Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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aleph - 000366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
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Full Text

Duel at the Trop: Price takes mound for Rays /B


I --- N DAYJ II


CITRUS


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
92
LOW
72


COUNTY


wwvj.cIror icleorlnhinre.conr
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


COMMENTARY:


Technological
Rep. Jimmie T Smith
write about Career and
Technical Education.
/Page Cl
BUSINESS:
State chief
Citrus
County
builder
Ron
Lieber-
man has S
been
elected
president
of the
Florida Home Builders
Association./Page Dl
VETERANS:


'The bay is





less fresh'


10-year data shows disturbing

trend in bay's water quality


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
There is usually an ebb
and flow pattern about es-
tuarine habitats such as
King's Bay, but a decade
of water quality monitor-
ing data is revealing some
uncomfortable and some-


times puzzling trends for
scientists.
According to Chris
Anastasiou, senior scien-
tist Natural Systems and
Restoration at Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District, data col-
lected since 2002 clearly
shows three things: "The


bay is less fresh; it is more
green, which means the
bay is getting more chloro-
phyll and the nitrate load
is high, especially in the
northeast portion of the
bay (the Hunters Spring
area).
"Now, what is also of
concern to me is the rise
in phosphorus levels," he
said.
Because, according to
Anastasiou, elevated lev-
els of phosphorus would
See Page A14


STEVEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Southwest Florida Water Management District Senior
Scientist Jason Hood takes samples from King Spring to
take back to his lab and analyze.


( 0

7JL5) UPO 2Ic li


Love, service
Bill Pickett found the
love of his life during
his first tour of duty in
the U.S. Army, and they
celebrate 58 years
wed today./Page A19
COMMENTARY:
Hospital suits
Attorney
Bill Grant
writes a
guest -
column H
about the
disputes
surround-
ing Citrus
Memorial./Page Cl
EXCURSIONS:


-- -IF'M zi!!
STEVEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
After work, Karen Wright enjoys a little downtime with her teen children from left, Greg, 17; twins Julia and Polina, 14; Ben, 17; and
Gabby, 15. Her oldest daughter, Rebecca, 18, was working.


-.J
Go golfing
Travel from Citrus
County to the County of
Fife in Scotland for a
round of golf./Page A15

Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ............... A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ..................... A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together ..................A17


6 l 21100711 o


Teens know teamwork key to family's success


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY
he doesn't sport a long red
cape or jump off 20-story
buildings.
o However, she does utilize
superhuman powers that enable her
to cast a spell from her "mother-
means-business" evil eye in six differ-
ent directions. Instinctively, her six
children know to comply immediately
with her expectations. Even Super-
man would defer to Supermom.
Like many, Supermom Karen
Wright describes herself as the aver-
age working mother who has striven
to rise to the challenge of parenthood
since the first of her six children was
born.
"I don't see myself as 'Supermom;' I
just like to supervise," Karen said. "I
lay out the ground rules that these are


their choices."
Hence Karen, a third-grade teacher
at Floral City Elementary School, said
her teenagers Rebecca, 18; Greg,
17; Benjamin, 17; Gabby, 15; and twins
Polina and Julia, 14 are focused on
their futures, and discipline is rare.
"Because my kids are involved in
sports, they are mostly self-moti-
vated," Karen said. "They have that
internal wanting to do well, go to col-
lege and are driven. So I don't have
too many issues. I try to be supportive,
but they understand there are guide-
lines that have to be followed. My hus-
band (Jon) and I have to have a united
front or it is all going to fall apart."
Nonetheless, they are teenagers
and Karen recognizes the financial
and physical burden of returning to
school. She said organization equals a
successful year


Page A14


Parents, students invited

to school open houses
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Summer break has nearly reached its end for
public school students, and their new school
year is only days away
Citrus County students are to report to school
Wednesday, Aug. 7, for the first day of the 2013-
14 year
To prepare them and their families, the Citrus
County School System has scheduled open house
dates and times for each facility Open house
times are when students and their parents can
meet teachers, see their classrooms, ask ques-
tions and get bus routes and class schedules.
Below is a list of upcoming open houses:
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Central Ridge Elementary 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 5.
See Page A14


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LOAN TERMINATION HEADQUARTERS


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SPaying interest higher than 2.15% APR

SDriving a vehicle that is no longer under warranty
SDriving a vehicle that does not get 30 MPG


ROADS


=/ FIND


fI CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET
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SHundreds of cars & trucks to choose from with
new vehicle payments starting at $128 pe mo.
0 2.15% APR available on all new
and most used vehicles
SEvery vehicle sold during this event is covered
under warranty
250 vehicles available
that get 30 MPG or better ........... |


Few storms
move inland; rain
chance 30%.
PAGE A4


VOL. 118 ISSUE 362


LORN'TEERMINRTION EVENT I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WE ARE FOCUSED ON

MAKING SURE YOU GET

QUALITY HEALTH CARE

FOR YEARS TO COME.


le ve/ls


4~J


The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees believes that this
checklist can be a reality IF we all work together to sell or lease
Citrus Memorial Hospital. By selling or leasing our hospital to a
bidder who will invest capital, our patients will receive the
quality health care and indigent care they deserve. We are
focused on making all of these goals come true we are focused
on saving our hospital.




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^uscounty q^^^


BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE CITRUS COUNTY HOSPITAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES.


A2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013





Page A3 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4,2013



TATE.& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Virtual Instruction
Program offered
Citrus County schools
will partner with Seminole
County to offer parents and
students a Virtual Instruc-
tional Program.
A meeting with parents
will take place at 12:30 p.m.
Aug. 9 at the Citrus County
School District headquar-
ters in Inverness.
This is a blended option
for students, in which the
student may be full-time vir-
tual or part-time, scheduling
some classes at their zoned
school in Citrus County.
Parents interested in this
form of instruction for their
child are encouraged to at-
tend. Call Janet Selman at
352-726-1931, ext 2235, to
confirm your attendance.
Fingerprinting
suspended at EOC
The fingerprinting service
offered by the sheriff's office
at the Emergency Opera-
tions Center in Lecanto is
temporarily unavailable due
to technical difficulties.
According to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, the
fingerprinting equipment is
being sent off for repair. Fin-
gerprinting for the general
public will be unavailable
until further notice.
For further information,
call Deputy Andy McEwen
at 352-527- 3701.
Purple Heart tribute
set for Thursday
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693, at 7890 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Ho-
mosassa, will host a break-
fast and program at 9 a.m.
Thursday, Aug. 8, honoring
all Purple Heart recipients
and commemorating the
231st anniversary of the
Purple Heart. The families
of those who fell in combat
and all combat wounded vet-
erans and their guests are
invited. Attendees must reg-
ister for the free breakfast
by contacting Carrie
Clemons at 352-628-1633
or mailing carriejeanette
clemons@yahoo.com.
Please indicate the number
in your party.
Gen. George Washington
established the Purple Heart,
originally known as the Badge
of Military Merit, on Aug. 7,
1782. The Purple Heart rec-
ognizes those patriots who
selflessly made the supreme
sacrifice or shed their blood
on the field of battle in defense
of the nation's freedoms.
-From staff reports


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle


At 102, she's


still singing
C caregiver Sam Poulin, left, shares a
birthday moment Saturday after-
noon with resident Isabel Becker
at Crown Court, an assisted living facility
in Inverness. Many of Becker's friends
and family helped make her 102nd birth-
day celebration unforgettable. Her son
Charlie Somers and daughter-in-law Gay
said Becker, in her earlier days, loved to
shop and model for pictures. In her bed-
room is a picture of Becker modeling in
1980. She was a schoolteacher by day and a
shopper by night. However, her passion
is music, and she happily sang along as a
musician played for her birthday.


Have an Apple product?


There's a class for that


For Mac users,

CMUGjust works
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Though Mac users may be in
the minority when it comes to
personal computers, they have
plenty of support in Citrus County
The Citrus County Macintosh
Users Group, CMUG, shares
technical know-how, computer
tips and education, and socializ-
ing for people who prefer prod-
ucts from Apple.
"It was formed in 1995 when a
bunch of Mac people got together
and said 'Let's do this,"' ex-
plained member Curt Herrin.
"The Macintosh Users Group
deals with Apple products."
It now has about 380 members.
"It's really grown," said mem-
ber Carolyn Moss, who was at-
tending a recent class put on by
CMUG. "The club has grown a lot
because of people getting iPads."
Herrin was teaching a class
called "Numbers forApple Com-
puters," which demonstrated
how to create and use spread-
sheets. He had also prepared
take-home CD tutorials for the
participants.
The group hosts two classes a
month covering a variety of Mac


skills, focusing on the iPad every
other month.
CMUG also holds Macintosh
workshops and workshops on
specific devices such as iPads,
iPods and iPhones. Workshops
are free for club members only;
there is a small charge for
classes. The classes are also
open to interested nonmembers
for a higher fee. Participants
bring their own computers.
There are also monthly labs for
computer tune-ups or correcting
problems and members can set
up house calls for instruction
and technical service if they can-
not wait for a lab. All activities,
including monthly group meet-
ings, are at the College of Central
Florida campus in Lecanto. All
the instructors are volunteers.


Curt Herrin
teaches a
class called
"Numbers
y for Apple
Computers" to
"-4 members of the
* -"j Citrus County
S Macintosh Users
Group. Known as
CMUG, the
group is open to
anyone with an
Apple computer
or iPad.
PAT FAHERTY
/Chronicle
The club also has an annual
social event and has a scholar-
ship program. Herrin said they
try to award three $1,000 schol-
arships a year one for each
high school.
Members can keep in touch
through an online message
board, calendar and magazine.
Though it tends to skew older,
membership is open to all ages.
"Anyone can join our club if
they have a Mac computer they
want to learn something about,"
said Herrin. 'A Mac computer or
an iPad."
For details on membership,
club activities and schedule of
classes, visit cmugonline.com.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


Special to the Chronicle


Police K-9


after near
Associated Press
ORLANDO -An police K-9
is recovering after authorities
said a suspected burglar re-
peatedly held the dog under-
water, nearly drowning him.
WOFL Fox 35 Orlando re-
ported Seabee and his handler
were responding reports of
a burglar Thursday at about
1:30 p.m.
The German Shepherd
found 18-year-old suspect Lan-


How to be

a lunchbox

hero
For many parents, one of
the biggest headaches of
sending kids off to school
is what to pack them for
lunch.
It means finding the
least expensive, easiest,
most nutritious foods your
picky eaters will actually
eat and not throw away
All it takes is a little
forethought and planning,
said Carol Burke, registered
dietician for the Citrus
County Health Department
What's a parent to do?
Here are some tips to
help your children get the
best nutrition possible in
their lunchboxes and
into their bellies:
Include seasonal fruit,
which is less expensive,
Burke suggests. Also, car-
rot sticks and apples are
available year-round. Fruit
from local produce stands
often costs less than fruit
at the supermarket.
Make your own con-
venience. Pack whole-
grain crackers and cheese
or peanut butter in indi-
vidual zipper-lock plastic
bags. In other bags, mix a
handful of nuts and raisins
or dried cranberries. Keep
them in the refrigerator and
grab one of each, along
with a drink and a piece of
fruit, carrot sticks, grapes,
grape tomatoes or olives
for your child's lunch box.
Try leftovers for
lunch. If they liked it at
dinnertime, they might
like it at noon. "To keep it
safe, make sure you either
pack an ice pack to keep
food cold or put hot food in
a thermos," Burke said.
Cut things up. Burke
said kids will often eat
something cut up that they
won't eat whole bite-size
pieces of chicken, melon,
cheese cubes, etc. Think of
kid-size fingers and make
lunch as easy as possible
to pop in a kid-size mouth.
Make goodies as
healthful as possible. Bake
cookies with whole-grain
flour and add things like
raisins and canned pump-
kin, mashed banana, finely
grated carrots or zucchini.
Check online for recipes.
Variety is best, but not
vital. Burke tells parents
not to panic if their children
only want to eat a peanut
butter and honey sandwich
and an apple every day 'As
long as they get a variety of
food at other times through-
out the day, it's OK to pack
the same thing day after day"
-Nancy Kennedy



recovering


drowning
don Bradley Barnes and fol-
lowed him into a swampy area
near Druid Lake. Police said
Barnes held Seabee underwa-
ter as the dog tried to force the
teen out of the lake.
Seabee spent the night re-
covering at an animal hospital.
He was released Friday, but
police said he has a high fever.
Barnes has been charged
with burglary, resisting an offi-
cer with violence and injuring
a police dog.


Seven injured after

nine-vehicle crash on

1-75 in Hillsborough


Associated Press
BRANDON Authorities
are investigating the cause of a
crash between a semi- truck
and eight other cars on Inter-
state 75 in Hillsborough
County that sent seven people
to the hospital.
Hillsborough County Fire
Rescue reported the crash Sat-
urday afternoon in Brandon.
Three people were critically
injured and at least one had to
be airlifted to the hospital.


Fire rescue spokesman
Ronnie River said that
person was trapped inside
his car that was wedged be-
tween the truck and concrete
guard rail. It took crews
about an hour to get the person
out of the car
No fatalities were reported.
The accident snarled traffic
along the busy interstate for
hours.
The Florida Highway Patrol
was on the scene and will in-
vestigate the crash.




A4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday A number of pleasant sur-
prises could be in store for you in the
year ahead. One might involve your
work; others, your social life.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You'll figure
out how to reach someone whom
you've thought of as being cold and
aloof. You've been misreading this
warm and welcoming individual.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) This is an
excellent day to make a change that
could improve your finances. Once you
iron out any wrinkles, make your move.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you feel
you have to make a decision that in-
volves others and could have far-
reaching effects, it's important to have
the courage of your convictions.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A situa-
tion in which you've worked hard for
something that is being denied you is
likely to be rectified today Keep faith.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) --Al-
though you have established a valu-
able contact, thus far you haven't
handled a relationship to the best of
your advantage. Make up for lost time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
give up on something worthwhile that
you've been pursuing. The results
you've been hoping for could be much
closer than you think.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your
mental acuity can be your greatest
asset. If you think resourcefully, there's
no doubt you'll have the ability to inter-
est the right people and get the help
you need.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You'll
have the rare knack of being able to
turn an unusual development (or two)
to your advantage.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
delegate an important chore to a less-
talented person. This can be a reward-
ing day for you, provided you select
the right person to do the job.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Allow
your extremely perceptive mind to spot
where your best chances for making a
good profit lie. Your instincts should be
right on the money.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because
you'll work effectively in most group in-
volvements today, try to avoid solitary
pursuits. When all is said and done,
the results will be quite gratifying.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't be
hesitant in attempting to fulfill an impor-
tant ambition. Numerous challenges
will awaken all kinds of latent talents
that you may not have known existed.


ENTERTAINMENT


Associated Press
Music fans arrive on the second day of Lollapalooza at Grant Park on Saturday in Chicago.


Mantegna of CBS' "Criminal
Minds" joined his hometown
band to sing "If You Leave Me
Now."

Man arrested in
burglary attempt
DETROIT Tips from the
public led to the arrest on Satur-
day of a 43-year-old suburban
Detroit man following an at-
tempted burglary of a home
owned by musician Kid Rock.
The man was arrested at his
home in Oakland County's Inde-
pendence Township, north of
Detroit, according to Undersher-
iff Michael McCabe.
Two tips were made to the
sheriff's dispatch center, Mc-
Cabe said in a release.
The arrest came after surveil-
lance photos from security cam-
eras on Kid Rock's property in
Clarkston were released this
weekend. The photos showed a
man ramming the gate Wednes-
day afternoon and trying to
break into the house. He also


4ro


I -am
In this image from video, an
attempted burglary suspect in
crutches walks toward the
house of musician Kid Rock in
Clarkston, Mich.

was on crutches and failed to
get in.
Born Robert Ritchie, Kid
Rock's music is a blend of hip-
hop, hard rock, country and
Southern rock. He had offered a
$5,000 reward for information
leading to the man's arrest in a
post on the musician's website.
-From wire reports


Pacino movie films
at Chicago concert
LOS ANGELES -An Al Pa-
cino movie broke out in the mid-
dle of a concert by the band
Chicago, with thousands of fans
serving as extras.
Cameras were wheeled on-
stage during intermission of the
group's show at the Greek The-
atre on Friday night to film a
scene from Pacino's upcoming
movie "Imagine," in which he
plays aging rock star Danny
Collins.
With coaching from the direc-
tor, the crowd chanted the name
of Pacino's character as the 73-
year-old actor walked on stage
to sing "Hey Baby Doll" in a
black suit. The movie co-stars
Michael Caine, Annette Ben-
ing and Jennifer Garner.
"This is an improvisation," Pa-
cino told the crowd. 'You just
came in and got it. That's not
easy."
Earlier in Chicago's set, Joe


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Aug. 4, the
216th day of 2013. There are 149
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On August 4, 1944, 15-year-old
diarist Anne Frank was arrested
with her sister, parents and four oth-
ers by the Gestapo after hiding for
two years inside a building in Ams-
terdam. (Anne died the following
year at Bergen-Belsen.)
On this date:
In 1790, the Coast Guard had its
beginnings as the Revenue Cutter
Service.
In 1830, plans for the city of
Chicago were laid out.
In 1916, the United States
reached agreement with Denmark
to purchase the Danish Virgin Is-
lands for $25 million.
In 1964, the bodies of missing
civil rights workers Michael Schw-
erner, Andrew Goodman and
James Chaney were found buried
in an earthen dam in Mississippi.
Ten years ago: West African
forces arrived in Liberia to oversee
the departure of President Charles
Taylor.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush signed legislation
allowing the State Department to
settle lawsuits against Libya by
American victims of terrorism.
One year ago: Michael Phelps
ended his career with another gold
as the United States won the med-
ley relay at the London Olympics;
Phelps left the sport with a record
18 golds and 22 medals overall.
Today's Birthdays: Singer
Frankie Ford is 74. Actress-singer
Tina Cole is 70. Actor-comedian
Richard Belzer is 69. Actor and
screenwriter Billy Bob Thornton is
58. President Barack Obama is 52.
Retired MLB All-Star pitcher Roger
Clemens is 51. Actor Daniel Dae
Kim is 45. Actor Michael DeLuise is
44. Race car driver Jeff Gordon is
42. Actress Greta Gerwig is 30. Ac-
tors Dylan and Cole Sprouse are 21.
Thought for Today: "When you
love someone, all your saved-up
wishes start coming out." Eliza-
beth Bowen, author (1899-1973).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LOPR HI LO PR L
NA NA NA Q 71 tf_ 92 7.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a moderate chop. Chance of
thunderstorms today.


95 77 0.10 91 75 trace

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusvedaily
forecast by:
W TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 92 Low: 72
Few storms move inland, rain
chance 30%
If yn MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 91 Low: 72
Scattered storms, rain chance 40%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
THigh: 90 Low: 73
Scattered storms, rain chance 40%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 91/73
Record 99/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.20 in.
Total for the month 0.60 in.
Total for the year 37.00 in.
Normal for the year 31.71 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.3/12
Monday's count: 5.7
Tuesday's count: 4.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/4 SUNDAY 4:10 10:22 4:34 10:45
8/5 MONDAY 4:53 11:05 5:16 11:28
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
e 0 ( SUNSETTONIGHT ............................8:19P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:54A.M.
S C / I 0 4 IMOONRISE TODAY ...........................4:55A.M.
AUG. E AUG. 14 AUG.20 AUG. 28 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 6:42 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:39 a/1:04 a 4:43 p/12:35 p
Crystal River" 4:00 a/9:57 a 3:04 p/11:02 p
Withlacoochee* 1:47 a/7:45 a 12:51 p/8:50 p
Homosassa** 4:49 a/12:03 a 3:53 p/11:34 a


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
6:12 a/1:40 a 5:25 p/1:19 p
4:33 a/10:41 a 3:46 p/11:34 p
2:20 a/8:29 a 1:33 p/9:22 p
5:22 a/12:39 a 4:35 p/12:18 p


Gulf water
temperature



90
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 20.02 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.94 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.90 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.13 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


pc
ts
s
pc
.01 s
pc
.03 s
pc
pc
s
sh
pc
.17 ts
ts
.06 pc
s
pc
.05 pc
s
pc
.24 s
sh
pc
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
.05 pc
.06 s
pc
.71 pc
.01 ts
pc
pc
pc
.01 s
.01 pc
pc
pc
.01 ts
ts
.04 pc


73 51
90 70
83 59
89 72
81 60
98 75
82 57
85 58
89 72
93 58
76 58
68 51
70 51
93 77
80 54
89 66
75 57
79 58
72 59
96 72
76 56
74 54
102 81
89 59
80 63
73 57
98 77
81 60
79 55
79 53
96 77
77 57
94 74
104 81
92 74
73 63
84 61
92 70
71 60
75 61
92 74
92 73
85 63


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 94 76 pc 93 77
NewYorkCity 77 68 .06 s 80 60
Norfolk 89 71 .01 pc 84 63
Oklahoma City 96 76 pc 96 75
Omaha 81 62 pc 80 66
Palm Springs 10573 s 108 79
Philadelphia 79 71 s 81 59
Phoenix 10986 pc 109 89
Pittsburgh 79 64 .21 pc 73 52
Portland, ME 80 58 sh 74 57
Portland, Ore 82 61 s 86 60
Providence, R.I. 79 67 s 80 57
Raleigh 91 71 2.30 pc 89 62
Rapid City 80 60 .30 pc 81 62
Reno 91 57 s 92 60
Rochester, NY 76 61 sh 68 53
Sacramento 90 56 s 89 57
St. Louis 85 72 pc 82 64
St. Ste. Marie 64 54 s 68 49
Salt Lake City 96 68 s 94 71
San Antonio 10279 pc 100 77
San Diego 73 65 s 72 66
San Francisco 70 54 pc 68 55
Savannah 92 76 ts 95 76
Seattle 76 60 pc 81 58
Spokane 76 57 pc 86 57
Syracuse 77 62 .04 sh 69 52
Topeka 86 72 .04 ts 80 68
Washington 82 71 .01 s 83 63
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 110 Needles, Calif.
LOW 28 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/79As
Amsterdam 77/58/s
Athens 99/75/s
Beijing 95/81/pc
Berlin 85/68/pc
Bermuda 85/81/pc
Cairo 100/71/s
Calgary 70/54As
Havana 93/75/pc
Hong Kong 86/79/sh
Jerusalem 85/68/s


Lisbon 82/59/s
London 74/63/c
Madrid 97/66/s
Mexico City 74/51/ts
Montreal 66/52/sh
Moscow 78/61/sh
Paris 84/59/s
Rio 84/64/s
Rome 90/78/s
Sydney 65/48/pc
Tokyo 84/77/sh
Toronto 69/54/pc
Warsaw 95/62/pc


M meeting Notices..................D5


Miscellaneous Notices.......D5


Self Storage Notices...........D5



C I T R UL S C 0 U N T Y



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013




Fal Pritchett, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fal Jackson Pritchett,
also known at John, F.J.,
and "Pritch," of Crystal
River, Fla., died peacefully
in his sleep on Aug. 2,2013.
Fal was
born on
Dec. 17,
1927, in
Archer,
Fla., the
youngest
of four
S Pritchettsons born
Fal Pto William
and Ella Bell Pritchett.
He graduated Porter
Military Academy in
Charleston, S.C., in 1945.
He served in the Navy dur-
ing World War II onboard
the USS LSMR 408. He
was honorably discharged
in 1947, and rode a '38
Harley Davidson ex-police
cycle from his place of dis-
charge in California home
to Florida. He married his
hometown sweetheart,
Marjorie Kinzer, in 1949.
Together they had two
children.
He began his career at
his father's Standard Oil
garage in Archer, and later
found his calling in elec-
tronics. He erected radio
towers and worked as an
electronics technician
during the Kennedy space
era at Cape Canaveral. He
worked as a much-valued
troubleshooter for com-

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


puter circuit boards and
other electronic mysteries
in the early computer era.
He was brilliant
John could fix anything,
and he did. Friends and
neighbors were always
bringing him something to
repair from toaster
ovens to pinball machines.
He never accepted money
for the repairs, but always
accepted the challenge,
whistling happily under
his breath until he solved
the puzzle laid out on his
workbench.
He made great beer and
guava jelly He grew papayas
and grapefruit. He liked to
fish if the fish were biting.
He and Marge settled in
Crystal River in 1988, and
he soon became known at
town events as the man in
red suspenders with the
antique calliope, and later
as the grits man, with his
stone-burr gristmill. He
liked to be the center of at-
tention and people were
happy to give it to him. He
made friends easily and he
made them laugh. He was
generous. He was passion-
ate. He was very much loved.
He was proud to be a De-
mocrat and a humanist.
He was a founding mem-
ber of the Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalists.
He is preceded in death
by his brothers Wallace
Ray and William Carey
and his wife Marjorie. He
is survived by his children


John Pritchett of Hon-
olulu, Hawaii, and Janie
Clark of Bentonville, Ark.;
and granddaughter Arielle
Clark of Bentonville, Ark.
Memorial services will
be held at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 10, 2013, at Nature
Coast Unitarian Univer-
salists at 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations be made
to Camp E-Nini-Hassee in
Floral City, an organiza-
tion for at-risk girls, for
which he was a devoted
advocate and supporter
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Donna
Martin, 50
LECANTO
Donna J. Martin, 50, of
Lecanto, Fla., died Sunday
July 28, 2013. Memorial
service of remembrance,
3 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6,2013,
at Fero Funeral Home.


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Ellen Pierce, 94
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ellen Dorothy Pierce,
age 94, of Crystal River,
Fla., passed away Aug. 2,
2013, at Crystal River
Health and Rehab in Crys-
tal River Private crema-
tion arrangements are
under the care of Strick-
land Funeral Home with
Crematory Crystal River,
Fla.
Alexander
Brizenski, 92
CRYSTAL RIVER
Alexander J. Brizenski,
92, of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Aug. 2, 2013,
at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River. Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Crystal River, Fla.
See Page A8


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 A7


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p k




AS SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6
Winifred
McCarthy
LECANTO
Winifred E. McCarthy
from Lecanto, Fla., formerly
of Coxsackie, N.Y, peace-
fully passed away July 30,
2013, at Citrus County Hos-
pice in the loving hearts and
hands of her family She
was born
in Albany,
N.Y, to
the late
Edmund
a n d
Winifred
Barry
Winnie
Winifred was the
McCarthy beloved
wife ofJames McCarthy She
is survived by her sisters,
Judy Spadaro and Kathleen
(John) Fazzio; her children,
Theresa (Paul) Klein, Kathy
(Dan) Jones, Sharon March-
esani, Ann Marie (Bill)
O'Brien, Kevin (Karen)
Everingham, Devin (Lisa)
McCarthy, Jim (Debbie)
McCarthy, Patrick McCarthy,
Dawn (Richard) Zelasko,
Tammy McCarthy; many
grandchildren; and great-
grandchildren.
Winnie was a lifetime
member of the Catholic
Church. Her early years
were spent raising her
family and working at the
Watervliet Arsenal for 20
years. She then retired to
Florida with Jimmy, where
she enjoyed her life paint-
ing anything that didn't
move. She went yard sale-
ing, often took long drives
and kept tabs on her fam-
ily Winnie will be remem-
bered as an exceptionally
strong woman who taught
us the meaning of Living.
She will be greatly missed.
She will be laid to rest in
the Florida National Ceme-
tery A celebration of her
life will be in upstate N.Y,
in September Donations in
her honor can be made to
Hospice of Citrus County;
PO. Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Arrangements
by Heinz Funeral Home
and Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LaLander 'Duck'
Norman, 101
HOMOSASSA
LaLander Stadig "Duck"
Norman, 101, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., died Friday,
July 26, 2013, at his home.
A native of Binford, N.D.,
he was born April 10,1912,
to John and Corrine
(Stadig) Norman. Duck re-
ceived his MBA at the Uni-
versity of Michigan and
became an actuary in the
insurance business. He
served at American
United Life Insurance Co.
(now One America) of In-
dianapolis, Ind., for 35
years. During World War II,
he was a lieutenant in the
U.S. Navy When they dis-


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covered his actuarial
skills, he was assigned to
the Aviation Logistics
Plans Division. His part
was to
project fu-
ture usage
K of air-
craft, so
that pilot
training
and pro-
curement
LaLander of equip-
Norman ment was
properly coordinated. He
moved to Homosassa in
1979 from Carmel, Ind.
Duck loved golf and
bridge. He was past presi-
dent of Woodland Country
Club in Carmel, Ind., and
belonged to Sugarmill
Woods and Southern
Woods Country Clubs in
Homosassa.
Mr Norman is survived
by his three daughters,


Martha Mary Neely (Jim),
Maricopa, Ariz., Carol
Jean Wellborn and Shirley
Ann Cook, both of Ho-
mosassa; eight grand-
children; and 11 great
grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by his
wife of 62 years, Garnet
Norman, Aug. 17, 2004; his
son, Eric John Norman
(2011)' and his three sib-
lings, Olaf and Kenneth
Norman and Katherine
Stanley
A memorial service
will be 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 6, 2013, at First
United Methodist Church
of Homosassa. Military
honors will be rendered at
2:30 at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa, FL wwwwilder
funeral.com.
See DEATHS/Page AlO


OBITUARIES
Chronicle policy permits free and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home
or society in charge of the arrangements.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the
next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicleonline.com, fax 352-563-
3280 or call 352-563-5660 for details.
All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated
Press style unless a request to the contrary is made.
















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SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 A9


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A10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


DEATHS
Continued from PageAS

Nada
Williams, 84
HOMOSASSA
Nada F Williams, 84, a
lifelong resident of Ho-
mosassa, passed away Fri-
day, July 26, 2013, at Cross
City Rehab and Health
center in
Cross City
Nada was
born May
2, 1929, in
Inverness,
40 t h e
daughter
s of Frank
Nada and Edith
Williams Smith.
She was a homemaker
Nada loved all kinds of
flowers and was an avid
gardener, as well as an
accomplished seamstress.
She was a Jehovah's
Witness.
She was predeceased by
her parents; sons. Lloyd
Shiver Jr, Clinton Kirk-
land Jr; grandson, Jeremy
Lanier; granddaughter,
Tina Jean Beatty; and
great-granddaughter, Des-
tiny Beatty Nada is sur-
vived by daughters,
Frances Haley, Willa Jean
Gurdry, Marion Ebby Ire-
land; sons, Russell
Williams and Jason Linier;
her grandchildren, great-
grandchildren; and great-
great-grandchild.
A memorial service will
be at the Heinz Funeral
Home Chapel at 1 p.m. Sat-
urday, Aug. 10, 2013.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home and Crema-
tion, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Lillian
DeMonarco, 97
SPRING HILL
Lillian DeMonarco, age
97, of Spring Hill, and for-
merly of Inverness, died
Aug. 2, 2013, under the
care of her loving family
and HPH Hospice in
Brooksville.
Lillian was born on Oct.
9, 1915, in Brooklyn, N.Y,
to the late Carmelo and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Josephine (Romano) Man-
tione. She was a retired
primary
school,
.Js c h o o 1
teacher
S and for-
S> mer mem-
ber of Our
Lady of
S*J ~ Fatima
Parish in
Lillian Inverness.
DeMonarco Left to
cherish her memory are
her son Joseph A. De-
Monarco and his wife
Carol of Spring Hill; two
daughters, JoAnn De-
Monarco, Lake Peekskill,
N.Y, and Mary Ann Dona-
dio, Oceanside, N.Y; eight
grandchildren; and five


great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
her husband Salvatore J.
DeMonarco on Nov 11,
1991, and her son Ronald
DeMonarco.
A Mass of Christian Bur-
ial will be offered at 11 a.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 6,2013, from
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church. Burial
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery The fam-
ily will receive friends in
visitation from 2 p.m. to
4 p.m. Monday at the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home,
where there will be a
wake vigil service at
3:30 p.m.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Natalie Burt, 92
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Natalie June Burt, 92,
passed away July 30, 2013,
at her home in Chassa-
howitzka, Homosassa, Fla.
She was born in St. Joseph
County, Mich., in 1921, the
daughter of the late Charles
R. and Clara (Mallory)
Wadsworth. She served
the Chassahowitzka com-
munity in many ways in-
cluding the food sharing
programs feeding the
needy, Crime Watch, Sen-
ior Companion program
and opened her home to
Bible study led by her pas-
tor, Richard Erickson.
She is survived by her


sons Arthur Burt (Sharon),
Atlantic Beach, and Thomas
Burt, Homosassa; daughters
Kathleen (Robert) Lenn and
Wendolyn Stemler (Edwin
III), Port St. John; step-
daughter JoAnn Johnson
(Gerald), Three Rivers, Mich.;
son-in-law Richard Seigler
(Donna Jean), Cumberland
Furnace, Tenn.; 17 grand-
children; and 30 great-
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by her


brothers Kenneth Hassel
Wadsworth; half-brothers
Raymond Lowell Wadsworth
and Clifton Frazier; hus-
band, Donald L. Burt; and
daughter, Donna J Seigler
She will be laid to rest at
Oaklawn Memorial Gardens
in Titusville. Donations may
be made to the CancerAsso-
ciation or St. Jude's Chil-
dren's Research Hospital.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


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OBITUARIES




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thousands protest
soldier's death
TAIPEI, Taiwan Tens of
thousands of Taiwanese gath-
ered in downtown Taipei on
Saturday to protest the death
of a 24-year old soldier con-
fined to a brig as punishment
for bringing an unauthorized
cellphone onto his base.
The protest was the biggest
so far in the continuing cam-
paign to register discontent
over the death of Hung
Chung-chiu on July 3.
The simmering anger is
complicating the Taiwanese
military's efforts to transition
from a mixed forced of con-
scripts and volunteers to an
all-volunteer force.
The university graduate
died after several days of
being forced to perform a rig-
orous regime of push-ups, sit-
ups and other exercises in
sweltering heat. He was just
three days short of completing
his 20-month service obliga-
tion at the time.
Eighteen officers and
NCOs have already been
charged in connection with
the case.
President Ma Ying-jeou has
apologized and the minister of
defense has resigned.
Public lunch
protests fasting
ALGIERS, Algeria -About
300 people in a restive north-
ern region of Algeria joined a
public lunch Saturday during
Ramadan to protest what they
say is persecution of people
who refuse to observe the re-
ligious fast.
The protest lunch was
highly unusual for North
Africa, where people can be
arrested for not fasting during
the Muslim holy month.
It was held as a demonstra-
tion against the decision of


security forces to question
three young people who were
eating outside last week in the
Kabylie region during the 18-
hour daily fasting period.
Costa Rica may
close public zoos
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica -
Costa Rican officials say they
plan to close both of the coun-
try's public zoos next year so
that animals can be freed
from their cages. But the
foundation that runs the ani-
mal parks is trying to keep
them operating.
Environment Minister Rene
Castro said the 97-year-old
Simon Bolivar zoo in central
San Jose will become a
botanical park.
Another zoo outside the city
also would close. Together
they hold 400 animals of 60
species, including a lion, croc-
odiles and deer.
The foundation that runs


the zoos is known as Funda-
zoo and it is asking a court to
block the closure.
Foundation spokesman Ed-
uardo Bolanos said Saturday
its contract to run the zoos
has been renewed through
2024. He said both zoos are
in good condition.
Twitter hands
down new rules
LONDON -Twitter is
handing down new rules to
control abusive language, the
company said Saturday, a
move which follows a barrage
of nasty, harassing, and
threatening messages di-
rected at high-profile female
users of the microblogging
site.
In a message posted to its
website, Twitter said it is intro-
ducing a one-click button to


report abuse and updating its
rules to clarify that it will not
tolerate abusive behavior.
The one-click button means
users will not have to navigate
to Twitter's help center in
order to fill out an abuse form
- a process some said was
too cumbersome to deal with
a mass of angry messages -
while the new rules includes a
stricture against "targeted
abuse," something which
could include slamming a sin-
gle user with messages from
multiple accounts, creating an
account purely to harass
someone, or making threats.
The company also prom-
ised to devote more staff to
weed out offending messages.
General Manager Tony
Wang said in a tweet that the
new anti-abuse policy will
apply worldwide.


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Zimbabwe: Mugabe
declared winner
HARARE, Zimbabwe -
Zimbabwe's electoral
panel on Saturday
declared that long-
time President
Robert Mugabe had
won re-election by a
landslide, a result
that could exacer-
bate tensions in the -
country, where the Rob
89-year-old's chief Mug
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winn
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Election Commission said his
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liament seats. That gives it a
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 All

amend a recently approved
constitution that provides for
democratic reforms.
Challenger Morgan Tsvan-
girai's party, which
Shad gambled that a
high turnout in its
favor would over-
come any alleged
fraud in the vote, cap-
tured 50 seats and
two went to inde-
pendent candidates.
lert According to the
Irabe results, Mugabe won
ared
er of 61 percent of the
uted vote, compared to 33
on in percent for Tsvangi-
abwe. rai, who had been
prime minister in a
tense power-sharing deal with
the president.
Officially, Mugabe, who has
been in power for 33 years,
gets another five-year term in
office.
-From wire reports


b
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A12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Nation/World
BRIEFS

Five hurt at power
plant implosion
BAKERSFIELD, Calif. -
Five spectators were injured
Saturday after shrapnel was
sent flying at the demolition of
a decommissioned steam
power plant in California, au-
thorities said.
More than 1,000 people had
gathered at 6 a.m. in a nearby
parking lot to watch the planned
implosion at the plant owned
by Pacific Gas and Electric in
Bakersfield. After structures on
the property came crashing
down, a police officer at the
scene heard a man screaming
for help and saw his leg had
been severed, police said.
"It was a piece of shrapnel
that came flying out of the ex-
plosion and came across and
went through a couple of
chain link fences, struck him
and impacted into a vehicle,"
said Lt. Scott Tunnicliffe.
Four other spectators were
treated for minor injuries, said
Kern County Fire engineer
Leland Davis. All of the injured
spectators were standing be-
yond a perimeter set up to en-
sure public safety, Davis said.
Family love triangle
spurs arrest
MOAB, Utah--According to
a newly released Moab police
report, last month's arrest of a
Grand County sheriff's deputy
for investigation of attempted
murder of his father stemmed
from a family love triangle.
The 13-page report released
Friday alleges Deputy Timothy
Brewer assaulted his wife and
his father, then-Moab Fire
Chief Wesley "Corky" Brewer,
after he caught them in bed
together July 11.
It's the first time police have
publicly released details in the
case involving the deputy, who
has since been charged with
misdemeanor counts of assault
and assault on a police officer.
The report states the
deputy and his wife had his
father over for dinner at their
home and the three sat
around having drinks until
Logan Brewer put one of the
couple's children to bed.
Timothy Brewer told investi-
gators he later "lost it" after he
went upstairs to find his son's
bedroom locked and his fa-
ther and his wife having sex.
Nine killed in
attack on consulate
KABUL, Afghanistan -
Three suicide bombers tried
to attack the Indian consulate
in an eastern Afghan city on
Saturday, sparking a shootout
with guards on a bustling
downtown street that left at
least nine civilians dead, offi-
cials said.
The attack, which ended when
the militants detonated a car
bomb that left charred debris
scattered in central Jalalabad
near the Pakistan border, did
not appear to damage the
consulate itself, and Indian of-
ficials said all of the facility's
staff escaped unharmed.
The Taliban denied respon-
sibility for the attack.
Inspired by Pamplona,
bull runs coming to US
ATLANTA- Organizers of
a new event planned for sev-
eral U.S. cities plan to un-
leash bulls to sprint through
fenced-in courses as daredev-
ils try to avoid being trampled.
The Great Bull Run is in-
spired by the annual running
of the bulls in Pamplona,
Spain. It's set to kick off Aug.
24 at a drag-racing strip south
of Richmond, Va. A second
event is planned for Oct. 19 at
an Atlanta-area horse park
that hosted events for the
1996 Olympics. More events
are planned later for Texas,
Florida, California, Minnesota,
Illinois and Pennsylvania.
Village trying birth


control on deer
HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON,
N.Y -A suburban New York
village has a birth control plan
- for deer.
It plans to inject females
with a contraceptive made
from pigs' ovaries.
Hastings-on-Hudson Mayor
Peter Swiderski said he's
hoping for a reduction of 35
percent to 40 percent in the deer
population over five years.
If the state approves the
program, does in Hastings
could be tranquilized, then in-
jected, by next winter.


