Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Full Text

Still on top: Rays win, stay in AL East lea1/B


TODAY
& next "
morning


HIGH
89
LOW
73


C I T R U


Scattered storms
rain chance
50 percent.
PAGE A4


JULY 28, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


S C 0 U N TY





ONICLE
L www.chronicleonline.com
q- Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 355


COMMENTARY:


Seven dead in shootout


SWAT team kills gunman in Hialeah


Associated Press
HIALEAH -A man living with
his mother in a South Florida
apartment complex set their unit
on fire and went on a shooting


rampage throughout the building,
killing six people before being
shot to death by police. As the
eight-hour standoff unfolded,
horrified residents hunkered
down in their homes, at times so


close to the action they could feel
the gunfire or hear negotiations
between the gunman and police,
authorities and witnesses said
Saturday
In the final hours, Pedro Vargas,
42, held two people hostage at gun-
point for up to three hours in their
apartment until a SWAT team en-


tered and killed him, police said.
The hostages were not hurt
"The crime scene is the whole
building," said Lt. Carl Zogby, a
spokesman with the Hialeah Po-
lice Department.
Police were called to the aging,


PageA8


JFK
Dallas prepares to mark
50 years./Page Cl
HOMEFRONT:


Geometric
Interior designers get
mathematical for
decor. /HomeFront
USA WEEKEND:









Smurfy
Actor Neil Patrick Harris
speaks about the new
Smurfs movie./Inside
COMMUNITY:
Live long
Colum-
nist Jim
Mullen
writes
about life
ex-I
pectancy
and
obesity.
/Page All


EXCURSIONS:


San Francisco
Neil Sawyer writes
about the City by the
Bay./Page A13


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................ D4
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial ................. ... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ..................... A14
Obituaries ................A9
Together ..................A18


6 14578 Ii o


0Tourism is natural
Tourism is natural


County

benefits from

surging state

industry
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Back in 2011 in
a speech on
tourism,
Gov Rick
Scott claimed every
85 visitors create one
Florida job.
The statement was
subsequently given a
true rating by Politi-
Fact Florida and has
since been repeated by
other state leaders.
Using Scott's math,
current tourism data
and employment num-
bers, overnight visitors
can be credited with
creating 3,869 jobs in
Citrus County during
See Page A5
Plant City's Denise
Williams paddles her
way down the
Chassahowitzka River
on a recent morning as
she and her husband,
who spent some time
camping nearby, quietly
make their way along
the shallow, clear
waters of the tidal river.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Sea cows the

big tourist draw
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
One thing is clear: Manatees
are the leading reason tourists
throng to King's Bay and, by all
indications, people keep coming
to either see the county's cash
cow or snorkel the spring waters
with them.
Another major ecological or
nature-based tourism draw is
scalloping, which is currently in
season. Families pulling boats on
trailers have been inundating
area boat launches since the
start of the season June 29.
A survey of recreational har-
vesters in 2010 showed out-of-town
visitors spent between $960 and
$1,917 per party, while in-town
harvesters spent between $120 to
$237 per party At that time, offi-
cials estimated about 400 parties
per week.
Conversely, a few years earlier,
in 2004, a published survey
See Page A5


VISITORS TO CITRUS COUNTY AREA


Attraction
* Withlacoochee State Forest
* Homosassa Springs state park
* Withlacoochee State Trail
* Rainbow Springs
* Crystal River Reserve
* Fort Cooper State Park


Visitors in 2011
600,000
291,521
287,635
244,610
193,828
28,059


Forest, trail, parks top attractions


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
While nature-based tourism
in Citrus County is synonymous
with manatee-watching and
other water-oriented activities,
parks, trails and forests attract
their share of visitors.
However, the economic im-
pact of parks and trails and
other natural land attractions is
not as easy to quantify for day-
use visitors, based on available
data.
The county is well-known for
its portion of the Withlacoochee


State Trail. According to the De-
partment of Environmental
Protection, the trail attracted
287,635 users in 2011, up from
274,754 in 2010.
Regis Hampton, owner of
Hampton's Edge Trailside Bicy-
cles in Floral City, credits the
trail and the trail bicyclists it at-
tracts to pulling Inverness and
Floral City on the map. And the
DEP has promoted Inverness as
a Florida Trail Town.
"My husband Danny and
I choose to open our new busi-
ness in downtown
See Page A8


Neighbors

on edge

about

gunshots
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The wooded hammock
between Sugarmill Woods
resident Albert Spiers'
home and a neighbor's
property was once an
idyllic part of the
neighborhood.
But in recent months,
those woods say Spiers
and another neighbor on
Cyclamen Court, Edward
Caramanico have be-
come filled with bullets
whizzing toward their
homes. In fact, Spiers re-
cently discovered his
home has been hit by two
bullets, one of which
came pretty close to mak-
ing it into his bedroom.
"It's like living on the
edge," Spiers said. "One
weekend, whoever is
doing the firing must have
fired at least 200 rounds,"
he said.
Caramanico said the
gunfire has reached
alarming proportions.
"To hear those bullets
whistling through the
trees makes you feel
threatened and unsafe,"
Caramanico said. He said
neighbors believe they
know the source of the
gunfire and have called
the sheriff's office about
it.
"But I guess their hands
are kind of tied about the
issue because apparently
state law allows people to
fire their guns as long as
they don't shoot across a
road or specifically at your
house. Basically they will
only respond if a crime is
committed, which is if
they actually shoot at your
house. But what do I do,
wait to get shot before any-
thing can be done?"
Caramanico asked.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Westside Patrol
Commander Capt. Danny
Linhart said the Spiers'
home incident was re-
ported to the agency on
Monday and is under ac-
tive investigation. Linhart
said CCSO does respond
to shots-fired calls, but
every case is investigated
based on its merits. Offi-
cials at CCSO said they av-
erage at least one call per
day sometimes more -
in which a person is re-
porting either hearing, in
most cases, or seeing a
See. Page AO10




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WE NED TOTRAVL TH

ROAD THATS BSO


JBSCUIT
mS]ATEOF-TE-ATTECHNOLOG


EMPLOYEE BENEFITS]


[SECRE ESIN


The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees is committed to the future
of our hospital and its employees. In any discussion of a sale or lease of
Citrus Memorial Hospital, CCHB is making the well-being of all hospital
employees a top priority. From supporting the existing pension plan to
job security and leading the discussion on employee benefits we will
look out for our doctors, nurses, specialists, technicians, administrative
staff and employees at all levels.


BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE CITRUS COUNTY HOSPITAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES.


Pp- FLearin More: www,,careforcitruscounty.org


A2 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013





Page A3-SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013



TATE.& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Transitioning
veterans sought
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Services Department is
looking for veterans who have
recently transitioned from
the military (or returning re-
servists from tours of active
duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services is re-
questing veterans and their
spouses call to be placed on
a list for an upcoming seminar.
We will discuss what bene-
fits or services you need to
help ease your transition.
We will schedule a semi-
nar to inform you of your
benefits and solicit your
ideas. Call 352-527-5915 to
reserve your seat.
For more information on
Citrus County Veterans Of-
fice, log onto www.bocc.
citrus.fl .us/commserv/vets;
or, contact Samuel Dininno,
county veteran service offi-
cer, at 352-527-5915.
Volunteer
connection offered
The United Way of Citrus
County has established a
means to help connect those
interested in volunteering
with finding organizations in
need of their skills.
Log on to www.citrus
unitedway.org and click on
the 'Volunteer" button. Enter
your information and choose
your areas of interest. United
Way of Citrus County will
share your interests with non-
profit agencies in the county
so they may contact you
when they have a volunteer
opportunity.
Purple Heart
observance set
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693, at 7890 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa, will host a
breakfast and program at 9
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 8, hon-
oring all Purple Heart recipi-
ents and commemorating
the 231 st anniversary of the
Purple Heart. The families
of those who fell in combat
and all combat-wounded
veterans and their guests
are invited. Attendees are
requested to register for the
free breakfast by contacting
Carrie Clemons at 352-
628-1633 or carrie
jeanettedemons@yahoo.com.
Please indicate the number
in your party.

West Palm Beach
High water levels
put Corps on alert
The Army Corps of Engi-
neers has activated its
emergency operations center
in response to high water
levels at Lake Okeechobee.
The corps' emergency
operations center in Jack-
sonville was activated Fri-
day. The lake stood at
15.66 feet by Saturday.
The corps fully opened
its locks around the lake
Thursday to protect the
aging Herbert Hoover Dike.
Corps spokeswoman Jenn
Miller told The Palm Beach
Post inspectors found
"minor flow increases" in
areas where the earthen
dike was known to seep.
Miller says the corps
wants to be ready to react
to any effects from Tropical
Storm Dorian.
Weekly inspections of the
dike began this week when the
lake's water level reached
15.5 feet. Daily inspections
will begin if the water level
reaches 16.5 feet.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction
Due to editor error, the
Royal Skunk Pet Clinic was
incorrectly described on
Page A3 of Saturday's edi-
tion. The clinic is for-profit,
but does donate some of


its proceeds to nonprofit
organizations.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


One Rake cleanup effort awarded


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The One Rake at a Time
Lyngbya cleanup project
for King's Bay got its first
financial grant, worth up
to $52,000, according to
project director Art Jones.
Jones said the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA) is
fronting $26,000, while the


city of Crystal River and
Kings Bay Rotary will add
$13,000 each to the two-
year effort to remove Lyn-
gbya algae by rake only
from Cedar Cove, which is
the area behind Cracker's
restaurant.
"It is really exciting,
being our first grant, and I
hope it's the beginning of
more to come. It could also
be a recurring grant, so


that makes it even more
exciting," Jones said.
He said the cleanup will
begin immediately and
that he would encourage
various groups, such as
homeless charities and
Scouts, to participate be-
cause they will be paid
$2.77 for every cubic foot
of Lyngbya removed.
"It is really a way for us to
put the money right back


into the community," he said.
Jones said the city of
Crystal River's Jackie Gor-
man and the city's Water-
fronts Board worked hard
to make the grant possible.
Lyngbya is an invasive
filamentous algae detri-
mental to the aquatic
ecosystem in King's Bay
and the Crystal River The
noxious weed interferes
with boating, fishing,


swim:
other
For
call A
7659
@aol.
ect it
book:
Savel
Coi
porte
564-2$
chror


grant
ming, manatees and
aquatic life.
r more information,
Art Jones at 727-642-
or email MrAWJones
com. To see the proj-
n action, visit Face-
and YouTube, search
KingsBay
ntact Chronicle re-
r A.B. Sidibe at 352-
925 or asidibe@
nicleonline. corn.


I --


CARLY ZERVIS/For the Chronicle
Veterans and spectators salute Friday as the American flag is raised outside the historic Citrus County Courthouse in at a ceremony
honoring Citrus County's casualties of the Vietnam War as well as the signing of the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953.




A day of remembrance

CARLY ZERVIS
Chronicle intern
O n the anniversary of the armistice,
-two of Citrus County's fallen soldiers
,--, y __ ""v were, at last, remembered.
Local veterans came together Friday at the historic
Citrus County Courthouse in downtown Inverness to
honor the addition of two recently discovered names
of Vietnam War casualties from Citrus County to the
stone memorial outside the courthouse.
..R The program, which lasted two hours, was also held
SF\in honor of the 60th anniversary of the July 27, 1953,
...... P'Jsigning of the armistice which put a halt to military ac-
S '" ".' j tion on the Korean peninsula.
Dozens of veterans in uniform attended, accompa-
nied by spouses and family members. Also in atten-
''B 4 j dance were representatives of local Korean groups,
...^ rInverness Mayor Bob Plaisted, Inverness City Man-
.. Lg N. ager Frank DiGiovanni and Citrus
I".. FCounty Schools Superintendent San-
7. IiRI" 'dra "Sam" Himmel.
r3B 3 L IThe ceremonies opened with a
4,-.,.. -rBtrtioiinal K recitation an of the Pledge in of Allegiance
For more *and singing of the national anthem,
xH I' For more Iand the reading of the recently discov-
'": ^ 'photos, click ered names: Pvt Arthur P Carlsen, 1st
i'**.J"BI won this story ati Calvary Division, and Pfc. Richard G.
www.chronicle Sanders, U.S. Army 2nd Infantry
online.com. In addition to honoring the casual-
ties and veterans, there were speeches and presenta-
tions by local Korean residents including a rendition
of an ancient Korean folk song called 'Arirang," famil-
iar to many Korean War veterans, and a performance
of a Korean dance by women in traditional clothing
called hanbok.
KORE "The impact of the war was tremendous, on a lot of
people," said local veteran Gerry Hodom.
W. \. [ F R.-\c I F ,(,Pi 1., Lecanto resident and wife of a submarine veteran
P\ T ART I HF F' i Jane Griffith concurred, adding, "This area is particu-
Prr R-H.IRD.fl larly supportive of all their veterans."
There will be a national POW/MIA recognition day
Sept. 21. Local events will include an escort of ex-
POWs from the county fairgrounds to Inverness Elks
Lodge No. 2522, with a ceremony at noon at that loca-
VIETNAM tion. For more information, call 813-230-9750. To con-
tact Korean War Vets Assn. Chapter 192, which
c.k nWILLIAM HOE LR'XIU arranged the Inverness ceremony, call 352-270-9025.
IST 1 STANLEY GERALD HRTS
", S ,T. CARL HENRY Jt' \R Korean-American women perform a
RICHARD SMITH [t"\T[ traditional Korean dance garbed in hanbok, a
traditional style of Korean dress with roots dating
,c' -PFC HERBERT D. SL.RUL, back to the 1400s.
,- p ,WILLIAM ARTHUR 'ICk0
"rAMES'GORDON WIL:.14m A wreath stands in front of the
.., R.LES E- HALl Inverness memorial to Citrus County's Korean and
E.- .,:.:,:,.Vietnam war casualties, with the addition of the
recently discovered names of Pvt. Arthur P. Carlsen
and Pfc. Richard G. Sanders revealed.




National Dance
.. -Day gets people
_moving at mall

-j T rina Murphy, director of
Operations & Advertising
for the Chronicle, participates in
National Dance Day by leading
Jazzercise classes at the Crystal
....River Mall on Saturday. She taught
dance routines to the public
every 30 minutes until 1 p.m.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle




CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Past experiences have
taught you to always build upon a firm
base, and that is exactly what you're
likely to try in the year ahead. If you
choose your ground well, it will provide
you with many possibilities of success.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Surprisingly,
you might find someone with whom
you've rarely seen eye-to-eye to be es-
pecially good company. This could pro-
duce a new relationship.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You'd be
smart not to allow yourself to be over-
whelmed by details. You'll fare better if
you make yourself look at the big pic-
ture instead of a few brush strokes.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't ap-
pear too eager if someone is trying to
interest you in a business proposition.
It would weaken your position if you
look to be too easy.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) In an
arrangement where your mate opts for
the lead, it's OK to relegate yourself to
a supporting role.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Do
yourself a favor by pushing away from
your desk and getting some exercise.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Asso-
ciating with some friends whose exu-
berance is infectious will make this a
fun day Avoid dullards.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Al-
though you'll have a reservoir of
strength to draw upon that will serve
you well in performing tedious endeav-
ors, you'll still need to pace yourself if
you want to run the best race.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) When
dealing with others on a one-on-one
basis, your manner will put them at
ease.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -As of
today, you should have some stabiliz-
ing influences starting to manifest in
areas that have been disruptive lately
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't
hesitate to disengage yourself from
others if you need to attend to an im-
portant matter that requires your imme-
diate attention.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because
you are likely to require solitude to per-
form at your best, try to quietly slip
away from others to a place that is to-
tally free from outside interference.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Relaxed
social activities with some old friends
will prove to be the most pleasurable
part of your day. You're not apt to feel
the same way when with newer, more
casual acquaintances.


ENTERTAINMENT


Fox: Comedy won't
focus on Parkinson's
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -
Michael J. Fox said Parkinson's
disease will not be a major
storyline of his upcoming NBC
comedy.
On "The Michael J. Fox
Show," the actor plays Mike
Henry, a former local NBC news-
caster with Parkinson's, who left
the business to spend more time
with his family. The series begins
when he decides to return to
work now that his kids are older.
At Saturday's Television Crit-
ics Association summer press
tour, Fox said he didn't think
about how others with Parkin-
son's would react to the show
because he doesn't "vet creative
instinct."
"I just go with it," he said. "I
feel that this is the reflection of
my experience and certainly in
the pilot it was more prevalent
than it is in subsequent scripts.
The way I look at life and the re-
ality of Parkinson's, sometimes
it's frustrating and sometimes it's
funny. I need to look at it that
way and other people need to
look at it that way. Beyond that
we all got our own bag of ham-
mers ... I think people will look at
that and say, 'Yeah, I need to
laugh at my own stuff, too.'"
The premise of the show does
have similarities to Fox's real-life
story. The actor left "Spin City" in
2000 as he tried different treat-
ments and medications to treat
Parkinson's. He also used the
opportunity to spend quality time
with his four kids during their
formative years.
Because Fox plays a local
NBC newscaster, the show will
tap real people to do guest ap-
pearances that make the story
more believable. Matt Lauer
and Savannah Guthrie are in
the pilot. New Jersey Gov. Chris


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR I HI LO PR Hi LC
NA NA NA Q. 79 . 92 7;


Associated Press
NBC Entertainment President Jennifer Salke, left, and
Entertainment Chairman Robert Greenblatt, right, pose
Saturday with actor Michael J. Fox during the Television
Critics Association summer press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Fox will star in "The Michael J. Fox Show," as Mike Henry, a
former local NBC newscaster with Parkinson's.


Christie will appear in an
episode as himself.
The Michael J. Fox Show"
premieres at 9 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 26.
NBC scheduled to air
Clinton miniseries
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -


NBC says it's
planning a
four-hour
miniseries
about Hillary
Clinton.
The project,
titled "Hillary,"
will star Diane
Lane, the net-
work an-
nounced
Saturday at a
session of the


Hillary
Clinton
former U.S.
secretary of
state.


Television Critics Association.
The role of former President Bill


Clinton has yet to be cast, NBC
said.
The minis-
eries will re-
count the life
and career of
the former first
lady and sec- ,...
retary of state
from 1998 to
the present. Diane
NBC Enter- Lane
tainment will portray
Chairman Bob Clinton in
Greenblatt miniseries.
said the air
date has yet to be determined.
But he said it would likely air be-
fore Clinton might declare her
candidacy for the Democratic
nomination for president.
Hillary Clinton has not said
whether she will run in the 2016
presidential election.
-From wire reports


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Chance of thunderstorms
today.


95 75 0.00 9 73 O000

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusvedaily
forecast by:
9 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73
Scattered storms, rain chance 50%

f yn MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 91 Low: 73
Scattered storms, rain chance 40%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
) High: 92 Low: 72
-W, Wr, Scattered PM storms, rain chance 40%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 94/73
Record 99/62
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 84
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 12.70 in.
Total for the year 32.00 in.
Normal for the year 29.97 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.97 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 67
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 44%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, sagebrush
Today's count: 3.1/12
Monday's count: 5.0
Tuesday's count: 4.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was moderate with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/28 SUNDAY 11:20 5:08 11:44 5:32
7/29 MONDAY 5:58 12:10 6:22
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
( e^ ~ 0~ SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:24P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:50 A.M.
4 I S0 1C MOONRISE TODAY ................................NONE
JULY 29 AUG. E AUG. 14 AUG. 20 MOONSET TODAY .......................... 12:53 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 10:18 a/5:54 a 10:55 p/6:42 p
Crystal River" 8:39 a/3:16 a 9:16 p/4:04 p
Withlacoochee* 6:26 a/1:04 a 7:03 p/1:52 p
Homosassa*** 9:28 a/4:53 a 10:05 p/5:41 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:59 a/6:31 a -- 7:44 p
9:20 a/3:53 a 10:25 p/5:06 p
7:07 a/1:41 a 8:12 p/2:54 p
10:09a/5:30a 11:14 p/6:43 p


Gulf water
temperature



87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.96 28.89 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.74 37.75 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.55 38.57 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.05 40.04 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


)RECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


ts
ts
.61 pc
pc
ts
.03 pc
.05 ts
.01 ts
pc
s
ts
sh
ts
.05 ts
pc
.55 ts
pc
.12 pc
.19 sh
.03 ts
.27 pc
ts
pc
ts
s
.16 sh
.04 pc
.58 pc
.03 ts
ts
.14 pc
.51 pc
.84 pc
pc
.27 pc
pc
.02 pc
.04 pc
pc
.01 pc
.42 pc
pc
.02 pc


79 65
89 67
78 58
86 66
84 68
99 77
82 67
82 60
85 66
89 53
82 69
72 60
79 64
87 74
77 56
84 68
70 57
74 53
71 58
87 70
73 55
80 65
94 75
77 62
74 55
69 57
92 74
77 56
80 63
84 68
95 76
74 55
91 71
100 82
86 67
70 62
78 58
85 67
66 56
71 54
90 70
86 69
81 60


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 83 77 .07 pc 91 77
NewYorkCity 82 70 ts 82 69
Norfolk 83 66 ts 86 70
Oklahoma City 88 69 pc 87 72
Omaha 75 53 pc 77 60
Palm Springs 10983 pc 103 76
Philadelphia 85 69 ts 84 69
Phoenix 10584 pc 105 84
Pittsburgh 76 61 .15 pc 70 54
Portland, ME 81 61 ts 79 66
Portland, Ore 80 55 pc 76 57
Providence, R.I. 85 64 ts 83 71
Raleigh 88 68 ts 84 68
Rapid City 76 48 pc 78 61
Reno 95 66 pc 94 62
Rochester, NY 80 57 sh 77 59
Sacramento 91 56 s 90 57
St. Louis 78 62 pc 78 59
St. Ste. Marie 64 53 sh 60 50
Salt Lake City 86 78 ts 91 68
San Antonio 95 75 .05 pc 98 77
San Diego 72 66 pc 71 62
San Francisco 70 55 pc 68 56
Savannah 91 75 .41 ts 88 73
Seattle 77 55 pc 76 55
Spokane 88 62 s 86 55
Syracuse 83 56 c 79 60
Topeka 74 57 ts 74 62
Washington 86 72 .09 ts 83 68
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 110 Borrego Springs, Calif. LOW 39
Bismarck, N.D.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/77As
Amsterdam 76/63/pc
Athens 93/75/s
Beijing 99/72/pc
Berlin 100/66/pc
Bermuda 84/79/pc
Cairo 102/72/s
Calgary 68/46As
Havana 88/74/pc
Hong Kong 82/80As
Jerusalem 88/69/s


Lisbon 73/58/c
London 75/62/sh
Madrid 77/57/pc
Mexico City 77/52/ts
Montreal 79/63/ts
Moscow 77/57/c
Paris 81/64/ts
Rio 70/59/pc
Rome 86/75/pc
Sydney 68/50/pc
Tokyo 88/75/ts
Toronto 70/57/sh
Warsaw 95/72/s


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 28, the
209th day of 2013. There are 156
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 28, 1943, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt announced
the end of coffee rationing, which
had limited people to one pound of
coffee every five weeks since it
began in November 1942.
On this date:
In 1540, King Henry Vill's chief
minister, Thomas Cromwell, was ex-
ecuted, the same day Henry mar-
ried his fifth wife, Catherine Howard.
In 1914, World War I began as
Austria-Hungary declared war on
Serbia.
In 1932, federal troops forcibly
dispersed the so-called "Bonus
Army" of World War I veterans who
had gathered in Washington to de-
mand payments they weren't
scheduled to receive until 1945.
In 1945, a U.S. Army bomber
crashed into the 79th floor of New
York's Empire State Building, killing
14 people.
In 1976, an earthquake devas-
tated northern China, killing at least
242,000 people, according to an of-
ficial estimate.
Ten years ago: Rebels in Liberia
captured Buchanan, the country's
second-largest city.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush received Pak-
istan's new prime minister, Yousuf
Raza Gilani, at the White House.
One year ago: Syria's govern-
ment launched an offensive to re-
take rebel-held neighborhoods in the
nation's commercial hub of Aleppo.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Darryl
Hickman is 82. Former senator and
NBA Hall of Famer Bill Bradley is
70. "Garfield" creator Jim Davis is
68. Actress Sally Struthers is 65.
Actor Michael Hayden is 50. Ac-
tress Lori Loughlin is 49. Actress
Elizabeth Berkley is 41.
Thought for Today: "All youth is
bound to be 'misspent'; there is
something in its very nature that
makes it so, and that is why all men
regret it." Thomas Wolfe, Ameri-
can author (1900-1938).



LEGAL NOTICES


BOCC Commission Records................B4

Meeting Notices....................................D8

Lien Notices..........................................D8

Miscellaneous Notices.........................D8

Surplus Property...................................D8


y^ C I T R ULS C 0 U N T Y E



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A4 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATURAL
Continued from Page Al

the past year
Visitors will also spend ap-
proximately $19.6 million on
local lodging this year, which
will generate about $588,000 in
bed tax revenue on top of sales
taxes and gas taxes.
The governor has continued
emphasizing the role of tourism
in job creation and economic
growth as has the Citrus County
Tourism Development Council,
which uses bed tax revenue to
promote the county and attract
more visitors.
In its 2018 Vision of Citrus
County, the Economic Develop-
ment Council states tourism will
continue to lead the county in
economic income as the Three
Sisters Springs becomes a


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 A5


tourist destination, new hotel
rooms become available and
ecotourism booms.
This year, even Florida Tax
Watch, a government watchdog
group focused on taxing and
spending issues; is bullish on
tourism.
Statewide, it views the industry
as a job engine like health care
- not so affected by swings in the
economy Its research found
tourism was one of two sectors of
the state economy that actually
created jobs during the "Florida
recession." The other was health
care and social assistance.
While tourism has come to de-
fine a substantial portion of the
state's economy as well as hav-
ing an estimated $143 million
annual impact on Citrus County,
it comes in various aspects.
The TDC has recently intro-
duced sports tourism and dis-
cusses and works with heritage


tourism, event tourism, cultural
tourism, volunteer tourism and
other types.
Commissioner Rebecca Bays,
who chairs the TDC, see these
areas as a way to diversify
county tourism and expand.
"I think nature tourism had
pretty much been the focus over
the years," she said. "I think we
need to look at other ways and
not just on what we've had."
But "ecotourism" tourism
based on enjoying natural re-
sources in a sustainable fashion
- still tops the list. However,
the term itself has morphed into
"nature-based tourism" and is
often expanded to encompass
related activities.
"Nature-based tourism is the
passive enjoyment of the natural
environment we have," ex-
plained Marla Chancey, director
of Citrus County Visitors and
Convention Bureau. "It's pretty


easy on nature and sustainable.
It's the bulk of what we have for
resources."
"It's what makes Citrus County
special," she said. "People come
here to get away It's the heart
and soul of the Nature Coast"
She listed hiking, biking, bird
and wildlife watching, canoeing
and kayaking, photography and
horseback riding as some
nature-based activities. She cited
data showing the purpose of vis-
its, with some visitors participat-
ing in multiple recreational
activities: manatee watching,
49.5 percent; parks, 31.2 percent;
water sports, 15.5 percent; and
kayaking, 11.4 percent.
Chancey said this area pro-
vides such great outdoor oppor-
tunities that Citrus is partnering
with Hernando and Pasco coun-
ties for a Nature Coast bird and
wildlife festival in March. Na-
tionally, Florida ranks second in


wildlife viewing recreation, and
Citrus County has numerous lo-
cations on the Great Florida
Birding Trail.
The Florida Department of
Economic Opportunity offers an
expanded view of ecotourism,
which includes camping, fishing
and scalloping, hunting, and es-
pecially visiting and using state
parks, beaches and trails. About
15 percent of the visitors come to
Citrus County to fish.
Statewide, an estimated 73
percent of all Florida visitors in-
clude nature-based activities in
their travels.
The local role of nature-based
tourism could be further defined
in the coming months as the
TDC continues work on brand-
ing the county in terms of its
message to potential visitors.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com.


DRAW
Continued from PageAl

placed the economic im-
pact for Citrus County at
$1.4 million.
Fast forward to 2012
and, according to county
tourism officials, last year
123,400 overnight visitors
stayed at local hotels and
helped pump $28.7 million
into the economy for the
three-month season.
These figures exclude day-
trippers.
Once the tide settles on
2013's numbers which
by many estimates look to
surpass last year's num-
bers county businesses
could be swimming in a fi-
nancial windfall.
Nature-based tourism
has come to carve out a big
piece of the county's eco-
nomic pie, and manatee
viewing continues to be
king.
Ivan Vicente, the
spokesman at U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service's
Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge, said 2013
tourism numbers have
been mind-boggling so far
"In May and June, which
is normally the off-season,
we are seeing numbers
that are more than 10,000
visitors. In previous years,
we are lucky if we get


7,000," Vicente said.
He said National Geo-
graphic's April spread
about Three Sisters
Springs and the Discovery
Channel's "North Amer-
ica" show, which also fea-
tured the popular springs,
are adding to the influx of
people.
"We are seeing a lot of
foreign tourists, too es-
pecially at this time of the
year Normally, they would
come only during the man-
atee season, which is from
November to March, but
we are seeing a lot of them
right now," Vicente said.
He said if this trend con-
tinues, King's Bay would
register 150,000 visitors for
the year
'And these are only the
people who either did a
guided tour or did rentals.
The people who come for
a day or do their own thing
are not included in those
numbers," Vicente said. In
2012, 117,000 registered
manatee tourists visited
King's Bay
His guess is that if the of-


ficial and unofficial fig-
ures are combined, visi-
tors to the area will easily
surpass 250,000.
Tracy Colson, who runs a
kayak tour operation, said
she has definitely seen a
big increase in visitors in
recent years, but adds a
word of caution about
some of the sometimes-
overcrowded hotspots for
manatee viewing.
"I have talked some
tourists out of going to the
crowded areas and I will
take them to an area
where they can see the
manatees and it's scenic,"


Colson said.
Sue Primeau, who runs
a tour operation at Pete's
Pier in Crystal River, said
business has been brisk.
"It's a good summer We
are running two to five
boats a day out of here,"
Primeau said.
She also said she has no-
ticed an increase in for-
eign tourists.
"We try to make it a fun
experience for them and
show them a video before
we go out about how to
treat the manatee. We give
them a personalized expe-
rience and many of them
do come back," she said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.
Manatees are a top draw
for ecotourism in Citrus
County.
Chronicle file


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Last year, 123,400 overnight
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A6SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


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We stepped forward and provided the truth -
and you responded. The hospital website at
CitrusMH.com provided residents a video explain-
ing why Citrus Memorial Hospital, your hospital, is
being sold, leased, or merged. You heard the truth,
understood the consequences and told us what
you the people of Citrus County want. Thank
you!
That's right, much of your hard earned tax dollars
collected by the hospital board to be handed over
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nearly $11 million of your tax dollars not turned
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Why doesn't the Citrus County Hospital Board
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high level of quality healthcare they now offer?
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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHOOTOUT
Continued from PageAl

five-story apartment building in
Hialeah, a working class suburb
a few miles northwest of down-
town Miami, on Friday at 6:30
p.m. The first calls reported a
fire, but when firefighters ar-
rived, they heard shots and im-
mediately notified police, Zogby
said.
Vargas, who has no known
criminal record, set a com-
bustible liquid on fire in his
fourth-floor apartment. Building
manager Italo Pisciotti, 79, and
his wife, Camira Pisciotti, 69,
saw smoke and ran to the unit,
Zogby said. When they arrived,
Vargas opened the door and
fired, killing both.
Detectives were investigating
whether Vargas had any ongoing
disputes with the building man-
ager, as some residents believed.
His mother was not home at the
time.
After gunning down the build-
ing managers, Vargas went back
into his burning apartment and
fired 10 to 20 shots from a 9mm
pistol into the street. One of the
bullets struck 33-year-old Carlos
Javier Gavilanes, who was park-
ing his car after returning home
from work. Zogby said his body
was found next to his vehicle.
The gunman then kicked his
way into a third-floor apartment,


where he shot to death Patricio
Simono, 54; his wife Merly
Niebles, 51; and their 17-year-
old daughter Family members
said Simono worked at a car
wash and Niebles cleaned hotel
rooms. Their daughter wanted
to be a nurse.
All six people were killed in a
short time span, Zogby said, and
it's possible they were all dead
by the time police arrived.
Officers and Vargas then en-
gaged in an hours-long shootout
and chase, with police following
the gunman from one floor to the
next.
"He kept running from us as
he fired at us and we fired at
him," Zogby said.
Several hours into the ordeal,
Vargas forced his way into a
fifth-story unit and held two peo-
ple captive. Sgt. Eddie Ro-
driguez said negotiators and a
SWAT team tried talking with
him from the other side of the
door
Miriam Valdes, 70, was in a
friend's apartment two doors
down. She said she heard offi-
cers trying to convince Vargas to
surrender
"Pedro let these people out,"
Valdes said officers told him.
"We're going to help you."
She said the gunman first
asked for his girlfriend and then
his mother, but refused to
cooperate.
Rodriguez said the talks even-
tually "just fell apart." Officers


stormed the building, fatally
shooting the gunman in an ex-
change of gunfire. Zogby said
Vargas still had several rounds
of ammunition when he was
killed.
"He was ready to fight," Zogby
said.
The hostages, identified as
Zoeb and Sarrida Nek, were


Associated Press
The apartment building where a fatal shooting took place is shown
Saturday in Hialeah. A gunman holding hostages inside the
apartment complex killed six people before being shot to death by a
SWAT team that stormed the building early Saturday following an


shaken up but not hurt, he said.
Police and neighbors de-
scribed Vargas as a quiet man
who had only recently moved
into the building.
Tenants painted a mixed por-
trait of the gunman.
"He was a good son," said
Ester Lazcano, who lived on the
same floor as Vargas and his
mother "He'd take her in the
morning to run errands" and to
doctor appointments.
Lazcano said she was in the
shower when she heard the first
shots, then there were at least a
dozen more. "I felt the shots,"
she said.


Valdes said Vargas was also
known as a difficult person who
sometimes got into fights and
yelled at his mother
"He was a very abusive per-
son," she said. "He didn't have
any friends there."
Zogby called Vargas' back-
ground "unremarkable." Police
had not responded to any prior
calls at his home.
"Nobody seems to know why
he acted the way he acted,"
Zogby said.
As police investigated the
crime scene, relatives of the vic-
tims began arriving to pick up
their loved one's belongings.


LAND
Continued from PageAl

Inverness due to the prox-
imity of the Withlacoochee
Trail and the city of Inver-
ness's promotion of safe
cycling including addi-
tional bike lanes and
shared lanes," said Sherry
Bechtel, who is opening
Inverness Bicycle & Fit-
ness. "Inverness has cho-
sen to promote cycling as
environmentally friendly
transportation, and we
wanted to be a part of
that."
Though it is 47 miles
long, where it can connect
and link to other trails is a
concern of County Com-
missioner Rebecca Bays,
who chairs the Tourism
Development Council.
"We would like to work


with the state to connect
the gaps," she said. "It
would bring in those coast-
to-coast riders and more
leisure riders." Bays also
sees the expanded bike
trails as attracting younger
visitors who may be im-
pressed by the county
and return to become
residents.
She said those would
also attract more people
for birding and photogra-
phy, "We are the Nature
Coast," she said. "We'll
(see) interest from those
types of visitors."
Bays also sees the Cross
Florida Barge Canal as a
resource for increasing
tourism and the possibly of
using the Flying Eagle Na-
ture Center, currently
owned by the Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District, for outdoor
activities such as paintball


that would attract visitors.
Sharing a name with the
trail, the Withlacoochee
State Forest attracts more
than 600,000 visitors a year
The Citrus Tract covers
about 50,000 acres and of-
fers hunting, fishing,
wildlife viewing, camping,
hiking, biking, picnicking
and horseback riding.
The state forest is part of
the Florida Scenic Trail


and the Great Florida
Birding Trail.
The Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park attracted
291,521 visitors during
FY2011-12, according to
the Division of Recreation
and Parks.
For 2011, the park was
credited with an economic
impact of $13.6 million and
206 jobs.


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Crystal River Reserve
State Park, which attracts
hikers and cyclists in addi-
tion to water users, at-
tracted 193,828 visitors in
FY11-12 and Fort Cooper


State Park attracted
28,059.
Nearby Rainbow
Springs State Park in Mar-
ion County attracted
244,610 visitors.


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STATE/LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Musician JJ Cale dies at 74


yit A former member of the
W rote laptonr h Grand Ole Opry touring
company, Cale never rose
Associated Press Hospital in La Jolla, Calif. to the level of success of
Born John Weldon Cale his admirers, but his fin-
Grammy-winning musi- in Oklahoma City, gerprints could be
cian JJ Cale, whose best he cut a wide path heard all over the
known songs became hits through 1970s r.. ', genre in the 1970s,
for Eric Clapton with rock'n' roll, influ- and his music re-
"After Midnight" and encing some of .. mains influential.
Lynyrd Skynyrd with "Call the most famous His album with
Me the Breeze," has died. musicians at the Eric Clapton "The
He was 74. time with songs Road to Escondido"
The performer and pro- that were laid back won a Grammy for
ducer's manager Mike and mellow, yet JIJ Cale Best Contempo-
Kappus has told The Asso- imbued with adrivinggroove. rary Blues Album in 2007.
ciated Press that the ar- Neil Young, Mark In 2006, Cale told the AP
chitect of the Tulsa Sound Knopfler and Bryan Ferry in an interview "I'd prob-
died Friday night of a are among his many fans ably be selling shoes today
heart attack at Scripps in the music world, if it wasn't for Eric."


Clapton also recorded
Cale's "Cocaine," "Trav-
elin' Light" and "I'll Make
Love To You Anytime."
Artists including San-
tana, Johnny Cash and
The Allman Brothers have
all covered Cale's songs.
Cale was asked on his
website if it bothers him
that "contemporaries and
critics list him amongst
legends, and fans might
love his songs yet not even
know his name?"
"No, it doesn't bother
me," he said with a laugh.
"What's really nice is
when you get a check in
the mail."


Former Rep. Lindy Boggs dies at 97


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Former Rep.
Lindy Boggs, a plantation-born
Louisianan who used her soft-spoken
grace to fight for civil rights during
nearly 18 years in Congress after
succeeding her late husband in the
House, died Saturday She was 97.
Boggs, who later served three
years as ambassador to the Vatican
during the Clinton administration,
died of natural causes at her home
in Chevy Chase, Md., according to
her daughter, ABC News journalist
Cokie Roberts.
Boggs' years in Congress started
with a special election in 1973 to
finish the term of her husband,
Thomas Hale Boggs Sr, whose
plane disappeared over Alaska six
months earlier Between them, they
served a half-century in the House.
"It didn't occur to us that anybody
else would do it," Roberts said in
explaining why her mother was the
natural pick for the congressional
seat. Her parents, who had met in
college, were "political partners for
decades," she said, with Lindy
Boggs running her husband's polit-


[I 7 ical campaigns and
I becoming a player
on the Washington
political scene.
When Boggs an-
nounced her re-
tirement in 1990,
she was the only
Lindy white representing
Boggs a black-majority
district in Congress. "I am proud to
have played a small role in opening
doors for blacks and women," she
said at the time.
As family tragedy brought her in
to Congress, so did it usher her out.
At the time of her July 1990 an-
nouncement, her daughter Barbara
Boggs Sigmund, mayor of Prince-
ton, N.J., was dying of cancer Sig-
mund died that October
Breakingwith most Southern whites,
Lindy Boggs saw civil rights as an
inseparable part of the political re-
form movement of the 1940s and '50s.
She worked for the Civil Rights
Acts of 1965 and 1968, Head Start
and other programs to help minori-
ties, the poor and women.
Corinne Claiborne was born
March 13,1916, on a plantation near


New Orleans, a descendant of
William C.C. Claiborne, the state's
first elected governor She came to
be known as Lindy, according to
Roberts, because a nurse thought
she looked like her father, Roland
Claiborne, and called her "Rolindy"
She attended Sophie Newcomb
College, affiliated with Tulane Uni-
versity, and met her future husband
when both were editors of the Tu-
lane student paper She taught
school between graduation in 1935
and their marriage in 1938.
In her first election for Congress,
in March 1973, she had to overcome
prejudice against her gender and
privileged background.
Said her Republican opponent,
Robert E. Lee: "I've covered this
district by foot, by car, by air This is
something that takes a strong,
healthy man. .. A socialite is not
going to do this district any good in
Congress."
Her constituents disagreed, giv-
ing her at least 60 percent of the
vote in every election from then on.
In addition to her children, Boggs
is survived by eight grandchildren
and 18 great-grandchildren.


Victims of train derailment honored at Mass


Associated Press
LAC-MEGANTIC, Que-
bec An overflow crowd
attended a memorial serv-
ice Saturday at a church in
the Quebec town of Lac-
Megantic for the 47 people
who were killed there
when a runaway oil train
derailed and exploded.
About 1,000 people
packed Ste-Agnes Church
for the morning Mass
presided over by Luc Cyr,
the archbishop of Sher-
brooke. Among the digni-
taries attending were
Canadian Prime Minister
Stephen Harper, Liberal
Party Leader Justin
Trudeau, Quebec Premier
Pauline Marois and the
town's mayor, Colette
Roy-Laroche.
"This has been an emo-
tional day followed by a
very emotional period,"
Harper said outside of the
church.
The town is near the U.S.
border, and Maine Gov Paul
LePage, of French-Canadian
descent, was on hand to
offer his condolences.
Parish priest Steve
Lemay said in his homily
that the town has suffered
through "unbelievable
events that caused us inex-
pressible suffering."
"Our town, its heart dev-
astated, is mourning its
children. Children who
were unique because of a
color and vitality they
brought to their families."
The service was held
three weeks after a run-
away train carrying 72 car-
loads of crude oil hurtled
down an incline, derailed
and slammed into down-
town Lac-Megantic. Sev-
eral train cars exploded
and fireballs rained down
on the town, destroying 40
buildings in the picturesque
lakeside town of 6,000. The
unattended Montreal,

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Associated Press
Dignitaries and mourners attend a memorial service on
Saturday for the victims killed when a runaway oil train
derailed and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec.


Maine & Atlantic Railway
train had been parked
overnight on a rail line be-
fore it came loose.
Father Lemay said he
found inspiration in the
courage of crews at the
disaster site; the volun-
teers in the parish; the
schools transformed into
shelters; and the legions of
dedicated public workers.
A large crowd gathered
outside the church as the
solemn procession began,
applauding a group of fire-
fighters as they arrived for
the Mass.
The service began with a
grandmother from the
town reading out the
names of all the victims
from a large card.


Many people outside the
church wiped tears from
their eyes as the names of
the victims were read out
The July 6 tragedy has
triggered lawsuits in
Canada and the U.S., a po-
lice criminal investigation


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and a probe by federal
transportation safety
officials.
Quebec and the federal
government have each
promised $58 million for
emergency assistance and
longer-term reconstruc-
tion help for the town.
Ottawa has also revamped
some rules on train
transport, following the
advice of the federal
Transportation Safety
Board. Canadian trans-
portation authorities
banned one-man crews
for trains carrying dan-
gerous cargo, and also
said such trains will not
be allowed to be left un-
attended on a main track


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Obituaries

Julia
Alvarez, 84
MINNEOLA
Julia Alvarez, age 84, of
Minneola, Fla., passed
away July 24, 2013. Local
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto. Burial will
be in Puerto Rico.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory Lecanto.




Henry Pate, 94
INVERNESS
Henry Pate, age 94, In-
verness, died July 25, 2013,
under Hospice of Citrus
County care. Henry was
born Feb. 18, 1919, in
Colquitt, Ga., to the late
Ana Norris and Victoria
(Duncan) Pate.
He served our country
in the United States Army
during World War II, see-
ing action in Rome, Arno,
Southern
SFrance,
Rhineland
and Cen-
. trail Eu-
_.-....J rope and
^,' received a
P Purple
'-.J-Heart for
Henry wounds
Pate received in
France on Jan. 6, 1945.
Henry was a member of
VFW No. 4337 in Inverness
and the Masonic Lodge in
New Jersey
He was preceded in
death by his wife Mary
Ann Pate in 2000 and a
brother, OscarA. Pate. Sur-
vivors include his dear
friend, Mary Cleveland, In-
verness; daughter and son-
in-law Doretha and
Thomas Workman, Del-
tona, Fla.; stepsons
Thomas D. Barclay III of
Rome, Ga., and Donald W
Barclay and Joseph T Bar-
clay, both of North Au-
gusta, S.C.; three
stepdaughters, Roberta S.
Goslen of Conyers, Ga.,
Jeanne Jones of Aiken,
S.C., and Kathleen A.
Malarkey of North Au-
gusta, S.C.; and their fami-
lies. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements. Inurnment
will be at the Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 A9


I ~OOOFASVI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TS Dorian


loses force


Associated Press
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
- Tropical Storm Dorian
lost force Saturday and be-
came a tropical wave as it
pushed westward across
the Atlantic before nearing
Caribbean islands.
National Weather Serv-
ice meteorologist David
Sanchez told The Associ-
ated Press that some rain
and rough ocean condi-
tions are expected on
Monday in Puerto Rico.
The tropical wave had
maximum sustained winds
of 40 mph Saturday after-


GUNSHOTS
Continued from PageAl

weapon fired.
Linhart said the county
had local laws that set
fairly defined and restric-
tive parameters for
firearms discharges in
public, but in 2008 state
lawmakers nullified those
laws, directing municipal-
ities to state statutes.
While those laws also
contain some parameters
for firearms discharges in
public places, they come
with qualifications such as
legally establishing
whether the person was
negligent or reckless in the
discharge of the firearm,
Linhart said.
"So, from the law en-
forcement side of things, if
we get a call about shots
fired, we have to deter-
mine where it came from
and we always investigate
these calls. Then, we have
to establish what caliber
weapon was used, the way
the bullets traveled and
then determine if the per-
son was negligent in dis-
charging that firearm,"
Linhart said
He said while he per-


noon and it was centered
about 550 miles east of the
northern Leeward Islands,
moving west at 24 mph.
In the Pacific, Tropical
Storm Flossie was moving
quickly west-northwest,
heading toward Hawaii,
though it was projected to
weaken before reaching
the islands. It had maxi-
mum sustained winds of 50
mph and was centered
about 920 miles east of
Hilo, Hawaii. It was moving
west-northwest at 18 mph.
There were no watches
or warnings in effect for ei-
ther storm.


Don't
shoot in a
direction if
there is a
house. Just be
prudent about
it.
Capt. Danny
Linhart
CCSO westside
patrol commander.
sonally believes people
have a right to own and
discharge their firearms,
he thinks those firing their
weapons should employ
some common-sense prac-
tices to avoid getting into
legal hot water or harming
their neighbors.
"The main thing is being
safe about it and get a
backstop," he said.
Linhart said if a person
wants to use their back-
yard to fire their weapon,
they should at least build
an earthen backstop to
stop the bullets.
"And don't shoot in a di-
rection if there is a house.
Just be prudent about it."


