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Citrus County chronicle ( 07-07-2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03172

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03172

Full Text

Title game: Inverness, Dunnellon vie for Distg


I --- N DAYJ II


CIT R-US


Scattered late-
day storms, rain
chance 40%.
PAGE A4


JULY 7, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


COUNTY'


ONICL.
Ojwww.chronicleonline.com
L Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 118 ISSUE 334


Good old days


Fish tales and

other memories

of growing up

in Citrus

County
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
Longtime local fish-
ing guide Charles
Barnes' Citrus
County roots run
deep.
The son of a hunting and
fishing guide, and himself a
fishing guide for 50 years,
he knows every inch of the
local waterways and 15
square miles of his home-
town of Crystal River bet-
ter than he knows the palm
of his hand.
"My great-grandfather
was killed by Indians in
Bushnell in the Dade Mas-
sacre," Barnes said from
his Meadowcrest home.
"My great-grandmother
had seven children, and
after my great-grandfather
was killed, she remarried
and moved to Cedar Key
My grandfather came back
and married a woman from
Red Level and they home-
steaded in Lecanto.
"I was born in downtown
Crystal River in an old two-
story house on Citrus Av-
enue, with big oak trees in
the front yard," he said.
"It's not there anymore."
Barnes' grandfather was
John Yulee Barnes, chair-
man of the Board of County
Commissioners when the
Historic Courthouse was
built in 1912.
"My grandfather was a
butcher," Barnes said. "In
those days, a fellow that
was enterprising and had
wild cattle in the woods,
he'd run them down and
brand them, and they'd be
his. By 1926, he had almost
10,000 head."
His other grandfather
worked in the cedar mill.


N
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MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Longtime Citrus County fishing guide Charles Barnes says he has guided clients to a vast
variety of fish, from the small freshwater species that live in the Crystal River to the prized
tarpon of the saltwater flats and everything in between.


"My father was in busi-
ness with my grandfather
in Lecanto," he said. '"A tick
problem came through and
they were paying the boys


to kill the deer, pile them
up and burn them. They
wanted the cattlemen to
dip their cattle, but Grand-
daddy said he wasn't about


to dip 10,000 head, so he
sold them to some brothers
in Tampa.
See Page A9


Pay raises


plenty for


some in


county


Officials: Each raise

has a specific purpose
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
A Citrus County budget strapped for
cash is expected to include modest pay
raises for employees the first, officials
say, in several years.
While it is true the wage scale hasn't
changed in that time, about 250 employ-
ees have received pay bumps since 2010
and several have
had more than
one increase. COUNTY
Reasons in- SALARIES
clude changes in
job responsibility, Citrus county
temporary or per- government
manent promo- employs about
manent promo- 497 people full-
tions and time*. Here is
obtaining special the breakdown
certifications. based on
A handful of salary:
upper-level ad-
ministrators also 0 $25,000 or
received pay under:
raises after six 29 percent.
months on the job $25,000 to
-incentives for $40,000:
employment, ac- 49 percent.
cording to county $40,000 to
records. $65,000:
One is Vince 17 percent.
Cautero, director
of development $65,000 and
services. Cautero, above:
hired in Septem- 5 percent.
ber 2010 at a *As of February
salary of $92,497, 2013; the exact
received a 5 per- number fluctu-
cent hike in April ates often.
2011 as part of his Source: Citrus County
emplo y ment Department of
agreement. Human Resources
Cautero said he
would have taken
the job even without the incentive.
"I was of the firm belief that my job
was being eliminated in Hendry
County," he said.
But he sees the value of an incentive
program for highly skilled positions.
Cautero offered the same arrangement
to Carl Jones, who became the county's
See Page A10


Betty Fowler was all about fun


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS If you wanted to find
Betty Fowler, all you needed to do was
follow the laughter.
That woman loved a good time, and if
she was in a room you knew it, and you
were drawn to her.
Betty Jean Fowler died June 29 after a
long illness. As for her age, as Betty would
say, "That's none of your business."
"She was one of the sweetest ladies
I've ever known," said longtime friend
Judy Dean. "We played cards together
and had a wonderful relationship. She
was a super lady"
Fun, fun, fun is how Barbara Fallon


C,, A J 7 commissioner. "That was in 1958 and
/--' i i" 7 -',. four years later we got married."
4 I" .. Betty's daughter, Dawn Tanner, re-
I members laughing with her mother all
the time.
remembers time spent with Betty. "We had a tradition," Tanner said.
"We were the groupent with Betty and Jim"Starting when I was in middle school,
Dave and Karen Langer, Vicky andTom every Sunday we would go to the mall in
Dave and Karen Langerd Joe,"Vicky and Tom Ocala and spend the day shopping.
Kane, me diand my husband Joe, Fallon She'd get an outfit and I'd get an outfit.
said "We did things together, went to "We timed it just right, getting to Mor-
Vegas together; we were good friends, r a t wnitopned-
and we laughed a lot" rison's Cafeteria at 11 when it opened -
Born in Georgia and raised in Orlando my mom loved their fried chicken," Tan-
Born Miami, she met Jim, her husbandof ner said. "We'd eat lunch and be finished
and Miami, she met Jim, her hand nd by the time the stores opened at noon."
nearly 51 years, while working as a wait- Tanner said her mother was one of the
ress in Miami. "From the first time I saw T e h e has ever known
her I thought she was the prettiest thing
I'd ever seen," said the former county See Page A9


.11 li I I I1 o


Classifieds . .
Crossword . .
Excursions . .


.... D4
. .A18
. .A17


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ....... .A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts
Movies ...... .
Obituaries . .


.... B3
. .A18
.. A6


TV Listings ...... A18
Together ........ A22
Veterans Notes . .A20


1. 41



*-10 uEOumOSTmu1,0m SCPAIY




0A-AA 1 T I


- CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.1* CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
vso a- - 1035 South Sun coast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448


+ALL PRICES INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES, TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50.
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


FIND ROADS --


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
91
LOW
71


Special to the Chronicle
Betty Jean Fowler, wife of former county
commissioner Jim Fowler, died June 29
after a long illness. The family will receive
friends from 2 to 5 p.m. today at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes.


OOFERL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E


and leave the


ING to
..............


0
* .~
* S
S


Carpet &
Upholstery Cleaning
Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning
Io Truck Mount Extraction Spot Removal
Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs
Wood Floor Cleaning


Fire & Water Damage
* Recommended by Insurance Industry
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* Quick Response Time
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c 1 HALLWAY C c c Have a couch and loveseatC
Soo A 0 cleaned, get a chair or 0
U u u ANY CLEANING recliner cleaned
p p p SERVICE pp p
0 0oo OVER $100 0 0 0
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"One room can not -"
s0r- -l0 0nn ec ft Exnires 7/31/13 -'


Expires 7/31/13.I.
Expires 7/31/13


Restrictions Apply.


Expires 7/31/13


ServiceMaster of Citrus County

352-794-0270


I / /-

,&INIIOl


www.smcflorida.com


1


A2 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


pyp


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Page A3-SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013



ITATE.& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Democratic delegate
vote set July 17
This year's Florida Dem-
ocratic Party State Confer-
ence will be Oct. 25 to 28 at
the Disney Yacht and
Beach Club. The state dele-
gate selection process is
now open, and you can file
for delegate through July
15. Any Democrat who is
eligible to vote in Florida
can run.
The delegate application
must be returned to the
county Democratic Executive
Committee. The Citrus County
delegate election will be at
7 p.m. July 17, at the Beverly
Hills Community Center at
7 p.m. Delegate candidates
must be present at the elec-
tion. To run, you must obtain
an application from DEC
Chairman Mike Fahey, who
can be reached at 352-503-
6035 or mike.faheyl4@
gmail.com.
Help offered for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Services Department is
offering help for veterans
who have had their post-
traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been
denied within the past two
years are asked to contact
the department to review
your case and discuss your
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans who
have been diagnosed by
the Lecanto VA Mental
Health Center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss your claim,
call the Citrus County Veter-
ans Office at 352-527-5915.
You will need to have your
denial letter and a copy of
your compensation exami-
nation by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical
records or from the primary
care window in Lecanto.
For information about the
Citrus County Veterans Of-
fice, log onto www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.
Gill to discuss
changes in laws
Supervisor of Elections
Susan Gill will be the guest
speaker at the next League
of Women Voters of Citrus
County meeting at 10:15
a.m. Tuesday, July 9, at
Central Ridge Library in
Beverly Hills. She will dis-
cuss changing voter laws.
Gill also will answer
questions.
All interested men and
women are invited to at-
tend. The LWV of CC is a
nonpartisan, educational or-
ganization. For more infor-
mation, call 352-745-0655.

Palatka
Men charged in theft
of chicken statue
Three men in north
Florida have been charged
with the theft of a giant
purple chicken statue.
The Florida Times-Union
reported the men took the
9-foot, 600-pound alu-
minum chicken from a
home in Putnam County on
Tuesday. They hooked it to
a Chevrolet truck and
dragged it a mile down the
road. The owner of the bird
told deputies he saw one of
the thieves mount the bird
and ride it.
The men then unhooked
the statue and fled. Detec-
tives located them the next
day.
All three suspects are
between the ages of 18
and 21 and have been


charged with grand theft.
The chicken has been
returned to its rightful
owner, but suffered a
lacerated leg, cracked
claw and scarring on its
side from the ordeal.


-From staff and wire reports


CCHB to hear from hospital bidders


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

Four bidders for Citrus
Memorial hospital will
make their pitch Wednes-
day to the Citrus County
Hospital Board, which
hopes by month's end to
select one for a letter of in-
tent to sell, lease or merge
the public institution.
The bidders HCA, Hos-
pital Management Associ-
ates (HMA), RegionalCare
Hospital Partners and Tampa
General Hospital are
scheduled to make presen-
tations beginning around
4:30 p.m. The hospital board
meeting begins at 3 p.m. in
the county commission cham-
bers of the courthouse.
All butTampa General are
proposing a lease or pur-
chase of Citrus Memorial
Health System. Tampa Gen-
eral is proposing a merger,
with no cash on the table
other than an unspecified
capital investment.


HCA and HMA both
have been in the news in
recent weeks.
Twenty-three hospitals
with HCA paid $7.1 million
to the U.S. government to
settle allegations that they
used more expensive inpa-
tient procedures rather
than outpatient spinal sur-
geries to get bigger pay-
ments from Medicare.
HMA is pushing back
against an attempt to re-
move its board of directors
by HMAVs largest stock-
holder, Glenview Capital
Management.
HMA also was the sub-
ject of a June "60 Minutes"
TV show segment that ac-
cused the company of
pressuring doctors to
admit patients in order to
increase revenues.
Josh Nemzoff, the CCHB
transaction agent, said
those issues should have
little bearing on potential
arrangements for Citrus
Memorial.


Two meetings are on tap this week regarding the
Citrus Memorial hospital sale/lease/merger bids:
* Citrus County Hospital Board transaction agent
Josh Nemzoff will make a presentation to the
Citrus County Commission at 3:45 p.m. Tuesday
in the county courthouse regarding the hospital
bidding process.
* Companies will present their bids to the CCHB
at a special 3 p.m. meeting Wednesday in the
Citrus County Courthouse. The public is invited.


"We shouldn't make
business decisions based
on what '60 Minutes'
thinks," Nemzoff said. "All
these companies HCA,
Tenet, Community Health
- have had times in their
history where problems
come up and there's a lot
of bad press."
However, Nemzoff en-
couraged CCHB trustees
to seek assurances from
bidders that these issues
won't plague the Citrus
Memorial process.
For example, Nemzoff
said there are rumors


HMA may be getting sold.
While the transaction cri-
teria would require terms
of a contract to transfer to
a new owner, Nemzoff said
trustees should ask HMA
about it.
"Absolutely if I'm a
board member I'd ask
about that issue," he said.
A larger potential prob-
lem, Nemzoff said, in-
volved antitrust
regulations. HCA owns
Oak Hill Hospital in
Brooksville, which com-
petes with Citrus Memo-
rial for patients in


Seventeen-year-old Cody Roy reaches for a mullet. Proceeds
from the toss benefited the Homosassa Elementary
School PTO.


southwest Citrus County.
HMA owns Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center
near Crystal River and has
a letter of intent to buy
Munroe Regional Medical
Center in Ocala, both of
which are direct Citrus
Memorial competitors.
Nemzoff said the Fed-
eral Trade Commission
could determine that a
sale to either HCA or
HMA creates unfair com-
petition and nix the deal,
or delay it. He said he's
urged the hospital board
to hire an antitrust attor-
ney to offer advice in that
area and he believes
CCHB attorney Bill Grant
is doing that.
"You don't want to sign
a letter of intent," he
said, "with someone who
could have an antitrust
problem."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


State BRIEFS

Police locate parents
)f boy found on street
TAMPA- Police have located
e parents of a 4-year-old boy found
walking alone near an intersection.
The child was found Saturday
round 1 a.m. by a citizen who
called police.
The boy was wearing a blue
ind white striped shirt, jeans and
ack shoes. Officers determined
s name was Darius and that his
parents were possibly Scooby
ind Wayne.
The Tampa Police Department
asked for the public's help early
saturday in locating his parents
r legal guardian.
Officers found his home a short
ne later. The front door had been
ft opened while the boy was being
ken care of by a baby sitter.
Police: Celebratory
gunfire strikes man
ST. PETERSBURG Police
St. Petersburg said the stray
bullet that injured a 38-year-old
an likely came from a Fourth of
uly celebration.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
orted the bullet fell from the sky
ind hit Robert Anthony Turner
thursday about 10 p.m.
Turner was taken to Bayfront
medical Center with cuts on his
eck and right eyebrow. His in-
ries were not life-threatening.
Three miles away, another bul-
t went through the ceiling of a
t. Petersburg home and wound
p lodged in a bamboo table.
Police throughout Tampa Bay
ad pleaded with residents not to
e guns in the air on the Fourth.
St. Petersburg police spokesman
ike Puetz said celebratory gun-
e is illegal and has resulted in
,veral injuries in recent years.
;ar drives several miles
with dog under hood
DANIA BEACH Firefighters
ame to the rescue of a dog that
aveled 5 miles while trapped
inder the hood of a car.
The Broward Sheriff's Office
aid firefighters were called
thursday afternoon to Dania
each to free the dog. The animal
ad been trapped between the car's
dxle and steering mechanism.
A sheriffs office spokesman said
e dog suffered no injuries, even
ough it had been driven roughly
miles from Hallandale Beach.
Teens rescued from
capsized kayak
TALLAHASSEE Two teens
ave been rescued after their
syak capsized amid heavy rain
nd high winds.
The Tallahassee Democrat re-
orted a 17-year-old male and his
4-year-old sister were found cling-
g to their kayak in the Ochlock-
ee River on Friday evening. The
ens' father jumped from an
overhead bridge to assist them.
A Wakulla County Sheriff's
tenant and a deputy re-
)onded to the scene and called
r a search and rescue boat. But
e water became increasingly
ugh, so instead of waiting, the
tenant called a friend who
ame with his own boat and was


ble to rescue them.
Neither the teens nor their fa-
er were injured.
-From wire reports


PTO at Homosassa

Elementary School
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Fish were flying, wet sand kicked up
and a toilet was a "bowls-eye" for
charity.
The sun was out for hundreds of partic-
ipants and spectators Saturday at the Old
Mill Tavern in Homosassa for the 2013 Ho-
mosassa Mullet Toss. Homosassa Mullet
Toss is a nonprofit organization that donates
proceeds to the Homosassa Elementary
School Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO).
Old Mill Tavern, Smok'n Mo's Country
Diner and The Freezer invited partici-
pants of all ages to toss a mullet across a
measured and outlined ground. Judges
recorded the distance of each toss, and
prizes were awarded for first and second
place in male and female categories.
For an additional donation, mullets
were tossed into a toilet. Those who
scored a "bowls-eye" competed for a toss-
off cash prize.
At the end of the event, leftover fish
were given to local fishermen for bait.


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Four-year-old Gabrielle Nickerson grabbed a fish longer than her torso to throw across the orange line
in front of her. She may be too young to understand what charity is, but she was eager to take home
the mullet title.




Charity chums


Mullet toss benefits f A T,,




A4 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday A number of interesting
developments might be in store for you
in the year ahead, but none of them
are apt to pertain to your work or ca-
reer. That area of your life will be rela-
tively stable, with few surprises.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Go
ahead and trust some of your
hunches. Just don't go overboard and
take every thought you get as gospel.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) One of your
greatest possibilities for gain will stem
from some kind of collective endeavor.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -An impul-
sive decision could turn out to haunt
you down the line. Take time to ana-
lyze all your options.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although it
might take you extra time to get your
act together, once you establish some
plans and get going on them, you'll be
both industrious and productive.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You
should be quite adept at matters that
require a quick wit and sharp mental
agility. These attributes are likely to be
most effective in social involvements.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
You're likely to fare much better acting
alone when it comes to financial or
commercial endeavors. If you must in-
clude associates, be sure you're the
one running the show.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Com-
plicated, theoretical involvements are
your forte. You have the ability to visu-
alize and grasp all the pertinent facts,
even if they appear fuzzy to others.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Al-
though financial trends are rather en-
couraging, you're not likely to benefit
from any venture that is too risky. If
you're smart, you'll avoid taking
chances.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Even if
most people greet you with pleasure, a
few close relatives might not be so
welcoming. Don't get upset con-
sider the source.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your
possibilities for success improve when
you do what needs doing without di-
verting too much energy to side issues.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When
commingling with friends, don't de-
mand they do things your way, even if
it truly is best. Give them some room.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Although
you're in a good achievement cycle,
you still might not get everything done.
There's a chance you could slack off
just enough to drop the ball.


ENTERTAINMENT


NYC mayor's race is
a star-studded affair
NEW YORK One makes a
video with Steve Buscemi and
rockers Vampire Weekend. An-
other gets shout-outs from
Whoopi Goldberg and Brooke
Shields. A third hobnobs over
cocktails with an actor from "The
Sopranos."
No, it's not an awards show
weekend. It's the New York City
mayor's race, featuring a cast of
celebrities like few other munici-
pal elections.
Last weekend, Democratic
mayoral contender Christine
Quinn unfurled a star-dusted list
of pro-gay-rights backers of her
bid to become the city's first fe-
male and first openly gay mayor.
Among them: singer Lance
Bass, actor Neil Patrick Harris,
director Rob Reiner and "Pro-
ject Runway" style czar Tim
Gunn, who said Quinn would
"make the position of mayor the
bully pulpit it needs to be to fight
for all New Yorkers."
Ten days earlier, Alec Bald-
win announced he'd raffle off
two dinner invites to any-amount
donors to Democratic candidate
Bill de Blasio.
And in May, a fundraiser for
Republican hopeful Joe Lhota
spotlighted as "special guest"
Steve Schirripa, best known as
gentle-spirited goodfella Bobby
"Bacala" Baccalieri on "The
Sopranos."
The race can sometimes seem
like something of a ballot-box ver-
sion of "Battle of the Network
Stars." De Blasio's "LGBT for
BdB" gala is headlined by Sarah
Jessica Parker and Cynthia
Nixon of "Sex and the City" fame
and Tony Award-winning actor
Alan Cumming? Well, here
comes the "LGBT for Quinn"
team, with actor-playwright Har-
vey Fierstein and actors


Associated Press
Sheryl Crow performs in the infield Saturday prior to the
NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona Beach.


Cheyenne Jackson and
George Takei, along with Bass,
Harris, Reiner and Gunn.
Republican candidate George
McDonald, meanwhile, has links
to actor Ethan Hawke, a long-
time supporter of the Doe Fund,
the homelessness-services non-
profit McDonald runs. GOP rival
John Catsimatidis has been
cultivating a theatrical tie of his
own the billionaire business-
man has been underwriting per-
formances of "The Little Flower,"
actor Tony Lo Bianco's one-
man show about former New
York Mayor Fiorello La
Guardia.

Rappers' daughters
are new authors
NEW ORLEANS The
teenage daughters of rappers Lil
Wayne and Birdman are in New
Orleans with their dads this
weekend, but it's the girls who
are greeting fans and signing
autographs at the Essence
Festival.


Reginae Carter is the 14-
year-old daughter of Lil Wayne,
whose real name is Dwayne
Carter. She collaborated with
16-year-old Bria Williams,
daughter of Bryan "Birdman"
Williams on a teen novel, "Pa-
parazzi Princesses."
It's based on stories and char-
acters inspired by their own life
experiences.
"It's about the ups and downs
of having celebrity parents,"
Reginae Carter said. "It's about
how we go through everyday
drama like everybody else."
They hope their book will in-
spire more teens to read.
The teens are scheduled to
continue their book tour in other
cities through the summer.
They're in Washington on Mon-
day and Orlando, Fla., next
week. But they have bigger
plans when fall rolls around a
trip with friends to Disney World.
The girls, like their famous fa-
thers, are from New Orleans.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 7, the
188th day of 2013. There are 177
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 7, 1846, U.S. annexation
of California was proclaimed at
Monterey after the surrender of a
Mexican garrison.
On this date:
In 1898, the United States an-
nexed Hawaii.
In 1919, the first Transcontinental
Motor Convoy, in which a U.S. Army
convoy of motorized vehicles
crossed the United States, departed
Washington, D.C. (The trip ended in
San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.)
In 1941, U.S. forces took up posi-
tions in Iceland, Trinidad and British
Guiana to forestall any Nazi inva-
sion, even though the United States
had not yet entered the Second
World War.
In 1981, President Ronald Rea-
gan announced he was nominating
Arizona Judge Sandra Day O'Con-
nor to become the first female jus-
tice on the U.S. Supreme Court.
Ten years ago: NASA launched
its second Mars rover, Opportunity,
which arrived on the red planet in
January 2004.
Five years ago: A suicide
bomber struck the Indian Embassy
in Kabul, Afghanistan, killing at least
60 people.
One year ago: Jubilant Libyans
chose a new parliament in their first
nationwide vote in decades. The
Obama administration declared
Afghanistan the United States'
newest "major non-NATO ally."
Today's Birthdays: Musician-
conductor Doc Severinsen is 86.
Ringo Starr is 73. Actor Joe Spano
is 67. Actress Shelley Duvall is 64.
Actress Roz Ryan is 62. Actor Billy
Campbell is 54. Singer-songwriter
Vonda Shepard is 50. Actor-come-
dian Jim Gaffigan is 47. Actress
Amy Carlson is 45. Actress Jorja
Fox is 45. Actor Troy Garity is 40.
Thought for Today: "Only a
mediocre person is always at his
best." W. Somerset Maugham,
English author and dramatist (1874-
1965).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR-HI LO PR | HLi
0.00 > i QR 7.1 n nn k J90 72


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Partly cloudy with a
slight chance of thunderstorms today.


94 74 0.00 ----NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK e xclusvedaly
forecast by:.
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 71
Scattered late-day storms, rain
chance 40%
If MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 71
Few late-day storms, rain chance 30%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Scattered late-day storms, rain chance 40%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 92/73
Record 98/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 83
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.10 in.
Total for the month 4.00 in.
Total for the year 23.30 in.
Normal for the year 25.09 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.09 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 69
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.8/12
Monday's count: 5.2
Tuesday's count: 5.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/7 SUNDAY 5:22 11:33 5:45 11:57
7/8 MONDAY 6:08 6:32 12:43
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................8:32 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:39A.M.
JUC 1 \ I 4 MOONRISE TODAY ...........................6:09A.M.
JULY 8 JULY 15 JULY 22 JULY 29 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 8:02 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:39 a/2:03 a 5:38 p/1:37 p
Crystal River" 5:00 a/10:59 a 3:59 p/11:58 p
Withlacoochee* 2:47 a/8:47 a 1:46 p/9:46 p
Homosassa*** 5:49 a/1:02 a 4:48 p/12:36 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
7:12 a/2:36 a 6:15 p/2:16 p
5:33 a/11:38 a 4:36 p/---
3:20 a/9:26 a 2:23 p/10:17 p
6:22 a/1:35 a 5:25 p/1:15 p


Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder NA NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando NA NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness NA NA NA
Tsala Apopka-Floral City NA NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


87 72 ts
91 65 .05 ts
80 66 1.16 ts
83 70 .31 ts
93 74 pc
98 67 ts
92 74 pc
83 59 ts
75 70 1.29 ts
91 57 s
93 79 pc
83 68 ts
88 73 ts
89 74 .01 pc
87 69 ts
83 71 .17 ts
83 65 ts
79 68 1.89 ts
85 70 ts
86 72 .03 ts
85 71 .02 ts
89 69 pc
96 73 pc
90 63 ts
92 69 pc
83 70 ts
101 75 ts
82 66 .04 pc
92 72 pc
92 74 pc
94 75 ts
73 68 .03 pc
86 69 .01 ts
10288 .01 s
90 68 pc
74 66 pc
75 68 .95 pc
88 70 pc
82 66 ts
91 76 pc
78 71 1.69 ts
79 73 1.17 ts
75 67 1.19 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 84 74 .13 ts 87 78
New York City 91 78 pc 94 75
Norfolk 91 74 pc 91 72
Oklahoma City 95 72 pc 93 73
Omaha 90 69 pc 92 73
Palm Springs 108 80 s 109 81
Philadelphia 94 77 pc 94 74
Phoenix 10988 s 113 88
Pittsburgh 87 70 ts 81 66
Portland, ME 88 75 .02 pc 86 67
Portland, Ore 74 56 s 80 58
Providence, R.I. 93 75 pc 94 72
Raleigh 87 73 .01 pc 90 71
Rapid City 90 61 ts 84 65
Reno 96 60 s 96 64
Rochester, NY 86 67 ts 84 70
Sacramento 85 57 s 92 60
St. Louis 87 71 pc 89 72
St. Ste. Marie 85 61 pc 84 63
Salt Lake City 93 70 ts 92 71
San Antonio 96 74 ts 91 75
San Diego 73 67 pc 73 66
San Francisco 71 55 pc 70 55
Savannah 89 75 .07 pc 89 74
Seattle 77 55 s 73 57
Spokane 82 55 s 86 57
Syracuse 86 72 .01 ts 87 69
Topeka 87 69 pc 96 76
Washington 91 77 pc 92 75
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Phoenix, Ariz. LOW 33 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/78/pc
Amsterdam 82/54/s
Athens 93/73/s
Beijing 93/75/pc
Berlin 81/56/s
Bermuda 82/76/pc
Cairo 98/71/s
Calgary 68/52/pc
Havana 85/73/ts
Hong Kong 86/78/ts
Jerusalem 88/68/s


Lisbon 99/72/s
London 86/56/s
Madrid 102/69/s
Mexico City 66/54/ts
Montreal 82/66/sh
Moscow 88/64/sh
Paris 89/60/s
Rio 78/64/s
Rome 85/74/pc
Sydney 60/47/s
Tokyo 90/74/pc
Toronto 81/70/sh
Warsaw 81/55/s


LEGALL NOTICES





Meeting Notices............................D6

Foreclosure

Sale/Action Notices.................D6

Surplus Property...........................D6


S CITRUS C LCO UNTY -


CHRONICLEI

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Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT




Nothing quite as good as a visit to this,





neighborhood Pizzeria


ABOVE: Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe in Hernando serves brick oven-fired pizza, garlic knots and wings like few others in Citrus County.
Diners may add wings, cold beer and delicious homemade apple pie for dessert. The restaurant is at 2780 N. Florida Ave. in Hernando
(352) 637-1920 BELOW LEFT: Simply the best Calzone ever! Found right here at Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe in Hernando.


ChefAnthony's Pizza Cafd uses secret family recipes for pizza dough, sauces


What Makes Us Great?


LELAND ASHBY
Pizza Critic


Today you do not hear
enough positive comments
about young people. I would
like to take the time to rec-
ognize Pizza Caf6's great
staff. Manager Ashley Zane
Wait staff: Lisa, Jessica &
Nini. Four great young
ladies working hard to make
sure our customers have a
pleasant dining experience.
In the kitchen we have
Maxwell, John, Kenny, Kyle
& David. Kenny and Kyle
are new but have proven to
be an asset. The rest of the
guys have all been with the
Pizza Caf6 for seven or more
years. This type of dedi-
cation keeps the food consis-
tent and the customers com-
ing back.
We have added some new
menu items such as the Bleu
Cheese Delight Salad.
Lettuce, tomato, red onion,
5oz. marinated chicken


breast, bacon, bleu cheese
crumble drizzled with bal-
samic glaze and bleu cheese
crumble. The new dine-in
menu has Weight Watchers
Points Guide for all menu
items. The portions tend to
be large which makes it great
for couples to share an
entree. Teresa's homemade
Lasagna layered with Grande
special blend mozzarella and
other cheeses. Has become
our number one selling din-
ner item; other than our great
pizza.
All Crew members includ-
ing servers must work a shift
per week in the kitchen to
learn the product, timing etc.
to hopefully improve the cus-
tomers dining experience. All
new employees after suc-


cessful completion of pro-
bation period get a maroon
shirt, showing they are a
Pizza Caf6 employee. Next is
the green shirt showing they
are fully trained and produc-
tive team members. Last is
the Black shirt of distinction,
for dedication, positive atti-
tude & superior performance.
Sincerest thanks to the crew.
Cheney Brothers is our
exclusive food supply. C-B-I
the largest privately owned
food supplier in Florida pro-
viding the best products on
the market. Chef Anthony's
Pizza Caf6 only uses Grande
cheese, there is no better.
Stanislaus tomato products
are the best in the industry.
Our product arrives fresh and
clean twice a week. Pizza
Caf6 maintains a clean
kitchen and is one of the few
mom and pop places, maybe
the only one to receive a per-
fect health inspection. In ten
years of business they may
not have all been perfect but
I can boast that Pizza Cafe
has never received a bad
health inspection. Go to
myflorida .com hotel & res-
taurant and see for yourself.

Chef Anthony takes the
mystery out of making a
great New York style pizza.

Chef Anthony takes the
mystery out of making a
great New York style pizza.
Great pizza sauce starts
with a great tomato. I have
tried multiple brands of
tomato paste, pizza sauce,
and combinations of herbs
and spices. The key is to
understand that all tomatoes
are not created equal. You
have green house, Roma,
field vine, California, etc.
The time of year, amount of
rainfall are a few factors that
affect any tomato gravy.
Start with a good base
sauce. Chef Anthony only
uses Stanislaus, absolutely
the best tomato products on
the market. Gravy should


have a smooth texture with
some small chunks of tomato
still visible. You will need to
add sugar in some quantity
and heat over low flame for
about fifteen minutes to cook
out any bitterness in the
sauce. Carrots are a good
natural sweetener and will
absorb some of the acid con-
tent. The amount of sugar,
cook time and temperature
may vary depending on some
of the factors listed above.
Chef Anthony uses the fin-
est base tomato gravy and
adds an assortment of spices
to make a great pizza sauce.
The bottom line is this;
Stay away from precooked
ready to serve sauce. The
correct cook time and tem-
perature is the key. Gently
stir sauce about every three
minutes, cool sauce for fif-
teen minutes and put in an
airtight container and refrig-
erator for twelve to twenty
four hours before serving.
Most Pizza places buy fro-
zen dough balls from their
food supplier and tell cos-
tumers that they made it
themselves.
At the Pizza Caf6, Chef


Anthony makes dough fresh
every day. I have used purified
water, spring water and fil-
tered tap water. All three yield
the same result. However, you
cannot use well water, filtered
or otherwise.
If your local pizza shop is
on well water it means one of
two things. They make bad
dough or they buy frozen
dough balls loaded with pre-
servatives.
Basic Ingredients: water,
flour, yeast, salt, sugar, oil &
filler (fillers are secret ingre-
dients to give the dough a dis-
tinct flavor.)
A few tips: Do not make
your batch sizes too big, use
cold water to keep the yeast
from activating and the less
time the batch of dough is
exposed to air the better it will
be.


Healthy
Pizza...
Is There
Such A
Thing?

The new whole-
wheat crust in
concert with
h!i aly toppings
like fresh
vegetables and
chicken is
fantastic! Try it
with traditional
red sauce, ricotta,
or Alfredo sauce.
Weight Watcher
Friendly Mom's
salad, Chicken
Bacon Ranch
Wrap, not so
friendly Bleu
(Chl, Delight
salad- man is it
good, Specialty
Steak or
Chicken salad:
see full description
at our web site
pizzacafenow.corn


Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe

Celebrates Ten Years of Serving

Some of the Best Pizza in Citrus County


It has been an honor
to serve our community.
Thank you for your
patronage.
This past quarter has
been the best we have had
in ten years. Because of
you, our loyal customers,
we will be hiring three
new employees.
Keep your community
strong by supporting local
small businesses. It does
make a difference.


Photo of: Owners of Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe
Kevin & Teresa Paige Opening Day August 2002.


I


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 A5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries

Virginia
Whisenant, 91
INVERNESS
Mrs. Virginia Berdion
Whisenant, age 91 of In-
verness, Florida, died Sat-
urday, June 29, 2013 in
Inverness, FL. She was
born March 26, 1922 in
Passaic, NJ, daughter of
Milton and Edith (Mana-
han) MacDonald. She was
a private music teacher
Mrs. Whisenant was pre-
ceded in death by her par-
ents, 1st husband, Manuel
Berdion (1972) and 2nd
husband, George
Whisenant (2002), son,
Richard Wilson, and
brother, Malcolm MacDon-
ald. Survivors include 3
daughters, Barbara (Ray)
DeLozier, Leslie (Richard)
Esseck and Marilyn (Allen)
Lunsford, daughter-in-law,
Maureen (Dan) Wilson-
Sansavere, sister-in-law,
Chris MacDonald, 9 grand-
children, Whittney Glasco,
Jordan DeLozier, Kayla
DeLozier, Kirsten De-
Lozier, Alex Adams, Mona
Adams, Mary (Damon)
Stinbrook, Sharon (Keith)
Mellars, David John (Zena)
Wilson, 8 great grandchil-
dren and 4 great-great
grandchildren.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Shannon
Willoughby, 81
HERNANDO
Shannon R. Willoughby,
81, of Hernando, Fla., died
Thursday, July 4, 2013, at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center.
A memorial service will
be at 11 a.m. Monday, July
8, 2013, at Hernando
Church of the Nazarene,
2101 N. Florida Ave., Her-
nando. Fero Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.

David
Woods, 56
INVERNESS
David A. Woods, 56 of In-
verness, died Thursday,
July 4, 2013, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital. Private
arrangements by Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,'
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


Two years after Southern states'


immigration laws, not much change


Associated Press
VIDALIA, Ga. Two
years after Georgia and
Alabama passed laws
designed to drive away
people living in the
country illegally, the
states' agricultural areas
are still heavily populated
with foreign workers, many
of whom don't have legal
authorization to be there.
There are still concerns
over enforcement and
lingering fears among
immigrants, but in many
ways it appears people
have gone on with life
much as it was before
the laws were enacted.
Farmers say many of
the foreign workers have
returned because the
laws are not heavily en-
forced and it once again
seems safe.
But the story is more
complicated than that:
Some are still staying away
or have gone underground,
according to community
activists, and some farmers
say they are filling labor
shortages not with return-
ing immigrants but with
workers hired through a
program that grants tem-
porary legal visas.
Meanwhile, employers
and workers in both states
are watching as Congress
wrestles over plans that
aim to simultaneously
prevent future illegal
immigration and offer a


r ', ,.=' -'-:- - -, a': '- ..iL a
Associated Press
Guest workers harvest an onion field June 10 in Lyons, Ga. Two years after a handful
of Southern states passed laws designed to drive away people living in the country
illegally, the landscape looks much as it did before: still heavily populated with foreign
workers, many of whom don't have legal authorization to be here.


chance at citizenship for
millions now living in the
country illegally
Georgia and Alabama
were two of five states to
pass tough crackdowns on
illegal immigration in
2011, a year after Arizona
made headlines for a hard-
line immigration enforce-
ment law that ended up
being challenged in the
U.S. Supreme Court.
According to govern-
ment statistics, thousands
of employers in Alabama
have been ignoring a pro-
vision in the state's immi-


gration law that requires
them to register with the
federal E-Verify system, a
program to electronically
verify workers' legal status.
And yet, at least in Geor-
gia, the story is a bit more
complicated.
Some migrant families
- both legally and illegally
in the country- are avoid-
ing Georgia because they fear
discrimination and profil-
ing, said Andrea Hinojosa,
a community organizer who
has worked with Latino
workers in the Vidalia area
for more than 20 years.


Solar plane on final leg of flight


Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
solar-powered aircraft
lifted off from a subur-
ban Washington airport
before dawn Saturday,
embarking on the final
leg of a history-making
cross-country flight.
The Solar Impulse
flew out of Dulles Inter-
national Airport a little
before 5 a.m. en route to
New York City The flight
plan for the revolutionary
plane took it past the
Statue of Liberty before
landing at New York's JFK
Airport early Sunday
"This is a leg where
everybody is quite
moved," Bertrand Pic-
card, one of two pilots


who took turns flying the
Solar Impulse across the
United States, said shortly
after the aircraft was in
the air
The Solar Impulse was
expected to set down in New
York around 2 a.m.
Despite the relatively
short distance, it would be
a long flight. The slow-
flying aircraft would be
traveling between two of
the world's busiest air-
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


With leaks, public-private security under fire

Former CIA case officer: 'We're going to get more Snowdens' due to intel-industrial complex
A -- - -.- --1 -~t'


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Be-
fore Edward Snowden
began leaking national se-
curity secrets, he twice
cleared the hurdle of the
federal government's
background check system
- first at the CIA, then as a
systems analyst at the Na-
tional Security Agency
Snowden's path into
secretive national security
jobs has raised concerns
about the system that out-
sources many of the gov-
ernment's most sensitive
background checks to an
army of private investiga-
tors and pays hundreds of
millions of dollars in fed-
eral contracts to compa-
nies that employ them.
"You can't outsource na-
tional security," said
Robert Baer, a former CIA
veteran who worked in a
succession of agency sta-
tions in the Mideast. 'As
long as we depend on the
intel-industrial complex
for vetting, we're going to
get more Snowdens."
The company with the
biggest share of contracts
is under a federal investi-
gation into possible crimi-
nal violations involving its
oversight of background
checks, officials familiar
with the matter told The
Associated Press. They
spoke on condition of
anonymity because they
were not authorized to dis-
cuss the investigation.
Even with fresh congres-
sional scrutiny, the federal
government appears
wedded to the incumbent
screening system. Nearly
three-quarters of the gov-
ernment's background
checks are done by private
companies, and of those,
more than 45 percent are
handled by the U.S. Inves-
tigations Services, or
USIS, according to the
U.S. Office of Personnel
Management, the agency
overseeing most of the gov-
ernment's background
checks.


Associated Press
A workman slides a dust mop over the floor at Central Intelligence Agency headquarters
March 3, 2005, in Langley, Va. Edward Snowden's path into secretive national security
jobs has raised concerns about the system that outsources many of the government's most
sensitive background checks to an army of private investigators and pays hundreds of
millions of dollars in federal contracts to companies that employ them.


USIS, which started out
with 700 former government
employees in 1996 and is
now run by a private equity
fund, dominates the back-
ground check industry,
taking in $195 million in
government payments last
year and more than $215
million already this year
The OPM turned to pri-
vate security screeners in
the late 1990s because of
growing backlogs that
were snarling the govern-
ment's hiring process. A
force of 2,500 OPM investi-
gators and more than 6,700
private contract screeners
has sliced into those back-
logs, reducing the time it
takes on average for back-
ground screening by 9 per-
cent in 2010.
As of 2012, more than 4.9
million government workers
held security clearances.
Senior federal appointments
are still carefully investi-
gated by FBI agents, and
the FBI and the CIA still
maintain strong in-house
screening staffs to vet their
own sensitive positions.
But privatization efforts
started during the Clinton
administration keep farm-


ing out work to contractors.
The Defense Department
turned over its screening
work to OPM in 2004 and
even intelligence agencies


that conduct their own in-
vestigations relegate some
checks to private companies.
The OPM's success has
come with mounting gov-


ernment expenditures.
The average cost of a back-
ground investigation rose
from $581 in 2005 to $882
in 2011, according to the
GovernmentAccountability
Office. At the same time, a
$1 billion "revolving fund"
paid by federal agencies
for most background checks
has remained off-limits to
outside audits. The White
House pledged only re-
cently to provide money
for an inspector general's
office audit of the fund in
the 2014 budget
The inspector general
appointed to watch over the
OPM, Patrick McFarland,
said at a Senate hearing last
month there were prob-
lems with Snowden's most
recent screening before he
was hired to work for de-
fense contractor Booz Allen
Hamilton Inc. as an NSA
computer systems analyst.
McFarland did not specify
the problems, but said
Snowden was screened and
approved last year by USIS.