-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Low-wage, part-time jobs dominate gains


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
162,000 jobs the economy
added in July were a dis-
appointment. The quality
of the jobs was even worse.
A disproportionate num-
ber of the added jobs were
part-time or low-paying-
or both.
Part-time work accounted
for more than 65 percent
of the positions employers
added in July Low-paying
retailers, restaurants and
bars supplied more than
half July's job gain.
"You're getting jobs
added, but they might not
be the best-quality job," said
John Canally, an economist
with LPL Financial in
Boston.
So far this year, low-pay-
ing industries have provided
61 percent of the nation's
job growth, even though


these industries represent
just 39 percent of overall
U.S. jobs, according to Labor
Department numbers an-
alyzed by Moody's Analytics.
Mid-paying industries have
contributed just 22 per-
cent of this year's job gain.
That's one reason
Americans' pay hasn't
kept up with even histori-
cally low inflation since
the Great Recession
ended in June 2009. Aver-
age hourly pay fell 2 cents
in July to $23.98 an hour
Among those feeling the
squeeze is Elizabeth
Wilkinson, 28, of Houston.
After losing a $39,000-a-
year administrative job at
Rice University in Janu-
ary, Wilkinson found work
at an employment agency
for $15 an hour Yet she's had
to supplement that job with
part-time work as a waitress.
"This morning I put $1.35


Associated Press
A "Now Hiring" sign hangs in front of a new McDonald's
restaurant under construction Thursday in Tempe, Ariz.
Of the 162,000 jobs the economy added in July 2013, a
disproportionate number were part-time, low-paying or both.


worth of gas in my car be-
cause that is all the money
that I had," Wilkinson said
via email.
Part-time work has
made up 77 percent of the
job growth so far this year
The government defines


part-time work as being
less than 35 hours a week.
The low quality of the
added jobs could help ex-
plain something that has
puzzled economists: How
has the U.S. economy man-
aged to add an average of


roughly 200,000 jobs a month
this year even though it
grew at a tepid annual
rate below 2 percent in
the first half of the year?
Some are proposing an
answer: Perhaps a chroni-
cally slow-growth economy
can't generate many good-
paying jobs but can pro-
duce lots of part-time or
lower-wage retail and
restaurant work.
Diane Swonk, chief
economist at Mesirow Fi-
nancial, recalls that the
robust economic growth of
the late '90s generated
millions of middle-class
jobs. And it pushed unem-
ployment so low that
short-staffed companies
were forced to convert
part-time jobs into full-
time work.
"Faster growth would fix
things," Swonk said. "Thafs
the magic fairy dust"


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
woman who gave birth to
a baby boy on a Metro
platform in downtown
Washington has been re-
leased from the hospital
with her son.
Shavonnte Taylor and
her son Amir were re-
leased from The George


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Washington's Historic
Congressional Cemetery
is employing a heard of
goats to clean up the
cemetery
The cemetery says 100
goats will graze at the
cemetery 24 hours a day
for six days starting
Aug. 7. The cemetery said


Washington University
Hospital on Saturday
Taylor gave birth Thurs-
day morning on the plat-
form of the busy LEnfant
Plaza station. Metro offi-
cials say she went into
labor aboard a green line
train bound for Greenbelt,
Md. An off-duty emer-
gency medical technician
helped her off the train


they'll eliminate vines,
poison ivy and ground
cover while "fertilizing
the ground."
The cemetery was
founded in the early
1800s and covers 35 acres
on Capitol Hill. The thou-
sands of people buried at
the cemetery including a
number of former sena-
tors and members of the
House.


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Metro general manager
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gratulations along with a
$100 SmarTrip card.
Taylor's son weighed 8
pounds, 5 ounces at birth.
He was two weeks early
and spent two days in the
neonatal intensive care
unit


GOT A
NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle
welcomes tips
from readers about
breaking news. Call
the newsroom at
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prepared to give
your name, phone
number, and the
address of the
news event.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal River at Bagley Cove near Crystal River, Fla.


Southwest Florida Water Management District/Special to the Chronicle
This is the location of the USGS/SWFWMD gauge where
salinity data is collected. This gauge, according to sci-
entist Chris Anastasiou, is a deepwater monitoring sys-
tem which keeps track of salinity levels as the tide ebbs
and flows.


USGS 02310747 CRYSTAL RIVER AT BAGLEY COVE NEAR CRYSTAL RIVER FL
Minimum Salinity (14-day moving average)
2002-2012


o -/2
4/19/2001


9/1/2002 1/14/2004 5/28/2005


10/10/2006 2/22/2008


7/6/2003 11/18/2010


y=- 0.0006x-19.944
R'- 0.318


4/1/2012 8/14/2013


Southwest Florida Water Management District/Special to the Chronicle
This graphic shows minimum salinity from 2002-12 at Bagley Cove station just downstream of the mouth of King's
Bay. The trend in minimum salinity indicates that the bay is getting less fresh.


BAY
Continued from PageAl

indicate that stormwater run-off,
chemical fertilizers or poorly
treated sewage or leaking septic
systems are polluting the bay
Water district personnel re-
cently concluded annual water
quality monitoring in the bay;
that data will be released in
about two months. The district
also conducts quarterly testing
at various springs in the bay
Some of the factors they test in-
clude: nitrates; turbidity, chloro-
phyll; fluoride, phosphorous;
chloride, sulfate and alkalinity
The district's data after last
fall's tests show nitrate levels in
King's Bay with the huge vari-
ances. For instance, at Hunters
Spring area the count was 0.62
parts per million the highest
in the bay while at Idiot's De-
light it was 0.17 the lowest.
Three Sisters Springs, King
Spring, Catfish and Magnolia
Springs had recordings of 0.20,
0.23, 0.37 and 0.59, respectively
The Homosassa and Chassahow-
itzka rivers' results were 0.66 and
0.59, respectively The accept-
able standard endorsed by the
Environmental Protection
Agency is 0.35.
However, the total nitrogen
count in the bay is down from
0.33 in 1990 to 0.20 in 2012.
Anastasiou said because of the
high phytoplankton or algae, the
bay's water column is turning
greener, which is in turn causing
the chlorophyll count to rise.
Phytoplankton can block sun-
light from reaching aquatic life
at the bottom. Chlorophyll
counts show a 10-year average
(2003-12) of 10.80, but a 14.30 in
2012 alone. Phosphorus shows a
10-year average of 0.031, but a


STEVEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Southwest Florida Water Management District Senior Field Technician Bob Brady evaluates water conditions in King Spring on Crystal River.


0.037 count in 2012 alone. In
1990, the phosphorus count was
0.042.
Anastasiou acknowledges the
data can be confusing, but that
data clearly show things are
trending the wrong way


He also tried to put the salin-
ity issue into context
Anastasiou said it is more eco-
logically important to think of
the bay as getting less fresh.
He said many freshwater
species can tolerate brief peri-


ods of high salinity as long as the
salinities drop back down.
"That's an important distinc-
tion here, because when mini-
mum salinities stay above 2 to 3
parts per thousand, you have ef-
fectively transitioned into an es-


tuary. And that's where the bay
is now Ecologically speaking,
that's not necessarily a bad
thing."
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


SUPERMOM
Continued from Page Al

As soon as the back-to-
school supply list is released,
each child is accountable for
printing out his or her own
school list
"I have an overall list of all
of the things that they need,"
Karen said. "I start shopping
as soon as school is out. I know
they are going to have to have
pens, pencils, paper ... that
kind of stuff. So I watch all
summer long and pick up
items as soon as I see them."
For the big-ticket items,
they recycle.
"They just got new back-
packs last year, so we are
going to recycle them, either
swap out with their sibling or
just use the same one," Karen
said.
The sports-enthusiastic
family also ensured physical
were completed before Karen
returned to her classroom on
Aug. 1. Her agenda was to
have everything from home
completed as she becomes fo-
cused on teaching the moment
the school bell rings.
School starts Wednesday, so
how does she remain organ-
ized throughout the school
year?
"Plan ahead," she said. "If
you can do a little bit at a time
it doesn't hurt as much as it
does doing it all at once. Also,
plan ahead to be involved."
School days become lengthy
and after-school activities
take the Wrights into the late
hours of the day; however,
Karen said no matter what,
the family is together
"We go to the games that the
kids have," she said. "Some-
times half of us will be at one
game while the other half is at
the other game on the same
night A lot of days, I make din-
ner in the Crock-Pot so that
dinner is ready for us when
we get home, because every-
one is starved as soon as they
walk in the door Sometimes,
not everyone can be home at


STEVEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Karen Wright is a schoolteacher and the mother of six. Shown clockwise, from left, are: Gabby,
15; Greg, 17; twins Julia and Polina, 14; and Ben, 17. Her eldest, Rebecca, 18, was at work.


Sometimes, not everyone can be
home at the same time, but we have
a group of us that can eat dinner
together. We heat things up for
the stragglers that come in later
from practice or game.

Karen Wright


the same time, but we have a
group of us that can eat dinner
together We heat things up for
the stragglers that come in
later from practice or game."
After dinner, homework
takes precedence, Karen said.
This year, she has decided


to implement a house rule of
cellphones being collected at
10 p.m. each school night.
"That way, they are not up all
night on their phones," Karen
said. "I don't know what they
are doing after I go to bed."
If homework is not finished,


Karen knows teachers have
her on speed dial.
"There is a lot of open com-
munication with teachers,"
she said. "They know my
email address, my phone
number We follow through so
that they know that school is a
priority"
Karen said she is no "Su-
permom," she just enforces
organization, responsibility,
planning ahead, family time
and open communication.
"It is definitely a whole fam-
ily working together," Karen
said. "There is no way that I
can do it all alone."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext 1334, oreworthington
@chronicleonline. corn.


OPEN
Continued from PagepAl

Citrus Springs Elementary 4 to
6 p.m. Monday Aug. 5.
Crystal River Primary 4 to 6 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 5 for first through fifth
grades; pre-K and kindergarten stu-
dents meet in the cafeteria at 3 p.m.
and Safety Patrol and their parents
meet in the cafeteria at 6 p.m.
Floral City Elementary 9:30 to
10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 5, for pre-K,
kindergarten and new students. The
remaining students meet their teacher
from 10 a.m. to noon.
Forest Ridge Elementary 4 to
6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 5.
Hernando Elementary- 3 to 4 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 5, for pre-K and kinder-
garten students and 4 to 6 p.m. for first-
through fifth-grade students.
Homosassa Elementary- 4 to 6 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 5.
Inverness Primary- 4 to 6 p.m. Mon-
day, Aug. 5.
Lecanto Primary 3 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 5 for pre-K and kindergarten stu-
dents and from 4:30 to 6 p.m. for first-
through fifth-grade students.
Pleasant Grove Elementary 3:30 to
4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 5, for new students
and 4 to 6 p.m. for all other students.
Rock Crusher Elementary 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 5.
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
All middle school open houses were
Friday, Aug. 2.
HIGH SCHOOLS
Citrus High 9 a.m. to noon Tues-
day, Aug. 6, for freshman only Fall
Open House is 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 20, with an informational session
at 5:30 p.m. for anyone pursuing Ad-
vanced Placement courses.
Crystal River High 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 6, for freshmen only Fall
Open House is 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 22.
Lecanto High 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday
Aug. 15.
OTHER PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Academy of Environmental Science
- 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 5, at College of
Central Florida Lecanto campus.
CREST 2 to 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 5.
Renaissance Center 3 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 6.


A14 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


LOCAL








EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE












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Hitting the links in Scotland
Fife's Classic Links Golf Trail, the purest of links golf,
includes the Old Course, New Course, Jubilee Course
and Kingsbarns (Scotland's equivalent to Pebble Beach),
all of which are in St. Andrews and Lundin Golf Club.
The Open Championship Qualifying Trail, made up of
qualifying courses for the Open Championship,
includes Ladybank, Scotscraig and Lundin Golf Clubs,
as well as Leven Links.
The Ladies Golf Trail, Strathtyrum Course, Elie Links
and Balcomie Links at Crail are open to males and
females. The Lundin Ladies Golf Club is just for women.
All courses are steeped in women's golf history and are
less demanding in course length.
The Family Trail, suitable for newcomers or
youngsters, includes Anstruther Golf Club (nine holes)
and Balgove Course (nine holes), as well as Charleton
and Scoonie Golf Clubs.
The Hidden Treasure Trail courses, overlooked and
deserving of a higher profile, include Thornton,
Kinghorn and Aberdour Golf Clubs, as well as
Burntisland Golf House Club.
Located inland, away from the popular coastal
courses, are the courses of The Carnegie Country Trail:
Glenrothes, Dunnikier and Dunfermline Golf Clubs, as
well as the Montgomery Course.
The four courses that make up The Golf Gourmet
Trail, where courses and restaurants are equal in great-
ness, are the Castle Course (Peat Inn), Torrance Course
(Esperanto Restaurant), Duke's Course (Road Hole
Restaurant) and Balbirnie Park (The Orangery).


Some 4,300 miles away from Citrus County, along Scotland's eastern
coastline, is the County of Fife. Its 521 square miles are filled with
Scottish heritage that dates back to its formal beginnings in 1150.
Like Citrus County, Fife's bordering of a large body of water,
the North Sea, makes boating and water sports very popular in the
county that has roughly 365,000 people. Unlike Floridians,
Fife residents consider 80 degrees (or, as they would say, 26 degrees
Celsius), a scorching heat wave. A 40- or 50-degree day would come
easy for Fife residents when it comes to playing their sport,
the one invented in their county 550 years ago golf.


T he County of Fife is a
destination where
visitors can navigate
horse riding trails or
steep hills, perfect for
cycling. They can take in
the breathtaking coastal
views, head out on a boat or enjoy local
flair at Fife's spectacular restaurants.
Yet it is Fife's 43 golf courses that make
it a golf destination first and foremost.
"Approximately 85 percent of the
golfers that play our course are from
North America," said Alan Hogg, chief
executive at Kingsbarns Golf Links.
The likelihood that a foursome in


front and behind you at Kingsbarns
hails from Trenton, N.J., Minneapolis,
Minn., or Tempe, Ariz., illustrates that
fellow Americans are more than
willing to make the trek across the
pond to try their hand at links golf.
Fife, just like anywhere else, offers a
range of places to lay your head. Bed
and breakfasts, rental villas and homes,
as well as elaborate hotels are all
available. St. Andrews, the most
popular destination in the entire
county because of it rich golf history,
has the most accommodations by far
A university town, St. Andrews, said


Page A18


Golf clubs are shown in the seaside village on the East Neuk of Fife coast.

Feature story and photos by Keith Chartrand / For the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING AUGUST 4, 2013 C:Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D1i: Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B OD/IFI H1 6:00 16:30 7:001 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
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Don't cut sister


off so quickly


D earAnnie: My sis-
ter always leaves
big tips -like $5
for a cup of coffee. She
also is overly generous
in other ways. She gave
our teenage niece sev-
eral pairs of expensive
boots and was furious
when the girl then sold
them on eBay
Six years
ago, my sister
let her house
go to mold.
When the
local police
began asking
about her, I
stepped in
and found
someone will- -
ing to buy her
home and
rehab it She
has since lived ANI
in an ex- MAI
tended-stay
hotel and is
now on anti-depressants.
I recently met her for
lunch. We both ordered
soup for a total of $8.1 I
left a 20 percent tip, but
as I was walking out the
door, I caught her check-
ing out my tip and then
adding to it Frankly, I
don't want to meet up
with her anymore. How
should I handle this? -
Indy
Dear Indy: Has your
sister been screened to
see if she is bipolar? Her
anti-depressant may not
be adequate. We know
her behavior is irritating,
but please don't cut her
off over this. Your pres-
ence may be a major


N
L


source of support for her
DearAnnie: This is in
response to "Frustrated
Daughter-in-Law," who
said her mother-in-law
has anxiety and self-
diagnosed fibromyalgia.
Fibromyalgia can be a
disabling disorder Anxi-
ety depression and irrita-
ble bowel are all very
real compo-
nents of the ill-
ness. I am only
in my mid-50s
and also find it
difficult to ex-
ercise. I don't
leave the
house unless I
Shave to or un-
less it is for
something I re-
ally enjoy
When you
IE'S have fi-
BOX bromyalgia,
you learn to
budget your
energy You owe a lot of
people an apology -In
Her Shoes
Dear Shoes: Our com-
ment had nothing to do
with the legitimate pains
of fibromyalgia. We know
that many people suffer
from this energy-draining
illness. But Mom has not
seen a doctor about her
various maladies and is
unwilling to be tested.
She doesn't actually know
what's wrong and is self-
diagnosing in a way that
allows her to maintain
her current status. There
could be something else
going on that can be
treated, and she should
be willing to find out.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"2 Guns" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Conjuring" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 7:25 p.m.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.,
2:50 p.m.,8 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." In 3D. (PG-13)
5:20 p.m.
"Smurfs 2" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Smurfs 2" In 3D. (PG)
5:15 p.m. No passes.
"Turbo" (PG) 12 p.m.,
2:30 p.m.,5 p.m.
"The Wolverine" 12:30 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.


"The Wolverine" In 3D. (PG-
13) 3:30 p.m. No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"2 Guns" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Conjuring" (R)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
11:50 a.m.,2:25 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" In 3D.
4:50 p.m.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Smurfs 2" (PG) 11:45 a.m.,
2:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Smurfs 2" In 3D. (PG)
4:55 p.m.
"Turbo" (PG) 12 p.m.,
2:30 p.m.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG) 5 p.m.
"The Wolverine" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Wolverine" In 3D.
(PG-13) 3:30 p.m.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Washed-out
6 Diminutive
11 UK nation
16 Chicago players
20 Tequila source
21 Veranda
22 Delicious smell
23 Port city in Japan
25 Merciless
26 Make sense
(2 wds.)
27 Theater curtain
28 Of kidneys
29 A perfect-
30 Alit
32 Hires
34 Part of NATO (abbr.)
35 Bristle
37 -of March
38 Old Roman writer
39 Sharpshooter Annie -
41 Temptress
43 Hoisting device
44 Saw
46 Serving dish
49 Toss
50 Place for
merchandise
54 Careless
55 Adhere
56 Stylishly elegant
57 Be gloomy
58 In the past
59 Arrow part
60 Marine snail
61 Large and
extra-large
62 Clammy
64 Kerchief
65 Defraud
66 Metric measures
67 Seaweed
68 Vetch seed
69 Root
70 Tried for office
71 Latter- Saints


Cede
Hoarse sound
Looney Tunes Pig
That girl
Upper limit
Brief
Secure with ropes
Schoolroom event


87 Cop's beat
89 Lull
90 Dirty, in a way
91 Notorious ruler
92 Pale
93 Stone fruits
94 Casts a ballot
95 Insect egg
96 Going it alone?
97 Consumes
98 Trent or Thames, e.g.
99 Humorous
102 Collection of
animals
105 Grew
106 Military rank
107 Clear
108 Brick of a kind
109 Ralph Emerson
110 Seem
113 Safe place
114 Jung or Perkins
115 Dalai-
119 Likewise not
120 Split open
123 Tropical fruit
125 -Abnerof
comics
126 Audibly
128 Countrified
129 Relating to a town
130 Fair-haired one
132 Liking
133 Dwelling
134 Loos or Ekberg
135 Knight's weapon
136 Woodwind
137 French artist
138 Fleur---
139 Lawn tool

DOWN
1 Information
2 See eye-to-eye
3 Discourage
4 She raised Cain
5 Computer maker
6 Defame
7 Drive crazy
8 South American range
9 Praise
10 Sass
11 Household chore
12 Mysterious
13 Truck, British style
14 Give off


15 Identical
16 Flower
arrangement
17 Application
18 Commonplace
19 Glide over ice
24 Friendly nation
31 Buenos -
32 Bell sound
33 Bellow
36 Wine city in Italy
38 Write a certain way
40 Muppets frog
42 "-a boy!"
43 Precipice
44 Inclined upward
45 Loading platform
46 "The Devil
Wears -
47 Licit
48 Surrounded by
49 Fiery signal
50 Clip
51 Flowed slowly
52 Musical drama
53 Untidy
55 Leafy vegetable
56 Impertinence
59 Overcharge for tickets
60 Cereal grass
61 Godown
63 Letter before el
64 Pilfer
65 Disagreeable task
66 Bird or Hagman
69 Traverse
70 Plant parts
73 Religious picture
74 Pals
75 Difficult question
76 Hankering
77 Tic
78 makes waste
79 Frome or Allen
81 Word in a recipe
82 Toned down
84 Inert gas
85 Come to be
86 Roadside
establishment
88 Entertain
89 Fabric design
90 Delaware's capital
93 Persian fairy
94 Fox
98 Talked wildly


99 Full of mirth
100 Antique
101 Refrigerate
103 Cautious
104 Light color
105 Ripple
106 Capital of
Venezuela
108 Procession
109 Antlered animal


Body structure (abbr.)
- bear
Ordinary language
A Great Lake
Make trivial
objections
Lengthwise
Chop
Deciduous tree
Baby buggy


Band member
Yearn
Competent
Western Indian
Bounder
Youth


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


2013 UFS, Dist- by Universal Uclick for UFS


A16 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE TOGETHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 A1 7


On growing the $800 apple


ears ago, I started planting
fruit trees in the back yard.
I planted five different
kinds of apple trees, a cherry and
a pear The next year, I planted
five different kinds of apple trees,
a cherry and a pear because the
deer had eaten the first batch
down to the nubs. I bought wire
fencing and made cages around
each new tree.
The following year, I planted
five different kinds of apple trees,
a cherry and a pear because the
deer just leaned over the fences
and ate the saplings. The next
year, I used taller, stronger wire
fence cages. It kept the deer out,
but not the rabbits, which nibbled
the bark off the bottom of the trees
and killed them.
The next batch of trees I fenced
in with deer- and rabbit-proof
fencing. The tent caterpillars ar-
rived in June and spent the next
month eating every leaf The next
batch caught some kind of rust or
mold and all the leaves fell off.
The next batch got backed over by
the guy who delivered the shingles
for our new garage roof
One year they all just died, and
no one could figure out why Was it
too wet in June or too dry in July?
I've been at this for 10 years
now I refuse to give up. Why
should farmers have all the fun?
And my perseverance has paid off.


This year I will get r
grown apples. Grani
of them. They are sti
and nothing has eatE
but there's only a mc
to go before I have t
ing crew
When you add it a
fencing, the root sto(
put in it will probe
me about $800 per a
year I might get four
dropping my per-ap]
to $266. Of course, m
start supplying all th
need, I still have to 1
the store.
You may think tha
vs. deer standoff has
forever, and that I st
with it But while do
torical research in s
year-old newspaper
news story from 191'
last, John O'Connor,
farm on Ogden Hill I
deer cross the road


He tried to follow it but it soon dis-
appeared." Not a very exciting
Jim story except for the fact that it
means a hundred years ago, deer
Mullen were so rare around here that
spotting one was a news story
VILLAGE The main problem with shrub-
IDIOT eating, crop-eating, flower-eating,
sapling-eating, tick taxi suburban
deer is that they are cute. If they
looked like 250-pound giant lo-
ny first home- custs, something tells me that
ny Smiths. Two shooting them would be made
ill on the tree mandatory But no, they look like a
en them yet, Disney cartoon and get all the
month and a half privileges that come with being
o hire a pick- cute.
Which is why, one morning last
11 up the week, there were 23 deer grazing
ck, the time I on my front lawn. It looked as if we
ably only cost were raising them. Next to the
pple. But next deer was a flock of Canada geese
More apples, that never seem to leave. When
ple cost down did geese stop flying south in the
until my trees winter and north in the summer?
4e apples I They just live in the same place all
buy them at the time now My lawn.
A car stopped in front of our
it the human house and a guy stuck his iPad out
Been going on the window and videoed the
iould just deal wildlife. You'd have thought he
)ing some his- was filming a rare white tiger for
ome hundred- "Wild Kingdom." I wish he was ... a
s, I spotted a nice cute tiger would solve so
3: "On Tuesdav many of my lawn care problems.


who has a
Road, saw a
going north.


Contact Jim Mullen online at
JimMullenBooks. corn.


Aug. 6to 10MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Hot dog on bun with mustard, baked beans with
tomato, carrot coins, mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Vegetable soup, turkey ham and cheese on
whole-grain bun with mayonnaise and mustard, fresh orange,
oatmeal-raisin cookie, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday celebration: Beef rotini pasta,
Neapolitan spinach, Italian vegetable medley, dinner roll with
margarine, slice birthday cake, low-fat milk.


Thursday: Baked chicken thigh with coq au vin sauce,
rice pilaf, country vegetable medley, applesauce, slice
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk
Friday: Sausage and bean casserole, buttered spinach,
yellow corn, citrus fruit, slice whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon.
For information about Senior Dining services, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


10th ANNIVERSARY

The Radfords





Bpip 2


fc^I-

Michael Duane and
Mary Ann Radford of
Crystal River celebrated
their 10th wedding an-
niversary Aug. 2,2013.
The couple were mar-
ried Aug. 2, 2003, in Citrus
Springs. Mary Ann, a
housewife, is a lifelong
resident of Citrus County


and is from Inglis.
Michael, a native of
Miami, has lived in Citrus
County for 16 years and is
a nuclear building
serviceman.
They have four
children: Michael Lee,
Ann Marie, Michael
Devin and Hailey Skye.


For the RECORD


July 22-29, 2013
Divorces
Edwin Moore vs. Louise
Moore
Stephanie V. Salay,
Homosassa vs. James K.
Salay, Reno, Nev.
Vance L. Shaffer, Crystal
River vs. Linda R. Shaffer,
Beverly Hills
Alexis D. Solverson, Citrus
Springs vs. Steven J.
Solverson, Pensacola
Marriages
Lewis Earl Anderson,
Lakeland/Betty Ann Delong,
Hernando Beach
Timothy Alan Evans,


Homosassa/Sharon Elizabeth
Kight, Homosassa
Steven Edward Smith,
Beverly Hills/Tiffany Marie
Hatadis, Inverness
Daniel Wilbur Thrush,
Floral City/Kathie Jo Revis,
Floral City
Kenneth Wayne Wright,
Homosassa/Nancy Ann
Easton, Homosassa
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400.


AND THE




2013,


NERS ARE...


S/e dtluctllae


I ,i ,
*V


4


, r s ,

.. ,11
1' "-
L^ ^ k"


Friday, August 9,11:30 AM


Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club


*o *e par ofthis amzn ventples e cal-th

Cirs ont*habr fCo mrc t 9- 3149


Thank you to our Healthcare Hero Partners.


511/f cc


S P/>/i'


af SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES CITRUS_ COUNTY
t f/of Lecanto REOL CON
M MOIkY CARE ........................... www.chronicleonline.com


Citrus Memorial Health Systems, Complete Family Dentistry, Crystal Community ENT and Suncoast Eye Center


I


F>




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KEITH CHARTRAND / For the Chronicle
A ball washer is shown on a golf course in seaside
village on the East Neuk of Fife coast.

SCOTLAND
Continued from Page A15
to be where the first round of golf was played in the
1400s, is home to eight courses on Fife's seven golf trails.
The friendly and welcoming spirit of the locals in
Fife makes a stay more enjoyable. The feeling of being
Norm from "Cheers" at a Fife watering hole takes just
one trip back. The flexibility of restaurant and bar
staffs to cater to patrons extends so far that, if men-
tioned in advance, a kitchen will stay open past its
normal operating hours if an afternoon round of golf
extends beyond its normal kitchen hours. During the
best golfing months in Scotland, July and August, it
doesn't get dark until almost 10 p.m. A 4 p.m. tee time
would be fine for 18 holes. Afterwards, a plate offish
and chips could literally be waiting for you after your
round. Such is the case at Greyfriars Hotel Bar, just a
five-minute walk from the Old Course. Under the di-
rection of Jim and Paul McClements, Greyfriars has
fabulous meals, 50 different beers from all over the
world and a wide array of liquor including Scotland's
famous single-malt scotches.
To get the most golfing experiences during a trip to
Scotland, schedule it during Open Championship.
Watching the pros trying to tame some of the most fa-
mous courses in the world is a treat. ScotRail, Scot-
land's train system, provides connectivity to the entire
country A relaxing train ride to Muirfield, the site of
last month's Open Championship, from St. Andrews is
two hours one way and a total of 26 pounds ($34)
roundtrip; well worth it as opposed to driving a rental
car while battling 35,000 other spectators. Also visit
the British Golf Museum located behind the St.
Andrews clubhouse.
Getting past the long flight, passport hassles and
driving on the other side of the road are minor incon-
veniences for a trip to Scotland. It promises to be a
trip of a lifetime.


()Good Tim. s Trav(I
843-4133
Marlene Kaiser marlenekaiser@yahoo.com
F1 seller oftravel 13519
OKTOBERFEST HELEN, GA OCTOBER 16 -19,2013
Stay at Best Western with welcome reception, breakfast daily, step
on guide for Helen, Dinner followed by Oktoberfest Festival, one
day at Dahlonega for their Gold Festival, followed by a fantastic
lunch/dinner. This is always a wonderful fun trip with the
beautiful colors in the mountains. Double $445 pp
BEST OF SARASOTA Sept. 17-19, 2013


VIKING RIVER
VIKING CRUISE 2014
RIVER CRUISES UI 2 1
uBo ENJOYABLE WAY
TO SEE EUROPE!
S BFilling up quickly.
Hurry to reserve your stateroom.
Call to check availability and rates.


C Celebrity Solstice
March 10,2014
Austrailia & New Zealand
Includes Air from Orlando
Inside........................... 351 .L00
Oceanview...................3704.00
Balcony............4....... 02.OO


Becky's Travel Store


Driven Tours
Call for more details!
Call for more details!


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ,-*1 C ^-f I
Located Next to Winn Dixie __ t(352)52, 85 1

PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

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4 *.,.,,,.... www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River


Spectacular
SPECIALS
C =1-j


Midee Ponoo Spca


SCALLOPING TOURS
Collecting scallops is like hunting
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starfish and many other creatures await your visit.
JULY 1 THRU SEPTEMBER 25- Reservalions Requited
$65 per person includesRidetothe Gulfof Mexico, ........ ....
Saltwater Fishing License, Mask, Snorkel and Fins.


(352) 628-5222 or 800-758-3474 a
www riversafaris corn _'^ B r~ i^ F -.V


If you want to
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call 563-5592


Break The Cigarette Stigma!


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SINGLE TREKKERS 6 i^'\ ,1kTkiiJr- O COLLETTE
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Guest speaker-Globus Vacations ST. MAARTEN, ST. LUCIA, AN. 16-FEB. 5, 2014
CRSVP 860-2805 or BARBADOS, MARTINIQLUE,
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... -..... ..


.. .. .. .. .


A18 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


ExcURSIONS


I L2G
2


g"
im it











CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a singu-
lar event or moment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to you. It can be any
type of event, from something from the
battlefield to a fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that you provide us with
your rank, branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit and veter-
ans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at
352-586-9202 or email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo. corn. C.J. will put together your sto-
ries and help set up obtaining "then" and
"now" photos to publish with your story

New DAV group to meet
Service-connected disabled veterans
are sought to become members of a newly
forming Disabled American Veterans
chapter in Crystal River The chapter
needs 50 new members to get a charter
The group will meet at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 24, in the old Sears building at
Crystal River Mall.
For information, call Duane Godfrey at
352-794-3104, or email
mgodfrey222@gmail. com.

Heroes'names reading
A special event, an Iraq/Afghanistan
Fallen Hero Name Reading, will be held
from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 21, at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
The Vietnam Veterans Gathering seeks
community volunteers to read the names
of fallen heroes from Iraq and
Afghanistan. Volunteers are asked to read
30 names. A recording of all names will be
played at local and nationwide memorials
and veteran events.
Call Jim Stepanek at 352-489-1644 or
email IMcrazyjim@aol.com.

Post open dinner, installation
American Legion Post 166 will have its
installation of officers and dinner at 6 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 10, at Springs Lodge No.
378 F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. Installation of officers will
begin at 7 p.m. The public is invited.
Cost of the dinner is $12 per person,
with a choice of either chicken parmesan
or prime rib.
Send a check and indicate entree and
number of persons to attend to: Vice
Commander Clay Scott, PO. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL 34447.
For more information, call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-2090.

Purple Heart event
The West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693, at 7890
W Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa,
will host a breakfast and program at 9 a.m.
Thursday, Aug. 8, to honor Purple Heart
recipients and commemorate the 231st an-
niversary of the Purple Heart.
The families of those who fell in combat
and all combat-wounded veterans and
their guests are invited.
Attendees are requested to register for
the free breakfast by calling Carrie
Clemons at 352-628-1633 or mailing
carriejeanetteclemons@yahoo.com.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Transitioning veterans
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans who
have recently transitioned from the mili-
tary (or returning reservist from tours of
active duty) to Citrus County within the
past two years.
Veterans Services requests that veterans
and their spouses call to be placed on a
list for an upcoming seminar, which will
discuss what benefits or services they
need to help ease transition.
The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call 352-
527-5915 to reserve a seat.
For more information about the Citrus
County Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Veterans' Memorial
Purple Heart recipients are sought to be
honored with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.


Finding love on duty


I :- I ... ".., ...'. ".


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Bill Pickett, U.S. Army retired, and his wife, Jytte, look through some of the many photographs he acquired during his
career in military service. The couple first met in Copenhagen and married a few months following their introduction. Today
is the couple's 58th anniversary.


RetiredArmy

journalist celebrates

58 years with wife

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
During his more than 20 years
in the U.S. Army, Bill Pickett
saw action from one side of
the world to the other It was
during his first assignment, however,
that he made his greatest discovery
That would be Jytte, whom he met
in Copenhagen, Denmark, while on
leave from his posting in Bamburg,
Germany After a four-month
courtship, the two were married on
Aug. 4,1955 58 years ago today
Now 80, Pickett grew up in the
Boston area and was working while
taking classes, first at Northeastern
University and then Suffolk Univer-
sity, before joining the Army in 1953 at
the end of the Korean conflict. His
first posting was in Germany "I was
there when the (Berlin) wall went up,"
he said and after that, he spent time
in the Dominican Republic, Peru,
Panama and served four tours in
Vietnam.


!ii!ji~I~~
~Their K:
2UUi~ .uU~


"I was in Thailand for a while, and
was stationed in Da Nang and Chu
Lai," he said.
Pickett, who was a first sergeant
when he was discharged, was not your
typical soldier He was in the Public
Information Detachment a journal-
ist- writing, editing and doing the


layout for various regimental
newspapers.
"It was pro-military stuff," he said.
"I was writing about the guys in the
foxholes. I like to think we were like
Ernie Pyle (the famous American

See Page A20


Veterans & Service GROUPS


This listing contains only basic informa-
tion regarding each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activities, meals
and more for a specific post or group, call or
email the contact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or corrections to com-
munity@chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPostl 55@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPost1l55.org.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155.
Call Unit President Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
American Legion Wall Rives Post 58
and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly Hills Me-
morial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway,
in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org
or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Legion Post
77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president Alice Brummett
at 352-476-7001.
American Legion Post 166, meets at
the Olive Tree Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Call Commander Robert Scott


In SERVICE
U.S. Air Force
Airman Blake
S Delmain
returned from
duty in
Afghanistan
on Friday,
Aug. 2.
Delmain is a
graduate of
Crystal River
High School.
He will be
returning to a
duty station in
California.


at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American Legion
Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087, County
Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864,
10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose


Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call
352-726-3339, email vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com and Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189,
West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Homosassa. Call
352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post
7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and
Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call 352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698,
520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east
of U.S. 19. Call 352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post 447,405
E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans Gerald
A. Shook Chapter No. 70,1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Inde-
pendence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-
419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans Auxil-
iary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.

See Page A20


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to


community@chronicleonline.com.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event.


BW f g I|||||||..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

NAME- W.L. (Bill) Pickett
RANK First Sergeant
BRANCH U.S. Army
SERVED Germany, Dominican Republic, Vietnam, Panama,
Peru, United States
YEARS 1953-73
OUTFITS 1st Infantry Division, 26th Infantry Regiment,
Germany; Inter-American Peace Force (IAPF), Dominican
Republic; U.S. Army Support Command, 23rd Infantry Division,
Thailand and Chu Lai, Vietnam; 196th Light Infantry Brigade,
Da Nang, Vietnam
JOB Public Information Detachment, responsible for production
of various regimental newspapers
VETERANS ORGANIZATIONS Veteran of Foreign Wars and
Disabled American Veterans




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORDS
Continued from Page A19

journalist killed in World
War II)."
It was while on duty in
Vietnam that Pickett was
exposed to Agent Orange,
the infamous insecticide
blamed for various veter-
ans' ailments. Pickett said
he is 20 percent disabled,
and his Type II diabetes
was the result of his
exposure.
Besides his postings in
Vietnam, Pickett said he
was in the Dominican Re-
public during its 1965 rev-
olution, which prompted
American intervention
and occupation. While Bill Pick
stationed at the Panama earned (
Canal Zone in May 1970, Walt Bo
he was part of a disaster earned t
aid effort for the Ancash Pickett
- or Great Peruvian ceremor
earthquake in the Andes,
of which the resulting av- Harriso
alanches caused an esti- Indiana
mated 20,000 fatalities, he serve
Pickett also had several instruct
assignments in the U.S., trade to
including his final posting tal news
at Fort Benjamin It was




GROUPS
Continued from Page A19

Marine Corps League Ladies
Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400.
The Korean War Veterans Associ-
ation, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496, Neville
Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets atAmer-
ican Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base
Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown restau-
rant, Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe at
352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Ca-
bane 1219 meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal
River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith
at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La
President Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
.ett, center, is presented the U.S. Army Commendation Medal, one of five he
during his time in the Army. Presenting him the medal in 1968 is Lt. Col.
wie. Pickett's wife, Jytte, was present at the ceremony in Panama. Pickett
the honor for service performed following a disastrous earthquake in Peru.
said he, his wife and their children returned to America shortly after the
ny.


n, outside
polis. While there,
ed as a journalism
or, teaching his
aspiring regimen-
s journalists.
While serving at


Fort Benjamin Harrison
that Pickett said he heard
of a job opening at the
Indianapolis Star
"They paid a lot more
than the Army did," he
said.


