. citrusedc. com/events.html


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!




* 4 SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER8,2013


To place an ad, call 563=5966




Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All

Th e Tim e


Fax (52.53-66 1Tol Fee .(88 82-34 1Emal:clssfidschonclon ie om0 w-0 0 *chonclonlin 0


RIT 1- M U
I am a fun loving at-
tractive widow who
enjoys life and looking
for that honey-bunny
of a gentleman in his
late 70-80"s who
enjoys the same. I
would love to get to
know you. If interested
please write so we
could get together
and find out more.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind box 1847
106W Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




I WOULD LIKE TO
EXPRESS MY THANKS
to everyone's kind-
ness & help during my
son RHETT ROBERTS
illness & death.
Special thanks to
Davis Funeral Home,
Citrus Hospice, Stump-
knockers, good
friends. I shall treasure
this love & caring
always. Sincerely,
MARGARET ENDRESS



2007 John Deere
Riding Mower
X324, 4ws, 48" deck
110 hrs only, 22hrps
Kawasaki, $1500.
(352) 489-7906
Dining Rm Table
TEAK 62x41, w/22"
self-storing leaf 4 chrs.
made in Denmark An-
derson Mobler $425
obo (352) 382-4779
FORD
1999 Exp Eddie Bauer.
214K mi, good cond in
/out, good tires $3800
obo(352) 794-3930
LITTLE TYKES TOYS
8 in 1 Playground $150
Other items Available
(352) 794-0211
Love Seat, chair, Bed-
room suite, oak furn.
Priced right! Ask for
Diana 352-37-4695
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Whirlpool Washer &
Dryer, matching pair
4yrs old large ca-
pacity, multi-cycle,
excellent condition
$400. obo Homosssa
(352) 503-7821
Whirlpool Washer &
Dryer, matching pair
4 yrs old large
capacity, multi-cycle,
excellent condition
$400. obo Homosssa
(352) 503-7821



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087

Look
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or mulch u load & haul
352-628-9624
FREE
5 Month Old Black
Kitten. He loves kids!
neutered, wormed,
and Flead.
(352) 464-1567
FREE
Part Bengal Cat
Young Male, neutered,
he is a lap cat and likes
to be held & have lots of
attention. Are you
home most of the time
to give him lots of
love? call for more
information
352-464-1567


You load and Haul ARNP/PA
(352) 726-1633 R r
SIX, 5 week old
Kittens, very cute Full time, for Dr.'s
Free to Good Home Office & Nursing
(352) 364-1615 Home Practice,
Fax Resume to:
352-795-7898


Lost Cat, DENTAL
male, orange tabby RECEPTIONIST &
Tropic Terrace SURGICAL ASSIST


yai(352) 422-4180v
(352) 422_4180


Lost Dog Overboard
Sunday. Sept. 1st.
Part Chihuahua &
dachshund, Male
black with white
blaze on chest
25 Ibs. short hair.
Vicinity betwn Shell
Island and Marker 5,
Approx.. 5am
Crystal River
REWARD
(352) 746-1895
618-781-8728
REWARD Large
Siamese cat. lost
6/15/13 in the area of
hwy 200 and orchid dr.
He was wearing a black
collar with no tags.
please call or text
239-287-0953
TWO PUPPIES
7 mos. old. Pitt Bulls
one is all black, other
is blue brindle, lost
in the vicinity of
Creed St. Crystal River
pls call 352-777-1344
Yellow & white cat.
Lost in Leisure Acres
on 8/31. Has been
spayed and has rabbi
shot. (352) 628-1783
352-601-1458








DOG GROOMING
WORKSHOP
"BYOD" Bring Your
Own DOG! $50.
9/14, 11am to 4pm
offered at the Acad-
emy of Anmmal Arts,
Largo, FL Academy
ofanimalarts.com
866-517-9546


-5.~


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII

Situations

WANTED!
(HAM Radio Equip.)
Vintage or Modern,
tubes, tube audio amps,
speakers, test equip.
call Ethan
775-313-2823



Front Office

West Coast Eye
Institute, just off
Highland Blvd,
Inverness. Is looking
for a bright individual,
with a smile and
good people skills
Full Time. Fill out
application or leave
resume at the office.
352-726-6633
LEGAL ASSISTANT
P/T 16 hrs per wk avg.
Exp preferred. Resume
& references to:
PO Box 2763,
Inverness, FL 34451










Tell that special
person
Hapgy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo com


Exp. Med. Assist.
Must have knowl-
edge of Computers.
CALL 352-212-2629

IMMEDIATE
HIRING:
PT/RN, Psych RN
Florida Homecare
Specialist
Call (352) 794-6097
for an interview.


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


Staff
Development
Coordinator/
Risk Manager
Come join an
Exciting Team
Must have knowl-
edge of Federal,
State and OSHA
Regs. Two years
experience and FL
RN license required.
Exc. Benefits
Apply in Person:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness,FL. Or send
resumeto: atdon@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D


CITRUS MEMORIAL




www.citrusmh.com/
career-opportunities

IN













CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
DIRECTOR
Purchasing and
Auxiliary Services
The Purchasing
Director will
provide technical
knowledge and
understanding in
specialized field
of purchasing
and procurement.
Implement policies
and procedures
adopted by the
Board for all major
purchases. Bache-
lor's degree or
higher required.
Program of study
should include
business-related
courses. Minimum
of four years in
area of purchasing,
two of which must
have been in a s
upervisory position
is required.
Requires overnight,
out-of-district travel
on a recurring basis.
Review date for this
position is 9/30/2013
Please submit a
copy of transcripts
indicating the
degree conferred
with the electronic
application. Educa-
tion must be from a
regionally accred-
ited institution.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


Office
Professional
Salary: Based on
experience and
education
Summary:
Well established
Inverness company
seeking a
Professional with
knowledge and
experience in
Quickbooks, excel,
accounting, imports
and logistics. The
ideal candidate
must have strong
math and commu-
nication skills, dem-
onstrated attention
to detail and accu-
racy, and enjoys
working in a small
office environment.
College degree in
business, account-
ing, logistics or simi-
lar field preferred.
Please send
your resume' to
Attn: Glenn Roberts,
105 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness
FL 34450.




Breakfast Cook
Exp. Top Pay
w/benefits! apply M-F
6 7 am or 2-3 pm
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19, CR

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
PART TIME
w- Cooks
w Hostesses
w- Dishwashers
Call 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment




HELP WANTED
RETAIL SALES
People who want to
work to replace the
ones that don't.
Nights/Weekends
75 CHROME SHOP
Wildwood
(352) 748-0330




DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624


Hi




ELECTRI-

CIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab,
lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wildwood

Hiring for
Service Plumber
Experienced req.
Apply in person:
6970 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.
Homosassa
Mon.-Friday 9a-4p

Lead Aquatic
Plant Technician
Announcement
#13-47
Responsible techni-
cal work involving
a variety of tasks
related to aquatic
plant control. Leads
and participate
s in work of crews
including operation
of airboats, handl-
ing and mixing of
herbicides. Must
possess or be able
to obtain within six
months of employ-
ment a Public
Applicator's Re-
stricted License with
Aquatic endorse-
ment. Must possess
a valid Florida
Driver License.
$11.53 hourly to
start. Excellent
benefits. Full time
position working
4-10 hour days
Monday-Thursday.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, September
13, 2013 EOE/ADA.


Now hiring: Class
A-CDL Drivers

$2500 Sign -On
Bonus, Great Pay,
Full Benefits, and
Achievable
Bonuses! Call us now
at 1-888-378-9691 or
apply at
www.hevl.net

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH
Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

The Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District Is accepting
applications for:
Mosquito Control
Technician I

Public Health Pest
Control Certification
is necessary within
six months of
employment. A
detailed job
description & appli-
cation can be
obtained at the
Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District Head-
quarter's Office,
or our website, www
.citrusmosquito.org
968 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
(352) 527-7478
Bet: 7:30 am-4:30pm
weekdays. Deadline
to receive applica-
tions will be 4:30 pm
on Friday9/20/2013.
The Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District is an equal
opportunity em-
ployer and does not
discriminate on the
basis of race, color,
national origin, sex,
religion, age or disa-
bilityin employment
or the provisions of
services. Preference
will be given to
veterans. (A copy
of the DD-214 must
be provided).





CITRUS MAIDS
CLEANING PERSON
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Key Training
Center
PT & FT
Positions available
in Group Home.
Assist non- ambula-
tory medically
fragile adults with
disabilities in daily
living. HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*


I


Community/
Sales Manager
Needed, Immediate
Opening. 382-0770




Light Equipment
Operator
Announcement
#13-48
Semi-skilled work in
the operation of
automotive public
works equipment
and performing
manual labor.
Graduation from HS
or GED. Must have
a valid Florida CDL
Class "A" with
endorsement "N"
combination air
brakes or be able
to obtain within
90 days of
appointment.
$9.22 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, September
13, 2013. EOE/ADA.




Recreation Pro-
gram Specialist
Announcement
#13-49
Responsible recrea-
tion work serving
as the Parks and
Recreation repre-
sentative during
recreational activi-
ties (public and
private) at county
events/facilities.
Must be available
to work a flexible
schedule to include
nights, weekends
and holidays. Must
have some experi-
ence in recreation
and/or programm-
ing. Must success-
fully pass a level II
background check.
Starting pay
$9.99 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, September
13,2013. EOE/ADA


Maintenance
at Wildlife Park,
some animal diet
preparation.
Outdoor work,heavy
lifting. $8.00 per hr.
call 352-628-5343

Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.com or Call
352-422-2160

Promotional
Tasting Event
Company
looking for energetic
outgoing personal-
ities to handle
liquor tasting events
in local liquor &
grocery stores. Send
resume w/ picture to
mbbpromoltionslc@gmail
corn or Mary
@ (407) 718-5825




CARE GIVER
Looking for reliable
CNA for elderly
woman on MonThurs,
& Sat. Must be able to
transfer 140 Ibs. Send
resume:whgn
tampabav.rr.com




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, Excavators. 3
Weeks Hands On
Program. Local Job
Placement Assis-
tance. National
Certifications. GI Bill
Benefits Eligible!
1-866-362-6497

MEDICAL OF-
FICE TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547



CRAFT SUPPLIES
several books, software,
decopage,stamping
kit,stencil setall for($20)
352-613-7493


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$ 15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
COIL TOP STOVE$100
works great. 30 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504
DROP IN ELECTRIC
RANGE AND OVEN
Whirlpool Self-cleaning.
Almond color. Pics avail.
$50 352-621-1249
DRYER
$100 in perfect working
condition. 30 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504
Frigidaire Washer
& GE Dryer,
Extra Large, capacity,
excel, cond.
$250.
(352) 249-1097
GE Dishwasher,
built-in, Excel. cond.
$125. Bisque
(352) 270-8343
GE Refrigerator
white, side by side,
43 W 32 Deep, 68 tall
15 Cu. Ft., $350. &
Stainless Gas Grill
$150. 352-527-7002
HOT POINT ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 White.
Older model. Works
great. 30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504
RCA ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 Almond
color. Older model. 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


WASHER
$100 In perfect work-
ing condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER AND DRYER
Maytag washer and
Kenmore dryer in good
working condition $150
for both. 352-563-0664
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Cond. Free Del.
60 Day Guarantee
352-263-7398
WHIRLPOOL DISH
WASHER Kitchen re-
modeled. Light almond
color. Can send pictures
$50 352-621-1249
Whirlpool Electric
Range, like new
black, smooth top
4 burner, works good
$200.352-586-1784
WHITE KENMORE
RANGE HOOD $40
works great.30 day
warranty call/text
352-287-9671
WHITE RANGE
HOOD$40 Kenmore.
works great. 30 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504



Drafting Board
white tubular frame.
Includes a parallel
arm clamp on pro-
tractor 42x31 $60
352-816-4879
OFFICE CHAIR BLACK
PADDED OFFICE
CHAIR EXCELL.
COND. $50
352- 527-8993



COMPRESSOR
SMALL. 125 LBS. NEW
EXCELLENT $35.00
352-527-4319
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HEAVY
DUTY METAL MODEL
INVERNESS 419-5981



Mitsubishi
Projection TV
63" Model -WD 62527,
w/ Extra Lamp,
Good Cond. $250
(352) 220-9787
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $80
352-613-0529



ALUMINUM PORCH
DOOR REMODELING -
WHITE 6'8" W/ VINYL
WINDOW $75
352-527-8993
BATH VANITY CABI-
NET WHITE W/SINK
& FAUCET
&COUNTER TOP
$100 352 527-8993
CARPET
INDOOR-OUTDOOR,
BROWN, 27'6" X9'6"-
$50 352 527-8993
CEILING FANS FOUR
WHITE FANS -$25
EACH 352 527-8993
FORMICA COUNTER-
TOP LARGE KITCHEN
COUNTERTOPS $50
352 527-8993


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


1.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013* 5


GENERATOR
Briggs & Stratton, 5250
watts, used once.
Exc Condition. $400
(352) 527-8993
KOHLER KITCHEN
SINK REMODELING?
DOUBLE SINK WITH
FAUCET -$100
352- 527-8993
SLIDER BLINDS SET
OF TWO $45 EACH
352 527-8993



47 VHS TAPES.
Children's VHS tapes.
Movies/TV shows. $30
takes them all. Call
352-563-2172
CARRYING CASE for
Dell laptop, with extra
cords, games, software,
web cam,($20)
352-613-7493
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



PATIO UMBRELLA
STAND 19"x16"high Off
white metal.
35 Ibs. Good Cond
$20.00 352-527-9639



2 Stunning
Dining Room Sets,
1 ) solid wood
54" round, 18" leaf,
w/ cream color
microfiber chairs $400.
1) Wicker glass top
rectangular set 77"
long 44" wide, 6 cush-
ioned chairs $500.
(970) 402-4280
mandb0971@att.net
Brand New
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set
$150.
Still in original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
BROYHILL COUCH
Excellent Condition.Off
white w/periwinkle blue
flowers. Comes from
home with no pets,
no-smoking and no chil-
dren. Paid $950: Ask-
ing $200. Telephone
352-8600302 Inverness
BUNK BED twin on top
full size futon/fold up
couch on bottom.
$75.call melanie
352-650-7978
BUNK BEDS-
wood deluxe w/
built-in desk/book
shelves. Staircase-not
ladder.PD $1350, ask-
ing $675. Will email
photos (352) 628-9963
CABINETS
Two cottage style
cabinets, one for com-
puter, one for a TV.
$200 Each
(352) 527-8993


Siitr
CHINA CABINET 2
glass doors 3 drawers 2
cabinets $100.00 Firm
352-419-4520
Dining Rm Table
TEAK 62x41, w/22"
self-storing leaf 4 chrs.
made in Denmark An-
derson Mobler $425
obo (352) 382-4779
DINING ROOM SET
Dark wood w/nice trim,
8 chairs,gray granite
top,china hutch,paid
$3500,asking $975/obo.
352-552-7569.
r High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LEATHER SECTIONAL
4 PC Slate Blue
Dual Incliners
Excellent Cond.
400.00 or B.O.
352-795-9888
LOVE SEAT
Broyhill, Green, like
new. No pets or
smoking. Exc Cond!
$250 (352) 746-2329
LOVE SEAT Like new
75.00 Call for email
picture linda 341-2271
LOVE SEAT
Taupe, Microfiber
Excellent Cond.
$150.
(352) 746-9247
Leave Message
Love Seat, chair, Bed-
room suite, oak furn.
Priced right! Ask for
Diana 352-37-4695
Maroon and gold sofa,
two extra matching
cushions, good condi-
tion. $100 or best offer.
Call 352 794 3961
ROCKER RECLINER
Tan rocker recliner, very
good condition. $100 or
best offer. 352 794 3961
Twin Beds
Two with headboards
Matt. & box springs
$75; Complete Full
Size Bed $125. No
calls before 11 a.m
(352) 6284766
TWO SWIVEL BAR
STOOLS PADDED
SEAT $20 EACH
352- 527-8993
Wheelchair
Elec Mobility Express.
Immaculate cond.
$600; 3 wheel Elec
Scooter, New Battery
$400. 352-382-0411




2002 Craftsman
Riding Mower
42" Cut & deck
$375.
(352) 628-5708
2007 John Deere
Riding Mower
X324, 4ws, 48" deck
110 hrs only, 22hrps
Kawasaki, $1500.
(352) 489-7906


AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman GT 5000
w/54" Deck, 22HP,
Briggs & Straton, over-
head canopy, runs &
looks new $1,500
(352) 621-0848
Craftsman LT 1000
Riding Mower
18HP, 42 Decks,
rebuilt motor & carb
$450. Firm
352-527-7002
Craftsman Riding
Lawn Mower, DYT
4000, 48" cut, V twin,
25 hsp, Kohler engine
$600.(352) 419-6210
DIXON ZERO-TURN
MOWER. VERY GOOD
CONDITION.
$750. 352-527-4319
LAWN MOWER
Self propelled, Weed
wacker & blower.$75.
(352) 860-1265
Scaggs Walk Behind
48 Inch cut
great condition
$800. obo
(352) 634-1213
Sears LT 2000 Riding
Mower 5 yrs. old low
hrs. 19.5 HP, 42" cut
$450.
Sears Self Propelled
Mulching Mower, w/
bagger 6.5HP, 21" cut
$100. 352- 507-1490




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun., 8a 4p
11120 N. Citrus Ave.
563-5695, 223-0919
HOMOSASSA
9/7 & 9/8 9am-?
7290 Finale St.



3 MENS PLEATED
PANTS SIZE 36 X 30 &
2 CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $25
352-613-0529
4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$10 EACH
352-613-0529
5 DRESSES
GREAT CONDITION,
NICE FOR OFFICE,
SIZE 16, $15 EACH
634-2004
BOOTS ladies 7 tan
work, 7/2 black
dress with heel, great
shape, both for($15)
352-613-7493

""fly,
WEDDING GOWN
Brand newivory
colorbeautiful
sz.8,halter
style/pearl/seq./Michael
Angelo/$190
352-552-7569.
352-552-7569


MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZE 36X30 $25.
& 34X30 $25.
352-613-0529
WOMEN BLAZER
BLACK SIZE 16,
GREAT FOR THE
OFFICE, EXCEl COND.
$45. 634-2004




!!! LT225/75 R 16!!!
GOODYEAR LIGHT
TRUCK TIRE (1) 90%
TREAD 50.00
3524640316
2 KAYAKS
79 inches long, $30
each, Ex. 352-628-0033
4 TIRES
195 70 R15
Excel. Tread $80
352-201-7125
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45,
352-628-0033
5 SHAKESPEARE
UGLY STICK FISHING
RODS- Casting &
Spinning, Ex., $12- $15,
352-628-0033
12 MALLARD DUCK
DECOYS- early plastic,
glass eyes, made in It-
aly, will sell individually,
Ex. $96, 628-0033
23 PINE WOOD
HEARTSBUNNIES/TEDDY
BEARS $25
PAINT FOR ARTS
CRAFTS 419-5981
78 RPM Records
209 count, assorted
music, 1920's -1950's
must take all $45
Ridgid Tri Stand Pipe
cutter & threader #40
1" -2" $125.
(352) 344-5283
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOYS BICYCLE SPI-
DERMAN 16" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
BURTON STOVE TO
GO $20 CAR OR
TRUCKS WITH 12
VOLT OUTLET LIKE
NEW 419-5981
BURTON STOVE TO
GO $20 FOR TRUCK
OR CAR WORKS ON
12 VOLT OUTLET LIKE
NEW 419-5981

BUYER BE AWARE!

Don't be fooled by
ridiculous offers!
FREE HEARING AID
CONSUMER GUIDE
This FREE guide will
let you compare all
makes and models
BEFORE you buy
hearing aids!Call
795-1775 and we will
mail you one TODAY!


BATH TUB NEW 6 FT
40.00 LINDA 341-2271
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" ON WHEELS
WITH COVER $25
352-613-0529
CHEST FREEZER
Sears 21 34in W, 35 inL
like new $80; EDGER
Sears, 3.5 hp, Gas $65
(352) 465-2709
Chevy Silverado
Aluminum Running
Boards, great shape
ONLY $100.00
352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra
for 4 headlights
Great Shape ONLY
$80 352-464-0316
COOL SURGE Eco
friendly air cooler rolls
from room to room,
cent per hr. to use.
$150. (352) 344-4374
ELECTRIC SMOKER
( LITTLE CHIEF)
COST 120.00 USED IN
BOX ONLY 70.00
3524640316
Entertainment
Centers, 1 black & 1
lite color wood. $100
for both; Walker,
stroller, swing, car
seat, playpen $100 for
all (352) 795-7254
FOLDING BIKE RACK
Two bike folding rack,
still in box. $50.
352-794 -3961
GENERATOR Brand
New 3500 Industrial
$300 Call 352-344-3112
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
Kenmore Overlock
/Sewing Machine
2/3/4D, Model
385.1644 New Cond.
Org. Cost $700
Price $120 firm, own-
ers manual & instruct.
book (352) 382-5300
LITTLE TYKES TOYS
8 in 1 Playground $150
Other items Available
(352) 794-0211
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/white color, $30
(352)465-1616
POWERWASHER
CRAFTSMAN -7.0 HP
OHV, 2900PSI/2.3
GPM, multi-tips, $100.
352-628-0033
ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE SOLID OAK
$75 HANDCRAFTED
CAN E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok
condition, $50
(352)465-1616
TROLLING MOTOR
MINN KOTA TURBO 65
36#, 5 fwd/2 rev, tilt
tiller, weedless prop,
Ex., $90. 352-628-0033


M AG neck and
foot, great shape, both
for ($15) 352-613-7493
TWO GARAGE
SHELVING UNITS
HARD PLASTIC 5
SHELVES $25.00
EACH 352 527-8993
Western Electric
Crank Magneto
wall telephone,
circa 1910, Excel. Cond.
$300.
(352) 344-5283
WET/DRY VAC
Craftsmans 16 gal.,
6HP. $40. Maple
Couch Table 52" L,15"
W, 27"H w/glass top
$25 (352) 344-1088
WOMEN'S RUBBER
RIDING BOOTS $15
LIKE NEW SIZE L/43
EUR CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981

Medi^SB

3 wheel Scooter
Legend 2006,
no lift gate, fair cond.
$250
352-795-3764
Bedside Commode
Aluminum Walker
both have adjustable
legs 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
Aluminum Walker
both have adjustable
legs 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
BLOOD SUGAR MONI-
TOR Bayer Contour,
brand new with strips,
($10) 352-613-7493
CAR LIFT
Harmar -Never Used
$500; Golden Com-
panion Scooter w/ all
accessories. Never
Used $800 Will deliver
(352)860-1195
CUSTOM 4 wheeled
walker, brakes
seat basket, even
footrests ONLY $85.00
352-464-0316
Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464-0316
Ramp With Rails
16+ ft. aluminumramp.
Never used. $800
Will Deliver
(352)860-1195
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps
to the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
Great shape
with footrest 90.00
352-464-0316



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
SMALL BODY CUTA-
WAY BEAUTIFUL! $75
352-601-6625


"NEW NYLON STRING
CLASSICAL GUITAR
W/GIGBAG,BOOK&CD
LESSONS&MORE! $45
352-601-6625
DIGITECH VOCAL
HARMONY PROCES-
SOR W/FOOTSWITCH
AND EFFECTS $100
352-601-6625
DJ LIGHTS & STAND
very professional. Paid
$500, asking $250
352-228-3040
ELECTRO-HARMONIX
NANO "THE MOLE"
BASS BOOSTER
PEDAL $35
352-601-6625
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR AMPLIFIER
W/CHORUS, VINTAGE
TWEED LOOK $25
352-601-6625
Keilwerth Alto Sax
Brand New
$600
(352) 533-2223
PARKING LOT
PICKER/JAMS? ELEC-
TRIC MANDOLIN
PLAYS GREAT $60
352-601-6625
PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
TWO HEAVY DUTY
FOLDING STANDS
ACOUSTIC/ELECTRIC
GUITAR/BANJO/BASS
$20 352-601-6625
ZOOM 504 II ACOUS-
TIC GUITAR MULTI EF-
FECTS PEDAL IN
ORIGINAL BOX LIKE
NEW $45 352-601-6625
ZOOM B1 BASS MULTI
EFFECTS PEDAL
W/CONVERTER LIKE
NEW $40
352-601-6625



CITRUS JUICER
ProcterSilex,like manual
but electric heavy-duty,
great shape,($10)
352-613-7493
CROCKPOT large with
removable crock, good
shape,($10)
352-613-7493
PICTURE FRAMES 3
wood, 1 metal, large,
good shape, all for ($15)
352-613-7493
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529
UMBRELLA STAND
VERY STURDY,
BLACK WITH GOLD
TRIM,
$45 634-2004


Die Cast Car
Collection 1/18th
scale 30 cars, must
buy entire Collection
$300
(352) 726-9151
Electric Treadmill,
Sears, used only a few
times, (Got Lazy)
Paid $1,100
Sacrifice Only $200.
(352) 628-2844
EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only 90.00
352464-0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
GREAT SHAPE
NEARLY NEW ONLY
75.00 352 464 0316
Olympic Bench Press
$150.
Plate Loading
Leverage Squat/Calf
Machine $200.
(352) 726-9151
PRO-FORM XP160 EL-
LIPTICAL EXERCISER
10 Resistance Levels
11 Workout Programs
Heart Rate Monitor
$200.00 Call
352-382-3224 After
5PM




Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Double Clear Blue
Hawaii KAYAK
google for photo,
retails new, $1800.
great condition! $400.
pls call between 9-5
(352) 563-2763
Fear No-Evil Guns
Hi-Point & Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
Golf Cart
exc. condition
exc. batteries
w/back seats
from $1500.
(352) 527-3125
LADIES BIKE Ladies 6
speed Roadmaster
bike. Excellent condi-
tion. $100 or best offer.
352 794 3961
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516
ROLLER SKATES
Rinkmaster women
size 8, great shape,
($20) 352-613-7493




NECKLACE new
engravable heart neck-
lace, bought at High Oc-
tane for $150,sell
for($50) 352-613-7493


*V;




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





Looking for
FORD WINSTAR
Low miles, in good
cond. (352) 794-3930

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369

Wanted N Scale
Model Trains
and accessories
(352) 564-8605

Wanted
Small Galvanized
single axel boat trailer,
Text info to
352-220-3682


ANNE LISE
Anne Lise, a 7-8 y.o.
Blue Terrier/Bull dog
mix, spayed, house-
brkn, & homeless.
Family had to move
so she came to the
shelter Weighs
about 65 Ibs, and is
a beautiful dog,
sweet, affectionate,
gentle, loyal,
good w/other dogs,
good w/children.
Playful & full of life.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


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4 eF D^-b^^E~ EB ^'IaF^iiiiiiiE~^ aBniii ^S^^S~ SS fl B^TB4^* y


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins.
Will Care For You &
Assist in Daily Needs
**352-249-7451**
Let me help you. Lite
hsekeeping, shopping
companionship. Call
Sylvia (352) 613-3114




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M& W Interiors
Inside/Out Home Repair
Wall/Ceiling Repair
Experts, Popcorn Re-
moval,DockPainting &
Repair(352) 5374144



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Andersen HandyMan
Home Repairs, Lawn
Care. Cheaper Prices
352-453-6005
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
M& W Interiors
Inside/Out Home Repair
Wall/Ceiling Repair
Experts, Popcorn Re-
moval,DockPainting &
Repair(352) 5374144




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447


A+ CLEANING
Res/Com. 27 yrs exp.
Lic/ bonded, client
focused 386-717-2929


Home/Office Cleaning
catered to your needs,
reliable & exper.,lic/dns
7964645 / 345-9329




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards




AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320

GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com


A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374




PIANO LESSONS








Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131









II




A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Li/dlns 247-5971

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


STERLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
***352-639-1024***





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827


RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178









TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


GENERAC
Stand Alone
Generator .-n

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

iGenerac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377







GENIE"


*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


Metal Roofing

We Install Seamless Gutters
JOH___s0NLiC#CC1325497


MaC JOOHN S 0N
ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

'866-376-4943





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
*' Repairs
SmalL Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
S Clean Dryer
Vents
1 f i f d,'ido.le & Dependable
f' Eq-,ince lifelong
352.-344-0905
I. cell 400-1722
sured Lic.#37761


KNOCKOUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
S Workers Comp.
S Pressure
I e Washing Too
^ ^ 352.42.6876


S Call Woday for a
OOOFIHF Clean Tomorrow





Kat's Kritter Kare

& Kastle Kleaner
Relax wtfe you're away knwing your petO
are OK at home safe in their own beds
All Kritters Big or Small
4. \Kathleen M. Dacey *

|J | (352) r^
fl 2704672!
BONDED & INSUIRED TrainingAvailable
katskritterkare@yahoo.comr


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
S9_ 01 pool 01 plan
something
Q :; C*-- completely new!
-Oftenn .tard
ne~edupIcaicd


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed i' f io
& nsued 352-400-3188

& Insured


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


I DYR ET 11A1N


AA ROOFING
Call the ak te"
Free Written Estimate


: 100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
| Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
|ic/ins.CCC05757~ ooFW~


i~EU!


ISelo M


M -I In a B




* 6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


- s I


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$100
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219


COCKER SPANIELS
4 Males, 2 Females w/
papers. 8 weeks old
Blonde & white $800
(352) 287-0519










Dojha
Dojha, approx. 3
y.o., a yellow/white
lab retriever mix,
medium size, came
to shelter because
family lost their
home & could not
keep him. Gentle,
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs,
beautiful in color,
great shape.
Pen #25.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


LILLY
Lilly, approx. 6-y.o.
female Bulldog mix,
mostly white with
black ears, a beau-
tiful, friendly girl,
heartworm-negaltve,
housebrlm. Came
to the shelter as a
stray, weight 36 Ibs.
A very affectionate
girl who wants to be
by your side, loves
treats & sits on com-
mand. Wants very
much to be your
companion. Call Jo-
anne @
352-795-1288."


I wish to adopt a dog,
male lab, light choc, or
lab golden mix 6 yrs old
well behave and trained.
The perfect "BOY"
or "Tomboy" 75 Ibs,
extremely loving, must
be able to get along
well with a female dog,
should have smooth
sleek fur.
Please call me and
leave message
on voice mail
(352) 746-3087



IN






LOKIE
Lokie, a 3-y.o.
brown/white terrier
mix male, weight
about 65 Ibs. Came
to shelter d/t
owner's inability to
keep him. Lokie is a
shy, gentle, humble
dog, easy to walk
on leash, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
human friends. Ea-
gerto please. No
cats. A beautiful
dog, both physically
and behavior-wise.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

PULLET CHICKS,
GUINEAS $4up.
Ameraucana, RIR,
Barred Rock, BIk
Star, Buff Orpington.
Ducklings:
$6.50 *Pekin, Cayuga,
Buff. 727-517-5337
Brooksville

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
Miniature Poodles
Small Mini 1 females
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males start @ $400.
Females start @ $600.
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


I

ZOEY
Zoey, a 7-8 y.o.
blue/white Terrier/
Bulldog mix, spayed
and housebrkn.
Came to the shelter
after her family had
to move and could
not take her. She is
sweet & exception-
ally gentle,
affectionate &
beautiful. Likes
other dogs & also
children. Very
playful. Weight
about 60 Ibs.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.




CANOES FOR SALE
White water canoes:
purple dagger legend
16 ft $150; Yellow
water buffalo 16 ft
$200; Red Mohawk
solo 13ft $100; Light
blue dagger caper
solo 14ft $100;
Flat Water Canoes:
White Mohawk Jen-
sen solo 14 ft $300;
Green Mohawk Alumi-
num 16 ft $100; 2
white water percep-
tion paddles $30
each, 4 kayak pad-
dles $20 each. 6 extra
sport panelled PFD's
$25 each; Six person
commercial white
water raft $250;
commercial electric
air pump $40
Cash only. Call Capt.
Vince (352) 690-7140




BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*


BOAT SLIP FOR RENT
HOMOSASSA RIVER
$125. mo.
352-220-2077
BOAT, MOTOR &
trailer, $975. 14FT
alum. Lund. deep V,
25HP elec. start, troll-
ing motor, 2 anchors,
depth finder, folding
seats, life jackets.
(352) 344-4690




PONTOON BOAT
2003 Sun Tracker.
25 ft. Great running
party/fishing boat!
130 hp Honda motor.
Very Quite and
great on gas!
$10,500
352-697-3428

RIVERBOAT
17/2 ft. completely
rebuilt, shallow draft,
wide beam $1250
Go Devil Engine
6.5 hp. New, $750.
(352) 726-9647
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555"*
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation

CHEVY
1998 40 FT Class A
motor home, 22k mi-
les, cost 90k, selling
for 7k & some TLC
(352) 563-0615




Gulf Stream 3105 GF
2008 5th WhI, toy hauler
33 ft, 5500 Onan Gen,
gas pump, sleeps 7,
many extra's $29,925
call 352-843-8578
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NUWA
'90, 5TH WHEEL,
36ft Long,
$2,500.
(352)601-7911


CLASSIFIED



PUMA
'07, 30 FT. 5th wheel
$8,500 obo
(352) 503-6455
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




5 All Terrain Tires
31 x10.5x 15
for Jeep 87-06
call Jack 352-220-9101
CHEVY 1500
1998 Silverado Topper,
78" bed, white fiber-
glass, new struts on
rear window $60.00
352-465-9026
PU Truck Bed Cover
for 8ft, Bed, tilt top
fiberglass w/ lock,
perfect condition
Asking $400.
(352) 220-9787

Vehicles

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE
eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Leok

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

'99 Dodge Ram 1500
$900 Down

'98 Chevy Cavalier
$650 Down

'00 Pontiac Gr Prix
$675 Down

'00 Dodge Caravan
$795 Down

CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BIG SALE
,eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19O&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

CHEVROLET
2005, Colorado
EX Cab, 20K miles,
$11,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHEVY
'96, Impala,
144k miLES
$7,000
(352) 726-7755
Dodge
2001 Caravan
excellent condition
$3900.(352) 634-5665
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Mustang
$7,995.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444


2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed,
4-door, one owner,
great condition, 141,000
miles $3,500.
352-860-2146
MERCURY
'97, Grand Marquee,
104k miles, AC good,
runs good, $1,600
(352) 249-7061
TOYOTA
'08, Corolla, low miles,
excel, cond. cruise
control $8,500.
(352) 628-1171
TOYOTA
2010, Yaris
$8,995
352-341-0018




Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$28,500 352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
2009 CORVETTE
COUPE Z51: Jetstream
blue w/ebony int., 2LT,
Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3
eng., only 9500 mi., car
show winner, serious
inquiries only, first
$35K/OBO gets it. Lets
talk @ 352-249-7630
PONTIAC
'80, Grand LeMans,
blue, 2 door, landeau
top, 301, V8, AC, 71K
mi., 2 owners, $4,800.
(352) 341-3323
PORSCHE
911, '78, 959, Body Kit
mtr, & Tranny good
needs paint & inter
restoration $12K
Gas Monkey?
(352) 563-0615







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





BIG SALE
eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440










DODGE
'03, 2500, Heavy Duty
4 x 4, quad cab, hemi
magnum eng., 46K mi.
$14,500, 352-419-6819


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEVY
'03, Silverado, 114k mi.
motor. 4.8L, V8,
looks & runs excel.
$6500., 352-897-4347,
(810) 577-4308

FORD
1986 F350
REDUCED
auto, crew cab, good
work/hunting truck,
2wd, ac needs blower,
$1500. call Doug
(352) 212-8385

FORD
1991 F150V8, runs
great, automatic, newer
cobra tires no a/c,
$1200. obo 422-6407

FORD
'96, 250, Pwr. stroke
DSL. 8ft. Kidron Refrig-
ated box, Thermo king
unit., $5,000 obo
(352) 422-4548

NISSAN
2012 Titan, 4DR, 3k mi.
Loaded, wife can't
drive it. $28,500 obo
772-370-9374

NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control,
power windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tn-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319


TOYOTA
2007 Tundra Dual Cab
Metallic Blue V6 6' bed
with liner 86000 miles
good condition $15000
352-382-4595


LISTINGS

I'- S


DODGE
2005, Durango
leather, navi
$9,995.
352-341-0018

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600


ilit
B^erhi'ginfff

1999 Exp Eddie Bauer.
214K mi, good cond in
/out, good tires $3800
obo(352) 794-3930
JEEP
'08, Grand Cherokee
low miles, V6,
very clean $13,500.
(352) 270-8221
NISSAN
2010, Murano
$4,995.
352-341-0018



DODGE
1987 Ram charger 8"
lift, auto, 35" Tires, no
a/c $2,000 OBO/Trade
352-453-6005



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom
352-325-1306
MAZDA
1998 6 pass. van
Select, all wheel, runs
well, looks good first
$1,475 (352) 637-2588





ONE OWNER
SUZUKI RM85-L
2005 RM85-L Runs
great. Basically new,
Garage Kept. Started
often, kept up.
Less than 20 hours
of use. Rare, last
year/model they
made 2 stroke
dirtbikes. Comes
with custom helmet.
Also have gloves.
$1,100.00 Contact
352-476-4181




HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2012 FLHTCUTG Tn
Glide Ultra Classic
AMFM/CD/AUX
w/speakers; CC, Fairing
Full, Alarm, Travel trunk
w/rack, stage 2 scream-
ing eagle high perfor-
mance exhaust & pipes;
ABS brakes, extra
chrome accents. Excel-
lent condition w/only
1250 mi. First $28.5K.
Lets talk @
352-249-7630.

0000000
HONDA
2006 Shadow Spirit 750
C2 (VT750C2) senior
owned, a beauty of a
bike, lowered,
14600 miles, orange,
new tires, $3800.
352-503-2795
YAMAHA
2012 YAMAHA STAR
1700cc V-MAX With
$2000. in V-Max
Accessories. Adult
owned!Garage kept &
covered! Bought
new.Only 3,400 Miles!
Pictures available upon
request.Extra Bonus in-
cludes a used in good
condition ARAI helmet &
a bike cover.$16,500.00
352-270-8424


356-0908 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote McGuire
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Franklin S. McGuire
5974 W. Baghdad St
Dunnellon, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle September 8, 2013

913-0914 MIX-CRN
Workforce Connection
PUBLIC NOTICE
SEEKING OFFICE SPACE IN BETWEEN
LECANTO AND INVERNESS
Workforce Connection, a governmentally-funded organization is seeking approxi-
mately 3,500 sq ft or more of office space in Citrus County. Preferable locations
would be in or in-between Lecanto and Inverness.
Prefer office space with at least 4 private offices, room for additional cubicles (at
least 12), break room, open resource area for customers, at least 4 bathrooms, con-
ference room and computer lab.
Must be ADA compliant. Need ample parking and occupancy beginning at end of
December, 2013.
Interested parties may send responses to:
Val Hinson
Workforce Connection
3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205
Ocala, FL 34474
352 873-7939, ext 1203
FAX: 352 873-7956
Email: vhinson@workforceconnectionfl.com
Workforce Connection is an EOE Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are
available upon request to individuals with disabilities using TrY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at 711.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, September 8-14, 2013.


355-0908 SUCRN
9/13 Board of Directors Nominating Committee Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
A meeting of the Nominating Committee of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Me-
morial Health Foundation, Inc., will be held on Friday, September 13, 2013, at 11:30
am, in the Board room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health
System Administration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of
the meeting is the selection of candidates for three (3) Board Director positions and
one (1) candidate for an Advisory Board (non-voting) director.
Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing
to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered
at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
September 8,2013.

357-0908 SUCRN
9/12 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 12, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 8, 2013.


Meeting
I r^Notce


Meeting
I FrNotce


I =]




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2004 JEEP LIBERTY 2005 FORD 500
One owner monroof, leather. Leather.
$7,950 $7,950


1992 CHEVY CORVETTE 2007 MERCURY SABLE 2006 FORD 500
Leather glass top convertible. Leather. 6 cyl. economy, cloth interior.
$7,950 $9,950 $9,950
OF*~


2005 CADILLAC CTS I
47,000 miles, one owner.
10- 050


2005 FORD F 1 50 TITAN
5.4 L.
$1 1,950


2011 FORD FOCUS
Economy Car.
$12,950
L-I--7-m-3


2005 FORD EXPLORER SPORTTRACK
Leather, moonroof, trailer tow package.
$13,950
a* -- ^ |


2012 FORD ESCAPE
5 speed, std trans, 1 owner.
$14,950


2005 FORD F150 LARIAT 2011 FORD FOCUS
I 5 .4 L, leather..
$14,950 $15,950


2012 FORD FOCUS SE
30,000 Miles.
$16,950


2011 KIASORENTO
4 cyl.,economy SUV.
I t17- SA I.


2011 FORD FUSION 2012 FORD FOCUS SEL 2008 FORD MUSTANG CONV. 21008 FORD 3/4 TON SUPER DUTY 4X4
4 cyl., 21,000 miles. Moon roof, 28,000 miles 6 cyl., auto, 1 owner, leather 5. 4L gas engine.
$17,950 $17,950 $17,950 $18,950


2007 LINCOLN MKX
Moon roof, navication, AWD.
S20-A050


2010 LINCOLN SIGNATURE
Limited edition.
$21,950


2005 FORD F150 LARIAT
Leather, 35,000 miles,5.4 L.
$21,950


2012 HONDA CRV
Moonroof, cloth interior.
S2-950OR


Nick Nicholas


Crysta


River


Hwy. 19N.
795-7371
Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


Mnna .ruz
Salesperson of the Month


*Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 8/31/13.


LINCOLN


Nick*^**
Nicholas
Ford E
Lincoln

N oast FOldC r ^^


I


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


l, E ivEor
lw-S'^ f Now


ZbE MN7 T


..6


Ie is On!


IC tiS
0000


ax "' u .. .ad.
)^Seo,,
30,dV'tl f lln e d ci aor


:4 .


1986 GMC 1500
5.0 Liter, Great OleTruck
$3,595*


2003 Toyota Avalon XLS
Top of the Line & Reliable!
$9,995*


2006 Chevy HHR LS
Great, Gas Mileage
$8,995*


2010 Dodge Dakota Big Horn
Lonestar Edition C.C.!
$16,995*


2006 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
5 Speed, A/C, 4x4
$13,999*


CITRUS CYCLE CENTER WHERE WE SELL FUN!


2006 Suzuki Hayabusa 1300
To Good to $8*
beTrue! O,9 5


AAE MI7T-EOf?


AE N7 T


www.citruscyclecenter.com I 1581 W Gulf to Lake Hwy I Lecanto FL


A


2008 Nissan Versa SL
Low Payment &Tech Package A Must see!
$9,999*


2005 Honda
Pilot EX
Reliable & Safe,
3rd Row Seating!
91 0,995*


. ..... 2008 Ford
F150 V6
Great work truck
and good on gas
s13,699*


2005 Chevy V8 1500
24k miles this is all there
$12,995*


2004 Chevy 1500 4x4
Long Bed, Great forWork!
$14,995*


2006 Toyota Tundra
40k miles and loaded up!!
$ 7,995*


2008 Chevy 1500 LT
Crew Cab, Loaded!
$21,995'


2011 Chevy 1500 4x4
Ext Cab, LS, Loaded!
$24,995*


2010 Dodge Laramie 1500
4x4 C.C., Why Buy New!
$29,999'


r


2013
Yamaha
650s
light weight but tons
of fun from
*5,999*


DS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


--Mad









HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEI REAL ESTATE GU.IID


HOWE AND GARDEN:



REAL ESTATE


II
B Sikorski's
fL7rAttPic
PAGE E6


Associated Press
Anthony Voz, lava lamp
expert and collector,
poses Aug. 19 in a shop
in London with some of
the lava lamps in his
collection. The lava
lamp, an iconic piece of
British design and
social trends, is
celebrating its
50th birthday.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Etate DIGEST


Strawn tops $1M in sales
Waybright Real Estate is pleased to an-
nounce that Rose Strawn, Realtor, has
surpassed $1 million in real estate sales for
the year.
Strawn has been with Waybright Real Es-
tate for more than two years and has proven
to give outstanding customer service.
She has resided in the area for most of
her life and has a vast background in real
estate. Call her at 352-795-1600.


Marth
Sather
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Pair reach multi-
million status
With more than $2 mil-
lion in closed sales vol-
ume this year, Martha
Sather and Dawn
Wright have qualified for
the elite Multi-Million
Dollar Club.
Both Sather and
Wright are agents with


RE/MAX Realty One in
Citrus County.
Sather works out of
the Central Ridge office
in Lecanto and Wright
is an agent in the
Crystal River office on
U.S. 19.
Sather and Wright are
seasoned agents in this
area who specialize in
residential real estate.


Dawn
Wright
RE/MAX
Realty One.


DIGEST GUIDE
* News notes submitted without photos will
not be reprinted if the photo is provided
later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn:
HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit
news notes for space and/or clarity.


ENJOY THE RELAXING POOL!
S3/2.5/2 Split Plan Leaded Glass Entryway
SLots of Tile/Laminate Nice Pool Pavers
SUpgraded Windows Fabulous Master
*Security System! Plenty of Privacy!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1
EFnuill eiiiesullona leluox ne |
www.FIoidulislinglInlo.c In


LIVL In L UnLI I'I:
*Master with Huge Walk-In 2.8 Acres
* 2/2/2+ Office/Den Very Nice Bath
* Very Quiet Area Nice Tasteful Decor
* Fully-Fenced/Very Private Boat/RV Park.!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 0
b .Imhh'.I'e ~,lion l l'I.I ii H. eId
E[nill eIliesullon lelusix eele
www.FIoiiduLislingInlo.coml I


VIEW OF LAKE TAHOE!
Lovely Kit. w/Wood Cabs. 3/2/2 Split Plan
Nice Enclosed Porch Cozy Gas Fireplace
* All Neutral Tones Ceramic & Carpet Floors
Minutes to Rivers/Gulf Close to Downtown
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Flnullll eIliesullon lemlilx eele
www.FlomiduLislinglnlo.comn fI


*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL .
(352) 527-7842 L i
(352) 422-3875


* 3BD/2BA/2CG w/POOL Private 1.5 Acre Lot
* Many Upgrades, Granite Roof (2008), A/C (2010)
* Solar-Heated POOL Fully-Fenced Pastures
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


CRYSTAL RIVER!
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH SINGLEWID
WITH LARGE SCREEN PORCH, 2-CAI
CARPORT, 2 SHEDS, DEAD-ENI
STREET, IMMACULATE.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com l


UII muNIUU
*3BR, 2 BATH
*GRANITE County
* Carrier HVAC 201
* Extended Screen

KELLY GODDA
Email: kellygo


E UPDATED BEAUTY!!!
2-Car Garage w/Screen
ers Roof Shingles 2010
10 *1,823 Sq. Ft. Living
ed Lanai Community Pool

RD 352476-8536
ildardsellsflorida.com


tm






REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
f637-2828


r 2 Buyer enters house
* 2 m number when
prompted


V
3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


Beautiful home on Withlacoochee River with over 100 feet of water
frontage Spacious architect's property with 18 foot high open wood-
beam great room on two blots, many mature cypress trees, screened pool
(pool has large concrete decking area 60' x 45), boat house (3 boat
sips), jet ski dock, extensive screened porch areas with impressive river
views Gourmet custom kitchen, buit-in applances with granite counter
tops, and center island with Jenn-Air cooktop/gnll Fishing from o
dock Back-up generator with LP tank for emergency power
ALAN IVORY 352-302-9781
Email: ThelvoryTeam@yahoo.com









INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
*3/2/2 on .77 Acres *13 X 18 Living Room
* Family Room w/Fireplace Kitchen w/All Appliances
*22 X 7 Screen Room Storage Shed
* Washer & Dryer oNice Trees Lots of Privacy
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunnngham@remax.net


RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit
lamuaiiiJl nll~


SHOW ME THE MONEY!!
DU WONT FIND A NICER PROPERTY IN MEADOWCREST!
tremely well-kept doesn't even begin to describe this home Interior
atures includes two master suites, separate living room/family
oms, inside laundry, upgraded kitchen, new flooring and large
closed patio Master bath boasts dual sinks, walk-in closet and
.ge walk in shower Property is ideally located next to community
housee with two large pools ovedrlooking park-setting
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 IDi
Email: davidsivory@hotmaiil.com


241N Leoo Hwy. Beel Hil 52-74 ww.IIXcmI0 ..Hy.4 neres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. Hon s 62-70 w wHurosielslecm54NHy.1,CsialRvr7524


MAGNIFICENT 2005 SWEETWATER
3 En Suite Baths Cul-De-Sac Lot
31/2-Car Garage 3-Zone HVAC
Salt System Pool 18" Tile & Hardwood
SEE THIS ONE BEFORE IT'S GONE! '
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
Weisite: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


E2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013








How to turn your lilies into more lilies


LEE REICH
Associated Press

I want more lilies. A lot
more.
And I mean true lilies
(Lilium spp.) rather than
daylilies (Hemerocallis
spp.).
Casa Blanca is the vari-
ety that has put me in such
a state. Its large, white
petals flare out into trum-
pets, from whose frilly
throats poke groups of
rust-red anthers and sin-
gle tear-capped stigmas.
The heady fragrance from
just one cut spray of blos-
soms can perfume a good
portion of any home.
Sure, I could just plunk
down some money and
order more Casa Blanca
and other lilies. But part of
the fun of gardening is
making new plants, and
even a single lily plant of-
fers a few avenues to this
goal.
SEEDS OFFER
CHALLENGE
It might seem that the
most straightforward way
is to let seeds develop and
then plant them. Lily seed
germination is not, how-
ever, all that straightfor-
ward.
The seeds might germi-
nate in as little as a couple
of weeks or as long as 18
months. In the latter case,
the plants first form small,


Associated Press
Lily bulblets form from scaling in November 2011 in New
Paltz, N.Y. Little bulbs that form along stems below ground
are called stem bulblets. Collect these stem bulblets,
taking care to preserve any roots clinging to as soon as the
stems and leaves begin to whither. Plant them
immediately, before they dry out, a couple of inches deep.


underground bulblets,
usually after a period of
cool temperatures, before
any sign of life appears
above ground. Flowering
from seed takes from two
to four years.
Another wrinkle to seed
sowing is that seedlings of
lily varieties or hybrids
will not be the same as
their parents. They may be
better, they may be worse,
but they'll be different
DIG AND
MULTIPLY
Lilies are easy to multi-
ply by just digging up and
dividing clumps as they
age. This time, the off-


r- Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney --
I eIP L . Ie A HOUSE Realtor@
| j302.3179 SOL.DNamne! @lalR l
S746-6700 287"9022 1
IThe Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


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spring do mimic their par-
ents exactly Wait until fall
or spring to divide lilies,
but don't expect to get too
many new plants out of a
clump.
BULBILS
AND BULBLETS
Some lilies form little
bulbs along their stems.
Above ground, these small
bulbs, now called bulbils,
appear where leaves meet
stems.
Flick them off and plant
them shallowly
Little bulbs that form


along stems below ground
are called stem bulblets.
Collect these, taking care
to preserve any roots
clinging to them as soon as
the stems and leaves begin
to wither Plant them im-
mediately, before they dry
out, a couple of inches
deep.
Expect bulbils or bul-
blets to form flowers that
look just like their parents
in one to three years.
Bulbils and stem bul-
blets are easy ways to
propagate lilies, but only a
few cultivated lilies form
them. Still, it is possible to
coax a lily that does not
normally make bulbils or
stem bulblets to do so.
Some lilies form them in
response to nothing more
than having their flower
buds pinched out before
they open.
Others need a bit more
coaxing in the form of hav-
ing their stems shortened
by a half after the
pinching.
Yet another approach is
to pinch off flower buds
and then wrench the stem
from the bulb, leaving the
bulb in the ground.
Lay the liberated stem
in a trench and shoots will
emerge along it, hopefully
studded with bulbils.


CAROLE LISTER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
f la cell: 422-4620
ERS Office: 382-1700

iUDY Set.8,201 -100-300.m


27 DOGWOOD DR
* 2/2/2 Villa New flooring
* New Granite New cupboards
* New roof New interior paint
#703312 $99,000

*F


31 Masters Drive S
*3/2/2villa 3 skylights
* Hardwood floors Conan
* Newer appliances Lawn maintenance
#702308 $137,900


11 Byrsonima Loop W
/2/2 villa Community pool
lorida room Eat-in-kitchen
SPorches Lawn maintenance
#704142 $138.500


FOR THE MOST,
SCALE THEM
Scaling is the final
method I'll mention for
making new lilies, lots and
lots of them.
Sometime in the next
few weeks, dig up a lily
bulb, remove some of the
plump, firm, outer scales,
and put them into a plastic
bag along with plenty of
moist perlite or sand.