McFarland's office, aided
by the Justice Department,
is investigatingwhether USIS
exaggerated the extent of its
internal reviews ofbackground
checks, said two govern-
ment officials who spoke
on condition of anonymity.
USIS is one of three top
security companies the
others are KeyPoint Gov-
ernment Solutions Inc. and
CACI Premier Technology
Inc. working under a five-
year contract with the OPM
worth a total of $2.4 billion.
The inquiry into USIS'
conduct is unusual in its
focus on an entire company,
but authorities repeatedly
have zeroed in on individ-
ual background check in-
vestigators in recent years
for falsifying reports. At least
seven private contract and
11 government investigators
have been convicted since
2005, authorities said. Cur-
rently, authorities are prob-
ing nearly 50 separate cases
of alleged falsification by
screeners.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOOD
Continued from Page Al

"He put his money in the
... bank, and when they
went broke one day he
had 50 grand in the bank
and the next day he didn't
have a cent," he said.
MEN
It was 1926, and Barnes'
father had to do something
to support his family He
became a full-time hunting
and fishing guide.
"About that time, Dazzy
Vance had a hotel in Ho-
mosassa and had all the
baseball players come
down and Daddy took
them hunting for quail and
deer in the wintertime,"
he said. "In the summer he
ran a grouper boat and
took people fishing, and
Daddy would take me with
him I'd cut bait In '38 or
'39, I began to guide, and I
also net fished with my
uncle. I made good money,
too."
Barnes graduated from
Crystal River High School
in 1946, a class of 12 stu-
dents who called them-
selves the "dirty dozen."
After high school,
Barnes went off to the Uni-
versity of Florida, driving
back and forth to
Gainesville in his 1931
Model A coupe, coming
home to guide on the
weekends to earn money
to pay for school.
"I was getting busier and
busier and I got to think-
ing," Barnes said. "Here I
am leaving something I
love guiding and all
these boys up here are
going to be doctors and
lawyers. So, I figured they
can go ahead and make
money at that and bring it
down here to me. I stayed
two semesters before I
left."
At one point, Barnes de-
cided to join the Marines.
He went as far as traveling
to Jacksonville to get a
physical, but the doctor
said he needed to go home
and have his tonsils out
and then come back.
"My mother was blinded
in a hunting accident," he
said. "Most of the shot
went over her head, but
she was blind. World War
II was over and guys were


getting out of the service. If
I joined, we'd have to hire
someone to stay with my
mother, so I just never
went back."
Barnes still has his
tonsils.
MEN
After he left college,
Barnes built his first guide
boat, which he steered with
his foot, and guided full
time, taking people out on
the rivers and into the gulf,
fishing everything from
bream to tarpon, shark and
"Goliath grouper."
"I caught one that
weighed 200 pounds,"
Barnes said. "But the best-
tasting fish is a six- to
eight-pound black grouper,
but not red. Red grouper's
too soft."
After a day out on the
water, Barnes would bring
the people on his boat to a
clearing on the banks and
fry up some fish and hush
puppies.
He said his secret to
good hush puppies is one
cup water-ground corn-
meal, a half-cup of flour,
two tablespoons of baking
powder and enough water
to make it a cake-batter
consistency
"No milk or sugar," he
said. "That makes them
brown too quickly when
you drop them in the hot
oil. And all that baking
powder makes them light
and fluffy"


He said his regular cus-
tomers from Coca-Cola in
Atlanta liked to fish in the
daytime and play gin
rummy at night
"I used to play with
them, and they were some
cutthroat players," he said.
"I guided a lot of Coca-
Cola executives, doctors
from Tampa and UF and a
lot of guys from Atlanta. I
guided one man for 32
straight Labor Day week-
ends. It got so somebody
would have to die to work
someone in."
MEN
Like his grandfather be-
fore him, Barnes went into
local politics, serving on
the Crystal River City
Council in the 1960s. Later
he was appointed to the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District
basin board and served
there for 16 years.
"I don't miss politics," he
said. "I got my belly full of
that."
He said he doesn't miss
guiding either.
"After 50 years, I just got
burned out, but I do miss
the people, though," he
said. "I made a lot of good
friends. If he wasn't a good
fella, I didn't book him any
more. All my customers
became my friends."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


POSTSCRIPT
Continued from Page Al

and that she learned to be strong herself
by her mother's example.
"As a child, if we were going through
hard times, I never knew, because my
mother never let it show," she said. "She
just handled things."
Fowler recalled going into business
for himself back in the 1970s, with Betty
by his side. Their office for their
portable toilet company was in Lees-
burg, and they'd leave the house every
morning at 4 a.m. to get there.
"At first, she couldn't type and was
scared to answer the phone," Fowler
said. "Then one day I walked into the of-
fice and she was so excited. She had an-
swered the phone and had taken her
first order. She said, And I got the di-
rections and I was careful so I know
you'll be able to get there.'
"I said, 'Uh, who is the order for?' She
had been so excited to get the directions
right that she forgot to get the person's
name," Fowler said. "But she caught on.
We started out with less than nothing,
but with her working right alongside me,
we sacrificed and did without and saved
and eventually prospered.
"We traveled, did a lot of things, had
all the things money will buy and all the


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County issues
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with them a fine of
$100 for first
offenders of local
watering rules.


CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL UPDATE

*The Hospital Board has launched a web site with
updates on our search for a partner.
The web site is www.careforcitruscounty.org
We encourage you to visit the site and register for updates!

SOn June 18, the Hospital Board met to review bids
from 4 healthcare organizations.

On July 10, the Hospital Board will see presentations
from bidders at 4:00 pm at the BOCC Chambers at
the Courthouse in Inverness.

PLEASE JOIN US! All members of the public are
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things money won't buy I couldn't have
done it without her."
Betty Fowler loved to crochet and
quilt, do ceramics and watch the Food
Network. She loved to go to Biloxi and
Las Vegas and always had a great
time losing her money at the slot ma-
chines and poker tables.
She loved to fish for and eat specks,
play tennis and shop. She said her
prayers every single day
She belonged to Altrusa and LaSer-
toma and also her own "do nothing"
club with her friends no agenda, no
fundraising, just fun.
In 2008, Betty suffered a stroke, which
affected her reading comprehension.
But through sheer determination, she
retrained herself to read, even though it
took her a full year to read "Follow the
River" all the way through.
Her favorite song, "Surely the Pres-
ence of the Lord is in This Place," will
be sung at her memorial service at
10 a.m. Monday, July 8, at St. Scholastica
Catholic Church in Lecanto. The family
will receive friends from 2 to 5 p.m.
today at the Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes.
"She was the love of my life," Jim
Fowler said. "Because of her, we had a
wonderful life."
Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. com.


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SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 A9




AIO SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


PAY
Continued from PageAl

building division director
in December 2012 at a
starting salary of $66,976.
By June, thanks to Jones
obtaining two special cer-
tifications, plus the six-
month incentive, his pay
rose to $77,558.
Cautero said Jones is
worth the extra pay
"I needed a certified
building official," he said.
"He's certified in just
about every trade. That's
why you do it. We want the
best. We don't want
second-rate."
More
responsibility,
more pay
County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek said
in June that the proposed
budget,
which will
receive
more dis-
cussion
Tuesday c
morning,
includes 3
percent
cost of- Joe Meek
living pay county
raises for commission
all em- chairman.
ployees.
He said county workers
haven't received a pay
raise in five years.
Local government critic
Bob Schweickert Jr.
pointed out that wasn't ac-
curate by publishing on-
line a list of employees
who earn at least $35,000
annually and who re-
ceived pay increases since
2010. His posting offered
no explanation for the
higher pay
The list includes 50 cur-
rent employees.
Human Resources Di-
rector Sherry Anderson
said the county doesn't
offer across-the-board pay
increases. Rather, each
pay raise is associated
with a specific event, such
as job promotion, certifi-
cation or increased re-
sponsibilities.
At the Chronicle's re-
quest, her office also pro-
vided a list of employees


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


earning less than $35,000
annually who received pay
increases since 2010. The
list numbered about 200
people and, like the other
list, included several who
received more than one
raise during that time.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe signs off on
each pay increase.
Accord-
ing to An-
derson
a n d
county
record ds,
pay raises -
generally
come from
four areas: Brad
r Pro- Thorpe
motion or county
temporary administrator.
promo -
tion. Simply, when some-
one is promoted, a pay
raise comes with it. The
county's personnel policy
states temporary promo-
tions come with temporary
raises and the employee
should return to his or her
regular pay when the in-
terim period ends.
A review of the pay
raises showed several ex-
amples of employees who
received temporary pay
raises while filling in for
vacant supervisory roles.
Their pay returned to the
original salary when the


temporary assignment
ended.
But not everyone. Jim
Baird received two pay
raises in 2011 when he was
appointed first as interim
building director and then
as building director. When
Baird returned to the as-
sistant's position following
Jones' hiring in 2012,
Baird kept his $73,528
salary
Anderson said that oc-
curred because Baird has
the skill set and certifica-
tion to step in as building
director if needed.
Employees who take
on additional duties or re-
sponsibilities generally re-
ceive pay increases.
The personnel policy
states employees in a par-
ticular pay grade who are
assigned duties of a higher
pay grade must be com-
pensated or moved into


TYPES OF PAY RAISES
County officials say pay raises generally come in
four categories:
* Promotion or temporary promotion.
* Employee takes on additional responsibilities or
duties.
* Employee receives certification to improve his/her
skills.
* Incentive for employment.


that higher pay grade. The
amount of raise is discre-
tionary and up to the
supervisor.
That has become more
common as the county
eliminated jobs through
attrition or layoffs in re-
cent years. Employees as-
signed certain duties now
have additional responsi-
bilities.
Thorpe said reassigning
duties is much less costly
than filling new positions.


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He noted that in 2011 he
eliminated the position of
deputy county administra-
tor, then promoted Com-
munity Services Director
Cathy Pearson and Public
Works Director Ken Frink
to assistant administrators
- while both still kept
their other jobs.
Both received pay raises
to $99,486 Frink, about
$5,000 extra; Pearson's pay
jumped about $21,700.
Thorpe said he saved


$80,000 by increasing
Frink's and Pearson's re-
sponsibilities instead of
keeping them as they were
and having a separate
full-time assistant
administrator.
Anderson said she at-
tempts to rewrite job de-
scriptions as those
responsibilities shift and
assign them proper pay
grades. Each pay grade
has a minimum and maxi-
mum pay
However, the pay in-
crease only comes when
the additional work is
from a higher pay grade.
Hourly workers, for exam-
ple, may have more ball
fields to maintain due to
an additional workload,
but they don't receive
more pay because of it.
"Are they working

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LOCAL


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAY
Continued from Page A1O

harder? Absolutely, but
they're still at the same
level of responsibility," An-
derson said.
At least one employee
received a hefty pay in-
crease without the corre-
sponding pay grade
change. Heidi Blanchette,
the county's housing serv-
ices operation manager,
saw her annual pay jump
in March from $44,262 to
$54,995.
Pearson, community
services director and
Blanchette's supervisor,
wrote on Blanchette's per-
sonnel action form that the
increase was "in recogni-
tion of additional respon-
sibilities and expanded
duties over the course of
three years."
Pearson said the in-
crease is "100 percent
grant-funded" and has no
impact on the county
budget.
Employees who re-

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ceive specialized certifica-
tions, above what is re-
quired for the job, often
receive pay increases if
the certification improves
their job performance.
Certification pay bumps
are common, Anderson
said. Supervisors have dis-
cretion in the amount of
increases, but it's gener-
ally between 2 percent and
5 percent.
"It's based on value,"
she said.
A handful of employ-
ees received pay raises
after six months on the job
as incentive for
employment.
Along with Cautero and
Jones, that list includes
Frink and County Attorney
Richard Wesch.
On the other end of the
scale, the county in Janu-
ary gave pay raises to 32
employees, mostly
custodians.
The reason? To meet the
new $7.79 hourly mini-
mum wage.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.




*B


Galveston uses seaweed to fight storm surge


Associated Press

GALVESTON, Texas Galveston
beachgoers have long tiptoed around
massive piles of seaweed, often
using their children's plastic beach
toys and a few well-chosen exple-
tives to rake away the stinky, dark
muck that arrives daily like an unre-
quested gift from the Sargassum Sea.
But after years of having mid-
night workers try to clear the
beaches of tons of seaweed deliv-
ered by the currents, the Galveston
Island Park Board of Trustees and
Texas A&M University are launch-
ing a pilot program aimed at using
the sticky muck to build a buttress
against severe weather. The pilot
program will test a theory that sand
dunes fortified by compressed sea-
weed will be more resilient to storm
surges and high tides, protecting
the fragile community that has been
pounded by countless hurricanes.
The $140,000 project is just one of
several ongoing programs along the
Texas Gulf Coast designed to use
natural resources and the existing
habitat to fight rising sea levels and
future hurricanes, ideas that have
become more popular since 2008,
when Hurricane Ike breached


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Seaweed scraped from the beach near 17th Street in Galveston, Texas, is
piled into dunes June 26 where vegetation is already growing over
decomposing seaweed. The Park Board of Trustees voted unanimously to
support projects that will create "seaweed-enhanced sand dunes."


Galveston's manmade, multimillion-
dollar seawall, flooding the inner
city and causing more than $20 bil-
lion in damage.
Jens Figlus, an expert on coastal
engineering with the department of
maritime engineering at Texas
A&M University at Galveston, said
the first challenge is to modify a hay
baler a piece of machinery with
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One man's trash is another man's garbage


Have you ever thrown some-
thing out, like a Rembrandt
etching or an old Tiffany
lamp, only to find out later that it
was worth tens of thousands of
dollars?
Neither
have I.
Yet every
time I watch
"Antiq u es
Roadshow" or
"Pawn Stars,"
I hear that
someone e
found this
Stradivarius JIM
violin in the MULLEN
trash, or that a
neighbor had
given them George Washington's
sword to thank them for cleaning out
the attic.
It makes me wonder what I did to
get the stingy neighbors I have, who
never seem to throw out anything
valuable. When I go through their
trash, there's never anything worth
selling, and yet I'm the one who gets
yelled at.
I'm talking about you, Thelma! It's
bad enough that all your garbage is
just garbage. It's a real pain to have
to listen to you telling me you'll call
the police if I don't put it back in the
recycling bin exactly the way I found
it.
What a troublemaker she is.
I know she's got stuff in that house
that's worth real money; it's got to be
only a matter of time before she
makes a mistake and throws it out.
No one likes a hoarder, dearie!
It's not even about the money, it's
about making a good deal.
It's like the lottery, except your


It makes me wonder what I did to get the
stingy neighbors I have, who never seem to
throw out anything valuable. When I go through
their trash, there's never anything worth
selling, and yet I'm the one who gets yelled at.


chances of finding a Rembrandt in
the trash are much, much better.
And you don't have to wait in line.
One of the things I see that are
worth a lot of money are old dolls,
the kind with porcelain heads and
stuffed bodies that are wearing dull
brown, truly unflattering Victorian
dresses.
All the experts pick them up and
look at them and say they're worth
$800. Eight hundred dollars?
These things make Chatty Cathy
look like Barbarella. No wonder
most of them are in such good shape.
Nobody would want to play with
those dumpy-looking things. A dead
flounder would be cuter and more
fun.
These antique dolls are the oppo-
site of fun. They are anatomically
correct in the way a sandbag is
anatomically correct. And I'm talk-
ing about the hands and feet. Forget
about the other parts they sure
did.
It transforms into nothing. It does
not speak or let you change its dia-
pers or comb its hair. Calling this a
toy is like calling a feed bag a prom
dress.
As a present, it would be worse
than giving your kid a lump of coal
for Christmas. At least the child can
burn the coal. No one wants to burn
$800.


Wouldn't you know it, I inherited
one of these so-called "dolls" from
an elderly aunt. I don't collect them,
and no one I know collects them, so
I put it on eBay to get the depressing
thing out of my home before it
sucked out my will to live. And to get
a quick $800. There's no doubt I
could buy something much more fun
than that doll for $800. Like a hair
shirt. Or leg irons.
There are lots of dolls like this for
sale on eBay for $800, but they're not
up for auction. They are always
listed as "Buy it Now" with a price.
So, I took a few flattering pictures
of my windfall and waited for the
bids to come in. The first bid was for
$29.
Well, that's OK, I thought You start
low, and it grows from there.
There were six and a half days left
for people to bid the doll up to its
true value. And sure enough, they
did.
The final price? $39.
Well, I got it for free, so I didn't
lose any money And in truth, I
wouldn't have paid that much for it.
Now that it's gone, I can get back
to looking for Van Goghs in the
neighbor's trash.

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Hot dog on bun
with mustard, baked beans
with tomato, carrot coins,
mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Vegetable soup,
turkey, ham and cheese on
whole grain buns with may-
onnaise and mustard, fresh
orange, oatmeal raisin
cookie, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday cel-
ebration for July: Beef rotini
pasta, Neapolitan spinach,
Italian vegetable medley,
dinner roll with margarine,
slice birthday cake, low-fat
milk.


Thursday: Baked
chicken thigh with coq au vin
sauce, rice pilaf, country
vegetable medley, apple-
sauce, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk
Friday: Sausage and
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July 8 to 12 MENUS


A12 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


COMMUNITY


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obama's health law will be judged on three questions


Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Three months before unin-
sured people can start
shopping for coverage,
some big unknowns loom
over President Barack
Obama's health care
overhaul.
The surprise announce-
ment this past week that
the White House is delay-
ing a requirement that
many employers offer cov-
erage raised questions
about other major parts of
the biggest expansion of
society's safety net since
Medicare nearly 50 years
ago.
One delay may not mat-
ter much in the end. People
will judge Obama's law on
three main points: premi-
ums, choice and the overall
consumer experience.
Only partial answers can
be gleaned now, and they
don't necessarily fall along
predictable lines.
Basic economics sug-
gests premiums will be
higher than what many
people who buy their own
coverage pay now, espe-
cially the young and
healthy The new policies
provide better benefits,
and starting next year, in-
surers won't be able to
turn away the sick. But the
pocketbook impact will be
eased by new tax credits
and other features that
people soon will discover.
As for choice, Obama's
plan isn't likely to deliver
the dozens of options
available to seniors
through Medicare. But
limited choices may not be
seen as a step backward
because in most states the
individual health insur-
ance market is now domi-
nated by a single insurer.
The consumer experi-
ence shopping online for
insurance remains the
biggest unknown and a
risk.
Squads of technology ex-
perts federal, state, in-
surer and contractor
employees are trying
mesh government and pri-
vate computer systems to-
gether in ways that haven't
been tried before. It may


not feel like Amazon. com.
Many people could default
to enrolling the low-tech
way, through call centers
or even through the mail.
A closer look at the three
big questions:
PREMIUMS
The Obama administra-
tion sees encouraging
signs in states that have re-
leased premiums for next
year, as well as from rates
filed directly with the fed-
eral government but not
yet publicly revealed.
"We are seeing in-
creased choice and afford-
able premiums," said Mike
Hash, head of the Depart-
ment of Health and
Human Services' health
reform office.
But what will consumers
see?
The data-crunching
company Avalere Health
found that in nine states
that have released premi-
ums, the rates appear to be
lower than the Congres-
sional Budget Office esti-
mated when the law was
being drafted in 2009.
But Avalere vice presi-
dent Caroline Pearson ac-
knowledges that doesn't
represent the cost compar-
ison a consumer might
make. Most people who
now buy policies individu-
ally could see an increase
from what they're now
paying.
"The benefit design is
going to be richer than
what is typically pur-
chased and available
today ... and the rules re-
quire insurers to sell a pol-
icy to whoever wants it,
regardless of health sta-
tus," she said.
That still doesn't get you
to the bottom line because
most consumers will be el-
igible for income-based
tax credits to help pay pre-
miums. The plan they pick
also could make a big
difference.
CHOICE
The typical Medicare re-
cipient has about 30 pri-
vate insurance plans from
which to choose. There
may not be nearly as much
choice for families and in-


ON THE NET
* Health care site: https://www.healthcare.gov
* Kaiser Foundation's subsidy calculator:
http://kff.org/interactive/subsidy-calculator


dividuals under the health
care law. How much that
will matter remains to be
seen.
It's partly because in
most states a single insur-
ance company currently
controls more than half
the market for individual
coverage.
The administration says
that's going to change for
the better. In three-quar-
ters of the markets the fed-
eral government will run,
there will be at least one
new insurer.
But areas of concern are
emerging. New Hamp-
shire could end up with
just one insurance com-
pany offering plans
through the new market-
place. In 36 of Missis-
sippi's 82 counties, no


insurer has yet signed up
to offer coverage. Bigger
states, however, don't seem
to be having problems at-
tracting insurers.
"The individual market
for 2014 will look a lot like
the individual market
today one or a handful
of carriers dominant in
most states," said Larry
Levitt, a leading expert
with the nonpartisan
Kaiser Family Foundation.
But people will be able
to move more easily from
insurer to insurer, he
added, which should bring
more competitive pres-
sure.
CONSUMER
EXPERIENCE
For people without job-
based coverage, shopping


for insurance under the
new system is supposed to
be as smooth as using a
major online site such as
Travelocity or Expedia.
But in a recent report,
the Government Accounta-
bility Office raised con-
cerns about the sheer
technological complexity
of the task and the short
time left to accomplish it.
The goal is for con-
sumers to be able to find
out the amount of the tax
credit they're entitled to
and sign up for a plan in
real time or close to it.
For that to happen, the
computer systems of sev-
eral major federal agen-
cies, the states and dozens
of insurance companies
have to be able to talk each
other, and the information
exchanged must be
accurate.
Testing the connections
is under way


"We really feel very
much on target for Oct. 1
and ready for open enroll-
ment," said Chiquita
Brooks-LaSure, a top HHS
official overseeing the roll-
out "We are meeting criti-
cal implementation
deadlines."
"My guess is some of
these states are not going
to be up and running on
time," said Dan Maynard,
president of Connecture, a
health technology com-
pany building three
marketplaces.
That wouldn't necessar-
ily mean some consumers
will have to wait. People
could sign up through call
centers.
"You could have a very
light online (marketplace)
and have a lot of things
drop to the call center and
claim success," said
Maynard.


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Oil train derailment kills one in Quebec town

Fires spread to homes, displacing up to 1,000 people in town of 6,000


Associated Press
The pilot of a single-engine,
banner-towing plane taking
off from Long Beach airport
survived Saturday after he
crashed on an embank-
ment on the north side of
northbound 1-405 near the
Walnut Avenue overpass.
The plane sits where it
crashed after hitting
power lines and a tree
and losing its right wing.

Enthusiasts say
butterflies scarce
FARMINGTON HILLS,
Mich. Enthusiasts across
Michigan want to know: Where
are the butterflies this year?
Official data are being col-
lected by monitoring groups
around the state. But anec-
dotally, it's not looking great.
Just ask Joe Derek.
Butterflies are absent
from Derek's naturally land-
scaped property in Farm-
ington Hills, where he
grows 2 acres of native
plants known to draw the
fluttering beauties.
"Normally, at this time of
year, I'd see hundreds,"
Derek, former naturalist for
the City of Farmington Hills,
told the Detroit Free Press.
"In my life, I've never seen
a season where we're not
seeing butterflies really of
any kind."
Although enthusiasts are
concerned about the lack of
butterflies, Ashley Anne
Wick, biological research di-
rector at the Kalamazoo
Nature Center, says it is too
soon to sound the alarm.
Boy robs state fair
in Batman costume
PUEBLO, Colo.-A 16-
year-old boy wearing a Bat-
man shirt and mask broke
into a building at the Colorado
State Fair, then turned him-
self in to police after seeing
his likeness on the news.
The Pueblo Chieftain re-
ported the boy is one of
three accused of breaking
into the Fair's VIP building
early Thursday. The trio
took televisions, a laptop
and an empty cash register.
The suspects managed to
lock themselves in the build-
ing and had to break out.
KRDO-TV aired surveil-
lance video of the suspect
dressed as Batman. After
the video aired, the boy
turned himself in to police.
Authorities plan to seek
charges including burglary
and criminal mischief.
Officials call in fake
gators to scare geese
PROVINCETOWN, Mass.
- The Cape Cod National
Seashore is trucking in
gators to scare away geese.
They're fake alligator
heads that seashore officials
hope are realistic enough to
spook the Canada geese
that like to frequent a re-
mote section of Blackwater
Pond in Provincetown.
The Cape Cod Times re-
ported that the geese are
devouring a rare aquatic
plant called the golden club
that grows at the pond.
Hundreds of the plants
used to carpet the pond's
surface decades ago. But
the geese's appetite for the
endangered plant is so vo-
racious that there are barely
two dozen plants remaining.
Seashore plant ecologist
Stephen Smith said he has-
n't found any hard scientific
data that the decoys work.
But he said at only $30
per fake gator head, he
thought it was worth a shot.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec
- A train carrying crude
oil derailed Saturday in
eastern Quebec, sparking
several explosions and a
blaze that destroyed the
center of the town of Lac-
Megantic and killed at
least one person. An un-
specified number of peo-
ple were reported missing.
Witnesses said the erup-
tions sent local residents
scrambling through the
streets under the intense
heat of towering fireballs
and a red glow that illumi-
nated the night sky.
Quebec provincial police
Lt Michel Brunet confirmed
one person had died. He
refused to say how many
others might be dead, but
said authorities have been


told "many" people have
been reported missing.
Up to 1,000 people were
forced from their homes in
the middle of the night in
the town, which is about
155 miles east of Montreal
and about 10 miles west of
the Maine border
The derailment caused
several tanker rail cars to
explode in the downtown
core, a popular area
known for its bars that is
often bustling on summer
weekend nights. Police
said the first explosion
tore through the town
shortly after 1 a.m.
The fire spread to a
number of homes in the
lakeside town of 6,000 peo-
ple, and witnesses said the
flames shot up higher
than the steeple on a
nearby church.


Associated Press
Smoke rises from railway cars that were carrying crude oil
Saturday after derailing in downtown Lac Megantic, Quebec.
A large swath of Lac-Megantic was destroyed after the
train derailed, sparking several explosions and forcing the
evacuation of up to 1,000 people.


Flames and billowing
black smoke could be seen
more than 12 hours after
the derailment, which in-
volved a 73-car train.


"When you see the cen-
ter of your town almost de-
stroyed, you'll understand
that we're asking our-
selves how we are going to


Associated Press
Fire crews work the crash site of Asiana Flight 214 on Saturday at San Francisco International Airport.



Two killed in crash at



San Francisco airport


Dozens injured; cause unknown, but terrorism ruled out


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO
n Asiana Airlines flight
crashed while landing at
San Francisco International
Airport on Saturday, killing at
least two people, injuring dozens
of others and forcing passengers
to jump down the emergency in-
flatable slides to safety as flames
tore through the plane.
One person was unaccounted
for from among the 307 passengers
and crew, said airport spokesman
Doug Yakel. He said 181 people
were taken to local hospitals.
There were 291 passengers and
16 crew members.
San Francisco Fire Chief
Joanne Hayes-White said the in-
vestigation has been turned over
to the FBI and terrorism has
been ruled out.
The Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration said Flight 214 from Seoul,
South Korea, crashed while land-
ing before noon PDT A video clip
posted to YouTube showed smoke
coming from a jet on the tarmac.
Passengers could be seen jump-
ing down the emergency slides.
The top of the fuselage was
burned away and the entire tail
was gone. One engine appeared
to have broken away Pieces of
the tail were strewn about the
runway Emergency responders
could be seen walking inside the
burned-out wreckage.
It wasn't immediately clear
what happened to the plane as it
was landing, but some eyewit-
nesses said the aircraft seemed
to lose control and that the tail
may have hit the ground.
Stephanie Turner saw the
plane going down and the rescue
slides deploy, but returned to her


This aerial photo shows the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214.


hotel room before seeing any
passengers get off the jet, she told
ABC News. She said when she
first saw the flight she noticed
right away that the angle of its
approach seemed strange.
"I mean we were sure that we
had just seen a lot of people die.
It was awful," she said. "And it
looked like the plane had com-
pletely broken apart. There were
flames and smoke just billowing."
The National Transportation
Safety Board said it was sending
a team of investigators to San
Francisco to probe the crash.
NTSB spokeswoman Kelly Nan-
tel said Saturday that NTSB
Chairman Deborah Hersman
would head the team.
Boeing said it was preparing to
provide technical assistance to
the NTSB. The maker of the
plane's engines, Pratt & Whitney,
said it was cooperating with au-
thorities investigating the crash.


Asiana is a South Korean air-
line, second in size to national
carrier Korean Air It has re-
cently tried to expand its pres-
ence in the United States, and
joined the Star Alliance, which is
anchored in the U.S. by United
Airlines.
The 777-200 is a long-range
plane from Boeing. The twin-en-
gine aircraft is one of the
world's most popular long-dis-
tance planes, often used for
flights of 12 hours or more, from
one continent to another. The
airline's website says its 777s
can carry between 246 to 300
passengers.
The flight was 10 hours and 23
minutes, according to
FlightAware, a flight tracking
service. The 777 is a smaller,
wide-body jet that can travel long
distances without refueling and
is typically used for long flights
over water


get through this event," an
emotional Mayor Colette
Roy-Laroche told a tele-
vised news briefing.
The cause of the derail-
ment was not immediately
known.
Environment Quebec
spokesman Christian
Blanchette said a large but
undetermined amount of
fuel had also spilled into
the Chaudiere River
Firefighters and rescue
workers from several
neighboring municipali-
ties were called in to help
deal with the disaster
Firefighters from north-
ern Maine were also de-
ployed to the Quebec town,
according to a spokesman
at the sheriff's office in
Franklin County.
The train belongs to Mon-
treal Maine & Atlantic.


World BRIEFS

Tribute


Associated Press
A South African woman
holds a basket of flowers
with a candle bearing an
image of former South
African President Nelson
Mandela on Saturday out-
side the Mediclinic Heart
Hospital in Pretoria, South
Africa. There was no official
update Saturday morning
on the condition of the 94-
year-old former president,
who is in critical but stable
condition after being di-
agnosed with a recurring
lung infection, but the
government has said
Mandela is not in a vege-
tative state contrary
to recent court documents.

Egypt's new leader
asserts authority
CAIRO Egypt's new
president moved to assert
his authority and regain
control of the streets Satur-
day even as his Islamist op-
ponents declared his powers
illegitimate and issued blood
oaths to reinstate Mohammed
Morsi, whose ouster by the
military has led to dueling
protests and deadly street
battles between rival sides.
But underscoring the
sharp divisions facing the
untested leader, Adly Man-
sour, his office said pro-
reform leader Mohamed El-
Baradei had been named
as interim prime minister
but later backtracked on the
decision, saying consulta-
tions were continuing.
Mansour's administra-
tion, meanwhile, has begun
trying to dismantle Morsi's
legacy. He fired Morsi's in-
telligence chief and the
presidential palace's chief
of staff. Prosecutors, mean-
while, ordered four detained
stalwarts of Morsi's Muslim
Brotherhood held for 15 days
pending an investigation
into the shooting deaths of
eight protesters last week.
No major violence was
reported between support-
ers and opponents of Morsi
as the two sides sought to
regroup after a night of
fierce clashes that turned
downtown Cairo into a bat-
tlefield. Clashes were also
fierce in the port city of
Alexandria, where thousands
from both sides fought each
other with automatic rifles,
firebombs and clubs.
Friday's violence left 36
dead, taking to at least 75
the number of people killed
since the unrest began on
June 30.
-From wire reports








EXCCUIQRSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


having a picnic


The Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins Historic State Park in Homosassa is a
remembrance of Florida's first United States Senator David Levy
Yulee's legacy. He chose the Homosassa River as his residence to
embark on his sugar mill plantation operation in 1851, producing
sugar cane syrup. Today, the remnant of Yulee's bequest lives on and
provides daily historical knowledge while visitors grab a picnic lunch.
Located across the road from the ruins is a six-table pavilion for
picnickers. The park has bathrooms, tables and grills.



For those who want to see the "real" Florida and a bit of natural
habitat within the waterways of the Nature Coast, Inglis Dam
Recreation Area will fill the bill. Local anglers claim some of the best
fishing can be found here. For those looking for a relaxing day
surrounded by natural beauty and a picnic basket, Inglis Dam
Recreation Area is available. Picnic tables, wildlife viewing,
playground, biking, boating, fishing and more are available. From
Crystal River, head north on U.S. 19 about 5 miles and turn right onto
Riverwood Drive. Follow the road to the Inglis Dam Recreation Area.



Home of the Floral City Strawberry Festival, Floral Park is snuggled
into the depths of one of the oldest cities in Florida Floral City.
It was surveyed in 1883 and was named for its abundance of
wildflowers, which is perfect for those who want to venture to Floral
Park for an afternoon picnic. A children's playground, spacious
grounds, bathrooms, volleyball, tennis, horseshoes and other
recreational activities are available to park visitors. Floral Park can
be visited at 9530 S. Parkside Ave., Floral City.


By Eryn Worthington
Chronicle




Located along the shoreline of the Lake Tsala Apopka
chain are Liberty Park and Wallace Brooks Park. The
two parks share not only scenery, but also a paved
portion of the Withlacoochee State Trail, which
connects the two. Picnic tables, benches, shuffleboard,
grills, restrooms, a playground, outdoor exercise
equipment, sand volleyball courts, a fishing pier and
much more is offered to those utilizing the parks for
their picnicking use. Liberty Park can be visited at
286 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. Wallace Brooks Park can
be found at 328 E. Dampier St, Inverness.



On 20 acres neatly landscaped in the midst of
Lecanto's school complex lies Lecanto Community
Park Small wildlife keeps the embedded complex in
a natural environment for those who want to escape
into nature. Pedestrians can utilize the park for
jogging, tennis, recreational sports and picnicking.
Multiple picnics tables are placed under the canopy
of pine trees offering shade for those wanting to
watch the family play. On select dates, Citrus County
Parks and Recreation provides "Movies in the Park"
for families to enjoy an outdoor picnic while viewing
a popular movie together on a large outdoor screen.
Lecanto Community Park can be visited at
3505 W Educational Path, Lecanto.


The Yulee Sugar Mill in Homosassa offers visitors a chance to look back in time to an era when technology was not as sophisticated.


MATTHEW BECKiChronicle file




Al8 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING JULY 7, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D11: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 18:00 18:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
S[WESH NBC 19 19 News News America's Got Talent Auditions continue. Law & Order: SVU Crossing Lines '14' News Access
Bill Cosby: The Mark Secrets of Henry Vlll's Secrets of Althorp Masterpiece Mystery! Sudden Yes As Time As Time
0 WE PBS 3 3 14 6 Twain Prize 2009 Palace (N)'PG The Spencers (N)'G' death of a student. () PG' Minister PG Goes By Goes By
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E [WF(,). NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly America's Got Talent Auditions continue. (In Law & Order: Special Crossing Lines (N) '14' News Paid
NBC 8 8 8 8News Stereo) M Victims Unit'14' (DVS) Program
1 . ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Celebrity Wife Swap Whodunnit? "Kaboom" Castle Significant News Sports
S[WFT AB 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' (N) 'PG' (N) '14' Others" 'PG' Night
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FOX13 6:00 News (N) Cleveland The The Bobs Family Guy American FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
SWT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) Mc Show Simpsons Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) M Notice 'PG'
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S CBW ) IND 12 12 16 14 '14' Theory Theory 14' Stereo) 14 PG' PG'
E D WTTIA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 '70s '70s Scrubs Raymond Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris |Chris Tampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
W TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Brody
King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Slow Burn" CSI: Miami Stalkerazzi" Cold Case "Blank *** "Bull Durham"
IM T cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men '14'm 14'M Generation"'PG' (1988)'R'
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3 IWYKE FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living Eye
D iCWOi FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang BigBang Cleveland Simpsons Simpsons |Burgers |Fam. Guy |American FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG'm
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** "The Fighting Temptations" (2003, Sunday Best (Season Premiere) Performance Sunday Best Performance by Ernest Pugh;
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(NN) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Inside Man (N) Anthony Bourd.
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S*** "Star Trek" (2009 Science Fiction) Chris *** "Taken" (2008) Liam Neeson. Slavers *** "Taken" (2008) Liam Neeson. Slavers
( 30 60 30 51 Pine, Zachary Quinto. 'PG-13' kidnap the daughter of a former spy. kidnap the daughter of a former spy.
(GOL) 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Greenbrier Classic, Final Round. cMcCentral
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(iSNl 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Sex Slaves: TX Sex Slaves: Teens |Minh's Story
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732 112 732 Racing (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Car TV PG'
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**30 "10 Years" (2011) Channing ***2 "Brave"(2012) Voices of ** "The Wedding Planner" (2001) Jennifer ** "Underworld:
370 271 370 Tatum. PG-13' c Kelly Macdonald. PG Lopez. (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Awakening"(2012)
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:n) 36 31 36 Blue 'G' Exp. Shape TV Adv. Sport Flats Fishing Tournament Series Blue 'G' Exp.
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31 59 31 26 29 'R' Fcton) Arnold Schwarzenegger. R' Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. 'R' c the Machines" 'R'
(1SS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Life as We Know It" (2010) PG-13' ** "Monster-in-Law"(2005) PG-13' ** "Monster-in-Law"(2005)'PG-13'
S1*** "Picnic" (1955, Drama) William Holden, *** "The Incredible Shrinking **+ "The Devil Doll" (1936) Lionel A Night at the Movies
169 53 169 30 35 Kim Novak, Rosalind Russell. PG' Man" (1957) Grant Williams. Barrymore.'NR'N aN
( i) 53 Fast N' Loud "No Bull Fast N' Loud (In Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid:
53 34 53 24 26 Bonneville"'14' Stereo)'14' Uncensored (N)'14' Uncensored (N)'14' (In Stereo) 14' Uncensored'14'
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"The *+ "The Darkest Hour" (2011) ** "Man on a Ledge" (2012) Sam ** "Reindeer Games" (2000) Ben Affleck, "Reservoir'
S 350 261 350 Help" Emile Hirsch. PG-13' c Worthington. PG-13 c Gary Sinise. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R'
48 33 48 31 34** "Shooter" (2007) Mark **2 "Unknown" (2011) Liam Neeson. An accident victim Falling Skies (N)'14' Falling Skies '14'
rttlJ48 33 48 31 34 Wahlberg.'R'm (DVS) finds a man using is identity. 'PG-13' (DVS) _______ _________
TOON 38 58 38 33 1 "Percy Jackson & the Olympians" Lego Star Teen King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland |Fam. Guy Burgers Fam. Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Caribbean Escapes Bikinis Bikinis Wat Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Sturgis: Wild Ride Sturgis: Cops 'PG'
truii 25 55 25 98 55 Worked Worked Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage Top 20 Funniest'14'
(TVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Cleveland The Golden Girs Gold Girls GoldGirls Goldirls Gold Girls Gold Gids Gold Gids Gold Girls
S 47 NCIS "TheMissionary NCIS "Rekindled" '14' NCIS "Playing With NCIS A terroristtarget- NCIS "Till Death Do Us Graceland "Graceland"
47 32 47 17 18 Position"'PG' B (DVS) Fire" (In Stereo)'PG' ing the Navy. 'PG' Part"'14' 14'
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W 117 69 117 the Coffin" '14' Octane" '14' kidnapping. '14' Going, Gone" 14 You Are" '14' Could KIIl"'14' m
(WGiN3A) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay *** 'ce Age"


Choice simple:



just go or not


D ear Annie: I
heard that my
cousin's daughter
is giving a surprise baby
shower for her sister
This is the girl's second
child. She had a baby
shower for the first one
two years ago.
Since when is it appro-
priate to have a baby
shower for the second
child? Am I out of touch?
This simply
sounds like a
way to get
more gifts. I
also heard
that the
shower will
be in a
restaurant
and guests
have to pay
their own .
bill.-A
What ANN
should I do? MAI
- Kentucky MAI
Dear Ken-
tucky: Baby showers are
to help a new parent
have clothing, diapers
and other necessities for
the child. It is assumed
that a second child can
use the gifts the first
child received, so a
second baby shower be-
comes a burden on the
guests. (And we won't get
into the impropriety of
giving a shower for


I
.I


one's sister)
A second shower is
considered OK, however,
if the parents have
moved to another city
with different friends or
if the births are so far
apart that the parents
have given away the
baby things belonging to
the older sibling.
Nonetheless, if your
cousin's daughter is
going ahead
with this, your
choice is sim-
ply whether or
not to attend.
Dear Annie:
"Proud Mili-
tary Spouse" is
cringing at the
thought of her
husband's par-
ents giving him
childish gifts at
E'S a formal cere-
tBOX money to mark
iBOX his change of
command. His
parents' gifts are a sign
of their love and are not
intended to humiliate or
embarrass him. A better
option might be for her
to have a family celebra-
tion such as lunch or
dinner before the cere-
mony He can then re-
ceive those gifts in
private, rather than in
front of his military unit
- N from Canada


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
11:45 a.m.,2:25 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
In 3D. 5 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Lone Ranger" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10 p.m. No passes.
"The Heat" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"White House Down" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Monsters University" (PG)
11:30 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG)
In 3D. 4:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"World War Z" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"World War Z" In 3D (PG-13)
10:25 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Despicable Me 2" (PG)
12:20 p.m., 2:30 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Despicable Me 2" In 3D.


(PG) 2:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Lone Ranger" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.
"The Heat" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"White House Down" (PG-13)
12:40 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters University" (PG)
11:45 a.m., 2:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG)
In 3D. 4:55 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
No passes.
"World War Z" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 8 p.m.
"World War Z" In 3D. (PG-13)
5:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13)
11:50 a.m., 2:55 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D.
9:55 p.m. No passes.
"This Is The End" (R)
11:55 a.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Sumptuous meal
6 Fail to hit
10 British lockup
14 Prize of a kind
19 Dispute
20 Happen
22 Curved letters
24 Peace goddess
25 Marsh bird
26 Pioneer Daniel -
27 Sully
28 Gamma's follower
29 Flooring piece
30 Aristocratic
32 Tricycle part
34 Hoof-to-pavement
sound
35 Prophetess
39 Tantalize
41 Unwilling
43 Flower
45 Dick Cheney's wife
47 Marathons
48 Mineral spring
51 Expert in a foreign lan-
guage
53 Raison d'-
55 Hodges of
baseball
56 Remote
59 Starchy food,
for short
61 Punta del -
62 Mild oath
64 Corrupt
66 Harsh in tone
68 Saharan
70 President
Cleveland
72 Conductor's wand
73 Particular
75 Pointed arch
77 Lukewarm
79 and rave
80 Quaid or Hopper
82 Hirsute
84 Friendly
86 Valley
88 Dud of a car
90 State near Miss.
91 Muddled with drink
95 Merchandise
97 Mean
101 Recipe amount
102 Kind of beet
or bowl


104 say die
106 Gorge
108 State in India
110 Read casually
112 Mine entrance
114 says
115 Jeweled
headdress
117 Extremely
118 Culture medium
120 Sandwich store, for
short
121 Whichever
122 Plaines, Ill.
124 Warbled
126 Beast
128 Pop
129 Out into view
131 Hangs loosely
133 The Prince of Darkness
135 Spiteful
139 Food regimens
141 Down payment
145 The Bard's river
146 Cake
148 Revealed
150 Woody stem
151 "-, I'm Adam"
153 Serious
155 Begot
157 Beelzebub
158 -Saxon
159 Gung-ho
160 Rice Burroughs
161 Skirt shape (hyph.)
162 Horse
163 Present!
164 Like a moray
165 Civet relative

DOWN
1 Eats no food
2 Tennessee Ford
3 Nimble
4 Excellent
5 Golf ball peg
6 Unruly crowd
7 Holy picture
8 Go quickly
9 Warm weather region
10 Acquire
11 Right away!
12 Willow rod
13 Mortgage issuer
14 Central
15 Builds
16 Reese the singer


17 Chekhov or Bruckner
18 Jumped
21 Kind of race
23 Prison camp
31 Serf
33 Crystal-clear
36 Sprite
37 Foot part
38 The March King
40 Stage direction
42 Famed person,
for short
44 The subway
in Paris
46 Rye fungus
48 Food fish
49 Walked
50 Mountain ridge
52 Equine sound
54 Roof border
56 Deadly
57 In unison (2 wds.)
58 Torn
60 High-fiber food
63 Storage place
65 Sharp projection
67 Game of chance
69 Watch part
70 Relevant
71 Put through a sieve
74 Speaks
rhythmically
76 Watch
78 Modest restaurant

81 Establish (2 wds.)
83 Time past
85 Karenina and
others
87 Israeli desert
89 Russian river
91 Bowl
92 Composition
93 Herringlike fish
94 Challenges
96 Car type
98 Roman poet
99 Used a stopwatch
100 Gay
101 Art movement
103 Countrified
105 Stiff
107 Town in
Oklahoma
109 Red wine
111 Church council
113 Made


manageable
116 Worth
119 Talk wildly
123 Straight man
125 Nonchalant
126 With a leg on each side
127 Cup edge
129 Concluding
musical section
130 Yippee!


