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Citrus County chronicle ( June 24, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03188

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03188

Full Text

Surprising leader: 49-year-old on top at British Open /B1


TODAY
& next
morning


CITRUS


COUNTY


Partly cloudy. 50
percent chance
of thunderstorms.
PAGE A4


www.chronicleonline. m
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOL. 118 ISSUE 347


Board fires transaction agent


Nemzoffsaid he will sue for break


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Transac-
tion agent Josh Nemzoff's
brief but stormy relation-
ship with the Citrus County
Hospital Board ended
abruptly Friday when the





Refuge manager
leaving post
Michael Lusk, the man-
ager of the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge,
announced Friday he is
leaving his post for a simi-
lar position at Okefenokee
National Wildlife Refuge
in southern Georgia.
Lusk, who took over
the helm in Crystal River
four years ago, dis-
patched an email to an-
nounce his resignation,
which he said he is doing
with a heavy heart. Lusk
had recently purchased a
home in Homosassa and
said he had planned to
stay here longer, but
could not pass up the
opportunity to work at
Okefenokee.
Lusk's tenure as man-
ager here has been
marked with tackling
several controversial is-
sues, including the intro-
duction of new rules of
conduct in King's Bay
and its designation as a
manatee protection
zone. He has also
presided over the man-
agement of Three Sis-
ters Springs, which is
being developed into an
eco-tourism destination.
-From staff reports
Im urI["-ww I']=


board fired him for refusing
to comply with a public
records request.
Nemzoff, hired in April to
facilitate the possible sale,
lease or merger of Citrus
Memorial Health System,
lost his contract on a 3-1
vote. Trustee Bob Priselac


ich ofcontract

voted to keep Nemzoff
onboard.
The hospital board will
decide at its July 24 meeting
whether to hire a successor
to Nemzoff.
Reached by phone Friday,
Nemzoff vowed to sue the
hospital board and its attor-


ney, Bill Grant, for breach of
contract.
The dismissal comes a
week after trustees Krista
Joseph and Chairwoman
Debbie Ressler tried unsuc-
cessfully to fire Nemzoff for
what they considered inap-
propriate emails to Grant
and board members. They
were also upset that Nem-
zoff took an offer to the Cit-


rus Memorial Health Foun-
dation to settle legal dis-
putes between the two
boards without running the
offer by trustees first.
Ressler said Friday the
situation worsened over the
weekend when Nemzoff, his
attorney and Grant ex- Josh
changed a series of emails Nemzoff
transaction
See Page A2 agent.


Rains keeping drought at bay


... .. ... ...-..... ....... -- -- : ..... ... -
." _.-: --._. .- - --




MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Heavy storms across Florida this summer have delivered beneficial rainfall that has brought higher-than-average totals across the
Central Florida region. This storm moves onshore between Crystal River and Ozello.

Whirl ofstorm systems created the wettest June in the state's history


BACK TO SCHOOL:


School days
See the Chronicle's
special Back to School
section./Inside


Classifieds ....... C9
Comics .......... C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment ... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts .... B3
Movies ...........C8
Obituaries ....... A6
TV Listings .......C7


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Florida's 2013 summer rainy
season has been an almost
daily soaking, thanks to what
weather officials call a high-
pressure ridge sitting just
north of the Sunshine State's
border.
The ridge has created a whirl
of storm systems mostly from
the southeast and eastern part


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
With the federal government
on track to open its online health
insurance marketplace Oct. 1, a
program is in place using com-
munity organizations to help
consumers simplify enrollment.
Some states will have their
own insurance marketplace, but
Florida residents will use the
national version.


of the state. The phenomenon
has helped create the condi-
tions for one of the wettest
Junes in the state's history and
has caused several of the
peninsula's ribbon of rivers to
swell to what is being called "in
flood state." The ridge is ex-
pected to move imminently, and
while the rains will continue to
fall, the patterns and times will
change, according to officials.
However, the Southwest


To help cc
ernment est
application c
give persona
marketplace:
exchanges.
CACs will p
on coverage o
dividuals col
applications.
are expected


)nsumers, the gov-
ablished certified
ounselors (CACs) to


Florida Water Management
District says lake levels in the
district, sans the Tampa area,
appear to be at below-normal
levels. And aquifer levels also
are at normal range.
Weather forecasters also are
saying the almost daily soaking
for almost two rainy seasons in
a row is keeping the D-word at
bay drought. Florida had
been in the throes of an acute
drought situation since 2006


until Tropical Storm Debby
came through and gave the
state a good soaking in 2012.
Drought Monitor is predict-
ing a soggy several months in
the near term in the eastern
half of the U.S.
"Tropical Storm Debby basi-
cally recharged the lakes and
rivers and brought them back
to normal levels," said Jon
See Page A2


Duke tax situation


confounds county budget


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer


1 assistance in the INVERNESS County Ad-
s also known as ministrator Brad Thorpe on Fri-
day unveiled a proposed $250.3
providee information million budget that raises taxes
optionss and help in- nearly 30 percent to make up for
mplete and submit the Duke Energy shortfall.
These counselors Actual spending is dropping
d to come from 2.1 percent but it would go up
if Duke makes payments the
See Page A5 county says the company owes.


* WHAT: Citrus County
Commission budget hearing.
WHEN: 9 a.m. Wednesday.
WHERE: Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness.

Just as Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene presented a July 1
tax roll that included a second
See Page A5


NI CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.6 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
S N I S S A N 937 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
SE CLUDES TA.. rAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE 6593 a) DISCO'JUW OFF MSRP INCLUDESALL REBATES AJD IN.ENTIvES NOl EVER( E WILL QW ALi, WIIH AFPPROED CREDIT OF~P~ri 'AOED1 T BE
COMBINED PIC:TuRES ARE JOH ILLIJSTRATIf V PURf PPLS ONL, PRIOR SALES MA' RESTRICT STICO


HIGH
89
LOW
72


JULY 20, 2013


Help coming for

insurance marketplace




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DCF secretary resigned

amid opposition to change


Associated Press
MIAMI The head of
Florida's child welfare
agency abruptly resigned
over growing dissension
with the agency's private
contractors as he worked
to transform the
agency, particu-
larly the role of
child protective in-
vestigators, ac- -
cording to a state
official familiar
with the situation.
The official was
not authorized to Da
discuss the cir- Wil
cumstances of the DCF
resignation pub- resik
licly and spoke to Thur
The Associated Press on
condition of anonymity
Friday, a day after David
Wilkins stepped down.
Wilkins has declined to
discuss publicly why he re-
signed, but he told the AP
Friday that his heart lies in
helping children and that
he'll continue that in some
form in the private sector.
Miami's regional manag-
ing director, Esther Jacobo,
will be interim secretary of
the agency, which has a
nearly $3 billion budget
and a staff of about 11,600.



STORMS
Continued from PageAl

Jelsema, meteorologist
with the National Weather
Service in Tampa.
"Even though we had
less than normal rainfall
during the cool months or
dry season since Debby,
the rains seem to have
started early this year in
May and really picked up
in June," Jelsema said.
He said in the Tampa
recording station, officials
noted 11.3 inches of rain
for June. The norm is
about 6.3 inches.
"That was way above
normal. That was almost
twice the normal


DCF's chief of staff,
Amanda Prater, also re-
signed abruptly last week.
The resignations also come
as the agency faced intense
scrutiny for alleged mis-
steps in handling a handful
of child deaths in recent
months.
Wilkins was in
the process of dra-
matically overhaul-
ing the role of child
protective investi-
j gators by adding a
new tool that would
help them assess
vid whether children
kins were in danger
chief when they made
ned home visits. He also
sday. was working to cre-
ate a system where the in-
vestigators linked families
to prevention services such
as substance abuse and
mental health treatment,
day care help or anger man-
agement classes. Since tak-
ing on the job in 2011, he
hired 100 new investigators,
mostly in South Florida, re-
duced their caseloads and
bolstered training. Jacobo
said further improvements
will be a priority
But the private contrac-
tors, who have influential
board members and pow-


amounts," Jelsema said.
In Citrus, 9.9 inches
were recorded, according
to Margit Crowell, chief
scientific data analyst with
SWFWMD.
"Already in July, Citrus
County has had 78 percent
of what is the normal rain-
fall amount," Crowell said.
She said despite the in-
creased rainfall, lake lev-
els in the county are what
the water district consid-
ers below average.
"The effects have been
minimal. We are doing
well as far as the rainfall
goes, but there are no
record-breaking rainfall
amounts," Crowell added.
Friday's records of area
lake levels are the follow-
ing: Inverness Pool is at


erful political connections,
balked at the transforma-
tion and were vocal in crit-
icism against Wilkins,
accusing him of trying to
exert too much control
over them as he renegoti-
ated their contracts and
undermining the goals of
the privatized system.
Officials across the state
had taken notice of the
discord.
"I think there are some
severe systemic problems
at DCE I think they extend
to the people that are run-
ning this transformation in
Tallahassee. I think it is
not well thought out," said
Miami Judge Jeri Beth
Cohen, who praised im-
provements made under
the privatized system.
Sen. Eleanor Sobel,
chairwoman of the state
Senate's Children, Fami-
lies and Elder Affairs Com-
mittee, had also recently
called for a hearing into
the child deaths and the
turmoil between Wilkins
and the contractors.
"We believe there was
overreach by DCF in areas
we believe they shouldn't be
involved in," said Kurt Kelly,
CEO of the coalition that
represents the contractors.


38.16 feet; Hernando Pool
at 37.50 and Panasoffkee at
38.13. Floral City Pool did
not have any data for Fri-
day, but Thursday's data
was 39.55 feet.
Meteorologist Jelsema
expects the shift in the
high pressure ridge to af-
fect when rain falls in the
area. He said right now
most of the storms are hap-
pening during late after-
noon and evening, but
expect that to change to
late morning and early
afternoon.
And, expect most of the
rainfall on the eastern part
of the peninsula.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


FIRED
Continued from Page Al

regarding a citizen's pub-
lic records request.
"Basically, it's a contin-
uation of the same issue,"


Ressler said. "He
needs to follow
the guidelines."
The board has
paid Nemzoff
about $53,000 for
his work since
mid-April. He was
to make a total of
$775,000 once the
hospital transac-
tion closed.


Bill G
hospital
attor


The Pennsylvania-
based consultant, known
for matching small, strug-
gling nonprofit hospitals
with large corporate
health care chains, re-
fused to comply with
Grant's demands that he
produce emails between
him and hospital bidders,
and between him and the
Citrus County Chronicle.
Nemzoff at first indi-
cated he would comply
Then, last Sunday, his at-


torney sent Grant an email
saying that as an inde-
pendent contractor Nem-
zoff is not required to
comply with Florida's pub-
lic records law. The attor-
ney said Nemzoffwould be
willing to research and
send the emails at a cost of
$12,000.
Nemzoff's attor-
ney, Ernest Bad-
i way, also said the
S hospital board was
making unfounded
a accusations
against Nemzoff.
Badway said
rant Joseph "specifi-
board cally impugned
ney. the character and
veracity of Nemzoff" and
owed him an apology.
Grant's response Sun-
day night was that board
members had done noth-
ing wrong. He gave Nem-
zoff until Wednesday to
produce the demanded
emails.
Nemzoff sent an email
to trustees Monday night
that stated his attorneys
told him he wasn't re-
quired to follow the pub-
lic records law. And, as he


had done in several
emails prior, Nemzoff
blamed Grant for side-
tracking progress in find-
ing a buyer for Citrus
Memorial.
"I am respectfully ask-
ing that all of you tell Bill
to leave me alone so I can
do my job," he wrote.
Joseph forwarded the
email to Grant on Tuesday
with a one-word com-
ment: "Unbelievable."
Grant said Friday that
Nemzoff's contract re-
quires him to abide by the
public records law.
Nemzoff said in an in-
terview the only way the
board can fire him is
for gross and willful
malfeasance.
"My contract does not
say 'we can fire you if you
don't follow the Sunshine
Law,"' he said. "A judge is
going to say to them, 'what
are you, stupid?' I'm as-
tounded this board would
be foolish enough to listen
to Bill Grant's advice."
Contact Chronicle re-
porterMike Wrightat352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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FIRST 60 POUNDS OR 10 GALLONS FREE
FOR HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ONLY
WEEKDAY HAZARDOUS WASTE COLLECTIONS
TUESDAY, THURSDAY & FRIDAY
9:00 AM TO 1:00 PM
For more information call
Citrus County Solid Waste Management (352) 527-7670
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm
Email: hazwasteinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us


A2 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


LOCAL/STATE


k
g
"s


~8~:






Page A3 SATURDAY, JULY 20,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

STATE

Citrus County

Water district has
springs contest
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
has launched a contest on
the social media site Insta-
gram to raise awareness of
springs throughout the
district.
Springs sites are a popu-
lar hot spot with both local
residents and tourists dur-
ing the summer months, es-
pecially on holiday
weekends. This summer,
whether you are tubing,
kayaking, swimming or just
relaxing near one of the
many springs in the district,
you can share those experi-
ences for a chance to win a
springs prize pack that in-
cludes tickets to Weeki
Wachee Springs State
Park. To enter, shoot a
photo or video while visiting
any spring. Then, upload
your photo or video to Insta-
gram and tag it #Renew
OurSprings through Sept.
2, 2013. Users earn one
contest entry for every
photo or video tagged.
To learn more about the
area's five major springs
systems in Citrus, Her-
nando and Marion counties,
and what the district is
doing to monitor and re-
store them, visit the website
WaterMatters.org/Springs.
Members of the public
can hear firsthand from the
district's team of springs ex-
perts about ongoing and fu-
ture restoration projects at
Chassahowitzka Springs,
King's Bay and Three Sis-
ters Springs. Users will find
regular project updates,
photo galleries and videos.
United Way offers
volunteer connection
The United Way of Citrus
County has established a
means to help connect
those interested in volun-
teering with finding organi-
zations in need of their skills.
Log onto www.citrus
unitedway.org and click on
the "Volunteer" button.
Enter your information and
choose your areas of inter-
est. United Way of Citrus
County will share your inter-
ests with nonprofit agencies
in the county so that they
may contact you when they
have a volunteer opportu-
nity in your area of interest.
Your email will not be re-
leased, all communications
will filter through the United
Way registry.
Transportation board
to meet Aug. 1
The Transportation Dis-
advantaged Coordinating
Board will meet at 10:30
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, at
the Citrus County Transit
Center, 1300 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
The annual public hear-
ing has been scheduled
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
Any person requiring
special accommodations or
desiring further information
regarding this meeting may
contact the transportation
supervisor of Citrus County
Transit at 352-527-7630.

Port Orange

K-9 removed from
service after biting
A police dog will be re-
moved from service "until
further notice" after biting a
woman twice during a
search for a missing child in
central Florida.
The Daytona Beach
News-Journal reported the
4-year-old child was found
safe inside his Port Orange
house earlier this week. But
the K-9 named Rex bit 53-
year-old June Dileo on the
thigh and hip.


Police say the dog's
leash came off while he
was tracking and they be-
lieve Dileo tried to help stop
Rex from running away.
Dileo's attorney said the
police report isn't entirely
accurate.
-From staff reports


CCHB sticks with same tax rate


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

INVERNESS Citrus County
Hospital Board members gave
tentative approval Friday to a
budget that keeps the tax levy the
same and assumes Citrus Memo-
rial hospital will not sell in 2014.
If the sale occurs after the
budget year starts Oct. 1, the hos-
pital board could use tax funds for
other health care-related pro-
grams, attorney Bill Grant said.
Board members set the tax rate
at.245 mills, the same as this year.
Someone with a $100,000 home,
minus the $50,000 homestead ex-
emption, would pay $49 in hospi-


tal board taxes.
The budget calls for providing
up to $3.7 million to the hospital
for charity care reimbursement,
plus debt reduction and capital
expenses. The CCHB budgeted $4
million for the hospital this year
and has spent under $1 million
with less than three months left to
go in the fiscal year.
Trustees also budgeted $2.1 mil-
lion for operating expenses. A
large chunk, which is still unde-
termined, is related to costs asso-
ciated with the potential sale,
lease or merger of Citrus Memo-
rial Health System. A transaction
attorney alone could cost $1 mil-
lion or more, trustees have said.


The millage brings in about $1.8
million. The budget includes
about $4 million in carryover from
this year.
Also Friday, the board defeated
on a 3-1 vote a proposal by trustee
Bob Priselac to begin discussions
with the county commission on
how to spend up to $80 million in
proceeds that could occur with
the hospital's sale.
"It's the taxpayers' money That
dialogue should begin immedi-
ately," Priselac said.
Proceeds from the hospital's
sale would be given to the county
commission to spend on health
care. Proceeds from a lease would
stay with the hospital board.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Youth 4 Dance participants Kristen Dewitt, left, and dance instructor Charles Cook practice a West
Coast Swing routine Thursday afternoon at the Central Ridge Library.


vx 4t 0 0


r allroom dancing
is not just for old
i folks.
That's the mes-
sage 22-year-old Charles Cook
of C4 Dance Academy and
members of USA Dance
Chapter 6072 Spirit of Citrus
had for local teens at a recent
dance
dem-
onm- ON THE NET
on-
stra- socdancer.org
tion
at Facebook:
Cen- C4DanceAcademy
tral
Ridge Library
The teens learned the West
Coast Swing to today's style of
music.


Dancers work on their West Coast Swing steps Thursday.


The next free dance
demonstration will be from 5
to 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, at
Central Ridge Library Teens


and "tweens" are encouraged
to attend.
For information, call the li-
brary at 352-746-6622.


Snooty the manatee celebrates 65th birthday


Associated Press

BRADENTON Snooty the
manatee was born when Harry S.
Truman was president, Columbia
records had just released its 33
1/3 LP format, and people were
still talking about how the NBC
television network had broadcast
Beethoven's Ninth Symphony in
its entirety.
Life in America, of course, has
changed.
But Snooty is still around, en-
tertaining visitors, munching on
lettuce and swimming silently in
his tank at the South Florida Mu-
seum in Bradenton.
Sunday is his 65th birthday, and
to mark the occasion the museum
will host a free party Saturday
He's the oldest manatee in cap-
tivity and possibly one of the old-
est ever, experts say
"If you lived in a pool where
people gave you a bath and fed
you lettuce by hand and you had
no other predators and the water
was always a nice warm temper-
ature, you'd be living long too,"
said Brynne Anne Besio, execu-
tive director of the South Florida
Museum. "He's protected, he's
safe, he has a great diet, he has
regular medical care, and so he's
got all the odds for him in terms
of living long."
Snooty, who is in good health,
eats about 80 pounds of lettuce
and vegetables every day to sus-
tain his 1,000 pound body. He
shares a tank with two smaller
manatees that are being rehabil-
itated for cold stress. And lately,


Associated Press
Snooty the manatee lifts his snout out of the water July 17 at the South
Florida Museum in Bradenton. Snooty turn 65 on Saturday. He was
born in captivity in Miami and is the oldest manatee in captivity.


he appears thrilled to greet his
visitors from the media.
"He loves cameras," said Mari-
lyn Margold, the museum's
aquarium director. Indeed, on a
recent day, Snooty glided from
his deep tank to a shallow med-
ical tank and hoisted his torso
above the water so he could sling
a flipper onto the edge of the
pool. When he spotted a video
camera, he slowly inched for-
ward toward its lens.
Snooty has been invaluable
over the decades for education
and conservation purposes, said
Robert Bonde, a research biolo-
gist and manatee expert for the
United States Geological Survey


in Gainesville.
"Every year we celebrate a
birthday for Snooty, it sets a new
records as far as the aging poten-
tial for manatees," he said.
Bonde said that among the
wild manatee carcasses found in
Florida, research showed the
oldest was 53 yet the average
manatee only lives to be about 13
due to man-made threats and en-
vironmental stressors, such as
cold weather
Although Snooty is the longest
lived manatee in captivity, it's en-
tirely possible that they could
live just as long in the wild if they
didn't face threats like boat pro-
pellers, said Bonde.


BUDGET HEARINGS
The Citrus County Hospital
Board tentatively set budget
hearings for 5:05 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 5, and
Wednesday, Sept. 18, in the
county commission
boardroom in Inverness.

Board members Debbie Ressler
and Krista Joseph, however, said it
was premature to begin those talks
since the board has yet to select a
bidder or decide whether the trans-
action should be a sale or lease.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
mwright@chronicleonline. com.



Key run


concludes

Editor's note: It's Run for the
Money Week, with runners taking
turns covering the 180 miles be-
tween the Capitol in Tallahassee
and the Key Training Center cam-
pus in
Lecanto.
While
the gru-
eling
journey /-r
is to r/"'
raise
aware-
n e s s
about the developmentally dis-
abled, it is especially significant
in that it brings attention to the
need for donations to cover the
expenses of Key clients who don't
receive government support.
MuE
Runners completed the barren
30-mile stretch of U.S. 19 between
Otter Creek and Inglis on Friday,
the next-to-last leg of the Key
Training Center's 180-mile Run
for the Money
"We finished our 30 miles on
time as planned. One of the great-
est things that happened was that
we had 11 cadets
from the WTI
Law Enforce- TODAY'S
ment Academy EVENTS
help out," said
Deputy Bryan the money
Melhado. the Money
Melhado. events
Members of today:
various specialty
teams from the 0 26th Key
Citrus County Training
Sheriff's Office Center's
shared the load Run for
on the extra-long the Money
portion of the Telethon
run. airs from
"We had a lot 9 a.m. to
of great support 6 p.m. on
from the Citrus WYKE-TV,
County Sheriff's cable
Office today with channel
administration 16.
being there," U Walk a
Melhado said. Mile in My
"One of the cool shoes at
things was that 11:30
some our cadets a.m. at
went online and Key's
viewed the pho- Lecanto
tos from yester- campus.
day of us crossing Key Train-
the bridges. ing Center
Throughout the vs. Citrus
event today, they County
talked about that Sheriff's
the entire run. Office
They used it as softball
energy to run an game at
extra mile each. I 9:30 a.m.
would say more
than half of those
cadets accomplished some per-
sonal goals."
The run will conclude today at
the Key Center's Lecanto campus
when the runners will be wel-
comed by Key supporters, con-
sumers, their families and a
celebration at noon a finale
they have looked forward to all
week.
"We finish the run by getting to
meet the clients and have lunch
with them," Melhado said.
Compiled by Eryn
Worthington

Key Training Center's
Run For The Money


SATURDAY'S
ITINERARY:
Runners arrive at the
Key Training Center
about noon.


Chronicle graphic





A4 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Because your ambitions
and talents are likely to blend together
very nicely over time, conditions in the
coming months look to be quite hope-
ful. You could do exceptionally well in a
number of areas in your life.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A project
that has been mismanaged could
come under your direct control. You
have the talent and the know-how to
succeed where others have failed.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You're likely
to do unusually well if you are more
concerned with the big picture than the
little details. Laying a strong foundation
will pay off.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There are
strong indications that you'll start culti-
vating an extremely important
relationship.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) New
heights can be achieved if you have
the motivation and desire to reach for
the stars.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Many of
your associates will appreciate the value
of your ideas and suggestions, giving
them more merit than even you do.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Someone with whom you enjoyed suc-
cess in the past will want to team up
with you again.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You'll
have the gift of arousing great interest
in others regarding the things you're
passionate about.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
are presently in a promising financial
cycle where increased earnings are a
strong possibility. However, don't think
that you won't have to work hard for
what you'll get.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -A rather
unique opportunity is likely to be pre-
sented to you by an old friend. It might
not look like much on the surface, but it
will develop greater depth down the line.
Aries (March 21-April 19) You're
likely to be much more successful using
traditional methods than you would be
trying something unorthodox or new.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Certain in-
formation you get from one party could
be of great value to another. If you bring
these two divergent factors together,
everyone could profit, including you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Develop-
ments that could improve the affairs of
both yourself and your colleagues are
brewing. Look for signals that things
are happening, so you can get on top
of matters posthaste.


ENTERTAINMENT


'Veronica Mars' film
teased at Comic-Con
SAN DIEGO It's not a mys-
tery: "Veronica Mars" is really
coming to the big screen.
Movie creator Rob Thomas,
star Kristen Bell and the rest of
the cast previewed footage Fri-
day from the upcoming fan-
funded film at Comic-Con.
The cult teenage gumshoe
series was canceled after three
seasons in 2007. Thomas used
crowd-funding site Kickstarter to
pull in $2 million in less than a
day to make the movie, eventu-
ally gathering more than $5.7
million in 30 days.
The footage teased didn't give
away too much of the plot,
showing an adult Mars as a hot-
shot New York lawyer returning
to her hometown and meeting
up with her old pals.
'Veronica Mars" stars Jason
Dohring, Tina Majorino and
Chris Lowell joined Bell on at
the San Diego Convention Cen-
ter panel.
Rocker's son fights
for dad's music
LOS ANGELES Singer
Marc Bolan's son is suing a
music publisher for more than $2
million, alleging the company
didn't renew its contract to use
the British glam rocker's hits, in-
cluding "Bang a Gong (Get It
On)" and "Jeepster."
Roland Seymour Feld filed
the lawsuit against Westminster
Music Limited in Los Angeles
court last week, alleging copy-
right violations.
Feld alleges the copyrights to
his father's songs expired at the
end of 1999, making him the
sole owner and administrator of
the songs, as the rocker's sole
heir.
Bolan, whose real name was
Mark Feld, was best known as


Associated Press
Kristen Bell participates Friday in the "Veronica Mars" panel
at Comic-Con International in San Diego.


front man of glam rock group T. A hearing was held Friday.
Rex. He died in a car accident in 3 Doors Down to play

Rihanat Scout Jamboree
Rihanna sues British


retailer over T-shirt
LONDON Racks of T-shirts
bearing Rihanna's image have
been on display at London's
High Court, where the singer is
suing a British retailer for using
her image.
Lawyers for the star seek
damages from Arcadia Group
Brands Ltd., which owns the
Topshop fashion chain, after it
sold shirts bearing her picture
without permission.
The shirts were initially sold as
the "Rihanna Tank" and then -
after she complained as the
"Headscarf Girl Tank" and the
"Icon Tank."
Rihanna's lawyers accuse
Topshop of trying to pass off the
T-shirt as being approved or au-
thorized by the singer.
The store said Rihanna is
seeking legal recognition for a
flawed assumption that "only a
celebrity or her successors may
ever market, or license the mar-
keting, of her own character."


CHARLESTON, W.Va. -A
spokesman for the Boy Scouts
of America said 3 Doors Down
will be the headline act at the
Scouts' National Jamboree con-
cert this weekend.
Deron Smith told The Associ-
ated Press on Friday that the
group will perform Saturday
night at the Summit Bechtel
Family National Scout Reserve
in southern West Virginia.
The band replaces other acts
that previously dropped out.
In March, Carly Rae Jepsen
and Train canceled planned ap-
pearances at the Jamboree over
the BSA's exclusion of gays.
Months of divisive debate led to
a vote by the BSA's National
Council in May to allow gay boys
to participate in Scouting while
keeping a ban on gay adults.
The policy change is effective
next January.
The band's hits include "Kryp-
tonite," "When I'm Gone" and
"Here Without You."
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, July 20, the
201st day of 2013. There are 164
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 20, 2012, a gunman
wearing a helmet, body armor and
a gas mask opened fire inside a
crowded movie theater in Aurora,
Colo., during a midnight showing of
"The Dark Knight Rises," killing 12
people in one of the deadliest mass
shootings in recent U.S. history.
(Suspect James Eagen Holmes
has pleaded not guilty by reason of
insanity to more than 160 counts of
murder and attempted murder.)
On this date:
In 1968, the first International Spe-
cial Olympics Summer Games, or-
ganized by Eunice Kennedy Shriver,
were held at Soldier Field in Chicago.
In 1969, astronauts Neil Arm-
strong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin be-
came the first men to walk on the
moon after reaching the surface in
their Apollo 11 lunar module.
Ten years ago: Gen. John
Abizaid, the top commander of
coalition forces in Iraq, predicted
that resistance to U.S. forces in Iraq
would grow in coming months as
progress was made in creating a
new government to replace the dic-
tatorial regime of Saddam Hussein.
Five years ago: Padraig Har-
rington became the first European
in more than a century to win golf's
British Open two years in a row.
One year ago: After years of
preparation and months of buildup,
London's Olympic moment finally
arrived as Royal Marine Martyn
Williams carried the Olympic torch
from a Royal Navy Sea King heli-
copter into the Tower of London on
the shore of the River Thames.
Today's Birthdays: Author Cor-
mac McCarthy is 80. Actress Diana
Rigg is 75. Rock musician Carlos
Santana is 66.
Thought for Today: "The regret
on our side is, they used to say
years ago, we are reading about
you in science class. Now they say,
we are reading about you in history
class." Neil Armstrong, American
astronaut (1930-2012).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
) PR H LO PR HI L
0.15 1- -92 71 0.10 ., 89 7


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
89 75
88 79
91 74
90 72
87 76
91 73
88 82
91 73
89 75


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUl
Southeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Mostly cloudy with
scattered showers and thunderstorms
today.


NA NA NA '- g6 73 2.50

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xclusdaily
forecast by
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 72 4
Partly cloudy; 50% chance of show-
Sers and storms.
9 SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 72
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of showers and
storms.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of showers and
S\ storms.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 88/72
Record 98/64
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 80
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 1.80 in.
Total for the month 8.90 in.
Total for the year 28.20 in.
Normal for the year 28.08 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.09 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 77
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 88%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 2.3/12
Sunday's count: 4.1
Monday's count: 4.6
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/20 SATURDAY 3:44 9:59 4:15 10:30
7/21 SUNDAY 4:41 10:56 5:11 11:27


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 2............................8:8 M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:45 A.M.
4 l 9 MOONRISE TODAY........................... 6:32 P.M.
JULY 29 AUG. 6 AUG. 14 MOONSET TODAY............................ 4:22 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitka* 5:13 a/12:20 a 4:01 p/12:00 p
Crystal River* 3:34 a/9:22 a 2:22 p/10:36 p
Withlacoochee* 1:21 a/7:10 a 12:09 p/8:24 p
Homosassa*** 4:23 a/10:59 a 3:11 p/-


*At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
6:04 a/1:14 a 4:57 p/12:57 p
4:25 a/10:19 a 3:18 p/11:25 p
2:12 a/8:07 a 1:05 p/9:13 p
5:14 a/12:13 a 4:07 p/11:56 a


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


LOOK
Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.29 28.23 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.51 37.50 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.17 38.16 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.55 39.56 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


96 74
88 66 .20
86 66
87 73 trace
97 79
96 69
96 75 .37
94 60
90 73
10364
99 79
88 79
98 73 .07
89 75
88 73 .64
90 73
96 78
90 73 .07
94 78
91 74
91 75
95 70
95 74 .25
81 65
96 78 .01
95 78
82 68 .02
91 73
97 75 .01
96 78
89 73 .18
92 76
91 70
10988
94 70
73 63
92 76
90 72
94 80
86 79
89 71 .06
93 72
93 72


87 65
86 67
85 67
87 72
90 74
95 73
97 74
90 59
88 73
101 60
94 70
80 62
86 55
87 75
88 71
90 72
82 68
89 69
85 67
92 74
87 67
89 59
96 74
86 63
87 67
86 63
88 72
92 70
88 69
93 67
92 75
88 66
91 73
103 87
95 75
73 65
89 72
93 73
78 62
78 61
89 73
89 73
92 74


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 91 74 ts 89 76
New York City 96 83 ts 94 73
Norfolk 94 77 ts 94 75
Oklahoma City 94 71 pc 94 74
Omaha 95 78 ts 87 70
Palm Springs 101 83 pc 101 83
Philadelphia 97 81 ts 95 74
Phoenix 10581 .02 ts 101 85
Pittsburgh 91 72 ts 85 64
Portland, ME 95 69 ts 88 62
Portland, Ore 82 57 s 87 58
Providence, R.I. 98 77 ts 94 72
Raleigh 92 75 ts 91 73
Rapid City 90 63 .31 ts 87 65
Reno 10465 pc 105 70
Rochester, NY 93 76 ts 83 61
Sacramento 99 58 s 100 62
St. Louis 98 78 ts 93 72
St. Ste. Marie 80 67 1.16 s 69 47
Salt Lake City 10271 ts 102 69
San Antonio 96 75 ts 93 73
San Diego 71 66 pc 72 67
San Francisco 67 54 s 69 55
Savannah 88 74 .29 ts 88 74
Seattle 82 56 s 79 58
Spokane 93 64 s 94 58
Syracuse 95 78 ts 85 58
Topeka 99 78 ts 93 71
Washington 95 81 ts 97 76
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 114 China Lake, Calif. LOW 34 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/78/pc
Amsterdam 83/62/pc
Athens 95/72/s
Beijing 90/70/s
Berlin 85/59/s
Bermuda 8478/sh
Cairo 97/68/s
Calgary 77/59ts
Havana 86/73/pc
Hong Kong 86/80ts
Jerusalem 82/67/pc


Lisbon 78/59/pc
London 82/57/pc
Madrid 97/65/s
Mexico City 75/57/ts
Montreal 79/54/ts
Moscow 68/55/r
Paris 93/69/s
Rio 8472/c
Rome 8272/s
Sydney 70/45/pc
Tokyo 79/71/c
Toronto 81/59/pc
Warsaw 76/51/sh


LEGAL NOTICES







Surplus Property


................................C 12




y- CITRUS COUNTY


-1
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JULY22




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH
Continued from Page Al

community-based organi-
zations with expertise in
social service programs.
Organizations can apply
to the marketplaces by on-
line application to have
staff or volunteers certi-
fied. Organizations with
CACs will be listed on the
marketplace website.
According to Florida
CHAIN, a statewide advo-
cacy group for affordable
health care, almost 3 million
Floridians will be eligible to
participate in the insurance
marketplace. CHAIN,
which stands for Commu-
nity Health Access Informa-
tion, is working to make
sure consumers are edu-
cated about the new system.
The group hosted a webi-
nar Friday on consumer as-
sistance and the new health
insurance marketplace.
"Getting health insur-



BUDGET
Continued from Page Al

"worst-case scenario" ver-
sion, Thorpe's budget takes
into account taxes owed
but that are not likely to be
collected from Duke.
Thorpe said the pro-
posed tax rate of 9.2387
mills anticipates Duke's
pledge to pay roughly the
same amount in property
taxes in 2014 as it paid this
year about $20 million.
Duke is disputing in
court Greene's assessment
of its energy complex
north of Crystal River.
That leaves other county
taxpayers to make up
about $9.6 million that of-
ficials believe Duke owes
but is not expected to pay
Officially, the budget is 8
percent higher than this
year's. But when the budget
is adjusted for Duke's non-
payment, it drops 2.1 per-
cent from this year's.
The Duke situation
makes this year's budget
process more complex
than usual.
"It's very confusing,"


ance is probably the
biggest raise in salary that
any low-income family will
get," Tricia Brooks, with
the Georgetown University
Health Policy Institute,
said. "Any organization
whose mission is to
strengthen families will
find it compatible with
that mission."
Training for CACs is ex-
pected to start in August.
Brooks said there will be no
fee for training and no cost
for certification. However, it
has not yet been made clear
exactly how the training
will be available.
"The hope is that almost
everyone can have public
coverage or purchase," said
Greg Mellowe, policy direc-
tor for Florida CHAIN.
A sample application for
organizations interested in
providing CACs is avail-
able at www.cms.gov For
consumer information on
the health insurance
marketplaces, visit www.
healthcare.gov.


Thorpe said. "It's the most
complicated budget I've
ever done."
Thorpe said he is rec-
ommending a $970,000 cut
from the general fund.
Those reductions include
eliminating 18 vacant posi-
tions, closing a road main-
tenance satellite office,
reduce right-of-way mow-
ing and reducing operat-
ing hours at the East and
West Community Centers.
No services or programs
are being eliminated.
The budget includes a 3
percent across-the-board
cost of living pay raise for
all employees at a cost of
$966,000.
Thorpe said the board
also has higher costs in the
state retirement system
and Medicaid payments.
He said employees will
see a 10 percent bump in
their health insurance
premiums.
The supervisor of elec-
tions, sheriff and tax col-
lector have also reduced
their budgets for 2014.
County commissioners
will review the proposed
budget during a Wednes-
day public hearing.


Domestic
battery arrests
Nicholas Dyer, 22, of
Crystal River, at 12:30 a.m.
July 12 on misdemeanor
charges of domestic battery
and criminal mischief. No
bond.
Brian Kessinger, 44, of
Crystal River, at 12:58 a.m.
July 12 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
Jeffery Browder, 33, of
Dunnellon, at 12:07 a.m. July
13 on a felony charge of sim-
ple assault/battery on a law
enforcement officer, fire-
fighter, emergency medical
services provider or public
transit employee. No bond.
Rachel Powalish, 37, of
Lecanto, at 4:21 a.m. July 14
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
Shawn Carpenter, 41,
of Hernando, at 7:35 a.m.
July 14 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
Salina Blanton, 28, of
Crystal River, at 3:28 p.m.
July 14 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
Zachary Gregory, 38,
of Homosassa, at 6:18 p.m.
July 5 on felony charges of
aggravated child abuse and
domestic battery by strangu-
lation and a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
DUI arrest
James Maynard, 42, of
West Sanction Road,
Lecanto, at 12:02 a.m. July
13 on a misdemeanor charge
of driving under the influence.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, he was stopped on
State Road 44 for driving on
the wrong side of the road.
He admitted to consuming a
12-pack of beer over a 10-
hour period and had difficulty
performing sobriety tasks. He
refused to submit to a test of
his breath. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Daniel Maxwell, 29, of
Northeast 5th Terrace, Crys-
tal River, at 11:59 a.m. July
12 on a felony charge of in-
troducing contraband to or


possessing contraband upon
the grounds of a detention fa-
cility. According to his arrest
affidavit, he is accused of
having marijuana at the Cit-
rus County Detention Facility.
Bond $2,000.
Raymond Lucas, 25, of
East Ray Street, Hernando,
at 4:24 p.m. July 12 on a Cit-
rus County warrant for grand
theft. Bond $2,000.
Nicholas Nolte, 23, of
South Bob White Drive, Ho-
mosassa, at 5:07 p.m. July
12 on a Citrus County war-
rant for violation of probation
on five original charges of
driving under the influence
with serious bodily injury. No
bond.
Thomas Botchie Jr.,
53, of South Sunset Point,
Floral City, at 6:08 p.m. July
12 on a Marion County war-
rant for violation of probation
on an original felony charge
of obtaining property by
means of worthless check.
Bond $1,000.
David Lemon Jr., 18, of
West Moss Lane, Crystal
River, at 7:58 p.m. July 12 on
a felony charge of posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance (cannabis). Bond
$5,000.
Gabriel Morales, 35, of
West El Dorado Lane, Bev-
erly Hills, at 8:52 a.m. July 13
on a felony charge of driving
while license suspended or
revoked (habitual offender).
Bond $5,000.
Frederick Long, 52, of
North Tumbleweed Trail, Her-
nando, at 1 p.m. July 13 on a
Citrus County warrant for vio-
lation of probation on an orig-
inal felony charge of
withholding information from
a practitioner. No bond.
Walter Griffin, 28, of
Johns Lake Road, Clermont,
at 8:34 p.m. July 13 on a
Brevard County warrant for
violation of probation on an
original felony charge of driv-
ing under the influence.
Bond $7,777.
Stephanie Audia, 37,
of Southwest 62nd Court,
Ocala, at 5:40 a.m. July 14
on a felony charge of pos-
session of a controlled sub-


stance (cocaine). Bond
$2,000.
Jonathan Attrino, 30, of
North Gulf Avenue, Crystal
River, at 8:56 p.m. July 14 on
a felony charge of petit theft.
Bond $2,000.
Vera Lindahl, 44, of
North Citrus Avenue, Crystal
River, at 10:20 p.m. July 14
on a misdemeanor charge of
disorderly conduct. Bond
$250.
Jason Collins, 29, of In-
verness, at 11 p.m. July 14
on a felony charge of aggra-
vated battery on a pregnant
victim. No bond.
Casey Waldron, 21, of
Dunnellon, at 3:16 a.m. July
15 on a felony charge of ag-
gravated assault with a
deadly weapon without intent
to kill and violation of injunc-
tion for protection against do-
mestic violence. No bond.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
SA residential burglary
was reported at 9:38 a.m.
Wednesday, July 17, in the
5000 block of S. Memorial
Drive, Homosassa.
SA residential burglary
was reported at 10:05 a.m.
Thursday, July 18, in the
5400 block of S. Elm Ave.,
Homosassa.
A Vehicle burglary was
reported at 4:02 p.m. July 18
in the 1700 block of Tuttle St.,
Inverness.
A residential burglary
was reported at 10:12 p.m.
July 18 in the 40 block of S.
Jeffery St., Beverly Hills.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 10:51 p.m. July 18
in the 1500 block of N.