Keep the bag in the dark
at room temperature for
about six weeks or until
bulblets form at the bases
of the scales.
After that period, put
the bag in a refrigerator
for at least eight
weeks, after which each
bulblet can be potted up to
grow
Three years later, you'll
have flowers oodles of
them!


I 5 S.MELBOURNE


I www.listerlistings.com


m


m


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








Living underground in Louisiana


MAGGIE MARTIN
The Shreveport Times

HOMER, La. Rick and Chris
Broussard decided to go under-
ground 33 years ago.
Literally
Their home is about 11 feet under
the rich soil of Claiborne Parish, in
40 acres including lush woodland
and a spring-fed creek.
To get there, one follows a trail of
churches out of Minden.
A curvy gravel road takes a visitor
three-quarters of a mile in hilly ter-
rain to their house. The Broussards
walked and flagged the property to
lay out the vehicle path to their
home.
"We wanted it to wind and miss
the fern beds," Chris said.
Chris is an artist who teaches at
Glenbrook Academy in Minden and
tends 4 acres of Minden's Cultural
Crossroads Farm where she is also
grant writer and board chairwoman.
Rick, an industrial engineer, is
water utilities manager with the city
of Minden. Son Ben Broussard, of
Austin, Texas, was born two weeks
after they moved in. When they
talked about marriage, Rick pro-
posed building a house under-
ground.
"I wanted to be near trees," he
said in a separate interview
"I have a fascination with trees
and love to be around them, close to
them," he added, saying his woods
include beech, hickory, elm, maple


and sassafras.
That was the bottom line, but Rick
was tired of taking care of a yard like
the one he once tended in Minden.
"I made up my mind I was not going
to spend the rest of my life doing
that," he said.
'And, environmental conscious-
ness played into it," Chris said.
She didn't object. "I was in love!"
Rick was initially exposed to the
notion through a friend who built a
basement nearby But Rick did his
own research, bought a set of plans,
went to a place up North where such
houses were prevalent
He hired Harold Weaver Con-
struction. "I had never built one,"
said Harold Weaver, but I said, 'I
think we can do it."'
Rick took a year and a half off
work to supervise the construction
of his home of concrete 200 cubic
yards of it- steel and dirt.
Biggest challenge? "Waterproof-
ing it. Making sure it was water-
proofed," answered Weaver
Rick and Chris hiked the property
to find the site which faced the south
on a hill gentle enough to provide a
landscape around the house.
The house has a small air condi-
tioning unit, not to cool the place but
to prevent condensation and control
the humidity
The only heat in the winter comes
from a very small wood-burning
stove.


JIM HUDELSON/The Shreveport Times
Chris Broussard stands on stairs Aug. 7 in the atrium area of the earth-sheltered home that she
and her husband Rick built mostly underground in 1981 in Claiborne Parish, La. Their home is
about 11 feet under the rich soil of Claiborne Parish, in 40 acres including lush woodland and a
spring-fed creek. To get there, one follows a trail of churches out of Minden. A curvy gravel road
takes a visitor three-quarters of a mile in hilly terrain to their house. The Broussards walked and
flagged the property to lay out the vehicle path to their home.


See UNDERGROUND/Page E5


A deck and the back porch area of the Broussards' earth-sheltered home are
all that extend above ground.


Z


E4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

UNDERGROUND
Continued from Page E4


"The temperature varies only
10 degrees between winter and
summer and the change is grad-
ual," Chris said.
When you arrive, you see a 12-
by-23-foot mustard-colored shed.
(The house can also be entered
off the back deck.)
Open the door and immedi-
ately step onto a narrow, long
landing which looks down on the
atrium or up to the 25-foot ex-
posed beam ceiling.
Inside the square 1,950-
square-foot house there is a den,
dining room, three bedrooms,
two full bathrooms, a laundry
room and an office and dark-
room. Some doors came from
abandoned buildings in down-
town Minden; wood was rescued
from abandoned houses the
owners were tearing down.
Walls are painted in earth
hues and floors are ceramic tile
or parquet wood.
Natural objects like feathers,
plant stalks in unusual shapes
and bird nests and wood
scrounged in the woods brings
nature in and makes the house
part of the environment.
The house is warm and cozy
Except for the comfortable
couches in the den, it is fur-
nished with things the couple
have made, bought at auctions
or estate sales or rescued from
abandoned houses they find as
they trod their 40 acres.
They filled it with Chris' art,
which one expert calls "hyper-


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 E5


JIM HUDELSON/The Shreveport Times


The Broussards' living room holds antiques and collectibles.


realistic," Rick's photographs of
country things and items they've
bought from other artists. An un-
usual and bold Native Ameri-
can-inspired walnut sculpture
- "The Burden" by Arkansas
artist Charles Widmer was
purchased with a swap of some
property and cash.
In the master bedroom is a
pencil sketch of a elephant's


head Ben drew when he was
seven.
You might call the decor
shabby chic underground.
"We fight for wall space," ad-
mitted Chris.
And, for space, period.
"We rescue dogs, jars and an-
tiques," said Chris.
She collects willow and other
blue-white plates and platters


while he cherishes ironstone of
all styles, and they both use
Mason jars they've accumulated.
There is a wall clock from
France which once belonged to
Chris' mother and an unusual
primitive kitchen piece which
was crammed with with linens
when they snatched it up for $11
at the end of an auction.
And, in a bathroom, a mosaic


mirror Chris fashioned from
broken dishes she and Rick re-
trieved when they hiked in the
woods.
This family home is comfort-
able, filled with memories of
travels, estate sales and walks in
the woods.
For them, it is "Home. Sweet
Home." It just happens to be
underground.


i .,JOANNi MARTIN Ei [
W iP eferrwecd
r rE o L AL EwSTATE Em.e

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net


3459 N. Honeylocust Drive
Beverly Hills
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. 1604 sq. ft.
of living, new roof 2012, outside just painted.
Well maintained home. Move in ready.
Offered at $78,900.00
Directions: From Forest Ridge Blvd. to
East on Thistle to Right on N.
Honeylocust. Look for signs!


505 E. Charleston Ct
Hernando
2780 sf of living, new roof 2011, HVAC
2008, central vacuum, fire place, lots of
storage, large lanai with jacuzzi & summer
kitchen. Pristine condition. Don't miss out
call today. $249,900.
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis
to right on Charleston to home on right.


JONOUR WINNING TEAM!

Energize Sa les Proals Want


Positive Attitude...

High Energy...

Professional Demeanor!


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Florida RE License is preferred.

C VILLACES OF. o,-., Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
itrus (pLlilS nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707
1Q F G________________________________________________________________________________




E6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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Ci ipnru.Ehitltlnf

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Decorative peacock ginger Inside...


thrives in dense shade


ingers are a diverse group of de-
ciduous, perennial, tropical plants
that can be used in Central Florida
shade gardens. They have lush
foliage in summer Beneath a
canopy of trees that will offer
protection from short, light
frosts, ginger leaves can last
into late December in Cold
Zones 9a and 8b locally Gingers
naturally take a few months to
rest every year this far north. In
the tropics some ginger species -
remain evergreen and bloom
on second year stems. Jane
There are hundreds of indi- JAN
vidual species in several genera. GAR
The Alpinagenus, commonly
called ornamental or shell gin-
ger, is native to Asia and Pacific islands.
Costus contains about 150 species of spiral
gingers originally from Africa and tropical
America. Dichorisandra has about 25
species from humid Central and South
America including D.thyrsifloraBlue Gin-
gers. Globba, aromatic ginger has some 70
species scattered through Southeast Asia
and nearby islands. Hedychium has about
40 species of tall, clump-forming ginger
lilies that have dense spikes of delicate-


looking flowers in summer here. Native to
Southeat Asia, White Ginger Lily, H. coro-
narium -also called Butterfly Ginger- is
popular locally The 50 species
of Kaempferia Peacock Gingers
come from tropical forests in
Africa and Asia. Zingiber has
about 100 species of Pine Cone
Gingers Form India and
Southeat Asia including
the common edible spice
Z. officinale.
All gingers need dense
shade and no direct sunlight
Weber during the afternoon in Cen-
I E'S tral Florida summers. Here all
DEN are frost-tender perennials
that die down for the winter
Soil must be well-drained and
contain lots of natural, decayed humus to
provide nutrients for the lush growth.
High summer humidity and ample rain-
fall or irrigation is essential for flowering.
If there is too much sun, flowers may not
form and leaves will curl and scorch.
Alongside a shady sand path that me-
anders through the oaks and pines of my
sandhill yard, I wanted foliage to border
the path. Gingers would grow well in the
See GARDEN/Page E7


21'.'.
4


p


U.
Lava lamps
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Dining room 'set' made of many styles; fun radios


Dear John: Attached
Share pictures of my
cherry dining room
furniture. There is a drop-
leaf table with an additional
leaf, eight chairs, buffet, and
hutch. It was made by Willett
Furniture in Louisville, Ken.,
in the 1940s. I am interested
in knowing the value and
market for its sale. B.H.,
Internet
Dear B.H.: The Willet Fur-
niture Company was in busi-
ness from the 1930s until the


John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
ATTIC


1960s. They are known for good quality
This Chippendale-style china cabinet is
made by the Willet Furniture Company.
Although all the pieces are made by the
same company, they are separate
individual pieces and do not comprise a
set. Potential dollar value is catch-as-
catch-can.


reproduction furniture. Al-
though all the pieces are
made by the same company,
they are separate individual
pieces and do not comprise a
set. They all appear to be in
excellent condition.
The chairs are copies of
Federal era, circa 1800, style
and called sabre leg type re-
ferring to the form of the front
legs. The drop-leaf table was
made in the mid-20th century
in 19th century style. The
china cabinet is Chippendale


style, circa 1700s. The sideboard with
the spiral turned columns is also in 18th
century style.
Currently, general market interest is
low except in Kentucky where there is
some interest.
If you are thinking of selling the
pieces, it might be better to wait a while


Special to the Chronicle See ATTIC/Page E13


Special to the Chronicle
This tray is a liner or base for a compote.
Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-
can. Read John Sikorki's comments
about it with the continuation, Page E13.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
The 50 species of Kaempferia Peacock Gingers come from tropical forests in
Africa and Asia. All gingers need dense shade.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


MOVE RIGHT IN -
NATURE LOVERS GOSPEL ISLAND BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very Come spread out! Spacious 2/2/2 Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
corner lot with matuLre oak trees and lots
secluded and private setting home (1,642 sq ft living), nice of privacy! Very well maintained new
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture 0.42 ac comer lot in the great roof 05/09 Just bring your suitcase and
and mature oaks. Take the tour at community of Shadow Wood. move right in! Community features
M .1 - .. ..*. r,. -, *golf, tennis, clubhouse
ML $379,000 r.... ,., $99,900 MLS #358397 $175,000






COUNTRY ESTATE-
PLEASANT GROVE
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO .. mbudlt ROOM TO ROAM!
THE GULF OF MEXICO! .... . .. a... t *n quality Specta1 .....l..... ... lanai
throughout' vaulted tongue & groove On 214 ac' i. i ,, ,ached
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and ceilings, fireplace; granite counters & garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for
boat slip on deep water canal no custom cabinetry; family room, den/office, your RV Nicely landscaped with pretty
bridges to the Crystal River' Tile floors, 2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor oaks and well maintained, too New roof
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and entertaining' Jenn-Air summer kitchen (2013), 14 Seer HVAC (2009), generator
windows; great income potential, tool covered p w/pavers & soaring ceilmgs & perimeter alarm
MLS 359564 $189, 000 $c 549,900o e $249,895







CASHIERS CT. LIVING ON THE WATER!I lli
Spotless 3/2/2, built 2007 on This classic contemporary pool home is NICELY WOODED 5 ACRE LOT
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Dra.ble Ive s Go lf Eate lifestyle Open and airy with the perfect place to build your retreat The short
Desirable Inverness GolI Estate plantation shutters diffusing the
and IGCC neighborhood. Super sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you distance to the Withlacoochee State Forest
high efficiency AC system, plenty of room to dock all the water (Tillis Hill Trail) makes it a desirable location
high efficiency A/C system toys imaginable! for the horse and country lover
City water & sewer. $119,900 MLS 354435 $489,000 $55,000


GARDEN
Continued from Page E6

dense shade. The sandy soil is
certainly well-drained, but
contains little organic mate-


rial. As gingers need rich dirt
like that found on the floor of
tropical forests, I amended
the top 6 inches of the beds
where I wanted to grow gin-
gers. The humus was free,
fine mulch made at Central
Landfill on State Road 44 east


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 E7
of Lecanto. I trucked the recy-
cled yard waste home and it
sat in a pile on the roadside
cooking and decaying until I
got around to amending the
planting beds for the gingers.

See GARDEN/Page E14


- SE V40 L 9*4 C7-M 9O MT


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. Pru e tial
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 Properties

OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


U1Lli, 400 E Dakota Ct
MLS 702580 $224,900
2bd/3ba pool home w/den on the golf course.
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, right
on Dakota Ct.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
RIlIAI I ICTIRII.


,y,-V 131b N Iloseway ler
SMLS 705086 $139,000
Nice home on 1+ acre w/HUGE
detached garage.
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273


'01itA 1667 N Shadowview Path
MLS 702383 $349,900
Spacious 3bd/2.5ba villa with so many attractive
features. This is a must see!
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


*-i ". IJ. Wvv NICule ur
MLS 704580 $109,900
2bd/2ba villa w/close proximity to Brentwood
Fitness & Pool Facility.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories in J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


s04 534if E Kninhlsbridne PI
MIL [lo u4l^a $141,900
Impeccably clean & neat3bd/2ba energy
efficient home on an acre lot.
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, right on
Reehill/Seton, left on Lancaster, right
on Knightsbridge P1.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING





300 E Glassboro CI 18.3B
MLS 705063 $85,900
Furnished 2bd/2.5ba Townhome located just a
few steps from community pool.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


TZist$ 460 W Doerr Path
MLS 356086 $288,000
Stunning 3bd/2.5ba Villa overlooking 6th
Fairway of Skyview Golf Course.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


* l&" 1313 VV Oweel UaKS LI
MLS 705172 $139,900
Come & live a dream lifestyle in this 3bd/2.5ba
townhome, all at an affordable price!
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787


3077 N Caves Valley Path
MLS 702034 $350,000
Spacious, well maintained home with expansive
views of #9 on The Ranch Course.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


7ICOVt 244 W Romany Loop
MLS 704148 $275,000
Beautiful 3bd/2.5ba pool home with so many
upgrades & features.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
RENTAL
-1111I 1.1r .


S 1644 Spring Meadow Loop 771 E Hartlord S1 30.5a
Unfurnished, 2/2.5/1 Corner Brentwood Move-in ready- Fully Furnished 2/2 Condo
Townhome. $950 F/L/SD w/ Carport. $750 F/L/SD
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Mark Casper352-364-1947


'Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
'First Time Home Seller


nume Duyer/J i 56111r 6 LUuyU y---
1 I III II .lhi III .... III 1 ,I I IIi I III .Ihh i III I I h l hh I ,I I ,, ,I I .I
[E, I1 ,, ,h I .. .. I .. i I0,h i . ,, .I I I ,, .. Ih Ih ,M ,,O I1 ,, ,,,,S I,, . i i h ,,


WHO SAID THREE's A CROWD')




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013








4.
'I @1*.1)
I






*








Lava lamps: 50 years old

and still looking groovy


JAMES BROOKS
Associated Press

LONDON
all them '60s
*relics or
Shippy home
accessories,
lava lamps
have been casting their
dim but groovy light on in-
teriors for half a century,
having hit British shelves
50 years ago this past
Tuesday
A British company
began marketing their
original creation as an
"exotic conversation
piece" in 1963. Since
then, millions of models
of the much-copied inven-
tion have been sold
worldwide.
The design was created
by British inventor Ed-
ward Craven-Walker, who
was inspired by an odd-
looking liquid-filled egg
timer he saw in a pub in
southwest Britain.
The former World War II
pilot then spent years
transforming the concept
into a home lighting acces-
sory, having recognized
the potential for such an
invention during anything-
goes '60s Britain.
"Everything was getting
a little bit psychedelic,"
said Christine Baehr, the
second of Craven-


Walker's four wives.
"There was Carnaby
Street and The Beatles
and things launching into
space and he thought it
was quite funky and might
be something to launch
into."
Britain's "Love Genera-
tion" saw an affinity be-
tween the fluorescent
lava flow's unpredictable
nature and the easy-going,
drug-induced spirit of the
decade.
Craven-Walker's first
model, the Astro Lamp,
also reflected the techno-
logical innovation and
imagination of the time,
shaped like a sci-fi rocket.
Soon other models, such
as the Astro Mini and the
Astro Nordic, emerged
from Craven-Walker's
Crestworth company,
building on his original
concept.
Baehr recalls a memo-
rable moment when they
were told that Beatles
drummer Ringo Starr had
bought one of their lamps.
"That was a great, Ah,
we've made it,' moment,"
she said.
Despite the decline of
British manufacturing,
with numerous well-
known brands dying or
moving to countries with
cheaper labor costs, lava
lamp making company


Associated Press
Lava lamps are photographed Aug. 19 in a shop in London. The lava lamp, an iconic piece of British design and so-
cial trends, is celebrating its 50th birthday. Since its launch in 1963, Mathmos lava lamps have been in continu-
ous production at their factory in Poole, Dorset. The company founder and eccentric inventor Edward Craven-
Walker originally developed the lava lamp from an egg timer design he saw in a Dorset pub. Lava lamps are based
on two liquids of slightly different density that will not mix. The heavier liquid sinks to the bottom, but when
heated by the lamp light, its density decreases and it floats to the top.


Mathmos has remained at
their factory in southwest
Britain still employing
Craven-Walker's tried and
tested formula.
"I think it's really special
to manufacture something
that's been invented and
made in Britain, in Britain
for 50 years," said Cressida
Granger, who became in-
volved with Crestworth in
1989, renamed it Mathmos
in 1992 and gained sole
ownership in 1999.
U.S. rights to manufac-
ture the lamps are held by
Haggerty Enterprises Inc.
of Elk Grove Village, Ill.
Granger went on to
enjoy a second wave of
success for Craven-
Walker's invention during
the 1990s, as a new genera-
tion of consumers, ob-
sessed with retro British
trends, lit their rooms with
'60s lava lamp designs.
Craven-Walker, whose
other enthusiasm in-


cluded nudism, died in
2000.
Lava lamps are based on
two liquids of slightly dif-
ferent density that will not
mix. The heavier liquid
sinks to the bottom, but
when heated by the lamp
light, its density decreases
and it floats to the top.
His invention has had
roles in music videos and
on television, having orig-
inally appeared in popu-
lar British television
shows during the '60s
such as "The Prisoner"
and "Doctor Who."
"I think it's the motion
within the lamp," said An-
thony Voz, a collector of
Mathmos products. "The
way that it flows, how it's
anti-repetitive, how it's a
mixture of light and chaos
blending together It kind
of pulls people in and be-
fore you know it, you've
spent 15 minutes looking
at it."




Full Text

PAGE 1

PATFAHERTY Staff writerFallout from the Great Recession could continue to shape Citrus Countys real estate market for several years. While the number of mortgage foreclosures is declining, the number of foreclosed homes and other distressed properties on the market and those in the pipeline will continue to reflect the economic problems of previous years. Distressed properties include short sales, a negotiated transaction where the lender accepts less than is owned on a property; mortgage-release properties returned to the lender; and third-party sales. According to real estate broker Linda Bega, of the 1,994 residential closings from Jan.1 through Aug.31, 390 were foreclosures and 117 were short sales. That total of 507 distressed properties represents slightly more than 25 percent of all sales. For July, a benchmark month for local home sales, distressed sales were about 40 percent of the action, according to data from the Realtors Association of Citrus County. Of 161 single-family home sales, 52 were foreclosures and 12 were short sales. Bega is the owner of Landmark Realty, which leads the county in the sale of foreclosed homes. She works with a variety of lenders and the various federal agencies involved with housing. She said her recent contacts with Freddy Mac and Fannie Mae indicate the county can expect another wave of housing inventory. Fannie Mae currently has 97 foreclosure homes listed for sale in Gyms founder passes on, but leaves his dream behind A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerHERNANDOThe sport of boxing has a folkloric resonance about it. From the persistent rhythms of speed bags, punching bags and the sweltering, dank gyms of long ago to the giant historical gladiators the sport has produced from Jack Johnson to Rocky Marciano to Muhammad Ali boxing has always maintained a creed, the Queensberry rules. The rules have defined INSIDE SEPTEMBER 8, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 32 $1 CITRUS COUNTY IN THEIR WORDS:Cold WarAs a Navy pilot in the 1950s, Thomas Trout remembers a close call in the Medeterranean. /Page A14www.chronicleonline.com COMMENTARY:DCF chiefThe News Service of Florida interviews the interim secretary of Floridas Department of Children and Families, Esther Jacobo./Page C1 BUSINESS:Health careSo, what will the new plans from the health care reform law cost people? Read about two studies that analyzed it./Page D1 EXCURSIONS:Maze masterDesigner turns fields of corn into mazes across the country./Page A11 Annies Mailbox......A12 Classifieds................D4 Crossword..............A14 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........A4 Horoscope................A4 Lottery Numbers......B3 Lottery Payouts........B3 Menus . . . . . .A7 Movies....................A14 Obituaries................A6 Together..................A16 Veterans . . . .A14 INDEX For video, click on this story at www.chronicle online.com. HIGH92LOW69Isolated p.m. storms; rain chance 20%.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning 000FXB8 SO YOU KNOW An advertisement on the front of toda ys comics section contains the wrong date for the Womens Health and Fitness Expo. The event is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River. SUNDAY PATFAHERTY Staff writerThe actual number of foreclosed homes in Citrus County is subject to interpretation. Some databases and websites amalgamate numbers including preforeclosures, homes in fore closure, short sales, bank-owned homes, homes being auctioned and unspecified properties. Foreclosure cases turn up in the circuit court system when the lis pendens suit pending paperwork is filed and are subsequently counted as mortgage cases filed. But those numbers can seem small when compared to the array of foreclosure-related properties listed on RealtyTrac, a real estate website often quoted by the media and public officials. Company officials explained the difference. Jennifer von Pohlmann with RealtyTrac detailed the companys methodology: The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month broken out byVarious factors add to home foreclosure numbers His legacy lives on MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleChris Hedry, left, takes a punch to the face as he and Hayes Gray spar. Even though the boxers are required to wear heavy-duty protective gear, a punch is still a punch. During his sparring with Gray, Hedry lost a tooth. See BOXING/ Page A5 A small building in Hernando, at 2700 N. Florida Ave., is home to Lake Side Boxing. Gym founder James Collazo died July 4. Ever since I met him, all he talked about was owning his own gym. He wanted to have a place for children and their parents to come and learn boxing and have fun. He looked at the gym as a way of giving to the kids, his widow Linda Collazo said. WHAT: Lake Side Boxing. WHERE: 2700 N. F lorida Ave. WHEN: 4 to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10a.m. to 2p.m. Saturdays. PHONE: 352-228-2314. FEES: $40 per month per person; f amily rates are available. See more photos from the g ym/Page A10. See a video from Lake Side Bo xing with this story online at www. chronicleonline.com. Foreclosures play large role in county home market See MARKET/ Page A8 See FACTORS/ Page A8 The good news is we have to get through the process, you have to get rid of the back inventory, which is holding down prices of other property. Its huge competition. Linda Begaowner of Landmark Realty. Upset alert: Hurricanes sweep past No. 12 Gators /B1

PAGE 2

One dead in St. Pete shooting ST. PETERSBURG Six St. Petersburg police officers are on administrative leave after the fatal shooting of an armed man on a front porch early Saturday. Officers were called twice to the neighborhood after residents reported hearing gunshots and loud music, said police spokesman Mike Puetz. While on the scene a second time, officers heard a gunshot and saw an armed man standing on an enclosed front porch. The man initially responded to officers commands to lower his weapon, but then picked up a rifle that he pointed at the officers in his yard, Puetz said. According to police, six officers fired at the man. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Police identified the man as Lealann Russell Melder Cooley. Investigators found other weapons and ammunition in Cooleys house, Puetz said.Scott to tour state to discuss tax cutsTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott will make stops throughout Florida to talk about next years budget. Scott has announced plans to cut taxes and fees for the state by $500 million in the next proposed budget. The Its Your Money tour will begin Tuesday morning in West Palm Beach, followed by a stop that afternoon in Fort Lauderdale. Scott will then stop in Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlando during the next three days.No ticket wins Mega MoneyTALLAHASSEE No tickets matched all four numbers plus the Mega Ball in the Mega Money game so the jackpot has rolled over to $1.5 million, Florida Lottery officials said Saturday. Two tickets won $3,300 for picking 4-of-4; 33 tickets won $438 each for picking 3-of-4 plus the Mega Ball number; 675 tickets won $63.50 each for picking 3-of-4; 976 tickets won $30.50 each for picking 2-of-4 plus the Mega Ball; 9,032 won $3 each for matching one number plus the Mega Ball; 23,527 tickets won $2 each for picking 2-of-4. The numbers drawn Friday night were 1-18-30-37 and the Mega Ball was 2.Airport adds service to MexicoFORT MYERS Mexico will become Southwest Florida International Airports third non-U.S. destination in December. Thats when MetJet will launch weekly seasonal flights between Fort Myers and Cancun, Mexico. Airport officials say they want to expand their international reach even farther. Canadian service began nearly two decades ago. Nonstops to Germany debuted April 1994. The airport already is in rare company: Of the 429 commercial airports in the United States, its one of just 26 with nonstops to non-U.S. destinations.A2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE LOCAL/STATE New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart) Must present coupon. Any make or model. In office only. One week only.FREEHEARING TEST BATTERY REPLACEMENT HEARING AID REPAIRS BATTERIESPREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES99Limit 1 Coupon Per Visit. Limit 2 Packs Per Visit. Must present coupon. One week only. 0%FINANCINGONE WEEK ONLY!12 MONTHS SAME AS CASH CHECK QUALIFICATION CALL352-795-1484 22 YEARS IN CITRUS COUNTY!Owner Rickey RichardsonLicensed Hearing Aid SpecialistBrian LazioLicensed Hearing Aid Specialist ATTENTION U.S. RESIDENTS Travel With Confidence . Miracle Ear Will Be There.Over 1,200 Miracle Ear Locations! WALK-INS WELCOME! Call for a FREE demo today! FREE HEARING AIDS Fits Hearing Loss of 30 DB If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 45 days of the completion of fitting, i n satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG. Limited Time Discount. No other offers or discounts apply. Discount does not apply to prior sales. 000FXI8 Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart) 352-795-1484 OPEN: Mon.-Fri. 10AM-5PMALSO IN OCALA9570 SW Hwy. 200 (Corner of Hwy. 484 & 200)(352) 291-1467Paddock Mall(352) 237-1665 Inside Inside 000FZUU 000FZIX GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM 000FXP4 Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays StateBRIEFS Sept. 11 artifacts on display Wednesday Special to the ChronicleDonations of artifacts from the 9/11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center will be on display from noon to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, at Inverness City Hall. The Citrus County Sheriffs Office partnered with the city of Inverness and the National Association of Retired Law Enforcement Officers to travel to New York City to bring back these artifacts. Some artifacts that will be on display are a piece of the sphere that rested between the towers, doors from patrol cars (one being a K-9 officer), signs from locations around the city and other pieces. From left are: Sgt. Dave Vincent, Dep. Joe Faherty, Dep. Todd Farnham, Joe Jurgins, NARLEOs Andy Tarpey, Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni and Gary Gersitz. From wire reports

PAGE 3

Around theSTATE Citrus County CR Council gets first look at budgetThe Crystal River City Council will have its first reading of the citys tentative budget for 2013-14 on Monday evening. The rollback rate for fiscal year 2013-14 was set 3.8945 mills. The millage rate being proposed for is 3.8 mills, which is the same rate as last year. The proposed general fund budget is $3,995,084. The council also will have a first hearing on adopting the Community Redevelopment Budget for 2013-14. Council members have slated for discussion possible changes to the Three Sisters Springs management plan. It was continued from the last months meeting.Water task force to meet MondayThe Citrus/Hernando Waterways Restoration Council-Citrus County Task Force will meet at 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9, in Room 166 of the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Business will include Aquatic Habitat Enhancement and Restoration, Water Quality Report, and preparation for the annual report to the state Legislature. The public is invited and public input is welcomed. For information, call Al Grubman at 352-726-2201 or Jennifer Nolan at 352796-7211League to hear about springsThe League of Women Voters of Citrus County invites the public to join them at 10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, for a presentation and discussion on the Florida Land and Water Constitutional Amendment Initiative, with land preservationist Dr. K.C. Nayfield as the guest speaker. The meetingwill be at the Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills. The league is an educational, nonpartisan organization that meets the second Tuesday each month. For information, call 352-7460655. REC announces guest speakerThe next meeting of the Citrus County Republican Executive Committee will be at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9, in the Board of Realtors Building, 714 S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto. Guest speaker will be Randy Osborne, chairman of the Marion County Republican Executive Committee and director of education for Heartland Research Eagle Forum, speaking about the education initiative Common Core.PalmettoDonors help save familys homeA Manatee County family was on the verge of losing their home because of a tax bill glitch, but dozens of donors have stepped forward. The Herald Tribune reported Karen Laffler and her family were on the brink of losing the home because a developer failed to pay the appropriate property taxes. The home, valued at $91,000, was custom-built for their needs and donated to them in 2006. Laffler is wheelchair-bound from a stroke that she suffered several years ago. Her daughter, Amanda, was born with spina bifida and also cannot walk. After a story in the Herald-Tribune 58 area donors raised $40,560 that the family needed to buy back the home from an investor who had acquired it at the recent tax auction. From staff and wire reports Page A3SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE INVERNESS Hundreds of people spent their Saturday at the Citrus County Auditorium for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce Business Expo. With more than 50 local vendors, guests were handed a variety of opportunities to answer their questions and inquiries while learning about local resources and pet adoptions. The family-centered expo also dedicated 10 booths to local nonprofits. The event was sponsored by Bailey Electric, the Citrus County Chronicle the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Suncoast Dermatology, Plantation on Crystal River, WWJB News Radio and Insight Credit Union.Eryn Worthington ERYN WORTHINGTON/ChronicleGFWC Womens Club of Inverness member Judy Hrycaj introduces herself to Garijo Stackhouse on Saturday at the Citrus County Chamber Business Expo. Business shines at expo Special to the ChronicleStart your Citrus County Outdoor Adventure by attending the first Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Festival on Saturday, Nov. 16. Capping off a week of activities in honor of Americas veterans, this regional festival will raise money for the Wounded Warrior Project, as well as the Chamber of Commerce Scholarship/Outreach Fund and Citrus County community youth programs. Admission is free and there will be fun for all family members with food and crafts booths, a kids zone and dragon boat racing on the lake. Lake Hernando is at the junction of U.S. 41 and County Road 486. Described as the fastestgrowing watersport in the world, dragon boating features 20 people paddling a 42-foot boat to the beat of a drummer sitting on the bow. A steersperson stands in the stern to guide the boat. Dragon boating can be a purely recreational activity or a highly competitive sport, and began more than 2,000 years ago in China. The Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Festival will feature club and community teams competing for prizes and bragging rights. Community teams are forming now. All it takes is 21 people who want to have fun. No prior experience is necessary. Teams may solicit pledges to cover the registration fees and to raise funds for the charities. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. Festival staff will work with corporate or other potential sponsors to help form teams. Practice sessions will be held during the week before the festival. Paddles, life vests, boats, drums and steerspersons will be provided for the practice sessions and all of the races. Spectator admission and parking are free. Food, beer and wine will be sold. Bring blankets and chairs. The event is made possible through a partnership of Citrus County Commission, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and High Five Dragon Boat LLC. Official hosts for the festival are Grandmasters Dragon Boat Club of the Villages and Nature Coast Dragon Boat Club of Homosassa. For further information about forming a team or becoming a sponsor, visit www. LakeHernandoDragonBoat.com or call 352-400-0960 or 352-7953149. Special to the ChronicleDragon boat races will take place on Lake Hernando on Saturday, Nov. 16. Inaugural regional Dragon Boat Festival slated for Nov. 16 Row, row, row your beast PATFAHERTY Staff writerThe Florida Public Service Commission has scheduled a meeting on Duke Energys proposed revised settlement agreement that terminates the contract for the proposed Levy County nuclear plant. The other parties in the settlement are the Office of Public Counsel, representing Florida ratepayers, the Florida Industrial Power Users Group, the Florida Retail Federation and White Springs Agricultural Chemicals. The revisions to the 2012 settlement agreement relate to the Crystal River nuclear plant costs, the insurance settlement, the proposed Levy project, the future of Crystal River units 1 and 2 and options for meeting long-term power needs. Duke recently responded to PSC staff requests for additional information regarding the proposed revisions. Duke acknowledged it received $835 million to settle its insurance claims pertaining to the shuttered Crystal River area nuclear plant known as CR3. The company also reiterated its reasons for retiring rather than attempting to repair the plant. Duke stated it was not confident the containment building could be repaired successfully and the attempted repair was not cost-effective for customers. Between October 2009 and March 2011, Duke spent $176 million on repair costs. Aside from the repair issue, the agreement covers the planned power output increase at CR3. Between March 1, 2012, and July 21, 2013, Duke collected $28.1 million from its customers under the nuclear cost recovery law to pay for that planned improvement. Also under nuclear cost recovery, Duke will have collected approximately $102.8 million by end of 2013 for the Levy nuclear project. The company plans to recover a total of $350 million for the project by the end of 2017. The revised agreement represents an effective balance between moderating rate impacts to customers, providing clarity on recovery of past investments and allowing us to move forward with planning for Floridas energy future, said Alex Glenn, Duke Energy state president, last month when the agreement was first announced. The Sept. 16 PSC meeting will fall about a week short of the fourth anniversary of CR3 going dark in 2009. The company announced it would retire the plant in February of this year. The full commission hearing on the revised settlement is set for Oct. 16 and 17.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicleonline .com. PSC plans follow-up meeting about Duke Energy proposal Special to the ChronicleJudy Brinkley, former area behavior analyst for the Agency for Persons with Disabilities and currently training specialist for the Key Training Center, will speak about behavior issues as experienced by persons with developmental disabilities at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, in the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center at the Key Training Center, 5521 Buster Whitton Way, Lecanto. The presentation is open to the public. Additional meetings may be scheduled for parents with individual concerns or questions. Teaching appropriate behavior is not just a concern for parents of young children, but for caregivers of adults. Sometimes parents of young children feel overwhelmed by the health, learning and communication needs they must address, and behavioral problems are pushed to the end of the list, especially if the child is very young. As the child matures, becomes bigger, more mobile and more verbal, teaching discipline and the correct ways to interact with society become a lot more important. For more information, call Stephanie Hopper at 352-344-0288. Keys training specialist to talk behavioral help

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Birthday You may need to alter some of the variables in your life in order to ease stress and avoid loss in the year ahead. The right move could bring high returns, but temptation could cost you dearly. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Get involved in something that challenges you. Someone you encounter will give you an interesting point of view concerning a project you are considering. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Your charm will entice someone you want to get to know better. Make plans that will allow you to show off your smarts and skills, but refrain from overindulging. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Draw from your varied and colorful experience and find a way to use your fund of knowledge to explore new avenues. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) You should adapt to shifting trends and make the most of whatever situation you face. You will attract someone as spirited as you, who will want to travel down the same path. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Youll find it easier to deal with lifes many demands if you take better care of yourself. Working hard can be good, but not at the expense of your health. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Look for new ways to use your skills. A change in the way you earn your living could prove to be a turning point. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take a look at interesting investments and pursue the one that seems the best. Reopen doors that may have been closed in the past, and you will prosper. Aries (March 21-April 19) A partnership will be on shaky ground if you overreact. Question your reasoning before you take action. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Do something you enjoy or spend time with a person likely to make you laugh. Avoid stressful situations. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do the legwork and find out all you can before pursuing someone or something that may not be as it appears. False perceptions will lead to disappointment. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Dont make personal changes that could alter your looks without serious thought. Take the path of least resistance until you know you can achieve positive results. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Protect your reputation. Uncertainty regarding your status and personal relationships will cause confusion. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Sunday, Sept. 8, the 251st day of 2013. There are 114 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Sept. 8, 1943, during World War II, Gen. Dwight E. Eisenhower announced Italys surrender; Nazi Germany denounced Italys decision as a cowardly act. On this date: In 1565, a Spanish expedition established the first permanent European settlement in North America at present-day St. Augustine, Fla. In 1892, an early version of The Pledge of Allegiance, written by Francis Bellamy, appeared in The Youths Companion. In 1951, a peace treaty with Japan was signed by 49 nations in San Francisco. In 1974, President Gerald R. Ford granted an unconditional pardon to former President Richard Nixon. Ten years ago: The Recording Industry Association of America, the music industrys largest trade group, filed 261 copyright lawsuits across the country against Internet users for trading songs online. Five years ago: In a pointed but mostly symbolic expression of displeasure with Moscow, President George W. Bush canceled a oncecelebrated civilian nuclear cooperation deal with Russia. One year ago: Strong storms pummeled the East Coast, spawning a pair of tornadoes in the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. Todays Birthdays: Comedian Sid Caesar is 91. Ventriloquist Willie Tyler is 73. Actor Alan Feinstein is 72. Actress Heather Thomas is 56. Singer Aimee Mann is 53. Gospel singer Darlene Zschech is 48. TV personality Brooke Burke-Charvet is 42. Actor Martin Freeman is 42. Actor David Arquette is 42. Actor Larenz Tate is 38. Actor Nathan Corddry is 36. Singer Pink is 34. Actor Jonathan Taylor Thomas is 32. Thought for Today: Censorship is the height of vanity. Martha Graham, American modern dance pioneer (1893-1991). Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 90 71 0.00 HI LO PR 92 69 1.20 HI LO PR 88 68 2.20 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 87 69 0.70 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Isolated PM storms, rain chance 20%THREE DAY OUTLOOK Few PM storms, rain chance 30% Few PM storms, rain chance 30%High: 92 Low: 69 High: 91 Low: 70 High: 92 Low: 71TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Saturday 92/69 Record 96/64 Normal 91/70 Mean temp. 81 Departure from mean +0 PRECIPITATION* Saturday 1.20 in. Total for the month 4.00 in. Total for the year 45.01 in. Normal for the year 40.40 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 9 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in. DEW POINT Saturday at 3 p.m. 70 HUMIDITY Saturday at 3 p.m. 54% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Saturday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:43 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:12 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY .........................10:08 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................9:40 P.M. SEPT. 12SEPT. 19SEPT. 26OCT. 4 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 89 72 s Ft. Lauderdale 88 79 ts Fort Myers 93 73 ts Gainesville 90 69 s Homestead 87 74 ts Jacksonville 88 70 s Key West 88 78 ts Lakeland 93 72 s Melbourne 87 76 pc City H L Fcast Miami 89 77 ts Ocala 90 70 s Orlando 92 71 s Pensacola 92 73 s Sarasota 93 73 pc Tallahassee 92 69 s Tampa 92 75 s Vero Beach 88 73 pc W. Palm Bch. 88 77 ts FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNortheast winds around 10 knots. Seas 1 foot or less. Bay and inland waters will have a light chop. Mostly sunny today. Gulf water temperature89 LAKE LEVELSLocation Fri. Sat. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 29.47 n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.09 38.15 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.31 39.42 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.36 40.48 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka L L L 99/79 76/66 92/61 90/70 81/64 80/63 74/61 96/75 79/56 79/60 80/56 75/57 90/72 89/77 94/75 87/60 THE NATION Albany 75 48 pc 70 41 Albuquerque 89 66 pc 87 65 Asheville 81 57 pc 83 59 Atlanta 88 68 s 90 72 Atlantic City 78 47 pc 81 60 Austin 97 72 .23 pc 96 74 Baltimore 82 51 pc 86 57 Billings 88 64 ts 79 56 Birmingham 89 70 s 92 67 Boise 82 53 s 83 53 Boston 81 54 pc 75 50 Buffalo 67 55 .25 pc 66 47 Burlington, VT 67 56 pc 63 41 Charleston, SC 88 70 s 88 71 Charleston, WV 82 51 pc 85 63 Charlotte 85 61 pc 90 64 Chicago 88 65 .01 pc 76 66 Cincinnati 86 54 pc 85 65 Cleveland 82 54 pc 74 56 Columbia, SC 90 65 s 92 70 Columbus, OH 85 54 pc 81 60 Concord, N.H. 79 42 pc 68 35 Dallas 99 77 s 99 79 Denver 95 57 pc 92 61 Des Moines 96 73 pc 91 70 Detroit 81 57 .01 pc 75 57 El Paso 93 73 s 90 70 Evansville, IN 88 64 ts 90 69 Harrisburg 80 47 pc 78 47 Hartford 79 51 pc 77 44 Houston 88 75 pc 94 75 Indianapolis 88 62 ts 85 66 Jackson 95 69 .01 s 96 70 Las Vegas 89 81 pc 91 76 Little Rock 99 69 s 96 71 Los Angeles 82 68 s 80 63 Louisville 87 65 ts 90 70 Memphis 95 71 s 94 74 Milwaukee 84 69 .50 pc 73 64 Minneapolis 94 72 pc 81 64 Mobile 91 70 s 92 71 Montgomery 94 72 s 94 68 Nashville 92 63 pc 91 68 New Orleans 90 76 s 92 74 New York City 80 59 pc 80 56 Norfolk 79 60 pc 88 67 Oklahoma City 98 70 s 97 70 Omaha 89 71 .01 pc 92 73 Palm Springs 96 81 pc 108 83 Philadelphia 79 55 pc 84 55 Phoenix 93 83 ts 97 80 Pittsburgh 80 47 pc 77 55 Portland, ME 79 48 pc 68 42 Portland, Ore 81 56 .26 s 85 61 Providence, R.I. 77 49 pc 77 47 Raleigh 82 59 pc 90 65 Rapid City 97 65 pc 87 63 Reno 90 53 s 88 58 Rochester, NY 66 53 .07 pc 68 47 Sacramento 98 55 s 100 67 St. Louis 94 70 pc 93 71 St. Ste. Marie 74 60 .08 s 64 50 Salt Lake City 87 68 .02 pc 85 67 San Antonio 99 76 pc 95 75 San Diego 84 70 s 84 70 San Francisco 88 62 s 79 63 Savannah 92 69 s 90 72 Seattle 74 63 pc 79 60 Spokane 69 54 pc 79 53 Syracuse 71 52 .01 pc 63 43 Topeka 100 69 pc 98 72 Washington 82 60 pc 87 60YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 106 Mc Cook, Neb. LOW 29 Stanley, Idaho SUNDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 86/75/ts Amsterdam 66/52/sh Athens 87/67/pc Beijing 77/58/c Berlin 80/58/pc Bermuda 83/78/r Cairo 96/70/s Calgary 72/54/ts Havana 89/74/ts Hong Kong 85/77/sh Jerusalem 81/63/s Lisbon 76/60/s London 67/48/sh Madrid 84/57/pc Mexico City 69/56/ts Montreal 61/46/pc Moscow 61/44/c Paris 75/48/sh Rio 79/64/s Rome 80/72/pc Sydney 76/60/sh Tokyo 84/68/sh Toronto 69/50/pc Warsaw 74/52/s WORLD CITIES Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Sunday MondayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 7:46 a/3:44 a 8:29 p/4:08 p 8:17 a/4:17 a 9:15 p/4:50 p Crystal River** 6:07 a/1:06 a 6:50 p/1:30 p 6:38 a/1:39 a 7:36 p/2:12 p Withlacoochee* 3:54 a/11:18 a 4:37 p/11:27 p 4:25 a/12:00 p 5:23 p/ Homosassa*** 6:56 a/2:43 a 7:39 p/3:07 p 7:27 a/3:16 a 8:25 p/3:49 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 9/8 SUNDAY 8:18 2:05 8:43 2:30 9/9 MONDAY 9:14 3:01 9:40 3:27 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SUNDAY HI LO PR 89 69 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen:Ragweed, chenopods, grasses Todays count: 6.3/12 Mondays count: 7.9 Tuesdays count: 8.0 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Giffords rehab in new music videoPHOENIX A new music video shows images of thenCongresswoman GabrielleGiffords in the earliest days of her recovery following injuries from a 2011 shooting. Giffords is shown working with a physical therapist in the video version of the song Overcomer, by gospel singer Mandisa, the Arizona Republic reported. The video shows Giffords taking tentative steps in a hospital room and sitting up in a bed wearing protective headgear. Those images had not been previously released. The video also features former Olympic skater Scott Hamilton, who was treated for testicular cancer and a benign brain tumor, and Robin Roberts, co-host of Good Morning America. Last year, Roberts underwent a bone-marrow transplant. Giffords said in a statement she was inspired by the song because its message is one of hope, perseverance and faith.JFK museum to display replica gownBOSTON A paper replica of the gown worn by Jacqueline Bouvier when she wed thenU.S. Sen. John F. Kennedy will be displayed in Boston to mark the 60th anniversary of their nuptials. The bride wore an ivory silk taffeta gown with a portrait neckline and bouffant skirt for the Sept. 12, 1953, event in Newport, R.I. The gowns original designer was Ann Lowe The replica was created by Belgian artist Isabelle de Borchgrave with collaboration from Rita Brown. Marshall Fields department store commissioned the replica in 2004, later donating it to the JFK Library and Museum. The replica will be displayed from Sept. 12 until Nov. 3 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. The actual gown, now too fragile for display, was last featured in a 2003 exhibit.James Taylor teams up with choirSALT LAKE CITY It took a while for it to happen, but James Taylor has finally teamed up with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir on stage. The pop star sang a dozen songs Friday night in Salt Lake City, some with the 360-person choir, some with the Utah Symphony and some with his touring combo. A capacity crowd of 21,000 cheered as he sang some of his classics Shower the People, Fire and Rain, and Carolina in My Mind, among others. Taylor raved about the choir, calling it a national treasure and a great gift to the world. After singing Lonesome Road, he said the song had died and gone to heaven with the choir singing backup to him. Choir officials first approached Taylor about performing together in 2006. Taylor says it just took us a long time to find the date, (but it) was worth the date. The choir has performed with other stars from outside the Mormon church over the past decade, including Sting Sissel and Rene Fleming. From wire reports Associated PressDirector Tsai Ming-liang holds the Grand Jury Prize for his film Straw Dogs during the awards photo call Saturday at the 70th edition of the Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy. A4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 000FUXO in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . D6 Miscellaneous Notices . . . D6 ON THE NETTo see the video: http://abcn.ws/15G8V9g

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boxing since 1867 and there are 12 of them, but to boxing purists, it is how boxing is done pure and simple.Dream and crashTo purists like the late Jaime Collazo of Hernando, there was no reason to veer from those rules. In fact, his mission statement was: We teach boxing; the sport of fighting with fists, with padded gloves in a roped square ring according to the Queensberry Rules. Strictly boxing. And, for all his seven decades of life, Collazo or Mr. C, as his pupils called him boxed, trained, talked and dreamt about opening a boxing gym an old-school gym where families could learn the finer points of the sport. In February 2013, and in his 70th year, Collazo realized his dream when he purchased a building at 2700 N. Florida Ave. to open Lake Side Boxing. We were opened May 1 and on June3 he broke his neck (C6 and 7) and died July 4, said Collazos widow, Linda Collazo. Collazo was riding his scooter to the gym from home when he ran over a pebble and crashed. She said her husband was so excited about opening the gym and we all thought he didnt have any paralysis from the accident, but when we went back to the doctors for a follow-up visit, they said there was something wrong and they needed to operate, Mrs. Collazo said. It was during that operation or soon after that Collazo developed an infection, pneumonia. A few days later, he was dead.Now what?According to Mrs. Collazo, she met Collazo 31 years ago and the two had been married the past 25 and a half years. Ever since I met him, all he talked about was owning his own gym. He wanted to have a place for children and their parents to come and learn boxing and have fun. He looked at the gym as a way of giving to the kids, Mrs. Collazo said. She said Collazo was born in Puerto Rico but moved to the Bronx at age 5, where he picked up his passion for boxing. Collazo later moved to Massachusetts, where they met, and he worked for Sealtest/Good Humor/ Breyer for 37 years. Fifteen years ago, the couple moved here, but Collazo was still on the lookout for young talent to tutor. Mrs. Collazo said her husband found what he thought was the perfect place and three trainers Aaron Rodriquez, Bruce Lang and Corvin Poncho Henry who became as passionate about the gym as Collazo. Those three kept visiting him daily at the hospital and he would always ask How is the gym? But after he passed, we all kind of asked, What are we going to do about the gym? Mrs. Collazo said. The guys decided they wanted to keep it going.LegacyToday, the gym continues to thrive. Families are signing up, trainees can be found pounding away at the punching bags. The gym has the feel of an old-school facility. There is no air conditioning. The heat inside, heavy and thick, attacks as you enter; here, everyone sweats. The gym also has its first professional fighter a lightweight from Puerto Rico, Hector Marengo. He recently won a bout in Orlando via technical knockout in the second round. We are trying to keep doing what Mr. C. always talked about, trainer Lang said. When you come here to train, we emphasize power punching and cardio and people love it. But everybody is working well together to keep things going, Lang added. Henry, who was driving by one day and saw Collazos vehicle parked at the new building with boxing signage on the vehicle, stopped and the two chatted.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 A5 MANAGERS SPECIALS 000G02C Hwy. 44 W. Inverness (352) 726-1231 nicknicholasford.com SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 Inverness CR 486 Hwy 44 Hwy 41 H w y 4 90 Nick Nicholas Hwy 491 Hwy. 19 2007 FORD EXPLORER Low mileage Eddie Bauer. NP5860 $18,668 2010 LINCOLN MKT Affordable lincoln. N3T401A $29,968 2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL Only 4k miles on this hybrid. N3C188A $29,988 2010 FORD FOCUS SES Great fuel economy. N3C166A $14,868 2012 FORD FUSION SE A must see. NP5893 $20,668 2011 FORD FIESTA SES Come with benefits. NP5861 $17,968 2010 LINCOLN MKX All the lincoln luxury. NP5876 $26,968 2011 FORD E250 This one is work ready. N3T349B $20,668 000FXFO www.superioralf.com 4865 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto 352.746.5483 000FVIH Assisted Living Facility License # 12256 YOU ARE NOT ALONE 22% of seniors over the age of 70 suffer from memory loss. WE ARE HERE TO HELP. Blackshears II Aluminum 795-9722 Free Estimates www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer 000FWND HWY. 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 2013 2013 2013 2013 Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleJames Collazo is pictured in his gym before his accident. His wife said Collazos life-long dream was to open a boxing gym. BOXINGContinued from Page A1 When you come here to train, we emphasize power punching and cardio and people love it.Bruce Langone of three trainers originally hired by Lake Side Gym founder James Collazo. See LEGACY/ Page A8