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A10 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


WORLD/LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

July 29 to Aug. 2
MENUS

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Italian meatball
hoagie (meatballs in marinara
sauce), cheesy mashed pota-
toes, Italian beans, hot dog
bun, margarine, raisins, low-
fat milk.
Tuesday: Blended juice,
baked chicken thigh, yellow
rice with tomato and pepper,
black beans, white bread,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Grilled
chicken breast patty in mari-
nara sauce, penne noodles
with garlic oil, Tuscan vegeta-
bles, slice rye bread with mar-
garine, peaches, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Flame-broiled
beef patty with bun and
ketchup and mustard, pota-
toes O'Brien, corn with diced
tomato, fresh orange, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Tuna salad, pea-
cheese salad, marinated
broccoli salad, two slices
whole-grain bread and may-
onnaise, graham crackers,
low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 All


Life expectancy: Live long and prosper


Almost every day, you hear
about an accident victim
being airlifted to a med-
ical center which, many times, is
able to save the person's life
thanks to the speedy transport.
When you hear that our life ex-
pectancy is going up, advances
like that are a big reason why
A hundred years ago, I would
have been dead at 22 with a
burst appendix. Instead, I had a
routine surgery, recovered
quickly and went on barely giv-
ing it a thought. My life ex-
pectancy increased dramatically
after surgery, but it had no effect
on yours. But it did have an ef-
fect on the "average": My sur-
vival boosted everyone's life
expectancy a tiny fraction of a
fraction of a fraction of a per-
cent Multiply that by all the
medical advances through the
years that have driven up our
life expectancy transplants,
bypass surgeries, defibrillators,
antibiotics, pre- and postnatal
care and even things like the
Heimlich maneuver and you
really see the numbers jump.
But here's the really strange
thing about life expectancy -
the older you get, the longer you
will live. It sounds crazy until
you realize that when you hear
the average life expectancy for
men is 75.5 years, they're not


year after that... well, there is
~no upper end in sight.
Jim And the thing is, can you really
Ji call being 350 pounds an acci-
Mullen dent? It's like getting "acciden-
tally" run over by a glacier that
VILLAGE moves 2 inches a year. Didn't you
i: IDIOT hear all the people yelling "Walk
IDIO for your life"? Weighing 350
pounds and wondering why
you're getting sick is like buying
talking about you. They're talk- a house next to the airport and
ing about a baby born today A wondering why it's so noisy
man who is 75.5 today will, on EMTs are saying they need
average, live almost another 11 bigger ambulances for the big-
years. Why? Because he's sur- ger patients; hospitals say they
vived childbirth, a plethora of need bigger beds and bigger
deadly childhood diseases and wheelchairs; funeral parlors are
allergies and the draft. He's also ordering bigger and bigger (and
probably pretty tough, because more and more expensive) cas-
he hasn't been carried off by a kets. Where will it end?
host of other things that would Every now and then, you'll see
have killed frailer people, a story about a person so large
But we may have reached our they have to break out a window
peak. A news story this week an- and use a forklift to get him or
nounced that many of the heli- her out of the house. My friend
copters used to airlift patients to Dr Sam says he has a money-
hospitals were not big enough to making solution to the problem.
carry patients that weigh more Not the helicopter part of the
than 350 pounds, which is be- problem, but the coffin part. He
coming a more and more com- dreams of starting a business
mon dilemma. No doubt, called "Dr Sam's Postmortem
someone is now legislating for Liposuction." It works like this:
bigger and more powerful emer- When a super-sized person dies,
agency airlift helicopters to han- instead of going through the ex-
dle the load, but in a few years pense of ripping out a wall, hir-
they'll say that 400-pound pa- ing a special hearse and
tients can't be transported. The spending thousands extra on a


Weighing 350
pounds and
wondering why
you're getting sick
is like buying a
house next to the
airport and
wondering why it's
so noisy.

giant coffin, you simply call Dr
Sam. For half the price of all
that, he shows up with a few
five-gallon buckets and starts li-
posuctioning the body until it's
small enough to use all the nor-
mal modes of transportation.
It may sound silly now, but I
can easily see this service being
advertised in an infomercial on
late-night television, with Dr
Sam saying things like, "Call in
the next 10 minutes and get an
extra five-gallon bucket for free."
I should mention here that I
just play golf with Dr Sam; I'm
not even sure he's a medical
doctor It sounds like something
only a Ph.D. would think up.
Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. corn.


SO YOU KNOW
* Citrus County public
schools begin Aug. 7.
Look for weekly school
menus alongside
senior dining menus
on Sunday in the
Chronicle.
* View calendars for the
entire month at
http://cafe.citrus.kl12.
fl.us/
* Parents may apply
online for free and
reduced-price meals
at www.citrus.k12.fl.
us/departments/food
/default.htm
* For senior dining,
menus for the month
are available at
http://bocc.citrus.fl.
us/commserv/
su ppserv/sen prog/
centers/menu.pdf


We Welcome You To A w

Value Dental Care t


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.
Crystal River
352-794-6139


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD &Associates


Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD I


IAL OUR-PODUCT AREAMERIAN ADE! W*do*ot*sip t


OP9 A Cleaning Special flfl Porcelain
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We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refu
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduce


I1


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se to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is I
ed fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. I


Why should your dentist inject you with these cosmetic treatments?


* My training was concentrated on head & neck

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no counterfeit products.


Ledger Dentistry

LedgerDentistry.com SE HABLA ESPAIOL


Next to ACE
in Homosassa

(352) 628-3443


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COMMUNITY










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Cowtyke


Associated Press
Eric Mullis, 6, competes in
the calf roping competition
Saturday during the Na-
tional Day of the Ameri-
can Cowboy celebration
at Woodlawn Stables in
Mebane, N.C. The event
served as a fundraiser for
the North Carolina Thera-
peutic Riding Center.

Body found where
bride-to-be vanished
PIERMONT, N.Y-Au-
thorities pulled a woman's
body from the Hudson River
on Saturday near the spot
where a bride-to-be was
hurled into the water, along
with her fiance's best man,
when a speedboat carrying
six friends crashed into a
construction barge near the
Tappan Zee Bridge.
Officials were working to
confirm it was the body of
30-year-old Lindsey Stewart,
who has been missing since
the Friday night accident,
but they said it appeared to
fit her description. She had
been set to get married in
just two weeks.
The search for the miss-
ing best man, 30-year-old
Mark Lennon, was continu-
ing, said Rockland County
undersheriff Robert VanCura.
Jury awards $18.6M
over credit report
PORTLAND, Ore. -
A federal jury in Oregon
awarded $18.6 million to a
woman who spent two
years unsuccessfully trying
to get Equifax Information
Services to fix major mis-
takes on her credit report.
Julie Miller of Marion
County was awarded $18.4
million in punitive damages
and $180,000 in compensa-
tory damages, though Friday's
award will likely be appealed,
The Oregonian reported.
The jury was told she
contacted Equifax eight times
between 2009 and 2011 in
an effort to correct inaccura-
cies, including erroneous
accounts and collection at-
tempts, as well as a wrong
Social Security number and
birthday. Her lawsuit alleged
the Atlanta-based company
failed to correct the mistakes.
Miller discovered the
problem when she was de-
nied credit by a bank in
early December 2009. She
alerted Equifax and filled
out multiple forms faxed by
the credit agency seeking
updated information. She
had found similar mistakes
in her reports with other
credit bureaus, Baxter said,
but those companies cor-
rected their errors.
Couple sues, gets
marriage recognized
CINCINNATI Two gay
men who successfully sued
to get their out-of-state mar-
riage recognized in Ohio
despite a state ban are at the
forefront of what supporters
and experts believe will be
a rush of similar lawsuits
aiming to take advantage of
an apparent legal loophole.
John Arthur of Cincinnati,
who is dying of Lou Gehrig's
disease, won the right to be
listed as married on his death
certificate and to have his
partner of more than 20 years
listed as his surviving spouse.
In his decision ordering
the marriage be recognized,
federal Judge Timothy Black
said Ohio law historically has
recognized out-of-state mar-
riages as valid as long as
they were legal where they
took place, citing marriages
between cousins and in-
volving minors.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dozens of Morsi supporters


latest round of bloodshed ii


Associated Press
CAIRO Security
forces and armed men
clashed with supporters of
Egypt's ousted president
early Saturday, killing at
least 65 protesters in may-
hem that underscored an
increasingly heavy hand
against protests demand-
ing Mohammed Morsi's re-
turn to office.
In chaotic scenes, pools
of blood stained the floor
and bodies were lined up
under white sheets in a
makeshift hospital near the
site of the battles in eastern
Cairo. Doctos struggled to
cope with the flood of
wounded, many with gun-
shots to the head or chest.
It was the deadliest sin-
gle outbreak of violence
since the military ousted
Morsi on July 3 and one of
the deadliest in 2 1/2 years
of turmoil in Egypt.


Associated Press
Opponents of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi
demonstrate Friday at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.
Security forces clashed with supporters of Morsi early
Saturday in an outburst of violence that put the possibil-
ity of political reconciliation in the deeply divided nation
ever further out of reach.


The extent of the blood-
shed pointed to a rapidly
building confrontation be-
tween the country's two
camps, sharply divided
over the coup that removed


Egypt's first freely elected
president after widespread
protests against his rule.
Authorities talk more
boldly of making a move to
end weeks of protests by


killed in


n Egypt
Morsi's largely Islamist
supporters. At the same
time, the Islamists are
growing more assertive in
challenging security forces
as they try to win public
backing for their cause.
Saturday's clashes were
sparked when pro-Morsi
protesters sought to expand
their main Cairo sit-in camp
by moving onto a nearby
main boulevard, only to be
confronted by police and
armed civilians report-
edly residents of nearby
neighborhoods. Police ini-
tially fired tear gas but in
ensuing clashes, the pro-
testers came under gunfire.
Officials from Morsi's
Muslim Brotherhood and
their allies decried what
they called a new "mas-
sacre" against their side,
only weeks after July 8
clashes with army troops
in Cairo that left more than
50 Morsi supporters dead.


Associated Press


Protesters carry a sign Wednesday outside the Levin Federal Courthouse in Detroit.


Bankruptcy another




setback for unions


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Detroit's
historic bankruptcy filing is a
major setback for public employee
unions that have spent years try-
ing to ward off cuts to the pen-
sions of millions of government
workers around the country
If the city's gambit succeeds, it
could jeopardize an important
bargaining tool for unions, which
often have deferred higher
wages in favor of more generous
pensions and health benefits.
It also could embolden other fi-
nancially troubled cities dealing
with pension shortfalls to con-
sider bankruptcy, or at least take


a harder line with their unions.
Unlike private employers that
must fund defined-benefit pen-
sions under the Employee Re-
tirement SecurityAct, government
employers are exempt.
If cities such as Detroit can use
bankruptcy or other tactics to re-
duce pension obligations, gov-
ernment employees could become
less interested in union member-
ship, said Charles Craver, a George
Washington University professor
specializing in labor relations.
Detroit's financial woes were
aggravated by widespread cor-
ruption, financial mismanage-
ment the auto industry collapse
and a dramatically shrunken tax


base. The city has long-term
debts of at least $18 billion, in-
cluding $3.5 billion in unfunded
pensions and $5.7 billion in un-
derfunded health benefits for
about 21,000 retired workers.
Unions, led by the American
Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employees,
launched a furious legal chal-
lenge to Detroit's bankruptcy
petition, arguing Michigan law
does not allow public pension
obligations to be diminished. But
a federal bankruptcy judge dealt
a blow to that tactic last week,
halting any state lawsuits that
would interfere with the bank-
ruptcy proceeding.


Coaster death spurs talks on regulation


Associated Press


DALLAS From Six
Flags to Walt Disney World,
there's no federal oversight
of permanent amusement
parks, and regulations
vary from state to state.
The death of a woman
who fell 75 feet from Six
Flags Over Texas' Texas
Giant roller coaster is rein-
vigorating discussion among
safety experts about
whether it's time to create
more consistent, stringent
regulations for thrill rides
across the nation.
'A baby stroller is subject
to tougher federal regula-
tion than a roller coaster
carrying a child in excess
of 100 miles per hour,"
Massachusetts Sen. Edward
J. Markey, a Democrat, said
in a statement this week.
As a congressman, Markey
tried for years to have the
U.S. Consumer Product


A baby stroller is subject to
tougher federal regulation than a
roller coaster carrying a child in
excess of 100 miles per hour.

Sen. Edward J. IVMarkey
in a statement issued earlier this week.


Safety Commission -which
oversees mobile carnival
rides regulate fixed-site
amusement parks.
But a spokeswoman with
the International Associa-
tion of Amusement Parks
and Attractions countered
that the trade group be-
lieves state officials "are
best able to determine the
level of regulation needed
for their state."
In Texas, the Department
of Insurance requires that
an amusement park's in-
surance company perform
a yearly inspection and


carry $1 million liability
insurance on each ride,
agency spokesman Jerry
Hagins said. Six Flags Over
Texas was in compliance
with those rules at the time
of Rose Ayala-Goana's July
19 fatal fall from the wooden
coaster with steel rails that
features a drop of 79 de-
grees and banked turns.
The park doesn't need to
submit a report to the state
on what caused her to fall,
and while Arlington police
are also looking into the
death, they aren't investi-
gating the ride.


"The question is: Will
they release it and will it
be complete and compre-
hensive?" said Ken Mar-
tin, an amusement ride
safety analyst who owns
KRM Consulting of Rich-
mond, Va. "There's a lot of
unanswered questions and
because of the way it is in
Texas we might not ever
have the answer to those
questions."
Walter S. Reiss, an
amusement ride safety in-
spector based in Bethle-
hem, Pa., agreed: "When it
comes time for an acci-
dent, it sure would be nice
if the state would be that
omniscient third party to
come in and do that
investigation."
Martin noted that both
the stringency of inspec-
tion regulations and which
entity oversees those in-
spections vary across the
country


World BRIEFS

Heat wave


Associated Press
A man juggles with balls
Saturday in Stuttgart,
Germany. Weather fore-
casts for the region pre-
dict temperatures up to
100.4 degrees.

Protesters disrupt
gay pride parade
VILNIUS, Lithuania--A
group of protesters tried to
disrupt Lithuania's second gay
pride parade ever on Satur-
day, defying an enormous
police presence by throwing
eggs at marchers and at-
tempting to storm a stage.
Several hundred gay rights
activists took to the grand
main street of Vilnius to show
their pride, waving Lithuanian
and rainbow-colored flags,
with some standing on top
of buses decked out in col-
orful balloons.
They were met by hun-
dreds of unruly protesters,
28 of whom were detained,
police said. Among them
was Petras Grazulis, an
anti-gay lawmaker who ral-
lied protesters with a bull-
horn. He was thrown
face-down on the ground
and carried off in handcuffs
by police, though the law-
maker soon reappeared at
the protest after being re-
leased from police custody.
1,000-plus inmates
escape ULibyan prison
TRIPOLI, Libya More
than a thousand inmates
escaped a prison Saturday
in Libya as protesters stormed
political party offices across
the country, signs of the
simmering unrest gripping a
nation overrun by militias
and awash in weaponry.
Inmates started a riot and
set fires after security
forces opened fire on three
detainees who tried to es-
cape the facility outside of
Benghazi, a security official
at al-Kweifiya prison said.
Gunmen quickly arrived to
the prison after news of the
riot spread, opening fire
with rifles outside in a bid to
free their imprisoned rela-
tives, a Benghazi-based
security official said.
Those who escaped ei-
ther face or were convicted
of serious charges, the
prison official said.
Special forces later ar-
rested 18 of the escapees,
while some returned on
their own, said Mohammed
Hejazi, a government secu-
rity official in Benghazi.
Thousands protest
gov't at funeral
TUNIS, Tunisia Thou-
sands of protesters chanting
anti-government slogans
joined a funeral march to
lay to rest an assassinated
Tunisian opposition politi-
cian, a display of the anger
threatening the survival of a
government once seen as a
model in the region for the
transition to democracy.
Adding to the tension, a
bomb exploded in the early
morning underneath a car
at the port in Tunis outside
a police station. Though
there were no injuries, the
rare attack helped deepen
the sense of unease in in
the North African country,
where two opposition politi-
cians have been gunned
down in the last six months,
apparently with the same gun.
"Down with the party of the
Brotherhood," chanted mourn-
ers, referring to the ruling
Ennahda Party's affiliation
with the regional Muslim
Brotherhood religious group.
"The people demand the
fall of the regime."
-From wire reports


I








T Travel & Leisure



EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


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FRAN([]I C


IT'S A TREAT


PHOTOS BY NEIL SAWYER/ Special to the Chronicle
The Golden Gate Bridge (top), the trolley (above, right) and
historic homes (above) are must-sees in San Francisco.


Everything among
the iconic features
of San Francisco
has been discov-
ered, and redis-
covered, many
times over If resi-
dents have not ex-
posed these
secrets of San
Francisco, tourists
certainly have. This "tour
guide" may be of some assis-
tance in your enjoyment of San
Francisco as you discover the
city on your own.
Of the many times that I've
been to San Francisco, my pulse
quickens and my eyes widen as I


Neil
Sawyer

SPONW4AEOUS
TRAVELER


enter the city, as if I've plugged
into a new source of energy
"Electrified" might better de-
scribe the feeling.
On our descent to downtown,
from our B&B on Twin Peaks, we
got on the city bus (keep your
stub) on Portola Street and
wound our way to the colorful


and eclectic Castro area, ogling
at the colorful Victorian homes
on the way, and then switched to
the Muni-F Line trolleys.
Then, passing through the
mixed-use business end of upper
Market Street, and crossing the
always busy Van Ness Avenue,
we entered downtown San Fran-
cisco. Our first landmark was the
attractive civic center, city hall,
and the main library, leading us
into the Tenderloin district, an
area of about 50 square blocks
that has a historically unsavory
reputation.
Central downtown is marked
by the famous cable car
See Page A15


The battle of old cars versus new cars


A 11 of my show cars are no more
than 7 years old. I considered buy-
ng an older restored muscle car
from the 1960s or early 1970s, which are
beautiful cars, but decided to stick with
the newer ones. I really like the depend-
ability, handling, smooth ride, technol-
ogy and safety features of the newer
cars. Plus they are making some great
muscle cars these days, such as the Mus-
tangs, Challengers, Chargers and
Camaros that can be used as show cars.
As a matter of fact, it seems that when
you go to car shows, more than half of
the cars in the show are of the newer
variety
My friend Mike is an "old car" guy He
has some great looking classic cars from
the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. But Mike is
also a very good mechanic, and he can


Lf Ken McNally

CAR



usually fix most problems he has with
these cars to keep them running well.
He also does most of the restoration
work himself. I, on the other hand, am
not a mechanic and am not willing to do
any work on my cars other than keeping
them clean and polished for shows. If
my cars need any work, I go to the local
dealership to have it done. I don't even


do any oil changes.
It's amazing how much money is spent
for some of the rarer, restored older
cars at auctions such as Barrett Jackson
and Mecum. I have seen some 1950s and
1960s Corvettes and Mustangs sell for
hundreds of thousands of dollars, de-
pending on just how rare they are. Obvi-
ously, these buyers are not average car
enthusiasts but wealthy collectors who
probably have another dozen cars of
similar value home in their very large
garages. However, if you are really into
the older cars and can do much of the
repair and restoration work yourself,
there are some real good deals out
there on many beautiful classic cars.
Some of the sites available to find these
cars are www.autotraderclassics.com,
www.cars-on-line.com and


wwwgatewayclassiccars. com. However,
if you decide to purchase a car online, I
would recommend that you visit the
owner, test drive the car and have it
checked by a local mechanic to be sure
it is in the condition as presented by the
seller
As for me, I prefer to purchase the
newer vehicles from local dealers, par-
ticularly since I can get a Carfax report
on the history of the car to see if it has
been in any serious accidents or has any
other major issues such as being af-
fected by flooding. However, when I go
to car cruise-ins and shows, I am always
drawn to the old classic cars, as they are
beautiful vehicles with their fins, long
body lines and unique designs. And, of
course, they are the ones that started
See Page A15




A14 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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LF 727 67 727 1 1Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf RBC Canadian Open, Final Round.
I "1 Married Who?" (2012, Romance-Comedy) Cedar Cove "A House "Second Chances" (2013, Romance) Alison Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
59 68 59 45 54 Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. ccDivided"'PG' Sweeney, Greg Vaughan, Ed Asner.
** "Cowboys & *1 "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" True Blood "In the The Newsroom "Willie True Blood "In the
NiJ 302 201 302 2 2 Aliens" (2011) cc (2012) Benjamin Walker. (In Stereo)'R' Evening" (N)'MA' Pete" (N) 'MA' Evening"'MA' c
303 202 303 Boxing The Real Time With Bill TrueBlood"Don'tYou Tea ii-i MarkWahlberg. R.I.P.D.: "Dream House"
303 202 303 Wolverine Maher'MA' c Feel Me"'MA' iii, : First (2011).
HTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunters Hunters HuntlIntl Beyond Spelling Love It or List It, Too Brother vs. Brother Hunters Hunt Intl
i- 51 25 51 32 42 i Mountain Men'PG' c Mountain Men'PG' Mountain Men "No Way Mountain Men "Disaster Ice Road Truckers "Art God, God,
mS 51 25 51 32 42Out" 'PG' c Strikes" 'PG' of War" (N) '14' Guns & Guns &
Ei 24 38 24 31"Murder on the 13th "Obsessed" (2009) Idris Elba. A stalker Drop Dead Diva "Fool Devious Maids (N) "Obsessed" (2009)
24 38 24 31 Floor" (2012) 'NR' threatens a married man's idyllic life. for Love"'PG' 14'c Idris Elba.
."Summoned" (2013, Horror) Cuba Gooding Jr., "Adopting Terror" (2012, Suspense) San ** "The Perfect Nanny" (2000) Tracy Nelson,
MJ 50 119 Ashley Scott. (In Stereo)'PG-13' ccAstin, Brendan Fehr. (In Stereo) 'NR' c Dana Barron. (In Stereo) 'NR' c
S 32021 32 3 3 *** "Die Hard With a Vengeance" (1995) **W "Horrible Bosses" (2011, Comedy) Jason Strike Back (In Stereo) Strike Back "Serena"
320 221 320 3 3 Bruce Willis. (In Stereo)'R' c Bateman. (In Stereo)'NR' 'MA'c
SNj 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Sex Slaves Sex Slaves: Texas Sex Slaves: Oakland
S 10 6 19 Manhattan Mob Bloods and Crips: L.A. Miami Drug Cartel Inside the Amedcan Inside the American Inside the American
U 109 65 109 44 53 Rampage '14, L,V' Gangs '14, L,V '14, L,V' Mob (N)'14' Mob (N) 14' Mob'14'
I 28 36 28 35 25 Sam & Haunted Haunted |Haunted SeeDad lWendell ***,"Gremlins"(1984)ZachGalligan.'PG'm cIFriends
W 103 62 103 Our America Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
XYI 44 123 Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped: Killer Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c
S I 3 21 3 1 "Twilight Saga: Dexter "Scar Tissue" Ray Donovan "Black Dexter "This Little Ray Donovan Ezra has Ray Donovan Ezra has
340 241 340 4 Breaking Dawn" 'MA' c Cadillac"'MA' Piggy" (N)'MA' an accident.'MA' an accident.'MA'
732 112732 Lucas Oil Off Road SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR Viper: Soul Survivor My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
732 112 732 Racing (Live) Tunnel Victory L. PG'Car TV PG'
S 37 3 37 27 3 Bar Rescue "Turtle on Bar Rescue "Bro's Got Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (N) (In Tattoo Rescue "Wiped Ink Master"Thrills for
S37 43 37 27 36 Its Back"'PG' toGeaux"'PG' 'PG' Stereo)'PG' Out!"'PG' Grills"'14'[c
(Jt Z 370 271 The Notebook",'_*,, Romance) Ryan Magic City (In Stereo) *** "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" (2011, Suspense) Ma ic City
S370 271 370 ...i.,i, : i.... i 'MA Daniel Craig, Rooney Mara. In Stereo) 'R' c 'MA
S4 3 3 Into the Saltwater Flats Class Ship Sprtsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Blue G' Exp. I Shape TV Adv. Sport Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue'G'
S 31 59 3 26 2i "Red: Werewolf ** "Underworld: Evolution" (2006, Horror) ** "Underworld: Rise of the Lycans" (2009, "Monsterwolf" (2010)
31 59 31 26 29 Hunter" (2010)'NR' Kate Beckinsale.'R'c Horror) Michael Sheen. R' cLeonorVarela.'R'
(T]i 49 23 49 16 19 ** "DueDate"(2010)'R' (DVS) ** "Year One" (2009) Jack Black. ** "Year One" (2009) Jack Black.
9 53 169 3 3 *** "A Kiss Before Dying" (1956, Suspense) **** "Great Expectations" (1946, Drama) *** "So Long at the Fair" (1950, Mystery)
(_ 169 53 169 30 35 Robert Wagner. NR'c John Mills, Bernard Miles. NR'c Jean Simmons. NR'c
SNaked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid:
S 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14'c Stereo)'14'c Stereo)'14'c Uncensored (N) (In Stereo)'14' c Uncensored c
T 50 46 50 29 30 SayYes SayYes Breaking Amish: LA Sister Wives'PG' Sister Wives (N)'PG' Breaking Amish: LA Sister Wives'PG'
i 30 26 30 "2 Days in "MeetingEvil" (2011) Samuel ** "Bulletproof Monk" (2003) ** "Payback" (1999, Action) Mel Gibson, "Wes
350 261 350 NY" L. Jackson. 'RN' ChowYun-Fat.'PG-13' cc Gregg Henry. (In Stereo) 'R' cc Craven"
i 48 33 48 3 1 34 ** "Men in Blacklr" ** "Sherlock Holmes" (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr. The detec- Falling Skies "Journey ii,. :ii.- i journey
( 48 33 48 31 34_ (2002) 'PG-13' tive and his astute partner face a strange enemy 'PG-13' toXibalba"'PG' .. ll .
TOON 38 58 38 33 ***, "Shrek" (2001, Comedy)'PG' Legends I Looney King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Burgers Fam.Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Steak Paradise 3'G' Bikinis Bikinis Wat I Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Adam Adam BBQ Cr. BBQCr.
tru 25 55 25 98 55 Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Storage Storage Storage Container Container Container Most Shocking
(TVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Cleveland Gold Girls Gold oldGrlsGirls I il Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs Gold Girls IGold Girls
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special LBurn Notice'PG' c
04) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14" (DVS)
S 117 9 7 CSI Miami "Inside Out" CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami "Deep CSI: Miami "Sunblock" CSI: Miami "Chain CSI: Miami "Cyber-leb-
117 69 117 '14' '14'N Freeze"'14'c '14'm Reaction"'14' drty"'14'c
rWGN3A i ~18 18 18 18 20 Baseball 10th Inn. Cubs Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay "SlumdogMill"


D earAnnie: My hus-
band and I have
disagreed about
this since the day we mar-
ried. I was divorced, and
he was divorced twice.
Let's call him 'Joe Smith"
and I'll be 'Jane Doe."
After my divorce, I went
back to using my maiden
name. I didn't want to be
the third "Mrs. Smith."
Here's the problem:
Mail, holiday
cards and in-
vitations all
come ad-
dressed to
"Mr and Mrs.
Joe Smith." I
feel it should
be "Mr Smith
and Ms. Doe."
It irks me that
people cannot
grasp this sim-
ple concept
-WhoAmI? ANN
DearWho: MAIL
Basic eti-
quette says a
married couple is ad-
dressed as "Mr and Mrs.
Whatever" unless in-
formed otherwise. Even if
people are aware that you
use your maiden name,
they may think it is only
for business purposes and
not for social invitations.
You need to clarify your
preference. You should
let your friends and fam-
ily know you use your
maiden name for all
forms of address and
would appreciate it if


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"The Conjuring" (R) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
1:30p.m.,4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG) In
3D. 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Turbo" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG) 4:40 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Wolverine" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"The Wolverine" In 3D. (PG-
13) 3:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Conjuring" (R)
12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG) 12:15
p.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m.


I
.I


they would respect that
DearAnnie: Your ad-
vice to "Grandparents"
was right on the money
Our son and daughter-in-
law also have three chil-
dren, the eldest from a
previous relationship.
It was obvious 'Johnny"
was not treated as well as
his younger siblings. We
were heartsick at the way
he was singled out for un-
kind treatment
He was berated
for every little
thing, yet he
was a good boy
With excellent
grades who
graduated from
school with top
honors.
We took
'Johnny" when-
ever possible,
sometimes for a
IE'S week at a time,
BOX and stayed
closely in touch
until, not sur-
prisingly, it reached the
crisis stage and he threat-
ened suicide. They disre-
garded it and he ran off.
We found him and took
him to live with us. His
parents were angry and
there was a yearlong es-
trangement but we stuck
to it knowing it was the
right thing to do.
Today 'Johnny" is a
successful student at col-
lege and reunited with his
parents and siblings. -
Grandparents, Too


"Despicable Me 2" In 3D.
(PG) 5:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)
12:50 a.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13) 1 p.m.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 8 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." In 3D. (PG-13)
5:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No
passes.
"Turbo" (PG) 12 p.m.,
2:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG) 5 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Wolverine" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Wolverine" In 3D. (PG-
13) 3:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Head covering
6 Cousin to an org.
11 Embarked on
16 Corpuscles
21 One of the
Simpsons
22 Art
23 Serviceable
24 Of the bishop
of Rome
25 Juvenile heroine
26 Go by bike
27 Light-show device
28 Boxing prize
29 Ameche or Adams
30 Female sheep
32 Bedouin, e.g.
34 Special pleasure
36 Serpent
37 Love god
39 Move very slowly
41 Tangle
43 Metallic element
44 Sharpen
45 Similar in
character
48 Twosome
50 Casino items
52 Off the right path
55 Opera highlight
57 Edinburgher
59 Soothing
preparations
63 Control board
64 Sea animal
66 Potted fern, e.g.
68 Go away!
69 At what time
70 Mineral
72 Kilmer poem
73 Roman household god
74 Poetic time of day
75 Calendar abbr.
76 Fescue
78 Spread to dry
79 Raton
80 Cowboy hat
82 Monk's title
83 Go furtively
85 Bash
86 Showy performer
87 Cravat
88 "...- I saw Elba"
89 Against
90 -delune
93 Irrigate
95 Code for ATMs (abbr.)
96 Mixed-breed dog


100 Moos
101 Name for a stranger
102 Synthetic fabric
104 Street
105 Work in verse
106 Actress Gardner
107 -Domingo
109 Cup handle
110 Small room
111 Brink
112 Sinuous
115 Copyist of old
117 Make indistinct
118 Deliver a sermon
119 Brusque
121 -and hearty
122 Tasty, in a way
123 Ticket remnant
125 Skidded
127 Plunder
129 Popular pets
132 Bird's beak
134 Collection of poems
136 Dismounted
137 Cheer
141 Actress Hagen
142 Precipitous
144 Plant bristle
146 Particular
148 Neighbor of Can.
149 Silk cotton
151 Fold
153 Apportion
155 Moving about
157 The uppercrust
158 Cheer
159 "Phantom of the
Opera" role
160 Velocity
161 Goat antelope
162 Prevent from
acting
163 Pester in fun
164 Houdini or Potter



DOWN
1 Protect from the sun
2 Hue
3 acid
4 Chronicle (abbr.)
5 On the house
6 Travel upward
7 Tall building
8 passim
9 Earthenware pot
10 Hotel employee
11 Curving outward


12 Timetable abbr.
13 Substance
14 Wide-awake
15 Greek sea nymph
16 Date (abbr.)
17 Greek letter
18 Winfrey of TV
19 En-
20 Dozed
31 Gale
33 Word in arithmetic
35 Liqueur flavoring
38 Trapshooting
40 Leggy bird
42 Part of MIT (abbr.)
44 Healthy
46 Indisposed
47 Racket
49 Horn sound
51 Tams and berets
52 Church areas
53 Aspect
54 Pointless
56 Where Greeks once
assembled
58 Tortoise
60 Bravery
61 Make into law
62 Wander
64 Steer clear of
65 Notable time
67 Look for
69 A pronoun
71 Curve shape
75 Old Russian ruler
76 Unripe
77 Coil or yarn
79 Explosive sound
81 The one here
82 Conform to
84 Samovar
85 Body of water
87 Maneuver
89 Fossil fuel
90 Fastening device
91 Inamorato
92 Cognizant
93 Destitution
94 Cereal grass
95 Veranda
96 Burrowing
creature
97 Roundup
98 -Allan Poe
99 Distrustful
101 Search for
an escapee
103 -Vegas
104 Disobedient


Faction
Burden of proof
Eyelashes
Young eel
Go by
- Stanley
Gardner
Knock
Sack
Racetrack tout
Glut


124 Made a warning sound
126 Female animal
128 Wee
129 Long vegetables, for
short
130 "--of
Two Cities"
131 Tropical animal
133 Beautiful girl
135 Commence
138 External


Willow rod
Not punctual
Distort
Earthy fuel
Winglike parts
Reduce to pulp
Ear (prefix)
Had lunch
Mauna -
Health club


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Wrong name


annoys wife


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAWYER
Continued from PageA13

turntable at Market and Powell Streets. At this loca-
tion there's a visitor information center located at 900
Market Street, lower level of Hallidie Plaza, that is
worthy of a stop to secure valuable information about
the city Before you leave for your trip to San Fran-
cisco go to: wwwsanfrancisco.travel/about/Visitor-
Information-Center, where you'll find everything
you'll need to know about San Francisco and the sur-
rounding area.
From this location (Market and Powell), you can get
on the cable car to the popular Fisherman's Wharf at
the end of the cable car line, via Nob Hill and Russian
hill, while enjoying the awesome views along the way
Or continue on down Market Street on the trolley
through the financial district to Embarcadero Center,
where you will disembark for a visit to the various
piers along the water front of San Francisco Bay Walk
to the left for odd-numbered piers and to the right for
even-numbered piers.
Pier 23, a well-known restaurant, was our destina-
tion for lunch. As you might expect, their specialty is
oven-roasted Northern California Dungeness crab.
Take a table on the open deck (wear a hat and sun-
screen), from which you will have a view of San Fran-
cisco Bay or a clear view of the skyline of the financial
district, anchored by the well-known pyramid-shaped
building of Trans America. After lunch we strolled
along the pier area enjoying the blue sky, gentle
breeze, and a host of entertaining exhibits and shops.
Take some time to visit these exhibits (mostly free)
and stop in at the boutique chocolate factory, TCHO,
for an energizer
At this point your options are open, but an interest-
ing way to go is to stroll along the waterfront (odd-
numbered side) to Fisherman's Wharf, to finish off an
interesting day This area hosts the Maritime Museum


MCNALLY
Continued from PageA13

this great car enthusiast hobby
CAR JOKE: A traffic cop pulled over an elderly lady
driving her little old car too slow down the highway
"This is a 70 mph. highway ma'am," he said. "How come
you're only doing 20? You're a danger to other vehicles."
"I'm sorry, officer," she said, "but I saw a lot of signs
that said 20, not 70." "That's not the speed limit," ex-
plained the cop. "That's the name of the highway"
Just then he looked into the back of the car and saw
two more little old ladies trembling with fear "What's
the matter with them?" he asked.
The driver replied: "We've just come from highway 127."
Upcoming events
Aug. 3 and 10: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. hosted by Citrus
County Cruisers at Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Crystal River
Aug. 6: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. High Octane Saloon on
U.S. 19 in Homosassa.
Ken McNally is the car columnist for the Chronicle.
Contact him at kenmcnally@tampabay.rrcom or
352-341-1165.


If you go:
Before you leave for your trip to San Francisco go to: wwwsanfrancisco.travel/about/Visitor-Information-Center,
where you'll find everything you'll need to know about San Francisco and the surrounding area.


at Aquatic Park, historical ships, and a national park
information center There are several eateries in the
area, plus the famous Ghirardelli Square across from
the museum. Bay cruises are available at Pier 41.
The Powell-Hyde cable car turnaround is nearby for
your return trip to Powell and Market Streets, but con-
sider jumping off the cable car after it turns the cor-
ner from Hyde Street onto Washington Street, where


j VIKING RIVER
VIKING RIS 014
RIVER CRUISES RUISE 2014
B ENJOYABLE WAY
~Trt qFF FT'PnPFuiTf


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

I 352.795.5797
...la ,,a,..o www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River


Spectacular
SPECIALS
m-i =1


you can visit the Cable Car Museum and museum-area
restaurants. Chinatown is only four blocks away if you
continue down Washington Street.
If you follow this itinerary, you would have visited
the core of interesting venues and a significant part of
what has made this city a magnet for sightseeing de-
lights to visitors young and old, but you risk leaving
your heart in San Francisco.


Greetings To All Our Single Trekkers!
Thanks to the m any of you who have responded to our 7"N iqht
"........."' Eastern FROM
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Royal Cari ea Inside Cabin
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STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
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T IN ITV

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YIp


Cruises


T AYUL


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Vacations Serving Florida Over 10 Years


- IJ^DAY TRv IPS

L ISCi iOV H RTE R&A


Carrilon Concert Guided Gardens Tour
Pinewood Estates Tour Lunch at Chalet Suzanne
Only $85 per person


7 i. T_ ", TV. Io


A Day Tour Includes
Lakeridge Winery Lunch at Historic Lakeside Inn
Shopping Historic Mount Dora Yalaha Bakery
Russell Stover Candy Factory Outlet Store
Only $60 per person


I A I WEETTEMPATION


Visit Farris & Fosters Chocolate Factory
Chocolate Party Lunch at Bahama Breeze
Shopping at Premium Outlet Mall International Drive
Only $85 per person


Saturday, October 19th, 2013
Great Local Seafood Specialties LIVE Musical Entertainment
Over 200 Arts and Crafts Exhibits
Lighthouse Tours on Seahorse Key A Visit to Dakotah Winery
$30 per person. Transportation only. Join Us!
wig; -, Ia M*,
Saturday, October 26th, 2013
Regions Largest Nationally Ranked Craft Fair
Over 350 Vendors Booths Offering
Handcrafted Wares Plenty of Fair Food Offerings
Quaint Local Shops & Restaurants Visit to the Yalaha Bakery
Only $30 per person. Transportation only. Join Us!


Port Canaveral
Luxury Motor Coach $20 FREE Play $10 Food Voucher
600 Vegas Style Slots Craps Roulette Blackjack o Texas Hold Em EZ Baccarat
Only $40 per person.


BRANSNALLSAR SHO U


November 5th 12th, 2013
6 Shows / 12 Meals 4 Casino Visits / $30 FREE Play
Yak Smirnoff Dinner Show Tony Orlando Great American Christmas Mel Tillis Shoji Tabuchi Christmas Show
The Oak Ridge Boys The Brett Family Christmas Show PLUS ALSO ENJOY Veteran Museum Tour
College of the Ozarks Tour Branson Festival of the Lights
Only 959pp/do $1200 single


HOLLY6 J OY [1 RL i Augustine


Nov. 25-26, Nov. 28-Nov.29, 2013
Dec. 2-3, Dec. 5-6, Dec. 9-10, Dec. 12-13, Dec. 16-17, Dec. 19-20, 2013
Join us & Experience The Holiday Brilliance of the Ancient City!
Your Tour includes: 1 Night Stay at The Holiday Isle Resort with a Full Hot Breakfast Buffet and an 'ALL YOU CAN EAT'
Italian Buffet Narrated OLD TOWN TROLLEY Tour with On/Off Hops Shopping on St. George Street Night of Lifts Tour
on The Molly Jolly Trolley! Lunch at World Famous COLUMBIA RESTAURANT Lite Lunch at The Old Spanish Bakery
Only $2 19 pp/dbl $269 single Call today & Join us! I


OKOBRFSTINALPNEHEE
October 13th- 16th, 2013
Enjoy the Spectacular Fall Foliage as we wander thru the Blue Ridge Mountains to Quaint Alpine Helen Georgia
and OKTOBERFEST! You'll DRINK German Beer, Eat the Best of the Wurst and Dance to Oomph Band till the Goats I
Come Home! We'll Tour this Rustic Area Visiting Nora Mill am 1800's working Grist Mill Nacoochee Village Antique
Mall Habersham Winery Fred's Famous Peanuts Ghosts on the Roof! Babyland General Hospital Historic
Dahlonega Gold Rush Museum and Much More! Festhalle Meal &Activities 3 Breakfasts & 2 More
Only $385 db $535 single I


Biloxi 4 Days /3 Nights Package includes: Hotel Accommodations $25 Slot Play $24 Food
Voucher Deluxe Motor Coach Professional Tour Director 3 Casino Visits Boomtown $5.00 Slot Play
Lunch Buffet Voucher (Value $12.00) New Palace $15 Slot Play Margaritaville $25 Slot Play
$ 169 pp/dbl
3 Days / 2 Nights / 4 Meals includes: Spectacular PINE MOUNTAIN INN 2 Breakfasts &
2 Dinners Guided Tour of The Gardens Tram Tour of Fantasy of Lights Visit to FDR Little White House
Only $410 dbl $6 19 single

Includes: Overnight Stay in Ft. Myers with Breakfast Broadway Palm Dinner Theater Enjoy a Broadway Musical &
Chef's Buffet The Ringling Museums Visit the Art & Circus Museums Plus CA'D ZAN Residence The Edison & Ford
Winter Estates Guided Tour of Sanibel Island Enjoy Lunch on your own at THE BUBBLE ROOM Plus The Shell Factory
$245 db l 285 single

4 Days / 3 Nights / 5 Meals includes: Best Western Savannah Historic River District with 3 Hot Breakfast
Buffets Old Town Trolley Tour Savannah Historic Trolley Tour of Amelia Island Dinner at Mrs. Wilkes'
Boarding House Family Style Dining Dinner at Paula Deen's Lady & Sons' Restaurant Southern Cooking
Favorites Buffet Anheuser Busch Brewery Tour Free Time to Explore & Enjoy Savannah
$429 dbl $564 singleDsitwh3oBrka
A IlA
5 Days /4 Nights includes: Visit to USS ALABAMA with Dinner in the ward room IP Casino Resort & Staybridge Suites French
Quarter National World War 2 Museum 3 Hour Guided Tour of New Orleans Mississippi River Cruise & Battlefield Tour
Shopping in the French Quarter BOURBON STREET CRAWL Dinner from MOTHER'S Restaurant Total 7 Meals & $30 FREE Play
$495 dbl $599 single
I i
3 Days / 2 Nights / 2 Continental Breakfasts Full Day in KEY WEST & Sunset Celebration The Oyster House Restaurant
The Star Island Sightseeing Cruise Airboat Ride &Wildlife Show Visit to Bayside Miami Marketplace
$199.95 dbi 289 single

January 25,2014-January 30, 2014- 5 Day Cruise Sailing from Port ofTampa Ports of Call Include: Grand Cayman &Cozumel with
2 Fun Days at Sea Package includes: Stateroom Accommodation, Motorcoach Transportation, taxes & Government Fees
Interior Cabin Category 4C Main & Upper Deck $469 per person Oceanview Cabin Category 6C Main & Upper Deck $509 per person


If you want to

advertise here in the

Great Getaways

call 563-5592


Midweek Pontoon Special
Full day rental 9am-4pm
1$125 Monday Thru Friday


i


I


I


i


I


i


i


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 A15











CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of
local veterans. The stories will be
about a singular event or moment in
your military career that stands out
to you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battlefield
to a fun excursion while on leave. We
also ask that you provide us with your
rank, branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit and
veterans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J.
Risak at 352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set up
obtaining "then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story

Members sought for DAV
Service-connected disabled veter-
ans are sought to become members of
a newly forming Disabled American
Veterans chapter in Crystal River
The chapter needs 50 new mem-
bers to get a charter For information,
call Duane Godfrey at 352-794-3104.

Heroes'names reading
A special event, an Iraq/
Afghanistan Fallen Hero Name
Reading, will be held from 1 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, July 30, at Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills. Volunteers are asked to read 30
names. A recording of all names will
be played at local and nationwide
memorials and veterans' events.
Another reading will take place
from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday
Aug. 21, at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Call Jim Stepanek at 352-489-1644
or email IMcrazyjim@aol.com.

Post open installation
American Legion Post 166 will have
its installation of officers and dinner
at 6 p.m. Saturday Aug. 10, at Springs
Lodge No. 378 F&AM, 5030 S. Memo-
rial Drive, Homosassa. Installation of
officers will begin at 7 p.m. The pub-
lic is invited.
Cost of the dinner is $12 per per-
son, with a choice of either chicken
parmesan or prime rib.
Send a check and indicate entr6e
and number of persons to attend to:
Vice Commander Clay Scott, PO. Box
767, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447.
For more information about the
post, call Commander Robert Scott at
352-860-2090.

Purple Heart event
The West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693, at
7890 W Grover Cleveland Blvd., Ho-
mosassa, will host a breakfast and
program at 9 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 8, to
honor Purple Heart recipients and
commemorate the 231st
anniversary of the Purple Heart.
The families of those who fell in
combat and all combat-wounded vet-
erans and their guests are invited.
Attendees are requested to register
for the free breakfast: Call Carrie
Clemons at 352-628-1633 or email
carriejeanetteclemons@yahoo.com.
Indicate the number in your party
when making reservations.

Trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy, retired,
will lead the 2014 trip to Hawaii for
veterans and their families and
friends from Feb. 25 to March 14.
Signups are being taken for the an-
nual trek, which includes visits to
several islands, some golfing and a
special visit to the USS Arizona Me-
morial and The National Cemetery of
the Pacific.
Although the 2013 September trip
is full, those interested may register
now for 2014.
For more information, call McLean
at 352-637-5131 or email dmclean8@
tampabayrr.com.

Coast Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired military
personnel are needed to assist the
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary to help
the Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, vessel
safety checks, safety patrols search
and rescue, maritime security and
environmental protection.
Criminal background check and
membership are required. Email
Vince Maida atvsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.