Arkansas Terrace, Hemando.
Thefts
A grand theft was re-
ported at 9 a.m. Wednesday,
July 17, in the 3600 block of
N. CitrusAve., Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 1:49 p.m. July 17 in the
2900 block of Harrison St.,
Inverness.
SA grand theft was re-
ported at 5:22 p.m. July 17 in
the 7800 block of E. Spanish
Trail, Floral City.
An auto theft was re-
ported at 9:48 a.m. Thursday,
July 18, in the 2800 block of
W. Buccaneer Lane,
Dunnellon.
A petit theft was reported
at 3:34 p.m. July 18 in the
9500 block of N. Paradisea
Drive, Dunnellon.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:51 p.m. July 18 at
E. Murray Street, Beverly
Hills.
a A petit theft was reported
at 5:32 a.m. Friday, July 19,
in the 2100 block of S. Cole-
man Ave., Homosassa.
Vandalisms
SA vandalism was re-
ported at 6:37 a.m. Wednes-
day, July 17, in the 20 block
of S. Jefferson St., Beverly
Hills.
SA vandalism was re-
ported at 10:35 p.m. July 17
in the area of N. Florida Av-
enue and E. Van Ness Road,
Hernando.
SA vandalism was re-
ported at 11:32 a.m. Thurs-
day, July 18, in the 1900
block of E. Maryann Lane,
Hernando.
SA vandalism was re-
ported at 11:39 a.m. July 18
in the 500 block of W. High-
land Blvd., Inverness.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Aveleen
Price, 1
CARROLLTON,
KY.
Aveleen Price, 1 year
old, drowned Sunday, July
14, 2013. She was born July
20, 2011, in Carroll County,
Ky., to
Aron Price
and her
mother. .
H e r
mother
had her
worst fears ..- -
realized
Sunday af- Aveleen
ternoon Price
when her
1-year-old child drowned
in a family pool. The child
had wandered outside her
family's home in Carroll-
ton after her mother laid
her down for a nap and fell
in a swimming pool on the
property.
She was found unre-
sponsive in the pool after
an undetermined amount
of time and was trans-
ported to Carroll County
Memorial Hospital, where
she later died.
Survivors include her
mother and her father
Aron Price; and great-
grandparents, Joe and
Cynthia Price of
Homosassa.
A funeral was at
Worthville Baptist Church,
Kentucky, Friday, July 19,
2013.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


Leonard
'Lenny'
Colangelo, 79
CRYSTAL RIVER
Leonard A. "Lenny"
Colangelo, 79, of Crystal
River, Fla., died Thursday,
July 18, 2013, at Hospice
House of Citrus County. He
was born Sept. 12, 1933, to
Thomas L. and Alice
(Abraham) Colangelo in
Torrington, Conn. He came
here 19 years ago from
there. He was a U.S. Army
veteran and was the owner
of Lenco Bicycles of Crys-
tal River
He is survived by his
wife, Betty; sons, Tom and
Peter Colangelo and De-
wayne McVay; daughters,
Christy McVay, Stacy
Latimer and Melissa
McVay; a sister, Angela
Rundo; and several
grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral
Home with crematory as-
sisted the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

dg"?C. 6. Zacit
Funeral Home With Crematory
FRANCESCO BRUNO
Service: Hillside, IL
RANDY BEARDMORE
Service: Sat. July 27, 3:00 PM Chapel
DOROTHY FOX
Service: Mon. 10:00 AM
Burial: Florida National Cemetery
JAHU CREWS
Private Arrangements
JAMES AUSTIN NEAL
Private: Florida National Cemetery
LEWIS INGLE
Private Arrangements
EVELYN RICHARDSON
Pending
726-8323 FD4


Phyllis
Mills, 85
HERNANDO
Phyllis M. Mills, 85, of
Hernando, Fla., passed
away July 16, 2013, at the
Hospice House in
Lecanto. Born April 10,
1928, in Cambridge, Mass.,
to George A. and Alice
(Ayer) Shattuck, Phyllis
moved to Citrus County in
1988 from Ipswich, Mass.
She was a retired
bookkeeper
Survivors include her
children, Jeff Mills, Brad-
ford Mills and Linda Mills;
one sister, Pauline Tomer;
six grandchildren; one
great-grandchild.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto. In lieu of flowers,
donations in memory of
Phyllis can be made to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
www. brown funeral
home.com.


Darin
Slaughter, 44
INGLIS
Darin Arthur Slaughter,
44, of Inglis, Fla., passed
away July 9, 2013, at this
home. Darin was of the
Baptist faith. Mr Slaughter
was born in Delaware in
1969. He moved to the
local area 24 years ago.
Darin enjoyed playing his
guitar, and loved all of his
family and friends above
all.
Darin leaves to cherish
his memory his wife,
Tammy; brother, Brian of
Ocala; sister, Renee
Slaughter of Morriston;
grandmother, Marydel
Roosa; aunts, Pauline Jus-
tice and Donna Wooster;
stepmother, Lynn
Slaughter
The family will receive
friends at the cemetery
one hour before service.
Funeral service will be
graveside, 10 a.m. Monday,
July 22, 2013, at Pleasant
Hill Cemetery
Arrangements are under
the care of Knauff Funeral
Home. For further infor-
mation please call 352-528-
3481.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Robert
Tinker, 87
FORMERLY OF
INVERNESS
Robert N. Tinker, 87 for-
merly of Inverness, Fla.,
died Tuesday, July 16,
2013. There are no serv-
ices planned at this time.

Death
ELSEWHERE

Marc
Simont, 97
ILLUSTRATOR
CORNWALL, Conn. -
Illustrator Marc Simont,
whose
work
adorned
some of
the most
celebrated
titles in
children's
literature,
has died Marc
after a Simont
short ill-
ness, his family said
Thursday
Simont died Saturday at
his home in Cornwall, his
son, Marc "Doc" Simont,
said. He was 97.
With a pared-down style


that matched painterly use
of color with loose lines,
Simont illustrated close to
a hundred books over his
career In 1957, he won the
Caldecott Medal, one of
the top honors in Ameri-
can children's literature,
for his illustrations for "A
Tree is Nice" by Janice
May Udry
His work also won Calde-
cott Honor awards in 1950
for Ruth Krauss's "The
Happy Day" and in 2002 for
"The Stray Dog," based on
a story by Reiko Sassa.
Although most were for
young people, he worked
with authors ranging from
Margaret Wise Brown to
James Thurber In 1972, he
and author Marjorie Shar-
mat launched a 21-book se-
ries about a boy detective,
"Nate the Great"
Simont won the "James
Aronson Award for Social
Justice Journalism"
Hunter College in 2007 for
his political cartoons.
-From wire reports





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A6 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


m@




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
15.600 .................... ... Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,543.74
Change: -4.80 (flat)


1,600.0 10 DAYS.. -1 I: 10 DAYS
1 ,7 0 0 ..... .................................... .. .............. .................. .... 1 6 ,0 0 0 ..... ......... ... .... ... ....... .... ......... ............ ....... .... ..
1,65 0 ........ ......... .......... ...1.. ....... .... 15 ,5 00 ...
1,600 .. .......... ............... 15,000 ..... ... .... .. .....
1550 ............ ".. "... ............................. 14,500 ".. . . ................. .... .......
1,500 ...........................14,000
1,450 ......F ... ..... ........... ...... ...... ... 13 ,500 F.......
SF M A M J J F M A M J J


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,229
Pvs. Volume 3,338
Advanced 1546
Declined 1489
New Highs 257
New Lows 17


NASD
1,721
1,653
1154
1272
218
11


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15544.55
6608.87
508.22
9618.50
3589.05
1692.09
1235.04
17925.68
1050.50


LOW
15491.96
6542.93
504.99
9565.92
3578.57
1684.08
1229.32
17848.29
1046.08


CLOSE
15543.74
6586.57
506.22
9618.50
3587.61
1692.09
1234.25
17925.62
1050.48


CHG.
-4.80
+7.52
-0.68
+31.31
-23.67
+2.72
+1.61
+17.38
+0.21


%CHG.
-0.03%
+0.11%
-0.13%
+0.33%
-0.66%
+0.16%
+0.13%
+0.10%
+0.02%


YTD
+18.62%
+24.12%
+11.73%
+13.92%
+18.81%
+18.64%
+20.95%
+19.54%
+23.68%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 6.73 3.35 -.05 -1.5 A A -27.2 -36.2 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -- 39.00 35.81 +.07 +0.2 A A +6.2 +3.7 27 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 45.78 45.81 +.06 +0.1 A A A +21.9 +34.8 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 76.17 - 101.86 89.43 -.22 -0.2 V A V +2.3 +16.6 2.21e
Bank of America BAG 6.90 0 14.85 14.75 -.01 -0.1 A A A +27.0 +96.5 26 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 7.00 0 13.08 12.48 -.02 -0.2 A A A +9.8 +59.8 96
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 --- 43.43 35.98 +.17 +0.5 V A A -8.0 -6.0 26 2.16
Citigroup C 24.91 53.56 52.35 -.34 -0.6 A A A +32.3 +94.6 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 23.60 -.33 -1.4 A A A +49.0 +30.7 98 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 67.89 65.16 -.66 -1.0 V A A +30.9 +34.9 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 75.46 70.88 -.27 -0.4 A A A +11.1 +12.3 21 3.12f
EPR Properties EPR 42.25- 61.18 51.75 -.65 -1.2 A A +12.2 +26.7 22 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 83.50 0 94.84 95.17 +.79 +0.8 A A A +10.0 +12.2 10 2.52f
Ford Motor F 8.82 17.29 16.76 -.17 -1.0 V A A +29.4 +83.7 12 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.43 24.45 24.72 +1.09 +4.6 A A A +17.8 +22.8 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 49.77 81.56 79.89 -.13 -0.2 V A A +29.2 +59.9 25 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 26.90 23.04 -.20 -0.9 V V V +11.7 -7.9 12 0.90
IBM IBM 183.20 --- 215.90 193.54 -4.45 -2.2 A V A +1.0 +7.0 13 3.80f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 16.54 26.83 25.84 -.07 -0.3 V A A +22.5 +48.4 29
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 44.55 44.27 -.02 ... A A A +24.6 +75.1 25 0.72f
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 103.70 100.27 +.09 +0.1 V A A +13.7 +11.9 19 3.08
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 36.43 31.40 -4.04 -11.4 V V +17.6 +19.3 12 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.78 64.72 59.85 +.49 +0.8 A A A +7.5 +29.4 19 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 0 85.88 84.96 -.47 -0.6 A A A +22.8 +24.8 21 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 13.55 --- 32.55 16.35 -.15 -0.9 V A V -17.0 -16.3 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -- 21.09 18.78 +.02 +0.1 A A A +4.0 +13.1 41 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 10.34 10.23 ... ... A A +43.5 +53.1 12 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -- 68.77 44.38 +.81 +1.9 A A A +7.3 -14.0 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 74.60 0 107.55 108.16 +.77 +0.7 A A A +25.4 +44.1 22 2.32f
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 38.16 37.26 -.34 -0.9 V A A +20.6 +39.1 22 1.12
Time Warner TWX 36.95 0 62.43 61.77 -.48 -0.8 A A A +29.1 +62.8 19 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 61.22 100.97 100.13 +.50 +0.5 A A A +36.6 +52.9 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 -- 54.31 49.95 -.02 ... A A V +15.4 +13.4 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 30.80 29.53 +.41 +1.4 A A A +17.2 +5.6 1.57e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 79.96 78.08 +.74 +1.0 A A A +14.4 +8.5 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 30.27 51.45 50.61 +.07 +0.1 A A A +36.7 +66.7 22 1.26f
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


U"


The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
fell to 2.48
percent on
Friday. Yields
affect interest
rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
rose on Friday,
capping the
week with the
fourth weekly
gain in a row.
Metals were
mostly higher,
led by platinum.
Palladium fell.
Corn and soy-
beans ended
lower.





ED.


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .02 0.02 ... .08
6-month T-bill .07 0.07 ... .13
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .15
2-year T-note .30 0.31 -0.01 .22
5-year T-note 1.30 1.33 -0.03 .61
10-year T-note 2.48 2.53 -0.05 1.51
30-year T-bond 3.56 3.63 -0.07 2.61


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.32 3.38 -0.06 2.32
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.02 4.93 +0.09 4.28
Barclays USAggregate 2.35 2.33 +0.02 1.77
Barclays US High Yield 5.89 6.03 -0.14 7.06
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 4.35 4.29 +0.06 3.35
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.53 1.54 -0.01 .86
Barclays US Corp 3.24 3.22 +0.02 2.98


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 108.05
Ethanol (gal) 2.47
Heating Oil (gal) 3.09
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.79
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.12
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1293.30
Silver (oz) 19.45
Platinum (oz) 1429.70
Copper (Ib) 3.15
Palladium (oz) 748.65
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.22
Coffee (Ib) 1.23
Corn (bu) 5.44
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 326.90
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.45
Soybeans (bu) 14.91
Wheat (bu) 6.65


PVS.
108.04
2.50
3.10
3.81
3.11
PVS.
1284.60
19.38
1413.30
3.14
746.40
PVS.
1.22
1.27
5.41
0.85
331.50
1.43
14.69
6.61


%CHG
+0.01
-0.04
-0.36
-0.60
+0.44
%CHG
+0.68
+0.37
+1.16
+0.24
+0.30
%CHG
-0.11
-3.58
+0.55
+1.57
-1.39
+1.08
+1.46
+0.61


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.90 +.03 +13.2 +18.8 +14.9 +8.5
CaplncBuA m 56.28 +.06 +8.5 +12.7 +11.6 +5.0
CpWIdGrlA m 41.18 +.04 +12.3 +23.6 +12.7 +4.3
EurPacGrA m 43.80 -.06 +6.3 +19.6 +8.5 +2.6
FnlnvA m 47.76 -.02 +17.8 +26.8 +17.0 +6.7
GrthAmA m 40.74 +.04 +18.6 +29.2 +16.9 +6.9
IncAmerA m 19.71 +.03 +11.0 +16.3 +13.8 +7.7
InvCoAmA m 35.49 +.01 +18.6 +25.0 +15.9 +7.2
NewPerspA m 35.34 -.09 +13.1 +24.5 +14.3 +6.4
WAMutlnvA m 37.13 +.04 +20.2 +24.3 +19.0 +8.4
Dodge & Cox Income 13.57 +.03 -0.6 +1.6 +4.7 +7.0
IntlStk 38.44 -.01 +11.0 +30.0 +10.8 +3.2
Stock 149.84 -.08 +24.0 +36.7 +19.4 +7.9
Fidelity Contra 90.25 +.19 +17.4 +21.4 +17.8 +7.8
GrowCo 112.52 +.37 +20.7 +24.8+21.3 +9.6
LowPriStk d 47.90 -.08 +21.3 +32.2 +20.0 +11.5
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 60.01 +.10 +20.0 +25.6 +18.9 +8.4
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.35 ... +8.5 +14.9 +11.7 +7.8
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.13 ... +0.2 +7.5 +7.0 +9.5
GIBondAdv 13.08 ... +0.3 +7.7 +7.2 +9.7
Harbor Intllnstl 65.27 +.03 +5.1 +18.5 +10.6 +2.2
PIMCO TotRetA m 10.84 +.03 -2.4 +0.3 +4.3 +7.3
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 31.51 +.14 +20.2 +28.7 +18.1 +8.7
GrowStk 44.54 +.13 +17.9 +22.8 +19.5 +9.1
Vanguard 500Adml 156.12 +.25 +20.0 +25.7 +19.0 +8.5
5001nv 156.12 +.26 +19.9 +25.5 +18.8 +8.4
MulntAdml 13.75 -.03 -2.8 -1.1 +3.6 +4.6
STGradeAd 10.70 +.01 0.0 +1.7 +2.8 +4.0
Tgtet2025 14.98 +.02 +10.2 +16.4 +12.7 +6.5
TotBdAdml 10.70 +.03 -2.1 -1.5 +3.4 +5.4
Totlntl 15.45 -.01 +4.7 +18.7 +8.0 +0.8
TotStlAdm 42.60 +.06 +20.6 +27.0 +19.5 +9.0
TotStldx 42.58 +.06 +20.5 +26.8 +19.3 +8.9
Welltn 37.69 +.06 +12.8 +17.8 +13.6 +8.4
WelltnAdm 65.10 +.11 +12.8 +17.9 +13.7 +8.5
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks ended mixed on Friday.
The S&P 500 eked out another
all-time closing high. A slump in
technology stocks led by Micro-
soft and Google weighed on the
Dow Jones industrial average
and Nasdaq. The S&P 500 is
on track for its best month since
October 2011.

ManpowerGroup MAN
Close:$65.69A3.85 or 6.2%
The staffing company said that its
second-quarter net income rose 66
percent. The company's cost cutting
made up for sliding sales.





52-week range
$30.53 L i $66.20
Vol.:1.7m (3.1x avg.) PE:28.7
Mkt. Cap:$5.07 b Yield: 1.4%
General Electric GE
Close:$24.72A1.09 or 4.6%
The conglomerate posted a slight
gain in net income in the second
quarter and said its U.S. operations
are picking up steam.
$2P

2
2,1i
52-week range
$19.45 I $24.95
Vol.:103.3m (2.5x avg.) PE:17.1
Mkt. Cap:$255.61 b Yield: 3.1%
Chipotle CMG
Close:$408.97A32.22 or 8.6%
The Mexican food chain said that its
revenue and net income in the sec-
ond quarter rose as it opened more
restaurants.



,-, [.1 J J
52-week range
$233.82 I $410.12
Vol.:2.3m (5.2x avg.) PE: 44.3
Mkt. Cap:$12.64 b Yield:...
Rockwell Collins COL
Close:$70.42 A1.90 or 2.8%
The military electronics maker said
that its fiscal third-quarter net income
fell, but its results still topped ana-
lysts' estimates.





52-week range
$46.37 I $71.52
Vol.:1.9m (2.8xavg.) PE:16.3
Mkt. Cap:$9.55 b Yield: 1.7%
Capital One Financial COF
Close:$69.14A2.09 or 3.1%
Thanks to higher revenue at its cred-
it card and commercial banking busi-
nesses, the lender said that its sec-
ond-quarter profit rose.





52-week range
$50.21 $70.00
Vol.:5.3m (1.5x avg.) PE:12.2
Mkt. Cap:$40.39 b Yield: 1.7%


Stocks mixed


To, M I| THE WEEK ON WALL STREET


I. L-LIJ 3144-IIfII

holds back US

stocks; Sd&P

500 edges up

Associated Press

NEW YORK A bad
day for technology stocks
Friday slowed a recent
surge in the stock market
Microsoft led the slump
in tech, falling the most in
more than four years after
the company wrote off
nearly $1 billion on its new
tablet computer and re-
ported declining revenue
for its Windows operating
system. Google dropped
after its revenue fell below
analysts' forecasts, partly
because the Internet
search leader's ad prices
took an unexpected turn
lower
With tech stocks falling,
the Standard & Poor's 500
index eked out a gain of
2.72 points, or 0.2 percent,
to an all-time high of
1,692.09. The S&P 500 has
rebounded after a decline
last month and is up


Nasdaq
composite
For the week ending
Friday, July 19
-12.47

3,587.61


.................................................................. 3 ,7 5 0
.3,500
.. .. .. 3,250
. .. . .. .. 3,000
.................................................................. 2 ,7 5 0


JA S O N D J F M A M J J


5.3 percent in July
Despite the market's
broad advance, a growing
list of poor tech results is
raising concerns about the
strength of the economy
and the stock market. Intel
and eBay also reported
weak results this week,
and chipmaker Advanced
Micro reported a second-
quarter loss because of a
worldwide slump in PC
demand.
Technology "has defi-
nitely been a sector that
people have been expect-
ing big things from and it
has not delivered," said
Randy Frederick, Manag-
ing Director of Active
Trading & Derivatives at
the Schwab Center for Fi-
nancial Research.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average closed down
4.80 points, or 0.03 percent,
to 15,543.71. If not for the


2,500


declines in Microsoft,
Hewlett-Packard and IBM,
the index would have
gained about 70 points.
Even General Electric's
brighter outlook for the
U.S. economy on Friday
was overshadowed by the
tech slump.
The technology-heavy
Nasdaq composite fell
23.66 points, or 0.7 percent,
to 3,587.61.
The index was the only
major market benchmark
to end the week lower,
falling 0.4 percent.
Technology stocks in the
S&P 500 have lagged the
S&P 500 this year, gaining
only 8.5 percent, versus
18.6 percent for the
broader index. The indus-
try is one of four of the 10
sectors in the S&P 500 that
are expected to see earn-
ings growth contract in the
second quarter.


Business BRIE FS


TSA expands faster
screening to more travelers
WASHINGTON The government is ex-
panding the ways airline passengers can en-
roll in an expedited screening program that
allows travelers to leave on their shoes, light
outerwear and belts and keep laptop comput-
ers in cases at security checkpoints.
Under the Transportation Security Adminis-
tration's Precheck program, only travelers who
were members of the frequent-flyer programs
of some air carriers were eligible for expedited
screening.
On Friday, TSAAdministrator John Pistole
said beginning later this year, U.S. citizens will
be able to enroll online or visit an enrollment
site to provide identification, fingerprints and
an $85 enrollment fee.
About 12 million people are currently en-
rolled in the program. Pistole said he expects
about another 3 million people to enroll before
the end of the year.


US oil/gas rig count up 11
this week to 1,770
HOUSTON Oilfield services company
Baker Hughes Inc. said the number of rigs ac-
tively exploring for oil and natural gas in the
U.S. increased by 11 this week to 1,770.
The Houston-based company said Friday in
its weekly report that 1,395 rigs were exploring
for oil and 369 for gas. Six were listed as mis-
cellaneous. A year ago there were 1,935 ac-
tive rigs.
Of the major oil- and gas-producing states,
Texas gained nine rigs, Colorado, Oklahoma,
West Virginia and Wyoming each gained two
and California and Pennsylvania each added
one.
Alaska, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, New
Mexico, Ohio and Utah each lost one. North
Dakota was unchanged.
The U.S. rig count peaked at 4,530 in 1981
and bottomed at 488 in 1999.
-From wire reports


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Money&Markets
1,720 ................................. S& P 500
,,-, Close: 1,692.09
Change: 2.72 (0.2%)


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 A7






Page A8 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"In general, the art ofgovernment consists in
taking as much money aspossiblefrom one
part of the citizens to give to the other."
Voltaire, 1764


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
S Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PAINFUL DECISIONS




Realities of



budget about



to hit home


With Tuesday's budget
meeting looming
large, the Citrus
County Commission and
the public need to em-
brace the financial realities
necessary to keep the county
financially afloat.
The budgeting
choices will be THE I
painful and un- County
popular, no mat-
ter the ultimate OUR 01
decisions.
In recent days, Targeted
many residents outside
have been up in desi
arms about a $60
fee to fund fire services. To
date, public outcry about the
strong likelihood of the
county/library/fire rescue
millage rate leaping from 7.1
mills to 9.3 mills has been
modest, at best.
Expect that to change now.
Many citizens have been
adamant about maintaining
existing services; however,
the triple-whammy of Duke
Energy's withholding of a
portion of its assessed taxes,
the lousy local economy and
the county's use of fund bal-
ances means big changes are
in store.
Unpopular as it may be,
raising taxes while cutting
some services is the only re-
alistic way to go. Commis-
sioners, however, should not
consider across-the-board
budget cuts.
Whether the public is sym-
pathetic or not, county lead-
ers must take to heart
government's core mission,
then embark on targeted cuts.


Is


F
P


ra


They must view the county as
a whole and cannot afford to
cave to specific interests re-
gardless of how well-meaning
they may be.
From the years of a boom-
ing economy and growing
government, serv-
ices were incor-
SUE: porated that we
village. can no longer
keep pace with,
'INION: financially
Commissioners
cuts and need to step back
analysis and make big,
able. fundamental
changes to re-
duce expenses. Look at the
various branches of govern-
ment from county adminis-
tration to constitutional
offices and look to com-
bine functions ranging from
transportation and purchas-
ing, to I.T. and human re-
sources and other areas of
redundancy
While it would be a tall
task, assembling an inde-
pendent panel of experts to
analyze expenses and make
recommendations on consoli-
dating the functions of agen-
cies would be of benefit
because it would offer a per-
spective that wouldn't be
found among those battling to
protect their turf.
Because of existing reali-
ties, Citrus County's finan-
cial future is about to see
drastic change. All con-
cerned must come to grips
with that and protect criti-
cal services while accepting
the cost of living here is
about to rise.


Enough Zimmerman
I cannot understand why I
have to be inundated by this
trial over there with George Zim-
merman. I want to know why
every channel has to have that
for news. I cannot get news. I
cannot get weather. It's just ab-
solutely horrible that
we sensationalize our 0
news. That is unfair.
Where is justice? These
stories should be pri-
vate. They do not need
television in our court-
rooms at all.
Judge is super
I don't know what CAL
this judge's name is in 563
the Zimmerman trial. I
forgot. I'm sure I've
seen it there at one time, but
she is super as a judge. I think
she's being fair and she's doing
the right thing for both sides.
God bless her.
Let him have peace
Kind of tired about hearing
about this trial. It's over with.
Move on with your life. If you
want to do something, do some-
thing about it legally. But there's
all these threats against George
Zimmerman. George Zimmer-
man did not acquit himself of
the murder case of Trayvon Mar-
tin. The jury did. The judicial
system did. So, if you want to
pick on somebody, pick on the
system. Don't pick on the guy
they let free.


I

C


Sad situation
My views on the Zimmerman
case: First of all, George Zim-
merman should have minded his
business, listened to the police
and stood where he was. Then
you have a 911 operator calling
him to see where he's going.
That didn't help the sit-
JND uation. Trayvon should
have basically called
ft 911, got to a safe spot
Sand told him about
& what was going on. He,
too, took it upon him-
self to get into a fight
with Zimmerman. Ap-
parently a neighbor saw
Zimmerman where he
)579 was being hit and badg-
ered by Trayvon. So, you
know, these jurors made
their decision and we have to live
with that. Unfortunately, this is a
sad situation for everybody be-
cause Zimmerman's life will be
changed by this. He'll never pur-
sue a career as he wanted as a
police officer. His life will always
be in jeopardy. So it's a sad
situation for everybody,
unfortunately.
Case closed
George Zimmerman was
found not guilty, case closed.
This Trayvon Martin thing has
gone out of control. ... We have
a system in this country. If you
commit a crime, you go
through the judicial system.
You're found guilty or innocent,
case closed.


16-year-old has a brave heart


BELFAST, Northern Ireland
While American cable
TV news engaged in
saturation coverage of
the closing arguments and ver-
dict in the George Zimmerman
murder trial, the
BBC and Sky News
carried an inspiring
speech by Malala
Yousafzai, the 16-
year-old Pakistani
girl shot in the head
last October by the
Taliban for advocat-
ing the education of
girls. CalT
On her birthday, al T
Malala addressed in OTI
barely accented Eng- VOI
lish a special youth
gathering at the
United Nations in New York.
She wore a shawl that had be-
longed to the late Pakistani
President Benazir Bhutto, who
was assassinated by Islamic ex-
tremists in 2007.
Only occasionally referring to
notes, Malala, who now lives in
Birmingham, England, where
she received medical treatment
following the attack, delivered
a speech more compelling than
those given by most diplomats
and presidents who have spo-
ken at the U.N. "Thousands of
people have been killed by the
terrorists and millions have
been injured," she noted, "I am
just one of them." She said her
injury and the killing and
wounding of her friends had
launched "thousands of voices."
Sounding more mature than
her years, Malala said, "The ter-


Ph
H
I4


rorists thought that they would
change our aims and stop our
ambitions but nothing changed
in my life except this: Weak-
ness, fear and hopelessness
died. Strength, power and
courage was born."
Invoking the non-
violent teachings of
the Rev Martin
Luther King Jr, Ma-
hatma Gandhi, Jesus,
Buddha, Mother
Teresa and Nelson
Mandela, Malala said
she is not against
anyone, rather she is
Lomas for education for
IER girls and boys, espe-
CES cially the children of
the Taliban. She said,
"I do not even hate
the Talib who shot me. Even if
there is a gun in my hand and he
stands in front of me, I would
not shoot him."
In a powerful indictment of
extremism, Malala said, "The
extremists are afraid of books
and pens. The power of educa-
tion frightens them. They are
afraid of women. The power of
the voice of women frightens
them."
She accused terrorists of
"misusing the name of Islam
and Pashtun society for their
own personal benefits." While
her claim "Islam is a religion of
peace" is debatable, given how
it is often practiced by many
radicals who assert they are the
true disciples of Mohammed,
Malala's voice needs to be mul-
tiplied by thousands, even mil-
lions if the Taliban and their


terrorist brothers are to be iso-
lated and defeated. The voices
(and most importantly behav-
ior) must come from within
Islam, not outside of it
Here are three recent exam-
ples of what Malala and her ap-
plauding U.N. audience face.
Last week, Islamic extremists
kidnapped and murdered a
Coptic Christian in Egypt as
part of a protest against the mil-
itary coup that ousted Presi-
dent Mohammed Morsi. It is the
latest example of the growing
persecution against Egyptian
Christians.
The Middle East Media Re-
search Institute reported that
in a Friday sermon in Damas-
cus, a Syrian preacher blamed
Jews for the civil unrest
throughout the Middle East.
In London, a funeral was
held last week for Lee Rigby, a
British soldier stabbed to death
in May by a pair of alleged Is-
lamic fanatics.
Malala, though courageous,
faces a seemingly impossible
task, but if one person can
spark a revolution, perhaps one
can spark a counter revolution
with words like these: "Let us
wage a global struggle against
illiteracy, poverty and terrorism
and let us pick up our books
and pens. They are our most
powerful weapons. One child,
one teacher, one pen and one
book can change the world."
Good luck, brave heart


Email Cal Thomas at
tmseditors@tribune. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Rationalize first
Far too many contributions
to "Sound Off" and Letters to
the Editor display a noticeable
lack of understanding and/or
rationality regarding real-life
conditions. Several repeat con-
tributors seem to lack even the
most basic understanding of
governmental responsibility to
its citizens or business reality
in the real world.
Individuals short on reason-
ing continue to demand unlim-
ited "services" from city and
county government Yet they
complain vehemently when in-
creased taxes are imple-
mented or discussed. Are they
so gullible to believe every-
thing is paid for by the money
fairy? Have they ever taken
time to analyze their actual
dollar contribution to our tax
base relative to the myriad
services they receive in
return?
What would their reaction
be if they were required to pay
actual costs for all services
rendered to them through city
and county governments if
those real expenses were pro-
portionately charged back as
an assessment to their prop-
erty taxes? Such services as
fire department protection,
road system maintenance,
night-time illumination in re-
spective living areas, police
and law enforcement coverage,
emergency first-responders,
911 call-in availability, etc, etc.
What about those individu-
als who do not understand
common-sense business prac-
tices called "profit"? Contribu-
tors to the Chronicle request


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

county officials "build" a Tar-
get, or up-scale clothing mer-
chandiser or a specific grocery
or restaurant in the Crystal
River Mall. Or question why
chain stores do not react to re-
quests and open "conve-
nience" outlets where they
would like them to be. Would
they be willing to guarantee
that business a profit commen-
surate with their other stores?
Wake up, people. We can
have everything we want sup-
plied by local government if we
are willing to pay the price for
those services, which we are
not. Stop complaining. We al-
ready receive more than what


our minimal tax contributions
pay for. As for those who be-
lieve they are owed everything
possible because they pay an-
nual real estate, sales or gas
taxes, think again.
Contrary to some misguided
opinions, Citrus County has a
well-run, cost-conscious gov-
ernment You may disagree for
political reasons with some of
our leaders. You may also dis-
agree with one or another de-
partment based on personal
feelings for whatever reason.
But for those who find it neces-
sary to constantly find fault, try
a dab of thought rationaliza-
tion before blathering com-
plaints based on
non-justifiable reasoning.
William Lambert
Inverness

Who should judge?
Liberals love to use the bibli-
cal quote: "Do not judge lest
you be judged." Matthew 7-1.
For some reason they never
use Proverbs 30 v 5 (NIV ver-
sion) "Every word of God
proves true." I think it's obvi-
ous why they don't use it. It
would mean that when the
Bible says something is wrong,
it's actually wrong.
If you're a liberal and you
actually believe or live by
this non-judgmental doc-
trine, do you believe that
armed robbery should be
legal? Do you believe that
arson and burglary should be
legal? For after all, who are
you to judge?
Brad L. Block
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: ZIMMERMAN




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 A9











NATION


C


CITRUS COUNTY
ITRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Heat waveObama talks race


World BRIEFS

Run over


CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Brianna Sanchez, 10,
reacts Friday as water
pours over her at
Firefighters Memorial
Pool during a heat wave
in Union City, N.J., in
which temperatures
reached the high 90s.


DOE: Fracking
didn't taint water
PITTSBURGH -A land-
mark federal study on hy-
draulic fracturing, or
fracking, shows no evi-
dence that chemicals from
the natural gas drilling
process moved up to con-
taminate drinking water
aquifers at a western Penn-
sylvania drilling site, the De-
partment of Energy told The
Associated Press.
After a year of monitor-
ing, the researchers found
the chemical-laced fluids
used to free gas trapped
deep below the surface
stayed thousands of feet
below the shallower areas
that supply drinking water,
geologist Richard Ham-
mack said.
Although the results are
preliminary the study is
still ongoing they are the
first independent look at
whether the potentially toxic
chemicals pose a threat to
people during normal
drilling operations.
The DOE team will start
to publish full results of the
tests during the next few
months.
NJ ruling covers
cellphones
NEWARK, N.J. Pri-
vacy experts said a court
ruling in New Jersey this
week on cellphone tracking
could resonate beyond the
state's borders.
In a unanimous ruling
published Thursday stem-
ming from a 2006 burglary
case, the state's Supreme
Court directed that begin-
ning in 30 days, all law en-
forcement officers must get
a search warrant based on
probable cause if they want
access to cellphone locat-
ing data.
Since 2010, police have
had to satisfy a lower stan-
dard of demonstrating there
are "reasonable grounds" to
believe the information
would be relevant to an
investigation.
Cops: Men found
held in home
HOUSTON Four men
found living in "deplorable
conditions" in a Houston
garage on Friday told police
that they were being held
captive after being lured by
promises of food and ciga-
rettes so that their captor
could cash their public-
assistance checks, authori-
ties said.
Three of the men were
malnourished and taken to
a hospital after being dis-
covered by officers re-
sponding to a 911 call about
the home, Houston police
spokeswoman Jodi Silva
said. Sgt. Steven Murdock
described the living condi-
tions as like a "dungeon."
Investigators were still
trying to determine how
long the men lived there,
but they said it may have
been weeks.
Silva said the men told
investigators they were
forced to live in the garage
- which included just one
chair, no bed and a possibly
malfunctioning air condi-
tioner so their captor
could cash their assistance
checks.
-From wire reports


President says Martin 'could

have been me'years ago


Associated Press

WASHINGTON In a
rare and public reflection
on race, President Barack
Obama called on the na-
tion Friday to do some soul
searching over the death
of Trayvon Martin and the
acquittal of his shooter,
saying the slain black
teenager "could have been
me 35 years ago." Em-
pathizing with the pain of
many black Americans,
Obama said the case con-


jured up a hard history of
racial injustice "that
doesn't go away."
Obama's personal com-
ments, in a surprise ap-
pearance in the White
House press room, marked
his most extensive discus-
sion of race as president.
For Obama, who has writ-
ten about his own struggles
with racial identity but
often has shied away from
the subject in office, the
speech signaled an un-
usual embrace of his stand-


ing as the nation's first
black president and the
longing of many African-
Americans for him to give
voice to their experiences.
"When you think about
why, in the African-
American community at
least, there's a lot of pain
around what happened
here, I think it's important to
recognize that the African-
American community is
looking at this issue through
a set of experiences and a
history that doesn't go
away," Obama said during
his 20-minute remarks.
A Florida jury last week
acquitted George Zimmer-
man of all charges in the
February 2012 shooting of


Martin, an unarmed 17-
year-old. The verdict was
cheered by those who
agreed that Zimmerman
was acting in self-defense,
while others protested the
outcome, believing Zim-
merman had targeted Mar-
tin because he was black.
Despite his emotional
comments on the case, the
president appeared to sig-
nal that the Justice De-
partment was unlikely to
file federal civil rights
charges against Zimmer-
man. Traditionally, he
said, "these are issues of
state and local govern-
ment," and he warned that
the public should have
"clear expectations."


Motor City uncertainty


Associated Press
The sun sets Thursday on Detroit, Mich. State-appointed emergency manager Kevyn Orr asked a federal
judge for permission to place Detroit into Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection Thursday.

Residents worry whether bankruptcy will better Detroit


Associated Press

DETROIT In Detroit, it can take police nearly
an hour to respond to a 911 call. Despite razing
close to 10,000 vacant houses, three times as many
still stand with windows smashed and doors ripped
off. At night, many streets and even freeways are
dangerously shrouded in darkness because tens of
thousands of street lights don't work.
This is Detroit, an insolvent city seeking to find
its way through the uncertainty of the largest city in
U.S. history to file for bankruptcy
For decades, residents have heard one city offi-
cial after another vow to improve city services but
little would be done. On Friday a day after the
city filed the unprecedented bankruptcy they
were given a deadline.
Gov. Rick Snyder and Detroit emergency man-
ager, Kevyn Orr, promised weary residents that they
would see better city services in 30 to 60 days.
"Now is our opportunity to stop 60 years of de-
cline," Snyder said Friday during a press confer-
ence just north of downtown.
Though Thursday's bankruptcy filing had been
feared for months, the path ahead for the once
mighty Motor City is still uncertain. As Detroit starts
the likely lengthy process of shedding its debt, res-
idents, businesses owners and retirees nervously
wonder if they'll see improvements after years of
neglect or if another round of promises will go
unfulfilled.
In the heyday of its industrial power, Detroit used
to boast of having one of the highest owner-
occupied housing rates in the country thanks to the
then-booming auto industry that offered well-paying
jobs and a gateway to the middle class. In the 1950s,
1.8 million people lived here. Now, the population
struggles to stay about 700,000. With neighborhoods
in neglect, property values have plummeted.


Detroit's long-term economic decline
Detroit became the biggest U.S. city to file for bankruptcy.
The filing put the city on an uncertain path that could mean
laying off municipal employees, selling off assets, raising fees
and scaling back basic services.


The population has been dwindling ...
2.0 ...
15
1.0
0.5"
'50 '60 '70 '80 90 0
... while unemployment remains stubbornly high.
2 5 % ..... ... .......... . .................. .... ..... .


In millions


0.71


) '10


201 14 .............. /....... ............... .........
15 4 1 0 a


10% .. r .. ....... .. ..
'05 '06 '07 '08


The city is the biggest employer


.09 10 '11 . 12...
'09l '10 '11 '12


Employees


City of Detroit 11,396
Detroit Public Schools 10,951
Detroit Medical Center 10,823
Henry Ford Health System 8,774
U.S.Government 6,665


Revenues continue to decline


In $ billions


1 .2 ... ............ ........$1 ..... ... ............. ............... ............. ....


0.9 .. . . .. .
'08 09 10
SOURCES: City of Detroit; Census Bureau


1.1 12 .. .......... 13....
'11 '12 '13


House votes to replace 'No Child' education law


Associated Press


WASHINGTON
House Republicans voted
Friday to dismantle the
troubled No Child Left Be-
hind law for evaluating
America's students and
schools, saying states and
local school districts
rather than Washington
should be setting rules for
ensuring that kids are get-
ting good educations.
The legislation would
eliminate federally re-
quired testing of students,
which has been controver-
sial from the start. But the
measure passed with no
Democratic support and
drew a veto threat from the


Obama administration,
which said it would be a
"step backward" in efforts
to better prepare children
for colleges and careers
and to bring improvements
to low-performing schools.
Democrats in the Sen-
ate, where they hold the
majority, are working on
their own bill. It would
also give states greater
flexibility in designing
school improvement stan-
dards. But it would main-
tain the authority of the
federal education secre-
tary to approve those
plans. A Senate vote on
that legislation is unlikely
until autumn.
The House bill, which


Republicans named the
Student Success Act and
Democrats dubbed the Let-
ting Students Down Act,
passed 221-207, with every
Democrat, and 12 Republi-
cans voting against it
That partisanship comes
against a background in
which nearly everyone
agrees that No Child Left
Behind, while achieving
some successes in improv-
ing achievement levels, is
too inflexible and needs a
major overhaul.
The law was passed by
Congress in 2001, a biparti-
san effort led by, among oth-
ers, current House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, and
the late Sen. Ted Kennedy,


D-Mass. President George
W Bush was a strong sup-
porter and signed it into
law in early 2002.
It required that all stu-
dents be able to read and
do math at their actual
grade level by 2014. But
the Obama administration,
in a tacit acknowledge-
ment that the goal was un-
attainable, last year began
offering waivers to states
that came up with their
own federally approved
plans to prepare students
for college and careers
and to measure student
and teacher performance.
To date, 39 states and the
District of Columbia have
been granted waivers.


w_

Associated Press
Ye Meng Yuan poses for
photos with other
classmates in Jiangshan
city in eastern China's
Zhejiang province. On
Friday, the San Mateo
County Coroner's Office
announced that
Mengyuan survived the
the July 6 crash of Asiana
Airlines Flight 214 only to
be run over and killed by
a fire truck.