Rental agreement
Venue
Mothers
- -garde
File, as a
complaint
Phase
Wool fabric
Lustrous fabric
Silly


Puzzle answer is on Page A21.
1 12 13 14 15 6 17 18 19 S


144 Doctrine
147 Perpetually
149 Bargain
152 Fashionably
up-to-date
154 Before, poetically
156 Not sweet
157 Droop


@ 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


History buffs remember Gettysburg battle


Thousands flock to Pennsyvania
on 150th anniversary of fight

GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. From camera-toting tourists
to visitors eager to re-trace the footsteps of ancestors
who fought in the Civil War, thousands of people
have flocked to the Gettysburg battlefield to commem-
orate the 150th anniversary of the defining battle of
the war
Sightseers snapped photos Tuesday in front of the
stately statues and monuments that mark positions of
Union and Confederate forces, while military buffs
quizzed park rangers on popular battlefield education
programs. One on Little Round Top drew more
than 500 people -10 times the typical turnout and
attendees carefully walked the hilltop path and
craned their necks to listen to the Civil War history
lesson.
"Oh my gosh, there are so many people," Park
Ranger Allyson Perry said between stops on the
Tuesday morning tour. "I'm so impressed."
Farther down the trail, Valerie Josephson waited
near the memorial for the 20th Maine Regiment, the
unit that helped defend the hill from Confederates ex-
actly 150 years ago Tuesday Josephson, 72, of Stock-
holm, N.J., said she has visited Gettysburg 10 times -
but never on July 2, the day that her great-grandfather
Mansfield Ham got shot in the thumb while fighting on
Little Round Top in 1863.
"I still get the chills when I start riding into Gettys-
burg. There's such a feeling here," said Josephson,
who self-published a book about her great-
grandfather's unit. "I have been thinking about this for
years. I'm going out here to do my part (to honor
him) today"
Up to 10,000 Union and Confederate troops died at
Gettysburg July 1 to 3, 1863, with another 30,000
wounded. It's the bloodiest battle fought on American
soil.
Along with Little Round Top, some of the most
desperate fighting on July 2 occurred at places that
have become well known to Gettysburg enthusiasts, in-
cluding Devil's Den, the Peach Orchard and the
Wheatfield.
The South gained ground on Day 2 but could not dis-
lodge Northern defenders setting up Gen. Robert E.
Lee's ill-fated decision on the Battle of Gettysburg's
third and final day to launch Pickett's Charge. Thou-
sands of people were expected to attend the Park Ser-
vice's commemorative march at 3 p.m. Wednesday,
about the same time the failed assault took place.
Shelley Long of Orbisonia, Pa., decided to head out
to the battlefield for an early morning walk with her
husband before the crowds hit Their route took them
to Little Round Top, which Long said is her favorite
spot on her favorite day of the battle.
'"Just the challenge of it, with the South coming up this
whole terrain, the North being up here, fighting down-
ward and Maine running out of ammunition. I don't
know, it's just my favorite day," said Long, 45, a former


U.S. military officer who studied tactics. She said she
also had a distant relative who fought in the war
Long soon disappeared into the large group that
gathered to hear the ranger program. It was even
more crowded at one program Monday, when an esti-
mated 1,200 visitors followed along to hear about the
Union's famed Iron Brigade, which suffered heavy ca-
sualties on the battle's first day
The Park Service has said it doesn't keep official
counts of visitors to battlefield programs, which are
free and don't require registration. Gettysburg Na-
tional Military Park typically attracts 1.2 million visi-


tors a year a mark officials expect to easily exceed
thanks in large part to the 10-day anniversary period
that ends today
At the Wheatfield site, David Runyon, 59, of Aliquippa,
Pa., was joined by his wife and son to remember Run-
yon's great-great-great-grandfather, Union soldier
Thomas Thornburgh. Runyon said his Thornburgh was
badly wounded at the Wheatfield before being taken
prisoner and dying at a hospital in Virginia.
"It's the first time we've been here on the day," wife
Terri Runyon said, "and something that we've always
wanted to do on the 150th anniversary"


The Rotary Club of
_- Homosassa Springs
















The Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs would like to thank all of the sponsors,
organizations and people that helped make this year's Shrimpapalooza a successful
event. The funds that we raised will help several Citrus County organizations that are
in dire need of assistance. As we look toward next year we hope that you will again
partner with us so that we can continue to do good things in this county.


Thank You

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Associated Press
Re-enactors stand near luminaries that mark the
graves of Union dead at Soldiers' National Cemetery
last week during ongoing activities commemorating
the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in
Gettysburg, Pa. Union forces turned away a Confederate
advance in the pivotal battle of the Civil War fought July 1
to July 3, 1863, which was also the war's bloodiest
conflict, with more than 51,000 casualties.


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SUNDAY, JULY 7th


Breakfast 9:15AM
Kick-Stands Up 11AM


Registration 10AM
Last Bike In 5PM


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(Approx. 70 miles)
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#2 Peck's Old Port Cove (Ozello Trail)
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#4 Blue Gator Tiki Bar (Dunnellon)
#5 McPherson's Archery (Lecanto)
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Live Concert by HAYFIRE,
$3 home-made pot-roast,
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TRAVEL & LEISURE


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 A19




A20 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

Coming soon:
'In Their Words'
The Chronicle is revamping
its Veterans News section to
include a new feature titled "In
Their Words."
We will prominently feature
the stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about a
singular event or moment in
your military career that
stands out to you. It can be
any type of event, from some-
thing from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on leave.
We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of
service, theater of war served,
years served, outfit and veter-
ans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email him at cjrisak2@yahoo.
com. C.J. will put together
your stories and help set up
obtaining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with your
story.

Special Activities
& Reunions
USS Chilton APA38 will
have a reunion Oct. 10, 11
and 12 in New London, Conn.
Contact Joe Doherty at
352-341-5959 or jdohertyl
@tampabay.rr.com.
M A special event, an
Iraq/Afghanistan Fallen
Hero Name Reading, will be


held from 1 to 4 p.m. Tues-
day, July 30, at Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. The Viet-
nam Veterans Gathering
seeks community volunteers
to read the names of fallen
heroes from Iraq and
Afghanistan. Volunteers are
asked to read 30 names. A
recording of all names will be
played at local and nationwide
memorials and events.
Another reading will take
place from 10:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21,
at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Call Jim Stepanek at
352-489-1644 or email
IMcrazyjim@aol.com.
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693, at 7890 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Ho-
mosassa, will host a breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 8, to honor Purple
Heart recipients and com-
memorate the 231st anniver-
sary of the Purple Heart.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for
the free breakfast by calling
Carrie Clemons at
352-628-1633 or mailing
carriejeanetteclemons@
yahoo.com. Please indicate
the number in your party.

Post News
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Riders
meet the first Thursday of the
month. On the second Thurs-
day, Ladies Auxiliary meets at
4:30 p.m. and AMVET mem-
bers meet at 5:30 p.m. Joe
Hozian is commander.


For more information about
kitchen and canteen hours,
call 352-447-4473. For infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information


regarding American Legion
Post 155, or any of its pro-
grams and functions, call
352-795-6526, email blanton-
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
com, or visit www.fl Post
155.org.
The post will have a break-
fast fundraiser from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. today, July 7. Cost
is $6 and proceeds will benefit
the 40 & 8 programs. For
more information, call
352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post. El-
igibility in the Auxiliary is open
to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President


Barbara Logan at
352-795-4233.
Fried chicken dinner with all
the fixings will be served from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 19,
at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Fish
dinner choice of fried or
baked is on the menu from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
July 24. Everyone is
welcome; donation is $7
for each meal.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For
more information, call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County


Girls State delegates


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Special to the Chronicle
American Legion Auxiliary Blanton-Thompson Unit 155, Crystal River, sponsored
delegates to Florida Girls State in Tallahassee from June 13 to 21. Delegates,
above, from left, were: Holly Pafford, Seven Rivers Christian; Abigail Fielding,
Lecanto; Hayley Clark, Crystal River; Alexis Zachar, Seven River Christian; and
Jordan O'Quinn, Seven Rivers Christian. Florida Girls State was first held in 1947
and is currently attended by 300 young women from across Florida in their
junior year of high school. The youths have the opportunity to experience our
democratic form of government by assuming the roles of city and state officials
and legislators. The program is fully funded by the American Legion Auxiliary,
which includes transportation, tuition, food and lodging.


Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
The post meeting is
changed to the second
Monday starting in July (at
7 p.m. Monday, July 8).
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Crispy, oven-fried chicken
will be served from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, July 12.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 officially
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday monthly at the chap-
ter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, at the intersection

See VETERANS/Page A21


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VETERANS & IN SERVICE

Veterans NOTES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mqwwrwlr
F-Ca-ff-f-orftee
I ;_E tAe




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A20

of Independence Highway
and U.S. 41. The chapter hall
is on the corner of Independ-
ence Highway and Paul
Drive. Due to vacations, there
will be no official meetings in
July or August.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any vet-
erans who received a Purple
Heart for a combat injury or
those with service-connected
disabilities to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207
or 352-400-8952. Call these
numbers also for information
about chapter activities,
veterans' benefits or DAV
membership.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call
352-344-3464.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility-
challenged veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment
for transportation to the VA
medical center in Gainesville
may call the Citrus County
Transit office for wheelchair
transportation; 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70 meets at 2 p.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday of the month,
except July and August, at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
includes all family members of
a disabled American veteran,
including expanded family
members. Members are
never too young or too old to
join; there is no membership
fee for those older than 81.
Phone Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104, or
Adjutant Lynn Armitage at
352-341-5334, or chairwoman
Juanita Godrey at
352-563-1238.
Material, yarn, bed sheets,
blankets, toiletry items, etc.,
are needed for the many proj-
ects the auxiliary makes for
veterans in nursing homes. To
help, donate and for more in-


formation, call Godfrey at
352-794-3104, or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at
352-344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon. Post meets the
first Wednesday of the month
at 7 p.m. The auxiliary meets
at 1 p.m. the first Wednesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast is sus-
pended until Sept. 21.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and
Saturday, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post for
information.


Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191
S. Florida Ave., Floral City.
For information about the post
and its activities, call
352-637-0100.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at
352-563-2496, Neville
Anderson at 352-344-2529 or
Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375
Little Al Point, off Arbor Street
in Inverness. Call Com-
mander Norm Brumett at
352-476-2134 or Auxiliary
president Alice Brummett at
352-476-7001 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
The post will host an eight-
pin, no-tap bowling tourna-
ment at 1 p.m. Saturday,


July 20, at the Sportsmen's
Bowl. For more information
call Norm at 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 typically meets the first
Monday monthly at the Olive
Tree Restaurant in Airport
Plaza in Crystal River. Dinner
is at 6 p.m. and the meeting
follows at 7. (The July meet-
ing has been moved to July 8.
This is a one-time change.)
The August meeting will be
Aug. 5, with the installation
Aug. 10 at the Masonic
Lodge, 5030 S. Memorial
Drive, Homosassa.
All veterans in the
Homosassa/Homosassa
Springs area are invited to be
a part of American Legion
Post 166. This is open to all
veterans who love to ride and
would be interested in forming
an American Legion Riders
chapter. Riders members are
military men and women from
all branches of service, as
well as children of service
members. For more informa-
tion, call Clay Scott at
928-848-8359 or email
eaglerider@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
Commander, Robert Scott, at
352-860-2090.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Country Club,
Rose and Crown restaurant,
Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the


Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at
352-746-1959; or visit
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at
352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


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II






IIISGOVER PHOTO ONTESTN1

We are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among
those chosen to be displayed in the
2013-2014 Discover Magazine. Please
submit only photos taken in Citrus
County and include a brief description
of the photo along with your name,
address and phone number. Photos
must be submitted by July 31, 2013.






I I I I II I I I




ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.
PHOO I SUMITED T BCOES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


How does it work? Submit a photo of YOUR car or truck before
July 8th then tell everyone you know to vote for you starting
July 9th. The car and truck with the most votes wins!

Does the car or truck have to be Vintage or Classic? No. The
car or truck you enter can be any YEAR, MAKE & MODEL.


%ea


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 A21

Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for
information and directions.


O0FFCG




A22 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013

For VETERANS

The Citrus County Veter-
ans Services Department of-
fers help for veterans who
have had their post-
traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied. Veter-
ans who have been denied
within the past two years are
asked to contact the office to
review the case and discuss
compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the
Lecanto VA Mental Health
center and have been denied
may call the Citrus County
Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim, call
352-527-5915. You will need
to have your denial letter and
a copy of your compensation
examination by Gainesville.
You can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical
records or from the primary
care window in Lecanto.
For more information about
the Citrus County Veterans
Office, log onto www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans' Services Advisory
Board will meet at 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 11, at the Cit-
rus County Resource Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. For more in-
formation, call 352-527-5904.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. the second Saturday
each month at the Disabled
American Veteran's Building,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness. The building is on the
corner of State Road 41 and
Paul Drive.
It is an advocacy group for
current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 is en-
couraging new members to
join to promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Visit www.rollingthunder
fl7.com. Full membership is
open to all individuals 18
years or older.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday, July 18, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. All are welcome.
Call Mike Emig at 352-854-
8328 for more information.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday-
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran


CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


60th ANNIVERSARY


The Harts


Art and Marion Hart of
Dunnellon celebrated
their 60th wedding
anniversary July 3, 2013.
The couple were wed
July 3, 1953, in Biloxi,
Miss. Their hometown is
Lancaster, N.Y, and they
have lived in Citrus
County for 14 years.


6/24/13 6/30/13
Divorces
Shari L. Clague vs. Jeffery Clague,
Lecanto
Carole Croote, Hernando vs.
John Croote, Hernando
Diana Leigh Phillips, Homosassa


Art is retired and Marion
is a housewife.
They have two daugh-
ters: Vicki Halleland of
Fort Lauderdale and
Wendi Hart of Pompano
Beach.
The couple also have
three grandchildren and
one great-grandchild.


On Friday, May 24,
2013, what started out a
as surprise birthday
party for Eric Gerard
Nelson of Lecanto,
turned into a surprise
wedding.
His fiance, Susan
Frances Trebing of
Lecanto, made the plans
within days of the cele-
bration. The couple al-
ready had their marriage
license and were to be
wed on a cruise, which is
basically being married
on a ship while still
docked in port and in the
company of strangers.
Since the birthday
party was already
planned, the bride
thought the wedding
would be a wonderful
surprise and family and
friends could share in

For the RECORD


vs. Robert Joseph Phillips,
Homosassa Springs
Betty L. Vaudrain, Beverly Hills vs.
David B. Vaudrain, Ocala
Marriages
Richard Alan Braithwaite,
Norcross, Ga./Taylor Ann Bilbro,


Wedding

Trebing/Nelson


the celebration.
The groom may have
suspected the surprise
birthday party, but when
the bagpipe player began
playing the "Wedding
March," he was visibly
shocked.
The bride was handed
a bouquet and veil. The


Norcross, Ga.
Allen James Henderson,
Inverness/Kathleen Frances Connell,
Inverness
Simon Larchae Howard,
Inverness/Erika Shawnte Hutchins,
Inverness


groom was given a blue
T-shirt with a tuxedo im-
printed on the front and
they were married. Chap-
lain Donna Viglione from
The Wedding Chapel in
Inverness performed the
Christian service.
The bride's daughters,
Monica Trebing and
Stephanie Roberts, and
Stephanie's husband,
Frank, plus the groom's
son and daughter, Eric
Nelson and Sara Nelson,
stood up as witnesses for
the couple.
The bride is employed
at Citrus Memorial
Health System and the
groom works for the
Citrus County School
Board.
They went on the
cruise for their
honeymoon trip.


Mark Andrew Myers, Inverness/
Alexis Precious Harris
Brett Lewis Norton, Inverness/
Kerry Elizabeth Vonstaden, Inverness
Divorces and marriages filed in the
state of Florida are a matter of public
record. Call 352-341-6400.


Ten of the most admired women of Citrus County will be featured in the
special section on Wednesday, August 28, 2013



NOMINATION BALLOT


Sponsored by:
CIT w. onicleonline T om


Citrus County's


MOST ADMIRED





WOMEN


Join the Citrus County Chronicle and Altrusa International of Citrus County to choose the

10 Most Admired Women in Citrus County


Most Admired in the Arts
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:_




Most Admired in Government
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:_




Most Admired Mother
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:_




Most Admired Athlete
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:_




Most Admired Leader
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:_


Most Admired in Education
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:




Most Admired in Business
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:




Most Admired Up and Coming Youth
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:




Most Admired in Community Involvement
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:




Most Admired in the Health Field
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:


in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876 or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.


PLEASE INCLUDE A SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATION/REASONS ON AN ATTACHED SHEET
RULES AND REGULATIONS


1. Nominees must be a Citrus County resident.
2. All nominations must be received at the Chronicle
business office no later than 5 p.m. on July 10, 2013.
These may be delivered to the Meadowcrest or
Inverness office, or mailed to 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Envelopes must be
marked 10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN.
You may also fax your entry form to the Citrus County


SubmDtted by:.


Chronicle at 352-563-5665.
3. Only one nomination per category will be
accepted.
4. Additional information for each nominee may be
attached.
5. Only one nomination entry form per person will be
accepted.
6. PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY


Phone:


DOODN03


TOGETHER & VETERANS










SPORTS


Dwight Howard
officially made the
decision to join the
Houston Rockets
public Saturday./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2, B3
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
0 NBA, golf/B5
ZAvf& Crystal River triathlon/B5
0 U Tennis, Tour de France/B6


Bartoli claims Wimbledon women's title


French female

smokes Lisicki

6-1, 64

Associated Press
LONDON Ever since she
was a kid, practicing until mid-
night with her father, Marion
Bartoli went about playing ten-
nis her own way.
The two-handed strokes for
backhands, forehands, even vol-
leys. The hopping in place and
practice swings between points,
which help her focus. The un-


usual setup for serves no
ball-bouncing, arms crossed,
right wrist resting on her left
thumb before the toss.
Whatever works, right? This
unique Wimbledon, appropri-
ately enough, produced a unique
champion in the ambidextrous
Bartoli, the 15th-seeded French-
woman who won her first Grand
Slam title by beating 23rd-
seeded Sabine Lisicki of Ger-
many 6-1, 6-4 Saturday in an
error-filled, one-sided final that
was far from a classic.
"It's always been a part of my
personality to be different. I
think being just like the other
one is kind of boring. I really


embrace the fact of being a bit
different and doing something
that not everyone is," said the
28-year-old Bartoli, who plays
tennis right-handed but signs
autographs with her left. "I ac-
tually love that part of my
game, being able to have some-
thing different."
See Page B3
Marion Bartoli downed Sabine
Lisicki 6-1, 6-4 to win the
Wimbledon women's singles
championship Saturday at the
All England Lawn Tennis
Championships in Wimbledon,
London.
Associated Press


Little League stays dry


After week of

rain, Dunnellon

wins junior title

vs. Inverness
STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER The
Dunnellon junior baseball team
took the District 15 champi-
onship in emphatic fashion, de-
feating Inverness 13-1 in a
shortened five-inning contest
Saturday at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River.
Dunnellon amassed 17 hits,
six for extra bases, including a
Jarod Hamm solo homerun in
the top of the first inning.
But the majority of the dam-
age was done in a nine-run
fourth frame, as Dunnellon sent
15 batters to the plate.
Zach West's sacrifice fly made
it 5-1, scoring Gary Sonneberger,
who doubled. West came home
on an Inverness error, Hunter
Kephart reached on a base hit
and John Kunberger blasted a
two-run double to make it
8-1. Maurice Goldsby and Ivory
Mack followed with back-to-
back RBI singles, and Dunnel-
lon tacked on three more runs,
turning what was a 4-1 lead into
the decisive final score.
Dunnellon head coach Jeff
Hamm explained his lineup's
success at the plate.
"They're staying patient. We
mainly just make sure that
they're hitting their pitch and not
the pitcher's pitch," Hamm said.
"They're all really good, but our
first six hitters just lit it up."
On the flip side, Inverness bat-
ters were stymied by Goldsby,
who tossed the full five innings
for the win. Goldsby surren-
dered just two hits while striking
out seven and walking three.
Inverness' first two batters of
the game drew walks, but
Goldsby struck out two in the
frame to pitch out of the early
trouble.
"Their starting pitcher was
good," Inverness manager
Michael Vandertulip said. "He
didn't throw anything we could-
n't hit, but the bats just weren't
there today"
The only other chance for In-
verness to rally came in the
third inning with one out, as
James Smith singled and Chet
Dellich reached on a walk. The
See Page B5


S- A


.-.

-. -"-



..._ .--. -. . .. --- .. S -.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Inverness shortstop Mike Vandertulip gets hit by a pitch against Dunnellon on Saturday during the Dis-
trict 15 All-Stars junior baseball championship game at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. Dunnellon won
the District 15 title with a 13-1 rout of Inverness.


Inverness major

softball set to

meet CR for title

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER The In-
verness Major Softball (11 and
12) All Stars used some small
ball and strong pitching to put
them in a title game.
Inverness beat Central Citrus
7-1 at Harley Levins Softball
Complex Saturday to give the
east Citrus County team a 2-0
record and the Pool B title.
They will face Crystal River (2-
0), the Pool A winner, at 12 p.m.
today for the District 15 title
and the chance to advance to a
sectional in St Petersburg.
Inverness used three pitchers
- Madison Spires, Tyler Ben-
son and Faith Alexander to
hold Central Citrus to one hit.
Spires was the winning pitcher.
"We played small ball," In-
verness manager Caleb
Hanssen said. "It worked for us.
It was a pitching strategy day
for us. We used our pitchers
only an inning or two. Our
pitchers did fabulous. We knew
Katelynn was a fabulous
pitcher."
Losing pitcher Katelynn
Parks held Inverness to two hits
and struck out seven for Central
Citrus but gave up five walks
and hit three batters.
Central Citrus committed
four errors.
Inverness took advantage of
walks, hit batsmen, wild pitches
and throwing errors to score
their runs. Zarrie Washington
walked and scored in the sec-
ond inning. Faith Alexander
was hit by a pitch and scored on
a throwing error. Spires and
Lauren Honea both walked and
scored in the fifth inning. Tyler
Benson reached on an error
and scored on Christine
Lanzell's single. Lanzell scored
on a wild pitch.
Hannah Carpenter had the
only Central Citrus hit.

We played small
ball. It worked for
us.
Caleb Hanssen
Inverness Major softball manager said on
his team's 7-1 win over Central Citrus.


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New York
Miami


5 5
8Y2 8Y2
12Y2 12Y2
17Y2 17Y2


NL

Cardinals 5, Marlins 4
Miami St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ruggin If 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 1 1 1
Polanc 3b 2 1 0 0 Beltran rf 4 0 1 1
Stanton rf 3 0 1 0 Hollidy If 3 0 0 0
Morrsnib 4 1 1 2 Craigib 3 0 1 0
Ozunacf 4 0 0 0 Freese3b 4 0 0 0
Dietrch 2b 4 2 2 1 Descalsss 3 0 0 0
Hchvrrss 4 0 1 1 T.Cruzc 4 1 1 0
Brantly c 4 0 1 0 Jay cf 3 1 1 0
Eovaldip 2 0 0 0 J.Kellyp 2 1 1 0
MDunn p 0 00 0 Maness p 0 00 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 MAdmsph 1 1 1 2
Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0
ARamsp 0 00 0 Mujicap 0 00 0
SRonsnph 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 46 4 Totals 325 8 4
Miami 012 100 000 4
St. Louis 002 000 201 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Stanton (7), Descalso 2 (7). DP-Miami 2,
St. Louis 1. LOB-Miami 5, St. Louis 5.2B-Di-
etrich (9). 3B-M.Carpenter (4). HR-Morrison
(4), Dietrich (8), Ma.Adams (7). S-Eovaldi.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Eovaldi 62/35 3 3 3 3
M.Dunn BS,2-3 2/3 1 1 1 0 0
Quails 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
A.RamosL,3-3 2/3 1 1 0 1 0
St. Louis
J.Kelly 6 5 4 4 2 4
Maness 1 1 0 0 0 0
Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 1 1
MujicaW,l-1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Nationals 5, Padres 4


ab r h bi


EvCarr ss 5 0 0 0 Span cf 3 2 2 0
Venale cf 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 1 2 0
Quentin If 4 1 2 0 Harper If 2 0 1 3
Headly3b 4 1 1 0 Zmrmn3b 4 0 2 1
Guzmnlb 4 1 2 3 AdLRclb 4 1 2 1
Denorfi rf 4 0 0 0 Werth rf 3 0 1 0
Forsyth 2b 3 1 1 0 Rendon 2b 4 0 1 0
Grandlc 1 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 1 1 0
Hundlyc 3 02 0 Zmrmnp 2 00 0
Marqusp 2 0 1 1 Ohlndrfp 0 0 0 0
Ciriaco ph 0 0 0 0 Berndn ph 1 0 0 0
Vincent p 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Thtchrp 0 0 0 0 RSorinp 0 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 00 0
Kotsayph 1 00 0
Totals 35 49 4 Totals 31 512 5
San Diego 000 013 000 4
Washington 001 110 20x 5
DP-San Diego 3. LOB-San Diego 6, Wash-
ington 6. 2B-Quentin (15), Guzman (11), Mar-
quis (1), K.Suzuki (11). HR-Guzman (5),
Ad.LaRoche (13). SB-Forsythe (3), Span (9),
Ad.LaRoche (3). S-Ciriaco. SF-Harper.
IP H RERBBSO


6 8 3
1/3 2 2
1/3 0 0
11/32 0

51/35 3
12/32 1
1 0 0
1 2 0


ab r h bi
Crwfrd If 4 0 0 GBlanc cf
Puig rf 4 0 0 0 Scutaro 2b
AdGnzlIb 4 00 0 Sandovl3b
HRmrzss 4 0 1 0 Poseyc
Uribe 3b 3 0 0 0 Pence rf
Ethiercf 3 1 1 0 Belt lb
Fdrwczc 3 1 1 2 AnTrrslf
Punto 2b 2 0 0 0 BCrwfrss
Howellp 0 00 0 Bmgrnp
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 SRosari p
HrstnJrph 1 0 1 0 J.Lopezp
PRdrgzp 0 00 0 Romo p
Fife p 1 0 0 0
M.Ellis2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 31 24 2 Totals
Los Angeles 000 020 000
San Francisco 030 100 OOx


3 3 3
2 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 1


ab r h bi
3 0 31
2 0 0 01
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0






00 00
3 1 1 0







29 4 7 4
-4 2 1 0
4 1 0 0
4


E-Punto (6), H.Ramirez (4), Federowicz (3).
LOB-Los Angeles 2, San Francisco 7. 2B-
Hairston Jr. (6), G.Blanco 2 (13). 3B-H.Ramirez
(1). HR-Federowicz (3). CS-Belt (2). S-Scu-
taro. SF-Scutaro, Bumgarner.
IP H RERBBSO


41/37 4
12/30 0
1 0 0
1 0 0

7 3 2
2/3 1 0
1/30 0
1 0 0


ab r h bi
Smmns ss 5 3 3 2 Revere cf
DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Utley 2b
Heywrd rf 5 1 2 3 Frndsn 2b
RJhnsn ph-rfl 0 1 1 Rollinsss
J.Upton If 6 0 1 1 DBrwn If
FFrmnlb 5 1 1 0 MYong3b
McCnnc 5 24 0 DYong rf
A.Woodp 0 0 0 0 L.Nixlb
Janish ph-ssl 0 0 Aumont p
Uggla2b 3 2 1 3 Diekmnp
Pstrnck2b 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph
BUpton cf 5 2 2 0 Ruiz c
CJhnsn3b 5 1 2 2 Kndrckp
THudsn p 2 0 1 1 JMcDnI ph
G.Lairdc 1 1 1 0 Saveryp
Ruf lb
Totals 44131913 Totals
Atlanta 120 120 412
Philadelphia 001 000 012


ab r h bi
4 1 2 0
3 0 1 0
0 0 0 1

4 0 1 1




354 1 1 09 4
4 1 2 2
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
0 00 00


4 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


13
4


E-Utley (7). DP-Atlanta 1, Philadelphia 1.
LOB-Atlanta 10, Philadelphia 5. 2B-F.Free-
man (16), McCann (8), C.Johnson (19). 3B-
Simmons (2). HR-Simmons (7), Heyward (7),
Uggla (16), M.Young (6). SB-Heyward (2). S-
THudson. SF-Uggla, Frandsen.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
T.HudsonW,5-7 7 5 1 1 0 4
A.Wood 1 2 1 1 0 0
D.Carpenter 1 2 2 2 0 3
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick L,7-6 5 12 6 6 2 2
Savery 2 2 4 0 2 0
Aumont 1 2 1 1 0 1
Diekman 1 3 2 2 0 1
WP-A.Wood, D.Carpenter.


W
Texas 50
Oakland 51
Los Angeles 41
Seattle 38
Houston 31


Arizona
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Fran.
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC
36 .581 -
37 .580 -
45 .477 9 6Y2
49 .437 12Y2 10
56 .356 19Y2 17


West Division
t GB WC


Str Home
W-2 26-18
L-1 28-14
L-1 22-25
L-1 21-22
L-2 17-32



Str Home
W-3 22-16
L-1 26-21
L-1 25-21
W-1 25-16
L-8 25-18


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays base runner Wil Myers slides after advancing to third base on a ground ball by Jose
Lobaton during the sixth inning Saturday against the Chicago White Sox in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 3-0.



Moore dazzles in Rays victory


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Matt
Moore won his fourth consecutive
start to help the Tampa Bay Rays
beat All-Star selection Chris Sale
and the Chicago White Sox 3-0 on
Saturday night.
Moore (12-3), who could still be-
come an All-Star as an injury re-
placement, gave up five hits, two
walks and struck out six over 6 1/3
innings.
The Rays have won seven of
eight, improving to a season-best
eight games (48-40) over .500. Fer-
nando Rodney, the third Tampa
Bay reliever, pitched the ninth for
his 19th save completing the
six-hitter.
American League

Yankees 5, Orioles 4
N EW YORK Andy Pettitte
stopped the Orioles once again, Ed-
uardo Nunez returned with a go-
ahead hit and the New York Yankees
beat Baltimore 5-4 for their season-
high sixth straight win.
The Yankees overcame Chris Davis'
major league-leading 33rd home run
and yet another double from Manny
Machado, celebrating his 21st birth-
day. The Orioles have lost four of five.
The 41-year-old Pettitte (6-6)
earned his 251 st win, tying Hall of
Famer Bob Gibson for 44th place on
the all-time list.

Twins 6, Blue Jays 0
TORONTO Brian Dozier hit a
three-run home run, Mike Pelfrey and
three relievers combined for a four-hit-
ter and the Minnesota Twins beat the
Toronto Blue Jays 6-0.
Dozier had two hits and four RBIs,
connecting off knuckleballer R.A. Dickey
for his eighth homer as the Twins
snapped a six-game skid and won for
just the fourth time in 14 games.
Minnesota came in having lost 17 of
23 to Toronto, including eight of nine
at Rogers Centre.

Royals 4, A's 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Jarrod
Dyson delivered an infield single with
the bases loaded and two outs in the
eighth inning, giving the Kansas City
Royals a scrappy 4-3 victory over the
Oakland Athletics.
The Royals had rallied to tie the
game on a sacrifice fly by Eric Hosmer
in the seventh, and then loaded the
bases on an error and a pair of walks
by reliever Ryan Cook.
Dyson, hardly known for his power,
showed bunt on his first pitch from
Cook (1-2) before hitting a grounder
deep behind second base. Shortstop
Adam Rosales fielded it cleanly but
didn't even bother with a throw as
pinch runner Alcides Escobar scored
the go-ahead run.

Tigers 9, Indians 4
CLEVELAND Torii Hunter drove
in three runs, Miguel Cabrera cracked
a two-run homer and the Detroit
Tigers dominated Cleveland again,
pounding the second-place Indians 9-
4 for their fifth straight win.
Hunter hit a two-run homer, tripled
and doubled as the Tigers won their
seventh consecutive game over the
Indians and increased their lead in the
AL Central to 3 1/2 games. Needing a
single for a rare cycle, Hunter
grounded out in the eighth.
Detroit is 8-2 against Cleveland this
season, and the Tigers have
outscored the Indians 16-4 in winning


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 5, Baltimore 4
Minnesota 6, Toronto 0
Kansas City 4, Oakland 3
Detroit 9, Cleveland 4
Cincinnati 13, Seattle 4
Tampa Bay 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Houston at Texas, late
Boston at L.A. Angels, late
Today
Baltimore (Hammel 7-5) at N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 7-6),
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 6-5) at Cleveland (Kluber 6-5), 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota (Diamond 5-7) at Toronto (Redmond 0-1),
1:07 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 6-8) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-6),
1:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-5) at Tampa Bay
(Price 2-4), 1:40 p.m.
Oakland (Griffin 6-6) at Kansas City (Mendoza 2-4),
2:10 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-4) at Texas (Grimm 7-6), 3:05
p.m.
Boston (Lackey 6-5) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 2-4), 8:05
p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 5, Miami 4
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 1
Washington 5, San Diego 4
Cincinnati 13, Seattle 4
Atlanta 13, Philadelphia 4
San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Milwaukee 7, N.Y. Mets 6
Colorado at Arizona, late
Today
Seattle (J.Saunders 6-8) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-6),
1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 6-7) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 4-3),
1:35 p.m.
San Diego (Erlin 1-1) at Washington (Strasburg 4-6),
1:35 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Hefner 3-6) at Milwaukee (Gorzelanny 1-
1), 2:10 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 5-4) at St. Louis (Lynn 10-3), 2:15
p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-6) at Chicago Cubs (Vil-
lanueva 2-4), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 7-5) at San Francisco
(Gaudin 2-1), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Oswalt 0-3) at Arizona (Corbin 9-1), 4:10
p.m.


the first two games of the four-game
series.

National League

Cardinals 5, Marlins 4
ST. LOUIS Jon Jay scored from
first on right fielder Giancarlo Stan-
ton's throwing error on Shane Robin-
son's single with two outs in the ninth
inning, giving the St. Louis Cardinals a
5-4 victory over the Florida Marlins.
Edward Mujica (1-1) worked a
scoreless ninth for the Cardinals after
Matt Adams' pinch-hit two-run homer
tied it two innings earlier.
Jay drew a full-count walk off A.J.
Ramos (3-3) with two outs in the ninth
and had third easily on Robinson's
pinch-hit single, then scored without a
play after Stanton hesitated before
throwing a relay that skipped under
Morrison's glove at first base.

Cubs 4, Pirates 1
CHICAGO -Alfonso Soriano hit
two-run homers in consecutive innings
to lead the Chicago Cubs to a 4-1 vic-
tory over the Pittsburgh Pirates 4-1.
Edwin Jackson and three relievers
combined on a five-hitter, and the
Cubs handed the Pirates just their
third loss in 14 games.
Pittsburgh came in with the best
record in the majors and a seven-
game road win streak, but the Pirates
couldn't get much going at the plate or
find a way to contain Soriano.

Nationals 5, Padres 4
WASHINGTON Bryce Harper
drove in three runs after talking his
way into Washington's lineup, Ryan
Zimmerman knocked in the go-ahead
run and the Nationals rallied for a 5-4
win over the San Diego Padres.
Adam LaRoche homered, and
Denard Span and lan Desmond


added two hits apiece as the Nation-
als won their third straight.
Harper lobbied Davey Johnson for
playing time earlier in the day after the
Washington manager said Friday
night that he was probably going to
give the young slugger the weekend
off. Harper walked with the bases
loaded in the third, snapped an 0-for-
19 skid with an RBI single in the fifth
and drove in the tying run in the sev-
enth with a sacrifice fly.

Giants 4, Dodgers 2
SAN FRANCISCO Madison
Bumgarner drove in two runs and
struck out nine in seven innings, and
the San Francisco Giants overcame
an embarrassing lineup mistake to
beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 4-2.
The Giants were caught batting out
of order in the first inning, wiping away
Buster Posey's RBI double. Manager
Bruce Bochy submitted a lineup with
Posey batting fourth, but the reigning
NL MVP and batting champion hit third.
On the day he earned his first All-
Star selection, Bumgarner (9-5)
helped erase Bochy's big blunder by
retiring his first 14 batters. Tim
Federowicz's two-run homer off Bum-
garner accounted for each of Los An-
geles' runs.

Braves 13, Phillies 4
PHILADELPHIA- Jason Heyward
hit a three-run homer to lead an At-
lanta offense that scored in all but two
innings, Tim Hudson pitched seven
strong innings and the Braves set sea-
son highs for runs and hits in a 13-4
rout of the Philadelphia Phillies.
Andrelton Simmons and Dan Uggla
also homered for Atlanta, which
amassed 19 hits while snapping a
three-game skid. Brian McCann had
four hits and Simmons was a double
shy of the cycle for the Braves.
Hudson (5-7) allowed one run on five
hits to earn his first victory since May 5.
The right-hander had been 0-6 with a
4.50 ERA in his last 10 starts. He struck
out four and did not walk a batter.

Brewers 7, Mets 5
MILWAUKEE Jonathan Lucroy
homered and Yovani Gallardo scattered
six hits over six innings while adding
two hits and a pair of runs scored to
lead the Milwaukee Brewers to a 7-5
victory over the New York Mets.
Gallardo (7-8) allowed four earned
runs, striking out six and walking
three. In his previous outing Monday
against Washington, Gallardo gave up
nine hits and eight earned runs in
three innings.
Francisco Rodriguez recorded his
eighth save of the season and 302nd
of his career.
Gallardo had a single and a double,
scoring both times he reached base.
He also had a key sacrifice bunt.

Interleague

Reds 13, Mariners 4
CINCINNATI Cesar Izturis drove
in three runs, matching his season
total, and Mat Latos doubled home two
more, rallying the Cincinnati Reds to a
13-4 victory over the Seattle Mariners.
The Reds got only their second win
over Seattle in interleague play. The
Mariners are 9-2 overall in the series.
Manager Dusty Baker decided to
give Izturis his ninth start at shortstop
so he could get some at-bats and stay
sharp. Izturis singled home a run in
the second and doubled home two
more in the fifth off Jeremy Bonder-
man (1-3).


B2 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


Chicago

De Aza cf
AIRmrz ss
Rios rf
A.Dunn lb
Kppngr dh
Gillaspi 3b
Viciedo If
Bckhm 2b
Flowers c


Tampa Bay
r h bi
0 1 0 DJnngscf
0 2 0 SRdrgz lb
0 0 0 Loneylb
0 0 0 Zobrist 2b
0 1 0 Longori 3b
0 0 0 WMyrs rf
0 0 0 YEscorss
0 2 0 Loaton c
0 0 0 Scott dh
Fuld If


ab rh bi
4 0 0 1
4 00 0
0 00 0
3 02 0
3 00 0
4 1 1 0
4 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
3 0 1 1
3 0 1 1


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 53 33 .616 - 7-3 L-1 29-15 24-18
St. Louis 52 34 .605 1 5-5 W-2 24-16 28-18
Cincinnati 50 37 .575 312 5-5 W-1 30-15 20-22
Chicago 37 48 .435 1512 12 6-4 W-1 18-23 19-25
Milwaukee 35 51 .407 18 1412 3-7 W-1 20-24 15-27


Baltimore
Tillman L,10-3
Matusz
Gausman
New York
Pettitte W,6-6
Kelley H,4
D.Robertson H,20
Rivera S,29-30
PB-Teagarden.
Twins 6,


51/310 5 5 2 3
1 0 0 0 1 1
12/30 0 0 1 1


62/39 4
1/3 0 0
1 1 0
1 1 0


Blue Jays 0


Minnesota Toronto
ab r h bi
Dozier 2b 4 1 2 4 Reyes ss
Carroll3b 4 1 1 1 Bautistrf
Mauerc 4 0 1 1 Encrnclb
Mornealb 4 0 0 0 Linddh
Arcia If 2 0 0 0 CIRsms cf
Thorns If 1 0 0 0 RDavis If
Plouffe dh 4 0 0 0 MIzturs 3b
Parmelrf 3 1 2 0 Tholec
Hicks cf 3 2 1 0 Kawsk2b
EEscorss 4 1 0 0
Totals 33 67 6 Totals


ab rh bi
4 00 0
4000
3000
3 00 0
2 00 0
3 0 1 0
3 03 0
3 00 0
3000

280 4 0


Minnesota 003 000 300 6
Toronto 000 000 000 0
E-E.Escobar (4). DP-Minnesota 2, Toronto 1.
LOB-Minnesota 3, Toronto 4. 2B-Carroll (5),
Parmelee 2 (12). HR-Dozier (8). SB-Arcia (1).
CS-R.Davis (3).
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
PelfreyW,4-6
Thielbar
Burton
Perkins
Toronto
Dickey L,8-9
Oliver
J.Perez


7 7 6 6 2 3

1 0 0 0 0 2


HBP-by Dickey (Arcia). PB-Thole.
Tigers 9, Indians 4
Detroit Cleveland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksn cf 3 2 2 1 Bourn cf 3 0 1 1
TrHntrrf 5 1 3 3 Raburnrf 1 1 1 2
MiCarr3b 4 1 1 2 ACarerss 3 00 0
D.Kelly3b 0 0 0 0 Avilesss 2 0 0 0
Fielder b 5 1 1 1 Kipnis2b 4 0 0 0
VMrtnzdh 4 1 1 0 Swisherlb 3 1 2 1
JhPerltss 5 0 2 1 Brantly If 4 0 0 0
Dirks If 5 1 2 0 CSantn c 4 0 0 0
Avila c 3 1 1 0 Giamrbidh 3 00 0
RSantg2b 4 1 0 MrRynlph 1 00 0
Chsnhll3b 3 1 2 0
Stubbsrf-cf 3 1 2 0
Totals 38 9138 Totals 344 8 4
Detroit 004 302 000 9
Cleveland 001 001 002 4
E-Mi.Cabrera (10), Carrasco (2). DP-Detroit
2. LOB-Detroit 9, Cleveland 7. 2B-A.Jackson
(12), Tor.Hunter (22), V.Martinez (15), Chisenhall
(10), Stubbs (15). 3B-Tor.Hunter (2). HR-
Tor.Hunter (5), Mi.Cabrera (27), Fielder (15),
Raburn (10), Swisher (9). SB-Stubbs (9). S-
R.Santiago. SF-A.Jackson.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Ani.Sanchez W,7-5


5 3 1 1 1 4


Coke 12/32 1 1 0 1
Putkonen 1/3 0 0 0 2 (
Smyly 1 1 0 0 0 1
D.Downs 1 2 2 2 0 1
Cleveland
Carrasco L,0-4 31/310 7 6 1 ;
R.Hill 2/3 0 0 0 0 ;
Albers 2 2 2 2 0 1
Shaw 1 0 0 0 2 1
Pestano 1 0 0 0 1 1
C.Perez 1 1 0 0 1 (
HBP-by Ani.Sanchez (Swisher). WP-Pt
nen, D.Downs.