1959. Visit www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Mil-
itary Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders
Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League, Samuel R.
Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League Citrus De-
tachment 819 meets at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patter-
son at 352-746-1135, Ted Archambault
at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher,
secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets
at Denny's in Crystal River. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
West Central Florida Coasties
meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant
in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State


Pickett left the Army in
1973, spending the next 23
years at the Star, first as a
copy editor and later as
an assistant sports editor
and columnist. He and
Jytte live in Crystal River


Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group meets at differ-
ent VFW posts throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-1037, or email
geneusawo@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter
7 meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rollingthunderfl7.com,
call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of
the Air Force Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike
Emig at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coalition
is on the DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-8952. Members
can renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless Coalition.
Call Ed Murphy at 352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by non-
profit agency ServiceSource, is to meet
the needs of wounded veterans. 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call employ-
ment specialist Charles Lawrence at
352-527-3722, ext. 102.


United States Army Sgt. Major Bill Woolridge and Bill
Pickett visit with one another while serving in Thailand.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


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A20 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


VETERANS









SPORTS


Bucs
linebacker
Foster said
defense is
improving./
B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Baseball/B2, B4
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
Football, golf/B5
1 Auto racing/B6


Former Buc Sapp inducted into hall


Other headliners

include Carter,

Parcells

Associated Press
CANTON, Ohio Forcefully
and emotionally, Cris Carter
summed up the 50th induction
ceremony for the Pro Football
Hall of Fame on Saturday night
The seventh and final in-
ductee from the Class of 2013,
Carter honored dozens of peo-
ple in his life who were "going
into the Hall of Fame with me
tonight," as he followed
Jonathan Ogden, Dave Robin-
son, Larry Allen, Bill Parcells,


Curley Culp and Warren Sapp
in being inducted.
More than 120 hall members,
a record, returned for the 50th
anniversary celebration of the
shrine.
I appreciate the process you
have to go through to get to be a
Hall of Famer," said Carter, who
had perhaps the best hands of
any receiver the NFL has seen.
"To be able to join these men on
this stage in football heaven is
the greatest day of my life."
Carter needed six tries to
make the hall even though he
retired as the No. 2 career re-
ceiver behind Jerry Rice. He
choked back tears as he made
his speech after being pre-
sented by his son, Duron, and
he spoke of his problems with
alcohol while playing three


years for the Eagles before
being released.
He hooked on immediately
with the Vikings and hooked onto
nearly everything throw his way:
Carter finished his 16-season ca-
reer with 1,101 catches for 13,899
yards and 130 touchdowns.
"This game gave me identity,
gave me a sense of purpose," he "
said.
Parcells also seemingly spoke
for everyone in the Hall of
Fame, and all the people gath-
ered Saturday night.
"There's a kinship created
that lasts for the rest of your
life," he said about his experi-
ence as one of the NFEs most
successful coaches. Associated Press
Parcells had several of his Former NFL football player Warren Sapp, left, and his daughter,
Mercedes, unveil Sapp's bust during the induction ceremony at the
See HA Page B3 Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday in Canton, Ohio.


Extra good for Rays


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays outfielder Wil Myers is showered with water Saturday during a TV interview with Barry Lebrock after his game-
winning single in the 10th inning against the San Francisco Giants in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 2-1.

Myers' RBI single in 10th lifts Tampa Bay to 2-1 win over San Fran.


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Wil Myers had
an RBI single in the bottom of the 10th in-
ning, lifting the Tampa Bay Rays to a 2-1
victory over the San Francisco Giants on
Saturday night.
Desmond Jennings drew a leadoffwalk
in the 10th off Jean Machi (2-1) and stole
second. Ben Zobrist was intentionally
walked and Evan Longoria walked to
load the bases on four pitches before
Myers won it on his liner that went over
the left fielder's head.
Closer Fernando Rodney (4-2) allowed
two hits during a scoreless 10th, striking
out Brandon Crawford with two on and
two out.
The game featured a matchup of for-
mer Cy Young Award winners, David
Price and Tim Lincecum, and both were
outstanding.


Price gave up one run, five hits and
struck out five in nine innings. In seven
starts since returning from a left triceps
injury, the Rays left-hander has allowed
just 10 runs, 38 hits, one walk, and struck
out 40 over 57 1/3 innings.
Lincecum allowed one run, six hits,
one walk and had five strikeouts in seven
innings. The right-hander was making his
third start-the previous two were losses
- since throwing a no-hitter at San Diego
July 13.
It was just the second game in Rays his-
tory that featured two former Cy Young
Award winners. The first came May 9
when Price pitched against Toronto
knuckleballer R.A. Dickey in a contest
that included both reigning winners.
Jeff Francoeur doubled leading off
eighth for his third hit in three at-bats
against Price and advanced to third on
fly, but was left stranded when Crawford
hit a soft liner and Andres Torres had a


grounder
Crawford put San Francisco up 1-0 with
an RBI single in the third. Price struck
out Crawford with runners on second and
third to end the fifth.
Zobrist tied it at 1 in the bottom of the
third on a run-scoring grounder that
drove in Jose Molina, who walked to open
the inning. Molina went to second on wild
pitch and advanced to third on Kelly
Johnson's infield single that saw Lince-
cum get in the way of first baseman Brett
Pill as he tried to tag out Johnson.
Giants catcher Buster Posey made a
nifty play in the fourth on Myers' infield
single. He chased down an errant throw
by the first-base dugout and threw out
the speedy rookie as he tried to reach
second.
Longoria went 0 for 3, including three
strikeouts and two walks, and is hitless in
his last 17 at-bats. He hit just. 194 in July,
a month the Rays went 21-5.


Woods

average, but


still leads
Associated Press
AKRON, Ohio With an elite
field chasing the lead, Tiger Woods
decided to play keep-away
Already up by a staggering seven
shots through 36 holes thanks to a
career-tying best of 61 in the sec-
ond round, Woods shot a solid 2-
under 68 on Saturday in the
Bridgestone Invitational to main-
tain that same seven-stroke lead.
It was as if he was turning
around and daring the world's best
players to come after him. No one
really could.
"You know, today was a day that
I didn't quite have it," said Woods,
who was at 15-under 195. "But I
scored. And that's the name of the
game, posting a number, and I did
today I grinded my way around
that golf course."
Now he's only 18 holes away
from making even more history in
a career of historic accomplish-
ments. He'll be competing against
the record book as much as the
elite field.
"It's kind of tough to pick up
seven or eight shots on Tiger
around here," said Henrik Sten-
son, a distant second after a 67. "It
would take something spectacular
on my behalf or any of the other
guys around me, and obviously a
very, very poor round for him."
Woods, by the way, is 41-2 when
leading after 54 holes in a PGA
Tour event.
A victory would be his eighth at
Firestone Country Club and in the
Bridgestone and its forerunner,
the NEC Invitational. That would
match the tour-record eight he al-
ready has at Bay Hill and the eight
wins Sam Snead had at the
Greater Greensboro Open.
Woods also could capture his
79th victory on the PGA Tour,
drawing him within three of
Snead's record of 82.
"I'll just go out there and execute
my game plan," he said. "It all starts
with what the weather is doing, and
then I build it from there. We'll see
what I do tomorrow"
Unlike in a second-round 61 that
could easily have been a 59 or even
lower, Woods didn't recover from all
of his errant shots. He bogeyed the
ninth, 14th and 16th holes, failing to
bounce back from wayward shots.
Yet he still was good enough to
put himself in position for yet an-
other lopsided victory, one that
will likely mark him as the player
to beat next week in the PGA
Championship at Oak Hill.


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r


OOOFOKS I




MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC
8 E- -
1 21 2
0 5%/2 4
3 8/2 3/2
9 15 /2 10/2


East Division
GB WC


11/2 61/2
151/2 101/2
151/2 1012
22 17


NL

Braves 5, Phillies 4,
12 innings
Atlanta Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Smmnsss 6 1 1 0 Rollinsss 6 1 2 1
J.Uptonrf-lf4 3 1 1 MYongilb 3 00 0
FFrmnlb 5 0 1 2 LuGarcp 0 00 0
Gattisc 5 0 0 1 Papeln p 0 0 0 0
CJhnsn3b 3 00 0 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Constnzpr 0 0 0 0 Kratz ph 0 0 0 0
Janish3b 0 00 0 Diekmnp 0 00 0
Uggla2b 5 00 1 DeFrtsp 0 00 0
BUptoncf 5 0 1 0 L.Nixph 1 00 0
Trdslvcl If 4 1 1 0 Utley2b 5 0 0 1
Waldenp 0 00 0 DYongrf 5 00 0
DCrpntp 0 00 0 Rufl If 4 1 1 0
SDownsp 0 00 0 Mrtnzpr-cf 0 00 0
Cnghmph 1 00 0 Asche3b 4 00 0
Avilanp 0 00 0 Mayrrycf-lf 5 22 2
Kimrelp 0 00 0 Ruizc 4 02 0
Beachyp 2 0 0 0 Lannanp 1 00 0
Ayalap 0 0 0 0 Minerp 1 0 0 0
Heywrdrf 2 00 0 Frndsnph-1b3 00 0
Totals 42 55 5 Totals 424 7 4
Atlanta 001 030 000 001 5
Phily 120 000 100 000 4
E-Gattis (5), D.Young (5), Asche (3). LOB-At-
lanta 11, Philadelphia 7. 2B-Simmons (15),
Rollins (21), Ruiz (5). HR-J.Upton (19), May-
berry (8). SB-B.Upton (8), Terdoslavich (1),
Rollins 2 (14). S-Beachy, Ruiz.
IP H RERBBSO


Atlanta
Beachy
Ayala BS,1-1
Walden
D.Carpenter
S.Downs
Avilan W,4-0
Kimbrel S,33-36
Philadelphia
Lannan
Miner
Lu.Garcia
Papelbon
Bastardo
Diekman L,0-2
De Fratus


324
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 1 1
0 1 1
002

220
0 1 2
002
0 0 2
0 2 1
1 3 0
0 0 1


HBP-by Lannan (F.Freeman). WP-Beachy,
Kimbrel.
Dodgers 3, Cubs 0
Los Angeles Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crwfrdl If 5 0 3 2 Lakecf-lf 4 0 1 0
Puigrf 3 1 2 0 Gillespil If 4 0 2 0
M.Ellis2b 1 00 0 Greggp 0 00 0
HRmrzss 5 0 1 0 Rizzolb 3 0 0 0
Ethiercf 4 0 2 0 Castilloc 3 0 1 0
HrstnJr3b 3 0 1 1 StCastrss 4 0 1 0
Belisarip 0 00 0 Schrhltrf 4 0 1 0
PRdrgzp 0 00 0 Ransm3b 4 0 1 0
AdGnzlph 1 00 0 Barney2b 3 0 1 0
Jansenp 0 0 0 0 Smrdzjp 2 0 0 0
Schmkr2b-rf2 1 0 0 HRndn p 0 00 0
VnSlyklb 2 00 0 Guerrirp 0 00 0
Fdrwczc 4 1 1 0 DeJess ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Capuanp 3 000
Leaguep 0 000
Uribe ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 3103 Totals 32 0 8 0
Los Angeles 001 002 000 3
Chicago 000 000 000 0
E-Hairston Jr. (5), Samardzija (3). DP-Los An-
geles 4, Chicago 2. LOB-Los Angeles 11,
Chicago 7. 2B-C.Crawford (16), Federowicz
(6), Castillo (18). CS-C.Crawford (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
CapuanoW,4-6 61/36 0 0 1 5
League H,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
BelisarioH,12 2/3 2 0 0 0 0
RRodriguezH,14 1/3 0 0 0 1 1
JansenS,16-19 1 0 0 0 0 2
Chicago
Samardzija L,6-10 6 7 3 3 5 9
H.Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 0
Guerrier 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gregg 1 2 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Samardzija (Van Slyke).
Nationals 3,
Brewers 0
Washington Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Spancf 4 00 0 Weeks2b 4 0 1 0
Harper If 4 0 0 0 Aokirf 3 0 0 0
Zmrmn3b 4 00 0 Segurass 4 00 0
Werthrf 3 1 2 0 Lucroyc 3 00 0
Berndnrf 1 00 0 CGomzcf 4 00 0
AdLRclb 4 1 1 1 KDavisl If 2 0 1 0
Dsmndss 3 0 1 0 Bianchi3b 3 0 1 0
Rendon2b 3 0 1 1 YBtncrlb 3 0 1 0
WRamsc 4 1 1 1 Wootenp 0 00 0
Harenp 2 0 1 0 D.Handp 2 00 0
Clipprdp 0 00 0 JFrncslb 1 00 0
RSorinp 0 000
Totals 32 37 3 Totals 29 0 4 0
Washington 010 011 000 3
Milwaukee 000 000 000 0
DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB Washington 5, Mil-
waukee 5. 2B Weeks (20). HR-Ad.LaRoche
(15), W.Ramos (7). SB Werth (5), Desmond
(15). S-Aoki. SF-Rendon.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
HarenW,6-11 7 4 0 0 2 6
ClippardH,21 1 0 0 0 0 1
R.Soriano S,28-32 1 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
D.HandL,0-3 7 5 3 3 1 3
Wooten 2 2 0 0 0 1
HBP-by D.Hand (Haren).
Pirates 5, Rockies 2


Colorado Pittsburgh
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Fowlercf 3 1 1 0 SMartel If 3 2 1 0
LeMahi2b 3 0 1 0 Mercerss 4 02 0
Tlwtzkss 2 0 1 1 McCtchcf 3 1 2 1
Cuddyrib 4 0 1 1 GSnchzlb 4 02 2
WRosrc 4 00 0 TSnchzc 4 0 1 0
Arenad3b 3 0 1 0 Tabatarf 4 23 1
Culersnlf 3 00 0 Walker2b 2 00 0
WLopezp 0 00 0 JHrrsn3b 3 00 1
Heltonph 1 00 0 Lirianop 3 00 0
Blckmnrf 4 00 0 Watsonp 0 00 0
JDLRsp 2 00 0 Morrisp 0 00 0
Ottavinp 0 0 0 0 GJonesph 1 00 0
CDckrsl If 1 1 1 0 Melncnp 0 00 0
Totals 30 26 2 Totals 31511 5
Colorado 000 000 020 2
Pittsburgh 001 111 l10x 5
DP-Colorado 2, Pittsburgh 3. LOB-Colorado
6, Pittsburgh 7. 2B-McCutchen (30). 3B-
Tabata (2). HR Tabata (3). SB-S.Marte (32),
McCutchen 2 (23). S-Walker, J.Harrison.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
J.DeLaRosaL,10-6 4 6 3 3 2 3
Ottavino 22/35 2 2 0 4
W.Lopez 11/30 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
LirianoW,12-4 7 2 0 0 5 6
Watson 1/3 3 2 2 0 0
MorrisH,4 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Melancon S,6-7 1 0 0 0 0 0
J.De La Rosa pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by J.De La Rosa (Walker). WP-J.De La
Rosa, Liriano.


Str Home Away
W-1 38-21 29-24
W-1 36-21 29-24
L-1 33-24 28-26
W-1 29-25 28-27
L-2 28-28 22-31



Str Home Away
W-9 38-15 28-30
W-2 31-25 23-31
L-4 27-25 23-35
L-1 22-31 27-28
L-1 26-31 17-35


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
45 .583 9
49 .555 3 9
52 .514 71/2 41/2 9
60 .439 151/2 121/2 4
68 .370 23 20 1


Str Home
W-7 36-19
W-1 37-19
W-1 27-24
W-2 25-27
L-9 22-28


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 66 44 .600 6-4 W-1 37-20 29-24
St. Louis 64 45 .587 11/2 2-8 L-1 32-17 32-28
Cincinnati 61 50 .550 51/2 4-6 W-1 33-18 28-32
Chicago 49 61 .445 17 111/2 4-6 L-3 23-32 26-29
Milwaukee 46 64 .418 20 141/2 4-6 L-3 26-31 20-33


W
Oakland 64
Texas 61
Seattle 51
Los Angeles 50
Houston 36


Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
San Fran.


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
46 .582 6
50 .550 31/2 1/2 !
59 .464 13 10 3
58 .463 13 10 ,
73 .330 271/2 241/2 :


West Division
L Pct GB WC


Str Home
W-1 35-19
L-1 33-24
W-1 29-28
W-2 29-28
L-3 18-37



Str Home
W-3 31-25
L-1 30-24
L-1 31-26
L-1 30-25
L-1 28-27


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves reliever Jordan Walden pitches Saturday against the Philadelphia Phillies in Philadelphia.




Braves beat Phillies in 12


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA- Dan Uggla
had a tiebreaking RBI grounder
in the 12th, the Atlanta bullpen
pitched 5 2/3 scoreless innings
and the Braves beat the slump-
ing Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 on
Saturday night for their ninth
straight win.
Luis Avilan (4-0) pitched a
scoreless llth inning to earn the
win and Craig Kimbrel got the last
three outs for his 33rd save as the
Braves won for the llth time in 13
games.
National League

Dodgers 3, Cubs 0
CHICAGO Chris Capuano scat-
tered six hits over 6 1/3 innings and
the Los Angeles Dodgers set a team
record with their 13th straight road
win, 3-0 over the Chicago Cubs.
The Dodgers eclipsed the 1924
mark set by the Brooklyn Robins.
Carl Crawford broke open a 1-0
game by driving in two runs with a sin-
gle in the sixth inning. Jerry Hairston
Jr. singled in the first run in the third
for NL West-leading Los Angeles.

Reds 8, Cardinals 3
CINCINNATI Devin Mesoraco
drove in three runs with a pair of
homers, and the Cincinnati Reds fi-
nally broke out against a St. Louis
team that has held them down all sea-
son, beating the Cardinals 8-3.
The Reds won for only the fourth
time in 11 games between the NL
Central rivals. Cincinnati had scored
fewer than four runs in each of their
last nine games head-to-head.
Left-handed Tony Cingrani (5-1)
and four relievers contained an of-
fense that had scored 26 runs in the
last two games, allowing four hits.

Nationals 3, Brewers 0
MILWAUKEE Dan Haren pitched
seven strong innings and Adam
LaRoche and Wilson Ramos hit home
runs to lead Washington to a 3-0 win
over the Milwaukee Brewers.
Haren gave up just four hits, with
six strikeouts and two walks.
It was the second straight strong
outing for Haren (6-11) as he allowed
one run and three hits in seven in-
nings of a 4-1 win over the New York
Mets on July 27.
Pirates 5, Rockies 2
PITTSBURGH Francisco Liriano
continued his recent dominance with
seven strong innings, and Jose Tabata
homered and drove in two runs to
lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 5-2
win over the Colorado Rockies.
Liriano (12-4) allowed only two hits
to offset his five walks and had six
strikeouts. The left-hander improved
to 7-1 with a 1.65 ERA in his last eight
starts for the NL Central leaders.
Tabata hit his first home run since
May 11 a span of 112 plate appear-
ances and also tripled while going
3 for 4.

American League

Tigers 3, White Sox 0
DETROIT Max Scherzer took a
shutout into the eighth inning before
being pulled, and the Detroit right-han-
der became baseball's first 16-game
winner when the Tigers held on for a
3-0 victory over the punchless
Chicago White Sox.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Kansas City 4, N.Y Mets 3, 12 innings
Oakland 4, Texas 2
Seattle 8, Baltimore 4
Detroit 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Boston 5, Arizona 2
Cleveland 4, Miami 3
Minnesota 6, Houston 4
Tampa Bay 2, San Francisco 1, 10 innings
N.Y Yankees 3, San Diego 0
Toronto at L.A. Angels, late
Today
Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 0-0) at Detroit (Porcello 8-
6), 1:08 p.m.
Cleveland (Kazmir 6-4) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 1:10
p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 7-6) at N.Y Mets (Z.Wheeler
4-1), 1:10 p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 2-4) at Boston (Doubront 7-5),
1:35 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 9-10) at Baltimore (W.Chen 6-3),
1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Moscoso 0-0) atTampa Bay (Ro.Her-
nandez 6-11), 1:40 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 1-3) at Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-9),
2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 7-7) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 11-6),
3:35 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 8-6) at Oakland (Griffin 10-7), 4:05
p.m.
N.Y Yankees (P.Hughes 4-9) at San Diego (Kennedy
3-8), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Toronto at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Kansas City 4, N.Y Mets 3, 12 innings
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 4, 12 innings
L.A. Dodgers 3, Chicago Cubs 0
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 2
Boston 5, Arizona 2
Cleveland 4, Miami 3
Tampa Bay 2, San Francisco 1, 10 innings
Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 3
Washington 3, Milwaukee 0
N.Y Yankees 3, San Diego 0
Today
Cleveland (Kazmir 6-4) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 1:10
p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 7-6) at N.Y Mets (Z.Wheeler
4-1), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 12-5) at Cincinnati (Leake 10-4), 1:10
p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 2-4) at Boston (Doubront 7-5),
1:35 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 6-5) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-
7), 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Moscoso 0-0) atTampa Bay (Ro.Her-
nandez 6-11), 1:40 p.m.
Washington (Jordan 1-3) at Milwaukee (Lohse 7-7),
2:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 8-3) at Chicago Cubs (Vil-
lanueva 2-7), 2:20 p.m.
N.YYankees (P.Hughes 4-9) at San Diego (Kennedy
3-8), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (A.Wood 1-2) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 10-4),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers atSt. Louis, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


The White Sox have lost nine
straight. The Tigers have won 11 of 12,
despite playing most of that stretch
without slugger Miguel Cabrera.

Athletics 4, Rangers 2
OAKLAND, Calif. Yoenis Ces-
pedes hit a two-run home run to help
the Oakland Athletics end the Texas
Rangers' five-game winning streak
with a 4-2 victory.
Matt Garza (7-2) lost for the first
time since June 11 and the Rangers
lost ground on the AL West Division
leading As for the first time in nearly a
week, falling 3 1-2 games back.
Jed Lowrie and Eric Sogard also
drove in runs for the A's, who ended
a three-game losing streak. Brandon
Moss and Coco Crisp each added
two hits.

Twins 6, Astros 4
MINNEAPOLIS Ryan Doumit hit
the go-ahead single in the seventh in-
ning, Minnesota's bullpen pitched six
scoreless innings and the Twins beat


the Houston Astros 6-4.
After starter Kyle Gibson allowed
four runs and nine hits in three in-
nings, Anthony Swarzak struck out
five in the next three innings and the
American League's second-best
bullpen came through for Minnesota.
Brian Duensing (4-1) followed with
a scoreless seventh and Casey Fien a
scoreless eighth to set up All-Star
Glen Perkins for his 26th save.

Mariners 8, Orioles 4
BALTIMORE Michael Saunders
homered twice and drove in five runs,
Erasmo Ramirez retired 18 of the first
20 batters he faced and the Seattle
Mariners beat the Baltimore Orioles
8-4 to end a four-game losing streak.
Saunders hit a three-run drive in the
fifth and added a clinching two-run shot
in the ninth. It was his fifth career two-
homer game, the second this season.
Justin Smoak homered and went 3
for 3 with two walks for the Mariners.

Interleague

Royals 4, Mets 3,
12 innings
NEW YORK Pinch-hitter Justin
Maxwell homered deep into the left-
field seats leading off the 12th inning,
and the Kansas City Royals overcame
a late blown lead and got back to their
winning ways with a 4-3 victory over
the New York Mets.
Kansas City, which had a nine-game
winning streak snapped Friday with a
loss in the 11th, is 8-2 in extra innings.

Red Sox 5, D'backs 2
BOSTON Jake Peavy allowed
four hits in seven-plus innings to lead
the Red Sox to a 5-2 victory over the
Arizona Diamondbacks, winning his
first start since coming to Boston at
the trade deadline.
Peavy (8-5) struck out seven and
walked two, giving up Paul Gold-
schmidt's homer in the fourth and
leaving with a 3-1 lead after a leadoff
single in the eighth. He walked slowly
from the mound as the crowd rose to
a standing ovation, tipping his cap to
the fans while crossing the first-base
line on his way to the dugout.
Shane Victorino and Jarrod Saltala-
macchia homered for Boston.

Indians 4, Marlins 3

MIAMI Michael Bourn had three of
Cleveland's six stolen bases and scored
three times to help the Indians earn their
ninth victory in the past 10 games with a
4-3 win over the Miami Marlins.
Jason Kipnis' two-run single broke a
2-all tie in a wild seventh inning, when
the Marlins narrowly missed three
chances to throw out Indians on the
bases. Steals led to all four runs for
the Indians, whose stolen-base total
was their highest since 2000.
Kipnis had three hits and drove in
three runs.

Yankees 3, Padres 0
SAN DIEGO Curtis Granderson
hit a two-run home run, his first since
coming off the disabled list, and Ivan
Nova dominated the Padres through
seven impressive innings to lead the
New York Yankees to a 3-0 victory
against San Diego.
Tyson Ross was pitching well for
the Padres when it quickly fell apart.
Alfonso Soriano singled to center
leading off the seventh and Grander-
son followed with a homer into the
Jack Daniel's Old No. 7 party deck
atop the right field wall.


B2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


Chicago
Joh.Danks L,2-9
Lindstrom
Veal
Detroit
ScherzerW,16-1
Veras H,1
BenoitS,12-12


7 6 3 3 1 6
1/3 0 0 0 0 0
2/3 0 0 0 1 1

72/33 0 0 3 6
1/3 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1


A's 4, Rangers 2


Texas
ab
LMartn cf-rf 3
Andrus ss 3
Kinsler2b 4
ABeltre dh 4
N.Cruz rf 4
Gentry cf 0
DvMrplIf 4
G.Soto c 4
Profar 3b 4
Morlnd lb 2


Oakland
r h bi
1 1 0 Crisp cf
0 1 0 Sogardss
1 1 1 Lowrie dh
0 1 1 Cespdslf
0 0 0 Mosslb
0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b
0 1 0 Reddckrf
0 0 0 Callasp2b
0 1 0 Vogtc
0 1 0 DNorrsc


ab r h bi
4120
2011
4111
4112
4020
4010
3000
2100
2000
0000
4 1 2 0
2 0 1 1
4 1 1 1
4 1 1 2
4 0 2 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
2 1 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


JeBakr ph-1bl 0 0 0
Przynsph 1 000
Totals 34 27 2 Totals 294 8 4
Texas 001 010 000 2
Oakland 300 000 10x 4
LOB Texas 7, Oakland 5. 2B-L.Martin (11),
Moss (10). HR-Kinsler (10), Cespedes (17).
SB-Andrus (25). S-Sogard 2, Vogt.
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
Garza L,1-1
Oakland
J.ParkerW,7-6
Doolittle H,16
Cook H,16
Balfour S,29-30


8 8 4 4 1 5


Interleague

Red Sox 5, D'backs 2


Arizona

GParra cf
A.Hill 2b
Gldsch lb
ErChvz dh
Prado 3b
C.Ross rf
Kubel If
Nieves c
Pnngtn ss

Totals
Arizona
Boston


Boston


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0 Ellsurycf
4 0 2 1 Victorn rf
3 1 1 1 Pedroia2b
h 4 0 0 0 D.Ortizdh
2 0 0 0 Napolilb
4 0 0 0 JGoms If
4 0 0 0 Sltlmchc
3 1 2 0 Drewss
2 0 0 0 BSnydr3b
Holt pr-3b
30 26 2 Totals
000 100 010
000 010 22x


ab r h bi
4011
3122
4010
4010
4 01 100
3 1 2 2
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
1 1 0 0
4000
4112
4120
3010
4 1 1 200
4 1 2 0
3 0 1 0
1 1 0 0
325 9 5
2
5


E-A.Hill (2). DP-Arizona 1, Boston 1. LOB-
Arizona 5, Boston 7. HR-Goldschmidt (26), Vic-
torino (7), Saltalamacchia (10). SB-Ellsbury
(40). CS-Goldschmidt (3). SF Victorino.
IP H RERBBSO


Arizona
Corbin L,12-3
WHarris
Thatcher
D.Hernandez
Sipp
Boston
Peavy W,9-4
Breslow
Tazawa H,18


742227
010000
110001
7 4 2 2 2 7
0 1 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1


UeharaS,10-13 1 0 0 0 1 0
Peavy pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Breslow pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Corbin pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Breslow (Pennington). WP-Corbin 2.


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
Aug. 4 vs San Francisco
Aug. 6 at Arizona
Aug. 7 at Arizona
Aug. 9 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 10 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 11 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 13 vs Seattle
Aug. 14 vs Seattle
Aug. 15 vs Seattle
Aug. 16 vs Toronto
Aug. 17 vs Toronto
Aug. 18 vs Toronto
Aug. 19 at Baltimore
Aug. 20 at Baltimore
Aug. 21 at Baltimore
Aug. 23 vs N.Y Yankees
Aug. 24 vs N.Y Yankees
Aug. 25 vs N.Y Yankees
Aug. 27 vs L.A. Angels
Aug. 28 vs L.A. Angels
Aug. 29 vs L.A. Angels
Aug. 30 at Oakland
Aug. 31 at Oakland
Sept. 1 at Oakland
Sept. 2 at L.A. Angels
Sept. 3 at L.A. Angels
Sept. 4 at L.A. Angels
Sept. 5 at L.A. Angels
Sept. 6 at Seattle


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 2, Giants 1,
10 innings
San Francisco Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
AnTrrscf 4 00 0 DJnngscf 4 1 1 0
Scutaro dh 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-lf 4 0 1 1
Sandovl3b 4 00 0 Longori3b 3 00 0
Poseyc 4 00 0 WMyrsrf 5 02 1
Pencerf 4 0 1 0 Loney lb 3 0 1 0
Pilllb 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-lbl 0 1 0
Beltph-lb 1 0 0 0 YEscorss 3 0 1 0
Francrl If 4 1 3 0 Scottdh 3 0 1 0
Arias2b 4 0 2 0 JMolin c 2 1 0 0
BCrwfrss 4 0 1 1 Joyceph 0 00 0
RRorts ph-2b 1 0 0 0
KJhnsnl If 3 0 1 0
Fuld If 0 0 0 0
Loaton ph-c 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 17 1 Totals 33 2 9 2
SanFran. 001 000 000 0 1
T.Bay 001 000 000 1 2
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-San Francisco 1, Tampa Bay 1. LOB-
San Francisco 5, Tampa Bay 11.2B--Pence
(26), Francoeur (2), Arias (4). SB-De.Jen-
nings (17). S-YEscobar.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Lincecum 7 6 1 1 1 5
S.Casilla 1 1 0 0 1 0
Mijares 0 1 0 0 0 0
S.Rosario 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
J.Lopez 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
MachiL,2-1 0 1 1 1 3 0
Tampa Bay
Price 9 5 1 1 0 5
RodneyW,4-2 1 2 0 0 0 2
Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Machi pitched to 4 batters in the 10th.
WP-Lincecum, S.Casilla.

Tigers 3,
White Sox 0
Chicago Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DeAzacf 4 0 1 0 AJcksncf 4 01 0
Flowrsc 0 0 0 0 TrHntrrf 4 1 1 1
AIRmrzss 3 00 0 Tuiasspl If 3 00 0
Riosrf 4 0 1 0 D.Kellylf 1 0 0 0
A.Dunndh 4 0 1 0 Fielder 1b 2 00 0
Konerklb 4 00 0 VMrtnzdh 4 00 0
Gillaspi3b 4 0 1 0 JhPerltss 3 1 1 1
Viciedo If 2 0 0 0 Iglesias 3b 3 1 1 1
Bckhm2b 2 00 0 Avilac 3 00 0
Pheglyc 2 00 0 RSantg2b 3 02 0
JrDnks ph-cfl 0 0 0
Totals 30 04 0 Totals 30 3 6 3
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Detroit 110 100 OOx 3
DP- Detroit 1. LOB- Chicago 6, Detroit 5. HR-
Tor.Hunter (12), Jh.Peralta (11), Iglesias (2).
SB-DeAza(13), Rios (24).
IP H RERBBSO




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Royals 4, Mets 3,
12 innings
Kansas City NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
L.Caincf-rf 5 1 1 0 EYongl If 5 0 1 0
Hosmerrf-1b5 0 2 0 Lagarscf 5 1 1 0
BButler 1 b 3 00 0 Satin 1 b-3b 5 02 2
Dyson cf 2 00 0 Byrdrf 4 00 0
AGordnlf 4 00 1 DnMrp2b 5 1 2 1
MTejad2b 4 03 1 Ardsmp 0 00 0
KHerrrp 0 0 0 0 JuTrnr3b-2b 4 0 1 0
Maxwllph 1 1 1 1 Reckerc 4 00 0
GHIIndp 0 0 0 0 Buckph 1 00 0
Mostks3b 5 00 0 Quntnllss 5 00 0
AEscorss 5 00 0 Hefnerp 2 00 0
Kottarsc 3 1 1 1 Germnp 0 00 0
S.Perezc 2 0 0 0 Felicinp 0 0 0 0
B.Chenp 2 1 1 0 ABrwnph 1 1 1 0
Loughph 1 00 0 Atchisnp 0 00 0
Hochvrp 0 00 0 Baxterph 1 00 0
Collinsp 0 0 0 0 Ricep 0 0 0 0
Crowp 0 00 0 I.Davislb 0 00 0
EJhnsn2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 43 49 4 Totals 423 8 3
Kansas CityOO3 000 000 001 4
NewYork 010 000 020 000 3
DP-Kansas City 1, NewYork 1. LOB-Kansas City
4, New York 5. HR-Maxwell (3), Kottaras (5),
Dan.Murphy (9). SB-Lagares (3), Dan.Murphy (13).
CS-Byrd (4). SF-A.Gordon.


Kansas City
B.Chen
Hochevar H,2
Collins H,16
Crow BS,3-4
K.Herrera W,4-5
G.Holland S,29-31
NewYork
Hefner
Germen
Feliciano
Atchison
Rice
Aardsma L,2-1
PB-S.Perez.


R ER BB SO

1 1 0 8
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 1
2 1 0 1
0 0 1 3
0 0 0 2


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 B3


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
4-6-8
41' r& CASH 3 (late)
,,I 5-0-8


POWERBALL
21 24 36 42 45
POWER BALL
15


PLAY 4 (early)
6-8-8-6
PLAY 4 (late)
3-8-9-3

FANTASY 5
4-11-13-34-36

LOTTERY
3-4-5-39-47-48
XTRA
5


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 18 -19 -27 -35
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 3
3-of-4 MB 39
3-of-4 795
2-of-4 MB 1,138
1-of-4 MB 10,235
2-of-4 24,351


$2,172.50
$366.00
$53.50
$26.00
$2.50
$2.00


Fantasy 5:5 -11 -21 -24 -31
5-of-5 2 winners $112,314.55
4-of-5 348 $104.00
3-of-5 10,647 $9.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


Mariners 8, Orioles 4 On the AIRWAVES


Seattle


Baltimore
ab r h bi


BMillerss 6 0 3 1 McLoth If
Frnkln 2b 4 0 0 0 Machd 3b
Seager3b 3 1 0 0 Markksrf
KMorlsdh 5 0 2 0 A.Jones cf
IbanezlIf 5 0 1 0 C.Davislb
EnChvz If 0 0 0 0 Wieters c
Morse rf 5 2 2 1 Urrutia dh
Smoaklb 3 3 3 1 Flahrtyss
MSndrs cf 4 2 2 5 ACasill 2b
Quinterc 5 0 20
Totals 40 8158 Totals
Seattle 010 140 002
Baltimore 010 100 200


ab r h bi


- 4


DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Seattle 12, Baltimore 3.2B-
B.Miller(7), Morse (11), Smoak (15), Machado (40),
A.Jones (27). HR-Smoak (10), M.Saunders 2 (10),
Machado (10), Wieters (15). SB-Seager (5), Wieters
(2). SF-C.Davis.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
E.RamirezW,3-0 6 4 4 4 0 6
FurbushH,11 12/32 0 0 1 1
FarquharS,1-3 11/30 0 0 0 2
Baltimore
FeldmanL,2-3 42/37 5 5 4 4
McFarland 11/33 1 1 0 2
S.Johnson 1 0 0 0 2 2
Matusz 1 2 0 0 1 1
O'Day 1 3 2 2 0 1
E.Ramirez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.

Indians 4, Marlins 3
Cleveland Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bourncf 4 3 2 0 Yelichl If 4 1 1 1
Swisherlb 4 0 0 0 Lucas3b-2b 4 0 1 1
Kipnis2b 4 0 3 3 Stantonrf 3 00 0
ACarerss 4 0 1 0 Morrsnlb 4 1 2 0
Brantlyl If 4 00 0 DSolan2b 2 00 0
CSantnc 4 00 0 Webbp 0 00 0
Raburnrf 2 0 1 0 MDunnp 0 00 0
Allenp 0 0 0 0 Dobbsph 1 0 1 1
Giambiph 1 00 0 Hchvrrss 3 00 0
J.Smithp 0 0 0 0 Mrsnckcf 3 00 0
C.Perezp 0 0 0 0 Brantly c 4 1 1 0
Chsnhll3b 2 00 0 JaTrnrp 1 00 0
Aviles ph-3b2 0 1 0 Pierre ph 1 0 0 0
McAlst p 2 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0
Stubbsrf 2 1 1 0 Polanc3b 2 00 0
Totals 35 49 3 Totals 323 6 3
Cleveland 101 000 200 4
Miami 000 002 001 3
E-Brantly (5). LOB-Cleveland 8, Miami 6. 2B-
Raburn (14), Yelich (3), Morrison (7). SB-Bourn 3
(16), Aviles (8), Stubbs 2 (13). S-Hechavarria, Maris-
nick.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
McAllister 51/33 2 2 1 7
AllenW,5-1 12/31 0 0 1 1
J.SmithH,13 1 0 0 0 0 0
C.PerezS,16-18 1 2 1 1 0 0
Miami
Ja.Turner 6 6 2 2 2 6
Da.JenningsL,1-2 1/3 2 2 2 2 0
Webb 12/31 0 0 0 1
M.Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Ja.Turner 2.

Reds 8, Cardinals 3


St. Louis

Jay cf
Beltran rf
Craig lb
Hollidy If
Freese 3b
Descals 2b
RJhnsn c
Kozma ss
MCrpnt2b
Westrk p
BPtrsn ph
Maness p
Choate p
Blazek p
KButlr p
T.Cruz ph
Totals
St. Louis
Cincinnati


Cincinnati


ab r h bi
3 1 0 0 Choocf
4 0 1 1 Heisey If
4 0 0 0 Votto lb
3 1 1 0 Phillips2b
3 1 1 0 Brucerf
S3 0 1 0 Hannhn3b
3 00 1 MParrp
1 0 0 0 DRonsnph
2 00 1 Hooverp
2 0 0 0 Paul ph
1 00 0 Chpmnp
0 0 0 0 Cozartss
0 0 0 0 Mesorcc
0 0 0 0 Cingrn p
0 00 0 Simon p
1 0 0 0 Frazier 3b
30 34 3 Totals
100 002 000
S 200 210 03x


ab r h bi
5112
4110
2210
4021
3000
3012
0000
1000
0000
1000
0000
3110
4223
2000
0000
5 1 1 200
4 1 1 0
2 2 1 0
4 0 2 1





3 0809 8
3 0 1 2
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 1 0
4 2 2 3
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
338 9 8
3
8


E-Beltran (5). LOB-St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 10.2B-
Beltran (18), Holliday (18), Freese (18), Phillips (20).
HR-Choo (15), Mesoraco 2 (8). S-Descalso.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
WestbrookL,7-6 5 4 5 5 5 5
Maness 1 2 0 0 1 0
Choate 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Blazek 1 2 3 3 2 2
K.Butler 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
CingraniW,5-1 5 4 3 3 5 7
Simon H,6 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
M.ParraH,8 12/30 0 0 0 2
Hoover H,6 1 0 0 0 0 2
Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cingrani pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
Maness pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Maness (Heisey). WP-Cingrani. PB-
Ro.Johnson.
Twins 6, Astros 4


Houston Minnesota
ab r h bi
Villarss 4 1 1 0 Dozier2b
Altuve2b 5 0 1 1 Mauerc
JCastro c 5 0 1 0 Mornea dh
Carterdh 4 0 0 0 Doumitrf
Wallaclb 3 1 1 1 Plouffe3b
MDmn3b 4 1 1 0 Arcia lf
GrssmnlIf 4 1 2 1 Colaelllb
BBarns cf 4 02 0 Thomrns cf
Hoesrf 4 0 1 1 Bernierss
Totals 37 4104 Totals
Houston 103 000 000
Minnesota 120 000 30x


ab r h bi
4221
3101
3010
4021
4000
3121
4000
3210
4 2 2 1



3 1 0 101
3 0 1 0
4 0 2 1
4 0 0 0
3 1 2 1
4 0 0 0
3 2 1 0
3 0 1 1
316 9 5
4
6


E-Villar (3). DP-Houston 2. LOB-Houston 8, Min-
nesota 7.2B-Altuve (16), M.Dominguez (17), Dozier
(21), Thomas (8). 3B-Dozier (3), Arcia (2). HR Wal-
lace (8). SB-Villar (6), Hoes (1), Thomas (1). S-
Bernier.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Bedard 6 6 3 3 2 6
HarrellL,5-12BS,1-1 2 3 3 3 3 1
Minnesota
Gibson 3 9 4 4 1 2
Swarzak 3 0 0 0 1 5
DuensingW,4-1 1 1 0 0 0 2
FienH,14 1 0 0 0 0 2
Perkins S,26-29 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Duensing.

