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Citrus County chronicle ( June 24, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03165

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03165

Full Text

New laws: See what goes into effect Monday /A2


Showers, storms,
rain chance
70 percent.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next
morning


JUNE 30, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


Newspaper Serving Florida's


www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 327


W PP MD AWAT4


He is everything we are and everything we are not. He's an alien and an immigrant, a stranger
needing a home. He is a man, yet he is a super man, a simple country boy turned big city reporter and
a superhero with super powers and abilities "far beyond those of mortal men." Superman, the "man of
steel" sent to earth where he takes on the mantle of defender and champion of the helpless and
oppressed, continues to fight a "never-ending battle for Truth, Justice and the American Way."


In the beginning, the planet Krypton is about to explode. Noted
scientist Jor-L builds a spaceship and puts his son, Kal-L, into it.
Just as the rocket launches, Krypton explodes.
Kal-L, however, lands safely on earth, in the farm community of
Smallville, Kansas.
Jonathan and Martha Kent find the baby and adopt him, giving
him the name Clark.
As Clark grows, he slowly begins to realize he has super powers
(super strength, super speed, X-ray vision and invulnerability). His
adoptive parents also become aware of his powers and instill in him
strong moral values and teach him that his powers are to be used
for the good of others.
See Page A5


SIE A"SUPERMAN
CHANGES AS O UR
CULTURE CHANGES.
/ THE ONLY THING ABOUT
SHIM, IN FACT, THAT HAS RE-
SMAINED UNTOUCHED, INVIOLATE,
SINCE ACTION COMICS t*l HIT THE
STANDS IN APRIL- 1938 IS HIS MO-
TIVATION. THAT MOTIVATION IS AT
ONCE THE SIMPLEST OF THEM ALL-
AND THE HARDEST TO UNPACK: HE
IS A HERO. SPECIFICALLY, HE PUTS
THE NEEDS OF OTHERS OVER
THOSE OF HIMSELF AND HE
NEVER GIVES UP...HE'S NOT THE
\ HERO iE REL-ATE TO;
0 JHE'S THE HERO
,NEE BELIEVE IN."
GlenWeldon, author of "Superman:
The Unauthorized Biography"
Featu


Annie's Mailbox ......A10
Classifieds................D4
Crossword ..............A10
Editorial................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ...............A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........B3 3
M ovies ....................A 10
O bituaries ................A6
Together..................A16

1 i II I IIe Business:
6 84578 20075 0 One year later: Merger paying off/Di


Jim Blinkhorn is owner of 7th Inning Stretch
Sports Cards and Comics in Dunnellon.

QandA with Jim Blinkhorn, ownerof 7th Inning
Stretch Sports Cards and Comics in Dunnellon
Q After 75 years, do people really still
like Superman?

A: They do. We have people in here
every week, reading the monthly
serials. Right now Superman has several
running (monthly) titles "Superman,"
"Action Comics," "Adventures of Super-
man" and now "Superman Unchained."
People know the day the delivery truck
comes, and they're lined up at the door.
See Page A5

re content compiled by Nancy Kennedy / Chronicle
Photos by Matthew Beck / Chronicle


Excursions:
Dive into scallop season/A9


CMHS



facts,



plans


Expert: Dispute

won't hurt sale
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Josh Nemzoff has seen these
games of chicken before.
Nemzoff, who has made a ca-
reer brokering million-dollar
health care sales and mergers,
doesn't flinch with the squab-
bling over control of Citrus Me-
morial Health System even as
four companies
have made their
pitches to buy
or partner with
the hospital.
And while
both the Citrus
County Hospital
Board and Cit-
rus Memorial Ryan Beaty
Health Founda- CEO of Citrus
tion blame the Memorial
other for finan- Health System.
cial and legal
breakdowns that have sepa-
rated them since 2009, Nemzoff
does not believe it will hurt
chances for a sale or lease.
"I'm not nearly as concerned
about it," said Nemzoff, the
Pennsylvania-based consultant
hired by the CCHB to oversee
the transaction details. "This is
a pretty clear case. Everybody
on both boards understands this
See Page A7


Suitors have big

plans for hospital
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem's four suitors carry big
names, hefty wallets and plenty
of promises.
Three of the four say their
bids will reap the county mil-
lions of dollars in cash to pro-
vide health care for its indigent
community Millions of dollars
more are offered for capital im-
provements at the hospital,
which would keep its name re-
gardless of who buys or leases it.
The Citrus County Hospital
Board will hear from the bid-
ders HCA, Health Manage-
ment Associates, RegionalCare
Hospital Partners and Tampa
General Hospital at a 3 p.m.
July 10 meeting at the court-
house in Inverness. A fifth bid-
der, Community Hospital Corp.,
offered only consulting services.
Both the hospital board and
Citrus Memorial Health Foun-
dation board meet later in July
where each could agree on a let-
ter of intent with one of the bid-
ders. That is not a guarantee,
however, as the foundation is
not partnering with the CCHB
in the process because of lin-
gering financial and legal dis-
putes. Foundation members are
attending bid meetings to keep
apprised of the situation.
Here is a look at the bidders
and their offers for CMHS. In-
formation comes from their bids
and the summaries by CCHB


See Page A7


Inside:
See who's best in Citrus County


CITRUS COUNTY





HIRONICLE


HIGH
86
LOW
73


I I J


00


77-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New laws coming on power plants, drones, bongs


JIM TURNER
The News Service
of Florida

TALLAHASSEE The
state's $74.1 billion budget,
which will fund 114,481 po-
sitions, 3,955 more than in
the current fiscal year,
kicks in on Monday.
The fiscal package also
includes the first raise
those workers will see in
seven years.
At the same time, nearly
200 new laws approved by
the Legislature and signed
by Gov Rick Scott hit the
books.
The bills range from a
limit on the law enforce-
ment use of drones, to a
bill spelling out how
money is raised to build
nuclear power plants to
new rules for Citizens
Property Insurance Corp.
There also will be, come
Monday, a crackdown on
"cyberbullying," conver-
sion of low speed vehicles
into golf carts and a prohi-
bition on the sale of bongs.
A new law against tex-
ting while driving (SB 52)
doesn't take effect until
Oct. 1, while changes to
campaign fundraising (HB
7013) go into place next
year.
Here are highlights of
some of the bills taking ef-
fect July 1:
Education
HB 21: Requires the
Department of Education
to conduct background
screening for non-
instructional contractors
who will be on school
grounds, and creates a
statewide identification
badge for the contractors.
HB 209: Changes the
name of Lake Sumter
Community College to
Lake Sumter State College.
SB 284: Allows private
schools to be notified by
first responders about
emergencies and makes
sure public schools spell
out which agencies are
supposed to contact them.
HB 609: Cracks down
on "cyberbullying" in pub-
lic schools by expanding
what school districts are
allowed to punish at
school and when children
are not at school if the
non-school bullying affects
education.
HB 801: Changes guid-
ance counselors to certi-
fied school counselors.
SB 1664: Requires at
least 50 percent of a class-
room teacher's or school
administrator's perform-
ance evaluation be based
on the growth or achieve-
ment of the students under
their charge. The other
half would be based on
district-determined plans.
Teachers with less than
three years experience
would only be judged on 40
percent of their students'
performance.
SB 1388: Allows school
districts to create their
own instructional material
adoption process.
HB 7009: An omnibus
education package that
adds both new accounta-
bility measures and new
flexibility for charter
schools. High-performing
charters would be allowed
to boost their enrollment
annually, and the Depart-
ment of Education is
charged with proposing a
standard contract for char-
ter schools. Allows school
boards the ability to set up
a public "Innovation
School of Technology" that
could get much of the
same flexibility as charter
schools get if they use new
technology in instruction.
And bars students from
being taught by low-
performing teachers in the
same subject two years in
a row, though parents
could allow districts to ig-
nore that rule in the case
of extracurricular courses.
HB 7165: Moves the
state's voluntary pre-
kindergarten and school
readiness programs to the
Department of Education
and tightens accountability


Transportation
HB 55: Could help
head off lawsuits alleging
that auto dealers have en-
gaged in deceptive and un-
fair practices by requiring
customers to provide a de-
mand letter before they
can sue auto dealers. If
dealers pay the claims and
related surcharges within
30 days, they could not be
sued.
SB 62: Allows street-
legal, "low-speed vehicles"
to be reclassified as golf
carts, a move to reduce
registration and insurance
costs.
HB 93: Lets people
voluntarily contribute to
the homeless when renew-
ing a driver's license.
SB 606: Creates the
Northeast Florida Re-
gional Transportation
Commission for Baker,
Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Putnam and St. Johns
counties.
HB 4001: Abolishes the
state law requiring most
gasoline to include nearly
10 percent ethanol by re-
pealing the 2008 Renew-
able Fuel Standard Act.
Because of federal ethanol
mandates, the state action
is mostly symbolic.
HB 7125: An omnibus
transportation package
that: prevents ticketing
motorists as long as vehi-
cles come to a stop, even
after crossing the stop line,
before making legal right
turns on red; creates spe-
cialty license plates for the
American Legion, Big
Brothers Big Sisters and
Lauren's Kids, which is a
program aimed at prevent-
ing sexual abuse of chil-
dren; and bars left-lane
drivers from going more
than 10 mph below the
speed limit if they know
they are being overtaken
from behind by faster-
moving vehicles.
Insurance
and banking
HB 157: Allows insur-
ers to electronically trans-
mit insurance policy to the
insured.
HB 223: Lets property
and casualty insurance
policies and endorsements
be made available on an
insurer's Internet website
rather than being mailed,
if agreed to by the
customer.
SB 468: Exempts med-
ical malpractice insurance
from the state rate filing
and approval process for
some facilities and practi-
tioners and continues the
exemption of med mal in-
surance from the CAT
Fund assessment program.
SB 1770: The Citizens
Property Insurance Corp.
overhaul, less imposing
than initially proposed,
still prevents coverage for
new homes in high-risk,
environmentally sensitive
coastal areas, creates an
internal inspector general


Associated Press
Gov. Rick Scott speaks June 10 before signing a bill at
Hialeah Gardens Elementary School in Hialeah Gardens;
HB 113 makes it a third-degree felony for an adult to
knowingly distribute harmful materials to a minor on
public or private school property.


position, and a clearing-
house intended to shift at
least 200,000 policies into
the private market.
Environmental
and agriculture
HB 203: Prohibits
local governments from
regulating or charging
fees on certain farm
land under certain
circumstances.
SB 244: Allows water-
management districts to
enter into cooperative
agreements.
SB 336: Allows tourist
development tax dollars to
be used for the benefit of
certain not-for-profit run
museums or aquariums.
SB 444: Requires six
utilities in Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach
counties to end the prac-
tice of dumping treated
wastewater into the ocean
by Dec. 31, 2025.
SB 674: Requires ani-
mal shelters and animal
control agencies keep
more records on euthana-
sia and make them avail-
able to the public.
SB 948: Expands the
role of the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and
Consumer Services with
local utilities in water sup-
ply planning.
Law enforcement
HB 49: The "bong ban"
prohibits the sale of metal,
wooden, acrylic, glass,
stone, plastic or ceramic
smoking pipes, chillums or
bongs.
SB 92: Restricts the
use of unmanned aerial
drones by law enforce-
ment unless a judge issues
a warrant, there is a "high
risk of terrorist attack" or
officials fear someone is in
imminent danger.
HB 95: Declares that
money given to charities
by Ponzi schemers would
not have to be later re-
turned to victimized in-
vestors if it was accepted
in good faith.


SB 390: Prohibits or-
ganizations from holding
themselves out as veterans
service organizations if
they're not.
SB 454: Allows police
departments at state col-
leges to enter into mutual
aid agreements with local


law enforcement
HB 489: Requires rail-
roads to cover cost of con-
tinuing education for
railroad police officers
and adds penalties for as-
saulting the officers.
HB 875: Makes it a
crime to impersonate a se-
curity officer and allows
authorized security offi-
cers to detain trespassers
in some cases.
HB 1355: Blocks gun
sales to some people who
voluntarily admit them-
selves for mental-health
treatment.
Medical
SB 56: Replaces the
concept of Sudden Infant
Death Syndrome (SIDS)
with Sudden Unexplained
Infant Death, while alter-
ing requirements for train-
ing first responders and
protocols for medical
examiners.
SB 160: Requires the
Department of Health
waive certain licensure
fees for veterans.
HB 239: Allows op-
tometrists to prescribe
certain types of drugs.
HB 365: Allows phar-
macists to offer certain
types of complex drugs


known as biologicss" for
illnesses such as cancer.
SB 662: Allows doctors
to charge 112.5 percent of
drugs' average wholesale
prices a measuring
stick in the pharmaceuti-
cal industry and $8 dis-
pensing fees. Those
amounts are higher than
what pharmacies can
charge for providing med-
ications to workers-
compensation patients.
HB 1129: Intends to
protect infants born alive
after attempted abortions
by requiring health care
professionals to "hu-
manely exercise the same
degree of professional
skill, care and diligence to
preserve the life and
health of the infant" as
would be the case in a nat-
ural birth. It also requires
that infants born alive
after attempted abortions
be immediately taken to
hospitals.
a SB 1844: Is intended to
bolster the Florida Health
Choices program, a long-
planned online health
marketplace, by increas-
ing funding and eligibility
standards.
See Page A6


Employment
HB 655: Aimed at Or-
ange County where a 2014
referendum was planned,
the law locks local govern-
ments from requiring em-
ployers to offer paid sick
leave to workers. The law
also creates an Employer-
Sponsored Benefits Study
Task Force, which is di-
rected to analyze employ-
ment benefits.


e c r ins..wl \.wns, C 1.E O .:..:sm 1. leni., 1. I..nI.


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IiiT 1 I I I





IA ITT In I



1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer
in their lifetime.

Melanoma, the most common form of cancer
for young adults is fatal if left untreated and
1 in 58 will be diagnosed during their lifetime.

Routine screening and early detection of skin
cancer is key to treatment.


----------------- -- -- ------------------------------ ------- ---------
We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
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A2 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


STATE


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1- ,-.F I, "I, .. .. p ,- 1- 1 "I -.r II-.










STATE & LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Power line tree
work planned
Duke Energy crews will
be trimming, removing
trees and performing se-
lective herbicide applica-
tions in the right of way of
the transmission line that
starts at the Crystal River
area power plant and ends
at the Central Florida Sub-
station at 8797 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in
Wildwood.
The corridor is a 53-mile,
295-foot-wide right-of-way.
Work is scheduled to start
in the next few weeks.
Trees are a leading
cause of power outages.
The tree care practices help
minimize outages during
storms.
For more information,
contact Aaron Borgner at
352-254-0824 or aaron.
borgner@dukeenergy.com.
Help offered for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Services Department is
offering help for veterans
who have had their post-
traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been
denied during the past two
years should contact the
department. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health Center and have
been denied benefits
should contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment, contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office at
352-527-5915. A denial let-
ter and a copy of the com-
pensation examination from
Gainesville is needed. A
copy of the exam can be re-
quested from the VA med-
ical records or from the
primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about Citrus County Veter-
ans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/comm
serv/vets.
Pesticide workshop
scheduled for July 16
There will be a workshop
from 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 16, at the Cit-
rus County Extension Serv-
ices Building, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, to
introduce participants to
safe pesticide mixing, appli-
cation methods, storage
and disposal. Natural pest
control methods including
mechanical pruning, benefi-
cial insects and IPM will
also be discussed.
To register, contact Steve
Davis at 352-527-5708 or
steven.davis@bocc.citrus.
fl.us.
Holiday
CLOSINGS

Animal shelter
to stay open
All county government of-
fices will be closed Thurs-
day, July 4, in observance
of the holiday, with the ex-
ception of Citrus County
Animal Services. It will be
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Landfill will be
closed July 4
The Citrus County Cen-
tral Landfill will be closed
Thursday, July 4, in obser-
vance of Independence
Day. It will open as usual on
Friday. For more informa-
tion, call 352-527-7670 dur-
ing office hours or visit the
county's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Planning panel won't
meet Thursday
The Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development
Commission meeting has
been cancelled because of


the Independence Day holi-
day. The next meeting of
the PDC is 9 a.m. Thurs-
day, July 18, in Room 166
of the Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto.
-From staff reports


Maidhof doubly honored


Deceased county official awardedposthumously for springs protection


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

Inverness Family
members of Gary Maidhof,
the county's Operations
and Projects Officer who
died last year,
were presented
with an award for
his services at
Tuesday's com-
mission meeting
and also learned
of another honor
for his memory
"A beautiful Ga
passion flower Mal
and a gorgeous Florida
water scene," said Char-
lotte Maidhof, Gary's wife,
describing the watercolor
painting unveiled before
her by Charles Pattison,
president of 1,000 Friends
of Florida, making the
Community Steward
Award posthumously to


ar



Ii
d


Maidhof "for his many
contributions to springs
protection and conserva-
tion and for his inspira-
tional leadership in Citrus
County"
The original watercolor
Painting by Quincy
artist Dawn McMil-
lan depicted many
of Maidhof's
wildlife interests -
Sa gopher tortoise, a
butterfly and bats.
Charlotte Maid-
hof, accompanied
w by her son Aaron
hof Maidhof and
parents-in-law Walter
and Helen Maidhof,
thanked everyone in the
county who had given
her husband opportuni-
ties to pursue his lifelong
passions.
"This is an award the
entire county should be
proud of," she said.


Pattison said 1,000
Friends is a nonprofit
statewide membership
group that was created to
be a watchdog for growth
management programs in
Florida and to promote
smart growth options.
"Our award recipients
must reflect an innova-
tive approach to growth
management that's re-
sulted in major replica-
ble changes that can be
used elsewhere in
Florida," Pattison said.
"We are pleased and priv-
ileged to announce that
the late Gary Maidhof is
being recognized by 1,000
Friends 2013 Community
Steward Award. He was
nominated by the county
commission as well as
Gerry Mulligan, the pub-
lisher of the Citrus
County Chronicle."
Pattison said Maidhof


spent more than 30 years
with the county in many
areas of service.
"He was instrumental in
the development of the
county's comprehensive
plan, including the mana-
tee element, I believe one
of the few in the state,"
Pattison said. "He was a
valued member of the Gov-
ernor's Springs Protection
Task Force."
Maidhof developed
springs protection amend-
ments that were incorpo-
rated into the coastal rivers
and lakes management el-
ement and conservation el-
ement of the county's
comprehensive plan.
"The driving force be-
hind the county's adop-
tion of best management
practices regulations for
water protection, Gary
also jumpstarted the en-
deavor to get the city and


the county to work coop-
eratively on the central
sewer project in an envi-
ronmentally sensitive
area," Pattison said. "He
helped lead negotiations
for public ownership
of Three Sisters Springs,
protecting it from
development."
During the same meet-
ing, commissioners agreed
to assist the city of Crystal
River with $30,000 from
park impact fees to build a
public boardwalk with
viewing platform and
parking facilities at the
Academy of Environmen-
tal Science School on Fort
Island Trail. They also de-
cided to name the new
boardwalk in Maidhof's
honor.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


Fourth of July festivities kick off early

LEFT: Teams strain as the
tug of war contest gets
under way Saturday at the
Freezer in Old Homosassa.
The event was one of
many Saturday in Old
9J /Homosassa during the
annual Homosassa River
Fireworks Festival and
Poker run.

BELOW LEFT: Seth Tanner,
_. left, and Cody Quick, both
of Lakeland, struggle to
stay dry.

BELOW: Paul Howard of
Lakeland is the first
person to be pulled into
the pool filled with ice
water as teammates
A struggle to avoid being
. : pulled into the chilly drink
SP.. HN with him.

.i ,I .STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


Citrus High grad facing bone marrow transplant


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Those who know Rich
Archambault know he
loves stand-up comedy -
and he loves to read and
study
Studying at the Univer-
sity of South
Florida for his two
remaining classes
before medical
school was exactly
what he was doing
when he received
horrific news -
his aplastic ane-
mia was back and Ri
he also had Archai
myelodysplastic schedu
syndrome (MDS). bone r
Aplastic anemia trans
is a rare blood dis-
ease that affects about
1,000 Americans each year.
His bone marrow does not
produce enough red blood
cells, white blood cells and
blood platelets. Without
treatment, the disease is
fatal.
MDS is a group of disor-
ders and bone marrow
does not function properly
The blood-forming stem
cells in the bone marrow
fail to make healthy blood


1C
c
n
Ifm
sp
k
4F


cells.
Archambault, a 2004 Cit-
rus High School graduate,
is familiar with aplastic
anemia. He was diagnosed
six years ago.
"I was hospitalized for
two months then," Ar-
chambault said. "I was
doing really well
S until a few months
ago. I thought I had
relapsed. I went to
the hospital and
found out that I
also have MDS."
On May 14, Ar-
chambault was ad-
ch mitted to Florida
nbault Hospital in Or-
ed for a lando. He was re-
larrow leased this past
Dlant. week to make a
brief visit home before re-
turning for his bone mar-
row transplant.
"I know it's a risky proce-
dure, but I look at it like it's
a cure," Archambault said.
"If all goes well, a year
down the road I will be
back to normal. I won't have
to live my life cautiously"
Ideally, transplants take
place between perfect
matches siblings or par-
ents. However, no one was
a match.


His spirits are great. He has
had a few down days, but a
month and a half in the hospital
is hard.

Linda Archambault
Rich's mother.


"Six years ago they
found a match for him,"
said his mother Linda Ar-
chambault. "They have to
do some testing and set up
the donor."
Meanwhile, Archam-
bault has no health in-
surance, and is awaiting
approval of Supplemen-
tal Security Income. Dis-
ability was canceled
after he was released
from the hospital years
ago to return to work and
school since his blood
counts had risen.
Archambault is required
to wear a mask when any-
one is around to protect his
weak immune system from
infection. However, he
views his illness as oppor-
tunity, not an encumbrance.
"Before I became sick I
had no clue what I wanted


to do with my life," Ar-
chambault said. "It has put
me on to a path for going to
school for biomedical sci-
ence. I am two classes
away from graduating with
honors. I am hoping to go
to med school or as a PA
for either hematology or
oncology within the next
few years. I was hoping it
would happen after I got
out of college."
Archambault has signed
up to take online classes in
the fall while he is in the
hospital recovering from
his transplant In five years,
he plans to be working in a
hospital somewhere help-
ing others as a doctor or
physician's assistant.
"His spirits are great,"
his mother said. "He has
had a few down days, but a
month and a half in the


hospital is hard."
"Try not to feel bad for
me in my situation," Ar-
chambault wrote on the
Internet to his friends. "As
long as I'm alive and sur-
rounded by such wonder-
ful people, I'm in complete
bliss. Life isn't always easy
for anyone, but I'd rather it
be me in this bed than a
family member, kid, some
single mother out there or
anyone one of you. It's not
a matter of IF I'll make it
out it's a matter of WHEN.
And when I do make it out,
I plan on thanking all
of you face to face. Love
every minute. Love
everybody"
After Archambault's
transplant, he will be re-
quired to remain near
the doctor's office in Or-
lando for a minimum of
100 days.
To donate to Archam-
bault's housing and living
expenses during recovery,
go to www.gofundme.com/
39awn0, or call Linda Ar-
chambault at 352-464-3809.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.




A4 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday A number of unusual hap-
penings will elevate your hopes and
expectations in the year ahead. Just
when you think something important
isn't going to happen, you could be in
for the surprise of your life.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Cooper-
ation from your friends or peers will
prove to be essential to your success.
Happily, you won't have any trouble
getting the right people to lend a hand.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) The fresh in-
sights you seek can be realized
through brainstorming or a conversa-
tion with a friend in the know. Seek out
anyone who fits this description.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You
shouldn't have any trouble gratifying
your ambitious objectives. Make the
most of this wonderful cycle.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Generally
speaking, you should be able to get
along with most everybody you know.
You're likely to be most effective deal-
ing with people on a one-on-one basis.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You
often work in fits and starts, but not so
today. Whatever you set your mind to
doing should be completed to your
satisfaction.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) You
might find a need to share your feel-
ings and/or thoughts with friends.
Chatting won't be a waste of time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) There
are some hopeful indications you're
moving toward firmer ground in your
affairs. Any pressure you've been feel-
ing could be eased considerably.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Some
happy news could put you in a pleas-
ant mood and get you started on a pro-
ductive course of action.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) The
charitable way you deal with people
will yield you large returns down the
line.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -When it
comes to doing something with others,
the group will be looking to you to es-
tablish the program. Fortunately, it's
what you do best.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Some-
one you've always been able to rely on
will have something in mind without
you even having to ask that will
please you very much. You're lucky to
have such a friend.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Most
group involvements will work out well.
Engage with others in a shared inter-
est, and you'll be on top of the world.


ENTERTAINMENT


Baldwin apologizes to
gay group for tweets
NEW YORK Alec Baldwin
has apologized to a New York
City-based lesbian, gay, bisexual
and transgender rights group for
a series of tweets that could be
interpreted as homophobic.
Baldwin's messages were di-
rected at a newspaper reporter
who accused his wife of tweeting
during the funeral for the former
star of "The Sopranos" James
Gandolfini. Baldwin said in a
letter to GLAAD posted on its
website Friday his tweets didn't
have anything to do with "issues
of anyone's sexual orientation."
The former "30 Rock" star
said he's done political work with
marriage equality groups and in-
sists he wouldn't advocate vio-
lence against someone for being
gay.
GLAAD spokesman Rich Fer-
raro said Baldwin's language
was improper and his tweets
didn't reflect his "history of ac-
tively supporting LGBT equality."
Boston rocker owes
for failed lawsuit
BOSTON The founder of
the rock band Boston has been
ordered to pay a newspaper
$132,000 for the court costs it in-
curred in successfully defending
itself against his defamation
lawsuit.
Musician Tom Scholz
claimed the Boston Herald and
two reporters blamed him for the
2007 suicide of lead singer Brad
Delp. A Superior Court judge
dismissed his lawsuit in March,
saying it was impossible to know
why Delp killed himself.
Scholz's attorneys argued he
shouldn't have to pay court
costs. The judge said court rules
require it and such costs could
have a chilling effect on "free ex-
pression of ideas and opinions


Associated Press
Actors perform Friday with giant illuminated puppets during
an open air event in front of the Munich opera in southern
Germany. Munich is celebrating the 200th birthday of
composers Richard Wagner and Guiseppe Verdi.


by media defendants."
Herald publisher Pat Purcell
said Friday the decision is a re-
minder of "the harmful impact"
such lawsuits can have.
Boston peaked in the 1970s
and '80s with hits such as "More
Than a Feeling."
Rapper ordered to
etiquette class
PHILADELPHIA-A judge
has ordered a Philadelphia rap-
per to attend etiquette classes
and notify his probation officer
before taking any trips outside of
the commonwealth.
The Philadelphia Inquirer said
Common Pleas Court Judge
Genece Brinkley on Friday
gave Meek Mill, whose real
name is Robert Williams, an
Aug. 4 deadline to complete the
classes.
The orders came at a proba-
tion violation hearing for
Williams, who is on probation for
a 2008 gun and drug conviction
for which he was sentenced to
11 to 23 months in prison.
Prosecutors said his state-
ments on social media have
been followed by threats to his


probation officer from supporters.
The judge said Williams
needed etiquette classes to re-
fine his use of social media and
to help him explain his business
to the court.
'Duck Dynasty' stars
headed to Alcorn fair
CORINTH, Miss. -A&E's
cable network "Duck Dynasty"
stars Willie Robertson and
John Luke Robertson will par-
ticipate in the Alcorn County Fair
and Crossroads Arena's "Kids
and Family Day" on Sept. 21.
The Robertsons became stars
after their reality television series
began airing on A&E in March
2012.
The show, depicting the
everyday life of a West Monroe,
La., family who make duck prod-
ucts for hunters, became the
most-watched program in A&E's
29-year history when 9.6 million
people viewed the season finale.
Arena General Manager
Tammy Genovese told The
Daily Corinthian the Robertsons
should add something extra spe-
cial to the fair experience.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, June 30, the
181st day of 2013. There are 184
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 30, 1953, the first
Chevrolet Corvette, with its innova-
tive fiberglass body, was built at a
General Motors assembly facility in
Flint, Mich.
On this date:
In 1908, the Tunguska Event
took place in Russia as an asteroid
exploded above Siberia, leaving
800 square miles of scorched or
blown-down trees.
In 1933, the Screen Actors Guild
was established.
In 1972, for the first time, a leap-
second was added to Coordinated
Universal Time to account for the
slowing rotation of the Earth.
Ten years ago: Israeli and
Palestinian commanders shook
hands as bulldozers dismantled
checkpoints and Palestinian traffic
flowed freely in the Gaza Strip.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush signed legislation
to pay for war operations in Iraq
and Afghanistan for the rest of his
presidency and beyond, hailing the
$162 billion plan as a rare product
of bipartisan cooperation.
One year ago: Islamist Moham-
med Morsi became Egypt's first
freely elected president.
Today's Birthdays: Actress Lea
Massari is 80. Actor Tony Musante
is 77. Actress Nancy Dussault is 77.
Singer Glenn Shorrock is 69. Actor
David Garrison is 61. Actor-
comedian David Alan Grier is 57.
Actor Vincent D'Onofrio is 54. Ac-
tress Deirdre Lovejoy is 51. Actor
Rupert Graves is 50. Boxer Mike
Tyson is 47. Actor Peter Outer-
bridge is 47. Actor Brian Bloom is
43. Actor Brian Vincent is 43. Ac-
tress Monica Potter is 42. Actor
Rick Gonzalez is 34. Actress Lizzy
Caplan is 31. Olympic gold medal
swimmer Michael Phelps is 28.
Thought for Today: "I believe
the future is only the past again, en-
tered through another gate." Sir
Arthur Wing Pinero, English drama-
tist (1855-1934).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR I, HI LO PR I LC
NA NA NA r If6 71 1 .n 82 7;


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
South winds around 15 knots. Seas Gul
2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters tem
will have a moderate chop. Chance of
showers and thunderstorms today.


