<%BANNER%>

Citrus County chronicle ( June 24, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03185

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03185

Full Text


British Open: Westwood leads after third


CITRUS


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
89
LOW
73


/B1&8


COUNTY


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 348


Fire fee fans debate


:Their::iii
H .. ....... H HH i HH ^.x:!!!!!!!!!!!



New feature
Robert Palmisano writes
about his time in the
Korean War./Page A18

EXCURSIONS:


Go camping
Make lasting memories
at local campgrounds.
/Page A15
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:
Mystery box
A reader
asks
John
Sikorski
for help
identify-
ingthe
S original
j purpose
carved
wooden
box./
Page E4
COMMENTARY:


Me-wow
Publisher Gerry
Mulligan gets a surprise
visitor nibbling his cat's
kibble./Page Cl

COMMUNITY:
Senior dining
See menus for the
upcoming week at all
senior dining sites in
the area./Page A4


GARDENING TIPS:


Commissioners say it's fair;

homeowners say it's not


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS The cost of
the Citrus County Commis-
sion's proposed fire and rescue
fee/tax structure is an
attention-grabber.
With an across-the-board,
$60-per-residential-unit fee
proposed, homeowners on the


lower end of the tax scale will
triple what they pay for
fire/rescue services.
Those in upper-echelon
homes will pay more, but their
increase isn't as great because
the county proposes to reduce
the fire tax rate.
Homeowners have flooded
the county commission office
with phone calls and emails


complaining about the new fire
fee/tax structure, saying they
cannot afford the higher rates.
Owners of low-income mo-
bile home parks and apartment
complexes are also complain-
ing because the $60 fee is per
unit. They say they cannot af-
ford the higher fee and are also
reluctant to pass the fee onto
their tenants, a significant per-
centage of whom barely scrape
by as is.
County officials are not sure
whether Tuesday's public
hearing to finalize the fees will


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Like many residents in Citrus County, William Funtig of Crystal River isn't fond of the proposed $60 fee
for fire services call a municipal services benefit unit. "To me," he said, "it's just too much."


Fire chief: Need drives quest for tax


Editor's note: To ieu a
break.doit in i:ot capital asset re-
qlests t,'ro1, the tit e-.1 ear
strateLic plan. read ttils 5to:o at
ii-ii chroillicleoiline cowi
A.B. SIDIBE
.Stntt "'riti'r
As t -alk on either side f the
tire te \ i ssle ji s lip lejdin-'
into the inal hI earni' Tiiles(la.
ti:llr words sum up the mood
of fire officials the time is
Ino(\
Yes. officials say, they under-
st.iid economic times are
to i h. but they urge county res-
identk to take an alternative
Iook .it their needs and back


the MlItnitcip I Ser it e Busi-
ness Unit iMSBUI- tathatis ex-
pected to be ,oted on by
members of the Board of
CoI lt ConiiIIssioners (BOCC)
[tiolloing, j public hearing
Tuesday.\ The t. \ is expected to
add $60 to an jaier'ae home or
bisiless )o ilerl ta\ bill.
"It \ill hbe somethingg like $5
a month. Litrus County Sher-
iff's Office Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Morabito said.
"But the benefits to the citi-
zens will be great. Because the
money will allow us to upgrade
our equipment, purchase ap-
paratus and gear for our fire-
fighters so we can deliver the


best service to the citizens,"
Morabito said.
He said the tax dollars also
will be used to address needs
such as replacing aging fire sta-
tions and adding full-time staff.
"Some of our stations are
more than 40 years old and the
extra staff would mean there
will always be someone avail-
able to answer the call," Mora-
bito said.
County commissioners voted
3-2 last month on a resolution
to add a $60 fee to residents' tax
bills for fire protection services
to offset the shortfall caused b1.\
See NEED/Page A12


* W HAT: itr,.,, Ci :.i.ir,r
::.fi i .ri public hearing
,:ri :,,,:,:,,:,!-:J fire M SBU.
WHEN: 2:30 p.m. Tuesday.
WHERE: Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness.
ONLINE: www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us

bring a huge crowd or not.
They're prepared, if necessary,
to move the hearing on the spot
See Page A13


Fire fee


inflames


taxpayers

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Anew way of pay-
ing for fire pro-
tection services
has got people
in heated talks.
All over the county, resi-
dents have received a no-
tice that Citrus County will
consider the imposition of
an additional special as-
sessment on top of the regu-
lar ones: a municipal
services benefit unit that is
a flat fee of $60 per resi-
dence regardless of the
value of the home. Whether
it is the principle, the ex-
pense or both, many resi-
dents have voiced their
displeasure.
"They're not really telling
you the whole story," said
William Fintig. "The whole
story is they could keep on
going up without even our
votes."
Funtig, a Crystal River
resident since 1984 who is
retired and on a fixed in-
come, lives outside of the
city limits in a mortgaged
house. The market value of
his house was assessed in
2012 at about half the
amount of the 2006 assess-
ment. But according to the
property appraiser's web-
site, Funtig's tax levy has
risen from $355 to $417 dur-
ing the same period.
"When I get to the end of
the month, I'm a little
See Page A10


Weedless
An author shares his
technique for using
straw bales for
container gardening.
/HomeFront

Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds................ D5
Crossword ............A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ....... A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies .................. A16
O bituaries ................A6
Together..................A19


I6 llllll5782007511 o


Rainbow of supportive


runners wrap up Key events


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer


fI ~


LECANTO Rain drizzling
into their faces did not faze the
excited residents of the Key For mo
Training Center on Saturday photos
Their eyes were fixated on on this
runners being escorted into the www.c
Lecanto campus off State Road online.
44. Quickly, the clients grabbed a
runner's hand and guided them through
the final steps of the finish line near the
Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center.
Runners ran 180 miles from the Capi-


;'-
ore
S,
st
.co


tol in Tallahass(
Training Cente:
Lecanto for the o
the Money Whil
journey is to ra
e about the develop
click abled, it is especi
tory at in that it brings a
onicle need for donatio
om. expenses of Key c
receive governme
"This is the finale," sa
nan, Key Foundation dir
the Money is our main


I7V~


ee to the Key
r campus in
annual Run for
le the grueling
uise awareness .
mentally dis-
ially significant
attention to the -
ns to cover the
clients whodon't STEPHEN E. LASKO/FortheChronicle
ent support Key Training Center resident Jason Isaacs breaks the
iid Neale Bren- ribbon at the finish line of the annual Run for the Money
rector. "Run for outing between Tallahassee and Key Training Center's
push to raise headquarters in Crystal River, raising awareness and
See Page A9 funds for the nonprofit organization.


SUMMER CLEARANCE EVENT Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram is working with
- -- newly formed Chrysler Financial and having a






Bad Credit No Proof of Income P ZERO Money Down

6 --O ----F NEWSC:HRY D O-DGE, JEp -, LES
Ourgol S to gnistory.VS I *YE I I This soucanctsa oe


-w


w CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.3 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM 4
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM HOMOSASSA INVERNESS BROOKSVILLE
ON SELECT VEHICLES. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 07/31/13.


I --UNDwJ II


Scattered storms,
rain chance 40%.
PAGE A4


JULY 21, 2013



MILITARY MATTERS:


."" .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


tsuf @ ,


0


CITRUS MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL NEEDS
YOUR HELP!
How many times in the past has Citrus Memorial Hospital come to your aid
or the aid of a loved one or friend? Their dedicated doctors, nurses and staff may
even have saved your life. Now Citrus Memorial, the hospital you bought and
paid for with your hard-earned tax dollars, needs your help. Please join us and
raise your voice to help the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation choose the best
healthcare partner for our community.
It is time that YOU, the people of Citrus County, knew the truth because if
you don't know the truth in its entirety, we could all suffer the harsh consequences.
Soon, Citrus County citizens may forfeit ownership of the only publicly owned
hospital in the area your hospital paid for with your tax dollars. Citrus Memorial
may either be sold, leased or forced to merge with another corporate entity in the
very near future. However, since you own it, you should have a say as to which
company takes control of your hospital but if you want your voice to be heard,
then you must take action soon!
Why has this happened? Because the Citrus County Hospital Board and a
small politically motivated group of people tried to wrest away control from the
legally constituted Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, the dedicated professionals
who made it the award-winning facility it is today.
How did this happen?


HERE ARE THE HISTORICAL FACTS:
The State of Florida creates the Citrus County Hospital Board. The Board is given the power to levy an ad valorem tax as high as 3 mils per
year to help fund healthcare for county residents.
Using funds raised by the Board, Citrus Memorial Hospital, a publicly owned facility, is built and begins to treat area residents.
To avoid the financial strain of having to pay employee pensions in the state pensions plan, the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation is created
as a private management corporation.
The Board leases Citrus Memorial Hospital to the Foundation for 40 years. As part of their lawful contract, the Board agrees to hand over to
the Foundation all ad valorem tax money they collect each year to pay expenses, invest, and expand their services. Under the mutual
guidance and supervision of both the Board and the Foundation, Citrus Memorial grows and prospers. Each year, the Board collects the ad
valorem taxes and willingly provides them to the Foundation. The Foundation alone decides how to best spend the tax money for the benefit
of the hospital and healthcare for the residents of Citrus County.
The Foundation sells bonds to fund expansion projects to help service more of the community, one of which is the Citrus Memorial
Healthcare Center at Sugarmill Woods in Homosassa.
Some local physicians thought the Hospital was unfairly competing with them with the opening of the Sugarmill Woods Healthcare Center.
The Hospital Board began work to get political help to pass legislation giving the Board full authority over the Foundation.
The Board withholds millions of dollars of taxpayer money forcing the Foundation and Citrus Memorial Hospital into financial distress. The
members of the County Hospital Board walked off from the Foundation Board. Both sides begin to file lawsuits, as the Foundation depends on
the funds being withheld to help pay operating expenses to provide patient care.
The Foundation has remained focused on one thing maintaining the highest standard of care possible at Citrus Memorial Hospital and
providing quality healthcare to the residents of Citrus County. They are saddened that politics have taken such precedence over
healthcare. They are incredulous that the County Hospital Board has squandered away such a huge amount of tax money.


Patients, and Residents who otherwise have no way to access healthcare, and Citrus Memorial Hospital need your help. It has been said, "All that is necessary
for the triumph of evil is that good men and women do nothing," and that is the case here. If you stand idly by and don't reach out to help the Foundation have a
voice in deciding which corporate entity takes control of Citrus Memorial Hospital- we will all be losers.


SO, WHERE DOES THIS LEAVE YOU?
IT LEAVES YOU WITH A CHOICE. i

Visit CitrusMH.com and learn what you can do to help "find the right home" for
Citrus Memorial Hospital... your hospital.


"ff no Wonder
su.ke Tene."
-i"1*rk Twan


f~fffrf ,4t..frner f n /A'bon. Fctn 4W to


I,,v-


TMENT OF SPINE
6 SROKE | SURGERY
FIVE-STAR EXCELLENCE
RECIPIENT AWARD"
2111l-2013 |3


CITRUS MEMORIAL


502 West Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-1551 I CitrusMH.com


sweoA
viortt \


A2 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


H A B


5E






S Page A3-SUNDAY, JULY 21,2013



TATEC& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Supplies needed
for students
The first day of school is
fast approaching, and the
yellow school bus seats will
be filled.
Across the county from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
various groups will be col-
lecting school supplies to
be distributed to county
schools as students return
to class Aug. 7.
Look for the yellow
school bus at Publix stores
in Inverness, Citrus Hills
and Crystal River or at Wal-
mart in Homosassa.
Supplies needed include
pencils, pens, spiral note-
books, rulers, book bags,
loose-leaf three-hole paper,
lunchboxes, crayons,
markers, three-ring binders
(1-inch and 2-inch), glue
sticks and small assign-
ment notebooks.
For more information, call
Bernadette Salmaggi at
352-726-1931, ext 2246.
Seventh-graders
need immunizations
In compliance with state
immunization requirements,
students entering, attending
or transferring to seventh
grade for the 2013-14
school year are required
to receive a tetanus-
diphtheria-pertussis (Tdap)
vaccination.
By state statute, students
cannot begin seventh grade
without documentation of
this required vaccination.
The 2013-14 school year
begins Aug. 7. To avoid in-
terrupting the student's edu-
cational opportunities, call
for an appointment today
with your private physician
or the health department.
They recommend parents
bring the child's immuniza-
tion records along to be
updated.
If you have any questions
regarding school immuniza-
tion requirements, call
Jessica Hoag, student
health specialist, at 352-
527-0090 or the health de-
partment at 352-726-1731
(Inverness), 352-527-0068
(Lecanto) or 352-795-6233
(Crystal River).

Palm Beach
Sergeant charged
after recording teen
Veteran Palm Beach
Sheriff's sergeant is facing
sex charges after allegedly
using his department-
issued video camera to
record a teenage girl.
The Palm Beach Post
reported that Sgt. Mario
Pradere was arrested
Thursday on allegations of
lewd conduct and video
voyeurism.
According to Pradere's
arrest report, a teenage
girl alleged that the
50-year-old police sergeant
massaged her feet while
touching himself. The girl
also alleged that he hid a
department-issued video
camera in her bedroom
and recorded her while
she undressed.
Police say Pradere later
admitted to fondling the
girl's feet and videotaping
her. Authorities say the ser-
geant said his behavior re-
sulted from a "fetish."
"People get arrested all
the time, and they're pre-
sumed innocent," Pradere's
lawyer said Friday. "In
Mr. Pradere's case, it's
no different."
-From staff and wire reports


Lakeland


scandal


getting


second


look
Associated Press
LAKELAND The
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement is con-
ducting a second criminal
investigation relating to the
sexual misconduct case
within the Lakeland Police
Department.
FDLE confirmed for the
Ledger this week that an
inquiry had been made.
FDLE spokeswoman
Linda McDonald said the
state agency had been con-
tacted, but said she did not
know by whom. She said
FDLE will be in contact
with Lakeland police and
Chief Lisa Womack about
the situation.
The scandal is centered
on allegations made by
crime analyst Sue Eberle.
Following questioning
in a separate case,
Eberle claimed she had
sex, or inappropriate rela-
tionships of a sexual na-
ture, while on duty with
more than 20 officers and
city employees.



Cultural


Alliance


seeking


partners


in arts
Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Cultural Al-
liance seeks to unite busi-
ness, government, the arts,
organizations and individ-
uals toward these common
goals: enhancing the cul-
tural landscape of Citrus
County, keeping the cul-
tural dollars in the county,
improving the local econ-
omy and attracting poten-
tial residents.
In order to ensure qual-
ity of and access to these
kinds of cultural opportu-
nities, the support of local
government and business
is essential. CCA wishes to
partner with these entities
to make this happen. It will
include among its projects
those that show how the
arts can draw attention to
community concerns. CCA
is seeking membership and
community-wide support.
CCA is following up its
successful June 28 presen-
tation at the Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum by offer-
ing two more free presen-
tations during July and
August. CCA invites the
public to come and learn
what the alliance can do
for the community, and
how individuals, busi-
nesses and organizations
can become involved.
These presentations are
to be given at 12:30 p.m.
Friday, July 26, at the
Florida Artists Gallery,
Floral City, with lunch pro-
vided; and 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Aug. 15, at the
College of Central Florida,
with brunch provided.
RSVP, as space is lim-
ited. Call 251-746-6721 or
email wirtm@cf.edu.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Jazmine Lee gets up from her wheelchair and stands to finish her act at the Citrus County Auditorium.





Standing tall


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer


ver since she opened her eyes,
Jazmine Lee's focus has been
to dance. Saturday, that's
exactly what she did.


Jazmine, severely in-
jured in an October mo-
torcycle accident that
killed her father, took to
the stage Saturday in a
program through the
Dance Central studio.
She was featured in a
performance of
"Grenade," lip-synching
the words from her
wheelchair while others
danced around her
"I'm thinking about how
much I am going to love
dancing again," Jazmine
said. "My goal is to get up
and dance with everyone
else and walk around."
With their matching
outfits, Dance Central
dancers gathered


around Jazmine and
helped her to her feet.
Tears filled her
mother's face as Jazmine
stood on her own for
one of the first times.
"She is scared, but she
couldn't be happier,"
said her mother Carrie
Connoly "This is her
first time in nine months
to show people what God
has done for her. He has
brought this amazing lit-
tle girl and turned her
into a miracle."
Jazmine leaves for
Tampa General Hospital
next week for intensive
therapy to get her up and
walking by the middle of
August


To see more photos
from Jazmine's
performance,
click on this story at
www. chronicle
online.com.


Backstage, Jazmine Lee goes over her part
one more time with grandmother Susan Lee
before going onstage with other Dance Central
performers.


Mall invites everyone to dance on National Dance Day


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Local in-
structors are lacing up their
shoes and stretching their mus-
cles for a day at the mall to cele-
brate National Dance Day
A free Everybody Can Dance
routine taught by professional


Jazzercise instructors is being
offered from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday at the former Famous
Footwear store in the Crystal
River Mall.
The National Dance Day cam-
paign, celebrated on the last Sat-
urday in July, encourages people
of all ages to incorporate dance
into their lives as a way to pro-


mote health and self-esteem
through the art of dance.
The Dizzy Feet Foundation,
led by "So You Think You Can
Dance" executive producer
Nigel Lithogoe, has created two
new routines and is inviting
dancers of all capabilities to join
the step-by-step instructed
routine.


"Professional Jazzercise in-
structors from Citrus County
will lead us through the easy
routine step by step," said Beth
Johns in a news release. "Then
we will all dance it together. A
video is available on citrus
countyfl.com if you choose to
preview the dance, but it is not
necessary."


For the experienced dancer, a
"Master Class" will be available.
Instructors will videotape the
entire dance group at the con-
clusion and submit it to "So You
Think You Can Dance."
For more information, visit
citruscountyfl.com, email
dance@citruscountyfl.com or
call 352-564-2020.





A4 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Your talent and imagina-
tion are likely to take you right to the
top in your field of endeavor in the
coming months. Strive to use these
gifts with every ounce of commitment.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Have
fun and enjoy yourself, but not at the
expense of others. If you singe any-
one's fingers in your quest for happi-
ness, your pleasure will turn sour.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Even though
major accomplishments are possible,
you might still fall short of your mark.
Self-doubts could overwhelm you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be fair in
your dealings with others, but don't go
overboard by making self-penalizing
concessions.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) This
should be a rewarding day as long as
you don't do anything at the last minute
to take the edge off your victory.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Just be-
cause conditions in general tend to
favor you today, that doesn't mean you
should lower your guard.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
There's no need for you to embellish
your achievements. Should you do
something worthy of praise, the events
will speak loudly for themselves.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
be stingy in involvements with your
friends. Yet, by the same token, don't
think that you have to break the bank
in order to win acceptance.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) It's OK
to be proud of your achievements
when speaking to your friends, but
don't call a project finished when you
still have abundant loose ends.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In order
to appease family and friends today,
you might feel obligated to promise
them much more than you can deliver.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Even if
asked, it might not be too wise to ad-
vise a friend on how s/he should han-
dle a financial matter. Although you'll
mean well, your suggestion could
make matters worse.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't
make the mistake of trying to force
your opinions on someone who
doesn't want to hear them. Something
you feel strongly about might nonethe-
less be totally wrong for your listener.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Poor
eating habits and a lack of exercise
could be at the base of your sluggish-
ness. Analyze your lifestyle honestly,
and do something about any flaws.


ENTERTAINMENT


Comic-Con looks at
'Godzilla' footage
SAN DIEGO Exploding air-
planes, flattened trains, massive
missiles and even more massive
monsters greeted Comic-Con
fans Saturday morning.
Stars Bryan Cranston, Eliza-
beth Olson and Aaron Taylor-
Johnson joined director Gareth
Edwards to offer a look at early
footage from "Godzilla," which
hits theaters next spring.
The footage showed Godzilla
battling another giant monster,
nearly decimating an airport and
sending cities into chaos.
The film is set for release in
May 2014.
Stan Lee draws
fans, onlookers
SAN DIEGO Where Stan
Lee goes, a crowd follows.
Saturday at Comic-Con Inter-
national was no exception as the
co-creator of Spider-Man, the
Fantastic Four and other leg-
endary heroes, took time to sign
autographs on titles from his
comic imprint Stan Lee's Kids
Universe, which touts family-
friendly fare aimed at first-time
and young readers, along with
his 1821 Comics.
"There's no better way to tell a
story to children than through
words and pictures, and as they
get familiar with putting the words
and pictures together, it makes


readers out of them," he said.
As he spoke, passersby
stopped, gawked and whipped
out cameras to get pictures of
Lee, one of comics' best-known
figures.
Scrapbooks show
Hemingway's youth
BOSTON Long before
Ernest Hemingway first wrote a
story, his mother was busy writ-
ing about him.
Grace Hall Hemingway
started a series of scrapbooks
documenting the childhood of
the future Nobel and Pulitzer
Prize winner by describing how
the sun shone and robins sang


on the day in July 1899 when he
was born.
Starting Sunday, the John F.
Kennedy Presidential Library
and Museum in Boston will
make the content of five Hem-
ingway scrapbooks available on-
line for the first time, giving fans
and scholars the chance to fol-
low the life of one of the 20th
century's literary greats from dia-
pers to high school degree.
Hemingway Collection curator
Susan Wrynn said much of the
content hasn't been made avail-
able to the public before and
only a few researchers have
seen it in its entirety.
-From wire reports


=July 22 to 26MENL


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with rotini pasta, parslied carrots,
Italian vegetable medley, dinner roll with margarine,
applesauce, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Three-bean beef chili, parslied rice, yellow
corn, wheat crackers with margarine, raisins, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad, lettuce with carrot and
tomato, marinated broccoli salad, whole-grain bread,
fresh orange, low-fat milk.


Thursday: Salisbury steak with brown gravy, garlic
mashed potatoes, green peas, graham crackers, slice
rye bread with margarine, low-fat milk
Friday: Barbecued chicken thigh, brown rice,
collard greens with turkey ham, slice cornbread with
margarine, fresh orange, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and
South Dunnellon. For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 21, the
202nd day of 2013. There are 163
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 21, 1973, Israeli agents
in Lillehammer, Norway, killed
Ahmed Bouchikhi, a Moroccan
waiter, in a case of mistaken iden-
tity, apparently thinking he was an
official with Black September, the
group that attacked Israel's delega-
tion at the 1972 Munich Olympics
and killed 11 athletes. Five people
identified as members of the
Mossad spy agency served brief
prison terms in Norway for murder
and were then pardoned.
On this date:
In 1861, during the Civil War, the
first Battle of Bull Run was fought at
Manassas, Va., resulting in a Con-
federate victory.
In 1930, President Herbert
Hoover signed an executive order
establishing the Veterans Adminis-
tration, which later became the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs.
In 1944, American forces landed
on Guam during World War II.
In 1980, draft registration began
in the United States for 19- and 20-
year-old men.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush told reporters at
his Texas ranch he was working to
persuade more nations to help in
Iraq.
Five years ago: In a face-to-face
meeting with Iraq's leaders, Demo-
cratic presidential contender Barack
Obama gained fresh support for the
idea of pulling all U.S. combat
forces out of the war zone by 2010.
Today's Birthdays: Singer Kay
Starr is 91. Former Attorney General
Janet Reno is 75. Actress Patricia El-
liott is 71. Actor Edward Herrmann is
70. Singer Yusuf Islam (formerly Cat
Stevens) is 65. Cartoonist Garry
Trudeau is 65. Comedian-actor
Robin Williams is 62. Comedian Jon
Lovitz is 56. Actor Josh Hartnett is 35.
Thought for Today: "Success is
getting what you want; happiness is
wanting what you get." Ingrid
Bergman, Swedish-born actress
(1915-1982).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
) PH L, H LO PR~| |HI LO PR
0.00 92 71 race 86 72 trace
lPR 192I 71 P trc bi,, ,RI7


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Partly cloudy with a
chance of thunderstorms today.


NANA A NA N A-NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK e xclusivedaily
forecast by:
W TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73 *4
Scattered storms, rain chance 40%

V MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
Few storms, rain chance 30%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
Few storms, rain chance 30%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 88/72
Record 100/66
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 80
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.10 in.
Total for the month 9.00 in.
Total for the year 28.30 in.
Normal for the year 28.31 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 65%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 1.1/12
Monday's count: 4.8
Tuesday's count: 4.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/21 SUNDAY 4:41 10:56 5:11 11:27
7/22 MONDAY 5:39 11:54 6:09 -


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT............................8:28 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:46 A.M.
J4 0 MOONRISE TODAY...................... 7:29 P.M.
JULY 29 AUG.E6 AUG. 14 MOONSET TODAY....................... 5:28 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:04 a/1:14 a 4:57 p/12:57 p
Crystal River" 4:25 a/10:19 a 3:18 p/11:25 p
Withlacoochee* 2:12 a/8:07 a 1:05 p/9:13 p
Homosassa*** 5:14 a/12:13 a 4:07 p/11:56 a


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
6:47 a/2:03 a 5:50 p/1:49 p
5:08 a/11:11 a 4:11 p/---
2:55 a/8:59 a 1:58 p/9:57 p
5:57 a/1:02 a 5:00 p/12:48 p


Gulf water
temperature


85
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.23 28.39 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.50 37.54 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.16 38.26 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.56 39.71 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


.01 pc
ts
ts
.02 ts
ts
ts
ts
s
.33 ts
s
pc
.37 pc
.04 s
.29 ts
.09 ts
ts
ts
.01 ts
.71 pc
ts
.44 pc
.01 s
pc
pc
ts
.02 pc
pc
ts
pc
pc
.01 ts
.13 ts
.01 ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
.39 ts
ts
ts


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 90 75 ts 90 76
New York City 93 81 pc 89 74
Norfolk 91 77 ts 91 75
Oklahoma City 94 72 pc 95 75
Omaha 89 68 ts 87 68
Palm Springs 97 83 trace pc 98 81
Philadelphia 94 80 ts 90 74
Phoenix 10380 ts 97 84
Pittsburgh 83 71 .10 pc 85 62
Portland, ME 91 74 s 80 57
Portland, Ore 81 57 s 82 58
Providence, R.I. 95 77 .11 pc 87 67
Raleigh 90 74 ts 90 72
Rapid City 83 64 .22 ts 87 65
Reno 10568 pc 105 71
Rochester, NY 82 69 .35 pc 77 57
Sacramento 99 58 pc 97 63
St. Louis 93 78 ts 88 72
St. Ste. Marie 65 56 pc 72 54
Salt Lake City 10272 s 102 70
San Antonio 96 75 ts 94 75
San Diego 71 63 pc 73 67
San Francisco 70 54 pc 70 56
Savannah 88 73 .29 ts 89 74
Seattle 76 55 s 76 59
Spokane 94 64 s 91 58
Syracuse 80 66 .26 pc 81 56
Topeka 90 74 .05 ts 90 71
Washington 94 80 ts 90 76
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 China Lake, Calif.
LOW 36 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/77/ts
Amsterdam 93/65/s
Athens 97/74/s
Beijing 96/78/pc
Berlin 86/62/s
Bermuda 84/78/pc
Cairo 97/68/s
Calgary 72/54/pc
Havana 92/73/ts
Hong Kong 86/80/ts
Jerusalem 82/65/s


Lisbon 79/59/s
London 89/59/s
Madrid 97/66/s
Mexico City 73/55/ts
Montreal 72/57/s
Moscow 71/58/sh
Paris 97/72/pc
Rio 79/71/sh
Rome 81/72/s
Sydney 64/45/s
Tokyo 84/72/pc
Toronto 75/57/pc
Warsaw 79/53/sh


LEGAL NOTICES





BOCC Commission Records............B6

Fictitious Name Notices...................D7

Meeting Notices................................D7

Surplus Property ...............................D7


CI TRULIS COUNTY



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ......................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney ........... ................................ Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........... .............................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes................. ................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ........... ................................ Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .........................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ........ ............................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content ......... ............................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................ ....................................... ............... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4r Phone 352-563-6363
I POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


Associated Press
Actress Gillian Anderson, left, and writer Chris Carter attend
"The X Files" comic book panel Friday at the 2013 Comic-Con
International Convention in San Diego, Calif.


JULY 22
JULY22




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PIZZA CAFE


We've got you covered with
America's
E'S Favorite Food '


HOME OF THE
LITTLE BIG BURGER


rb,
I. v
. 1' l


NNW -7
wol,? ..
^ ^


a


I


cr


PAIGEs
IROOT BEER
1& MIT


HOME OF THE
L.rrLE BIG BURGER


PIZZA CAFE


Voted BEST BURGER in the county!
Serving great burgers, fries, onion rings
and new cheesy tator tots, along with milkshakes
and old-fashioned homemade root beer.
2147 W. NORVELL BRYANT HWY., LECANTO (352) 746-3351


Still the place where the locals go!
Serving good pizza, cold beer, unique salads
and the best garlic knots and calzones
in the county.
97AA M EIlnDIhA A IE LIEDMAMI IC nn 1Qi 7.-192A


PAIGE'S ROOT BEER


PAIG


JI-
*.. S
! V., *


PIA CAFE
P2IA AF


|<2


i .1"


'U' mI


--------


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 A5


.1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Evelyn
Collins, 80
FORMERLY
OF HOMOSASSA
Evelyn Fletcher Collins,
80, formerly of Homosassa,
died on Friday, July 19,
2013. Graveside service
will be at 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, July 24, 2013, at Fero
Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
John
Gorrow, 55
BEVERLY HILLS
John J. Gorrow, age 55,
of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
July 18, 2013. He was born
Jan. 4, 1958, in Knoxville,
Tenn., to Arthur John and
Agnes Juanita (Hicks) Gor-
row He came here five years
ago from Ghent, N.Y, after
retiring as a corrections of-
ficer in New York state
with 20 years of service.
He was a member of Cel-
ebrate Recovery, Alcoholics
Anonymous and Gulf to
Lake Church in Crystal River
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 20 years Gina of
Beverly Hills, Fla.; a son; a
daughter; his parents
Arthur and Juanita Gorrow
of Beverly Hills, Fla.; two
sisters, Diane McClure (Ralph
L.) of Citrus Springs, Fla.,
and Julia Clapp (Leslie B.)
of Mountain View, Calif.;
and one grandchild.
A memorial service will
be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
July 23, 2013, at the Gulf to
Lake Church in Crystal
River. In lieu of flowers,
the family is requesting
memorial contributions to
Gulf to Lake Church at
1454 N. Gulf Ave., Crystal
River, FL 34429.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.
Frances
Green, 74
FLORAL CITY
Frances A. Green, 74, of
Floral City, died Friday,
July 19, 2013, at her resi-
dence. Services for Mrs.
Green will take place on
Wednesday, July 24, 2013,
at 11 a.m. at Fountains Me-
morial Park, Homosassa.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home and Crema-
tion, Inverness.
Lorna
Rolfe, 57
BEVERLY HILLS
Lorna A. Rolfe, 57, of
Beverly Hills, died Satur-
day, July 20, 2013, at Brent-
wood Health Care Center.
Private arrangements by
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.


ta. E aii
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation



For Information and costs,<
call 726-8323


Herbert
Stenger, 85
CITRUS SPRINGS
Herbert C. Stenger, 85, of
Citrus Springs, Fla.,
passed away on Wednes-
day, July 17, 2013, in the
loving care of his family
and HPH Hospice. He was
born on Tuesday, Dec. 13,
1927, in Brooklyn, N.Y., to
Harry and Irene (O'Toole)
Stenger.
Herbert
tired de-
0 g veloper in
the con-
struction
industry
and an en-
Herbert trepre-
Stenger neur. He
was a founding member of
We Care Food Pantry in
Homosassa and will be re-
membered for his caring
heart and passion for giv-
ing to those in need.
Survivors include his
wife, Mary Stenger of Cit-
rus Springs, Fla.; sons
David Stenger of Fishkill,
N.Y, and Kenneth Stenger
and wife Sharon of
Fishkill, N.Y; sister Irene
Zarkoff of Brooklyn, N.Y;
and grandchildren
Cameron Stenger of
Fishkill, N.Y, and Jillian
Kelly and husband Steven
of Raleigh, N.C.
Memorial contributions
may be made to We Care
Food Pantry, PO. Box 331,
Homosassa, FL 34487.
Memorial Mass of Re-
membrance will be at
10:30 a.m. Friday, July 26,
2013, at Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church. Private
inurnment at Fero Memo-
rial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fbro Funmeral Home. www
ferofuneralhome.com.

U Chronicle policy permits
free and paid obituaries.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or call 352-
563-5660 for details.








Professional
Hearing Centers'
www.InvernessHearing.com
726-HEAR (4327)

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


I I


LEMi.


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. tA...
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhme.com


Eleanor
Lipski, 87
BEVERLY HILLS
Eleanor Lorraine
Lipski, 87, Beverly Hills,
Fla., passed away July 18,
2013.
Eleanor was a longtime
resident and was active in
the local Polish Club, serv-
ing as president and enter-
tainment chair for several
years.
Her husband, Dr. John
G. Lipski, M.D., passed
away Aug. 12, 1997. She is
survived by her son Jan
Lipski; daughters Irene
Barrera, Roberta Mayes,
Laura Eglen and Lilly
Bonetti; and numerous
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. Her grand-
daughter Carla Rowley
comforted her in her last
moments in the hospice
care unit at Citrus Memo-
rial hospital.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
www.ferofuneralhome
.com.


British comedy figure

Mel Smith dead at 60


Associated Press
LONDON Actor and
writer Mel Smith, a major
force in British comedy
whose evening news par-
ody anticipated the hi-
jinks of hits such as "The
Daily Show with Jon
Stewart," has died of a
heart attack, his agent
said Saturday He was 60.
Smith shot to fame
along with his partner-in-
comedy Griff Rhys Jones
in "Not the Nine O'Clock
News," whose take-down
of earnest BBC newscasts,
talk shows, and commer-
cials would influence a
generation of comedians.
"We probably enjoyed
ourselves far too much,
but we had a rollercoaster
of a ride along the way
Terrific business. Fantas-
tic fun, making shows. Huge
parties and crazy times,"
Jones said. "Mel was al-
ways ready to be support-


ive. Nobody could have
been easier to work with."
The pair's sketch show
also featured a genera-
tion of comedians, includ-
ing "Mr. Bean" actor
Rowan Atkinson and ac-
tress Pamela Stephenson.
Smith and Jones' com-
pany, Talkback Produc-
tions, went to nurse other
British comedic greats,
including Sacha Baron
Cohen's wince-inducing
character Ali G and Steve
Coogan's hilariously awk-
ward Alan Partridge.
Born in London, Smith
was directing plays by the
age of six. He studied ex-
perimental psychology at
Oxford, directing produc-
tions at the Oxford Play-
house and performing at
the Edinburgh Fringe
Festival in Scotland.
Agent Michael Foster
said Smith died Friday at
his home in London. He is
survived by his wife, Pam.


Tired of the pain and fatigue of


fibromyalgia?


If you have fibromyalgia you may be eligible to
participate in a research study to test the safety
.- and effectiveness of an investigational medication.

/p. '4H Qualified participants will receive at no cost
study-related:
Evaluations
Medication
Physical exams
S* Routine lab work
Compensation for time and travel may
| be available. No medical insurance is necessary.


Merid ^^ie 16176 CortezBlvd.
Qeael a- c 3 -5917-003 9 Brooksville, FL 34601
e each Mildred V Farmer, MD
Medical research Close To lome WWW.neWSludyinlO.CONm Board Certified, Internal Medicine


V151W r Vote & WIN!
:VdW aH July 9th July 26th
Got a car in the contest? Tell everyone you know to vote for
your car starting July 9th. The car and truck with the most votes


New Patient Specials

Full Mouth I-Rays, $ S
Comprehensive Exam 4 9 '
\e M t All Y Not in conjunction with insurance.
We IMeet All Your Offer expires in 30 days
Dental Needs, In house denture lab
Free Denture Consults
Including Implants Financing available

Family Friendly Mot insurance
Call today! 352-527-1614
Alexsa Davila,
DMD DN 15390
Walton Van Hoose, .
DMD DN 18101 r
Citrus Hills Dental t
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Min FeeADAcode D0210, D0150 uj


Lend



Your



Ears M


Hearing in Noise
Comparison
Study
Participants
Sought
Gardner Audiology,
a leader in hearing
satisfaction research, is
seeking participants to
evaluate and compare
a new advanced noise
suppression technology
in hearing aids that hide
inside your ear canal
verses behind the ear
models.
In exchange for
completing a pre and
post-fitting questionnaire
Gardner will loan you the
hearing aid model of your
choice for a free 30 day
field study. Audiologists
with advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.
At the end of 30 days
you will return the loaner
aids or purchase them
with a generous discount.
It is your choice.


Call 1.800.277.1182
to schedule a free
candidate screening
3000 Central Florida
residents have participated
in Gardner Audiology
research studies









Crystal River
and Inverness
Offices
www.gardneraudiology.com


A6 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Community Alliance refocuses efforts at CEO Roundtable


Special to the Chronicle
"With great power
comes great responsibil-
ity" Although it may seem
overreaching to use this
pop-culture reference,
nothing could be further
from the truth when it
comes to the CEO Round-
table of the Community Al-
liance. In an event that
lasted for five hours, the
CEO Roundtable met to
discuss how members
could re-evaluate their re-
sponsibilities for the Com-
munity Alliance of Citrus
County, and how they
could use their influence
for the betterment of area
citizens.
The Inverness Woman's
Club was the backdrop for
the July 12 event. The club
venue provided CEO
Roundtable members a
place to gather in a com-
fortable atmosphere to
share important concerns
and needs in the county.
Participants were treated
to a barbecue lunch courtesy
of M&B Dairy, so there was
no shortage of food to go
with the conversation.
"It had been almost three
years since the last strate-
gic planning event, so it
was important to have the
right atmosphere to ensure
that our goals could be met
and the day would be very
productive," said alliance
facilitator Renea Teaster.
Even wihthe right set-
ting and food, the conver-
sation had to be led by
someone who could spur
the discussion and keep
everyone focused. This is
why alliance leaders chose
Rebecca Martin, a profes-
sional development
trainer and mediator, to
lead the day Martin titled
the day's agenda "Refuel
and Refocus" and began
the main session by asking,
"Who are you?" in order to
assist the attendees in re-
viewing their origin as
well as solidifying their
identity
It was a consensus by all
participants that the CEO
Roundtable is the execu-
tive element for the al-


liance. The Roundtable
will continue providing
the connectivity, setting
priorities, and supporting
goals between themselves
and the Membership
group, which includes the
frontline workers in health
and human service agen-
cies. With this "power"
comes the "responsibility"
to be collaborators, influ-
encers, communicators,
and policymakers, in addi-
tion to identifying the
areas in which the alliance
needs to focus its efforts,
which are: communication
and mental health/sub-
stance abuse.
"There is a lot involved
in these two areas," said
Circuit Judge Patricia
Thomas, who serves as the
executive chair for the
Roundtable. "We believe
that communication is im-
portant because our com-
munity needs to know
what services are avail-
able and/or the lack of
services as well, so that we
can grow and improve the
quality of life for our resi-
dents. We also felt like
mental health and sub-
stance abuse is a key area
to address because there
is a strong interaction with


other areas such as jobs,
housing, and education."
"We feel this workshop
was successful and we would
like to thank the members
of the CEO Roundtable
and membership that par-
ticipated. We would like to
extend a special thank you
to the Inverness Woman's
Club for the use of their
lovely facility, M&B Dairy
for the wonderful lunch,
Lee & Celina Jones who
assisted with the set-up, and
Rebecca Martin, who did
such a terrific job and do-
nated her time to act as the
facilitator."
For more information on
the Community Alliance of
Citrus County, go to
www.citrusalliance.org or
call 352-341-7075.


O Cleaning Special f lfl Porcelain
New Patients Only V Fused to
FREE Exam & E-Rays Metal Crowns
w/Cleaning f o n
D0210 D0150 D1110 (For first one)
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 7/31/13 Expires 7/31/13 D2751


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the CEO Roundtable for the Community Alliance of Citrus County recently
gathered July 12 for a strategic planning session to discuss how they can provide
assistance to local agencies and other organizations in the county. Shown, back row
from left, are: Justin Ferrara, Carl Scarano, Greg Kell, Rick Bedson, Randy Reynolds,
Dale Benefield, Vernon Lawter and Jimmie Smith. Front row, from left, are: Renea
Teaster, Cara Meeks, Barbara Wheeler, Edith Ramlow, Rebecca Martin, Melissa
Bowermaster, Amy Meek, Amy Engelken, Lisa McCafferty and Patricia Thomas.


We Welcome You To


Value Dental Care t f


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.

Crystal River

352-794-6139


ur. Michael vvelcn, UMU & Associates


ur. Philip bnerman, uIvIu ur. Jay bKipper, uIv I


endures 69000 FREE Second
en ures Opinion
starting at X-ray & Exam
Upper & Lower (New Patients Only)
E D0210 D0150
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required.
Expires 7/31/13 D551 0. D5120 I Not validwith any other offers. Expires 7/31/13


Our Story + Your Story =
Sunshine For Your Loved One
Our compassionate staff is ready to help.
Assisted Living just got a whole lot better.
Call us today! We want to share our story,
More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY.
Memory care Short term and long term stays



(352) 563-0235 As, ,,sIte LU 12230 Es
311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River www.sgwseniors.com


Blackshears !!


MAluminum
Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens
New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions
HWY. 44 Q Q7 Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER I9'- 2,, I RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
11::M .14 116. I 6


IAL OUR-PODUCT AREAMERIAN ADE! W*do*ot*sip t


I


We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance.


-- -- - -- - -- - - - --- - -I


-A 0


L-


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 A7









Habitat for Humanity reaches milestone


Foundation for 100th


Special to the Chronicle

Habitat for Humanity of Citrus
County President and CEO George
Rusaw called Habitat home applicant
Ariel Luce to tell her the special news.
"I'm out here at the site that's to
become your new family home,"
said Rusaw. "The concrete for the
foundation is still wet. I've placed a
copper penny down into one of the
corners of the slab so that you will
have many years of good luck here,"
Rusaw continued.
Luce couldn't believe what she was
hearing. She had waited so long to find
a place for herself and young family
Luce had attended a mandatory
homeowner orientation in January
At that time, she learned about the
Habitat program and expectations.
With encouragement from her co-
workers at Big Lots and Golden Cor-
ral, Luce applied for a Habitat home
and was admitted into the program.
Once accepted, she had to come up
with a $2,000 down payment, and
schedule time to complete the 500
sweat-equity hours required to take
ownership of a Habitat home.
"It seemed like such a long appli-
cation process," said Luce. "It took
me about three weeks to complete all
of the necessary paperwork and pro-
vide the required documentation. I
couldn't have done it without the help
of my family services agent, Nancy
Wessel, and encouragement from my
friends."
All applicants accepted into the
Habitat home partnership program
are paired up with a family services
representative. Wessel, in this case,


Special to the Chronicle
Volunteers gather for the blessing of the 100th Habitat home under
construction at 4440 S. Slash Pine Ave., Homosassa. Proud
Habitat home partner Ariel Luce, right, stands with family services sponsor
Nancy Wessel in the window frame of what is to become her new home.
Wessel will guide Luce through the process of gaining a Habitat house.


will provide essential support and
guidance to Luce as she navigates the
process until the applicant receives
the keys to her new Habitat home.
The home sits on land bequeathed
by a local Citrus County family whose
mother's first name was Maria. As a
result, Habitat has named the Ho-
mosassa neighborhood in her honor
Maria's Habitat neighborhood will
eventually include nine homes -
four on South Slash Pine Avenue
and five on Holiday Drive.
"I love this location. It is so peace-
ful and surrounded by trees," Luce
said of the designated building site.
"This spot to the right of what will be
our house will provide a perfect play
area for my son and his friends."


The three-bedroom, two-bath
house plan is sponsored by the Nick
Nicholas Ford dealership in Crystal
River. The Nick Nicholas Ford and
Nick Nicholas Ford-Lincoln family
of car dealerships has sponsored 19
Habitat homes since Habitat first got
its start in Citrus County 20 years
ago in 1993.
This particular structure is sched-
uled to be completed sometime in
October.
"This milestone house is a lucky
one. We were striving so hard to
reach our 100th house," Rusaw said.
"Now I see that it really is an attain-
able benchmark There's plenty more
time to squeeze in a couple more
homes before the end of the year."


The premiere active-adult master-planned community in
West Central Florida wants you!
Unlimited earning potential.
New home sales experience preferred, not required.
No Florida RE License is required.
Positive Attitude High Energy" Professional Demeanor
Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707

SV I AGES OF


Bring this coupon & receive one


with purchase of regularly priced beverage
Sunday between 2pm-7pm


Citrus Habitat home complete


A8 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KEY
Continued from PageAl

funds. We have limited
funds necessary What we
need has to be raised in
the community. We get
support from state fund-
ing, but we rely on the
community to help us do
this. That's tough in these
economic times. It is a
tough goal to fill every
year, but they have done it.
The community has never
let us down."
Jason Isaacs was one of
the first residents to cross
the finish line with a blue
shirt on, huge smile on his
face and excitement in his
voice.
"This is my third year
running with the runners,"
Isaacs said. "It is so much
fun. I run all of the time."
Each Key resident run-
ner sported a different col-
ored team T-shirt, as
friends, families, busi-
nesses, civic organizations
and church groups spon-
sored a team in an event at
the Key Training Center
called Walk a Mile in My
Shoes, which took place
moments before the finale.
Teams of 10 or more spon-
sored an honorary Key
client as its captain and
made the one-mile walk
through the Lecanto cam-
pus. They finished just in
time to join the welcome-
home parade.
"I would dream about
this event," Brennan said.
"I wanted this rainbow of
people to run and I saw it.
It happened. What was im-
portant this year was that
the runners saw all of the
support. Everyone formed
this parade and you could
feel it. Every runner just
said what that meant to
them. The clients just
loved it. They saw that
these people were running
for them. The whole com-
munity was there to sup-
port them."
Indeed, the runners felt
it.
"Once we got into Citrus
County, we started hearing
a lot more horns beep and
(seeing) people give the
thumbs up," said Deputy
Bryan Melhado, organizer


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Firefighter Anthony Seguin of the Citrus County Sheriff's
Fire Rescue team crosses the finish line with
participant Dorothy Cole in Saturday's Run for the
Money finale at the Key Training Center in Crystal
River. Seguin is one of two participants who ran all
15 miles of the last leg of the run Saturday.


of the run. "That energizes
you. As soon as we turned
the corner into this beauti-
ful complex, and seeing
those clients' faces and


smiles while wanting to
hold your hand was great."
Melhado said Fire-
fighter Anthony Seguin
ran all 15 miles of the last


BLIND FACTORY


1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO
www.72-hourblinds.com


527-0012 -_-."*


leg of the run.
"We also had Deputy
Bryan Eldridge who ran 7
miles and Josh Titus who
ran 15 miles," Melhado
continued. "They all did
their personal best. They
understood the purpose
and the help that we
needed today"
Throughout the day, the
26th Key Training Center's
Run for the Money




SLAB LEAKS
SEPTIC SYSTEMS
WATER HEATERS
FAUCETS REPIPES
DRAIN CLEANING

PLUMBING REPAIRS
www.modern-plumbing.com
LICENSE #CFC1426B65


Telethon aired. The pro-
gram was hosted by com-
munity personalities and
featured stories and inter-
views with clients, fami-
lies, volunteers and staff.
"It could not happen
everywhere like it does
here," Brennan said. "It
can only happen when all
of the stars line up in the
community. You have to
have that kind of support


LOCAL


;try
.A.


'BEST
\ T


*4. Greystone

I Home Health


IN CITRUS COUNTY


Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
Skilled Nursing
24 Hour Nurse on Call


I am happy to recommend Greystone.
All staff were very nice & professional.
PATIENT TESTIMONY
MORE INFORMATION
888-843-4088
www.greystonehcm.com


A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


"We Cater to Cowards!"
General & Cosmetic Dentistry
FREE SECOND OPINION.
Most Insurance Accepted License #DN 1760611

Ledger Dentis
M Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P

Se Haba Ledgerdentistry. com
Espaol Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 A9

behind you and we have it
here. We are so blessed
that we have that formula
here with the people. Re-
gardless of what the econ-
omy is doing they
understand that we have
to take care of these peo-
ple. They can't fight this
fight by themselves."
The total money raised
was $205,427.66. For more
information about the Key,
visit wwwkeytraining
center org.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or email eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


5





A10 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


FEE
Continued from Page Al

shorter than I normally
am," Funtig said. "The in-
surance goes up. It's like it
doesn't end."
Increases don't feel like
a good solution.
"I don't think they have
a plan for this county,"
Funtig said. "Taxes go up.
They never go down."
Ron Krasneck of Her-
nando speaks on behalf of
the Fairview Estates
homeowners at county
commission meetings. His
home, in the $200,000-plus
range, has shown a drop in
tax levy during the past
seven years, from about
$4,000 to about $2,500. But
in his community, Kras-
neck knows people who
are struggling with health
care expenses for them-
selves or a family member,
as he is.
"We're almost, but not
quite, on a fixed income,"
Krasneck said. "We have a
little bit of extra."
Krasneck explained
how he manages to scrape
up that little bit extra -
and why


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"Our son's been diag-
nosed with a very, very se-
rious case of cancer in his
internal organs and we
take him to Mayo Clinic (in
Jacksonville) four times a
month," Krasneck said.
"It's an additional expense
for us. It averages about
$600 a month for trans-
portation, hotels and food.
Luckily, his insurance is
covering most, if not all, of
his treatment."
Krasneck has learned to
cut back to cover his son's
needs.
"We don't have an outside
income source like taxing
the public or raising the
millage rate," Krasneck
said. "It has to come out of
what I call our square box of
limited income. The only
way we can pay for addi-
tional expenses is to cut
down on some other ex-
penses. For example, we
used to have a lawn-care
service. We do it ourselves,
even though it is dangerous.
I trim our own trees. I get up
on ladders with a pole saw. I
trim them not because I like
to do it, but we can't pay for
everything."
It's an exercise the
county should practice, he
suggested.


"What I'm asking the
commission and the
county is to look within,"
Krasneck said. "They say
they've already looked, but
they haven't looked as
hard as we have and other
people."
Martha Morrow lives in
Citrus Springs near the
river Her home currently is
assessed at $43,722. With
her homestead exemption,
she paid a tax bill of $319.65,
and she paid it in quarterly
installments because she
lives on Social Security and
a small pension.
"I figured if the property
tax goes up 30 percent, it
would increase my bill by
$45 quarterly," Morrow
said.
She said she would pay
the $60 fire protection
services fee quarterly at
$15 a quarter, calculating a
quarterly increase of $60
including the millage
increase.
"I can't afford it, but I
have to figure out how I
can," Morrow said. "I was
squeaking out the taxes,
but adding $60 more a
quarter, and they are talk-
ing about adding even
more of those type of taxes
- if they keep increasing


that, it would be very diffi-
cult. It will be the differ-
ence between eating and
going to the doctor or pay-
ing taxes."
With other living ex-
penses increasing, such as
electricity, gasoline and
food, Morrow said people
living on small fixed in-
comes will find it hard to
pay increased taxes.
Sue Ellen Friddle and
her husband Mike have
owned Moonrise Resort on
Tsala Apopka Lake in Flo-
ral City for 27 years. It in-
cludes 98 mobile home
lots, five of which are va-
cant, 14 RV sites and 10 va-
cation cabins. Sixty
full-time residents live at
Moonrise.
Last week, Friddle sent
an email to commission-
ers: "We believe that there
is a need for an MSBU for
fire services, but not to the
extent that our property is
being assessed."
Using a formula from
the Government Services
Group, the firm hired by
the county commission to
set up the new fee for fire
services, Friddle wrote:
"Our new special assess-
ment for fire protection
services will increase our


existing tax bill by $6,729!
We are being assessed for
all of the mobile home and
RV lots that we have,
whether they are vacant or
filled."
Friddle pointed out that
Moonrise has provided af-
fordable housing in the
county
"We see our residents on
a daily basis, and we know
that we cannot pass this
tax on to the majority of
our residents without it af-
fecting them financially,
too." Friddle wrote. "We
are not a huge corporation
that has managers operat-
ing their parks. We take
pride in not increasing our
rent by enormous amounts
every year, because we
have to operate within our
means."
When reached by the
Chronicle on Thursday,
Friddle said she'd just
done the math and her fire
services charges alone
would increase by 438 per-
cent.
"That's ridiculous,"
Friddle said. "I agree we
need fire services, but I


don't agree my taxes need
to go up 438 percent."
Friddle's current fire
services tax assessment is
$1,157.90 at a millage rate
of 0.81. A millage rate re-
duction to 0.75 would re-
duce the fire services tax
by $74.27, but the new flat
fee charged at $60 per mo-
bile home lot and cabin
and $11.46 per RV site will
raise her current fire serv-
ices charges by $6,729.
The county could learn
from how she does busi-
ness, Friddle explained.
"Every time our lake
level drops, our business
goes down drastically," she
said. "We know it's going to
happen. We tighten out
belts. We cut back on the
things we want to reinvest
to add to the value of our
property We tighten up
and wait until the water
comes back up. Eventually,
it will."
JoAnne Vantine of Cit-
rus Springs called the
Chronicle to ask if anyone
was starting a petition


Page A13


Th Savings Ares Be



1657 W GL OLKEHY* CNTO
i ww .7 linds.co m5


BEVERLY HILLS LIQUORS

3898 N. Lecanto Hwy., (Hwy 491) Beverly Hills, FL 34465

(352) 7496-7723



Pie G o T ru* gh BJ ul 27F 2013




Skol Vodka Pinnacle Vodka Viking Fjord Vodka Pearl Vodka 800
A Karkov Vodka Smirnoff Vodka 80 14.99
SAft Af tA 0 M M ) RI +a


2 AYSEIL


Su .-72, o. 7/22


.-. . .. -. ..