Yankees 3, Padres 0
NewYork San Diego
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Gardnrcf 3 00 0 EvCarrss 4 00 0
Cano 2b 4 00 0 Headly3b 4 02 0
ASorinlf 4 1 1 0 Alonsolb 4 0 1 0
Grndrsrf 4 22 2 Venalerf 4 0 1 0
Overaylb 3 01 0 Gyorko2b 4 00 0
Nunezss 3 00 0 Amarstcf 4 0 1 0
Lillirdg 3b 2 0 0 0 Forsyth If 2 0 0 0
ISuzukiph 1 00 0 Hundlyc 3 00 0
J.Nix3b 1 01 1 TRossp 2 00 0
CStwrtc 4 00 0 Vincentp 0 00 0
Novap 3 00 0 Hynesp 0 00 0
DRrtsnp 0 00 0 Guzmnph 1 00 0
MRiverp 0 00 0 Thayerp 0 00 0
Totals 32 35 3 Totals 32 0 5 0
NewYork 000 000 201 3
San Diego 000 000 000 0
LOB-NewYork 5, San Diego 6. 2B Venable (13),
Amarista (10). HR-Granderson (2). SB-Gardner
(18), Granderson (2).
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Nova W,5-4
D.Robertson H,25
M.Rivera S,35-37
San Diego
TRoss L,2-5
Vincent
Hynes
Thayer


740018
110000
100001
7 4 0 0 1 8
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1


TRoss pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.

AL leaders
BATTING- MiCabrera, Detroit, .359; Trout, Los An-
geles, .325; DOrtiz, Boston, .322; Mauer, Minnesota,
.320; Loney, Tampa Bay, .313; ABeltre, Texas, .312;
TorHunter, Detroit, .312.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 78; CDavis, Baltimore,
78; AJones, Baltimore, 75; Trout, Los Angeles, 73;
Bautista, Toronto, 71; Encarnacion, Toronto, 69; De-
Jennings, Tampa Bay, 69.
RBI-CDavis, Baltimore, 102; MiCabrera, Detroit, 99;
Encarnacion, Toronto, 85;AJones, Baltimore, 77; Fielder,
Detroit, 76; NCruz, Texas, 75; DOrtiz, Boston, 71.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 40; Mauer, Min-
nesota, 31; Trout, Los Angeles, 31; CDavis, Baltimore,
30; JCastro, Houston, 29; JhPeralta, Detroit, 29;
Napoli, Boston, 28; AIRamirez, Chicago, 28.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 40; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 32; Encarnacion, Toronto, 29; NCruz, Texas,
26; Bautista, Toronto, 25; ADunn, Chicago, 25; Ibanez,
Seattle, 24; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 24.
STOLEN BASES- Ellsbury, Boston, 40; RDavis,
Toronto, 31; Altuve, Houston, 26; Andrus, Texas, 25;


McLouth, Baltimore, 25; Rios, Chicago, 24; Al-
Ramirez, Chicago, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23.
PITCHING- Scherzer, Detroit, 16-1;Tillman, Balti-
more, 14-3; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 14-3; Colon, Oak-
land, 14-3; Masterson, Cleveland, 13-7; FHernandez,
Seattle, 11-4; CWilson, Los Angeles, 11-6; Guthrie,
Kansas City, 11-7; Verlander, Detroit, 11-8.
ERA-FHernandez, Seattle, 2.30; Kuroda, New
York, 2.38; Colon, Oakland, 2.50; AniSanchez, De-
troit, 2.59; Darvish, Texas, 2.66; Iwakuma, Seattle,
2.76; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.85.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 186; Scherzer, De-
troit, 170; FHernandez, Seattle, 166; Masterson,
Cleveland, 160; Sale, Chicago, 155; Verlander, De-
troit, 138; DHolland, Texas, 135.

NL leaders
BATTING-CJohnson, Atlanta, .344;YMolina, St.
Louis, .330; Cuddyer, Colorado, .328; Votto, Cincin-
nati, .321; Craig, St. Louis, .320; Segura, Milwaukee,
.314; DWright, NewYork, .309.
RUNS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 79; Votto, Cincin-
nati, 76; Choo, Cincinnati, 73; CGonzalez, Colorado,
72; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 71; Holliday, St. Louis, 71;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 71.
RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 89; Craig, St. Louis,
84; Phillips, Cincinnati, 83; Bruce, Cincinnati, 74;
FFreeman, Atlanta, 73; PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 71;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 70.
DOUBLES- MCarpenter, St. Louis, 32; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 31; Rizzo, Chicago, 31; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, 30;YMolina, St. Louis, 30; Posey, San Fran-
cisco, 29; Desmond, Washington, 28.
HOME RUNS-PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 27; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 26; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 24; Bruce, Cincinnati, 22;
Uggla, Atlanta, 21;Tulowitzki, Colorado, 20.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 37;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 32; Segura, Milwaukee, 31;
CGomez, Milwaukee, 29; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 23;
Revere, Philadelphia, 22; EYoung, NewYork, 22.
PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington, 13-6;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 13-6; Corbin, Arizona, 12-3; Liri-
ano, Pittsburgh, 12-4; Lynn, St. Louis, 12-5; Minor, At-
lanta, 11-5; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 11-6; SMiller,
St. Louis, 11-7.
ERA-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.87; Kershaw, Los
Angeles, 1.87; Harvey, New York, 2.21; Corbin, Ari-
zona, 2.33; Locke, Pittsburgh, 2.36; Fernandez,
Miami, 2.54; Leake, Cincinnati, 2.59.
STRIKEOUTS-Harvey, NewYork, 172; Kershaw,
Los Angeles, 161; Samardzija, Chicago, 155; Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 151; Bumgarner, San Francisco,
146; HBailey, Cincinnati, 145; Latos, Cincinnati, 142;
Lincecum, San Francisco, 142.




Bridgestone Invitational
Saturday
At Firestone Country Club (South Course),
Akron, Ohio
Purse: $8.75 million
Yardage: 7,400, Par: 70
Third Round
TigerWoods 66-61-68 -195 -15
HenrikStenson 65-70-67 -202 -8
Jason Dufner 67-69-67 203 -7
Luke Donald 67-69-68 204 -6
Bill Haas 67-68-69 204 -6
Chris Wood 66-68-70 -204 -6
Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-69-65- 205 -5


Keegan Bradley
Adam Scott
Zach Johnson
Steve Stricker
Rickie Fowler
Richard Sterne
John Merrick
Bubba Watson
Jim Furyk
Phil Mickelson
lan Poulter
Justin Rose
Martin Kaymer
Rory Mcllroy
Ryan Moore
Hideki Matsuyama
Angel Cabrera
Jamie Donaldson
Harris English
Kiradech Aphibarnrat
Peter Hanson
Matt Kuchar
G. Fernandez-Castano
Paul Lawrie
Bo Van Pelt
Francesco Molinari
Webb Simpson
Charl Schwartzel
Brandt Snedeker
Graeme McDowell
Lee Westwood
Ernie Els
Michael Thompson
Boo Weekley
NickWatney
Paul Casey
Thorbjorn Olesen
Richie Ramsay
Matteo Manassero
Branden Grace
Stephen Gallacher
Nicolas Colsaerts
Russell Henley
Dustin Johnson
Sang-Moon Bae
Brian Gay
D.A. Points
David Lynn
Sergio Garcia
Carl Pettersson
Jonas Blixt
Ken Duke
Jason Day
Martin Laird
Shane Lowry
Mikko Ilonen
Satoshi Kodaira
Scott Piercy
Billy Horschel
Derek Ernst
Kevin Streelman
Tommy Gainey
Brett Rumford
Toru Taniguchi
Daniel Popovic
Jaco Van Zyl


66-68-71
73-68-66
69-70-68
71-67-70
67-71-70
70-68-70
72-66-70
67-69-72
67-69-72
72-71-67
69-72-69
69-72-69.
74-67-69
70-71-69
66-74-70
72-68-70
72-68-70
70-69-71
70-68-72
69-68-73
70-72-70
72-71-69
70-74-68
69-72-71
71-73-68
70-70-72
64-75-73-
74-74-64
72-70-71
71-71-71
71-71-71
71-72-70
72-71-70
73-70-70
71-72-70
70-70-73
73-69-72
73-69-73
71-70-74
70-75-70
74-74-67
72-70-74
72-69-75
72-69-75
73-73-70
72-70-75
73-69-75
71-73-73
71-76-70
72-73-73
70-75-73
70-75-73
74-72-72
77-70-71
72-76-70
73-73-73
70-74-76
68-77-75
74-74-72
73-76-71
76-73-71
74-71-76
76-74-72
75-73-79
79-77-76
73-82-78


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: GoBowling.com 400 race
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Firestone Lights Series (Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Honda Indy 200 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAO'ReillyAuto Parts Northwest Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: GoBowling.com 400 race (Same-day
Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Cleveland Indians at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (SUN) San Francisco Giants at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Arizona Diamondbacks at Boston Red Sox
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Los Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (NBC) Preseason: Hall of Fame Game Dallas Cowboys vs.
Miami Dolphins
GOLF
10 a.m. (ESPN2) Women's British Open, Third Round
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: WGC Bridgestone Invitational, Final Round
2 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: WGC Bridgestone Invitational, Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Mylan Classic, Final Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: 3M Championship, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Reno-Tahoe Open, Final Round
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding (Taped)
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: Citi Open final
5 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA U.S. Open Series: Southern California Open final

RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) San Francisco Giants at Tampa Bay Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


HALL
Continued from Page BI


proteges in the crowd at Faw-
cett Stadium. The only coach to
take four franchises to the play-
offs, Parcells won Super Bowls
with the New York Giants in the
1986 and 1990 seasons. The mas-
ter of the team turnaround with
the Giants, Patriots, Jets and
Cowboys, Parcells was called
"the definitive winner" by for-
mer player George Martin, who
presented him for induction.
"Every organization I worked
for supported me to the fullest,"
Parcells said. "Without that,
you've got no shot."
Parcells' career record was
183-138-1 and he won Coach of
the Year honors in 1986 and 1994.
He asked to have his bust placed
somewhere near Lawrence Tay-
lor in the hall "so I can keep an
eye on that sucker"
And he mentioned a quote by
former Giants defensive back
Emlen Tunnell, the first black
man inducted into the Canton
shrine, in 1967:
"Losers assemble in little
groups and complain about the
coaches and players in other lit-
tle groups. But winners assem-
ble as a team."
As relaxed as if he had no
one to block, Ogden became the
first Baltimore Raven en-
shrined in the hall. Ogden was
the leadoff inductee in his
seven-member class, just as he
was the first player drafted by
the Ravens after the franchise
moved from Cleveland in 1996
and was renamed. The man
who made that selection, fellow
Hall of Famer Ozzie Newsome,
now Baltimore's general man-
ager, presented the massive of-
fensive tackle.
A former college shot putter
at UCLA, at 6-foot-9,345 pounds,
Ogden was an imposing pres-
ence at tackle for a dozen sea-
sons in Baltimore, winning the
2000 NFL championship. Six
months after the Ravens won
their second Super Bowl, Ogden
gave a smooth, humor-laden
speech, always in control -just
like he was when neutralizing
even the best opponents.
"He is part of the foundation
of this franchise, part of the rea-
son we have two Super Bowl
championships," Newsome said.
Ogden, who was given a 2013
Super Bowl ring by the team,
made the hall in his first year of
eligibility. He was a six-time All-
Pro, made the Pro Bowl 11
times and was the main blocker
when Jamal Lewis rushed for
2,066 yards in 2003.
"Talent isn't enough," Ogden
said. 'A lot of people have tal-
ent they don't always live up to
it. For me it is about maximiz-
ing, striving for perfection.
"I am so proud to be the Bal-
timore Ravens' first Hall of
Fame inductee."
Allen, who sniffled his way
through his speech, was just as
dominating a blocker as Ogden.
He also was, he said, NFLs
strongest man, once bench-
pressing 700 pounds, and saying
"I did it naturally"
One of the key blockers for
Dallas as Emmitt Smith became
the NFLs career rushing leader,
Allen made six All-Pro squads
and 11 Pro Bowls in his 14 sea-
sons, the final two with San
Francisco. He won the Super
Bowl in the 1995 season and was
voted into the Hall of Fame in
his first year of eligibility,
"I just knew I had to win every
play" he said. "That's the reason
I am here I knew if I lost a play, I
had 45 seconds to get even."
Presented by Cowboys owner
Jerry Jones, who drafted Allen
out of small-college Sonoma
State in 1994, Allen punctuated
his discourse with the requisite
"How about them Cowboys?" as
he joined the likes of Smith,
TroyAikman, Michael Irvin and
Deion Sanders in the hall.
Sapp became only the second
Tampa Bay Buccaneer to be en-
shrined, 18 years after Lee Roy
Selmon made it. He was elected
in his first year of eligibility fol-
lowing 13 seasons in which he
went from instant starter after
being selected 12th overall in
the 1995 draft to Defensive
Player of the Year in 1999. That
season, he had 12 1/2 sacks as
the Bucs won their first division
title in 18 years. For his career,
Sapp had 96 1/2 sacks, extremely
high for a defensive tackle.


Women's British Open
Saturday
At The Old Course, St. Andrews, Scotland
Purse: $2.75 million
Yardage: 6,672, Par: 72
Partial Third Round
Play suspended by high wind; scheduled to
resume 1:15 a.m. EDT Sunday, a-amateur:
Cristie Kerr 71-74-75 220 +4
a-Lydia Ko 69-76-75 220 +4
Minea Blomqvist 71-74-76 221 +5
Shanshan Feng 69-76-76 221 +5
Gwladys Nocera 74-71-78-223 +7
Moriya Jutanugarn 72-73-79 224 +8
Mika Miyazato 74-71-80-225 +9
Moira Dunn 71-74-81 -226 +10
Rikako Morita 70-75-86- 231 +15
Leaderboard
NaYeon Choi -10 thru 2R
Miki Saiki -9 thru 2R
Morgan Pressel -8 thru 2R
Suzann Pettersen -7 thru 2R
Nicole Castrale -7 thru 2R
Jee Young Lee -7 thru 2R
Mikaela Parmlid -6 thru 2R
Hee Young Park -5 thru 2R
Angela Stanford -5 thru 2R
SoYeon Ryu -5 thru 2R
Stacy Lewis -5 thru 2R
Mamiko Higa -5 thru 2R
3M Championship
Saturday
At TPC Twin Cities, Blaine, Minn.
Purse: $1.75 million
Yardage: 7,114, Par: 72
Second Round
Tom Pernice Jr. 66-65- 131 -13
Tom Kite 68-65-133 -11
Jay Don Blake 68-66-134 -10
Rod Spittle 68-66-134 -10
Corey Pavin 65-69- 134 -10
KirkTriplett 71-64- 135 -9
John Riegger 66-69- 135 -9
Bart Bryant 66-69- 135 -9
MarkWiebe 64-71 -135 -9
Gene Sauers 70-66-136 -8
Colin Montgomerie 67-69-136 -8
Jeff Brehaut 66-70- 136 -8
Kenny Perry 65-71 -136 -8
Mark McNulty 71-66 -137 -7
Jay Haas 69-68- 137 -7
Bobby Clampett 70-67-137 -7
Jim Carter 69-68- 137 -7
Rocco Mediate 68-69-137 -7
John Cook 68-69 -137 -7
Mike Goodes 68-69-137 -7
Chien Soon Lu 73-65-138 -6
David Eger 72-66-138 -6
Craig Stadler 72-66- 138 -6
Larry Nelson 71-67 -138 -6
Bill Glasson 71-67-138 -6
Jeff Sluman 69-69-138 -6
Loren Roberts 69-69- 138 -6
Tom Lehman 69-69- 138 -6
Steve Elkington 68-70- 138 -6
Peter Senior 66-72- 138 -6
Jeff Hart 72-67- 139 -5
Brad Bryant 72-67- 139 -5
Fred Funk 71-68 -139 -5
David Frost 71-68- 139 -5
John Harris 71-68 -139 -5
Mark Calcavecchia 69-70- 139 -5
Mark Bucek 68-71 -139 -5
Gary Hallberg 72-68- 140 -4
Larry Mize 71-69 -140 -4
Esteban Toledo 71-69 -140 -4
Wayne Levi 70-70-140 -4
Duffy Waldorf 70-70-140 -4
Russ Cochran 69-71 -140 -4
Brian Henninger 69-71 -140 -4
Kohki Idoki 68-72-140 -4
Bob Gilder 71-70-141 -3
Steve Pate 72-69- 141 -3
Mark Mouland 71-70-141 -3
Jim Thorpe 71-70-141 -3
Don Pooley 70-71 -141 -3
Gil Morgan 70-71 -141 -3
Scott Simpson 70-71 -141 -3
Hal Sutton 67-74-141 -3
Bruce Vaughan 74-68- 142 -2
Steve Lowery 73-69- 142 -2
WillieWood 71-71 -142 -2
Joel Edwards 75-68-143 -1
Blaine McCallister 72-71 143 -1
BobTway 72-71 -143 -1
Nick Price 76-69- 145 +1
Tom Purtzer 71-74 -145 +1
Roger Chapman 69-76-145 +1
Hale Irwin 75-71 -146 +2
Gene Jones 72-74-146 +2
John Inman 73-73- 146 +2
Dan Forsman 77-70-147 +3
Don Berry 73-74- 147 +3
Brad Faxon 73-74- 147 +3
Joey Sindelar 72-75- 147 +3
Jim Rutledge 70-77-147 +3
Mark Brooks 70-77- 147 +3
Ronnie Black 72-76- 148 +4
Tom Jenkins 72-76-148 +4
BobbyWadkins 71-77-148 +4
Joe Daley 74-75-149 +5
Dana Quigley 73-76-149 +5
Rick Fehr 74-76- 150 +6
John Huston 75-77- 152 +8
David Podas 78-78-156 +12
Andrew Magee 81-78-159 +15
Jim Sorenson 87-84- 171 +27


"I sit here with the greatest
among the great," Sapp said,
breaking into tears. "We're
here, baby"
Presented Saturday night by
his 15-year-old daughter, Mer-
cedes, Sapp made the NFLs
All-Decade squads for the 1990s
and the 2000s.
Sapp, who both Ogden and
Allen said was as tough to han-
dle as any player they faced,
paid tribute to his roots in
Plymouth.
"That dirt road was some-
thing rough," he said. "We sure
turned it into something
special."


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Advanced Fitness wins men's softball title


Special to the Chronicle

Monday marked the
final night of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's
Men's Summer Softball.
The night included two
playoff games and the
championship.
The first round of play-
offs began at 6:30 p.m. with
RC Lawn Care playing
against Advanced Fitness.
The bats were hot for R.C.
Lawn Care scoring 2 runs
in the first inning, and then
it was Advance Fitness'
turn at bat It was a quick 3,
up 3 down. In the second
inning Advanced Fitness
took the lead with a score
of 4-2. R.C. Lawn Care bat-
tled back in the fourth in-
ning tying the game at 4. In
the end Advance Fitness
was on fire winning the
game 9-4 and moved on to
the championship.
The second playoff game


started at 7:30 p.m. with
Reflections Church verses
the 01 Guys with Help. It
seemed that The 01 Guys
with Help had the advan-
tage being the home team
and ranked second overall.
The 01 Guys with Help
started things off scoring
five runs in the first inning.
Reflections Church ap-
peared hungry for the win.
The game was very intense
and both teams worked
very hard to get to the play-
offs. At the top of the 4th in-
ning Reflections Church
held the lead with the score
at 9-7. They continued to
control the game and at the
top of the 5th inning the
score was 11-9. At the top of
the 7th inning, Reflections
Church tried to continue
their scoring knowing that
The 01 Guys with Help had
the last at bat.
Down by six runs 01
Guys with Help had one


last at bat to win the game.
The defense of Reflections
Church was too much for
the 01 Guys with Help and
the final score was 15-10
and Reflections Church
moved on to the Champi-
onship game.
The stage was set and the
teams were ready to battle
for the chance to be called
the Champions. Reflections
Church was set to take on
first place Advance Fitness.
The game started with Re-
flections Church batting
first and scoring five runs in
the first inning. Advance
Fitness couldn't seem to get
anything going. The game
got really exciting for every-
one in attendance keeping
them on the edge of their
seat Reflections Church
held the lead for the entire
game until Advance Fitness
had their last at bat
The score was 10-9 Re-
flections Church in the


Special to the Chronicle
Advanced Fitness poses with the trophy after winning the Citrus County Parks and
Recreation's Men's Softball title.


bottom of the 7th inning.
Ricardo Valle was up to
bat and hit a ground ball
that got past shortstop to


score two runs, ending the
game 11-10 Advance Fit-
ness. Advanced Fitness
not only became the Men's


Summer Softball Champi-
ons but also remained un-
defeated throughout the
entire season.


P LLAAYY soon


Special to the Chronicle

The next season of
PL.A.Y begins Aug. 12. Cit-
rus County Parks & Recre-
ation's PL.A.Y programs
are designed for children
ages 3 to 5 who aren't quite
ready for the organized
sports leagues.
The PL.A.Y programs
offered in the upcoming
session include soccer,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Monday and Homosassa
Area Recreational Park
on Wednesday, and T-
ball, which will be held at
Central Ridge District
Park on Tuesdays and Bi-
centennial Park on
Thursday.
All sports are offered at
either from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
or 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The
PL.A.Y programs are held
one night a week for one
hour over six weeks and
parents are encouraged to
participate.
On the first night of
PL.A.Y, each child will re-
ceive age-appropriate
sports equipment and a
team T-shirt.
Registration opens
Wednesday, July 31.
Please contact Crysta
Henry, Recreation Pro-
gram Specialist for Youth
Programs, at 352-527-7543
or visit www.citruscounty-
parks.com for more
information.
Citrus Stingers
Baseball
Looking for a more compet-
itive Baseball experience?
Registration is open for U 1ll &
U12 players for Citrus
Stingers Fall 2013 and Spring
2014 baseball.
Practice will be held at
Central Ridge Park in Holder.
The team's goal is to provide
a higher level of play at a rea-
sonable cost.
Contact Chris Richardson at
302-1281 or chrisrichardson47
@gmail.com.


Special to the Chronicle
The P.L.A.Y. program is for young athletes between the ages of 3 to 5.


Par 4 Programs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation presents the inau-
gural "Par 4 Programs" Fall
Golf Tournament. Profits from
this tournament will go back
into Parks & Recreation to
help continue and improve
our youth programs. Our pro-
grams (Adopt A Tree, Kids
Fishing Clinic, Cheerleading,
Basketball, Golf, Free Movies
in the Park and other Sports
Camps, Tournaments, Etc.)
are a source of activities
where our youth can interact
with each other and grow as a


community.
The tournament will be held
on Saturday, October 12 at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club. Registration is now
open for golfers. On the day
of the tournament registration
will begin at 7:30 a.m. and the
shot gun start will be at 8:30
a.m. 50/50 Tickets will be
sold, mulligan tickets: 2 for
$5.00 (with a maximum of 8
per foursome), closest to pin
challenge, men's & ladies
longest drive contest. After
golf tournament lunch will be
served in the Grille Restau-
rant. There will also be sev-


eral raffles & silent auctions.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is currently seek-
ing businesses and organiza-
tions to help sponsor this
worthwhile event by offering a
variety of advertising plat-
forms. You can show your
support by sponsoring a hole,
providing items for gift bags or
by donating prizes that can be
given away or raffled off for
additional funds.
For more information on
how to register or become a
sponsor, please call 352-527-
7540 or visit www.citrus
countyparks.com.


Recreation BRIEFS


Annual veterans
tourney is Sept. 7
The ninth annual Citrus
County Veterans Golf Tour-
nament will be held Sept. 7
at the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club course for the
benefit of the Citrus County
Veterans Foundation Inc.
Check-in for the four-per-
son scramble will be at 7:30
a.m. with a shotgun start at
8:30 a.m. Individuals and
groups short of four persons
will be combined to make
four-person teams. You do
not need to be a veteran to
participate.
Registration form and dona-
tion of $55 per person must be
received no later than Aug. 31.
Each participant's donation in-
dudes golf and cart, beverages
on the course and lunch at the
country dub. The tournament
features a hole-in-one car
lease prize, closest to the pin
prizes and door prizes. Charita-
ble tax-deductible contributions
for door prizes and hole spon-
sorships for $400, $300, $200
or $100 are welcome.
Participating golfers
should make their check or
money order payable to Cit-
rus County Veterans Foun-
dation and send it with their
registration form to: Citrus
County Veterans Founda-
tion, Attn: Samuel Dininno,
2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Key No. 13, Lecanto,
FL 34461-7718 no later than
Aug. 29.
For more information or a
registration form, visit
www.citrusvf.org or contact
Samuel Dininno at 352-527-
5915.
'A Day at the
Swamp'
The Citrus County Gator
Club invites the public to its
annual scholarship kickoff
party, "A Day at the Swamp,"
from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 24, at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds Auditorium in In-
verness. NFL legend and
Florida Gator great Chris Do-
ering will be the special guest
speaker.
Tickets can be purchased
at the following locations: All


About Nature in Crystal River
Mall; Burkes of Ireland and
Firestone of Crystal River;
Century 21 on Main Street
and Goldiggers & Gun-
slingers in Inverness; The
Gator Patch in the Ocala
Mall. Or, order tickets by mail:
6570 N. Tamarind Ave., Her-
nando, FL 34442.
Cost for alumni club mem-
bers is $10 in advance; non-
alumni club members pay
$15 each or two for $25; or
$15 at the door. Children
age 5 and younger are free.
The swamp-style Gator
gathering will be filled with
food, fun, entertainment,
silent auctions, raffles and
giveaways. All proceeds ben-
efit the Citrus County Gator
Club Scholarship Fund.
For more information, call
352-503-4263. Find the club
on Facebook at Citrus
County Gator Club (group) or
visit the website at www.cc-
gators.com.
Citrus United
Soccer Club
Citrus United Soccer Club
is beginning a new season in
October! Our first registration
will be August 20 at the
Lion's Club in Homosassa
and the Fairgrounds in Inver-
ness, from 5 to 7 p.m.
The last registration will be
held on Sept. 15 at the soc-
cer complexes in Ho-
mosassa (HARP) and
Inverness (Holden Park)
from 3 to 5 p.m.
Please check the website
for additional times and loca-
tions. www.citrusunited.com
We offer programs for all
ages 3 through 19, including
programs for children with dis-
abilities. Registration fees start
at $75 per child, with a $5 dis-
count for multiple children.
Registration for our First
Kicks program for 3-year-
olds is $45. Registration fees
for children of an active
member of the U.S. Armed
Forces are waived.
Any new registrants must
provide a copy of birth certifi-
cate. For further information,
call Mike Callaway at 352-
476-3698.
From staff reports


Last days of A-Rod could be right now


Associated Press

NEW YORK On the
day Alex Rodriguez was
the No. 1 pick in the base-
ball draft two decades ago,
his high school coach pre-
dicted a flashy future.
"He has a great work
ethic, humility, confi-
dence," Rich Hofman said.
"He'll be an example for
Seattle and Major League
Baseball. I hope success
will not spoil that."
Three MVP awards, 14
All-Star selections, two
record-setting contracts
and countless controver-
sies later, A-Rod has be-
come baseball's marked
man, the biggest and
wealthiest target of an in-
vestigation into perform-
ance-enhancing drugs
that's likely to culminate
with a lengthy suspension


Monday
Instead of following the
record-setting paths of
Babe Ruth and Hank
Aaron, Rodriguez even
faces the outside chance
he could wind up in per-
manent baseball exile
along with Pete Rose and
Shoeless Joe Jackson.
When Rodriguez first
admitted in 2009 that he
had used PEDs, he apolo-
gized repeatedly and
called himself "young and
stupid" three times.
"I'm in a position where
I have to earn my trust
back," he told a news con-
ference at Steinbrenner
Field in Tampa back then.
"The only thing I ask from
this group today and the
American people is to
judge me from this day
forward. That's all I can
ask for"


Associated Press
New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez warms
up for a Class AA baseball game with the Trenton Thunder
against the Reading Phillies on Saturday in Trenton, N.J.


Now 38, his rise and fall
is water-cooler discussion
across America.
Monday's decision by
baseball Commissioner
Bud Selig will define A-
Rod's career, overshadow-
ing his 647 home runs, his
repeated postseason fail-
ures, his October of tri-
umph in 2009 with the


New York Yankees, even
his romances with
Madonna, Kate Hudson,
Cameron Diaz and Torrie
Wilson.
And it's not as if he is
lacking in labels.
Teammates call him "A-
Fraud" behind his back,
according to a book by for-
mer manager Joe Torre.


Fans at ballparks hold
up signs deriding him as
"A-Roid" and "Cheater"
Throughout Rodriguez's
19 major league seasons,
teammates have repeat-
edly praised his work
ethic. He's the first player
on the spring-training
fields after daybreak, tak-
ing extra grounders, per-
fecting his craft.
At the same time they
roll their eyes at his be-
havior, which is said to
border on obsessive nar-
cissism. He dresses in the
back rooms of the club-
house and emerges only
when every hair is per-
fectly in place for the
cameras and the collar of
his leather jacket drapes
just so.
Has any other athlete
been photographed kiss-
ing his reflection in a mir-
ror, as A-Rod was by
Details magazine in 2009?
He didn't protest when
he was photographed with
a stripper at a Toronto


hotel or reported to be at a
swingers' club in Dallas
and at an illegal poker
club in New York.
But he did make fans
grouse last year when his
awful postseason slump
didn't stop him from chat-
ting up two women in
seats behind the dugout at
Yankee Stadium during a
game.
Since Rodriguez joined
the Yankees in 2004, he's
never come to terms with
why fans openly adore
Derek Jeter and not him.
"Derek has four world
championships and I want
him to have 10," Rodriguez
said at his introductory
news conference. "That's
what this is all about."
Once they were pals.
But Jeter began to dis-
tance himself after Ro-
driguez was quoted in a
2001 Esquire article say-
ing "Jeter's been blessed
with great talent around
him" and "he's never had
to lead."


Drug suspension will define

New York Yankee's career


B4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foster: Buccaneers defense making


Associated Press

TAMPA The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers have in-
vested heavily in the draft
and free agency to revamp
a defense that Mason Fos-
ter feels is on the verge of
taking a big step forward.
The Bucs nearly set a
NFL record for passing
yards allowed last season,
so upgrading the second-
ary with the acquisition of
Darrelle Revis, Dashon
Goldson and rookie John-
than Banks was a major
priority this offseason.
Improving a sagging
pass rush remains an ob-
jective, too. Coach Greg
Schiano is trying to do that
by getting more produc-
tion out of recent high
draft picks Gerald McCoy,
Adrian Clayborn and
Da'Quan Bowers.
Foster is an unheralded


component of the restora-
tion project, part of a
group of starting lineback-
ers that also includes
Lavonte David and
Dekoda Watson.
"Everybody is strong
(throughout the defense).
We don't mind being over-
looked. It's one defense,"
said Foster, a third-year pro
who started 31 of 32 games
at middle linebacker over
the past two seasons.
"I'm happy that we've
got great safeties, great
secondary great defensive
line it all ties in together
They make our job easier,
we make their job easier,"
Foster added. "I don't care
who gets the notoriety, it's
about winning. We are
here to win. We want to
continue to get better"
The former third-round
draft pick out of Washing-
ton led all NFL rookies


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Mike Williams,
right, and linebacker Mason Foster participate in a drill on
July 25 in Tampa.
with 126 tackles in 2011 in 2012, when David had a
and is considered a good fit standout rookie season
the attacking style of de- and spearheaded a run de-
fense second-year coach fense that yielded a
Greg Schiano brought to league-low 75.3 rushing
the Bucs a year ago. yards per game.
Foster was second on The trade that brought
the team with 104 tackles Revis to Tampa Bay from


the New York Jets this
spring, the signing of Gold-
son in free agency and
drafting of Banks in the
second round have been
the talk of training camp.
Foster, however, is qui-
etly preparing for what he
hopes will be a break-
through season for himself
- and the Bucs, who have
not made the playoffs
since 2007.
Schiano is encouraged
by what he's seen in prac-
tice and expects Foster to
get better in his second
season in the scheme run
by defensive coordinator
Bill Sheridan.
"I thought Mason grew
in this defense, and as he
learned it and understood
it better, he got better and
better," Schiano said. "I
thought he was a play-
maker, I thought he did
some good things, and I


Too windy to play


Weather suspends

play at Women's

British Open

Associated Press

ST ANDREWS, Scotland -
Inbee Park wanted tough condi-
tions at St Andrews to try to make
up an eight-shot deficit in her
pursuit of a fourth straight major
It turned out to be too tough for
anyone.
The third round of the
Women's British Open was sus-
pended Saturday by gusts that
topped 40 mph and kept golf
balls from staying put on the
greens. After waiting six hours
for the wind to calm, players
were told to return Sunday
morning for a marathon finish.
Whether that becomes a huge
break for the leaders Na Yeon
Choi at 10-under 134 was an hour
away from teeing off- won't be
known until Sunday
"It's still going to be windy to-
morrow not, hopefully, as
windy as it's been today, but
there's no letup in it," said Susan
Simpson, head of operations for
the Ladies Golf Union. "It's still
going to be very breezy and
equally difficult conditions."
How difficult?
Nine players who completed
the third round had an average
score of 78.2. Cristie Kerr and
Lydia Ko each had a 75, the best
of those who finished. Rikako
Morita shot 86. The cumulative
nine-hole scores for the 20 play-
ers who at least made the turn
was 54-over par
There were 508 holes played,
and only 26 birdies.
Park is trying to become the
first golfer, male or female, to
win four straight professional
majors in the same season. Her
hope was for a steady round in
raging wind and for the leading
players to lose ground. Park was
1 under through four holes, mak-
ing a 30-foot birdie putt at No. 3.
But it was her par on the
fourth hole that helped make of-
ficials realize it was time to stop.


Associated Press
Korea's Jeong Jang plays her shot from the 15th fairway Friday during the second round of the Women's
British Open golf championship on the Old Course at St Andrews, Scotland. The third round was sus-
pended due to strong winds.


The ball moved from its position
from a gust, and Park called for a
ruling to make sure she could re-
place it as long as she didn't ad-
dress the ball.
Simpson said it wasn't Park's
ruling alone.
"The time frame for the balls
actually moving was very short,"
Simpson said. "We got five calls,
all in the space of a few minutes.
... So I can't actually say which
one was the last one that made
the difference because it all hap-
pened so quickly There was a
gust of almost 40 mph, and with
that singular gust, all the balls
started to move on the five calls
that we had. And we suspended
play immediately"
The most impressive round be-
longed to Anna Nordqvist, who
was 1 under through 15 holes.
Danielle Kang was even through
11 holes.
Everyone was to return at 6:15
a.m. Sunday to resume the third
round. That means the last group
of Choi and Miki Saiki is expected


to tee off about 7:30 a.m. The draw
will not change for the final round
-players will head right back out
and if everything goes according
to plan, the Women's British Open
should finish around 6 p.m.
Choi had a one-shot lead over
Saiki. Morgan Pressel was an-
other shot behind.
Most of the trouble was around
the loop Nos. 7-11 on the far
end of the Old Course that is ex-
posed to the elements. Simpson
said the wind reached a sus-
tained speed of 30 mph, and dur-
ing the suspensions, one gust was
recorded at 50 mph.
Because more than half of the
69-player field did not finish,
there is an option to scrap the
third round and start over Eight-
een players had not even started
the third round. Simpson said
starting over was considered, but
not for long.
"We had five groups complete
the round, and while we took
that into account and it was part
of the discussions, it was quite


quickly ruled out," she said. "Be-
cause we don't feel that's fair to
the players who have also com-
peted and already played their
rounds. We want to try to con-
tinue. Tomorrow, the conditions
are meant to be difficult in the
morning, as well."
She said she spoke to all the
players and their response was
mixed.
"Some are delighted and some
are not delighted," she said. "And
I think that's the way it works."
Wind is the main defense of
links courses, and St. Andrews is
among the toughest of the British
links in these elements because
the Old Course is exposed. Simp-
son said officials prepared for a
big blow Saturday by not cutting
the green on the par-3 llth hole
and being mindful of hole loca-
tions, making sure they were not
on ridges. The greens were 9.4 on
the Stimpmeter, compared with
10 the previous two days.
They just weren't prepared for
this much wind.


SPORTS


3M lead

Associated Press

BLAINE, Minn. One
good putt saved the day for
Tom Pernice Jr
Pernice moved into posi-
tion Saturday for his second
Champions Tour title, shoot-
ing a 7-under 65 to take a two-
stroke lead over Tom Kite in
the 3M Championship.
He had a 13-under 131
total at the TPC Twin Cities
after opening with a 66. The
two-time PGA Tour winner
had four straight birdies on
the front nine, and added
two more on Nos. 10 and 12.
However, his approach
shot on the par-4 14th buried
in the bank of a hazard in
front of the green. After a
drop in the fairway, his next
shot landed about 40 feet
short of the hole. Likely fac-
ing a double bogey at best,
Pernice instead curled in
the long putt.
"You're not really thinking
about making it. I just hit a
good putt and it rolled right
in perfectly," he said.
With the momentum, he
then birdied Nos. 15 and 18.
Playing in the tournament
for the first time, the 53-year-
old Pernice will likely need to
shoot a similar score Sunday
to win his first tour event
since the 2009 SAS Champi-
onship. He has been close this
year, with two second-place
finishes and three thirds in
his 14 previous starts.
"I really feel like my ball
striking has come around,"
said Pernice, who worked
on "a couple of things" with
his instructor, E.J. Pfister,
before last week's Senior
British Open.
"My putting's been pretty
good all year, so I'm looking
forward to the opportunity
I've got myself tomorrow...
It's going to take another
good score, that's for sure."