Sacrifice saves Marine's life


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
he memory is still vivid for Chuck
Spikes of Inverness. A corporal at
the time serving in the military po-
lice for the U.S. Marines First Division,
Spikes was scheduled to provide secu-
rity on a train taking supplies from
Ascom City, five miles from the port of In-
chon. It was in the middle of the Korean
War, and North Korean and Chinese
guerillas had been a constant problem.
Just prior to the scheduled mission,
Spikes' friend and superior, Sgt. Bob
Stoneking, told him he was taking his
place.
"That was supposed to be me," Spikes
said. "I said 'Your wife's having a baby,'
but he was in charge."
The train was attacked by guerillas,
and Stoneking and another military po-
liceman, Willie Woodell, were shot and
then locked inside one of the train's
cars, which was set on fire. Spikes and
several others tried to get them out
when the train returned to base, but by
the time they unlocked the doors, all
they could do was drag out their friends'
burned bodies.
"I would not be here today if he hadn't
done that," the Inverness resident said.
It has been a difficult memory to deal
with for Spikes, now 80. He was hospi-
talized for a while with what was
termed survivor's guilt, a type of post-
traumatic stress syndrome. He remains
an active member of the Disabled
War Veterans Association, as well as a
lifetime member of the Korean War -
Veterans Association.
Spikes served in the Marines from
1951-59. Besides providing security for
supplies shipped to troops by train, he
also patrolled by Jeep to protect fuel
pipelines that were often targets of the
guerillas. In one instance, he and a fel-
low military policeman came across be-
tween eight and 10 guerillas trying to
sabotage the pipeline.
"I thought we were done for," Spikes
said after they were shot at. Spikes
yelled at the guerillas, ordering them to
drop their weapons and surrender, and,
surprisingly, they complied. Half-
starved and with no footwear in
weather that was well below freezing,


OUTFIT 1st Marine Division, 1st Combat Service Group, Military Police
JOB Providing security for supply lines and protecting troops
VETERANS ORGANIZATIONS Lifetime member of Korean War Veterans
Association and Disabled War Veterans Association


the prisoners were glad to surrender
and receive food and clothing.
"There was no fight left in these peo-
ple," Spikes said. "I feel proud of what I
did in Korea, getting clothes and food to


the men in the fighting lines."
Spikes served in Korea until 1954,
eventually achieving the rank of ser-
geant. He remained in the USMC
Reserves from 1954-59.


Veterans & Service GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding each
group. For more information
about scheduled activities, meet-
ing times and date, meals and
more for a specific post or group,
call or email the contact listed.
Email changes or corrections to
community@chronicleonline.com.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, directly
behind Cadence Bank, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.


= In SERVICE


Special to the Chronicle
Former Private First Class Gustavo
Adolfo Tejeda Tejera, whose parents
Lawrence Tropf and Sor M. Tropf
live in Hernando, graduated recently
at Fort Lewis, Wash., to become a
second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.
Tejeda, who is stationed in Puerto
Rico, is assigned to the Army
National Guard there.


Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-
726-3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west
of U.S. 19 between Crystal River
and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. Call 352-
637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW


Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19.
Call 352-447-3495.
AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call 352-795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPost1l55@gmail.
corn, or visit www.flPostl 55.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call
352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077


The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers help for
veterans who have had their
post-traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied
within the past two years are asked
to contact the office to review the
case and discuss compensation/
pension examination. All vets who
have been diagnosed by the Lecanto
VA Mental Health center and have
been denied are encouraged to
contact the Citrus County


N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org
or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at
352-476-2134 or Auxiliary
president Alice Brummett at
352-476-7001.
American Legion Post 166,
meets at the Olive Tree Restau-
rant in Airport Plaza in Crystal
River. Call Commander Robert
Scott at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City.
Call 352-860-1629.
See GROUPS/Page A17


Of SPECIAL NOTE


Help available for

denied PTSD claims

Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to
discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915.
Vets will need to have their denial
letter and a copy of the compensa-
tion examination by Gainesville.
They can get a copy of the exam ei-
ther by requesting it through the VA
medical records or from the primary
care window in Lecanto.
For more information about the
Citrus County Veterans Office, log
onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least two
weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but mul-


tiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


community@chronicleonline.com.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal 0 Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event.
River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from PageA16

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498. Call JV Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at Citrus Hills Country
Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 meets at
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River. Call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959. Visit
www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.


Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call Mor-
gan Patterson at
352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.


Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997
@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence
at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, or
email charles.lawrence@
servicesource.org.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


7-28


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Veterans NOTES


Transitioning veterans
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans
who have recently transitioned from
the military (or returning reservist
from tours of active duty) to Citrus
County within the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that vet-
erans and their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an upcoming semi-
nar, which will discuss what benefits or
services they need to ease transition.
The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For
more information about the Citrus
County Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.

Hospice helping veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partnering
agency with the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs (VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is trained to
provide Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique to each
military era or war It also provides


'WE. Greystone
'^ Home Health


caregiver education and a recognition
program to honor veterans' services
and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits. Call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-527-4600.

Air Force still wants you
The U.S. Air Force is looking for
prior enlisted men and women from all
services interested in both direct duty
assignments in previously obtained ca-
reer fields or retraining into select
career fields.
Some of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas, cyber
operation fields, and various other spe-
cialties. Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to retrain
consist of special operations positions
and unmanned aerial vehicle. Assign-
ment locations are based on Air Force
needs. Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is asso-
ciated with the national service organi-
zation, Yoga For Vets. She teaches free
classes to combat veterans at several
locations and times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397.


Wonderful care!
Nurses are terrific.
PATIENT TESTIMONY


NOW ACCEPTING PATIENTS

IN CITRUS COUNTY


Services
* Physical Therapy
* Occupational Therapy
* Speech Therapy
* Skilled Nursing
* 24 Hour Nurse on Call


I am happy to recommend Greystone.
All staff were very nice & professional.
PATIENT TESTIMONY
MORE INFORMATION
888-843-4088
www.greystonehcm.com


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VETERANS


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 A17


ma




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kelli Jo Yager of
Bronson and Roger
"Dale" Quinn Jr of East-
man, Ga., exchanged nup-
tial vows April 28, 2013, by
the waterfall at Rainbow
Springs Park. The cere-
mony was performed by
Chaplain Donna Viglione
from The Wedding Chapel
in Inverness.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Kevin and Patti
Starr of Bronson. The
groom is the son Wanda
and Roger Willis of East-
man, Ga.
Matron of honor was
Cynthia Hart. Ken
Wilbrandt was the best
man.
The bride was escorted
by Austin Yager and


July 15-21, 2013
Divorces
Anna Mirra, Crystal River
vs. Michael Paoli, Crystal
River
Dennis Newbold, Inverness
vs. Helen Newbold, Inverness
Brenna Lee Ramos,
Beverly Hills vs. Johnathan H.
Ramos, Dunnellon
Christina Michelle
Stevensky, Beverly Hills vs.
Christopher James
Stevensky, Beverly Hills
Marriages
Charles Alexander Botts IV,
Inglis/Casey Summer Boase,
Crystal River


Mason Yager was the
ring-bearer
A reception followed
the wedding at the park.
The couple honeymooned
on Cedar Key


Tommy Lynn Dunn Jr.,
Millington, Tenn./Marcia Dawn
Townsend, Millington, Tenn.
Clifford Allen Poynter,
Lebanon, Ind./Corrina Marie
Rader, Lebanon, Ind.
Randall Coy Steele, Crystal
River/Traci Charlene Daniels,
Crystal River
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit
the website at www.clerk.
citrus, fl. us.


Wedding

Yager/Quinn


Wedding

Kreigan/Zeuner
Cynthia Marie Kerigan
of Inverness and David
Brian Zeuner of Clermont
exchanged nuptial vows
Saturday, June 15, 2013,
on the patio at the Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club. |
Chaplain Donna
Viglione from The Wed-
ding Chapel in Inverness
performed the Christian *
service. .,,,.
Melanie Dullaghan %
Tilton was matron of
honor and best man was
William E Shur.
The bride is a math
teacher at D.S. Parrott
Middle School in
Brooksville. Her husband-
is CEO of Sunglass The couple took a
manufacturing, com. honeymoon cruise.

First BIRTHDAY

Desiree Luzelle Tomaine
Desiree Luzelle
Tomaine celebrated her
first birthday on July 4, 4 .jc,*
2013. She is the daughter --
of Jolena and David
Tomaine of Citrus
Maternal grandparents
are Lorenzo "Wannie" "
and Linda Sanders.
Paternal grandparents i
are Reggie and Nancy
Tomaine. -
Paternal great-
grandmother is Audrey
Bennett.


David and Joan Hill of
Beverly Hills celebrated
their 60th wedding
anniversary
They were married July
25, 1953, at the Presbyte-
rian Church in Paterson,
N.J.
They are the parents of


three children: David
(deceased) and Gerry and
Stephanie, both of
Florida. The couple have
seven grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren.
The Hills are retired
and moved here 19 years
ago from New Jersey


TOTAL



Skin Care


4J
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-' "-V.,



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Moles
Rashes
Skin Rejuvination
Laser Hair Removal
Botox/Juvaderm
Facials
L Peels


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in association with
Citrus High School Marching Band
Inverness, FL
PRESENTS:






ia re aspt si i0nal

With performances by:

Shenandoah Sound Drum and Bugle Corps Woodbridge, VA

Tampa Bay Thunder Drum and Bugle Corps Tampa, FL

Sun Devils Drum and Bugle Corps Inverness, FL

Citrus HS Marching Band- Inverness, FL

Impact of Orlando Drum and Bugle Corps Orlando, FL

Florida Brass Drum and Bugle Corps Lakeland, FL


Aug. 3,2013 7:30 PM

Citrus High School
600 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452


Tickets:I !
$10 in advance
$12 at the door

For ticket information, visit: SunDevilsDrumCorps.org


Call
Now!
746-220(


SUnCOA/T DERMARTOLOGY M
AND /KIN SURGERY CENTER


Allen Ridge Professional Village
525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461


)


Participating with: Medicare, BCBS, United Healthcare,
Cigna, Humana, Aetna.


wwShoncenlnao


* Local News
SSports
* Community Content
* Feature Stories
*Stock Ticker


* Expanded coverage of arrests
* Expanded package of State and National News
* Pet of the Week
* Reader Polls
* Community Calendar


The Chronicle site is continually updated throughout the day and includes a full electronic version of the day's newspaper.


Wedding

Bull/Pelinsky
Dorothea "Dorrie"
Adelle Bull and Robert J. -
Pelinsky exchanged nup-
tial vows at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, June 5,2013,
at their home in
Homosassa.
Chaplain Donna
Viglione from The Wed- '
ding Chapel in Inverness
officiated.
Carrie L. Stiglich ,
served as matron of honor
and Steven Bull stood by
as the best man.


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Hills


For the RECORD


www.dermatologyonline.com


PH ,T RU,"r CO ITf
CRnONwILE
.wwv.h Ch~nilec'r'lricu-


A18 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


TOGETHER









SPORTS


Ryan Newman
turns in fastest lap
to top Sprint Cup
qualification for
today's race./B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


" MLB/B2
" Scoreboard/B3
" Recreational sports/B4
" Golf/B4
" Football/B5
0 Auto racing/B6


Jobe, others honored at Hall of Fame


Associated Press
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -
Former major league pitcher
Tommy John was on hand, ap-
propriately enough, as Dr
Frank Jobe was honored at the
baseball Hall of Fame on
Saturday
Jobe was recognized for his
impact on the sport. He devel-
oped the procedure known as
Tommy John surgery when he
fixed the left-hander's elbow in
1974.
A day before Hank O'Day,
Jacob Ruppert and Deacon
White were posthumously in-
ducted into the shrine, Paul
Hagen accepted the J.G. Taylor
Spink Award for meritorious
contributions to baseball writ-
ing. Tom Cheek, the late
Toronto announcer, was hon-
ored with the Ford C. Frick
Award for broadcasting.


Also honored was Thomas
Tull, the CEO of Legendary En-
tertainment and producer of
the Jackie Robinson biopic
"42."
"I can't believe I'm sitting
here next to Tommy John and
Dr Frank Jobe," Tull said. 'All
these gentlemen have done for
the game brought them to Coop-
erstown. I'm just thankful I'm
here."
Three to be inducted
posthumously into
Baseball HOF
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y One
created baseball's foremost dy-
nasty, one transformed the role of
the men in blue, and one notched
the first hit in the first professional
game.
That's the impressive legacy of
baseball pioneers Jacob Ruppert,
Hank O'Day and James "Deacon"


White, who are finally about to re-
ceive the recognition they deserve
- induction into the National Base-
ball Hall of Fame and Museum.
The three men represent the Class
of 2013 and they've all been dead for
more than 70 years, making Sun-
day's festivities something out of the
ordinary. For only the second time in
42 years, baseball writers failed to
elect anyone to the Hall of Fame,
sending a firm signal that stars of the
Steroids Era including Barry
Bonds, Sammy Sosa, and Roger
Clemens, who didn't even come
close in their first year of eligibility -
will be judged in a different light.
"When December rolled around
and the ballots were out for comple-
tion, it started to dawn on us that
there was a better-than-likely
chance that the writers might not
come to a 75 percent vote on any-
one this year," said Hall of Fame
president Jeff Idelson.


Associated Press
Dr. Frank Jobe, right, known for the development of the historic
elbow procedure known as "Tommy John Surgery," stands with
Tommy John as they are honored during a ceremony at Doubleday
Field on Saturday in Cooperstown, N.Y.


Staying


Archer tosses

shutout as Rays

keep AL East lead

Associated Press
NEW YORK Chris Archer
popped out of the dugout for the
bottom of the ninth inning and
allowed himself to take a quick
peek at left field. Yep, he saw
relievers Fernando Rodney and
Joel Peralta warming up.
Nope, he didn't care.
"I was feeling confident we
wouldn't have to go the
bullpen," the rookie said.
Boy, was he right. Archer
threw a two-hitter for his sec-
ond shutout in three starts, out-
pitching Ivan Nova and leading
the Tampa Bay Rays to a 1-0 vic-
tory over the New York Yankees
on Saturday
Kelly Johnson had an RBI
single off Nova (4-4) in the sixth
to help the AL East-leading
Rays improve to 24-5 since June
23, when they were in last place.
Tampa Bay manager Joe
Maddon said before the game
Archer (6-3) embraces the big
moments, and he sure did once
again at Yankee Stadium.
The 24-year-old right-hander
with a Captain America lunch
box in his locker never threw
more than 14 pitches in an in-
ning and needed just 97 overall
- 67 for strikes for his sec-
ond career complete game.
Even more impressive:
Archer became the first visiting
rookie to toss a complete-game
shutout in the Bronx since
Arthur Rhodes in 1992.
Archer gave up a single to
Lyle Overbay with one out in
the fifth and a ground-rule dou-
ble to Brett Gardner in the sixth
for New York's only hits in its
sixth loss in nine games since
the All-Star break.
"I don't feel helpless," Yan-
kees manager Joe Girardi said.
"I still believe in these guys. I
see how they go about their
business."
Archer did not walk a batter
and struck out six. After catch-


on top


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Yunel Escobar throws out the New York Yankees' Eduardo Nunez at first
base during the third inning Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York.
ing Ichiro Suzuki's comebacker rence: the starting five's group was also the Rays' sixth shutout
and tossing to first for the final chest bump reserved for com- in July, a club record.
out, Tampa Bay's starters met in plete-game victories. "To follow the other starters
front of the mound for what is Archer's gem was the team's in the bunch makes it easier for
becoming a common occur- third in six games this week. It me," Archer said.


Red Sox


keep pace


with win

Boston still just

112 game behind

Rays in AL East

Associated Press
BALTIMORE Stephen
Drew hit two homers, drove in
five runs and scored three
times to power the Boston Red
Sox past the Baltimore Orioles
7-3 on Saturday night.
Shane Victorino also con-
nected for the Red Sox, who
won for only the fourth time in
10 games to remain a half-game
behind first-place Tampa Bay
in the AL East. Boston stood
atop the AL East for 60 straight
days before falling into second
on Friday night.
Red Sox slugger David Ortiz
was ejected from the game in
the seventh inning by home
plate umpire Tim Timmons for
arguing a called strike during an
at-bat that ended in a strikeout
Ortiz destroyed the covers of
two dugout phones with his bat,
then charged onto the field and
had to be restrained by man-
ager John Farrell and bench
coach Torey Lovullo. Ortiz fi-
nally relented, but as a final
gesture he threw an elbow pad
in Timmons' direction.
The shattered pieces of plas-
tic rained on teammate Dustin
Pedroia, who finally yelled,
'Stop!' at the enraged Ortiz.
Starting for the sixth time
since coming off the disabled
list with a strained hamstring,
Drew hit a three-run shot in the
fourth inning and connected
with a man on in the sixth. It
was his second career two-
homer game, and the five RBIs
tied a career high. He came in
batting .223 with five homers
and 32 RBIs in 71 games.
Ryan Dempster (6-8) gave up
two runs in 5 1/3 innings to earn
his first win in five starts since
June 30. His previous four starts
were no-decisions.
Both of Drew's homers came
off Scott Feldman (2-2).


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-111




MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Tampa Bay
Boston
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC
6 - S
0 1/2 --
2 4/2 --
9 8 3/2
6 14 /2 10


East Division
GB WC


NL

Braves 2, Cardinals 0
St. Louis Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt2b 4 00 0 Heywrd cf 3 00 0
Beltran rf 4 00 0 J.Upton rf 4 0 1 0
Hollidylf 4 0 1 0 FFrmnlb 2 1 0 0
Craig 1 b 2 0 0 0 Gattisl If 4 0 1 0
YMolin c 3 00 0 Kimrelp 0 0 0 0
Freese3b 3 0 0 0 McCnnc 4 1 2 0
Manessp 0 0 0 0 Uggla2b 3 00 0
Choatep 0 00 0 CJhnsn3b 3 02 0
Rosnthlp 0 00 0 Smmnsss 4 02 2
Jay cf 3 0 1 0 Tehernp 2 00 0
Descalsss 3 00 0 Trdslvc ph 1 0 1 0
J.Kellyp 2 00 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0
Kozma ss 1 0 0 0 Constnz ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 29 02 0 Totals 31 2 9 2
St. Louis 000 000 000 0
Atlanta 000 000 02x 2
DP-St. Louis 2. LOB-St. Louis 3, Atlanta 10.
2B-Holliday (16), Jay (14), Simmons (12), Ter-
doslavich (2).
IP H RERBBSO


St. Louis
J.Kelly 61/37
Maness 2/3 0
Choate L,1-1 1/3 1
Rosenthal 2/3 1
Atlanta
Teheran 7 2
AvilanW,3-0 1 0
Kimbrel S,30-33 1 0
Nationals 4,


NewYork

EYong If
DnMrp2b
DWrght 3b
Byrd rf
I.Davis lb
Buckc
Lagars cf
Quntnll ss
Gee p
Satin ph
Edgin p
Atchisn p
Totals
NewYork
Washingti


Washil


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0 Harper If
4 0 1 0 Rendon2b
S4 02 1 Zmrmn3b
4 00 0 AdLRclb
4 0 0 0 Werth rf
3 00 0 Dsmndss
3 00 0 Span cf
2 00 0 WRamsc
1 0 0 0 Harenp
1 0 0 0 Berndn ph
0 0 0 0 Clipprd p
0 0 0 0 RSorin p
30 14 1 Totals
000 001 000
on 022 000 OOx


033
0 3 3
0 0 0
2 1 1
0 1 2


Str Home Away
W-3 34-19 28-23
W-1 34-19 28-24
L-1 30-21 28-26
L-2 28-25 26-25
L-1 27-28 20-28



Str Home Away
W-2 33-15 26-30
W-2 30-25 21-29
L-7 26-21 23-34
L-2 21-30 25-25
L-1 22-28 17-35


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
45 .563 7
48 .534 3 2 6
51 .495 7 6 7
56 .446 12 11 7
61 .396 17 16 3


Str Home
W-2 31-19
W-3 32-19
W-5 27-24
W-2 23-24
L-2 22-27


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 62 39 .614 6-4 L-2 32-17 30-22
Pittsburgh 61 41 .598 1/2 5-5 W-1 32-18 29-23
Cincinnati 59 45 .567 4/2 7-3 L-1 32-17 27-28
Chicago 46 55 .455 16 11/2 5-5 W-1 22-26 24-29
Milwaukee 42 60 .412 20/2 16 5-5 L-2 26-29 16-31


W
Oakland 61
Texas 56
Seattle 49
Los Angeles 48
Houston 35


Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
43 .587 6
48 .538 5 1/2 :
55 .471 12 81/2
54 .471 12 81/2
68 .340 25/2 22 :


West Division
L Pct GB WC


Str Home
W-2 32-16
L-3 29-24
L-2 28-28
L-2 27-28
W-1 18-37



Str Home
W-1 28-24
W-2 30-22
W-1 30-25
L-2 28-25
L-1 27-23


Philadelphia Detroit
ab r h bi
MYong3b 2 0 0 0 AJcksncf
SusdorflIf 2 0 0 0 TrHntrrf
Frndsn 1 b-2b4 0 1 0 Dirks pr-rf
Rollinsss 2 0 0 0 MiCarr3b
JMcDnl ss 1 0 0 0 RSantg 3b
Utley 2b 2 0 0 0 Fielder lb
Mayrrycf 1 0 0 0 D.Kellylb
DYongdh 3 0 0 0 VMrtnzdh
Rufl If-lb 2 0 1 0 JhPerltss
L.Nix rf 3 0 0 0 Tuiassp If
Kratz c 3 00 0 HPerez2b
Mrtnzcf-3b 3 0 0 0 Avilac
Totals 28 02 0 Totals
Philadelphia 000 000 000
Detroit 530 110 00x


B2 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


Tampa Bay
Archer W,6-3
NewYork
Nova L,4-4
D.Robertson
Kelley


Associated Press
Atla^nta DRrapAq flQjfrtf-tnn A ndrpiljtn C immjnnf i-qf (jrj^^^r miti4 at+ Alr-4 ha-qp/ h C4t I jniiif Ca*rdinakl Alr-41 1ha^qpmanr


920006
761138
110002
110002
9 2 0 0 0 6

7 6 1 1 3 8
1 1 0 0 0 2
1 1 0 0 0 2


A's 3, Angels 1
Los Angeles Oakland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Shuck If 4 00 0 Crisp cf 4 1 2 0
Cowgillrf 4 0 1 0 Lowriess 4 01 1
Trout cf 3 0 1 0 Dnldsn3b 3 00 0
Trumolb 4 0 0 0 Mosslb 3 0 1 0
HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 0 Cespds dh 3 00 0
Hamltndh 4 1 1 1 Reddckrf 3 01 0
Callasp3b 3 0 1 0 CYoungl If 4 1 0 0
lannettc 1 0 0 0 Vogtc 2 00 0
Congerph 1 00 0 DNorrsph-c 1 1 1 2
Aybarss 3 00 0 Sogard 2b 3 0 1 0
Totals 31 151 Totals 30 3 7 3
Los Angeles 010 000 000 1
Oakland 000 000 30x 3
DP-Los Angeles 1, Oakland 1. LOB-Los An-
geles 7, Oakland 7. 2B-Lowrie (25). HR-
Hamilton (15), D.Norris (7). SB Trout (23).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Richards 5 3 0 0 2 4
D.DeLaRosaH,9 11/31 1 1 1 2
S.DownsL,2-3 1/3 3 2 2 0 1
Jepsen 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
Blanton 1 0 0 0 0 0


0 0 1 6 t R*arII "Ia.s I IU II J****** .O IO ,IUmi J i ;o UUt. CtL *IIOL OU y .L.. LOUUIO ,C IIICIO IIOL MOOI IIIll Oakland
0 0 0 1 AlIen Craig during the fourth inning Saturday at Turner Reld in Atlanta. The Braves scored a 2-0 triumph. MiloneW,9-8 7 4 1 1 4 6
0 0 0 1 CookH,1 1 1 0 0 0 2
Metsb lt Balfour 28-29 1 0 0 0 0 0
Mt1At
ngton ia t o i


ab r h bi


E-Rendon (11). DP Washington 1. LOB-
NewYork 4, Washington 2.2B-Haren (3). HR-
Harper (15), Desmond (16), Span (1).
SB-E.Young (21). S-Gee.
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Gee L,7-8
Edgin
Atchison
Washington
Haren W,5-11
Clippard H,19
R.Soriano S,26-30


7 6 4
1/3 0 0
2/3 0 0

7 3 1
1 0 0
1 1 0


Pirates 7, Marlins 4
Pittsburgh Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
SMartel If 5 22 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 0 0
Walker2b 5 23 2 Yelichl If 5 2 2 0
McCtchcf 4 1 2 0 Stantonrf 4 1 3 1
PAIvrz3b 5 1 1 1 Morrsnlb 4 1 3 1
GJoneslb 4 1 2 2 DSolan2b 4 0 1 1
JuWIsnp 0 0 0 0 Polanc3b 4 0 1 1
Morrisp 1 00 0 Mrsnckcf 3 0 1 0
Watsonp 0 0 0 0 Brantlyc 4 0 0 0
Barmesss 0 0 0 0 Koehlerp 2 00 0
McKnr c 5 04 2 Webbp 0 00 0
Snider rf 3 00 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0
Tabataph-rf2 00 0 DJnngsp 0 00 0
Mercerss 3 00 0 Dobbsph 1 00 0
Melncnp 0 00 0 ARamsp 0 00 0
Mortonp 3 000
GSnchz lb 1 0 0 0
Totals 41 7147 Totals 36411 4
Pittsburgh 302 001 010 7
Miami 103 000 000 4
E-McCutchen (4), S.Marte (5). DP-Pittsburgh
2. LOB-Pittsburgh 10, Miami 9. 2B-S.Marte
(21), Walker 2 (14), G.Jones (21), McKenry (6),
Stanton (14). 3B-McCutchen (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
Morton W,3-2 5 9 4
Ju.WilsonH,10 12/31 0
Morris H,3 1 0 0
Watson H,14 1/3 0 0
Melancon S,4-5 1 1 0
Miami
Koehler L,2-6 5 9 5
Webb 1 2 1
Da.Jennings 2 3 1
A.Ramos 1 0 0
HBP-by Morton (Morrison).WP-


536
1 0 2
1 0 2
0 0 0
-Da.Jennings.


ab r h bi
4000
4231
4 2 3 1
0000
3223
2000
4110
1000
4132
4121
4113
4110
4120
38101510
-0
4 1 0
1 0 0 0
4 1 3 2
4 1 2 1
4 1 1 3
4 1 1 0
4 1 2 0
38101510
0
-10


E-L.Nix (1). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Philadelphia
2, Detroit 6.2B-Ruf (5), Tor.Hunter (25), V.Mar-
tinez (23). HR-Mi.Cabrera (32), Tuiasosopo (7).
SF Tor.Hunter.
IP H RERBBSO


Philadelphia
Valdes L,1-1
J.Ramirez
Diekman
De Fratus
Detroit
ScherzerW,15-1
Alburquerque
E.Reed
WP-Valdes.


32/312 9
21/32 1
1 0 0
1 1 0


Associated Press

ATLANTA Andrelton Sim-
mons hit a two-run double in the
eighth inning and the Atlanta
Braves, boosted by Julio Teherafn's
sharp outing, beat the St. Louis
Cardinals 2-0 Saturday in a
matchup of NL division leaders.
Teheran allowed two hits in
seven innings, striking out six and
walking one.
Simmons' bases-loaded, two-
out double came on a 99 mph fast-
ball from Trevor Rosenthal.
Randy Choate (1-1) walked
Freddie Freeman to open the
eighth. Evan Gattis struck out and
Brian McCann singled. Rosenthal
relieved and struck out Dan Uggla
before walking Chris Johnson to
load the bases.
Luis Avilan (3-0) pitched a per-
fect eighth and Craig Kimbrel
recorded three outs to earn his
30th save.
Cardinals starter Joe Kelly
pitched 6 1/3 scoreless innings.
National League

Nationals 4, Mets 1
WASHINGTON Bryce Harper,
lan Desmond and Denard Span all
homered, powering the Washington
Nationals to a 4-1 win over the New
York Mets.
Dan Haren (5-11) pitched seven in-
nings for his first win since May 9, al-
lowing one run and three hits.
Desmond and Span hit back-to-
back homers against Dillon Gee (7-8)
in the second inning and Harper fol-
lowed with a two-run drive in the third.
Despite a tumultuous week, which
included the Nationals firing their hit-
ting coach and demoting former closer
Drew Storen to the minors, Washing-
ton has won three of four games after
dropping six straight following the All-
Star break.

Pirates 7, Marlins 4
MIAMI Michael McKenry had a ca-
reer-best four hits and drove in two runs,
Neil Walker and Garrett Jones each
added two RBIs, and the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates beat the Miami Marlins 7-4.
McKenry, who came into the night
batting .191, raised his average 26
points with a double and three singles.
Walker added three hits for the Pi-
rates, the NL wild-card leaders who
set the tone with three first-inning runs
against Miami's Tom Koehler (2-6).
Charlie Morton (3-2) allowed a sea-
son-high nine hits in five innings, still
finding a way to win consecutive starts
for the first time since May 2011. Mark
Melancon worked the ninth for his
fourth save.
Koehler gave up nine hits and five
runs in five innings.

American League

Athletics 3, Angels 1
OAKLAND, Calif. Derek Norris
had a pinch-hit two-run home run in
the bottom of the seventh inning in the
Oakland Athletics' 3-1 victory over the
Los Angeles Angels.
Jed Lowrie also drove in a run for
the A's, who won their second straight
and five of seven overall. Coco Crisp
added two hits.
Tommy Milone (9-8) allowed four
hits over seven innings, allowing one
run. He walked four and struck out six.
Josh Hamilton hit a booming home
run for the Angels, who lost their sec-
ond straight and five of seven overall.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Baltimore 6, Boston 0
Tampa Bay 10, N.YYankees 6
Cleveland 11, Texas 8, 11 innings
Toronto 12, Houston 6
Detroit 2, Philadelphia 1
Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 1
Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 4
Minnesota 3, Seattle 2, 13 innings
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 1, N.Y Yankees 0
Houston 8, Toronto 6
Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 1
Minnesota 4, Seattle 0
Boston 7, Baltimore 3
Cleveland 1, Texas 0
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 0
Kansas City 1, Chicago White Sox 0
Today
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 14-3) at N.Y Yankees
(PHughes 4-9), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 4-2) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez 7-5),
1:05 p.m.
Houston (Cosart 1-0) atToronto (Redmond 1-1), 1:07
p.m.
Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-4) at Detroit (Porcello 7-6),
1:08 p.m.
Boston (Lester 9-6) at Baltimore (Hammel 7-7), 1:35
p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 4-0) at Chicago White Sox
(H.Santiago 3-6), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Hanson 4-2) at Oakland (J.Parker 6-6),
4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 2-2) at Seattle (E.Ramirez 1-0),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 6:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y Mets 11, Washington 0,1st game
Washington 2, N.Y Mets 1, 2nd game
Detroit 2, Philadelphia 1
Miami 2, Pittsburgh 0
Atlanta 4, St. Louis 1
Colorado 8, Milwaukee 3
Arizona 10, San Diego 0
L.A. Dodgers 2, Cincinnati 1
Chicago Cubs 3, San Francisco 2
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, N.Y Mets 1
Atlanta 2, St. Louis 0
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 7, Miami 4
Milwaukee at Colorado, late
San Diego at Arizona, late
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, late
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today
Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-4) at Detroit (Porcello 7-6),
1:08 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 5-3) at Miami (Fernandez 6-5), 1:10
p.m.
N.Y Mets (C.Torres 1-1) at Washington (Jordan 0-3),
1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (TWood 6-7) at San Francisco (Lince-
cum 5-10), 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cingrani 4-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano
3-6), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (D.Hand 0-2) at Colorado (Chacin 9-5),
4:10 p.m.
San Diego (TRoss 1-4) atArizona (Corbin 12-1), 4:10
p.m.
St. Louis (S.Miller 10-6) at Atlanta (Medlen 6-10), 8:05
p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.


Grant Richards, making his first
start since April 30, pitched five
shutout innings. He gave up three hits,
walked two and struck out four.

Twins 4, Mariners 0
SEATTLE Brian Dozier and
Justin Morneau homered, Samuel De-
duno pitched seven scoreless innings
and the Minnesota Twins blanked the
Seattle Mariners 4-0.
It was the fifth shutout of the season
for Minnesota, which has won four of
its last six games and is 6-3 since the
All Star break.
Brad Miller and Kyle Seager each
had two hits for Seattle, which has lost
three of four.
Deduno (7-4) allowed three hits,
walked three and tied his season high
with six strikeouts. He has thrown
seven innings in each of his last three
starts, winning all three.


Aaron Harang (5-9) threw 105
pitches in five innings, the ninth time in
17 starts he has gone five innings or
less. Harang gave up one run on
three hits in five innings, struck out
five and walked two.

Astros 8, Blue Jays 6
TORONTO Chris Carter hit a
three-run home run, Justin Maxwell
and Matt Dominguez added solo
shots and the Houston Astros beat the
Toronto Blue Jays 8-6 on Saturday to
snap a three-game losing streak.
Dallas Keuchel (5-5) pitched a sea-
son-high 7 1/3 innings to end a six-
start winless skid. He allowed six runs
and 10 hits, walked one and struck out
six for his first victory since June 16.
Jose Veras got the final five outs for
his 19th save in 22 chances.

Indians 1, Rangers 0
CLEVELAND Michael Bourn
homered to lead off the first inning and
Justin Masterson took a shutout into
the eighth inning, outdueling Texas'Yu
Darvish in the Cleveland Indians' 1-0
win over the Rangers.
Masterson (12-7), an American
League All-Star, struck out eight and
allowed five hits in 7 2/3 innings. That
was enough to beat Darvish (9-5),
who struck out 11 and held the Indians
to three hits in six innings.
Darvish's only mistake came on his
second pitch of the game when Bourn
hit a line drive that barely cleared the
wall in right field.
Chris Perez pitched the ninth for his
14th save. Masterson retired the first
two hitters in the eighth but was pulled
after Nelson Cruz's two-out single.

Royals 1, White Sox 0
CHICAGO Wade Davis pitched
four-hit ball into the eighth inning and
the Kansas City Royals beat Chris
Sale and the Chicago White Sox 1-0
for their fifth consecutive victory.
Davis (5-9) allowed four hits all
singles and walked three in his
longest outing of the season.
Louis Coleman came in after Ale-
jandro De Aza's one-out single in the
eighth and gotAlexei Ramirez to
ground into a double play. Greg Hol-
land worked a shaky ninth for his 26th
save in 28 chances.
It was another hard-luck loss for
Sale (6-10), who allowed seven hits
and struck out seven in eight innings.
The All-Star left-hander is 1-8 with a
2.88 ERA in his last 10 starts.
Billy Butler and Eric Hosmer had
two hits apiece for the Royals, who
have won seven of nine overall.

Interleague

Tigers 10, Phillies 0
DETROIT-- Miguel Cabrera home-
red in his first at-bat after returning
from a hip injury and Max Scherzer
held Philadelphia to one hit in six in-
nings to become baseball's first 15-
game winner as the Detroit Tigers
routed the Phillies 10-0.
The Phillies lost their seventh in a row.
Scherzer (15-1) threw only 75 pitches
- he was one of several stars pulled
early after the game got out of hand.
Detroit scored five runs in the first
and three in the second off Raul Valdes
(1-1), who started because Cliff Lee
was out with a stiff neck. Cabrera's
solo homer in the first was his 32nd of
the year, and he later added two more
RBIs to increase his season total to 99.
Matt Tuiasosopo hit a three-run
homer in the first.


Houston

Villar ss
Altuve 2b
Elmore 2b
JCastro c
Carter dh
Wallac lb
Krauss If
MaxwllI rf
MDmn3b
BBarns cf
Totals
Houston
Toronto


Toronto
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


2 1 0 Reyesss 4 1 1 0
1 1 0 MeCarrl If 4 22 0
0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 1 2 3
1 1 1 Encrnclb 4 04 1
1 1 3 Linddh 4 0 0 0
0 1 1 DeRosa2b 3 1 1 1
0 0 0 Mlztursph-2b1 0 0 0
2 11 CIRsmscf 4 1 1 1
1 2 2 Arencii c 3 0 0 0
00 0 Lawrie3b 4 00 0
88 8 Totals 35611 6
400 201 100 8
110 010 030 6


DP-Houston 3. LOB-Houston 4, Toronto 3.
HR-Carter (19), Maxwell (2), M.Dominguez
(13), Bautista (24), DeRosa (7), Col.Rasmus
(17). SB-Villar 2 (3), Maxwell (4). CS-Villar
(2).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
KeuchelW,5-5 71/310 6 6 1 6
VerasS,19-22 12/31 0 0 0 0
Toronto
Jo.JohnsonL,1-7 52/37 7 7 2 8
J.Perez 21/31 1 1 2 4
Oliver 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Jo.Johnson (Maxwell). WP-Keuchel

Indians 1, Rangers 0
Texas Cleveland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 3 00 0 Bourn cf 2 1 1 1
EBeltrelf 4 02 0 Swisherib 4 00 0
N.Cruzrf 4 0 1 0 Kipnis2b 4 0 0 0
ABeltre3b 3 0 0 0 ACarerss 4 0 1 0
Przynsdh 4 00 0 Brantlyl If 3 0 1 0
Andrusss 4 0 1 0 CSantnc 2 00 0
Morlndlb 4 00 0 Giambidh 3 00 0
G.Sotoc 3 0 1 0 Chsnhll3b 1 00 0
LMartn cf 3 0 0 0 Aviles ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Stubbsrf 3 00 0
Totals 32 05 0 Totals 271 3 1
Texas 000 000 000 0
Cleveland 100 000 OOx 1
LOB-Texas 7, Cleveland 6. 2B-Brantley (15).
HR-Bourn (4). SB-A.Cabrera 2 (7), Brantley
(11), C.Santana (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Darvish L,9-5 6 3 1 1 4 11
Cotts 2 0 0 0 0 2
Cleveland
MastersonW,12-7 72/35 0 0 1 8
J.SmithH,12 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
CPerezS,14-16 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Masterson (Kinsler).

Red Sox 7, Orioles 3
Boston Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Ellsurycf 5 0 1 0 McLoth If 4 0 2 0
Victorn rf 5 1 1 2 Machd3b 4 00 0
Pedroia2b 4 0 0 0 Markksrf 4 1 1 0
D.Ortizdh 2 00 0 A.Jonescf 4 1 1 0
BSnydrdh 1 0 0 0 C.Davislb 3 0 1 0
Napolilb 4 0 0 0 Wietersc 4 00 1
Carp If 4 1 3 0 Hardyss 4 12 1
Navapr-lf 0 0 0 0 Urrutiadh 4 01 0
Sltlmchc 4 2 1 0 BRorts2b 4 01 1
Drewss 4 335
Iglesias3b 4 0 1 0
Totals 37 7107 Totals 35 3 9 3
Boston 001 302 100 7
Baltimore 000 011 010 3
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Boston 6, Baltimore 9.
2B-Carp (14), McLouth (22). HR-Victorino (5),
Drew 2 (7). SB-Ellsbury (38), Iglesias (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
DempsterW,6-8 51/36 2 2 2 4
Breslow 12/30 0 0 0 0
Tazawa 1 2 1 1 1 0
Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
FeldmanL,2-2 5 6 4 4 2 1
Patton 1 2 2 2 0 1
Asencio 1 1 1 1 0 2
Matusz 1 1 0 0 0 1
Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Breslow (McLouth).


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
July 28 at N.Y Yankees
July 29 at Boston
July 30 vs Arizona
July 31 vs Arizona
Aug. 2 vs San Francisco
Aug. 3 vs San Francisco
Aug. 4 vs San Francisco
Aug. 6 at Arizona
Aug. 7 at Arizona
Aug. 9 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 10 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 11 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 13 vs Seattle
Aug. 14 vs Seattle
Aug. 15 vs Seattle
Aug. 16 vs Toronto
Aug. 17 vs Toronto
Aug. 18 vs Toronto
Aug. 19 at Baltimore


Interleague

Tigers 10, Phillies 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 1, Yankees 0
Tampa Bay NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DJnngscf 5 0 1 0 Gardnrcf 4 0 1 0
Longori3b 5 0 1 0 ISuzukirf 4 00 0
WMyrsrf 4 0 1 0 Cano2b 3 00 0
Loneylb 3 02 0 ASorindh 3 00 0
Zobrist2b 4 1 1 0 Overaylb 3 0 1 0
Joycedh 3 0 0 0 V.Wells If 3 0 0 0
KJhnsnlf 4 0 1 1 Nunezss 3 0 0 0
Fuld If 0 0 0 0 Lillirdg 3b 3 0 0 0
JMolinc 3 0 0 0 CStwrtc 3 00 0
YEscorss 4 0 1 0
Totals 35 18 1 Totals 29 0 2 0
Tampa Bay 000 001 000 1
NewYork 000 000 000 0
E-Longoria (6). DP Tampa Bay 1. LOB-
Tampa Bay 10, NewYork 2. 2B W.Myers (7),
YEscobar(17), Gardner (23). SB-Zobrist(9).
IP H RERBBSO




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




PGA Tour

Canadian Open
Saturday
At Glen Abbey Golf Club, Oakville, Ontario
Purse: $5.6 million
Yardage: 7,253, Par: 72
Third Round
a-amateur
Brandt Snedeker 70-69-63 -202 -14
David Lingmerth 67-71-65 -203 -13
Matt Kuchar 66-74-64 -204 -12
Jason Bohn 70-68-66 -204 -12
Dustin Johnson 75-67-63 205 -11
Kyle Stanley 68-71-66 -205 -11
Greg Owen 70-68-67 205 -11
Charley Hoffman 69-69-67 205 -11
John Merrick 71-62-72 -205 -11
MarkWilson 70-69-67 -206 -10
Roberto Castro 69-70-67 -206 -10
James Hahn 69-68-69 206 -10
Patrick Reed 68-68-70 -206 -10
Trevor Immelman 68-73-66 -207 -9
Fabian Gomez 72-68-67 207 -9
William McGirt 71-69-67 207 -9
Jeff Maggert 72-67-68 207 -9
Alistair Presnell 72-67-68 207 -9
Jim Furyk 72-67-68 207 -9
Bubba Watson 68-67-72 -207 -9
Vijay Singh 69-73-66 208 -8
Greg Chalmers 73-68-67 208 -8
Chris Kirk 68-69-71 208 -8
Charl Schwartzel 73-70-66 209 -7
Chad Campbell 71-72-66 209 -7
Matt Every 71-71-67 -209 -7
Chez Reavie 68-73-68 209 -7
Jason Kokrak 72-68-69 209 -7
Hideki Matsuyama 69-69-71 -209 -7
James Driscoll 69-69-71 209 -7
Aaron Baddeley 68-68-73 209 -7
Justin Leonard 71-72-67 -210 -6
Ernie Els 71-72-67 -210 -6
Marcel Siem 71-70-69 -210 -6
Richard H. Lee 72-69-69 -210 -6
David Mathis 71-69-70 -210 -6
Casey Wittenberg 71-69-70- 210 -6
Andres Romero 69-70-71 -210 -6
Justin Hicks 72-71-68 -211 -5
Nicholas Thompson 73-70-68 -211 -5
David Hearn 70-73-68 -211 -5
YE.Yang 75-68-68-211 -5
Stuart Appleby 69-73-69 -211 -5
Luke List 72-69-70 -211 -5
Morgan Hoffmann 70-70-71 -211 -5
Rory Sabbatini 69-71-71 -211 -5
Tommy Gainey 73-64-74 -211 -5
Kevin Chappell 68-75-69 -212 -4
Jeff Gove 71-70-71 -212 -4
Cameron Beckman 70-71-71 -212 -4
Billy Horschel 71-69-72 -212 -4
Ryan Palmer 70-70-72 -212 -4
J.J. Henry 73-67-72 -212 -4
Cameron Tringale 72-67-73 -212 -4
Andrew Svoboda 71-72-70 -213 -3
Gary Woodland 69-72-72 -213 -3
Sang-Moon Bae 71-70-72 -213 -3
Tim Petrovic 71-69-73 -213 -3
Scott Verplank 72-68-73 -213 -3
Mike Weir 73-67-73-213 -3
CamiloVillegas 74-65-74 -213 -3
Steve LeBrun 73-70-71 -214 -2
Scott Langley 71-72-71 -214 -2
Roger Sloan 71-71-72-214 -2
Cameron Percy 71-70-73 -214 -2
Brendan Steele 65-75-74 -214 -2
Will Claxton 69-74-72 -215 -1
Brian Gay 72-71-72 -215 -1
Scott Piercy 71-71-73 -215 -1
Bob Estes 73-68-74 -215 -1
Robert Allenby 72-69-74 -215 -1
Scott Gardiner 66-74-75 -215 -1
Scott Brown 66-72-77 -215 -1
Made cut did not finish
Graeme McDowell 76-65-76 -217 +1
Seung-Yul Noh 70-73-75 -218 +2
Brian Stuard 72-71-75 -218 +2
Ryo Ishikawa 72-71-80 -223 +7

Senior British Open
Saturday
At Royal Birkdale, Southport, England
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 7,082, Par: 70
Third Round
a-amateur
Bernhard Langer 68-67-68 201 -9
David Frost 68-68-68 204 -6
MarkWiebe 70-65-70 -205 -5
Sandy Lyle 70-68-69 207 -3
Peter Fowler 69-68-70 207 -3
Gene Sauers 67-70-70 207 -3
Peter Senior 68-71-69 -208 -2
Corey Pavin 69-71-69 -209 -1
Steve Pate 70-72-68 -210 E
Gary Wolstenholme 70-72-68 -210 E
Steve Elkington 72-68-71 -211 +1
Jeff Hart 69-69-73 -211 +1
Miguel Angel Martin 72-75-65 -212 +2
Colin Montgomerie 72-71-69 -212 +2
Tom Pernice Jr. 70-72-70 -212 +2
Kohki Idoki 71-68-73 -212 +2
Steve Jones 73-70-70 -213 +3
Rod Spittle 71-72-70 -213 +3
Tom Kite 70-72-71 -213 +3
Rocco Mediate 70-68-75 -213 +3
Mark McNulty 70-67-76 -213 +3
Fred Couples 74-72-68 -214 +4
Des Smyth 76-69-69 -214 +4
Russ Cochran 71-73-70 -214 +4
Jamie Spence 75-69-70 -214 +4
Tom Lehman 72-72-70 -214 +4
Larry Mize 71-73-70 -214 +4
Mark O'Meara 74-68-72 -214 +4
Barry Lane 72-68-74 -214 +4
Greg Turner 70-69-75 -214 +4
Peter Mitchell 75-72-68 -215 +5
BobTway 74-72-69 -215 +5
SteenTinning 71-74-71 -216 +6
Anders Forsbrand 73-70-73 -216 +6
KatsuyoshiTomori 71-72-73-216 +6
John Inman 71-76-70 -217 +7
Eduardo Romero 75-70-72 -217 +7
Pedro Linhart 73-72-72 -217 +7
Michael Allen 75-70-72 -217 +7
David J. Russell 72-73-72 -217 +7
Carl Mason 74-70-73 -217 +7
Tom Watson 73-71-73 -217 +7
Gary Hallberg 69-75-73 -217 +7
Brad Faxon 74-69-74 -217 +7
a-Chip Lutz 71-71-75 -217 +7
Kirk Hanefeld 73-75-70 -218 +8
Duffy Waldorf 76-72-70 -218 +8
Mark James 74-73-71 -218 +8
Santiago Luna 72-74-72 -218 +8
Frankie Minoza 68-78-72 -218 +8
Jeff Sluman 71-75-72 -218 +8


WillieWood 75-71-72-218 +8
Dick Mast 72-73-73 -218 +8
Seiki Okuda 73-72-73 -218 +8
Mike Goodes 71-74-73 -218 +8
Lu Chien Soon 71-77-71 -219 +9
Philip Golding 74-74-71 -219 +9
Bruce Vaughan 73-74-72 -219 +9
Boonchu Ruangkit 73-73-73 -219 +9
Bill Longmuir 73-69-77 -219 +9
MarkCalcavecchia 75-72-73 -220 +10
Mark Brooks 74-73-73 -220 +10
Esteban Toledo 74-72-74 -220 +10
Paul Wesselingh 70-76-74 -220 +10
John Cook 69-79-73 221 +11
Joe Daley 75-73-73 221 +11
Peter Dahlberg 76-72-73 221 +11
Massy Kuramoto 70-77-74 221 +11
Andrew Oldcorn 74-72-75 221 +11
PhilipWalton 70-76-75 -221 +11
Hendrik Buhrmann 76-72-75 -223 +13
Mitch Kierstenson 74-72-77 -223 +13
Fred Funk 75-71-78 -224 +14
Phil Gresswell 74-71-79 -224 +14


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 B3


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
0 m~9-7-8
CASH 3 (late)
4-9-7


POWERBALL
9-23-40-53-58
POWER BALL
6


PLAY 4 (early)
3-8-6-2
PLAY 4 (late)
9-3-5-2

FANTASY 5
6 11 14 18 33

LOTTERY
6-10-18-27-28-51
XTRA
5


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 1 4 29 -43
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $642.00
3-of-4 MB 29 $436.50
3-of-4 793 $47.50
2-of-4 MB 1,078 $24.00
1-of-4 MB 9,503 $2.50
2-of-4 23,010 $2.00


Fantasy 5:10 -14 -15 -28 -29
5-of-5 3 winners $71,474.63
4-of-5 312 $110.50
3-of-5 9,017 $10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Magyar Magydij race
1 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Samuel Deeds 400 at the Brickyard race
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) GP2 Series (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Sonoma Nationals (Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Samuel Deeds 400 at the Brickyard
race (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Pittsburgh Pirates at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Boston Red Sox at Baltimore Orioles
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at San Francisco Giants
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Atlanta Braves
GOLF
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Senior Open Championship, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: RBC Canadian Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: RBC Canadian Open, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Albertsons Boise Open, Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
3:30 p.m. (FOX, UNI) CONCACAF Gold Cup final: United States vs.
Panama
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2)ATP U.S. Open Series: BB&TAtlanta Open final
5 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA U.S. Open Series: Bank of the West Classic
final

RADIO
BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:05 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Sprint Cup

Brickyard 400 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race today
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 187.531 mph.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 187.438.
3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 187.157.
4. (11)Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 187.122.
5. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 186.827.
6. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 186.722.
7. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 186.633.
8. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 186.536.
9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 186.474.
10. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 186.281.
11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 185.954.
12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 185.92.
13. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 185.789.
14. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 185.655.
15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 185.621.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 185.448.
17. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 185.437.
18. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 185.181.
19. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 185.101.
20. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 184.961.
21. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 184.794.
22. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 184.676.
23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 184.646.
24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 184.593.
25. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 184.536.
26. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 184.305.
27. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 184.045.
28. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 183.906.
29. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 183.816.
30.(13) Casey Mears, Ford, 183.752.
31. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 183.329.
32. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 183.046.
33.(10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 182.938.
34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 182.826.
35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 182.819.
36. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 182.448.
37. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, owner points.
38. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, owner points.
39. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, owner points.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner points.
41. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, owner points.
42. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner points.
43.(32)Timmy Hill, Ford, owner points.
Failed to Qualify
44.(19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 181.881.
45. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 177.235.