:2IAYPCA


Su .-72, o. 7/22


2IAY PCA


Sun. 721,Mo 7/2


LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and leave the


I


to


ServiceMASTER
Restore
mA R


9
* .~
* S
S


Carpet &
Upholstery Cleaning
Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning
Io Truck Mount Extraction Spot Removal
Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs
Wood Floor Cleaning


Fire & Water Damage
* Recommended by Insurance Industry
* Residential & Commercial 4
* Smoke, Odor, Soot Removal
* Quick Response Time
* Water Removal
* Mold Remediation


3 ROOMS & 1 1 0 ... I
.1 HALLWAY 10 UO FF
S7995* ANY CLEANING .
S2SERVICE
7 9 OVER $100
ServiceeMASTER
I *One room can not Resore ServieMASTER I
exceed 300 sq.ft. Expires 8/18/13 Restr
L Expires 8/18/13 ... Restrictions Apply.
ServiceMaster of Citrus
II 2 i7OAft


A


SUpholstery Special i
Have a couch and loveseat
cleaned, get a chair or
recliner cleaned

FREE
I ServiceMASTER I
I Expires 8/18/13 eS
L . . . . . _1


wwwA^Asmcflor I I ii da]co[ m WenIe] I I


A


County

270


C-,SOVLl ,C.- C "
bEST
nofTl
ON S


%livFff-m


M=ml


pppp-


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 All




A12 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


NEED
Continued from Page Al

Duke Energy's tax dispute.
Other fees are proposed
for commercial, industrial
and vacant land.
The new fee would be
paired with current prop-
erty tax for fire service, but
the tax would reduce the
millage rate of 0.80 to 0.75.
Commissioners Rebecca
Bays and Scott Adams
voted against the measure.
The taxes and
fees are expected to
generate about $10
million in revenue.
Morabito said the
county's population
growth has made it
necessary to have
up-to-date fire sta-
tions in practical La
locations to ensure Mora
quick responses to Citrus
emergencies. Sheriff
Deputy Fire Fire R
Chief Jim Good- ch
worth said since
2010, calls for service in
the county have risen some
54 percent.
In 2010, Goodworth said,
there were 4,340 calls, but
the figured jumped by 20
percent in 2011, when
5,379 were recorded. In
2012, there were 7,245 calls
for service, a 34 percent in-
crease from 2011.


I
L
ra
s
(
hi


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"I think that should give
people some idea about
the demand out there," he
said.
Goodworth said fire res-
cue has been under-
funded for so many years
that there is absolutely no
room left to make cuts
without having to cut serv-
ice delivery
"Our equipment is so
old, we are currently
spending $25,000 a month
on repairs alone," he said.
He said the cost of re-
pairs is beginning to add
up and would
make more sense
to purchase new
equipment.
"Even our Jaws
of Life equipment
is 20 years old,"
Goodworth added.
Jaws of Life is hy-
rry draulic rescue
abito equipment used by
County emergency work-
s Office ers to cut people
rescue out of vehicles fol-
ef. lowing accidents.
So far, according
to Morabito, about 900 peo-
ple have responded to mail-
ers sent to 140,000 property
owners about the tax.
"And about 80 to 85 per-
cent of those people were
calling and asking for an-
swers because they didn't
understand something and
there were about 20 callers
who were dead set against


2012 FIRES BY STATION


Station Incidents Pet of Incidents Est. Losses Pet of Losses
Crystal River 6 5% $167,700 4.45%
Inverness 18 15% $367,500 9.75 %
Homosassa 24 20% $721,768 19.14%
Hernando 12 10% $47, 926 1.27%
Connell Heights 5 4.17% $424,050 11.24 %
DeRosa 14 11.67% $795,272 21.09%
Beverly Hills 11 9.17% $302,000 8.01%
Citrus Springs 6 5% $35, 250 0.93 %
Sugarmill Woods 3 2.50% $78, 076 2.07 %
Pine Ridge 4 3.33% $146, 120 3.87 %
Kensington 8 6.67% $156,418 4.15%
Floral City 9 7.50% $529, 000 14.03 %
TOTALS 120 ----- $3,771,080 -----


it Mostly, people don't like that the $60 will mean they
it, but they understand our would continue to get ex-
needs and they understand cellent service from us."

HIGH OCTANE GRILL
99 DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS
TUESDAY STEAK
w/baked potato & green beans........................ 95 and S9.95
WEDNESDAY FULL RACK OF BABY BACK RIBS
w/potatoes and vegetable........................................ 14.95
THURSDAY 1 LB. PORK CHOPS
w/potatoes & vegetable.............................................. 9. 95
FRIDAY SURF-N-TURF
Prime Rib & Grilled Shrimp w/baked potato & salad...... 12.95
SATURDAY
BBQ Beef Sandwich w/chips..................................3..... 95
SUNDAY
Pot Roast w/mashed potatoes & green beans................... s3.95
NY Strip Sandwich on a hoagle roll w/fries....................... 6.95
DAIL1 LL\CH SPECIALS i$100 OFF LUNCH i
1$0 9i H lam I
S1%1{ 1 enu items only. Coupon Expires 8/31/13 8
OPEN HAM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373


COMPLETE DETAILS ARE IMPORTANT
1 0FJSB APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


mopping isn't enough call...
Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Clean, Seal & Repair
SShower Maintenance & Grout Repair
S Grout Colorant
586-1816 746-9868


I W |INOS


For information on
how your business can
advertise on the
Chronicle Website call
563-5592







RgCia6be (Pressure C'aningq Service I
"YOU CAN RELY ON US"
*Pressure Cleaning Specialists Residential/Commercial

DRIVEWAYS POOL DECKS WHOLE HOME
WITH CAGE PACKAGES
Starting at$ 5 Startingiat7 5 S.tng at 150


INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
Vst MON.FR1830.5
0 341-0813 W 'l SAT9.4
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
NSURED www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMENT



NEVER PAINT AGAIN!
M .. Duration
Lifetime Coatings
"Everlasting Beauty for your
home or business"
M.C.A. 352-212-3466
Coatings Co. Licensed Insured References


Licensed & Insured Jaime Massingill
John Massingill
LAWN

REPLACEMENT
Complete Lawn & Patch Work
Drought Tolerant Lawns

J&J SOD (352) 302-6049



For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
352-563-5592.


Ciir ...C .
Cl IoN ICE


For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
352-563-5592.


Ci ii pN ICiE



Top Notch Appliance Repair




Accepting Credit Cards or
-- Robert
Member of Roik
Chamber of Commerce Licensed
& Insured



ServiceMA STER Our Services:
TER Carpet Protector Tile Floor
24 7'365 ReStOM Cleaning Pet Odor Removal
EMERGENCY SERVICE Oriental Rugs Spot Removal

i PU *J.v Haveacouchandti i
1 HALLWAY I : :ioveseat clqeaneddlfl
i *Restrictions Apply One Room Cannot Exceed recliner Cleaned FR EEi
300 Sq Ft Expires 8/31/13 ($30 Value!) Expres8/31/13 I
352-794-0270
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com g



QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE
STARTING AT s600"
Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly

www--- -rE&~TO~mLpi
An ,oist www.CitrusPest.com D
ZB For solutions to all your pest problems, call today!
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS
Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River


Call[
1 I-35 I5Ti6 65.
Dr. Vent


When

1


352-726-2280 Less=s
Licensed & Insured


TIL CLEANING


I


F7afBfrfe


LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEBATE
Continued from Page Al

to the Citrus County
Auditorium.
That decision won't be
made ahead of time in
case the commission
chambers and an overflow
room can accommodate
the crowd, County Admin-
istrator Brad Thorpe said.
What's drawn pointed
scrutiny from many resi-
dents is that the combina-
tion of fees and taxes
doesn't simply to bring fire
services funding to the
same level as in the current
year; it raises an additional
$1.3 million for new equip-
ment and firefighters.
Thorpe and county com-
mission Chairman Joe
Meek said the board can
adjust the fees downward
during Tuesday's meeting
if commissioners opt to
eliminate or reduce the
higher fire budget.
"There's wiggle room in
there," Thorpe said. "We
can tweak the numbers
that evening."
Commissioners are di-
vided on whether the
fee/tax combination is the
right mix.
"The tax should have
gone away," Commissioner
Rebecca Bays said. "That
was the intent. It got hi-
jacked with the fire in-
crease of $1.3 million.
That's what I'm opposed
to."
Despite the outcry from
lower-income homeown-
ers, only Commissioner
Scott Adams has outright
rejected the new fee struc-
ture. His Facebook page
last week featured letters
from residents to commis-
sioners urging that they
dismiss the new fee, and
Adams is asking residents
to show up Tuesday.
The other commission-
ers say the burden of fund-
ing the fire department
should be shared regard-
less of income.
"For a house it's $60 for
one year $5 a month,"
Commissioner Dennis
Damato said. "Look at
other bills: cellphone,
cable. The reality of pay-
ing $5 a month is the
proper way to fund this."
Economy, Duke
shape new structure
Once, this was simple.
Figuring out a property
owner's share of the tax
burden was a routine cal-
culation involving as-
sessed value and millage.
As routinely stated in
newspaper budget stories:
One mill equals $1 for every
$1,000 of taxable value on
property. Example: If the
tax rate were 6 mills, some-
one with a $100,000 house,
minus the $50,000 home-
stead exemption, would
pay $300 in taxes.
The problem started up
around 2007 when prop-
erty values began to mirror
a diminished economy.
Lower property values
meant less tax revenue for



PETITION
Continued from PageAlO

against the new fee. Her
home's 2012 tax levy was
about $600, and she is re-
tired on a fixed income -
"Just getting by," she said.
"Petitions do make a dif-
ference," Vantine said, re-
calling her own experience
in other communities.
However, she said she
can't initiate a petition
herself because of her
health.
"If they add the $60 to
$100 fire fee, that alone is
going to be rough," Vantine
said. "How can anybody af-
ford to live here?"
A $25 to $50 levy would
be more reasonable, Van-
tine suggested.
"I understand we need
new equipment," she said.
"But this will raise my


mortgage payment. It's al-
ready raised from last
year's tax."
"We shouldn't suffer be-
cause of Duke Energy not
wanting to pay their tax,"
Vantine said. "The letter
they sent said if we don't
pay this tax they could put
a lien against our property.
Could they do that to Duke
Energy?"
Vantine said she hoped
a group would get together
to start a petition.
"We should have peti-
tions in the supermarkets,
gas stations, churches,
everywhere," she said.


PROPOSED MSBU FEES
H Ire 'ri t r h :.! r -.:.,. :l j fir r ,li.,: U fees*:
* F I ; r,:l tr ti_,ll: 1)._1:,-:r i.irit.
* i.:', lii '" I': r -- _1l: ( .: : r,t l:,; r !ir .:|I.I1 rIr foot.
* Irn.:1 li tr 11 .. :r!h,.:.i ;_: I -rt 1:', r square foot.
* Irn : titi .:.r-,i l t: ,:;' r ,ti t 1 r : I.:I.I1rr foot.
* : -3irt 3;n.:i.iIt i. i.ir,,i.1. r i i.1: -icres: $3.10 per

* : irit 1: ri itir u l .:.. r i !. -.: r-es: 2 cents per
acre.
*Excludes city of Crystal River, which has its own fire
department.


the county government.
Less revenue, however,
did not mean fewer govern-
ment services, officials said.
They had to find ways to
keep services libraries,
parks, senior centers in-
tact while realizing a re-
duced revenue stream.
In recent years the
county's response was to
lower costs in areas other
than services, particularly
personnel, and use re-
serves to help balance the
budget.
In issuing annual budget
messages in recent years,
county officials warned
that the following year
would be worse and hard
decisions would be
needed. Eventually, serv-
ices would be cut or taxes
raised or a combination
of the two, they said.
Citrus County was al-
ready on that path when
the county's largest tax-
payer, Duke Energy, paid
just $19.6 million of a $35
million tax bill in Novem-
ber 2012 and promised a
similar payment this year.
Duke took Property Ap-
praiser Geoff Greene to
court to fight the 2012 as-
sessed value of the energy
complex north of Crystal
River. A similar court bat-
tle is expected this year,
especially in light of
Greene's new assessment
of the power plant that
added more than $1 billion
in taxable value.
In terms of the fire serv-
ice, Thorpe said the con-
tinued decrease in
property values plus
Duke's loss which
equates to about 25 per-
cent of the tax revenue -
meant only one thing: a
tax/fee combination.
All four counties that
surround Citrus Levy,
Marion, Sumter and Her-
nando fund their fire
departments with a fee/tax
combination.
Meek and Bays say it's
only fair that the burden
be shared countywide.
Since most fire calls are
for homes, homeowners
should share the highest
burden, they say
Meek said even home-
owners who say they cannot
afford the fee should not be
exempt from paying it
"It's important the en-
tire community pays into
that system," Meek said.
"We get buy-in into a serv-
ice that everybody uses.
Are people going to like
that answer? No, they're
probably not"


Higher increase
hits lower half
Officials contend it isn't
fair that some people pay
no property tax, and the
proposed new structure
remedies that.
Of the 46,002 home-
steaded properties in Cit-
rus County, only 5 percent
fall completely below the
$25,000 homestead exemp-
tion and pay zero tax.
Under the proposed fee
schedule, these homeown-
ers will pay $60.
The biggest hit, in terms
of the relative increase in
tax bills and the number of
people affected, would
come to those in homes val-
ued at $25,000 to $75,000.
Florida has a tiered
homestead exemption law:
The first $25,000 of value is
exempted, the next $25,000
is taxed, and the third
$25,000 is exempted for all
but schools. Any value
above $75,000 is taxed.
So, people who live in
homes assessed at be-
tween $50,000 and $75,000
pay county taxes on only
$25,000 of value.
Those homeowners,
who account for about 47
percent of the total num-
ber of homestead owners
in Citrus County, now pay
about $20 a year each for
the fire tax. Under the pro-
posed structure, their fire
bill will jump to $78 a
$58 increase.
On the other hand,
someone in a home as-
sessed at $200,000 will see
their fire bill increase
from $120 to $169 a $49
increase.
Bays said that propor-
tion is still not fair. She
wants to see the fire serv-
ices solvent, with a system
that relies more on the fee
and less on the tax which,
she said, hits those in
higher-valued homes.
The bottom line, she
said, is that even low-
income property owners
should pay their fair share.
"If they own a piece of
property and are living in
it, they need electricity
and they need food. If they
want a fire truck to show
up, they want the fire truck
there," Bays said. "Is it
somebody else's responsi-
bility to make sure the fire
truck shows up?"
She added: "When do
we say you've got to have
skin in the game? Life isn't
free for nobody or nothing.
How do we balance this
out?"


KNEE PAIN?


.4


Attend a FREE Seminar:





The Villages
Comfort Suites
1202 Avenida Central

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


SLargo Medcal Center
ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


M) KEEP

CITRUS COUNTY

BEAUTIFUL


CITRUS COUNTY CLEANUP -

GREENUP PROGRAM


Everyone wants to live, work

and play in a clean and green

community and it's up to

everyone to improve the overall

quality of life in Citrus County.


If you are finally tackling that

garage clean out or just spring

cleaning, did you know....


Residents can dispose of the

following materials from their

home Free of charge at the

landfill, up to the listed limits.....


No Limits on these items!

-,1 Bulky waste consisting of furniture,
carpeting and padding, box springs
and mattresses
Computer components & all other
electronic items
-.1 Some metal appliances
(stoves, washers, etc.)
*:* Lead acid and rechargeable batteries
-.1 Scrap metal (all lawn equipment must
have fluids drained)


Items with limits of 2 per visit -

2 times per year

-,1 Televisions and computer monitors
:1- Refrigerators, Freezers, A/C Units
**- Propane Tanks


Items with other limits

-,1 Residential passenger car tires -
Maximum 5 per visit 2 times per year
-,1 Used oil and anti-freeze -
up to 10 gallons per visit
-,1 Fluorescent lamps & mercury
containing devices first 6 free
-,1 Latex paint maximum 10 gallons
per visit


Don't let your trash

become Litter ....

"Put Waste in Its Place"


*Businesses will be charged business rate.
For more information call
Solid Waste Management (Citrus County Landfill)
352 527-7670 or visit web site:
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm/solid_waste.htm


)00FK5J


I


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 A13


LOCAL


M[:











NATION


Nat


Nation BRIEFS

Thousands rally


Associated Press
Tracy Martin, father of
Trayvon Martin, wipes
sweat from his face Sat-
urday as he listens to
speakers at a "Justice for
Trayvon" rally in Miami.
The Rev. Al Sharpton's
National Action Network
organized rallies nationwide
to press for federal civil
rights charges against
George Zimmerman, who
was found not guilty in
the shooting death of the
unarmed teenager.

Michelin recalls
100,000 tires
WASHINGTON Michelin
is voluntarily recalling
100,000 tires after a retailer
discovered that some had
holes and quickly deflated.
The recall affects certain
sizes of Michelin's LTX
M/S 2, X Radial LT2 and
Latitude Tour tires. The tires
are typically used on light
trucks and SUVs.
The punctures, in the
sidewall, are caused by
machines used to handle
the finished tires. The tires
were made in Michelin's
Lexington, S.C., plant.
There have been no re-
ports of damage, death or
injury. Michelin said about
2,500 of the recalled tires
may have the defect.
Customers who may
have purchased the tires
will be notified by mail be-
ginning next week. Cus-
tomers who have already
replaced the tires may be
reimbursed.
Bombs may await
bidders on land
CONORD, N.H. Federal
officials preparing to sell the
New Hampshire compound
of a tax-evading couple
convicted of amassing an
arsenal of weapons can't
guarantee that explosives
and other booby traps aren't
hidden on the 103-acre spread.
In fact, they will openly
warn bidders that land
mines might be planted
throughout Ed and Elaine
Brown's bucolic property in
the small town of Plainfield.
And they say prospective
buyers won't be allowed on
the grounds until they submit
a winning bid that frees the
government of liability for
dismemberment or death.
"It's going to be a very in-
teresting sale," said Chief
U.S. Deputy Marshal
Brenda Mikelson, who's in
charge of the auction.
Thunderstorms a
wildcard for fire
IDYLLWILD, Calif. -The
threat of weekend storms
could bring much-needed
moisture to a huge wildfire
in the mountains near Palm
Springs.
But it could also bring wind,
lightning and other volatile
conditions that could make
a tough firefight even worse.
Cooler temperatures
overnight helped firefighters
make progress on the fire's
northern and southern flanks.
Thunderstorms present a
major threat to progress this
weekend. Combined with
hot air on the ground, the
unstable air could create a
strong updraft that draws
smoke high into the atmos-
phere, fire spokesman
Capt. Mike Lindbery said.
The blaze in the San Jac-
into Mountains had expanded
to roughly 42 square miles
and was 25 percent contained,
U.S. Forest Service spokes-
woman Kate Kramer said.
-From wire reports


CI


Associated Press


After decades of scram-
bling on the underside of
California bridges to pluck
endangered peregrine fal-
con chicks from ill-placed
nests, inseminating female
birds and releasing cap-
tive-raised fledglings,
wildlife biologists have
been so successful in
bringing back the powerful
raptors that they now
threaten Southern Califor-
nia's endangered shore-
bird breeding sites.
As a result, the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service says it
will no longer permit pere-
grine chick rescues from Bay
Area bridges, a move it
concedes will likely lead to
fluffy chicks tumbling into
the water below and
drowning next spring.
"It's a paradox," said
Marie Strassburger, chief of
the federal agency's divi-
sion of migratory birds and
habitat in Sacramento. "Yes,
chicks are cute. I won't
deny that for a second."


Associated Press
Aura, a 3-year-old female peregrine falcon, spreads her
wins June 19 at the home of biologist Glenn Stewart in
Santa Cruz, Calif.


But she said the loss of
chicks that fledge from the
nest too early is a natural
part of life.
Peregrines nest high on
cliffs, trees, buildings and
bridges because they hunt
by diving, at speeds top-
ping 200 mph, at wild birds
they like to eat. When
fledging, young peregrines
fly well and land poorly
On cliffs, there are plenty


of easy spots for a crash
landing. On buildings, they
scramble back onto win-
dow sills or ledges when
their first flights go awry
But on bridges chicks find
no perch and often just hit
the water.
"We see the loss of a
chick by natural causes as
an educational moment as
this happens in nature all
the time," said Strass-


&
TRUS COUNTY (


Pioneering report
Associated Press long time, and in and out
of the hospital before com-
WASHINGTON Cov- ing home Thursday.
ering 10 presidents over Thomas made her name
five decades, Helen Thomas as a bulldog for United
aged into a legend. She Press International in the
was the only reporter with great wire-service rivalries
her name inscribed on a of old, and as a pioneer for
chair in the White House women in journalism.
briefing room her own She was persistent to
front-row seat to history the point of badgering.
Starting as a copy girl in One White House press
1943, when women were secretary described her
considered unfit for seri- questioning as "torture" -
ous reporting, Thomas and he was one of her fans.
rose to bureau chief. Her disdain for White
Working at a news service, House secrecy and dodg-
where writers expect ob- ing spanned five decades,
security, she became one of back to President John
journalism's mostrecognized Kennedy
faces. Thomas embraced After she quit UPI in
her role as a Washington 2000 by then an outsized
institution, doing cameos figure in a shrunken or-
in movies, giving lectures, ganization-her influence
writing books about her life waned. The Bush adminis-
until the spotlight landed tration marginalized her,
on inflammatory remarks clearly peeved with a jour-
she made about Israel. nalist who had challenged
The uproar pushed her President George W Bush
out of the White House to his face on the Iraq war
press room at age 89. and declared him the
Thomas, 92, died sur- worst president in history
rounded by family and Thomas was accus-
friends at her Washington tomed to getting under the
apartment on Saturday, the skin of presidents, if not to
family said in a statement, getting the cold shoulder.
A friend, Muriel Dobbin, "If you want to be loved,"
told The Associated Press she said years earlier, "go
Thomas had been ill for a into something else."


WORLD


CHRONICLE


Helen Thomas dead at 92


Associated Press
Veteran White House reporter Helen Thomas asks White
House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs a question March 26,
2009, during the White House daily briefing in Washington.
Thomas, a pioneer for women in journalism and an irre-
pressible White House correspondent, has died. She was 92.


Thomas was at the fore-
front of women's achieve-
ments in journalism. She
was one of the first female
reporters to break out of
the White House "women's
beat" the soft stories
about presidents' kids,
wives, their teas and their
hairdos and cover the
hard news on an equal
footing with men.
She became the first fe-
male White House bureau
chief for a wire service
when UPI named her to
the position in 1974. She


was also the first female
officer at the National Press
Club, where women had once
been barred as members.
Born in Winchester, Ky.,
to Lebanese immigrants,
Thomas was the seventh of
nine children. Her family
moved to Detroit, and it
was in high school there,
after working on the stu-
dent newspaper, that she
decided she wanted to be-
come a reporter.
After graduating from
Detroit's Wayne University
(now Wayne State Univer-


sity), Thomas headed straight
for the nation's capital. She
landed a $17.50-a-week po-
sition as a copy girl, with
duties that included fetch-
ing coffee and doughnuts
for editors at the Washing-
ton Daily News.
United Press, later
United Press International,
soon hired her to write
local news stories for the
radio wire. Her assignments
were relegated at first to
women's news, society items
and celebrity profiles.
Her big break came
after the 1960 election that
sent Kennedy to the White
House, and landed Thomas
her first assignment related
to the presidency She was
sent to Palm Beach, Fla.,
to cover the vacation of the
president-elect.
Thomas is survived by
three sisters, and many
nieces, nephews and cousins,
according to her family
Thomas is to be buried
in Detroit, "the beloved city
of her youth," the family
said. A memorial service
in Washington is planned for
October, according Charles
J. Lewis, senior editor and
former Washington bureau
chief for Hearst News
Service.


World BRIEFS

Nice rice


KYODO NEWS/Associated Press
People stand near an
image of Marilyn Monroe
on a rice field Friday in In-
akadatemura, Aomori pre-
fecture, northern Japan.
The art is made from nine
rice species with seven
different colors.

Five convicted for
Concordia wreck
GROSSETO, Italy- Five
employees of an Italian cruise
company were convicted
Saturday of manslaughter in
the Costa Concordia ship-
wreck that killed 32 people,
receiving sentences of less
than three years that lawyers
for victims and survivors
criticized as too lenient.
The guilty verdicts for
multiple manslaughter and
negligence were the first
reached in the sinking of
the cruise liner carrying
more than 4,000 crew and
passengers near the Tus-
can shore in January 2012.
The ship's captain, the
only remaining defendant,
was denied a plea bargain
and is being tried sepa-
rately. He faces up to 20
years, if convicted of
manslaughter, causing the
shipwreck and abandoning
the ship.
Bombs, attacks
across Iraq kill 46
BAGHDAD -A coordi-
nated wave of seven car
bombs tore through bustling
commercial streets Satur-
day night in Shiite areas of
Baghdad, part of a relent-
less wave of violence that
killed at least 46 inside and
outside the capital.
The car bombs deto-
nated after the iftar meal
that breaks the daily fast of
the holy month of Ra-
madan. Many people head
out to shop or relax in cof-
fee shops in the cooler
evenings after fasting ends.
Bombings and other at-
tacks have now killed more
than 250 people since the
start of Ramadan on July
10, according to an Associ-
ated Press count. There
was no immediate claim of
responsibility.
-From wire reports


burger. "The peregrine fal-
cons on the bridges in the
Bay Area just happen to be
in a very visible spot so the
public is more aware of it."
The decision to stop sav-
ing peregrine chicks is
strictly local, said U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service mi-
gratory bird specialist Ali-
cia King at its Arlington,
Va., headquarters. She
noted that in many com-
munities the peregrines
are beloved and their
chicks are treasured.
"But birds sometimes nest
in places that are not the
best places for them to nest,
and while it's hard to watch,
sometimes nature has to
take its course," she said.
Peregrine falcons were
listed under the Endan-
gered Species Act in 1973;
at the time, there were just
11 of the birds known to be
living in California and
about 100 nationwide.
Today there are around
2,000 in California, and as
many as 10,000 more
across the United States.


Aurora marks a year since theater shooting


Associated Press
From left, Tom Sullivan, father of Aurora shooting victim Alex; Jane Dougherty, sister of Sandy Hook elementary
school shooting victim Mary Sherlach; Carlee Soto, sister of Sandy Hook elementary school shooting victim
Victoria; and Coni Sanders, daughter of Columbine High School shooting victim Dave Sanders, stand to-
gether Friday during an event to honor those killed in the massacre at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater a year
after the attack. The vigil participants read a list of names of those killed in gun violence across the nation
since the school shooting rampage in Newtown, Conn., in December. On Saturday, Coloradans embraced ways
to heal in Aurora with a city-sponsored "Day of Remembrance." Parents, siblings and survivors of those slain
attended a morning ceremony of prayer and remembrance outside Aurora's city hall. After the ceremony, res-
idents volunteered for projects tending a community garden, sorting food bank donations, donating blood.




With population soaring, feds give up


on Peregrine chicks on Bay bridges













EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


-~--
r"'1 d~


Make lasting memories

at local campgrounds

still remember my earliest
camping experiences. I was around
8, and it was just my sisters and me,
three girls stuffed into my Dad's
old Army tent in a pasture a good
distance away from our home but
close enough that we could still
see it. I packed wisely, bringing only the
essentials namely, a small collection of
My Little Ponies and their accessories,
even though there were real ponies just
on the other side of the fence.
I don't remember what we talked about or what
time we went to sleep, only the scent of the musty,
olive drab canvas and the excitement of sleeping
somewhere other than in our beds. Later I'd wake
up with my face in the dirt, my head having been
pushed outside during the night. I blamed the wiggly
5-year-old pressed between me and my very patient
big sister, who was a teenager then.
Since then, I've had many more camping trips, all
of them memorable. Once, a blue Coleman tent was
put to the test near the Everglades as a hurricane
dumped buckets of rain on us while lumbering to-
ward Louisiana. My husband and I spent an entire
night thinking the tent would give out and were
pleasantly surprised when it never did. That was a
good tent.
Each camping experience is unique, and the mem-
ories last a lifetime. Camping is a rite of passage for
kids, a way for couples to spend time together with-
out interference from iPhones, email and television
and it's a chance for families to get closer at least
geographically if nothing else.
See Page A17


* Adequate bedding, sleeping bags and blankets
Lightweight, light-colored clothing, including
long sleeves and pants
m Tent and plastic ground cloth
m Insect repellent
m Broad-spectrum sunscreen and lipscreen with
SPF 15 or higher
m Wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses
Healthy on-the-go snacks and other food
* Water
* Insulated cooler
mAlcohol-based hand sanitizer
Life jacket, helmet and other protective gear


* First-aid kit
Compass or GPS
Map
Flashlights
Extra batteries
Sturdy shoes
Extra set of clothes
Medical record, including information on vaccina-
tions; insect, food, plant and other allergies; dis-
eases and conditions; medicines, dosing schedules
and storage instructions; emergency contacts; and
activities your doctor or nurse says to avoid.
-SOURCE: www.cdc.gov


LEFT: Mackenzie
Randazzo, front, waits to
get into a rental boat on
the Chassahowtizka
River while Frank
Randazzo prepares the
vessel for a fishing trip.
The river is within
easy walking distance
of the Chassahowitzka
Campground.


ABOVE: A tent is set
up in one of the the
25 sites in the primitive
camping area of the
Chassahowitzka River
Campground.


TOP: Boats available for
rent are docked near the
Chassahowitzka River
Campground Store.


Amanda
Mims

JOURNEYING
JOURNALIST


Amanda Mims is a freelance
writer and photographer, RVer
and full-time traveler based on
the Nature Coast. She can be
reached at amanda,mims@
gmail.com


Feature photos
by Amanda Mims


-1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING JULY 21, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D11: Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 18:00 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
S[WESH NBC 19 19 News News America's Got Talent 'Vegas" Nc Law & Order: SVU Crossing Lines 14' News Access
Lewis & Clark: Journey Secrets of Chatsworth Secrets of Highclere Masterpiece Mystery! Visit to a Yes As Time As Time
S[ED! PBS 3 3 14 6 of Discovery (N) PG' B Castle PG' munitions factory. () 'PG' c Minister PG Goes By Goes By
B OiIT) PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin In Stereo) 'PG' cc Secrets of Highclere Masterpiece Movie Martin
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly America's Got Talent Vegas" Hopefuls audition Law & Order: Special Crossing Lines "Special News Paid
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News in Las Vegas. (In Stereo) Nc Victims Unit '14 Ops: Part 2" 14' Program
r ) ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Celebrity Wife Swap Whodunnit? "Bum Ba Castle Alexis starts a News Sports
c ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' (N)'PG' Dee Da" (N)'14' video blog.'PG' Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In Big Brother Contestants The Good Wife (In The Mentalist (In 10 News, Paid
[B WTP)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) s face eviction. (N) Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14'B 11pm (N) Program
FOX FOX13 6:00 News (N) American The The Bob's Family Guy Axe Cop FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Burn
(9 VT)FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) mc Dad'14' Simpsons Simpsons Burgers 14' (N) 14' (In Stereo) N Notice PG
3 [WCJtJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Celebrity Wife Swap Whodunnit? (N) '14' Castle 'PG' News Inside Ed.
ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for Believers Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
a [WCL IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Anointing Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
T ABC 11 11 11 News World America's Funniest Celebrity Wife Swap Whodunnit? "Bum Ba Castle Alexis starts a News Castle 'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' (N)'PG' B Dee Da" (N)'14' video blog.'PG'
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang I- ".J.-r"Tabula Law & Order "Empire" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
E CW o IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory i 1-, j '14'm 'PG' 'PG'
E D WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 '70s '70s Scrubs Raymond Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris |Chris Tampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM) W TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Brody
King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami Wannabe" CSI: Miami "Deadline" Cold Case Drive-by *** "Back to
SQIe CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men 14'm '14' shooting.'PG' School" (1986)
) Casita Big Rotary Family Healthy Your Citrus County Court I Spy 'Y' Eye for an Fam Team
S WYKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living Eye
ED [WiOX FOX 13 7 7 Fox 35 News at 5 (N) American Simpsons Simpsons |Burgers Fam. Guy |Axe Cop FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG'B
M [WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticiero Futbol Futbol Parodiando (N) 'PG' (SS AgquyAhora (SS)
M IWXPX) ION 17 Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl LI Larder: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
.**2 "Con Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Storage Storage Storage Storage
UAEI 54 48 54 25 27 Air" Dynasty Dynasty D ynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty WarsPG' WarsPG Wars PG Wars PG'
(Ai I 55 6 ** "Conspiracy Theory"(1997) Mel Gibson. Premiere. A paranoid The Killing The hunt for The Killing The hunt for The Klling The hunt for
55 4 55 cabbie's ratings make him a CA target. 'R' a pornographer a pornographer, a pornographer.
52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced To Hooker Thinkin Off the Off the Call of Call- Top Hooker (Season Call of Call-
52 35 52 19 21 outside the box.'P Hook Hook Wildman Wildman Finale) (N)'PG' Wildman Wildman
S** "Madea's Family Reunion" (2006, Sunday Best "United Sunday Best "United Sunday Best "United Sunday Best 'G'
( 96 19 96 Comedy) Tyler Perry.PG-13' B By Faith" (N)'G' By Faith"'G' I By Faith"'G'
Rla i) 254 51 254 Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Pincesses-Lo. Housewives/NJ Happens Jersey
Jeff Dunham: Arguing Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham: Arguing Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Drunk Tosh.0
[B 27 61 27 33 With Myself '14' m With Myself '14' m History 14'
f* "Son-in-Law" (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Hillbillies Hillbillies Bounty Bounty Hillbillies Hillbillies "Son-in-Law"
W Y 98 45 98 28 37 Carla Gugino, Lane Smith. PG-13' for Hire for Hire Hunters Hunters for Hire for Hire (1993) Pauly Shore.
[NBC) 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Princess |On 60 Minutes on CNBC Pepsi's Challenge American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
ftNNJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) To Be Announced Crimes of the Inside Man (N) To Be Announced
SAustin & Shake It Good- Dog With a '"Teen Beach Movie"(2013) Ross Austin & Jessie Dog With a Shake It Dog With a
S 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up! G' Charlie Blog G' Lynch. (In Stereo) N Ally G' G' Blog G' Up! 'G' Blog G'
rLSPNJ 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. (N) BN SportsCenter (N)
[EPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 NHRA Drag Racing Mopar Mile-High NHRA Nationals. B 2013 Open Championship Best of the Final Round.
[EWTN3 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Crossing |World Over Live Sunday Night Prime G.K. |Rosary |Theology Roundtabe God iBookmark
inD 29 52 29 2n n10 28 ** "Burlesque"(2010, Drama) Cher, Christina *** "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do Twisted "Pilot" '14'
29 52 29 20 28 Aguilera, Eric Dane. PG-13' white couple adopts a homeless black teen. PG-13'
**2' "The Golden Bowl" (2000, Drama) Uma *+ "The Scarlet Letter" (1995) Demi Moore. A married *** "Mansfield Park" (1999)
118 170 Thurman. (In Stereo)'R'B Puritan woman has an affair with a minister. 'R' Embeth Davidtz. 'PG-13' B
(Ei 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Stossel Huckabee
(jODI 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Food Network Star Food Court Wars 'G' Food Network Star Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
[FSNFL1 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker Tour World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
S** "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" *** "True Grit" (2010) Jeff Bridges. A crusty lawman ** Twue G',l '010, Western)
19) 30 60 30 51 (2009) Shia LaBeouf. 'PG-13' helps a teen avenge herfathers death. 'PG-13' i.-n li:..,- I:. i .'
GO F) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf ILive From ILive From Live From |Live From |Live From |Live From Live From Live From Live From Live From
D "A Taste of Romance" (2011, Romance) Teri Cedar Cove "Pilot" Judge Olivia Lockhart's new Frasier Frasier PG Frasier PG' Frasier PG'
59 68 59 45 54 Polo, Bailee Madison. 'NR' B1 opportunity. 'G' Bc G' Bc
"Crash *** "The Bourne Legacy"(2012, Action) Jeremy Renner, True Blood "Don't You The Newsroom "The True Blood "Don't You
i 302201 302 2 2 Reel" Rachel Weisz. (In Stereo) PG-13 Bm Feel Me" MA' Genoa Tip" (N) MA' Feel Me" MA'
S* 'Th; Mean Wiar" Real Time With Bill True Blood F.. the Pain **+ "American Reunion"(2012, Comedy) ** "Hesher"(2010)
L 2 303 202 303 ,._, i:, Maher'MA' Away"'MA' Jason Biggs. (In Stereo) R' BN'R',
(HlTV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl HGTV Star (N)'G' Love It or List It, Too Brother vs. Brother Hunters |Hunt Intl
Ice Road Truckers Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Mountain Men 'PG' Mountain Men (N) Ice Road Truckers Only in America With
fl ) 51 25 51 32 42 14' m PG' *PG' 'PG' "Load Rules" (N) '14' Larry the Cable Guy
S- "Because I Said ** "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Drop Dead Diva Devious Maids (N) "Miss Congeniality 2"
24 38 24 31 So"(2007)B Fabulous" (2005) Sandra Bullock. 'PG-13' "Secret Lives" (N) '14'm
"Time of Death" (2013, Suspense) Kathleen ** "Mary Higgins Clark's The Cradle Will "Cold Spring" (2013, Suspense) Sean Patrick
50 119 Robertson. (In Stereo NR Fall"(2004) Angie Everhart. (In Stereo) B Flanery. (In Stereo) 'NR'
S** '"The Man With the Iron Fists" (2012) *** "Prometheus" (2012, Science Fiction) "How High" (2001, Comedy) Life on Top
S 320 221 320 3 3 RZA, Cung Le. (In Stereo) NR' BN Noomi Rapace. (In Stereo) 'R' B Method Man. (In Stereo) R' Bc
[iMSNBCJ 42 41 42 1 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Minh's Story Sex Slaves |Trafficked: Slavery
Lfe Below Zero65 109 44 '14' Lfe BeLife Belowero14 if e Be low Zero "The Ultmate Survval ife Below Zero (N) 14' Ultimate Survival
S109 65 109 44 53 "Checkmate"'14' Chase"'14' Alaska (N)'PG' Alaska'PG'
fNitRJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sanjay |Sam & Sam & |Haunted See Dad |Wendell ** "Summer Rental"(1985) John Candy Friends |Friends
(DWj 103 62 103 Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass
(QXX) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' B Snapped: Killer Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' B
1 "Gone"(2012) Dexter Dexter contin- Raa Donovan "Twerk" Dexter"Scar Tissue" Ray Donovan "Black Ray Donovan "Black
SH 340 241 340 4 Amanda Seyfried. ues to hunt. 'MA' *MA' (N)'MA' Bc Cadillac" (N)'MA' Cadillac"'MA'
ARCA RE/MAX Series Racing Chicago. From SPEED Center (N) Hooters International Swimsuit Pageant Wind My Classic
[SPEED) 732 112 732 Chicagoland Speedway in Jolet, IIl. (Live) Tunnel Car
PiKE 317 43 37 27 36 Bar Rescue "Broke Bar Rescue A western Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (N) (In Tattoo Rescue (In Ink Master "Baby Got
37 43 37 27 36 Black Sheep"'PG' bar.'PG' 'PG' Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'PG' Back"'14' B
** "Here Comes the Boom"(2012, Comedy) Magic City "World in *** "Loo er" (2012, Science Fiction) Bruce Magic City "World in
370 271 370 Kevin James. (In Stereo) 'PG' B Changes"'MA' B Willis, Emiry Blunt. (In Stereo) 'R' B Changes"'MA' B
Into the Saltwater Flats Class Ship Sprtsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
l 36 31 36 Blue 'G' Exp. Shape TV Adv. Sport Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue G'
EY) 31 59 31 26 29 Buffy the Vampire Buffy the Vampire Buffy the Vampire BuV ampirfy mpire Buffy the Vampire Buffy the Vampire
31 59 31 26 29 Slayer'14'm Slayer'14'm Slayer'14'm Slayer "Hush"'PG' Slayer'14'm Slayer'14'm
(jB5) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Old School" (2003) Luke Wilson. 'R' ** "Due Date"(2010)'R' ** "Due Date"(2010)'R'B
S** "Mrs. Soffel"(1984, Drama) Diane ***+ "Mon Oncle"(1958 Comedy) Jacques **** "Modern Times"(1936, Comedy)
169 53 169 30 35 Keaton, Mel Gibson. PG-13' Tati, Jean-Pierre Zola. NR' Charlie Chaplin, Paulette Goddard. 'G'
) 53 Treehouse Masters (N) Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid:
M 53 34 53 24 26 'PG'm cStereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'BN Uncensored (N)'14' (In Stereo)'14' B Uncensored'14'
(TB 50 46 50 29 30 Sister Wives '14' Sister Sister Sister Wives '14' Sister Wives'PG' Breaking Amish: LA Sister Wives'PG'
"Billy *** "50/50" (2011) Joseph ***+ "Brokeback Mountain" (2005 *** '"Take This Waltz"(2011, Drama) Michelle
Iti:i 350 261 350 Elliot"'R' Gordon-Levitt. R' B Romance) Heath Ledger. (In Stereo) 'R' Williams. (In Stereo) 'R' B
S 48 33 48 31 34 "The Librarian: Return to King ** '"The Librarian: Quest for the Spear" Falling Skies "Strange Falling Skies "Strange
M 48 33 48 31 34 Solomon's Mines" (2006) Noah Wyre. B (2004, Action) Noah Wyle. Nc Brew"'14' Brew''14'
TOON 38 58 38 33 "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs"'PG' Legends Looney King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam.Guy Burgers Fam.Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Steak Paradise 'G' Bikinis Bikinis Wat Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Adam Adam BBQ Cr BBQ Cr.
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Container Container Container Most Shocking
rtvL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Cleveland Gold Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls
i 47 NCIS The team hunts NCIS "Cloak" (In NCIS "Dagger" (In NCIS Military country- NCIS Shadf Returns" Burn Notice "All or
47 32 47 17 18 for a killer. '14' B Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'1B N club bombing. '14' 'PG'B cNothing"'PG'
CSI: Miami "Rush" (In CSI: Miami "Just CSI: Miami "Burned" (In CSI: Miami Possible CSI: Miami "Born to CSI: Miami "Triple
) 117 69 117 Stereo) '14' Murdered" '14' Stereo) '14' drug-smuggling. '14' Kill" '14' Threat" '14' B
(WGiN3J 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay "You've Got Mail"


Wife wonders if


she's not forgiven


D ear Annie: I've
been married for
15 years. Eight
years ago, I was on an
online message board. I
was only hoping to have
fun, talk about life and
make online "friends."
But while on there, I met
a man.
We started
chatting on-
line and then
on the phone. I
thought it was
a simple flirta-
tion. My hus-
band had a job
that kept him
away a lot, and
I was lonely
and not think-
ing straight.
Long story ANI
short, we
ended up hav- MAII
ing an affair
that lasted five years, on
and off. I ended it three
years ago when my hus-
band found out. Fortu-
nately, he forgave me,
and we moved on.
The problem is, our
sex life, which was never
highly active, became
nil. We haven't had sex
in three years. He loves
me, and I love him. He
says he forgives me and
that he simply no longer
desires sex with any-
one. I believe him. But I
feel that I am still being
punished for my indis-


L


creation. I will never
cheat on him again, but I
wonder if this will be my
life from now on. What
can I do? Neglected
Wife
Dear Wife: It's possi-
ble that your husband is
still angry with you. For-
giveness after an affair
is a difficult
and ongoing
process. It
takes a great
deal of time.
However,
when you say
your sex life
was never
particularly
active, there
could be more
going on. Ask
HE'S your husband
to have his
BOX testosterone
checked, and
if that doesn't help,
please get counseling
and work on this.

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions
to anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate,
737 Third SL, Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254. Visit
www.creators.com to
read more.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"The Conjuring" (R)
12:40 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG) In
3D. 5:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13)
3:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Pacific Rim" In 3D. (PG-13)
12:20 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Turbo" (PG) 1 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG) 4:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Conjuring" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
12:15 p.m.,2:40 p.m.,


7:05 p.m.
"Despicable Me 2" In 3D.
(PG) 5:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)
12:50 a.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"The Lone Ranger" (PG-13)
12:05 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Pacific Rim" In 3D. (PG-13)
4:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Red 2" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"R.I.P.D." (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 8 p.m..
"R.I.P.D." In 3D. (PG-13)
5:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Turbo" (PG) 12 p.m.,
2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Turbo" In 3D. (PG) 5 p.m.,
10 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Burn with steam
6 Fibs
10 Exhibition
14 Raines or
Fitzgerald
18 Asian temple
20 Cogito sum
21 Insect stage
22 Demi or Dudley
24 Demeaned
25 Blunder
26 The McCoy
27 Magnitude
29 Narrow opening
30 Horse of a certain color
32 Number prefix
34 Wanton look
36 Greek colonnade
37 Chess pieces
38 Target
39 A living thing
41 Detergent
43 Psychic's ability (abbr.)
44 Weather word
45 Get by trickery
47 Position
49 Hammer
52 Similar to
53 Distance measure
55 Disparage
59 One of the
archangels
60 El Greco's city
62 Uttered
64 Indivisible unit
65 Mah-jongg piece
66 Youngster
67 CD predecessors
69 Part of Scand.
71 Prepares hides
72 Wing
73 Raucous
74 volente
75 Tendon
77 Perish
78 Religious images
80 Type of wedding?
82 Take a trip
84 Game
85 Daddy
87 Light metallic sound
88 Crude dwelling
89 Artist's workroom
90 Embolden
92 Worker
underground
93 Strike gently
94 Garden shelter
96 Mire
97 Throw carelessly


99 Spinning toy
102 Actor Bana
104 Container
105 Writer Fleming
106 Adhered
107 Kelly or Krupa
108 Benefit
110 Prejudice
112 Wool-bearing
animal
114 Dummy
115 Tenant
117 Word of woe
119 Like a moray
120 Annoy
121 Twelvemonth
123 Arrangement of
crossed bars
125 Recipe word
126 Comedian
DeLuise
129 Recognize
131 Traverse
132 Farm animal
133 Unmatched
136 Leave
unmentioned
138 Toothed wheel
140 Big bird
141 "-|Ia Douce"
142 The Buckeye State
143 Printed cloth
145 Unfreeze
147 Appraise
149 The Milky Way
151 Wireless device
152 Bird's bill part
153 Watched
154 TV chef
Lagasse
155 Sign gas
156 Stony
157 Presentation of a kind,
for short
158 Quartz variety


DOWN
1 Cramp
2 Metal rope
3 Once more
4 "- in Space"
5 JFK's
predecessor
6 Lawful
7 Metallic element
8 The "I"
9 Became less
severe
10 Elastic


Color
Fall birthstone
U.K. member
- City of Oz
Smoked salmon
Quite a number of
Mountain ridge
Skillful
Slaughter
of baseball
Kind of dance
Scull
Estuary
The dawn
personified
Scottish
Highlander
Cycled
Tumbler
Work in verse
Run away
Young horse
Notable time
Go quickly
Not talking
Seed cover
Very small
Lane of
"Superman"
Kind of car or room
Accidental
Boone or Day-Lewis
Failed Ford
The one here
Margarine
Put on
Twist out of shape
Like some plants
Consider anew
Water wheel
Buddhist law
of nature
Calendar abbr.
Awry
Food fish
Mineral spring
Hard liquor
- Maria
Deprive of food
Great fear
Gas (prefix)
Javelin
Fish in a can
Isinglass
Name for a
bystander
Hackneyed
"I Love -"
A single time
Equal
Metropolis


105 Newton orAsimov
106 Eyeglasses,
for short
107 Strong wind
109 Onion relative
111 Totality
113 Relaxed
114 Unhearing
116 Capital
of Myanmar
118 Scattered


Furry covering
Fish eggs
Male cat
Show-off of an actor
Sawbones
- Khayyam
City in Italy
Observe
Statement of belief
"Gone with the Wind"
name


Puzzle answer is on Page A19.


Ipse -
Sir Arthur Conan -
Ebb or neap
Flightless bird
News bit
Designer Cassini
AFL- -
Abbr. in schedules
Always
Drs.' org.


0 2013 UFS, Dist, by Universal Uclick for UFS


A16 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chevy's Corvette has storied design history


One of my cars is a 2008
crystal red Corvette
coupe with a removable
top panel, an automatic trans-
mission and paddle shifters for
manual operation. It's a great car
to drive, but it is scary fast with a
436 horsepower engine and top
speed of 192 miles per hour I use
it as a show car and have made a
few modifications such as a
black and silver center stripe
from front to back, chrome
pieces on the side vents and
some engine dress-up parts.
The Corvette is considered a
sports car manufactured by the
Chevrolet division of General
Motors (GM) that has been pro-
duced for six generations, with
the seventh-generation
Corvette being available by the
end of this year. The first
model, a convertible, was de-
signed by Harley Earl (a well-
known name in the Chevrolet
world) and introduced at the
GM Motorama show in 1953 as a
concept show car. The Corvette
was named after a type of
small, maneuverable warship
with the same name. Originally
built in Flint, Mich., and St.
Louis, Mo., the Corvette is cur-
rently manufactured in Bowl-
ing Green, Ky., and is the
official sports car of the Com-
monwealth of Kentucky. The
National Corvette Museum lo-
cated very near the Bowling
Green plant documents the
car's history and hosts exhibits,
tours and the annual anniver-
sary celebration. A Corvette
has been selected as the Indi-
anapolis 500 pace car 12 times.
The first-generation Corvette


Ken
McNally

CAR
CORNER


was introduced late in the 1953
model year and ended in 1962.
It is often referred to as the
"solid-axle" model because the
independent suspension did
not debut until the 1963 Sting
Ray. Only 300 hand-built polo
white Corvette convertibles
were produced for 1953. Body
style changes were made for
the 1956 and 1961 model years
then the second generation was
introduced in 1963.
The second-generation
Corvette is often referred to as
the Sting Ray and ran from
1963 to 1967. The famous split
rear window coupe design was
only available in 1963. The
third-generation Corvette, pat-
terned after the Mako Shark
(an actual shark caught by one
of the company's executives
while deep-sea fishing) concept
car was introduced for the 1968
model year and was in produc-
tion until 1982. This was the
first generation to use the
T-top removable panels. The
Stingray name (but spelled as
one word, instead of two)
was used again during the
1969 to 1976 model years and
will be used on the new 2014
Corvette.
The fourth generation of the
Corvette was the first complete


Special to the Chronicle
Ken McNally says his 2008 crystal red Corvette coupe with a removable top panel, an automatic
transmission and paddle shifters for manual operation, is a fun but scary ride.


redesign since 1963 and ran
from 1984 to 1996. Production
was to begin for the 1983 model
year but, due to quality issues
and part delays, there were no
Corvettes produced for that
year Therefore, the Corvette
was not produced consecutively
each year from 1953 as there
were no 1983 models. Produc-
tion of the fifth-generation
Corvette began in 1997 and
ended in 2004.
The sixth and current genera-
tion of Corvette was redesigned
with new bodywork and ex-
posed headlamps (for the first
time since 1962), a larger pas-
senger compartment and a new


engine and suspension. Due to
major design and engineering
changes, most Corvette enthusi-
asts are excited to see the new
seventh generation Corvette for
the 2014 model year, available
later this year
Car joke: A driver was speed-
ing along a winding country
road enjoying his new Corvette
when he turned a bend and, to
his horror, saw two farmhands
standing and chatting in the
middle of the road. He swerved
violently to avoid them, but the
Vette ran up an embankment,
did a triple summersault
and landed in an adjacent
field. One farmhand turned


to the other and said: "That
was a stroke of luck. I reckon
we got out of that field just in
time."