Coroner: Teen
killed by vehicle
SAN MATEO, Calif.-
As the wreckage of Asiana
Flight 214 burned, Ye Meng
Yuan was lying on the
ground just 30 feet away,
buried by the firefighting
foam rescue workers were
spraying to douse the
flames.
No one knows exactly
how the 16-year-old Chi-
nese student got to that
spot, but officials said one
thing is clear now: She
somehow survived the
crash.
And in the chaotic mo-
ments that followed -
flames devouring the fuse-
lage, those aboard escap-
ing by emergency slides,
flight attendants frantically
cutting away seat belts to
free passengers a fire
truck ran over Yuan, killing
her.
The new details re-
leased Friday by the coro-
ner's office compounded
the tragedy for her family
and confirmed the growing
suspicions that emergency
workers have had since
soon after the July 6 crash:
One of the three who died
did so by rescuers' actions.
"There's not a lot of
words to describe how
badly we feel, how sorry we
feel," said San Francisco
Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-
White.
Pope: Tweet for
indulgences
VATICAN CITY The
Vatican is offering indul-
gences for Facebook fans,
Twitter lovers and other "vir-
tual" participants of the up-
coming World Youth Day in
Rio de Janeiro but
there's a hitch.
The
Holy
See's so-
cial media
guru,
Arch-
bishop
Claudio
Maria
Claudio
Celli, Maria Celli
warned Vatican's social
Friday media guru.
that
merely checking the pope's
Twitter feed won't result in
an indulgence, the ancient
church tradition related to
the forgiveness of sins that
roughly amounts to a "get
out of Purgatory free" card.
Rather, Celli told The As-
sociated Press, a Catholic
seeking an indulgence for
participating in Rio either
physically or virtually-
must truly be contrite and
have a moment of deepen-
ing faith.
Famously, Martin
Luther's opposition to the
church's practice of selling
indulgences inspired him to
launch the Protestant Ref-
ormation in the 1500s. He
was excommunicated, and
the practice of buying and
selling indulgences has
been illegal since 1562
Council of Trent, but the
granting of them has
continued.
-From wire reports










SPORTS


SEC football coaches
talk about the battle of
recruiting talented but
troubled players, like
former UF standout
Aaron Hernandez./B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2, B4
0 Golf/B3
0 Tour de France/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 College football/B4


Down early, Rays rally past Blue Jays


Associated Press
TORONTO Ryan Roberts
singled home the tiebreaking
run in the eighth inning and the
Tampa Bay Rays beat the
Toronto Blue Jays 8-5 on Friday
night.
Evan Longoria, Wil Myers,
Kelly Johnson and Ben Zobrist
all went deep off Toronto
starter Esmil Rogers, but it was
former Blue Jay Roberts whose
two-out single off Steve Delabar
was the key in lifting the Rays
to their 15th win in 17 games.
Zobrist and Myers both had
three hits, each coming within
a triple of the cycle.
Jose Bautista hit a two-run
homer for the Blue Jays, who


got solo shots from Edwin En-
carnacion, Brett Lawrie and J.P
Arencibia, but couldn't protect
a 4-1 lead, losing for the ninth
time in 12 games.
David Price (4-5) pitched
seven innings for the win, im-
proving to 7-0 in eight career
starts at Rogers Centre. Price is
13-2 with a 2.45 ERA in 17 ca-
reer starts against Toronto.
Johnson singled off Brett
Cecil (3-1) to begin the eighth,
bringing Delabar on in relief.
Pinch hitter Sean Rodriguez
advanced Johnson with a sacri-
fice bunt and Jose Molina flied
out before Roberts hit an RBI
single. Roberts took second on
the throw and went to third on a
wild pitch before scoring on


Desmond Jennings' double.
Roberts was recalled from
Triple-A Durham earlier Friday
to take the place ofJames Loney,
who's on the paternity list
Joel Peralta worked the
eighth and Jake McGee surren-
dered Lawrie's sixth homer in
the ninth.
Price, who came in having
pitched back-to-back complete
games in his last two starts be-
fore the All-Star break, allowed
four runs and seven hits. He
walked one and struck out five.
Tampa Bay Rays starting
pitcher David Price throws to
the Toronto Blue Jays during the
first inning Friday in Toronto.
Associated Press


Surprising leader


49-year-old

Jimenez holds

slim lead at

British Open

Associated Press
GULLANE, Scotland -
Miguel Angel Jimenez looked
like the only guy who was
having fun.
On a punishing day at Muir-
field the course with a repu-
tation as the fairest links of
them all leave it to a 49-year-
old Spaniard who enjoys the
simple pleasures in life to make
such a demanding test at the
British Open seem like just an-
other round of golf.
There was calamity all
around him Friday
Zach Johnson lost the lead
with a three-putt from 10 feet.
Brandt Snedeker, regarded as
one of the best putters in golf,
took four putts from 15 feet.
Tiger Woods played well
enough to be only one shot be-
hind and rarely smiled.
Jimenez, with his frizzy red
hair bunched into a ponytail,
made his way around Muirfield
with only two bogeys for an even-
par 71 that gave him a one-shot
lead over Woods, Lee Westwood,
Henrik Stenson and Dustin
Johnson going into the weekend.
What's a 49-year-old doing
with the 36-hole lead at the
British Open?
"Why? I have not the right to
do it? Only the young people
can do it?" Jimenez said. "Why?
I'm fine. We keep playing golf
and still get myself on the golf
course, and that's the secret.
Enjoy yourself what you do in
life. That's what I'm doing."
For so many others, it was
tough to enjoy anything about a
course that brought the easterly
wind for the first time all week,
and greens that hit warp speed
even after tournament officials
hand-watered the putting sur-
faces overnight
Woods went 12 holes without
a birdie, saving his round with
a collection of tough pars, and
he finished with a 6-iron from
212 yards to 15 feet for a birdie
and a 71. Westwood matched
the best round of the day with a
68, while Stenson had a 70. Both
of them had a double bogey on
their cards. Dustin Johnson got


Associated Press
Miguel Angel Jimenez putts Friday during the second round of the British Open Golf Championship at
Muirfield, Scotland. Jimenez leads a group of players by one stroke after sitting at 3-under par.


himself into such a predica-
ment on the 15th that his only
option from a bunker was to
aim sideways into the rough. He
shot 72.
"Every hole is playing hard,"
Johnson said. "You don't get any
breaks. You've really got to


grind it out. It's tough off the
tee. It's tough on your approach
shot and it's tough putting."
Phil Mickelson was in range
of the lead until a four-putt on
the 16th hole, his second double
bogey of the day That was one
hole after Mickelson made a


par putt that would have gone
15 feet by if he had missed.
Zach Johnson couldn't think
of too many poor shots he hit in
the blazing sunshine, except
maybe for a pitching wedge he
See Page B3


49ers acquire
cornerback Wright
from Tampa Bay
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -
The San Francisco 49ers have
acquired cornerback Eric
Wright in a trade with Tampa
Bay that sends a conditional
selection in the 2014 draft to
the Buccaneers.
The teams announced the
deal Friday, one week after
Wright was arrested in Los An-
geles on an unspecified misde-
meanor charge. He was
released after posting bond.
Last season, Wright was sus-
pended for four games by the
NFL for violating the perform-
ance-enhancing drug policy in
his first and only season
with the Bucs. He signed a five-
year, $35.3 million contract with
Tampa Bay after a strong sea-
son in Detroit, and in 10 games
last year, Wright finished with 37
tackles and one interception.
In 2011 with the Lions,
Wright started 16 games and
had four interceptions.
He will join a crowded sec-
ondary and crop of corner-
backs, including Carlos Rogers,
Tarell Brown, Chris Culliver and
NnamdiAsomugha.
"We are pleased to add Eric
to our team," said 49ers gen-
eral manager Trent Baalke. "As
an organization, we have done
our due diligence and antici-
pate Eric working hard to con-
tribute to the 49ers."
Rays RHP Cobb to
begin minor league
rehab Tuesday
TORONTO Tampa Bay
Rays right-hander Alex Cobb,
who sustained a concussion
when he was hit in the head
by a batted ball in June, is
scheduled to begin a rehab
assignment with Class-A
Charlotte on Tuesday.
Cobb, 6-2 with a 3.01 ERA in
13 starts, was cleared on Fri-
day to begin his rehab after
throwing 59 pitches in a four in-
ning simulated game at Tampa
Bay's spring training complex
one day earlier.
Cobb was struck in the right
ear by a liner from Kansas
City's Eric Hosmer on June 15.
He was hospitalized overnight
after being carted off the field,
and was bothered by vertigo
for several weeks.
From wire reports


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B2 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto




Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC
2 E
' 2% -
S4/2 /2
S 7 3
4 122 8/2



East Division
GB WC
3 E
5 62 5%
) 7 6
6 12 11
! 19 18


NL

Dodgers 3,
Nationals 2
Los Angeles Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Crwfrdlf 4 0 00 Spancf 3 0 1 0
Puig rf 4 00 0 Rendon2b 4 00 0
Belisarip 0 0 0 0 Clipprdp 0 00 0
Jansenp 0 00 0 RSorinp 0 00 0
AdGnzllb 4 1 2 0 Zmrmn3b 4 1 2 0
HRmrzss 4 1 1 2 Harper If 4 1 2 0
Ethiercf 3 1 1 1 Werthrf 3 0 1 0
A.Ellisc 4 0 0 0 Dsmndss 4 0 2 1
Uribe3b 3 0 2 0 Tracy lb 4 0 0 0
JDmngp 0 00 0 WRamsc 4 00 0
PRdrgzp 0 0 0 0 Strasrgp 2 00 0
Schmkrrf 1 0 0 0 Lmrdzzph-2b1 0 1 0
M.Ellis2b 4 02 0
Nolascop 1 000
Punto3b 1 000
Totals 33 38 3 Totals 33 2 9 1
Los Angeles 002 000 001 3
Washington 010 001 000 2
DP-Los Angeles 3, Washington 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 5, Washington 6. 2B-Harper (10),
Desmond (25). HR-H.Ramirez (9), Ethier (6).
S-Nolasco.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Nolasco 51/38 2 2 2 2
J.Dominguez 1 1 0 0 0 0
PRodriguez 11/30 0 0 0 1
BelisarioW,4-5 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
JansenS,10-13 1 0 0 0 0 2
Washington
Strasburg 7 7 2 2 1 6
Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 2
R.Soriano L,1-2 1 1 1 1 0 1
Reds 5, Pirates 3
Pittsburgh Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMartelf 5 1 2 1 Choocf 4 1 1 0
Tabata rf 3 0 0 0 Heisey If 3 2 2 2
Watsonp 0 00 0 Vottolb 2 1 1 0
Morrisp 0 00 0 Phillips2b 4 0 1 3
McKnrph 1 00 0 Brucerf 4 00 0
McCtchcf 3 1 1 1 Frazier3b 3 0 1 0
PAIvrz3b 4 00 0 Cozartss 4 00 0
RMartnc 4 1 2 1 Mesorcc 3 02 0
GJoneslb 3 0 2 0 Leakep 2 1 0 0
GSnchz lb 0 0 0 0 Ondrskp 0 00 0
Mercer2b 4 0 1 0 Hannhnph 1 00 0
Barmesss 3 01 0 Simonp 0 0 0 0
Liriano p 2 0 0 0 MParrp 0 0 0 0
JuWlsnp 000 0 LeCurep 0 00 0
Mazzarp 0 00 0 Chpmnp 0 00 0
Snider ph-rf 1 0 1 0
JHrrsnph 1 000
Totals 34 3103 Totals 30 5 8 5
Pittsburgh 000 003 000 3
Cincinnati 100 040 OOx 5
E-G.Jones (6). DP-Pittsburgh 2, Cincinnati 3.
LOB-Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 6. 2B-G.Jones
(19), Phillips (16), Mesoraco (8). HR-S.Marte
(10), McCutchen (11), R.Martin (9), Heisey (5).
SB-McCutchen (21).
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Liriano L,9-4 41/35 5 5 4 4
Ju.Wilson 2/3 2 0 0 0 1
Mazzaro 1 1 0 0 0 1
Watson 1 0 0 0 1 0
Morris 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
LeakeW,9-4 52/36 3 3 2 5
Ondrusek H,5 1/3 2 0 0 0 0
Simon H,4 2/3 1 0 0 1 1
M.ParraH,6 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
LeCureH,13 2/30 0 0 1 0
Chapman S,22-25 1 1 0 0 0 2
Phillies 13, Mets 8


Philadelphia NewYork
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Rollins ss 5 2 1 0 EYong lf-2b 3 0 0 0
MYong3b 4 2 1 3 DnMrp2b 3 1 1 1
Utley 2b 5 2 2 3 Germn p 0 0 0 0
DBrwn If 5 2 3 2 Satin ph 1 0 0 0
Ruflb 5 22 0 Ricep 0 00 0
DYongrf 5 1 3 1 ABrwn lb 1 1 1 0
Mayrry cf 4 1 2 2 DWrght 3b 5 2 2 2
Ruizc 5 1 1 1 Byrdrf 4 1 1 3
Kndrckp 3 0 0 0 I.Davislb 4 1 2 0
LuGarc p 0 00 0 Ardsm p 0 00 0
Diekmnp 0 0 0 0 Reckerph 1 00 0
L.Nixph 1 0 0 0 Buckc 5 1 2 0
DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Niwnhs cf-lf 2 0 0 0
Quntnll ss 4 0 1 1
Hefnerp 0 0 0 0
Burke p 1 0 0 0
Edgin p 0 0 0 0
Lagars ph-cf 3 1 2 1
Totals 42131512 Totals 37812 8
Philadelphia 407 020 000 13
NewYork 000 312 002 8
E-Byrd (3), Quintanilla 2 (5). DP-Philadelphia
2, NewYork 1. LOB-Philadelphia 6, NewYork 7.
2B-Ruf (4), Mayberry (15), Ruiz (4), Buck (9),
Lagares (11). 3B-Utley (4). HR-M.Young (7),
Utley (12), D.Brown (24), D.Wright (14), Byrd
(16). SB-E.Young (17). S-K.Kendrick.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
K.KendrickW,9-6 52/39 6 6 1 7
Lu.Garcia 11/30 0 0 2 0
Diekman 1 1 0 0 1 0
DeFratus 1 2 2 2 0 1
NewYork
HefnerL,4-7 2 10 8 8 0 3
Burke 22/32 4 4 3 2
Edgin 1/3 2 1 1 0 0
Germen 1 0 0 0 0 1
Rice 11/30 0 0 0 0
Aardsma 12/31 0 0 0 3
Hefner pitched to 4 batters in the 3rd.
Brewers 2, Marlins 0


Miami Milwaukee
ab r h bi
Ruggin If 4 0 0 0 Aoki rf
Polanc3b 4 0 1 0 Segurass
Stantonrf 4 0 0 0 Braun If
Morrsn lb 4 0 1 0 LSchfr If
Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Lucroy c
Dietrch 2b 4 0 0 0 CGomz cf
Hchvrrss 3 0 3 0 JFrncs lb
Mathis c 3 0 1 0 YBtncr lb
JaTrnr p 2 0 0 0 Weeks 2b
Webb p 0 0 Bianchi3b
Dobbsph 1 00 0 Lohsep
ARamsp 0 00 0 Haltonph
DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Axford p
Hndrsn p
FrRdrg p
Totals 33 06 0 Totals
Miami 000 000 000
Milwaukee 000 110 OOx


ab r h bi
2000
4010
3000
0000
3 0 1 0
3010
4 1 11
4 1 11
0000
2000
4010
2000
1000
0000
0000
0000
292 5 2
0
2


E-Aoki (2). LOB-Miami 6, Milwaukee 9.2B-
Morrison (5). HR-C.Gomez (15), J.Francisco
(12). SB-Segura 2 (29), Lucroy (3), Weeks (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Ja.TurnerL,3-2 5 5 2 2 4 6
Webb 1 0 0 0 0 1
A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 1 2
Da.Jennings 1 0 0 0 0 2
Milwaukee
LohseW,6-7 6 5 0 0 0 5
AxfordH,15 1 1 0 0 0 1
Henderson H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1
Fr.RodriguezS,10-10 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ja.Turner pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.


Str Home Away
W-1 32-16 27-23
W-3 34-19 22-22
W-2 29-20 25-23
L-3 28-23 23-22
L-2 25-22 20-28




Str Home Away
W-1 31-15 24-26
W-3 26-21 23-27
L-1 27-19 21-29
L-1 17-28 24-23
L-2 21-27 14-32


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
43 .547 5
45 .531 1% 3 6
49 .473 7 82 4
53 .430 11 122 4
56 .398 14 152 3


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Str Home
L-1 29-19
L-1 30-19
W-1 23-22
W-3 22-23
L-3 19-22


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 58 36 .617 8-2 W-2 28-16 30-20
Pittsburgh 56 38 .596 2 4-6 L-2 32-18 24-20
Cincinnati 54 42 .563 5 5-5 W-2 31-16 23-26
Chicago 42 51 .452 152 102 6-4 L-1 22-26 20-25
Milwaukee 39 56 .411 192 142 5-5 W-2 23-26 16-30


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




Arizona
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC
39 .589 -
42 .563 22 --
49 .473 11 8%
52 .453 13 102
61 .351 222 20


West Division
GB WC
6 E
5 2 5/2
) 42 8
' 62 10
3 9 12/2


Str Home
W-2 30-15
L-2 27-20
L-3 24-25
W-3 25-25
L-2 17-32



Str Home
L-1 27-20
W-1 27-23
W-1 26-21
L-1 25-20
L-1 27-23


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox batter Jonny Gomes tosses his elbow guard as he heads down the first base line on a ground
rule double Friday against the New York Yankees during the seventh inning at Fenway Park in Boston.




Red Sox best Yankees 4-2


Associated Press

BOSTON Jacoby Ellsbury
and Johnny Gomes homered, and
Felix Doubront outpitched Andy
Pettitte on Friday night to lead the
Boston Red Sox to a 4-2 victory
over the depleted New York Yan-
kees in the opener of their three-
game series.
Ellsbury homered on Pettitte's
second pitch of the game, and
Gomes made it 3-0 in the second.
Doubront (7-3) held a Yankees
lineup without Derek Jeter and a
handful of other regulars hitless
until Lyle Overbay doubled to
lead off the fifth inning.
American League

Orioles 3, Rangers 1
ARLINGTON, Texas Matt Wieters
homered, Wei-Yin Chen pitched into
the seventh inning and the Baltimore
Orioles beat the Texas Rangers 3-1.
Nick Markakis had an RBI double
and a home run-robbing catch for the
Orioles in manager Buck Showalter's
250th victory with the team since
being hired in July 2010.
Left-hander Chen (5-3) allowed only
one run and eight hits and two walks
over 6 1-3 innings. Jim Johnson
worked the ninth for his majors-best
34th save even after allowing a hit and
hitting a batter.

Royals 1, Tigers 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Ervin
Santana allowed two singles in 7 1/3
innings and the Kansas City Royals
beat the Detroit Tigers 1-0 to snap a
five-game losing streak.
Santana, who can be a free agent
after the season and has been widely
speculated to be traded before the
July 31 deadline without a player
clearing waivers, did not allow a run-
ner to reach second base. He walked
one and struck out six.
Santana (6-6), who was coming off
his worst outing of the season, when
he allowed eight runs on 10 hits in a
July 11 loss at Cleveland, retired the
first 10 Tigers before Torii Hunter's
one-out single in the fourth.

Twins 3, Indians 2
MINNEAPOLIS Joe Mauer's
two-out RBI single in the eighth inning
lifted the Minnesota Twins to a 3-2
victory over Cleveland, after an error
by Indians first baseman Nick Swisher
set up the winning run.
Four Twins relievers struck out six
over 3 1/3 hitless innings, including
Casey Fien (2-2) in the eighth and All-
Star Glen Perkins in the ninth for his
22nd save in 24 tries.
Trevor Plouffe's hit a tying two-run
single in the sixth against Scott
Kazmir, who stifled them for two hits
over six innings.

National League

Dodgers 3, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON -Andre Ethier
homered off Rafael Soriano to lead off
the ninth inning, and the Los Angeles
Dodgers resumed play after the
All-Star break with a 3-2 win over the
Washington Nationals.
Ethier pulled a 1-2 slider just over
the wall in right-center, his sixth homer
of the year and the second ninth-


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay 8, Toronto 5
Boston 4, N.Y Yankees 2
Baltimore 3, Texas 1
Atlanta 6, Chicago White Sox 4
Minnesota 3, Cleveland 2
Kansas City 1, Detroit 0
Seattle at Houston, late
Oakland at L.A. Angels, late
Today
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-3) atToronto (Buehrle 5-6),
1:07 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 9-8) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy
6-4), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 8-6) at Boston (Lackey 7-6),
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 7-5) at Minnesota (Correia 6-6),
7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 10-6) at Kansas City (Guthrie 8-7),
7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 8-4) at Houston (Bedard 3-6), 7:10
p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 7-3) at Texas (Wolf 1-2),
8:05 p.m.
Oakland (Straily 6-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 9-6),
9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 2:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Boston, 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 3, Washington 2
Philadelphia 13, N.Y Mets 8
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 3
Atlanta 6, Chicago White Sox 4
Milwaukee 2, Miami 0
St. Louis 9, San Diego 6
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Today
Philadelphia (Hamels 4-11) at N.Y Mets (Z.Wheeler
3-1), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 9-8) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy
6-4), 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-6) at Cincinnati (Latos 8-3),
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 8-2) at Washington (G.Gon-
zalez 7-3), 7:05 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 2-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 7-8), 7:10
p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 6-8) at St. Louis (Lynn 11-4),
7:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-5) at Colorado (Nicasio
5-4), 8:10 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 6-7) at San Francisco (M.Cain 5-6),
9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.


inning homer allowed by Soriano (1-2)
in three appearances.
Hanley Ramirez also homered for
the Dodgers, who picked up where
they left off before the break, winning
for the seventh time in nine games
and moving back above .500. They
were 12 games below the break-even
mark on June 21.

Reds 5, Pirates 3
CINCINNATI Brandon Phillips
drove in three runs with a bases-
loaded double, and Mike Leake got
the better of left-hander Francisco Liri-
ano for the third time this season,
leading the Cincinnati Reds to a 5-3
victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates that
tightened the NL Central.
The third-place Reds moved to
within three games of second-place
Pittsburgh. The Pirates lead their sea-
son series 6-5.
The Reds sent nine batters to the
plate for four runs in the fifth off Liriano
(9-4), who had his shortest outing of
the season. Chris Heisey's infield sin-


gle drove in the first run, and Phillips'
double off Justin Wilson made it 5-0.
Heisey also had a solo homer off
Liriano.

Phillies 13, Mets 8
NEW YORK Chase Utley,
Domonic Brown and the Philadelphia
Phillies came flying out of the All-Star
break, scoring 11 runs in the first three
innings on the way to a 13-8 rout of
the New York Mets.
Michael Young hit a three-run
homer, Utley had a two-run drive and
Brown a solo shot as the Phillies
(49-48) won for the ninth time in 12
games to move over .500 for only the
second time this season. Philadelphia
roughed up familiar foil Jeremy Hefner
in its seventh consecutive victory at
Citi Field dating to last season, includ-
ing a three-game sweep in April.

Cardinals 9, Padres 6
ST. LOUIS Jake Westbrook
pitched 6 1/3 innings of two-run ball
and contributed three hits, All-Star
Matt Carpenter continued his strong
season with three hits and three RBIs,
and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the
San Diego Padres 9-6.
A career .116 hitter, Westbrook had
never had more than one hit in a
game. The right-hander, who scored
twice and had an RBI, surpassed his
hit output for the year with two singles
and a double in his three at-bats. That
raised his batting from .100 to .217.
On the mound, Westbrook (6-4)
scattered eight hits while striking out
one and walking four.

Brewers 2, Marlins 0
MILWAUKEE Juan Francisco
and Carlos Gomez each hit home
runs and Kyle Lohse blanked Miami
for six innings as the Milwaukee Brew-
ers started the second half of the sea-
son with a 2-0 victory over the Marlins.
Lohse (6-7) has owned the Marlins
over his career. He came in 5-2 in
nine starts, including a 3-0 record with
the St. Louis Cardinals last season.
He was in command all the way this
time, too.
He struck out five, allowed five hits
but no walks. It was his fourth win in
his last five decisions.

Interleague

Braves 6, White Sox 4
CHICAGO Brian McCann hit a
three-run homer in the sixth inning to
break open a tie game and the Atlanta
Braves started the second half of the
season with a 6-4 victory over the
Chicago White Sox.
Braves starter Tim Hudson (7-7)
earned his third straight win after a
10-start winless streak. He pitched
7 1/3 innings, giving up four runs on
eight hits while striking out four and
walking two in the interleague game.
Craig Kimbrell pitched the ninth for his
27th save in 29 outings.
White Sox starter John Danks (2-7)
took his seventh loss in his last 10
starts. Danks pitched seven innings,
allowing all five Atlanta runs on seven
hits, including homers by McCann and
Andrelton Simmons. He struck out
four and walked none. Danks also
uncorked a wild pitch before to
McCann's homer.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 8, Blue Jays 5


Tampa Bay
ab
DJnngs cf 5
Zobrist ss 5
Longori 3b 4
Scott dh 4
WMyrs rf 5
KJhnsn lb 4
Fuld If 1
Joyce If 3
SRdrgz lb 1
JMolin c 5
RRorts 2b 4
Totals 41
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Toronto
rh bi ab rh bi
0 1 1 Reyesss 5 1 1 0
1 3 1 Bautistrf 5 1 1 2
1 1 1 Encrnclb 3 1 1
1 1 0 DeRosadh 2 00 0
23 1 Lindph-dh 1 00 0
22 1 RDavislf 4 01 0
0 0 0 Mlzturs3b 3 01 0
0 1 0 Bonifacpr-2b 0 0 0 0
0 1 1CIRsmscf 4 0 1 0
0 0 0 Arencii c 4 1 1 1
1 1 1 Lawrie2b-3b 4 1 1 1
8147 Totals 35 5 8 5
001 102 022 8
103 000 001 5


E-Reyes (1), Lawrie (5). LOB-Tampa Bay 9,
Toronto 6. 2B-De.Jennings (23), Zobrist (22),
Scott(12), W.Myers (5), Joyce (14). HR-Zobrist
(7), Longoria (19), WMyers (4), K.Johnson (14),
Bautista (21), Encarnacion (26), Arencibia (17),
Lawrie (6). SB-Reyes (9). S-S.Rodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Price W,4-5 7 7 4 4 1 5
Farnsworth 0 0 0 0 1 0
Jo.Peralta H,25 1 0 0 0 1 0
McGee 1 1 1 1 0 1
Toronto
E.Rogers 52/37 4 4 0 4
McGowan 1 1 0 0 1 1
Cecil L,3-1 1/3 1 1 1 1 0
Delabar 1 2 1 1 0 1
Wagner 1 3 2 1 0 1
Cecil pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Farnsworth pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-Delabar, Wagner.
Red Sox 4, Yankees 2
NewYork Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gardnrcf 2 1 0 0 Ellsury cf 3 1 2 1
AIGnzlzlf 2 00 0 Victornrf 2 00 0
ISuzuki rf-cf 3 0 1 0 Nava rf 2 00 0
Cano2b 3 0 1 0 Pedroia2b 4 01 0
V.Wellsdh 3 0 1 0 D.Ortizdh 4 02 0
Almontlf 2 0 0 0 Napolilb 3 10 0
L.Cruz3b 2 00 0 JGomslf 4 22 2
Overaylb 4 1 1 0 Sltlmchc 3 00 0
Lillirdg3b-rf 3 0 0 0 BSnydr3b 2 0 0 0
Nunezss 4 0 0 0 Holtph-3b 1 00 0
CStwrtc 3 0 1 1 Iglesiasss 3 0 1 1
Totals 31 25 1 Totals 31 4 8 4
NewYork 000 110 000 2
Boston 120 000 10x 4
E-Saltalamacchia (5). DP-NewYork 1, Boston
1. LOB-NewYork 6, Boston 5. 2B-Cano (19),
Overbay (19), C.Stewart (3), D.Ortiz 2 (24),
J.Gomes (12). HR-Ellsbury (4), J.Gomes (7).
SB-Gardner 2 (15).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
PettitteL,7-7 61/36 4 4 1 4
Kelley 1/31 0 0 0 0
Logan 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
Claiborne 1 1 0 0 0 0
Boston
DoubrontW7-3 61/33 2 1 3 5
TazawaH,16 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
BreslowH,8 1 2 0 0 0 0
UeharaS,9-12 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Kelley
Orioles 3, Rangers I


Baltimore Texas
ab r h bi
McLoth If 4 0 2 1 Kinsler2b
Machd3b 4 1 1 0 Andrusss
Markks rf 4 0 1 1 Przyns c
A.Jones cf 3 0 1 0 ABeltre3b
C.Davislb 4 0 0 0 JeBakrdh
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 Morlnd lb
Wieters c 4 1 1 1 Gentry cf
Valencidh 4 0 0 0 DvMrp ph
BRorts 2b 2 1 0 0 Profar If
LMartn rf
Totals 33 36 3 Totals
Baltimore 011 010 000
Texas 000 100 000


ab rh bi
4 02 0
5 02 0
4 00 0
4000

3 00 0
1 0 1 1
1 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
34 1 9 1
3
1


LOB-Baltimore 5, Texas 10.2B-McLouth (20),
Markakis (19), Kinsler 2 (16), Andrus (9), Gentry
(5). HR-Wieters (13). SB-Je.Baker (1). SF-
Gentry.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
WChenW,5-3 61/38 1 1 2 3
O'DayH,15 12/30 0 0 0 2
Ji.Johnson S,34-40 1 1 0 0 0 1
Texas
D.Holland L,8-5 8 6 3 3 2 6
Frasor 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Ji.Johnson (Kinsler).
Royals 1, Tigers 0


Detroit

AJcksn cf
TrHntr rf
MiCarr 3b
Fielder 1b
VMrtnz dh
JhPerlt ss
Dirks If
Avila c
RSantg 2b
D.Kelly ph
Totals
Detroit


Kansas City
ab rh bi
4 0 0 0 AGordn If
4 0 1 0 Hosmerlb
3 0 0 0 BButlerdh
3 0 0 0 S.Perezc
3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b
2 0 0 0 L.Cain cf
3 0 1 0 Lough rf
3 0 0 0 AEscorss
2 0 0 0 Getz 2b
1 000
28 02 0 Totals
000 000 000


ab rh bi
4 1 1 0
4 0 1 0


2 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 0 0

27 1 5 1
0


Kansas City 100 000 OOx 1
E Avila (3). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 2,
Kansas City 8. SB-A.Gordon (6), Getz (5).
CS-Dirks (1). S-Lough.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Ani.Sanchez L,7-7 6 4 1 1 5 3
Coke 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
B.Rondon 11/30 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
E.SantanaW,6-6 71/32 0 0 1 6
K.Herrera H,9 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
G.Holland S,23-25 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Ani.Sanchez.
Interleague

Braves 6,
White Sox 4


Atlanta
ab
Constnz If 4
RJhnsn cf 4
J.Upton rf 4
McCnnc 4
Gattis dh 4
Uggla 2b 3
CJhnsn 3b 4
Janish pr-3b0
Smmnsss 4
Trdslvclb 3
FFrmnlb 0
Totals 34
Atlanta
Chicago


Chicago
r h bi
0 0 0 De Aza cf
0 0 0 AIRmrzss
2 2 0 Rios rf
1 1 3 C.Wells rf
0 1 0 A.Dunndh
0 0 0 Kppngrlb
1 3 1 Gillaspi3b
0 0 0 Viciedo If
1 1 2 Bckhm2b
1 1 0 Pheglyc
0 0 0 Tekotte ph
69 6 Totals
002 003 001
002 000 020


ab rh bi
4 1 1 0

3 0 1 2
1 0 0 0
4 00 0
4 0 2 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
4 0 1 0

0 0 0 0
344 9 4
6
4


DP-Atlanta 2, Chicago 1. LOB-Atlanta 2,
Chicago 6. 2B-AI.Ramirez (25), Rios (20).
HR-McCann (13), Simmons (9). SB-De Aza
(11).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
THudsonW,7-7 71/38 4 4 2 4
AvilanH,15 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Walden H,9 1/31 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel S,27-30 1 0 0 0 1 3
Chicago
Joh.DanksL,2-7 7 7 5 5 0 4
N.Jones 1 1 1 1 0 2
Purcey 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Lindstrom 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
N.Jones pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-Joh.Danks.


AMERICAN LEAGUE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



British Open
Friday
At Muirfield, Gullane, Scotland
Purse: $7.8 million
Yardage: 7,192, Par: 71
Second Round
Miguel Angel Jimenez 68-71- 139 -3
HenrikStenson 70-70-140 -2
LeeWestwood 72-68-140 -2
TigerWoods 69-71--140 -2
Dustin Johnson 68-72-140 -2
Martin Laird 70-71 -141 -1
Rafael Cabrera-Bello 67-74- 141 -1
Zach Johnson 66-75- 141 -1
AngelCabrera 69-72-141 -1
Ryan Moore 72-70 -142 E
Jordan Spieth 69-74- 143 +1
Darren Clarke 72-71 -143 +1
Charl Schwartzel 75-68- 143 +1
Adam Scott 71-72-143 +1
WebbSimpson 73-70-143 +1
Francesco Molinari 69-74- 143 +1
BubbaWatson 70-73-143 +1
lan Poulter 72-71 143 +1
Phil Mickelson 69-74-143 +1
Justin Leonard 74-70--144 +2
Hunter Mahan 72-72- 144 +2
Jason Day 73-71 144 +2
HidekiMatsuyama 71-73-144 +2
JohnsonWagner 73-72-145 +3
MarkO'Meara 67-78-145 +3
Tom Lehman 68-77-145 +3
Harris English 74-71 -145 +3
Branden Grace 74-71 -145 +3
Jamie Donaldson 74-71 -145 +3
Shiv Kapur 68-77--145 +3
BerndWiesberger 71-74--145 +3
Ben Curtis 74-71 -145 +3
Kevin Streelman 74-71 -145 +3
Stephen Gallacher 76-70- 146 +4
Graeme McDowell 75-71 -146 +4
Gregory Bourdy 76-70--146 +4
Eduardo de la Riva 73-73- 146 +4
Martin Kaymer 72-74- 146 +4
Daniel Willett 75-72-147 +5
Marcus Fraser 73-74- 147 +5
Freddie Jacobson 72-75-147 +5
MattKuchar 74-73-147 +5
StewartCink 72-75- 147 +5
BrandtSnedeker 68-79- 147 +5
Thomas Bjorn 73-74- 147 +5
Ken Duke 70-77-147 +5
George Coetzee 76-71-147 +5
Steven Tiley 72-75-147 +5
YE.Yang 78-70-148 +6
Sandy Lyle 76-72-148 +6
Padraig Harrington 73-75-148 +6
SergioGarcia 75-73--148 +6
Oliver Fisher 70-78--148 +6
Shane Lowry 74-74-148 +6
Graham DeLaet 76-72-148 +6
Ernie Els 74-74- 148 +6
Tim Clark 72-76-148 +6
Russell Henley 78-71 -149 +7
a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 73-76- 149 +7
BoVan Pelt 76-73-149 +7
Bud Cauley 74-75-149 +7
Jason Dufner 72-77- 149 +7
Fred Couples 75-74- 149 +7
Keegan Bradley 75-74- 149 +7
G. Fernandez-Castano 70-79- 149 +7
a-Jimmy Mullen 71-78-149 +7
JoshTeater 72-77- 149 +7
K.T Kim 73-76-149 +7
Gareth Wright 71-78- 149 +7
BooWeekley 74-76-150 +8
Thongchai Jaidee 79-71 -150 +8
Richie Ramsay 76-74-150 +8
Paul Lawrie 81-69- 150 +8
GeoffOgilvy 75-75-150 +8
Mark Brown 77-73-150 +8
Peter Senior 74-76- 150 +8
Todd Hamilton 69-81 -150 +8
Mikko Ilonen 72-78-150 +8
ChrisWood 75-75-150 +8
K.J. Choi 76-74-150 +8
Jonas Blixt 72-78- 150 +8
Carl Pettersson 74-76- 150 +8
Richard Sterne 75-75- 150 +8
Shingo Katayama 73-77-150 +8
Missed cut
Oscar Floren 74-77- 151 +9
Marc Leishman 76-75- 151 +9
Alvaro Quiros 77-74- 151 +9
Kyle Stanley 82-69- 151 +9
Michael Thompson 72-79-151 +9
Bill Haas 77-74-151 +9
Marcel Siem 75-76-151 +9
George Murray 76-75- 151 +9
ThomasAiken 71-80--151 +9
Jimmy Walker 72-79-151 +9
NicolasColsaerts 75-76-151 +9
CamiloVillegas 72-79-151 +9
Niclas Fasth 77-75- 152 +10
Jim Furyk 78-74 152 +10
Luke Donald 80-72- 152 +10
Hiroyuki Fujita 78-74- 152 +10
Justin Harding 78-74 152 +10
Stephen Dartnall 80-72- 152 +10
MarcWarren 72-80- 152 +10
Justin Rose 75-77- 152 +10
NickWatney 75-77- 152 +10
Mark Calcavecchia 72-80- 152 +10
Hyung-sun Kim 76-76- 152 +10
Toru Taniguchi 78-75 153 +11
D.A. Points 78-75- 153 +11
a-Ben Stow 76-77 -153 +11
AshunWu 76-77- 153 +11
Robert Garrigus 78-75 153 +11
John Senden 77-76- 153 +11
a-Garrick Porteous 76-77-153 +11
Tom Watson 75-78 153 +11
Vijay Singh 77-77 154 +12
Thorbjorn Olesen 78-76 154 +12
Rickie Fowler 78-76 154 +12
Gareth Maybin 78-76 154 +12
Robert Karlsson 77-77- 154 +12
Scott Stallings 76-78 154 +12
David Lynn 79-75- 154 +12
Billy Horschel 74-80- 154 +12


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 B3


record


= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Fridayin the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Global Rallycross Championship
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Mopar Mile-High NHRA Nationals
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
4 p.m. (FOX) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Milwaukee Brewers
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Colorado Rockies
BICYCLING
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 Tour de France Stage 20
BOXING
11 p.m. (FSNFL) Golden Boy Live: DeMarcus Corley vs.
Frankie Gomez
FOOTBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) CFL: Montreal Alouettes at Calgary
Stampeders
GOLF
7 a.m. (ESPN) 2013 Open Championship Third Round
9 a.m. (ESPN) 2013 Open Championship Third Round
11 a.m. (GOLF) American Century Championship, First
Round (Taped)
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Marathon Classic, Third Round
3 p.m. (NBC) American Century Championship, Second
Round
3 p.m. (ABC) The Open Championship Today Third round
(Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Sanderson Farms Championship,
Third Round
7 p.m. (ESPN) 2013 Open Championship Best of the Third
Round (Same-day Tape)
LACROSSE
4 p.m. (ESPN2) MLL: New York Lizards at Charlotte Hounds
MOTORCYCLE RACING
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) AMA Peterson Cat Washougal National
450 & 250 Moto II
SOCCER
3:15 p.m. (UNI) CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinal: Panama
vs. Cuba
6:15 p.m. (UNI) CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinal: Mexico
vs. Trinidad and Tobago
SOFTBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN2) National Pro Fastpitch: USSSA Pride at
NY/NJ Comets

RADIO
BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:05 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto
Blue Jays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Rory Mcllroy
John Huh
Kenichi Kuboya
Darryn Lloyd
David Duval
Richard McEvoy
Steven Jeffress
John Wade
Thaworn Wiratchant
Lucas Glover
Brett Rumford
Scott Jamieson
Lloyd Saltman
Brooks Koepka
Estanislao Goya


154 +12
154 +12
155 +13
155 +13
155 +13
155 +13
155 +13
155 +13
156 +14
156 +14
156 +14
156 +14
156 +14
156 +14
156 +14


Brendan Jones
a-Steven Fox
Matteo Manassero
Daisuke Maruyama
Kiradech Aphibarnrat
Brian Davis
Nick Faldo
Luke Guthrie
a-Grant Forrest
Makoto Inoue
Scott Brown
a-Rhys Pugh
Satoshi Kodaira
Tyrrell Hatton
Scott Piercy


156 +14
157 +15
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160 +18
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161 +19
161 +19
162 +20


Three at LPGA event lead


Associated Press

SYLVANIA, Ohio For-
mer winner Paula Creamer
shares the lead and top-
ranked Inbee Park is lurk-
ing nearby through the
second round of the
Marathon Classic.
Creamer, who five years
ago won what was then re-
ferred to as the Jamie Farr
LPGA stop, shot a 3-under
68 on Friday on the heels of
an opening 66 to pull even
with Beatriz Recari and Al-
ison Walshe at 8-under 134
at the tournament's mid-
point.
Recari, who picked up
her second career tour win
earlier this year, had the
day's low round with a 65.
Walshe, the first-round
leader, shot 69.
Park, a six-time winner al-
ready this year including all
three major championships,
is two shots off the lead
along with top amateur
Lydia Ko. Defending champ
So Yeon Ryu is another
stroke back.


Six tied for lead at Rypien on top at
Sanderson Farms Nevada Pro-Am


MADISON, Miss. Six
players are tied atop a
crowded leaderboard midway
through the second round of
the Sanderson Farms
Championship.
Vaughn Taylor, Fabian
Gomez, Paul Stankowski, Troy
Matteson and Kyle Reifers are
tied at 10 under in the club-
house. First-round leader
Daniel Summerhays also is at
10 under but only completed
eight holes in the round Friday.
The six have plenty of com-
pany behind them, with eight
players within two strokes.
Play was delayed for the sec-
ond straight day at Annandale
Golf Club because of lightning
close to the course. The after-
noon session was unable to fin-
ish after a delay that lasted
more than two hours.
Stankowski is the most un-
likely name among the leaders.
The veteran is playing in his
first PGA Tour event of the sea-
son and hasn't won since 1997.


STATELINE, Nev. Former
NFL quarterback Mark Rypien
had an eagle and three birdies
Friday to take a two-point lead
after the first round of the Amer-
ican Century Championship.
Rypien finished with 27 points
at Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course
under the modified Stableford
scoring system that awards grad-
uated points for pars or better.
"I got it going on my first nine
holes and scored 19 points on
that side. By far my best in all
the years I have played here,"
said Rypien, who started play on
No. 10. "The fountain of youth is
not in my favor, but I think I am
playing better golf now than
when I first came out here."
He eagled the par-5 16th, hit-
ting a hybrid club to 8 feet.
Actor Lucas Black was sec-
ond with 25 points, followed by
former NFL quarterback Chris
Chandler with 24. Former Den-
ver quarterback John Elway,
Golden State guard Steph
Curry and former NHL player
Jeremy Roenick were tied for
fourth place with 22 points.


For the


Associated Press

LE GRAND-BORNAND, France -
Chris Froome can already taste the
champagne and has only one more day
of climbing remaining before mount-
ing the Champs-Elysees podium steps
as Britain's second consecutive Tour
de France winner
The race leader preserved his com-
fortable five-minute-plus lead over
two-time former champion Alberto
Contador on Friday's rainy 19th stage
featuring four big climbs and one hair-
raisingly fast descent
Rui Costa won it with a solo break-
away on the final ascent. Froome
braced himself for a big Contador at-
tack that never materialized on any of
the climbs, nor in the long downhill to
the finish line on increasingly wet
roads.
"I certainly feel a big sigh of relief,"
Froome said. "Today was a day I was
nervous about, happy to put it behind
us."
Contador is 5:11 behind and has only
Saturday's final mountain stage in
which to do that, since Sunday's 21st
and last stage is largely processional.
"It's going to be hard for someone to
take more than five minutes in 125
kilometers," Froome said. "But having
said that I don't want to be complacent
and want to stay switched on until at
least tomorrow evening."
Realistically, only an improbable
slump make that impossible, given
how he's been riding so far -will stop
the 28-year old from matching coun-
tryman Bradley Wiggins's success last
year
"I am excited, but quietly excited,"
Froome said. "It is a day where the
whole team's going to have to stay alert
and control that last stage. One final
big effort, then we can start relaxing on
the ride into Paris."
Costa secured his second stage win


of the race, and third of his career,
after catching Frenchman Pierre
Roland about a quarter of the way up
the final major ascent of Col de la
Croix Fry
German veteran Andreas Kloeden
was second and Belgian Jan Bakelants
was third.
The 127-mile trek featured two HC
climbs and two Category 1 ascents be-
tween Bourg-d'Oisans and Le Grand-
Bornand in the snow-capped peaks of
the Alps.
Contador was tipped to attack
Froome on the downhill stretch, but
perhaps because of the rainy condi-
tions, he held back.
"Even though there wasn't much at-
tacking, it was really tough out there,"
Froome said. "For us the objective was
to stay on the wheel (of the other con-
tenders)," Froome said. "The team did
a huge amount of work today There are
still 125 kilometers to go tomorrow."
Saturday's 20th stage goes 78 miles
from Annecy to Annecy-Semnoz and
features a Category 1 climb and fin-
ishes with an Hors Categorie climb,
meaning it is considered so daunting
as to be beyond classification.
But Contador will need a miracle to
claw back his deficit and may not even
go for it.
"It all depends on how my legs are
tomorrow," Contador said. "It depends
how I feel."
Froome was not attacked up the first
of the two big HC climbs to Col du
Glandon.
Canadian Ryder Hesjedal and
Spaniard Jon Izaguirre opened up a
sizeable lead over the yellow jersey
group once they went over the top.
As Hesjedal and Izaguirre reached
the second HC of Col de Madeleine,
the peloton was 10 minutes behind.
Hesjedal forged ahead but was then
overtaken by Frenchman Pierre
Rolland.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods lines up a putt on the 14th green Friday during the second round of
the British Open Golf Championship at Muirfield, Scotland.