Ti


89 75 0.20 -- A NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusveda ly
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 86 Low: 73
Showers, storms, rain chance 70%


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 73
Showers, storms, rain chance 70%


TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 87 Low: 73
Showers, storms, rain chance 60%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/76
Record 100/62
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday trace
Total for the month 12.70 in.
Total for the year 18.80 in.
Normal for the year 23.23 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 65%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Grasses, Palm
Today's count: .06/12
Monday's count: 3.1
Tuesday's count: 3.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/30 SUNDAY 12:17 6:30 12:41 6:53
7/1 MONDAY 1:03 7:14 1:26 7:37
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:36 A.M.
S! MOONRISE TODAY...........................1:10A.M.
JUNE 30 JULY 8 JULY 15 JULY 22 MOONSET TODAY ............................2:06 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdl
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitka* 11:58 a/7:19 a /8:28 p
Crystal River* 10:19 a/4:41 a 11:02 p/5:50 p
Withlacoochee* 8:06 a/2:29 a 8:49 p/3:38 p
Homosassa** 11:08 a/6:18 a 11:51 p/7:27 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:41 a/8:10 a 12:50 p/9:44 p
11:11 a/5:32 a -- 7:06 p
8:58 a/3:20 a 10:16 p/4:54 p
12:00 p/7:09 a /8:43 p


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


BOCC C
Fictitiou
Meeting
Lien Not


Miscella
f water Surplus
nperature Surplus


36
aken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.40 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.04 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.61 NA NA
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.97 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION
o %V


)RECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


83 66
96 69
82 62 .01
92 72 trace
83 66 .28
10672
87 68
88 62
90 73
10070
82 70 .07
74 62 .14
80 63 1.14
89 73 .01
80 61 .16
86 71
70 64
77 60 .10
74 63 .28
89 74
79 63 .11
84 66 .01
97 77
86 57
77 68 .06
77 64
10274
84 66 .03
84 66
83 70
10780
75 63 .12
91 70 .01
11489
92 75
76 63
83 69 .01
88 69
68 61
77 63 .38
91 75
89 72 .06
89 65


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 88 72 1.80 pc 92 77
New York City 83 71 ts 83 71
Norfolk 88 71 .11 ts 84 73
Oklahoma City 93 76 pc 84 61
Omaha 80 62 pc 79 57
Palm Springs 12284 s 120 82
Philadelphia 88 70 ts 86 71
Phoenix 11891 s 116 91
Pittsburgh 78 61 ts 81 65
Portland, ME 74 63 ts 81 65
Portland, Ore 87 63 s 92 65
Providence, R.I. 81 69 .04 ts 83 68
Raleigh 85 68 .12 ts 86 71
Rapid City 82 59 pc 77 60
Reno 99 68 s 101 69
Rochester, NY 76 62 .38 ts 73 63
Sacramento 105 67 s 107 72
St. Louis 82 64 .40 ts 77 61
St. Ste. Marie 76 59 pc 77 52
Salt Lake City 10474 s 101 73
San Antonio 10877 pc 96 71
San Diego 80 68 s 80 70
San Francisco 84 61 s 77 59
Savannah 94 73 trace ts 87 74
Seattle 85 65 s 87 63
Spokane 75 64 .06 s 92 65
Syracuse 78 63 .13 ts 79 65
Topeka 86 65 pc 79 59
Washington 87 70 ts 86 73
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 121 Thermal, Calif. LOW 35 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/78ts
Amsterdam 70/58/pc
Athens 88/70/s
Beijing 88/70/c
Berlin 65/57/c
Bermuda 82/76pc
Cairo 98/69/s
Calgary 81/61/sh
Havana 86/75ts
Hong Kong 87/81/pc
Jerusalem 81/63/s


Lisbon 90/65/s
London 79/57/s
Madrid 94/61/s
Mexico City 70/54/ts
Montreal 75/63/pc
Moscow 88/62/pc
Paris 80/54/pc
Rio 75/68/sh
Rome 79/66/pc
Sydney 63/52/sh
Tokyo 79/68/sh
Toronto 73/61/pc
Warsaw 72/46/sh


LEGAL NOTICES




ommission................................ A5
s Name Notices.......................D6
Notices..................................... D6
tices............................................ D6
neous Notices..........................D6
Property.................................... D6


CITRUS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
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\\ \




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the
RECORD

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A commercial burglary
was reported at 8:02 a.m. Fri-
day, June 21, in the 5700
block of W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
A residential burglary
was reported at 9:39 a.m.
June 21 in the 8400 block of
W. Kimberly Court,
Homosassa.
A vehicle burglary was
reported at 12:36 p.m. June
21 in the 3200 block of N. Tal-
low Point, Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary
was reported at 5:17 p.m.
June 21 in the 6700 block of
W. Linden Drive,
Homosassa.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 7:49 a.m.
Saturday, June 22, in the 700
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Thefts
SA larceny petit theft was
reported at 10:28 a.m. Friday,
June 21, in the 700 block of
S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto.
SA petit theft was reported
at 1:18 p.m. June 21 in the
2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
SA petit theft was reported
at 2:43 p.m. June 21 in the
1800 block of N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
SA petit theft was reported
at 1:14 a.m. Saturday, June
22, in the 1000 block of
Mossy Oak Drive, Invemess.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 10:39 a.m. June 22
in the 400 block of E. Circle-
wood St., Invemess.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 1:09 p.m. June 22
in the 1900 block of N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
SA petit theft was reported
at 11:28 p.m. June 22 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 10:52 a.m. Sunday,
June 23, in the 7400 block of
W. Chassahowitzka St.,
Homosassa.
SA petit theft was reported
at 4:18 p.m. June 23 in the
1900 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:31 a.m. Thursday,
June 27, in the 5000 block of
E. Backner Lane, Invemess.
SA petit theft was reported
at 8:42 a.m. June 27 in the
100 block of N. Independ-
ence Highway, Invemess.
SA larceny petit theft was
reported at 9:16 a.m. June
27 in the 10300 block of W.
Yulee Drive, Homosassa.
SA petit theft was reported
at 4:36 p.m. June 27 in the
2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 7:20 p.m. June 27
in the 40 block of S. Colum-
bus St., Beverly Hills.
Vandalism
A vandalism was re-
ported at 2:57 p.m. Friday,
June 21, in the 400 block of
S. U.S. 41, Invemess.
A vandalism was re-
ported at 3:47 a.m. Sunday,
June 23, in the 60 block of S.
Tyler St., Beverly Hills.
A vandalism was re-
ported at 1:49 a.m. Thursday,
June 27, in the 8100 block of
N. Dyke Way, Dunnellon.

ON THE NET
Go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click
on the Public Infor-
mation link, then on
Arrest Reports.


SUPERMAN
Continued from Page Al

After the Kents die,
Clark decides it's time to
use his powers for the '
good of humanity He
fashions a costume for
himself and moves to Me-
tropolis, where, after
graduating with a journal-
ism degree from Metropo-
lis University, he works as
a reporter for the Daily 7th Inning St
Star(DailyPlanetin the Dunnellon ca
1950s TV series) when
he's not saving the world
from evil.
An abbreviated look at
Superman through the
decades:
When Superman en-
tered American pop cul-
ture in 1938, his creators,
Jerry Siegel and Joe
Shuster, gave their audi-
ence a crime-fighting
hero who would take on
corrupt businessmen and
dangerous working condi-
tions, crooked cops and
rigged prize fights. He
couldn't fly at first, but he
could jump really, really
high.
Enter the 1940s and
World War II. America's
villains, real and per-
ceived, grew scarier and
Superman's powers in-
creased to meet the need.
As time progressed, Su-
perman evolved into the
superhero we needed for
the particular era we
were in. During World
War II, Superman pro-
tects the homeland as the
men of the nation fight in
Europe and the Pacific.
Animated short films
shown in theaters have
Superman helping the Al-
lies win the war. In the
comics, he battles Nazi U-
boats and Japanese Zero "Man of Ster
fighters.
In 1947, he travels back man George
in time to meet William feature-lengl
Shakespeare, George 1951, "Super
Washington and Abraham Mole Men."
Lincoln. During the
During the 1950s, Su- through 198C
perman teams up with Superman te
Batman, meets Krypto the various anim
Superdog, Beppo the such as Aqua
Super Monkey and Batman and
Bizarro, his contrary, sorted super
twisted clone, fight crime o
He also finds his way to morning TV
the small screen in "The During the
Adventures of Superman" Kent leaves t
(1952-58) starring George for a job as a
Reeves as Superman/ chorman and
Clark Kent. George discovers he
Reeves committed sui- Kara Zor-L, v
cide in 1959. Power Girl. T
In 1964, Superman re- beats him in
veals his secret identity to 1970; he tean
President Kennedy Sadly, Marvel Comi
the issue didn't appear on Man in 1976o
newsstands until three ing lessons fr
months after Kennedy's mad Ali in 19
assassination, defeat alien i
Prior to that, TV Super- Also during



BLINKHORN
Continued from Page Al

Not all for Superman, but we get quite a
few.
Q What does a comic book cost these
days?
A. They've come a long way from 12
cents in the 1940s. A new one
today costs around $3. Old ones are
where the money is. Just a few weeks
ago, someone found a ratty copy of a Su-
perman comic book in a wall that sold
for $175,000. One with the first appear-
ance of Krypto (the dog) is probably
worth $1,000.
*Q Who generally collects Superman
comics?
*A. All kinds of people. We get a lot of
.guys in their 60s who are rounding


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
retch Sports Cards and Comics in
rries many Superman comics.


Associated Press
portrays Superman in Warner Bros. Pictures'
l.,


Reeves did a
th movie in
man and the

late 1960s
Is, a cartoon
eams up with
lated friends
aman and
other as-
friends to
n Saturday

1970s, Clark
he newspaper
TV news an-
1 Superman
has a cousin,
vho becomes
'he Flash
a foot race in
ns up with
cs' Spider-
and gets box-
'om Muham-
978 so he can
nvaders.
g the '70s, Su-


perman heads to the big
screen when Christopher
Reeve portrays him in
"Superman the Movie"
(1978) followed by "Super-
man II" (1980) "Superman
III" (1983) and "Superman
IV: The Quest for Peace"
(1987).
The '90s were difficult
for Superman. He loses
his traditional powers
and becomes a being of
electromagnetic energy
He dies in 1992 after bat-
tling a monster named
Doomsday, although he
doesn't stay dead, since
he marries Lois Lane in
1996.
At one point in the
1990s, Superman grows
his hair long and Clark
Kent sports a ponytail.
By the early 21st cen-
tury, Clark can see a living
being's "aura" and he be-
comes a vegetarian. By


out their collections from years ago. By
the time they're in their 70s, though,
they're usually downsizing, giving their
collections to their kids or grandkids or
selling them.
Q How has Superman changed
.through the years?
A. The new movie and the comics are
a lot darker, grittier In this day
and age, kids are into (games) like
"Halo" and "Call of Duty." You can't give
them a goody two-shoes version of Su-
perman. The Christopher Reeve (movie)
version, as much as you might like it for
nostalgia purposes, it's almost unwatch-
able today
The villains are more evil, and they've
got a harder edge to them. You've got to
give Superman something really evil to
fight anymore. Some of the early villains
were really hokey They'd never fly
today


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SUPERMAN STATS
* NAME: Kal-L (Kryptonian name), Clark Joseph Kent
(Earth name), Superman (Superhero name)
* BIRTHPLACE: Planet Krypton
* HOMETOWN: Smallville, Kansas
* OCCUPATION: Reporter, novelist and superhero
* CURRENT LOCATION: Metropolis, USA
* MARITAL STATUS: Married Lois Lane in December
1996
* HEIGHT: 6' 3"
* WEIGHT: 225
* EYE COLOR: Blue
* HAIR: COLOR: Black
* FIRST APPEARANCE: Action Comics No.1
(June 1938)


2005, there are two earths,
1 and 2, and Lois Lane of
Earth 2 dies. Kal-L fights
Earth 1 Superman until
Wonder Woman steps in
and ends the battle.
In 2006, Superman re-
turns to the big screen in
"Superman Returns," in
which he battles the evil
Lex Luthor who plots to
build a new continent
with remnant crystals of
the planet Krypton that


will wipe out most of
North America and Su-
perman, since the conti-
nent will be embedded
with Kryptonite, Super-
man's only fatal weakness.
This month, as the su-
perhero turns 75, he is re-
booted as the "Man of
Steel," this time revisiting
his origins, learning of his
destiny and smashes
through a lot of buildings
across Metropolis.


0630 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN, that the Board of County Commissioners of
Citrus County, Florida, sitting as the governing body of
the 2013 Country Oaks Road Improvement/Maintenance
Municipal Service Benefit Unit, will hold a public hearing
on Tuesday, July 23, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Board of
County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida to consider adoption of the:

NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENT ROLL FOR THE
2013 COUNTRY OAKS ROAD IMPROVEMENT/
MAINTENANCE MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT

to impose and provide for collection of a special
assessment on improved and unimproved, privately
owned properties located in the centralized 2013
Country Oaks Road Improvement/Maintenance
Municipal Service Benefit Unit.

The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem
assessment applies is as follows:


DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE AREAS


Country Oaks: Properties abutting the streets, roads
and common areas of that part of West Casa Terrace
from the north lot line of Lot 8, Block A to the north right-
of way line of West State Park Street plattedd as State
Park Drive), all of West Samson Lane and North Lida
Point lying within that portion of the Country Oaks
Subdivision.

The total cost of the improvements is approximately
$112,975.04. The total assessment revenue to be
generated within the entire service area, including the
financing costs and the collection costs (if there are no
prepayments) over the entire ten year period is
approximately $161,171.64. Property owners can chose
to pay a lump sum special assessment fee of $4,034.82
per assessment unit, or pay the special assessment fee
along with financing costs over 10 years on the property
tax bill as a non-ad valorem assessment. The estimated
annual road and drainage improvement assessment is
$575.61 per assessment unit. All affected property
owners have a right to appear at this public hearing and
to file written objections with the Board of County
Commissioners within twenty (20) days of the date of
this notice. Written objections or comments should be
mailed to the Board of County Commissioners, c/o Land
Section, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 205, Lecanto,
Florida 34461. A more specific description of the
assessment program is set forth in the proposed Final
Assessment Resolution which can be viewed following
publication of the July 23, 2013 BOCC agenda. The
preliminary Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Roll is
scheduled to be available for inspection on July 1, 2013
at the Assessment Coordinator's office in the Lecanto
Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite
#205, Lecanto, Florida, following adoption of the
Preliminary Assessment Resolution.

The assessments will be collected on the ad valorem
tax bill, as authorized by Section 197.3632, Florida
Statute. FAILURE TO PAY THE ASSESSMENTS WILL
CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE ISSUED AGAINST
YOUR PROPERTY WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS
OF TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY. The Board intends to
collect the assessment in installments, the first of which
will be included on the ad valorem tax bill to be mailed in
November 2013 by the County Tax Collector.

The public hearing is being held for the purpose of
receiving public comment on the proposed assessment
and collection of the assessment on the ad valorem tax
roll. All affected property owners have a right to appear
at the hearing and to file written objections with the
County Administrator any time prior to the public
hearings, or twenty days from this notice, whichever is
longer.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any
matter considered at this public hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record shall include the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the County Administrator's
Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the
TTY Telephone (352) 341-6580.

BY: JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OOFEAP OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


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SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 A5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Space Shuttle Atlantis on display


Mary
Bailey, 66
HERNANDO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Mary P
Bailey, age 66, of Her-
nando, Florida, will be
held 2:00 PM, Tuesday,
July 2, 2013 at the First
Presbyterian Church of In-
verness, Inverness, FL.
The family requests ex-
pressions of sympathy take
the form of memorial do-
nations to the Alzheimer's
Association 225 N. Michi-
gan Ave., Fl. 17 Chicago, IL
60601 r the First Presbyte-
rian Church of Inverness,
206 Washington Ave., In-
verness, Florida 34450.
Cremation will be under
the direction of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Bailey was born
February 4, 1947 in Lin-
coln, NE, daughter of
Harold and Lenore
(Dunker) Payne. She died
June 26, 2013 in Lecanto,
FL. She worked for Ozark
Airlines, Inc, Peoria, IL for
18 years; 13 years as
Reservations Manager and
then with the FPC Corpo-
ration, Wauconda, IL from
1996 -2007. She moved to
Hernando, Florida from
Palatine, IL in 2009. She
was an avid reader and en-
joyed cooking. Mrs. Bailey
was a member of First
Presbyterian Church of In-
verness, FL and Kirk of
the Lakes Presbyterian
Church, Mundelein, IL.
Survivors include her
husband, Don Bailey of
Hernando, FL, 4 sons,
Scott Bailey of Los Ange-
les, CA, Chris (Bree) Bailey
ofVernon Hills, IL, Donald
(Jessica) Bailey Jr and
Tim Bailey, all of Bend,
OR, brother, Ronald Payne
of Taiwan, sister, Virginia
Williams ofWaunakee, WI,
and 8 grandchildren, Grif-
fin, Brittany, Tanner,
Nicholas, Zachery, Cooper,
Quinton and Caia.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory




James
Hopkins, 78
BEVERLY HILLS
James H. Hopkins, age
78, of Beverly Hills, Fla.,
died Tuesday, June 25,
2013, at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 11 a.m.
Thursday, July 18, 2013, at
the Bible Baptist Church
in Crystal River, Fla.
Strickland Funeral Home
Crystal River, Fla., as-
sisted the family with
arrangements.


FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.


Jerrie Low, 84
INVERNESS
Mrs. Jerrie L. Low, age
84 of Inverness, Florida,
passed away Wednesday,
June 26, 2013 under the
loving care of Citrus
Health & Rehab in Inver-
ness, FL. She was born
February 10, 1929 in Chat-
tanooga, TN, daughter of
Herman and Mary (Vick)
Woods. She was a home-
maker and a member of
the VFW Auxiliary,
Inverness.
Mrs. Low was preceded
in death by her parents,
her husband, Howard J.
Low Jr (01/18/2010) and
son, Damon Low. Sur-
vivors include son,
Howard J. Low III, 2
daughters, Deidre Jensen
and Brenda Gates, all of
Inverness, a brother,
James Woods of TN, 7
grandchildren, and 16
great grandchildren.
Cremation arrange-
ments are under the direc-
tion of the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory Pri-
vate inurnment will take
place at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell, FL.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.

Barbara
Robinson, 79
HOMOSASSA
Barbara A. Robinson, 79,
of Homosassa, Fla., died
Saturday, June 29, 2013, at
Hospice of Citrus County
Private arrangements
are by Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness, Fla.

Helen
Turner, 90
INVERNESS
Helen E. Turner, age 90,
Inverness, died Friday,
June 28, 2013.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private
arrangements.

Joseph
Woods, 78
INVERNESS
Joseph W Woods, 78, of
Inverness, Fla., died Fri-
day, June 28, 2013, at Hos-
pice of Citrus County
Memorial services will
be at 4 p.m. Tuesday,
July 2, 2013, at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or fax 352-563-3280.



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Associated Press
VIPs file into the Space Shuttle Atlantis Exhibit on Friday at the Kennedy Space
Center Visitor Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The $100 million exhibit opened
to the public Saturday. Also on display is a life-size replica of the Hubble Space
Telescope and astronaut-captured images of the International Space Station.


LAWS
Continued from Page A2

Housing
HB 77: The "Florida
Residential Landlord and
TenantAct" allows a land-
lord to accept partial rent
without waiving the right
to evict, clarifies that
weekends and holidays
do not stay a sheriff's 24-
hour eviction notice, and
prohibits landlords from
retaliating against a ten-
ant who lawfully pays a
landlord's association
dues or complains of a
fair housing violation.
HB 179: Allows cer-
tain interest on deposits
collected in eminent do-
main proceedings to go to
property owners rather
than the government
HB 217: Requires
check-cashing companies
to report checks worth
$1,000 or more to a new
state online database. The
check cashing database,
intended to prevent work-
ers' compensation fraud,
is not expected to be
funded until 2014.
SB 342: Allows some-
one with a homestead ex-
emption to rent their
property out for 30 days
without losing their
homestead exemption.
Courts
SB 186: Clarifies that
foreign judgments issued
by U.S. territories are en-
titled to full faith and
credit in this state under
the Florida Enforcement
of Foreign Judgments Act.
SB 286: Allows a de-
sign professional, such as
an architect, geologist or
engineer, to be immune
from tort liability for dam-
ages occurring within the
course and scope of
the performance of a pro-
fessional services con-
tract under certain
circumstances.
SB 1792: The


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medical-malpractice bill
requires that expert wit-
nesses have the same spe-
cialties as the physicians
who are defendants in
medical-negligence cases.
HB 7015: Imposes the
more restrictive "Daubert"
standards for admitting ex-
pert witness testimony in
lawsuits, taking into ac-
count whether the expert
testimony is "based upon
sufficient facts or data;"
whether it is the "product
of reliable principles and
methods;" and whether a
witness has "applied the
principles and methods re-
liably to the facts of the
case." The change will
lead to Florida using the
same standards as are
used in federal courts.
HB 7083: The "Timely
Justice Act" that is in-
tended to reduce final de-
lays in carrying out the
death penalty The meas-
ure includes several
changes in the death-
penalty process. As an ex-
ample, the act requires
the clerk of the Florida
Supreme Court to notify
the governor when a
Death Row inmate's state
and federal court appeals
have been completed.
The governor would then
have 30 days to issue a
death warrant if the exec-
utive clemency process
has finished. The warrant
would require that the ex-
ecution be carried out
within 180 days. Scott's of-
fice has repeatedly con-
tended the law doesn't
"fast-track" the death
penalty process.
Utilities
HB 1083: Establishes
a permitting process for
natural gas to be injected
underground and stored
until it is needed.
SB 1472: Establishes
new benchmarks for elec-
tric utilities that want to
collect controversial fees
while planning nuclear-
power plants. The meas-
ure alters a 2006 law



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intended to encourage
more nuclear power.
Florida Power & Light
and the former Progress
Energy Florida (now
Duke Energy) have used
the law to collect hun-
dreds of millions of dol-
lars in pre-
construction nuclear fees.
Entertainment
HB 347: Allows about
20 small craft distillers in
Florida that annually pro-
duce less than 75,000 gal-
lons of spirits to offer
on-site sales. The bill im-
poses a two-bottle-per-
customer annual cap for
the purchases.
HB 623: Allows the
sale of wine in 5.16 gallon
canisters, which can be
tapped like kegs, allowing
easier sales of wine by the
glass in restaurants and
bars.
Government
SB 142: The term
"mental retardation" will
be replaced by "intellec-
tual disability"
SB 230: The governor
will be required to adopt
flag display protocol on
displaying the state flag
and for the lowering of
the state flag to half-staff.
HB 1285: Abolishes
the Tallahassee-Leon
County Civic Center Au-
thority and transfer its as-
sets and liabilities to
Florida State University,
with a provision that di-
rects a division of the De-
partment of Business and
Professional Regulation
to issue a special
alcoholic-beverage li-
cense for the civic center.
HB 1421: Allows some
hotels and motels in
Madison County to get a
special alcoholic bever-
age license.

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OOOF3RB




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EXPERT
Continued from Page Al

hospital's in serious trou-
ble. I'm confident these
boards will pick one of
these bidders and this will
get resolved."
The CCHB, which owns
the hospital and leases it to
the foundation to operate,
received four bids to buy or
partner with the hospital.
CCHB members will hear
from the bidders on July 10
and could have a letter of
intent with one of the bid-
ders by late July After that,
negotiations are expected
to take up to six months.
The foundation, how-
ever, is not a partner in the
process. Foundation mem-
bers are attending meet-
ings, but they refuse to join
the CCHB because of liti-
gation that still exists and
the foundation's belief that
the hospital board owes it
$4.2 million.
Both sides are at a stale-
mate. The foundation says
it will not agree to any sale
or lease unless the hospi-
tal board drops lawsuits
and makes the payment.
The hospital board says it
will make payments and
drop lawsuits only after
the foundation agrees to a
letter of intent with one of
the companies.
Hospital CEO Ryan
Beaty blames the CCHB
for the hospital's financial
woes. The hospital is in
danger of defaulting on a
2002 bond with SunTrust
Bank.
SunTrust has called in
the remaining $5.7 million
owed on the $10 million
bond with final payment
due April 2, 2014. While
Beaty said the hospital
should be able to cover
that payment, a bigger
issue is a bond covenant
that calls for the hospital
to have 65 days of cash on
hand or the amount it
would take to operate the
hospital with no additional
revenue.
If the hospital does not
have at least 65 days cash
on hand on Sept. 30, it
risks default.
Beaty said he is consid-
ering the hospital borrow-


ing money to pay off both
the SunTrust and another
bond. He said repaying that
total amount, about $14
million, would eliminate
the hospital's 65-day cash-
on-hand requirement.
Nemzoff said the best
way to avoid default is
signing a letter of intent
with a bidder sometime in
the next month or two. He
said without the possibility
of an imminent agree-
ment, companies may lose
interest in CMHS.
"These bids are on the
table. They're not going to
wait until November or
December," Nemzoff said.
"If nothing happens, these
bidders will get withdrawn
and they may or may not
reappear."
CCHB attorney Bill
Grant said if the founda-
tion doesn't choose a bid-
der by the end of July he
will ask Attorney General
Pam Bondi or even the
Citrus County Commission
- to intervene.
"We're looking for an ar-
bitrator," he said. "If they
can't make a deal, maybe
someone needs to come in
here and end this dispute
once and for all."
Beaty had little to say
about that.
"His answer is always to
sue," he said of Grant
Nemzoff, who said he
works well with Beaty and
his staff, said he doesn't
think either side will let
their differences ruin a
chance to save the hospital.
"I've seen this many,
many, many times before,"
he said. "At the end, there
will be a day of reckoning
for everybody"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


SUITORS
Continued from PageAl

transaction consultant
Josh Nemzoff.
HCA
Hospital Corporation
of America, or HCA, based
in Nashville, Tenn. Pub-
licly owned company
Owns 156 hospitals, in-
cluding 38 in Florida. No-
tably nearby it owns Oak
Hill Hospital in
Brooksville and the Re-
gional Medical Center at
Bayonet Point in Hudson.
Offer for CMHS: $133
million. The net, includ-
ing debt and pension obli-
gations, is $85 million.
Offer is to purchase or a
50-year, cash up front,
lease.
Elimination of hospi-
tal property tax.
$35 million in capital
improvements over five
years.
Current employees
would be kept on board.
Commitment to char-
ity care.
Maintain core serv-
ices for at least five years.
Would define "core serv-
ices" prior to the final
contract
Work with the Univer-
sity of South Florida to
bring residency training
to CMHS.
Agree not move hos-
pital out of Inverness
market.
No changes in the
medical staff bylaws.
Pay property taxes.
HMA
Health Management
Associates, or HMA,
based in Naples. Pub-
licly owned company.
Owns 71 hospitals in 15


states, including Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center in Crystal River
and Brooksville Regional
Hospital. It most recently
signed a letter of intent to
buy Munroe Regional
Medical Center in Ocala.
Two offers for CMHS.
One is an outright pur-
chase or long-term lease
for $120 million, which
would net $72 million
after the debt and pension
obligations. The other is a
joint venture with Seven
Rivers Regional for $70
million, or $17 million net.
Best option, the com-
pany says, is the joint ven-
ture. "The combined
organization would estab-
lish significant clinical
synergies ... that do
not exist today," the bid
states.
$50 million in capital
improvements over five
years.
Commitment to char-
ity care.
Retain all current
employees.
Pay property taxes.
Medical staff stays in
place.
REGIONALCARE
RegionalCare Hospi-
tal Partners, based in
Brentwood, Tenn. Pri-
vately owned company.
Partners with eight hospi-


Chronicle file
The Citrus County Hospital Board will hear from the
bidders for Citrus Memorial Health System HCA,
Health Management Associates, RegionalCare Hospital
Partners and Tampa General Hospital at a 3 p.m.
July 10 meeting at the courthouse in Inverness.


tals, none in Florida.
Offer for CMHS: $70
million partnership or
long-term lease, with net
of $51 million after debt
and pension obligation.
$30 million in capital
improvements over five
years.
$8 million to recruit
10 to 15 physicians over
five years.
Hospital managed lo-
cally with regional focus.
Expand services and
strengthen the Citrus Me-
morial brand name.
Pay property taxes.
TAMPA GENERAL
Tampa General Hos-
pital, based in Tampa.
Private, not-for-profit
charitable hospital.


Offer for CMHS: Affil-
iation with no cash.
Capital investment,
though the bid does not
state how much.
Will not assume debt
or pension obligation.
Hospital property tax
still required to continue
charity care.
Reduces hospital's
costs in support services
and purchasing.
Access to Tampa Gen-
eral's medical services,
such as trauma unit and
burn center.
No change in CMHS
employees or medical staff.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wrightat352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline.com.


CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL UPDATE

*The Hospital Board has launched a web site with
updates on our search for a partner.
The web site is www.careforcitruscounty.org
We encourage you to visit the site and register for updates!

SOn June 18, the Hospital Board met to review bids
from 5 healthcare organizations.

SOn July 10, the Hospital Board will see presentations
from bidders at 4:00 pm at the BOCC Chambers at
the Courthouse in Inverness.

PLEASE JOIN US! All members of the public are
invited to attend.