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The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer or LADEE, is taking a roundabout path to the moon, making three huge laps around Earth before getting close enough to pop into lunar orbit. It is expected to reach the moon Oct. 6. Scientists want to learn the composition of the moons ever-so-delicate atmosphere and how it might change over time. Another puzzle, dating back decades, is whether dust actually levitates from the lunar surface. The $280 million moonorbiting mission will last six months and end with a suicide plunge into the moon for LADEE. The 844-pound spacecraft has three science instruments as well as laser communication test equipment that could revolutionize data relay. NASA hopes to eventually replace its traditional radio systems with laser communications, which would mean faster bandwidth using significantly less power and smaller devices. Associated PressIBM plans to move many retired workers off its health plan and give them money to buy coverage on a health-insurance exchange. The move is part of a corporate trend away from providing traditional retiree health benefits as costs rise. The company said it acted after projections showed that costs under its current plan for Medicare-eligible retirees will triple by 2020 and that the increases would be paid by retirees through premiums and out-of-pocket costs. An IBM spokesman said Saturday that the change will affect about 110,000 retirees. Under the change, IBM will make annual contributions to healthretirement accounts. Retirees would use the money to buy Medicare Advantage or supplemental Medigap policies through a private exchange. A Kaiser Family Foundation report issued last month found that among companies with at least 200 workers, 28 percent that provide health benefits also offer retiree coverage. The authors said there could be a significant change in the way that employers approach health benefits and the way employees get coverage, with employers playing a less active role. Augustine Ambrose, 77SUMMERFIELDAugustine R. Ambrose, age 77, of Summerfield, Fla., died Sept. 1, 2013. Private arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.Joyce Boothe, 49OCALAJoyce Boothe, age 49, of Ocala, Fla., died Aug. 26, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.Russell Hadley, 61HOMOSASSARussell W. Hadley, 61, of Homosassa, passed away Aug. 29, 2013. He was born to Willis and Kathleen (Surface) Hadley in Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 21, 1952. Russell Hadley taught soccer and Little League baseball in Citrus County. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Post 4272 and a SAL member of American Legion Post 155. Russell was an employee of Progress Energy for 39 years. He retired as plant manager on Sept. 1, 2012. He is survived by his wife Lin Hadley; Russs two sons, John Hadley of Providence, R.I., and Chad Hadley of Antioch, Ill., and their children, Keiran, Liam and Jack Hadley; two stepsons, Giuseppe Cimmino of Lawton, Okla., and Gino Cimmino of Glenville, N.Y., and their children Angelina, Giovanni and Nikko Cimmino. His mother Kathleen (Surface) Hadley was senior regent of the Women of the Moose Clearwater Chapter 995, where they lived until moving to Inverness, Fla. A memorial will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 21 at VFW Post 8189 on Veterans Road, 352-795-5012, where his wife Lin Hadley is a lifetime member. In lieu of flowers donations to be sent to Crystal River Little League, P.O. Box 1775, Crystal River, FL 34423. Joseph Leshinski, 80HOMOSASSAJoseph Leshinski, age 80, of Homosassa, Fla., died Sept. 6, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.James Wilson Jr., 86LECANTOJames Wilson Jr., age 86, of Lecanto, Fla., died Sept. 2, 2013. Private arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.Eddy Martinez, 57BEVERLY HILLSEddy Martinez, 57, of Beverly Hills, Fla., died Sept. 4, 2013, at his residence. Visiting hours for Mr. Martinez will be from 10 a.m. until noon Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, with a service at 12 p.m. Burial will take place at Hills of Rest Cemetery, Floral City, Fla. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness, Fla.Mark Varney, 59CRYSTAL RIVERAward-winning journalist, broadcaster, and musician Mark Nesbit Varney died Aug. 26, 2013, in Homerville, Ga. He was 59 years old. He was born Oct. 1, 1953, in Abbeville, S.C. His family moved to Crystal River, Fla., in 1958 and he was a lifelong Citrus County resident. He attended Crystal River School (K-12) and graduated in 1971. He studied speech broadcasting at the University of South Florida in Tampa and, for decades, was a familiar voice on Citrus and Marion County radio stations. He worked in local television as well. As a journalist, he reported for newspapers in Citrus and Hernando counties. As a freelance writer, he wrote on music and literature for a number of regional, national and international publications. As a musician, he played drums and sang with touring blues bands The Accelerators and The James Peterson Band. Most recently, he was a member of Marion County-based Sugar Bear, and was active in the Ocala music community. His interests included collecting record albums and books, painting, drawing, writing songs, playing guitar, reading, writing poetry, classic films, swimming, snorkeling and bicycling. He is survived by an older brother, Russell Varney (of Temple Terrace); an older sister, Elaine Varney-Panuska (of Eustis, and Inverness, Nova Scotia); a younger brother, Brad Varney (of Crystal River); nephews, Matthew Panuska (of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) and Adam Varney (of Temple Terrace); a niece, Cass Panuska-Borsting (of San Francisco, Calif.); and two grandnephews. A member of the First Baptist Church of Crystal River, he was a practicing New Testament Christian/ Zen Buddhist. Manuel Patino, 79SPRING HILLManuel J. Patino, age 79, of Spring Hill, Fla., died Aug. 29, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.Daniel Ralls, 82CRYSTAL RIVERDaniel Ralls, 82, of Crystal River, Fla., died Aug. 31, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.Ernest Stephenson, 59INVERNESSErnest M. Stephenson, age 59, of Inverness, Fla., died Aug. 18, 2013. Private cremation is under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.A6SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000FQJU 000FXBH $ 49 It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or treatment. Min. Fee ADA code D0210, D0150 Not in conjunction with insurance. Offer expires in 30 days Full Mouth X-Rays, Comprehensive Exam New Patient Specials Call today! 352-527-1614 Alexsa Davila DMD DN 15390 Walton Van Hoose DMD DN 18101 In house denture lab Free Denture Consults Financing available Most insurance accepted. Family Friendly Citrus Hills Dental 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando Located in the Hampton Square Plaza We Meet All Your Dental Needs, Including Implants 000FXJH Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com Like us on Facebook352.621.8017www.sunfloweralf.comRESORT STYLEAssistedLiving Assisted Living Facility License #11566Sometimes you just need a little help. Stop in & see why relationships blossom daily.8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa000FVGC Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000FX8G For Information and costs,call 726-8323 Burial Shipping CremationFuneral HomeWith Crematory000EHVX Obituaries Russell Hadley Mark Varney Associated PressAn unmanned Minotaur rocket launches off from NASAs Wallops Flight Facility on Friday carrying the space agencys newest robotic explorer, the LADEE spacecraft, on Wallops Island, Va. IBM moving retirees off health plan Associated PressNASAs newest robotic explorer rocketed into space late Friday in an unprecedented moonshot from Virginia that dazzled sky watchers along the East Coast. But the LADEE spacecraft quickly ran into equipment trouble, and while NASA assured everyone early Saturday that the lunar probe was safe and on a perfect track for the moon, officials acknowledged the problem needs to be resolved in the next two to three weeks. S. Peter Worden, director of NASAs Ames Research Center in California, told reporters hes confident everything will be working properly in the next few days. LADEEs reaction wheels were turned on to orient and stabilize the spacecraft, which was spinning too fast after it separated from the final rocket stage, Worden said. But the computer automatically shut the wheels down, apparently because of excess current. He speculated the wheels may have been running a little fast. The LADEE spacecraft, which is charged with studying the lunar atmosphere and dust, soared aboard an unmanned Minotaur rocket a little before midnight from Virginias Eastern Shore. Launch successful, if shaky

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CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS Elementary school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sau sage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal variety and toast, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Hot dog, hamburger sliders, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, potato smiles, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken, Goldies Grab N Go (turkey), turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken nuggets with ripstick, mozzarella maxstix, Italian super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken Alfredo with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled peach cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Middle school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, milk and juice variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Mozzarella maxstix, fajita chicken with rice and ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Hamburger sliders, turkey wrap, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby carrots, potato smiles, chilled strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken Alfredo with ripstick, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, tangy baked beans, chilled peach cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Hot dog, breaded chicken sandwich, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet potato crosstrax, flavored Crai sins, fruit juice, milk variety. High school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sau sage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Ham, egg and cheese on loco bread, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Chicken and rice burrito, pizza, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, green beans, cucumbers, celery, potato roasters, applesauce, juice, milk. Tuesday: Orange chicken with rice, turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, cucumber coins, peas, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, strawberry cup, juice, milk. Wednesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with rice, spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, baked beans, chilled baked beans, potato roasters, flavored Craisins, juice, milk. Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, ham super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, fresh broccoli, steamed broccoli, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, peach cup, juice, milk. Friday: Hot dog, chicken Alfredo with ripstick, pizza, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cold corn salad, sweet corn, potato roasters, strawberry cup, juice, milk. SENIOR DINING Monday: Chunky barbecued chicken, Lyonnaise potatoes, California-blend vegetables, sugar cookie, whole-grain wheat bun with margarine, low-fat milk. Tuesday: Macaroni and cheese with turkey ham, green peas, parslied carrots, peaches, slice rye bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Lemonpepper baked chicken breast, potatoes au gratin, mixed vegetables, apple juice, graham crackers, slice rye bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Thursday: Pork riblet with barbecue sauce on hamburger bun, baked beans, yellow corn, mixed fruit, low-fat milk. Friday: Chef salad with ham, cheese, whole boiled egg and tomato, French dressing, carrot-raisin salad, mixed fruit, slice whole-grain bread, low-fat milk. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. COMMUNITYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 A7 000FZ6N Three Days Only! Tuesday through Thursday September 10-12 Crystal River Mall Accessories next to Cosmetics Buying Hours 10am-5pm No appointment necessary Sept. 9 to 13MENUS

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Obama to speak to nation Tuesday Associated PressWASHINGTON President Barack Obama faces a high-stakes week of trying to convince a skeptical Congress and a war-weary American public that they should back him on a military strike against Syria. His administration came under pressure Saturday from European officials to delay possible action until U.N. inspectors report their findings about an Aug. 21 chemical attack that Obama blames on the Assad government. Foreign ministers meeting in Lithuania with Secretary of State John Kerry did endorse a clear and strong response to an attack they said strongly points to President Bashar Assads government. Kerry welcomed the strong statement about the need for accountability. But the EU did not specify what an appropriate response would be. Obama received an update Saturday afternoon from his chief of staff, Denis McDonough, on the administrations latest outreach to members of Congress, the White House said. Obama called a bipartisan group of lawmakers on Friday and was expected to make more calls this weekend. The days ahead represent one of the most intense periods of congressional outreach for Obama, whos not known for investing heavily in consultations with Capitol Hill. Kerry held talks in Paris with French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, and said at a joint news conference that this is not the time to be silent spectators to slaughter and this is not the time to allow a dictator unfettered use of some of the heinous weapons on Earth. Fabius said, Punishment is not at odds with a political solution. ... Bashar Assad will not participate in any negotiation as long as he sees himself as invincible. Just back from a European trip, Obama is working to salvage a policy whose fate hes placed in lawmakers hands. His administrations lobbying campaign culminates Tuesday, the evening before a critical vote is expected in the Senate. Obama will address the nation from the White House to make his case for military action. Dozens of people opposed to Obamas call for military action demonstrated outside the White House. Speakers chanting They say more war. We say no war, said the picket line marks a line Congress should not cross as it prepares to vote on the issue. Obama left the White House during the protest, traveling by car to Andrews Air Force Base to play golf with three aides. A passionate debate in Congress, which returns to work Monday after its summer break, already is under way. On Wednesday, the first showdown Senate vote is likely over a resolution authorizing the limited and specified use of U.S. armed forces against Syria for no more than 90 days and barring American ground troops from combat. A final vote in the 100-member chamber is expected at weeks end. Citrus County. The two federally chartered companies finance and purchase mortgages, but do not originate consumer loans. Fannie Mae becomes the investor after we buy mortgages from lenders, so (lenders) have more capital and can issue more loans to homeowners, company spokeswoman Callie Dosberg explained.So as the investor, we own the loan and the risk. Freddy Mac did not have county-specific data available, but has a current Florida inventory of approximately 6,700 homes. The good news is we have to get through the process, you have to get rid of the back inventory, which is holding down prices of other property, Bega said. Its huge competition. She added while prices are less that other homes on the market, some are not in as good condition as occupied homes. For July 2013, the median sale price for a foreclosed home was $61,250, down 12.5 percent from 2012; while the median price for a traditional sale was $122,000, up about 16 percent over last year. For real estate agents and brokers, selling foreclosed homes can be more complicated. Theres more paperwork, its more of a process, you have to follow the rules, Bega said. And with that type of sale, she said, there is no emotion or owner involvement. Lingering inventoryBega explained Florida will have lingering foreclosure inventory because the process takes longer. She said it can take more than two years for a foreclosed home to get to market, which means it will take longer to get through the inventory in the pipeline. For example, using Citrus County Circuit Court figures, some of the 1,562 foreclosures filed in 2012 could be expected to hit the real estate market in 2014. Another 727 foreclosure cases were filed through Aug. 31 of this year. County foreclosure figures followed the state trend, peaking in May with 107. Cheryl Lambert, president of the Realtors Association of Citrus County, noted the local market had been heavy with a lot of bank foreclosures, but they have moved a lot of their inventory. She said there is a new way of processing foreclosures through the judicial system a mediation process to help people that is causing some delay. But the time it takes to bring a foreclosed home to market could speed up following a May ruling by the Florida Supreme Court to reduce the backlog of foreclosure cases. It allows chief circuit court judges to appoint magistrates to handle residential foreclosure cases.Our foreclosure inventory levels are down overall primarily because of a reduction in delinquencies, said Wells Fargo spokeswoman Veronica Clemons. Many programs/assistance have been put in place to help people manage their finances: modifications, principle reduction, etc. Brad German with Freddy Mac concurred. Its important to note that our inventory is steadily declining, he said, thanks to a combination of improving markets and sales promotions by our Home Steps sales division. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. type of filing by state, county and metropolitan statistical area. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. RealtyTracs report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: default notice of default and lis pendens; auction notice of trustee sale and notice of foreclosure sale; and real estate owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and re purchased by a bank). If more than one foreclosure document is received for a property during the month, only the most recent filing is counted in the report. The report also checks if the same type of document was filed against a property in a previous month. If so, and if that previous filing occurred within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state the property is in, the report does not count the property in the current month. Typically, when pulling from the court system, you are only getting the initial foreclosure notice, said Daren Blomquist, RealtyTrac vice president. He added that, particularly in Florida, its not uncommon to see a lender/attorney refile a foreclosure notice if the original notice was kicked back for bad documentation. We dont count that again as a new foreclosure notice, Blomquist said. Shelley Sansone, with the Citrus County Clerk of Court and Comptroller Office, confirmed the individual foreclosures do not show up more than once unless the lis pendens is amended; then the office would record the amended lis pendens. FACTORSContinued from Page A1 After that, Henry came back and kept coming back, and is now one of the main trainers at the facility. During an August evening, he had his two sons in tow, Chris, 7, and C.J., 10. The kids donned protective gear and were sparring with other kids in their respective age groups. You know there are a lot of kids out there who do not have an outlet and this place provides that. This is great for the kids and parents, too. Like Mr. C used to say, if I can get one kid out of the street, I have done good, Henry added. Rodriquez said he was one of those troublesome kids who even spent some time in prison. But this changed everything for me. I love boxing and it keeps your mind focused and busy. You dont have time to be thinking about bad things, Rodriquez said. Andy McEwen, who is a deputy with the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, said he discovered the gym by chance and walked in and decided to sign up. This day, McEwen brought along his son Sam, 10, who is schoolmates with C.J. Between sparring exercises, McEwen said he is glad he found the place. The atmosphere is great. It is so familyoriented and you get to lose weight and get fit at the same time, McEwen said. Mrs. Collazo said she is glad the group is sticking it out. He must be looking down and saying This is exactly how I would have done it. After the tragedy, its taken a life of its own. His legacy lives on. Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352564-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com.A8SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLENATION/LOCAL 000FZUL 000FYTQ 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000FYRY Wednesday Sept. 11, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Crystal River Plantation on Crystal River 9301 W. Fort Island Trail Attend a FREE Spine Seminar: call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. Learn about the Florida Spine & Neuro Center and the innovative treatment options available. 000FYHI SPINE CARE YOU CAN TRUST MARKETContinued from Page A1 LEGACYContinued from Page A5 High-stakes week on Syria Associated PressWaving a Syrian flag, protesters against U.S. military action in Syria march to Capitol Hill on Saturday from the White House in Washington, D.C.

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Associated PressCAIRO Egyptian helicopter gunships and tanks pounded suspected hideouts and weapon caches of Islamic militants, killing nine people Saturday in the northern Sinai Peninsula in what locals say is the largest operation in the lawless region for years. Officials say that the military is hunting hundreds of militants believed to be responsible for a series of attacks in the region they overran after the fall of autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011. The militants, the officials say, belong to a number of well-known al-Qaida-inspired groups that seek the establishment of an Islamic Caliphate in northern Sinai, a region bordering Israel and the Gaza Strip. Attacks in the region have increased following the July 3 military coup that toppled President Mohammed Morsi, an Islamist, prompting the military offensive. Early Saturday, residents said they saw winding columns of trucks and armored vehicles pour into the area. Some said they hadnt seen soldiers on foot in their villages in decades. Communications were jammed for hours, as authorities seized control of two telephone exchanges. Military helicopters hovered overhead in a dozen villages concentrated near two border towns of Rafah and Sheikh Zuweyid, security officials said. Airstrikes targeted shacks believed to be gathering points of militants, they said. Soldiers later stormed homes searching for suspected fighters. Successive strikes are aimed at causing paralysis of the militant groups and cutting communications between each other, a security official said. The offensive is carried out within a timeframe where there will be periods of calm for intelligence before resuming once again. We aim for cleansing the whole region of militants and prevent them from coming back, he added. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorized to publicly brief journalists. In a statement, Army spokesman Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali said nine suspected militants were killed Saturday and nine others detained. Earlier, another official said dozens were wounded in the Sinai offensive. Conflicting casualty figures come from militants taking away the corpses of their comrades and treating their wounded, a security official said. Smoke could be seen rising from villages and troops set up a cordon to prevent militants from escaping as others combed the area, he said. Troops arrested a number of suspected militants but others managed to escape to mountainous areas in central Sinai, an official said. In the past, militants used a vast network of underground tunnels linking Egypt with Gaza as a way to escape security crackdowns. However, over the past two months, the military has destroyed more than 80 percent of them, stemming the flow of weapons, militants and goods into Gaza, a territory under an Israeli-imposed blockade. MARIACHENG AP medical writerLONDON Electronic cigarettes worked just as well as nicotine patches to help smokers quit, according to the first study to compare them. E-cigarettes are batteryoperated products that look like real cigarettes and turn nicotine into a vapor inhaled by the user. Since the devices hit the market nearly a decade ago, sales have spiked so quickly some analysts predict they will outsell traditional cigarettes within a decade. E-cigarettes are often marketed as a less harmful alternative to traditional smokes and come in flavors including cinnamon, vanilla and cherry. This research provides an important benchmark for e-cigarettes, said Chris Bullen, director of the National Institute for Health Innovation at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, the studys lead author. Until now, there has been little information about the effectiveness or safety of e-cigarettes. We have now shown they are about as effective as a standard nicotine replacement product. Bullen and colleagues recruited 657 adult smokers in Auckland who wanted to quit for the study. Nearly 300 got nicotine-containing e-cigarettes while roughly the same number got nicotine patches. Just over 70 people got placebo e-cigarettes without any nicotine. Each group used the e-cigarettes or patches for 13 weeks. After six months, similar rates of smokers 6 percent to 7 percent managed to quit after using either the nicotine-containing e-cigarettes or patches. Only 4 percent of smokers using the placebo e-cigarettes successfully quit. Among smokers who hadnt managed to quit, nearly 60 percent of those using e-cigarettes had cut down the number of cigarettes smoked by at least half versus 41 percent of those using nicotine patches. Smokers were also much bigger fans of the ecigarettes; nearly 90 percent of users said they would recommend them to a friend compared to just over half of people who got patches. Researchers also found similar rates of side effects in smokers that used the ecigarettes and the patches. The most common side effect in all groups was breathing problems. The study was published online Sunday in the journal Lancet and presented at a meeting of the European Respiratory Society in Barcelona, Spain. The e-cigarettes used in the study were provided free by the company and the study was paid for by the Health Research Council of New Zealand, a government funder.WORLDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 A9 We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, exa mination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discou nted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICAN MADE! We do not ship to China! $ 59 00 Cleaning Special New Patients Only FREE Exam & X-Rays w/Cleaning D0210 D0150 D1110 Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 $ 579 00 Porcelain Fused to Metal Crowns (For first one) Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 D2751 $ 690 00 Dentures starting at Upper & Lower Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 D5510 D5120 FREE Second Opinion X-ray & Exam (New Patients Only) D0210 D0150 If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 9/30/13 6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy. Crystal River 352-794-6139 Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD We Welcome You To Value Dental Care NEW LOCATION! 000FUFK Meet Dr. Santa Cruz, DMD Dr. Santa-Cruz offers high quality dentistry. Dr. Santa-Cruz was rewarded several scholastic awards, he is certified in the administration of Botox/ Dysport/Cosmetic fillers. Originally from Miami, Dr. Cruz is a veteran of Naval Aviation, serving overseas in Japan and the Arabian Gulf. He currently serves in the reserves. 000G02V Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. Stanley Steemer. Expires 9/30/13. Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. charge. Residential only Can be used on Duct Cleaning only Stanley Steemer. Expires 9/30/13. Stanley Steemer. Expires 9/30/13. DUCT CLEANING DUCT CLEANING E-cigarettes as good as nicotine patches Egypt strikes at militants AP Detail EGYPT 300 km 300 miRed SeaLIBYA Cairo Egypt attacks militants across several villages GAZAMediterranean Sea 50 km 50 mi ISRAEL EGYPT

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A10SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Hayes Gray gets instruction on his form. Josh Riemer hits the heavy bag during a workout at the gym, the rules of the gym behind him a reminder of the discipline expected of the boxers. Israel Torres keeps his eye on a bag used to hone hand-eye coordination in the sweltering Lake Side Boxing gym. Trainer Rick Mendigutia keeps a close eye on two of his young boxers as they spar. The lone professional who trains at Lake Side Boxing is Hector Marengo. Here Marengo, right, works outside of the gym with his trainer Bruce Lang.

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EXCURSIONS Page A11SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Hump (birth)day Steven and Sydelle Levy of Homosassa went on a vacation to Egypt to celebrate Stevens birthday. The trip of a lifetime included tours of the Giza pyramids and the Sphinx of Viator, a cruise on the River Nile and more.Special to the ChronicleThe Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the newspaper. Readers are invited to send a photograph from their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip. If its selected as a winner, it will be published in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that photograph will win a prize. Please avoid photos with dates on the print. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office.DREAMVACATIONSPhoto ContestALLENG. BREED AP National WriterFUQUAY-VARINA, N.C.Timothy Day isnt exactly sick of corn by the end of the summer, but ...If I had a penny every time Ive heard, This is a-MAZE-ing, Id certainly be rich by now, he said with a chuckle. During the past couple of months, Day has cut more than 50 corn mazes. Someone else does the designs, but theres definitely some artistry in the way he spins that steering knob. My paintbrush is a rototiller, Day said. And a tractor hooked to it. Most people associate corn mazes with Halloween, but the work starts long before October. Days season began the last week in June. Since then, he and his partner have been as far north as Ontario, Canada, as far south as Florida, and to almost every state between here and there. Its not out of the ordinary for us to drive 3,000 or 4,000 miles in five days and cut out 10 or 12 corn mazes in that amount of time, said Day, who lives in Edinburg, Va., and whos been doing this since 2005. Our truck is our hotel. We actually sleep in the truck most of the time. We keep either the tractor driving or the truck driving, one or the other. One of us is driving something almost 24 hours a day. Day cuts for Maize Quest out of New Park, Pa. Company owner Hugh McPherson said this season has been a logistical nightmare. The rain has been sending us to scheduling haywire for the cutting crew, said McPherson, aka The Maze Master. He and Day have to stagger the cutting schedule to catch the corn at just the right growth stage. If its too mature, the plants will grow back in the paths hes cut. Day likes to cut the corn when its about waistor chest-high, but thats not just for practical reasons. Hes allergic once the corn tassels. Basically, anywhere that the pollen touches me, I just get a really itchy rash, said Day, who ran into that problem this year outside Memphis, Tenn. It gets to where the pollen is so thick in your eyes ... you can feel the grit on your eyeballs and, literally, for three days my eyes will run yellow. Once he gets to a farm, its all fairly routine. First, he drives around the fields perimeter to establish the boundaries for the GPS system. Then he fits the design into that shape, and the computer does the rest. Theres very little room for error in our corn mazes, he said. Theyre tight-packed. The trails are close to together. So a little mistake breaks through a whole wall and changes the whole maze. With some designs, Day who runs landscaping business the rest of the year has to go in with a lawnmower. And occasionally hell arrive to find that the fields not quite big enough to accommodate the artists vision. And then I get to play a little bit of designer on the fly, he said. Its kind of fun when that happens, too. Most of the work takes place between sunup and sundown. But Day has been known to cut in the dark. Youve got to trust this more, he said, hoisting the little black box in his right hand. Sometimes, getting to the job is the hardest part. On a recent Saturday, Days truck limped into this little bedroom community south of Raleigh just before dawn. He was supposed to cut the field at Naylor Family Farms on Aug. 16, but a band of thunderstorms turned him away. He was scheduled to do another maze in Chesnee, S.C., the following Friday morning, and decided to hit Naylor before dusk. But just outside Charlotte, Days pickup truck started giving him trouble. Hed just swapped out the transmission a few days earlier, and now the new one was going out on him. Not wanting to let Robert Naylor down again, Day picked his way across the state driving 15 miles, stopping to let the truck cool down, then doing another 15 miles. It took me 15 hours to get here when it should have taken four, the bleary-eyed redhead with the days growth of beard said. The majority of mazes Day cuts are about 5 or 6 acres, though hes done fields as large as 13 acres. The stand of corn at Naylor Family Farms is just shy of 10. Naylor went with a pirate theme last year. This season, he chose a maze called Escape from Egypt, with pyramids, palm trees and a giant camel at the center. This is Naylors third year doing a maze. He said it takes him a couple of weeks to memorize the path. Its easy to get disoriented, even if you have your map, he said as turkey buzzards circle overhead. And thats the point of it, I guess. Its kind of fun when you get lost if youre not in a hurry. Day isnt just a Maize Quest employee. Hes also a client. His brother, Jonathan, runs Bridgemont Farm, a 500-acre spread in Virginias picturesque Shenandoah Valley, where the family raises corn, soybeans and beef cattle. Day cut their design in July. The 12-acre field is divided into two interconnected mazes The Great Train Adventure, with a giant steam locomotive, and The Dinosaur Adventure, featuring a Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex. Maze Master stalks fall fun across country Associated PressThe Idle-Hour Ranch has an African safari-themed corn maze made by Maize Quest in Troy, Ohio. Timothy Day stops in a FuquayVarina, N.C., corn field to check his computer on Saturday, Aug. 24. The Virginia man travels the country for Maize Quest, using GPS equipment to cut out elaborate mazes for the fall tourist season.

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A12SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT Dear Annie: My husband and I have been married for three years. Its a second marriage for both of us. We are in our 50s. Heres my problem: My husband still keeps in close contact with his ex-wife. I understand that a certain amount of communication is necessary because they have grown children together. But I recently found out that he sent her money for her car loan and bought her a pair of sneakers, and I saw a text message in which he asked whether theres any jewelry in particular shes been looking at. He also commented that he thinks of her often. I feel betrayed. I keep in touch with my ex when it comes to the kids, but thats as far as it goes. I also tell my husband when Ive contacted my ex and what the conversation was about. My husband is closemouthed about everything, including his kids. I constantly have to pry out of him how theyre doing and whether hes heard from them. I receive short, nondescript answers. My husband is a kind and generous man, but I think this is too much. What do you think? How do I approach him about it? Second Wife Dear Wife: The fact that your husband is closemouthed about his children is probably irrelevant. Many guys are slow to share that type of information. But he should not be buying his exwife shoes and asking whether she wants jewelry. Please dont tiptoe around this. Tell him what you found out. Ask him why he thinks this behavior is OK and why he kept it a secret. If his answers do not reassure you, the next step is counseling.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email anniesmail box@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. Visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX ACROSS 1Mend 6Money substitute 11Train 16Different 21Run off with a lover 22Low-down fellow 23Excessive 24Idahos capital 25Primordial god 26Citified 27Domain 28Jars 29Ms. Longoria 30Animal enclosure 31Corpuscle 33Vetch seed 35Permit 36Take pleasure in 39Salad plant 43 cit. 44Upperclassmen 45Mix up 47Colossus 49Part of NATO (abbr.) 51Hang in folds 54Gladden 57Martin King Jr. 59Behaves 63Long time 64Kid 66Captain of fiction 68Skin (pref.) 69Central part 70Fish in a can 72Corvine cry 74Pickle flavoring 76Boulder 78Essays of 79Disturbance 82Hind 84Traitor Arnold 86Molars 87Alcove 89City in Utah 91Long fish 92Recent (pref.) 93So far 95Canine tooth 97Letter start 99Breakfast item 101Expert 104Melody 106Parka part 108Worry 110Graceful horses 114Office machine 117Howl 119Round like a ball 121Fraudulence 122Sufficiently, archaically 124New Mexico town 126Tolkien monster 127Aqua 128Formerly, formerly 129Eager 131Do nothing 133Continent N. of Afr. 135Weight unit 136 -do-well 137Ingenious 139Do a certain dance 141Emissary 143Fuss 145Object from antiquity 147Hospital worker 149Time of yr. 152Classifieds 154Hiss 157Set in motion 161Kind of dog or devil 162Florida 164Tranquil 165Bashful 167Nest-egg letters 168Fight (hyph.) 170Water wheel 173Maltreat 175Repairs 177Occurrence 178Chimps cousin 179Measuring device 180Take on 181Seed layer 182Ball 183Mountain ridge 184Indian princess (var.) DOWN 1Falk or Fonda 2 and well 3Complete 4Books expert (abbr.) 5Farm bird 6Skid 7School in Ithaca, N.Y. 8Massage 9Newton or Asimov 10Five (pref.) 11Tumult 12Dir. letters 13Oklahoma city 14Much-maligned religion 15Of blood 16Intent 17Overly 18Beverly 19Organic compound 20Sleeps 30Advanced degree 32Assn. 34Bellow 37Mischievous child 38Hard fat 40Penn or Connery 41Praise 42Stage direction 46Hold up 48Pulsate 50Spiked 51Coup 52A cosmetic 53Girl in the funnies 55Spread to dry 56Arab VIP 58Man at the podium 60Firth or Farrell 61Instant 62Defunct alliance 65Calendar abbr. 67Margarine 71ABA mem. 73Warp and 75Soft fat 77Part of the leg 80In front 81Beery or Webster 83Hazard to ships 85British composer 88Recognize 90 Needs Moms 94Ebb or neap 96Horned animal 98Loan-default action, for short 100Hold 101Pale 102Task 103Rub out 105Of the kidneys 107Watch part 109Ultimatum 111Sharp 112Powerful businessman 113Lean 115Additional 116Name for a hound 118Fly up and around 120Old French coin 123Spouses 125 Paulo 130Sandwich shop, for short 132Dart 134 avis 137Cipher 138Thoracic structure (2 wds.) 140Israels parliament 142Wildebeest 144American Indian 146NSA cousin 148Tarzan portrayer Ron 149Something of value 150Annoy 151Appraises 153Council of churches 155Andes animal 156Fossil resin 158Fords predecessor 159Pancake 160Hurriedness 163Marsh bird 166Present! 169Explosive stuff 171Tried for office 172Abbr. in bus. 174Western Indian 175Remote 176Cretes Mount SundayPUZZLER Wife questions hubbys tie to ex (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 9/11 : Wh ere W ere Y ou ? V I ns id e 9/11 : W ar on A mer i ca I nvest i gat i on o f events. PG I ns id e 9/11 : Z ero H our T error i st attac k s o f S ept. 11, 2001. PG I ns id e 9/11 : W ar on America PG (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Swindle (2013) Jennette McCurdy. NRSee DadWendell The Karate Kid (1984) Ralph Macchio. PG (OWN) 103 62 103 Iyanla, Fix My LifeIyanla, Fix My LifeOprahs Next Oprahs Lifeclass (N)Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs Next (OXY) 44 123 Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped (N) PGSnapped PG Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Stepmom (1998) Julia Roberts. Dexter A murder hits close to home. MA Ray Donovan Road Trip MA Dexter Goodbye Miami (N) MA Ray Donovan Fite Nite (N) MA Ray Donovan Fite Nite MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 Rolex Sports Car Series Racing Laguna Seca. (N) (Live) UFC Unleashed The Ultimate Fighter (In Stereo) FOX Sports Live (N) (Live) (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Bar Rescue Empty Pockets PG Bar Rescue A western bar. PG Bar Rescue A Bar Full of Bull PG Bar Rescue (N) (In Stereo) PG Tattoo Rescue Slap in the Face! (N) PG Bar Rescue Turtle on Its Back PG (STARZ) 370 271 370 The Wedding Planner (2001) Jennifer Lopez. (In Stereo) PG-13 The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA Zero Dark Thirty (2012) Jessica Chastain. (In Stereo) R (SUN) 36 31 36 MLB Baseball: Rays at Mariners Rays Live! (N) Ship Shape TV Sprtsman Adv. Florida Sport Fishing the Flats Addictive Fishing Professional Tarpon Tournament Series Saltwater Exp. Into the Blue G (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) Harrison Ford. PG-13 Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett. PG-13 Godzilla (1998) PG-13 (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 You, Me and Dupree (2006) Wedding Crashers (2005) Owen Wilson. R Due Date (2010) R (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Saboteur (1942, Suspense) Robert Cummings, Priscilla Lane. PG Foreign Correspondent (1940, Suspense) Joel McCrea. NR North by Northwest (1959, Suspense) Cary Grant. NR (DVS) (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Jungle Gold Armed Robbery Jungle Gold Deal With the Devil PG Jungle Gold: Wild Ride (N) L,V Jungle Gold Run for the Border Neighboring site is attacked by militia. (N) PG Jungle Gold Run for the Border PG (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Who Do You Breaking Amish: LASisterSisterSister Wives (N) PGBreaking Amish: LASister Wives PG (TMC) 350 261 350 Dangerous Minds (1995, Drama) Michelle Pfeiffer. (In Stereo) R Brake (2012) Stephen Dorff. (In Stereo) R The Ninth Gate (1999, Suspense) Johnny Depp, Frank Langella, Lena Olin. (In Stereo) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Along Came a Spider (2001, Mystery) Morgan Freeman. R (DVS) Sherlock Holmes (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. PG-13 (DVS) Sherlock Holmes (2009) Robert Downey Jr. (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Diary of a Wimpy Kid (2010) Uncle MAD PGKing/HillKing/HillClevelandFam. GuyBurgersFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Tastiest PlacesFood Paradise GRIDE.RIDE.Adam BikinisFood Paradise GFood Paradise PG (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55JokersJokersPawnPawnPawnPawnContainerContainerContainerContainerStorageStorage (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold Girls (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Burn Notice Sea Change PG (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Dissolved CSI: Miami Seeing Red CSI: Miami Out of Time CSI: Miami Hostile Takeover CSI: Miami Bolt Action CSI: Miami Reality stars murder. (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20VideosBloopers!Bloopers!MotherMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplay28 Days Later R SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsFootball Night in America NFL Football New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys. (N) News # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk WEDU Arts Plus Easy Yoga for ArthritisLast Tango in Halifax Masterpiece Mystery! Silk Martha defends a repeat offender. (N) (In Stereo) 3 Steps to Incredible Health!-Joel % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpKeeping Up Appearances PGLast Tango Masterpiece Mystery! Silk (N) Austin City Limits ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Football Night in America (N) (In Stereo Live) NFL Football New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys. From AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (N) (In Stereo Live) News ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Shark Tank PG (DVS) Secret Millionaire PG (DVS) Castle The Squab and the Quail PG NewsSports Night (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 102013 U.S. Open Tennis Womens Final. 60 Minutes (N) (In Stereo) Big Brother Contestants face eviction. (N)Unforgettable Maps and Legends (N) The Mentalist Red and Itchy 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NFL Football Regional Coverage. (N) (In Stereo Live) The OT (N) PG The Simpsons Bobs Burgers Family Guy Family Guy FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsBurn Notice PG 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Funny Home VideosShark Tank PGSecret MillionaireCastle PG NewsInside Ed. 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileStakel/ Terror Peter Youngren Great AwakeningLove a Child G UnspokenKnow the Cause Daniel Kolinda Jesse Duplantis Bridging the Gap Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Shark Tank PG (DVS) Secret Millionaire PG (DVS) Castle The Squab and the Quail PG NewsCastle @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order Sundown Law & Order Loco Parentis How I MetHow I MetThe Office The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 GoldenEye (1995) PG-13 SeinfeldSeinfeldChrisChrisOur IsWhackedBorn/RideHonor H (WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the LordConnecPassion!Turning Point GJourneyJim RaleyBrody Ministries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12Friends PG Friends PG Two and Half Men Two and Half Men CSI: Miami Speed-dating. CSI: Miami Pirated (In Stereo) Criminal Minds to Life Criminal Minds Corazon O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Casita Big Dog Rotary Club Family Solutions Healthy Living Your Citrus County CourtI Spy YEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7NFL Football The OTSimpsonsBurgersFam. GuyFam. GuyFOX 35 News at 102013 FOXBurn Not. (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroAqu y Ahora (SS)Rosa de GuadalupeSal y Pimienta (N) (SS) Comed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Law Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CI (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Modern Dads PG Modern Dads PG Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Bad Ink (N) Bad Ink (N) Bad Ink Bad Ink (AMC) 55 64 55 National Treasure (2004, Adventure) Nicolas Cage, Diane Kruger. Premiere. PG Breaking Bad Rabid Dog Breaking Bad Things heat up for Walt. Low Winter Sun Cake on the Way Talking Bad Breaking Bad (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedGator Boys Scotts Revenge PG Call of the Wildman: Viva Live Action! Call of Wildman CallWildman Gator Boys Bitten and Blue (N) PG Call of Wildman CallWildman (BET) 96 19 96 Thin Line-Love and Hate Eves Bayou (1997) Jurnee Smollett. A girls family life unravels in 1960s Louisiana. R Hurricane Season (2009) Forest Whitaker. Displaced students form a basketball team. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/NJHousewives/NJHousewives/NJHousewives/NJHousewives/NJHappensJersey (CC) 27 61 27 33 MacGruber (2010) NR The House Bunny (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. PG-13 Tosh.0 The Comedy Central Roast James Franco MA Amy Schumer: Mostly Sex Stuff (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded RV (2006) Robin Williams. A dysfunctional family goes on vacation. PG Dog and Beth: On the Hunt (CNBC) 43 42 43 Hair Rest.Cook Debt/PartOn CNBC Titans J. Crew and American Greed60 Minutes on CNBC (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46CNN Newsroom (N)Beyond 911 CNN Presents The Flag The Flag (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Cinderella (1950) Voices of Ilene Woods. G Jessie G Jessie G Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17ESPN Radio (N)SportsCenter (N)MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at Cincinnati Reds. (N) SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49NHRAProfile: 60Baseball Tonight (N)SportCtrSportsCenter (N)StrongStrongStrongMLS Soccer (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DevotionsCrossingWorld Over LiveSunday Night PrimeG.K.RosaryWith Cardinal DolanGodBookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Harry Potter and the HalfBlood Prince (2009) PG Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. Harry sets out to destroy the secrets to Voldemorts power. PG-13 The Vineyard Secrets Out (FLIX) 118 170 Beaches (1988, Drama) Bette Midler, John Heard. (In Stereo) PG-13 Twins (1988, Comedy) Arnold Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) PG Man on the Moon (1999, Biography) Jim Carrey. (In Stereo) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee FOX News SpecialStossel Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 The ShedBubba-QFood Truck RaceKids Cook-OffFood Truck RaceCutthroat Kitchen GIron Chef America (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker TourWorld Poker TourUFC Unleashed (N)World Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Salt (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. PG-13 Colombiana (2011, Action) Zoe Saldana, Jordi Moll, Lennie James. PG-13 Colombiana (2011, Action) Zoe Saldana, Jordi Moll, Lennie James. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA Tour Golf Golf Walker Cup, Final Day. PGA Tour Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54A Crush on You (2011, Romance-Comedy) Brigid Brannagh. NR Cedar Cove PG Just Desserts (2004, RomanceComedy) Lauren Holly. Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Red Tails (2012) PG-13 Argo (2012, Historical Drama) Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin. (In Stereo) R Boardwalk Empire MA The Newsroom (N) MA Boardwalk Empire MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Boardwalk Empire MA Boardwalk Empire MA Boardwalk Empire MA Life of Pi (2012, Adventure) Suraj Sharma, Tabu. (In Stereo) PG Phil Spector (2013) Al Pacino. (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlExtreme Homes GLove It or List It, TooHouse Hunters RenoHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Mountain Men Thin Ice PG Mountain Men Going For Broke PG Mountain Men Ticking Clock PG Mountain Men Settling the Score PG Were the Fugawis Were the Fugawis American Pickers PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Made of Honor (2008) Julie & Julia (2009) Meryl Streep, Amy Adams. A woman vows to make every recipe in Julia Childs cookbook. PG-13 Devious Maids (N) PG Julie & Julia (2009) PG-13 (LMN) 50 119 Childs Play, Deadly Play Killer Kids Psychopath Killers Killer Kids Sexual Killers Killer Kids (N) (In Stereo) I Killed My BFF Two Cowboys My Life as a Gangster Girl PG, V (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3The Edge R U-571 (2000) Matthew McConaughey, Bill Paxton. (In Stereo) PG-13 Project X (2012) Thomas Mann. (In Stereo) R The Sitter (2011) Jonah Hill. (In Stereo) R Sin City Diaries 4 (MSNBC) 42 41 42 Caught on CameraCaught on CameraCaught on CameraCaught on CameraLockup: Raw Lockup: Raw Puzzle answer is on Page A15. TodaysMOVIES Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Riddick (R) 1:15p.m., 4:15p.m., 7:30p.m. Nopasses. One Direction: This Is Us (PG) 1:30p.m. One Direction: This Is Us In3D. (PG) 4:30p.m. Youre Next (R) 1:25p.m., 4:40p.m., 7:20p.m. The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (PG-13) 4:05p.m. Jobs (PG-13) 1:05p.m., 7:05p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7p.m. Planes (PG) 1:45p.m., 7:10p.m. Planes In 3D. (PG) 4:45p.m. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters (PG) 1:55p.m., 7:40p.m. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters In3D. (PG) 4:55p.m. Were the Millers (R) 1:40p.m., 4:20p.m., 7:45p.m. This is the End (R) 2p.m., 4:50p.m., 7:50p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Riddick (R) 12:50p.m., 1:30p.m., 3:50p.m., 7:05p.m., 7:30p.m. Nopasses. One Direction: This Is Us (PG) 4:40p.m. One Direction: This Is Us In3D. (PG) 1:40p.m., 7:40p.m. Nopasses. The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (PG-13) 1p.m., 4:10p.m., 7:10p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 12:45p.m., 3:45p.m., 7p.m. Elysium (R) 4:30p.m. Were the Millers (R) 1:20p.m., 4:20p.m., 7:20p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.

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New members needed for DAVA new chapter of Disabled American Veterans is being formed in Crystal River. The group meets at Crystal River Mall. The next meeting will be at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21. For more information, call Duane Godrey at 352794-3104.Post to celebrate Recognition DayEugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and auxiliaries will celebrate National POW/MIA Recognition Day on Saturday, Sept. 21, at the post home, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m., to be followed by a cookout and music by Mark B. The pubic is invited. Call 352-344-3495.POWs, MIAs to be honoredNational POW/MIA Recognition Day will be celebrated locally on Saturday, Sept. 21, at Inverness Elks Lodge, 3580 Lemon St., Hernando. Sponsored by the Elks and Rolling Thunder, Florida Chapter 7, the event will begin at 11 a.m. with an escort for exPOWs departing from the Citrus County Fairgrounds on U.S. 41 in Inverness. The public is invited to meet, greet and dine with true American heroes. The ceremony will begin at the lodge at noon. For more information, call Ray Thompson at 813230-9750 or email ultraray 1997@yahoo.com.Vets sought for classroom talksThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its annual Veterans in the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12 as part of its 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week activities. Coordinated by the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), the Veterans in the Classroom program brings living history to the classrooms of the countys public and private schools, as well as homeschool groups. Veterans share with students their firsthand military experiences and travels while serving our country in uniform around the world. The model Veterans in the Classroom program was recognized in 2008 with a Florida Education Foundation award. The programs success has generated the need for additional veterans to share their experiences with students. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, National Guard and women veterans are especially needed as participants. All interested veterans may contact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384, cmcleod 670@earthlink.net, or Bob Crawford at 352-2709025, baddogusmc@ tampabay.rr.com. Case manager aids veteransThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department has a case manager who is available to assist veterans to apply for benefits and provide information about benefits. The schedule is: First Wednesday Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Second Wednesday Homosassa Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa. Third Wednesday Coastal Regional Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make an appointment to meet with the case manager, call 352527-5915. Office has help for vets with PTSDThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department offers help for veterans who have had their post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied. Veterans who have been denied within the past two years are asked to contact the office to review the case and discuss compensation/pension examination. All veterans who have been diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health center and have been denied are encouraged to contact the Citrus County Veterans Office. To schedule an appointment to discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will need to have your denial letter and a copy of your compensation examination by Gainesville. You can get a copy of your exam either by requesting it through the VA medical records or from the primary care window in Lecanto. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com mserv/vets. DAV needs volunteer driversThe DAV transportation network needs volunteer drivers for the two vans assigned to the Lecanto clinic one going from Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from Lecanto to The Villages. While the Gainesville van goes each weekday, there are not enough drivers for The Villages run. While The Villages trip is not an everyday run (just when someone needs to go there), more drivers are needed. Volunteers must have a Florida drivers license and up-to-date car insurance. No CDL is required. Stop by the Veterans Service Office in Lecanto for an application. Call Joe Stephens at 352-4895245 for information.Assistance for transitioning vetsThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department is looking for veterans who have recently transitioned from the military (or returning reservist from tours of active duty) to Citrus County within the past two years. Veterans Services requests that veterans and their spouses call to be placed on a list for an upcoming seminar, which will discuss what benefits or services they need to help ease transition. The office will schedule a seminar to discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call 352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com mserv/vets. Reserve for trip to Hawaii Don McLean, U.S. Navy, retired, will lead the 2014 trip to Hawaii for veterans and their families and friends from Feb. 25 to March 14. Signups are being taken for the annual trek, which includes visits to several islands, some golfing and a special visit to the USS Arizona Memorial and The National Cemetery of the Pacific. Although the 2013 September trip is full, those interested may register now for 2014. For more information, call McLean at 352-6375131 or email dmclean8@ tampabay.rr.com. Memorial for vets in HomosassaPurple Heart recipients are sought to be honored with centerpieces with their names on them at The Old Homosassa Veterans Memorial. Call Shona Cook at 352422-8092.Hospice assists with special careHPH Hospice, as a partnering agency with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), provides tailored care for veterans and their families. The program is provided in private homes, assisted-living facilities and nursing homes, and staff is trained to provide Hospice care specific to illnesses and conditions unique to each military era or war. It also provides caregiver education. HPH Hospice care and programs do not affect veterans benefits. Call the Citrus Team Office at 352-527-4600.Free yoga classes offered for vetsYoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is associated with the national service organization, Yoga For Vets. She teaches free classes to combat veterans. Call Sandstrom at 352382-7397 for information. VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 A13 Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando will host a veterans breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 22. All are welcome. There is no charge for veterans; donations are appreciated from all others. For more information, call 352-464-2146.Of SPECIAL NOTE Elks Lodge slates vets breakfast VETERANS NOTES When your dentist recommends implants... The Dentofacial Institute is the Office to call!!! FREE SEMINAR Wed., Sept. 18, Starting at 4:30 PM Location: 591 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 ~ Refreshments Served ~ LIMITED SEATING CALL FOR RESERVATIONS NOW! 352-527-8000 FREE Implant exam voucher ($155.00) for every seminar participant. Michael M. Hashemian, DMD, MD Board Certified Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon 000FW7D Missing Teeth? Unstable Dentures? 000FSEA Lawn Sprinkler Not Working? Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 2013 2013 000G0WK 000FYYR OPEN 11AM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373 HIGH OCTANE GRILL DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS MONDAY $1.00 Side Salad, Select $1.00 Menu Items TUESDAY Flat Iron Steak w/2 sides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 7.95 Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell ...... Beef .79 . Chicken .99 WEDNESDAY All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread (Add a side salad for $1.00) . . . $ 8.95 THURSDAY 1 LB. PORK CHOPS w/potatoes & vegetable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9.95 FRIDAY Prime Rib Available at 4pm SATURDAY Sloppy Joe w/Mac & Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5.95 Baked Mac & Cheese Casserole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 6.95 SUNDAY Pot Roast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 Valid Monday Friday on regular price menu items only. Coupon Expires 9/30/13 $ 1 00 OFF LUNCH 11am 3pm 000G00R C OME V ISIT O UR N EW INDOOR N ON S MOKING D INING A REA C OME V ISIT O UR N EW INDOOR N ON S MOKING D INING A REA INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN.