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
July 7 vs Chicago Sox
July 8 vs Minnesota
July 9 vs Minnesota
July 10 vs Minnesota
July 11 vs Minnesota
July 12 vs Houston
July 13 vs Houston
July 14 vs Houston
July 19 at Toronto
July 20 at Toronto
July 21 at Toronto
July 22 at Boston
July 23 at Boston
July 24 at Boston
July 25 at Boston
July 26 at N.Y. Yankees
July 27 at N.Y. Yankees
July 28 at N.Y. Yankees
July 30 vs Arizona
July 31 vs Arizona
Aug. 2 vs San Francisco
Aug. 3 vs San Francisco
Aug. 4 vs San Francisco
Aug. 6 at Arizona
Aug. 7 at Arizona
Aug. 9 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 10 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 11 at L.A. Dodgers
Aug. 13 vs Seattle
Aug. 14 vs Seattle
Aug. 15 vs Seattle
Aug. 16 vs Toronto
Aug. 17 vs Toronto


Totals 31 06 0 Totals 31 3 6 3
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Tampa Bay 020 001 00x 3
E-Gillaspie (5). DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-
Chicago 7, Tampa Bay 8. 2B-Keppinger (6),
Scott (10). SB-Zobrist (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
SaleL,5-8 7 6 3 2 1 9
N.Jones 1 0 0 0 1 1
Tampa Bay
M.MooreW,12-3 61/35 0 0 2 6
McGeeH,17 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Jo.Peralta H,21 1 1 0 0 0 2
Rodney S,19-24 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Sale (Zobrist, Scott), by M.Moore (De
Aza). WP-M.Moore.
Yankees 5, Orioles 4
Baltimore New York
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Markks rf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr cf 4 0 0 0
Machd 3b 4 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 1
A.Jones cf 4 1 2 0 Cano 2b 3 0 1 1
C.Davislb 4 1 1 2 Hafnerdh 3 1 0 0
BRorts dh 4 0 1 0 Almont If 3 1 1 0
Hardy ss 4 1 1 0 V.Wells ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Reimldlf 3 1 1 0 Overaylb 4 1 3 0
McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 L.Cruz 3b 3 0 1 1
ACasill2b 3 0 2 1 Nunezss 3 1 2 2
Flahrtyph 1 0 1 0 CStwrtc 2 1 1 0
Tegrdnc 3 0 1 1
ChDckr ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 4114 Totals 30510 5
Baltimore 210 100 000 4
NewYork 020 021 00x 5
E-Pettitte (2). DP-Baltimore 1, New York 1.
LOB-Baltimore 5, New York 8. 2B-Machado
(39), Hardy (16), A.Casilla (4). HR-C.Davis
(33). SB-A.Casilla (6). CS-Teagarden (1). S-
Gardner, L.Cruz. SF-Nunez.
IP H RERBBSO


San Diego
at


Washington


ab r h bi


San Diego
Marquis
Vincent L,2-1 H,2
Thatcher BS,2-2
Gregerson
Washington
Zimmermann
Ohlendorf W,2-0
Storen H,12
R.Soriano S,24-27
WP-Thatcher.


Giants 4, Dodgers 2
Los Angeles San Francisco


Los Angeles
Fife L,3-3
Howell
Belisario
PRodriguez
San Francisco
BumgarnerW,9-5
S.Rosario H,1
J.Lopez H,4
Romo S,20-23
HBP-by Fife (Belt).


Braves 13, Phillies 4


Atlanta


Philadelphia


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 3, White Sox 0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Wimbledon Results
Saturday
At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet
Club, London
Purse: $34.9 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Championship
Marion Bartoli (15), France, def. Sabine Lisicki (23),
Germany, 6-1, 6-4.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Ivan
Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo (12), Brazil, 3-6, 6-
3, 6-4, 6-4.
Women
Championship
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (8), China,
def. Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua (12), Aus-
tralia, 7-6 (1), 6-1.



PGA Tour
Greenbrier Classic
Saturday
At The Greenbrier Resort, The Old White TPC,
Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
Purse: $6.3 million
Yardage: 7,287, par 70
Third Round
Johnson Wagner 62-70-64 -196 -14
Jimmy Walker 69-65-64 198 -12
Jonas Blixt 66-67-67-200 -10
Matt Jones 69-66-66 201 -9
Jordan Spieth 67-67-67-201 -9
Steven Bowditch 65-67-69 201 -9
Pat Perez 71-65-66 -202 -8
Bill Haas 68-67-67-202 -8
Rory Sabbatini 70-65-67-202 -8
D.H. Lee 66-68-68 -202 -8
Tag Ridings 65-69-68 202 -8
Tommy Gainey 62-71-69 202 -8
Gary Woodland 69-70-64-203 -7
Morgan Hoffmann 69-67-67-203 -7
Bill Lunde 66-66-71 203 -7
NickWatney 72-67-65-204 -6
Cameron Percy 71-68-65-- 204 -6
Bryce Molder 71-67-66 204 -6
Tim Petrovic 69-68-67 204 -6
Scott Stallings 70-67-67-204 -6
Brian Stuard 71-66-67-204 -6
David Lingmerth 71-66-67-204 -6
Louis Oosthuizen 67-68-69 204 -6
Ted Potter, Jr. 69-66-69 204 -6
Ben Curtis 67-66-71 204 -6
Russell Henley 67-65-72 204 -6
Troy Matteson 69-70-66 205 -5
Graham DeLaet 69-70-66 205 -5
Brad Fritsch 68-71-66-205 -5
Justin Leonard 68-70-67-205 -5
Charlie Wi 73-65-67 -205 -5
Peter Hanson 66-71-68 205 -5
George McNeill 66-71-68-205 -5
Davis Love III 67-70-68 -205 -5
Jason Kokrak 66-71-68-205 -5
Brian Davis 67-68-70 205 -5
James Driscoll 66-68-71 205 -5
Greg Owen 67-66-72 205 -5
Matt Every 69-62-74 205 -5
Daniel Summerhays 65-67-73 205 -5
Cameron Tringale 73-66-67-206 -4
Michael Kim 70-69-67-206 -4
Billy Horschel 69-70-67-206 -4
K.J. Choi 71-67-68-- 206 -4
Bubba Watson 68-69-69 206 -4
Kevin Chappell 67-68-71 206 -4
Chez Reavie 70-69-68 207 -3
James Hahn 72-67-68 207 -3
Luke List 71-67-69 -207 -3
John Senden 70-68-69 207 -3
Webb Simpson 64-73-70 207 -3
Chad Campbell 69-66-72 207 -3
Brendon de Jonge 66-68-73 207 -3
Andres Romero 68-71-69-208 -2
Brian Harman 68-70-70 -208 -2
Jin Park 64-73-71 208 -2
Richard H. Lee 68-70-70-208 -2
Jeff Overton 68-68-72 208 -2
Brendan Steele 66-70-72 208 -2
Kenny Perry 68-67-73 208 -2
D.A. Points 70-65-73 208 -2
Andres Gonzales 71-68-70 209 -1
Ryan Palmer 68-71-70 209 -1
Shawn Stefani 70-69-70 209 -1
Carl Pettersson 69-70-70 209 -1
Robert Streb 69-70-70 209 -1
Tom Gillis 67-71-71-209 -1
Tom Watson 68-69-72 209 -1
William McGirt 69-70-71-210 E
Jim Herman 72-67-71 -210 E
Martin Flores 71-65-74 -210 E



2013 All-Star Rosters
Rosters for the MLB All-Star game on Tuesday,
July 16 at Citi Field in NewYork (x-injured, will
not play; y-injury replacement):
AMERICAN LEAGUE
STARTERS
Catcher-Joe Mauer, Minnesota
First Base-Chris Davis, Baltimore
Second Base-Robinson Cano, New York
Third Base-Miguel Cabrera, Detroit
Shortstop-J.J. Hardy, Baltimore
Outfield- Mike Trout, Los Angeles; Adam Jones,
Baltimore; Jose Bautista, Toronto
Designated Hitter-David Ortiz, Boston
RESERVES
Catcher-Jason Castro, Houston; Salvador Perez,
Kansas City
Infielders-Prince Fielder, lb, Detroit; Jason Kip-
nis, 2b, Cleveland; Manny Machado, 3b, Baltimore;
Dustin Pedroia, 2b, Boston; Jhonny Peralta, ss, De-
troit; Ben Zobrist, 2b, Tampa Bay
Outfielders-Nelson Cruz, Texas; Alex Gordon,
Kansas City, Torrii Hunter, Detroit
Designated Hitter-Edwin Encarnacion, Toronto
PITCHERS
x-Clay Buchholz, Boston; Brett Cecil, Toronto; z-
Bartolo Colon, Oakland; x-Jesse Crain, Chicago; Yu
Darvish, Texas; Felix Hernandez, Seattle; Hisashi
Iwakuma, Seattle; Justin Masterson, Cleveland; Joe
Nathan, Texas; z-Glen Perkins, Minnesota; Mariano
Rivera, NewYork; Chris Sale, Chicago; Max Scherzer,
Detroit; JustinVerlander, Detroit


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 B3


For the record


Russell H,12 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
GuerrierH,4 2 0 0 0 0 2
GreggS,15-16 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Morton (Schierholtz).WP-E.Jackson.


Florida LOTTERY Reds 13, Mariners 4


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
___ 4-7-7
SCASH 3 (late)


PLAY 4 (early)
7-9-2-6
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 4-8-0-8

FANTASY 5
16 17 24 25 28

POWERBALL LOTTERY
2 13 35 36 x52 1-7-35-39-43-47
POWER BALL XTRA
11 3


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:
Mega Money: 6 17 39 41 Fantasy 5:3 8 9 13 14
Mega Ball: 15 5-of-5 3 winners $72,575.54
4-of-4 MB No winner 4-of-5 349 $100.50


4-of-4 3
3-of-4 MB 33
3-of-4 673
2-of-4 MB 1,003
1-of-4 MB 9,161
2-of-4 20,655


$1,962.50
$391.00
$57.00
$26.50
$2.50
$2.00


3-of-5 11,600 $8.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (CNBC) Formula One: German Grand Prix race
12 p.m. (ABC) IndyCar Racing Pocono IndyCar 400 race
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) GP2 Series (Same-day Tape)
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Summit Racing Equipment Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Baltimore Orioles at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at St. Louis Cardinals
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Pittsburgh Pirates at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Red Sox at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
BICYCLING
6:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 Tour de France Stage 9
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Alstom Open de France, Final
Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Greenbrier Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Greenbrier Classic, Final Round
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship. (Taped)
SOCCER
3 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Sporting Kansas City at Chicago Fire
TENNIS
9 a.m. (ESPN) 2013 Wimbledon Championships men's final: Novak
Djokovic vs. Andy Murray
3 p.m. (ABC) 2013 Wimbledon Championships men's final: Novak
Djokovic vs. Andy Murray (Same-day Tape)

RADIO
MLB
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay Rays


NATIONAL LEAGUE
STARTERS
Catcher-Yadier Molina, St. Louis
First Base-Joey Votto, Cincinnati
Second Base-Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati
Third Base-David Wright, New York
Shortstop-Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado
Outfield-Carlos Beltran, St. Louis; Carlos Gonza-
lez, Colorado; Bryce Harper, Washington
RESERVES
Catcher-Buster Posey, San Francisco
Infielders-Pedro Alvarez, 3b, Pittsburgh; Everth
Cabrera, ss, San Diego; Matt Carpenter, 2b, St. Louis;
Allen Craig, lb, St. Louis; Paul Goldschmidt, lb, Ari-
zona; Marco Scutaro, 2b, San Francisco; Jean Se-
gura, ss, Milwaukee
Outfielders-Domonic Brown, Philadelphia;
Michael Cuddyer, Colorado; Carlos Gomez, Milwau-
kee; Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh
PITCHERS
Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco; Aroldis Chap-
man, Cincinnati; Patrick Corbin, Arizona; Jose Fer-
nandez, Miami; Jason Grilli, Pittsburgh; Matt Harvey,
NewYork; Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles; Craig Kim-
brel, Atlanta; Cliff Lee, Philadelphia; Jeff Locke, Pitts-
burgh; Adam Wainwright, St. Louis; Travis Wood,
Chicago; Jordan Zimmermann, Washington.
Royals 4, A's 3


Oakland
ab
Crisp cf 4
Jaso c 4
Cespds dh 3
Moss lb 4
Dnldsn 3b 3
S.Smith If 4
Reddck rf 4
Rosales ss 3
Lowrie ph 1
Sogard 2b 4
Totals 34
Oakland
Kansas City


Kansas City
rh bi ab rh bi
00 0 AGordnlf 2 0 0 0
1 1 0 Hosmerib 3 0 0 1
0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 1
00 0 S.Perezc 4 0 0 0
22 2 Lough rf 4 0 0 0
0 1 0 MTejad 2b 4 0 1 0
0 1 1 AEscorpr-ss 0 1 0 0
0 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 1 1 1
0 0 0 EJhnsn ss-2b 3 1 1 0
0 1 0 Dyson cf 3 1 3 1
38 3 Totals 30 4 6 4
011 001 000 3
001 100 11x 4


E-Rosales (6), J.Parker 2 (2), Dyson (2). DP-Oak-


land 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-Oakland 6, Kansas City
9.2B-Sogard (12), Dyson (6). HR-Donaldson (15),
Moustakas (6). SB-A.Gordon (5), A.Escobar (12),
Dyson 2 (12). SF-Hosmer.
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
J.Parker
Blevins BS,4-4
Cook L, 1-2
Doolittle
Kansas City
E.Santana
Crow W,6-3
G.Holland S,20-22
Cubs
Pittsburgh


61/35 3
1/30 0
1 1 1
1/3 0 0


4, Pirates 1
Chicago


ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMarte If 4 0 2 0 Borbon cf 2 1 0 0
Walker 2b 2 0 0 0 StCastr ss 4 0 0 0
Inge2b 2 0 0 0 Rizzolb 4 11 01
McCtch cf 4 0 2 0 ASorin If 4 2 2 4
GJoneslb 3 00 0 Valuen3b 3 0 2 0
PAIvrz 3b 4 1 1 1 Schrhlt rf 3 0 0 0
McKnr c 4 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0
Tabata rf 2 0 0 0 Castillo c 2 0 2 0
Mercer ss 3 00 0 EJcksnp 2 0 0 0
Morton p 2 00 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 00 0
Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Guerrirp 0 0 0 0
Morris p 0 00 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 294 7 4
Pittsburgh 000 100 000 1
Chicago 000 220 OOx 4
E-McKenry (2). DP-Pittsburgh 2. LOB-Pittsburgh
5, Chicago 6.2B-Rizzo (25), Castillo (15). HR-RPAI-
varez (22), A.Soriano 2 (12). SB-S.Marte 2 (27),
Tabata (2), Borbon 2 (6). CS-S.Marte (9).
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
Morton L,1-2
Ju.Wilson
Morris
Chicago
E.Jackson W,5-10


6 7 4 4 3 6
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 1 0

52/34 1 1 2 3


Seattle

BMiller 2b
EnChvz rf
Seager3b
KMorls lb
MSndrs If
Zunino c
Ackley cf
Ryan ss
Bndrm p
FrnkIn ph
Capps p
Smoakph
Farqhr p


Totals
Seattle
Cincinnati


ab r h bi
2 1 0 0


5 00 0
5 00 0
5 0 1 0
4 1 2 0
2 0 1 1
2 00 0
1 0 0 0
0 00
1 0 0 0
0 00 0


34 48 4
201
010


Cincinnati

Choo cf
DRonsn If
Votto 1lb
Phillips 2b
Bruce rf
Hannhn 3b
Clzturs ss
LeCure p
Simon p
Heisey ph
Ondrskp
Hanign c
Latos p
MParr p
Cozart ph-ss
Totals
001 000
323 04x


ab rh bi
4 2 2 1

3 1 0 0
4 1 1 1
4 42 3
4 23 2
4 02 3
0 00 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0
0 00 0
3 1 1 1
3 1 1 2
0 00 0
2 00 0
37131313
4
13


E-En.Chavez (2), B.Miller (1). LOB-Seattle 11,
Cincinnati 8. 2B-Ackley (6), Ryan (8), Bruce (26),
Hannahan (4), C.Izturis (4), Hanigan (6), Latos (2).
HR-Seager (13). SF-Seager, Phillips.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
BondermanL,1-3 5 7 6 6 5 4
Capps 2 4 3 3 0 0
Farquhar 1 2 4 2 2 2
Cincinnati
Latos W,8-2 6 6 4 4 4 11
M.Parra 1 1 0 0 0 2
LeCure 2/3 1 0 0 2 1
SimonH,3 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP-Bonderman, Latos, M.Parra, Ondrusek.
Brewers 7, Mets 6


NewYork


ab r h bi
EYongl If 4 0 0 0
DnMrp2b 5 1 3 1
DWrght3b 5 0 1 0
I.Davis lb 2 1 0 0
Byrd rf 4 1 1 2
Niwnhscf 5 1 1 0
Buckc 3 1 2 3
Quntnllss 4 1 2 0
Marcm p 2 00 0
Hwkns p 0 0 0 0
Vldspn ph 1 00 0
Burke p 0 0 0 0



Totals 35 6106
NewYork 000
Milwaukee 121


Milwaukee


Aoki rf
Segura ss
CGomz cf
ArRmr3b
YBtncr 3b
Lucroy c
JFrncs lb
Weeks 2b
LSchfr If
Gallard p
Axford p
Halton ph
Hndrsn p
McGnzl p
FrRdrg p
Totals
022 101
101 10x


ab rhbi


24 000
2 00 0
2 00 0
4 1 2 2

3 1 2 0

2 22 0
0 00 0
10 00
0 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
34712 6
6
7


E-D.Wright (9), Dan.Murphy (10). LOB-New York
9, Milwaukee 9. 2B-Dan.Murphy (21), L.Schafer
(10), Gallardo (2). HR-Byrd (13), Buck (14), Lucroy
(9). SB-E.Young (12), I.Davis (1), Quintanilla (1),
C.Gomez (19), Weeks (5). CS-Weeks (3). S-Mar-
cum, Aoki, Gallardo. SF-Byrd, Segura.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
MarcumL,1-10 5 11 6 5 1 3
Hawkins 2 1 1 1 2 0
Burke 1 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,7-8 6 6 4 4 3 6
Axford H,13 1 2 1 1 1 0
Henderson H,3 2/3 1 0 0 1 1
Mic.Gonzalez H,8 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Fr.RodriguezS,8-8 1 1 1 1 0 3
Marcum pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
AL leaders
G AB R H Pct.
MiCabrera Det 85 336 66 121 .360
CDavisBal 87 315 63 102 .324
Pedroia Bos 87 337 53 109 .323
DOrtiz Bos 68 252 42 81 .321
LoneyTB 88 297 37 95 .320
HKendrickLAA 85 328 39 104 .317
Donaldson Oak 86 319 48 101 .317
MachadoBal 88 378 53 119 .315
Trout LAA 85 344 57 108 .314
MauerMin 80 322 49 101 .314
Home Runs
CDavis, Baltimore, 33; MiCabrera, Detroit, 27;
ADunn, Chicago, 23; Encarnacion, Toronto, 23;
NCruz, Texas, 21; Ibanez, Seattle, 21; Bautista,
Toronto, 20; Cano, New York, 20.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 88; CDavis, Baltimore, 85; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 66; Fielder, Detroit, 66; NCruz,
Texas, 65; DOrtiz, Boston, 61; AJones, Baltimore, 59.
Pitching
Scherzer, Detroit, 13-0; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 12-3;
Colon, Oakland, 11-3; Tillman, Baltimore, 10-3; Mas-
terson, Cleveland, 10-7; Buchholz, Boston, 9-0; Ver-
lander, Detroit, 9-5.
NL leaders


YMolina StL
Cuddyer Col
Craig StL
Votto Cin
Segura Mil
MCarpenter StL
CGomez Mil
Scutaro SF
Posey SF
FFreeman Atl


G AB R
81 306 36
66 257 42
83 320 47
87 326 60
84 343 49
82 332 65
81 308 49
73 286 35
82 291 34
74 283 46
Home Runs


CGonzalez, Colorado, 23; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 22;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 22; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 20;
Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 18; Tulow-
itzki, Colorado, 16; Uggla, Atlanta, 16.
Runs Batted In
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 71; Craig, St. Louis, 68;
Phillips, Cincinnati, 64; CGonzalez, Colorado, 62;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 60; Bruce, Cincinnati, 59; PAlI-
varez, Pittsburgh, 57.
Pitching
Zimmermann, Washington, 12-3; Wainwright, St.
Louis, 11-5; Lee, Philadelphia, 10-2; Lynn, St. Louis,
10-3; Corbin, Arizona, 9-1; Marquis, San Diego, 9-4;
Bumgarner, San Francisco, 9-5.


Rare sweep at Daytona


Asso
Jimmie Johnson leads the race ahead of Kasey Kahne n
halfway point of Sprint Cup's Coke Zero 400 race Saturday
Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. Johnson
the first driver in 31 years to win both races at the track in ti
calendar year.


31 years to win

both races in year

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH Jim-
mie Johnson became the first
driver in 31 years to sweep Day-
tona International Speedway,
ciated Press accomplishing the feat with a
near the dominating run Saturday night
night at for his fourth win of the season.
became The Daytona 500 winner is
he same the first driver since Bobby Al-
lison in 1982, and the fifth over-


all, to win both races in a season
at Daytona.
The five-time NASCAR cham-
pion was the leader on the
restart for a two-lap sprint to the
finish in overtime Saturday
night He held off Kevin Harvick
on the restart, and then pulled
out front to a sizeable lead. Tony
Stewart moved into second and
may have been timing his at-
tempt to make a pass for the
lead when a caution in the mid-
dle of the pack froze the field.
Stewart was second, followed
by Kevin Harvick in a Chevrolet
sweep.
Clint Bowyer was fourth and
team co-owner Michael Wal-
trip fifth in a pair of Toyotas.


Orioles get



3 All-Star



starters


Davis tops fan

vote, 0's have 3

All-Star starters

Associated Press

NEW YORK Baltimore
slugger Chris Davis powered
past Detroit Triple Crown win-
ner Miguel Cabrera in the final
week to claim the most fan
votes in All-Star game balloting,
and Washington outfielder
Bryce Harper used a final surge
to win a spot in the National
League's starting lineup.
Right-hander Max Scherzer
was one of a major league-best
six Tigers chosen for the All-
Star game July 16 at Citi Field
in New York. St. Louis catcher
Yadier Molina led the NL fan
vote announced Saturday night.
He is one of the Cardinals' five
All-Stars, tops in the NL.
"I think any time you are get-
ting that recognition not only
from your fan base but from
everybody across the nation I
think it feels good to know that
people are watching," Davis said.
Mets young ace Matt Harvey
and third baseman David
Wright will represent the host
team in the 84th All-Star game.
Harvey received the most votes
among NL pitchers in the
player balloting, outpacing the
Dodgers' Clayton Kershaw
Cuban defector Yasiel Puig
wasn't picked not yet, at least.
The Los Angeles Dodgers out-
fielder with just one breathless
month in the big leagues is
among five candidates for the
final NL spot, with fans able to
vote online through Thursday
Puig is joined in the final NL
five by shortstop Ian Desmond
of Washington, first basemen
Freddie Freeman of Atlanta,
Adrian Gonzalez of the Los An-
geles Dodgers, and outfielder
Hunter Pence of San Francisco.
The American League's five
are all relievers: Detroit's
Joaquin Benoit, Toronto's Steve
Delabar, the Yankees' David
Robertson, Texas' Tanner Schep-
pers, and Boston's Koji Uehara.
New York Yankees closer
Mariano Rivera was one of the
68 players selected. The 43-
year-old career saves leader
will hop across town as part of
his retirement tour for a 13th
All-Star appearance, second
most by a pitcher behind Hall of
Famer Warren Spahn, who
made 17 teams.
"The fact that I went through
all the adversity and I'm stand-
ing here talking about the All-
Star game ... it's a privilege,"
said Rivera, who has 29 saves
this year after missing nearly
all of last season with a torn
knee ligament.



BARTOLI
Continued from Page B1

She certainly stands alone.
This was Bartoli's 47th Grand
Slam tournament, the most ever
played by a woman before earn-
ing a championship.
She is the only woman in the
45-year Open era to win Wimble-
don playing two-fisted shots off
both wings (Monica Seles, Bar-
toli's inspiration for that unusual
style, collected her nine major ti-
tles elsewhere).
Until Saturday, it had been
more than 112 years since Bartoli
won a tournament at any level.
Until these last two weeks,
Bartoli's record in 2013 was 14-
12, and she had failed to make it
past the quarterfinals anywhere.
Asked how to explain how she
went from that sort of mediocre
season to winning seven
matches in a row at Wimbledon,
never dropping a set, Bartoli
briefly closed her eyes, then
laughed heartily
"Well," Bartoli said, spreading
her arms wide, "that's me!"
Unlike Lisicki, a first-time
major finalist who was admit-
tedly overwhelmed by the occa-
sion and teared up in the second
set, Bartoli already had been on


this stage, with the same stakes.
Back in 2007, Bartoli won only
five games during a two-set loss
to Venus Williams in the Wim-
bledon final.
"I know how it feels, Sabine,"
Bartoli said during the on-court
trophy ceremony. "And I'm sure,
believe me, you'll be there one
more time. I have no doubt about
it."
Bartoli became the first
woman in the Open era to win
Wimbledon without facing any-
one seeded in the top 10 her
highest-rated opponent was No.
17 Sloane Stephens of the United
States in the quarterfinals.


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Archery Camp a bullseye for youngsters


Special to the Chronicle

The first Citrus County Archery
Camp wrapped up on Thursday,
June 27. There were four separate
camps over two weeks. The first
week included ages 6-8 and 9-11, and
the second week included ages 12-15
and 6-15. This camp was hosted by
McPherson's Archery & Outdoor Pro
Shop in conjunction with Citrus
County Parks & Recreation.
Throughout each camp, partici-
pants learned how to stretch be-
fore shooting, about the different
equipment used in archery and
how to be safe while shooting. The
campers were very excited to learn
about archery and to get the op-
portunity to shoot bows.
At the end of each week, the best
overall camper received a brand
new bow and the second-place
camper won a $50 gift card to spend
at McPherson's. The bow winners
were: Ian Algor, Tommy Crowley,
Onna Fernley and Chelsie Budd.
The $50 gift card winners were:
Kamden Aungst, Elisabeth Jaquith,
Tyler LaBelle and Clayton Hauser.
Parks & Recreation and McPher-
son's Archery would like to thank
the sponsors who helped make this
camp possible. Thank you Rustic
Ranch, Citrus Sports & Apparel, JJ
& Jen Grow, Dolan Smith Carpen-
try, Curry Ranch Outfitters, Colli-
sion Tech, Capital City Bank,
Rutabaga's Etc., Don Poss Roofing
and Technical Pump.
MIP Monthly
It's time again for another of Citrus
County Parks & Recreations Movie in
the Park Events. "Madagascar 3" (PG)
will be shown on the two-story-tall air
screen this Saturday. The movie will
begin at dark (approximately 8 p.m.).
The event will be held at Lecanto Com-
munity Park. Bring the whole family out
for this fun and free event under the
stars. We will provide the popcorn, you


make the memories.
For more information, contact Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at 352-527-
7540 or visit www.citruscountyparks.com.
Lifeguard Camp at
Whispering Pines Park
Whispering Pines Park Aquatics Team
will host a Junior Lifeguard Camp for
youths ages of 11 to 15 years old from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. each day July 22 to 26.
The half-day camp will prepare partici-
pants for a future as a lifeguard. Partici-
pants will have the opportunity to
experience the role of a professional life-
guard in a fun learning environment. The
Aquatics Team will teach the fundamen-
tals of lifeguarding, water safety, basic
first aid and CPR, as well as basic water
rescue techniques.
Registration fee is $50 for the camp. On
the final day, there will be a pizza lunch for
campers and their families at 11:30 a.m.,
followed by a skills demonstration.
Participants should be physically capa-
ble of swimming 25 yards using front
crawl, swim a depth of 10 feet and re-
trieve an object and tread water for 1
minute in a depth of 10 feet.
All registrations must be completed at
the Whispering Pines Park Pool Complex.
For more information, call 352-726-1995.
Club to have golf camp
Inverness Golf and Country Club will
have its 18th annual Junior Golf Camp
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. each day from
July 16-19.
Deadline to register is Monday, July 9.
The four-day camp for youths ages 7 to
15 will include instruction on full swing,
chipping, putting and sand shots. Rules of
golf and proper etiquette will be ad-
dressed. On-course playing experience
will highlight each afternoon, with a tourna-
ment and awards on the final day.
Camp is limited to the first 48 paid par-
ticipants. For more information and prices,
call 352-637-2526.


Special to the Chronicle


Liam O'Neill shoots on the outdoor range at McPherson's Archery.


P. L.A.Y. for kids Dumb sports


Special to the Chronicle

The next season of
PL.A.Y will begin on Aug.
12. Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's PL.A.Y pro-
grams are designed for
children ages 3 to 5 who
aren't quite ready for the
organized sports leagues.
The PL.A.Y programs
offered in the upcoming
session include soccer,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Monday and Homosassa
Area Recreational Park on
Wednesday, and T-ball,
which will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park on
Tuesday and Bicenten-
nial Park on Thursdays.
All sports are offered at
either 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. or 6
p.m. to 7 p.m.; choose the
time and park that works
for your schedule. The
PL.A.Y programs are held
one night a week for one
hour over six weeks and
parents are encouraged to
participate. On the first
night of PL.A.Y, each
child will receive age-
appropriate sports equip-
ment and a team T-shirt.
Registration will open
on Wednesday, July 31.
Please contact Crysta
Henry, Recreation Pro-
gram Specialist for Youth
Programs, at 352-527-7543
or visit wwwcitruscounty
parks.com, for more
information.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Parks and Recreation's P.L.A.Y. program begins on Aug. 12, with
signups opening on July 31.


Meyer rejects

Hernandez blame

Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State coach
Urban Meyer said it is "wrong and irre-
sponsible" to connect him or his former
Florida staff to the murder charge facing
Aaron Hernandez.
In texts to The Columbus Dispatch and
The Gainesville Sun on Saturday, Meyer
said there was no cover-up of drug tests dur-
ing Hernandez's time at Florida.
These were Meyer's first comments about
Hernandez after he declined to comment
earlier this week.
The coach said in the texts he "received
an email from a friend where there is an ac-
cusation of multiple failed drug tests cov-
ered up" by the university or the coaching
staff. Meyer said that is "absolutely not
true" and Hernandez was "held to the same
drug testing policy as every other player."
Hernandez played three years under
Meyer at Florida. The former New England
Patriot is charged in the shooting death of
semi-pro football player Odin Lloyd.
"Prayers and thoughts are with the family
and friends of the victim," Meyer texted.
"Relating or blaming these serious charges
to the University of Florida, myself or our
staff is wrong and irresponsible."


Kitchen comes in first yet again in run


Special to me unronicle
Crystal River runner Kerri Kitchen won first place in her division at
the seventh annual Firecracker 5K in North Port. Kitchen is spon-
sored by River Ventures of Crystal River and has won grandmaster
or first place in the six races she's run this year.


The Fourth of July has
always been one of
my favorite holidays
and with several of my
kids in the military plus
the state of America in the
world our Independ-
ence Day has taken on new
meaning.
Therefore, as
my wife and I
sat at Lolly-
gagers in Crys-
tal River for
lunch on the -
Fourth with our
8-year-old
daughter, we
were amazed
watching
ESPN. The Dr. Ron
New York City DOCT
holiday tradi- ORD
tion of Nathan's
hot dog eating
contest was on and we
watched the soon-to-be
crowned champion Joey
Chesnut win his seventh
consecutive victory and set
the world record, eating
(really inhaling) 69 hot
dogs in 10 minutes.
Is this a sport? Trying to
chow down on my own
Chicago dog with the
works, I realized this was
truly a pure but dumb
sport. The winner is not
determined by a judge, but
wins by hot dogs eaten
within a time period with
lots of competition, no style
points and has a sponsor
Most importantly, I
learned there was a league
called the Major League of
Eating. The league chair-
man and announcer George
Shea is basically the Bob
Costas of competitive eating.
To put this in context,
the normal American diet
is about 2,000 calories a
day, 200 grams of fat and
less than 2,300 mg of salt.
One Nathan's Famous hot
dog and bun has 290 calo-
ries, 17 grams of fat and
710 milligrams of sodium.
The winner, Joey Chestnut,
ate 20,000 calories. This is
the equivalent of 7 pounds
of hot dog and bun, seven
times the daily intake of
sodium and 24 times the
fat in 10 minutes.
On our list of dumb
sports, we were watching
the X Games last week and
were enthralled with a
couple of motorcycle ath-
letes demonstrating how
high a motorcycle can high
jump in the Sony Moto X
Step Up event
As the husband of a track
athlete turned coach, I have
watched my share of ath-
letes attempting to leave
Earth's gravitational pull in
high jump, long jump and
pole vault But I could have
never fathomed a motorcy-
cle going almost straight up


r
T,
34


a ramp and vertically clear-
ing 46 feet for the current
world record. For perspec-
tive, that is more than dou-
ble the world pole vault
record and slightly less
than double the world long
jump record.
Needless to say, both
had significant
injuries. One
"athlete" had a
badly injured
wrist and the
other noted it
was a good
thing he already
had children.
Having been
a paraglider for
Joseph years, jumping
OR'S off some nasty
ERS cliffs and moun-
tain tops, I was
amazed at the
dude standing in a balloon
capsule at the edge of
space. When he launched
into a free fall, landing on
Earth with a great salute, I
hope he would get a life-
time supply of Red Bull.
This is only topped by
the recent tragedy of two
girls parasailing in the
Florida panhandle. Often
confused with paragliding,
this is a sport in which
there is no tether and you
are at the whims of the air
currents, while a parasail
is tethered to and pulled
by a boat. You are at the
whims of the guy who har-
nessed you and is driving
the boat. The girls' para-
sail ripped loose and
slammed them into power
lines, a condominium high
rise and eventually cars in
a parking lot.
Topping that is the guy
tight roping across the
Grand Canyon without a
tether. He actually got the
highest rating in prime
time. Tightrope walkers
are athletes who require
balance, conditioning, fi-
nesse and, in this case,
luck that the air currents
were merciful.
Maybe the next sport
can be a competition of
athletes, each carrying a
giant boulder and jumping
into a swimming pool
clinging to them. The win-
ner is the person holding
their breath the longest,
being the last to surface.
My two SEAL sons started
this sport years ago but it
went nowhere because of
lack of finding a sponsor
I am not sure if these are
dumb sports or future
sports only the ratings
and time will tell.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand and shoulder ortho-
pedic surgeon at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute may
be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


B4 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


-qlw- Nw -qmw-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Howard spurns Lakers, joins Rockets


Associated Press

HOUSTON Last off-
season, the Houston Rock-
ets were an afterthought, a
young team with little star
power.
Now, after trading for
James Harden just before
this past season and
adding Dwight Howard on
Friday, Houston is sud-
denly primed to contend
sooner than almost any-
body expected.
Still, Houston general
manager Daryl Morey
knows nabbing Howard is
only the first step in a long
process for his team.
"We haven't accom-
plished anything yet, but
we're putting something
pretty cool together, I
think," Morey said in an
interview with Comcast
SportsNet Houston.
Howard is the Rockets'


latest superstar center, fol-
lowing Hall of Famer Ha-
keem Olajuwon and
eight-time All-Star Yao
Ming.
They reached the play-
offs for the first time since
2009 this season and bat-
tled back from a 3-0 deficit
before being eliminated by
the Oklahoma City Thun-
der in Game 6.
Their return to the post-
season showed they have
plenty of speed and long-
range scoring power with
Harden, Jeremy Lin and
Chandler Parsons. Omer
Asik was a solid rebounder
in the playoff run and aver-
aged 12.3 points in the se-
ries, but it was clear that the
team needed a more potent
scoring threat inside.
The addition of Howard
gives them just that, as the
6-foot- 11star has averaged
more than 18 points and


Center turns Houston from

promising to contenders


almost 13 rebounds in his
nine-year career
His one season in Los
Angeles was filled with un-
rest, including what many
believed to be a less than
positive relationship with
Kobe Bryant Bryant unfol-
lowed Howard on Twitter
on Friday night after he an-
nounced his decision to
join the Rockets with a
tweet
It was the end of a short
tenure with the Lakers in
which Howard averaged
17 points and almost 11 re-
bounds in the playoffs,
where the injury-riddled
team was swept by the San
Antonio Spurs in the first
round.
Morey believes his team
offers many benefits to the
27-year-old center, but one
thing sealed the deal.
"I think Dwight's in a
great place in his career,"
Morey said in the televi-
sion interview. "He's fo-
cused on winning and we
gave him the best chance
to win. It's that simple."
Howard can't officially


sign until July 10 when
next season's salary cap
has been set. The Rockets
can pay him $88 million
over a four-year contract
- $30 million less than
what Los Angeles could


have given him.
But in Houston, Howard
saw the chance to join
Harden and boost this up-
and-coming team. Harden
blossomed in his first year
with the Rockets, going


from stellar sixth man with
the Thunder to Houston's
top player. He averaged
25.9 points, 4.9 rebounds,
5.8 assists and 1.8 steals,
setting career highs in
each category


allow the new leader


Associated Press
Johnson Wagner watches his tee shot on the 11th hole Saturday during the third round of the Greenbrier Classic
PGA tour golf tournament at the Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.


Wagner fires 64

Associated Press

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS,
WVa. Amid a disappointing sea-
son, Johnson Wagner has found a
comfort zone not far from his col-
lege stomping grounds.
Wagner shot a 6-under 64 Satur-
day to take a two-stroke lead after
the third round of the Greenbrier
Classic.
Wagner was at 14 under on the
Old White TPC course. Jimmy
Walker also shot 64 and was second
at 12 under.
Wagner has yet to post a top 10
finish this year. At the Greenbrier,
he broke a string of seven consecu-
tive early exits.
In his two previous tournaments,
he had three birdies combined. He
had seven of them on Saturday
"I felt really comfortable all day,"
Wagner said. "I hit a lot of good golf
shots. I've got a really clear picture of
what I'm trying to do on every swing.
"Sometimes when you're playing
bad, you forget who you are and you
get down on yourself. The last cou-
ple of weeks, I've just trying to be
positive and remember that I've
won three times out here. I'm a lit-
tle more comfortable with myself


at third round of Greenbriar Classic


right now."
Wagner played golf at Virginia
Tech less than two hours from The
Greenbrier resort. Several mem-
bers of his wife's family have joined
them for the weekend, and hoots
from Hokies fans could be heard
around the golf course.
"It's great seeing a bunch of ma-
roon-and-orange in the crowd,"
Wagner said.
He hopes they can see him wrap
up his first win since the 2012 Sony
Open.
The other two times Wagner held
the lead going into the final round
on tour, he won the 2008 Houston
Open and the OHL Classic at
Mayakoba in Mexico.
But no third-round leader has
gone on to win the Greenbrier Clas-
sic, now in its fourth year The tour-
nament has been decided by
playoffs the past two years, and Stu-
art Appleby shot 59 in the final
round to win by a stroke in 2010.
Wagner said he isn't going to stop
being aggressive Sunday unless the
wind picks up.
"I'm just going to try to make as
many birdies as I can," he said.
"This golf course, when it's firm and
fast, may be one of my favorite


places we play on tour."
Like Wagner, Walker also gets a
cozy feeling at The Greenbrier. He
finished one stroke out of a playoff
in the 2011 Greenbrier Classic and
tied for fourth in 2010.
"The golf course really seems to
fit my eye," Walker said. "I like the
tee shots, I like the second shots,
and I feel comfortable. And when
you feel comfortable at places ... I
seem to play well."
Still searching for his first tour
win, Walker woke up sick early Fri-
day morning and still wasn't feeling
well Saturday
His swing certainly didn't suffer.
After seven straight pars on the
front nine, Walker ran off five
birdies down the stretch, including
a 17-foot putt on the par-3 18th.
Walker is hoping to secure a spot
in the British Open in two weeks.
After the Greenbrier Classic, the
leading five players not already ex-
empt from inside the top 20 in the
FedExCup points standings will earn
a spot at Muirfield. Walker is 24th.
"I have a room booked," Walker
said. "I might as well go use it."
Sweden's Jonas Blixt was four
strokes behind Wagner at 10 under
after shooting 67.


LL
Continued from Page BI

runners advanced on a
wild pitch, and Smith
came home to score on an-
other wild offering from
Goldsby, but Inverness did-
n't threaten again as Dun-
nellon took control from
there.
"I think they lost sight of
it, they just didn't have it
today," Vandertulip said.
'"As soon as they started
hanging their heads,
everything started to go
bad."
Smith labored through 3
2/3 innings, totaling 92
pitches in the effort for In-
verness.
Dunnellon's contribu-
tions from the plate were
many, as West (2 for 5,
three RBIs), Hamm (2 for


AP source: Pistons, Josh
Smith agree to $54M deal
DETROIT A person familiar with the
deal tells The Associated Press that the
Detroit Pistons have agreed to a $54 mil-
lion, four-year contract with free agent
Josh Smith.
The person spoke Saturday on the condi-
tion of anonymity because the agreement
has not been announced.
NBA rules prevent confirmation of moves
until July 10, when Smith is expected to sign
his deal.
The 6-foot-9, 225-pound forward scored a
team-high 17.4 points last season for Atlanta
and also averaged 8.4 rebounds, 4.2 assists,
1.8 blocks and 1.2 steals.
Detroit will start the 27-year-old in its front
court with power forward Greg Monroe and
centerAndre Drummond. The Pistons fired
Lawrence Frank in April, a day after they fin-
ished 29-53, and hired Maurice Cheeks in
the hopes of ending the franchise's four-year
postseason drought.