For more information:
www.careforcitruscounty.org


B E&A STAH MENTS ROG AT

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 A7










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Tension rises ahead of Egypt protest


Associated Press

CAIRO Organizers of a
mass protest against Egyptian
President Mohammed Morsi
claimed Saturday that more
than 22 million people have
signed their petition demanding
the Islamist leader step down,
asserting that the tally was a re-
flection of how much the public
has turned against his rule.
The announcement adds to a
sense of foreboding on the eve
of opposition-led mass demon-
strations that many fear could
turn deadly and quickly spin


out of control, dragging the
country into a dangerous
round of political violence.
The demonstrations planned
for Sunday reflect the growing
polarization of the nation since
Morsi took power, with the
president and his Islamist al-
lies in one camp and seculars,
liberals, moderate Muslims
and Christians on the other
There is a sense among oppo-
nents and supporters of Morsi
that Sunday's rally is a make or
break day. The opposition feels
empowered by the petition,
known as Tamarod, or Rebel,


but it offered no proof regarding
the figures. If verified, it would
mean that nearly double the
number of people who voted for
Morsi a year ago are now calling
for him to step down.
"Honestly, if (Sunday) is not a
game changer, we might all just
pack up our bags and leave,"
said Mahmoud Salem, a promi-
nent blogger known by his
blog's name Sandmonkey and a
vocal critic of the Muslim
Brotherhood, from which Morsi
hails.
While violence is likely in
such a tense atmosphere, Salem


said it would not play out in
favor of Morsi supporters be-
cause they will be outnumbered.
"They have alienated every-
body," he said. Even if no vio-
lence breaks out, Salem said
civil disobedience is expected
in a movement designed now
to "save the country"
Morsi's supporters, on the
other hand, question the peti-
tions, saying his opponents are
led by members of the ousted
regime of Hosni Mubarak who
are trying to orchestrate a
comeback and are instigating
violence.


Associated Press
An Egyptian protester holds an anti-
President Mohammed Morsi poster and
a red card with the Arabic word "Leave"
on Saturday during a protest in Cairo,
Egypt.


Traffic cameras bring village to a stop


Devices divide

tiny town

Associated Press

ELMWOOD PLACE, Ohio -
This little village had a big
problem.
Each day, thousands of cars -
sometimes as many as 18,000 -
rolled along Elmwood Place's
streets, crossing the third-of-a-
mile town to get to neighboring
Cincinnati or major employers
in bustling suburbs or heavily
traveled Interstate 75. Many
zipped by Elmwood Place's
modest homes and small busi-
nesses at speeds well above the
25 mph limit
Bedeviled by tight budgets,
the police force was under-
manned. The situation, vil-
lagers feared, was dangerous.
Then the cameras were
turned on, and all hell broke
loose.
Like hundreds of other U.S.
communities big and small,
Elmwood Place hired an out-
side company to install cam-
eras to record traffic violations
and mail out citations.
In the first month after the
cameras began operating, late
last year, 6,600 tickets went out
- more than triple the village's
population. Before some un-
suspecting drivers realized it,
they had racked up multiple
$105 citations they would learn
about when their mail arrived
weeks later Some 70 parish-
ioners, or more than half the
congregation at Our Lady of
Lavang Catholic Community
Church, were ticketed on one
Sunday last September
Soon, there was a Facebook
page promoting a boycott of the
village, a petition drive against
cameras, and a lawsuit against
the village that threatened to
wreck Elmwood Place finan-


Gov't probes Honda
brake problem
DETROIT U.S. safety reg-
ulators are investigating some
Honda Odyssey minivans be-
cause they can brake without
the driver pressing the pedal.
The probe affects nearly
344,000 vans from the 2007
and 2008 model years.
The National Highway Traf-
fic Safety Administration said
it has received 22 complaints
from owners about unex-
pected braking. In some
cases, the vans braked while
drivers were accelerating,
cutting the speed by up to 30
miles per hour. Five people
told the agency that dealers
found trouble in a steering
angle sensor in the electronic
stability control system.
The agency said it has no
reports of crashes or injuries.
Investigators will determine if
the problem happens frequently
enough to seek a recall.
Two missing after
storms bring floods
FORT PLAIN, N.Y. -Two
people are missing after
heavy rains inundated the
northeast and led to severe
flooding in some areas.
Officials said a woman in
upstate New York's Mohawk
Valley is unaccounted for after
her mobile home was washed
away by rising waters Friday in
Fort Plain. A number of other
nearby communities also ex-
perienced flash flooding.


Associated Press
TOP: Catherine Jones, sitting
outside her restaurant, is among
many small business owners
worried that the cameras have
given the village a speed-trap
stigma. BOTTOM: A pair of traffic
cameras are aimed on Vine
Street, in Elmwood Place, Ohio.
RIGHT: Holly Calhoun, standing
across the street from a tower
of speed cameras located near
the Elmwood Quick Mart she
manages, in Elmwood Place,
Ohio, doesn't believe the
devices installed in the village
were about safety.
cially Four council members
resigned. And an atmosphere
of distrust and uneasiness hung
over a village that traced its
roots back to the 19th century
"I think Elmwood Place
tried to do something, but
maybe not in the right way,"
said Catherine Jones, who
brought a chair and small table
out ofher namesake Southern-
style restaurant on a recent af-
ternoon and sat in the sun as
she read her Bible.
She recalled a pedestrian was
hit and killed last year a couple
of blocks from her restaurant,
near an elementary school. She
understood something had to be


done. Now she is among many
small business owners worried
that the cameras have given the
village a speed-trap stigma.
Supporters of camera en-
forcement said they stretch law
enforcement resources, and
they usually result in safer
driving and thus save lives. Op-
ponents see cameras giving
governments a way to grab
more money from taxpayer
pockets, putting local policing
in the hands of remote, for-
profit companies, and taking
society another step toward an
Orwellian state of constant sur-
veillance for misbehavior
Holly Calhoun doesn't be-


Nation BRIEFS

Motion filed


- :





Associated Press
Less than 24 hours after California started issuing
marriage licenses to same-sex couples, lawyers for the
sponsors of the state's gay marriage ban filed an
emergency motion Saturday asking the U.S. Supreme
Court to step in and stop the weddings. Kim, right, and
Rachel Hadley were among dozens of couples to marry
Saturday at City Hall in San Francisco.


Heavy rains Thursday and
Friday caused the Mohawk
River and other waterways to
overflow. At Little Falls, the river
reached more than 3 feet
above flood stage late Friday
morning before receding, the
National Weather Service said.
Authorities in central Penn-
sylvania said an 86-year-old
man was swept into a rain-
swollen creek Thursday while
trying to retrieve an ATV.
Lightning injures 3
at summer camp
INDIANAPOLIS Indi-
anapolis police said three
children were injured when


lightning struck a summer
camp on the north side of the
city, including one child who
was critically hurt.
Officer Kendale Adams said
the critically injured child was
taken to Indianapolis St. Vin-
cent Hospital, but the child's
condition wasn't immediately
known. The other two were
taken to Riley Hospital for Chil-
dren in stable condition.
Witnesses told police that
the children were injured
when lightning struck shortly
before 2 p.m. Saturday at the
Goldman Union Camp Insti-
tute, a Reform Jewish sum-
mer camp.
-From wire reports


lieve they were about safety in
her hardscrabble village.
"Elmwood was just doing it
because they needed money,"
said the manager of Elmwood
Quick Mart.
Former county prosecutor
Mike Allen filed a lawsuit
against the town. Among the
plaintiffs: the Rev Chau Pham,
who said church attendance
dropped by a third after that
Sunday when so many congre-
gants were ticketed; and David
Downs, owner of St. Bernard
Polishing for 25 years, who said
longtime customers had vowed
to shop elsewhere because
they had been ticketed.

World BRIEFS


Gov't to punish
offensive remarks
ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada
- Legislators in Grenada
have approved a bill that
makes it a crime to offend
people through websites such
as Facebook and Twitter.
The measure was ap-
proved as part of an elec-
tronic crimes bill passed late
Friday in the tiny eastern
Caribbean island.
According to the bill, a
complaint about offensive on-
line activity would be filed
with police. Ajudge would
then decide if the message
was offensive.
Obama meets with
Mandela family
JOHANNESBURG -
President Barack Obama and
first lady Michelle Obama met
privately Saturday with the
family of Nelson Mandela.
The meeting was held in
Johannesburg at the Nelson
Mandela Centre of Memory,
which is part of the former
South African president's
foundation.
It lasted for about a half
hour, enough time for a small
crowd to gather outside in
time for Obama's departure.
The White House didn't say
which Mandela family mem-
bers the Obamas met with.
The president and first lady
will not meet with the ailing
94-year-old Mandela, who is
hospitalized with a lung infec-


Scorching

heat

blisters

Southwest

Associated Press
DEATH VALLEY, Calif.
- Scorching heat blistered
the Southwest on Saturday,
where highs between 115
and 120 degrees were ex-
pected for parts of Arizona,
Nevada and California
through the weekend.
Forecasters said tem-
peratures in sunbaked Las
Vegas could match the
record of 117 degrees Sat-
urday Phoenix also was
expected to hit that mark,
matching the record for
June 29 set in 1994. And
large swaths of California
sweltered under extreme
heat warnings, which are
expected to last into Tues-
day night and maybe
even longer
Dan Kail was vacation-
ing in Las Vegas when he
heard that the tempera-
ture at California's Death
Valley could approach 130
degrees this weekend. He
didn't hesitate to make a
trip to the desert location
that is typically the hottest
place on the planet.
"Coming to Death Valley
in the summertime has al-
ways been on the top of my
bucket list," the 67-year-old
Pittsburgh man said. "When
I found out it might set a
record I rented a car and
drove straight over If it goes
above 130 I will have some-
thing to brag about"
The forecast called for
Death Valley to reach 128
degrees Saturday as part
of a heat wave that has
caused large parts of the
western U.S. to suffer


Protesting in Turkey


Associated Press
Protesters walk past riot policemen Saturday during a
demonstration in Istanbul, Turkey. Thousands of
protesters returned to Istanbul's Taksim Square
demanding justice for a demonstrator slain by police fire
during demonstrations that have swept Turkey this
month. Police later forced the protesters out of the
square, pushing them back using their shields.


tion. The White House said
that decision was made in ac-
cordance with the wishes of
Mandela's family.
Four killed in
helicopter crash
BERLIN Four men in-
cluding the 62-year-old pilot
have died in a helicopter crash
in southem Switzerland.
Police in the Italian-speak-
ing canton (state) of Ticino
said the helicopter with six
people on board crashed
after clipping a boulder as it
was taking off from a granite
quarry near the town of Lo-
drino early Saturday.
The co-pilot and a passen-


ger survived.
Shooting, bombing
kill 11 in Iraq
BAGHDAD Bombs and
a shooting targeted a market-
place and off-duty policemen
in Iraq on Saturday, killing at
last 11 people in the latest at-
tacks by militants seeking to
destabilize the country.
Iraq has been experiencing
one of its deadliest waves of
violence, raising fears the
country is heading toward a
new round of sectarian con-
flict like that which pushed it
to the brink of civil war in
2006 and 2007.
-From wire reports







E Travel & Leisure



EXCURSIONS __
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
































_~-f _--- .. -_-


Scallop season is officially open and area boaters are starting their engines. The hunt will bring travelers nationwide to the
Nature Coast for hopes of harvesting scallops in the Gulf of Mexico. However, the question is whether scallops received the
memo to show up or not. Therefore, hiring local licensed guides or businesses is the popular preference for many who are
unfamiliar with location and legalities of the recreational sport. The following is a list of a few of the dozens of guides and
businesses available:


I1., ,,. .

a ..

---i


_; $~ .',-:
...- ..-. C"

'I1 e

^^*-


rp


Adventure Center
at the Plantation
Exploration begins immedi-
ately on Kings Bay as the trip
continues into the Gulf of
Mexico. They offer scalloping
package options including
accommodations and
breakfast.
They are located at 9301 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal
River. Contact them at 352-
795-5797.
Riversport Kayaks
They provide free snorkel
equipment to those interested
in joining them on one of their
daily charters.


They are located at 5297
South Cherokee Way, Ho-
mosassa. For more information
contact them at 352-621-4972
or visit http://www.fla
kayak.com/location/.
River Safaris and Gulf
Charters
They suggest taking a water-
proof camera along for the trip
as the world beneath the water
is photogenic. They offer
guided scalloping trips, which
are approximately four to six
hours long.
They are located at 10823 W.
Yulee Drive, Homosassa. For
more information contact them


at 352-628-52222 or visit
http://www.riversafaris.com/
homosassa-scalloping-
fishing.html.
Red Ed's Adventures
Scallopers can enjoy a scenic
route on the Homosassa River
on their way to the Gulf of Mex-
ico. They offer cleaning of the
scallops dockside. They also sup-
ply license, coolers, ice and in-
structions, in and out of the
water. What you'll need to
bring is snorkel, mask, fins,
drinks, food and sun
protection.
For more information, con-
tact Capt. Red Ed at 352-382-


3939 or email him at
RedEd@Homosassa
Redfish.com.
Barnes Charter Service
Capt. Lex Barnes is a third-
generation fishing guide in
Citrus County. He offers a four-
hour river tours, snorkeling or
scalloping trips. His company
has partnered with the Planta-
tion Inn for discounted rates
for customers.
Barnes is located at 7730 N.
Hargrove Point, Crystal River.
For more information, contact
Barnes at 352-634-0435 or
email him at capt.lexbames
@earthlink.net.


- Feature content compiled by Eryn Worthington / Chronicle
File photos by Matthew Beck/ Chronicle


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(GOL) 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf AT&T National, Final Round. B
L 59 6 5 4 5 ** "Loving Leah" ** "The Lost Valentine" (2011, Drama) "Banner 4th of July" 2013, Drama) Brooke Frasier PG Frasier'PG'
S59 68 59 45 54 (2009) MJennifer Love Hewitt, Betty White. 'NR' White, Mercedes Ruehl." M
The Out List (In Stereo) '"The Watch" (2012, Comedy) Ben Stiller, True Blood Eric is irate. Family Tree Family Tree True Blood Eric is irate.
lHB 302 201 302 2 2 'MA' VinceVaughn. (In Stereo) 'R' (N) MA' MA MA' MA'
Fight True Blood Real Time With Bill True Blood "The Sun" *** "The Dark Knight Rises"(2012) Christian Bale. Batman faces a
i 303 202 303 Game Maher'MA' 'MA' masked villain name Bane. (In Stereo)'PG-13'
(HGTVI 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters HuntIntl HGTV Star (N)'G' Love It or List It, Too Hunters |Huntlntl Hunters Hunt ntl
Modern Marvels'PG' Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Mountain Men "Winter Mountain Men "Last Ice Road Truckers "Ice Swamp People "The
fiST' 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' PG' Strikes"'PG' Chance" (N)PG' Rodeo" (N) 14' Reape' PG
S"Rumor Has It..." ** "Morning Glory" (2010) Rachel McAdams. Drop Dead Diva (N) Devious Maids "Setting ** "Morning Glory"
E 24 38 24 31 (2005)'PG-13' Premiere. 'PG-13' 'PG the Table"'14' (2010)'PG-13I
S1 "Stalked at 17" (2012, Suspense Taylor ** "She's Too Young" (2004, Drama) Marcia "A Girl Like Me: The Gwen Araujo Story"
M )N 50 119 Spreitler, Jamie Luner. (In Sereo)'NR Gay Harden. (In Stereo) B (2006) Mercedes Ruehl.'NR'B
"Sherlock Holmes:A *+ "The Sitter"(2011) Jonah Hill. "The Apparition" (2012, Horror) ***- "Heat"fllI Crime Drama) Al Pacino,
IX 320 221 320 3 3 Game of Shadows" (In Stereo)'R'B Ashley Greene.'PG-13' 1 1-....- I1..-I,,.. i, :tereo)'R'
(MSNBCJ 42 41 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Lockup: Colorado Lockup: Colorado
Wild Justice "Born to Wild Justice "Caught Wild Justice '14' Ultimate Survival Life Below Zero (N) 14' Ultimate Survival
109 65 109 Kill" 14' RedHanded" 14 Alaska (N)PG' Alaska 'PG'
NiCKI 28 36 28 35 25 Sanjay ISponge. Sam& Sam & See Dad IWendell ** "LookWho'sTalking"(1989)s Friends |Friends
(Wi) 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next
Y 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' B
S** "Payback" (1999) ** "Lawless" (2012, Crime Drama) Shia Dexter"A Beautiful Ray Donovan "The Bag Ray Donovan "The Bag
ISHOW) 340 241 340 4 Mel Gibson. LaBeouf. (In Stereo) R' BDay"'MA' or theBat"'MA' orhe Bat"'MA'
S 732 1 73 Lucas Oil Off Road SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR Ultimate Street Car My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
SPEE 732 112 732 Racing (Live) Tunnel Victory L. InvitationalCar TV'PG'
,- Bar Rescue "Hogtied Bar Rescue A western ** "The Expendables" (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone. Mercenaries "Universal Soldier:
37 43 37 27 36 Ham's"'PG' bar.'PG' embark on a mission to overthrow a dictator. (In Stereo) 'R' Regeneration" (2009)
0 21 **30 "Total Recall"(2012 Science Fiction) Magic City"Adapt or Magic City Adapt or *** "Premium Rush" (2012) Magic City
370 271370 Colin Farrell. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Die"MA' Die MA'B Joseph Gordon-Levitt. 'PG-13 'MA
I 3 3 Inside the Sport Flats Class Shipe Srtsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Rays Fishing Shape TV Adv Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue'G'
Continuum "Second Covert Affairs An unfa- Covert Affairs "Glass Covert Affairs Covert Affairs "Let's Covert Affairs "Rock'n'
(YFYJ 31 59 31 26 29 Skin"'14' miliar situation. '14' Spider (N) '14' "Suffragette City" (N) 14' Dance" (N) '14' Roll Suicide"'14'
ITBS1 49 23 49 16 19 JoeDirt IBigBang BigBang BigBang *** "The Hangover" (2009) 'R' "Joe Dirt" (2001) David Spade.'PG-13'
I 169 53 169 30 3 "Sweet November"(1968, Comedy- **** "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" (1945, ** "It Happened in Brooklyn" (1947, Musical
169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Sandy Dennis. 'NR' Drama) Dorothy McGuire. 'PG' Comedy) Frank Sinatra.'NR' B
Dual Survival "Misty Dual Survival "Belly of ,i : i.. i Naked and Afraid: Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid:
IC 53 34 53 24 26 Mountain Drop" 14 the Beast"'14' I Uncensored'14' (In Stereo)'14' Uncensored'14'
(TLC 50 46 50 29 30 Untold Stores of ER Breaking Amish: Long Is Longls Long Island Medium Breaking Amish: Long Island Medium
350 261350 "Twilight- "Spy Kids: All the Time in the *** "The School of Rock" (2003, Comedy) "The Three Musketeers" (2011, Action)
350 261 350 Dawn World" (2011)'PG'B Jack Black. (In Stereo) 'PG-13 Matthew MacFadyen.'PG-13'
*** "The Bourne Identity" (2002) *** "The Bourne Ultimatum" (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Falling Skies (N) '14' Falling Skies '14'
) 48 33 48 31 34 Matt Damon.'NR' Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. PG-13 B (DVS)
TOON 38 58 38 33 -*** "Surf's Up" (2007, Comedy)'PG' Teen Looney King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland |Fam. Guy Burgers Fam. Gu
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Destina Destina Wat Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Grills Gone Wilder Men vs. Monster
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Lizard Lizard Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage Storae Storage
T(LJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Cleveland The Soul Man'PG' Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls
n NCIS "Left for Dead" (In NCIS "Ee Spy" (In NCIS The severed leg NCIS "One Shot, One NCIS "Untouchable" (In Burn Notice "Brothers
47 32 47 17 18 Stereo) PG' Stereo) G' of a corpse.'PG' Kill"'PG' Stereo)'PG' in Arms"'PG'
W 117 69 7 SI: Miami "Open CSI: Miami "Shock" (In CSI: Miami Gang mem- CSI: Miami "One of Our CSI: Miami "Rio" (In CSI: Miami "Free Fall"
117 69 117 Water"'14'" Stereo)'14'B bers.'14' Own"'14'" Stereo)'14' '14'
WGNOAJ 18 18 18 1 8 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Relay **"Species"'R'


Is customer


service dead?


earAnnie: Is cus-
tomer service a
thing of the past?
I recently went to a
drive-through window.
After repeating my
order numerous times, I
saw that the youth run-
ning the window was
chatting with his co-
workers. When he
brought my order out, it
was still incorrect, but
he was more
interested in
continuing
his conversa-
tion than fix-
ing it. I
finally be-
came frus-
trated and
gave up, and
he yelled _
that I could
scrape off
the incorrect ANN
contents my- MA
self. I found AIL
this totally
unacceptable, so I
parked and went to
speak to the manager.
Meanwhile, the young
man continued to make
rude remarks about my
order to his friends and
then yelled that, yes, he
was talking about me.
Last Friday, I went to
the deli at the grocery
store to order some
luncheon meat, only to


I
.I


be told that the woman
in charge was not cut-
ting any more meat that
day. When she turned
her back on me, I asked
the manager what time
the deli closed. I was
told that it was still op-
erating for another
hour.
Is it asking too much
for employees to do
their jobs? Why do I
have to go to
management
in order to get
decent serv-
ice? Tired
of Poor Cus-
tomer Service
Dear Tired:
Complaining
to the manager
is the proper
way to handle
this. Some em-
E'S ployees under-
s t a n d
X customer serv-
ice, but others
have no clue and need
to be trained. If man-
agement does not de-
mand appropriate
behavior, you won't see
it in the workplace.
Forcing the manager to
address these failures is
the way these employ-
ees learn.
Unfortunately, some
of them take a very long
time to get it.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Fast & Furious 6" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D.
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters University" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG)
In 3D. 10:30 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"White House Down" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No
passes.
"World War Z" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"World War Z" In 3D (PG-13)
10:20 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Fast & Furious 6" (PG-13)
12:10 p.m.


"The Heat" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13)
11:50 p.m., 2:55 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG)
11:45 a.m., 2:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters University" (PG)
In 3D. 4:55 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
No passes.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:45 p.m.
"This Is The End" (R)
11:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"White House Down" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"World War Z" (PG-13) 2:10
p.m., 5:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
No passes.
"World War Z" In 3D. (PG-13)
12 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 8 p.m.
No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Like some wines
6 Young lady
10 Org. cousin
15 ---relief
18 Freight
19 Interment
21 Drumming Beatle
Ringo -
22 Give off
24 Inert gas
25 Nonacid
26 Glue
27 Round dance
28 MGM's lion
29 Insignia
31 Whinny
33 Casino employee
35 Punta del -
37 Not up and around
38 Spook
39 Ardent
40 Son or daughter
42 Nearby
43 Depend
44 Relating to cats
46 Entire
47 City in Egypt
48 Farmer in the-
52 Harangue
53 Portrayed
54 Cue
56 Sticky stuff
57 Girl in old comics
58 Twosome
59 Young cod
60 Scarlett of "Gone with
the Wind"
62 Wharf
63 Did a gardener's job
65 Color
66 Stiff
67 "- a boy!"
68 Paddy plant
69 Racetrack shape
71 Harbor towns
73 Soaks flax
75 Poem
76 Spin
77 Mil. address part
78 Gratuities
82 Lid
84 A single time
85 -and bear it
86 Shooting marble
87 Scuffle


90 DDE, familiarly
91 Venturesome
93 Wraparound
garment
94 Terre -
95 Torn piece
97 Instance
98 of Troy
99 Like Methuselah
100 Idea
102 Severe
104 Dying down
105 Entreaty
107 Cereal plant
108 Aflower
109 Straightforward
110 Mother-of-pearl
112 Bearing weapons
113 Corpsman
114 Kind of word puzzle
117 Unkind
118 Strong wind
119 Pale
123 Brewed
beverages
124 Player
125 Invaders from Mars
127 Calendar abbr.
128 Abbr. in footnotes
129 Domed dwelling
131 Pressing
133 Smell
135 Actress
Blanchett
136 Edible bulb
137 Team spirit
138 Back tooth
139 French article
140 A little crazy
141 Lots of
142 Paradises


DOWN
1 Weighing device
2 Merchandise
3 Rye fungus
4 The "I"
5 Musical sound
6 Pondered
7 Annoyed
8 Thailand, formerly
9 soda
10 Have a goal in sight
11 Phase
12 Obi


13 Scrap of food
14 Sideboard
15 Acted
16 Soap plant
17 Warning device
19 Blather
20 Nebraska's capital
23 Tangy
30 The Pine Tree State
32 Facilitate
34 Work unit
36 Pastry item
38 Sluggish
39 Monstrous one
41 Skin
42 Disagreeable task
43 Great French writer
44 Limited
45 Borgnine or
Hemingway
46 Complain
47 Beget
49 Mild oath
50 Traditional
learning
51 Cash advance
52 Ungulate animal
53 Plate
54 Oar
55 Plunder
58 "- and Prejudice"
59 Used with others
61 Emcee
63 Demonstrate to be
true
64 Swallowed
66 Incorrect
70 Tayback or
Morrow
71 County in
Louisiana
72 Think
74 Begone!
76 Coin ofa kind
79 Type style
80 Mom or pop
81 Playground item
83 Sign on a door
85 Seize
87 Boutique
88 it a day
89 Ill-mannered
90 Metallic element
92 Bitter
93 Old Roman statesman
95 Tempest


Put on the payroll
Mata -
Special event
Dull
Toward shelter
Dilate
Los -
Musical group
Take out
Abbr. in


timetables
- and Cleopatra"
For the most part
Actor Guinness
Of one's birth
Quartz variety
Go quickly
Gather
Pilfered
Person


Light and leap
Dismounted
Taj Mahal site
Identical
Wildebeest
CD--
Pole


Puzzle answer is on Page A12.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Today' MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


A10 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New officers


Special to the Chronicle
The 2013-14 officers for Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart were installed during the chapter's annual picnic celebrating Armed Forces Day. The
installing official was Nancy Weaver, wife of Chief Warrant Officer Aaron A. Weaver, for which the chapter was named in honor of his memory. From left are: Rudy Weddle, Joe
McClister, Phil Pasay, Mike Schlaudraff, Lee Helscel, Ernie Tucker, Richard Hunt, Harold Layman and Curt Ebitz.


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
& REUNIONS
USS Chilton APA 38 will
have a reunion Oct. 10, 11
and 12 in New London, Conn.
Contact Joe Doherty at 352-
341-5959 or jdohertyl
@tampabay.rr.com.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Riders
meet the first Thursday of the
month. On the second Thurs-
day, Ladies Auxiliary meets at
4:30 p.m. and AMVET mem-


bers meet at 5:30 p.m. Joe
Hozian is commander.
For more information about
kitchen and canteen hours,
call 352-447-4473. For infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and


dining hall.
For more information re-
garding American Legion Post
155, or any of its programs
and functions, call 352-795-
6526, email blantonthompson
Postl55@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPostl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,


pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus


Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
The post meeting is
changed to the second Mon-
day starting in July (at 7 p.m.
Monday, July 8).
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
The post will have a picnic
beginning at 1 p.m. Thursday,
July 4. On the menu are
pulled pork sandwiches, po-
tato salad, pork and beans,
sweet corn and coleslaw.
Everyone is welcome.
Donation is $7.
Baked spaghetti with meat
sauce dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, July 5. Cost
is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. Karaoke by Mike.
The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.


Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 officially
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday monthly at the chap-
ter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, at the intersection
of Independence Highway
and U.S. 41. The chapter hall
is on the corner of Independ-
ence Highway and Paul
Drive. Due to vacations, there
will be no official meetings in
July or August.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any vet-
erans who received a Purple
Heart for a combat injury or
those with service-connected
disabilities to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
See Page A12


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See dealer or toro.com (toro.ca for Canadian residents) for warranty details. Product availability, pricing & special promotions are subject to dealer option.


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VETERANS & IN SERVICE


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 All


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A12 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


VETERANS
Continued from Page All

their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207
or 352-400-8952. Call these
numbers also for information
about chapter activities,
veterans' benefits or DAV
membership.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility-chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
includes all family members of
a disabled American veteran,
including expanded family
members. Members are
never too young or too old to
join; there is no membership
fee for those older than 81.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104, or
Adjutant Lynn Armitage at
352-341-5334, or chairwoman
Juanita Godrey at 352-
563-1238.
Material, yarn, bed sheets,
blankets, toiletry items, etc.,
are needed for the many proj-
ects the auxiliary makes for
veterans in nursing homes. To
help, donate and for more in-
formation, call Godfrey at
352-794-3104, or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m.the first Wednesday at
the post. Call Neil Huyler at
352-344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post meets the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. The auxiliary meets at
1 p.m. the first Wednesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast has
been suspended until
Sept. 21.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League


membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206 for
information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In SERVICE



Former resident excels in Air Force


Special to the Chronicle

Breanna Gawrys can now add doctor
and U.S. Air Force captain to her list of
accomplishments.
The 25-year-old former Beverly Hills
resident recently graduated from Lake
Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine
(LECOM) in Bradenton and is beginning
her career as an Air Force family physi-
cian, stationed at Fort Belvoir, Va. She is
also in training as a flight surgeon, which
required that she actually learn to fly a
plane.
"She even had to do acrobatics in the
plane," said Breanna's father, Ed Gawrys.
"She's been all over the world, including
an internship in Italy"
Gawrys had decided on a career in med-
icine while in high school at Trinity
Catholic School in Ocala after taking
anatomy and physiology classes. She also
decided she wanted to go to Duke Univer-
sity, but even with stellar grades, the
$50,000-plus yearly tuition seemed daunt-
ing.
She told the Chronicle in 2011, "My dad
put the idea in my head about the Air
Force. He was in the Air Force for a cou-
ple of years and he always told me how he
regretted not staying in because he saw
how good the officers lived."
At one point she received nominations


Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-


2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-476-
7001 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
The post will host an eight-
pin, no-tap bowling tourna-
ment at 1 p.m. Saturday, July
20, at the Sportsmen's Bowl.
For more information call
Norm at 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 typically meets the first
Monday monthly at the Olive
Tree Restaurant in Airport
Plaza in Crystal River. Dinner
is at 6 p.m. and the meeting
follows at 7. (Due to the com-
mander and some members
being out of town, the July
meeting has been moved to
July 8. This is a one-time
change.) The August meeting
will be Aug. 5, with the instal-
lation Aug. 10 at the Masonic
Lodge, 5030 S. Memorial
Drive, Homosassa.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.

See VETERANS/Page A14


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page AIO.