Duke Johnson in spotlight as Miami opens camp


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Duke
Johnson was already wide
awake at 4 a.m. Saturday
Never mind that the wake-up
call wasn't for another 2 hours,
or that the Miami Hurricanes
first practice of training camp
was still more than 4 hours away
'Just that ready to go," John-
son said.
Apparently, even he's eager to
see what he does for an encore.
Johnson ran for 957 yards in his
debut season on only 139 carries.
He was the only player in college
football with at least 900 rushing
yards and 800 kickoff return yards
a year ago, which makes it easy to
see why he was touted as one of
the nation's best freshmen. And
after adding eight pounds of mus-
cle in the offseason, Johnson
thinks he's well-prepared to han-
dle a much bigger workload in
2013, when he's expected to be
Miami's featured back
"I'm excited," Johnson said.
"Just ready to get out here and
play some football. The whole
summer we've been doing
strength and conditioning. Now
it's time to get down to football,
and I'm ready"
It's obvious that Miami coach


Associated Press
Miami running back Duke Johnson is expected to carry the load for
the Hurricanes offensively in 2013.


Al Golden will be calling John-
son's number often this season.
What remains unclear is what
name Golden will use when ad-
dressing his running back.
After two years of strife
brought on by the still-unre-
solved NCAA investigation into
the Hurricanes' athletic depart-
ment- it is possible that the as-
sociation's Committee on
Infractions may announce in the


next few days what penalties, if
any, will be levied against Miami
- the closest thing to an in-
house controversy seems to be
why Golden insists on calling his
running back by his given name.
He calls him Randy and not
Duke, the name everyone else
uses.
"Am I the only one? I thought
it was his mom," Golden said.
"I'll call him whatever he wants


to be called. We're still going to
give him the ball. I don't care
what you call him."
As Golden was speaking on an
86-degree morning, his players
just getting settled on the team's
redesigned practice fields for
the first time. New wind screens
surround the complex, the dark
green mesh not only shielding
the team from prying eyes but
also serving as a tribute to the 74
former players who have been
recognized as All-Americans in
their college careers.
Their images, along with pho-
tos of Miami's five national
championship rings and
Golden's credo of "Deserve Vic-
tory" are printed on those
screens. At this rate, Johnson
could easily be one of the next
names added to the display
He was one of only two players
in college football last season to
throw for a touchdown, run for
one, catch a scoring pass and run
back a kickoff for a score. And he
did all that while Miami moni-
tored his number of touches, with
hopes of not overexposing the 5-
foot-9, 196-pound speedster
"He's motivated to be the
best," Golden said. "He's im-
proved his conditioning. He's
improved his size. Physically, he
looks different. I think he's more


mature. He should play with a
quiet mind because he's learned
everything. He's learned all the
pickups. He's learned the
routes. He's learned everything
in the backfield.
"I think that's going to help
him play faster He's got a great
toolbox already"
While others lauded Johnson
for his play last season, he would
often go into the video room
with his own harshest critic -
himself
Almost from the moment
Johnson's freshman season
started, Golden and Miami play-
ers alike raved about his air of
humility and how he wasn't get-
ting swallowed up in any sort of
hype that surrounded him last
year, when he finished with
2,060 all-purpose yards.
Expectations for both Johnson
and the Hurricanes are higher
in 2013, and again, he seems un-
fazed. In his eyes, he's just get-
ting started.
"First off, I had to put on more
weight so I would avoid injuries
and not go down midseason,"
Johnson said. "And my condi-
tioning, but mainly my leader-
ship. I just have to be more of a
leader and help other guys and
bring other guys along and make
this team better"


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 B5



progress

think this offseason he's
made huge strides. I think
he understands it umpteen
times better I think he re-
acts more quickly because
of that."
David, a second-round
draft pick in 2012, led the
Bucs with 139 tackles as a
rookie. With 20 tackles for
loss, he ranked third in the
league behind Houston's
J.J. Watt and Denver's Von
Miller
"The sky is the limit for
Lavonte," Foster said. "We
try to push each other I try
to push him, he pushes me."
Despite being overshad-
owed by David, Foster felt
he broadened his game
last season.
In addition to having a
knack for getting to the ball
carrier and making plays,
the 6-foot-i, 241-pounder
has two career intercep-
tions and a pair of sacks.




Pemice


holds




B6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


Blaney wins Truck


Series race at


Pocono Raceway


Associated Press
LONG POND, Pa. -
Sitting in the truck, Ryan
Blaney got some fatherly
advice right before the
green flag dropped.
Choose the right line
on restarts.
With more than 570
NASCAR starts behind
him, Dave Blaney sure
knew what he was talking
about.
Ryan Blaney pulled
away on the second at-
tempt at a green-white-
checkered finish to win
the Truck Series race Sat-
urday at Pocono Raceway
"It was pretty funny that
we were talking about
restarts before the race
and that's what it came
down to," Blaney said.
Blaney had the truck to
beat on both restarts to
win his second career
Truck race in 20 starts.
He dipped low and took
the lead off the first
restart, then would not be
denied a second time.
"It was just a matter of
being able to get close to
make the move," Blaney
said. "Once the final
restarts came, I really
had to be aggressive."
The 19-year-old Blaney
drove a Ford into Victory
Lane in the Truck Series


for the first time in four
years. About the only one
who missed out on the
fun was team owner Brad
Keselowski. Keselowski,
the reigning Sprint Cup
champion, was off to
Iowa to drive in the Na-
tionwide Series race.
Blaney gave Ke-
selowski a happy landing.
Pole-sitter Miguel
Paludo finished a career-
best second and German
Quiroga matched a career
best with a third-place fin-
ish. Joey Coulter and Ross
Chastain rounded out the
top five. Series points
leader Matt Crafton was
eighth and now leads Jeb
Burton by 52 points.
"We had the fastest
truck on the racetrack
all day long," Paludo
said. "It's a little frus-
trating to come second
but I'll take it."
The field was set by
practice speeds after rain
washed out qualifying on
Saturday
A third-generation
driver, Blaney now has
more NASCAR wins (2)
than his dad. Dave
Blaney is winless in 450
career Cup starts, three
Truck starts and has one
win (2006) in 121 Nation-
wide starts.


Associated Press
Ryan Blaney holds onto the checkered flag as he
climbs in the window of his car after winning the Camp-
ing World Truck Series race Saturday in Long Pond, Pa.


Associated Press
Drivers Jeff Gordon, left, and Tony Stewart talk in the garage during Friday's practice
for today's Sprint Cup race in Long Pond, Pa.



On the edge


Gordon clings

to Chase spot

as cutoff looms

Associated Press
LONG POND, Pa. -Jeff
Gordon made his last win
at Pocono a family affair
It was a win to savor.
His 86th career victory
was the first time his wife
and both of his two young
children joined him in a
Victory Lane celebration.
But his Pocono run also
thrust Gordon into wild-
card contention for the
Chase, and he finished
10th in the final standings.
Fast forward a season.
Gordon enters Pocono still
looking for his first win of
this season and hoping to
hold on to his precarious
10th-place spot in the
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship standings.
And, he again can make
it another win to remem-
ber Once the dominant
"Rainbow Warrior," Gor-
don turns 42 on Sunday,
long removed from the era
when he was always the
driver to beat at any track.


But the birthday boy
still knows how to drive -
and he hasn't forgotten
how to win. What he's still
chasing is that elusive
fifth Cup championship,
11 years after he cele-
brated his last one.
It's what drives him as
he's changed from the
driver who shot NASCAR
into the mainstream and
made it must-see TV into
the sport's elder statesman.
Gordon would love to
make another champi-
onship push in the No. 24
- as long as he can stay in
the field.
"This year has been a
strange year for us," Gor-
don said. "I feel like last
year we showed a little bit
more speed up to this
point and I felt like all we
needed were some breaks
to go our way, and a few
slight changes to get our-
selves in. This year, we
just can't seem to really
get ahold of it."
He needs to figure it
out, fast.
Gordon holds the 10th
and final locked-in spot in
the 12-driver Chase field.
Here's where it gets tricky
for the driver known as
Four Time: He's just one
point ahead of Tony Stew-


art, five points ahead of
Martin Truex Jr and six
points ahead of Brad Ke-
selowski. The final two
wild card spots in the
Chase go to the drivers in
llth to 20th place with the
most wins. Should Gordon
fall out of the top 10 and
not win a race, he'll be on
the outside of the Chase.
"Every year we have
gone through this, it's a dif-
ferent kind of stress level,"
he said. "There are stress
levels of meeting your full
potential, there are stress
levels of trying to not let
some silly thing happen, or
there is the stress level of
one little incident."
Gordon worked fast Sat-
urday to defuse a silly inci-
dent when one his
comments about fan
turnout for the NASCAR
race at Pocono compared
to the crowd at the IndyCar
race at the track was taken
as a shot at the latter
"I am very, very appre-
ciative of this sport and
this series that we are in
because when you drive
in that tunnel for an Indy-
Car race, and you drive in
here for a NASCAR race,
you get a perspective of
how big our sport is," he
said Friday


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rise at least 30 to 40% over
this time frame. Savings are
based on the lower cost of
running a new 15 SEER 3 ton
Heat Pump versus one that is
over 10 years old. Your indi-
vidual savings can vary.
Savings are even greater for
4 ton and 5 ton Heat Pumps.


FACTORY
AUrMORTZE
DEALER


turn to Ttie experts
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Sprint Cup
GoBowling.com
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 180.654.
2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 180.639.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 180.18.
4. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 180.004.
5. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 179.695.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 179.601.
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 179.533.
8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 179.329.
9. (11)Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 179.144.
10. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 179.094.
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 178.937.
12. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 178.848.
13.(31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 178.667.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 178.508.
15. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet,
178.501.
16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 178.409.
17.(17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 178.264.
18. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 178.26.
19. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
178.056.
20. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 178.031.
21.(27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 177.982.
22. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 177.658.
23. (93)Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 177.592.
24. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 177.508.
25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
177.441.
26. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 177.239.
27.(98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 177.221.
28. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 176.991.
29.(13) Casey Mears, Ford, 176.942.
30. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 176.838.
31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 176.821.
32. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 176.267.
33. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 176.098.
34.(10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 175.86.
35.(83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 175.743.
36. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 175.179.
37. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
38. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner
Points.
40. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (19)Alex Kennedy, Toyota, Owner Points.
43. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
Sprint Cup schedule
x-non-points race
June 2 Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Tony
Stewart)
June 9 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa.
(Jimmie Johnson)
June 16 Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn,
Mich. (Greg Biffle)
June 23 -Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma,
Calif. (Martin Truex Jr.)
June 30 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
(Matt Kenseth)
July 6 Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-
Cola, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Jimmie Johnson)
July 14 Camping World RV Sales 301,
Loudon, N.H. (Brian Vickers)
July 28 -Your Hero's Name Here 400 atThe
Brickyard, Indianapolis (Ryan Newman)
Aug. 4- Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 11 -Cheez-lt 355 atThe Glen, Watkins
Glen, N.Y
Aug. 18 Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn,
Mich.
Aug. 24 Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol,
Tenn.
Sept. 1 AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta,
Hampton, Ga.









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Power
couples

i iwho lf




A mark
S AJ it W published a
news story in
AC. the Chronicle
this week that Ron and
Beverly Drinkhouse are
moving out of Citrus
C#.ICounty
Ron is well known as
the wine columnist who
writes every Thursday
in the Chronicle food
section. Together, Ron
and Bev Drinkhouse are
two dedicated people
who made some good
ttt 'things happen in our
*.community.
,* Back in the late '90s,
the Drinkhouses led the
.county effort to save the
old courthouse in Inver-
ness. It was through their
leadership that we raised
lots of money and grants
to restore the court-
house. The old court-
house is now the center
Uof downtown Inverness.
A That got me thinking
tVO about other retired cou-
t i ,.. ples who have made a
., difference in our com-
munity. There are a
AW "number of power cou-
ples, where both the
husband and the wife
4W"h. played significant roles
together and separately
in Citrus County
Hank and Miriam
*""Cohen were a power
couple from Floral City
who were really the par-
ents of the environmen-
.tal movement in Citrus
County. They started the
first real environmental
group Concerned Cit-
izens and stopped a
10-story timeshare con-
dominium projectplanned
near Fort Island Gulf
Beach in Crystal River
Hank went on to get
elected to the county
commission, but Miriam
was without question
the strategic brains of
the couple.
0 Just this week we
published the obituary
of Bob England of Inver-
ness. Bob and Mary Eng-
land spent years running
banks and leading efforts
for economic development
They served together as
the campaign chairs of
one of the early United
Way campaigns in the
county and helped start
the Committee of 100.
0 John and Kitty
Barnes left a mark on
our town. John was a real
estate guy who eventu-
ally became the head of
the county's recreation
department and then a
county commissioner from
Homosassa. He helped
start the chamber of com-
merce in Homosassa
and was the unofficial
mayor of the unincorpo-
rated Homosassa Springs
area. Kitty Barnes was
See Page C3

Choosing to end the CCHB/Foundation dispute


n early 2009, community lead-
ers began to discuss and re-
view the incredible increase of
the Citrus County Hospital Board
(CCHB) ad valorem assessed taxes.
An intense debate broke out be-
tween legislators, doctors and the
hospital (Foundation) leadership.
In March 2009, the legislature au-
thorized an audit by the Office of
the Auditor General. By the time
the report arrived in February
2010, the parties had met to resolve
the issues, but sides had become so


entrenched in their differences
that no progress was made. Thus,
the Foundation filed the first law-
suit in 2010 while the CCHB pur-
sued changes in legislation.
I could elaborate here and with
great detail discuss the means,
goals and purposes of the CCHB
Trustees for restraining the Foun-
dation's financial conduct but that
will not resolve the matter at hand
at this time.
What is important is that right
now, right here and forever, the dis-


pute can begin to come to an end
and a community righteous in their
divided respective positions can
move on and time can begin to heal
the rift that now dominates our
conversation.
The CCHB passed a resolution
on July 24,2013, which is an offer to
forever end the governance and lit-
igation disputes that separate the
CCHB and the Foundation (hospi-
tal). Specifically, if both the CCHB
and the Foundation choose the
same bidder, then the CCHB will


agree to dismiss all of the lawsuits
except the case pending before the
Florida Supreme Court.
What will be dismissed:
2010 CA 5399, filed by the Foun-
dation, seeking $11 million in tax
money and countered by the CCHB
to eliminate illegal lease provisions
(and other claims);
2011 CA 809, filed by the CCHB
against Ryan Beaty for breaching
his fiduciary duty to CCHB;
See Page C3


Bill Grant
GUEST
COLUMN





OPage C2- SUNDAY, AUGUST 4,2013



PINION


"In the old days, if a neighbor's apples fell into your yard, you worked it out
over the back fence or picked them up and made pies. Today, you sue.
Lee lacocca, "Talking Straight," 1988


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ....................................publisher
S M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.ji Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TIME FOR RESOLUTION



8.4 million



reasons to end



hospital dispute


he two boards fighting
over the future of Cit-
rus Memorial hospital
have wasted $8.4 million in
legal fees.
That's $8.4 million of your
money that should have been
used to provide health care to
needy people, ex-
pand health serv- THE 1
ices, or even build
new buildings at Legal c
the public hospi- hospite
tal in Inverness.
Instead, the $8.4 OUR OH
million went to
pay the lawyers $8.4 r
who fought over was
every minor de-
tail in a four-year battle for
control of the hospital. The
end result of the legal battle
is that Citrus Memorial will
most likely be sold to a for-
profit hospital chain.
Citrus County residents
should be outraged at this
waste of money and time that
went into the legal battle.
Citrus residents are quick
to jump on the county com-
mission for spending money
to study the construction of a
port on the barge canal. Well,
with the money that has been
wasted on the hospital gover-
nance dispute you could have
funded 137 port studies.
That's something to get
upset about.
The complex legal fight is
beyond the comprehension of
most people in the commu-
nity. Powerful political forces
were trying to undo a lease
agreement so they could take
control of the public hospital.
For the last three years, taxes


C(
-a
IT


It


were levied against property
owners to run the hospital,
but instead, most of the tax
dollars raised were used to
pay the legal fees.
There is nothing that can
be done to retrieve the lost
$8.4 million, but the taxpay-
ers should put the
-|E. members of the
SUE: governing board
costs of and the founda-
I feud. tion board on no-
tice: the
|INION: nonsense must
come to an end.
million The two boards
ted. are slowly moving
toward a final de-
cision on which hospital Cit-
rus Memorial will be sold to
or merged with. The founda-
tion board won support from
the governing board to ask
nonprofit Tampa General
Hospital to make a more seri-
ous proposal for considera-
tion. But most of the positive
comments have been toward
an outright sale to the HCA
group that owns Oak Hill
Hospital in Spring Hill.
Regardless of the final
choice, we once again urge
the members of both boards
to completely stop the legal
infighting and get on with the
next chapter of the history of
our county hospital.
No more legal fees should
be wasted. No more legal ma-
neuvering should be contem-
plated. The two boards have
collectively wasted $8.4 of our
money on their disagreement.
This tragic chapter in the
history of our county needs to
finally come to an end.


Hot Corner: HOSPITAL


Who pays for ads?
I'm just reading, looking at
the Sunday paper (July 28) and
seeing two full-page ads for the
Citrus hospital and I'm just curi-
ous where the money's coming
from with the hospital being in
financial straits. Just curious.
Editor's note: To clar-
ify, one ad is for Citrus
Memorial hospital and 0
the other is the Citrus
County Hospital Board.
Two separate groups.
Time to sell
As many Citrus A
County residents, (I'm) 1
hoping Citrus Memorial CALL
hospital is sold and the 56
new owner has a less o000
colorful billing system.
Legal fees a disgrace
I cannot believe the hospital
legal bill is $8.4 million. When I
think of all my friends and how
many hours they had to spend
in the emergency room before
they were taken care of, I think
this is a disgrace.
Cheaper solution
This is Monday (July 29) and if
what I'm reading in the paper is
correct, apparently it would have
been cheaper for the hospital to
give each board member and foun-
dation member half a million
dollars and tell them all to go home.
Calling the governor
I've called the governor and
asked him to shut that hospital
down because of what it's doing
to the taxpayers.


!
.c


Waste of money
It is obscene that the first
thing you see in the morning is
that a couple of doctors and
two juvenile boards that can't
play in the hospital sandbox
without making attorneys rich
have a headline of $8.4 million.
Boy, would that have
|ND paid for a lot of health
J care and a lot of em-
E ployee's salaries.
6CMH, Esq.
I have a new name for
Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal. Let's call it the Law
Firm of Citrus Memo-
rial. Let's get rid of
S579 both boards and go
) back to square one and
start over.
Confusing complication
I'm calling about Mike
Wright's article concerning the
$8.4 million hospital legal bill.
Mike, for most of your article
you are clear about two enti-
ties being involved, namely
CCHB and CCHFE Good. But
why in your second paragraph
did you introduce a third
unidentified entity you called
the Citrus Memorial Health
System, which is the hospital?
You unnecessarily obfuscated
an already tangled discussion.
Please, you and all other writ-
ers, be clear in the future.
Keep it simple.
Editor's note: Citrus Memorial
Health System owns the hospital,
family care clinics and diagnostic
testing facilities such as those at
Allen Ridge.


Tests failing students


We all know who they
are those students
who, no matter how
hard the subject or how diffi-
cult the teacher, always earn an
A. Though rare, they are pres-
ent in every school. So what
happens when the principal de-
cides straight As mean the cur-
riculum is too easy and changes


the grading scale so
those students earn
B's or C's for the
same quality work?
This is precisely
what our school sys-
tem experienced
this past year
Like students,
schools are evalu-
ated by a number of
factors. School
grades are deter-
mined by FCAT and
other standardized


^1
Pat Deut
GUE
COLL


test scores, learning gains, im-
provements in scores, the per-
centage of students taking
upper-level courses, etc. Every
year, the criteria change and
the scores required to receive a
passing grade change, making it
nearly impossible to meet ex-
pectations. Yet consistently, the
majority of Citrus County schools
have earned an A year after
year- and our district has also
been A-rated seven years in a
row There have been slow and
steady increases in student per-
formance, and all schools
scored remarkably similar as a
result of uniform professional
development programs, consis-
tent administrative supervision
and support and high expecta-
tions for all students by the su-
perintendent and school board.
So how does one explain eight
of 11 schools' grades suddenly
plummeting from As to C's and
D's? How does one reconcile the
fact that for the past 15 years,
test scores have varied by a few
percentage points from one
year to the next, and this past
year there were swings of more
than 40 percentage points?
This is not a local anomaly- it
has occurred statewide in thou-
sands of Florida's public schools.
The first alarm sounded
when school superintendents
learned that, due to new stan-
dards commonly referred to
as "raising the bar" would re-
sult in a more than 200 percent
increase in failing schools in
Florida. They had also been
forewarned that school grades
would drop because the state


Board of Education had de-
cided there were too many A
schools!
What changed? Same teach-
ers, same students, same lead-
ership, same curriculum, same
tests, but different passing scores.
Raising the bar very often just
means raising the score it takes
to pass a test, given the same
questions. Is this a
S |fair assessment of
student perform-
ance, or is it a meas-
urement of
test-taking skills?
School grades are
being calculated on
this moving target,
which has created
Lschman unattainable expec-
tations. The cards
EST are stacked against
J M N schools serving high
populations of stu-
dents who live in poverty, who
are highly mobile, who come
from families who do not or
cannot communicate with the
school and who have limited
English language skills. These
factors, more than any others,
separate the As from the F's.
These schools struggle the most
with the changing landscape of
requirements.
Raging controversy has
started anew about the State
Board of Education and
Florida Commissioner of Edu-
cation agreeing to "pad" school
grades by not allowing a
school's grade to drop more
than one letter regardless of the
scores. Some accused the board
of inflating grades to make the
governor look good, while some
accuse the board of not being
truthful about Florida's student
performance. And now we
learn that our third Commis-
sioner of Education in the three
years has resigned amid these
controversies.
Where is the outrage that
schools that worked hard to
keep up their high level past
performance are suddenly pro-
nounced failures? Where is the
outrage that our children and
public schools are being shame-
lessly manipulated so as to cre-
ate a preset outcome at their
expense? Where is the outrage
that our students, teachers and
schools are being judged un-
fairly by a rigged system?
Public schools need all the
support and assistance they can
get to meet these constantly
changing expectations if the


goal truly is to improve and suc-
ceed. Raising the bar so high
everyone eventually fails is not
the methodology to bring about
positive improvements.
I am outraged our students'
futures are being put in jeop-
ardy as their learning perform-
ance is being judged by invalid
and unreliable criteria. I am
outraged public opinion of pub-
lic education is purposefully
being politically manipulated
and denigrated to promote and
support a growing charter and
voucher school movement. I am
outraged tens of thousands
teachers in Florida will not re-
ceive their earned A-plus re-
ward bonus because of a preset
manipulation to purposely
lower school grades. I am out-
raged there is not a public up-
rising demanding fair and
truthful accountability of stu-
dent performance by our gover-
nor and legislators.
Thankfully, after years and
years of over testing our stu-
dents, people are beginning to
question the value of the test-
ing, the validity of the test
scores and the reliability of
school grades and their mean-
ing. I support efforts to simplify
and streamline school account-
ability measures.
Enough is enough. Our stu-
dents, despite what popular radio
pundits profess, are equally
competitive with students from
other countries given the same
demographics. Our local
schools, despite what naysayers
believe, are high-performing
and have been successful in
meeting the ever-increasing
standards that is until this
new scoring method.
While student test scores may
bounce around, our kids don't
go from smart to dumb from one
year to the next rather it's the
testing and scoring that changes
so much it's hard to find any
comparisons of any use. Tests
should be used to monitor stu-
dent performance and identify
areas in need of improvement.
When they fail to capture the
consistent and expected growth
of student learning, they be-
come a waste of time, money
and anxiety The students
haven't failed the tests the
tests have failed the students.

Pat Deutschman is a
longtime member of the
Citrus County School Board.


SLETTERS to the Editor


CCHB has not
raised taxes
In response to the letter in
the Aug. 1 Chronicle by Fred
Conway, I must respectfully
correct the record. The Citrus
County Hospital Board has not
voted to raise taxes, in fact, as
stated in the Chronicle article
published on July 19, "CCHB
keeps tax rate the same," the
board voted to keep the millage
rate the same and continues to
advocate for the sale or lease
of Citrus Memorial, which
would eliminate the hospital
ad valorem tax we now pay
Mr Conway may be confusing
a vote the county commission
took, which was reported in the
Chronicle on July 24, to raise
property taxes 30 percent
We know tensions remain high
and that some have chosen to not
put the past behind us and stop
the disagreements, but we all
must make sure we only report


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in edi-
torials are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown.
We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

or print or speak the facts so as
not to cause more harm and
confusion for our community
The CCHB remains commit-
ted to doing what is best for
our community, our hospital,
doctors, nurses, hospital staff
and patients and eliminat-
ing the ad valorem tax we pay
now Selling or leasing our hos-


pital is an option that we have
to reduce our taxes.
Debbie Ressler
chair, CCHB

Ike said it
On Nov 8,1954, President
Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote
the following in a letter to his
brother, Edgar:
"Should any political party
attempt to abolish Social Security,
unemployment insurance, and
eliminate labor laws and farm
programs, you would not hear of
that party again in our political
history There is a tiny splinter
group, of course, that believes
you can do these things. Among
them are Texas oil millionaires
and an occasional politician or
business man and they are stupid."
According to Eisenhower,
today's GOP has become the
party of stupid.
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Yes, I can hear you now when I want to


'm convinced that
when people are hard
of hearing, it isn't the
ones who can't hear who
most need to have their
hearing augmented. Nope,
the folks who need for the
hearing-impaired to hear
better, are their family and
friends, workmates, sales-
people, customers, even
rank strangers, who have
to deal with them.
I confess: Up until a few
days ago, I was as deaf as a
stump. I've always had
some trouble hearing, but
during the past few years,
it had obviously become
worse much worse. I
first became aware of my
hearing deficiency when,
as a young fellow, I went
for my draft physical. I was
certain that I would not


pass it because of my poor
vision. We'll come back to
that later But I had no
idea my hearing was sig-
nificantly below par until
it took four tries before
they finally marked me as
fit for duty
Now, back to the eyes.
My optometrist, a former
military doctor, assured
me I could not be drafted.
He indicated that the re-
quirement was a minimum
of 20/40 corrected vision in
both eyes. He told me that
with my glasses, I was at
20/20 in my left eye, but
there was no way he could
get my right eye above
20/60. His opinion was that
it was bad news that my
sight was less than desir-
able, but it was good news
that I wouldn't be drafted.


When I was informed that Can't hear? You're still a
I had passed the eye exam, warm body
I complained and made I started out by saying
the point my doctor had that up until a few days
made to me. The army fel- ago, I was deaf Over the
low said, "Your years, though
doctor is right. 1 've always had
The require-, some problems,
ment is 20/40 especially with
corrected vi- high-pitched
sion. We have sounds, my
you at 20/20 in hearing had in-
the left and deed grown
20/60 in the worse. One way
right, that aver- of explaining
ages 20/40. You Fred Brannen this gradual de-
pass." A SLICE cline is that for
Of course, the first25 years
that was in OF LIFE we were mar-
1965. They ried, Cheryl
shipped two buses full of sometimes kept me awake
boys from Dade City to with her snoring. Freight
Jacksonville for physical train? Thunder? Those are
and out of some 80 of us, the first things that come
only two failed. Can't see? to mind. But, for the past


22 years, no problem. I think
that means that I couldn't
even hear it thunder
How did I suddenly be-
come able to hear?
No, itwasn't a faith healing
It was Cheryl crying. She
was sick and needed
someone to care for her,
someone to see to it that
her tea cup was filled and
that her medications were
readily available. I was
busy in another part of the
house and she couldn't
make me hear her When I
finally moseyed out into
the living room, she cried
and told me in a way that I
understood just how im-
portant my getting hearing
aids was to her
I made an appointment
and was fitted with hear-
ing aids. And guess what?


I'm thrilled with them. I
had gone for years not be-
lieving such instruments
would improve my hear-
ing, but that they would
most certainly inflict other
annoyances on me. I was
wrong. My hearing is
greatly improved and the
accompanying aggrava-
tions are minor
Yes, I can hear you now,
but more importantly, I
can hear Cheryl.
And, uh, I don't worry
about her snoring keeping
me awake. I remove my
hearing aids and place 'em
on my desk beside my glasses
right before I go to bed!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

the head of the chamber of commerce in Ho-
mosassa and then for the whole county She
led the business organization for decades.
John passed away a few years ago and Kitty is
now retired and living in Homosassa.
Dave and Peggy Pattillo retired to Inver-
ness, and through their volunteer efforts, made
change happen The couple helped kick start the
rebirth of downtown Inverness about 20 years
ago when they started talking up the need to
save the city Eventually the City of Inverness
took the lead and made all the good things
happen, but the Pattillos got the ball rolling.
Karen and John Thurman were the ultimate
power couple. Karen started out as a school-
teacher in Dunnellon who ran for mayor of
that tiny town. She ended up winning elec-
tion to the Florida Senate and then became
our U.S. congresswoman for a decade. John
started as a public defender in Inverness, not
making much more than minimum wage. He
overcame some serious health challenges
and was elected as a judge in the county


IMPERATIVE We must have


Continued from Page C1

In the 2013 Florida Legislative ses-
sion we made great strides to ensure
our students will be able to follow CTE
pathways in areas they are passionate
about, thus motivating them to stay in
school, learn a skill and graduate job-
ready James R. Stone III, Ed.D, direc-
tor of the National Research Center
for Career at the University of
Louisville, provided my CTE Task
Force data showing Florida's future
labor market requires only 31 percent
of the workforce hold a bachelor's de-
gree or higher, while 59 percent will
require a high school diploma, career
certificate and/or associate's degree.
We can conclude from this that not
everyone is going to or needs to go to
college to be successful in the job mar-
ket
Yet there are two things that are crit-
ical to the success of CTE and must be
addressed.
First, we need to emphasize in our
schools and communities that CTE in-
struction containing equivalent rigor
should be on the same level as the
standard secondary curriculum cur-
rently taught in our high schools. The
solution is to focus on CTE curriculum
as an alternate pathway and not an
elective. Teaching the concepts of
geometry, chemistry or other classes
under the applied setting of a CTE
class allows a number of students who
are passionate about a subject to not
only gain job-ready skills but, to also
retain the same educational concepts
which they otherwise might struggle
with in an ordinary classroom setting.
Through this we can create "light
bulb" moments where students gain
knowledge, confidence and become
passionate learners.


GRANT
Continued from Page C1

2012 CA 219, filed by the
CCHB to prevent the payout of
millions in executive golden
parachutes.
What has already been dis-
missed/resolved:
2010 CA 5702: Dismissed.
2011 CA 1476: Dismissed.
2011 CA 1388: Dismissed.
2012 CA 1034: Dismissed.
The end result is very clear: If
the CCHB and the Foundation
choose the same bidder and sign
a letter of intent, then the CCHB
has agreed to enter into an
agreement with the Foundation
to dismiss all lawsuits (except
the Florida Supreme Court
case) simultaneously with the
signing of the final agreement,


a much broader

discussion

on what the

purpose of

our education

system is and

what its future

will look like for

our students.
Second, we must have a much
broader discussion on what the pur-
pose of our education system is and
what its future will look like for our
students. It's my belief that our educa-
tion system is a workforce develop-
ment tool, because no matter when you
finish your education, if you possess a
usable skill set, your chance of job
prospects and your value to the work-
force increases, and subsequently so
will Florida business and future gen-
erations. This also ensures students
coming out of secondary education
will be able to be more successful
going into the job market by providing
pathways as broad as auto mechanics
and welding to certified nursing assis-
tant or certified drafter Additionally,
this success will help inspire our stu-
dents to open the door to college.


referred to as the definitive
agreement
The CCHB has made clear its
intention to maintain the case
pending in the Florida Supreme
Court. The appeal is also
brought by the state of Florida's
Office of the Attorney General,
knowing this case has statewide
implications. The case will only
end with a decision by the
Florida Supreme Court; that cir-
cumstance must be considered
by all of the parties.
To crystallize the status of gov-
ernance and litigation as it re-
lates to the bidders, it is
important to be advised that the
case pending in the Florida
Supreme Court has absolutely
no impact on the bids submitted
by HCA, HMA and Regional
Care. The Florida Supreme
Court case only impacts a bid by
Tampa General Hospital be-


Locally we have excellent examples
of CTE courses that have been taught
successfully, such as the Crystal River
High School Health Academy I suggest
that we look at providing stronger cur-
riculum and course options like the
Health Academy and comparable ca-
reer-oriented curricula to more stu-
dents. Also, as the implementation of
digital learning is being developed at
the local and state levels, we must en-
courage educators in CTE to partner
in this development and use this to
bridge any gaps found in CTE educa-
tion pathways. Doing this and teaching
in a more applied setting will engage
students and better prepare them for
their career choices.
For our postsecondary institutions,
such as our community colleges and
universities, this means they can then
focus more on actual course instruc-
tion and less on remediation. This
process will require the educational
and industrial community to work in
conjunction with one another Fortu-
nately, this is currently being worked
on, but needs to happen at a faster
pace. I will continue to push and sup-
port CTE to ensure it happens.
These are the first steps that are
being taken; in the end we will con-
tinue to improve our educational sys-
tem by making CTE courses equal in
education, being able to stay focused
on what education is for, and ensuring
that our students have a greater chance
at success. This will create economic
opportunities for our students here at
home and for our businesses here in
Florida and across the nation. None of
these changes are going to be easy;
they do, however, have great reward
and are most certainly achievable.

Jimmie T Smith, R-Inverness,
represents District 34 district in the
Florida House ofRepresentatives.


The end result is very clear: If the
CCHB and the Foundation choose the
same bidder and sign a letter of intent,

then the CCHB has agreed to enter into
an agreement with the Foundation to

dismiss all lawsuits except the Florida


Supreme Court case
cause it is a not-for-profit, which
will be regulated by the CCHB.
In addition, any offer by Tampa
General Hospital must also then
address the remaining issues of
governance and taxation, if the
parties choose Tampa General
Hospital as the winning bidder
To be clear, if Tampa General
Hospital is chosen, our hospital
taxes will not be eliminated.


Through the

effort of these

volunteer

couples, some

very good
things have

happened

in Citrus
County.
cil and for many yea


Ed and Kay
Tolle of Crystal
River helped create
the definition of the
power couple. Kay,
who passed away
last year, came from
one of the founding
families of Crystal
River and became
the boss of the
Democratic Party
and a very astute
businesswoman. Ed
became a serious
banker and Realtor
and served elected
terms on the Crys-
tal River City Coun-
rs was the county's


elected property appraiser
Curt and Mari-Elain Ebitz are a power
couple from Sugarmill Woods who have done
amazing things. Curt, a retired Army colonel,
is a member of the Chronicle editorial board.
As a volunteer he helped start Save Our Wa-
ters Week (which is coming up soon) and Vet-
erans Appreciation Week. He served on the
Florida Veterans Affairs Council and is a
member advisory committee that helps se-
lect students for appointments to our nation's
top military academies.
Mari-Elain just finished her term as a gu-
bernatorial appointee to the board of
trustees at the College of Central Florida.
She served for many years as the editor of the
Greenbelt Gazette in Sugarmill Woods.
I have to also mention one of the most
culturally astute retiree couples I know -
Mac and Sharon Harris of Timberlane. Mac
is the retired "voice" of Progress Energy, as
he ran their public relations department for
many years. In their retirement, Mac and
Sharon have become involved full-time in
the management of the Citrus County Art
League Center in Citrus Hills. This couple
not only handles so many of the back shop is-
sues, from broken air conditioning to budg-
ets, but also have both directed plays at the
popular theater (I have got to also mention
that Mac is a member of the Chronicle's edi-
torial board).
Through the effort of these volunteer cou-
ples, some very good things have happened in
Citrus County We are fortunate that each of them
has decided to call our community home.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


itself in the belief that this dis-
pute must end now
The Foundation at its last
meeting warmly received the
offer (resolution) of the CCHB.
Foundation counsel Clark Still-
well pointedly emphasized that
if there is a transaction, then
resolution of the litigation be-
comes much easier I absolutely
concur; if the Foundation and
the CCHB decide on the same
bidder, the lawsuits can and will
be dismissed with the signing of
the final (definitive) agreement,
which ends forever the difficul-
ties under which our community
is now living, and the ad valorem
tax we now pay would be gone
forever

William J. Grant serves
as general counsel for the
Citrus County Hospital Board.


If the CCHB and the Founda-
tion finally agree on a bidder, all
of the lawsuits will stop, our hos-
pital taxes will be eliminated,
and our hospital will be able to
provide the care our community
deserves.
While currently the future is
not crystal clear, the choices are
and the offer by the CCHB to for-
ever end this dispute manifests


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


Don't give out
account information
I am calling about another
telephone scam. We had two
telephone calls today: one from
a man and one from a woman,
about five hours apart. They
were heavily accented and they
were telling us that we would
get new Medicare cards and
they were telling us that they
had our name and our address
and we need to verify that. Then
they said, "What is your bank?"
And then they said, "We have
your account number right here
in front of us, but we need for
you to verify that." We hung up.
Patiently awaiting
the next election
Thank you, Mr. Knecht, for
your letter, "Board wields too
much power." Many voters
agree that something has to be
done to break up this good-ol'-
boy system. Why can't we vot-
ers have a vote on important
issues such as Ottawa, Port
Citrus, MSBUs, MSTUs? The
present board does not listen
to the will of the people. True,
they have too much power and
don't use it wisely. Just waiting
for the next election very
patiently.
Feral cat bounce
The "vacuum effect" occurs
among many animal species.
Removed from an area, a vac-
uum is created. The displaced
are replaced. Whispering Pines
could see an influx of feral
cats, unaltered breeding and
carrying disease. A new colony
of feral cats would endanger
more wildlife and be impossible
to control without an expensive
and time-consuming, ineffec-
tual program. Put the cats back
before it's too late.


escape ourns
I'm sounding off today about
these proposed burns in Chas-
sahowitzka and other naturally
sensitive areas. I'm walking out
in my yard right now and I've
got no less than three nests full
of birds. Now these are just
birds. We're not talking about
the rabbits or anything else.
And all of these are going to be
lost. Baby birds can't fly. They
can't get away from these fires.
Nor can the birds or the baby
turtles or anything else. What
are they doing, doing this now?
They're supposed to be environ-
mentalists and the animal con-
servatory, but this isn't the way
to do it and I'm really up
against it. Who is benefiting
from this? I'd like to know.


I'm calling about the fire-
works in Crystal River for the
Fourth of July. They were beau-
tiful and we appreciate them. I
would hope in the future that
the city might reconsider their
planning process and put the
fireworks where they can be
seen better. It's great if you are
fortunate enough to live on the
water. Those people have a
wonderful view. But for the pub-
lic in general, it's very difficult
and we found many dangerous
situations of people trying to
drive and park to where they
could see the fireworks. It
would be an opportunity for our
wonderful community celebra-
tion, but for the whole commu-
nity, not just for those fortunate
enough to live on the water.


