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Citrus County chronicle ( June 24, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03179

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03179

Full Text


Back on right track: Rays rally to down


TODAY
& next
morning


CITRUS


COUNTY


Afternoon and
evening storms;
70% rain chance.
PAGE A4


www.chronicleonline.com (,
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 341


Zimmerman not guilty


Associated Press
SANFORD George Zimmer-
man blinked and barely smiled as a
jury found him not guilty of second-
degree murder in the fatal shooting
of Trayvon Martin.
Supporters of Martin's family who
had gathered outside the court-
house yelled out "No! No!"
The jury had been given the
chance to convict Zimmerman of


manslaughter but did not do so, de-
spite asking for a clarification of the
charge earlier in the evening.
Zimmerman's wife, Shellie Zim-
merman, had tears in her eyes after
the six-member, all-woman jury de-
livered its verdict Saturday night.
After hearing the verdict, Judge
Debra Nelson told Zimmerman he
was free to go.
Jurors heard two different por-
traits of Zimmerman and had to de-


cide whether he was a wannabe cop
who took the law into his own hands
or a well-meaning neighborhood
watch volunteer who shot the un-
armed teenager in self-defense be-
cause he feared for his life.
Zimmerman, 29, was charged with
second-degree murder, but jurors
also had the options of finding him
guilty of manslaughter or not guilty.
He pleaded not guilty, claiming he
shot the 17-year-old Martin in


self-defense.
The jury started deliberating Fri-
day afternoon. At the time jurors
asked their question about
manslaughter Saturday, they had
been deliberating for a total of 111/2
hours over two days. On Friday, they
asked their first question: a request
for a list of all the evidence. George
Jurors were being sequestered, Zimmerman
declared not
See Page All 1 guilty at trial.


~- .=-


- --- ~


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Southwest Florida Water Management District senior scientist Chris Anastasiou conducts part of a post-mapping
seagrass study along the Springs Coast, not far off Fort Island Gulf Beach last week. He says the prolific plant and algae
life off Citrus County's coast indicate a healthy ecosystem.


Scads of scallops bring boom in boaters


CARLY ZERVIS
Chronicle intern
It looks like 2013 is the year of the
scallop.
"Scallop season is a tradition," said
Marla Chancey, director of the county's
Visitors and Convention Bureau. "So
many local families and groups from
throughout Florida look forward to the
opening season each year.
"It's kind of like Thanksgiving on the
water, experiencing nature with bathing
See Page A8


Scallops sit
on ice after
being caught
July 10 in the
Gulf of
Mexico. The
bivalves are
usually white
or brown in
color; shades
of red and
orange are
less common.
CARLY ZERVIS/ For
the Chronicle


Amap



of grass


Water district will

soon unveil map of

'healthy' seagrass bed

near county s coast
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Scientists call them "canaries of
the estuary," perhaps because
they are harbingers of what's to
come for the health of marine
and economic well-being of many
coastal communities.
Near the shoals of i,,,
the Springs Coast lay ( .
glowing mats of sea--
grass the home of
bay scallops, grouper, For more
snook and tarpon,
among others-that photos, click
officials say is among www.chronicle
the healthiest in the online.com.
nation.
Officials with the Southwest Florida
Water Management District have been
mapping the seagrass since 2012 to
gauge their health. The results are ex-
pected in August, said Chris Anasta-
siou, senior scientist at the district.
Anastasiou and other scientists are
currently conducting a post-mapping
verification study of 834,560 acres of
seagrass.
The mapping digitally recorded sub-
merged land including macroalgae,
See Page A8


Hospital board sought 'tough' transaction agent


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
He never promised them a
rose garden.
Josh Nemzoff, president of
Nemzoff & Co. LLC of New
Hope, Pa., came to the Citrus
County Hospital Board as a
highly touted broker of hospital
transactions.
He was one of three bidders
seeking to be the CCHB's trans-
action agent, tasked with bring-
ing together well-financed
health care corporations to buy,
lease or merge Citrus Memorial
hospital.


The contract pays
handsomely: $20,000 a
month, rolled into a
$775,000 payday once
the transaction is com-
plete. Even if a deal
doesn't close, he keeps
the monthly retainer
fees. jo
CCHB trustee Bob Ner
Priselac, a former chief
executive of hospitals in Miami
and the Lower Keys who is
leading the board's transaction
efforts, said he had never met
Nemzoff, but others in the in-
dustry urged him to consider
Nemzoff.


TI
M;


"It was my impression
that because of the so
many challenges we've
had in this county, we
needed someone strong
enough to work through
it," Priselac said. "One
of the reasons we se-
lected him was his abil-
szoff ity to be tough."
Apparently, though,
trustees didn't expect their con-
sultant to be so brash.
Last week trustees Krista
Joseph and Chairwoman Deb-
bie Ressler wanted to fire Nem-
zoff because he brought a
See Page A7


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Josh Nemzoff doesn't shy
away from expressing views.
His emails to the Citrus
County Hospital Board have
been especially critical of
CCHB attorney Bill Grant, who
he considered as meddling in
a transaction process that, he


implied, Grant knows nothing
about.
"Bill needs to stop acting
like he is the project director,"
Nemzoff wrote to CCHB
trustees. "He does not swim in
this lake and he will drown."
On other occasions, Nemzoff
was more direct, using terms


Page A6


Il84578 2007511


Classifieds ...... .D5
Crossword ...... .A14
Excursions ...... .A13


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ...... A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ........ A14
Obituaries ....... .A9


TV Listings ...... A14
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes . .A15


PAID ADVERTISEMENT
CRYSTAL
I, T ,1 T I -
Crystal Automotive Group
Homosassa, FL


CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

MAKES HISTORY ONCE AGAIN


Crystal Automotive Group is once again
making automobile sales history. This time,
Crystal is offering to pay customer's
payments until 2014 and pay the customer's
interest for the length of the loan.
When asked how Crystal Automotive
Group could make this happen, Director of
Operations, Justin Lamb explained that "Now
is the best time in history to buy a new
vehicle. At Crystal, we decided this offer
would entice the public. With this
opportunity, it is easy for every customer to
buy a new or used car, because everybody
would love a dealership to pay their car
payments and interest, allowing them to enjoy
a beautiful vehicle without payment


obligation until 2014. With our company
paying the interest for the entire length of the
loan, it's obvious that you will be making a
wise financial decision."
Every customer buying a new or used
vehicle has the opportunity to qualify for this
program. Banks and finance companies
working with Crystal have relaxed both credit
and income requirements for the duration of
this sales event. There are more than 800
vehicles to choose from and there is no doubt
that there is a new or used vehicle that will fill
any customer's transportation needs.
Ted Nipper, Crystal's Director of Finance
claims, "This program is very easy to qualify
for. It is our goal to ensure that every


customer qualifies. The only requirement is to
be able to to finance the vehicle for 5 years at
no more than a 2.99% interest rate. Most
models that we have in stock will qualify for
this program."
Crystal Automotive Group is the largest
automotive group on the Nature Coast,
consistently selling more cars and trucks than
any other dealer in the area.
"It's our volume that allows us to make
deals like this for our customers," stated
Lamb.
If you're in the market to buy a new or
used vehicle, you need to take advantage of
this history making offer as soon as possible.
This is a limited time offer. Do not hesitate to


get the new or used vehicle you've always
wanted. Today is the day!
"Everyone knows that at Crystal, Steve
Lamb has been chopping prices for years.
Now, he's not only chopping the prices, but
chopping away payments until 2014 along
with interest for the entire length of the
loan!" exclaimed Lamb.
Crystal has Chrysler Dodge Jeep
Ram dealerships in Inverness on Hwy 44,
Homosassa on Hwy 19 and Brooksville on
State Road 50; along with a Chevrolet and
Nissan dealership in Homosassa on Hwy 19
as well. There is a hotline set up for
customers to call and get more information-
(800) 584-8755 ext. 2014.


HIGH
89
LOW
72


Nemzoff to Grant:

'You really are apiece of work'


I


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tsuff^ S@Y
^^p.. (mom
Ru^ iri" ^


CITRUS MEMORIAL

HOSPITAL NEEDS

YOUR HELP!
How many times in the past has Citrus Memorial Hospital come to your aid
or the aid of a loved one or friend? Their dedicated doctors, nurses and staff may
even have saved your life. Now Citrus Memorial, the hospital you bought and
paid for with your hard-earned tax dollars, needs your help. Please join us and
raise your voice to help the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation choose the best
healthcare partner for our community.
It is time that YOU, the people of Citrus County, knew the truth because if
you don't know the truth in its entirety, we could all suffer the harsh consequences.
Soon, Citrus County citizens may forfeit ownership of the only publicly owned
hospital in the area your hospital paid for with your tax dollars. Citrus Memorial
may either be sold, leased or forced to merge with another corporate entity in the
very near future. However, since you own it, you should have a say as to which
company takes control of your hospital but if you want your voice to be heard,
then you must take action soon!
Why has this happened? Because the Citrus County Hospital Board and a
small politically motivated group of people tried to wrest away control from the
legally constituted Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, the dedicated professionals
who made it the award-winning facility it is today.
How did this happen?


HERE ARE THE HISTORICAL FACTS:
The State of Florida creates the Citrus County Hospital Board. The Board is given the power to levy an ad valorem tax as high as 3 mils per
year to help fund healthcare for county residents.
Using funds raised by the Board, Citrus Memorial Hospital, a publicly owned facility, is built and begins to treat area residents.
To avoid the financial strain of having to pay employee pensions in the state pensions plan, the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation is created
as a private management corporation.
The Board leases Citrus Memorial Hospital to the Foundation for 40 years. As part of their lawful contract, the Board agrees to hand over to
the Foundation all ad valorem tax money they collect each year to pay expenses, invest, and expand their services. Under the mutual
guidance and supervision of both the Board and the Foundation, Citrus Memorial grows and prospers. Each year, the Board collects the ad
valorem taxes and willingly provides them to the Foundation. The Foundation alone decides how to best spend the tax money for the benefit
of the hospital and healthcare for the residents of Citrus County.
The Foundation sells bonds to fund expansion projects to help service more of the community, one of which is the Citrus Memorial
Healthcare Center at Sugarmill Woods in Homosassa.
Some local physicians thought the Hospital was unfairly competing with them with the opening of the Sugarmill Woods Healthcare Center.
The Hospital Board began work to get political help to pass legislation giving the Board full authority over the Foundation.
The Board withholds millions of dollars of taxpayer money forcing the Foundation and Citrus Memorial Hospital into financial distress. The
members of the County Hospital Board walked off from the Foundation Board. Both sides begin to file lawsuits, as the Foundation depends on
the funds being withheld to help pay operating expenses to provide patient care.
The Foundation has remained focused on one thing maintaining the highest standard of care possible at Citrus Memorial Hospital and
providing quality healthcare to the residents of Citrus County. They are saddened that politics have taken such precedence over
healthcare. They are incredulous that the County Hospital Board has squandered away such a huge amount of tax money.


Patients, and Residents who otherwise have no way to access healthcare, and Citrus Memorial Hospital need your help. It has been said, "All that is necessary
for the triumph of evil is that good men and women do nothing," and that is the case here. If you stand idly by and don't reach out to help the Foundation have a
voice in deciding which corporate entity takes control of Citrus Memorial Hospital- we will all be losers.


SO, WHERE DOES THIS LEAVE YOU?
IT LEAVES YOU WITH A CHOICE.

Visit CitrusMH.com and learn what you can do to help "find the right home" for
Citrus Memorial Hospital... your hospital.


"ft no Wonder
suke .ente."
-i"1*rk Twan


ftf frltq ,f frn er f tn /a,'bon. FG.on 4 to


I,,v-


STROKE SURGERY
FIVE-STAR EXCELLENCE
RECIPIENT AWARD"
21)1-2013 |3


CITRUS MEMORIAL


502 West Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-1551 I CitrusMH.com


sweoA
rs 4ct


A2 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


H A B






Page A3-SUNDAY, JULY 14,2013



TATE4&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


Around the
COUNTY

Key dinner-auction
raises $80,000
The Key Training Center's
dinner-auction Friday night,
kicking off Run for the Money
week, raised $80,349.
On Monday morning,
runners will leave from the
steps of the Capitol and
take shifts in covering the
180-mile trek from Tallahas-
see to the Key Center cam-
pus in Lecanto.
Runners are expected to
arrive at about noon Satur-
day to festivities coinciding
with the annual Run for the
Money Telethon, from 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m., airing on WYKE-
TV, cable channel 16. To
donate, call 352-527-2341
or, toll free 888-377-0340,
during telethon hours.
Proceeds raised go di-
rectly to care for the Key
Center's developmentally
disabled clients.
United Way launches
registry for volunteers
The United Way of Citrus
County has established a
means to help connect those
interested in volunteering
with finding organizations in
need of their skills.
Log onto www.citrusunited
way.org and click on the
'Volunteer" button. Enter your
information and choose
your areas of interest.
United Way of Citrus County
will share your interests
with nonprofit agencies in
the county so they may
contact you when they have
a volunteer opportunity in your
area of interest. Your email will
not be released; all commu-
nications will filter through
the United Way registry.
WPNCC collecting
coupons for veterans
The Women's Political
Network of Citrus County
has adopted an overseas
military base to which it will
send money-saving coupons.
The WPNCC has mailed its
third package, valued at
more than $10,000 in
coupons, and expresses
thanks to those who made
it possible by donating
coupon inserts from Sunday
editions of the Chronicle.
The WPNCC sends both
food and non-food
coupons. They must have
"manufacturer's coupon" on
them and they cannot spec-
ify use at particular stores
or restaurants. Also, they
can use them six months
after the expiration date.
The WPNCC is meeting
at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, July
16, for a luncheon/coupon-
clipping get-together in the
back room of Joe's Family
Restaurant, State Road 44,
Inverness. Everyone is wel-
come; just bring a scissors.
For information, call Ros-
alie Matt at 352-746-7143.
Purple Heart
ceremony planned
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693, at 7890 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa, will host a
breakfast and program at 9
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 8, hon-
oring all Purple Heart recipi-
ents and commemorating
the 231st anniversary of the
Purple Heart. The families
of those who fell in combat
and all combat wounded
veterans and their guests
are invited. Attendees are
requested to register for the
free breakfast by calling
Carrie Clemons at 352-
628-1633 or mailing
carriejeanetteclemons@
yahoo.com. Please indicate
the number in your party.
-From staff reports

Correction
Due to reporter and edi-
tor error, the name of the
country of Colombia was
misspelled on Pages A13


and A17 of today's edition.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


DEP

PAT FATHER
Staff writer
Businesses and n
its can now spon
Withlacoochee Sta
and put up signs to
tise to visitors.
The trail is one
state recreation
available for spon
opportunities.
"This is the first
wide sponsorship p
for state trails o
parks," explained C
Quintana, spokes
for the Florida I
ment of Environ
Protection.
Proceeds from s
ships will be split,
percent going for m
ment and opera
state Greenways
Trails facilities an
erties. The rest wi


offering ac
TY the state Transportation
r Trust Fund for use in traf-
fic and bicycle safety edu-
lonprof- cation programs.
sor the The program comes under
te Trail The John Anthony Wilson
adver- Bicycle Safety Act, which
took effect July 1, 2012.
of the "Businesses may now
assets sponsor seven of our state
sorship trails," Quintana said.
"The Withlacoochee State
system- Trail has seven locations
program where signs can be placed
)r state and potentially seen by
,atalina more than 275,000 trail
woman users of all ages hikers,
Depart- bicyclists, equestrians,
mental skaters, parents with
strollers and more."
ponsor- Sponsors will be ex-
with 85 pected to provide, at no
nanage- cost to the state, pre-
tion of approved signs and all
s and personnel and materials
d prop- needed to set up the signs
ill go to in accordance with state


Ivertising on state trails


Proceeds from sponsorships will
be split, with 85 percent going for
management and operation of
state Greenways and Trails facilities
and properties. The rest will go to
the state Transportation Trust
Fund for use in traffic and bicycle
safety education programs.


guidelines in a pre-
approved location.
DEP will ensure the
size, color, materials, con-
struction and location of
all signs are consistent
with the management plan
for the property and DEP
standards.
The signs, either 4
square feet or 16 square
feet, may contain the spon-
sor's logo and attribution.


Quintana said sponsor-
ship may also include other
cross-promotional items as
part of negotiations.
Quintana said there are
no set prices for sponsor-
ships because the program
is new, and the DEP is un-
able to predict how much
revenue the program
might generate.
Trail users Dennis and
Linda Reiland agreed if


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
In an effort to assist cleanup efforts in King's Bay, a group of volunteers recently transplanted hyacinth
from a nearby pond into a holding area in the bay. The aquatic vegetation helps filter water, which King's
Bay Springs Alliance speakers Saturday said is pertinent in a growing economy.



Preservation group



aims to save springs


At inaugural meeting

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
At one time, King's Bay
was full of bubbling
springs pumping billions
of gallons of crystal-clear water
into the bay daily
Today, ecologists say, the
springs have been damaged by
human negligence and could be
lost unless efforts are under-
taken to preserve them.
On Saturday approximately 100
community activists congregated
at the Crystal River Mall for the
inaugural meeting of the King's
Bay Springs Alliance (KBSA).
"KBSA promotes conserva-
tion, preservation and restora-
tion of the King's Bay springs
system for the benefit of future
generations," said KBSA presi-
dent Tracy Colson.
Three diverse speakers high-
lighted the past, present and fu-
ture of King's Bay
H elen Spivey, a former state
representative, spoke to
the crowd as the "ghost of
springs past." A resident of
Crystal River since late 1970,
Spivey recalled the springs'
state some 40 years ago.


bay alliance looks backward forward


"Next to the City Hall is a lit-
tle pond that used to be the
kids' swimming spring," Spivey
said. "You could throw a child
in and the spring's boil would
bounce them back up to the top.
There was no danger of losing
your child."
A contractor at one point
thought to reconstruct the
spring, Spivey said, and it col-
lapsed an example, she said,
of the deleterious effect hu-
mans have had on the springs
in Citrus County.
She also witnessed residents
fishing with dynamite and pol-
lutants being carelessly spilled
into the waters and aquifer
Dr. Bob Knight, of the H.T.
Odum Florida Springs In-
stitute, illustrated to the crowd
the billions of gallons of water
the springs used to pump into
the bay However, he said, the
flows have been reduced due to
controllable causes.
"Can we sustain a growth in
population?" Knight asked the
crowd. "We can do something
about it if we change our ways."
For Knight, that means re-
ducing groundwater with-
drawals in springsheds,
reducing nitrogen loads in


State BRIEFS


Brothers turning 1957
airplane into restaurant
NEW SMYRNA-Two brothers are re-
furbishing a 1957 airplane and turning it
into a restaurant in central Florida.
Danny and Skip Perna bought the DC-7
airplane from Opa-locka Airport in Miami after
it was decommissioned from flight in 2005.
The classic airliner was last used to fly cargo.
The brothers said the DC-7 Grille will
Daron Erznoznik blows into a sculptor's
rendition of a saxophone Saturday at the
Lower Keys Underwater Music Festi-
val in the Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary off Big Pine Key, Fla. About
200 snorkelers and divers gathered to
listen to a local radio station's broad-
cast that was piped beneath the sea.
Associated Press


springsheds, reducing reliance
on aquatic herbicide and fertil-
izer use, improving water circu-
lation, removing accumulated
sediments and re-establishing
beneficial vegetation.
Gary Kuhl, former county
administrator, said the fu-
ture of the springs is dependent
on making a connection be-
tween the environment and the
economy that is, viewing en-
vironmental resources not just
as natural treasures, but as eco-
nomic engines.
"Does it take an environmen-
talist to see the problems in a
clear and simple way?" Kuhl
asked. "To me, I believe this is
not a very logical situation that
most anyone could see. That is
the connection between the
quality Florida environment
and the robust Florida econ-
omy It seems that we have lost
sight of that"
To join KBSA, visit www.
facebook.com/KingsBaySprings
Alliance or email KBSA at
KingsBaySpringsAlliance
@gmail.com.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


seat nearly 50 customers. The cockpit will
remain intact and the wings are being
painted silver.
The Daytona Beach News-Journal re-
ported it will be several more months be-
fore the restaurant opens.
Police seeking witnesses
to fatal Ybor City shooting
TAMPA--The Tampa Police Depart-
ment is looking for witnesses after a man
was fatally shot outside a Tampa-area bar.
Authorities said the unidentified man
was involved in a fight around 3 a.m. Sat-
urday morning in a parking lot after leaving
a bar in Ybor City. The victim was taken to
a hospital after the shooting where he was
later pronounced dead.
-From wire reports


the final display provides
a service for the trail
users, is tastefully done
and supports the trail's
function, it's worth a trial.
The mandatory telecon-
ference for potential spon-
sors will be at 10:30 a.m.
Monday Proposals are due
no later than 5 p.m. on Aug.
8. There are 17 nonprofits
and businesses currently
signed up for the call.
The other trails avail-
able are the: Florida Keys
Overseas Heritage Trail,
Blackwater Heritage Trail,
Tallahassee-St. Marks His-
toric Railroad State Trail,
Nature Coast State Trail,
General James A. Van Fleet
State Trail and Palatka-
Lake Butler State Trail.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.



PDC to


be asked


to deny


permit


for dock

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA- A prop-
erty owner might not get to
rebuild an unpermitted
boat dock and add a cov-
ered boat slip with a boat
lift on a vacant lot in the
Mason Creek area.
The Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development
Commission, which meets
Thursday, will be advised
by county staff to deny a
conditional-use applica-
tion to remove two existing
docks and replace them
with a single 10-foot-by-48-
foot dock, a 16-foot-by-28-
foot covered boat slip and
a boat lift. According to
staff, the application as
proposed is inconsistent
with the county Compre-
hensive Plan's goal, objec-
tives, standards and
policies.
Rodney MacRae has
made the application for
George L. Sabates, owner
of a 5,667.76-square-foot
vacant lot at 5671 S. Sea
Otter Path, Homosassa.
According to county staff,
Sabates bought the vacant
lot for the specific purpose
of building a boat slip to
use with the dock to take
his boat out to an island
site he also owns.
When the boat dock was
built in 1996, it was allowed
on a vacant lot because the
lot was considered unde-
velopable, as it could not
provide enough area for
onsite waste disposal
treatment, such as a septic
system. Since that time, a
central sewer system has
been built in the area, and
the property could hook
up to it to serve a single-
family residence.
With the update of codes,
a principal structure is re-
quired on a property be-
fore a boat dock can be
permitted. In addition, the
Comprehensive Plan spec-
ifies that residential dock
facilities in coastal waters
are limited to a density of
one boat slip per 100 feet
of owned shoreline when
within essential manatee
habitat, which is where this
area is considered to set.
Also on Thursday's
agenda, the PDC will re-
view language revisions to
the Land Development Code
regarding setbacks from
residential uses for auto-
mobile service stations.

WHAT: Citrus County
Planning and Develop-
ment Commission.
WHEN: 9 a.m. Thursday.
WHERE: Lecanto Gov-


ernment Building, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Room
166, Lecanto.


4





A4 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday It's possible for you to be-
come far more daring and enterprising
in the year ahead. Provided you don't
become overly reckless, your confi-
dence could be a marvelous asset.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Even if
material conditions are improving, it
should not give you license to be
wasteful or extravagant. You may later
need all the money you blow today.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There's a
good chance you might be a shade too
opinionated for your own good. Al-
though you might feel you're making
an impression, it's the wrong way.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you're
not careful, you could easily let the cat
out of the bag regarding an important
secret. Be extra mindful of not only
what you say, but to whom.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't allow
an extravagant whim to gain control of
your wallet, which could easily happen
if you're palling around with a big
spender whom you're trying to impress.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Usually,
you have an appreciation for the
virtues, abilities and desires of your
friends. Today, however, you might feel
your way is the only way
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) In
your haste to promote something that
you care about, there's a strong possi-
bility you could leave out pertinent in-
formation. Slow down a bit.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Keep
in mind that old adage: "A bird in the
hand is worth two in the bush." It could
prove to be quite useful when negotiat-
ing an important financial matter.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) People
who are in a position to help you might
not do so if they think they are being
manipulated. To be effective, you must
be totally sincere.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Beware
of becoming so unduly enamored with
your own thinking that it blinds you to
much better suggestions being offered
by experienced people.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Resist
temptations to team up with someone
without knowing what that person's
plans or intentions might be. You may
not like his or her ideas.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Some-
one who is sincerely interested in your
welfare might have some sage advice.
Hear him or her out.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If you let
another do a job for you that you can
handle yourself, you could regret it.


ENTERTAINMENT


Barry Manilow
cancels concert
WEST VALLEY CITY, Utah -
Barry Manilow made a last-
minute decision to cancel a con-
cert in Utah on Friday night,
citing illness.
Police turned concert-goers
away as they approached the
Maverik Center in the Salt Lake
City suburb of West Valley City.
Fans were told to hold on to
their tickets because the show
would be rescheduled.
According to online ticket bro-
kers, the concert was nearly sold
out.
Manilow's concert Thursday in
Colorado was canceled due to
lightning, wind and rain.

Ex-NY Gov. Spitzer
offers life advice
NEW YORK Former Gov.
Eliot Spitzer is offering life ad-
vice in a new book released as
he campaigns for city comptrol-
ler, writing that "self-importance"
can lead to a "dangerous arro-
gance" that often ends badly.
The e-book, "Protecting Capi-
talism Case by Case," was pub-
lished this week and is selling
online for $9.99. A 198-page pa-
perback version is also available.
Spitzer, who resigned as gov-
ernor in 2008 amid a prostitution
scandal, surprised many by en-
tering the race for New York City
comptroller on July 7. His book
focuses on how he went after
law-breaking Wall Street titans as
a state attorney general dubbed
the "Sheriff of Wall Street."
"I'm beginning to think my po-
litical career has had an unusual
arch to it, but every day has
been fascinating," Spitzer told
The Associated Press in a tele-
phone interview Saturday.
One chapter in the book offers
his 10 "Rules of Life," starting
with No. 1: "Loyalty and fiduciary


Associated Press
The Rolling Stones perform Saturday at Barclaycard Presents
British Summer Time at Hyde Park in London.


duty matter."
But it doesn't delve into the
scandal that drove him from of-
fice and turned him into a late-
night punch line.
"The only question now is
moving forward," Spitzer said.
This week, he's been appear-
ing on various national television
shows as a serious candidate -
including a morning talk-show in-
terview during which he broke
down when asked whether the
excruciating spotlight on his pri-
vate life had changed him.
He had just days to collect
more than 3,700 signatures to
be on the Democratic primary
ballot with his main opponent,
Manhattan Borough President
Scott Stringer, but Spitzer deliv-
ered 27,000 signatures late
Thursday before the midnight
deadline.


Obama golfs with
ESPN's Kornheiser
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama's birthday gift to
ESPN commentator Tony Korn-
heiser is a game of golf. With
the president.
The White House said Obama
teed off Saturday with Korn-
heiser and Michael Wilbon, co-
hosts of the sports network's
"Pardon the Interruption" talk
show. Saturday was Korn-
heiser's 65th birthday.
Obama spent more than four
hours at the golf course at the
Army's Fort Belvoir in Virginia,
south of Washington. The presi-
dent is an avid sports fan and
viewer of ESPN programming.
The White House did not
identify the fourth member of the
presidential golf party.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 14, the
195th day of 2013. There are 170
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 14,1913, Gerald Rudolph
Ford Jr., the 38th president of the
United States, was born Leslie
Lynch King Jr. in Omaha, Neb.
On this date:
In 1789, during the French Revo-
lution, citizens of Paris stormed the
Bastille prison and released the
seven prisoners inside.
In 1881, outlaw William H. Bon-
ney Jr., alias "Billy the Kid," was
shot and killed by Sheriff Pat Gar-
rett in Fort Sumner (New Mexico).
In 1933, cartoon character Pop-
eye the Sailor made his movie
debut in the Fleischer Studios ani-
mated short, "Popeye the Sailor."
In 1999, race-based school bus-
ing in Boston ended after 25 years.
Ten years ago: Iraq's new gov-
erning council, in its first full day on
the job, voted to send a delegation
to the U.N. Security Council and as-
sert its right to represent Baghdad
on the world stage.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush lifted an executive
ban on offshore oil drilling which
had stood since his father was
president.
One year ago: The boss of
British security group G4S went on
television to say he was sorry that
his company had bungled the con-
tract to help protect the 2012 Lon-
don Olympic Games.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Harry
Dean Stanton is 87. Actress Nancy
Olson is 85. Actress Polly Bergen is
83. Former football player and actor
Rosey Grier is 81. Actor Vincent Pas-
tore is 67. Actor Stan Shaw is 61. Ac-
tress Jane Lynch is 53. Actor Jackie
Earle Haley is 52. Actor Matthew Fox
is 47. Actress Missy Gold is 43.
Country singer Jamey Johnson is
38. Actor Scott Porter is 34.
Thought for Today: "If the gov-
ernment is big enough to give you
everything you want, it is big
enough to take away everything
you have." President Gerald R.
Ford (1913-2006).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
) PR L HI LO PR| HI L
1.10 85 -70 0.20 90 72


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
89 74
88 76
90 73
89 70
88 72
89 76
88 83
90 72
87 75


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Showers and thunderstorms today.


88 73 1.00 -- NA ANA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK lusve daily
forecast by
W TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
_.MEg High: 89 Low: 72 4
Afternoon and evening storms, rain
chance 70%
r y MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73
Scattered afternoon and evening storms, rain
chance 60%
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 73
Scattered afternoon and evening storms, rain
V chance 40%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 86/71
Record 96/68
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean -3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 1.60 in.
Total for the month 6.50 in.
Total for the year 25.80 in.
Normal for the year 26.78 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.97 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 94%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grasses
Today's count: 1.8/12
Monday's count: 3.7
Tuesday's count: 4.3
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/14 SUNDAY 11:01 4:50 11:24 5:13
7/15 MONDAY 11:51 5:39 6:03


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT 8.............. :31 P. M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:42 A.M.
0 4 0 MOONRISE TODAY......................... 12:23 P.M.
JULY 22 JULY 29 AUG.6 MOONSET TODAY.................................NONE


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 10:15 a/5:47 a 10:28 p/6:24 p
Crystal River" 8:36 a/3:09 a 8:49 p/3:46 p
Withlacoochee* 6:23 a/12:57 a 6:36 p/1:34 p
Homosassa*** 9:25 a/4:46 a 9:38 p/5:23 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:57 a/6:29 a 11:41 p/7:25 p
9:18 a/3:51 a 10:02 p/4:47 p
7:05 a/1:39 a 7:49 p/2:35 p
10:07 a/5:28 a 10:51 p/6:24 p


Gulf water
temperature


86
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.27 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.39 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.94 n/a n/a
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.40 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


)RECAST FOR 3 0 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


79 67 pc
92 68 .02 ts
74 63 ts
87 69 .29 ts
84 71 pc
10370 ts
83 69 pc
86 58 pc
84 66 ts
86 59 s
72 66 pc
81 61 pc
83 61 pc
85 75 .05 pc
85 60 pc
80 70 .01 pc
83 62 pc
83 63 pc
83 64 pc
84 72 .13 pc
85 65 pc
80 58 pc
100 81 ts
92 64 .18 ts
81 67 pc
82 64 pc
98 76 s
86 63 ts
83 69 .07 pc
81 67 .22 pc
98 77 ts
85 63 pc
88 67 .02 pc
101 80 s
88 66 pc
73 63 pc
85 64 pc
88 68 pc
81 60 pc
80 65 2.74 pc
90 70 ts
87 71 ts
86 63 ts


90 70
96 67
78 66
84 68
83 72
93 74
91 76
85 61
83 72
99 59
85 71
81 71
89 67
86 74
90 68
86 71
82 74
90 71
86 71
88 72
90 72
90 63
84 69
89 64
86 68
88 69
102 77
87 70
90 72
88 71
93 76
87 72
88 72
105 87
89 69
76 66
88 73
88 71
78 66
87 71
86 74
84 72
87 70


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 90 75 pc 88 76
New York City 81 67 .05 pc 87 75
Norfolk 87 72 .11 pc 89 71
Oklahoma City 98 76 ts 77 66
Omaha 88 73 .03 pc 86 67
Palm Springs 10880 s 109 82
Philadelphia 87 72 pc 90 74
Phoenix 10584 pc 108 85
Pittsburgh 81 63 pc 91 70
Portland, ME 79 59 pc 84 64
Portland, Ore 80 53 s 83 60
Providence, R.I. 79 66 .07 pc 87 72
Raleigh 78 70 .53 pc 88 71
Rapid City 92 63 ts 80 67
Reno 92 57 s 94 63
Rochester, NY 81 60 pc 88 71
Sacramento 94 57 s 93 58
St. Louis 85 65 pc 87 71
St. Ste. Marie 83 56 pc 82 60
Salt Lake City 90 76 pc 92 71
San Antonio 10075 ts 95 75
San Diego 77 69 pc 76 67
San Francisco 72 52 pc 70 54
Savannah 84 72 .02 ts 87 74
Seattle 77 52 s 79 56
Spokane 75 53 s 87 54
Syracuse 80 64 pc 88 69
Topeka 90 72 pc 87 67
Washington 85 72 pc 88 73
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 108 Hays, Kan. LOW 32 Truckee, Calif.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 71/49/c
Athens 94/73/s
Beijing 87/75/pc
Berlin 79/54/pc
Bermuda 82/77As
Cairo 98/68/s
Calgary 70/52/sh
Havana 89/73/ts
Hong Kong 87/80/ts
Jerusalem 86/67/s


Lisbon 78/60/pc
London 85/57/sh
Madrid 95/66/s
Mexico City 72/54/ts
Montreal 88/70/s
Moscow 83/62/c
Paris 87/59/s
Rio 78/66/s
Rome 81/72/s
Sydney 64/54/sh
Tokyo 92/72/pc
Toronto 84/70/pc
Warsaw 78/57/sh


LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices............................D8

Lien Notices..................................D8

Miscellaneous Notices.................D8

Surplus Property...........................D8


CI TRULIS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
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C
JULY15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 A5




A6 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


NEMZOFF
Continued from Page Al

like "insane," "pathetic
whining," and "smoking
crack" to describe his
opinions of Grant.
From a public records
request, Grant on Thurs-
day released a set of
emails between Nemzoff,
himself and CCHB mem-
bers since early late April.
Grant said there are other
emails, but these are the
only ones he could com-
pile in a day's time.
Here are some high-
lights, beginning with an
exchange of emails just
two weeks after the CCHB
hired Nemzoff:
OnApril 30, at 9:30 p.m.,
Nemzoff asked Grant for
comments on the request
for proposals, or RFPs, a
process to solicit bids from
companies interested in
buying, leasing or merging
Citrus Memorial hospital.
"This is taking way too
long. If you are swamped
with work and can not
handle all the board's af-
fairs, then let me know."
Grant responded at
10:29 p.m. that the board
hasn't decided yet on the
RFP wording.
"I don't care if you ask
me 30 times," Grant wrote.
"In fact, I suggest you
watch your tone. I will not
tolerate it any more. Do
not send me another email
like this again. I hope that
is clear enough for you. If I
need your help, I'll ask."
Nemzoff's response
came about a half hour
later.
'Always a pleasure to
exchange emails with
you," he told Grant. "Let's
go over the rules here.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I suggest you
watch your tone. I will
not tolerate it any
more. Do not send
me another email I
like this again.

First of all I don't work for entire c
you. I work for the board." counsel,
Nemzoff then told Grant has nev
to get in step. a deal I
"Your organization's nose in
credibility as it relates to this. Wi
procedural matters is not him und
at an all time high right CCHB
now," he wrote. "So when Debbie
my client hires me for reply u
$775,000 to get them over and Nei
$100MM in sale or lease edgy em
proceeds, or merge their "This]
hospital, and I ask for you of a pr
to get me your comments, and not
what I need you to do is discuss(
stop your pathetic whining 'Ask ag,
... and do your job. and dign
'"As to your comment of, Nemz
'If I need your help I will Grant sh
ask,' you must have lost ing advi
your mind. I am not offer- intent,
ing to help you. I only step in s
asked for your comments." "Pleas
He closed: "If you don't one se
like my tone maybe you should t
should resign as general question
counsel because my tone that coi
is not the issue. The issue bidders.
is you have not gotten any- Ressler.
thing done on schedule." chance
Nemzoff sent a May 5 than he
email to trustees regarding would b
what Nemzoff believed was either o:
an urgency to hire a trans- 0 On
action attorney prior to the wrote ai
June 18 bid openings. saying h
"The process of selecting
a transaction counsel is
now being run by Bill and
he will not tell me what he
is doing," he wrote. "This is
insane. I am getting tired of (
all this ... I have never in my


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Bill Grant
CCHB attorney.


career seen a local
especially one that
er been involved in
like this, stick his
the process like
ll you please get
der control?"
B Chairwoman
Ressler's May 5
rged both Grant
mzoff to cease the
ails.
process needs to be
ofessional nature
one of a backyard
on," Ressler wrote.
ain that decorum
nitybe maintained."
off's response said
should not be offer-
ce on the letter of
which is the first
electing a bidder.
se do not think for
second that Bill
be answering legal
ns regarding LOI's
me in from these
," Nemzoff told
"I have a better
of getting it right
does and you all
e crazy to listen to
fus."
May 21, Nemzoff
in email to trustees
he knew of a meet-


ing Grant had in his law of-
fice with Sen. Charlie
Dean and representatives
of RegionalCare Hospital
Partners, in direct viola-
tion of the requests for pro-
posals that called for no
direct contact from bidders
with the hospital board. He
said the company presi-
dent told him "terms" of
the bid were discussed.
"...From my position as
transaction adviser is that
if in fact this is true and
other bidders find out
about it, we may have a
problem," Nemzoff wrote.
(Grant later admitted
the meeting occurred but
said he didn't participate.
He said Dean and Region-
alCare's consultant, for-
mer Attorney General Bill
McCollum, spent most of
the time catching up on
their political histories.
Then-trustee Mike Bays
said he spoke with Region-
alCare's president, who
said there were no specific
discussions regarding the
Citrus Memorial contract.)
On May 23, Nemzoff
complained to Grant about
a spreadsheet he assumed
Grant compiled on 16 at-
torneys who replied to the
CCHB's solicitation of
transaction counsel. Nem-
zoff, who was recovering
from shoulder surgery,
said he found several mis-
takes in the information.
"It took me 30 seconds
on my drugs to pick this
error up. You are priceless
Bill," he wrote.


. Page A7


RV show continues


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Arrow RV general manager Brian Banas and his wife,
Judy Banas, parked five recreational vehicles inside
Howard's Flea Market in Homosassa on
Saturday. The RV Swap Meet is one in a series of
events Howard's has planned to give the public
entertainment options during the slow summer months.
The show continues today until 2 p.m. at the end of
aisle K. Howard's Flea Market will be hosting Boat and
Fishing Swap Meet Show on Aug. 3, featuring
Homosassa Marina. For more information about
upcoming swap meets, call 352-628-4656.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AGENT
Continued from PageAl

settlement offer to the Cit-
rus Memorial Health
Foundation without run-
ning it by the CCHB first.
Plus, trustees were put
off by a series of email ex-
changes between Nemzoff,
trustees and CCHB attor-
ney Bill Grant (see related
story) that pointedly ques-
tion Grant's ability to par-
ticipate in the transaction
process.
"I had 20 examples of
rudeness," Joseph said.
If trustees were sur-
prised by Nemzoff's di-
rectness, a quick check to
his corporate website
would have given an indi-
cation of what to expect.
The site,
www.nemzoff.net,
includes a Wall
Street Journal pro-
file that details a
history of Nemzoff
offending clients,
colleagues and
bidders.
"For living proof B
that business suc- Pris
cess isn't always a CCHB
popularity contest,
consider Josh Nemzoff,"
the Journal story begins.
But along with that be-
havior comes a success
story Nemzoff's firm has
brokered $10 billion in
mergers and acquisitions,
according to the website.
His specialty: Selling strug-
gling public or nonprofit
hospitals, such as Citrus
Memorial, to well-financed
corporations for huge
profit
Priselac was indirectly
on the wrong end of one of



GRANT
Continued from PageA6

Nemzoff then sent an
email to trustees.
"I believe your legal
counsel is out of control,"
he said, adding later: "I
have 2 percocets and 3
oxycontin in my system
and it is my opinion that I
am still thinking better
than your lawyer."


Nemzoff's e-mail tirades.
Nemzoff since early May
strongly encouraged the
hospital board to hire a
transaction attorney in
time for the June 18 bid
opening. He gave Grant
several names and asked
for his input.
Instead, Grant and
Priselac decided to send
requests for proposals
from attorneys and re-
ceived 16 responses.
Priselac created a spread-
sheet for trustees to con-
sider when making the
final selection, which
should occur later this
month.
When Nemzoff received
the spreadsheet, he hit the
roof. He found fault with it
and, assuming Grant had
created it, blamed the at-
torney for the mistakes.
"You are price-
less Bill," he
wrote.
Grant re-
sponded that
Priselac was the
creator of the
spreadsheet and
he had done so to
ob help other trustees
elac make their
trustee. decision.
Priselac said in
an interview he under-
stands Nemzoff's passion
but that he also wants
trustees to feel comfort-
able with the hiring of an
attorney who could cost
taxpayers up to $1 million
depending on the transac-
tion issues.
"Can Josh be a little
harsh? Yes," he said. '"Josh
has worked with a lot of
transaction attorneys. At the
same time, I've got to look at
what is the right ingredient
to make this thing work"

At 12:41 a.m. May 24,
Grant responded. He said
Nemzoff was trying to
"drive a diverse agenda"
away from the board's
goals.
"Please think of that be-
fore your paranoia over-
takes this process," Grant
wrote.
Nemzoff responded five
minutes later: "I thought I
was the only one on drugs?
Apparently not"
May 28, Nemzoff sent


ON THE NET
www.nemzoff.net

Nemzoff said Saturday
he was well within con-
tract to suggest a settle-
ment with the hospital
foundation because the
lack of an agreement be-
tween the combating sides
could block a sale or lease.
He also said had
Joseph's attempt to fire
him succeeded, he would
have sued and prevailed
in court.
"That was obviously a
premeditated ambush," he
said. "It was kind of a
waste of time."
Priselac said he thinks
the air is cleared between
the board and Nemzoff to
move forward. The board
last week chose three fi-
nalists HCA Corp.,
Health Management Asso-
ciates and HealthCare
Hospital Partners and is
holding out hope that it
will have an agreement
with the hospital founda-
tion in selecting a final
bidder.
"He told us from Day 1
he has a tendency to get
like that," Priselac said of
Nemzoff. "We knew that
going in. I don't want to
jeopardize the success
we've had up to now I be-
lieve we can refocus and
get this job done. The al-
ternative is not good."
Nemzoff said that's his
focus, as well.
"I'm just trying to get the
deal done," he said. "I'll try
to watch my P's and Q's."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.

in email to Grant in re-
sponse to his quote in a
Chronicle story regarding
the Dean meeting. In the
story, Grant said since the
hospital board doesn't
have a CEO, "There's no-
body for them to call but
me."
Nemzoff wrote: "Are you
smoking crack or what?
What do you think your
client hired me for? Wow,
you are really a piece of
work."


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A8 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


GRASS
Continued from Page Al

sponges and coral, from
the mouth of the Anclote
River near Tarpon Springs
to the mouth Withla-
coochee River in the Pan-
handle. It also will extend
20 miles offshore, accord-
ing to Anastasiou. Sea-
grass also provides
essential habitat to other
marine wildlife such as
turtles, dolphins, rays,
sharks and the endan-
gered manatee.
The SWFWMD mapping
project, which encom-
passes some 400,000 acres
and stretches from Tarpon
Springs to Waccasassa Bay
in Bay County in the Pan-
handle, is expected to cost



SCALLOPS
Continued from PageAl

suits and bologna sand-
wiches."
The scallop season usu-
ally opens in Florida on
July 1 and runs through
Sept 24, but this year Gov.
Rick Scott asked the Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission to open the
season June 29. This ad-
justment accommodated
the weekend preceding
July 1, with the intention of
boosting local economies.
Local charter captains
Ross Files of the Planta-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$200,000.
The area is the second
largest seagrass habitat in
the United States, after
Florida Bay in the Keys.
"The seagrass beds look
amazingly stable," Anasta-
siou said, "which means
there are no signs they are
decreasing or increasing
in any significant way, but
they healthy," he said.
Anastasiou said unlike
the plant life in King's Bay,
seagrass and the macro-
algae in the mapping area
need a lot of salt water to
thrive.
"Fresh water kills
them," he said. Fresh
water, along with other
manmade pollutants, can
wreak havoc on seagrass,
which in turn will mean
fewer scallops and other
fish.


tion Dive Shop at the Plan-
tation resort in Crystal
River and Jake McGowan,
owner and operator of Salt
Water Savages, have seen
the effects of a booming
scallop population. Files
said the dive shop's boats
average two to seven tours
each day and as many as
10 on weekends.
Chancey recommends
scalloping Monday
through Thursday to avoid
the crowds that flock to the
gulf on weekends, clogging
parking areas, boat ramps
and waterways. According
to Greg Daugherty, an em-
ployee of the bait shop at
Pete's Pier, the busiest


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Chris Anastasiou, senior scientist with the Southwest
Florida Water Management District, says some forms of
algae located inshore are edible, such as this sample of
gracilaria he tastes.


"I think the seagrass in
this area is healthy be-
cause of lack development,
and this coast has a lot of
preserved land like the


time at the ramp is "from
about 7:30 to 10 in the
morning."
Files and McGowan con-
firmed that, on most trips,
visitors net the limit of
scallops permitted.
Florida regulations state
the daily limit for scallops
is 2 gallons whole (in the
shell) or 1 pint of scallop
meat per person, with a
maximum of 10 gallons
whole or a half-gallon of
meat per boat
The health of this year's
scallop population,
Chancey said, is partly due
to "extensive and healthy
seagrass beds" in the gulf
near Chassahowitzka, Ho-


Chassahowitzka Preserve
and cannot be developed."
According to officials,
the Springs Coast was pre-
viously mapped in 1985,


mosassa and Crystal
rivers.
"The ideal mixture of
sunlight, water salinity
and clarity makes for a
perfect place to perch,"
Chancey said, "and we
have a history of a popula-
tion here that has the abil-
ity to reproduce and
sustain the resource."
The easiest way to be
successful is to pay atten-
tion to the tides, Files said.
"Low tide is better. The
lower the tide," he said,
"the easier it is." And since
the tide changes about
every five and a half hours,
"One week the tide is low
in the morning, next week


1992 and 1999 by other
agencies. The mapping is
done every five years,
Anastasiou said.
He said this was the first
time digital photography
was used, producing more
accurate and cost-effective
imagery
The Florida Big Bend,
which includes the
Springs Coast, makes up
30 percent of all seagrass
in Florida and is the sec-
ond largest seagrass area
in the continental United
States and one of the
largest in the world.
"More than anything, I
don't want people to take
this for granted and for
them to do what is neces-
sary to protect it. This is
where the bay scallops and
a lot of the fish we catch
recreationally and com-


it's low in the evening."
However, going scallop-
ing tends to be an all-day
affair. Hopeful scallopers
head out into the gulf early
and stay out all day,
sometimes braving
Florida's frequent after-
noon thunderstorms but
bad weather doesn't deter
everyone.
"It's about fifty-fifty,"
Daugherty said of the
numbers of people who
come in ahead of the
storms and those who ride
them out. "It depends on
how far out they are."


Udotea and penicillus are
two common forms of sea-
grasses found along the
county's coast. The
grasses provide invaluable
habitat for sea creatures.
mercially live and thrive,"
Anastasiou said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Files said those who do
come in often congregate
in the river, "swimming in
the fresh water, shucking
their scallops."
Once they're shucked,
it's up to the cook how to
prepare them. A family
recipe of McGowan's calls
for them to be saut6ed in
butter, garlic, lemon juice
and Old Bay seasoning,
then served over pasta
with grated Parmesan
cheese and chopped green
onions a tasty and well-
deserved payoff after a
day in the gulf.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Peter Beley, 79
BROOKSVILLE
Peter Beley, age 79, of
Brooksville, Fla., passed
away July 12, 2013. Private
cremation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Fla.