SWEET I MISS ASSOC E AS
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6-30 ) 2013 UFS, Dist. b Universal Uclick lor UFS


Special to the Chronicle
Breanna Gawrys, a former Beverly Hills resident, is beginning her U.S. Air Force career as a
family physician. She is also in training as a flight surgeon at Fort Belvoir, Va.


and appointments to both the Air Force
and U.S. Navy academies. But Duke was
her dream, so she joined the Air Force
ROTC program at the university, and the


Air Force paid her way through school.
Now that she has graduated, she begins
serving on active duty, commissioned as a
captain.


Safety on our waters


Special to the Chronicle
USCG Auxiliary vessel examiner Wilbur B. Scott conducts a courtesy vessel
safety check at Walmart of a boat belonging to Raymond Becker.


Flotilla 15-4 celebrates national observance


WILBUR B. SCOTT
Special to the Chronicle

Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary kicked off Na-
tional Safe Boating Week on May 18
with an energetic agenda. The group
was busy at Homosassa Walmart an-
swering questions from members of
the public, many of whom were
boaters.
Some folks were just curious about
what the Coast Guard Auxiliary was
all about. As members of Flotilla 15-
4, one of the most active flotillas in
the area, conducting both surface
and air patrols as well as public edu-
cation programs and numerous other
activities, members were only too
happy to answer the many questions


put to them (including how to be-
come a member).
Safe boating pamphlets and other
informational materials were also
provided for the public, including
young children. The USCG Auxiliary
feels strongly that it is very important
for children to learn the rules of
safety on and near the water, includ-
ing swimming pools.
At the south end of the parking lot,
Flotilla 15-4 vessel examiners were
busy conducting free courtesy vessel
safety checks for boaters. Not all
boaters had their boats with them
while shopping, of course, but ap-
pointments were made for those peo-
ple to have a courtesy vessel check
conducted at the location where
their boat is stored or moored.


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VETERANS & IN SERVICE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Photos byAssociated Press
ABOVE: Azia Wiscombe Ludwig is shown with her father, Clifford Robert Wiscombe II, shortly after her
wedding in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. Ludwig's father died from a fall at a Mexican hotel, and Ludwig says
the complicated logistics of repatriating his remains added to her grief and shock. BELOW: People walk into
Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine during for funeral services for actor James Gandolfini, in New York.
Gandolfini was one of thousands of Americans who die while traveling abroad each year.



Hassles add to grief when tourists


die abroad during vacation


KAREN SCHWARTZ
Associated Press

Actor James Gandolfini
was just one of the thou-
sands of Americans who
die while traveling
abroad each year Their
survivors need to not only
cope with grief, but also
the logistics of trying to
repatriate the body
For Azia Ludwig, 22, the
tragedy of her father's
death from a fall hours
after her wedding in Mex-
ico was only the begin-
ning. Her experience
included a funeral home
she felt was unscrupulous
and a Spanish death cer-
tificate that wasn't ac-
cepted by all the U.S.
banks and insurance com-
panies she's had to deal
with.
"It was a nightmare. I
had the best day of my life
and I woke up to the very
worst day," she says in a
telephone interview from
her home in Midville,
Utah. "You're never really
prepared, but here was a
language barrier"
It's impossible to know
how many Americans die
outside of the country
each year, but in 2012, the
U.S. State Department as-
sisted the survivors of
nearly 11,000 U.S. citizens
by notifying next of kin,
helping with returning
the body and keeping the
family informed of any in-
vestigations, says Beth
Finan, a spokeswoman for
the agency's Bureau of
Consular Affairs.
Gandolfini's body was
flown back four days after
his death, the process ex-
pedited by U.S. Secretary
of State John Kerry But
for average folks, the
process can take much
longer, and may include
hassles ranging from bu-


reaucratic hurdles to high
(and sometimes question-
able) fees. The State De-
partment or a U.S.
Consulate may be able to
assist with advice and
arrangements, as can
many funeral homes. If
the deceased had life in-
surance or travel insur-
ance, those companies
should be consulted as
well to see what help
might be available, and
what type of documenta-
tion is required to claim
benefits.
Ludwig decided to cre-
mate her father, Rob Wis-
combe, a 43-year-old
businessman and chef
from Pocatello, Idaho,
since there are fewer is-
sues involved in trans-
porting ashes than
transporting a body "If we
waited to get my dad's
body home I would have
had to be there for sev-
eral weeks and the body


!.i A aXWr., 4!"- I
would be shipped back
like luggage," says Lud-
wig. She was warned,
however, that sometimes
the urn is opened and
contents inspected at the
airport
Ludwig believes it was
the hotel manager in at
the resort in Playa del
Carmen who contacted a
funeral home on her be-
half. Ludwig says they
were first told that crema-
tion would cost $2,000,
then after the manager
left, the price was raised
to $4,000 with $500 cash
up front.
"We kept asking why
and there was a language
barrier For some reason
they couldn't explain it to
us," she says.
They scraped together
the cash and when the fu-
neral home refused to
provide a receipt, they
asked the hotel desk clerk
to witness the transaction.


The next day, they
called the U.S. Consulate,
which intervened along
with an apologetic hotel
manager
Nevertheless, the fu-
neral home was several
hours late for a meeting,
and in a surreal moment
in a cafe, the man from
the funeral home, while
holding Wiscombe's
ashes, says, "There was a
problem with the crema-
tion," she recalled. Al-
though she never got the
details, she eventually
worked out a final, firm
price $2,500 and was
able to fly home with the
urn on her original ticket,
three days after her fa-
ther's death.
But there was another
problem: The autopsy re-
port and death certificate
were in Spanish, compli-
cating the paperwork for
her father's estate. Her
insurance agent set up a
FedEx account to facili-
tate getting the paper-
work from Mexico and the
consulate eventually sent
an English Certificate of
Death Abroad, but she
gave up trying to get Eng-
lish copies of the police
and autopsy reports.
Ludwig, a student and
waitress, believes her fa-
ther flipped over a low
third-floor balcony railing
when he took a wrong
turn after a night of cele-
brating following her
wedding this past May
Those who choose to
send back a body face
other challenges.
"The body has to be em-
balmed and in a sealed
container and a shipping
crate," says Carol
Williams, executive direc-
tor for the National Fu-
neral Directors and
Morticians Association,
based in Atlanta.


Below ground


zero, a museum


is taking shape

DAVID B. CARUSO
Associated Press

NEW YORK Gray dust blankets everything
in the subterranean halls of the unfinished Na-
tional September 11 Memorial & Museum. But
while the powder may look ominously like the
ash that covered lower Manhattan after the ter-
rorist attacks, this time it is a product of rebirth,
not destruction.
After a yearlong construction shutdown be-
cause of a funding dispute, and additional
months of cleanup following a shocking flood
caused by Superstorm Sandy, work has been rac-
ing ahead again at the museum, which sits in a
cavernous space below the World Trade Center
memorial plaza that opened in 2011.
About 130 workers are at the site each day and
there is much left to be done, but officials with
the museum says the project is on track to open
to the public in the spring of 2014.
Some of the museum's most emotion-inspiring
artifacts already are anchored in place.
Tears rolled down Anthoula Katsimatides'
cheeks Thursday as she toured halls holding a
mangled fire truck, strangely beautiful tangles of
rebar and the pieces of intersecting steel known
as the Ground Zero Cross.
"It makes me sad," says Katsimatides, whose
brother John died at the trade center But it's
also inspiring, says Katsimatides, who sits on the
museum's board. "Seeing it come to fruition is
pretty intense."
Work on the museum was halted for nearly a
year, starting in the fall of 2011, because of a
money fight between the memorial foundation
and the Port Authority of New York and New
Jersey, which owns the trade center site.
In retrospect, that slowdown was a blessing.
Shortly after the two sides worked out their dif-
ferences, Superstorm Sandy sent the Hudson
River thundering through lower Manhattan and
filled the museum cavern with 712 feet of water
The flood destroyed interior walls and electri-
cal circuits, but the construction delay meant
that hundreds of artifacts and exhibits that
might have been in the museum still hadn't been
fabricated or were sitting safely in storage.
There was minor flash rusting to one of the fire
trucks that had already been lowered into the
space, but the damage was repaired by conser-
vators and isn't noticeable today, says National
September 11 Memorial & Museum President
Joseph Daniels.
Today there is no sign that there was ever a
flood. Daniels says there has been "almost
indescribable" progress on construction since
the storm.


Associated Press
Joe Daniels, left, 911 Memorial President, and
Anthoula Katsimatides, left, a member of the
911 Memorial board, lift a cover to reveal symbol
cutouts in a steel column recovered from the
World Trade Center (WTC) site, during a tour
Thursday of the 911 Memorial Museum in
New York.


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SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 A13


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- . L




A14 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


VETERANS
Continued from Page A12

Riders members are mili-
tary men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
Commander, Robert Scott, at
352-860-2090. Your call will
be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call


Jimmie at 352-621-0617.

SERVICES & GROUPS
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Services Department of-
fers help for veterans who
have had their post-trau-
matic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied. Veter-
ans who have been denied
within the past two years are
asked to contact the office to
review the case and discuss
compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the
Lecanto VA Mental Health
center and have been denied


are encouraged to contact the
Citrus County Veterans
Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim, call
352-527-5915. You will need
to have your denial letter and
a copy of your compensation
examination by Gainesville.
You can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical
records or from the primary
care window in Lecanto.
For more information about
the Citrus County Veterans
Office, log onto www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. the second Saturday
each month at the Disabled
American Veteran's Building,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness. The building is on the
corner of State Road 41 and
Paul Drive.
We are an advocacy group
for current and future veter-
ans, as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 is en-
couraging new members to
join to promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. More than 88,000 com-
bat veterans are still unac-
counted for from all wars. We
fight for them and their
families.
More information is avail-
able at www.rollingthunder
fl7.com. Full membership is
open to all individuals 18
years or older who wish to
dedicate time to the cause.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. If you would like for us
to provide a speaker, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members, are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-


profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.


Christian A.
Wunderlich
Air Force Airman Chris-
tian A. Wunderlich gradu-
ated from basic
military training at
Joint Base San
Antonio-Lackland,
San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman
completed an in-
tensive, eight-
week program that Chris
included training in Wund
military discipline U.S. Ai
and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness and basic warfare


Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service


principles and skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Com-
munity College of
the Air Force.
Wunderlich
earned distinction
as an honor
S graduate.
He is the son of
Michele Smith of
tian Beverly Hills and
erich Robert Wunderlich
Force of Valrico.
The airman is a
2011 graduate of Crystal
River High School.


source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


In SERVICE


rial. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-


nearing agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war.
HPH Hospice care and pro-
grams do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call 352-527-4600.


ATTENTION


FLORIDA SNOWBIRDS
U -- Y. V. W ---* f-~ -


FRESdem
S. S1

Elo
today! I


COMING SOON: 'In Their Words'
* The Chronicle is revamping its Veterans News section to
include a new feature titled "In Their Words."
We will prominently feature the stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about a singular event or moment in
your military career that stands out to you. It can be any
type of event, from something from the battlefield to a fun
excursion while on leave. We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of service, theater of war
served, years served, veterans organization
affiliations and outfit.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202
or email him at cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put
together your stories and help arrange obtaining "then"
and "now" photos for publication.


r
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


My folks wrecked my life!


= Wedding

Wadyka/Jones


I don't know what my parents
were thinking, sticking me with
a weird name like Jim.
Why couldn't they have named
me something cool, like Hal 2000 or
Bandersnatch or Sasquatch or a
thousand other cool names that the
parents who really care about their
kids would have come up with?
Maybe something like Hashtag,
Kingsolomon, Espn, Yoga or
Burger. But no, they named me
after some relative, a grandad or
somebody, and I got teased merci-
lessly about my odd, funny-
sounding name by Whiz, Spam and
Colic, the school's biggest bullies.
Oh, kids can be cruel.
I had a crush on a girl named I
Break for Whales but she would
never play with me because I
wasn't a Native American. I said,
"But neither are you, or your
parents."
"Not in this life," she said, "but
they were before. They don't want
me to forget my past-life heritage."
My wife, Sue, had problems, too.
It seems Rainbow and Lilypad
were always up in her face about
her silly name. "What are you
gonna do," they'd say, "sue us?" and
laugh all the way to class.
Of course, Sue and I were born
before our parents could Google
the really good, creative names that
give kids a leg up on the fierce com-
petition for future jobs. Who
wouldn't want someone named
Mephistopheles, Bang Bang, Partly
Cloudy Chance of Rain or Trape-
zoid working for them? Faster than
you can say, "Nice skull tattoo on
your forehead," they'll be sucking
up all the good jobs on Wall Street
and at the white-shoe law firms,


I always th(
I would get a
nickname, lik
or Kong, or a
Butch or Bi
a name that
reflect what
am on the ii

while the Jims and Su
world are quickly forg
A Jim plays checker
Tyrion has adventures
canasta, while a Katni
down dinner with a bo
I always thought I wou
rific nickname, like K:
or at least Butch or Bu
that would reflect wha
on the inside.
But a nickname, jus
given name, is not son
pick yourself. It is give
don't remember who s
me Dumbo, but it stuc
I'm pretty sure it was
Giving me such an o
name wasn't the worst


parents ever did; it just started the
ball rolling downhill. I don't know
Jim what was wrong with them, but
they made sure I had a happy
Mullen childhood. Obviously, they didn't
know much about parenting. They
VILLAGE read me bedtime stories, they gave
IDIOT me plenty of love and attention,
they made sure I was well fed and
clothed and had plenty of fun
things to do.
In short, they wrecked my life.
ought Who wants to read about someone's
terrific boring, happy childhood? They to-
Stertally killed my chances of writing a
ce Killer string of bestsellers about my strug-
gles to overcome childhood
it least traumas.
Who would read "Oliver Twist" if
ud the whole story was about how
would much fun he was having at Chuck
E. Cheese's day after day? Who
I really would read "Mommie Dearest" if
she had been the perfect mom?
inside. Why couldn't my dad have made
me stand out in the cold under a
dripping drainpipe for 24 hours for
es of the forgetting to shine his shoes? Why
gotten. couldn't he have sold my puppy to a
rs, while a traveling salesman? Why couldn't
s. A Sue plays he have been an absinthe smuggler
ss hunts or a spy?
Dw and arrow. If only my folks had done some-
ild get a ter- thing interesting, I could be on all
iller or Kong, the morning shows plugging mem-
id a name oirs like "Food Fight: My Multiple
at I really am Personalities Have Multiple Eating
Disorders," "Still Potty-Training at
t like your 40" and "My Problems Make Yours
lething you Look Tiny"
en to you. I But I can't. I'm perfectly happy
;tarted calling and content.
k. Actually, They wrecked my life.


Sue.
ordinaryy
Thing my


ContactJim Mullen online at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Susan Marie Wadyka
and Brad Matthew Jones
of Zephyrhills exchanged
nuptial vows April 20,
2013, in the garden of the
Old Seminole Heights
Garden Club, Tampa.
The Christian ceremony
was officiated by the
groom's father, Jim
Jones.
The bride is the
daughter of Kathy Kelly
of Tampa and Wade
Wadyka of Bushnell. The
groom is the son of Jim
and Patty Jones of Crys-
tal River
Diana Saunders of San
Mateo, Calif., was the
bride's honor attendant.
Best man was Joshua
Smith of Ruskin.
Ring-bearers were the
bride's younger brothers
from Massachusetts:
Daniel and Alex Provost.
Hannah Wadyka served
her aunt as flower girl.
Given in marriage by
her father, the bride
wore a full-length white,
gathered-waist wedding
gown with beaded
bodice, scoop neck and
keyhole back. She car-
ried a bouquet of roses
and tulips she and her
groom made the morning
of the wedding.
Her attendant wore a
celadon gown and also
carried a bouquet of
roses and tulips.
Family members
from Michigan and


Massachusetts traveled
to attend the nuptials.
A reception followed
the ceremony in the Old
Seminole Heights
Garden Club.
The new bride re-
ceived her Master of
Business Administration
degree from the Univer-
sity of South Florida and
is employed with the
United States Geological
Survey
Her husband, who
earned his Bachelor of
Environmental Science
degree from USF, is also
associated with the
USGS.
The couple, who re-
side in Zephyrhills, plan
a honeymoon trip to
Paris and Amsterdam in
late August.


6/10/13 6/23/13
Divorces
Donna S. Motlow, Dunnellon vs.
Dudley E. Motlow Sr., Bradenton
Venesia D. Brightman, Citrus Springs
vs. Kevin Brightman, Citrus Springs
Shari L. Clague vs. Jeffery Clague,
Lecanto
Joseph Leo Eckstein, Beverly Hills vs.
Catherine Hodgkins Eckstein, Inverness
Ronald W. Vaughan, Crystal River vs.
Mare Vaughan, Homosassa

Marriages
Tommie Lee Alexander Jr.,
Hernando/Jenna Marie Hay, Hernando


For the RECORD
William Edward Thau, Inverness/
Ingeborg Marianne Thau, Inverness
Michael Nathan Wright, Floral
City/Christina Louise Owens, Floral City
Keith Eric Zigler, Inverness/Crystal
Lynn Schumacher, Inverness
David Gillette Bowles,
Inverness/Karen Rise, Inverness
Brenton Dewayne Rugg, Battle Creek,


July 1 to5 MENUS


Mich./Tiffany Marie Lokcynski, Battle
Creek, Mich.
Michael Keith Skeen, Citrus
Springs/Isabel Brizard, Citrus Springs
Kevin Lee Stroh, Seeley Lake,
Mont./Elaine Renee Lea, Floral City
Travis Keith Tatman, Citrus
Springs/Holly Jean Rawlings, Citrus
Springs


SO YOU KNOW
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of
public record, available from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Italian meatball
hoagie, meatballs in mari-
nara sauce, cheesy mashed
potatoes, Italian beans, hot
dog bun, margarine cup,
raisins, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Blended juice,
baked chicken thigh, yellow
rice with tomato and pepper,
black beans, white bread,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Fourth of
July celebration: Flame-
broiled beef patty with bun
and ketchup and mustard,


slice American cheese,
baked beans, corn with
diced tomato, fresh orange,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: All sites
closed for Fourth of July.
Friday: tuna salad, pea-
cheese salad, marinated
broccoli salad, graham
crackers, two slices whole-
grain bread with mayon-
naise, low-fat milk.
For information and loca-
tions of Senior Dining pro-
gram sites, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


m-
US .
-'
1,ff L.-F-
C~-^S PA.L k


A16 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


TOGETHER










SPORTS


Mayhem mars
first stage of
Tour de France
after bus gets
stuck in bridge
ahead of charging
riders/B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Djokovic, Williams ease into fourth round


Colts safety arrested
on gun charge in D.C.
WASHINGTON Indianapolis
Colts safety Joe Lefeged was
arrested early Saturday after
officers found an unregistered
semi-automatic pistol gun in the
car he was riding in, police said.
Lefeged was a passenger in
a Chevrolet Camaro that fled a
traffic stop for speeding in
northeast Washington just after
midnight Saturday. Officers
smelled marijuana in the car
and found a container of vodka
and orange juice in the center
console and a semi-automatic
pistol under the front passen-
ger seat, police documents
show. A receipt showed Lefeged
bought the gun this year for
about $900, police said.
Lefeged and another pas-
senger were caught when they
tried to run from the car in dif-
ferent directions, police said.
The driver got away.
Court records show Lefeged
has been charged with carrying
an unlicensed pistol and was
being held until a preliminary
hearing Tuesday.
Police say officers stopped
the car for speeding and be-
cause one passenger, identi-
fied as 23-year-old Aaron
Wilson, was standing upright in
the backseat of the convertible.
Kirilenko opts out
of Timberwolves deal
MINNEAPOLIS -Andrei
Kirilenko has decided to opt out
of the final year of his contract
with the Minnesota Timberwolves
and will become a free agent.
Kirilenko informed the Tim-
berwolves of his decision on
Saturday, the deadline that was
written into the two-year deal
he signed last summer. Kirilenko
is declining the one year and
$10 million left on his deal in an
effort to get one last longer-
term deal in his career.
Kirilenko averaged 12.4
points, 5.7 rebounds and 1.5
steals per game for the Wolves
last year, his best season in the
league since 2005-06.
He will become a free agent
on Monday.
Chavez's fine for pot
slashed to $100,000
LAS VEGAS The Nevada
State Athletic Commission has
slashed boxer Julio Cesar
Chavez Jr.'s fine over a failed
drug test from $900,000 to
$100,000.
Commission members took
the action Friday after
Chavez's attorneys argued the
excessive fine violated the
boxer's constitutional rights
and negotiated to reduce it.
The Las Vegas Review-Journal
reported the 27-year-old former
WBC middleweight champion
did not attend the meeting.
Chavez tested positive for
marijuana after his first profes-
sional loss in Las Vegas on
Sept. 15.
He was slapped with the
$900,000 fine by the commis-
sion on Feb. 28 as a repeat of-
fender of the panel's drug
policy. Chavez had tested posi-
tive for diuretics in 2009.
He has served a nine-month
suspension that was part of the
original punishment and will re-
turn to the ring Sept. 7 against
Brian Vera in Los Angeles.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

LONDON Even by his own
lofty standards, Novak Djokovic
put in a Wimbledon perform-
ance that was close to perfect.
The top-ranked Serb played
near-flawless tennis to reach
the fourth round of the grass-
court Grand Slam on Saturday,
going close to a full match with-
out making an unforced error in
dispatching Jeremy Chardy of
France 6-3, 6-2, 6-2.
Serena Williams wasn't bad
either, giving a lopsided school-
ing to the oldest woman in the
tournament.
Williams recorded her 600th
career win, brushing aside 42-


year-old Kimiko Date-Krumm
6-2, 6-0 in an evening match that
was moved to Centre Court so it
could be played under the
lights with the roof closed.
It still wasn't as impressive as
Djokovic's play on the same
court earlier
By the time he finally did
make an error, it was the sim-
plest sort. At 4-1, 40-0 in the third
set, Djokovic double-faulted.
Until that point, he had lost just
three points on his own serve.
It was a temporary glitch. He
closed out the game on the next
point, and wrapped up the Associated Press
match in just 87 minutes. Serena Williams plays a return to Kimiko Date-Krumm on Saturday
during their match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in
See Page B6 Wimbledon, London.


Rays rally in

eighth, 10th

to win 4-3


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG -
Yunel Escobar had an RBI
single in the bottom of the
10th inning as the Tampa Bay
Rays rallied for a 4-3 victory
over the Detroit Tigers on
Saturday night.
James Loney had a one-out
single off Bruce Rondon (0-1).
Pinch-runner Sam Fuld went
to second on Wil Myers' single,
and after Luke Scott struck
out, both runners advanced
on a wild pitch.
Escobar won it for the Rays
with a line drive that sailed
over the head of center
fielder Austin Jackson.
Scott tied it at 3 on a solo
homer with one out in the
eighth off Tigers starter Justin
Verlander, who allowed three
runs, nine hits and four walks
over a season-high eight in-
nings. Verlander is winless in
his last four starts.
Detroit's Miguel Cabrera
went 1 for 4 with a walk, but
his major league-leading bat-
ting average dropped two
points to .375. He has a 14-
game hitting streak.
Cabrera appeared to yell
toward the Rays' dugout after


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays center fielder Desmond Jennings, slides into third base with a triple Saturday ahead
of the throw to Detroit Tigers third baseman Miguel Cabrera during the third inning in St. Petersburg.


striking out against Fernando
Rodney (3-2) in the 10th. The
Rays closer, who worked two
scoreless innings, threw an
in-tight 1-2 pitch that backed
him off the plate.
Rays slugger Evan Longoria
was out of the starting lineup
for the first time this season
due to a sore right foot. The
third baseman is also ex-


pected to sit out on Sunday
against the Tigers.
Jackson hit an opposite-field
solo homer to right, and Jhonny
Peralta had a two-run single
off Chris Archer that put the
Tigers ahead 3-0 in the third.
Archer gave up three runs,
five hits, three walks and had
three strikeouts in five innings.
Loney had an RBI single


during the fifth to get the
Rays within 3-2.
Loney grounded into a double
play with runners on the corners
and one out in the seventh.
Myers hit an inning-ending
flyball with two on in the first.
Tampa Bay's Desmond Jen-
nings tripled and scored on
Ben Zobrist's grounder in the
third.


Rain washes out Sprint Cup race at Kentucky


Quaker State 400 rescheduledfor Sunday at noon; Earnhardt on


Associated Press

SPARTA, Ky. Rain Satur-
day night forced NASCAR to
postpone the Sprint Cup race at
Kentucky Speedway until Sunday.
The 400-mile event was
rescheduled for Sunday at noon.
Dale Earnhardt Jr will start
on the pole in a Chevy along-
side Carl Edwards' Ford.
It was the circuit's first post-
ponement since last year's sea-
son-opening Daytona 500.
Showers were forecast all day
around the state, which arrived


around mid-afternoon with a
heavy downpour followed by
sporadic rain. NASCAR delayed
the start and held out hope for a
late start with jet driers on the
track, but another band of rain
led officials to postpone the
race just after 9 p.m.
"It's a 90-minute to two-hour
window with the best of conditions,
and once it reached around 9
p.m. and it was still raining and
in the forecast, we made the de-
cision we thought was best,"
NASCAR spokesman Kerry
Tharp said.


thepole
Joey Logano
stops to sign
the head of a
fan Saturday
before the
scheduled
start of the
Sprint Cup
race at
Kentucky
Speedway in
Sparta, Ky.
The race was
postponed
due to rain.
Associated Press


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Desena delivers winning hit for Dunnellon


Dunnellon, Inverness girls to square offfor District 15 softball title today at 10 a.m.


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER The
Rabbit came through Saturday
afternoon.
Dunnellon 9 and 10 Softball
All Stars pitcher Cortney "Rab-
bit" Desena singled in Kendazy
Moore to give Dunnellon a 7-6
victory over South Sumter in the
Little League District 15 tourna-
ment at Harley Levins Softball
Complex.
Desena was the winning
pitcher South Sumter's Summer
Hinton was the losing pitcher.
Dunnellon is now 3-1 and will


face Inverness (3-1) for the dis-
trict title today at 10 a.m.
Desena was also the winning
pitcher when Dunnellon beat In-
verness 6-3 Thursday night.
"Rabbit came through," said
Dunnellon manager Gary Son-
neberger "I'm very relieved.
They had me worried. The de-
fense and pitching were good."
"I'm proud of the girls," said
South Sumter manager Derek
Pike. "They hung in there."
In the bottom of the sixth,
Moore led off with a walk and
Haley Roy also walked. Desena's
hit was over the second base-
man's head.


As a pitcher, Desena allowed
six hits and struck out four South
Sumter scored four runs in the
second inning. Baily Morrison's
RBI single was the key hit.
For Dunnellon, Kaitlyn Knox
scored two runs. Haley Headley
had two hits and two runs batted in
Dunnellon had five hits.
South Sumter was 1-3 in the
tournament.



Dixie County 25, Crystal
River 15, 5 innings
Dixie County was behind 14-1 at


one point but rallied to win 25-15.
Kaleigh Nonnemacher was
the losing pitcher.
For Crystal River, Allison
Phillips scored four runs. Amber
Moore scored two runs, as did
Emma Ward.
Crystal River finished with a
2-2 mark in the tournament



Crystal River 19,
Dunnellon 6
Crystal River's Alyah Valle
hammered a two-run, inside-
the-park home run and a run-


scoring triple, leading Crystal
River to a victory in its first
game.
Allison Walker had a three-
run double and the West Citrus
team had 19 hits.
Inverness hurler Courtney
Tidwell was the winning pitcher
and had two hits and two runs
batted in.
Dunnellon's Grace Thompson
took the pitching loss.
Allyssa Hamilton was the win-
ning pitcher.
"It was a phenomenal game,"
said Crystal River coach Scott
Hamilton. "Valle hit the ball
well. I'm very proud of them."


Hamilton takes pole at British Grand Prix Eyes on

Associated Press Rosberg, who was fastest in
British Grand Prix lineup practice and had been strong in
SILVERSTONE. England recent weeks in winningMonacoHowa


Lewis Hamilton said all week he
was uncomfortable in his car.
When it mattered most at Silver-
stone, though, he delivered a
blazing lap to take pole position
for the British Grand Prix.
He won his 28th career pole,
one less than Juan Manuel Fan-
gio, with a time of 1:29.607 on his
final lap, besting Mercedes team-
mate Nico Rosberg, who clocked
the fastest time of 1:30:059 mo-
ments before.
Three-time defending cham-
pion Sebastian Vettel was third
just ahead of his Red Bull team-
mate Mark Webber.
"Storming job, Lewis, storming
job," the Mercedes team said
over the radio as Hamilton
crossed the line.


After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone, England
Lap length: 3.66 miles
Third Session
1. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes, 1 minute,
29.607 seconds.
2. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 1:30.059.
3. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 1:30.211.
4. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 1:30.220.
5. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 1:30.736.
6. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 1:30.757.
7. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 1:30.908.
8. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 1:30.955.
9. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Lotus, 1:30.962.
10. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 1:30.979.

Fans, many waving British
flags and holding signs in support
of the home drivers, were on
their feet cheering in a great
homecoming for the 2008 Fl
champion who made his name at
McLaren but angered many of
his supporters by switching to


Eliminated after second session
11. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 1:31.649.
12. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 1:31.779.
13. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 1:31.785.
14. Sergio Perez, Mexico, McLaren, 1:32.082.
15. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Sauber, 1:32.211.
16. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 1:32.359.
Eliminated after first session
17. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams, 1:32.664.
18. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber, 1:32.666.
19. Charles Pic, France, Caterham, 1:33.866.
20. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia, 1:34.108.
21. Max Chilton, England, Marussia, 1:35.858.
22. Giedo van der Garde, Netherlands, Caterham,
1:35.481.