LEADER
Continued from Page B1

punched from 158 yards that bounded
over the back of the 15th green. He
chipped to 10 feet and took three putts
from there for a double bogey, and he
dropped one more shot on the final
hole for a 75.
"I enjoy difficult tests," said John-
son, who won the 2007 Masters in the
toughest conditions at Augusta in
more than 50 years. "I think everyone
does. 'Fun' ... you've got to use that
term loosely What's fun about it is
that we don't see this but once a year."
The reference was to links golf,
though such brown, brittle conditions
have not been seen at the Open since
Hoylake in 2006, and the greens there
weren't nearly that quick. Mickelson
said the Muirfield greens in these
conditions were faster than Augusta.
Jimenez, who was at 3-under 139,
has his own definition.
"The fun does not mean you have
the biggest smile and start laughing all
day," he said. "Fun is when you enjoy
what you're doing. I play golf and I
enjoy it. And it's fun to me, no? Some-
times you can see me serious because
of a situation, but having fun doesn't
mean that you are falling on the
ground and start laughing."
What about leading the British
Open, with a chance at 49 to be the old-
est major champion in golf history?
"Then you put the smile on the
face," he said.
If he cared to look behind him,
Jimenez might have reason to be
concerned.
The biggest name was Woods, al-
ready a four-time winner this year who
has been steering his way around Muir-
field with mainly irons that go forever
on the rock-hard fairways. More omi-
nous is that he is making so many im-
portant putts, even if they are for par
"There will be no surprise to me if
he's picking up the claret jug on Sun-
day night," said Graeme McDowell,
who played with Woods and was seven
shots behind. "But I'm not writing off
the rest of the field. There's quality
players here in this field, and I'm cer-
tainly not writing myself off. But if he
continues to play the way he's playing,
he's going to be tough to beat"
Westwood surged to the top of the
leaderboard with a 31 on the front


nine and one more birdie at the 12th,
but he dropped three shots on the last
six holes. Even so, he gave himself an-
other chance to capture his first major
in what already is banner sporting
year for England. The last English-
man to win the British Open was Nick
Faldo in 1992 at Muirfield.
"Why not enjoy it out there?" West-
wood said. "It's tough for everybody
So smile your way through."
Angel Cabrera, among six players
who had a share of the lead at one point
Friday, dropped five shots over the last
three holes for a 72. Even so, he was
only two shots behind at 1-under 141
along with Zach Johnson, Martin Laird
(71) and Rafael Cabrera-Bello (74).
Only nine players remained under
par on a course that is playing to an
average of just under 75.
Jordan Spieth, the 19-year-old
Texan, was closing in on the lead until
a double bogey on the 15th, followed
by two more bogeys that dropped him
to a 74. That still was enough to put
him in the large group at 1-over 143
that included Mickelson, Masters
champion Adam Scott, Bubba Watson,
Ian Poulter, Charl Schwartzel and
Darren Clarke, who has all but van-
ished since winning the claret jug two
years ago at Royal St. George's.
Clarke had a 71 despite a quadru-
ple-bogey
Most players prefer a firm, fast and
fiery golf course. Some of them are
starting to feel burned, even
Schwartzel, who had a 68.
"I don't like it when it starts becom-
ing that much luck, because that's
what it is," Schwartzel said. "Because
when it gets this crusty... with 6-irons
going 280 yards, how do you judge
that? It becomes a bit of a lottery You
don't know what's going to happen."
There were 23 players separated by
only five shots going into the weekend,
and 10 of them were major champions.
"I think it's going to be a good test to
be able to separate yourself if you're
playing well," Mickelson said. "The
great thing about tomorrow is that
now all the players that are in con-
tention will be on the course at the
same time. And that's going to be key"
Some players won't be around at all.
U.S. Open champion Justin Rose shot
a 77 and missed the cut. Rory McIlroy
shot 40 on the front nine to take him-
self out of the tournament. He had a
75 for another weekend off in what is
becoming a long, troublesome year.


SCOREBOARD


Froome close to



Tour de France win




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SEC coaches weigh


talent vs. trouble


Associated Press
The legal problems of current and former SEC players from ex-Florida and NFL tight
end Aaron Hernandez (above) to LSU's Jeremy Hill has cast a negative light on the
league that has won seven consecutive national championships. Coaches in the
conference say they have to weigh a player's talent against trouble when recruiting.

Coaches take potential problems into account


Associated Press
HOOVER, Ala. The
legal problems of current
and former SEC players -
from ex-Florida and NFL
tight end Aaron Hernan-
dez to LSU running back
Jeremy Hill cast a nega-
tive light on the league that
has won seven consecutive
national championships.
It also highlights the
challenges and respon-
sibilities facing coaches
who must weigh a player's
talent against the potential
for trouble in or out of the
locker room.
The biggest spotlight by
far has been on Hernan-
dez, who's pleaded not
guilty to murder in the
killing of Boston semi-pro
football player Odin Lloyd.
More pertinent to the up-
coming season is Hill's un-
certain status while facing a
misdemeanor simple bat-
tery charge from an April 27
scuffle in a bar parking lot
Coaches at Southeastern
Conference media days
this week insisted they do
their best to keep players
behaving, which benefits
the team, the players and
the men paid millions to
win in a powerhouse con-
ference with high stakes
and brutal competition.
Florida's Will Muschamp
understands he can't know
what every player is doing
every night away from the
football building.
"You also can't stick your
head in the sand and pre-
tend everything is OK, ei-
ther," Muschamp said.
He said coaches and
staff need to know who
players are hanging out
with off the field.
"You're 100 percent re-
sponsible," Muschamp said.
"When you sign a student-
athlete to come to the Uni-
versity of Florida, I look at
his parents, guardians,
whoever is important to


him in his life, tell them it's
my job to be an extension of
what's already happened at
home. But you're 100 per-
cent responsible for the
young man. Everything that
happens."
As Alabama's Nick
Saban put it: "We can be
the moral compass for our
young people, but we can-
not always drive the ship.
We cannot always be there
to drive the ship."
In the heated arms race
of recruiting, coaches also
bear the responsibility for
signing a player who
might have had off-the-
field troubles.
Mississippi's Hugh
Freeze brought in one of
the nation's most surpris-
ing and highly rated talent
hauls in February Weigh-
ing risk vs. reward is a fac-
tor in recruiting decisions,
he said, not just whether a
kid is deemed a four- or
five-star talent.
"I do think you have to
be very calculated in the
risk you take because
you're under such scrutiny
and you're bringing them
into your team," Freeze
said. "We try to minimize
the number of at-risk is-
sues you might have, but
you're going to have some.
I have a gut feeling. I look
at his support system, who
he has and listen to him
talk about what he wants
to be known for. Then I
have to make a decision on
whether I think we can
trust one another with our
core values."
Alabama dismissed four
players from school follow-
ing their arrests stemming
from two violent robberies
on campus barely a month
after the Crimson Tide
claimed its second straight
national title.
Saban said every player
he has kicked off has been
someone the team's lead-
ership group felt needed


to go.
"With events of today
and the attention on some
of the people who have
been arrested in sports in
the last couple of weeks,
it's even going to be more
critical to players' future
that they make good
choices and decisions,"
Saban said. "And they have
to realize that."
Saban said Alabama
has a 12-course program
in behavior for success
and has psychiatrists or
sports psychologists talk
to troubled players.
"I always talk to our
players about being a
blinking light," he said. "If
you look at a Christmas
tree, when all lights shine
bright, it's beautiful. But if
one light's going like this
(flickering), your attention
is just to that light Nobody
should be a blinking light.
The players always bring
that up to me: 'This guy is a
strobe light, man."'
Even the week of media
days started with legal
matters.
Heisman Trophy winner
Johnny Manziel of Texas
A&M pleaded guilty on
Monday to a misdemeanor
of not identifying himself to
a police officer following a
2012 altercation at a bar
near campus. That day, Van-
derbilt's James Franklin
identified four players dis-
missed from school in June
for an incident being inves-
tigated by police as a possi-
ble sex crime.
Franklin said he and
Vandy won't sign players
they believe have charac-
ter issues for the sake of
winning.
"I can't speak for other
places or other institutions
but not at Vanderbilt,"
Franklin said. "It's never
been that way in the past.
It's not that way presently
It will never be in the fu-
ture. That's not what we're
all about"


Jeter placed on 15-day DL


Yankees SS

has strained

right quad

Associated Press
NEW YORK Derek
Jeter is back on the dis-
abled list.
The Yankees placed their
captain on the 15-day DL on
Friday He strained his right
quad in his first game back
with New York last week
after being out all season
with a broken left ankle.
The Yankees had waited
to make a decision, using
the four days of the All-Star
break for the shortstop to
receive treatment. But
with New York set to open
the second half of the sea-
son against the Red Sox in
Boston on Friday, the team
announced the move.
The Yankees also signed
infielder Brent Lillibridge
from Triple-A Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre.
The 39-year-old Jeter
singled on his first pitch in
a major league game this
year as the Yankees beat
Kansas City on July 11, but


he left in the eighth inning
when his quad tightened
in his third at-bat.
At the time, Jeter
said he hoped the
strain was "not a
big deal."
He missed the
weekend series
against Minnesota
but hoped to avoid
the DL.
"It's frustrating. De
I don't know what Je
else you want me
to say," Jeter said in a
statement a day after the
injury "I worked hard to
get to the point of rejoining
the team yesterday It's not
how you draw it up, but
hopefully I'll be back out
there soon and help this


I
r
t


team win some games."
After just four rehabilita-
tion games, the Yankees
pushed up the star
shortstop's return
one day after Brett
Gardner and Travis
Hafner got hurt.
Jeter had been
telling the team he
was ready to re-
turn, and general
ek manager Brian
er Cashman said re-
ports from Triple-A
Scranton/Wi lke s-B arre
were positive.
So Jeter came back to a
huge ovation and beat out
an infield hit in his first at-
bat. He also scored a run
and had an RBI on a
groundout.


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ROB PHILLIPS

EAGLE BUICK GMC










I Ill""Metnt


I I


'I


Leave out: 7:00 AM


Deadline Weigh in: 5:00 PM

at MacRae's of Homosassa


Places to leave out of


Saturday, July 27,2013


MacRae's of Homosassa

5300 S. Cherokee Ia)y, Homuosassa

352-628-2602

Twin Rivers Marina

2880 N. Sea Breeze R, Crystal River

352-795-9231


Captains Meeting:

Fri., July 26, 2013 6PM- 8PM

at MacRae's ofHomosassa


BIGGEST GROUPER: 1, 2 & 3

RED FISH: 1,2 & 3

TROUT: 1,2 & 3

Fish Fry to follow at MacRae's of Homosassa
after announcements of winners.
Prizes to be determined
upon number of boat entries.


CONTACT FOR ENTRY:
Mark Mileti: 352-220-4339 or 352-795-6800
Bill Nast: 352-484-9482 oi 352-795-6800
Randy Harbin: 813-690-5528 or 352-621 -0934
Dean Simmons: 352-267-5007 or 352-787-4650

Official Entry Form
Entry fee: $100.00 per boat (Includes 2 Free Beer Tickets & One Goodie Bag. One free door prize ticket
per angler.)
____ $100 per boat due by Friday, July 26,2013
__ Homosassa Slam Opt-In $25 per boat (Snook, Redfish, Trout Overall length of all three fish -
measuring tape provided in goodie bag)
All participants aboard my boat agree to abide by amended IGFA rules. I also accept full responsibility
for the conduct and safety. All changes must be reported before check out on Saturday, July 27, and ALL
anglers must be listed before check out on Saturday.
Captain:
(Please Print)
Signature:
Address:
City: State: Zip:
Date: Phone: ( )
Email:
Anglers Name: (Captain excluded)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Boat Name:
FL Vessel #:
Emergency Contact # on Boat:
Mail complete entry form with check to: Eagle Buick GMC, 1275 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34448. Make checks payable to: Rob Phillips:. Tournament
VHF RADIO: 68 During Tournament


PRINTING AND DESIGN COURTESY:
m FORD PRESS
m ..


BENEFITTING THE


I- WP BUCllK-EMC* TRnKS


B4 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


SPORTS










RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Caught in the middle


*iy,


I
I


1'I


I

-i


i r .. Il
-




A


Associated Press
A poster is seen in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish Mea Shearim neighborhood in Jerusalem, depicting Haredi soldiers rolling
through the streets atop tanks trying to lure young boys onto their vehicles. The ad denounces the soldiers as Zionist
"ambassadors" and "missionaries." The soldiers in sidecurls have been given the insulting nickname "Hardak" a
combination of Haredi and insect.

Ultra-Orthodox Israeli soldiers attacked by their own community


Associated Press


JERUSALEM

The Israeli soldier was walking home on a busy

Jerusalem street when suddenly a car stopped next

to him, and men inside spat upon him and hurled

insults, trash and water bottles. When the assailants

stepped out, he was fearful enough to call the police

who swiftly arrived to rescue him.


The assailants were members of
his own community ultra-Orthodox
Jews, outraged that he chose to serve
in the military Ultra-Orthodox males
have long avoided military service,
but with the government ending a
contentious 65-year-old system of
draft exemptions, a small number of
them who do serve in the army are
being branded as collaborators and
increasingly face harassment and as-
saults by extremists.
"I'm afraid of wearing my uniform.
Even with a weapon, I am helpless.
There is nothing I can do," said the
soldier in last Thursday's incident,
who only identified himself by his


first name, Israel, for fear of further
retaliation from extremists. "This is
the beginning of a phenomenon that
we don't know how it will end."
The issue of army service is at the
core of a cultural war over the place
of ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israeli so-
ciety The ultra-Orthodox, who make
up about 8 percent of Israel's 8 mil-
lion citizens, have largely been al-
lowed to skip compulsory military
service to pursue their religious
studies. Older men often avoid the
workforce and collect welfare
stipends while continuing to study
full time.
The system, which is the result of


religious parties' historically dispro-
portionate political power in parlia-
ment, has caused widespread
resentment among Israel's secular
majority The issue figured promi-
nently in January elections and pro-
pelled the secular Yesh Atid Party
into the government.
Last week, Israel's Cabinet ap-
proved a Yesh Atid plan to gradually
end the automatic draft exemptions
to ultra-Orthodox seminary students
and require all to register for service.
Yaakov Peri, the minister who
headed the drive, called the pro-
posed legislation historic, telling The
Associated Press that it takes into
consideration "the importance of
learning the Torah and the obligation
to serve in the army"
Ultra-Orthodox rabbis vehemently
oppose the plan, saying the military
and immersion in mainstream soci-
ety will expose their youth to secular-
ism and undermine a pious way of
life that has kept the Jewish people
alive through centuries of persecu-
tion. They insist their young men
serve the nation through prayer and
study, thus preserving Jewish learn-
ing and heritage.
Leaders of the community, who in
Hebrew are known as "Haredim," or
"those who fear" God, say their fol-
lowers would rather sit in jail than
join the military They charge their
ancient brand of Judaism is under
siege and warn of an uprising if par-
liament approves the draft plan.

See Page C5


The meaning of 'manna from Heaven'


With the popularity of
the food networks
and the prevalence
of foodies in our midst, it is
interesting to look back in the
Bible for the original "perfect
food" that is, manna. As it
is told in Exodus, the Is-
raelites, after their freedom
from bondage in Egypt, were
led by Moses into the wilder-
ness. They soon ran out of
food, having left Egypt in
haste with little time for pro-
visions. (Remember matzah,
unleavened bread?) It was
not long in typical 'Jewish"
form that the people started
kvetching and wishing for the
fleshpotss of Egypt" where
they, though slaves, at least
had food.
God, in compassion for his
people, sends down a special
food called manna. While
the Creator could have pro-
vided simple bread, this fine,
coriander seed-like sub-
stance was found each morn-
ing on the ground under the
dew When gathered, it could
be ground into flour and
baked into cakes. According
to the Torah, raw manna
tasted like wafers made with
honey (Exodus 16:31) or


Judi
Siegal

JUDI'S
JOURNAL


when baked into cakes, it
tasted like cake made with
oil. But what really was this
marvelous substance, and
where did it come from?
There have been some
theories about the Israelites'
sustainable food. Most would
agree that because it ap-
pears on the ground in the
morning and without appar-
ent cultivation, it was some-
thing of a "miracle food."
Practically speaking, the
manna described in the
Bible was some kind of a sap
from either a tamarisk tree
or a camelthorn bush, both
of which grow prolifically in
the desert regions of the
Middle East. The sap oozes
out at night and dries out
quickly in the hot desert sun
of the morning. This is prob-
ably what the Israelites gath-


ered for sustenance.
Other authorities look at
the situation in a different
manner According to the
commentator Rashi, manna
could taste like anything any-
body wished, except like cu-
cumbers, watermelons,
leeks, onions and garlic be-
cause these could be harmful
to nursing mothers. Jewish
tradition also claims that
manna was one of the 10
things created by God at twi-
light on the eve of the first
Sabbath of creation. There-
fore, it was put in place even
before the Israelites com-
plained to Moses.
Another interesting fact
about manna is that it tasted
like any food anybody
wished so that to the young it
tasted like bread, the old, as
wafers with honey, to infants,
as mother's milk, to the sick,
fine flour mingled with
honey This idea came about
from a comment from Rabbi
Jose, who wrote about
manna in the Talmud.
While the events de-
scribed in Exodus happened
more than 3,000 years ago,
the remembrance of the
manna still lingers in Jewish


ritual today On a traditional
Sabbath table are two loaves
of bread with poppy or
sesame seeds sprinkled on
top. This is to symbolize the
double portion of manna
that the Israelites received
on Friday, since no gathering
of manna was allowed to
take place on the Sabbath.
The seeds were to resemble
the manna, as we under-
stand the generalized consis-
tency of the food.
Had I lived during the
time of the Israelites, I
would have wanted my
manna to taste like choco-
late. (Though I concede the
cacao bean would be discov-
ered much, much later in
history) In the true spirit of
tzekadah, righteousness, let
us share our food with those
in need in our community
and be grateful for the suste-
nance we have been given.
To me, this is the message of
the manna, a marvelous food
which sustained my ances-
tors for 40 years in the
wilderness.
Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


The gift of


repentance




Nancy
Kennedy

GRACE
NOTES


Friend calls it "the Jesus
Show," preachers who stand
on street covers in the hot
sun and stifling humidity, wearing
dress shirts and ties, holding signs
with messages like "Repent of your
sins" and preaching loudly, often
to no one.
Repent! Repent ofyour sins!
It sounds so simple, to simply re-
pent of your sins because you read
it on a sign.
It's actually very simple, but it's
not at all easy
A few weeks ago, a woman
posted on her Facebook page that
she had just come from church,
heard a great sermon and that she
was going to "put God first" in her
life.
Good thought, but it's not easy
I've had that same thought a thou-
sand times and I've yet to be able
to do it.
Same with repenting. I tell my-
self to do it and then nothing
happens.
People say faith is a decision, a
choice, and it is. But it's much
more, so much more.
In the 2003 book "TrueFaced" by
Bill Thrall, Bruce McNicol and
John Lynch, a chapter talks about
repentance as the "sweetest gift of
grace."
The authors begin the chapter
with the obvious: We don't like the
thought of repenting. They liken it
to nasty tasting medicine some-
thing that's good for us, something
we know we need but we'll do all
we can to avoid it. That's our nor-
mal position.
The authors describe repen-
tance as a zipper. They say that
walking around with unresolved
sin is like wearing a heavily insu-
lated parka on the hottest day of
summer in the Sahara.
"We're suffocating and can't fig-
ure out why," they write. "Repen-
tance is the zipper out of that
parka."
The catch, they write, is that con-
trary to what many believe, repen-
tance is not a matter of the will. We
can't read a sign telling us to re-
pent and then just do it. We cannot
decide to stop sinning or will our-
selves to change, to feel contrition.
We can't drum up feelings of re-
morse and repentance, except
maybe momentarily
Confession, too how often
have I confessed my sin, told God
that I know I'm doing wrong, that I
don't want to do it anymore, except
that I do want to? I'm still looking
for loopholes and exceptions, a
way to manage my sin, at least
some of my favorite ones.
The 17th-century Puritan
Thomas Watson explained repen-
tance as a "grace of God's Spirit
whereby a sinner is inwardly hum-
bled and visibly reformed."
Or, as the apostle Paul wrote:
"It's God's kindness that leads us
to repentance" (Romans 2:4). It's a
gift of grace, a work of God's Spirit
moving our spirit, not a matter of
willpower It's a supernatural, hu-
manly impossible act that changes
us from the inside out.
You can stop doing things you
ought not be doing, but that doesn't
mean you've repented.
You can be sorry, seriously, emo-
tionally sorry, and vow not to do
whatever you've been doing, but
even that doesn't mean you've
repented.
And then one day you can be
minding your own business, going
about your daily life, not thinking
about anything more than what
you want to eat for lunch, and God
will enter your thoughts and bring
you to your knees and it will be
different from the other times
you've knelt to pray
I recall vividly my first taste of
the "sweetest gift of grace" 35-plus
years ago. For the first time my sor-
row for my sin was not "sorry I got
caught" or sorry because of the con-
sequences, but true sorrow for of-
fending a holy God.
And with that gift of sorrow for
my sin came the assurance that
God loved me and that I could
trust him both with my sin and
with my life.
See Page C5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Summer fun
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host Vacation
Bible School from 5:15 to
8 p.m. Sunday through Thurs-
day. This year's theme is
"God's Backyard Bible
Camp," where kids discover
which two are the most impor-
tant Commandments. All ages
are invited and a nursery is
provided. A supper is served
every night. There is no fee.
Call 352-726-3153 to register.
Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church VBS for children ages
5 through fifth grade is from 9
a.m. to noon Monday through
Friday. The theme is "God's
Backyard Bible Camp." Get
ready for an outdoor adven-
ture that starts in the back-
yard and gets bigger each
day as kids take the love of
Jesus into their homes, neigh-
borhoods and communities.
Through music, singing, Bible
stories, crafts and games, the
kids will learn how to apply
God's truths to serving their
family, friends, neighbors and
others in community. Call
VBS coordinator Joan Greve
at 352-304-8711 or the church
office at 352-854-4509, ext.
221. The church is at 7045
S.W. 83rd Place at State


Road 200, Ocala.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church will host a unique Va-
cation Bible School starting
Monday through Friday, regis-
tration at 6 p.m. Events begin
at 6:15 to 8 p.m. Free back
packs and school supplies,
activities, games, great music,
snacks, Bible lessons, concert
on Friday evening, with a 50-
foot ice cream sundae for
grades K-5 and grades 6-12.
Signing for the deaf will be
available. Rock a cross with
"Remember This." A Christian
rock band will perform with a
light show on Friday. The
church is at 974 W.G. Mar-
tinelli Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Call 352-208-3055.
First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon contin-
ues its third annual "SPARK
Summer Camp," from 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. through Aug. 2.
This program also accepts
children with special needs.
There are different themes,
crafts and games for each
week. The church is at 21501
W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.
As part of its annual
Summer Missions Project,
Rock Crusher Road First
Church of God has set a
"God-sized" goal of contribut-
ing 500 hours of their time in


community service. Members
can serve as volunteers any-
where in the community. The
reason behind the goal is to
get the church outside of the
building and into the commu-
nity where they can help
make a difference. The
church is at 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road, Crystal River.
Call the church office at 352-
795-5553 or visit www.rock
crusherchurch.com.
Sale away
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church in Dunnellon
will host an outdoor flea
market the first Saturday
monthly beginning in Septem-
ber. For space rental, call
Maureen in the office at 352-
489-3166. Spaces begin at
$10.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Special events
The next joint blood
drive of the ministries of Our


Lady of Grace Parish and
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 is from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
today at Our Lady of Grace
Parish Life Center, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Donors are urgently needed
during the summer vacation
season. A continental break-
fast is planned, as well as to-
kens of appreciation to all
donors. Call LifeSouth at 352-
537-3061.
The third Saturday night
supper will take place from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. today in the
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes bar-
becued pulled pork, potato
salad, baked beans, dessert,
coffee and tea. Tickets are
$10 for adults, $5 for children
and can be purchased at the
door. Takeouts available. Call
the church at 352-489-1260.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church on Fort Island Trail will
consecrate the new statue
of St. Anne, the church's pa-
tron saint, at the 10:15 a.m.
Mass Sunday. The Rev. Fr.
Gilbert S. Larsen, SSC, will
perform the ceremony in the
sanctuary. The church plans a
week of festivities, prayer and


teaching about St. Anne and
her husband St. Joachim, the
Blessed Virgin Mary's par-
ents, and Lord Jesus Christ's
grandparents, culminating in a
parish picnic at Rainbow
Springs. There will be a light
meal after mass in the parish
hall. The statue was donated
as a memorial for her hus-
band by a parishioner, who
will be present to discuss the
details of the gift.
First Christian Church of
Inverness will host a concert
by River Jordan at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 27. River Jor-
dan sings a pure Southern
gospel quartet sound, low
bass, high tenor and smooth
dynamic harmony. Everyone
is invited to attend. There is
no charge for tickets. The
church is at 2018 Colonade
St., Inverness. Call the church
office at 352-344-1908.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River will
host a fact-finding event
from noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
July 30, in the church fellow-
ship hall. Guest speakers
from the Veterans Administra-
tion, housing, transportation
and meal programs will dis-
cuss opportunities available in
the area. An agent from Well
Care will also present supple-


mental health care options
they offer to the public. Light
refreshments will be provided.
The church welcomes the
community. To sign up for this
informative event, call Linda
in the church office at 352-
795-2259.
The Citrus County
Community Choir will pres-
ent a concert of music by An-
drew Lloyd Webber at
7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, at
First Presbyterian Church of
Crystal River (U.S. 19, next to
Sweetbay Plaza). Admission
donation is $10 for adults.
Children 12 and younger are
free. Call 352-795-2259.
The Altar & Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will collect
new and used children's
clothing July for their upcom-
ing "Clothe the Children"
drive that will take place
Thursday, Aug. 8. New cloth-
ing can be brought to the of-
fice or placed in the collection
bin in the church narthex.
Used clothing should be
brought to the storage trailer
(key can be obtained in the
office). Any and all gift cards
or cash donations should be
brought to the office.

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship


that offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
S"We strive to make
newcomersfeel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced

CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479





Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................... Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
I/ mi.east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


B C Crystal
SRiver

Foursquare

Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



JCrystal Diver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 NW. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S(12th Ave.) Nurse
Provided

HERNANDO

United
Methodist
Church

Opew
Heat;s,



opew

1..... .. .ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1F miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.



h l .


T ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


THE
SALVATION
A RMY CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Lynn Irish



, /


] Sherpherd
of the Hills
Episcopal
Church
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Wednesday
Healing Service
10:00 am
2540W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.

1, I .1 11 i i r ,










Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"


Ca Mrig.evc 1:0AM
Ca We. Pae t.&BbeSuy


Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

CASUAL
Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30, &
11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 & 10:45 am
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors

A Stephen
Ministry
Church
Office Hours
8:30 am
To
4:30 pm


Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www. luc. org


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


West
Citrus
Church of Christ

9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday -
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


k Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


a First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship ilb Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CA INC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKXYTAL
RIVIE y
UNITED
M METHOD IST
CHU KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider,.


.. ..... .


C2 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

The church is at 7525 U.S.
41 in Dunnellon. For more in-
formation call 352-489-5954.
The Summer Book
Club at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, Crystal River, meets
at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the fel-
lowship hall. Men and women
of the community are invited.
The club reads and discusses
books relevant to our lives
and our personal spiritual
journey. Call Gail Sirak at
352-634-2021.
Community Christian
Karate Club (CCKC) offers a
Citrus County group for learn-
ing karate skills, working on
cardio, and meeting new
friends. Three different
classes for three different age
groups are offered: the 4- to
7-year-old class, 8- to 12-
year-old class, and the
teen/adult class. Classes take
place Tuesday evenings at
New Hope Baptist Church,
8635 W. Goodman Lane, Ho-
mosassa. Cost is $25 a
month with discounts for fami-
lies. For more information,
contact 5th degree black belt
instructor Greg Gunn at 352-
428-6348 or email ggunnl4
@gmail.com or visit www.


topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church offers Bingo
at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and
5:30 p.m. Wednesday featur-
ing regular, double and spe-
cial bingos, together with a
jackpot and "pickle" game.
Doors open at 10 a.m. Tues-
day and 4 p.m. Wednesday.
Kitchen features "homemade"
soups and sandwiches. The
church is on U.S. 41, three
miles north of Dunnellon.
Study & support
Come hear great stories
from the Bible at 6 p.m. Sat-
urdays in Holy Grounds Cafe
at Calvary Chapel Inverness,
960 S. U.S. 41. This week
hear Paul Anthony Giglio
teach about Joshua and the
Big Wall. Free coffee and
dessert served. Call 352-
726-1480 or visit www.
calvaryinv.com.
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) will
begin a 30-week study of the
book of Romans from 9:45 to
11:45 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 5, at
First Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills at the intersection of
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491) and Forest Ridge
Boulevard. This class is open to
men and women and includes
a program for children ages 5
and younger. CBS is part of an


international organization that
provides interdenominational
Bible study. Preregistration is
necessary. To register, call
Annie at 352-795-9307, Rose-
mary at 352-564-2813, Terry at
352-382-2365 or Linda at 352-
746-1698.
Registration for the fall
Faith Formation Classes at
St. Thomas the Apostle Roman
Catholic has started for children
in grades pre-K and up. Call
Alicia between 9 a.m. and
3 p.m. Tuesday through Thurs-
day at 352-628-7000 for more
information or stop by the office
on those days.
People of all religions are
welcome to bring their inspira-
tional writings and prayers to
share during "Interfaith De-
votionals" at 2 p.m. Sun-
days. Refreshments served.
Call Sandi at 352-364-6035.
The public is welcome to
Zen meditation sessions at
2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto (off County
Road 491). Call 352464-4955.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend


and enjoy Christian fellowship.
All widows in the com-
munity are invited to join the
Widows Ministry Group
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't
finished with us yet!" Call
Darla at 352-270-8115.
Ladies, come to "The
Well" for refreshment and
prophetic prayer ministry at
7 p.m. the first Friday monthly
at FresHope Ministries, 2991
E. Thomas St., Inverness. If
you are hurting, need to hear a
word from God, and/or spiritual
growth and strength, then this
is the night just for you. Come
comfortable and come expect-
ing to receive. You will not
leave the same way you came
in. Call 352-341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
Recovery outreach
Celebrate Recovery
meetings: Wednesdays and
Friday at 7 p.m. at Christian
Recovery Fellowship Church,
2242 W. State Road 44 (call
352-726-2800); Fridays at 6
p.m. at Seven Rivers Presby-
terian Church in Lecanto (call
352-453-5501); and Fridays
at 6 p.m. at the Gulf to Lake
Ministry Complex in Meadow-
crest, left of SunTrust Bank
(call 352-586-4709).


Britain,


France show


contrast in


gay marriage


Associated Press
LONDON The
French like to make fun
of the British, joking
about their repressed
ways in matters of the
heart. But when it came
time to debate same-sex
marriage, it was France
that betrayed a deep con-
servative streak in some-
times violent protests -
while the British showed
themselves to be modern
and tolerant.
With little fanfare or
controversy, Britain an-
nounced Wednesday that
Queen Elizabeth II -
hardly a social radical -
had signed into law a bill
legalizing same-sex mar-
riages in England and
Wales. France has also le-


galized gay marriages, but
only after a series of gi-
gantic protests attracting
families from the tradi-
tional heartland that re-
vealed a deeply split
society.
Official word that the
queen had approved the
bill drew cheers in the
usually sedate House of
Commons.
"This is a historic mo-
ment that will resonate in
many people's lives,"
Equalities Minister Maria
Miller said in a statement.
"I am proud that we have
made it happen and I
look forward to the first
same sex wedding by next
summer."
There were British

See MARRIAGE/Page C4


Places of worship


that offer love, peace ,


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifrig Up lJesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


S.U








VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:00 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:15 P.w Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of SR. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
:' .cathollcweb.com .:


I Homosassa Springs
SFtr,',tAi AETr.ThT'URCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services =
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Lutheran

Church LCMS
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
F {9 atFo t ont ..
^cffG't ~w^ fhew.


First Baptist
Ckswck
ofLake, Rouarrsea
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: -', i .ri I '.' ,.1 l ... ,
Check us out on Facebook






Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
00Y Floral City, FL.


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


gNORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"Rooted in Scripture, Relevantfor Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Callfor location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'
714 S. Scarbor --
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


^^ Hernando
i ThOhurchof
^s^ TheNazarene
4A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A. M
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy -'
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com


wlo








Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA










Worship

9:30 am

July & August
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship............... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway




Todd
Langdon


ll ;wumn/ eIlomese

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am

Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352)746-9422


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Sanford churches
to hold weekly
prayer meetings
SANFORD, Fla. -
Churches in Sanford, Fla.,
have opened their doors for
prayer to ease tensions after
George Zimmerman's acquit-
tal in the shooting death of
Trayvon Martin.
The group, Sanford Pastors
Connecting, announced that
churches across Seminole
County would open their
doors each Monday at noon.
The first prayer meeting Mon-
day at New Life Word Center
Church was attended by San-
ford's mayor, city manager
and police chief.
New Life Word Center's
pastor, the Rev. Ronald


Merthie, said they prayed for
both the Zimmerman and the
Martin families and for unity,
peace and better community
relations.
Merthie said Mayor Jeff
Triplett expressed relief that
Sanford had endured intense
media scrutiny and that vio-
lence had not occurred.
Illinois Sen. wants
handguns banned
from churches
PARK RIDGE, Ill. -An Illi-
nois state senator wants to
add churches to the list of
places where concealed guns
wouldn't be allowed.
Park Ridge Democrat Dan
Kotowski said he doesn't
agree with a provision in the


state's new concealed-carry
law that allows guns in
churches, temples or
mosques. He filed an amend-
ment to the law Monday and
said he'll push for its
approval.
Illinois was the last state in
the nation to approve con-
cealed-carry legislation this
month.
Kotowski is a former gun
control lobbyist.
He's one of a number of
lawmakers seeking changes
to the gun bill, although law-
makers voted to override
changes that Gov. Pat Quinn
proposed last week to meet a
federal court deadline.
Several other states, in-
cluding Nebraska, South Car-
olina and North Dakota,


prohibit carrying concealed
guns in churches.
LGBT group finds
acceptance at
evangelical college
PASADENA, Calif. Fuller
Theological Seminary in
Pasadena, Calif., is one of the
first evangelical seminaries in
the nation to approve an offi-
cial student organization for
lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender students.
Its decision not to oppose
the LGBT club is creating rip-
ples in the larger world of
Christian colleges. Attempts to
start gay student groups at
some other Christian colleges
in the U.S. have been met with
censorship or outright bans.


Though Fuller's approval is
seen by many as progress,
some don't like the conditions
that come with it. School pol-
icy states that students can
"come out," but they must re-
main celibate and are not al-
lowed to be politically active.
Students said they are
aware of the LGBT group's
limitations, and choose to ac-
cept them.
Pa. man guilty
of killing organist
ex in church
COUDERSPORT, Pa. -A
Pennsylvania man has
pleaded guilty to fatally shoot-
ing his ex-wife while she
played the organ during a
church service last year.


The Bradford Era reports
that under the plea agree-
ment, 53-year-old Gregory El-
dred of Coudersport will
receive a mandatory life
prison term when he returns
for sentencing next week.
Eldred pleaded guilty to
first-degree murder, acknowl-
edging that he gunned down
53-year-old Darlene Sitler
while she was serving as the
organist at the First United
Presbyterian Church of Coud-
ersport on Dec. 2. The church
is about 140 miles northeast
of Pittsburgh.
Eldred was an elementary
school music teacher, while
Sitler taught music at the
Northern Potter Children's
School.
From wire reports


MARRIAGE
Continued from Page C3

political figures and religious
leaders vehemently opposed to
gay marriage, but the opposition
never reached a fever pitch, in
part because the same-sex mar-
riage bill had broad public sup-
port and the backing of the
leaders of the three major polit-
ical parties. In fact, it was Prime
Minister David Cameron, leader
of the tradition-minded Conser-
vatives, who proposed the legis-
lation in the first place.
The public seemed to take it for
granted that gay marriage should
be a part of British life. It was per-
haps a sign of how Britain has
evolved in past decades into a
much more cosmopolitan nation
than its starchy, traditionalist
image would suggest.
"The opposition seemed re-
stricted to a very small number
of people very vigorous in their
views," said Steven Fielding, a
political scientist at the Univer-


Legalizing gay marriage was near the
bottom of French President Francois
Hollande's 36-point agenda for his
presidency. It was mentioned in passing
during his presidential campaign but was
never an issue that galvanized
opposition, and was entirely eclipsed by
concerns about the economy.


sity of Nottingham. "It was re-
stricted to the back benchers of
the Conservative Party It wasn't
shared across the political spec-
trum. It was an issue whose time
had come. To oppose it seemed
slightly strange."
The law was also written in a
way that allowed the Church of
England which is opposed -
to sidestep the controversy since
it is explicitly barred from con-
ducting same-sex marriages.
The picture was completely dif-
ferent in France. Few people had


expected legalizing gay marriage
to face much of a hurdle. French
polls had shown for more than a
decade that the concept enjoyed
majority public support, and Paris
has had a gay mayor for years.
And to outsiders, of course,
France is seen as the land
of "anything goes" when it
comes to sex from the Mar-
quis de Sade to author Colette to
disgraced French politician Do-
minique Strauss-Kahn, notori-
ous for his libertine sex parties.
Politically, too, it was meant to


be a blip. Legalizing gay mar-
riage was near the bottom of
French President Francois Hol-
lande's 36-point agenda for his
presidency It was mentioned in
passing during his presidential
campaign but was never an issue
that galvanized opposition, and
was entirely eclipsed by con-
cerns about the economy
Then, something clicked in
the conservative heartland -
which showed just how much of
a force it is in French life.
When the law was drafted and
the idea of gays marrying turned
from concept to imminent real-
ity, traditionalists spoke up, and
loudly Protests grew bigger, and
spread wider. Opponents of the
bill stirred up fears about gay
parents raising France's new
generations.
A fringe of far-right skinheads
drew camera crews and con-
demnation as they wrestled with
riot police at Paris protests. But
most of those at the barricades
were families, children with
grandparents, members of
France's minority of practicing


Catholics bussed in en masse
from towns and villages to march
on the capital. Some conserva-
tive Muslims and Jews joined in.
In marching against gay mar-
riage, the demonstrators also
seemed to be protesting free-
wheeling Paris life, the image of
a wanton, insatiable French sex-
uality celebrated in films and art
- but far from the reality of
many provincial French families.
For a time in early 2013, France
felt like a deeply divided nation.
But the size of the anti-gay mar-
riage movement was largely the
result of a political backlash
against Hollande, whose popular-
ity dived soon after his election
over his handling of the economy
The movement was the right
vehicle at the right time to target
Hollande and his Socialists.
Once the law passed, the mo-
mentum stalled.
Even the protesters seemed to
realize they remain the minority,
and polls continue to show that
most French people think gay
marriage now that it is a fact
of life is fine.


Places of worship



that offer love, peace



and harmony to all.
----------------------- ^ i". ,^ ^


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !


S"' Pastor
j Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.


SPRIMERAIGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
S 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670


I 00FBC3


ll Timoth


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service.. 10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and
play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siil.i, Evening 6:00 PM


Wednesday


7:00 PM


Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to I. ,,,, ,I. ',,.,,


$5


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 AM
Sunday School...............9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...10:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes ..................7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00
Teens ............................... 7:00 pM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Hwy. 44 E @
i Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services *
S Traditional
11:00 AM
. Casual Service U
i 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service .
* Tapes& CD' s Available U
0 Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group
0 5to 7 PM
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org
0 Podcast: FPC inv.com 0
* U
Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U
I .