Upcoming events
* July 20 and 27: Cruise-in
hosted by Citrus County
Cruisers at 6 p.m. at Wendy's on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River
* July 26: All American Muscle
Night cruise-in at 6 p.m. at Arby's
on U.S. 19 in Crystal River

Ken McNally is the car
columnist for the Chronicle.
Contact him at kenmcnally@
tampabayrrcom or 352-
341-1165.


CAMPING


Citrus County is a treas-
ure trove of opportunities
for outdoor recreation,
and there are several
places here to set up a
tent, whether you want to
go backcountry camping
or enjoy the conveniences
of hot showers and
electricity.
One of the more popu-
lar camping spots in sum-
mer is the Chassahowitza
River Campground at
8600 W Miss Maggie Drive
in Chassahowitzka. Camp-
sites are in a wooded area
within easy walking dis-
tance of the spring-fed
Chassahowitzka River, a
local favorite for paddling
and swimming.
The campground is an
ideal starting point for
families who want to
spend time canoeing,
kayaking or cooling off in
the springs.
I recently stopped and
talked with Liz Blauer, one
of the campground's man-
agers, who recommends
campers go to Seven Sis-
ters Springs, which is a
short paddle away from
the boat launch.
Visitors are surrounded
by nature both on the
clear, cool river and at the
wooded campground.
"It's a beautiful experi-
ence," Blauer said.
"Campers love it. They're
not sandwiched by RVs.
It's primitive, so we don't
allow anything back (in
the primitive area) except
tenting."
Blauer said the camp-
ground is family friendly,
and no alcohol is allowed
on the property.
More to know about the
Chassahowitzka River
Campground:
Primitive tent camping
is $23 plus tax per night
for two people (each extra
person is $5; no charge
for children 12 and
younger). Weekly rate is
$161 plus tax for two peo-
ple and an extra $20 for
each additional person
older than 12 years. There
are 25 primitive camp-
sites. Fifty-two RV sites
are also available and can
be used for tent camping.
The RV sites have elec-
tric, water and sewer
hookups (higher rates
apply for RV sites). Camp-
sites have picnic tables
and fire rings. The camp-
ground has restrooms and
showers. Call 352-382-
2200 or visit http://chassa
howitzkaflorida.com.
Here are some other
local places to consider
for your next outdoor ad-
venture. It's a good idea to
call ahead of time to en-


Continued from PageA15

sure the campground or
property will be open
when you want to camp
and to see if hunting sea-
son will affect your use of
the surrounding areas.

Holder Mine Recreation
Area, Withlacoochee
State Forest, Inverness
The Holder Mine Camp-
ground sites are in a
wooded area in the Withla-
coochee State Forest
Hunters use this property
during hunting season, so
plan accordingly Leashed
pets are allowed. There
are two hiking trails, one
17.3 miles long and the
other 8.6 miles long. The
campground has restrooms
and showers, and camp-
sites have water and elec-
tricity hookup, as well as a
fire ring and picnic table.
Fees vary by time of year
Directions: From the in-
tersection of State Road
44 and County Road 581
in Inverness, turn south
on County Road 581.
Drive 2.5 miles until you
reach a sign for Holder
Mine Recreation Area.
Turn right and continue
for one mile.
Call 352-754-6896 for
more information or visit
www.floridaforestservice.
com/state_forests/withla
coochee_recreation.html.

Mutual Mine Recreation
Area, Withlacoochee
State Forest, Inverness
Mutual Mine Camp-
ground has 13 non-
electric campsites. Camp-
sites have water, picnic ta-
bles and fire rings. There
are restrooms but no
shower facilities. There is
a nature trail and two hik-
ing trails, one 16.9 miles
long and the other 19.4
miles long. Pets are not al-
lowed. Fees vary by time
of year.
Reservations, which
are required, can be
made by calling 352-
754-6896.
Directions: From State
Road 44, turn onto County
Road 581 and drive five
miles. A sign is posted on
the right side of the road
at the property's entrance.
Find out more at
www.floridaforestservice.
com/state_forests/withla
coochee_recreation.html.

Potts Preserve,
Citrus County
Potts Preserve is an
8,500-acre Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District Property.
Access points are 2700
Dee River Road (eques-
trian camping) and 2988
N. Hooty Point (River


AMANDA MIMS / For the Chronicle
A sign points visitors in the direction of the primitive campground near the
Chassahowitzka River.


Hiking Trail), Inverness.
Free equestrian, group,
primitive and backcoun-
try camping is available.


Some sites are equipped
with fire rings or grills
and picnic tables. Reser-
vations are required.


aj VIKING RIVER
VIKING CRUISE 014
RIVER CRUISES CRUISE.2014
E Early Booking
2 for 1 Cruise Plus
Up to 2 for 1 air. Prices on select sailings
and dates. Offer expires June 30, 2013.
Rates based on double occupancy.
Call for more information and details.


wee Pontoon Specialff1'4


TAIlITU YIP LT. y L
casinoo Tours I Lruises I Vacations




e HIP CASINO RESORT
ein i u179 pp/dbl in casino
Also offering Beau Rivage $199 pp/dbl Incentive


1 I L4fl .U1 *W. IE1 11 *t. U L..t.11 'Er. *u L*J I IS. 1T


IAwwwRtrinity .iptrvl .C M LiIDHJI


Backcountry camping
areas can be reached by
water or on foot and have
no amenities. Hiking, bik-


ing, bird watching and
boating opportunities are
available on the property.
In areas where permitted,
dogs must be on a leash
no longer than 6 feet.
Visit http://www.swf
wmd. state.fl.us/recreation
/areas/potts.html for more
information.

Fort Cooper State Park,
3100 S. Old Floral City
Road, Inverness
Fort Cooper State Park,
the site of a skirmish dur-
ing the Second Seminole
War, offers three primi-
tive tent sites for up to 20
people and one primitive
tent site for up to eight
people. Sites have picnic
tables, fire rings, grills
and potable water. Hik-
ing, birding and wildlife
viewing opportunities are
available at the park. Pets
are allowed in the park
but not the camping
areas. For more informa-
tion or to make a reserva-
tion, call 352-726-0315.


co VIIP-CHRISTMAS
*- O IN NASHVILLE
WONDERS OF CHINA B- Dec. 12-17, 2013
& YANGTZE RIVER CRUISE 1195 168 ping
2013 DATES: NOV. 7, DEC. 5 11 pp/dbl O pp/single
2014 DATES:JAN. 9, FEB. 6 20, MAR. 6 20 Fullyescorted motorcoachto Nashville.Fivenights'
C nAi Eper ncle, FROaccommodations at great hotels, attractions, shows,
China Experience ha FROMand more includingthe Radio City Rockettes
Yanitze Rver C s 1nghai, Christmas Show and Country Music Hall of Fme.
Xian Biverruise, 1 9 9 9 pp/din blCall fordetaileditinerary
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
ITNo
TALLY-HO Hidden 352-860-2805
eem www tallyhova0cations.com
r W vedmuir@tallyhovacations.com
AfI M lO imJ t"CA!UL sm __ FL Seller of Travel 10131


Thank you 1- ST 3545
Citrus County Becky's tovel Store
for voting Hawaii
us BEST oI...........
7f the Best nt Western Oahu, Maul & Kauai
of the Best Brilliance Of The Seas 10 Days Priced from
m'rI""" From Tampa $1099.00
B- ES 7T visiting Key West, Grand Local Host service
Cayman, Roatan, Cozumel useful maps, guidebooks
BEST Inside............'750.00 and sightseeing.
Oceanview.... 910.00 Option to add 3 nights to
Per person includes cruise port & govt fees your vacations Kona for fee.
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 27-8855
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352)527-8855
www,'AbeckysI :travei IlservIqice [[comI,] OO O''li


LonecK ouic aii our great aesic inaic ions ,aic:._


TRAVEL & LEISURE


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 A17


I Chat-k mif mil mir nrazif rlacf ir


I


I





















Veterans NOTES


'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a singu-
lar event or moment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to you. It can be any
type of event, from something from the
battlefield to a fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that you provide us with
your rank, branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit and
veterans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at
352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put together
your stories and help set up obtaining
"then" and "now" photos to publish with
your story

Members sought for DAV
Service-connected disabled veterans
are sought to become members of a newly
forming Disabled American Veterans
chapter in Crystal River
The chapter needs 50 new members to
get a charter. For information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.

Auxiliary to serve fish
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a fish dinner- choice of fried or
baked from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
July 24, at the post home, 6585 W Gulf-to-
Lake Highway
Everyone is welcome; donation is $ 7.
All profits help support the many pro-
grams of the American Legion Auxiliary
For more information, call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.

Commemorative event
Korean War and Korea service veterans
of the Korean War Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 will host "60 Years of
Peace Celebrating the Armistice" from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, July 26, at the His-
toric Downtown Courthouse in Inverness.
The public is invited to the free com-
memorative event. There will be a mili-
tary ceremony honoring Korean War
veterans, a wreath laying at the monument
honoring two Citrus County Korean War
casualties recently discovered, a film fea-
turing Korean War highlights, a Korean
community cultural event, vintage military
vehicles and VFW/American Legion
displays.
For more information, call Hank Butler
at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-
489-0728.

Heroes' names reading
A special event, an Iraq/Afghanistan
Fallen Hero Name Reading, will be held
from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, July 30, at Cen-
tral Ridge Library, 425 W Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. The Vietnam Veterans Gath-
ering seeks community volunteers to read
the names of fallen heroes from Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Volunteers are asked to read 30 names.
A recording of all names will be played at
local and nationwide memorials and
veterans' events.
Another reading will take place from
10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21, at
Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Call Jim Stepanek at 352-489-1644 or
email IMcrazyjim@aol.com.

Post open dinner, installation
American Legion Post 166 will have its
installation of officers and dinner at 6 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 10, at Springs Lodge No.
378 F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. Installation of officers will
begin at 7 p.m. The public is invited.
Cost of the dinner is $12 per person,
with a choice of either chicken parmesan
or prime rib.
Send a check and indicate entree and
number of persons to attend to: Vice
Commander Clay Scott, PO. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL 34447.
For more information about the post,
call Commander Robert Scott at 352-
860-2090.

Purple Heart event
The West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693, at 7890
W Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa,
will host a breakfast and program at 9 a.m.
Thursday, Aug. 8, to honor Purple Heart
recipients and commemorate the 231st
anniversary of the Purple Heart.
The families of those who fell in combat
and all combat-wounded veterans and
their guests are invited.
Attendees are requested to register for
the free breakfast by calling Carrie
Clemons at 352-628-1633 or mailing
carriejeanetteclemons@yahoo.com.
Indicate the number in your party when
making reservations.


Korean Armistice: A soldier remember]


ROBERT PALMISANO
Special to the Chronicle

Y ou might say that I experienced
my 15 minutes of fame some 60
years ago in a small country that
was just a dot on a map. I nei-
ther asked for it, nor did I want it. I usu-
ally tell people that I was in the wrong
place at the right time.
After four months of hard fighting, we
ended up in reserve near a town called
Munson-ni. This presented me with a
ringside seat just 10 miles from Pan-
munjom where the peace talks were
being held. My position was just off the
one-lane, dusty, dirt road that led from
Seoul to Freedom Bridge and into the
Armistice compound.
Every day I watched the staff cars
heading for their meetings with the Chi-
nese and North Koreans. As we were ac-
customed to seeing trucks and jeeps on ,
this road, the staff cars were a welcome
sight It meant, to me, that there was a ./
civilization somewhere to our rear. Warm |
beds, showers, clean clothes and real
food. We all prayed that a cease fire
would come, but our officers kept telling r
us to stay on our guard, be alert and re-
member the war is still on. It would be
nice to get some solid sleep with both
eyes shut, but the killing would go on
awhile longer until the guns were finally
silent.
Korea was a country most people did
not know or could even locate on a map.
But I was not one of them. My uncle was
stationed in Korea with the 40th Division
in the "Punch Bowl" region. Through his
letters, I was able to keep up with the ac-
tion and pretty much knew what to ex-
pect if I ever ended up there.
My army career began when I was 17
years old. I enlisted in the Connecticut
State Guards and went off to summer
camp and trained for the regular army I
remember our biggest thrill was march-
ing through the streets of New Haven in
all the big parades. It felt like a vacation
when the training ended, but my ship-
ping orders came right away and I soon Robert P
was on a liberty ship headed for Korea.
When my orders for permanent assign- flex theii
ment came, I was sent to the 27th regi- pressure
ment of the 25th Division. The 27th was retreated
one of the best known and most highly were tol
decorated units in the entire U.S. Army the takin
Better known as the "Wolfhounds," they new bun!
can trace their lineage back to the Civil get too c(
War and up through the action in the Pa- other fiv
cific during World War II and much later, time, we

It would be nice to get
some sleep with both eyes shut,
but the killing would go
on a while longer ...


Vietnam. We covered a sweeping section held fast
from a point just above the Imjin River, My cor
south to the Kimpo peninsula. In front of ni, where(
us, we faced four battle tough Chinese di- history u
visions. Our officers kept us informed of armistice
the progress of the truce talks. 26, 1953,
We all prayed that this thing would end through
soon but we weren't given much hope. would pc
When we heard that the Chinese were ar- wave rad
guing about the size and shape of the bar- the news
gaining table, our morale sank to a new signed. S
low. The Chinese were determined not to five of us
end this war lightly, they continued to Now, I


MATTHEW BECK/CI
almisano of Inverness is a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War.


r muscles and constantly put
on our lines. At one point, we
d five miles to new positions. We
d that the area just wasn't worth
.g of casualties, so we dug in to
kers. But we were ordered not to
comfortable as we might move an-
e miles if needed. In the mean-
were doing some muscle flexing
of our own.
We began to hear rumors
that agreements might have
been made. On July 8,h1953,
we were relieved by the 1st
Marine Division. The past
four months were pure hell.
All the units along the MLR
(front lines) took everything
that was thrown at them,
and stood tall.
mpany was sent south to Munsan-
e I was to have a ringside seat to
nfolding in front of me. The
e was soon to be signed. On July
a group of reporters came
our compound and asked if we
)se for pictures around a short-
[io and pretend we were getting
that the armistice had been
ure, sounded like fun to me, so
posed as requested.
never saw the pictures, so if


they were published or not, I really d
know. But, if they did, I'm the skinny
without a shirt on, holding his right a
up in the air and his left arm tightly
wrapped around his M1 rifle, my ins(
rable friend for the past four months,
The next day, July 27, 1953, we got wc
that the armistice was signed. I coulc
member crying like a baby The first
thing I said was, "When can I go hom
To this day, I never really talked ab
the war to my family My kids only kn
that I was in the service and that's aIt
it. Most veterans feel the same way, s,
we've suffered in silence, lo these 60
years.
Moving to Inverness about six year
ago was a revelation for me. The peo
here have been marvelous to veteran
Hardly a day goes by that a person
doesn't come up to me and thank me
my service.
The past six years have more than
made up for the previous 60.
On July 27, 2013, I might just celebi
the signing of the Korean Armistice f
the very first time. Perhaps I'll shoot
firecracker or two. That should bring
back some memories.
God bless all of my friends and the
good people of Inverness for their su
port. Thank you so very, very much.


Veterans & Service GROUPS


This listing contains only basic
information regarding each group.
For more information about sched-
uled activities, meeting times and
date, meals and more for a spe-
cific post or group, call or email the
contact listed. Email changes to
community@chronicleonline.com.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, directly
behind Cadence Bank, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-
465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-
726-3339, email vfw4252@


tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west
of U.S. 19 between Crystal River
and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. Call 352-
637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19.
Call 352-447-3495.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal


River. Call 352-795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPost155@gmail.
com, or visit www.flPostl55.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall Rives
Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730
U.S.41, Dunnellon. Call 352-4
89-3544, or email boosc29@
gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or
call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness. Call Com-
mander Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president Alice
Brummett at 352-476-7001.
American Legion Post 166,
meets at the Olive Tree Restaurant


in Airport Plaza in Crystal Rive
Call Commander Robert Scot
352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber America
Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City
352-860-1629.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
447, 405 E. State Road 40, In
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816:
email Amvet447@comcast.ne
Disabled American Vetb
ans Gerald A. Shook Chapti
No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Ir
ness, at the intersection of Inc
pendence Highway and U.S.,
Call 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vebt
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. C:
Commander Lucy Godfrey at
794-3104.
See Pag


* Submit information for the veterans pages at least two
weeks before the event if possible.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but


multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to


community@chronicleonline.com.
* Notes are also published on the Community pages a
often as possible.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Transitioning veterans
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans who
have recently transitioned from the mil-
itary (or returning reservist from tours
of active duty) to Citrus County within
the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that veter-
ans and their spouses call to be placed
on a list for an upcoming seminar,
which will discuss what benefits or serv-
ices they need to help ease transition.
The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a seat.
For more information about the Cit-
rus County Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy, retired, will
lead the 2014 trip to Hawaii for veterans
and their families and friends from


GROUPS
Continued from Page A18

Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary
Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529
or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-
Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Is-
land X-23 meets at Citrus Hills Country Club,
Rose and Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane
1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at
352-746-1959. Visit www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall
Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254.


Feb. 25 to March 14. Signups are being
taken for the annual trek, which in-
cludes visits to several islands, some
golfing and a special visit to the USS
Arizona Memorial and The National
Cemetery of the Pacific.
Although the 2013 September trip is
full, those interested may register now
for 2014, which will be the eighth such
trip from Citrus County. Five couples
have already signed up. For more infor-
mation, call McLean at 352-637-5131 or
email dmclean8@tampabayrr.com.

Upcoming reunions
USS Chilton APA 38 will have a re-
union Oct. 10, 11 and 12 in New London,
Conn. Contact Joe Doherty at 352-341-
5959 or jdohertyl@tampabayrr.com.
USS Mount McKinley Association will
have its 25th annual reunion Sept. 18 to
22 in Portland, Ore. Contact Dwight L.
Janzen at djanzen4@msn.com or 509-
534-3649.


Marine Corps League Citrus Detach-
ment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet
Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank.
Call Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186
meets at the DAV Building, Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at
Denny's in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
West Central Florida Coasties meets at
the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east
of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-
503-6019.
VFW Riders Group meets at different
VFW posts throughout the year. Call Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or email
geneusawo@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7
meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness.
Visit www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell) or email
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the
Air Force Association meets at Ocala Re-
gional Airport Administration Building, 750
S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on
the DAV property in Inverness at the corner of
Paul and Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. Members can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless Coalition can
assist homeless veterans. Call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, helps meet the needs
of wounded veterans. It is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722, ext. 102,
or email charles.lawrence@servicesource.org.


61st ANNIVERSARY

The Robeys
Norman and Loretta
Robey of Homosassa will
celebrate their 61st an-
niversary on July 24, 2013.
The couple were mar-
ried in Prince Georges
County on July 24, 1952, in
Hyattsville, Md. They are
longtime residents of
Citrus County.
They have four chil-
dren: sons Norman (who
passed away in 2010) and
Lenny, and daughters
Dana Lee of Florida and
Jade Fay of Missouri.
They have 10 grand-
children and four great-
grandchildren.


Finally, answers



to your Medicaid



and Nursing Home



questions.


Free Medicaid Information Seminar


Monday, July 29,


2:00


- 4:00 pm


Lakes Region Library

1511 Druid Road

Inverness, Florida

Please call law office to register at

1-800-823-5571

or visit our website at FLMedicaid.com



* Find out the legal way to avoid being

impoverished by nursing home costs.

* Learn how to save your assets, your

house, car, and way of life and still

obtain long-term nursing care.

* Easy to understand explanations of

how Medicaid works by elder law

attorney Sean W. Scott, Esq.

* New, up-to-date information for 2013

includes the most recent federal

Medicaid law changes.







Sean Scott

Elder Law Attorney
3233 East Bay Drive Largo Florida 33771
727 -539 0181


7/8/13 7/14/13
Divorces
Teresa Caponigro,
Inverness vs. Anthony J.
Caponigro, Inverness
Lorraine Sue Grant, Crystal
River vs. David L. Grant,
Crittenden, Ky.
Jose Hernandez Jr.,
Dunnellon vs. Michelle
Hernandez, Inverness
Diana Leigh Phillips,
Homosassa vs. Robert
Joseph Phillips, Homosassa
Springs
Paula J. Underhill,
Inverness vs. Eric Troy
Underhill, Hernando
Dana Wilkes vs. Denette
Wilkes

FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and
marriages filed in the
state of Florida are a
matter of public
record, available from
each county's Clerk of
the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call
the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit the
website at www.
clerk.citrus.fl.us.


For the RECORD
Marriages
William Lee liames,
Homosassa/Rita Marie Watts,
Homosassa
Jack Robert Reed,


Homosassa/Ellyn Oceanak,
Dunnellon
Steven Eugene Schnetzler,
Inverness/Lisa Anne
Warnock, Inverness


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


SCABLSD mG O E RSH E0 EW ELLA
PAGODA ERGO PUPA MOORE
ABASED GOII REAL EXTENT
SmLnINT R OA'N TRIM LEER SM T0A
M EN GO0A L B E I NG SO0A P ES
FAIR FINAGLE SLOT
M A LL-E-T L I K E Y ARD D-I E-R I D E
UR I EL TOLEDO SA I D MONAD
T NI LE H I LD LPS N N R T A NS
E LL NO I SY DIEO SINE W DIE
ICOINS S HIOTGUN TIRA VEL
S PORT PAPA- TI G -H VEL
S TUD110 HEAR EN INER
PAT ARBOR MUD SL ING TOP
ERIC TUB IAN STUC K GENE
AVAA L B IASNALPACANDUNCE
RENTER ALAS EELY PESTER
YEAR AT- T CE-HEAT
D M K NOW CROSS CAL F OD D
OMIT GEAR EMU I RMA OH 1 0I
C7AL I2 C THA 2 DW R T EIG A0LAX Y
RADIOO CER EE YED EMER I L
7-2A D DE O AGAiTk E
7-21 (D 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our
qualifications and experience. Also visit us at FLMedicaid.com.


VETERANS & TOGETHER


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 A19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


... .. ..-0


k.


And work together for the future of our community, our hospital, and our
patients, doctors, employees and taxpayers. The Citrus County Hospital
Board of Trustees is diligently working to sell or lease Citrus Memorial
Hospital so that its tradition of serving patients in our region can flourish
for decades to come. Regardless of the road we have traveled to get to
where we are today, we can forge a new path together and save our
hospital.


A sale or lease of Citrus Memorial Hospital would bring new jobs,
financial stability, state-of-the-art technology, capital improvements,
lower taxes and a renewed commitment to quality health care for our
community.





ea awww, areforcitrucountyor


A20 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013










SPORTS


The Boston
Red Sox host
the New York
Yankees at
Fenway Park
in Boston./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
. Recreational sports/B4
0 Soccer/B4
Golf, basketball/B5
0 Football/B5, B6
0 Auto racing/B6
0 Tour de France/B6


Westwood in good position at British Open


Associated Press
Tiger Woods, left, and Lee Westwood finish their third round of the
British Open Golf Championship on Saturday at Muirfield, Scotland.


Englishman two shots up on Woods

heading into major's final round


Associated Press
GULLANE, Scotland Lee
Westwood passed his first big
test Saturday when he out-
played Tiger Woods and
grabbed a two-shot lead in the
British Open.
The next one figures to be the
toughest test of all.
Westwood somehow salvaged
a bogey from the knee-high
grass on the 16th, pulled ahead
of Woods with a birdie on the
17th and was solid down the last


hole for a 1-under 70 that gave
him a two-shot lead going into
the final day at Muirfield.
Widely considered the best
player of his generation to have
never won a major, Westwood is
the 54-hole leader for the sec-
ond time. Phil Mickelson over-
took him in the Masters three
years ago. Two other times,
Westwood missed a playoff by
one shot.
"I'm hoping it's going to turn
out differently because I
haven't won one yet and I'd like


to win one," Westwood said.
"But what can you do? You can
only do what you think is right
and put all that practice and
hard work you've done tomor-
row, try not to get in your own
way mentally and just focus on
the job at hand and believe
you're good enough."
He was plenty good on an-
other warm, sunny afternoon
on a course that was noticeable
softer but no less demanding.
After three days on brittle,
brown Muirfield, only three
players remained under par.
Westwood was at 3-under 210,
two shots clear of Woods (72)
and Hunter Mahan, whose 68
See Page B5


Held up on second


STEVE HASEL/For the Chronicle
Kiera Morgan is safe at second after knocking in the only run of the game for the Inverness Senior Softball All-Stars in a 4-1 loss to
Debary. The team struck out 13 times against Debary pitching.

Inverness rained out in second game ofstate tourney after droppingfirst


STEVE HASEL
Special to the Chronicle
WEST MELBOURNE -
After a disappointing 4-1
loss in the opener Saturday
at the Senior Softball
state tournament, the Inver-
ness All-Stars came back to
life in the following game be-
fore heavy rain and lightning
forced a postponement until
today.
The Inverness All-Stars -
who won the Section 7 cham-
pionhip last weekend in St.
Petersburg started the day
off slowly, looking ill-pre-
pared to face Debary Only
Kiera Morgan managed a hit
(an RBI double in the top of
the 4th inning), as she cut the
deficit to a single run, but
loose defensive play and poor
hitting (13 strikeouts) doomed
the local team.
The loss forced a back-to-
back second game, this time
against the East Bay All-Stars
of Section 4. The hour be-
tween games gave Inverness a
chance to regroup, and re-
group it did.
In the top of the first, lead-
off hitter Alyssa Nathan
slammed a triple, followed
by a walk and steal by team-
mate Darian Stephens. With


E


Alyssa Nathan, right, is jubilant as she scores the first run of the second game in the rain. On deck
to congratulate her is designated hitter Kiera Morgan.


runners at second and third
and no outs, the skies
opened and rain began to
fall. The East Bay pitcher
then unloaded two wild
pitches, allowing Nathan
and then Stephens to score
for a 2-0 Inverness lead.
The deluge that followed
forced a stop in play, with the


games to continue at 10 a.m.
today The tournament in-
cludes Pools A and B, with
three teams in each pool.
After round-robin play, the
top two teams in each pool
will play in semifinal games.
Those winners play for the
state title and the right to
keep advancing. Weather-


permitting, the tournament
ends Monday
The members of the Inver-
ness team are Courtney Tid-
well, Lauren Tidwell, Moriah
Martin, Nathan, Darian
Stephens, Katie Jones, Savan-
nah Banning, Alyssa Sloan,
Angel Hardy, Anna Savoie,
Madie Ogle and Morgan.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher
Jeremy Hellickson delivers to the
Toronto Blue Jays during the first
inning Saturda in Toronto.


Rays hold


off Blue


Jays, 4-3

Peralta works out

ofhuge jam in

eighth inning

Associated Press
TORONTO Joel Peralta got
the biggest outs of the game, and
Tampa Bay showed how important
its bullpen has been to its recent
success.
The right-hander got out of a
bases-loaded, no-out situation in
the eighth inning and the Rays beat
the Toronto Blue Jays 4-3 Saturday
for their 16th win in 18 games.
Jeremy Hellickson won his fifth
straight decision, and Desmond
Jennings reached base four times
but it all could have been for
naught if Peralta hadn't come
through. The nine-year veteran
called it one of the most important
relief appearances of his career.
"It was really big," he said. "I've
probably had some of those before
but with the spot we're in right now,
second place, a couple of games be-
hind Boston, it's really huge."
Since starting the season 14-18,
the Rays are a major league-best
43-23 since May 8. They visit the
AL East-leading Red Sox for four
games starting Monday
Rookie Wil Myers had two RBIs
in his first career start as the
cleanup hitter. Myers, who fin-
ished 2 for 4, has nine hits in his
past 17 at bats.
See Page B3


Wiper Blades FREE
O : : Alignment
$ 6x9 I tI
i ..: -*' '; ""' ".. i , ,. ... .*'.. . '., ,
b------ --- ---------
M FII- ,f Ii Tr--_1.'h 1 4 I" '114,
BUy 3 TIRES FREE
AND GET ONE
FREE :1 Air Conditioning Check
:.I.I L, : ... --.1..,r -I
. -.. --.. '-_ ..', --- -----.. -". --
'- - --, ^ -'-, . "' ,. ..


r --- -- ------------ -------
I





Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check 77re Pressure an All 4 Tres
27-Point Inspection I .
Battery Test
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! w
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere I
L...............................................


2219 S. Suncoast Blhx Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovelhonda.cooxi.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-PL;: 9AM-6PM Sat.: I AM-4PM Sun.
Serivce 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt.: 8AM-2PM Sat.


WYIEk


2209 Highway 44 West Invemess. FL 34453
352.341.0018
lovelhevysales.comn
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt.: 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-FrL: 8AM-Noont Sat.


IjirflS


-111












Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto




Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC
6 E
! 1% --
' 4 /2
6 6 2/2
) 12% 9


East Division
GB WC
7 E
) 6% 6/2
) 6% 6/2
! 11 11
8 19 19


NL

Mets 5, Phillies 4
Philadelphia NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollins ss 5 1 2 1 EYong If 4 1 1 0
MYong3b 2 1 0 0 DnMrp2b 4 1 2 1
Utley2b 4 1 2 3 DWrght3b 3 1 1 1
DBrwn If 5 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 1 2 1
Ruflb 4 0 0 0 Satin lb 3 0 0 0
DYong rf 4 0 3 0 Lagars cf 4 0 3 1
Mayrrycf 4 0 1 0 Reckerc 4 0 0 1
Ruizc 4 0 0 0 Quntnllss 3 1 0 0
Hamelsp 2 1 1 0 ZWhelrp 2 0 0 0
L.Nix ph 1 0 0 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0
JRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0
Diekmn p 0 00 0 I.Davis ph 0 0 0 0
LuGarc p 0 00 0 Hwkns p 0 00 0
Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 0
Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 4104 Totals 31 5 9 5
Philadelphia 100 010 002 4
NewYork 300 010 10x 5
E-Satin (2). DP-New York 1. LOB-Philadel-
phia 10, NewYork6.2B-D.Brown(17), D.Young
(11), Dan.Murphy (23), Lagares (12). HR-
Rollins (5), Utley (13). SB-E.Young (18),
Dan.Murphy (11). CS-D.Wright (3), Byrd (3).
SF-Utley.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
HamelsL,4-12 5 7 4 4 2 5
J.Ramirez 1 0 1 1 2 2
Diekman 1/3 1 0 0 0 1
Lu.Garcia 11/31 0 0 0 2
Bastardo 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
NewYork
Z.Wheeler 42/37 2 2 2 5
GermenW,1-1 12/30 0 0 1 3
RiceH,9 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
HawkinsH,7 1 1 0 0 0 0
Parnell S,18-21 1 2 2 0 0 0
J.Ramirez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Z.Wheeler (M.Young).
Reds 5. Pirates 4


Pittsburgh Cincinnati
ab r h bi


SMarte If 3 0 0 0
Tabata rf 4 0 0 0
McCtchcf 5 1 4 1
PAIvrz3b 5 00 0
RMartn c 5 00 0
GJoneslb 3 1 1 1
McKnrph 1 00 0
Mercer2b 5 1 2 0
Barmesss 2 1 0 0
Snider ph 1 0 1 1
JHrrsn 2b 0 00 0
AJBrntp 2 0 0 0
JGomzp 0 0 0 0
GSnchz ph 0 0 0 0
Melncn p 000 00

Totals 36 48 3
Pittsburgh 020
Cincinnati 400


Choo cf
Heisey If
Votto lb
Phillips 2b
Bruce rf
Hannhn 3b
Cozart ss
Mesor c c
Latos p
Hoover p
Clzturs ph
LeCure p
Simon p
Ondrsk p
DRonsn ph
Chpmn p
Totals
100 010
001 OOx


E-Mercer (8), Cozart 2 (10), C
DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pittsburgh
nati 9. 2B-McCutchen (27), Merce
(12), Choo (23), Cozart (22), M&
HR-McCutchen (12), G.Jones (9)
(7). S-A.J.Burnett. SF-Cozart.
IP H R ER
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burneft L,4-7 52/310 5
J.Gomez 11/30 0 I
Melancon 1 0 0 1
Ccicnnati
LatosW,9-3 5 4 3
Hoover H,4 1 0 0
LeCure H,14 1 1 0 1
Simon H,5 2/3 2 1
Ondrusek H,6 1/3 0 0 1
Chapman S,23-26 1 1 0 1
HBP-by A.J.Burnett (Hannahan
(S.Marte). WP-Latos.
Brewers 6, Mar
Miami Milwaukee
ab r h bi
Hchvrrss 4 0 1 0 Aoki rf
Lucas3b 4 0 1 0 Segurass
Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Braun If
Morrsn lb 3 0 0 0 Lucroyc
Ozuna cf 3 00 0 CGomz cf
Dietrch2b 4 0 2 0 JFrncslb
Ruggin If 2 0 0 0 Weeks 2b
Slowey p 0 0 0 0 Bianchi 3b
DSolan ph 1 0 0 0 Gallard p
Quails p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p
MDunnp 0 00 0 YBtncrph
Polancph 1 00 0D.Handp
Mathis c 3 0 0 0 McGnzl p
Eovaldi p 1 0 0 0 Badnhp p
Pierre If 2 0 1 0
Totals 31 05 0 Totals
Miami 000 000 000
Milwaukee 201 300 00x
E-J.Francisco (10). DP-Miami 1
2. LOB-Miami 7, Milwaukee 7.2B-
Lucroy (10), Bianchi (4). HR-L
Weeks (10). S-Gallardo.
IP H R ER
Miami
Eovaldi L,2-1 4 10 6
Slowey 2 0 0 0
Quails 1 1 0 0
M.Dunn 1 1 0 0
Milwaukee
GallardoW,8-8 61/35 0 0
Kintzler 12/30 0 0
D.Hand 1/3 0 0 0
Mic.Gonzalez 1/3 0 0 0
Badenhop 1/3 0 0 0
Interleague


Atlanta


White Sox 1
Braves 6
a Chicago
ab r h bi


Constnzcf 5 1 1 0 DeAzacf-lf
CJhnsnz3b 4 1 1 0 AIRmrzss
J.Uptonrf 4 0 2 1 Riosrf
FFrmn lb 3 1 1 3 Viciedo If
McCnndh 4 0 1 0 Tekotte pr-c
Gattisc 4 1 1 0 Kppngrlb
Uggla 2b 4 1 1 2 C.Wells dh
Smmns ss 4 01 0 Bckhm 2b
Trdslvc If 3 1 1 0 Phegly c
Morel 3b
Totals 35 6106 Totals
Atlanta 022 000 020
Chicago 005 400 10x
E-C.Johnson (10), Morel (1). DP-
LOB-Atlanta 4, Chicago 7. 2B-
Phegley 2(3). HR-F.Freeman (10)
Rios (12). CS-Constanza (1). SF-
IP H R ER


Atlanta
Maholm L,9-9 3 7 7
D.Carpenter 3 4 2
Varvaro 1 1 1
Ayala 1 1 0
Chicago
PeavyW,7-4 6 7 4
Lindstrom 1 0 0
Troncoso 1/3 1 1
Veal 2/3 1 1
A.Reed 1 1 0
Maholm pitched to 2 batters in the
WP-D.Carpenter. PB-Phegley.


Str Home Away
L-1 32-17 27-23
W-4 34-19 23-22
W-2 29-20 25-23
W-1 28-23 24-22
L-3 25-23 20-28



Str Home Away
L-1 31-15 24-27
L-1 26-21 23-28
L-1 27-19 21-29
W-1 18-28 24-23
L-3 21-27 14-33


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
44 .542 4
46 .526 1% 3% 6
49 .479 6 8 4
53 .436 10 12 4
56 .404 13 15 4


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Str Home
L-2 29-19
L-2 30-19
W-2 24-22
W-4 23-23
W-1 20-22


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 58 37 .611 7-3 L-1 28-17 30-20
Pittsburgh 56 39 .589 2 3-7 L-3 32-18 24-21
Cincinnati 55 42 .567 4 5-5 W-3 32-16 23-26
Chicago 43 51 .457 14% 10% 7-3 W-1 22-26 21-25
Milwaukee 40 56 .417 18% 14% 5-5 W-3 24-26 16-30


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




Arizona
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC
40 .583 -
42 .563 2 -
49 .479 10 8
52 .464 11% 9/2
63 .344 23 21


West Division
GB WC
1 --
5 1% 6
4 4% 9
3 5% 10
) 8 12/2


Str Home
L-1 30-15
L-2 27-20
W-1 25-25
W-5 25-25
L-4 17-34



Str Home
L-2 27-20
W-1 27-23
L-1 26-22
W-1 26-20
W-1 27-23


,'-..-,,,-': -.S . .. ... .- ...... .


-, .-c*.": -"- "


Associated Press
New York Yankees relief pitcher Mariano Rivera pitches in the ninth inning Saturday against the Boston Red
Sox in Boston. The Yankees won 5-2.



Yankees beat back Red Sox


Associated Press


BOSTON Brett Gardner and
ab r h bi Lyle Overbay each had three hits
5 1 2 0 and drove in a run to back Hiroki
4 1 1 0 Kuroda's seven strong innings,
4 1 2 1 carrying the New York Yankees to
4 0 0 0 a 5-2 win over the Boston Red Sox
2 0 0 0 on Saturday afternoon.
3 1 2 1 The victory snapped a three-

2 0 0 0 game losing streak for the injury-
0 0 0 0 riddled Yankees, who hope to be
1 0 1 0 bolstered by the return of cap-

0 0 0 0 tain Derek Jeter and Alex
0 0 0 0 Rodriguez soon.
1 0 0 0 Mike Carp had three hits and
0 0 0 0 scored a run for the Red Sox. It
33510 4
4 was just Boston's second loss in its
5 last 11 games in Fenway Park.
chapman (1). In a matchup veteran right-han-
h 12, Cincin- ders, Kuroda and John Lackey
esoraco (9). both mostly relied on fastballs in
). CS-Choo the low 90s with hard sliders to go
along with outstanding control.
R BB SO The pair combined for just one

2 2 8 walk by Kuroda and threw a
0 1 4 high percentage of strikes.
0 0 1 American League

2 4 5
0 0 2 Twins 3, Indians 2
0 0 0
1 1 0 MINNEAPOLIS Kevin Correia
0 0 0 threw six sharp innings for his first win

), by Simon in a month, Joe Mauer and Justin
Morneau each had two hits and a
lines 0 walk, and Minnesota beat Cleveland
3-2 on Saturday night for its fourth-
ab r h bi straight win.
5 2 2 1 Correia (7-6) allowed only three hits

4 0 1 2 one of them a two-run homer by
4 1 4 2 Jason Kipnis with one walk and
3 0 0 0 three strikeouts.

3 1 1 1 The Indians entered the day 1 1/2
4 1 2 0 games behind Detroit in the AL Cen-
2 0 0 0 tral and led 2-0 after Kipnis' homer in

1 0 0 0 the sixth. Corey Kluber, who had
0 0 0 0 pitched five shutout innings up to that
0 0 0 0 point, left the game with tightness in
his left hip, and the Twins pounced on
34 612 6 a couple of Cleveland infield miscues
6 to take the lead.
--6
, Milwaukee The Indians have lost two straight
-Braun (14), after heading into the All-Star break
ucroy (14), with a four-game winning streak.

R BB SO Royals 6, Tigers 5

6 2 5 KANSAS CITY, Mo. Salvador
0 2 Perez drove in three runs and Mike
0 0 0 Moustakas went 3 for 4 with a game-
2 5 winning home run to lead the Kansas
0 1 City Royals to a 6-5 victory over the
0 1 0 Detroit Tigers and Justin Verlander.
0 0 1 Verlander (10-7) had not lost to the
0 0 0 Royals since Sept. 9, 2009, but gave up
8 six runs, five earned, on eight hits and
L0, four walks in 5 2-3 innings. It was the
seventh time in 21 starts that Verlander
failed to make it into the sixth inning.
Moustakas homered to right in the
ab r h bi fifth to snap a 5-5 tie.

5 2 1 1 Perez drove in a run in the first with
5 2 3 5 a sacrifice fly and stroked a two-run
3 0 0 0 double in the third.

5 0 1 2 Jeremy Guthrie (9-7) picked up the
2 0 0 0 victory, surrendering five runs on 10
4 0 0 0 hits and two walks in six innings.

3 2 11 Greg Holland worked the ninth to
36101310 collect his 24th save in 26 chances.
-6
10 Mariners 4, Astros 2
-Chicago 2.
-Gattis (12), HOUSTON Michael Saunders
U, ggla (19), got Seattle's only hit with a two RBI
-FFreeman. double with two outs in the seventh in-
ning to lift the Mariners to a 4-2 win

7 2 0 over the Houston Astros.
2 0 2 Erik Bedard (3-7) pitched 6 1/3
1 2 2 Ed t
0 1 1 innings of no-hit ball before he was
replaced by Jose Cisnero, who
0 0 walked Mike Zunino with two outs
1 0 0 before the double by Saunders put
1 0 2 Seattle ahead 4-2.
4th. 3 The long fly ball sailed just out of
reach of sprinting center fielder Bran-


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 3
Chicago White Sox 10, Atlanta 6
N.Y Yankees 5, Boston 2
Minnesota 3, Cleveland 2
Kansas City 6, Detroit 5
Seattle 4, Houston 2
Baltimore at Texas, late
Oakland at L.A. Angels, late
Today
Tampa Bay (Archer 4-3) at Toronto (Dickey 8-10),
1:07 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 9-4) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana
4-2), 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 10-7) at Minnesota (Diamond
5-8), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 7-5) at Kansas City (Shields 4-6), 2:10
p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 10-4) at Houston (Lyles 4-3),
2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Colon 12-3) at L.A. Angels (Williams 5-5),
3:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 11-3) at Texas (M.Perez 3-2), 7:05
p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 9-8) at Boston (Dempster 5-
8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y Yankees at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y Mets 5, Philadelphia 4
Chicago White Sox 10, Atlanta 6
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 4
Milwaukee 6, Miami 0
San Diego 5, St. Louis 3
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, late
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, late
Arizona at San Francisco, late
Today
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 10-3) at N.Y Mets (Harvey 7-2),
1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 8-2) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 5-8),
1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 8-6) atWashington (Zimmer-
mann 12-4), 1:35 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 9-4) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana
4-2), 2:10 p.m.
Miami (H.Alvarez 0-1) at Milwaukee (WPeralta 7-9),
2:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 8-7) at St. Louis (Wainwright 12-
5), 2:15 p.m.
Arizona (Delgado 1-3) at San Francisco (Bumgarner
10-5), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 6-10) at Colorado (Chat-
wood 5-3), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers atToronto, 7:07 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Miami at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


don Barnes and landed at the top of
Tal's Hill in straightaway center.
The Mariners, who extended their
season-high winning streak to five
games, tied it in a wacky sixth inning
by scoring two runs thanks to a combi-
nation of passed balls, walks and a
sacrifice fly.
Travis Blackley and Jose Veras
each pitched a scoreless inning to
complete the one-hitter.

National League

Reds 5, Pirates 4
CINCINNATI Joey Votto drove in
a pair of runs, and Shin-Soo Choo ex-
tended his hitting streak to a career-
high 14 games, leading the Cincinnati
Reds to a 5-4 victory over the Pitts-
burgh Pirates that revolved around an
early rain delay.
The third-place Reds have won the
first two games in the NL Central se-
ries, closing their gap with second-
place Pittsburgh to two games. The
Ohio River rivals have split their 12
games this season.
Cincinnati's Mat Latos (9-3) and
Pittsburgh's A.J. Burnett (4-7) had a
tough time finding their control after a
1-hour, 17-minute delay in the middle
of the first inning. Aroldis Chapman
escaped a two-on threat in the ninth
for his 23rd save in 26 chances.


Mets 5, Phillies 4
NEW YORK Gonzalez Germen
came out of the bullpen to bail out fel-
low rookie Zack Wheeler and help the
New York Mets hold off the Philadel-
phia Phillies 5-4.
Marion Byrd, David Wright and
Daniel Murphy each had an RBI sin-
gle for the Mets, who handed Cole
Hamels his latest defeat and snapped
Philadelphia's seven-game winning
streak at Citi Field. Another rookie,
Juan Lagares, had a run-scoring sin-
gle among his three hits.
Jimmy Rollins hit a leadoff homer,
and Chase Utley had a two-run shot in
the ninth for the Phillies. They put the
potential tying run on second with two
outs before Bobby Parnell retired Darin
Ruf on a game-ending liner to second.

Brewers 6, Marlins 0
MILWAUKEE -Yovani Gallardo
pitched a shutout into the seventh in-
ning and Jonathan Lucroy and Rickie
Weeks belted home runs, leading the
Milwaukee Brewers to a 6-0 win over
the Miami Marlins.
Gallardo (8-8) gave up five hits in 6
1/3 innings. He struck out five batters
and walked two. Four relievers com-
bined to preserve the shutout as the
Brewers held the Marlins without a run
for the second consecutive game and
extended Miami's scoreless streak to
24 innings.
Lucroy collected four hits in four at-
bats and finished a triple short of a cycle.
The Brewers continued their domi-
nance at home against the Marlins,
having won 13 of the last 16 games at
Miller Park, dating to 2009.
The Brewers got to Miami starter
Nathan Eovaldi (2-1) for two runs in
the first inning.

Padres 5, Cardinals 3
ST. LOUIS Edinson Volquez was
bailed out by his bullpen and earned
the victory in San Diego's 5-3 win over
the St. Louis Cardinals.
Nick Vincent, Dale Thayer, Luke
Gregorson and Huston Street worked
an inning apiece after Volquez (7-8)
faded at the end of a five-inning out-
ing. Street was perfect in the ninth for
his 16th save in 17 chances after Car-
los Quentin's RBI double off Trevor
Rosenthal in the ninth put the Padres
up by two runs.
Lance Lynn (11-5) lost for the fourth
time in five starts, allowing four runs in
five innings. Allen Craig had a two-run
single and 29-year-old rookie Brock Pe-
terson had an RBI groundout in his first
major league at-bat after getting called
up to replace injured Matt Holliday.
Jedd Gyorko, Everth Cabrera and
Nick Hundley added an RBI apiece for
San Diego, which had lost 19 of 23.

Interleague

White Sox 10, Braves 6
CHICAGO -Alex Rios hit a grand
slam and drove in five runs, and Jake
Peavy pitched six solid innings in his
return from the disabled list to lead the
Chicago White Sox to a 10-6 victory
over the Atlanta Braves.
Rios, who had been in a 2-for-20
slump, went 3-for-5 to help Chicago
win for just the 10th time in 32 games.
Peavy (7-4), making his first start
since June 4 because of a fractured
rib, got off to a shaky start. He allowed
a two-run homer to Dan Uggla in the
second inning and two more runs in
the third. But he shut down the Braves
during his final three innings.


B2 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


Tampa Bay Toronto
ab r h bi
DJnngs cf 4 2 3 0 Reyes ss
Zobrist ss 4 0 2 0 Bautist rf
Longori3b 4 1 1 1 Encrncdh
WMyrsrf 4 02 2 Lindlb
RRorts 2b 5 0 1 0 CIRsms cf
SRdrgz lb 4 0 1 0 Mlzturs 3b
Scott dh 4 0 1 0 Arencii c
JMolin c 4 0 0 0 RDavis If
Fuld If 3 1 1 0 Lawrie2b
Totals 36 4123 Totals


ab rh bi
5 1 2 0
4 1 2 1
4 0 1 1
2 00 0
4 00 0
3 00
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
3 1 0 0
333 6 2


Tampa Bay 103 000 000 4
Toronto 001 010 001 3
E-Rodney (1), Lawrie (6). DP-Toronto 1.
LOB-Tampa Bay 10, Toronto 10. 2B-Encar-
nacion (17). HR-Bautista (22). SB-Bautista
(7), Encarnacion (5). CS-De.Jennings (7). SF-
WMyers.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
HellicksonW,9-3 5 5 2 2 3 3
AI.TorresH,3 2 0 0 0 2 2
Jo.Peralta H,26 1 0 0 0 1 2
Rodney S,23-28 1 1 1 0 1 1
Toronto
Buehrle L,5-7 7 10 4 3 3 5
Oliver 1 1 0 0 0 0
Janssen 1 1 0 0 1 2
Al.Torres pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP-Hellickson. Balk-Hellickson.
Umpires-Home, David Rackley; First, Jim
Joyce; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Jeff Nel-
son.
T-3:17. A-42,639 (49,282).

Yankees 5, Red Sox 2
NewYork Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gardnrcf 5 0 3 1 Ellsurycf 4 0 0 0
ISuzuki rf 5 1 0 0 Nava rf 3 0 1 0
Cano 2b 4 0 1 2 Pedroia 2b 4 00 0
Overaylb 4 0 3 1 D.Ortizdh 4 12 0
V.WellsIf 4 0 1 0 Carplb 4 1 3 0
Hafner dh 4 0 0 0 JGoms If 3 0 1 1
Nunezss 4 1 3 0 Sltlmchc 4 0 0 0
CStwrtc 3 0 0 0 Drewss 2 0 0 0
L.Cruz 3b 3 3 111 Iglesias3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 36 5125 Totals 31 2 7 1
NewYork 000 010 301 5
Boston 000 000 200 2
E-Cano (3), Pedroia (2). DP-New York 1,
Boston 1. LOB-New York 7, Boston 5. 2B-
Overbay 2 (21), Nunez 2 (6), Carp (13). SB-
Nunez (3), L.Cruz (1). CS-Gardner (7).
S-C.Stewart. SF-Cano, J.Gomes.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
KurodaW,9-6 7 5 2 2 1 4
D.Robertson H,23 1 1 0 0 0 0
M.RiveraS,31-33 1 1 0 0 0 2
Boston
Lackey L,7-7 61/310 4 4 0 7
Thornton 1 2 0 0 0 0
Beato 2/3 0 1 0 0 0
D.Britton 1 0 0 0 0 0
Beato pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Kuroda (Nava), by Beato (L.Cruz).
WP-Kuroda 2, Lackey

Twins 3, Indians 2


Cleveland
ab
Bourn cf 3
ACarerss 4
Kipnis 2b 4
Swisher rf 4
Stubbs pr 0
Brantly If 3
CSantn c 3
Giambi dh 2
Raburn dh 1


Minnesota
r h bi
1 0 0 Dozier2b
0 1 0 Plouffe3b
1 2 2 Mauerc
0 1 0 Mornealb
0 0 0 Doumitrf
0 0 0 Colaell dh
0 0 0 Hicks cf
0 0 0 ThomslIf
0 0 0 Flormn ss


ab rh bi
4000
4000

3 1 2 0
4 1 1 0
4 0 1 1
4 0 0 0
2 0 0 1
3 0 0 0


MrRynllb 3 000
Chsnhll3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 30 25 2 Totals 31 3 6 2
Cleveland 000 002 000 2
Minnesota 000 003 OOx 3
E-Chisenhall (6). LOB-Cleveland 5, Min-
nesota7.2B-Mauer(31). HR-Kipnis (14). S-


Brantley.

Cleveland
Kluber
R.Hill L,1-2
Shaw BS,4-4
Pestano
Albers
Minnesota
Correia W,7-6
Duensing H,11
Burton H,16
Fien H,11


IP H RERBBSO


6 3 2
1/3 0 0
2/3 0 0
1 1 0


Perkins S,23-25 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Hill pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Duensing (C.Santana).WP-Albers.

Mariners 4, Astros 2


Seattle
ab
BMillerss 3
FrnkIn 2b 3
Ibanez If 3
KMorls dh 3
Seager3b 4
Smoak lb 3
Bayrf 2
Ackley ph-cf 2
Zunino c 2
MSndrs cf-rf 2
Totals 27
Seattle
Houston


Houston
r h bi
1 0 0 C.Penadh
0 0 1 Altuve 2b
0 0 0 JCastro c
0 0 0 Carter If
00 0 Wallac lb
1 0 0 Maxwll rf
0 0 0 BBarnscf
0 0 0 MDmn3b
1 0 0 Elmoress
1 1 12 Krauss ph
41 3 Totals
000 002 200
000 020 000


ab rh bi
3 00 0
3001
4 011

4000
3 010

3 1 2 0
3 1 1 0
312 0
322 7 2
4
2


DP-Seattle 1. LOB-Seattle 3, Houston 7.
2B-M.Saunders (11), Carter (14), Maxwell (8),
Elmore (2). SF-Franklin, Altuve.
IP H RERBBSO


Seattle
Iwakuma W,9-4
Furbush H,9
Wilhelmsen S,21-26
Houston
Bedard L,3-7
Cisnero
Blackley
Veras
PB-J.Castro 2.