Mary
Edwards, 75
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Mary A.
Edwards, age 75, of Inver-
ness, Florida, will be held
2:00 PM, Tuesday, July 16,
2013 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
7 HHomes
with Pas-
Stor Kip
Younger
IN V officiat-
S/ ing. Cre-
mation
will be
under the
Mary direction
Edwards of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness. The
family will receive friends
from 1:00 PM until the
time of service, Tuesday at
the Inverness Chapel. The
family requests expres-
sions of sympathy take the
form of memorial dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com.
Mrs. Edwards was born
April 9,1938 in Cannelton,
WV, daughter of the late
Charles and Edith (Oliver)
Hudson. She died July 10,
2013 in Inverness, FL. She
worked as an executive
secretary in the banking
and finance industry and
enjoyed karaoke and boat-
ing. Mrs. Edwards was a
member of Eugene Quinn
V F W Post 4337 Auxiliary
and the Fraternal Order of
Eagles, Inverness, FL.
Survivors include her
husband, James D. Ed-
wards of Inverness, FL, 2
daughters, Paula Sowell
and Kimberly (Steven)
Mitchell, 3 brothers,
Charles M. Hudson, Jerry
Hudson and John Hudson,
2 sisters, Lucille Snyder
and Rebecca Wright, 14
grandchildren, and 2 great
grandchildren.

Carol
McClellen, 75
HOMOSASSA
Carol Y McClellen, age
75, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away July 10, 2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. Burial will
be at the Florida National
Cemetery at a later date.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Fla.

Virginia
Robinson, 87
CITRUS SPRINGS
Virginia Robinson, 87, of
Citrus Springs, Fla.,
passed away July 11, 2013,
under the care of her fam-
ily and Hospice of Citrus
County in Citrus Springs.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service LLC,
Hernando.



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Andrew
Ramanauskas, 90
CRYSTAL RIVER
Andrew J. Ramanauskas
(aka Raman), 90, of Crystal
River, Fla., passed away
July 3, 2013, after a long
battle with Alzheimer's
disease.
Memorial services were
in Crystal River, and a fu-
ture service will be in
Chicago, Ill.
He is greatly missed by
his loving wife, Loretta;
their children; many
grandchildren; and great-
grandchildren.
We are grateful to Hos-
pice of Citrus County for
their outstanding care and
support.

Dorothy
Young, 93
HERNANDO
Young, Dorothy, 93, of
Hernando, Fla., passed
away July 7,2013, at Wood-
land Terrace of Citrus. Pri-
vate services will be held
under the direction of
Fero Funeral Home.




Jentines 'Bob'
Jackson, 77
LECANTO
Jentines "Bob" H. Jack-
son, age 77, Lecanto, died
July 8,2013, under the care
of Hospice of Citrus
County.
Bob was born Aug. 8,
1935, in Vance County,
N.C., to the late Harvey J.
and Carrie L. (West) Jack-
son. He served our coun-
try in the U.S. Army and
was a postal clerk at the
Inverness post office for
more than 32 years. He
was a member of the Sev-
enth-day Adventist
Church in Crystal River.
He was preceded in death
by his wife Lois on Dec. 25,
2012. Left to cherish his
memory is his son Jay and
wife Lisa Jackson and son
Steven Jackson, all of
Lecanto; his sister Victo-
ria "Vi" Clark, Tenn.; and
grandchildren Travis,
Wayne, Paul and Luke
Jackson; as well as nieces
and nephews.
A tribute to Bob's life
will be held at 11 a.m. Fri-
day, July 19, 2013, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 9 a.m. until the hour
of service. Burial will be
private at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


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Dennis
Nelson, 60
CRYSTAL RIVER
Dennis L. Nelson, 60, of
Crystal River, passed away
on Tuesday, July 9, 2013. A
funeral service will be at
11 a.m. Tuesday, July 16,
2013 at Wilder Flneral Home
with burial to follow at
Florida National Cemetery
Family and friends will be
received from 6 p.m. until
8 p.m. Monday July 15,2013.

Hsiou Wang, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
Hsiou Ching Wang, 81,
Crystal River, passed away
on Wednesday July 10, 2013,
at 11:35 a.m. in the great
care of Lifecare and Hospice
of Citrus County She went
to God in the presence of
her daughter Lian, grand-
daughter Rebecca and great-
granddaughter Courtney.
She was soon joined by
her grandson Ben and his
girlfriend Anastassia, and
her son-in-law Bob.
She was born on Dec. 6,
1931, in Taipei, Taiwan.
She was known as "Mama
Suzie" or "Mama Wang" to
everyone. She had a booth
at Howard's Flea Market
for more than 20 years.
She was a member of S.G.I.
religion. She was fluent in
Chinese and Japanese.
Survived by her daugh-
ter Lian Sargent and son-
in-law Bob Sargent of
Homosassa; son Wen Long
Wang; aunt and daughter-
in-law of Taiwan; grand-
daughter Rebecca Johnson;
grandson-in-law Kam
Johnson; two great-grand-
children, Ben and Courtney
Johnson of Crystal River;
and a granddaughter,
Betty Wang of La Puente,
Calif. She had many friends
all over the world. She will
be missed by everyone she
ever touched.
Her memorial service
will be held at Brown Fu-
neral Home in Lecanto,
Fla., on Tuesday, July 16,
2013, at 4 p.m. Family and
friends are welcome to ar-
rive any time after 3 p.m.
The Hospice pastor, Kelly,
will be officiating.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Fla.
www.brownfuneralhome
.com.

Norman
Weggeland, 73
HERNANDO
Weggeland, Norman S., 73
of Hernando, Fla., passed
away July 5, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial hospital. A me-
morial will be held at3 p.m.
July 21 at Fero Memorial
Gardens. Front Fneral Home.








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Associated Press
People peruse items up for bid at Harrisburg's Wild West
auction. Approximately 8,000 items are up for sale.


Cash-starved Pa.

city to sell Wild

West artifacts


Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. -
A cavernous brick build-
ing on the outskirts of the
city holds a failed dream,
a warehouse stacked high
with the remnants of a
multimillion-dollar spend-
ing spree by a former
Harrisburg mayor who
used city money to pur-
chase artifacts for an Old
West museum that died in
its infancy
City officials hope that
after a weeklong auction
that starts Monday, the
collection will be gone -
the stuffed buffalo and
mountain lion, the more
than 500 firearms, the


racks of period clothing,
the wooden dugout canoes
and the Savage Ale bar sign
with a bullet hole tenuously
attributed to frontier-
swoman Calamity Jane.
Stephen Reed, who was
in his seventh term four
years ago when Democratic
primary voters turned
him out of office, pursued
the museum project as
part of a plan to draw
tourists with five muse-
ums. Two were established,
a small fire museum and
a larger facility focused
on the Civil War
No one seems to know
preciselyhow much he spent
as he traveled the country
to purchase the items.


Founder of Bose

audio firm dies at 83


Associated Press

BOSTON Acoustics
pioneer Amar Bose,
founder and chairman of
the audio technology
company Bose Corp.,
known for the rich sound
of its small tabletop radios
and its noise-canceling
headphones, has
died at age 83.
Bose's death was
announced Fri-
day by the com-
pany's president,
Bob Maresca, I
and the Massa-
chusetts Institute
of Technology, An
where Bose Bo
began his acoustics re-
search and was on the fac-
ulty for more than 40 years.
Details about Bose's
death weren't immedi-
ately available.
Bose founded the com-
pany, based in Framing-
ham, just outside Boston,
in 1964. Maresca said the
company will remain pri-
vately held.


In 2011, Bose gave MIT
the majority of Bose Corp.
stock in the form of non-
voting shares whose divi-
dends are used to support
education and research.
MIT does not participate
in management or gover-
nance of the company
Bose, who was born
and raised in
j. Philadelphia to
parents who
were natives of
India, received
his bachelor's de-
gree, master's de-
gree and
doctorate from
nar MIT, all in electri-
Dse cal engineering.
Bose started a research
program in physical
acoustics and psychoa-
coustics, leading to the
development of patents in
acoustics, electronics,
nonlinear systems and
communication theory
'As long as there are in-
teresting problems to solve,
I'll stay active," Bose said
in a 2005 interview.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Domestic battery
arrests
Michael Allender II, 38, of Inver-
ness, at 10:47 p.m. June 28 on a mis-
demeanor charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
Wendy Austin, 37, of Lecanto,
at 1:10 a.m. July 3 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No bond.
Jason Gulley, 30, of Crystal
River, at 4 a.m. July 5 on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
BUI arrests
Ethan Burgess, 31, of North
Derosa Terrace, Dunnellon, at 8:07
p.m. July 6 on a misdemeanor charge
of boating under the influence. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, he was
stopped in a vessel in King's Bay in
Crystal River. He refused to submit to
field sobriety tests and refused to sub-
mit to a test of his breath. Bond $500.
Bradley Crawford, 23, of North-
east 147th Lane, Fort McCoy, at 9:52
p.m. July 7 on a misdemeanor charge
of boating under the influence. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, he was
stopped in a kayak on the Homosassa
River. Tests of his breath showed his
blood alcohol concentration was 0.110
percent and 0.113 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. Bond $500.
DUI arrests
Joseph Carrigan, 25, of North
Travis Drive, Dunnellon, at 9:19 a.m.
June 29 on a Citrus County warrant
for a misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence. Bond $500.
Christopher Carr, 21, of North
Whippoorwill Terrace, Hemando, at 4
p.m. June 29 on a Citrus County war-
rant for a misdemeanor charge of driv-
ing under the influence with property
damage. Bond $500.
Donna Burke, 45, of South
Mooreland Point, Homosassa, at 8:37
p.m. June 29 on misdemeanor
charges of disorderly intoxication and
resisting an officer without violence.
Bond $650.
Cassie Reneer, 22, of East Live
Oak Lane, Inverness, at 4:40 p.m.
July 2 on a misdemeanor charge of
driving under the influence. According
to her arrest affidavit, she was ar-
rested following a crash on Civic Cir-
cle north of Lake Beverly Drive,
Beverly Hills. A test of her breath


showed her blood alcohol concentra-
tion was 0.134 percent. The legal limit
is 0.08 percent.
Other arrests
Tyler Flannigan, 21, of West
Sugarmaple Court, Beverly Hills, at
1:50 p.m. June 28 on a felony charge
of burglary of an unoccupied con-
veyance. According to his arrest affi-
davit, he is accused of burglarizing a
vehicle at the Inverness Regional
Shopping Center. Bond $5,000.
Michael Borski III, 22, of South
Federal Highway, Lake Worth, at 1:26
p.m. June 28 on Citrus County war-
rants for misdemeanor charges of
criminal mischief and trespassing in a
structure or conveyance and violation
of probation on an original misde-
meanor charge of petit theft. No bond.
Ronald Ramsey, 38, of South
Incognito Point, Homosassa, at 2:51
p.m. June 28 on a Marion County
warrant for violation of probation on an
original felony charge of driving while
license suspended or revoked (habit-
ual offender). No bond.
Daniel Rice, 25, of East Circle-
wood Street, Inverness, at 3:19 p.m.
June 28 on a felony charge of battery
on a correctional officer. According to
his arrest affidavit, he is accused of
throwing a food tray at a correctional
officer at the Citrus County Detention
Facility. Bond $5,000.
Summer Roberts, 34, of Walnut
Street, Dunnellon, at 5:23 p.m. June
28 on a felony charge of possession of
a controlled substance (methamphet-
amine) and a misdemeanor charge of
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $5,500.
Scott Carrig, 49, of South
Columbus Street, Beverly Hills, at
7:20 p.m. June 28 on a felony charge
of aggravated battery with a deadly
weapon. According to his arrest affi-
davit, Carrig's neighbor accused him
of hitting her car with his car at Winn-
Dixie in Beverly Hills and speeding
away. Bond $5,000.
Edwin Rolon, 20, of South
Columbus Street, Beverly Hills, at
1:08 p.m. July 2 on a felony charge of
grand theft. According to his arrest af-
fidavit, he is accused of stealing a tel-
evision, a bow and DVDs. Bond
$2,000.
Matthew McDonald, 18, of
Elkins Road, Inglis, at4:30 p.m. July 2


For the RECORD

ON THE NET
For more information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the
Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the CCSO
website, click on Crime
Mapping for a view of
where each type of crime
occurs in Citrus County.
Click on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary, theft
and vandalism.
For the Record reports are
also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office/Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Morabito said the fire
service is seeking
volunteers to serve
alongside paid staff at all
stations. For more
information, call John
Beebe, coordinator, at
352-527-5406.
The "Sheriff's 10-43" show
airs on TV station WYKE,
digital channel 47 and
Bright House cable channel
16. The show features
interviews with sheriff's of-
fice staff from all areas of
the agency. It also features
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy taking
live calls during the entire
show on the last
Wednesday monthly.
The Sexual Predator Unit is
responsible for tracking all
registered sexual offenders
and predators in the
county. Click on the Sexual
Offender Information link
on the CCSO website.
To join the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office Volunteer
Unit, call Sgt. Chris Evan at
352-527-3701 or email
cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.

on felony charges of trafficking or en-
deavoring to traffic in stolen property,


grand theft, burglary of an unoccupied
residence, burglary of an unoccupied
conveyance and giving false verifica-
tion of ownership/false identification to
a secondary metals recycler and a
misdemeanor charge of petit theft. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, he is ac-
cused of burglarizing a home on West
Wicker Street in Crystal River, steal-
ing several items and selling some of
the items to a recycler. Bond $32,250.
Kelly Brosey, 44, of North Shel-
tering Oaks Drive, Inverness, at 9:32
p.m. July 2 on Citrus County warrants
for failure to appear in court for an
original felony charge of driving while
license suspended (habitual offender)
and failure to appear in court for an
original misdemeanor charge of petit
theft from a merchant. No bond.
Cassandra Laudicina, 26, of
North East Avenue, Inverness, at
11:06 p.m. July 2 on a felony charge of
possession of a controlled substance
(oxycodone). Bond $5,000.
Billy Brown, 41, of Hemando, at
1:15 p.m. July 5 on two felony charges
of burglary of an unoccupied con-
veyance and a misdemeanor charge
of petit theft. According to his arrest af-
fidavit, he is accused of committing
two vehicle burglaries in Hernando
and stealing medication. Bond
$4,500.
Joseph Sciongay, 22, of East
Dandy Loop, Hernando, at 5:35 p.m.
July 5 on a misdemeanor charge of
retail petit theft. Bond $250.
Joseph Hummel, 34, of North
Picnic Point, Hemando, at 11:19 p.m.
July 5 on a Citrus County warrant for
violation of probation on an original
felony charge of fleeing or attempting
to elude a law enforcement officer. No
bond.
Adam Futral Jr., 26, of North Al-
lamandra Drive, Beverly Hills, at 4:06
p.m. July 6 on a felony charge of
grand theft and a Citrus County war-
rant for failure to pay child support. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, he is
accused of taking cash from a
woman's purse. Bond $4,020.
Amelia Teachman, 28, of West
Cedar Street, Crystal River, at
6:20 p.m. July 6 on a misdemeanor
charge of retail petit theft. Bond $250.
Charles Davis, 27, of 20th Street
North, St. Petersburg, at 6:42 p.m.
July 6 on a Pinellas County warrant for


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violation of probation on an original
felony charge of burglary to a struc-
ture. No bond.
Tiffany Shepard, 32, of North
Pocono Drive, Dunnellon, at 11:31
p.m. July 7 on a misdemeanor charge
of disorderly intoxication. Bond $150.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A commercial burglary was re-
ported at 8:26 a.m. Wednesday, July
10, in the 800 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 9:27 a.m. July 10 in the
10700 block of S. Riviera Drive,
Homosassa.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 11:28 a.m. July 10 in the
1000 block of Turner Camp Road,
Inverness.
A burglary was reported at 5:16
p.m. July 10 in the 10 block of Cleome
Court, Homosassa.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 5:20 p.m. July 10 at Pine
Drive, Homosassa.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported at
9:57 a.m. Wednesday, July 10, in the
area of S. Suncoast Boulevard and W.
Candy Lane, Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was reported
at 2:11 p.m. July 10 in the 5300 block
of W. Amman St., Dunnellon.
M A petit theft was reported at 3:16
p.m. July 10 in the 2600 block of N.
Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando.
A grand theft was reported at
12:55 p.m. Thursday, July 11, in the
3900 block of N. Calumet Terrace,
Hernando.
A grand theft was reported at
2:09 p.m. July 11 in the 3900 block of
S. Illinois Terrace, Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported at
2:47 p.m. July 11 in the 5300 block of
S. Cherokee Way, Homosassa.
M A petit theft was reported at 3:07
p.m. July 11 in the 7900 block of E.
Southlake Drive.
Vandalism
M A vandalism was reported at 8:33
a.m. Thursday, July 11, in the 8500
block of W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa.


A10 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


LOCAL


w r-


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JURY
Continued from Page Al

and their identities are
kept anonymous they
are identified only by
number.
As jurors deliberated for
a second day, there was lit-
tle understanding between
two camps assembled to
support Martin and Zim-
merman outside the Semi-
nole County Courthouse.
"He deserves some re-
spect and appreciation,"
Casey David Kole Sr., 66,
shouted about the former
neighborhood watch
leader. "It's a tragedy"
Patricia Dalton, 60,
yelled back: "It's a tragedy
that could have been
avoided!"
Dalton, like most of the
people at the suburban
Orlando courthouse, said
she was there in support
of the family of Trayvon
Martin, the 17-year-old
black teen from Miami
who Zimmerman fatally
shot last year
The supporters stayed
peaceful for most of the
day until in the afternoon
when sheriff's deputies
had to separate a Zimmer-
man supporter from a pro-
Martin demonstrator after
a heated exchange. There
was no physical contact
made and no one was ar-
rested. Saturday night, two
men who got into an argu-
ment left voluntarily after
talking with sheriff's
deputies.
Others remained calm.
Two Orlando sisters,
dressed in colorful
African-print clothing and
walking on stilts, sang
"Lean on Me" with the
crowd as a man strummed
a banjo and people waved
signs.
"We're just here for
peace and love," said stilt
walker Bambi Loketo.
Prosecutors and
Trayvon Martin's family
say Zimmerman profiled
Martin because of the
teen's race. Those allega-
tions, and a 44-day delay
before police arrested
Zimmerman, sparked na-


Associated Press
Demonstrators get into a shouting match Saturday outside the Seminole County
Courthouse while they wait for a verdict in the George Zimmerman trial in Seminole cir-
cuit court in Sanford.


tionwide protests involv-
ing leading national civil
rights leaders and spurred
emotional debates about
gun control, self-defense
laws, race, and equal jus-
tice under the law
In Saturday's strong
Florida sun, some people
at the courthouse wore
hoodies, as Martin had
when he died. One woman
lay in the grass, her arms
spread, in a re-creation of
Martin's death. Those in


the smaller pro-
Zimmerman camp held
small signs, saying things
like "We love you George"
and "George got hit you
must acquit."
Joseph Uy of Longwood
was among an even
smaller group: the few
who said they had no opin-
ion on whether Zimmer-
man was guilty.
He said he came be-
cause he was "just


curious."
"I'm neutral," he said,
while cradling his three
tiny Chihuahuas in his
arms.
By mid-afternoon, peo-
ple rallied in the heat and
chanted slogans as a loom-
ing thundercloud threat-
ened a downpour
'Justice for Trayvon,"
some shouted. Others
yelled, "Convict George
Zimmerman."


Police and civic leaders
have pleaded for calm in
Sanford and across the
country after the verdict.
"There is no party in this
case who wants to see any
violence," Seminole
County Sheriff Don Es-
linger said. "We have an
expectation upon this an-
nouncement that our com-
munity will continue to act
peacefully"
In New York on Satur-
day, the Rev Al Sharpton
said that no matter the ver-
dict, any demonstrations
that follow it must be
peaceful.
"We do not want to
smear Trayvon Martin's
name with violence," the
civil rights leader said.
"He is a victim of vio-
lence."
The Rev Jesse Jackson
had a similar message. He


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SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 All

tweeted that people
should "avoid violence be-
cause it only leads to more
tragedies."
Benjamin Crump, an at-
torney for Martin's family,
said the parents are emo-
tional but doing as well as
expected as they await a
verdict.
"(Jurors) staying out
longer and considering the
evidence and testimony is
a good thing for us arriving
at a just verdict," Crump
said.
On Saturday morning,
Martin's mother, Sybrina
Fulton, shared on Twitter
what she called her fa-
vorite Bible verse: "Trust
in the LORD with all your
heart and lean not on your
own understanding; in all
your ways submit to him,
and he will make your
paths straight."











NATION


CI


&
TRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


CHRONICLE


Nat*


atownBRdEs Napolitano departure lays bare gaps at DHS
Slow and steady


. Associated Press


SI- .
Associated Press
Dan Longnecker slowly
moves down the strip on
his John Deer 720 while
dragging a 20,000-pound
sled behind him Saturday
as part of the Red River
Valley Antique Tractor
Club's tractor pull event
in Paris, Texas.


Famously filthy
river hosts swim
BOSTON The Charles
River may be famous for its
filth, but it's also clean
enough now for its first pub-
lic swim since the 1950s.
The Boston Globe re-
ported dozens of people
jumped into the river Saturday
near Boston's Hatch Shell.
The water quality meets
standards for swimming most
days, a big improvement
since the EPAgave the
water quality a grade of D in
1995. But the bottom remains
polluted, so swimmers Sat-
urday had to avoid it.
Some swimmers de-
scribed the water as orange
or resembling beef broth.
Renata von Tscharner, head
of the Charles River Con-
servancy, said she preferred
to describe it as a tea.
Patriotic quilts
donated to veterans
CORALVILLE, Iowa -
When Betty Bream learned
of a national organization
that allows people make
custom, patriotic quilts for
combat veterans, she knew
she wanted to participate.
She did, and then some.
On Friday, Bream pre-
sented quilts she made her-
self to 15 veterans some
of them relatives, some
friends who came from
Iowa, Florida, Alabama,
Tennessee, Illinois and Wis-
consin. The group receiving
quilts represented the Army,
Navy, Air Force and
Marines, and veterans from
the Korean War, Persian
Gulf War and Vietnam War.
Bream created the quilts as
part of the Quilts of Valor
program.
Each quilt took her about
20 hours to complete,
Bream told the Iowa City
Press-Citizen.
Bream distributed the
quilts in a carrier tote to
each veteran, saying she
opted against wrapping
each veteran in their quilt.
"Sometimes during the
ceremony, they'll take the
quilt out of the bag and ac-
tually wrap them in it, and it
can get very emotional,"
she said. "All of these peo-
ple I know. I don't think I
could get through it without
crying, so I planned on just
handing it to them and
thanking them for their
service."
-From wire reports


WASHINGTON The
leadership vacancy created
by Homeland Security Sec-
retary Janet Napolitano's
resignation is the latest and
greatest blow to a depart-
ment where one-third of the
heads of key agencies and
divisions have been filled
with acting officials or re-
mained vacant for months.
Napolitano's departure,
slated for September, will
create the 15th hole in the
department's 45 leadership
positions. Napolitano's
chief of staff and the direc-
tor of Immigration and
Customs Enforcement are
leaving this month. The
deputy secretary, general
counsel, heads of Customs
and Border Protection,
privacy, legislative affairs,
intelligence and analysis
and more are filled with


acting officials. Other key
positions, like the execu-
tive secretariat, inspector
general and deputy under-
secretary for cybersecurity
remain vacant
This swath of vacancies
raises questions about how
a department depleted of
permanent leadership could
implement changes, par-
ticularly as Congress con-
siders overhaulingthe nation's
immigration system.
The Homeland Security
Department is comprised
of agencies that protect the
president, respond to dis-
asters, enforce immigration
laws and secure air travel.
Many of the unfilled lead-
ership positions don't re-
quire Senate confirmation.
While some of these va-
cancies have little impact
on daily operations
around the country, the
lack of permanent leader-


Napolitano's departure will create
the 15th hole in the department's
45 leadership positions.


ship at the top can have
long term effects over pol-
icy, said Richard Skinner,
the department's former
inspector general. There
has been no permanent re-
placement for Skinner
since he left two years ago.
Acting officials are always
reluctant to make long-term
policy calls, said James
Ziglar, the last commis-
sioner of the Immigration
and Naturalization Serv-
ice, which was absorbed
into the Homeland Secu-
rity Department in 2003.
"On the administration
side, management side,
everyone is looking at the
person, saying, 'You aren't
going to be around very long,


so we're going to just hold
off doing stuff,"' Ziglar said.
Customs and Border
Protection, which over-
sees the securing of the na-
tion's borders, has not had
a Senate-confirmed leader
since the George W Bush
administration. President
Barack Obama in 2010 ex-
ercised his ability to bypass
Congress and appoint Alan
Bersin as head of CBP But
that appointment was up
at the end of 2011. The act-
ing commissioner who re-
placed Bersin recently
retired from government,
only to be replaced by an-
other acting commissioner
The department's second
most senior position has


Abortion restrictions make it through Texas Legislature


Associated Press
Abortion rights advocates fill the rotunda of the State Capitol in Austin as the Senate nears a vote Friday
night on sweeping abortion restrictions. More than 2,000 demonstrators filled the Capitol building to oppose
the bill, and state troopers dragged six out of the Senate chamber for trying to disrupt the debate. Republicans
in the Texas Legislature passed the omnibus abortion bill, one of the most restrictive in the nation, shortly
after midnight, but Democrats vowed Saturday to fight in the courts and at the ballot box as they used the
measure to rally their supporters. The legislation allows abortions only in surgical centers, requires doctors
who perform them to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals, dictates when abortion pills are taken
and bans abortions after 20 weeks unless the woman's life is in imminent danger.




Judge to mull if airlines owe WTC owners


Associated Press


NEW YORK A judge who has
presided over most of the litigation
stemming from the Sept 11 attacks
will decide whether the owners of
the World Trade Center can try to
make aviation companies pay bil-
lions of dollars in damages.
U.S. District Judge Alvin K.
Hellerstein said he will announce
his decision immediately after hearing
several witnesses and listening to
arguments in a nonjury trial starting
Monday and expected to last three days.
The trial will decide whether World
Trade Center Properties and its af-
filiates can receive more than the $4.9
billion in insurance proceeds they
have already recovered since the 9/11
attacks by terrorists who hijacked
commercial airliners and flew them
into the 110-story twin towers. The
attacks also led to the destruction of
a third trade center building.
If the judge should decide that the
World Trade Center owners were
entitled to additional money, a lia-


Associated Press
Michigan City firefighters, police and first responders dig
through a sand dune Friday at Mount Baldy near Michigan
City, Ind., while searching for a missing 8-year-old-boy who
fell into a hole. Lakeshore Ranger Bruce Rowe said it took
crews using heavy excavating equipment about 3.5 hours
to pull the boy out, saying he was buried under 11 feet of
sand. The boy initially was taken to Franciscan St. Anthony
Health Medical Center, then flown to a Chicago hospital.


Associated Press
Larry Silverstein, president of Silver-
stein Properties and lease holder on the
World Trade Center, discusses the re-
building of the trade center June 20,
2003, during the 23rd annual
BulidingsNY Show in New York.
ability trial might occur. The defen-
dants include American Airlines
Inc., AMR Corp., United Airlines
Inc., US Airways Inc., Colgan Air
Inc., Boeing Co. and the Massachu-
setts Port Authority, among others.
The airlines and other aviation-
related companies were sued with
the reasoning that they were negli-
gent, allowing terrorists to board air-
planes and overtake their crews


before plunging the planes into the
trade center complex.
Hellerstein has already said the
maximum the trade center owners
could recoverfrom aviation defendants
would be $3.5 billion. The trade cen-
ter owners say it has cost more than
$7 billion to replace the twin towers
and more than $1 billion to replace the
third trade center building that fell.
In court papers, both sides have
accused the other of unfairly char-
acterizing their claims, with the avi-
ation defendants saying the trade
center owners were being "absurd"
and the complex's owners labeling
some of the aviation defendants' ar-
guments as "nonsense."
The aviation defendants say
Hellerstein should conclude that the
trade center owners are entitled to
no award because they've already been
reimbursed by insurance companies
for the same damage they are trying
to force aviation defendants to pay for
as well. They also note the replacement
buildings are more modern and
fancy than the original buildings.


Eight-year-old boy rescued


after being trapped in dune
Associated Press Bruce Rowe said. The boy who called the incident
was taken to Franciscan St "baffling."
MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. Anthony Health Medical "I have never heard of
An 8-year-old boy who was Center, but was later flown anything like this here or
playing near a large sand to a Chicago hospital. at other sand dune parks,'
dune at Indiana Dunes Rowe said he was told said Rowe, who has
National Lakeshore along the boy had vital signs, but worked at the lakeshore
Lake Michigan partially didn't know his condition. since 1991. "I've never
fell into a hole and then Officials didn't immediately heard of anything like this
got trapped under 11 feet release the boy's name. on a sand dune."
of sand before rescuers The boy's family called The dune will remain
managed to pull him out. 911 atabout4:30 p.m. saying closed this weekend while
It took a crew using their son became covered authorities investigate.
heavy excavating equipment when they tried to dig him "We won't let people on
more than three hours to out. Emergency respon- the dune again until we
pull the boy out of a dune ders were on scene within know what happened and
known as Mount Baldy on 15 minutes and began dig- whether it is safe for
Friday, Lakeshore Ranger going by hand, said Rowe, them," he said.


Associated Press
People gather Saturday
outside Ste. Agnes Roman
Catholic Church in Lac-
Megantic, Quebec, Canada,
as the church's bells
chime 50 times for the
50 victims believed to
have died in the train
crash and blaze there
early July 6.

Blast at Baghdad
mosque kills 11
BAGHDAD Iraqi au-
thorities said a bomb ex-
ploded at a Sunni mosque
in Baghdad on Saturday,
killing at least 11 worship-
pers and wounding 35.
Police said the blast
struck near the gate of the
Khalid bin al-Walid mosque
in the capital's southern
Dora neighborhood.
Parliamentarians
want Morsi's return
CAIRO Islamist law-
makers in Egypt's disbanded
upper house of parliament
are demanding the return of
the country's ousted presi-
dent, and calling on other
parliaments not to recog-
nize the country's new
army-appointed leadership.
The demand was made
Saturday by around 20
members of the Shura
Council, which was Egypt's
sole legislative house from
the court-ordered dissolution
of the lower house last year
until the military's July 3 top-
pling of Mohammed Morsi.
Protest scraps plan
for uranium plant
BEIJING -Authorities in
a southern Chinese city on
Saturday scrapped a plan to
build a uranium-processing
plant, a day after hundreds of
residents protested it be-
cause of safety concerns.
The city government of
Heshan in Guangdong
province said in an online
statement it would halt the
$6 billion project by China
National Nuclear Corp., which
would have built facilities for
uranium conversion and en-
richment, and the manufac-
ture of nuclear fuel equipment.
"The people's govern-
ment of the city of Heshan
has decided to respect the
public opinion and will not
consider CNNC's Longwan
industrial park project," read
the one-line announcement.
CNNC could not be im-
mediately reached for com-
ment, but its plans are part
of national efforts to reduce
China's reliance on coal.
-From wire reports


t
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been without a confirmed
leader since Jane Holl Lute
left in April. Rand Beers,
who has been the acting
deputy secretary, is poised
to take over the department
while the Senate considers
Alejandro Mayorkas to fill
the job permanently
But Mayorkas' confirma-
tion would also create an-
other vacancy, this time at
U.S. Citizenship and Immi-
gration Services. That agency
is responsible for policing
who gets immigration ben-
efits, including green cards.
And not having a perma-
nent inspector general to
serve as the department's
watchdog is a significant
problem, said Skinner,
who once served in an act-
ing capacity in that role.
"The longer that posi-
tion stays vacant, the more
vulnerable the depart-
ment becomes," he said.


World BRIEFS

A town mourns






* Veterans news begins on Page A15


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


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* g
,~1 *,.
* .qu...A'
*.


Couple treks to South America


to share grandson's special day


Special to the Chronicle
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The Bykowskis traveled to a
variety of locations in Columbia and photographed native
wildlife and vistas.


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO
traveling the world is
second nature to Carl and
Mary Bykowski.
Therefore, when their
grandson Alex Trapp requested
their presence at his wedding in
Libano, Columbia, Carl and
Mary willingly agreed.


"We have been to Europe, but this was our
first trip to South America," Mary said. "We have
always been close to him while he was growing up
in Wisconsin. It was important to us to attend his
wedding."
Three years ago, Alex traveled to Columbia to
teach and translate English at Cambridge
Institute of Languages in Bogota. Following his
love for education led him to his soul mate -
Ledis. She was studying at the institute in hopes of
learning English to become a tour guide
for her country
Last year-- knowing Ledis was the one and
Columbia was his home -Alex decided to move to
Libano. Wedding bells shortly followed on May 25.
See I Page A17


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: Carl and Mary Bykowski of Hernando look through
a photo album from a recent trip to Columbia. The couple
made the journey to attend their grandson's wedding.


DREAM
VCATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group
sponsor a photo contest
for readers. Readers are


invited to send a photograph
from their Dream Vacation
with a brief description of
the trip.
If it's selected, it will be
published in a Sunday
Chronicle. At the end of
the year, a panel of judges
will select the best photo
during the year and that


photograph will win
a prize.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or
dropped off at the
Chronicle office in
Inverness, Crystal River or
any Accent Travel Office.


Hafners vacation in Ireland
Jennifer and Kimberly Hafner, along with their father, vacationed in Ireland for three
weeks recently. They visited every county in the Republic of Ireland and two of the
three counties in Northern Ireland. They visited the following 10 "must-see" places:
Bru na Boinne; The Burren; The Hill of Tara; Glendalough; Lakes of Killarney and Ring
of Kerry; The Giant's Causeway; Sligo and Area; Bunratty Castle and Folk Park; Cliffs
of Moher and more. They also visited several castles, cathedrals, gardens, caves,
Victorian palaces, prehistoric monuments and limerock plateaus and saw
breathtaking mountain landscapes. Pictured are Jennifer, left, and Kimberly at
St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin.
Special to the Chronicle





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING JULY 14, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House Di: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 18:00 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
S[WESH NBC 19 19 News News America's Got Talent (In Stereo) 'PG' cc Law & Order: SVU Crossing Lines 14' News Access
Lewis & Clark: Journey Secrets of Althorp-- Secrets of Chatsworth Masterpiece Mystery! "Endeavour, Yes As Time As Time
0 ED PBS 3 3 14 6 of Discovery The Spencers (N) 'G' (N) 'PG' B Series 1: Fugue" (N7'PG' Minister PG Goes By Goes By
B1 OiF) PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin In Stereo) 'PG' cc Chatsworth Masterpiece Movie Martin
SWFD NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly America's Got Talent Auditions continue. (In Law & Order: Special Crossing Lines "Special News Paid
NBC 8 8 8 8 8News Stereo)'PG'Bc Victims Unit'14 Ops: Part 1" 14' Program
ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Celebity Wife Swap Whodunnit? "Mountain Castle A DJ is mur- News Sports
W AB 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' (N) 'PG' Lyin" (N)'14' dered. 'PG' Night
CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In Big Brother Contestants The Good Wife (In The Mentalist "The Red 10 News, Paid
lBW JCBS10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) sNface eviction. (N) Stereo)'14'B Barn"'14' B1 11pm(N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News (N) Cleveland The The Bob's Family Guy Ameican FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
S~T FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) mc Show Simpsons Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) N Notice PG'
3 [WE JL ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Celebity Wife Swap Whodunnit? (N) '14' Castle 'PG' ~ News Inside Ed.
S IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening "Lakeland Revival" (Taped) Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Duplantis the Gap Awaken
ABC 11 News World America's Funniest Celebity Wife Swap Whodunnit? "Mountain Castle A DJ is mur- News Castle 'PG'
SWFTSABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' (N) 'PG' B Lyin" (N)'14' dered. 'PG'
WMFiR ND 12 12 16 family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Shield" Law & Order "Juvenile" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
mCN IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory '14'm '14'm 'PG' 'PG'
E D WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *** "Evelyn"(2002) Pierce Brosnan. Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris |Chris Tampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
M WAMX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Brody
King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Invasion" CSI: Miami Armored Cold Case 'Yo, Adrian" **2 "Scooby-Doo"
IM CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men 14' truck is robbed. '14' 14' (2002)'PG'
Casita Big Rotary Family Healthy Your Citrus County Court ISpyY' Eye for an Fam Team
S WYKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living Eye
EJ CWOXiFOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Cleveland Simpsons Simpsons |Burgers IFam. Guy |American FOX 35 News at10 TMZ(N)'PG'
S WVE UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Futbol Parodiando (N)'PG'(SS) Sal y Pimienta'PG' AqufyAhora(SS)
M IWXPX) ION 17 Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
Duck IDuck IDuck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Storage Storage Storage Storage
(AE) 54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Wars WarsPG WarsPG' WarsPG'
S*** "Casino Royale" (2006) Daniel Craig. Premiere. James Bond plays The Killing Sarah goes The Killing Sarah goes The Klling Sarah goes
(_i_ ) 55 64 55 poker with a man who finances terrorists. 'PG-13' missing. (N) '14' missing. '14' missing. '14'
S 52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced Call- Call- Off the Off the Callof Call- Top Hooker"The Final Call of Call-
(L)I 52 35 52 19 21 Wildman Wildman Hook Hook Wildman Wildman Four"(N)'PG' Wildman Wildman
** "Daddy's Little Girls" (2007, Romance) Sunday Best "United Sunday Best "United Sunday Best'G' Sunday Best'G'
(BE 96 19 96 GabrielleUnion.'PG-13' c By Faith" (N) 'G' By Faith" 'G' i
RAVDJ 254 51 254 Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Pincesses-Lo. Housewives/NJ Happens Jersey
*** "I Love You, Man"(2009, Comedy) Paul *+ "Grandma's Boy" (2006, Comedy) Doris Futurama Tosh.0 Drunk Tosh.0
ICCI 27 61 27 33 Rudd, Jason Segel. R' Roberts, Allen Covert. R' 14 14' History '14'm
Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Hillbillies Hillbillies Dog and Beth: On the Hillbillies Hillbillies
MY) 98 45 98 28 37 Hunt'14' Hunt'14' Hunt (N)'14' for Hire for Hire Hunt'14'B for Hire for Hire
[WNBJ 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess On 60 Minutes on CNBC Truth About American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
tNNJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Crimes of the Inside Man (N) Anthony Bourd.
SAustin & Jessie Austin & Good- Dog With a Austin & Shake It Jessie Austin & Good- Jessie A.N.T.
) 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' 'G' Ally'G' Charlie Blog G' Ally G' Up! 'G' G' Ally'G' Charlie 'G' Farm G'
(E$Pj 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs. (N) N SportsCenter (N)
[EPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 College Baseball Skateboard Street League (N) INation Softball Word Cup, Final: Teams TBA. (N) World/Poker
[EWTN3 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Crossing World Over Live |Sunday Night Prime In Her Footsteps The |With Cardinal Dolan God |Bookmark
S* Zoo eepe ** "Happy Gilmore"(1996, Comedy) Adam *+ "Billy Madison"(1995 Comedy)Adam America's Funniest
(1 ini) 29 52 29 20 28 ,_,,.. i,,,,- Sandler, Julie Bowen.PG-13' Sandler, Darren McGavin. PG-13' Home Videos'PG'
*** "Max"(2002, Drama) John Cusack, Noah **2 "Frances" (1982) Jessica Lange. Outspoken actress *** "Crimes of the Heart"(1986)
(_i_ 118 170 Taylor, Leelee Sobieski. 'R' Frances Farmer, committed by her mother. R' Diane Keaton. 'PG-13'
(Ei) 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Stossel Huckabee
[(OD) 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Food Network Star Food Court Wars 'G' Food Network Star Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
FSNFL1 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker Tour World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
S**"Just Go With It" (2011, Romance- "Grown Ups"(2010, Comedy) Adam "Grown Ups" (2010, Comedy) Adam
1(9) 30 60 30 51 Comedy) Adam Sandier. PG-13' Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Roc PG-13 Sandler, Kevin James, Chis Ro. 'PG-13'
GOLE) 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf |PGA Tour Golf John Deere Classic, Final Round. N
** "A Princess for Christmas" (2011, ** 'The Christmas Card" (2006, Romance) "Help for the Holidays" (2012, Fantasy)
59 68 59 45 54 Comedy) Katie McGrath, Roger Moore. B Ed Asner, John Newton. NR N Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. N
*I 302 201 302 2 2 "Wrath of the ** "Ted"(2012, Comedy) Mark Wahlberg, True Blood F.. the Pain The Newsroom (In True Blood F... the Pain
302 201 302 2 2 Titans" (2012) B Mila Kunis. On Stereo) 'R' Away" (N)'MA' Stereo) 'MA' Away"'MA'
The Newsroom Ratings The Newsroom 'MA' The Newsroom Nina *+ "The Watch"(2012) Ben Stiller. Red 2: **+ "The Eagle"
HBO2 303 202 303 plummet. 'MA' surprises Mac. 'MA' (In Stereo) 'R' BFirst (2011) PG-13_
(HlTV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl HGTV Star (N) F Love It or List It, Too Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl
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) 51 25 51 32 42 Reaper" PG'B Divide'"PG' 'PG' '14'm Guns & Guns &
E 24 38 24 31 ** "Notting Hill" "Fool's Gold" (2008, Action) Matthew Drop Dead Diva Devious Maids (N) *+ "Fool's Gold"
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S** "The Island" (2005, Action) Ewan **+ "The Man With the Iron Fists"(2012) "National Lampoon's Dorm Daze Co-Ed
320 221 320 3 3 McGregor. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Bc RZA, Cung Le. (In Stereo) 'NR' N 2"(2006) Gabe Carr.R' Confid.
[IMiNBCJ 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera | Deadly Game Sex Slaves |Sex Slaves City
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732 112 732 Racing (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Car TV PG'
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"Hope ** "Celeste and Jesse Forever" Magic City Magic City *** "The Bourne Supremacy"(2004) Matt Magic City
370 271 370 Springs" (2012) Rashida Jones. "Crossroads" 'MA' 'MA Damon. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Bc 'MA
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i 36 31 36 Blue 'G' Exp. Shape TV Adv. Sport Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue 'G'
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M 1 59 31 26 29 Kilmer, Tommy Lee Jones.'PG-13 dynamicduoreturnstotakeonan icyvillain.'PG-13 JessicaAlba.
(MI$J 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Bruce Almighty" (2003) 'PG-13' "Talladega Nights: Ricky Bobby" "Talladega Nights: Ricky Bobby"
169 53 169 30 35 "Divorce American Style" (1967, *** 'The Magnificent Seven" (1960, ** "Seven Angry Men" (1955, Historical
169 53 169 30 35 Comedy) Dick Van Dyke. 'NR' N Western) Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach. NR' N Drama) Raymond Massey NR' B
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CL 50 46 50 29 30 Medium Medium Breaking Amish: Long Island Medium Long Island Medium Breaking Amish: Long Island Medium
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(Li) :350 261 350 Black" Finnigan. 'N R'N Elizabeth Banks. (In Stereo) PG-13' mB Jackman. (In Stereo) PG-13 Bc
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(TRAV) 9 54 9 44 No Reservation Bikinis Bikinis Wat Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Adam Adam BBQ Cr BBQ Cr.
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Hardcore Hardcore Hardcore Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Bidders Most Shocking
(tLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Cleveland The Golden Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs Gold Gids Gold Girls
A) 47 7 NCIS Intelligence offi- NCIS A Navy lieutenant NCIS Director's contact NCIS A murder victim NCIS "Angel of Death" Burn Notice "Exit
47 32 47 17 18 ceris killed.'PG' is poisoned.'PG' is killed.'PG' in a taxi.'PG' '14'm cPlan"'14'
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117 69 117 Heat" '14' Bc Land" '14' '14' m Home" '14' Bc Murder" '14' "Backstabbers" '14' m
(WGNA 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay "Bull Durham" (1988)


Parent fuming


D ear Annie: I am
still fuming over
something that
happened a month ago.
I was contacted by my
son's high school teacher,
alleging that he plagia-
rized parts of his final
term paper Annie, I
coached him through the
writing process, making
sure he followed through
with his outline. It took
an agonizing 15 hours
over several days. I know
he didn't plagiarize, be-
cause I was in
the room the
entire time.
The
teacher ran
the paper
through one
of the com-
mercially
available on-
line programs r
designed to
catch plagia-
rism, and part
of one sen- ANN
tence popped MAIL
up. She in-
sists he
copied the sentence from
some book published in
the 1950s and expects
him to cite his source.
Aren't students allowed
to have the same
thoughts someone else
has had before?
My son is being called a
liar and told to give credit
to some writer he never
heard of. How many


I
.I


unique phrases can stu-
dents come up with these
days? I don't believe stu-
dents should have to
change their wording if
they wrote it themselves.
I think teachers should
stop relying on computer
programs and start teach-
ing kids to think, read
and write. I told my son
he should be proud of his
hard work, but he thinks
it simply wasn't worth the
effort.
Disgusted Parent
Dear Parent
We agree that
this is a sorry
commentary on
schooling, but
you need to be
practical. If
teachers use
these online
programs to
check for pla-
giarized
phrases, it
makes sense for
E'S students to
BOX double-check
their papers
the same way
Of course, two people
could come up with the
same sentence independ-
ently, but the teacher has
no way of knowing this is
the case.
Your son can protect
himself from future accu-
sations by running his pa-
pers through a program
similar to what the
teacher uses.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG) In
3D. 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:30 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Lone Ranger" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:25 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters University" (PG)
1 p.m., 4:15 p.m.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13)
3:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Pacific Rim" In 3D. (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"White House Down" (PG-13)
6:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Despicable Me 2" In 3D.
(PG) 4:50 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Grown Ups 2" (PG-13)


1 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 10 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"The Lone Ranger" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Pacific Rim" (PG-13)
12:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Pacific Rim" In 3D. (PG-13)
4:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No
passes.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13)
12:35 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG)
12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG)
In 3D. 5:30 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
No passes.
"White House Down" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"World War Z" (PG-13)
5:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"World War Z" In 3D. (PG-13)
12:10 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Book of snapshots
6 Junk email
10 Jessica Parker
15 Impostor
20 Fully
21 Grow weary
22 Official
investigation
23 Unrefined
24 Below
25 High point
26 Snake
27 Elemental gas
28 Become older
29 "- the Knife"
31 Mexican food
33 Pith helmet
35 Kind
36 Cistern
37 Redirect
39 Toward a
plane's tail
41 Misrepresentation
44 Decrease
45 Helper (abbr.)
48 Indian of Mexico
53 Make better
54 Stage area
55 Band
57 Web-footed bird
58 Slant
59 Cheat
60 Hampshire
61 Soothing ointment
63 River in France
64 Skill
65 Crook
66 Honored with
a party
68 Cabbage salad
70 Indeed!
71 Country
72 Tender of cattle
74 Inland sea in Asia
76 printer
79 Not hidden
81 Fawn
83 Ledger entry
87 Communion table
88 Broad
89 Singing voice
91 Then and-
92 Sic-
94 Macadamize
96 Word of parting
97 Hemmed and -
98 Players
100 Rescinds


102 Norse god of thunder
104 Oolong, e.g.
107 Wild disturbance
109 Inflexible
110 Punch
111 Depot (abbr.)
114 Arm bone
116 Untruthful witness
118 Deighton or Cariou
119 vital
120 Bridge
121 Very strange
123 Partner in marriage
125 Workers on a ship
126 Enamel
127 Gladden
128 Abound
129 Police action
130 Outer edge
131 An article
133 Stick
136 Refrigerate
137 Butcher shop item
141 Ruler unit
144 Flowing garment
145 Masticate
146 Common abbr.
149 Fame
151 "The Thinker" sculptor
153 Do an office job
155 Embankment
157 Breakfast fare
158 Higher up
159 Eye part
160 Antelope
161 Sat for a painter
162 Cut down
163 Remaining
164 Wash cycle


DOWN
1 vitae
2 Breathing organ
3 Wait
4 Western Indian
5 Fantastic creature
6 Heap
7 Mining tool
8 Branch
9 Get-together
10 "Lost in -"
11 Intensity of feeling
12 Pole
13 Further
14 Big sandwich
15 Cunning creature
16 Bolger and Liotta
17 Jason's ship


Employer
Fender spoiler
Hairdo
Tiny colonist
- Maria
The kneecap
Portable shelter
Cool and damp
Seaman
Playground game
Kind of
processing
Arab ruler
Gael or
Welshman, e.g.
Untamed
Bro. or sis.
Springs
Park of a kind
Whig's opponent
Serf
So-so grades
Word with bow
or bay
OT name
Wool fabric
Big -
Salamander
Painter Chagall
Roadblock
Eternally
Much feared
Wild pig of Africa
Fewest
Fragrant wood
Fleur--
"Merry Widow" com-
poser
Once around a track
Wing
Rds.
Big shot (abbr.)
Itinerary (abbr.)
Morning wetness
Wrath
Turner or Kennedy
Make illegal
Post
Wicked acts
Related by blood
Make damp
Pointed arch
Attila the -
Melody
Jewish month
Wall pier
End-of-race marker
Toboggan
Whirl


112 Chinese dynasty
113 Poker stake
115 ABAmem.
117 Caviar
119 Cleveland's lake
120 Go by boat
122 So far
124 Actress
Thurman
125 Cautious
126 Thief in the night


Johnny -
Enemy
Clue
Keep in motion
Sharpened
Dishonest one
Cut short
Blood (pref.)
Dollar bills
Warsaw native
Stuff


143 Vagrant
145 Musical symbol
146 "-Almighty"
147 Playing cards
148 Yield
150 Get hitched
152 Jones Industrial Aver-
age
154 "- Got a Secret"
156 Biblical judge


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & IN SERVICE

Veterans NOTES


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 A15


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

COMING SOON:
'IN THEIR WORDS'
The Chronicle is revamping
its Veterans News section to
include a new feature titled "In
Their Words."
We will prominently feature
the stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about a
singular event or moment in
your military career that
stands out to you. It can be
any type of event, from some-
thing from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on leave.
We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of
service, theater of war served,
years served, outfit and veter-
ans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help
set up obtaining "then" and
"now" photos to publish with
your story.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
& REUNIONS
USS Chilton APA 38 will
have a reunion Oct. 10,
11 and 12 in New London,
Conn. Contact Joe Doherty at
352-341-5959 orjdohertyl @
tampabay.rr.com.
A special event, an
Iraq/Afghanistan Fallen
Hero Name Reading, will be
held from 1 to 4 p.m. Tues-
day, July 30, at Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. The
Vietnam Veterans Gathering
seeks community volunteers
to read the names of fallen
heroes from Iraq and
Afghanistan. Volunteers are
asked to read 30 names. A
recording of all names will be
played at local and nationwide
memorials and veteran
events.