Mercedes this season. Critics
predicted Hamilton would fail
and McLaren's Jenson Button
would fill his shoes. Instead,
Hamilton has outperformed his
countryman, earning three
podiums compared to none for
Button.


and earning pole in Spain, said
he relished the competition with
former karting rival Hamilton.
"It's a big battle we have. Usu-
ally it's close, not today," Rosberg
said. "It's a really big push for the
team that we are pushing each other
all the time. It's fantastic momen-
tum we have at the moment."
Vettel was full of praise for his
rivals.
"They are bloody quick in qual-
ifying. They seem to be in a dif-
ferent world on Saturday
afternoon," Vettel said.
The German believes he still
has a good chance to win on Sun-
day- noting Mercedes struggles
to transform its qualifying success
into wins. Rosberg took pole in
Bahrain but Vettel won the race.


For some managers, maneuvers a must


Associated Press

ST LOUIS If it seems like
Don Mattingly is writing out a
new batting order for the Los An-
geles Dodgers every night, it's be-
cause he just about is.
With the season approaching
the halfway point, Mattingly used
a major league-high 75 different
batting orders in the first 79 games
for his injury-stricken team.
Seattle (73) and Miami (72) were
just behind entering Saturday,
while Baltimore and St. Louis (40
each) were the standards of sta-
bility, according to STATS.
"I don't know if there's a man-
ager alive that wouldn't want to
come to the park and have one
through nine set for you," Marlins
manager Mike Redmond said. "A
manager is always trying to figure
out that spot where guys have the
most success and it benefits the
team. I think that's the beauty of
managing, trying to figure that
out."
Injuries, statistics, slumps and
matchups all play a role in trying
to find that perfect order.
And then there was Billy Mar-
tin, who said he occasionally
pulled names out of a hat to de-
termine his batting order when
his teams were scuffling.
"You like having things set,"
Chicago manager Robin Ventura
said. "That would be nice, but it's
not always that easy having teams
where you're just going to sit
there and have the same nine
guys play, the same guys hitting."


Only two White Sox players have
been fixtures at their slots this
season: leadoffman Alejandro De
Aza and third-spot hitterAlex Rios.
Texas manager Ron Washing-
ton used 55 batting orders, with
five players sharing the No. 3
hole and six batting No. 5.
During his career, Washington
appreciated relative certainty. In
1982, Washington's most productive
season as a player, all but 20 of his
starts came batting first or second.
'As soon as we get back to the way
I know we can go, you can see that
same lineup. Itain'tgoingto be jump-
ing back and forth," Washington
said. "I think these guys love when
they come to the yard knowing
exactly where they are every day"


while Orioles the picture ofstability


Washington judged that Elvis
Andrus failed in the leadoff spot
because he stopped being aggres-
sive, that he took too many strikes
early in the count. Ian Kinsler
took over at the top of the order
in mid-June, and he says famil-
iarity brings comfort.
"You definitely understand the
players around you and the play-
ers that are hitting in front of you
and behind you and what they
like to do and their tendencies,"
he said.
Mattingly has had to work around
injuries to Matt Kemp, Hanley
Ramirez and Carl Crawford, plus
Andre Ethier's season-long slide.
Eight players have batted cleanup
and a dozen have hit fifth.


Cardinals manager Mike Math-
eny took over last season from Tony
La Russa, a manager he played
under In leading the Cardinals to
the 2011 World Series title, La Russa
used 126 lineups during the reg-
ular season. And that was down
from 147 the previous season.
Matheny changes up the bat-
ting order to keep players fresh
during the grind of 162 games in
182 days.
"If you've got a healthy group of
guys that are feeling good and
don't look like they need days, I
love throwing them out there," he
said. "That's the way the game is
supposed to be played."
Oakland's Bob Melvin, the
reigning AL Manager of the Year,
relies heavily on matchups. Chris
Young has hit in every spot but
cleanup, Jed Lowrie in all but the
No. 8 hole and Seth Smith every-
where but leadoff, according to
STATS.
"Based on some of the re-
sources we have, this is the way
we have to do it," Melvin said.
"I'm all for it. It keeps everybody
involved."
Twins manager Ron Garden-
hire maintains creativity is been
an absolute must He recalled an
era where when filling out the
lineup card was as easy as push-
ing the print button.
"I don't mind moving people
around and trying different
things and reading all these stats
that you guys love so awful dearly
much, which are fun, it's fun stuff
to read," Gardenhire said.


as free


agency


opens

Associated Press

Dwight Howard could
leave, Chris Paul is ex-
pected to stay, and plenty
more will happen beyond
Los Angeles when the NBAs
free agency period opens.
Frontcourt players such
as Josh Smith, David West,
Andrew Bynum and Al Jef-
ferson also can become
free agents Monday at
midnight.
Howard heads the class
after spending one largely
unhappy season with the
Lakers. They would like him
back and can outspend
other suitors by about $30
million, according to NBA
rules, but teams such as
Houston, Dallas and At-
lanta will try to persuade
him to take less money for
more enjoyment.
He didn't fit right in
Mike D'Antoni's offense
and could end up with his
third home in less than a
year, having been dealt
from Orlando to Los Ange-
les just last August.
Bynum was in that deal,
too, going from the Lakers
to Philadelphia in what
was a four-team trade. He
sat out all season because
of knee problems and could
leave without ever playing
a game for the 76ers.
The Clippers are much
happier with Paul, and he
has plenty of reasons to
stay in Los Angeles.
Players can agree to deals
any time after free agency
opens but can't sign until
July 10, after next season's
salary cap has been set.
That's when the block-
buster draft-night trade
that sent Kevin Garnett
from Boston to Brooklyn
will become official.
The more severe penal-
ties in the 2011 Collective
Bargaining Agreement now
start to take effect, with stiffer
luxury taxes and more re-
strictions on sign-and-trades.


Keselowski takes Nationwide race at Kentucky


Associated Press

SPARTA, Ky Brad Ke-
selowski took his final lead on
the 156th lap and went on to a
rain-shortened victory Friday
night in the NASCAR Nation-
wide Series race at Kentucky
Speedway
Showers halted the race at lap
170 in the scheduled 200-lap,
300-mile event, but drivers were
expecting it to resume before
another pocket of rain forced of-
ficials to call it off. Keselowski
settled for doing victory spin-
outs, being careful to avoid slid-
ing into the wall on a night
mostly spent on firm footing.
After Keselowski finished sec-
ond Thursday night in the Truck
Series race, the Sprint Cup
champion led four times for 59
laps en route to his second vic-
tory of the year and second at
the track in three years. Elliott
Sadler was second, followed by
Truck Series points leader Matt
Crafton, Brian Vickers and Kyle
Busch.
Series points leader Regan
Smith saw his 28-point advan-


tage over Justin Allgaier coming
in whacked to an eight-point
edge over Sam Hornish Jr after
an engine problem that forced
him behind the wall and left him
30th, 17 laps down.
The night mostly belonged to
Busch and eventually Ke-
selowski, who has a chance to
add another trophy if he can win
Saturday night's 400-mile Cup
race. If his first two races and
Friday night in particular are
any indication, he's certainly the
driver to beat.
Starting 19th, Keselowski
quickly moved the No. 22 Ford
into contention to make it a bat-
tle between him and Busch on a
tripleheader weekend for both.
Running in the top five on lap
150, Keselowski eventually got
by Sadler for the lead before the
sky opened up.
"You know, I didn't want it to
end this way but we had a great
car and we were able to drive to
the front," said Keselowski, who
set a track record with his fifth
top-five Nationwide finish. "We
didn't qualify like we wanted to
but (crew chief) Jeremy Bullins


Associated Press
Brad Keselowski (22) pulls away from Elliott Sadler on the last
restart of the rain-shortened NASCAR Nationwide Series race Friday
at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky. Keselowski won the race.


and this team did a great job.
"It was just a great car tonight.
This is the type of car you get
once a year if you are lucky
Driving this car I feel like Jim-
mie Johnson, this is a rocket."
Busch led three times for a
race-high 74 laps, mostly before
the halfway point. The race fea-
tured 12 lead changes among
seven drivers.
One of the team was defend-


ing race winner Austin Dillon,
whose quest was keeping the
family name in victory lane for
the third straight time at Ken-
tucky. The grandson ofNASCAR
team owner Richard Childress
dominated here a year ago, lead-
ing 192 laps while averaging a
race-record 151.643 in a Chevy
sporting RCR's iconic No. 3
made famous by seven-time Cup
champion Dale Earnhardt.


Dillon led 65 last September
to complete a season sweep
here. If that wasn't enough moti-
vation for him to stay hot not
to mention, cutting into his 45-
point deficit to first-place Smith
- there was the opportunity to
one-up his brother, Ty, who won
Thursday night's Truck race.
Dillon's bid started well as he
won the pole with a speed of
175.758 mph and he led the first
18 laps before yielding to Busch
and eventually finishing sixth.
As for the two Cup heavyweights,
they seemed intent on a strong
follow-up to their 2-3 finish in
the Truck race.
Sadler and Crafton had their
turns up front as well, but Ke-
selowski carefully threaded his
way back into the lead just be-
fore showers arrived, turning
into a downpour soon after the
race was called.
"As a racer, you always want to
see a restart to get the opportu-
nity to win the race," Sadler
said. "But Brad and those guys
definitely had a strong car. He
got me loose when he was be-
hind me and made a good pass."


Dodgers lead majors in lineup changes,


Associated Press
Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly, right, talks with Philadelphia
Phillies manager Charlie Manuel during warmups Friday in Los Angeles.


B2 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Feed The Children 300
results
Friday at Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (19) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 170 laps, 130.3 rating, 0
points, $83,975.
2. (6) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 170, 118.9, 43, $61,400.
3. (8) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 170, 114.2, 0, $47,150.
4.(11) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 170, 103.6, 40, $34,150.
5. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 170, 137.7, 0, $27,500.
6. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 170, 110.8, 39, $30,775.
7. (21) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 170, 89.6, 37, $26,175.
8.(18) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 170, 83.6, 36, $23,975.
9. (3) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 170, 112.8, 36, $22,950.
10. (10) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 170, 89.5, 34, $23,275.
11. (17) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 170, 82.3, 34, $16,200.
12. (4) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 170, 85.7, 32, $21,350.
13. (7) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 170, 94.9, 31, $20,800.
14. (16) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 170, 75.6, 30, $20,250.
15. (2) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 170, 93.8, 29, $21,200.
16. (12) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 170, 83.1, 28, $19,800.
17.(15) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 169, 68.9, 27, $19,675.
18.(13) Michael Annett, Ford, 169, 75.4, 26, $19,525.
19.(24) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 169, 65.9, 25, $19,400.
20. (20) Johanna Long, Chevrdet, 168, 63.9, 24, $19,775.
21. (27) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 168, 49.6, 23, $19,325.
22.(28) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 168, 59.8, 22, $19,025.
23. (39) Eric McClure, Toyota, 167, 44.4, 21, $18,875.
24. (29) Ken Butler, Toyota, 167, 44.1, 20, $18,725.
25. (38) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 166, 53.6, 19,
$19,075.
26.(33) Bryan Silas, Ford, 166, 45.6, 0, $18,475.
27.(23) Jamie Dick, Chevrdet, 165, 50.8, 17, $18,350.
28. (35) Carl Long, Chevrolet, 164, 38.1, 16, $18,225.
29.(34) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, 164, 37.9, 15, $18,075.
30.(14) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 153, 77.7, 14, $18,250.
31. (9) Cole Whitt, Toyota, transmission, 107, 63.5, 13,
$17,825.
32. (32) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, engine, 90, 45.1, 12,
$11,700.
33. (22) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 52, 51.7, 11,
$17,590.
34.(30) Blake Koch, Toyota, brakes, 16, 36.2, 10, $11,480.
35.(40) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, handling, 15, 35.3, 9,
$11,359.
36. (25) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, engine, 14, 40.8, 8,
$16,555.
37. (31) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, transmission, 10, 33.7, 0,
$10,520.
38. (36) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, vibration, 7,33.8,6, $10,486.
39. (37) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, rear gear, 3, 32.9, 5,
$10,350.
40. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 31.3, 4, $10,250.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 131.162 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 56 minutes, 39 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 5 for 25 laps.
Lead Changes: 12 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1-18; K.Busch 19-49; S.Hor-
nish Jr. 50; M.Crafton 51-54; K.Busch 55-93; B.Ke-
selowski 94; K.Busch 95-98; B.Keselowski 99-113;
K.Swindell 114; B.Keselowski 115-142; M.Crafton
143-146; E.Sadler 147-155; B.Keselowski 156-170.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
K.Busch, 3 times for 74 laps; B.Keselowski, 4 times
for 59 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 18 laps; E.Sadler, 1
time for 9 laps; M.Crafton, 2 times for 8 laps; S.Hor-
nish Jr., 1 time for 1 lap; K.Swindell, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 521; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
513; 3. J.Allgaier, 510; 4. E.Sadler, 502; 5. A.Dillon,
501; 6. K.Larson, 477; 7. PKligerman, 475; 8. B.Vick-
ers, 473; 9. B.Scott, 466; 10.TBayne, 453.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins,
Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position
While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green,
Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.


AT&T National par scores
Saturday at Congressional Country Club, Bethesda,
Md., Purse: $6.5 million,Yardage: 7,569, Par: 71
Completed Second Round:
Roberto Castro 66-69- 135 -7
Jordan Spieth 69-66- 135 -7
Andres Romero 70-66- 136 -6
D.H. Lee 71-66-137 -5
Jason Kokrak 71-66-137 -5
NicolasColsaerts 69-68- 137 -5
CameronTringale 71-67-138 -4
James Driscoll 69-69-138 -4
Bill Haas 70-68-138 -4
Gary Woodland 70-69-139 -3
StewartCink 70-69-139 -3
Russell Henley 69-70- 139 -3
David Lingmerth 74-65- 139 -3
Bud Cauley 68-72-140 -2
Graham DeLaet 68-72-140 -2
BrandtSnedeker 69-71-140 -2
Troy Matteson 72-68- 140 -2
Ben Kohles 69-71 -140 -2
Patrick Reed 76-64- 140 -2
Angel Cabrera 70-70- 140 -2
Billy Horschel 68-72-140 -2
George McNeill 71-69-140 -2
CamiloVillegas 71-70-141 -1
David Mathis 71-70-141 -1
BrendonTodd 74-67-141 -1
David Hearn 73-68- 141 -1
Morgan Hoffmann 73-68-141 -1
Ken Duke 71-70-141 -1
Kevin Chappell 70-72 -142 E
Brian Davis 70-72 -142 E
Fabian Gomez 69-73-142 E
Chez Reavie 71-71 -142 E
Chad Campbell 72-70 -142 E
Tom Gillis 70-72 -142 E
Richard H. Lee 74-68 142 E
Lucas Glover 72-70 142 E
Ted Potter, Jr. 72-70 -142 E
John Huh 71-71 -142 E
Rickie Fowler 71-71 142 E
Nicholas Thompson 73-69 142 E
Bryce Molder 72-71 -143 +1
Robert Garrigus 72-71 -143 +1
Jason Day 70-73- 143 +1
Ricky Barnes 72-71 -143 +1
Jason Bohn 73-70- 143 +1
Charlie Wi 72-71 -143 +1
Steve LeBrun 71-72- 143 +1
Jim Furyk 69-74- 143 +1
Brian Stuard 74-69- 143 +1
Brandt Jobe 71-73- 144 +2
Bob Estes 73-71 -144 +2
Brendan Steele 73-71 -144 +2
Tommy Gainey 73-71 -144 +2
Adam Scott 73-71 -144 +2
Martin Laird 71-73- 144 +2
Matt Jones 72-72- 144 +2
Brad Fritsch 72-72- 144 +2
Doug LaBelle II 73-71 144 +2
John Senden 71-73- 144 +2


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 B3


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
3-2-7
CASH 3 (late)
PIP 6-0-9


POWERBALL
8-28 -30 -53 -56
POWER BALL
16


PLAY 4 (early)
6-9-4-5
PLAY 4 (late)
5-9-0-8

FANTASY 5
8-22 -24 -25 -35

LOTTERY
1-3-5-14-28-32
XTRA
3


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 12 24 32
Mega Ball: 14
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 5
3-of-4 MB 41
3-of-4 653
2-of-4 MB 897
1-of-4 MB 8,253
2-of-4 20,093


$1,127
$301
$56
$28.50
$3
$2


43 Fantasy 5:1 8 16 22 25
5-of-5 4 winners $54,875.89
4-of-5 343 $103
3-of-5 9,817 $10


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (CNBC) Formula One: British Grand Prix. From Silverstone
Circuit in Northamptonshire, England
11:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: British Grand Prix (same-day tape)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA drag racing: O'Reilly Auto Parts Route 66
NHRA Nationals. From Joliet, Ill. (same-day tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) San Diego Padres at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Detroit Tigers at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Arizona Diamondbacks atAtlanta Braves
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Cleveland Indians at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles
3 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles (same-day tape)
BICYCLING
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Tour de France: Stage 2. From Bastia to Ajaccio
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Tour de France: Stage 2. From Bastia to Ajaccio
(same-day tape)
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Irish Open, final round. From
Maynooth, Ireland
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: AT&T National, final round. From Bethesda, Md.
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Constellation Senior Players,
final round. From Pittsburgh
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Women's Open Championship, final round. From
Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y.
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: AT&T National, final round. From Congressional
Country Club in Bethesda, Md.
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Women's Open Championship, final round. From
Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y.
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: AT&T National, final round. From Congres-
sional Country Club in Bethesda, Md.
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Web.com: United Leasing Championship,
final round. From Newburgh, Ind. (same-day tape)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) NHL Draft
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (taped)
SOCCER
11:30 a.m. (UNI) Confederations Cup, third place: Uruguay vs. Italy.
From Salvador, Brazil
11:45 a.m. (ESPN2) Confederations Cup, third place: Uruguay vs. Italy.
From Salvador, Brazil
2 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: Houston Dynamo at New York Red Bulls
5:30 p.m. (UNI) Confederations Cup, final: Brasil vs. Spain. From Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Confederations Cup, final: Brazil vs. Spain. From Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Confederations Cup, final: Brazil vs. Spain. From Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil (same-day tape)
MISCELLANEOUS
11 a.m. (ESPN) X Games Munich (same-day tape)



RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Detroit Tigers at Tampa Bay Rays


Ryan Palmer
Martin Flores
Chris Stroud
Henrik Norlander
Shawn Stefani
John Rollins
Charley Hoffman
Dicky Pride
Erik Compton
Joe Ogilvie
Luke Guthrie
Sean O'Hair
Vijay Singh
YE.Yang
Harris English
Derek Ernst
Nick Watney
Pat Perez


U.S. Women's Open
par scores
Saturday at Sebonack Golf Club, Southampton,
N.Y., Purse: TBA ($3.25 million in 2012),
Yardage: 6,821, Par: 72, Completed Second
Round, a-amateur:
Inbee Park 67-68- 135 -9
I.K. Kim 68-69-137 -7
Jodi Ewart Shadoff 70-69- 139 -5
Lizette Salas 68-72- 140 -4
Angela Stanford 73-68- 141 -3
Jessica Korda 70-71 141 -3
SoYeonRyu 73-69-142 -2
Anna Nordqvist 68-74- 142 -2
Karine Icher 70-72- 142 -2
Ha-Neul Kim 66-77-143 -1


Caroline Hedwall 68-75-143 -1
Cristie Kerr 72-72- 144 E
Haeji Kang 71-73 -144 E
Lindy Duncan 71-73- 144 E
Lexi Thompson 75-69 -144 E
Brittany Lincicome 72-72- 144 E
Soo JinYang 72-72 -144 E
Brittany Lang 76-69- 145 +1
Catriona Matthew 70-75-145 +1
Paula Creamer 72-73-145 +1
Caroline Masson 71-74- 145 +1
RyannO'Toole 72-73-145 +1
Amy Meier 74-72-146 +2
Maude-Aimee Leblanc 69-77-146 +2
AmyYang 74-72-146 +2
Shanshan Feng 71-75- 146 +2
Mariajo Uribe 70-76- 146 +2
Ai Miyazato 76-70-146 +2
KarrieWebb 73-73-146 +2
MiJungHur 75-71 -146 +2
Jennifer Rosales 70-76- 146 +2
a-Brooke Mackenzie Henderson71-76 147+3
Morgan Pressel 73-74- 147 +3
Azahara Munoz 73-74- 147 +3
Dewi Claire Schreefel 76-71 -147 +3
Stacy Lewis 71-76-147 +3
Danah Bordner 73-74- 147 +3
Sarah-Jane Smith 71-76- 147 +3
a-Casie Cathrea 75-73- 148 +4
Chella Choi 73-75-148 +4
Pornanong Phatlum 71-77- 148 +4
Mo Martin 74-74- 148 +4
Cynthia Lacrosse 74-74- 148 +4
a-Doris Chen 74-74- 148 +4
NaYeonChoi 71-77-148 +4
a-Lydia Ko 72-76-148 +4
Carlota Ciganda 76-72- 148 +4
Natalie Gulbis 70-78-148 +4
Becky Morgan 75-73- 148 +4
Thidapa Suwannapura 75-74-149 +5
Austin Ernst 75-74- 149 +5
Mika Miyazato 72-77-149 +5
Gerina Piller 73-76- 149 +5
HeeKyungSeo 75-74-149 +5
Jackie Barenborg Stoelting 75-74 149 +5
a-Yueer Feng 72-77- 149 +5
Jenny Shin 78-71 -149 +5
Jane Park 73-76- 149 +5
Kristy McPherson 74-75- 149 +5
Moira Dunn 78-72- 150 +6
Julieta Granada 74-76- 150 +6
Christina Kim 75-75-150 +6
Laura Diaz 76-74- 150 +6
Ayako Uehara 75-75- 150 +6
a-Nelly Korda 73-77--150 +6
CarolineWestrup 74-76-150 +6
Meena Lee 71-79-150 +6
Eun-HeeJi 73-77-150 +6


Wimbledon
show court schedules
Monday at The All England
Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club
London
Play begins on Centre Court and No. 1 Court
at 8 a.m.; other main-draw courts at 6:30 a.m.
Centre Court
Serena Williams (1), United States, vs. Sabine Lisicki (23),
Germany
Mikhail Youzhny (20), Russia, vs. Andy Murray (2), Britain
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, vs.Tommy Haas(13), Germany
No. 1 Court
Laura Robson, Britain, vs. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia
Andreas Seppi (23), Italy, vs. Juan Martin del Potro (8), Ar-
gentina
Bernard Tomic, Australia, vs. Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Re-
public
No. 2 Court
David Ferrer (4), Spain, vs. Ivan Dodig, Croatia
Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, vs. Tsvetana Pironkova,
Bulgaria
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, vs. Treat Huey,
Philippines, and Dominic Inglot (16), Britain
No. 3 Court
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, vs. Carla Suarez Navarro
(19), Spain
Roberta Vinci (11), Italy, vs. Li Na (6), China
FernandoVerdasco, Spain, vs. Kenny de Schepper, France
Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Vera Dushevina, Rus-
sia, vs. Jamie Murray, Britain, and Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan,
comp. of susp. match


Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES- SentLHPWei-Yin Chen
to Bowie (EL) for a rehab assignment. Designated INF
Travis Ishikawa for assignment. Recalled RHP Jair Ju-
rrjens from Norfolk (IL).
BOSTON RED SOX Designated RHP Clayton
Mortensen for assignment. Selected the contract of
2B Jonathan Diaz from Pawtucket (IL). Agreed to
terms with RHPTeddy Stankiewicz on a minor league
contract.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Optioned RHP Brian
Omogrosso and 3B Brent Morel to Charlotte (IL). Re-
called RHP Simon Castro from Charlotte.
CLEVELAND INDIANS Optioned RHPs Trevor
Bauer, Carlos Carrasco and Matt Langwell to Colum-
bus (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Joe Martinez
from Columbus.
DETROIT TIGERS Optioned RHP Evan Reed
to Toledo (IL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS Optioned RHP Alex Colome
to Durham (IL). Recalled INF Ryan Roberts from
Durham. Agreed to terms with RHP AnthonyTzamtzis
on a minor league contract.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Reinstated RHP
J.J. Putz from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Zeke
Spruill to Reno (PCL).
CHICAGO CUBS Optioned C Steve Clevenger
to Iowa (PCL). Transferred RHP Zach Putnam to the
60-day DL.
CINCINNATI REDS Reinstated 2B Brandon
Phillips from the paternity leave. Optioned INF Henry
Rodriguez to Louisville (IL). Placed RHP Johnny
Cueto on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Logan On-
drusekfrom Louisville (IL).
COLORADO ROCKIES Sent RHP Edgmer
Escalona to Colorado Springs (PCL) for a rehab as-
signment.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS Optioned OF Caleb
Gindl to Nashville (PCL).
NEWYORK METS Sent RHP Jenrry Mejia to the
GCL Mets for a rehab assignment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES -Optioned INF Freddy
Galvis to Lehigh Valley (IL).
PITTSBURGH PENGUINS -Agreed to terms with
OF Nick Buckner, RHP Billy Roth and LHP Will
Kendall on minor league contracts.
SAN DIEGO PADRES Agreed to terms with
RHP Jace Chancellor and OF Jordan Paroubeck on
minor league contracts.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Optioned LHP Eric
Surkamp to Fresno (PCL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS -Optioned 1B Chris
Marrero and OF/INF Jeff Kobernus to Syracuse (IL).
Selected the contract of RH P Taylor Jordan from Har-
risburg (EL). Recalled RHP Erik Davis from Syracuse.
HOCKEY
USA HOCKEY Named Pittsburgh coach Dan
Bylsma coach of the men's Olympic hockey team.
National Hockey League
DETROIT RED WINGS Agreed to terms with D
Jakub Kindl on a four-year contract. Re-signed F Drew
Miller to a three-year contract.


Cardinals 7, Athletics 1
St. Louis Oakland
ab r h bi ab rh bi
MCrpnt2b 5 0 1 1 Crispcf 3 00 0
YMolinc 5 01 0 S.Smithdh 4 00 0
Beltrandh 5 1 1 0 Lowriess 3 0 1 0
Craig rf 4 1 2 0 Freimn ph 1 0 0 0
Hollidylf 4 1 1 1 Cespdslf 4 00 0
MAdmslb 3 32 4 Mosslb 3 00 0
Freese3b 3 10 0 Dnldsn3b 3 1 1 0
Jay cf 3 0 1 0 Rosales3b 1 0 0 0
Descals ss 2 0 1 1 Reddckrf 3 0 1 1
Sogard2b 3 00 0
DNorrsc 3 02 0
Totals 34 7107 Totals 31 1 5 1
St. Louis 000 024 010 7
Oakland 000 000 010 1
E-Ma.Adams (1). DP-St. Louis 2, Oakland 1.
LOB-St. Louis 5, Oakland 5.2B-Beltran (10), Craig
(18), Jay (10), Donaldson (21). HR-Ma.Adams 2 (6).
S-Jay. SF-Descalso.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
WainwrightW,11-5 9 5 1 1 2 8
Oakland
J.Parker 32-32 0 0 0 3
J.ChavezL,1-2 11-33 4 4 1 0
Blevins 1 2 2 2 0 1
Neshek 12-32 1 1 0 2
Otero 11-31 0 0 0 1
J.Chavez pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by J.Chavez (Freese), by Blevins (Descalso).
T-2:48. A-35,067 (35,067).
Pirates 2, Brewers 1
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Weeks 2b
Segura ss
CGomz cf
ArRmr3b
Lucroy c
YBtncr lb
Aoki ph
Halton rf
LSchfr If
D.Hand p
Kintzlr p
Bianchi ph
Axford p
Hndrsn p
Totals 3
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh


0 0 0 SMarte If
0 1 0 RMartn c
1 2 0 McCtch cf
0 1 0 GJones rf
00 0 Watson p
01 1 Melncnp
0 0 0 Grilli p
0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b
0 0 0 Walker2b
0 1 0 GSnchz lb
0 0 0 Mercer ss
0 0 0 Liriano p
0 0 0 Snider rf
000
17 1 Totals
000 001 000
010 100 OOx


4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
3 1 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 1 1
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
2 0 0 0
1 0 0 0

292 6 2
4010
4010
3010
3111
0000
0000
0000
3111
3000
3000
3010
2000
1000

2926 2
-1
-2


DP-Milwaukee 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Milwaukee 7,
Pittsburgh 3. 2B-S.Marte (15). 3B-C.Gomez (9).
HR-G.Jones (7), PAlvarez (20). SB-R.Martin (5),
McCutchen (16).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
D.Hand L,0-1 5 5 2 2 0 2
Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 2
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1
Henderson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
LirianoW,7-3 6 7 1 1 1 6
Watson H,12 1 0 0 0 0 0
MelanconH,23 1 0 0 0 0 2
Grilli S,27-28 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP-Melancon.
T-2:40. A-38,438 (38,362).
Rays 4, Tigers 3,
10 innings
Detroit Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksncf 3 11 1 Joycef 3 1 0 0
Dirks If 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-lf 1 0 0 0
AGarciph-rf2 00 0 DJnngscf 5 1 1 0
MiCarr3b 4 1 1 0 Zobrist2b 5 0 3 1
Fielder b 4 00 0 Loneylb 5 03 1
VMrtnzdh 5 13 0 Fuldpr 0 1 0 0
JhPerltss 5 0 1 2 WMyrsrf 5 02 0
D.Kelly rf-lf 4 0 0 0 Scottdh 5 1 1 1
Infante2b 4 0 1 0 YEscorss 4 02 1
B.Penac 4 01 0 JMolinc 2 00 0
KJhnsn3b 3 00 0
RRorts ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 38 3 Totals 39412 4
Detroit 003 000 000 0 3
TampaBay001 010 010 1 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Fielder (4), De.Jennings (1). DP-Detroit 3.
LOB-Detroit 9, Tampa Bay 10. 2B-Infante (15),
B.Pena (5). 3B-De.Jennings (4). HR-A.Jackson
(4), Scott (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Verlander 8 9 3 2 4 4
Smyly 1 0 0 0 0 3
B.Rondon L,0-1 2-3 3 1 1 0 1
Tampa Bay
Archer 5 5 3 3 3 3
Al.Torres 2 0 0 0 1 3
Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 0
RodneyW,3-2 2 2 0 0 0 2
WP-B.Rondon, Archer 3.
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Vic Carapazza;
Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Brian Knight.
T-3:24. A-23,809 (34,078).
Cubs 5, Mariners 3,
11 innings
Chicago Seattle
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Valuen3b 5 1 1 0 EnChvzrf-cf 3 0 1 1
StCastrss 5 1 2 1 BMiller2b-ss 5 0 0 0
Schrhltrf 5 22 1 Seager3b 5 00 0
ASorindh 5 13 3 KMorlsdh 4 02 0
Rizzolb 5 00 0 Baypr-dh-rf 1 0 0 0
Sweeny cf 1 0 0 0 Ibanezlf 5 0 2 0
Borboncf 4 01 0 Smoaklb 5 1 2 1
Bogsvclf 5 00 0 Zuninoc 5 1 1 0
Barney 2b 4 0 0 0 Ackley cf 3 0 1 1
Castilloc 4 01 0 Furushp 0 00 0
HBlancph 0 00 0
MSndrspr 0 1 0 0
Medinap 0 00 0
OPerezp 0 00 0
JSndrs ph 1 0 0 0
Ryan ss 2 0 1 0
Frnkln ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 43 5105 Totals 40310 3
Chicago 100 002 000 02 5
Seattle 020 000 001 00 3
LOB-Chicago 6, Seattle 8. 2B-Valbuena (11),
A.Soriano (19), Ibanez (7), Zunino (2), Ryan (7). HR-
St.Castro (4), A.Soriano (9), Smoak (6). SB-Schier-
holtz (5), B.Miller (2), Franklin (5). CS-Bay (1),
Ackley (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Samardzija 7 6 2 2 3 5
RussellH,11 1 3 0 0 0 0
GreggBS,1-13 1 1 1 1 1 1
VillanuevaW,2-4 1 0 0 0 0 1
B.ParkerS,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Seattle
Harang 8 5 3 3 0 1
Furbush 1 1 0 0 0 2
Medina 1 1 0 0 1 1
O.PerezL,2-2 1 3 2 2 0 2
T-3:32. A-34,630 (47,476).