The county, after buying
all new fire equipment and
every county employee has
a new pickup truck and the
rodeo guys at the garbage
dump have to get new
equipment after tearing it
up, you would think these
impact fees from all the
Walmarts and the subdivisions
going up should buy a fire de-
partment. I think they ought to
audit the county and see what's
going on with this impact
money.
Nineteen-cent
difference
I was down in Reddington
Shores in St. Pete and paid
$3.40 for gas. I get here today,
$3.59 a gallon for gas.


A rush to judgment
To the person who left the
"Shame on you" note on my
paper box for not having my
flag lit up at night: I am a World
War II veteran, five years in the
military. I volunteered for service,
leaving a wife and child behind
because of my love of country
and flag. I have flown a flag all
my life since boyhood and always
had my flag lit up at night. My
flag lights up automatically and
unfortunately the bulb burned
out while I was out of town. As
you can see, my light is only 4 feet
up from the ground and easily
accessible. If you were so con-
cerned, and if you would have
rang my bell on several occa-
sions with no response, and if
you used a bit of common
sense and thought that maybe
the bulb burned out, and if you
were a good Samaritan, you
would have replaced the bulb
and left me a note. I would have
gladly reimbursed you and
thanked you. So next time don't
be so quick to condemn some-
one and say, "Shame, shame."
To me, the shame is on you
until you know all the facts.
Losing kids to opiates
I just want to say something
about the opiate addiction that
runs rampant in Citrus County.
It's everywhere. I mean it's
everywhere. People that work,
people that don't work. But
there's not much help out there,
I'll tell you, not much help at all.
You can't find help for somebody
that's addicted or they can't find
help unless they're rich and have
exorbitant amounts of insur-
ance. We need to get something
in Citrus County to help opiate
addiction. We're losing our
youth in Citrus County to opiate
addiction. Some of our law en-
forcement just turns their head.


IWednesdav AniiQIt 21\ \I


Th1ii .- #e vl k.W-w byr RSVP MtrcCo.-. progr. m tt- F . Cot w C.n
WKV if rMo MIaffltMe V40thf CV- CAnV S&AtWr* Fw rUMttt WrTom ~ W~~i -M, 32*-124 75,


Citrus County Craft Council
Presents its 24th Annual


HARVEST MOON


For More Information, call Patti at 503-6329


We invite you to join us for our
Annual Scholarship Kick-Off Party
"A Day at the Swamp"
Citrus County Fairgrounds Auditorium
Inverness, Florida
Saturday, August 24th, 2013 5:00 9:00pm
Special guest speaker:
NFL Leqrnd and Florida Gator Great

Chris Doering
Tickets can be purchased at the following locations:
All About Nature n Crytal River MaIl
Burkes Of Ireland and FRrestone of Crystl- River
Century 21 on Main Street and Goidiggers & Gunsli'gers n Inverness
The Galor Patch e the Ocala Mall
Or by mail: 6570 N Tamarind Ave, Hernando, FL 34442


Baby birds can't Fireworks for all Audit the county


C4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


COMMENTARY







BUSINESS,
BUSINESS


Inside:
How to compete with big
business/D3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Citrus County builder Ron Lieberman has been elected president of the Florida Home Builders Association. Lieberman of
Lecanto owns Steel Structures of Florida and is a past president of the County Builders Association. He will take office
in October.

Shaking off the devastating downturn, the Citrus County building
industry is looking ahead, eyeing the housing recovery in other parts of
the state. And to its advantage, one county builder is ready to takes the
reins as president of the Florida Home Builders Association (FHBA).


Local builder takes reins of state organization


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

I t is move that will put Ron
Lieberman and Citrus County
into the state and national
spotlight, as the position in-
cludes a seat on the board of
the National Association of
Home Builders.
And it comes as the Florida
homebuilding industry faces a new set
of challenges in returning to growth.
Lieberman of Lecanto owns Steel
Structures of Florida. He has been
building in Citrus County since 1999
and has more than 30 years experi-
ence in the Florida housing industry
He is also a Realtor
He has been president of the Cit-
rus County Builders Association
twice and has earned three Builder
of the Year awards.
Lieberman has also been active as
a volunteer in other community or-
ganizations including the YMCA cap-
ital committee, and is a past
president of Central Citrus Rotary
Club. He noted the local building in-
dustry has always been active in the
community. He recalled that in 2005,
the construction industry was 40 per-
cent of the county's economy


A longtime member, Lieberman
has been "real active" with FHBA
since 2000. He chaired many of the
association key committees involving
governmental affairs, political ac-
tion, codes and affordable housing.
Two years ago he moved up to a
senior leadership role. He served as
secretary, then first vice
president/treasurer
In July, at the Southeast Building
Conference in Orlando, the 200-
member FHBA board of directors
elected Lieberman president-elect
He will be officially installed in Octo-
ber as the association's 61st president
FHBA has 27 local building associa-
tions, including Citrus County and ap-
proximately 7,000 company members
with thousands of employees. The core
membership includes commercial and
residential builders, remodelers and
developers. FBHA also includes sub-
contractors, building suppliers, archi-
tects and engineers, Realtors, and the
financial community
Plus, FHBA owns an insurance com-
pany providing products to meet the
needs of the construction industry
Each state association is a member
of the Washington, D.C.-based Na-
tional Association of Home Builders
and Lieberman serves on its board of
directors as well.


He said his own company is kind of
on hiatus right now, buying up some
lots and other things for when the
building climate comes back to the
area.
"What we're doing is more toward
affordable housing," he said. "It's
more toward the first time home-
buyer kind of thing and that hasn't
returned to Citrus County yet.
"Things are getting better in the
more custom home business, but
more affordable housing is not ready
here maybe another year or so."
But he's admittedly bullish on Cit-
rus County, based on what is happen-
ing in some other areas of the state,
which are dong extremely well. Some
regions have bounced back to the ex-
tent where there are labor shortages
in the building industry
With business slow right now, he is
able to devote the necessary time to
his new position, which also involves
being in Tallahassee when the legisla-
tion is in session, and a lot of travel.
"It's the president's job to support
and defend the construction indus-
try," he said. "For the builders it's im-
portant that the legislators
understand what they are voting on
as far as the construction industry is
concerned.
See Page D3


BIf ever there was a builder who was ready, willing and able
to serve as President of FILBA, it's Ron Lieberman.
Everyone has all the confidence in the world in Ron.

B III3 --FHBA President Suzanne Graham of Port Charlotte

Florida Home Builders Association





Navigating municipal bonds after Detroit


CHRISTINA REXRODE
AND MATTHEW CRAFT
Associated Press
NEW YORK When Detroit be-
came the biggest city in U.S. history
to file for bankruptcy last month, it
turned public attention to the munici-
pal-bond market, where cities and
states go to borrow money
Was this sleepy, often-overlooked
area of the financial world actually
dangerous?
Like other cities, Detroit borrowed
from investors to pay for roads, sewer
lines and an array of other projects.
Now Detroit says it can't afford to pay
bond investors all of their money back
Even if you don't own any muni
bonds, it's important to understand
what they are and how they work.
They're what your city uses to keep it-
self running, but it can be tough to cut


through the jargon and heated claims
surrounding Detroit's bankruptcy To
help, here's a look at the nuts and
bolts of what finance types call
munis: who owns them, how they
work and just what they are, anyway
What are municipal bonds, exactly?
Cities, states, towns and other local
governments sell municipal bonds to
raise money for school renovations,
sports stadiums or other projects. A
fire district might need a few hun-
dred thousand dollars for a new
truck; a state might need a few billion
to build highways and hospitals.
When investors buy a muni bond,
they're lending to a local government
In return, they get a regular interest
payment and the promise of all their
money back at the end of the bond's
life. That could be one year later or
as many as three decades later
See Page D3


THE WEEK AHEAD

* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Institute for
Supply Management releases its
service sector index for July, 10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases international
trade data for June, 8:30 a.m.;
Labor Department releases labor
turnover survey for June, 10 a.m.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Federal Re-
serve releases consumer credit
data for June, 3 p.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Stocks drop back on
mixed jobs figures
LONDON -A mixed U.S. jobs re-
port took the edge off global stock
markets Friday as it raised ques-
tions over the pace of growth in the
world's largest economy and when
the U.S. Federal Reserve will start
reducing its monetary stimulus.
Europe lost its early gains to trade
lower, with Germany's DAX down
0.2 percent at 8,392.85 and France's
CAC 40 dropping 0.1 percent to
4,038.47. Britain's FTSE 100 fell 0.6
percent to 6,641.38 as Royal Bank of
Scotland shares shed 4.5 percent on
disappointing earnings.
Earlier in Asia, markets ended
higher Japan's Nikkei 225 index
surged 3.3 percent to 14,466.16, with
export shares boosted by a weaken-
ing yen. Hong Kong's Hang Seng
added 0.5 percent while in main-
land China, the Shanghai Composite
Index rose less than 0.1 percent

Oil falls after data
show tepid job growth

NEW YORK The price of oil
fell Friday after two days of big
gains, as investors took profits fol-
lowing a report that showed job
growth slowed in the U.S. last
month.
Benchmark crude for September
delivery fell 95 cents to close at
$106.94 per barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. Oil still fin-
ished the week up $2.24 a barrel,
or 2 percent, due to a gain of $4.81
over Wednesday and Thursday
At the pump, the average price
for a gallon of gasoline held steady
at $3.63. That's up 15 cents from a
month ago and 10 cents higher
than at this time last year
Brent crude, traded on the ICE
Futures exchange in London, fell
59 cents to finish at $108.95 per
barrel. Brent gained $1.78 a barrel
for the week.
-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY





Used cars


offer more


bang for


the buck

DEAR BRUCE: My husband
and I have always pur-
chased used vehicles. We
can't afford to pay cash, so we take
out low-interest loans. We kept our
last car for 10 years. Unfortunately,
they aren't worth much when we
do get rid of them. Is it wise to
lease a second vehicle, considering
we never have anything left when
we sell it anyway?
Pat, via email
DEAR PAT: I think you are doing
things exactly right! You're keep-
ing the car for 10 years, and you're
buying a vehicle used to begin
with. You are providing the lowest
cost for transportation that you
could possibly achieve.
At the end of 10 years, the cars
aren't worth much, and that's un-
derstandable. But you had 10 years
of use and at least six years of no
payments. This is another example
of "If it isn't broke, don't fix it." You
are doing just fine.
DEAR BRUCE: My dad recently
passed away I am told that his es-
tate was in the six figures. I under-
stand there were three
handwritten wills. My sister had
one copy, and two of my brothers
each had one. I hear that all three


were different.
My sister settled the estate with-
out going to probate using her copy
of the will. She gave one brother


Page D3








D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Upcoming Chamber of Commerce events
Aug. 8 Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 Aug. 22 Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to Sept. 12 Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to 7
p.m. at Suncoast Business Masters 7 p.m. at Life Care Center/Comfort Keepers p.m., Leland Management
Aug. 9 -Chamber Luncheon, Citrus Hills Sept. 7 -Chamber Business Expo, 9 a.m. Sept. 26 Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to 7
Healthcare Heroes Awards Ceremony to 3 p.m. at the Citrus County Auditorium p.m. at Emeritus at Barrington


Member Spotlight:


Rock Monsters, Inc.

M ike Duca, a state-certified contractor,
opened his business in 2005. Rock Mon-

wall installation, drywall repairs, popcorn removal,
You can count on Mike
SDuca to get the job done s,
"My word timely. Mike Duca believes
is golden." that an immediate re-
sponse to problems and
commitment to his clients
for keeping them on schedule with their projects
are key elements for a successful contractor busi-
ness. Mike Duca's customer-service philosophy is
to be speedy while providing quality work.
If you are looking to make repairs or to update
your home or business Rock Monsters, Inc. will
provide you with a professional estimate and.
prompt service with minimal inconvenience. Call
for information.

SWHAT: Rock Monsters, Inc.
WHO: Mike Duca.
SHOURS: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. / .-___,..
CONTACT: 352-746-9761. ."...__ _ _


r---------------------------------------------------------------
I I
Give a shout out to employees
who focus on customer service
I The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is proud to promote its "You Caught My
Eye" program. The program allows residents and visitors to recognize employees who
go beyond in their attention to Customer Service. In addition to the employee's name ap-
pearing in the newspaper, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce sends a letter to the
employee's manager noting the recognition.
YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ... for OUTSTANDING customer service!
PERSON you are nominating
* BUSINESS they work for
ADDRESS of business
CITY DATE of contact
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?

YOUR NAME
L ----------------------------------------------------------------------------A


YOUCAUGHTMYEYE...
FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!
Deborah Kellett Deb Kamlot
Quest Diagnostics, Crystal River Citrus County Chronicle


N


Check our com-
plete Chamber
and Community
calendar at
citruscounty
chamber.com.


Alikat Fashions and Ridin' Dirty
have moved to Inverness


Hours: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday to Saturday.
Location: 3129 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness, FL 34453
Call: 352-794-6116


Location:
3131 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness, FL
34453
Call: 352-419-7907


News you can use
Suncoast Business Masters hosts mini-expo
Invite your friends, family, and business associates. Suncoast Business
Masters members will be featuring a mini-expo at the upcoming Business
After Hours on Aug. 8. Refreshments will be served. This mixer will be
held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Tuscany on the Meadows, 350 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy, Hernando.
Just a few exhibitor spaces left!
You won't want to miss out on this opportunityto showcase your business
by exhibiting at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce Business Expo on
Saturday, Sept. 7. This event will be held at the Citrus County Auditorium
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit us at www.citruscountychamber.com/expo
for detailed information on exhibiting and/or sponsorship opportunities
for the Business Expo. Call JeffInglehart at 352-795-3149.
Save the Date! International Ethnic Weeks
Food. Music. Fun. Chamber member restaurants Seagrass Waterfront,
Neon Leon's, and MacRae's will be participating in this monthlong event
featuring international flavors and music. Irish week kicks off the month
Sept. 23 to Sept. 29, then Germanyweek Sept. 30 to Oct. 6, followedby Italian
week from Oct. 7 to Oct. 13 and ending with Polish week Oct. 14 to 20.
Visit www.naturecoastriverevents.com for more information.



Nature Coast EMS announces
next Citizens Academy class


Nature Coast EMS is pleased to
announce the next Citizens
Academy will begin Aug. 13, 2013.
The Citizen's Academy is a hands-
on opportunity for community
members to see and learn what
Nature Coast EMS paramedics
and EMTs do every day.
Graduates learn skills they can
use in actual emergencies because
the academy is focused on hands-
on training, showing and teaching
the skills that an EMS crew may
use. Participants will get to prac-
tice starting IVs, intubations
(placing a breathing tube), defib-
rillations, reading heart rhythms,
and doing a full "code" on our
SimMan mannequin. In the final


The Nature Coast EMS
Citizens Academy meets
every Tuesday for eight
weeks from 6p.m. to 9p.m.
session, participants will take care
of a simulated patient in a mock
patient care scenario and have the
opportunity to ride along with
paramedics and EMTs and go on
actual emergencies.
The Nature Coast EMS Citizens
Academy is free and meets every
Tuesday for eight weeks from 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. If you would like to
have fun while learning life-saving
skills, call 352-249-4700 or visit
www.naturecoastems.org. Just
click on "community."


AND THE WINNERS ARE...

2013 Cealth care
/o m ft/ Birllimil


Shop local Habitat for

for back- Humanity

to-school! needs


VO, AN,
/_ i "




AWARDS LUNCH
Friday, August 9,11:30 AM
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club






Thank you to our Healthcare Hero Partners.


5L 1 :. t14 0___
,%; t,:..,,6~~C I I1 A"i R-" .... .....


Chtin U nui iumdali Hih Slscm. Compikt. Fam ij Dentiy, Cryltil Ccimunttf ENT wId SujxI:t Eye Cimor


The summer will be over before
you know it. Take advantage
of the 2013 Florida Sales Tax Holi-
i-- day for Back-
2] R1 to-School
% shopping. The
three-day
I J *sales tax holi-
day began at
12:O1 a.m.,
Friday,
Aug. 2, and end at midnight
Sunday, Aug. 4. Visit www.citrus
countychamber.com and search
our business directory for busi-
nesses that can fulfill your back-
to-school shopping needs! Visit
http://dor.myflorida.com/ or
scan the QR code above for a list
of eligible items!
, I i Atf (II t ll ^|1l


volunteers
Habitat for Humanity has now
reached the milestone of
building its looth home in Citrus
County. Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County builds homes with


Contact
Habitat
Construction
Coordinator
CD Perez at
cdperezi9@
gmail.com
nr call her


lower-earning fam-
ilies who meet all
the qualifications
and perform 500
sweat-equity hours
volunteering for
Habitat.
We can't thank


S Court seasoned vol-
at63-6582. unteers, partner/
60-6582. homeowners, pro-
fessional trade contractors, mate-
rial suppliers and financial donors
enough for making this happen.
However, the demand for the work
we do has now exceeded our ca-
pacity and we need more help.
Interested participants please
contact Habitat volunteer
coordinator C.D. Perez at
cdperezl9@gmail.com or call her
at 352-601-6582. Habitat provides
all the tools necessary for the work.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


* ~1


' mmEIbill --. ,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learning how to compete with big business


mall restaurants.. big
opportunities?
Small businesses can be pressured
by big businesses to compete, survive
or... ? The small-restaurant business
owner faces this challenge when na-
tional restaurant chains enter the com-
munity The way the chains manage
their operation can be tough on the
small eateries. Small-business owners
view the big businesses as putting small
businesses out of business, but it doesn't
have to be that way! Small-business
owners can be competitive and flexible
with a strong survival instinct
If you can't beat them...
If you can't beat the big guys, join
them. This is not to suggest the small-
business owner close up shop and go to
work for the chain. What is does mean is
beat them at their own game. Become
known for good food, great customer
service, reasonable prices, cleanliness
and ambience. That's what the average
diner really wants. Call it the Holy Grail
of the restaurant experience.


Frederick

J. Herzog


EXPERIENCE
MATTERS


Beyond the basics
When the basics of good restaurant
management are firmly in place, overall
daily performance earns happy cus-
tomers who come back. Who doesn't
want satisfied customers who come
back time after time? Repeat business
brings short- and long-term profit suc-
cess.
The big chains continually train and
educate their staff. Their programs in-
clude all the employees from the front


end to the wait staff to the kitchen pros.
When best practices are taught and the
employees practice these principles,
staff become highly effective and pro-
fessional.
SCORE offers restaurant Best
Practices Program
Citrus SCORE is pleased to announce
a new coaching-counseling program for
restaurant management. Our volunteer
staff includes two highly qualified vet-
eran food service management profes-
sionals. Owners who would like to
enhance their operation can avail them-
selves of an evaluation at no cost.
Heading up the team are Bunni Bucci
and Chuck Kircoaf. Restaurant owners
can call SCORE at 352-249-1236 to sign
up for initial discussions about the pro-
gram.
Some basics of restaurant
management, by Chuck Kircoaf
Competing with the big chains doesn't
have to represent an impossible strug-
gle. But it does mean incorporating best
practices, the ones proven to work.


Here are some practices that should be
at the top of your program.
Train your employees. Maintain good
morale among all of them, front end,
wait staff and kitchen pros. Remember,
your customers see how your staff oper-
ates as they wait for their food.
Offer a diversified menu that features
local, fresh entrees that the preparation
staff can translate into great food
choices. Adequate equipment is neces-
sary to ensure entrees are prepared in a
reasonable period of time.
Listen to your employees. Be open to
their suggestions, constructive criticism
and ideas about how to make the restau-
rant better
The above suggestions underlie the
making of good food, service, pricing
and cleanliness. It's your staff that
makes it all work.

Dr. FrederickJ. Herzogis the immedi-
ate past chairman/president of Citrus
County SCORE. He can be reached at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


BONDS
Continued from Page Dl


Have local governments borrowed
a lot?
The total amount of municipal
debt outstanding is $3.72 trillion, ac-
cording to the Federal Reserve's lat-
est report. That may sound
enormous, but it's less than a fifth of
the total $21.7 trillion U.S. bond mar-
ket Corporations have borrowed
more money owing $5.9 trillion to
bondholders. And the federal govern-
ment has more publicly traded debt
than both groups put together: $11.9
trillion.
For the sake of comparison, the
value of the entire U.S. stock market





BUILDER
Continued from Page Dl


"It's mostly making them under-
stand, 'If you pass this, this is what it
will do to the industry' or 'We need
this legislation to help the industry"'
He added it includes legislation that
would needlessly make homes more
expensive affects homeowners -
and doesn't accomplish anything. So
FHBA provides construction expert-
ise. As president-elect, Lieberman is
working on the association's 2014 leg-
islative priorities.
Lieberman will also focus on re-
turning full funding to the Sadowski
Affordable Housing Act to help low
to moderate income Florida families
obtain housing.
"It's a big job," he said.
"If ever there was a builder who
was ready, willing and able to serve
as President of FHBA, it's Ron
Lieberman," said FHBA President
Suzanne Graham of Port Charlotte.





MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

and one sister $100 each because my
dad had given them money through-
out their lives. I received $2,500. The
rest of the money was divided up be-
tween herself and my two brothers
who had copies of the will.
She would not allow us to see the
will or provide us with copies. What
can we do?
-O.L., via email
DEAR O.L: With three different
handwritten wills, it's difficult to know
which one to acknowledge as the
proper will. On balance, it would be
the one that is dated the latest If there
are two or more dated the same day
the only way I would know to proceed
is to go to the surrogate in the county
where your father passed away and
turn the problem over to that office.
That is its function to represent the
person who passed away and solve
problems of this kind.
How your sister came up with $100
for the one brother and sister, $2,500
for you, and the rest divided among
herself and the other two brothers, I
have no way of determining. It would
seem to me that she acted improp-
erly She should have sent all three
of the wills to the surrogate's office
for probate and followed its guid-
ance as to which one was the appro-
priate will. In no way did she have
the right to settle the affairs your dad
left so muddled.
DEAR BRUCE: In 1997 1 bought a
hot dog cart for my wife to make
some money Let's just say big mis-
takes were made. She worked only
six weekends at baseball games.
I found that she kept no records of
sales or purchases. When it came
time to file state and federal taxes, I
panicked and haven't filed since. I
am so scared to find out what the
IRS will do to us. What can we do?
Reader via email
DEAR READER: I doubt seriously


is $18.7 trillion, according to S&P
Dow Jones Indices.
What's the appeal?
It's mainly the tax-free income.
The federal government taxes inter-
est payments from savings accounts,
corporate bonds and other invest-
ments, but doesn't touch income
from muni bonds. To somebody in
the top tax bracket, a New York State
bond paying 3 percent is equal to a
corporate bond paying 4.97 percent.
Who owns them?
They're mainly held by individu-
als, who buy them outright or
through mutual funds. Individuals
hold 44 percent of all munis, and mu-
tual funds have another 25 percent,
according to the Fed. Banks and in-
surance companies own much of the
rest.



"Everyone has all the confidence in
the world in Ron."
And as the homebuilding industry
rebounds, there will challenges, ac-
cording to Paul Thompson, CEO/
executive vice president of FHBA.
"Definitely things are looking up.
A national index shows 18 improving
markets in Florida seeing growth,"
Thompson said. "Home appreciation
is growing and building permits are
growing, that news is definitely
good."
But he pointed out that with the
growth, they are seeing labor short-
ages in some markets, some material
prices increasing and problems with
appraisals still based on comps. He
added they are keeping an eye on
Washington, especially Congress and
the home interest deduction. And
lending conditions are still tight.
"It's getting better," concluded
Thompson. "We're excited about him
being president."

Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.




if there is much of a problem with
the little amount of money that she
had in terms of revenue for the few
weeks that she sold hot dogs. More
important is the fact that you haven't
filed regular taxes since that time.
What you should do is contact a
CPA who specializes in tax matters
or an enrolled agent. He or she can
catch you up by filing the back re-
turns. If you are employed and there
was money taken out of your pay, itfs
entirely possible that you will have
some type of refund coming, depend-
ing upon the specifics of your cir-
cumstance.
DEAR BRUCE: I was reading an ar-
ticle about being wary of credit repair
companies. Does this also include non-
profit organizations like Consumer
Credit Counseling Services? This is
the company that contacts credit card
companies and negotiates settlement
figures at a lower interest rate, and
sometimes even a lesser amount than
owed.
I owe approximately $10,000 in
credit card debt I have thought of
bankruptcy, but would like to avoid it,
if possible. I am 65 years old and now
collecting Social Security and can only
work part-time.
-TA., via email
DEAR TA: The Consumer Credit
Counseling Services have earned a
very good reputation. These organi-
zations will do their best to negotiate
legitimately with credit card compa-
nies, and depending on your circum-
stance, possibly lowering your
interest rate, extension of terms, etc.
I have no problem at all recommend-
ing them to people.
There are other companies out
there that are also good. But I con-
tinue to say that if a company wants
money up front, forget it.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions of general interest will be an-
swered in future columns. Owing to
the volume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


BUSINESS DIGEST


Special to the Chronicle
Individuals and businesses are invited to sponsor Purchase Awards for the 2013
Inverness Festival of the Arts, which will take place Nov. 2 and 3. Purchase Award
ribbons are color-coded: Teal, $50 (minimum of two must be purchased); Maroon,
$100; Light Blue, $150; Rose, $200; and Lavender, $250. Deadline to sponsor a
ribbon is Sept. 1.


Awards now

available for

arts festival

INVERNESS -The In-
verness Festival of the
Arts Committee has an-
nounced that its Purchase
Award Program in sup-
port of the 42nd edition of
Citrus County's leading ju-
ried art show is open now
to patrons and members
of the County business
communities. Purchase
Awards are large, attrac-
tive ribbons that can be
purchased prior to the
event, which will take
place Nov 2 and 3.
When a Purchase
Award is acquired by a
patron or local business,
their name is imprinted
on the ribbon that can be
used to acquire art during
the Festival, just as if it
were a gift certificate.
After making a purchase,
the donor's ribbon will be
proudly displayed in the
booth of the artist, provid-
ing public recognition
that your business is a
supporter of the arts and
the Festival. Purchase
Award may be deductible
for federal income tax
purposes.
Purchase Award rib-
bons are color-coded in
the following denomina-
tions: Teal, $50 (minimum
of two must be pur-
chased); Maroon, $100;
Light Blue, $150; Rose,
$200; and Lavender, $250.
Checks should be made
payable to Festival of the
Arts Committee Inc., and
sent to PO. Box 2383, In-
verness, FL 34451-2383.
Checks must be received
no later than Sept. 1.
Purchase Award ribbons
will be delivered to spon-
sors about two weeks
prior to the festival
weekend.
The Inverness Festival
of the Arts is the only
event of its kind in Citrus
County because it allows
only the finest craftsmen
and artists to exhibit their
work, which they earn
through a rigorous jury
system. All artistic media
will be represented, in-
cluding watercolor, oils,
acrylic, pastel, wood carv-
ing, pottery stained glass


and original jewelry
Inquiries about the Pur-
chase Award Program
should be referred to
Nancy Pearson at 352-382-
2191. For more informa-
tion about the Inverness
Festival of the Arts, in-
cluding artist application
forms, go to www.inverness
-fl.gov/index.aspx?
NID135.

Area chamber

offers public

speaking class

BROOKSVILLE -The
Greater Hernando County
Chamber of Commerce
announces offers its an-
nual course in public
speaking to its members
and the general public at
large. The course consists
of five weekly sessions
of two hours each,
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9 through
Oct. 7, at The Greater
Hernando County Cham-
ber of Commerce build-
ing's training room, 15588
Aviation Loop Drive,
Brooksville.
It will be conducted by
Vince Vanni, who has pro-


vided public speaking
training to countless busi-
ness professionals and
public officials.
Vanni will combine his
35 years in sales, market-
ing and public speaking to
help participants develop
the presentation style
that's appropriate for
their own personality
Topics to be covered in-
clude dealing with fear,
projecting confidence,
preparing and delivering
the speech and more.
This is a hands-on
course. Participants have
the opportunity to de-
velop and refine their
skills through practical
participation.
A certificate of comple-
tion is awarded to those
who attend 80 percent of
the course (four of the
five classes).
The fee is $60 for
Greater Hernando County
Chamber of Commerce
members and $120 for
nonmembers. To register,
visit www.hernando
chamber corn/events or
call the chamber office at
352-796-0697.
This is a program of the
chamber's Business Re-
source Council.


Classifieds


a


FORD
95 Ranger ext. cab
109k mi, v6 auto,
X-clean, no rust, bed
liner $3,695 call after
11 am 352-489-3914
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control, power
windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tri-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319

#1 Employment source is

I www.chronicleonline.cor


T1 T


HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2013 Wrangler Sport sil-
ver hard top with 6
speed manual transmis-
sion, 17 inch alloy
wheels, running boards,
tinted windows, towing
package and much
more. 6400 miles new
condition. $25000 352
503-7572 Homosassa
LINCOLN
2003, Navigatoro
$6,495.
352-341-0018



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment


DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom
352-325-1306


Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
low miles,garage kept,
Adult Owner, $6K OBO
(352) 257-8850


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 D3





D4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013







Classifieds


Cihronicl
Concion~Z ^ i^


Friends and Family
are invited to come
celebrate Alma
"Shortie" Bedford's
90th Birthday at the
Floral City Park on
August 10th, 2013.
Shortie will be there
from 1pm until 6pm.




Auto Mechanic
FT. Exp and DL req.
Mostly oil changes
and tires. Some tools.
(352) 563-1600 CR

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, lawn,
water, sewr & garb.
W/D hk up $500.mo
$300 dep, sm pets
352-212-7922
352-212-9205

Exp. Line Cook
Apply In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Aug 10th 9a-5p
Sun. Aug 11th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605

INVERNESS
Sunday 8a-3p
Hsehold items, kids
clothing, toys, & more
2209 Bluegrass St
LOVESEAT & COUCH
W/ 2 recliners. Beige
micro fiber, Very good
cond. $425 obo; 1913
WHITE Trendle Sewing
machine $250 obo
(352) 212-8594
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178

TWO TOP
CLOSER NEEDED

Pre-set qualified
leads. In Home
Water Treatment
Sales for Authorized
GE Distributor. Sum-
ter (The Villages),
Lake, & Marion
Counties. Top Sales-
man earning
$150,000 per year.
Looking for Sales
Closers. Two Positions
avail. Please call
Mon-Fri 10am-2pm.
Ask for Sam
352-391-1337.




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metal
352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



3 cushion sofa,
beige and white.
fair condition
(352) 795-0876
3 Roosters
352-795-2347
FREE
Male Black Kitten 12
weeks old. Playful and
cute. Wormed and
Flead. (352) 464-1567
Free to Good Home
10 months, Jack Russell
Mix, Male, very loving,
wonderful with kids
(352) 621-0401
Free to good home
Black Lab Mix,
Female Good with
kids, Playful & Loving
House trained
(352) 299-4993
Large Quantity
of wood chipped
Mulch You Haul
(352) 746-9861
TV Antenna
You take down
approx. 40'
(352) 341-0557
We Rescued 4 female
cats, they were preg.
12 kittens needing for-
ever homes lots of
colors males and female
pls (352) 564-2428/
(813)425-3995


I-or tnhe hPerson or
Location of the Cooler
(352) 212-0315


Choc Chihushua
(Name is Connor)
Male, apprx. 3 yrs old,
white patch on chest,
tan paws, lost on
7/31/13 on Woodside
Ave/Rock Crusher
Crystal River
Reward offered
(352) 257-3692

Large Neutered Male
Gray tabby, approx. 12
yrs old, name is frodo,
missing since 7-11, lost
in the Ottowa Ave/Russ
St, Lecanto area.
Please call 527-8419 if
seen or found.

UPDATE
Large Anatolian
Shepherd Male, cream,
BIk ears & nose,
chipped,100l1bs lost on
4/26/13 in Floral City,
S.Turner Ave/ Stage-
Coach rd. Last Seen on
7/3/13 off of East
Spanish trail, Floral
City REWARD
OFFERED
(352) 220-2540

White, male, neutered
Cat with brown collier,
18 weeks old, recent
surgery to left hip, lost in
connell heights,
rockcrusher/ Hwy 44.
missing since friday
7-26, pls call 563-1063
if found or seen




Found Brown & White
Dog approx. 50 Ibs.
Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge
(352) 794-0001

Found
Young Female Cat,
mixed colors, black,
gray & light brown
Mini Farms Area
(631) 745-8569 Cell

Tortist Calico Kitten
poss. female 10-12 wks
found near
independence/Berry
Inverness call to identify
352-400-5200




Advertise in newspa-
pers across Florida -
One phone call puts
your ad in 117
newspapers. Reach
millions of
Floridians for one low
cost by calling
866.742.1373 or visit
www.AdNetworks
Flordacom




Looking for
Mildred Gannett
Dumars/Wood
Daughter of Harold
& Dora, Gannett
Widow of
William Dumars and
Thomas Wood
Contact
Thomas Atkinson
215 Dee Road
North Aurora, IL 60542




Infant/Toddler
Head start Teacher

Must have specific
credentials, for more
information call
(352) 795-2266





Therapist

Local Spa has rental
spaces avail, for all
Licensed Therapist.
For more info. call
527-0077/464-1166





CLINICAL STAFF

Home Health Agency
is Growing.
Advanced Nursing
Concepts is looking
for clinical staff with
Home Health
experience for Citrus
and Marion counties:
RN's, LPN's, HHA's,
PT's, OT's, MSW's.
Call (352) 742-9856.
Please fax resumes
to (352) 742-9857
or email to
wandakd@gmail.com


DENTAL
Front Desk/
Dental Asst

Are you a team
player with great
attitude and
phone skills?
Dental Knowledge
a Must PT/FT
Send Resume to:
dentalofficecitrus
countvflkamail.com


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


FIT MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Need motivated,
detail oriented
team player for a
busy medical office.
medical experience
required. Knowl-
edge of scripts
helpful. Competitive
wages & Benefits.
Email resume to:
lecantojobapps@
yahoo.com


RN/LPN
3p- 11p Full time

Apply In Person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100
or Fax Resume
352-746-0748

RN/LPN,
Part time

OB/GYN Office
OB GYN Experience
Preferred
Fax Resume
352-794-0877

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time
and part-time
employees, with
opening in all shifts.

HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF




Accounting
Clerk

Will secretarial skills.
Send Resume:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1838P
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd Crystal
River, Florida 34429

Engineering
Inspector
Announcement
# 13-39

Advanced and
technical field in-
spection and office
related work in
connection with
civil engineering
construction proj-
ects, road and avia-
tion construction
and road resurfac-
ing for Engineering
and Public Works
projects. A minimum
of five years'
experience in civil
engineering and
construction man-
agement. Starting
pay $13.07 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, August 16,
2013 EOE/ADA.

Great opportunity
in Floral City!

Teacher Wanted
Math and/
or Science
Visit our website:
www.eckerd.org
to apply. EOE

Librarian I
Announcement
#13-41

Professional library
work responsible for
instruction, research
and customer
service in a public
library. Four year
degree from an
accredited college
or university is
required. Masters in
Library Science or
related coursework
preferred.
ABILITY TO WORK
SOME EVENINGS
AND SATURDAYS
AND AT VARIOUS
LOCATIONS WHEN
NEEDED AS
REQUIRED. Starting
pay $13.34 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the Citrus
County Board of
County
Commissioners,
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, August 16,
2013 EOE/ADA




Exp. Line Cook

Aeelv In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19

LINE COOK
PIZZA MAKER
& DRIVER

ADDIv in Person
2492 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernando


OUTSIDE SALES

Person needed for a
statewide, inde-
pendent wholesale
protein food distrib-
utor. Immediate
opening in
Leesburg/lnverness
area. Restaurant,
meat market or
food distribution
experience a plus.
We offer weekly
salary + commission,
medical and 401K.
Email confidential
resumes to:
m walker@
kellysfoods.com

TWO TOP
CLOSER NEEDED

Pre-set qualified
leads. In Home
Water Treatment
Sales for Authorized
GE Distributor. Sum-
ter (The Villages),
Lake, & Marion
Counties. Top Sales-
man earning
$150,000 per year.
Looking for Sales
Closers. Two Positions
avail. Please call
Mon-Fri 10am-2pm.
Ask for Sam
352-391-1337.





Alum. Installer

Exper. installer & shop
worker, also screen
room product sales.,
emai: info@pest
guardproducts.com

Auto Mechanic
FT. Exp and DL req.
Mostly oil changes
and tires. Some tools.
(352) 563-1600 CR

EXP AC/TECH &
HELPER

Growing business
Own tools, clean DL,
DT & EPA CERT
CURRENT REFS
866-797-5577

FABRICATORS
NEEDED
Part time, Full time

NO EXP. NEC.
Will train, Must be
detail oriented and
have good hand
eye coord. Drug
Free Workplace

DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
352-794-5460


















NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim.
Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124AUnit4
Wildwood












































Now hiring: Class
A-CDL Drivers
$2500 Sign -On
Bonus, Great Pay,






















Full Benefits, and
Achievable
Bonuses! Call us
now at
1-800-973-9161 or
apply at
www. hevl.net

QUALIFIED
AIC SERVE TECH

Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
407 C 14AUnt 4m











NesaperDLarrivers
wantedforearlPy,

theCitusesCallnuy
Choil ndother
newspapers916for


suredyand



van, SERVTECH


Exp Only& uren
prodRuLcamut.


Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

BC23


Drivers Helpers,
Full Time/Part Time,

Must be clean cut,
bondable, Drug
Free. NO CALLS.
Applv in person at
Keepit Safe Storage
& Moving 5050 W.
Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Crystal River Florida

EXP. LANDSCAPE
PERSONNEL

Trimming exp. must
Apply in Person
920 E. RAY ST.
HERNANDO


CLASSIFIED




GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
(2 positions avail.)
Announcement
#13-40

Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Heavy lifting,
pushing, bending,
climbing and reach-
ing required. Ability
to work outdoors in
hot/cold tempera-
tures under noisy
conditions. Current
valid Florida Driver
License required.
$7.79 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, August 9,
2013 EOE/ADA




ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Become a
Certified Microsoft
Professional!
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! SC Train
can get you job
ready ASAP! HS
Diploma/GED
PC/Internet needed!
(888)212-5888

AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769






SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
i" AUGUST 12, 2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
w"AUGUST 12,2013

MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
SEPTEMBER 3,2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING










SPRING HILL
CLASSES
s s< s< s< s<
COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
wAUGUST 12, 2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
w'AUGUST 12,2013

MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
r'SEPTEMBER 3,2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





YOU'LL Uv THIS!
** FREE** 8X10 METAL
STORAGE SHED 8'x10'
metal storage shed in
good condition. You
dismantle and move.
Bought bigger building
and must remove to
make room. phone
352-513-4797









Need a job
4ir a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!