"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and inviteyou
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study







w First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


II OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


47 Years of
FIRST o Invernes
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 AM.
726-1637
E ^ Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson





First United

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
Senior Pastor


Summer Schedule
8:45 AM 9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Worship Service

10:00 AM
Kidzone Childrens
Worship


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


oad

1st

ch


Inverness
SMiles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


C4 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


RELIGION


- i- -




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAUGHT
Continued from Page C1

"The main problem
here is that we are those
being blamed instead of
those blaming," ultra-Or-
thodox lawmaker Israel
Eichler told Channel 2 TV
"If the law passes, it will
be a declaration of war"
Some 3,000 Haredim
soldiers, who volunteered
to join, are already serv-
ing, according to the mili-
tary Thousands more are
expected to be drafted in
the coming months if the
legislation passes.
Among ultra-Orthodox
extremists, the war has al-
ready begun with a vio-
lent campaign against
those in service. A hand-
ful of Haredi soldiers
have been accosted the
past two weeks. Activists
have posted banners de-
nouncing them and have
even set up a phone hot-
line so people can snitch
on those they know are
serving or they have seen
in uniform.
The atmosphere has be-
come so charged that
ultra-Orthodox soldiers
say they shed their uni-
forms before heading
home.
In Jerusalem's hard-
core bastions of ultra-Or-
thodox Jewry, there
appears to be room for
only one type of uniform
- the traditional black-
and-white garb donned
by the hard-line
observers.
In the neighborhood of
Mea Shearim, a large car-
toon poster depicts
Haredi soldiers rolling
through the streets atop
tanks trying to lure young
boys onto their vehicles.
The ad denounces the sol-
diers as Zionist "ambas-
sadors" and
"missionaries." Soldiers
in sidecurls have been
coined the insulting nick-
name "Hardak" a com-
bination of Haredi and
insect
"They disgust me," said
Shimon Gutfarb, a 25-
year-old father of three.
"The army is a melting
pot. The fear is that our
youth will go rotten ...
They (the soldiers) aban-
doned their traditions.
They represent the oppo-
site of our lifestyle."
Many ultra-Orthodox
sects are anti-Zionist, re-
fusing to recognize Israel
since they say there can-
not be a Jewish state until
the coming of the
Messiah.
The battle over the
draft law is part of a
larger cultural war gain-
ing steam in recent years.
Due to its high birthrate
and the relatively low par-
ticipation in the work-
force, the Haredi
community suffers from
high unemployment and
poverty
Voices have begun to
emerge criticizing the
ultra-Orthodox education
system, which teaches
students about Judaism
but very little math, Eng-
lish or science. More than
a quarter of all Israeli
first-graders are ultra-Or-
thodox and government
statistics project that if
these trends continue, the
ultra-Orthodox could
make up 15 percent of the
country's population by
2025.
But the tide has begun
to turn. The new educa-
tion minister from Yesh
Atid has already taken
moves to force them to
adopt a core curriculum
or lose government
funding.
According to official Is-
raeli figures, the number
of ultra-Orthodox men
and women who now
work has begun to creep
up in recent years.
Haredi employees are in-


creasingly finding work
in the country's booming
high-tech industry This
trend shows the commu-
nity is far from the ho-
mogenous mass viewed
by outsiders.
Shlomo Trachtman, a
25-year-old Haredi who
calls himself "an Israeli
patriot" says those who
don't study scripture full-
time should serve in the
military
"There is a culture war
going on," he said, and he
referred to his own
neighborhood ofMea
Shearim as "the height of
extremism."
"I've seen soldiers
called Nazis here. It's
hard to join the army in
such an environment."
Avi Lotan, who wit-
nessed an assault on a sol-
dier on Sunday, said it's
best for Haredim in the
army to lie low. "Whoever
attacks them is insane,"
the 25-year-old said. "But
in the meantime I recom-
mend they stay away"
Peri, of Yesh Atid, who
serves as science minister
in the government, said
he has met with dozens of
religious leaders and
though they are obliged to
say publicly they are
against the plan, they
know a majority of their
followers wants to serve.
"It is in the interest of
both communities, the
secular one and the Or-
thodox one, to reach a
kind of balance in which
everybody will serve," he
said.
Defense Minister
Moshe Yaalon said "we
must not allow violent
thugs to threaten the
safely of young Haredim
who chose to join the
army."
Changing the ways of
the ultra-Orthodox will
not be easy
Leaders insist that
study in religious semi-
naries is no less impor-
tant than military
strength in protecting
the country from modern
threats in a hostile re-
gion. Meanwhile, secular
Israelis who voted Yesh
Atid into power are
growing impatient and
demanding results. A
clash seems all but
inevitable.
"The Haredi commu-
nity is in crisis regardless
of the draft issue," Yoaz
Hendel, a former top aide
to Prime Minister Ben-
jamin Netanyahu, wrote
in a column for the Yediot
Ahronot daily "Over time,
you cannot maintain a
community that is (finan-
cially) supported by
everyone else. There is no
religious justification for
it and there is no prece-
dent for it in the history of
the Jewish people."


Pope creates commission



to investigate finances


Associated Press

VATICAN CITY Pope Francis
on Friday created another commis-
sion of inquiry into the Vatican's
troubled finances, naming an
eight-member committee to recom-
mend ways to cut waste, improve
transparency and fix the Holy
See's administrative shortcomings.
It was the third such commission
Francis has named in his four
months as pope and signaled that
big changes are coming as he re-
sponds to demands by the cardinals
who elected him to overhaul the dys-
functional bureaucracy that runs the
1.2 billion strong Catholic Church.
The Holy See's problems, which
have long been acknowledged in
church circles, were revealed pub-
licly last year with the leaks of
papal correspondence by then-
Pope Benedict XVI's butler, which
then later appeared in a block-
buster book.
The documents exposed the
petty turf battles among Vatican
bureaucrats, allegations of corrup-
tion in the awarding of Vatican
contracts and enormous fiscal
waste, including the 550,000 euro
($720,115) the Holy See spent in
2009 for its Christmas Nativity
scene in St. Peter's Square.
The Vatican said Friday the com-
mission's aims were to "simplify
and rationalize" the Holy See ad-
ministration and better plan its
spending.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

You could argue that
it was my act of repen-
tance, but that act did
not originate with me; it
originated with God.
It came out of the
blue, something I hadn't
asked for or even knew
I needed or wanted it
until God dropped it in
my lap. It was that easy
I believe that if you
and I ask for the gift of
repentance, we will re-
ceive, because even our
asking begins with him.
It's always him, and
never you and me.
Repentance is God's
sweet gift to those he
loves.
Like any good gift, I
want more of it
Nancy Kennedy is the Got a
author of "Move Over
Victoria -I Know the your
Real Secret," "Girl on a wins!
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace." Vo
She can be reached at Tire,
352-564-2927, Monday to'
through Thursday or
via email at nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


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Associated Press
Pope Francis caresses a child Sun-
day after delivering the Angelus
prayer at Castel Gandolfo, near
Rome.
The commission, made up of
seven lay people and a Vatican
monsignor, will recommend re-
forms to avoid wasting money, im-
prove transparency in buying
goods and services, better admin-
ister the Vatican's vast real estate
holdings and ensure correct ac-
counting principles, among other
things, according to the legal docu-
ment creating the commission.
Francis has made clear that he
has no tolerance for waste, finan-
cial or otherwise, denouncing con-
sumerism and the world's "throw


car in the contest?
car in the contest? T


away" culture. He has made reach-
ing out to the world's poor and
marginalized with a more mission-
ary church his main priority. He
has also proven himself to be a de-
cisive administrator, seeking coun-
sel from others but acting alone.
On the one-month anniversary of
his election, Francis named eight
cardinals to help him govern the
universal church and study an
overall reform of the Vatican bu-
reaucracy The Holy See has been
criticized for having offices with
overlapping functions which nev-
ertheless operate as individual
fiefdoms that don't communicate
with one another
Last month, he named a commis-
sion of inquiry into the scandal-
plagued Vatican bank, whose top
two managers resigned amid a
widening money-laundering probe
by Italian magistrates and a re-
lated scandal involving a 20 million
euro ($26 million) money-smug-
gling plot allegedly engineered by
a Vatican monsignor.
Friday's commission into the
economic and administrative or-
ganization of the Holy See will re-
port to Francis but it will also
collaborate with the "Group of
Eight" cardinals named in April,
the document said.
The Holy See posted a 2.2 million
euro ($2.85 million) budget surplus
for 2012, an improvement from the
previous year when it booked a 14.9
million euro shortfall.


IRONIC

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uly 9th July 26th
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:ar starting July 9th. The car and truck with the most votes


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* *g a


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* Local News
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The Chronicle site is continually updated throughout the day and includes a full electronic version of the day's newspaper.


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 CS






Page C6 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES


Coi Speak up for children
Coin enthusiasts
gather at library
The Beverly Hills Coin
Club will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Monday at Central Ridge .
Library, Beverly Hills. Next area guardian litemtraining coming up Aug. 5
The club has no dues; its
purpose is to bring local
coin collectors together and Special to the Chronicle unteer supervisor and program at- be objective are eligible.
provide numismatic torney He/she becomes familiar A GAL must successfully com-
education. There are about 1,700 children in with the child and the child's case plete 30 hours of pre-service train-
For more information, Marion, Hernando, Lake, Sumter and makes recommendations to the ing. On average, volunteers spend
call Joe at 352-527-2868. and Citrus counties who have been court to help ensure a safe, caring, five to 10 hours a month on a case.
removed from their homes for al- stable and permanent environment Most cases last 10 months.
All welcome leged abuse, abandonment or neg- Persons 21 years of age and older To learn more, call Lynn Sennett
at fish dinner lect, who are now part of a (young adults between the ages of at 352-274-5231 or email Lynn.
dependency court proceeding. 19 and 21 years of age are also eligi- Sennett@gal.fl.gov For more infor-
Blanton-Thompson These children need someone who ble, working under the guidance mation and an application, visit the
American Legion Auxiliary will speak up for them. and partnership with a certified website at www.guardian
Unit 155, Crystal River, will A guardian ad litem (GAL) is a volunteer GAL), who successfully adlitem.org. The next training be-
serve a fish dinner volunteer appointed by the court to complete the pre-service training gins Monday, Aug. 5, at the Ocala
choice of fried or baked advocate for a child. The volunteer program, have a clean criminal Police Department, 402 S. Pine
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. works as part of a team with a vol- background check and are able to Ave., Ocala.
Wednesday, July 24, at the
post home, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway. CRHS grads earn BWA scholarships
Everyone is welcome;
donation is $7.
All profits help support
the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary.
For more information, call
Unit President Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
Club slates card
party, luncheon P.
One of the five card
partylluncheons sponsored
by the GFWC Woman's
Club of Inverness during
the year will be Saturday,
July 27, at the First Presby-
terian Church in Inverness.
The popular event, which
features a buffet salad
luncheon and desserts pre-
pared by club members, is
open to anyone in the com-
munity, including men.
Participants usually get
together their own group
and bring their own cards
such as bridge or mah
jongg; however, singles
who wish to participate are
welcome to join group
games, such as hand and
foot or Mexican train.
Tickets are $10 and may
be reserved by calling Fran
Pierce at 352-637-1582 or Special to the Chronicle
Sandra Koonce at 352- The Business Women's Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce awarded $1,000 scholarships to four
634-4216. deserving Crystal River High School female students at the CRHS Awards Ceremony in May. Pictured, from left,
are: Ariana Rudge, attending the College of Central Florida, majoring in nursing; Megan Creech, attending Florida
All invited to Gulf Coast University, majoring in accounting/finance; Rhonda Lestinsky, BWA Scholarship Committee represen-
Pickin' Party tative; and Jamie Jaster, attending the University of Florida, majoring in psychology. The BWA has awarded more
than $39,000 in scholarships in its seven-year history.
Everyone is invited to an
Acoustic Bluegrass and
Old-time Pickin' Party be-

gunday at Nature's Resort Lecanto High School students receive scholrships
on Halls River Road in
Homosassa.
The Pickin' Party is free Special to the Chronicle The BWAs scholarship awards are for women
The Pikin' Party is free pursuing further education in health care careers
and open to the public. The Business Women's Alliance of the Citrus or non-health care business careers.
County Chamber of Commerce awarded $1,000 The funds awarded are used for tuition, books
Humanitarians scholarships to four deserving Lecanto High and materials. Scholarships are funded through
OF FLORIDA School female students at the Lecanto Awards the organization's networking luncheons and an-
Ceremony in May. nual Women's Health and Fitness Expo, which
The four Lecanto Seniors are: Katelyn Schulze, will be Sept. 28 this year Recipients are chosen in
M cFadden attending Florida State University, majoring in ac- a competitive process from Citrus County's three


Special to the Chronicle
McFadden is one pretty,
sweet girl looking for a
home. We are having a
two-for-one special on all
cats and kittens.
Adoption fees include
microchip, spay/neuter,
all required vaccinations,
including rabies, and
there are all varieties of
felines to choose from.
Drop by and enjoy the
felines in their cage-free
environment from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Hardin
Haven on the corner of
State Road 44 and
North Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River.
Call the Humanitarians
at 352-613-1629 for
adoptions, or view most
of the Hardin Haven's
felines on-line at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fll86.html.


counting; Kelena Klippel, attending the University
of Florida, majoring in medicine; Kendall Moore,
attending Florida Southern College, majoring in
nursing; and Carly Howell, attending the Univer-
sity of Florida, majoring in political science.


public high schools and Withlacoochee Technical
Institute.
For more information about the BWA, call the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce at 352-
795-3149 or visit www.citruscountychamber com.


Come throw a shoe with Beverly Hills club


Special to the Chronicle
The Beverly Hills
Horseshoe Club at 54
Civic Circle in the Beverly
Hills Recreation Park
hosts free horseshoe
pitching to all ages from
8:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days through Sept. 4. In-
struction and horseshoes
are provided.
The Beverly Hills
Horseshoe Club is a spon-


sor of the Florida State
Horseshoe Pitchers'
$1,000 Scholarship Award
and also the John
Reynolds $100 J.R. Memo-
rial Award. The award is
presented to students of
any age up to 18 years.
Money is held in a foun-
dation until they graduate
from high school.
Membership in a horse-
shoe club, although rec-
ommended, is not


required. Students will
need to get a National
Horseshoe Pitchers Asso-
ciation card to play in
tournaments.
Sanctioned tourna-
ments are on the second
Saturday each month,
September through April,
at BHHC.
In April 2014, the Bev-
erly Hills Horseshoe Club
will host the 54th annual
Florida State Champi-


onship Horseshoe Tour-
nament. Students need
only one sanctioned tour-
nament to be eligible to
play in the state tourna-
ment; however, four sanc-
tioned tournaments are
required to be eligible for
the $1,000 scholarship.
Soda and water will be
available at these events.
Call Eileen Fox at 585-
305-1912 or email Eileen
at eileenffox@gmail.com.


Donate unwanted cell phones to help crime victims


Special to the Chronicle

Unwanted cellphones can be do-
nated to The Center for Victim
Rights by dropping them off at Up-
scale Resale, 244 S.E. U.S. 19, Crys-
tal River (phone 352-795-0743).
Wear To Go Consignment, Times
Square Plaza, 3802 E. Gulf-to-Lake


Highway, Inverness (phone 352-344-
9327) also accepts unwanted cell
phones, and the Inglis Police De-
partment assists in this effort.
Drop phones off during operating
hours.
The phones are used as a
fundraiser and so that crime vic-
tims who need them can have a


phone to call 911 if necessary The
center helps victims of crime apply
for victim compensation and assists
with other resources for victims.
This is a free and nationwide
service. Contact the center at 352-
628-6481 or crimevictimhelp@
aol.com. Visit the website at
www.advocate4victims.org.


News NOTES

Readers needed
to honor heroes
A special event, an
Iraq/Afghanistan Fallen
Hero Name Reading, will be
held from 1 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, July 30, at Central
Ridge Library, 425 W. Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering seeks community
volunteers to read the
names of fallen heroes from
Iraq and Afghanistan. Vol-
unteers are asked to read
30 names. A recording of all
names will be played at
local and nationwide memo-
rials and veteran events.
Another reading will take
place from 10:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21,
at Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Call Jim Stepanek at 352-
489-1644 or email IMcrazy
jim@aol.com.
See 'Fashions
Under the Sun'
If you want to see some
of summer's latest fashions,
don't miss the GFWC Crys-
tal River Woman's Club's
"Fashions Under the Sun"
show slated for Saturday,
July 27, at Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club, Hernando.
The luncheon and fash-
ion show begin at 11 a.m.
Tickets are $25 per person
and are nonrefundable.
There will be silent auction
items available and enter-
tainment features young vo-
calist Sophie Robitaille.
The luncheon menu is a
choice of sliced London
broil with mushroom gravy,
or Swiss chicken (boneless
breast of chicken lightly
breaded topped with tomato
and Swiss cheese with a
demi glace) or eggplant
parmesan with pasta. All
are served with salad, rolls,
parsley steamed red pota-
toes and vegetable of the
day. The dessert is a berry
trifle with coffee or tea.
For tickets, call Margie
Harper at 352-795-6790 or
Madeline Markowitz at 352-
794- 0477.
FC library friends
slate book sale
Friends of Floral City Li-
brary will have a mini book
sale beginning at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 3, at the li-
brary, 8360 E. Orange Ave.
The Sizzling Summer
Reading Mini Book Sale
features two-for-one deals
in the biography and paper-
back romance categories,
plus a special red dot sale
with buy-two-get-one-free
with select romance and
summer cooking. Door
prizes throughout the day
will be sponsored by local
merchants: Robin's Country
Kitchen, Pudgee's Hot Dog
Stand, Express Lane Foods
and Florida Artists Gallery
Cafe.
An optional door prize is
a package of two books for
fans of Harlequin Romance
author Charlotte Douglas,
signed by the author.
For more information,
contact Thelma Noble at
folnfc@gmail.com or 352-
726-2431.
Elks plan Purple
Heart breakfast
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693, at 7890 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Ho-
mosassa, will host a break-
fast and program at 9 a.m.
Thursday, Aug. 8, to honor
Purple Heart recipients and
commemorate the 231st
anniversary of the Purple
Heart.
The families of those who
fell in combat and all com-
bat-wounded veterans and
their guests are invited. At-
tendees are requested to
register for the free break-
fast by calling Carrie
Clemons at 352-628-1633


or mailing carriejeanette
clemons@yahoo.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING JULY 20 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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S 37 43 37 27 36 Bale. (In Stereo) 'G-13' Action) Lucas Black. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Shue.(In StereoR'
STZ 30 Magic City "World in *** "The Bourne Supremacy"(2004) Matt ** "Here Comes the Boom"(2012) Kevin Magic City "Think
CTA ) 370 271 370 Changes"'MA' c Damon. (In Stereo)'PG-13' James. Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG' 'MA Like"
Transat Quebec-St- Tee It up Golf Trackside Live: Special The List: The Game The Game Inside the Powerboatng 3 Wide Life
U 36 31 36 Malo With Destination Edition (N) (Live) SEC 365 365 HEAT 'PG'
**,n "Blade 1" (2002, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Sinbad "The Siren"'14' Sinbad Sinbad returns Primeval: New World ** "Dinoshark"
S 31 59 31 26 29 Kris Kristofferson, Ron Perlman.'R' to Basra.'PG' (N) a (DVS) (2010) Eric Balfour.
(TS) 49 23 49 16 19 King IKing Big Bang BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang Sullivan Deon
*fT I 169 53 169 30 35 ** "Major Dundee"(1965, Western) Charlton ** "Gaslight" (1944, Suspense) Charles ** "History Is Made at Night"(1937,
169 53 169 30 35 Heston, Jim Hutton.'PG-13'1 Boyer'NR' (DVS) Romance) Charles Boyer.'NR'B
Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud (In Street Outlaws (In Street Outlaws (In Street Outlaws (In
ITIJ 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14' S )14')4' Stereo)'4'o)14' Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14'
(TLC 50 46 50 29 30 Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER
*.'3 "The Darkest ** "Bulletproof Monk" (2003, Action) Chow *) "The Crow: City of Angels" ** "The Crow: Salvation" (2000)
350 261 350 Hour" (2011)'PG-13' Yun-Fat. (In Stereo)'PG-13' (1996) Vincent Perez.'R' Kirsten Dunst.'R'
S**/ "Red" 2010, Action) Bruce Willis, Morgan ** "2 Fast 2 Furious" (2003, Action) Paul ** "The Fast and the Furious" (2001,
48 33 48 31 34 Freeman.'PG-13' (DVS) Walker, Tyrese.'PG-13' (DVS) Action) Vin Diesel.'PG-13' (DVS)
TOON1 38 58 38 33 Teen Teen "CloudyWitha Chanceof Meatballs"'PG' King/Hill |American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Cleveland |Boon
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Extreme RVs'G' Mysteries-Museum Monumental Myster Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
truTV i 25 55 25 98 55 Wipeout'PG' Wipeout'PG' Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Most Shockin
TVL1 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne IRoseanne Roseanne |TheExes'PG' Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |Raymond
SLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Covert Affairs "Vamos"
SA 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 '14'
7 Pregnant & Dating Pregnant & Dating 14' Pregnant & Dating'14' Pregnant & Dating'14' Pregnant & Dating'14' Pregnant & Dating'14'
117 69 117 "SSweethearts"'14
[WON-A) 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: ClI Funny Home Videos MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Colorado Rockies. (N) (Live) News |Videos


West
, Q9 4
V K 10 8 7 5
S852
* A 9


North
* AK5
V A 6 3
* A J 10 7 4
*QS


07-20-13


East
* J 10 7 6
' 92
SKQ 9 3
* 6 4 3


South

V Q J 4

4 K J 10 7 5 2


Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North
1
1 NT Pass 3 NT


East
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: V 7

I Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Bernard Pivot, a French journalist, inter-
viewer and host of cultural television pro-
grams, said, "You get the feeling that many of
my guests feel that the French language gives
them entry into a more cultivated, more intelli-
gent world, more highly civilized too, with
rules." Several decades ago, French was the
diplomatic language, but it has been replaced
by English. But it still is a beautiful language.
If a bridge player is careful with his entries,
he must be an intelligent player. This is a text-
book example. How should South play in three
no-trump after West leads a fourth-highest
heart seven?
South doesn't like to respond one no-trump,
but such is life occasionally at the bridge table.
(Some Souths would respond three clubs, a
weak jump shift, but I am not a fan of leaping
into the stratosphere with no known fit. Here,
it is true, it works fine because East is unlikely
to find the testing heart lead against three no-
trump.) North, with a good five-card suit, three
aces and one king, is worth the jump-raise to
three no-trump.
South has only five top tricks: two spades,
two hearts (given the opening lead) and one di-
amond. Five more winners can come from the
club suit, but assuming the defender with the
club ace will duck the first round of the suit,
declarer will need a hand entry which is
where?
His only winner outside clubs is in hearts. To
guarantee that hand entry, South must take the
first trick with dummy's heart ace. Then he
drives out the club ace and will eventually
come to 10 tricks: two spades, two hearts, one
diamond and five clubs.
I1jfJ THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Why run Are you blind?
one letter to each square, How could you call
to form four ordinary words. walk? right over theplate!
CARE -

iT .. 1I, Servces, Inc

STHIGF


TOPNUW



CIXTEO
< 1Em <


AFTER HE WALKED HOME
THE WINNING RUN, THE
PITCHER ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer D I III
here: < 0
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: YAHOO ARROW PULSAR UNSEEN
Answer: The steaks at the chef's top-rated restaurant
were undercooked RARELY


ACROSS
1 School stat
4 Runway
hazard
7 accompli
11 Filch
12 Irene of
"Fame"
13 Infrequent
14 Bucked the
system
16 If - a
nickel ...
17 Little kids
18 Org.
19 Genesis
woman
20 Little lie
21 Outmoded
24 Point the way
27 Jackie's
second
28 my lips!
30 Name in
essays
32 Hari
34 One-time


36 Goofy Answer to Previous Puzzle
37 Spurts
39 Winslet and
Capshaw
41 Call - cab LGE COAT SU MO
42 Brownish fruit I E ER 0LE OBI S
43 Actress
Sedgwick P EYIRENEES NILE
45 To any degree R EL E AKY
(2 wds.) IRI ACT
48 Carry on
49 Nutty A G|O DIM H AC K|S
confection THHIREE EC OATT
52 Lagers
53 "- of March" G UNNY DONE
55 Nuisance F N I BUS ED
56 Young boy F I N AM BU E
57 Bastille Day AIB|EISRO A M OA R
season RI EIA M S U L U I V A


DOWN
1 Watchdog's 5 Mine find
warning 6 Ramble
2 Ballad writer around
3 Popular 7 Flying dis
advice giver 8 Long sig
4 Incorrect 9 Persa,


ESP PET
10 Koppel or
Knight
12 Ingenious
c 15 Barely makes
Is ends meet
18 Full of hot -
20 Bona -
(genuine)
21 Cooking
S spray brand
22 Bedouin
23 In -
(as found)
24 Dit partners
25 Thicken
26 Ocean motion
29 Spanish 101
verb
31 Billboards
33 Recliner part
35 Curly tailed
pooches
31 | 38 Ocean
40 Petri dish
content
42 Confronted
43 Cabbage kin
44 Mr. Tanguy
46 Opera box
47 Boor
48 Kanye West
genre
49 Wire gauge
50 Oklahoma city
51 "Bill the
Science Guy"


c( 2013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for Urs


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: My 32-year-
old sister, "Ashley," got
herself into trouble.
From my earliest memories,
she has always lied. She re-
cently got out of drug rehab,
but it doesn't seem to have
helped. My parents
and Ashley's bio-
logical mom consis-
tently bail her out
of trouble, whereas
my other siblings
and I have to learn
from our mistakes.
Ashley is jobless
and collecting gov-
ernment assistance
and is on Facebook
all day long, but
says she is "trying."
Ashley is a manip- ANI
ulative con artist. I MAII
believe there also
may be some men-
tal illness. She is divorced
and has three children, and
her actions are not in their
best interests. I've caught her
in a few lies since rehab, and
I'm at the point where if I see
her again, I may blow up. I
have a big heart, but I cannot
find it in me to forgive her for
the terrible things she has
done and the hurt she has
caused. The stress is causing
me physical pain.
Ashley is still my sister, and
I love her. How do I help her
without getting angry about
the poor decisions she contin-
ues to make? -Ashley's Sis
Dear Sis: You cannot help
Ashley until she is willing to
help herself, and that may
never happen. We under-
stand your anger and frustra-
tion, but you'll feel better if
you can simply accept that
this is who she is. Please con-
centrate your efforts on those
children. They need stability


I
L


and solid role models in their
lives, and you can provide
both. Can you take them to
the park after school? Help
with homework? Cook them a
meal or take them out on the
weekends? Whatever hours
you can give them
will be time well
spent
DearAnnie:
There is a girl in
our group of
friends who is re-
ally starting to
annoy me. She con-
stantly has her
phone in her hand.
She also won't do
certain things be-
cause she's wor-
IE'S ried people will
BOX "judge" her. She
doesn't play any
sports and isn't in
any club, because they're
"lame." Also, she always
needs one friend by her side
so she won't be alone.
She may be insecure, but
it's really starting to make me
resentful. What should I do?
California
Dear California: These
high-maintenance friends
don't realize how exhausting
they are to be around. If you
think you can gently tell her
that her insecurities are get-
ting the best of her, go ahead.
But it's a delicate balance. If
you think she will turn on
you, it might be best to ignore
what you can and spend as
little time in her company as
possible.
DearAnnie: This is in re-
sponse to "Wanting No Re-
grets," who wants to divorce
his wife and go back to his ex-
fiancee.
I was married for 27 years
when I ran into my ex-


boyfriend from high school.
My marriage wasn't horrible,
just boring. My ex was sweet,
wonderful, loving and made
me feel 17 again. We decided
to get divorced and finally be
together. It only took six
months for me to realize what
a horrible mistake I had
made. Everything I disliked
about him in high school was
a thousand times worse. I'd
forgotten his flaws and con-
vinced myself he was perfect.
"Wanting" needs to take off
the rose-colored glasses and
remember why he didn't
marry his ex in the first
place. You were correct when
you told him to try working
through his problems with
his wife. Even if things don't
work out, he should hold off
getting too involved with his
ex. He may realize that he
was lucky to have gotten out
of their engagement the first
time. My ex will always have
a special place in my heart,
but not enough to live with
him. Been There, Done
That

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 C7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CS SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013

Peanuts


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


IT'5 ONLY AN WHY
HOUR BEFORE I BOTHER
BEDTIME
U U ^L.
rin^^ ^^i
:aoi^ An>J.


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

BET OU A SUCKYOU CrIT A F 51RU5BBE7. BA6< IB a l, BUPE-P 7" NO W4m i
ERUSeEA6 6UGY BUMPERS' RU&S.L 64 &U66Y buN EV, fOut
,aL. Tmcs Fw ^ F R.Ufc&P- B EU^WY 6UMN W SW SAS IT
r-_'- ^ UP1

rii &I


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury Flashback


5008MYN 14. Y04
SES YA HUN virwT.









Big Nate

GAME,
GRAMSON Wooo HL
WE
SMOKED
"/ THOSE
ul afiS!






Arlo and Janis -


I OY me rame We
iii HA V HAOOR 6A T
" ,,%


Blondie


WELL..LOOK O', 1OV, MAv/Y
WHO GOT A A NICE BONUS!
SSPE.CIAL .
CAQ0 F OMy



--.. ,


Dennis the Menace


'ITos-E scOUTS ARE LUcWK THEY GET TO SLEEP
IN TEEWOOPS A' THEy vO N'T RAFTATAKE
A BATH ERY PAY!"

Betty


DIrHERs B CO.

M'. Dioll-hc ;.,k-iL lll 1 O 1r L :
I'llld L irllfl 'day \ 3hlLA.
I[jlppy 1ITrlhdly...
Si|ncurlly_ .::-"

| 1tL- [:"HER '--0


SURE ir'S A TVPYWIffTEN,
NOTARIZE9, SECONDHAND
BI~THOAV WISH, SBUT WHEN I
YOU WORK FOR O lH-25, /
yOU T1AKS WHAT YOu r
CAN fr' .-. _6-. ,',


|| ........

i, ", :, "f .


The Family Circus


"We ARE helping' Mommy.
We're staying outside
while she takes a nap."


Frank & Ernest


YOU cWD YOUD O~'rID r
TO KtOME ARAIAOID!


WE HAD A
"PeRAHBORHOO' M TCHS'
PROGRAAAO YEARS'


Today y' MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Conjuring" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG) In 3D. 5:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13) 3:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Pacific Rim" In 3D. (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Turbo" (PG) 1 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG)4:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Conjuring" (R) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.


"Despicable Me 2" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:40 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" In 3D. (PG) 5:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13) 12:50 a.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"The Lone Ranger" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Pacific Rim" In 3D. (PG-13) 4:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 8 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." In 3D. (PG-13) 5:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Turbo" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG) 5 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public L alRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE. sEnba


"Y'HZ ILA SJJ AFZNZ SEAYNAYX


CEZMPZGA-CJYZE WYJZN SGV


XSNFYGI AFZW YG. Y TSGA AL VL UYI,


CSA WLHYZN."


- TYJJYSW F. WSXD


Previous Solution: "The people who weep before my pictures are having the
same religious experience I had when I painted them." Mark Rothko
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 7-20


Garfield


Pickles


HELLO. MY NAME IS 1
INIGO MC rOYA...

NOW.
^^ t^ V~fs,


-^^


Dilbert


THERE'S NOTHIN~C THE ONLY THIM& 1 T WASh'T %_RF&lliri:
r ENJOY MORE PON' LLIE ABOUT I WAS Elr-...k-.,'
THAN WATCHING LT1 IT 15 WHEN CRAZY YOU TO RE-ORIENT
KICDS PLAY / p FA, PARENTS SCIEAM AT YOURSELF JIM ORDER
BASEBALL' YE TAHE COACHES, TO B COME MORE
I LOVE AWARE OF YouPR
S \ASE- SURR7UNp&I .
r"\ T^V6^-' -^-y wtK-'-y ^T^^
y~~~ ~~~ tI-J|[ ^


NL, Y'W


COMICS


I; o





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY,JULY 20, 2013 C9


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tin me


Fax:(35) 53-565 1Tol Fre: 888)852234 1 mail clssiied~chrniceoninecom wesit: ww~chonileolin ~ .1


Is there just one truthful
honest healthy man,
that knows how to treat
a sweet affectionate
lady, he should be be-
tween 70-80 yrs old. if
you meet this criteria let
talk. 352- 344-0052





BEVERLY HILLS
MOVING SALE*
Fri. Sat. Sun. 8am-til
Everything Must Go
Including Misc. Items
Reasonable
77 W. Sugarberry Ln.






BEVERLY

HILLS
Sat-Sun 8am-1pm
Furn, tools, hshld
women's clothing,
342 W. Sugarberry Ln

Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 8/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms, Furn, Cable,
near Publix
$115wk/l420mo
$120wk/430mo
352-563-6428

Fear No-Evil Guns
XDS's-Sheild-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595

FLORAL CITY
Moon Rise Resort
55+ comm 2/2 split plan,
walk in closet, sc. rm,
car port, Ig shed, w/d
$21,900, lot rent $290
608-752-4532/726-2553


FORD
1995 F150 Ford
Truck,FL150,3.0 liters,
Two wheel drive.
200,000 Miles In great
shape, runs Great
$2,000 FIRM Call
352-637-5331 If no an-
swer Leave message
Please
Free to a good home-
Lab/Pit mix puppies
Loving homes
322-1884, 634-1618 or
527-1399

GENERATOR 3.3KW
220/120V. Has never
been used other than
periodically started for
maintenance. $200.00
(352)637-5376

LECANTO
Saturday, 20th 9a-2p
Household items, golf,
dolls, dog crates, bike
& much more
395 S. Easy St. off 44
LIVING ROOM RE-
CLINING PIECES a
large chair-looks like a
wing but footrest folds
under. loveseat each
sides reclines separately
must sell asking
$175.each piece
352-637-2499




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389




Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metal
352-270-4087



1 Green Leather Sofa
Glass Table Top Round
(352) 277-1375
3 CATS,
8 months old
2 males, I female
(352) 476-5382
3 Kittens w/Tiger Stripe
litter trained, approx 3
months old, very cute
Free to good home
(352) 628-6487
Free 20 cucumber
plants, and 8 green
pepper plants
Blooming & Healthy
(352) 527-2085
Free Black Kittens
born on Mother's Day
2 males, 1 female
pls call (352) 428-1233
FREE KITTENS
12 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free Pit Bull
Puppies
10 weeks old
(352) 513-5249
Free Shipping Boxes,
various sizes, small to
medium
(352) 746-5356
Free to a good home-
Lab/Pit mix puppies
Loving homes
322-1884, 634-1618 or
527-1399
Free to Good Home
2 yr. old Cat
w/accessories
(352) 257-8001
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to
go. Bring Shovel, Truck
load avail., Help Your-
self. 352-697-5252
HOT TUB
72" Square, no motor,
uses watering trough or
inground fishpond,
clean no cracks,
ready to load
(352) 621-3333
Large Quanity of
Garden Compost.
You haul.
(352) 746-9861
Pitt Bull Mix
Female
Free to good home
(352) 322-0003
Three Domestic Rats
Free to Good Home
(352) 503-6666




Frog Tog" RainJacket
and Pants, on trail near
barge canal fishing
station (352) 249-7812
$500. REWARD
For the Person or
Location of the Cooler
(352) 212-0315
Black Mouth Curr
Male
Lost of Junglecamp
Turner Camp
REWARD
(352) 860-3050
Found Dog
Boxer Mix, Female
Caramel color
By Grace Bible
Homosassa Area
352-212-5131
Keys Lost
July 12th in the parking
lot of Evergreens in In-
verness, several key on
the ring a Toyota key
and store discount card
Ask for Hubert
(352)344-8123


Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9,


structures
4wi 4 wa withstand
120m h
Installations by BriancBcI2s5ss3 wi 1 h

&aed a. 352-625-7519


'FWREEte ,iES rni

Permit And I lli i
Engineering Fees !
SUp to $200 value I T
-. .-J- ......

SSiding Soffit Fascia Skirting *Roofovers *Carports* Screen Rooms *Decks *Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


6/29, in Kenwood Oaks
small, grey toned female
approx 5 Ibs & 12 yrs.
old, answers to Gloria
(352) 628-1989
LOST IN CITRUS
SPRINGS "RUSTY"
Large Male, Fluffy
Orange Cat, Much
Loved and Greatly
Missed.Very Friendly.
IF FOUND PLEASE
CALL 352-201-9149
Lost Peacock
1 still missing on Hwy
41 & 491 on Trail
Hernando
(352)247-5397
Lost White Bichon
12 yrs., Name Snowie
Inverness Area
East of the trail
(352) 637-9685
Male Min Pin
Chihuahua mixed,
male, 7 9yrs old
REWARD
James Ct. Beverly Hills
(352) 400-6733
Medicine Container
of Jewelry
small clear container
w/heirloom jewelry
very sentimental!!
Handsome Reward
pls call(352) 419-8286
One Checkbook
w/several credit cards
and one bag of cash
taken from vehicle on
Stage Coach Trail in
Floral City. If found
please call Detective
McIntyre CCSO @
352-476-4164
or (352) 726-5794
UPDATE
Large Anatolian
Shepherd Male, cream,
BIk ears & nose,
chipped,1001bs lost on
4/26/13 in Floral City,
S.Turner Ave/ Stage-
Coach rd. Last Seen on
7/3/13 off of East
spanish trail, Floral
City REWARD
OFFERED
(352) 220-2540
Women's Bulova
Wrist watch, yellow/gold
band, BIk face, sm dia-
mond lost at outback
steak house on 7/11/13
(352) 860-0123




Black German Shep-
ard in Inverness area
RTe 41.(352) 212-5736
Found 3 Small Dogs
approx. 6 mo. old
Tan & white, 1 male
2 females Off 495
Dunnelon/Crystal Riv.
(727) 871-1290
Found: White cat with
tiger markings. 495/488
area. Please call
352-563-5259
FOUND-TIGER CAT
Male Brown/Grey with
black bottoms to paws
on Bay Meadows Drive,
Inverness.
Call (352) 419-4978






DEN 1 I S T R Y

Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS
to our practice.


vvEL.uIvicE
Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922

0AE SOC/S





-f,


PET ADOPTION
CANCELED
FOR
Saturday,July 20,
NEXT ADOPTION
PET SUPERMARKET
July 27 10a-12N
(352) 527-9050 to
rehome small dogs
www.ahumanesocie
typetrescue.com




2 Cemetery Lots
2 Openings & Closing
Fero Memorial Gardens
Over Looking the
Garden of Honor
Package normally sells
for $7,980 asking
$5,500 (352) 746-0945
2 Cemetery Lots
2 Openings & Closing
Fero Memorial Gardens
Over Looking the
Garden of Honor
Package normally sells
for $7,980 asking
$5,500 (352) 746-0945


package available
at Fero Memorial
Gardens Cemetary.
Includes open/close.
Located inside build-
ing. Package nor-
mally sells for $1700,
will sell for $995.
Call or text Ron DuBois
(321) 684-9987




Exp. Paralegal

Workers compensa-
tion or social
security disability
exp. preferred
Email resume:
Lawoffdeu@
embarqmail.com

F/T Receptionist

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person at:
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Btw. 9a-12P, Mon-Fri











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





AVANTE
At Inverness

LPN, FULLTIME

Part time RN
MDS Coordinator

Please apply online
At
Avantecenters.com

Entry level
Ophthalmic/
Medical
Assistant

preparing exam
rooms, charts, greet-
ing patients, escorting
to exam room and
testing. 3-5 days per
week.
Apply in person to:
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

FIT P/T
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST

For Primary Care
office in
Homosassa
FAX RESUME TO:
352-628-1120

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885




Executive Asst.

Email Resume to:
resume2013ncf
.@amail.com




Auto Technician

Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
AUTOMOTION
Floral City
352-341-1881

EXP CNC
LATHEIMILL
Operator/Set-UP

G code familiar
Aerospace Shop
352-422-6086







NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim.
Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124AUnit4
Wildwood


EXP. MECHANIC

Needed. Busy shop
since 1977, Apply at
Steves Auto Repair
(352) 726-1208

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH

Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness






















II i _,--] 1 ,





















Office Help

with light labor for
Window Treatment

customer service,
some Exp. Preferred
apply @ 1657 W
Gulf to Lk, Lecanto




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.I

for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest

application




Thrift Store
Manager

Must have retail
experience Operation

aspects of a
nCon-profit org.ce

















Fax or email resume
sippperd@






MEDICAL BILL-
ING TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HSn




















PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547






SPRING HILL
CLASSES
Thi s Sorea C




















COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
o AUGUST 12, 2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
rAUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
r*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

SKIN & NAILS



International
School of Beauty
THERAPY


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATEAPPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
AUGUST 12, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
a-AUGUST 12,2013

MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
SEPTEMBERR 3, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





USED CAR LOT
* FOR SALE or LEASE *
| Well Established |
909 NE 5th St (44)
L (352) 46'-45'8




PHONOGRAPHS
Portable, Tube type.
1963 Motorola, 1956
Columbia. $75/both
(352) 344-5283
Star Wars Star trek
collectibles, over 1000
pieces, must see to ap-
preciate, mostly new,
located in Floral City
(352) 726-6681

A


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onfy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
VICTROLA'S
1920 Crank-up.
2 portable, 1 table. All
work good. $125 each
or $325 for all.
(352) 344-5283




3 TON AC Unit
for Doublewide
Mobile Home
$750.
(352) 637-3482
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER Whirlpool white
looks good works per-
fect $100 90 day war-
ranty 352-503-7210
Generator
Heavy Duty, Generac
8,550 surge watts,
never used
$350. final
(352) 382-3420
HOT POINT ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 White.
Older model. Works
great. 30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504
Kenmore
Char Broil gas grill
$70.00 Call
352-6374849.
KENMORE
over stove white
microwave $75.00,
dishwasher $125.00,
352-637-4849
RCA ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 Almond
color. Older model. 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
Both Kenmore, 27' cu
side by side white $225,
white self cleaning ele
stove w/ ceramic top
$175.00 352-6374849
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER
$100 In perfect work-
ing condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352-263-7398
WASHER/DRYER
KENMORE STACKED
COMBO. HD,27" WIDE
$375.00 352-513-5400


FILE CABINET WITH
LOCK like new
condition,wood grain,
call 4 details 3@$15.00
each 352-344-2321
FILING CABINET 2
DRAWER OPEN TOP
FOR UNDER
COUNTER Good condi-
tion. $5.00 563-6410
FILING CABINET 4
drawer steel 15 X 25 X
52 $35.Three available
2 no lock, 1 no key.
(352)563-6410
JC PENNY CLOSING
Selling Store Fixtures,
Office Furniture,
and Mannequins
Starts 7-12-13
Crystal River MALL




MOECKER
AUCTIONS
Public Auction
Tuesday, July 30 @
10am
2230 Jog Rd,
Greenacres, Fl
33415
401k Exchange Inc.
Fully equipped call
center: computers,
servers, phone
system,2008 Toyota
Scion xB Wagon &
more! Details at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
15%BP, $100 ref.
cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




2005 Craftsman
Generator,
5,600 watt run 8,600
watt surge
$250.
(352) 628-5371
Air Compressor
2HP, Craftsman 26gal
vertical tank, like new
$175 (352) 246-3500




32 LCD-HD TV
Flat Screen, Emerson,
still in org. packaging,
$200.
(352) 382-0387
SAMSUNG DVD
PLAYER $5.,
PANASONIC VCR $5.,
Magnavox VCR/DVD
$10. (352)563-6410
SONY 27" TRINATRON
TV XV27X8R55 Needs
ext. speakers Works
well $25.00
(352)563-6410
TV PHILIPS
MAGNAVOX 19" also
Hitachi 13" They work.
$5.00 each
(352)563-6410
TV STAND Media stand
for up to 70" TV, good
cond. $50.00
352-382-2591
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $80
352-613-0529
YAMAHA Yamaha AV
receiver, center
speaker, 2 tower
speakers, excellent
cond.,$250.00
Call 352 382-2591



ALUMINUM DOOR
DOUBLE GLASS AND
SLIDE WINDOW 31" X
79" $50 352-527-1193
METAL DOOR FRONT
ENTRY 36" X 79" $45
352-527-1193
METAL FRONT DOOR
WITH WINDOWS AND
LOCKS 31" X 79" $45
352 527 1193
TEN 36 X 62 INCH
WINDOWS Aluminum
single pane clear glass
screens locks You re-
move $80 341-0450
Used Entry Metal
Doors with new
frames, 2 sizes,
good cond. $65 ea,
352 410-6823 Home
352-484-9066 cell



CORNER COMPUTER
DESK & HUTCH
53X53" May need disas-
sembly to remove. $20.
(352)563-6410
DELL COMPUTER
2006 141N INSPIRON
100.00 352-212-7788
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
PRINTER 2009Canon
with Copier, Scanner &
Ink. $75
628-3899
UNUSED BETA
MACHINE & TAPES
unused beta machine
& tapes
$100 795-2044


XBOX360 HALO3 LEG-
ENDARY Game Set.
Complete, NM
Homosassa $60 Firm.
407-766-2335
XBOX360 ROCK BAND
GAME 1 Complete,
used. Homosassa.
407-766-2335 $50.00
firm.