7 7 2 2 2 7
1 0 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 1 0


61/30 3
2/3 1 1
1 0 0
1 0 0


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
July 21 at Toronto
July 22 at Boston
July 23 at Boston
July 24 at Boston
July 25 at Boston
July 26 at N.Y Yankees
July 27 at N.Y Yankees
July 28 at N.Y Yankees
July 30 vs Arizona
July 31 vs Arizona
Aug. 2 vs San Francisco
Aug. 3 vs San Francisco
Aug. 4 vs San Francisco
Aug. 6 at Arizona
Aug. 7 at Arizona
Aug. 9 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 10 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 11 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 13 vs Seattle
Aug. 14 vs Seattle
Aug. 15 vs Seattle
Aug. 16 vs Toronto
Aug. 17 vs Toronto
Aug. 18 vs Toronto
Aug. 19 at Baltimore
Aug. 20 at Baltimore
Aug. 21 at Baltimore
Aug. 23 vs N.Y Yankees
Aug. 24 vs N.Y Yankees
Aug. 25 vs N.Y Yankees
Aug. 27 vs L.A. Angels
Aug. 28 vs L.A. Angels
Aug. 29 vs L.A. Angels


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 4, Blue Jays 3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


2


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




British Open
Saturday
At Muirfield, Gullane, Scotland
Purse: $7.8 million
Yardage: 7,192, Par: 71
Third Round
Lee Westwood 72-68-70 210 -3
Hunter Mahan 72-72-68-212 -1
TigerWoods 69-71-72-212 -1
Adam Scott 71-72-70-213 E
Ryan Moore 72-70-72-214 +1
Angel Cabrera 69-72-73- 214 +1
Zach Johnson 66-75-73-214 +1
Henrik Stenson 70-70-74 214 +1
Phil Mickelson 69-74-72-215 +2
Francesco Molinari 69-74-72-215 +2
Sergio Garcia 75-73-68 216 +3
Brandt Snedeker 68-79-69- 216 +3
Jamie Donaldson 74-71-71 -216 +3
Hideki Matsuyama 71-73-72- 216 +3
Jason Day 73-71-72- 216 +3
Dustin Johnson 68-72-76- 216 +3
Miguel Angel Jimenez 68-71-77-216 +3
Rafael Cabrera-Bello 67-74-76- 217 +4
Richard Sterne 75-75-68 -218 +5
Ernie Els 74-74-70 -218 +5
Martin Kaymer 72-74-72-218 +5
Johnson Wagner 73-72-73- 218 +5
Justin Leonard 74-70-74 218 +5
Ian Poulter 72-71-75-218 +5
Shingo Katayama 73-77-69- 219 +6
Keegan Bradley 75-74-70- 219 +6
Thomas Bjorn 73-74-72- 219 +6
MattKuchar 74-73-72- 219 +6
Danny Willett 75-72-72- 219 +6
Graeme McDowell 75-71-73- 219 +6
Charl Schwartzel 75-68-76 219 +6
Darren Clarke 72-71-76 -219 +6
Jordan Spieth 69-74-76 -219 +6
Carl Pettersson 74-76-70 220 +7
Todd Hamilton 69-81-70 -220 +7
Paul Lawrie 81-69-70 220 +7
Bud Cauley 74-75-71 220 +7
Steven Tiley 72-75-73-220 +7
Ken Duke 70-77-73 220 +7
Gregory Bourdy 76-70-74 220 +7
Bernd Wiesberger 71-74-75 220 +7
Harris English 74-71-75-220 +7
Tom Lehman 68-77-75 220 +7
Bubba Watson 70-73-77 220 +7
Webb Simpson 73-70-77 220 +7
K.J. Choi 76-74-71 221 +8
Thongchai Jaidee 79-71-71-221 +8
Boo Weekley 74-76-71 221 +8
YE.Yang 78-70-73- 221 +8
Eduardo de la Riva 73-73-75 221 +8
Mark Brown 77-73-72 222 +9
Geoff Ogilvy 75-75-72 222 +9
Richie Ramsay 76-74-72 222 +9
G. Fernandez-Castano 70-79-73-222 +9
Fred Couples 75-74-73 222 +9
a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 73-76-73 222 +9
George Coetzee 76-71-75-222 +9
Freddie Jacobson 72-75-75 222 +9
Stephen Gallacher 76-70-76 222 +9
Branden Grace 74-71-77 -222 +9
Mark O'Meara 67-78-77 -222 +9
Martin Laird 70-71-81 222 +9
Jonas Blixt 72-78-73-223 +10
Peter Senior 74-76-73 -223 +10
Shane Lowry 74-74-75 -223 +10
Stewart Cink 72-75-76 223 +10
Marcus Fraser 73-74-76 223 +10
Gareth Wright 71-78-75 224 +11
a-Jimmy Mullen 71-78-75-224 +11
JoshTeater 72-77-75 -224 +11
Russell Henley 78-71-75 -224 +11
Tim Clark 72-76-76 224 +11
Graham DeLaet 76-72-76 224 +11
ChrisWood 75-75-75-225 +12
Jason Dufner 72-77-76 -225 +12
Oliver Fisher 70-78-77 -225 +12
Padraig Harrington 73-75-77 225 +12
Ben Curtis 74-71-80 225 +12
Mikko Ilonen 72-78-76 -226 +13
K.T. Kim 73-76-77 -226 +13
Bo Van Pelt 76-73-77-226 +13
Kevin Streelman 74-71-82-227 +14
Sandy Lyle 76-72-80 228 +15
Shiv Kapur 68-77-83-228 +15
LPGA Tour

Marathon Classic
Saturday
At Highland Meadows Golf Club, Sylvania,
Ohio
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,512, Par: 71
Third Round
a-amateur
Paula Creamer 66-68-67 201 -12
Beatriz Recari 69-65-67 201 -12
Lexi Thompson 66-71-67 204 -9
Chie Arimura 69-67-68 204 -9
Jacqui Concolino 67-68-69 204 -9
Chella Choi 68-71-66 205 -8
Jennifer Johnson 73-66-66 205 -8
Jodi Ewart Shadoff 69-68-68 205 -8
Hee Young Park 71-68-67 206 -7
Mo Martin 68-70-68 206 -7
Angela Stanford 71-72-64 207 -6
Eun-Hee Ji 68-72-67 207 -6
Morgan Pressel 68-72-67 207 -6
Dewi Claire Schreefel 69-71-67-- 207 -6
Heather BowieYoung 70-69-68-207 -6
Gerina Piller 67-72-68 207 -6
SoYeon Ryu 68-69-70 207 -6
a-Lydia Ko 69-67-71 207 -6
AlisonWalshe 65-69-73- 207 -6
Brittany Lang 68-72-68 208 -5
Ayako Uehara 68-72-68 -208 -5
Cindy LaCrosse 71-68-69 208 -5
Danah Bordner 73-70-66 -209 -4
Brooke Pancake 71-72-66 209 -4
I.K. Kim 70-69-70 -209 -4
HaejiKang 67-71-71 -209 -4
AmyYang 69-69-71 -209 -4
Inbee Park 67-69-73- 209 -4
SeRiPak 69-74-67 -210 -3
Amelia Lewis 74-68-68 -210 -3
Mariajo Uribe 71-70-69 -210 -3
Candie Kung 71-69-70 -210 -3
SunYoungYoo 71-73-67- 211 -2
Stacy Lewis 70-72-69- 211 -2
Jessica Shepley 66-76-69- 211 -2
Sandra Changkija 69-72-70- 211 -2
Katie Futcher 69-72-70- 211 -2
Natalie Gulbis 68-73-70- 211 -2
JiYoungOh 70-71-70- 211 -2
Katherine Hull-Kirk 73-67-71- 211 -2
Paige Mackenzie 74-70-68- 212 -1
Kristy McPherson 73-71-68- 212 -1
NaYeon Choi 72-71-69- 212 -1
Jane Rah 74-69-69- 212 -1
Vicky Hurst 71-71-70- 212 -1
Moira Dunn 73-67-72- 212 -1
Mika Miyazato 70-70-72- 212 -1
Irene Cho 70-74-69- 213 E
Jennie Lee 72-72-69 213 E


Meena Lee 70-73-70 213 E
Lizette Salas 70-73-70 -213 E
Sarah Jane Smith 72-71-70 213 E
Nicole Jeray 72-70-71 213 E
Wendy Ward 69-73-71 213 E
Michelle Wie 74-67-72 213 E


SCOREBOARD


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
14 25 27 38 58
POWER BALL
6


CASH 3 (early)
8-3-9
CASH 3 (late)
7-8-4

PLAY 4 (early)
7-3-3-7
PLAY 4 (late)
8-3-5-8

FANTASY 5
2-4-18-33-35

LOTTERY
8-21-22-27-40-44
XTRA
3


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 6 24 30 39
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $2,725.50
3-of-4 MB 33 $362.00
3-of-4 592 $60.00
2-of-4 MB 957 $25.50
1-of-4 MB 8,283 $3.00
2-of-4 19,669 $2.00


Fantasy 5:11 20-
5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 279
3-of-5 8,581


-25 -29 -36
$217,610.08
$125.50
$11.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TV
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: STP 300 qualifying
1 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series: Grand Prix of Mosport
3 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: STP 300 race
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Mopar Mile-High NHRA Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: STP 300 race (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at Washington Nationals
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Milwaukee Brewers
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Atlanta Braves at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox
BICYCLING
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 Tour de France Stage 21
GOLF
6 a.m. (ESPN) 2013 Open Championship Final Round
8 a.m. (ESPN) 2013 Open Championship Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Marathon Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) American Century Championship, Final Round
3 p.m. (ABC) The Open Championship (Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Sanderson Farms Championship, Final
Round
9 p.m. (ESPN2) 2013 Open Championship Best of the Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (62 UNI) Mexican Premier Division Toluca vs. Pachuca
3:30 p.m. (FOX, UNI) CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinal: United
States vs. El Salvador
6:40 p.m. (UNI) CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinal: Honduras vs.
Costa Rica
SOFTBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN2) National Pro Fastpitch: USSSA Pride at NY/NJ Comets

RADIO
BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:05 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays


Karine Icher
Stacy Prammanasudh
Momoko Ueda
Ryann O'Toole
Laura Davies
Lisa Ferrero
Kelly Jacques
Maude-Aimee Leblanc
Ilhee Lee
Katie M. Burnett
Inhong Lim
Jin Young Pak
Rebecca Lee-Bentham
Jennifer Rosales
Paola Moreno
Becky Morgan
Jenny Shin


67-71-75
70-73-71
71-71-72
68-72-74
72-72-71
72-72-71
73-70-72
70-72-73
70-72-73
72-69-74
73-68-74
69-74-73
69-73-74
72-70-74
73-71-73
71-71-75
73-70-75


PGA Tour


Sanderson Farms

Championship
Saturday
At Annandale Golf Club, Madison, Miss.
Purse: $3 million
Yardage: 7,202, Par: 72
Third Round


Nicholas Thompson
Daniel Summerhays
Chad Campbell
Cameron Beckman
Woody Austin
Kyle Reifers
Brendon Todd
Bill Lunde
Vaughn Taylor
Rory Sabbatini
Jim Herman
Matt Every
Seung-Yul Noh
Chris Kirk
Paul Stankowski
Troy Matteson
Will Claxton
Kevin Sutherland
Brad Fritsch
Jonathan Randolph
Billy Mayfair
Fabian Gomez
Greg Chalmers
Billy Andrade


69-65-65
63-67-69
67-69-65
72-64-65
69-65-67
65-69-67
72-64-66
67-67-68
67-67-68
68-68-67
66-69-68
71-67-66
69-68-67
69-65-70
66-68-70
67-67-70
66-71-68
70-69-66
66-69-70
66-69-70
72-62-71
70-64-71
70-69-67
73-66-67


Scott Langley
Ken Looper
Martin Flores
William McGirt
Peter Lonard
Chris Stroud
Russell Knox
Steve LeBrun
Cameron Percy
Tag Ridings
Jason Bohn
Chris Riley
Eric Meierdierks
Brian Harman
Lee Williams
Joe Ogilvie
Steven Bowditch
Nathan Green
Ryan Blaum
Kevin Kisner
David Mathis
Brandt Jobe
Brendon de Jonge
Heath Slocum
Stuart Appleby
Skip Kendall
Darron Stiles
Wes Short, Jr.
Ben Kohles
Kent Jones
Marco Dawson
Andre Stolz
Dicky Pride
Glen Day
Michael Bradley
Robert Gamez
Charles Howell III
Joe Durant
D.J.Trahan
Jeff Overton
Scott Gardiner
Chez Reavie
Henrik Norlander
Bobby Gates
Michael Letzig
Davis Love III
Marc Turnesa
Frank Lickliter II
Chris DiMarco
Andrew Johnson
Colt Knost
Nick O'Hern


70-69-67-
68-69-69-
71-65-70-
66-70-70-
67-67-72-
69-70-68-
69-69-69-
67-71-69-
71-65-71 -
74-66-67-
73-68-66-
67-68-72-
68-70-70-
70-68-70-
69-70-69-
70-67-71 -
67-68-73-
69-72-67-
70-68-71 -
65-73-71 -
70-67-72-
75-65-69-
75-65-69-
69-71-69-
73-67-69-
67-68-74-
73-68-68-
71-70-68-
73-68-68-
72-69-68-
72-67-71
70-69-71
67-72-71
70-69-71 -
66-70-74-
72-68-70-
72-69-69-
70-71-69-
67-70-74-
68-71-72-
71-69-71 -
70-70-72-
72-69-71 -
70-70-73-
70-71-72-
71-70-72-
69-71-74-
72-69-73-
72-67-76-
72-69-74-
72-69-74-
70-69-78-


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 B3


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Activated SS Stephen Drew
from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Brock Holtto Paw-
tucket (IL).
NEWYORKYANKEES-Placed OF Zoilo Almonte
on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Melky Mesa and OF
Thomas Neal from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Desig-
nated INF Alberto Gonzalez for assignment.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES-Placed RHP Rafael Be-
tancourt on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Mitchell
Boggs from Tulsa (TL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Placed OF Matt Holliday
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 12. Purchased
the contract of 1B-OF Brock Peterson from Memphis
(PCL).
American Association
AMARILLO SOX-Signed RHP Jeff Lyman.
EL PASO DIABLOS-Signed LHP Carlos Teller.
GRAND PRAIRIEAIR HOGS-Signed LHP Chuck
Lukanen.
LAREDO LEMURS-Signed RHP Jon Kountis.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS-Released RHP Andy
Wells.
QUEBEC CAPITALES-Released C Mike Greico.
TROIS-RIVERES AIGLES-Signed C Kyle Nisson.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Suspended New York Giants S Will Hill four
games for violating the league's substance of abuse
policy.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Signed DE Dion Jordan to a
multiyear contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
WINNIPEG JETS-Agreed to terms with D Zach
Redmond on a one-year contract.




Royals 6, Tigers 5
Detroit Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksncf 3 1 0 0 AGordnl If 3 10 0
TrHntrrf 4 00 1 Hosmerib 3 12 1
MiCarr3b 4 1 1 0 BButlerdh 3 1 1 0
Fielder b 5 0 2 1 S.Perezc 3 0 1 3
VMrtnzdh 5 1 3 1 L.Cain cf 4 1 1 0
HPerez pr 0 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 4 23 1
JhPerltss 5 1 2 0 Lough rf 4 0 1 0
Dirks If 3 0 1 0 AEscorss 4 0 0 0
Tuiassp ph-lf2 0 0 0 Getz 2b 2 0 0 1
Avila c 4 1 3 2 EJhnsn 2b 2 0 0 0
RSantg2b 3 0 1 0
D.Kelly ph-2b00 0 0
Totals 38 5135 Totals 32 6 9 6
Detroit 210 020 000 5
Kansas City 102 210 OOx 6
E-Fielder (6), Verlander (1). LOB-Detroit 11,
Kansas City 7.2B-V.Martinez (20), Avila (6), S.Perez
(17). HR-Moustakas (7). SB-Getz (6). S-A.Jack-
son. SF-Tor.Hunter, S.Perez.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Verlander L,10-7
Alburquerque
Smyly
Kansas City
Guthrie W,9-7
Collins H,13
Hochevar H,1
Crow H,14
G.Holland S,24-26
PB-Avila.


52/38 6 5 4 3
1 0 0 0 0 2
11/31 0 0 0 1


Padres 5, Cardinals 3


San Diego St. Louis
ab r h bi
EvCarrss 4 0 0 1 MCrpnt2b
Headly 3b 5 2 2 0 Jay cf
Quentin If 4 0 2 1 Beltran rf
Alonso lb 5 1 1 0 Craig If
Gyorko 2b 5 0 1 1 YMolin c
Venale rf-cf 4 1 1 0 MAdms lb
Amarst cf 1 1 1 0 Freese 3b
Denorfi ph-rfl 0 0 0 Rosnthl p


Hundly c
Volquez p
Forsyth ph
Vincent p
Thayer p
Kotsay ph
Thtchr p
Street p
Totals
San Diego
St. Louis


ab rh bi
3 1 0 0
3 1 1 0
4 00 0
4 0 1 2
4 00 0
3 00 0

0 0 0 0


2 0 1 1 Salas p 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 Descals ss-3b3 0 1 0
1 00 0 Lynnp 1 00 0
0 00 0 BPtrsnph 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 Siegristp 0 00 0
1 0 0 0 Maness p 0 00 0
0 00 0 Choatep 0 0U0 0
0 00 0 Kozma ss 1 00 0
34 59 4 Totals 30 3 4 3
112 000 001 5
000 210 000 3


DP-San Diego 1. LOB-San Diego 9, St. Louis 3.
2B-Quentin (18). S-Volquez. SF-Ev.Cabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
Volquez W,7-8 5 4 3 3 1 1
Vincent H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Thayer H,15 1 0 0 0 1 0
ThatcherH,10 1 0 0 0 1 1
Street S,16-17 1 0 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Lynn L,11-5 5 6 4 4 3 1
Siegrist 0 0 0 0 2 0
Maness 12/31 0 0 0 1
Choate 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Rosenthal 11/32 1 1 0 1
Salas 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Siegrist pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
WP-Volquez 2, Lynn.

AL leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .360; Mauer, Min-
nesota, .323; DOrtiz, Boston, .322; Trout, Los Ange-
les, .322; Loney, Tampa Bay, .315; Pedroia, Boston,
.313; ABeltre, Texas, .312.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 74; CDavis, Baltimore,
70; AJones, Baltimore, 67; Trout, Los Angeles, 66; De-
Jennings, Tampa Bay, 65; Bautista, Toronto, 63; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 61.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 95; CDavis, Baltimore,
93; Encarnacion, Toronto, 74; Fielder, Detroit, 70;
NCruz, Texas, 69; Cano, New York, 67; AJones, Bal-
timore, 67.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 133; Machado, Balti-
more, 129; Pedroia, Boston, 120; Trout, Los Angeles,
120; ABeltre, Texas, 118; AJones, Baltimore, 118; Ells-
bury, Boston, 117.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 39; Mauer, Min-
nesota, 31 ;Trout, Los Angeles, 29; CDavis, Baltimore,
27; JCastro, Houston, 26; Pedroia, Boston, 25; Jh-
Peralta, Detroit, 25; AIRamirez, Chicago, 25.
TRIPLES-Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Ellsbury, Boston,
7; Drew, Boston, 6; Gardner, New York, 5; DeJen-
nings, Tampa Bay, 5; LMartin, Texas, 5; Kawasaki,
Toronto, 4; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 4.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 37; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 30; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; ADunn,
Chicago, 24; Ibanez, Seattle, 24; Bautista, Toronto,
22; NCruz, Texas, 22.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 36; RDavis,
Toronto, 24; McLouth, Baltimore, 24; Altuve, Houston,
21; Kipnis, Cleveland, 21; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; AI-
Ramirez, Chicago, 20.
PITCHING-Scherzer, Detroit, 13-1; MMoore,
Tampa Bay, 13-3; Colon, Oakland, 12-3;Tillman, Bal-
timore, 11-3; FHernandez, Seattle, 10-4;Verlander,
Detroit, 10-7; Masterson, Cleveland, 10-7.
ERA-FHernandez, Seattle, 2.53; Kuroda, New
York, 2.65; Colon, Oakland, 2.70; Sale, Chicago, 2.85;
AniSanchez, Detroit, 2.85; Lackey, Boston, 2.95;
Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.99.


STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 157; Scherzer, De-
troit, 152; FHernandez, Seattle, 140; Masterson,
Cleveland, 137; Sale, Chicago, 131; Verlander, De-
troit, 128; DHolland, Texas, 127.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 34; MRivera, New
York, 31; Nathan, Texas, 30; Balfour, Oakland, 25;
GHolland, Kansas City, 24; AReed, Chicago, 24;
Perkins, Minnesota, 23; Frieri, Los Angeles, 23; Rod-
ney, Tampa Bay, 23.

NL leaders
BATTING-YMolina, St. Louis, .336; Craig, St.
Louis, .333; Cuddyer, Colorado, .329; Segura, Mil-
waukee, .326; Posey, San Francisco, .324; MCarpen-
ter, St. Louis, .323; Votto, Cincinnati, .319.
RUNS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 74; Choo, Cincin-
nati, 68; CGonzalez, Colorado, 68; Votto, Cincinnati,
68; Holliday, St. Louis, 64; JUpton, Atlanta, 61; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 60; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 60.
RBI-Phillips, Cincinnati, 78; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
77; Craig, St. Louis, 76; DBrown, Philadelphia, 69;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 66; FFreeman, Atlanta, 64; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 64.
HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 124; Craig, St. Louis,
119; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 118; Votto, Cincinnati, 114;
YMolina, St. Louis, 111; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 110;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 109; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 109.
DOUBLES-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 30; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 28; YMolina, St. Louis, 28; Posey, San
Francisco, 28; Rizzo, Chicago, 28; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, 27; GParra, Arizona, 26.
TRIPLES-CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span, Washington,
7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Hechavarria, Miami, 5;
DWright, NewYork, 5.
HOME RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 25; PAI-
varez, Pittsburgh, 24; DBrown, Philadelphia, 24; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 21; Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 19; Uggla, Atlanta, 19.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 34; Se-
gura, Milwaukee, 29; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Revere,
Philadelphia, 22; CGomez, Milwaukee, 21; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 21; Pierre, Miami, 18; EYoung,
NewYork, 18.
PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington, 12-4;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-5; Corbin, Arizona, 11-1;
Lynn, St. Louis, 11-5; CILee, Philadelphia, 10-3; Bum-
garner, San Francisco, 10-5; 10 tied at 9.
ERA-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.98; Locke, Pitts-
burgh, 2.15; Harvey, NewYork, 2.35; Corbin, Arizona,
2.35; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.45; Zimmermann,
Washington, 2.58; Fernandez, Miami, 2.75.
STRIKEOUTS-Harvey, NewYork, 147; Kershaw,
Los Angeles, 139; Samardzija, Chicago, 134; Latos,
Cincinnati, 132; Wainwright, St. Louis, 130; CILee,
Philadelphia, 125; GGonzalez, Washington, 125;
Lincecum, San Francisco, 125.
SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 29; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 27;
Mujica, St. Louis, 27; RSoriano, Washington, 25;
Chapman, Cincinnati, 23; Romo, San Francisco, 22;
Papelbon, Philadelphia, 20.
This Date in baseball
July 21
1921 -The Cleveland Indians and the New York
Yankees combined for an AL record 16 doubles as
the Indians won 17-8. Cleveland had nine doubles and
NewYork seven.
1945 -The Detroit Tigers and the Philadelphia
Athletics battled 24 innings and ended in a 1-1 tie. Les
Mueller pitched 19 2-3 innings for the Tigers.
1956 Brooks Lawrence of the Cincinnati Reds
had his 13-game winning streak broken as Roberto
Clemente's three-run homer led the Pittsburgh Pirates
to a 4-3 victory.
1970 San Diego's Clay Kirby held the New York
Mets hitless for eight innings but was lifted for a pinch
hitter by manager Preston Gomez. With the Padres
trailing 1-0 with two out in the eighth, Gomez elected
to go for the win instead of letting Kirby finish the game.
The Padres lost the no-hitter and the game, 3-0.
1973 Hank Aaron of Atlanta hit his 700th home
run in the third inning of an 8-4 Braves loss to
Philadelphia. Aaron connected on a 1-1 fastball off
Phillies pitcher Ken Brett.
1975 Joe Torre of the New York Mets grounded
into four double plays in a 6-2 loss to the Houston As-
tros. Felix Millan had four singles but was wiped out
each time byTorre.
2001 In their highest-scoring game in 58 years,
the Los Angeles Dodgers routed Colorado 22-7. The
22 runs were the most scored by the Dodgers since
Brooklyn beat Pittsburgh 23-6 on July 10, 1943, at
Ebbets Field.
2006 Alex Rodriguez became the youngest
player to reach 450 home runs when he homered in
the NewYorkYankees'7-3 loss to Toronto. Rodriguez
also recorded his 2000th career hit.
2008 Detroit's 19-4 victory at Kansas City
marked the third time this season the Tigers scored
19 runs. The Boston Red Sox were the last team to
accomplish that feat, scoring 19 or more four times in
1950. Detroit beat Texas 19-6 on April 23 and Min-
nesota 19-3 on May 24.
2012 Jason Kubel became the seventh player in
Diamondbacks' history to homer three times in a game,
driving in six runs as Arizona dominated Houston 12-3.
Today's birthday: Wei-Yin Chen 28; Kyuji Fujikawa
33; CC Sabathia 33.
Baseball calendar
July 28 Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown,
N.Y
July 31 Last day to trade a player without secur-
ing waivers.
Aug. 14-15- Owners meeting, Cooperstown, N.Y
Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Oct. 23 -World Series begins, city of American
League champion.
November TBA Deadline for teams to make
qualifying offers to their eligible former players who
became free agents, fifth day after World Series.
November TBA Deadline for free agents to ac-
cept qualifying offers, 12th day afterWorld Series.
Nov. 11-13-General managers meeting, Orlando,
Fla.
Dec. 2 Last day forteams to offer 2014 contracts
to unsigned players.
Dec. 2-5 Major League Baseball Players Asso-
ciation executive board meeting, La Jolla, Calif.
Dec. 9-12 -Winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista.
Dec. 9 Hall of Fame expansion era committee
(1973 and later) vote announced, Lake Buena Vista.
2014
Jan. 14 Salary arbitration filing.
Jan. 17 Salary arbitration figures exchanged.
Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings, St. Pe-
tersburg.
Feb. 13 -Voluntary reporting date for pitchers,
catchers and injured players.
Feb. 18 -Voluntary reporting date for other players.
Feb. 25 Mandatory reporting date.
March 12- Last day to place a player on uncon-
ditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination
pay instead of 45 days.
March 22-23- Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona,
Sydney
March 26 Last day to request unconditional re-
lease waivers on a player without having to pay his
full 2014 salary.
March30 Opening day Active rosters reduced to
25 players.
July 15-All-Star game, Minneapolis.
July 18 -Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign.
July 31 -Last day to trade a player without secur-
ing waivers.


Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Dec. 2 Last day forteams to offer 2015 contracts
to unsigned players.
Dec. 8-11 -Winter meetings, San Diego.


RAYS
Continued from Page BI


Jennings went 3 for 4
with a walk and scored
twice.
Toronto's Jose Bautista
homered for the second
straight game but the last-
place Blue Jays lost for the
fifth time in six games. Ex-


pected to contend this sea-
son, the Blue Jays have
struggled instead, winning
just one of their past seven
series.
Pitching despite suffer-
ing from an illness, Hel-
lickson (9-3) allowed two
runs and five hits in five
innings, walked three and
struck out three. The right-
hander is 5-0 with a 2.19
ERA in his past six starts.


Hellickson started feel-
ing nauseated and light-
headed following batting
practice on Friday, and
said the heat made things
rough on him Saturday
"It felt pretty good, it
was just so hot I got a little
lightheaded those first
couple of innings," he said.
Alex Torres was perfect
in the sixth and seventh
but left after walking


Bautista and Edwin En-
carnacion to begin the
eighth. Peralta came on
and loaded the bases by
walking Adam Lind, but
escaped by getting Colby
Rasmus to foul out, strik-
ing out Maicer Izturis look-
ing and fanning J.P
Arencibia on a 3-2 pitch.
"It was Houdini-esque,"
Maddon said. "Just a mas-
terful job on his part"


Last Chance for

Flag Football and Cheerleading
Nature Coast Flag Football and Cheerleading
will be hosting their Annual Football Fun Day
on July 27th at the Lecanto field
from 10am-2pm.



n ..a .... e a ... ... o
,u 352.672.2312

SW nalurecoasloulhsporls.org









Pink team wins men's flag football league


Special to the Chronicle

The men's flag football
league at Homosassa
Recreational Area Park
came to a close Thursday
night and a champion was
crowned.
The title game saw the
Blue and Pink teams
square off for the right to
be called champion. Blue
scored first, but Pink an-
swered and never looked
back en route to a 31-14 tri-
umph to take home the
crown.


Earlier in the playoffs,
No. 3 seed Pink defeated
the second-seeded Red
team 19-0 in the first semi-
final, while No. 1 Blue
overcame a 14-0 lead by
No. 4 Purple to win 19-14.
In the latter contest,
Patrick Rash had two
interceptions.
Women's leagues
offered
Get your teams together,
because the time is now. Do
you have a group of ladies at
work or a group of your


friends who want to partici-
pate in flag football, softball or
basketball?
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation at 352-527-7540
and ask Pedro Williams.
Men's softball
Game 1
Ames Oil 9, The Machines 1
Games 2 and 3 were post-
poned due to rain.
New fishing
tourney on tap
The inaugural Rob Phillips


Eagle Buick GMC Fishing
Tournament will be held Satur-
day, July 27, at MacRae's of
Homosassa. Boats will leave
the docks at 7 a.m. from
MacRae's or Twin Rivers Ma-
rina in Crystal River.
The captains' meeting will
be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday,
July 26, at MacRae's.
Entry is $100 per boat.
Entry payment deadline is
July 26. For entry forms and
more information, call Mark
Mileti at 352-220-4339 or
352-795-6800, Bill Nast at
352-484-9482 or 352-795-


6800, Randy Harbin at 813-
690-5528 or 352-621-0934, or
Dean Simmons at 352-267-
5007 or 352-787-4650.
Lifeguard Camp at
Whispering Pines
Park Pool
Whispering Pines Park
Aquatics Team will host a Jun-
ior Lifeguard Camp for youths
ages of 11 to 15 years old
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each day
July 22 to 26.
The half-day camp will
prepare participants for a fu-


ture as a lifeguard. Partici-
pants will have the opportu-
nity to experience the role of
a professional lifeguard in a
fun learning environment.
The Aquatics Team will teach
the fundamentals of life-
guarding, water safety, basic
first aid and CPR, as well as
basic water rescue
techniques.
Registration fee is $50 for
the camp and must be com-
pleted at the Whispering
Pines Park Pool Complex.
For more information, call
352-726-1995.


P.L.A.Y. for your kids


Special to the Chronicle

The next season of
PL.A.Y will begin on Aug.
12. Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's PL.A.Y pro-
grams are designed for
children ages 3 to 5 who
aren't quite ready for the
organized sports leagues.
The PL.A.Y programs
offered in the upcoming
session include soccer,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Monday and Homosassa
Area Recreational Park on
Wednesday, and T-ball,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Tuesday and Bicenten-
nial Park on Thursdays.
All sports are offered
from either 5 to 6 p.m. or 6
to 7 p.m.; choose the time
and park that works for
your schedule. The
PL.A.Y programs are held
one night a week for one
hour over six weeks, and
parents are encouraged to
participate. On the first
night of PL.A.Y, each child
will receive age-appropri-
ate sports equipment and
a team T-shirt
Registration will open
on Wednesday, July 31.
Contact Crysta Henry,
Recreation Program Spe-
cialist for Youth Programs,
at 352-527-7543 or visit
www. citruscountyparks.
com for more information.
The P.L.A.Y. program is for
children ages 3 to 5.
Special to the Chronicle


Recreation
BRIEFS

Warrior Volleyball
Camp next week
The2013 Warrior Volleyball
Camp will be held at the Seven
Rivers Christian School gym in
Lecanto from July 29 to Aug. 2.
The cost per camper is $50. A
multiple sibling discount ($90 for
two, $130 for three) is available.
Kids in grades 4 through 6
will play from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
while grades 7 through 9 go
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Funds from the camp will
benefit the Seven Rivers Chris-
tian School's volleyball team. All
players will receive instruction in
the fundamentals of serving,
passing, setting, and hitting.
Players will also receive instruc-
tion on how to utilize their skills
in a team concept.
For more information, contact
Wanda Grey at 352-428-0228
or through email at wgreyl12
@aol.com.
CRHS student-
athletes offered
physical for $15
Citrus Chiropractic Group will
be giving sport physical for all
students who will be attending
Crystal River High School dur-
ing the 2013-14 school year on
Thursday, July 25.
The physical are offered at
their Crystal River office on
Hwy. 44. Times are determined
by the athlete's last name.
Last names beginning with A-
F will begin at 1 pm, G-M at
1:30 p.m., N-S at 2 p.m., and T-
Z at 2:30 p.m. The cost is $15.
Please bring proof of insurance
and any first time student should
bring a copy of birth certificate.
LHS providing sports
physical for $10
All sports physical will be
given on July 30 at the Lecanto
High School gym from 3 p.m. to
6 p.m. Parents or guardians
must be present. Middle school
students are welcome.
Cost is $10 and all proceeds
will benefit the Lecanto High
School athletic department.
For more information, call
352-746-2334.


,1 -~




~*i I




I. /

I


SI


- ltk.


.*


do


S I
1" .. '":: % ., '. ,. ,,-,, ..... +.i
e *'. ,,.,+ 1. , ,


.. .


I





-- -
I. _, J .




." .,,,-- .:' ;,l-- -

At .* ,.. -


, '. -. ,, '-:. >'" i" ".. .. ...
.. . ** -. -. . .
, """ ".. .--% I 1 -" '.,
... .. . .,
,. .
,.,. z,.. ""+. ef ": . + ., ..... ,,.. ." .a* ., ..


*, 'I a


.* ... ,,. ,, .
.~V%*4


It's not fireworks


aturday morning, I took my
daughter to her swim meet
in Ocala. Watching her com-
pete reminded me of last week's
tragic story about a girl close to
her age that was elec-
trocuted during swim
practice. An electrical
wire broke when
struck by a lightning
storm and landed on
the ground outside the
building. All the swim- / ,
mers were told to exit
the pool. The little girl
exited the pool by
grabbing the metal lad- Dr. Ron
der It was fatal. DOCT
How often have we ORD
been in a situation ORD
where things are going
great and BOOM a storm cuts
it short! It is tempting to continue
and pretend it won't happen to
you.
Typically lightning kills more
people in the United States than
any other act of nature other than
floods and exceeds even torna-
does. Lightning is the second-
largest storm killer in which over
1/3 of injuries occurred during
recreational or sports activities.
Florida leads the nation in the
number of days with lightning ac-
tivity Also, Florida represented 33
percent of all boating claims due
to lightning strikes.
Many lightning casualties occur
as the storm approaches or within
30 minutes after the storm has
passed.
Open boats have more light-
ning-related deaths or injures be-
cause it is more likely to strike


1
r'
II
a
TC


crewmembers when there is no
mast The boats are often the high-
est structure in the area.
There are several types of light-
ning strikes that determine the
type of injury and ne-
cessity for medical
treatment. Some peo-
ple my have a cardiac
arrest; others have no
apparent outward
signs of injury.
The direct strike is
self-explanatory Con-
tact strikes happen
when touching an ob-
Joseph ject that is struck such
OR'S as a tree, rock, fishing
ERS pole or golf club.
Side-splash occurs
when lightning jumps
from the primary object struck to
the person on its way to the
ground.
Blunt injury is the result of
being thrown violently from the
strike or from the explosive force
nearby due to air being super-
heated and then rapidly cooled.
If you don't die on the spot from
cardiac arrest, either immediately
or several days later, a lightning
strike may have many other med-
ical ramifications.
When the brain is affected there
can be difficulty with short-term
memory, organizing new informa-
tion or recalling old information.
In outdoor sports activity such
as soccer, T-ball, fishing, water ski-
ing or camping, adults are respon-
sible for children in the face of
lightning activity in the vicinity.
Any person suspected of being
injured by lightning should be


evaluated in an emergency room
even if obvious injuries are not
present
Simple rules of prevention are
easy to write about but difficult in
reality to follow.
The best rule is that if you hear
thunder you are in range of a light-
ning strike. Lightning travels 10 to
12 miles ahead of a storm.
Lightning strikes may happen
boating, fishing, golfing or playing
baseball. Drop any golf clubs, fish-
ing poles, tennis rackets or base-
ball bats.
Remove metal objects such as a
baseball helmet Do not touch any-
thing metal.
Shelter is under metal bleach-
ers, in a golf cart, or on a bicycle or
motorcycle is not safe. A car on the
other hand is because it is not
grounded.
In my humble opinion, park the
boat, get off the wake board, stow
the kayak paddle, duck and seek
shelter. The simple safety slogan
of the National Lightning Safety
Institute is, "If you can see it, flee
it (take shelter). If you can hear it,
clear it (stop your activities)."
In the worst case scenario, use
the lightning crouch: put your feet
together, squat down, tuck your
head and cover your ears.
Do not lie down! It is very dan-
gerous.
Most importantly, stop in the
middle of the best game of your
life because it may be your last
game ever!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at
SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute,
may be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net


Soccer BRIEFS


Mexico, Panama
advance to Gold
Cup semis
ATLANTA- Mexico and
Panama set up a semifinal
rematch in the CONCA-
CAF Gold Cup after each
won their quarterfinal
matches on Saturday.
Panama beat 10-man
Cuba 6-1, while Mexico es-
caped with a 1-0 victory


over Trinidad and Tobago.
Panama is unbeaten thus
far in the tournament, with
three wins, including a 2-1
victory over heavily favored
Mexico in group play, and a
draw. Mexico, a six-time
Gold Cup champion, is
going for its third straight title.
The United States faces
El Salvador and Honduras
takes on Costa Rica in the
other quarterfinal matches


on Sunday.
Cuba took a 1-0 lead on
Jose Ciprian's goal in the
21st minute, but Gabriel
Torres' penalty four min-
utes later leveled the
score, and his second goal
gave Panama the lead for
good in the 38th minute.
Torres has five goals in
four Gold Cup games.
Cuba played a man
down and gave up four


goals in the last 32 minutes
after Ariel Martinez was
given a red card for a hard
foul against Bias Perez.
Perez scored twice, and
Carlos Rodriguez and
Jairo Jimenez also netted
for Panama.
Panama coach Julio Dely
Valdes said he was upset by
his team's lapse in concen-
tration early in the game.
From wire reports


B4 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recreation
BRIEFS

Tourney to benefit
Humane Society
If you love to fish, would like
the opportunity to make some
money doing it and at the same
time benefit the Humane Soci-
ety of Citrus County, join in the
inaugural Large Mouth Bass
Fishing Tournament slated for
Saturday, July 27.
The tourney will take place on
Lake Henderson in Inverness at
the State Road 44 boat ramp
from 6 a.m. until 2 p.m. Prizes
will be awarded at about 3 p.m.
Prizes are $1,000 for first place,
$500 for second place, and
$250 for third place. The big
bass prize is $100. There is a
registration fee of $150, with two
anglers per boat.
For a printable registration
form, email fishingforaliving@
hotmail.com, or call Richard at
352-266-4574. Anglers can also
register online at www.humane
societycitrus.com.
Vets group to
host golf tourney
Vets Journey Home, a nonprofit
group dedicated to helping veter-
ans share and heal, will host its in-
augural golf outing Saturday, Aug.
17, at Citrus Hills at The Meadows.
The event will include lunch
and a raffle.
For more information or to
contribute to the event, call 815-
621-8319. All proceeds will bene-
fit a special Vets Journey Home
weekend slated to begin Nov. 15
in Citrus County.
Annual veterans
tourney is Sept. 7
The ninth annual Citrus
County Veterans Golf Tourna-
ment will be held Sept. 7 at the
Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club course for the benefit of the
Citrus County Veterans Founda-
tion Inc. The Foundation is a for
profit entity that has provided
more than $200,000 in emer-
gency financial assistance to
local honorably discharged veter-
ans and their surviving spouses
since its inception in 2004.
Check-in for the four-person
scramble will be at 7:30 a.m. with
a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Indi-
viduals and groups short of four
persons will be combined to make
four-person teams.
Registration form and donation
of $55 per person must be re-
ceived no later than Aug. 31. Each
participant's donation includes golf
and cart, beverages on the course
and lunch at the country club. The
tournament features a hole-in-one
car lease prize, closest to the pin
prizes and door prizes. Charitable
tax-deductible contributions for
door prizes and hole sponsor-
ships for $400, $300, $200 or
$100 are welcome.
Participating golfers should
make their check or money order
payable to Citrus County Veter-
ans Foundation and send it with
their registration form to: Citrus
County Veterans Foundation,
Attn: Samuel Dininno, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Key No.
13, Lecanto, FL 34461-7718 no
later than Aug. 29.
For more information or a regis-
tration form, visit www.citrusvf.org
or contact Samuel Dininno at
352-527-5915.
Adult 'Soccer
Blast' on tap
The Manatee Soccer Blast
Tournament, the Nature
Coast's only adult soccer tour-
nament, is planned Sept. 14
and 15 at the Homosassa Area
Recreational Park (HARP) in
Homosassa Springs.
The Kiwanis Clubs of Ho-
mosassa Springs invites adult
teams throughout Florida and
Georgia to participate in a five-on-
five round-robin tournament with
four divisions: men open, men
over 40, women and coed. Partic-
ipation is limited to 50 teams.
Registration is $210 per team.
For more information and to
register, visit the website at man-
ateesoccerblast.com or call DRC
Sports at 352-637-2475.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Armageddon year' for Garrett? Jones says no


Associated Press

OXNARD, Calif. -Jerry
Jones opened his 25th
training camp as owner of
the Dallas Cowboys sound-
ing as if coach Jason Gar-
rett would be around for 25
more.
The first vote of confi-
dence came even before
someone could ask Satur-
day in the annual "State of
the Cowboys" address that
Jones gives on the eve of
camp.
The words got stronger
after the questions started.
Jones said it was a "mis-
take" to consider this a
make-or-break year for Gar-
rett, who missed the play-
offs with 8-8 records in each
of his two full seasons. Both
ended with losses in finales
to NFC East rivals with a
playoff berth on the line.
The owner and his


coach shared a concert-
like stage for nearly 40
minutes in what has be-
come something of a sum-
mer tradition for Jones
since he bought the team
in 1989. Garrett had to
duck out for the first team
meeting of camp, and as he
was walking off the stage,
Jones was asked if it was
fair to say Garrett's job was
on the line.
Jones leaned into the mi-
crophone, said "no" in sev-
eral ways and even
suggested that he was look-
ing beyond the two years re-
maining on Garrett's
contract.
"I look to the future with
Jason and not just through
his contract that we're sit-
ting here with right now,"
Jones said. "But it is not
what is implied when you
say, 'Well, this is an Ar-
mageddon year for him.' It


Associated Press
Dallas Cowboy owner Jerry Jones, left and head coach
Jason Garrett talk as they arrive for the state of the
Cowboys address Saturday in Oxnard, Calif.


is not that with me."
The questions started as
soon as the Cowboys over-
hauled their defensive
staff a few weeks into the
offseason, and not long
after Jones said he was
going to make things "un-
comfortable" at team


headquarters.
Fueled by the comment,
speculation centered on
Garrett being a rubber
stamp for the firing of de-
fensive coordinator Rob
Ryan, the hiring of re-
placement Monte Kiffin
and the decision to move


play-calling duties from
Garrett to Bill Callahan.
Kiffin might not have
helped things when he
said his first phone calls
were from the owner and
his son, executive vice
president Stephen Jones.
Garrett had a stock an-
swer for the "hot seat"
issue all offseason: Every-
one in the NFL is on it. The
question for him Saturday
was getting out of his per-
sonal .500 rut and the
team's. The Cowboys are
128-128 going back to the
start of the 1997 season.
"We are what we are to
this point," Garrett said.
"But at some point in your
life, you have to let the past
go, whether it's been great,
good, mediocre or not so
good. And you focus on
learning from those experi-
ences and getting better
and take advantage of the


opportunity in front of you."
Garrett and Jones think
the Cowboys are better be-
cause they're healthier
than they were after a 28-18
loss to Washington that kept
them out of the playoffs.
The optimism has
mostly to do with a defense
that was missing six key
players by the end of the
season: linebackers Sean
Lee and Bruce Carter,
linemen Jay Ratliff and
Kenyon Coleman, safety
Barry Church and corner-
back Orlando Scandrick.
DeMarcus Ware didn't
miss any games but had
offseason surgery on a
shoulder that limited him
late in the year.
Tony Romo has been
cleared for today's opening
practice after missing off-
season workouts to have a
cyst removed from his
back.


Vegas puts league on the map


NBA's summer

league out

west blossoms

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Basketball was
made for summer.
The playgrounds and school
yard courts come alive when the
temperature warms up, with
kids watching the NBA Finals
and mimicking their favorite
players. High school players hit
the AAU circuit, crisscrossing
the country for premier tourna-
ments and college recruiting is
in full effect.
And for years, the NBA simply
sat out The championship would
conclude in June, the draft
would take place a week later
and then the league would go
dark for the rest of the summer
"The problem was in the old
days, they would build up the
draft, then nothing because
they'd concede to baseball," War-
ren LeGarie said. "That was a
mistake."
LeGarie, an agent who repre-
sents some prominent NBA
coaches, has helped turn the Las
Vegas summer league into an
event that keeps the league in
the headlines well into July
What started as a six-team gath-
ering that was thrown together
on the fly in 2004 has blossomed
into a 22-team summit that in-
cludes a tournament, owners'
meetings and one of the few
chances for agents and repre-
sentatives from all 30 teams to
meet in one place to hash out
contracts, discuss trades and lay
the groundwork for future deals.
"We want it so that people
know that there's great basket-
ball, but there's also a way to
break down the walls so that
people can reacquaint, develop
new acquaintances or in some
cases repair old acquaintances,"
LeGarie said. "There was a lot of
face to face. We created some-
thing like the winter baseball
meetings, where people can
come in converse, do business,


BRITISH
Continued from Page B1

matched the best score of
the third round. Mahan,
also going after that
maiden major with far
fewer credentials than
Westwood, will be playing
in the final group at his
second straight major.
Woods lost his chance to
get in the final group with
one swing.
Tied with Westwood as
they played the par-5 17th
into a stiff breeze off the
Firth of Forth, Woods tried
to hit 3-wood over a series
of bunkers to allow for a
simple wedge into the
green. With his ball on the
slightest slope, he got it up
in the air just enough that
the wind grabbed it and
deposited the ball in the
bunker. Woods had to blast
out sideways and missed a
15-foot par putt
Woods twice had at least
a share of the 36-hole lead
in majors a year ago and
fell out of contention on
Saturday Despite the late
bogey, he did well enough
this time that he was only


and then get down to the busi-
ness of basketball."
LeGarie had been lobbying
the league for quite some time
to bring the summer league to
Las Vegas for a centralized
event. Several satellite leagues
had been run in the past, in
places like Colorado, Boston
and on the campus of Loyola
Marymount in California. But
the fractured nature of the
meetings made it difficult for
schedules to be coordinated,
and the door opened for
LeGarie in 2004. Boston hosted
the Democratic national con-
vention, leaving a dearth of
hotel rooms for the teams
scheduled to participate in the
summer league.


two shots behind. This is
his best chance to end his
five-year drought in the
majors since the upheaval
in his personal life at the
end of 2009.
And while he has never
won a major when trailing
going into the last day, the
outlook didn't look bleak
from his vantage point.
"I've got 14 of these
things, and I know what it
takes to win it," Woods
said. "He's won tourna-
ments all over the world.
He knows how to win golf
tournaments. He's two
shots ahead and we're
going to go out there and
both compete and play It's
not just us two. There's a
bunch of guys who have a
chance to win this tourna-
ment. And all of us need to
really play well tomorrow
to win it."
Instead of playing with
Westwood in the final
group, Woods will be in the
penultimate group with
Masters champion Adam
Scott, who had a 70. The
Australian not only is
poised to be the first
player with a multiple-
major season in seven
years, he can atone for his


LeGarie got Boston, Washing-
ton, Cleveland, Phoenix, Denver
and Orlando for the first Vegas
summer league, and it quickly
grew to a 16-team field. At the
behest of Adam Silver, who will
take over for David Stern as
NBA commissioner in February,
the NBA got directly involved in
2007, paying LeGarie, Albert
Hall and VSL Properties to put
on the event while helping with
promotion and organization.
The summer league games are
broadcast on NBA TV and ESPN
has a SportsCenter set on scene
at the Thomas and Mack Center
The games feature high-profile
rookies, but most of the scouts
and executives watching from the
stands are more interested in


meltdown a year ago at
Royal Lytham & St. Annes.
"I go out there tomorrow
not carrying the weight of
the lead or not having won
a major," Scott said. "So
it's a different feeling."
Mahan made only two
bogeys, and he avoided a
third on the final hole
when he made a 25-foot
putt to save par from the
bunker. He played with
Mickelson in the final
round at Merion and
stayed in the game until
late in the round, closing
with a 75. One month later,


he gets another crack at it.
And there are plenty of
others still in the game -
five major champions
within five shots of the
lead, a list that goes down
to Mickelson at five shots
behind.
Two-time major cham-
pion Angel Cabrera
opened with 12 pars and
had a roller-coaster finish
- double bogey, birdie,
bogey for a 73. He was at
1-over 214, along with for-
mer Masters champion
Zach Johnson (73), Henrik
Stenson (74) and Ryan


evaluating the many players who
come to Vegas with no contract
for the coming season. Everyone
is constantly searching for the
next diamond in the rough, the
unknown talent who is either
coming off an injury or hasn't
been put in the right situation yet
A player like Gary Neal.
The Spurs guard went un-
drafted in 2007 and played in
Spain, Turkey and Italy for three
years before San Antonio invited
him to play for its summer
league team in 2010. He played
well enough to earn a three-year
contract and has established
himself as a key cog for a team
that lost to the Miami Heat in
seven games in the finals this
season.


Moore (72).
But it starts with West-
wood, who can add to the
British celebration of
sport by capturing his first
major. He certainly looked
up to the task over 18 holes
in the third round, and he
didn't seem the least bit
uptight when asked to
think about what was at
stake Sunday
"I'm not in a high-pres-
sure situation because I'm
going to go have dinner,
and I'm so good with a
knife and fork now that I
don't feel any pressure at
all," he said, trying to keep
the mood light.
He sees nothing wrong
with imagining his name
on the base of the claret
jug, ending all those ques-
tions about whether he has
the game and guts to win a
major. But when he steps
to the first tee Sunday, it's
all about finding the short,
yellow grass carved out of
rough that looks like a
Kansas wheat field.
"I should be in the same
frame of mind as I was
today," Westwood said. "I
didn't feel any pressure
today-felt nice and calm
out there and in control of


Two on



top at



LPGA

Associated Press

SYLVANIA, Ohio -
Spain's Beatriz Recari
birdied the two closing par
5s to catch Paula Creamer
atop the leaderboard
through 54 holes Saturday in
the Marathon Classic.
Recari, a two-time winner
on the LPGA Tour, matched
Creamer's 4-under 67. Both
are at 12-under 201.
Creamer, who won in 2008
when the tournament was
known as the Jamie Farr
Toledo Classic, led by as
many as two shots before Re-
cari's late surge at Highland
Meadows.
Rising American teen
Lexi Thompson had a 67
and, along with Jacqui Con-
colino and Japan's Chie
Arimura, was three shots
back. Concolino, whose ca-
reer-best tie for 11th came at
the event last year, had a 69.
Arimura three-putted the
final hole for bogey and a 68.
Top-ranked Inbee Park,
chasing her seventh win of
the season, sagged to a 73.
Thompson,
Summerhays lead
at Sanderson Farms
MADISON, Miss. Nicholas
Thompson and Daniel Summer-
hays are tied for the lead going
into the final round of the Sander-
son Farms Championship.
Summerhays waited out a
rain delay of 1 hour, 17 minutes
before making his final 19-foot
putt for birdie, finishing with a 3
under 69 on Saturday atAnnan-
dale Golf Club. He also led last
week going into the final round
of the John Deere Classic be-
fore finishing fourth.
Thompson bogeyed his first
hole in the third round, but was
nearly flawless after that with a
65 to reach 17 under. Thomp-
son is trying for his first PGA
Tour win and would join sister
Lexi as only the third brother-
sister combo to win on the
LPGA and PGA Tours.


what I was doing."
Miguel Angel Jimenez
didn't lose control. He just
lost the lead.
The 49-year-old Spaniard
found too many bunkers,
missed too many fairways
and dropped far too many
shots. He wound up with a
77, six shots behind.
Woods was never far
from the lead, even during
four two-shot swings in-
volving Westwood.
The first one came on
the par-5 fifth hole. Woods
proved there was a driver
under that tiger head
cover by smashing his tee
shot down the fairway,
though he wound up miss-
ing a 6-foot birdie putt,
while Westwood rolled in a
50-foot eagle putt from just
short of the green.
Westwood hit a high shot
that settled 4 feet from the
cup at the par-3 seventh
while Woods hammered a
9-iron through the green
and made bogey West-
wood led by as many as
three shots, but they were
tied at the turn when West-
wood found a bunker of
the tee and made bogey,
while Woods had a simple
up-and-down for birdie.