Nationwide Series

Indiana 250 Results
Saturday
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis, Ind.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 100 laps, 150 rating, 0
points, $69,625.
2. (11) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 100, 110.4, 43,
$58,444.
3. (13) Joey Logano, Ford, 100, 107.4, 0, $40,050.
4. (6) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 100, 109.7, 41, $41,453.
5. (15) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 100, 105.8, 0,


$31,575.
6. (10) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 100,98.3,0, $28,000.
7. (9) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 100, 118.4, 0, $26,575.
8.(18) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 100, 82.4, 36, $33,128.
9. (19) Michael Annett, Ford, 100, 85.8, 35, $31,628.
10. (39)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 100, 75.2, 34, $31,603.
11. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 100, 76.1, 33,
$29,953.
12. (7) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 100, 87.1, 32,
$29,703.
13. (4) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 100, 87.6, 31, $30,428.
14. (8) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 100, 78.9, 30,
$29,078.
15. (38)Alex Bowman, Toyota, 100, 62.4, 29, $29,828.
16. (3)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 100, 105.3, 29, $30,953.
17. (22) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 100, 71.1,27, $28,553.
18. (5) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 100, 83, 26,
$28,403.
19. (16) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 100, 82.5, 25,
$28,203.
20. (23) Kyle Fowler, Ford, 100, 53.6, 24, $28,753.
21. (20) David Starr, Chevrolet, 100,60.2,0, $27,928.
22. (30) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 100, 59.5, 22,
$27,803.
23. (24) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 100, 62.3, 21,
$27,653.
24. (25) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 99, 57.4, 0, $21,100.
25. (29) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 99, 45.2, 19,
$27,953.
26. (12) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 99, 73.8, 0,
$20,975.
27. (26) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 98, 50.2, 17,
$27,253.
28. (28) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 98, 41.8, 16,
$27,178.
29. (27)Tanner Berryhill, Toyota, 98, 38, 15, $20,650.
30. (37) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 98, 42.5,
14, $27,303.
31. (36) Eric McClure, Toyota, 95, 35.3, 13, $26,903.
32. (35) Ken Butler, Toyota, transmission, 90, 33.1,
12, $26,778.
33. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 81, 38.9, 11,
$26,718.
34. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, overheating, 64, 92.8,
10, $26,683.
35. (31) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, overheating, 59,
38.2, 9, $26,617.
36. (21) Mike Bliss, Toyota, engine, 41, 57.3, 8,
$25,008.
37. (34) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, electrical, 7, 34.1, 0,
$18,545.
38. (40) David Green, Toyota, transmission, 6,31.3,6,
$18,461.
39. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, rear gear, 6, 31.5, 5,
$18,300.
40. (33) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4, 30.3, 4,
$18,190.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 134.610 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 51 minutes, 26 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.141 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 18 laps.
Lead Changes: 6 among 4 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Busch 1-29; T.Bayne 30-31; K.Busch
32-64; B.Vickers 65-67; K.Busch 68-94; B.Scott 95-
97; K.Busch 98-100.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
K.Busch, 4 times for 92 laps; B.Scott, 1 time for 3 laps;
B.Vickers, 1 time for3 laps;TBayne, 1 time for 2 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. A.Dillon, 656; 2. R.Smith, 650; 3.
E.Sadler, 643; 4. S.Hornish Jr., 642; 5. B.Vickers, 628;
6. J.AlIIgaier, 621; 7. K.Larson, 612; 8. B.Scott, 610; 9.
T.Bayne, 592; 10. RKligerman, 589.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.


The formula combines the following categories: Wins,
Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position
While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green,
Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.




Royals 1, White Sox 0
Kansas City Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
AGordnl If 4 0 0 0 De Azacf-lf 3 02 0
Hosmerib 4 1 2 0 AIRmrzss 3 00 0
BButlerdh 3 0 2 0 Riosrf 4 02 0
S.Perezc 4 0 0 0 A.Dunnlb 2000
L.Caincf 4 0 1 1 Konerkdh 4 00 0
Dysoncf 0 0 0 0 C.Wells pr 0 00 0
Loughrf 4 00 0 Kppngr3b 4 00 0
MTejad3b 3 0 1 0 Viciedol If 3 01 0
Mostks 3b 1 0 0 0 Tekotte pr-cf 0 0 0 0
AEscorss 4 0 1 0 Gillaspi ph 1 00 0
Getz2b 1 00 0 Bckhm2b 3 00 0
Pheglyc 3 00 0
Totals 32 17 1 Totals 30 0 5 0
Kansas City 000 001 000 1
Chicago 000 000 000 0
E-S.Perez (6). DP-Kansas City 2. LOB-Kansas
City 7, Chicago 7. 2B-L.Cain (18). SB-Rios (22).
CS Tekotte (3). S-Getz 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
WDavisW,5-9 71/34 0 0 3 4
ColemanH,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
G.Holland S,26-28 1 1 0 0 1 1
Chicago
SaleL,6-10 9 7 1 1 1 7

Twins 4, Mariners 0


Minnesota Seattle
ab r h bi
Dozier2b 5 1 1 1 BMillerss
CHrmnrf 4 00 0 Frnkln2b
Mornealb 4 2 2 1 Ibanezlf
Doumitc 4 0 1 0 KMorlsdh
Colaelldh 4 1 2 0 Seager3b
Thornmsl If 3 00 1 Smoaklb
Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 EnChvz rf
Hickscf 3 0 0 1 Quinterc
Bernierss 3 0 1 0 MSndrsph
HBlanc c
Ackley cf
Totals 33 47 4 Totals
Minnesota 000 101 200
Seattle 000 000 000


ab r h bi
4020
4000
3000
4010
4 0 1 0
3020
3000
4000
2000
1010
1 0 1 0
0 00 0
3000
31 0 6 0
4
0


E-En.Chavez (3). DP-Minnesota 2. LOB-Min-
nesota 10, Seattle 7.2B-Morneau (25), Doumit(20),
KMorales (25). HR-Dozier (9), Morneau (8). CS-


Bernier (1).

Minnesota
Deduno W,7-4
Roenicke
Burton H,17
Swarzak
Seattle
Harang L,5-9
Furbush
Medina
Farquhar
Luetge


IP H RERBBSO

7 3 0 0 3 6
2/3 2 0 0 0 1
1/3 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1


WP-Deduno, Luetge. PB-Quintero.

AL leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .361;Trout, LosAn-
geles, .324; Mauer, Minnesota, .324; DOrtiz, Boston,
.321; Loney, Tampa Bay, .320;TorHunter, Detroit, .313;
ABeltre, Texas, .310.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 78; CDavis, Baltimore,
74; AJones, Baltimore, 73; Trout, Los Angeles, 68;
Bautista, Toronto, 67; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 67; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 66.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 99; CDavis, Baltimore,
97; Encarnacion, Toronto, 81; Fielder, Detroit, 74;
AJones, Baltimore, 74; NCruz, Texas, 71; Cano, New
York, 70.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 136; Machado, Balti-
more, 135; Trout, Los Angeles, 131; ABeltre, Texas,
127; AJones, Baltimore, 127; Ellsbury, Boston, 122;
TorHunter, Detroit, 122; Pedroia, Boston, 122.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 39; Mauer, Min-
nesota, 31; CDavis, Baltimore, 30; Trout, Los Ange-
les, 29; JhPeralta, Detroit, 28; JCastro, Houston, 27;
Napoli, Boston, 26; CSantana, Cleveland, 26; Seager,
Seattle, 26.
TRIPLES Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Ellsbury, Boston,
7; Drew, Boston, 6; Gardner, NewYork, 5; DeJennings,
Tampa Bay, 5; LMartin, Texas, 5; Kawasaki, Toronto,
4; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 4; McLouth, Baltimore, 4.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 37; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 32; Encarnacion, Toronto, 28; Bautista,
Toronto, 24; NCruz, Texas, 24; ADunn, Chicago, 24;
Ibanez, Seattle, 24.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 38; RDavis,
Toronto, 27; Altuve, Houston, 25; McLouth, Baltimore,
25; Trout, Los Angeles, 23; Andrus, Texas, 22; Rios,
Chicago, 22.
PITCHING-Scherzer, Detroit, 15-1; MMoore,
Tampa Bay, 14-3; Colon, Oakland, 14-3;Tillman, Bal-
timore, 13-3; Masterson, Cleveland, 12-7; FHernan-
dez, Seattle, 11-4; CWilson, Los Angeles, 11-6.
ERA-FHernandez, Seattle, 2.34; Kuroda, New
York, 2.51; Colon, Oakland, 2.54; AniSanchez, De-
troit, 2.68; Sale, Chicago, 2.69; Darvish, Texas, 2.80;
Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.87.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 172; Scherzer, De-
troit, 164; FHernandez, Seattle, 158; Masterson,
Cleveland, 153; Sale, Chicago, 149; Verlander, Detroit,
132; Iwakuma, Seattle, 129; DHolland, Texas, 129.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 35; MRivera, New
York, 33; Nathan, Texas, 32; Balfour, Oakland, 28;
GHolland, Kansas City, 26; AReed, Chicago, 26;
Frieri, Los Angeles, 25; Perkins, Minnesota, 25; Rod-
ney Tampa Bay 25.

NL leaders
BATTING-YMolina, St. Louis, .332; CJohnson, At-
lanta, .332; Cuddyer, Colorado, .331; Craig, St. Louis,
.329; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .321; Votto, Cincinnati,
.320; Posey, San Francisco, .314.
RUNS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 79; Votto, Cincin-
nati, 72; Choo, Cincinnati, 71; CGonzalez, Colorado,
71; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 65; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 65;
Holliday, St. Louis, 64.
RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 83; Phillips, Cincinnati,
81; Craig, St. Louis, 79; Bruce, Cincinnati, 72;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 69; CGonzalez, Colorado, 67;
PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 65; FFreeman, Atlanta, 65.
HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 127; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 125; Craig, St. Louis, 124; Votto, Cincinnati, 123;
DanMurphy, NewYork, 119; DWright, NewYork, 118;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 117;YMolina, St. Louis, 117.
DOUBLES-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 32; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 30;YMolina, St. Louis, 30; Rizzo, Chicago,
29; Posey, San Francisco, 28; McCutchen, Pittsburgh,
27; GParra, Arizona, 27.
TRIPLES-CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span, Washington,
7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; DWright, New York, 6;
Hechavarria, Miami, 5.
HOME RUNS-PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 26; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 26; DBrown, Philadelphia, 24; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 22; Bruce, Cincinnati, 21; Uggla,
Atlanta, 21; Beltran, St. Louis, 19.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 35;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 30; Segura, Milwaukee, 30;
CGomez, Milwaukee, 22; Revere, Philadelphia, 22;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 21; EYoung, NewYork, 21.
PITCHING Wainwright, St. Louis, 13-6; Corbin,
Arizona, 12-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 12-5; Zimmermann,
Washington, 12-6; 9 tied at 10.
ERA-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.96; Harvey, New
York, 2.11; Locke, Pittsburgh, 2.15; Corbin, Arizona,
2.31; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.51; Leake, Cincinnati,
2.73; Fernandez, Miami, 2.74.
STRIKEOUTS-Harvey, NewYork, 164; Kershaw,
Los Angeles, 156; Wainwright, St. Louis, 145;
Samardzija, Chicago, 139; HBailey, Cincinnati, 138;
GGonzalez, Washington, 136; Latos, Cincinnati, 136.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 30; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 30;
Mujica, St. Louis, 30; RSoriano, Washington, 26;
Chapman, Cincinnati, 24; Romo, San Francisco, 24;
Cishek, Miami, 21.

This date in baseball
July 28
1931 Bob Fothergill of Chicago hit a home run
and a triple in an 11-run eighth inning. The White Sox
set an American League record by recording 12 hits
in the inning and beat the NewYorkYankees 14-12.
1940 King Kong Keller hit three homers to give


the NewYorkYankees a 10-9 win over Chicago in the
first game of a doubleheader split.
1951 Clyde Vollmer of Boston hit a grand slam
in the 16th inning, the latest ever hit in a major league
game. The Red Sox beat the Cleveland Indians, 8-4,
in 16.
1958 For the sixth time in his career, Mickey
Mantle hit home runs from both sides of the plate.
NewYork beat the Athletics 14-7.
1971 Sixteen-time Gold Glove winner Brooks
Robinson committed three errors in the sixth inning
against the Oakland A's. Frank Robinson's three-run
homer in the ninth won the game for the Orioles.
1976 John Odom (five innings) and Francisco
Barrios (four innings) combined on a no-hitter as the
Chicago White Sox beat Oakland 2-1.
1979 Dave Kingman of the Chicago Cubs hit
three home runs in a game for the second time in the
season and became the sixth player in major league
history to accomplish the feat. Kingman's homers
weren't enough as the Cubs lostto the NewYork Mets
6-4.
1983 AL president Lee McPhail ruled that
George Brett's "pine tar" home run against NewYork
on July 24 should count. The umpires had disallowed
the homer because the pine tar on Brett's bat ex-
ceeded the 18-inch limit. The rest of the game was
played Aug. 18 with the Kansas City Royals beating
the Yankees, 5-4.
1990 Shawon Dunston tied a major league
record with three triples and led the Chicago Cubs to
a 10-7 win over the Montreal Expos.
1991 Dennis Martinez pitched a perfect game
as the Montreal Expos beat Los Angeles 2-0 at
Dodger Stadium.
1993 Ken Griffey Jr. tied a major league record
by homering in his eighth consecutive game, but it
wasn't enough forthe Seattle Mariners in a 5-1 loss to
the Minnesota Twins.
1994- On the night the baseball players set an
Aug. 12 strike date, Kenny Rogers of the Texas
Rangers pitched a perfect game for a 4-0 victory over
California.
1999 For the first in 12 years, the U.S. baseball
team beat the world champion Cubans, scoring five
runs in the ninth inning for a 10-5 victory at the Pan
American Games. Marcus Jensen's three-run homer
broke a 5-5 tie.
2001 -Vinny Castilla hit three homers and drove
in five runs, but Houston still lost 9-8 to Pittsburgh.
Down 8-2 with two outs in the ninth inning, the Pirates
scored seven runs, including Brian Giles' game-win-
ning grand slam.
2004 -Troy Percival recorded his 300th save after
John Lackey allowed three hits over 8 1-3 innings to
help Anaheim beat Texas 2-0.
2006 -Houston rookie Luke Scott hit for the cycle
and drove in five runs, but the Astros lost to Arizona
8-7.
2009 Chicago White Sox ace Mark Buehrle set
a major league record by retiring 45 straight batters.
Coming off a perfect game in his last start against
Tampa Bay, Buehrle retired the first 17 Twins to sur-
pass the record of 41 straight set by and San Fran-
cisco's Jim Barr in 1972 and tied by teammate Bobby
Jenks, a reliever, in 2007. The streak ended with two
outs in the sixth and Minnesota went on to win 5-3.
Baseball calendar
July 28 Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown,
N.Y
July 31 -Last day to trade a player without secur-
ing waivers.
Aug. 14-15-Owners meeting, Cooperstown, N.Y
Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Oct. 23 -World Series begins, city of American
League champion.
November TBA Deadline for teams to make
qualifying offers to their eligible former players who
became free agents, fifth day after World Series.
NovemberTBA Deadline for free agents to ac-
cept qualifying offers, 12th day afterWorld Series.
Nov. 11-13 General managers meeting, Orlando.
Dec. 2 Last day forteams to offer 2014 contracts
to unsigned players.
Dec. 2-5 Major League Baseball Players Asso-
ciation executive board meeting, La Jolla, Calif.
Dec. 9-12 -Winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista.
Dec. 9 Hall of Fame expansion era committee
(1973 and later) vote announced, Lake Buena Vista.
2014
Jan. 14 Salary arbitration filing.
Jan. 17 Salary arbitration figures exchanged.
Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings, St.
Petersburg.
Feb. 13 -Voluntary reporting date for pitchers,
catchers and injured players.
Feb. 18 -Voluntary reporting date for other play-
ers.
Feb. 25 Mandatory reporting date.
March 12 Last day to place a player on uncon-
ditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination
pay instead of 45 days.
March 22-23 Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona,
Sydney.
March 26 Last day to request unconditional re-
lease waivers on a player without having to pay his
full 2014 salary.
March 30 Opening day. Active rosters reduced to
25 players.
July 15- All-Star game, Minneapolis.
July 18 -Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign.
July 31 -Last day to trade a player without secur-
ing waivers.
Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Dec. 2 Last day forteams to offer 2015 contracts
to unsigned players.
Dec. 8-11 -Winter meetings, San Diego.



BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Sent RHP Josh Tomlin
to the AZL Indians for a rehab assignment.
DETROIT TIGERS Agreed to terms with RHP
Jair Jurrjens on a minor league contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS Placed OF J.D. Martinez
on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Paul Clemens to
Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled LHP Brett Oberholtzer
and OF Robbie Grossman from Oklahoma City.
MINNESOTA TWINS- Sent OF Darin Mastroianni
to the GCL Twins for a rehab assignment.
SEATTLE MARINERS Optioned RHP Hector
Noesi to Tacoma (PCL). Recalled RHP Brandon Mau-
rerfrom Tacoma.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES -Optioned RHP Mitchell
Boggs to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled RHP
Collin McHugh from Colorado Springs.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS Optioned 1B Sean
Halton to Nashville (PCL). Selected the contract of
RHP Rob Wooten from Nashville.
NEWYORK METS Sent LHP Jon Niese to the
GCL Mets for a rehab assignment. Optioned OF Kirk
Nieuwenhuis to Las Vegas (PCL). Traded OF Julio
Concepcion to the L.A. Angels.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS- Optioned OF Brock Pe-
terson to Memphis (PCL). Reinstated OF Matt Holli-
day from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Optioned RHP
Drew Storen to Syracuse (IL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DENVER NUGGETS- Re-signed CTimofey Moz-
gov to a three-year contract.
PHOENIX SUNS -Traded F Luis Scola to Indiana
for F Gerald Green, C Miles Plumlee and a first-round
draft pick.
FOOTBALL


National Football League
NFL Suspended Oakland WR Andre Holmes
four games for violating the NFLs policy on perform-
ance enhancing substances.
ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed WR Nicholas
Edwards.
BUFFALO BILLS Released TE Mickey Shuler
and OL Chris Scott.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Placed LB Pat Angerer
and DE Fili Moala on the PUP list.
NEWYORK JETS Placed CB Aaron Berry on in-
jured reserve. Signed RB Chad Spann. Activated DT
JuniorAumavae and CB Mike Edwards from the PUP
list. Removed CB Darrin Walls from the non-football
injury list.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Released OT Jake
Bscherer. Claimed LB O'Brien Schofield off waivers
from Arizona.
COLLEGE
EMORY & HENRY Named Kevin Girard men's
tennis coach and Jessica Giuggioli women's tennis
coach.


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


P.L.A.Y. accepting signups Wednesday


Special to the Chronicle

The next season of
PL.A.Y begins Aug. 12. Cit-
rus County Parks & Recre-
ation's PL.A.Y programs
are designed for children
ages 3 to 5 who aren't quite
ready for the organized
sports leagues.
The PL.A.Y programs
offered in the upcoming
session include soccer,


which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Monday and Homosassa
Area Recreational Park
on Wednesday, and T-
ball, which will be held at
Central Ridge District
Park on Tuesdays and Bi-
centennial Park on
Thursday.
All sports are offered at
either from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
or 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The


PL.AY programs are held
one night a week for one
hour over six weeks and
parents are encouraged to
participate.
On the first night of
PLAY, each child will re-
ceive age-appropriate
sports equipment and a
team T-shirt.
Registration opens
Wednesday, July 31.
Please contact Crysta


Henry, Recreation Pro-
gram Specialist for Youth
Programs, at 352-527-7543
or visit www.citruscounty-
parks.com for more
information.
Dive in Movie
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will be showing the
movie "Dolphin Tale" (PG) at
Bicentennial Park Pool on
Saturday, Aug. 3.


The movie will begin at
dusk. The gates to the pool
open at 7 p.m. and this event
is limited to 125 people.
Pre-registration is required;
to register visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Citrus Stingers
Baseball
Looking for a more compet-
itive Baseball experience?


Registration is open for U 1ll &
U12 players for Citrus
Stingers Fall 2013 and Spring
2014 baseball.
Practice will be held at
Central Ridge Park in Holder.
The team's goal is to provide
a higher level of play at a rea-
sonable cost.
Contact Chris Richardson at
302-1281 or chrisrichardson47
@gmail.com.


Soccer rains


*-- 7


Special to the Chronicle
Players ages 10 to 13 throw soccer balls into the air following a clinic led by respected coach Sheldon Cipriani on
Wednesday at Central Ridge Park in Holder.


Nature Coast Soccer hosts Olympic Development coach
ial to the Chronicle Gainesville Soccer Al- new skills and techniques, coach Cipriani as we.
liance. He is currently the At one point, parents and According to Eas
gh-level soccer clinic coach for the VSI profes- coaches jumped into enjoy goal of the clinic was
*cently conducted at sional team playing in the the exercises, pose local players t(
ature Coast Soccer United States Soccer Day two saw the U-14 level soccer training
ex at the behest of League (USL) as well as through U-17 players being by all accounts, it
soccer trainer Ron the head coach of their treated to an incredible success. The two-day
which featured pro- PDL affiliate, array of technical skills was attended by ap
nal soccer coach Day one was designated training, ball movement mately 80 players fro:
)n Cipriani. for U-10 through U-13 play- and movement off the ball. around Citrus Coun
ch Cipriani is a ers and featured an entire Coach Cipriani introduced cluding players from
'A Licensed coach training session with the players to the same type clubs Nature Coast a
olds a FIFA Olympic music that players had to of training that he takes his as Citrus United. Bas
cate. He is a Florida complete each routine to professional players the response from pl
iic Development while staying in synch with through. Coaches from all coaches and parents C
am (ODP) coach and the rhythm. The kids had age groups were busy tak- Cipriani will be ii
SDirector for the an amazing time learning ingnotes and learning from back in the near futu


11.
t, the
to ex-
o high
g and,
was a
event
proxi-
m and
ty, in-
n local
as well
sed on
ayers,
Coach
invited
re.


Local bowler


claims teen title

Williams wins Teen Masters

National Championship


Special to the Chronicle

Jenna Williams, a 12
year-old youth bowler at
Manatee Lanes, took first
place at the 2013 Teen
Masters National Cham-
pionship Bowling Tour-
nament (U14 girls
division) held at Saw-
grass Lanes in Fort
Lauderdale from July
1 to4.
After bowling league
since 2009 and compet-
ing in various tourna-
ments around Florida
since 2011, Jenna felt
that she was ready to
compete in her first na-
tional event. This tour-
nament was particularly
challenging due to the in-
troduction of the new
PBA Skill balls, which


were used to level the
playing field.
As most bowlers know,
a vast array of perform-
ance balls can enhance
a bowler's ability to
strike.
Jenna proved her abil-
ity to adjust to lane condi-
tions. Bowling in
tournaments such as
Burkins Bowling, South
West Florida Classic, and
Florida Junior Bowling
Tour has allowed Jenna
to hone her competition
talents.
Jenna thanked the
staff at Mantee Lanes
and John Gibbs Pro Shop
and also Mariner Lanes
and Tom Daugherty's
Hall of Fame Pro Shop
for their support of her
bowling.


Special to the Chronicle
Homosassa resident Jenna Williams, far right, took first
place at the 2013 Teen Masters National Champi-
onship Bowling Tournament (U14 girls division) held at
Sawgrass Lanes in Fort Lauderdale from July 1 to 4.
The 12-year old Citrus County athlete is pictured with
Rosecoe Pretlow (U14 boys champion) and
Bowling.com's Ben Dodson,


Vets Journey Home group to host tourney


Special to the Chronicle

Vets Journey Home, a
nonprofit group dedi-
cated to helping veterans
share and heal, will host
its inaugural golf outing
Saturday, Aug. 17, at
Citrus Hills at The
Meadows.
The event will include
lunch and a raffle.
For more information or
to contribute to the event,
call 815-621-8319. All pro-
ceeds will benefit a special
Vets Journey Home week-
end slated to begin Nov 15
in Citrus County


Annual veterans
tourney is Sept. 7
The ninth annual Citrus
County Veterans Golf Tourna-
ment will be held Sept. 7 at
the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club course for the
benefit of the Citrus County
Veterans Foundation Inc.
Check-in for the four-person
scramble will be at 7:30 a.m.
with a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. Individuals and groups
short of four persons will be
combined to make four-per-
son teams. You do not need to
be a veteran to participate.


Registration form and dona-
tion of $55 per person must be
received no later than Aug. 31.
Each participant's donation in-
cludes golf and cart, beverages
on the course and lunch at the
country dub. The tournament
features a hole-in-one car lease
prize, closest to the pin prizes
and door prizes. Charitable tax-
deductible contributions for
door prizes and hole sponsor-
ships for $400, $300, $200 or
$100 are welcome.
Participating golfers should
make their check or money
order payable to Citrus
County Veterans Foundation


and send it with their registra-
tion form to: Citrus County
Veterans Foundation, Attn:
Samuel Dininno, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Key No.
13, Lecanto, FL 34461-7718
no later than Aug. 29.
For more information or a
registration form, visit www.cit-
rusvf.org or contact Samuel
Dininno at 352-527-5915.
'A Day at the
Swamp'
The Citrus County Gator
Club invites the public to its an-
nual scholarship kickoff party,
"A Day at the Swamp," from 5


to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, at
the Citrus County Fairgrounds
Auditorium in Inverness. NFL
legend and Florida Gator great
Chris Doering will be the spe-
cial guest speaker.
Tickets can be purchased at
the following locations: All
About Nature in Crystal River
Mall; Burkes of Ireland and
Firestone of Crystal River;
Century 21 on Main Street and
Goldiggers & Gunslingers in
Inverness; The Gator Patch in
the Ocala Mall. Or, order tick-
ets by mail: 6570 N. Tamarind
Ave., Hernando, FL 34442.
Cost for alumni club mem-


bers is $10 in advance; non-
alumni club members pay $15
each or two for $25; or $15 at
the door. Children age 5 and
younger are free.
The swamp-style Gator
gathering will be filled with
food, fun, entertainment,
silent auctions, raffles and
giveaways. All proceeds ben-
efit the Citrus County Gator
Club Scholarship Fund.
For more information, call
352-503-4263. Find the club
on Facebook at Citrus County
Gator Club (group) or visit the
website at www.ccgators.com.
From staff reports


Snedeker takes Canadian lead


Langer seizes top

spot at Senior

British Open

Associated Press

OAKVILLE, Ontario -
Hunter Mahan gave up the lead
in the Canadian Open when his
wife went into labor, and Brandt
Snedeker grabbed the top spot a
few hours later Saturday
Mahan was 13 under after two
rounds when he got a call before
he was scheduled to tee off Sat-
urday saying wife Kandi had
gone into labor The American
rushed to the airport for a flight
to Texas.
"I received exciting news a
short time ago that my wife
Kandi has gone into labor with
our first child," Mahan said in a
statement. "Kandi and I are
thrilled about the addition to the
Mahan family and we look for-
ward to returning to the RBC
Canadian Open in the coming
years."
Snedeker had a 9-under 63 at


Glen Abbey to take the lead after
the rain-delayed third round. He
won the Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am in February for his fifth
PGA Tour victory
"I know how to handle it and I
know what to expect tomorrow
especially on a golf course like
this," Snedeker said. "I'm not too
concerned about my number
right now I know what I have to
do tomorrow"
The 2012 FedExCup cham-
pion had nine birdies in a bogey-
free round.
"I knew I had a chance if I
could keep the momentum going
after the first six holes and I
could really ride it out and do
something special today,"
Snedeker said.
There were scattered showers
and an 80-minute delay because
of lightning.
Sweden's David Lingmerth
was a stroke back after a 65, and
Matt Kuchar and Jason Bohn
were 12 under Kuchar had a 64,
and Bohn shot 66.
Dustin Johnson also shot 63,
good for a tie for fifth at 11 under
with John Merrick (72), Greg
Owen (67), Charley Hoffman (67)
and Kyle Stanley (66).


Langer takes 3-shot lead
at Senior British Open
SOUTHPORT, England Bern-
hard Langer seized a three-shot
lead after the third round of the Sen-
ior British Open on Saturday, mas-
tering Royal Birkdale with superb
links play for a 4-under 66.
Langer shared the overnight lead
with American Mark Wiebe but
birdied three of his first seven holes
to jump in front on his own. David
Frost of South Africa shot his third
straight 68 to sit alone in second
place, while Wiebe only managed a
70 to drop into third, four shots back.
Langer's only bogey came on the
14th, but he finished with two birdies
on 15 and 17 to stay in control.
His lone bogey came when he hit
his tee shot to the back of the green,
sent his approach putt long and left
and missed the return.
He got it back immediately with a
birdie at the long 15th, added another
at the long 17th and just missed his
birdie chance from 12 feet at the last.
Frost made three birdies in a row
from the seventh but then made
three bogies came on the 10th, 14th
and the 18th, with two other birdies
in between.


Associated Press
Brandt Snedeker reacts to the crowd after finishing his round on the
18th green Saturday during the third round of the Canadian Open at
Glen Abbey in Oakville, Ontario.


Speci

Ahig
was re
the N
comply
local
East, a
fession
Sheldo
Coach
USSF
who ho
Certifi
Olymp
Progr
is the


B4 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Former UF RB Gillislee hopes


to follow Ricky Williams' path


Associated Press

DAVIE As a kid grow-
ing up in Central Florida,
Mike Gillislee idolized one
of his Miami Dolphins pred-
ecessors at running back
"Ricky Williams,"
Gillislee said Saturday.
"His vision, the way he ran
the ball. He was a very
tough running back. And I
liked that he was humble,
he didn't say very much.
Gillislee now follows in
Williams' cleat marks as a
soft-spoken Dolphins
rusher In his only year as
a Florida starter last sea-
son, Gillislee ran for 1,152
yards (4.7 avg.) to become
the Gators' first 1,000-yard
rusher since Ciatrick
Fason in 2004.
Gillislee hasn't gone un-
noticed even though veter-
ans Lamar Miller and
Daniel Thomas began
training camp higher on
the Dolphins depth chart.
"He hasn't been tenta-
tive," Miami coach Joe
Philbin said. "That's the
one thing, when you get a
young back, you're a little
concerned a new
scheme, getting used to
pro football, maybe a little
dance and shuffle. We
haven't seen a lot of that.
We've seen some get to the
point of attack, make a de-


Associated Press
Miami Dolphins running back Mike Gillislee, left, and
linebacker Josh Kaddu do drills Wednesday during the
team's practice in Davie.


cision and go."
Gillislee returned to
Gainesville after June's
minicamp to condition, lift
weights and work on his
techniques. He said the
toughest part, so far, of going
from college to pro has been
in the passing game.
"Knowing where you
have to be and knowing who
you have to pick up in the
blocking schemes," he said.
The 5-11, 213-pound
Gillislee figures to see time
on special teams besides
battling Jonas Gray and
Marcus Thigpen for spot
duty running the ball.
'Anything that the
coaches want me to do,"
Gillislee said. "I'm going to


work, I'm going to learn and
I'm going to try and be the
best atwhateverthe role is."
Gillislee was one of
three Florida Gators -
linebacker Jelani Jenkins
and kicker Caleb Sturgis
- selected by Miami in
April's draft. Add center
Mike Pouncey, who's en-
tering his fourth season,
and there's a strong Gators
presence at Dolphins
camp. But that doesn't
mean the Florida alums
are spending all their time
together
"When I went home
after the (organized team
activities), everybody had
on Miami Dolphins stuff,"
Gillislee said.


0728 SUCRN
NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED MONIES

HELD IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT CITRUS COUNTY-
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
The below listed unclaimed monies shall be declared forfeited to the County
unless claimed before the first day of September 2013. Persons claiming such
funds, or any part of them should file a written claim with sufficient proof (driver's
license, picture ID) with Angela Vick, Clerk, Citrus County, Inverness, Florida
before September 1, 2013.
Angela Vick
Clerk of the Circuit Court and Comptroller
By: Traci Phillips
Accounting Services Director
UNCLAIMED MONIES PRIOR TO JANUARY 1. 2012


ACURA TITLE CO 35.36
ALBERT, MICHAEL 8.75
ALEMAN, TERESA MARIE 15.00
ALPHA-OMEGA TITLE 16.00
AMERICAN FREEDOM ASSURANCE INC 42.50
AMMONS, STEPHANIE 10.00
ANDERSON, CASSANDRA NICOLE 15.00
ANGELO, JOSEPH M 15.00
BANNASCH PA, DESIREE E 5.00
BELL, CHRISTOPHER ALLEN 36.00
BENAVIDES, MARIA ELIZABETH 17.00
BENROSME, ALEXIUS 132.00
BOND, TRUDY GRIFFIN 16.00
BOYER, JENNIFER LYNN 15.00
BRADLEY, BOBBIE JOE 15.00
BROWN & ASSOCIATES 69.45
BRYANT, SCOTT 195.80
BUTEAU, STEVEN B 30.00
BUTTS, ALEXANDER MICHAEL 50.00
CANTAL, AQUINO 96.25
CAPITAL CITY BANK 167.20
CARTER, JAMES 203.00
CARTER, SAMANTHA 10.00
CASE, ANN 430.00
CASEY, PATRICK M 177.41
CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 7.50
CIBYER, TYEESHA 50.00
CIRCLE K STORES INC, TIMOTHY MARLER 35.00
CITRUS HILLS INVESTMENT PROP 17.50
CLARK, JOHN B 7.51
CLEMENTS, MURRAY JEFF 4.41
CLIFTON, JERRY 612.00
COLEGROVE, CHRISTINE M 15.00
COLLETT, STANLEY 15.00
COLLINS, JENNIFER BOONE 5.59
CONARD, GREG 250.00
CONTI, NICHOLAS 20.00
COOPER, WILLIAM DOUGLAS 15.00
CORBETT, KAYLA MARIE 10.00
COUCHE-TARD INC DBA CIRCLE K 17.50
CROFT, LINDA IRENE 15.00
CROOTE, JOHN 15.00
CRYSTAL SEAS LLC 15.00
DE JESUS, IVELISE 15.00
DELMAIN, JOYCE GIBSON 15.00
DEVAULT, MICHAEL RAYE 15.00
DIRSCHEDL, DANIEL 10.00
DIXON, MICKEY 22.00
DUEKER, DUANE DALE 15.00
DUNOFF, MOSHEYHUDA 7.44
EDWARDS, PEGGY 650.00
ELDREIDGE, NICOLE 10.00
ELKIN ESQ, BARRY M 5.50
ELLINGHAM, CHARLES 50.00
FIORE, HUGO JAMES 15.00
FLORIDA PEST CONTROL 12.00
FOWLER, JAMAAL 35.00
FRAZIER, TONY LEE 30.02
FRIEDMANS JEWELRY STORE 272.00
GARESCHE, CLAUDE FRANCES 46.92
GATELEY, DANNEYL 212.00
GIBBS, CYNTHIASUSAN 15.00
GINDA, VANESSA NICOLE 15.00
GORDON, GEORGIA BAKER 15.00
GORDON, JOHN HAROLD III 120.00
GRADY, CHARLOTTE 163.25
GREENE, CLINTON ANDREW 15.00
GRIBBON, ELIZABETH A 15.00
GROUT, KELLY C 15.00
HALL, CANDACE 16.00
HALL, GEHRIG TYLER 15.00
HAMILTON, ROBERT K 30.00
HAWKINS, GLENN RICHARD 15.00
HERNE, SHEENAMONIQUE 15.00
HILL, ASHLEY MARIE 25.00
HOFFMAN, CATHERINE REBECCA 15.00
HUNTER, HEATHER NERO 15.00
HUTCHINS, CHERYLANN 15.00
INGALLS, KAREN 7.00
JAMES, WILLIAM GREGORY 1.75
JOACHIM, ANGELA GEIGER 15.00
KALOYANIDES, RYAN JOHN 15.00
KANGAROO GAS STATION 40.00
KANTER, KATHERINE MARIE 15.00
KELLERMAN, MATTHEW JACOB 15.00


KELLEY, SAMANTHA
KELLOWAY, TARA LEA
KIRK, TABITHACAITLYN
KOHEL, CAROL T
KRONGOLD, DAVID
LANIER, KEVIN MATHEW
LAW OFFICE OF MARSHALL C WATSON PA
LOPEZ, ISRAEL
LYONS,TERESA
MARCOTTE, EDWARD LEO
MARLER, TIMOTHY
MAYFIELD, BRANDON L
MCCALL, SALLY RIEGLE
MCCANNA, RICHARD
MCCLELLAN, JUSTIN ALLEN
MCELMURRAY, MARJORIE GAIL
MCWILLIAMS, JAMES
MERCADO, CATRINA LOUISE
MILLER, CHASITYANN
MIRITELLO, LEISAM
MOLEN, MARKANTHONY
MONROE, RONALD
MOORE, JO
NELSON, JOEL CHRISTOPHER
NETCO INC
NICKELSON, DOUGLAS CHARLES
NYE,CHARLES
ORPIKOWSKI, THOMAS MICHAEL JACOB
OSTEAN, GUY DAN
PARSONS, MARYANN
POWERS, RICHARD ALLAN
PREMIUM TITLE SERVICES INC
PRINCIPLE, TONI JO
PROGRESS ENERGY
PUCKETT, GEORGE JACKSON
RAKER, IRVIN FRANKLIN
REYES,STACIL
RINAUDO, KATHERINE MICHELLE
RODRIGUEZ, RICCARDO
ROSS, DAVID ANDREW
ROUNDTREE, JOHN
SAMUELS, JESSICA RAE
SCHULZ, REX
SCOTT, BONNIE JO
SELBE, CHAD
SERVICELINK
SHAFFER,JEFFREY F
SHEA, MAUREEN HELEN
SHORE, SHARON L
SKAPURA, TAMMY LYNN
SLACK, KIMBERLY M
SMITH, DAVID
SMITH, JENNIE SUE
SMITH, LIVIA LEE
SOBOLEWSKI, SUSAN CONKLING
STEWART TITLE CO
STINE, JILL PATRICIA
STRICKLAND, JAMES D
SUBWAY
SWEET BAY LIQUORS
SWEETBAY
TD BANK NA
THACKER, ANDREA M.
THOMPSON, J
THORN, REID RUSSELL
TOWNSEND, WILLIAM
TRG SETTLEMENT SERVICES
TRUST, DAVID
TURNER,ROBERTS
VALENCA, KRISTINA
WACHOVIABANK
WARNER, SELINA
WATKINS, KAYLA
WELTER, KEITH ANTHONY
WHITFORD, MCKENZIE MARIE
WHITTEN, JOHN B
WILMON RAY STEVENSON BUILDERS
WILSON, KAYLEIGH
WINES, JOHN
WOELHER, JACKIE
WOLFON, MICHAEL
WOLFORD, WADE G
WREN, SARAH NICOLE
YEARWOOD, TIMOTHY M
ZAJAC, KENNETH


5.74
15.00
15.00
15.00
175.00
15.00
7.00
5.50
10.00
15.00
150.00
15.00
15.00
17.00
15.00
15.00
63.00
15.00
17.00
43.53
17.12
35.50
107.00
15.00
377.81
15.00
10.00
3.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
9.50
45.00
35.00
15.00
15.00
6.00
15.00
8.00
15.00
90.27
50.00
5.56
15.00
28.50
8.50
6.91
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
34.50
15.00
15.00
15.00
8.50
15.00
8.90
130.62
240.00
350.13
80.00
17.00
9.00
15.00
50.00
25.50
25.00
15.00
100.00
18.00
29.25
10.00
15.00
15.00
7.00
11.67
40.00
10.00
260.00
37.34
15.00
15.00
50.00
40.00


P An Experience
Beyond the Game


Flag Football,


Soccer, and


Baseball Leagues


Sign ups now open in Citrus

County! Leagues run year round.

Fall Season starts in October.


* Organized programs for boys and girls 3-12
* Focused on fun, sportsmanship and safe play
* Convenient schedule one day a week! Practice
held before game
* All skill levels! NO tryouts!
* All coaches background checked and certified


I i-
i9 Sports Core Values:
1. Organization and Communication
Professional management of program details, team rosters and schedules.
Flexibility to accommodate team assignment with friends, siblings, etc.
Easy access to the i9 Program Directorfor quick response to questions or needs.
24/7 access to the latest schedules, standings and statistics online.
Proactive communication so parents are always informed about important details.
2. Convenience
Quick and easy registration process online or by phone.
Minimal practices, all on game day.
3. A Safe, Supportive Environment
Certified coaches who have been carefully screened (criminal background check).
Trained referees/officials at each game.
Individualized attention and encouragement provided to each player.
"i9 Sports Parental Pledge" agreement which prohibits sideline negativity and disruption
4. Quality Instruction in Skills & Good Sportsmanship
Instruction in the game fundamentals.
Priority on core values such as sportsmanship, teaming, and fair play over competition.
Belief that everyone is a winner.
5. Fun!
No player tryouts or drafts.
Everyone plays regardless of talent level.
Free team jersey for each player.
Game photos posted on the i9 website.
Post season celebration and award for all players



in* a I og m


near you!

Visit i~sots or

cl35=4 9 5


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Newman on pole Busch dominates
in Nationwide win


Driver nips

Johnson at

Brickyard

Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS -The
Rocket Man got his fuel
back.
Finally
Ryan Newman
snatched the pole away
from Jimmie Johnson
with a blistering lap of
187.531 mph around Indi-
anapolis Motor Speedway
to set a track record for
NASCAR races at the
Brickyard.
Newman was the last of
the 45 drivers to make a
qualifying attempt Satur-
day as Johnson's No. 48
was atop the scoring
tower for well over an
hour with a lap of 187.438.
Driver after driver had
failed to knock Johnson
from the pole, and the
four-time Brickyard win-
ner watched and waited to
see if Newman could get
the job done.
Newman, an Indiana
native, pulled it off as
Johnson smiled his
approval.
"You can't count Ryan
out, and he put up a whale
of a lap," Johnson said.
Added team co-owner
Tony Stewart, "They don't
call him 'Rocket Man' for
no reason. He had an awe-
some lap."
It's the 50th pole for
Newman, who established
himself as an elite qualifier


Associated Press
Sprint Cup Series driver Ryan Newman waves to the fans Saturday after qualifying for
the pole position for today's Brickyard 400 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway in Indianapolis. Newman qualified with a speed of 187.531 mph.


with six poles his rookie
season. He set a NASCAR
record with 11 poles in
2003, and won at least one
pole a year for 11 seasons.
But he'd been in a
drought of late, and New-
man's last pole was late in
the 2011 season.
"I just am ecstatic. It's
awesome because it's my
50th. It's awesome be-
cause it's Indy, and it's a
track record on top of that,
so it's like a double triple
bonus," Newman said.
The normally stoic New-
man admitted he got emo-
tional on the backstretch
of his cool-down lap.
"It's more special to me
because it's the Brickyard,


because it's Indy, because
of the history of auto rac-
ing at this facility," he
said. "So many drivers
who are my heroes, so
many drivers I've ad-
mired, so many drivers
that have worked so hard
in their career to get to
here on this day, to be the
fastest one, that's what's
the most special to me."
The drought on poles
had weighed on Newman
over the last year
"It's been bothering me
for a long time," he said. "I
feel like I'm a driver that
can still hit his marks
each and every lap and
put it all together, and we
didn't win a pole last year


We were close at times."
The 50th pole of his ca-
reer is good enough for
ninth on the career list,
and it comes at a critical
time for Newman. Stewart
told Newman he's not
being re-signed for next
season two weeks ago, and
Newman is currently
looking for a job for 2014.
"No hard feelings. They
made a move, and that
move makes me move,
and there's no hard feel-
ings," Newman said. "I
don't know what I'm going
to do. Obviously this is a
good step in publicity for
me on the positive side, so
we'll see what we can do
tomorrow."


Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS Kyle
Busch had a commanding
lead wiped out with one
ill-timed caution.
He snagged it back just
in time to extend his dom-
inant run in the Nation-
wide Series and seal his
latest win with a kiss.
Busch was the newest
driver to kiss the bricks,
leading 92 of 100 laps Sat-
urday at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway
He turned his baseball
cap around, dropped to his
hands and knees, and
planted a big one on the
bricks.
How'd they taste?
"Like bricks," he said.
Busch even gave the
bricks a celebratory slap.
Not bad after a late
scare off a restart dropped
him to third with six laps
left and nearly turned
Brian Scott into the sur-


prise winner
Busch fell back after
some hard racing with
Joey Logano that almost
wiped out his near-
flawless racing. But his
No. 54 Toyota was the
fastest car all day and he
roared back to take the
lead with three laps left.
He won for the eighth time
in 15 races this season.
He took his usual bow
before he grabbed the
checkered flag. Then, off
to the bricks.
"It's Indianapolis. It's
pretty awesome to be able
to win here, whether you
are driving Nationwide or
Cup, sports cars, Formula
One, MotoGP, anything," he
said. "It's pretty cool, this
place, with the history and
all the automobiles that
have raced on this surface
and the surfaces before it.
And all the fans who have
been here over the years,
it's awesome."


Associated Press
Kyle Busch heads through a corner during the Nationwide
Series race Saturday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in
Indianapolis. Busch won the event.


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press


President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline Kennedy arrive at Love Field airport Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas.


A F T E R F I I

JAMIE STENGLE


DALLAS

ANGER SEETHES FROM THE LETTER
mailed to City Hall on Nov. 23, 1963,
the day after the tragedy, raging that
this city "virtually invited the poor
insignificant soul who blotted out the
life of President Kennedy to do it in Dallas. Dallas, the
city of Hate; Dallas, the city of Shame."
As the nation and world mark this year's 50th anniversary of the as-
sassination of John E Kennedy, special attention once again falls on
the Texas metropolis. The "hate/shame" letter, which came from Cal-
ifornia and was one of many that poured in after the shooting, shows
how the city instantly became a focus of fury, resentment and confu-
sion, which locals have struggled with in the ensuing decades.
With scrutiny renewed by this year's milestone, Americans are
learning again about the hostility toward Kennedy and his policies
darkly voiced by some Dallasites before the assassination. The pass-
ing of five decades prompts new reflection on the city's tormented but
evolving response to the crime here that changed history And finally
many Americans wonder: How will Dallas mark that terrible day this
year?
No longer are residents confronted by scorn when they tell people
they're from Dallas as then-Mayor Wes Wise was a decade after the
assassination when asked by a fellow mayor how it felt to be the
leader of "the city that killed Kennedy"
But it was a legacy that took time for the young city to come to terms
with a conundrum symbolized by its debate over the fate of the
Texas School Book Depository, where Lee Harvey Oswald fired on
the presidential motorcade from a sixth floor window
The old depository building could have been razed, but instead now
houses the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, dedicated to telling
the tale of that day unflinchingly
"The story of the museum is also the story of Dallas," said Stephen
Fagin, associate curator "It's the story of the city and how the city has
emerged from the long, dark shadow of history"


F T Y


YEARS


ASSOCIATED PRESS


S9WT ELCOMEMR E KENNEDYTO DALLAS."
W That was the headline across a full-
page advertisement in The Dallas MorningNews
on Nov 22, 1963, as the president made his way
to the city on a political fence-mending trip.
A quick read made it clear the ad's greeting was
sarcastic: It went on to ask a series of questions
that implied he was a communist sympathizer
Reading it, Kennedy quipped to first lady
Jacqueline Kennedy that they were "heading
into nut country"
Just four weeks earlier, his United Nations
ambassador, Adlai Stevenson, had been ha-
rangued by a group of ultra-conservatives as he
spoke at a downtown auditorium. Frank McGehee,
a Dallasite who had founded the anti-communist
National Indignation Convention, shouted ques-
tions at Stevenson through a bullhorn until po-
lice took him away Audience members loudly
interrupted Stevenson's speech, and as he left, a
woman bopped him on the head with a protest sign
"It was headlines across the nation," recalled
Darwin Payne, a professor emeritus of commu-
nications at Southern Methodist University who
was a reporter at the Dallas Times Herald in 1963.
Three years earlier, during the 1960 presi-
dential campaign, protesters accosted Kennedy's
running mate Lyndon B. Johnson and his wife
Lady Bird as they crossed a downtown Dallas
street from one hotel to another At a White
House luncheon in 1961, Dallas Morning News
publisher E. M. "Ted" Dealey told Kennedy to
his face that a "man on horseback" was needed
to lead the nation, not someone "riding Caro-
line's tricycle," a reference to Kennedy's young
daughter. James F Chambers Jr. of the rival
Dallas Times Heraldtold Kennedy that Dealey's
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Middle


ground


won't be


greener
We are a nation
founded by
angry taxpayers.
When we fought our
Revolution, the thing
that irked our Founding
Fathers was that England
was raising taxes and
doing a pretty bad job of
providing services.
So it shouldn't be a
surprise that 237 years
later citizens of this
country still get mighty
mad when government
wants them to pay
higher taxes.
The members of the
Citrus County Commis-
sion got an education in
taxpayer anger this
week when they held a
public meeting on the
proposed $60 (now $54)
tax for fire services.
The meeting had to be
moved to the county au-
ditorium to handle the
hundreds of angry peo-
ple who wanted to voice
their displeasure.
It is easy for some to
discount the angry com-
ments from citizens be-
cause some were
misinformed about the
details. For instance, the
county commission has
nothing to do with
school buses, so criticiz-
ing it for seeing empty
buses is so far off the
point that it's funny
But what's not funny is
that the message from
the citizens of Citrus
County is clear they
like small government
and they distrust the
very people they elect to
represent them.
Those same residents
have a problem recon-
ciling exactly what part
of government they
would like to be smaller
Illogical? Maybe. But
it's who we are.
That is part of the very
culture we have culti-
vated in Citrus County
We are not known as
big spenders. We have
high expectations from
business, government,
schools, and we don't want
to pay much for them.
If you step back and
look at the big picture,
for the past 40 years Cit-
rus County has mar-
keted itself as an
inexpensive place to
live and retire. Beverly
Hills and the Inverness
Highlands originally
marketed themselves up
North as places you
could buy a house for
$9,999 and retire in the
great state of Florida.
Walmart is our largest
retailer. Garage sales
are the weekend tradi-
tion for many We love
See Page C3


Q&A: Marion Hammer, former NRA chief


MARGIE MENZEL
The News Service
of Florida
TALLAHASSEE Marion
Hammer is one of Florida's
most influential lobbyists. She
served as president of the Na-
tional Rifle Association from
1995 to 1998, is a member of the
NRA board and has been the
executive director of the Uni-
fied Sportsmen of Florida, the
state's NRA affiliate, since
1976.


"Being successful involves believing in what you're

doing, because if you don't believe in it, you're not
going to care to the depths of which you need to

care to get it done. You have to have focus."


Bloomberg News has called legislation, the controversial
Hammer "the woman responsi- "stand your ground" self-defense
ble for many of the nation's law and the so-called "Docs vs.
most permissive gun laws." Glocks" law, which seeks to
She's credited (or blamed) for limit physicians from asking
the passage of concealed-carry patients about gun ownership.


Along with firearms-
issues, she helped secu
ing for the McKay Schol
for Students with Disa
See


The News Service of Florida


Marion Hammer, lobbyist for the
-related National Rifle Association, speaks
re fund- in favor of a bill to prevent physi-
larships clans from asking patients
abilities whether they own guns in 2011
during the House Criminal Justice
Page C3 Subcommittee in Tallahassee.





0Page C2 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013



PINION


"Say first, of God above or man below,
What can we reason but from what we know?"
Alexander Pope, "An Essay on Man," 1734


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PERFECT STORM




It's time for all



to face current



fiscal reality


or the past several
decades, Citrus
County's tax base
benefited greatly from the
Crystal River power gener-
ation complex and a robust
construction industry fueled
by a growing population.
However, our nation's
Great Recession from De-
cember 2007 to June 2009
and its sputter-
ing recovery THE 1
have contributed
to the ill eco- Co'
nomic winds that budge
have combined
to form Citrus OUR 01
County's perfect
fiscal storm. Time
The county's blame g
misfortunes in- move f
elude the near
collapse of the construction
industry, an anemic real es-
tate market, a precipitous
drop in property values, a
fragile economy, stagnant
population growth, closure
of Duke Energy's nuclear
power plant and Duke En-
ergy's unilateral decision to
withhold $16 million in tax
payments.
Despite the gathering per-
fect fiscal storm gathering
during the past five years,
both county government
and the public have been
slow in facing up to the new
fiscal realities.
Although county officials
have reduced the budget
more than $43 million,
decreased staff by nearly
25 percent, deferred capital
improvement projects and
restructured county govern-
ment, they have side-
stepped making tough,
unpopular choices by main-
taining the level of services,
spending down reserves
and opting not to roll for-
ward the millage to the pre-
vious rate.
On the public side of the
ledger, residents have been
conflicted, with most de-
manding no reduction in
the level of services while
adamantly opposing any tax


Is
)u
t

F
IP

t
,ca
fo


increase, despite the fact
that declining property val-
ues have pushed down
property taxes significantly.
As a result of the county
commission and public
being unwilling to squarely
face the budget realities
created by this fiscal storm,
the fiscal chickens have fi-
nally come home to roost,
producing a
SSE ~budget crisis of
SUE: historic propor-
nty tions for the
crisis, county.
While there is
'INION: probably some
wiggle room to
to end cut county gov-
ame and ernment spend-
irward. ing further, the
magnitude of the
budget crisis has left county
officials and residents alike
with the alternatives of
being either a viable com-
munity or a community in
decline.
Faced with this choice,
county commissioners, by a
3-2 vote, made the tough but
unpopular decision to adopt
a tentative property tax rate
that would increase the cur-
rent rate by 30 percent from
7.1033 to 9.2387 mills.
While the millage in-
crease plus the fire fee rep-
resent, on average, a $157.54
increase over last year, the
increase is still a reduction
of $90.71 from what the av-
erage homeowner paid in
2008 given declining prop-
erty values.
Nevertheless, due to an
emotionally charged anti-
government mood, some, to
include a sitting commissioner,
have chosen to find blame
rather than face fiscal real-
ity. While pointing fingers
for past actions and inac-
tions may charge emotions,
it does nothing to address
the county's budget crisis.
With the county tax struc-
ture at the tipping point and
the benefit of hindsight, it's
time to end the blame game
and move forward.


=-- Hot Corner: CAT VS. BOBCAT =--
It was a mean bunny Troublesome bobcat


Regarding "Gerry's cat:"
I'm glad to see that others
were as upset as I was, and
still am. Gerry should not
own any animals. Remember
what he did with his daughter's
bunny when she was
leaving for college? C
He turned it loose
in the yard and when
that turned out bad,
he said, "Oh well, it
was a mean bunny." f
Would he have chased
the bobcat to try to
rescue his cat? I think C A
not. He seems to have C
a cruel streak. Shame 563
on him.
Big can of worms
Gerry, did you or didn't
you realize you were opening
up a can of worms when you
published your article on
Sunday (July 21) about your
cat? You should know better.
Take care.


About Gerry's bobcat story:
Three months ago, I had a bob-
cat hanging around my dock
area because I have a fish-
cleaning table there and I gave
him scraps. My 14-year-old cat
was eating his fish
JND scraps when the bob-
cat tried to get his
OFF meal. Pawsy slapped
his nose and the bob-
S cat backed up. Pawsy
S has double paws in the
Front. That's how he
got his name. But feed-
g ing the bobcat was a
)79 mistake. He grabbed
)579 my tame pelican one
day a few feet in front
of me. I felt bad. No
more feeding him. He stayed
around about a week, but
moved on. My neighbors said
he was last seen about a block
away where someone had
chickens and he ate every one
of them. He evidently liked fish
and fowl.


Losing faith in government


ow for some good news,
and it has nothing to do
with the birth of the
royal baby
According to a USA Today/Bi-
partisan Policy Center poll,
'Americans by more than 2-1
say the best way to
make positive
changes in society is
through volunteer
organizations and
charities, not by
being active in gov-
emrnment." Even bet-
ter news: People
younger than 30 are
especially put off by Cal T
politics and are "sig- OTI
nificantly less likely
than their parents to VOl
say participating in
politics is an important value in
their lives."
Why is this good news? There
are at least two reasons. One is
that the less faith people have
in government, the more they
are likely to have in themselves.
The second is that a public loss
of faith in politics and politi-
cians increases the possibility
of government becoming
smaller That could mean less
spending, a smaller deficit and
ultimately, one hopes, lower
taxes.
On the same day the USA
Todaypoll was published, a Mc-
Clatchy-Marist poll found Pres-
ident Obama "is suffering his
lowest approval numbers in
nearly two years." His June ap-
proval rating was 41 percent,
down from 50 percent in April.
Obama's endless speeches
aren't cutting it. The public
wants the action it was prom-


h
H



ised. It's not getting any and so
is increasingly disillusioned
with politics and politicians.
Republicans don't escape blame.
The McClatchy-Marist poll
found only 22 percent of those
surveyed approve of congres-
sional Republicans.
Again, this is or
can be good news
S for the country and
even for Republi-
S cans if they get the
S message. USA
Today quotes Rep.
Aaron Schock, R-Ill.:
"There's a skepti-
lomas cism of government.
dER Young people say, 'If
IE I want to feed the
DES hungry or make a
difference for can-
cer patients, it's easier to do
that through a nonprofit and
see the tangible results up close
than, say, trying to push for fed-
eral funding to do the same."' At
32, Schock is the second-
youngest member of Congress
and may reflect the attitude of
many of his generation.
What's the message? It is that
the states, especially those with
Republican governors, are
mostly doing a far better job in
addressing people's needs and
wants than Washington. As
Peter Roff notes in U.S. News,
"... while the 'blue states' are
running up debt and flirting
with bankruptcy, the 'red states'
continue to take the lead in
cutting taxes, streamlining gov-
ernment and job creation,
according to a report issued
Monday by the State
Government Leadership
Foundation..."


Charitable organizations are
addressing problems the fed-
eral government only talks
about. World Magazine, a bi-
weekly Christian publication,
has given its annual "Hope
Award for Effective Compas-
sion" (note the word "Effec-
tive") to My Safe Harbor, an
organization in Anaheim, Calif,
that "helps single mothers
break the dysfunctional cycle of
broken homes." The program
promotes faith, personal re-
sponsibility and accountability
for one's actions. Its goal is not
to addict people to a govern-
ment check, but to free them
from dependency so they can
have the dignity that goes with
earning their own check. It is an
anti-poverty program that
works.
If Republicans want to regain
trust, they should be focusing
less on the failures of Democ-
rats and more on the successes
of Republican governors, Re-
publican legislatures, charita-
ble organizations like My Safe
Harbor and volunteers. They
are achieving goals Washington
can't. Instead, Washington con-
tinues to misspend too much
money with little to show for it,
except ever-increasing debt
The USA Today poll found
that young people put "elected
official or working for one" at
the very bottom of their career
choices. Given the performance
of Washington's political class,
who can blame them?

Readers may e-mail
Cal Thomas at tmseditors
@tribune.com.


TAH FR.
600MwICS-CO 2013


SLETTERS to the Editor


Don't raise taxes,
charge Duke
Our commissioners (exclud-
ing Scott Adams) do not have
any interest in the Citrus
County taxpayer They are only
interested in tax increases.
The average taxpayer
should expect tax increases in
November None of these tax
increases are necessary if
commissioners were con-
cerned about the taxpayer
Citrus County should be
charging Duke Energy for its
toxic waste dump. Decades'
worth of nuclear waste are on
its property Any strong cli-
mactic change or leakage will
wreak havoc on the residents
of Citrus County It can hap-
pen. Remember, Japan, Wash-
ington State, etc. The
commissioners must levy a
substantial charge or fee on
Duke for this heinous prob-
lem. It should be at least $50
million per year. Duke, the
largest utility in the United
States, is mega-rich. Fifty mil-
lion dollars is peanuts to it
and is a tax write-off. The CEO
and upper management make
considerably more. Duke also
uses about 4 million gallons of
fresh water per day, free. This
should be charged.
The revenue from the sale of
Citrus Memorial hospital
should be used to eliminate
taxes.
The commissioners must for-
get about tax increases and go
after Duke for money due Cit-
rus County
Robert Geffken
Beverly Hills


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address
the editorial board should call
352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
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to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Best practices
Re: "The greatest nation," by
John McFadden, guest column,
Page A12, July 9.
That column was written ex-
ceptionally well. I feel the same
way as the author I lived through
the years he describes and fre-
quently wonder about the future
of our country I believe we have
lost the will to live by the stan-
dards that served us so well
and wish the media would do a
better job of helping us find our
way back to those qualities.
Robert Best
Crystal River


Do liberals
destroy society?
I am not a liberal, but let me
respond to Brad L. Block's
challenge anyway ("Ideas that
destroy society," Page A9,
Thursday, June 27). He main-
tains "most liberals seem to
have a desire to dispose of any
type of traditional religions,
morals, or historical founda-
tions," leading inevitably to the
destruction of society
His "argument" is fatally
flawed. First of all, he is guilty
of the logical fallacy that
rhetoricians term "begging the
question," a form of circular
reasoning that occurs when we
assume in the premise the con-
clusion we are trying to prove.
In other words, in order to prove
a society fails because of its
liberal values itself a specu-
lative assumption you must
first prove liberals do in fact
possess those values, and that
they so thoroughly permeate
society that failure is inevitable.
Saying it doesn't make it so.
Still more: You must then
prove it was precisely because
of those values that society failed.
This is the fallacy usually re-
ferred to by the Latin label
"post hoc ergo propter hoc"
("after this, therefore because
of this") the error of suppos-
ing that where there is a time
relationship between two events
there is also a cause-and-effect
relationship; we cannot pre-
sume the relationship. And Mr
Block's entire argument is
based upon presumption.
Peter Poland
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


-0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It was messy, and it hurt, but it was love


My Cheryl and I
enjoy our life to-
gether, and we al-
ways have.
The Lord has blessed us
beyond measure in so
many ways, but I think she
and I fully agree that His
giving to us our three ba-
bies was the ultimate.
Nowadays, they are all
adults with kids of their
own. Even their kids are
not little fellows any
longer; four of the seven
are now teenagers.
A few days ago, as we so
often do, my sweetheart
and I were talking about
our children and grand-


JFK
Continued from Page Cl

views didn't represent everyone.
A war of editorials followed.
Besides McGehee's group, the
anti-communist John Birch So-
ciety had an active chapter in
Dallas. And the outspoken Maj.
Gen. Edwin Walker, who resigned
from the U.S. Army after being
reprimanded for giving troops
right-wing propaganda, settled
in Dallas, where he flew the
American flag upside down in
front of his home.
Anti-Kennedy fliers in the
form of a "Wanted" poster with a
mug shot-style portrait of the
president appeared on the
streets just before Kennedy's
visit. Michael V Hazel, historian
of the city who was a high school
sophomore in 1963, remembers
his younger brother and a friend
found such literature on the
neighborhood sidewalk, leaving
his family appalled. To most lo-
cals, Hazel said, "I think those
incidents seemed rather isolated
and almost fringe-type things."
But beyond the city, after the
assassination, those incidents
took on greater meaning to those
looking for explanations. "The
city got branded with the 'City of
Hate' because the extreme con-
servatives, the right-wingers,



HAMMER
Continued from Pa

Program her grandson is disab]
and for speed-limit signs outside
vate schools like the one he attei
She has lobbied to allow dyslexic
dren to use talking computers d
standardized tests.
Hammer was inducted into
Florida Women's Hall of Fame in
and is a certified firearms instri
She spoke to The News Servi
Florida on July 12, the day b
George Zimmerman's acquittal i
death of Trayvon Martin.
NSF: It's said you're in a cla
yourself at getting your bills pass
what's the secret of your success?
HAMMER: First of all, do you i
expect me to give up trade secrets
Being successful involves beli
in what you're doing, because i
don't believe in it, you're not goi
care to the depths of which you ne
care to get it done. You have to
focus. You have to do your rese
You need to have your facts, an
have to believe in what you're c
People who don't believe in
they're doing rarely give it the de
tion an issue deserves.
I'm not a hired gun. I am privi
to be paid to do a job that I love c
And I am successful because I car
cause the people with whom I
know that I care. They know tha
going to tell them the truth, evei
hurts me, and that I'm not going tc
So it's from that backdrop that
proach every issue.
And if it's important enough to
it's important enough to finish.
NSF: How did you come to be s(
sionate about gun rights?
HAMMER: Well, I grew up sho
My grandfather taught me to
when I was 6 years old. And I
hunting after school. We were a
family and we engaged in subsis
hunting. And that's where my lc
guns came from. I guess it's more;
of my right to have and use a gun t]
is my love of guns. Sometimes those
get intermingled and mixed up.
And when I got married, I manr
man that loved to hunt and shool
we shot competitively That was
of our family recreational actix
and when our children came a
they were involved in it.
The '68 Gun Control Act angers
beyond belief because our govern:
that is supposed to protect us an
rights, decided to engage in some
ical eyewash. They wanted to p
piece of legislation to make thems
feel good because we had had
tragic assassinations (John E Ken
Martin Luther King Jr. and I
Kennedy) that had nothing to do
guns, but with people.
I started working to try to stop ti
Gun Control Act. I believed they
serious about passing it. I could
other shooters, other hunters,
sportsmen, heavily engaged be(


children. We began to rem-
inisce about our early days
of parenthood and re-
counting the adventures
we had with each of them.
We loved them dearly,
but we were not deaf or
blind, and our senses of
touch and smell were in
good working order
I know some of you read-
ers are still eating your
breakfast, so I'll be as gen-
tle with this as possible.
Kids do stuff that doesn't
always smell good.
Not only that but all three
of ours were into sharing
almost anything, including
- once they started cut-


ting teeth their teething sharing and other messi-
biscuits. Later on, it was ness, because I went off to
whatever cookie work and was
or piece of not with them
candy they all day, every
might be eating. day I didn't suf-
We didn't ask fer as much as
for these things. Cheryl did.
They just They each
automatically had their own
stuffed them special way of
into our inflicting dis-
mouths. It was Fred Brannen comfort in the
very generous, S I name of love on
but it was also A SLICE their mother
very messy OF LIFE Bethy-Pooh's
Quite frankly, it special treat
was disgusting. Yuck! was to run at full gallop,
Though I always seemed leap into Cheryl's arms and
to get my fair share of the then climb up, with her


had a following and they were good
at getting publicity," said Gary
Mack, curator of the Sixth Floor
Museum, who added, 'A lot of
people knew about them, but they
didn't have a lot of followers."
In fact, as the president and
first lady arrived in Dallas after
buoyant stopovers in San Anto-
nio, Houston and Fort Worth,
bright skies and cheering throngs
greeted them. As the motorcade
made its way downtown, Kennedy
even had his car stop so he could
greet children who'd lined up.
Crowd estimates range from
150,000 to 200,000 people, about
a third of the population of the
city at the time, said Mack,
adding, "When you look at the
films and photographs, you can-
not find more than two or three
negative signs anywhere. There
were nothing but cheers."
Wise, the future mayor who was
a reporter with KRLD radio and
television in 1963, agreed. He'd
covered the Stevenson fracas, which
was on his mind as Kennedy's
motorcade left Dallas' Love Field.
"It was such a cheerful crowd
that my fears kind of went away,"
Wise said.
Near the end of its route, the
motorcade approached the school
book depository, located across
from Dealey Plaza, a grassy area
marking Dallas' birthplace in
1841. Texas first lady Nellie Con-
nally, sitting beside her husband


in front of the Kennedys in the
limousine, recalled saying: "Mr
President, you certainly cannot
say that Dallas doesn't love you."
The rifle shots came moments
later

As mayor at the time, Earle
Cabell was on the receiving
end of much of the criticism of
Dallas that quickly followed.
The letters from around the
world are part of his papers
housed at Southern Methodist
University, one of the sponsors
of a series of public programs to
mark the anniversary
One letter writer alluded to an
"insanity" predominating the city
and its politics, while another was
incredulous that Oswald himself
could have been fatally shot
while being escorted by police.
Some letters to the city offered
sympathy and support and
leaders began contemplating
how to move forward.
In 1964, J. Erik Jonsson, co-
founder of Texas Instruments,
who succeeded Cabell as mayor,
announced his "Goals for Dal-
las" initiative focusing on the fu-
ture. Results included the new
Dallas-Fort Worth International
Airport, kindergarten in public
schools and other changes.
Current Dallas Mayor Mike
Rawlings called the program "a
healing process as well as a
planning process."


"I've had I cannot

tell you, through the

years, how many

legislators men -

have called me for

private conversations

about which gun

they needed to buy,

and where was the

best place to get it,

and where can I find

the best price?"
they just didn't believe it would hap-
pen. And it did. And that started waking
people up to the arrogance of govern-
ment to trample the rights of law-abiding
citizens who had done nothing wrong,
to make themselves feel like they were
doing something. From that point on, I
never really got out of doing everything
I could to protect those rights to see to
it that that sort of thing didn't happen
again.
You win some, you lose some. I love to
win, and I do not like to lose -particu-
larly when there's so much on the line.
NSF: You were the first female pres-
ident of the NRA. What was it like being
a woman lobbying for a major issue that
was predominantly associated with men?
HAMMER: When I would stand in
front of a committee, testifying on the
gun issue, I found that a lot of legislators
- probably 99 percent of them back
then were men thought they knew
more about guns than I did. Because they
were men, I mean, and men naturally
know more about guns than women.
And I would find in committee that I
would be asked questions I was
being tested. I was being asked ques-
tions about differences in guns and dif-
ferences in ammo that were everyday,
around-the-potbellied-stove-at-the-
general-store kind of questions that had
no bearing at all on the legislation. Well,
it didn't take 'em long to figure out that
I knew my stuff and they better quit ask-
ing those questions, because when I
gave the right answers, they looked bad.
So you make your own place in the
world in which you live and work.
I've had I cannot tell you, through
the years, how many legislators men
-have called me for private conversa-
tions about which gun they needed to
buy, and where was the best place to get
it, and where can I find the best price?
NSF: While you were leading the
NRA, you took in your daughter, who
was terminally ill, and your grandchil-
dren. How did you balance your family
with your leadership responsibilities?
HAMMER: You just do it. I mean,
some things you just do. You don't think
about it.


hard little shoes leaving
bruises all along the way
Becky thought her
mother's long, blond hair
was the most beautiful stuff
she had ever seen, and she
wanted to brush it. Cheryl
couldn't say no. Think about
a 3-year-old girl pulling a
brush with all of her might
through hair that was at
least 30 inches long. It was
love, but it was painful.
And Fred 3 had his own
special little trick. It
wasn't physically painful,
but it would wreak emotional
havoc on Cheryl for a few
minutes when it happened.
He played hide-and-seek


By 1970, the Texas School
Book Depository, the most
visible reminder of the assassi-
nation, sat empty after the book
company moved out. Following a
push by a small group to buy the
building and tear it down, the
City Council passed an order in
1972 blocking demolition.
Eventually, the building
caught the eye of county officials
looking for additional space.
Chairwoman of the Dallas County
Historical Commission, Lindalyn
Adams, part of a group that toured
the "ghostlike, eerie" structure,
recalled taking a freight elevator
up to the empty sixth floor and
peering from the window that
had been Oswald's perch. "I
looked out of it for the first time
and I thought, 'Oh my gosh, it's so
close,"' she said.
The county bought the build-
ing in 1977 and opened offices
there in 1981, with the sixth and
seventh floors remaining empty
Soon, Adams embarked on a
mission to convince Dallasites
something should be put in
place to explain what had hap-
pened there. She found an ally
in Lee Jackson, who after being
elected as Dallas County judge
in 1986 noticed the "persistent
interest" of tourists.
The sixth floor finally opened
to the public in 1989. Even then,
however, it was simply called an
exhibit.


I raised three daughters and then two
grandchildren. My youngest daughter
was diagnosed with a terminal, inoper-
able brain tumor, just weeks after I was
elected president of the NRA. That was
a personally devastating thing. And so
here I am in a new position with the na-
tion's spotlight on me and a pain that is
burning a hole. I've always believed
that the good Lord's not going to give
you any more than you can handle.
There were times when I wondered if
He was paying attention, but I always
managed to get it done.
Two years after she was diagnosed,
her husband walked out He told me, "I
didn't sign up for this." And he walked
out on her and two little children. When
Sally was diagnosed, Kayla wasn't even
a year old. So I moved her and the kids
in with me. The kids and I took care of
her and each other, and I did my job,
and we got through it.
And now those kids are grown. Eric
is 21 years old today, and last month
Kayla turned 18. So it's been a long
time, but they've kept me young.
They've kept me active. And we've man-
aged to be successful as a family and in
the workplace.
NSF: Eric is also the basis for your
lobbying for children with disabilities.
HAMMER: Eric has severe dyslexia.
When he got to be about 5, when we put
him in pre-school, we began to realize
that something was wrong. We weren't
sure. And when he started kinder-
garten, he failed kindergarten. So they
put him in K-l, and they called us in
and said he was going to fail again, and
they didn't know what to do with him.
We had him tested and found that he
had severe dyslexia. He just couldn't
read the way they were teaching. And
so I spent a lot of time advocating for
children with disabilities because the
parents needed somebody to advocate
for their children, and they certainly
didn't have the money to hire a big-time
lobbyist. So we got a bunch of us, you
know, working to do what we could to
help kids. And any time that there are
issues dealing with children with dis-
abilities and their educational issues,
you're going to find me in the middle of
it because I saw what getting the
right kind of education did for my
grandson.
His kindergarten teacher, his K-1
teacher, told me that he was a throw-
away, that he would never learn. When
that boy gave the valedictorian speech
at his high school graduation, there
wasn't a dry eye in the room. He's now
going to be a junior in college and he
has a 3.5 grade-point average. This is a
kid who's a throwaway? Because some
teachers don't want to teach? They don't
want to think outside the box? They
don't want to have a kid that doesn't fit
in the same little cookie-cutter hole?
These kids need somebody to advo-
cate for 'em, and I'm going to be there
as often as I can. And I've worked with
a lot of legislators through the years,
getting things done that probably
wouldn't have happened if there
weren't a lot of us who cared about the
issue.


with her; the problem was,
he didn't tell her before he
started the game, leaving
her in turmoil and yelling
his name until she would
hear him giggle and find
his hiding place. To him, it
was just a game he loved to
play with his mommy To
her, it was the momentary
terror of a missing toddler!
The bottom line is we -
all five of us survived.
It was messy, and it hurt,
but it was love.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


"To have a full-fledged mu-
seum was too much to take at
that time," Adams said, though
it's long since been accredited as
a museum and expects to get
350,000 visitors this year

O overtime, Dallas has become
more associated with the
Dallas Cowboys football team and
the television show "Dallas" than
with the assassination. But the
50th anniversary has prompted
reflection throughout the city.
The Dallas Museum of Art has
premiered a commemorative ex-
hibit: It reunites many works of
art Fort Worth residents had lent
to decorate the Kennedys' hotel
room the night of their stay in
that city The Nasher Sculpture
Center will host a concert featur-
ing a musical composition com-
missioned for the occasion. The
Sixth Floor Museum has embarked
on a speaking series featuring
people with ties to Nov 22, 1963.
The city itself will mark the date
with a solemn ceremony in Dealey
Plaza featuring the tolling of church
bells, a moment of silence and
readings by historian David Mc-
Cullough from Kennedy's speeches.
"We want to be very respect-
ful," said Mayor Rawlings. "We
want to be very somber because
it's a somber moment and have
a sense of understated grace
that I think this city has when it's
at its best."


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

coupons. We love discounts. We love a deal.
Should we be surprised that people
don't want to pay more taxes?
Low-cost living has become part of our
community DNA.
It is true that over the past 20 years
there has been an infusion of communities
such as Sugarmill Woods, Black Diamond
and Citrus Hills where it is not just about
finding a bargain. But those communities
are in the minority.
Since the recent Great Recession (or as
some call it, the Great Unpleasantness)
has arrived, Citrus County businesses
have sliced and diced their payrolls and
expenses just to survive.
Many have not survived.
Now the flow of reduced revenues has
caught up with county government. It's
true that the county has already cut more
than 100 jobs and reduced spending by 25
percent. But the recent decision by Duke
Energy to not pay its full property tax bill
has turned a steady decline in revenues
into a freefall that's causing shivers in ac-
countants everywhere.
The county's answer has been to
make additional spending reductions, but
also implement this $54 fire service fee
and raise property tax millage rate by
30 percent.
Angry taxpayers showed up at the
auditorium to complain about the $54 fire
tax change, but for most that will be noth-
ing compared to the 30 percent property
tax hike.
When property owners get their TRIM
notices on property taxes in August, they
will see a much higher new charge to
make up for the Duke shortfall.
The auditorium will be filled again when
the county holds those public workshops.
The challenge for citizens now is to stop
saying silly things and instead give the
politicians direct input on what existing
services you can do without
Our county commissioners are not
crooks. They are not dopes. They are not
in the pockets of some rich bogeyman.
They are elected folks who are trying
to balance their spending with the amount
of money we are all willing to pay At the
same time, they want to help nurture the
economy; entice tourists to come here;
and provide roads, parks, libraries and
community centers to people who want
them.
And because they are politicians, they
want to be liked and appreciated.
Angry taxpayers are part of our national
DNA. Citrus County has an extra dose of
that gene because that's who we invited to
come live here.
Let's not be surprised by who's sitting
down at our dinner table. Let's just try to
figure out the middle ground that the ma-
jority can live with.
It won't be a pretty process but it's the
journey we have chosen.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


Sound OFF


Not the time
for foolish loan
Our board of county commis-
sioners needs some education.
I wonder if Joe Meek also thinks
an attorney only bills for the time
he's actually in the court or if a
project manager only bills for
the time he actually walks the
property. This is in regard to his
comment that it was ludicrous
that staff time be counted to-
ward the cost of Port Citrus.
What school did he go to? I hope
you don't send your children or
your grandchildren there because
they didn't do a very good job.
Secondly, taking out a loan in
these times to do work that was
not essential and also work that
is going to be done by an out-
of-Citrus-County contractor and
work that is going to be done by
non-Citrus-County employees,
does not make sense. That loan
is still on the books as of yet
against your resources. This is
not the time to take out loans to
do things, no matter how they're
going to be repaid. Now is the
time to cut your costs as much
as possible and keep your bal-
ance sheets as clean and good
as possible.
Try these
taxes instead
I'm calling the Chronicle in
reference to the increase for the
fire tax. Why don't they increase
the tax on cigarettes, alcohol
and lottery in Citrus County?
That would bring up more than
more money than what they
need. So tax cigarettes, alcohol
and lottery and quit hitting the
homeowners with more money
paying for more money.
Editor's note: The county
doesn't have the statutory author-
ity to pass taxes on cigarettes, al-
cohol and the lottery.


A1YOU?AAWNLUC W NO. B"VEY
FIMt JOf7> A.l A THE PRES1PEM


Be nice to old people,
Commissioner
Us old people in Beverly Hills
take objection to "JJ" Kenney
calling old people, when they
die, "taking a dirt nap." We
think it's uncalled for and
unprofessional.
What's happening
near Walmart?
Can you find out about what's
going in up by our new Walmart
on (county roads) 486 and 491?
They're putting soil down and
they're out there plowing it today
and it's obviously a building
that's going to be built. So can
you let the public know what it
is? If you're looking at Walmart,
it's to the left in the front.
Editor's note: That will be the
site of a new McDonald's.


No longer a On the other hand...


This old hippie feels I should
respond to guest writer John
McFadden's Tuesday article about
the United States no longer being
the greatest nation. Moral wars?
What we did to the Indians just
here in Florida, the Seminole
Indians. We kicked them out of
Florida and where did we send
them to? I don't know, the Dust-
bowl in Oklahoma? That sure is
not like the swamps in Florida.
That's just one example. Plus, we
had a Civil War; brother killing
brother, and we freed the slaves.
Excellent column
The July 9 guest column by
John McFadden ("The greatest
nation") was outstanding and
the best illustration of the di-
rection that our country is
heading that I have ever seen.


great country
The guest column in the
Opinion page today, July 9, of
the Chronicle was the greatest I
have read lately. It was titled "The
greatest nation," and was written
by John McFadden. A key phrase
was, "Our nation has replaced
'In God we trust' with 'If it feels
good, do it.'" I am an 81-year-old
male who proudly served our
country during the Korean Conflict.
This writer has captured the very
essence of what has evolved over
the years since Pearl Harbor was
attacked in 1941. I honestly be-
lieve this country will never again
elect a Republican president and
I also believe we will receive what
we deserve a country much
like the former Russia, which
became a hodgepodge of cul-
tures, languages and beliefs.


COMMENTARY


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We invite you to join us for our
Annual Scholarship Kick-Off Party
"A Day at the Swamp"
Citrus County Fairgrounds Auditorium
Inverness, Florida
Saturday, August 24th, 2013 5:00 9:00pm
Special guest speaker:
NFL Legend and Florida Gator Great
Chris Doering
Tickets can be purchased at the following locations:
All About Nature In Crystal River MaI
(Irfes Of IrelInd d Fiwstoe of Crystli Rive'
Century 21 on Main Street and Goldiggers & Gunslingers in Inverness
The Gator Patch in the Ocala Mail
Or by mail: 6570 N Tamarind Ave, Hernando, FL 34442
Additional irformatian calh; 352-503-4263
Find us on Facebook: Citrus County Gator Club (Group)
Our website Is www.ccgators.com
Alumni Club Members: $10 in Advance
Non-Alumni Club Members: $15 each or 2 for $25
SS15 at the Door
Children: Age 5 and under are Free


CH~pN1CLE
C~ma


Join us in "Swamp" style for this
Gator galthering filed with food,
fun, entertainment, silent 8auctions,
raffles, and giveaways!
All proceeds benefit the Citrus Cournty
Gator Club Scholarship Fund.


I ,
LaI I


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-.*--, i .----i-I----I--J---,---*"**


= -.7 "" T :


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Ridiculous law
The Florida Legislature en-
acted a ridiculous law which al-
lows someone who commits a
criminal act, to wit assault and
battery, to be reborn and de-
clare himself a victim and
plead self-defense when he real-
izes he is losing the fight.
Stay awake
at election time
I find it very interesting that
people can always come up
with an idea that we live in a
good-ol'-boy county, which
sometimes I agree with. But
what surprises me the most is
that with reading some of the
Sound Offs and the letters to
the editor and our new commis-
sioner, Scott Adams, I'm start-
ing to realize there are some
smart people in this county. Ei-
ther that or they're just waking
up, whatever the case may be.
And if it's the fact that they're
just waking up, they should
have done that a long time ago.
But I hope they stay awake
when it comes election time.
Animal Control
will help
I read in today's paper,
Tuesday, July 9, in the Sound
Off, about a lady that's upset
because these two dogs are
not being fed or watered.
Please call Animal Control.
They will not take away the
dogs from the people, but they
will get onto those people and
they will keep checking to make
sure they are taking care of
their dogs. Please, it makes
me sick to read stuff like that
and I know it makes you sick
and disgusted also. But I beg
you, either go talk to the people
or call Animal Control. We
must do something for these
animals.


IL.


', I
i:' j


L i- .-7 4 1 :t -!
w, '-L- I









BUSINESS


Inside:
"Summer slump"
hits Citrus County/D3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Despite pressure from some liberal Democrats for a
September showdown in hopes of ending huge automatic,
government-shrinking spending cuts, Washington appears
on track to avert what would be the first government

shutdown in nearly two decades.



AVERTING SHUTDOWN


TRICKY OBSTACLES AHEAD FOR NATION'S LAWMAKERS


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil has first weekly
decline since June

NEW YORK The oil market
cooled off this week following some
lofty gains.
Oil fell 79 cents to close at $104.70
Friday in New York For the week,
the price of oil fell $3.35, or 3.1 per-
cent the first weekly decline since
mid-June.Oil is still up $11, or 12
percent since June 21, when it fell
to $93.69. It broke above $100 on July
3 for the first time since May 2012
and peaked at slightly more than
$109 on July 19. The rise was mostly
due to falling U.S. crude stockpiles
and increased interest from finan-
cial investors.
Oil's rise pushed up pump prices.
Starting on July 8, the average price
for a gallon of gas rose for 11 straight
days, going from $3.47 to $3.67, be-
fore leveling off. At $3.65, the price is
still 16 cents more expensive than at
this time last year

Stocks falter as
China struggles
LONDON Stocks mostly
dropped Friday on concerns that a
brusque overhaul of China's indus-
try could slow down the world's sec-
ond-largest economy and after
retailer Amazon.com reported a sur-
prise loss.
In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100
index was down 0.5 percent to
6,557.49 while Germany's DAX fell
0.7 percent to 8,243.24.
France's CAC-40 bucked the
trend, rising 0.3 percent to 3,969.76.
It was boosted by a 4.1 percent rise
in the shares of LVMH, the luxury
goods maker, after it reported
higher earnings.
In Asia, Japan's Nikkei 225 index
fared worst on Friday, closing 3 per-
cent lower at 14,129.98, due to a big
rise in the yen, which risks making
the country's exports less competi-
tive on international markets.
-From wire reports


ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press


3hat's not to say it will be
easy Senior lawmakers
on Capitol Hill are find-
ing trickier-than-usual
obstacles in their path as
they try to come up with
must-do legislation to keep federal
agencies running after Sept. 30.
At issue is what is normally rou-
tine: a plug-the-gap measure known
as a continuing resolution to fund the
government for a few weeks or
months until a deal can be worked
out on appropriations bills giving
agencies their operating budgets for
the full 2014 fiscal year, which begins
Oct. 1.
On the one hand are some Demo-
cratic liberals who don't want to vote
to continue to fund the government at
new, lower levels mandated by auto-
matic, across-the-board spending cuts
known as sequestration. This pro-
gram has cut $55 billion about 5
percent from the day-to-day oper-
ating budgets of federal agencies
since March.
"There are lots of progressives who
care about domestic discretionary
spending who think that the Republi-
cans are winning because with the se-
quester we have a gradual
downsizing of the government going
on that nobody's doing anything about
and If we just let it keep happening


without having a confrontation about
it we're losing. And Sept. 30 becomes
a place to have a confrontation about
it," said Democratic strategist Steve
Elmendorf, a former longtime House
staff aide.
On the other hand are conserva-
tives making a last stand against Pres-
ident Barack Obama's new health
care law and Senate Democrats' re-
sistance to a $20 billion spending cut
wanted by many, if not most Republi-
cans. These are two of the major
problems confronting House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, and other
GOP leaders.
The combustible mix raises the
possibility of the first government
shutdown since the 1995-96 battle be-
tween President Bill Clinton and
GOP insurgents led by Speaker Newt
Gingrich. Republicans got the worst
of that battle and have avoided shut-
downs ever since.
"I don't see any big challenges,"
Boehner, R-Ohio, said recently "The
law is the law"
As for Obama, he'd be hard-pressed
to veto a bill that keeps to govern-
ment funded at the same rate it's
funded now
"The American people will not look
kindly upon action taken here in
Washington to shut down the govern-
ment," White House Press Secretary
Jay Carney said this week.
"He's not going to veto a short-term
CR," said Democrat Elmendorf. "I


just think realistically it's not going to
happen."
The prevailing thinking is that it
will all get worked out since leaders
in both parties want to avoid a shut-
down. But unlike last year, when Con-
gress opted to delay debate on the
so-called fiscal cliff until after the
election and the December holidays,
there has been little negotiation this
time. The differences on spending
levels also are more troublesome
than last year
The appropriations process is
hopelessly tangled this year, in great
part because the Democratic-led Sen-
ate and GOP-controlled House are
more than $90 billion apart on how
much to spend on Cabinet agency op-
erations. And Oct. 1 is deceptively
close since Congress takes the month
of August off and has a limited sched-
ule in September because of the Jew-
ish holidays.
The ordinary thing to do would be
to continue running the government
on autopilot at current levels as
has been done dozens of times since
the 1995-96 debacle to buy time for
negotiations this fall on both funding
the government and raising the so-
called debt limit. That would punt
any battle over sequestration further
into the fall.
But many tea party Republicans,
spurred on by outside groups like the


Page D3


Bank profits soar in 2nd quarter; tech lags


STEVE ROTHWELL
Associated Press
NEW YORK Just over half of
the companies in the Standard &
Poor's 500 index have reported
earnings for the second quarter,
and some are faring better than oth-
ers. Here are some of the things
we've learned so far
Banks and other financial compa-
nies have been the standouts. The
materials sector, which includes
miners and chemical companies,
have fared the worst. Earnings are
also contracting in the technology
industry Some older tech compa-
nies are reporting lower profits as
they struggle to adapt while con-
sumers embrace smartphones and
other mobile devices.
Overall, earnings growth is


projected to slow for a third
straight quarter Analysts forecast
that companies in the Standard &
Poor's 500 index will report earn-
ings growth of 4.5 percent for the
period, according to S&P Capital
IQ. That's a drop from 5.2 percent in
the first three months of the year
It's not all bad news.
Earnings at U.S. companies are
expected to grow faster in the sec-
ond half of the year as the economy
strengthens. Rising consumer confi-
dence, boosted by climbing home
prices and an improving job mar-
ket should combine to drive the
economy to stronger growth, help-
ing companies earn more. The
economy should also benefit after
the impact starts to fade from


Page D3


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON National As-
sociation of Realtors releases
pending home sales index for
June, 10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
Labor Department releases
weekly jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.;
Freddie Mac, the mortgage
company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.; Institute
for Supply Management releases
its manufacturing index for July,
10 a.m.; Commerce Department
releases construction spending
for June, 10 a.m.
*FRIDAY
WASHINGTON- Labor Depart-
ment releases employment data for
July 8:30 a.m.