Shaq: LA spotlight too
bright for Dwight Howard
DAYTONA BEACH Shaquille O'Neal
said the Los Angeles spotlight was too bright
for Dwight Howard.
Speaking at Daytona International Speed-
way on Saturday, Shaq hammered his for-
mer colleague as if they were battling in the
post.
O'Neal opened his mouth agape when
asked about Howard, who chose to leave the
Lakers for the Houston Rockets late Friday,
and joked about cheering on Dale Earnhardt
Jr. and Danica Patrick in Saturday's race.
Afew seconds later, he threw an elbow
Howard's way.
"It was expected," Shaq said. "We've all
been in LA, and not a whole lot of people can
handle being under the bright lights. Every-
body wants to do it, but when you get there,
there are certain pressures. I think it was a
safe move for him to go to a little town like
Houston. That's right, little town. I said it."
From wire reports


All are winners



at CR Triathlon


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
There's a certain beauty
Bob Brockett finds in
every triathlon.
"Everyone is a winner
out here," Brockett said.
He likes the fact that this
race is not just for the
young whippersnappers
with the full heads of hair
and the six-pack abs.
"Five of the top 10 fin-
ishers are around 40 years
old," he said.
Brockett himself isn't
doing too bad.
The 59-year-old Lecanto
resident was very re-
spectable when he com-
peted in the Crystal River
Fourth of July Triathlon
Saturday at Fort Island
Gulf Beach.
Brockett, who was one of
the original founders of
this triathlon, finished
17th with a time of 1:10:47.
Brockett was one of 230
participants in the popular
triathlon.
"Perfect conditions,"
Brockett said. "One other
thing I am missing: My
youth."
John Hovius of Orange
Park was the overall win-
ner. He finished with a
time of 1:03:11. Second
place and Masters winner
went to Jerry Gisclair of
Tampa with a 1:05:42.
"I've won 80 percent of
the time," Hovius said. 'As
good a weekend is. We had
a head wind and nice tail-
wind coming back. These
are always fun races here.
Chris puts on a great race.
We have a bunch from
AAA Triathlon."
Savannah Dearden,19,
of St. Petersburg, was the
women's winner She had a
1:09:57 and is a student at
University of California in
Santa Barbara. This was
her third triumph.
"Conditions were great,"
Dearden said. "I passed
Celia Dubey on the run."
Dubey, 41, who owns a
gym in Tarpon Springs and
brings along competitors
to the race, said she had
problems.
"I have been sick all
week," she said. "The

4, home run, double, two
RBIs), Matthew Webb (2
for 3, double, two RBIs),
and Mack (2 for 3, two
RBIs) all did damage.
"It was a complete team
effort. The kids stayed
with each other and stayed
with a positive team ef-
fort," Jeff Hamm said.
Major Baseball

Crystal River 1,
Lady Lake 0
Crystal River broke a score-
less tie in the top of the sixth
inning, as Tyler Labelle dou-
bled, advanced to third on a
wild pitch, then scored on an
RBI groundout off the bat of
Caleb Dix.
Dix tosssed a perfect bot-
tom half to seal the victory.
Zack O'Callaghan was per-
fect through the first four in-
nings for Crystal River,


course is always beautiful.
This is my second favorite
race. I love this course.
Today, I brought about 35
(competitors). I've raced
here a lot. I have won it a
third of the times I have
run. I love this race. It is so
dialed in."
Dubey finished 20th
with a time of 1:11:18.
Gainesville's Anna
Busseni was behind Dear-
den and won the masters
woman title with a time of
1:10:25.
Race director Chris Mol-
ing was happy with this
race.
"What a great week for
Independence Day" Mol-
ing said. "We have had out-
standing weather today It
rained all week. It has
been troubling everybody
that came into this. The
runners are enjoying the
breeze. Almost near-
perfect conditions for us
for a triathlon. Bob Brock-
ett is back out and doing a
great job. We have a great
turnout today People
came from Miami and
North Georgia. Lots of
people are making a holi-
day weekend here in Cit-
rus County."
CR Fourth of July
Sprint 2 Triathlon
2013 Results
Men's Overall winner: John
Hovius, Orange Park 1:03:11
Women's Overall winner:
Savannah Dearden, St. Pe-
tersburg 1:09:57
Men's Masters winner:
Jerry Gisclair, Tampa 1:05:42
Women's Masters winner:
Anna Busseni, Gainesville
1:10:25
Top 10 Finishers
1. John Hovius, Orange
Park, 1:03:11; 2. Jerry Gis-
clair, Tampa 1:05:42; 3.
Michael Wyatt, Orlando
1:05:58; 4. Leif Stringer,
Gainesville 1:06:27; 5. Scott
Matney, 1:06:29; 6. Dave
Bracken, Tarpon Springs
1:06:44; 7. Pete Strawser,
Odessa 1:07:51; 8. Bruce
Mann, Clearwater 1:08:15; 9.
Kevin Drury, Weeki Wachee
1:08:53; 10. Richard
Klobuchar, Clearwater
1:08:57.

striking out six Lady Lake bat-
ters along the way. T.J. Keefe
threw the fifth inning before
Dix came in to close.
Aaron Perry and Dominic
Madonna pitched the first five
scoreless innings for Lady
Lake before Crystal River's
sixth-inning outburst won it.
Central Citrus 6,
Dixie County 0
The other shutout of the
day was a 6-0 Central Citrus
win over Dixie County, with
Cameron Cain as the winning
pitcher.
Central Citrus' Chris
DiRosa scored in the first in-
ning on an RBI groundout
from Blake Brisco, and added
two more runs in the third on
Dixie County errors. Shawn
Host had an RBI single in the
fourth, and Central Citrus
tacked on two more runs en
route to the win.


Associated Press
Free agent center Dwight Howard spent just one season with the Los Angeles Lakers
before announcing his intent to sign with the Houston Rockets on July 10.


NBA BRIEFS


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best of the best


Djokovic,

Murray

building

rivalry

Associated Press
LONDON Novak
Djokovic and Andy Murray
are building their own
Grand Slam rivalry, one that
perhaps someday will merit
mention alongside Roger
Federer vs. Rafael Nadal,
or Djokovic vs. Nadal.
When the No. 1-ranked
Djokovic faces No. 2 Mur-
ray to determine Wimble-
don's champion Sunday, it
will be their fourth meet-
ing in a major final and
third in less than a year
Djokovic beat Murray at
the Australian Open in
2011. Murray beat
Djokovic at the U.S. Open
last September. Djokovic
beat Murray at the Aus-
tralian Open this January
That's not yet quite up to
the lofty standard set by
Federer and Nadal, who
played each other in eight
Grand Slam title matches
from 2006-11. Djokovic
and Nadal have contested
five major finals since
2010, including a stretch of
four in a row.
While part of the appeal
of the Federer-Nadal
matchup lies in their
vastly contrasting games -
all the way down to the
most basic level, righty vs.
lefty Djokovic-Murray
features two guys who em-
ploy rather similar styles.
They are improving
servers and fantastic re-
turners who managed to
silence big hitters in the
semifinals Friday: Tough
to decide whether it was
more surprising that
Djokovic had a 22-4 edge
in aces during his 7-5, 4-6,
7-6 (2), 6-7 (6), 6-3 victory
over No. 8 Juan Martin del
Potro, or that Murray had
a 20-9 edge in aces during


Associated Press
Andy Murray will meet Novak Djokovic for the fourth time in a major final the third time
in less than a year when the two face off today in the Wimbledon men's singles final.


his 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-4, 6-3
victory over No. 24 Jerzy
Janowicz.
They also are cover-
every-inch hustlers who
can switch from defense to
offense, quick as can be.
"There is some similari-
ties there, in terms of if
you look at stats and stuff. I
mean, both of us return
well. That's probably the
strongest part of our
games. Both play predom-
inantly from the baseline,"
said Murray, who is aiming
to become the first British
man to win Wimbledon
since Fred Perry in 1936.
"We both move well, but


a different sort of move-
ment," Murray continued.
"He's extremely flexible
and he slides into shots,
even on the courts here. He
slides more. He's quite a bit
lighter than me. So I'd say I
probably move with more
power, and he's much more
flexible than me."
Djokovic, the 2011 Wim-
bledon champion, is seek-
ing his seventh Grand
Slam title overall and will
be playing in his 11th
major final. Murray is 1-5
in major finals. He has
reached the championship
matches at each of the last
four Grand Slam tourna-


ment's he entered; he
skipped this year's French
Open because of a bad
back.
Murray didn't need to
expend too much energy to
get past Janowicz, but
Djokovic's win against del
Potro was physically and
emotionally sapping. It
lasted 4 hours, 43 minutes,
a record for a Wimbledon
semifinal, and was filled
with intense points.
"I did play a very long
match, but I had situations
before where I had to re-
cover even just in 24 hours
for the match the next day,"
Djokovic said Saturday


Dominant Froome


wins Stage 8


Tourde

France ascends

up mountains

Associated Press
AX 3 DOMAINES,
France Chris Froome
used the first tough moun-
tain stage to take com-
mand of the Tour de
France on Saturday, leav-
ing two-time champion
Alberto Contador and
other challengers behind
on a grueling climb in the
Pyrenees to seize the
leader's yellow jersey
with a dominant win in
the eighth stage.
Froome entered the
Tour as the favorite after
finishing second last year
behind countryman and
Sky teammate Bradley
Wiggins, who isn't de-
fending his title because
of an injury After
Froome's performance,
the race looks like it's his
to lose.
"I must be among the
happiest men in the world
today," Froome said.
"There's a long way to go
until Paris. There are two
weeks left, but we want to
keep the yellow jersey"
Froome leads Contador
by nearly two minutes,


with former champions
Andy Schleck and Cadel
Evans much further back,
ahead of another tough
mountain stage today
"More than anything
today we've got a bit of a
psychological advantage
over the others," Froome
said. "It's quite hard to
think about this, standing
in yellow today This is in-
credible. We've worked
for months to be in this
position."
In the overall stand-
ings, Froome is 51 sec-
onds ahead of teammate
Richie Porte and leads
third-place Alejandro
Valverde by 1:25. Mean-
while, Contador is 1:51
behind in seventh spot;
Schleck is 4:00 back in
21st and Evans is 4:36
adrift in 23rd.
This is the 100th edi-
tion of the Tour- and the
first since Lance Arm-
strong was stripped of his
seven straight titles (1999-
2005) for doping.
Froome's ride on Satur-
day resembled Armstrong
at his best, when the
American used to punish
his opponents early in the
race to take control.
Froome was asked after
the stage if he is riding
clean.
"One hundred per-
cent," he responded.


Associated Press
Chris Froome puts on the overall leader's yellow jersey
Saturday on the podium of the eight stage of the Tour
de France cycling race over 122 miles with the start
in Castres and finish in Ax 3 Domaines, Pyrenees
region, France.


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B6 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


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COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Government woes


Associated Press
An Iraq War demonstrator in March gets arrested outside the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in Washington during a protest
on the fifth anniversary of the war in Iraq. The IRS scandal and the recent wars the U.S. has been involved in are just two
of the recent blips that have Americans doubting the country's leaders.


Leadership shines


through cloudy days


DONALD WHITAKER
Special to the Chronicle
scandal is a strong
word, implying that
someone or a group of
people had malicious in-
tent. Yet, in most cases scan-
dals are used as a way to
scare people into overre-
acting to an issue. The 24-
hour news networks have to
keep viewers interested.
When President Clinton
was caught cheating with
Monica Lewinsky, the issue
remained on TV and in
newspapers for months?
These are just one of the
non-issues our newsmen
and -women have sensa-
tionalized to gain viewers
and keep the American
people in a constant state of
anger and mistrust.
NSA, IRS, ObamaCare,
Libya, Syria, and Benghazi
are just some of the "scan-
dals" current President
Barrack Obama has had to
deal with during his time in
office. Obama's detractors
will point to these scandals
while shifting the focus
from enacting new laws.
These skeptics also say the
president ignores the Con-
stitution like no other
leader before him.
Not true. Obama is lead-
ing the United States into
the 21st century
Whether one agrees with
ObamaCare or not, the U.S.
health system needed over-
hauling. The United States
ranks 37 of 191 countries
(World Health Organization
2000 report). Also, as of
2009, the United States has
spent approximately 17.9
percent of its gross domes-
tic product on health care
costs (Organization, 2009).
Obama Care should be the
first step of many in fixing
our health care.
Scandal has hit Obama
this year. Most recently,
NSA leaker Eric Snowden
announced that the United


States has been sp;
its citizens. But who
is this really? Former
ident George Bu:
nounced that he b
fact, "put the prog
place to protect thi
try" He was giv
power through th
gress-enacted Patrio
The Patriot Act
lows law enforce
use surveillance
other crimes of tern
lows wire tapping w
warrant as long as a
forcement official
probable cause to su
person of being a tei
The IRS/tea party
has also dogged the
dent Look at this log
political organization
goal is to impro
United States shou!
to pay taxes. It is th
job to check out any
zation that they thi
not be worthy of tax-
status. IRS official Jo
Shafer described his
"He said his team
the first tea party a
tion because it appe
be a high-profile ca
he wanted to make
high-profile cases r
similar attention."
Another scandal t
legs is Benghazi.
curred in 2012 in L
country dealing wi
stant warfare for mo
two years now. One
wonder would Oba
any president, purpc
allow American citi
die. No. This is an at
and narrow-i
thought. Secondly, ti
ident of the United S
not omnipresent. In
the last few months
has had to deal w
House trying to repe
maCare, five wars
flicts (Afghanistan
Libya, Mexico and
North Korea, Iran,


ying on
se fault
er Pres-
sh an-
had, in
ram in
e coun-
pn the


Time to regroup


ROBERT HAGAMAN
Special to the Chronicle
Our federal leader-
ship is a real mess. It
has been moving in
that direction for a long
time, but it seems to be in a
constant state of accelera-
tion recently From the eco-
nomic meltdown, to


e Con- massive unemployment
otAct and underemployment, to
also al- all the current failures in
nient to governmental agencies -
against this is really serious.
or It al- Now, of all things, our
without a president appears ready to
law en- put us into another un-
Is had winnable war.
aspect a After losing the Korean
rrorist. War, the Vietnam War, the
scandal Gulf War, the Bosnian War
e presi- and the Iraq and
ically A Afghanistan Wars, it seems
n whose our government would
ve the learn that losing wars
Id want makes no sense. Yet there
.e IRS's are plans for us to help in
organi- losing the Syrian War now.
nk may Any effort at involvement
*exempt in a war without a plan to
)nathan win is a guaranteed loss.
s audits, After losing every war for
flagged almost 65 years, someone
applica- should be able to figure out
ared to that war without a plan to
ase, and win is senseless.
sure all Results of the 2008 elec-
eceived tion have led us into re-
peated governmental
that has failure. With a president
It oc- who spends his time in con-
ibya, a tinuous campaign mode
th con- and a Congress that has for-
ire than gotten its purpose, we have
has to real problems.
ama, or After the 2008 election,
usefully the Democrats told the Re-
izens to publicans, "We won, you
rocious lost." However, it has been
minded a major loss to allAmerican
he pres- citizens, as well.
States is Governing based on "who
fact, in will vote for me" has be-
Obama come the norm.
'ith the With the 2012 elections,
eal Oba- major mistakes were made.
or con- First, the Democrats failed
, Iraq, to take a serious look at
Syria), their presidential candi-
Russia, date. It seems they voted
blindly for a candidate who
Page C4 had proven himself unwor-


thy of being elected.
The party who chose to
take recognition of God
from their platform is cer-
tainly not in any position to
lead.
At the same time, Repub-
lican presidential candi-
dates concentrated on
destroying each other in-
stead of proving why one of
them was best qualified to
lead our nation.
Then, when the nominat-
ing process began at the
convention, the first thing
they did was to publicly in-
sult a fringe candidate, Ron
Paul, further alienating a
large block of voters (many
of whom then may have
chosen to stay on the
sidelines).
Then there was the 47
percent comment that could
have been turned into a pos-
itive by explaining that get-
ting the 51 percent vote
would make it possible to
help the 47 percent to be-
come more prosperous not
only money wise, but per-
sonally That was followed
by Romney letting a moder-
ator suck him into a debate
with her instead of the op-
posing candidate.
After the Benghazi disas-
ter, President Obama took
enough time to make a brief
memorial photo op before
hopping on a plane to Las
Vegas. Later the Secretary
of State declared, "Four
people are dead! What dif-
ference does it make?"
Nine months later, we have
never been told why this
was allowed to happen and
at the rate things are going
we may never know.
Then there was the
Sandy storm. Another photo
op with the New Jersey gov-
ernor and an immediate
hop on the plane to Las
Vegas again. Several
months later, nothing had
been done to help with the
storm recovery
President Obama just for-
got about it while Congress
fought over how many pork
See /Page C4


The rain


keeps


coming


and so do


the snakes

If you want to know why it seems to be
raining every day for the last three
weeks, I've been sitting on the answer
I purchased a rain barrel.
That's right, a rain barrel.
My wife volunteers on the city water
board in Crystal
River, and we've be-
come very aware of
how valuable water
is for the future of
our area. So we -i
don't waste water t l -
I routinely get w
pleasant reminders
that I should not
leave the water on
when I'm brushing Gerry Mulligan
my teeth and I
should take shorter OUT THE
showers. WINDOW
We have lived in
our house for eight
years and I have never watered the front
lawn. I'd like to say this is because I am
very dedicated to protecting our water sup-
ply, but it's really because I'm lazy
But the grass is green and it looks fine.
So why bother?
Anyway, back to the rain barrel. I went
out three weeks ago and purchased the
rain barrel for the flowers we have around
the house. I actually had some good folks
come by and install a short gutter on the
garage roof so I could capture the rain di-
rectly into my new rain barrel.
After having everything installed, I was
happy to see that it immediately rained
and filled up my rain barrel.
The next day it rained again and my rain
barrel overflowed.
The next day it rained again and my rain
barrel overflowed again
And every day since that day, it has
rained in Citrus County
My rain barrel flows over each day and
the rain just keeps coming.
Some of my flowers are now dying from
water rot
I am going home tonight and kicking over
the rain barrel to see if I can make the rain
stop. I'll let you know how it goes.
MEN
One effect of too much rain is that the
snakes of Citrus County are become
displaced.
Snakes like to snuggle up in dry, en-
closed places after they've eaten a meal.
Because of the above-mentioned rain, the
regular dry places are now a foot
underwater
So all over Citrus County, snakes are
looking for new homes.
Which brings me to my garage.
We had an electrician in a week ago on a
project (not the rain barrel) and he told me
he saw a very large snake in our garage. He
stretched his arms and said it was at least
six feet long.
Then he made a circle with his two
hands and said it was fat as my leg.
That sounded like a big snake.
So I went into the garage looking for the
snake.
I wasn't sure why I was actually looking
for the snake because if I found it, it would
only create the new dilemma of what the
heck to do with it
A six-foot snake as fat as my leg doesn't
sound like something I really wanted to
fool with. If I was actually successful in
finding the snake, the most aggressive thing
I could do was to politely ask it to leave.
"Please, Mr Snake. Go visit my neighbor
Jim's house because he enjoys the com-
pany," I would say (Jim is a lawyer; he's
used to hanging around snakes. He also has
several large guns.) But after knocking
around in the garage for 10 minutes I
couldn't find the fat, six-foot long snake.
In a moment of relief, I put my right hand
down on the top of my golf bag and thought
about putting them in the back of my car At
that exact moment Mr Fat Snake intro-
duced himself.
He had wrapped himself inside my golf
bag and around my five-iron. His entire
body was in the golf bag and only his Fat
Snake head stuck out
I thought it was the six-iron.
In my best imitation of a school girl, I
screamed and whooped and hollered and
danced.
I have not danced in a long time, and my
performance obviously traumatized the
snake.
He quickly exited the golf bag and went
back under the house.
I am going to treat the snake just like
county government treats its budget deficit


I'm going to make believe it's not there and
hope it goes away.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.





Page C2 SUNDAY, JULY 7,2013



PINION


"Lean compromise is better than a fat
lawsuit."
George Herbert, 1651


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike Arnold .............. .... .............. editor
Charlie Brennan.......................managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................. ..............citizen m ember
Mac Harris ...............................citizen m ember
Rebecca Martin ................. guest member
Brad Bautista ................... ..............copy chief


w WT
Founded
by Albert M.
Williamson


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


UNIFY FOR PROGRESS



CMH boards need


joint decision on


hospital's future

It's a showdown at the Cit- the governing board will not
rus Memorial hospital turn over tax dollars they feel
parking lot. are owed as part of the lease
After years of acrimony, agreement. They feel the gov-
front-page headlines and self- earning board is purposefully
induced wounds, forcing the hospi-
the two hospital tal into a finan-
boards are trying THE ISSUE: cial crisis.
not to blink as Showdown time The foundation
they enter into showdown tiCMH.e board has de-
the week where at cided not to con-
they will examine sider any of the
outside bids to OUR OPINION: bids unless the
purchase the Find resolution. g o v e r n m e n t
institution. board pays up
Let there be no about $4 million.
mistake, the dis- BOARD The governing
pute between the BOARD board is sitting on
hospital govern- MEMBERS about $5 million
ing board 0 The Citrus in reserves, but it
which owns the County Hospital refuses to budge.
hospital and Board owns Cit- Both boards
the foundation rus Memorial must agree on a
board which Health System sale or new lease
leases the hospi- and leases it to or things can not
tal facility is the Citrus Memo- move forward.
one of the key rial Health Foun- It seems ab-
reasons the hos- daton oard.e five mem- surd, but the lack
pital must now be bears of the gov- of flexibility on
sold or merged earning board are the part of both
with another appointed by the boards could
entity. governor. Cur- eliminate the one
Citrus Memo- rently, those chance they both
rial is on the criti- members are have to come out
cal care list Debbie Ressler, of this with a solu-
because of its Krista Joseph, Dr. tion that works.
poor financial Mark Fallows and This long dis-
condition. And Robert Priselac. putehas damaged
one of the reasons vacant awaiting the financial via-
it's in poor finan- the governor's ability of CMH, the
cial condition is appointment, reputation of its
that the governing services and the
board has almost The Ciltus Me- morale of its em-
morial Health
completely cut off Foundation Board ployees. All of
the use of local leases and oper- those involved on
tax dollars for ates the hospital both of these
medical purposes in a long-term boards need to
instead opting to agreement with pay attention to
use those funds to the Citrus County the original mis-
fight the legal Hospital Board. sion of Citrus Me-
battle. Ryan Beaty is the morial and do
A bond default CEO of the or- what's in the best
is looming be- ganizatimembers inclu. Board interest of the
cause the founda- Bob Collins, San- community, pa-
tion board can not dra Chadwick, Dr. tients and
meet a covenant Carlton Fair- employees.
that requires 65 banks, James T. That means
days cash on Sanders, Joseph both sides need to
hand. S. Brannen, Dr. put down their
On Wednesday, Venugopala weapons of dis-
the hospital Reddy and David agreement and
board will sit and Langer. find resolution. In
listen to presenta- the end, what
tions from those hospital or- matters is the future of Citrus
ganizations interested in Memorial and the care it can
taking over CMH. Many of the provide the taxpayers and
hospital foundation board patients.
members will be in We urge the two boards to
attendance. move forward and find an ac-
But foundation board mem- ceptable new owner and di-
bers are putting on the reaction for our community
brakes. They are furious that hospital.


Rules not enforced not happening.
This is my outrage for today: I Flag retirement


live in Sugarmill Woods and
quoting our Greenbelt
Gazette asfar as having
deed restrictions in
Sugarmill, it's nonexist-
ent. I've driven around
this community and it
seems to be going
downhill very quickly
with people parking
their boats on the CAI
lawns, lawns not kept,
houses are supposed to 563'
be kept clean.
That is not happen-


IU


-


ing, and I wonder why we have a
board that enforces rules and it
seems like nothing's being done.
I don't understand why this is


I just saw on TV and
ND I've seen it in newspa-
JND pers where they are re-
fm tiring tattered American
rr flags in a ceremony in a
veterans organization.
As veterans, they
should be reading the
regulations. When they
retire the American flag
*O in its tattered form, the
)579 burning of it should not
579 be photographed in any
way, shape or form.
And when this happens,
sometimes the media is held ac-
countable, but it is not their
fault. The members should read
their regulations.


The never-mind presidency


WASHINGTON vada is a border state. So Ma-
t this intermission in the jority Leader Harry Reid's con-
immigration debate, stituents, and those of Nevada's
with House Republicans Republican Sen. Dean Heller,
preparing to look who supported the
askance at the Sen- bill, can feast on bor-
ate's handiwork, the der security pork.
argument is becom- Such provisions
ing ever stranger It reflect an impera-
has reached a boil, (g J tive of legislating in
especially concern- a continental nation.
ing border security, at / Because durable,
a moment when ille- principle-based con-
gal entries are at a 40- gressional majori-
year low and net ties are rare,
immigration from George Will legislation often be-
Mexico has recently OTHER comes large and
been approximately complex through the
zero, largely because VOICES process of cobbling
enforcement effi- together a coalition
ciency has already been sub- of legislators more attuned to
stantially improved and parochial interests than philo-
because America's economic sophical arguments. Logrolling
growth is inferior to Mexico's. is necessary to this process, but
Yet some Senate Republicans it necessarily reduces the
support spending $46 billion moral momentum of the final
over 10 years to, among other product.
things, double the number of Whatever momentum the
border agents. Senate imparted to reform is a
The Government Accounta- wasting asset. The House is un-
bility Office says border secu- likely to complete its immigra-
rity in 2011 was about 84 tion legislation before the
percent effective. A much-dis- August recess, when Republi-
cussed aspiration is 90 percent, can members will return to
So the $46 billion is supposed to their districts, about which The
purchase a six-point improve- Wall Street Journal says: Only
ment. This embarrassing mili- 38 of 234 House Republicans -
tarization of the border was 16 percent represent dis-
designed to entice a few of the tricts that are at least 20 per-
14 Senate Republicans (of 46) cent Hispanic. And "only 28
who joined all Democrats in Republican-held districts are
supporting the Senate bill. considered even remotely at
Some senators expect House risk of being contested by a
Republicans to be swayed be- Democratic challenger" De-
cause a minority of the Senate mocrats will not accept a bill
minority supported the bill. that does not provide a path to
These senators should trek to citizenship for illegal immi-
the other side of the Capitol grants, and in a recent poll al-
and, like Margaret Mead among most half of Republicans said
the Samoans, mingle with the they were less likely to support
natives, a legislator who supports a
On a Friday, the Senate re- pathway
ceived a 114-page amendment Four Augusts ago, Congress
to the (by then) more than 1,000- was busy passing in order to
page "Gang of Eight" bill, which find out what was in it a dif-
the Senate passed the following ferent mammoth, because
Thursday Senators can repent "comprehensive," bill. During
at leisure after they read de- the August 2009 recess, legisla-
tails such as: Never mind what tors conducted often tumul-
maps say, the Senate says Ne- tuous town halls where they


discovered that intensity
resided disproportionately
among opponents of the Patient
Protection and Affordable Care
Act. Opponents' anger was reg-
istered emphatically in con-
gressional elections 15 months
later, which is one reason why
the implementation of the act's
most onerous provisions were
delayed until 2014, after the
2012 presidential election.
The PPACA remains unpopu-
lar, and there are congressional
elections in years divisible by
two not even the Obama ad-
ministration can ignore this
constitutional fact so last
Tuesday the administration
said this about the act's man-
date that in 2014 large employ-
ers provide expensive health
care for their workers or pay a
substantial penalty: Never
mind.
Although the Constitution has
no Article VIII, the administra-
tion acts as though there is one
that reads: "Notwithstanding all
that stuff in other articles about
how laws are made, if a presi-
dent finds a law politically in-
convenient he can simply post
on the White House website a
notice saying: Never mind."
Never mind that the law stip-
ulates 2014 as the year when
employers with 50 full-time
workers are mandated to offer
them health care or pay fines.
Instead, 2015 will be the year
Unless Democrats see a presi-
dential election coming.
This lesson in the Obama ad-
ministration's approach to the
rule of law is pertinent to the
immigration bill, which at last
count had 222 instances of a dis-
cretionary "may" and 153 of
"waive." Such language means
that were the Senate bill to be-
come law, the executive branch
would be able to do pretty much
as it pleases, even to the point
of saying about almost any-
thing: Never mind.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Enjoy ride with us
My wife Sandra and I just re-
tired to Citrus County from
Pinellas. I drove for the PSTA
(Pinellas Suncoast Transit Au-
thority) for 23 years. Even
though I am retired, I still
wanted to stay as active as I
could so I applied to the Citrus
County Transit and was hired. I
have been driving for about
four months and I really do
enjoy the new job. I have met a
lot of great people along the
way and we really like Citrus
County I have a great boss, Lon
Frye and his associate Laurie.
The Orange line serves In-
verness, making connections
with Crystal River, Beverly
Hills and Homosassa and it is
a great way to see the county
Even while the expansion is
still in progress, it is a great
way to travel. You will meet a
lot of great drivers and passen-
gers on the buses while you
enjoy the ride.
In the near future, there will
be more routes and more fre-
quent service while paying
only $1 a ride one way and $2
for an all day pass. All the
routes are wheelchair accessi-
ble and are easy on and off.
So come ride with us and
enjoy the ride. Go Orange line


and go Citrus County
Joh


Walking ta
Was it on the front p
about our fellow Flori
Nick Wallenda, 34, aft
ing Niagara Falls, who
conquered the Grand
on June 23, 2013, by w
over a distance of a qi
a mile on a high wire,
safety harness over a
1,500 feet?
Mr Wallenda had to


the wire twice once because
of the wind and another be-
n Dunson cause the cable was moving -
Inverness all the while balancing a pole
at the same time, with 3 mil-
ill lion viewers watching him
)age walk over a dangerous canyon!
idian This accomplishment of
er cross- courage was an inspirational
o also one! Making one think that if
Canyon Nick can do that, what amazing
walking things can't we do?
quarter of Congratulations, Nick
with nn Wallenda!


height of

) stop on


Renee Christopher-
McPheeters
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


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* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to
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* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
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letters@chronicleonline.com.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pavlov's dog had his day, and so did Teddy


A s I have admit-
ted before, on
rare occasion,
I'll repeat a column
from many years be-
fore. I try never to
have one reprinted
that is less than 10
years from its origi-
nal publication date.
The material for Fred B
today was first of- A SI
fered some 18 years OF I
ago. Why am I run-
ning it again? The
story crossed my mind when I
was thinking about my father
and remembering his pragmatic
approach to life. Some say I am
like him, but I only wish my wis-
dom was half as practical as his
was. So, now, from Oct. 15, 1995,


3r
L
L


is the story of a
chicken-eating dog.

Ivan Pavlov made
a name for himself,
and for his dog, with
research in the
* area of conditioned
responses.
One of my earliest
rannen recollections is of my
.ICE father conducting
IFE such an experiment.
Daddy had a dog
named Teddy This
dog was a member of the family
before I was born, and I believe
Teddy even preceded my good
bother William. The dog didn't
pretend to be a family pet. No,
he was Daddy's dog.
Teddy was a mixed-breed


mutt, but his most obvious fea-
tures were those of a chow. His
coat was red and he was notably
tenacious. Frankly, I suspect the
dog's toughness was part of what
brought about the bond between
him and his master.
But, ol' Ted had a yen that
Daddy found unacceptable. The
mutt liked chicken. Not just left-
overs from the supper table, but
also the fine-feathered occu-
pants of our neighbor's chicken
coop.
I don't know if he got the idea
from Pavlov, but Daddy devel-
oped a plan to protect the poul-
try by subjecting Teddy to a bit of
behavior-changing therapy
One afternoon, my father
leashed the dog to a tree some
distance from the chicken coop.


He then gathered together a car
battery, two strands of wire and
a still feathered, still warm, al-
beit deceased, chicken. He in-
serted one end of each of the
wires at strategic locations in
the dead bird. He then fastened
one of the wires to the battery's
negative pole and prepared the
other wire for a quick connec-
tion with the positive pole.
The unsuspecting pooch was
then brought to this impromptu
outdoor laboratory He was re-
leased, and just as anticipated,
he sank his teeth into the
chicken. Simultaneously, Daddy
connected the remaining wire.
It wasn't a pretty sight. I'll
spare you readers the details,
but the effort was successful.
Teddy lost his taste for chickens


straight from the hen house.
Before any of you folks decide
to have my father posthumously
hauled into court for cruelty to a
canine, remember this: While
his action was certainly shock-
ing for the dog, he saved the
mutt's life. In those days, a
chicken-killing dog was subject
to capital punishment. Also
think about the innocent chick-
ens. They lived to peck, cluck
and lay another day!
There you have it.
MEH
And, thanks for allowing me to
tell this tale one more time.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Letters to the EDITOR


Fire fee math
The June 13 edition of the Chronicle
contained an article pertaining to the
new flat fee for fire protection service,
which stated that "will raise some resi-
dents' taxes while not affecting others."
Mr. (Joe) Meek states that in a
$200,000 home the reduction in the mill-
age rate may be as great as the $60 fee.
According to the article, the reduced
cost due to the millage rate would be
$0.05 (5 cents) per $1,000 assessed value.
By my calculation, the new flat fee
would result in an increase in cost to
any homeowner unless the assessed
value was $1.2 million or more. Unless I
misunderstand or am in error in my cal-
culations, the following would apply:
Assessed value / Increase / Reduction
/ NET INCREASE
$20,000 / $60 / $1/ $59
$100,000 /$60 /$5 / $55
$200,000 / $60 / $10 / $50
$300,000 / $60 / $15 / $45
$500,000 / $60 / $25 / $35
$700,000 / $60 / $35 / $25
$900,000 / $60 / $45 / $15
$940,000 / $60 / $47 / $13
$1,000,000 / $60 / $50 / $10
$1,200,000 / $60 / $60 /$0
Sadly, the flat fee affects those home-
owners with the lowest assessed value
the hardest. Rather like "take from the
poor and give to the rich."
Due to my being cognizant of the pos-
sibility that I am wrong in my opinion
(or mathematics) and in fairness, I in-
vite, even challenge, Mr. Meek to clear
up my misunderstanding. I look for and
appreciate honesty and truth I abhor
the opposite. If I am correct both in my
analysis and my interpretation of Mr
Meek's statements, it would be trou-
bling. ... A lack of response to my invita-
tion can be interpreted as one wishes.
Dennis Marshall
Beverly Hills (Pine Ridge)

The road to serfdom
In his 1944 classic, Nobel economist
Friedrich Hayek describes the
economies of pre-war and National So-
cialist (Nazi) Germany Hayek consid-
ered himself a classical or 19th century
liberal. He believed in "free markets,
capitalism, government regulations that
promote competition, private property,
personal liberty, the rule of law and in-
dividualism based on the respect of
Christianity for the individual." His
views align with conservative principles
of today and are diametrically opposed
to those of American liberals or pro-
gressives. His conclusions about the
U.S. and England are sobering. "We are
in some danger of repeating their fate,"
and "The forces which destroyed free-
dom in Germany are also at work here."
A dozen years before World War II, Ger-
mans believed it could never happen. But
people of goodwill, by their socialist poli-
cies, "prepared the way for the forces
which stand for everything they detest"
And most importantly "the rise of fascism
and Nazism wasn't a reaction against so-
cialist trends but a necessary outcome of
those tendencies." Many who "hate every-
thing about Nazism are working for the
ideals which lead to that same tyranny."
They favor "consciously directed eco-
nomic life and economic planning" over a
competitive system. They try to shape a fu-
ture based on what they believe are high
ideals but produce the opposite result
Planners must have great power;
their success depends on it. But democ-
racy is an obstacle to that power. Eco-
nomic planning and democracy must
eventually clash. Many socialists believe
that by removing power from individu-
als and transferring it to the state,
power is decreased.
Instead, concentrated power is greatly
magnified. Nobody in a competitive free
society can exercise anywhere near the
power of an all-powerful socialist plan-
ning board. Consider the CEOs of Mi-
crosoft and Walmart and the heads of
IRS, EPA, FDA and Dept of Justice.
Who has more say in the way you live
your life? History has shown "where the
sole employer is the state, opposition
means death by slow starvation."
'A democratic leader who aspires to
plan a country's life soon discovers he
must abandon his failing venture or as-
sume dictatorial power. So the totalitar-
ian leader must choose between
disregard of ordinary morals and failure.
The unscrupulous are more successful in
a society tending toward totalitarianism."
A leader like that needs willing helpers


to impose the plan by force on the rest of
us. And here's one of the reasons why
such a group is likely to be comprised of
the worst rather than the best elements
of a society The easiest way to connect
with a large group is to appeal to com-
mon human weakness. Always stress the
negative. To portray your group as vic-
tims, you need an enemy Nazis used the
"Jew," Soviets used the "Kulaks"; today's
leaders use the 1 percent vs. the 99 per-
cent, Wall Street bankers, infidels, oil
companies, foreign agitators, or anything
else that serves the purpose.
Once in power the leader has greater
flexibility than if he had outlined a spe-
cific positive program; he has been de-
liberately vague about specifics. To
advance higher in this group requires a
willingness to do immoral things. If the
end justifies the means, the plan must
be carried out regardless of the cost.
Does any of this sound eerily familiar?
Joseph P Ryan
Homosassa

Don't be uninformed
One could only hope that the "low-
information voters" would've gotten to
know by now where the Obama adminis-
tration is headed. But there seems to be
no improvement, nor cure in sight. We
have a president who claims he knows
things only from reading the newspaper,
just like you and me! We have govern-
ment agencies that run amok with total
misuse of their authority. The president
claims to know nothing as to what really
is going on during his watch. The "Buck
does not stop here," ever! How can any-
one support such an inept or incompe-
tent president? The "Lame Stream
Media" has strongly fostered this blind
trust of Obama. But even with that con-
sidered, the low-information voters
should be informed as to what is really
going on within the new immigration bill
that has passed the Senate and awaits
action in the House. We are being sold
out with a smile and handshake.
Do you know that the new guest-
worker program exempts companies
from paying any FICA, Social Security,
unemployment taxes, or as basic a
thought as covering them with Oba-
macare? They are exempt it seems from
these and most other cost-incurring re-
quirements of hiring an American
worker. They even get a tax credit to
hire in some cases. Only a fool would not
see clearly that companies will hire
these wonderful new employees at much
cheaper labor costs. Again, only a fool
could not see that this is going to cost
them their jobs and future employment.
But don't worry: Everybody is going to
assure you this will not happen! My
goodness, why would we not trust our
government? So silly of me to suggest
that they might deceive you! Sorry!
It seems we have a mass of people
who are so uninformed that they really
know nothing of what is being passed or
done by our government. Is it because
no one cares anymore? Or do they actu-
ally believe what President Obama and
their legislators are telling them?
Seems rather ignorant for me to think
they actually believe the propaganda
they're being told. But our politicians,
and especially this president, lie with
such a smooth presentation, and the
supportive media feeds it to us as truth.
Real truth only comes out later and it is
soon buried with the help of the media.
I strongly suggest everyone read what
is being said about the new immigration
bill and ask their representatives about
the above and other unstated impacts of
this new immigration bill. However, if
you are like most, you will find that they
know very little of what is contained
within the bill they just passed, as they
are just like Nancy Pelosi when she
stated, "We will just have to pass the bill
to see what is in it."
What was found within Obamacare's
many thousands of pages were many
line items, that now even Democrats are
distancing themselves from the intent
Hundreds of line items within the new
immigration bill would really upset us
as taxpayers. The first estimated tax-
payer cost for this new bill was $1 billion
and now some are saying it's going to
cost the taxpayers $1 trillion. Sorry to
say, even low-information voters are
going to pay their part of this bill, and
maybe even with their jobs. Wake up, get
involved and ask questions. Stop sleep-
ing as your future goes down the tubes.
John Cassell
Homosassa


Port Citrus problems
Port of Citrus cons: Semi-truck traf-
fic, pollution, barges and little boats not
compatible, manatee and scallop habi-
tat destroyed. Build it up for recre-
ational use (with) handicapped fishing,
a marina with a launch, trails, a camp-
ground, Publix, a gas station. Use it for
the people, not for the fat cats for their
wallets to get fatter.
Not rocket science
Of course the consultant on the Port
Citrus project is definitely going to ad-
vise that they proceed ahead, because
they've already got $20,000 and now
they're going to get the additional
$80,000 that was set aside for that
project. Of course they're going to rec-
ommend the feasibility of it. I mean
what does it take, a rocket scientist to
figure that out?
No surprises here
About Port Citrus: Did anyone think
that the consultant would not approve
the study and not want the second
study to go ahead? They stand to make
lots of money on this boondoggle. ...
Did anyone think that these consultants
would vote any other way? They make
lots of money on this.
Adams needs support
If there's anybody else in this county
that will help support our Commis-
sioner Scott Adams besides myself, I


Taxes going up
More taxes coming down the street
from the county commissioners. Re-
member when Sheriff (Jeff) Dawsy took
over the fire and there was going to be
no increase in taxes? Well, we now have
an MSBU and an MSTU safety patrol
and fire, which are under the leadership
of Sherriff Dawsy. That's a tax increase.
It's called an assessment, but it is a tax
and you will pay it. This is after we were
told no more taxes. Folks, you've got to
start thinking about who you vote for
because we're going to go broke paying
all of these additional taxes. The sher-
iff's budget has never decreased, it's
only increased. Now has your budget
had to decrease like a lot of other peo-
ple's? Think about it.
Missed out on survey
I'd like to make a comment on the
county commissioners saying that they
need to raise our taxes like $60 a year
per household in order to keep certain
services, namely public safety. Now I
know they conducted an online poll of
about 1,500 people and most of them
said they don't see a problem with any
kind of tax increase when it comes to
public safety. My opinion is that 1,500
does not represent the 100,000-plus


Port is such a waste
Wow, was it any surprise that
the county commissioners saw
merit in continuing the port
episode? Such a waste of tax-
payer dollars.