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Upcoming reunionsUSS Mount McKinley Association will have its 25th annual reunion Sept. 18 to 22 in Portland, Ore. Contact Dwight L. Janzen at djanzen4@msn.com or 509-534-3649. The Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association of Florida will have its 21st annual reunion Sept. 26 to 29 at the Sheraton Tampa East Hotel, 10221 Princess Palm Ave., Tampa. Contact Tom Rountree at trountree@tampabay.rr.com or 352560-7361 for details. USS Chilton APA 38 will have a reunion Oct. 10, 11 and 12 in New London, Conn. Contact Joe Doherty at 352-341-5959 or jdoherty1@tampabay.rr.com.New veterans pin availableDisabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces the design and availability of this years Citrus County Veterans Appreciation Commemorative Pin. In keeping with this years theme, Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans, the pin is an outline of Citrus County superimposed with the Iraq campaign and the Afghanistan campaign service medals. Pins are available for a donation of $3 each and may be obtained by calling the chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also available at the Citrus County Veterans Service Office in Lecanto.Ribs on menu for Sept. 13VFW Edward W. Penno Post 4864 invites the public to a rib dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Citrus Springs. Donation is $8. Children younger than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For more information, call 352-465-4864. Post 166 has new homeDue to the Labor Day holiday falling on its regular meeting night, Arnold Vern Allen American Legion Post 166 will meet Monday. The post is now meeting at the Springs Lodge No. 378 F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive in Homosassa. All veterans in the Homosassa/Homosassa Springs area are welcome. For more information, call Robert Scott, commander, 352-860-2090.Post slates special serviceThe American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 invites everyone to a special 9/11 Remembrance Service at 7 p.m. Wednesday, followed by a Celebration of Life. Refreshments will be served. The post is at 10730 U.S. 41 in Dunnellon.CCVC yard sale is Sept. 14The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split. Sellers may come and set up the day before (typically Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the security of their own items overnight. The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10. For more information and to make reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.Purple Heart group to meetAaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will conduct its bimonthly meeting at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 17, at the Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto, a half-mile south of State Road 44 on the west side of CR 491. All combat-wounded veterans and parents, lineal descendants, spouses and siblings of living or deceased Purple Heart recipients are invited to attend the meeting and to become a Chapter 776 member. To learn more, visit the Chapter 776 website at www.citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847. Vets planning group to meetThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its monthly coordination meeting for Citrus Countys 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18, in the conference room of the Citrus County Chroniclebuilding, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River. All veterans service organizations are encouraged to send representatives to participate in the planning process. Individual veterans are also welcome. For more information, call Chris Gregoriou at 352-795-7000. Submit information for the Veterans page at least two weeks bef ore the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated, b ut multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a specific day is not guaranVETERANS NOTES VETERANSPage A14SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE C.J. RISAK For the ChronicleStill in high school in 1943, Thomas Trout qualified for and signed on with the U.S. Navys reserve officers training program. Not willing and not feeling ready to become an officer at 18 years old, Trout signed up for flight training.A native of Marietta, Ohio, Trout (who lives in Homosassa) would complete primary flight training in 1946. Before going on to get his wings, however, he would leave the Navy for a few months, anyway. Trout would attend Ohio State University from the fall of 1946 to the spring of 1947 before returning to the Navy to become a midshipman at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. It was a continuation of a nearly 27year Navy career for Trout. He would be in the service through four wars, but the one that would affect him the greatest was one that gains little attention today. Its one that lasted more than 45 years, from the conclusion of World War II until 1991, pitting the United States and its allies against the Soviet bloc. I wanted to emphasize the Cold War, he said. People dont realize what we went through. Trout would serve in various roles during his Naval career, earning his wings in 1953 and going on to fly Banshees, Tigercats and Skyhawks from carrier decks. However, it was a single night during a combat patrol mission flying just outside of Soviet airspace, while serving aboard the USS Intrepid in 195455, that Trout chose to reflect upon. It was a time of extreme tension between the East and West, with nuclear intervention always a possibility. The jets Trout flew were capable of carrying nuclear weapons, although they never carried them on patrols like this one. This is his story: The Soviet Union was what the Cold War was all about. And for me as a Naval aviator, that meant I had to learn how to deliver atomic weapons, to find the assigned target in the Soviet Union while flying below radar and then working out an escape route because we couldnt carry enough fuel to get back to the carrier. In our 1954-55 cruise of the Mediterranean Sea aboard the USS Intrepid, our squadron was flying Banshees. This is what happened on one of our patrols. My wingman, Bill Macke and I were assigned to a night combat patrol with 15 other squadron aircraft performing other missions. We completed our mission without incident in about 90 minutes and were in a landing pattern above the Intrepid when a jet nosed over on the deck and, unable to land, we were diverted to Romes international airport. I was surprised, considering how much fuel we lost circling the carrier while waiting to land. Most of our reserve had been used. It looked like it would be close. It was a clear night, so the city was easy to spot, but not the airport. I had to radio the control tower to put on all the beacons and lights so we could spot the field. My fuel gauge was near zero when over the radio, Doc Wassell, a classmate of mine, said he couldnt make it and he was going to splash down in the Mediterranean. I had to make a decision. I was thinking about bailing out when I spotted the airport. I came in just ahead of my wingman, but Bill was waved off. He pulled up his landing gear and went around for another attempt. But he forgot to put down his landing gear the second time and crashed on the runway. Lt. Commander Morris was still aloft (at the time, Romes airport had one runway that could accommodate jet aircraft) and now this runway was blocked, and thinking we were carrying atomic weapons, the Italian officials wouldnt clear it. Morris said, What am I supposed to do? I spotted the taxiway that ran parallel to the runway and radioed, Morris, taxiway with blue lights looks good. He responded, Here I come. Then I saw a DC6 (airliner) parked with its tail extended over the taxiway, just as Morris Banshee came in to land. To my huge relief, the low-built fighter swooped under the tail. As I was taxiing to my parking spot, I flamed out or ran out of fuel. It was that close. A couple hours later, this raggedydressed bald man walked into the airport waiting room: Doc Wassell. He said a couple of fishermen had pulled him out of the Mediterranean and he was so grateful he gave them everything he had, including his silk parachute. The next morning, Morris and I flew our refueled Banshees back to the carrier, while Macke and Wassell were picked up by the carriers mail plane. We all had orders to see Capt. Blackburn, our ships captain, who gave us a well done and said he was happy no pilot was lost. And thats the way it was for me, one night in the Cold War. One night during the Veteran recalls incident serving as Navy pilot MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleUnited States Navy Lt. Comm. Thomas Warren Trout (retired) holds his lucky hat he says has traveled all over the world with him. The Sugarmill Woods resident served in the Navy for more than 26 years. Special to the ChronicleLt. Comm. Thomas Warren Trout, bottom right, and the rest of his squadron are pictured in front of a Grumman Tigercat airplane. The photo above was taken in 1955 in Jacksonville. NAME & RANK Thomas Trout, Lt. Commander BRANCH& YEARS SERVED U.S. Navy, 1943-1970 SHIPS USS Missouri, USS Worcester, USS Intrepid, USS Saratoga, USS Boston, USS Cimarron JOB Pilot aboard the Intrepid and Saratoga, executive commander and commanding officer aboard the Cimarron, Naval Intelligence, navigator aboard the Boston AWARDS Two Navy commendation medals VETERANS ORGANIZATIONS American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Military Officers of America Association

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Aug. 19-25, 2013 Marriages Ryan Andrew Balcomb, Hernando/Kathrine Renee Mahoney, Hernando Donald Lee Dotson, Homosassa/Kimberly Dawn Hall, Homosassa Earl Spencer Dow Jr., Bronx, N.Y./Daisy Velez, Bronx, N.Y. Caleb Joshua Oakes, Lecanto/Amber Afzal Majid, Coral Springs Aug. 26 to Sept. 1, 2013 Divorces Aeriel Lee Luce, Beverly Hills vs. Robert Daniel Luce, Tampa Patricia Jane Riddle, Ocala vs. Leo A. Riddle, Homosassa Chlora Ruth Strelow, Inverness vs. Fred Robert Strelow, Homosassa Marriages Nilanjan Banik, Gainesville/Yahaira Ivette Figueroa-Rodriguez, Citrus Springs James Allen Milligan, Indianapolis, Ind./Barbara Ann Taylor, New Whiteland, Ind. Wayne Mack Terry, Aledo, Texas/Patricia Lynn Boston, Arlington, Texas Colin Victor Young, Dover, Kent, U.K./Carol Ann Wilson, Dover, Kent, U.K. For theRECORD This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or corrections to community@chronicle online.com.AMERICANLEGION Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352795-6526, email blantonthompsonPost155 @gmail.com, or visit www.flPost155.org. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit President Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233. American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email boosc29@gmail.com. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call 352-746-5018. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call Commander Norm Brumett at 352-4762134 or Auxiliary president Alice Brummett at 352-4767001. American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call Commander Robert Scott at 352-8602090. Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.VETERANS OFFOREIGNWARS H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 County Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-7460440. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-7263339, email vfw4252@ tampabay.rr.com and Google VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352795-5012. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352-637-0100. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston at 352-3443495, or visit www.vfw4337. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352447-3495.OTHERGROUPS AMVETS William Crow Post 447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email Amvet447@comcast.net. Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104. Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352860-2400. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-5632496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets at Citrus Hills Country Club, Rose and Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-7461959. Visit www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto. Visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352344-0727. Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Dennys in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting dates are: Sept. 14, Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019. VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-3021037, or email geneusawo @tampabay.rr.com. Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell) or email ultraray1997 @yahoo.com. Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association meets at Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328. Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on the DAV property in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encouraged by calling 352-4008952. Members can renew with Gary Williamson at 352527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org. Hunger and Homeless Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at 352-382-0876. Warrior Bridge, developed by nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is to meet the needs of wounded veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call employment specialist Charles Lawrence at 352527-3722, ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence@service source.org. VETERANS& COMMUNITYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 A15 Veterans & ServiceGROUPS SundaysPUZZLER Puzzle is on Page A12. FOR THE RECORD Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida ar e a matter of public record, available from each countys Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. Special to the ChronicleThe inaugural Horizon of Hope Luncheon will be staged Saturday, Sept. 14, at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club in Hernando. Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is served at noon. Tickets are $25 and include lunch, a live auction featuring designer purses, silent auction items, raffles, door prizes and other goodies. The purses are full of pampering items and there is usually no minimum opening bid. Alma Tankersley will host the event, which benefits the Michelle-OGram Fund. The Michelle-O-Gram Fund was established several years ago in Marion County following the death of a Michelle Blauser Standridge, who was diagnosed with the BRCA gene breast cancer. She was the wife of a Marion County EMT firefighter and the mother of two boys ages 9 and 5, and throughout her battle with breast cancer, she was always reminding women to get their mammograms. The Michelle-O-Gram started as a Relay For Life event, raising money for cancer research. After her death, the focus changed and the fund was established to provide mammograms and other diagnostic testing for women who do not have insurance or are underinsured in the community. The Michelle-O-Gram Fund has already assisted nearly 600 women at a cost of more than $150,000. There are no overhead costs, no administrative fees and the MOG Fund is run solely on volunteerism and donations. Every dollar donated and every dollar raised is used for the women of the community. The MOG Fund has helped women in Marion, Citrus and surrounding counties. It is the funds vision to establish a Michelle-O-Gram chapter in Citrus County and work toward a chapter in each surrounding county. The effort is also working on obtaining diagnostic assistance from local companies in Citrus County. For information, or to purchase tickets, call Diana Sewak at 352-527-8831 or the MOG Fund at 352-469-6006. Inaugural event will benefit fund established to help women battle breast cancer 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com (352) 726-6623 ac cent travel SINCE 1972 000FZ4Z VIKING RIVER CRUISE 2014 E NJOYABLE WAY TO SEE E UROPE Filling up quickly. Hurry to reserve your stateroom. Call to check availability and rates. Rates based on double occupancy. 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50thANNIVERSARY The Geositses Elizabeth and Joseph Geosits were married on Sunday, April 21, 1963, on Long Island, N.Y. They celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Sunday, April 21, 2013. Father Tom Spillett officiated at the ceremony in the Hampton Room at the Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. Their daughter, Suzanne, and husband Nat Mund, son Joseph and wife Kimberly, and their three grandchildren watched as the couple renewed their wedding vows. Their two granddaughters, Sarah Anne Mund and Alexandra Rose Geosits, both 7, were flowergirls. Joseph Geosits V, age 3, was their ring-bearer, but fell asleep during the ceremony. They had 90 guests family and friends coming from as far away as Long Island, New York, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina and points in Florida. A dinner dance followed the ceremony. A celebration weekend was held at their house for their family. The following weekend, Joe and Elizabeth flew to Las Vegas to enjoy a few days of relaxation at the Bellagio Hotel. A16SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETOGETHER FREE GAS! FREE FREE GAS! GAS! G I V E A W A Y 000FY9X $ 5 0 FREE GAS CARD One lucky winner for 8 weeks Grand Prize Winner $200 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Wednesdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest Pick up your copy of the Citrus County Chronicle Contest Begins Wednesday, September 11 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. 70thANNIVERSARY The Wises George and Dolores Wise of Inverness celebrated 70 years of marriage on Sept. 7, 2013. The couple, who have lived in Inverness for 32 years, wed in Great Bend, Kan., and raised their family on Long Island, N.Y. They are members of Our Lady of Fatima Roman Catholic Church. George is retired from the Long Island Lighting Co. and worked part time at TG&Y and Inverness Primary School. Dolores worked for Westhampton Beach Schools in New York and also TG&Y in Inverness, along with Bealls Outlet. They have five children: Carol (Mike) Stewart (Bay Shore, N.Y.), Mickey (Riverhead, N.Y.), Ginny (Bob) Joseph (Hampton Bays, N.Y.), Patty (Matt) Van Bourgondien (East Hampton, Conn.) and Dotti (Tom) Christiansen (Inverness); 14 grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren. Both George and Dolores turned 90 this past spring. 60thANNIVERSARY The Witcheys Carol and William Witchey of Inverness will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary Sept. 12, 2013. The couple were married Sept. 12, 1953, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Manhattan, N.Y. They have been residents of Inverness for 20 years. They raised three children in Massapequa, Long Island, N.Y. They are William Witchey Jr. of Linderhurst, N.Y.; Carleen Policastro of Pocono Mountain, Pa.; and Juliann Kindierski of Citrus Springs. The Witcheys have eight grandchildren: Vicki, Jimmy, Chrissy, Jennifer, Johnny, Daniella, Jesse and Jillian. They have eight greatgrandchildren: Adriana, Breanna, Maddy, C.J., Jasmine, Jason, Emerson and Samantha. Wedding Heckerman/Pepito Kara Elyse Heckerman and Matthew Scott Pepito exchanged nuptial vows June 29, 2013, at the William Skelton House in historic Key West. Marcella of Southernmost Brides officiated at the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mike and Nancy Heckerman of Plant City. Parents of the groom are Tas and Marilee Pepito of Lecanto. The bride wore a strapless gown with an empire waist and criss-cross ruching on the bodice. It was accented with a sweeping train and beaded sash. She carried purple calla lilies with white peonies and was escorted by her father, Mike Heckerman. Stacey Heckerman attended her sister as the maid of honor. She wore a vintage lilac chiffon floorlength dress accented with lace, and carried a long-stemmed purple calla lily. Best man was the grooms brother, Troy Pepito. A reception, given by the brides parents, followed at the William Skelton House. A cupcake tower of caramel with Dreamsicle frosting, made by the brides best friend, was topped with Lladro porcelain bride and groom figurines. Out-of-town guests included friends and relatives from California, Nevada, Colorado and Florida. Following their honeymoon trip to Amelia Island, the couple are at home in Plant City. The bride is a graduate of Florida State University and is a speech therapist with the Hillsborough County School District. Her husband is a graduate of the University of South Florida and is a human resource manager with Omni Hotels. Special to the ChroniclePlanning a wedding? Come to the Bridal Show from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Free lunch will be served for brides and their guests. Vendors will be in attendance to offer help with event solutions, makeup and hair, jewelry, flowers, cakes, photographs, specialty desserts, catering stationery, dance, limousines and more. This is a one-stop shop for all wedding needs hosted by Event Solutions by Linda and Fruiti Jiggle-uti. More than 30 door prizes will be awarded. The first 25 brides to arrive will receive a free wedding planning guide. The event is open to the public. For reservations, call Linda at 352464-0004 or Bonnie at 352-228-1807. Bridal show slated for Nov. 2 000FWZD

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Baseball/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 TV, lottery/B3 Tennis/B4 Auto racing/B4 Football/ B4, B5, B6 For the full story on the Lecanto football teams 10-6 victory over Wesley Chapel late Friday night, see PageB6. SPORTSSection BSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000FXAZ X-C season off to rousing start at Lecanto JAMESBLEVINS CorrespondentLECANTO Lecanto High School invited over 30 of the best cross country teams in the state of Florida to its campus Saturday morning for a big startup to what hopes to be a highly competitive year of running. From as far away as Jacksonville and St. Augustine, the teams came to the Lecanto hills and the results proved to be worth the travel. Host Lecanto placed the highest of the local teams in the boys meet with a team total of 260 points for seventh place. Crystal River took 10th (356) while Citrus jockeyed for 15th STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleThe boys varsity cross country meet got off to a big start with 156 runners Saturday morning during the Lecanto Invitational at Lecanto High School. The meet was attended by 32 schools. See CROSS/ Page B5 Bucs open today with Jets Tampa Bay on road at New York Associated PressEAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. The thought of Darrelle Revis wearing something other than a green and white jersey once seemed impossible to New York Jets fans. After all, he was easy to root for: a shutdown cornerback who frustrated the NFLs best wide receivers on a weekly basis. And then, after six seasons, Revis was gone. With Revis coming off a major knee injury and knowing that the two sides would never come close to a new contract, new Jets general manager John Idzik traded him to Tampa Bay. Feeling healthy after a long rehabilitation process and hoping to play Sunday in the season opener, Revis makes his return to MetLife Stadium against the team that gave him his start. I moved on from those experiences I had, Revis said. I had a great six years there. Now Ive just got to move on. Ive got a new start ahead of me, with a new team and Im excited to be a Buccaneer. Jets fans certainly arent thrilled, and it will be interesting to see the reception he receives from the folks who once cheered his every play. Im not concerned about that, Revis said. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers will be coming up there with 53 guys, including the coaching staff and our owner. Were coming up there with an army and were coming up there to get a win. Hear that, Geno Smith? The Buccaneers might be licking their chops at facing the Jets rookie starting quarterback, who got the call with Mark Tampa Bay Bucs at New York Jets Time: 1 p.m. today. TV: FOX. The U prevails Associated PressMiamis Shayon Green sacks Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel in the third quarter Saturday in Miami Gardens. Miami won 21-16. Miami capitalizes on five turnovers to stun No. 12 Florida at home Associated PressMIAMI GARDENS Once again, Florida flopped against Miami. It just wasnt intentional this time around. The 12th-ranked Gators dominated just about every statistical category including turnovers, and that ultimately was what decided everything. Florida turned the ball over five times, came up empty on four red-zone trips and wound up losing 21-16 to the Hurricanes on Saturday in whats widely expected to be the last time the one-time traditional rivals meet for a long, long time. I cant give it to Miami, Gators offensive lineman Jonotthan Harrison said. It is on us. Stephen Morris threw two first-quarter touchdown passes to put Miami ahead, and the onslaught of Gator mistakes ensured that the Hurricanes stayed there. The win almost certain assures that the Hurricanes dogged for the last 26 months by a still-unresolved NCAA probe will return to the AP Top 25 for the first time since 2010. Its been such a hard road, Miami coach Al Golden said. Weve just been battling this thing and obviously theyre one of the teams theyve been battling during this thing. I think you guys can figure that out. It was just a very cathartic moment. It was a great moment for our guys, all those guys that not only chose the University of Miami during this but stood there and fought. In 1971, the Gators executed whats forever known as the Florida Flop, when the defense fell to the ground and let Miami score, just so the offense could get the ball back and allow John Reaves to break Jim Plunketts record for NCAA career passing yards. This one will just go down as an allday flop. Jeff Driskel completed 22 of 33 passes for a career-best 291 yards and a late See THE U/ Page B3 See BUCS/ Page B6

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Associated PressNEW YORK Mike Napoli hit two home runs, Jonny Gomes and prized rookie Xander Bogaerts also connected, and the Boston Red Sox kept up their dizzying scoring spree at Yankee Stadium, bashing New York 13-9 Saturday for their fifth straight win. The AL East leaders became the first visiting team in more than a century to score at least nine runs on three straight days against the Yankees. In fact, the last time it happened, they werent called the Yankees Boston did it in 1912 to the Highlanders at Hilltop Park. Down 12-3, the Yankees rallied with four runs in the sixth inning and chased John Lackey (9-12). Mark Reynolds added a two-run double in the eighth off Red Sox reliever Drake Britton that made it 12-9. David Ortiz and Dustin Pedroia each contributed to Bostons five doubles.American League Orioles 4, White Sox 3, 10 inningsBALTIMORE Matt Wieters hit a two-run single in the 10th inning to give the Baltimore Orioles a 4-3 victory over the Chicago White Sox. Pinch-hitter Henry Urrutia started the winning rally with a one-out infield single against closer Addison Reed. Pinch-runner Chris Dickerson then went all the way to third on Nick Markakis base hit. Reed bounced back with a strikeout of Nate McLouth, but Markakis stole second and both runners scored on Wieters lined a single into right field.Royals 4, Tigers 3KANSAS CITY, Mo. Salvador Perez hit a two-run homer off Justin Verlander and the Kansas City Royals beat the Detroit Tigers 4-3. Perez drove a two-out pitch over the left-field wall to put the Royals ahead 4-2. Verlander (12-11) is 0-3 with three no-decisions in six starts since an Aug. 6 victory at Cleveland. The Tigers have dropped his past six starts and are 13-17 in his 30 starts this season.Athletics 2, Astros 1OAKLAND, Calif. Dan Straily pitched seven scoreless innings to help the Oakland Athletics edge the Houston Astros 2-1. Yoenis Cespedes and Jed Lowrie homered as the As won for the seventh time in nine games to remain on top of the AL West. They began the day with a half-game lead over Texas. Straily (9-7) allowed two hits, struck out seven and walked one. Sean Doolittle got four outs for his first save in four chances, completing the five-hitter.Blue Jays 11, Twins 2MINNEAPOLIS Adam Lind hit a pair of three-run homers and J.A. Happ snapped a three-game losing streak, leading the Toronto Blue Jays over the Minnesota Twins 11-2. Linds first home run highlighted a five-run first inning a night after Toronto posted five runs in the third frame in a victory over Minnesota. Lind went deep again in the eighth for his second multi-homer game this season and 10th of his career. Happ (4-5), who entered the game with a 7.71 ERA in his last three outings, allowed an unearned run on five hits while striking out four.National League Reds 4, Dodgers 3, 10 inningsCINCINNATI Billy Hamilton stole second in the 10th inning to set up Todd Fraziers game-winning single, helping the Cincinnati Reds beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 4-3. Ryan Ludwick opened the Cincinnati 10th with a leadoff walk against Brian Wilson (1-1). Reds manager Dusty Baker then went to the dynamic Hamilton, and the speedy prospect took second as catcher A.J. Ellis dropped the ball while taking it out of his glove. Yasiel Puig hit a two-run homer for NL West-leading Los Angeles.Phillies 6, Braves 5PHILADELPHIA Freddy Galvis hit a game-ending homer with one out in the ninth inning to lift the Philadelphia Phillies to a 6-5 win over the Atlanta Braves. Atlanta had trailed 5-3 going into the ninth, but Andrelton Simmons hit a two-out two-run homer off Jonathan Papelbon (5-1), who blew his seventh save in 32 opportunities. Galvis, who had four hits, got Papelbon the win by connecting on a 1-0 pitch from Freddy Garcia (0-1) into the seats in right field. It was the first fourhit game for Galvis, who had been 0for-7 since being recalled from Triple-A Lehigh Valley on Sept. 3. It was his fifth homer of the season. Carlos Ruiz singled, doubled and drove in three runs, and Cesar Hernandez and Kevin Frandsen each had three hits for the Phillies.Cardinals 5, Pirates 0ST. LOUIS Adam Wainwright bounced back from back-to-back subpar outings with seven shutout innings and David Freese homered to lead the St. Louis Cardinals to a 5-0 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The victory moved the Cardinals into first place, a half-game ahead of the Pirates in the NL Central with their third win in four games. Pittsburgh has lost four of six including the first two of the three-game set. The Pirates remain stuck on 81 wins, one shy of assuring them a winning record for the first time since they went 96-66 in 1992. Wainwright (16-9) had given up 15 earned runs over his previous two starts, both against Cincinnati. He allowed a career-high nine runs in two innings of a 10-0 loss Aug. 28. But he regained his form against the Pirates allowing just two hits.Nationals 9, Marlins 2MIAMI Ryan Zimmerman homered twice and drove in three runs, powering the Washington Nationals to a 9-2 victory over the Miami Marlins. Zimmerman hit a two-run shot in the first and a leadoff drive on Nathan Eovaldis first pitch of the third. Tanner Roark (5-0) pitched six scoreless innings as the Nationals won for the third time in four games to remain on the fringe of the NL wild-card race.Brewers 5, Cubs 3CHICAGO Logan Schafer hit a three-run triple and Johnny Hellweg pitched six innings for his first career major league victory in the Milwaukee Brewers 5-3 win over the Chicago Cubs. Hellweg (1-3) allowed three runs on four hits. He struck out one and pitched around three walks to finally earn his first victory after flourishing in the minors. Brewers relievers Rob Wooten and Brandon Kintzler each pitched a scoreless inning then Jim Henderson pitched a perfect ninth for his 23rd save in 27 opportunities.Interleague Indians 9, Mets 4CLEVELAND Asdrubal Cabrera hit a three-run homer, Nick Swisher had a solo shot and the surging Cleveland Indians beat the New York Mets 9-4. Cleveland has won four in a row for the first time since it captured eight straight from July 24-Aug. 1. Swisher finished with two hits and two RBIs as the Indians stayed in the hunt for the ALs second wild-card slot. Corey Kluber (8-5), the first of seven Cleveland pitchers, allowed two runs in five-plus innings. Kluber, pitching for the first time since Aug. 5 after being sidelined by a sprained right middle finger, was pulled after walking the leadoff hitter in the sixth. AL Associated PressBoston Red Sox batter Jonny Gomes rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run during the third inning Saturday against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Red Sox won 13-9. Red Soxs bats sink Yankees AMERICAN LEAGUEFridays Games Boston 12, N.Y. Yankees 8 Baltimore 4, Chicago White Sox 0 Cleveland 8, N.Y. Mets 1 Detroit 16, Kansas City 2 Toronto 6, Minnesota 5 Oakland 7, Houston 5 L.A. Angels 6, Texas 5 Seattle 6, Tampa Bay 4 Saturdays Games Boston 13, N.Y. Yankees 9 Baltimore 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings Oakland 2, Houston 1 Cleveland 9, N.Y. Mets 4 Kansas City 4, Detroit 3 Toronto 11, Minnesota 2 Texas at L.A. Angels, late Tampa Bay at Seattle, late Todays Games Boston (Lester 13-8) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 11-10), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Matsuzaka 0-3) at Cleveland (Salazar 1-2), 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 1-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 10-10), 1:35 p.m. Detroit (Fister 12-7) at Kansas City (B.Chen 6-2), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (Rogers 4-7) at Minnesota (A.Albers 2-2), 2:10 p.m. Texas (Tepesch 4-6) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 8-6), 3:35 p.m. Houston (Clemens 4-4) at Oakland (Colon 14-6), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 15-3) at Seattle (E.Ramirez 51), 4:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEFridays Games Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 5 Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1 Cleveland 8, N.Y. Mets 1 Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2 Miami 7, Washington 0 St. Louis 12, Pittsburgh 8 San Diego 4, Colorado 3 San Francisco 3, Arizona 0 Saturdays Games Cincinnati 4, L.A. Dodgers 3, 10 innings Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 3 Cleveland 9, N.Y. Mets 4 Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 5 Washington 9, Miami 2 St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 0 Colorado at San Diego, late Arizona at San Francisco, late Todays Games N.Y. Mets (Matsuzaka 0-3) at Cleveland (Salazar 1-2), 1:05 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 6-9) at Miami (Ja.Turner 3-5), 1:10 p.m. Atlanta (Maholm 10-10) at Philadelphia (Hamels 613), 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 7-3) at St. Louis (Wacha 2-0), 2:15 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 10-9) at Chicago Cubs (S.Baker 0-0), 2:20 p.m. Arizona (Miley 9-10) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 11-9), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Bettis 0-3) at San Diego (Kennedy 6-9), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 14-8) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 10-10), 8:05 p.m. Red Sox 13, Yankees 9Boston New York abrhbi abrhbi Victorn rf4211Gardnr cf3322 JGoms lf4234Jeter ss4011 Pedroia 2b4010MrRynl pr-3b1112 JMcDnl 2b1000Cano 2b5021 D.Ortiz dh4111ASorin lf4111 Napoli 1b5223Grndrs dh4000 Mdlrks 3b4120Nunez 3b-ss4210 BrdlyJr cf4210Overay 1b4011 Lvrnwy c5111ISuzuki rf4021 Bogarts ss4223AuRmn c2000 JMrphy ph-c2210 V.Wells ph1000 Totals39131413Totals389129 Boston02352000113 New York0111040209 DPNew York 1. LOBBoston 4, New York 9. 2BVictorino (24), Pedroia (38), D.Ortiz (31), Lavarnway (7), Bogaerts (1), Gardner (32), Mar.Reynolds (12), Nunez (14), I.Suzuki (15). HRJ.Gomes (12), Napoli 2 (21), Bogaerts (1). SGranderson. SFD.Ortiz. IPHRERBBSO Boston Lackey W,9-1252/387736 Thornton 1/320000 D.Britton 11/322210 Tazawa H,23100010 Breslow 2/300000 New York Huff L,2-1 31/389902 Ji.Miller 11/333310 B.Marshall 41/331113Orioles 4, White Sox 3, 10 inns.Chicago Baltimore abrhbi abrhbi LeGarc cf-2b5010BRorts 2b4111 Bckhm 2b3000Machd 3b5120 JrDnks ph-cf1000A.Jones cf5020 AlRmrz ss4110C.Davis 1b5011 Konerk 1b4021Hardy ss5000 AGarci rf4000Valenci dh4030 Kppngr dh4000ACasill pr-dh0000 Viciedo lf3121Urrutia ph1010 A.Dunn ph1000ChDckr pr0100 BryAnd c0000Markks rf5110 Phegly c3000Morse lf2000 De Aza lf1000McLoth ph-lf3010 Semien 3b3000CSnydr c2000 Gillaspi 3b1111Wieters ph-c2012 Totals37373Totals434134 Chicago00011000013 Baltimore10001000024 Two outs when winning run scored. ELe.Garcia (2), Phegley 2 (4), Hardy (10). LOBChicago 5, Baltimore 12. 2B Al.Ramirez (37), Konerko (16), Viciedo (20), Machado (47), C.Davis (39), Valencia 2 (11), McLouth (27). HRViciedo (12), Gillaspie (12), B.Roberts (5). SBA.Jones (13), Markakis (1), McLouth (30). CSJor.Danks (2). IPHRERBBSO Chicago H.Santiago572224 Petricka 110001 Lindstrom 110002 Purcey 1/310000 N.Jones 12/300003 A.Reed L,5-32/332201 Baltimore W.Chen 662208 ODay 200011 Ji.Johnson 100001 Tom.Hunter W,4-3111102As 2, Astros 1Houston Oakland abrhbi abrhbi Villar ss4010Lowrie ss4121 Altuve 2b4010CYoung cf4020 Crowe rf4000Dnldsn 3b4020 JCastro dh4000Cespds lf4121 MDmn 3b3010Freimn 1b3010 Carter lf3000Barton 1b1000 Wallac 1b3110Callasp 2b4010 Pagnzz c2000DNorrs dh3000 Krauss ph1010S.Smith ph-dh1000 Keuchl pr0000Choice rf2000 C.Clark c0000Moss ph-rf1000 BBarns cf2001KSuzuk c3000 Totals30151Totals342102 Houston0000000101 Oakland00010010x2 EM.Dominguez (13). LOBHouston 3, Oakland 8. 2BM.Dominguez (21), Wallace (13), C.Young (15), Donaldson (34). HRLowrie (11), Cespedes (22). SBB.Barnes (11), Cespedes (7). CSB.Barnes (11). IPHRERBBSO Houston Oberholtzer L,4-2671105 Zeid 131100 Lo 100000 Oakland Straily W,9-7720017 Otero H,6 2/321100 Doolittle S,1-611/310000Royals 4, Tigers 3Detroit Kansas City abrhbi abrhbi AJcksn cf3110AGordn lf4010 TrHntr rf4000Bonifac 2b4021 MiCarr 3b2012Hosmer 1b3110 Fielder 1b4011BButler dh4010 VMrtnz dh4000Mostks 3b4000 Infante 2b4000S.Perez c3112 NCstlns lf2110Lough rf3010 Dirks ph-lf2000L.Cain rf0000 B.Pena c4110JDyson cf1100 RSantg ss1000AEscor ss3111 Avila ph1000 Totals31353Totals29484 Detroit1000101003 Kansas City00101200x4 DPDetroit 1. LOBDetroit 7, Kansas City 4. 2BHosmer (30), Lough (17). HRS.Perez (11). SBJ.Dyson (30). CSR.Santiago (1), Bonifacio (7). SJ.Dyson. IPHRERBBSO Detroit Verlander L,12-11784417 Coke 1/300010 Veras 2/300002 Kansas City Duffy 41/322251 W.Davis W,7-1012/300011 W.Smith H,41/321101 Hochevar H,512/310001 G.Holland S,39-42100002Blue Jays 11, Twins 2Toronto Minnesota abrhbi abrhbi Reyes ss5220Presley cf5020 Kawsk 2b4122Mstrnn rf4010 DeRosa ph1000Doumit ph-rf1000 Goins 2b0000Dozier 2b4020 Encrnc dh3200Wlngh dh3100 Lind 1b5226Plouffe 3b5120 Lawrie 3b5131Arcia lf4021 Sierra rf2110Colaell 1b3000 RDavis rf3120Pinto c4011 Arencii c5011Flormn ss4010 Gose cf4011 Pillar lf4110 Totals41111511Totals372112 Toronto50000021311 Minnesota0001000102 ELawrie (10). DPToronto 2, Minnesota 1. LOBToronto 5, Minnesota 13. 2BReyes 2 (12), Sierra (6). 3BGose (3). HRLind 2 (19), Lawrie (11). IPHRERBBSO Toronto Happ W,4-552/351034 Wagner H,91/300001 Loup 2/330001 S.Santos 1/300001 Drabek 031110 Delabar 100002 Jeffress 100012 Minnesota Correia L,9-11675514 Roenicke 12/353302 Thielbar 2/323310 Fien 2/310000 NL Reds 4, Dodgers 3, 10 inningsLos AngelesCincinnati abrhbiabrhbi Crwfrd lf5010Choo cf4120 Puig rf4212CIzturs 2b5131 AdGnzl 1b5040Votto 1b2120 Punto pr-3b0000Bruce rf5011 HRmrz ss5011Ludwck lf4011 Ethier cf4000BHmltn pr0100 MYong 3b5010Frazier 3b5011 Schmkr 2b3000Cozart ss4010 M.Ellis 2b1000Mesorc c4000 A.Ellis c4120Latos p2000 Greink p2000DRonsn ph1000 PRdrgz p0000Duke p0000 Belisari p0000Simon p0000 HrstnJr ph1000LeCure p0000 Howell p0000Heisey ph0000 BWilsn p0000Hoover p0000 Totals393103Totals364114 L. Angeles12000000003 Cincinnati20000010014 No outs when winning run scored. ECozart (13). LOBLos Angeles 9, Cincinnati 11. 2BC.Izturis (6), Votto (28). HRPuig (15). SBB.Hamilton (4). SGreinke, Choo. IPHRERBBSO Los Angeles Greinke682219 P.Rodriguez2/321111 Belisario11/300001 Howell100020 B.Wilson L,1-1011110 Cincinnati Latos793313 Duke1/300000 Simon2/300001 LeCure100002 Hoover W,4-5110001 B.Wilson pitched to 2 batters in the 10th. HBPby Latos (Puig).Brewers 5, Cubs 3MilwaukeeChicago abrhbiabrhbi Aoki rf4110StCastr ss4000 Segura ss5000Barney 2b3000 Lucroy c5121Rizzo 1b4020 ArRmr 3b2100Schrhlt rf4000 Gennett 2b5111Sweeny cf4000 Gindl lf2100Bogsvc lf3211 JFrncs 1b1000Valuen 3b3112 YBtncr 1b1000Castillo c3000 LSchfr cf2013Arrieta p1010 CGomz cf1000Watkns ph0000 Hellwg p2000Raley p0000 Halton ph0000Lim p0000 Wooten p0000Lake ph1010 Kintzlr p0000AlCarr p0000 Bianchi ph1000Rosscp p0000 Hndrsn p0000BParkr p0000 Totals31555Totals30363 Milwaukee0004000015 Chicago0200010003 EGindl (3), St.Castro (18). DPMilwaukee 2, Chicago 1. LOBMilwaukee 9, Chicago 4. 3B Lucroy (6), L.Schafer (3). HRBogusevic (4), Valbuena (10). CSLake (4). SL.Schafer. IPHRERBBSO Milwaukee Hellweg W,1-3643331 Wooten H,3110001 Kintzler H,22110000 Henderson S,23-27100001 Chicago Arrieta L,2-2534434 Raley11/300001 Lim2/310010 Al.Cabrera1/300011 Rosscup2/300021 B.Parker111002 HBPby Hellweg (Barney), by B.Parker (Ar.Ramirez), by Arrieta (J.Francisco).Cardinals 5, Pirates 0PittsburghSt. Louis abrhbiabrhbi Tabata lf4010MCrpnt 2b3100 NWalkr 2b4000SRonsn cf-lf4000 McCtch cf4020Hollidy lf3001 Mornea 1b3000Jay pr-cf0000 Byrd rf3000Beltran rf3100 PAlvrz 3b3000YMolin c3220 RMartn c2000Freese 3b2112 Barmes ss2000Maness p0000 JHrrsn ph-ss1000Choate p0000 Locke p2000BPtrsn 1b2000 JGomz p0000MAdms ph-1b2000 Snider ph1000Kozma ss3011 Grilli p0000Wnwrg p3010 Watson p0000Rosnthl p0000 Descals ph-3b1011 Totals29030Totals29565 Pittsburgh0000000000 St. Louis00021101x5 EBarmes (11). DPPittsburgh 1, St. Louis 1. LOBPittsburgh 4, St. Louis 8. 2BTabata (16), McCutchen (35), Y.Molina 2 (39), Wainwright (3). HRFreese (8). SFFreese. IPHRERBBSO Pittsburgh Locke L,9-5533244 J.Gomez211111 Grilli2/311110 Watson1/310000 St. Louis Wainwright W,16-9720028 Rosenthal100001 Maness2/310000 Choate1/300001 HBPby Locke (M.Carpenter). WPLocke.Nationals 9, Marlins 2WashingtonMiami abrhbiabrhbi Span cf4121Coghln 3b4010 Zmrmn 3b5223DSolan 2b4010 Werth rf5130Yelich lf4120 EPerez rf0000Stanton rf3000 AdLRc 1b4121Mrsnck cf1000 Clipprd p0000Ruggin cf-rf4010 Tracy ph1000Morrsn 1b4100 Storen p0000Hchvrr ss4011 Dsmnd ss5210Mathis c3011 WRams c4012Eovaldi p0000 Ohlndrf p0000Brantly ph1000 CBrwn lf0100SDyson p0000 TMoore lf5122Pierre ph1010 Rendon 2b5030Hatchr p0000 Roark p3000Dobbs ph1000 JSolano c1000ZPhllps p0000 Caminr p0000 Totals429169Totals34282 Washington2030011029 Miami0000002002 DPWashington 1. LOBWashington 8, Miami 5. 2BWerth 2 (17), Ad.LaRoche (18), Rendon (21). HRZimmerman 2 (19). SFSpan. IPHRERBBSO Washington Roark W,5-0640004 Ohlendorf132202 Clippard100000 Storen110001 Miami Eovaldi L,3-6395502 S.Dyson321102 Hatcher121100 Z.Phillips2/310000 Caminero11/322211 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Oakland8260.5777-3W-246-2736-33 Texas8060.57115-5L-239-2941-31 Los Angeles6674.47115117-3W-234-3932-35 Seattle6477.45417135-5W-132-3832-39 Houston4795.33135313-7L-223-4924-46 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Boston8757.6048-2W-547-2540-32 Tampa Bay7763.55083-7L-244-2633-37 Baltimore7665.539916-4W-341-2935-36 New York7567.5281135-5L-343-3132-36 Toronto6676.46520127-3W-235-3431-42 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Atlanta8556.6036-4L-351-2034-36 Washington7269.5111386-4W-140-3132-38 Philadelphia6577.45820155-5W-238-3327-44 New York6377.45021164-6L-228-3835-39 Miami5387.37931264-6L-130-4023-47 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway St. Louis8260.5774-6W-243-2539-35 Pittsburgh8160.5745-5L-345-2536-35 Cincinnati8162.56617-3W-346-2435-38 Milwaukee6180.43320193-7W-131-4030-40 Chicago6081.42621205-5L-129-4531-36 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Los Angeles8358.5896-4L-343-2840-30 Arizona7169.5071184-6L-140-3131-38 Colorado6676.46517145-5L-141-3125-45 San Diego6377.45019164-6W-139-3324-44 San Fran.6378.44720175-5W-135-3628-42 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit8260.5775-5L-144-2738-33 Cleveland7665.539515-5W-444-2732-38 Kansas City7468.521846-4W-139-3535-33 Minnesota6179.43620164-6L-328-3833-41 Chicago5685.39725211-9L-932-3424-51 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBASEBALL B2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS TV AUTO RACING 8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Gran Premio DItalia race 11:30 a.m. (FS1) K&N Pro Series: Monroe. West racing (Taped) 12:30 p.m. (FS1) Camping World Truck Series: Iowa qualifying (Same-day Tape) 2 p.m. (FS1) Camping World Truck Series: Iowa race 5 p.m. (FS1) Rolex Sports Car Series: Laguna Seca 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped) BASEBALL 1 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Miami Marlins 1 p.m. (TBS) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees 2 p.m. (WGN-A) Milwaukee Brewers at Chicago Cubs 4 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners 8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at Cincinnati Reds BICYCLING 3 p.m. (NBC) Cycling Vuelta a Espana, Stage 15 (Same-day Tape) BOWLING 2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Womens USBC Queens (Taped) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Miami (Taped) NFL 1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Cleveland Browns 1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New York Jets 4:25 p.m. (FOX) Green Bay Packers at San Francisco 49ers 8:20 p.m. (NBC) New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys GOLF 9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Omega European Masters, Final Round (Same-day Tape) 1:30 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Chiquita Classic, Final Round 4 p.m. (GOLF) Walker Cup, Final Day 6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Montreal Championship, Final Round (Same-day Tape) RODEO 6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped) SOCCER 1 p.m. (SUN) Womens College: Oklahoma State at Florida 11 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: Philadelphia Union at San Jose Earthquakes TENNIS 12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) 2013 U.S. Open: Mens Doubles Final 4:30 p.m. (CBS) 2013 U.S. Open: Womens Final TRACK AND FIELD 2 p.m. (NBC) IAAF Diamond League: Brussels (Taped) RADIO BASEBALL 3:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game 4:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: POWERBALL 2 19 22 26 45 POWER BALL 24Fridays winning numbers and payouts: Mega Money: 1 18 30 37 Mega Ball: 2 4-of-4 MBNo winner 4-of-42$3,330.00 3-of-4 MB33$438.00 3-of-4675$63.50 2-of-4 MB976$30.50 1-of-4 MB9,032$3.00 2-of-423,527$2.00 Fantasy 5: 4 9 11 12 32 5-of-51 winner$226,054.79 4-of-5378$96.00 3-of-511,649$8.50Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 8 6 6 CASH 3 (late) 7 1 7 PLAY 4 (early) 4 5 2 0 PLAY 4 (late) 5 0 0 8 FANTASY 5 17 19 26 29 31 LOTTERY7 16 31 38 39 42XTRA 2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 B3 Glantz-Culver LineFor Sept. 8 NFL Today FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG New England610(51) at Buffalo at Pittsburgh67(42) Tennessee at New Orleans33(55) Atlanta Tampa Bay23(39) at N.Y. Jets Kansas City24(42) at Jacksonville at Chicago33(42) Cincinnati at Cleveland Pk1(41) Miami Seattle33(45) at Carolina at Detroit35(46) Minnesota at Indianapolis610(47) Oakland at St. Louis54(41) Arizona at San Fran.54(49) Green Bay at Dallas33(49) N.Y. Giants Tomorrow at Washington43(52) Philadelphia Houston24(44) at San DiegoNFL standingsAFC East WLTPctPFPA Buffalo000.00000 Miami000.00000 New England000.00000 N.Y. Jets000.00000 South WLTPctPFPA Houston000.00000 Indianapolis000.00000 Jacksonville000.00000 Tennessee000.00000 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati000.00000 Cleveland000.00000 Pittsburgh000.00000 Baltimore010.0002749 West WLTPctPFPA Denver1001.0004927 Kansas City000.00000 Oakland000.00000 San Diego000.00000 NFC East WLTPctPFPA Dallas 000.00000 N.Y. Giants000.00000 Philadelphia000.00000 Washington000.00000 South WLTPctPFPA Atlanta 000.00000 Carolina000.00000 New Orleans000.00000 Tampa Bay000.00000 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago000.00000 Detroit 000.00000 Green Bay000.00000 Minnesota000.00000 West WLTPctPFPA Arizona000.00000 San Francisco000.00000 Seattle 000.00000 St. Louis000.00000 Thursdays Game Denver 49, Baltimore 27 Todays Games Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago, 1 p.m. New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m. Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m. Oakland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Green Bay at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Mondays Games Philadelphia at Washington, 6:55 p.m. Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.Miami 21, No. 12 Florida 16Florida 603716 Miami 1400721 First Quarter MiaWaters 7 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 7:24. FlaDriskel 9 run (pass failed), 3:43. MiaDorsett 52 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 1:47. Third Quarter FlaFG Hardin 33, 8:40. Fourth Quarter MiaDu.Johnson 2 run (Goudis kick), 3:29. FlaPatton 21 pass from Driskel (Hardin kick), 2:08. A,968. FlaMia First downs 2210 Rushes-yards44-12228-50 Passing 291162 Comp-Att-Int22-33-212-25-1 Return Yards5770 Punts-Avg. 4-42.59-43.6 Fumbles-Lost4-30-0 Penalties-Yards10-705-58 Time of Possession38:2021:40 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGFlorida, Jones 18-47, M.Brown 10-29, Showers 4-27, Driskel 9-19, Patton 2-4, T.Burton 1(minus 4). Miami, Du.Johnson 21-59, Hagens 1-7, Team 1-(minus 2), Waters 1-(minus 5), Morris 4(minus 9). PASSINGFlorida, Driskel 22-33-2-291. Miami, Morris 12-25-1-162. RECEIVINGFlorida, Dunbar 7-98, Patton 6-118, T.Burton 6-64, Ajagbe 1-7, Showers 1-3, Jones 1-1. Miami, Hurns 4-60, Waters 3-14, Walford 2-24, Du.Johnson 2-12, Dorsett 1-52.Michigan State 21, South Florida 6South Florida 06006 Michigan St. 077721 Second Quarter MSUCalhoun 4 fumble return (Muma kick), 9:30. USFFG Kloss 49, 2:06. USFFG Kloss 21, :03. Third Quarter MSUCalhoun 56 interception return (Muma kick), 6:51. Fourth Quarter MSULangford 2 run (Muma kick), 10:12. A,401. USFMSU First downs1216 Rushes-yards35-8938-171 Passing 6694 Comp-Att-Int6-26-112-24-0 Return Yards2075 Punts-Avg.9-40.17-45.6 Fumbles-Lost1-12-2 Penalties-Yards8-559-94 Time of Possession28:3130:39 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSouth Florida, Shaw 23-94, Pierre 5-15, Bench 1-4, Eppes 1-1, B.Eveld 5-(minus 25). Michigan St., Hill 9-63, Langford 9-38, R.Bullough 6-36, Burbridge 1-21, Cook 9-10, Shelton 2-7, OConnor 2-(minus 4). PASSINGSouth Florida, B.Eveld 6-25-1-66, Bench 0-1-0-0. Michigan St., Cook 6-11-0-32, Maxwell 4-90-40, OConnor 2-4-0-22. RECEIVINGSouth Florida, A.Davis 2-41, Hopkins 2-14, Eppes 2-11. Michigan St., Langford 5-21, Kings 3-24, Burbridge 1-20, Mumphery 1-18, Hill 1-10, R.Bullough 1-1.College football scoresEAST Albany (NY) 37, Colgate 34 Bryant 34, Assumption 7 touchdown for Florida (1-1), which had gotten off to 2-0 starts in each of the previous eight seasons. But he had two interceptions, fumbled once and was stopped on a fourth-down try for another giveaway, all part of a messy effort by the Gators. It started with me, Driskel said. I was careless with the ball. Duke Johnson added a 2-yard touchdown run for a 219 lead with 3:29 left for Miami (2-0), which has won four straight dating back to last season, the longest such streak for the Hurricanes since 2008. The offensive numbers were ridiculously one-sided, in favor of the Gators. Florida outgained Miami 413-212, had a 22-10 edge in first downs, outran the Hurricanes 122-50, enjoyed nearly a 2-to-1 edge in time of possession and held Miami to an abysmal 1-for-11 effort on third-down chances. And the Gators still lost, only blaming themselves afterward. You cannot keep shooting yourself in the foot, especially on the road, Florida coach Will Muschamp said. Miami had 143 yards in the first quarter, averaging 7.9 yards per play. The rest of the way: 69 yards, 2.0 per play. It was Miamis lowest yardage total in a victory since Oct. 26, 1996, when the Hurricanes managed only 162 against thenNo. 12 West Virginia. There was nothing easy on that field, Golden said. For either team. For Florida, that was particularly true when it got inside the Miami 20. The one touchdown Florida had in the red zone was a gift, set up by a blocked punt in the first quarter. The other Florida trips deep into Miami territory ended thusly: Interception by Miamis Rayshawn Jenkins. Driskel stopped on downs by Miamis Denzel Perryman and Olsen Pierre. Fumble by Trey Burton that was forced by the Hurricanes Jimmy Gaines. Field goal by Floridas Austin Hardin. Interception by Miamis Tracy Howard. Im putting it on myself, Burton said. I made many mistakes. THE UContinued from Page B1 Bucknell 27, Marist 14 Delaware 42, Delaware St. 21 Fordham 27, Villanova 24 Georgetown 42, Davidson 6 Houston 22, Temple 13 Lehigh 51, CCSU 44, 2OT Maine 24, UMass 14 Penn St. 45, E. Michigan 7 Robert Morris 31, Morgan St. 14 Rutgers 38, Norfolk St. 0 Sacred Heart 26, Lafayette 24 Stony Brook 24, Rhode Island 0 Towson 49, Holy Cross 7 SOUTH Bethune-Cookman 66, Virginia Union 7 Campbell 56, Virginia-Wise 21 Charleston Southern 23, Shorter 15 Charlotte 47, Chowan 7 Chattanooga 42, Georgia St. 14 Clemson 52, SC State 13 Coastal Carolina 35, Furman 28 Delta St. 24, MVSU 14 Duke 28, Memphis 14 Elon 49, WV Wesleyan 7 Georgia 41, South Carolina 30 Georgia Southern 59, St. Francis (Pa.) 17 Howard 27, Morehouse 16 Jackson St. 30, Alabama St. 23 Kentucky 41, Miami (Ohio) 7 Louisville 44, E. Kentucky 7 Marshall 55, Gardner-Webb 0 Maryland 47, Old Dominion 10 Miami 21, Florida 16 Mississippi St. 51, Alcorn St. 7 NC A&T 24, Appalachian St. 21 NC Central 23, St. Augustines 20, 2OT NC State 23, Richmond 21 North Carolina 40, Middle Tennessee 20 Oregon 59, Virginia 10 Presbyterian 42, Brevard 24 South Alabama 41, Tulane 39 Tennessee 52, W. Kentucky 20 Tennessee St. 27, Florida A&M 7 Tuskegee 23, Alabama A&M 7 VMI 34, Glenville St. 27 Virginia Tech 45, W. Carolina 3 Wofford 21, The Citadel 10 MIDWEST Akron 35, James Madison 33 Ball St. 40, Army 14 Bowling Green 41, Kent St. 22 Butler 49, Wittenberg 24 Cent. Michigan 24, New Hampshire 21 Dayton 23, Duquesne 20 Illinois 45, Cincinnati 17 Iowa 28, Missouri St. 14 Michigan St. 21, South Florida 6 Missouri 38, Toledo 23 N. Dakota St. 56, Ferris St. 10 N. Iowa 45, Drake 14 Navy 41, Indiana 35 Nebraska 56, Southern Miss. 13 Northwestern 48, Syracuse 27 Ohio St. 42, San Diego St. 7 Purdue 20, Indiana St. 14 St. Josephs (Ind.) 34, Valparaiso 31 W. Illinois 34, Quincy 6 Wisconsin 48, Tennessee Tech 0 Youngstown St. 67, Morehead St. 13 SOUTHWEST Baylor 70, Buffalo 13 Oklahoma St. 56, UTSA 35 TCU 38, SE Louisiana 17 FAR WEST Boise St. 63, UT-Martin 14 CSU-Pueblo 41, N. Colorado 36 California 37, Portland St. 30 Idaho St. 40, Dixie St. 14 Utah 70, Weber St. 7 Utah St. 52, Air Force 20 Wyoming 42, Idaho 10Indians 9, Mets 4New York Cleveland abrhbi abrhbi EYong lf2110Bourn cf5110 DnMrp 2b4000Swisher 1b4222 Z.Lutz dh4000Kipnis 2b3210 Duda 1b3100JRmrz 2b0000 JuTrnr 3b4222CSantn dh4111 Lagars rf4011YGoms c2210 dnDkkr cf4021AsCarr ss4113 TdArnd c4000Raburn lf2013 Quntnll ss3020MCarsn pr-lf1010 Aviles 3b4020 Stubbs rf4000 Totals32484Totals339119 New York0100030004 Cleveland51000030x9 ENiese (2). DPNew York 2, Cleveland 2. LOB New York 4, Cleveland 5. 2BJu.Turner (11), Swisher (24), Raburn (16), Aviles (14). HRSwisher (17), As.Cabrera (10). SBE.Young (36), Bourn (22), Kipnis 2 (26), M.Carson (1). SE.Young, Kipnis. IPHRERBBSO New York Niese L,6-7696525 Atchison 123321 Aardsma 100002 Cleveland Kluber W,8-5552215 R.Hill 2/301112 Pestano 021100 Hagadone H,21/300001 Shaw H,102/310000 Rzepczynski H,1100001 Carrasco 11/300000 Kluber pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Pestano pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.Phillies 6, Braves 5Atlanta Philadelphia abrhbi abrhbi BUpton cf4000CHrndz cf5230 J.Upton rf3000Frndsn 1b5131 FFrmn 1b4122Papeln p0000 Gattis lf3000Utley 2b5120 McCnn c4000Ruiz c4123 CJhnsn 3b4121Ruf lf-1b2000 Uggla 2b1000Asche 3b4000 DCrpnt p0000Galvis ss5142 Avilan p0000Mayrry rf-lf4010 Varvar p0000Kndrck p2000 Trdslvc ph1000Orr ph1000 FGarci p0000DeFrts p0000 Smmns ss4232Diekmn p0000 A.Wood p2100Berndn ph-rf1000 Ayala p0000 SDowns p0000 ElJhns 2b2000 Totals32575Totals386156 Atlanta0020010025 Philadelphia0020200116 One out when winning run scored. DPAtlanta 2, Philadelphia 1. LOBAtlanta 4, Philadelphia 12. 2BC.Johnson (30), C.Hernandez (3), Frandsen (8), Utley (22), Ruiz (13), Mayberry (23). HRSimmons (15), Galvis (5). CSSimmons (5). IPHRERBBSO Atlanta A.Wood 42/394434 Ayala 110002 S.Downs010000 D.Carpenter11/310010 Avilan 2/321101 Varvaro 1/300010 F.Garcia L,0-11/311100 Philadelphia K.Kendrick 643338 De Fratus H,811/310002 Diekman H,72/300002 Papelbon W,5-1122200 S.Downs pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby K.Kendrick (Uggla). PBRuiz.AL leadersGABRHPct. MiCabrera Det13049296175.356 Trout LAA13652095176.338 Mauer Min11344562144.324 ABeltre Tex13854480174.320 DOrtiz Bos12045467141.311 Cano NYY14153176163.307 Loney TB13546246140.303 HKendrick LAA10841948126.301 TorHunter Det12853982162.301 Nava Bos11739367118.300 Home Runs CDavis, Baltimore, 48; MiCabrera, Detroit, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 36; ADunn, Chicago, 30; AJones, Baltimore, 30; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 30; Bautista, Toronto, 28; ABeltre, Texas, 28; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 28. Runs Batted In MiCabrera, Detroit, 133; CDavis, Baltimore, 124; Encarnacion, Toronto, 104; AJones, Baltimore, 100; Fielder, Detroit, 97; Cano, New York, 95; DOrtiz, Boston, 90. Pitching Scherzer, Detroit, 19-2; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 153; Tillman, Baltimore, 15-5; CWilson, Los Angeles, 15-6; Colon, Oakland, 14-6; Masterson, Cleveland, 14-10; AniSanchez, Detroit, 13-7.NL leadersGABRHPct. CJohnson Atl12344348147.332 Cuddyer Col11542967141.329 YMolina StL11844059142.323 McCutchen Pit13851987167.322 Werth Was10939270126.321 MCarpenter StL137546110172.315 Craig StL13450871160.315 Posey SF13045953142.309 DWright NYM10540860126.309 Beltran StL12749174151.308 Home Runs PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 32; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 31; DBrown, Philadelphia, 27; Bruce, Cincinnati, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; JUpton, Atlanta, 24; Beltran, St. Louis, 23. Runs Batted In Goldschmidt, Arizona, 106; Phillips, Cincinnati, 101; Craig, St. Louis, 97; FFreeman, Atlanta, 96; Bruce, Cincinnati, 91; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 87; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 87. Pitching JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 16-6; Zimmermann, Washington, 16-8; Wainwright, St. Louis, 16-9; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 15-7; Greinke, Los Angeles, 14-3; Latos, Cincinnati, 14-5; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 14-8.Sprint Cup Federated Auto Parts 400 ResultsSaturday At Richmond International Raceway Richmond, Va. Lap length: .75 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (26) C. Edwards, Ford, 400 laps, 111.2 rating, 47 points. 2. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 129.6, 43. 3. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 100.9, 42. 4. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 114.1, 41. 5. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 90, 40. 6. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 104.3, 39. 7. (11) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 87.8, 37. 8. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 101.9, 37. 9. (16) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 400, 75.9, 35. 10. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 400, 77.2, 34. 11. (17) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 92.1, 33. 12. (9) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 99.3, 32. 13. (14) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 81.8, 31. 14. (18) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 78.8, 30. 15. (34) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 400, 71.2, 29. 16. (12) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 400, 81.5, 28. 17. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 118.9, 29. 18. (19) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 400, 97.2, 26. 19. (13) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 92.3, 25. 20. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 83.4, 24. 21. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 399, 73.3, 23. 22. (8) Joey Logano, Ford, 399, 67.6, 22. 23. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 399, 60, 21. 24. (20) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 399, 62.9, 0. 25. (4) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 398, 104.5, 20. 26. (25) Casey Mears, Ford, 397, 53.8, 18. 27. (32) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 397, 56.6, 17. 28. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 397, 45.8, 16. 29. (23) David Ragan, Ford, 397, 57.2, 15. 30. (36) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 396, 39.1, 14. 31. (40) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 396, 47, 13. 32. (35) David Reutimann, Toyota, 395, 46, 12. 33. (41) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 395, 36.6, 0. 34. (28) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 395, 46.3, 0. 35. (38) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 395, 34.1, 0. 36. (43) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 393, 32.9, 8. 37. (42) Ken Schrader, Ford, 393, 36.8, 7. 38. (29) David Stremme, Toyota, 391, 30.8, 6. 39. (31) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 388, 31.6, 0. 40. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 372, 46.8, 4. 41. (27) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 142, 43, 0. 42. (39) Reed Sorenson, Ford, brakes, 126, 25.8, 0. 43. (30) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 76, 31.9, 1. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 105.028 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 51 minutes, 23 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.668 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 29 laps. Lead Changes: 17 among 9 drivers. Lap Leaders: J.Gordon 1-49; B.Keselowski 50-65; Ku.Busch 66-94; J.McMurray 95-96; B.Keselowski 97-104; M.Kenseth 105-109; Ku.Busch 110-137; J.McMurray 138-141; B.Keselowski 142-208; Ku.Busch 209-217; B.Keselowski 218-268; Ku.Busch 269; C.Bowyer 270-341; Ku.Busch 342-347; C.Edwards 348-390; R.Newman 391-394; P.Menard 395397; C.Edwards 398-400. Michigan St. scores two TDs on defense Associated PressEAST LANSING, Mich. Bobby Eveld has his coachs endorsement as South Floridas quarterback even if his performance at Michigan State was a forgettable one. Bobby cant throw the ball when hes on his back, and he cant complete passes when you drop the ball, coach Willie Taggart said. Right now hes our guy. Things change but right now hes our guy. Shilique Calhoun scored on a fumble return and an interception return, enabling Michigan State to overcome its own poor offensive performance in a 21-6 victory over South Florida on Saturday. Eveld was 6 of 25 for 66 yards with a fumble and an interception. South Florida (0-2) was routed in its opener by McNeese State, and the Bulls couldnt get anything going offensively Saturday. Its very frustrating, Eveld said. Obviously you talk about not turning the ball over, period, and then having the other defense score just kind of ruins it for you. The Spartans (2-0) rotated Connor Cook, Tyler OConnor and Andrew Maxwell at quarterback, but their offense contributed only one touchdown. The defense has scored four of their six TDs this year. Michigan States offense finally scored in the fourth quarter when Jeremy Langford ran 2 yards for a touchdown. That drive was only 33 yards after a short South Florida punt. Michigan States defense scored two of the teams three touchdowns in a seasonopening win over Western Michigan. USF shut down in 21-6 loss