Xa '- ~ --- -
S. -

Associated Press
The Phoenix Suns' Marcus Morris drives against the Toronto Raptors' Coby Karl in the fourth quarter of
an NBA Summer League game Saturday in Las Vegas.


/ 1


Associated Press
Tiger Woods plays out of a bunker Saturday onto the 14th
green during the third round of the British Open Golf
Championship at Muirfield, Scotland.


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 B5


SPORTS









Froome essentially locks up Tour de France


Associated Press

ANNECY-SEMNOZ,
France Chris Froome
retained his big race lead
Saturday to all but ensure
he will become Britain's
second consecutive Tour
de France champion.
Only an accident or
other freak mishap on
today's largely ceremonial
final ride to Paris could
stop Froome from winning
the 100th Tour, a year after
Bradley Wiggins won the


99th.
Froome finished third in
a dramatic Stage 20 to the
ski station of Annecy-
Semnoz in the Alps that de-
cided the other podium
placings.
Nairo Quintana from
Colombia won the stage
and moved up to second
overall.
Joaquim Rodriguez
from Spain rode in 17 sec-
onds behind Quintana. He
moved up to third overall.
Froome's lead is more


than five minutes on both.
Alberto Contador, who
had been second at the
start of the day, struggled
on the final climb and
dropped off the podium.
The 78-mile trek was the
last of four successive
stages in the Alps and the
final significant obstacle
Froome needed to over-
come before today's usu-
ally relaxed ride to the
finish on the Champs-Ely-
sees in Paris. That 82-mile
jaunt starts in Versailles.


Froome's dominance at
this Tour was such that
this victory could very
well be the first of sev-
eral. At 28, he is entering
peak years for a bike
racer. He proved at this
Tour that he excels both
in climbs and time trials
- skills essential for
those who want to win cy-
cling's premier race. He
also handled with poise
and aplomb questions
about doping in cycling
and suspicions about the


strength of his own per-
formances. He insisted he
raced clean.
Froome first took the
race lead and the yellow
jersey that goes with it on
Stage 8, when he won the
climb to the Ax-3 Do-
maines ski station in the
Pyrenees. For today's
Stage 21, he will wear the
yellow jersey for the 13th
straight day
Froome told French tele-
vision that when he passed
the sign showing 2 kilome-


ters (about 1 mile) to go on
Saturday's final climb, "for
the first time I realized that
it was almost won."
"It was hard today," he
said. "Rodriguez and
Quintana raced very
strongly"
Today "will be a day for
sprinters on the Champs-
Elysees. For us, it is done."
Saturday's stage did a
big loop south of Annecy,
through the mountains of
Savoie between the lakes
of Annecy and Bourget


Phins sign Jordan


Associated Press
Defensive end Dion Jordan, the Miami Dolphins' first-round draft pick, signed with the
team Saturday. The Dolphins now have all nine draft choices under contract for the
start of training camp workouts today.


Giants'Hill

banned

fourgames

Associated Press

MIAMI S- With his NFL
career yet to start, Miami
Dolphins first-round draft
pick Dion Jordan decided
he didn't want to fall any
farther behind.
Jordan, a defensive end
and linebacker from Ore-
gon, signed a multiyear
contract Saturday and will
take part in the first train-
ing camp practice today
He missed all of the Dol-
phins' offseason workouts
because Oregon is on the
quarter system.
With his signing, the
Dolphins have all nine
draft choices under con-
tract. Players reported


Saturday
Jordan has been in South
Florida for the past two
months working out with
teammates, but conceded
he had ground to make up
because of the practices he
missed. He had right shoul-
der surgery in February
and might be limited at the
start of camp.
The 6-foot-6, 240-pound
Jordan was the third
player taken in the draft
after the Dolphins swung a
trade with Oakland to
move up nine spots. Miami
projects he'll upgrade a
defense that tied for
fourth-worst in the league
in takeaways last year.
Jordan totaled 14 1/2 ca-
reer sacks as a speed
rusher in college and has
drawn comparisons to for-
mer Dolphin Jason Taylor.
Jordan may initially be a
pass-rush specialist with
the Dolphins, but they an-
ticipate he'll eventually


become an every-down
end in their 4-3 scheme op-
posite Cameron Wake, who
has 43 sacks over the past
four seasons.
Giants' Hill loses
four games to
suspension
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- New York Giants safety Will
Hill has been suspended for
four games by the NFL for vio-
lating the league's substance
of abuse policy, his second
drug suspension in two years.
Hill who played for the Uni-
versity of Florida -will miss the
first four games of New York's
season and be eligible to return
in time for the Oct. 6 game
against Philadelphia. He is still
allowed to take part in training
camp and preseason games.
He was suspended last year
for violating the league's per-
formance enhancing drug pol-
icy, testing positive for Adderall.


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
NASCAR suspended the
use of aerial camera sys-
tems Friday, nearly two
months after a Fox Sports
cable snapped and injured
fans and damaged some
cars at Charlotte Motor
Speedway
Ten people were injured
during the Coca-Cola 600
when part of the drive
rope landed in the grand-
stand. Three people were
taken to hospitals, and
were checked out and re-
leased soon after.
Fox successfully used
the CATCAM system at the
Daytona 500 and the


Sprint All-Star race at
Charlotte. ESPN.com said
Friday that the network
had planned to use the
Batcam system next week-
end for the Brickyard 400
at Indianapolis and the
Aug. 11 race at Watkins
Glen, N.Y
Smith reaches out
to Sadler ahead of
Chicagoland
JOILET, Ill. Elliott Sadler
said Regan Smith reached
out to him this week, and the
NASCAR drivers talked about
their confrontation following
last weekend's Nationwide
race in New Hampshire.
Feud over? Well, not exactly.


Sadler said he's still upset
after Smith spun him around
on a restart toward the end of
last Saturday's race in
Loudon. After Sadler went on
to finish 18th, he angrily told
Smith he would not win the
series title this year.
Next up for the champi-
onship contenders is the
STP300 today at Chicagoland
Speedway, where Sadler is
the defending champion.
Smith leads the series stand-
ings by five points over Sam
Hornish Jr.
Sadler said before Satur-
day's practice sessions that
he had cleared the air with
Smith. But he didn't feel any
better after their conversation.


0721 CRN

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, that the Board of
County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, sitting as the governing body of
the 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Service Benefit
Unit for Wastewater Utility Services Harbor Isle, will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Board of County Commissioners'
Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida to consider adoption of the:

NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENT ROLL FOR THE
2010 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT HARBOR ISLE

to impose and provide for collection of a special assessment on improved and
unimproved, privately owned properties located in the centralized 2010 Citrus County/
City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Harbor Isle.

The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem assessment applies is as
follows:


DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE AREAS


Harbor Isle: Properties located in the Fort Island Trail corridor and part of the
unincorporated area of Citrus County bordering and/or in close proximity of the
Crystal River and King's Bay to the City of Crystal River's wastewater facilities.

The total cost of the improvements is approximately $313,043.46. The total
assessment revenue to be generated within the entire service area, including the
financing costs and the collection costs (if there are no prepayments) over the entire
ten year period is approximately $80,688.06. Property owners can chose to pay a
lump sum special assessment fee of $3,621.64 per assessment unit, or pay the
special assessment fee along with financing costs over 10 years on the property tax
bill as a non-ad valorem assessment. The estimated annual wastewater assessment
is $424.67 per assessment unit. All affected property owners have a right to appear
at this public hearing and to file written objections with the Board of County
Commissioners within twenty (20) days of the date of this notice. Written objections
or comments should be mailed to the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners at
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. A more specific description of
the assessment program is set forth in the proposed Final Assessment Resolution
which can be viewed following publication of the July 9, 2013 BOCC agenda. The
preliminary Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Roll is scheduled to be available for
inspection on July 9, 2013 at the Assessment Coordinator's office in the Lecanto
Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite #205, Lecanto, Florida,
following adoption of the Preliminary Assessment Resolution.

The assessments will be collected on the ad valorem tax bill, as authorized by
Section 197.3632, Florida Statute. FAILURE TO PAY THE ASSESSMENTS WILL
CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE ISSUED AGAINST YOUR PROPERTY
WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS OF TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY. The Board
intends to collect the assessment in installments, the first of which will be included on
the ad valorem tax bill to be mailed in November 2013 by the County Tax Collector.

The public hearing is being held for the purpose of receiving public comment on the
proposed assessment and collection of the assessment on the ad valorem tax roll.
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written
objections with the County Administrator any time prior to the public hearings, or
twenty days from this notice, whichever is longer.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580.

BY: JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


* *o*n


* Local News
* Sports
* Community Content
* Feature Stories
* Stock Ticker


* Expanded coverage of arrests
* Expanded package of State and National News
* Pet of the Week
* Reader Polls
* Community Calendar


The Chronicle site is continually updated throughout the day and includes a full electronic version of the day's newspaper.


NASCAR suspends use


of aerial camera systems


B I T U COUN


Swwvh iChrOni(lehCrlir


B6 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Don't mess with this cat's food


ou never know how tough
someone is until you mess
with their food.
Don't try to take chocolate away
from my wife.
Granddaughter Izzy loves her
Dunkin' Donuts in the morning.
Don't mess with the glazed donut
with sprinkles.
And don't even think about mess-
ing with Streak's Purina Cat Chow.
Streak is our 16-year-old Ragdoll
cat who once tipped the scales at 20
pounds. He is named after James
Lee Burke's Dave Robicheaux, the


detective in the best modern-day de-
tective series since John D. Mac-
Donald gave us Travis McGee.
Robicheaux's nickname was
Streak because, just like our cat, he
has a streak of hair that was a dif-
ferent color
Back to Streak the cat and his Pu-
rina chow mix. At 16, Streak is no
longer at his fighting weight. He just
sits around most days snoozing. He
occasionally wakes up and goes to
bother the neighbors.
See Page C3


Chronicle
This bobcat came into a Crystal River neighborhood and attempted to
eat Streak's Purina Cat Chow. He won't make the mistake again.


I AM A
GEAR IN A
BROKEN
MACHINE.
THE MACHINE DOESN'T
KNOW IT'S BROKEN.
WE CAN KICK THE
MACHINE OR WE CAN
FIX THE MACHINE.
THE MACHINE IS THE
GOVERNMENT.
I WORK FOR IT.


BY DR. ANTHONY
J. SCHEMBRI






MEAUR


The people we select to fix the machine make it worse. Is it broken on the federal, state and
local levels? Years ago there was a whisper in this country that somehow we had lost our greatness
- that has now become a shout. The scandal du jour exposes the Internal Revenue Service, the
state department, the FBI, the CIA, the Congress and, of course, government on the local level.


Religious, sports and business
scandals deepen our cynicism. Gov-
ernors, congressmen, senators, judges,
sports figures and religious leaders
are in jail. Our interests lie in the
low road of celebrity. Some of us
ponder a question under our breath


works? What can we believe in?" widow anymore. The way to have a
More and more people expect less balanced budget is like protecting
and less from government. More and your virtue learn to say no. Hap-
more, the gap between the promise piness is not the responsibility of
and the practice becomes clearer, government. Government only guar-
More and more, the gap between antees the pursuit of happiness.
what we say and what we do gets


or at the top of our lungs: "What wider. Government is not a rich


See .Page C4


Editor's note: i'I: :.,:,li
was also submitted to the
U.S. Conference of Mayors.


The chart above, developed by Anthony Schembri,
is a recipe for organizational development one he
sees making organizations better at what they do.


4- ;Nt ', /, d f : A, : t'. l11 t ir It i' I;f ji .i: lt : I : t if
and a Sir Leon Radzinowicz Professor of criminology,
criminal law and police science at the University of Florida.


Crafting a budget we can all live with


JOE MEEK
Special to the Chronicle
As the chairman of
the Board of County
Commissioners, I'd
like to take this opportunity
to discuss the county budget
I know there are a lot of
people in the community


concerned about financial
challenges we, as a com-
munity, face. I'd like to
specifically address what
we have done during the
past few years as a local
government, and how we
are moving forward.
First, let me be very
clear: The Board of County


Commissioners has sub-
stantially reduced its
spending and lowered its
cost during the past four-
plus years. Since 2008, our
overall budget has been re-
duced by more than $40
million. We have reduced
the size of personnel by
nearly 25 percent, com-


pletely reorganized our
structure, reduced our
capital improvement proj-
ects, cut discretionary
spending and changed the
way we operate. The result
is the largest reduction of
budgets and cutting of
costs in the history of Cit-
rus County. When you hear


comments that county gov-
ernment has not reduced
its spending or cut its costs,
that is simply incorrect.
Citrus County now has
one of the lowest per-
capita total local govern-
ment costs in the state of
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


V


a ~


I.- W.
Joe Meek
GUEST
COLUMN


P PULI
P PLIC


I





"7
Page C2 -SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 t



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ro work hard, to live hard, to die hard, and then
o go to hell after all would be too damned hard."
Carl Sandburg, "The People, Yes," 1936


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................... ......... publisher
Mike Arnold ............... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
M Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin .........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TOO MANY IRONS





Fund fire,





but don't





hold our




feet to it
1111


Some folks in Citrus
County are fired up over
the proposed new method
of funding fire services.
On July 2, letters were sent
to residents describing the
purpose of the fire services
Municipal Services Benefit
Unit (MSBU) and giving the
level of the proposed assess-
ment on their property.
This mailing led
to hundreds of THE I
calls and many
complaints, but Citizens
some residents propose
sent in the pay-
ment even though OUR 01
the notice was not
a bill. The county Create M
is returning these keep fin
checks, which will at curre
not be due until
tax notices are sent out later
this year.
The Citrus County Commis-
sion will hear public com-
ment and vote on the
proposal this Tuesday
Currently, fire protection is
funded by a fire tax based on
the value of a property. Faced
with a significant loss of tax
revenue from Duke Energy,
the commission voted to
move forward with the MSBU
as a way of stabilizing fire
protection funding in the
same way the landfill tax has
stabilized landfill funding.
Under the current funding
formula, there are many resi-
dential properties that pay
little or no fire tax. The
MSBU will assess a fee on
every property for the initial
fire protection response.
Since this fee is based on the
cost of providing the service
divided by the number of
properties, every residential
property would be taxed at
the same rate. Businesses
will be taxed based on their
square footage.


S

d

P

e
en


The proposed rate is $60
per residence. The final rate
will be set on Tuesday
The fire tax based on value
will continue, though at a
slightly lower level, so more
valuable properties will con-
tinue to pay more for fire pro-
tection than properties with
less value.
Still, the MSBU fee will
represent a sig-
SUE:. nificant increase
in total taxes paid
react to by owners of
I fire tax. lower value
homes.
'INION: In addition to
the new MSBU
SBU, but fees, the commis-
funding sion plans to
it levels, raise overall mill-
age to offset the
loss of revenue from Duke.
Given the facts, the decision
to increase overall fire fund-
ing as proposed in the 2013-14
budget seems questionable.
County officials point out
that fire protection has been
inadequately funded for
years, and as a result, the
county cannot avoid spending
more money to enhance pro-
fessional fire coverage and
upgrades to facilities.
While there is merit to this
argument, the other side of
this equation is that the eco-
nomic downturn has put fi-
nancial pressure on many
homeowners and businesses,
and any increase in taxes is
an additional burden.
For this reason, while we
support formation of the
MSBU as a way to stabilize
long-term fire funding, we be-
lieve it would be better to
maintain funding at current
levels rather than increase it
during what undoubtedly is
one of the most difficult
budget years for the county in
decades.


Not buying numbers
Just read the "Taxpayers react
to fire fee" article. Says that the
sheriff's office received 500 calls
concerning the fee. The assis-
tant chief said only 20 callers
disagreed with it. I just can't be-
lieve that out of 500 calls, only
20 disagreed with the tax. Also,
it's not to maintain existing; it's
for new fire stations and new
equipment. You know, $60 is
just the camel's nose under the
tent. That's all I have to say.
Credibility an issue
This issue with the fire tax, I
still kind of halfway support the
idea of it for the necessity. But
in the same token, I'm like a lot
of my friends are that I've talked
to; nobody trusts the commis-
sion or Thorpe, that that money
would be used for what it's being
addressed at the current time.


Fee is too high
I'm calling about the fire tax
that we are being inflicted upon.
I think $60 to $100 is way far too
much. I'd say $25 to $50, but
you're talking about raising taxes
again all because of Duke Energy.
I would like to know, in my letter
it stated that if we don't pay this
fire tax, we may be getting a let-
ter from the tax office to put a
lien against our house. Was Duke
Energy asked the same option?
Lay them all off
I want to make a comment on
this $60 they want to put on the
taxpayers of Citrus County be-
cause Duke Energy don't pay
their taxes. Well, I don't want to
pay Duke Energy's taxes either.
And if they can't afford, the fire
department, a $5 million shortfall,
then it's called layoffs. Lay the
firemen off. Lay the police off.


We must not be enemies


As the Senate headed for
a showdown this week
over a Democratic threat
to erode the filibuster rule, a
senior Republican was musing
about the party leaders he'd
known over his long career
It should never have come to
this, he said sadly.
Previous leaders -
like Republican
Howard Baker and
Democrat Robert .
Byrd would have ,
found a compromise
long before the en-
tire Senate came
within hours of
blowing itself up. Coki
Their counterparts Steven
today Democrat Steven
Harry Reid and Re- OTI
publican Mitch Mc- VOI
Connell barely
speak to each other, except to
hurl insults.
Fortunately, the crisis was
averted because Republican
John McCain and Democrat
Chuck Schumer who also
helped craft the bipartisan im-
migration bill again acted
like grown-ups and saved the day,
brokering a deal that forced
both sides to bend a bit. Repub-
licans released most of the
president's nominees they'd been
stalling; Democrats pulled back
on their challenge to the rules.
During critical negotiations,
the official leaders were largely
sidelined. As the Washington Post
reported, "left to their own, Reid
and McConnell could not have
reached this pact," and their
"treacherous relationship ...
leaves the Senate in a dangerous
position going forward on criti-
cal legislative negotiations."
This whole incident rein-
forces the point made by our
Republican source. The Senate
suffers today from a profound
failure of leadership in both
parties. McConnell said re-
cently that if Reid changed the
rules he'd "be remembered as
the worst leader of the Senate
ever." Reid surely thinks the
same damning description
would apply to McConnell.


ie

H
I(


The poisonous connection
between the two leaders lacks
both affection and trust, and
with good reason. Both accuse
the other of going back on his
word and both have legitimate
grounds for complaint.
Under McConnell, Republi-
cans have badly
abused the fili-
buster, blocking nu-
merous nominations
and requiring 60
votes on even minor
issues. Sen. Tom
Udall of New Mex-
ico is right when he
argues, "Let's not let
and the tyranny of the
Roberts minority continue."
But it was Reid
IER who provoked the
CES latest standoff, advo-
cating changes in a
rule he had ardently defended
during the Bush administration
when Republicans complained
that Democrats were unfairly
blocking the president's judi-
cial choices. His insistence on
pushing the Senate to the brink
of disaster was irresponsible
and unnecessary
The two leaders, however,
are also shaped and shackled
by the lawmakers they try to
lead, and the composition of the
Senate is changing rapidly For
the worse.
Eight years ago, a bipartisan
"Gang of 14" forged a compro-
mise that defused the con-
frontation over Bush's judges.
Only five of those 14 remain in
the Senate today. Some senior
lawmakers have died in office
(Democrats Robert Byrd and
Dan Inouye) or retired volun-
tarily (Republican John
Warner). Alaska Republican
Lisa Murkowski, herself the
daughter of a senator, told the
Post that the chamber sorely
misses those "senators who car-
ried with them the sense of the
history and the traditions of the
Senate."
Moderates in both parties
have found life on Capitol Hill
increasingly uncomfortable and
unproductive. Republican


Olympia Snowe of Maine quit
with a blast of frustration:
"What I like to call the sensible
center has now virtually disap-
peared in Washington." Demo-
crat-turned-Independent Joe
Lieberman also retired, es-
tranged from his party after los-
ing a primary to a left-wing
challenger who derided him for
working with Republicans like
McCain.
Dealmakers need partners,
and the center of the Senate
has hollowed out. Still, leader-
ship can make a difference. As
that senior Republican told us,
McConnell and Reid have for-
gotten the lessons preached by
Howard Baker, who served as
Republican leader in the late
'70s and early '80s.
In 1998, at a convocation cel-
ebrating his career, Baker re-
called that during his tenure he
often found himself "engaged
in fire-breathing passionate de-
bate with my fellow Senators"
about incendiary issues from
Watergate to the Panama Canal.
"But no sooner had the final
word been spoken and the last
vote taken," he said, "than I
would usually walk to the desk
of my most recent antagonist,
extend a hand of friendship,
and solicit his support for the
next issue for the following
day"
"People may think we're
crazy when we do that," Baker
conceded. "Or perhaps they
think our debates are fraudu-
lent to begin with. ... But we
aren't crazy and we aren't
frauds." These rituals are "as
natural as breathing here in the
Senate" and validate Lincoln's
adage: "We are not enemies
but friends. We must not be
enemies."
Like many politicians in
Washington today, Reid and Mc-
Connell are enemies, not
friends. They should listen to
Baker And Lincoln.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email
at stevecokie@gmail.com.


LETTER to the Editor


Enforce code
compliance standards
This letter is addressing
property standards. After the
county and state spent several
millions of dollars on a side-
walks along State Road 44
from Inverness to Crystal
River and all the talk about
how beautiful Citrus County
is, why is it that you can drive
along that road and others in
Citrus County and see peanut
vendors, fruit stands, cars and
boats for sale in the right of
way? Not counting the
amount of uncut grass in front
of homes and business.
If we are going to tell peo-
ple we invite to Citrus County
how beautiful it is, wouldn't it
seem we would want to clean
up all the trash, abandoned
cars and even waste bins and
old tires stacked by S.R. 44? I
would challenge the county to
start enforcing some of the or-
dinances to clean up the
county and do away with some
of these eyesores. We do have
a code enforcement court
once a month to handle the
people who don't clean up
their trash. Property that is


even in foreclosure by a bank
should have the grass cut, if a
real estate company has a for-
sale sign on it, then make the
owner either cut the grass or
cut it for them and bill them.
We have five people work-
ing in property standards. We
shouldn't see the same trash,
uncut grass and eyesores
every day if someone is being
written up for their code vio-
lation. They should either get
cleaned up or be receiving a
fine for not doing so and
forced to clean it up, up to
and including putting liens
and for cleaning it up for
them. Homeowners and land-
lords have a responsibility to
keep their properties clean. I
shouldn't have to complain to
get the job done.
Plus, don't tell me they don't
see it anyone who drives in
the county sees it. Wouldn't it
seem to you that we need to
enforce these laws and ordi-
nance to make those causing
the problems clean up their
acts?
Ray Speerly
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: FIRE FEE


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in politi-
cal cartoons, columns or let-
ters do not necessarily
represent the opinion of the
editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opin-
ions in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address
the editorial board, which
meets weekly, should call
Charlie Brennan at 352-563-
5660.
* All letters must be signed
and include a phone number
and hometown, including let-
ters sent via email. Names
and hometowns will be
printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fair-
ness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The
Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or
e-mail to letters@chronicle
online.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Daddy, get the tape! You can Ex it!'

ne of the most mar- But not the girls and espe- Mommy finds one that uses Not to worry; I could So far th t


0Uvelous things about
being a father is
that when your children
are small, in their eyes you
are invincible and can do
anything.
I have never been me-
chanically adept. "Mr. Fix
It" I am not, nor have I
ever been.
Son Fred, who is indeed
very talented in such ways,
saw through me right
away, and by the time he
was 9, he was fixing things
for me instead of asking
me to fix things for him.


cially not middle child
Becky She thought that if I
had a roll of tape, all of her
problems could be solved.
A balloon popped?
"Get the tape, Daddy!
You can fix it!"
A doll's arm fell off?
"Daddy, get the tape. You
can fix it!"
An old-fashioned phono-
graph record, one of her
mother's favorites, could
not survive Becky using it
as a makeshift Frisbee?
"Quick, Daddy, get the
tape! You can fix it before


out!"
I couldn't fix
all of those
things, but F
once Becky
gave the job to
me, it wasn't
her problem
anymore.
A few days Fred B
ago, I put my- A Sl
self to the mod- OF I
em world's
master test of
what I can really fix with a
roll of tape.
My computer printer is


I

L
I


small ink car-
tridges which
snap into a
moving gizmo
and then spew
ink into the
right places
when you hit
the correct
rannen keys. Even I am
LICE smart enough
LIFE to change these
cartridges, but
unfortunately, on
the day in question, a part of
the tab that holds the car-
tridge in place snapped off.


hear Becky's voice encour-
aging me.
"Get the tape Daddy You
can fix it."
I got the same light-
weight tape I used to use to
fix all of Becky's problems
and mended my printer. I
printed one page and it
worked just fine, but when
I tried to print another
one, the printer started
clacking and the resulting
print was gibberish. Did I
let that defeat me? No,
never. I found some heavy-
duty tape and did it again.


making strange noises and
the ink is going on the page
in a proper fashion.
As life goes on, your kids
grow up and even Becky
has found out that there are
some things in life I cannot
fix with a roll of tape.
But, who knows? Maybe
I could if I were to use a
more substantial type of
tape!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Time for some
budget cutting
Wake up, Citrus
County citizens, and
unite. The county com-
missioners are out of
control. They are about
to increase our taxes 30
percent this on top of
$60 per household for
full-time fire services.
They need to stop all
road construction, med-
ical corridors and that
Port Citrus, need to re-
duce Dawsy's empire by
at least 30 percent, in-
stead of threatening to
close senior citizen cen-
ters, pools and parks.
That's the old scare tac-
tics they use to support
their needs. We as citi-
zens must stand up to
these actions. Where did
all the millions of dollars
of windfall surpluses
from earlier this decade
go? If that had been put
into savings- some $40
million to $50 million a
year -we would not be
having this discussion.


eliIl'T"


563-0579

Make use of the
system you have
Sugarmill Woods
is comprised of three
villages. Each village
is responsible for
enforcing its own deed
restrictions. The
gentleman who
complained about a
board not enforcing its
rules should find out
which village he lives in
and attend the next
monthly board meeting
to voice his specific
concerns. Next he
should volunteer to help
enforce the rules.


MEEK
Continued from Page C1

Florida. We are a very affordable com-
munity to live in, and your local govern-
ment has become very efficient with your
tax dollars.
In spite of the substantial reduction in
spending, we still find ourselves approx-
imately $17 million short as we build the
2014 county budget. This is a result of two
primary factors: the continued reduction
of property value brought on by the con-
tinued real estate recession; and the re-
duced tax payment by Duke Energy. Duke
Energy made a partial payment of its tax
bill that was $16 million less than what
the Citrus County Property Appraiser val-
ued its property at. Duke Energy's inten-
tion is to make relatively the same
payment for the 2014 budget year. The
case is currently in the court system,
where a judge will ultimately determine
the correct value and tax responsibility
In the interim, our county must plan
accordingly
With the current shortfall, the obvious
answer would be to cut $17 million from
our budget, but it's not that simple. The
county has multiple state mandates and
nondiscretionary expenses (i.e. jail, Med-
icaid, medical examiner, etc.) that, by law,
we must fund. Out of a $231 million
budget, the true discretionary control the
BOCC has is closer to $23 million. You can
see that when we talk about reducing $17
million from $23 million, we are talking
about changing the face of government
and, I believe, negatively impacting the
quality of life in our community That's
not scare tactics, it's just the facts.
Please understand, no one wants to
raise taxes. Since I have been elected I
have fought hard to reduce government
spending, as have all the board members.
I understand the hardships many in our
community face and I work hard every
day to improve our county. The fact is, we
must make a decision as a community as
to what level of service our government
should provide.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

But for the most part, he is
spending his senior years
sleeping. In these parts, that's
not too unusual.
He is fed on the front porch
of our home because he no
longer possesses the direc-
tional fortitude to actually hit
the litter box. He gets close,
but in cases such as this, close
is not good enough. I've heard
rumors that senior cats are not
the only species that suffer
from this directional chal-
lenge.
For the record, we live in
downtown Crystal River about
a block off of Citrus Avenue,
the main drag in town. This
part of town is no longer con-
sidered the country
That's why it was highly un-
usual last week when Streak
had a visitor at dinner time.


I'm calling about the
Port Citrus project. Where
is the EPA right now? Why
haven't they stepped in
and stopped this?
How much spent
on lawyers?
I was wondering if they
ever come up with a total
on the legal bill for the
hospital and the trustees
on the county hospital.
Don't trash
roadsides
OK, people, stop and
look along the roadside
and intersections out in
the country. Look at all
the trash and litter
that's been deposited.
And don't say it's our
snowbirds, because the
snowbirds have been
gone for a good three
months or better. So
come on, people. Let's
keep Florida beautiful
for people to use and
enjoy as much as we do
and not trash it.


Read the
driver's manual
This whole issue
about flashing lights,
what lights mean cau-
tion, the concern about
the flashing lights on
(State Road) 44 and
Meadowcrest. I guess
the basic question is,
when you people went
and got your driver's li-
cense, didn't you get a
manual on driving laws
and rules and didn't it
explain anything about
red lights, flashing
lights, yellow lights and
green lights? I guess I
question how you got
your driver's license if
you don't even know
anything about flashing
yellow lights.

Pets are
like children
I'm sick and tired of
these people making
comments about dogs.
They are pets like our
children. If they don't
like it, then they need to
stay home.


The choice before us is
clear: fund the budget
to produce the necessary
revenue, or eliminate
substantial departments
of local government
and the services they
provide. I will work every
day to find additional
savings, but I will also
do what I think is right
to ensure the success
of our county.
We must ensure our community remains
an affordable place to live and at the same
time fund services that maintain and im-
prove the quality of life for our citizens.
There is no easy answer, or secret pot of
money, from which to draw. If the county
had not reduced its budgets by more than
$40 million during the past few years, and
made drastic spending reductions, I don't
believe we could or should have the dis-
cussion of raising revenues. But we have,
and while there may still be room to re-
duce certain costs, the reality of the situ-
ation is bigger than that We must address
a structural deficit that mathematically
cannot be solved by cutting personnel
costs or just by stopping certain projects.
After six months of detailed budget analy-
sis, presentations and much commission
discussion, the county administrator will
present a budget to the commission this
week. In addition, an independent budget
expert has gone through a detailed analysis
to analyze our financial situation and as-
sist in the formation of the budget It has
been a detailed and thorough process, and
the commission and county staff have
worked very hard to ensure we look at all
the possibilities in front of us.


With a fresh bowl of Purina Cat
Chow sitting on the porch, Streak
was trying to work the energy
up to open his eyes and eat
To the surprise of everyone,
a bobcat walked up the front
steps of our house, stuck his
nose in Streak's food and
began to eat.
The juvenile bobcat was
easily twice the size of Streak
and had a full set of claws,
something Streak involuntar-
ily donated to the vet at least
15 years prior.
My wife Janet had 4-month-
old grandbaby Bradley in her
arms, so she wisely moved to
safer ground.
As the bobcat began to chow
down on the Purina, both of
Streak's eyes popped open. He
walked over to his food bowl
and stared at the bobcat going
to town on his dinner.
As I have previously men-
tioned, you don't mess with the
favorite food of someone in the
Mulligan family


We're being
sold out
I'm amazed the
Chronicle's editorial
board finally endorsed
the BOCC's considera-
tion of spending cuts
instead of tax in-
creases. Although it was
stated very gently, I'm
sure the gang of four on
the county commission
were surprised. It was
no stinging rebuke for
their setting our county
up for this mess. In-
deed, it was not even an
admonishment. It did
not compare to the
harsh words you have
continued to rain down
upon Scott Adams, the
only commissioner who
appears to care about
the welfare of our citi-
zens. You were in a
strategic position to in-
form our citizens and
avoid this mess. How
about a referendum?
How about you recom-
mending a referendum?
Let the citizens make a
decision before we con-
tinue to be sold out.


The proposed 2014 overall budget
is a reduction (excluding disputed tax
reserves) of $4 million from the previous
year. The BOCC portion of the budget
proposes a reduction from 2013 of an
additional $900,000. However, because
of the continued real-estate valuation
reduction and Duke Energy shortfall,
a millage rate increase and MSBU fire
fee will be necessary to fund the budget
and operations of the county Unfortu-
nately, this means individuals will pay
more than last year.
While it's not popular to talk about, the
millage rate increase is necessary to en-
sure the operation of our county, and I
support it and ask the residents of the
county to do so as well. I do not want us to
be a community in decline, closing serv-
ices, boarding up libraries and turning
our backs on each other. Since 2008, the
average BOCC portion of the tax bill has
dropped by $248.25. The proposed mill-
age rate increase along with the new fire
MSBU would be an increase of $157.54 for
the average homeowner from last year I
think it's very important to realize that
even with the increase in millage rates
and the fire MSBU, this is a reduction of
$90.71 from what the average homeowner
was paying in 2008.
The choice before us is clear: fund the
budget to produce the necessary revenue,
or eliminate substantial departments of
local government and the services they
provide. I will work every day to find ad-
ditional savings, but I will also do what I
think is right to ensure the success of our
county
In spite of the large issues we face, I am
confident the future of our community is
bright. The long-term goals of this pro-
posed budget are to break our depend-
ence on Duke Energy, diversify our tax
base, finally fix a structural budget deficit
and, as a county, become better because
of it. I ask that you join me, as part of a
community, in ensuring the future of Cit-
rus County is bright.


Joe Meek is Chairman of the Citrus
County Board of County Commissioners.


Streak got close to the bob-
cat, leaned over, and swatted
him in the head with his claw-
less paw.
The bobcat hit the deck.
The astonished bobcat got to
his feet and looked down at
the elderly cat less than half
his size.
That's about the time Streak
decided to really go on the of-
fensive.
Streak lunged at the bobcat
and knocked him down again.
This time Streak jumped on
top of the bobcat and used his
best wrestling moves to pin the
bobcat to the deck.
There were some cat words
exchanged at that moment, but
we can only imagine what they
were. ("Get your bobcat butt
off my porch and leave my Pu-
rina alone!" or something
close).
The bobcat retreated in
disbelief and ran into the
road. He sat down and looked
up at Streak, probably contem-


plating a second run at the
Purina.
Streak let out a little growl
and Mr. Bobcat took off behind
a neighbor's house.
We live in a pretty high-den-
sity area of Crystal River and
there are no woods around. I
called all the proper authori-
ties from the sheriff's depart-
ment to animal control to
Florida Fish and Wildlife, and
everyone suggested that a wild
bobcat in a city was not their
responsibility
Fortunately, Streak didn't
have to wait for any govern-
ment official to deal with a
hungry bobcat.
You mess with his food and
he's going to slap you upside
the head.
Let that be a warning.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


OUND lIM EPA should stop
iS UU Port Citrus


LETTERS

to the Editor


Thanks for kindness
I and my family would like to
express our thanks to so many
who have prayed, sent cards,
called and attended our memorial
service for my beloved husband,
John D. Dyer.
John passed away on April 23,
2013, after a long fight with
dementia.
We married at 19 years old and
were married 64 years. Your
prayers and cards have been a
comfort and a blessing. Your cards
have been filled with words of love
and comfort, also.
Thanks to the Citrus County
Chronicle for getting the obituary
in so quick!
Thanks to Brown Fineral
Home in Lecanto for their help
and kindness.
Velda J. Dyer
Lakeland

Don't bless sin, repent it
Re: 'Jesus espoused forgiveness,
tolerance, "James Mack, Letters to
the Editor, Page A12, July 9.
No man created the laws in the
Bible. The law was given to Moses
by God. The quotes from Paul come
from God, not him. St. Paul says,
"The words that I have written to
you are the commands of the
Lord." Corinthians Ch. 14-37. There
are no hateful quotes in the Bible,
only truth.
One of the reasons I quit drink-
ing is because St. Paul says in
Corinthians Ch. 6, that drunkards
shall not enter into the kingdom of
God. Part of being a Christian is to
live according to God's will not
your own.
Mr. Mack believes in a God that
blesses sin. I believe in a God that
demands that you repent of it.
Luke Ch. 13 verse 5.
Brad Block
Homosassa

Encourage our
leaders to excel
Re: 'Jesus espoused forgiveness,
tolerance, "James Mack, Letters to
the Editor, Page A12, July 9, and
"The Greatest Nation," John
McFadden, guest column, July 9.
Dear John and James: Sounds
like your names were taken right
from the Bible, and that's good.
While I am a Democrat/Indepen-
dent, having worked for the great-
est U.S. Senator in our country, (the
building is named after him) Sen.
Richard Russell, he was not per-
fect. He was not always in sync
with Sen. Ted Kennedy and his
best friend was President Lyndon
Johnson. However, he always did
his best and he loved this country
above everything.
Let me say to you gentlemen, you
both have written excellent pieces,
and what you have proclaimed was
interesting and thought-provoking.
I have not agreed with it all, but most
of it I would like to point out to
John that we are still the greatest
nation in the world. Let's encourage
the U.S. Congress, the White House,
and the Supreme Court to make
certain we remain the greatest
Ruth J. Anderson
Homosassa

Cut, cut, cut
In reference to the article on the
July 10 front page of the Chronicle,
"Board facing tough Budget choices:"
Hey, ya think? We are all facing
tough budget choices: rising taxes,
gasoline, insurance rates, medical
rates, home repairs, car repairs,
MSTUs MSBUs, millage rate in-
creases, special fees, etc. The list
goes on and on.
Please get on with it, and stop
looking to the citizens to continue
to fund the budget at the current
level. Cut back. Cut back! That's
what we all have to do, and com-
missioners, didn't your parents
ever teach you that money doesn't
grow on trees?
Wayne Sessa
Beverly Hills


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 C3


COMMENTARY


K




C4 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


MACHINE
Continued from Page C1

We have a conflict of emo-
tions. We love our country and
don't like the machine of gov-
ernment. If I had an Uncle Sam
who shipped my job to China,
lied to me, took bribes and mis-
managed my money, I would not
like him either.
It seems one of the problems
lies in a partnership between
political careers and special in-
terests. When caught, their de-
fense is "We are not corrupt, we
are incompetent." We not only
have a budget deficit we have a
trust deficit Who can we trust?"
Puts me in mind of a suspect
in a murder case we had in
Brooklyn. His defense was, "I'm
not guilty because I was killing
someone else at the time."
In one short period, corrup-
tion infected 28 senators and
representatives in New York
alone. It seems both parties are
infected. Republicans in the
legislature get up and say: "I
have a bad idea." Democrats re-
spond by saying: "I can make it
worse."
They are patriots to their
party but traitors to good gov-
ernment.
It seems that both parties
share the same motto about
each other: "Let's stop them
from doing anything." It makes
me feel like putting a sign on
the Congress that says: "Closed
for Repairs."
It is my purpose in this writ-
ing to get you to put a mirror in
front of us and flex the analyti-
cal muscle. It's also my purpose
to get you to look at the same
thing and think something dif-
ferent What's our answer? Crit-
icism! Criticism from the
media, the politicians and those
who want to score points on, or
because of, our problems.


Problems they're not prob-
lems, they're challenges. If we
view problems as challenges,
they become opportunities in
disguise. It gets us to put a mir-
ror in front of us and look at
what we are doing without
intemperate speech and wild
accusations that move us fur-
ther away from resolution.
Especially if we measure out-
comes. What does that mean?
One of my government heroes is
an architect who built several
buildings on a college campus
and did not put in the side-
walks. Months went by without
the sidewalks amid complaints.
Finally he looked at where the
people walked, and that's where
he put the sidewalks. He meas-
ured the outcomes, it was user-
friendly and they chose their own
path between the buildings.
What do we want? We want
change. But you don't change
your mind; you change your di-
rection, the direction you're
going in. Is that what we need?
After almost 50 years in gov-
ernment and having been ap-
pointed by three governors and
two mayors of New York with
the battle scars to prove it, I can
say without the fear of contra-
diction that the strongest force
in government is inertia.
My enemies were not on the
streets, they're in the govern-
ment buildings.
I wasn't fighting crime or fix-
ing government, I was fighting
politicians, I was fighting legis-
lators, I was fighting budget an-
alysts, I was fighting unions. I
was a gear in a bad machine.
Governmental structures im-
pede the innovative use of data.
Hierarchical structures in gov-
ernment, or what I call the wed-
ding-cake table of organization,
often elevate control at the ex-
pense of innovation. In addition,
different departments have his-
torically collected their own data
with their own data standards.


COMMENTARY


We need to become better

talent hunters. Government has

the best talent. I tell the story

that when I was in the Army

they assigned a convicted

arsonist to my platoon. I made

him the flamethrower.

I used his talent instead of

following him around to see

if he was lighting matches.


However, the biggest insights
occur when public officials work
across agencies with open data
and participation from commu-
nity organizations. Instead, we
keep ourselves to ourselves.
The last thing this govern-
ment needs is more criticism.
You take the pride out of em-
ployees. Raise the level of pub-
lic debate, convene the best and
the brightest-- supply its needs;
itneeds cooperation, itneeds help.
Raise the level of public debate.
We need to become better tal-
ent hunters. Government has the
best talent I tell the storythatwhen
I was in the Army they assigned
a convicted arsonistto my platoon.
I made him the flamethrower. I
used his talent instead of fol-
lowing him around to see if he
was lighting matches.
Lower expectations. On the
local level we are not electing
our brain trust. We are electing
barbers, upholsterers, drugstore
cowboys and carpenters. Nec-
essary people, and good at their
work. Don't expect too much and
you will not get disappointed.
We cannot kick that can down


the road so the people who follow
us have to deal with it. Eventu-
ally the can will hit a brick wall.
That wall has been hit. Unpop-
ular decisions must be made.
They need the political courage
and will to say "no more" to
supporters, "no more" to cam-
paign contributors and "no more"
to special interests. It all stops
now! I would like to coin a new
word, "solutionism." I have added
it to my dictionary Evidence-
based policy should be adopted
as a path toward solutionism -
the fixing of our problems. The
holding of our political ap-
pointees accountable. Faux re-
form efforts should be exposed.
Government is at a crossroads
to meet rising expectations with
shrinking resources. The choices
are to cut services or increase
tax burdens or pursue a more
value-driven/-oriented agenda
that will put them on the path to
higher performance. Unachiev-
able promises by elected politi-
cians disappoint us and contribute
to the negative view of govern-
ment. Until government stops
promising a world where all ne-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

cessities are provided, where
all anxieties are tranquilized
and where all boredom is
amused, government should be
closed for repairs. The demand
of the people is not for bigger
government or smaller govern-
ment it's for better govern-
ment. So budget for success or
don't budget for a function gov-
ernment will do badly. That's
where the puck needs to be.
Look at NASA: FRlly funded,
it went to the moon. It got there.
Budget so we can get there. My
skills lie in organizational de-
velopment, making an organi-
zation better at what it does.
Having been appointed by three
governors and two mayors and
authoring on a book on leader-
ship, I have enjoyed some suc-
cess. There is no weapon as
powerful as that of an idea whose
time has come. There are about
23 million government employ-
ees. They determine public pol-
icy more than Congress. This
must stop. Policy should be de-
termined by research that's suc-
cessful. Why throw hard-to-get
budget money at something that
research says does not work? This
makes government successful.
The chart accompanying this
column is a process that will
make the organization better at
what it does.
It is a recipe for organizational
development, one that makes
an organization better at what it
does. This chart is a mindset I
have worked hard to formulate,
in the hope that if we follow it.
It will take us to where the
puck will be.
It will change our direction
because we have measured results.
It will not make government
bigger or smaller
It will reduce costs and taxes.
It will put tax money where
the puck will be.
It will make government better
If not I wish stupidity
caused pain.


Fashions from

Ibelk


Saturday, July 27, 2013
11:00 A.M.
Tickets: $25.00 Donation
(Non-refundable)

Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
509 E. Hartford St.
Hernando, FL

Entertainment Featuring:
Sophie Robitaille


Wednesday August 21


St. Benedict's Catholic Church
455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River

A Lunch
at noon

$ 12 per person
Playing begins
at 12:30 p.m.

Door Prizes
"Share The Wealth"

All proceeds to benefit *
the Pregnancy &
Family Life Center V
x I Int


For more information
call us at 344-3030


Rails to Trails of the Withlacoochee

2013 Cycling Jersey by Pnma


Unisex Sport Cut
3/4 length zipper
Short sleeve only


$52


Silicone Waist Gripper
3 Rear Pockets
100% Polyesler


Check size availability on our website.
Delivery will be at our Annual Ride on Oct. 6, 2013.
Shipping Is available

For more details and ordering visit our website at:
railstotrailsonline.com
If you have any questions contact Jules Fevrier at
bentspokes2@gmail.com Phone (352) 637-1946


CHMi L


OOOFDTA


Paul Perregaux
,t Cordially invites you to a
^^wa^N /gathering Benefitting the local
"' Citrus County Scouting Program
4 7 Honoring Gerry Mulligan

Please come and celebrate our
Friends of Scouting successes and help us
complete our 2013 Campaign.

Thursday, July 25, 2013
Garden Room at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club
505 E. Hartford Street
Hernando, FL
6:00pm 7:30pm


Heavy Hors d'oeuvres and
drinks will be served


i Please RSVP by July 19th to Paul Perregaux
at 352-598-9724 or 352-746-7899
G-o


GfWC Crystal River Woman's Club
Presents
"Fashions Under the Sun"
A Fashion Show & Luncheon


* /




C


for information or tickets, please call Madeline Markowitz
at 352-794-0477 or Margie Harper at 32-795-6790.


Sponsored by CHtpNicLE


OOOEMVH


11 \1


Silent Auction
Door Prizes











BUSINESS


Inside:
When life gives you lemons, make
lemonade. When it gives you years,
make the most of your senior
discounts/D4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Photos by Associated Press
Prospective students tour Georgetown University's campus in Washington. The Senate could vote as early as Thursday on a
bipartisan compromise that heads off a costly increase for returning students.



Senators to restore lower loan rates


Loan rates to be pegged to markets

WASHINGTON -A bipartisan deal in the Senate
has emerged that would lower interest rates on student
loans in the next few years but could spell higher costs after
that
Interest rates on new subsidized Stafford student loans
jumped from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on July 1. Lawmak-
ers from both parties objected and set in motion an overhaul
of the whole system that links interest rates to the financial
markets.
Here is a look at the direct-lending system students could
face this fall under the Senate compromise:
m All undergraduates would borrow at a rate of 3.85 per-
cent this fall. As the economy improves, rates would climb
but could not top 8.25 percent. Students previously bor-
rowed at 3.4 percent or 6.8 percent based on their financial
need.
Most graduate students would have access to loans at
5.4 percent, but rates could not climb above 9.5 percent.
Qualifying graduate students previously borrowed at
6.8 percent.
Loans that parents sign to help their children would
come at a 6.4 percent interest rate. The rate would be
capped at 10.5 percent. Some graduate students could
choose these loans as well.
Student borrowing limits are based on how much they
and their parents could be expected to contribute to college
costs, in addition to the costs of attending the school.
m Other popular financial aid options such as work-study
programs, Pell grants and Perkins loans are not part of the
deal and would continue as before.
Students' previous borrowing does not change under the
deal. Those already repaying loans would not be affected.
Only new loans taken out this fall would be covered under
the deal.


PHILLIP ELLIOT
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
A bipartisan compromise on student loans
promises better deals for students and par-
ents over the next few years but could spell
higher rates as the economy improves.
The Senate deal pegs the interest rates on new
loans to the financial markets and was expected to
come to a vote next week, well before students re-
turning to campus this fall have to sign their loan
agreements.
Under the deal, undergraduates this fall could
borrow at a 3.9 percent interest rate. Graduate stu-
dents would have access to loans at 5.4 percent,
and parents would be able to borrow at 6.4 per-
cent. Those rates would climb as the economy im-
proves and it becomes more expensive for the
government to borrow money
The compromise undoes the doubling of rates on
some student loans that took hold on July 1, and
one analysis of the Senate deal suggests incoming
freshmen would save more than $3,300 in interest.
"We have gone through weeks of negotiations
and we have an agreement," said Sen. Dick
Durbin, D-Ill.
At the White House, spokesman Jay Carney said
President Barack Obama was "glad to see that a
compromise seems to be coming together"
And Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said stu-
dents benefited: "For every one of them, the inter-
est rates on their loans will be lower"
At least for now. The compromise could be a
good deal for students through the 2015 academic
year, but then interest rates are expected to climb
above where they were when students left campus
in the spring.
Even in announcing the compromise, it was
clear the negotiations were dicey
"While this is not the agreement any of us would
have written, and many of us would like to have
seen something quite different, I believe that we
have come a very long way on reaching common
ground," Durbin told reporters.
Moments later, Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin of
Iowa, chairman of the Senate Health, Education,
Labor and Pensions Committee, said he would re-
visit the whole agreement this fall, when his panel
takes up a rewrite of the Higher Education Act.
"Can we change it? Sure, we can change it,"
Harkin said. "It's not the Ten Commandments, for
God's sake."
Harkin did little to hide his unhappiness with
the compromise but said there were few options to
avoid a costly hike on students returning to cam-
pus this fall.


Associated Press


See Page D4


Far-flung frontiers luring investors


Associated Press
NEW YORK-- Bul-
garia, the United Arab
Emirates and Pakistan.
An itinerary for a trav-
eler with a flair for lan-
guages or a list of scenes
for a spy thriller set dur-
ing the Cold War?
Neither It turns out
they're among the coun-
tries with the best-per-
forming stock markets in
the world this year And
the success of these so-
called frontier markets,
mainly in Asia and
Africa, has attracted U.S.
investors eager to find
the next set of rapidly
growing countries now
that Brazil and other
emerging markets have


fallen into a slump.
"These places might
scare some people," says
Russ Koesterich, global
chief investment strate-
gist at the money-man-
agement giant
BlackRock. "But they're
seeing some of the
fastest growth in the
world."
People had a similar
response when investors
were dabbling in emerg-
ing markets during the
1990s, Koesterich says.
"Brazil and India -
those used to be scary
places, too."
Unlike the U.S. and
Europe or even emerg-
ing markets like China
and Brazil, frontier-mar-
ket countries are a grab-


bag group with little con-
nection to each other
But they have a few
things in common.
They're small, growing
quickly and some, like
Kuwait and Qatar, are
rich. Many of them
shunned the outside
world for years and are
slowly opening their
doors to outside invest-
ments.
Thanks to rapid eco-
nomic growth, the MSCI
Frontier Market index
has gained 22 percent
over the past 12 months.
That compares with a 3
percent rise for MSCI's
emerging market index,
and 25 percent for the


Page D5


THE WEEKAHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON National
Association of Realtors releases
existing home sales for June,
10 a.m.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases new home
sales for June, 10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor
Department releases weekly
jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie
Mac, the mortgage company,
releases weekly mortgage rates,
10 a.m.; Commerce Department
releases durable goods for June,
8:30 a.m.
MADRID Spain's statistics
institute releases unemployment
figures for the second quarter


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil little changed
near $108; pump
price at $3.67
NEW YORK The price of oil
finished with a fourth straight weekly
gain after rising a penny on Friday
After a big spike in oil prices
since late June, a weekend road
trip will cost many Americans
more than it has in four months.
Benchmark crude for August
delivery rose 1 cent to close at
$108.05 a barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. Oil gained
$2.10 a barrel this week.
Signs of an improving U.S.
economy have helped push the
price of oil to the highest level in
16 months. On Friday, oil rose to
$109.32, the highest price since
March 1, 2012, before pulling back.
Oil has jumped 15 percent since
June 21, when it traded at $93.69,
and has pulled up the price of
gasoline along with it. Gasoline fu-
tures have gained 13 percent in the
same period.