Keep bark to yourself
I'm calling about the article


CA5L
563-


about pets and it says "Pets aren't peo-
ple." Well, you know what? Sometimes
I'd rather bond with a dog than most of
the people that I see around here.
Maybe some people can't have children


hope to God they will step forward
pretty quick. This comment that Meek
made in reference to the port study,
that staff labor shouldn't be included in
the cost. I'd like to know what anybody
has done that there isn't costs from
labor involved in the project, regardless
of what it is. There's always other ex-
penses. The quickest example I can
think of is go to a lawyer. You see if
there isn't labor costs there alongside
of the expense that they generate.
Come on, people. Let's wake up and
support somebody that's got some
common sense on that board. We don't
seem to have much of it being shown
lately.
Against growth
I'm so tired of reading about this port
thing and developing Port Citrus. It's
such an absurdity. We're supposed to
be the Nature Coast. Everything around
here is considering the environment and
etc., and yet all this commission wants
to do is bring in new business, create
jobs and growth. Well, what do you
think that's going to do to the Nature
Coast? And what do you think a port is
going to do? You know, we already have
enough problems with too much popu-
lation growth, too much of this too
much of that destroying Citrus County.
Yet this commission, all they want is
more growth and more money. I know
that it's financially tough times, but you
know what? You would sacrifice what
you came here for.


residents of the county. I didn't even
know there was such a survey on the In-
ternet that I could have participated in.
They definitely didn't broadcast it in
the newspaper or anywhere else to get
the people's real input on it. Me, person-
ally, I'm against any tax increases.
I don't care if it's for public safety or
otherwise. In a state like Florida where
you're allowed to own a gun to protect
yourself, let me tell you, more than likely
with the sheriff's (office), they'll respond
after you've already been a victim. To
prevent yourself from being a victim,
you have to protect yourself. The sher-
iff's (office) can't be everywhere.
Stop spending on help
Did the Chronicle just print that (the
board of county commissioners) bor-
rowed $3 million to give to an electrical
company to make some improvements
on some buildings? $3 million while
we're in a fiscal crisis where all they can
do is run around and try to find out how
to raise our taxes without calling it a tax
increase. This is so pathetic and so
good-ol' boy. We cannot wait 'til the next
election. This country and this county
can't wait another three or four years to
get these big-government socialists
from making our decisions for us.


and maybe that's their way of
feeling like they are caring for
something. So why don't these
people mind their own business
and if they don't like it, they
need to stay home.


W Tiny, tiny phone book
0579 I'd like to say amen to the
Sounding Off article that was
talking about the printing of the new
phonebook. I myself have to wear
glasses and use a magnifying glass to
read the print. They need to do some-
thing about that.


Hot Corner: PORT CITRUS


Hot Corner: TAXES


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 C3


W-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


Recyclables fraud
In Sugarmill Woods, Friday is
pickup (of) recyclables, but the
patrons that live in Sugarmill
Woods are now putting their reg-
ular household garbage in there.
FDS, check it out.
Looking for crafts
A while ago, somebody called
in to Sound Off about the fact
that we do not have a JoAnn's or
a Michaels crafts. There's no
place in Citrus County where
you can actually go and buy fab-
ric, crafts or any other thing. You
have to drive all the way into
Ocala, which for me is almost
27 miles, just to get crafts. I
think Citrus County should look
into using some of the mall area
or other options in order to get
some kind of a great craft store
in here. It's a terrible thing when
you have so many people that
are seniors that do crafts and
they have to drive all the way to
Ocala to get their supplies.
Stop attacking schools


editor, I read somebody wants to
cut the money to the schools be-
cause of a problem with the
taxes with Duke. Why is it every-
body always goes after the
schools? Now I'm not a teacher
or have anything to do with the
schools. I have two kids that go
to school. Well, one kid now; one
graduated. And why is it they al-
ways attack the schools? How
about the sheriff's department?
You know, I see plenty of cars
just sitting on the side of the
road and gathering like mainte-
nance workers. We have plenty
of sheriff's (deputies). Why
don't we cut back there a little
bit? It doesn't seem right to al-
ways attack the schools.
Be happy trailer is back
For the couple that had that
small trailer stolen in Beverly
Hills: I wish they'd just pay the
money that's owed for finding
that and towing it and quit
(complaining) about it. Better be
glad they got it back.
Replace garbage lid


I was reading the paper this They still haven't ironed out
morning and in the letters to the all of the problems with the new


garbage cans, so at least one
man still gets off the truck to be
sure the can is lifted up OK. The
other day, rain was coming
down in buckets and he was al-
ready soaking wet. So why
couldn't he just reach out and
put the lid back on the garbage
can? By the time I got home and
could put the can away, there
was already a couple of inches
of water in it. Do you know what


it's like for an elderly lady to
turn that huge thing over to
empty that water out of it? It
wasn't easy. Maybe I should
have just left the water in it for
a breeding ground for
mosquitoes.
Stop septic permits
The Chronicle editorials con-
stantly hammer on the issue of
a centralized sewer system and


to get rid of septic tanks. This is
such doublespeak. I can't under-
stand why the county still issues
septic tank permits. They issue
a permit and the next day if it's
decided sewers are going by
their house, they've wasted the
cost and inconvenience of the
septic and then still have to
hook up to the sewer. If you re-
ally want to address this issue
that keeps popping up over and
over, the city or the county
should stop issuing septic tank
permits. It's real simple.

No room for the kitties
Everyone adores kittens (with)
those trusting eyes, precious,
playful mannerisms. However,
soon enough they grow into
cats. There are never enough
homes for kittens and less so for
adult cats. Both of them are eu-
thanized in hundreds of thou-
sands across the U.S.
The animal shelters try their
best to find them homes but
there are never enough. Please
spay and neuter them as soon
as possible. There are a number
of low-cost clinics in our county.


SHINES
Continued from Page C1

nuclear disarmament, gay
rights, voting rights act that
was repealed, the severe
amount of drugs going
through our boarders, and
failing education.
Do these "scandals" hin-
der the president's ability to
lead the United States? No.
Obama has pushed through
while championing some of
his toughest legislative vic-
tories. Additionally, Obama
is the first president since


Vietnam to visit Cambodia.
Obama is also pushing for a
punishment for those who
commit sexual assault in
the military Finally, he
helped push passage of a
law paving the way for
ultra-high-speed Internet in
rural areas.
Though Obama has been
highly scrutinized recently
for a number of missteps,
his administration has
passed legislation that ear-
lier in his presidency would
not have been possible.
Some of the scandals do in
fact violate the Constitution,
but these issues were


around before Obama took
over the presidency
Going forward, I chal-
lenge Obama and the De-
mocrats to do what they
said they would do when
Obama was campaigning
for a second term close
Guantanamo, end our con-
stant interference in other
nation's problems, have a
more transparent govern-
ment and put an end to the
Patriot Act
-0
Donald Whitaker heads
the Citrus County Young
Democrats Club.


REGROUP
Continued from Page C1

projects could be funded in place of
funding storm recovery
Now we have the IRS targeting non-
profit groups that the administration
dislikes with no explanation available,
extravagant parties being held at public
expense, the Justice Department ille-
gally targeting reporters (investigation
to be conducted by the head of the Jus-
tice Department), interception of phone
conversations and emails, and "Fast and
Furious" still not settled.
On top of all of this, the immigration
issue is about to receive a vote that fails


7


14


to deal with the problem. It looks like
the Affordable Care Act all over again.
How can a problem be solved without
knowing what the problem really is. In
fact, the most pressing issue, border se-
curity, appears to be the last thing our
leaders are interested in. Again, do what
might get "us" votes rather than do the
right thing.
It looks like it is time to train a group
of potential leaders in the basics of our
Constitution, then fire all those
presently in control and start all over.
Something has to give, and soon!

Robert E. Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.

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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VICTIM OF POLITICS


Urban-rural alliance breaks down on farm bill vote


THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa
or decades, country and city interests had come together
I every few years to pass the farm bill, a measure that pro-
vided billions of dollars in subsidies to farmers and busi-
nesses in rural areas and food stamp money for urbanites.
j No more.
F Here's how the breakdown of a longtime coalition hap-
pened: Newly emboldened conservative groups pressured rural-
state Republicans many representing agricultural districts -
with radio ad campaigns to oppose the five-year $940 billion bill,
calling its proposed cuts to food stamps too little. Hardly faultless,
Democrats, whose districts mostly encompass urban areas home to
food-stamp recipients, refused to budge on cuts they considered too
deep. Each party was fearful of angering their core supporters.
It was the height of partisanship over a measure that long had
been devoid of it.
"That kind of thing wouldn't have happened at another mo-
ment in time," said Rep. Allyson Schwartz, a Pennsylvania De-
mocrat who opposed the measure.
Rep. Steve Daines, R-Mont, voted for it, and bemoaned the re-
sult of House failure to pass it: "Doing nothing is worse than
doing something."
Traditionally, Democrats and Republicans have worked
closely together to pass farm bills.
Long ago, conservative rural lawmakers whose numbers in
Congress were shrinking became aware that they alone couldn't
muster enough votes to pass a measure paying for farm pro-
grams. So they agreed to include food-stamp money in the farm
bill in exchange for support from their more liberal urban peers.
It was a mutually beneficial relationship. Conservative law-
makers were mindful that the measures included subsidies for
farm-growing regions home to their core constituents, while lib-
eral lawmakers were keenly aware that they contained dollars
for food assistance that largely went to their bedrock voters in
big cities. Each party needed the other to pass the measure that
melded both farm and food money, and it almost always passed
with bipartisan support
See Page D2


The recent defeat of
this year's farm bill -
traditionally a sturdy, albeit
lonely pillar of cooperation in
Washington highlighted
how the country-city political
marriage became yet another
victim of partisan politics in
polarizing times. The divorce
throws into doubt the future
of sweeping agriculture and
nutrition spending.



Details:
DOWN ON THE FARM:
The defeat of this year's farm bill tradi-
tionally a sturdy, albeit lonely pillar of co-
operation in Washington highlighted
how the country-city political marriage
became yet another victim of partisan pol-
itics in polarizing times. The divorce
throws into doubt the future of sweeping
agriculture and nutrition spending.
PLANTING DISTRUST:
Newly emboldened conservative groups
pressured rural-state Republicans many
representing agricultural districts with
radio ad campaigns to oppose the five-year
$940-billion bill, calling its proposed cuts to
food stamps too meager Some Democrats
refused to budge on cuts they considered
too deep. Each party was fearful of angering
core supporters.


GOOD ENOUGH:
DIf no billpasses, Congress
would likely adopt a short-term resolution
to continue spending at current levels.
Associated Press

Associated Press
^. ITOP: Cows line up to feed at a farm in
Danville, Vt., in 2012. The defeat of the
2013 farm bill highlighted how the
country-city political marriage became yet
W f j another victim of partisan politics. LEFT:
S. / Rep. Allyson Schwartz, D-Pa., speaks dur-
a ... ing a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.





Why 2Q earnings might not be so dim


SCOTT MAYEROWITZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK For Corporate
America, it's the season of low
expectations.
Companies have been scaling back
their earnings forecasts for weeks as
part of a quarterly cat-and-mouse
game with financial analysts. It's not
OK just to report a strong second-
quarter profit they also need to
beat analysts' forecasts. And compa-
nies are eager to do just that
Earnings season gets started
Monday, when aluminum giant
Alcoa Inc. reports results after the
stock market close.
Wall Street analysts now predict
that earnings for companies in the
Standard & Poor's 500 rose 3 per-
cent in the second quarter com-
pared with a year earlier, according


to a survey by S&P Capital IQ. But
as recently as April 1, they thought
earnings would rise nearly 7 per-
cent. At the start of the year; they
forecast a 9 percent increase. Com-
panies that provide raw materials
and technology firms are expected
to drag down growth.
Another reason for the drop?
Eighty seven of the 111 S&P 500
companies that offered guidance
were negative.
"You really have to take it with a
grain of salt," said Christine Short,
associate director at S&P Capital
IQ. Last quarter, she said, 65 per-
cent of companies beat financial
analysts' estimates.
Quarterly growth over the past 15
years has averaged 8 percent. In the
last eight quarters, analysts' esti-
mates have underplayed growth by
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Federal
Reserve releases consumer credit
data for May, 3 p.m.
BERLIN Germany releases
May industrial production figures
and export and import data for May.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Labor
Department releases job openings
and labor turnover survey for May,
10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.;
Treasury releases federal budget
for June, 2 p.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil price climbs after
jobs report released

NEW YORK -The price of oil
marched higher Friday after a posi-
tive report on U.S. hiring and ongo-
ing concerns that the crisis in Egypt
might affect Mideast supplies.
In midday trading, benchmark
crude for August delivery was up
$1.56 to $102.80 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile Exchange. On
Wednesday, oil closed above at
$101.24, the highest level since May
3,2012. U.S. markets were closed
Thursday for Independence Day
At the pump, the national average
for a gallon of gas stayed at $3.48 for
the third straight day That's down
14 cents from a month ago.
Brent crude, which is used to set
prices for crude oils used by many
U.S. refineries, was up $1.75 to
$107.29 per barrel on the ICE ex-
change in London.
Natural gas fell 11 cents to
$3.58 per 1,000 cubic feet

Concerns over Fed
policy hit markets
LONDON Stock markets
turned lower on Friday as investors
worried that a strong rise in U.S.
jobs figures meant the Federal Re-
serve will stick to its plans to rein in
its monetary stimulus.
In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100 lost
all gains to trade 0.7 percent lower
at 6,375.52. Germany's DAX slumped
2.4 percent to 7,806.00 and France's
CAC-40 shed 1.5 percent to 3,753.85.
In Asia, Tokyo's Nikkei 225 closed
up 2.1 percent to 14,309.97 and Hong
Kong's Hang Seng added 1.9 percent
to 20,854.67 as investors there caught
up with the rally in Europe.
Taipei's TAIEX jumped 1.4 per-
cent to 8,001.82 while Sydney's
S&P/ASX 200 edged up 1 percent to
4,841.70 and China's Shanghai
Composite posted a small gain of
0.1 percent to 2,007.29.


-From wire reports


Frederick
J. Herzog

EXPERIENCE
MATTERS


Labor laws


that impact


businesses

he most far reaching Federal
Labor Laws impacting busi-
ness practices,with respect
to employer/employee working re-
lationships, number only eight in
total. But since 1938, legislators
have enacted additional workplace
laws increasing the guidelines em-
ployers must follow. This process,
over the years, has further refined
and increased the protections em-
ployees receive. Many worker and
workplace protections originally
not articulated in the Fair Labor
Standards Act now exist. Union
contracts go beyond the major em-
ployment laws. Compensation,
benefits and working conditions
are the main concerns.
Here are the first four of the
eight federal labor laws.
Equal Opportunity-I
The U.S. Equal Employment Op-
portunity Commission (EEOC) was
established to enforce federal em-
ployment discrimination laws.
Formed in 1965, the EEOC en-
forces workplace discrimination,
investigates complaints based on a
person's race, color, national ori-
gin, religion, sex, age, disability, ge-
netic information and retaliation
reporting. The commission not
only investigates reported cases
but mediates and settles thousands
of complaints every year.
Civil Rights-II
Also known as Title VII, the Civil
Rights Act prohibits discrimina-
tion on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, sex and national origin. Title
VII applies to employers with 15 or
See Page D2




D2 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 BUSINESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Social media networks offer job opportunities


The audience at Workforce Connec-
tion's recent "Hire a Grad" forum
was pretty diverse, with about half
the graduates having gone to college
straight out of, or shortly after, high
school while the others were older and
mid-career transition or more
nontraditional grads.
The interesting anomaly is that nei-
ther group had plugged social media
into their job search. The younger social
networking Jiu Jitsus in the room had
no problem using Facebook and Twitter
to keep up with friends and family, but
they seemed surprised, albeit glad, to
learn the power of their pins, tweets
and posts when it came to finding a job.
Older graduates seemed suspicious of
the notion. One gentleman said he's not
online at all due to "privacy unknowns"
and the time involved.
"I've seen my children, they get ad-
dicted to it," he said. "I have more im-
portant things to do than keep up with
friends and family"
More important than finding a great
job?
If you eschew social media networks,
you are not taking advantage of some
very helpful, and free, job-search tools
available via Facebook, Twitter and the
king of professional networking,
LinkedIn.
First of all, it is important to remem-
ber that these platforms whether singly
or combined are just one of several tac-
tics that can help you find a job. To be
successful, you'll need a multi-tiered
strategy that includes networking yes,
the old-school, face-to-face kind in addi-
tion to social media as well as tar-
geted r6sum6s and cover letters for
every job.
Let's get started. When asked which of
the three top platforms experts recom-
mend for job seekers, the answer is al-
ways LinkedIn. If you only create one
social profile, make it LinkedIn.
Originally known as "colleaguester,"
LinkedIn as we know it was launched in
late 2002 and a decade later has grown
to 225 million members. What's more, it
is growing at more than two members
per second and not surprisingly is the
world's largest professional network.
In a nutshell, and this comes from
LinkedIn itself, the network can help


HERZOG
Continued from Page Dl

more employees. The Florida Civil
Rights Act of 1992 added age, disability
and marital status to these protections.
Age Discrimination-III
In an attempt to protect workers
40 years of age and older, this law ap-
plies to businesses with 20 or more em-
ployees. The Age Discrimination in
Employment Act of 1967 does not pro-
tect workers under the age of 40. Under
this legislation, it is not illegal to favor a
worker of 40 years of age or older The
law forbids discrimination when it
comes in any aspects of employment, in-
cluding hiring, firing, pay, job assign-
ments, promotions, layoff, training,
fringe benefits and any other term or
condition of employment.
Equal Pay-IV
This Act prohibits wage discrimina-
tion between men and women who per-
form substantially the same equal work
within the same workplace. This law ap-
plies to virtually all employers.
The Equal Pay Act was signed into
law by President John F Kennedy in
1963. The law is enforced by the U S De-
partment of Labor and includes a num-
ber of issues beyond simply the wage
aspect of equal pay Here are some his-
torical facts relevant to the act.
In 1963, a national survey discovered
women, who were doing the same work





FARM
Continued from Page D1

But this year, when House Speaker
John Boehner urged lawmakers to sup-
port the bill and put it up for a vote, it
failed to get enough support, shocking
longtime congressional observers and
lawmakers alike. Tea party-backed con-
servatives refused to budge in their de-
mands for even deeper cuts to the food
stamp program, which has doubled in
cost over the last five years to almost
$80 billion annually and now helps feed
1 in 7 Americans.
The House version already had pro-
posed slashing the $955 billion version
of the bill that the Democratic-
controlled Senate had passed by $20.5
billion in food-stamp cuts. That wasn't
enough for some Republicans and their
allies, who were looking ahead to the
2014 midterm congressional elections
and worried about the impact of sup-
porting the measure.
"I can't imagine being a Republican
and asking primary audiences for their
vote when you just voted for this deba-
cle," said Americans for Prosperity Pres-
ident Tim Phillips. "It's impossible to
justify, no matter where you are from."
Lawmakers like Rep. Walter Jones, R-
N.C., who voted for the $600 billion farm
bill in 2008, were clearly mindful that
they would be inviting this type of criti-
cism if they backed this year's measure.
The congressman, who often talks about


Laura Bymes

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION



you establish your professional profile
and control one of the top search results
for your name, build and maintain a
broader network of professionals you
can trust, find and reconnect with col-
leagues and classmates, learn about
other companies, leverage tools to find
and reach the people you need, tap into
the knowledge of your network and
discover new opportunities.
Think of your LinkedIn profile as
your living r6sum6. Be complete, thor-
ough and honest. This is the place for a
professional-looking photograph.
You'll want to be strategic in building
your network, inviting people you know
or have something in common. When
you establish a LinkedIn presence, it
seems like invitations to connect come
out of the woodwork; resist the urge to
accept every invitation that comes your
way (especially if it comes from some-
one clearly outside your area of expert-
ise or interest). Focus on building your
network 20 solid links at a time; remem-
ber a chain is only as strong as its
weakest link.
And some of the strengths of your net-
work are endorsements and recommen-
dations. Endorsements are skill specific
and completely unsolicited. You request
recommendations, which are similar to
- and often viewed by prospective em-
ployers as letters of reference. Be
careful how you approach these -
those who view your profile can see
your recommendations as well as who
you have recommended (in other words,
it will be obvious that you're trolling for
recommendations if you recommend
everyone who recommends you, or vice
versa).
LinkedIn comes with a nifty Job
Search tool, powered by the Simply-
Hired job search engine, which gives
you an in-line view of your connections



as men in the same workplace, earned
on average 59 cents per hour for every
dollar a man earned. Today, the average
women worker now earns 77 cents per
hour for each dollar a man earns doing
the same work in the same workplace
environment. This disparity gives rise to
national economic concerns relating di-
rectly to the issues of, equal or unequal
pay, that exist today
One of Every Two Workers is a Woman
Workplace trends reveal almost 50
percent of our workforce today is popu-
lated by women. Women who are the
primary wage earner today are of major
importance individually and to our
economy in general. The family remains
a basic unit of our society and one sig-
nificant driver of the national economy
If this unit should have financial short-
falls what will be the collective results?
More to Come
Part 3 of Labor Laws Impacting Busi-
ness will appear in the next Experience
Matters column on Aug. 4, 2013.
Citrus SCORE
SCORE Citrus established 15 years
ago has consistently counseled and
mentored business owners, both new
and existing, to start and/or grow a busi-
ness. Successful businesses create jobs,
pay taxes to state and local governments
and keep our economy strong.

Frederick JHerzog, Ph.D., is the im-
mediate past chairman of Citrus County
SCORE. He can be reached via email at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.




his district's tobacco, cotton and soy-
bean production, chose not to take that
chance. He voted against the bill after
Americans for Prosperity targeted him
with radio ads and an email push to
contact his office.
Jones explained his "no" vote this
way: "At a time when America is over 16
trillion dollars in debt and running mas-
sive deficits, we simply cannot afford
this."
Republican Rep. Phil Gingrey, who
has represented rural Georgia during
his decade in Congress, also voted
against it. One of his advisers argued
that the measure didn't do enough to
benefit farming. But the adviser, Chip
Lake, also noted the increased pressure
from outside groups, saying, "That activ-
ity between the last farm bill and this
farm bill has increased exponentially"
For example, the conservative group
Heritage Action urged constituents to
call lawmakers like Rep. Tom Latham, a
10-term Iowa Republican, to pressure
him to oppose the measure. Latham, as
a result, received calls from con-
stituents angry about the bill's food-
stamp spending. Latham aides said the


calls frustrated the congressman. He
had argued that, without the cuts, food-
stamp spending would be unchecked.
If no bill passes, Congress would
likely adopt a short-term resolution to
continue spending at current levels.
Democrats, meanwhile, were fearful
of backlash from liberals who warned
them against voting in favor of deep
food-stamp cuts.


to the job you're interested in. You can
connect with your connection directly
on LinkedIn or via email.
Why is this effective? Consider that
Microsoft, eBay, Netflix, Target and
scads of other top companies use
LinkedIn to recruit job candidates. The
bottom line, according to Alison Doyle,
who writes about social media for
About.com, is that "LinkedIn has
reached a point where it's almost un-
professional not to be on LinkedIn.
There are members from all 500 of the
Fortune 500 companies. LinkedIn mem-
bers comprise hundreds different in-
dustries, and include thousands of
hiring managers and recruiters."
Once you've set up your LinkedIn pro-
file, make sure it's included on your r6-
sum6, business card, email signature
and anything else a prospective
employer might see.
Remember, your online presence is
something that more and more employ-
ers are checking not having a social
footprint is really not an option nowa-
days, just make sure you have a positive
social footprint.
If you are setting up a Facebook ac-
count, or even if you already have one,
control your privacy settings, otherwise
everything can be viewed by current
and prospective employers. Inappropri-
ate behavior posted on Facebook by you
or even your friends can cost you a job
offer or may get you fired. The best de-
fense is to be circumspect from the get-
go; manage or clean up your profile
before launching a job search, that in-
cludes posts, photos, groups you belong
to, pages you like and, yes, even your
"friends."
Facebook's job search uses the same
search engine as Linkedln, so you'll also
be able to see who among your friends
have connections to companies that are
hiring. Parenthetically, if you'd like to
see your job-search connections from
all your networks in one place, you may
want to check out Jackalope Jobs
(www.jackalopejobs.com), a free, per-
mission-based search engine that taps
into your social networks. The process
is confidential, they don't post on your
public wall or news feed and they do not
collect or store login information.
Since we're always talking about the


importance of doing your homework,
you can also use it to "Like" the pages of
companies you're interested in, engage
with them and get updates and company
news. You'll also have access to addi-
tional job search tips and advice
directly on Facebook.
And then there's Twitter. Workforce
Connection uses Twitter to communi-
cate with job seekers several times a
day Because there's so much competi-
tion for jobs, we recognize the need for
real-time information. Research indi-
cates that if you're in the midst of a seri-
ous job hunt, you want to know about
every job spotlight, hiring event, work-
shop and resource available to you as
soon as possible. We also use this forum
to share links to interesting websites
and articles as well as retweet from
workforce experts we follow.
As with LinkedIn and Facebook, cre-
ate a professional profile and link to
your LinkedIn or other online r6sum6,
use a professional photo for your
avatar. Follow people, job sites and com-
panies that can assist your endeavors
(search Twitter, Twellowcom or
MrTweet.com for recommendations).
Some definitely worth following are
Hannah Morgan, the "Career Sherpa"
and Monster com.
Also, all major job search engines and
job boards are on Twitter, so follow
them to get more postings and advice.
Remember that positive social foot-
print we mentioned earlier? It's not
enough to simply be, you need to be en-
gaged. Use your status updates to tweet
about industry topics, tips and advice;
when curating content, it is fine to tweet
links to relevant articles and retweet.
Again, be careful what you say As
with LinkedIn and Facebook, this is not
the forum to talk smack about a previ-
ous employer or regale the world about
the ragin' good time you had partying
last night or going into detail about what
you had for lunch. Be relevant Be pro-
fessional. Be social.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is Workforce Con-
nection's communications manager and
a Florida Certified Workforce Profes-
sional. Please contact her at 352-291-
9559 or 800434-5627, ext. 1234 or
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl.com.


I-bonds easily passed to heirs


DEAR BRUCE: We recently pur-
chased I-Bonds. I am wondering
how our children will be able to
collect them if something happens to
us. They are in mine and my husband's
name. Will us mentioning this in our
will be good enough? Is this a good way
to put some money away?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Not to worry The
I-Bonds will be easy to transfer upon
your deaths. They certainly should be
mentioned in the will.
Is this a good way to put the money
away? I don't believe I-Bonds are a
particularly good investment in terms
of what they return. But this is a
whole other subject. Certainly, if you
have the bonds set up appropriately,
there will be no problem having them
transferred upon your demise.
DEAR BRUCE: I purchased an eq-
uity index annuity for $100,000 six
months ago, which matures in 15
years. Due to a medical emergency
for a family member, I must access
this money right away The surrender
charge is 25 percent, which I would
like to avoid.
I received a quote from a buyer of
structured settlements, but the offer
was only about $60,000. I thought that
was extremely low. Do you know if
there are buyers who would be will-
ing to buy the annuity for $90,000?
I know I'm going to lose money on a
sale, but a $40,000 loss after only six
months seems awfully steep. I'm unfa-
miliar with this market and any help




WALL STREET
Continued from Page Dl

about 4 percentage points, according
to Short. That would mean earnings
in the second quarter just ended are
more likely to rise around 7 percent.
There are plenty of areas that could
help lift corporate profits. Americans'
confidence is up and they are willing to
spend again. The housing market re-
bound is also expected to push up
earnings of home construction compa-
nies such as DR Horton Inc., Lennar
Corp. and PulteGroup Inc. The con-
sumer discretionary sector, which in-
cludes retailers like Target Corp.,
entertainment companies like Walt
Disney Co. and the homebuilders, is ex-
pected to see growth of 12 percent
The financial sector is also ex-
pected to see a jump, with 16 percent
growth from a year earlier.
An aggregate of the S&P 500's earn-
ings per share is estimated at $26.41,
up from $25.67 reported in the second
quarter last year. That would be the
second-highest quarterly earnings,
only topped by the all-time high of
$26.71 during this year's first quarter.
Howard Silverblatt, a senior index
analyst with S&P Dow Jones Indices,


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY


would be appreciated.
--M.L., via email
DEAR M.L.: I don't know the terms
of your equity index annuity, but a
charge of 25 percent seems excessive.
This is why I caution against going
into annuities unless you know ex-
actly where you are going.
The structured settlement of
$60,000 is an extremely low offer You
asked if there might be any buyers
willing to purchase the annuity for
$90,000 no way! You know you are
going to lose money, but a $40,000 loss
after six or seven months seems awful
steep to me, too.
I would go back to the company that
sold you the annuity, explain the cir-
cumstances and see if it can help. If it
can't, you might consider asking an at-
torney to at least look over the con-
tract to see if there is any way this
charge can be avoided.

Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions of general
interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be provided.



said the earnings should propel the
S&P 500 index past its record close of
1,669.16 on May 21.
"The guidance has been negative,
but not as much as historically," Sil-
verblatt said.
Still, there are concerns. Short
points out that earnings are only part
of the picture. She's scrutinizing rev-
enue growth, which is predicted to
slow by 0.3 percent from last year's
second quarter. If that holds true, it
would be the first revenue slowdown
since the third quarter of 2009, just
after the recession ended
"Companies have gotten very good
at managing costs which is of
course important but it's unsus-
tainable," Short said. "At some point
you need to grow that top line."
Profits at mining and other compa-
nies that provide gold, aluminum and
similar products are expected to slow
because of lower commodity prices.
Growth for their profits is expected to
pull back by 4 percent
The technology sector isn't looking
promising either Personal computer
sales have slumped, hurting Dell Inc.
and Hewlett-Packard Co. But the real
drag is Apple Inc. The company isn't
launching any new products and is ex-
pected to earn $7.37 a share, down from
$9.32 last year, according to FactSet






SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Morey Construction and Wollinka-Wikle Title celebrate groundbreaking


The new 5,000-square-foot building will be built in Cypress Crossings Professional Park and will include the offices for Morey
Construction Corporation and Wollinka-Wikle Title, as well as available office suites. The Cypress Crossings office condos are off of
State Road 44 just west of Norvell Bryant Highway. These upscale professional buildings are built by Morey Construction Corporation,
a local general contractor that has been serving Citrus County since 1979. For more information on available Cypress Crossings condo
space, please call Morey Construction at 352-795-7007. Wollinka-Title can be reached at 352-564-0220. Joining Wollinka-Wikle owner
Paul Wikle are members of his staff Jennifer Ebner, Annette Carr, Amanda Rowthorn, Brandi Wilson, Tracy Kjos and Kelly Paul. Also
pictured are Morey Construction owners Pete and Shawna Morey. Joining Chamber President/CEO Josh Wooten are Chamber
Ambassadors Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives; Jim Ferrara, Insight
Credit Union; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Lisa Nash, F.D.S. Disposal; Rhonda Lestinksy, Nature Coast Bank; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin
Pest Control; Dan Pushee; George Bendsten, Insurance by George; Jeanne Green, Inside Citrus; Jenee Vickers, Kiddie Kampus Daycare;
Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee; and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


United Way

welcomes

Cindi Fein
The United Way of Citrus
County is pleased to name Cindi
Fein as its executive assistant.
Cindi's varied background
provides her with eight years
in magazine/newspaper pub-
lishing, 15 years in office man-
agement and more than 20
years in customer service. She
holds a B.S. in journalism/
public relations from NIU and
currently
sits on the
advisory
board for U.
Coastal
Healthy Liv- -
ing Maga-
zine and
represents
United Way
in Florida Cindi Fein
Public Rela- executive assis-
tant United Way
tions Asso- of Citrus County
Nature Coast Chapter.
"We are excited to welcome
Cindi to the United Way and
know she will be a great addi-
tion to our team," said Amy
Meek, CEO. Cindi's participa-
tion in Leadership Citrus 2013,
a program of the Chamber of
Commerce, helped her to make
the decision to work with
United Way of Citrus County.
Cindi said, "We have great
programs here in Citrus, and
many people who need access
to those programs so that they
may take care of themselves
and their families not just
today, but in the future. I've al-
ways believed in paying it for-
ward and working with United
Way is just one more avenue to
give back some of the blessings
my life has provided me."


Welcome to the Citrus County Chamber of

Commerce Business Expo!


CrrRus COUNTY'
Chamber of Commerce
September 7th
2013
County
Fairgrounds
Auditorium


9am-3pm
Free to the
Public.
Bring the
Family!


Not your normal Business Expo..!

In addition to a great chance to spend some time with our local businesses learning about
the products and services they provide, we are offering a variety of other fun things to do to
make it a great time for the whole family. While you're talking to the business leaders in
our community, your kids can spend time in the play area, or making something in the
Home-Depot Project area. Maybe add a new four-footed member to the family at the Pet
Adoption area sponsored by the Citrus County Animal Services. If you're hungry or thirsty
we'll have fresh-grilled food cooking, courtesy of Leon McClellan of M&B Dairy! Oh yeah, a
lucky visitor to our Expo is going to get a shot at bringing home some cash by stepping into
our fabulous money machine. Save the Date-We'll see you at the Expo!
*1; /


Presented by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and Baily Electric!
Platinum Sponsors Robert Boisseneault Oncology Institute and
The Plantation at Crystal River
For mre minfonratin tact Jeff at the Citrus county chamber oomme (effetruscountmber.com)or 352-795-349


News you

can use
Industry
Appreciation
Month moved
IAM's month long festivi-
ties, the mixer, luncheon,
and everyone's favorite BBQ
will be moving to October.
We will be adding a new
event too! Be on the lookout
for details coming soon!



Upcoming
Chamber
events
Aug. 8 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Suncoast Business Masters
Aug. 9 Chamber
Luncheon, Citrus Hills,
Healthcare Heroes
Awards Ceremony
Aug. 22 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Life Care Center/Comfort
Keepers
Sept. 7 Chamber Busi-
ness Expo, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at Citrus County Auditorium
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com or
follow the QR code to see
the website on your
smartphone!


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE...
Barbara Purvis
Highlands Restaurant
Anita Marshal
Crystal River Health
and Rehab


... FOR
OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER
SERVICE!


Grumpy Gators receives New Image Award


Grumpy Gators Bar and Grill of-
fers a variety of delicious menu items
and hosts numerous monthly events,
including karaoke nights and horse
shoe tournaments.
Grumpy Gators can be found at
4828 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Springs, FL 34446 or by calling 352-
503-2064.
Pictured are Chamber Presi-
dent/CEO Josh Wooten; Chamber
Ambassador Rhonda Lestinksy, Na-
ture Coast Bank; Grumpy Gators
owner Jamie Busiel; and Chamber
Chairman John Murphy, Citrus
County Chronicle.


Joining Margaret Bates, executive director for
Superior Residences, are Chamber members Crystal
Ashe, Healthcare at Brentwood; Ann Neptune,
Hospice of Citrus County; and Gwen Klaiber, Citrus
County Property Appraiser.


Superior Residences hosts Business After Hours
Superior Residences, a retirement and assisted living facility in
Lecanto, has 60 studio apartments and accommodations for up
to 80 residents. Nursing care is provided around the clock, and
residents' safety is ensured by the latest building security tech-
nology. The facility also offers onsite barber and salon services,
outdoor activity areas and scheduled transportation.
They provide customized therapy programs and services for
their residents in a comfortable, home-like environment. They
strive to create a caring community that accommodates the
unique needs and interests of their residents.
Superior Residences is located at 4864 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Lecanto, FL 34461. Please call 352-746-5483 to learn about
their many quality services.


Mid-Florida Homeless Coalition
joins Chamber of Commerce


Joining Executive Director Barbara Wheeler with the
Mid-Florida Homeless Coalition are Chamber
Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Lisa Nash,
F.D.S. Disposal; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center; Sarah
Fitts, First International Title; Mary Pericht, Cadence
Bank; and Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics.
Mid Florida Homeless Coalition Inc. is a not-for-profit cor-
poration operating in Citrus, Hernando, Lake and Sumter coun-
ties within Florida, whose purpose is to promote partnerships
that will reduce and prevent homelessness in the affiliated coun-
ties. The primary responsibility is to perform the function of the
lead agency of the Department of HUD CoC grant and function
of lead agency for the State Office on Homelessness for the af-
filiated counties. Contact person is Barbara Wheeler at 352-860-
2308, mfhcol@gmail.com or www.midfloridahomeless.org.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


F : 5 5 5 1 o F : 8 8 2 1m7a f s r c n e m0 0 .0 0


C ic


HOWARD
Honest, Sincere
Very lonely widower
would love to meet
attractive lonely lady
70-80. For loving rela-
tionship. Dine out, go
places, do fun things
together, and change
our lives.Please write
and tell me about
yourself. It could be
great for Both of Us
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1835P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FI
34429



Single White Female
Searching for
retired gentleman,
outgoing, pretty & fun
please write: Occupant
PO Box 830661
Ocala, FL 34472
Widow, attractive,
healthy, fit, petite,
well traveled.
Seeking company of
retired gentleman
70-80 Healthy, fit, out-
going and financially
independent.
Send Response to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box1836P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 21229



-LAUNDROMAT**
REDUCED PRICE
FOR QUICK SALE
Lrg., Clean, Well Est.
352-795-2399
CORVETTE
2003 50th Anniv.
Edition.17k mi,
like new, $29,900
352-341-4178
INVERNESS
Immaculate, former
model, 3/2/2, fenced
bk yd, $795 mthly, 1st,
last,sec. 352-400-1501
MATTRESS
new queen size $60
Gazelle Ex Mach. w/
video $70. no calls b-4
1 lam( 352) 628-4766


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905

Wear house/
Deliver Person
Valid drivers license
required, apply in
person Badcock &
More in Crystal River


Your World






CHkONICLE
raedtd




CII dN1I


are my N ome
utilities incl. $340. mo
1st wk free
563-1465 /228-1802



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



FREE KITTENS
11 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free kittens 3 orphaned
kittens adorable 1 black,
2 black and white Free
to good homes only
352-382-2030
FREE
Part Bengal Cat
Young Male, neutered,
he is a lap cat and likes
to be held & have lots of
attention. Are you
home most of the time
to give him lots of
love? call for more
information
352-464-1567
Free to good home 3
adult female cats.All
spayed. Very sweet.
Please call
352-422-6310
FREE to GOOD home
ONLY! We have a 7
month old German
Shepherd (mix?) that
found us about 4
months ago. Husband
says he has to go!!
Good, lovable, loyal dog
but needs obedience
training. Up to date on
all shots and house bro-
ken! Good around older
kids, please serious in-
quiries only! Breaks my
heart to let him go!
352-697-2795
Free to good home, 5
adult male cats.All
neutered.Very loving
and playful. Please
call 352-422-6310
HORSE MANURE
Racked and ready to
go. Bring Shovel, Truck
load avail., Help Your-


N cell phone on
7-3-13 from Inverness
McD's during fireworks!
Black Verizon with over
1,300 SENTIMENTAL
pictures of my children!!
PLEASE RETURN MY
PHONE!!!! Email me at
mylittleguy67@yahoo.co
m THANK YOU
NO QUESTIONS
ASKED
Lost Black Cat
neutered male,
pink collar, Hernando
area,chipped
REWARD
(352) 464-0548


"Sparky" is a Tri Color
Fox Hound
Lost Saturday 1st,
Vincity of Circle M Rd,
& W. Oak Hill
$100. Reward
(727) 480-3219
(866) 597-2424 for
animal control
Lost Pitbull Mix
w/long snout, w/bow &
arrow down back, tan
Her name is Sandy Girl
last seen on Gospel
Island Rd.
(352) 419-7016
or 727-664-1772
Lost Two Peacocks
Last seen in North
Hernando
(352) 897-4845
Lost, grey male cat,
Buffalo Dr area of Pine
Ridge, please call
(352)4334446 or
(518)4519572,
thank you
Older female calico cat
lost in Pine Ridge Can-
dlewood / Canarywood
Drive area. If found call
527-0478.
Yellow Lab, female
very friendly, approx. 8
yrs old, answers to
Grace, lost in the
Vicinity of E. Trails End
Rd by the Orange State
Canal. pls call & Iv. msg
352-726-2972
Yorkie-Maltese
female, 7lbs, silver, mis-
sing her collier ,missing
in Citrus Spring area of
Tiny Lilly/Deltona on 64
owners heartbroken
302-5111 or 400-0800




Found
1 pair of Sunglasses
Mini Farms
(352) 564-8915
FOUND female Lab
dog on Trails End
Road in Floral City.
Please call to identify.
She really misses her
owners! 352-423-0094
Found Small
Female Dog Beige
with brown spots Cit-
rus Springs on Deltona
(352) 897-4746






DEN CYSTIC AND FAMILY DTISTRY

Dunnellon Dentistry
would like to welcome
Dr Nahir Rosado DDS
ftlour nrafcice


WELCOME
Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
sity of Florida and Indi-
ana University school of
dentistry. She is accept-
ing new patients, and
accepts most dental
insurances. Please feel
free to give us a call if
you would like to sched-
ule an appointment or if
you have any questions.
1-352-489-3922


Advertise in newspa-
pers across Florida -
One phone call puts
your ad in 117
newspapers. Reach
millions of
Floridians for one
low cost by calling
866.742.1373 or visit
www.AdNetworks
Florida.com


Nature's Way
Precision Hair






-k



Welcomes
-.-




TIFFANY MAZUR
Formerly of
Headhunters and
In-town Barber-
shop doing mens
& ladies precision
& clipper cuts.
Walk-Ins Welcome
or Call. 726-6868
For Appointment
1445 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando,
one driveway north
of Dollar General.