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B4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Djokovic, Rafa in US Open final Associated PressNEW YORK The game took 21 minutes. It lasted 30 points. Novak Djokovic squandered five break points and lost that instant classic of a game but made Stanislas Wawrinka pay an awfully heavy price. After dropping the epic third game of the final set Saturday, Djokovic broke the next time Wawrinka served, then didnt falter once he had the lead. The topseeded Serb withstood a 4-hour, 9minute onslaught of Wawrinkas massive groundstrokes to pull out a 2-6, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory and advance to his fourth straight final at the U.S. Open. Well, I was thinking I guess everybody was thinking Whoever wins this game is going to win the match, Djokovic said. After he won the game, I thought to myself, OK, I guess I have to fight against those odds. He did, to improve to 20-7 in fiveset matches, and now the 2011 champion will go for his second U.S. Open title Monday against No. 2 Rafael Nadal, who had a much easier time in a 6-4, 7-6 (1), 6-2 victory over eighth-seeded Richard Gasquet. It will be the third Nadal-Djokovic final at Flushing Meadows in the last four years, the only break coming last year when Nadal was out with a knee injury. They split the first two meetings. Novak is an amazing competitor, Nadal said. His results say that he is probably one of the best players that I have ever seen. Nadal won easily despite dropping his first service game of the tournament. He had extended his streak to 73 when Gasquet broke him in the fourth game of the second set. Both men held until a secondset tiebreaker, which Nadal won 7-1 to end what little drama existed in the afternoons second match. Fans certainly got their moneys worth in the first one. I managed to find my way through, to adjust, and to win, Djokovic said. Thats what counts. Top billing for Novak, Nadal Associated PressRafael Nadal hits autographed balls to fans Saturday after beating Richard Gasquet during the semifinals of the 2013 U.S. Open in New York. No. 11 Bulldogs triumph Georgia downs No. 6 Gamecocks in early SEC game Associated PressATHENS, Ga. Aaron Murray threw for 309 yards and four touchdowns, Georgias beleaguered defense finally came up with a stop, and the Bulldogs defeated South Carolina 41-30 for an early edge in the Southeastern Conference East. Coming off a 38-35 loss at Clemson, Georgia could not afford another defeat if it wanted to remain a serious contender for a national title. Murray took care of that, turning in one of the best games of his career. The fifth-year senior capped his stellar day for the Bulldogs (1-1, 1-0 SEC) with an 85-yard touchdown pass to Justin Scott-Wesley with 13 minutes remaining. The defense made sure it stood up, stuffing Mike Davis on fourthand-goal from inside the 1. Davis led the Gamecocks (1-1, 0-1) with 149 yards rushing on 16 carries.No. 2 Oregon 59, Virgina 10CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. DeAnthony Thomas ran for 124 yards and three touchdowns, Marcus Mariota threw for two touchdowns and ran 71 yards for another score, and Oregon started fast and completely manhandled Virginia. The Ducks (2-0), who gained a school-record 772 yards last week in beating Nicholls State, looked capable of doing it again against a Virginia defense that hoped to keep the Cavaliers in the game. Oregon finished with 557 yards and did all its scoring while possessing the ball for just 21:25. Virginia (1-1) got an early look at what it was up against as Mariota dropped back on a third-and-5 on the opening series, then bolted up the middle untouched, going 71 yards for a touchdown.No. 3 Ohio St. 42, San Diego St. 7COLUMBUS, Ohio Kenny Guiton took over when Braxton Miller left with a sprained left knee, running for one touchdown and passing for two while leading Ohio State over San Diego State. Miller watched the last three quarters from the sideline after being sandwiched between two tacklers on the Buckeyes seventh offensive play. The Buckeyes (2-0) didnt need him. Guiton, who helped save Ohio States 12-0 season a year ago, had the most playing time hes ever had in a game. He set career bests with 19 of 28 passing for 152 yards and 83 rushing yards. Guiton came in having completed 14 of 25 passes for 144 yards and two touchdowns with two interceptions in his 16 career games. He had totaled 59 yards rushing on 14 attempts.No. 4 Clemson 52, South Carolina St. 13CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd ran for a touchdown and Clemson returned two interceptions for scores for the first time in program history in a win over FCS opponent South Carolina State. Boyd finished 14-of-23 passing for 169 yards after accounting for five TDs a week ago and becoming a prime Heisman Trophy contender as the Tigers (2-0) defeated No. 11 Georgia 38-35. In this one, Boyd scored Clemsons first touchdown and played only a half against the Bulldogs (0-2) before finding a spot on the Death Valley sidelines next to offensive coordinator Chad Morris. That was more than enough, though, for Clemson to move to 27-0 all-time against FCS teams. Cornerbacks Martin Jenkins and Darius Robinson each had pick-6 scores to help the Tigers to a 38-7 lead by halftime.No. 7 Texas A&M 65, Sam Houston St. 28COLLEGE STATION, Texas Johnny Manziel threw for 426 yards and three touchdowns and ran for another score in less than three quarters to give No. 7 Texas A&M to a 6528 win over Sam Houston State. The Heisman Trophy-winner played about a quarter more than he did last week when he sat out the first half serving a suspension for what the school called an inadvertent violation of NCAA rules involving signing autographs. Texas A&Ms suspension-depleted defense was burned for several big plays by the Bearkats, the FCS runner-up the last two seasons, in the final tuneup before next weeks rematch with top-ranked Alabama.No. 8 Louisville 44, E. Kentucky 7LOUISVILLE, Ky. Teddy Bridgewater threw for 397 yards and four touchdowns, and Louisville routed Eastern Kentucky on a day the Cardinals defense just missed it second straight shutout. Linebacker Preston Brown had two sacks for Louisville, and Calvin Pryor had an interception as Louisville limited Eastern Kentucky (1-1) to 76 yards of total offense in the first half. Following the noon kickoff, Louisville (2-0) settled for a pair of field goals from John Wallace after turnovers gave the offense short fields. The Cardinals also settled for a third field goal in the third quarter despite reaching Eastern Kentuckys 4. Bridgewater hit his first five passes and wound up 23 of 32 with no interceptions after throwing five touchdowns with one interception in the opener.No. 9 LSU 56, UAB 17BATON ROUGE, La. Zach Mettenberger passed for an LSU single-game record five touchdowns, receiver Odell Beckham Jr. scored one of his four touchdowns on a 100-yard field goal return, and the ninth-ranked Tigers overwhelmed UAB 56-17. LSU coach Les Miles also decided to end running back Jeremy Hills benching in the second quarter of the second game of the season. Hill, who was arrested last spring for landing a punch outside a bar, scored on a 3-yard run on his first carry. Mettenberger finished 16 of 19 for 282 yards and was not intercepted. Beckhams 136 yards and three TDs receiving were both career highs. He led LSU (2-0) with 331 all-purpose yards.No. 13 Oklahoma St. 56, UTSA 35SAN ANTONIO New starter J.W. Walsh completed his first 10 passes and finished 24-of-27 for 326 yards with four touchdowns to lead Oklahoma State over UTSA. Its the fourth start for the sophomore Walsh, his first this season after a quick relief performance for Clint Chelf last week. With his speedy start against a Roadrunners team entering its third season of football, Walsh led the Cowboys (2-0) to TDs on five of six first-half possessions. UTSA (1-1) tied the score 7-7 when Kenny Bias scored on a 6yard run with 4:22 left in the first quarter. But Walsh scored from 4 yards out in the second and the Cowboys led 35-7 at halftime.No. 16 Oklahoma 16, West Virginia 7NORMAN, Okla. Brennan Clay had career-high 170 yards rushing as Oklahoma overcame a secondhalf quarterback switch defeat West Virginia 16-7. The No. 16 Sooners (2-0, 1-0 Big 12) scored the games final 16 points after trailing 7-0 in the first quarter. Freshman quarterback Trevor Knight threw a pair of thirdquarter interceptions, leading to junior Blake Bell taking over in the fourth quarter. Clay finished with 22 carries, leading an Oklahoma offense that had 323 yards rushing and topping his previous best of 157 yards rushing against Iowa State in 2012. Paul Millard was 21-of-42 passing for 218 yards for the Mountaineers (1-1, 0-1).No. 19 Northwestern 48, Syracuse 27EVANSTON, Ill. Trevor Siemian threw for 259 yards and a career-high three touchdowns, and Kain Colter passed for a score and ran for another to lead Northwestern over Syracuse. Tony Jones added a personalbest 185 yards receiving and a 47yard TD, and the Wildcats (2-0) racked up 581 yards on offense. They also intercepted Syracuses Drew Allen four times. Northwestern scored the games first 20 points and led 34-7 at the half after amassing 387 yards, with their quarterbacks picking apart Syracuse (0-2).No. 21 Wisconsin 48, Tennessee Tech 0MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gordon ran for 140 yards and a score, and Wisconsins overpowering defense got its second straight shutout with a win over FCS school Tennessee Tech. Joel Stave was 24 of 29 for 219 yards with three touchdowns and an interception, while defensive back Darius Hillary set the tone early by forcing a fumble that set up a score for the Badgers (2-0). The early-season tuneup went about as well as could be expected for first-year coach Gary Andersen, whos breaking in a new 3-4 defense in Madison. Wisconsin had no problems against the Golden Eagles (11), whose spread offense got outmuscled by the bigger Badgers. Including Gordon, three backs went over 100 yards for the second straight game. Gordon accumulated all his stats in the first half on nine carries. He had more yards rushing by himself than Tennessee Tech had in total offense (83) at halftime.No. 22 Nebraska 56, S. Mississippi 13LINCOLN, Neb. Stanley JeanBaptiste and Ciante Evans returned first-quarter interceptions for touchdowns and Nebraska made quick work of Southern Mississippi in the victory. Taylor Martinez threw for three touchdowns and Ameer Abdullah ran for two more for the Cornhuskers (2-0), who now turn their attention to next weeks home game against No. 18 UCLA. Jean-Baptiste jumped in front of Rickey Bradley Jr. just as Allan Bridgfords pass arrived on the third play of the game and ran it back 43 yards. Evans put the Huskers up 213 with the first of his two interceptions, catching a ball tipped by Tyreoune Holmes and going 22 yards to the end zone.No. 23 Baylor 70, Buffalo 13WACO, Texas Bryce Petty threw for 338 yards and two touchdowns, Lache Seastrunk ran for 150 yards with three scores and Baylors first-team offense had 576 total yards in only 11 minutes with the ball in a rout of Buffalo. The starters for the Bears (2-0) had eight touchdowns in their nine drives. The only non-scoring drive was when they had the ball at the end of the first half. Baylor finished with a schoolrecord 781 total yards and topped the 69 points scored a week earlier in what had been the most for the Bears since 1929. Alex Neutz had six catches for a career-high 197 yards for Buffalo (0-2). Petty completed 13 of 16 passes, and two of his incompletions were balls caught but ruled out of bounds. He also ran for a score.No. 24 TCU 38, SE Louisiana 17FORT WORTH, Texas Trevone Boykin led three straight scoring drives after starter Casey Pachall left with an injury game, and TCU pulled away from Southeastern Louisiana. Pachall appeared to injure his left arm or wrist at the end of a running play late in the second quarter. Boykin ran 16 yards on the next play, and Jaden Oberkrom ended the first half with a 46-yard field goal that put the Horned Frogs (1-1) ahead 17-14. Boykin completed a 29-yard pass to Brandon Carter on the first play of the second half, and Carter finished that drive with a 5-yard scoring run. Then Boykin threw 27 yards to Josh Doctson for a 31-14 lead. Bryan Bennett had 132 yards passing and another 132 rushing for the Lions (1-1). Associated PressGeorgia running back Todd Gurley works against the South Carolina defense during the second half Saturday in Athens, Ga. The No. 11 Bulldogs knocked off the No. 6 Gamecocks 41-30. Edwards wins at Richmond Keselowski out of Chase Associated PressRICHMOND, Va. NASCAR will have a new champion at the end of the season. For now, it has yet another conspiracy. Reigning champion Brad Keselowski failed to make the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship Saturday night when an illtimed caution ruined his run at Richmond International Raceway. Same thing happened to Ryan Newman, who used a pass on eventual winner Carl Edwards with 10 laps to go to take the lead for what should have been enough to get him into the Chase. Then Clint Bowyer spun three laps later to bring out a caution that ruined Newmans race. The benefactor? Martin Truex Jr., Bowyers teammate at Michael Waltrip Racing, who struggled the entire race. Newman and Truex were locked into a race for the second of two wild cards in the 12-driver Chase field, and the race win would give it to Newman. Only he lost the lead on pit road, wound up finishing third, and Truex grabbed the final spot in the Chase. Conspiracy theorists immediately accused Bowyer of spinning on purpose to help his teammate. A despondent Newman wasnt sure. They are teammates. I dont know if he looked at the scoring pylon, knew I was leading, it doesnt matter, Newman said. If that was the case, Ill find out one way or the other. At the same time we still had the opportunity to make our own destiny and win it on pit road, and we didnt. That being said, were out. No. 14 Notre Dame at No. 17 Michigan Michigan defeated Notre Dame 41-30 late Saturday night in Ann Arbor. A small story will appear in Mondays sport section.

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place (491). Im really ecstatic with the boys times today, Lecanto boys coach Roselle Lattin said. Our goal is always to run in a pack and I think we did that today. Jacksonville Mandarin took home the first place trophy with 53 points while Lecanto and Citrus district rival Land O Lakes finished second with 78 points. The Lady Panthers took top county honors in the girls meet finishing ninth with 269 points. Only one point separated Lecanto and eighth place district rival Springstead. Citrus finished in 18th place (464), a mere three points ahead of 19th place Crystal River (467). Ocala Vanguard won the girls meet with 61 points. Lecanto sophomore Claire Farnsworth was the top-county finisher in the varsity girls race, placing ninth with a time of 20:38 over the 5K distance. Farnsworth locked in her top 10 placing early in the race and held on to it through to the finish. We were all pretty spread out, Farnsworth said of her race. I wasnt too close to the girls ahead of me and the girl behind me was pretty far away. I pretty much stayed where I was. Lecanto junior Sam Alford was the county boys top finisher in 29th place (17:52), followed closely by teammate Michael Lindsey in 35th place (18:07). Crystal Rivers Brandon Harris (18:08) came in right on Lindseys heels for 36th place. Alexis Ulseth took 55th and was the Lady Pirates top finisher in a time of 24:15. Citrus junior Cameron Grant (18:49) finished 60th as the top Cane boys runner while junior Alyssa Weber (22:22) finished as the No. 1 Lady Cane in 23rd place. Seven Rivers Christian competed solely in the junior varsity races. The Warrior boys finished in the 16th and last place with 468 points while the girls took the runner-up trophy with 75 points. Efforts from sophomore Olivia Huegel (24:21) and freshman Paige Eckart (24:22) who finished 8th and 9th respectively helped the Lady Warriors score low enough. NATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 B5 000FSGG Honoring Survivors and Remembering Loved Ones. Include your loved ones and those touched by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake Edition on October 1. This special edition will be printed on pink newsprint. *All photos & information must be submitted by Tues., Sept. 24 PER TRIBUTE Will include a photo and short bio, approximately 20 words or less. Call Candy 563-3206 to reserve your space. 000FZDZ CROSSContinued from Page B1 Associated PressThe last time the Packers saw Colin Kaepernick in person, he was a meteor bolting through a flimsy defense. When Green Bay journeys to San Francisco for Sundays marquee matchup with the NFC champion 49ers, the defense better be a lot stingier or the Packers will get smashed up again. Kaepernick set a postseason record for quarterbacks by rushing for 181 yards in San Franciscos 45-32 divisional-round victory. Green Bay, which has a pretty effective passer of its own in Aaron Rodgers, looked inept when it came to slowing down Kaepernick and the Niners read option. As Packers star linebacker Clay Matthews said, the read option has become a big part of the league, and it causes you problems because it can make you unsure what to do. Packers defensive coordinator Dom Capers wants his guys to be aggressive and force the issue with Kaepernick and the versatile 49ers offense. Thats not easy, of course, with Frank Gore at running back, Vernon Davis at tight end and Anquan Boldin at wide receiver, all working with a stout line. Rodgers actually is one of the better scrambling quarterbacks in the league, and no one throws on the run better, not even Kaepernick. He could keep offbalance a staunch 49ers defense led by linebackers Patrick Willis, NaVorro Bowman and Aldon Smith. On Thursday night in the season opener, Peyton Manning matched the NFL record with seven touchdown passes in Denvers 49-27 home victory over Super Bowl champion Baltimore. Today, its Atlanta at New Orleans, Minnesota at Detroit, Tampa Bay at the New York Jets, Seattle at Carolina, Cincinnati at Chicago, New England at Buffalo, Oakland at Indianapolis, the New York Giants at Dallas, Tennessee at Pittsburgh, Kansas City at Jacksonville, Miami at Cleveland, and Arizona at St. Louis. Monday night has Philadelphia at Washington, then Houston at San Diego.Atlanta at New OrleansWelcome back, Sean Payton. Now lets see how much your presence means for the Saints. New Orleans lost its first four games last season while Payton was suspended for the entire schedule due to the bounty scandal. He doesnt want his return to be the focus at the Superdome, especially with the division rival Falcons and their equally prolific offense in town. Sorry, Sean, its the big storyline in the Big Easy.Philadelphia at Washington, MondayHeres one to savor: Robert Griffin III, back from major knee surgery, running the read option. And this: Chip Kellys fastpaced, versatile offense trying to match points with RG3 and the Redskins. The furor over Griffins injury and whether he should have been on the field in the playoff game against Seattle last January was followed by daily, if not hourly, reports on his recovery. The reigning Offensive Rookie of the Year is back. Kellys Philly version of the Quack Attack already is without receivers Jeremy Maclin and Arrelious Benn. But he does have DeSean Jackson, do-everything running back LeSean McCoy, and Michael Vick to run the show.Houston at San Diego, MondayFinishing off the opening weekend will be the Texans, who have never beaten the Chargers, but are favored over rebuilding San Diego. Houston is built around stars like a RB Arian Foster, WR Andre Johnson, DE J.J. Watt and LB Brian Cushing, who just got a huge contract extension. San Diego has few stars left and has concentrated on improving the defense, although new coach Mike McCoy is an offensive master. One thing to look for: How many sacks does Dwight Freeney have left as he comes over from Indianapolis through free agency?Minnesota at DetroitThis one is simple: If the Lions can neutralize Adrian Peterson, then their high-powered offense could have a field day, particularly if Reggie Bush ignites the running game. That, of course, is an IF the size of Ford Field. Peterson rushed for 273 yards in two games against Detroit in his MVP 2012 season. He could reach that number on Sunday if he matches the way he performed down the stretch as Minnesota won four straight to get a wild card last year. Detroit has its own record setter, of course, in WR Calvin Johnson. Megatron had 1,964 yards receiving on 122 catches.Seattle at CarolinaHistorically, the Seahawks dont travel to the East Coast too successfully. That really shouldnt be a factor to start the season, though, and this is one of Seattles best squads. While versatile quarterbacks Cam Newton and Russell Wilson are focal points, how much the defenses can slow down the opposition will decide this one. Newton will face a superb secondary led by All-Pros Richard Sherman and Earl Thomas, and each side has a terrific linebacker, Bobby Wagner in Seattle and 2012 Defensive Rookie of the Year Luke Kuechly in Carolina.Cincinnati at ChicagoA very intriguing game out of the gate for the Bengals, who many see as a Super Bowl contender or at the very least, an AFC North winner. A win at Soldier Field over the revamped Bears under new coach Marc Trestman could stamp Cincinnati as a force. To get it, the Bengals will need a big effort from star DT Geno Atkins, who just got a huge contract. If he can unnerve Bears QB Jay Cutler, who can be rattled, Cincinnati would prosper. Two standout wideouts, Cincys A.J. Green and Chicagos Brandon Marshall, will be on display.New England at BuffaloThe Patriots, winners of nine straight openers, dominate the Bills like no one else, winning 18 of the last 19 meetings and 23 of 25. Dont look for Tom Bradys streak of games with TD passes (48, second only to Drew Brees 54) to end against an injurydepleted secondary. Plus, theres Buffalos quandary at quarterback, where it can only hope first-round pick EJ Manuel, who will start, has fully recovered from his preseason left knee injury.Oakland at IndianapolisThe Raiders have the look of the worst team in football. The Colts look like they could push Houston to the limit in the AFC South. Oakland, with nearly $50 million going to players no longer on the roster, is playing it coy about its starting QB, Terrelle Pryor or Matt Flynn. Unless Ken Stabler is coming back in his prime, it might not matter against an Indianapolis team that went from 2-14 in 2011, earning it the top draft pick (Andrew Luck), to 11-5. The uncertainty at quarterback means the Raiders will force feed RB Darren McFadden, who when healthy is very dangerous. Indy was 29th against the run last year.N.Y. Giants at DallasCowboys owner Jerry Jones loves the idea of his team being featured in prime time. He must hate the idea of playing the Giants, who have never lost in Jerrys billion-dollar house, going 4-0. Breakaway receiver Victor Cruz is back from a bruised left heel, something Eli Manning finds critical for New York. Definitely, its good to have all your weapons out there, one of your top receivers, Manning said. Its good to get him running around. Im excited hell be back for this opening game.Tennessee at PittsburghYes, the NFL is a passing league, and when Ben Roethlisberger is healthy, the Steelers can do major damage through the air. Still, this has the look of whatever team runs most effectively will take charge. While the Steelers backfield is a jumble after the presumed starter, rookie LeVeon Bell, sprained his right foot, the Titans have Chris Johnson, a one-time 2,000yard rusher. Pittsburgh has won 10 straight home openers, longest active streak in the league.Kansas City at JacksonvilleBoth of these teams were 2-14 on merit last year. Only one, Kansas City, seems ready to distance itself from the cellar. Andy Reid is following an approach in KC that is similar to the one that helped him turn the Eagles from doormats to contenders. He brought in a quarterback, Alex Smith, who has a good grasp of his West Coast offense, and he inherits a lot more talent with the Chiefs than new coach Gus Bradley does with the Jaguars. Jacksonvilles best chance is for Maurice Jones-Drew to be unstoppable in the ground game.Miami at ClevelandThe Browns have won four straight over Miami. To get to five, new coach Rob Chudzinski needs his offense to pound the ball with Trent Richardson. The Dolphins are considered a potential challenger to New England in the AFC East, but after a difficult preseason, expectations might have been tempered. They brought in Mike Wallace as a deep threat to complement Brian Hartline in the passing game, but with Bush gone to Detroit, who will run the ball?Arizona at St. LouisThe Rams went 4-1-1 in the division, and considering how strong San Francisco and Seattle were last season, thats impressive. If St. Louis truly is on the upswing in its second season under Jeff Fisher, it will get more production in the deep passing game. The tools are there with QB Sam Bradford and firstround pick Tavon Austin. Bruce Arians parlayed an interim coaching gig in Indianapolis after Chuck Pagano underwent treatment for leukemia into NFL Coach of the Year honors. And now, at age 60, his first head coaching assignment, with a Cardinals team that fell apart after a 4-0 start in 2012. Associated PressSan Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick runs against the Green Bay Packers during an NFC divisional playoff NFL football game last year in San Francisco. The last time the Packers saw Kaepernick in person, he was a meteor tearing through their flimsy defense. When Green Bay journeys to San Francisco for todays marquee matchup with the NFC champion 49ers, that defense better be a lot stingier, or the Packers will get smashed up again.

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B6SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHIGHSCHOOLFOOTBALL Vote for your favorite restaurants and you have a chance to WIN a $100 Visa Gift Card! All votes must be submitted by 4pm, September 17, 2013. For complete rules see chronicleonline.com go to features, then select enter a contest. Go to www.chronicleonline.com Features Enter a contest Mexican Food? Dessert? Service? 2013 Golden Fork Awards 000FVVC Munroe 36, Seven Rivers 0SR 0 0 0 0 0 RFM 0 23 13 0 36 Scoring Summary Second Quarter RFM Bailey 63-yd run (Harris pass to Skipper) RFM Lewis 3-yd run (Harris pass to Edwards) RFM Edwards 49-yd run (kick failed) Third Quarter RFM Skipper 15-yd pass from Harris (Skipper kick) RFM Lewis 47-yd run (kick failed) Individual Leaders Rushing SR: Jimenez 10-20-0; RFM: Bailey 5-112-1; Lewis 6-73-2; Winburn 6-52-0; Edwards 1-49-1. Passing SR: Gardner 3-12-0-1; RFM: Harris 4-10-1-1. Receiving SR: Mazza 1-20-0; Rivers 2-70; RFM: Skipper 3-44-1; Winburn 1-8-0.South Sumter 38, Crystal River 0CR 0 0 0 0 0 SS7 21 10 0 38 Scoring Summary First Quarter SS J. Taylor 20-yd run (kick good) Second Quarter SS J. Taylor 5-yd run (kick good) SS A. Faulk 3-yd run (kick good) SS A. Faulk 13-yd run (kick good) Third Quarter SS W. Moir 27-yd FG SS S. Marcus 5-yd run (kick good) Individual leaders Rushing CR: A. Franklin 12-22-0. SS: J. Taylor 11-144-2. Passing CR: C. Ryan 4-13-52-0; SS: L. Sapp 8-12-104-0-0. Receiving SS: C. Hernderson 2-30-0.Lecanto 10, Wesley Chapel 6LEC 0 10 0 0 10 WES6 0 0 0 6 Scoring Summary First Quarter WES E. Bennett 45-yd INT return (kick blocked) Second Quarter LEC D. Growdon 6-yd run (kick good) LEC L. Leiva 21-yd FG Individual Leaders Rushing LEC: D. Growdon 19-111-1; J. Nightengale 9-27; WES: T. Ragle 4-13-0. Passing LEC: T. McGee 2-4-0-1-13; WES: S. Edwards 3-8-0-1-39; J. Williams 2-7-0-1-28. Receiving LEC: J. Lucas 1-9; J. Nightengale 1-4; WES: E. Bennett 3-29; T. Ragle 1-30. Citrus at Dunnellon boxCitrus 14, Dunnellon 8CIT 0 7 7 0 14 DUN2 0 0 6 6 Scoring Summary First Quarter DUN Safety Second Quarter CIT Moore 20-yd run (Marsden kick) Third Quarter CIT D. Franklin 40-yd pass from Moore (Marsden kick) Fourth Quarter DUN Parks 3-yd run (pass failed) Individual Leaders Rushing CIT: J. Pouncey 15-57-0; T. Washington 10-45-0; J. Clark 6-41-0; DUN: J. Williams 8-54-0; Parks 8-42-1; D. Sims 13-39-0. Passing CIT: D. Moore 8-20-1-0-122; DUN: K. Jones 2-9-0-3-36; J. Hamm 1-1-0-34. Receiving CIT: D. Franklin 3-64-1; S. Franklin 3-35-0; DUN: M. Livermoore 1-34-0; K. Parks 1-26-0. High School Football BOXES Defensive gem Lecanto gives up no points on defense in 10-6 victorySTEVEMCGUNNIGLE CorrespondentLECANTO In what is developing into an early-season trend, the Lecanto Panthers defense was the signature key to its 10-6 win over visiting Wesley Chapel on Friday night, as an interception by Nicolai Kortendick put an end to a lastminute threat by the Wildcats. Lecanto (2-0) trailed 6-0 early in the first quarter before scoring 10 unanswered points, all in the second period, and shutting out Wesley Chapel the rest of the way. Dmitry Growdon led the Panthers offensive attack with 111 yards rushing on 19 carries, plowing in for a 6-yard touchdown run midway through the second quarter to give Lecanto a 7-6 lead. The Panthers were put in favorable field position when a Wesley Chapel punt attempt from midfield resulted in a fumbled snap, and Lecanto took over possession 38 yards away from the end zone. A 28yard dash by Growdon coupled with a Wildcat penalty set the running back up for his scoring plunge. In addition to Growdon, the defense took on the workload from there. I think at the end of the day, what really helped us was our defensive play, Lecanto head coach McKinley Rolle said. They didnt let Wesley Chapel in the end zone, they had multiple takeaways, they played aggressively toward the ball. I was just really proud of their effort. In fact, the Wildcats only points came from their defensive side of the ball. On Lecantos second possession of the game, a Travis McGee pass was read and picked off at the line of scrimmage by Eric Bennett, who raced untouched 45 yards to the end zone. The ensuing extra point attempt was blocked by McGee. Leading 10-6 with 4:29 remaining in the game, the Lecanto defense forced a Wesley Chapel punt. But the kick was fumbled, the Wildcats recovered at their own 47 yard line and they had late life. Wesley Chapel looked poised to take full advantage of the opportunity after converting on a 4th-and-15, as Jase Williams found Travis Ragle for a 30-yard gain down to the Panthers 32. But three snaps later, Williams pass over the middle was deflected off the hands of a receiver and into the arms of a waiting Kortendick with 1:11 remaining. Two McGee kneels later ended the contest. Lecanto held Wesley Chapel to 67 yards of offense, including just 20 on the ground and none in the first half. The Panthers defense also recovered three of six Wildcat fumbles. Ardante Anderson had a pair of sacks and was big in key moments. Luis Leiva connected on a 21yard field goal in the second quarter for Lecanto. A banged-up Jonah Nightengale gained 27 yards on nine carries for the Panthers. So on this night, it was Growdons turn to carry the load. Dmitrys effort is incredible, Rolle said. He doesnt go down after first contact, hes pumping those legs, he doesnt assume hes down. He keeps going, he runs extremely hard and Im proud as heck of that kid. Lecanto hosts rival Crystal River this Friday for a 7:30 p.m. start. MATT PFIFFNER /ChronicleLecanto junior running back Dmitry Growdon runs behind of the block of junior teammate Ardante DeDe Anderson on Friday night against Wesley Chapel at Lecanto High School. The Panthers waited out a long lightning delay to down the Wildcats 10-6 and improve to 2-0 on the season. McKinley RolleLecanto coach starts the season 2-0 for first time. Friday-night standouts StaffPlayers of the weekDeion Moore, Citrus senior quarterback Moore accounted for both touchdowns in the Hurricanes 14-8 victory over Dunnellon on Friday night. The upperclassman scored Citrus first touchdown to give his team a 7-2 lead in the second quarter on a 20-yard quarterback keeper. Although Moore went just 8 of 20 for 122 yards passing, he got better in the second half. In the final 24 minutes, the Hurricane was 6 of 10 for 93 yards and the eventual game-winning score on a 40-yard touchdown pass to junior wide receiver Desmond Franklin in the third quarter. Dmitry Growdon, Lecanto junior running back Growdon was the only area player to hit tripledigit rushing yards by taking his 19 carries for 119 yards and a touchdown during the Panthers 10-6 home victory over Wesley Chapel. Growdons 6-yard touchdown in the second quarter was the only offensive touchdown of the game for either team. Desmond Franklin, Citrus junior WR/DB Franklin caught three balls for 64 yards and a TD. Got behind Tiger defense for the 40-yard score. He also intercepted a pass with 20 seconds left to clinch a 14-8 win, Citrus first over Dunnellon since 1990s. Keiwan Jones, Dunnellon senior defensive tackle Jones was a big part in Dunnellon holding Citrus to 199 yards of total rushing yards. He had multiple stuffs in the run game, pressured the quarterback consistently and recovered a Hurricanes fumble. Jaimee Juse, Citrus senior linebacker Juse was a thorn in the Tigers side Friday night. He intercepted a pass and was all over the field in helping limit Dunnellon to 174 yards of total offense. For good measure, Juse also caught a 12-yard pass. Nicolai Kortendick, Lecanto senior DB For the second week in a row, the Panthers needed a huge defensive play to preserve a win, and Kortendick was the one to deliver it. Kortendicks interception off a deflection with 1:11 left deep in his own territory helped Lecanto hold on to a 10-6 victory against Wesley Chapel. Nicolai Kortendick Jamiee Juse Keiwan Jones Sanchez out with an injured shoulder. The second-round pick out of West Virginia played only 69 snaps in the preseason, but hes ready for his NFL debut. I always dreamed of being in the NFL, but it was always a long shot, Smith said. You cant really put too much into those things, especially as a kid. Yeah, theres dreams, but at the same time you have to go out and chase it. To be here and to have an opportunity to start is great. But, Im not here to celebrate. Here are some things to watch for in the season opener for the Buccaneers and Jets:Genos debutThe Jets organization might have been hoping for Smith to win the quarterback competition all along, but the way it ultimately came about with Sanchezs injury clouded things. There are plenty of questions, with the top being whether the rookie is anywhere close to being ready to start as an NFL quarterback. It will be offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinwegs task to tailor a game plan around Smith, which means there could be lots of plays out of the shotgun and some read option.Revis receptionAll signs are pointing to Revis playing for the first time in nearly a year, since he tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee at Miami. Bucs coach Greg Schiano gradually increased his workload during training camp and held Revis out of preseason games. If he does play, and start, as expected, Revis will have no restrictions, Schiano said. That means the Jets will find out quickly if the Revis Rules Rex Ryans term for not throwing in Revis direction are in effect.Dee instead of DarrelleWith Revis departure, the Jets were down a shutdown corner. But theyre hoping Antonio Cromartie will play as well as he did while Revis was injured last season, when Cromartie established himself as a true No. 1 cornerback. The Jets used their first pick in the draft No. 9 overall to select former Alabama star Dee Milliner with the hope that hell be able to step into the lineup opposite Cromartie. BUCSContinued from Page B1

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The Disney cycle As expected, life does come full circle. There is a ritual for people who come of age in Florida. For the most part, adults who live and work in Florida do not go to Disney World. The vacation destination is for the tourists. We Floridians dont go to Disney! Give us the beach, give us the islands and give us a rest. Until we have children. Once Floridians have children, they too find themselves drawn to the Magic Kingdom. It just cant be helped. The marketing is intense. The allure overwhelming. We all make the trip with our kids, but were so tired most of us dont even remember what happened. Then, when our children became teenagers, the magic gets sucked out of the Kingdom. Teenagers often reach the conclusion that it is no longer cool to spend time with Goofy, Donald and the gang. In fact, for many of our kids, it was no longer cool to spend time with us. So for a decade, there are no visits to Disney. But then a funny thing happens. Our kids have kids and the magic is restored. Our grown-up kids cant wait for their kids to meet Mickey. Suddenly the mouse with the big ears isnt a geek with a squeaky voice. He becomes a cool dude with an attitude. So that explains why, a few weeks back, we found ourselves packed up with six grandkids and four adult children to once again make the trek to the Magic Kingdom. And the Kingdom was magic. Mary Poppins had her bounce, Donald Duck his quack and Cinderella her beauty. It was through the eyes of Izzabella Grace Mulligan on her eighth birthday that we could once again experience the joy of Disney. While it had been a generation since we have visited, things had not changed that much. Some rides had been updated and there were some new things happening. The campus of tied-in resorts now stretches for many miles. But for Izzy, her brothers and her cousins, the magic was a first-time experience. For the adults, it was the comforting knowledge that some things are repeated with each generation. And thats good.Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan@ chronicleonline.com. Gerry MulliganOUT THE WINDOW Section CSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE DR. PARESHDESAIThis is in response to the editorial published on Aug. 28 and Rebecca Bays resultant column. The Citrus County Tourism Council is in the process of rebranding the county to tourists. In attempts to replace Visit Citrus to Visit Crystal River, there were some political hurdles that appeared to polarize businesspeople within the county. Its important to understand that the goal here isnt to divide businesses, but to actually bring in more revenue and exposure to the entire area. Let us rationalize why Crystal River should be used as the main reason to bring tourists to the area: Have you ever heard of Clark County in Nevada, or Monroe, Orange and Osceola Counties in Florida? Likely not. However, Im sure youve heard of Las Vegas in Nevada, and Key West and Disney World in Florida. No famous landmarks in the United States are marketed by their counties to visitors as Citrus County has chosen to do for years. Its always the city that is the famous destination of interest. And when you visit any of these cities as a tourist, you find other nearby attractions that are available for your enjoyment. Why not use something which is unique only to our area and which brings people here from all over the world? People from around the world come to Crystal River seeking to get a glimpse of an animal that was once teetering on the brink of extinction. Crystal River has made its mark on the world map because of this precious mammal. It has been recognized on the Discovery Channel, in National Geographic Magazine, as well as in U.S. Air Magazine, which circulates to 1.5 million people annually. Crystal River has more than 700 hotel rooms available to our visitors and it pays the lions share of its bed tax. I would suspect that businesspeople in the surrounding areas would actually welcome the increased revenue and hotel traffic brought in by our friendly manatees that reside in the Crystal River. Once our out-of-town guests arrive to our quaint town, it should be the responsibility of the TDC as well as the local hoteliers to internally market what its neighboring towns have to offer, whether its hiking and birdwatching on the Withlacoochee State Trail, strawberry picking in Floral City, boating on the Homosassa River or camping in Inverness. The TDC should be providing our local businesses with marketing products to increase their exposure. Keep in mind that the human brain recognizes and then selects or deselects images in fewer than 3 seconds. Since Crystal River already has national and international exposure, why shouldnt we use it to help optimize the success of its nearby towns and local businesses? It would be illmannered not to do so. Dr. Paresh Desai is a member of the Citrus County Tourist Development Council. Have you ever heard of Clark County in Nevada, or Monroe, Orange and Osceola Counties in Florida? Likely not. However, Im sure youve heard of Las Vegas in Nevada, and Key West and Disney World. We know what works; dont abandon it Q: Weve heard criticismthat judges arent getting full records including prior offenses before making critical dependency decisions for families. What can be done about that?A: Remember, I was a lawyer and I was in court with the judges, so Im not sure that they are not getting all of the priors. I do think that priors are not necessarily being discussed in court. And so I think we need to do two things. We need to work in partnership with the judges, number one. The protective investigators and the lawyers need to make sure they are bringing that forward. But the judges can also do their part by asking the questions about the priors and having the PIs (protective investigators) go thoroughly through the priors. The PIs have all the priors before they file a case. So its a matter of communicating it. For example, Judge (Jeri Beth) Cohen would always ask the court to look for every case that this person had before. And by the way, the judges also have access to (the Florida Safe Families Network), and so they can look at the priors. It is a matter, in my mind, of coordination. Rather than not getting it, I think we need to coordinate how they can get it better and what relevant things they need to glean from those priors.Q: Talk about the Florida Safe Families Network. You said recently the federal government will help FSFN come into compliance how will that serve the child-welfare system?A: What happened is that the federal government funded the creation of FSFN our one child-welfare record. They gave us the money to build it. In order for them not to ask us for that money back, they want us to meet certain Associated PressEsther Jacobo, right, interim secretary of the Department of Children and Families, speaks Aug. 20 during a town hall meeting at the Broward College South Campus in Pembroke Pines. DCF officials say nine children have died this year after having some sort of involvement with the agency. At left is Florida Sen. Eleanor Sobel. sther Jacobo was tapped as interim secretary of the Florida Department of Children and Families last month after David Wilkins resigned amid a series of childrens deaths, with the number now topping 20 since April. An attorney, Jacobo has been with the department since 2008, most recently as head of its Miami region. Before that, she was deputy director of Childrens Legal Services and chief of the Miami-Dade domestic crimes unit under state attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle. Jacobo earned her law degree from St. Thomas University in Miami in 1992. Shes married with three children. The News Service of Florida has five questions for her: FIVE QUESTIONS FOR INTERIM DCF SECRETARY ESTHER JACOBO See JACOBO/ Page C3

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Page C2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 Stay out of SyriaI cannot see any national interest in being involved in Syria. None. Assad is not our guy, and neither are the Muslim /Iran/ brotherhood rebels. Let them kill each other off. Killing is killing and dead is dead, whether a machete, sarin gas or Tomahawk missiles are involved. More than 100,000 Syrians are dead, so other than to save Obamas pride, why should 1,400 more be cause to involve ourselves in a civil war which we cannot understand? If we use $1.2 million each Tomahawk missiles, we will see pictures of killed and maimed women and children and we have no goal or strategy anyway. Oh, and we are broke. Those 200 missiles equal more than $200 million, and with no purpose stated. I would further state that our only real interest in the Middle East is the oil, and that given the new finds in the rest of the world and particularly the United States in the form of natural gas and shale oil, we could be well on our way from exiting that part of the world, energy self-sufficiency and create a booming economy. The EPA, DOE and the regulatory morass they enforce with federal blessing keeps them in business at the expense of our tax dollars, while those policies cripple our economy and support involvement in foreign lands, which our Constitution clearly warns us against.Robin Humphrey Crystal RiverMaking changesIn my past, if I didnt like the clerk in a store, Id go to another and not go back to that store again. If someone in church was too loud or knew all the answers, I went to another church. If hotdogs were cheaper on the other end of town, Id spend $1 worth of gas to save 5 cents. In my new life of sobriety, I find old habits coming into my mind. If I dont like the person conducting the meeting, do I stop going there? If a speaker doesnt say what I want to hear, do I leave? If there is someone who knows all the answers or is too loud, do I stop going to that meeting? When I drank if there were people like that, I didnt stop going to that bar. I have to be flexible. If I get too stiff, Ill break. When I go to heaven yes, I plan to go to heaven if there is someone there you dont like, do I say I think Ill try the other place? I find if the speaker doesnt say what I want to hear, the next might just save my life. God bless and thanks for listening.Ernie Porter Inverness WASHINGTON Because Syrias convulsion has become as serious as Barack Obama has been careless in speaking about it, he is suddenly and uncharacteristically insisting that Congress participate in governance. Regarding institutional derangements, he is the infection against which he pretends to be an immunization. In the Illinois Legislature, he voted present 129 times to avoid difficulties; now he stoops from his executive grandeur to tutor Congress on accountability. In Washington, where he condescends as a swan slumming among starlings, he insists that, given the urgency of everything he desires, he cant wait for Congress to vote on his programs or to confirm persons he nominates to implement them. The virtues of his policies and personnel are supposedly patent and sufficient to justify imposing both by executive decrees. In foreign policy, too, he luxuriates in acting, as most modern presidents have improvidently done, without the tiresome persuasion required to earn congressional ratifications. Without even a precipitating event such as Syrias poison gas attack, and without any plausible argument that an emergency precluded deliberation, he waged protracted war against Libya with bombers and cruise missiles but without Congress. Now, concerning Syria, he lectures Congress, seeking an accomplice while talking about accountability. Perhaps he deserves Congress complicity if he can convince it that he can achieve a success he can define. If success is a shot across the bow of Syrias regime, he cannot fail: By avoiding the bow, such a shot merely warns of subsequent actions. Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has advertised his skepticism about intervening in Syria. His very public intrusion in a policy debate may exceed what is proper for the uniformed military, but he seems to have played Obama as dexterously as Duke Ellington played a piano. Dempsey assured Obama that the military mission could be accomplished a month from now. (Because the bow will still be there to be shot across?) This enabled Obama to say that using the military to affirm an international norm (about poison gas), although urgent enough to involve Congress, is not so urgent that Congress recess required abbreviation. Britains Parliament inadvertently revived the constitutional standing of the U.S. Congress when Prime Minister David Camerons incompetent management of the vote resulted in Parliament refusing to authorize an attack. His fumble was a function of Obamas pressuring him for haste. If Parliament had authorized an attack seven switched votes would have sufficed Obama probably would already have attacked, without any thought about Congress prerogatives. The Financial TimesGideon Rachman reports that in an Aug. 24 telephone conversation with Cameron, Obama made it clear that he wanted a swift military response before global outrage dissipated and Bashar al-Assads regime had the chance to prepare its defenses. Many Republicans are reluctant to begin yet another military intervention in a distant and savage civil war. Other Republicans, whose appetite for such interventions has not been satiated by recent feasts of failure, will brand reluctance as isolationism. Reluctant Republicans can invoke Dwight Eisenhower. He, who in 1961 enriched Americas lexicon with the phrase military-industrial complex, sought the presidency in 1952 to prevent its capture by what he considered an isolationist, or at least insufficiently internationalist, Republican faction represented by Mr. Republican, Ohio Sen. Robert Taft. Yet after one look as president-elect at the front line in Korea, Eisenhower ended that war. To advisers urging intervention on Frances behalf in Vietnam, he said (this from his memoirs): Employment of airstrikes alone to support French troops in the jungle would create a double jeopardy: it would comprise an act of war and would also entail the risk of having intervened and lost. He was not an interventionist regarding the 1956 Hungarian revolution, and he not only refused to support the 1956 British-French-Israeli attack on Egypt, he ruthlessly forced its termination. About his brief and tranquil intervention in Lebanon, he wrote: I had been careful to use (about U.S. forces) the term stationed in Lebanon. Obamas sanctimony about his moral superiority to a Congress he considers insignificant has matched his hypocrisy regarding his diametrically opposed senatorial and presidential understandings of the proper modalities regarding uses of military force. Now he asks from the Congress he disdains an authorization he considers superfluous. By asking, however reluctantly, he begins the urgent task of lancing the boil of executive presumption. And surely he understands the perils of being denied an authorization he has sought, then treating the denial as irrelevant. George Wills email address is georgewill@washpost.com. He who is too much afraid of being duped has lost the power of being magnanimous.Henri Frederic Amiel, Journal, Dec. 26, 1868 Now wanted: an accomplice CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief Stop butting heads and fund park We have long advocated that county government has a responsibility to provide funding for Whispering Pines Park in Inverness. Whispering Pines is the jewel of our park system and has been the center of activities in the county seat for more than three decades. While the huge regional park is located in Inverness, more than 75 percent of those who make use of the park are county residents and dont pay taxes in the city. For that reason, county government has kicked in a portion of the funding for the park for many years. The relationship between the county and city has been rocky since a misguided group of county commissioners tried to move the county seat to Lecanto about a decade ago. (None of those county commissioners remain on the board). That lack of trust has led to disagreements in recent years over the amount of money the county should pay the city for the operation of the park. Last year the county faced a fiscal crisis of its own and the Whispering Pines funding was held up. County Commission chairman Joe Meek has tried to extend the olive branch in recent weeks by officially offering Inverness $300,000 in funding from the county. But Chairman Meek got a funny response from the city he has had a hard time getting them to accept the money. Chairman Meek was insistent so he showed up unannounced at Mondays city council meeting to make the $300,000 offer to the council. Council members were polite, but City Manager Frank DiGiovanni said later in the week that Inverness does not want an interlocal agreement with the county. The problem apparently stems from the county wanting to have a contract with the City of Inverness about what the county funds can be used for. The county wants the funds to be used at Whispering Pines and for services county residents utilize. The county wants some documentation for how the money would be used. The city manager would prefer the county simply reimburse the city for its efforts. The problem is the county operates its parks at a much lower cost than the city of Inverness. The city manager does not want county recreation leaders looking over his shoulder and having input on spending decisions. Whispering Pines does offer a higher level of service than the county parks, but we dont believe semantics should be a permanent stumblingblock to the city accepting county funding. After all, if the Inverness council doesnt take county funding, then city taxpayers are unfairly being charged to cover all of the costs at Whispering Pines. No one thinks thats fair. The members of the Inverness City Council need to show some leadership and work out an agreement to accept funding from county government for the park. It may not be at the level the Inverness administration thinks it deserves, but $300,000 is a lot of money and city taxpayers shouldnt be forced to pick up that tab just because the council cant work through the details. At the same time, the county needs to relinquish its desire to micromanage activities at Whispering Pines. This city park operates with a higher level of service because thats what the city wants. The city council needs to agree to the details of a contract with the county. For their $300,000, the county deserves to have an explanation provided for what services are being delivered. For the record, were not too concerned about the details of the contract, but county taxpayers deserve to have some record that documents how their money is being spent. In these days of shrinking government budgets, citizens expect elected and appointed officials to have the ability to work together toward the greater good. Chairman Meek did the right thing by forcing the issue at the council meeting. The elected council members need to accept that challenge and solve the problem. THE ISSUE:County funding for Whispering Pines.OUR OPINION:Show leadership; reach a deal. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including emailed letters.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor Take closer look at closersIn regards to the libraries heavy doors: Why is it the public library has these doors extremely heavy? Its not the doors that are heavy. Im a retired locksmith and I went to handy ADA applicator schools and all, I know the codes, and the door closers are not adjusted properly. They should make their doors light as a feather if theyre adjusted at 4.5 pounds inside, 5.5 out for weather. And if the doors were adjusted properly, you wouldnt even know you were opening them. As for the handles, they have to be ADA certified at a certain height, certain type. So its not the door, its the closers. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE George WillOTHER VOICES PSST