7 Piece Hamton Bay
patio set, w/6 chairs
beige cushions, 2
swivel, tlb is rectangle
with glass in the middle
exec cond.
$300 249-7651
PATIO BAR SET Five
piece bar set. Bar and
4 stools. Mesh covering
on stools and front of
bar. Some Rust. $50.00
Call 352-382-7042
White Patio Furniture
Table 72" Long w/6 Ig.
chairs. Excellent Cond.
Top of the line! $225.
(352) 489-0818



2 BAR STOOLS
RATTAN $75.
BEIGE Fabric seat
Seat 24" Back 35"
352 249-3231
Antique Furniture
(settee couch 1890's,
dressing Tablel932)
Fire Place, Kit China
cab, Safari Decor, 5pc
wicker set, hall tables, tv
Cab, straddel lounger,
coffee & end table,high
quality items 746-0011
Beautiful Stand
Behind Bar, Walnut,
with corian top,
411 ft. H.& 51 hftW
2 bar stools $700
(352) 726-3731


BLACK HIGH TOP
WOOD TABLE/4 HIGH
CHAIRS Table is 64-48
wide. Folds to 48
round. table has shelf
on bottom with storage
unit. excellent condition.
$300.00 352-503-7281
Black Lacquer
Bedroom Set. dresser
w/ mirror, chest, night
stand full sz. headbrd.
mattress & springs
$200. (352) 637-3541
CHINA CABINET
Walnut with glass front 3
drawers 60's era excel-
lent condition $90
352-249-6227
Coffee table and 2 end
tables, light wood, glass
tops, $65 OBO
(352) 341-5020
(352) 476-4340
COFFEE TABLE wood
Caribbean style casual
carved detailed pecan
finish 52x28 $35.
352-270-3909
DINETTE SET
42" octagon shape with
large center leaf. 4
chairs with coasters.
very good condition.
352-382-1154
Dinning Room Table
with 6 chairs, glass top
11/2 yr old $325 OBO
(352) 270-8540 Leave
Message
DRESSER oak dresser
with mirror, no scars
$85.00 352-513-5400
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT Cherry colorfits
27" TV,glassdoor for
DVD player etc.
Excellent.$50 746-7232
Furniture Set Couch &
loveseat, green &
chair/ burgandy trop-
ical all matching very
good cond. $500. obo
(352) 563-1185
0e High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
KING SIZE MATTRESS
Posture Comfort pillow
top king sized mattress.
Perfect shape. $50.00
PH. 382-2942
LIVING ROOM RE-
CLINING PIECES a
large chair-looks like a
wing but footrest folds
under. loveseat each
sides reclines separately
must sell asking
$175.each piece
352-637-2499
LIVING ROOM SET
Sofa,love seat,coffee
tablewall table,2 end
tables.Lamps included.
Exc. cond. $235. Call
352-382-1154
LOVE SEAT Like new
light colors/flowers
75.00 Linda 341-2271
LOVESEAT & COUCH
W/ 2 recliners. Beige
micro fiber, Very good
cond. $450 obo; 1913
WHITE Trendle Sewing
machine $275 obo
(352) 212-8594
MOSAIC TOP TABLE
Bottom is metal and
used as a magazine
holder, $75,
352476-7516


69 7 1 5 42 83 3
324 968 7 5 6 1

815 623947

1 3 817 6 2 4 5 9

9 76|5 4 8 1 3 2

5 4 23 1 9 87 6

759 4 31628
263 895714
4 8 1 276 3 9 5


CLASSIFIED







ClO SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013



lnelass& hrome STONES Free Qu
Coffee Table with round Scalloped S
Two Matching End 352-746-5421
Tables, Two Lamps,
SOLD AS A SET
asking $350.
(352) 400-9070
Queen Bedroom Set BEVERLY HIL
off white,good cond., Fri & Sat 8a-2
incl. matt, frame, head- 2 Family yard s
board, dresser, night Quality kit, dining
stand $450, Dinnet set ing room items.
4 chairs w/wheels, tan netware, Mix-m(
$450 352-628-4254 and Much Mor
CAN DELIVER 4 Meadowdakl
QUEEN HEADBOARD, BEVERLY HIL
DRESSER MOVING SAL
W//MIRROR, NIGHT Fri. Sat. Sun. 8c
STAND, WHITE, LIKE Everything Must
NEW $300.00 Including Misc. I
352-513-5400 Reasonable
Queen Size 77 W. Sugarberr
Sofa Sleeper
Tropical Print,
great cond. $200.
(352) 257-1794
RATTAN DINING 95 m oV .-.l
ROOM SET Glass oval BEVERI
top,6 chairs, 3 bar
stools, and 2 piece HILLS
china cabinet. $500 HILLS
takes all! (770)831-0925 Sat-Sun 8am-1
Leave message if no Furn, tools, hsl
answer women's cloth
SECRETARY/DESK. 342 W. Sugarber
3 display shelves. 3 CITRUS SPRIN
drawers. Good condi- MOVING SAL
tion. Circa 1930's. Fri. & Sat. 9a-l p R
Asking $195 527-6709 mower, tool bx.
SOFA BED bench, garage
SABnets. Too much t,
Floral pattern sofa w/ full e2969 W YORKSHI
size bed. 2 free end ta-
bles w/ purchase. $150. CRYSTAL RIV
Can deliver, you must BIG SALE
unload(352) 422-5622. Saturday, 20th 8
Solid Oak Dinning Set Furn., gold & si
table, chairs, & hutch jewelry, women
beveled glass, lighted children clothi
$600 (Crystal River) collectibles wallp.
(989)-627-2719 borders, antique
CAN DELIVER and MORE.
TABLE LAMPS. SET Behind Olive T
OF 3, WHITE, FOR A Restaurant, US
BEDROOM $35.00 MULTIPLE UNI
352-513-5400 CRYSTAL RI\
TABLE, YARD SALE
COUCH/SERVER,1 & CAR WASI
DRAWER,2 CABINETS, HARLEY DAVIDS
OLD $45.00 Rt 19
352-513-5400 Sat July 20th @
Wall Unit, whitewash Fund raiser fort
oak, w/lights $100. Susan G Kome
Two Used Stainless 3Day, 60 mile w
Sinks $10. ea. Come get your
(352)586-8415 washed while bros
WINGBACK CHAIR for "deals"!
1940's style fair Dunnellor
condition very
comfortable $30 Fri, Sat, 8am to
352-249-6227 REDECORATIN
352-49-227 furniture, art,ran
Wooden Rocking bowflex, & mor
Chair, 5731 W Riverbc
Ivory with cushions Rd.
excel, cond. $65.
(352) 564-9440 FLORAL C11


16 ft Aluminum Exten-
sion Ladder $30 and
1300 PSI Pressure
Washer $50 Call
352-726-6728 Mon-Fn
10AM to 6PM
10" Poulan Pole Saw
$50, Craftsman Leaf
BlowerNacuum $20
Call 352-726-6728
Monday thru Fnriday
10AM to 6PM
AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman Mower
6.75 HP 22" Cut self
propelled w/bagger,
and mulch blade,
like new $195
(352) 527-1193
ELECTRIC WEED
EATER, STICK EDGER
& CORDLESS WEED
EATER $60
352-613-0529
FOR SALE 16" HOME-
LITE CHAIN SAW $60
Manual Pole saw $20
Call 352-726-6728
Monday thru Fnriday
10AM to 6PM
Husqvarna self pro-
pelled lawn mower
with Honda engine.
Bag or mulch. New in
2013 $275.00 Phone
(352)503-9599
MOWER
Sulkey, dual wheels,
new batt w/ 2yr warr.
and I rototiller. $900
OBO 352-795-2454 or
352-726-8298
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944


a
arter
tones
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& liv-
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a-til
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Riding
work
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River
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HI
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9am
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IG!
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TY


Fri, Sat & Sun 8a-3p
Huge Yard Sale!
Power tools, antique
tools, household
items, plants & misc.
11739 S Pleasant
Grove Rd. 14 mi South
of Stage Coach Rd.
FLORAL CITY
MOVING SALE *
Sat. 20th, Starts 7am
Bikes, more, dog
cages, tackle, furni-
ture, lots of Misc items
7206 Duval Island Dr.
FLORAL CITY
Sat-Sun 9am-4pm
Tools, books, keyboard
11150 S Power Ave

HOMOSASSA
INSIDE SALE
Sat. July 20th
6:30am to 3pm
baby stuff, electronics
basketball hoop,
furnithure,clothes,
much more!
5540 W. Cagney
Loop

Homosassa
Sat, 8am to 4pm
Sun, 9am to 3pm
furn, lots of misc. items
8541 W Kipling Lane

MOVING



INVERNESS
Saturday 7/20
8am to 2pm
household, tools, Sports
Memorabilia, Coca
Cola Collectibles
324 Camelia Ave.
INVERNESS
Saturday 9a-Ilp
Futon twin bunk beds,
toys/kids stuff, 5 pc
bedroom set & more!
4057 E Walker St. off
Independence Hwy.
220-1008


HOMOSASSA
Saturday 20th, 8A.- 1P.
88 Oak Village Blvd. N.
LECANTO
Saturday, 20th 9a-2p
Household items, golf,
dolls, dog crates, bike
& much more
395 S. Easy St. off 44
MOVING SALE!!
8445 N Firefly Ter Cryl
Rvr Sat 20th, Sun 21st
9-6




OZELLO
Friday July 19th
8am to 1pm
Saturday July 20th
8am to 11am
Everything Must Go!
$1 designer
women's & baby
clothing, shoes,
furn, china, house-
wares, art, books,
rugs, toys, too much
to list! Liquidating
the rest of:
Katiesisland
treasures.com
ACCEPTS MC/Visa
14434 W Ozello Trail
7 mi. down on left




BEVERLY HILLS
Sat & Sun 9am-3pm
tools, furn, sm apple, ect
346 W. Crestmont Ct

CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE MOVING
SALE!
July 18th thru 21st
8am-4pm
Entire Household
furn, appl, garage
full of miscellaneous
EVERYTHING MUST
GO! MAKE OFFERS!
961 N Hollyvwood Cir

Solid Wood Day Bed
with all access & Matt.
Chaise w/wood trim,
Oriental chest 31.5 X
75.5 Art, misc.382-0544




!!!! LT225/75R 16
TIRE!!!! Good Year
Light Truck Great
Shape 90% Tread
ONLY 60.00 464-0316
2 DEER ANTLERS-
large 10 point on board,
$25, smaller 6 point,
$12. 352-628-0033
3 RING BINDERS like
new,(25)all for $50 or
$2-$4ea. No wanting on
binders,exc.
352-746-4160
4 BOAT TRAILER
RIMS GALVANIZED
13" 5 LUG $25 each
352-527-1193
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, $50
628-0033
06 CARAVAN RIMS 4
16" 5 LUG 1 CRACKED
$35 each 352 527 1193
6 LARGE OPEN END
WRENCHES- 1-3/8
inches to 2 inches, $40.
352-628-0033
23 PINE WOOD
HEARTS/BUNNIES/
TEDDY BEARS $25 TO
PAINT ARTS @
CRAFTS 419-5981
69 Jigsaw Puzzles,
$39 obo
352-746-3799
352-726-9472
3/4" DR. SOCKET
WRENCH SET- 21 pcs.,
ratchet, breaker bar, ex-
tensions, Ex., $40
352-628-0033
AIR PURIFIER
PERMALIFE, MODEL
30546/30547
LIKE NEW $50.00
352-513-5400
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BREADMAN BREAD
MACHINE Makes up to
2 lb. loaf, includes hard
bound recipe book. VG
Cond. $30 746-7232
BURTON STOVE TO
GO LIKE NEW $20
PLUG IN CAR 12V
OUTLET/LIGHTER
419-5981


Boxspring and Mattress
Set clean! $50
860-2475
CAST IRON KETTLE
Vintage hanging cast
iron camp fire kettle with
lid. Good Condition.
$40 746-7232
Chevy Silverado
Aluminum Running
Boards, great shape
ONLY $100.00
352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra
for 4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY
$80 352-464-0316
CHICAGO ELECTRIC
ANGLE GRINDER- 4",
10,000 RPMs, 20 new
mason &metal wheels,
$25. 628-0033
CHILDREN'S IRON
HEADBOARD Brand
New Metal Headboard,
$7 (352)465-1616
CHINA BUFFET LIGHT
INSIDE W/GLASS 6'6
1/2H 50 1/2L
PECAN WOOD 85.00
OBO 352-212-7788
CORNING WARE
ELECTRIC COFFEE
POT- 10 cup, cornflower
pattern, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
Creative Memory
Scrap Book Kit $125.
Vertical Knee
raise/chin dip exc.
equip. $125.
352-586-8415
Cress Kiln
ceramics, molds
& misc. supplies
$350.
(352) 586-8415
DOG CARRIER XLG
Petmate pet porter
(airline) 40"L 27"W 30"H
Excellent & clean $60.
352-270-3909
EASY RIDER
WOMAN'S FITTED
LEATHER JACKET M
LIKE NEW $50.00
352-513-5400
EASY RIDER
WOMAN'S LEATHER
PANTS W/STRETCH
SIDES LIKE NEW M
$35.00 352-513-5400
FOLDING GUITAR
STANDS- black,
excellent condition, $10
ea., 352-628-0033
GALVESTON
ACOUSTIC GUITAR-
Model WJ 750, blue
color, nice condition,
$30. 352-628-0033
GAS GRILL WITH SIDE
BURNER,PROPANE
TANK & COVER $60
352-613-0529
GENERATOR 3.3KW
220/120V. Has never
been used other than
periodically started for
maintenance. $200.00
(352)637-5376
GENERATOR
Brand New,3550 watts,
$500. HITACHI KOKI
10" rounded blade,
255mm Compound
Saw $100.
(352) 726-1858
Gerstner Snap on Top
Tool Box 1956, 8
drawer, 100 to 300
machinist tools $585. 8"
4 Golf Cart Tires, &
$80. (315) 466-2268
GRANDMOTHER
CLOCK looks good but
needs a little repair only
$75.00 352 464 0316
GUINEA PIG/RABBIT
CAGE Plastic base with
wire top.40"L*18"W*20"
Plus bowl,bottle,hutch.
$50 746-7232
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
LARGE MOUTH BASS
NATURAL SKIN
MOUNT- 8-1/2 Ibs, 1974
fish from St Johns
River, $25. 628-0033
MISSING CAT Long
haired tabby. Disap-
peared off of Emerald
Oaks in Crystal River
352-302-7905
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
MOVIE/SLIDE PRO-
JECTOR TABLE $60
ACME LITE VINTAGE
1959 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981


CLASSIFIED



Mowen Kit Faucet
Hot/Cold no sprayer
almost new $25, Solid
Oak wood sm desk 4
side drawers, 1 top
middle drawer, $50
(352) 419-5124
NEW CAR COVER fits
cars 15'1"to 16'8".ln the
box only $20.00
352-464- 0316 or
352- 464- 0316
PAPER SHREDDER
NEW IN THE BOX
shreds all your impt.
papers.prevent identy
theft 35.00 464-0316
PARAFFIN BATH
HoMedics Para spa
Plus Paraffin Bath Heat
Therapy System.VG
cond. $40 746-7232
POOL TABLE
pool table $100
795-2044
PROTECH MTCYL
MANS LEATHER
JACKET, LIKE
NEW,SIZE 46 $70.00
352-513-5400
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok
condition, $50
(352)465-1616
SCHWINN THRASHER
YOUTH BIKE-
16" tires, chrome frame,
hand/pedal brakes, Ex+,
$65. 352-628-0033
TIRES 4 WildcatTires
255/65R16 for 16 Inch
rims,$100 for all 4
Mameblueeyes
@yahoo.com




TYPEWRITER (ELEC)
w/all features.Carrying
case & owners manual.
Xtras like new $50
352-746-4160




4 Wheeled Walker
with brakes and
seat ONLY $70.00
352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
Aluminum Walker both
have adjustable legs
20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COM-
MODES, EXCELLENT
COND. 2 available.
$15.00 each
(352)563-6410
Lg.Wheelchair
electric, runs well
$350. BBQ grill
w/almost full tank gas
good cond. $70
(352) 341-7718
Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464-0316
NEW 4" Toilet Seat
Riser, makes it much
easier to get up
ONLY 20.00
352-464-0316
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps
to the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
TRANSPORT
W CHAIR (SMALL
WHEELS) good shape
with footrests only 90.00
464-0316
WHEELCHAIR WITH
FOOTRESTS. GOOD
CONDITION. $80.00
352-513-5400




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PLUS USED
CASIO LD50 ELEC-
TRIC DRUMS $80
352-601-6625
"NEW" TRAVEL
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/BAG,STRINGS,
STRAP&MORE$80
352-601-6625
5 STRING BANJO
W/RESONATOR
PLAYS GREAT!
"JAMS"OR LESSONS
$90 352-601-6625


CITRUS COUNTY (FL)D CHRONICLE


M-Audio Key tudlo 49
key controller $10.
352-419-4464
PIANO LESSONS


'51
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
Small Kids
Guitar $5.
352-419-4464
Tenor
Saxophone
$400.
(352) 257-3542
Yamaha psr-6 music
keyboard $10.
352419-4464
Yamaha YPT-210
music keyboard $15
352-419-4464



2 STOOLS LIGHT
WOOD 291/2"H $12
each 352-527-1193
FAUX WOOD BLINDS
WHITE (4) 34 1/2"X 64"
AND (4) 51 1/4" X 64"
$15 EACH
352-527-1193
HAND PAINTED
BENCH with Drawers,
Beautiful, $75
352-476-7516
HOOVER
WINDTUNNEL
VACUUM U6634-900
Bagless works well.
$45. (352)563-6410
JIFFY CLOTHES
STEAMER MODEL J2
Works well. $25.
(352)563-6410
NEW BATHTUB Tan 6
ft/call for e-mail picture
Linda 341-2271
ROTISSERIE
ELECTRIC RONCO
SHOWTIME & BBQ
Works well. $10.
(352)563-6410
TABLE LAMP White
base w/raised boat &
sea gulls 28"H Unique!
pd $150. sell $25.
352-270-3909
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529
Two(2) ASHLEY END
TABLES Hand Carved,
$100 352476-7516
VACUUM RAINBOW
R1A650 W/POWER-
HEAD & HOSES
Works well. $25.
(352)563-6410



ELLIPTICAL
COMPACT SIZE
works fine, 100.00
352 464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only $90.00
352 464 0316
GOLD GYM WEIGHT
BENCH ,olympic 451b
bar. 2 451b plates, 4
251b, 4 10b, 4 51b plates
with weight tree.150.00
352-726-9964
ROWING MACHINE
Stamina rowing
machine, like new,
$75.00 352-382-2591
TREADMILL TX-400
w/incline & extra fea-
tures excellent condition
$90 352-249-6227
WELDER PRO 9940
WEIGHT SYSTEM Like
new adjustable multiple
stations, sacrifice
$200.00. Must pick up.
352 527 7732.



1986 15 HP Evanrude
Motor, $450.
1995 Club Car 36v,
with top, good parts,
$150. (315) 466-2268
26" Men's Folding
Mountain Bike, 6
shimano shifter, like
new condition $125
(352) 344-5933
BICYCLE BOYS SPI-
DERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529


HERMAN
7-20 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2013

"To avoid a repetition of yesterday,
I bought you birthday cards for
the next three years."
'


Dunne llon
r, i u i i % T PI

Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS


WELCOME
Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Flonrida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922




P L E X U S




Ambassador

Samantha

Haven
Independent
Plexus Slim
Weight Loss I love help-
ing people get healthy
and motivated. I'm so
THANKFUL that I was
showed this by a Dear
friend:)
The products have
changed my LIFE
If you would like more
information call me or
send me a text at
352-536-4025
Visit my web site at
www.plexusslim.
com/haven
Can't wait to hear from
you :)


ANNA LISE
AND ZOEY
Anna Lise and Zoey
are 8 y.o. sisters, lost
their home when their
family moved. Beauti-
ful spayed blue/white
Bulldog mixes, amaz-
ingly sweet, gentle,
easy to handle,
housebrkn, get along
w/other dogs & like
children, are playful &
full of life. Please give
these older girls a
chance for new life.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


BEELA
Beela, 2-3 y.o. Border
Collie/ Lab Retriever
mix, surrendered
because owners could
not afford. She is
spayed, microchop-
ped, housebrkn, very
affectionate & gentle.
Walks quietly on
leash. Very calm &
beautiful, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
people. Needs new
home after losing
hers. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
XDS's-Sheild-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"w'th a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On ly$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944


re *s ry


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


KAT BUNN
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ years
Specializing in hair
color,highlights, fashion
colors-$10 off highlights
with ad. now offering
hair extent ions.
Call for an appointment
352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com







SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports,
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518







JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Al HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
" FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
& FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Lawncare & More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 8/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447




CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820
House Keeping
Services weekly,
biweekly, or monthly
352-344-3432

NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




HOME INSPECTIONS
CRS CONTRACTING
SERVICES LLC,
Lic # HI 1392, 414-8693




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $20
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131




A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135











Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/Insured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


'LT'ERLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofin- Inc. com
Lic# Ccc1327656 /lns.
**352-639-1024"**




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a I-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


Carol's



Airport TransPort
352-746-7595
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service

Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Tnmming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Tnrim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825

& -







TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


I Pt





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 C11


AKC MINIATURE
SCHNAUZER PUPS!
Lovingly raised in my
home. Health Cert, 1st
shots, dewormed, tails
docked & declawed.
Black & Silver: 1 male, 2
females. Salt & Pepper:
1 male; 1 female. $600,
cash discount!
(352)419-4723










Georgia
Georgia, 2-3 y.o. Bull-
dog mix, cinnamon
red in color,
HW-negative, house-
brkn, gets along
w/other dogs, walks
well on leash. Listens
carefully when spoken
to. She is a good girl,
appears to love her
human friends, gentle
& calm. Great person-
ality, good as com-
panion dog. Call Jo-
anne @
352-795-1288











HONCHO
Honcho, 3-y.o. Amer-
ica bulldog mix, had
eye surgery for Entro-
pion, now fully recov-
ered & needs a home.
Has been fostered,
mom says he's great
dog, very affectionate.
Neutered, gets along
w/other dogs, good
w/kids. Loves activity
& exercise, fenced
yard is best. Big
strong boy.
Call Kathy @
352-895-1218


LAYLA
Layla, a 2-y.o.
spayed Shepherd/
Terrier mix,
affectionate,
leash-trained,
housebrkn, good
w/other dogs. Has a
beautiful shiny
short-haired coat.
Weight about 50 Ibs.
Gentle, good
w/people. Loves to
have treats & sits
nicely. Adoption fee
$30, includes spay,
chip, tests &
vaccinations.
Call Michelle @
352-302-2664. "






&44




MILO
Milo, a handsome
2 1/2y.o. neutered
Husky/Lab mix,
beautiful white
color, w/one blue
eye & one brown
eye. Has a short
coat, easy to care
for, & is a strikingly
good-looking dog.
Lots of energy &
needs an active
home or large
securely fenced
yard to play. Gets
along w/other dogs,
no cats. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.











NANUKE
Nanuke, a 2-3 y.o.
neutered Lab/
Terrier/Weimaraner,
about 65 lbs.,
beautiful golden
brown velvety coat,
short-haired, gets
along w/other dogs,
no cats.
Heartworm-negative.
Lovesto ply in
water, is gentle and
calm. A big, strong
dog, best with
fenced yard, loves
treats & walks.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


2 Baby Guinea Pigs
females $10 each
(352) 634-4109
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
4 pups left.
All male.
First set of shots.
Asking $200 firm.
First come first serve.
352-201-8004
invisible Dog Fence,
with dog collier and con-
trols, model #LP 300
4 new collier
batteries $125
(352) 795-4674


SALLY
Sally, a 7-y.o. beauti-
ful golden-brown
Vizla mix, weight 48
lbs. Gentle, socia-
ble, very affection-
ate, sensitive. Good
w/people & other
dogs, not cats. Very
intelligent w/above
average training
ability. Could be
part of active family
or quiet home with
daily walks. Fee $30
includes spay, chip,
tests, vaccinations.
Call Judy
@352-503-3363.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
Miniature Poodles
White, 2 females
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Ask about my Summer
Discount,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827









TUCKER
Tucker, a 2-y.o. Ger-
man Shepherd mix,
neutered, HW nega-
tive, microchipped,
housebrkn, UTD on
shots, wt 54 Ibs.
Needs to be only dog
w/single person or
couple, needs fenced
yard w/room to run,
but prefers to be in-
side dog. Loves his
human friends. Walks
well on leash. Cur-
rently fostered, mom
says he's a great
watchdog, very alert.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
or Dianne @
352-419-5880.




Male Goat For Sale
$50.
(352) 628-4750


4-



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
up


INVERNESS, FL
Move in Special!
1 month free/w
one year lease.
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1
bath@$350 inc H20.
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $450.mo., 1st, 1st
& sec. 352-795-9738

DUNNELLON/488
2/2, Lg Lot, exec. clean,
CHA $540/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970

HERNANDO
(No Pets) 3BR/2BA,
All Appi's $595.mo
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815

HOMOSASSA
2/1'2, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019

YANKEETOWN
2/2 New W/D. $600mo
moves you in no dep
needed.15 minutes from
power plant. Call Paul
(407) 579-6123




$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182

ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181





HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, 16x16
workshop, Must-see!
$64,000 (352) 621-0192

I BUY USED HOMES

(352) 490-6101

LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, mncl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171

Luxury home
tape/texture
crown molding
solid wood cabinets
& much more
$495.00 month
(352) 490-6100

Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great nursery or blue-
berries. Asking 124,900
352-364-2985

Palm Harbor Homes
New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,900
TEXT: STORE 126A
TO: 313131
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60





INVERNESS
Move in Special!
1 month free w/one
year lease.

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details





FLORAL CITY
3/2 Dblwide, on Canal
to River & lakes,
need TLC,$35,000.
obo 352-726-9369





For Sae %t

HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Handy Man Special,
apprv. for FHAfinancing
$45,900 352-795-1272


For Sae %

Hernando
DWMH on land,Ready
to move in, Call me for
more information
352-795-1272


Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5% park like acres,
owner financing avail.
59k (941) 778-7980

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




DRASTICALLY
REDUCED
OAK POND MH
ESTATE (Hwy 44 E)
Inverness,
2/2 Lovely home turn
key ready to move in
H(352) 726-0348
C(352) 586-3662
FLORAL CITY
Moon Rise Resort
55+ comm 2/2 split plan,
walk in closet, sc. rm,
car port, Ig shed, w/d
$21,900, lot rent $290
608-752-4532/726-2553
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




INVERNESS
2/1 SWMH w/add 1.2 ac
with 20x40 work shop,
near wal-mart $35,500,
or RENT $475 mthly
non-smoker
706-473-2184





-ACTIONJ
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Citrus(ountyHomeRentals.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
10216W.Panondeho.............$850
3/2 DW mobile with pool
1245 NE 2ndSt ...................$1100
3/2 Pool home
2561 N. SeneaPt.................$1200
2/2WalerfrontDW furnished
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
3679W. Treyburn Path() .....$900
3/3/2 Furn or Unfurn Block Diamond
8160 N. Duval Dr. (CS)......... 1300
Pool home, furnished
HOMOSASSA
7650W. Homosassa Trail #28. $500
2/1 Duplex with patoW/Dhook-ps
5865W. Vikre Path................$700
2/2/1 Cute home on I ace
11701 Clearwater C ............ $1000
2/2Waterfrontmobile





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apt, 2 BRI1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE


Lee k

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 Completely Remod-
eled In Town, $675 mo.
$250 sec. 412 Tomp-
kins St. 352-895-0744

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENT HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $592. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to
qualified applicants
For rental info.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:00P
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer


6i.
r *:


Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815
LECANTO
Lrg 2/2, AC, screen
porch, water incl.
$500. F/L/S,
352-746-4191
352-697-5900



INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495./1 mo.
(352) 447-6016



FLORAL CITY
RETAIL; 2 Storefronts
Corner of US 41 &
Hwy 48,600sf &1,400 sf
$495. mo. & $695 mo.
813-310-5391



MEADOWCREST
2/2/1 Villa, furn. or un-
furn. 1st last. sec. 55+
comm (352) 628-7573
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2 w/ Community
Pool. $725/mo
(352) 628-1616
River Links Realty



HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo.
352-2124981



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio
Efficiency w/ equipped
kitchen. All util., cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BEVERLY HILLS
2BR/2BA, CHA
Move in just $1350
(352) 422-7794
BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month
includes basic
cable & lawn care.
Call 746-3301
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1.5/1 Nice home
$650/Mo.
352-3024057
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1
Lg Mast suite $750
352-697-3133
CRYSTAL OAKS
3/2/2, avail, long term
$890 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
3/2 new carpet/paint
$750.mo 352-628-7526
Inverness
2/1, all apple, waterview
$550.(352) 860-0904
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/2/1
$590mo.+ $700 dep.
(352) 422-6978
INVERNESS
Spacious 3/2/2, $795.
mo. (352) 212-4873
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM


-I
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Waterfront, Condo
w/priv. dock Lease
to Own. $1,200. mo.
352-220-3005
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bdrm. 2 ba. Cottage
style home on Canal
with Floating Docks.
Perfect for small fam-
ily. Located On NW
18th St. Carport with
separate laundry and
bathroom. Stg Shed
Rent $900 mthly 1st &
last req. Can reduce
rent with 6 months in
advance.Phone:
Trisha 352-794-6716
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
FURNISHED
WATERFRONT
HOME 2 bd, 1.5 ba
home with central
alc $595.
352-476-4964



HOMOSASSA
Classic SMW Hm 3/2/2
newly refurbished, land
escaped ac on golf
course, screened
18x36 pool & lanai, dbl
sided wood burning fire
place, huge great room,
built in book cases 4100
sq ft under roof, $225K
Call Owner 382-2528


CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms, Furn, Cable,
near Publix
$115wkI 420mo
$120wk/430mo
352-563-6428






PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.










STERLING
Renovations/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-in-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate
I'm there for you

The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


WORDY GIUJRD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Nerf material stadium roof (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Hex a seaside golf course (1) theywill fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
|definition tells you how many
3. Baby cow bar chart (1) syllables in each word.
I 1 0 ___ I @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Ucick for UJFS
4. Pat and Vanna show bargain (1)


5. Moon man Armstrong's cries of delight (1)


6. "R.I.P.D." star Jeff's gnatlike pests (2)


7. Exasperating fishing using dragnets (2)


7-20-13


ONIIVHL ONITIVO L S3OsW 83aalH a'9 SaVnflbS S'IIN 'S
'rWV3 a3HA1M' HdVD TVI'V' SNII XNI NI HIWOG aWVOJ I
SHHASNV


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittaml@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!



PINE RIDGE
ITS A STEAL
3/2/2, Pool, Exc.
Condition! $199k
obo (352)422-2632



BEVERLY HILLS
Laurel Ridge, 2/2/1 de-
tached villa Kit. has new
appl, granite counters,
new ac, & much more
$92K (352) 513-4155
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina
--,J rl[ q


Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience

(352) 212-1446

RealtvConnect.me

Bilingual/Spanish
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity. $119K Cash
Deal posss rent opt)
352-804-9729




Your World
****"e







E ,,


LISTINGS
117 S Lunar Terrace
Inverness
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
CB home, big yard,
Move in ready.
Clean as a whistle. Big
Garage, plus Carport.
GREAT BUY!
$79,500.
Owner 352-344-9290
2BR, IBA, + Den
Open Fl. plan, close to
shopping & town,
new roof, well wtr.
.44 acres $49,900 obo
OWR REALTY, John
352-653-7977

3/1+ CP Block home
on corner lot. % mile
to Lake Appoka boat
ramp. $55,000
Financing avail
(352) 564-2421

GOSPEL ISLAND
4BD/3BA & GARAGE
For Sale $92,000.
(941) 758-8719
(941) 524-6556




voR





Great

Starter

Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
$2,500 down
$788. month
877-500-9517

INVERNESS
4/2.5/2 separate dinn-
ing. rm.office, Ig kitchen
patio, 2200 sq ft, move
in ready $182,500
352-220-1313




Very Nice Furn home
near Duval Island.
2/1+ CP. 3rd BR or ofc.
Lndry rm w/ shower.
Shed & fenced fruit
trees. $59,900 (352)
678-7145 or 444-0406

Homosassa^
Homes^jl~


HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME ISA FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


3BD/2BA/2Car garage,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328


House for Sale
4 Bedroom 2 Bath
A/C Carport, Pool
2 Acres move in con-
dition, near schools,
4100 S. Fireside Way
352-382-5558





4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



NMI^^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.



For Sale
HOMOSASSA
Reduced $199,500
211 Pine St, Built 2006
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool,Granite,
Wood Floors,Tile & Car-
pet. 2 Car Gar,SS Appl.
Call 850-585-4026















Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!

Owner
Financing
Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


2013 NAUTIC STAR

SYamaha F115 Four Stroke
SSwim platform
Aluminum

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



SYLVAN
15' DECKBOAT
Yamaha 60 -Trailer


*6,995
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-55101


1 21'LOGIC
CENTER CONSOLE
*.2001o Logic210occ
Honda BF130 with 153 hrs.. SS prop
S2011 Fastload Aluminum Trailer with Spare Tire

$18,900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



TRIUMPH 17' DC
n Yamaha 60
n- Trailer


fl 9,250
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


_" 2013 EXCURSION
X23F4 POINT FISH
PONTOON BOAT
Fuel efficient Yamaha F115 EFI Four Stroke
Deluxe Helm Console with storage
SSS Swim Ladder
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



CALL FOR DETAILS

-. .. 563-3206

.As ow As$8 er a -



As Low As 18 per ad


Citirus Spig
Homes 9I






C12 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
binowell@
netscaDe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'll work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515



10IN USR

SATURDAY '


C


Citrus cou
Homes


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**





4L--



SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855











TONY Pauelsen
Realtor
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

BUYING OR SELLING
SALES ARE WAY UP!

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.comrn





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


INGLIS
Delightful
Withlacoochee Water-
front home offers 2 bed-
room 2 bath main
home, 1 bedroom 1
bath Guest Cabin,
Screened house with
bath and smoke house,
Detached Garage,
Multi-tiered Deck/Dock
all located on 213 ft of
waterfront on 1.52
acres. $270,000
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc
352-220-2658


INGLIS
Stunning Withlacoochee
River Waterfront
Home. 3 Bedrooms, 2
Baths 1.51 acres with
201 feet of waterfront.
Many impressive fea-
tures including Two fire-
places One in the Mas-
ter, Large upper deck
overlooking the River
Boat Dock and so much
more Must see.
Offered at $299,900
Hwy 19to right on Foss
Grove Path 1.9 miles to
Edwards Ct home on
the Left
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc
352-220-2658








Employment



Swww chronicleonline


Waterfront
Homes I


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
CI Bkr/owner 228-1047



TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905




KAYAK
13ft, Sit in, blue &
white good shape
$700.
(352) 220-1162




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"**

12' JOHN BOAT
1990 sears 12' alum
john boat, 9.9 Evenrude
motor & fuel tank, li-
censed thru 5/2014
$ 825.00 352-795-4674


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom 1 bath fixer
upper located close to
schools, dining and
shopping
Hwy 44 to North on
NE 9th Ave
to home on corner of
NE 9th and 5th Ter.
Great Price $ 40,000
call for viewing and
MAKE an Offer
352-220-2658
Jo DeMarcus


2012 EVERGREEN
EVER-LITE
29 Foot Travel Trailer,
Model 29FK (Front
Kitchen). Well con-
structed, generously op-
tioned, like-new condi-
tion. Easy tow with SUV
or Pick-Up. Priced well
below NADA at
$21,000. Please call
352/746-3374 for addi-
tional information or to
schedule a time to see.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
PROWLER
33ft, 2 slides, wood firs.
new furniture, like new
$7,900.
(352) 795-7397
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945


. . 1-:
1 *:


CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2/2
CBS, 2100 sq. ft. living
area, 10K boat lift,
updated 2011, shed
$229,000.
352-794-3020/586-4987

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks
'93 Buick Regal
$500 down
'99 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible
$650 down
'97 Ford Taurus
$695 Down
'98 Ford Mustang
$700 Down
CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -19 0 2
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BIG SALE
e*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


14' JOHN BOAT
14' alum john boat, 18
hp Evenrude motor, 40
# thrush troller motor,
minn kota, new seat,
battery, new tire on
trailer,new lights
$1325.00 352-795-4674
BAYLINER
14ft. Forest Motor
50 HP, $300. obo
352-201-2120
CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tn-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.
Sportscraft
1988 27 Coastal
Fisherman, cabin
cruiser, $9,995 OBO &
boat trailer 22'
tandam,galv., $995
(813)-244-3945
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



Coachman
94 20' Travel Trailer
hitch, stabilizer, $4500.
(352) 341-0262
Jayco
1980 Eagle 30 ft.
Exc Condition.
Must See! $3500
(574) 226-4503

u~u^


I gnats


I


L 'TEST DRIVE AV

KIA AND GET $25

SIN CITRUS KIA

BUCKS!


4 2013 KIA



OPTIMA LX


15** FINANCING*


w7-


Citr us KIA 1850 S.E. Hwv. 19
SCrystal River, FL


AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T
CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS" 352 5648668
*0% APR FOR UP TO 60 MONTHS ON SELECT NEW CARS ONLY MUST QUALIFY FOR MILITARY COMPETITIVE BONUS CASH -OR- LOYALTY & CONSUMER REBATE "ALL CARS PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY


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KA


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P444621,999

o6,999**


2011 KIA

FORTE SI
5 DOOR
P416991
$15,559*


BBF 4 N







O00FFWO ,


F6


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Yellowstone
1999 28' Fifth Wheel
2 slidouts,Exc. Cond.
new awning,Queen bed,
new refridg. very clean,
2 mi. to Gulf, on river
$10kobo(352) 447-2933



Chevrolet Tires
& Rims
6 lugs, $400.
(352) 257-3542
Heavy Duty Metal
Rack for FORD F150
$250
352-410-6823
352-484-9066 cell



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE
e*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Lee k
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price


2003, Century
$4,995.
352-341-0018
BUICK
2011, Regal CXL,
16 yrs/150,000 miles of
worry free warranty.
$18,995, 352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
1974 Corvette This is a
blue corvette that had
some restoration done
to it and is needing a
new owner for $16,999
352-322-5555
352-465-6560


CHEVROLET
1983 Camaro Z-28.
One owner. Original
power train. Most other
parts 5 years old or less.
Exterior and interior in
good condition. Great
hobby car for right
owner. Make offer.
Home: (352)746-0285
Cell: (352)464-4339
CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt
$7,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
2006, Magnum,Super
Clean and Fast! Don't
Miss Out! $8,995.,
352-240-7412
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2008 Mustang GT
Premium TROPHY
WINNER 50 + upgrades
details at 352-795-0558
GMC
2010, Terrain, Loaded,
save $1,000s from new
29 MPG $16,995,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Sierra, Loaded!
Great for Work or Fun,
MUST SEE!! $15,995,
352-240-7412
GMC
2013, Envoy, Great
for Small Families,
Loaded, MUST SEE!
$7,995, 352-240-7412
HONDA
2009, Fit, Navi Sport
Perfect Shape
$11,995, 352-240-7412
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MERCURY
2001, Grand Marquis
$3,995.
352-341-0018
NISSAN
2011, Altima,
17 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free warranty.
$14,995, 352-240-7412
PONTIAC
'04, Grand Prix
Sport red, sunroof,,
Looks & runs good,
$6,100. (352) 220-1162


07, G6, GT, cony,
leather, 33,700 mi.
exc. cond. $17k obo
(352) 794-3523
SCION
2006 xB, AUTO
fog lights, new tires, all
power, showroom cond.
dealer maint. 60K.
clean title/carfax.
$8900. 516-220-9865
TOYOTA
2011, Camry,
15 yrs./150,000miles of
Worry Free warranty.
$12,995, 352-240-7412



Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560
CORVETTE
2003 50th Anniv.
Edition.17k mi,
like new, $29,900
352-341-4178






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
OnIy $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
EX Cab, $7,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Silverado,
Loaded, Must See!
Great for Work or Fun!!
$11,995, 352-240-7412
FORD
1995 F150 Ford
Truck,FL150,3.0 liters,
Two wheel drive.
200,000 Miles In great
shape, runs Great
$2,000 FIRM Call
352-637-5331 If no an-
swer Leave message
Please


'03, Sports Track,
white, runs good,
looks good,. $8,700.
(352) 220-1162
FORD
2009, F150,4x4,
Super Cab, Loaded,
Best Price In Florida
$15,995 352-240-7412
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control, power
windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tn-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $23,500. Phone:
352-601-1319



CHEVROLET
2006, Suburban 4 x 4
$6,995
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
94, Grand Cherokee
Lariat, $1500.
(352) 303-0928



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom
352-325-1306



Hallmark
2009, Box Trailer
22ft, tandem axle
$4,000 obo
(352) 302-6241
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
1990 FXR Lownder.
New pipes. New wind-
shield. Mustang seat.
Looks and runs great.
$5,700. Can text photo.
352-220-5299
HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition
$1200.00 352-637-3254




950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at
covdeals.com,
July 1, 2013 July 31, 2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.