---Chia e




TEACHER
Fulltime/Part time,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222



Do^^e^tiB


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Ona $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII






DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamolom
y hoocom


ED RNs
Florida Hospital
Waterman
in Tavares currently
has full-time, day
and night shift
positions available
for experienced
Emergency Depart-
ment Nurses. Quali-
fied candidates
must have a current
FL RN license,
ACLS/BLS (through
the American Heart
Association) and a
minimum of 1 year
ED experience in an
acute care hospital.
PALS must be
obtained within 90
days. BSN and TNCC
preferred. Contact
the Nurse Recruiter
at (352) 253-3696
or email
ryan.cuti@ahss.org
for more informa-
tion, or apply on our
website:
www.fhwat.org/
careers

FLORIDA
HOSPITAL
WATERMAN
Equal Opportunity
Employer and
Nicotine-Free
Employer



MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
For Primary Care
Office in Homosassa
SEND RESUME TO:
PO Box 700
Lecanto Fl. 34460



REGISTERED
NURSE
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
in Lecanto
Full-time and part
-time 11 a.m.-7 p.m.
positions available
for Florida-licensed
RNs. Long-term
care experience
preferred. We offer
great pay and
benefits to full-time
associates in a
team-oriented
environment. Please
apply in person to
Hannah Mand.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne
Ln., Lecanto, FL
34461 Visit us:
LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
#41341


CaV
C4n#ter





REHAB AIDE
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
Full-time position
available. Must be a
Florida-certified
nursing assistant.
Healthcare experi-
ence preferred. We
offer great pay and
benefits in a team-
oriented environ-
ment.
Please Apply
in Person to
Melanie Reyna,
Rehab Manager.
352-746-4434,
352-746-6081,Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne
Ln., Lecanto, FL
34461
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
41307



COe n-
*'Curei


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T Receptionist
Experienced. For
busy physicians
office. Apply at:
PO Box 207
Crystal Riv. Fl. 34423




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927




SALES
PROFESSIONALS
ARE YOU READY TO
MOVE FORWARD
2013?
High Commission
with Guarantee
hourly wage.
-High Commission
paid in full.
Comprehensive
Benefits Package:
-Life, disability Long
and short term,
vision, dental, pre-
scription. Company
contributing 401K,
paid holidays,
personal, sick days,
vacation days and
paid training.
-A Life Insurance
license preferred,
but not required.
Call for
Immediate Interview
Tony Rocco
352-746-4646
FERO MEMORIAL &
FUNERAL HOME
5891 N. Lecanto Hw
Beverly Hills Fl 34465
EOE/DFWP




AUTO
COLLISION
TECH
352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm

Big Truck/Equip.
Mechanic
Must have tools &
experience.
***apply at:***
6730 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FL
no phone calls please

Class A Driver

2 yrs Experience
Flatbed/Lowboy/
Stepdeck home 3/4
weeks $40-60K
334-864-7456

DIRECT
TECHS

4 spots open. Must
pass bckgd, drug
DMV check. Must
have Truck, SUV or
Van. Piece work $1 k
to $2k1wk. 80 miles
radius. 352-201-7219
or 407-738-9463

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624


EARNING BETTER
PAY IS ONE STEP
AWAY!
Averitt offers
Experienced CDL
-A Drivers
Excellent Benefits
and Weekly
Hometime.
888-362-8608,
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Apply
online at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH
Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness


TELLER
Brannen Bank is cur-
rently interviewing
for a teller position in
the Citrus County
area. Must have
previous cash
handling experi-
ence, be detail
oriented, PC
literate and have
excellent customer
service skills.
Inquiries please call
Carol Johnson at
352-726-9001.

Brannen Banks
of Florida, Inc.
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP













































Seeking
Customeri
Service Rep
29 Hours per week

Solid Computer Skills
Weekend Hours

Email resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
or

Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd

Drug Screen
required for Final
Applicant.
EOE
EOE


CHiPONICLE

Seeking
PT Telemarketer
Proven Sales Skills
Strong Customer
Service
Mon-Fri 5PM-8PM
Base plus Comm.
Qualified
Applicants Only.
Email resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
Drug Screen
required for final
Applicant.
EOE




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.



Wear house/
Deliver Person
Valid drivers license
required, apply in
person Badcock &
More in Crystal River









SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS & NIGHTS
a*JULY 1, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
wAUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING









SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS & NIGHTS
UrJULY 1, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
lrAUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
@*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty









(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


F ,Your DrewM HoMe,
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Become a Certified
Microsoft Office Pro-
fessional! NO EXPE-
RIENCE NEEDED!
SC Train can get you
job ready ASAP! HS
Diploma/GED
PC/Internet needed!
(888)212-5888

MEDICAL BILL-
ING TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





"LAUNDROMATI
REDUCED PRICE
FOR QUICK SALE
Lrg., Clean, Well Est.
352-795-2399

HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR
LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
(352) 464-2514
1305 Hwy 486




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
527.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




HARD COVER ABOUT
AUTOMOBILES & AVI-
ATION. Approximately
90 books, excellent con-
dition. $275/all or $3 to
$10 each.
Telephone or e-mail.
352-586-1471 or
pandersoni6@tam-
pabay.rr.com


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On ly$28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111

VINTAGE CHINA
CLOSET 1940's Deco
call for photo. $100.00
good cond.glass door
352-513-4473




17' cubic ft. Energy
Star, frigidair up right
freezer, 9mth old pd
$700 sell $500
(352) 465-2823
7am-7pm

APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504

Refrigerator
Almond, Kenmore,
$125.
352-697-2195


OOOEXJX
CITRUS COUNTY



www.chron cleoni necom
















At home or



on the go...




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-' Your News



_Your Town



ww cYour Way



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D4 SUNDAY. TULY 7. 201


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TURKEY FRYER
BUTTERBALL
ELECTRIC
EXEC.COND. $100
(352) 527-8993
TURKEY FRYER
MASTERBILT-28
QT.EXCELL.COND.
$60 (352) 527-8993



Cherry Executive
Desk & Chair
good condition
$100. (352) 746-9868
FILING CABINET Two
drawer open top, heavy
steel very good cond.
$15. (352)563-6410

Auctions


WOODEN LADDER 6'
WOODEN LADDER 6'
WOODEN LADDER-
$25 (352) 527-8993



Denon AVR
591 Surround Sound
Receiver Infinity sur-
round sound speakers
w/woofer, like new $550.
obo (352) 3444384
Hitachi, stereo with
tape and record
player in Cabinet
$150.
Disney VHS Library
$100 (352) 527-7223
Magnavox 36"
good condition
good for rec room
$125.(352) 795-1648
TELEVISION
60" SONY Flat Screen
HD, 1080P. $400
(352) 249-1124
ii


CABINET WHITE
W/FORMICA TOP -
5'WX3'HX25"D-2
DRAWERS DOORS
$100 (352) 527-8993
DOORS
5-Bi-Fold Louvers
5-Solid Face
1-New 6 Panel
$100. 352 746-7741
Premium Metal
Roofing, Manufac-
turer Direct!
8 Metal Roof profiles
in 40+ colors I
Superior customer
service, same day
pick-up, fast
delivery!
1-888-779-4270 or
visit www.aulfcoast

TUB SHOWER DOORS
Like NEW
White Frame
Designer Frosted
Glass $150.00
352 746-7741


QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS Almost brand
new, double sided,
beautiful, Beverly Hills.
$100 352-249-7574
SEVERAL ITEMS Office
Chair-$20, Book-
case-$20, Bedroom
dresser w/ mirror, bed-
side stand-$50, Corner
computer desk-$10,
Corner hutch-$20.
352-613-2232
SIMMONS RECLINER,
BOOKCASE,
CHANDELIERS
Simmons taupe recliner
3mo old $200
Wood book case $30
Brass 12 light chande-
lier $125 Murray Fiess
small chandelier $100
Call 352-746-6322
Sofa Sleeper
Queen Sz. $250.
Entertainment Center
Light wood $150
.(352) 628-3411
WICKER HEADBOARD
King size,color gold,


--JI------ beautiful cond.$100.00
Vido 352-513-4473
Dell Computer f
w/15' monitor, printer,
keyboard, mouse and
speakers, very good 7.5' Aluminum loading
DUDLEY'S DUDLEY'S condition $175 ramps $50 OBO
AMO 352-344-5311 (352) 423-0611
3 Diestler Computer AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
AUCTIONSuesday 72 3 AUCTIONS New & Used systems Mulch, Stone, Hauling
Emergency Walk Tuesday 7-2 repairs. Visa/ MCard & Tractor Work
About Auction Emergency Walk 352-637-5469 (352) 341-2019
Pre: 12pm Auc: 4pm About Auction Craftsman 22 inch Gas
Change from Pre: 12pm Auc: 4pm hedge trimmer, sacrifice
Thursday. Everything Change fromurFr tingi $75(352) 873-2505
you can imagine just Thursday. Everything
so much fun, you can imagine just DRIFTWOOD CARVED Garden Tractor, Murry
Household, furniture so much fun, FISH FOR WALL Heavy Duty 18.5 HP
anHouseh old, s Household, furniture, HANGING $80 V-Twin 46 inch cut
Saturday 7-6 antiques, tools. (352) 527-8993 $500, Sarlo Comm.
SaturdaY 7-6 Saturday 7-6 Push Mower high wheel,
Sonshine Lighting Sonshine Lighting PATIO DINING SET belt run 6.75 HP 24 inch
and Fans Auction and Fans Auction PVC WhteVeryHeavy cut $150 352- 507-1490
Pre: 8am Auc: 9am Pm: 8am Auc: 9 duty table & six chairs.
3129 E. Gulf to Lake Pr3129 E. Gulf to 9La $75. (352)563-6410 MOWER
Hwy (SR 44) 3129 E. Gulf to Lake New Troy-Bilt Bronco,
Inverness, FL 34453. Hwy (SR 44) 19HP, Kohler engine,
Building sold Entire Inverness, FL 34453. F42 in, $1200 at Lowes,
contents to be sold. Building sold Entire must sell $825 call Ken
contents to be sold. 352-637-0619
Sunday 77 Sundat -7 5-PIECE TRAY TABLE 3526370619
Collectible Auction Antique & SET Dark color. Two 42" Riding
Collectible Auction Collectible Auction 4 tables and stand. Mowers
Pre: 10am Auc: 1pm Pre: ilam Auc lpm Good condition. Ask- $250. & $375.
Br500+otsnze, furniturewelry, 500+lots, jewelry, ing $25 352-233-3227 in very good cond.
Coins, Sterling, Bronze, Art, furniture, BAR STOOLS (2) 732597391
Fenton, Wedgwood Coins, Sterling, BLACK SWIVEL 7--9
Call or web for info Fenton, Wedgwood W/CUSHIONS $50
Dudley's Auction Call or web for info (352)527 8993
352-637-9588 Dudley's Auction BEDROOM
www.dudleys 352-637-9588 FURNITURE White, VERY LARGE PEACE
auction.com www.dudleys Provincial-style dresser LILY Newly potted, 3
10%BPAu2267 auction.com67 with mirror, chest, and foot high, luscious
10%BP Au2267 nightstand. Also a white green. $50
MOECKER captain's bed. With twin 352-613-2232
AUCTIONS sized mattress. Very
Public Auction good condition. Asking I
Display & Cabinet $200 352-726-2872
Manufacturing Co. DESK AND CHAIR
LIVE & ONLINE Perfect for home office. BEVERLY HILLS
Tuesday, July 9 at Dark brown. Rolling "MOVING SALE**
10am chair, adjustable height. All Furniture, misc.
16290 NW 13th Ave, $50.00 352-233-3227 items (352) 746-5421
Miami, F133169
Wood & Plastic Dining Room Set, or (352) 476-6608
Fabricating/ 4 captain chairs,
Rotating & Cuttffing table w/ 1 leaf,
Equip.: CNC china closet $350.
Routers Fork lift Wing Back Chair $60.
Furniture, Fixtures & (352) 628-3411 2 Automatic Pool
Equipment. Details FUTON BED FRAME Cleaners, Hayward nav-
at www.moecker queen size,white metal igator, zodiac barracuda
auctions.com no mattress.Good cond. with hoses, exec. cond.
(800) 840-BIDS $50.00 or best offer $135 each 270-8475
15%-18%BP $100 ref. 5134473 2 End Tables & Coffee
cash dep. High End Used Table $200
Subj to confirm. Furniture 2NDTIME Small Freezer
AB-1098 AU-3219, AROUND RESALES $125.
Eric Rubin 270-8803,2165 Hy 491 .(352) 628-3411





& = i 6 l


CLASSIFIED



AMANAAIR COND.
20,000 BTU window/wall
really cold, 220 electric
necessary. $75.00
OBO. 513- 4473
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BRIDGE TABLE (36"
SQ.) + 4 chairs (tan),
never used. $35.
352-249-7017
CHILDREN'S IRON
HEADBOARD Brand
New Metal Headboard,
$10 (352)465-1616
Color Nook Reader
7 inch, with Case
$85.
Excellent Cond.
(352) 795-1958
Commercial Singer
Sewing Machine Md #
331 K4, straight stitch,
good condition, with
large table, $500
352-220-1313
FANTOM THUNDER
VACUUM CLEANER
excellent cond., $30.
352-249-7017
FLOOR MATS
WEATHER
TECH-GRAY-LEXUS
RX CUSTOM MATS -
$75 (352)527-8993
GAS GRILL TABLETOP
NEW 4 BOTTLES
PROPANE $65
(352) 527-8993
MATTRESS
new queen size $60
Gazelle Ex Mach. w/
video $70. no calls b-4
SlaIm( 352) 628-4766
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Pentair Kreepy
Krawly, great white suc-
tion side pool cleaner,
for in ground pool $200
call (352) 382-1885
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored,
rocks by rubber,
ok condition, $50
(352)465-1616
Sears Cargo Carrier,
Car Top with two keys
$50 OBO
(352) 423-0611
Wooden Swing Set
Gym Play Set,
w/ rock climbing wall
& tunnel, small play-
house, slide & more,
needs paint Org.
$1,300 Asking $450.
(352) 795-2515
(352) 422-6161



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


ELECTRIC GUITAR,
AUSTIN, with case, ca-
bles and tuner box, ex-
cellent condition, $100
(352) 465-1813
FENDER SONORAN
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR,GIGBAG
&XTRAS, BLACK W/
PEARL PICKGUARD
$175 352-601-6625
HAMMOND ORGAN
125 XL series
w/padded bench
good cond. $100
352-344-5311
Lowrev Pageant
Organ, 2 keyboards
w/bench, 48" wide
Exc. Condition $300.
obo(352) 746-5421
PACKAGE!"NEW"
WASHBURN GUITAR
STYLE DULCIMER&
ALL ACCESSORIES
$75 352-601-6625



DINNING ROOM LIGHT
bronze in color 6 lights
with a down light $75.00
phone 352-341-2081
Queen Size Gel
Memory Foam Mat-
tress topper 3 inches
thick, 2 mths old, (paid
$125) asking $75 Call
(352) 726-8021



BOWFLEX BLAZE
Resistance Rods 210
pounds, 60 exercises,
lat tower, squat
station, aerobic
rowing, leg presses,
good condition,
$300,352-212-8922
ELLIPTICAL
NordicTrack E5vi
Adjustable stride
Pre Set Programs
$300.00 352-527-3589
Schwinn Recumbent
Exercise Bike,
programmable $400,
(352) 465-3947



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
GOLF DRIVER
Tour Edge Exotics.
XLD, MRH, Senior, Gold
65 shaft. Exc cond w/
new grip & HC. $65 obo
Dunellon 465-8495
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
lesse 586-7516R


GRACO HIGH CHAIR
No frills basic high chair.
Great for extra at
Grandmas. $20.00
352-400-5650


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50

includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369






NTI IS T IRY
I COSMETIC AND f MILY DMTISM

Dunnellon

Dentistry

would like to

welcome

Dr Nahir

Rosado DDS

to our prac-

tice.


BeNautur ay


SNature's Way
Precision Hair


I I




I-. I
I *

Welcomes I


TIFFANY MAZUR I
I Formerly of I
Headhunters and I
SIn-town Barber-
shop doing mens
& ladies precision
& clipper cuts. I
Walk-Ins Welcome
or Call. 726-6868
For Appointment
1445 N. Florida
I Ave., Hernando, I
one driveway north I
U hI
of Dollar General.

P L E X U S


.Li r

Ambassador

Samantha

Haven
Independent
Plexus Slim
Weight Loss I love
helping people get
healthy and motivated.
I'm so THANKFUL
that I was showed this
by a Dear friend:)
The products have
changed my LIFE
If you would like more
information call me or
send me a text at
352-536-4025
Visit my web site at
www.plexusslim.
com/haven
Can't wait to hear
from you :)


VVWLOUIVI-
Dr Rosado DDS is a
graduate of The Univer-
s t of Flordaad Inri_


"NEW"MADE IN U.S.A. ana University school of
TENOR BANJO UKE dentistry. She is accept-
CHERRY&MAPLE Bing new patients, and
CUTE AS A BUG $80 accepts most dental
352-601-6625 Baby Cradle,high chair insurances. Please feel
ELECTRIC GUITAR (both wood) car seat, free to give us a call if
AMPLIFIER, RMS stroller and play pen, you would like to sched-
MODEL 400D, excellent blankets, all in good ule an appointment or if
condition, $40, condition all for $200 you have any questions.
(352) 465-1813 (352) 795-7254 1-352-489-3922




SML


I


REX
Rex, 5-y.o. house-
brkn, neutered
Retinever/Blckmouth Cur
mixwt.57 Ib6.
Very sweet,
affectionate, loves
people, good
w/children, gets
along w/other dogs.
Favorite thing is to
play fetch. Happiest
in fenced yard.
When done playing
likes to lie & watch
the world go by.
Would be a
wonderful compan-
ion or family dog for
anyone!
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Small Breed, AKC,
health cert. up to date
w/ shots. White/Brown
Mom & Dad family
pet. $400-$450
352-503-7430


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


Computers


Death. Interested in
publishing your story?
Http://www.amazon.com/
author/elainekleid


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Paios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V'RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *


AAA ROOFING
Ca4ut te"Acakf6usmJ"
Free Written Estimate


100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000FCMA

ww.aaofnfhoetacm


Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
Rent by Day, clean
gutters, repair doors,
windows, caulk, etc..
(352) 220-0851



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Residential/Commercial
(352) 400-8361
Mention this ad and get
a service call for $19.
Expires 8/31/2013
Lic# CAC1817447






CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


H
HOME INSPECTIONS
CRS CONTRACTING
SERVICES LLC,
Lic # HI 1392, 414-8693




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


T



White Diamond Limo
Weddings/Sporting
events/Special
Occasions/Airport
352-341-LIMO (5466)




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397







Jeffrey Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273


Stmretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
Free In Home Estimates
Lifetime Warranty on Stretching
SRepairs
Uoholstery Cleanina
Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces
., ,,
Ei am.
k^1 ^=


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135










Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/lnsured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc13276564/Ins.
-352-639-1024**





Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955



Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Serv-
ice
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


IDY CANINI


GENERAL' J -
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
SGenerac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians"
ER0015377


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S ALL Home
Repairs
I \ / ,- Small Carpentry
Fencing
SScreening
Clean Dryer
a Vents
Allodable & Dependable
Expeence lifelong
S352 344-0905
cell: 400-1722
sured Lic.#37761


Water Darmage....r..........
Service
l Powerful truck
estimonted
i &Inur I equipment


DON'T LET YOUR Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
DRYER START orpoolorplan
A FIRE s0methin
FMaA r.i e No completely new!
HiddenCo.l T .O na



YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPIES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Lie./s IBonsea d 352-400-3188


6xewlknce in -9o




ROOFINGC |
SQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


WINDOW I

We Clean Windoms and a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


MALTESE/COTON MIX
PUPPY 14 weeks.
Loving, adorable lap
dog. 4 Ibs, crate trained,
all shots, etc. Carrier,
crate, pen, etc included.
Must sell due to travel.
$700 Call 344 0779











Meet Ansley
a sweet & energetic
young (aprox 16
mths) Basenji mix
who is looking to find
a forever home.
Right now she is in a
foster home & gets
along well with the
other dogs. Ansley is
house broken, a
fenced home is best
as she likes to run
Not recommended
for a person that
does not have time
to spend with her,
is very loving.
Please contact
Victoria at
352-302-2838 or
FOCCSA
352-746-8400
ID#17387903


SUNDAY, JULY 7,2013 D5


pmILSA RS




D6 SUNDAY,JULY 7, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827

Shorkie for Sale
1 Female & 1 Male,
health cert, 1st shots, 8
wks $300 Call Judy
352-344-9803

Toy Chihuahua
Female, 7 months
old, Tan, good health
all shots $375.
(352) 795-2515
(352) 422-6161














TUCKER
Tucker, a 2 y.o.
Shepherd mix, neu-
tered, HW-negative,
housebrkn, UTD
shots, wt. 54 Ibs.
Needs to be only
dog, with single
person or couple,
needs fenced yard
w/room to run, but
prefers to be inside
dog most of time,
wants to be with
human friend. Walks
well on leash.
Currently fostered,
mom says he would
be a great watch-
dog, very alert.
Call Dianne @
352-419-5880
orJoanne @
352-795-1288.

Zebra Finches
approx. 50
various colors
w/cages $165.
(352) 503-3446


Hens for Sale
great layers, $10 ea.
Quail $3 ea. Rabbits
also, cages & hutches
(352)-212-8590


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45'Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299




SEA-DOO
GSI, 97, new engine in
05 & trailer, runs good
$850. 352-436-3583





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510-


Classic Mako
20'Honey Pot teak,good
cond. well maint.Trailer
150 Evenrude 1993
Nice! Extra's! $5200
obo 352 795-1546
Sail Boat
20' with Cabin, & trailer,
new sail, boat needs
some work $1100
(352) 220-6303
SEA EAGLE
2013, 21% ft, Inflatable
boat & motor, pump
incl'd. sea worthy, hard
resin firs. seats 4, 9.9
Yamaha, outbrd eng.
like new, mtr. 2 hrs.
Lowrance 7" fishfinder
depth recorder, 12v
electric motor $2,300
obo 352 -344-4384
SEA FOX
19 2'Aft, Yamaha 115
4 stroke motor, runs
great, extra clean
$15,500. 352-212-7758






Sweetwater
2003 18 Ft Pontoon, 60
HP yamaha with trailer,
& custom cover $5300
352-476-1113/513-5135
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


BIG SALE
s*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100










AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

2005 Chrysler
PT Cruiser $3950

2001 Plymouth
Neon $2495

1999 Chevy
Venture Van $2300

1995 Toyota
Camry $2275

CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3-1 902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl


BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
'11, Regal,CXL, 15yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$20,777, 352-240-7412
BUICK
'11, Regal,CXL, 15yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$20,669, 352-240-7412
BUICK
2007, LaCrosse CXL
15 yrs./150K miles of
worry free protection
warranty $11,995,
352-240-7412
BUICK
2011, LaCrosse CXS
15 yrs./150K miles of
worry free protection
warranty $23,888,
352-240-7412
BUICK
2012, LaCrosse 15yrs./
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$28,399, 352-240-7412
BUICK
2012, Verano 15 yrs./
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$22,688, 352-240-7412
BUICK
2012, Verano 15yrs./
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$22,889, 352-240-7412
BUICK
2012, Verano 15yrs./
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$22,299, 352-240-7412


Y l d%11d I-ll St.

Y iour \\ first.

1<) D}


Ciko',i,


CHEVROLET
2004, Monte Carlo
supercharged SS,
leather, sunroof
$9,995, 352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Equinox,
extra clean, sunroof
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2011, Malibu LS
15yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $13,999,
352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2011, Malibu LT
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $14,888,
352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2011, Malibu LT
15 yrs/ 150000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $14,888,
352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2012, Cruze, 2LT,15yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$15,988, 352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2012, Malibu LS, 15
yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,999,
352-240-7412
CHEVROLET
2012, Malibu LT
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $16,777,
352-240-7412
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2012, Touring, 15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$15,978,352-240-7412
CORVETTE
'78 Sllver Anniversary
Same owner for 30 yrs.
Garage Kept. $6500
352-302-1557


For more information on how to reach I T R U S C0UNT Y
Citrus County readers call CHC LE
352-563-5592. e l
o www.chronicleonline com
*[Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; myfwc.comMildlifehabitls/AlligatorncidentsFactsSheet.himn) Scarborough 2010


0008xas


DODGE
2010, Charger 3.5L
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,999,
352-240-7412
DODGE
2012, AvengerSE
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $14,277,
352-240-7412
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2007, LaCrosse CXL,
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $11,995,
352-240-7412
FORD
2011, Fusion SE
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,725,
352-240-7412
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
'12, Santa Fe GL,
15 yrs/ 150000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $18,999,
352-240-7412
KIA
2006, Spectra
5 door $7,995
352-341-0018
MAZDA
2007 Miata MX5
Grand Touring, with
only 17,250 actual mi-
les! 6-Speed Automatic
w/paddle shift, Heated
Leather Seats, Trim
Package. Stormy Blue
Mica exterior with Tan
interior.Beautiful and a
blast to drive! Garage
kept, like new condition.
Premium "Bose" stereo
sound system. Tan cloth
top. Includes "Mazda"
leather bra. 30+ MPG
$16,900 Firm
352-503-7496
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
MINI COOPER
2010, panorama roof,
low miles, BIk & Slvr,
6 speed. $17,000
352-302-1557
NISSAN
2005, Titan
EX Cab XE, $6,995.
352-341-0018
NISSAN
2011, Altima, 15 yrs./
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$13,888, 352-240-7412
NISSAN
2012, Altima 2.5 S,
15 yrs./150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty $15,577,
352-240-7412
NISSAN
2012, Sentra 2.0,
15 yrs./150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty $13,997,
352-240-7412
PONTIAC
2000, Sunfire
$2,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2011, Camry LE,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$14,377, 352-240-7412
TOYOTA
2011, Camry LE,15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$16,888, 352-240-7412


TOYOTA
2011, Camry SE, 15 yrs/
150,000 miles of worry
free protection warr.
$12,488, 352-240-7412




Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CORVETTE
2003 50th Anniv.
Edition.17k mi,
like new, $29,900
352-341-4178







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





BIG SALE
ECome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

GMC
2011, Sierra 1500
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $31,777,
352-240-7412
TOYOTA
2009 Tacoma BLUE,
TRD Prerunner Sports
pk, Tow pk, Crew Cab,
backup cam, 41k miles,
$21,000 352-613-4487




CHEVROLET
2013, Equinox LS
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $23,888,
352-240-7412
FORD
FORD 2005 EX-
PLORER XLT 89K ONE
OWNER,ALL DEALER
SERVICE
RECORDS,SATELLITE
RADIO ,$7700
1-352-527-3498
GMC
2010, Terrain SLT-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $15,777,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Terrain SLE-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $21,488,
352-240-7412
GMC
2011, Terrain SLT-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $25,998.,
352-240-7412
GMC
2012, Terrain SLE-1
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty. $24,777,
352-240-7412


2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2011, Patriot Sport,
15 yrs/150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warranty $15,889,
352-240-7412



JEEP
2011, Wrangler Sport,
15 yrs/ 150,000 miles of
worry free protection
warr. $21,499,
352-240-7412



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment



BMW
1994 BMW R1100RS,
Luggage, ABS, 77,000
miles. $2,500.
RIA-51Q-2984


DUCATI
1994 900 Super Sport
Ducati, new battery
$3000.00 contact me at
352-563-2763 between
9am and 5pm or my cell
is 352-257-5840
Harley Davidson
'00, SOFTAIL, Standard
CHEAP $5,500.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
Harley Davidson
'07, STREET GLIDE
LOADED FINANCE
AVAILABLE
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HONDA
1994 Night Hawk, looks
great, runs like new,
very low mileage $1,100
FIRM 352-249-7127
HONDA
1997 SHADOW 1100
EZ Finance $2,500.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HONDA
2006, GOLDWING 1800
$7,995.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HONDA
'94 GOLD WING TRIKE
Full Conversion
$12,900.
352-330-0047
SUZUKI
'02, INTRUDER 1400
BUY HERE PAY HERE
http://www.lucky
ucycles.com/
352-330-0047



950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at
covdeals .com,
July 1, 2013 July 31, 2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.


900-0707 W/SUCRN-Mix
DUTKO, PAMELAG 09-2012-CA-000909 NOS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-2012-CA-000909
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
V.
PAMELA G. DUTKO; JOESPH V. DUTKO, JR.;
UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2;
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE) NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; RONALD D. GLOVER
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foredosure
entered on May 02, 2013, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus County, Florida, the
clerk shall sell the property situated in Citrus County, Florida, described as:
TRACT 43, HERITAGE ACRES SUBDIVISION, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 114-115, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2004 OAK SPRINGS MOBILE HOME
LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND AN APPURTENANCE
THERETO. VIN NUMBER G2620102SA, TITLE NUMBER 91470086 AND VIN NUMBER
G2620102SB, TITLE NUMBER 91469885.
a/k/a 6143 W. PATRIOT STREET, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448-2179
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Online at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com Citrus County, Florida, on July 11, 2013 at 10:00 AM.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 31st day of May, 2013.
Angela Vick, Clerk of the Circuit Court
Douglas C. Zahm, PA., Attorney for the Plaintiff
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716
Telephone No. (727) 536-4911, Email Address: efiling@dczahm.com
By:/s/ Tara M. McDonald, Esq., Florida Bar No. 43941
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
ADA COORDINATOR (352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450
WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, July 3 & 7 2013. 888121156


324-0707 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice of Budget Workshop
HOMOSASSA SPECIAL WATER DISTRICT
The Board of Commissioners of the Homosassa Special Water District will be holding a
Budget Workshop on Monday, July 15, 2013 @ 1:00 PM at the District office at 7922 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL.
July 7, 2013


325-0707 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, July 7, 2013.


m


m


m





Section E -SUNDAY, JULY 7,2013



OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULD


Sikorski's
-- Attic PAGE E4


77


- U ''' -
- ,-

. -.... --- ..


r'


7-


HfIE ,V I


iirw L)j iJ~


ri/ri


The ingredients for tomato saice are s
S .. nursery in Ventura. Catif. Alhst percent. aIhooie
{ t canners are growing herbs second oply to tomatoes-
.with about one-third dr yg oTfreeth#t them for later use.
Herbrre popular for flavoring sauces, soups. meats.
vinegar- butters, alcoholic drinks, salts and jellies.
DEANFOSDICK :: ::- :, .r :


U','


E:

POMPIETEMIA










Monetary gift requests becoming more common


Dear Sara: I got a wedding
invitation in the mail this
week with a note that cash
or gift cards are preferred. Is this
in poor taste? CM., California
Dear C.M.: Call me a tradition-
alist, but I think it is in poor
taste. However, I am not at all
surprised by these types of re-
quests and am not offended by


them. I have seen them on birth-
day invitations, too. Gifts are not
an obligation and shouldn't be
mentioned in the invitation.
They're voluntary and shouldn't
be expected. A family member
or friend in the wedding party
can share that the couple prefers
cash if he or she is directly
asked. Another option that's


more of a "meaningful gift" reg-
istry than what some might per-
ceive as a "money grab" is
rainfallofenvelopescom. This
site allows you to set up a reg-
istry that requests, gives and re-
ceives monetary gifts online.
But it is a fact that times have
changed. Many couples are in-
cluding notes in their invitations


that request cash gifts, and more
and more people are finding it
perfectly acceptable. Instead of
being offended or judgmental,
remember as the gift-giver that
whether there's a request note
or a gift registry, what you give is
still up to you.


Page E6


,oter ti,,




RUSAW BUILT DREAM HOME!!
SBeautiful Kitchen Maple Cabinets
S3/3/2 + Office Huge Screened Lanai
* Lrg. Fam. Rm. Very Tasteful Decor
SReally Nice Master Bath Lge. Garage
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -
Em.nl elliesullon eniemlx nel
www.F rIl oil. .islinglnlo.coi








WONDERFUL VIEW OF LAKE TAHOE!
* Lovely Kit. wWood Cabs. 3/2/2 Split Plan
* Nice Enclosed Porch Cozy Fireplace
*All Neutral Tones Ceramic & Carpet Floors
* Close to Rivers/Gulf Sets Back from Road
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 '7
EinlEl elliesulloni leinux nel
www.FloiduLiuslinglnlo.com


Charming 3 bedroom home on five shady acres near
town. Huge recreation room, fireplace, large dining
room and enormous 3 car detached garage. Come to
the country! Only $189,900.
STEVE VARNADE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


UPDATES GALORE!! MUST SEE INTERIOR!!!
3 BR, 2 BATH Over 1/2 ACRE
* GRANITE Counters Updated Wood Cabinets
* Laminate Flooring Updated Baths
* Large Lanai Storage Sheds

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 k
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com









REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


CLOSE TO SHOPPING, BIKE TRAIL, BOAT .Oak Village Home -3/2/2
RAMP, AND GOLF COURSE. 3BR/2BA *Caged Pool Garage w/Screen Enclosure
HOME IN MOVE-IN CONDITION. LARGE Solid Surface Counters -BeautifulTile Flooring
CORNER LOT, CITY WATER, DETACHED .First Green of Southern Woods Course
GARAGE AND MUCH MORE.
S CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 i (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmi ls@arthlink.net Email: kcunningham@remax.net

-A pl.-M

'lAb

M i


NEW! NEW! NEW! A FEW UPDATES
This 2 bedroom 25 bath Waterfront Condo boasts
new 18" tile, completely renovated kitchen with new WILL MAKE ME PRETTY AGAIN!
appliances, Corian Counter Tops, Tile back splash and 3/2/2 with family room and privacy fenced backyard.
orgou theWoodter w Cabinets.wn Alloat NEW k SoBATHS! Situated on great corner lot in the great family community of
Overlok the water with i'on a dok!Slm
for so little. See this one today! Connell Heights Priced to sell!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com f Email: cnadalcremax.net


2421 N. Le ww IA~o II0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


Sara
Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


52 637.282g





211 S. JACKSON ST.
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2B CG On Extra Large Lot
* Newer Roof, AC, and Appliances
* Large Screened Patio Nice Neighborhood
* Well-Maintained Circular Driveway
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


i


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HomeFront BRIEFS


Clinics to look at
drought tolerance
Regardless of our expected
weather patterns, it is always
a good idea to know and
properly place plants that are
drought-tolerant.
The free July monthly Cit-
rus County Extension Service
Master Gardener Plant Clinic
topic will be "Drought-tolerant
Trees and Shrubs."
There are trees and
shrubs, both native and ex-
otic, which will perform well in
Citrus County.
The schedule for the re-
maining July free plants clin-
ics is:
1 p.m. Tuesday, July 9,


at Lakes Region Library,
Inverness;
1:30 p.m. Wednesday,
July 10, at Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills;
0 1:30 p.m. Friday, July 12,
at Coastal Region Library,
Crystal River;
1 p.m. Wednesday, July
17, at Citrus Springs Library;
2 p.m. Tuesday, July 23,
at Homosassa Library.
Questions about land-
scape, samples for plant iden-
tification or garden-related
problems are welcome. Mas-
ter gardener volunteers will
be available to address these
and other concerns regarding
anything related to home
landscaping.


For more information, call
the Extension Service at 352-
527-5700.

Workshop looks at
lawn care products
A workshop will be con-
ducted from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 16, at the Cit-
rus County Extension Serv-
ices Building, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, to
introduce participants to safe
pesticide mixing, application
methods, storage and
disposal.
Improper application of
lawn care products can injure
a landscape and be harmful
to your health.
Natural pest control meth-


ods, including mechanical
pruning, beneficial insects
and IPM will be discussed in
detail.
Sustainability of a land-
scape is a result of proper
planning, material selection
and proper maintenance.
To register, call Steve at
352-527-5708 or email
steven.davis@bocc.citrus.
fl.us.

Learn best methods
for gardening
A workshop will be held
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 20, at the Citrus County
Extension Services Building,
3650 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, to introduce garden-


ing best management
practices.
Successful gardening de-
pends on utilizing manage-
ment practices which have
been proven effective.
Florida-friendly Landscaping
Practices and the nine basic
principles encourage garden-
ers to practice proper meth-
ods of fertilization,
responsible pest manage-
ment and efficient watering,
while also conserving and
protecting natural
resources.
To register, call Steve at
352-527-5708 or email
steven.davis@bocc.citrus.
fl.us.
From staff reports


I


TerraL G iTst

REALTY GROUP


Speilzn n er it
-I&;retooRs.e
ww .T rai st e tGr upc m


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Rui i DFKFR 359.464.0647, SIJIAN Mill I FN 359.499.9213 VICToRl FRANKI IN 359.497.1777


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Terra Vista maintenance free villa featuring 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. This villa DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
This lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is the ideal place for any occasion, whether was built in 2006 with an open concept and all the stunning features such as glass block Exceptional Windward model Villa. 3/2/2 with den, split floor plan, separate
seasonal use, retirement, or full time living! From the sliders to the lanai master shower and all wood cabinets, plus horizontal blindsthroughout. Large luxurious dining room. Many desirable upgrades including exquisite wood flooring,
overlooking the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, master bath with glass block walk in shower and two separate vanity areas. You're Conan countertops, surround sound, plantation shutters, self cleaning, heated
this home has what you've been looking for. Let others maintain the exterior lovely screened lanai overlooks a beautiful pond and fountain. And with no neighbors pool. The panoramic view is spectacular of the 5th green on the Skyview Golf
while you enjoy the social life that comes with the social membership! behind you, a's the perfect placeto enjoy your morning coffee inthe fresh Florida air. All Course in the premier country club gated community of Terra Vista.
M LS 703807 ............................................................................................. $288,000 this plus Terra Vista's w orld-class am entities. M LS 702966 ............................ $238,000 M LS 359361 ..................................................................................... $ 2 8 3 0 0 0


L -

DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Terra Vista maintenance free villa. Popular Lantana model. Open
floor plan features formal dining, breakfast bar, 3rd bedroom can be
used for an office or den. Driveway finished with pavers for nice
curb appeal. Well maintained.
M LS 703425 .......... ................ ........................... $ 18 9 ,9 0 0


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Stunning pool home with a breathtaking view of the golf course. Perfect for
entertaining. Upgraded landscaping. Hardwood flooring throughout. Crown
molding, upgraded lighting fixtures and ceiling fans. Outdoor kitchen and so
much more. Come see the quality that went into this home.
M LS 700921 ............................................. .......................... $ 2 9 9 ,0 0 0


SINGLE FAMILY HOME
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS and walk butlr mak ths gourmet ktchn th3 BED, 2.5 BATH
Luxury and storage! With over
3600 sq. ft. of gorgeously
happened living space this
home has all the options. The
tall cherry cabinets, Conan
countertops, SS appliances
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS and walk in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook. The
Bright and cheerful maintenance free villa in this gated community of Terra massive formal living area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch
Vista. This light and bright 2 bedroom, 2 bath home with a den. Decorated with hardwood flooring which carries through to the spacious family room. Large master
all neutral colors Totally open floor plan with an expansion of tile leading to a suite w/sitg area & TWO walk-in closets, Split floor plan, Guest bedrooms w direct
triple sliding door that takes you to the extended lanai with lots of privacy. All bath access & huge walk in closets. A beautiful terrace garden and an oversized
combine to make this an outstanding Villa Value!!! 2 car garage with a separate golf cart entrance complete this fabulous home.
M LS 700224 ................................................................................... $ 2 1 4 ,9 0 0 M LS 700959 ..................................................................................... $ 4 5 9 ,0 0 0


EXCEPTIONAL ANDFABULOUS describe ths 3 bedroom ETACHED2 car garage. Brght

LAKEVIEW VILLAS
Beautiful
Maintenance free
Villa in Terra Vista.
2 bedroom, 2 bath,
EXCEPTIONAL AND FABULOUS describe this 3 bedroom 2 car garage. Bright
(plus a den), 3 bath, 2 car, 5375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive and open floor plan.
upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island Very open and spacious living area. Great for everyday living and
kitchen great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the entertaining. Close to all of the amenities so you can experience the
extended screened Lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. active lifestyle Terra Vista have to offer Move-in ready!
# 5375 ....................................................... ..................................... . . $ 2 3 0 0 # 3296 ..................................................................................................... $ 1 5 0 0


-I
TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD
Brentwood Town Home unfurnished 2 bed, 2.5 baths, 1 car garage.
Half bath downstairs. Lanai very private with no neighbors behind it.
Social Membership included.
# 1659 ............................................. .... ........... .... .............. .... .. $ 9 0 0


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 E3


GOT A
NEWS TIP?

* The Chronicle wel-
comes tips from
readers about break-
ing news. Call the
newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be
prepared to give your
name, phone num-
ber, and the address
of the news event.
* To submit story
ideas for feature sec-
tions, call 352-
563-5660 and ask
for Logan Mosby.
Again, be prepared
to leave a detailed
message about your
story idea.


ie s ......... .s.... o r M--
T^erra Vista& Brentwood Rentals! SociaMmrmrhi nculclwthalRetl






E4 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHIONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Volunteers turn out


to give helping hand


Learning Landscape gets needed maintenance

More than 160 volunteers from spite the hot day and multiple threats of
Seven Rivers Presbyterian rain, the hale and hearty volunteers
Church rolled up their sleeves to pressed on and applied 16 yards of mulch
perform community service throughout the grounds and
Saturday, June 29. UF/IFAS 0 learning landscape at the Cit-
Citrus County Extension was 1 rus County Extension building.
one of the fortunate sites that For those not familiar with
received volunteer help during the Florida-friendly Learning
the community service Landscape, it was developed
workday, by UF/IFAS Citrus County Ex-
A group of 17 volunteers took tension and features a collec-
time out of their busy sched- tion of six themed gardens
ules to help improve the entry- which convey landscape de-
way plantings at the Citrus Joan Bradshaw sign and maintenance ideas
County Extension building and FLORIDA- based entirely on the nine
the Florida-friendly Learning RIENDLY principles of the Florida Yards
Landscape at the rear of the FRIEND and Neighborhoods Program
Extension complex. LIVING (FYN). These principles in-
Led by three veteran Citrus clude: right plant/right place,
County Extension Master Gardener vol- water efficiently, mulch, recycle yard
unteers Jim Bruno, Chris McMillan waste, fertilize appropriately, control
and Ron Chaney teams weeded, yard pests responsibly, reduce
pruned, applied mulch and took care of
general horticultural maintenance. De- See HELP/Page E5


Inside...