Associated Press
NHL draft prospects, from left, Jonathan Drouin, Seth Jones, and
Nathan MacKinnon answer questions at a news conference May 30
in Mississauga, Ontario. The Tampa Bay Lightning hold the third over-
all pick in Sunday's draft.


For Avalanche, MacKinnon No. 1


Associated Press


The Colorado Avalanche have
plenty to choose from with the
first pick of a talent-rich NHL
draft.
Nathan MacKinnon and Seth
Jones. Jonathan Drouin and
Aleksander Barkov They're all
among the candidates to go
first Sunday at the Prudential
Center.
Colorado won the draft
lottery and has flirted with the
idea of picking a puck-moving
defenseman in Jones. But it
appears the Avalanche are lean-
ing toward a forward to take
No. 1 overall, possibly the 17-


year-old MacKinnon.
MacKinnon, a 6-foot, 182-
pound center, is a solid two-way
presence with strong hands,
stick handling and skating skills.
He's considered a natural
scorer and very good puck
distributor.
The Florida Panthers hold
the second draft pick and the
Tampa Bay Lightning are No. 3.
Meanwhile, the Nashville
Predators find themselves in
the unfamiliar position of hav-
ing an early selection in the
NHL draft.
Nashville's 16-23-9 season has
the Predators holding the fourth
overall selection.


That's the highest Nashville
has selected since the fran-
chise's first draft in 1998 as an
expansion franchise when the
Predators took David Legwand
second overall.
Predators general manager
David Poile usually keeps his
cards close to the vest, but was
clear that Jones will fall no fur-
ther than No. 4 should he still be
available.
"Absolutely, 100 percent, 110
percent," Poile said when asked
if he would take Jones. "I think
he is the best player in the draft.
That is my, our organization's
opinion as to what he is going to
become."


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inverness Golf and Country Club hosts camp


Men's rec softball

football league

continues play

Special to the Chronicle

Inverness Golf and Country
Club will have its 18th annual
Junior Golf Camp from 9 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. each day from Tuesday,


July 16, to Friday, July 19.
Deadline to register is Mon-
day, July 9.
The four-day camp for youths
ages 7 to 15 will include instruc-
tion on full swing, chipping, put-
ting and sand shots. Rules of golf
and proper etiquette will be ad-
dressed. On-course playing ex-
perience will highlight each
afternoon, with a tournament
and awards on the final day
Camp is limited to the first 48
paid participants. For more in-


formation and prices, call 352-
637-2526.
Men's softball
Advance Fitness 15,
The Machines 0
On Monday night at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River, The Machines
could not get their bats going. Al-
though they did get some hits, the
team was unable to capitalize on it.
Advance Fitness, on the other hand,
exploded at the plate and took home


a 15-run triumph.
The final two games were can-
celed due to inclement weather. The
contests will be played Tuesday.
Men's flag football
Purple 28, Red 21, OT
Although Red scored first, Purple
answered with a touchdown of its
own. After halftime, the Red team
scored quickly, but Purple tied the
game to send it to overtime and
eventually took a seven-point win in
the extra period.


Gold 41, Orange 20
The Gold team was on fire for this
game, with a tremendous show on both
sides of the ball. Although Orange
battled hard, Gold was never in trou-
ble en route to its 21-point victory.
Pink 40, Green 6
Although the game was close
early on, two key interceptions by
Pink helped turn the game into a
rout as the team rolled to a 34-point
triumph.


Invorss Crown c ams


Special to the Chronicle
The Inverness 10 and 11 Baseball All Stars exploded for eight runs in the third inning to win the Little League
District 15 title with a 14-1, four-inning win over West Hernando on Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.
Inverness moves on to the Section 7 tournament, which begins in July.




Brazil respectful, but unafraid


Teams to play for

Confederations

Cup soccer title
Associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO Brazilians
aren't hiding how much they admire
Spain's national team, how good the
World Champions are and how diffi-
cult it is to play against them.
But make no mistake, they say,
that doesn't mean they'll fear Spain
when the teams meet in the Confed-
erations Cup final today at the
Maracana.
In a match everyone has been
hoping to see, the hosts will be try-
ing to win their third straight title in
the World Cup warm-up competi-
tion, and fourth overall, while Spain
will be looking for its fourth major
trophy in five years.
Nearly every Brazilian player who
has talked about Spain has praised
the world and European champion,
acknowledging that it's the best
team in the world today But they
guarantee Brazil will be ready to
make the home fans proud.
"We just have to play football, we


Associated Press
Jesus Navas and Spain will meet Brazil today for the Confederations Cup final.


can't be afraid," Brazil striker Ney-
mar said Friday "We know Spain is
the best team in the world and that
they have the best players in the
world. We respect them and I ad-
mire them a lot, but when the match
starts we have full confidence that
we can play well to beat them and
win the title for our fans."
Brazil and Spain haven't played
since a 1999 scoreless draw in a
friendly
"It's tough to wait for a match like


this," Neymar said.
Brazil won its fifth World Cup title
in 2002, but recently it's Spain which
has been the dominant team in in-
ternational football, capturing the
last two European championships
and the 2010 World Cup.
Yet to win the Confederations
Cup, Spain has nearly the same
squad that won the World Cup, while
Brazil has only three players left
over from its disappointing partici-
pation in South Africa.


Recreational BRIEF


New fishing
tourney on tap
The inaugural Rob Phillips
Eagle Buick GMC Fishing
Tournament will be held Sat-
urday, July 27, at MacRae's of
Homosassa. Boats will leave
the docks at 7 a.m. from
MacRae's or Twin Rivers Ma-
rina in Crystal River. Deadline
for weigh-in is 5 p.m. at
MacRae's; a fish fry will follow.
The captains' meeting will
be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday,
July 26, at MacRae's.
Entry is $100 per boat.
Three prizes will be awarded
in each category for biggest
grouper, redfish and trout.
Prizes will be determined
upon number of boat entries.
Entry payment deadline is
July 26. For entry forms and
more information, call Mark
Mileti at 352-220-4339 or
352-795-6800, Bill Nast at
352-484-9482 or 352-795-
6800, Randy Harbin at 813-
690-5528 or 352-621-0934,
or Dean Simmons at 352-
267-5007 or 352-787-4650.
Adult rowers
sought for regatta
The Rowing Organization
of Citrus County Students
(ROCCS) seeks adult rowers
to compete in the just-for-fun
Halifax Regatta in Daytona
on Saturday, July 27.
All inquiries should be
emailed to roccs.inc@
gmail.com, or call 352-354-
3769. In the event practice
is ever canceled due to bad
weather, text messages will
be sent out.
To learn more about
ROCCS, visit
www.crewroccs.com or the
Facebook page.
Annual tourney
gets new name
The Key Training Center
and the Rotary Club of In-
verness are making waves,
along with an increasing
number of supporters and
sponsors throwing their
lines in for some exciting
changes to the Key's an-
nual fishing tournament.
The date has been set for
Saturday, Sept. 21, with par-
ticipants launching from Wal-
lace Brooks Park in Inverness
by 7 a.m. and activities taking
place throughout the day until
the return of the boats at 3 p.m.
New location, new spon-
sors and new activities war-
rant a new name, the
Rotarians decided, christening
the tournament the Inverness
Rotary Bass Blasters to ben-
efit the Key Training Center.
Apopka Marine has
grabbed the Title Sponsor-
ship, which insures that col-
lectible T-shirts will
commemorate the fishing
experience.


For more information
about the Inverness Rotary
Bass Blasters Fishing Tour-
nament to benefit the Key
Training Center, call
352-287-1770.
Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club meets at 8:30 a.m.
each Wednesday. Men,
women and juniors age 10
and older can join.
There are all levels of
play; handicapped method.
Call Ron Fair 352-746-3924,
or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.
SilverSneakers
location is YMCA
Citrus County YMCA is an
official SilverSneakers loca-
tion for their group exercise
program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise pro-
gram designed exclusively
for older adults and is avail-
able at little or no additional
cost through Medicare
health plans, Medicare Sup-
plement carriers and group
retiree plans.
Group exercise classes
meet at the First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
Classes include cardio inter-
val, Pilates, and stability and
strength. For more informa-
tion, call the YMCA office at
352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site
for a community Divine Yoga
class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities. Some of
the benefits of yoga are im-
proved balance, coordina-
tion, strength and flexibility.
Yoga is also helpful in coun-
teracting stress and anxiety.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at 352-
270-8019 or email divine
yogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA
offers group exercise in Cit-
rus Springs at the Hope
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
The location offers classes
in Pilates and cardio circuit
on a regular basis beginning.
The Y currently has three
other areas in the county
where group exercise
classes are offered, includ-
ing Homosassa, Inverness
and Crystal River.
-From staff reports


ACC ready to welcome Pitt, Syracuse, Notre Dame


Associated Press

GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Atlantic Coast Conference
Commissioner John Swof-
ford has spent nearly two
years working to bring in
new schools, refuting re-
ports of departures and
securing a media rights
deal to pump the brakes
on realignment.
The end result comes
Monday when Pittsburgh,
Syracuse and Notre Dame
officially arrive to form a
15-team ACC.
"It's a very exciting time
to be a part of this league,"
Swofford said. "In a lot of
ways, it feels like Pitt and
Syracuse and Notre Dame
are already in the league.
They just haven't been in it
competitively but they've
been in our meetings and
been a part of our discus-
sions and the decisions
that will move us forward.
... We're just in a really


good place right now."
The changes began with
the ACC inviting Pitt and
Syracuse in September
2011. A year later, Notre
Dame said it would join in
all league sports except
football, though it will play
five games annually
against ACC teams and
gain access to its bowl tie-
ins starting next fall.
Then, after Maryland's
surprise defection to the
Big Ten for 2014, the league
reached out to Louisville as
a replacement and secured
a grant-of-rights agreement
giving the ACC control of
TV money for schools that
leave before the broadcast
deal ends after the 2026-27
season.
The changes have
strengthened the ACC's
East Coast presence, ex-
panded its footprint west
into Indiana and offered
protection from future re-
alignment.


That's why Notre Dame
athletic director Jack
Swarbrick said there's ex-
citement in South Bend
about the move for the
Fighting Irish, who will re-
main a football independ-
ent. He said a man stopped
him on the way to his of-
fice Friday to say it was
"the best thing Notre
Dame could have done."
"You want to go into a
conference where you know
the members are fully com-
mitted to the conference,"
Swarbrick said. "They were
saying that publicly, they
were saying that privately,
but (the grant of rights) was
a very significant manifesta-
tion of that commitment
That's a great place."
It's the second ACC ex-
pansion in 16 years under
Swofford, who lured
Boston College, Miami and
Virginia Tech from the Big
East a decade ago.
This time, he expanded


campus visits with presi-
dents and athletic direc-
tors to include university
trustees during stops at
Florida State, Clemson
and Virginia to answer
questions about the ACC's
future.
"The Maryland move
was disconcerting in the
sense that it caught all of us
by surprise," Swofford said.
"But on the other hand, I've
always been confident
about the future and the
stability of this league be-
cause I see firsthand the
commitment at the presi-
dential level, at the AD
level, institution to institu-
tion and to the league itself.
"When you lose one, you
kind of look sideways a lit-
tle bit about the trust factor
But I never had any reason
not to trust any of our other
schools or the people rep-
resenting those schools."
The ACC has sued Mary-
land for payment of an exit


fee of nearly $53 million,
set after the Notre Dame
announcement that also
allowed the league to
renegotiate its TV deal
with ESPN.
The 14 football members
will receive an average of
more than $20 million an-
nually, a person familiar
with the situation said.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condi-
tion of anonymity because
the league isn't releasing
the financial details of the
TV deal.
Notre Dame will get a
basketball share worth
about 20 percent of the
ACC's TV package -
roughly between $3 mil-
lion and $4 million be-
cause of its football
partnership with NBC.
The per-school payouts
are up from an average of
$16.9 million for 12 teams
for the 2011 tax year with
adjustments for bowl rev-


enue and other compensa-
tion, according to the
league's Form 990 tax filing.
The league is also re-
searching the creation of
its own TV channel.
Florida State President
Eric J. Barron said the
changes bolster football
before the College Foot-
ball Playoff begins in 2014,
and make men's basketball
- long the league's most
tradition-rich sport -
even tougher
"I think that it provides
fresh opportunities," Bar-
ron said. "I think that
we're moving more and
more into a phase in which
who you play (in football)
is critical as you start to
compete for a national
championship. You're get-
ting Notre Dame on your
schedule, and Pittsburgh
and Syracuse are solid
schools. I think the confer-
ence is scary in terms of
basketball."


B4 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston
Baltimore
NewYork
Tampa Bay
Toronto


W
Atlanta 47
Washington 40
Philadelphia 39
NewYork 33
Miami 28


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Mets 5, Nationals 1
Washington NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 3 0 0 0 EYong If 4 0 1 1
Rendon 2b 4 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 00 0
Abadp 0 00 0 DnMrp2b 5 23 0
Zmrmn3b 1 00 0 DWrght3b 3 00 0
AdLRlb 4 0 1 0 Byrdrf 3 2 1 1
Werthrf 4 0 1 0 Satin 1b 3 0 1 0
Dsmndss 3 00 0 Niwnhscf-lf 3 00 1
Berndnlf 4 1 1 0 Buckc 4 0 1 1
KSuzukc 4 03 1 Quntnllss 4 1 2 0
Jordanp 2 0 1 0 Geep 2 0 0 0
Stmmnp 0 00 0 ABrwnph 1 00 0
Lmrdzz ph-2b10 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0
Lagars ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 171 Totals 3359 4
Washington 000 100 000 1
NewYork 000 122 00x 5
E-Desmond (9), Zimmerman 2 (13). DP-New
York 3. LOB-Washington 7, NewYork 10. 2B-
Ad.LaRoche (10), Bernadina (5), K.Suzuki (10),
Quintanilla (4). 3B-Dan.Murphy (2). SF-
E.Young, Nieuwenhuis.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Jordan L,0-1 41-35 3 1 2 1
Stammen 12-33 2 2 0 1
Abad 2 1 0 0 0 2
NewYork
GeeW,6-7 6 6 1 1 3 4
C.Torres 2 1 0 0 1 3
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Stammen (D.Wright), by Jordan (Byrd).
T-3:05. A-26,426 (41,922).

Braves 11, D'backs 5


Arizona

GParra rf
Prado 2b
Gldsch lb
ErChvz3b
MMntr c
Kubel If
Pollock cf
Gregrs ss
Kenndy p
WHarrs p
Ziegler p
C.Ross ph
Bell p
A.Hill ph
DHrndz p
Sipp p
Putz p
Totals
Arizona
Atlanta


Atlanta


ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 Smmns ss
5 0 1 0 Heywrdrf
3 1 1 0 J.UptonIlf
5 0 1 0 FFrmnlb
5 2 2 2 McCnnc
4 1 1 1 Uggla2b
3 1 2 2 BUptoncf
4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b
1 0 0 0 Janish 3b
0 0 0 0 THudsn p
0 0 0 0 A.Wood p
1 0 1 0 Varvarp
0 0 0 0 Avilan p
1 0 1 0 Waldenp
0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph
0 0 0 0 DCrpntp
0000
36 5105 Totals
000 202 010
002 020 07x


ab r h bi
4100
4221
4230
3 3 1 2
3312
4122
4112
2002
4 0 2 1
4021
20000
2000
0000
0000
0000
0000
1 100
0000

32111110
5
11


E-Kubel (2). LOB-Arizona 9, Atlanta 10.2B-
M.Montero (10), Heyward 2 (12), McCann (3),
Uggla (5). HR-M.Montero (5), Pollock (6),
FFreeman (8). SB-Goldschmidt (8). S-
G.Parra, T.Hudson. SF-B.Upton 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
Kennedy 41-35 4 4 4 4
W.Harris 2-3 0 0 0 2 1
Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 1
Bell 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hrnndz L,4-5 BS,5-6 1-3 2 4 4 0 0
Sipp 1-3 2 3 3 1 0
Putz 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
T.Hudson 52-35 4 4 3 2
A.Wood 2-31 0 0 0 1
Varvaro 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Avilan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
WaldenW,3-1 1 3 1 1 0 1
D.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by D.Hernandez (R.Johnson, Simmons),
by Kennedy (J.Upton).WP-Kennedy, THudson.
T-3:46. A-39,180 (49,586).

Rockies 2, Giants 1
San Francisco Colorado
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AnTrrs If 4 0 3 0 CDckrscf 4 1 1 0
Scutaro 2b 3 1 1 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0
Poseylb 4 0 2 1 LeMahi2b 3 0 0 0
Pencerf 3 0 0 0 CGnzlzlf 4 0 0
Sandovl3b 4 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 0 1 1
J.Perezcf 2 00 0 Heltonlb 2 00 0
Blanc ph-cf 2 0 0 0 Rutledg pr 0 1 0 0
Quirozc 4 0 1 0 Arenad3b 4 0 1 1
Affeldtp 0 0 0 0 Torrealc 3 0 1 0
BCrwfrss 3 0 0 0 JHerrrss 3 00 0
M.Cainp 2 0 0 0 JDLRsp 2 00 0
HSnchzc 0 00 0 WLopezp 0 00 0
Outmn p 0 00 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Colvin ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 171 Totals 3024 2
San Francisco 000 001 000 1
Colorado 100 000 001 2
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Sandoval (10), J.Perez (1). DP-Colorado
1. LOB-San Francisco 6, Colorado 5.2B-
Posey (23), Co.Dickerson (4). SB-An.Torres
(3), Rutledge (6). CS-An.Torres (2). S-Scu-
taro, LeMahieu.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
M.Cain 8 3 1 1 1 5
AffeldtL,1-4 2-3 1 1 1 1 0
Colorado
J.DeLaRosa 6 6 1 1 1 4
W.Lopez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Outman 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Belisle 11-30 0 0 0 0
R.BetancourtW,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1
T-2:44. A-44,612 (50,398).

Marlins 7, Padres 1
San Diego Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Forsyth2b 4 0 1 0 Ruggin If 4 1 2 0
Amarstcf 4 0 1 0 Lucaslb 3 1 1 0
QuentinIf 30 1 0 Stantonrf 4 1 1 1
Headly3b 4 0 0 0 Ozunacf 4 1 1 1
Blanks lb 4 0 0 0 Polanc3b 1 1 0 1
Venalerf 4 1 1 0 Dietrch2b 4 1 2 0
Hundlyc 3 0 2 1 Hchvrrss 4 1 1 1
Ciriacoss 3 01 0 Mathisc 3 01 2
Stults p 1 0 0 0 JaTrnrp 3 0 0 0
Stauffrp 1 0 0 0
Kotsayph 1 000
Thayerp 0 0 00
Totals 32 171 Totals 3079 6
San Diego 000 010 000 1
Miami 300 300 10x 7
E-Amarista (3). DP-San Diego 1, Miami 1.
LOB-San Diego 5, Miami 5.2B-Hundley (12).
3B-Venable (4). HR-Stanton (8). S-
Ja.Turner. SF-Polanco.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
Stults L,6-6 32-37 6 5 2 2
Stauffer 31-32 1 1 1 0
Thayer 1 0 0 0 1 1
Miami
Ja.TurnerW,2-0 9 7 1 1 1 7
WP-Stults.
T-2:24. A-19,266 (37,442).


Str Home Away
L-1 27-16 22-18
W-3 24-17 22-19
L-4 23-18 19-20
W-1 24-18 18-21
W-1 22-17 18-23



Str Home Away
W-2 27-11 20-23
L-1 22-16 18-24
W-1 19-18 20-24
W-1 15-24 18-20
W-1 16-24 12-27


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
36 .544 4
38 .531 1 2% 7.
41 .474 5% 7 3.
41 .468 6 7% 5.
46 .410 10% 12 3.


Str Home
L-1 26-16
W-3 24-15
L-1 19-19
W-1 21-18
L-4 17-18


Texas
Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


West Division
L Pct GB WC
33 .588 -
35 .573 1 -
43 .469 9% 7%
46 .432 12% 10%
51 .370 17% 15%


Str Home
W-3 23-15
L-1 25-13
W-5 20-23
L-1 21-21
L-2 16-28


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Milwaukee


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
30 .625 9
31 .613 1 4
35 .563 5 3
45 .430 15% 10% 5
47 .405 17% 12% 4


Str Home
W-8 27-13
W-1 22-16
L-3 26-14
W-1 17-22
L-4 19-23


Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
San Fran.
Los Angeles


West Division
t GB WC


Associated Press
Toronto Blue Jays right fielder Jose Bautista celebrates his solo home run with teammate Jose Reyes on
Saturday in the sixth inning in Boston. The home run was the 200th of Bautista's major league career.



Bautista hits No. 200 en route to win


Blue Jays 6,


Red Sox 2

Associated Press

BOSTON -Jose Bautista hit a
pair of long homers over the
Green Monster, starting with the
200th of his career and following
with a tiebreaking, two-run drive
off Junichi Tazawa in the eighth
inning that led the Toronto Blue
Jays over the Boston Red Sox 6-2.
Bautista put Toronto ahead 2-0
with a solo homer in the sixth, a
drive that cleared a billboard at
the back of the Monster seats in
straightaway left and had the
crowd buzzing for several batters.
He stood at the plate briefly, ad-
miring the ball's flight.
After Shane Victorino's two-run
single against Steve Delabar (5-1)
tied the score in the seventh,
Bautista followed Jose Reyes'
leadoff single in the eighth with a
drive off Tazawa (4-3) that went off
the base of a light-tower in left-
center.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Indians 4, White Sox 3
CHICAGO Nick Swisher singled
in the tiebreaking run in the eighth in-
ning, and the Cleveland Indians beat
the Chicago White Sox for the third
time in less than 24 hours 4-3.
Swisher's homer in the ninth inning
Friday night helped Cleveland secure
a sweep of a marathon doubleheader
Friday night.
This time, Cabrera, Jason Kipnis
and Swisher hit three consecutive
one-out singles off Jesse Crain (2-3)
in the eighth. Crain allowed his first
run since April 12. He hadn't given up
an earned run for 31 outings before
Saturday.
Joe Martinez (1-0), called up from
Triple-A Columbus Saturday, earned
the victory in his first major league ap-
pearance this season.

Angels 7, Astros 2
HOUSTON Joe Blanton pitched
seven sharp innings, and Howie Kendrick
and Chris lannetta both homered to
give the Los Angeles Angels a 7-2 win
over the Houston Astros.
Alberto Callaspo and Erick Aybar
drove in two runs apiece in a big
fourth inning to help Los Angeles to its
fifth straight win.
Blanton (2-10) tied season lows with
three hits and two runs, pitching six
scoreless innings before a two-run home
run by Brett Wallace in the seventh.
Kendrick's solo homer came in the
fifth, lannetta tacked on two with a home
run in the eighth, and Josh Hamilton
doubled and likely robbed Houston of
two home runs with big defensive plays.

Twins 6, Royals 2
MINNEAPOLIS Kyle Gibson
pitched six solid innings in his major
league debut, and Trevor Plouffe
homered to help the Minnesota Twins
beat the Kansas City Royals 6-2.
Gibson (1-0) allowed two runs and
eight hits, and he struck out five to be-
come the first first-round pick in Twins
history to win a start in his major
league debut. He had plenty of early
help as Minnesota scored five in the
first inning.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 19, Chicago White Sox 10, 1st game
Baltimore 4, N.Y Yankees 3
Detroit 6, Tampa Bay 3
Boston 7, Toronto 5
Texas 4, Cincinnati 0
Kansas City 9, Minnesota 3
L.A. Angels 4, Houston 2
Cleveland 9, Chicago White Sox 8, 2nd game
Oakland 6, St. Louis 1
Seattle 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10 innings
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 7, Oakland 1
Toronto 6, Boston 2
Cleveland 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 6, Kansas City 2
L.A. Angels 7, Houston 2
Chicago Cubs 5, Seattle 3, 11 innings
Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 3, 10 innings
Baltimore 11, N.YYankees 3
Cincinnati at Texas, late
Sunday's Games
Toronto (Buehrle 4-5) at Boston (Dempster 5-8), 1:35 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 4-5) at Tampa Bay(Hellicksn 6-3), 1:40p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 9-6) at White Sox (Sale 5-6), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Santana 5-5) at Minnesota (Crreia 6-5), 2:10 p.m.
Angels (C.Wilson 7-5) at Houston (Harrell 5-8), 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 7-1) at Texas (Darvish 7-3), 3:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 4-2) at Oakland (Milone 6-7), 4:05 p.m.
Cubs (Jackson 3-10) at Seattle (Bonderman 1-1), 4:10 p.m.
Yankees (Kuroda 7-5) at Baltimore (Tillman 9-2), 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 10, Milwaukee 3
San Diego 9, Miami 2
Washington 6, N.Y Mets 4
Atlanta 3, Arizona 0
Texas 4, Cincinnati 0
Colorado 4, San Francisco 1
Oakland 6, St. Louis 1
Seattle 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10 innings
Philadelphia 16, L.A. Dodgers 1
Saturday's Games
N.Y Mets 5, Washington 1
Atlanta 11, Arizona 5
St. Louis 7, Oakland 1
Colorado 2, San Francisco 1
Miami 7, San Diego 1
Chicago Cubs 5, Seattle 3, 11 innings
Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 1
Cincinnati at Texas, late
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday's Games
San Diego(Cashner 5-3) at Miami (Eovaldi 1-0), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (Gonzalez 4-3) at Mets (Wheeler 1-0), 1:10 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 3-9) at Atlanta (Maholm 8-6), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 3-6) at Pittsburgh (Morton 1-1), 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 7-1) at Texas (Darvish 7-3), 3:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 4-2) at Oakland (Milone 6-7), 4:05 p.m.
Cubs (Jackson 3-10) at Seattle (Bonderman 1-1), 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Kendrick 7-4) at Dodgers (Fife 2-2), 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 7-5) at Colorado (Pomeranz 0-0),
4:10 p.m.


Orioles 11, Yankees 3
BALTIMORE Chris Davis home-
red twice to raise his major league-
leading total to 30, and the Baltimore
Orioles beat the Yankees 11-3 to extend
New York's losing streak to four games.
Davis hit a three-run drive in the first
inning and added a two-run shot in the
sixth, his third multihomer game of the
season. The five RBIs gave him 79,
second-most in the big leagues and
just six short of his career high.
Ryan Flaherty also homered for the
Orioles, who built a 9-0 lead in the
third against David Phelps (5-5).

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Mets 5, Nationals 1
NEW YORK- Dillon Gee beat
Washington for the third time this sea-
son and the New York Mets scored
the go-ahead run when third baseman
Ryan Zimmerman and shortstop lan
Desmond made errors on the same
strange play to top the Nationals 5-1.
Daniel Murphy delivered three hits
and first baseman Josh Satin started a
pair of nifty double plays for the Mets.
The Nationals fell back to .500.
Gee (6-7) limited Washington to
one run in six innings, working around
six hits and three walks.


Braves 11, D'backs 5
ATLANTA- Jason Heyward hit a
tying RBI double and Andrelton Simmons
scored the go-ahead run on the same
play in a seven-run eighth inning that
gave the Atlanta Braves an 11-5 vic-
tory over the Arizona Diamondbacks.
The Braves rallied for their 23rd
comeback victory, tops in the National
League. Atlanta has won two straight
and four of five to lead Washington by
6 1/2 games in the NL East.

Rockies 2, Giants 1
DENVER Nolan Arenado hit a
game-ending single with two outs in
the ninth inning to lift the Colorado
Rockies to a 2-1 victory over the San
Francisco Giants, losers of six straight
for the first time in three years.
Michael Cuddyer singled in the first
inning to extend his hitting streak to 26
straight games.
Rafael Betancourt (2-3) got the win
in his first appearance since May 31.