C)I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The all-new 2013 Lincoln MKZ.


What to get the garage that's had everything.


I Newe. 2.01- .6bot n ie rH bi via l Reracabl P normicGlas oof


FOR 36 MONTHS j
LINCOLN AFS CASH DUE AT SIGNING
9 RED CARPET LEASE' AFTER $0,000 CASH BACK.
Security deposit waived. Excludes taxes, title and license fees.
Optional features shown not included in lease price.


VIN#2LMDJ6JK8DBL33908


Stk#L3T041


2013 LINCOLN MKX FWD
WITH 100A PACKAGE


FOR 36 MONTHS 3 9
LINCOLN AFS CASH DUE AT SIGNING
RED CARPET LEASE' AFTER $0,000 CASH BACK.
Security deposit waived. Excludes taxes, title and license fees.
Optional features shown not included in lease price.


VIN#1LNHL9DK6DG606017


Stk#L3C020


2013 MKS FWD
WITH 100A PACKAGE


Get to know the 2013 Lincoln line up at Lincoln.com


Only Certirled Lincoln De:aler
L Cftrus, a O&pa
for Sales & SenvAce in your 4 County
sco
ZArea: Lev:yCftrusHern:anndo&Pa 3


~~n ;21 C~c ~i-n~~ I


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 C13


LINCOLN




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"Check anywhere in

CHECK

CHAD I


...for a New 2013 Honda
CMVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


Vv
"6^6
-^'^


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CE XWEq
Stripped With Automatic, A


L~A~5


.....I a 9MIU AU tPre-OwnedVehicles include:
0.9% OVER 90 500W MILITARYI6MOi PUS-DAY
X 60 MONTHS Used & Certifed APPRECIATION OFFER' 6000 L EXCHANGE
on select new Honda models Pre-Owned Vehicles! To eligible members of the US Military & their Umned PowertrainWarranty" PROG RAM
on approved credit spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you See dealer forcomplete details.
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


Lsr


C14 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


~ ~ti ~"d~B ~


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mom.#




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~L1!I


*0000


:El


3
k


S.s


CRUZE LS
iSpeed Transmission
. ..... ......................... .....$7. 955
-$956
lY- -$S1,500
I IY* $2,500


CHEVY SONIC


......$18.110
.................................... ...... 18 110
-$400
-$500
NTr--- $2-500


New 2013
CHEVY TRAVERSE LS
C13288
MSRP: .......................................................... ....... 31,920
DEALER DISCOUNT:-- -$665
REBATE ............ -$1,00
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY: $2,500


New 013
CHEVY EQUINOX LS
C13230
M SRP:$...................................................................... $25,015
DEALER DISCOUNT: -$800
REBATE -$100
CASH ORTRADE EQUITY -$2,500


New 2013
CHEVY MALIBU LS


MSRP: ........................................ $23,045
DEALER DISCOUNT: $600
REBATE. $2,M00
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:- -$2,500


CAMARO ZL1 CONVERTIBLE
M SRP:$..................................................................... $65,625
DEALER DISCOUNT: $2,000
REBATE $1500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:-. $2300


'R90
:Certified
d Vehicles!


All Pre-Loved Certified


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000
MILE
Warrantyt


2 YEARS oR
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE
FREE OF CHARGE!t


Plus, a FREE
PIT-STOP
PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


7 MERCURY MARINER
nzot?
99.995


07 HYUNDAI SONATA 10 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 10 CHEVY AVEO 08 MERCURYSABLE 11 FORD RANGER
1U076 117 5000M tiw l7RLQtLL.! li2D75, REIGCAB.5-SPFEO,LOWMILElI
S$,995 $%119S $11,995 $V14,as $VA1*95


09TOYOTA RAV4
$15,995


IOIMRTSlTOWN&COiliUY 11FORD CROWN VICTORIA
STOII60STS, POWISW I~DOOIS
$16,995 $16.99S


U OESIIWRADOEXCAB 12CHEVY SILERADO 11CHEVROLETSILVERADO
aI Pre Z4OAD 915. .CREW CAB, LTZ,OADEDI OEWCABUiKG rLrFULBWfrSV '
532-995 SS3.995 S37995


11 CEVY SILVRADOREG, CAB 12 CHEVY CRUZE ECO


$175so0


11 CHEVYSUBURBAN LTZ
IlIft8, O.LUMTE. AMVI POWrTPS
$37.995


$18,995

PLUS
MANY
MORETO
CHOOSE
FROM


Do For You!

i AIl


-qfiE


6 months with $2,470 cash down, plus
forl Incentives to obtain pdces. limited
I ld Oacessodes additional cost offer


I


SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 C15


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Safety *


Luxury *


Performance


* Engineering


* Service


ZERO
* DOWN PAYMENT
* PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
* SECURITY DEPOSIT


NEW'13
Acura RDX
Urbrn Achlever
10, ,k


$39
399
i. P, : r-N T,I -" ,,


~ I~ !i~ ~ ~lr- ~; r ..,-~..,,,, Ir


ZERO APR
AVAILABLE FINANCING FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS ON NEW Acuras
bsaid Vehlle Uwup hI Ammqtua
wM i ,Ms l I SIM RfBlSM a o M La, ,-K.


NEW'13
Acura MDX 4
S t -n :. i. ,



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u CiL Camel I5 c 2ombirid wi0t any ow at i K i "* 5 .. r.l.n, arI pa. ar p U Dpp l S t Tra w.tabn s Safer1. or y [osram (wp, alriar w). M. 0este with
S-. 1 u ,c 1o lle0 t al laiit' Th ,ugh Sep I . .1 I
Cloi. a IOW Wta~ 1,, "13 M X 6Spcd l ntenat- (MU YD02HZDJNWj MS"P 3" ITS Acii tHt 5 iAl-ia- M.1- t S19,2171 81...l -as (nly "y IL SI'M4 Opt-n p".... MI -I $?a Bl -11* 85 Citww-cn 'i)a Ii 013 1 L 6 Spia( AuloW-alc I ModaWl 20UA^5 MSRP S3.BOB Wua rw cWpitallinad M S32,01D 24 TOlMal $olMI pift'sn1 4O4 Opt-on
W uwhntoe W 0Nos .at I 211 712 C 0if-eld ase fw 2014 RDX 6 p5asuathA- ac ted4 TBT 3EJNW 1 MSRP S35.415 AOIS B ri l ,pial-I -oat 03 071 14 TOE naOM"t p0t,0n.14 S1 2.0 041 ,1 pS 14aHa 0I a0, 4,awd 22,1.6520 Cl00.31.- I4.-, 1or 201t( LX 2 p5S 1d Aul m IskIsatc 4 E I4 E JNW) USRP 327 795 005 al "slc00 1.0 4a tt 123803 00
00ll 0o0lh11,,ly sn llS 7I24 02001n,1 ( 1pO**1h8 41 \ s4 e1n4 SIS 85 ii .. -. 5 .. .. r,. . . . i. .*, i p, 11- i 44 -. --l* psynMr 15RP incuii lt.oWl!it0 1 0I0,00,1,,0,Sientb lfw iini.n.,,i,,I,,C sIM i1,,, $ I 1 i 1 2 4 > .i 1 I 11 . i i I1 p 4 11 SU 01oa.e or wpl. ItI.*d *$ A91a llC 1M I R01X 2D0 .iS pp0d4 0iI, L


AVAILABLE ON SELECT CERTIRED PREOWNED MODELS'
* On Sola Modkh. See Dakn Flt Dik Good Tm i07t3113.


7 Yr 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty'
S12 Month I 12,000Mile Comprehensive Warranty
150 Point Inspection
24 Hour Emergency Roadside Assistance
STrip Interruption Expense Reimbursement g
*Rental Vehicle
Reimursement & More
*Powertrain warranty begins from
date of new car sae and
zero mileage


ACURA

S Prr-Owned Vehicles


2009 VW
JETTA
A MUST SEEI

$13,995


SELETION

OF PRE-OWNID


S2010 CHRYSLER
STOWN&ICOUNTRY
NICE)

$17,995
2012 TOYOTA
PRIUS G ON RlilHES
N995CE & SPORTY
, 18,995 SUV0S1 IR.OOKS


2009 CHRYSLER 2007 CHEVY 2007 ACURA 2009 ACURA 2007 LEXUS 2011 NISSAN 2007 TOYOTA
300 SILVERADO RDX TSX ES350 ALTIMA SIENNA
#A3461A #P3971A ,A360SA #P3915B #A4013A #A3656A #A4034A


2007 ACURA 2012 CHEVY 2012 CHEVY 2011 TOYOTA 2008 LEXUS 2012 ACURA 2010 ACURA
TL MALIBU IMPALA CAMRY RX350 TL RLX
#A3667B #P3969 #P3968 #A4062AA 4A3654A #A3551B #A4044A


Thank you for reading this. All prices are plus tax, tag & title. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase Cannot be combomed with any other advertised offers. See dealer for
complete details.Programs subject to change without notice. 'With a purchase of a used vehicle. Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details.


First Year
Maintenance
Included With All
Pre-Owned
Vehicles
mft
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NEW'14
Acura ILX
Luxury Starts Here


'209 -
Mj MONTH ASE


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C16 SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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www.chronicleoninW.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Welcome back, students


I want to take this opportunity to
welcome you back as we begin the
2013-2014 school year. I can't wait
until all of you return
from the summer and
we officially start the ,,
year! Make sure J
you're well rested and
eager to hit the
ground running as we
continue to provide "7
opportunities and
make the connections
necessary for high
achievement in the
coming year and suc- it
cess in the future.
Sandra "
While we have
made progress in
many areas and have received state
recognition, there is still much work
to be done to ensure all of our stu-
dents are successful in whatever


San


they choose to do upon graduation.
Parents, please know that I deeply
appreciate and value the role you
play in your child's
'education. I urge you
S to stay involved each
year of his/her school
S career to ensure the
Greatest possible
success.
I want you to know
how honored and ex-
cited I am to continue
to serve each of you
as your Superinten-
dent of Schools. No
n" H l matter where I go and
n" Himmel
no matter whom I
meet across the state,
I always take time to share the won-
derful things that are happening in
our schools with the support of our
entire community. Thank you for al-


"Please look twice
for children at bus stops!"


lowing me to serve you in this role.
As always, I look forward to see-
ing all of our returning school fam-
ily as well as meeting each of you
who are just beginning your partner-
ship with us. Don't hesitate to stop
me as you see me at school events or
in the community or drop me a line
to let me know your thoughts. To-
gether, we can make sure that great
things are going to continue to hap-
pen within our Citrus County
Schools ... Where Learning is the
Expectation and Caring is a Com-
mitment!






Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent of Schools


* CEREC One-Visit Crowns U Extractions U Fillings
* Implants h In-House Specialty Care U Cleanings
* Lumineers and Veneers U Root Canal Therapy U Sealants
* Dentures, Partials & Bridges U Periodontal Gum Care U And much more!
* Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) U AAID/ICOI
New Patients Free Consults Emergency Care
Sl 352-795-1223
s 1815 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
www.rswansondental.com
PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE Dr.ichardC.Swanson


What's Inside


Attendance policy ............................ Page 3

School Board
memberslmeetings .......................... Page 5

Meet your teachers
orientation dates .............................. Page 6

Guidance counselors ...................... Page 6

2013-2014 school calendar..............Page 7

Administrative staff directory..........Page 8

Back to school information ............Page 9

Public school directory.................. Page 10

Private school directory ............Page 13

Become a school volunteer ..........Page 13

School meal information................Page 14

New teachers .................................. Page 16

School Advisory
Enhancement Councils..................Page 16

Principals and
assistant principals........................ Page 16

Health services .............................. Page 17

Special requirements for
children entering seventh grade ..Page 17

General contact information..........Page 17

Dress code ...................................... Page 18

Strategic planning framework ......Page 18

General facts .................................. Page 19

WTI Extended Daycare ..................Page 19

Establishing school bus stops......Page 19


G2 Saturday July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County attendance policy


It is the position of the
Citrus County School
Board that students must
attend school on a regular
and timely basis to maxi-
mize educational opportu-
nities offered in Citrus
County Schools. Regular
and timely student atten-
dance can be successfully
achieved through a strong
partnership between the
home and school
representatives.
This policy is applicable
for all Pre-K-12 students in
Citrus County. The super-
intendent may approve ex-
ceptions to this policy for
special programs, such as
alternative education, mag-
net programs, and adult ed-
ucation programs for the
purpose of enhancing the
goals of these programs.

I. SCHOOL
ATTENDANCE
The parents or guardians
are responsible for their
child(ren)'s attendance and
to follow compulsory atten-
dance laws.
Florida Statute 1003.21
requires: All children who
have attained the age of 6
years or who will have at-
tained the age of 6 years by
Feb. 1 of any school year or
who are older than 6 years
of age but who have not at-
tained the age of 16 years,
except as otherwise pro-
vided, are required to at-
tend school regularly
during the entire school
term. Students are obli-
gated to attend one hundred
eighty (180) days of school
each year. Regular atten-
dance is a critical compo-
nent for student success.
Students between sixteen
(16) and eighteen (18)
years of age who plan to


terminate their school en-
rollment must complete a
formal declaration signed
by the student and the stu-
dent's parent or guardian
prior to the termination
going into effect.

Parent Responsibilities
Florida Statutes 1003.21
and 1003.24 clearly define
the responsibility of parents
for the attendance of their
children) at school. The
school district expects par-
ents to fulfill their responsi-
bilities to ensure student
attendance in school.
It is the responsibility of
the parents) to be aware of
all absences and the penal-
ties associated with exces-
sive absences and
unexcused absences and
tardies. Schools will pro-
vide information to parents
about attendance require-
ments, will make reason-
able attempts to notify
parents of student absences,
and will work with parents
to resolve attendance con-
cerns. The principal/de-
signee will contact the
parent or guardian to deter-
mine the basis for unex-
cused absences or absences
when the reason is un-
known.
If a student has unex-
cused absences sufficient
enough to jeopardize aca-
demic progress and it is de-
termined that the student's
parent or legal guardian is
at fault for these absences,
the appropriate school per-
sonnel will adhere to
Florida Statutes 1003.24,
1003.26 (Enforcement of
School Attendance), and
1003.27 (Court Procedures
and Penalties).

Non-enrollment of
Compulsory Attendance


Age Students
Written notice shall be
given in person or by re-
turn-receipt mail to the par-
ent(s) or guardian(s) or
other person exercising in
loco parents, when no
valid reason is found for a
child's non-enrollment. If
the notice and requirement
are ignored, the designated
school representative shall
report the case to the super-
intendent and refer the case
to the Student Services De-
partment for compliance
with the Florida Compul-
sory Attendance Statute
(Florida Statute 1003.21).

Notification of
Loco Parentis
In cases in which a stu-
dent is not residing with
his/her parentss/
guardian(s), the parent of
the student must designate
in writing the adult per-
son(s) with whom the pupil
resides who stands in loco
parents so that the pupil
may be admitted to or con-
tinue in school. This state-
ment must be notarized
and presented to the
principal/designee for
acceptance.

II. STUDENT
ABSENCES
Excused Absences
Excused absences,
tardies, and permission to
leave school early will be
allowed only for the
following:
* Illness of the student
* Major illness in the im-
mediate family of the
student
+ Medical appointments of
the student
+ Death in the immediate


continued on Page 4


Public school families and employees are invited to bank with Suncoast, Florida's largest
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+an^ = (1?


SCHOOLS AND COMMUNmES:
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4


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Interested? loin online today at


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Gerry Mulligan
Publisher

Ken Melton
Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist

Sarah Gatling
r 4Community Editor

Trista Stokes
Advertising
-in i~ l Sales Manager


Citrus Publishing

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429

352-563-6363

www.chronicleonline.com


BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday, July 20, 2013 G3







G4 Saturday July 20, 2013


from Page 3


family of the student
+ Religious holiday of a student
must be documented by
parent/guardian three (3) days in
advance
+ Subpoena or forced absence by
any law enforcement agency to
fulfill civic duties, (a copy of the
subpoena or court summons must
be presented to the principal or
designee.)
+ Major disaster that would jus-
tify absence in the judgment of
the administration
+ Head lice, a maximum of two
(2) days for each occurrence
+ Planned absences approved in
advance by the principal/designee
It is the responsibility of the
parents) or guardian(s) to pro-
vide a written statement indicat-
ing the reason for the absence
within two (2) days of the stu-
dent's return to school. If the
written statement is not provided
by the parent, the absence(s) will
be unexcused. The written state-
ment must include the following
information for each absence:
* Date the excuse is written
* Date(s) of the absence(s)
* Full name of the student
* Reason for the absence
* Daytime telephone number of
parent or guardian
+ Signature of the parent or
guardian
Final determination of whether
an absence, tardy, or early dis-
missal is excused or unexcused is
the responsibility of the local
school principal/designee. Any
planned absences, other than
medical appointments, must be
approved in advance by the prin-
cipal/designee.

III. TARDIES AND
UNEXCUSED
DISMISSALS
A. A tardy is defined as an
arrival to class or school after the
designated starting time or the
tardy signal has sounded. Rea-


sons for excused tardies are the
same as for excused absences.
Three (3) unexcused tardies
within a nine-week grading pe-
riod are equivalent to one (1) un-
excused absence.
Students may leave early for
those reasons accepted for ex-
cused absences. To leave school
early without an acceptable rea-
son is an unexcused absence/
early dismissal. Three (3)
unexcused early dismissals
within a nine-week grading pe-
riod are equivalent to one (1)
unexcused absence.
Parents are encouraged to
maintain student attendance for
the entire school day with mini-
mal interruptions or unnecessary
requests to leave school early.
For high school, a student must
attend each class period a mini-
mum of 50 percent to avoid being
marked absent.
When tardies or early dis-
missals become excessive, the
problem may be addressed
through a required parent confer-
ence with the school principal/
designee, and appropriate disci-
plinary action may be taken. The
disciplinary actions may include,
but not be limited to:
* Detention
* In-school suspension
* Saturday school

IV. SCHOOL
RESPONSIBILITY
AND AUTHORITY
After 10 days of excused or un-
excused absences, a written state-
ment of illness from a licensed
health care practitioner will be re-
quired for subsequent absences
due to illness indicating they are
under the supervision of the
physician. Absences previously
documented by a licensed health
care practitioner, a court official,
a church official and out-of-
school suspensions are excluded
from the 10-day absence count.
(NOTE: For purposes of this
policy, a licensed health care
practitioner is defined as follows:


BACK To SCHOOL


medical doctors and persons who
are licensed to practice medicine
in psychiatry, osteopathy, podia-
try, optometry, dentistry, or chiro-
practic medicine. An Advanced
Registered Nurse Practitioner
(ARNP) or a Physician's Assis-
tant (PA) practicing under the
protocol of a supervising physi-
cian is also allowed to sign.) If no
medical documentation is pro-
vided, further absences are con-
sidered unexcused. Failure to
comply with these requirements,
followed by continued absences
of the student, may result in dis-
ciplinary action as defined in the
Code of Student Conduct (i.e.,
detention, in-school suspension,
Saturday school, etc.) and consid-
ered appropriate by the school
principal. A parent conference
with the school's attendance as-
sistant may also be required to
discuss compliance with the
Florida Compulsory Attendance
Statute (Florida Statute 1003.21).
If a student has had at least five
(5) unexcused absences, or ab-
sences for which the reason is un-
known, within a calendar month
or ten (10) unexcused absences,
or absences for which the reason
is unknown, within a 90 calendar
day period, the student's primary
teacher shall report to the school
principal/designee that the stu-
dent may be exhibiting a pattern
of non-attendance. The principal
shall, unless there is clear evi-
dence that the absences are not a
pattern of nonattendance, refer
the case to the school's child
study team to determine if early
patterns of truancy are develop-
ing. If the child study team finds
that a pattern of nonattendance is
developing, whether the absences
are excused or not, a meeting
with the parent must be sched-
uled to identify potential
remedies.
After fifteen (15) unexcused
absences accumulate within any
ninety (90) calendar days, the
Student Services Center will de-
termine the appropriate steps for
the enforcement of the Florida


Compulsory Attendance Statute.
(Florida Statute 1003.21).

V. HIGH SCHOOL
ATTENDANCE
REQUIREMENTS
FOR COURSE CREDIT
Possible Failure
Due to Excessive Absences
When a high school student ac-
cumulates five (5) or more ex-
cused (see B, below) or
unexcused absences in a class in
any one quarter, the student may
receive a final grade of"F" and
receive no credit for the course.
In addition, this student may be
withdrawn from class by the prin-
cipal for the remainder of the
quarter. It is the responsibility of
the students and parents to be
aware of all excused and unex-
cused absences and to verify all
absences in writing.
If a student has five (5) or more
excused or unexcused absences,
the student will receive the calcu-
lated quarter grade average for
the classess, provided the student
passes the final comprehensive
exam.

Exceptions to the Failure
Due to Excessive Absences
The following excused ab-
sences from school shall NOT be
counted as absences for calculat-
ing excessive absences. Written
documentation MUST be pro-
vided when involving:
Absences for illnesses or other
health-related reasons that are
documented by a statement from
a licensed health care practi-
tioner, (for definition, see
"NOTE" above).
Absences due to death in the
immediate family.
Absences due to religious holi-
days of a student must be docu-
mented by a parent/guardian's
note three (3) days in advance.
Absences for approved college
visitation days. A maximum of
four (4) documented college visi-
tation days will be allowed for
students beginning the second


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

quarter of the junior year through
the end of the senior year. Armed
Forces Academies and vocational
school visits will also fall under
this provision. These absences
must be applied for three (3) days
in advance. The principal may
allow additional days when
necessary.
Absences due to subpoena or
forced absence by any law en-
forcement agency. Verification
must be provided by a copy of
the subpoena or court summons.
Homebound education place-
ments due to an extended illness
are not considered absences.
School-sponsored activities are
not considered absences. (i.e.,
field trips, school-sponsored as-
semblies, extracurricular
activities.)
Absences resulting from out of
school suspensions. Absences re-
sulting from out of school sus-
pensions are unexcused absences.
A high school student with five
(5) unexcused absences in a class
must pass a final comprehensive
exam to receive credit for the
course.

Grading and the
Attendance Policy
The attendance policy shall im-
pact only the final grade of the
quarter.
The teacher shall not give any
student an "F" for a mid-term
grade based on the student having
five (5) or more absences from
his/her class.

VI. PROVISIONS AND
DIRECTIONS FOR
MAKE-UP WORK
Excused Absences
Students with excused ab-
sences are given the privilege of
making up work for credit. Stu-
dents are allowed the same num-
ber of days for make-up work as
the number of days absent, not to
exceed six (6) school days. The
principal/designee may grant ex-
tensions to the make-up time
continued on Page 5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


from Page 4

limit for extenuating cir-
cumstances. It is the stu-
dent's responsibility to
obtain and complete all
make-up work within the
time specified.
All scheduled tests and
assignments that were due
on the first day of a stu-
dent's absence will be taken
or turned in on the day the
student returns to school.
Planned absences, other
than medical appointments,
must have the prior ap-
proval of the principal/de-
signee. At least three (3)
school days prior to the ab-
sence, students are to make
pre-arrangements for their
test(s) and school work to
be completed. Tests are to
be taken and work will be
due the day the student re-
turns to school.

Unexcused Absences
Each school will develop
administrative practices and
procedures regarding make-
up work for students with
unexcused absences. Input
and involvement from the
faculty, staff, and school
enhancement council
should be included in the
development of these prac-


tices and procedures. To
maintain academic
progress, students should
be encouraged to make up
work, even if credit will not
be awarded. Parents and
students will be provided
information regarding these
practices and procedures.

Suspensions
Students suspended out
of school may be denied the
opportunity to make up
work for credit. Determi-
nation of this consideration
is the responsibility of the
local school principal/
designee.

VII. ENFORCE-
MENT OF COM-
PULSORY SCHOOL
ATTENDANCE
In cases of excessive ab-
sences, tardies, or early dis-
missals, an attendance
assistant or school social
worker may visit or make
other contact with the par-
ent(s) or guardian(s) at the
home or other places to dis-
cuss the attendance prob-
lem for the purpose of
returning the student to reg-
ular attendance. Legal ac-
tion against a student and
parents) or guardian(s)


may be taken for not com-
plying with the Florida
Compulsory School Atten-
dance Statute (Florida
Statute 1003.21).

VIII. DRIVING
PRIVILEGES
Students who fail to com-
ply with attendance require-
ments will lose their
driving privileges. Pur-
suant to Section 322.091,
Florida Statute requires
schools to report to the De-
partment of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicle
(DHSMV) the names of
minors who attain the age
of 14 and above who have
accumulated 15 unexcused
absences in a period of 90
calendar days. The school
principal/designee is the
contact for additional infor-
mation regarding these
requirements.

ATTENDANCE
RECORDING
Student attendance
records are to be main-
tained in accordance with
School Board Policy. Stu-
dents who are on hospital/
homebound or home
placement instruction are
counted as present.


Citrus County School Board

members 2013-2014


Thomas Kennedy
352-476-4031
District 1


Sandy Balfour
effective after
swearing-in later
in the month of July
District 4


Virginia "Ginger"
Bryant, Chairman
352-795-2053
District 2


Linda B. Powers
352-726-6938
District 5


Pat Deutschman,
Vice Chairman
352-344-3463
District 3

School board
meetings
The Citrus County
School Board meets at
4 p.m. the second Tues-
day of each month and
additional special meet-
ings/workshops as
needed. For more infor-
mation, call 726-1931,
ext. 2206, or log on to
www.citrus.kl2.fl.us and
click on the "School
Board" link to view
meeting agendas and
minutes.


I ABC -

We continue to take
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the school year!


ci Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten
NOW OFFERED!


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cm )L


BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday, July 20, 2013 G5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Meet your teacher and



orientation dates announced


ELEMENTARY
SCHOOLS

Central Ridge Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
4:30 6:30 p.m.

Citrus Springs Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Pre-K through Grade 5
Monday, Aug. 5
4 6 p.m.

Crystal River Primary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten
3 p.m. meet in the cafeteria
First through Fifth grades 4 6 p.m.
Safety Patrol and Parents
6 p.m. in the cafeteria

Floral City Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten and
New Students 9:30 10 a.m.
Meet your Teacher Pre-K Fifth
grade 10 a.m. noon

Forest Ridge Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K through Fifth grade
4 6 p.m.

Hernando Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten
3 4 p.m.
First through Fifth grade
4 6 p.m.

Homosassa Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
4 6 p.m.


Inverness Primary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
4 6 p.m.

Lecanto Primary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
Grades: Pre-K and Kindergarten
3:30 p.m. sharp
First through Fifth grade
4:30 6 p.m.

Pleasant Grove Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
New to PGE 3:30- 4 p.m.
All others 4 6 p.m.

Rock Crusher Elementary
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5
4:30 6:30 p.m.



MIDDLE SCHOOLS

Citrus Springs Middle
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Friday, Aug. 2
3 6 p.m.

Crystal River Middle
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Friday, Aug. 2
2:30 5:30 p.m.

Inverness Middle
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Friday, Aug. 2
3 6 p.m.

Lecanto Middle
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Friday, Aug. 2
3 6 p.m.


HIGH SCHOOLS

Citrus High
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Tuesday, Aug.6
9 a.m. Noon FRESHMEN only
Fall Open House:
Tuesday, Aug. 20, 6 7 p.m.
Informational session at 5:30 p.m.
for anyone pursuing AP Courses.

Crystal River High
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Tuesday, Aug.6
9- 11 a.m. FRESHMEN only
Fall Open House:
Thursday, Aug. 22, 6 7 p.m.

Lecanto High
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
All students, all grades
Thursday, Aug. 15, 6 -7 p.m.
Freshmen and new students only
Wednesday, July 31,
8 a.m. noon in the gym



OTHER SCHOOLS

Academy of
Environmental Science
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 5, 6 p.m.
College of Central Florida
Lecanto Campus

CREST
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Friday, Aug. 5
2 6 p.m.

Renaissance Center
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Tuesday, Aug.6
3 6 p.m.


2013-2014 Citrus

County Schools

Guidance Counselors

ELEMENTARY
Central Ridge Elementary ..........Lois Campbell
Citrus Springs Elementary ..........Holly Becker
Crystal River Primary .................Terry Cates
Floral City Elementary ..................Julie Keiper
Forest Ridge Elementary ............Marcia Brown
Hernando Elementary............Stephanie Mihalic
Homosassa Primary ................Debra Harmon
Inverness Primary ..........................Diane Buie
Lecanto Primary ............................Coni Young
Pleasant Grove Elementary ........Linda Braden
Rock Crusher Elementary..............Beth Noland

MIDDLE
Citrus Springs Middle ..................Teresa Pettit
.............................. ................... T ra cie S to ke s

Crystal River Middle ......................Debra Kidd
...................................................C laudia M cC oy

Inverness Middle ..............Stephanie Skoblicki
................................................S herina A nderson
......................................... ..... ................ T B A

Lecanto Middle .............................. Patti Martin
.................................................... .. D ia ne H e ad

HIGH
Citrus High ....................... .....Connie Hooker
..................................Cali M cClain, Roy Sw ihart,
............Thurman "Butch" Keiper, Kristin Neuman

Crystal River High..................Sherry Snowden
............................Michael Nelson, Trudee Mason
......... .... .......................... .... ................ T B A

Lecanto High.................................... Judy Clark
..........................Shedrick Staley, Stacey Swihart
....................................Beth Evans, W illiam Bond

OTHER SCHOOLS
Renaissance Center....................................TBA

Withlacoochee Technical Inst.
................................................Lucinda C ha nd ler
........................Ryan Naugle, Sandra VanDervort

AES.................................. Sondra (Sandy) Terry


G6 Saturday July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013 2014 Citrus County

School District Calendar


AUGUST
Professional Development Day
Teacher Workdays
First Day of School
Professional Development Day/Early Dismissal

SEPTEMBER
Labor Day
High School Professional Development Day/
Parent Conference Elementary and Middle Student Holiday

OCTOBER
Early Dismissal for Exams/Teacher Workday End of Reporting
Professional Development Day/Early Dismissal

NOVEMBER
Veterans Day
Professional Development Day/Early Dismissal
Thanksgiving Holiday


DECEMBER
Dec. 19-20 Early Dismissal for Exams/Teacher Workday End of Reporting
Dec. 23-31 Christmas Vacation


After School

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LOCK IN RATE
Pa the smealyr incl^<^udi

Aug. 1
Aug. 2-6
Aug. 7
Aug. 28

Sept. 2
Sept. 27


Oct. 3-4
Oct. 30

Nov. 11
Nov. 20
Nov. 25-29


FREE
uNIFORM f
wITH REGISTRATION


JANUARY
Christmas Vacation
Teacher Workday
Professional Development Day
Students Return to School
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Professional Development Day/Early Dismissal

FEBRUARY
Professional Development Day Student Holiday

MARCH
Early Dismissal for Exams/Teacher Workday End of Reporting
Professional Development Day/Early Dismissal
Spring Break


Good Friday


APRIL


MAY
Last Day for Seniors
CREST Graduation
WTI Graduation
Lecanto High Graduation
Crystal River High Graduation
Citrus High Graduation
Early Dismissal for Exams/Teacher Workday End of Reporting
Last Day of School
Memorial Day Holiday
Teacher Workday


NO EXTI
FOR


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* Martial arts class after school and nights classes included in weekly fee
* Students learn discipline, respect, exercise, manners & self-defense while earning belt ranks






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MARTIAL ARTS & FITNESS, LLC

352-341-0496
312 S Kensington Ave., Lecanto, FL 34461


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Jan. 1-3
Jan. 6
Jan. 7
Jan. 8
Jan. 20
Jan. 29


Feb. 17

March 6-7
March 19
March 24-28


April 18

May 16
May 19
May 20
May 21
May 22
May 23
May 22-23
May 23
May 26
May 27-28


BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday, July 20, 2013 G7


i






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Administrative staff directory for Citrus County schools


Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
Extension: 2202
himmels@citrus.k12.fl.us

Mike Mullen
Assistant Superintendent,
School Operations
Extension: 2202
mullenmi@citrus.k12.fl.us

Kenny Blocker
Assistant Superintendent,
Business and Support Services
Extension: 2412
blockerk@citrus.k12.fl.us

Mark Klauder
Executive Director,
Educational Services
Extension: 2245
klauderm@citrus.k12.fl.us

Scott Hebert
Director, Area Schools and
Elementary Education
Extension: 2251
heberts@citrus.k12.fl.us

Gayle Nobles
Coordinator,
Special Academic Programs
Extension: 2248
noblesg@citrus.k12.fl.us

Bruce Sheffield
Coordinator, Health, PE
and Special Programs
Extension: 2239
sheffieldb@citrus.k12.fl.us

Nancy Haynes
Director, Exceptional
Student Education
Extension: 2331
haynesn@citrus.k12.fl.us


Julie Kelsay
Coordinator, Exceptional
Student Education
Extension: 2330
kelsayj@citrus.k12.fl.us

Alan Burcaw
Director, Facilities
and Construction
Extension: 2478
burcawa@citrus.k12.fl.us

Karen Briggs
Supervisor, Accounting
and Internal Accounts
Extension: 2417
briggskl@citrus.k12.fl.us

Tammy Wilson
Supervisor, Business Operations
Extension: 2472
wilsonta@citrus.k12.fl.us

Roy Pistone
Director, Food Services
Extension: 2404
pistoner@citrus.k12.fl.us

Jonny Bishop
Director, Human Resources
Extension: 2281
bishopj 1 @citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Suzanne Swain
Coordinator, Certification
and Professional Standards
Extension: 2273
swains@citrus.k12.fl.us


Cheri Cernich
Director, Human Resources
and Risk Management
Extension: 2270
cernichc@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Steve Chamblin
Director, Information Services
352-746-3437
chamblins@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Dr. Mike Geddes
Director, Instructional Technology
352-746-3437
geddesm@citrus.kl2.fl.us

John Colasanti
Coordinator, Maintenance
Extension: 2444
colasantij@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Hugh Adkins
Supervisor, Marine
Science Station
352-795-4393
adkinsh@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Chuck Dixon
Director, Planning and
Growth Management
352-746-3960
dixonc@citrus.kl2.fl.us


Citrus County School Board

(District Services Center)
1007 W. Main St., Inverness, 34450
352-726-1931
www.citrus.kl 2.fl.us
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.


Lindy Woythaler
Director, Professional
Development and
Community Services
Extension: 2232
woythalerl@citrus.k12.fl.us

Patrick Simon
Director, Research
and Accountability
Extension: 2235
simonp@citrus.k12.fl.us

Bob Brust
Supervisor, Achievement
Data Technology
Extension: 2244
brustr@citrus.k12.fl.us

John Mullen
Supervisor, Achievement
Data Technology
Extension: 2259
mullenj2@citrus.k12.fl.us

Regina Allegretta
Director, Student Services
352-527-0090
allegrettar@citrus.k12.fl.us

Kit Humbaugh
Coordinator, Student Services
352-527-0090
humbaughk@citrus.k12.fl.us

Kathy Pomposelli
Coordinator, Title 1/NCLB
Extension: 2227
pomposelli@citrus.k12.fl.us

Marilyn Farmer
Coordinator, Transportation
Extension: 2370
farmerm@citrus.k12.fl.us


G8 Saturday July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BACK To S




Back to school



information


CHOOL Saturday, July 20, 2013 G9
S ~s__t n 'I


Back to School informa-
tion will be available in the
following ways: published
in this Back to School
Guide, at all schools' Meet
Your Teacher orientations,
on the Citrus County
School District's official
website at www.citrus.
kl2.fl.us and through the
back to school informa-
tion hotline.
Back to School informa-
tion includes the following:
Administrative Staff Direc-
tory, School Board Mem-
bers Directory, District
Calendar(s), Extended Day
Care Services, Food Serv-
ices Meal Prices, Home Ed-
ucation, Health Services
(including registration re-
quirements), School(s)/
Other Sites Directory, Meet
Your Teacher Orientation
Dates and Times, Guidance
Counselors, Code of Stu-
dent Conduct, and Trans-
portation Services (bus
information).
The back to school in-
formation hotline (637-
2233) will be open
Friday, Aug. 2, from
8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.;
Saturday, Aug. 3, from
9 a.m. until 1 p.m.;
Monday, Aug. 5, from
8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.;
Tuesday, Aug. 6, from
8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.;
Wednesday, Aug. 7 the
first day of school from
6 a.m. until 6 p.m., and
Thursday, Aug. 8, from
6 to 10 a.m. and 2 to 6 p.m.
The hotline will have infor-
mation available for the


entire school district.
The hotline calls will
not go through the dis-
trict services center
switchboard or the trans-
portation department
numbers.
Please advise all appro-
priate staff to give the back
to school information hot-
line number (637-2233) to
parent(s)/legal guardian(s)
for back to school informa-
tion including bus
information.
Do not refer calls to the
Transportation Department
from Aug. 2 through Aug.
8. If school staff has trans-
portation questions, they
should also call the hotline.

Anyone needing infor-
mation prior to Aug. 3 and
after Aug. 9 should call:
Crystal River
Transportation at 795-
0057 (serving CRPS,
CSES, RCE, CSMS,
CRMS, CRHS/HA, and
REN/WTI/Academies for
CRMS/CRHS zones)
Inverness
Transportation at 344-
2193 (serving FCE, HES,
IPS, PGE, IMS, CHS, WTI


Transition Academy and
Teen Parents, and
REN/WTI/Academies for
IMS/CHS zones)
Lecanto Transportation
at 746-2714 (serving CRE,
FRE, HOM, LPS, LMS,
LHS, CREST, and
REN/WTI/Academies for
LMS/LHS zones).
As in past years, each
school will have a school
contact person for trans-
portation request forms.
This person will help to fa-
cilitate the parent(s)/legal
guardian(s) in requesting
bus stop changes. Parents)
and/or legal guardian(s) re-
questing a bus stop change
should complete the trans-
portation request form
available at all Citrus
County Public Schools. If
the form is returned to the
school contact person for
transportation requests, it
should be sent to the route
manager at the appropriate
Transportation Department
immediately.
If there are any concerns
or problems, please call.
Thank you for your assis-
tance in this important
process.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County public school directory


Citrus County public

elementary schools

CENTRAL RIDGE ELEMENTARY
185 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
352-344-3833(Citrus)
352-465-5709 (Marion)
Fax: 352-249-2103
Email Secretary:
withringtonk@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Nancy Simon
Assistant Principal: Sharen Lowe
TOSA: Angela Swain
Volunteer Coordinator:
Karen O'Bryan-Chiavetta
Chaperone Coordinator: Linda Peltier
Contact for Transportation:
Karen O'Bryan-Chiavetta
Student School Hours:
9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. -4 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5, 4:30 6:30 p.m.

CITRUS SPRINGS ELEMENTARY
3570 W. Century Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34433
352-344-4079 or 352-489-8144
Fax: 352-249-2110
Email Secretary:
mckeownl@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Alice Harrell
Assistant Principal: Amy Crowell
TOSA: Mindy Weed
Volunteer Coordinator: Anne Fleck
Chaperone Coordinator: Holly Becker
Contact for Transportation: Hollie Hisey
Student School Hours:
9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours:
8:10 a.m. 3:55 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5, 4 6 p.m.

CRYSTAL RIVER PRIMARY
8624 W. Crystal St.
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-2211
Fax: 352-249-2109
Email Secretary:
kaiserianc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Donnie Brown
Assistant Principal: Jill Young
TOSA: Virginia George
Volunteer Coordinator: Terry Cates
Chaperone Coordinator:
Terry Cates/Linda Laing


Contact for Transportation: Jill Young
Student School Hours:
9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten
3 p.m. meet in the cafeteria
First through Fifth Grades 4 6 p.m.
Safety Patrol and Parents
6 p.m. in the Cafeteria

FLORAL CITY ELEMENTARY
8457 E. Marvin St.
Floral City, FL 34436
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 340, Floral City, 34436
352-726-1554
Fax: 352-249-2127
Email Secretary: careym@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: Janet Reed
Assistant Principal: Jennifer Hetland
Volunteer Coordinator: Julie Keiper
Chaperone Coordinator: Michelle Carey
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Michelle Carey
Student School Hours:
9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. -4 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten and New Students
9:30 10 a.m.
Meet your Teacher Pre-K Fifth Grade
10 a.m. Noon

FOREST RIDGE ELEMENTARY
2927 N. Forest Ridge Blvd.
Hernando, FL 34442
352-527-1808
Fax: 352-249-2128 Administration
Fax: 352-249-2129 Guidance
Email Secretary: heltk3@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: Laura Windham
Assistant Principal: Michelle McHugh
TOSA: Bridget Merchant
Volunteer Coordinator: Shelley Schantz
Chaperone Coordinator: Karen Helt
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Susan Nyswaner
Student School Hours:
9:10 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours:
8:10 a.m. 3:55 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Friday, Aug. 5
Pre-K through Fifth Grade
4 p.m. -6 p.m.


HERNANDO ELEMENTARY
2975 E. Trailblazer Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
352-726-1833
Fax: 352-249-2130
Email Secretary: beldena@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: John Weed
Assistant Principal: Amanda Parker
TOSA: Jamie Fehrenbach
Volunteer Coordinator: Joyce Scott
Chaperone Coordinator: Joann Tarpey
Contact for Transportation: Joann Tarpey
Student School Hours:
9:10 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten 3 4 p.m.
First through Fifth Grade 4 6 p.m.

HOMOSASSA ELEMENTARY
10935 W. Yulee Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-2953
Fax: 352-249-2131
Email Secretary:
balkcomp@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Chris Bosse
Assistant Principal: Sandra Sonberg
Volunteer Coordinator: Debi Harmon
Chaperone Coordinator: Mary Schaentzler
Contact for Transportation:
Mary Schaentzler
Student School Hours:
8:50 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5, 4 6 p.m.