Tech earnings weigh
on global markets
LONDON Disappointing earn-
ings from two U.S. technology gi-
ants weighed on global markets
Friday after a stellar run that has
seen Wall Street's main indexes
post a series of all-time highs.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index
of British shares closed Friday
barely changed on the day, off
0.04 percent at 6,630, while Ger-
many's DAX fell 0.07 percent to
8,331. The CAC-40 in France was
down 0.06 percent at 3,925.
Japan's Nikkei 225 shed 1.5 per-
cent to 14,589.91 while Hong Kong's
Hang Seng added just 0.1 percent
to 21,362.42. Seoul's Kospi wavered
between gains and losses, finishing
0.2 percent down at 1,871.41.
China's Shanghai Composite index
fell 1.5 percent to 1,992.65.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


Apply


yourself


when you're


applying

DEAR BRUCE: After looking
for a job, I finally found an
opening that suited me per-
fectly The pay is much less and I
would have to relocate, but that's
OK with me.
I sent my r6sum6 with a cover
letter as requested and have been
waiting patiently I called the
Human Resources department to
ask if the job is still available and
the lady said it was. I asked her if
there are many applicants. She
said that there are and the search
committee has to evaluate all the
r6sum6s before they can ask for in-
terviews. She would not or could
not say when or if I'd be called for
an interview.
Should I send a new letter ex-
plaining my situation and work
ethics? How much or how often
should a job-seeker keep inquiring
about a job without becoming a pest?
I am 55 years old and have 30
years of experience. You mentioned
once that age discrimination really
does exist in the workplace. Do you
think that might prevent me from
getting work? I am getting desperate
and nervous. Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Addressing
your last comment, about age dis-
crimination and could it prevent
you from getting work? Possibly
The fact that you are desperate
and nervous does not sit well. You
don't want to convey that.
The more serious question you
asked is should you send a new let-
ter explaining your situation and
See Page D4







SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
,,f Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801





Member Spotlight: Virgilio Insurance Services


* WHAT: Arnold Virgilio
Insurance Services.
* WHERE: 906 S.
Sweet Pine Point,
Inverness FL 34452.
* HOURS: 8 a.m. to
6 p.m. Monday to
Friday. Weekend
appointments and
service available
upon request.
* CONTACT:
352-726-0040 or
virgilioinsurance.com.


T hirty-six years ago Vir-
gilio Insurance Serv-
ices opened its doors with
the mission of providing
services that would assist
families in acquiring af-
fordable insurance that
meets the needs of each
family member.
At Virgilio Insurances
Services you will find a
wide array of insurance
products and options: life,
health, disability, long-
term care, Medicare sup-


plements, Medicare Ad-
vantage plans, Part D Pre-
scription plans, fixed
annuities and SPIAs (sin-
gle premium immediate
annuities).


To provide the most
comprehensive insurance
plans at the lowest rates
available, Virgilio Insur-
ance Services is affiliated
with more than 75 top-


rated insurance companies.
Virgilio Insurances Serv-
ices offers you an impecca-
ble customer service
experience and their high
level of expertise in the in-


surance arena will ensure
that you have the best
product to fit your needs.
Give them a call and let
them do the shopping for
you!


Manateee

Soccer Blast set

for September
M ark the date: Sept. 14 and 15 will
be the the Manatee Soccer Blast
Tournament.
The Kiwanis of Homosassa Springs
are pleased to host the only adult soc-
cer tournament in the Nature Coast.
We invite adult teams throughout
Florida and Georgia to participate in a
5-on-5, round-robin tournament with
four divisions: men open, men over
40, women and coed. Participation is
limited to 50 teams. The tournament
will be held at the Homosassa Area
Recreational Park (HARP) in Ho-
mosassa Springs, Florida. Registra-
tion is $210 per team.
For more information and to regis-
ter, visit manateesoccerblast.com or
call DRC Sports at 352-637-2475.
The Kiwanis Club of Homosassa
Springs is proud of its history of sup-
port for the children and youth of the
Homosassa area and its efforts made
on behalf of the intellectually chal-
lenged citizens of Citrus County, both
children and adults. It is through our
fund raising efforts that projects like
"Reading is Fundamental" in the ele-
mentary schools, scholarships for
graduating seniors, and Field Day, a
special track and field event for the
developmentally disabled, come
about. These service projects and
many more are to be funded through
the "Manatee Soccer Blast."
The Kiwanis of Homosassa Springs
greatly appreciate their sponsors: the
Citrus County Chronicle, WYKE TV,
Beef '0' Brady's of Crystal River, and
Boulerice Roofing. Additional spon-
sorships with benefits that increase
awareness of your business are
available. For additional information
on sponsorships, visit manateesoccer
blast.com or call 352-628-5281.



Upcoming
Chamber
events
Aug. 8 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Suncoast Business Masters
Aug. 9 Chamber
Luncheon, 11 a.m. at Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club, Healthcare Heroes
awards ceremony
Aug. 22 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Life Care Center/Comfort
Keepers
Aug. 28 Chamber and
School Board Luncheon,
11:30 a.m., presenting the
commissioner of educa-
tion, at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club
Sept. 7 Chamber Busi-
ness Expo, 9 a.m. to 3
pm. at the Citrus County
Auditorium.
Sept. 12 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Leland Management
Sept. 26 Business
After Hours, 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. at Emeritus at
Barrington Place
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com.


EDC wants to list your


commercial properties


f you have a commercial
building for sale or lease, or
vacant commercial land for
sale, the EDC wants to know
about it.
"As the economy begins to re-
cover, the EDC is receiving more
leads on businesses that may be
interested in relocating to Citrus
County. Since some of these in-


quiries have a quick response time,
it would be helpful for the EDC
to have a current list of available
properties that we could refer to."
Additionally, businesses that
are members of the EDC also
have the opportunity to list their
commercial properties on the
EDC website. There is no addi-
tional charge to do so beyond the


regular membership fee.
For more information on EDC
membership, contact Heather
Gibson at heather@citrusedc.com.
To submit propertyto be included
in the inquiry list (property de-
scription must indicate current
zoning classification), contact
Ardath Prendergast at 352-795-
2000 or ardath@citrusedc.com.


YOUCAUGHT MYEYE...
Susan Lehman
TD Bank
Peggy Mahony
The Hagar Group

... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


r -----------------------------------

Give a shout out to employees
who focus on customer service
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is proud to promote its "You Caught My
Eye" program. The program allows residents and visitors to recognize employees who
go beyond in their attention to Customer Service. In addition to the employee's name ap-
pearing in the newspaper, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce sends a letter to the
employee's manager noting the recognition.
YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ... for OUTSTANDING customer service!
PERSON you are nominating
BUSINESS they work for
ADDRESS of business
CITY DATE of contact
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?

YOUR NAME



Welcome to the Citrus County Chamber of

Commerce Business Expo!


CITRUS CO-UNn

September 7th
2013
County
Fairgrounds
Auditorium


9am-3pm
Free to the
Public.
Bring the
Family!


Not your normal Business Expo..!

In addition to a great chance to spend some time with our local businesses learning about
the products and services they provide, we are offering a variety of other fun things to do to
make It a great time for the whole family. While you're talking to the business leaders in
our community, your kids can spend time In the play area, or making something in the
Home-Depot Project area. Maybe add a new four-footed member to the family at the Pet
Adoption area sponsored by the Citrus County Animal Services. If you're hungry or thirsty
we'll have fresh-grilled food cooking, courtesy of Leon McClellan of M&B Dairyl Oh yeah, a
lucky visitor to our Expo Is going to get a shot at bringing home some cash by stepping into
our fabulous money machine. Save the Date-We'll see you at the Expol


Presented by the Chamber of Commerce and Bailey Electrical Contracting!
Platinum Sponsors Robert Boisseneault Oncology Institute and
The Plantation at Crystal River
For more Information contact Jeff at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce (Jefflcitruscountychamber.com) or 352-79S-3149


News you

can use
A few spots
left at Sept. 7
Business Expo
You won't want to miss out
on this opportunity to show-
case your business by ex-
hibiting at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
Business Expo on Saturday,
Sept. 7. This event will be held
at the Citrus County Audito-
rium from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Visit us at www.citruscounty
chamber.com/expo for de-
tailed information on ex-
hibiting and/or sponsorship
opportunities for the Busi-
ness Expo. Call Jeff Inglehart
at 352-795-3149.
Healthcare
Heroes award
winners
announced
The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, in part-
nership with the Citrus
County Chronicle, will pres-
ent the Healthcare Heroes
Awards at the Aug. 9 Cham-
ber luncheon. The luncheon
will be at the Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club. Network-
ing will begin at 11:30 a.m.,
with the program beginning
at noon. This luncheon is open
to the public. Please visit
citruscountychamber.com
under News and Events to
make your reservations or
call 352-795-3149. Reserva-
tions are $18 in advance and
$20 at the door.
Attention
teens and kids
of Citrus County
Is your summer packed
with anything besides Face-
book, TV, and boredom?
Shake it up, get out of the
house, and get a jump on
summer with the Y!
From field trips to the
Rays game to stomping
down the runway and every-
thing between, the Y has you
covered.
Youth Camp, for ages 5 to
11, and Camp E.P.I.C. -
Encouraging People to Im-
pact the Community for
ages 12 to 14, will have con-
venient locations in Crystal
River, Inverness, and
Lecanto. The Y offers before
and after care for no addi-
tional charge and includes
breakfast and lunch.
For more information on
camp registration call the Y
at 352-637-0132, visit our of-
fice in Beverly Hills, or check
us out on Facebook or at
ymcasuncoast.org.
LovetoVolunteer?
If you are always looking
for ways to volunteer your
search just got easier!
Log on to citrusunited
way.org and click on the
VOLUNTEER button. Enter
your information and choose
your areas of interest. United
Way of Citrus County will
share your interests with
nonprofit agencies in the
county so that they may con-
tact YOU when they have a
volunteer opportunity in your
area of interest. Your email
will not be released. All com-
munications will filter through
the United Way registry.
So go ahead, let us know
how YOU want to volunteer
in your community.





Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's Conneition


D3

SUNDAY
JULY 21, 2013


Aurora Awards announce Best of the State winners


ORLANDO The Southeast
Building Conference (SEBC)
crowned its champions of design
excellence this Saturday night
as the winners of the Aurora
Awards were honored at a din-
ner at the Rosen Centre Hotel.
In all, 135 awards were pre-
sented to leading builders, ar-
chitects, remodelers and de-
velopers from a 12-state South-
ern region of the United States,
according to Aurora Awards
Chairman John Fought of Baker
Street Design in Clearwater.
Major sponsors for the event are
Two Trails Inc., Duke Power,
Sentricon, Florida Power and
Light and Gulf Power Company
The team of BCBE Construc-
tion, LLC, and Collins and


Dupont Interior Design won the
Best of State Award for Florida
for the spectacular renovation
of a private residence in
Naples, Fla.
Other Best of State winners
were:
Tennessee: Scott H. Wilson
Architects LLC and Phipps
Construction for a whole-house
remodel in Franklin.
Illinois: W Design for inte-
rior merchandising of the High
Style Study in Chicago.
North Carolina: Kay Green
Design, Schumacher Homes,
and Dominick Tringali Archi-
tects for interior merchandis-
ing of the Blue Ridge Model in
Asheville.
Maryland: Charlan Brock


2013
SEBCr7





and Associates, Ronald W
Johnson Associates Inc., Dix-
Lathrop & Associates, Johnson
Development Associates and
DDM Designs for the Green
construction Mid-Rise Apart-
ment The Haven at Odenton.


South Carolina; Koenig
Construction Inc., Sunnyside
Designs Inc., Lynn Morgan De-
sign, and Wayne Windham Ar-
chitect, PA for High Cotton
custom home in Cassique, SC.
Georgia: Collective Con-
struction & Design, CSJM Archi-
tects, and Marriot International
Design and Construction for the
Residence Inn in Alpharetta.
Louisiana: DreamCatcher
Hotels, TBG, and HnedakBobo
Group for the Seven Clans Hotel
at Coushatta Resort in Kinder
Indiana: Looney Ricks Kiss,
Kite Realty Group, Buckingham
Companies and The Troyer
Company for the Foundry Lofts
& Apartments at Eddy Street
Commons in South Bend.


ON THE NET
www.theauroras.com

Texas: Looney Ricks Kiss,
Bosse and Turner Associates,
Keaton Interiors and Post Prop-
erties for the Post Sierra devel-
opment at Frisco Bridges in
Frisco.
The Golden Aurora winner
(Best in Show) was awarded to
BCBE Construction, LLC, for the
spectacular renovation of a pri-
vate residence in Aqua at Peli-
can Isle, Naples, Fla. Additional
team members included Collins
and Dupont Interior Design.
Visit our site for the complete
list of winners will be available
at www.theauroras.com.


CCBA

membership

furthers your

industry

"Every man owes a part of his
time and money to business or
industry in which he is engaged.
No man has the moral right to
withhold support from an organi-
zation that is striving to improve
conditions within his sphere.
- Theodore Roosevelt
Are you a member of the
CCBA? When asked this ques-
tion, often the answer is "Why
should I be?" when in fact, the
better question is ... Why should-
n't you be? Membership with
your local Home Builders Associ-
ation is support of your industry
through and through. Standing
alone, a small business is "a
voice in the dark," but by joining
other members of the team, what
can be accomplished is nothing
short of amazing.
When you join your local asso-
ciation, you automatically be-
come a full member at the state
and national levels. That's three
memberships for the price of
one. Your National (NAHB),
State (FHBA) and Local (CCBA)
Home Builders Associations
offer plenty of resources to help
each member make the most of
their investment and connect
with the benefits they value most.
For more than 60 years, NAHB
has been the nation's leading
source for housing industry infor-
mation. HBA members use a vari-
ety of ways to stay connected to
industry information, including
publications, e-newsletters, exclu-
sive website content, bulletins,
special reports, email alerts, fi-
nancial data and many other
means. Up-to-date information,
when you wanitit, how you want it!
Membership in your local
Home Builders Association is
more than just networking or
having a special seal on your
business door or stationery, it's
about building relationships. You
may not feel that you need more
business, but every contact a
businessperson makes is a poten-
tial asset to them and their busi-
ness. That doesn't just mean
more business; it means better
information flow, more exposure
to more innovative and/or more
cost effective materials and serv-
ices, as well as more opportuni-
ties to put your advertising
dollars to their most effective use
through local HBA sponsorships
and publications.
Put quite simply, it means that
your business is better because
you made an investment in your
industry!
So what are you waiting for? If
you already know that you've
waited too long to support your
industry, then go to www.citrus-
builders.com, and click on the
"how to join" link for a printable
membership application.
If you're still not convinced
that you need to make this invest-
ment, then call the CCBA at 352-
746-9028.
The Citrus County Builders As-
sociation:
Shouldn't
you be a
member?


Renewing members of CCBA


Renewing Members, from left, are: Membership Committee Co-Chair Wayne Bardsley of
Quality Crafted Builders, Rich Gelfand of Sherwin Williams-Crystal River (26 years), Bill
Larder of Larder & Sons Construction (7 years), Ken Lindquist of Ken Lindquist Corp. (3
years), Eric Swart of Citrus Pest Management (12 years), Jim Loos, Affiliate of Schlabach
Security (7 years). Renewing members not pictured were: Bluewater Drafting Inc. (5
years), Citrus County School District (15 years), Citrus County Schools Affiliate WTI (5
years), Citrus Hills Construction (15 years), Citrus Pest Management (12 years), Crystal
Automotive (25 years), Deem Cabinets (35 years), Edward J. Serra CPA PLLC (6 years),
Event Solutions by Linda (2 years), Eveready Fire & Security (21 years), Gale Insulation of
Hernando (19 years), Gardner's Concrete (16 years), Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln (1 year),
Papa Bear Construction Inc. (10 years), SanderSon Bay Fine Homes LLC (11 years), Senica
Air Conditioning Inc. (16 years), and Tampa Bay Times (12 years).


New Spike


member honored

John Jobe of City Electric Supply received
his new Spike award at the CCBAs June Gen-
eral Membership Luncheon on Thursday,
June 27. CCBA Members become "Spikes"
when they sponsor six new members within a
two-year period. For more information on
membership at the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, visit www.CitrusBuilders.com, call
the office at 352-746-9028 or contact any of the
CCBA Spike Members listed below:
0 Anjela Wright, Gold Crest Homes
0 Bill Larder, Larder & Sons Construction
0 Chuck Blanchard, Bruce Component
Systems
0 Chuck Sanders, SanderSon Bay Fine
Homes
0 Cynthia McRee, Duke Energy
0 Dan Kern, Gulf Coast Ready Mix
0 Dave Hutchins, Bay Area Air Conditioning
0 Dennis Jenkins, Pro-Line Tile
0 Eric Swart, Citrus Pest Management
0 Gaston Hall, Hall Brothers of Citrus
County Inc.
0 Gerry Gaudette, Gaudette Electric
0 Hazel Carlson, Quality Crafted Builders
0 Jarey Schlabach, Schlabach Security &
Sound
0 Jim Loos, Schlabach Security & Sound
0 John Jobe, City Electric Supply
0 John Osborne, Pinecrest Building
Corporation
0 John Porter, Porter's Locksmithing
0 Kathleen Gilbert, Gold Crest Homes
0 Ken Lindquist, Ken Lindquist Corporation
0 Larry Tate, Sweetwater Homes of CC Inc.


I


John Jobe of City Electric Supply

Linda VanAllen, VanAllen-Clifford
Insurance
Lori Clark, Clark Construction Inc.
Michael Gilbert, Gold Crest Homes
Michael Moberley, Tropical Window Inc.
Mike Deem, Deem Kitchen & Bath
Paul LaFond, Paul LaFond Fine Homes
Randy Clark, Clark Construction Inc.
Rich Gelfand, Sherwin Williams CR
Richard Dolbow, Citrus County Schools
Roger Carlson, Quality Crafted Builders
Ron Lieberman, Steel Structures of Florida
Todd Workman, Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric
Virginia Will, Will Construction Corp.
Wayne Bardsley, Quality Crafted Builders


Member SPOTLIGHT


Richard Clay
of Richard Clay Architect, LLC
"Central Florida Architect"
352-795-4155
Number of Years in Business: 30 years,
23 years in Citrus County.
Community Organizations: Citrus County
Chamber, Citrus County Builders Association
(2 years) and Citrus County Historical Advisory
Board (HRAB). Former president of Citrus
20/20.
What you love about your work: "I enjoy
the solving problems. Any problems and pos-
sess the ability to quickly analyze obstacles
and 'roadblocks' and to offer solutions using off
the shelf items is a different way that can save
time and money compared to standard ac-
cepted methods. I can now say that nothing is


A


impossible. I completely enjoy what I do."
What you love about this county: "Citrus
County is a sleeping giant of a county. This
County has a lot to offer, plus the fact that we
are conveniently not near any large cities."


IMPORTANT
UPCOMING
CCBA EVENTS
" The August General Mem-
bership Luncheon is
scheduled from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22.
Agenda highlights will be the
guest speaker: Florida Home
Builders Association Immedi-
ate Past President Dave
Carter, and the annual CCBA
elections. If you have ever
been interested in joining the
CCBA, this is a great meet-
ing to attend and is catered
by Sonny's BBQ. Cost is $15
per person. Reservations
required.
* The 2013 Florida Public
Utilities Community Show-
case, presented by the Cit-
rus County Builders
Association, will be Saturday,
Nov. 16, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River. Formerly known as
the Home & Outdoor Show,
the new Community Show-
case will focus on all com-
munity businesses and
organizations. Sponsorships
and vendor space are open
now, with prices ranging
from $100 to $200 per space
for exhibit space. Please
contact the Citrus County
Builders Association for
more information. Don't miss
this opportunity to participate
in this true showcase of our
community and all that it
offers.
Save the Dates!
* The 2014 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing
has been scheduled for
Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014,
at the Inverness Golf &
Country Club, with a por-
tion of the proceeds to
benefit the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
Sponsorships are avail-
able now. Call Executive
Officer Donna Bidlack at
352-746-9028 with any
questions.
* The 2014 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment has been scheduled
for April 26 and 27, 2014,
at the Homosassa River-
side Resort, with a por-
tion of the proceeds to
benefit the Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Mili-
tary Order of the Purple
Heart. Sponsorships are
open now, and official reg-
istration is expected to
open in October of this
year. For more informa-
tion, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028.







WELCOME

new member:

Colony Stone
& Plastering
Inc.

352-746-5951
www. ColonyStone.com





D4 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


BUSINESS


Part 3: File on time, every time


he filing deadline for an
annual nonprofit infor-
mational return to the
IRS is officially the 15th day of
the fifth month after the end of
the nonprofit's fiscal year. As an
example, if the fiscal year ends
on Dec. 31, the report is due on
or before May 15 of the next
year. Should the report not ar-
rive on time, the IRS can re-
voke the organization's
tax-exempt status. There is one
consolation relative to this ap-
parently harsh treatment: the
IRS may not cancel this benefit
until three years of non-report-
ing has occurred. Best profes-
sional advice: File on time.
Officers, directors and the par-
ticipating members are all ad-
vised to file on time all the time.
The official
revocation notice
The official notice of revoca-
tion of tax-exempt status can be
a painful event. Even though
there may be understandable
reasons why reports went un-
filed, the IRS is not required to


Dr. Fred
Herzog


NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


offer relief. Instead, the exempt
nonprofit must start all over
again and reapply at the federal
level. This is when the reappli-
cation process will be subjected
to closer scrutiny from the IRS.
The big question is why any
group would, after being granted
a federal tax exemption, allow
this tax privilege to be revoked
due to non-compliance. Cur-
rently, IRS professionals are
stretched thin by a backlog of
day-to-day responsibilities.
Consequently, the approval
process for a nonprofit income-
tax exemption can take one full
year, and possibly longer.


Who suffers
from revocation?
The impact of a revocation
includes more than the re-
quired reapplication process.
The strain on the organization's
credibility may have a negative
public relations effect in the
community in which the organi-
zation resides and serves. Addi-
tionally, those who may benefit
from the need-fulfillment serv-
ices the nonprofit provides may
lose support. If reinstatement is
approved, a revised startup
date will be assigned. This situ-
ation could result in a bevy of
board, administrative, funding
and membership issues more
reason to report and comply
within prescribed guidelines.
A negative public
relations impact
The Kiplinger (News) Letter,
published in our nation's capi-
tal, recently commented on an
apparent rules breach in opera-
tional and fund management
usage. In question were non-


profits in the 501(c)(4) category
that received huge sums of
money from various unknown
donors. The report further read
that money donated to these or-
ganizations, for which IRS al-
lows a tax deduction to any
donor to remain anonymous,
went to support political adver-
tising campaign efforts.
IRS donations in this cate-
gory are to be used only for "so-
cial welfare" programs. It has
been reported the nonprofits at
issue did not follow IRS regula-
tions established in this category
Other national publications
have reported the same con-
cern. Donations of more than $2
billion is clearly a material mat-
ter, and should be used within
appropriate guidelines.
The Nonprofit Resource Center
was founded by Dr. Frederick J.
Herzog, Ph. D., to help partici-
pants navigate the complicated
waters of the nonprofit busi-
ness. "Empowering Non Profits
for Success. "Dr Herzog can be
reached at 847-899-9000 or at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


How to ferret out senior discounts


Associated Press worst
And y
NEW YORK-- There's your
a big silver lining to get- the pe
ting older: a bevy of dis- regist
counts for you to enjoy, much
from free samples to dis- are.
counts on car rentals. "Tc
For many of these in- more
centives, you don't have their
to be anywhere near 65. disco
In fact, some can be en- Jatlo3
joyed starting at 50. Of strate
course, to get the freebies firm
or the 20 percent off, also e
you'll have to admit your to thi:
age and then most at eve
likely flash your ID, but it to ele
can be well worth it JO]
"Every penny counts," OTH]
said Jodi Furman, author you're
of a blog called Livefabu- to be
less.com, who said she's whici
seeing more discounts like d
that start at age 50 than bies t
just a few years ago. "All throu
you have to do is mention It cos
your age." ber fo
Here are some strate- than 1
gies and tips: mem]
DON'T BE SHY: Many years
stores or restaurants ganiz
don't broadcast their dis- Amer
counts. Even on their zatiol
websites, the offers can too.
be hard to find. So just RE
ask the manager what's Disco
available. What's the so yoi



LOANS
Continued from Page Dl

A Harkin ally, Sen. Jack Reed
of Rhode Island, said he would
vote against the bill.
"We might see one or two or
three years of rates that are rel-
atively below that number, but
inevitably, mathematically
those rates will go beyond 6.8
percent," Reed said on the Sen-
ate floor after the deal was an-
nounced.
As part of the compromise,
Democrats won a protection for
students that capped rates at a
maximum 8.25 percent for un-
dergraduates. Graduate stu-
dents would not pay rates
higher than 9.5 percent, and
parents' rates would top out at
10.5 percent.
Using Congressional Budget
Office estimates, rates would
not reach those limits in the
next 10 years.
And one analysis from a for-
mer director of that office pre-
dicted students starting college
this fall would face $3,325 less
in interest payments when they
graduate. Doug Holtz-Eakin,
who leads the conservative
American Action Forum, used
the average subsidized and un-
subsidized loans students were
estimated to borrow during
each the next four years of
college.
Lawmakers engaged in near-
constant work to undo a rate
hike that took hold for subsi-
dized Stafford loans on July 1.
Rates for new subsidized
Stafford loans doubled from
3.4 percent to 6.8 percent
On Wednesday, the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau es-
timated outstanding student debt
at $1.2 trillion up 20 percent
in just two years. Student loans
are now the largest form of con-
sumer debt behind mortgages.
The Congressional Budget Of-
fice estimates 21 million loans
would be issued in 2013. Stu-
dents often take a combination
of subsidized and unsubsidized
loans to pay for their education.
The rapid growth in debt is
raising alarm among experts,


t that can happen?
you may even get
ego stroked when
erson at the cash
;er thinks you're
1 younger than you

)day people are
comfortable with
age -and asking for
unts," said Alison
w Levy, a retail
egist at consulting
Kurt Salmon. She
encourages shoppers
nk broadly and look
ery area, from spas
ctronics.
[NAARPAND
ER GROUPS: Once
e 50, you can sign up
a member of AARP,
h provides benefits
discounts and free-
o its members
gh affiliate partners.
ts $16 to be a mem-
br the year, but less
that if you want a
bership for several
. There are other or-
ations like the
rican Seniors Organi-
n that offer benefits,

SEARCH ONLINE:
ounts keep changing,
u need to keep surf-


Associated Press
Frankie Morris, left, fills a costumer's order Oct. 19,
2006, at the Dunkin' Donuts store in Franklin, Tenn.
Dunkin' Donuts offers seniors who purchase a large or
extra-large beverage a free doughnut, but you have to
show your AARP card.


ing the Web to make sure
they're current. The
AARPorg website has a
tab dedicated to dis-
counts. It includes a gro-
cery coupon center
powered by Coupons.com
and has links to such re-
tailers like arts and crafts
chain Michael's, which of-
fers a 20 percent savings
every Tuesday for AARP
members. It also has a
section on free samples of
top brands in food and
beauty.
Levy encourages con-


sumers to check out dif
ferent websites that focus
on discounts for the 50
and over set Among the
largest: seniordiscounts.
com, which features more
than 250,000 local listings.
Other sites include free
4seniors.com, allsenior
deals.com and sciddycom,
which lets you search dis-
counts by your area code.
Furman advises the 50-
age group to try a free
app called Larkycom,
which currently works on
Apple and Android prod-


ucts. The app offers auto-
matic reminders of your
membership perks and
discounts when you need
them.
BE PREPARED: Make
sure to bring your ID and
your AARP card when
you go out Business es-
tablishments will likely
want to see proof that you
are the age you say es-
pecially if you look much
younger than you are.
The following are the types
of discounts you can grab:
RETAILERS: A diverse
group of stores offer dis-
counts, though most offer
them on a certain day of
the week.
RESTAURANTS: A
vast array of eateries offer
discounts, but most are
limited to fast-food chains
like IHOP and Dunkin'
Donuts.
TRAVELAND HOTELS:
For many car rental com-
panies, you have to be a
member of AARP to take
advantage of discounts.
Budget Rental Cars discounts
rates of up to 10 percent
Cruise bound? For
AARP members, you can
save 5 percent on select
Norwegian cruises.


A


Associated ress
This file image from the Russian documentary film "Ten Years of the Space Age," provided by the
Russian news photo agency Novosti, shows the launch of Sputnik 1, a Soviet satellite. Beach
ball-sized Sputnik touched off a space race and stoked big fears that American students might not be
up to the challenges of the Cold War. Calls to improve science and technical education led to creation
of a low-interest college loan program in the National Defense Education Act of 1958. The loan dollars


came directly from the government
and there is growing evidence
student debt is weighing down
the economy for instance, by
delaying the ability of young
graduates to buy homes.
The increase follows the jump
in the cost of higher education.
The tuition sticker price at
public four-year colleges is up
27 percent beyond overall infla-
tion over the last five years, ac-
cording to the latest figures
from the College Board. This
past year it rose nearly 5 per-
cent to an annual average of
$8,655 nationwide.
Only about one-third of full-
time students pay that pub-
lished price, and the average
net price what the average
student does pay after grants,
scholarships, loans and federal
tax credits and deductions is
just $2,910 for a year of studies.


But net prices have been rising,
too, and tuition is just part of
the cost of college. Including
room and board, the average
annual sticker price at public
colleges is now $17,860, and stu-
dents pay on average $12,110.
At private four-year colleges,
the annual average full tuition
price is now just under $40,000,
with the average student paying
$23,840.
The bipartisan student loan
compromise closely hews to
what House Republicans
passed earlier this year. Both
Senate Republican Leader
Mitch McConnell and Republi-
can House Speaker John
Boehner suggested the outlines
of the proposal were acceptable
to the GOP rank-and-file mem-
bers who have pushed for a link
between interest rates and the


financial markets.
Even House Democrats who
opposed the GOP-led deal there
appeared ready to go along.
"I'm encouraged that biparti-
san efforts continue in the Sen-
ate to reverse the student loan
interest rate hike," said Rep.
George Miller, the top Democ-
rat on the House Committee on
Education and the Workforce.
Few students had borrowed
for fall classes. Students typi-
cally do not sign loans until just
before they return to campus,
and lawmakers have until the
August recess to restore the lower
rates. The students who had
borrowed for summer programs
since July 1 would have their
rates retroactively reduced.
The deal was estimated to re-
duce the deficit by $715 million
over the next decade.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

work ethics? Absolutely! Ex-
plain that you are very inter-
ested in the position, even
though the pay is lower than
you currently receive, and
that you are willing to relo-
cate for this job. Forget about
the r6sum6s and cover let-
ters. They have a habit of get-
ting lost on someone's desk.
A personal letter, not too
long, is a good idea.
If you don't hear anything
after three or four weeks, I
wouldn't have a problem
with sending another letter.
Let them know you're still
here and would like an op-
portunity to explain why hir-
ing you would be to their
advantage as well as yours.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I inherited
$100,000. We are both 54
years old, working full time
and in good health. Our chil-
dren are college graduates
and on their own. Our house
is paid for, and we have no
other debts. What sound fi-
nancial advice would you
give us for investing some of
this money? L.M., via
email
DEAR L.M.: Your question
is one that is often asked. If
this is money you want to in-
vest and grow, you will have
to take a certain degree of
risk. That means the stock
market. I am not suggesting
you should go out and buy
wildly speculative stocks at
your age. You haven't indi-
cated any other monies, so
I assume they are not
substantial.
I would talk to a good bro-
ker about investing with
solid American companies
that are paying decent divi-
dends and are performing
well in the market. You no-
tice that I said "American
companies," which doesn't
mean you can't invest in the
foreign market, but with
$100,000, I would keep it
here.
DEAR BRUCE: I found out
that my father left me a
death benefit check in the
amount of $6,264.44. The
company took out insurance
on his life payable to me in
the 1930s in Pennsylvania. I
don't have the policy, but the
Pennsylvania Treasury De-
partment said it was made
out to "'John Doe." The treas-
ury auditor says I am not en-
titled to the money since
there are three John Does in
its survey The auditor says I
must get a release from my
son to claim the money,
which is impossible since I
haven't seen him in 29 years.
My father obviously
wanted me to be the benefi-
ciary, but the insurance com-
pany failed to put "'Jr." on the
policy, and it is now out of
business. I find this idiotic as
my father is deceased. My
son wasn't even born at that
time. Do I have any recourse
in this matter? D.D., via
email
DEAR D.D.: I am not at all
certain. The fact that there
are several other people with
your name doesn't affect the
situation except for possibly
your son. Since you haven't
had any contact with him for
29 years, I would let the
treasury department know
you have no knowledge as to
his whereabouts or even if he
is still living.
If this doesn't satisfy the
department, then the next
step is to find an attorney
who specializes in this type
of circumstance. It seems to
me that there should be
some kind of remedy for you.
DEAR BRUCE: When I re-
tired, I left my money in my
401(k). I am now in my 70s
and withdrawing enough
money yearly to meet the re-
quirement. My question is,
are there any advantages in
rolling over my 401(k)?
-VW, via email
DEAR 1VW: The question
is, do you need the money? If
not, you can leave any
monies in the account that
are not required to be with-
drawn and take advantage of


the tax deferral. Any money
that is earned by the account
is tax-deferred.
Aside from that, if you
need the money, the disad-
vantage of rolling it over is
paying taxes. It's simply a
matter of whether you need
the money and how well it is
doing in the 401(k). If it's not
doing well, pay the taxes,
take it out and find another
place to invest.
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



FRONTIERS
Continued from Page D1


Standard & Poor's 500, the
benchmark U.S. stock index.
Investing in frontier markets
carries plenty of dangers. Ar-
gentina's government could de-
cide to take over more private
companies and leave investors
with nothing. The war in Syria
could spill into Lebanon and
Jordan, upending their thriving
markets. Cote d'Ivoire, Pakistan
and many of the 37 frontier
countries have had coups, wars
and other turmoil over the past
two decades.
"Buying into them has to be a
long-term play," says Jack Ablin,
chief investment officer at BMO
Private Bank "You have to take
some leaps of faith."
The steady rise of their stock
markets has apparently helped
investors put aside their wor-
ries. They've dropped money
into frontier market funds week
after week, raising the total to $3
billion so far this year, according
to EPFR Global, a company


BUSINESS


which tracks the flow of invest-
ment funds. That's triple the
amount deposited in them last
year and just shy of the full-year
record of $3.07 billion in 2010.
Cash has streamed in so
quickly that Franklin Temple-
ton's $1.3 billion frontier fund
has decided to start turning
away new investors. Its top hold-
ings include a Romanian oil and
gas producer, OMV Petrom, and
a batch of companies from Qatar
and other countries on the Per-
sian Gulf.
Last month, Wells Fargo's pri-
vate banking group, which man-
ages $170 billion in clients'
money, took its first step into the
frontier, pulling a portion of its
money out of emerging-markets
like Brazil, China and India and
putting it into countries like Pak-
istan and Vietnam.
A key reason for the move was
that the frontier markets are
largely insulated from problems
plaguing bigger countries, said
Sean Lynch, the global invest-
ment strategist for Wells Fargo
Private Bank
When stock and bond markets
in the U.S. and Europe were rat-


Classifieds


tled by talk that the Federal Re-
serve would withdraw some of
its support for the U.S. economy,
many countries' currencies sank
against the dollar But Lynch no-
ticed that frontier countries' cur-
rencies held up.
Why? As a group, these less-
developed countries aren't as
tied to the world's developed
economies. Their industries are
growing by selling to customers
at home or nearby Kenya's East
African Breweries Ltd., for
example, has most of its
customers in neighboring
African countries.
"They really seem impervious
to what's happening on the main
stage," says Ablin.
The main attraction for in-
vestors is the rapid economic
growth. In theory, it should pull
many people in those countries
out of poverty, and as they begin
to spend their higher pay on re-
frigerators and mobile phones,
local businesses should flourish.
'"A lot of them have growing
populations and expanding
workforces, and they don't just
rely on exports of food or oil,"
Lynch says. "Look at Vietnam.


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 D5


They traditionally exported cof-
fee, seafood and rice. Now
they're making high-end
machinery"
Not so long ago, these same
traits lured investors to emerg-
ing markets. But after more than
a decade of strong economic
growth, the upstarts have
slowed. Brazil, Russia and India
are now closely tied to swings in
global markets as well as to each
other
When China's economy slows,
for instance, it drags down finan-
cial markets in Brazil, which
counts China as the top cus-
tomer for its exported goods.
But if a frontier market like
Ghana ran into trouble,
Vietnam and Kuwait wouldn't
even notice.
As U.S. markets recently
turned turbulent over concerns
about the Fed, Ablin watched
one frontier fund, the iShares
MSCI Frontier 100, climb higher
day after day He recently
bought a bunch of shares in the
fund for his children and his
BMO investment team is mulling
a shift into frontier funds, too.
Still, a frontier market like


Pakistan can leave some in-
vestors skittish. Osama bin
Laden hid in Pakistan before he
was killed in a U.S. raid in 2011.
The country is often at logger-
heads with neighboring India.
And Pakistan has been the target
of U.S. drone strikes against sus-
pected Islamic militants near
the border with Afghanistan.
Wells Fargo's Lynch and many
others in the investment world
argue that the good news out of
Pakistan is going unnoticed. An
election last month brought
Nawaz Sharif to leadership as
prime minister Sharif is consid-
ered pro-business and has
pledged to take on unemploy-
ment, inflation and corruption.
In early July, his government
lined up a $5 billion loan from
the International Monetary
Fund.
All of that has helped drive up
Pakistan's stock market 11 per-
cent this month. For the year, it's
up 28 percent By contrast,
China's Shanghai Stock Ex-
change composite index has
lost 10 percent this year, and
Brazil's Bovespa has dropped
22 percent


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tim e


6a: *2)53-65 ol*re:(88 82230 1 m i* lasf *d 0rnilonie 0o Iw b*t: w crnilonie 0o


Is there just one truthful
honest healthy man,
that knows how to treat
a sweet affectionate
lady, he should be be-
tween 70-80 yrs old. if
you meet this criteria let
talk. 352- 344-0052



Adult Tricycle
folding trifecta, large
basket, excel. cond.
made in USA
$150.
(352) 563-1327
BEVERLY HILLS
1 bedroom1.5 car gar-
age villa, 55+ comm.
1780 sq ft, all
appliances and utilities
incl. quiet area.
$1325 monthly
(352) 465-6006
BEVERLY HILLS
MOVING SALE*
Fri. Sat. Sun. 8am-til
Everything Must Go
Including Misc. Items
Reasonable
77 W. Sugarberry Ln.
Chevrolet
1970 Stepside Pick-up
$6500.
(352) 795-1958
FORD
Expedition E.B. 2007
only 22,000 miles,
ext. warranty till 4/14,
fully loaded, tow hitch
$23,500 267-718-8628
PROSHOP
HELP

Needed, part time
Apply in Person
INVERNESS GOLF
AND COUNTRY
CLUB
3150 S. Country Club
Dr.
726-2583 / 637-2526
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Scrap Metal
352-270-4087

Leek
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



1 Green Leather Sofa
Glass Table Top Round
(352) 277-1375
3 CATS,
8 months old
2 males, I female
(352) 476-5382


Your World







CHk Ni.LE


wiensw Miger ripe
litter trained, approx 3
months old, very cute
Free to good home
(352) 628-6487
Free 20 cucumber
plants, and 8 green
pepper plants
Blooming & Healthy
(352) 527-2085
Free Black Kittens
born on Mother's Day
2 males, 1 female
pls call (352) 428-1233
FREE KITTENS
12 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free Pit Bull
Puppies
10 weeks old
(352) 513-5249
Free Shipping Boxes,
various sizes, small to
medium
(352) 746-5356
Free to a good home-
Lab/Pit mix puppies
Loving homes
322-1884, 634-1618 or
527-1399
Free to Good Home
2 yr. old Cat
w/accessories
(352) 257-8001
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to
go. Bring Shovel, Truck
load avail., Help Your-
self. 352-697-5252
HOT TUB
72" Square, no motor,
uses watering trough or
inground fishpond,
clean no cracks,
ready to load
(352) 621-3333
Large Quanity of
Garden Compost.
You haul.
(352) 746-9861
Three Domestic Rats
Free to Good Home


.$bUU. KEWAKU
For the Person or
Location of the Cooler
(352) 212-0315
Black Mouth Curr
Male
Lost of Junglecamp
Turner Camp
REWARD
(352) 860-3050
Found Dog
Boxer Mix, Female
Caramel color
By Grace Bible
Homosassa Area
352-212-5131
Keys Lost
July 12th in the parking
lot of Evergreens in In-
verness, several key on
the ring a Toyota key
and store discount card
Ask for Hubert
(352)344-8123
Lost Peacock
1 still missing on Hwy
41 & 491 on Trail
Hernando
(352)247-5397
Lost White Bichon
12 yrs., Name Snowie
Inverness Area
East of the trail
(352) 637-9685
Male Min Pin
Chihuahua mixed,
male, 7 9yrs old
REWARD
James Ct., Beverly Hills
(352) 400-6733
Medicine Container
of Jewelry
small clear container
w/heirloom jewelry
very sentimental!!
Handsome Reward
pls call(352) 419-8286
One Checkbook
w/several credit cards
and one bag of cash
taken from vehicle on
Stage Coach Trail in
Floral City. If found
please call Detective
McIntyre CCSO @
352-476-4164
or (352) 726-5794
Women's Bulova
Wrist watch, yellow/gold
band, BIk face, sm dia-
mond lost at outback
steak house on 7/11/13
(352) 860-0123


Black German Shep-
ard in Inverness area
RTe 41.(352) 212-5736
FOUND-TIGER CAT
Male Brown/Grey with
black bottoms to paws
on Bay Meadows Drive,
Inverness.
Call (352) 419-4978





r i i

Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS
to our oractice


Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922



2 Cemetery Lots
2 Openings & Closing
Fero Memorial Gardens
Over Looking the
Garden of Honor
Package normally sells
for $7,980 asking
$5,500 (352) 746-0945
Cremation Niche
package available
at Fero Memorial
Gardens Cemetary.
Includes open/close.
Located inside build-
ing. Package nor-
mally sells for $1700,
will sell for $995.
Call or text Ron DuBois
(321) 684-9987




Exp. Paralegal
Workers compensa-
tion or social
security disability
exp. preferred
Email resume:
Lawoffdeu@
embarqmail.com

F/T Receptionist
Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person at:
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Btw.9a-12P Mon-Fri










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On% $28.50
includes a photo


ACTIVITY
ASSISTANT/CNA

Join our fun and
exciting team !!!
If you are an ener-
getic, creative and
customer service
oriented individual,
we are looking for
you. Must be
able to work week-
ends and evenings.
C.N.A. and CPR
certification re-
quired. Experience
preferred.
Email resume to:
athrc@
southernLTC.com
or fax 352-637-1921
Or in person at:
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

AVANTE
At Inverness
LPN, FULLTIME

Part time RN
MDS Coordinator

Please apply online
At
Avantecenters.com

Entry level
Ophthalmic/
Medical
Assistant

preparing exam
rooms, charts, greet-
ing patients, escorting
to exam room and
testing. 3-5 days per
week.
Apply in person to:
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

FIT PIT
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST

For Primary Care
office in
Homosassa
FAX RESUME TO:
352-628-1120

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time
and part-time
employees, with
opening in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or e-mail
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF


Professiona


Call our Classi- Executive Asst.
fied Dept for de-
tails Email Resume to:
352-563-5966 resume2013ncf
I I 111111 @ 1mail.com


Fiscal Specialist
Announcement
# 13-34
Track and/or over-
see department
revenues and
expenditures, assure
accuracy and
compliance with
County policies
and procedures
statutes, regulations
and GAAP. Ensure
errors or discrepan-
cies are avoided or
corrected in a
timely manner. May
train and/or super-
vise administrative
or fiscal staff.
Graduation from an
accredited college
or University with a
Bachelor's degree
in accounting or re-
lated field. A com-
parable amount of
relevant training or
experience may be
substituted for the
education qualifica-
tions. At least three
year's experience in
accounting, budg-
eting, contract and
grant management
or related field. Ad-
ditional education
may be substituted
for up to two years
of experience. Pay
range $1 ,718.17-
$2,525.70 B/W, DOQ
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, August 2,
2013 EOE/ADA.




Crown Jewel
Club Operations

* FT Cook
* PT Dishwasher
* FT/PT Golf Course
Laborers
Call 352-854-6557 X3
EEOC/DFWP

PT Kitchen Help
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues




CDL-A Company
Drivers, Students or
Lease a Brand New
Freightliner or
Peterbilt Tractor
Today! Zero Down,
No Credit Check,
Affordable & Fuel
Efficient. CDL-A
Required. Apply
Online:
TheWilTrans.com

EARNING BETTER
PAY IS ONE STEP
AWAY!
Averitt offers
Experienced CDL
-A Drivers
Excellent Benefits
and Weekly
Hometime.
888-362-8608,
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Apply
online at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer


Auto Technician
Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
AUTOMOTION
Floral City
352-341-1881

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

EXP CNC
LATHEIMILL
Operator/Set-UP

G code familiar
Aerospace Shop
352-422-6086

EXP. MECHANIC
Needed. Busy shop
since 1977, Apply at
Steves Auto Repair
(352) 726-1208







NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Exp. preferred.
Rough &Trim.
Slab, lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit4
Wildwood

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH
Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

Solo & Teams.
Priority Dispatch.
Consistent Miles.
Established Routes.
No Touch
Freight/Hazmat CDL
A w/1 yr. OTR exp.
Food Grade Tanker
855-IRT-TANK
www.indianriver
transoort.com













Chroniclen tEr
newsppesfo













vehicl -


Office Help
with light labor for
Window Treatment
store. Scheduling,
customer service,
some Exp. Preferred
apply @1657 W
Gulf to Lk, Lecanto



SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHpNiCLE

Thrift Store
Manager

Must have retail
experience Operation
Management with all
aspects of a
non-profit org.
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sippperd@
bellsouth.net




our \\orkl fi rs

Need ii jolh

qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

ClassNILE
Classifieds


PROSHOP
HELP

Needed, part time
Apply in Person
INVERNESS GOLF
AND COUNTRY
CLUB
3150 S. Country Club
Dr.
726-2583 / 637-2526

Water Conserva-
tion Specialist
Announcement
#13-35
Enforces Southwest
Florida Water
Management
District and/or
county watering
restrictions. Previous
enforcement experi-
ence preferred.
Horticultural knowl-
edge beneficial.
THIS IS A FULL TIME
SHIFT WORK POSI-
TION, MUST BE ABLE
TO WORK NIGHTS
AND WEEKENDS
Starting pay
$11.53 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, July 27, 2013.
EOE/ADA




ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Become a Certified
Microsoft Office Pro-
fessional! NO EXPE-
RIENCE NEEDED!
SC Train can get you
job ready ASAP! HS
Diploma/GED
PC/Internet needed!
(888)212-5888


MEDICAL BILL-
ING TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





SPRING HILL
CLASSES
*C :-C < c gC
COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
AUGUST 12, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
c*AUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
c-SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING



ti'r \~, rId IIrstt
Ei,) D.)


Center Director to plan, organize, develop, and direct the
Endoscopy Center, in accordance with the guidelines and
regulations that govern our facility. The qualified candidate
will promote a collaborative work environment and ensure
high quality care is maintained at all times. Management
experience is required.

Must be a Registered Nurse, work full time, and must be able
to assist in staffing as needed. Hours are M-F. Candidate
must have experience in the Operating Room, ASC and GI
experience is preferred. Strong communication and team
building skills are required. Competitive pay.