F-

Herb storage
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E9
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E6
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Rocking chair is not a Stickley; sizing up a spice rack


Dear John: I bought a nized of the Stickley broth-
rocker at an auction a ers. He popularized the Arts
few years ago and and Crafts or Mission style in
was told it was a America during
1970s era Stickley the first part of the
It is black with 20th century
painted gold trim You have an
detail and a fruit English Windsor
scene also type of rocker The
painted on the B style is country
back of the seat. Sheraton with
How do I deter- black painted sur-
mine the value? I face and fruit
want to sell it stencil decoration
we are running John Sikorski on the crest rail.
out of space for SIKORSKI'S The Hitchcock
my estate and ATTIC Furniture Com-
auction sale finds! AIC____ pany popularized
- S. WE, Internet the style in Amer-
Dear S.WE: The rocker ica in the 19th century and
was not made by any of the continues in production
Stickley Brothers nor is the currently
rocker the correct style to be Your rocker was produced
considered a Stickley Gustav as a reproduction sometime
Stickley was the most recog- in the late 20th century. Po-


tential dollar value is catch-
as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have the
spice set in the enclosed
photographs. There are 15
pieces including oil and
vinegar bottles, rice, salt,
sugar, etc. On the bottom they
say #325, Germany -A. T,
Inverness
Dear A.T.: Your spice set
was made in Germany, as
marked, sometime during
the 1920s to 1940s. They were
produced in large quantities
by numerous manufacturers.
They are quite decorative
and display nicely, providing
a practical use. I think the
set would sell in the $50 to
$100 range.
DearJohn: I live in Crystal
River and have enjoyed
reading your articles in the
Chronicle. My twin sister


passed away last year and
left me a variety of pins,
brooches, and a couple of
bracelets; all are costume
jewelry There is no one to
pass them on to, as you often
suggest in your column. So I
need some advice on what to
do with these pieces.
My sister was the fashion-
able one and most of the
pieces are rather gaudy, to
say the least. Whatever you
can suggest would be greatly
appreciated. TD., Internet
Dear T.D.: Costume
See ATTIC/Page E5
This rocking chair was
produced in the English
Windsor style by the
Hitchcock Furniture
Company, probably in
the late 20th century.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

jewelry is a large specific cat-
egory of collector interest. I
would be glad to help advise
you on what to do with the col-
lection. Put the pieces in
small groups and take photo-
graphs. Make sure to examine
the backside and findings of
the pieces for maker's marks
and include a list of those
marks. Then I will finish the
story


Dear John: My wife saw
your May 26 article relative to
antiques in the Citrus County
Chronicle HomeFront. She
has an old antique stand of
her grandmother's. Would you
know someone in our area
who would be able to give us
a reasonable value for this
item? I have attached three
views of said item. Please ad-
vise. -A W, Internet
DearAW: You have a good-
looking wicker two-tier table.
It was likely made between
World War I and II, so it may
be close to 100 years old. It ap-


pears that the legs are not
ended out and in need of
repair.
Potential dollar value, as is,
is in the $100 range.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send ques-
tions to Sikorski's Attic, PO.
Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski&@aol. com.


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 E5

This attractive wicker
stand was likely
manufactured in the
early 20th century,
so it could be close to
100 years old.
Special to the Chronicle


HELP
Continued from Page E4

stormwater runoff, attract
wildlife and protect the
waterfront. The learning
landscape is open to the
public and serves as an ed-
ucational tool for those in-
terested in learning more
about Florida-friendly
landscape practices.
Sincere thanks are ex-
tended to Pastor Brandon
Lauranzon and the follow-
ing Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church volunteers:
group leader Ray Greene;
Gary Wright; Matthew
Wheat; Bill and Trish
Nicholas; Rob, Dana,
Drew and Erin Holberg;
John, Dotty, Susan, Jake
and Elizabeth Schedel;
Tom Koral; and Deidre
Novotruk. Joel Weinhold


also joined the group of
volunteers.
For more information on
volunteering at the
Florida-friendly Learning
Landscape, contact UF/
IFAS Citrus County Exten-
sion at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, re-
search and resources to
address youth, family,
community and agricul-
tural needs. Programs and
activities offered by the
Extension Service are
available to all persons
without regard to race,
color, handicap, sex, reli-
gion or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshawis
director of University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely pub-
lication of submitted material. The earlier Chroni-
cle editors receive submissions, the better chance
of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance
of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication
Wednesday.


-A



Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR

SA r=- Eli 111


CIRSSPIG


BEEL IL







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E2

Dear Sara: Where can one pur-
chase coconut oil? In one of your re-
cent articles, a reader mentioned
that she used coconut oil for her
feet, but she didn't mention where
she got it from. -Allison B., email
Dear Allison: Check health food
stores, Trader Joe's, Costco, Whole
Foods and Walmart. Many grocery
stores carry it. If you have trouble
finding it in the store, ask the
manager.
Dear Sara: I don't have curtains,
but I want to keep my room as dark
as possible for sleeping. White


OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


(,bLfAt 1187 N Hunt Club Dr
MLS 703368 $379,900
Custom 3bd/2ba home w/direct view of
Lake Pastor.
Directions: Terra Vista Blvd, R on
Fenway, L on Hunt Club, R at stop sign-
Hunt Club.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787


"7C 'J"J 5681 W Forl Drum Dr
MLS 703892 $225,000
Lovely 3/2/3 country style home. Private
backyard, pool.
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273

li


A-,o < L-" 4389 S LeWoods Dr
MLS 702204 $199,000
Spacious & updated 3/3/2 ranch home.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


poster board is the only creative
idea I can come up with, although it
is not quite large enough for some
of my windows. Any ideas? M.L.,
email
Dear M.L.: Thin Styrofoam insu-
lation can be used. You can cover it
with fabric if you don't want it to
look strange from the outside. You
can get it with a foil coating. Some
people use foil-covered cardboard,
too. There are various blackout/
darkening shades on the market
A sleep mask can be easier to
manage. Tempur-Pedic offers a nice
one. It's not the cheapest, but it has
an adjustable Velcro and elastic clo-
sure, and it contours to your face.
Dear Sara: I am going back to col-
lege in the fall, and I want to be


OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


1896 N Ravenwood PI
$ MLS 702755 $339,900
3bd/2ba home is perfectfor
entertaining...has spacious lanai &
outdoor area.
Directions: Terra Vista main entrance,
R on Fenway (roundabout), R on Eagle
Chase, L on White Oak, R on Ravenwood.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING





370 E Glassboro CI 20 4B
MLS 703822 $67,900
Completely furnished 2bd/2.5ba
townhome great location!
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


"'- MLS 702826 $144,90(
Meticulously maintained 3bd/2ba pool
home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


super-prepared. I have the summer
off from work and would like to
spend that time doing things that
will reduce my home workload
while I am in school next year I fig-
ure the more prepared I am, the less
money I will waste. I could use some
ideas on where my focus should be.
I already plan to cook and freeze
meals, and I hope to have around
150 meals at least mostly prepared.
We have two full-sized freezers, so I
have the space for this. I only have
one teenager at home at this point,
and no little kids. I am feeling over-
whelmed at what lies ahead, but I
suspect once I start and get into a
routine, that will change.

See FRUGAL/Page E10


S4AVA4 AL -*4 9,7IU O M1


PINE RIDGE Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. c a
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING


4,fiLL 400 E Dakota Ct
MLS 702580 $224,900
2bd/3ba pool home w/den on the golf
course.
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on
Dakota.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


?>aeg. 5278 W Yuma Ln
MLS 703898 $264,900
Absolutely Exquisite 3/2/2 with huge
lanai on private one acre.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


? 3422 N Buckhorn Dr i$t{ 172 W Doerr Path
MLS 355561 $299,000 MLS 701971 $249,900
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres. 2bd/2ba Villa overlooking the 5th Green
Bring your horses! of Skyview Golf Course.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


'"V 2178 W Snowy Egret PI
MLS 703006 $112,000
3bd/2ba home w/an extra private lot.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


-' 790 E Gilchrist Ct 27-2a
MLS 357670 $59,900
Very attractive and much sought after
ground level condo.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


0 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Real Estate DIGEST


Reulen
posts
new
record
Weston
Properties w
LLC is proud Myriam
Reulen
to announce Weston
Weston
that sales Properties.
agent Myriam
Reulen has closed more than
$1.5 million in sales this year.
Myriam is actively involved
in finding investment proper-
ties for overseas investors
and vacation homebuyers.
Her international connections
have put a worldwide spotlight
on her listings.
Call Myriam at 352-613-2644.


Gary
Baxley
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Karen
Baxley
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Baxleys excel
at ERA Realty
ERA American Realty &
Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
levels achieved by two of its
agents year to date.
Gary and Karen Baxley,
of the Inverness office, have
surpassed the $2 million mark
in closed sales volume thus
far in 2013.
ERAAmerican Realty is


proud to recognize the
achievements of these fine
real estate professionals.
Karen and Gary can be
reached at the Inverness of-
fice of ERAAmerican Realty
by calling 352-726-5855.
Prudential gets
new blood
Prudential Florida Show-
case Properties is very
pleased to an-
nounce that
Andrea Migli-
accio has
joined their
Pine Ridge of-
fice team.
Andrea has
lived in Citrus Andrea
County for 12 Migliaccio
years and has Prudential
years and as Florida
experience in Showcase
equestrian Properties.
and waterfront
properties, as well as income-
producing/commercial real es-
tate. Andrea can be reached
at 352-527-1820.
Agent
shines in
Citrus
Hills
The Vil-
lages of Cit-
rus Hills Karis
named Karis Geistfeld
Geistfeld the The Villages of
top sales Citrus Hills.
top sales
agent for June, 2013.
The Welcome Center for
the Villages of Citrus Hills is
located at 2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd. in Citrus Hills. Visit on-
line at www.CitrusHills.com.


r7 Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney0
Realtor ', A HOUSE Realtor@
302-3179 SOLD Name' 2879022
he olden irl WEEKS RETY, BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.022
IThe Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil Photos

6ww.lor6a hocas.roprtie-co


E6 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013


f- ,
1rol







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Decorating tips for a second home


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

A bungalow on the beach. A cabin
for weekend getaways.
Second homes, designed for relax-
ation, are often decorated with hand-
me-down furniture and other cast-offs
from the owner's main living space.
But, say interior designers, a bit of
creativity can transform a small va-
cation home into the perfect haven
- a place to combine family heir-
looms, funky flea-market purchases
and a few new pieces, with style and
on a budget.
"Second homes are all about the
three f's: family, friends and flea mar-
kets," says designer Brian Patrick
Flynn, founder of Flynnside Out Pro-
ductions. "There are really no rules,
but the one thing to keep in mind is
that second homes are the best place
to showcase your personality by fill-
ing them with one-of-a-kind pieces
packed with sentiment and history"
Some ideas for getting this laid-
back, layered style:
Mix and match
A mix of decorating styles is great;
just don't overload the space, says
HGTV host Sabrina Soto, a judge on
this season's "HGTV Star."
"Mixing in multiple elements can
create an overwhelming and clut-
tered interior," Soto says, so "avoid
over-accessorizing with knickknacks
and space holders."
See Page E13


Associated Press
A small bedroom designed by Brian Patrick Flynn, where
he mixed high-end and inexpensive items in a weekend
home. Flynn updated the floors with vinyl plank flooring
and had custom window treatments made from Schu-
macher chinoiserie fabric. But the 1960s bubble chair
and a 1970s wood dresser cost very little at the Long
Beach Flea Market. "The blend helps keep everything
somewhat fresh and current," he said, "but not feeling
like, 'I got this all from the same catalog.'"



1t Acre Upland, 69 Acres Wetlands/Marsh
L oated on the Homosassa River & Gulf of Mexico
Imme 31ale Access Io Iie GC ll of Ideal for Prvale Eslale, F-shing Camp
Mexico & Homosassa River Retreat, Boating, etc.
Breathtaking 360 Views Public Electric & Septic System in place
*4,0001 SF Building on Premises Last Asking Price $1.5 Million!
To be Sold to the Highest Bidder at or above $90.000!
Starts: Monday, July22@ 10AM Ends: Thursday, July 25 i 2PM


A living room
designed by
Brian Patrick
Flynn, where
he uses a
colorful red,
white and
blue palette
balanced by
wood tones
and muted
browns to
create a
rich, layered
look.
Associated Press


a- GITTA BARTH
Investors Realty REALTOR
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house.com





VILLAGES OF CITRUS HILLS -. -
Well known for an active Florida
NATURE LOVERS lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on I acre, open LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very floor plan, wood burning fireplace, a 2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
secluded and private setting- 1.. 1 and spacious covered community on Lake Tsala Apopka
seclu an private setting 1 you feel at home right Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture away A recent remodel included new floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
and mature oaks. Take the tour at paint and flooring, and A/C, range and privacy You will love to call this comfy
the garage door were replaced in 2012 house your home! MLS703427
ML $379,000 MLS700472 $142,500 $109,000





GET YOUR
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO GOLF CART READY!
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mitch Underwood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home m the center
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET of the back nine of the Pine Ridge Golf
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River Course might be your well-deserved haven
bridges to the Crystal River' Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River .... .,,. r...,i .... smart
windows; great income potential, tool $199,900 ,. .. ...
MLS 359564 $189,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! i. -,.41 $292,000






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acre lot in quiet neighborhood
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Ope and airy with the on
estate w/pool and separate apartment A lifesty Open and airy with te on Ambrdge Pt next to the Withlacoochee
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the At
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you State Forest and the trails but also very close to
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sq ft this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $122,000


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 E7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


p


I


'a'
cM---I^E


fl


.V


-J


LNf I


tilnrlie


DEAN FOSDICK
A, in tinitd I'r,,


Cilinllir herbs ire ill,'n ill the
hottest trends in .i rdeniinl The. jlso
J'e popllijllr onIl fiiii lies% 1ho pre-
ser\e fresh foods,. fir Ijter I ise
Nejrl.\ 71 percent of hoIile llnnerl
Jre 'ro\''illl Ilerl)s. se i'lld 'inll\ to
toiiijtoe'. sJIid LjiiI'en De\ille-HAtel,
j priod iit reseirc h ind test-kitcihen
s lentiut w\ ith iJjren HOIlie Brjndl.
\\ l lih iiiLilllLi tillre' tile dl siil: Bill
hiollle-clnlllnll' Mijiin Il's
At lest j third of thell (dr.\ jnd
store their herbs." she sjid
JidIlen is pI)\ Il iii'0re jttelltiin to
thjt tfj.t-eiIerLlll iiJrket b\ (e\elo|)p-
I nl ne\v re i |)pe. ne\v iiiethi o: f
plreser\ tlllon. Jilln nev pnl'O(ii(t.s for
s.lliort- ind loill'-terli'i store. Del ine-
Htjer sjid
\\len we .sk people wit t hlier)s
tlhe.'re LriO i lniL. the. tell iis No 1 is
ijsil. follo,1 ed bI dhi es. : Ialintr,:o lnd
dill." she s.jid "These ire ill ,Lreit for
j l nlll ilor to illejI \ ltliollt IISilll'
iIllll h i f jll s. it l
Pei'|ple ji : i jre II-i l hersl) in \N% sj\
the. Ihli\en't tr.litionjll. been used.
S.- HERBS Page E10


I "r' N


Of0'. L !,
SA'
;1~ ~ ~ A i i '*


S..


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W-


E8 SUNDA, JULY 7, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Basics of pruning


Oakleaf Hydrangeas LAND


Careful attention to detail is key


MLS


O akleaf Hydrangea, Hy-
drangea quercifolia, is a
large, deciduous woody shrub
native to eastern North America,
from central Florida north to New
England and west to eastern Texas
in cold zones 5 to 9 and
heat zones 9 to 1, accord-
ing to renowned Florida
botanist Gil Nelson. If
grown in afternoon
shade, it can thrive and
bloom well locally in our /
wet and hot summers in
heat zone 10. I have seen
it used as a specimen
plant in Coastal Maine
Botanical Gardens close Jane
to the New Brunswick, JAN
Canada border and in GAR
Toronto, Ontario, in the
city's Edwards Gardens.
This native hydrangea blooms well
in late spring about May to June in
our tri-county region, Citrus, Levy
and Marion. It becomes quite large in
three years, so may require pruning
immediately after the flowers fade.
As it flowers on last year's wood,
pruning in July gives the plant four
months to bush out and form woody
stems before the large, oak leaf
shaped foliage turns burgundy and
falls off in November or December
In winter the naked twigs have an
attractive form where songbirds like
to perch. The exfoliating, light-tan
and orange bark is a decorative fea-
ture most noticeable in winter.
Creamy-white flowers are clus-
tered in foot-long heads, 4 to 6
inches in diameter at the tips of last
year's twigs. If the shrub is old and
large or outgrowing its allotted
space, gardeners may want to reju-
venate it by sawing out a third of the
largest stems at ground level. (I use a
cordless Sawzall.)
The healthy root system will soon
send up new stems. Sucker shoots
may rise several yards from the par-
ent plant These can be allowed to
grow 6 inches tall and then be severed
from the parent and potted up to be
grown in a shady, irrigated, nursery lo-


cation ready for planting out in late
fall when dormant and leafless.
Gardeners may want to just re-
move all spent flowerheads, snip-
ping a quarter-inch above a leaf
node one or two down from the
bloom. Oakleaf Hy-
drangea will quickly
sprout pairs of new shoots
from nodes two and/or
three down from the cut.
These will grow and pro-
duce flowers next season.
To reduce the size or
create a smaller and
denser shrub Oakleaf Hy-
drangea can be cut a foot
Veber or two down from the
E'S spent flower The pruned
DEN stems are not suitable for
propagation, but do make
striking dried flowers. Cut
stems up to 36 inches long, snip off
the leaves and hang the stems to dry
upside down indoors. Once dry, the
flowers can be spray-painted to
match your decor or seasonal theme.
Pruning is a bit like cutting hair.
Look at the bush and decide what is
too tall and where stems may be get-
ting too large. Remove large stems
first and step back to study where fur-
ther pruning is desired. Next, remove
stems and flowerheads wanted for
drying. Then snip off all spent heads
to lower the overall size and shape.
Step back again and finally snip
off any errant shoots protruding be-
yond the shape you want. Remem-
ber, the plant will become four to six
times as dense and up to 2 feet taller
before next year's flowering season.
Even novice gardeners can under-
take pruning, providing they think
first and have an artistic eye.

Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY
MAW- 111 =V7li777 .P l~


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 E9


!
I
l






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERBS
Continued from Pap E8

said Daniel Gasteiger, author
of "Yes You Can! And Freeze
and Dry It, Too" (Cool
Springs Press, 2011).
"We're seeing a lot of infu-
sions and mixology," said
Gasteiger, from Lewisburg,
Pa. "People are getting into
herb-mixed drinks. I use
vodka infused with herbs and
garlic to flavor things like
Dijon mustard and creamed
noodles. You put a flamb6 on
it to burn off the alcohol and
it leaves the essence of the
herbs behind."
Herbal innovation also is
becoming more noticeable at
farmer's markets, he said.
"I've seen lots of herb jellies
being sold. Fennel, thyme,
rosemary and lavender."
Moreover, there has been a
surge in the sale of food de-
hydrators electrical de-
vices that remove moisture
from foods to aid in
preservation.
"Many people just want to
know what's in their food,"
said Meagan Bradley, a vice
president of marketing for


There has been a surge in the sale of FRUGAL


Continued from Page E6


The Legacy Companies,
which markets the Excalibur
line of dehydrators. "They're
using their own herbs and
dehydrating making sea-
sonings by grinding it up."
Food preservation is a
great way to stock up on es-
sentials, Bradley said from
her Miami office. "Maybe
they work long hours or they
want something to tide them
over during hurricanes," she
said.
Other things to remember
when preserving herbs:
Herbs are among the
easiest plants to grow, and
can be planted inside, on
window sills, or outside in
gardens or containers.
Herbs can be grown from
seed, making them
inexpensive.
Shelf life varies depend-
ing upon the type of herb, the
amount of moisture removed
and storage conditions.


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The best time to harvest
herbs for drying is just before
the flowers first open, when
they are in the "bursting bud
stage," the University of
Georgia's National Center for
Home Food Preservation
says. Gather herbs in the
morning to minimize wilting.
Many people dry or
freeze fresh herbs, while oth-
ers add them to vinegars, oils,
butters, alcoholic drinks, sea
salt, soaps and jellies.
Preservation in those cases
often involves short-term re-
frigeration or long-term
freezing.
Dry herbs are more con-
centrated and have a
stronger flavor than fresh
herbs. 'A recipe calling for a
tablespoon of fresh basil
would call for a half-
tablespoon of dried basil,"
said Angelica Asbury, a culi-
nary analyst with The Legacy
Companies.


food dehydrators electrical
devices that remove moisture from
foods to aid in preservation.


Some things I have already
thought of to get ahead:
Schedule all doctor appoint-
ments for the year.
Stock the pantry
Do any deep housecleaning that
will be needed.
Perform vehicle maintenance.
Get Christmas and birthday
shopping and wrapping partially
done.
Do you have any other sugges-
tions? CB., Vermont
Dear C.B.: You're doing well
preparing. When I went back to
school, I discovered the biggest chal-
lenge was family boundaries. Fam-
ily members tend to forget that you
need study time and that they need
to pull together with chores and re-
sponsibilities and be supportive.
You might want to seek out support
from other students in a similar
situation.
Streamline your day/week and es-
tablish a routine now so you're used
to it by fall. This will give you time to
adjust anything that isn't working
well, too.
mm.
If you don't have room for a full-
scale garden, try container garden-
ing. Focus on what you can do.

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Maybe start with a kitchen herb gar-
den, or regrow produce scraps such
as garlic, potatoes, leeks, ginger or
celery, to name a few.
The first reader tip shares more
ideas:
Window-box garden: If you have a
sunny windowsill, buy some window
boxes and plant seeds in them (you
can use gutters and hang them out-
side, too). I am growing spinach,
herbs and green onions, and I even
have a bok choy plant in my east
window. I'm even growing mini-
carrots! The bok choy and green
onions were started from food I was
not eating quickly enough. I picked
up my window boxes at the Dollar
Tree. -A.T, Idaho
Haircuts: I'm a barber with 18
years of experience, and I am ex-
cited about buying a CreaClip
(creaclip.com).
I cut men's and women's hair, but
I have never received a good haircut
myself. I've always been frustrated
that I cannot cut the back of my own
hair. I bet I can with this! TG.,
Arkansas
Toaster oven: We used a small
toaster oven for years. We even
made toast in it from time to time,
and we could cook a frozen pizza in
it if we cut it down the middle and
put half on each rack. We bought a
larger countertop oven that doesn't
make toast, but a pizza will fit into it.
If you have cast-iron frying pans, see
if there is one that will fit inside the
toaster oven and is a useful size for
you.
Lots of stuff can be baked in cast
iron. Corningware, Pyrex and alu-
minum pans work, too. Check out
Goodwill stores and garage sales if
you decide you need these or other
baking pans. S.D., Minnesota
Budget eats: Check the supermar-
ket cases for bags of bulk-packaged
chicken and fish. You can buy frozen
chicken breasts (sometimes individ-
ually wrapped) and fish filets (al-
ways wrapped) in 2-pound bags at a
very economical rate. I get 2-pound
bags of chicken for $4.99 and tilapia
filets for $6.99 per bag. This is just
about the cheapest way you can get
fish or chicken these days. They're
very easy to thaw, marinate and cook
however you like.
Sausages and brats are also cheap
eats. I look for the turkey ones, and I
buy a lot when they are on sale. A 1-
pound pack of turkey kielbasa has 4
moderate servings.


E10 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sisters band together to run dairy


AMY HANSON
HTR Media

NEWTON, Wis. Just
like the crops they grow, so
has the appreciation and
respect the Fitzgerald sis-
ters have for one another.
Now grown and mar-
ried, Stacy Klotz, 31; Kelly
Goehring, 42; and Julie
Maurer, 43,work together
in partnership with their
parents -Jim and Sandie
Fitzgerald to run Soar-
ing Eagle Dairy in
Newton.
"Ever since we were lit-
tle kids, we all pitched in,"
Klotz said. Whether it was
milking cows or picking up
another chore, the sisters
were kept busy on the
farm, which has changed
over the years. Their pa-
ternal grandfather, John,
who began by milking
eight cows by hand when
he was 18, later started the
farm with his son, Jim. The
farm is now home to 1,150
cows.
As they graduated from
high school, Goehring,


Klotz, and earlier their fa-
ther, took the 16-week
Farm and Industry Short
Course program at the
University of Wisconsin-
Madison following high
school. Goehring was the
first daughter to join the
family farm as a partner in
1997. Klotz and Maurer fol-
lowed in 2005.
"I've always enjoyed
working on the farm, tak-
ing care of the cows," said
Klotz who was involved
with FFA growing up,
along with Goehring. All
the sisters were into 4-H
and showing cattle at the
fair.
Goehring's connection
to the farm never wavered,
she said.
"I always liked the
farm," she noted. "I always
say cows don't talk back.
They kick, but they don't
talk back ... I've never left
the farm."
Maurer, on the other
hand, found herself look-
ing beyond the hay bales
for a different career path.
She spent 11 years as an


accountant before return-
ing to her roots.
"I had absolutely no de-
sire to farm when I left
high school," Maurer con-
fessed. "I was always told
that if I ever left there
would always be a place to
come back to."
Every two to three
weeks, there's a partner
meeting to discuss farm
business. There are two
other siblings Nick
Fitzgerald who has
worked steadily on the
farm for a year and Tammy
Madson who aren't cur-
rently partners. The cur-
rent partners have


decided that a two-year
commitment to working on
the farm is necessary be-
fore attaining partnership.
The farm has grown into
1,000 milking cows. Milk-
ings happen daily at
2 a.m., 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
"We all have things that
we're responsible for, but
they blend into each
other," Maurer said.
Goehring and Klotz deal
mainly with breeding,
calving and sick cows,
while Maurer fills in as
needed, but coordinates
employees, the parlor,

See DAIRY/Page E12


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FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

I typically cut one in
half and grill it, and my
husband and I share it. If
yours is a big eater, he
could eat half of the pack-
age himself, but it would
still be inexpensive. It's
also a good leftover for
lunches. I buy brand-
name turkey hot dogs on
sale when they go below
$1. They last a very long
time in the freezer. My
husband can get these out


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 Ell

and fix them himself
whenever he wants a
snack or quick lunch. -
C.H., Missouri


Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village
(www.frugalvillage. com),
a website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living To send tips, com-
ments or questions, write
to Sara Noel, c/o Univer-
sal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
St., Kansas City MO
64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


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E12 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013



DAIRY
Continued from Page Ell

supplies, Department of
Natural Resources re-
ports, land conservation
and contracts.
They all chip in on tasks
like picking rocks.
"When you're done, it's
the best feeling in the
world," Maurer said with a
sigh. She enjoys being a
part of the farm's
operations.
"Every decision you
make, you are the benefi-
ciary or not of that deci-
sion," she said. "Your end
product is so rewarding."
Working outside with the
animals and being a part
of food production are
"pluses" to Maurer.
"Every day is something
different," Goehring said.
"One day you come in and
you're treating a cow and
working with the vet, and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


the next crops."
Klotz enjoys "not sitting
in an office all day"
Of course, there's also
the occasional difference
of opinion to deal with.
"It happened the other
day, mom drove the tractor
away from me," Goehring
joked while describing a
disagreement that oc-
curred during a recent
rock picking.
"You have to learn to let
little things go," Maurer
explained. "With family,
you know what makes
them tick and ticks them
off'"
"It kind of just comes
down to talking it out and
sitting on it for a while,"
Goehring shared.
During their youth, the
sisters recall time spent
away from the farm was
not in abundance, but they
did have their moments.
"They were tied to the
farm almost 365 days (a
year)," Maurer recalled of


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Stacy Klotz uses a stethoscope to listen to a cow's four stomachs after it recently delivered a calf at Soaring Eagle
Dairy in Newton, Wis. Klotz, 31, and her sisters Kelly Goehring, 42, and Julie Maurer, 43, work together in partner-
ship with their parents Jim and Sandie Fitzgerald to run the dairy.


her parents operating the could have a quality of life,
farm. "There was enough though." The sisters re-
family involved that you membered trips to McDon-

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ald's after church and a
road trip to Florida, but
vacations were sparse.
"It's easier for us to take
a day off now," Goehring
said.
One thing making it eas-
ier has been advances in
the industry
"There's just so much
science and technology,"
Maurer noted. "That's
crazy information we
didn't have when we were
kids."
For example, the farm is
now able to rank cows by
genetic potential.
The farm went from uti-
lizing rubber mats and tie
stalls to converting to
sand-bedded free stalls so
the cows are able to walk
around, which created a
healthier environment,
Goehring explained.
"It's like living on a
beach," she said.
The sisters say life on
the farm taught them a
sense of responsibility and


work ethic.
"We all just learned to
work hard," Goehring
added. "Whether we went
out and stayed out until
midnight, we still had to
get up at 4 a.m."
They also learned from
their parents to give back
and help out when they
could thanks to their
Christian upbringing.
"We're fortunate that we
were brought up that way,"
Goehring said.
The sisters had a posi-
tive example of what was
possible for them in their
mom, Sandie.
"We're all very strong
and good dairy women. We
had an excellent female
role model growing up,"
Maurer said of her mother
who raised five children
while handling farm du-
ties including: bookkeep-
ing, driving tractor and
cutting hay "I think that's
part of what shaped us
all."


www.mypropertyhelper.com I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TIPS
Continued from Page E7

She also advises against
"grouping a certain style
in one corner and the
other style in another."
Go ahead and combine
two plaid chairs with a flo-
ral sofa, though. Kyle
Schuneman, author of
"The First Apartment
Book: Cool Design for
Small Spaces" (Potter
Style, 2012), recommends
mixing the scale of the pat-
terns but keeping the scale
of the furniture the same.
"So if you have a small
sofa, keep the side chairs
in that same scale. Then
with the fabric in the
room, for instance, use a
small pinstripe, a medium
plaid and a large graphic
pattern as your three mix-
ins. By keeping the pat-
terns in a different scale, it
keeps it from getting too
busy and fighting each
other for attention," he
says.
Color can also help one
piece stand out: Paint an
old wooden dresser a bold
yellow, Schuneman says,
then "keep the other
pieces muted with just tex-
tures of metals and
woods."
And even when styles
are drastically different,
Soto says, "consider their
color If they're in the same
color range, they'll fit per-
fectly together in one
space."
Flea market finds
Second homes are often
in small towns with week-
end flea markets and an-
tique shops. Flynn
suggests mixing your own
family hand-me-downs
(your grandfather's old
reading chair, say, or your
dad's collection of "Hardy
Boys" books, or a painting
made by a relative) with
flea-market purchases that
connect with your per-
sonal history
For the kitchen of his
weekend home in the Hol-
lywood Hills, for instance,


Associated Press
A living room by designer Brian Patrick Flynn, with art on the walls bought second-
hand at flea markets. The whimsical mix of paintings and prints provides a perfect spot
to hide a flat-screen television.


Flynn bought a vintage
Circle K sign at the Rose
Bowl Flea Market.
"I grew up in Fort Laud-
erdale, Fla., and spent a
ton of time at the Circle K
on weekends" getting
ready for the beach, he
says. "Every time I walk
past the dining room, I
kind of feel that carefree,
beachy feeling all over
again."
A vintage item picked up
for $5 can sometimes be-
come the star of a room.
"My living room walls
are completely covered
with flea-market art
picked up for next to noth-
ing. Best part? Everyone
always asks me what
gallery I source all of my
amazing art from," Flynn
says.
Blending old with new
can be fun: "In my bed-


room, I updated the floors chinoiserie fabric. But the
with white vinyl plank and 1960s bubble chair and a
custom window treat- 1970s wood dresser picked
ments made from high- up for $60 at the Long
end Schumacher Beach Flea Market are


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vintage," Flynn says. "The
blend helps keep every-
thing somewhat fresh and
current, but not feeling
like 'I got this all from the
same catalog."'
Maximize
small rooms
Second homes are often
small, so decorate with
that in mind.
'"A cluttered space will
always appear smaller,"
Soto says, so keep a
smaller room clean. She
suggests hanging shelves
to keep items off the floor,
and using mirrors to make
rooms appear larger and
brighter.
"Incorporate pieces
with dual purpose, such as
storage ottomans which
can act as seating while
concealing your clutter,"
she says. "Stacking chairs
or nesting tables are great,
too."
Schuneman agrees:
"Usually with a second
home you use it for relax-
ation and entertaining, so
keep the pieces double
duty Benches that can
work as side tables, poufs
that can work as extra
seating, and a desk that
can also work as a bar or
buffet at night."
Flynn's second home
doesn't have any guest
bedrooms, but he often
hosts friends there. Ceil-
ing-mounted draperies in
the dining room let him


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 E13

partition it off and use it as
a sleeping space for guests.
Local flavor
Schuneman suggests
filling your weekend home
with family photos but
buying the frames locally
- maybe something made
by an artist or craftsman.
"Also, bringing in local
flora like driftwood or
maybe a stump or natural
elements that bring the out-
side in really makes it feel
like a destination home,"
he says, "and for free."
If the home has a nice
view of mountains or
water, Flynn suggests
using a monochromatic
palette inside to draw the
eye outside. But if there is
no view, it's "ideal for
going crazy with color," he
says.
"Since I love the all-
American aesthetic, I
painted my walls and ceil-
ings a deep shade of slate
blue, then used tons of red
and white as accents."
Don't have a second
home?
"You don't have to actu-
ally have a second home to
create that warm, well-
worn, welcoming feeling"
in your main home, Flynn
says. "It's all about a great
edit, and just making a
space that makes you for-
get about work, forget
about bills and forget
about anything else except
rest and relaxation."


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E14 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds

hi *^'s! t it 1~ A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details



Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5% park like acres,
owner financing avail.
59k (941) 778-7980


For Sale %kg

Hernando
DWMH on land,Ready
to move in, Call me for
more information
352-795-1272
INVERNESS
2/1 SWMH w/add
(9x23) 1.5 ac with 20x40
concrete blk workshop.
$35,500 all reasonable
offers considered
706-473-2184
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807



DRASTICALLY
REDUCED
OAK POND MH
ESTATE (Hwy 44 E)
Inverness,
OPEN HOUSE
07/3-7/7 10am-5pm
2/2 Lovely home turn
key ready to move in
H(352) 726-0348
C(352) 586-3662
Lecanto
Lecanto Hills MH Park
55 + comm. 2/2 livdin,
kit, carport, rec.rm new
apple, furn, never rented
$11,500 352-228-4515
352-746-4648 manager
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!
I-*


-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounHtyHorneRentals.corn
CITRUS SPRINGS
8160 N. DualDr. ...............$1300
3/2/2 Pool home, fully furnished
CRYSTAL RIVER
1455 NW 21st St .................$775
3/2/1 Big yard, screened porch
1245 NE 2nd St..................$1100
3/2 Pool home cose to shopping
11770W. Sunnybrok..........$1300
3/2 Screen porch, boot dock on cnal
HOMOSASSA
1650W. Homosassa TrL #2 ...$500
2/1 affordable duplex
6312W.Park Dr........$......... 600
3/1/1 Freshly painted
145 Pine St.......................$1600
3/3/3 Beautiful Pool home in SMW
SJamaica St.......................$1175
2/2/1 Villa in SMW, clean bright rooms

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

2/1/1...............$650
2/1/1...............$625
2/2/1..............$700
2/2/1 .............. $700

4/2/2 .............$900
2/1.5 .............. $550

3/2 Doublewide..$700
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


-U
















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Studio Apt.
Furnished, All Util. W/D
Rm., Boat dock, cable
TV $650 mo $250 sec.
352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
Small 1BR w/Utilities
$375. mo., $500 sec.
352-563-1033 or
352-601-0819





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

HOMOSASSA
2BR, $500, incls. garb
& H20, no pets
352-697-0310



INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393


INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495./ mo.
(352) 447-6016

-i-

FLORAL CITY
RETAIL; 2 Storefronts
Corner of US 41 &
Hwy 48, 600sf &1,400 sf
$495. mo. & $695 mo.
813-310-5391



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio Effi-
ciency w/ equipped
kitchen. All util., cable,
Internet, & cleaning pro-
vided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 3/2, Manuf.
Home, Rent Possible
Own 352-795-0088



BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month in-
cludes basic cable &
lawn care. Call
746-3301
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 3/2 w/
Pool $1,200 incl'd soc.
mem. to all amenities,
yrd. maint. & wkly pool
service, avail. July 1st.
(352) 422-4086
CITRUS HILLS
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
$1,100.00
POOL. PETS OK
352-249-7919
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $875.
(352) 897-4447
or (352) 697-1384


CRYSTAL OAKS
3/2/2, pet invisible
fence $890 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299,
352-364-2073
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Rent or Lease
to Own. $750. mo.
352-220-3005
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. 3/2, $675 mo.
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo
352-212-4981
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2, Fenced Yard,
3864 S. Flamingo Terr.
$750. mo 352-382-1373
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown.
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND 3/2/2
includes, cable, water,
garbage $1000mth
352-804-9729
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $600-$700
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
2 Master BR, Dbl Gar.,
S/S Appl. $850/Mo.
352-302-4057



FLORAL CITY
3/1, 1,200 sf, Boat
Dock, Lrg. Lanai, oak
trees, priv., fenced,
perfect for retiree's
$725. mo. incls cable
& water 352-419-7063
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic/cottage all utilities
incld. $625 no smoking
352-422-2994


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


wof







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ema
FOR SALE BY
AUCTION




2,240 SF
Bldg
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. July 11,
12PM
Preview From 11 am
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com











CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf CoursCommunity
3/2/2 Sell for $49,995.
possible owner finance
/options 352-422-1284
or 352-634-3862




Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina
m,









Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish

HUGE HOUSE for Sale
3 Bedroom Possible 4,
2 Car Garage,
Carport, 2 Bath,
228 Monroe Street
(352) 464-2514




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity. $119K Cash
Deal posss rent opt)
352-804-9729


2BR, 1BA, + Den
Open Fl. plan, close to
shopping & town,
new roof, well wtr.
.44 acres $49,900 obo
OWR REALTY, John
352-653-7977
GOSPEL ISLAND
4BD/3BA & GARAGE
For Sale $92,000.
(941) 758-8719
(941) 524-6556









Great
Starter
Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
$2,500 down
$788. month
877-500-9517

INVERNESS
4/2.5/2 separate dinn-
ing. rm.office, Ig kitchen
patio, 2200 sq ft, move
in ready $182,500
352-220-1313

INVERNESS
Immaculate, former
model, 3/2/2, fenced
bk yd, $795 mthly,
1st, last,sec.
352-400-1501




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2CQG
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE

House for Sale
4 Bedroom 2 Bath
A/C Carport, Pool
2 Acres move in con-
dition, near schools,
4100 S. Fireside Way
352-382-5558


HOMOSASSA5+
DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com


TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY !




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

S=1 I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


#1 Employment source is

n'4()N--N1` I Clsifid


Fi#U Your t'rwup, Home-


Homes


(A
















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear..


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


- iHI


(352) 563-5966

CIlIH1)N (;l


C i [tr


Wa efr n


Homes


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. frontage
on golf course
$52,500. Call
352-638-0905










.ll


SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 E15


^Citrus Cou
Homes^^


^^^^^19








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* I: .] ...n u. .11. _"111(.
* ? _" F lU il .i
* I .il, P,,:I F.\ P. 1,

* Hi.h Ti,[ l:. .i n i hi pl..:J
Mii = V:*_4_7 $219,000
Jeanne 1 lW'illaid Pickel 352 212 3410
CtliusCoungi Sold coin


OPEN WATERFRONT 3/2/2 WITH
CAGED, INGROUND POOL/SPA




Ili: ASKING S198.000

h iel i,sing ii .n ,.nl l ,s i.',,










BLUE WATER AND BLUE SKIES
l j,,.If ir.. l.....




M11. i I- ii REDUCED TO $59,900
4sh for 4 ri. r. Bomit 6371 .90o r 201 1121


A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION






PaODiS- ,3522/27280
lI .i tii I ii ii'i, c2/p idini t c0l,


* I I.I I .h _' U.ll. _H'l.l l P .ii
* : 1.:. I.. 8 .1 Ti ..1 ,. .:.. :.i F i'ip
* lil. i.. i, F.:..:.ia 1.3i A I:
* VV.:.Il 9Ih.:.L, iil Ti h l ...i.
Mt i = 1lI:x. 35. $125,000
Jeanne it Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
it''it. CillusCounlnSold. comr


LOCATION AND CLASS .J ... I...



S .. II.. .... ,, il l I
1C7p Ah1ii San de' 352 476 8121 t p'o. 9o
IINOW del ,.2 tO .onl'lp 4. to, hi. =358119
1 NOW ONLY $179,000


VERY NEAT AND CLEAN

inI. 1 I I li I I ',.1 ,|plI1

Mit = 3-,.: l' ONLY $54,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


COMMERCIAL BUILDING

M H .jlini.it .11 Til p. i ...I _"_l i .I I
0..ca H ..jl ., j-1 :l j i i6i. 1

Mi =3 AI ..l $105,900
Call Jnim Moion at 422 2173 /oi a toui









$99,900 NOTHING LEFT TO DO!
.. ..i ..,,,,,, ,, ,,.....





AIp1 Ppa ,. 352634 1273


. .i I ,11 i .I I



Ml =/11iii:/'. $59,000
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 2123410
ii'i't'i. CiliisCounl Sold corn


THIS HOME OFFERS A LOT OF IMPROVEMENTS
THAT MAKE IT A NICE PLACE TO LIVE

I ..I d i 1 1. .ll 1.-1....I .1 .I 1 1...


rii: :i- ASKING $68,000


f* A 3_', ,: M .li .i ,, .', I l'i ,
* IV]:, ,. .:. M ni, la, i |
* M .- 1 11
MI_ =/ 1:lhI:l. $115,000
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 2123410
i n'r. CitiusCount Sold. corn


EXCELLENT
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Z....-1 I: I i :
Mi ii= h-I 3:i: ASKING $49.900
Cat Slkl.n Sl..al a. hig cIl 3? /? ?1? 071


TWO BEDROOM. 1.5 BATHS WITH
OFFICE OR STUDY PLUS DEN



i =-1, ASKING $48.900
Plt Dis 3522/2 7280


GOLF LOT CITRUS SPRINGS
AWESOME PRICE $8,900 FLAT

Mi = /ii'u :.:.
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202




4.E/25BAH2%A


4 BED/2.5 BATH/2 CAR
ON ONE ACRE!

Call ...n a l Fese 35326.1 ..i 9.l .9
I.,..Ii"j I,. 'l ...I6i ...:..', $123,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


CELINA HILLS
l, ,ll .. L, lr, i,.) ; ,p ) ,. ,.) l.h.



Mi ;ii $160,000
Call Jim Moiton 422 2173
to see this lovely home


COUNTRY LIVING AT ITS FINEST!


,iil li. II.. hi.- I I..- l ,
IIId l l I 1. I ,,"
I l. =/II' $239,000
Mail Paisons 352 634 1273


INVERNESS HOME AT A GREAT PRICE!
3359 E Muay, SI Inverness Floida 34453
* I -.I. :... i.i..) i



rii: = OFFERED AT ONLY S78.900
C1 fEi G ioI nji t J352 400 2635


ENJOY FLORIDA AT ITS BEST!
1 i. .Nl l ' ll h ll ,,i:l l I I. ,,.l -I,l

,l .'. .1 [ ...I1 1 I1 i~ll h fl l .3 lull ll .h
Mi =3`.: .1 $90,000
Call Doiis Minei 352 422-4627


WATERFRONT COTTAGE ON 2.4 ACRES
.In, I,.- h.-n II. , Ih ,I



i: = ".-ll ASKING $119.900
Pt Dio ,352212/280
i ,.. jpopng c2/p rdp.. com.


E16 SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013