Bruce
Williams

L SMART
MONEY





Property



doesn't


equal


security

EAR BRUCE: We are re-
tired and have a grown-up
son who works full time. He
does not want to marry until he
has a stable job, which is not possi-
ble in this unstable job market We
want to transfer our rental com-
mercial property to him to give
him some financial security How
we can transfer it without costing
us an arm and leg?
-Jay, via email
DEARJAY: All you have to do
is transfer the property to your son.
In the event that you don't wish to
pay any taxes on the transfer, you
simply claim against your lifetime
exemption. Unless the property's
value is in the millions, you're
home free.
I don't see any good reason to
transfer the commercial property
to give him financial security We
would all like to have stability, but
why try to purchase it for him? To
get him to marry? I don't see any
purpose in that.
I would keep the property in
your name. I don't see how giving
your son a substantial amount of
money is going to help him, but I
can see a lot of problems that it
could create.
DEAR BRUCE: We have been
married for over 40 years. Our
See Page D3






D2 SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013
D2 Promotional information provided
H^ by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801




Member Spotlight: Walk Don't Run Travel


or over six years Sue Fuller-
ton, with Walk Don't Run
Travel, has been assisting
families, groups, and
businesses with their travel
needs. Walk Don't Run
Travel is an online business
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Booking a cruise,
exciting adventure or
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Price &

Company

welcomes

Comer
Crystal River CPA firm
Price & Company, P.A.,
is pleased to announce the
addition to the firm's staff
of John B. Comer II as the
company's bookkeeper.
John re-
ceived his
bachelor's
degree in
account-
ing from
the Uni-
versity of
John B. Phoenix in
Comer II 2009. He
will be continuing his ac-
counting education by
studying for the IRS En-
rolled Agent (EA) exam.
John was previously em-
ployed by an accounting
firm in Lutz, Fla., for three
years, and was with Bran-
nen Bank for 10 years. He
moved to Citrus County in
1999 from Ypsilanti, Mich.
We are excited to add John
to our team.



Shop

local for

back-to-

school!


".I


The summer will be
over before you know it.
Take advantage of the 2013
Florida Sales Tax Holiday
for Back-to-School shop-
ping. The three-day sales
tax holiday will begin at
12:01 a.m., Friday, Aug. 2,
and end at midnight Sun-
day, Aug. 4. Visit www.
citruscountychamber.com
and search our business di-
rectory for businesses that can
fulfill your back-to-school
shopping needs! Visit
http://dor.myflorida.com/
or scan the QR code above
for a list of eligible items!



i4I l 1


'Two Good Soles' benefits children

in remembrance of Sept. 11 attacks


This year marks the 12th an-
niversary of the Sept. 11 at-
tacks and has been designated a
National Day of Service and Re-
membrance. In tribute to those
who were lost and the tens of
thousands who rose in service.
the Citrus County Commission's
Nature Coast Volunteer Center
(NCVC) and Retired and Senior
Volunteer Program (RSVP) are
sponsoring the "Two Good Soles"
drive, collecting new shoes and


socks for children in need from
July 31 through Sept. 11.
Come out and see us during
the Tax Free Holiday weekend
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 2, 3
and 4 at the Crystal River Mall
(Kmart and Payless Shoe Source),
Walmart, Kmart and Payless
Shoe Source (Inverness). Partic-
ipate in the remembrance of
9/11 by making a donation at
one of these collection sites.
Collection items will benefit


local agencies (Citrus Abuse
Shelter Association, Citrus County
District Student Services, Citrus
County Family Resource Center,
Citrus United Basket, Daystar
Life Center, SPOT Family Cen-
ter, The Path of Citrus County,
and Mission in Citrus Shelter).
If you are a business or civic
organization that would like to
learn how you can participate in
"Two Good Soles," call 352-249-
1275.


YOUCAUGHT MY EYE...
Ed Bugbee
Citrus County Water Resources
Phyllis Sutherland
Suntrust Bank, Beverly Hills
... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Sponsors, donors make the difference

at BWA's HEALTH and FITNESS Expo


hanks in large part to its
major sponsors, this
year's Women's HEALTH
and FITNESS Expo, hosted by
the Business Women's Alliance
of the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, will be able to de-
liver another excellent event.
This year's Expo will be from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
28 at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Thank you to presenting
sponsor Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, plus these
major sponsors: Advanced
Urology Specialists; Citrus Me-
morial Health System; Genesis
Women's Center & Medical
Spa; and Tobacco Free Florida
of the Citrus County Health De-
partment. Our generous media
sponsors are the Citrus County
Chronicle and Citrus 95/Classic
Hits the Fox. A number of other
businesses also are sponsoring
at varying lower levels.
In addition to gathering


HEALTH...

,FITNESS



health and wellness informa-
tion, plus enjoying demos and
screenings, Expo attendees may
register free for the door prize
drawings. We thank our donors
thus far for health/wellness-
themed door prizes having a
value of $250 or more: Citrus
County Jazzercise; Genesis
Women's Center & Medical
Spa; Rodan + Fields; and the
new Walmart store.
The Expo's purpose is to edu-
cate women and those around
them about their health, fitness
and wellness. Sponsorship
helps fund scholarships for stu-


dents from Citrus, Crystal River
and Lecanto high schools and
Withlacoochee Technical Insti-
tute for healthcare and business
careers. The BWA was able to
award nine scholarships for the
past year.
Details on exhibit registration
and sponsorship opportunities
are available from the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
at 795-3149; from the Chamber
website; on presenting sponsor
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center's website; or find us on
Facebook at bwacitrus.
Proceeds from BWA's
Women's HEALTH and FIT-
NESS Expo fund scholarships
for high school and WTI stu-
dents who are pursuing careers
in health and in non-health
business occupations. In seven
years, we have awarded more
than $39,000 in scholarships to
Citrus County students. Help us
help them, and help yourself at
the same time!


Ugly Tie/Earring Day, Jeans
Day and Florida Gator Day
are just some of the ideas busi-
nesses can use to support the
United Way. In its first ever
campaign manager training, the
local United Way will share per-
sonal success stories from Citrus
County and offer simple and fun
ways to guarantee a successful
workplace campaign.
"The standard workplace
campaign offers an easy way to


give a payroll deduction in the
amount of the employee's
choosing," explains CEO Amy
Meek. "But this year the cam-
paign adds some additional fun
and games to increase aware-
ness of what United Way is and
what we do."
Each year United Ways across
the world appeal to organiza-
tions and individuals to provide
a financial investment in the
local community. In Citrus


County, United Way keeps 99
percent of the funds right here.
These monies are kept in the
community to promote positive
community impact in three main
areas: Education, Income and
Health.
If you are interested in a work-
place campaign at your place of
business, call 352-795-5483.
Campaign manager training
is scheduled from 8 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. Aug. 7.


5ll Upcoming Chamber of Commerce events
Aug. 8-Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 Aug. 22-Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to of Education, 11:30 a.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
iB: r ip.m. at Suncoast Business Masters 7 p.m. at Life Care Center/Comfort Keepers and Country Club
yI WHeAug. 9 Chamber Luncheon, Citrus Hills Aug. 28 Chamber and School Board Sept. 7 Chamber Business Expo, 9 a.m.
"IMrwr r Healthcare Heroes Awards Ceremony Luncheon presenting the State Commissioner to 3 p.m. at the Citrus County Auditorium


News you

can use
Showcase
your business at
September expo!
You won't want to miss
out on this opportunity to
showcase your business
by exhibiting at the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce Business Expo on
Saturday, Sept. 7. This
event will be held at the
Citrus County Auditorium
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit
www.citruscounty
chamber.com/expo for
detailed information on
exhibiting and/or spon-
sorship opportunities for
the Business Expo. Call
Jeff Inglehart at 352-795-
3149.
Make your
reservation for
the Healthcare
Heroes Awards
luncheon
The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, in part-
nership with the Citrus
County Chronicle will
present the Healthcare
Heroes Awards at the
Aug. 9 Chamber luncheon.
The luncheon will be at
the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club. Networking
will begin at 11:30, with
the program beginning at
noon. This luncheon is
open to the public. Please
visit www.citruscounty
chamber.com under News
and Events to make your
reservations or call 352-
795-3149. Reservations
are $18 in advance and
$20 at the door.
Education
commissioner
to speak at
luncheon
The Citrus County School
Board and the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce are sponsoring a
presentation by the
Florida Commissioner of
Education, Dr. Tony Ben-
nett, to be held at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club on Aug. 28 from
11:30 a.m. to 1:oo00 p.m.
The public is invited to at-
tend this presentation.
Reservations are $18 in
advance and $20 at the
door. Seating is limited,
so please RSVP. To make
your reservation, visit the
Chamber Events section
of the Chamber of Com-
merce website (www.
citruscountychamber.com),
or call the Chamber at
352-795-3149. Seats are
expected to go quickly,
so early registration is
recommended.


Check our com-
plete Chamber
and Community
calendar at
citruscounty
chamber.com.


* WHAT:
Walk Don't
Run Travel.
* WHO:
Sue
Fullerton.
* HOURS:
24-hour
availability.
* CONTACT:
352-344-
0905 or
walkdont
runllc.com.


You can make a difference by being your

organization's United Way campaign manager




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Summer slump' rears its head in Citrus County


he day the June 20,2009, issue of
the Chronicle hit the streets was
pretty typical for Florida this time
of year It was a Saturday and there
were scattered thunderstorms with a
heat index of up to 110 degrees.
But the temperature wasn't the only
thing soaring that June so was Citrus
County's unemployment rate. The bold
headline across all six columns at the
top of the front page left little to the
imagination: "Citrus unemployment
climbs." Reporter Chris Van Ormer's
lede told us that, "Once again, the un-
employment rate for Citrus County
surged above 11 percent...'.
In fact it had hit 11.4 percent that May
and 12.1 percent in June -the month the
Great Recession officially supposedly
came to an end. At the time, nearly 7,000
Citrus County residents were unem-
ployed, more than double the number out
of work in December 2007 when the re-
cession began and the unemployment
rate was 6 percent. Oh, the difference
18 short months can make.
Fast forward to this past June, when
the unemployment rate was 8.3 percent
and there were 4,753 jobless. To be sure,


WALL STREET
Continued from Page Dl

government spending cuts and higher
social security taxes put in place at
the beginning of the year
By the fourth quarter of this year,
company profits are expected to leap
11.2 percent from the same period a
year earlier That would be the fastest
pace since the third quarter of 2011.
For now, investors have to be content
with modest growth.
BANKS: GETTING BETTER
U.S. banks reported surging profits
after setting aside less money for bad
loans. Major banks including Citi-
group and JPMorgan Chase also prof-
ited from a boom in investment
banking as recovering financial mar-
kets resulted in big increases in fees
for underwriting stock and bond offer-
ings. Rising interest rates also helped
banks earn more from lending money
The outlook for banks isn't as en-
couraging, however There are signs
that the boom in mortgage refinancing 1
is starting to peter out. On the positive
side, there weren't any nasty surprises
of the kind banks have regularly
handed investors in the years follow-
ing the financial crisis. There was no
mention of massive trading losses like
JPMorgan's $6 billion "London whale"
debacle last year, or settlements for
mortgage-related lawsuits.
Banks are forecast to post earnings
growth of 24 percent in the second quar-
ter, the best of any industry group in the
S&P 500. Of the 39 financial companies
that have posted earnings, 74 percent
have beaten analysts' expectations for
earnings. That's better than the 66 per-
cent average for S&P 500 companies. In
fact if you strip out banks, overall earn-
ings are forecast to rise only 0.5 percent,
according to S&P Capital IQ.
"I suspect that over the next few
quarters, to the extent that interest
rates continue to rise, you may well
continue to see financial outperform
the broader market," said Joseph Tan-
ious, a global market strategist at JP-
Morgan Funds.
The earnings have helped financial





MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

bank accounts are in my husband's
name. I've discussed with him that in
the event of an unforeseen illness or
worse, I would not have any access to
the funds. I am the beneficiary on the
accounts, but in the event of a stroke or
other serious illness, I wouldn't have ac-
cess. I am worried.
-JM., via email
DEAR J.M.: You have every right to be
worried. In the event that your husband
became incapacitated, the finds would
be unavailable to you until such time as
he passed away The accounts should
have your name on them equally That
way, if something happens to him, you can
make withdrawals, write checks, etc.
I don't understand why the accounts
are in your husband's name only He
may not be happy with what I am sug-
gesting, but putting both your names on
the accounts is the appropriate and
proper thing to do.
DEAR BRUCE: I went through a di-
vorce a few years ago and ended up sell-
ing our house in a short sale (it was an
FHA loan). I want to buy a house again
and my credit score is good, around 700.
I'm told there is no way to finance the
loan until at least three years after the
close of the short sale. Is this accurate?
I've asked two mortgage companies with
the same response. Is there any other
way to finance in this circumstance?
-John, via email
DEAR JOHN: You say your credit is
good; 700 is marginal, but it certainly
shouldn't prevent you from getting a
mortgage. Since you do have a bad mark
on your credit, it may well be that many
companies won't finance the loan, but
there are others that will. Even though
you've been turned down by two or


we haven't returned to the
of, say, 2006 when the une:
rate going into the summe
a mere 3.3 percent and on
were out of work.
So what do these three
local unemployment have
They give us perspective i
else we've come to expect
year when it comes to emj
"summer slump."
Each June, we see local
ment rates begin to rise, o
in July or August, but with
ception most notably th
years the rates return tc


below, the pre-slump levels by Septem-
ber or October We have certainly seen
this pattern during the recovery, but we
Laura also saw it in good times, too. Region-
ally, this has been the case tracking back
Bymes to 1991.
n Why does the slump happen? Briefly,
the monthly employment and unem-
WORKFORCE ployment rates at the state and local lev-
CONNECTION els are not seasonally adjusted and
therefore tend to exhibit sharp fluctua-
tions due to seasonal events that follow
a somewhat regular pattern each year
e halcyon days Industries with seasonal declines in em-
mployment ployment in Florida in June included
*r months was agriculture and public and private edu-
ly 1,800 folks cation (in Citrus County elementary and
secondary schools were not in session
snapshots of in June).
in common? Typically in June, the southern coun-
nto something ties experience drops in tourism em-
Sat this time of ployment, but we don't really see that
ployment: the impact here until July
Here's the takeaway: While all 67
unemploy- counties had an increase in unemploy-
ften peaking ment rates over the month, all 67 coun-
i very little ex- ties had declines in their rates over the
e recession year To gauge true economic recovery,
, or drop it's important to look at long-term


companies post the second-best re-
turns in the S&P 500 this month.
They're up 6.1 percent in July, com-
pared with a 5.3 percent gain for the
broader index. Financial stocks have
gained 25.7 percent this year
'OLD' TECH STRUGGLES
Technology companies were meant
be among the biggest beneficiaries of
an improving economy It hasn't
played out that way Some of the
biggest names in the sector are strug-
gling to adapt to new technologies and
how consumers use them.
Microsoft fell 11.4 percent July 19,
the most in more than four years, after
the company wrote off nearly $1 bil-
lion from its new Surface tablet busi-
ness and said that a poor reception for
its Windows 8 operating system
crimped revenue.
Intel, which is wedded to the PC
market even as consumers switch to
mobile devices, slumped after the
company predicted flat sales.
Even Google faltered. Its results sug-
gest that the company is having trou-
ble navigating the transition from
traditional desktop and laptop com-
puters to smartphones and tablets.
Earnings are expected to contract 5
percent for tech companies in the sec-
ond quarter
"Technology companies are where
we've seen some of the biggest disap-
pointments in terms of earnings," said
Kate Warne, an investment strategist
at Edward Jones. "The older technol-
ogy companies have been a bit slow to
move to newer areas."
GLIMMER OF LIFE IN EUROPE?
The slump in Europe may not be
over, but there are some signs of hope,
judging from comments made by exec-
utives at industrial companies.
That's good because many U.S. com-
panies rely heavily on sales to Europe.
Deutsche Bank's chief U.S. equity
strategist, David Bianco, estimates
that 17 percent of the profits at S&P
500 companies come from the region.
General Electric's CEO, Jeff Immelt,
told analysts on a conference call that
Europe has stabilized. GE's orders in-
creased 2 percent in the period after
falling 17 percent in the first three
months of the year




three companies, just continue to look
for someone else.
What you are looking for is a pre-ap-
proved mortgage. Then you can go out
and start looking for a house after you
have the pre-approval. I am confident
that if you continue to look, you will find
a mortgage available.
DEAR BRUCE: In one of your
columns, this sentence caught my atten-
tion: "$250,000 at 7 percent could give
you $15,000 to $18,000 a year income
without attacking principal."
Where on earth can a retiree above
age 70 find 7 percent interest without
taking an unbelievable risk, one from
which he or she could never recover if
the stock market tanked? Any thoughts
would be more than welcome.
-Dorothy via email
DEAR DOROTHY: I am happy that
my sentence caught your attention.
When I say a 7 percent return, it's not an
unreasonable number With $250,000 or
more, you will be worthy of the atten-
tion of any number of qualified brokers
who will have no problem averaging 7
percent or more.
At the risk of being redundant, since
this question is asked so often, invest in
good, solid American companies that
are paying a reasonable dividend
around 2 percent to 4 percent, plus their
appreciation overall. In the market-
place, 7 percent is entirely possible.
I can tell you that I am not risk-averse.
On the other hand, I am not highly spec-
ulative in my investments, but mine
have been consistently earning over 7
percent for a good many years. There
have been some bad years, but overall,
it works well.

Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions of general
interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot be provided.


SHUTDOWN
Continued from Papge Dl

Heritage Foundation and the Club
for Growth, which has a history of
backing right-wing challengers against
incumbents in GOP primaries, are
vowing to oppose any short-term bill
for keeping the government open that
doesn't block spending on Obama's
health care law
"If you pay for a budget that pays for
Obamacare ... you have voted for Oba-
macare," said Sen. Marco Rubio, R-
Fla. "Some will say, 'That is crazy You
are going to shut down the govern-
ment over Obamacare.' No. What is
crazy is moving forward with this."
In the past, GOP leaders have
beaten back efforts that made averting
a government shutdown contingent on
stopping funding for Obama's health
care law But conservatives are casting
this as a last stand against a law they
detest.
"It's spreading. It's kind of getting
out beyond just the tea party It's start-
ing to get to regular people that are
very frustrated with Obamacare,"
Rep. Lee Terry, R-Neb., said. "That's
why it's getting some legs here in the
House."
Some Republicans are nervous
about the effort, fearing it could com-
plicate routine passage of a continu-
ing resolution. And they say it's not a
winning strategy anyway because
Obama brings both a veto pen and the
White House podium to the battle.
"I think it's the dumbest idea I've
ever heard," said Sen. Richard Burr,
R-N.C. "Some of these guys need to
understand that if you shut down the
federal government, you better have a
specific reason to do it that's achiev-
able.... At some point, you're going to
open the federal government back up,
and Barack Obama's going to be presi-
dent, and he won't have signed a dis-
solution of the Affordable Care Act."


trends, not month-to-month fluctua-
tions. Citrus County's unemployment
rate in June was, as I said, 8.3 percent,
that's down 2.0 percentage points over
the year, down from 11.9 percent in 2011
and down from 12.7 percent in 2010. Are
you starting to see a different pattern
here? In real numbers, there are 2,500
fewer people out of work today than
there were just three years ago. That's a
drop of nearly 35 percent.
So did our June unemployment rate
climb in June? Yes, exactly 0.3 percent-
age points. Has it done that before? Yes,
every year, with over the month in-
creases ranging from 0.3 percent to 1.1
percent at the height of the recession in
2008. Will it return to pre-slump or
lower levels by September or October?
Based on what we've experienced over
the years, there is reason to believe that
will be the case.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is Workforce Con-
nection's communications manager and
a Florida Certified Workforce Profes-
sional Please contact her at (352) 291-
9559 or (800) 434-5627, ext 1234 or
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl. corn.


"Shutting down the government, I
think, that's almost never a good tac-
tic," said Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla.,
whose views usually reflect those of
Boehner "It wasn't good for us in 1995;
it's not going to be good for us in 2013."
In the Senate, Mike Lee, R-Utah, is
rounding up fellow conservatives to
pledge to oppose any continuing reso-
lution that funds implementation of
the health care law But Democrats
seem sure to get enough support to hit
the 60-vote threshold needed to ad-
vance the measure past conservative
opposition. Tellingly, No. 2 Senate Re-
publican John Cornyn of Texas ini-
tially signed onto the effort to
"defund" implementation of the
health care law, only to have second
thoughts on Thursday and withdraw
from Lee's letter
A separate wrinkle involves what
spending levels to set. Democrats in-
sist, at a minimum, that spending
should continue at rates consistent
with the current $988 billion cap on
appropriations for the 2013 budget
year ending Sept. 30. But current law,
set by the hard-fought 2011 budget and
debt deal, sets a lower cap of $967 bil-
lion for 2014 as required by automatic
budget cuts known as sequestration.
That's the level demanded by many
Republicans, including Senate Minor-
ity Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
"We made this commitment on a bi-
partisan basis two years ago, and we
intend to keep it," McConnell told re-
porters this week.
Under the complex calculations of
sequestration, however, the Pentagon
would bear virtually all of the additional
cuts required to bring the cap on ap-
propriations from $988 billion to $967
billion, which could give Democrats
leverage in negotiations later on. Seques-
tration would take effect in January
Boehner is facing pressure from
conservatives to try to force the $967
billion figure upon Senate Democrats.
Their leader, Harry Reid of Nevada,
has vowed he won't accept it.


aISCOon fr OT; CONTEST !

W e are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among
those chosen to be displayed in the
2013-2014 Discover Magazine. Please
submit only photos taken in Citrus
County and include a brief description
of the photo along with your name,
address and phone number. Photos
must be submitted by July 31, 2013.




I ~ e I I* I l

oemil to:
disove* c 44e-nlneSo


ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 D3




D4 SUNDAY,JULY 28, 2013


Chroniclea


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tinme


0 @ 0 0 ... 116 0 0 0 *0A


Fa:(32nin5651 ol r-:(88 5--301Eal _sifescrncenie~o es:ww~hoiloln~o


Bayliner
1999Trophy, 22ft Cuddy
cabin, Mercury Force,
many extras $6500
OBO (352) 344-4198
Computer Station
w/ shelves $50.
Lazy Boy Recliner,
pink upholstry $50.
(352) 746-9076
DENTAL
Front Desk/
Dental Asst

Are you a team
player with great
attitude and
phone skills?
Dental Knowledge
a Must PT/FT
Send Resume to:
dentalofficecitrus
countvflaamail.com
DRESSER oak dresser
with mirror, no scars
$85.00 352-513-5400
Free Oak Trees
Cut Down
You cut up and Haul
(352) 628-0348
GENERATOR TROY
BUILT
portable, 120-220v
12v electric start, 8000
running watts, 13,500
starting watts, will do
whole house, bought
after Katrina, never
used. pd $1400. sell for
$925 (352) 489-3914
LINCOLN
'04, Towncar,
62K miles, $9,200
Excellent Cond.
(352) 628-4681
MULTI TOW DOLLY
for car & full size motor-
cycle, new tires & Spare
$2300 OBO
(352) 586-0183
SPEAKERS Yamaha
receiver, center chan-
nel speaker, 2 38"
tower speakers, ex-
cellent cond.,$175.00
Call 352 382-2591
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
YANKEETOWN
8/2 & 8/3 9a-2p
Great Garage Salel
Lots of tools ,air tools,
yard tools, chain
come-a-long.
Honda EU2000 2 KW
generator( only 40
hrs.) Chainsaw on a
stick, sand blaster (5
gal), 2 Channel Dig-
ital Storage Oscillo-
scope (battery
powered). Signal in-
jector and lots
more!!
6010 Riverside Drive




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100






w
M
-"

M.M
















How


To Make


Your


Washer


Disappear...



Simply advertise

in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!







(352) 563-5966


Cl IipNI"I.E

www.chronicleonline.com


$500. REWARD
For the Person or
Location of the Cooler
(352) 212-0315
Black Mouth Curr
Male, tan w/black
snout. Was wearing
bright orange collar
Lost off of Junglecamp
Turner Camp
REWARD
(352) 860-3050
Female Black
Labrador
9 yrs old, graying on
face, white patch on
chest, last seen on
evening of July 17th in
Ozello,(352) 585-8230
Lost
Long Hair Chihuahua
Caramel & White
Male, Name Ollie
Pine Ridge Area
REWARD
(352) 746-3602
Lost Peek a Poo
Black & White
6 yrs. old,
Heart broken
Lee Way, Homosassa
Area, REWARD
(352) 628-4766
Lost Silver Filigree
Bracelet within last
month, Inverness/
Crystal River. Area.
Sentimental Value
REWARD
(484) 354-8138
Mens Diamond
Wedding Band
Lost Scalloping
in Crystal River
Please call
(386) 209-2858
Soft Coated
Wheaten Terrier
Male, 30 Ibs
Lost Shamrock
Acres Area
REWARD
(352)464-2751




Black Akita Mix
Male, chipped, name is
Achilles lost two years
ago from Beverly Hills
recently found in
Inverness area RT 41,
call to identify
(352) 212-5736
Chocolate Female
Labrador
found on Mustang Blvd
in Pine Ridge area
352-464-3274


-ouna d Beagies
Sugarmill woods
Female, 3 4 yrs.
Male 3-4 yrs.
(352) 503-7910
Found Male Tabby,
White fur on his nose.
Declawed, neutered.
Found on Gobbler Dr
in Floral City
(352)212-4090
FOUND PUG MIX DOG
DOG IS A MALE
WEARING A BLUE
COLLAR WITH NO
TAGS. I FOUND HIM
SCARED TO DEATH
ON MEADOW ST.
(HOMOSASSA, FL) WE
NEED TO FIND THIS
SWEET DOGS
OWNER! IF ANYONE
KNOWS ANYTHING
CONTACT US AT
352-228-3175
Found together
2 Female Cats
BIk & White female,
& Torti, left ears
lobbed No chip
on Rosevelt Blvd. BH
(352) 746-8400
Male Grey & White Pit
Bull, Very well
mannered, Off of
Rock Crusher.
(352) 628-2996
Orange and white
fluffy female kitten
with blue eyes.
Approx 3 mo old.
Found on W Green
Acres.(305) 923-0400






ipunne I on
DENTISTRY
rcoaumcfcwifOMfwi
Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS


FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metal
352-270-4087



1 healthy Quarter Horse
Mare age 8, and 1
Thoroughbred Mare age
15. Green broke. Free
to good home. Recently
widowed and unable to
care for them.
(352) 503-2347
Free Firewood
cut in 2' sections
352-794-3368
FREE HOT TUB
You Pick-UP
(352) 726-6461
or (352)-201-5113
FREE KITTENS
14 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free Kittens
Hemingway Big Foot
7 toes on front paws, 6
toes on back. Box
Trained. Males & fe-
males (352) 637-3339
Free large tempered
glass tabletop,
rectangular in
shape., 40 in. wide by
60 in. long. Just come
and pick it up.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
FREE
Male Black Kitten 12
weeks old. Playful and
cute. Wormed and
Flead. (352) 464-1567
Free Pitt Bull Mix
Male, neutered
2 yrs. old
Leave Message
When call speak
loudly (352) 422-2731
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to
go. Bring Shovel, Truck
load avail., Help Your-
self. 352-697-5252
Mattress'
2 Twin, 1 Queen
fair condition
(352) 503-2832
Moving out of state.
Must have loving
home for 2 older cats
that need to stay to-
gether. If you have
room in your heart
please call me.
(352) 422-8092
Three Male Kittens
8 weeks old. 2 BIk/wh,
1 all black. Box trained
very sweet
352-382-2030
Two female kittens,
sisters 6 mo. old.
Would like to keep
together, Needs
loving home.
(352) 476-3583



CAT
male, neutered
11 mos. old.,
good cat, litter
trained. To oood


DENTAL
Front Desk/
Dental Asst

Are you a team
player with great
attitude and
phone skills?
Dental Knowledge
a Must PT/FT
Send Resume to:
dentalofficecitrus
countvflidamail.com

Entry level
Ophthalmic/
Medical
Assistant

preparing exam
rooms, charts, greet-
ing patients, escorting
to exam room and
testing. 3-5 days per
week.
Apply in person to:
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

F/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Need motivated,
detail oriented
team player for a
busy medical office.
medical experience
required. Knowl-
edge of scripts
helpful. Competitive
wages & Benefits.
Email resume to:
lecantojobapps@
yahoo.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

PART TIME
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Medical Experience
Required.
Please Send Resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

SMust be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time
and part-time
employees, with
opening in all shifts.

HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF




Experienced
Sr. Accountant
Must have experi-
ence in Auditing
and Corp. Partner-
ship and Non-Profit
tax prep. CPA or
CPA candidate
with 5-10 yrs.
exp. Preferred.
Qualified Applicants
Send Resumes to:
career.cpas
@amall.com
or PO Box 895
Inverness, FL 34451

F/T THRIFT
MANAGER
Crystal River

Retail/sales & super-
visory experience
required. Previous
thrift store experi-
ence a plus. Must
be able to work in
outside conditions.
Flexibility in schedul-
ing a must; includes
some weekends.
Appoolv in Person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL
"EOE"




Breakfast Cook

Experience
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19, CR
No Phone Calls
Apply 6am-3pm
Mon-Fn




Your World









Cn PNoCLE


PT Kitchen Help

Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues





APPOINTMENT
SETTER

Insurance Agent
needs Appt Setter.
Work from home.
Salary based on
number of appt. or
percent of my
commission. Leads
& training provided.
Experienced &
serious applicants
only. Call (352)
422-7291 or email
pcason2@
tampabay.rr.com






Gaudette Electric, Inc. is

accepting applications for
Service Technicians and
Residential/Commercial
Electricians.


be proficient in doing service
,-,n-' "-vil change outs, misc
S in res/comm/indus
environments
ONLY EXPERIENCED NEED APPLY
Apply onlne at

Homosassa, FL 34448 EOE

Auto Repair
Mechanic

w/computer
diagnostic exp.
Full Time w/benefits
call 352-447-3174

DECCA CABLE

Is looking for an
EXP CABLE
TECHNICIAN

Candidate should
possess strong tech-
nical ability in all areas
of CATV. On-call duty
required and valid FL
drivers license with
good driving record.
Apply at Oak Run
SR200&110th Street
Ocala, or call
352-854-6557 X3
EEO/DFWP

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

Drivers HIRING
EXPERIENCED
/INEXPERIENCED
TANKER DRIVERS!
Earn up to $.51 per mile!
New Fleet Volvo Trac-
tors! 1 Year OTR Exp.
Req. Tanker Training
Available. Call
Today! (877)882-6537
www.OaklevTran
sport.com

EXP AC TECH

For Small Family
Owned Business
3-5 yrs. Exp. Must
Own Tools, Clean
DL, DT&EPACert.
& Current References
866-797-5577

Exp. Power
Equip. & Small
Engine Mechanic

Must have
experience in a small
engine shop, and
have own tools
Apply in Person
M-Fri 6659 W
NORVELL BRYANT
HWY, CR
NO CALLS

Light Equipment
Operator
Announcement
#13-38

Semi-skilled work in
the operation of
automotive public
works equipment
and performing
manual labor.
Graduation from HS
or GED. Must have a
valid Florida CDL
Class "A" with
endorsement "N"
combination air
brakes or be able
to obtain within 90
days of appoint-
ment. $9.22 hourly
to start.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, August 8,
2013. EOE/ADA


EXP. MECHANIC

Needed. Busy shop
since 1977, Apply at
Steves Auto Repair
(352) 726-1208

HVAC
Opportunity
Looking for help to
expand existing one
man A/C business.
Must have desire to
grow reputable
business in Citrus
area. All inquiries
confidential.
lbsl@tampabay.rr
corn or 270-0933

















NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim.
Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPPLY AT'
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124AUnit4
Wildwood

QUALIFIED
A/C SERVE TECH

Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniels Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

ROOFER'S
WANTED
Experienced Roofer's
5 yrs exp. Own tools
& truck, Shingle/Tile
Experience.
Competitive pay
Hire immediately
Call 1-800-309-5667
or 352-754-8880

Survey Tech II
Announcement
#13-37

Performs land
boundary and
elevation measure-
ments for the Survey
Section of the De-
partment of Public
Works. Will include
field and office
work. Requires at
least two years re-
lated experience.
Previous surveying
experience pre-
ferred. Starting pay
$12.30 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
libraries or the
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, August 2,
2013 EOE/ADA

TIDY NOOK NEEDS
handyman / land-
scaper / cleaner to
service properties in
area.Travel required.
Will train. Must have
access to internet
and own tools.
888-389-8237




Community
Center Aide
Announcement
# 13-36

Full time position
assisting volunteers
and clients at the
Central Ridge Com-
munity Center in
Beverly Hills. HOURS
AND DAYS OF
WORK VARIES
WEEKLY. Must be
able to lift at least
fifty (50) pounds and
possess strong
computer and cus-
tomer service skills.
Performs custodial
duties as required.
Must possess valid
Florida Driver
License. Starting
pay $7.79 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Fri., August 2, 2013
EOE/ADA


CITRUS MAIDS

CLEANING PERSON
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Direct Support
Professionals

Are you looking for
a challenging and
rewarding position?
We are looking for
FT Direct Care staff
who have a passion
and desire to work
with our develop-
mentally disabled
adult population. Job
duties include
recreational and
community based
activities and
attending to our
resident's personal
needs. Extensive
training is provided.

Must be at least 18
years old and have a
high school diploma.
Must be able to pass
a mandatory criminal
background investiga-
tion, reference inquiry,
and a post-hire
physical exam &
drug screen.

We offer competitive
wages, excellent
benefit package & a
tobacco-free campus.
Various shifts availa-
ble. To be consid-
ered, please complete
an application at:
NEW HORIZONS
VILLAGE, 1275 N.
Rainbow Loop,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
(352) 746-3262.

EXP. LANDSCAPE
PERSONNEL

Trimming exp. must
Apply in Person
920 E. RAY ST.
HERNANDO


CHflpNI1dE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.
Par-timer t-
























CHiRpNiCE





CLEANERS

Reliable Ind./Couple
Every Wed. & Sun.
In Sprlnghlll,
SERVICEMASTER
352-726-4555 E.O.E
ThsCsagreer
Opportunityiteow














ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Become a
Certified Microsoft
Professional!
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! SC Train
can get you job
ready ASAP! HS
Diploma/GED
PC/Internet needed!
(888)212-5888

AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


MEDICAL BILL-
ING TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547






SPRING HILL
CLASSES
-e sec sec sc :-C
COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
m AUGUST 12, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
irAUGUST 12,2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING









SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
,AUGUST 12, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
w-AUGUST 12,2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




A SODA/SNACK
VENDING ROUTE
LOCATIONS
INCLUDED IN YOU
LOCAL AREA
$8,995 MINIMUM
INVESTMENT
GUARANTEE
CASH FLOW
10 YEAR
WARRANTEE
1-800-367-6709
Ext.99




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
S13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
OnH $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111

VICTROLA'S
1920 Crank-up.
2 portable, both work
good. $125 each or
$200 for all.
(352) 344-5283




PRINCESS SPA/HOTTUB
Royalty Series, Like
New, Seats 4; $1000
OBO (864) 367-7403




25 Cu ft side by side,
white, refrigerator
with ice maker
3 yrs old $395
(352) 382-2433

APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER KENMORE
Good Condition
runs great white
$100 352-270-3527
GE Gas Stove
used very little
Exc. Cond. $400. obo
352-436-3302
GE
STOVE,DW,
MICROWAVE All like
new. BISQUE. $400 for
all. 3 porcelain bath-
room sinks Bisque. $20
ea. 352-637-3156
HOT POINT ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 White.
Older model. Works
great. 30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504
KENMORE DISH-
WASHER $100 White,
in great condition 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
RCA ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 Almond
color. Older model. 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER
$100 In perfect work-
ing condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398




DESK
7 drawer Desk $20.00
352-746-5421
Exec. Desk w/ inch
glass top, $100 OBO
Hse Safe, 23 x18.5
x14.5 blk new, still in
box $100 OBO
352-795-9146
FILING CABINET 4
DRAWER Steel,
53"X25"X12" Very good
$35. (352)257-4076





Bank Owned
ON SITE

REAL ESTATE
AUCTION
Lake Panasofkee SFH
2005 County Rd. 429
2BR/1BA, 576 sq. ft.
SALE DATE:
SAT., AUG. 24TH 11AM
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
800-229-9793
www auctionservicesintl corn
5% Buyers Premium -
James H (Jay) Lloyd
Lic#FL-AU2073 ASI-AB675
'-k-rit -^'j 'A-k'k' k-k--kk-




GENERATOR
Troy-bilt. New. Never
used. 3550 watts
$200.00 352-341-0366
LADDER RACK truck
black metal ladder rack
for 6 or 8 ft bed $100
352-364-1771
METAL TRUCK TOOL
BOX metal truck tool
box white $50 obo
352-364-1771


VVWLCUIVIO
Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922




TEACHER

Part time, Afternoon
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




RECEPTIONIST

P/T Person needed
with people, clerical,
phone & social internet
skills, email newjob0713
@gmail.com




Nail Technicians

BELLAVITA
Spa & Fitness
Center

Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs

Call for Interview
Mon-Fri 10am-4pm
352-746-1241

Receptionist

BELLAVITA
SPA & FITNESS
CENTER

Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs

F/T or P/T Front Desk
Receptionist

Call for Interview
Mon-Fri 10am-4pm
352-746-1241






Domestic


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


91


; I F!


I CC rA(ZLJ DAM Elf- I c-.-A 0 1- I I I I -- -.. ... T-9 1 ;


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 D5


...for a New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!










...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Model TF3H3DJW Best Selling Corn pact
SUV In America! Save While They Last!


"Check any- 39
where in the -e ^TlQQ^
world first, but r

CHECK //"

WITH CHAD i


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...for a New 2013 Honda
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


...for a New 2013 Honda
CR-VLX2WD
Model RM3H3CEW-ComeSeeWhyTheCR-VlsThe Best
Selling Compact SUV In Amedrica! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW,
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%- S5O MIUTARY
M MONTHS APPRECIATION OFFER'
X MONTHS To eligible membersofthe US Military&their
on select new Honda models Pre-Owned Vehicles! spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
on approved credit, finance or lease thru HFS. See dealerfor details.


All Pire-Owned Vehicles Include:

Umited Powertraln Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
See dealer or complete details.


Check Out Our REALLY BIG Selection
of Pre-Loved Vehicles!
Sice
HIONDA 2006 HONDA 2005 HONDA 2002 RAh
RD 2DR CIVIC _CRV LX ROVER
339 S3.580 S4.380 S4.38


54,380


2007 HONDA
ACCORD 4DR SEV6
$8,687
a"2


2011 FORD
FUSION
$13,500


2008 FORD
ESCAPE
$7,163


2006 HONDA
ACCORD
$9,682


2009 TOYOTA
VENZA
$15,980


Sd( 9a
I k*td Cars


ZUU2 ALLUKU
4DRLX-P
$10,952



2008 ELEMENT
C$1 19
,$14,719


2011 ACCORD
4DREXL
$17,794


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of Vehicles!


2010 CIVIC 2010 ACCORD
4DR LX ADRLX-P
$12,390 $13,835


2012 FIT
SPORT
$15,456


2011 ACCORD
4DR LX-P
$15,930


2011 CRY 2010 ODYSSEY
EXL
$18,115 $20,130


ZU1Z UVK.
,$I LXV
$14,580


2011 CRV
SE
$16,855


2011 CRV
EX-L
$209742


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!
On US-19,2 Miles 352 628 L 0O
South of Crystal River hw 5

LOVEHONDA.COM
1.36 month closed end lease with approved credit, 12.000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter.
$2995 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing.
Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost Not a ease. 2 36 month closed end one-pay lease of
$9,976 with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter $2000 cash or trade equity.
Payment is plus tax, tag and lease and state lees due al signing Options al additional cost fUsed as a down
payment or cap cost reduction toward the purchase or lease of any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda
A Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program through HFS (excludes Zero
Due at Signing Lease PIrogram). Must meeT certain credit criteria established by HFS. and vehicle must be
eligible for new-vehicle rates ttCovers internal lubricant parts See dealer for details All pre-owned vehicles
include $2500 cash down or trade equity Otters valid thru date ol publication


Baa HEl

*M~cffltILS


LZ








Anything Th eyc ___


CA3 9BTT~
PALM
a~_- -a..^ r



|-- j.i E .. .| A m


$50 O mCAS GU& AR N EED^
,qwNawk i Ai r w-o A i %VnE EU A MO% MAIM


INLWVV 2UIJ
CHEVROLET
0M4
O NT"FOR

UOTH0


; ILVKAWVUU WU
E XT CAB STK#D5302
BUYFO
$299 o.*

PRICE1,988
MSRP $Sao760


BUY FOR
199/MO.-
I15988
MSRP l~rncL


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
MALIB $S BUY FOP
D4056 9,,,,o .

19488
~MSRP S132-665I


I -........ m,,,,....... .-I- I- L -- -- - ~ e' 1
*$13,88 PER THOUSAND FINANCED, WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *BUY WITH 2 : APR. 7 M0Oh S5UU000 CASH O'WN OR iIRAOE EOUirY PAYME I rMNCLUDESAU TA.. I LE AND LICENSE, WITH APPROVED CREDIT. OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. FOR 2013 SILVERADO SWD EXT CAB CUSTOMER
MUST OWN AND TRADE A 99 OR NEWER GM TRUCK. PRICE PLUS TAX, TAG & LICENSE. ALL FACTORY REBATES AND INCENTIVES TO DEALER. ^BRING US AN AUTHORIZED WRITTEN BUYER'S ORDER TO PURCHASE THE IDENTICAL NEW VEHICLE FOR A LOWER PRICE FROM A FRANCHISED
DEALER WITHIN 50 MILES AND 48 HOURS, WE WILL BETTER THE PRICE OR PAY YOU $5000. PALM CHEVY MUST BE ABLE TO PURCHASE THE OTHER VEHICLE IMMEDIATELY FROM THE COMPETITORS STOCK AT THE LOWER PRICE, ALL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS EXCLUSIVE.
INTEREST ACCRUES FROM DATE OF PURCHASE. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS END DATE,


JOIN US FOROURCOOKOU!i


SIGN& DRIVE


2013 KIA
SOUL


2013 KIA
OPTIMA LX


SIGN&DRIVE


GIFTCARD WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. ONE PER CUSTOMER NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. MUST BE 8 YEARS OR OLDER "2014 KIA CADENZA, 2995 DOWN. SO SECURITY DEPOSIT SO FIRST PAYMENT. LEASES ARE 36 MONTHS WITH SO DOWN SO SEC DEP. SOFIRST PAYMENT 12K
MILES PER YEAR LESSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESS WEAR & TEAR LESSEE MUST BE ELIGIBLE FOR KMAOWNER LOYALTY PROGRAM IOLP OR COMPETITIVE BONUS PROGRAM CEPI OF $W FOR 0 Y13 OPTIMAAND MY14 SORENTO. EXCLUDESTAX. TITLE. LICENSE & DEALER
FEES WHERE OLP,`CBP DOES NOTAPPLY. PAYMENTS WILL INCREASE TO $263 FOR MY1,3OPTIMAAND S314 FOR MYI4 SORENTO ALL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED ALL OFFERS EXCLUSIVE tFOR 2013 KIAOPTIMA. SOUL AND SORENTO SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS END DATE.


D6 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L


Ar% &-V tinjIf'II rl inIl I/lI I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 D7


POWER WASHER
Electric,1400 PSI, Ex-
cellent Condition.
Used once. 30.00
352-341-0366




SPEAKERS Yamaha
receiver, center chan-
nel speaker, 2 38"
tower speakers, ex-
cellent cond.,$175.00
Call 352 382-2591
STERO EQUIPMENT
JVC CD Player Dou-
ble Cassette Player &
Speakers $100.00
352-746-5421
TV 19" JVC Television
$25.00 352-746-5421
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $80
352-613-0529



100 AMP ELECTRIC
BOX NEW 6 spaces,
12 circuits, indoor.
$85.00 352-249-7212
Building Supplies
Sliding Screen Door
New, 36 x 75 $20.00
steel single garage door
hardware, tracks,
springs no rust 9' x 7'
$150, (352) 382-5932
Corigated drainage pipe
approx 80 feet $35, (2)
28 oz liquid nails
tubes $2 ea
(352) 382-5932
Old window 41" h x 47
3/4 w $10, Brown
aluminum drip edge 5
10 ft pieces $3 each
(352) 382-5932
Premium Metal
Roofing, Manufac-
turer Direct!
8 Metal Roof profiles
in 40+ colors !
Superior customer
service, same day
pick-up, fast
delivery!
1-888-779-4270 or
visit www.aulfcoast
su01y com
Smoked glass panel
42" h x 14w $10,
50 gal metal drum
without top $10
(352) 382-5932
Timmer Line HD
shingles 18 bundles
white, $20. each, kwik
stick roof under layment
36 "x 66 3/4 ft, $50 or
(2 partial $75 takes all)
(352) 382-5932


Air Compressor
2HP, Craftsman 26gal
vertical tank, like new
$175 (352) 246-3500




GLIDER
Heavy duty material,
beige VGC $50.00
352-249-7212
White Patio Furniture
Table 72" Long w/6 Ig.
chairs. Excellent Cond.
Top of the line! Pictures
available via emailed
$225. (352) 489-0818




54" round glass/wrought
iron dining table with
4 matching chairs
$250.High end
patio heater $100
352-746-1884
Antique Furniture
(settee couch1890's,
dressing Table1932)
Fire Place, Kit China
Cab, Safari Decor, 5pc
wicker set, TV cab,
Stratford recliner, hall,
coffee & end tables,
high quality items. Much
much, more! 746-0011
CABINET,
115"L,30"H,17'D,Wood
grain, old but solid.
$50.00 OBO
352-513-5400
CHINA CLOSET Very
Nice Looking Ig 2 pc
wood and glass. 75.00
obo 352-212-7788
Computer Station
w/ shelves $50.
Lazy Boy Recliner,
pink upholstry $50.
(352) 746-9076
COUNTRY BUFFET
large buffet with
shelves, country style
for plates, etc. $100
352-364-1771
W High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
KING BED
bed/box spring $50
352-364-1771
LOVESEAT & COUCH
W/ 2 recliners. Beige
micro fiber, Very good
cond. $450 obo; 1913
WHITE Trendle Sewing
machine $275 obo
(352) 212-8594
MATTRESS
King, Simmons Beauty
Rest Pillow Top, 1 yr.