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COMMENTARYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 C3 Time flies when you are having fun, but my Cheryl accuses me of trying to make it go faster than it actually does. Im inclined to begin using the next number right after we pass the previous one with our wedding anniversaries. Ive been thinking and even saying occasionally that we have been married for 47 years, but the truth is, we wont make 47 until Sept. 24. The same has been true of my comments about this column. I know Ive been guilty of referring to this as being the columns 25th year, which it has been, but today, Sept. 8, is in fact the anniversary edition. It appeared for the very first time on Sept. 4, 1988. Were older now. Im specifically talking about Gerry Mulligan and me. Im not sure, but I suspect Im a tad older than he is. Back in 1988, I was only 43 and he was no doubt younger. Just how did A Slice of Life come to be? Ive told this story before, but it seems appropriate to tell it again, especially today. Technology invaded my world. Id always done my own typing, which meant I didnt have to deal with a Dictaphone or a stenographer. In mid-1988, my employer was strongly suggesting that I learn to use a computer instead of a typewriter. I needed to master the touch of the computers keyboard. It was boring to simply copy things, so I began writing out stories I had told all of my life little slices of life. I allowed family and friends to read some of these very short stories. Several folks said I should have them published. Published? Where, and as what? After a bit of thought, I realized these vignettes were about the right length for a newspaper column. Gerry, meanwhile, wasnt bothering a soul. He was just sitting at his desk being theChronicleseditor. As fortune had arranged it, he and I had become acquainted. Ill go ahead and say it: We had become friends while he was coaching my son in T-ball. His not-sohectic day became a little more hectic when I called and asked if I could visit with him. Being the nice, outgoing guy that he is, Gerry immediately said, Sure, Fred. Come on by and well have a cup of coffee. I then told him that before I came I should tell him what I wanted to talk about and did precisely that. As any reasonably intelligent person in his position would have done, he began to back up. Uh, Fred, why dont you bring some samples of your work by, Ill look at it and get back with you. I took a half-dozen or so potential columns for his review and left them. One week, then two, passed. I decided to let him off of the hook and called late one Friday afternoon to do so, to tell him to just discard my manuscripts. He wasnt in, so I left a message asking that he call me. To my surprise, when I arrived in my office the next Monday morning my phone was ringing. I answered it and Gerry was on the line. He said, Fred, I just read those articles you left with me. Half of the people in Citrus County think they can write, but you really can! Lets begin to do a weekly column. And the rest is history: 25 years of life in 1,300 slices.Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. A Slice of Life: Twenty-fifth anniversary edition Fred BrannenA SLICE OF LIFE RONLIEBERMANAs incoming president of the Florida Home Builders Association (FHBA), I am anxious to fulfill my volunteer leadership responsibilities. Presiding at meetings and conferences, serving as the voice for our industry on legislative issues, and working to provide safe and affordable housing for our citizens are all part of my job description. But one of the things I feel most strongly about is sending a message to all who will listen: Housing has been and always will be the backbone of the Florida and national economies, and the way to get our economy really humming is through a healthy homebuilding/construction industry. Thats why even before I officially take over as FHBA president in October, I met with Gov. Rick Scott to pledge our industrys support for his job-creating initiatives and made a connection with Enterprise Florida, the private-public partnership designed to expand existing businesses and bring new ones to the Sunshine State. I attended the most recent Enterprise Florida board of directors meeting in Destin and came away mightily impressed with the work of the group, as well as the support they receive from the business community and our state government leaders. Every member of the Florida Cabinet was in attendance along with a Whos Who of the men and women leading the largest and most influential businesses in our state. Everyone should understand the economics of housing. For every new home built in Florida, three full-time jobs are created for builders, building suppliers, trades professionals and others connected to our industry. Housing generates millions of dollars in tax revenues are generated for the state and local government. And, remember, housing is the gift that keeps on giving, with each new home creating a ripple effect of jobs and revenues through the sale of furniture, appliances, landscape services, among many others. Gov. Scott knows these facts well, and as the Chairman of Enterprise Floridas board of directors, he can play an important role in supporting the homebuilding industry and fueling our job-creating capacity. Under his leadership, Floridas unemployment rate has dropped from more than 11 percent when he took office in 2010 to 7.1 percent this summer. During that span, more than 300,000 private-sector jobs were added in Florida. In addition, Florida has enjoyed some highprofile success stories in getting companies to move to our state (in May, Hertz established its worldwide headquarters in Lee County) and Enterprise Florida is today in direct contact with 180 other companies considering a move. When you combine that effort with the fact that 500 people a day are moving to Florida and 100 million people visit Florida each year, the economic future is bright for our state. I plan to stay closely involved in the work of Enterprise Florida during my tenure as president to offer the housing industrys support for their work and spread the simple message: Housing = Jobs.Ron Lieberman, of Lecanto, is set to become the 61st president of the Florida Home Builders Association (FHBA) on Oct. 19. Special to the ChronicleFlorida Home Builders Association Presidentelect Ron Lieberman met recently with Gov. Rick Scott to pledge his industrys support for Enterprise Floridas job-creating initiatives. In Florida, homebuilding equals jobs Letter toTHE EDITOR Come together, resolve CMH issuesDear Ms. Ressler and Mr. Collins: During the recent Citrus County Economic Development Council Board meeting, the EDC board directed me to send a letter urging both the Citrus County Hospital Board and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation to set aside your differences, agendas and politics and come to a resolution on the issues that have beleaguered your boards for more than four years. While the EDC is attempting to move forward to diversify and expand our local economy, we are concerned that our major health care provider institution in this area is embroiled in ongoing rhetoric between the two boards to the detriment of our county population. Hopefully you can understand, this is not the image we want to project to new business prospects when they inquire about our major health care institution in the county. Further, it is our understanding; nearly 95 percent of our area doctors report a loss in billing revenues because patients are going elsewhere due to their concerns with the CMH situation. The EDC implores your boards to now show your leadership in coming together to choose the best business option for CMH, the Citrus County residents, and the health care community. It is past time to bring the boards together to move forward to a resolution that will provide financial security to the hospital and maintain the important level of care for which CMH has been known.Don Taylor executive director, Citrus County Economic Development Council criteria that meet with their requirements. So its not that its not working right or we dont have things that we need to track, necessarily, but the government wants to make sure that because they invested money, it complies with what they would like to see. There are about 46 items they gave us when they came down and said, You need to fix these things. We plan to be fully compliant by fiscal year 2014. Its really important to have it in place, not just because the federal government invested money in it, but because having one system allows all of us to be able to access the notes, the prior records. So if the family moves, say, from Miami to Pensacola, the Pensacola protective investigators and (community-based care organization) will have the full and complete record through the FSFN system. It tracks when children go to the doctor. It tracks when children have a dental appointment. It tracks all kinds of court issues the issues around reunification or adoption. So it is the record. The other thing it allows us to do is get statistics about whats happening. So for example, we can pull by CBC (community-based care organization). So lets say, in (community-based care region) X, theres children who are not going to the doctor. We have a high number of children that are not seeing physicians or dentists. We can then hone in on that area or that CBC and say, Whats happening and how can we fix it? So in addition to being a good information system for particular children, it also allows us to use it for quality assurance of kids well-being.Q:Advocates say child protective investigations should be multidisciplinary. Do you agree? A:Yes, I think we need a multidisciplinary approach to investigations and, partly, case management as well. To some extent and it should be more we do have that. For example, were not all employed by DCF. Were fortunate that we have many partners in the community that provide assistance. The Child Protection Team theyre not funded by DCF, theyre (Department of Health). But they provide a review of cases, and they have criteria. They help us make decisions about whether theres abuse or neglect on a case. We have a working agreement with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and their experts are available to us not just to provide services for DV (domestic violence) victims through their own funding, but also to advise our protective investigators and case managers about the integrated issues around domestic violence. (DCF has) the managing entities, which deal with substance abuse and mental health all across the state. We have privatized experts in substance abuse and mental health, and recently, we added to both the CBC contracts and the managing entity contracts that there must be an integration between the managing entity and child welfare, so that child welfare clients are served first, to make sure we are serving the needy population. I think we can still do much more multidisciplinary staffings on these cases, but were well on our way. We all have recognized, I think, the importance of not making these decisions alone.Q:You said earlier this week that youre looking to revise the scorecard by which the communitybased care agencies are rated monthly. What revisions do you foresee?A:Yes, we are actually meeting. Casey Family Programs is coming in with their experts and statisticians. They have helped other child welfare systems around the country develop the right measures, and we begin the conversation with the (community-based care organizations), DCF and Casey. We have to make sure were measuring, right? Things that dont get measured people dont pay attention to them. Human nature, right? So its important for us to measure the right things. And some of the complaints CBCs had with the prior scorecard is they didnt feel it was measuring the right things. They felt there were unintended consequences to some of the measures that drove bad decisions even though you were doing well on the measures. I certainly am not an expert on what measures are the right measures, which is why I wanted national experts to come and help us. And thats what Im hoping well start with this conversation. And hopefully well end with a really good way to measure our performance here in Florida. Q:Are you concerned that the Legislature will move too fast to fix DCFs troubles? What advice do you have for lawmakers?A:Well, I love this question. This is such a complex area of practice. And to think that you could have hearings and then, in a month or two, put a fix in place, is not just nave but irresponsible. But Im really confident that our Legislature is going to look at this in a deliberate and thoughtful way. And the reason I say this is because I had the honor of being at that (Aug. 20) town hall meeting with Sen. Sobel and the tri-county delegation from MiamiDade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties. And Im encouraged because it was very much focused on solutions. There was truly, in my mind, a recognition that this is complex work, and it is not as easy as remove more, remove less and throw money at it, right? Its a lot of complex and difficult items that we need to resolve. I would not think of advising the Legislature how they should act necessarily, but I do think they are very committed, at least from my experience and the legislators Ive met, to really look at this deliberately. Im hopeful that some of the things weve already put in place, once we explain it to them, and that are coming down the pike, will make them comfortable with what the future of the department looks like. And also if there are suggestions of what we can do to make it better, then Im hopeful we can work together with the Legislature to make that happen. JACOBOContinued from Page C1

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Thanks, Dr. McGillI would like to give a big hearty thanks to Dr. McGill hes a veterinarian at Citrus Animal Hospital in Crystal River for the outstanding job he did on removing a large tumor from my German shepherd Gator. And basically it was benign and hopefully hell recover and he is back to health again. And I truly appreciate that because I was fearful we were going to lose this great dog, and Dr. McGill and his staff did an outstanding job and I really appreciate everything that they have done. Thank you. Concentration of powerFront page, Aug. 18: Sheriff ponders air ambulance service. For crying out loud. Dont give the sheriff any more power than what hes already got. Hes getting to a point where were not going to have any say-so in Citrus County because the sheriff is going to be Big Brother. Think about it, folks. Think about it.Make casinos legalIn todays paper, if casinos are illegal in Florida without approval by the Legislature, why dont our county commissioners get off the port and get onto the legislators to legalize this? Bring casino to mallI agree with the person in todays paper (Aug. 22) about putting a casino in the Crystal River Mall. Lets give people something to do that will help make money for the county and give people jobs and fill empty spaces. Get legislators to approve. Do something for the people.Building an empireI hope the people in this county wake up in time to see that Dawsy is trying to take over every function in this county. And if you give all that power to one person, then he will dictate what he wants to do with the money, where it goes and what you can and cannot have. A monopoly is the worst thing we can do in Citrus County. This county cannot handle a monopoly or monopolistic type of control of the people. So I hope the citizens of this county will wake up and start taking charge of their own destiny. Fructose out, salt inCould you please put this in the paper? I just was told that theres so much products out there that they took fructose out of for the people that are complaining about too much of that in there. But what they did, when I went to buy a product that didnt have any fructose, they doubled the salt in it. From the 200, 300 grams of salt, they put 1,500 grams of salt. So we cant figure out what to do. We cant have salt and we dont want the fructose. Come on, you manufacturers. Stop doing that to us. Be neighborlyI just want to say to the people that are calling in on their neighbors for very minor offenses, I do not call in on my neighbors because sometimes in these economic times, they cant mow their grass. Maybe theres lightning. Maybe their mower broke. Maybe they cant afford to have a company. And I think some of these people should realize that their neighbors are their neighbors and they just should be realistic. And unless theyre doing some crime or something, that they just be neighbors.They pave, you payThis is in regards to County needs to pave the roads. Be careful what you wish for. We, off of Grand Circle, only have three roads in here. They petitioned one road, which we did not sign, the third road. And its cost us $500 a year for the last 10 years for a quartermile pervious not paved, mind you. This money goes straight to our board of county commissioners, but we paid for it and everyone uses this road in the whole complex. Everyone elses taxes are only $40 a year. Ours on the third road that is paved or pervious, is $540. Those roads will cost you, not the county. Please check into this before you decide to get your roads paved.Mow the hayfieldIm calling about the grass ordinance they have in the county. I understand through code enforcement, the grass has got to be over 18 inches tall. Well, thats no longer a lawn, thats a hayfield. And I understand the county commissioners are thinking about changing the grass law to a shorter distance. I sure hope they do it because its way over and above what it should be. The snowbirds come from up North, they buy property down here and then they dont want to maintain their lawns and us permanent residents have to look at it. And Ive been trying to get a hold of JJ Kenney or any of the county commissioners and they dont call you back at all. And when you call the office, theres never nobody in there. I dont know why they even need that office. Theyre never there.C4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY 000G016 September 8th October 12th Journey Stories At Old Courthouse Heritage Museum in Inverness Free. Journey Stories is a compelling Smithsonian exhibition that shows how our evolving mobility changed a young nation and how transportation made us grow. The accounts of travelers themselves express the hopes and promises of fresh starts, the grim realities of forced migrations and difficult journeys, and the thrills of personal travel. Brought to you by The Smithsonian Institution and the Florida Humanities Council. For more information call 352-341-6436. September 10th 11:00 am-3:30 pm Fundraiser Luncheon Fall Card Party At West Citrus Elks Homosassa Entrance Fee: $12 Approximate Number of Attendees: 100 List of Charities: Boys and Girls Club, Food Pantry, Homosassa Elementary School, Isaiah Foundation, Blessings. For more information call 352-382-4748. September 11th Noon-7:00 pm 9/11 Memorial and Freedom Walk At Inverness Government Center Free. A memorial exhibit takes over the Council Chamber and lobby areas with a short outdoor presentation at 5:30 pm and followed by a symbolic freedom walk. For more information call 726-2611. September 14th 7:00 am-4:00 pm Bass Blaster At Inverness Government Center Free. Fishing tourn with Prize money. Rotary and Key training center in partnership with the city of Inverness are teaming up to bring this awesome event to Liberty Park. For more information call 726-2611. September 15th Sunr ise to 11:30 am Save our Waters Week 24th Annual Adopt A Shore/Coastal Clean Up Volunteers needed to clean up out Countys waterways. For more info email info.citrus2020@gmail.com or call Citrus County Aquatics Services at 352-527-7620. Must be registered by Sept. 10th. More information available at www.citrus2020.org September 16th 8:30 am Skyview Member Member Golf Tournament At Skyview At Terra Vista. First Annual Member Member Golf Tournament for Skyview At Terra Vista Golf Members. Approximate Number of Attendees: 120 For more information call 352-601-1319. SoundOFF

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Section DSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE BUSINESS BRIEFS Bruce WilliamsSMART MONEY From wire reports NEW YORK The price of oil closed at a two-year high Friday on a combination of fear of escalating tension in the Middle East and hope for continued stimulus measures from the U.S. Federal Reserve. Benchmark oil for October delivery rose $2.16, or 2 percent, to close at $110.53 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Thats the highest closing price since May 3, 2011. In the U.S., the average price of a gallon of gasoline slipped 1 penny to $3.58. Thats unchanged from a week ago, but down 24 cents from this time last year. In other energy futures trading on Nymex:Wholesale gasoline rose 2 cents to $2.85 per gallon.Natural gas fell 5 cents to $3.53 per 1,000 cubic feet.Heating oil added 2 cents to $3.16 per gallon. Oil hits 2-year high on US jobs report, Syria SMITHFIELD, Va. Smithfield Foods Inc. said a U.S. committee that reviews mergers between American companies and those overseas has given clearance to the pork producers proposed sale to a Chinese company. Smithfield said Friday the U.S. Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States gave clearance to its proposed sale to Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd. Hong Kong-based Shuanghui agreed to in May to buy Smithfield in a deal valued at $7.1 billion, including debt. Smithfield shareholders are scheduled to vote on the transaction on Sept. 24. Shares of Smithfield rose about 3 percent in after-market trading. Regulator OKs Smithfield sale DEAR BRUCE: I am paying for my daughters schooling to ensure she has a great future. The school is rated one of the top private schools in the country. I can afford to pay this expense, but I am unsure that I am teaching her responsibilities. Should I stop paying and let her get a part-time job to pay her school loans herself? Reader, via email DEAR READER: Since you can afford the expense of private school, I have no problem with you paying. There are other ways your daughter can exercise responsibility. You might suggest that she gets a job on campus for 10 or 15 hours a week for the experience. And of course, during vacations, she should not only be encouraged but obligated to find employment. I salute your idea of teaching your daughter to have some responsibility. If you couldnt afford to pay for the school, it would be a different matter, but on balance, if she is enjoying herself, keeping good grades, and you can afford it without jeopardizing your retirement, I see no problem with it. DEAR BRUCE: My husband and I want to build a new home in Texas. We are unsure how to pay for the home. Should we get a mortgage or pay cash for the house? If we pay cash, we will end up closing our savings account. We heard that we should finance a home to make our credit score go up. We have no debt and maintain two good incomes. What do you think? Reader, via email See MONEY/ Page D2 Daughter can be responsible without being responsible for cost of school Do you believe creative thinking, mixed with life experiences, can be the spark that ignites a successful endeavor? If so, here is your opportunity to move Citrus County forward with your great idea. The Citrus County EDC and Chamber of Commerce invite you to present your thoughts at a kickoff event for Industry Appreciation Month. The event is called Fire Up Citrus and will be held on Thursday, Oct. 3, at Tuscany on the Meadows located in the new Quality Inn Conference Center in Hernando. The program will run from 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Purpose, eligibility and ground rulesFire Up Citrus is your chance to present your ideas to county officials, business leaders and the public. Presenting participants will be required to submit a Fire Up Citrus presenter application form. The form can be obtained by accessing the EDC web site, calling 352-795-2000 or emailing either Heather Gibson (heather@citrusedc.com) or Ardath Prendergast (ardath@citrusedc.com). All presenters must follow the ground rules. The ground rulesYour thoughts and the images presented must be positive. No negative comments or criticism of people, places or other programs. You may not belittle, demean or depreciate anyone or anything. only positive thoughts, please! Make them new, different, fun and original. What-ifs and why-nots are welcome. Youll never know when an inspirational thought will generate significant change or improvement. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Your ideas will have no conceptual restrictions. Its OK to think big and outside of the box! All presentations will have a total time limit of 5 minutes from start to finish. A 20-slide/image/show presentation is required with slides/images each appearing in a 15-second sequence. Help is available to put your ideas in presentation format. Call either Ardath Prendergast or Dr. Frederick Herzog, Ph.D.EXPERIENCE MATTERS See HERZOG/ Page D2 Can your ideas change Citrus? Heres your chance to share them SOURCE: Avalere Health analysis of health insurance rate filings *Carriers are prohibited from rating based on age in Vermont and New York. APHealth insurance premiums by ageA new study compares insurance premiums for three age groups under the new health care law in selected states.* Estimated cost for nonsmokers for mid-level coverage known under the law as a silver plan: 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700$800Md. Ind. D.C. Calif. Ohio Conn. Wash. Va. S.D. R.I.21 years of age 40 60 Associated PressWASHINGTON President Barack Obamas health care law appears to mirror a trend in job-based insurance, where employees are being nudged into cost-saving plans that require them to pay a bigger share of their medical expenses.Two independent studies out this week highlighted attractive prices for less-generous bronze plans that will offer low monthly premiums but require patients to pick up more of the cost if they get sick. Consumers might avoid rate shock over premiums, but some could end up struggling with bigger bills for the care they receive. The Obama plans will be available starting Oct. 1 for people who dont have access to coverage on the job. Studies by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation and Avalere Health provided the first look at rates filed by insurers around the country, ahead of the Oct. 1 opening of new state insurance markets under the law. Consumers will use the markets to find out if they qualify for tax credits to help pay their premiums, and to pick a private insurance plan from a range of coverage levels: bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Come Jan. 1, virtually everyone in the United States will be required to have coverage, or face fines if they dont. At the same time, insurance companies no longer can turn away people in poor health. Associated PressA basket of medical supplies await storage Oct. 11, 2012, in Brookhaven, Miss. The No. 1 question about President Barack Obamas health care law is whether consumers will be able to afford the coverage. Now the answer is coming in: The biggest study yet ofpremiumsposted publicly by states finds that the sticker price will average about $270 a month if youre a 21-year-old buying a mid-range policy. Thats before government tax credits that will act like a discount for most people, bringing down the cost based on their income. New system, familiar trend A bronze plan is a very basic plan. It will enable consumers to pay very low premiums up front, zero in some cases. But when they actually need medical care, they will pay higher costs out of their own pockets. Larry Levitt, Kaiser Family Foundation vice president See PREMIUMS/ Page D2

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DEAR READER: You didnt mention your age, but I assume that you are relatively young. I would certainly not deprive myself by paying cash for the house, especially since mortgage rates are so low right now. As these words are being written, somewhere around 2.9 percent is available for 15year financing. How in the world can you say no to that? I congratulate you on having a good income and having no debt, but I would not pay out all of my savings under the conditions you have outlined. As to the credit score, I wouldnt worry, assuming that you pay your bills on time and meet your obligations in a proper manner. DEAR BRUCE: I have a bill for $13,000 that needs to be paid as soon as possible. My question is, where should I take the money: from my CD 401(k), which has no penalty, or use my savings account, which has $15,000? R.S. Via EmailDEAR R.S.: You mentioned that you have a 401(k) with a bank CD. How much can that be paying you? I wouldnt take the money out of the 401(k) because it is tax-protected, but I most certainly wouldnt leave it sitting in a CD. The market is the only place that I would recommend. As to your savings, pay the bill and keep the $2,000 in your account, then pay yourself back as quickly as you can. As you will come to find out, it goes in very slowly and comes out enormously fast. DEAR BRUCE: My husband and I are having a disagreement regarding Roth IRAs. Together we earn around $100,000. I was told that we should open a Roth IRA and my husband says we shouldnt. Can you tell me who is correct? Cynthia, via emailDEAR CYNTHIA: You havent told me much about your and your husbands ages and individual incomes. But, by and large, a Roth has many advantages. Not the least of these is that you put money in a Roth with taxes having already been paid. From that point forward, until such time as you cash it in, there are no taxes and nothing on the interest that is earned. The younger you are, the smarter this is. There will be more time for your money to work hard for you without paying taxes on those returns. I am assuming that you will put the money in the Roth in a reasonably solid investment, one that should return somewhere between 7 percent and 8 percent a year. Thats a goal that is relatively easy to obtain in the market.Send questions to bruce@bruce williams.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns.D2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBUSINESS 000FZE9 SOD Licensed & Insured Jaime Massingill John Massingill LAWN REPLACEMENT Complete Lawn & Patch Work Drought Tolerant Lawns J&J SOD (352) 302-6049 Tub & Tile RefinishingServing Citrus Since 1989ALL ABOUT BATHSWarranty Porcelain Fiberglass Tile Custom Colors Acrylic Bath Systems Chip Repairs & Morewww.AllAboutBaths.com352 637-2299 Check us out!BATHTUB REFINISHING000FYKY 000G0UW DRYER VENT CLEANING DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. Vent 1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Years Licensed, Bonded, Insured $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000FNUL 352-794-0270 www.smcflorida.com CARPET CLEANING Our Services: Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Spot Removal 24/7/365 EMERGENCY SERVICE CR-C057844 Expires 11/30/13 Have a couch and loveseat cleaned, get a chair or recliner cleaned FREE ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13 $ 79 95 3 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL 000FXJ8 When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile Cleaner Showers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Clean, Seal & Repair Shower Maintenance & Grout Repair Grout Colorant 586-1816 746-9868 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. 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LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED LICENSE #CCL002604 WINDOWS UNLIMITED 352-795-8772 1-800-600-HEAT (4328) www.windowsfla.com WINDOWS 000FX7T QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE STARTING AT $ 60 00 Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! www.CitrusPest.com 000FX7O (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS PEST CONTROL Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River 2013 2013 2013 2013 000FX1M APPLIANCE REPAIR Top Notch Appliance Repair Over 30 Years Experience 352-586-9109 Accepting Credit Cards Licensed & Insured Robert Roik Member of Chamber of Commerce 000FZ5J MONEYContinued from Page D1 Heather Gibson at 352-795-2000 to make the arrangement for assistance. The source of your ideas can come from your job, business, life experience, hobby, and/or a vision for the future for Citrus County. You can partner up with another person, but must stay within the guidelines of 20 images/PowerPoint, etc., and the five-minute time limit. A committee has been chosen to review all presentations prior to Oct. 3. Twelve presentations will be selected. The EDC will contact the 12 presenters letting them know they have been selected to present their ideas. The deadline to submit presentations to the EDC office is Sept. 27. The EDC and Chamber are in charge of this event. It is designed with the purpose of potentially discovering a unique and/or great idea(s) which might move Citrus forward. The event will be videotaped. There will be a break after each group of four presentations, giving those in the audience time to socialize. Once the event has started, the audience and presenters are asked to remain for the entire program. All presenters are encouraged to rehearse their presentation until they are comfortable with providing a smooth performance.Final thoughtsYour presentation will be reviewed by a selection committee. Presenters are asked not to deviate from their presentation once they have been approved for the event. Final thought: This event is designed to be constructive. Any negatives coming out during the presentation could cause the facilitator to stop the presentation! Good luck to all!Dr. Frederick J Herzog, PhD is the immediate past president and chairman of Citrus County SCORE. He can be reached at fherzog@tampabay.rr.com. What was really striking as we dug into the numbers is how inexpensive the bronze plans are, said Larry Levitt, a Kaiser vice president. Avalere, a private data analysis firm, found the average monthly premium for a bronze plan is $274, compared with $336 for the next level of coverage, a silver plan. The savings from going with bronze adds up to $744 annually, and thats off the sticker price, before federal tax credits that will reduce premiums for an estimated 4 out of 5 customers in the new markets. Its likely to entice healthier enrollees to opt for a less generous benefit package, said Caroline Pearson, a lead author of the study. The laws tax credits will make low-cost plans more appealing. By pairing their tax credit with a bronze policy, some younger consumers can bring their premiums down to the range of $100 to $140 a month, the Kaiser study found. Older people can drive their monthly cost even lower well below $100, and zero in some cases if they are willing to take a chance with higher deductibles and copays. Its a trade-off consumers unfamiliar with insurance might not fully grasp. A bronze plan is a very basic plan, explained Levitt. It will enable consumers to pay very low premiums up front, zero in some cases. But when they actually need medical care, they will pay higher costs out of their own pockets. Job-based plans have been shifting costs to employees for some time. In 2009, when Obama took office, 22 percent of workers were in plans with an annual deductible of $1,000 or more for single coverage, according to Kaiser. By this year, the share had nearly doubled, to 38 percent, including 3 out of 5 employees of small companies. People with modest incomes may still come out ahead by sticking with a silver plan instead of going for bronze. Thats because additional help with outof-pocket costs such as copays will only be available to people enrolling in a silver plan. The tax credits work by limiting what you pay for premiums to a given percentage of your income. For example, someone making $23,000 would pay no more than 6.3 percent of his or her annual income $1,450 for a benchmark silver plan. The amount you pay stays the same whether the total premium is $3,000 or $9,000. But those tax credits taper off rapidly for people with solid middle-class incomes, above $30,000 for an individual and $60,000 for a family of four. HERZOGContinued from Page D1 PREMIUMSContinued from Page D1 Speed Networking at Crystal River mallThe Crystal River Mall is sponsoring an evening of business matchmaking. Speed Networking will take place from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5, at the west end. This event is a way to promote a business and make some new business contacts. For more information and to register, call the mall office at 352-795-2585 and speak to Millie or Linda. Registration fee is $10.Lewandowski joins Better HealthBetter Health Chiropractic of Crystal River is proud to announce the addition of Russell Lewandowski, D.C.Dr. Lewandowski is formerly of Russell Chiropractic in Inverness. He is a certified computerassisted pro-adjuster for post surgical patients and a certified workmans comp provider. He also has the DOT physical exam certification. He is joined in our practice by daughter Shannon.McFarland-Bryant completes trainingDr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant has just completed the Department of Transportation Certification Training for the examination of interstate and Class A, B and C drivers. DOT physical exams will soon require this certification by the examiners. While attending the Florida Chiropractic Association convention, she also attended the seminar MegaSpore Probiotics for the calming of inflammatory states such as ulcers, allergies, autoimmune disorders, irritable bowel disease, Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis. Dr. Bryant practices at Better Health Chiropractic.CF committee meets Sept. 11The College of Central Florida Foundation Executive Committee will meet at 4:30 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Foundation Office of the CF Enterprise Center, 3001 S.W. College Road, Ocala. The committee will discuss general business. The meeting is open to the public.BUSINESS DIGEST Russell Lewandowski Cheryl McFarlandBryant

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013Chamber Connection 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801D3 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce. YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!S teve FitzgeraldBay Area A/C & HeatingV eronica MasseyWest Coast Insurers, Crystal River Upcoming Chamber of Commerce eventsSept. 13 Chamber Luncheon with speaker Dr. Anthony Schembri, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Plantation Inn of Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Sept. 26 Business After Hours hosted by Emeritus at Barrington Place, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 2341 W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto. Sept. 28 Seventh annual Womens Health and Fitness Expo presented by the Business Womens Alliance (BWA), 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the National Guard Armory, 8551 W. Venable Ave., Crystal River. Oct. 3 Fire Up Citrus! 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. New kick-off event for Industry Appreciation Month will be held at Tuscany on the Meadow Quality Inn 350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Check our complete calendar at www.citruscountychamber.com or follow the QR code to see the website on your smartphone! Anthony Schembri October is Industry Appreciation Month in Citrus County! Fire Up Citrus!Twelve presenters each have 5 minutes to fire up Citrus and inspire economic development! Thursday, Oct. 3, 6 to 8:45 p.m. at Tuscany on the Meadows, at the Quality Inn Conference Center, 350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Annual Awards LuncheonAlways the most popular and well-attended business luncheon of the year in Citrus County, the annual luncheon honors our local businesses and industries with awards for Outstanding Small Business, Outstanding Employer or Corporate Citizen, and Person of the Year. Our featured speaker this year is R. Alexander Glenn, Florida president for Duke Energy, who is certain draw a large crowd. This luncheon SOLD OUT last year, so we suggest that you get your reservations early! Friday, Oct. 11, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m,. College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. EDC BarbecueThe EDC Barbecue is one of the best events of the year in Citrus County! M&B Dairy, the largest dairy farm in Citrus County, will once again host over 800 people for an evening of delicious barbecue prepared by the Ag Alliance. This beautiful location backs up to a small lake, but provides plenty of room to spread out, chow down on the best barbecue ever prepared by the Citrus County Agricultural Alliance, enjoy libations at the open bar, and kick up your heels with great live music frome the best country band in the south the Dan Story Band. It is truly the place to be seen in Citrus County in October. Dale McClellan, owner of M&B Dairy, is the 2012 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Ag Expo Florida Farmer of the Year, and we thank him for opening his farm again this year for this fun-filled event. Thursday, Oct. 17, 6 to 10 p.m. M&B Dairy, 8760 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. For questions about these events, or to make reservations, contact Heather at 352-795-2000 or heather@citrusedc.com, or pay at www.citrusedc.com/events.html Industry Appreciation MixerSpecialty Gems of Crystal River invites everyone to join them in as they host the Industry Appreciation business mixer at their wonderful store. Mixers are a great business-to-business networking opportunity in a relaxed atmosphere, so be certain to bring your business cards. Admission is free, but registration is requested to give our host an idea of how many will attend. We give our sincere appreciation to Carol Kimbrough, owner of Specialty Gems, for making this wonderful event possible. Thursday, Oct. 10, 5 to 7 p.m. Specialty Gems 600 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. Laura Sullivan, Director at Cypress Cove, and Chamber ambassador Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers. New Image Award for business beautification presented to Cypress Cove Care Center, LLC The inaugural dragon boat race to be held on Lake Hernando will take place on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013. A committee of dragon boat paddlers and event planners, county representatives and tourism professionals are bringing fun, competition and recreation to one of Citrus Countys beautiful parks. The event will begin at 9 am and conclude at approximately 4 pm. Spectators are encouraged to come to Lake Hernando Park with their lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy the festivities. Food vendors and music will keep the event lively for all throughout the day. This festival is focused community involvement and charitable giving. Enter a team or sponsor the event at http://www.lakehernandodragon boat.com/about.html. Dragon Boat Festival slated for Nov. 16 Five mini-workshops are being offered as an added benefit for attendees at the free Womens Health and Fitness Expo, hosted by the Business Womens Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. This years Expo will be on Saturday, Sept. 28, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River. The first 30-minute session will begin at 9:30 a.m., with the final session beginning at 12:30 p.m. Speakers scheduled so far include:Carlos Rodriguez, MD: Laser treatment for Nail Fungus / Sponsor: Genesis Womens Center Med SpaRoxanne Maldunas, RN: Womens Heart Health / Sponsor: Citrus Memorial Heart & Vascular CenterDr. Kevin Hoffman, D.C.: The Healing Power of LowLevel Laser / Sponsor: Citrus Chiropractic GroupGregory von Mering, MD: Women & Heart Disease: Know the Facts / Sponsor: Seven Rivers Regional Medical CenterJudi Tear, PIO: 3x3 A Clear Path to a Healthier Lifestyle / Sponsor: The Florida Department of Health Citrus County Thank you to the Expos presenting sponsor Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, plus these major sponsors: Advanced Urology Specialists; Citrus Memorial Health System; Genesis Womens Center & Medical Spa; Tobacco Free Florida of the Citrus County Health Department; and Florida Cancer Specialists. Our generous media sponsors are the Citrus County Chronicle and Citrus 95/Classic Hits the Fox. A number of other businesses also are sponsoring at varying lower levels. Proceeds from BWAs Womens Health and Fitness Expo fund scholarships for female high school and WTI students. In seven years, $43,000 in scholarships has been awarded to Citrus County students. Our mission is to empower and develop women through education, networking, mentoring and partnerships; and to promote opportunities for all women throughout Citrus County. For more information about the Business Womens Alliance, find us at Facebook .com/bwacitrus or contact the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce at 352-795-3149 or at the Chambers website, www. citruscountychamber.com. Mini-workshops offered at Business Womens Health and Fitness Expo A woman has her carbon dioxide levels tested.

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D4SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER8,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699187 WASHER $100 In perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call or text 352-364-6504 WASHERAND DRYER Maytag washer and Kenmore dryer in good working condition $150 for both. 352-563-0664 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Cond. Free Del. 60 Day Guarantee 352-263-7398 WHIRLPOOLDISH WASHER Kitchen remodeled. Light almond color. Can send pictures $50 352-621-1249 Whirlpool Electric Range, like new black, smooth top 4 burner, works good $200. 352-586-1784 WHITE KENMORE RANGE HOOD $40 works great.30 day warranty call/text 352-287-9671 WHITE RANGE HOOD$40 Kenmore. works great. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 Drafting Board white tubular frame. Includes a parallel arm clamp on protractor. 42x31 $60 352-816-4879 OFFICE CHAIR BLACK PADDED OFFICE CHAIR-EXCELL. COND. $50 352-527-8993 COMPRESSOR SMALL. 125 LBS. NEW EXCELLENT$35.00 352-527-4319 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $100 HEAVY DUTYMETALMODEL INVERNESS 419-5981 Mitsubishi Projection TV 63 Model -WD 62527, w/ Extra Lamp, Good Cond. $250 (352) 220-9787 YAMAHASPEAKERS SET OF 5 $80 352-613-0529 ALUMINUM PORCH DOOR REMODELING WHITE 6 W/ VINYL WINDOW-$75 352-527-8993 BATH VANITYCABINETWHITE W/ SINK & FAUCET &COUNTERTOP $100 352 527-8993 CARPET INDOOR-OUTDOOR, BROWN, 27 X 96$50 352 527-8993 CEILING FANS FOUR WHITE FANS-$25 EACH 352 527-8993 FORMICACOUNTERTOPLARGE KITCHEN COUNTERTOPS-$50 352 527-8993 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 COILTOPSTOVE$100 works great. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 DROPIN ELECTRIC RANGEAND OVEN Whirlpool Self-cleaning. Almond color. Pics avail. $50 352-621-1249 DRYER $100 in perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 Frigidaire Washer & GE Dryer, Extra Large, capacity, excel. cond. $250. (352) 249-1097 GE Dishwasher,built-in, Excel. cond. $125. Bisque (352) 270-8343 GE Refrigerator white, side by side, 43 W 32 Deep, 68 tall 15 Cu. Ft., $350. & Stainless Gas Grill $150. 352-527-7002 HOTPOINTELECTRIC DRYER $80 White. Older model. Works great. 30 day warranty Call/text 352-364-6504 RCAELECTRIC DRYER $80 Almond color. Older model. 30 day warranty Call/text 352-364-6504 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Maintenanceat Wildlife Park, some animal diet preparation. Outdoor work,heavy lifting. $8.00 per hr. call 352-628-5343 Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 Promotional Tasting Event Companylooking for energetic outgoing personalities to handle liquor tasting events in local liquor & grocery stores. Send resume w/ picture to mbbpromotionsllc@gmail. com or Mary @ (407) 718-5825 CARE GIVERLooking for reliable CNA for elderly woman on Mon,Thurs, & Sat. Must be able to transfer 140 lbs. Send resume:whgn@ tampabay.rr .com AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approvedAviation MaintenanceTechnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CallAIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 CRAFTSUPPLIES several books, software, decopage,stamping kit,stencil set,all for($20) 352-613-7493 Community/ Sales ManagerNeeded, Immediate Opening. 382-0770 Light Equipment OperatorAnnouncement #13-48 Semi-skilled work in the operation of automotive public works equipment and performing manual labor. Graduation from HS or GED. Must have a valid Florida CDL Class A with endorsement N combination air brakes or be able to obtain within 90 days of appointment. $9.22 hourly to start. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, September 13, 2013. EOE/ADA. Recreation Program SpecialistAnnouncement #13-49 Responsible recreation work serving as the Parks and Recreation representative during recreational activities (public and private) at county events/facilities. Must be available to work a flexible schedule to include nights, weekends and holidays. Must have some experience in recreation and/or programming. Must successfully pass a level II background check. Starting pay $9.99 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, FL 34461 to apply online by Friday, September 13, 2013. EOE/ADA Now hiring: Class A-CDL Drivers$2500 Sign -On Bonus, Great Pay, Full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call us now at 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl.net QUALIFIED A/C SERV TECHExp Only & current FL DR Lic a must. Apply in person: Daniels Heating & Air 4581 S. Florida Ave. Inverness The Citrus County Mosquito Control District Is accepting applications for:Mosquito Control Technician IPublic Health Pest Control Certification is necessary within six months of employment. A detailed job description & application can be obtained at the Citrus County Mosquito Control District Headquarters Office, or our website, www .citrusmosquito.org 968 N. Lecanto Hwy. Lecanto, Fl. 34461 (352) 527-7478 Bet: 7:30 am-4:30pm weekdays. Deadline to receive applications will be 4:30 pm on Friday9/20/2013. The Citrus County Mosquito Control District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or disabilityin employment or the provisions of services. Preference will be given to veterans. (A copy of the DD-214 must be provided). CITRUS MAIDSCLEANING PERSON Needed. Must have flex. schedule, lic./vehicle. Exp. a plus. Leave message (352) 257-0925 Key Training CenterPT & FT Positions available in Group Home. Assist non-ambulatory medically fragile adults with disabilities in daily living. HS Diploma/ GED required. Apply in person at 5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto FL 34461 *E.O.E.* Office ProfessionalSalary: Based on experience and education Summary: Well established Inverness company seeking a Professional with knowledge and experience in Quickbooks, excel, accounting, imports and logistics. The ideal candidate must have strong math and communication skills, demonstrated attention to detail and accuracy, and enjoys working in a small office environment. College degree in business, accounting, logistics or similar field preferred. Please send your resume to Attn: Glenn Roberts, 105 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness FL 34450. Breakfast CookExp. Top Pay w/benefits! apply M-F 6-7 am or 2-3 pmA.J.s CAFE216 NE. Hwy 19, CR Skyview Restaurant At Citrus Hills Is SeekingPART TIME Cooks Hostesses DishwashersCall 352-746-6727 Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p For Application Appointment HELP WANTED RETAIL SALESPeople who want to work to replace the ones that dont. Nights/Weekends 75 CHROME SHOP Wildwood (352) 748-0330 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 ELECTRICIANSRESIDENTIALNEW CONSTRUCTION Exp. preferred. Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service. Full benefits, paid holidays & vacation /EOE APPLY AT: Exceptional Electric 4042 CR 124A Wildwood Hiring for Service PlumberExperienced req. Apply in person: 6970 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa Mon.-Friday 9a-4p Lead Aquatic Plant TechnicianAnnouncement #13-47 Responsible technical work involving a variety of tasks related to aquatic plant control. Leads and participate s in work of crews including operation of airboats, handling and mixing of herbicides. Must possess or be able to obtain within six months of employment a Public Applicators Restricted License with Aquatic endorsement. Must possess a valid Florida Driver License. $11.53 hourly to start. Excellent benefits. Full time position working 4-10 hour days Monday-Thursday. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, September 13, 2013 EOE/ADA. ARNP/PAFull time, for Dr.s Office & Nursing Home Practice, Fax Resume to: 352-795-7898 DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Exp. Med. Assist.Must have knowledge of Computers. CALL 352-212-2629 IMMEDIATE HIRING: PT/RN, Psych RNFlorida Homecar e Specialist Call (352) 794-6097 for an interview. NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 Staff Development Coordinator/Risk ManagerCome join an Exciting Team Must have knowledge of Federal, State and OSHA Regs. Two years experience and FL RN license required. Exc. Benefits Apply in Person: ARBOR TRAIL REHAB 611 Turner Camp Rd. Inverness,FL. Or send resumeto: atdon@ southernLTC.com An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D www.citrusmh.com/ career-opportunities -an equal opportunity college-College of Central Florida DIRECTORPurchasing and Auxiliary Services The Purchasing Director will provide technical knowledge and understanding in specialized field ofpurchasing and procurement. Implement policies and procedures adopted by the Board for all major purchases. Bachelors degree or higher required. Program of study should include business-related courses. Minimum of four years in area of purchasing, two of which must have been in a s upervisory position is required. Requires overnight, out-of-district travel on a recurring basis. Review date for this position is 9/30/2013 Please submit a copy of transcripts indicating the degree conferred with the electronic application. Education must be from a regionally accredited institution. How to Apply Go to www.CF.edu, click on Quick Links then Employment at CF. Submit electronic application, pool authorization card and unofficial transcripts online. Email copy of transcripts to hr@CF.edu or fax to 352-873-5885. 3001 SW College Road, Ocala, FL 34474 CF is an Equal Opportunity Employer Pine StrawYou load and Haul (352) 726-1633 SIX, 5 week old Kittens, very cute Free to Good Home (352) 364-1615 Lost Cat, male, orange tabby Tropic Terrace Crystal River (352) 422-4180 Lost Dog Overboard Sunday. Sept. 1st. Part Chihuahua & dachshund, Male black with white blaze on chest, 25 lbs. short hair. Vicinity betwn Shell Island and Marker 5, Approx.. 5am Crystal RiverREWARD(352) 746-1895 618-781-8728 REWARD Large Siamese cat. lost 6/15/13 in the area of hwy 200 and orchid dr. He was wearing a black collar with no tags. please call or text 239-287-0953 TWO PUPPIES 7 mos. old. Pitt Bulls one is all black, other is blue brindle, lost in the vicinity of Creed St. Crystal River pls call 352-777-1344 Yellow & white cat. Lost in Leisure Acres on 8/31. Has been spayed and has rabbi shot. (352) 628-1783 352-601-1458 DOG GROOMING WORKSHOP BYOD BringYour Own DOG! $50. 9/14, 11am to 4pm offered at the Academy of AnimalArts, Largo, FL Academy ofanimalart s.com 866-517-9546 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANTED! (HAM Radio Equip.) Vintage or Modern, tubes, tube audio amps, speakers, test equip. call Ethan 775-313-2823 Front OfficeWest Coast Eye Institute just off Highland Blvd, Inverness. Is looking for a bright individual, with a smile and good people skills Full Time. Fill out application or leave resume at the office. 352-726-6633 LEGAL ASSISTANTP/T 16 hrs per wk avg. Exp preferred. Resume & references to: PO Box 2763, Inverness, FL 34451 Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I am a fun loving attractive widow who enjoys life and looking for that honey-bunny of a gentleman in his late 70-80s who enjoys the same. I would love to get to know you. If interested please write so we could get together and find out more. Citrus Co. Chronicle Blind box 1847 106 W Main St Inverness, Fl 34450 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I I WOULD LIKE TO EXPRESS MY THANKS to everyones kindness & help during my son RHETT ROBERTS illness & death. Special thanks to Davis Funeral Home, Citrus Hospice, Stumpknockers, good friends. I shall treasure this love & caring always. Sincerely, MARGARET ENDRESS Todays New Ads 2007 John Deere Riding Mower X324, 4ws, 48 deck 110 hrs only, 22hrps Kawasaki, $1500. (352) 489-7906 Dining Rm Table TEAK 62x41, w/ 22 self-storing leaf 4 chrs. made in Denmark Anderson Mobler $425 obo (352) 382-4779 FORD1999 Exp Eddie Bauer. 214K mi, good cond in /out, good tires $3800 obo(352) 794-3930 LITTLE TYKES TOYS 8 in 1 Playground $150 Other items Available (352) 794-0211 Love Seat, chair, Bedroom suite, oak furn. Priced right! Ask for Diana 352-37-4695 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 Whirlpool Washer & Dryer, matching pair 4yrs old large capacity, multi-cycle, excellent condition $400. obo Homosssa (352) 503-7821 Whirlpool Washer & Dryer, matching pair 4 yrs old large capacity, multi-cycle, excellent condition $400. obo Homosssa (352) 503-7821 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 fertilizer horse manure mixed with pine shavings great for gardens or mulch u load & haul 352-628-9624 FREE 5 Month Old Black Kitten. He loves kids! neutered, wormed, and Flead. (352) 464-1567 FREE Part Bengal Cat Young Male, neutered, he is a lap cat and likes to be held & have lots of attention. Are you home most of the time to give him lots of love? call for more information 352-464-1567