INVERNESS PRIMARY
206 S. Line Ave.
Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-2632
Fax: 352-249-2134
Email Secretary: wearl@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: Laura Manos
Assistant Principal: Kay Harper
TOSA: Heather McLeod
Volunteer Coordinator: Georgie Conrad
Chaperone Coordinator: Lory Wear
Contact for Transportation: Lory Wear
Student School Hours:
8:50 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours:
8:10 a.m. 3:55 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5, 4 6 p.m.


LECANTO PRIMARY
3790 W. Educational Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-2220
Fax: 352-249-2139
Email Secretary:
pietroburgor@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Vicki Lofton
Assistant Principal: Jennifer Homan
TOSA: Michelle Loreth
Volunteer Coordinator:
Coni Young and Dolores Ramos
Chaperone Coordinator: Deborah Cahela
Contact for Transportation: Deborah Cahela
Student School Hours: 9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours:
8:05 a.m. 3:50 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5
Pre-K and Kindergarten 3:30 p.m. sharp
First through Fifth Grade 4:30 6 p.m.

PLEASANT GROVE ELEMENTARY
630 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, FL 34452
352-637-4400
Fax: 352-249-2141
Email Secretary: kellyj21@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Lynne Kirby
Assistant Principal: Rob Hermann
TOSA: Julie Jones
Volunteer Coordinator: Linda Braden
Chaperone Coordinator: Lynn Brooks
Contact for Transportation: Joyce Kelly
Student School Hours: 8:50 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8 a.m. 3:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5
New to PGE 3:30 4 p.m.
All others 4 6 p.m.

ROCK CRUSHER ELEMENTARY
814 S. Rock Crusher Road
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-795-2010
Fax: 352-249-2143
Email Secretary: gushak@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: Rene Johnson
Assistant Principal: Brendan Bonomo
TOSA: Debi Collins
Volunteer Coordinator: Pam Burns
Chaperone Coordinator: Sharon Erlandson
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Brendan Bonomo
Student School Hours: 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. -4 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5, 4:30 6:30 p.m.
continued on Page 11


G10 Saturday, July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


from Page 10

Citrus County public
middle schools
CITRUS SPRINGS MIDDLE
150 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
352-344-2244
Fax: 352-249-2111
Email Secretary: BenderR@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: David Roland
Assistant Principals:
Jason Koon and Deirdre Murray
TOSA: Eileen Jenkin
Volunteer Coordinator: Zachary Leonard
Chaperone Coordinator: Rachel Bender
Contact for Transportation:
Muriel Dufresne
Student School Hours:
7:45 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Friday, Aug. 2, 3 6 p.m.
CRYSTAL RIVER MIDDLE
344 N.E. Crystal St.
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-2116
Fax: 352-249-2108
Email Secretary:
hudsonal@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Gloria Bishop
Assistant Principals:
Inge Frederick, Brian Lancaster
TOSA: Lori Casalvieri
Volunteer Coordinator: Claudia McCoy
Chaperone Coordinator: Carolyn Jackson
Contact for Transportation: Jennifer Paugh
Student School Hours:
7:50 a.m. 2:20 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Friday, Aug. 2, 2:30 5:30 p.m.
INVERNESS MIDDLE
1950 U.S. 41 North
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1471
Fax: 352-249-2133
Email Secretary: perkinsy@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: Patricia Douglas
Assistant Principals:
Rick Darby and Teresa Alvardo
TOSA: Karen Tyler
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Skoblicki
Chaperone Coordinator: Faye Hoff
Contact for Transportation: Rick Darby
Student School Hours:
7:55 a.m. 2:20 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Friday, Aug. 2, 3 6 p.m.


LECANTO MIDDLE
3800 W. Educational Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-2050
Fax: 352-249-2138
Email Secretary:
nelsond@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Danita Eatman
Assistant Principals:
William Nelson, Ryan Selby
TOSA: Michelle Tripp
Volunteer Coordinator: Michelle Tripp
Chaperone Coordinator:
Paula MacDonald
Contact for Transportation:
Paula MacDonald
Student School Hours:
7:55 a.m. 2:37 p.m.
Teacher School Hours:
7:05 a.m. 2:50 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Friday, Aug. 2, 3- 6 p.m.



Citrus County public
high schools

CITRUS HIGH
600 W Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-2241
Fax: 352-249-2102
Email Secretary:
neanders@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Rich Hilgert
Assistant Principals: Phillip McLeod,
Deon Copeland, Laura Aguilera
Dean of Students:
Steven Baumer and Angela BlasI
Activities Director: Larry Bishop
Volunteer Coordinator: Angela BlasI
Chaperone Coordinator: Angela BlasI
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Linnet Calise
Student School Hours:
7:50 a.m. 2:20 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Tuesday, Aug. 6
9 a.m. Noon Freshmen only
Fall Open House:
Tuesday, Aug. 20, 6 7 p.m.
Informational session at 5:30 p.m.
for anyone pursuing AP courses


continued on Page 12


Your school
Your choice
Your call



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For more information, visit
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BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday July 20, 2013 Gil







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


from Page 11


CRYSTAL RIVER HIGH
3195 Crystal River High Drive
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-4641
Fax: Main Office 352-249-2106
Fax: Guidance Office 352-249-2105
Email Secretary: carterl@citrus.k12.fl.us
Principal: Dr. Linda Connors
Assistant Principals: Charles Brooks,
Janet Tuggle, Melissa Zaniewski
Activities Director: Tony Stukes
Volunteer Coordinator: Tony Stukes
Chaperone Coordinator: Cheryl Pratt
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Kim LaRue
Student School Hours:
7:45 a.m. 2:23 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Tuesday, Aug. 6,
9 -11 a.m. Freshman only
Fall Open House:
Thursday, Aug. 22, 6 7 p.m.

LECANTO HIGH
3810 W. Educational Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-2334


Fax: 352-249-2136
Email Secretary: Headkl@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Jeff Davis
Assistant Principals: Doug Connors,
Tony Whitehead, Shawyn Newman
Dean of Students:
Robert Smith, Sean Furniss
Activities Director: Ron Allan
Volunteer Coordinator:
Diana Brown and Ron Allan
Chaperone Coordinator: Diana Brown
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Kim Head
Student School Hours:
7:55 a.m. 2:22 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
All students all grades
Thursday, Aug. 15, 6 7 p.m.
Freshman and new students
only Wednesday, July 31,
8 a.m. Noon in the gym



Other schools/sites

ACADEMY OF
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
12695 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429


352-795-8793
Fax: 352-249-2100
Email Secretary:
fletcherd@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Administrator: Ben Stofcheck
Chaperone Coordinator:
Wendy West-Cleary
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Donna Fletcher
Student School Hours: 8 a.m. 1:45 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Monday, Aug. 5, 6 p.m.
College of Central Florida
Lecanto Campus

CREST
2600 S. Panther Pride Drive
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0303
Fax: 352-249-2104
Email Secretary:
foresterm@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Lee Mulder
Assistant Principal: Anita Moon
Volunteer Coordinator: Susan Castorina
Chaperone Coordinator: April Schmitt
Contact for Transportation Request forms:
Anita Moon
Student School Hours:
8:45 a.m. 3:15 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8 a.m. 3:45 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Friday, Aug. 5, 2 p.m. 6 p.m.

RENAISSANCE CENTER
3630 W Educational Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-4567
Fax: 352-249-2144
Email Secretary:
gerhardtc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Dale Johns
Assistant Principal: Ernie Hopper
Volunteer Coordinator: Cherri Gerhardt
Chaperone Coordinator: Cherri Gerhardt
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Vicki Miranti
Student School Hours: 8 a.m. 2 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.
Orientation Dates and Times:
Tuesday, August 6, 3 6 p.m.

WITHLACOOCHEE
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
1201 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-2430
Fax: 352-249-2157
Email Secretary: tobinc@citrus.k12.fl.us
Director: Denise Willis
Assistant Directors:
Richard Van Gulik (Curriculum)
Judy Johnson (Adult Education)


Volunteer Coordinator: Melissa Burke
Chaperone Coordinator:
Becky Strittmatter
Contact for Transportation /Registration:
Elizabethea Spence
Secondary Student School Hours:
8:15 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Post-Secondary Student School Hours:
7:45 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
HVAC and IMMR Student School Hours:
7:30 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
(DISTRICT SERVICES CENTER)
1007 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1931
Website: www.citrus.kl2.fl.us
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.

STUDENT SERVICES CENTER
2575 S. Panther Pride Drive
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0090
Fax: 352-249-2145
Email Secretary: welshj@citrus.k12.fl.us
Director: Regina Allegretta
Coordinator: Kit Humbaugh
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

PLANNING AND
GROWTH MANAGEMENT
2575 S. Panther Pride Drive
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-3960
Fax: 352-249-2145
Email Secretary: Mosert@citrus.k12.fl.us
Director: Chuck Dixon
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER
3741 W. Educational Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-3437
Fax: 352-249-2140
Email Secretary: crossS2@citrus.k12.fl.us
Director: Dr. Mike Geddes,
Instructional Technology
Director: Steve Chamblin,
Information Services
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

MARINE SCIENCE STATION
12646 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-4393
Fax: 352-249-2140
Email Secretary:
proveauxc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Supervisor: Hugh Adkins
Volunteer Coordinator:
Catherine Proveaux
Office Hours: 8 a.m. 4 p.m.


A GREAT END

TO THE DAY

After school programs offered
at most Citrus County schools!


YMCA OF THE SUNCOAST CITRUS COUNTY PROGRAM BRANCH
3909 North Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 637-0132 I www.ymcasuncoast.org
YMCA Mission: To put Christian principles into practice through
programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.


I


G12 Saturday, July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL


4 1

.A






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County private


school directory
nverness Christian Academy Solid Rock Christian Academy
grades: K2 through 12 Grades: K through 8
222 S. Florida Ave., Inverness 972 N. Christy Way, Inverness
52-726-3759 352-726-9788
-mail: office@invernesschristian.org Principal: Sheila Chau
principal : Day Riley School starts Aug. 12


School starts Aug. 7
Pope John Paul II Catholic School
Grades: EC3 through 8
4341 W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto
352-746-2020
Email: office@pjp2.net
Principal: Dr. Lou Whittaker
Seven Rivers Christian School
Grades: PK3 through 12
4221 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Lecanto
352-746-5696
Email: dnelson@sevenrivers.org
Principal: Scott Jackson
School starts Aug. 19


St. Paul's Lutheran School
Grades: Preschool through 8
6150 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
352-489-3027
Email: office@stpauls.edu
Principal: Kyle Bender
Preschool Director:
Kay-Lynn Johnson
West Coast Christian School
Grades: K through 12
718 N.W. First Ave., Crystal River
352-795-2079
Principal: Marlene Pringle


Become a school volunteer


A Citrus County School District vol-
unteer may be a parent or grandparent,
a member of the business community, a
retiree, or any individual who is willing
to give freely of his or her time to make
a positive difference in the lives of stu-
dents. Every day during the school
year, hundreds of volunteers are spend-
ing time in Citrus County schools and
classrooms and sharing their talents
with students and teachers.
Volunteers serve in a wide variety of
ways. They may choose among numer-
ous activities that include mentoring or
tutoring students, sharing special inter-
ests or talents, working in media cen-
ters, listening to children read, setting
up learning centers, and helping stu-
dents with special projects.
Helping children reach their full po-
tential in the classroom and become
successful citizens is a wonderful bene-


fit of serving as a volunteer. If you are
interested in enriching the lives of
young people in our community, you
are invited to join the Citrus County
School District volunteer community.
For more information on volunteer op-
portunities and district-wide volunteer
training, please call Helen Pannelli at
352-726-1931, ext. 2233.


g Sharper Image

PERFORMANCE DANCE STUDIO


6621 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
(East of Publix Shopping Center)


I s505 1" MONTH
I500 OF TUITION
WITH COUPON

S Miss Alvssa
V1 Bonomo

BEST IS'
BEST Classes
Start
[ *August 12
2013
352-563-5550
wwM n sharperillagedl n(e (coi
SI (heck our schedule th
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Online. I g *


'eA NTI-DRUG
COALITION OF CITRUS COUNTY

SI .aliliiiii@antidrugeitrus.com
Like us on Facebook
601-6620

A:L k 586-7214


CIl )ONICLE
Tom Rogers, creator of
Tommy Tucker and Sparky,
and owner of Graphic Elite
Printng and Blue Heron
Tees in Inverness, is
pictured with "Sparky
Ihe Wonder Dog" played
by Sam (Sam's owner
is Susan Lewis)


I
4
3
E
P


BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday July 20, 2013 G13


J, N







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Free and reduced-price Florida income eligibility guidelines



meals at school for free and reduced-price meals
Effective from July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014


Citrus County School
Board Food & Nutrition
Services announces its pol-
icy for free and reduced-
price meals for students
under the National School
Lunch and Breakfast
Programs.
Any interested person
may review a copy of the
policy by contacting the
Food & Nutrition Services
Department, 1007 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450;
352-726-1931 or 800-
788-1930.
Application forms are
being sent to all homes
with a letter to parents or
guardians. There are two
ways to apply for free or
reduced-price meals.
Households may apply on-
line by following the Free
& Reduced-Price Meal Ap-
plication link at
http://cafe.citrus.kl2.fl.us
or complete the paper ap-
plication and return it to the
Citrus County School
Board District Office. Ad-
ditional copies are available
in the Food & Nutrition
Services Department at the
School Board Office. The
information provided on
the application will be used
for the purpose of deter-
mining eligibility and may
be verified at any time dur-
ing the school year. Appli-
cations may be submitted at


any time during the year.
Household size and in-
come criteria will be used
to determine eligibility. An
application cannot be ap-
proved unless it contains
complete eligibility infor-
mation. Once approved,
meal benefits are good for
an entire year. You need not
notify the organization of
changes in income and
household size.
Households that receive
SNAP (Supplemental Nu-
trition Assistance Program)
or TANF (Temporary As-
sistance for Needy Fami-
lies) are required to list on
the application only the
child's name, SNAP/TANF
case number for ANY
family member, and signa-
ture of adult household
member.
Foster children will re-
ceive free benefits regard-
less of the child's personal
income or the income of
the household.
Households with children
who are considered home-
less or runaway should
contact the district liaison,
District Student Services
Center at 352-527-0090.
Households with children
who are considered migrant
should contact the migrant
coordinator, Migrant Edu-
cation at 352-228-0377.
For the purpose of deter-


mining household size, de-
ployed service members are
considered a part of the
household. Families should
include the names of the
deployed service members
on their application. Report
only that portion of the de-
ployed service member's
income made available to
them or on their behalf to
the family. Additionally, a
housing allowance that is
part of the Military Hous-
ing Privatization Initiative
is not to be included as
income.
All other households
must provide the following
information listed on the
application:
+ Total household income
listed by gross amount re-
ceived, type of income
(e.g., wages, child support,
etc.) and how often the in-
come is received by each
household member;
* Names of all household
members check the "no
income" box if applicable;
if household member is a
child, list school name for
each;
+ Signature of an adult
household member certify-
ing the information pro-
vided is correct; and
+ The last four digits of
the Social Security number

continued on Page 15


Household


Size Annual Monthl
1 .............. .14,937 . ..1,245 .
2 .............. .20,163 . .1,681 .
3 .............. .25,389 ... .2,116 .
4 .............. .30,615 ... .2,552 .
5 ...............35,841 ... 2,987 .
6 .............. 41,067 ... .3,423 .
7 .............. .46,293 ... .3,858 .
8 .............. .51,519 ... .4,294 .
For each additional family member, add:
.............. .+5,226 .... +436


Household


Si:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8


ze Annual
............. .2 1,257
............. .28,694
............. .36,13 1
............. .43,568
............... 51,005
............... 58,442
...............65,879
............... 73,316


Weeks
. 575 ......
. 776 ......
. 977 ......
. .1,178 .....
...1,379 .....
...1,580 .....
. .1,781 .....
. .1,982 .....


Weekly
..288
..388
..489
..589
.690
..790
..891
..991

. .+101


Weekly
..409
..552
..695
..838
..981
S.1,124
..1,267
..1,410


Monthly
....1,772 ....
. .2,392 ....
... .3,011 ....
... .3,631 ....
... .4,251 ....
... .4,871 ....
.. .5,490 ....
... .6,110 ....


For each additional family member, add:
............... .+7,437 .... +620


y


Month
. .623 ....
. .841 ....
. .1,058 ..
..1,276 ..
S.1,494,
..1,712 ..
. .1,929 ..
. .2,147 ..


.+218 .... +201


Month
..886 ..
..1,196
..1,506
..1,816
..2,126
S.2,436
S.2,745
..3,055


Weeks
. .818 ......
. .1,104 .....
. .1,390 .....
...1,676 .....
...1,962 .....
..2,248 .....
...2,534 .....
. .2,820 .....


.+310 .... +287 .......+144


To determine annual income:
* If you receive the income every week, multiply the total gross income by 52.
* If you receive the income every two weeks, multiply the total gross income by 26.
* If you receive the income twice a month, multiply the total gross income by 24.
* If you receive the income monthly, multiply the total gross income by 12.

Remember: The total income before taxes, Social Security, health benefits, union
dues, or other deductions must be reported.

"In accordance with Federal Law, and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this insti-
tution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex,
age, or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination write USDA, Director, Office of
Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call
toll free 866-632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech
disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8339;
or 800-845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer."


FREE MEAL SCALE
Twice Per Every Two


REDUCED-PRICE MEAL SCALE
Twice Per Every Two


G14 Saturday, July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Free and reduced-price


meal application processing


Citrus County Schools
Food & Nutrition Services
Department offers state-of-
the-art online processing of
free and reduced-price meal
applications. This service
provides you the conven-
ience and confidentiality
you desire when applying
for benefits. Additionally, it
expedites the approval
process, eliminates the need
to mail back the paper ap-
plication and also elimi-
nates processing delays
associated with incomplete
applications. When enter-


ing your application online,
you only need the student's
name and birthdate. If you
need assistance, please call
the District Food & Nutri-
tion Services Department at
352-726-1931, ext. 2402 or
2425.
For the 2013-2014 school
year, Citrus County encour-
ages parents to apply online
for free and reduced-price
meals. Please visit our
website at http://cafe.citrus
.kl2.fl.us and follow the
Free & Reduced-Price Meal
Application link. You can


enter the application from
the convenience of your
own home, use a friend's
computer, go to the library
or come by the Citrus
County Schools Food &
Nutrition Services office.
Our office is available to as-
sist you Monday through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m.
We constantly strive to
find new and better ways to
serve our students and our
families, and we thank you
for partnering with us in
this effort.


Citrus County offers MyPayments
Plus, a state-of-the-art online service
that provides you the convenience and
information you need to manage your
student's meal account.
This system speeds up serving lines
in the cafeteria, eliminates the need to
send checks to school or worry about
lost or forgotten lunch money, and en-
sures that your child will receive a
nutritious meal.
At NO cost, MyPaymentsPlus allows
any family to:
+ Create a free, secured account to
manage all of your student's accounts.
+ Check your student's current account
balance.
+ Monitor the items your student has
been purchasing in the cafeteria.
+ Create settings to receive email noti-
fications when the account reaches a
low balance.
For a small program fee, My
PaymentsPlus allows any family to:
* Make a prepayment into your stu-
dent's meal account using a credit card
or debit card. This can be done through
MyPaymentsPlus or by calling 877-
634-9609. Funds deposited through
MyPaymentsPlus are usually available
for student use within a matter of
minutes.


from Page 14

the adult signing the application or check
the no Social Security box for this house-
hold member if he or she does not have a
Social Security number.
If a household member becomes unem-
ployed or if the household size changes,
the District Food & Nutrition Department
office should be contacted.
Under the provisions of the free and re-
duced-price meal policy, the director of
Food & Nutrition Services will review ap-
plications and determine eligibility. If a
parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the


+ Create settings to automatically re-
plenish your student's account when it
reaches a low balance.

For the 2013-2014 school year, we
strongly encourage all parents, even if
you do not prepay for your student's
meal account, to create an account at
MyPaymentsPlus at no cost.

Citrus County offers several convenient
ways to access MyPaymentsPlus. You
can follow the link on our website at
http://cafe.citrus.kl2.fl.us, go directly
to MyPaymentsPlus at www.my
paymentsplus.com or call 877-634-
9609 from anywhere, at anytime.
To create a new account on the website,
follow the onscreen directions and reg-
ister your student using their seven-
digit District Student ID number. If you
need assistance locating this number
please call the District Food & Nutrition
Services Department at 352-726-1931,
ext. 2402 or 2425.

We constantly strive to find new and
better ways to serve our students and
our families, and we thankyoufor
partnering with us in this effort.


ruling of the official, he or she may wish
to discuss the decision with the determin-
ing official on an informal basis. If the
parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he
or she may make a request either orally or
in writing to:
Sandra "Sam" Himmel, Superintendent
1007 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1931 or 800-788-1930
Unless indicated otherwise on the appli-
cation, the information on the free and
reduced-price meal application may be
used by the school system in determining
eligibility for other educational programs.


Online MealpayPlus


offers convenience


BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday July 20, 2013 G15







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County Schools 2013-2014


new instructional hires


Elizabeth Abramowich Citrus Springs Middle
Laurne Albury Forest Ridge Elementary
Damon Anderson Crystal River High
Lisa Bauer Crystal River Primary
Matthew Bialick Crystal River Middle
Todd Bone Pleasant Grove Elementary
Kerri Bradley Citrus High School
Samantha Carey Citrus Springs Elementary
Ward Cooper -Academy of Environmental
Science
Gillian Darby Crystal River Primary
Guy Devaney Crystal River High
Elaine Fitzgerald Hernando Elementary
Cindy Lou Fowler Citrus Springs Middle
James Gerlach Withlacoochee Technical
Institute
Snick Glenn Hernando Elementary
Jennifer Gula Citrus Springs Elementary
Stephanie Hays Central Ridge Elementary
Alexandra Hearsey Central Ridge Elementary
Jaclynn Herb Inverness Primary School
Allison Johnson Crystal River Primary
Cheryl Kaye Lecanto Primary
Ashley Kemp Forest Ridge Elementary


Kristine Marinello Inverness Primary
Ciera Markey Citrus Springs Middle
Barbara McKinnon Crystal River High
Elizabeth Meek Crystal River Middle
Cathy Michalik Inverness Primary
Constance Miller Floral City Elementary
Rachel Miller Crystal River Primary
Ashley Moore Homosassa Elementary
Danielle Nowosiadlo Homosassa Elementary
Michelle Ohman Crystal River Middle
Lisa Paprzycki Citrus Springs Middle
Marcie Peterson Rock Crusher Elementary
Cassandra Powell Crystal River Primary
Emily Ramsey Central Ridge Elementary
Jessica Reynolds ESE
Michael Shelton Crystal River Middle
Samantha Stitzel ESE
Leita Strickland Lecanto Primary
Benjamin Swinton Citrus High
Julia Taylor Inverness Middle
Tanya Tsacrios Central Ridge Elementary
Melissa Varnadore Crystal River Middle
Dennis Yamrose Citrus High


School Advisory Enhancement
Councils (SAEC) have been es-
tablished at each school in Citrus
County. The SAEC is comprised
of parents, students, teachers,
support staff, business/commu-
nity members and the principal.
As a resource to the school and
principal, the SAEC:
+ facilitates school communica-
tion with parents and community
members
+ assists in providing program
support to parents, students,
teachers and the community
+ informs and advises school
staff
regarding community conditions
+ assists the principal in prepar-
ing
and evaluating the School


Improvement Plan
+ provides assistance in prepa-
ration of the school's annual
budget
One of the primary functions of
the SAEC is to assist the school
in identifying, developing and
implementing school goals
through a school improvement
planning process. This plan ad-
dresses the needs of the student
as they relate to state goals and
district strategic aims. SAEC
meetings are open to all school
and community members. Team-
work and the power of collective
thinking as seen through the
work of the SAEC have resulted
in meaningful and positive
change in our school and dis-
trict.


Principals and assistant principals announced for the 2013-2014 school year


Central Ridge Elementary School
Nancy Simon, Principal
Sharen Lowe, Assistant Principal

Citrus Springs Elementary School
Alice Harrell, Principal
Amy Crowell, Assistant Principal

Crystal River Primary School
Donnie Brown, Principal
Jill Young, Assistant Principal

Floral City Elementary School
Janet Reed, Principal
Jennifer Hetland, Assistant Principal

Forest Ridge Elementary School
Laura Windham, Principal
Michelle McHugh, Assistant Principal

Hernando Elementary School
John Weed, Principal
Amanda Parker, Assistant Principal


Homosassa Elementary School
Chris Bosse, Principal
Sandra Sonberg, Assistant Principal

Inverness Primary School
Laura Manos, Principal
Kay Harper, Assistant Principal

Lecanto Primary School
Vicki Lofton, Principal
Jennifer Homan, Assistant Principal

Pleasant Grove Elementary School
Lynn Kirby, Principal
Robert Hermann, Assistant Principal

Rock Crusher Elementary School
Rene Johnson, Principal
Brendan Bonomo, Assistant Principal

Citrus Springs Middle School
David Roland, Principal
Jason Koon, Assistant Principal
Deirdre Murray, Assistant Principal


Crystal River Middle School
Gloria Bishop, Principal
Brian Lancaster, Assistant Principal
Inge Frederick, Assistant Principal

Inverness Middle School
Trish Douglas, Principal
Teresa Alvardo, Assistant Principal
Rick Darby, Assistant Principal

Lecanto Middle School
Danita Eatman, Principal
Ryan Selby, Assistant Principal
William Nelson, Assistant Principal

Citrus High School
Rich Hilgert, Principal
Phillip McLeod Assistant Principal
Deon Copeland, Assistant Principal
Laura Aguilera, Assistant Principal

Crystal River High School
Linda Connors, Principal
Charles Brooks, Assistant Principal
Melissa Zaniewski, Assistant Principal
Janet Tuggle, Assistant Principal


Lecanto High School
Jeff Davis, Principal
Doug Connors, Assistant Principal
Tony Whitehead, Assistant Principal
Shawyn Newman, Assistant Principal

CREST
Lee Mulder, Principal
Anita Moon, Assistant Principal

Withlacoochee Technical Institute
Denise Willis, Director
Judy Johnson, Assistant Director
Richard Van Gulik, Assistant Principal

Renaissance Center
Dale Johns, Principal
Ernie Hopper, Assistant Principal

Marine Science Station
Hugh Adkins, Supervisor

Academy of Environmental Science
Ben Stofcheck, Academy Administrator


School Advisory



Enhancement Councils


G16 Saturday, July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County public schools' health services


Medication Policy
The appropriate Citrus
County Public Schools'
personnel will be author-
ized to assist the students)
in the administration of
prescription medication ac-
cording to the Florida
Statute 1006.062. Over-the-
counter (OTC) medication
will be handled in the same
manner as prescription
medication.
All medications must be
properly labeled from the
pharmacy and in the origi-
nal container. A separate
medication authorization
form is required for each
drug administered. The
prescription bottle must be
within the expiration date.
An adult must bring all
medication to the school.
Medicines and treatments
considered outside medical
protocols, as established by
the Citrus County Health
Department, such as herbal
treatments for
ADD/ADHD, caffeine
pills, aloe for burs, and
meat tenderizer for bee
stings require a physician's
note.
Medications should be
administered at school only
if it is necessary to give the
medication during school
hours, for example, a med-
ication given three times a
day could be given before
school, after school, and at
bedtime.
Over-the-counter med-
ications are treated just like
prescriptions. OTC med-
ication may be limited or
require a physician's order.
Students shall not carry
any medications including
Tylenol, eye drops or cough
drops, etc. Florida Statute


1002.20 provides that stu-
dents may carry a metered
dose inhaler, epinephrine
auto-injectors diabetic sup-
plies and equipment, and
pancreatic enzyme supple-
ment. These students are
allowed to personally carry
medications/equipment at
school with the permission
of their physician and par-
ent(s) and/or legal
guardian(s). A special per-
mission form must be com-
pleted and any metered
dose inhaler, epinephrine
auto-injector, diabetic sup-
plies and equipment, and
pancreatic enzyme supple-
ment must be labeled with
the student's name.

Immunizations
Parents need to provide
the school with an immu-
nization record. These im-
munizations are required by
Statute 1003.22. Students
can and will be excluded
from school if immuniza-
tion requirements are not
met.

State of Florida
Immunization
Requirement Guidelines
2013-2014 School Year

Pre-Kindergarten (PK)
4 DTP/DTaP (Diphtheria,
Tetanus, Pertussis)
3 Polio
4 Hib (Haemophilus
influenzae type b)
1 MMR (Measles, Mumps,
Rubella)
3 Hepatitis B
1 Varicella+ (chicken pox)

Kindergarten (KG) -
Sixth Grade
5 DTP/DTaP
4 Polio*


2 MMR
3 Hepatitis B
2 Varicella+ for KG Fifth
Grade
1 Varicella+ for Sixth
Grade

Seventh Grade Twelfth
Grade
5 DTP/DTaP
4 Polio
2 MMR
3 Hepatitis B
1 Tdap Seventh Grade -
Eleventh Grade
1 Tdap or Td (Twelfth
Grade)
1 Varicella+ for Seventh
Grade Twelfth Grade

For kindergarten entry, if
the fourth dose of polio was
administered before the
fourth birthday, a fifth dose
of polio is required.
+ Varicella vaccination is
not required ifvaricella
disease is documented by a
health care provider.
For more information or
to schedule an appointment
for vaccinations contact
your primary health care
provider or the Florida De-
partment of Health in
Citrus County.

Citrus County
Health Department
(Appointment line
352-527-0247)

120 Montgomery St.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1731

3700 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0068

117 N.W. U.S. 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-6233


Physicals
Students entering
Kindergarten must provide
the school proof of a cur-
rent physical examination
by a health care provider or
by the Florida Department
of Health in Citrus County
(Health Department) prior
to the first day of school.
Students entering a Florida
school for the first time
also need to present a phys-
ical dated within the past
year.
For more information or
to schedule an appointment
for a physical, contact your
primary health care
provider or the Health De-
partment. The Health De-
partment offers physical
for $40 and will assist with
eligibility applications for
other programs such as
Medicaid and food
assistance.

Registration
Requirements
Parents) and/or legal
guardian(s) of all children
entering Citrus County
Public Schools for the first
time are required to have
the following items to
register:
* Birth Certificate
* Certificate of
Immunization
(DH 680 card)
* Physical Examination
(completed within
one year of entry date)
* Proof of Florida
Residency
* A Social Security card is
requested


Special requirements


for children entering


seventh grade


Do you have a child
entering the seventh
grade for the 2013-2014
school year? In addition
to compliance with all
immunization require-
ments, children entering,
attending, or transferring
to the seventh grade in
Florida schools must re-
ceive a tetanus-diphthe-
ria-pertussis (Tdap)
vaccination. By state
statute, your child will
not be able to start sev-
enth grade without doc-
umentation of this
required vaccination. To
avoid interrupting your
child's educational op-
portunities for the 2013-
2014 school year
(starting date Aug. 7,


2013), call for an ap-
pointment today with
your private physician
or the health department.
Be sure to take all your
child's immunization
records with you so they
can be updated. Please
take the time today to
make an appointment.
If you have any ques-
tions regarding school
immunization require-
ments, contact Jessica
Hoag, Student Health
Specialist at 352-527-
0090, or your local
Health Department loca-
tion at 352-726-1731
(Inverness), 352-527-
0068 (Lecanto), or 352-
795-6233 (Crystal
River).


General contact information

For: Home Education
Contact: Kit Humbaugh
Coordinator of Student Services
352-527-0090

For: Zoning Information and
Special Attendance Requests
Contact: Chuck Dixon
Director of Planning and Growth Management
352-746-3960
Place: Student Services Center
Located in the Lecanto School Complex
2575 South Panther Pride Drive
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Directions: From Inverness/Floral City
West on State Road 44 to County Road 491 in Lecanto. Turn left
(South) on County Road 491 and continue to the Lecanto School
Complex. Turn right at the light and follow the signs to the District
Student Services Center.
From Crystal River/Homosassa
East on State Road 44 to County Road 491 in Lecanto. Turn right
(South) on County Road 491 and continue to the Lecanto School
Complex. Turn right at the light and follow the signs to the District
Student Services Center.


BACK To SCHOOL


Saturday July 20, 2013 G17






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Student dress code for


Citrus County public schools


Strategic Planning


Framework


The Citrus County School
Board recognizes that clothing
fashions change and that fads
come and go, but distinctions still
need to be made as to what is ac-
ceptable attire for educational pur-
poses. Some clothing which
might be appropriate in other set-
tings would be completely inap-
propriate and disruptive for the
learning atmosphere in a school
setting.
The principal or designee is re-
sponsible for interpreting and clar-
ifying the student dress code upon
student or parent request. The
principal or designee is the final
authority for interpreting and ap-
plying the student dress code re-
lated to special events and
activities conducted at the school.
Students will dress in attire
which does not distract from the
learning process or the educational
environment. The Citrus County
School guidelines specify the
following:
+ Clothing should not be sexu-
ally suggestive and it should cover
and conceal body parts, e.g. chest,
midriff, back, legs (to mid-thigh
or longer), shoulders (2-inch-wide
shoulder straps minimum).
+ Clothing should cover all
undergarments.
+ Shorts, skirts, or pants should
be worn at natural waistline.
+ Attire should not illustrate,
enhance or depict tobacco/
alcohol/drugs, nor have offensive,
racial, satanic, gang-related, sex-
ual or violent messages or images.
+ Attire should contribute to the
health and safety of all students
and staff. Jewelry, shoes, acces-
sories, hair color and hair styles
must be free of conditions that
could be considered hazardous or
disruptive.
+ Accessories such as, but not
limited to, spiked neck, spiked


wristbands, and wallet chains are
not permissible.
+ Blankets used for jackets and
sleepwear (i.e., pajamas, house
slippers) are not allowed.

HEAD COVERS
Hats and distracting head covers
should not be worn in designated
school areas at any time.

FOOTWEAR
Footwear should contribute to
the health and safety of all stu-
dents and staff. Roller shoes and
house slippers are not permitted.
Tennis shoes/sneakers may be re-
quired for physical activity.

CLOTHING
The following administrative
guidelines must be followed by
all students when wearing shorts,
skirts, pants, and dresses:

1. Length of shorts, skirts, and
dresses must be mid-thigh or
longer when standing.
2. Dresses, skirts, and shorts
that are too tight or too baggy
will not be permitted. Items such
as leggings, bicycle shorts, aero-
bic shorts, etc. are not permitted
unless under approved clothing.
3. Shorts, skirts, pants, and
dresses must be hemmed.
4. Pants that are too tight, too
baggy, or too long will not be
permitted.
NOTE: It is the responsibility
of each student to come to school
in the appropriate dress, have re-
spect for self and others, and un-
derstand the role that appropriate
dress and respect for self and oth-
ers has on an orderly learning en-
vironment. Therefore, students,
while attending school during the
regular school day, are prohibited
from wearing clothes that expose


underwear or body parts in an in-
decent or vulgar manner or that
disrupts the orderly learning envi-
ronment. Any student who vio-
lates this dress policy is subject to
the following disciplinary ac-
tions:
1. For a first offense, a student
shall be given a verbal warning
and the school principal shall call
the student's parent or guardian.
2. For a second offense, the
student is ineligible to participate
in any extracurricular activity for
a period of time not to exceed
five (5) days and the school prin-
cipal shall meet with the student's
parent or guardian.
3. For a third or subsequent of-
fense, a student shall receive an
in-school suspension pursuant to
1003.01(5), Florida Statutes, for
a period not to exceed 3 days, the
student is ineligible to participate
in any extracurricular activity for
a period not to exceed 30 days,
and the school principal shall call
the student's parent or guardian
and send the parent or guardian a
written letter regarding the stu-
dent's in-school suspension and
ineligibility to participate in
extracurricular activities.

Violation of the
student dress code
Any student violating the stu-
dent dress code may be sent home
to change, or the parent may be
asked to bring a change of clothes
to the school for the student.
Any absence caused by a stu-
dent dress code violation will be
an unexcused absence for each
period or day missed. A violation
may also result in a suspension.
Nothing in this section is in-
tended to keep school principals
from using their best judgment as
to how to best implement this
code.


Mission
The mission of the Citrus
County School District is to
educate all students through
relevant curriculum and expe-
riences for life in an ever-
changing world.

We believe that:
+ A safe and caring environ-
ment is essential for the learn-
ing and well-being of all
individuals.
+ Individuals and organiza-
tions are accountable for their
behaviors and actions.
+ High expectations and
challenging standards pro-
mote continuous improve-
ment and high achievement.
+ All individuals can learn
at different times, in different
ways, and at different rates.
+ Mutual respect is a key-
stone of learning.
+ Recognition promotes
higher accomplishment and
self-esteem.
+ Community involvement
and teamwork are critical to a
high-quality educational
system.
+ It is essential to embrace
the diversity of individuals,
ideas, talents, and learning
styles.
+ High-quality education de-
mands innovation and risk.
+ The balance of academics
and extracurricular activities
is essential for a well-rounded
education.
+ Students require discipline
and direction in order to be
successful learners.
+ Open and honest commu-
nication is essential to effec-
tive human interaction.
+ Lifelong learning im-


proves the quality of life.

Strategic goals
All students will develop a
foundation of knowledge and
skills through a rigorous and
relevant curriculum that ex-
ceeds local, state, and national
expectations, closes all per-
formance gaps, and helps all
students realize their full
potential.
Schools will be safe and se-
cure for all individuals and
will provide students the op-
portunity to participate in a
school community that cre-
ates a caring environment
committed to building posi-
tive relationships.

Strategies used to
achieve the strategic
goals will involve:
+ Innovative and research-
based curriculum and pro-
gram delivery systems
+ Emphasis on at-risk and
special groups of learners
(including gifted)
+ Staff development, recruit-
ment, and retention of
workforce
* Data systems (technology)
* Allocation of resources
(human, physical, technologi-
cal, financial)
+ Career preparation
* Community connections

Strategic delimiters
We will not initiate any new
program or service unless:
+ it is consistent with and
contributes to our mission.
+ it is accompanied by the
training and resources needed
to assure its effectiveness.
+ it is fiscally responsible.


G18 Saturday, July 20, 2013


BACK To SCHOOL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


School Population Data
Elementary..............6,965
M iddle .................... 3,352
High ........................ 4,589
Other schools ............769
Total (Pre K- 12) ..15,675


Anticipated
2013-2014 .............15,414
School District Personnel
Instructional............1,254
Non-instructional ......1,073
Administrative ..............82
Total employees........2,409


WTI Extended Daycare Services


+ Morning, 6:30 a.m. until
start of school, $21 week
+ Afternoon, dismissal to
6 p.m., $21 week
+ Morning and afternoon,
$42 week
Fees are collected every
two weeks.
Payment for the first two
weeks will be collected at


the time of registration.
Registration is available
during Elementary School
Open House. Extended
Daycare staff will be avail-
able to meet with parents
and students. For additional
information call Michelle
Jones at 726-2430, ext.
4303.


2012-2013 general facts


Home Telephone:


Business Telephone:


Name of School:


Grade:


Age:


Establishing school bus stops


Florida Statutes (FS),
Florida Administrative Code
(FAC) and Citrus County
School Board Policies Re-
lated to the Establishment of
School Bus Stops:
Chapter 234.01, FS in-
structs Florida school boards
to provide transportation for
students whose homes are
more than a "reasonable
walking distance" from the
student's assigned school.
Chapter 6A-3.001, FAC
defines a reasonable walking
distance as "any distance not
more than two (2) miles be-
tween the home and school or
one and one-half (1 1/2)
miles between the home and
the assigned bus stop."
Citrus County School
Board Policy 3.21(1), School
Bus Scheduling and Routing
is the basis for the establish-
ment of stops within our dis-
trict. These guidelines are:
+ Buses will be filled to
maximize capacity.
* Stops will be only on
roads with conditions and
bridges which will support


the bus.
+ Stops will not be sched-
uled any closer than two-
tenths miles (.2) apart.
+ Routes will not be ex-
tended to accommodate stu-
dents within a reasonable
walking distance from the
school.
+ School bus routes will be
restricted to main thorough-
fares and all-weather roads.
+ Spur routes are defined as
roads where the bus is re-
quired to leave the main thor-
oughfare for less than
five-tenths (.5) of a mile to
make a stop and then make a
turnaround and return to the
main thoroughfare and are not
within the scope of the policy.
+ Spur routes will not cause
poor scheduling, such as
causing students to leave
home at an unreasonable time.
+ When a route necessitates
a turnaround, a suitable turn-
ing area must be available for
the bus
+ Changes in routes must be
made by the transportation
supervisor.


Assigned Bus Stop Location:

Nearest Cross Street:

Please allow up to 10 working days for a decision on the requested bus stop change. Transportation Services
Department personnel will contact parent(s)/legal guardian(s) by telephone when a decision is made.

Reason for Request:

0 Establish new transportation service.
D Bus stop is more than .5 miles from home address.
0 Intersection of the nearest cross street is more than .5 miles from home address.
O Walk route to the bus stop is hazardous (multiple curves, no shoulders, etc.).
D Location of present bus stop requires student to cross a divided highway.
0 Other

Please Note:
* If the School District has approved a Special Attendance Request, the student may ride the bus at the
closest bus stop of the reassigned school.
* Please contact Citrus County Animal Control at 726-7660 for animal safety concerns.
* Please contact the Citrus County Sheriffs Office at 726-4488 for suspicious persons concerns.

Please review the Citrus County School Board Transportation Policy and the Florida Statues on the
back of this form.


F


Approved


Not Approved


District Contact Person:

Date Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s) Noti fied:


Citrus County Public Schools'
Transportation Request Form


Directions for Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s): (PLEASE PRINT)
Please complete the Transportation Request Form and return to the Transportation School Contact Person at
the assigned school or mail to the Transportation Department, Citrus County School Board, 1007 W Main St
Inv, FL 34450 or Fax to 352-249-2147.

Date

Name of Student:

Name of Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s):

Street Address:


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College of Central Florida offers equal access and opportunity in employment, admissions and educational activities. The college will not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, marital status, national origin, genetic information or disability status in its employment practices or in the
admission and treatment of students. Recognizing that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination on the basis of gender and violates this policy statement,
the college will not tolerate such conduct. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies:
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