Furniture
RECLINER ROCKER
Lazy Boy, tan suede
fabric, good condition.
$70. 352/628-0698
ROCKER/ RECLINER
Brown leather, over-
sized $400; Swivel
rocker recliner $300
Both Excellent Cond.
(864) 367-7403
SECRETARY/DESK.
3 display shelves. 3
drawers. Good condi-
tion. Circa 1930's.
Asking $195 527-6709
SOFA BED
Queen Size $50.00
352-746-5421
TRUNDLE DAY BED
Elliott Designs, white
decorative Iron
w/mattresses, like new
$400
BEDROOM SET
upscale, dresser
w/mirrow, 2 night
stands, head & foot
boards, armoire $900
(352) 513-5400



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman Mower
6.75 HP 22" Cut self
propelled w/bagger,
and mulch blade,
like new $195
(352) 527-1193
Garden Tractor,
Murray Heavy Duty
18.5 HP V-Twin 46
inch cut $500.
Murray rear eng. Rider
Trans./Axle 12 HP
30 in. cut, $250. Firm
352- 507-1490

*%r .J


JUHn U IEErNE UUJlM-
MERCIAL 36" G-15 with
Kohler Command Pro
15 OHV motor and
mower Sulky speed
w/reverse.
Asking $1000 -Great
condition Excellent for
lawn business back-up
&/or personal use.
352-410-7135
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items


COMPUTER CORNER olU d$20uuCash/Cdarry
DESK LARGE 53"X53" (352) 860-2385 352-613-2944 W
Needs disassembly to RECLINING
remove Very good. $20. LOVE SEAT ir i
(352)563-6410 SAGE GREEN !!! LT225/75R 16
Diestler Computer MICRO FIBER PALMS QUEEN TIRE!!!! Good Year
New & Used systems PERFECT 9' Healthy 50 gal Light Truck Great
repairs. Visa/MCard $150. containers Shape 90% Tread
352-637-5469 352-637-2499 $40 352-270-3527 ONLY 60.00 464-0316


Gar e'



DOWNSIZING
FIRE SALE!!
BEST OFFERS! ellipti-
cal exerciser, cedar
hope chest,oak rolltop
desklge wheelbarrow,2
person lanai
lounger,garden
bench,garden
worktable,sears 42"
mower w/bagger and
cart,push mower,chain
saw,edger,wacker,garage cabi-
nets, alum ladder.
352-503-2610.

HOMOSASSA
Sat. & Sun. 8am-3p
7209 W Green Acres St

YANKEETOWN
8/2 & 8/3 9a-2p
Great Garage Salel
Lots of tools ,air tools,
yard tools, chain
come-a-long.
Honda EU2000 2 KW
generator( only 40
hrs.) Chainsaw on a
stick, sand blaster (5
gal), 2 Channel Dig-
ital Storage Oscillo-
scope (battery
powered). Signal in-
jector and lots
more!!
6010 Riverside Drive





CITRUS HILLS
Cash Estate Sale
By appointment
341-0777
Rare Wes Hunting
art glass, + glass
vases, flowers, etc.
Tiffany type lamps;
clown, frog & angel
collections. Bronze,
marble, ceramic,
mosaic, pictures,
perfumes. Lanai
table & chairs &
Bose Radio.

CITRUS SPRINGS
Large Moving Sale,
everything must go
8284 N. Santos Dr
352-897-5270




4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZES 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MEN'S 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZES 36X30 & 34X30
$35 EACH
352-613-0529


4 TIRES __6vmvOT
185-55-R15 Brand New ,3550 watts, cottage
like new $70 $500. HITACHI KOKI $75 3
352-201-7125 10" rounded blade, WALL C
255mm Compound w/batt.
4 WHEEL WALKER- Saw $100.
seat, hand brake & (352) 726-1858 Whirlr
wheel locks, folds for gree
storage, Ex. $45 GENERATOR TROY (35;
352-628-0033 BUILT or (3!
portable, 120-220v --
10 WOODEN 12v electric start, 8000 ACCOR
CLOTHES HANGERS. running watts, 13,500 BOX. :
$7 OBO vintage, starting watts, will do legs.
(352) 527-2085 whole house, bought
15 FT Canoe, after Katrina never
2 lifesavers, 2 seats 2 used. pd $1400. sell for
paddles, trolling motor, $925 (352) 489-3914
$500 GOLD INT. SILVER Broth
(352) 746-7357 FLATWARE. $30 OBO copier
2008 2 Horse Slant 4 place settings in box great
Load Gooseneck never used. (352
w/large dressing area, (352) 527-2085
screened door, elect. Graco Pac n Play
very good cond $6500 w/extra's $40.
obo(765) 318-1156 Stroller $12. h
23ft Camper Frame (352) 341-3887 4with
w/ Tantum Axle $250. GRANDMOTHER c
Heavy Duty 10ft Trailer CLOCK looks good but 3
$500.(352) 726-6461 needs a little repair only Bedsi-
or (352)-201-5113 $75.00 352 464 0316 Alur
40' Electrical Wiring Harley Mufflers both he
GCC-P 6-3 NMB Slide on Original legs
600volt. sell for $1.75pr NEW 1350/1450 35;
foot, never used ONLY $90.00 Manu
352436-3302 352-464-0316 with
ACOUSTIC GUITAR HEALING GARDEN sha
$50 OBO 1960's LAVENDER 7 OZ. SET. 3
(352) 527-2085 $6 OBO. body wash Safe
.and lotion 7oz.ea. Grs
ADULT TRICYCLE. (352)527 2085 to the
Quality MIAMI SUN.
Only $100. HONDA GENERATOR ON
352/628-0698. EU 2000, like new
$650. TR
APPLIANCES, like new (352) 423-0289 W C
washers/dryers, stoves, MOVING? Free used WHEEL
fridges 30 day warranty paper and boxes with foot
trade-ins, 352-302-3030 352-513-5400 35;
BICYCLE NEBULIZER WH
10sp MENS HUFFY 26" $12 OBO With w/remo
NewCond,purple/black new attach. & arms.
$75 OBO 352-270-3527 (352) 527-2085 ditk
BOYS BICYCLE PAPER SHREDDER 35
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH NEW IN THE BOX WH
TRAINING WHEELS shreds all your impt. w/remo
$30 352-613-0529 papers.prevent identy and ar
Chevy Silverado theft 35.00 464-0316 cond
Aluminum Running Sewing Machine,
Boards, great shape Brothers, portable
ONLY $100.00 good cond. $50 I
352464-0316 Window AC Unit 5000 ACOUS
Chevy Silverado Bra BTU, Good Cond. $50 GUITA
for4 headlights Great (352) 364-1704 W/TUN
Shape ONLY WI MA I XTRA,
$80 352-464-0316 SEWING MACHINE, $753!
S324640316 Kenmore zig zag
China Cabinet 6' high, w/accessories $25.00 BLACK
4 'wide, elegant, OBO 352-513-5400 ELECT
Lighted, Pecan wood STAINLESS W/GIC
$70.00 352-212-7788 FLATWARE NEVER 5CORD
Conger Parrot, female USED. $25 OBO
5yrs old, w/cages $200, 59forks,16knives,34 BUBI
25 gal. fish tank, w/fish, spoons. (352)527-2085 "NEW"D
ACOUS
stand,& accessories Three Gallon Oil-less W/APHEX
$100 352-726-7106 Air Compressor UT
352-201-0676 Central Neumatic 35;
DOG CARRIER XLG $45. (352) 341-3887 PIA
Petmate pet porter 40 L TWO 3 DRAWER
27W 30H LIKE NEW PLASTIC BINS. $10
$60. Pine Ridge EA.OBO or both for
352-270-3909 $15obo (352)527-2085
FOLDING TABLE, TWO HANDMADE
30"X30" wood, sewing THROW PILLOWS. $2
or cards. $15.00 EA. or both for $3.
352-513-5400 (352) 527-2085
GAS GRILL WITH SIDE VERA BRADLEY
BURNER, PROPANE PURSE $8 OBO Study P
TANK & COVER $60 neutral colors. Beginne
352-613-0529 (352) 527-2085 All style


e beige, green
352-364-1771
LOCK. $4 OBO
(352) 527-2085
pool Bathtub
n/white $40.
2) 726-6461
52)-201-5113
/OODEN
;DIAN SEWING
$7 OBO. With
352)527-2085



her fax/scan
r w/telephone
condition $40.
2) 746-6397



eeled Walker
brakes and seat
)NLY $70.00
52-464-0316
de Commode
ninum Walker
ave adjustable
20.00 EACH
2464-0316
al Wheelchair
h footrests, great
pe $100.00
352-464-0316
aty Bath Tub
ib Bar, it clamps
side of the tub
LY $25.00,
352-464-0316
ANSPORT
CHAIR (SMALL
.LS) good shape
rests only 90.00
2464-0316
EELCHAIR
vable foot rests
Excellent con-
on. $85.00
2-513-5400
EELCHAIR
ovable footrests
rms. Excellent
ition. $85.00



TIC ELECTRIC
AR FISHMAN
IER&PHASE&
S SUNBURST
.52-601-6625
S"L.P." STYLE
TRICK GUITAR
SBAG STRAP
'&XTRAS $90
2-601-6625
NGA WOOD!
DEAN EXOTICA
TIC ELECTRIC
,PERTYFUL&BEA
IMUS! $250!
2-601-6625
10 LESSONS


SMALL BODIED
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PLAYS NICE, SOUNDS
GREAT "NEW" $50
352-601-6625
TRAVEL ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PAK, GIGBAG, STRAP,
EXTRAS ONLY $50
352-601-6625



TABLE LAMPS Large
28" white $30. Medium
beige $25.NICE Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529



EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only $90.00
3524640316
EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only 90.00
352 464-0316
PROFORM
Eliptical 480 LE
built in fan w/tapes
Like new $150 OBO
(352) 795-9146



BASKET BALL HOOP
stand alone basket ball
hoop $50 352-364-1771
CLUB CAR
Late Model, exec cond,
exc. battery, headlights,
brakelights, $1500
(352) 527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
XDS's-Sheild-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
GOLF HEAD COVERS
New $8, wrenches $4!
For Drivers/Fairway
Woods/number dial
TaylorMade Rock-
etBallz, Burner, R11s,
FCT Rescue, Callaway
Diabb,RAZRXTitlstCevelan
d,Cobraand other
brands/models
637-1842
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516



BABY BOUNCER
blue with teddy bears,
vibrates & plays music
$15 352-364-1771


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944





W Dunnfellon
W-.M -C -_D..-
Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS


Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352489-3922


ZA4y Y .. .....


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Headlight Restoration
we come to you. only
$25.00 per light
352-601-8043




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M& W Interiors
Inside/Out Home Repair
Wall/Ceiling Repair
Experts, Popcorn Re-
moval,DockPainting &
Repair(352) 5374144


Stretching Cleaning

Rmovl epair
Fr.. In Homr. Etnmati5
SLifftime. Warranty on Stretching
& R.-pair5
Upholtery ClI-aninq
Now Cle-aning Til- & Hard Surfaces
L. Eih
kt = rmI t


ROOFING
Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED





wtm


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279k**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
SFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


*ui -, ill Inst.
Lo, I1 '


DONT LET YOUR


DRYER START
A FIRE!















qENERAC j
Stand Alone JO
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians"
ERO0015377

35 -211 4*


Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V'RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Lawncare & More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M& W Interiors
Inside/Out Home Repair
Wall/Ceiling Repair
Experts, Popcorn Re-
moval,DockPainting &
Repair(352) 537-4144




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 8/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447




CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lie. (352) 364-2120



AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $20
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS


nl*
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
W or pool or plan
S something
"i .i ""completely new!
O'fren nvared,

QzaMB^^*?w never duplIcareJ"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST

|. POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed
& Insured 352-400-3188




NO CABLE

NO DISH

NO BILLS
HD Antenna, Pole
and Installation
$139

TCR Solutions

352-493-0061


A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135








Pit

Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/lnsured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570






STERLNG
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S* Repairs
Snmaill Carpentry
tflBL^P^"Fencing
*Screening
( lean Dryer
Vents
4f'lo'do-le & Dependable
I Esipenence lifelong
u y 35 2344-0905
cell: 400-1722
sured -Lic.#37761


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business. For
questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins





C
YIL "'mirld firs[


Need a.job

or a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!


CHipNiAE
( '1'.
B-I IJI.IIJI.II.J- ...


MEALROFN


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
X # 4 L#CCC1325497


JOHNSON
rM ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

1866-376-4943


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vyrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




I\-



TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


AM ROOFING
Call the akh6usten
Free Written Estimate

1OOOFF
Any Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed I1
|Lic/lns. CCC057537 FCMA








KNOCKOUT...


KINDLE NOVEL
Sleeping with Jane
Austen by David Aitken.
$2.99. davidaitken.org
KINDLE NOVEL. A
Dundee Detective by
David Aitken. $2.99.
davidaitken.org


iano w/ Rick D
er to Advanced
s 352-344-5131


PAINTING




D8 SUNDAY,JULY 28, 2013


KAT BUNN
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ years
Specializing in hair
color,highlights, fashion
colors-$10 off highlights
with ad. now offering
hair extentions.
Call for an appointment
352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com


LAYLA
Layla, a 2-y.o.
spayed Shepherd/
Terrier mix,
affectionate,
leash-trained,
housebrkn, good
w/other dogs. Has a
beautiful shiny
short-haired coat.
Weight about 50 Ibs.
Gentle, good
w/people. Loves to
have treats & sits
nicely. Adoption fee
$30, includes spay,
chip, tests &
vaccinations.
Call Michelle @
352-302-2664."


MACK
Mack, handsome
2-3 y.o. purebred
neutered male
coonhound, 45 Ibs.,
playful, good-
natured, easygoing,
very affectionate.
Loves toys & belly
rubs. Good w/other
dogs, playful
w/cats, needs
plenty of outdoor
exercise. Afraid of
men. Loves car rides
& walks. Perfect
home would be
small farm
w/women as con-
stant companions.
With the right home
& lots of love,
Call Judy @
352-503-3363
or email Jamcbriar
@yahoo.com.


Ieut


AKC MINIATURE
SCHNAUZER PUPS!
Lovingly home raised
and socialized Health
Certificate all shots, cur-
rent, tails docked &
dewclaws removed 1
males 9 wks ,1 Salt &
Pepper: IBIk & Silv.
$600, cash discount!
(352) 419-4723


Havanese Pure Bred
Pups, Born 5/11/13.
Will have health
certificate. Great
coloring. Only sold as
companion dogs. No
yellpers. Paper trained
Call (352) 628-2828











MARLIN
Marlin, a 2-3 y.o.
male Shar pei mix,
50 Ibs of joy for you.
Had been aban-
doned & forced to
fend for himself, but
still loves people &
his tail never stops
wagging. Likes to
play catch & play in
the pool, but prefers
to spend time w/his
human friend.
Could someone
give this sweet boy
the good life he has
never known?
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.




MINIATURE DACHS-
HUNDS CKC regis-
tered. Health certifi-
cates, up to date on
shots. Males and fe-
males, various ages
and colors. Prices start-
ing at $250 Call
503-6564 or 212-4952











NANUKE
Nanuke, a 2-3 y.o.
neutered Lab/
Terrier/Weimaraner,
about 65 Ibs.,
beautiful golden
brown velvety coat,
short-haired, gets
along w/other dogs,
no cats.
Heartworrr-negative.
Loves to play in
water, is gentle and
calm. A big, strong
dog, best with
fenced yard, loves
treats & walks.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


TESS
Tess is a beautiful
female pit mix,
brown with white
markings. She is very
sweet, gentle, af-
fectionate, and
loves attention from
her human friends.
Walks very well on a
leash, knows the
command to sit,
and does not jump
on people. She
loves to chase a ball
and bring it back to
you. Call Sandy @
224-223-9279.


TURBO
Turbo is a sweet &
gentle middle-aged
male Terrier/Pit mix,
weigh 59 Ibs. Not in-
terested in running,
would rather sit near
you & have his head
& chest rubbed.
Knows the sit com-
mand, walks very
well on lead, does
not jump on people.
Loves riding in the
car, low energy &
would make a great
companion.
Call Sandy @
224-223-9279.



Livestock


RED
Red, a gorgeous
male chestnut
Bulldog mix, approx.
2 1/2 y.o., 56 Ibs of
happiness. Good
with kids, most other
dogs, even cats.
Well-behaved, play-
ful, loves to have
belly rubs, likes at-
tention, & rewards it
with lots of kisses.
Beautiful, in great
shape, gentle,
sweet, playful, lov-
ing & affectionate.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
Miniature Poodles
White, 2 females
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH TZU Puppies
8 wks old, heath cert.,
registered. 2 males,
4 females. Male $350,
Female $400.
Call 352- 637-9241

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Ask about my Summer
Discount,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


*** ** ***
SMOOTH MINI
DACHSHUNDS
1 male black
and brown mix
1 female, 9 weeks old
Ready to ao home!
call Debbie at
352-564-0855 eves


I et


2012 EVERGREEN
EVER-LITE
29 Foot Travel Trailer,
Model 29FK (Front
Kitchen). Well con-
structed, generously op-
tioned, like-new condi-
tion. Easy tow with SUV
or Pick-Up. Priced well
below NADA at
$21,000. Please call
352/746-3374 for addi-
tional information or to
schedule a time to see.

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Iet


(352)563m5966 ,



I. *_ I -- -- I -. _


CLASSIFIED



ANGLER
1993 center console
18ft, 115hp Suzuki
outboard,with
trailer.Engine rebuilt in
1998, Lower unit rebuilt
2011 Runs great. GPS
and fish finder included.
$4000.00 OBO
352-628-7216 or
352-422-0150

Bayliner
1999Trophy, 22ft Cuddy
cabin, Mercury Force,
many extras $6500
OBO (352) 344-4198

CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tri-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.

Sportscraft
1988 27 Coastal
Fisherman, cabin
cruiser, $9,995 OBO &
boat trailer 22'
tandam,galv., $995
(813)-244-3945

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




Coachman
94 20' Travel Trailer
hitch, stabilizer, $4500.
(352) 341-0262


Yellowstone
1999 28' Fifth Wheel
2 slidouts,Exc. Cond.
new awning,Queen bed,
new refridg. very clean,
2 % mi. to Gulf, on river
$10kobo(352) 447-2933

Vehicles

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE
w.Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100








AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

'93 Buick Regal
$500 down

'99 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible
$650 down

'97 Ford Taurus
$695 Down

'98 Ford Mustang
$700 Down
CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3-1 9 02
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

CHEVROLET
1974 Corvette This is a
blue corvette that had
some restoration done
to it and is needing a
new owner for $16,999
352-322-5555
352-465-6560


2002, Saturn SC
$3,450.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2007, Aveo
$5,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2005 PT Cruiser
5 spd, Manual, w/only
30k miles, $7500. obo
"352-637-9588**
CORVETTE
'86, Targa, new tires,
new paint, new inter.
new muffler $7,500
352-637-6993
FORD
2003 Taurus
4 dr, auto, pwr steering
& brakes, pwr windows,
ac,am/fmradio/cassette,
clean interior, good tires
& brakes, $2750.
352-697-5570
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'04, Towncar,
62K miles, $9,200
Excellent Cond.
(352) 628-4681
MAZDA
'94, MX-5, Miata sport
conv, candy apple red,
11K org. miles, like new
garg. kept$8,500
(352) 344-2331
TOYOTA
2002 Corolla S, Exec.
4 dr, 32 MPG, garaged,
Pwr, Auto, new brakes
$5800 (352) 422-0294
TOYOTA
2004, Prius
$9,450.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
96 CAMRY, power win-
dow, locks, cruise, a/c,
new tires, exc. cond.
$3150.(352) 527-3125



Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257

Misc. Notice


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





Kayak Current Design
Fiberglass, 14 ft
w/rudder, sit-in $500
(352) 344-2161





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510-

10 ft. V Hull Alum.
Fishing Boat
with Twin Swivel Seats.
401b Trolling Motor
and New Battery.
2 new Life Jackets.
Trailer with new wire
kit and paint. Anchor.
All for $475. Crystal
River at 352-563-0772


332-0728 SUCRN
08/08/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, August 8, 2013 at 8:30 am at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, July 28, 2013.


333-0728 SUCRN
08/07/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, August 7, 2013 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, July 28, 2013.


340-0728 SUCRN
Public Hearing 8-13-13
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Ctitus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, REPEALING ORDINANCE NO. 2013-02
WHICH CREATED THE LAW ENFORCEMENT MUNICIPAL SERVICE TAXING UNIT FOR THE
ENTIRE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 13th day of August, 2013, at 2:40
PM, at which time and place any and all persons interested may present any matter
for or against the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Commission.
Copies of the proposed ordinance may be reviewed in the Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of
County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.
/s/JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICE, July 28, 2013.


342-0728 SUCRN
CCTPO MEETING NOTICES
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning
Organization (TPO) Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and Citizens
Advisory Committee (CAC) will hold a Joint meeting on Wednesday, August 7,2013
at 2:00 pm in Room 280 at the Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning
Organization.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning
Organization (TPO) Board has CANCELLED the meeting for Thursday, August 8, 2013
at 5:15 pm in Council Chambers at the Inverness Government Center, 212 W. Main
Street, Inverness, Florida 34450, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning
Organization.
Any person requiring reasonable accomrmodation far a meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's
Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
(2) days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
Telephone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal ny decision made by the Transportation laining
Organization with respect to any matter considered at a meeting, he/she will need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record shall
include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. B Y:
/S/ Sheila Martin, Planning and Administration, TBARTA
Published one time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, July 28, 2013.


341-0728 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote Roddenberry
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Lawrence E. Roddenberry
2699 S. Bolton Ave.
Homosassa, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 28, 2013


1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BIG SALE
'Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control, power
windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tri-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $23,500. Phone:
352-601-1319


Vui > IHi St.
L^. L'

CHRpNiCLE





950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at
aovdeals.com,
July 1,2013-July 31, 2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.


CHEVROLET
1998, S10, EX Cab
$2,995.
352-341-0018
Chevrolet
2003 Silverado
Pick-Up, clean
$4900. (917) 733-3644
FORD
2006 F150, Pick-Up
priced for a quick sale
$6400. (917) 733-3644
TOYOTA
'06, Tundra, limited
4 x 4, Dbl. Cab, cap
running boards, 65,400
mi, $19,500,341-0858




HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LINCOLN
2003, Navigatoro
$6,495.
352-341-0018
MULTI TOW DOLLY
for car & full size motor-
cycle, new tires & Spare
$2300 OBO
(352) 586-0183




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom
352-325-1306




Suzuki
2005 Bergman
400cc, 30k miles
$2200. (317) 410-6080



343-0728 SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PUBLIC NOTICE
ADVANCE TOWING gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles) on
08/07/2013, 8:00 am. at
4875 S. FLORIDA AVENUE,
INVERNESS, FL 34450,
2001 CHRYSLER
VIN# 1C3EL65U71N692312
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the FL. Statutes.
ADVANCED TOWING
reserves the right to
accept or reject any and
/or all bids.
July 28, 2013


Misc. Notice


Metn


Metn


Metn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 D9


*0000


0l 0


O-i


*7
V



I
S


LI


0 :0


"TCRUZE LS
ISpeed Transmission
. ......................................$17.955
*-------- 5956
---$1,500
IT-:-- -$2,500


CHEVY SONIC


............... ......................... $18,110
I -- ---- -$500
BY:___________ r2.500


New 2013
CHEVY TRAVERSELS
C13288
M SRP: ........................................................................ $31,920
DEALR DISCOUNT: _________- $665
REBATE..................... -$1,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:- ---- $2,500


New 2013
CHEVY EQUINOX LS
C13230
M SRP $ .... ............................. .. .. .. ... $25,01,
DEALER DISCOUNT: .. ... $000
REBATE;: --------- $1,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY: ----- $2500


New 2013
CHEVY MALIBU LS


M SRP: ....................................................................... $23,045
DEALR DISCOUNT: . .%.-$600
REBATE-- T T------$2,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUfY:-: -$2.500


CAMARO ZL1 CONVERTIBLE
M SRP:$. .... ....................... . .. $65,625
DEALER DISCOUNT: --------. $2,000oo
REBATE: --------- -$1,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:- -- --....- $2.500


OVER 90
Used & Certified
LPre-Loved Vehicles!


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTr


2 YEARS oi
30 000 MILE
MAINTENANCE
FREE OF CHARGE


Plus a FREE
PiT-STOP
PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


N MERCURY MARINER
moe
"MQO
"91"s


07 HYUNDAI SONATA
112076
$%995


10 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
#118T4
M4

10CHEVYAVEO 08 MERCURYSABLE
SDOORI MlUIhRGLQUIM
Sm199 SIe5o


11 FORD RANGER
i11TO5,REG.CAB,5SMWWD.LWMILISI
$i1ef


09 TOYOTA RAV4
$159995


IN


#PINEVYS LYQDOEXCAB
S32$995


1CHRYSuRTOWN&COIJNTRY 11 FORD CROWN VICTORIA
STOWUDMCGOS, PMOitiUDIM OiS
$16*995 $16995


11 CHEVYSILVERDO RG. CAB 12 CHEVY CRUZE ECO
$18,750 $18,995


12 CHEVY SILVERADO 11CHEVROLET SILVERADO 11CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ
11imS. cWn LTZ, LuwOADEB WhEw rfffuijr2J iu5IS m13,a1DU.AvIIMAV, POW STIP
s$33,ss 37,ms $,ms


PLUS
MANY
MORETO
CHOOSE
FROM!


Do For You!

0018


I:


hs with $2,470 cash down, plus
incentives to obtain prices, limited
essodes additional cost. offer


1[~


I'l AI A 1:F


:LA osil




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013 F-150
$25,340 MSRP
-1400 NNFL DISCOUNT
-1000 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
-1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH
-1000 FORD CREDIT RETAIL BONUS CASH
-1000 RETAIL TRADE IN ASSISTANCE
STARTING FROM


2


ii
--El


U


2013 FOCUS


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH


2013 FUSION


$22,695
-700
-500
-500
-1000


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
FORD CREDIT RETAIL
MATCHING DOWN CASH


2013 ESCAPE SE


$26,360
-900
-500
-1000
-1000


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH
FORD CREDIT


I99


-Ij
Z.)


-ED)-')
J J


2006 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
Cloth interior, 3rd row seat, CD player.
A60A O0


2002 MAZDA TRIBUTE
Leather, new tires, V6.
AA O-9


2002 FORD SPORTTRACK
Roof rack, taneu cover.
A7-090


2006 FORD 500 2009 FORD MUSTANG
Leather, 6 cyl., 1 owner. 45th anniversary, SHARP!
$9,950 $10,950 |


2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Convertible hard top.
S 1.950


2011 FORD FOCUS
Economy Car.
$12,950


08 MERCURY MARINER I
Leather I
$ 14,950


2011 FORD CROWN VICTORIA
Leather.
$15,950

.40, 7-11


2012 FORD ESCAPE
5 speed, std trans, 1 owner.
$16,950


2010 CHRYSLER 300
Leather, chrome wheels.
$17,950


201 FORD FOCUS
Excellent mileage
$17,950


2011 FORD FUSION
4ey., 21,000 miles.
18,950

- -r


12012 KIA SORENTO 2012 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED 2011 FORD ESCAPE HYBRID|2010 LINCOLN MK1
Cloth interior, 4 cly. economy. Leather, keyless entry. Only 10 000 miles moonroof I 10,000 miles, monroof, DVD.
$21,950 1 $22,950 1 $29,950 1 $31,950


r MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS UNLIMITED
SAir suspension, 1 owner, wood grain accent. $ 1 4,950


Nick Nicholas


Crysta


River


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 2011 CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 7/31/13.


Anna Cruz


LINCOLN


520,090
-600
-1000
-1000
-500


'9


{2


U


{2


AI


2)


U


Call Toll Free

877.795.7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


D10 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


ry, mmilCrystmiNiver




Section E SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013


OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE G


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* Upgraded Lg. Kitchen Beautiful Master Suite
* Relaxing Master Bath Huge Screened Lanai
2.75 Acres/Salt Water Lap Pool 4 + CAR GAR.
2 HVAC Systems Guest Suite with Sep. Entry
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -"-I
En1nuli elIlesUllOn' meInx nl.
Einaii eiiiesiaiiionati einiineii m^


* ,3BD/2BA/2CG New Construction Now Ready
SLiving RM + Fam. RM '2,464 SF Living Area
SChoose Your Own Appliances, Fans & Fixtures
Call Listing Agent for Details -
PETER & MARVIA KOROL L-rU
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


PINE RIDGE
1992 built 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 acre with
appliances & roof being 5 to 6 yrs old. Remodeled
baths, new paint, new carpet. Nice open floor plan,
high ceilings, split bedrooms, screened room,
outbuilding, & fenced backyard.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 If
Email: lucybarnes@remax.ne l
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com A


i~f A II' .
491 L. ON PINE RIDGE, R. ON ALLAMANDRA
S3 or 4 Bedrooms Updated Classy Kitchen
* Gorgeous Pool/Lanai On 3rd Green
Huge Formal Dining *3-CAR GARAGE
* Extraordinary Landscape Extended Fam. Suite
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 I .
EFinlE elllesullon'i leminax ne|
www.FloidnLislingInlo.coEi


VERY NEAT ATTRACTIVE SHORT SALE
* Large Eat-In Kitchen Close to Schools
* Great Family Home Really Nice Decor
S3/2/2 Split Plan Screen Porch in Back
* Close to Rivers Price Tentative Appv.
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 I--1
Ennuin elliesullon'i lemnax nel
www.FloidnLisliunglnlo.coin _


-1 :tW ltllI
LOCATION...CONVENIENCE...QUALITY
This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is in great condition
with split bedrooms, huge living room, updated
kitchen, large garage, and shady yard. Enjoy the
large enclosed patio. Situated on a quiet street and
close to shopping, doctors, and recreational
facilities. Put it on your list. -
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


3710 H. HONEYLOCUST DR.
BEVERLY HILLS
'2BD/1 BNA1 CG w/POOL Furniture Available
SNicely Maintained Great Neighborhood
SAl Appliances Lots of Tile, New BD carpeting
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 0 1
(352) 527-7842 L i
(352) 422-3875


3/2 1700+ SQ. FT. MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Crystal
River. Tons of space for your family. Fully-fenced & electric
gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large
storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio,
screened back porch, 2 car attached carport, BBQ
pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call
for your private showing and fall in love.
CHERYL HAUAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net








4043 H. MONADNOCK ROAD
HERNANDO
B Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Great Room & Office
* Corian Countertops Screened Lanai
* Detached Workshop Private Landscaped Acre

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmerfremax.nel 1 1


3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH 2-CAR GARAGE HOME,
LOCATED ON 15TH FAIRWAY, INGROUND
SCREEN POOL, FORMAL DINING AREA,
BREAKFAST NOOK, INSIDE UTILITY ROOM,
LOCATED ON CUL-DE-SAC. i |
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com


s2637282
ECterle houSe# 1,T60


WATERFRONT STILT HOME
*2003 Mobile with 1280 Sq. Ft. Living Space
*3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
* Wood-burning Fireplace
* Sundeck Upstairs and Concrete Floored
Carport Under Home
* Ozello Fishing Community
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491
Email: pnparvi@yahoo.com








MINI-FARMS SPECIAL!
Privacy personified with this move-in ready 3/2 2005
mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide open floor plan w/split
bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area,
covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. All
appliances, window treatments and some furnishings
are included.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 with pool, 1789 living area. Built 2008,
all appliances, security system. Washer and
dryer. Beautiful finishing touches, fenced
backyard, large shed for storage.
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM m
(352) 637-6200 i ]
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


241 N H8 I 11 In


OAK RIDGE UPDATED BEAUTY!!!
*3 BR, 2 BATH *2 Car Garage w/Screen
* GRANITE Counters Roof Shingles 2010
* Carrier HVAC 2010 *1,823 Sq. Ft. Living
* Extended Screened Lanai Community Pool

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 fl
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com "


*u .. .... ikdiPlIi
MANY UPGRADES!
*Built 2006 Wide Open Spaces
4bd/2bth/2 car garage 42" Kitchen Cabinets
Granite Countertops Hurricane Shutters
*16" Neutral Tile
Pre Wired for Generator
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.comn
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


WrAt
V



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828
4,

2 uyer enters house
S2 number when
prompted


3 uyer listens to
j'qj property
presentation in
English or Spanish


CUSTOM BUILT CITRUS HILLS HOME
WITH CAGED POOL.... 3BR/2BA HOME WITH A
TOTAL OF 3,219 SQ. FT. UNDER ROOF. TILE
FLOORING, FIREPLACE, PANTRY/LAUNDRY
ROOM, AND SKYLIGHTS.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 [
Email: barbarajmills@oarthink.not 1


-2,4117TNFO LIVE
,6'31 N
7-282
Enter JA
L 4.L house #6 liq


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tomika Spires- Kimberly
Hanssen Fuller
Landmark Landmark
Realty. Realty.

Landmark agents
hit the spot
Landmark Realty of Inver-
ness is pleased to announce
the dynamic real estate team
of Tomika Spires-Hanssen
and Kimberly Fuller have
sold in excess of $8 million
and well more than 100 prop-
erties to date in 2013.
Tomika and Kim cover all of
Citrus County. These two
agents are hard-working and
customer service-driven. No
sale is ever too small or too
big for the personal attention
to detail and experience they
bring to each customer.
Call Tomika or Kimberly at
352-726-5263.
Also with Landmark, Jean
Cassese with has sold $2 mil-
lion to date in 2013.
Jean specializes in residen-
tial sales and has vast experi-
ence in the short sale market.
Call Jean at 352-726-5263.
Paradiso reaches
for the top
EXIT Realty Leaders
wishes to con- -
gratulate
Becky Par-
adiso for clos-
ing more than
$1 million so
far in 2013. '
Becky is a Becky
professional Paradiso
agent who EXIT Realty
brings a Leaders.
wealth of
knowledge to every transac-
tion and is always committed
to providing excellent service.
Becky can be reached at 352-
527-1112, or you can visit her
website at www.exitrealty
leaders.com.


Waybright brings
aboard new talent
Waybright
Real Estate r
Inc. is proud
to announce
that Phyllis
Garrett has
joined our
firm. Phyllis
Phyllis has Garrett
been a Citrus Waybright
County resi- Real Estate.
dent for seven
years and brings 19 years of
wide-ranging experience to
our agency. She has worked
as a broker in Arkansas
and Minnesota, and as a li-
censed Realtor in Florida,
Missouri, Oklahoma
and Texas. She has served
on multiple state committees,
as well as on the board of di-
rectors of the Realtors Associ-
ation while working in
Arkansas and Texas.
Phyllis attributes her success
to the exceptional, personal at-
tention she offers to buyers and
sellers who employ her serv-
ices. Reach her by email at
phylgarrett5@gmail.com or by
phone at 352-445-1393 or 352-
795-1600.
Broker Stephanie Ann
Price is pleased to announce
that Waybright Real Estate
has surpassed $3 million in
sales this year.
Waybright Real Estate is lo-
cated at 110 N.E. Crystal St.,
Crystal River. Call them at
352-795-1600.
Baker notches new
record for 2013
ERAAmerican Realty & In-
vestments is
proud to an- ^ .
nounce the lat-
est production
level achieved
by one of its
Inverness of-
fice agents for Margaret
2013. Baker
Margaret ERAAmerican
Baker has Realty.
surpassed the
$1 million mark in closed


sales volume in 2013.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievement of this fine real
estate professional.
Reach her at the Inverness
office of ERAAmerican Realty
by calling 352-726-5855.
Citrus Ridge
continues to soar
Citrus Ridge Realty is
proud to announce that Kirk
and Amanda Johnson, with


DIGEST DEADLINES


buyer special-
ist Tom Bal-
four, have
closed more
than $7 million
in sales for
2013. Kra
Contact the Kirk and
Amanda
Johnson Johnson
Team at 352- Citrus Ridge
746-9000 or Realty.
by email at
citrusridgerealty@century
link.net.


* Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by
4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.
* News notes are published as space is available.
* Submit material, attn: HomeFront, at Chronicle of-
fices in Inverness or Crystal River; or by email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 769
BROKERASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


. D 3050 W. MUSTANG 1,
3/3/3 702967 $399,900 4/2.5/2


57 W. PINEHILL 4710 W. MUSTANG
+702645 $269,000 3/2/3 359604 $239,900




I ,^'JLA.UL??! '.iJi.L^iSL
S 3 CHINKAPIN CT. 9 N. WADSWORTH
3/3/2 702854 $138,500 3/1.5 704088 $54,900


4371 N. LINCOLN
3/2/2 703982 $120,000


S 9142 N. AKOLA WAY
S3/2/2 702470 $120,900


2435 W. ERIC 4210 E LAKE ARK DR. 2047 W. PARAGON LN.
S 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900


I 2/1/1 704027 $44,900


87 S. LUCILLES WIGWAM S JACKSON 19MEADOWDALE 52 S FILMORE
2/2/2 703454 $79,500 3/2 703669 $49995 2/2/1 703481 $55,900 2/1.5/1 703687 $64,900 2/1/1 704090 $49,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


I


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 E3


7170 N. GR
3/2/2 700780 1





E4 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci iir.E nnMIfnIi.E

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


people have cooked with herbs for
thousands of years. Herbs are a
healthy way to enhance the flavor
of foods without adding extra
fat, sugar, or sodium. This arti-
cle provides tips on buying,
washing, and cooking fresh
herbs.
To ensure freshness, buy
herbs right before you will be
using them. Buy them in a
small quantities so you can use
them before they lose their
peak flavor If buying in small
quantities is not possible, Monica
share the herbs with family CONS
and friends.
Buy herbs that are full of SCIE
color and aroma. The herbs
should not be wilted, discolored, or smell
musty You can find fresh herbs at local
supermarkets and farmers' markets. The
Inverness Farmers' Market runs from
8 a.m. to noon the first and third Saturday


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Liven up your meals iiside...



with fresh herbs


of each month at the Inverness Govern-
ment Center
At the store, fresh herbs will be located
in or near the fresh vegetable
section. Another option is to
grow your own herbs.
Wash herbs before cooking
or storing them. You can rinse
S small portions under cool, run-
ning water Once all dirt is re-
Smoved, either shake the herbs
gently or dry them using a
salad spinner Pat lightly with
S a dry paper towel to remove
Payne excess water
UIMER To cook with herbs, follow
these tips:
NCE U When cooking with fresh
herbs, there is no general rule
on how much to use; however, most
recipes will tell you the amount in the list
of ingredients. Usually it is better to start
See HERBS/Page E5


Geometric decor
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E14
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Figure looks to be work of noted Austrian sculptor


ear John: I have a getting an appraisal or even tak-
bronze snake charmer ing this statuary to auction, or if
figure that I maybe it is not a good
have been wonder- time for selling this
ing about for a while kind of art. Any rec-
now I picked it up at ommendations or in-
a consignment shop formation would be
10 or 12 years ago in r fantastic.
South Florida. My I have attached a
partner said it looks H" photo of my own, so
like a Bergman, and you can see what I
indeed, I have found am talking about Do
some pictures that not worry, I do not
are comparable to John Sikorski keep her outside. I
what I have in my SIKORSKI'S just took the photo
possession. ATFIC outside because the
She is 9 inches tall light was brighter -
with the base; one of AN., Internet
the smaller figures is signed Dear A.N.: Franz Bergman,
Nam Greb, probably because of 1861-1936, was born in Austria.
the figure's partial nudity His Vienna bronzes are sought
My partner recommended you after by collectors. Most popu-
since yours is a local show and lar are the bronzes of Moroccan
we thought maybe you would and Oriental people in various
know who I should talk to about genre, or real-life, circum-


stances of the period. He used
the letter B inside the letter U
or his name spelled backwards
as Nan Greb.
It is unclear whether the
backward signature was used
only on his nudes. In your pho-
tograph, the metal looks more
like white metal with a bronze
wash. To check whether you
have bronze or white metal,
take a pocketknife or sharp in-
strument and make a small
deep scratch on the underside.
If the scratch reveals a silver
color, it is white metal; if the
color is yellow or goldish, it is
bronze.
Bergman's bronzes generally
sell in the $500 to $2,500 range,
depending on subject matter If
your figure is bronze, potential
dollar value would be in the
$500 range.
Dear John: I have been read-


ing your articles for quite some
time in the Chronicle. My hus-
band and I attended an estate
sale a while ago and purchased
two clear glass fruit bowls. The
price was $25 for the two.
The seller said she thought
they were American cut glass
made more than 100 years ago. I
was not able to get a good photo
to show you. The price seemed
very reasonable, as we have
seen similar bowls in antiques
shops priced much higher
Without a photograph, can
you give me an opinion about
See ATlTIC/Page E5
This snake charmer figurine
coule be the work of Franz
Bergman, whose works are
popular with collectors. If
it's bronze, it might sell for
around $500.
Special to the Chronicle


Bringflavor without harmful additives


;I


i--M





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERBS
Continued from Page E4

small with herbs until you
know how your taste buds
will respond to them. You
can always add more the
next time. If you have no
recipe to follow, start with
a quarter teaspoon and
add more to taste. Balance
should exist between the
herbs and the other flavors
in the dish.
When doubling a
recipe, don't double the
amount of herbs or spices.
Increase their amounts by
one and a half.
You can substitute
fresh herbs for dried herbs
in a recipe, but remember
that dried herbs are
stronger than fresh ones,


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

the price we paid did
we get a really good buy
because we found them at
the estate sale? Please ad-
vise us. Thanks for any
help you can provide. -
S.C., Internet
Dear S.C.: Twenty-five
dollars for two cut glass
bowls is a bargain if they
are indeed cut glass.
A cut glass bowl starts its
life as an undecorated
bowl. The pattern is pro-
duced by a craftsman
holding the blank bowl
against a cutting wheel to
produce the pattern that
has been outlined on the
blank. Then the cuts are
polished with a series of
polishing wheels. The re-
sulting edges are quite
sharp to the touch.
The bowls you pur-
chased are more likely to


so you will need to use
more fresh herbs. If the
recipe calls for 1 teaspoon
of dried, crushed herbs or
a quarter teaspoon of pow-
dered herbs, use 3 tea-
spoons (or 1 tablespoon) of
fresh herbs.
Recipes generally give
instructions on how to pre-
pare fresh herbs. If there
are no directions, it is com-
mon to mince or finely
chop the herbs. By minc-
ing them, the herb's flavor
is enhanced.
When to add fresh
herbs during cooking de-
pends on whether the dish
will be served hot or cold.
For hot dishes, add fresh
herbs near the end of the
cooking process or just
prior to serving for best
flavor and aroma. The
more delicate herbs (basil,

be pressed glass. Molten
glass is placed in a mold or
blown into a mold and the
pattern is pressed into the
glass. The patterns are
very similar to cut glass
patterns in order to give
the look of cut glass.
One telltale difference is
that the interior of a
pressed glass bowl will
have a gentle, uneven feel
and not be perfectly
smooth, resulting from the
mold pressing. In addition,
the edges of the pattern
will not be sharp to the
touch.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, P.O. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


cilantro and dill) should be
added during the last one
to two minutes of cooking
or just before serving the
dish.
Less delicate herbs,
such as rosemary and
thyme, can be added ear-
lier in the cooking process,
during the last 20 minutes
of cooking. Some cooking
processes will recommend
adding the herbs toward
the beginning.
For cold dishes (sal-
ads, dips, dressings and
some desserts), the herbs
should be added before
serving or overnight.


Follow the recipe for
the best time to add herbs.
For information on stor-
ing herbs, recipes using
herbs, or common herb
and food combinations,
view UF fact sheet FCS
8932 at www.solutionsfor
yourlife.com.
Call Monica Payne at the
Extension office at 352-
527-5713.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida
/IFAS' knowledge, re-
search and resources to
address youth, family,
community and agricul-


tural needs. All programs
and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted
by, the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons
with non-discrimination
with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disabil-
ity, sex, sexual orientation,
marital status, national
origin, political opinions
or affiliations.


Monica Payne is the
Family and Consumer
Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 E5


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle wel-
comes tips from read-
ers about breaking
news. Call the news-
room at 352-563-
5660, and be
prepared to give your
name, phone number,
and the address of
the news event.
* To submit story ideas
for feature sections,
call 352-563-5660
and ask for Logan
Mosby.


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil Photos,
6ww.loria ho cas 60prtie-co


J(l 4( E Dakula el c 2359 W Pine Ridge Blvd
l 1: ,,: $224 .00 MLS 702560 $139,500 Ii 1044 E McKinley SI
2bd/3ba pool home w/den on the Centrally located and just right 3/2/2. '.0 '.. S258.360 JttS 4070 N Ringwood Cir
golf course. Directions: 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to This 3bd/2ba home is nestled between MLS 704353 $198,800
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, home on right (across from two beautiful acres- home is Brand new roof on this 3bd/2ba pool
right on Dakota Ct Apple Valley Dr.) picture perfect, home on 1.1 acres.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976 Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING





S 1534 E Knighlsbridge PI 7) 1187 N Hunt Club Dr )ISta 1667 N Shadowview Path 7) S 1 463 W Doerr Path
MLS 704309 $141,900 MLS 703368 $379,900 MLS 702383 $349,900 MLS 703227 $273,000
Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba Custom 3bd/2ba home w/directview Spacious 3bd/2.5ba villa with so many This well maintained Villa has 3bd/3ba
energy efficient home on an acre lot. of Lake Pastor, attractive features. This is a must see! plus an office.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


-iziz/l

Shtl'$ 854 N Kensinmilon Ave 25 S MylesPt 351 W Hillmoor Ln 400 E Glassboro CI 21 4A
l : ," 19. MLS 703258 $169,000 MLS 357980 $129,000 MLS 703304 $68,000
3/2/2 Split plan with a huge family room Beautiful 3bd/2ba home surrounded by 2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by Sought-after end unit that is light,
and large bedrooms, trees on 1.67 acres. Twisted Oaks Golf Course. bright & clean.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Sandra Olear 352-212-4058 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
0 2013 BRERAffiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAffiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo andthe Rocksymbol are registered service marks of Prudential mp
;-= Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dayflowers are



brief beauties


Associated Press
This undated photo shows a dayflower in New Paltz, N.Y.

Get in close to really appreciate blossoms


LEE REICH
Associated Press
The cheery blue color of dayflow-
ers (Commelina communis) so
named because each flower lasts but
a day does nothing to dispel some
pity I feel for them.
Not that the petals cry out for sym-
pathy You have to get fairly close to
the plant, or really stop and look at
it, to even see its blossoms. Its stems
and leaves, though, are bold, seem-
ingly ready to gobble up any piece of
ground they can grab with their suc-
culence and lushness.
Aggressive growth coupled with
almost inconspicuous flowers could
categorize any plant as a "weed."
And many species of dayflower are


considered just that, especially in
parts of the South and Southwest.
But name calling is not what stirs up
my sympathies for this plant.
Take an even closer look at a
dayflower. Zoom in on the flower,
and below the two prominent, azure
petals you'll see a third petal, pale
compared to the other two and
much smaller
The petals are what give
dayflower its botanical name. Carl
von Linnaeus, the founder of our
system of plant nomenclature, gave
dayflowers the botanical name Com-
melina to honor two 18th century
Dutch brothers who were stars in
botany at the time. But there was a


See BEAUTIES/Page ElI


MYLANTA! iii ,i ii i ..i! I HOME OF DISTINCTION FOR THE DISCRIMINATING BUYER! il-u1111 ...... -I i,-,,, il l iin
erfront condo is ONLY $64,900! #701658. Call disappoint you. Elegant, tasteful & immaculate, with too many upgrades to list. $198,000 2 Speceberry Ct. S., #704291
k! Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983.