Another reading will take
place from 10:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21,
at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Call Jim Stepanek at
352-489-1644 or email IM
crazyjim@aol.com.
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693, at 7890 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Ho-
mosassa, will host a breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 8, to honor Purple
Heart recipients and com-
memorate the 231st anniver-
sary of the Purple Heart.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for
the free breakfast by calling
Carrie Clemons at 352-
628-1633 or mailing
carriejeanetteclemons@
yahoo.com. Please indicate
the number in your party.
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
conduct its monthly coordina-
tion meeting for Citrus
County's 21st annual Veter-
ans Appreciation Week at
1:30 p.m., Wednesday, July
17, in the Conference Room
of the Citrus County Chronicle
Building, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans' service organi-
zations are invited to send
representatives to participate
in the planning process. Indi-
vidual veterans are also
welcome.
For more information, call
Chris Gregoriou at 352-
795-7000.

POST NEws
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Riders
meet the first Thursday of the
month. On the second Thurs-
day, Ladies Auxiliary meets at
4:30 p.m. and AMVET mem-
bers meet at 5:30 p.m. Joe
Hozian is commander.
For more information about
kitchen and canteen hours,
call 352-447-4473.
For information about the
post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.


Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information re-
garding American Legion Post
155, or any of its programs
and functions, call 352-795-
6526, email blantonthompson
Postl55@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPostl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sis-
ters, daughters, granddaugh-
ters, great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
Fried chicken dinner with all


the fixings will be served from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 19,
at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Fish
dinner choice of fried or
baked is on the menu from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
July 24. Everyone is wel-
come; donation is $7 for each
meal.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For
more information, call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John


Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Fried fish dinner will be
served from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, July 19. Cost is $8;
children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke by Mike. The
public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.


Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 officially
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday monthly at the chap-
ter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, at the intersection
of Independence Highway
and U.S. 41. The chapter hall
is on the corner of Independ-
ence Highway and Paul
Drive. Due to vacations, there
will be no official meetings in
July or August.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any vet-
erans who received a Purple
Heart for a combat injury or
See VETERANS/Page A16


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Nuggets of news may be valuable for vets


Iwas going to focus on the history be-
hind Independence Day this month,
but due to some recent events, I've
chosen to address them instead.
I do hope everyone had a safe and
happy Fourth of July, and took the time
to give some thought to our brave sol-
diers who have given and are currently
giving so much to keep our freedom in-
tact. Kudos!
The next thing I'd like to address is
the display of the American flag. Most of
us already know it is to be of the same
height or, ideally, higher than other flags
being flown in close proximity. I've no-
ticed several home flagpoles in Citrus
County bearing flags at half-staff in re-
spect for the 19 firefighters lost in a
tragic fire in Arizona. It warms my heart
to see private citizens taking the time to
show this respect and I'd like to publicly
say thank you to those of you who have
participated in this lowering of the flag.
On our Facebook page, I posted one of
our members has been dealing with
some serious medical issues. I've not
mentioned his name for the sake of pri-
vacy for him and his family Even so,
we've received many kind responses of-


Barbara
Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


fering well-wishes and healing energy to
this loving couple who are facing their
challenges head on and without doubt
or hesitation.
Medical conditions can change
quickly, and some major changes are
coming about in their life together I'm
happy to report these beloved members
are making this episode into a positive
change, rather than allowing anger and
self-pity enter the picture.
I know I speak for many when I ex-
press how proud I am of them both. This
is truly an example to live by
Our food bank is in need of mostly dry
goods boxed rice, dry soup mixes and
instant mashed potatoes are just some
examples. Call the coalition at 352-


400-8736 for further details, and please
remember to check those expiration
dates, as we must follow them as well.
Another important issue has been
brought to my attention this past week,
and that is the importance of getting
yourself registered with the Veterans
Administration.
You don't have to be disabled in order
to utilize the clinic facilities, prescrip-
tion services and receive certain bene-
fits. All you need is a valid photo
Identification card (driver's license will
do) and a copy of your DD-214 release
papers showing you were honorably
discharged.
You can become registered by visiting
the Veterans Administration Service Of-
fice in the same building as the VA
clinic in Lecanto on Marc Knighton
Court. Make sure to ask for the correct
forms to fill out that may save you from
having to pay a co-pay, based on your
annual income and assets.
This qualification can cover doctor
visits, lab work, prescriptions and more,
and it's a great way to save some money
in these tight economic times.
Also, make sure to ask about travel re-


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

those with service-connected
disabilities to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207
or 352-400-8952. Call these
numbers also for information
about chapter activities, veter-
ans' benefits or membership.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility-
challenged veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment
for transportation to the VA
medical center in Gainesville
may call the Citrus County
Transit office for wheelchair
transportation; 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
includes all family members of
a disabled American veteran,
including expanded family
members. Members are
never too young or too old to
join; there is no membership
fee for those older than 81.
Phone Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104, or
Adjutant Lynn Armitage at
352-341-5334, or chairwoman
Juanita Godrey at 352-
563-1238.
Material, yarn, bed sheets,
blankets, toiletry items, etc.,


are needed for the many proj-
ects the auxiliary makes for
veterans in nursing homes. To
help, donate and for more in-
formation, call Godfrey at
352-794-3104, or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post meets the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. The auxiliary meets at
1 p.m. the first Wednesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.


Caleb M. Curry
Army Pvt. Caleb M.
Curry has graduated from
basic combat training at
Fort Jackson, Columbia,
S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness and re-
ceived instruction and prac-
tice in basic combat skills,
military weapons, chemical


Thursday at the post. Call
352-726-5206 for information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in


warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksman-
ship, armed and unarmed
combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches
and field training exercises.
Curry is the son of Kim
Howard and stepson of
James Howard of Crystal
River.
He is a 2012 graduate of
Crystal River High School.


any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375
Little Al Point, off Arbor Street
in Inverness. Call Com-
mander Norm Brumett at 352-
476-2134 or Auxiliary
president Alice Brummett at
352-476-7001 for information.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
The post will host an eight-
pin, no-tap bowling tourna-
ment at 1 p.m. Saturday, July
20, at the Sportsmen's Bowl.
For more information call


Norm at 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 typically meets the first
Monday monthly at the Olive
Tree Restaurant in Airport
Plaza in Crystal River. Dinner
is at 6 p.m. and the meeting
follows at 7. The August
meeting will be Aug. 5, with
the installation Aug. 10 at the
Masonic Lodge, 5030 S. Me-
morial Drive, Homosassa.
All veterans in the
Homosassa/Homosassa
Springs area are invited to be
a part of American Legion
Post 166. This is open to all
veterans who love to ride and
would be interested in forming
an American Legion Riders
chapter. Riders members are
military men and women from
all branches of service, as
well as children of service
members.
For more information, call
Clay Scott at 928-848-8359 or
email eaglerider@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call 352-860-2090.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway).
For more information about
the 40/8, call the Chef De
Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web
at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday, July


16, at the Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. All com-
bat-wounded veterans and
parents, lineal descendants,
spouses and siblings of living
or deceased Purple Heart re-
cipients are invited to attend
the meeting and to become a
Chapter 776 member. For
more information, visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome.
Call Morgan Patterson at
352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City.
All eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.


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A16 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


imbursement if you must drive more
than a certain number of miles for
treatment or a checkup, then a form
filled out can reimburse you for a
portion of your gasoline expenses.
There are limitations on the number
of these claims allowed per month and
the last time I checked, you have only 30
days after your attended appointment to
file the form.
The reimbursement is now directly
deposited to a bank account of your
choice as long as your name appears on
the account Make sure to follow up on
this, as these claims can sometimes take
30 days or more to arrive in your
account.
I'm still investigating on where to call
if the reimbursement doesn't appear
after several months.
Have a safe July, and I'll tell you more
in August!

Barbara L. Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She may be
contacted via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group may be
found at www.ccvcfl.org.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Report: Forest trails poorly maintained


Volunteers strive to keep them clean,


but training is limited and funding lags behind the need


JEFF BARNARD
Associated Press

GRANTS PASS, Ore.- Shane
Krogen has no trouble finding
retirees willing to spend a week
in the wilderness grubbing out
rocks and swinging a pick or
shovel to bring a hiking trail
back up to national standards.
The hard part is getting the
U.S. Forest Service to come up
with a few thousand dollars to
buy the volunteers a T-shirt and
feed them well, which is all it
takes to keep them coming back
for more.
"The Forest Service will fund
us when they can, if they've got
the dollars," said Krogen, exec-
utive director of the High
Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew in
Clovis, Calif. "It's just a matter
of their budgets being cut
drastically"
A government watchdog
agency has found that hiking
trails on national forests suffer
from a $314 million backlog in
maintenance, with only a quar-
ter of the 158,000 miles of trails
meeting national quality
standards.
"The Forest Service has
more miles of trail than it has
been able to maintain, result-
ing in a persistent maintenance
backlog with a range of nega-
tive effects," said the report
from the Government Account-
ability Office.
Annual funding has lagged
far behind the need. In 2012,
for example, trails needed
$523.7 million for maintenance,
operations and capital im-
provements, according to the
report, yet received only $81.9
million. The gap in 2006 was
similar, with $509.1 million of
need, but only $74.2 million in
funding.
The report adds that the For-
est Service relies heavily on
volunteers to maintain trails,
but does not take full advan-
tage of them. While the Forest
Service manual sets a goal of
using volunteers, the agency
has not established that as an
expectation of trails managers,
and training on working with
volunteers is limited.
In 2012, the equivalent of 667


Associated Press
In this March 16, 2009, file photo, California Conservation Corps workers clear a hiking trail on the San Bernardino National Forest in
Hemet, Calif. A Government Accountability Office report released in June 2013 finds that hiking trails on national forests suffer from a
$314 million backlog in maintenance. The report states only a quarter of the national forest system's 158,000 miles of trails meets
quality standards, which makes people use them less and damages the environment.


volunteers working fulltime did
$26 million worth of work, the
report said. The volunteer ef-
fort was equivalent to the 667
full-time Forest Service em-
ployees working on trails.
The national system of recre-
ational fees does little to fill the
funding gap. The Forest Serv-
ice told Congress last month it
collects $66 million a year,
mostly from campgrounds, cab-
ins and picnic areas. The law
authorizing the fee expires in
December 2014.


Jim Furnish is a retired For-
est Service deputy chief for the
forest system. He says the prob-
lem goes back decades, and re-
sults from the Forest Service
and Congress making recre-
ation a low priority, with a low
level of risk when the work
doesn't get done.
"Part of the issue is the con-
sequences of neglect are not
seen as severe," he added.
"People can usually get where
they're going, just with
difficulty."


Forest Service Chief Thomas
L. Tidwell said in his formal re-
sponse to the report that the
agency agrees with the GAO's
conclusions, and pledged to
look for ways to close the fund-
ing gap and improve training.
He said the growing need to
fight wildfires and budget cuts
both contribute to the problem.
Krogan said spending $600
for T-shirts and $2,000 for food
will keep a crew of 50 volun-
teers working in the wilderness
for five days. A paid crew


would cost 20 times that.
Why would someone work so
hard for so little?
"Most of us sit at a desk all
week and at the end of the
week have no tangible outcome
for our effort," said Krogen.
"Whether they are cutting out a
tree or building rock steps, they
have a sense of pride and own-
ership. 'Look what I was able to
do, and I've never done this be-
fore. Now I'll be able to come
through here and remember
this day for the rest of my life."'


COLUMBIA
Continued from Page A13

However, before the
couple could tie the knot,
Alex waited on his
mother and grandparents
to arrive from Hernando
to the farming community
nestled in the Andes
Mountains.
"We arrived in Bogota
May 21," Mary said. "How-
ever, due to a landslide,
the road into Libano was
closed. They had some
political meeting the day
of the wedding in Libano,
so they cleared it for
that"
Carl said it took six and
a half hours to travel the
120 miles of narrow rock
roads to Libano. Hours
before the wedding was
scheduled to begin, Carl
and Mary finally arrived
for their grandson's
"perfect" day
"While we were there it
was the beginning of the
rainy season," Mary said.
"However, the day of the
wedding the skies cleared
and the wedding turned
out perfect."
Mary was quickly
introduced to the


Columbian culture.
"They did not have hot
water," Mary said. "My
daughter and the bride
went to have their hair
done the day of the wed-
ding and they washed her
hair in cold water Also,
my daughter has platinum
blond hair and everyone
there was in awe of her
hair They wanted to
touch it."
Carl experienced the
culture in a different
manner
"I gave a toast and
there was an interpreter
that interpreted what I
was saying to the audi-
ence," Carl said. "How-
ever, Alex did sing an
Elvis Presley's "I Can't
Stop Loving You" to his
bride."
They described the re-
mainder of their vacation
as a memorable experi-
ence and a time to enjoy
different customs.
"We were treated like
royalty," Mary said. '"Alex
was marrying someone
from their little town. We
got to ride inside the
truck, where everyone
else had to stand up in
the back of the truck."
"We both have medical
problems. I think they


were a little happy to gets
us back on the plane to
come home," Mary said.
While there, they took
time to visit the town and
local eateries. They told
of a pub that caught their
attention.
"They had a drink that
was sweet steamed milk
with a side of brandy,"
Mary said. "You would sip
your milk and then sip on
the brandy Also, the pubs
there had religious pic-


tures on the walls."
Their only challenge
during the trip was com-
munication.
"Very few people speak
English, so that was a lit-
tle challenge," Carl said.
"They were so friendly, so
we were able to communi-
cate by pointing to items."
"I didn't miss being in
the United States," Mary
said. "I just missed being
able to communicate.
Everyone was introduced


to us; however, all we
could say was hello."
Ledis is learning to
speak English and Carl
and Mary were able to
communicate with her by
talking slowly
The newlyweds are
planning a trip to Her-
nando later in the year to
see their grandparents
and to introduce Ledis to
Alex's culture.
Carl and Mary arrived
home on June 4 and are


counting the days to their
grandson's arrival, but
they are still reminiscing
their trip to Columbia.
"It is always great see-
ing a different culture,"
Carl said. "People should
try to take trips like this if
they can."

Contact Chronicle
reporter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


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TRAVEL & LEISURE


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 A17




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Amber Richards and
Christopher Powell of
Jacksonville exchanged
nuptial vows at 6 p.m.
April 13, 2013, at the
home of the bride's grand-
father, Ray Vick, in Inver-
ness. The couple's pastor,
Kelly Medders of the
Connect Church in Jack-
sonville, officiated at the
ceremony
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Cindy and John
Howard of Inverness and
Anthony and Kelly
Richards of Zephryhills.
The groom is the son of
Peggy and Ricky Hart of
Oxford, N.C.
Given in marriage by
her father, Anthony
Richards, the bride wore
a diamond white strapless
ball gown with a tulle
skirt. The gown featured a
sweetheart neckline and
a beaded and pearl-
embellished belt at the
natural waist Her veil
was elbow length with a
pearl and beaded edge.
The bouquet was of green
and white hydrangeas
and white roses, and was
accented with green hy-
pericum berries. A green
flower brooch at the cen-
ter of her bouquet had
belonged to her late
grandmother, Edwina
Vick.
Erin Dorn of Nashville,
Tenn., attended her sister
as matron of honor She
wore a clover green
chiffon strapless dress,
featuring a sweetheart
neckline and asymmetri-
cal hem.
Bridesmaid was Sarah
Powell of Charlotte, N.C.,
sister of the groom. She
wore a clover green chif-
fon dress featuring a


I 'i
one-shoulder design with
a flower accent and a
knee-length hem.
Flower girls were
Abigail and Emilia Dorn,
nieces of the bride from
Nashville. They wore
white tulle gowns with a
clover green flower at the
waist.
Brandon Clark of Jack-
sonville stood by his
friend as the best man.
Groomsman was Nick
Adkins of Jacksonville,
friend of the groom.
A reception followed
the wedding at the home.
Following a honeymoon
to Sandals Resort, Negril,
Jamaica, the couple re-
side in Jacksonville.
A 2001 graduate of Cit-
rus High School and 2005
graduate of Santa Fe Col-
lege, Gainesville, with a
major in surgical technol-
ogy, the bride is an
ophthalmic technician.
A 2001 graduate of
South Granville High
School in Creedmoor,
N.C., the groom graduated
in 2008 from the United
States Naval Academy,
Annapolis, Md. He is a
U.S. Navy pilot, stationed
in Jacksonville.


Wedding

Richards/Powell


Tiffany Marie
Lokcynski and Brenton
Dewayne Rugg of Battle
Creek, Mich., were
married at 4 p.m. June
17, 2013, on Fort Island
Gulf Beach.
The ceremony was
performed by Chaplain
Donna Viglione from
The Wedding Chapel in
Inverness.
The bride is the
daughter of John and
Suzanne Madieros of
Beverly Hills.
Marsha Coleman at-
tended as the matron of
honor and best man
was Khris Car. Tyler
Rugg and Bryce Brust
shared duties as
ring-bearers and Brylee


Rugg was flower girl.
The couple honey-
mooned in Florida.


TOGETHER QUESTIONS?
* Call Sarah Gatling at 352-563-5660.


Wedding

Gonzalez/Ortiz

Jennifer Maria
Gonzalez and Victor
Andres Irizarry Ortiz of
Beverly Hills were mar-
ried in an evening cere-
mony June 13, 2013, in
the gazebo over the
water at Cooter Park.
The ceremony was
performed by Chaplain f
Donna Viglione from
The Wedding Chapel in
Inverness.
The bride, who is a
teacher, is the daughter
of Ruben and Margarita
Gonzalez of Hernando.
The groom, a Victor and Brenda
dispatcher for Citrus Irizarry of Beverly
County, is the son of Hills.

Wedding

Lokcynski/Rugg


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbe-
cued chicken, Lyonnaise
potatoes, California-blend
vegetables, sugar cookie,
whole-grain wheat bun with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Macaroni and
cheese with turkey ham,
green peas, parslied carrots,
peaches, slice rye bead with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Lemon
pepper baked chicken breast,
potatoes au gratin, mixed
vegetables, apple juice, gra-
ham crackers, slice rye bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.


For the RECORD


7/1/2013 to 7/7/2013
Divorces
Curtis Cleary, Crystal River
vs. Wendy Michelle Cleary,
Hernando

Marriages
Charles David Fowler,
Beverly Hills/Barbara Anne
Kane, Beverly Hills
Aaron Frederic Locklear,
Crystal River/Jennifer Fawn
Lambo, Crystal River
Kyle Evan Manion,
Inverness/Amanda Marie
Beasley, Dunnellon
Walter James McCarthy,


Inverness/Geraldine Benno,
Inverness
Willie Sheldon Miller Jr.,
Inverness/Michelle Aaron
Thornberry, Inverness
Robert Anthony Nicholson,
Floral City/Caitlin Alyse
Foulkrod, Floral City
Hayes Michel Sawyer,
Hollis Center, Maine/Bethany
Leigh Gardner, Inverness
Ernest Valdes Jr., Crystal
River/Kristy L. Reynolds,
Crystal River
Brandon Raymond
Whittaker, Clearwater/Jennifer
Nichole Harris, Clearwater


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


HAVE A STORY IDEA?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
Call Mike Arnold, editor, at 352-563-3225, or
Logan Mosby, features editor, at 563-5660.


Timeless pieces to celebrate
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SJ on Cr sUal ,Rier

S I' 11. ' l I , l ll I i' i i I i I, l


4 4 . ,V:


Thursday: Pork riblet with
barbecue sauce with
hamburger bun, baked beans,
yellow corn, mixed fruit,
low-fat milk
Friday: Chef salad with
ham, cheese, whole boiled
egg and tomato, French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
mixed fruit, whole-grain
bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information,
call Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


July 15 to 19 MENUS


^ Citrus Coiunty s


d,,/





dri (1 ,I



La( Ckda y



Hi ^mfre


k. 'Ev ^W 91


A18 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


TOGETHER










SPORTS


The Houston
Rockets officially
welcomed top
free agent
Dwight Howard
on Saturday./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Recreation sports/B4
* Basketball/B4
0 Auto racing/B5
0 Golf/B5, B6


Summerhays grabs lead at John Deere


Mickelson
at Scottish
INVERNESS, Sc
Henrik Stenson helix
gent Phil Mickelson
tish Open by shooti
66 to take a two-str
the final round.
Mickelson was in
four players in a tie fi
after making six birdie
11 holes for a 66 on
Branden Grace ai
leader John Parry w
Mickelson after eac&
66.


Associated Press


surges


Open SILVIS, Ill. Calm skies and
a near-perfect course gave
otland every golfer at the John Deere
d off a resur- Classic the chance to shoot a re-
at the Scot- ally low number on Saturday
ng a 6-under Daniel Summerhays went
oke lead into lower than everyone else, seiz-
ing firm control heading into
a group of Sunday's final round.
or second Summerhays shot a 9-under
ies in his last 62 for a two-stroke lead follow-
Saturday. ing third-round play Summer-
nd first-round hays, whose previous best
nd fistround finish on the PGA Tour was a tie
ere tied with for fourth, enters the final
h shooting round at 19-under 194 and in
position for his first career win.
-From wire reports He notched 10 birdies while
matching the lowest third-round


score in tournament history
"I think when I'm playing
well the mentality is make as
many birdies as you can," Sum-
merhays said. "I'm really look-
ing forward to (Sunday). I'm
playing really well."
Canadian David Hearn (64) is
second at 17 under Defending
champion Zach Johnson held a
share of the lead after each of
the first two rounds, but he's now
alone in third after shooting a 67.
J.J. Henry and Jerry Kelly are
tied for fourth at 15 under,
while Nicholas Thompson
leads three golfers at 14 under
Summerhays had missed Associated Press
three straight cuts failing to Daniel Summerhays watches his putt Saturday on the 18th green
shoot a round under 70 in those during the third round of the John Deere Classic at TPC Deere Run
See Page B3 in Silvis, III.


Back in win column


Scott's HR,

3 RBIs helps

Rays win 4-3

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Luke
Scott downplayed his contribu-
tion to Tampa Bay's win.
Scott hit a two-run homer and
a go-ahead RBI single Saturday,
but he credited the efforts of his
Rays teammates in a 4-3 victory
over the Houston Astros.
Trailing 3-0, Scott hit a two-
run homer off Houston starter
Dallas Keuchel in the fifth.
Yunel Escobar then had a two-
out double, stole third and
scored on Desmond Jennings'
RBI bunt single.
In the sixth, Wil Myers sin-
gled with two outs then stole
second before scoring on
Scott's hit
"They're little things that
mount up in the course of a
game, and I think that's indica-
tive of what we've been doing
as a lineup," Scott said. "Guys
up and down the lineup con-
tributing all sorts of things with
the bat, with the legs."
After Scott's eighth homer
got the Rays on the board, Es-
cobar doubled with two outs
and stole third base on a very
close and risky play
"That's got to be almost a 100
percent play if you're going to
try that," Rays manager Joe
Maddon said. "Why do that?
Because then Desmond can do
what he did."
Jennings beat out a bunt
down the first base line and Es-
cobar scored to make it 3-3.
"The pitcher was lifting his
leg and he gave me just one
look," Escobar explained
through an interpreter "I
thought I could get a jump and
get to third base. After that, a
wild pitch or anything could
score me, so I took a chance."
Roberto Hernandez survived
a shaky first inning to post the
Rays' 14th straight quality start,
going six innings and giving up
three runs and six hits. He won
for the first time in six starts
since June 11. Hernandez (5-10)
struck out six.
Myers had two hits and
scored twice for the Rays, who
have won 13 of 15. Fernando
Rodney pitched the ninth for
his 22nd save.


r "
I- ...


^ dII


~/ I


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays relief pitcher Fernando Rodney poses on the mound after a strikeout against the
Houston Astros on Saturday in St. Petersburg.


The Astros jumped out to a
3-0 lead behind Brett Wallace's
two-run homer and J.D. Mar-
tinez's RBI groundout. Hous-
ton had four hits in the first but
only two the rest of the way and
never got a runner to second
base in the final eight innings.
The Rays tied it in the fifth
against Keuchel, who gave up
six hits and three runs in 5 1/3


innings. Scott's single in the
sixth came off Lucas Harrell (5-
10), who relieved with one out.
"When you're called on, you
have to go up there and get
people out," Harrell said. "It
doesn't matter what the situa-
tion is, you have to go out there
and make pitches."
Scott, who extended his hit-
ting streak to nine games, is


hitting .373 with five home
runs in his last 23 games.
"I've had some moments in
my career like this and even
better, where the baseball
slows down for me and the
swing feels good and I'm not
missing the pitches I've been
getting to hit," he said. "It's fa-
miliar territory, but it's been a
long time and I'm enjoying it"


Clear


skies for

Citrus


Showdown

Nichols, Greenlee

triumph at 5K

run in Inverness
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS -Two of Pasco
County's top distance runners
picked up some trophies after
whizzing through Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness on
Saturday
Travis Nichols, a senior at
Land O' Lakes High School, won
the men's race with a 16:59 time.
"It was a slower course than I
thought it was," Nichols said.
"This is the first time I have
done any kind of competition
since November since I was out
all track season with a stress
fracture. I am 100 percent now.
The heat wasn't too bad."
Samantha Greenlee, a stu-
dent at Pasco-Hernando Com-
munity College in New Port
Richey, took the women's title
with a time of 20:36. She beat
Lake Panasoffkee's Cindy
Carver, who had an even 21
minutes time.
"It's the first time running
this," Greenlee said. "It was a
tough course. I was in the Army
I didn't run in high school. I
think it's challenging. I trained
up in North Carolina."
Clarissa Consol, a recent
graduate of Crystal River High
School, finished 16th with a
24:06 time. She was one of the
top local runners last year and
is set to run cross country on
scholarship at Stetson Univer-
sity this fall.
"I'm tired," Consol said. "I am
out of shape. I should run 20 or
21. My legs are out of shape. I
ran hard this week. I used this
more as a workout."
Daniel French, 50, proved
that he has plenty of heart. The
Brooksville resident had a pro-
cedure in which a defibrillator
was used to shock his heart He
has had an irregular heartbeat
for years, but has been one of
the top masters runners in the
area.
He just jogged this race. He
See Page B3


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"Od


.. . .












Boston
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC
1 --
i 4 --
' 6 2
3 6% 2/2
4 12 8


East Division
GB WC
4 --
) 7 5
) 8 6
4 12 10
) 18 16


NL

Braves 5, Reds 2
Cincinnati Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Heisey If 4 1 1 0 Constnz If 4 0 3 1
Choo cf 4 02 1 Smmns ss 4 00 0
Vottolb 3 0 1 0 FFrmnlb 4 0 0 0
Phillips2b 3 0 1 0 McCnnc 3 1 1 1
Bruce rf 4 0 1 0 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 1
Frazier3b 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn3b 4 1 1 0
Cozartss 4 1 1 0 Avilanp 0 0 00
CMillerc 3 0 0 1 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Paul ph 1 0 0 0 RJhnsncf 3 1 2 0
HBaily p 2 0 0 0 Trdslvc rf 4 1 2 0
Clztursph 1 0 0 0 Minorp 2 0 1 2
MParrp 0 0 0 0 Janish3b 1 0 0 0
Simon p 0 000
Totals 33 27 2 Totals 33511 5
Cincinnati 020 000 000 2
Atlanta 000 121 10x 5
DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-Cincinnati 6, Atlanta 7.
2B-Heisey (8), Terdoslavich (1), M inor (1). 3B-
Cozart (2). HR-McCann (12), Uggla (17). CS-
Bruce (3). S-Minor.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
H.Bailey L,5-8 6 10 4 4 1 7
M.Parra 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
Simon 11/31 1 1 0 0
Atlanta
MinorW,9-4 7 6 2 2 1 7
Avilan H,14 1 1 0 0 1 0
Kimbrel S,26-29 1 0 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Simon (Re.Johnson).
Dodgers 1, Rockies 0
Colorado Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab rhbi
Fowlercf 4 00 0 Schmkrrf 4 1 1 0
LeMahi2b 4 00 0 M.Ellis2b 2 00 0
CGnzlz If 3 0 0 0 Punto pr-2b 0 0 0 0
Cuddyrrf 3 00 0 AdGnzllb 4 00 0
Heltonib 2 0 1 0 HRmrzss 3 0 1 1
Rutledg pr 0 0 0 0 Ethier cf 3 0 0 0
Pacheclb 0 0 0 0 A.Ellisc 3 0 1 0
Arenad 3b 3 0 0 0 HrstnJr If 2 0 0 0
Torreal c 3 0 VnSlyk f 0 0 0 0
JHerrrss 3 0 1 0 Uribe3b 3 00 0
Chatwd p 2 00 0 Greink p 3 0 1 0
Blckmn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 28 02 0 Totals 27 1 4 1
Colorado 000 000 000 0
Los Angeles 100 000 00x 1
E-Pacheco (4). DP-Colorado 2. LOB-Col-
orado 2, Los Angeles 5. 2B-Schumaker (9),
A.Ellis (13). SB-Helton (1), Greinke (1). CS-
J.Herrera (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Chatwood L,5-3 8 4 1 1 2 4
Los Angeles
Greinke W,8-2 9 2 0 0 1 9
HBP-by Chatwood (M.Ellis).
Pirates 4, Mets 2
NewYork Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EYong lf-cf 4 02 0 SMarte lf 3 00 0
DnMrp2b 5 1 1 0 Tabatarf 4 1 1 0
DWrght 3b 5 00 0 Melncn p 0 00 0
I.Davislb 4 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0
Byrd rf 3 1 2 1 McCtch cf 4 1 2 2
Niwnhs cf 4 0 1 1 PAIvrz 3b 3 0 1 0
Burkep 0 00 0 RMartn c 3 00 1
Edginp 0 00 GJoneslb 3 1 1 0
Germn p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-lbl 0 0 0
ABrwn If 0 0 0 0 Mercer 2b 4 0 1 1
Buckc 3 0 1 0 Barmesss 4 0 2 0
Quntnllss 3 0 1 0 AJBrntp 1 0 1 0
CTorrs p 2 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0
Vldspn ph 1 0 0 0 Snider ph-rf 2 1 1 0
Ardsm p 0 000
Lagars cf 1 000
Parnellp 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 28 2 Totals 32 410 4
NewYork 000 110 000 2
Pittsburgh 000 011 20x 4
DP-NewYork 1. LOB-NewYork 10, Pittsburgh
8.2B-Nieuwenhuis (3), G.Jones (18). HR-MGc-
Cutchen (10). SB-E.Young (16), Dan.Murphy
(10), D.Wright (15). S-A.J.Burnett.
IP H R ER BB SO
NewYork
C.Torres 5 5 1 1 0 5
Aardsma BS,1-1 1 2 1 1 0 0
Burke L,0-2 2/3 3 2 2 0 1
Edgin 0 0 0 0 2 0
Germen 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 3
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burnett 52/37 2 2 4 8
Ju.WilsonW,6-1 11/31 0 0 0 1
MelanconH,25 1 0 0 0 0 0
Grilli S,29-30 1 0 0 0 0 1
Edgin pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by C.Torres (S.Marte).
Interleague

White Sox 5,
Phillies 4, 11 innings
Chicago Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
De Aza cf-lf 5 1 2 2 Revere cf 6 0 2 0
AIRmrz ss 6 1 4 1 Rollins ss 5 1 1 0
Rios rf 6 00 0 MYong 3b 4 1 2 0
A.Dunnlb 3 1 2 0 DBrwn If 5 0 0 1
Viciedo If 6 0 1 0 DYong rf 5 0 2 1
A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 Frndsn 2b 5 0 1 0
Gillaspi3b 2 0 0 1 Ruflb 4 2 3 1
Morel ph-3b0 0 0 0 Ruizc 5 0 1 0
NJonesp 0 0 0 0 Pettionp 2 00 0
C.Wells ph 1 0 1 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0
Troncs p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 0 0 0 0
Tekottecf 0 00 0 Utleyph 1 00 0
Pheglyc 5 1 1 0 Bastrd p 0 00 0
Bckhm2b 4 12 0 Papelnp 0 00 0
JhDnksp 2 00 0 L.Nixph 1 00 0
Lndstrp 0 000 JRmrzp 0 00 0
Vealp 0 00 0 Diekmnp 0 00 0
Kppngr3b 2 0 0 0 Quinterph 1 0 1 1
JMcDnl pr 0 00 0
Totals 42 5134 Totals 44413 4
Chicago 000 021 000 02 5
Philly 200 000 100 01 4
E-A.Dunn (5), Rollins (9). DP-Chicago 2,
Philadelphia 1. LOB-Chicago 12, Philadelphia
9. 2B-De Aza (18), AI.Ramirez 2 (24), Viciedo
(12), M.Young (18), D.Young (10), Ruf (3). 3B-
De Aza (2), Beckham (1). HR-Ruf (2). SB-
Beckham (5). CS-Morel (1). S-Joh.Danks.


SF-Gillaspie.

Chicago
Joh.Danks
Lindstrom
Veal
N.Jones
Troncoso W,1-2
A.Reed S,24-28
Philadelphia
Pettibone
De Fratus
Bastardo
Papelbon
J.Ramirez L,0-1
Diekman
PB-Ruiz. Balk-


IP H

61/38
1 1
1/3 0
11/32
1 0
1 2

6 6
1 1
1 0
1 1
12/34
1/3 1
-N.Jones.


R ER BB SO

3 3 1 4
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0

3 3 4 6
0 0 1 1
0 0 1 1
0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0


Str Home Away
W-4 31-16 27-21
W-1 33-19 21-22
L-1 28-20 24-23
L-1 28-22 23-21
W-1 25-21 20-27



Str Home Away
W-1 31-14 23-26
L-3 27-18 20-29
L-1 24-21 22-27
L-2 17-27 23-23
W-3 21-26 14-31


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
42 .548 6
44 .532 1% 3% 5
48 .473 7 9 4
53 .418 12 14 2
53 .411 12% 14% 4


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Str Home
L-1 28-19
W-3 29-19
L-4 22-22
W-1 21-23
W-2 19-21


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 56 36 .609 - 5-5 W-3 32-17 24-19
St. Louis 56 36 .609 7-3 L-1 27-16 29-20
Cincinnati 52 42 .553 5 4-6 L-1 30-16 22-26
Chicago 42 50 .457 14 9 6-4 W-1 22-25 20-25
Milwaukee 37 55 .402 19 14 4-6 L-3 22-26 15-29


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




Arizona
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC
39 .581 -
40 .574 % --
47 .484 9 8
52 .441 13 12
60 .355 21 20


West Division
GB WC
7 --
5 2 4/2
4 5 7/2
' 6% 9
6 8% 11


Str Home
L-2 28-15
W-1 27-19
L-1 24-25
W-1 23-25
L-1 17-32



Str Home
W-2 26-19
W-1 27-22
L-1 26-21
W-2 25-20
L-3 26-22


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves outfielders Jose Constanza (13), Reed Johnson (7) and Joey Terdoslavich (25) celebrate as
they leave the field after a 5-2 win Saturday against the Cincinnati Reds in Atlanta.



Braves take 5-2 win over Reds


Associated Press

ATLANTA Mike Minor strug-
gled early before recovering to
throw seven strong innings, and
also hit a go-ahead double that led
the Atlanta Braves over Homer
Bailey and the Cincinnati Reds
5-2 Saturday
The Braves, who lost starting
outfielders Jason Heyward, B.J.
Upton and Justin Upton to in-
juries in the first two games of the
series, found success with their
fill-ins. Jose Constanza, recalled
from Triple-A Gwinnett, started in
left field and hit leadoff with Reed
Johnson in center and rookie Joey
Terdoslavich in right.
The patchwork outfield com-
bined for seven hits, including
three by Constanza. Brian McCann
and Dan Uggla hit home runs.
Minor (9-4) snapped a streak of
five straight starts without a win.
The left-hander allowed two runs
on six hits and one walk in-
cluding only one hit in his last five
innings.
National League

Dodgers 1, Rockies 0
LOS ANGELES Zack Greinke
retired his first 13 batters before finish-
ing with a two-hitter for a win in his
fifth straight start to lead the Los Ange-
les Dodgers over the Colorado Rock-
ies 1-0.
The Dodgers won for the 14th time
in 17 games, despite the absence of
rookie outfielder Yasiel Puig, who
missed his first game since his promo-
tion on June 3 because of a sore left
hip. He was removed during each of
the previous two games of this series
for precautionary reasons.
Greinke (8-2) struck out nine,
walked one and got 14 groundball outs
while recording his fourth shutout and
13th complete game in 245 career
starts. He out-pitched Tyler Chatwood
(5-3), who gave up a run in the first in-
ning then nothing the rest of the way.

Pirates 4, Mets 2
PITTSBURGH -Andrew Mc-
Cutchen hit a tying home run, then de-
livered a go-ahead single the next
inning as the Pittsburgh Pirates rallied
past the New York Mets 4-2 for their
third straight win.
McCutchen's 10th homer this sea-
son made it 2-all in the sixth. He
added an RBI single in the seventh off
Greg Burke (0-2).
Justin Wilson (6-1) earned the vic-
tory in relief of starter A.J. Burnett. All-
Star closer Jason Grilli worked a
perfect ninth for his NL-leading 29th
save. The victory assured Pittsburgh
(56-36) of its best record at the All-
Star break since 1975.

Marlins 2, Nationals 1,
10 innings
MIAMI Giancarlo Stanton home-
red leading off the ninth inning to tie it
and Ed Lucas beat out double-play
relay in the 10th to lift the Miami Mar-
lins over the Washington Nationals 2-1.
Stanton connected against Rafael
Soriano to make it 1-all.
Steve Cishek (3-4) struck out Scott
Hairston and Ryan Zimmerman with
runners on second and third to end
the Washington 10th.
Adeiny Hechavarria opened the
Miami 10th by reaching second when
third baseman Chad Tracy fielded his
chopper but threw the ball into stands.
Craig Stammen (4-4) walked Jeff


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 4, N.Y Yankees 1
Chicago White Sox 5, Philadelphia 4, 11 innings, 1st
game
Toronto 7, Baltimore 3
Tampa Bay 4, Houston 3
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 3
Texas 7, Detroit 1
Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, late, 2nd game
Boston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Today
Kansas City (Shields 4-6) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez
7-4), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 1-2) at N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 9-
7), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Perez 3-1) at Detroit (Verlander 9-6), 1:08
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 4-2) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 4-11), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Jo.Johnson 1-4) at Baltimore (Feldman 0-
1), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-5) at Tampa Bay (Archer 3-3),
1:40 p.m.
Boston (Workman 0-0) at Oakland (Colon 12-3), 4:05
p.m.
L.A. Angels (Blanton 2-11) at Seattle (Iwakuma 7-4),
4:10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at NewYork (Mets), 8 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago White Sox 5, Philadelphia 4, 11 innings, 1st
game
Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 2
L.A. Dodgers 1, Colorado 0
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y Mets 2
Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 4
Miami 2, Washington 1, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, late, 2nd game
Milwaukee at Arizona, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Today
Washington (Jordan 0-2) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-1),
1:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 4-2) at Philadelphia
(Hamels4-11), 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cingrani 3-1) at Atlanta (Teheran 7-4),
1:35 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Gee 6-7) at Pittsburgh (Cole 4-2), 1:35
p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 8-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 6-
8), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (W.Peralta 6-9) atArizona (Kennedy 3-5),
4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 4-6) at San Diego (Stults 7-7),
4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 12-5) at Chicago Cubs (TWood
6-6), 8:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at NewYork (Mets), 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled


Mathis and Placido Polanco sacrificed
both runners over. Justin Ruggiano was
intentionally walked to load the bases.
Lucas grounded to second base-
man Steve Lombardozzi, who threw to
shortstop lan Desmond for the force-
out at second. Lucas beat the throw to
first as the winning run scored.

Cubs 6, Cardinals 4
CHICAGO Matt Garza pitched
into the seventh inning for his fifth con-
secutive win and Alfonso Soriano
homered again, leading the Chicago
Cubs to a 6-4 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals.
Garza allowed a season-high 10
hits in 6 2/3 innings, but held the NL's
highest scoring offense to two runs
while improving to 5-0 with a 1.24 ERA
in his last six starts. The right-hander
struck out four and walked two.
Jon Jay had four hits and Matt
Adams went 2 for 4 for St. Louis,
which had won six of seven, including
a 3-2 victory in the second game of
the four-game series on Friday night.
Lance Lynn (11-4) was knocked out in
the fifth inning in his second-shortest
outing of the season.

American League

Twins 4, Yankees 1
NEW YORK Samuel Deduno
pitched seven impressive innings and
the slumping Minnesota Twins finally
figured out a way to beat the New
York Yankees, hitting three home runs


off Phil Hughes in a 4-1 win.
Trevor Plouffe, Ryan Doumit and
Pedro Florimon connected against
Hughes all on 2-2 pitches. Min-
nesota snapped a six-game losing
streak with its second victory in 14
games, winning for the first time in six
meetings with the Yankees this year.
New York won 32 of the previous 39
matchups, including a pair of playoff
sweeps.
Beaten by Hughes earlier this
month, Deduno (5-4) scattered six hits
in his first start at Yankee Stadium.

Rangers 7, Tigers 1
DETROIT Max Scherzer's un-
beaten run ended when the Texas
Rangers tagged the Detroit All-Star
with his first loss of the season, de-
feating the Tigers 7-1.
Scherzer (13-1) was trying to be-
come the first pitcher in the majors to
start 14-0 since Roger Clemens in
1986. He allowed four runs and eight
hits in six innings, walking two and
striking out six.
It was Scherzer's first regular-season
loss since Sept. 23, a span of 21 starts.
Mitch Moreland's two-run homer in
the fourth gave Texas a 3-0 lead, and
for once, the Tigers didn't back
Scherzer with much offensive support.
Derek Holland (8-4) allowed a run and
five hits in seven innings.
Adrian Beltre added a two-run
homer in a three-run ninth for Texas.

Indians 5, Royals 3
CLEVELAND Lonnie Chisenhall
hit his first career grand slam, Scott
Kazmir pitched into the seventh inning
and the Cleveland Indians beat the
Kansas City Royals 5-3.
Chisenhall's homer in the sixth
broke open a 1-0 game and hit off the
facing of the second deck in right field,
landing in Kansas City's bullpen.
Kazmir (5-4) allowed two runs in 6
1/3 innings for his first victory since
June 21 as the Indians won for the
fifth time in seven games.
Miguel Tejada's RBI single in the
seventh broke a streak of 22 consecu-
tive scoreless innings for Kansas City.

Blue Jays 7, Orioles 3
BALTIMORE J.P. Arencibia put
Toronto ahead with a two-run single in
the sixth inning, and the Blue Jays
overcame home runs by Chris Davis
and Adam Jones in a 7-3 victory over
the Baltimore Orioles.
Edwin Encarnacion hit his 25th
homer, and Maicer Izturis had three
hits to help the Blue Jays secure their
fourth win in 11 games.
Davis increased his major-league
leading home run total to 36 with his
third long ball in three games, a solo
shot in the second inning. Reggie
Jackson is the only player in AL his-
tory with more home runs before the
All-Star break, hitting 37 in 1969.

Interleague

White Sox 5, Phillies 4,
11 innings, 1st game
PHILADELPHIA-Alexei Ramirez
hit a tiebreaking double in the 11th in-
ning to lift the Chicago White Sox over
the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 in the
opener of a day-night doubleheader.
After a 41-minute rain delay following
the top of the ninth, White Sox righty
Nate Jones escaped a no-out, second-
and-third jam in the bottom half.
The teams were forced to play two
after Friday night's interleague game
was rained out.