Marlins 7, Padres 1
MIAMI Jacob Turner pitched a
seven-hitter for his first complete game
in 19 career starts, helping the Miami
Marlins beat the San Diego Padres 7-1.
The complete game was the first for
the Marlins this year. They had been
outscored 20-3 while losing their first four
games to San Diego this season, but
the lowest-scoring team in the majors
gave Turner a 6-0 lead after four innings.
Giancarlo Stanton hit his eighth
home run, Jeff Mathis had two RBIs
and Placido Polanco became the 22nd
active player to score 1,000 runs.

Pirates 2, Brewers 1
PITTSBURGH Pedro Alvarez
and Garrett Jones each homered and
Francisco Liriano pitched six strong in-
nings as the surging Pittsburgh Pirates
won their eighth straight game, 2-1
over the Milwaukee Brewers.
Alvarez hit his 20th home run with
one out in the second inning to extend
his hitting streak to 12 games and
help the Pirates to their longest win-
ning streak since 2004. Pittsburgh,
which has endured 20 consecutive
losing seasons, has the best record in
the major leagues at 50-30.

INTERLEAGUE

Cardinals 7, Athletics 1
OAKLAND, Calif. -Adam Wain-
wright pitched a five-hitter to become
the NL's second 11-game winner, Matt
Adams had his first two-homer game
and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the
Oakland Athletics 7-1.
Wainwright (11-5) tied Washington's
Jordan Zimmerman for most wins in the
NL. He struck out eight and walked two
in a 112-pitch performance for his
fourth complete game this year and
15th of his career.

Cubs 5, Mariners 3
SEATTLE -Alfonso Soriano hit a
two-run homer in the 11th inning to lift
the Chicago Cubs to a 5-3 victory over
the Seattle Mariners.
Nate Schierholtz opened the 11th
with a drag bunt off Oliver Perez (2-2).
Soriano then connected on a 1-2 pitch
over the center-field wall, his ninth.
The Mariners had tied the game
with two outs in the ninth. Pinch-hitter
Henry Blanco earned a one-out walk
off Kevin Gregg to start the rally.


AL

Blue Jays 6, Red Sox 2


Toronto
ab
Reyes ss 5
Bautist rf 4
Encrnc dh 4
Lindlb 4
DeRosa3b 3
Bnifc ph-2b 1
RDavis If 2
CIRsms cf 4
Arencii c 4
Mztur 2b-3b 4
Totals 35
Toronto
Boston


Boston
r h bi
2 2 1 Ellsurycf
2 2 3 Victorn rf
1 0 0 Pedroia 2b
0 3 1 D.Ortizdh
00 0 Napolilb
0 00 Navalf
0 1 0 Sltlmch c
0 1 0 Iglesias ss
1 1 0 Jo.Diaz3b
0 0 0 Carp ph
6105 Totals
100 001 022
000 000 200


ab rh bi
5020
4022
4020
4 0 1 0
4000
3000
4020
4 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
0000
35210 2
6
2


E-M.Izturis (8), Napoli (5), Jo.Diaz (1). DP-
Toronto 1, Boston 1. LOB-Toronto 5, Boston 8.
2B-R.Davis (5), Victorino (10), Pedroia (22).
3B-Lind (1). HR-Bautista 2 (18). SB-Bautista
(6), R.Davis 2 (18). CS-R.Davis (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
E.Rogers 6 6 0 0 1 6
Oliver H,5 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
DelabarW,5-1 BS,3-312-32 0 0 0 4
Wagner 1 0 0 0 1 0
Boston
Doubront 61-35 2 2 3 6
A.Wilson 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
TazawaL,4-3 1 3 2 2 0 0
Breslow 1 2 2 0 0 1
WP-E.Rogers.
T-3:05. A-37,437 (37,071).

Indians 4, White Sox 3
Cleveland Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourncf 3 1 0 0 DeAzacf 5 0 1 0
ACarerss 4 22 1 Gimenz c 0 00 0
Kipnis2b 3 12 2 AIRmrzss 5 0 1 0
Swisherlb 3 0 1 1 Riosrf 4 1 1 0
Brantlylf 4 02 0 A.Dunndh 5 00 0
CSantnc 4 01 0 Kppngrlb 4 1 1 0
Giambidh 2 00 0 Gillaspi3b 3 1 2 1
MrRynl ph-dh2 0 1 0 Viciedo If 4 0 3 1
Chsnhll3b 2 00 0 Bckhm2b 3 0 1 0
Aviles ph-3b2 0 0 0 Flowrs c 3 0 1 1
Stubbs rf 3 00 0 JrDnks ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 49 4 Totals 37311 3
Cleveland 000 102 010 4
Chicago 010 020 000 3
DP-Chicago 4. LOB-Cleveland 4, Chicago 11.
2B-C.Santana (20), Viciedo (10), Flowers (10).
HR-A.Cabrera (6), Kipnis (12). SB-Kipnis
(19), Brantley (8), Rios (14).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
U.Jimenez 5 9 3 3 4 8
Jo.MartinezW,1-0 2 2 0 0 0 1
J.SmithH,7 1 0 0 0 0 0
C.PerezS,7-9 1 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Axelrod 6 5 3 3 3 3
Thornton 1 0 0 0 0 1
CrainL,2-3 1 3 1 1 0 0
N.Jones 1 1 0 0 0 0
T-3:05. A-26,289 (40,615).

Angels 7, Astros 2


Los Angeles Houston
ab r h bi
Aybarss 5 02 2 Elmoress
Trout If-cf 4 0 1 0 Altuve 2b
Pujols dh 4 0 0 0 JCastro c
Trumolb 5 12 0 Carterlf
HKndrc2b 4 2 1 1 JDMrtnrf
Hamltnrf 3 1 1 0 Wallaclb
Callasp3b 4 2 2 2 Dmngz3b
lannettc 4 1 1 2 Kraussdh
Bourjos cf 1 0 0 0 BBarns cf
ShuckIf 2 0 1 0
Totals 36 7117 Totals


ab r h bi
4000
4 0 1 0
4010
4000
2 1 1 0
2110
4000
4112
3000
3000
3 0 1 0
30102 4 2
312 4 2


Los Angeles 000 410 020 7
Houston 000 000 200 2
E-Elmore 2 (2). DP-Houston 1. LOB-Los An-
geles 7, Houston 4. 2B-Trout (25), Hamilton
(15), Altuve (15). HR-H.Kendrick (9), lannetta
(6), Wallace (1). CS-Shuck (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
BlantonW,2-10 7 3 2 2 2 6
D.DeLaRosa 1 0 0 0 0 2
Richards 1 1 0 0 0 2
Houston
LylesL,4-3 4 5 4 4 2 1
Fields 2 1 1 1 0 0
Ambriz 1 1 0 0 0 0
Blackley 1 3 2 2 0 1
W.Wright 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Lyles(H.Kendrick Bourjos).WP-Blanton.
T-3:01. A-26,650 (42,060).

Twins 6, Royals 2


Kansas City Minnesota
ab r h bi
AGordn If 5 00 0 Thoms cf
AEscorss 4 1 1 1 Dozier2b
Hosmerlb 3 0 2 0 Mauerc
BButlerdh 4 0 1 0 Mornealb
S.Perezc 4 0 2 1 Plouffedh
Mostks 3b 4 0 2 0 Arcia If
L.Cainrf 4 00 0 Parmel rf
MTejad 2b 4 0 1 0 Carroll 3b
Dyson cf 3 1 1 0 Flormn ss
Francrph 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 2102 Totals


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
3 2 1 0
4010
3210


3 1 1 3
2100

3 1 0 0
3122
3113
4000
3100
4020
3021

296 9 6


Kansas City 002 000 000 2
Minnesota 510 000 OOx 6
DP-Kansas City 1, Minnesota 1. LOB-Kansas
City 9, Minnesota 5.2B-Moustakas (11), M.Te-
jada (3), Morneau (22). HR-Plouffe (6). SB-
Dyson (10). CS-Thomas (3). SF-Plouffe.
IP H RERBBSO


Kansas City
W.Davis L,4-6
W.Smith
Hochevar
Minnesota
Gibson W,1-0
Duensing
Fien
Perkins


Duensing pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
W.Davis pitched to 3 batters in the 2nd.
HBP-by Gibson (A.Escobar).
T-2:53. A-36,881 (39,021).

Orioles 11, Yankees 3


NewYork

Gardnrcf
J.Nix ss
Cano 2b
AIGnzlz 3b
V.Wells dh
ISuzuki rf
Almont If


Baltimore
r h bi
0 2 1 McLoth If
1 1 0 Machd3b
1 2 0 Markks rf
0 0 0 A.Jones cf
0 1 0 C.Davislb
0 1 0 Wieters c
0 1 1 Tegrdn c


ab rh bi
5000
5110
5230
5 1 1 1
3325
41200 0
0000


DAdms3b-2b30 1 0 Hardyss 3 1 2 0
Overaylb 4 0 1 0 ACasill2b 0 0 0 0
AuRmnc 2 00 0 ChDckrdh 4 1 2 2
Hafner ph 1 0 0 0 Flahrty 2b-ss 4 1 2 3
CStwrtc 1 1 1 0
Totals 36 3112 Totals 38111511
NewYork 000 002 001 3
Baltimore 405 002 00x 11
E-C.Davis (3). DP-NewYork 1, Baltimore 2.
LOB-New York 10, Baltimore 5. 2B-Gardner
2 (20), J.Nix (7), Almonte (3), C.Stewart (2), Wi-
eters (17), Ch.Dickerson (5). HR-C.Davis 2
(30), Flaherty (6). SF-Almonte.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
D.Phelps L,5-5 21-39 9 9 2 1
Nova 52-36 2 2 0 4
Baltimore
BrittonW,2-2 52-36 2 1 3 1
Jurrjens 21-33 0 0 0 1
Strop 1 2 1 1 0 1
T-2:51. A-46,607 (45,971).


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 B5




B6 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


Mayhem marks start of 100th Tour de France


Associated Press


BASTIA, Corsica Riders at
the Tour de France know to expect
the unexpected. But nothing could
have prepared them for the may-
hem that turned Saturday's first
stage of the 100th Tour into a
demolition derby on two wheels.
Seemingly for the first time at
the 110-year-old race, one of the
big buses that carry the teams
around France when they're not
on their bikes got stuck at the fin-
ish line, literally wedged under
scaffolding, unable to move. The
timing couldn't have been worse:
The blockage happened as the
speeding peloton was racing for
home, less than 12 miles out.
Fearing the worst a possible
collision between 198 riders and
the bus race organizers took
the split-second decision to
shorten the race. Word went out
to riders over their radios and
they adapted tactics accordingly,
cranking up their speed another
notch to be first to the new line,
now 1.8 miles closer than origi-
nally planned.


Associated Press
Murilo Antoniobil Fischer of Brazil, center left, Tony Martin of Germany,
center right, and Tony Gallopin of France, right, wait for medical as-
sistance Saturday after crashing in the last kilometers of the first
stage of the Tour de France.


Then, somewhat miraculously,
the bus wriggled free. So organ-
izers reverted to Plan A. Again
over the radios, word went out to
by-now confused riders and
teams that the race would finish
as first intended.


Then, bam! Two riders collided
and one went down, setting off a
chain of spills that scythed through
the pack like a bowling ball.
And this was just Day One. The
bad news for riders: They've still
got another 20 stages and 1,982


more miles to survive to the fin-
ish in Paris.
Keeping his head and riding
his luck amid the chaos, Marcel
Kittel sprinted for the win,
claiming the first yellow jersey
"It feels like I have gold on my
shoulders," said the German rider
for the Argos-Shimano team.
Even for the Tour, which has
seen more than its fair share of
dramas in 99 previous editions,
Saturday's calamitous chain of
events was exceptional.
"We've never had to change
the finish line before," said Jean-
Francois Pescheux, the event di-
rector who helps pick the route
each year. "There's never been a
bus stuck before."
Because of what Pescheux called
"the little bout of panic and
crashes" caused by this confusion,
organizers subsequently decided
to give everyone the same time
as Kittel 4 hours, 56 minutes,
52 seconds over the 132-mile trek
from the port town of Porto Vecchio
to Bastia in the north of the island.
That means no one was penal-
ized by Saturday's events.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tour de France results
Saturday at Bastia, Corsica
First Stage
A 132.4-mile flat ride from Porto-Vecchio
to Bastia
1. Marcel Kittel, Germany, Team Argos-Shimano,
4 hours, 56 minutes, 52 seconds.
2.Alexander Kristoff, Norway Katusha, same time.
3. Dannyvan Poppel, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-
DCM, same time.
4. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-Sharp, same time.
5. Matteo Trentin, Italy, Omega Pharma-Quick
Step, same time.
6. Samuel Dumoulin, France, AG2R La Mondi-
ale, same time.
7. Gregory Henderson, New Zealand, Lotto-
Belisol, same time.
8. Jurgen Roelandts, Belgium, Lotto-Belisol,
same time.
9. Jose Joaquin Rjas, Spain, Movistar, same time.
10. Kris Boeckmans, Belgium, Vacansoleil-
DCM, same time.
11. Daryl Impey, South Africa, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
12. Sep Vanmarcke, Belgium, Belkin Pro Cy-
cling, same time.
13. Julien Simon, France, Sojasun, same time.
14. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, Team Saxo-Tinkoff,
same time.
15. Simon Gerrans, Australia, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
16. Andrey Kashechkin, Kazakhstan, Astana,
same time.
17. Jose Ivan Gutierrez, Spain, Movistar, same time.
18. Ruben Perez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
same time.
19. Michael Albasini, Switzerland, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
20. Maarten Wynants, Belgium, Belkin Pro Cy-
cling, same time.


Luiten leads Irish Open

by 1 after three rounds


Associated Press

MAYNOOTH, Ireland -
Dutch golfer Joost Luiten
will take a one-shot lead
into the final round at the
Irish Open on Sunday with
a chance at his second vic-
tory this month.
Luiten moved to 13 under
par and one ahead of
Pablo Larrazabal of Spain


after both players shot
bogey-free 6-under 66s at
Carton House on Saturday
Luiten won the Lyoness
Open in Austria this month
for the second European
Tour title of his seven-year
pro career.
England's Robert Rock
(71) was in third place on
10 under and still within
sight.


Associated Press
D.H. Lee sets up his putt on the third green Saturday during the third round of the AT&T National at Congressional
Country Club in Bethesda, Md.



After three rounds, four-way



tie for lead at Congressional


Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. A triple
bogey for Bill Haas. Double bogeys
for Andres Romero and Roberto
Castro. They still wound up in a
four-way tie for the lead Saturday in
the AT&T National with James
Driscoll, whose third round was
pleasantly dull by comparison.
Castro put the perfect finishing
touch on this most wild day at Con-
gressional when he hit his ap-
proach into the water left of the
18th green, and then chipped in for
par from 80 feet to salvage an even-
par 71 and keep a share of the lead.
Haas made nine birdies and had
to settle for a 68, courtesy of two
wedge shots that cost him four
shots, including his triple bogey on
the beastly 1lth hole. Romero had a
three-shot lead at one point, and
then it was gone. He went from the
water to a bunker on the 11th for
double bogey and followed that with
a bogey on the next hole. He made
six pars the rest of the way for a 70.
Driscoll, meanwhile, motored
along without too much excitement.
He had a 68, the only player in the
field to break 70 all three rounds.
Coming off a bogey on the 15th,
Driscoll though he might be headed
for another with a poor tee shot But
he knocked a 4-iron out of the
rough, barely got onto the green and
rolled in a 25-foot birdie.
They were at 7-under 206, and
more fun awaits Sunday
Ten players were separated by
four shots going into the final
round, a group that includes 19-


year-old Jordan Spieth. He had a
two-shot lead after opening with
two straight birdies, and then went
through a stretch of missing five putts
inside 8 feet on a four-hole stretch.
One of them was a three-putt from
5 feet for double bogey on No. 8.
Spieth had a 74, though he's still in
the game, just three shots behind.
"A wild day," Castro said.
Jason Kokrak had a 70 and was
one shot out of the lead, while Char-
lie Wi had a 29 on the front nine and
shot 65 to finish two shots behind,
along with Tom Gillis (66). Spieth
was in the group at 209 with Brandt
Snedeker, who had a 69.
If Saturday was any indication,
expect anything in the final round,
especially since seven of those 10
players have never won on the PGA
Tour.
Haas was five shots behind after
his triple bogey Four holes later, he
had the lead to himself.
It looked early on as though the
more times Spieth put himself in
contention, the more comfortable
he would be. That only lasted a
short time.
He opened with a 10-foot birdie
putt and followed that with a tee
shot that used the backstop per-
fectly on the par-3 second, the ball
rolling back down the hill to 2 feet
for a tap-in birdie. After a good par
on the third hole, he had a two-shot
lead.
Five holes later, he was four shots
behind.
That's how quickly the scores
changed on a balmy Saturday at
Congressional.


Couples leads at midway
point of Senior Players
PITTSBURGH Fred Couples
shot an 8-under 62 to take a four-
shot lead over John Huston at the
midway point of the Senior Players
Championship.
Couples finished the rain-delayed
second round at Fox Chapel Golf
Club early Saturday morning with a
36-hole score to 12 under. It's the
second straight year the Hall of
Famer has taken the lead at the
midway point of one of the Champi-
ons Tour's biggest events.
The 62 tied a Champions Tour
record for lowest round in a major,
last matched by Olin Browne during
the 2012 Senior Players.
Couples was 7 under through 11
holes on Friday before rain inter-
rupted play. He two-putted for par
from 60 feet on the par-3 third when
play resumed at 8 a.m. Saturday.
Five more pars followed before he
finished up with a birdie on the par-
4 ninth to reach 12-under.
Huston shot 3-under 67 and is at
8 under as he pursues his first
major title. Huston was two shots
back when play was suspended, in-
cluding an eagle from the fairway
on No. 15. He slipped four back
after bogeying the 17th.
Jeff Hart and Duffy Waldorf are
four shots behind Couples at 7
under.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Pablo Larrazabal lines up a putt on the 18th hole Saturday
during round three of the Irish Open.



Park leads at


Women's Open


after second round


Associated Press

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y -
Inbee Park led the U.S.
Women's Openbytwo strokes
after the end of the fog-
suspended second round.
Jodi Ewart Shadoff
birdied the 18th hole Sat-
urday morning to move into
sole possession of third
place and a spot in the last
group with Park and I.K.
Kim when the third round
starts later in the day She
had three holes to play
when the horn sounded


Friday evening and wound
up shooting a 69 for a 5-
under total.
Park and Kim finished
their rounds Friday. Park
is at 9 under and Kim at 7
under
Players will start in
groups of three from the
first and 10th tees for the
third round.
The cut was at 6 over.
Among those just missing
it were five-time major
champion Yani Tseng and
seven-time major champ
Juli Inkster


Associated Press
Jessica Korda tees off the second hole Saturday during
the third round at the U.S. Women's Open at Sebonack
Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y.


WIMBLEDON
Continued from Page B1

"Everything went my way,"
Djokovic said. "I did everything
I wanted to do.... When you play
that well, obviously you feel
great, you feel confident. This
kind of performance came in the
right time for me."
He finished with 38 winners
and just three unforced errors in
a masterful display that ce-
mented his status as the favorite
to win a second Wimbledon title,
having seen seven-time cham-
pion Roger Federer and two-
time winner Rafael Nadal
already knocked out.


He will next face Tommy
Haas, the 35-year-old German
who is enjoying a late career re-
vival and beat Feliciano Lopez
of Spain 4-6, 6-2, 7-5, 6-4.
"He's playing maybe the best
tennis ever," Djokovic said. "I
don't see any clear favorite to be
honest"
Most fans probably do, espe-
cially after Djokovic picked
apart Chardy so convincingly
Even though fourth-seeded
David Ferrer managed to ad-
vance in five sets and remain on
course for a semifinal against
Djokovic, most fans are probably
already penciling the Serb's
name in the final.
Williams picked up where
Djokovic left off, dominating


Date-Krumm in their first ca-
reer meeting.
Date-Krumm was the oldest
woman to reach the third round
of Wimbledon in the Open era -
having made the semifinals here
in 1996 and the Japanese vet-
eran never stood a chance
against the power game of the
31-year-old Williams.
Williams finished with 28 win-
ners to 8 for Date-Krumm and
broke her five times. The five-
time champion will next face
Sabine Lisicki of Germany
"It's unbelievable playing
here on Centre Court, closed
roof, under the lights," Williams
said. "I don't think it gets any
better for me than a closed roof
on grass."


Ferrer had a much tougher
time, struggling with blisters on
his foot and the tenacious game
of Alexandr Dolgopolov of
Ukraine before winning 6-7 (6),
7-6 (2), 2-6, 6-1, 6-2.
Earlier, Petra Kvitova avoided
becoming the latest former
champion to be knocked out in
the first week, rallying from a
break down in the final set to
beat Ekaterina Makarova of
Russia 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.
Last year's runner-up, Agnieszka
Radwanska, also advanced, while
Centre Court featured another
upset when ninth-seeded Richard
Gasquet lost to Bernard Tomic,
the Australian whose father has
been barred from tournaments
because of an assault case.


Radwanska held off a hard-
serving performance by Ameri-
can teenager Madison Keys to
win 7-5, 4-6, 6-3. Tomic beat Gas-
quet 7-6 (7), 5-7, 7-5, 7-6 (5).
Tomas Berdych and No. 8
Juan Martin del Potro also ad-
vanced, although the latter said
he would need to see a doctor
after injuring his ankle and knee.
Laura Robson gave the crowd
another reason to cheer when
she became the first British
woman since Sam Smith in 1998
to reach the fourth round.
Igor Sijsling of Netherlands
retired against Croatia's Ivan
Dodig when trailing 6-0, 6-1, 1-0,
the 13th retirement or walkover
of the tournament. That equals a
Wimbledon record from 2008.








COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Economy back on track,



district's future bright


Session is over, and I am back home in
Citrus County. Since being back, I have
spent a lot of time travelling the district
to meet constituents, various civic organizations
and community leaders. I While travelling, I
have noticed many positive things happening in
our community, one of the most encouraging
being "help wanted" signs.

In the past two years, unemployment has continued to drop as we
are getting more people back to work. Businesses are expanding
and hiring more workers; couple that with seeing more and more
commercial buildings being built and that says to me the business
community is gaining confidence in our state's economy and is will-
ing to invest its capital to grow business here in our community.
With unemployment at 7.1 percent and falling, and the Consumer
Price Index the highest it's been in six years, I am encouraged and
proud of what we as Floridians have done to rise up out of a bad sit-
uation and become an economic example for the rest of the country.
That being said, we can all admit that there is still much work to
be done. The first thing we must do is fight the negative mindset of
the past several years. We need to realize the bottom has been hit
and, as a district, now is the time to move upward. Although we see
progress being made, I know there is a lingering financial effect to
city, county and school budgets. The truth is, we need to address the
situation, and with a positive mindset, attack these budget issues with
vigor. It's important that we be unafraid while focusing on the future.
A priority for this office is to strongly promote infrastructure,
making sure we secure our future by championing projects like the
expansion of the Suncoast Parkway. Not just Suncoast 2; for long-term
prosperity it is vitally important that we push strongly for Suncoast
3, which will finally create a western corridor and help to diversify
our economy. We need to a have solid long-term vision of what we
want our district to be and start implementing steps so when we do
have opportunities we are ready and welcome them with open arms.
While we look to take steps to grow our economy, it is vital we do
so while finding the appropriate balance between economic growth
and protecting the environmental gem that is our district. These
natural resources are one of the defining qualities of our district,
and I want to ensure they are around for many generations to come.
I will continue to push for the funding of projects like cleaning up
King's Bay and protecting the manatees, but the biggest issue I see
right now is our water. Especially as we grow, it is important we be
responsible and transparent about our water use and look to find
alternative ways to access fresh water so that we don't put undue
stress on the aquifer. I am currently exploring, with state agencies
and industry professionals, the possibility of desalination in our
community. The power plants and pumping stations associated
with them already provide us with a majority of the infrastructure
needed and drastically reduces the conversion costs to changing
those facilities over to desalination stations. Implemented, it would
at the least enable Duke Energy and some other large single entities


Jimmie T. Smith
GUEST COLUMN


to have a sustainable water
supply that does not require
them to pull from the aquifer.
For many this is a passionate
issue and it is important we
use that passion in the right
way to find real, viable an-
swers to this issue. We can't
have one without the other.
This district can't be so "pro-
growth" we forget about our
environmental responsibili-
ties, but we also can't rope off
the district. Our district is the
most successful and most
beautiful when the appropri-
ate balance is struck between
a flourishing commerce,
beautiful springs, manatees
and clean water.
The future of this district is
bright, and I believe having as
many entities at the table
communicating and sharing
their knowledge is vital to our
success. We are not all going
to agree on every issue, but
when everyone is at the table
we can learn from one an-
other, resolve issues faster,
and set a long-term course of
prosperity for this district.


Jimmie T. Smith is the District
34 Representative in the Florida
House. He lives in Citrus County.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Expanded

online

delivery

on its way
A s technology
races ahead, or-
ganizations such
as the Chronicle have to
adjust the approach we
use doing business.
In the early 1990s, the
Chronicle became one
of the first newspapers
in Florida to deliver its
daily news via the Inter-
net. Longtime residents
will remember that the
Chronicle was one of the
first local businesses to
actually sell Internet ac-
cess on a local level.
We have published a
daily website for nearly
20 years and have per-
mitted unlimited access
to anyone who wanted to
view our news and ad-
vertising information.
Going forward, we will
continue to produce our
website, but we're going
to focus on providing
service to our customers
as opposed to the whole
wide world.
Customers of the
Chronicle will have un-
limited 24-hour access
to our website and to all
the information we
gather But going for-
ward, we are going to
limit the access that
non-Chronicle cus-
tomers have to the site.
Nonsubscribers to the
newspaper will soon
find their access to the
Chronicle website lim-
ited to eight stories per
month.
The people reading
this column this morn-
ing in the printed edi-
tion of the Chronicle are
the ones who, for the
past 20 years, have paid
for the creation and
management of the
website.
During the busy sea-
son, we deliver the
Chronicle to about
30,000 homes in our
community. You might
be surprised to learn
that another 10,000 peo-
ple visit our website
each day and consume
much of the same news.
We are a business, and
it doesn't make a huge
amount of sense to
charge one group of peo-
ple for news and infor-
mation and then give it
away for free to another
See Page C3


In 'Brokers of Deceit,'Arab perspective prevails


MICHAEL FRANCIS
For the Chronicle
Rashid Khalidi, "Brokers of Deceit"
(Boston, Beacon Press, 2013, 167
pages), $25.95.
Ever since President Harry Tru-
man stepped forward and rec-
ognized Israel as a country in
1948, the United States has had an inti-
mate relationship with this country to
which so many Jews came after the
horrors of World War II and the Holo-
caust. The United States took leader-
ship in convincing others to recognize
this new state in what had been a
British colony in part, perhaps, as a
way of compensating for our slowness
in recognizing the Holocaust Adolf
Hitler had unleashed.
Since that time, we have assisted mil-
itarily and financially while at the same
time trying to help reach a peace agree-
ment between the new state and the
refugees (calling themselves Palestini-
ans) that resulted from the war that cre-
ated Israel. American presidents since
Truman have all tried to broker a


Book REVIEW
peace accord between the Israeli gov-
ernment and groups that claim to rep-
resent the Palestinians driven off their
land in 1948 and who lost territory in '
the various wars since then. .
This is a difficult situation to discuss "
because many Israelis claim there is no
such thing as a Palestinian, there is dis-
agreement over who started which war,
the role of the Arab governments, who
violated various peace agreements,
America's support of the Israeli gov- .
ernment with military assistance, who :- .- -"
speaks for the so-called Palestinians,
who's a terrorist and who is a patriot,--
the supposed influence of the Jewish
press in America and so forth.
It does seem fair to say that the Is-
raeli government has been massively .
more effective at getting its interpreta- .
tion of Israeli situation across than the Associated Press
opponents have been in stating the Palestinian children look at damage following an Israeli air strike Monday in Al-Zawaida
Palestinian side of the story This book in the central Gaza Strip. Israeli aircraft pounded targets in the Gaza Strip after rockets
presents a coherent argument for the were fired at Israel from the territory, the military said, unsettling a tenuous cease-fire
between Israel and Hamas. The hostilities between Palestinians and Israelis have been
See Page C3 raging since 1948.




"The a
Page C2 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Itar cloth of one aeon is the doormat of the next."
Mark Twain, "Notebook," 1935


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ..............................................editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
SMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
'You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

TOUGH CHOICES





Tax hike of




concern to





taxpayers


While county commis-
sioners are hopeful
they can right the
budget without additional
cuts, we feel the board needs
to cut deeper rather than re-
lying strictly on raising taxes.
So far the budget meetings
have been sparsely attended.
However, if the hike in millage
and MSBU for fire service
stays, taxpayers
will feel the pain THE I
when they open
their TRIM no- Budget
tices in August. being b
We understand
tough choices must OUR 01
be made. Raises
haven't been given Reconsi
to county employ-
ees in five years. Services
need to be maintained. Short-
ages in tax revenue need to
be covered and public safety
(fire and policing) are getting
more expensive each year.
But we are seeing the same
thing throughout the county.
Unemployment in Citrus
County is still higher than
state and national averages.
Families have been forced to
drop personal amenities as
they have less money coming
in. Private companies have
struggled, gone out of busi-
ness or frozen wages and hir-
ing for six years now.
Commissioners need to un-
derstand the message they
send when they talk of raising
taxes without making addi-
tional cuts to services. Tax-
payers are fed up and in
many cases incapable of
tightening their belts any-
more but the county is.
While the decision to cut
services and continue hiring
and raise freezes is a tough


Keep alert at tollbooth
Some helpful information about
coming north on the Suncoast
Parkway at night: Right after
you pay your toll and you go
through to come up onto (U.S.)
98, the two lanes southbound
and northbound join and there's
no signs or anything. If some-
body doesn't know where they're
going, they could go left
and they'd hit head-on
for somebody that's
getting on the toll road.
So whoever designed
that and has it set up,
evidently doesn't know
what they're doing. But
we came home last
night that way and we
know we go to the right CAL
and a car passed us 563
right on our left. There's U6 "
no dividing or anything.
That is very dangerous and it
should be noted in here so peo-
ple know.
Thanks for the help
I'd like to say thank you to the
sheriff's department and all the
wonderful people that helped us
round up our horses the other
morning. There are some really
excellent people in this area. No
one was hurt. Everyone was fine.
Again, thank you very much.


c

a

P
d


I
U
-0


one, it is the same one private
business and Citrus County
households have all had to
make. The difference is they
can't cast a vote forcing em-
ployers to raise their pay or
hire them.
The board has a tough
choice: Raise taxes and face
criticism or cut services and
face criticism. The answer is
balance.
SUE: Listen to what
S : the taxpayers are
:loser to saying. Seventy-
ilanced. six percent of all
households in the
'INION: United States are
living paycheck to
ier cuts. paycheck. They
cannot absorb
substantial hikes to their tax
bill. They can live with a loss
of some services, as painful
as it might be. The county still
has not felt the pain quite like
everyone else. As tough as it
is to accept, it is a cold fact
supported by high unemploy-
ment figures, low housing
starts, a slow real estate mar-
ket and a high number of va-
cant foreclosed homes.
It is time for commissioners
to accept they will have less
money to work with and
things will are not what they
used to be at least for the
foreseeable future.
It is time to look creatively
at saving money Consolidate
where you can. Form part-
nerships with other public
bodies to save costs. Nothing
should be sacred and every-
thing is on the table for
discussion.
We urge commissioners not
to use Duke Energy as an ex-
cuse to raise taxes without
making significant cuts.