( C I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




ARMLESS
WINGBACK CHAIR
gold velvet excel condi-
tion $50 352-249-6227
WINGBACK CHAIR
fair condition very old
needs TLC $30
352-249-6227




Leisure Bay Spa
6 person w/ cover,
heater multi color
lights, under waterfall,
power box all in-
cluded, works great
$700. (352) 287-0767




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
GE Chest Freezer
runs good,
looks good,
36"L 22"W, 26" D
$100.
(352) 697-2583
GE ELE. STOVE
self clean, Color is
Bisque $100
GE Dishwasher,
Color is Bisque $100
352-637-3156
HOT POINT ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 White.
Older model. Works
great. 30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504
Maytag
Upright Freezer
14 Cubic inches only 1
yr old White $200
(352) 794-6761
RCA ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 Almond
color. Older model. 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
Refrigerator
Whirlpool Side by Side
w/ ice maker, 4 mo,
old 25 cu ft., white
$500.
(352) 344-8344
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER
$100 In perfect work-
ing condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition.Free De-
livery 352-263-7398




FILING CABINET 4
DRAWER 52"X25"X12".
Gray steel. $25.
(352)257-4076
Solid Oak L Shaped
Executive Desk with
matching bookcase,
file cabinet & chair
$500 (352) 697-1483
(352) 746-1284




Bank Owned

ON SITE

REAL ESTATE
AUCTION
Lake Panasofkee SFH
2005 County Rd. 429
2BR/1 BA, 576 sq. ft.
SALE DATE:
SAT., AUG. 24TH 11AM
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
800-229-9793
wwwauctionservicesinti corn
5% Buyers Premium
James H (Jay) Lloyd
Lic# FL-AU2073 ASI-AB675




GENERATOR
Troy-bilt. New. Never
used. 3550 watts
$200.00 352-341-0366




CASSETTE DECK


Pioneerdouble
component,good
shape,($10)
352-613-7493
MAGNAVOX
64" projection TV
good working cond.,
good speakers $99
(352) 270-3421
SPEAKERS Yamaha
receiver, center chan-
nel speaker, 2 38"
tower speakers, ex-
cellent cond.,$175.00
Call 352 382-2591
TV SONY 27"
TRINITRON PICTURE
IN PICTURE missing
ext. speakers $10.
(352)257-4076

TV STAND
3 shelves, glass
47 x 18
$50.
(352) 637-2254


DOORS, 36"new bifold,
30" 6 panel Int., $10.00
each 352-513-5400
SINK 16"X19" oval
white porcelain
bathroom, new,($10)
352-613-7493




COMPUTER DESK
large corner desk
w/hutch, 53"X53"you
disassemble. FREE
(352)257-4076
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Air Compressor
2HP, Craftsman 26gal
vertical tank, like new
$175 (352) 246-3500




2 Seater Patio Swing
with Canopy
$50.
(352) 860-0976
2 Tropic Tone,
white lounge chairs
with cushions cond.
$45. ea.
2 Tiered Concrete
Fountain $99.
(352) 601-4223
PATIO TABLE 45"
Square Bronze
Metal/Glass top.
Extra Top $45.00
586-8931
PATIO TABLE
47"Round Green
Metal/Glass
Patio Table. $30.00
352-586-8931




4 Horse Carousel
Pedestal Coffee Table,
with removable glass
top, beige & brn horses
Pd $700 asking $350
(352) 637-2499
4 New Formal Dinning
Chairs, walnut with
beige upholster seats
$100 (352) 746-7940
4 Wicker Bar Stools,
swivel, light tan
with cushions
excel, cond. $160
Cherry Dining Room
Lighted Hutch w/ ta-
ble 6 chairs 2 leave.
$900 (352) 601-$4223
8 pc. Dining Room
White, $500.
7 Pc. Living Room
Cream $700.
Call btw. 8am-4pm
352795-1499,
352-860-6747
4pc Bed Room, Twin
$300 Oak entertainmt
Center $500.
Call btw. 8am-4pm
352795-1499,
352-860-6747
BAR CHAIRS 2
Wrought Iron Chairs w/
backs. Heavy Weight
$100.00. 586-8931
Beautiful SOLID
WOOD QUEEN BED
with antiqued gold de-
tailing on the head-
board and dark chess
nut color wood. There
are detachable metal
bars that make a
canopy.Very good
shape.$400.
call-352-601-7773
Book Case, 5 shelves
72 x 30
$75.
End Table w/ glass top
$25.
(352) 637-0407
CHINA CABINET lovely
Ig 2 pc w/glass pecan
wood.must sell 70.00
352-212-7788 or
352-287-2650
CHINA CABINET
Walnut with glass door
excel cond matching
table available $75
352-249-6227
COFFEE TABLE
Oval glass, with
brown leather and
wrought iron base.
352-270-8423
Couch & love seat
Very Nice Fall Pattern,
good cond $125
Computer Desk 47x24
Shelves & Drawers
$125 (352) 628-1924
DINETTE SET
AND 4 CHAIRS
Glass top, wrought iron
pedestal and legs
352-270-8423
Furniture
Desk $25, book case$
20 (2) End tables $25
(352) 447-4727
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
King Bed
incl. mattress & box
springrails, mattress
pad, 3 fitted sheets and
3 flat sheets $175
352-875-7991
KING BED
mattress double pillow
top with box spring $100
(352) 447-4727
Kitchen Table Almond
Formica wood grain,
6 chairs, 1 leaf, very
good cond. $250.
Lazy Boy Love Seat,
both seats recline for-
est green, excel. $450.
(352) 601-4223
Lazy Boy, Tan fabric
Mint Condition.
$100.
Hi Back French,
Blue Chair, $75.
(352) 637-0407
LOVESEAT & COUCH
W/ 2 recliners. Beige
micro fiber, Very good
cond. $425 obo; 1913
WHITE Trendle Sewing
machine $250 obo
(352) 212-8594
OAK DESK
Large oak desk
352-270-8423


Sectional
with 2 recliners
double bed, storage
section, vibrator seat,
telephone, $300
Oak Entertainment
Center, drawers,
shelving for compo-
nent, CD & DVD
storage, good cond.,
includes TV, $300.
(352) 341-2482
TABLE LAMPS LARGE
28"H white $30. Medium
20"H beige $25. NICE!
non smoke home
352-270-3909
TRUNDLE DAY BED
Elliott Designs, white
decorative Iron
w/mattresses, like new
$400
BEDROOM SET
upscale, dresser
w/mirrow, 2 night
stands, head & foot
boards, armoire $900
(352) 513-5400



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Garden Tractor,
Murray Heavy Duty
18.5 HP V-Twin 46
inch cut $500.
Murray rear eng. Rider
Trans./Axle 12 HP
30 in. cut, $250. Firm
352- 507-1490
GRASS CLIPPER
Weedeater, hand held,
rechargable with
hedgeclipper,($10)
352-613-7493
JOHN DEER
L130 23 HP, Kohler
eng. 48" cut $1200
OBO call between
9am-1 pm 726-5189

OW -A J


JOHN DEERE COM-
MERCIAL 36" G-15 with
Kohler Command Pro
15 OHV motor and
mower Sulky speed
w/reverse.
Asking $1000 -Great
condition Excellent for
lawn business back-up
&/or personal use.
352-410-7135
LAWN SWEEPER
26"Craftsman,push
type,leaves,pinecones
great shape($25)
352-613-7493
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944




INVERNESS
Sunday 8a-3p
Hsehold items, kids
clothing, toys, & more
2209 Bluegrass St



Ladies Clothing
Upper Scale, 4 suites, $
15 each, pants, blouses,
$2-5 ea sizes 16-18
very reasonably priced
call for appt.628-4766
no calls before 11am
TEEN GIRLS
CLOTHES 1 sun dress,
1 aero shirt (medium),
2 t-shirts. $20
352-613-0529
TEEN GIRLS CLOTH-
ING 1 Mid-length shorts
size 5/6 & 5 hollister
graphic tee's (medium).
$30 352-613-0529



!!!! LT225/75R 16
TIRE!!!! Good Year
Light Truck Great
Shape 90% Tread
ONLY 60.00 464-0316
**4 Gen Tires**
225-70-16
only 1 mth old,
exec. cond $125 ea
(352) 527-3125
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45
628-0033
10 VINTAGE WOODEN
HANGERS. $1 EA. Or
$5 for all.
(352)527-2085
2008 2 Horse Slant
Load Gooseneck
w/large dressing area,
screened door, elect.
very good cond $6500
obo(765) 318-1156
40' Electrical Wiring
GCC-P 6-3 NMB
600volt. sell for $1.75pr
foot, never used
352-436-3302
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Battery Charger
for Golf Cart
48 Volt,
$300.
(352) 860-0939
Black Full Size Rack
for Full Size Pick Up
Truck $75.00
352-270-1580
CAMERA Minolta
freedomzoom,35m.,90X
zoom,with case, great
shape,($15)
352-613-7493
CAR TOP CARRIER
Sears Sport 20SV hard
plastic with lock. Used
once. $35.00
352-341-0366


CHECKMATE FULL
SIZED ACOUSTIC
GUITAR $40 OBO
1960's. (352)527-2085
Chevy Silverado
Aluminum Running
Boards, great shape
ONLY $100.00
352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra
for 4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY
$80 352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra
for 4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY
$80 352-464-0316
CHILD TRAIN TABLE
Childs step 2 train table
with top 35.00, small
Thomas big wheel bike
20.00 352-628-4447
DINNING ROOM LIGHT
6 light with a down light,
dark finish,nice. $25.00
352-341-2081
DOG CARRIER XLG
Excellent shape
Petmate (plastic) 40L
27W 30H $60. CLEAN
Pine Ridge 270-3909
GENERATOR TROY
BUILT
portable, 120-220v
12v electric start, 8000
running watts, 13,500
starting watts, will do
whole house, bought
after Katrina, never
used. pd $1400. sell for
$925 (352) 489-3914
GOLF CART
Very good condition.
Cover w/ plastic
curtains. $1200
(352) 503-5002
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
HEALING GARDEN
FRAGRANCE SET. $10
OBO Never used.
(352)527-2085
LOVE SEAT
floral pattern clean
no smoking,
Like new cond.
$60.
(352) 489-9970
Metal Tree
Wall Mounted
4ft x 4 ft.Copper &
gold shades,
$115 one of a kind
(352) 601-4223
Olympus SP800UZ
Digital Camera,
Brand New w/ warranty
14mgp, 30 OPT x 5 Dig.
$180 Call for Details
(352) 344-3485
Recumbent Bicycle
2 Wheel EZ sport,
27 speed.
very good cond.
$700.
(352) 897-4751
SMALL FIRE PROOF
Steel Safe, for home
or office 17"W x 14.5
x13" H $35.00
(352) 344-5283
TRAFFIC LIGHT Old
new York traffic light.
3 lights 95.00
352-628-4447
WINE CHILLER
Bravetti, like new,($15)
352-613-7493




4 Wheeled Walker
with brakes and
seat ONLY $70.00
352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
Aluminum Walker
both have adjustable
legs 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464-0316
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps to
the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
TRANSPORT
CHAIR (SMALL
WHEELS) GREAT
shape with footrest
90.00 352-464-0316




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT
ONLY $50
352-601-6625
"NEW" BACKPACKER
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/BAG & EXTRAS
ONLY $50
352-601-6625
"NEW" REPAIRED
GRAND CONCERT
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/FISHMAN PREAMP
$65 352-601-6625
"NEW"BLACK
LES PAUL STYLE
GUITAR, SET-UP
AND READY $70
352-601-6625
"NEW"LES PAUL
STYLE GUITAR 2
HUMBUKERS PLAYS
LIKE "BUTTER" $70
352-601-6625
LAP STEEL KIT "NEW
IN BOX"BUILD YOUR
OWN COMPLETE
W/EXTRAS $50
352-601-6625


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131

TROMBONE
Trombone,case,accessories
great for band
class 95.00
352-628-4447


Oak Dinning Rm Set
6 chairs, & 2 extra leafs,
exec. cond. $500
Floor Model Ele. Or-
gan $200 352 446-6329
Queen Mattress Set
Pillow Top with box
spring, semi firm,
only a few yrs old, no
stains,good cond $195
(352) 794-6761
Recliner Tan/Brown
tweed. Good
Cond.$50.
10 Kitchen Chairs
$10 per chair
(352) 628-1924
RECLINER-ROCKER
Lazy Boy, tan suede
cloth fabric, good condi-
tion. $70 352-628-0698
SOFA BED COUCH
Standard Size, gold &
beige tropical pattern
w' 2 Oak end tables
$150.
(352) 422-5622


0 FIRE RSCUE
Building Maintenance Tradesworker
THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS NOW
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR A BUILDING MAINTENANCE TRADESWORKER.
Regular, full time position working Monday through Friday,
sharing on-call with Building Maintenance Coordinator.
Responsibilities of this position include constructing,
repairing, renovating and maintaining Sheriff's Office
buildings and equipment. Responsible for performing a
wide variety of general maintenance, including carpentry,
plumbing, painting, electrical, HVAC, and other skills in
accordance with standard practices of the trade.
QUALIFICATIONS: 3-5 years of experience dealing with
general maintenance issues and the ability to lift 100
pounds. Position may be subject to call back in
emergency situations.
Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriffs Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King JrAve
Inverness FL 34450
(352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications at
www.shenriffcitrus.org
Equal Opportunity Employer MF/D/V N




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 C5


REFRIGERATOR White
top freezerlCEMAKER
LG Clean $100
419-5549
Solar Cover
& Attached Roller over
kidney shaped pool
You remove $50. obo
746-3327 or 212-7299
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529



EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only 90.00
352 464-0316
NEW PUNCHING BAG
80 Ibs never used
352-419-5549
SOLOFLEX
Machine. Good
working order $600
(352) 344-1258
TREADMILL
electric, good cond.
$99 (352) 270-3421
TREADMILL Proform
785-PI,inclining,full
electronics,great
shape,($100)
352-613-7493



BOWLING BALL
women, Maxim,like
new,+ bag,($15)
352-613-7493
BOYS BICYCLE
SPIDER MAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
Callaway Golf Bag
Big Bertha, like new $50
(352) 794-6203
CLUB CAR
Late Model, exec cond,
exc. battery, headlights,
brakelights, $1500
(352) 527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course


SeloS
A Dundee Detective by
David Aitken. A Kindle
novel. $2.99.
davidaitken.org
KINDLE NOVEL
Sleeping with Jane Aus-
ten by David Aitken. A
Kindle novel. $2.99.
davidaitken.org



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369

Wanted
Full Size Adjustable or
Hospital Bed,
(352) 613-5557

Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944


KAT BUNN
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ years
Specializing in hair
color,highlights, fashion
colors-$10 off highlights
with ad. now offering
hair extentions.
Call for an appointment
352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com


SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Ask about my Summer
Discount,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827



U




TUCKER
Tucker, a 2-y.o. Ger-
man Shepherd mix,
neutered, HW nega-
tive, microchipped,
housebrkn, UTD on
shots, wt 54 Ibs.
Needs to be only dog
w/single person or
couple, needs fenced
yard w/room to run,
but prefers to be in-
side dog. Loves his
human friends. Walks
well on leash. Cur-
rently fostered, mom
says he's a great
watchdog, very alert.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
or Dianne @
352-419-5880.




GAS TANK
6 gallon (used) $60
Fort Island Marine
Supply; 9683 W
Fort Island Tr
(352) 436-4179




Kayak Current Design
Fiberglass, 14 ft
w/rudder, sit-in $500
(352) 344-2161


CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tri-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.

MALIBU SKI BOAT
1989 looks and runs
great. Garage kept
$5250 obo
(352) 302-7365

SOUTHBAY 2009
18 FT pontoon boat
w/ trailer, 75 HP etec.
21hrs, $16,000
(352) 341-3305

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com


2012 EVERGREEN
EVER-LITE
29 Foot Travel Trailer,
Model 29FK (Front
Kitchen). Well con-
structed, generously op-
tioned, like-new condi-
tion. Easy tow with SUV
or Pick-Up. Priced well
below NADA at
$21,000. Please call


Yellowstone
1999 28' Fifth Wheel
2 slidouts,Exc. Cond.
new awning,Queen bed,
new refridg. very clean,
2 2 mi. to Gulf, on river
$10kobo(352) 447-2933




4 Michelin X Tires
245/75/16 E Rated,
Great cond. $100 firm
352-201-2280
352-220-2715
FORD
2004 F-250 99-04 8 lug
F-250 steel wheels 16x7
with used Uniroyal street
tires, some miles left on
them, one has plugs
you may want patched
at a tire shop, holding air
now, set of 4 $200
352-817-5546

Vehicles^
Wanted


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE
eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYERS
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Look
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


CHEVROLET
2002, Saturn SC
$3,450.
352-341-0018
-efstorage
*Notices


[


UDAN'S GUN R MUUIVI oz2/74.-334. for addi-
(352) 726-5238 BUY, SELL- tional information or to
Fear No-Evil Guns & TRADE CLEAN schedule a time to see.
USED BOATS
XDS's-Sheild-Beretta AKC MINIATURE THREE RIVERS Gulf Stream 3105 GF
Concealed Classes SCHNAUZER PUPS! MARINE 2008 5th WhI, toy hauler
352-447-5595 Lovingly home raised US 19 Crystal River 33 ft, 5500 Onan Gen,
K F and socialized Health "352-563-5510** gas pump, sleeps 7,
GUN & KNIFE Certificate all shots, cur- many extra's $29,925
SHOW rent, tails docked & lIft HYDROPLANE call 352-843-8578
dewclaws removed 1 RACE BOAT,
BROOKSVILLE males 9 wks ,1 Salt & built in 1950's, recently MAC'S MOBILE RV c
HSC CLUB Pepper: IBIk & Silv. rebuilt $500. obo REPAIR & MAINT.
Sat. Aug 10th 9a-5p $600, cash discount! (352) 344-0071 RVTC Certified Tech.
Sun. Aug 11th 9a-4p (352) 419-4723 Leave Message 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
HERNANDO BalPupI will call back I
COUNTY Beagle Puppies
FAIRGROUNDS 8 wks. old tri colors ANGLER WE BUY RV'S,
Admission $6.00 $75. Cash. 1993 center console TRAVEL TRAILERS,
(352) 799-3605 (352) 447-2018 18ft, 115hp Suzuki 5TH WHEELS,
Havanese Pure Bred outboard,with MOTOR HOMES
James Anglin Havanese Pure Bredn trailer.Engine rebuilt in Call US 352-201-6945
Gunsmith ups, Born 5/11/13. 1998, Lower unit rebuilt
9 unewin Will have health 2011 Runs great. GPS S l tI
9 Millimeter new in certificate. Great and fish finder included.
Box with 2 mags coloring. Only sold as $4000.00 OBO
$189.00 352-419-4800 companion dogs. No 352-628-7216 or
RAY'S GUN SHOP yellpers. Paper trained 352-422-0150 Person<
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Call (352) 628-2828
Mossberg 715T 22-AR H TI D Bayliner
$295. NRA-concealed HUNTING DOG 1998 20 ft 3.0 in board
classes 586-7516 Hunting Dog. Beautiful mercuriser, walk thru, PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE F
--------5-yr old male Fox Ter- seats 7-9, exec cond, SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCC
"IB rier. Free to right situa- w/trailer, + $5,695 call FACILITY ACT, SECTIONS 83-SO6
Mll" tion. 727-512-2700 after 11am 489-3914
Trile-rs Shih Poo Puppies, BOATSLIP FOR RENT PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DU
Landscaping Trailer 3 males, 2 females HOMOSASSA RIVER #0012 Andrea Garratt; #0014 K
6x12 bk ramp folds Yorkshire Puppies $125mo. 352-220-2077 #0122 Diane Summers; #01341
down,exec. cond $800 1 Male
(352) 527-3125 Miniature Poodles Canoe, CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITC
SWhite, 2 females 15 ft., 2 lifesavers, GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FL
(352) 795-5896 2 seats, 2 paddles, THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES
628-6188 evenings trolling motor, $500 OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT T(
(352) 746-7357
SHIH TZU Puppies LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE
NECKLACE 8 wks old, heath cert., LINCOLN Red VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME 0
large engravable registered. 2 males, 2010 MKT, 41k miles, PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNI
heartH.D.,double-dhain,stain- 4 females. Male $350, loaded! All the options 11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 4
less,new,($55) Female $400. Garage kept, $33,000 Published in the Citrus County
352-613-7493 Call 352- 637-9241 (352) 341-3305


AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks
'93 Buick Regal
$500 down
'99 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible
$650 down
'97 Ford Taurus
$695 Down
'98 Ford Mustang
$700 Down
CALL TED TODAY
(352) 563-1 9 02
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
1974 Corvette This is a
blue corvette that had
some restoration done
to it and is needing a
new owner for $16,999
352-322-5555
352-465-6560
CHEVROLET
2007, Aveo
$5,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHEVY
2010 HHR 4 door, red
61K mi, exec. cond
asking $13,500 call any
time (352) 446-6329
CHEVY
95 Berretta, auto, 120k
mi, one owner, good
reasonable transp,
$975 FIRM 637-2588
CHRYSLER
Convertible 2006 PT
Cruiser touring edition,
turbo, auto, cream with
tan top only 55K mi,
wife's car like new
$8000 (352) 302-1527
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
GMC CADILLAC
02 Deville 83k mi, Good
Cond, runs good $5,500

i 32)341-055


345-0811 SUCRN
al Mini Storage 08-21 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO
'RDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE
1AND 83-807:
NNELLON
Kristin Stewart; #0108 Glenda Girard;
Kathleen Zimmerman; #0241 Erik Brinkley
HEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
JRNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
S SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
O BID ON UNITS.
PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2013.
)FTHE SALE ONLY.
NNELLON
1), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
Chronicle, August 4 & 11, 2013.


FORD
2007 Mustang, v6, auto,
85k mi, loaded, very
clean inside and out,
$11,795 call after 11am
352-489-3914
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'04, Towncar,
62K miles, $9,200
Excellent Cond.
(352) 628-4681
MAZDA
Miata MX5, 1.8,
5 speed convertible,
66,700 miles. $6995
obo (260) 704-8683
PORSCHE
1999 Porsche Super-
Boxter, Conv, garg.
kept, 73k mi, Sports
pkg, leather interior,
alloy wheels, heated
seats, cruise control, tilt
steering wheel, all
power, am/fm/CD, 5
speed trans, security, air
bags,AC $12,000
(352) 382-1771
1j3525604


TOYOTA
2004, Prius
$9,450.
352-341-0018




Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$29,900 352-513-4257

CHEVROLET
'86, Monte Carlo,
383 motor SS
$2,000.
(352) 212-6144

CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560



345-0804 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote Roddenberry
PUBLIC NOTICE


FORD
1978 F150, 302 eng.
body, tires, good cond.
needs Transmission,
$1500 OBO 795-5413




BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
1998, S10, EX Cab
$2,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
05 F150 4 x2
Super Crew Lariat
35,630k mi, lots of
extra's a beautiful truck
in exec cond. $23,400
(352) 795-5310
(410)-474-3454
TOYOTA
'06, Tundra, limited
4 x 4, Dbl. Cab, cap
running boards, 65,400
mi, $19,500,341-0858


Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Paul A. King
5477 S. Burr Ter
Inverness, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle August 4, 2013


342-0804 SUCRN
08/13 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least
one day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, August 4, 2013.
343-0804 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 8, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, August 4, 2013.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst3525613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


M& W Interiors
Inside/Out Home Repair
Wall/Ceiling Repair
Experts, Popcorn Re-
moval,DockPainting &
Repair(352) 537-4144




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279***
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508*
Lawncare & More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M& W Interiors
Inside/Out Home Repair
Wall/Ceiling Repair
Experts, Popcorn Re-
moval,DockPainting &
Repair(352) 537-4144



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 8/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447


CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820

HOME CLEANING
on Wednesday
Experienced.
(352) 621-9285
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakh6usten"
Free Written Estimate

: 100OFF
Any Re-Roof:,
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed I
|Lic./Ins. CCC057537 FNAM


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS


461
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131



A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



FieTTTTI
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713



ZIER,_LING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
***352-639-1024***


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852


Your World

4 9a'14e "ta




CHI~pNicJ.


RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178








TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


I CRYER...NT.-LEANI


I Add an artistic touch to your existing yard DON'T LET YOUR
W orpoolorplan DRYER START
something A FIRE!a
e completely new! FlaIRale-No
.r lk "Often infirared, idnCi
ELS nevet duplicated'F all


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALISTDrV t


POOL AND PAVER LLC LclOe1Ys.
L ensued 352-400-3188
& Insured


JIIWi (a s.mui .VA J i Mn



*Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


GENERAL '.
Stand Alone ...ji
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
SGenerac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-1 4*


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
*" ALL Home
Repairs
/ Small Carpentry
Y Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
-leodo'A.ie & Dependable
Experience lifelong
3 52- 344-0905
cell: 400-1722
.. sured Lic.#377511


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
XLrN cCCC1 325497


MAC JOHNSON
MAC ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


KNOCK OUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
'B Licensed, Insured,
S Workers Comp.
) Pressure
1% Washing Too


"; s352.942.6876
Call Today for a
... Clean Tomorrow


trcc*%?nct? ,n {/ooftny'



IROO FING |
SQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices


www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
S(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


m^h r-04'BDi 3?l~aCSS^


Meeting
I Notes :


Meeting
I Ntics -


MeetBin
I Notice


ZI PAI N


I ..!. 1 .... .. .. S I




CITmUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1Y77/1/


AtIz


11:W


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
li 4AND MILES fHRPME WHEELS HEATED
AND CLE SEATS ONEER O3X1 A
si8,988g


2009 CADILLAC
CTS
OLD M6T 40 MIUS LEATHER SUNRi'OF
HEATED SEATS #38353
$23,988


2009 CADILLAC
STS
UE LEATHER LOCAI WFLETRAD CLEAN
Q0,9785
$120,4988


2010 CADILLAC
SRX


BLAL AN L CAL. ONE OWNER TRADE IN LIHE
NEW C3A49
$24A98,9


2013 CADILLAC
ATS


a LU Y COLLiON LEATHER 'CUE'
SYSTEM SAVE0#3
'30,988


2011 CADILALC
CTS
]IAMONO WHITE 1DI'Il MILES LEATHER ONE
O ANER7 gTOB
p27,


2010 CADILLAC
SRX
GOLD MIST 3800 MILES LEATHER SUNROOF
HEATED SEATS 7A
127988


2011 TOYOTA
AVALON


UM BEIGE ONLY 6000 MILES LEATR SUN-
ROOF LOALTRADE IN #343090
$27,488


2010 CADILLAC
SX
COLLECTION CMYSTAL RED ONLY 260M00 MILES
LEATHER SUNROOF ONE OW #C3362A
'28,988


2005 CADILAC
STS


WHITE DIAMOND 6157 MILES LEATHER EPTA
[LEAN LOCAL TRADE CI:3M;,
13,988


2010 CADILLAC
SRX


A IT LaMER 25000 MILES LEATHER SUNROOF
HEATED SEATS 360
p"9,988


2008 SATURN
VUEXR


ED 5M MILES LEATHER ETRA CLEAN
AI3S416A
p13,988


2009 CADILLAC
DTS
DK MOCHA LEATHER WtEIOR LUURY INNE
O0,AL TRAE 126A
$;20,988B


2013 CADILLAC
CTS
SILER 15328 MILES LUXURY COLLECT N HEAT-
:D SEATS BACK UP CAMERMA I718 )
p31,588


2013 CADILLAC
CTS
CRYSL RED [UiURi COLLECTION LEATHER
ATED SEATS C:K 350
$31,988


.........-.


2006 NISSAN
350Z


TONVERTILE SILVER ONL i30i0O MILES LOCAL
TRAD EXRA CLEANi C32,4F
$16,988


2005 CADILALC
CTS


3 L BLA 45939 MILES LEATHER HEATED SEATS
ONE OWNER TRADE #C3T37OB
si2,988


2013 CHEVROLET
CAMARO
CONV SILVER 1 000 MILES EDTRA CLEAI LT1
PACKAGE 383620
826,988


2012 RAM 2010 CHEVROLET 2006 MERCURY 2009 HONDA 2005 CADILLAC 2002 FORD
1500 EQUINOX LTZ GR MARQUIS FIT CTS T.BIRD
M 8 DOANOW A DO MWOA 3100 MILES LEATHER ONE SL A ER .S SILVER ULTIMATE PACN EitNROOF A HITE &00 MILES AUTO TRANS AC SILVER 450(11 MILES SUNROiF LEATHER EXTRA 3LACK ONLY 1N MILES REMOVABLE HARDTOP
L.I.LSLOLALTRAD !:;, TRADE SUPER CLEAN MA LTHER LOW MILES,4C38HYA XTRA CLEAN OCIE64VA CE 83I A EXTRA CLEAN C383M
S23,9BB E2,4B8 10,9 B Sl,9BB$ 13,98B $23,988


2007 GMC
YUKON XL
IT I EATHERSUNROFORDUAL MS

18,988


2002 CHEVY
510


BURG 53 MILES V6 AUTO TRANS AC
?3'6,9bF
^sgBB


2012 CADILLAC
SRX


Ij' M.' M LE5lTHER

$29,988
L'rkL 0 OV O, I, ER TRAD; K '6"O] A
s'wg gB


2003 SATURN
ION


EMI 3 SILVER LICALONE OWNER RADIE
ENTiA CLEAN ,.!A414A
'6,488


2010 CHEVY
AVALANCHE
$S 8R LEATHER EUNRO 91 EiTPA LEI
#0383770
$28,988


1998 SATURN
SW2


WAGON I HI E 6, MILES 4 CL AUTO ICE
COLD ACO C383370A
'4,988


2007 PORSCHE
BOXSTER
B M MILES RARE EXTRA CfAN
:LAWNS 9CA8R
S30,988


1998 BUICK
CENTURY


3REEN LOWvr MILES BXRA CLEAN IOCAL
OWNER #C3T162B8
$4,988


2007 LEXUS
RX350


LVER LOCAL TRADE LEATEHR SUNROOF LOW
LES948315
S19,,488


2004 CADILLAC
Cis
Eti BLAE I E A CLEALO(ALTRADE
#C.'7,948nA
71988


2008 JEEP
WRANGLER
SA ARAGEEN LOCAL TRADE POWER WINDOWS
BOTHN TOPS0383870A
'17,588


2006 HONDA
CIVIC


BURG 4M AUTlO 1RAN CLDfI A,
OC3SM7C
S8,988 j


'_ 1i


S....... ..
WWW.- L U LL-IVAN Ar-I I- LLA -C3
40m40MW COLLE E ROAD OC ALA, FL - 735 7C-47


^K~ld'I dl^MI Tl'^I I IHT


D6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013





" I o l 4,



HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


- Sikorski's
PAGE AtticE4
BK^ \ PAGE E4


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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a bUUnlini ALa:, lil:.
* Horses Welcome Great Decor
* Granite & Wood Gourmet Kitchen
* 4/2 w/Office Large Front Porch
* Huge Workshop/Gar. Paved Road!!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 r
Einuil elliesulIon,, lenilx nel'l
www.Hoiidnlisilnglnlo.conu


MOVE RIGHT IN TO PERFECTION
*3/2.5/2 Split Plan Gorgeous Entryway
* Lots of Tile/Laminate Nice Pool Pavers
* Upgraded Windows Newer Pool Pump
* Security System! Plenty of Privacy!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997L[
Eltnui elliesullon i lelnix nei
www.FloBndnLisinglnlo.coli


327.jj


WOW FACTOR APPLIES!!
* New SS Appliances New Carpet and Tile
* Great Front Porch New Roof Shingles in 2013
*New Paint & Doors New LG W&D/Cen. AC
* Poss. Own. Fin. Gorgeous Interior!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Eltnui elliesullon i lelnix nei
www.F lot ldnLisilnginlo.co I _


* Upgraded Lg. Kitchen Beautiful Master Suite
* Relaxing Master Bath Huge Screened Lanai
*2.75 Acres/Salt Water Lap Pool 4 + CAR GAR.
*2 HVAC Systems Guest Suite with Sep. Entry
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1
Elnui elliesulloni lelnx nel
www.Flot iduLisilnginlo.coin


420gPNER IDGEhill
4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
BEVERLY HILLS
4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
. New Roof in July 2013 MSeparate Game RM
Beautifully Maintained Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [X 1
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/3CG Home Great Rm./Dining Rm./Office
* Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area Enclosed Florida Rm.
* Nice WoodfTile Floors Covered PatioArea w/Fire Pit
* Private Landscaped Acre
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpaliner@reinmax.net i


IMMACULATE HOME WITH SWIM SPA
* 3 BR, 2 BATH 2-Car Garage
S2003 Built 8x 15 Swim SPA
* Oak Cabinets Laminate Flooring
* QUALITY Built Short Sale

KELLY GODDARD 352476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com






WM*i



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
B 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
f637-2828


S2 uyer enters house
2i number when
prompted

3 Buyer listens to
p~j'qj property
presentation in
English or Spanish


RENTALS

AVAILABLE

Visit


MOVE-IN CONDITION.
CLOSE TO SHOPPING 3BR/2BA HOME WITH
OPEN FLOOR PLAN, BUILT IN 2005 WITH A
TOTAL OF 1,892 SO. FT UNDER ROOF. LARGE
SCREEN ROOM, 2-CAR GARAGE & PRIVATE
BACKYARD.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 [*
Emoil: barbaraimils@earthlink.net


BUY ME, DO SOME UPDATES
AND MAKE ME PRETTY AGAIN!
3/2/2 with family room and privacy fenced backyard.
Situated on great corner lot in the great family community
of Connell Heights. Priced to sell!
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


MINI-FARMS SPECIAL!
Privacy personified with this move-in ready 3/2 2005
mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide open floor plan w/split
bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area,
covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. All
appliances, window treatments and some furnishings
are included.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


NEW LISTING
3/2/2 pool home ready for your family! Split
bedrooms, formal dining, large living room, breakfast
bar, laundry room, PLUS covered, screened pool.
Lovely landscaping and situated on a quiet street in
Citrus Springs. Don't miss this one, because at this
price it won't last long at all.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


SHOW ME THE MONEY!!
YOU WONT FIND A NICER PROPERTY IN MEADOWCREST!
Extremely well-kept doesn't even begin to describe this home Interior
features includes two master suites, separate living room/family
rooms, inside laundry, upgraded kitchen, new floodring and large
enclosed patio Master bath boasts dual sinks, walk-in closet and
huge walk in shower Property is ideally located next to community
clubhouse with two large pools overlooking park-setting
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 0
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


1 N. L H. I4 I


2439 W. DEVON DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
*3BD/1.5 BA Secluded Location
* Over 1,600 SF Living 2 Blocks from Park
* Large Family Rm. Shed, Fruit Trees
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842 L
(352) 422-3875


I MLS #704399 49^^


E2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Freezing whole strawberries
ear Sara: Can I this way with smoothies. I'd ing soda, with no success.
freeze whole success? Most remove as D.L., Virginia
strawberries? of our straw- much air as Dear D.L.: Sounds like
There was a great sale on berries are possible before mineral deposits. Try
strawberries recently at used in sealing the bag. dropping a couple of Ef-
the local farm, but I didn't smoothies, so Not an ideal ferdent denture-cleaning
have much time that night texture after way to go about tablets into the bowl.
to "put them up," so I thawing is not it because they Leave overnight and then
passed. I usually wash, an issue. tend to clump clean the toilet as usual.
crush or slice my berries, Susan, email together, but Dear Sara: I grew up on
add sugar and bag them in Dear Susan: Sara Noel it's better than homemade bread, but my
gallon-sized bags. But Yes, you can FRUGAL losing out on husband never had it until
could I freeze the berries freeze them LIVING the sale orhav- we got together He likes it
whole? I wonder if I could whole, exactly ___________ ing them rot. for buttered bread, but nol
wash, pat dry, hull and lay the way that you're plan- Dear Sara: How can I re- much else. I need to find a
them in a single layer on a ning on trying. I prefer this move a bluish-green ring recipe that's as close to
cookie sheet and freeze method for freezing whole stain in my porcelain toilet store-bought as I can, as
them, then transfer them strawberries, but you can bowl? I have tried Bar our local bread outlet has
to a larger container with put them in a freezer bag Keeper's Friend, vinegar, closed and I know it's
an airtight lid in the immediately if your plans baking soda and a combi-
freezer Have you done it are to just use them for nation of vinegar and bak- See FRUGAL/Page E5


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 E3


M- Brnwo Resales*


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Ri i nrr'4rD q)-.AAA.nAA7 QIIQAM MMii IM i 10-A99-91 V/IrTtDIA PDAMKI IM -420.A97-1777


-Terms 6 Months or More


Exceptional and Fabulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath -
2 car, 5375 sq ft pool home in the exclusive upscale gated community BRENTWOC
of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen -great space for Furnished Town
entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreatonthe extended screened Lanai baths. King in
Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. Membership
$ 1 2 0 5375 ............................................................................................... $ 2 3 0 0 # 1190.................


I H3 BED 2.5 BED 1 CAR
1 CAR BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME
with 2 12 Luxurious Townhome in Brentwood. Partially furnished, 3 Bed,2.5 baths,
oca b eat in kitchen. Sit on the Lanai and enjoy the view of the pond
surrounded by large Southern Oaks.
..$ 1 0 0 0 # 1226 .............................................................................................. $ 1 ,1 0 0


.......................................................................


VACATIONING? Remember to take photos during the
trip, to submit to the Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip.
Include the names of anyone pictured, and include a
contact name and phone number on the back.
Weekly winners will be published in the Sunday
Chronicle. Avoid photos with computerized dates on
the print. Make sure photographs are in sharp focus.
Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaff ney -~"
F__ Reallor.L. A HOUSE Realtor @ A)
302.3179 SoLDNe 287.90226670
11 --746-6_700 287.- 902-2-

The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
6^^**'' *j iin^ -[ *gg''^^
_Q 102 W Honey Palm Impressive 3/2/2
Expanded Huntington model featuring
double door entry, new interior paint, new
".tile, new carpet. New stainless steel
Al appliances, gas fireplace, formal living
and dining. 25 x 35 expanded screened
lanai. Workshop in garage.Roof in 09'
Gorgeous view of walking park.