B2 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


Houston

C.Pena dh
Altuve 2b
JCastro c
JDMrtn rf
Wallac lb
Maxwll cf
Krauss If
MDmn 3b
Elmore ss

Totals
Houston
Tampa Bay


Tampa Bay
ab r h bi
3 0 1 0 DJnngscf
4 1 1 0 SRdrgz If
4 1 2 0 Joyce ph-lf
4 0 0 1 Zobrist 2b
4 1 1 2 Longori3b
3 0 1 0 WMyrs rf
3 0 0 0 Scott dh
3 0 0 0 Loney lb
3 0 0 0 JMolin c
YEscor ss
31 36 3 Totals
300 000 000
000 031 00x


ab rh bi
3 0 1 1
3 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
4 22 0
4 1 2 3
3 0 1 0
3 00 0
2 1 1 0
31 4 8 4
3
4


DP-Houston 1, Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Houston
2, Tampa Bay 5.2B-J.Castro (25), Maxwell (7),
YEscobar (15). HR-Wallace (4), Scott (8).
SB-W.Myers (2),YEscobar(3).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Keuchel 51/36 3 3 0 3
Harrell L,5-10 12/32 1 1 2 0
Fields 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Blackley 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
HernandezW,5-10 6 6 3 3 1 6
McGee H,19 1 0 0 0 0 2
Jo.PeraltaH,24 1 0 0 0 0 0
Rodney S,22-27 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Eric Cooper; First, Will Little;
Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Jeff Kellogg.
T-2:47. A-20,409 (34,078).
Twins 4, Yankees 1
Minnesota NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Dozier2b 4 00 0 Gardnrcf 4 0 1 0
Mauerdh 4 0 2 0 ISuzuki rf 4 1 2 0
Mornealb 4 0 0 0 Cano2b 4 0 1 1
Doumitc 4 1 1 1 V.Wellsdh 4 0 1 0
Plouffe3b 4 11 1 Overaylb 3 0 0 0
Parmel rf 3 0 0 0 Almont If 3 0 1 0
Hicks cf 4 1 1 0 L.Cruz ss-3b 4 0 0 0
Thoms If 3 0 0 0 AIGnzlz 3b 2 00 0
Flormn ss 2 1 1 2 Hafnerph 1 0 1 0
Nunezpr-ss 1 0 0 0
AuRmnc 3 0 1 0
Totals 32 46 4 Totals 33 1 8 1
Minnesota 010 000 120 4
NewYork 100 000 000 1
DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Minnesota 3, NewYork
8. 2B-Mauer (29), I.Suzuki (11), Hafner (8).
HR-Doumit (9), Plouffe (10), Florimon (5).
CS-Florimon (2), Almonte (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
DedunoW,5-4 7 6 1 1 3 3
FienH,10 1 1 0 0 0 0
Perkins S,21-23 1 1 0 0 0 0
NewYork
PRHughes L,4-9 71/35 4 4 1 10
Kelley 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP-Deduno.
Blue Jays 7, Orioles 3


Toronto Baltimore
ab r h bi
Reyes ss 4 2 1 0 McLoth If
Bautist rf 5 1 1 1 Machd 3b
Encrnc 1b 4 1 1 2 Markks rf
Lind dh 4 1 2 1 A.Jones cf
CIRsms cf 4 1 2 1 C.Davis lb
Mlzturs 3b 4 0 3 0 Hardy ss
Arencii c 4 0 1 2 Wieters c
Lawrie 2b 4 00 0 BRorts 2b
Bonifac If 2 1 1 0 Reimld dh
Flahrty ph
Totals 35 7127 Totals
Toronto 200 002 300
Baltimore 010 200 000


ab rh bi
5 00 0
5 00 0
4 0 1 0
2 1 1 1
3 2 1 1
4 0 1 0

3 00 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 1 0
333 7 3
7
3


DP-Toronto 1, Baltimore 2. LOB-Toronto 5,
Baltimore 8. 2B-Reyes (4), Bautista (20),
B.Roberts 2 (3). HR-Encarnacion (25), A.Jones
(18), C.Davis (36). CS-Bonifacio 2 (5), C.Davis
(1).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Redmond 4 4 3 3 1 6
LoupW,4-3 11/30 0 0 1 0
McGowanH,2 11/31 0 0 0 2
Cecil 1 1 0 0 1 2
DelabarH,5 2/3 1 0 0 1 1
JanssenS,18-19 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
Baltimore
HammelL,7-6 6 10 6 6 2 1
Asencio 0 1 1 1 1 0
Patton 1 0 0 0 0 0
O'Day 1 1 0 0 0 1
McFarland 1 0 0 0 0 0
Hammel pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Asencio pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Redmond (C.Davis), by Hammel
(Bonifacio). WP-McGowan, Cecil.
Indians 5, Royals 3


Kansas City
ab
AGordn If 4
AEscorss 5
Hosmer lb 4
BButler dh 4
S.Perezc 2
L.Cain cf 3
Mostks 3b 4
MTejad 2b 4
Lough rf 4

Totals 34
Kansas City
Cleveland


Cleveland
rh bi ab rh bi
0 0 0 Bourn cf 4 1 1 0
0 1 2 ACarerss 3 0 1 0
0 2 0 Kipnis2b 3 1 3 1
0 2 0 Swisherrf-1b3 00 0
1 0 0 Brantlylf 4 1 1 0
1 1 0 CSantnlb 3 1 1 0
0 1 0 Stubbs rf 0 00 0
1 1 1 Giambidh 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 Chsnhll3b 4 1 2 4
YGoms c 4 0 0 0
38 3 Totals 31 5 9 5
000 000 300 3
001 004 00x 5


DP-Kansas City 1, Cleveland 1. LOB-Kansas
City 8, Cleveland 7.2B-Brantley (13), Chisen-
hall (11). HR-Chisenhall (6). SB-Kipnis (21).
SF-Kipnis.
IP H RERBBSO


Kansas City
Guthrie L,8-7
Hochevar
Cleveland
Kazmir W,5-4
Albers
R.Hill H,8
Pestano H,6


7 8 5 5 3 3
1 1 0 0 0 0


61/34 2
1/3 2 1
1/3 0 0
1 2 0


C.PerezS,12-14 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Guthrie (Giambi). WP-Guthrie 2.
Rangers 7, Tigers 1


Texas


Kinsler 2b
LMartn cf
N.Cruz rf
ABeltre 3b
Przyns c
Andrus ss
Morlnd lb
Profar dh
DvMrp If
Totals
Texas
Detroit


Detroit
r h bi
1 0 0 AJcksn cf
1 0 0 TrHntr rf
2 4 1 MiCarr3b
1 3 2 Fielder lb
0 1 2 VMrtnzdh
1 0 0 JhPerltss
1 1 2 Tuiassplf
0 1 0 B.Penac
0 2 0 HPerez2b
7127 Totals
000 310 003
000 100 000


ab rh bi
2 00 0
4 02 0
3 0 1 0
4 00 0
4 1 1 0
3 00 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 1
31 1 6 1
7
1


E-B.Pena (2). DP-Texas 2, Detroit 1. LOB-
Texas 7, Detroit 8.2B-N.Cruz (18), Pierzynski
(14), Profar (6). HR-A.Beltre (21), Moreland
(13). SB-Kinsler (5), L.Martin (19), Jh.Peralta
(3). SF-Pierzynski.
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
D.Holland W,8-4
Soria H,3
Cotts
Detroit
Scherzer L,13-1
Putkonen
Coke
Alburquerque
WP-D.Holland.


7 5 1 1 5 7

1 0 0 0 0 0


6 8 4
1/3 2 0
12/30 0
1 2 3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Rays 4, Astros 3


AMERICAN LEAGUE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PGA Tour


John Deere Classic Florida LOTTERY


Saturday
At TPC Deere Run, Silvis, III.
Purse: $4.6 million
Yardage: 7,268, Par: 71
Third Round
a-denotes amateur
Daniel Summerhays 65-67-62-- 194 -19
David Hearn 66-66-64 -196 -17
Zach Johnson 64-66-67 -197 -16
J.J. Henry 68-65-65-65 198 -15
Jerry Kelly 68-64-66- 198 -15
Nicholas Thompson 69-66-64-199 -14
Chris Kirk 67-66-66 -199 -14
Matt Jones 66-65-68 -199 -14
Jordan Spieth 70-65-65 200 -13
Kevin Sutherland 70-65-65 -200 -13
Patrick Reed 67-63-70 200 -13
Morgan Hoffmann 74-64-63-201 -12
a-Patrick Rodgers 67-69-65 201 -12
Jim Herman 66-68-67 -201 -12
Troy Matteson 68-64-69 -201 -12
Lucas Glover 68-62-71-201 -12
Jason Bohn 69-69-64 202 -11
Erik Compton 72-66-64 202 -11
Ryan Moore 67-70-65 202 -11
Chad Campbell 69-67-66 202 -11
Scott Langley 68-67-67 202 -11
Steve Stricker 67-66-69 202 -11
Chez Reavie 72-61-69-202 -11
Robert Streb 66-72-65 -203 -10
Harris English 69-69-65 -203 -10
Scott Brown 71-67-65 203 -10
Ryo Ishikawa 68-69-66 -203 -10
Justin Hicks 71-66-66 203 -10
Joey Snyder Ill 72-64-67-203 -10
Martin Flores 67-67-69 -203 -10
Kevin Streelman 66-66-71-203 -10
Brian Davis 70-68-66 204 -9
Heath Slocum 71-67-66 204 -9
John Kimbell 69-69-66 204 -9
Kevin Stadler 70-68-66 204 -9
Steven Bowditch 69-68-67 204 -9
Jonathan Byrd 69-68-67 204 -9
Mike Weir 69-69-67 205 -8
Andrew Svoboda 68-69-68 205 -8
K.J. Choi 67-70-68 205 -8
Dicky Pride 68-69-68 205 -8
Joe Affrunti 69-67-69 205 -8
YE.Yang 70-66-69-205 -8
Charles Howell III 68-66-71 205 -8
Rod Pampling 69-69-68 206 -7
Stuart Appleby 70-68-68-206 -7
Vaughn Taylor 66-71-69-206 -7
Nick Watney 67-70-69-206 -7
Gary Woodland 69-68-69-206 -7
Michael Letzig 68-69-69-206 -7
BrandtJobe 69-67-70 -206 -7
Bryce Molder 70-66-70 206 -7
Boo Weekley 66-69-71 206 -7
Steve LeBrun 67-67-72 206 -7
Andres Romero 71-67-69 207 -6
Tim Petrovic 70-68-69 207 -6
Brian Gay 68-69-70 207 -6
Carl Pettersson 70-67-70 207 -6
David Mathis 70-66-71 207 -6
Tom Gillis 67-68-72 207 -6
Brendon de Jonge 65-68-74 207 -6
Keegan Bradley 69-69-70 208 -5
Matt Bettencourt 65-73-70 208 -5
Roberto Castro 68-68-72 208 -5
Lee Williams 67-68-73 -208 -5
Ken Duke 69-67-72 208 -5
Doug LaBelle II 69-69-71 209 -4
Greg Owen 71-67-71 209 -4
Darron Stiles 71-67-72 -210 -3
CamiloVillegas 64-73-73-210 -3
Davis Love Ill 67-71-73-211 -2
NickO'Hern 69-69-73-211 -2

U.S. Senior Open
Saturday
At Omaha Country Club, Omaha Neb.
Purse: $2.75 million
Yardage: 6,711, Par: 70
Third Round
a-amateur
Michael Allen 67-63-72-202 -8
Kenny Perry 67-73-64 204 -6
Fred Funk 67-70-67 204 -6
Corey Pavin 69-73-64 206 -4
Rocco Mediate 68-67-72 207 -3
Chien Soon Lu 68-75-65 208 -2
Tom Pernice Jr. 74-69-65 208 -2
Chris Williams 70-72-66 -208 -2
Steve Pate 72-69-67 208 -2
John Riegger 72-69-67 208 -2
Bart Bryant 72-69-67 208 -2
Peter Fowler 70-70-68 208 -2
Mark O'Meara 67-71-70-208 -2
Tom Lehman 67-71-70 -208 -2
Jeff Sluman 69-67-72 208 -2
David Frost 72-70-67 209 -1
Jeff Brehaut 69-68-72 209 -1
Bernhard Langer 68-74-68 210 E
Joe Daley 72-70-68-210 E
Gary Hallberg 67-74-69- 210 E
Fred Couples 71-69-70 -210 E
Gil Morgan 73-70-68 211 +1
Larry Mize 71-72-68-211 +1
Loren Roberts 76-67-68-211 +1
Gene Sauers 73-70-68 -211 +1
John Cook 72-70-69-211 +1
Peter Senior 68-73-70 211 +1
Steve Elkington 70-70-71-211 +1
Esteban Toledo 71-69-71-211 +1
Duffy Waldorf 70-69-72-211 +1
Gary Koch 71-68-72 -211 +1
Barry Lane 73-71-68 212 +2
Mark McNulty 72-72-68 -212 +2
Don Pooley 74-69-69 212 +2
Larry Nelson 73-72-68-213 +3
Kohki Idoki 69-74-70 -213 +3
Brian Henninger 71-72-70 -213 +3
KirkTriplett 70-72-71 -213 +3
Jeff Freeman 73-68-72-213 +3
Tom Watson 70-70-73-213 +3
Tom Kite 70-75-69 -214 +4
Jay Haas 73-72-69-214 +4
John Huston 77-68-69 -214 +4
Jeff Hart 71-74-69 -214 +4
Stan Utley 70-74-70 -214 +4
Andrew Morse 74-70-70-214 +4
Willie Wood 75-68-71 -214 +4
Colin Montgomerie 69-73-72 -214 +4
Jay Don Blake 67-74-73-214 +4
Steve Lowery 69-72-73-214 +4
Gene Jones 73-72-71-216 +6
Joel Edwards 73-71-72-216 +6
Dan Forsman 70-74-72-216 +6
Hale Irwin 74-69-73-216 +6
David Eger 70-71-75 -216 +6

LPGA Tour

Manulife Financial
Classic
Saturday
At Grey Silo Golf Course, Waterloo, Ontario
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,336, Par: 71
Third Round
a-amateur
Hee Young Park 65-67-61 -193 -20
Angela Stanford 63-67-64-194 -19
Catriona Matthew 63-64-68 -195 -18
Meena Lee 65-66-65 -196 -17
Anna Nordqvist 67-64-67-198 -15
Gerina Piller 70-67-62-199 -14


AmyYang 66-67-66 -199 -14
Austin Ernst 68-64-67 199 -14
Inbee Park 65-67-68 200 -13
Suzann Pettersen 68-64-68 200 -13
Chella Choi 66-65-70 -201 -12
Christina Kim 71-65-66 202 -11
Stacy Lewis 68-67-67 202 -11
Karine Icher 67-66-69 202 -11
Ryann O'Toole 66-65-71 202 -11
Hanna Kang 69-70-64 203 -10
Jacqui Concolino 69-67-67 203 -10
Michelle Wie 69-67-67-203 -10
Jennifer Johnson 67-68-68 203 -10
SunYoung Yoo 68-67-68 -203 -10
Jessica Korda 68-66-69-203 -10


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
0 8-9-3
CASH 3 (late)
0, 7-2-1





PTM 6-8-1-6

FANTASY 5
11 16 29 31 33

POWERBALL LOTTERY
2 8 22 35 37 2-10-11-41-42-53
POWER BALL XTRA
6 4


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 2 19 37 43
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $711.50
3-of-4 MB 37 $379.00
3-of-4 711 $58.50
2-of-4 MB 1,193 $24.00
1-of-4 MB 10,511 $2.50
2-of-4 23,111 $2.00


Fantasy 5:1 16 22 23 36
5-of-5 5 winners $43,385.12
4-of-5 246 $142.00
3-of-5 8,763 $11.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup: Camping World RV Sales 301 race
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar 2 in T.O. Race Two
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (TBS) Texas Rangers at Detroit Tigers
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Houston Astros at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia Phillies
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN2) SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 Tour de France Stage 15
GOLF
9:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Aberdeen Asset Management
Scottish Open, Final Round
12 p.m. (NBC) European PGA Tour: Aberdeen Asset Management
Scottish Open, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: John Deere Classic, Final Round
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Manulife Financial LPGA Classic,
Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Senior Open Championship, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: John Deere Classic, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: Utah Championship, Final Round
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship. (Taped)
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) World Cup: Puerto Rico vs. United States
3 p.m. (ESPN) USA Slow Pitch Showdown: United States vs. United
States Futures (Taped)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) World Cup final: Teams TBA

RADIO
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Houston Astros at Tampa Bay Rays


Sydnee Michaels 70-69-65
Jodi Ewart Shadoff 67-71-66
Irene Cho 65-72-67
NaYeon Choi 69-68-67
Haeji Kang 70-67-67
Lisa McCloskey 68-69-67
Lizette Salas 70-67-67
Jee Young Lee 68-68-68
I.K. Kim 68-66-70
Belen Mozo 65-66-73
Jane Park 71-67-67
Mariajo Uribe 70-68-67
Dewi Claire Schreefel 69-67-69
Momoko Ueda 67-68-70
Paola Moreno 67-67-71
SoYeon Ryu 71-67-68
Jennifer Kirby 71-66-69
Mina Harigae 71-64-71
Mi Hyang Lee 75-64-68
Katie M. Burnett 72-66-69
Danielle Kang 70-68-69
Amelia Lewis 71-67-69
Morgan Pressel 68-70-69
Lorie Kane 69-68-70
a-Brooke M. Henderson 70-66-71


Ji Young Oh
Alena Sharp
Alison Walshe
Amanda Blumenherst
Becky Morgan
Felicity Johnson
Candie Kung
KrisTamulis
Sandra Gal
Nicole Jeray
Karrie Webb


66-70-71
68-71-69
68-71-69
68-70-70
67-70-71
71-65-72
68-68-72
71-65-72
68-66-74
71-68-70
69-69-71


Nationwide

CNBC Prime's The
Profit 200 Results
Saturday
At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon, N.H.
Lap length: 1.058 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 213 laps, 148.2 rating, 0
points, $46,700.
2. (2) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 213, 128.5, 43, $35,775.
3. (11) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 213, 107.3, 41,
$31,450.
4. (5) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 213, 100.4, 40, $26,700.
5. (23) Michael Annett, Ford, 213, 89.5, 39, $23,100.
6. (14)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 213, 87.3, 38, $20,075.
7. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 213, 105.5, 37,
$19,625.
8. (4) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 213, 105.6, 36,
$19,525.
9. (8) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 213, 113.5, 0, $13,100.
10. (21) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 213, 78.4, 34, $20,825.
11. (7) Joey Logano, Ford, 213, 90.1, 0, $12,850.
12. (15) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 213, 70.4, 32,
$19,050.
13. (6) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 213, 85, 31,
$18,575.
14. (13) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 213, 85.3, 30,
$18,325.
15. (22) Billy Johnson, Ford, 213, 76, 29, $19,375.
16. (17)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 213, 73.8, 28, $18,075.
17. (20) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 213, 65.8, 27, $17,950.
18. (9) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 213, 99.6, 26, $18,800.
19. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 211, 96.7, 0,


$12,250.
20. (10) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 211, 73.8, 24,
$18,375.
21. (19) Chad Hackenbracht, Toyota, 211, 57.8, 0,
$17,600.
22. (18) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 211, 63.7, 22,
$17,550.
23. (35) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 210, 54, 21,
$17,500.
24. (27) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 209, 63.7, 20,
$11,435.
25. (36) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 208, 44.1, 19,
$17,875.
26. (40) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 208, 35.6, 18, $17,365.
27. (38) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet, 208, 40.2, 17,
$17,330.
28. (34) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 208, 47.1, 16,
$17,295.
29. (39) Tony Raines, Toyota, 208, 39.8, 15, $17,260.
30. (24) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 207, 56.3, 14,
$17,525.
31.(33) Eric McClure, Toyota, 207, 42.7, 13, $17,190.
32. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, accident, 205, 77.5,
0, $11,155.
33. (37) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, electrical, 144, 34.2,
11, $11,135.
34. (29) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, engine, 126, 46.4,
10, $17,115.
35. (28) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, engine, 117, 43.1, 9,
$17,068.
36. (26) Brett Butler, Toyota, accident, 100, 36.4, 8,
$16,345.
37. (31) Blake Koch, Toyota, brakes, 99, 29.9, 7,
$16,325.
38. (30) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, brakes, 10, 33, 6,
$10,311.
39. (32) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, vibration, 7, 30.8, 0,
$10,190.
40. (25) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 30.2, 4,
$10,105.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 105.087 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 8 minutes, 40 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.465 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 27 laps.
Lead Changes: 6 among 3 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Busch 1-37; B.Vickers 38-40;
M.Kenseth 41-46; B.Vickers 47-106; K.Busch 107-
119; M.Kenseth 120-122; K.Busch 123-213.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
K.Busch, 3 times for 141 laps; B.Vickers, 2 times for
63 laps; M.Kenseth, 2 times for 9 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 594; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
589; 3. A.Dillon, 582; 4. J.Allgaier, 574; 5. E.Sadler,
570; 6. B.Vickers, 548; 7. K.Larson, 546; 8. B.Scott,
534; 9.TBayne, 526; 10. PKligerman, 525.

Sprint Cup

Camping World RV
Sales 301 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon, N.H.
Lap length: 1.058 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 135.922 mph.
2. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 135.835.
3.(88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 135.786.
4.(18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 135.757.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 135.525.
6. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 135.487.
7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 135.482.
8. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 135.333.
9.(31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 135.246.


F Od 'r9 TCCOTi


IP I KH R ERK
Washington
Haren 6 3 0 0
StorenH,14 1 0 0 0
ClippardH,17 1 0 0 0
R.Soriano BS,4-28 1 1 1 1
Stammen L,4-4 2/3 0 1 0
Miami
Fernandez 6 4 1 1
Webb 1 1 0 0
Da.Jennings 1 0 0 0
A.Ramos 1 0 0 0
CishekW,3-4 1 2 0 0
Webb pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-Cishek.


10. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 135.107.
11. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 135.073.
12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 135.006.
13. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 134.978.
14. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 134.868.
15. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 134.849.
16. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 134.753.
17. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 134.71.
18. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 134.492.
19. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 134.411.
20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 134.089.
21. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 134.028.
22. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 133.839.
23. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 133.835.
24. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 133.821.
25. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 133.778.
26. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 133.778.
27. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 133.637.
28. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 133.431.
29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 133.273.
30. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 132.993.
31. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 132.919.
32. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 132.905.
33. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 132.72.
34. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 132.485.
35. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 132.002.
36. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, owner points.
37. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, owner points.
38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner points.
39. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, owner points.
40. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, owner points.
41. (52) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, owner points.
42. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, owner points.
43. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, owner points.



Marlins 2, Nationals 1,
10 innings
Washington Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 3 0 0 0 Rugginlf 4 0 0 0
Dsmndss 4 0 1 0 Lucas3b-2b 5 00 1
Harper If 3 1 0 0 Stantonrf 4 1 2 1
Hairstnlf 1 0 0 0 Morrsnlb 3 0 0 0
Zmrmn3b 5 02 0 Ozunacf 3 00 0
Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Dietrch2b 4 00 0
AdLRclb 4 0 1 0 Cishekp 0 00 0
Werthrf 2 0 0 1 Hchvrrss 4 1 0 0
Lmrdzz2b 4 0 0 0 Mathisc 2 02 0
WRamsc 4 0 1 0 Frnndz p 0 00 0
Haren p 0 00 0 Webb p 0 00 0
Berndn ph 1 0 1 0 DJnngsp 0 00 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 DSolanph 1 00 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 ARamsp 0 00 0
RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Polanc 3b 0 0 0 0
Tracy ph-3b 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 17 1 Totals 302 4 2
Wash. 000 100 000 0 1
Miami 000 000 001 1 2
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Tracy (2), Lucas (3). DP Washington 1, Miami
1. LOB Washington 9, Miami 7. HR-Stanton (10).
SB-Bernadina (3). CS-Span (4), Desmond (3).
S-Haren 2, Fernandez 2, Polanco. SF-Werth.
SID W P Ppnn QU


Cubs 6, Cardinals 4 CITRUS


St. Louis Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
MCrpnt2b 3 1 1 1 Valuen3b 5 1 1 2
Descals ss 5 0 1 0 StCastr ss 5 0 2 1
Beltranrf 5 0 1 0 Rizzolb 3 0 0 0
Craig If 5 0 1 1 ASorin If 5 2 2 1
MAdmslb 4 22 0 DNavrrc 4 1 1 0
Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 Bogsvccf 4 01 0
Jaycf 5 1 4 1 Sappeltrf 4 1 2 1
TCruz c 2 0 1 1 BParkr p 0 0 0 0
CMrtnzp 0 0 0 0 Russellp 0 00 0
SRonsn ph 0 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 00 0
Choate p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 1 1 0
Manessp 0 00 0 Garzap 2 0 1 0
Kozmaph 1 00 0 Guerrirp 0 00 0
Lynn p 2 0 0 0 Borbon rf 1 0 1 0
KButIr p 0 0 0 0
RJhnsnc 1 000
YMolin ph-c1 0 0 0
Totals 38 4124 Totals 36 612 5
St. Louis 010 000 111 4
Chicago 031 200 00x 6
E-Beltran (3), Freese (4), T.Cruz (1), Borbon (2).
DP-St. Louis 1, Chicago 1. LOB-St. Louis 13,
Chicago 10. 2B-Freese (13), Jay (12), A.Soriano
(23), Borbon (2). HR-Valbuena (8), A.Soriano (16).
SB-Bogusevic (2), Sappelt (3). CS-Descalso (2).
SF-M.Carpenter.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
LynnL,11-4 41/310 6 5 1 2
KButler 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Ca.Martinez 2 0 0 0 0 2
Choate 2/3 2 0 0 1 1
Maness 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Garza W,6-1 62/310 2 2 2 4
GuerrierH,6 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
B.Parker 1/3 1 1 0 1 1
Russell H,15 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Gregg S,17-19 1 1 1 1 2 1
HBP-by K.Butler (Garza). PB-TCruz.

AL leaders


MiCabrera Det
Trout LAA
DOrtiz Bos
Mauer Min
ABeltre Tex
Pedroia Bos
Loney TB
CDavis Bal
TorHunter Det
Machado Bal


G AB R H
92 360 72 132
90 362 64 117
75 279 49 90
87 349 49 112
92 371 54 118
94 368 57 117
95 323 39 102
94 339 68 106
83 353 54 110
95 409 56 127
Home Runs


CDavis, Baltimore, 36; MiCabrera, Detroit, 30; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 25; ADunn, Chicago, 24; Ibanez,
Seattle, 24; NCruz, Texas, 22; ABeltre, Texas, 21;
Cano, NewYork, 21.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 95; CDavis, Baltimore, 89; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 71; NCruz, Texas, 69; Fielder, De-
troit, 69; AJones, Baltimore, 65; DOrtiz, Boston, 65.
Pitching
Scherzer, Detroit, 13-1; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 13-3;
Colon, Oakland, 12-3;Tillman, Baltimore, 11-3; Mas-
terson, Cleveland, 10-7; FHernandez, Seattle, 9-4;
Verlander, Detroit, 9-6.

NL leaders


YMolina StL
Cuddyer Col
Craig StL
Segura Mil
MCarpenter StL
Posey SF
Scutaro SF
Votto Cin
GoldschmidtAri
Beltran StL


G AB R H
86 317 37 106
73 280 43 92
89 343 48 112
90 365 52 117
88 353 72 113
88 316 35 101
79 311 37 99
94 349 64 111
92 344 60 108
83 324 49 100
Home Runs


CGonzalez, Colorado, 25; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 24;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 23; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21;
Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 18; Uggla,
Atlanta, 17.
Runs Batted In
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 77; Craig, St. Louis, 73;
Phillips, Cincinnati, 71; DBrown, Philadelphia, 65;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 64; CGonzalez, Colorado, 64; PAl-
varez, Pittsburgh, 62.
Pitching
Zimmermann, Washington, 12-4; Wainwright, St.
Louis, 12-5; Corbin, Arizona, 11-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 11-
4; Lee, Philadelphia, 10-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco,
10-5; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 9-3.


Continued from Page BI


finished 93rd with a time of
26:08.
"They shocked it," French
said. "It was good people and
good fun. I came out to say hi to
everybody"
Cole Harrison, who will at-
tend Crystal River Middle
School, found himself with a
minor case of pain.
"I stepped in a hole," Harri-
son said. "I liked running this."
Karen Stukes was 23rd with a
time of 25:35. The Crystal River
accountant used to run cross
country at Crystal River High
School but now is a wife and
mother.
"I'm a little disappointed
with the time," she said. "I'm a
little cautious. I graduated in
1988."
Race director Milton Lyons
began the race as a school proj-
ect when he was a cross coun-
try runner at Citrus High
School. Now, an operations
manager at Fitniche, Lyons
noted a number of people
didn't show.
"We had about 500 people
(registered)," Lyons said. "It
went well. We were concerned
about a tropical storm but I am
looking at blue skies right now.
It is looking fine. I'm glad that
the City of Inverness lets us do
this and hopefully, we will look
forward to keep continuing
this."
Citrus Summer
Showdown results
Men's Overall winner: Travis
Nichols, Land O' Lakes 16:59
Women's Overall winner:
Samantha Greenlee, New Port
Richey 20:26
Men's College winner: Sam Hip-
pely, Wesley Chapel 17:23
Women's College winner: Ashley
Heitling, Mount Dora 21:35
Men's High School winner: Tyler
Fisher, Port Charlotte 17:17
Women's High School winner:
Audrey Carpenter, Ocala 21:01
Boy's Middle School winner:
Joey Fitzpatrick, Belleview 18:01
Girls Middle School winner: Na-
talie Abernathy, Land 0' Lakes
22:58
Top 5 Male Finishers
1. Travis Nichols, Land O' Lakes
16:59; 2. Tyler Fisher, Port Char-
lotte 17:17; 3. Sam Hippely, Wesley
Chapel 17:23; 4. Jake Poore, Land
O' Lakes 17:24; 5. Tommy Brown,
Land O' Lakes 17:44.
Top 5 Female Finishers
Samantha Greenlee, New Port
Richey 20:36; 2. Cindy Carver,
Lake Panasoffkee, 21:00; 3. Audrey
Carpenter, Ocala 21:01; 4. Ashley
Heitling, Mount Dora 21:35; 5.
Shelby Blaes, Ocala 22:36.


DEERE
Continued from Page B1


events before finishing ninth
last week at the Greenbrier
Classic.
He's been hot all weekend at
Deere Run, though, and Satur-
day marked the lowest round of
his career
Summerhays blew a 2-shot
lead during the final round of
the Mayakoba Classic in Mex-
ico last year and finished fifth,
but he insists that he'll take an
easygoing approach into
today
"I know there's going to be
obstacles and challenges, as
there always are. There are al-
ways things that stand in your
way But I'm just excited to see
what those are and deal with
them," Summerhays said.
Hearn finished with three
birdies in four holes to pull
within two shots of Summer-
hays. After matching 66s,
Hearn went two strokes lower
to give himself a chance today
Johnson had been remarkably
consistent over his last six
rounds at Deere Run, but for the
first time in a long time, Johnson
found himself battling just to
hang close to the leaders. He ea-
gled No. 2 with a 60-foot putt to
grab the lead outright but a
bogey at the par-4 6th was his
first here in 62 holes, and he
picked up another one five holes
later
Still, Johnson likes his
chances heading into the finale.
"I certainly think there were
a lot more positives out there
than negatives," Johnson said.
"My putter has been great.
Even the ones I've missed have
been great."
No amateur has won on the
PGA Tour in 22 years but for
about 15 minutes, unheralded
Stanford amateur Patrick
Rodgers was alone atop the
leaderboard.
Rodgers was 7 under through
12 holes a stretch capped by a
winding 57-foot birdie that put
him a shot clear of the field -
and enters the finale at 12
under


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 B3


SCOREBOARD


BB SU


I ---- -









Signups for P.L.A.Y. start July 31


Special to the Chronicle

The next season of
PL.A.Y will begin on Aug.
12. Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's PL.A.Y pro-
grams are designed for
children ages 3 to 5 who
aren't quite ready for the
organized sports leagues.
The PL.A.Y programs
offered in the upcoming
session include soccer,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Monday and Homosassa
Area Recreational Park on
Wednesday, and T-ball,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Tuesday and Bicenten-
nial Park on Thursdays.
All sports are offered
from either 5 to 6 p.m. or 6
to 7 p.m.; choose the time
and park that works for


your schedule. The
PL.A.Y programs are held
one night a week for one
hour over six weeks, and
parents are encouraged to
participate. On the first
night of PL.A.Y, each child
will receive age-appropri-
ate sports equipment and
a team T-shirt
Registration will open
on Wednesday, July 31.
Contact Crysta Henry,
Recreation Program Spe-
cialist for Youth Programs,
at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.
com for more information.
Movie in the Park
It's time again for another of
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's Movie in the Park
Events. Come join Marty, Mel-
man, Gloria and Alex on their
wildest adventure yet.


"Madagascar 3" (PG) will
be shown on the two-story
tall air screen this Saturday,
July 20. It was rescheduled
due to inclement weather.
The movie will begin at
dark (approximately 8 p.m.)
The event will be held at
Lecanto Community Park.
Bring the whole family out for
this fun and free event under
the stars. We will provide the
popcorn; you make the
memories.
For more information,
please contact Citrus County
Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Inverness Storm
event is July 20
Inverness Storm Punt Pass
Kick & Cheer will be pre-


sented by Nature Coast Or-
thopaedics from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, July 20, at Cit-
rus High School. The cost of
$15 includes lunch. The event
is open to all kids ages 5
through 15.
Football and Cheer -
Longest Punt, Pass and Kick
with first-, second- and third-
place trophies; Cheer Camp
with Stunt and Dance; medals
for all participants.
All proceeds go to Inver-
ness Storm. For more infor-
mation, call Tommy Frederick
at 352-302-7386 or visit
www.invernessstorm.com.


Signups for the P.L.A.Y.
program begin Wednesday,
July 31. Sports include
soccer and T-ball.
Special to the Chronicle


National runner-up


The Citrus Wildcats 12th-grade girls basketball team poses with the runner-up trophy the squad earned over the Fourth of July weekend in
the 12th-Grade AAU National girls basketball tournament.

Citrus County-based girls basketball team claims national runner-up spot


Special to the Chronicle

A team is commonly referred
to as a group of individuals work-
ing together for a common goal.
During the Fourth of July week-
end, players from several high
schools around the area came to-
gether and competed in the 12th-
Grade AAU National girls bas-
ketball tournament.
The sacrifice, dedication and
hard work of the players paid off
in the semifinals as Alexis
Zachar drained a free throw with
less than two seconds left to seal


the victory against Virginia and
propel the Citrus Hoops Wildcats
into the championship game.
Although the result of the
championship game was not
what the team hoped for, nothing
could take away from the experi-
ences from a journey that began
back in February
Every player contributed to the
success of the Citrus Hoops team.
There was no standout player
that dominated every game, just
a group of girls that worked to-
gether and pushed to be great.
Their two seniors Hallie


Linville and Tanika Jackson pro-
viding scoring in bunches with
timely shooting. Megan Wells,
Katelyn Hannigan and Ariana
Tankersley came off the bench
and hit big shots to boost the
Wildcats.
The defense was led by Jas-
myne Eason, Sarah Poehlman,
and Kiersten Weaver, who pres-
sured opponents into making mis-
takes. Rita Jarque and Alexis
Zachar roamed the paint, defend-
ing against opposing post players.
Feeding off the word assistant
coach Denise Wells often


shouted to them "believe" -
the girls did just that. They be-
lieved in themselves, their team-
mates and their head coach
Curtis Wells, who battled back
from cancer so he could have the
opportunity to coach a wonder-
ful group of young ladies. This
group of 10 girls showed every-
one what being a team is and the
results that can be attained by
working together Looking back,
it is funny how much can be ac-
complished by four simple let-
ters, T.E.A.M. (Together
Everyone Achieves More).


Howard: From Superman to Rocket Man


Houston Rockets

officially welcome

new starting center

Associated Press
HOUSTON Dwight Howard
has a new team and catchy new
nickname.
"He's not Superman anymore.
He's Rocket Man now," longtime
Rockets broadcaster Bill Worrell
said Saturday as he introduced
the team's major free agent ac-
quisition.
As Howard took the stage and
greeted several Houston officials
including owner Leslie Alexan-
der and coach Kevin McHale, a
couple of his new teammates
playfully repeated his new
moniker 'Rocket Man, Rocket
Man' and were met with a
huge, toothy smile from Howard.
"It means a lot to me just to
have a fresh start and have an
opportunity to write my own
story," Howard said. "I don't
think people understood the fact
that I got traded to L.A., and now
I had a chance to really choose
my own destiny, and this is the
place where I chose and I'm
happy about it"
The Rockets gave him a four-
year deal worth about $88 mil-
lion, a year less and far below


Houston Rockets center Dwight
conference Saturday in Houston.


the $118 million the Lakers
could have offered.
The center was formally intro-
duced in Houston on Saturday
after spurning the Lakers to sign
with the Rockets. He was
greeted by some of the brightest
stars in team history
Hall of Fame center Hakeem
Olajuwon and Yao Ming were
among those on hand to cele-


brate Howard's signing. Also
joining the party were Ralph
Sampson, Clyde Drexler and
Elvin Hayes.
He will be the latest in a sto-
ried line of centers to play for the
Rockets. He has long worked
with Olajuwon to improve his
game, and "The Dream" was
among the contingent that flew
to Los Angeles to woo him into


joining the Rockets.
Olajuwon didn't shy away from
raving about his student.
"He is the missing piece where
he can really bring the team to a
championship contender," he
said.
Howard joins a team starring
James Harden that reached the
playoffs for the first time since
2009 and battled back from a 3-0
deficit before being eliminated
by the Oklahoma City Thunder
in Game 6.
General manager Daryl Morey,
who led the effort to land
Howard, is excited about up-
grading his team and knows this
puts the Rockets among the pre-
season favorites to contend for a
championship.
"I think it absolutely gives us a
chance," he said. "What you do
this job for is to have a chance.
The reality is five to seven teams
have a chance any given year.
The way it is in this league,
you've got to have multiple All-
Stars, you generally have to have
dominant top players and we
have two guys that we think are
in the top 10 in the league in
James and Dwight"
Howard was traded from Or-
lando to the Lakers in a four-
team trade that also included
Philadelphia and Denver last
year. He recovered from back
surgery last season and averaged
17.1 points and 12.4 rebounds.


Women's


rec sports


upcoming

Special to the Chronicle
Get your teams together,
because the time is now. Do
you have a group of ladies at
work or a group of your
friends who want to partici-
pate in flag football, softball
or basketball?
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation at 352-527-7540
and ask Pedro Williams.
Men's flag football
Game 1
Gold vs. Blue
Gold team came out ready to
play in a tense matchup, but
Blue couldn't be held back for
long and won the game 37-19.
Game 2
Green vs. Orange
This game was a rematch
from earlier in the season,
which Orange won. This meet-
ing was another intense, back-
and-forth battle at the
Homosassa Area Recreational
Park. But Green team had al-
ready said that they were not
going to let the Orange team
beat them a second time. The
final score was 27-26 in Green's
favor.
Men's softball
scores
Advance Fitness 14, The 01'
Guys w/Help 12.
Reflections Church 15, The
Machines 2.
Ames Oil 20, RC. Lawn Care
18.

Recreation
BRIEFS

Lifeguard Camp at
Whispering Pines
Park Pool
Whispering Pines Park Aquat-
ics Team will host a Junior Life-
guard Camp for youths ages of
11 to 15 years old from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. each day July 22 to 26.
The half-day camp will pre-
pare participants for a future as
a lifeguard. Participants will
have the opportunity to experi-
ence the role of a professional
lifeguard in a fun learning envi-
ronment. The Aquatics Team will
teach the fundamentals of life-
guarding, water safety, basic
first aid and CPR, as well as
basic water rescue techniques.
Registration fee is $50 for the
camp and must be completed at
the Whispering Pines Park Pool
Complex. For more information,
call 352-726-1995.
New fishing
tourney on tap
The inaugural Rob Phillips
Eagle Buick GMC Fishing Tourna-
ment will be held Saturday, July
27, at MacRae's of Homosassa.
Boats will leave the docks at 7
a.m. from MacRae's or Twin
Rivers Marina in Crystal River.
The captains' meeting will be
from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, July 26,
at MacRae's.
Entry is $100 per boat.
Entry payment deadline is
July 26. For entry forms and
more information, call Mark
Mileti at 352-220-4339 or 352-
795-6800, Bill Nast at 352-484-
9482 or 352-795-6800, Randy
Harbin at 813-690-5528 or 352-
621-0934, or Dean Simmons at
352-267-5007 or 352-787-4650.


B4 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kyle Busch takes


Nationwide race


Associated Press
Kurt Busch talks with his crew Saturday after the final practice for today's NASCAR Sprint Cup race at New
Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H.







BuSCh in the mix


Driver in Top

10 of Sprint

Cuppoints

Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Kurt
Busch has lost rides with
top teams. He's paid the
price for losing his cool
more times than anyone in
NASCAR can count
Busch, though, has never
lost his ability to drive.
He's kept his composure,
kept that superior skill be-
hind the wheel and kept
pace this season with the
best in the Cup series.
Yes, Jimmie Johnson is
again the driver to beat
Kevin Harvick and Matt
Kenseth are primed to be in
the thick of championships
contention.
But look who's lurking not
too far behind. Just the 2004
Cup champion who's found
a home at FRrniture Row
Racing and found a regular
spot running up front to put
NASCAR on notice that he
can still be as good as it gets
in a stock car
Busch is ninth in the
points standings entering
Sunday's race at New
Hampshire Motor Speed-
way He'll start second in the
No. 78 Chevrolet at a track
where he has three career
victories and he has win
No. 1 of this season in sight


Busch has reeled off
three straight top-six fin-
ishes and has five top 10s in
his last seven races to storm
into contention and up the
standings.
"For us to be in the
Chase is a huge accom-
plishment for a single-car
organization," Busch said.
"For me, it's great to be
back in the Chase and the
fraternity of guys I'm ac-
customed to hanging out
with over the years."
With 24 career Cup wins,
Busch had long proven him-
self as one of the top drivers
in the sport. But he's had
more teams (2) than wins (0)
the last two seasons and
hasn't pulled into Victory
Lane since winning the fall
2011 race at Dover
He has plenty of time to
take the checkered flag this
season not that he neces-
sarily needs a win to make
the Chase. With eight races
left until the 12-driver field
is set for the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship,
Busch just needs to keep the
steady top 10s coming to
stick around.
"You don't have to win,
but you have to stay away
from those bad finishes,"
Busch said. "If you do just
nice, consistent runs, then
you control your own des-
tiny going to Richmond."
Busch knows how easy it
is to lose control. He blew
rides at multicar teams
owned by Jack Roush and
Roger Penske because of a


lengthy list of confrontations
and bad behavior Out of
elite ride options, he
hitched a ride last year with
James Finch's underfunded
racing team before making
a late-season switch to Fur-
niture Row.
He finished 28th in the
season-opening Daytona
500 and sprinkled two top-
fives in with five finishes of
20th or worse over the first
seven races. He was doing
well in April at Martinsville
until a bad fuel pump and
then a brake issue caused
his race to end in a fiery
crash. The car that had
been seventh was dumped
to 37th place.
Busch and crew chief
Todd Berrier have found
the right combination over
the last month. Busch has
gone from 20th to 17th to
14th to ninth in the stand-
ings and suddenly looks like
the driver who was always a
threat to win at any track.
"Kurt was always hands
down to me the guy that I
looked to and said, 'Wow,
how did he do that? How
did he go that fast? How did
he make that happen?"' for-
mer teammate Brad Ke-
selowski said. "I always
walked away and said that
guy was talented."
While his behavior will
always be scrutinized, his
outbursts at the media and
dustups with other drivers
that once landed him on
probation have fallen by the
wayside this season.


No one's really waiting
for that next high-profile in-
cident- just the next win.
"We can't force it," Busch
said. "I keep saying it and
then I go out there and I try
a little bit harder and drive
that 101 percent and it steps
over the line."
Busch's Furniture Row
team has been bolstered by
a technical alliance with
Richard Childress Racing.
He's a free agent again at
the end of the season and
could be in the mix to take
Harvick's spot at RCR in
2014. Busch stayed at
Berrier's house in Colorado
in the offseason and bonded
with the pit crew in North
Carolina, calling those visits
the "best way" to build a
team. But if another top or-
ganization like RCR makes
a pitch, Busch will listen.
"There are a lot of irons
in the fire," he said. "It's
good to run well. Being in
the top 10 in points is an ac-
complishment Now we've
just got to close the door be-
hind us and make sure we
are part of the group that is
in it."
And if they do make the
Chase?
"If I accomplish some-
thing and check that off the
box, what's next," he asked.
It could mean Busch will
be back with a deep-pock-
eted team where the big
boys play
But take a look at the
standings and it's like he
never left


Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Kyle
Busch needed some OT to
grab that checkered flag.
Once he did, he bowed
twice to the crowd.
He could have done it
one more time one for
each green-white-
checkered finish he
needed to survive to win
at New Hampshire Motor
Speedway
Busch dominated in
regulation, then proved
he had the car to beat in
three attempts of
NASCAR's version of
overtime to win the Na-
tionwide Series race.
Busch needed to drive
213 laps of a scheduled
200-lap race to win his
seventh race of the sea-
son. He snapped a four-
race winless streak and
won his 58th career Na-
tionwide race.
He had enough fuel left
in the tank to win from
the pole for the fourth
time this season.
Busch then used it all
up with one big burnout.
"We didn't want to have
those late restarts,"
Busch said. "We felt like
we had just enough fuel
to make it to the end."
Who knew they'd need
every drop?
The bonus racing
stretched just about
every car on the track.
Not everyone made it
Brian Vickers ran out
of gas just as he crossed
the finish line. Busch pit-
ted for the final time two
laps after Vickers, on lap
119. He tried to conserve
fuel through various
methods and pad his stats
for total laps led. He
passed the 12,000 mark in
career laps led and has


12,085 now.
"It's just about being out
front and setting your own
pace," Busch said. "It's
kind of like minding your
own business. I like every-
one away from me and to
be doing my own thing."
Joe Gibbs Racing driv-
ers Busch (141), Vickers
(63) and Matt Kenseth
(nine) led every lap in the
race.
Vickers was second and
Austin Dillon third. Brian
Scott and Michael Annett
round out the top five.
"Finally, nothing stupid
happened and we kept
our nose clean and
brought home a top-five,"
Annett said.
Nothing stupid, just
wild.
Busch had been the car
to beat and seemed like he
could put the No. 54 Toy-
ota on cruise control
heading into Victory Lane.
Then the real fun
started.
Chad Hackenbracht
spun out with two laps left
of the scheduled finish,
setting up the first G-W-C.
No sooner did they
restart, than Landon Cas-
sill ran out of fuel and
stalled on the track. The
caution came out and
Mike Wallace pushed
Cassill out of the way
There was a four-car
wreck on lap 206 that
brought out the caution
flag yet again. Parker
Kligerman's car was stuck
in the infield mud for a bit
after the accident.
Elliott Sadler then spun
on the lap 212 but, this
time, the caution did not
come out and Busch fi-
nally pulled away for good.
His four wins from the
pole matched Sam Ard's
record set in 1983.


Associated Press
Kyle Busch celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the
NASCAR Nationwide Series race Saturday at New
Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H.


GofBR I E FS


Allen's lead down to two
strokes at US Senior Open
OMAHA, Neb. Kenny Perry and Fred
Funk are making charges in the U.S. Senior
Open, each pulling within two shots of leader
Michael Allen with one round to go.
Perry, going for a second straight win in a
senior major, shot 6-under-par 64 to match
Corey Pavin for the low round on Saturday at
Omaha Country Club. Funk shot 67 after mak-
ing a long birdie putt on No. 18.
Allen, who shot a 63 on Friday, ballooned to
a 2-over 72. He started the day with a 5-stroke
advantage over Rocco Mediate. It was the
largest lead after 36 holes in the tournament's
34-year history.


Allen is at 8-under 202 for the tournament.
Pavin is two shots behind Perry and Funk and
four behind Allen.
Park up at LPGA event
WATERLOO, Ontario South Korea's
Hee Young Park shot a career-best 61 on
Saturday to move into the lead after the third
round at the Manulife Financial LPGA Classic.
Park was 10 under for the round and 20-
under 193 overall, one stroke better than
American Angela Stanford and two shots
ahead of Scotland's Catriona Matthew.
Park nearly chipped in on the 18th hole for
an eagle before tapping in a short putt for her
sixth birdie on the back nine.
From wire reports


ISCOVEi PHOTO CONTEST!