Qualified candidates, please send your resume
to Attn: Kimberly Walsh, via fax: 615-234-1705
or email: kwalsh@amsurg.com EOE




D6 SUNDAY,JULY 21, 2013


AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769










SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
or AUGUST 12, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
.-AUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





A SODA/SNACK
VENDING ROUTE
LOCATIONS IN-
CLUDED IN YOU
LOCAL AREA
$8,995 MINIMUM
INVESTMENT
GUARANTEE CASH
FLOW
10 YEAR
WARRANTEE
1-800-367-6709
Ext.99
r us-- m
USED CAR LOT
FOR SALE or LEASE I
| Well Established |
909 NE 5th St (44)
(352) 461-4518


ALL STEEL Portable, Tube type.
BUILDINGS 1963 Motorola, 1956
Columbia. $75/both
(352) 344-5283
Star Wars Star trek
collectibles, over 1000
pieces, must see to ap-
preciate, mostly new,
located in Floral City
(352) 726-6681
130MPHVICTROLA'S
130 MPH 1920 Crank-up.
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2 portable, 1 table. All
Roof w/Overhang, work good. $125 each
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, ork g$325 for all.each
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents or (352)344-5283
4" Concrete Slab. (352)
$13,995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) l
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 3 TON AC Unit
4" Concrete Slab 3 TON AC Unit
$15995. INSTALLED for Doublewide
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) MobileHome
Roof w/Overhang $750.
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors (352) 637-3482
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents APPLIANCES, like new
4" Concrete Slab washers/dryers, stoves,
$27.995 Installed fridges 30 day warranty
+ A local Fl. Manufact. trade-ins, 352-302-3030
+ We custom build- Generator
We are the factory Heavy Duty, Generac
+ Meets & exceeds 8,550 surge watts,
2010 Fl. wind codes, never used
+ Florida "Stamped" $350. final
engineered drawings (352) 382-3420
+ All major credit HOT POINT ELECTRIC
cards accepted DRYER $80 White.
METAL Structures LLC Older model. Works
866-624-9160 great. 30 day warranty
Lic # CBC1256991 Call/text 352-364-6504
State Certified KENMORE
Building Contractor over stove white
www. metal microwave $75.00,
structuresllccam dishwasher $125.00,
352-637-4849
RCA ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 Almond
color. Older model. 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
Both Kenmore, 27' cu
side by side white $225,
white self cleaning ele
stove w/ ceramic top
$175.00 352-637-4849
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
I I I UP! 352-564-8179
Tell that special WASHER
person $100 In perfect work-
Hapy Birthday ing condition. 30 day
"with a classi- warranty call or text
fied ad under 352-364-6504
Happy Notes. WASHER/DRYER
Only $28.50 KENMORE STACKED
includes a photo COMBO. HD,27" WIDE
$375.00 352-513-5400
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966




)Oul I [ II I sItI st
L 11, ,




Classtfieds


1 91


1 91


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FILE CABINET WITH
LOCK like new
conditionwood grain,
call 4 details 3@$15.00
each 352-344-2321
FILING CABINET 2
DRAWER OPEN TOP
FOR UNDER
COUNTER Good condi-
tion. $5.00 563-6410
FILING CABINET 4
drawer steel 15 X 25 X
52 $35.Three available
2 no lock, 1 no key.
(352)563-6410



AUCTION
Sat July 27th 1:00pm
Preview 11:00am
Plantation Inn, 9301 W.
Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, Fl

Items to include 300 +
Dolls, 100 Longaberger
baskets, 15 guns, Gold
and Sterling Silver
Jewelry and Silver Co-
ins 200 Madame Alex-
ander, Rustie Dolls,
Vickie Walker & more

CHECK
AUCTIONZIP.COM
9643 For Pictures,
Rolphs Auction Depot
AB 1375
Denzel Rolph
Auctioneer AU3666
13% Buyers Premium
3% Discount for Cash
Debit, Visa, MC and
Cash Accepted, Call
904-993-8679 For Info
Snacks & Drinks
Available, CASH BAR



2005 Craftsman
Generator,
5,600 watt run 8,600
watt surge
$250.
(352) 628-5371
Air Compressor
2HP, Craftsman 26gal
vertical tank, like new
$175 (352) 246-3500



SAMSUNG DVD
PLAYER $5.,
PANASONIC VCR $5.,
Magnavox VCR/DVD
$10. (352)563-6410
SONY 27" TRINATRON
TV XV27X8R55 Needs
ext. speakers Works
well $25.00
(352)563-6410
TV PHILIPS
MAGNAVOX 19" also
Hitachi 13" They work.
$5.00 each
(352)563-6410
TV STAND Media stand
for up to 70" TV, good
cond. $50.00
352-382-2591


CLASSIFIED



YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $80
352-613-0529
YAMAHA Yamaha AV
receiver, center
speaker, 2 tower
speakers, excellent
cond.,$250.00
Call 352 382-2591



ALUMINUM DOOR
DOUBLE GLASS AND
SLIDE WINDOW 31" X
79" $50 352-527-1193
METAL DOOR FRONT
ENTRY 36" X 79" $45
352-527-1193
METAL FRONT DOOR
WITH WINDOWS AND
LOCKS 31" X 79" $45
3525271193
Premium Metal
Roofing, Manufac-
turer Direct!
8 Metal Roof profiles
in 40+ colors !
Superior customer
service, same day
pick-up, fast
delivery!
1-888-779-4270 or
visit www.aulfcoast

TEN 36 X 62 INCH
WINDOWS Aluminum
single pane clear glass
screens locks You re-
move $80 341-0450
Used Entry Metal
Doors with new
frames, 2 sizes,
good cond. $65 ea,
352 410-6823 Home
352-484-9066 cell



CORNER COMPUTER
DESK & HUTCH
53X53" May need disas-
sembly to remove. $20.
(352)563-6410
DELL COMPUTER
2006 141N INSPIRON
100.00 352-212-7788
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
PRINTER 2009Canon
with Copier, Scanner &
Ink. $75
628-3899
UNUSED BETA
MACHINE & TAPES
unused beta machine
& tapes
$100 795-2044



7 Piece Hamton Bay
patio set, w/6 chairs
beige cushions, 2
swivel, tlb is rectangle
with glass in the middle
exec cond.
$300 249-7651


White Patio Furniture
Table 72" Long w/6 Ig.
chairs. Excellent Cond.
Top of the line! $225.
(352) 489-0818




2 BAR STOOLS
RATTAN $75.
BEIGE Fabric seat
Seat 24" Back 35"
352 249-3231
ANTIQUE CHAIR
1930's armless wing-
back chair gold velvet
excellent condition $50
352-249-6227
Antique Furniture
(settee couch 890's,
dressing Tablel 932)
Fire Place, Kit China
Cab, Safari Decor, 5pc
wicker set, TV cab,
Stratford recliner, hall,
coffee & end tables,
high quality items. Much
much, more! 746-0011
Beautiful Stand
Behind Bar, Walnut,
with corian top,
41/2 ft. H. & 5/2 ft W
2 bar stools $700
(352) 726-3731


BLACK HIGH TOP
WOOD TABLE/4 HIGH
CHAIRS Table is 64-48
wide. Folds to 48
round, table has shelf
on bottom with storage
unit. excellent condition.
$300.00 352-503-7281
Coffee table and 2 end
tables, light wood, glass
tops, $65 OBO
(352) 341-5020
(352) 4764340
Dinning Room Table
with 6 chairs, glass top
11/2 yr old $325 OBO
(352) 270-8540 Leave
Message
DRESSER oak dresser
with mirror, no scars
$85.00 352-513-5400
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT Cherry colorfits
27" TVglass door for
DVD player etc.
Excellent.$50 746-7232
Furniture Set Couch &
loveseat, green &
chair/ burgandy trop-
ical all matching very
good cond. $500. obo
(352) 563-1185
d- High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LIVING ROOM RE-
CLINING PIECES a
large chair-looks like a
wing but footrest folds
under. loveseat each
sides reclines separately
must sell asking
$175.each piece
352-637-2499


im
KING SIZE MATTRESS
Posture Comfort pillow
top king sized mattress.
Perfect shape. $50.00
PH. 382-2942
LOVE SEAT Like new
light colors/flowers
75.00 Linda 341-2271
LOVESEAT & COUCH
W/ 2 recliners. Beige
micro fiber, Very good
cond. $450 obo; 1913
WHITE Trendle Sewing
machine $275 obo
(352) 212-8594
Queen Bedroom Set
off white,good cond.,
incl. matt, frame, head-
board, dresser, night
stand $450, Dinnet set
4 chairs w/wheels, tan
$450 352-628-4254
CAN DELIVER
QUEEN HEADBOARD,
DRESSER
W//MIRROR, NIGHT
STAND, WHITE, LIKE
NEW $300.00
352-513-5400
Queen Size
Sofa Sleeper
Tropical Print,
great cond. $200.
(352) 257-1794
RATTAN DINING
ROOM SET Glass oval
top,6 chairs, 3 bar
stools, and 2 piece
china cabinet. $500
takes all! (770)831-0925
Leave message if no
answer
SECRETARY/DESK.
3 display shelves. 3
drawers. Good condi-
tion. Circa 1930's.
Asking $195 527-6709
SOFA BED
Floral pattern sofa w/ full
size bed. 2 free end ta-
bles w/ purchase. $150.
Can deliver, you must
unload(352) 422-5622.
Solid Oak Dinning Set
table, chairs, & hutch
beveled glass, lighted
$600 (Crystal River)
(989)-627-2719
CAN DELIVER
TABLE LAMPS. SET
OF 3, WHITE, FOR A
BEDROOM $35.00
352-513-5400
TABLE,
COUCH/SERVER,1
DRAWER,2 CABINETS,
OLD $45.00
352-513-5400
Wall Unit, whitewash
oak, w/lights $100.
Two Used Stainless
Sinks $10. ea.
(352)586-8415
WINGBACK CHAIR
1940's style fair
condition very
comfortable $30
352-249-6227
Wooden Rocking
Chair,
Ivory, with cushions
excel. cond. $65.
(352) 564-9440


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


KAT BUNN
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ years
Specializing in hair
color,highlights, fashion
colors-$10 off highlights
with ad. now offering
hair extent ions.
Call for an appointment
352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



Your World









C. I NClEl


JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Palios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
SFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE-*Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


#1 Employment source is
www.chronicleonline.co
www.chronicleonline.com


Lawncare & More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 8/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447



CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820
House Keeping
Services weekly,
biweekly, or monthly
352-344-3432
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate -$20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



HOME INSPECTIONS
CRS CONTRACTING
SERVICES LLC,
Lic # HI 1392, 414-8693



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $20
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS


n I
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131



A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135








POOL

Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/Insured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


3-TjE- Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844


TEfRLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofinq- Inc.comrn
Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins.
-352-639-1024-




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


Carol's



Airport Transport
352-746-7595
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins




YourO ard lirt


Need a joI)
ur a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
.. ................. -.


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178








TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


*.I I I I I*AlII*

Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
S or pool orplan
S something
'41,;z completely new!
S i l "Often imiated,
,Cp~' Sneerdu pfieated'


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVERSPECIALIST
SCOPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352-400-3188





Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
LUc#CCC1325497


A JOHNSON
M AC ROOFING, INC
S- c7


TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


N ;.



Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


GENERAL .
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians"
ER0015377

35-61-24


ROOFING

SQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
Free In Home Estimates.
| Lifetime Warranty on Stretching

SUNoholt-a rv Clanina
Now Cleaning Tilde & Hard Surfaces
in ,' ;;, i,-,


KNOCK OUT DON'T LET YOUR

CLEANING SERVICE DRYER START
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION A FIRE
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP -
FlalRale No
Licensed, Insured, 3 Hidden Coi
Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
*~ All Home
S Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
AEllorde & Dependable
Experience lifelong
3 52.344-0905
cell: 400-1722
P. sured Lic.#37761






AAA ROOFING
Call /eakhuste'"
Free Written Estimate

$1OO OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000FCMA


16 ft Aluminum Exten-
sion Ladder $30 and
1300 PSI Pressure
Washer $50 Call
352-726-6728 Mon-Fri
10AM to 6PM
10" Poulan Pole Saw
$50, Craftsman Leaf
Blower/Vacuum $20
Call 352-726-6728
Monday thru Friday
10AM to 6PM
AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman Mower
6.75 HP 22" Cut self
propelled w/bagger,
and mulch blade,
like new $195
(352) 527-1193
ELECTRIC WEED
EATER, STICK EDGER
& CORDLESS WEED
EATER $60
352-613-0529
FOR SALE 16" HOME-
LITE CHAIN SAW $60
Manual Pole saw $20
Call 352-726-6728
Monday thru Friday
10AM to 6PM
Husqvarna self pro-
pelled lawn mower
with Honda engine.
Bag or mulch. New in
2013 $275.00 Phone
(352)503-9599
MOWER
Sulkey, dual wheels,
new baft w/ 2yr warr.
and 1 rototiller. $900
OBO 352-795-2454 or
352-726-8298
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944




BEVERLY HILLS
MOVING SALE*
Fri. Sat. Sun. 8a-til
Everything Must Go
Including Misc. Items
Reasonable
77 W. Sugarberry Ln.





BEVERLY

HILLS
Sat-Sun 8am-1pm
Furn, tools, hshld
women's clothing,
342 W. Sugarberry Ln
FLORAL CITY
Fri, Sat & Sun 8a-3p
Huge Yard Sale!
Power tools, antique
tools, household
items, plants & misc.
11739 S Pleasant
Grove Rd. 14 mi South
of Stage Coach Rd.


HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Sat., June 27th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020
Homosassa
Sat, 8am to 4pm
Sun, 9am to 3pm
turn, lots of misc. items
8541 W Kipling Lane



OZELLO
Friday July 26th
Saturday July 27th
8am to 1pm
Everything Must Go!
$1 designer
women's & baby
clothing, shoes,
furn, china, house-
wares, art, books,
rugs, toys, too much
to list! Liquidating
the rest of:
Katiesisland
treasures.com
ACCEPTS MCVNisa
14434 W Ozello Trail
7 mi. down on left




CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE MOVING
SALE!
July 18th thru 21st
8am-4pm
Entire Household
furn, appl, garage
full of miscellaneous
EVERYTHING MUST
GO! MAKE OFFERS!
961 N Hollywood Cir
LECANTO
Moving Sale
Call for appt
(352) 527-7223
Solid Wood Day Bed
with all access & Matt.
Chaise w/wood trim,
Oriental chest 31.5 X
75.5 Art, misc.382-0544



!!!! LT225/75R 16
TIRE!!!! Good Year
Light Truck Great
Shape 90% Tread
ONLY 60.00 464-0316
4 BOAT TRAILER
RIMS GALVANIZED
13" 5 LUG $25 each
352-527-1193
6 LARGE OPEN END
WRENCHES- 1-3/8
inches to 2 inches, $40.
352-628-0033


]DIraz C416




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


06 CARAVAN RIMS 4
16" 5 LUG 1 CRACKED
$35 each 352 527 1193
69 Jigsaw Puzzles,
$39 obo
352-746-3799
352-726-9472
3/4" DR. SOCKET
WRENCH SET- 21 pcs.,
ratchet, breaker bar, ex-
tensions, Ex., $40
352-628-0033
AIR PURIFIER
PERMALIFE, MODEL
30546/30547
LIKE NEW $50.00
352-513-5400
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Boxspring and Mattress
Set clean! $50
860-2475
BREADMAN BREAD
MACHINE Makes up to
2 lb. loaf, includes hard
bound recipe book. VG
Cond. $30 746-7232
CAST IRON KETTLE
Vintage hanging cast
iron camp fire kettle with
lid. Good Condition.
$40 746-7232
CHAIR blue and wood
office chair on wheels.
$15.00 352-564-9311
Chevy Silverado
Aluminum Running
Boards, great shape
ONLY $100.00
352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra
for 4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY
$80 352-464-0316
CHILDREN'S IRON
HEADBOARD Brand
New Metal Headboard,
$7 (352)465-1616
CHINA BUFFET LIGHT
INSIDE W/GLASS 6'6
1/2H 50 1/2L
PECAN WOOD 85.00
OBO 352-212-7788
CORNING WARE
ELECTRIC COFFEE
POT-10 cup, cornflower
pattern, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
Creative Memory
Scrap Book Kit $125.
Vertical Knee
raise/chin dip exc.
equip. $125.
352-586-8415
Cress Kiln
ceramics, molds
& misc. supplies
$350.
(352) 586-8415
EASY RIDER
WOMAN'S FITTED
LEATHER JACKET M
LIKE NEW $50.00
352-513-5400
EASY RIDER
WOMAN'S LEATHER
PANTS W/STRETCH
SIDES LIKE NEW M
$35.00 352-513-5400
GAS GRILL WITH SIDE
BURNER, PROPANE
TANK & COVER $60
352-613-0529
GENERATOR 3.3KW
220/120V. Has never
been used other than
periodically started for
maintenance. $200.00
(352)637-5376
GENERATOR
Brand New,3550 watts,
$500. HITACHI KOKI
10" rounded blade,
255mm Compound
Saw $100.
(352) 726-1858
Gerstner Snap on Top
Tool Box 1956, 8
drawer, 100 to 300
machinist tools $585. 8"
4 Golf Cart Tires, &
$80. (315) 466-2268
GRANDMOTHER
CLOCK looks good but
needs a little repair only
$75.00 352 464 0316
GUINEA PIG/RABBIT
CAGE Plastic base with
wire top.40"L*18"W'20"
Plus bowl,bottle,hutch.
$50 746-7232
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Mowen Kit Faucet
Hot/Cold no sprayer
almost new $25, Solid
Oak wood sm desk 4
side drawers, 1 top
middle drawer, $50
(352) 419-5124
NEW CAR COVER fits
cars 15'1" to 16'8".In the
box only $20.00
352 -464 -0316 or
352- 464- 0316
PAPER SHREDDER
NEW IN THE BOX
shreds all your impt.
papers.prevent identy
theft 35.00 464-0316
PARAFFIN BATH
HoMedics Para spa
Plus Paraffin Bath Heat
Therapy System.VG
cond. $40 746-7232
POOL TABLE
pool table $100
795-2044
PROTECH MTCYL
MANS LEATHER
JACKET, LIKE
NEW,SIZE 46 $70.00
352-513-5400
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok
condition, $50
(352)465-1616



4 Wheeled Walker
with brakes and
seat ONLY $70.00
352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
Aluminum Walker both
have adjustable legs
20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COM-
MODES, EXCELLENT
COND. 2 available.
$15.00 each
(352)563-6410
Lg.Wheelchair
electric, runs well
$350. BBQ grill


w/almost full tank gas
good cond. $70
(352) 341-7718
Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464-0316
NEW 4" Toilet Seat
Riser, makes it much
easier to get up
ONLY 20.00
352-464-0316
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps
to the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
TRANSPORT
W CHAIR (SMALL
WHEELS) good shape
with footrests only 90.00
464-0316
WHEELCHAIR WITH
FOOTRESTS. GOOD
CONDITION. $80.00
352-513-5400


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PLUS USED
CASIO LD50 ELEC-
TRIC DRUMS $80
352-601-6625
"NEW" TRAVEL
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/BAG,STRINGS,
STRAP&MORE$80
352-601-6625
5 STRING BANJO
W/RESONATOR
PLAYS GREAT!
"JAMS"OR LESSONS
$90 352-601-6625
M-Audio Key Studio 49
key controller $10.
3524194464
PIANO LESSONS









Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
Small Kids
Guitar $5.
352-419-4464
Yamaha psr-6 music
keyboard $10.
3524194464
Yamaha YPT-210
music keyboard $15
3524194464




2 STOOLS LIGHT
WOOD 291/2"H $12
each 352-527-1193
FAUX WOOD BLINDS
WHITE (4)34 1/2"X 64"
AND (4) 51 1/4" X 64"
$15 EACH
352-527-1193
HOOVER
WINDTUNNEL
VACUUM U6634-900
Bagless works well.
$45. (352)563-6410
JIFFY CLOTHES
STEAMER MODEL J2
Works well. $25.
(352)563-6410
NEW BATHTUB Tan 6
ft/call for e-mail picture
Linda 341-2271
ROTISSERIE
ELECTRIC RONCO
SHOWTIME & BBQ
Works well. $10.
(352)563-6410
Solar Cover
& Attached Roller.
You pick and remove
$50. obo 746-3327
or (352) 212-7299
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
352-613-0529
VACUUM RAINBOW
R1650 W/ POWER-
HEAD & HOSES
Works well. $25.
(352)563-6410




ELLIPTICAL
COMPACT SIZE
works fine, 100.00
352 464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only $90.00
352 464 0316
GOLD GYM WEIGHT
BENCH ,olympic 451b
bar. 2 451b plates, 4
251b, 4 101b, 4 51b plates
with weight tree.150.00
352-726-9964
ROWING MACHINE
Stamina rowing
machine, like new,
$75.00 352-382-2591
WELDER PRO 9940
WEIGHT SYSTEM Like
new adjustable multiple
stations, sacrifice
$200.00. Must pick up.
352 527 7732.




1986 15 HP Evanrude
Motor, $450.
1995 Club Car 36v,
with top, good parts,
$150. (315) 466-2268
26" Men's Folding
Mountain Bike, 6
shimano shifter, like
new condition $125
(352) 344-5933
Adult Tricycle
folding trifecta, large
basket, excel, cond.
made in USA
$150.
(352) 563-1327
BICYCLE BOYS SPI-
DERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
XDS's-Sheild-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516


-4xv



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


redln stitems
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944








Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS
to our practice.


Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922
P L E X U S


Limi

Ambassador

Samantha

Haven
Independent
Plexus Slim
Weight Loss I love help-
ing people get healthy
and motivated. I'm so
THANKFUL that I was
showed this by a Dear
friend:)
The products have
changed my LIFE
If you would like more
information call me or
send me a text at
352-536-4025
Visit my web site at
www.plexusslim.
com/haven
Can't wait to hear from
you:)



2 Baby Guinea Pigs
females $10 each
(352) 634-4109
AKC MINIATURE
SCHNAUZER PUPS!
Lovingly raised in my
home. Health Cert, 1st
shots, dewormed, tails
docked & declawed.
Black & Silver: 1 male, 2
females. Salt & Pepper:
1 male; 1 female. $600,
cash discount!
(352)419-4723
















ANNA LISE
AND ZOEY
Anna Lise and Zoey
are 8 y.o. sisters, lost
their home when their
family moved. Beauti-
ful spayed blue/white
Bulldog mixes, amaz-
ingly sweet, gentle,
easy to handle,
housebrkn, get along
w/other dogs & like
children, are playful &
full of life. Please give
these older girls a
chance for new life.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.










BEELA
Beela, 2-3 y.o. Border
Collie/ Lab Retriever
mix, surrendered
because owners could
not afford. She is
spayed, microchop-
ped, housebrkn, very
affectionate & gentle.
Walks quietly on
leash. Very calm &
beautiful, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
people. Needs new
home after losing
hers. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.










Georgia
Georgia, 2-3 y.o. Bull-
dog mix, cinnamon
red in color,
HW-negative, house-
brkn, gets along
w/other dogs, walks
well on leash. Listens
carefully when spoken
to. She is a good girl,
appears to love her
human friends, gentle
& calm. Great person-
ality, good as com-
panion dog. Call Jo-
anne @
352-795-1288










HONCHO
Honcho, 3-y.o. Amer-
ica bulldog mix, had
eye surgery for Entro-
pion, now fully recov-
ered & needs a home.
Has been fostered,
mom says he's great
dog, very affectionate.
Neutered, gets along
w/other dogs, good
w/kids. Loves activity
& exercise, fenced
yard is best. Big
strong boy.
Call Kathy @
352-895-1218


Invisible Dog Fence,
with dog collier and con-
trols, model #LP 300
4 new collier
batteries $125
(352) 795-4674











LAYLA
Layla, a 2-y.o.
spayed Shepherd/
Terrier mix,
affectionate,
leash-trained,
housebrkn, good
w/other dogs. Has a
beautiful shiny
short-haired coat.
Weight about 50 lbs.
Gentle, good
w/people. Loves to
have treats & sits
nicely. Adoption fee
$30, includes spay,
chip, tests &
vaccinations.
Call Michelle @
352-302-2664. "











MILO
Milo, a handsome
2 1/2 y.o. neutered
Husky/Lab mix,
beautiful white
color, w/one blue
eye & one brown
eye. Has a short
coat, easy to care
for, & is a strikingly
good-looking dog.
Lots of energy &
needs an active
home or large
securely fenced
yard to play. Gets
along w/other dogs,
no cats. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.










NANUKE
Nanuke, a 2-3 y.o.
neutered Lab/
Terrier/Weimaraner,
about 65 lbs.,
beautiful golden
brown velvety coat,
short-haired, gets
along w/other dogs,
no cats.
Heartworm-negative.
Loves to play in
water, is gentle and
calm. A big, strong
dog, best with
fenced yard, loves
treats & walks.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.







3-4


SALLY
Sally, a 7-y.o. beauti-
ful golden-brown
Vizla mix, weight 48
lbs. Gentle, socia-
ble, very affection-
ate, sensitive. Good
w/people & other
dogs, not cats. Very
intelligent w/above
average training
ability. Could be
part of active family
or quiet home with
daily walks. Fee $30
includes spay, chip,
tests, vaccinations.
Call Judy
@352-503-3363.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
Miniature Poodles
White, 2 females
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Ask about my Summer
Discount,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827









TUCKER
Tucker, a 2-y.o. Ger-
man Shepherd mix,
neutered, HW nega-
tive, microchipped,
housebrkn, UTD on
shots, wt 54 Ibs.
Needs to be only dog
w/single person or
couple, needs fenced
yard w/room to run,
but prefers to be in-
side dog. Loves his
human friends. Walks
well on leash. Cur-
rentlyfostered, mom
says he's a great
watchdog, very alert.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
or Dianne @
352-419-5880.




Male Goat For Sale
$50.
(352) 628-4750


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


CLASSIFIED




KAYAK
13ft, Sit in, blue &
white good shape
$700.
(352) 220-1162




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510

12' JOHN BOAT
1990 sears 12' alum
john boat, 9.9 Evenrude
motor & fuel tank, li-
censed thru 5/2014
$ 825.00 352-795-4674
14'JOHN BOAT
14' alum john boat, 18
hp Evenrude motor, 40
# thrush troller motor,
minn kota, new seat,
battery, new tire on
trailer,new lights
$1325.00 352-795-4674
CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tri-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.
Sportscraft
1988 27' Coastal
Fisherman, cabin
cruiser, $9,995 OBO &
boat trailer 22'
tandam,galv., $995
(813)-244-3945
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




Coachman
94 20' Travel Trailer
hitch, stabilizer, $4500.
(352) 341-0262
Jayco
1980 Eagle 30 ft.
Exc Condition.
Must See! $3500
(574) 226-4503


2012 EVERGREEN
EVER-LITE
29 Foot Travel Trailer,
Model 29FK (Front
Kitchen). Well con-
structed, generously op-
tioned, like-new condi-
tion. Easy tow with SUV
or Pick-Up. Priced well
below NADA at
$21,000. Please call
352/746-3374 for addi-
tional information or to
schedule a time to see.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
PROWLER
33ft, 2 slides, wood firs.
new furniture, like new
$7,900.
(352) 795-7397
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
Yellowstone
1999 28' Fifth Wheel
2 slidouts,Exc. Cond.
new awning,Queen bed,
new refridg. very clean,
2 % mi. to Gulf, on river
$10kobo(352) 447-2933




Heavy Duty Metal
Rack for FORD F150
$250
352-410-6823
352-484-9066 cell




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE
.Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price


AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

'93 Buick Regal
$500 down

'99 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible
$650 down

'97 Ford Taurus
$695 Down

'98 Ford Mustang
$700 Down
CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -19 02
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl


SUNDAY,JULY 21, 2013 D7


,*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUICK
2003, Century
$4,995.
352-341-0018
BUICK
2011, Regal CXL,
16yrs/150,000 miles of
worry free warranty.
$18,995,352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
1974 Corvette This is a
blue corvette that had
some restoration done
to it and is needing a
new owner for $16,999
352-322-5555
352-465-6560



CHEVROLET
1983 Camaro Z-28.
One owner. Original
power train. Most other
parts 5 years old or less.
Exterior and interior in
good condition. Great
hobby car for right
owner. Make offer.
Home: (352)746-0285
Cell: (352)464-4339
CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt
$7,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
2006, Magnum,Super
Clean and Fast! Don't
Miss Out! $8,995.,
352-240-7412
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2008 Mustang GT
Premium TROPHY
WINNER 50 + upgrades
details at 352-795-0558
GMC
2010, Terrain, Loaded,
save $1,000s from new
29 MPG $16,995,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Sierra, Loaded!
Great for Work or Fun,
MUST SEE!! $15,995,
352-240-7412
GMC
2013, Envoy, Great
for Small Families,
Loaded, MUST SEE!
$7,995, 352-240-7412
HONDA
2009, Fit, Navi Sport
Perfect Shape
$11,995, 352-240-7412
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MERCURY
2001, Grand Marquis
$3,995.
352-341-0018
NISSAN
2011, Altima,
17 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free warranty.
$14,995,352-240-7412
PONTIAC
'04, Grand Prix
Sport red, sunroof,,
Looks & runs good,
$6,100. (352) 220-1162
PONTIAC
07, G6, GT, conv,
leather, 33,700 mi.
exc. cond. $17k obo
(352) 794-3523
SCION
2006 xB, AUTO
fog lights, new tires, all
power, showroom cond.
dealer maint. 60K.
clean title/carfax.
$8900. 516-220-9865
TOYOTA
2011, Camry,
15 yrs./150,000 miles of
Worry Free warranty.
$12,995, 352-240-7412




Chevrolet
1970 Stepside Pick-up
$6500.
(352) 795-1958
Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


BIG SALE
"Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
EX Cab, $7,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Silverado,
Loaded, Must See!
Great for Work or Fun!!
$11,995, 352-240-7412
FORD
'03, Sports Track,
white, runs good,
looks good,. $8,700.
(352) 220-1162


FORD
1995 F150 Ford
Truck,FL150,3.0 liters,
Two wheel drive.
200,000 Miles In great
shape, runs Great
$2,000 FIRM Call
352-637-5331 If no an-
swer Leave message
Please

FORD
2009, F150, 4x4,
Super Cab, Loaded,
Best Price In Florida
$15,995 352-240-7412

NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control, power
windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tri-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $23,500. Phone:
352-601-1319


CHEVROLET
2006, Suburban 4 x 4
$6,995
352-341-0018
FORD
Expedition E.B.2007
only 22,000 miles,
ext. warranty till 4/14,
fully loaded, tow hitch
$23,500 267-718-8628
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
94, Grand Cherokee
Lariat, $1500.
(352) 303-0928




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom
352-325-1306


m


337-0721 SUCRN
BOCC-OMB-RFP
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 038-13
Generator Installation and Relocation Services
for
Citrus County Solid Waste Management
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to Supply, install and make operational (Turn Key Operation) one diesel powered
generator capable of providing enough power to allow the Citrus County Solid
Waste Management Administration Building and a portion of the Scale House to op-
erate at full capacity for an extended period of time. Relocate an existing propane
generator and fuel tank currently controlling a portion of the Administration Building
and Scale House to the new modular office and fuel site location.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirement to be determined a
responsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
Bidder must have five- (5) years experience in the commercial/industrial electrical
industry working on projects of similar size and scope, as the services specified in the
bid documents.
MANDATORY PRE-BID: A Mandatory Preo-Bid Conference will be held on July 26, 2013
@ 10:00 am. The meeting will be held on location at the Solid Waste Management
Administration Building 230 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, Florida 34461
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before August 5, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.

A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for August 5, 2013 a 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Then click on "BIDS". Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 21, 2013.


338-0721 SUCRN
BOCC-OMB-RFP
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
RFP No. 039-13
License Compliance Special Master Services
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners is seeking the services of a quali-
fied attorney to serve as the License Compliance Special Master to the Citrus
County Code Compliance Division pursuant to Floida Statutes and the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. The License Compliance Special Master will perform the duties
of a hearing officer and decide matters of alleged violations of Chapter 489, Parts 1
& 2, the Florida Administrative Code 61 G4, and 61 G6, and Chapter 18-Building
Ordinance #2013-04 and to impose all penalties, fines and enforcement costs when
applicable. Hearings may involve and are not limited to: county certified/registered
contractors; state certified/registered contractors;
uncertified/unregistered/unlicensed contractors; unpermitted work; commencing
work without applicable permit; advertising and other violations.
Minimum Requirements For Submittina A Proposal
Proposer shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a
responsive and responsible at the time of Proposal Submittal:
1. Proposer must be a member in good standing of the Rorda Bcr fcr a minimurn
of five (5) years and.
2. Proposer must possess a reputation in the community for integrity,
responsibility, and professional ability. Appointments shall be for a term
of one (1) year.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before August 14, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for August 14, 2013 a 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
"BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 21, 2013.


339-0721 SUCRN
BOCC-OMB-RFP
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 040-13
NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM
NSP1 10DB-4X-05-19-01-F06
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish all labor and materials to rehabilitate one (1) single family home for its
Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
* 33 S. Desoto, Beverly Hills, FL
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at the
mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for July 26, 2013 @ 10:00 am. Additional
information concerning the pre-bid conference is provided below.

All prices shall include all labor, supervision, materials, equipment and services nec-
essary to do a workman like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in
this work if ineligible to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the
work will be provided, in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
Citrus County and their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract
documents, inspecting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be be-
tween the owner and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be ap-
proved by the owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consultant,
Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to
bid submittal. Contact Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., Phone (866)
484-1975 (Toll Free) or Fax (352) 381-8270 for an application.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on
July 26, 2013 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located
at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a
Mandatory Walk through of the location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before August 9, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for August 9, 2013 a 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Joe Meek, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 21, 2013.


336-0721
Fictitious Name Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Ficititious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.09,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in
business under the
fictitious name of:


LAKEVIEW SALON
located at: 3822 Parsons
Point Rd, Hernando,
Florida 34442, in the
County of CITRUS,
intends to register said
name with Florida
Department of
State, Division of
Corporations,


Tallahassee, Florida,
DATED at Lecanto,
Florida
this 24th day of June,
2013.
/s/ Carol B. Bidgood,
owner
Published 1 time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
July 21, 2013


t'ehirU b


Hallmark
2009, Box Trailer
22ft, tandem axle
$4,000 obo
(352) 302-6241


HARLEY
DAVIDSON
1990 FXR Lowrider.
New pipes. New wind-
shield. Mustang seat.
Looks and runs great.
$5,700. Can text photo.
352-220-5299


HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition
$1200.00 352-637-3254




950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at
covdealscom,
July 1, 2013 July 31, 2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


00000


HE
0,,Tm dS


V



a,


Y CRUZE LS
Speed Transmission
. ........ ....................... .....$ 17,955
--$956
_________-$1,500
WlflY $2,500


DEVY SONIC


..................................................... $18,110
IT~ -$400
---$500
3iY* ----$2,500


New 2013
CHEVY TRAVERSE LS
C13288
M SRP: .................................................................... $31,920
DEALER DISCOUNT: -$665
REBATE -$1,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY- $2,500


New2013
CHEVY EQUINOX LS
C13230
M SRP:$.. ................. ................................ .... $25,015
DEALER DISCOUNT: -$800
REBATE -$1500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY: $2,500


New 2013
CHEVY MALIBU LS


M SRP:........................................................................$23,045
DFALER DISCOUNT-L: ........ . -$600
RErATEr $2,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUrfY: :- $2,500


-New 2013 Chevy
CAMARO ZL1 CONVERTIBLE
MSRP:$................................................................... $65,625
DEALER DISCOUNT: -$2,000
RE AT*E -$1,500
CASH ORTRADEEQUrY: -$2,500


AL....L..d.C rtii.


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000
MILE
Warranty'


2 YEARS OR
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE
FREE OF CHARGE!'


Plus, a FREE
PIT-STOP
PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


07 MERCURY MARINER
$9,995


07 HYUNDAI SONATA
r U12076
$9,995


10 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 10 CHEVYAVEO 08 MERCURY SABLE 11 FORD RANGER
#11874 5DOORI 11 ,UALfAl6l,,IM 112075, ElG. CABSM, U. LOW MILESI
-11/95 $11.995 $1 "s0 $ "9


09 TOYOTA RAV4 100HYSIERTOWN& COUNTRY 11 FORD CROWN VICTORIA 11 CHEVY SILVERADO REG. CAB
Io20 SwTOI6sAT POWEmaSUIGOIOS
$15,995 $16,995 $16,995 $18,750


4T EVYSILVERADO DCAB
I >P29 LTZUt LOADED
S32Z995


12 CHEVY SILVERADO
1915. CREW CAB, LTZ, LOADED
53"s995


11 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
9Cwad".uln9W rmwj'


11 CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ
IlMt. ND.LUEAElR.AVI. POWEITPSI!
S3.995


12CHEVY CRUZE ECO
$18,995

PLUS
MANY
MORETO
COOSE
FROM!


in Do For You!





:S36 months with $2,470 cash down, plus
11uliiulfy forall Incentives to obtain prices. limited
pitlons and accessories additional cost. offer


dVehicles!


~MVYMABU


11A 9'


D8 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


'f41

I klI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"Check anywhere in t

CHECK'

CHAD L


...for a New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


S i l ia


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Eqi
Stripped With Automatic, A


2Y/;
*W^
,) *I


0.9%A OVER 90 5O M6ILMTARY6MON PlUSa5DAY
X 60 MONTHS Used & CertIfed APPRECIATION OFFER 6000 MILEXCHANG
on select new Honda models Pre-Owned Vehicles! To eligible members of the US Military & their Umied Powertrain Warranty PROG RAM !
on approved credit spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you Seedealer forcomplete details.
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


rF
L'Wi


. Iobd ,


FF


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 D9









Anything They can oo...


-r j -1- it 0J
WECA 5BTTR


or we'll pay you
$5000 CASH


GUARANTEED
NEW 2013 SILVERADO 2WD
CH EVROLET EXT CAB STK#D5302
FOR UYF$2999.
i-7 OR
72s l21 988
MONTHS" PRICESALE


BUY FORP
S199/MO.

1*15988
MSRP $17,9S5


F MSRP $9-.,-20
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
MALIBU 1LS BLI' f-OP
I M259,mO.-

19488
MSRP $22,&95


'$13 88 PER THOUSAND FINANCED. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. "BUY WITH 2.99% APR, 72 MONTHS, $5000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUITY. PAYMENT INCLUDES ALL TAX, TITLE, AND LICENSE. WITH AP-
PROVED CREDIT, OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. FOR 2013 SILVERADO SWD EXT CAB CUSTOMER MUST OWN AND TRADE A 99 OR NEWER GM TRUCK. PRICE PLUS TAX, TAG & LICENSE. ALL FACTORY REBATES
AND INCENTIVES TO DEALER. BRING US AN AUTHORIZED WRITTEN BUYER'S ORDER TO PURCHASE THE IDENTICAL NEW VEHICLE FOR A LOWER PRICE FROM A FRANCHISED DEALER WITHIN 50 MILES
AND 48 HOURS. WE WILL BETTER THE PRICE OR PAY YOU $5000. PALM CHEVY MUST BE ABLE TO PURCHASE THE OTHER VEHICLE IMMEDIATELY FROM THE COMPETITORS STOCKAT THE LOWER PRICE.
ALL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. INTEREST ACCRUES FROM DATE OF PURCHASE. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS END DATE,


(tLBAIL -!11 - 4'


SIGN&DRIVE


2013 KIA
SOUL
I _


j219
MONTH LEASE


2013 KIA
OPTIMA LX


SIGN& DRIVE


2014 KIA SIGN&DRIVE 2014 KIADENZA
SORENTO LX CADENZA 0 -MILE
WARRANTY


$299 $ 319
MONTH EASE MONTH LEASE
.GIFTCARD WHILE SUPPUES LAST ONE PER CUSTOMER NO PURCHASE NECESSARY MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER "2014 KIACADEIA., 52995 DOWN So SECURITY DEPOSIT SO FIST PAYMENT LEASES ARE 36 MONTHS WITH SO DOWN SO SEC DEP S0 FIRST PA'fMENT 12K
MILES PER YEAR LESSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESS WEAR & TEAR LESSEEMUSr BE ELIGIBLE FOR KMA OWNER LOYALTY PROGRAM (OLPI OR COMPETITIVE BONUS PROGRAM (CBPI OF S500 FOR MY130PTIMAAND MY14 SORENTO E.CLUDESTA) TITLE UCENSE &DEALER
FEES WHERE OLP;CBP DOES NOI APPLY PAYMENTS WILL INCREASE TO 56 FOR M'13 OP[IMAAND S314 FOR MY14SORENTO ALL PRIOR SALES E.ALUDED ALLOFFERSEEXCLUSIVE tFOR 2013 KIAOPflMA SOULANDSORENTO SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS END DATE


D10 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Section E SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013



OME


RONT


Sikorski's
Attic PAGE E4
PAGE E4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


I r
~j~9
I


In this publicity photo provided by
Cool Springs Press. cabbage and
other vegetables planted in straw
bales are shown in Minnesota
author Joel Karsten's garden.
Karsten is the leading evangelist
of a straw-bale gardening
movement that has become one
of this summer's hottest
gardening trends.


I /


\/'


p"I. Ji.
-A-- -


I .


*,.


15m;L- A:







E2 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


LUXURIOUS VILLA
* Gorgeous Entry Beautiful Kit.
* SS Appliances Functional Center Island
* Relaxing Master Suite Many Updates
* Former Model Home Elegant Decor
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
.. I I "I IN:] I ,I 1 a I
iEmuil elliesullon *ia emux nel
www.Flo1ndLisimglnlo.com I


715 E. HARTFORD ST., HERNANDO
* 2BD/2BA Maintenance-Free Villa
* Fully Furnished Citrus Hills Club Available
* Screened Lanai Opens to Unobstructed Views
and Direct Access to Community Heated Pool
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842 L
(352) 422-3875


1UUU N. UKIuH1 I-K.
PINE RIDGE
* 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842 LL
(352) 422-3875


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


nt r h,- 82





GORGEOUS UPGRADES MUST SEE!!!
*3 BR, 2 BATH 2 Car Garage
* 1,924 Sq. R. Living Chestnut Cabinets
* Corian/Center Island Stainless Appliances
BUILT IN 2007
*SANDERSON BAY HOME

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com











REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4PM


1275 E. ALLEUGRIE DR.
CLEARVIEW ESTATES
*3BR/2.5BA/2CG Citrus Hills Lg Great Room
* Master Suite w/Private Office Pool & LanaiArea
* Lots of Upgrades View of Equestrian Trails

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net










WATERFRONT BEAUTY
close to Homosassa River Built in 2002, granite, summer
kitchen 2 docks, one w/lift, tile, neutral colors thru-out. Hobby
room off garage w/h&a. Private lagoon out back & canal on
side, across the street from river. $375,000 and you could be
scalloping next month!
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com


MANY UPGRADES!
Built 2006 Wide Open Spaces
4bd/2bth/2 car garage 42" Kitchen Cabinets
Granite Countertops Hurricane Shutters
*16" Neutral Tile
Pre Wired for Generator
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotis@aol.com
Weisile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.corn


3/2/2 with pool, 1789 living area. Built 2008,
all appliances, security system. Washer and
dryer. Beautiful finishing touches, fenced
backyard, large shed for storage.
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.iinet9









3/2 1700+ SQ. FI. MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Crystal
River. Tons of space for your family. Fully-fenced & electric
gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large
storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio,
screened back porch, 2 car attached carport, BBQ
pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call
for your private showing and fall in love. I
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


1220 E. WHIRL AWAY, INVERNESS, FL
* Pristine 3 bed 2 bath pool home.
* 1727 sq. ft. with many upgrades.
* Belmont Hills community
* Original owners show pride of ownership.
* Second home was hardly used.
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491 I[-
Email: pjparvi@yahoo.com


2012 FOREST DR., INVERNESS
* Move-in ready 2/2/1 Maintenance-free condo
* Eat-in kitchen + dining Glass/screen FL rm.
* Vaulted ceilings Pool community
* Open floor plan Great location
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


2421 N. Leana Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


SHOW ME THE MONEY!!
YOU WONT FIND A NICER PROPERTY IN MEADOWCRESTII
Extremely well-kept doesn't even begin to describe this home Interior
features includes two master suites, separate living roomlfamily
rooms, inside laundry, upgraded kitchen, new flooring and large
enclosed patio Master bath boasts dual sinks, walk-in closet and
huge walk in shower Property is ideally located next to community
clubhouse with two large pools overlooking park-setting
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


ENCLAVE OF SUGARMILL WOODS
* Elegant 3BR/2BA/2CG Pool Home.
* Living Rm./Family Rm Style, 11 Ft. Ceilings
* Formal DR & Den/Office or 4th BR
* Open flowing split floor plan
* 16'x33' Heated Inground Pool, Lrg. Lanai
* Fully Landscaped, Sep. Irrig. Well
* Meticulously Maintained, Corner Lot H i
LOU NALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: Iounalley@tampabay.rr.com







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How to remove dye transfer on clothes


D ear Sara: My mother-in-
law recently gave me a
pair of maternity shorts
that were white. This was only
the second pair of maternity
shorts I have and summer is
here. Well, I needed something
red washed and without think-
ing, I threw these shorts in the
same load. So, now they're pink.
Do you know of some "secret"
to get the pink out? I know I can
find dye in the grocery store, so I
was thinking maybe I could dye
them a darker color. I just hate
to throw them away, and I don't
want to cut them up for rags, ei-
ther. I've never dyed anything
before and I know that I can't do
it in my washer (we rent, and


there are signs all over the laun-
dry room telling us not to dye
clothing in the washers). -
Sarah, Massachusetts
Dear Sarah: You can soak
them overnight in OxiClean or
Tide Stain Release, then laun-
der as usual. If this doesn't work,
Rit makes color remover dye.
You can use Rit dye in a bucket
to dye them a darker color, too.
Dear Sara: We have an extra
piano that has not been played in
nearly 4 years. I would like to give
it to someone, the only problem is
that I am afraid whoever moves it
will drop it on the Italian marble
they would have to move it over
But I want it out of here. Any sug-
gestions? -ED., email


Dear ED.: I would
place an ad and state
that you request the
piano be profession-
ally moved because of
your expensive floor-
ing and to avoid any
other types of damage
to your home (i.e.
doorways, lawn, etc.).
Assuming it's in good Sara
condition, I'm sure FRU
you'll find a good LIV
home for it, even with
the added cost of moving it pro-
fessionally This helps the buyer
protect against damages to the
piano and their home, too. You
can contact churches, schools,
community centers or even used


piano sellers to see if
they might want it, if
you don't have luck
with your ad.
^ Dear Sara: I am
thinking of going to
our local farmers'
market for the first
time this weekend.
How often do you go?
Noel Is it worth it? Can you
GAL get items at a decent
ING price? MM,
Minnesota
DearM.M.: I enjoy going to the
farmers' market. I don't go as
often as I used to, but I make a
point of going at least once each
year. Every market is different,
so the prices might not beat your


grocery store prices, and if they
do, it might not be by much. Ei-
ther way, I like supporting local
growers, buying fresher, higher-
quality items and finding items
that aren't always available at
my local grocery store. To in-
crease your chances of getting a
decent deal at the farmers' mar-
ket, you can buy a higher quan-
tity or become a regular
customer, buy right before ven-
dors pack up for the day or on a
slow, rainy day, or simply ask for
a deal. Most of all, know your
grocery store prices so you can
compare costs.
MEl

See FRUGAL/Page E7


Spcalzn in Ter6it

-t&BrnwodReae
ww .Tra itaeaty rop ao


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


.. DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2.5 CAR, HILLSIDE DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Well maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage plus den, an Come savor the best of Florida. Conveniently located near the main
Spectacular Terra Vista home. 3 Bedroom, 3 bath, 2 1/2 car garage, situated on Stunning pool home with a breathtaking view of the Golf Course. Perfect for expanded Laurel model, extensive oak molding around windows, entrance of Terra Vista. Well maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
a cul-de-sac on premiere street, with beautiful views. Custom details with entertaining. Upgraded landscaping. Hardwood flooring throughout. Crown crown molding in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry oak cabinets garage, plus den. A totally open floor plan with a triple sliding door
upgrades galore. Professionally decorated, shows like a brand new home with molding, upgraded lighting fixtures and ceiling fans. Outdoor kitchen and so with crown molding extra footage in bedrooms and den, a must see that takes you to the pavered lanai with a great hedge in back for
a perfect floor plan. Pool, spa, extended lanaiwith extensive landscape. much more. Come see the quality that went into this home. at this price in Terra Vista. extra privacy. Located on a street with very little traffic.
M LS 704118 ............................................................................................... $ 4 4 9 ,0 0 0 M LS700921 ............................................................................ $ 2 9 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 357742 ............................................................................ $ 2 3 2 ,0 0 0 M LS 702296 ......................................................................... $ 1 7 9 ,9 0 0
BRENTWOOD DU 5 A DETACHED VILLA
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SOUTHATE VILLAS (plus a den, 3 bath 2 car, 5375 sq. ft. pool home n the exclusive Very nce fully furnished mantanedvlla on a less traveled street n TO2 CARWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD
2.5 BATH, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Very nIce 2 bed-, .,, fabu-
room, 2.5 bath, 1 car course
garage town home ,,- ,,1 you
n etahe beautiful gated community of Brentwood. Grea t room with have lots of room with upgrades such as Coodan countertops, dual
during and dining combo, eato. Enjoy kitchen. Spacious bedrooms ocal ktchen-greatspace for entertanng. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on th ne windows, energy efficient radiant barrier Nice neutral colorsvng area Half bath downstairs. Lana very private with no neighbors behind it.
upstairs, master suite with walk-in closet. Leave the yard and BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 2 BED 2.5 BATH 1 CAR complement this model. You will fall in love with the views from your Very popular Widwad mode 3 bedr om plus den 2.5 baths, great
exterior maintenance to others while you enjoy the new fitness Beautiful Townhouse in Brentwood! 2 Bedroom/2.5 bath/i car garage oversized lanai which overlooks a Koi pond with waterfall. The room floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades. Situated on
center & spa, golf, swimming, restaurants, social activities and Maple cabinets & Cornan counters in kitchen, screened porch Private backdrop is a lushes landscape of Majestic Oaks and greenery. Skyview golf course with breathe taking views. Oversized lanai with
much more! community pool &club amenitibershp ncludesed Lvethe Florida lifestyle-sacs over Located in a mainteoks the p anced screened action ofTerra Vista. lush landscape. Located in the premiere community of Terra Vista.
M LS 702404 .................... ... ................... .................. .......... $ 1 14,90 0 M LS 702289 ........................... M L 702401....................... ......... ............... $ 2 3 0 0 273 .. . .. ............................ ..................... $ 2 9 1,0 0 0 M LS 702685 .................................................... ..................... $ 3 3 4 ,9 0 0









EXCEPTIONAL AND FABULOUS describe this 3 bedroom DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEWVILLAS
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SOUTHGATE VILLAS (plus a den), 3 bath 2 car, 5375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive Very nice fully furnished maintained villa on a less traveled street in TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD
Detached Villa in Terra Vista. 2 bedrooms 2 bath with a den. Fully upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island Terra Vista. Lovely 2 bedroom with a den, separate eat-in kitchen with Brentwood Town Home unfurnished, 2 bed, 2.5 baths, 1 car garage.
furnished, ready to move into. Enjoy maintenance free living. Social kitchen great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the pass through breakfast bar. Combination dining and living area Half bath downstairs. Lanai very private with no neighbors behind it.
membership included, extended screened Lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. overlooks the paved screened lanai. Social Club Membership Included. Social Membership included.
# 3322 ............................................................................................. $ 1 ,5 0 0 # 5375 ........................................................................................ $ 2 3 0 0 # 1273 ............................................................................................... $ 1 2 5 0 # 1659 .................................................................................................. $ 9 0 0


REALTY GROUP


M


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E3


t
Iq
rl






E4 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci ii:)MICLEE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wet weather brings



out pocket gophers


Sand-mound engineers well-adapted for digging

As a result of all the rainfall we have it carries soil from the burrow in these
been enjoying this summer, you pouches is false. The lips close behind the
may have noticed many fresh sand protruding chisel-like front teeth so the
mounds popping up in fields in gopher can chew through
higher and dryer areas around dense soil or large roots with-
Citrus County. out getting dirt in its mouth.
The southeastern pocket go- Gophers dig extensive tun-
phers, Geomys pineti, also 4 nel systems and are rarely
known as the sandy-mounder seen on the surface. The aver-
or salamander, have been age tunnel length is 145 feet,
working in overdrive refur- and at least one tunnel was fol-
bishing and shoring up their lowed for 525 feet. The soil go-
burrows and cavities. The re- phers remove while digging
sults of their activities are the Joan Bradshaw their tunnels is pushed to the
tan mounds of sand that many FLORIDA- surface to form the character-
mistakenly think are ant FRIENDLY istic rows of sand mounds.
mounds. Nests and food storage cham-
The pocket gopher is a ro- LIVING bers are located in these
dent that is well adapted for its deeper tunnels.
life underground. It has very small eyes The most common problem associated
and ears and large claws on its powerful with gophers is the numerous large,
front legs. The term "pocket" refers to the sandy mounds they deposit on the
fur-lined cheek pouches that the gopher
uses to carry food. The old wives' tale that See GOPHERS/Page E5


Inside...


Straw man
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E10
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E6
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Wooden box an enigma; secrets of old pocketwatch


Dear John: Do you have
any idea of what this
is? The box has sev-
eral dates carved
into it. Any infor-
mation would be
appreciated. -
JP, Internet
Dear J.P: In
order to help you I
need more com-
plete photographs.
All I can see is a bit
of carved surface
and the carved John S
date 1817. The SIKOF
item might be a AT
document box. It
looks interesting,
but that is all I can say until I
get better photographs.
Dear John: Recently, I ac-
quired a new plaything, a mi-
croscope which attaches to
my computer and allows you


k


1


to take digital photographs at
various magnifications.
I have been thinking that
this would be a
great tool to help
with research on
trademarks, etc.
The trademarks on
S?. the watch are too
small to photo-
S graph even with a
macro lens. The at-
tached photos
through the micro-
ikorski scope show the de-
SKI'S tail better than I
TIC thought possible.
We have a small,
open-face pocket-
type watch we assume to be a
ladies Swiss or French watch.
It is 34.5 millimeters in diam-
eter, 11.5 millimeters thick,
with an engraved floral silver
back.


The face is white enamel,
rose gold hands, black roman
numerals with blue numbers
in the outer band. It winds at
12 and has a small pin to set
time.
The only words anywhere
on the watch are "Cylindre
Dix Rubis Remontoir" on the
inside back. We think that
stands for 10 jewels
stemwind. The case is
marked 0.800 in a rectangle,
so we assume it to be 80 per-
cent silver. There are various
small trademarks on the
brass works. The movement
is not numbered.
The case is marked inside
both backs with a peacock
running. These trademarks
are much too small to photo-
graph legibly Could you help
us find these trademarks and
thus figure out who made the


watch and perhaps when?
We assume that it came
with my wife's grandmother
from Norway about 1900. It
has been in my wife's posses-
sion since about 1980. -M. &
R.H., Internet
Dear M. & R.H.: I think
your ladies open-face
stemwind watch was made in
Switzerland. You are correct
the watchcase is made of .800
silver; it appears to be in
rather worn condition.
Watches like yours were
manufactured in large quan-
tities during the late 19th to
early 20th century, the time
See ATTIC/Page E5
This carved wooden box is
a bit of a mystery. It might be
a container for holding
documents.
Special to the Chronicle


1-

- ,


4
., I, ~2%,
h-.-:. 4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOPHERS
Continued from Page E4

surface. Occasionally, go-
phers will feed on the roots
or tubers of garden, orna-
mental or crop plants.
In natural settings, go-
pher tunneling activities
are beneficial. The soil go-
phers bring to the surface
contains nutrients leached
from surface soils. This nat-
ural fertilizer helps to main-
tain the sandhill ecosystem.


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E5


The mounds of loose soil
provide needed germina-
tion sites for some native
plant seeds. Many amphib-
ians and reptiles use gopher
mounds as homes, including
Florida's unique mole
skinks. The gopher tunnels
themselves serve as habitat
for many unique inverte-
brates that are found
nowhere else.
For more information, con-
tact Citrus County Extension
at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-


versity of Florida/IFAS's
knowledge, research and re-
sources to address youth,
family, community and agri-
cultural needs. Programs
and activities offered by the
Extension Service are avail-
able to all persons without
regard to race, color, handi-
cap, sex, religion or national
origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the
Director for Citrus County
University of Florida/IFAS
Extension.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of submitted
material. The earlier Chronicle editors receive submissions, the better
chance of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Saturday.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

your watch was made. I was
not able to identify the hall-
marks on your watchcase.
In the pocket watch cat-
egory, interest in these
watches is low. Potential
dollar value is below $50.
Dear John: I would be
grateful to know just how
much the piece in the copy
of a picture I enclosed is
worth. It was given to me
twenty years ago by a very
wealthy lady as a gift.
Thank you very much for
any information. D.F,
Homosassa
Dear D.F: The title of
your figurine is Sleepy-
head, depicting a young
girl sleeping in an uphol-
stered, brightly colored
chair with her teddy bear
at her side. It is one of the
more desirable Royal
Doulton figurines made in
the 1950s. Currently, po-
tential dollar value is in
the $1,000 range, perhaps


more on a lucky day
Dear John: I have an old
banjo clock, which has
been in the family forever
We thought it might be a
Willard and then, maybe a
Howard. The latest idea is
possibly a Tift. I would
send you a picture but the
clock is back home on
Cape Cod. -JR., Internet
Dear J.R.: Banjo clocks
are a very popular type of
clock in the clock-collect-
ing world. If your banjo
clock was made by Willard
or the Howard Clock Com-
pany, it would be wonder-
ful for you. I will be glad to
help. Make sure your pho-
tos are good and clear


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


RealLor. A HOUSE Realtor@
5302-3179 SOLaDName! 2879022 W
746-6700
The Golden Gir WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.