EI SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gardening choices for a smaller pot


ear Sara: I have a
clay strawberry pot,
but I don't want to
plant strawberries in it What
plants do you recommend?
-Karla, Pennsylvania
Dear Karla: Hens and
chicks will work well. I
have some planted in a
strawberry pot, and they
grow back each spring
even after neglecting and
leaving them outside in
the pot through winter
Herbs, ivy, sedum and
flowering annuals will
grow nicely and look
lovely, too. If you're using it
indoors, African violets


look lovely in a pocket
planter
Dear Sara: I have a lot of
lily of the valley plants
growing along the side of
my house. They grow like
weeds. I pull them out
every year, but they seem
to grow back even thicker
How do I get rid of these
plants? The foliage looks
so ugly! Linda, New
York
Dear Linda: I love lily of
the valley as a shady area
ground cover Rather than
use chemicals, I would
take a shovel and turn over
the entire area. You need


to get the entire root sys-
tems. These plants really
can become invasive. It
can take a couple of years
to get rid of them, and even
one little stray can be
enough for them to regen-
erate and spread pretty
quickly all over again. I
suggest after you turn the
entire area over and re-
move as much as you can,
cover the entire area with
newspaper or cardboard
to stop it from growing
back. Also, be sure to wash
your hands after pulling
them out, because they are
poisonous.


Dear Sara: I
need a summer
snack idea for
my kids. I've
tried frozen
grapes, home-
made popsicles
and smoothies.
I want to give
them a treat, Sara
but I do not
want them to FRU
eat a lot of ice LIV
cream. Any
ideas? -Jan, Colorado
Dear Jan: Buy a bunch
of bananas. Melt together 1
cup of chocolate and 1 cup
of peanut butter Slice


each banana
into about 6
pieces. Dip
each piece of
banana into the
melted choco-
late mixture.
Place on a wax
paper-lined
Noel baking sheet
and place in the
GAL freezer Once
ING frozen, transfer
to plastic zip-
close bags. When the kids
are craving a sweet treat,
reach for these.
Yogurt can be frozen
into tasty bites, too. Dip


fruit such as blueberries
or cut strawberries into yo-
gurt and freeze. Or place
yogurt and small pieces of
fruit into ice cube trays or
muffin tins and freeze.
Dear Sara: My Brownie
Girl Scout troop is making
mini-worlds to learn about
the Earth. Do you have a
suggestion for a frugal con-
tainer that can be used as
a terrarium? It has to have
a lid. -Beth, email
Dear Beth: Try glass jars
Mayoo, pickle, etc. or
Mason) or a plastic 2-liter

See FRUGAUPage El0


Specilzngi errista
Brnwo Resales *


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
RiI nt'rD 1q.9_ )-AAAAARA7 QII ll M IM Ill 0 AM . I/IrTnDIA PDAMIVI IM 1 .0-A7-1777


teesahafbTh nte frsor.Sca l Vebrhpist &nldd Bove noacrnerltwirmr o uyod RerrnVsa.&onals g Sorner M em er hi pondcsurruded wlrg other Oaks. Re t l
f2 DETACHED VILLA
3 BED,
2.5 BATH,
2 CAR
SKYVIEW VILLAS
...priv '"S gated
of Terra
1, h h,,,aculate
." 1 ,1-, p private
bick paved courtyard home with separate in-law/guest suite with full
BEAUTIFUL UNFURNISHED MAINTENANCE FREE HOME IN b ath. Designer decorated and painted, gourmet kitchen, formal dining
TOWNHOME 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR BRENTWOOD TERRA VISTA, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2 car garage, open floor plan design incorporated with an open floor plan is greatfor entertaining. Lots of tile, TOWNHOME 3 BED, 2.5 BED, 1 CAR BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME
Brentwood Townhome 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bath and 1 car garage. Beautiful with a great use of space, sunroom with plantation shutters, supenor and wet bar. Large master suite has hardwood floorTWO custom walk-in Luxurious townhome in Brentwood. Partially furnished, 3 bedroom,
wood flooring in the living room. All bedrooms are on the second floor and condition, lots of added closet space and upgrades in every roo n! Ready to closets. You'll be proud to return to this elegant home w/lush landscaping 2.5 baths, eat-in kitchen. Sit on the lanai and enjoy the view of the
there is a half bath on the firstfloor. Social membership is included. move in on a corner lot in premiere community of Terra Vista. & on a large corner lot. pond surrounded by large Southern Oaks.
#3321 ............................................................ .................................... $ 1 ,2 0 0 6334 .......................................................................................................... $ 1 ,2 0 0 #98766 .............................................................................................. $ 1 ,8 0 0 1


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 E7


I!




E8 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


#iUM


Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

IECI
mIrJuT


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'*1"
Sa
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'12. *'ii '. "





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A Bespoke Global Lacquered
Crab Cabinet by Antoine Schapira.
Artisanship meets whimsy in
Shapira's two-door Brazilian
rosewood lacquered cabinet.
The "body" of the crab is fashioned
from lacquered Brazilian rosewood,
enhanced with arching cast brass
"legs" wrapped with palm wood.
Luxe finishes like lacquer and
metallics are trending this fall.
BespokeGlobal.com/Associated Press


Aerin Lauder's Geo bowls
are made of porcelain
then either dipped or
painted with 18K gold.
(www.aerin.com). A


OOOFM9Y ^

REAL ESTATE, INC.
l 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
HS ~CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWWAEXRE.COM EV-M: SATLES@ALEXRE.COM


The premiere active-adult master-planned community in
West Central Florida wants you!
H I II1;,-:' ,- i ,- L I;1


H- u I Ii IIt t;1 Hlu a HV ill CH 0c na.
* New home sales experience preferred, not required.
* No Florida RE License is required.


Positive Attitude High Energy Professional Demeanor
Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707

T V 0itLArus oE!-7A

citruss (^ils *S


ArGENT =i i in if. =ON DT S I -Tv'yAvj W E EK


I ",_1
LECANTO Nice half acre with well,
septic and impact fees paid Mobile not
livable but, take it off and replace with
new center of county, Lecanto school dist
#703990 $18,000


INVERNESS 1998 D/W M/TH, 4
bedrooms, 2 baths on over half acre, near
lakes, corner lot, well & septic, needs lot
of work #f700486 $24,900






FLORAL CITY 2 bedroom, split floor
plan, 1 5 baths, front screen porch, carport,
sheds, needs cosmetic work, but livable
with clean up Was central air but outside
t,,. .... i... L. I J ,1 11i: . inside


HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home, 1
bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean w/circular
driveway half way between crystal river
Si ,I. I
$45,000


CRYSTAL RIVER Totally renovated,
2 bedroom, 1 bath home with carport, fully
fenced, downtown Crystal River, large
laundry room, currently rented on month
to month basis, make a nice investment
#700696 $53,000


ELHAN LIU Zuu4 nome w/4 DeOrooms, j
baths, 4 car detache- 7I;- (n-2 I
bedroom, 1 bath i , ,,
upstairs Gazebo/ ......... i '
pavillion abuting, inground caged pool,
secluded/private but nearby everything


llUVUivnta A IYY4 DIcorm, Z Dao, Z-
S ... M/Hon 5 beautiful
i,. , , Cent A/C, excellent
well water near by to new Wal-mart;
paved road #700665 $75,000


HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side by side
All new roofs in 2001 & 2002 and central
a/c units installed in 2004 Good condition,
2-wells, each bldg has own septic system
ff703762 $396,000


bestS7
e':/i
-B1tfSf
Re.lto,


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 E9


J
^HS1 W





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDGY
Continued from Page E8

The large polygonal star or
pyramidal cone would make a
striking accessory (www
restorationhardware.conm)
Canadian design duo
Gabriel Kakon and Scott
Richler have created the
Welles light fixture, a cluster
of blackened steel polygons
with interiors available in
nickel, brass or copper
(www.gabrielscott.com)
Also in lighting, Seattle-
based design house lacoli and
McAllister offers open-
framed rhomboid pendants,
available in different configu-
rations, crafted in metallics,
as well as fun, powder-coated
colors like tomato, blue and
white. (wwwiacolimcallister.
com)
Ridgely, a Toronto studio,
welds cut steel rods into criss-
cross shapes on screens that
can be left raw or powder-
coated with several different
colors. They can be used as
room or landscape dividers,
or as wall art. (wwwridgely
studioworks.com)
Florcom has a range of car-


Check out Brett

Bara's tutorial on

creating your

own geometric

patchwork wall

art using triangle

fabric shapes in

an Ikea frame.


pet tiles that replicate graphic
patterns like zigzags and rec-
tangles. (wwwflorcom)
Atwwwoverstock.com, cir-
cles are the focus on the
Metro wool rug, with disc
shapes in vibrant fall shades
of rust, olive and steel blue on
a charcoal background. The
retailer's Ivory Geometric
Circles rug has a midcentury
vibe with concentric seafoam,
magenta, gold and olive
swirls on a background of
cream.
Another Canadian talent,
Renato Foti, makes tables, ac-
cessories and other home
decor elements out of colored
glass; his Martini tables and
Geo Square basins feature


geometric shapes embedded
in the hand-worked glass.
(www. triodes i gnglass
ware.com)
New York designer Jill
Malek's Voyageur wallpaper
takes non-Euclidean geome-
try to the next level, with a
range of papers printed with
lines radiating from points,
like a compass gone wild.
They're available in several
color combinations, including
Red Eye (white on black) and
CandyLand (white on red).
Her Luci Della Cita wallpa-
per evokes city lights at night,
with spherical shapes playing
across a moody, out-of-focus
background. (wwwjillmalek
.com)
You can solve for "x" with
one of Modshop's side tables,
with zebrawood, hickory,
rosewood or oak veneer tops
on sleek, chrome, X-shaped
legs. (wwwmodshopl .com)
Finally, if you're the crafty
type, check out Brett Bara's
tutorial on creating your own
geometric patchwork wall art
using triangle fabric shapes in
an Ikea frame. It's so simple
that you're guaranteed an
easy "A" in this geometry
class, at least. (wwwbrett
bara.com)


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

pop bottle. Even takeout containers
can work (think: clear plastic take-
out, salad bar or strawberry con-
tainers, rotisserie chicken or clear
plastic to-go drink containers). You
can make a trip to a thrift store and
look for all types of glass containers
with lids, such as candy dishes, de-
canters, baby food or candle jars,
too.
MEN
If you've been thinking about tak-
ing a class but money has been
stopping you, there are plenty of
free online classes available:
Yale offers free introductory
courses at oyc.yale.edu.
Open Courseware Consortium
is a collaborative effort by colleges
and universities to share courses


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very
secluded and private setting -
perfect retreat' Rolling pasture
and mature oaks. Take the tour at
ML :-$379,000


tmuirn i iru" i IIIU
THE GULF OF MEXICO!
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and
boat slip on deep water canal no
bridges to the Crystal Riverl Tile floors,
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and
windows; great income potential, too'
MLS 359564 $189,000


and lectures online. Check out
ocwconsortium.org.
"Learn almost anything for
free" at KhanAcademyorg.
Search for almost any how-to
instruction that you're interested in
and you're sure to find a few tutori-
als on YouTube.
The first reader shares another
suggestion:
Free Disaster Preparedness
Class: Coursera.org offers a wide
variety of free courses, including a
Disaster Preparedness Class
(coursera.org/course/disasterprep).
I have taken several Coursera
classes, and they are fantastic! No
gimmicks, no hidden agendas,
nothing. Just sign up and start tak-
ing a class. You can also add classes
to your watchlist, which means that
if you can't take the class this time
around, Coursera will notify you

See FRUGAL/Page E11


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


VILLAGES OF CITRUS HILLS
Well known for an active Florida
lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on 1 acre, open
floor plan, wood burning fireplace, a
1-i--.--7 .--1 and spacious covered
I ..... *, you feel at home right
away A recent remodel included new
paint and flooring, and A/C, range and
the garage door were replaced in 2012
MLS 700472 $139,000


I,., h ,,I 1- II i I .. ,, )m built
., ," , i, i ,i quality
throughout vaulted tongue & groove
ceilings, fireplace; granite counters &
custom cabmetry; family room, den/office,
2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor
entertammining' Jenn-Air summer kitchen,
covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is
the right setting for living the Florida
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water
your family to move right in' toys imaginable'
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000


LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
community on Lake Tsala Apopka
Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
privacy You will love to call this comfy
house your home! MLS703427
$109,000


GET YOUR
GOLF CART READY!
This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mitch Undenvrwood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home min the center
of the back nine of the Pine Ridge Golf
Course might be your well-deserved haven
Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
,, .. I . .
I h q,I 'lllAnn


NICELY WOODED 5 ACRE LOT
off Rosehill, very private, deeded access The
perfect place to build your retreat The short
distance to the Withlacoochee State Forest
(Tillis Hill Trail) makes it a desirable location
for the horse and country lover
$55,000


COLDWeLL
BANKeRO


E10 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


DBOSH





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

when it comes up again.
Very handy feature!
Note: Classes with the
"Signature Track" button
below the start date are not
free. -Debbie, Minnesota
Liquid Hand Soap
Recipe: I keep a mason jar
under my bathroom sink,
and when the shower soap
starts to break up, I throw it
in the jar When the jar is
full, I throw the soap in my
food processor to grate and
make this for the kitchen
and bathroom sinks:
Grate a bar of soap or
soap pieces to equal 4
ounces. Bring 4 cups of
water to a boil. Turn off the
heat and add the soap. Stir
Continue stirring until mix-
ture is fully combined.
Allow mixture to cool, then
stir again. Allow to cool
overnight Stir to check con-
sistency If too thin, reheat
and add soap. If it seems too
thick, reheat and add more
water Add a few drops of es-
sential oil. Pour soap mix-
ture into dispensers. If you
want to make more or less
liquid soap, use equal parts


I American
E RA Realty &
l Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855


I keep a mason jar under my
bathroom sink, and when the
shower soap starts to break up,
I throw it in the jar. When the jar
is full, I throw the soap in my food
processor and make this for the
kitchen and bathroom sinks.


of soap and water -
Rhonda, Michigan
Homemade Fabric
Softener:
4 cups Epsom salt.
20 drops essential oil.
Put in jar and mix well.
Add 1/4 cup to washer with
laundry detergent as it fills.
This works in hot or cold
water I use 10 drops laven-
der and 10 drops lemon es-
sential oil. It smells so good!
-N.G., North Carolina
All-Purpose Cleaner Put
orange peels in a jar, then
fill with vinegar Let soak for
10 days, then pour the liq-
uid into a spray bottle and
use for cleaning. I've been
using the same jar of orange
peels for over a month now,
just refilling with the vine-
gar as needed. It's a nice
scent! I was pretty stunned


BARBARA
' BANKS -
I. ....
cel: 352-476-3232
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net


|-- INVERNESS- 3/2/1
I E ES P O LAKE ESTATES
Enjoy this private setting on
.44 acre in a lovely community
of Inverness. Fenced yard, dual
pane windows, metal roof.
Just waiting for a new owner.





^P- ---- i^^^^^^^short saile. room #704055age
as aHome is being sold
;"-" ";' : as a short sale. MLS #704055
.7 8 " ,50 ASKING $63,000
INVERNESS POOL HOME
3/2/2 Pool Seller's Pride shows in this updated Home.
Split floor plan, Light & bright!
kitchen wall appliances
l 'Ji (Bosch range & dishwasher),
'0 0", wood cabinets. Features
-porcelain tile & Hardwood
-, flooring, double pane windows
all with Plantation shutters,
utility room with storage,
workbench in garage, sprinklers,
inground pool w/child guard,
newer A/C. Move in and
MLS #702982 ASKING $154,500 enjoy this like new home.
Zechariah 4:6 O00FM36


to see that the rinds didn't
rot, but I'm guessing the
vinegar preserves them. -
Theresa, Florida


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.frugal
village.corn), a website
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies
for everyday living. Send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St., Kansas City
MO 64106, or email
sara @Ofrugalvillage. corn.


BEAUTIES
Continued from Page E6

third brother too, less successful than
the other two and represented by the
dayflower's pale, relatively inconspicu-
ous petal. More generous accounts say
the third brother died young, before he
was able to leave his mark on botany At
any rate, what a sad thing to be immor-
talized for one's deficiencies.
Despite being called a weed and me-
morializing someone's lack of accom-
plishment, dayflowers keep good
company Among their kin is the popu-
lar houseplant called wandering Jew,
appreciated for the way its drooping,
purple-tinted stems impart a tropical
lushness to heated homes in the
winter.
Another dayflower relative is Moses-
in-a-boat, with lurid purple, spiky
leaves. The name comes from the fat
flowers that nestle down in the folds of
the leaves. Moses-in-a-boat is some-
times grown as a houseplant, but my fa-
vorite sight of it was outdoors in the
tropics, grown as groundcover to cre-
ate swathes of purple that contrasted
with adjacent beds plush with lime


green baby's-tears.
Among outdoor plants in colder re-
gions, dayflowers' best known relatives
are spiderworts. Spiderworts look much
like dayflowers, except the flowers are
larger and have only two petals.
More memorable kin
Linnaeus named spiderworts for
other prominent botanists, the Trades-
cants. Naturalist and plant collector
John Tradescant I, often referred to as
the "father of English gardening," was
head gardener to King Charles I. His
equally accomplished son, a royal gar-
dener as well, was among the first Euro-
pean plant explorers to the New World.
Like dayflowers, spiderworts can
spread aggressively
I'm not going to call dayflowers
"weeds" in my garden. Their lush green-
ery is welcome and so far under control.
And a close, close look at any of the
green-hooded flowers reveals hidden
beauty From the base of the two promi-
nent, blue petals arise three tiny sepals
(modified petals), each like a flower it-
self with three yellow lobes and a dark
maroon center From below these sepals
swoop forward two anthers, behind
which and not to be missed is that
third, pale petal.


BRING YOUR ELBOW GREASE AND
_- I GET READY TO WORK. Quaint 2/1/1 on a
'" quiet street within walking distance to nearby
I l park. Home features a wonderful circular drive,
SBstorage shed on a corner lot with palm trees
-and a screened porch. This is a Fannie Mae
HomePath property. Purchase this property for
as little as 3% down. This property is approved
for HomePath Renovation Mortgage
Financing. 704269 $29,900
GET THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR Ml k ,
BUCK!



7i $69.900..........
.BEAUTIFUL, FUNCTIONAL, FORMER MODEL
r,- i-,,,-,H ,OME IN A DEED RESTRICTED
COMMUNITY.
1.,,,i,,,i ,,,i i ,i
,1 ir ,- ,, 1: i- ,,,,-i-,:i-,:Iir,,
Ii.,.,,, .1[, II"I',,,= I- ll'



S- . .. 139.900
UNBELIEVABLE WATERFRONT UNDER ,' '
$1OOK! That's right, new carpet, paint, tile,
MOVE IN READY. Bring your flats boat, kayak, '
canoes, and have a Florida's picture perfect
ride to the Halls River and the Homosassa
River. Located at the end of the canal with great
privacy. This waterfront delight is great for the
angler or water lover who wants peace and
quiet yet close to town and all the amenities.
MOTIVATED SELLER[ 700250 $60,000
-. LOTS OF SWEAT EQUITY TO BE
MADE IN THIS PURCHASE! 3/2 home
that sits on a beautiful one acre lot. Home
features a large workshop/barn, open front
porch, and lots of privacy. Take a look today!
704257 $27,900


A 14 s I1


IJackie Davis
^B American Realty & Investments
MEN 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
.L ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidaviscom


ii'7Q


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 Ell






E12 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds

i""*3-t- i -.;.j -= ^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


....---- Classifleds
. .-^ .* .--i 'j .- . -*



In Print


and


Online


All

rThe Time


-IFx 2 56 I To4I ll Free. *I2-2340 1 Email: s


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
Es


INVERNESS, FL
Move in Special!
1 month free/w
one year lease.
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1
bath@$350 inc H20.
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2,$450.mo., 1st, Ist
& sec. No Dogs
352-795-9738

HERNANDO
(No Pets) 3BR/2BA,
All Appl's$595.mo
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815
YANKEETOWN
2/2 New W/D. $500mo
moves you in no dep
needed. 15 minutes from
power plant. Call Paul
(407) 579-6123



$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
'5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182
ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181


HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, 16x16
workshop, Must-see!
$64,000 (352) 621-0192
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, inl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great nursery or blue-
berries. Asking 124,900
352-364-2985
Palm Harbor Factory liq-
uidation sale
TEXT: STORE 126A
TO: 313131
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210
USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60


JI17371 m 17B

INVERNESS
Move in Special!
1 month free w/one
year lease.
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




FLORAL CITY
3/2 Dblwide, on Canal
to River & lakes,
need TLC,$35,000.
obo 352-726-9369


For Sale k

HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Handy Man Special,
apprv. for FHA financing
$45,900 352-795-1272


Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
52 park like acres,
owner financing avail.
55k (941) 778-7980

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807





CENTURY 21 JW
MORTON Rea Estate
55+ PARKS
Inverness MH Pk.
2/1 /2,Furn., $8,000
Sinaina Forest MH Pk
2/1 Scr. Rm. $13,900
2/2 Cute $13,900.
(Parks with pools)
Oak Pond MH Pk.
2/2 DW, Nice
Negotiable $11,000
Stoneridae Landina
3/2 DW, $23,500.
3/2 DW. $20,000.
Walden Woods MH
2/2 DW $22,500.
3/2 DW $31,900.
Crystal Riv. Villages
3/2, DW $21,000.
(Most Have Carports
scrn. porches/sheds)
BRING YOUR OFFERS
DORIS MINER, Agent
(352) 726-6668

DRASTICALLY
REDUCED
OAK POND MH
ESTATE (Hwy 44 E)
Inverness,
2/2 Lovely home turn
key ready to move in
H(352) 726-0348
C(352) 586-3662


FLORAL CITY
Moon Rise Resort
55+ comm 2/2 split plan,
walk in closet, sc. rm,
car port, Ig shed, w/d
$21,900, lot rent $290
608-752-4532/726-2553
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090



INVERNESS
2/1 SWMH w/add 1.2 ac
with 20x40 work shop,
near wal-mart $35,500,
or RENT $475 mthly
non-smoker
706-473-2184




ACTION:
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHoneRetal s.cornm
CRYSTAL RIVER
10216W. Pamindelw ........... $850
3/2 DW moble with pool
1245 NE 2ind St .................. $1100
3/2 Pool home
11122 W. Cove Harbor $1100
3/2 Pelcan Cove Wetefont dilla th boat sip
CITRUS SPRINGS
1820 W. Trade Ln. $850
3/2/2 Beautiful home nice loc1on
85671 N. Tempest Dr. ......... $900
3/2/2 Newer spacious home
HOMOSASSA
6 Hollylhck Ct ...................... $900
3/2/2 SMW prey home with gret room
4800 S. Wood Way ............. $900
3/2/1 Riverheven fully furished
6102 Graver Cleveland .......... $950


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

2/2/1 ...............................$675
2/1/1 ................................$625
2/1/1 ................................ $600
2/1/1 Pool ..................... $750


3/1 ........................$675

3/2/1 WMter &Liwn Inc....$800
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
zProperty Manager/
,Realtor-Associates
S352-726-9010





Inc -

333 N. Crf Av]] e nuel |id
InvresFL 34453


Available Now!
2 Bedrooms
Rental
Assistance
Available
Call Monday Through Fnday
sam 12pm & 1pm 5pm
(352)489-1021
TDD 800-955-8771
SThis Institution is an equal
LSJ opportu nlty provider & employer


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815

LQQk
INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/112, Unfurn.$550+sec
Furn. $650. w/d, c/h/a
828 5th Ave. NE,
727-455- 8998,
727-343-3965



Busiessi



CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242


MEADOWCREST
2/2/2 w/l Community
Pool. $725/mo
(352) 628-1616
River Links Realty




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio
Efficiency w/ equipped
kitchen. All until cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, 3/2/1, 3/1/1
Homes 352-464-2514
BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month
includes basic
cable & lawn care.
Call 746-3301
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1.5/1 Nice home
$650/Mo.
352-302-4057
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1
Lg Mast suite $750
352-697-3133
Crystal Riv./Homo.
2/2/1 $575.: RC Elem.:
2/1 $425.
212-2051,220-2447
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. 3/2, $650 mo.
352-212-4981
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Eaglepoint
3/2 $900.: 2/1 $496
212-2051,220-2447
Inverness
2/1, all apple, waterview
$550.(352) 860-0904

INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723


INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1%12
$590mo.+ $700 dep.
(352) 422-6978
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Waterfront, Condo
w/priv. dock Lease
to Own. $1,200. mo.
352-220-3005
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming turn or unfurn
effic/cottage all utilities
incd'd. $625 no smoking
352-422-2994
INVERNESS
FURNISHED
WATERFRONT
HOME 2 bd, 1.5 ba
home with central
a/c $595.
352-476-4964




*HERNANDO*
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR LEASE
$1500mth, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
(352) 464-2514
1305 Hwy 486
Beverly Hills
2/2/2 good neighbor-
hood, avail. 8/1/. Sale
$69,900. or rent $800.
(352) 249-7033
or (352) 601-8345
CITRUS HILLS
2/2.5 with carport, near
the club house & pro
shop, tennis courts,
heated pool, totally ren-
ovated (660)723-4193
LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Comm
$119K Cash Deal
or Rent $1000mth
352-804-9729


HOMOSASSA
Classic SMW Hm 3/2/2
newly refurbished, land
escaped ac on golf
course, screened
18x36 pool & lanai, dbl
sided wood burning fire
place, huge great room,
built in book cases 4100
sq ft under roof, $225K
Call Owner 382-2528



CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms, Furn, Cable,
near Publix
$115wk/ 420mo
$120wk/430mo
352-563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share my home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat dish
352-563-1465/228-1802




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



STERLING
Renovations/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNE TY


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


mm
MEDICAL OFFCE

Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
Suite #5 Crystal River.
$120K
352-422-2293
USED CAR LOT
4500 SF Bldg, 417 ft
frontage, 1.34 Acres,
all fenced ready to
go. Located at 7039
W Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Homosassa
$225,000.
(603) 860-6660



BEVERLY HILLS
1 bedroom1.5 car gar-
age villa, 55+ comm.
1780 sq ft, all
appliances and utilities
incl. quiet area.
$1325 monthly
(352) 465-6006
BEVERLY HILLS
Laurel Ridge, 2/2/1 de-
tached villa Kit. has new
apple, granite counters,
new ac, & much more
$92K (352) 513-4155
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buying or Selling


Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience

(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM


*Invernes
HoSmes


JUlSTINQS
117 S Lunar Terrace
Inverness
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
CB home, big yard,
Move in ready.
Clean as a whistle. Big
Garage, plus Carport.
GREAT BUY!
$79,500.
Owner 352-344-9290
3/1+ CP Block home
on corner lot. mile
to Lake Appoka boat
ramp. $55,000
Financing avail
(352) 564-2421

INVERNESS
4/2.5/2 separate dinn-
ing. rm.office, Ig kitchen
patio, 2200 sq ft, move
in ready $182,500
352-220-1313


Very Nice Furn home
near Duval Island.
2/1+ CP. 3rd BR or ofc.
Lndry rm w/ shower.
Shed & fenced fruit
trees. $57,900 (352)
678-7145 or 444-0406




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2Car garage,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RE6WM
REALTY ONE



b



HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!


4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Im'^B^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com


For Sakle
HOMOSASSA
Reduced $199,500
211 Pine St, Built 2006
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool,Granite,
Wood FloorsTile & Car-
pet. 2 Car GarSS Appl.
Call 850-585-4026


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**






# IhEmployment
#1 soucis,





Iww chronicleonline corn


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-72A-5855a


TONY Pauelsen
Realtor
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

BUYING OR SELLING

SALES ARE WAY UP!

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2/2
CBS, 2100 sq. ft. living
area, 1 OK boat lift,
updated 2011, shed
$229,000.
352-794-3020/586-4987


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom 1 bath fixer
upper located close to
schools, dining and
shopping
Hwy 44 to North on
NE 9th Ave
to home on corner of
NE 9th and 5th Ter.
Great Price $ 40,000
call for viewing and
MAKE an Offer
352-220-2658
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc


INGLIS
Delightful
Withlacoochee Water-
front home offers 2 bed-
room 2 bath main
home, 1 bedroom 1
bath Guest Cabin,
Screened house with
bath and smoke house,
Detached Garage,
Multi-tiered Deck/Dock
all located on 213 ft of
waterfront on 1.52
acres. $270,000
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc
352-220-2658


Stunning Withlacoochee
River Waterfront
Home. 3 Bedrooms, 2
Baths 1.51 acres with
201 feet of waterfront.
Many impressive fea-
tures including Two fire-
places One in the Mas-
ter, Large upper deck
overlooking the River
Boat Dock and so much
more Must see.
Offered at $299,900
Hwy 19 to right on Foss
Grove Path 1.9 miles to
Edwards Ct home on
the Left
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc
352-220-2658


' ,uiZ \\ ,tIid I I'.

NtetdI a jol
iir ;.i
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

C4lafedLE
C1assifed,


Hoe

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Propie2 com

great waterfront
properties"





PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047


CirsCony


CirsCu


FWa rfront
tel
Homes


FORECLOSURE
LAND LIQUIDATION!
Own your own
mountain retreat
with National Forest
access in the beauti-
ful Blue Ridge
Mountains. 1+ acre
mountain view
homesite in gated
mountain commu-
nity, bargain priced
at only $14,900 way
below cost! Paved
road, municipal
water, underground
power. Financing.
Call now
1-866-952-5303, x 32


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905




Your World









CHR9McLE
a^ Cf /, ,~




...C r,,,,,-,di+ .,,hra E OT


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 E13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


T0
Time of year to


get started on


strawberries


In Florida, herbaceous
perennial strawberry
plants, Fragaria x
ananassa, are best planted
in the fall as weather cools
off and days are
shorter Now is
the time to
think about
preparing a
raised bed for
planting a
strawberry
patch that will
provide fresh
berries from
January to June Jane
next year, when JAN
temperatures
are from 50 to GAR
80 degrees. As
young plants produce
much more than old
plants, gardeners gener-
ally start new plantlets
each fall in newly pre-
pared beds.
I grow strawberries as a
ground cover in raised
beds bordering a patio and
pathway From July to Sep-
tember, old strawberry
plants sprout long surface
runners where plantlets


form and send down their
own roots. While these
new plants are still small
but have developed
enough roots to sustain
themselves, I
transplant each
into a 6-inch di-
ameter pot.
By September
and October,
they are ready
to plant in two
rows, 10 inches
apart on a
mounded or
Veber raised bed.
E'S Sandy soil is
amended with
DEN organic, de-
cayed material
like well-rotted compost or
the fine mulch from Cen-
tral Landfill on State Road
44 west of Inverness. It is
ideally with a pH between
5.5 to 6.5. Raised beds pro-
vide ample drainage so
roots don't rot.
Strawberries need at
least eight hours, ideally
14, of full sunlight to flower
See JANE/Page E15


Days of future past


Book examines

fl CARS, old-fashioned visions

.B PASI, ,T" of thefuture
4---" RE ICTION
Hs ComnctPsAssociated Press

Flying cars. Waterproof living rooms
that you clean with a hose. A pool on
every rooftop
Many of the old dreams and schemes
about daily life in the 21st century didn't
come true at least not yet. Author Gre-
gory Benford has gathered them along
with more successful predictions in a
book, "The Wonderful Future that Never
,-. who Was" (Hearst, 2012). Some of the imagi-
1native ideas just weren't imaginative
enough, he says.
"Failures usually assumed that bigger
would always be better vast domed
cities, floating airports, personal heli-
copters, tunnels across continents," Ben-
ford says.
Forecasters didn't realize that being
able to invent something wasn't enough.
'Just because high-tech change is pos-
sible doesn't mean we always want it,"
says James B. Meigs, editor-in-chief of
Popular Mechanics magazine, noting the
slow-food and handmade-crafts move-
ments as high-tech counterpoints.
Hearst Communications/Associated Press "Sometimes affluence gives us the op-
"The Wonderful Future that Never Was," by author Gregory tions to choose more traditional things.
Benford, who culled scientists' and others' predictions from the early
1900s through the late 1960s from "Popular Mechanics" magazine. See FUTURE/Page E15


KE "Always There For You"
- GAIL COOPER
g [.1uIml hiili:. Dh.:lli1r I 111,-.r
Cell: (352) 634-4346
O2 Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4ulmindspring.com


WITHIN YOUR MEANS!
S3/2/2 home with 1890 sq ft of living
* Living room and large family room
-All appliances have been replaced
* Spacious lanai for outside entertaining
* Master shower/countertop redone
* Home warranty for the buyers
#703279 $102,999


POOL HAS JUST BEEN RESURFACED!
* 3/2/2 with 14'x30' pool
* Easy care salt system maintenance
* Dual paned windows
* 12-seerAC/heat new in 2009/2010
S18" tile and newer carpeting
* Home warranty for the buyers
#703307 $209,500


L Robert& Holly Jones AMERICAN
* 352-287-5020 REALTY& INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
A hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com 13
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1 ,


ENERGY EFFICIENT, EXCELLENT LOCATION!
Updated kitchen, roof, A/C and more. Ceramic & laminate flooring.
3/2/2 Pool home on one acre. Plenty of storage inside and out. Citrus
Hills Social Membership. Bring your boat or other recreational
vehicles. 1938 / 3250 sq. ft. includes storage under roof. MLS 703972
$143,900 Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd. to Reehill, turn right to
Knightsbridge to 290 E. Buckingham Dr., Lecano FL346


ICALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 I
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714


SeeIJVirtualIIIurs..ll.resalehomesI.I^Iu.I..m


E14 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013


V
I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FUTURE
Continued from Page E14

We choose clothing out
of wool rather than
synthetics."
Two well-known fail-
ures: flying cars and jet
packs. George Jetson
kissed his wife then flew
his car to work in the TV
cartoon series launched
in the 1960s, while TV's
Buck Rogers thrilled kids
of the 1950s by fighting
evil invaders wearing a jet
pack.
Such depictions cre-
ated a hunger for per-
sonal flying devices, but
that wasn't enough to
make them a reality
"People have produced
(both) those," says Ben-
ford. "It's just that neither
is particularly good at
being a plane or a car"
A physics professor at
the University of Califor-
nia at Irvine and a science
fiction writer, Benford
culled scientists' predic-
tions from the early 1900s
through the late 1960s
from Popular Mechanics
for this and another book,
"The Amazing Weapons
that Never Were" (Hearst,
2012).
"In the year 1900, every-
one knew that technology
drove their world and
would drive the future
even harder," Benford
writes. "That was the sin-
gle most prescient 'pre-
diction' of the 20th
century"
At mid-century plastics
seemed to offer all kinds
of possibilities: Take the
magazine's 1950 predic-
tion that housewives in
the year 2000 would clean
house with a hose. Every-
thing rugs, drapes, fur-
niture would be
waterproof, and the water
would run down a drain
in the floor
Among the idea's many
drawbacks, which include
how uncomfortable such
decor would be, forecast-
ers forgot one vital detail:


Electricity powers our
homes, and it doesn't mix
well with water
Remember how we
used to think we'd have
robots cleaning our
homes, cooking our food,
tending to our children?
Sadly, that one doesn't
look promising, Meigs
contends.
Robots do fine on an
automated factory line
with one, simple task,
but the home environ-
ment requires an adapt-
ability that robots can't
muster
"Getting someone to do
the dishes, butter toast,
organize the shoes in your
closet. Those are doable
but really tricky for a
robot," says Meigs. "They
have to improvise, and
you know if humans are
involved, you'll open the
refrigerator and the but-
ter won't be in the same
place."
Yet 50 percent of the
predictions that Benford
unearthed in the maga-
zine have come true, at
least in part.
The "picture phone"
was predicted in 1956, for
example; see today's
Skype calls on the
Internet
And those rooftop
pools? They were pro-
posed in 1928 as a way to
cool homes. Air condition-
ing later proved them un-
necessary, but Meigs says
the theory behind them
exists in practice: as evap-
orative coolers on home
and office rooftops.
What are these experts'
own predictions?
Benford says smart
homes and self-driving
cars are in the future; the
technology exists for both.
Smart homes, for in-
stance, will respond to
human presence in a
room by turning on lights
and adjusting the temper-
ature, making them en-
ergy-efficient, he says.
With Internet access,
homeowners also will be
able to lock and unlock
their homes and turn on


or check appliances re-
motely, says Meigs. (We
won't worry about
whether we left the coffee
pot on.)
"That stuff will seem
pretty routine, at least in
new houses in the next
10 to 15 years," he
predicts.
He also thinks we'll
have three-dimensional,
hologram TVs in 20 or
more years.
Benford says human
relations could be trans-
formed by Google glass -
a computer worn like
eyeglasses that thousands
of early adopters were
trying out this summer;
future models will have
facial recognition soft-
ware, he predicts. "It
means you can walk
around a cocktail party
and know who everyone
is, never mind those
nametags," Benford says.
"Two people will be
wired so they can ex-
change information-
phone numbers, email.
You will have a digital
record of who you talked
to at the party"
Meigs says it'll go far-
ther: We'll have the func-
tions of Google glass
without the device -
they'll be imbedded in our
heads.
"It sounds like crazy sci-
ence fiction, but the neu-
ral interfacing is coming
along," he says.


JANE
Continued from Page E14

and produce fruit. They
should not be planted
where tomatoes, potatoes,
eggplant or other vegeta-
bles were planted, as they
are susceptible to Verticil-
hlium wilt
In summer, new beds may
be prepared and covered
with black ground cover
fabric to solarize the soil -
heating it and killing many
soil-borne pests and dis-
eases and weeds. Opaque
fabric deters weed seed
sprouting by excluding light
and preventing windblown
seeds from reaching the un-
derlying soil.
Come fall planting time,
either remove the solariz-
ing material or cut slits in
the covering and trans-
plant well-rooted plantlets
12 inches apart. Drip irri-
gation tapes may be
needed between the dou-
ble rows in plastic covered
strawberry beds. Bare root
plantlets will need irriga-
tion until established.
Bags of bare root plantlets
are often sold in grocery
stores and big box outlets
at a reasonable price in
season.
Potted strawberry hy-
brid plants can be pricy
Store-bought ones are
mass-produced and have
been grown in an artificial


1259 S. Elmwood Drive, Inverness, Florida 34450
Warehouse/ Office connected to a
5-unit apartment complex. 5,400 sq ft. on .63 acre lot
$350,000- LEASE OPTION- OWNER FINANCING
wwwmypopetyhlpe 0o


bark medium, not real gar-
den soil. They have been
pampered with fertilizers,
daily irrigation, selective
herbicides to control weed
seed sprouting, insecti-
cides to kill spider mites
and insect pests, and fungi-
cides to prevent powdery
mildew and the like. Such
coddled plants will take
time to adjust to real-world
conditions in a garden.
The strawberry plants
growing as a ground cover
in my garden bed have nat-
urally amended, well-
drained soil, no
supplemental irrigation
and have never been
doused with chemical fer-
tilizers, fungicides or insec-
ticides. I sprinkle ground
egg shells around the plants
to deter slugs and snails, al-
though I have never seen
evidence of either pest. I
have been sprinkling Preen
for vegetable and fruit gar-
dens this year to see if it re-
ally does control weed seed


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 E15

germination. It seems to
work but needs applying
every month. I still pull a
few weeds as I remove
dead leaves weekly to avoid
providing a breeding
ground for fungus and
bacteria.
Strawberries make a
good ground cover in full
sun, have pretty white
flowers for over 6 months,
and provide ample fruit for
eating, freezing and mak-
ing jam and sweet wine.
Birds and lizard eat their
share. Hundreds of new
plants are now growing to
share with avid gardeners.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


IrGJackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney S-
|r 7 IReallor.- A HOUSE Realtor @ I
302-3179 SOLD Namae! 2879022
|E.,66co ...7. .6700
I The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.

*. ~579 W. Cherry Laurel Beautiful
.... ... : e One of a kind Villa. Great room,
.. Dining, and den (which could
easily be converted into 2nd
bedroom). Wood cabinets in eat-
in kitchen. Large screened lanai
with gorgeous view. Turn key!!


Ul t. tnaruesion %tv
Hernando
2780 sf of living, new roof 2011,
HVAC 2008, central vacuum, fire
place, lots of storage, large lanai with
jacuzzi & summer kitchen. Pristine
condition. Don't miss out call today.
$249,900.


2269 N. Eustis Pt
Hernando FL
2 bedroom 2 bath Meadowview villa.
1453 SF of living, caged in-ground
pool, private setting.
Priced to sell at
89,900.00






CITJuS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORIDA LAKEFRONT PARADISE


t-I 1i -i 11. 1. 1 h, I i... I. ,. I

NI11 = .1.-i ASKING $235,000
Cll Jim ilotiopn 422 2113 to see this
beiuilul .icie.ige


A REAL BUY 3/2/2 WITH FAMILY ROOM
AND LARGE (18X34) ENCLOSED PORCH


r i ,I I ..h I.. II.-.1 1...I.
ri1: =-ii41 1:1 ASKING $106,900
P111D1, 4352212 7280
1'leo.3- h- .1.1.1. clil g~r)..Jj


COME HOME TO THE FARM
l Ih ,h ,,I .. I, ,,,h,, ,,,I.,, 11 ,,I ,,I hh, l f ...
h .,,,,I I ......... I h







II







LOVELY! 2 BEDROOM. 2 BATH
1/l, .1 hI Ii A A 1 I h i,,,
.l li n : II, I, h,,,I,,iI Ah I' Ii,,, .... l


Mi =1-0ill .1Q $110,000
Jeanne in Willaid Pickiel 2123410
ww'ii'. CiliusCountil'Sold. corn











TWO COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS
IN CHIEFLAND CITY LIMITS
* .. i I l ,i h I I I 11 I.6 i,,, I
:,, I. . I , I. .... It [ h ,, 1,, , h ..6.1 .I .. ..


















ri = '. I ONLY S135.OOO0

11 6'. C 1 '11111 1, 352 400 2635


BANK OWNED
CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
Bai. 1l llIUU1 I.:..:.I .1111I *,II. Ip I:.I,.,I p..:l
ONLY 5159,900 SPECIAL FINANCING
1605 E. SI. Charles PI.. Inveiness
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


LIKE NEW HOME WITH TWO ACRES!
l -.' l l -' \'' I ^1 I I'l 1 1U I.l ' U I* .

liii... I 'II jil~ II ...ulR is (..i 'l ~
II '.T '.-ff_- T -ll [.'i'if l lT _

MII'.. ImI I'i. LISTED AT S149.000
Call Dons Mine, 352422B4627ice/li


INVERNESS COUNTRY LIVING
ON 1.3 ACRES
H i.III I .llll| _' L .... i I I lll I .lfllN 1 ,qla ..
l.h j~i. .l i ,l b .....m.. hi.lp ..uI .jf i. ..I
I' d',,,, mJ I .'. I_,I -,I '. ..Im .h .
Mil'-, =1Ill-. $129,000
lotaine 0 Regan 5860075


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACRE
* ?, P ', A II,.:l.:.. h:. l,

* Il ,:,.il i .:.l:h.:.n i I~ h .:1 7I ;:. : .ll .:ll

MI -*'dI,` $259,500
Call Chailes KellI 352 422 2387


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS BEAUTY
I I 1,, ., ,,I , I' ,-l ,,,,,,,I ,I,,- ,I ,
I lIIi II 1hh .lll Ihill I: ,,,,,I I I,
.l l I ,,ll,-,,,I l ,I ,- i ,, ,l , h
I 1,11111 h ,, i. ii .. .. I P,,, M11 I 'i i i ,

MIr-'.- ='i .01. ASKING $82,000
Call Nancj Jenks
352400 80872 52 726 6668


2 BR, 2 BATH + DEN

_i 'lj ih I I_ l ll.)h l:.ll ii.l ll.:l
Mi =111 :01 $49,000
Jeanne n Wil/laid Pickiel 212 3410
iw', w',. CitiusCount/Sold. corn


irjl.o .11. :1 : VMI/H lIVFR I:. FI
o I W l [ll i .h : . jh.i.ml,:l
I il I I.: .t 'l.l lf i _'. I: ii. I "I I I hii ..l ,ijiM


MIl'.1. ='i:i11 ASKING $214,900
Pal Davis i352 22127280


INVERNESS 7 LAKES AREA
.... ,h ,,,i h d, ir ,,,I h, ,,, i. I .. hI hI UI .. .. .. I
.... I, I ,I ,,, ,,h ,,, I I ,, ,,
I .I. I 6.1h.. 1 ,.1, 6 '' 1
6.1,h ... J1 1 6 , 1 ..1 ,, .6 .1 ,, .,, h, .. .. 6 1 ,hr '
6.I 1',, I .. I 1 ,h .

0 ... I U U , ,. 1" A- A .... ", ,M666 8


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!
I:, llI, ,I . b J....... W il' b lh .* i 'iJ 1. .I I,


; ..h .i I, i .i.,jlij h .ilil b .i .J
ONLY ASKING $179,900
Ca/l Ouade Feese 352302 7699


. ... .. .. : .. ... ... :..

.... I I..:..... I..I I. .I h .ll .. .. h. I I

i1: ="..:: ASKING $158,900
Pit Dio' ,352' 212 17280
I'l,4lhinrp .1.1.1 c2/g1drf l...Ji


3/2/2 WITH CAGED, INGROUND POOL/SPA




S -,-,i ASKING S19,8.000
pill 0 11's lfil SfMl
I ,h l, h, II 1111 1i ,,l, :.." "


THIS 3/2/2 HOME WITH
CAGED INGROUND POOL
.J.. vl, , I,,I ,, h ill ha.j v, '". m ,
iJii,' V. I I I Jjlu ,,I ll h. ,I I ...
li i ., ,:l .'. Ihb..Ih I...J 1-1.. ,h i.h ii.
$195,000
Call Ru/th fiedenick / 352 563 6866


,.hi^.~ l.il .1 _" _" I / ;',...1 II I_ A
_6 v a. i iI 1 ,I l ,i. ii i, A

MI__/Iu'X.h. $115,000

Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
ii'i'i,. CiliusCountl'So/d. coin


Mi_ =1II1I.l ASKING $84,900
Call Stelan Siuai 352.212.0211


COMMERCIAL BUILDING
;ql. :h]| l .ii 1 1 A:. q;.j .i| .l f .i.i: in.]
*hil.lh 1 l i/ hl .l i I'1 11 :l l l. ill I.: .I .jl i .I .

Mi_:, = h: "Ii'"" ASKING $228,900
Call Jim Moiton at 422 2173 to I'iew
the home ol foui nowei business


E16 SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013