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SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER8,2013D 5 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000FG53 DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000FV03 000FWNC ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000FX26 0 0 0 F X 2 1 TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PAVERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000G0IC Copes Pool & Pavers 000FX5Twww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 9/30/13LIC#CC1327656 CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000FUHFRESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP 000FSBI PET/HOUSESITTINGBONDED & INSURED(352)270-4672Kathleen M. Daceykatskritterkare@yahoo.com Training AvailableAll Kritters Big or SmallRelax while youre away knowing your pets are OK at home safe in their own beds 000FGCQ METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer SatisfactionLic.#CCC1325497 0 0 0 F X 1 U HANDYMANRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000FV68 Stand Alone Generator 000FX5E WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 10% off-Mention Ad Lic/ins. 352-344-2696 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tr ee Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 A+ CLEANING Res/Com. 27 yrs exp. Lic/ bonded, client focused 386-717-2929 Home/Office Cleaning catered to your needs, reliable & exper.,lic/ins 796-4645 / 345-9329 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Cuts $10 & Up Res./Comm., Lic/Ins. 563-9824, 228-7320 GROUND CONTROL Lawn Service Pressure washing Ken 352-316-1571 kenheffley2@gmail.com ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Andersen HandyMan Home Repairs, Lawn Care. Cheaper Prices 352-453-6005 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 M& W Interiors Inside/Out Home Repair Wall/Ceiling Repair Experts, Popcorn Removal,DockPainting & Repair(352) 537-4144 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone, Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M& W Interiors Inside/Out Home Repair Wall/Ceiling Repair Experts, Popcorn Removal,DockPainting & Repair(352) 537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins. Will Care For You & Assist in Daily Needs **352-249-7451** Let me help you. Lite hsekeeping, shopping companionship. Call Sylvia (352) 613-3114 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Looking for FORD WINSTAR Low miles, in good cond. (352) 794-3930 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Wanted N Scale Model Trains and accessories (352) 564-8605 WantedSmall Galvanized single axel boat trailer, Text info to 352-220-3682 ANNE LISEAnne Lise, a 7-8 y.o. Blue Terrier/Bull dog mix, spayed, housebrkn, & homeless. Family had to move so she came to the shelter. Weighs about 65 lbs, and is a beautiful dog, sweet, affectionate, gentle, loyal, good w/other dogs, good w/children. Playful & full of life. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. Die Cast Car Collection 1/18th scale 30 cars, must buy entire Collection $300 (352) 726-9151 Electric Treadmill, Sears, used only a few times, ( Got Lazy) Paid $1,100 Sacrifice Only $200. (352) 628-2844 EXERCISE BIKE (UPRIGHTTYPE) works great only 90.00 352 464-0316 MANUALTREADMILL GREATSHAPE NEARLYNEW ONLY 75.00 352 464 0316 Olympic Bench Press $150. Plate Loading Leverage Squat/Calf Machine $200. (352) 726-9151 PRO-FORM XP160 ELLIPTICALEXERCISER 10 Resistance Levels 11 Workout Programs Heart Rate Monitor $200.00 Call 352-382-3224After 5PM Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Double Clear Blue Hawaii KAYAK google for photo, retails new, $1800. great condition! $400. pls call between 9-5 (352) 563-2763 Fear No-Evil GunsHi-Point & Beretta Concealed Classes 352-447-5595 Golf Cartexc. condition exc. batteries w/back seats from $1500. (352) 527-3125 LADIES BIKE Ladies 6 speed Roadmaster bike. Excellent condition. $100 or best offer. 352 794 3961 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 ROLLER SKATES Rinkmaster womens size 8, great shape, ($20) 352-613-7493 NECKLACE new engravable heart necklace, bought at High Octane for $150,sell for($50) 352-613-7493 NEW NYLON STRING CLASSICALGUITAR W/GIGBAG,BOOK&CD LESSONS&MORE! $45 352-601-6625 DIGITECH VOCAL HARMONYPROCESSOR W/FOOTSWITCH AND EFFECTS $1OO 352-601-6625 DJ LIGHTS & STAND very professional. Paid $500, asking $250 352-228-3040 ELECTRO-HARMONIX NANO THE MOLE BASS BOOSTER PEDAL$35 352-601-6625 EPIPHONEACOUSTIC GUITARAMPLIFIER W/CHORUS, VINTAGE TWEED LOOK $25 352-601-6625 Keilwerth Alto Sax Brand New $600 (352) 533-2223 PARKING LOT PICKER/JAMS? ELECTRIC MANDOLIN PLAYS GREAT $60 352-601-6625 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 TWO HEAVYDUTY FOLDING STANDS ACOUSTIC/ELECTRIC GUITAR/BANJO/BASS $20 352-601-6625 ZOOM 504 II ACOUSTIC GUITAR MULTI EFFECTS PEDALIN ORIGINALBOX LIKE NEW $45 352-601-6625 ZOOM B1 BASS MULTI EFFECTS PEDAL W/CONVERTER LIKE NEW $40 352-601-6625 CITRUS JUICER ProcterSilex,like manual but electric heavy-duty, great shape,($10) 352-613-7493 CROCKPOTlarge with removable crock, good shape, ($10) 352-613-7493 PICTURE FRAMES 3 wood, 1 metal, large, good shape, all for ($15) 352-613-7493 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $25 352-613-0529 UMBRELLASTAND VERYSTURDY, BLACK WITH GOLD TRIM, $45 634-2004 MASSAGERS neck and foot, great shape, both for ($15) 352-613-7493 TWO GARAGE SHELVING UNITS HARD PLASTIC -5 SHELVES $25.00 EACH 352 527-8993 Western Electric Crank Magneto wall telephone, circa 1910, Excel. Cond. $300. (352) 344-5283 WET/DRY VAC Craftsmans 16 gal., 6HP. $40. Maple Couch Table 52 L,15 W, 27H w/glass top $25 (352) 344-1088 WOMENS RUBBER RIDING BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW SIZE L/43 EUR CAN E-MAIL PHOTO 419-5981 3 wheel ScooterLegend 2006, no lift gate, fair cond. $250 352-795-3764 Bedside Commode Aluminum Walker both have adjustable legs 20.00 EACH 352-464-0316 Bedside Commode Aluminum Walker both have adjustable legs 20.00 EACH 352-464-0316 BLOOD SUGAR MONITOR Bayer Contour, brand new with strips, ($10) 352-613-7493 CAR LIFT Harmar-Never Used $500; Golden Companion Scooter w/ all accessories. Never Used $800 Will deliver (352) 860-1195 CUSTOM 4 wheeled walker, brakes seat basket, even footrests ONLY$85.00 352-464-0316 Manual Wheelchair with footrests, great shape $100.00 352-464-0316 Ramp With Rails 16+ ft. aluminumramp. Never used. $800 Will Deliver (352) 860-1195 Safety Bath Tub Grab Bar, it clamps to the side of the tub ONLY$25.00, 352-464-0316 TRANSPORTCHAIR (SMALLWHEELS) Great shape with footrest 90.00 352-464-0316 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR SMALLBODYCUTAWAYBEAUTIFUL! $75 352-601-6625 BATHTUB NEW 6 FT 40.00 LINDA341-2271 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $25 352-613-0529 CHEST FREEZER Sears 21 in W, 35 in L like new $80; EDGER Sears, 3.5 hp, Gas $65 (352) 465-2709 Chevy Silverado Aluminum Running Boards, great shape ONLY$100.00 352-464-0316 Chevy Silverado Bra for 4 headlights Great Shape ONLY $80 352-464-0316 COOL SURGE Eco friendly air cooler, rolls from room to room, cent per hr. to use. $150. (352) 344-4374 ELECTRIC SMOKER ( LITTLE CHIEF) COST120.00 USED IN BOX ONLY70.00 352 464 0316 Entertainment Centers, 1 black & 1 lite color wood. $100 for both; Walker, stroller, swing, car seat, playpen $100 for all (352) 795-7254 FOLDING BIKE RACK Two bike folding rack, still in box. $50. 352-794-3961 GENERATOR Brand New 3500 Industrial $300 Call 352-344-3112 Harley Mufflers Slide on Original NEW 1350/1450 ONLY$90.00 352-464-0316 Kenmore Overlock /Sewing Machine 2/3/4D, Model 385.1644 New Cond. Org. Cost $700 Price $120 firm, owners manual & instruct. book (352) 382-5300 LITTLE TYKES TOYS 8 in 1 Playground $150 Other items Available (352) 794-0211 MOTORBIKE HELMET Hardly used, good condition, green/ black/ white color, $30 (352)465-1616 POWERWASHER CRAFTSMAN-7.0 HP OHV, 2900PSI/2.3 GPM, multi-tips, $100. 352-628-0033 ROCKING DOLL CRADLE SOLID OAK $75 HANDCRAFTED CAN E-MAILPHOTOS 419-5981 ROCKING HORSE Black-colored, rocks by rubber, ok condition, $50 (352)465-1616 TROLLING MOTOR MINN KOTATURBO 65 36#, 5 fwd/2 rev, tilt tiller, weedless prop, Ex., $90. 352-628-0033 MENS 2 PIECE SUITS SIZE 36X30 $25. & 34X30 $25. 352-613-0529 WOMENS BLAZER BLACK SIZE 16, GREATFORTHE OFFICE, EXCEl COND. $45. 634-2004 !!! LT225 /75 R 16 !!! GOODYEAR LIGHT TRUCKTIRE (1) 90% TREAD 50.00 352 464 0316 2 KAYAKS 79 inches long, $30 each, Ex. 352-628-0033 4 TIRES195 70 R15 Excel. Tread $80 352-201-7125 4 WHEELWALKERseat, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $45, 352-628-0033 5 SHAKESPEARE UGLYSTICK FISHING RODS-Casting & Spinning, Ex., $12-$15, 352-628-0033 12 MALLARD DUCK DECOYS-early plastic, glass eyes, made in Italy, will sell individually, Ex. $96, 628-0033 23 PINE WOOD HEARTS/BUNNIES/TEDDY BEARS $25 PAINTFORARTS CRAFTS 419-5981 78 RPM Records 209 count, assorted music, 1920s-1950s must take all $45 Ridgid Tri Stand Pipe cutter & threader #40 1-2 $125. (352) 344-5283 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BOYS BICYCLE SPIDERMAN 16 WITH TRAINING WHEELS $30 352-613-0529 BURTON STOVETO GO $20 CAR OR TRUCKS WITH 12 VOLTOUTLETLIKE NEW 419-5981 BURTON STOVETO GO $20 FOR TRUCK OR CAR WORKS ON 12 VOLTOUTLETLIKE NEW 419-5981 BUYER BE AWARE Dont be fooled by ridiculous offers! FREE HEARING AID CONSUMER GUIDE This FREE guide will let you compare all makes and models BEFORE you buy hearing aids!Call 795-1775 and we will mail you one TODAY! AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone, Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 Craftsman GT 5000 w/ 54 Deck, 22HP, Briggs & Straton, overhead canopy, runs & looks new $1,500 (352) 621-0848 Craftsman LT 1000 Riding Mower 18HP, 42 Decks, rebuilt motor & carb $450. Firm 352-527-7002 Craftsman Riding Lawn Mower, DYT 4000, 48 cut, V twin, 25 hsp, Kohler engine $600.(352) 419-6210 DIXON ZERO-TURN MOWER. VERYGOOD CONDITION. $750. 352-527-4319 LAWN MOWER Self propelled, Weed wacker & blower.$75. (352) 860-1265 Scaggs Walk Behind 48 Inch cut great condition $800. obo (352) 634-1213 Sears LT 2000 Riding Mower 5 yrs. old low hrs. 19.5 HP, 42 cut $450. Sears Self Propelled Mulching Mower, w/ bagger 6.5HP, 21 cut $100. 352-507-1490 CRYSTALRIVERSat. & Sun., 8a 4p 11120 N. Citrus Ave. 563-5695, 223-0919 HOMOSASSA9/7 & 9/8 9am-? 7290 Finale St. 3 MENS PLEATED PANTS SIZE 36 X 30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $25 352-613-0529 4 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R $10 EACH 352-613-0529 5 DRESSES GREATCONDITION, NICE FOR OFFICE, SIZE 16, $15 EACH 634-2004 BOOTS ladies 7 tan work, 7 black dress with heel, great shape, both for($15) 352-613-7493 WEDDING GOWN Brand new,ivory color,beautiful sz.8,halter style/pearl/seq./Michael Angelo/$190 352-552-7569. 352-552-7569 CHINACABINET2 glass doors 3 drawers 2 cabinets $100.00 Firm 352-419-4520 Dining Rm Table TEAK 62x41, w/ 22 self-storing leaf 4 chrs. made in Denmark Anderson Mobler $425 obo (352) 382-4779 DINING ROOM SET Dark wood w/nice trim, 8 chairs,gray granite top,china hutch,paid $3500,asking $975/obo. 352-552-7569. High End Used Furniture 2NDTIME AROUND RESALES 270-8803,2165 Hy 491 LEATHER SECTIONAL 4 PC Slate Blue Dual Incliners Excellent Cond. 400.00 or B.O. 352-795-9888 LOVE SEAT Broyhill, Green, like new. No pets or smoking. Exc Cond! $250 (352) 746-2329 LOVE SEATLike new 75.00 Call for email picture linda 341-2271 LOVE SEAT Taupe, Microfiber Excellent Cond. $150. (352) 746-9247 Leave Message Love Seat, chair, Bedroom suite, oak furn. Priced right! Ask for Diana 352-37-4695 Maroon and gold sofa, two extra matching cushions, good condition. $100 or best offer. Call 352 794 3961 ROCKER RECLINER Tan rocker recliner, very good condition. $100 or best offer. 352 794 3961 Twin Beds Two with headboards Matt. & box springs $75; Complete Full Size Bed $125. No calls before 11 a.m (352) 628-4766 TWO SWIVELBAR STOOLS PADDED SEAT-$20 EACH 352-527-8993 Wheelchair Elec Mobility Express Immaculate cond. $600; 3 wheel Elec Scooter, New Battery $400. 352-382-0411 2002 Craftsman Riding Mower42 Cut & deck $375. (352) 628-5708 2007 John Deere Riding Mower X324, 4ws, 48 deck 110 hrs only, 22hrps Kawasaki, $1500. (352) 489-7906 GENERATOR Briggs & Stratton, 5250 watts, used once. Exc Condition. $400 (352) 527-8993 KOHLER KITCHEN SINK REMODELING? DOUBLE SINK WITH FAUCET-$100 352-527-8993 SLIDER BLINDS SET OFTWO-$45 EACH 352 527-8993 47 VHS TAPES. Childrens VHS tapes. Movies/TV shows. $30 takes them all. Call 352-563-2172 CARRYING CASE for Dell laptop, with extra cords, games, software, web cam,($20) 352-613-7493 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 PATIO UMBRELLA STAND 19x16high Off white metal. 35 lbs. Good Cond $20.00 352-527-9639 2 Stunning Dining Room Sets, 1 ) solid wood 54 round, 18 leaf, w/ cream color microfiber chairs $400. 1) Wicker glass top rectangular set 77 long 44 wide, 6 cushioned chairs $500. (970) 402-4280 mandb0971@att.net Brand New Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 BROYHILLCOUCH Excellent Condition.Off white w/periwinkle blue flowers. Comes from home with no pets, no-smoking and no children. Paid $950:Asking $200. Telephone 352-8600302 Inverness BUNK BED twin on top full size futon/fold up couch on bottom. $75.call melanie 352-650-7978 BUNK BEDSwood deluxe w/ built-in desk/book shelves. Staircase-not ladder.PD $1350, asking $675. Will email photos (352) 628-9963 CABINETS Two cottage style cabinets, one for computer, one for a TV. $200 Each (352) 527-8993

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D6SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER8,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 355-0908 SUCRN 9/13 Board of Directors Nominating Committee Meeting PUBLIC NOTICE A meeting of the Nominating Committee of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., will be held on Friday, September 13, 2013, at 11:30 am, in the Board room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the meeting is the selection of candidates for three (3) Board Director positions and one (1) candidate for an Advisory Board (non-voting) director. Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. September 8, 2013. 357-0908 SUCRN 9/12 Meeting CCAAB PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 12, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461. Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446. JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC : Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes) Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312. Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, September 8, 2013. 356-0908 SUCRN Elig. To Vote-McGuire PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address: Franklin S. McGuire 5974 W. Baghdad St Dunnellon, FL You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747. Susan Gill Citrus County Supervisor of Elections 120 N. Apopka Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle September 8, 2013 913-0914 MIX-CRN Workforce Connection PUBLIC NOTICE SEEKING OFFICE SPACE IN BETWEEN LECANTO AND INVERNESS Workforce Connection, a governmentally-funded organization is seeking approximately 3,500 sq ft or more of office space in Citrus County. Preferable locations would be in or in-between Lecanto and Inverness. Prefer office space with at least 4 private offices, room for additional cubicles (at least 12), break room, open resource area for customers, at least 4 bathrooms, conference room and computer lab. Must be ADA compliant. Need ample parking and occupancy beginning at end of December, 2013. Interested parties may send responses to: Val Hinson Workforce Connection 3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205 Ocala, FL 34474 352 873-7939, ext 1203 FAX: 352 873-7956 Email: vhinson@workforceconnectionfl.com Workforce Connection is an EOE Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, September 8-14, 2013. 0 0 0 8 X H A For more information on how to reach Citrus County Readers call 352-563-5592. FORD1999 Exp Eddie Bauer. 214K mi, good cond in /out, good tires $3800 obo(352) 794-3930 JEEP, Grand Cherokee low miles, V6, very clean $13,500. (352) 270-8221 NISSAN2010, Murano $4,995. 352-341-0018 DODGE1987 Ram charger 8 lift, auto, 35 Tires, no a/c $2,000 OBO/Trade 352-453-6005 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment DODGE2013 Grand Caravan Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs call Tom 352-325-1306 MAZDA1998 6 pass. van Select, all wheel, runs well, looks good first $1,475 (352) 637-2588 SUZUKI RM85-L2005 RM85-LRuns great. Basically new, Garage Kept. Started often, kept up. Less than 20 hours of use. Rare, last year/model they made 2 stroke dirtbikes. Comes with custom helmet. Also have gloves. $1,100.00 Contact 352-476-4181 HARLEYDAVIDSON2012 FLHTCUTG Tri Glide Ultra Classic AMFM/CD/AUX w/speakers; CC, Fairing Full,Alarm,Travel trunk w/rack, stage 2 screaming eagle high performance exhaust & pipes; ABS brakes, extra chrome accents. Excellent condition w/only 1250 mi. First $28.5K. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630. HONDA2006 Shadow Spirit 750 C2 (VT750C2) senior owned, a beauty of a bike, lowered, 14600 miles, orange, new tires, $3800. 352-503-2795 YAMAHA2012YAMAHASTAR 1700cc V-MAX With $2000. in V-Max Accessories.Adult owned!Garage kept & covered! Bought new.Only 3,400 Miles! Pictures available upon request.Extra Bonus includes a used in good conditionARAI helmet & a bike cover.$16,500.00 352-270-8424 CHEVY, Silverado 114k mi. motor. 4.8L, V8, looks & runs excel. $6500.,352-897-4347, (810) 577-4308 FORD1986 F350 REDUCED auto, crew cab, good work /hunting truck, 2wd, ac needs blower, $1500. call Doug (352) 212-8385 FORD1991 F150 V8, runs great, automatic, newer cobra tires no a/c, $1200. obo 422-6407 FORD, 250, Pwr. stroke DSL., 8ft. Kidron Refrigated box, Thermo king unit., $5,000 obo (352) 422-4548 NISSAN2012 Titan, 4DR, 3k mi. Loaded, wife cant drive it. $28,500 obo 772-370-9374 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB SV 20122012 Frontier CC SV: This white Nissan Frontier Crew Cab SV is in excellent condition with only 8,500 miles. It has cruise control, power windows/door locks/outside mirrors. It has a factory installed bed liner and I added a vinyl tri-fold bed cover and trailer hitch.The truck is in perfect condition with a full factory warranty.The asking price is $21,900. Phone: 352-601-1319 TOYOTA2007Tundra Dual Cab Metallic Blue V6 6bed with liner 86000 miles good condition $15000 352-382-4595 DODGE2005, Durango leather, navi $9,995. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 MAZDA2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed, 4-door, one owner, great condition, 141,000 miles $3,500. 352-860-2146 MERCURY, Grand Marquee, 104k miles, AC good, runs good, $1,600 (352) 249-7061 TOYOTA, Corolla, low miles, excel. cond. cruise control $8,500. (352) 628-1171 TOYOTA2010, Yaris $8,995 352-341-0018 Chevrolet2004 Corvette ConvertibleArctic White, torch red leather, polished aluminum wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $28,500 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET2009 CORVETTE COUPE Z51: Jetstream blue w/ebony int., 2LT, Auto w/PS, 340hp LS3 eng., only 9500 mi., car show winner, serious inquiries only, first $35K/OBO gets it. Lets talk @ 352-249-7630 PONTIAC, Grand LeMans, blue, 2 door, landeau top, 301, V8, AC, 71K mi., 2 owners, $4,800. (352) 341-3323 PORSCHE911, 959, Body Kit mtr, & Tranny good needs paint & inter restoration $12K Gas Monkey? (352) 563-0615 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 DODGE, 2500, Heavy Duty 4 x 4, quad cab, hemi magnum eng., 46K mi. $14,500, 352-419-6819 AFFORDABLEAutos & Trucks Dodge Ram 1500 $900 Down Chevy Cavalier $650 Down Pontiac Gr Prix $675 Down Dodge Caravan $795 DownCALL TED T ODA Y (352) 5 6 3 -1 9 0 2 1675 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, Fl BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2005, Colorado EX Cab, 20K miles, $11,495. 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHEVY, Impala, 144k miLES $7,000 (352) 726-7755 Dodge 2001 Caravanexcellent condition $3900.(352) 634-5665 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2005,Mustang $7,995. 352-341-0018 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 PUMA, 30 FT. 5th wheel $8,500 obo (352) 503-6455 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 5All Terrain Tires 31 x10.5 x 15 for Jeep 87-06 call Jack 352-220-9101 CHEVY15001998 Silverado Topper, 78 bed, white fiberglass, new struts on rear window $60.00 352-465-9026 PU Truck Bed Cover for 8ft, Bed, tilt top fiberglass w/ lock, perfect condition Asking $400. (352) 220-9787 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BOAT SLIP FOR RENT HOMOSASSA RIVER $125. mo. 352-220-2077 BOAT, MOTOR & trailer, $975. 14FT alum. Lund. deep V, 25HP elec. start, trolling motor, 2 anchors, depth finder, folding seats, life jackets. (352) 344-4690 PONTOON BOAT2003 Sun Tracker. 25 ft. Great running party/fishing boat! 130 hp Honda motor. Very Quite and great on gas! $10,500 352-697-3428 RIVERBOAT17 ft. completely rebuilt, shallow draft, wide beam $1250 Go Devil Engine 6.5 hp. New, $750. (352) 726-9647 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com CHEVY1998 40 FT Class A motor home, 22k miles, cost 90k, selling for 7k & some TLC (352) 563-0615 Gulf Stream 3105 GF 2008 5th Whl, toy hauler 33 ft, 5500 Onan Gen, gas pump, sleeps 7, many extras $29,925 call 352-843-8578 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NUWA, 5TH WHEEL, 36ft Long, $2,500. (352) 601-7911 ZOEYZoey, a 7-8 y.o. blue/white Terrier/ Bulldog mix, spayed and housebrkn. Came to the shelter after her family had to move and could not take her. She is sweet & exceptionally gentle, affectionate & beautiful. Likes other dogs & also children. Very playful. Weight about 60 lbs. Call Anne @ 352-586-2812. CANOES FOR SALE White water canoes: purple dagger legend 16 ft $150; Yellow water buffalo 16 ft $200; Red Mohawk solo 13ft $100; Light blue dagger caper solo 14 ft $100; Flat Water Canoes: White Mohawk Jensen solo 14 ft $300; Green Mohawk Aluminum 16 ft $100; 2 white water perception paddles $30 each, 4 kayak paddles $20 each. 6 extra sport panelled PFDs $25 each; Six person commercial white water raft $250; commercial electric air pump $40 Cash only. Call Capt. Vince (352) 690-7140 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** I wish to adopt a dog, male lab, light choc, or lab golden mix 6 yrs old well behave and trained. The perfect BOY or Tomboy 75 lbs, extremely loving, must be able to get along well with a female dog, should have smooth sleek fur. Please call me and leave message on voice mail (352) 746-3087 LOKIELokie, a 3-y.o. brown/white terrier mix male, weight about 65 lbs. Came to shelter d/t owners inability to keep him. Lokie is a shy, gentle, humble dog, easy to walk on leash, gets along w/other dogs, loves human friends. Eager to please. No cats. A beautiful dog, both physically and behavior-wise. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. PULLET CHICKS, GUINEAS $4up. Ameraucana, RIR, Barred Rock, Blk Star, Buff Orpington. Ducklings: $6.50 *Pekin, Cayuga, Buff. 727-517-5337 Brooksville Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male Miniature Poodles Small Mini 1 females (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS,Available RegisteredLots of Colors Males start @ $400. Females start @ $600. Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 BEAGLE PUPPIES$100 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 COCKER SPANIELS 4 Males, 2 Females w/ papers. 8 weeks old Blonde & white $800 (352) 287-0519 DojhaDojha, approx. 3 y.o., a yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, came to shelter because family lost their home & could not keep him. Gentle, easy-going, gets along w/other dogs, beautiful in color, great shape. Pen #25. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. LILLYLilly, approx. 6-y.o. female Bulldog mix, mostly white with black ears, a beautiful, friendly girl, heartworm-negative, housebrkn. Came to the shelter as a stray, weight 36 lbs. A very affectionate girl who wants to be by your side, loves treats & sits on command. Wants very much to be your companion. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 D7 G3T157 G3T175 $20,090 MSRP -600 NNFL DISCOUNT -1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH -1000 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH -500 FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH G3C114 $25,340 MSRP -1400 NNFL DISCOUNT -1000 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH -1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH -1000 FORD CREDIT RETAIL BONUS CASH -1000 RETAIL TRADE IN ASSISTANCE $ 19,940 $ 19,940 2013 F-150 2013 ESCAPE SE $26,360 MSRP -900 NNFL DICOUNT -500 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH -1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH -1000 FORD CREDIT $ 22,960 $ 22,960 2013 FOCUS $ 16,990 $ 16,990 2013 FUSION $22,695 MSRP -700 NNFL DISCOUNT -500 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH -500 FORD CREDIT RETAIL -1000 MATCHING DOWN CASH $ 19,995 $ 19,995 G3C116 STARTING FROM 2012 FORD FOCUS SEL Moon roof, 28,000 miles $17,950 2013 FORD MUSTANG GT 3,000 miles, 1 owner, leather $33,950 2005 FORD 500 Leather. $7,950 2009 BUICK ENCLAVE Moonroof, leather, loaded. $24,950 2007 MERCURY SABLE Leather. $9,950 2011 FORD FOCUS Economy Car. $12,950 2011 KIA SORENTO 4 cyl., economy SUV. $17,450 2012 HONDA CRV Moonroof, cloth interior. $23,950 2011 FORD FUSION 4 cyl., 21,000 miles. $17,950 2012 FORD ESCAPE 5 speed, std trans, 1 owner. $14,950 2011 FORD FOCUS $15,950 2005 FORD F150 LARIAT 5.4 L, leather.. $14,950 2005 FORD F150 TITAN 5.4 L. $11,950 NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER 2006 FORD 500 6 cyl. economy, cloth inerior. $9,950 2008 FORD MUSTANG CONV. 6 cyl., auto, 1 owner, leather. $17,950 2005 FORD F150 LARIAT Leather, 35,000 miles,5.4 L. $21,950 2005 FORD F550 LARIAT Diesel, 37,000 Miles $29,950 1992 CHEVY CORVETTE Leather, glass top convertible. $7,950 2005 CADILLAC CTS 47,000 miles, one owner. $10,950 2010 LINCOLN SIGNATURE Limited edition. $21,950 2010 HONDA ODYSSEY 29,000 miles, leather, moon roof. $22,950 2004 JEEP LIBERTY One owner, monroof, leather. $7,950 2008 FORD 3/4 TON SUPER DUTY 4X4 5.4L gas engine. $18,950 2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR 4X4 Leather, moonroof, all pwr access. $29,950 2010 LINCOLN MKT Navigation, 1 owner, back-up camera, moonroof. $31,950 Crystal River *Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures a re for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 8/31/13. Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371 Nick Nicholas S.R. 44 Crystal River Mall U.S. 19 U.S. 98 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Formerly Gulf Coast Ford Visit Us Online www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com Anna Cruz Salesperson of the Month 000G023 2006 FLAGSTAFF TRAVEL TRAILER 30, 2 slideouts $12,950 2007 LINCOLN MKX Moon roof, navication, AWD. $20,950 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 30,000 Miles. $16,950 2005 FORD EXPLORER SPORTTRACK Leather, moonroof, trailer tow package. $13,950 FEATURED RV OF THE WEEK FEATURED RV OF THE WEEK

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D8SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 352.527.0979 | 352.527.0129 New vehicles have an additional $299 fee for freight and shipping. Low Payment & Tech Package A Must see!$9,999* Ext Cab, LS, Loaded!$24,995* Crew Cab, Loaded!$21,995* Lonestar Edition C.C.!$16,995* Long Bed, Great for Work!$14,995* 40k miles and loaded up!!$17,995* 5.0 Liter, Great Ole Truck$3,595* Original Moms Taxi, Loaded!$7,995* The Big boyz toyz$8,995* Reliable & Safe, 3rd Row Seating!$10,995* Touring Edition, Cute!$7,995* Great, Gas Mileage$8,995* It Has Every Extra There Is!$16,995* Top of the Line & Reliable!$9,995* $3,995* Mean Streak, Manager Special! $4,499* Great Starter Bike! $6,699* Hard To Find Classic! $7,999* Ultra Rare, Priced to Sell! $5,995* Fast & The Furious $5,995* Low Miles, Like New! $4,995* Quick & Reliable $8,995* To Good to be True! $23,995* Designer for Cruising! 000FT7O 000G0G2 the bad boy! 24k miles this is all there$12,995* $6,999* Big Blue & Easy No Motorcycle license required$2,290* NEW NEW $6,899* light weight but tons of fun from $5,999* Rates As Low As 1.99%See Us & Save!See Us First. See Us Last. $50GAS CARD Get a Just for mentioning this ad with the purchase of any new or preowned bike or truck. Join The Fun! Great work truck and good on gas $13,699* 4x4 C.C., Why Buy New! $29,999* 5 Speed, A/C, 4x4$13,999*

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ON THE COVER:LAVALAMPSTURN50, E8HOME AND GARDEN:MAKEYOUROWNSIGNS, E9REAL ESTATE:SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS HOMEFRONT Section ESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLEREALESTATEGUIDE INSIDESikorskis AtticPAGE E6E16SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000FZ58 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Email: info@citruscountycentury21.com www.citruscountycentury21.com SALES 352-726-6668 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OPEN SUNDAY SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR OVER 37 YEARS. CRYSTAL OAKS HOME 2 bedrooms/2 baths/2 car garage. Screenedlanai with partially fenced yard. Clubhouse andpool availability. MLS #700999 $90,300 Terry R. Blanco 352-419-9252 HOW MUCH IS YOUR HOME WORTH? Call Today For A Free Market Analysis! STUNNING CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT HOME Spacious 4bed/2.5bath/6 car garage! 5,500 sq. ft. total 3,700 sq. ft. living. Heated saltwater pool and boat lift included. GREAT BUY $459,000 AND LOOKING FOR OFFERS. MLS #703130 Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699 3BR, 2 bath, 2 car gar P ool, fenced, 2 lots, shed MLS #704237 $205,500 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com CAREFREE LIVING . Pool, boat ramp, Rails to Trails all surround this 2 bedroom 2 bath villa. Close to town, breakfast nook, fully equipped kitchen, porch and more. MLS #704425 $45,000 Call Doris Miner @ 352-422-4627 OLD FLORIDA WATERFRONT 1.8 Acs. on Lake Henderson, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage. Home has newer roof, windows, hurricane shutters, workshop, newer dock & seawall. MLS #705082 $285,000 Call Brad Gibbs 212-5286 to see this lovely waterfront home PRIME COMMERCIAL PROPER TY ON HWY 19 10,5 26 SF CBS professional cente r 2.97 Ac res zoned high intensity commercial 200 +/F t on Hwy. 1 9 High visibility with Ingress and Egr ess on 19. City w ater and sewe r Develope rs and inv estors welcome MLS # 7 051 38 OFFERED A T ONLY $5 90,000 Call Elias G. Kirallah, Broker A ssociate for more info at 352-400-2635 BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 IN CRYSTAL GLEN This 2003 move-in ready home features a cathedral ceiling, large dining area, his & hers closets, and an enclosed porch. MLS #705106 ONLY $129,900 Call Stefan Stuart 352-212-0211 GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY Spacious 3/2/2 with family room, nook for casual dining plus formal dining room, screened porch/lanai. Tile flooring LR, DR, family & kitchen. Bedrooms newly carpeted. Fenced backyard with storage building. City water separate well for irrigation. Located just minutes from downtown. MLS #702373 ASKING $144,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View listing: www.c21patdavis.com AFFORDABLE WATERFRONT T his home features great room with stone fireplace and bar/entertainment area N ewer roof H/AC and exterior paint S eller has done it all here so buyer can just relax and enjoy fishing from the dock or boating on the lake Q uiet neighborhood with easy access to both I nverness and O cala A ssumable VA mtg MLS #704838 ASKING $119,900 Pat Davis 352-212-7280 V iew listing: www.c21patdavis.com A MUST SEE BEAUTIFUL, TRADITIONAL HOME SITUATED IN-TOWN ON 1.41 ACRE HOMESITE. 3/2.5/2+ F eatures great room with fireplace, large sunny Fla. room, updated kitchen with stainless and granite. Formal dining room plus nook for casual dining. Wrap around porch. Finished attic offers lots of storage or potential for extra room. 10 foot ceilings. Spacious master with jetted tub & shower. 5 minutes to shopping, downtown, hospital. MLS #704772 ASKING $249,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 See all listings: www.c21patdavis.com Quiet County Home 1.16 acre w/extra detached workshop Updated bathrooms and kitchen, needs roof 2/2/2 with den, deck, porches decking fam. rm. MLS #705100 $75,000 Short Sale Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com I N VER NESS GOL F & COUN TR Y CLUB 55+ Community gated Beautiful 3/2/2, 1,735 sq. ft. LA 2 porches Florida landscaping E asy to maintain & enjoy Move-in ready MLS#703863 $108,900 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.CitrusCountySold.com RIGHT OUT OF BETTER HOMES AND G ARDENS C ustom home with Coast al, Key West flair. This 3/3.5 home featur es wr ap around porches, master suite on main floor. 2 upstairs suites with priv ate baths and dens. Picturesque c row s nest at 3rd floor lev el with views of w ater front and surrounding 1.89 acr es. Spacious, well equipped kitchen, living room with fir eplace and dining ar ea ove rlooking private, se rene backy ard. Near 46 mile bik e tr ail. I-75 access approx. 30 minu tes. MLS #357 269. This exceptional home is priced to sell at $318,900 Pa t Da vis (352) 2 12-7 280 View all listings at www.c21pa tdavis.com ALL THE W ORK IS DONE! The y ardwork, that is! Sparkling 2/2/2 fr eest anding classy home in the Moorings, with r ear scr een room, per fect for gazing at the lov ely, cur ving canal: a real balm to the eyes! MLS #7 01 409 REDUCED TO $11 9,900 A sk for Tim Dono van 220-0328 MOVE-IN READ Y 3/2 MOBILE ON OVER 3 ACRES! F eatures new carpe t and paint, w orkshop and carport $5 9,900 for home on 3 ac res or $49,000 for mobile home and 1 ac re. Call Quade F eeser 352-302-7 699 INVERNESS HIGHLANDS BEAUTY Mov e-in ready well maintained 3 bdrm/2 bath/2 car gar age home with almost 1 800 sq. ft of living space. R oof & AC replaced in 2 007 Corner lot Great location close to rest aurants, hospit al, shopping & more. MLS #7 03805 ASKING $82,000 Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-808 72/3 52-726-6668 INVERNESS HOME 3BR/2 bath with 2 car gar age. Beau tiful w ood cabinets & SS app liances in kitchen. All window s feature Plantation shut ters. MLS #7 05060 $105,000 Lorraine O Regan 586-007 5 A TOUCH OF HOLL YW OOD! S et back from the str eet you will find this one a site featuring a spacious, deluxe 3/3.5/2 home with large scr eened lanai and pool comp lete with ou tdoor kitchen and bath, just one of the many delightful featur es of this Citrus Hills home. MLS #356669 R eady for an offe r at $249,000 Ask for Marilyn B ooth 637-490 4 2 Bedroom, 2 bath, Florida room 1/3 Acr e fenced, priv ate backyard All app liances, new roof Pleasant Grov e School District MLS #7 05067 $1 10,000 Jeanne o r Willard Pickrel 2 12-34 10 www .CitrusCountySold.com NEW LISTING GA TED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY Special of fer on your choice of 1 0 acr e parcels in deed r estricted subdivision near the Withlacoochee St ate Forest for your tr ail riding pleasur e. Cleared and in matur e pasture with scat ter ed trees and pa ved roads aw aiting your dream farm. $9 5,000 Call Jim Morton at 352-422-21 73 for your personal tour of Emerald Hills 3 1 BEAUTIFUL ACRES with 1 004 feet of highw ay front age and central w ater and sewe r. This stunning parcel has w onder ful vistas for your enjoyment and is centr ally located for convenience. MLS #353869 $850,000 Call Jim Mor ton at 352-422-2 173 to tour this slice of paradise TARAWOOD REDUCED NEW LISTING SHOR T SALE Associated PressAnthony Voz, lava lamp expert and collector, poses Aug. 19 in a shop in London with some of the lava lamps in his collection. The lava lamp, an iconic piece of British design and social trends, is celebrating its 50th birthday.

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Burnham points out that these bulbs popularity may not last, so its probably impractical to invest in too many lamps or fixtures that look good only with them. Another vintage option is the globe light that first appeared in the 1950s. Their milky white finish and perfectly round shape can cast a flattering glow, Flynn says. Another option: vintage Nelson pendants, which are made of wire and vinyl in many shapes and sizes. FORGET OLD RULES Dont feel obligated to use the lampshade that comes with a lamp, Burnham says. You can replace it with another of similar size but a different shape, style or color. Or keep the shade but add piping or ribbon to change its look. Another bit of rule-breaking: Chandeliers should not be limited to living rooms and dining rooms, says Flynn. I use them in bathrooms a lot simply to bring more of a decorative look to an otherwise task-oriented space. His trick for making chandeliers appear less formal? Swap out flame bulbs for globes. It modernizes an otherwise traditional, heavy element. Dimmers, too, arent just for dining rooms. The designers suggest adding dimmers in every room of the home. Installation is easy enough that you may want to do it yourself, Luetkemeyer says, and its a complete game changer in how the home is lit. Also, consider using a floor lamp as a bedside reading lamp. Many floor lamps have bulbs that sit between 4 and 6 feet above the floor perfect for illuminating a book when youre propped up in bed and they take up little space. LIGHTING AS ART Some lamps come with warning labels advising owners to use only low-wattage bulbs. Think of these lamps more as accessories than true light sources, says Flynn. One of the most practical ways to employ accent lamps is as night lights, he says. Many times, Ill add a few to a built-in so the wall becomes somewhat of a dramatic feature at night. I think accent lamps offer a great opportunity to play with color and texture. Luetkemeyer agrees: Think of low-wattage lamps almost as sculpture, she says. Flynn takes that approach with the Astro pendant light made by Crystorama. He has used it several times to add beauty and style to entryways. It works well with just about every style interior, he says, and you can install just one or group several together for more drama. Sculptural lighting fixtures often work well when installed in groups of odd numbers. BETTER BULBS Once youve chosen the right lighting, its important to select the right bulbs. Along with Edison-style bulbs, silver-tipped bulbs are becoming popular. Their ends are painted so that little or no light escapes there. The result is softer, more indirect light. Luetkemeyer likes frosted bulbs and soft pink ones, and she favors three-ways bulbs for the same reason she loves dimmers: They let you choose soft light when you want it and bright light when you need it. Progress is being made in making compact fluorescent bulbs that give off warmer, more appealing light, but many now on the market produce a cold, blue-tinged light.Melissa Rayworth writes lifestyles stories for The Associated Press. Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter. com/mrayworth. Strawn tops $1M in salesWaybright Real Estate is pleased to announce that Rose Strawn, Realtor, has surpassed $1 million in real estate sales for the year. Strawn has been with Waybright Real Estate for more than two years and has proven to give outstanding customer service. She has resided in the area for most of her life and has a vast background in real estate. Call her at 352-795-1600.Pair reach multimillion statusWith more than $2 million in closed sales volume this year, Martha Sather and Dawn Wright have qualified for the elite Multi-Million Dollar Club. Both Sather and Wright are agents with RE/MAX Realty One in Citrus County. Sather works out of the Central Ridge office in Lecanto and Wright is an agent in the Crystal River office on U.S. 19. Sather and Wright are seasoned agents in this area who specialize in residential real estate. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E15 E2SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 2421 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 8375 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 628-7800 1101 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Inverness 637-6200 504 NE Hwy. 19, Crystal River 795-2441 www. REMAX .com www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net 1 Buyer calls exclusive 24/7 Info Line 637-2828 2 Buyer enters house number when prompted 3 Buyer listens to property presentation in English or Spanish 24/7 INFO LINE 637-2828 HERES HOW: REALTY ONE LIVE THE DREAM! Master with Huge Walk-In 2.8 Acres 2/2/2+ Office/Den Very Nice Bath Very Quiet Area Nice Tasteful Decor Fully-Fenced/Very Private Boat/RV Park.! VIEW OF LAKE TAHOE! Lovely Kit. w/Wood Cabs. 3/2/2 Split Plan Nice Enclosed Porch Cozy Gas Fireplace All Neutral Tones Ceramic & Carpet Floors Minutes to Rivers/Gulf Close to Downtown ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR ENJOY THE RELAXING POOL! 3/2.5/2 Split Plan Leaded Glass Entryway Lots of Tile/Laminate Nice Pool Pavers Upgraded Windows Fabulous Master Security System! Plenty of Privacy! ALAN IVORY 352-302-9781 Email: TheIvoryTeam@yahoo.com 12897 N. EDGEW ATER DR., DUNNELL ON Beautiful home on Withlacoochee River with over 100 feet of water frontage. Spacious architects property with 18 foot high open woodbeam great room on two lots, many mature cypress trees, screened pool (pool has large concrete decking area 60 x 45), boat house (3 boat slips), jet ski dock, extensive screened porch areas with impressive river views. Gourmet custom kitchen, built-in appliances with granite counter tops, and center island with Jenn-Air cooktop/grill. Fishing from your own dock. Back-up generator with LP tank for emergency power. (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1229 MLS #702600 $229,900 $229,900 $229,900 L ECANTO INVERNESS (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5366 MLS #703151 $149,900 $149,900 $149,900 INVERNESS (352) 637-2828 Enter house #2907 MLS #703620 $129,000 $129,000 $129,000 5989 N. ORCHIS TER. PINE RIDGE 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath Office or Den Many Extras 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #5989 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 MLS #700023 $329,000 $329,000 $329,000 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 4749 N. PERRY DR. PINE RIDGE 3BD/2BA/2CG w/ POOL Private 1.5 Acre Lot Many Upgrades, Granite Roof (2008), A/C (2010) Solar-Heated POOL Fully-Fenced Pastures MLS #703529 $239,900 $239,900 $239,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #4749 OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11AM-3PM 000FZ59 DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 Email: djmfl@yahoo.com CRY STAL RIVER! 2 BE DR OO M 1 BATH S IN GLEWID E WI TH LARG E SCR EE N PORCH 2 -C AR CA RPO RT 2 SHEDS D EA D-END STRE ET, I MMAC UL ATE. MLS #703028 $35,000 $35,000 $35,000 OAK RIDGE UPDATED BEAUTY!!! 3 BR, 2 BATH 2-Car Garage w/Screen GRANITE Counters Roof Shingles 2010 Carrier HVAC 2010 1,823 Sq. Ft. Living Extended Screened Lanai Community Pool 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #6214 MLS #704337 $139,900 $139,900 $139,900 SHOW ME THE MONEY!! YOU WONT FIND A NICER PROPERTY IN MEADOWCREST!! Extremely well-kept doesnt even begin to describe this home. Interior features includes two master suites, separate living room/family rooms, inside laundry, upgraded kitchen, new flooring and large enclosed patio. Master bath boasts dual sinks, walk-in closet and huge walk in shower. Property is ideally located next to community clubhouse with two large pools overlooking park-setting. DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com MLS #700989 $129,900 $129,900 $129,900 ABSOLUTELY SPECTACULAR CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net COME T AKE A LOOK at this nice 3/2/2 in Inverness Highlands. Great family neighborhood, close to everything Inverness has to offer. Split bedroom plan, tiled throughout, updated guest bathroom, shady lot. $82,900 $82,900 $82,900 MLS #R701839 REDUCED AGAIN SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com 5 GYPSOPHILA CT. MAGNIFICENT 2005 SWEETWATER 3 En Suite Baths Cul-De-Sac Lot 3 1/2-Car Garage 3-Zone HVAC Salt System Pool 18 Tile & Hardwood SEE THIS ONE BEFORE ITS GONE! $269,900 $269,900 $269,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5 CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM (352) 637-6200 Email: kcunningham@remax.net INVERNESS HIGHLANDS 3/2/2 on .77 Acres 13 X 18 Living Room Family Room w/Fireplace Kitchen w/All Appliances 22 X 7 Screen Room Storage Shed Washer & Dryer Nice Trees, Lots of Privacy MLS #704953 $78,500 $78,500 $78,500 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #1003 B ILL D ECKER 352-464-0647 S USAN M ULLEN 352-422-2133 V ICTORIA F RANKLIN 352-427-3777 000FZOC Terms 6 Months or More Social Membership included with all Rentals Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING IN GATED GOLF COMMUNITY! Meticulously maintained 2 bed room, 2 baths, 2-car garage detached villa on beautifully landscaped cul-de-sac lot in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Screened entry to this villa with a spacious open floor plan, Kitchen has eat-in dining area and breakfast bar. Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are handicapequipped. The sliders to the large rear lanai offer a view of a green expansive lawn. Plenty of room for a pool. Home is ready for you to move right in. Enjoy the Citrus Hills Country Club Membership lifestyle with this home. Hurry this villa value will not last long. MLS 705084 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $124,900 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Come savor the best of Florida. Conveniently located near the main entrance of Terra Vista. Well-maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage plus den. A totally open floor plan with a triple sliding door that takes you to the pavered lanai with a great hedge in back for extra privacy. Located on a street with very little traffic. MLS 702296 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,900 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS This lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is the ideal place for any occasion, whether seasonal use, retirement, or full-time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what youve been looking for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoy the social life that comes with the social membership! MLS 703807 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $288,000 SPECTACULAR 3/3/5 with gorgeous Golf Course view in premiere country club community of Terra Vista. Home has all of the upgrades of a custom home including a 12x24 pool, gas fireplace, built-in entertainment center, upgraded maple cabinets, upgraded stainless steel appliances, crown moldings and double-glazed insulated windows/sliders, tray ceilings, tile floors and more, plus one-of-a-kind, additional 2nd garage with expanded area for workshop, special car or boat. In prestigious condition, this a beautiful home, with great room design. CH Membership required. MLS 357110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $469,000 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS Light bright and open describe this fabulous golf course home. Inside you have lots of room with upgrades such as Corian countertops, dual pane windows, energy efficient radiant barrier. Nice neutral colors complement this model. You will fall in love with the views from your oversized lanai which overlooks a Koi Pond with waterfall. The backdrop is a lushes landscape of Majestic Oaks and greenery. Located in a maintenance-free section of Terra Vista. MLS 702401 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $291,000 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS 2 bedroom with den model home with everything upgraded! 12x24 salt water pool solarheated with water fall. 10 ft. ceilings. 8 ft. inside doors. T ray ceiling in master bedroom w/his & hers closets. D ouble sink w/jacuzzi tub. C rown moulding through-out. D en with hardwood floors. I sland sink & bar in kitchen. T op-of-the-line whirlpool, refrigerator, dishwasher, confection microwave, and gas stove with grill top. U pgraded cabinets, tankless water heater. L ocated at the end of a cul-de-sac. M ature landscaping with many palm trees. MLS 704233 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $234,900 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Malibu model 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage. 14 x 28 self cleaning POOL w/pavers in the lanai. Kitchen features wood cabinets. Laundry room w/sink, wood cabinets & washer/dryer. All appliances included. Great room opening to kitchen & nice-sized dining area. Lots of neutral ceramic tile. MLS 703945 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $199,000 BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR Beautiful townhouse in Brentwood! 2 bedroom/ 2.5 bath/1-car garage. Maple cabinets & Corian counters in kitchen, screened porch. Private community pool & club amenities!! Live the DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS Lovely immaculate home in Brentwood. Open floor plan includes 2 bedrooms with a den. Beautifully furnished with modern tones. Includes large eat-in kitchen, flat screen TV, kingsized bed in master, desk area in den with a pull-out sofa and much more. Social Club Membership included. #1216 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR SOUTHGATE VILLAS Detached villa in Terra Vista. 2 bedrooms, 2 bath with a den. Fully furnished, ready to move into. Enjoy maintenance-free living. Social membership included. #3322 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Luxurious unfurnished home in Terra Vista for rent. Formal living areas with a spacious open family room. Upgraded SS appliances with a gas stove and granite countertops in this gourmet kitchen. Social Club Membership included. #1245 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800 EXCEPTIONAL AND FABULOUS describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath, 2-car, 5,375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen-great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. #5375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,300 Florida lifestyle!! MLS 702289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $92,900 DIGEST GUIDE News notes submitted without photos will not be reprinted if the photo is provided later. Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront. Digest photos are kept on file for future use. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for space and/or clarity. Real EtateDIGEST Dawn WrightRE/MAX Realty One. Marth SatherRE/MAX Realty One. LAMPSContinued from Page E14 ON THE NET http://mdesignla.com/ www.burnhamdesign.com/ http://flynnsideout.com/