579 W. Cherry Laurel Beautiful
One of a kind Villa. Great room,
i dining, and den (which could
easily be converted into 2nd
bedroom). Wood cabinets in eat-
in kitchen. Large screened lanai
with gorgeous view. Turn key.!!


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


3 CHINKAPIN CT.
3/3/2 702854 $138,500


1503 & 1525 W EVERGREEN 137 N FRESNO 2275 N. EUSTIS PT.
552cargarage achedand a deahedgaage0099 $259900 3/2/2. 701884 $124,900 2/2/1. 703801 $89,900

_ _


9142 N. AKOLA WAY 2435 W. ERIC
3/2/2 702470 $125,000 2/1/1 701256 $49,900


87 S. LUCILLE 2178 S. WIGWAM 59 S. JACKSON 19 MEADOWDALE 52 S. FILLMORE
2/2/2 703454 $79,500 3/2 703669 $49,995 2/2/1 703481 $55,900 2/1.5/1 703687 $64,900 2/1/1 704090 $49,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


2 HOMES CITRUS SPRINGS


BEELYHLS.I


I






CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Clinic to look at


drought tolerance


Special to the Chronicle

Regardless of our ex-
pected weather patterns,
it is always a good idea to
know and properly place
plants that are drought
tolerant.
The free July monthly
Citrus County Extension
Service Master Gardener
Plant Clinic topic will be
"Drought Tolerant Trees &
Shrubs." There are trees
and shrubs, both native
and exotic, which will per-
form well in Citrus County


The remaining July
free plants clinic is at
2 p.m. Tuesday, July 23, at
Homosassa Library
Questions about land-
scape, samples for plant
identification or garden-
related problems are wel-
come. Master gardener
volunteers will be avail-
able to address these and
other concerns regarding
anything related to home
landscaping.
For more information,
call the Extension Serv-
ice at 352-527-5700.


Real Estate DIGEST


ERA American agents
continue to shine
ERA
American
Realty & In-
vestments
is proud to
announce
the latest
production
level Dawn Bobbi
achieved by Theroux DiLego
its agents ERA ERA
for 2013 American American
for Dawn013. Realty. Realty.
Dawn
Theroux has surpassed the $3 million
mark in closed sales volume in 2013.
Bobbi DiLego and Joanna Morris have
surpassed the $1 million mark in closed
sales volume in 2013.


Lr A .Ml R ..orAMERICAN
L. OU E RealorU ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.

cell: (352) 697-1685 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Cell: (352) 697-1685 f r-7-Ann


Joanna
Morris
ERA
American
Realty.


Debra
McFarland
ERA
American
Realty.


sara
Denny
ERA
American
Realty.


ERAAmerican Realty is proud to rec-
ognize the achievement of these fine
real estate professionals.
Dawn can be reached at the Inver-
ness office of ERAAmerican Realty by
calling 352-726-5855, or by email at
dawntherouxera@tampabay.rr.com.
Bobbi can be reached at the Beverly
Hills office of ERAAmerican Realty by
calling 352-746-3600. Joanna can be
reached at the Inverness office by calling
352-726-5855.
ERA is also pleased to announce that
Debra McFarland has recently joined
the company's Inverness office, where
she will work as a sales associate. She
has served the real estate needs for buy-
ers and sellers in all of Citrus County
since 2006.
Call Debra at 352-726-5855 or 352-
422-5835.
Sara Denny also recently joined ERA,
and will work in the company's Inverness
office specializing in residential sales.
Call her at 352-726-5855.
Maisel soars at
EXIT Realty
EXIT Realty Leaders
wishes to congratulate
John Maisel for closing
more than $2.3 million so
far in 2013.
John is a professional John
agent who brings a wealth Maisel
of knowledge to every EXIT Realty
transaction and is always Leaders.
committed to providing excellent service
to his clients.
Reach him at 352-794-0888, or visit his
website at www.exitrealtyleaders.com.

Bruce R Brunk, ReCt r&i ii
itrusSold.


Cheryl
Nadal
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Peter
Korol
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Marvia
Korol
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Agents hit new highs
with RE/MAX
The brokers and staff of RE/MAX Re-
alty One are pleased to announce that
Cheryl Nadal, along with the team of
Peter and Marvia Korol, have qualified
for the 2013 multimillion dollar club.
With more than $2 million in closed
sales volume already this year, Cheryl,
Peter and Marvia join a select group of
agents who have achieved this milestone.
Peter and Marvia are a husband and
wife team who work out of the Lecanto of-
fice on County Road 491. Cheryl works out
of the Crystal River RE/MAX office and
has been a Realtor for almost 30 years.


Byron
Jones
Villages of
Citrus Hills.


E..

Tim
Hume
Villages of
Citrus Hills.


Wayne
Saxer
Villages of
Citrus Hills.


New blood at Villages
of Citrus Hills
Three new sales associates have
joined the Villages of Citrus Hills team.
Byron Jones, a native of Winston-
Salem, N.C., came to Citrus County follow-
ing a 30-year career in law enforcement.
Tim Hume, originally from Buffalo,
N.Y, relocated to Citrus County two
years ago from Tampa. As a professional
golfer, Tim spent a number of years on
the Canadian Tour.
The third new associate is Wayne
Saxer, who moved to Citrus County 14
years ago and has been a licensed real
estate agent since 2002
The Welcome Center for the Villages
of Citrus Hills is located at 2400 N. Terra
Vista Blvd. in Citrus Hills. More informa-
tion online at www.CitrusHills.com.


E6 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

Hot dogs are versatile
leftovers. They're easily
frozen and reheated later
Cut some in half, roll them
in crescent dough and add
some cheese for pigs in a
blanket. They can be
added to macaroni and
cheese or chili, too.
The first reader shares a
couple of other ideas:
Leftover hot dogs: I had
a bunch of leftover hot
dogs recently, so I chopped
some up and made hot dog
sloppy joes (I used my
usual recipe for the sloppy
joe sauce). I also ground
some up and added a
diced egg and mayo to
make "ham" salad for
lunches. -Denise, Illinois
Potato biscuits: Use a
cup of fresh or leftover
mashed potatoes in your
next batch of biscuits or
buns, and they'll be fluffy
and delicious. Even refrig-
erated for a few days now,
my biscuits have not
turned into hockey pucks.
-I.C., email
Note from Sara: While
the mashed potatoes can
simply be added to most
any biscuit recipe, here's a
recipe in case you don't
have one: allrecipes.
com/recipe/tender-potato-
biscuits.
Facebook swap groups:
I've been selling on our
local Facebook garage
sale/buy/sell/swap sites.
Once you find one and join
it, more local groups you
can join will show up on
the right-hand side of the
page. I'm now in about 10
groups. I've been doing
this for about six weeks,
and I've sold quite a bit.
Take pictures and give an
accurate description, just
as you would if you were
listing on eBay. Make the
meeting public and close
enough to home or work to


not waste gas. Read the
rules well before listing. -
Niko, Florida
Homemade Jewelry
Cleaner: This stuff works
great!
1 tablespoon salt.
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 tablespoon dish-
washing liquid.
1 cup water.
Heat water in the mi-
crowave for 1 or 2 minutes.
Place a piece of aluminum
foil in the bottom of a
small bowl. Pour hot water
into bowl. Place salt, soda
and dishwashing liquid
into bowl. Place jewelry in
and let it sit for 5 to 10 min-
utes. Rinse jewelry in cool
water and dry completely
with soft cloth. Discard so-
lution after use and make
a new batch next time.
I kept the old basket
from my store-bought jew-
elry cleaner, and I use that
to get the jewelry in and
out of the bowl or mug. I
also use the old brush to
get into the crevices. If you
don't have these, use an
old toothbrush and pour
the water/jewelry through
a small strainer You don't
want to lose that jewelry
down the drain! Jone-
sie, Pennsylvania
Note from Sara: Please
proceed with caution.
While many readers have
shared they got terrific re-
sults, some have said it
made their silver pieces
worse. Also, do not use on
any opal jewelry.
Clean dishwasher: I take
my machine apart every
six months or so and scrub
everything. Between these
cleaning, I run an empty
machine with vinegar in
the bottom and a cup of
vinegar on the top. Wipe it
out when finished. Mine
used to get gunked up until
I started using Cascade
Complete gel, which came
highly recommended. It is
more expensive, but since
I've switched, I don't have
to scrub it as often. I've


tried the dishwasher
cleaners, but they don't do
any better than my current
method. -JM., Missouri
[-
Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, com-
ments or questions, write
to Sara Noel, c/o Univer-
sal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
St., Kansas City MO 64106,
or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


Gardening management


workshop scheduled


Slated for August 20


Special to the Chronicle

A workshop will run
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Aug. 20, at the Citrus
County Extension Serv-
ices Building, 3650 W Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto, to


introduce gardening best
management practices.
Successful gardening de-
pends on utilizing manage-
ment practices which have
been proven effective.
Florida-friendly Land-
scaping Practices and the


nine basic principles en-
courage gardeners to prac-
tice proper methods of
fertilization, responsible
pest management and effi-
cient watering, while also
conserving and protecting
natural resources.
To register, call Steve at
352-527-5708 or email steven.
davis@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744



For a Vita Tou orM lilePoo,


-tits 4UU I UakoTaTi
MLS 702580 $224,900
2bd/3ba pool home w/den on the golf course.
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd,
right on Dakota Ct.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


' I I. I. . .. .
fU MLS 703171 $395,'
Everything you everwanted in this
5bd/3.5ba home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


M. 218 S Harrison SI
MLS 701727 $68,900
Remodeled & updated 2/2/1. Centrally
located.
Directions: CR 491 to east on Truman,
left on Harrison.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261


.T ip ," '.--*..- .; *,,.-. ,-_=
7ZA MLS 702034 S350,000
Spacious, well maintained home with
expansive views of #9 on The Ranch
Course.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


/'1? a 244 W Rom any Loop
Z MLS 704148 $275,000
Beautiful 3bd/2.5ba pool home with so
many upgrades & features.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086






460 W Doerr Path
MLS 356086 $310,000
Stunning 3bd/2.5ba Villa overlooking 6th
Fairway of Skyview Golf Course.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


b t 3146 N Yacht Ter
MLS 703168 $430,000
EXQUISITE details & landscape.
Custom built 3/3/3; 5+ acres.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


"WS 3747 N Tyrone Ave
MLS 703297 $239,900
3bd/2.5ba pool home on a 1 acre
wooded lot.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787


i5 55 N Fresno Ave ? C 5215 N Carnalion Dr ,11 1835 W Nicole Dr
il.l 1 .., S185.000 MLS 359357 $178,900 L :i: : SI'9.900 l 130W Casurina PI
Great deal on this spacious 3bd/2ba Beautiful &well maintained with 2bd/2ba maintenance free villa w/open MLS 701745 $66,900
home w/manyfeatures. NEW ROOF. floor plan. Pristine 2/2, well maintained home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 Joy Holland 352-464-4952
S2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
s Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EYEEEEl

JOEL KARSTEN IS

THE GURU OF THE

LATEST TREND IN

GARDENING


SARAH WOLFE
Associated Press
Bad soil? Not enough
soil? Maybe even no
soil?
Skip the ground
and try planting fruits
and vegetables in straw
bales instead, suggests
Joel Karsten, author of
"Straw Bale Gardens"
(Cool Springs Press, 2013)
and guru of one of this
year's gardening trends.
The idea behind straw-
bale gardening is simple.
"It's basically a differ-
ent type of container gar-
den," says Karsten, of
Roseville, Minn.
Only the vessel is a bale
of straw and the medium, a
nutrient-rich compost cre-
ated by the straw and a bit
of fertilizer, is weed-free.
That's right. No weeds.
Perhaps that's what's
drawn tens of thousands
of people to Karsten's
Facebook page on straw-
bale gardening.
Marketing executive
Patricia Baker tried the


technique as a way to
avoid the weeds that
abound in the heavy, clay
soil at her home in the
Berkshire mountains of
Massachusetts.
"I found that some
plants did better than oth-
ers basically the ones
that like the heat, like
peppers," says Baker, 51,
who also had success
growing tomatoes.
"Overall, there are very
few weeds to contend
with and you don't have a
backache at the end of
your gardening day Also,
after you harvest, you can
use the leftover straw for
mulch."
Straw-bale gardening
lengthens the growing sea-
son in colder climates be-
cause the straw releases
heat as it decomposes.
In Jamestown, R.I., gar-
dener and freelance
writer Roger Marshall, 65,
planted tomatoes in April
and expected to begin
picking his Earl Greys


Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STRAW
Continued from Page E8

and beefsteaks in mid-July about
a month ahead of schedule.
"Right now the plants are lush
and about twice the size of the con-
trol tomatoes I planted directly in
front of the bales," he says.
For Karsten, a 43-year-old gradu-
ate of the University of Minnesota's
horticulture program, the idea
sprang from his days on the family
farm. As a child, he was intrigued
by the thistles and other plants he'd
see sprouting from wet bales of
straw, and he wondered how they
grew. After college, he began exper-
imenting with straw bales as a
growing medium at his suburban
St. Paul home, which sat at the
edge of a swamp on top of construc-
tion fill.
"I couldn't grow vegetables in


Cool Springs Press/Associated Press
what I had, so I thought, 'What if I
use straw bales like I saw up
against the side of the barn?"' says
Karsten.
After some trial and error, he fig-
ured out how to "condition" the
bale for planting.
Karsten offers these tips to start
your own straw-bale garden (and,
no, it's not too late this season):
What you'll need
First, be sure to buy straw bales,
not hay Hay bales contain seeds,
which will grow into weeds, and
isn't that one big reason you're try-
ing straw-bale gardening in the
first place?
Hay bales are typically green
while straw bales are a golden yel-
low. You can find them at many
nurseries and garden stores, and
Karsten has also started a website
(www.strawbalemarket.com) to
help people find bales for sale.
See Page E10


OWNER SAYS BRING OFFER Luiy, -lui, I GREAT PRICE AND OWi
country home on 1.6 AC. 3600 E. Perry St., Owner Will 1983 2/2 mobile on fully fei
Finance, $174,900, ,#356550. 6776 W. Sasser, Homosassa, $'


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E9






CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gymnosperms


in the garden


J ust about
everyone
loves to
have a gym-
nosperm in the
house during
the winter. It is
pronounced
" j i m n o -
sperm": it
means "naked Jane'
seeds." Flow-
ering plants JAIN
are called an- GAR
giosperms and
produce seeds formed in
ovaries.
Gymnosperms are non-
flowering plants having
naked seeds in cones.
Pines, cedars, cypresses
and cycads are the most


I




well-known
gymnosperms
in Florida.
Red Cedar,
Juniperus vir-
giniana, is a
fragrant, ever-
green native
tree ranging
throughout
Weber eastern North
America south
E'S to Central
DEN Florida in
Zones 3 to 9.
Tiny male cones are yel-
lowish. Female cones are
round, bluish and berry-
like, produced in late
summer in dense, showy
See Page E12


Jackie Davis
I American Realty & Investments
MEN 117 s. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell
..L ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bidavis.co


Associated Press/Cool Springs Press
Minnesota author and gardener Joel Karsten picks tomatoes
from his straw bale garden.


STRAW
Continued from Page E9

About 15 bales will provide the same plant pro-
duction as a 20-by-20-foot traditional soil garden.
Karsten suggests using about five bales per per-
son you want to feed.
You'll also need a soaker hose and 2 1/2 cups per
bale of lawn fertilizer that's at least 20 percent ni-
trogen, with no added herbicides. If you're going
the organic route, Karsten recommends using
three pounds of blood meal per bale.
Conditioning the bale
Before planting, you need to "condition" the
straw bales for 10 to 12 days.
First, lay them out as you want them in the gar-
den, placing them end to end in a row and turning
them up on their sides.
Every other day, sprinkle some of whatever fer-
tilizer you're using over the bale and "wash" it into
the bale with a spray hose, watering long enough
that water comes out from under the bale, Karsten
says. On days you don't fertilize the bale, keep wa-
tering it once a day until saturation.
On the 12th day, you should be ready to plant on
the tops and even the sides of the bales, spacing
the plants as you normally would.
If planting seeds, lay down 1 to 2 inches of pot-
ting soil on top of the bales first.
Maintenance
There's not a lot of maintenance required, but
Karsten does recommend watering the bales every
day when it's hot with a soaker hose or a dripper
system with one hose down into the middle of the
bale. Every two to three days is fine in the spring
and fall.
Trellises are needed for taller or climbing plants
like tomatoes and beans, and Karsten recommends
covering the bales with a tarp if temperatures are
going to dip to 30 degrees or lower at night.
Many times, you can use a bale two years in a
row, but after that, it's time to pile them together
for use as compost next spring.


CLASSIC and CLASSY
A 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, POOL home with an
office, a 2-car garage, a circular driveway, and a
tile roof. Hardwood floors, remodeled hall bath
and kitchen with granite, stainless steel
appliances (convection wall oven) that opens to
the family room. Sitting on an acre and looking so
proud. MLS #704244 $235,000


WITH 3 CAR GARAGE ON DOUBLE LOTS BIKE OR WALK TO PUBLIC!!!
* Landscaped wth Concrete Curbing Real Brick New Roof 2006 New Heat Pump 2009
* Huge Master Double Closets* Freplacewith Built In Bookcase Big Dining Room Open Great Room to Kitchen
* Corian Kitchen & Granie Island Hardwood &ile Fooring Tile in Kitchen & Halls Solar Heat for Pool
$247,500 MLS#704000 $158,900 MLS#702477
Take my vtuaI toW ,


213 BUILDING LOTS-CITRUS COUNTY
Westchase subdivision. 83.5 acres total. BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Phase I has 52 lots ready to build on now! 3BR/2BA/2 car garage in Inverness Highlands.
$895,000 MLS#703937 Enclosed porch & screen porch. $75,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
I Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours a52 302-6714 "


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'
NANCY Direct:
PONTICOS 352-634-4225
Multi-Million $$$ Producer A KEY 1 REALTY INC.
88015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com
i iiD [,1|.i : d I '] qi'. ['],',I =[-aj.] ',I =[-j1 ^


E10 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


With lawns, think beyond grass



Other alternatives offer many benefits


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Grass isn't always the best ground-
covers for a yard: It's thirsty at a
time when water is becoming
scarce; it attracts fewer pollinators;
it requires expensive chemicals to
maintain, and it must be disposed of
if you bag as you mow.
That's why many property owners
are downsizing their lawns or simply
eliminating turf grass in exchange
for something more functional and
less demanding.


"We're recommending ecosystem
changes provided by a more produc-
tive landscape, instead of a mono-
culture from grass," says Susan
Barton, an extension horticulturist
with the University of Delaware. 'A
lawn should not be a default vegeta-
tion, but it should be more purpose-
ful. More diverse."
She suggests four alternatives to
turf grass: landscape beds, mead-
ows, woods and paved, permeable
hardscapes.

See LAWNS/Page E12


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
The lawn remains the centerpiece in this yard in Langley, Wash., but it was greatly downsized and
shaped by a landscaped perimeter consisting of furniture, statuary and a variety of perennials. Less
mowing, less watering and fewer chemicals were the result. It attracts more wildlife, too.


- OOOBOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com







NATURE LOVERS life
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very flo
secluded and private setting n ,o
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture aw
and mature oaks. Take the tour at pai
the
ML_ 35:9 6 $379,000 M







QUICK TRIP OUT INTO
THE GULF OF MEXICO! ...
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and ceil
boat slip on deep water canal no cus
bridges to the Crystal Rivert Tile floors, 2
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and ent
windows; great income potential, too y cov
MLS 359564 $189,000







CLASSIC AND L
CONTEMPORARY Thi
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront life
estate w/pool and separate apartment A pin
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sun
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for ple
your family to move right in! toy
MLS #357471 $399,500


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR@
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com






VILLAGES OF CITRUS HILLS
1li known for an active Florida
style! 3/2/2 home on 1 acre, open LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
or plan, wood burning fireplace, a 2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
..11;... 1 and spacious covered community on Lake Tsala Apopka
.. .you feel at home right Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
ay A recent remodel included new floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
nt and flooring, and A/C, range and privacy You will love to call this comfy
garage door were replaced in 2012 house your home! MLS703427
LS700472 $139,000 $109,000





COUNTRY ESTATE -
PLEASANT GROVE GET YOUR
I in built GOLF CART READY!
," .... i, ,i i ,, quality This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mitch Underwood
oughout vaulted tongue & groove 3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home n the center
wings, fireplace; granite counters & of the back nine of the Pine Ridge Golf
tomn cabmetry; family room, den/office, Course might be your well-deserved haven
+ 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
ertanmg' Jenn-Air summer kitchen, ..... ..' r...i .... smart
ered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings .. .. i
$549.900 I -, ,I 5$292.000


GIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
is classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acre lot in quiet neighborhood
style Open and airy with the onAmbrdge Pt nexttothe Withlacoochee
light 190 ft of seawall gives you State Forest and the train s but also very close to
nty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sq ft this 3/3/2 pool home
s imaginable! offers a lot of space
MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $122.000


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E11







E12 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


LAWNS Other replaceable options
Continued from Page Ei include boulevards, driveways


'All of these provide
more ecologic service,"
she says. "We're talking
clean water. More habi-
tat for insects. More oxy-
gen taken in and less
carbon dioxide given
off."
Barton helped get a
county landscape ordi-
nance passed a decade
or so ago allowing "man-
aged meadows" to re-
place grass in
residential front yards.
These no-mow areas fil-
ter water, encourage the
return of native plants
that provide food and
cover for wildlife, and
still have curb appeal.
'"A managed meadow
isn't simply a matter of
letting your grass grow
long," she says. "It means
mowing paths through it
and adding edges where
needed. If people think
about it and make it look
good, there's no reason
why it shouldn't be part
of suburbia."
Downsizing or replac-
ing turf isn't simple or
cheap, but it can be done
in stages. Start with your
toughest-to-grow or
hardest-to-mow sections.
"Use the 80-20 plan
where 20 percent of your


area requires 80 percent
of your maintenance,"
says Evelyn Hadden, a
founding member of the
Lawn Reform Coalition
and author of "Beautiful
No-Mow Yards" (Timber
Press, 2012).
"Hillsides are a good
example," Hadden says.
"The steeper they are,
the more difficult they
are to mow. Replaced
with the proper plants,
they can moderate
(water) runoff."
Other replaceable op-
tions include boule-
vards, driveways and
pockets overgrown by
weeds or moss.
"Look first at areas
where the grass is al-
ready suffering "that
strip along the street
that's hard to water or
trampled by people get-
ting off the bus," says
Pam Penick, a garden
designer from Austin,
Texas, and author of
"Lawn Gone!: Low-
Maintenance, Sustain-
able, Attractive Alterna-
tives for Your Yard" (Ten
Speed Press, 2013).
Use ecological grasses


if you don't want to elim-
inate turf, Penick says.
"Fine fescue lawns grow
slowly and can get by
with less rainfall and
less mowing. Those are
good options for people
who want to fit in with
their neighborhoods but
don't want to be slaves to
their lawns," she says.
Or "consider ornamen-
tal grasses," she adds, or
"some of the new ground-
covers (aromatic herbs,
succulents, low-growing
shrubs, ferns, hosta). Ed-
ibles. Larger shrubs.
You can have a nice
looking yard yet be
conservation-minded."
Any lawn renovation
project should be region-
ally appropriate, however
"What we're really
talking about is using na-
tive vegetation," says the
University of Delaware's
Barton. "Xeriscaping is a
great concept for the
Southwest or areas that
are dry, but those kinds of
plants would drown here.
Rain gardens would be a
better addition given the
amount of moisture we've
had recently."


and pockets overgrown by
weeds or moss.


JANE
Continued from Page E10

clusters. Birds and wildlife
depend on juniper cones for
food. It is useful in a mixed
plant buffer and wildlife
zone along property lines.
Red Cedar is a host plant for
the caterpillar of the ju-
niper hairstreak butterfly
Atlantic White Cedar,
Chamaecyparis thyoides, is
an evergreen conifer in
north and central Florida. It
prefers wetter sites and
makes a good replacement
for Swamp Bay, which is un-
fortunately being eradi-
cated by an alien invader. I
have 10 sapling trees for
sale in pots, as they are not
available in most nurseries.
It is the host plant for Has-
sel's Hairstreak butterfly
caterpillars.
Bald Cypress, Taxodium
distichum, is a deciduous
native tree which can reach
up to 130 feet tall. If grown
in wetlands, it develops
"knees" from the roots, and
a thick trunk often but-
tressed toward the base. No
knees develop in dryer
sites.
It can be xeric, or
drought-tolerant, and is use-
ful in roadside swales and
irrigated gardens. I have
one in my sandhills back-
yard that gets water once a
week or when it rains. If


there is no air pollution,
Spanish moss, a harmless
epiphyte, has a tendency to
drape gracefully on Bald
Cypress trees.
Long-leaf Pine, Pinus
palustris, once covered
much of Florida and the
southeastern states from
Virginia to the Mississippi.
Ninety percent was har-
vested for timber. Since the
Red Cockaded Woodpecker
nests only in cavities in ma-
ture Long-leaf Pines, this
rare bird became endan-
gered. The Withalacoochee
State Forest off U.S. 44 and
County Road 491 contains
many Long-leaf Pines
painted with wide white
bands, indicating the wood-
peckers are using the tree to
nest
Long-leaf cones are the
largest in Florida, and often
used in holiday decorations
and gathered for use in the
craft industry This tree has
12-inch long needle leaves
in bundles of three. It looks
like a tuft of wiry grass for
up to eight or nine years
while developing a deep
taproot. It will grow a foot of
trunk by the 10th year and 3
or more feet a year after
that
I grow seedlings in pots
for patient gardeners and
have ringed my property
lines with sapling Long-
leafs planted every 10 feet.
Slash Pine, Pinus eliotii,
and its improved varieties,


1259 S. Elmwood Drive, Inverness, Florida 34450
Warehouse/ Office connected to a
5-unit apartment complex. 5,400 sq ft. on .63 acre lot
$350,000- LEASE OPTION- OWNER FINANCING
www.my proere.c 0


KE^Y9f "Always There For You"
PKEJL- GAIL COOPER
iI 1I ulilminillioIu Dom I. Re.cIlo
1 t1 "Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3,mindsprmng.com


BEAUTIFUL LUSH LANDSCAPING!
* Over 2600 sqft of living area
* 3+office/2.5/2 custom design
* Pool with expanded lanai for entertaining
* Wood burning fireplace in the family room
Oversized garage with 2 bump-out areas
SCentral vacuum and security system
* Solid surface counters in kitchen/laundry
* Home warranty for the buyers
#359082 $229,000


SCENIC VIEWS OF THE PRESERVE!
* Unique 3/2/2 custom home in Riverhaven
* Wooded with rustic feel 2300+ sqft of living
* 12'x30' Florida room dual paned windows
* Large kitchen with Corian island
* Deck off the Master suite with spa
* Bamboo flooring wood burning fireplace
* Indoor laundry with great storage
* Oversized jetted tub separate shower
#703906 $225,000


JOANN MARTIN
P ref erred g
BrRoe i ALt ESTATE f

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefmn.net


3024 N. Stratham Pt
Hernando FL
Nice 3 bedroom 3 bath home
Under contract in 10 days.
Thinking of Selling?
Call us Today!
352-270-3255


2269 N. Eustis Pt
Hernando FL
2 bedroom 2 bath Meadowview villa.
1453 SF of living, caged in-ground
pool, private setting.
Priced to sell at
89,900.00


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

are fast-growing evergreen
pines mostly grown for tim-
ber and pulp and paper.
Needles are up to 8 inches
long in bundles of two or
three. It ranged throughout
the Southeastern coastal
plain to south Florida in
moist, acidic and well-
drained soils. Cones are 3 to
6 inches long, shiny with
prickly scales.
Sand Pine, P clausa, lo-
cally common throughout
Florida, also occurs in south
Alabama, but nowhere else
in the world. Host to Eastern
Pine Elfin caterpillar, it
spread as Long-leafs were
harvested. Sand Pine has
the biggest stand on Earth in
the Ocala National Forest
Coontie, Zamia pumila, a
native evergreen, is the only
cone-bearing cycad left in
the USA. Fossil records
date back to dinosaur times.
Imported cycads are also
gymnosperms. Japanese
King Sago and Mexican
Cardboard Plant are com-
monly used exotic cycads in
Florida.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden. For
an appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


See.JVirtual.IIIs ..iv.resalehomesI..IIIB.coI..







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For outdoor art, go


or go home


Associated Press

Even a small slice of the
big outdoors can call for
big art.
With some do-it-
yourself ingenuity, creat-
ing artwork for an outdoor
living space needn't be
costly or complicated. In a
few summer hours, you
can make a piece, large or
not-so-large, that packs a
visual wallop.
Just keep in mind the
advice of Bob Richter, in-
terior designer and cast
member of PBS' treasure-
hunting series "Market
Warriors": "There's a fine
line between 'What's that
piece of junk in your
yard?' and art."
Landscape designer
Chris H. Olsen, of Little
Rock, Ark., is fond of wine
bottles, repurposing emp-
ties in myriad ways for the
garden as an artsy wall,
accent lighting and art
objects.
"I'm all about fun, funky,
great displays and projects
that are relatively easy to
do," says Olsen.
To add patio privacy or
garden interest, Olsen
builds a wine bottle wall:
vertical rows of wine bot-
tles inserted into a wood
frame using metal rods.
"I love a little 'bling
bling' in the garden, and I
love glass," says Olsen.
Another conversation
starter: Olsen's "bottle
stars" empty, corked
wine bottles that are glued
together to create a star
shape, then hung in trees
and positioned in planted
pots. This and other out-
door DIY projects can be
found in his book "Chris H.
Olsen's Five Seasons"
(Leisure Arts, 2011).
David Bromstad, host of
"HGTV Star" and host de-
signer of the network's
"Color Splash," says string-
ing a dozen or more wine


Here are directions for one DIY
outdoor-art project:

Supplies
* 9 assorted wine bottles, empty and
corked.
* 4 rolls of paper towels (to brace
bottles).
* Household adhesive sealant.

Assembly
* 1. Glue the bottoms of four wine


bottles with lights inside
them and hanging them
from a pergola or other
substantial structure -
the underside of a deck,
say creates alluring out-
door lighting.
"The more the better,"
he says. "If you do a ton of
those, you'll have an (art)
installation."
Bromstad recommends
cutting off the wine bottles'
bottoms and stringing the
lights through the bottles
with outdoor lamp cord.
Visit Pinterest, the online
projects board, for images
of this and other ways to
use wine bottles as
lighting.
Bromstad is known for
creating large pieces
bursting with color for his
TV show clients. DIYers
can do the same for an out-
door space, he says, by
using outdoor-safe sup-
plies: pressure-treated
plywood instead of canvas,
and an outdoor primer
and paint. Bromstad uses
Nova Color, an acrylic
paint that stands up well to
the elements.
Distress the plywood be-
fore painting to accentuate
its roughness, he suggests.
Do drip painting a la
Jackson Pollock if your
artistic skills are limited.
"Everything that has to
be outdoors has to last


bottles together to resemble a plus
(+) sign. Let dry for four hours.

* 2. Where the four bottles meet, glue
one additional bottle sitting up. Let
dry four hours.

* 3. Using paper towel rolls to brace
them, glue the four remaining bottles
leaning upward at a 45-degree angle,
allowing each to dry before attaching
the next.

-Adapted from the book
"Chris H. Olsen's Five Seasons"


through the elements,"
Bromstad says, "so you
might as well make it
look rough from the
beginning."
Both Bromstad and
Olsen say concrete blocks


are useful in the garden:
Stack them to build a wall,
cement couch, bench or
table. Make it artsy by
planting the openings with
flowers, herbs or other
greenery Again, Pinterest


GET THE MOST BANG FOR
YOUR BUCK! Private 3/2/2
move in ready Fannie Mae
HomePath property for your
family. This home boasts new
flooring, appliances, and great
curb appeal. Don't hesitate, a
buy like this won't last. Purchase this property for as little as 3%
down! This property is approved for HomePath Mortgage Financing,
and HomePath Renovation Mortgage Financing. $69,900 704105
Call Gene Wade 352-422-7627 for more details.


fL www.dudleysauction.com
FRI., AUG. 2 REAL ESTATE & CONTENTS PREVIEW: SAM AUCTION: 9AM REAL ESTATE: lOAM
6225 S. LEWDINGAR LN., HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
Motivatedseler-Guardian says sel. Wondedul set .
'd.. . .. 1. 1 ....... ..... .. . d "'. ., ll, ,,
1d . ..,I., .h a 1 ..1
. ,i d .n l i I ll r li I . .. 1. ,. I .1 r ,l ... .
. ... I I n, '.. .. , l . . . . .l ... .1 . r.|1, 1n,,, 1,,, 1 .1 .
I.::,,, h . , ,I .J , I ,d l ,,,, ,,,I .. ... .. .. . . .. .. ... . . , ,,,,,I, I ,
h , 1,h, 1 , ,I, .In,,t,, ,,h, I , [ 1.,,,,1[1,I".. 1 A ... ..I, I,,,,,1 M h i,,h ,, ,,, ,,, ,,h, "1."W


7302 Wincoln Lne ey: 3076,7303 Her


1k. FRI, AUG. 2- COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AUCTION
lr PREVIEW.:12PM AUCTION:1IPM*SC OM. DUPLEX
ouED Z 3206818 ) hsa1,50 s. t cme piofcng fpecrrenl I half ralled,
P5 -- seoit uthes wl pave paring lot & 2 spoiage shefi. Wel malntalne, goo
Sng zone commercial lots wlll be sol sepoiate fiom above ofifess Adonn os


Tral (A ey:3206864), 717 W HomosssaTral (Altkey: 3206876).


DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
(1/2 mileoS. oftheFairgrounds) MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE
Q-_ Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352.6379588. Upto-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Abl667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


posts scads of images.
"It's just stacking," says
Olsen. "You don't even
have to mortar it."
One more idea from
Bromstad: Hang old gut-
ters from a fence, garage
wall or along a pergola's
perimeter just about
anywhere, he says and
plant them with impatiens
or herbs. Make sure the
gutters slope so water can
drain.
"It's one big, beautiful
art project," says Brom-
stad. "It's just gorgeous."
Richter roams flea mar-
kets for large outdoor art


for himself and clients,
gravitating toward antique
signage and industrial-
looking collectibles be-
cause they can weather
the elements. Surfboards
- propped on a deck or at-
tached to a garage wall -
are popular right now, he
says.
While art is in the eye of
the beholder, Richter says
care and placement is the
key
"It's like framing a piece
of art," he says. "Half of
'art,' I think, is how you
display it and where you
display it."


OOOFKKN F

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
MlS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
oFcE: (352) 795-6633
WWW ATYXRE.COM E-M.A. SAI S@ AIX PYRC 'OM


I: eN IO DT.S:D A WEK


ILKENANDJ bank owned, 1D/W M/H
on 10 acres, fenced, 3 bedrooms, 2 5 baths,
cathedral & vaulted ceilings, skylights,
secluded & private Handyman/woman
special, needs floor covering, interior
painting, appliances & cleaning #701715
REDUCED TO $69,900




BEVERLY HILLS adult community,
55+, 2 bedrooms, 1 5 baths, 1 .......
tile floors throughout / i .
1 bedroom Eat-in kitchen w/dome
lighting, French doors, formal dining rm
i 1 ... ;1;... 1 ,1 1 pane windows,
..., i .1..... I'IM% $67,000




CRYSTAL RIVER 1980 waterfront
home remodeled in 2010 Corian counter
tops in kitchen, slate counter tops in baths,
wooden dock w/boat lift, short water trip
to Crystal River & Gulf of Mexico
4 bedrooms, 2 baths #702122
$320,000


HOMOSASSA very nice and beautifully
maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath, mobile on
just under an acre Furnished, all

I I I 1 I 1 I 1 p' ..



DUNNELLON 2002, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, M/H w/storage for 6 cars/
workshop on 2 acres Cherrywood
cabinets, china cabinet, carpet throughout
except for kitchen, baths and laundry rm
Large family rm, cathedral ;1;,,.
gourmet kitchen w/island "'I. "
$105,000





INGLIS 2001 Skyline w/3 bedrooms,
2 baths, newly remodeled, on 2 lots (0 97
acre), cathedral ceilings, inside laundry,
secluded & private Lg living rm, dining
rm, kitchen Easy access to Gulf of
Mexico #702563 $80,000


HOMOSASSA nice older mobile CRYSTAL RIVER 1 bldg w/9 apts on
w/2 bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear NE 8th Avenue Each apt has 2 bedrooms,
screened porches Newer roofover in 1 bath, washer/dryer hook up, central heat
2010, newer appliances approximately and air Just south of Crystal River high
2 years old FULLY fenced backyard school Crystal River water & sewer, Duke
with shed #700919 $22,500 Energy Electric #359088 $235,000


BOTTLE STAR


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E13


'BEST77


R-ator


r


!


:








E14 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL
Move in Special!
1 month free/w
one year lease.
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1
bath@$350 inc H20.
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $450.mo., 1st, Ist
& sec. 352-795-9738

DUNNELLON/488
2/2, Lg Lot, exec. clean,
CHA $540/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970
HERNANDO
(No Pets) 3BR/2BA,
All Appi's $595.mo
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815

HOMOSASSA
2/1%2, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
YANKEETOWN
2/2 New W/D. $600mo
moves you in no dep
needed.15 minutes from
power plant. Call Paul
(407) 579-6123




$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181




HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, 16x16
workshop, Must-see!
$64,000 (352) 621-0192
LECANTO
2/2 dIb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remid 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, inl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great nursery or blue-
berries. Asking 124,900
352-364-2985
Palm Harbor Homes
New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,900
TEXT: STORE 126A
TO: 313131
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210
USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


INVERNESS
Move in Special!
1 month free w/one
year lease.
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details





FLORAL CITY
3/2 Dblwide, on Canal
to River & lakes,
need TLC,$35,000.
obo 352-726-9369





PFor Sale %,

HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Handy Man Special,
apprv. for FHA financing
$45,900 352-795-1272

Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5%2 park like acres,
owner financing avail.
59k (941) 778-7980

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




DRASTICALLY
REDUCED
OAK POND MH
ESTATE (Hwy 44 E)
Inverness,
2/2 Lovely home turn
key ready to move in
H(352) 726-0348
C(352) 586-3662


FLORAL CITY
Moon Rise Resort
55+ comm 2/2 split plan,
walk in closet, sc. rm,
car port, Ig shed, w/d
$21,900, lot rent $290
608-752-4532/726-2553
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




INVERNESS
2/1 SWMH w/add 1.2 ac
with 20x40 work shop,
near wal-mart $35,500,
or RENT $475 mthly
non-smoker
706-473-2184



-__
-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCounltyHomeRentals.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
10216 W. Pamodeho ........... $50
3/2 DW mobile with pool
1245 NE 2nid St .................. $1100
3/2 Pool home
2561 N. Senea Pt................$1200
2/2 Waterfront W furnished
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
3679 W. Treyburn Path (L) .....$900
3/3/2 Furn orUnfurn Black Diamond
8160 N. Dual Dr. ((S) .......$1300
Pool home, furnished
HOMOSASSA
1650W. Homsassa Trail #28. $500
2/1 Duplex with poo, W/D hook-ups
5865 W. Vikre Path..............$100
2/2/1 Cute home on I acre
11701 learwater Ct...........$1000
2/2 Watedrfront mobile


Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


-U
J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant homer
and watch us work for you'


2/2/1 ................ $700
2/2/1 ............$675
2/1111 ................................$650
3/2/2 .............. $800
3/2 .................... $925
FREE STANDING GARAGE

3/2Doublewide 700
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
.Property Manager/
.Realtor-Associates
g 352-726-9010




















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815



INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 Completely Remod-
eled In Town, $675 mo.
$250 sec. 412 Tomp-
kins St. 352-895-0744
LECANTO
Lrg 2/2, AC, screen
porch, water incl.
$500. F/L/S,
352-746-4191
352-697-5900
PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1, 2 &3 BEDROOM
APARTMENT HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $592. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to
qualified applicants
For rental info.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1 -800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer



OPPORTUNITY




INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495./ mo.
(352) 447-6016


FLORAL CITY
RETAIL; 2 Storefronts
Corner of US 41 &
Hwy 48, 600sf &1,400 sf
$495. mo. & $695 mo.
813-310-5391



MEADOWCREST
2/2/1 Villa, furn. or un-
furn. 1st last. sec. 55+
comm (352) 628-7573
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2 w/ Community
Pool. $725/mo
(352) 628-1616
River Links Realty



HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo.
352-212-4981



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio
Efficiency w/ equipped
kitchen. All until cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2BR/2BA, CHA
Move in just $1350
(352) 422-7794
BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month
includes basic
cable & lawn care.
Call 746-3301
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1.5/1 Nice home
$650/Mo.
352-302-4057
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1
Lg Mast suite $750
352-697-3133


CRYSTAL OAKS
3/2/2, avail, long term
$890 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes
Estates 2/2/2, + FL
Room fenc'd yd
$600/mo. $300. Sec.
(352) 489-7094

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, 2 Acre,
Hwy. 200. $875. mo.
352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA
3/2 new carpet/paint
$750.mo 352-628-7526
Inverness
2/1, all apple, waterview
$550.(352) 860-0904
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/112/1
$590mo.+ $700 dep.
(352) 422-6978
INVERNESS
Spacious 3/2/2, $795.
mo. (352) 212-4873
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Waterfront, Condo
w/priv. dock Lease
to Own. $1,200. mo.
352-220-3005
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bdrm. 2 ba. Cottage
style home on Canal
with Floating Docks.
Perfect for small fam-
ily. Located On NW
18th St. Carport with
separate laundry and
bathroom. Stg Shed
Rent $900 mthly 1st &
last req. Can reduce
rent with 6 months in
advance.Phone:
Trisha 352-794-6716

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


INVERNESS
FURNISHED
WATERFRONT
HOME 2 bd, 1.5 ba
home with central
a/c $595.
352-476-4964




HERNANDO
1 BR, 2 BA, Office
2 Acre, Hwy. 200.
352-344-3084

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, 2 Acre,
Hwy. 200. $875. mo.
352-344-3084

HOMOSASSA
Classic SMW Hm 3/2/2
newly refurbished, land
escaped ac on golf
course, screened
18x36 pool & lanai, dbl
sided wood burning fire
place, huge great room,
built in book cases 4100
sq ft under roof, $225K
Call Owner 382-2528




CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms, Furn, Cable,
near Publix
$115wk/ 420mo
$120wk/430mo
352-563-6428




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Get Results

In The Homefront
Classified!








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









Renovations/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Aging-In-Place ++
Lg. or Sm Jobs
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 220-3844

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified l


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


",LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



Open House


218 S. Harrison St.
Beverly Hills:
TODAY12-3PM
2/2 Remodeled
MLS#701727
352-422-3261






HERNANDO
1 BR, 2 BA, Office
2 Acre, Hwy. 200.
352-344-3084


IAmi a ,u I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!






PINE RIDGE
ITS A STEAL
3/2/2, Pool, Exc.
Condition! $199k
obo (352)422-2632


BEVERLY HILLS
1 bedrooml.5 car gar-
age villa, 55+ comm.
1780 sq ft, all
appliances and utilities
incl. quiet area.
$1325 monthly
(352) 465-6006
BEVERLY HILLS
Laurel Ridge, 2/2/1 de-
tached villa Kit. has new
appl, granite counters,
new ac, & much more
$92K (352) 513-4155
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellinag










Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity. $119K Cash
Deal posss rent opt)
352-804-9729




LISTINGlS

117 S Lunar Terrace
Inverness
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
CB home, big yard,
Move in ready.
Clean as a whistle. Big
Garage, plus Carport.
GREAT BUY!
$79,500.
Owner 352-344-9290
2BR, 1BA, +Den
Open Fl. plan, close to
shopping & town,
new roof, well wtr.
.44 acres $49,900 obo
OWR REALTY, John
352-653-7977
3/1+ CP Block home
on corner lot. % mile
to Lake Appoka boat
ramp. $55,000
Financing avail
(352) 564-2421
GOSPEL ISLAND
4BD/3BA & GARAGE
For Sale $92,000.
(941) 758-8719
(941) 524-6556
INVERNESS
4/2.5/2 separate dinn-
ing. rm.office, Ig kitchen
patio, 2200 sq ft, move
in ready $182,500
352-220-1313


-

gSAI



Great
Starter

Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
$2,500 down
$788. month
877-500-9517




Very Nice Furn home
near Duval Island.
2/1+ CP. 3rd BR or ofc.
Lndry rm w/ shower.
Shed & fenced fruit
trees. $59,900 (352)
678-7145 or 444-0406


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

WRMRW
REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2Car garage,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


House for Sale
4 Bedroom 2 Bath
A/C Carport, Pool
2 Acres move in con-
dition, near schools,
4100 S. Fireside Way
352-382-5558




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



- 1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!


BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


For Sale i
HOMOSASSA
Reduced $199,500
211 Pine St, Built 2006
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool,Granite,
Wood FloorsTile & Car-
pet. 2 Car GarSS Appl.
Call 850-585-4026













Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245"


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855











TONY Pauelsen
Realtor
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

BUYING OR SELLING

SALES ARE WAY UP!

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2/2
CBS, 2100 sq. ft. living
area, 1 OK boat lift,
updated 2011, shed
$229,000.
352-794-3020/586-4987


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom 1 bath fixer
upper located close to
schools, dining and
shopping
Hwy 44 to North on
NE 9th Ave
to home on corner of
NE 9th and 5th Ter.
Great Price $ 40,000
call for viewing and
MAKE an Offer
352-220-2658
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc


INGLIS
Delightful
Withlacoochee Water-
front home offers 2 bed-
room 2 bath main
home, 1 bedroom 1
bath Guest Cabin,
Screened house with
bath and smoke house,
Detached Garage,
Multi-tiered Deck/Dock
all located on 213 ft of
waterfront on 1.52
acres. $270,000
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc
352-220-2658
ir, r n'm


Stunning Withlacoochee
River Waterfront
Home. 3 Bedrooms, 2
Baths 1.51 acres with
201 feet of waterfront.
Many impressive fea-
tures including Two fire-
places One in the Mas-
ter, Large upper deck
overlooking the River
Boat Dock and so much
more Must see.
Offered at $299,900
Hwy 19 to right on Foss
Grove Path 1.9 miles to
Edwards Ct home on
the Left
Jo DeMarcus
Plantation Realty Inc
352-220-2658


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties




FORECLOSURE
LAND LIQUIDATION!
Own your own
mountain retreat
with National Forest
access in the beauti-
ful Blue Ridge
Mountains. 1+ acre
mountain view
homesite in gated
mountain commu-
nity, bargain priced
at only $14,900 way
below cost! Paved
road, municipal
water, underground
power. Financing.
Call now
1-866-952-5303, x 32
PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013 E15


Homes


Homes


Hme








E16 SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2013


M nnEML 1 now -lIi ummn rM--iumw- nvi"
AND LARGE (18X34) ENCLOSED PORCH



r1: =- ill ai ASKING $106,.900
PiDi,,3 3522127280
I',oi .ajnh. ,l l 2lt/gId t,, om.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$69,900 ESTATE SALE!
I. .I *iaI ,,ila |l nl ,,lllllll 1, 1 : l. l l ,,l.. il.Ii

. ..l l..in .l I-.i I l A i I i...l ,

Mat' Pa/sons 634 1273


LOOKING FOR WATERFRONT IN INVERNESS?




ri,: = n.-i ASKING ONLY S55,000
t l. int, Is ,, i i ,# it J 0 !i Y a'see


* lII.h4 l.r. li Il"l pl.'"

S lh i. im.i.i, h,.i A I
* VV.a.I ihal., ai ll II .,.. .
Mt i = lI:l: '- $125,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
ii'ivi'. CiliusCountirSold. comn










COMMERCIAL BUILDING

In.h i l -,ii fiii .I A:.l n lii, liiA
Mit = ii' ASKING $228,900
Call Jim Motion al 4222173 to viewi
the home of I out new' business


3/212 WITH CAGED, INGROUND POOLISPA




,,1 i .. -, ASKING S19, 8.000
liYi,' I h, II 11 1 11 IA ,,I, lil ,' .jm,


|OPEN HOUSE







1349 N. FOXWOOD TERR.
INVERNESS, FL

,,, ... I. .. ", ..... ll .
ri: =- < $179,500
I lan, 4l it S Si e, Kl 68


1.111111 1a II i|I. I,,,. il alif . ai, a1l.i .aI, illl l ii
I"." ,d. hh.:, {, c l..ll .nl ,HI hl ,n.a i ., ..
I-.i p,.I, if.g p,, I I afih il .ail i ,aii.. ,j. ;

Mir_, fi' iIll ASKING $560,000
Call Jim Motion 4222173 lot a tout
of this pine business location


STUNNING CRYSTAL RIVER
WATERFRONT HOME
iii,...l.. j -I. I I ". lii 1 I,.
rHl 1: I i 1GREAT BUY $459.000
AND LOOKING FOR OFFERS
Call Ou ida [ 352302/699


I (t I .al~ .E- MI~llll_. illI I

a iiiJ I ., 1i. 1) .i 'I1II "1 II hiii ,i a .a,

i1:. =/i 7i.ll ASKING $214,900
Pal Davis i3521 212 7280


= ." -

INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
I e_ ii I J I 1_ I .il., j PIJ1

$205,500 = ilI 2:7
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
ii'i'. CitliusCounti'Sold. com


* e ..i. [I I : li / '. I. I l I A.
* _" lPa.:.h: ll. h i .l ,l lal.aal'.: .a .III.
* il ll2 III i ,.All


Ml =/ Il:l :'., $115,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
IaIIaa. CitiusCountl Sold. coin


* l: l.. I ll I

* I .1 PI-.....1 V ..i
* Il r: i l. l I,. h al /.I.
* Hi. h ll ,99 i .a a laa ia lil ..a I
Mi =/711./7 $219,000
Jeanne oa llillaid Pickiel 352212 3410
i it i CitulsCouni Sold comn


S I. .I h ,,, ....... I h .
-,, i H l .. ,, i. ii ..,, i I,.. .i i, i i,, ia .
ii..a 1aIa h...., I.. n a.1 i .1 Ia....1.11 n iii. j1 n1.
rii: =. ASKING $158,900
Pit Dr,4,352 2127280
li,,i h,.a iy i.ii 2/t rtd,,a~. co.r


SOME OF THE BEST
RIVERFRONT MONEY CAN BUY!
VV -I. &.leninl I en. I.,:.1 .l.i.d
laa I a lla l .. a11 l I Il
PRICED TO SELL 'a $149,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


FISH JUMPING, BIRDS FLYING!
1.111 l ,I F.lj, il l .. 1 11 lil IN ll,, il.al

n li ld i tld I I. ,,
1. iI an al lagild a I- ,,l,

Mi =7111.1i:i1: $119,900
Tim Donovan 220 0328


I AM ALL CLEANED UP AND
READY FOR COMPANY!
_'. ,l ..:. n ... : 1 .. .. .. ) I M..1. I. [| ,
h,':,lll i L :.,l .J l ..l' i I,:,,, l ,I,,,:,l li .: : l

1i_'.- = ii .114 ASKING $39,900
Call Dons Minet 3524224627


aI',I' i.. I l..h. .1 : I., k ill, l i
l. l..... I ll .:1|. 11......1 %V,1,1 i lhl 1..-: llll "I II
. I I, n.i ll _'I l i,, l I i i ilh


Mt i,= -iI1:' ASKING $138,500
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072
ot 352 726 6668


Ia' h ,i1h i I.i a.I aih aa.a..Il ,.h,,
Mt l =l: 1il.:. $144,900
Call Isaac Baylon lot a personal lout
3526972493


INVERNESS COUNTRY
LIVING ON 1/3 ACRES
H.,, li:,i ji ai I_' l, m 1ail W h,il 11l.a

uI a"I h l.aaaa m l ,,i Ial
Mt i:,=Jl4 $129,000
lottame 0 Regan 5860075


SERENITY BEYOND
WROUGHT IRON GATES
: a.i:J ihhi l li:.i ii lhi. .ii.:i VV Hi.lhlai ii.l
il, aa, lh iaail.lh laati I l, : a _a

A. :i .....I M lI =: 711/7.':,
Ask lot Maldyn Booth 637 4904