W e are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among
those chosen to be displayed in the
2013-2014 Discover Magazine. Please
submit only photos taken in Citrus
County and include a brief description
of the photo along with your name,
address and phone number. Photos
must be submitted by July 31, 2013.








o e I m I IIt

ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 B5


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Muirfie

Associated Press

One of the best players
who never won a major
would love a crack at one.
Colin Montgomerie used
to say it was harder than
ever to win a major be-
cause each year it seemed
that Tiger Woods won two
of them, Ernie Els, Phil
Mickelson or Vijay Singh
won another and that left
only one for everyone else.
Those days, at least for
the moment, are gone.
Over the last five years,
18 players have won the last
20 majors, none of them
named Woods. And the win-
ner? It could be anybody
Darren Clarke won in his
54th major Keegan Bradley
won in his first Rory McIl-
roy won when he was 22.
Els won when he was 42.
The next chance is the
142nd British Open, which
returns July 18 to Muir-
field for the 16th time dat-
ing to 1892.
Muirfield is reputed to
be the fairest of the links
courses on the rotation,
mainly because there are
no tricks and very few
blind shots. The course
consists of two loops run-
ning in opposite directions
so that golfers will face the
wind in every direction by
the end of the day. Muir-
field is perhaps more pre-


id provides

dictable than the others.
Not so predictable is
finding a player at the top
of his game.
The search ordinarily
would start with Woods, and
for good reason. The world's
No. 1 player already has
won four times this year,
and during a two-month
stretch in the spring, he won
three out of four tourna-
ments, the exception a tie
for fourth in the Masters.
Now, more mystery en-
velops Woods. He offered
limited details at the U.S.
Open about an injury in Rory Mcllroy isc
his left elbow that had in the last five y
been bothering him for a close of 2012, t!
month. Woods has not old from NorthE
played since he tied for made a wholes
32nd at the U.S. Open, and ment change at
he can't guarantee he'll be the year and ha
at full strength when he one reasonable
arrives at Muirfield. win, at the Texa
"I would like to be 100 After missing
percent, but I don't know," the Irish Open,
he said earlier this month. felt "lost."
"It depends on how the Graeme McI
body heals. We'll see how three wins, sec.
it goes." Woods this ye
McIlroy is one of two even he isn't su
players to win multiple expect. In his
majors in the last five tournaments,
years Padraig Harring- has won three
ton, with back-to-back missed the cul
major wins in 2008 is the five times. At
other only Boy Wonder there's simply
has become an after- what kind of
thought this year. After bring to links
building a big lead atop Firth of Forth.
the world ranking at the "When it's b


fair test for Britis


Associated Press
one of two players to win multiple majors
years.
he 24-year- it's been really good,"
ern Ireland McDowell said.
sale equip- If there is a trend in this
the start of year's majors, it is the
as had only emergence of quality play-
chance to ers whose careers were el-
as Open. evated by winning a Grand
g the cut at Slam event.
he said he Most players would have
been devastated to lose a
welll has four-shot lead with four
ond only to holes to play as Adam Scott
ar, though did last year in the British
ire what to Open at Royal Lytham & St
last eight Annes. Scott later said he
McDowell would have been crushed
times and had he been watching a
t the other performance like that from
this rate, home. Poised as ever, he re-
no telling alized he played the best
game he'll golf for 68 holes and took
along the that to understand he could
do it again.
been good, And that's what he did,


winning the Masters in a
playoff to end more than a
half-century of Australian
misery atAugusta National.
Scott hasn't been Down
Under to celebrate since he
slipped on that green
jacket. In his mind, the year
was still young. There was
much left to achieve, more
majors to win. And there is
a feeling of redemption he
brings to the Open, even
though he seemingly
atoned for that collapse by
winning his first major
"I haven't won the Open
because of the Masters. I
still miss out on that,"
Scott said. "I'm really look-
ing forward to going back
and trying to get myself in
a similar kind of situation,
a chance to win the Open.
The hardest thing is going
to be curbing the expecta-
tions right from the start
and just kind of building
my way into that position.
But it's exciting. Every
tournament, I feel, is an
opportunity for me now ...
to just build on this."
Not long after winning
the Masters, he sent a text
to Justin Rose that "this
was our time."
Rose lived up to his end
of the prediction by win-
ning the U.S. Open with
three clutch shots at the
end, including a 4-iron into
the 18th green that led to


h Open

par and a two-shot win.
They have been friends and
colleagues throughout their
careers, born two weeks
apart, both having endured
their share of struggled.
"It hit me really at the
U.S. Open that if you're not
willing to experience the
heartache and heartbreak
of losing a major, then you
can't really truly play your
best stuff and be free
enough in the moment to
get it done," Rose said. "If
you're kind of apprehen-
sive to what it might feel
like to lose, I think for me
that's just what struck me.
I was good with the fact
that you just have to put
yourself in that moment
time and time again, and
be willing to just keep
knocking down the door."
Woods can't relate to
any of this, of course. He
won his first major as a
pro with a record per-
formance at the Masters.
He had the career Grand
Slam when he was 24. He
was on his way to a calen-
dar Grand Slam in 2002
when Muirfield and some
fickle weather stopped
him. Two shots out of the
lead going into the third
round, Woods couldn't
cope with a cold rain and
40 mph wind that sent him
to an 81, still the highest
score of his career.


I
Par 4
Yards 447
Considered one of
the toughest opening
holes on a Scottish
links for the British
Open. Played into a
prevailing wind, the tee
shot should take on
Ihe bunkers down the
left side to have the
best angle into the
green. The green is
protected by bunkers
on both sides, with a
smaller bunker front
and to the right.


2 Par 4
Yards 364
The shortest par 4
at Muirfield could be
reached off the tee in
the right conditions,
but the penalty is
severe. Along with
a collection of four
pot bunkers short
and right of the
green, a stone wall
that is out-of-bounds
runs down the left side
and comes within 15
feet of the green.


THE 142ND BRITISH OPEN JULY 18-21


The Oper



returns tc



Muirfield


4- ..
.3


Muirfield Golf Course on the east coast
of Scotland has previously hosted The
British Open Championship 15 times,
most recently in 2002 when reigning
2012 Champion, Ernie Els, lifted the
Claret Jug.


13


0


0


................


/1/


/


I


/


I 5 Par 4
I Yards 448
The hole has been
lengthened by about
30 yards and has a
tight landing area
protected by deep
bunkers on both sides
of a fairway that
bends to the right.
The green is known
as a camel's back
because of the
contours. The first
bunker left of the
green has been filled
in, and other bunkers
have been moved
closer to the putting
surface.


Par 3
A I Yards 186
Middle of the green is
always a good play on
this final par 3 where
tee shots can fall off the
side of the green toward
bunkers. Lee Trevino
holed a bunker shot on
his way to winning in
1972. Ernie Els made
double bogey and had
to rally just to get into a
playoff.


^^^-~ <-

Muirfield G.C.
Gullane, East Lothian, I
Scotland


3 Par 4
Yards 377
The fairway narrows
severely at about 290
yards off the tee and is
guarded by bunkers, thus
most players will opt for a
long iron or a hybrid off
the tee. The view of a
green that is 40 yards
long is partially blocked
by a dune on the right,
and the bunkers to the
right have been moved
closer to the green.


4 Par 3
Yards 226
This par 3 has been
extended by 46 yards
since 1992. The tee
shot played to a plateau
green is 40 yards deep
and protected by pol
bunkers and hollows
on both sides. Anything
short is likely to run
down a slope into the
bunker. The course
turns clockwise to Ihe
east
at this point.


Yards 559


The first par 5 starts
with a tee shot at a
slight angle to a
fairway over five pot
bunkers on the right
side, with two more on
the left side if the shot
runs too hard and too
safe toward the left.
The green should be
reached in two by
most players, although
it will be key to avoid
bunkers on both
sides of the green.


G Par 4
S Yards 461
The drive has to cope
with a crosswind Io a
hidden fairway, followed
by an approach toward
a green that is protected
by three bunkers and
has Archerfield Wood
as a backdrop. New
hollows short and left ol
the green make the flag
look closer than it is
The bunker right ol
the green has been
moved slightly
to the left.


I.
A


9 Par 5
Yards 554
A new tee extends th s
hole nearly 50 yards,
which also brings
out-of-bounds to the
left into play. The drive
should be placed
between a deep
bunker on the left anc
a new bunker 270
yards on the right in
the landing area. The
green is close to out-
of-bounds left and
has a cluster of pot
bunkers to the right.


7 Par 4
Yards 184


The hole is uphill
and typically into the
wind. The slopes on
the putting surface
are not as severe as
the fourth hole, but
a slightly inaccurate
shot can feed down
the slope to the left
and into any of the
three bunkers, or to
the right into the
lone bunker.


S.....Par 4.
Yards 441
The tee shot requires A


a carry of 280
yards to clear
a cluster of
bunkers in a
fairway that
bends to the
right. Players
might opt for less
club off the tee to
stay short, leaving a
long shot over cross
bunkers to a green
that falls off at the
back and left.


I


4


9


10
Par 4
Yards 469
Back nine routing is
inside the outer loop of
the front nine and runs
opposite and counter-
clockwise. A fairway
bunker has been
added 290 yards right
of the fairway which
has been shifted, with
bunkers moved to the
left. Green is flat and
partially hidden, with
bunkers on both sides.


I I Par 4
Yards 387
The tee shot is blind
over the crest of a hill
to a fairway that has
been tightened by an
additional bunker
some 320 yards out
down the right side.
The left bunker has
been moved to 270
yards from the tee.
The approach is to a
small, heart-shaped
green protected by pot
bunkers and with sharp
contours.


I2 Par 4
I2 Yards 379
Only one bunker is
down the left side,
with the other
replaced by a
grassy hollow. The
bunker on the right
has been moved
slightly closer to the
landing area. The
second shot has to
avoid a group of
five pot bunkers to
the right.


S13 Yar


The feature on this
hole is the green
that is 46 yards deep
and not more than
15 yards wide at any
point and fall away
on both sides toward
three deep bunkers
on the right and two
of the left. Ernie Els
found one of them on
the left in 2002 and
played a remarkable
shot to save par


14
Par 4
Yards 475
This typically plays
into the wind, making
the longest par4 at
Muirfield even tougher.
A new tee makes the
hole 30 yards longer
than 2002, and the
fairway narrows at
about 300 yards out.
The bunker to the
right of the green has
been lengthened
toward the front of the
putting surface.


17
Par.5
A Yards 575

The last par 5 will play
about 30 yards longer
for this year's Open,
though the long hitters
should have no trouble
reaching in two
provided they avoid the
five bunkers in the
comer of this dogleg.
Group of cross
bunkers is situated
about 100 yards short
of the green. The green
is set back into the
dunes and protected
by a narrow entrance .
Par 3 with bunkers on
rds 190 both sides.


Sar 4
Yards 470
One of the stronger
closing holes in the
British Open became
about 20 yards longer
since the last Open.
Three bunkers cut into
the landing area on
both sides, while the
green is guarded by
bunkers short and on
both sides. The island
bunker to the right of
the green has been
altered to widen the
sand area and reduce
the chance of an
unplayable lie.
Illustrations are schematic.

Opens at Muirfield


YEAR WINNER
1892 Harold Hilton-a
1896 Harry Vardon
1901 James Braid
1906 James Braid
1912 Ted Ray
1929 Walter Hagen
1935 Alf Perry
1948 Henry Cotton


YEAR WINNER
1959 Gary Player
1966 Jack Nicklaus
1972 Lee Trevino
1980 Tom Watson
1987 Nick Faldo
1992 Nick Faldo
2002 Ernie Els
a-amateur


SOURCE: R&A Championships Limited


B6 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A highlight of the Key Training Center's annual Run for the Money week is when a group of Key clients meets up with runners to cross
the Suwannee River bridge, about two-thirds of the way home. The trek, in which runners take shifts in covering the 180 miles between
the capital and the Lecanto campus, begins early Monday morning and concludes Saturday. Run for the Money week festivities began
Friday with the dinner-auction fundraiser.




Unlocking potential


In Key Center, developmentally disabled have apl

NEALE BRENNAN
Special to the Chronicle

There has been no pharmaceutical discovery,
no surgical transposition, no scientific
breakthrough or cyber-age revolution that
has opened doors for those we politely
call developmentally disabled. Society, in its high
regard of its own appropriateness, has successfully
prolonged its ignorance, prejudice and inhumanity
dispensed on these undeserving victims longer than
any other disease, hatred or bias known to man.


The legends and myths that have
followed the plight of men and
women who suffer from a combina-
tion of disabilities relating to such
disorders as cerebral palsy, epilepsy,
autism and mental retardation have
validated the most inhumane treat-
ments from respected physicians and
have been the most heartless exam-
ples set and condoned by educators,
theologians and civil servants alike.
While we may forever question the
length of time it took for a reasonable
and compassionate social structure to
finally embrace the most basic of un-
derstanding toward the developmen-
tally disabled, the treatment and care
that surfaced was not particularly
complex. And yet even the most God-
fearing of segments and communities
struggled to accept, let alone under-
stand, that basic concept that under-
lines the most successful of programs
geared toward helping those who
struggle with the simplest tasks they
are faced with every day
But if you ask those who are in-
volved with the Key Training Center,
whether it be as a member of its staff,
an administrator guiding its day-to-
day management, family members of
those who are part of its programs, or
even the hundreds of volunteers who
join in the challenge, the answer has
been there all along.
"There must be a basic belief and
commitment in the self-worth and
human dignity underling all ap-
proached to enhancing human devel-
opment," explains Key Training
Center Executive Director Chet Cole.
"Most of these men and women, when
given the opportunity, are capable of
setting life goals and communicating
their desires. They are, after all, peo-
ple, and are capable of learning and
change. They may be slower than oth-
ers, but they are always capable."
Since its beginning in 1966, the Key
Training Center has provided a com-
prehensive scope of service to unlock
the doors of opportunity for men and
women that had been closed for cen-
turies. The facility, with its dedicated
staff and volunteers, has been the ab-
solute champion for ensuring that those
with handicaps can enjoy productive
lives in an atmosphere of respect.
The center is known for its work
with developmentally disabled adults
through services that include daily
living and social skills, job training,
life-sustaining care and residential
services. More importantly, these
services are provided with dignity,
kindness, love and respect.


The Key Training Center has grown
to become nationally recognized as a
leader and an innovator in programs
and initiatives associated with those
who cannot speak for themselves.
Each day the center provides adult
day training, academic programs, job
coaching and assisted living and con-
tinues to meet every need possible for
each individual advancing in his or
her community.
And those who were once housed
and locked behind doors are now
given the opportunity to earn a pay-
check, live in their own home, attend
church, play baseball and dance.
Developmental disabilities cut across
the lines of racial, ethnic, educational,
social and economic backgrounds.
Nearly 3 percent of the world's popu-
lation is mentally challenged. One out
of every 10 families is affected. But if
you stand back and look at Florida's
dispensation of services to the 23,000-
plus who are still waiting for a facility
such as the Key, the record is not one
to be proud of, according to Cole.
But he is not discouraged. He is
quick to explain his unwavering faith
in three areas:
1. Faith in God. "God has made a
statement of his love here, to show
what can be done. We don't preach
about God's works and his love; we
live it," Cole explains.
2. Faith in this community. It is im-
portant to recognize the atypical com-
munity support that has allowed the Key
Training Center to move dynamically
forward. This could not have hap-
pened without a community willing to
invest its time, energy and financial
resources in the future of these devel-
opmentally disabled men and women.
3. Faith in the developmentally dis-
abled who come to the Key Training
Center. "They are the champions of
unbelievable strength," declares
Cole. "They are the ones who teach us
how to love."
He shares a letter written to the
Key Training Center by President
Ronald Reagan in 1982, which Cole
feels is as relevant today in bridging
those gaps still present in our society
and dispelling those myths that still
can become barriers:
"There can never be a replacement
for the assistance which caring and
concerning individuals can provide
for each other. You have my great ad-
miration and I want to wish you con-
tinued success in your effort to enrich
the lives of your fellow man."
Neale Brennan is director of the
Key Training Center Foundation.


we to grow, live and love















With more than 250 known ex-
planations for what causes a
human body's chromosomes to lit-
erally flip-flop or never even show
up on the job, there are just as
many instances where the causes
are still unresolved. But medical
science does know that when the
human body virtually blocks its
own path of development, whether
by the absence of its building
blocks or their permanent damage
from any of a variety of sources, it
leaves incurable damage to the
mind, to the muscles, to growth,
and to the ability to perform the
normal functions it is routinely
asked to perform.
The men and women who are victims
of this affliction not only have lower-
than-average levels of intelligence but
often have physical abnormalities that
are viewed by many as unattractive, all of
which creates a stigma toward mental re-
tardation, even so far as to make that
term politically incorrect, now replaced
with the more acceptable term "develop-
mental disability."
In the absence of clear-cut messages
and comforting diagnosis, treatment and
cure, it is no surprise that myths and mis-
conceptions often fill in the spaces. Those
at the Key Training Center, focused on
restoring and building the quality of life
for those with developmental disabilities,
have responded to those myths.
MYTH: Mental retardation and mental
illness are the same thing.
FACT: Mental retardation is some-
times confused with mental illness. Men-
tal retardation refers to below-average
intelligence while mental illness is just
that an illness. Mental illness can often
be controlled by medication. It is associ-
ated with changes in a person's thinking,
mood and behavior and can appear at all
ages and is treatable.
Mental retardation (now commonly re-
ferred to as a form of developmental dis-
ability) is a disability for life. The
individual is diagnosed before the age of
18 and has an IQ below 70.
Cheryl Ferguson,
Key Training Center Goal Specialist
MYTH: We do not know what causes
developmental disabilities.
FACT: There are many conditions or
factors that have been identified to cause
developmental disabilities. Some can be
prevented; some cannot

See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Do you

know who

you're

giving

money to?
Citrus County resi-
dents have always
been generous in
their support of people
in need.
It's one of the extraor-
dinary things about liv-
ing here.
But one of the prob-
lems with that is that
people learn to take ad-
vantage of the giving
philosophy to raise
money for their favorite
charity themselves.
The Tampa Bay Times
recently published an
extraordinary series of
stories about charities
that scam the public.
They focused on some
interrelated charities
that claimed they were
raising money for chil-
dren with cancer
The charities weren't
doing that. While they
raised many millions of
dollars from generous
people, only a single-
digit percentage actu-
ally went to help any
children. The charity or-
ganizers used the money
for themselves.
Unfortunately, in the
age of direct mail and
Internet appeals, the un-
scrupulous few bilk
many millions of dollars
from generous people
who call Citrus County
home.
There are a few easy
rules you can follow to
not be taken advantage
of. First, when you make
a charitable contribu-
tion, do it with a charity
with local connections
that you know.
Do not give your
credit card to any char-
ity online and do not
reply to these direct
mail campaigns from or-
ganizations you are not
personally familiar with.
Just don't do it.
Jewel Lamb of Crystal
River is one of the most
giving people I know, but
she is also one of the
most educated. Before
she gives money even
to a local charity she
checks out their official
reports in Tallahassee
that show exactly how
their money is spent.
If the charity spends
too much on fundrais-
ing, salaries or adminis-
trative costs, she cuts
them off of her list.
Most of us won't go to
those extremes to inves-
tigate charities. But if
you follow the few basic
rules you can ensure
your donations are
being spent appropri-
ately
Certainly the religious
organization you are af-
filiated with is a good
place to start. But give
local as opposed to the
national organizations
that get your name on a
mailing list.
Locally we also have
dozens of great charities
that are doing good work
that is visible in our
community.
The Community Food
Bank, CUB, We Care
Food Pantry, Annie
Johnson Center, Family
Resource Center, Citrus
County Blessings and
Daystar all feed hungry
people.
The Key Training
Center has a national
See Page 03





"That i
Page C2 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


is a bad bridge which is shorter than the stream."
German proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ..................... ......... publisher
Mike Arnold ............... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen m em ber
SMac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin .........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ACKNOWLEDGE THE OBVIOUS




Hospital sale




might need



Tallahassee's




oversight


he members of the gov-
erning board at Citrus
Memorial hospital
hired a consultant to help
them navigate the sale of the
public hospital.
On Wednesday evening, two
of the hospital trustees tried
to terminate the consultant
because he took the extraor-
dinary step of actually trying
to reconcile the conflict be-
tween the feuding
hospital board THE I
and the Citrus
Memorial Health The fu
Foundation, Citrus M
which leases the
hospital and over- OUR 01
sees overall
operations. This
For the record, leaders
the hospital can interf
only be sold if the
two boards agree that it
should be sold.
The outrageous move to
terminate consultant Josh
Nemzoff should send up
warning flags to the commu-
nity and Gov. Rick Scott. The
move makes it appear that
some sort of behind-the-
scenes deal has been crafted
and that Nemzoff has gone off
the script.
The consultant has no con-
nection to Citrus County, so he
doesn't understand the crazy
politics of our community.
The governing board also
fired its newly hired public
relations firm last week be-
cause it apparently wasn't
doing a good enough job in
explaining the political posi-
tion of the trustees to the res-
idents of Citrus County.
The time for political ma-
neuvering over the future of
Citrus Memorial is over. The
governance conflict has
wasted millions of taxpayer
dollars and has damaged the
reputation of our public hos-
pital. There is no way a PR.
firm is going to repair that
damage.
The residents of Citrus County
want this nonsense to stop.


Ambulances equipped
I was very glad to see that
the man in Citrus Hills survived
his heart attack and they did a
wonderful job with the
ICE protocol, which I o
have seen them use
after working in hospi-
tals for many years.
But they should also
point out the fallacy of
the woman driving him
to the hospital. A lot of
times people think that
they can get to the CAL
hospital before the am- 563
bulance can get to 56-
their house, and that is
true. However, the ambulance
can treat them as soon as they
get there. ... So always call the
ambulance when you have
problems like that. Don't take
it on yourself to drive to the
hospital.


S
It

P

is
e


I

(


Consultant Nemzoff has
had the nerve to stand up to
governing board attorney Bill
Grant and chairwoman Debbie
Ressler and tell them their
constant interference with the
process is damaging the pos-
sibility of selling the hospital.
The sale is necessary be-
cause the battling boards could
not agree to work together to
create a strategic plan that
would ensure the
SSUE: health of the in-
stitution. True, the
:ure of foundation board
memorial. angered local
physicians and the
'INION: governing board
hoarded tax dollars
s not that were sup-
hip, it is posed to be used
rence. to run the hospital.
The end result
is that the hospital is facing a
financial crisis which can only
be averted through the sale of
this prized local institution.
Consultant Nemzoff recog-
nizes the obvious:
The two boards need to
immediately end all lawsuits.
The two boards then must
sit together and select a bid-
der they can both live with.
The two boards also must
agree that they are disbanded
once the sale is completed.
Details of the sale need to
be negotiated by two attorneys
hired from outside this area
so they are not consumed by
local politics.
Anew citizen board should
be created that oversees how
the potential proceeds of the
hospital sale are used for a
better pubic purpose.
The most important thing
board members can do now is
to get out of the way. They
have fouled up our hospital
beyond belief.
Gov. Scott and Attorney Gen-
eral Pam Bondi need to put
this issue on their radar screens
and protect the interests of the
citizens of Citrus County, be-
cause we appearto be incapable
of resolving this issue ourselves.

Hung up on etiquette
It is so annoying when you're
talking to someone on the
phone at 8 p.m. and they tell
you that they have an-
|JND other call coming in
JND that they have to take.
F They'll either put you on
hold or tell you that
they'll call you back, as
if you're not very impor-
tant at all and someone
else means much more
to them than you. I'm
getting to the point
where I feel like hanging
up and then not an-
swering when they call
me back. You'd think they were
running a real important busi-
ness and had to answer another
call or lose that customer, as if
their neighbor or relative is a
customer. Phone etiquette has
gone completely to pot.


Stand up and be counted


WASHINGTON
When Houston was com-
peting with a Brazilian
city to be the site of a
Japanese-owned plant, Hous-
ton could provide the Japanese
with pertinent information
about the educa-
tional attainments .
and other qualities
of its workforce and
the number of
Japanese speakers .
in the area. The /
plant is in Texas
partly because
Houston had supe-
rior statistics, Georg
thanks to an inex-
pensive federal pro-
gram currently VOI
under attack from
some conservatives. They may
not know that its pedigree
traces to the Constitution's
Framers.
These Enlightenment figures
-rational, empirical, inquisitive
- believed in the possibility of
evidence-based improvements.
And they mandated the "enu-
meration" of the population
every 10 years. James Madison
soon proposed expanding the
census beyond mere enumera-
tion to recording Americans' oc-
cupations. Compliance with the
survey was compulsory
During America's post-Civil
War dynamism, President
Ulysses Grant proposed a cen-
sus every five years to keep gov-
ernment abreast of change.
Beginning in 1940, a small per-
centage of households was re-
quired to fill out what came to
be the "long form." And since
2005, this has been replaced by
the American Community Survey
that about 3.5 million households
a year are required to com-
plete, providing demographic,
economic and social informa-
tion pertinent to government
and private-sector activities.
The government still makes
mandatory the mild duty of pro-
viding information pertinent to
governance. This is why some
conservatives oppose continu-
ing the ACS. Distrust of the
politicized IRS, with its moun-
tains of sensitive information,
and anxiety about the National


H
Ic


Security Agency's collection of
metadata, have deepened
Americans' instinctive suspi-
cion of government, which is
healthy But the ACS should not
become collateral damage.
If the survey were voluntary,
compliance would
plummet and the
cost of gathering the
S information would
soar The data, paid
for by taxpayers and
available to them at
no charge, serves
what the nation
needs most eco-
e Will nomic growth. Tar-
get, Walmart and
|ER other large retailers
DES tailor their invento-
- ries to regional,
even neighborhood differences
revealed in the ACS' granular
data. Homebuilders locate mar-
kets rich in persons 25 to 34,
and renters.
Information improves the ef-
ficiency of markets and of
governments, too. There are
systemic reasons why demo-
cratic governments frequently
behave foolishly: Politicians'
constant incentive is to confer
current benefits on targeted
beneficiaries and to defer costs
(by running deficits). Hence
there are weak incentives to
formulate government policies
with the quaint characteristic
of measurably ameliorating
broad social problems. The
ACS cannot cure systemic prob-
lems, but abolishing it would re-
quire government to be
unnecessarily ignorant.
Some incandescent conser-
vatives propose forbidding the
ACS to ask about respondents'
religious beliefs and practices.
But it does not ask. It is more in-
terested in, for example, at
what time respondents leave
home for work, information
that helps local governments
plan traffic flows. The ACS does
not seek to identify illegal im-
migrants, but by asking respon-
dents their ethnicity, if they are
citizens and how long they have
been in the country, it informs
public debate by estimating the
number of illegal immigrants.
Secrecy is government regu-


lation the rationing of infor-
mation. The collection and dis-
semination of useful
information by government
serve the deregulation of life by
empowering the public to di-
rect the government, to judge
its performance, and to de-
crease dependence on govern-
ment by invigorating the private
sector
In the absence of data, politi-
cians pluck factoids from the
ether, as Barack Obama did in
this year's State of the Union
address: "Every dollar we in-
vest in high-quality early child-
hood education can save more
than seven dollars later on, by
boosting graduation rates, re-
ducing teen pregnancy, even re-
ducing violent crime." Such
facially implausible and utterly
unsubstantiated claims flourish
when there is indifference to
information.
The Welfare Reform Act of
1996, which was applied con-
servatism, happened because
empirical data convinced
enough Democrats of the costs
of welfare dependency Charles
Murray, the most consequential
and conservative contemporary
social scientist ("Losing
Ground," "Coming Apart"), de-
pends on ACS and other census
surveys. Sociologist Peter
Rossi, a liberal Democrat and
an accomplished analyst of so-
cial programs, formulated two
"metallic rules" of policy eval-
uation. The Iron Law is: "The
expected value of any net im-
pact assessment of any large-
scale social program is zero."
The Stainless Steel Law is:
"The better designed the im-
pact assessment of a social pro-
gram, the more likely is the
resulting estimate of net impact
to be zero."
Clearly, conservatives should
favor the nation applying to it-
self the injunction "Know thy-
self." Besides, if conservatives
do not think information about
society the more the merrier
- strengthens their case, why
are they conservatives?

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTER 1 to the Editor


Country falling apart
from within
Re: "The real scandal,"
Maria Weiser, Letters to the
Editor, June 3.
Ms. Weiser, your statement
was that "We have been hoist
with our own petard" (de-
stroyed by the very devices
which one meant to destroy
or silence others). I would ask
the question, who is we? Is
we the social progressive De-
mocrats of our country? Is we
the liberal/socialist/commu-
nists of our country? Is we
those who wish to see the de-
mise of the United States of
America? Is we people like
Harry Reid, Nancy Pelosi,
Chuck Schumer? Is we the
underlings like Lois Lerner
(IRS), Steven Miller (IRS) and
Neal Wolin (Treasury)? Is we
Hillary Clinton on the deaths
of four Americans in Beng-
hazi, including our ambassa-
dor Chris Stevens, who were
ignored by leaders of this
country in their plea for
help? Is we those nasty con-
servatives of our country? Is
we those nasty traditionalists
of our country? Is we those
who have followed the script
of the president of the United


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

States of America Barack
Obama?
You say that you are at a
loss to understand the uproar


of the IRS investigation of tea
party and other conservative
organizations who apply for
tax-exempt status Can you
name one liberal or Demo-
cratic organization who sup-
port the Democratic party,
who are asked dumb ques-
tions and who have been
waiting for years to have their
applications either denied or
approved? The IRS had no
problem in approving the tax-
exempt status for one Malik
Obama, who has run a shady
charity for years. Within
three weeks the exemption
was granted retroactively, I
might add.
I immigrated to this coun-
try 51 years ago (legally). One
year after arriving here, I
watched our president be as-
sassinated. Close to 50 years
later, I watch as the country
that I chose as my home, the
country that next to God and
family I love be assassinated
from within.
In closing, allow me to say
that the liberal/social pro-
gressives of this country are
not ignorant, it's just that "They
know so much that isn't so."
Michael E. Pitts
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reading, arithmetic .... and what was that oth


I have recently read
that cursive might be-
come a thing of the
past that with key-
boards, the standard hand-
writing of old will no
longer have relevance. As
a matter of fact, my re-
search has indicated that
some have already de-
cided to drop writing as a
subject to be taught to ele-
mentary-school children.
The truth is, I'm not to-
tally sure how I feel about
this.
Can the world survive
without cursive?
Probably
I had to give it up a few
years ago when my


tremors would simply no
longer allow my hands to
form flowing, connected
letters.
Nowadays, I consistently
use a keyboard and when I
must absolutely venture
into handwritten commu-
nication, I use large capi-
tal print letters.
Still, while I can agree
that cursive might have no
prevailing future value, in
my heart, I hate to see it
become a lost art. Not that
mine was ever art My hand-
writing never looked at all
like what was posted above
the blackboard; it always
more closely resembled
chicken scratching.


Nonetheless, cursive sage on the inside of the
brings back some fond lid to my electric train box
memories for me. For ex- which said, "Dear Fred, Jr.,
ample: You are a very
As younger bad little boy.
brothers so ... Your good
often do, I b r o t h e r,
began life William."
messing up my His self-pro-
older brother's claimed closing
world. Soon title stuck and
after he he has been
learned how to known as my
write using Fred Brannen good brother
cursive, in con- A William ever
sideration of SLICE since.
the loss of OF LIFE Then, the
property and day came when
the physical injuries he Uncle Sam laid claim to
had suffered at my hand, my body
my brother wrote a mes- The old guy with


whiskers and in a star-
spangled suit did this
shortly after I met Cheryl
and we had begun our
whirlwind courtship.
Without a doubt, the
items that most helped me
bear the separation were
the letters she wrote to
me. She wrote them in the
loveliest cursive on pages
of blue stationery which
were scented with her
perfume. The blue en-
velopes with their lus-
cious smell became
something about which I
received much teasing
from the drill instructors
and the other soldiers, but
it was worth it each time I


COMMENTARY


Sound OFF


Get your pets fixed 20 L


This is a footnote for people
that have animals, cats and
dogs, and animal lovers: Have
your cats and dogs spayed and
neutered as soon as possible.
There is such an overload, in-
flux of kittens and puppies at
this time of year. No one wants
them and it's sad...Unfortu-
nately, they'll be put to death.
The outlook for adult dogs and
cats is even worse.
Missing my 'drive time'
I'm wondering if somebody
could tell me what happened to
the talk radio show called "The
Drive Time Happy Hour" on
97.3 The Sky with Chip Morris
that came on from 3 to 6 every
afternoon. I'm wondering if
they're just on vacation for the
summer or if they are perma-
nently off the air. If somebody
can let me know, I'd appreciate it.
Rules for funding
I'm calling because people
need to figure out what's going
on with our government. The
Citrus County Commission is
different than the Citrus County
School Board. They have differ-
ent funds that come from differ-
ent places. One can't intercede
with the other. You can't trans-
fer money from the county
commission to the schools. The
state allots so much money for
the school system and they
allot so much money for the
county commissioners to do
the roads and the other things.
You can't intermingle those
funds. So they also are con-
stantly saying do this, board
members and stuff, for free.
Yeah, they could, board mem-
bers, school board members,
donate their money back, but
the state designates in Talla-
hassee how much the salaries
are, not the county. The county
can't do anything about that, as
far as the salaries for them,
other than individual commis-
sioners or board members just
donate their money. They're not
doing that. Most of them are
running because they want that
extra salary. That's the way it
works.


k1 ['v'-A


PAPUY


Editor's note:Actually, laws were Give kitty a chance Watch for scammers Checkpoints and freedom
changed in 2009 and 2011 that
allows local elected officials I just heard a sad story at our Attention to all elderly peo- Well, you editorialized on the
school board, superintendent of lodge. An elderly woman who pie: Calls coming in with very Constitution and the freedoms
schools, county commissioner and lives in an apartment owns a long telephone numbers are of the American people that
other constitutional officers-to set cat, which is always indoors most likely a scam artist calling are self-evident. But in the
their own pay so long as it's lower and quiet, and was told by her to tell you that you have won a same paper, you say nothing
than the amount set by the state, landlord the lease says no pets. very large sum of money and about the sheriff's highway
Sn p in hLI fA il th t h t 1 t h n \ / i i k L\/ I + i t rhi hirriLO nVI lilh i- t n iL


Get rid of commissioners
I see where in the Chronicle, the
July 4 paper, where the county
commissioners have shut down
another part of the county and
laid off more people. I wonder,
is there any reason why we
can't get rid of the county com-
missioners? I bet we'd save a
lot of money if we got rid of
them and put in a management
of some kind. Think about it.
Editor's note: You can remove
individual commissioners at elec-
tion time. The state Constitution
requires the county commission
form of government.


bome seniors nave no Tamiiy
and only their pet for compan-
ionship. Rules are rules, but if
there is no problem being cre-
ated, try to be a human being,
Mr. Landlord.

Stop the luxuries
Mr. Thorpe, want to save
more taxpayer money? Close
another road maintenance
satellite, relocate asphalt trucks
to Lecanto satellite, terminate
everyone currently on the DROP
program, do not allow take-
home vehicles to be used for
personal use such as driving
home every day for lunch.


iaL you ave Lo p ay i percenIL
or more of the total winnings
amount before you can get your
winnings. They call over and
over again thinking that they
can change your mind. They are
very persuasive. This is a scam.
You will not get any money.
Please do not go out and get a
money order to send to them.
Do not send your hard-earned
savings. Please call this num-
ber to block any and all scam
artists each and every time
they call you. Please call and
block the number, 888-382-
1222. This message is coming
from someone who got
scammed big time.


c IeCL KponI sL, VVlw l Ic is a cuLe
way of saying "roadblock and
detaining." Oh, but it's for our
own good. We have the right to
move freely within the bound-
aries of this country. We
should not be arbitrarily
stopped and detained and
searched by the police. It takes
us one step closer to a police
state. Definitely violates our
constitutional rights. Just be-
cause you print it in the paper
doesn't make it OK. Another
example of giving up our
rights, little by little, to Big
Brother. It needs to be stopped
and the Chronicle needs to
stop it or help stop it.


FACTS
Continued from Page Cl

There are genetic causes such as Down
syndrome and Fragile X syndrome.
There can be complications suf-
fered by the fetus during gestation or
during the actual birth or delivery
Alcoholism, drug abuse and some
illnesses incurred by the mother can
cause or contribute to developmental
disabilities.
Accidents, injuries to the head or
illnesses children get can cause brain
damage, resulting in developmental
disabilities.
There are more than 250 causes that
have been identified and many that
are still unknown. Continued re-
search is critical.
Theresa Flick, Key Training
Center program and services director

MYTH: People with certain disabil-
ities don't really know what is going
on around them and are off in their
own world.
FACT: This is nothing more than a
stigma. Most of them have been given
a cruel label that often follows them
through life, and despite their ability
to contribute to society, they are pre-
vented from doing so. They under-
stand, they are sensitive, they are
emotional, they strive to be a part of
their communities, but most of all,
they are proud. Despite the obstacles,
they have achieved, they finish
school, they have a job, they become
home owners, they drive, they vote,
they go to church. They know!
-Jackie Fagan, Key Training
Center social services

MYTH: People with developmental
disabilities are simple people who
cannot learn or understand complex
things.
FACT: People with developmental
disabilities are individuals. Some can


MYTH: There is no hope for
the developmentally challenged.
They suffer lifelong and we
should feel sorry for them.
FACT: Research shows
that 89 percent of mentally
challenged are only mildly
delayed. This means that
given the appropriate
opportunity they can live and
thrive in their own communi-
ties and lead happy, produc-
tive and useful lives as full
citizen partners.
do anything a person without disabili-
ties can do; others may take longer to
learn.
Everybody learns. Nothing is im-
possible.
-Amy Cole, Key Training Center
vocational services supervisor

MYTH: Educational and vocational
training will not help people who
have developmental disabilities.
FACT: The people we serve at the
Key Training Center prove this myth
wrong every day Many are working in
the community and have learned
many new jobs. We have many who
live in their own apartments and
could not have done so without learn-
ing new skills as they do each day in
classes at Adult Day Training or in
their apartments.
Shirl Elder, Key Training Center
vocational services Director

MYTH: Adults with developmental
disabilities cannot make their own
friends and prefer to be with people
like themselves.


FACT: Persons with developmental
disabilities enjoy participating in a
variety of activities surrounding their
specific interests. They enjoy new
and challenging experiences where
they meet new individuals who allow
them to develop new and lasting
friendships. Persons with disabilities
have friends that have disabilities but
they have many friends without dis-
abilities as well.
Sara Roberts, Key Training
Center housingand residential director

MYTH: Persons who are severely
and profoundly developmentally dis-
abled must be locked away in institu-
tions for their own and society's
safety.
FACT: As society embraces persons
with developmental disabilities, it
has been proven that the most effec-
tive environment to learn and develop
in is one that is in the community and
which offers a family-like atmosphere
of caring and nurturing.
-Melissa Walker, Key Training
Center assistant executive director

MYTH: There is no hope for the de-
velopmentally challenged. They suf-
fer lifelong and we should feel sorry
for them.
FACT: There is abundant evidence
that the developmentally disabled are
more like us than different; that they
need, just as we all do, love, joy, activ-
ity, a chance to grow and progress,
and a chance to become independent.
Research shows that 89 percent of
mentally challenged are only mildly
delayed. This means that given the
appropriate opportunity they can live
and thrive in their own communities
and lead happy, productive and use-
ful lives as full citizen partners. The
inclusion of those with disabilities
into our society should be done not
out of charity but to respect them as
any other fellow human being.
Chet Cole, Key Training Center
executive director


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

reputation for helping the developmentally
disabled.
The YMCA, Boys and Girls Clubs, and the
Education Foundation focus on health and
the needs of children.
There are strong local affiliates with the
American Cancer Society, the Heart Associ-
ation, Catholic Charities, Salvation Army
and Red Cross. The Boy Scouts and Girl
Scouts are national organizations, but they
have strong local units that need your help.
One of the easiest ways to give money to a
lot of needy organizations in our community
is through the United Way This terrific local
organization spends 99 percent of the dollars
raised here to help people who live here.
United Way also has panels of local business
people and volunteers who analyze the spend-
ing of local charities each year If organizations
don't meet the standards, they are coached
along. If they don't make improvements,
United Way funding will be pulled away
I'm leaving out all sorts of local efforts. There
are groups that raise funds to protect animals.
There are others focused on helping the en-
vironment. Others focus on veterans. Some
on senior citizens. Others on public radio.
The point is that you should only con-
tribute your hard-earned money when you
know those dollars are being spent wisely If
you know a national organization that does
get the job done, go for it.
One of my favorite national efforts is Shel-
ter Box, a Rotary inspired group that puts
people on the ground when disaster strikes.
I have faith in Shelter Box because Alan
Monroe, a former Chronicle employee and
Citrus County resident, is one of its leaders.
Your contributions are incredibly important
and it is a shame that crooks can use your
good intentions to make themselves wealthy
Be careful, be skeptical and be local.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 C3



er thing?

opened one of those spe-
cial letters and read her
words which were meant
only for me.
What about cursive?
I suppose that its future
remains to be seen, but I
can assure you that its past
has tracked my past and
cursive, especially that
which is still produced by
my sweetheart on the
notes she leaves for me
from time to time, will al-
ways be among my favorite
things.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


Run, Roger, run
Roger Krieger's letter on
Tuesday, July 2, was right on
target. Roger, why don't you run
for commissioner? Then maybe
we could get this county back
on track. We need you and oth-
ers like you to help Mr. Adams
get back on the right track for
the will of the people, not spe-
cial interests. What is wrong
with the voters in this county
that vote the same old candi-
dates back in over and over? It's
time for a big, big change.
Doonesbury isn't funny
I see the comics. I love read-
ing the comics. I've been read-
ing them for over 70 years. You
know, the comics are for fun
and entertaining and should
not be used as a political plat-
form or format such as in the
"Doonesbury" strip. I would
suggest that you either edit it
out or drop this "Doonesbury."
It's nothing but a political for-
mat and a political opinion and
it's very, very insulting to your
readers.
Trees and climate
Everybody seems to have blind
eyes and deaf ears especially
the politicians to what the fact
is about ... greenhouse effect and
ozone is. It's not fossil fuel. It is
cutting down our trees and
forests. Trees absorb 60 percent
carbon dioxide and put out 40
percent oxygen into the atmos-
phere, which cools the world.
Greenhouse effect: Look at Ari-
zona and California. Thousands
and thousands of acres of for-
est burning up and it gets hot-
ter there every summer and
colder every winter. That's what
trees do; cool the land in the
summer, warm the land in the
winter. Florida is becoming the
same way.


cz~NcNj\JVr4~


I *.
1,1 j


-.

,,& ., i .


'U ./, '
-. -. ". ,,
Show me s n-


Show me something nice Check Habitat for bike


The media really milks the
cow dry when it comes to
things that they talk about
and talk about and talk about.
Who wants to watch the
Zimmerman trial, every as-
pect of it? What is in there
that people are interested in?
Or are they not interested in it
and the media uses it to fill
in? Well, the media could use
their expertise to put on some
things that are really nice
sometimes. It wouldn't hurt
a bit.
Cancer support group
This is a response to the
woman who was looking for a
cancer survivors support group.
We have a Homosassa women's
cancer survivors support group.
... I can be reached at 382-
0057.


This is for the person in the
Sound Off who wanted an exer-
cise bike. I donated one to
Habitat, Crystal River, very re-
cently. Go there. I'm sure they
should have one.
Don't water in rain
It's amazing just walking
around the neighborhood in
Pine Ridge and seeing people
that (have) their sprinkler sys-
tems on after all the rain we've
been inundated by. People still
don't have the knowledge or
brains to determine whether
their sprinkler system should
be shut off or not. They should
have a rain sensor on it, too,
that will automatically shut it
off. But to see people doing
that shows me their lack of in-
terest and lack of caring of the
environment.


- --










In need of care
What can a person do that
has a history of cancer already
and now they are sick and in
desperate need of a gastroen-
terologist but they do not have
medical insurance or the
money to pay for a doctor's
care out of pocket and they're
not qualified for Medicaid?
What can people do in this po-
sition? I'm desperate.
Feed the dog
To you, the caller complain-
ing about the animals not
having no water or food:
While you're poking around
looking, why don't you take
it some water and food? Or
are you too busy calling on
the people? Best not ever
deprive anything of a drink
of water. So go give it some
water.


F'rmw-X-


GfWC Crystal River Woman's Club
Presents
"Fashions Under the Sun"
A Fashion Show & Luncheon


Fashions from

Ibelk


Saturday, July 27, 2013
11:00 A.M.
Tickets: $25.00 Donation
(Non-refundable)

Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
509 E. Hartford St.
Hernando, FL

Entertainment Featuring:
Sophie Robitaille


Silent Auction
Door Prizes


for information or tickets, please call Madeline Markowitz
at 352-794-0477 or Margie H arper at 32-795-6790.


Sponsored by CHRpNICLE


000EMVH


Wednesday August 21


St. Benedict's Catholic Church
455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River

A Lunch
at noon

$ 12 per person
Playing begins
at 12:30 p.m.

Door Prizes
"Share The Wealth"

All proceeds to benefit *
the Pregnancy &
Family Life Center V


For more information
call us at 344-3030


Rails to Trails of the Withlacoochee

2013 Cycling Jersey byPrimaf


$52


Silicone Waist Gripper
3 Rear Pockets
100% Polyesler


Check size availability on our website.
Delivery will be at our Annual Ride on Oct. 6, 2013.
Shipping Is available

For more details and ordering visit our website at:
railstotrailsonline.com
If you have any questions contact Jules Fevrier at
bentspokes2@gmail.com Phone (352) 637-1946


CHMi L


OOOFDTA


Paul Perregaux
,t Cordially invites you to a
w gathering Benefitting the local
L" Citrus County Scouting Program
47 Honoring Gerry Mulligan

Please come and celebrate our
Friends of Scouting successes and help us
complete our 2013 Campaign.

Thursday, July 25, 2013
Garden Room at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club
505 E. Hartford Street
Hernando, FL
6:00pm 7:30pm


Heavy Hors d'oeuvres and
drinks will be served


i Please RSVP by July 19th to Paul Perregaux
at 352-598-9724 or 352-746-7899

GC. ii- i
I O ......


* /




C


Unisex Sport Cut
3/4 length zipper
Short sleeve only


C4 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


COMMENTARY


Put hyacinths in lakes
Why? I mean today's paper
(July 3), "Act two for hy-
acinths." It takes scientists to
figure this out. When I got here
in 1963, the lakes were white,
sandy bottoms. You didn't have
the hyacinth problem because
the hyacinths would float from
here to there and which, like it
said, would shade out the bad
algae and the hyacinth. And
now we've got a scientist and a
study taking a second look. It
doesn't need a second look.
The only reason why it was
taken away is because people
got upset with the floating hy-
acinths getting in the way of
the boat slips and along the
shoreline. But if they realized
it, they would have ample fish.
It used to be the bass capital of
the world on this side. And at
King's Bay, I can remember
when I first got here, you could
jump off out there where that
beach is and you had clear,
sandy bottom and blue crabs
running right up alongside of
the dock. Great example. Put
them back in their lakes. It
won't solve all the problems,
but it will definitely start killing
off all that garbage.
Call churches for walkers
A number of times over the
years, I have heard people com-
ment on the very high cost of
wheelchairs and walkers even if
you are lucky enough to find one
at a thrift shop. A number of
people do not have health insur-
ance and must pay out of pocket.
People frequently donate walk-
ers and wheelchairs to churches.
Try calling them, especially the
larger congregations, and ask-
ing if they have an extra one.
Some will have compassion on
you and someone in need and
will sell you one cheap.