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LEEREICH Associated PressI want more lilies. A lot more. And I mean true lilies (Lilium spp.) rather than daylilies (Hemerocallis spp.). Casa Blanca is the variety that has put me in such a state. Its large, white petals flare out into trumpets, from whose frilly throats poke groups of rust-red anthers and single tear-capped stigmas. The heady fragrance from just one cut spray of blossoms can perfume a good portion of any home. Sure, I could just plunk down some money and order more Casa Blanca and other lilies. But part of the fun of gardening is making new plants, and even a single lily plant offers a few avenues to this goal.SEEDS OFFER CHALLENGEIt might seem that the most straightforward way is to let seeds develop and then plant them. Lily seed germination is not, however, all that straightforward. The seeds might germinate in as little as a couple of weeks or as long as 18 months. In the latter case, the plants first form small, underground bulblets, usually after a period of cool temperatures, before any sign of life appears above ground. Flowering from seed takes from two to four years. Another wrinkle to seed sowing is that seedlings of lily varieties or hybrids will not be the same as their parents. They may be better, they may be worse, but theyll be different.DIG AND MULTIPLYLilies are easy to multiply by just digging up and dividing clumps as they age. This time, the offspring do mimic their parents exactly. Wait until fall or spring to divide lilies, but dont expect to get too many new plants out of a clump.BULBILS AND BULBLETSSome lilies form little bulbs along their stems. Above ground, these small bulbs, now called bulbils, appear where leaves meet stems. Flick them off and plant them shallowly. Little bulbs that form along stems below ground are called stem bulblets. Collect these, taking care to preserve any roots clinging to them as soon as the stems and leaves begin to wither. Plant them immediately, before they dry out, a couple of inches deep. Expect bulbils or bulblets to form flowers that look just like their parents in one to three years. Bulbils and stem bulblets are easy ways to propagate lilies, but only a few cultivated lilies form them. Still, it is possible to coax a lily that does not normally make bulbils or stem bulblets to do so. Some lilies form them in response to nothing more than having their flower buds pinched out before they open. Others need a bit more coaxing in the form of having their stems shortened by a half after the pinching. Yet another approach is to pinch off flower buds and then wrench the stem from the bulb, leaving the bulb in the ground. Lay the liberated stem in a trench and shoots will emerge along it, hopefully studded with bulbils.FOR THE MOST, SCALE THEMScaling is the final method Ill mention for making new lilies, lots and lots of them. Sometime in the next few weeks, dig up a lily bulb, remove some of the plump, firm, outer scales, and put them into a plastic bag along with plenty of moist perlite or sand. Keep the bag in the dark at room temperature for about six weeks or until bulblets form at the bases of the scales. After that period, put the bag in a refrigerator for at least eight weeks, after which each bulblet can be potted up to grow. Three years later, youll have flowers oodles of them! CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E3 000g13p Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700 REALTY, INC. CAROLE LISTER Multi-Million Dollar Realtor 27 DOG WOOD DR 2/2/2 V illa New flooring New Granite New cupboards New roof New interior paint #703312 $99,000 www.lister listings.com Never Forget Their Sacrifice OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY, Sept. 8, 2013 1:00-3:00 PM 31 Masters Drive S 3/2/2 villa 3 skylights Hardwood floors Corian Newer appliances Lawn maintenance #702308 $137,900 11 Byrsonima Loop W 2/2/2 villa Community pool Florida room Eat-in-kitchen 2 Porches Lawn maintenance #704142 $138,500 E14SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Peacock Ginger, Kaempferiapulchera, grows one leaf (6 inches) high and is used as a ground cover in dense shade. The broad, attractive leaves have markings of silver. A variety with bronze-green leaves is sometimes available. The large oval leaves emerge in May in Zone 8b earlier further south lasting until December frosts reach them beneath their protective canopy trees. By July the plants have a succession of pale lavender, four-petaled flowers that last only a day. Gingers grow from underground rhizomes. Peacock Gingers have little rhizomes the size of a pea and spread well in humus-rich soil. I divide and pot up clumps in fall. Lay the rhizomes 3 inches apart in a shallow trough about 3 to 4 inches deep amended with lots of decayed humus but also enough sand for good drainage. A scattering of shed oak leaves works as a decorative top mulch and winter frost protection. The leaves die off but the trailside beds still look good all year long. Jane Weber is a professional gardener and consultant. Semi-retired, she grows thousands of native plants. Visitors are welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion County, garden. For an appointment, call 352-249-6899 or contact her via email at JWeber12385@gmail.com. GARDENContinued from Page E7 How to turn your lilies into more lilies Associated PressLily bulblets form from scaling in November 2011 in New Paltz, N.Y. Little bulbs that form along stems below ground are called stem bulblets. Collect these stem bulblets, taking care to preserve any roots clinging to as soon as the stems and leaves begin to whither. Plant them immediately, before they dry out, a couple of inches deep. Ask a Designer: Tips on lighting a room well MELISSARAYWORTH Associated PressYour choice of lighting has a huge impact on how your home looks and feels. But how do you choose when the options include everything from retro Edison-style bulbs with glowing filaments to compact fluorescents, plus lamps and fixtures in every shape and size? Lamps are one of the most important factors in a rooms design, says designer Brian Patrick Flynn of Flynnside Out Productions. Yet homeowners often give lighting less attention than they do furniture or wall colors. Here, Flynn and designers Betsy Burnham of Burnham Design and Molly Luetkemeyer of M. Design Interiors share tips on choosing the perfect lamps, lampshades and light bulbs to achieve maximum style and function. OVERHEAD AND EYE-LEVEL If a room has no overhead lighting or wall sconces, these designers say its worth hiring an electrician to add them. Flynn recommends using 2-inch or 4-inch recessed halogen lights overhead, rather than brighter 6inch can lights. They instantly fill a room with the much-needed illumination, he says, but without looking tacky or heavy. Wall sconces also cast a flattering glow, and can serve as striking decorative pieces. Vintage (or new vintage-style) sconces are popular, says Burnham, and can be found at some flea markets. If you buy them used, take them to a lamp shop to check all the wiring, she says, and replace any worn parts before installing. But dont light a room exclusively with overhead lighting: Light from above that isnt balanced by lamplight can be prison-like, Luetkemeyer says. It casts a bunch of shadows and makes you look like a cadaver. Instead, create pools of light at different levels for a warm, layered effect, she says. GO RETRO Edison-style bulbs have become popular, and look great in industrial or vintage light fixtures or in chandeliers. But they can cost as much as $15 per bulb and give off minimal light. So use them as sculptural features integrated into lighting, Flynn says. Since theyre offered in many shapes, theyre almost like art. The ideal place for Edison bulbs is romantic spaces which are not hightraffic. For example, a chandelier above a bed in a master suite with Edison bulbs is ideal, since the room is not task-related and is meant for being sleepy and moody. See LAMPS / Page E15 LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY 000FZ57 311 W. Main St., Inverness 352-726-5263 www.landmarkinverness.com WHOA NELL Y! Check out this bank owned Forest Lake 2/2 with 1,749 living, 2.5 AC, $84,900 Fm & Liv Rms, Fireplace, 2 car det gar scr porch. #705123. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. WHEN YOU NEED IT ALL... here it is... covered R V bar n, 2+car garage/workshop, fully fenced 1 plus AC water front. Private location. 2007 mobile, 1783 living, 3/2 & porches galore. #704786. Asking $126,000 THIS DEAL IS AS SWEET as a glass of souther n ice tea! Sugar mill Woods 2/2/1 V illa w/ new flooring & paint, ONLY $59,900! #702098. T omika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. ST AGGER ON OVER to this Super Duper buy on Staggerbush, $59,900! MOVE IN READY 1987 2/2/2 with 1,278. New paint & flooring, living & family rooms, screen porch! #702847. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. COME A P ACKIN... with your SUITCASES cuz I have one BANGING good buy! Citr us Hills 1988 3/2/2 $134,900! New flooring, paint, AC, appliances... T ake a peek! 216 Highview #703591. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. FORGET THE POT O GOLD! This Fantastic 2000 3/2 DW with 2280 living on 1 AC, was dropped at the end of this rainbow! Remodeled & move-in ready! #703395. 6110 Coronado. $79,900! Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. LIKE A BREA TH OF FRESH AIR... NO NOT REALL Y... This bank-owned fixer upper needs some air fresheners & some work! 1960 2/1 with 1078 living. #703858. 89 CR 494. T omika Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598. HAPPY HOUR! 2 houses for the price of 1... 1985 2/2/1 w/1,644 living + a 1987 2/2 Singlewide with 924 living tucked on 1 AC, Inver ness! #703165. 2966 Buck. $64,900 Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. BAM!... NO FLUFF! Just look at it, love it & buy it! This 2006 4/2/2 with 2238 will sell itself! #703375. 8036 Sarazen. $104,900. T omika Spires-Hanssen 352586-6598. OUTSTANDING VALUE! 2/2/1 Sugarmill W oods villa, immaculate & move-in ready. Priced to sell at $76,700 5 Dogwood Dr ., # 704290. Debbie T annery 352-613-3983. WHY JUST COME TO VISIT when you can own a great villa in Royal Oaks at an amazing price? End unit, 2/2, screened porch, car garage. Across from pool & clubhouse. ONLY $79,435. #703803 F ANTASTIC FIND $159,000 Pine Ridge 4/3.5/2 Formal living & dining, family room, caged pool. Needs TLC. 3895 W Catalpa #705183 Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 AMAZING CUSTOM HOME $120,000 3/2/2 plus carpor t, fenced 1/2 acre. Gour met kitchen, granite & stainless. MUST SEE. 5783 N Kline #703517 Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 HERNANDO OPEN W ATERFRONT 2/2fully remodeled. Granite, hardwood, boat dock, bi-level dock. Very pretty. What!! ONLY ... $88,500 #704263 Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 GET YOUR OTHER HALF OUTT A THE HOUSE & working on a project! Ginor mous Bank-owned home with 1993 living, 1 AC, $69,900 #701736. 5555 Leonard. T omika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. NOT A TYPO! Sugar mill Woods 3/2/2 with 2,390 living For YES YES YES $89,900! #702925. 78 Douglas. T omika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. LOOKS ARE EVER YTHING! Stunning & elegant Sugar mill Woods 3/2/2 with pool, many upgrades. $184,880. 2 Speceberr y Ct. S., # 704291. Debbie T annery 352-613-3983. REDUCED 000G0VQ EXIT Realt y Leaders 201 3 201 3 201 3 201 3 The Wade Team 352-7 94-0888 352-527 -11 12 ***Foreclosur e List*** 2/1 in Y ankeetown 704923 $26,000 3/1 Handymans Delight in Beverly Hills 705153 $41,550 Cozy 2/1/1 in Beverly Hills 704381 $49,900 Immaculate 3/2/1 on half an acre 705068 $82,900 Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs 705093 $99,900 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen 704264 $124,900 3/2/2 on over an acre 705142 $124,900 Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on an acre 705087 $149,900 Custom built 3/3/3 on 1.11 acre 705148 $235,000 Spectacular 3/3.5/3 pool home in Sugarmill on double lot 704938 $349,900 Desirable Brentwood Estates 3/2/2 detached villa 704862 $119,900 Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 mobile on 1 acre 704257 $22,900 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres 704781 $38,000 Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over two acres! 705223 $89,900 The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD. Jason Gaffney Realtor 287-9022 302-3179 746-6700 Jackie Gaffney Realtor 000G05C wesellrealestatefast@yahoo.com A HOUSE SOLD Name! Get Excited!! New Completely remodeled ready to move your Business in. Roof 4/13, A/C 6/13, Paint in and out 13 flooring 13. Circuit breaker, cabinets, appliances, all 2013. Handicap parking. Everything is ready to go!! COMMERCIAL, BEVERLY HILLS 5 S. MELBOURNE

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or pass then on in the family. Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-can. There is quite a bit of information about the Willet Company online. If you Google the name you will find some conversation among interested parties. Dear John: Can you tell me anything about this tray, it was my great grandmothers. I found a marking that says Warwick made in Canada, a square with EB, then a triangle with NS inside. Can you tell me anything about it? Y.S., Internet Dear Y.S.: Your tray is a liner or base for a compote. I think it was made during the first two decades of the 20th century. There is no specific collector interest. Potential dollar value is catchas-catch-can. Dear John: I have an old Arvin AM radio and two AM Motorola handheld radios. Do you have any information on these? I have attached photos. J.B., Internet Dear J.B.: Transistor radios are a category of collector interest. Most were made in Japan from the late 1950s to 1966 and in Hong Kong from 1964 to 1970. They are fun to collect and generally very affordable. Highest prices paid are for the figural transistor radios that were made for various television shows, e.g. Flash Gordon, etc. For restoration, parts and more, check out Radio Relics at its website www.clge.com. The two you have would likely sell in the $10 to $20 range each. Dear John: I have what must have been a 12-piece place setting of Limoges china. The pattern is Blois. It is missing a few pieces, but has assorted serving dishes, as well. Where would be a good, honest source for information about the value? Also how does one go about selling something like this? M.J., InternetDear M.J.: Limoges, France is a town where there are numerous china manufacturers. The Haviland Brothers of New York set up a factory in Limoges in the 19th century to manufacture china. They produced huge quantities of china that was shipped to America and sold thru various retailers. They continue business into current times. There is no specific collector interest in your china. Dollar value is relative to interest in the china pattern replacement market place. The pattern Blois by Haviland, from what I can tell, is a low-demand pattern. I suggest you contact Replacements Ltd. in Greensboro, N.C., at 800REPLACE. Good luck. John Sikorski has been a professional in the antiques business for 30 years. He hosts a call-in radio show, Sikorskis Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorskis Attic, P.O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or asksikorski@aol.com.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E13 E4SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 0008SQK CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 000FZ53 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450 and Century 21 Real Estate Corporation Equal Housing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED KAREN E. MORTON (352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595 TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 Hall of Fame Centurion Member E-mail: kemorton@tampabay.rr.com Website: karenemorton.com CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE BOLD & BEAUTIFUL ONLY THE BEST IN THIS HOME 3900 sq. ft. Executive Estate home on 5 pristine acres. Leaded glass door entry. Top-of-the-line Chefs Kitchen w/ beautiful seamless glass dinette overlooking a tranquil setting. Spacious rooms. Elegant master suite w/8x10 closet, custom bookcase. Gorgeous master bath w/dual showers, 6 jetted tub, 2 designer vanities. Large lanai w/pavers. 3+garage. Separate 10x14 workshop. Granite, marble, tile, custom cabinets. Upgrades galore. MLS #701113 $296,900 FAIRVIEW ESTATES 3BR, 2BA, 2-CAR GARAGE, full acre on a cul-desac. Eat-in Kitchen Formal Dining Great Room Glass Doors to Pool Area Outdoor Fireplace Area Perfect for Your Florida Lifestyle. MLS #705095 $174,900 CHASSAHOWITZKA Quiet neighborhood in Chassahowitzka just off US 19 4 bedroom, 2 bath open kitchen split bedrooms wood deck on front and rear of home Affordable Family Home Nearby boat ramp close to shopping MLS #705176 $65,000 INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH ** SWIMMING POOL PLUS WORKSHOP/2ND GARAGE Mrs. Clean lives here Spotless 2 bedroom home with den/office both bedrooms are suites Huge master bedroom 20 x 15 endless storage everywhere Bright and Cheery kitchen all newer appliances Florida Room Oversized caged in-ground swimming pool 2 car garage on home PLUS detached 2 car garage for vehicles or workshop RV parking area This home is move-in ready!! Convenient to Inverness. MLS #704557 $159,900. GOSPEL ISLAND GARDEN OF EDEN SURROUNDS YOUR HOME!! 2 BR, 2 BA Den PLUS office Pottery Barn kitchen top of the line stainless steel appliances Walk-in pantry Split bedrooms Cathedral ceilings Great room with wood-burning fireplace* Rocking chair front porch Large screen lanai and wood deck overlooking the lakefront Ideal for airboats or kayaks. Priced to sell at $129,500. BEST OF THE BEST!!! Sweetwater home on 5 acres Gorgeous hickory cabinets 2800+ living area 3 BR, 2.5 Baths plus den/library 3-car garage Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances Engineered maple flooring and ceramic tile Spacious family room with glass windows overlooking the Florida natural backyard with wildlife feeding at your doorstep. Owners feeders bring the birds and wildlife in your backyardtruly amazing. 45x28 RV storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and truly better than new. MLS #704048. $324,900. BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY!!! Easy distance to shopping center ** SNOWBIRDS DREAM!! 2 BR, 1 BA Large kitchen appliances included Lots of storage. Large bedrooms Family room with fireplace LOCATION WILL SELL THIS HOME!!! MLS #704463 $62,900. INVERNESS GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Rolling views of the golf course off the back of this newly remodeled. 2 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Oversized Garage Beautiful wood floors, new granite kitchen counter, stylish bathrooms, FIREPLACE, new wood deck overlookinggolf course. Priced to Sell. $115,900 MLS 702891 R EDUCED FRESH W ATER CANAL TO CHAIN OF LAKES 2 bedr ooms 2 baths, cathedr al ceiling, updated kit chen, glassed-in Florida room, master suit e with lar ge walk-in closet and jett ed tub, 2car gar age with workshop ar ea. New r oof and heat and air 2 011. Great boat dock. MLS# 7 03 236 $89,900 REDUCED INVESTORS 3 DUPLEXES Two 2BR, 1BA Units in Each Building Eat-in Kitchen Each Unit has Laundry Hook-up and Carport Fully Occupied Well Maintained Located within City of Inverness Close to Downtown, Restaurants, Shopping, Hospital Great Opportunity $229,900. KM/711 CITRUS RIDGE REALTY 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100 www.citrusbestbuy.com T om Balfour REALT OR Amanda & Kirk Johnson BROKER/ASSOC. REALT OR, GRI Art Paty REALT OR Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner REALT OR BROKER 746-9000 000G05O 52 S. FILLMORE 2/1/1 704090 $49,900 HOM OSASS A 87 S. L UCILLE 2/2/2 703454 $79,500 BEVERL Y HILLS 59 S. J ACKSON 2/2/1 703481 $49,900 BEVERL Y HILLS 2.82 ACRE 2178 S. WIGWAM 3/2 703669 $45,900 BEVERLY HILLS CITRUS HILLS 2275 N. EUSTIS PT. 2/2/1 703801 $89,900 BEVERL Y HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS POOL 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 HERNANDO 4210 E. L AKE PARK DR. 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 2435 W ERIC 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 WATERFRONT WATERFRONT WA TERFRONT 45 S. DESOTO 2/1/1 704027 $42,900 BEVERL Y HILLS BEVERL Y HILLS 9 N. WADSWORTH 3/1.5 704088 $54,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING VILLA PINE RIDGE 3050 W MUSTANG 3/3/3 702967 $379,900 2011 POOL COMMERCIAL RESTAURANT 9576 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BL VD. 75 Seats 702233 $217,300 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING BEVERL Y HILLS 38 S COLUMBUS 2/2 704687 $58,900 19 N. AD AMS 2/1.5 704683 $56,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING 9430 F AIR LILLY 3/2/2 704086 $93,500 CITRUS SPRINGS BANK OWNED BANK OWNED BANK O WNED 9412 E. FERNWOOD 2/2.5 704664 $77,900 INVERNESS POOL 9142 N. AKOLA WAY 3/2/2 702470 $120,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 137 N. FRESNO 3/2/2 701884 $119,900 1.3 ACRE CITRUS HILLS This pair of AM Motorola handheld transistor radios would likely sell in the $10 to $20 range each. Transistor radios are fun to collect and generally very affordable. Special to the Chronicle ATTICContinued from Page E6 CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP To register for the Citrus County Sheriffs Offices CodeRED weather program, visit www.sheriff citrus.org/EM/ and click on the Emergency Management menu item. Choose CodeRED Registration and enter the location to be monitored and your contact details if using a cellphone, you may choose to receive text alerts, but standard text messaging rates may apply. Choose which types of warnings to receive: general notifications and/or severe weather warning about tornadoes, severe thunderstorms or flash floods. You may choose to create an account to easily manage your preferences. Living underground in Louisiana MAGGIEMARTIN The Shreveport TimesHOMER, La. Rick and Chris Broussard decided to go underground 33 years ago. Literally. Their home is about 11 feet under the rich soil of Claiborne Parish, in 40 acres including lush woodland and a spring-fed creek. To get there, one follows a trail of churches out of Minden. A curvy gravel road takes a visitor three-quarters of a mile in hilly terrain to their house. The Broussards walked and flagged the property to lay out the vehicle path to their home. We wanted it to wind and miss the fern beds, Chris said. Chris is an artist who teaches at Glenbrook Academy in Minden and tends 4 acres of Mindens Cultural Crossroads Farm where she is also grant writer and board chairwoman. Rick, an industrial engineer, is water utilities manager with the city of Minden. Son Ben Broussard, of Austin, Texas, was born two weeks after they moved in. When they talked about marriage, Rick proposed building a house underground. I wanted to be near trees, he said in a separate interview. I have a fascination with trees and love to be around them, close to them, he added, saying his woods include beech, hickory, elm, maple and sassafras. That was the bottom line, but Rick was tired of taking care of a yard like the one he once tended in Minden. I made up my mind I was not going to spend the rest of my life doing that, he said. And, environmental consciousness played into it, Chris said. She didnt object. I was in love! Rick was initially exposed to the notion through a friend who built a basement nearby. But Rick did his own research, bought a set of plans, went to a place up North where such houses were prevalent. He hired Harold Weaver Construction. I had never built one, said Harold Weaver, but I said, I think we can do it. Rick took a year and a half off work to supervise the construction of his home of concrete 200 cubic yards of it steel and dirt. Biggest challenge? Waterproofing it. Making sure it was waterproofed, answered Weaver. Rick and Chris hiked the property to find the site which faced the south on a hill gentle enough to provide a landscape around the house. The house has a small air conditioning unit, not to cool the place but to prevent condensation and control the humidity. The only heat in the winter comes from a very small wood-burning stove. See UNDERGROUND / Page E5 JIM HUDELSON/The Shreveport TimesChris Broussard stands on stairs Aug. 7 in the atrium area of the earth-sheltered home that she and her husband Rick built mostly underground in 1981 in Claiborne Parish, La. Their home is about 11 feet under the rich soil of Claiborne Parish, in 40 acres including lush woodland and a spring-fed creek. To get there, one follows a trail of churches out of Minden. A curvy gravel road takes a visitor three-quarters of a mile in hilly terrain to their house. The Broussards walked and flagged the property to lay out the vehicle path to their home. A deck and the back porch area of the Broussards earth-sheltered home are all that extend above ground.

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The temperature varies only 10 degrees between winter and summer and the change is gradual, Chris said. When you arrive, you see a 12by-23-foot mustard-colored shed. (The house can also be entered off the back deck.) Open the door and immediately step onto a narrow, long landing which looks down on the atrium or up to the 25-foot exposed beam ceiling. Inside the square 1,950square-foot house there is a den, dining room, three bedrooms, two full bathrooms, a laundry room and an office and darkroom. Some doors came from abandoned buildings in downtown Minden; wood was rescued from abandoned houses the owners were tearing down. Walls are painted in earth hues and floors are ceramic tile or parquet wood. Natural objects like feathers, plant stalks in unusual shapes and bird nests and wood scrounged in the woods brings nature in and makes the house part of the environment. The house is warm and cozy. Except for the comfortable couches in the den, it is furnished with things the couple have made, bought at auctions or estate sales or rescued from abandoned houses they find as they trod their 40 acres. They filled it with Chris art, which one expert calls hyperrealistic, Ricks photographs of country things and items theyve bought from other artists. An unusual and bold Native American-inspired walnut sculpture The Burden by Arkansas artist Charles Widmer was purchased with a swap of some property and cash. In the master bedroom is a pencil sketch of a elephants head Ben drew when he was seven. You might call the decor shabby chic underground. We fight for wall space, admitted Chris. And, for space, period. We rescue dogs, jars and antiques, said Chris. She collects willow and other blue-white plates and platters while he cherishes ironstone of all styles, and they both use Mason jars theyve accumulated. There is a wall clock from France which once belonged to Chris mother and an unusual primitive kitchen piece which was crammed with with linens when they snatched it up for $11 at the end of an auction. And, in a bathroom, a mosaic mirror Chris fashioned from broken dishes she and Rick retrieved when they hiked in the woods. This family home is comfortable, filled with memories of travels, estate sales and walks in the woods. For them, it is Home. Sweet Home. It just happens to be underground.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E5 E12SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000FYGD of FL & MA 352-270-3255 J OANN M ARTIN Broker Associate 000G05E www.prefm.net 3459 N. Honeylocust Drive Beverly Hills 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. 1604 sq. ft. of living, new roof 2012, outside just painted. Well maintained home. Move in ready. Offered at $78,900.00 Directions: From Forest Ridge Blvd. to East on Thistle to Right on N. Honeylocust. Look for signs! OPEN HOUSE SUNDA Y 12 2 PM 5 05 E. Charleston Ct Hernando 2780 sf of living, new roof 2011, HVAC 2008, central vacuum, fire place, lots of storage, large lanai with jacuzzi & summer kitchen. Pristine condition. Dont miss out call today. $249,900. Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to right on Charleston to home on right. OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12 2 PM UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW T O LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Sugarmill Woods 3/2/2 Den, Fam Rm, Wood Floors, 1 YR W arranty 31 Pine St, Homosassa $149,000 Realty Connect 212-1446 MEDICAL OFFICE FOR SALE Totally r enovated 700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5 Crystal River. $120K 352-422-2293 USED CAR LOT4500 SF Bldg, 417 ft frontage, 1.34 Acr es, all fenced ready to go. Located at 7039 W Grover Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa $225,000. (603) 860-6660 3/1, fenced yard, corner lot. Needs some repairs. As is $39,500 Negotiable 2081 W Gardenia Dr (352) 465-0623 Get Results in the homefront classifieds! Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ Years Experience (352) 212-1446 www. RealtyConnect.me LECANTO (Black Diamond)3/2/2 Gated Golf Comm $119K Cash Deal or Rent $1000 mth 352-804-9729 2 BR, 2BA, Den, lanai, Scrnd heated pool, Cen. AC, poll barn, 1 AC, fenced, well, many extras. By Appt. $129,900 firm (352) 444-2371 or (352) 586-7602 117 S Lunar Terrace2 bedroom. 2 bath. c/h/a,Tot ally Updated! Block home, Clean, Over-sized Garage, W/Carport. $79,500 Negotiable Call 352-344-9290 RENT TO OWN!! No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$850 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM FLORAL CITY2002, Custom Built 3/2/2 With Extra Lot $114.500.352-344-31121 AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Crystal River2/1 Pk Model on lake Rousseau Dock & pool, heat pump, dishwasher W/D, frig & Stove, $29,900 586-8096 10811 Cove V iew Terr 3BD/2BA/2Car garage, By Owner New Roof, Cathedral Ceilings, Fruit Trees, Secluded $135,000. (352) 563-9857 AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE HOMOSASSA5+ DEN, BEDROOMS. 3 BATH. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STOR YHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPT O A NATURE PRESER VE HOME IS A FORECLOSURE SHORT SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILT IN 2005 dennis_neff @yahoo.com TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKING TO SELL ? CALLME T ODAY HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALT ORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunt s homes.com. Phyllis StricklandRealtorBest Time To Buy!Prices are going up. So is interest.BUY NOW!Owner Financing Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 HANDYMAN SPECIAL2/1, EZ 3bd 52k Cash 352-503-3245 I Buy Houses Cash ANY CONDITION Over Financed ok! call ** 352-503-3245** BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 TONY Pauelsen Realtor ILLT AKE NEW LISTINGSBUYING OR SELLINGSALES ARE WA Y UP!TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant 352-303-0619 tpauelsen@ hotmail.com MINI FARMS AREA 4/2 on 10 ACRES 20 x 40 Poll Barn Move in Condition $139,900. 352-249-1248 Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including w/d. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 MINI FARMS JUST OUTSIDECHATT ANOOGA! 10-25 Acres S tarting at Only $56,000. Located on Signal Mountain. Ideal for horses and gentleman farming. Call 877-282-4409 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties FLORAL CITY City water ready to build 1/2 acre $4K. RAINBOW SPGS, Cleared 1/2 acre near Golf Course $10K 352-344-3112 Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $19,900 obo 352-444-2272 BUILDING LOT in Sugarmill Woods Homossasa, 1 mile from suncoast Hwy. $20,000 Negotiable (407) 542-7093 UNDERGROUNDContinued from Page E4 JIM HUDELSON/The Shreveport TimesThe Broussards living room holds antiques and collectibles.

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Lava lamps PAGE E8 Real Estate Digest PAGE E2 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Decorative peacock ginger thrives in dense shade Gingers are a diverse group of deciduous, perennial, tropical plants that can be used in Central Florida shade gardens. They have lush foliage in summer. Beneath a canopy of trees that will offer protection from short, light frosts, ginger leaves can last into late December in Cold Zones 9a and 8b locally. Gingers naturally take a few months to rest every year this far north. In the tropics some ginger species remain evergreen and bloom on second year stems. There are hundreds of individual species in several genera. The Alpinagenus, commonly called ornamental or shell ginger, is native to Asia and Pacific islands. Costus contains about 150 species of spiral gingers originally from Africa and tropical America. Dichorisandra has about 25 species from humid Central and South America including D.thyrsifloraBlue Gingers. Globba, aromatic ginger has some 70 species scattered through Southeast Asia and nearby islands. Hedychium has about 40 species of tall, clump-forming ginger lilies that have dense spikes of delicatelooking flowers in summer here. Native to Southeat Asia, White Ginger Lily, H. coronarium also called Butterfly Ginger is popular locally. The 50 species of Kaempferia Peacock Gingers come from tropical forests in Africa and Asia. Zingiber has about 100 species of Pine Cone Gingers Form India and Southeat Asia including the common edible spice Z. officinale. All gingers need dense shade and no direct sunlight during the afternoon in Central Florida summers. Here all are frost-tender perennials that die down for the winter. Soil must be well-drained and contain lots of natural, decayed humus to provide nutrients for the lush growth. High summer humidity and ample rainfall or irrigation is essential for flowering. If there is too much sun, flowers may not form and leaves will curl and scorch. Alongside a shady sand path that meanders through the oaks and pines of my sandhill yard, I wanted foliage to border the path. Gingers would grow well in the See GARDEN / Page E7 Jane WeberJANES GARDEN Dining room set made of many styles; fun radios Dear John: Attached are pictures of my cherry dining room furniture. There is a dropleaf table with an additional leaf, eight chairs, buffet, and hutch. It was made by Willett Furniture in Louisville, Ken., in the 1940s. I am interested in knowing the value and market for its sale. B.H., InternetDear B.H.: The Willet Furniture Company was in business from the 1930s until the 1960s. They are known for good quality reproduction furniture. Although all the pieces are made by the same company, they are separate individual pieces and do not comprise a set. They all appear to be in excellent condition. The chairs are copies of Federal era, circa 1800, style and called sabre leg type referring to the form of the front legs. The drop-leaf table was made in the mid-20th century in 19th century style. The china cabinet is Chippendale style, circa 1700s. The sideboard with the spiral turned columns is also in 18th century style. Currently, general market interest is low except in Kentucky where there is some interest. If you are thinking of selling the pieces, it might be better to wait a while This Chippendale-style china cabinet is made by the Willet Furniture Company. Although all the pieces are made by the same company, they are separate individual pieces and do not comprise a set. Potential dollar value is catch-ascatch-can.Special to the Chronicle John SikorskiSIKORSKIS ATTIC Inside... For current property transactions, use the search features on the website for the Citrus County Property Appraisers Office: www.pa.citrus.fl.us. HOMEFRONTS REAL ESTATE DIGEST Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352563-3280, attention HomeFront. News notes submitted without photos will not be reprinted if the photo is provided later. Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront. Digest photos are kept on file for future use. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for space and/or clarity. For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660. HomeFront is a weekly real estate section published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle. Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592 ............................................advertising@chronicleonline.com Classified advertising information.....................352-563-5966 News information.............................................352-563-5660 ..............................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.comThe market leader in real estate information CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E11 E6SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 inc H20. Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! CRYSTALRIVER3/2, $450.mo., & 4/2 $5501st, lst & sec. No Dogs 352-795-9738 Homosassa2/1, scrn. prch., no Pets. $500. mo. $500. sec. 352-613-2333 LECANTO2/2, Doublewide $600. (352) 212-9682 1986 Manufactured Home, Laminate floors, great shape $19,900 352-795-1272 7677 West Chassahowitzka St. 2BD, 2BA, Mobile Detached Garage Scrn. porch, lease or Sale, $2,000 down $732. mo. 877-499-8065 $11,094, DISCOUNT New Jacobsen, 2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA yr. Warranty. No down payment, use land or trade in. Payment only, $471.18 P & I, WAC Call 352-621-9182 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 BAD CREDIT? FORECLOSURE? BANKRUPTCY? Want your own home? I can help!! 35% down cash or land and you are approved. No gimmick, 386-546-5833 Tired of Renting? Super clean 2004 3BR/2BA, on acre ready to move in!!! $3,500 down, $380.03/mo. W.A.C. Call 386-546-5833 for details Wont last! USED HOMESSingle, Double & Triple Wides Starting at $6,500 Call (352) 621-9183 2011 Live Oak 4BR/2BA $46,900, 28x60 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details FLORALCITY Older 2/1 on 1/4 ac, nice cond. nice area, makes a great investment property, due to illness must selling cash price $19,500 (352) 287-1450 HERNANDO3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres Beautiful Back porch, must see $45K 352-795-1272 HomosassaNice 1988 3/2 DWMH lg corner lot, covered parking & utili., sheds. many up grades, cash sale $44,900 628-4819 / 228-2175 HOMOSASSAOwner Financing, 3/2, older MH on 2 acres, inside remodeled, fenced yard, $4k down $535 per mo. 352-302-9217 Lovely Acreage 2.3 Fenced, with 3/2 Remodeled Dblwd. 2 carports, see craigs list Poss. Owner Finance $69,900. 352-527-7015 TAYLOR MADE HOMESLOT MODEL BLOWOUT All Homes Discounted $4,000 to $8,000 Even up to $12.000 off Sticker Price Call 352-621-3807 INVERNESS 2BR/1-1/2 bath, furn. Melody M. H. Park, near downtown Inv. & Bike trail 905 Hoffman Ln, $4,500.(352) 419-6217 Moonrise Resort. Furn 2bd/2ba w/ carport, screen rm & storage room. $18,000 OBO 802 -334-6760 or 352-726-2553 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000FZPA www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com CRYSTAL RIVER 6507 W.Cannondale Dr. . . . . . $8502/2/2 Beautiful Villa in Meadowcrest 8560 W.Basilico St. .. . . . . . . . $8503/2/1 Nice house with big roomy kitchen, fenced yard 11280 Bayshore Dr. .. . . . . . . $10002/2 Furnished with view of canalBEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS 87 S. Adams (BH) . . . . . . . . . $6752/1.5/1 Cute home with Florida room 9047 N. Travis Dr. (CS) . . . . . $6252/2 Roomy duplex, neat and clean 8160 N. Duval Dr. (CS) . . . . $13003/2/2 Pool home, furnished or unfurnishedHOMOSASSA 6312 W.Park Dr. . . . . . . . . . $600Adorable house, freshly painted, fenced backyard 11701 Clearwater Ct. . . . . . $11002/2 Waterfront mobile home with dockINVERNESS 3529 E. Sapphire Ln. (HER) . . . $7252/2/1 Pretty house with view on canal J.W.MORTON PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC.1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FL000FZ52 Jennif er F udge Cheryl S cruggs Pr oper t y Manager / R e alt o rAs s o ciat e s 3 5 2 7 2 6-9010 CALLING ALL OWNERS NEED A GOOD TENANT?Bring us your vacant home and watch us work for you! INVERNESS 2/1/1 Pool. . . . . . $750 2/2/2 PoolcareIncluded. $900 2/2/1. . . . . . . $700 2/2/1. . . . . . . $700 3/2. . . . . . . . $800 BEVERLY HILLS 3/1. . . . . . . . .$600 2/1/1 . . . . . . .$550 2/2/1. . . . . . .$625 CASTRO REALTY & Property Management Inc333 N. Croft Avenue Inverness FL34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS ALLAREASCall For Details 352-341-4663 CRYST ALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORALCITY1/1, $450/Mo. $400/ Sec. Includes Cable septic water, trash. No pets. (352) 344-5628 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALEST ATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500, ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AV AILABLE CRYST AL RIVERQuiet, 1/1, $425. mo. (352) 628-2815 Your W orldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com PELICAN BAY APARTMENTS2 BDRM. APT. HOMES Carpet, Appliances, Central Heat & Air Rental assistance available to qualified applicants. If qualified, pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. For rental info. & applications 9826 West Arms Dr Crystal River, 352-795-7793 TDD#1-800-955-8771 Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:00PEqual Housing Opportunity Provider & Employer Citrus Hills2/2/1 spacious Citrus Hills Exec. Villa, FL room, furn, pristine. no pets/smoking $875. + dep. (352) 726-8273 Sugarmill W oods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BEVERLY HILLS1 BR, 1 BD, $475 mo., 352-302-3987 BEVERLY HILLSOak Ridge 3/2/2 Pool Home, Clubhse membership included $1,250 Rent or rent to own. 352-489-7674 Homosassa3/2 $775. first, last, sec. p ets ok, (352) 434-1235 CITRUS SPRINGSNewer 3/2/1 Large Master Suite $750 3/2/2 $850 mo. 352-697-3133 CRYST AL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 Crystal RiverLease Option to Own modern 2/2, 1500 sq.ft on 10 acres grass pasture w/horse barn. 5 miles from downtown Crystal River off of Citrus Ave. (Hwy 495 and 488) Lease for 10 yrs & it will be yours! rent $1000. pr mnth. call Larry Hough, Manager 352-795-2240 INVERNESS4/2/1, handicap access. CHA, remodeled $750 mo 352-422-1916 INVERNESSBeautiful 2/1, gated comm. 55+pool, clbhs activities, 5405 S. Stoneridge. $650 + dep. (330) 806-9213 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 Near Anna Jo Rd. By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 RENT TO OWN!! No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$850 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM CRYST AL RIVER3/2/2 Unfurn. fencd. dock, Appls. $1,200 mo 352-586-7128 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 Responsible Couple would like to rent your BOAT DOCK (352) 402-0455 CRYST ALRIVERRooms in house, Full Kichen, Near Publix, furn, one price for elec, W/D, H20, cable,+ WIFI $115wk/ 420mo $120wk/430mo 352-563-6428 Invernessnear Walmart, furn. room $110. pr wk $100. dep. (352) 422-0578 AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. See ATTIC / Page E13 Special to the ChronicleThis tray is a liner or base for a compote. Potential dollar value is catch-as-catchcan. Read John Sikorkis comments about it with the continuation, Page E13.

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dense shade. The sandy soil is certainly well-drained, but contains little organic material. As gingers need rich dirt like that found on the floor of tropical forests, I amended the top 6 inches of the beds where I wanted to grow gingers. The humus was free, fine mulch made at Central Landfill on State Road 44 east of Lecanto. I trucked the recycled yard waste home and it sat in a pile on the roadside cooking and decaying until I got around to amending the planting beds for the gingers. Special to the ChronicleDo you have a few hours a week to volunteer your time? If so, Citrus County Support Services has a feel-good volunteer opportunity. Become a volunteer Meals on Wheels driver. Each meal route consists of 10 to 20 meals, taking one to two hours to complete, and volunteers are paid for their mileage. With numerous locations countywide, volunteers can find a convenient route in a familiar area. For details or to become a volunteer driver, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. cabin or porch rules (Feel the breeze, Read a book). For $65, shell make an 11-by-24-inch sign with a familys name emblazoned across the top and room for some personal lines below. These and others are available at her Etsy.com store, Annies Barn. Stowe distresses the cheap pine boards with a hammer and other tools, or treats the barn wood with a bleach-and-water mixture to kill tiny critters. She follows that with a coat of primer paint, then paint, often latex. Her vinyl letters are arranged, and then the entire surface is rollered with a contrasting color of paint. After the letters are removed and the paint dries, Stowe distresses the piece with sand paper. She drills holes at the top for bailing wire for hanging. Finally, she seals the sign with a clear wax she uses Annie Sloan Soft Wax to make it weather-resistant for hanging outdoors. It looks like its worth a million bucks once you put the wax on, Stowe says. Using vinyl letters is more expensive and timeconsuming than stenciling, she says, but she believes her method provides the cleanest, sharpest lines. Her sentimental signs sell best, but her snarky signs (Trust me you can dance. Vodka) get posted to Facebook. Words are powerful, and we all know that, says Stowe. (These signs) tell a personal story. Thats why I think its big. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E7 E10SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G0HS 5569 W. G ULF TO L AKE H WY C RYSTAL R IVER FL 34429 O FFICE : (352) 795-6633 Alexander AGENT ON DUTY SEVEN DAYS A WEEK! REAL ESTATE, INC. WWW ALEXRE COM EMAIL : SALES @ ALEXRE COM Realtor HOMOSASSA nice older mobile w/2 bedrms, 1 bath, lar ge front and rear screened porches. N ewer roof over in 2010, newer appliances approximately 2 years old. Fully fenced backyard with shed. #700919 $22,500 HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side by side. A ll new roofs in 2001 & 2002 and central A/C units installed in 2004. G ood condition, 2-wells, each bldg. has own septic system. #703762 $396,000 HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home, 1 bedrm, 1 bath, neat & clean w/ circular driveway half way between C rystal R iver and H omosassa. 2 lots, 2 sheds, glassed in screen porch. F ully furnished. #703608 $45,000 LECANTO nice half acre with well, septic and impact fees paid. M obile not livable but, take it of f and replace with new. C enter of county L ecanto S chool D ist. #703990 $18,000 CRYST AL RIVER 1 bldg. w/ 9 apts on NE 8th A venue. E ach apt has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, washer/dryer hook up, central heat and air J ust south of C rystal R iver H igh S chool. C rystal R iver water & sewer D uke E nergy E lectric. #359088 $235,000 CRYST AL RIVER commercial opportunity in nursery wholesale; fencing & landscaping sales also, 5 acres totally fenced, plants, of fice, equipment, greenhouse & samples of fence work. #704193 $300,000 DUNNELLON 1998 nobility D/W M/H w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2.5 acres. M aster bath garden tub w/ dbl vanity & shower. C ountry kitchen, vaulted ceilings, 16 x 20 work shop w/electric, inside laundry #703976 PRICE REDUCED $55,000 HOMOSASSA beautiful family home on 6.3 acres, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, lar ge kitchen, family room w/fireplace, 5 x 24 barn w/8 x 24 work shop. F enced and cross fenced. 1 car garage, screened rear porch. #705104 $189,000 ERA Jackie Davis Always there for you. (352) 634-2371 Cell jackie@bjdavis.com American Realty & Investments 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL Jackie Davis For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bjdavis.com 000FZ55 FEATURING WINDERMERE 2 Villas, one of each floor plan 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths 2-Car driveways $161/Mos. maintenance $92,000 94,000 INDUSTRIAL ZONING 48 x 80 Steel building Residential allowed 2-Story apartment Fenced acre on 3 sides Irrigation (Addl acre available $45,000 #700782) $149,900 MLS 700776 TERRA VISTA SUNNY, OPEN FL OOR PLAN 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths Office/den with built-ins Extended lanai Premium lot w/greenbelt Gated community Stunning clubhouse $215,000 MLS 704593 www.FloridaSho wcasePr operties.com SERVING ALL OF CITRUS COUNTY 000G05K PINE RIDGE 1481 W Pine Ridge Blvd. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 527-1820 CITRUS HILL S 20 W Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 746-0744 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with n o other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 NEW LISTING Pr ud en ti al R ea l Es ta te Ta ke s TH RE E of F ou r Ca te go ri es i n J. D. P ow er an d As so ci at es 20 13 Ho me B uy er /S el le r St ud y! Re pe at H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Se ll er 400 E Dakota Ct MLS 702580 $224,900 2bd/3ba pool home w/den on the golf course. Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, right on Dakota Ct. Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING RENTAL RENT AL C it ru s H il ls C it ru s Citrus H il ls Hills K en si ng to n E st at es K en si ng to n Kensington E st at es Estates 534 E Knightsbridge Pl MLS 704309 $141,900 Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba energy efficient home on an acre lot. Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, right on Reehill/Seton, left on Lancaster, right on Knightsbridge Pl. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 B la ck D ia mo nd Ra nc h B la ck D ia mo nd Black Diamond Ra nc h Ranch 3077 N Caves V alley Path MLS 702034 $350,000 Spacious, well maintained home with expansive views of #9 on The Ranch Course. Jodie T race Holder 352-302-2036 T er ra Vi st a T er ra Terr a Vi st a Vista 1667 N Shadowview Path MLS 702383 $349,900 Spacious 3bd/2.5ba villa with so many attractive features. This is a must see! Maria Fleming 352-422-1976 T er ra V is ta T er ra Terr a V is ta Vista 460 W Doerr Path MLS 356086 $288,000 Stunning 3bd/2.5ba V illa overlooking 6th Fairway of Skyview Golf Course. Helen Forte 352-220-4764 244 W Romany Loop MLS 704148 $275,000 Beautiful 3bd/2.5ba pool home with so many upgrades & features. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 L au re l Ri dg e L au re l Laur el Ri dg e Ridge B re nt wo od B re nt wo od Brentw ood 1575 W Sweet Oaks Ct MLS 705172 $139,900 Come & live a dream lifestyle in this 3bd/2.5ba townhome, all at an affordable price! Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 7375 N Roseway T er MLS 705086 $139,000 Nice home on 1+ acre w/ HUGE detached garage. Richard DeV ita 352-601-8273 C it ru s Sp ri ng s C it ru s Citrus Sp ri ng s Springs G re en br ia r G re en br ia r Greenbriar 300 E Glassboro Ct 18-3B MLS 705063 $85,900 Furnished 2bd/2.5ba T ownhome located just a few steps from community pool. Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 B re nt wo od B re nt wo od Brentw ood 1835 W Nicole Dr MLS 704580 $109,900 2bd/2ba villa w/close proximity to Brentwood Fitness & Pool Facility. Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 L ec an to L ec an to Lecant o 1644 Spring Meadow Loop Unfurnished, 2/2.5/1 Corner Brentwood Townhome. $950 F/L/SD Mark Casper 352-364-1947 H er na nd o H er na nd o Hernando 771 E Hartford St 30-5a Move-in ready Fully Furnished 2/2 Condo w/ Carport. $750 F/L/SD Mark Casper 352-364-1947 CASHIERS CT Spotless 3/2/2, built 2007 on 0.55ac close to Davis Lake. Desirable Inverness Golf Estate and IGCC neighborhood. Super high ef ficiency A/C system, City water & sewer $119,900 Investors Realty of Citrus County, Inc. Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com REALT OR Cell: (352) 220-0466 gbarth@myflorida-house.com GITT A BARTH 000BOSH 000FZ54 LIVING ON THE W ATER! This classic contemporary pool home is the right setting for living the Florida lifestyle. Open and airy with the plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of room to dock all the water toys imaginable! MLS #354435 $489,000 COUNTR Y ESTA TE PLEASANT GRO VE Magnificent 451 1 sq. ft. estate, custom built 2007 on 5 acres MOL. Exceptional quality throughout: vaulted tongue & groove ceilings, fireplace; granite counters & custom cabinetry; family room, den/of fice, 2 + 2 car garage. Exquisite outdoor entertaining: Jenn-Air summer kitchen, covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings. $549,900 NATURE L OVERS 3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded and private setting perfect retreat! Rolling pasture and mature oaks. Take the tour at www.florida-ranch.com. MLS #703270 $379,000 ROOM TO ROAM! Spectacular 3/2/2 pool home w/lar ge lanai on 2.14 ac! HUGE 25x40 detached garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for your R V. Nicely landscaped with pretty oaks and well maintained, too. New roof (2013), 14 Seer HV AC (2009), generator & perimeter alarm. $249,895 NICELY WOODED 5 ACRE LOT of f Rosehill, very private, deeded access. The perfect place to build your retreat. The short distance to the Withlacoochee State Forest (T illis Hill T rail) makes it a desirable location for the horse and country lover $55,000 QUICK TRIP OUT INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO! 3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and boat slip on deep water canal no bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and windows; great income potential, too! MLS 359564 $189,000 SOLD MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre corner lot with mature oak trees and lots of privacy! Very well maintained, new roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and move right in! Community features golf, tennis, clubhouse. MLS #358397 $175,000 GOSPEL ISLAND Come spread out! Spacious 2/2/2 home (1,642 sq ft living), nice 0.42 ac corner lot in the great community of Shadow Wood. Move in ready A/C & roof replaced in 2008. $99,900 Associated PressLeAnne Stowe, of Overland Park, Kan., makes signs to sell through her home-based business, Annies Barn. SIGNSContinued from Page E9 Home-delivered meal drivers needed in area ON THE NET http://bocc.citrus. fl.us/commserv/ suppserv/support_ services.htm GARDENContinued from Page E6 See GARDEN / Page E14 Special to the ChronicleThe 50 species of Kaempferia Peacock Gingers come from tropical forests in Africa and Asia. All gingers need dense shade.

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JENNIFERFORKER Associated PressWalk into a crafts or home furnishings store today and notice all the signs: rows upon rows of pre-fabricated signs that speak of love, blessings, family and home. Theres the ubiquitous Live, Laugh, Love and Kiss the cook. Other signs offer guidance for staying strong, building courage or getting happy. Those signs cant be that difficult to make and personalize ourselves, right? It depends. If you want to make signage with a folksy, imperfect bent, then sure, thats easy to do. If youre after something more sophisticated if youd like to create signs for the home that mirror those sold in stores theres a little more work involved. LeAnne Stowe, of Overland Park, Kan., says that if perfection is not the goal, signs are super easy to make. She started handcrafting some a year ago, after viewing a tutorial on the website Pinterest. They fit well with Stowes interest in refurbishing rescued relics, aka flea-market finds, which she sells on her Facebook page, Annies Barn. She paints her signs mostly on inexpensive pine boards or recycled barn wood. People love the rustic feel of barn wood, Stowe says. In the beginning, she painted on stretched cotton canvas cheap and available at any crafts store using vinyl letters and acrylic paint (spray paint works, outside or in a well-ventilated room). Place the vinyl letters on the canvas, spray or brush paint over the entire surface (then maybe again for a second coat after the first one dries), lift off the lettering and voila! The canvas itself can be painted or wrapped (and stapled in back) with a vibrant fabric beforehand to give the message added pizazz. This is the way homemade signs ought to be made, asserts Bob Richter, an interior designer and cast member of PBS treasure-hunting series Market Warriors. The more rustic the better. Thats what gives it its charm, says Richter. Anytime youre asking for perfection in a home project youre asking for trouble. Richter sees families naming their country homes, their cabins and their boats all of which can benefit from prominently hung signage. Many parents hang their newborns names often embroidered over the crib. And Richter sees tourists in New York City carting around cheap signs they bought with their childs name lettered on the streets of Chinatown or Times Square. Theres nothing significant about New York City about it. Its more about peoples attachment to having something personalized, he says. Stowe sells signs that list lakeCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013E9 E8SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER8, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE (352) 726-2471 After Hours (352) 302-6714 All Citrus Realty INC CALL Roy Bass TODAY Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com 000G0Y8 BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL 4BR in Sugar mill Woods. Over 3000 sq. ft living. $160,000 MLS#702836 REGENCY P ARK CONDO-INVERNESS, FL 2BR/2BA w/hardwood floors. Ground floor unit. $49,000 MLS#703767 BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 2BR/1.5 bath Fireplace. Enclosed porch. Fenced rear yard. $52,000 MLS#704852 BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL 3BR/2BA/2 car garage in Inver ness Highlands. Enclosed porch. $75,000 MLS#704181 See Virtual Tours @ www.resalehomes4u.com Cell: (352) 634-4346 Office : (352) 382-1700 GAIL COOPER Always There For You REALTY E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com 000G0FP Multimillion Dollar Realtor MADE FOR ENTERTAINING! Custom 3+office/2/2 heated pool home Over 2500 sq. ft of living Corian with wood cabinetry in kitchen Wood burning fireplace in family room New roof in 2002 Dual pane windows AND sliders Interior & exterior recently painted Deep luscious greenbelt #704102 $209,000 ENJOY THE RELAXED LIFESTYLE! 2/2/2 single story end unit condo Updated tiled kitchen with SS appliances Pass thru to dining room for entertaining Hardwoods in dining and Great room Views of #3 green on Cypress Master suite has walk-in closet Convenient to SMWs country club Home warranty for the buyers #354159 $66,000 JAMESBROOKS Associated PressLONDON all them s relics or hippy home accessories, lava lamps have been casting their dim but groovy light on interiors for half a century, having hit British shelves 50 years ago this past Tuesday. A British company began marketing their original creation as an exotic conversation piece in 1963. Since then, millions of models of the much-copied invention have been sold worldwide. The design was created by British inventor Edward Craven-Walker, who was inspired by an oddlooking liquid-filled egg timer he saw in a pub in southwest Britain. The former World War II pilot then spent years transforming the concept into a home lighting accessory, having recognized the potential for such an invention during anythinggoes s Britain. Everything was getting a little bit psychedelic, said Christine Baehr, the second of CravenWalkers four wives. There was Carnaby Street and The Beatles and things launching into space and he thought it was quite funky and might be something to launch into. Britains Love Generation saw an affinity between the fluorescent lava flows unpredictable nature and the easy-going, drug-induced spirit of the decade. Craven-Walkers first model, the Astro Lamp, also reflected the technological innovation and imagination of the time, shaped like a sci-fi rocket. Soon other models, such as the Astro Mini and the Astro Nordic, emerged from Craven-Walkers Crestworth company, building on his original concept. Baehr recalls a memorable moment when they were told that Beatles drummer Ringo Starr had bought one of their lamps. That was a great, Ah, weve made it, moment, she said. Despite the decline of British manufacturing, with numerous wellknown brands dying or moving to countries with cheaper labor costs, lava lamp making company Mathmos has remained at their factory in southwest Britain still employing Craven-Walkers tried and tested formula. I think its really special to manufacture something thats been invented and made in Britain, in Britain for 50 years, said Cressida Granger, who became involved with Crestworth in 1989, renamed it Mathmos in 1992 and gained sole ownership in 1999. U.S. rights to manufacture the lamps are held by Haggerty Enterprises Inc. of Elk Grove Village, Ill. Granger went on to enjoy a second wave of success for CravenWalkers invention during the 1990s, as a new generation of consumers, obsessed with retro British trends, lit their rooms with s lava lamp designs. Craven-Walker, whose other enthusiasms included nudism, died in 2000. Lava lamps are based on two liquids of slightly different density that will not mix. The heavier liquid sinks to the bottom, but when heated by the lamp light, its density decreases and it floats to the top. His invention has had roles in music videos and on television, having originally appeared in popular British television shows during the s such as The Prisoner and Doctor Who. I think its the motion within the lamp, said Anthony Voz, a collector of Mathmos products. The way that it flows, how its anti-repetitive, how its a mixture of light and chaos blending together. It kind of pulls people in and before you know it, youve spent 15 minutes looking at it. Associated PressLava lamps are photographed Aug. 19 in a shop in London. The lava lamp, an iconic piece of British design and social trends, is celebrating its 50th birthday. Since its launch in 1963, Mathmos lava lamps have been in continuous production at their factory in Poole, Dorset. The company founder and eccentric inventor Edward CravenWalker originally developed the lava lamp from an egg timer design he saw in a Dorset pub. Lava lamps are based on two liquids of slightly different density that will not mix. The heavier liquid sinks to the bottom, but when heated by the lamp light, its density decreases and it floats to the top. Lava lamps: 50 years old and still looking groovy Signs are everywhere, so make your own Associated PressLeAnne Stowe, of Overland Park, Kan., sells homemade signs through her home-based business, Annies Barn. Stowe sells refurbished flea-market finds, including once a week via her business Facebook page, and recently launched a store site on Etsy. She paints her signs on inexpensive pine or recycled barn wood. See SIGNS/ Page E10 000G0GJ Sherri C. Parker & Associates, REAL TORS, LLC ROOM TO RO AM for you, the horses, dogs and the animals! This spectacular 4BR, 4BA, 2 car garage on 2.5 ac is priced to sell now at only $146,900! Minutes from downtown Crystal River. Completely remodeled and beautifully decorated. MLS 704339 7724 W Glendale Ct., Dunnellon ELEGANCE, ATMOSPHERE, COMFORT for you and the horses on a luxurious 10 ac equestrian estate. High triple tray ceilings, 4 BR, 3 BA, 3 car garage with riding trails adjoining property. Challenges comparison at $590,000. MLS 702509 6618 W Sentinel Post Path, Beverly Hills www .sherricparker.com See all our listings at: www.pineridgehorseproperties.com