E4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiiikoNfdE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...0
Callicarpa americana: Inside


Invite a native beauty


into your garden


merican beautyberry, Callicarpa over 6 inches tall and have more than
americana is a native, deciduous, four leaf nodes, pinch off the tips to force
woody shrub prized in naturalistic branching, business and shorter overall
gardens. It grows wild through- height. If pinched a second
out Florida and the Eastern time a few weeks later, the
United States in Cold Hardi- plant should remain 4 feet to
ness Zones 6-11 and Heat 5 feet tall and as wide in diam-
Zones 10-6. Central Florida is peter. Older, unpruned shrubs
in Heat Zone 10. Beautyberry can reach 12 feet tall.
grows in full sun (more than six The simple leaves, 3 inches
hours of direct sunlight) to part to 6 inches long, are opposite
shade. The shrub will be taller along the stems. Stalks are
and rangy in more shade, rather long and veins promi-
shorter and denser in full sun. nent. Light green in color, they
Beautyberry likes rich, mois- Jane Weber are shed in late fall. Beauty-
ture-holding soil that is well- JANE'S berry is fragrant up close,
drained and somewhat acidic, when pruned or when leaves
but grows well in dryer, sandy GARDEN are crushed. Spring pruning
soils and disturbed sites. This does not hinder flowering from
perennial responds well to pruning. It May to July locally From the leaf axils,
can be sheared to the ground in winter clusters of small flowers are white to pale
after the birds have eaten all the mauve pink with ample nectar to attract insects
berries. In spring the healthy roots will
send up many new shoots. Once these are See GARDEN/Page E9


Gardening at a
snail's pace
PAGE E8
Frugal Living
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Century-old vases, and a missed opportunity


DearJohnlm: I have the two small
vases decorated all over with
flowers. What can you tell me
about them and their
value? R.R, Internet i
Dear RR.: You have
two nice looking cloi-
sonn6 vases. Cloisonne is
the technique of enamel-
ing on a metal surface.
The design is drawn on
the metal body, then tiny
wires are placed on the
design and the voids are John S
filled with colored enam-
els and fired. The process SIKOF
has been in use for more AT
than 1,000 years. I suspect -
your two cloisonne vases were made
in Japan about 100 years ago. If there
is no damage, potential dollar value
is $50 to $100 each.
DearJohn: I read your column reg-
ularly in The Citrus County Chronicle
and hope that you can help my family


My sister and recently my brother's
mother-in-law passed away, leaving
jewelry My sister bought quite a few
pieces from the fine-
jewelry department at
Macy's, which used to be
Rich's in Atlanta, and she
S inherited a pearl neck-
S lace from her mother-in-
law in Savannah. The
pearl necklace has gradu-
ated pearls and is about
18 inches long when re-
korski paired; it needs to be re-
strung. I tried to check
SKI'S with a jewelry store, but
iC they did not have a gemol-
ogist and could not tell me
what the value of each piece was
without it costing quite a lot for each
piece. We are talking about 12 to 20
pieces of jewelry Is there any way to
find out what their value is without it
being cost-prohibitive?
Also, we want to sell these pieces


so that the money could be split up
among the relatives. Can you tell me
the best way to do this? My sister had
always thought jewelry was a great
investment, but it really is a problem
for those left behind, unless they
just want to keep it and wear it.
-J.C., Internet
DearJ.C.: Jewelry is an investment
in one's personal prestige and enjoy-
ment, but not financially The first
thing to do is to make an inventory
with good, clear photographs and no-
tate all marks on each piece. I am not
a gemologist; however, I can separate
the wheat from the chaff based on
See ATTIC/Page E6
This pair of cloisonne vases was
made by drawing the design on the
metal body of the vase, then placing
small wires over the design, filling
the voids with enamel coloring and,
finally, firing the pieces.
Special to the Chronicle


i
T





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

cheaper to make at home. Any sug-
gestions? S.B., Maine
Dear S.B.: Use the following
recipe from reader Sarah of Illinois.
Once it's cool, place the bread in a
plastic bag, which will help soften
the crust and make it a bit more like
store-bought.
Sandwich bread
* 3 cups lukewarm water
* 1/2 cup plus 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
* 2 tablespoons yeast (or 2 packets)
* 1 tablespoon salt


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 E5


* 1/2 cup butter (or shortening or salad
oil)
* 10 cups of flour
In a large, warmed bowl, add 1 cup
lukewarm water, 1 teaspoon granulated
sugar and yeast. Let stand 10 minutes,
then stir until yeast is dissolved. Stir in
2 cups lukewarm water, 1/2 cup granu-
lated sugar, salt and butter. Beat ingre-
dients, then stir in 9 cups of flour,
adding them 1 cup at a time.
Use the last cup of flour to flour your
countertop surface for kneading. Knead
until dough becomes elastic, approxi-
mately five minutes.
After kneading, put the dough in a
large, oiled bowl and flip to coat both
sides with oil. Loosely cover bowl with
plastic wrap and place in a warm place.
Let it rise for 1 hour. Punch down
dough to remove air bubbles and divide


into three pieces. Shape into loaves
and put into greased loaf pans. Cover
pans with dishtowels and place in a
warm area for another hour. Loaves
should double in size. Bake in a pre-
heated oven at 400 degrees F for 20
minutes.
It is ready when it turns golden
brown and sounds hollow when tapped.
Remove from pans and cool on a
cooling rack.
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.corn), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


ASSC.'r T RGRI LiO AL OR BROKER AL O 7 4 6 -9 0 0 0

Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour LI Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty ,o
BROKEPASSOC.- REALTOR GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from
readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.
NEED A REPORTER? Approval for story ideas must
be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a reporter
is as-signed. Call Managing Editor Charlie Brennan at
563-3225, or call Mike Arnold, editor, at 563-5660.
Be prepared to leave a message with your name, phone
number and brief description of the story idea.

uMiel AMERICAN
Lou Miele Realtor ERAI REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4 511N.LecaoHw."
ce.1: (352) 697.1685 Offi 5246-3600



4/2/3 CUSTOM
POOL HOME
2,875 sf living, huge
detached garage, gorgeous
professionally landscaped
: aacre lot and much more.
MLS #357791
,- $279.000


-OMMERCIA L R A
Ltpr^^^^k^^^__^_

^BSB~"fl"H


9576 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
75 Seats 702233 $217,300


,;00


1 3'


4/2I5 I W7 0 i.2645 111nL.
4/2.5/2+ 702645 $269.000


FAIR LILLY 7 0 N.O A ~ 3 CHINKAPIN CT. 10 1N.HAITIAN I
$ 0,3/2/2 700780 $109,500 3/3/2 702854 $138,500 [ 2122 704469 $68,900





LUEBIRD 7128 N. FAIRCHILD 137 N. FRESNO 2275 N. EUSTIS PT. 9 N. WADSWORTH
$187,500 3/2/2 704248 $118,500 3/2/2 701884 $124,900 2/2/1. 703801 $89,900 3/1.5 704088 $54,900


87 S. LUCILLE 2178 S. WIGWAM 59 S. JACKSON 19 MEADOWDALE 52 S. FILLMORE
2/2/2 703454 $79,500$49,995 2/2/1 703481 $55,900 2/1.5/1 703687 $64,900 2/1/1 704090 $49,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


I AI Antoni R.eaor AMERICAN
AflHI ill i V II I R EAl T Sr REALTY & INVESTMENTS
I S ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU. 4511 N. Lecto Hwy
f Cell: (352) 220-8143 2-74636s0 1
I "_ I alantoni@era.com .2...i..


215 W. CLIFTON PLACE, BEVERLY HILLS
LAUREL RIDGE ESTATES
3/2/2 2006 Rusaw built home,
1800 sq. ft. living space. Features
a great room, split floor plan,
1 1x33 screened-in lanai,
community pool, smoke and pet
free, surrounded by
Twisted Oaks Golf Gourse.
MLS #702719
$175,000
Directions Forest Ridge Blvd to
N Hollow Ridge, left on N Cresthne Right on
Romany Lp, Left on Clifton Home on Left
3/2/2, Beautiful Laurel
Ridge Estates home. Over
2700 sq. ft. living space,
large 21 x 30 great room,
Twisted Oaks Golf Course
community. Super clean.
Move-in ready.
MLS #702442
$199,900


^ 94
| 3/2/29





E6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013


SO YOU KNOW News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event.
During the busy season, expect notes to run no more than twice. Submit information
at least two weeks before the event.Early submission of timely material is appreciated,
but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


OME SEE THIS MOVE-IN READY 3 2 2IN COUNTRY LIVING WITH CITY CONVENIENCE. I..
R O Y H ILL ES TA T ES I.. Ii. it, ,,I t,, ... 1-t..". .. 1 ........ .. t If,, . ,,,I ,.... ,, ......, ,t l -,
..d- .,I ... -l ,,, 1..... I1 1,h ,, I hi- I ,,, .,, h ',, k. '""'. ", ,,, I',i,' h ,,,,v I,, h ,, ',, ,
109,000 #702495 $219,500 #359408
THERE'S NOT A
POT 0 GOLD AT THIS
RAINBOWW RIVER HOME
BUT THERE IS A GOLDEN
OPPORTUNITY!
Bank Owned MOVE IN READY
3/2/3 w/2,117 sql ft for
ONLY $154,900!
#702760.
19465 98th PI Rd.
Tomika Spires-Hanssen
5 352- 586-6598.


J sSWEET .
S SUGARMILL

THIS TERRA VISTA VILLA CAN TOOT ITS OWN WOODS LIVE LIKE A KING ON KINGLET! Bank Owned i trus
HORN FOR ONLY $169,900! Bank owned 3/2/2 Hills 19993/2/2w/1,603 livingw/NEW Paint &NEW
Terra Vista Villa w/106 living. #701796. Tomika Spires- B appliances. Realy cute & Only $, #704473.543 Knglet.
Hanssen 352-586-6598. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.
83 Chinaherry Homosassa .............. $64,900
j1 Moser Ct Homosassa.................. $83,900
72_ 1 DOUGLAS ST Homosassa...........$97,900
AR-SOGT 2 E Hemlock Ct Homosassa..........$124,900 .. _
SHUT THE FRONT DOOR! This Citrus Springs POOL
KIDSARE GOING BACK TO SCHOOL SO GET 2 Black Willow Ct N Homosassa....$139,900 HOME is only $99,9001 1998 3/2/2 w/1,438 living
BACK TO WORK! Almost 2000 living + 1.4 Acres. Fixer /NEW flooring/Paint/Appliances/Windows & More!
pper needing Aftention! #701736. 5555 Leonard. Call Km 183 DAISY ST Homosassa .......... $229 900 ONLY $99,900 #703630. Kmberly Fuller 352-212-
r 352-212-5752. 5752.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

style, and from there recommend fur-
ther action. If you like, send several
good, clear group photographs and the
information and perhaps I can help.
Dear John: I hope you can help
me with a question about my clock
without a photo. My friend and I were
having a garage sale three weeks ago.
A man came by and bought several
things, after which he said he collected
clocks and wondered if either of us
had any we would like to sell. He of-
fered me $50 for my aunt's mantle
clock. The clock does not run prop-


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very
secluded and private setting -
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture
and mature oaks. Take the tour at
ML -, :-$379,000


tJuin it ii iruui IIIU
THE GULF OF MEXICO!
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and
boat slip on deep water canal no
bridges to the Crystal River1 Tile floors,
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and
windows; great income potential, tool
MLS 359564 $189,000


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
early; I have not had it repaired be-
cause it is packed up in a box, where
it has been for a number of years, and
it just is not of much interest to me.
Here is a description: My aunt
called it a china mantle clock. It is
white with colored flowers in many
colors all over the front and sides.
On the dial it says Seth Thomas. Ac-
tually, it is quite pretty, but as I say
not of interest to me. The man said if
it was in good running condition he
would have offered more. I have no
one to pass it onto, so I sold it to him.
What do you think? Did I do the
right thing? T'D., Internet
Dear 'TD.: Seth Thomas clocks are
a specific category of collector interest
I wish you had asked before you sold
the clock Although Seth Thomas clocks
are not difficult to repair, generally
speaking, who knows? Perhaps the
movement was in really bad condition
and could have been costly to repair
In my opinion you sold it too cheap;
however, what is done is done.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


VILLAGES OF CITRUS HILLS
Well known for an active Florida
lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on 1 acre, open
floor plan, wood burning fireplace, a
.-i-.r--7 --1 and spacious covered
I ..... n ,, you feel at home right
away A recent remodel included new
paint and flooring, and A/C, range and
the garage door were replaced in 2012
MLS 700472 $139,000


I .,,,h ,, 1 11 i I .1 .. )n built
1 ,. i, ,i i i ,,, quality
throughout vaulted tongue & groove
ceilings, fireplace; granite counters &
custom cabmietry; family room, den/office,
2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor
entertaining Jenn-Air summer kitchen,
covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is
the right setting for living the Florida
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water
your family to move right in' toys imaginable'
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000


LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
community on Lake Tsala Apopka
Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
privacy You will love to call this comfy
house your home! MLS703427
$109,000


GET YOUR
GOLF CART READY!
This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mitch Underwood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home min the center
of the back nmine of the Pme Ridge Golf
Course might be your well-deserved haven
Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
i .. .. . . ... ..


NICELY WOODED 5 ACRE LOT
off Rosehill, very private, deeded access The
perfect place to build your retreat The short
distance to the Withlacoochee State Forest
(Tillis Hill Trail) makes it a desirable location
for the horse and country lover
$55,000


COIDWOLL
0" KeR 0


DBOSH





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Interior designer turns


talents toward pups


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Inte-
rior designer Nate Berkus
has been adding fantasy to
homes for 16 years, inspiring
people with just the right
creative touch But he's been
a dog-lover even longer,
and he's turning his design
expertise to a half-million-
dollar fantasy dog park.
Berkus, 41, has joined
the creative team for the
2014 Beneful Dream Dog
Park Contest. Contestants
have to answer one ques-
tion: "If you had $500,000
to create a Dream Dog


Park, what would you do?"
In Lancaster, Pa., the an-
swer included a doggy
amusement park with a
tennis ball tree and a 40-
foot roller coaster bridge.
The park there the third
winner -opens Aug. 6.
The firstwas built in Johns
Creek, Ga., with a family
destination theme and in-
cludes a bone-shaped bridge,
two splash pads, tunnels,
rubberized paths and
shade trees. The second
park in Alabaster, Ala., has
synthetic turf, agility rings,
a fetch field and a mulch
adventure path with tunnels.


OOOFOIX ^

REAL ESTATE, INC.
ln 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
*S ~CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
OFFIcE: (352) 795-6633


HOMOSASSA 2006 DAV M/H on a
little over 5 acres of land, fully fenced, w/3
bedrooms, 2 baths, gourmet kitchen and
island, cathedral & vaulted ceilings, lovely
-- 7 Gas fireplace, inside laundry
1';; $149,900





CRYSTAL RIVER Ready to move in
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is in cul-de-sac Has pool &
spa, patio for 1- 1-l. 7 f.l f-_. I
backyard 14 ....... ....
#359466 $104,900


CRYSTAL RIVER Commercial
opportunity in nursery, wholesale; fencing
& landscaping sales also, 5 acres totally
fenced, plants, office, equipment,
greenhouse & samples of fence work
#704193 $300,000


'*BEST7


Pcsdtor


HOMOSASSA 1991 3 bedroom, 2 5 bath
home on 1+ acre corner lot w/inground
caged pool Beautiful tile floors except 1
bedroom cathedral ceiling in living rm &
dining rm screen porch has summer
kitchen Country kitchen w/built in china
cabinet #702082 $130,000




DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
m/h -_-.- --I .-'orkshop on 2
acres i. .. i .1 ..., china cabinet,
carpet through out except for kitchen,
baths and laundry rm large family rm
cathedral .1... gourmet kitchen w/
island "'i'.' $105,000


CRYSTAL RIVER 1 I. ....
8th avenue each apt 1 .. i
bath, washer/dryer hook up, central heat
and air Just south of Crystal River High
School Crystal River water & sewer,
Duke energy electric #359088 $235,000


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 E7







The premiere active-adult master-planned community In
4 West Central Florida wants you!
AI \ I Inlimitar4 arninr, rlntiniIl


* New home sales experience preferred, not required.
* No Florida RE License is required.


Positive Attitude "High Energy Professional Demeanor
Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707

__ f/itrus ls








PINE RIDGE (U Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil Phts,,

ww .lrdS howcase- proper -esco


P eg 5582 N Mock Orange Dr
7 MLS 703701 $247,900
Brand new 2013 construction 3bd/2ba
with a 3-car garage.
Directions: 486 to Pine Ridge Blvd, left
on Mock Orange to home on left.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146
NEW LISTING





^ ttAUS 349 E Reehill St
S MLS 704371 $199,900
Immaculate 3bd/2ba home w/3-Car
Garage, shed & RV Parking
w/full hookup.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


MLS 704309 $141,900
Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba
energy efficient home on an acre lot.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


MLS 703493 $400,000
EXQUISITE 3/2.5/3 home in gated
community.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3




28 W ioy Egrul PI
MLS 703006 $103,900
3bd/2ba home w/an extra private lot.
Directions: W Citrus Springs Blvd to
north on Elkcam, right on Golfview, left
on Ryan, right on Snowy Egret.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


SMLS 700370 $247,900
This newly constructed 2013 3/2/3 home
is located on the golf course.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


NEW LISTING


Igot" 675 W Doerr Path
MLS 358289 $198,500
Customized 3bd/2ba Villa w/enlarged
garage & Florida room.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


bp 5196 N Sandalwood Dr i. $ 654 E Connecticut Ln ii771 E Hartlord St 305a
", a2$S 1121 N Chance Way MLS 703661 $149,000 MLS 703360 $139,000 MLS 357326 $49,500
SMLS 702458 $196,900 Custom designed 3/2/2 home offering Cozy, comfortable 3/2/2 well Move-in-ready upper unit in a great
3bd/2ba home with beautiful pool. treed privacy, maintained home. building.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Richard DeVita 352-601-8273 Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Mark Casper 352-364-1947
S2013 BRERAffiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marksof Prudential
= Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. M


I


7000;





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


At a snail's pace, in a snail's place


'Slow gardening' movement


says 'Why rush when you can relax?'


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
F elder Rushing is
not a man to be
hurried. This for-
mer county extension
agent turned folklorist,
author and lecturer is an
advocate of slow garden-
ing- emphasizing the
process over the product.
"Life has a lot of pres-
sures," Rushing says.
"Why include them in
the garden?"
Slow gardening is an
offshoot of the interna-
tional slow food move-
ment, which, in its
words, aims "to
strengthen the connec-
tion between the food on
our plates and the health
of our planet." Think of
it as mixing ecology with
gastronomy, promoting
wellness over the high-
calorie fare of many fast-
food menus.
The way Rushing
looks at it, fast food gar-
dening means outsourc-
ing most gardening
pleasures.
'A lot of people feel
they're too busy to main-
tain their lawn and
shrubs, so they hire 'mow
and blow crews' to get it
done," he says. "That's
fine, but it's product-ori-
ented. Others like eating
out regularly That's OK,
too, but it's not home
cooking or enjoying what
you grow"
Slow gardeners, on the
other hand, look forward
to whatever needs doing.
"They're anticipating,
performing and sharing
the process," he says.
Slow gardening is
more psychological than
horticultural. "Some


Associated Press
This bottle garden frames flower and vegetable beds in a backyard in Langley, Wash. Combined with a basket
collection, it brings the gardener's personality into play which is a component of "slow gardening:" "Doing what you
savor and savoring what you do."


people make their beds
every morning even if
they live alone and no-
body's there to notice,"
he says. "They do what
they do because it makes
them feel good."
Yet slow gardening is


not lazy gardening; there
are no shortcuts or how-
to lists.
"Sometimes it can get
pretty intense and long
on gadgets," Rushing
says. "But if you're able
to get into the rhythm of


that, you're practicing
slow gardening."
Susan Harris, a garden
coach and blogger (Gar-
denerSusan, Garden-
Rant) from Greenbelt,
Md., also subscribes to
the slow-gardening phi-


losophy, and recom-
mends it to her students,
readers and clients.
It's "doing what I'm
passionate about, not
being a purist about any-
thing, using hand tools,
not power tools, tolerat-


ing some pest damage or
just growing some other
plant rather than bother-
ing with products (or-
ganic or otherwise),"
Harris said in an email.
"Applying pesticides is
not gardening in my
book, at least not the
slow kind."
Some suggestions from
Rushing's book "Slow
Gardening, A No-Stress
Philosophy for All
Senses and Seasons"
(Chelsea Green Publish-
ing, 2011):
Take it easy. Garden-
ing doesn't have to be
stressful or a rush to
reach harvest Go slow
while you grow.
Don't try keeping up
with the Joneses. 'A lot of
gardeners are scared
they're going to mess
up," Rushing says. "What
are the neighbors going
to say? I'm saying hold
your head up and go on.
Make mistakes and savor
them. People are going to
talk about you anyway"
Don't be penny-wise
and flavor-foolish. "Slow
gardeners don't mind
spending a little more
trying to grow tomatoes
over what they'd buy at
the store, just for that
first, hot-off-the-vine
bite in the summer,"
he said.
Get together. Share
your harvests. Teach. "If
you like going to farmer's
markets, great. But take
some kids along with you
the next time and show
them the difference be-
tween a yellow (summer)
squash and a zucchini.
To me, slow gardening is
passing along a favorite
plant or some of your
knowledge."


E8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GARDEN
Continued from Page E4

and smaller butterflies. Bees are fond of gathering
beautyberry pollen in my garden.
The attractive shape, with graceful, arching branches
fits well in a shrub border, buffer wildlife zone or as a
specimen plant in a lawn tree ring. The abundant pur-
ple berries are relished by songbirds and wildlife alike.
Mildly flavored berries are edible by humans and can
flavor and color a beverage. A form with white berries
is also occasionally available. It makes a striking con-
trast planted among the purple-berried form.
Lifespan of American beautyberry is fewer than 10
years. It self-seeds in the wild and is sometimes avail-
able in private nurseries, though rarely in big chain
nurseries. Nature lovers can come visit my backyard to
pick up a wide variety of native and non-invasive exotic
plants. Beautyberry is easily transplanted when grown
in a container under bi-weekly irrigation. It thrives in
nature with no supplemental irrigation. One of my
plants usually needs watering to settle the soil around
it after planting, then perhaps once a week during the
next few weeks if it does not rain.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 E9


Once established, beautyberry needs no extra irriga-
tion, fertilizer or pesticides. It is easy to maintain, even
in a small garden. It can be mowed to the ground in late
winter after the attractive berries are used as bird food.
This native shrub is a welcome addition to any natura-
listic garden.
Jane Weber is a professional gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For an appointment, call 352-249-6899
or contact JWeber12385@gmail. corn.

3 "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods

NANCY Direct:
aPONTICOS 352-6344225
S0Multi-Million $$$ Producer 3 yKEY 1 REALTY INC.
8015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com
ij|ij^3u=1iui~~ra


E SPECTACULAR LINDHORST
4/3/3 ON DOUBLE LOT!
Over 2 900 Sq ft living Double Crown Molding
SMaple Cabinets Large Island Kitchen
SEtended Lanai Jetted Tub in Master
$249,400 MLS#704232
Talke my Vi1tiual ts 11O ? 1


OAKLEAF VILLA
* 2 Bedrooms 2 Baths. 2 Car Garage
* Cathedral Ceiling in LR New Hot Water/AC
* 3 Skylights Maintenance Free
$109,500 MLS#702226


JOANN MARTINI [
Preferred
REAL ESTATE [i

352-270-3255 www.prefm.net


2848 E Chartwell Cir.,
Hernando
Beautiful 3 Bedroom 2 bath home with
heated caged in-ground pool, 3 car
garage wood flooring, double pane,
double hung windows on private .47 acre
in Canterbury Lakes Estates.
Priced at 169,900.00 MLS #701542


2269 N. Eustis Pt
Hernando FL
2 bedroom 2 bath Meadowview villa.
1453 SF of living, caged in-ground
pool, private setting.
Priced to sell at
89,900.00


1259 S. Elmwood Drive, Inverness, Florida 34450
Warehouse/ Office connected to a
5-unit apartment complex. 5,400 sq ft. on .63 acre lot
$350,000- LEASE OPTION- OWNER FINANCING


^ KEY' "Always There For You"
PPaI h GAIL COOPER
MEN L uliniilh,:.n1 O -.lll & Ir R I .l|,-.r
r Cell: (352) 634-4346
Fk IOffice: (352) 382-1700
[f i ~E-mail me: homes4u. mindspring.com


SWEEPING CIRCULAR DRIVE!
3/2/2 pool home built in 2007
* Corian kitchen stainless appliances
* Fireplace in the family room
* 12'x21' Master opens to the pool
* Snail shower/jetted tub in Master
* Cabinets and sink in the laundry
Well for the yard
* Double leaded beveled front doors
#354014 $207,000


BRING YOUR ELBOW GREASE AND GET
READY TO WORK. Quaint 2/1/1 on a quiet
street within walking distance to nearby park.
I Home features a wonderful circular drive
storage shed on a corner lot with palm trees and BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL REGENCY PARK CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
Sa screened porch This is a Fannie Mae 4BR in Sugormill Woods Over 3000 sq. ft 2BR/2BA w/hardwood floors Ground floor
rmmmm HomePath property. Purchase this property for $160,000 [1 l i 50[ Q7
,,IEEN as little as 3%o down. This property is approved living. $160,000 MLS#702836 unit.51,500 MLS#703767
t.l. _.,, for HomePath Renovation Mortgage Fi.nancing. I 2
704269 $29,900 CAL Roy Bass TODAY (352) I726-2471 I
FUNCTIONAL, FORMER Email: roybass ampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours ( 302-6714
ME, IN A DEED RESTRICTED


PERFECT SECOND HOME!
S2/2/2 end unit 1-story condo
* Vaulted ceilings 1484 sq ft living
* AC/heat new in 2008
*New roof April 2013
* Yard maintained by HOA
* Spacious bedrooms neutral decor
* Cozy 2-sided fireplace
* Home warranty for the buyers
#701747 $89,900


n 3/3 HOME
with oversized
2-car garage;
ceiling fans;
,11 NoI M!, II %_hh skylights;
new carpet;
freshly painted,
all kitchen
I [] appliances
& updated
s Homosassa Tal (Hwy 490) turn f bathrooms.
rk Way & follow to end home on right $89,900
I o" W 11 9 l" '11 2 9 11Z


SeeIJVirtualIIIurs..ll.resalehomesI.I^Iu.I.. i






E10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds

M f S.-S i:f al!Lf ja: -. *


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


C*1*

BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
Move in Special!
1 month free/w
one year lease.
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1
bath@$350 inc H20.
r2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1, $400.mo., 1st, 1st
& sec. No Dogs
352-795-9738

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $450.mo., 1st, 1st
& sec. No Dogs
352-795-9738
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Fenced Acre, Addi-
tion, Huge Deck, Shed
$525.mo 352-628-5244
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182






1991 Palm Harbor MH
Price inclu. Deliv only
$24,900 WILL NOT
LAST 727-967-4230
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181




HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wlde 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, 16x16
workshop, Must-see!
$64,000 (352) 621-0192
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, inl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Stock Sequoia
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
FOR FREE PHOTOS....
John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 201
for details
USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60




INVERNESS
Move in Special!
1 month free w/one
year lease.
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


MobileHme'

FLORAL CITY
2/2 spit, 14 x 60, CHA
new floor covering, dbl
roof over, car port, cov-
ered porch on 1 acre
fenced cash or owner
financing with min.
$15,000 down and
then $500 monthly for
7 years, move in cond.
very nice. 352-586-9498

PFor Sole u

HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Handy Man Special,
apprv. for FHAfinancing
$45,900 352-795-1272


Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5% park like acres,
owner financing avail.
55k (941) 778-7980
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




CENTURY 21 JW
MORTON Real Estate
55+ PARKS
Inverness MH Pk.
2/1 /2,Furn., $8,000
Sinaina Forest MH Pk
2/1, Scr. Rm. $13,900
2/2 Cute $13,900.
(Parks with pools)
Oak Pond MH Pk.
2/2 DW, Nice
Negotiable $11,000
Stoneridae Landina
3/2 DW, $23,500.
3/2 DW. $20,000.
Walden Woods MH
2/2 DW, $22,500.
3/2 DW, $31,900.
Crystal Riv. Villages
3/2, DW $21,000.
(Most Have Carports
scrn. porches/sheds)
BRING YOUR OFFERS
DORIS MINER, Agent
(352) 726-6668


FLORAL CITY
Moon Rise Resort
55+ comm 2/2 split plan,
walk in closet, sc. rm,
car port, Ig shed, w/d
$21,900, lot rent $290
608-752-4532/726-2553
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090



FLORAL CITY
3/2 Dblwide, on Canal
to River & lakes,
need TLC, $35,000.
$3,000 down $400
Mthly or $18,000 cash
352-726-9369




J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for your

2/1111 ................................. $60 0
21111 ................................$625
3/2 2.5 Acres .............. $900
2/2/1 ..............................$700

3/1 Carport .............$675

3/2/1 Mter &Lg Inc. ...$800

3/2 Doublewide.......$700
Jennifer Fudge
CherylScruggqqs
UProperty Manaqer/
^Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified! I


-ACION3
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHorneRentals. corn
CRYSTAL RIVER
65017W. Caninodale Dr. ........ $815
2/2/2 Villa in Meadowcrest
1245 NE 2nid St .................. $1100
3/2 Pool home, close to shopping
I 1122 W. Gve Harbor......... SIO$1100
3/2 Pelican Cove Waterfront Villa wih bow slip
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
81 S. Adams (BH) .............$... 650
2/1 5/1 Cute home with Florida room
3619 W. Tireyburn Path (t)...... $900
Furnished or unfurnished
in gated golf comm of Black Diamond
HOMOSASSA
1650W. Homosassa TrL #28.. $500
2/1 Nice duplex, patio
5865 W. Vikre Path .............. $700
2/2/1 Very clean & cozy on I acre
6102 Grover develaiind ........... $950
3/3 Pool home on fenced acres


















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all until. incl'd.
$575 mo+Sec.,
352-634-5499


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Aps, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, lawn,
water, sewr & garb.
W/D hk up $500.mo
$300 dep, sm pets
352-212-7922
352-212-9205

HOMOSASSA
2BR, $500, inclds. garb
& Water, No Pets
352-697-0310






INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465 near
CM Hospital & Medical
Offices 352-422-2393





'MR
INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465 near
CM Hospital & Medical
Offices 352-422-2393

INVERNESS
2/1 Completely Remod-
eled In Town, $650 mo.
$250 sec. 412 Tomp-
kins St. 352-895-0744





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/12, Unfurn.$550+sec
cleanquite. No pets or
smoking 828 5th Ave.
NE. 727-455-8998
727-343-3965


LISTINGOS

CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
Fully. Furn. 2/2, 2nd Fl
Condo, w/ carport,
Heated Comm. Pool
Tennis Crt & Much
More! $750. mo + sec.
(352) 270-8313




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio
Efficiency w/ equipped
kitchen. All util., cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, recently updated
CHA, $600 + Sec.
352-563-2480
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, 3/2/1, 3/1/1
Homes 352-464-2514
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1.5/1 Nice home
$650/Mo.
352-302-4057

Citrus Springs
Newer 3/2/1
Lg Mast. Suite $750
and 3/2/2 $850 mthly
Avail. September
352-697-3133


CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, tile floors,
nice area, across from
rails to trails $845. mo.
1st & Last No pets
(352) 598-0235
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $800. mo + sec.
$500. 850-838-7289
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. 3/2, $650 mo.
352-212-4981
INVERNESS
31212, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/112/1
$590mo.+ $700 dep.
(352) 422-6978
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$850
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic/cottage all utilities
inc'd. $625 no smoking
352-422-2994
INVERNESS
FURNISHED
WATERFRONT
HOME 2 bd, 1.5 ba
home with central
a/c $595.
352-476-4964




*HERNANDO*
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR LEASE
$1500mth, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
(352) 464-2514 **
1305 Hwy 486
Beverly Hills
2/2/2 good neighbor-
hood, avail. 8/1/. Sale
$69,900. or rent $800.
(352) 249-7033
or (352) 601-8345


CITRUS HILLS
2/2.5 with carport, near
the club house & pro
shop, tennis courts,
heated pool, totally ren-
ovated (660)723-4193




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



:'IL LJLING
Renovations/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844
Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


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homefront

classifiedsl






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


112
OPPORTUNITY



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







Absolute Auction-
Andalusia, Alabama,
Covington County,
188+/- acres offered
in 5-8 acre parcels,
combos/entirety, 3
houses, metal
building, August
20,1:00pm.
Gtauctions.com,
205.326.0833,
Granger, Thagard &
Associates,
Jack F Granger,
#873


Beverly Hills Sun.
12-3 2 Br-split plan, 2
FULL baths, 1 garage.
NEW: Roof, kit., baths,
appliances, flooring,
paint. $66,900 3107
Thornapple 527-1239.




INVERNESS
For Lease Stand
alone commercial
building.Many uses,
1000 sq ft. Downtown,
119 Dampier St.
We call it Govt. Pt!
352-634-1273
MEDICAL OFFICE
FOR 5ALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
Suite #5 Crystal River.
$120K
352-422-2293
USED CAR LOT
4500 SF Bldg, 417 ft
frontage, 1.34 Acres,
all fenced ready to
go. Located at 7039
W Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Homosassa
$225,000.
(603) 860-6660




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Comm
$119K Cash Deal
or Rent $1000 mth
352-804-9729




BEVERLY HILLS
Laurel Ridge, 2/2/1 de-
tached villa Kit. has new
apple, granite counters,
new ac, & much more
$92K (352) 513-4155






LISTINGS
117 S Lunar Terrace
Inverness
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
CB home, big yard,
Move in ready.
Clean as a whistle. Big
Garage, plus Carport.
GREAT BUY!
$79,500.
Owner 352-344-9290
3/1+ CP Block home
on corner lot. mile
to Lake Appoka boat
ramp. $55,000
Financing avail
(352) 564-2421
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




Very Nice Furn home
near Duval Island.
2/1+ CP. 3rd BR or ofc.
Lndry rm w/ shower.
Shed & fenced fruit
trees. $57,900 (352)
678-7145 or 444-0406


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2Car garage,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RE6WRC
REALTY ONE







HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!





HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
decking 3/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
HOMOSASSA
Classic Home 3/2/2
newly refurbished, land
escaped acre on golf
course, screened 18x36
pool & lanai, wood
burning fire place, huge
great room, built in book
cases 4100 sq ft under
rf, $225K Gate House
Reality 352-382-4500

For Sae%," A
HOMOSASSA
Reduced $199,500
211 Pine St, Built 2006
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool,Granite,
Wood FloorsTile & Car-
pet. 2 Car GarSS Appl.
Call 850-585-4026












Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**


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Results in

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homefront

classifieds!i


BEM-Y J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


TONY Pauelsen
Realtor
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

BUYING OR SELLING
SALES ARE WAY UP!

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




OWNER MUST
SELL! Beautifully
wooded homesite
located next to
crystal clear moun-
tain lake, WISP Ski
area and brand new
golf Course- only
$79,900. Adjoining
lot sold for $249,900.
Bank will finance.
Call 301-387-8100,
x 91


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

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Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Hoe

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


Citrus Cou
Homes "1-


Home Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fixi Your rw* Hosw

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroni c lehomefinder.com


Citrus Coull
Homes^*


PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905

FORECLOSURE
LAND LIQUIDATION!
Own your own
mountain retreat
with National Forest
access in the beauti-
ful Blue Ridge
Mountains. 1+ acre
mountain view
homesite in gated
mountain commu-
nity, bargain priced
at only $14,900 way
below cost! Paved
road, municipal
water, underground
power. Financing.
Call now
1-866-952-5303, x 32

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013 Ell






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2 BH HOUSE
mI m 1,,1 .I I, 'l,,: h mlli A&
I]1=:1hl ,i:- H i Ihl ~ 1 0 h

Mi1 =111/i"11 $110,000
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 201 9871
n''i',. CiltusCountlSold. corn


YOUR OWN SHANGRI LA!

,.=. .. i. ,iiiii I i',- I ", I .iii.. ,, .. ,d

1..,, 1 h l 0,=,, lh 3 3 1 ,, I ,-, 1,I 111 h ', i
Mil. i:ii: .:_'_ $184,000
Maul in Booth b 6374904








BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED

,,I ., ... Ii I h ,,,
,I 1,, 1,,,, -,,, ,,,,,,Iil' ,, I6,.
ii. : = -I:. i : $145.000
Ci'l J.m Rvo' itn 422 2173
o 1i4 mqi cul..n.jn11 Aqpt hl.jimq


:ii iii ASKING S68.500
II h 'l tIl n [ [ [ i ,I, I ..1 .i
I h eoI d lShIlid .. r ..i",i,1 ~


NEW POOL HOME




.i.J Ih r ilhl,.... ... .. i l i I i.,:l I.II.
i, ,i..11.i, ,:1'li.J V|(,:Ill'liI hul ,: i'i. ..VK i~'li. i
$105,00
Call Ruth Fiedeick I 352563 6866


THIS HOME OFFERS
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
', ',l I .1, ,,,.l h ,, ,HI 11.d I, dq,
h,h I .. I

ril ='-iI ASKING $258.900
Pit D,, 352212 7280











INVERNESS
GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
:L'..I Ii.il.. I I.i i h .l

MI3 =/I:l"':/ $205,500
Jeanne o Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
n'Wi''. CiliusCouon 'Sold. coin


LARGE SPACES EVERYWHERE!
I.. ..I...I i..... i l i. I I..'1- 1 ........ .. l -I
ki l .ih ... I.. I.....I, I .Il I I --I I .h-
hi .. .. .. I i,,, 6,0 ,a ~ ,v a,1 .... _, ,,


ONLY $41.500
Call Dog Mue, 352 422 4621 Cell'


BANK OWNED TOWNHOUSE ON
SUGARMILL WOODS GOLF COURSE!
* l 1::1" -.h) ( _"V ,lh ] .,l JKI]J

* M .,i F .II I
Mi_ =3 ,:/:/ ONLY $55,000
Call Elhas G Knallah at 352 400 2635


7 ACRE ESTATE HOME PINE RIDGE
I ..... .. ...m l .. ..l 1' I.. d .... ..
d. '. h -,, I1 ", .1.i 1 1 .11 h I 1

h hl II' l l II lll
,, l h l! , h ,I I, I, I ,, I H , I ,

M1i_'.-. ;'.'. ASKING $399,000
uI ll A ,'; J'r&4 iVJOOJ ti.? 1, 1 lj b bbbS;;


CELINA HILLS
*1 H h~' l. :. m I- 11. ll



1,. ii I-I. $160,000
Call Jim Moi ton 422.2173
to see this lovel' home


ts^r. S an


4 BED/2.5 BATH/2 CAR
ON ONE ACRE!

I_.l ,l 1 I hl lh .'111 1 l.)i f .ilp I .ll

l 1 m",' 66. l,...h ; i.... $123,500
Call Ouade Feese/ 352302 7699









HOMOSASSA

i:: _k l. l h iT' II661 IU.I wi.Ih w ll.jlqi



i l. .j i l. .l I IP 11:11 M I_ = /1:1 1 11:11:1
O.h Id Antl 9.4-383 8786/ Oil 3.? 17?6 6668

p-IIF


WANTS AN OFFER



Mit Sn=j11' dei352I:x. $69,900
Call Mailha Snydei 352 476 8727


l ll. I. I.I. II I: ll .] 1.6. j .. ,:I I ,:j 'lI I
fl(.ai.j.i: i-.-.' 1,:i; A Ii
vv..11~ i ih 1. llll II : i l ..(
Mi1_ =il:.i'", $125,000
Jeanne ot Wi/llaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'n'w'. CiiusCounlt'Sold. corn


.l. 7l.: I. i l| .l ,I :ll.I ll I .:.I

I h ia 0 l vii ii5iiil00/
o.1l.16i6.iainle (l MI0 Re =1an lll v.
lmiame 0 Regan 586.0075


vW.L.WE rMH.lnEU wrrlnimu -
WATERFRONT 3/2 SKYLINE DWMH


I 'l~~. .. l Iv I i.-H I"0 .... I...,i'
r ii: =-.""III' ASKING $48.900
Pit D, 352 212 7280
l"i, ...ng 1.1 ,u m 2 f1 d ,i 12.. m


NICE 2/2/2 IN
CANTERBURY LAKES ESTATES
r 1 .. ....... ..... ..... 1 .. .. 1 ,, ,
~ ~.. ,,1 ....''" "' .. h.. H.11 1: 1:',
r ii : "1 -.)13" ASKING ONLY $89.900
Cm St.d- Slui -' 3522120211


_-- ..". "... HI I .
CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
GOLF COURSE

h .l.. J. 'hlul .I I hl I,1
.Call O.ade F leese', = 302' 99
Call Ouiade Feesei 3S2.302.7B99


POOL HOME ON 1/2 ACRE
11.11 ... _1:11:1 l. W h l, i H.:..- i

Mi__ = '","i S144,000 APPROVED PRICE
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel 2123410
n',','. CiliusCouanlt'Sold. coin


E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013