11 \





Inside:
Read financial advice from
Bruce Williams/D2


TECHNOLOGY
lwM-11- CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Price for simplicity in Google phones


ANICK JESDANUN
Associated Press
NEW YORK- The modifications Samsung and HTC apply to Google's
Android software are meant to be improvements. But I've complained be-
fore about how the changes actually make phones more complex to use.
The S4 even has an easy mode for first-time smartphone users, an admis-
sion that the normal mode is too confounding.
Google worked with both Samsung Electronics Co. and HTC Corp. to
come out with "Google Play" editions of the hit phones. Instead of cus-
tomized software from Samsung and HTC, the Google phones run a pure
version of Android, just as it was developed by Google.
Google lets any phone maker use its Android operating system for free. To
set themselves apart from competitors, phone makers often add their own
touches to devices. They rearrange the menu or load additional apps. Wire-
less carriers also like to add their own apps. Before you know it, phones are
bloated with features and apps you don't want and can't get rid of.
Consider my experience with the original S4 over the weekend. As I
tried to adjust the camera's flash setting, I inadvertently made some
postage stamp icon pop up. That activated the camera's dual-shot mode,
which snaps a shot of you with the front camera to superimpose over
whatever you're shooting with the camera on the back of the phone. I
didn't want that, but I couldn't figure out how to get rid of it. My friend
couldn't either. So we bagged the shot. Taking photos with a phone is sup-
posed to be fun, not a chore.
With Google's version of the S4, I get a no-frills camera that is easy to
figure out. It lacks gimmicks such as dual shots and the ability to combine
several images of motion into a single shot. It offers about a half-dozen
shooting modes, such as night, action and panorama, rather than the
dozen or so on the original S4. But a half-dozen is about a half-dozen more
than I need and use.
Google's S4 also lacks the original model's ability to pause video
See Page D2


About the new Google phones:


The new phones are existing Sam-
sung and HTC phones loaded with
Google's version of the Android op-
erating system. That's the version
that Google makes, before phone
makers and phone carriers load
Android up with their own features
and apps.
These phones are good options for
those who don't like all the bells and
whistles in the original models.
They are cleaner and easier to use.


But they are also more expensive, as
you have to pay full price through
Google's online Play store rather
than a subsidized price that
wireless carriers offer with
two-year agreements.
These phones aren't compatible
with Verizon's or Sprint's CDMA net-
works. If you're on AT&T, you'll be
paying more for the phone without
any reduction in monthly phone
bills. If you're on T-Mobile, though,


Specs:

Samsung Galaxy S4 Google Play
edition:
m Manufacturer: Samsung Electronics Co.
m Display: 5 inches (diagonal) with a res-
olution of 1920 by 1080 pixels (441 pixels
per inch)
* Keyboard: Touch screen only
m Memory capacity: 16 gigabytes, ex-
pandable with microSD card of up to 64
gigabytes.
m Price: $649
m Battery life: Talk time is 17 hours. Up to
69 hours of audio playback and 11 hours
of video playback.

HTC One Google Play edition:
* Manufacturer: HTC Corp.
m Display: 4.7 inches (diagonal) with a
resolution of 1920 by 1080 (468 pixels
per inch)
* Keyboard: Touch screen only
* Memory capacity: 32 gigabytes. Not
expandable with memory card.
* Price: $599.
* Talk time of 27 hours on GSM. Battery
cannot be replaced by user.


expect to save $20 a month, or
$480 over two years.
You're still paying about $70 more
overall for Google's S4 and $20 more
for Google's One, but it's not the
hundreds of dollars you'd be paying
on AT&T.
The one-time, upfront cost is
$649 for Google's S4 with 16 giga-
bytes of storage and $599 for the One
with 32 gigabytes. Both phones are
available in the U.S. only through
Google's online Play store, with
shipments beginning July 9.


Six stocks that stand out in a sizzling market


ALEX VEIGA
AP business writer
LOS ANGELES It's summertime
and the stock market is sizzling.
The market reached an all-time high
this week, torching its previous record
set just before Memorial Day
Even so, a handful of companies
stand out. Six stocks -Amazon, Star-
bucks, UnitedHealth, Visa, Master-
card, and Discover Financial -
notched their own records this week,
helped by the growing confidence of
American consumers.
Would buying these stocks now be a
hot-weather impulse or a coldly
calculated move?
All six have improving earnings out-
looks, analysts say Credit-card compa-
nies and UnitedHealth appear to be
the best bets.
The six companies share similar
traits that make them attractive. They


are consumer-focused, with dominant
market positions and growing revenue
streams, says Fred Dickson, chief in-
vestment strategist at D.A. Davidson &
Co.
Their importance to shoppers is cru-
cial to their growth prospects. Ameri-
cans' confidence in the economy has
reached its highest point in 5 1/2 years.
The housing recovery is strengthening.
Job growth continues at a steady pace.
When consumers feel better about
the economy, they splurge on discre-
tionary items like a Venti Caramel
Macchiato from Starbucks or a new
book or DVD from Amazon. And they
pay for those items with credit cards.
Visa and UnitedHealth are the most
attractive buys right now, said David
Brown, chief market strategist at
Sabrient Systems, an investment
research firm.
See Page D4


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases retail sales
data for June, 8:30 a.m. Eastern;
Commerce Department releases
business inventories for May,
10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases Consumer Price
Index for June, 8:30 a.m.; Federal
Reserve releases industrial pro-
duction for June, 9:15 a.m.; Na-
tional Association of Home
Builders releases housing market
index for July, 10 a.m.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases housing
starts for June, 8:30 a.m.; Federal
Reserve releases Beige Book,
2 p.m.


Two new Android

phones will look and

sound familiar to those

who have been

paying attention to

phones. That's because

these two devices are

replicas of Samsung's

Galaxy S4 and HTC's

One, except they lack

most of the bells and

whistles added to the

original models.



And that's a good

thing.


Laura
Byrnes

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


Hit the road to

re-employment

h, summer- the quintes-
sential time of year for a
road trip. Sometimes we like
to hit the open road on our own,
stopping and starting whenever it
suits us, taking whatever byway
beckons. Other times, a road trip
calls family or friends or at least
one copilot to help navigate and
even take the wheel when needed.
Depending on your needs and
interests, either road trip will
work.
The same is true on the road to
re-employment. If that's a trip you
need to take, you know the road is
paved with good intention but is
often bumpy and fraught with its
share of detours. Forget the old
saying, "Life is a journey, not a des-
tination;" just ask anyone who is
on a job-search journey, and you'll
most likely hear a chorus of 'Are
we there yet?"
Not only can it take a long time,
but it's easy to get lost along the way
Wouldn't it be nice if someone
handed you a customized roadmap
with the route clearly marked, just
like those wonderful AAA TripTiks?
If that sounds good, then put the
pedal to the metal and motor on
over to our One-Stop Career Center
in Inverness. Workforce Connec-
tion now offers our Roadmap to
Employment program in Citrus
County, offering job seekers the
choice between DIY self-service
resources or staff-assisted services.
Unlike most road trips, you won't
have to pay extra at the pump for
premium in fact, there is no
charge regardless of which route
you choose. And no matter which
direction you take, you can always
switch from one to the other.
So what's the difference? Let's
See Page D2


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises above $105;
pump prices at $3.55

NEW YORK- The price of oil
rose back above $105 Friday Gaso-
line prices jumped the most since
mid-February, unwelcome news
for summertime drivers.
By late morning in New York,
benchmark crude for August deliv-
ery was up 52 cents to $105.43 a
barrel on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. Even with a drop of
$1.60 a barrel Thursday, the price
of oil is still up about 9 percent this
month.
Drivers are seeing the impact.
The average price for a gallon of
gas in the U.S. rose 3 cents to $3.55
a gallon, the biggest one-day in-
crease since Feb. 16, according to
AAA. Prices rose 10 cents in both
Indiana and Michigan.
The average price has gained 8
cents since Monday, reversing
what had been a steady decline
since the middle of June.

AT&T to buy Leap
Wireless for $1.2B

LOS ANGELES -AT&T Inc.
said Friday that it has agreed to ac-
quire Leap Wireless International
Inc., the pre-paid cellphone car-
rier that operates under the
Cricket brand, for about $1.19 bil-
lion in cash, or $15 a share.
The purchase gives the nation's
No. 2 cellphone carrier a leg-up in
serving customers who prefer not
to have lengthy contracts. Leap's
Cricket service has 5 million sub-
scribers. The deal also gives AT&T
the right to use Leap's unused air-
waves also known as spectrum
- to expand its network.
Spectrum is the lifeblood of the
wireless industry and the fight to
grab more of it has spurred a re-
cent wave of consolidation.
As part of its deal, AT&T plans to
keep the Cricket brand name.
-From wire reports









Renting a home gives more flexibility than buying


DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I want to pur-
chase a home. My
husband is a graduate student
working full-time.
That said, we have a choice
of either renting or purchasing,
and we are leaning toward the
purchase option because it will
take several years to finish his
degree. I would like to pur-
chase a home so we can do al-
terations for our children, and
we may not be able to do that in
a rented home.
Also, we must decide
whether to take a fixed-rate
mortgage or, as a mortgage bro-
ker keeps pushing, an ad-
justable-rate mortgage. She
seems to think that we would
be far better off with an ad-
justable rate because we are
buying for the short term. The
mortgage will adjust at two-,
three-, four- or five-year levels
- the shorter the adjustment
period, the lower the initial
interest. What do you think?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: You are in
a difficult period in life and
complicating it by buying a new
home at this point, in my opin-
ion, is a mistake. At least when
you are renting, you can fore-
cast to some degree when you
are going to leave, and you have
no other responsibility except
to look for a place at your next
location.
As to the fixed-rate or ad-
justable-rate mortgage, there is
no way I would ever recom-
mend an adjustable-rate mort-
gage. All that does is delay
paying off the house. In the
days when the value of a house
"always" went up, maybe an ad-
justable mortgage would have
had some merit, but those are
days are behind us, at least for
the time being.
I think you would be better
off to rent Hopefully, you can
find a home you can adjust to
your needs. After graduation is
the time for buying.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 56 years
old and currently have about


$100,000 saved. I have educated
my kids, own my own business
and I net around $50,000, which
is about what we need to main-
tain our lifestyle.
My mom just passed away
and left me $350,000, which is
obviously a onetime proposi-
tion, and I would like to make
the most of it. I don't need it for
current expenses.
What would you suggest in
terms of retirement?
L.K., via email
DEAR LK: Congratulations!
You educated the kids and you
own your own business. But
you are 56 years old and have
only $100,000 saved toward
retirement
Clearly, even with maximum
Social Security, which you will
not get because you're not
showing enough income, you
would be in a difficult position
come retirement time. Your in-
heritance changes all that. With
$350,000 added to the $100,000,
this should develop enough in-
come if properly invested.
In my opinion, you must ac-
cept a fair degree of risk, and
that means investing in the
marketplace. I suggest you seek
out the services of two or three
brokers and explain exactly
which way you want to go. You
are looking for growth now and
income later
Any income that the $350,000
earns in terms of dividends
should be re-invested. At no
point should that money be dis-
sipated. You should be able to
earn 6 percent to 7 percent re-
turn following this scenario.
That should earn you an in-
crease approaching $25,000. All
added together, this should give
you a solid retirement at age 66
or 67.
DEAR BRUCE: I thought
what I was doing was pretty
smart, then I read that you
think I made a huge mistake. I
would like to know what it is.
I purchased a piece of indus-
trial real estate for $500,000.
Rather than getting a mortgage
at 8 percent or 9 percent, I bor-


rowed against my $
am paying only 3 pe
what they are paying
seems to me that th
is a lot smarter than
mortgage company
more.
I hope to unload
erty in four or five
explain it to me.
-I
DEAR L.P: What
is that when you ar
money for profit in
you should have a
which you actually
lem is that you hav
CD that is giving yo
return. I would hav
that you get a mort;
3 percent to 4 perc(
convert the CD to c
vest it with a return
cent to 8 percent. If
giving up 5 percent
that's a $25,000 loss
$125,000 in five yea
Also, I hope you
you may not be able
property immediate
ing the money for t
is a good thing, but
$500,000 in a CD is
DEAR BRUCE: A
ing for a company f
months, I left unde
circumstances. I wa
pended for what I
my fault Now I am
that I am getting ba
from this company
I had a friend cal
was considering mi
ment. They said tha
for work a couple o
which is true, and t
suspended because
thing I did at work,


I


GOOGLE to steer you i
GOOGL app store, as
own music ai
Continued from Page Dl players. You
too many wa:
automatically when you same things.
look away from the screen You might 1
or to scroll down an arti- a lot of work 1
cle when you tilt your apps you war
head. Those features may phones, but i
sound cool, but they often takes more w
don't work properly turn off every
The Google version of don't need -
the S4 also has alarm can at all -
sounds that I can actually sung's and H'
wake up to. Samsung had Now for th
substituted those sounds The Google e
with soft, soothing S4 sells for $(
melodies that I end up in- Google's HT(
corporating into dreams. for $599. You
I've overslept a few times get the origin
as a result, for $100 to $2
As for Google's version your wireless
of the HTC One, you don't a two-year ag
get a busy home screen And unless y
filled with news articles Mobile, your
and Facebook status up- won't go dow
dates your phone thinks cause you pa
you want to read. Instead, for the phonE
you get a clean page with In addition
few apps. It's up to you to phones are c
add the ones you want to only with T-M
see and use. and other cai
Both Google phones use GSM cell
feel spare and minimal, ogy, not the C
which is great because it works used b
makes me feel in control. Verizon Wire
If I want to constantly Google editic
know the weather, it's have been gr
easy to add a weather zon customer
widget to the home screen have unlimit
of either phone. But it's plans. Verizo
not forced, lets you stay
The same goes for apps. if you buy a s
I get basic functions such phone, so yoi
as text messaging and the pay the full p
clock and a range of The Googh
Google services such as also ideal for
Gmail and YouTube. If I want the late
want other apps, I can system that C
easily tap the Google Play offer. You'll b
icon to get them. With the date your ph
original S4, Samsung tries Google relea



WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl

start with self-service resources. Any-
one can visit our One-Stop Career Cen-
ter at any time, without an appointment,
and use the resource room, which is
equipped with computers with Internet
access, printers, copiers, phones and fax
machines. In addition, DIYers have ac-
cess to a host of online resources, job-
search tools, assessments and
eLearning courses.
Those who prefer staff-assisted serv-
ices have access to all the self-service
resources, plus receive the following
specialized placement services:
One-on-one career counseling with
trained placement specialists
Assessment and services matching
Job-search assistance and referrals
tailored to your interests and experience
R6sum6 and interview assistance
Support services referrals


nto its own
well as its
nd video
end up with
ys to do the

think it takes
to add the
it to Google's
t actually
vork to hide or
thing you
that is, if you
vith Sam-
TC's versions.
e bad news:
edition of the
649, while
C One goes
can typically
tal models
200 through
s carrier with
agreement.
you're on T-
monthly bill
n just be-
y full price
e elsewhere.
i, both Google
ompatible
Iobile, AT&T
rriers that
lular technol-
CDMA net-
by Sprint and
less. The
on would
eat for Veri-
rs who still
ed data
n no longer
on that plan
subsidized
u'd have to
price anyway
e phones are
* people who
est Android
Google has to
be able to up-
one as
ses new ver-


sions of Android. Nor-
mally, phone makers and
wireless carriers delay
updates by weeks or
months, so you can only
read about those new An-
droid features.
There are a few useful
Samsung and HTC add-ons
that Google does bring to
its versions of the phones.
Google's S4 is compati-
ble with Samsung's S-View
flip cover Using a mag-
netic sensor, the phone de-
tects when the cover is
closed and switches to a
special mode that gives
you the current time and
details about who's calling
through a small window in
the cover You can answer
or reject a call without
flipping over the cover.
Google's HTC One,
meanwhile, shares the
original model's front-
facing speakers, giving
you great sound when
you're watching a movie
or listening to music. Both
models also have cameras
with larger sensor pixels
for better low-light shots.
Our tests show that the
HTC One produces low-
light images with less dis-
tortion than other
Android phones, though
images aren't particularly
crisp because the resolu-
tion is lower
There are a few things I
wish Google would have
brought to its phones and
to Android in general.
In the original S4, the
on-screen keyboard has a
row of numerals to type in.
With the Google S4, you
have to hit a button to get
another screen with nu-
merals, then toggle back


You will also be able to take advan-
tage of job fairs, exclusive hiring events,
workshops and credentialing programs.
To determine which level of service is
right for you, ask yourself whether you
need help creating a job-search plan,
r6sum6 or cover letter, or if you have
challenges you could use help overcom-
ing, or if you could use a hand sharpen-
ing interview and employability skills. If
you answered "yes" to any of those
questions, you will likely benefit from
the Roadmap to Employment, staff-
assisted service.
You can learn more by visiting the Job
Seeker Services section of our website,
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com or by
calling the One-Stop Career Center at
352-637-2223 or 800-434-JOBS.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a Florida certi-
fied workforce professional and com-
munications manager at Workforce
Connection. Contact her at 352-291-9559,
800-434-5627, ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
elm workforce.com.


for the letters. The origi-
nal S4 also has the ability
to run two apps side by
side in a split window.
That's gone in Google's S4.


Meanwhile, the original
HTC One has the ability
to make calls, send texts
and take photos by sliding
icons from the lock


screen. With the Google
version, you have to un-
lock the screen before
getting icons to those
functions.


1*11 Vote & WIN!

July 9th July 26th
Got a car in the contest? Tell everyone you know to vote for
your car starting July 9th. The car and truck with the most votes
wins!
Vote and win an Oil change from George's Wholesale
Tire, a 13 week subscription and $50 classified ad credit
to the Citrus County Chronicle. Register & Vote Nowl

You Could Win Great Prizes!

ENTER NOW!

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also true, but I had a bad day
And they said that I was fired. I
Bruce feel that I quit because I didn't
go back after the suspension.
Williams The result of all of this is that
every time I fill out a job appli-
cation and they call these peo-
SMART ple, I don't get the job. What
can I do? I would like to stop
MONEY them from lying about me.
--R.O., via email
DEAR RO.: I hate to be the
500,000 CD. I bearer of bad tidings, but the
percent over company hasn't said anything
ng me. It untrue. You said you didn't go
ie 3 percent back after the suspension. If
n paying a you didn't come back to me, I
8 percent or would have fired you, too.
There is little you can do
this prop- about the record that you com-
years. Please piled. It is weak, and that's the
way it is. I would suggest that
L.P, via email on each job application, you ex-
t I suggested plain to your potential em-
'e investing ployer that you had some
real estate, differences of opinion at your
mortgage, previous job and as a conse-
do. My prob- quence, you were suspended
e a $500,000 and then fired. I wouldn't sug-
)u almost no arcoat it. It's not going to be a
ve preferred red hot explanation, but it's
gage for true, and truthfulness never
ent and then hurts.
ash and in- DEAR BRUCE: With all the
n of 6 per- events of Sept 11,1 I would have
f you are thought that the airlines would
t on $500,000, be literally giving away seats
s per year, or just to get people back in the
irs. air. I see ads in the newspapers
understand from travel agencies claiming
e to flip the that the prices are very cheap,
ely Borrow- but when it's all said and done,
he purchase with all the extra fees, every
having flight I have wanted to go on is
a tragedy more expensive than it was
After work- before.
for eight T.W, via email
r not-so-good DEAR T.W: Even unspeak-
as sus- able acts, such as the events of
felt wasn't Sept. 11, have only a relatively
finding out small effect on travel. That's
id references the reality.
You read that it is cheap to fly
11 and say he because it is. It's not as inex-
e for employ- pensive as it might have been
at I was late some time ago, but it's still a
)f times, bargain. Airlines are able to
that I was pack the planes these days. It's
e of some- an inconvenience for patrons in
which is the middle seats, but from the


D2 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


airlines' point of view, it's bet-
ter to operate fewer airplanes
and have them fly at near full
capacity.
DEAR BRUCE: In response
to an earlier letter about car in-
surance, anybody who is driv-
ing a $3,000 car probably
cannot afford to replace it. Al-
though the insurance compa-
nies will try to talk you out of
carrying collision on these cars,
the fact is that when somebody
hits your kid's car, it's probably
going to be totaled.
The opposing insurance com-
pany will, at minimum, say the
accident was partly your
driver's fault and knock a few
hundred off of the settlement
price, leaving you with the op-
tion of eating it or trying to go
to small claims court and losing
some unknown days of wages to
do that. If you talk to your own
insurance company, they will
regretfully inform you that
since you don't have collision
on the car, they can't help you.
This happened to me twice
with my kids. I finally got smart
and kept high-deductible colli-
sion coverage on every vehicle,
and the two other accidents
that totaled the vehicles were
paid out at Blue Book value
with no questions asked.
EO., Topeka, Kan.
DEAR EQO.: I don't agree with
anything you had to say I con-
tinue to point out that collision
insurance on $3,000 cars is rela-
tively expensive.
If you feel that you would
have a problem with replacing
the car, I have no major objec-
tion to carrying the insurance,
as long as you recognize that
you are paying a great deal
more on a percentage basis to
insure a $3,000 car than a
$30,000 car

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
ofmail, personal replies cannot
be provided.







SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Citrus County School Board and Chamber of

Commerce welcome education commissioner


T he Citrus County School
Board and the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce are sponsoring a pres-
entation by the Florida
Commissioner of Education,
Dr. Tony Bennett, to be held at
the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club on Aug. 28. Dr.
Bennett has dedicated his life
to teaching students, and his


nearly 30-year career began as
a high school teacher and bas-
ketball coach in Indiana.
Since then, he quickly ad-
vanced to superintendent of
public instruction in 2009,
and was named Government
Leader of the Year in 2011 be-
fore assuming his current post
as commissioner of education
here in Florida.


Dr. Bennett will be dis-
cussing subject matters in-
cluding the new Common
Core Standards that were
adopted by the state of Florida
in 2010, and are scheduled for
full implementation in the
2014-2015 school year.
The public is invited to at-
tend this presentation. Reser-
vations are $18 in advance


and $20 at the door. Seating
is limited, so please RSVP. To
make a reservation, visit the
Chamber Events section of the
Chamber of Commerce web-
site at www.citruscounty
chamber.com, or call the
Chamber at 352-795-3149.
Seats are expected to go
quickly, so early registration is
recommended.


AJ's Cafe celebrates ribbon-cutting


Pictured are AJ's Caf6's management and staff: AJ, AJ III, Suzie, Pat, Denice, Angela, Pam and Meghan. Joining Chamber President/CEO
Josh Wooten are: Chamber Ambassadors Kelly Paul, Wollinka-Wikle; Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives; Jeanne Green, Inside Citrus; Sarah
Fitts, First International Title; Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee; Dan Pushee; George Bendsten, Insurance by George; Lisa Nash, F.D.S. Disposal;
Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Rhonda Lestinksy, Nature Coast Bank; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; and Terry Jolly, Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce.

A 's Cafe is a family-run business with 40-plus years experience in homestyle
breakfast and lunch. Open daily from 5:3o a.m. until 3 p.m. and Sunday until
A J 2 p.m. They pride themselves on great service, quality and the freshness of
their entrees. Parties of eight or more need a reservation. AJ's Caf6 can be found at 216 N.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34429. Call 352-794-3899 to learn more about their restaurant.


Welcome new June

Chamber members
These businesses chose to invest in Citrus County
with a membership in the Chamber, and we thank
them. We hope you will support these new members
by visiting them and considering using their services.
The Chamber of Commerce and Economic Devel-
opment Council encourage you to Shop Citrus First!


Edward Russell
Johnston, Inc.
531 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-2200
www.erj.net
First Presbyterian Church
1501 S.E.U.S. 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-2259
www.fpccrflorida.org
Greystone Home
Healthcare
1400 U.S. 441 North
Suite 553
The Villages, FL 32159
352-205-8514
www.greystonehcm.com


Leland Management, Inc.
2720 W. Woodview Lane
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-364-4620
www.lelandmanagement.com
Realty Connect
PO Box 1503
Inverness, FL 34451
352-341-2588
www.realtyconnect.me
Smart Holmes, Inc.
9745 W. Laurel Oak Lane
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-229-4088
www.smartholmes.com
DeEttaAtkins
Crystal River, FL 34428


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
Doris Rowthorn
Pizza Hut
Debbie Fax
New England Cafe


... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Congratulations to Chamber Director
Dudley Calfee of Ferris Farms!
Dudley was recently recognized by Commissioner of
Agriculture Adam Putnam with the Florida Agriculture-
L Environmental Leadership Award.



Welcome to the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce Business Expo!


CmRs COU rNTY

September 7th
2013
County
Fairgrounds
Auditorium


. 9am-3pm
Free to the
Public.
4 *--p. Bring the
U :. "-,a, ,Family!


Not your normal Business Expo..I
In addition to a great chance to spend some time with our local businesses learning about
the products and services they provide, we are offering a variety of other fun things to do to
make it a great time for the whole family. While you're talking to the business leaders in
our community, your kids can spend time In the play area, or making something In the
Home-Depot Project area. Maybe add a new four-footed member to the family at the Pet
Adoption area sponsored by the Citrus County Animal Services. If you're hungry or thirsty
we'll have fresh-gilled food cooking, courtesy of Leon McClellan of M&B Dairyl Oh yeah, a
lucky visitor to our Expo Is going to get a shot at bringing home some cash by stepping Into
our fabulous money machine. Save the Date-We'll see you at the Expol







Presented by the Chamber of Commerce and Bally Electrical Contractingi
Platinum Sponsors Robert Bolsseneault Oncology Institute and
The Plantation at Crystal River
For more information contact J at the Otm Couty Chmber of Commerce ffcitti ncWuntydmn~amr.com) or 353-7S-3149


Tony
Bennett
education
commissioner


Member

news

Hagar Group
attends SIS
conference
Brandel Eldridge, vice
president, and Linda Mc-
Neal, private wealth man-
ager with The Hagar Group,
attended the Symetra In-
vestment Services National
Education Conference in
Bellevue, Wash. This three-
day, intensive training covered
subjects of National interest
to include the role of Social
Security in retirement plan-
ning, economic forecasting,
building better portfolios as
well as top-level cyclical and
secular outlooks. Eldridge and
McNeal will bring this infor-
mation back to their practices
to better serve their clients.

Klippert, Miller
join Hagar Group
Greg Hagar is proud to
announce that Deborah
Klippert has joined the
Hagar Group as a personal
lines customer service repre-
sentative. Deborah moved
to the Tampa area in 2000.
She has worked in the insur-
ance industry for 16 years, 15
as a licensed agent. Seeking
the small-town feel she was
used to, Deborah and her
husband moved to Inverness
in 2012. Deborah is proud to
be a member of the Hagar
Group team in the personal
lines department.
Mark Miller retired from
the Air Force after 22 years of
service. While in the Air Force,
he was a KC-135 boom oper-
ator. While stationed in Eng-
land, he received the only
"Stripes for Exceptional Per-
formers" promotion for all of
Europe. Mark's last assign-
ment was as chief of short
range scheduling at MacDill
Air Force base. After retiring
from the military, Mark started
working in the insurance in-
dustry. He went to work for
USAAas apersonallines agent.
Mark continued to work for
USAA until relocating to Cit-
rus County. Mark is now a
proud member of The Hagar
Group team in the personal
lines department.
Established in 1929, The
Hagar Group is the area's
oldest and largest continuous
insurance agency. With of-
fices in Inverness and Crys-
tal river, We offer a full range
of homeowners, auto and
business insurance products.




Upcoming
Chamber
events
Aug. 8 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Suncoast Business Masters
Aug. 9 Chamber
Luncheon, 11 a.m. at Cit-
rus Hills, Healthcare He-
roes Awards Ceremony
Aug. 28 Chamber and
School Board Luncheon,
11:30 a.m., presenting the
commissioner of educa-
tion, at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club
Aug. 22 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Life Care Center/Comfort
Keepers
Sept. 7 Chamber Busi-
ness Expo, 9 a.m. to 3
pm. at the Citrus County
Auditorium.
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com.




I U



Ei1HT4- IF








Iowa top court: Dentist's firing of attractive aide is legal


Associated Press
IOWA CITY, Iowa -A dentist
acted legally when he fired an
assistant because he had grown
too attracted to her worried he
would try to start an extramarital
affair, the Iowa Supreme Court
reaffirmed Friday in its second
crack at the controversial case.
Coming to the same outcome
as it did in December, but clari-
fying its rationale, the court
found that bosses can fire em-
ployees that they and their


spouses see as threats to their
marriages. The court said such
firings do not count as sex dis-
crimination because they're mo-
tivated by feelings, not gender
The ruling upholds the dis-
missal of a discrimination law-
suit filed by Melissa Nelson
against James Knight. The Fort
Dodge dentist fired the 33-year-
old Nelson two decades his
junior after his wife learned
of text messages between the
two. The married mother of two
had worked for Knight for 10


years, and he consid- a decade.
ered her his best In December, the jus-
assistant. tices ruled the key issue
Nelson's attorney was "whether an em-
asked the court to re- ployee who has not en-
consider its December gaged in flirtatious
decision, calling it a conduct may be lawfully
blow for gender equity. terminated simply be-
The all-male court took Melissa cause the boss views the
the unusual step last Nelson employee as an irre-
month of withdrawing longtime sistible attraction." Jus-
its opinion after na- assistant. tice Edward Mansfield
tional publicity and removed that language
criticism, granting a motion to Friday and emphasized the rul-
reconsider for the fifth time in ing's limited scope, noting that


Nelson did not bring a sexual
harassment claim.
He said that firing workers
because of gender-specific char-
acteristics such as their looks
can violate their civil rights, but
that the facts in Nelson's case
didn't support such a claim.
The firing came at the re-
quest of Knight's wife, who was
concerned about the relation-
ship between Knight and Nel-
son. The Knights' pastor agreed
with the termination and was
present when it happened.


STOCKS
Continued from Page Dl

The outlook for Dis-
cover and MasterCard is
also good, particularly as
consumer confidence im-
proves. The companies'
biggest challenge remains
staying competitive in a
crowded field, he says.
While Brown expects
Amazon to continue to
dominate its market, he
sees a big risk in buying
the stock now.
"It's a fine company, but
I would want to enter it in
a pullback a big pull-
back," Brown says. "It has,
by far, the most downside."
Here's a brief summary
of each stock:
UnitedHealth Group
Inc.
The stock of the nation's
largest health insurer has
climbed more than 25 per-
cent this year and hit an
all-time high of $68.75 in
trading on Wednesday, ac-
cording to FactSet.
Like other health insur-
ers, UnitedHealth stands
to benefit from the federal


health care overhaul. The
company will be able to
participate in state-based
health insurance ex-
changes designed to ex-
pand coverage to millions
of uninsured Americans.
The company is also the
largest provider of
Medicare Advantage
plans, which are privately
run versions of the gov-
ernment's Medicare pro-
gram for the elderly and
disabled people.
Financial analysts, on
average, expect the stock
to move higher. Their con-
sensus target price is
$71.47, according to
FactSet.
On average, the stock
has a "Buy" rating from
analysts polled by Fact-
Set.
Amazon.com Inc.
Amazon's stock price is
up about 23 percent this
year and touched an all-
time high of $307.55 in
trading on Friday
Sales for the world's
biggest online retailer
have been growing as
Americans' confidence in
the economy improves and
they shift to online shop-


ping. A key rival, Barnes &
Noble Inc., is struggling
with weaker sales and big
losses driven by its Nook e-
reader, a competitor to
Amazon's Kindle.
Analysts see Amazon
shares moving higher
still. The average target
price on the stock is
$316.79.
Even so, some invest-
ment experts sense a
bubble.
Brown has a "Sell" rat-
ing on the stock, which he
believes is overpriced. He
points to Amazon's "for-
ward" price-earnings ratio,
which compares a stock's
price to projected earnings
over the next 12 months.
Not all agree. Amazon has
an average analyst rating
of "Overweight," which in-
dicates the average broker
rating falls between "Hold"
and "Buy"
On that basis, Brown
says investors buying
Amazon's stock now are
paying 100 times future
earnings.
Starbucks Corp.
Starbucks' stock is up
30 percent this year and
reached an all-time high


of $69.72 in trading on Fri-
day That's barely above
the consensus target price
of $69.62, according to
FactSet.
The coffee chain, with
more than 18,000 stores
around the world, has de-
livered strong growth in
the Americas and Asia,
where it has opened more
shops. Last year it intro-
duced a single-serve cof-
fee machine and
branched out beyond cof-
fee by acquiring tea shops
and bakery chains, and a
bottled juice company
But it faces increased
competition from fast-food
chains such as McDon-
ald's, which have ex-
panded their coffee
offerings. On average, the
analyst rating on the stock
falls between "Buy" and
"Hold."
MasterCard Inc.
The stock is up 22 per-
cent this year and
reached an all-time high
of $602.74 in trading on
Monday
The credit and debit
card company, which
makes money from pro-
cessing charge card trans-


actions, thrives when con-
sumers are in a spending
mood.
MasterCard has been
focusing on developing
countries, where most
transactions are still done
in cash. As shoppers there
shift from paper money to
plastic, MasterCard can
tap into that growth.
A consensus price tar-
get of $614.61 suggests that
financial analysts see fur-
ther growth ahead for the
stock. But those surveyed
by FactSet are split be-
tween "Buy" and "Hold."
Visa Inc.
Visa's stock is up about
26 percent this year and
reached an all-time high
of $192.77 in trading on
Monday Visa remains the
industry heavyweight. It
has also taken steps to
make its payment-pro-
cessing business more ac-
cessible to mobile-device
users.
"Visa has done an
amazing job, really, of
capturing revenue and
new cardholders and
turning it into earnings,"
says Brown.
Analysts see the stock


advancing. Its consensus
target price is $197.12. An-
alysts polled by FactSet
are divided between rec-
ommending a "Buy" and a
"Hold."
Discover Financial
Services
Discover's stock is up
32 percent this year. It
rose to an all-time high of
$50.92 in trading on Fri-
day below the consen-
sus target price of $52.73.
Beyond its namesake
credit card, Discover has
moved into auto, personal
and student loans, as well
as home equity loans.
The Fed's signal last
month that it could begin
tapering its bond-buying
program, which has
helped keep interest rates
low, is potentially good
news for Discover and
other credit card issuers.
As interest rates rise, they
typically translate into
more revenue for card is-
suers. That's something
investors are anticipating,
says Dickson.
On average, the stock
has a "Buy" rating from
analysts polled by
FactSet.


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John Massingill

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For solutions to all your pest problems, call today!
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS
Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River


Cail.
I,5-6661


When mopping isn't enough call...

2 Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers* Floors* Lanais
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* Licensed & Insured


D4 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F7afBfrfe





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966






Classifieds Classifieds

In Print


and


SOnline


All


The Tint e


2/2 with big lanai. De-
tached garage. Very
nice area. Financed
by owner. $5000 dn,
$500/mo352-676-3155




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

INVERNESS
Immaculate, former
model, 3/2/2, fenced
bk yd, $795 mthly, 1st,
last,sec. 352-400-1501

JC PENNY CLOSING
Selling Store Fixtures,
Office Furniture,
and Mannequins
Starts 7-12-13
Crystal River MALL




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




**FREE**
Mixed breed adult male,
neutered dog. Brown
with white markings,
about 65 pounds,
healthy and needs
someone to spend time
with him. 352-422-2731
leave message.
1 healthy Quarter Horse
Mare age 8, and 1
Thoroughbred Mare age
15. Green broke. Free
to good home. Must go
together. Recently wid-
owed and unable to
care for them.
(352) 503-2347
2 Bunnies, 1 solid white
with red eyes, male
(med sz) 1 dwarf solid
black, male, 1 domi-
nique rooster
(352) 563-0937
2 free bantam roosters
352-637-9539 leave
msg.
2 Kittens
1 male, 1 female
yellow in color
Free to good home
Call Mike at
(352) 634-4237
8 Free Puppies
Lab/German Shep-
herd Mix
Very Cute
Call (352) 419-7393
Double Wide Trailer,
many good parts. Call
for more information.
(352) 586-2098
FREE Canning Jars
about 7 1/2 boxes, Ig
and quart sizes
(352) 746-1915
FREE KITTENS
11 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free to Good Home
Puppy, Lab/German
Shepherd Mix, Male,
10 months
(352) 503-2270
Grinnell Bros. Spinet
Piano,made in Detroit
Mich,, VG Cond.
(352) 447-4368
Pit Lab Mix
Brown Brindle, female,
18 mths, spade, utd on
shot, very sweet, smart,
needs young family with
FENCED YARD great
with children and other
dogs. Moving can't
keep (352) 794-6254




$500. REWARD
For the Person or
Location of the Cooler
(352) 212-0315
Black/White Shihtzu
wearing a blue collar
w/red tag, lost in the
vicinity of 486 near the
Dollar General.
please call
(352) 464-0779
FEMALE CAT- Tuxedo
blk & white, blk collar
Missy Meaner comes
to her name. Lost 7/2
Starburst/Oaklawn
area of Homosassa
(352) 613-1052 or
628-7353
Lost Female bulldog.
Citrus Springs area
around Country Club
and Deltona. She is all
white with black freck-
les, Approx. 451bs,
months old. Her collar
was not on her at the
time. We miss her terri-
ble. If you have any in-
formation please con-
tact Stephanie at
352-227-8626


Handheld GPS
Kingsbay, Crystal River
(352) 422-6838
Lost Mini Pincher,
Female, Pregnant
Cardinal Area
Homosassa
Reward
352-220-0240
MISSING CAT Female
striped tabby with white
boots wearing blue col-
lar near Woodthrush in
Leisure Acres. "Skittles"
is small, young, micro-
chipped friendly indoor
cat and her canine
buddy misses her
greatly. Please call if
you see or find her.
352-621-0175
Thank you.
Shih Tzu, Black and
White, 7yr old female
has collier with medal-
lion Service Animal .
She is my helper please
help me find her
(352) 419-8483
(352)-212-4608
UPDATE
Large Anatolian
Shepherd Male, cream,
BIk ears & nose,
chipped,100lbs lost on
4/26/13 in Floral City,
S.Turner Ave/ Stage-
Coach rd. Last Seen on
7/3/13 off of East
spanish trail, Floral
City REWARD
OFFERED
(352) 220-2540
White short-hair cat
missing in Emerald
Oaks area C.R.
352423-0495




Female Dog, Dober-
man looking. Black w/
brown face. Has tags.
Donovan Ave, Crystal
River.(352) 422-6999




Advertise in newspa-
pers across Florida -
One phone call puts
your ad in 117
newspapers. Reach
millions of
Floridians for one low
cost by calling
866.742.1373 or visit
www.AdNetworks
Floridacom


Dunnel J9Io

Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS


WvvrLCuIVi
Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922

Howard's Flea
Market
is Proud to announce
that July 13 & 14 we
are having an
RV Show and
Swap Meet
Featuring Arrow RV
Center. Are you
looking for parts..or
want to sell your
goods Please call or
just come on in.
352-628-4656
SPROUTS
Children's Boutique
Opening Monday July
15th 2013,gently use
children's items. Lo-
cated Across from CR
Middle school,
behind fancy pets
563-kids(563-5437)











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onyi $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


P/T Receptionist

Experienced. For
busy physicians
office. Apply at:
PO Box 207
Crystal Riv. Fl. 34423


RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time
and part-time
employees, with
opening in all shifts.

HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF





AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

Human
Resource Rep

Therapy
Management
Corporation,
a company com-
mitted to service
excellent is currently
looking for a Human
Resources Rep in
Homosassa, FL.
3+ years HR
experience, ADP
preferred. Please
send resume to:
humanresources
@therapymgmt.com
or fax resume to
352.382.8024.





Bartenders
Servers

World of Beer the
Villages, Hiring Event
July 19th -20th 9a-2p
Applications and Inter-
views 2751 W. Torch
Lake Dr, The Villages
407-982-0338





Aluminum
Installer

No experience
necessary for the
right person.
(352) 628-7519

AUTO
COLLISION
TECH-Wreck
Man

352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm


Auto Repair
Mechanic

w/computer
diagnostic exp.
Full Time w/benefits
call 352-447-3174

DIRECT
TECHS

4 spots open. Must
pass bckgd, drug
DMV check. Must
have Truck, SUV or
Van. Piece work $1 k
to $2k/wk. 80 miles
radius. 352-201-7219
or 407-738-9463

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

EARNING BETTER
PAY IS ONE STEP
AWAY!

Averitt offers
Experienced CDL
-A Drivers
Excellent Benefits
and Weekly
Hometime.
888-362-8608,
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Apply
online at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer


P/T Bus Drivers
CDL Class B,
w/P endorsement.
HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*


PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at:
4079 S. Ohio Ave,
Homosassa

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH

Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

TRUCK DRIVERS

E.M.T. Transportation
is taking applicants
for part time, Class A
and B drivers.
Starting wage is
$18.61 per hour plus
$4.46 per hour in
benefits. Must live
within 5 miles of
Hernando/Lecanto
Florida area. If
interested fax
7 year Motor
Vehicle Report to
904-354-0204 with
your phone number
and you will be
contacted.




FLORAL
DESIGNER

Exp. ONLY, P/T Hrs.
352-726-9666








































Office Help

with light labor for
Window Treatment
store. Scheduling,
customer service,
some Exp. Preferred
apply @1657 W
Gulf to Lk, Lecanto

Ride Right LLC
HIRING
Part-Time
Bus Drivers

Applicants must hold
a current Florida
Commercial Drivers
License (CDL)
Class A or B License
with a P Endorsement
and Air Brakes. CDL
training is not
provided. Applicants
must apply in person.
Ride Right/Sumter
County Transit
1525 Industrial Drive
Wildwood, Fl 34785




Seeking
Customer
Service Rep

29 Hours per week
Strong Customer
Service
Solid Computer Skills
Early Morning and
Weekend Hours
Required

Email resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or
Apply in person:
Chronicle, 1624N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River, FL
Drug Screen
required for Final
Applicant.
EOE


CHRONICLE

Seeking
PT Telemarketer

Proven Sales Skills
Strong Customer
Service
Base plus Comm.
Qualified
Applicants Only.
Email resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
Drug Screen
required for final
Applicant.
EOE


SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHRONiLE


Thrift Store
Manager

Must have retail
experience Operation
Management with all
aspects of a
non-profit org.
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sippperd@
bellsouth.net

Tree Service
Needs
Exp. Climber &
Grounds Person
with Valid Drivers
Lic. (352) 489-9344










SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
AUGUST 12, 2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
w-AUGUST 12, 2013

MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING










SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS
AUGUST 12, 2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
*AUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty









(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


r --- cA qLOi
USED CARROT
FOR SALE or LEASE
9 Well Established |
909 NE 5th St (44)
(352) 461-4518





HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR
LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
** (352) 464-2514 **
1305 Hwy 486




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13,995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com

INVERNESS SHEDS
JULY STOCK SALE!
10X14, $2400.
10X16, $2600.
12X12, $2600.
12X20, $3500.
FREE
Delivery & Set up
FREE
Engineer Plans
3399 E Gulf to Lk Hw
Inv. (352)726-0046




1964-1965 NYS
WORLD'S FAIR camera
& candy dish $100.00
352-527-1399




I


11111111
Tell that special
person
"Hapy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onry $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111I




3 TON AC Unit
for Doublewide
Mobile Home
$750.
(352) 637-3482
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER whirlpool white
75.00 homosassa
works great
352-476-9019
DRYER Whirlpool white
looks good works per-
fect $100 90 day war-
ranty 352-503-7210


IL HN I.


I I EUE/DRUG FREEWO RKurPLAE1


GE CLOTHES
WASHER
white, electric, works
good, $100.00
352-513-4473
Generator
Heavy Duty, Generac
8,550 surge watts,
never used
$350. final
(352) 382-3420
HOTPOINT ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 White.
Older model. Works
great. 30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504
KENMORE UPRIGHT
FREEZER $100 White.
Works great. 30 day
warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
RCA ELECTRIC
DRYER $80 Almond
color. Older model. 30
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
Refrigerator
bottom freeze 20.5 cu,
w/ice maker almond
good condition, $190
(352) 219-0805
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SOLD
Matag Glass Top
Range with 5 burners,
includes warming cen-
ter, white, self cleaning,
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352-263-7398
Whirlpool Cabrio
Washer, glass top 4.6
white, top of the line,
must see, call for details
$135 (352) 344-3485



JC PENNY CLOSING
Selling Store Fixtures,
Office Furniture,
and Mannequins
Starts 7-12-13
Crystal River MALL



Air Compressor
2HP, Craftsman 26gal
vertical tank, like new
$175 (352) 246-3500



DUAL CASSETTE
PLAYER Pioneer, great
shape,($10)
352-613-7493
SHARP RECEIVER
Bookshelf AM/FM
Cassette 30W Speakers
like new $35 Dunnellon
352-465-8495
TELEVISION
60" SONY Flat Screen
HD, 1080R $400
(352) 249-1124



SINK bathroom, white
porcaline, 19"x16",
new,($10)
352-613-7493
TUB SHOWER DOORS
Like NEW
White Frame
Designer Frosted
Glass $150.00
352 746-7741


Used Entry Metal
Doors with new
frames, 2 sizes,
good cond. $65 ea,
352 410-6823 Home
352-484-9066 cell




Dell Computer
w/15' monitor, printer,
keyboard, mouse and
speakers, very good
condition $175
352-344-5311
DELL OPTIPLEX GX w/
monitor, keyboard,
mouse, speakers, ca-
mara $100.00 obo
352-601-7816
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




ADARONDACK
CHAIRS 5 of them-red
white & blue. Like new
$10 each. Exercise
trampoline-$15.
352-613-2232
White Concrete Table
with blue tile inserts and
umbrella with 3 match-
ing benches $350
(352) 527-1453
White Patio Furniture
Table 72" Long w/6 Ig.
chairs. Excellent Cond.
Top of the line! $225.
(352) 489-0818




1 TV STAND in great
shape with drawer can
text picture $50.00 call
or text 352-746-0401
1 WHITE DRESSER in
great shape,
can text picture, $95
call or text 746-0401
1 WHITE WOOD
FRAMED MIRROR wall
hanger can text picture
call or text $50
352-746-0401
Bedroom Set White
Wicker 7 pcs full
with new mattress &
boxspring, dresser &
tables with glass tops
$800. (352) 341-0366.
Brown Swivel
Rocker/Recliner
good cond. $300.
Green Rocker/Recliner
$150. (352) 527-9706
CEILING FAN-
KITCHEN/PORCH Me-
tallic look.Matches stain-
less steel. Short blades.
35.00 obo 233-3227
Coffee table and 2 end
tables, light wood, glass
tops, $65 OBO
(352) 341-5020
(352) 476-4340
COFFEE TABLE
WOOD good condition
52"L x 28"W Deal at
$35. In Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
Dinning Room Table
with 6 chairs, glass top
11/2 yr old $325 OBO
(352) 270-8540 Leave
Message
DRESSER solid wood
chestnut 5 drawers
dovetailing. Older good
condition $50.
352-270-3909


FOLDING TABLE
Folds in half with car-
rying handle. Great
condition. 15.00
352-233-3227
FUTON BED FRAME
White pipe style, exc.
condition $50.00 OBO
call 513-4473.
HARDWOOD
DRESSER 6 drawers,
beige color, solid
build, great condition.
90.00 obo 233-3227
~& Hiah End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
HOME OFFICE DESK
AND CHAIR Good con-
dition. Asking 40.00
for both. 352-233-3227
Maple Hutch $150,
Brass bed head, foot
with rails, $200
(412) 767-4584
MATTRESS
King, Simmons Beauty
Rest Pillow Top, 1 yr
old $300 obo
Cash/Carry
(352) 860-2385
New Recliner,
Electric, Tan,
Mircrofiber $300.
New Love Seat,
tan, microfiber $300
(352) 344-4852
One Glass & Chrome
Coffee Table with
Two Matching End
Tables, Two Lamps,
SOLD AS A SET
asking $350.
(352) 400-9070
OVERSIZED
RECLINER Dark
burgundy velour.
$25.00 352-513-5482
Queen Bedroom Set
off white,good cond.,
incl. matt, frame, head-
board, dresser, night
stand $450, Dinnet set
4 chairs w/wheels, tan
$450 352-628-4254
CAN DELIVER
Queen Size
Sofa Sleeper
Tropical Print,
great cond. $200.
(352) 257-1794
Round Wooden Table
Like New!, w/formica top
& 4 beige chairs
$450. (352) 527-9706
SLEIGH BED
Queen size, legacy
vintage. Mahogany
w/ cherry finish. New
condition. $275
(352) 382-4779
Solid Oak Dinning Set
table, chairs, & hutch
beveled glass, lighted
$600 (Crystal River)
(989)-627-2719
CAN DELIVER
Temperpedic
Adjustable Ergo 6ft,
6inch Twin Bed.
$550 obo
352-270-1515,
352-270-1516, cell
Wall Unit, whitewash
oak, w/lights $100.
Two Used Stainless
Sinks $10. ea.
(954) 295-3055
White Wicker Patio
Furniture, love seat, cof-
fee table, 2 chairs, incl
cushions. $65 628-4254
CAN DELIVER
Wooden Rocking
Chair,
Ivory, with cushions
excel. cond. $65.
(352) 564-9440


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY,JULY 14, 2013 D5





D6 SUNDAY,JULY 14, 2013


.
are'Lawn
Supplies I


AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
DR TRIMMER MOWER
$125, Push Mower, yard
machine 4 hp 22" cut
$75 (352) 507-1490
Garden Tractor, Murry
Heavy Duty 18.5 HP
V-Twin 46 inch cut
$500, Sarlo Comm.
Push Mower high wheel,
belt run 6.75 HP 24 inch
cut $150 352- 507-1490
Husqvarna self pro-
pelled lawn mower
with Honda engine.
Bag or mulch. New in
2013 $275.00 Phone
(352)503-9599
JOHN DEER
L-130, lawn & garden
tractor, 23 hp, kohler
v-twin, 170 hrs, 48"
deck, leaf bagger and
trailer $1200
(352) 628-1722
LAWN TRACTOR
Husqvama, 23 HP,
48 in cut, 108 hours,
like new. Hudrostatic
Transmission. $950
(352) 726-8821
LAWN-SWEEPER
Craftsman 26",
push-type, great
shape,($30)
352-613-7493
MOWER
Sulkey, dual wheels,
new batt w/ 2yr warr.
and 1 rototiller. $900
OBO 352-795-2454 or
352-726-8298
Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944




Sago Palms
1 small, 22" H. $18.
1 med. 43" H $25. 1 Lg
53"H $35. You dig up
(352) 513-4311




INVERNESS
Sat 7/13, 7a to 5p
Sun 7/14, 8a to 2p
Misc. Household
Items
Lots of Good Stuff!!!
2161 S Ambridge Pt




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Auto Filters
fuel 33219/18,
33343,1ube 51791-
51068, 51647, 42784
Air 46363 637-2718


Ll


40 to 40 x 40 $25.00
352-527-0324
CHILDREN'S IRON
HEADBOARD Brand
New Metal Headboard,
$10 (352)465-1616
Creative Memory
Scrap Book Kit $125.
Vertical Knee
raise/chin dip exc.
equip. $125.
(954) 295-3055
Cress Kiln
ceramics, molds
& misc. supplies
$350.
(954) 295-3055
HAND TRUCK FOR
BARREL'S hand truck
for transporting barrels
352-637-2718
LED ZEPPELIN
boxset,complete,
10 c/d,case & book,
like new,($30)
352-613-7493
MATTRESS
new queen size $60
Gazelle Ex Mach. w/
video $70. no calls b-4
1 lam( 352) 628-4766
MIXER Waring stand
mixer, 12 speed,+ re-
movable hand
mixer,never used,($10)
352-613-7493
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Good condition, green/
black/white color, adult
size medium, both sex,
$30 (352)465-1616
Mowen Kit Faucet
Hot/Cold no sprayer
almost new $25, Solid
Oak wood sm desk 4
side drawers, 1 top
middle drawer, $50
(352) 419-5124
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok
condition, $50
(352)465-1616
SCRAPBOOK starting
equipment, numerous
items, good shape, ($5)
352-613-7493
SOLD
GENERATOR
3,550 Watt
Briggs & Straton Eng.
Model 1924,
Never used
VACUUM SEALER
FoodSaver2,+4 rolls of
bags, like new, ($15)
352-613-7493
WEATHER STRIPPING
FOR TRUCK weather
stripping for Nissan die-
sel3#79710-1TOOOO
352-637-2718
Western Paperback
Book Collection of
various authors, such
as Luke Short, Frank
O'Rourke, Giles Lutz, &
More $100 takes all
Cash or money order
(352) 382-0163



WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Manually Load folding
chair to vehicle hitch
$100. Dunnellon
352-465-8495


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR SMALL
BODYWI/UNER,STRAP&M
ORE READY TO
PLAY $75
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
TRAVEL GUITAR
WITH UPGRADED
ELECTRICS&GIGBAG
$80 352-601-6625
CASIO LD-50
ELECTRONIC DRUMS
W/STICKS,CORD &
INSTRUCTIONS $45
352-601-6625
Guitar instruction, set
up, repair. Coaching
techniques. 40+ yrs
Exp. (352)489-7309
Lowrev Paaeant
Organ. 2 keyboards
w/bench, 48" wide
Exc. Condition $300.
obo(352) 746-5421
Mandolin Collection
Most Hand Crafted
All Playable, Also
Wood Tennis Racquets
All in Great Shape
(352) 746-4063
Tenor
Saxophone
$400.
(352) 257-3542




PAINT
SPRAYER/RYOBI
Ryobi 1/2 hp paint sta-
tion tool used once
352-637-2718
VACUUM CLEANERS
Electrolux Pronto 2-in-1
and Rexair Rainbow
Cleaning System with
Power Nozzle. Both
complete, in excellent
condition and ready to
use. $250 for both. Tele-
phone (352)527 0868




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
older model works fine
doesn't fold up only
60.00 352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL
Weslo-Momentum 620
excellent condition. $60
Call (352)344-3112
EXERCISE BIKE
Nordic Track easy
entry. Audio Rider
R400/Inter Play music
port. w/ mat. Like New
$99 (352) 637-3059
PILATES MACHINE
$90.00
352.270.7420
PILATES
yoga tapes & c/d's,
good shape, ($5)
352-613-7493


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


CLASSIFIED




ADULT TRICYCLE
Reasonably pnced
352-382-4995


2 Trek Mountain
Bikes $50 both
(352) 637-3482
BOWLING BALL
women's Ebonite Maxim
black, case, like
new($20) 352-613-7493
CLUB CAR
Late Model, exec cond,
good tires, good battery,
turn signles, full
enclosure $1500
(352) 527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
FIRE ARMS
Training Classes, 3
levels: 2 hrs basic class
& meets states Req. for
CWP lic. $40, 4 hr Inter-
mediate class $80 pre
requisite for the ad-
vance class$120, done
by certified law enforce-
ment instructor Call for
details352-419-4800
GOLF DRIVER
TourEdge Exotics XLD
MRH Senior EXC
$50.HC inc. Dunnellon
352-465-8495
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516



JEWELRY ARMOIRE
$75.00
352-270-7420
NECKLACE BikerGirls
2-chain H/D,S/S, en-
gravable heart neck-
lace, new, 1/2 prce($60)
352-613-7493


Sell r Swa


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Wanted: (Men's items)
rods, reels, tackle,
tools, oil, grease,
knives, swords, hunt-
ing eq, antiques, col-
lectibles & war items
352-613-2944






TOTE TANK NEW
22 gal. Mfr. H&H. 4
wheels. Tow handle.
Saves trip to dump
station. $100
352-897-4195








Iunn llon
D r i 1 T P T


Dunnellon

Dentistry

would like to

welcome

Dr Nahir

Rosado DDS

to our prac-

tice.


Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


P L E X U S




Ambassador

Samantha

Haven
Independent
Plexus Slim
Weight Loss I love
helping people get
healthy and motivated.
I'm so THANKFUL
that I was showed this
by a Dear friend:)
The products have
changed my LIFE
If you would like more
information call me or
send me a text at
352-536-4025
Visit my web site at
www.plexusslim.
com/haven
Can't wait to hear
from you:)


BEELA
Beela, 2-3 y.o. Bor-
der Collie/ Lab Re-
triever mix, surren-
dered because
owners could not
afford. She is
spayed, micro-
chopped, house-
brkn, very affection-
ate & gentle. Walks
quietly on leash.
Very calm & beauti-
ful, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
people. Needs new
home after losing
hers. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.













Employment

Ssourceis...









wW.chroni0cleonline.cOm


BO
Bo, an 11 y.o. pure-
bred Beagle, neu-
tered male, wt. 23
Ibs. He is good with
people, other dogs,
& even cats. Walks
very well on a leash.
This poor older boy
deserves a good
home, in his older
years. Giving him a
home would be a
very rewarding ex-
perience for a fam-
ily. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


Georgia
Georgia, 2-3 y.o.
Bulldog mix, cinna-
mon red in color,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, gets
along w/other dogs,
walks well on leash.
Listens carefully
when spoken to.
She is a good girl,
appears to love her
human friends, gen-
tle & calm. Great
personality, good as
companion dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288













HONCHO
Honcho, 3-y.o.
America bulldog
mix, had eye surgery
for Entropion, now
fully recovered &
needs a home. Has
been fostered, mom
says he's great dog,
very affectionate.
Neutered, gets
along w/other dogs,
good w/kids. Loves
activity & exercise,
fenced yard is best.
Big strong boy.
Call Kathy @
352-895-1218


Looking for a set
of Wooden Trailer
Steps, call Mike
@ (352) 634-4237


AKC MINIATURE
SCHNAUZER PUPS!
Lovingly raised in my
home. Health Cert, 1st
shots, dewormed, tails
docked & declawed.
Black & Silver: 1 male, 2
females. Salt & Pepper:
1 male; 1 female. $600,
cash discount!
(352)4194723
AMERICAN
BULLDOGS $600
www.legacyabpups.com
352-445-4469
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
4 pups left.
All male.
First set of shots.
Asking $200 firm.
First come first serve.
352-201-8004








SALLIE
Sallie, spayed
terner/Dalmation mix,
wt 35 Ibs,
HW-negtive. Very af-
fectionate and
friendly, sits on com-
mand, loves treats.
Gets along w/other
dogs well. Housebrkn.
Slm and trim in ap-
pearance. She is a
sweet & joyful
polka-dot girl.
Would like a yard to
run in. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Small Breed, AKC,
health cert. up to date
w/ shots. White/Brown
Mom & Dad family
pet. $400-$450
352-503-7430
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Ask about my Summer
Discount,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827











TOBY
Toby, a black/white
terrier mix, neutered,
HW-negative, house-
brkn, wt45 Ibs. Very
friendly & gets along
w/other dogs well,
also cats. About 6-7
y.o., great shape, very
calm, walks well on
leash, loves kids.
Great companion,
especially for an older
person.
He is a happy boy.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


I I I I I I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-

fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45' Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*"352-563-5510"*

BASS BOAT
18ft. Ranger
READY TO FISH!
150HP Mercury
Motor
Ranger TrIr, $6500.
(352) 795-8665
BVS
20' Pontoon boat, 85 hp
Evinrude, bimini top,
seat covers, new
battery, runs good.
No trailer,
$4500. 352-212-5286
CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tn-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.


W4e I "4 "


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drivers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179





Headlight Restoration,
we come to you!Your
lights look new! Spec.
$25.00 per light
SO-Bnrite
352-601-8043





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374





Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554





AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch. Stone. Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838





#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279,**


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
*i FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
& RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 E*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
: AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
*r 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Residential/Commercial
(352) 400-8361
Mention this ad and get
a service call for $19.
Expires 8/31/2013
Lic# CAC1817447




CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820
House Keeping
Services weekly,
biweekly, or monthly
352-344-3432
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




HOME INSPECTIONS
CRS CONTRACTING
SERVICES LLC,
Lic # HI 1392, 414-8693




Guitar instruction, set
up, repair. Coaching
techniques. 40+yrs
Exp. (352)489-7309




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $20
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374



A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHEL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998







Jeffrey Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135








POOL

Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/Insured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofin- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
**352-639-1024"**




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Tnmming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827


RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825


StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178










TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696






Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135






344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!






THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


LICENSED & INSURED











RONIN
ualit HonPressuty Reasonable Pces











Gutwww.elterCleaoofing-inc.com
713 NE 5th St Crystal River, FL 34429

(352) 639-1024









BoLICENSED & INSURED
Window Cleaningh
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnnghill


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
S .N- or pool or plan
0 something
completely new!
Oftenimnired,
never d cupltdci"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COrPEES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
& nsured 352-400-3188





GENERAL
Stand Alone ;.
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians"
ER0015377
352-61-124


THRpeE SeRvice



ESTMAT S
* Tree trimming/removal
* Stump grinding
* 55' Bucket Truck


Licensed & Insured





Ron's AffordabLe
Handyman Services
*All Home

Small Carpentry
Fencing
*Screening
C (lean Dryer
.. Vents
AlIcdi[e & Dependable
fqp-r ince lifelong
352-344-0905
cell' 400-1722
sured Lic.#377615


AAA ROOFING
callthe teak6usterys"
Free Written Estimate
.- - - - - - - - - -

:100 OFF:
Any Re-RoofU
| Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000FCMA








I DON'T LET YOUR


DRYER START
A FIRE!
FL Ial Ie-No
Hidden Co.s l


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
SFrie In Homr Etimatl-
Liftime Warranty on Stretching

Upholstery Cleaning
Now ClIaning Tile & Hard Surfaces








Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
X N Lic #CC1325497


aM aJOHNSON
M A ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

1866-376-4943


3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shorkie for Sale
1 Female & 1 Male,
health cert, 1st shots, 8
wks $300 Call Judy
352-344-9803

Livestock


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAYJULY 14, 2013 D 7


Classic Mako
20'Honey Pot teak,good
cond. well maint.Trailer
150 Evenrude 1993
Nice! Extra's! $5200
obo 352 795-1546
SEA FOX
19 V2 ift, Yamaha 115
4 stroke motor, runs
great, extra clean
$15,500. 352-212-7758
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com


B^mB ^


2003, Century
$5,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2011, Malibu LT
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $14,888,
352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2011, Malibu LT
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $14,888,
352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2012, Cruze, 2LT,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$15,988, 352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2012, Malibu LS, 15
yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,999,
352-240-7412


2012, Malibu LT
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $16,777,
352-240-7412
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2002 300M 'Special Edi-
tion' Deep sapphire
blue, 107K miles (low
for year), cold air intake,
custom exhaust, 25%
under-drive crank pul-
ley, ceramic front brake
pads, has had 100K
service. Runs perfect
and strong. A reliable
and comfortable daily
driver. As is asking
$6,100 746-2484 or
201-723-8368


2005 Silver PT Cruiser
Touring Ed. Like new
tires. Great gas mi.
$3800 (352) 564-1390
CHRYSLER
2012, Touring,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$15,978, 352-240-7412
CORVETTE
'78 Silver Anniversary
Same owner for 30 yrs.
Garage Kept. $6500
352-302-1557
DODGE
2006, Magnum,Super
Clean and Fast! Don't
Miss Out! $8,995.,
352-240-7412
DODGE
2010, Charger 3.5L
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,999,
352-240-7412


DODGE
2012, Avenger SE
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $14,277,
352-240-7412

FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600

FORD
2007, LaCrosse CXL,
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $11,995,
352-240-7412

FORD
2008 Mustang GT
Premium TROPHY
WINNER 50 + upgrades
details at 352-795-0558


2011, Fusion SE
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,725,
352-240-7412
GMC
2010, Terrain, Loaded,
save $1,000s from new
29 MPG $16,995,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Sierra, Loaded!
Great for Work or Fun,
MUST SEE!! $15,995,
352-240-7412
GMC
2013, Envoy, Great
for Small Families,
Loaded, MUST SEE!
$7,995, 352-240-7412
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444


2009, Fit, Navi Sport
Perfect Shape
$11,995, 352-240-7412
HYUNDAI
'12, Santa Fe GL,
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $18,999,
352-240-7412
MAZDA
2007 Miata MX5
Grand Touring, with
only 17,250 actual mi-
les! 6-Speed Automatic
w/paddle shift, Heated
Leather Seats, Trim
Package. Stormy Blue
Mica exterior with Tan
interior.Beautiful and a
blast to drive! Garage
kept, like new condition.
Premium "Bose" stereo
sound system. Tan cloth
top. Includes "Mazda"
leather bra. 30+ MPG
$16,900 Firm
352-503-7496


R M
2006, Spectra
5 door $7,995
352-341-0018

Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583

MINI COOPER
2010, panorama roof,
low miles, BIk & Slvr,
6 speed. $17,000
352-302-1557

NISSAN
2005, Titan
EX Cab XE, $6,995.
352-341-0018

NISSAN
2011, Altima,
17 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free warranty.
$14,995, 352-240-7412


2012, Altima 2.5 S,
15 yrs./150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty $15,577,
352-240-7412
NISSAN
2012, Sentra 2.0,
15 yrs./150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty $13,997,
352-240-7412
PONTIAC
07, G6, GT, conv,
leather, 33,700 mi.
exc. cond. $17k obo
(352) 794-3523
PONTIAC
2000, Sunfire
$2,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2002 Corolla S, Exec.
4 dr, 32 MPG, garaged,
Pwr, Auto, new brakes
$5800 (352) 422-0294


2012 EVERGREEN
EVER-LITE
29 Foot Travel Trailer,
Model 29FK (Front
Kitchen). Well con-
structed, generously op-
tioned, like-new condi-
tion. Easy tow with SUV
or Pick-Up. Priced well
below NADA at
$21,000. Please call
352/746-3374 for addi-
tional information or to
schedule a time to see.
5TH WHEEL
2000, 24 ft,
1 slide, sleeps 6
(352) 637-1195
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
Yellowstone
1999 28' Fifth Wheel
2 slidouts,Exc. Cond.
new awning,twin bed,
new refndg. very clean,
2 mi. to Gulf, on river
$1 Ok bo(352) 447-2933




Chevrolet Tires
& Rims
6 lugs, $400.
(352) 257-3542
FLOOR MATS
2007 KIA Sportage
custom floor mats.
Black, front and rear.
$25 (352) 527-0655
Heavy Duty Metal
Rack for FORD F150
$250
352-410-6823
352-484-9066 cell



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100






at e.cUon



AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

'93 Buick Regal
$500 down

'99 Buick Sebring
Convertible
$650 down

'97 Ford Taurus
$695 Down

'98 Ford Mustang
$700 Down
CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -19 0 2
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, FI

BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BUICK
'11, Regal,CXL, 15yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$20,777, 352-240-7412
BUICK
2011, Regal CXL,
16 yrs/150,000 miles of
worry free warranty.
$18,995, 352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
1974 Corvette This is a
blue corvette that had
some restoration done
to it and is needing a
new owner for $16,999
352-322-5555
352-465-6560
CHEVROLET
2004, Monte Carlo
supercharged SS,
leather, sunroof
$9,995, 352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2011, Malibu LS
15yrs/ 150 000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $13,999,
352-240-7412


& -la -


. b "... -
146 ..


For more information on how to reach

"Citrus County readers cair

352-563-5592.


OOO8XHD


C CI TRUS COUNTY



CHPQRO()NICLE
www.chronicleonline.com

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commlsslon;
http://tinyudrl.com/http-myfwc-custhelp-com-app





D8 SUNDAY,JULY 14, 2013



-a IMI


2011, Camry LE,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr
$14,377, 352-240-7412
TOYOTA
2011, Camry LE,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr
$16,888, 352-240-7412
TOYOTA
2011, Camry SE,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr
$12,488, 352-240-7412
TOYOTA
2011, Camry,
15 yrs./150,000 miles of
Worry Free warranty.
$12,995, 352-240-7412




Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560
CORVETTE
2003 50th Anniv.
Edition.17k mi,
like new, $29,900
352-34141-78







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII
VOLKSWAGON
'70, Bug, auto, 51K mi.
rust free, new paint, tires
& batteries, $5,900 obo
352-978-0658




BIG SALE
'Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board



^^^^^^


CHEVY
2008, Silverado,
Loaded, Must See!
Great for Work or Fun!!
$11,995, 352-240-7412
DODGE
Quad Cab Sport v6
Clean Title new all Ter-
rains Tires 164k miles
$6500 OBO
(352)795-9878
FORD
07 Sports Track ex-
plorer limited edition,
exec. cond. low miles,
loaded, Blue, $18,500
Serious Inquires Only,
352-897-4681
FORD
2009, F150, 4x4,
Super Cab, Loaded,
Best Price In Florida
$15,995 352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Sierra 1500
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $31,777,
352-240-7412
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control, power
windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tn-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $23,500. Phone:
352-601-1319
TOYOTA
2009 Tacoma BLUE,
TRD Prerunner Sports
pk, Tow pk, Crew Cab,
backup cam, 41k miles,
$21,000 352-613-4487




CHEVROLET
2013, Equinox LS
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $23,888,
352-240-7412

GMC
2010, Terrain SLT-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,777,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Terrain SLE-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $21,488,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Terrain SLT-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $25,998.,
352-240-7412




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at



m ^^^^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GMC
2012, Terrain SLE-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $24,777,
352-240-7412
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2011, Patriot Sport,
15 yrs/150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty $15,889,
352-240-7412




JEEP
2011, Wrangler Sport,
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warr. $21,499,
352-240-7412




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom
352-325-1306


M0110MYC^e


DUCATI
1994 900 Super Sport
Ducatl, new battery
$3000.00 contact me at
352-563-2763 between
9am and 5pm or my cell
is 352-257-5840
Hallmark
2009, Box Trailer
22ft, tandem axle
$4,000 obo
(352) 302-6241
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
1990 FXR Lownder.
New pipes. New wind-
shield. Mustang seat.
Looks and runs great.
$5,700. Can text photo.
352-220-5299
HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition
$1200.00 352-637-3254




covdealscom,
July 1,2013 July31,2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.



n ^^^^


949-0714 F-SU MIXCRN
Estate of Matthew Jordan 2072-CP-526
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-526
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF Matthew Jordan,
Deceased.
NOTICE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on June 7,2013, thinere was placed on deposit in tinis
office funds received from William Huggins, the Personal Representative of the Estate
of Matthew Jordan, deceased, in the amount of $2,298.11. Said funds are all the
assets due to:
Unknown Heirs
whose last known address were
Unknown
and said assets remain unclaimed.
Unless said funds are claimed on or before six (6) months from the date of this
notice, said funds will be forwarded to the State of Florida, pursuant to Florida
Statutes 733.816.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and official seal at Inverness,
Citrus County, Florida, on June 7,2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of Courts
(SEAL)
By: /s/Sonia Prylepa, Deputy Clerk
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, June 14 & July 14, 2013


328-0714 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold at PUBLIC
AUCTION on the property
of SCALLY'S LUBE & GO
TOWING AND RECOVERY,
1185 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34453:


Meeting
Notices^


352-860-0550: In
accordance with Florida
Statute 713.78. Auction
Date as Follows: All Sales
will begin at 8:00 AM.
Vehicle may be viewed
30 minutes before sale.
For details call
352-860-0550.



m "H~


1995 BMW 325
Color: green VIN#
WBACB4324SFM20594
Auction Date: 7/25/2013
Scally's Lube and Go
reserves The right to bid
on all vehicles in Auction.
All sales final at 9:00 AM
Published: 7/14/2013




Mg


327-0714 SUCRN
Public Hearing 8-13-13
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that tinhe Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will hold a Public Hearing for Street Vacation SV-13-01 in the County
Commission Chambers, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, at 2:30 pm, on August 13, 2013, to determine the
advisability of vacating, abandoning, discontinuing and closing the existing street,
alleyway, road, highway or other place used for travel, or any portion thereof
described in the attached Exhibit "A", renouncing and disclaiming any right of Citrus
County and the public in and to any land described on the attached Exhibit "A".
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of
County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida
EXHIBIT A
THAT PORTION OF AN UNNAMED RIGHT-OF-WAY LYING EAST OF AND ABUTTING
AGAINST D.R.A. 4, AND LYING NORTH OF AND ABUTTING AGAINST W. WAYWARD
WIND LOOP, AND LYING SOUTH OF PARCEL 12300, ALL BEING A PART OF GROVER
CLEVELAND ESTATES, UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 14, PAGE 37, SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICE, July 14, 2013.


329-0714 SUCRN
08/01 Meeting Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 1st day of Auaust. 2013 at the Citrus
County Transit Center, 1300 S Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, FL 34460.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that The Annual Public Hearina will be held before this
meeting from 9:30AM 10:30AM.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information
regarding this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County
Transit, 1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352)
527-7630.

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, July 14, 2013.


330-0714 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have
questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Ballagas, Gloria A. & Juan J.
6760 S Sorrell Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Permit
#201106312 for a shed was issued on September 23,2011 and expired on March 21,
2012 and has not been repurchased.
Ballagas, Gloria A. & Juan J.
6760 S Sorrell Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Permit
#201106315 for a shed was issued on September 23,2011 and expired on March 21,
2012 and has not been repurchased.
Ballagas, Gloria A. & Juan J.
6760 S Sorrell Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Permit
#201106314 for a shed was issued on September 23, 2011
and expired on March 21,2012 and has not been repurchased.
Bejma, Paul A. & Maria S.
6 Della Ct, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, furniture, plastics, buckets, car parts, and
other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Boose, Nettie Beasley
1551 W Lockport Ln, Dunnellon, FI 344344
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: One grey Chevy Silverado with expired tag dated 02/12, one
blue Chevy car with no tag, one white Ford Expedition with no tag, and one silver
Nissan car with no tags and deflated tires.
Brightman, Elaine
668 W Hummingbird Dr, Citrus Springs, FI 344344
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: No permit
applied for or issued for a room addition and an open covered porch on the rear of
the residence.
Bryan, Richard Jeffrey
20 Truman Blvd, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and
undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter
pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Bryan, Richard Jeffrey
20 Truman Blvd, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk,
debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter
receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into
standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for
pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided
for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and
maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except
for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property,
pusuant to Arle III, Sectlon 20 31 (a) of the Citus County Code of Ordinances. To
Wit: Garbage, totes, plastics, aluminum, metals, and other miscellaneous materials
being stored in an unenclosed area.
Hamm EST, Margie M. ATTN: Jackie Bryant
1111 N Beach Park Dr, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Rubble, floor, and frame from the fire that
destroyed the mobile home.
Hanna, Linda J.
1949 S Melanie Dr, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, brush, and miscellaneous
junk.
Lindsey, Brian Scott & Brandy
1929 S Melanie Dr, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Junk and debris left from the fire that
destroyed the mobile home.
M & T Bank
7431 W 7 Rivers Dr, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to tine provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and
undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter
pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
McNeil, Brenda
12 S Monroe St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: The white car without tags and with flat tires parked on the the
property.
Nelson, Andrew C. & Romine, Gwen L. c/o D. Nelson
3141 N Hooty Pt, Inverness, FI 34453
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A porch on the
front of thine mobile home and a carport behind the mobile home.
Reese, Cassandra M. & Reese, Donald H.
1605 N Julia Way, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings;
except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recy-
clable
material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk
stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal
site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste
on
agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of
the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Garbage, metals, plastics,
appliances, household items, piles of tree debris, and other miscellaneous materials
being stored in an unenclosed area.
Regions Bank
9210 N Lennox Ter, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, plastic gas cans, empty
plastic oil bottles, broken pool equipment, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Multiple windows on the residence are unsecured.
Rolon, Edwin Luis
48 S Columbus St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings except
for junk which will hot fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material


stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, large TV, mattress, and
miscellaneous junk.
Romine, Mark A.
9051 E Floral Park Dr, Floral City, Fl 34436
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: 1.) White Pontiac sedan (no tag) 2.) White Buick (no tag)
Schaefer, Robert R. & Roberta G.
8033 W Fern PI, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Site Grading without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Land Development
Section 4915, which states in pertinent part: A site grading permit can be issued for
any lot of record, residential or commercial. The applicant shall provide a site
boundary survey, proof of ownership, existing elevations on the site (Publicly


available elevations and contours are acceptable), and proposed grading plan
showing proposed elevations. Any water bodies, wetlands, sinkholes, extraction pits,
or any other environmental designated area on or adjacent to the water body shall
be shown on the plan. Site erosion and control methods shall be shown on the
grading plan. To Wit: After the Fact site grading permit for multiple amounts of fill
dirt already placed on the property.
Schaefer, Robert R. & Roberta G.
8037 W Fern PI, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Site Grading without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Land Development
Section 4915, which states in pertinent part: A site grading permit can be issued for
any lot of record, residential or commercial. The applicant shall provide a site
boundary survey, proof of ownership, existing elevations on the site (Publicly
available elevations and contours are acceptable), and proposed grading plan
showing proposed elevations. Any water bodies, wetlands, sinkholes, extraction pits,
or any other environmental designated area on or adjacent to the water body shall
be shown on the plan. Site erosion and control methods shall be shown on the
grading plan. To Wit: After the Fact site grading permit for multiple amounts of fill dirt
already placed on the property.
Schaefer, Robert R. & Roberta G.
8043 W Fern PI, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Site Grading without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Land Development
Section 4915, which states in pertinent part: A site grading permit can be issued for
any lot of record, residential or commercial. The applicant shall provide a site
boundary survey, proof of ownership, existing elevations on the site (Publicly
available elevations and contours are acceptable), and proposed grading plan
showing proposed elevations. Any water bodies, wetlands, sinkholes, extraction pits,
or any other environmental designated area on or adjacent to the water body shall
be shown on the plan. Site erosion and control methods shall be shown on the
grading plan. To Wit: After the Fact site grading permit for multiple amounts of fill
dirt already placed on the property.
Solar Building 4 LLC
12189 N Gopher Pt, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and
undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter
pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Solar Building 4 LLC
12189 N Gopher Pt, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large pile of tree/vegetative debris and
miscellaneous items of metal and plastic debris.
Stuart Jr., James L. & Wang, Chiyi
5 N Jackson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: TV, garbage, plastics, cardboard, clothes, and
other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Thomas E. Mitchell Revocable Trust
4709 S Sea Ray Pt, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Approximately 50+ bags of trash in the front,
back, and side yard, mattresses, fires, and miscellaneous junk and debris around the
property.
Thor, Donald H. Jr. & Tina J.
5178 N Elkcam Blvd, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating
residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential
unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Did not comply with the conditions of the permit #2005 01819.
Complete the buffers and interior landscaping per the site plan submitted.
Waas, Glenn A. & Wendy A.
3093 W Tanager Ct, Lecanto, FI 34461
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(A); In Rural Residential
districts, raising of livestock or poultry shall be permitted on parcels containing not
less than one acre and developed with a single family residence. To Wit: Remove
the parrots and cockatoos from the property.
Wells Fargo Bank NA
5444 W J P Ct, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, household items, household
garbage, lumber, tires, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Wells Fargo Bank NA
5444 W J P Ct, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit:Two travel trailers
Wells Fargo Bank NA
5444 W J P Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Failure to
obtain a building permit for installing a shed.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
phone: (352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hear-
ing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 14, 2013.



331-0714 SUCRN
BOCC-ITB-021-13
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 021-13
Inverness Airport T-Hangars and Taxilanes
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will accept sealed bids for:
Projects: Financial Project ID FDOT No. 424103-3-94-01 & 424103-5-94-01 Inverness
Airport T-Hangars and Taxilanes. The project purpose is to construct two 16-unit
nested T-Hangar buildings with associated taxilanes, including stormwater treatment
ponds and drainage facilities, electrical, and utilities.

The T-Hangars and Taxilanes project is divided into two bid schedules as follows:
1. Base Bid Schedule includes all the earthwork, drainage and pond
improvements for both buildings. Utilities, electrical facilities and subsoil
improvements for the foundations for the first 16-unit building with associated
taxilanes and driveways, and the design build of the building and foundations and
all accessories. The estimated construction cost range for the Base Bid is $750,000 to
$1,100,000.
2. Additive Alternative Bid Schedule 1 (AAB1) includes all the utilities,
electrical
facilities and subsoil improvements of the foundations for the second 16-unit building
and the associated taxilanes and driveway in addition to the design build of the
building and foundations and all accessories. The estimated construction cost range
for the AAB1 is $350,000 to $750,000.
Bid Due Date:Sealed Bids are due on or before Auaust 6 2013 at 2:00 PM. The
mailing package must be marked to indicate "ITB 021-13", "Bidder's Name" and the
words "Sealed Bid Enclosed". Bids submitted via facsimile or e-mail will not be
accepted.
Deliver Bids To: Wendy Crawford
Office of Management &
Budget Purchasing Section
Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners
3600 W. Sovereign Pathin Suite
266
Lecanto, FL 34461
Bid Opening Date: Bids will be publicly opened on August 6, 2013 at 2:15 PM at the
Lecanto Government Building Room 226, located at 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida.
Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on July 23, 2013 at 10:00 AM
at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 166 located at 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Bid Security: Bidders must include with their Bid a Bid Bond, Certified Check or
Cashier's Check in the amount of five percent (5%) of thine total amount of their Bid.
The Bid Security shall be payable to Citrus County Board of County Commissioners.
Performance and Payment Bonds will be required for tinis project each in tine
amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Amount.


DBE Utilization Goal: There is a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) goal of 8.6%
for this project.
To Obtain Bid Documents: A copy of the Bid Documents may be obtained by
downloading them from Demandstar or via e-mail from
wendv.crawford@bocc.citrus.fl.us or from URS Corporation, 7650 West Courtney
Campbell Causeway, Tampa, FL 33607, Phone (813) 636-2139, FAX (813) 636-2400
upon payment of $ 100.00 for each hard copy set of Bid Documents (Florida sales tax
is included). Return of the Bid Documents is not required and the amount paid for
the Bid Documents is non-refundable.
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners hereby notifies all Bidders that it will
affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement,
Disadvantaged Business Enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit Bids in
response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of
race, color, gender, religion, age, disability, marital status or national origin in
consideration of an award.

Joe Meek, Chairman CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 14, 2013.


CLASSIFIED

Meeting
NoticesH


H


m


m


MEeti
I Notices


m
MeHeting
Notices j




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


. .


FEATURING BLOCKBUSTER DEALS

L 2013 F-150


$25,340
-1400
-1000
-1000
-1000
-1000


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH
FORD CREDIT RETAIL BONUS CASH
RETAIL TRADE IN ASSISTANCE


STARTING FROM


*19,9


2013 FOCUS 2013 FUSION


2013 ESCAPE SE


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH


$22,695
-700
-500
-500
-1000


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
FORD CREDIT RETAIL
MATCHING DOWN CASH


$26,360
-900
-500
-1000
-1000


MSRP
NNFL DISCOUNT
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH
FORD CREDIT


1 6,990 lk19,995 '22.960

PRESENTED BY FORD irM[ UI ANE [r[H[ V EIH y V U[[E.; T T[Hi ,. i [M[-X[LU IVE FfI-A[TVI IAT[E. 1 F-.[M
,ii lH T.0LB.IOWING [APABl IIYMllrUI O-[.PAYLOAD[APA[ITY 1HEi pi'Fr !',iiiiipf~i FO[U^;;i',iNnMiii! V

w mt'i, r [tiHYiBITENOLOGY. FUSION tiHi ,awiE[OBOOITTENt i]LOGY.EXPLOiERvii~vhff TEalR AINMANAfEMENTfi WTEM.:


NOWPLAYING" I


2005 NISSAN PATHFINDER 2006 FORD 500
One owner. Leather, 6 cyl., 1 owner.
A _Isoo


7 FORD EXPLORER 2009 FORD MUSTANG
S Bauer, tow package, leather. 45th anniversary, SHARP!
$10,950 $10,950
^s$ 1i0"^


2008 CHRYSLER SIBRING 2011 FORD FOCUS
Convertible hard top. Economy Car.
$11,950 $12,950
my -
-i U -s


FORD KCROWN VICTORIA I
36,000 miles, leather
tIA on I


I2011 FORD CROWN VICTORIA
Leather.
$15,950
Em0


2012 FORD ESCAPE
speed, std trans, 1 owner.
$16,950
1 ~mq


2010 CHRYSLER 300
Leather, chrome wheels.
$17,950
*^it^i^^^


201FORD FOCUS 2011 FORD FUSION
Excellent mileage 4 cyl., 21,000 miles.
$17,950 $18,950
- .,l


2011 KIASPORTAGE
4 cyl., economy SUV.
$18,950


Moon roof, 28,000 miles
$18,950 |


2009 LINCOLN MKZI
Leather, moon roof, Sirus radio, upgraded wheels I
$18,950 I


2008 HONDA C
Moon roof, leather.
$18,950


S2010 MERCURY MILAN
| Only 6,000 Miles.
$19,950


2011 TOYOTA PRIUS HY
Only 5,000 miles.
$19,950


1 2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Leather seats, chrome wheels.
I $19,950


2012 FORD MUSTANGO2009 LINCOLN MKZI
CD player, 6 speed transmission. Leather, heated/cool seats.
$19,950 I $19,950


Nick Nicholas


C


rysta


River


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 2011 CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 7/31/13.


Anna Cruz


LINCOLN


$20,090
-600
-1000
-1000
-500


Call Toll Free

877.795.7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


4t Cs-
Nick \-r
Nicholas
Ford :: S.R.44
Lincoln \
,t. \19


I


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JOIN US FOR OUR COOKOUT!


Annvthlifn 7he co" D


Or We'll pay you ^
s5000 CASH GUARANTEED


I


p BUY FOR
$199,Mo.
O-- S --
$15988
MSRP $17*25


NEW 2013 SILVERADO 2WD
CHEVROLET EXT CAB STK#D5302
FOR 2999.
OR
72 PC1,988
MONTHS** PRICE
.. MSRP $2 20
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
MAUB SI BUY FOR
SK,*405259,go.

194s88
MSRP $2(8O5


"$13.88 PER THOUSAND FINANCED. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 'BUY WITH 2.99% APR, 72 MONTHS, $5000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUITY. PAYMENT INCLUDES ALL TAX, TITLE, AND LICENSE. WITH AP-
PROVED CREDIT. OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. FOR 2013 SILVERADO SWD EXT CAB CUSTOMER MUST OWN AND TRADE A 99 OR NEWER GM TRUCK. PRICE PLUS TAX, TAG & LICENSE. ALL FACTORY REBATES
AND INCENTIVES TO DEALER. BRING US AN AUTHORIZED WRITTEN BUYER'S ORDER TO PURCHASE THE IDENTICAL NEW VEHICLE FOR A LOWER PRICE FROM A FRANCHISED DEALER WITHIN 50 MILES
AND 48 HOURS. WE WILL BETTER THE PRICE OR PAY YOU $5000. PALM CHEVY MUST BE ABLE TO PURCHASE THE OTHER VEHICLE IMMEDIATELY FROM THE COMPETITORS STOCK AT THE LOWER PRICE.
ALL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. INTEREST ACCRUES FROM DATE OF PURCHASE. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS END DATE.


t- AM -fMMJIN USlFOR OUR OKOT


2013 KIA SIGN & DRIVE
SOUL


$219
MONTH LEASE


2013 KIA
OPTIMA LX


SIGN& DRIVE


249
MONTH LEASE


*GIFTCARD: WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. ONE PER CUSTOMER. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER. "2014 KIACADENZA, $2995 DOWN, $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT, S FIRST PAYMENT. LEASES ARE 36 MONTHS WITH SO DOWN, $OSEC. DEP., $0 FIRST PAYMENT. 12K
MILES PER YEAR. LESSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESS WEAR & TEAR. LESSEE MUST BE ELIGIBLE FOR KMAOWNER LOYALTY PROGRAM (OLP) OR COMPETITIVE BONUS PROGRAM (CBP) OF $500 FOR MY13 OPTIMAAND MY14 SORENTO. EXCLUDESTAX, TITLE, LICENSE& DEALER
FEES. WHERE OLPICBP DOES NOT APPLY, PAYMENTS WILL INCREASE TO $263 FOR MY13 OPTIMAAND $314 FOR MY14SORENTO. ALL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. tFOR 2013 KIAOPTIMA, SOULAND SORENTO. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS END DATE,


2014 KIA SIGN & DRIVE
SORENTO LX I


A299
MONTH LEASE


__j


D10 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


I






Section E SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013



OME


RONT


Sikorski's
Attic PAGE E6
PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUII


19th century
framed herbarium
prints mounted
under glass from
Restoration
Hardware.
Framing ephemera
is a creative way
to use paper
as wall art
(www.rh.com).
Associated Press


L~ '~d *
* 7.


/ s.
* *~


/r ^

-. _


3 -^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Selling or Buying Real Estate?


Contact
Citrus
County's


Real
Estate


Company


Over $65 Million Closed This Year!
RE/MAX REALTY
ONE


RE/MAX REALTY ONE
Number 1 in
Transactions
Semi-Annual 2013


REALTY'


ERA SUNCOA
AMFRIrAN


I I I-


INVERNESS 1101 US 41N637-620 q
LECANTO 2421 N. LECANTO HWY. 527-784W
CRYSTAL RIVER 504 NE HWY. 19795-2441
HOMOSASSA 8375 S. SUNCOAST BLVD. 628-7800


www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com
ST/

CENTURY 21
J.W. MORTON
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
U m LANDMARK
I. i REALTY


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


Kt


;






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sherry
Edwards
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Nancy
Little Lewis
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


EXIT welcomes
newest agent
EXIT Realty Leaders is
proud to introduce everyone
to the newest EXIT agent.
Her name is Sherry Ed-
wards, and she is coming on
board with several years
of real estate experience in
Citrus County. She will be
working out of the Beverly
Hills office.
If you or anyone you know
is looking to buy or sell, give
Sherry a call at 352-527-1112.
EXIT also congratulates
Nancy Little Lewis with EXIT
Realty Leaders in Yankeetown.
Nancy has won the top list-
ing agent award and the top
sales agent award for June.
Call Nancy at 352-447-
2595.
RE/MAX agents
hit new highs
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
roud to announce that Ellie
Sutton has passed the multi-
million dollar mark in sales


Ellie
Sutton
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Linda
Meahl
RE/MAX
Realty One.


volume this year.
Ellie has achieved what
only a small percentage of
local Realtors have accom-
plished this year, closing more
than $2 million in sales
volume.
Sheworks out of the Cen-
tral Ridge RE/MAX office in
Lecanto and has been a Re-
altor for more than 40 years.
Linda Meahl has also
passed the multimillion dollar
mark in sales volume this
year.
With well over $2 million in
closings, Linda has achieved
what only a small percentage
of local Realtors have accom-
plished this year.
She works out of the Inver-
ness RE/MAX office on High-
way 41 and has been a
Realtor for more than 26
years in Citrus County. She
specializes in the communi-
ties of Inverness and Floral
City.
The brokers of RE/MAX
Realty One congratulate
these agents on their contin-
ued success.


DIGEST DEADLINES
* Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by
4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.


Jackie CGaffney Jason Caff ney
Realtor. A HOUSE Realtor@
02-3179 SOL Nlame 2879022

| The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.

241 Hollyfern St. In -ipe l E :., -
SI Cl 10 ,.:.H.e I01 ejlh.. Anq ne _: l, 17).(1
II d e W i .'1 11 1 le *, p i, -, .- i ,, de id ,:,1.11
double pane windows. Laige eal-in
kitchen, extra large rooms, new hot
wa;PI- tank. Totally move-in ready...
C(;all today for your private showing.


Removing candle wax from tablecloth


Dear Sara: I have a
patterned white-on-
white formal table-
cloth that recently got
cranberry-colored candle
wax on it. How do I get it
out? I haven't tried washing
it yet. -Jean M., email
Dear Jean: I would let a
professional remove the
wax. But if you'd like to give
it a try at home, freeze the
cloth and scrape off as much
wax as possible. Don't use a


sharp knife. Try something
flat like a credit card. Pour
boiling water through the
waxed area until the re-
maining wax has melted
and disappeared. Or you
can place a brown paper
bag, thick paper towel or
cloth towel over any wax
spots, then go over them
with a hot iron. As you iron,
check to see whether any of
the wax is being absorbed
by your bag or cloth, then


place a clean bag or cloth to
absorb more until you have
removed as much as possi-
ble. I would pretreat the
stain with Dawn dishwash-
ing liquid or rubbing alco-
hol, then launder as usual.
Don't put the tablecloth in
the dryer if the stain re-
mains after washing, be-
cause the stain can
set more. Don't try bleach,

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


HomeFront BRIEFS


Clinics to look at
drought tolerance
Regardless of our expected weather
patterns, it is always a good idea to
know and properly place plants that are
drought tolerant.
The free July monthly Citrus County
Extension Service Master Gardener
Plant Clinic topic will be "Drought Toler-
ant Trees & Shrubs." There are trees
and shrubs, both native and exotic,
which will perform well in Citrus County.
The schedule for the remaining July
free plants clinics is:
1 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, at Cit-
rus Springs Library;
2 p.m. Tuesday, July 23, at Ho-
mosassa Library.
Questions about landscape, samples
for plant identification or garden-related
problems are welcome. Master gardener
volunteers will be available to address


these and other concerns regarding any-
thing related to home landscaping.
For more information, call the Exten-
sion Service at 352-527-5700.
Workshop to address safe
use of lawn products
A workshop will be conducted from 2
to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 16, at the Cit-
rus County Extension Services Building,
3650 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, to in-
troduce participants to safe pesticide
mixing, application methods, storage
and disposal.
Improper application of lawn care
products can injure a landscape and be
harmful to your health. Natural pest con-
trol methods including mechanical prun-
ing, beneficial insects and IPM will be
discussed. Sustainability of a landscape
is a result of proper planning, material
selection and proper maintenance.
To register, call Steve at 352-527-


I y "Always There For You"
PEL.-U. GAIL COOPER
OEM Iliulillilioni' Dull,!f Reaullo
1 !' "Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3- mindsprmg.com


16'X32' POOL WITH HEAT PUMP & SOLAR!
* 3+office/3/2 beautifully presented home
* Wood cabinetry with roll out drawers
* Newer carpet and interior paint
* Dual pane windows AND sliders
* Gas fireplace in the family room
* Newer sprinkler system and timer
* Laminate wood flooring in living areas
* Home warranty for the buyers
#702597 $179.000


END UNIT ON #3 GREEN!
2/2/1 one-story end unit condo
* Rare opportunity in private setting
* Updated kitchen with SS appliances
* Raised panel cabinetry
* Hardwood flooring in living areas
* Updated vanity in Master bath
* One car garage plus parking spaces
* Home warranty for the buyers
#354159 $66.000


5708 or email steven.davis@bocc.
citrus.fl.us.
Gardening management
workshop scheduled
A workshop will be held from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 20, at the Citrus
County Extension Services Building, 3650
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, to introduce
gardening best management practices.
Successful gardening depends on uti-
lizing management practices which have
been proven effective. Florida-friendly
Landscaping Practices and the nine
basic principles encourage gardeners to
practice proper methods of fertilization,
responsible pest management and effi-
cient watering, while also conserving
and protecting natural resources.
To register, call Steve at 352-527-
5708 or email steven.davis@bocc.
citrus.fl.us.
From wire reports


JOANN MARTIN
R efe rred
I REAL ESTA TE 1


505 E. Charleston Ct 2599 W Apricot
Hernando Pine Ridge
2780 sf of living, new roof 2011, Beautiful 2002 Rusaw pool home.
HVAC 2008, central vacuum, fire 3 bedrooms plus office/den
place, lots of storage, large lanai with carpetingraded 2008, dual pane windows,
Jacuzzi & summer kitchen. Pristine bright kitchen w/skylig ht. A must see,
condition. Don't miss out call today, call today. Priced at $209,900.
$249,900.


Real Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 E3


IS irtual ToI I ..i.J.U JIJ IIJ.I.I..I^ IIBJ.I..






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hormones help


make new plants



from cuttings


Auxins are key factor in growth process


LEE REICH
Associated Press
Take a look at new shoots growing
on a favorite shrub or vine and you'll
see that the bases of these shoots
may be beginning to toughen up,
their once soft, green outer layer
turning brown and woody
Such shoots, snipped from the
mother plants as so-called half-
woody cuttings, can be rooted to
make new plants.
Cuttings made from shoots still
soft and green are called softwood
cuttings. Those cut from thoroughly
woody, leafless shoots taken in win-
ter are called hardwood cuttings.
Plant hormones, called auxins,
play an important role in rooting any
of these kinds of cuttings. Under nat-
ural conditions, auxins are pro-
duced in the buds and growing tips
of plants, and are then carried down
stems in decreasing concentrations.
If you apply auxins directly to the
bases of your cuttings, rooting can be
hurried along, and you get an in-
crease in the percentage of cuttings
that root, as well as the number and
quality of roots that form.
Powders to help you root
Natural auxins, once extracted
from a plant, decompose too quickly
to be of practical use. But we can
still use auxins by applying com-
mercially available, synthetic ones,
such as IBA and NAA, which are
slower to degrade.
These synthetic rooting hormones
are available either in liquid or pow-
der form. Concentrations and com-
binations of auxins will vary with
the manufacturer, with higher auxin
concentrations generally are used
for more difficult-to-root species.
Fungicides may be added to prevent
cuttings from rotting.
Apply a powdered rooting hor-
mone by dipping the base of a cut-


ting into the powder, tapping it to
shake off excess, and then sliding
the cutting into a hole without
brushing off the powder. Because
varying amounts of powder might
adhere to a cutting, rooting response
to powdered hormone preparations
is less consistent than it is to liquid
ones.
Liquid rooting hormones also are
more rapidly absorbed than pow-
dered formulations. Merely soak the
bases of cuttings in the liquid for-
mulations. The soaking time re-
quired depends on the hormone
concentration.
Whether you use powders or liq-
uids to promote rooting, pour only as
much material as you need into a
clean container, then discard that
portion after use. Eventually, the
materials do deteriorate. An easy
way to test whether a material is still
good to use is to snip a leaf from a
tomato plant, treat its base, then
poke the base into moist sand or pot-
ting soil. If the preparation is still
good, abundant roots will have
formed after a couple of weeks.
Technique matters
You don't have to go out and buy
rooting hormone to root cuttings. Be-
fore commercial, synthetic auxins
became available, some savvy gar-
deners would help rooting along by
soaking cuttings in water in which
stems of willow, an easy-to-root
plant, had previously been soaked.
And rooting hormones, whether
from a package or from willow
stems, are not essential in propaga-
tion, nor do they perform magic. No
need to use them for propagating
willows, chrysanthemums and other
species that are so easy to root. And
don't waste your time trying to root
stems from a mature apple or maple
tree, or other plants that just do not


Associated Press
A rooted softwood cutting in New Paltz, New York. Take a look at new shoots growing on a fa-
vorite shrub or vine and you'll see that the bases of these shoots may be beginning to toughen
up, their once soft, green outer layer turning brown and woody. Such shoots, snipped from the
mother plants as so-called half-woody cuttings, can be rooted to make new plants.


L U U C


See PLANTS/Page E5


E4 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


Aft_ -

L







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



PLANTS
Continued from Page E4

root from conventional cuttings.
The ultimate size and vigor of a
plant will be unaffected by
whether or not hormones were ap-
plied during propagation. Rooting
hormones also won't make up for
poor propagation practices. You
must still pay close attention to
how you take a cutting, to the root-
ing medium you use, and to mois-
ture, light and humidity
And always follow directions
closely for a particular rooting
hormone preparation because
hormones can be toxic to plants at
certain doses. Another synthetic
auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-
acetic acid is better known as
2,4-D, a widely used weed killer.


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 E5


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

because it can discolor and
leave yellow stains. I recom-
mend taking it to a professional.
Dear Sara: Grease above
stove? I'm trying to deep-clean
my kitchen and I cannot get rid
of the caked-on grease under
the cupboards above my stove!
I've tried baking soda, vinegar,
Fantastik and every other
cleaner I own! Is there any way
to get rid of this stuff? -
Rachel, Toronto
Dear Rachel: I would use Mur-
phy's Oil Soap or Guardsman
wood cleaner (guardsman.
com/en/find-a-retailerhtml). The
oil soap will take some elbow
grease, but it's worth it, because


most other types of cleaners will
damage the finish on cabinets.
Dear Sara: How do I remove
hair dye from my hands after I
dye my hair? -Jan, email
Dear Jan: Prevention is key
In the future, wear gloves when
dying your hair. To remove the
dye, makeup remover works
well. Try baby oil, too. If you
have any leftover hair dye (it
won't take much), applying it to
your hands then wiping it away
immediately will often remove
the rest of the dye. Lemon juice
applied to a cotton ball is effec-
tive, too.
Dear Sara: I've made toffee
that calls for melted chocolate
chips spread on top of the candy,
but the chocolate hardens and
just falls off. What can I do to
prevent this? I've tried choco-
late chips of varying levels of


quality Thanks! -M.B., email
Dear M.B.: You can add the
chocolate chips on top of the
hot toffee (after you spread it),
then spread them with a rubber
spatula once you see the choco-
late begin to melt. Once melted,
let it all cool for 20-30 minutes
at room temperature, then put
it in the fridge to set.
MEN
There's something youthful
about tater tots. They're typically
purchased frozen, then cooked
and served with burgers, hotdogs
or sloppy joes. Some families
enjoy tater tot casserole, too
(check out the recipe at frugal
village. com/forums/casseroles/
106363-tater-tot-casserole.html).
Tater tots probably don't make
the cut as a go-to potato side dish
in your meal rotation. But what if
you made them yourself? Sure, it


takes a bit of work, but it's
cheaper than frozen, and it might
even become a delicious new op-
tion your entire family can enjoy
The first reader-submitted
tip shares a recipe:
Homemade tater tots: If I had
known they were this easy, I
would have made them years
ago! I baked potatoes yesterday,
then put them in the fridge to
firm up overnight. I rubbed the
skins off and grated them today,
then seasoned and rolled them
into balls. I fried them for 1-2
minutes until browned, but you
can bake them, too.
I used the Indian-spiced tots
recipe at chow.com/recipes/
29272-indian-spiced-potato-tots,
but you can season them how-
ever you like. C.H., Missouri

See FRUGAL/Page E15


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E6 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's summer, so be


sure to beat the heat


Heat-related illness serious concern in Florida

W ith temperatures already well ing to reflect the heat.
into the 90s in Citrus County, it U Drink water more often, even if you
looks like it is going to be another don't feel thirsty. Our bodies need water
very hot summer. In these con- to cool off.
editions, we must take precau- Stay indoors in an air-con-
tions to avoid becoming ditioned space, if possible. If
overheated. you don't have air conditioning
Anyone can get overheated in your home, go to a mall or li-
under the right conditions, but brary or other public place to
certain individuals are more get cooled off during the
vulnerable to heat stress, in- hottest part of the day Even a
cluding people who are physi- few hours in the air condition-
cally ill, especially those with ing can help your body stay
heart disease or high blood cooler when you return to the
pressure, people who are 65 Monica Payne heat.
and older, babies and young CONSUMER U Don't drink alcohol, be-
children, and people who have cause it dehydrates you.
mental illness. Pay attention to SCIENCE U Eat light meals and avoid
your body's needs and follow caffeinated beverages.
these guidelines to prevent heat-related U Wear sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or
illnesses: greater, as sunburn decreases your body's
Reschedule outdoor activities for ability to cool itself.
cooler parts of the day
Wear lightweight, light-colored cloth- See HEAT/Page E11


Inside...


Paper decor
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Antique serving set was manufactured in Germany


Dear John: I re-
ceived this setting
about 40 years ago


and packed it
away Recently
I unpacked and
cleaned it to
put on display
in a cabinet.
The bottom
each piece is
marked in
green with a
crown above
crossed swords
and the letters
R.C. Below that
is the name
"Rosenthal,


John Si
SIKOR
ATI


Kronach-Germany, Vikto-
ria." Stamped in red on
top of the green on some
pieces is a pot figure with
the name "Veusch" and
"Made in Germany"


It appears to be white
china with a black glaze
and silver flower design.
The silver turns
black if not pol-
ished with sil-
ver polish and
is raised, to the
; touch, above
the glaze.
I have been
unable to find
this online. I
have a pot,
korski sugar dish, and
SKI'S creamer in ex-
rIC cellent condi-
tion, along with
six cups, one
crudely repaired on the
handle, and five saucers.
I think it is a coffee serv-
ice but I am not sure. See
the attached photos. Any
help will be really appre-


ciated. -EW, Internet
Dear EW: Yes, on dis-
play is a good place for
your ornately decorated
coffee service.
The decoration is in the
Art Nouveau style and is
likely silver Silver overlay
was popular during the
late 19th century and on
into the 20th century
I think your set is close
to, if not 100 years old. The
Art Nouveau style was
popular circa 1890 to 1910.
There is often a silver
See ATTIC/Page E7
This Art Noveau-style serv-
ice set is likely around
100 years old. It was man-
ufactured by the widely-
recognized German
company Rosenthal.
Special to the Chronicle


C' (

4.
\4







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

mark pressed into the
metal somewhere in the
design. Look it over care-
fully with a magnifying
glass for the mark.
Rosenthal is recognized
worldwide for high-quality
porcelain products. I think
your set would sell below
the $1,000 mark, but not far
Dear John: My husband
and I inherited some pieces
in a house that we pur-
chased. We have been trying
to get information on them
from the Internet, to no avail.
I am including pictures.
We have a dragon teaset
that has "Victora Japan
China" on the bottom of
each piece. As I said, we
have gone online to try to
research these and cannot
come up with any informa-
tion. -D. & E.R., Internet
Dear D. & E.KR: Your cof-
fee service was made in
Japan for export to Amer-
ica. Collectors refer to this
type of china as dragonware
due to the dragon decora-
tion on all the pieces.
The type of decoration is
called moriage. The tech-
nique is ancient and is ap-
plied to the surface like a
cake is decorated, using a
paper funnel to squeeze a
thin clay slip onto a sur-
face. Potential dollar value
for the set is $50 to $100.
DearJohn: I know of you
from listening to your
show and reading the arti-
cles in the Chronicle.
I inherited my uncle's
train set, which he pur-
chased new, probably in
the 1950s or the 1960s in
New York City. Some he
used, some he didn't, and
some are in original boxes.
There are many, maybe
30 to 50 pieces total. How
can I get these appraised
and how might I best sell
them? R.B., Internet


Dear R.B.: Toy electric
train sets are a large cate-
gory of collector interest.
In order to help you, I
need a list of what you
have. Take a few good
clear photographs in
groups, and I will be glad
to advise you about how to
sell the collection.
Dear John: I read your
article in the Chronicle this
morning. We hope you are
able to help us with an art
question. My wife and I re-
cently acquired two original
watercolors by Jacob Getlar
Smith. One is called 'Jersey
Ridge" and the other is ap-
parently untitled. We did a
little research on Mr Smith
and discovered that he is
quite famous and that some
of his works are hanging in
the most elite galleries in
the country We would like
to determine exactly what
we have here. K &
G.DeV, Internet
Dear K & G.DeV: Jacob
Getlar Smith, 1898-1958,
was born in New York and
was a New York City artist
during his painting career
He studied at the National
Academy of Design.
During his career, he
won numerous awards and
belonged to a number of
artist associations. His oil
on canvas paintings have
sold as high as $10,000, and
his watercolors have sold
in the $100 to $1,000 range.
In order to give you an
opinion of potential dollar
value of your two water-
colors, I need a couple
good photos.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 E7

This coffee service
was manufactured
in Japan for export
to the United
States. It is of a
style known as
"dragonware," and
the painting tech-
nique used is re-
ferred to as
moriage.
Special to the Chronicle


Amanda & KiJohnson Tom Balfour Li Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
S =- S


9142 N. AKOLA WAY 2435 W. ERIC
3/2/2 702470 $125,000 2/1/1 701256 $49,900


87S. LUCILLE 2178 S. WIGWAM 59 S. JACKSON 19 MEADOWDALE 6571 W. ROBIN
2/2/2 703454 $79,500 3/2 703669 $49,995 2/2/1 703481 $59,500 2/1.5/1 703687 $64,900 3/2/2 703864 $69,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Paper products find new life
in hands of creative crafters


KIM COOK
Associated Press
M any of us dis-
patch our used
paper to a bin,
the first step
on the way to Recycle
Land. These household
accumulations of paper
and cardboard are just
one more thing to get
rid of.
Luckily, there are de-
signers and artists who
see possibilities in all
that wood pulp. They're
busy using it to create
art, decorative acces-
sories, even furniture.
So what you sent to
the recycling center just
might find its way back,
in some form, to your
home.


Trent Mayol's com-
pany, SmartDeco, de-
signs and makes
heavy-duty cardboard
furniture that's simple,
stylish and easy to put
together without tools.
The idea came to him
when he was a Univer-
sity of Southern Califor-
nia neuroscience major
dealing with the pack-
ing and logistical has-
sles of his fifth
college-housing move.
"Nobody likes dealing
with furniture. Espe-
cially those living what
we've deemed the 'one-
year-lease lifestyle,"'
Mayol says. "These peo-
ple are young, economi-
cally savvy, and never in


See Page E10


RECYCLED


CHIC


E8 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013






Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY JULY 14, 2013 E9


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A detail view of "QuickBrix,"
created by artist Jan Mollet. The
paper decor uses everyday
cardboard packaging.
Attachable with adhesive or
magnets, the bricks are unique
paper decor that can be laid out
in a variety of ways
(www.janmollet.com).
Associated Press


9086 Atlas Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
40 unit+ storage facility.
2.8 Acres of outside storage.
5750 sq ft. bidg w/ office on-
site.
Suncoast Industrial Park
$149,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


1259 S. Elmwood Drive
Inverness, Florida 34450
Warehouse/ Office connected
to a 5-unit apartment
complex.
5,400 sq ft. on .63 acre lot
$350,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


ALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
I Email roybassotampabay.rr.com www.allctrusrealty.com After Hours 352302-6714 "'


'4


I.1


Salti.


aa


pi


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SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
This publicity photo provided by HomeGoods shows how
artisans use paper in a number of creative ways, by fold-
ing, or decoupaging, or spooling it, as in these vases
(www.homegoods.com).

NANCY LEE AYRES BEST
S 352-279-5058
R EXIT Realty Leaders
Crystal River 352-794-0888 Beverly Hills: 352-527-1112
.4; Absolutely stunning, like new,
. ( custom built home. Large bedrooms,
Z I Iilr NDa study! Family room AND
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iil.-,,r .)f cabinet and counter space
ri -lirate dining room! The master -
bedroom has a large walk-in closet, tray ceilings AND a 13 x 9 sitting room with sliding doors
to the screened lanai. The master bath has dual sinks, a jetted tub AND separate shower.
The living room has triple pocket sliders for indoor/outdoor entertaining. All on over an acre
in prestigious Golf & Equestrian Community. MLS 703873. $225,000 Nancy Ayres
:zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz:'


.-
Duplexes in great location,...
each unit featuring 2 bedrooms and 2 baths with
a great room floor plan, inside utility room and
open kitchen with breakfast bar. Needs some
Rehab, but it is at a great price. This is an
opportunity for investment or move in yourself!
Located close to Plantation Golf Resort and Fort
Island Beach and area amenities.


PAPER
Continued from Page E8

the same place for too long."
SmartDeco's pieces, which in-
clude a desk, sidestand and
dressers, are engineered to hold up
to 400 pounds, with multiple layers
of fiber and a center arched rein-
forcing panel. Yet they're light-
weight and easy to move.
Available in Kraft finish (the nat-
ural brown of the cardboard) or
white, the Modesto, Calif.-made fur-
niture might appeal particularly to
college students, but has enough of
a hip look for a wider audience, too.
Customize the pieces if you want; a
plastic snap-on protective shelf
cover comes with each one.
(www.smartdecofurniture.com)
Seattle design studio Graypants
makes striking light fixtures out of
repurposed cardboard boxes, in a
series called Scraplights. The corru-
gated cardboard allows light to play
dramatically through the fixtures,
and it's treated with a non-toxic fire
retardant. (www.graypants.com)
Amy Gibson's medium is maga-
zines. The Seattle artist folds sec-
tions of recycled periodicals into
color slabs, which she combines into
one-of-a-kind wall art and
mirror frames. (www.etsycom/shop/
colorstorydesigns)


If paper d6cor intrigues you, visit
other Etsy.com stores for items or in-
spiration. Israeli artist Ruti Ben
Dror offers functional bowls made of
origami folded paper. San Antonio,
Texas-based Shannon Ruby crafts
clocks out of recycled magazines
and paper; some are made of a myr-
iad of curled paper circles, others
are starbursts made of colorful
rolled pages. And she'll custom de-
sign. (www.etsy com)
You'll find similar brightly hued
work done by Indian craftspeople,
in folded or spooled storage boxes
and vessels at HomeGoods.
(www.homegoods.com)
Restoration Hardware Baby &
Child has paper mache animal
heads, including sharks, antelope,
giraffes and stags, made by Haitian
artists out of recycled paper similar
to newsprint. Each piece has the
look of a typographic sculpture.
(www.rhbabyandchild.com)
Sometimes inspiration comes
when you're just trying to clean up a
bit. A decade ago, photographer and
artist Adrienne Moumin was relo-
cating from Brooklyn, N.Y, to Mary-
land. Before she moved out of her


HOME Jackie Davis
AUCTION I American Realty & Investments
AUCTIO MEN 117 s. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
BAN-ONE E {RX (352) 634-2371 cell
...A E.S.A jackie@bjdavis.comn
HO M ESU~i~ 1Fora VisualTour of mylistings and all MLS:bdavis.co

featuring
1536 N Abalone Terrace
Hernando
3 BR, 2 BA 3,002 SF
Agent: Alan Ivory
One Real Estate
352-302-9781 B W ,4-- -_:----*
OPEN LAKE on the west, farmland on the east. What a setting for this 3 bedroom,
Selling ONSITE: 2 bath POOL home. A lanai, an open porch and a workshop attached to the 2-car
Thurs, July 25,11 AM garage. Lots of curb appeal here with its portico over a circular driveway and its metal
u, Julyroof. In, addition there's a bonus room between bedroom #3 and the lanai.
No Back Taxes MLS #704095 $245,000
No Liens
InsurableTitle WHAT A PARTY HOME
Up to 2% 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths
to Buyer's Agents! Large great room
_Hardwood, tile floors
S43 Deck w/grilling station
OPEN HOUSE: Circular driveway
Sat & Sun, July 20 & 21 On an acre
1:00 3:00 pm $255,000 MLS #703660
HUDSON & EASY LIVN'
MARSHALL L* 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths
Honesty. Integrity. Value. 2.5-Car garage
Granite counters
866.518.9065 Eat-in kitchen, family room
A see website for 2,456 SFLA
terms & conditions 1,- ,-, ,.,,-,-,
H&M, H1779, AU-C000274; ,-
B. G. Hudson, Jr., 262835, 225 1) i )) r I ii j
AU000103


rented darkroom, she began print-
ing up a bunch of architectural shots
she had lying around. She noticed
that the prints had the makings of a
collage, so she printed some more,
and the project took on a life of its
own.
"I started the series in 2003, thinking
it was what I'd do in the meantime
while I searched for a rental dark-
room," says Moumin. "It soon turned
into the main art form I practice."
The pieces, many of which she
showed at the recent Architectural
Digest Home Design Show in New
York City, are intricately hand-cut
assemblages drawn from the geo-
metric, often fractal images of sky-
scrapers and other urban elements
that she had photographed and
turned into silver gelatin prints.
(www.picturexhibit.com)
Got a carful of old maps, but now
have GPS? Decoupage cartographic
pages onto waste bins, serving trays
or furniture, or wooden or card-
board letters for instant d6cor. Old
atlas pages make cool lampshades,
drawer liners or framed wall art.
You'll find instructions galore
online.


m


E10 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Continued from Page E6


Plantings aim to revive riverfront


Never leave children or pets in
a parked car Temperatures inside a
parked car can rise to 135 degrees in
less than 10 minutes, which can kill
a child or pet. Call 911 if you see a
child or pet left unattended inside a
parked vehicle.
Watch for symptoms of heat ex-
haustion and heat stroke. Heat ex-
haustion symptoms include heavy
sweating, confusion, dizziness,
weakness and nausea. Heat stroke
symptoms include elevated body
temperature (106 degrees or higher),
hot and dry skin, continuous nausea
and vomiting, rapid, strong pulse,
confusion, and possibly loss of con-
sciousness or seizures. Anyone with
these symptoms may be suffering
from heat stroke or severe heat ill-
ness and needs immediate medical
attention. Call 911 or take the person
to the nearest hospital as quickly as
possible.
For information about treating
heat-related illnesses, visit: http://
solutionsforyourlife.ufl.edu/hot_
topics/agriculture/heat_stress.html
Call Monica Payne at the Exten-
sion office at 352-527-5713.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural
needs. All programs and related ac-
tivities sponsored for, or assisted by,
the Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences are open to all per-
sons with non-discrimination with
respect to race, creed, color, reli-
gion, age, disability, sex, sexual ori-
entation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or
affiliations.


Monica Payne is the Family and
Consumer Sciences Agent for
Citrus County Extension.


The Chronicle welcomes tips
from readers about breaking
news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be pre-
pared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the
news event.
To submit story ideas for fea-
ture sections, call 352-563-
5660 and ask for Logan Mosby.


Associated Press

CINCINNATI Berry bushes
and squash vines, apple and pear
saplings, and inches-high corn
plants growing now are envisioned
to blossom into an "edible forest
garden" in urban Cincinnati for the
benefit of joggers, bicyclists, hikers
and those who simply want to relax
along a waterway
Community forest and gardening
efforts have been popping up
across the country, from Seattle to
Pittsburgh, including other urban
gardens in this city along the Ohio
River But this new project com-
bines the goals of providing a new
source of fresh fruit and vegetables
for city dwellers with a long-term


I00FHK1


,4txande r
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE Hwy.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWWAILEXRECOM E- QAIT SPAESALEPYRFCOM


effort to renew the river, which has
been polluted for decades.
"Basically, we are transforming
what this river corridor looks like.
We're giving the river a green
edge and making it more inviting
for people," said Robin Corathers,
an environmental planner and
the executive director of Ground-
work Cincinnati, a community-
based nonprofit
The ambitious "Healthy Peo-
ple, Healthy River" project incor-
porates nutrition, recreation,
education and artwork along
with major environmental
cleanup. A 28-mile greenway trail
is planned in the Mill Creek

See REVIVE/Page E14


I 1- I
'-BE5T7


Realtor


Associated Press
Robin Corathers, executive director of Groundwork Cincin-
nati, stands next to the Mill Creek, in Cincinnati.


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


GIEN I DTY SVN DAYTS_,d A WEE


ti^- A I ,I- 1 Dearoom, z Dam,
trlplewide on 1.25 acres of land.
15 x 40 carport, paved road, well &
septic, country kitchen & formal dining
room. Rear porch under carport.
#703183 Reduced to $74,900


SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H
handyman/woman special, needs lots of
work, roof does not leak, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, private well & septic, no appliances
or outside A/C unit On 040 acres



g IU 8


wide mobile home with 2 bedrooms,
2 baths, 2 lots, concrete drive, comer lot
w/nice shade trees, newer central heat &
air Newer refrigerator #357305 $35,000





HERNANDO Waterfront 2 bedroom, 1 5
bath S/W M/H, needs some work, canal
leads to Tsala Apopka outfall canal to
Withlacoochee River, boat ramp on
property Owner financing with 20%
down #702276 $32,900


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very
secluded and private setting -
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture
and mature oaks. Take the tour at
ML : $379,000


VILLA
Well kn
lifestyle!
floor pl
1...
away A
paint and
the garage
MLS 701


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com






GES OF CITRUS HILLS
own for an active Florida
3/2/2 home on acre, open LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
an, wood burning fireplace, a 2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
. 1 and spacious covered community on Lake Tsala Apopka
S... you feel at home right Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
recent remodel included new floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
d flooring, and A/C, range and privacy You will love to call this comfy
ge door were replaced in 2012 house your home! MLS703427
0472 $139,000 $109,000


COUNTRY ESTATE -
PLEASANT GROVE GETYOUR
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO im ..mbuilt GOLF CART READY!
THE GULF OF MEXICO! tu t i. ... quality This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mitch Underwood
throughout vaulted tongue & groove 3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home m the center
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and ceilings, fireplace; granite counters & of the back nine of the Pine Ridge Golf
boat slip on deep water canal no custom cabinetry; family room, den/office, Course might be your well-deserved haven
bridges to the Crystal Riverl Tile floors, 2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor Dream kitchen w/grante counters, SS
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and entetaing' Jenn-Air summer kitchen, ... I ,. .... smart
windows; great income potential, too covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilmgs
MTS 359564 $189.000 $549.900 I' -,I $292.000


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
CRYSTAL RIVER Ready to move in defines this distinctive 54 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acre lot in quiet neighborhood
condition, this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the AmbridgePt nexttotheWithlacoochee
garage home is in cul-de-sac Has pool & true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you StateForestandthe trails butalsoverycloseto
spa, patio fo 1 off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With2,643 sq ft this 3/3/2 pool home
backyard 14 your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space
#359466 $104,900 MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $122.000


HEAT


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 Ell








E12 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013



g Choil


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1
bath@$350 inc H20.
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
DUNNELLON/488
2/2, Lg Lot, exec. clean,
CHA $540/mo.
+ Dep (352) 795-6970
HOMOSASSA
2/2'/2, $500 mo., 1st,
last, sec. 352-628-2678
Homosassa/CR
2/2, Screen Porch,
clean, good location
$500. 1st. & last (352)
563-9830, 586-7898
YANKEETOWN
2/2 New W/D. $600mo
moves you in no dep
needed.15 minutes from
power plant. Call Paul
(407) 579-6123








2013 3/2 DW $49,900,
Incl. Delivery, set-up,
furn, Decor Call
352-795-2377
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

For Sale ,,
HERNANDO
Ready to move in,
must see 3/2 1.5 acres
$49,000 approved for
FHA/ owner financing
(352) 795-1272

S-

HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, 16x16
workshop, Must-see!
$64,000 (352) 621-0192
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great nursery or blue-
berries. Asking 124,900
352-364-2985
Palm Harbor Homes
New Modular Homes
are here!
TEXT: STORE 126A
TO: 313131
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


ForSeie^f

Hernando
DWMH on land,Ready
to move in, Call me for
more information
352-795-1272

Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5% park like acres,
owner financing avail.
59k (941) 778-7980

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807





DRASTICALLY
REDUCED
OAK POND MH
ESTATE (Hwy 44 E)
Inverness,
2/2 Lovely home turn
key ready to move in
H(352) 726-0348
C(352) 586-3662

Lecanto
Lecanto Hills MH Park
55 + comm. 2/2 liv,din,
kit, carport, rec.rm new
appl, furn, never rented
$11,500 352-228-4515

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





INVERNESS
2/1 SWMH w/add 1.5 ac
with 20x40 work shop,
near wal-mart $35,500,
or RENT $475 mthly
non-smoker
706-473-2184


-U

MTIONE
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounHtyHomeRentals.comn
CRYSTAL RIVER
11701 ClearwaterCt ...........$1000
2/2 Watedront mobile
1455 NW 21st St ................$1175
3/2/1 Nice home, big yard
65017W. Canwidale .............. $815
2/2/2 Meadowrest villa
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
1820 Trde Li (CS)................$850
3/2/2 Newer home
3679 W. Treybhurn Path (L) .....$875
3/3/2 Furn Black Diamond
HOMOSASSA
5865 W. Vikre Path..............$100
2/2/1 Cute home on I acre
6 Hollyhock Ct....................$900
3/2/2 Nice home in Sugarmill Woods
145 Pine St. ...................... $1600
3/3/3 Beauul SMW pool home REDUCED










1 r 4 B OM S






Your World









CHi.... I.


-U
J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

3/2/2 Golf Course...$1200

3/2/2 New Listing....$800
2/1/1 Highlands........$650
2/1111 Poo ..............$800
ATTACHED VILLAS
3/2.5 wf................ $800
3/2 ......................$675

3/2/1 ...................$800
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
g 352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815


HOMOSASSA
2BR, $500, incls. garb
& H20, no pets
352-697-0310


Leek
INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393

INVERNESS
2/1 Completely Remod-
eled In Town, $675 mo.
$250 sec. 412 Tomp-
kins St. 352-895-0744

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENT HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $592. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental assistance
available to
qualified applicants
For rental info.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer









INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495./ mo.
(352) 447-6016





FLORAL CITY
RETAIL; 2 Storefronts
Corner of US 41 &
Hwy 48, 600sf &1,400 sf
$495. mo. & $695 mo.
813-310-5391


CRYSTAL RIVER
Commercial Office
space 1,555 sf AC/
heat, front & rear entr.
On Hwy 44, 1 blk off US
19, $350. mo. 422-1643




"INVERNESS**
Great Location! 2/2/1
w/scn porch, w/d, pool
$725. 352-726-6567

INVERNESS
2 bedroom 2 bath
Garage.$700.Ref &
Sec. required
352-464-0919


CRYSTAL RIVER
Meadowcrest
villa furnished. 2/2/1
linens, kitchen supp,
lanai, amenities, dues
incld.$850/mo, 500 dep.
563-1818.

MEADOWCREST
2/2/1 Villa, furn. or un-
furn. 1st last. sec. 55+
comm (352) 628-7573





HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo.
352-212-4981


INVERNESS
clean, attractive 2/2/1
Duplex, family neigh.
3619 Theresa Lane,
Terry Houston, Foxfire
Realty (352)359-1442



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio
Efficiency w/ equipped
kitchen. All until cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


Fi Your Drew How&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roni cleho rnefinder.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BLACK DIAMOND
3BR, 2BA, Golf Villa,
incld's. yard service.
$975. mo. No pets or
smoking. 746-6067




312/2 FOR RENT
IN LECANTO
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Gar
for Rent in Lecanto near
Timberlane Estates.
Yard care included
Rent $850 oer month.
Min. 12 month lease.
1st Mo. and security
deposit required.
Applicant will be subject
to backarou nd
credit check.
Contact Jeremy at
352-302-4019 for more
information.
BEVERLY HILLS
Near Library, 2/1/1,
fenced yard, $600/mo
F/L +Sec & Refer-
ences. 352-400-2627
BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month
includes basic
cable & lawn care.
Call 746-3301
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 3/2 w/
Pool $1,200 incl'd soc.
mem. to all amenities,
yrd. maint. &wkly pool
service, avail. July 1st.
(352) 422-4086
CITRUS HILLS
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
$1,100.00
POOL. PETS OK
352-249-7919
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1.5/1 Nice home
$650/Mo.
352-302-4057
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1.5 ba w/family rm
Newly remodeled inside
& out. W/D hook up.
Fenced $750 1st,
last,sec. 352-586-4037
CRYSTAL OAKS
3/2/2, pet invisible
fence $890 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Rent or Lease
to Own. $750. mo.
352-220-3005
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. 3/2, $650 mo.
352-212-4981
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2, Fenced Yard,
3864 S. Flamingo Terr.
$750. mo 352-382-1373
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$650. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723

INVERNESS
Spacious 3/2/2, $795.
mo. (352) 212-4873


RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM







CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story Furn., 1 BR/2BA
Pool, Dock, all util. incl
$900mo. 239-860-9620



CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bdrm. 2 ba. Cottage
style home on Canal
with Floating Docks.
Perfect for small fam-
ily. Located On NW
18th St. Carport with
separate laundry and
bathroom. Stg Shed
Rent $900 mthly 1st &
last req. Can reduce
rent with 6 months in
advance.Phone:
Trisha 352-794-6716



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225







Share my home
utilities incl. $85 wk
1st wk free
563-1465/228-1802







AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


-j
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.







UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







70+ Property Online
Real Estate REO
Auction
Homes, Commercial,
Multi-Family, Lots
Sperry Van Ness -
Commercial Real
Estate Advisors
504.468.6800
www.BidOnBank
REO.com
L. Fisher FLAU220


LAND & CABIN
PACKAGE
Only $79,900!
Crossville,
Tennessee.
Pre-grand opening
sale. 30 acres and
1,200 Sq. Ft. cabin
package. Minutes
from 4 state parks
and TN River.
Limited inventory.
Call now
877-243-2091




PINE RIDGE
3/2/2, Pool, Exc.
Condition! $199k
obo (352)422-2632




2/2 with big lanai. De-
tached garage. Very
nice area. Financed
by owner. $5000 dn,
$500/mo352-676-3155
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buying or Selling

"F








Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me

Bilingual/Spanish
HUGE HOUSE for Sale
3 Bedroom Possible 4,
2 Car Garage,
Carport, 2 Bath,
228 Monroe Street
(352) 464-2514













Open FI. plan, close to

. H re s $4900 ob
LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity. $119K Cash
Deal posss rent opt)
352-804-9729




2BR, BA, + Den
Open Fl. plan, close to
shopping & townG
new roof, well wtr.
.44 acres $492,900 obo
OWR REALTY, John
352-653-7977
3/1-+ CP Block home
on corner lot. % mile
to Lake Appoka boat
ramp. $55,000
Financing avail
(352) 564-2421

GOSPEL ISLAND
4BD/3BA & GARAGE
For Sale $92,000.
(941) 758-8719
(941) 524-6556


m



A


SALE


Great

Starter

Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
$2,500 down
$788. month
877-500-9517

INVERNESS
4/2.5/2 separate dinn-
ing. rm.office, Ig kitchen
patio, 2200 sq ft, move
in ready $182,500
352-220-1313

INVERNESS
Immaculate, former
model, 3/2/2, fenced
bkyd, $795 mthly, 1st,
last,sec. 352-400-1501





Very Nice Furn home
near Duval Island.
2/1+ CP. 3rd BR or ofc.
Lndry rm w/ shower.
Shed & fenced fruit
trees. $59,900 (352)
678-7145 or 444-0406





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


House for Sale
4 Bedroom 2 Bath
A/C Carport, Pool
2 Acres move in con-
dition, near schools,
4100 S. Fireside Way
352-382-5558


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY !





4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www. bettyhunts
homes.com.


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty


TONY Pauelsen
Realtor

I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

BUYING OR SELLING

SALES ARE WAY UP!

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com





CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2/2
CBS, 2100 sq. ft. living
area,10 OK boat lift,
updated 2011, shed
$229,000.
352-794-3020/586-4987


m
"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureCoast
Properties.cor
"To view
great waterfront
properties"







PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047





TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905


m


m


m


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 E13







E14 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013


REVIVE
Continued from Page Ell

watershed, which runs
from the Ohio River
through Cincinnati and
into its northern suburbs.
The watershed has long
been a receptacle for in-
dustrial waste, raw
sewage, residential
stormwater runoff and
other pollutants. Mill
Creek restoration has
been under way for two
decades, and the edible
forest garden is a way to
heighten public interest in
it, Corathers said.
Fresh, healthy food from
the garden is intended to
go to people who live
within walking distance
and aren't near a major
grocery store, and to food
pantries. It's also hoped
the fresh produce will
boost anti-obesity efforts
and attract people to the
area for exercise, learning
and leisure. The site will
include ground vegetation
and a tree canopy
The garden also is a cel-
ebration of art.
Jonathan Sears, execu-
tive director of Profes-
sional Artistic Research
Projects in Cincinnati's
Northside neighborhood,
and community volunteer
Lennell Myricks Jr spent a
recent 90-degree morning
hoeing rows of recently
planted corn in an acre-
size maze. Regional sculp-
tors will donate works to
be placed throughout the
corn maze; when the corn
grows tall, people will
come upon the works by
surprise as they search for
the way out.
"Long after the corn is
gone, the art will be here,"
said Sears. 'And people will
be able to snack on the other
things that are growing."
His group is among
many participants in the
forest garden. The Garden
Club of Cincinnati is con-
tributing plants and volun-
teers, and other help
comes from neighborhood


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


organizations, students,
environmental groups,
government programs and
corporations.
Scotts Miracle-Gro Co.
has made the project one
of 1,000 community gar-
dens and green spaces it
plans to help develop by
2018 in a corporate out-
reach project for its 150th
anniversary
"There are so many
healthy benefits to this,"
said Chris Cerveny, a hor-
ticulture scientist for
Scotts, the lawn products
and service company
based in Marysville, Ohio.
Scotts has partnered
with the U.S. Conference
of Mayors, which granted
$25,000 to the project this
year, including donations
of topsoil, compost and
other Scotts products. The
company organized
dozens of volunteers to
help clear and prepare the
soil for planting.
Ten sweat-soaked Duke
Energy Corp. volunteers
were working on a recent
day, wielding machetes
and sprayers to clear hon-
eysuckle and other inva-
sive plants along the Mill
Creek. The greenway proj-
ect is helping to revitalize
heron, turtle and other
wildlife habitat along the
Ohio.
Student volunteers are
teaching local youths more
about the area's history, as
well as the environment,
nutrition and horticulture.
Some of the newly
planted trees are called
"Freedom Trees" to cele-
brate Mill Creek's role in
the Underground Railroad
system that helped fugitive
slaves reach freedom.
Even on a recent hot
summer day, a few people
came down the trail on bi-
cycles. Soon, it's hoped,
they'll be able to stop and
pluck some blueberries or
an apple while taking a
break under shade trees.
"Anyone who uses the
trail who wants to grab
some fruit and nuts and
vegetables, that's what it's
there for," Carothers said.


Volunteer Jonathan
Sears plants seeds
in a garden along
Spring Grove Avenue
near the Mill Creek,
in Cincinnati. The
creek runs through
industrial areas and
has long been a
problem due to de-
forestation, pollution
and sewer overflow.
The city of Cincin-
nati is growing an
edible forest garden
near the creek as
part of a years-long
effort to restore the
Mill Creek valley.
Associated Press


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744



6o 6a Vita Tou or Mulipl Phoos


NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


419 W Mickey Manile Palh
MLS 703997 $385,000
Value, savings, elegance AND the golf
view you've always dreamed of.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING


110if l 716 W Doerr Path
MLS 704019 $289,900
Enjoy all the amenities Terra Vista has to
offer in this beautiful 3bd/2.5ba villa.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


.ti- 3020 E Berwick Ct 2772 N Crosswater Path
MLS 703938 $120,000 MLS 702222 $995,000
Beautiful, bright & cozy 3bd/2ba home Custom built property with endless
w/many attractive features. views of The Ranch Course.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976 Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


NEW LISTING


S18 W Keller St
MLS 704051 $275,000
This 3bd/2ba is the complete Oaks
Golf Course Home!
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


1180 E Triple Crown Loop 922 W Silver Meadow Loop
MLS 356404 $224,900 MLS 700994 $199,900
Spacious 3/3/2.5 home with heated Maintenance free villa featuring 2bd/
caged-in pool. 2ba, office/den and heated pool.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499 Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499

-" B ..


4,La5 625 E Bismark St 810 GilchrislCl285a 2392N Loma Pt
MLS 703017 $119,000 2178 W Snowy Egret PI MLS 356430 $59,900 MLS 358186 $51,000
Well maintained 3bd/2ba home w/open MLS 703006 $103,900 2/2 second floor condo. Bright, clean & spacious rooms in this
floor plan. 3bd/2ba home w/an extra private lot. Easy Florida living. 2bd/2ba mobile home in 55+ community.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
r 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

Buying affordable crocheted baby
blankets: This is for Tammy from Al-
abama, a reader who was asking
about handmade crocheted baby
afghans. Your advice regarding on-
line video tutorials was great, as it
would be easier than reading a book.
She could also purchase an infor-
mational CD on the Internet or bor-
row one from her local library. In
addition, the website Etsycom fea-
tures craft supplies, as well as hand-
made and vintage items. There are
LOTS of baby items to choose from
on Etsy -Flo, Mississippi
Reuse coffee cans: They make ex-
cellent containers for garage items.
Nails, screws, nuts and bolts can all
be put in separate containers, la-
beled and put on a shelf. The tight
lids ensure that they won't spill if
knocked over. -KJ, Washington
Lots of frugal cooking tips: Oat-
meal is a great cheap breakfast that
you can spice up with seasonings of
your choice. Rice served sticky with
cinnamon and a pinch of sugar
makes another nice breakfast. Al-
most any fruit can be used to make
muffins, if you just learn the correct
consistency to make moist muffins,
as well as the appropriate cooking
time.
You can bread meats and fish with
almost any bread product. Combine
a few seasonings with ground-up
crackers, potato chips or corn flakes
to make Shake N Bake. Put the mix-
ture in a bread bag, then drag a
piece of meat through an egg and
place it in the bag, shaking to coat
the meat. Place on a greased cookie
sheet and bake.
While most people have heard of
"leftover soup," fewer people know
about "leftover broth." Take ANY
vegetable peelings (carrots, onions
or potatoes, for example), leaves off
almost anything (such as celery,
spinach or lettuces) and ends ofveg-
gies (onions, carrots, root crops, etc.)
and cover with water in a stockpot.
You can also add bones to make
meat broths. Bring to a boil, then let
it sit on a backburner to cool. Run
the broth through a colander to re-
move solids before using. You may
need to run broths made with
chicken bones through a strainer to
remove bone fragments before
using. You can freeze all of these
vegetable parts and bones in a


You can bread meats
and fish with almost
any bread product.
Combine a few LAND
seasonings with
ground-up crackers,


potato chips or corn
flakes to make
Shake N Bake.

freezer bag until you have enough to
make a batch.
If you like flavored rices, search
the Internet for do-it-yourself
recipes. Many Rice-A-Roni-style
dishes can be duplicated with bouil-
lon cubes, one or two spices, an
onion and a pat of butter. It's easy to
cook up a whole pound of rice, sep-
arate it into individual meal-sized
freezer bags and freeze for later use.
Experiment with homemade
sauces for serving with meats. Many
of the most expensive are just a jam
and two or three other ingredients.
Serve with an appropriate vegetable
to reduce meat portions. You can
also experiment to discover which
sauces are nice with a pasta and cut
down meat servings even more.
Spinach makes a versatile and
healthy salad. Use it in salad until it
starts to droop, then wilt the re-
maining lettuce in the microwave
for 90 seconds with a little water.
Allow it to cool, then freeze it until
you have enough to add to a lasagna
or quiche. Grind it up and experi-
ment with adding it to almost any-
thing, especially soups.
Check nearby markets for dis-
count sections. Finding a market
that regularly marks down meats,
produce and breads can save a lot of
money. Plan your shopping trip
around the days when the manager
marks down these products. Cas,
Kansas
U -
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara @frugalvillage. com.


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY





NESTLED IN A WONDERFULLY RUN OVER 5
CASA MAJEALOUS IS W HAT YOU W ILL CALL THIS HOME I........ ..II,..... 1.......i i.., COMMUNITY. ..... h ..... .il '.il i ......
3/3/3 home on 167 ft. of open water. RV parking, amazing screened porch plus so much more. Call for private tour. from the pool and clubhouse. 2/2/1 corner uni f
#703523. ASKING ONLY $299,468 ONLY $79,435. Don't let this deal slip by. #703803.




Imaaa gh i II
^HVSUKSYew


I m m.....i ........ n


SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MIL lU LMRE riUmourrcEE


W ll. l al.llf _" Il I
Mi = )iii"lih PRICED RIGHT AT S110,000
Call Willaid o0 Jeanne Pickiel
to iviel at 201 9871


2 CAR GARAGE HOME
Ii i .a i ,il.A- Hl ..,r:] ,,i' ,i 'illi I Rili.

, lh u l h ,) ,i ,: e i l h ,: , ~ l i uf l,6mi hil ,:fl% '
Ml = 7iil-17:, ASKING ONLY S89,000
Call Jim Mi ion to wiieit,
this beautiful home 422 2173


* I- l I : .


* J II.j. a16 .6
* I)I. l, I I l l r ll m l ;. ,:il I.I
Mi= 111:': ONLY $87,500
Charles Kelly 352 422 2387


* 1 h, I.,,ll. M H IM 1 p.: i .:l



Ml =:il I 1 $95,000
Jeanne oa Wilaid Pickiel 212 3410
I:'I'It'. CitiusCounlySold. corn


CHEAP LIVING

h l Bil p ill 1 II1 i t,: 1'l (I' ll h l

11,ii hI ONLY $19,900 II.-
Ruth Fiedeck I 352 5636866


OPEN WATERFRONT-2 LOTS
dir i I0 I 11 ,,, I . ...1. h ,
I n,

r I.-i Asking $89,000
Pit Di, ,352 212 7280
['.eil l'../r iL.ii i. c12p ld ,om


IT'S ALL GOOD





ri ,, ASKING S78.500.00
P,r ,1, i,,,?' ?1? '"?? '
hirenarda 111C~it-rassPi C'If


* H 1 Pi-l l 1 .
* i.Jl pool ''' i..,l
* I ll .*I. mI I. .i. .I

Mi = 71_"3_7 $229,000
Jeanne oi B'illad Pickiel 352212 3410
i1 1 t1 ClliusCounlI Sold coin


7 ACRE ESTATE HOME PINE RIDGE
1 h 11 dl h I.I. .



lh.I=;I .. ASKING $399,000
CallI Nanc Jenks 352-400 8072
oi 352 726 6668


BANK OWNED SUGARMILL WOODS
GOLF COURSE HOME
. ; ( .,.)........ ; l, I ., ) ,



.i. =. ONLY $55,000
Fio mote inhim.anon call
fEh.s G KH.ll.Ah .t1 352 400 2635


.. . II I.. . . .


S i I I- ,, i, I I ri, 6i6
lt. 0-,, Valoe, f;2 ,-6668
0,,ew 1 j4,s, e.1wimemew


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY
III d, I, h h, -I I II .. ,
I, I I, dn mI l 1 I I


$95,000
Call Jim Mo tion at 3524222173 lot
Sout personal tout ol Emetald Hills









INVERNESS COUNTRY CLUB AREA

\. l.)l\\ ,iJl h l,1Jl .i ,Jl. l.
kqlh hi Ipl, p(i, Npil ( nil, l

Mi. = h7_":;c. PRICED AT $118,000
Call Willaid o Jeanne Pickiel
on cell 201 9871


WATERFRONT, POOL HOME WITH DOCK
II 1 III 1 i r 1 II I I i I i l I
rim ll l II h, II Il l,, I. I 1.. I, I


rii =-i vI ASKING $159.900
P~t Di, ,,352212 7280
I',i l I ; 12fl ldl ,? ,,4 C m


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!
I ;u:h I.) inwy. _" ll.l Inl d


. i*i 6ii*iI IV.a ind l .arr' l
ONLY ASKING $185,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


... n, I j ,,ll .,i ,I j j lh I j .. ,,,l j

.H .).. I a ......... .11

S:.:. $210.00
Ci" IhtlIh Sni d&, 352 476 8727
nd io Iv '1, = 703905


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS

i :lh I,.,' h Al ..i. : .II 'l II. lll .I I. v


Mi =II) 1,. ASKING $82,000
Call Nancf Jenks
352 400 80872 352 7266668


HERNANDO
.V I lv h h ..I..... h, , ..... d ,

I I. l .,

ii III I d, 1,11II I I I h
h~i =".,.'. $99,000
D.nid Kuilz Cell 954 383 8/86
OFF 352 126 6668


BEAUTIFUL STILT HOME ON CANAL
TO THE WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER
l dII. 1. l, I1 .. -1 I .....


i.: i= i'. ASKING 9149.000
C IAl /l t'' Snidte 4768727
to 4-' tie4 ?peo,'? l l.jnm


UN .60 ACRE CORNER LUT
1h.. ... h.,it......I..'I l.l Ri Ir'. r,,,,,'


Mi.1. = I'i' ASKING $28,900
Pat Dan is 352 212 1280
I e'1ll all li sr 1111 r2lpaidall ro' n


BANK OWNED
CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME


ONLY S159,900 SPECIAL FINANCING
1605 E. S. Charles PI.. Inverness
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


E16 SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013