Type's too small
We see where the new phone-
books have come out again. The
print is so small that even peo-
ple with good eyes have to put
glasses on or use a magnifying
glass to read it. Don't they real-
ize that 85 percent of the peo-
ple in Florida are elderly senior
citizens whose eyes have aged
enough that they need
IND glasses to read regular
Sprint, let alone this tiny
print? We just threw ours
on our woodpile for our
fireplace. That will
make good use of it.
Fairness issue
When I'm having a
garage sale, I have al-
?)579 ways gotten my permit
S from the city. I always
put signs around sev-
eral blocks around my house
the night before and remove
them the same day my sale fin-
ishes. Now I'm told I can only
put signs on my property. Un-
less you live on a main street,
nobody sees the signs. It
doesn't work. How come the
politicians can put up huge
signs anywhere they please, in-
cluding private property? They
leave them up for months at a
time. How fair is that?


Race;

"But history did not end in
1965."
ChiefJustice John
Roberts on Tuesday
WASHINGTON
P rogressives resent
progress when it renders
anachronistic once-valid
reasons for enlarging the federal
government's super-
visory and coercive
powers. Hence they
regret Tuesday's
Supreme Court rul-
ing that progress has
rendered Section 4
of the 1965 Voting
Rights Act unconsti-
tutional.
This section stipu- Georg
lates the formula by OTI
which nine states
and some jurisdic- VOI
tions in others are
brought under Section 5, which
requires them to get federal
permission preclearancee"
- for even the most minor
changes in voting procedures.
The 15th Amendment empow-
ers Congress to enforce with
"appropriate legislation" the
right to vote. Sections 4 and 5
were appropriate 48 years ago,
when the preclearance provi-
sions were enacted for five
years. They have been ex-
tended four times, most re-
cently in 2006 for 25 years.
The VRA is the noblest legis-
lation in American history,
more transformative than the
1862 Homestead Act, the 1862
Morrill Act (land-grant colleges)
or the 1944 GI Bill of Rights. But
extraordinary laws that once
were constitutional, in spite of
being discordant with the nation's
constitutional architecture, can
become unconstitutional when
facts that made the law appro-
priate change. The most recent
data, such as registration and
voting rates, on which Section 4
is based, are from 1972. The
data would have been 59 years
old when the most recent ex-
tension would have expired in
2031. Tuesday's decision pre-
vents this absurdity that Con-
gress embraced.


0


against

In 2009, in a case in which the
court chose not to rule on the
continuing constitutionality of
the VRAs formula, the court -
Chief Justice Roberts writing
for the majority clearly chal-
lenged Congress to update the
VRA because it "imposes cur-
rent burdens and must be justi-
fied by current needs."
On Tuesday,
Roberts tersely said
Section 4 is "based
on decades-old data
and eradicated
practices."
The 2006 exten-
sion was passed by
votes of 390-33 and
98-0 in the House
ge Will and Senate, respec-
HER tively. Justice An-
HER tonin Scalia
CES suggested during
February's oral ar-
gument that these numbers in-
dicated not conviction based on
reflection about continuing ne-
cessities but rather the reluc-
tance of risk-averse legislators
to vote against something with
the "wonderful" name Voting
Rights Act. Scalia should have
cited the actual name of the
2006 extension: the "Fannie
Lou Hamer, Rosa Parks, and
Coretta Scott King Voting
Rights Act Reauthorization and
Amendments Act." It is anti-
constitutional to argue that it
would have been admirable
"restraint" for the court to re-
spect Congress' decision to ex-
tend all of the VRA whether
from conviction, cowardice or
sloth regardless of what the
court has called the act's "sub-
stantial federalism costs."
Tuesday's decision came
nine years after a presidential
election in which most of the
states where higher portions of
whites than blacks were regis-
tered were in states (e.g., Mas-
sachusetts) not covered by
Section 5. The decision came
eight months after a presiden-
tial election in which African-
Americans voted at a higher
rate than whites. It came when
in a majority of the nine states
covered by the preclearance


t time

requirements, blacks are regis-
tered at a higher rate than
whites. It came when Missis-
sippi has more black elected
officials not more per
capital; more than any other
state.
The Supreme Court's 1896
Plessy v Ferguson decision af-
firming the constitutionality of
racial segregation in separate
but supposedly equal public ac-
commodations rejected the
idea that such segregation im-
posed a "badge of inferiority."
But of course it did, as the court
acknowledged in its 1954 school
desegregation ruling. And dur-
ing oral argument in February,
Justice Stephen Breyer sug-
gested the VRA remains consti-
tutional because it
acknowledges the South's con-
tinuing moral inferiority. He
likened Southern racism to a
dormant but still dangerous
disease:
"Imagine a state has a plant
disease, and in 1965 you can
recognize the presence of that
disease. ... Now, it's evolved. ..
But we know one thing: The dis-
ease is still there in the state."
Breyer's insinuation was that
we "know" the covered juris-
dictions remain uniquely dis-
eased, or potentially so.
Tuesday, Roberts' response was
that (in words from a prior
court ruling) "the constitutional
equality of the states is essen-
tial to the harmonious opera-
tion of the scheme upon which
the Republic was organized."
Section 5 is now a nullity be-
cause it lacks force absent a
Section 4 formula for identify-
ing covered jurisdictions, and
today's Congress will properly
refuse to enact another stigma-
tizing formula. On Tuesday,
however, the court paid the
VRA the highest possible trib-
ute by saying the act's key pro-
vision is no longer
constitutional because the act
has changed pertinent facts
that once made it so.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


am
PIn"


-4


LETTER to their

Taxation over and OPINIONS INVITED
b-lT a aQITQ^ar l d mlia I -


Property owners of Citrus
County, our leaders have failed
us. The county leaders are
right now about to approve
new taxes for fire services be-
cause of the shortage caused
by the Duke tax situation. The
resolution is to apply an MSBU
(or MSTU) to cover the short-
age. This type of taxation is
based on a flat fee to support
the fire service. Now all taxes
are really based on the need
for services by the amount of
property owners and residents
of this county, and we have
what is called a millage rate
that is supposed to be raised
and lowered according to the
real needs of this county.
Now, it is said that many
property owners don't pay taxes
for these services because the
assessed value of their property
is very low in comparison to the
average property and it is not
fair that we carry this burden
alone. Even if we raised the as-
sessed value, it would not help
because some property owners
still would not be subject to


this tax based on the assessed
value. So the question is: How
do we get these folks to pay
their fair share of the tax?
Well, the MSBU is the way to
do this, and by taxing us in this
way, all property owners will fund
this service. The resolution be-
fore the board is to lower the
millage rate for property own-
ers that pay for this service
and add a new tax called an
MSBU. At this time, I would
like to inform you all of the


Editor
real problems that are before
us. Yes, we need a fire service
just like we have a sheriff's
service to protect us.
All these services need
county roads to drive on to get
to the emergencies and needs
for services. School buses
transport your children to
school on these same roads.
The county road services is in
a $5 million hole because of this
same shortage (Duke). This Duke
tax problem is going to be very
costly to every property owner
in this county Why don't we just
raise the millage rate to adjust
for all these services and fund
our county in a fair way?
Next the county will add an-
other special assessment to re-
pair the county roads. It is my
belief this county government
is too large and needs to be cut
back to represent the real growth
of the population of this county
Please, just raise the millage
rate. By the way, let's not just
blame Duke Energy the
housing bubble and the econ-
omy are just as much to blame.
Charles Knecht Sr.
Dunnellon


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I


I


a ove assessed vaue


c~"~t~;""i~7lc




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Come with me, Freddy-Boy! We'll make a potful of money!'


A few days ago, I read
the obituary of Slim
Whitman.
He was 90 years old.
Most of us my age or
older know about Slim
Whitman. He was a singer.
He was unusual and, for a
number of years, he was
very popular
When he began in the
late 1940s, he cut quite the
figure in a black and white
suit, with a receding hair-
line, a mustache and a vocal
range which spanned a
full three octaves.
With his yodeling, he
took country music to a
different level with songs


such as his ever-popular
"Indian Love Call." His ca-
reer lasted six decades,
and with the help of TV
commercials, it was evi-
dently very lucrative.
My children accuse me
of embellishing and I
probably do. I use the excuse
that as one grows older, a
haze forms where memory
and imagination meet. Be-
sides, I get it honestly My
mother was an embell-
isher Probably one of her
best embellishments was
the connection between my
father and Slim Whitman.
Fact? Fiction? Some of
both? Probably all of the


foregoing, but it still makes Her recollections were
an interesting story of visits in each others'
My father was homes when
a musician. He the two men
let his picking ..., played and
and singing sang while she
speak for them- and the wife
selves. But, es- enjoyed con-
peciallyafterhe versation and
had passed on, listening.
my mother told So far,
quite the tale there's nothing
about a young Fred Brannen all that un-
fellow with A S usual about
whom Daddy A S Mama's story
jammed while OF LIFE She would
they worked to- then continue
gether building battleships about how when the war
at the Tampa shipyards ended, decisions had to be
during World War II. made about what would be


done next The other young
man Slim Whitman -
had ideas and shared
them with Daddy saying,
"Come with me, Freddy-
Boy! We'll make music and
we'll make a potful of money
We'll make more money
than we can spend!"
Slim Whitman did in-
deed make music. And ap-
parently he didn't die
destitute, so evidently he
made more money than he
could spend.
Daddy didn't go with
him. He chose instead to
go back to Lacoochee and
raise two sons with the
woman he loved. He con-


tinued to play and sing all
of his life, but never as a
professional.
Was that a mistake?
He never seemed to
think so.
And while I might ques-
tion the veracity of my
mother's version of the
events, Slim most certainly
made good on his career
plans; nonetheless, and
without any embellish-
ment of my own, my father
was the best I ever heard.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Dogs will die soon
Really sad on our Animal Control in Citrus
County. I've called the Animal Control twice
about a neighbor being deserted from his
home and leaving his two dogs in the yard
without water and food for over seven days. I
called them. They came out once and left the
man a notice. Called them again a few days
later because his dogs (were) without water.
The man has no power to even get water
from his house. They come out again and
give him another warning and said not for me
to give them food and water and it's been
four days since then and it's pretty sad. Why
can't they just take these dogs in and house
them? I mean, they're waiting for this man to
respond, which the dogs are going to die be-
fore they get their point across. This is a
shame.
Double standard
Why don't the people who support Meek in
investigating the hospital support Adams,
who wanted to investigate the county?
Better for the birds
To the person who thought feeding hum-
mingbirds one cup sugar to two cups water:
Too much sugar will actually cause liver dys-
function. You'll actually be
OUND harming the birds. A quar-
WlN ter cup sugar, one cup
I water boiled two minutes.
Cool it. Sugar water is only
valuable to attract the
f birds, not to nourish them.
If you want to do the birds
a favor, plant acacia, cit-
gCA rus, fuchsia, bottlebrush,
n [rosemary, coral belles,
563-0579 monkey flower, 4 o'clock
snapdragons. These things
will nourish the hummingbirds, not the sugar
water. Please don't do it.
On second review
Your recent article about county employees
being paid equally with everything else on the
average is very misleading when you take into
account medical, the vacation policies, time
off and the amount of hours worked during
the week and figure that in. Your original fig-
ure of $34,000-and-change is probably accu-
rate. But when you add on all those benefits,
it becomes more like a $50,000-a-year job.
These are all things that us on the outside
have to pay extra for or not even made avail-
able to, to try and reach that figure of
$34,000 that you claim is the average. So
once again, your figure is very misleading be-
cause you do not take into account all the
extra perks that county employees do get.
There ought to be a law
I just got a letter telling me I just won $1
million. I am to sign and send (a) check or
money order (for) consideration and process-
ing fee for $15. Can't our U.S. attorney gen-
eral put a stop to this kind of robbery (of)
people who pay the processing fee but never
get a check? This isn't right.


T nZAT IA ON1 T>



"" / d- ." -


4 /*! "

-" M
, .. ,, -
) T^.,I";/,


vWoIYMWeSNOWEm


Hot Corner: PETS


Pets aren't for everyone
I'm calling about people who want
pets in public places, restaurants, stores.
I believe they should not be in restau-
rants and stores when you're not al-
lowed to ask whether they are, for
identification papers to say that they
are. If I'm afraid of a dog, then I'm
frightened. I suggest you stay home and
don't go to restaurants because there
is nowhere to take their dogs. Well,
don't believe that. They've got yards.
They've got parks. There's roads. There's
places you can walk your pet that you
don't have to have them in a restaurant
or a store. And I don't believe it's a good
law. Maybe they have approved it. Maybe
we cannot stop it. But in my opinion,
animals should not be in restaurants
or stores. Leave them home. Walk them
where you can; go to the parks, walk
them down your street, in your yard,
in your house. Let them run around,
whatever. I don't agree with the law.

Pets aren't people
I read all the articles in Sound Off
about people complaining that the an-
imal haters are against them and their
dogs. After reading them all, the only
one thing I can say about it is, a lot of
those people need to get a life. I don't
know what their problem is, but they're
treating a dog or an animal like a human
being. Yes, it's fine to take them with you.
As far as in a restaurant, I think I draw


the line there. But if you don't have a
facility at home to keep them other than
seeing-eye dogs or something, then
you shouldn't have an animal. You want
everybody else to take care of your pet.
You want them to provide air condi-
tioning for them. You want them to do
everything, except you don't want to
take care of them yourself. So if you
can't do that, then don't have a pet.
There's other things you can do. Do
volunteer work or something. You get
to meet a lot of nice people that way.
But don't use animals as your crutch.
Love animals; hate pets
I'm sick and fed up with reading the
Chronicle about these pet owners that
keep insisting on pushing their pets,
their animals, on the rest of us that
maybe don't want that. That doesn't
mean we're animal haters. It just means
we're pet haters. I love animals. I give
money all the time to the Environmental
Defense Fund and Friends of Wildlife,
Sierra Club, to protect the woods and
the animals (that) live there squirrels,
deer, rabbits. I go hiking. I love animals,
wild animals. That's where they belong.
Leave pets at home
To you people with pets that has to
bring them in the store: A dog is an
animal. It's not a child. It's not part of
your family. It is an animal and there's
nothing that dog can do in the store
that you need done. Leave your dog to


home. I even seen one yesterday in
Walmart. It wasn't even on a leash,
just walking freely through the store.
Now that's wrong.
Bond with humans, not pets
I'm calling about the article in Sun-
day's paper (June 23) about animals
(being) allowed in restaurants and
stores. It seems to me that society is
more connected to animals than
human beings as far as how they re-
late to each other. And to me, this is a
scary scenario that most people view
animals as more faithful than a
human...I hope people realize this is
the human race and we all have to get
along and get together, not rely on ani-
mals to satisfy our needs as far as the
human race goes.
No pocketbook dogs
I'm calling Sound Off in reference to
"ADA rules." To this person with dis-
abilities ... with his working animal.
People are not complaining about the
animals that work for the disabled
people. They're talking about the peo-
ple that bring their little dogs in their
pocketbooks and bring their dogs to
the grocery stores and that. That
should not be allowed. That's what that
person was talking about. They were not
talking about service dogs. It's the
people that's bringing their personal
pets to the restaurants and supermar-
kets. That should not be allowed.


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

idea that Israel was founded by pushing
something like a million people who
consider themselves historically as
Palestinian out of the country/colony of
their origin. The author holds the Ed-
ward Said Professorship at Columbia
University and has played an insider role
in some of the talks. This book is pro-Arab
and extremely critical of the diplomatic
and military role the United States has
played in Palestine/Israel during the
past 70-plus years. It is an interpretation
that we seldom see spelled out, and one
that is extremely controversial.
At the broadest level, the book sees
four forces in conflict in the Middle East
One, of course, is the state of Israel. The
second group is the Palestinians -some
of whom live in Israel, but most of whom
are refugees in other countries or live in
the Palestinian territory and have a
deeply divided leadership. Thirdly, there
is the United States with its global power
and particular interest in the Middle
East and its oil. And finally, there are the
Arab countries such as Saudi Arabia,
Lebanon and Egypt who have consistently
put their own interests above those of the
Palestinians while claiming to be pro-
Palestinian. This last group has been most
influenced by Egypt, with its large pop-
ulation and control of the canal, and Saudi
Arabia, whose oil riches and government
have claimed to back the Palestinians
while placing their own interests first.
Israel is seen as preaching peace while
continually expanding the area it con-
trols. It has both made the desert bloom
and also built a powerful, high-tech mil-
itary to protect its interests. Additionally,
Israel has, in the eyes of the author, been
extraordinarily successful in influencing
U.S. public opinion. Part of this flows


from American sympathy for the brutality
of Holocaust, but also because the Is-
raelis have been successful in influencing
Congress. From an economic level, Amer-
ica wants oil from the area and tries to
stabilize the international oil market.
As for the Palestinians, the author points
out the degree to which Tel Aviv dis-
rupted attempts by Palestinians to unify
or govern. This led to the Palestinian
Liberation Organization, whose leader-
ship encouraged international and regional
terrorists. Only over the past 20 years have
the Palestinians been able to create some
sense of democracy, and that is splitbetween
the Palestinians living in the occupied
areas, who are much more inclined to
use terror, and the second group which
wants to negotiate a settlement.
Another important point in terms of
understanding this 65-year period is that
until the collapse of the Soviet Union,
every diplomatic action fit into the Cold
War competition between Moscow and
Washington. The Russians championed
the Palestinian cause and had significant
influence in Egypt, Iraq, Syria and other
countries, which complicated diplomacy
For years, one of my colleagues at the
University of Notre Dame was a Jewish
naturalized Israeli citizen formerly in
the Israeli army He has written a num-
ber of books and articles on this dispute.
I heard him say often that the frustrat-
ing aspect of the conflict is that there is
justice on both sides of the issues.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill Woods
resident who taught international politics
and US. foreign policy at the University
ofNotre Dame for39years. He served as
chairman of the Department of Gov-
ernment and International Studies for
six years, was director ofNotre Dame's
20 different foreign studies programs for
five years, and held various other posi-
tions at the university


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

group that uses a different delivery
method. Our costs are tied to gathering
the news and information we put in the
paper and publish on our website.
What we will begin to do is offer a new
type of subscription model for those who
want to receive their daily news in an
electronic format only For a monthly
subscription price, any person living
anywhere can get full access to our
website.
At the same time, we are expanding
how we deliver the news. More infor-
mation will be published each day on
our website. Currently, we publish an
electronic version of the newspaper
from the previous day Beginning
Wednesday, July 10, we will publish the
live electronic version of the paper.
There will also be an urgency on our
part to publish news numerous times a
day via the Internet. Our reporters and
photographers will repeatedly provide
updates throughout the day on our Web
page.
And, at the same time, we are in the
final stages of developing a new mobile
application for the delivery of our news
to those folks who do so much with their
phones.
There is an inconvenience factor
involved in this for everyone. We are
going to require that subscribers to
the print edition register so they can use
the website. We do this so we can differ-
entiate between subscribers and
nonsubscribers.
Nonsubscribers must also register so
they can see the headlines and read
eight stories a month.
We've made it easy to register, so I ask
your patience. If you have a problem,
just call our office and one of our service


representatives will walk you through
the process. Ads placed in this section
explain how you go about registering.
Those of you who now pay for the
newspaper will continue to get your
great local newspaper (OK, I'm biased)
and an expanded menu of electronic
options.
Those of you who don't pay will have
the option to sign up for newspaper de-
livery in print or online. If you don't
want to do that, your ability to access our
site will be limited.
We are a business that is supported by
our advertisers and subscribers. The In-
ternet has grown up with everything
being free, and it was great fun to go
along for the ride.
But Amazon.com does not give its
books away for free. And last I checked,
Chevrolet.com is not giving away free
cars.
Our business is to gather the local
news and advertising information for
this part of Florida. And we provide that
service for our customers.
The Chronicle is the oldest business
in Citrus County We have operated con-
tinuously since 1894 and we've gone
through lots of changes along the way
When we started making newspapers
in Citrus County, there was no radio, no
television, no Internet and no cable.
Time passes and technologies change.
We keep changing along the way to pro-
vide the news and information you need
to enjoy living in this great place.
We value your loyalty to the newspa-
per and want you to visit as often as pos-
sible. We will continue to do our job of
covering the stories, people and issues
that are important to our community in
print and online.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Give Adams a break
Ever since Scott Adams was
elected, his name has been ap-
pearing regularly in your news-
paper. Most often, any mention
of his name comes with much
criticism which can be ascribed
to you. Might I remind you that
the people of Citrus County
elected Mr Adams?
I, as one of those voters, take
exception to your negative inter-
pretation of the job he is doing
as a county commissioner. Per-
haps Mr Adams was purposely
elected solely to be an advocate
for the people to help stem
some of the ridiculous spending
and thoughtless decisions our
county commissioners have
been doing while spending the
people's hard-earned tax dol-
lars. Your frequent, negative
and harsh words on how he


does his job are irritating. Has
the Chronicle turned into Citrus
County's judge and jury?
You might want to focus your
attention on Washington, D.C.,
and how our government there
is taking America to hell in a
handbasket.
Leslie L. Granville
Crystal River

Can't ignore Taliban
Cal Thomas' criticism of talks
with the Taliban (6/21 column)
questions whether any such dis-
cussions can be trusted, then
gives cultural reasons why they
cannot
"What could the Taliban pos-
sibly give up?" he asks, and
"How will we know they're even
telling the truth?" We won't
know the answer to those ques-


tions unless we and the Karzai
government sit down to discuss
the issues.
What Mr. Thomas does not
provide are alternatives, with-
out which his criticism rings
somewhat hollow. Since a total
military victory is not possible,
attempts at peacemaking
through negotiations is the only
possible alternative. As it is with
other entities in world conflicts
like Hamas, the Vietcong, etc.,
the Taliban simply cannot be ig-
nored. The key here is the fol-
lowup, long-term. We should
expect a multi-year commitment
with Afghanistan both militarily
and economically Even then,
there are no guarantees. The
best hope for Afghanistan are
the Afghans themselves.
Wayne Logsdon
Hernando


Useless to the people Fed up with politics


As I read about Scott
in Tuesday morning's p
(June 25), it made me thi
government has worn o
usefulness to the people
more. Federal, state, loc
ernment, they're worth
the people and I think v
better without them
than with them. All
they do is take our
money and want more
and more and more.
Seeking sod
I would like to
know if anybody's
selling or putting in
Pensacola bahia sod.
I'm having trouble
finding it. I don't
know, I think there
might be a farm in Broc
but I'm not sure. So, Per
bahia sod I'm looking
Getting to Hen H
In reference to the in
about The Hen House C
dated June 23: It's local
behind the new Inverne
Hall building, formerly
adoodles Restaurant, a
food there is just great.
Reimbursing The
I'm wondering if our
county commissioners
ever reimbursed our re
county administrator fo
schooling in New Orlea
be the director of this i
lous Citrus Port. My qu
is very simple: Has he
reimbursed or was he s
his own nickel down the
Collect unpaid te
Instead of going ahe
raising the millage rate
about collecting the tax
are owed by so many pe
Citrus County and espe
the local businesses tha
not paid up their taxes?
not do that first before
raise any taxes?


Adams
aperr
nk how
iut its
le any-
cal gov-
less to
ee'd do


I'm a Democrat, but I'm
fed up with the Democrats
and Republicans alike. We
need an independent presi-
dent and independent Con-
gress people to show this
country that they're not run-
ning this country. In fact, I'm


going to re-register
SOUND as an independent.
S )FF Bureau kudos
I want to say that I
went to get my dri-
ver's license and car
registration changed
from another state
CA 1 to Florida and I was
0 at Citrus County in
563-0579 Inverness to get this
done and I want to
say that I was treated very,
oksville very courteously. It was done
nsacola promptly and I was deeply
g for it. impressed with how this was
house handled. I have to compliment
these people that work in that
quiry office because sometimes
Caf6, people go and they're not ex-
ated actly cordial to the employees.
'ss City If you have all the documen-
Cock- station that they request, you
nd the are whisked in and out and
it's done very expediently and
orpe I want to thank them.
Thanks for advice
have Thanks to the person that
tiring gave me good advice about
r his doing an autopsy report. I never
ns to thought about Google or going
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been
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ere? I'm going to try one more
axes time to ask why our chamber
of commerce in Inverness
ad and would let their office become
, how so unattractive. When I drive
es that down Tompkins, I admire the
iople in lovely street the city has created
racially and then I see the chamber's
at have fence. A few nails and some
?Why paint would certainly help. It
you has been in this condition for
a long while.


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C4 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


COMMENTARY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 C5


Hot Corner:
RAYS ANNOUNCERS

Listen to radio
In answer to the "Worst announc-
ers ever" that was in this morning's
(June 19) Hot Corner re announcers:
I suggest this person, if he doesn't
like the TV announcers for the Tampa
Bay Rays, turn off the sound on his
television and turn on WYKE, which
is 104.3, that broadcasts the Rays
games on the radio, and I think
he'll find that the radio announcers
are a lot better than the television
announcers.
Swing and a miss
I have been a Rays fan for years. I
watch them every time they play and
go to the games when I can. I do not
want to watch the Brian and Dewayne
show. I certainly don't want to watch
Brian showing how to pitch a ball
while a game is going on. One of our
players took four pitches the other
day before they even took the time to
announce who was up batting. An-
other thing: How many games have
we lost this year when two of the infe-
rior relief pitchers are called up to
pitch and we have a substantial lead?
We have a good supply of relief pitch-
ers but when I see one of these two
called up, I say, "There goes the
game," and I'm usually right.
Don't knock the good
Those two announcers for the
Tampa Bay Rays are very good.
They're very knowledgeable. Go listen
to some of the announcers (for) the
Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals
or the Chicago White Sox. You sit
there and wonder what's going to
come next. Don't knock something
that's good.
Awesome team
Contrary to another Sound Off, the
Tampa Bay Rays TV broadcasters,
Dewayne Staats and Brian Anderson,
are the best in their performance. We
are lucky to have them. Brian Ander-
son was a pitcher and, therefore,
shares with the audience his knowl-
edge of the game. They feed off each
other and provide humor and excite-
ment and play-by-play descriptions
of both teams, emphasizing the high-
lights of each inning. They are awe-
some. Go Rays!
Kudos, commentators
I watch all the Rays games on TV and
enjoy the commentators, Dewayne
and Brian. They are very knowledge-
able, informative and entertaining. I
think they're great. Go Rays!


Letters to THE EDITOR


Everyone tighten belts
In the budget workshop, it was an-
nounced our sheriff doesn't want an
MSTU for road patrol. His reasoning is
that it is not fair to county residents, as
the cities won't participate.
I suggest he read the statute: cities
are exempt from MSTUs and MSBUs
unless their councils agree to be taxed.
Residents of both cities pay extra taxes
to their cities for enhanced law enforce-
ment, so why should they participate in
the county's taxing plan? RFrther, as
Commissioner Joe Meek has pointed out
several times, the MSTU would benefit
all county residents, as the tax would be
spread out to all property owners and
might actually result in a lower property
tax rate in the future. Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
didn't have this problem with the MSBU
for fire, which lowered the millage rate in
the fire district tax ... paid by only county
residents. The real reason our sheriff
doesn't want this tax is because any changes
to the road patrol budget would have to
be approved by the board in the public
eye. We all know he never likes having the
public seeing how he handles its funds.
Before you breathe a sigh of relief for
not being hit with extra taxes, the BOCC
is looking at least a full mill if not
more increase in all property taxes,
including those paid by city residents, to
make up the county shortfall, which is
now projected at $17 million or more.
Oh, and the only part of county govern-
ment to increase its budget is the sher-


iff's office. Dawsy wants to fin
employees a 3 percent pay ra
think this long overdue, this is
to do it with a large shortfall
Cl


Welfare breeds dep(
My problem with welfare i
dependency, and it tends to b
way of life across generation
The farce is that the avera
welfare recipient isn't even c
earning $10 an hour by work
are living at a standard that 1
never earn on their own. The
Foundation released a report
just how good welfare recipi
it. We are talking large-scree
TVs, air conditioning, compu
cellphones, the whole thing.
your day, people wanted to g
work, and I'm sure some do t
Those people are not our pr
will come out OK. The probl
too many people have accept
as a way of life. That's dead v
I paid the max most of my
life, and even I won't get it al
have to account for the prese
money Every dollar I contril
1963 is worth seven dollars tc
could do the same analysis o
year or every month and you
the government owes you on
lot of money


tally give his Show me in the Constitution where it
raise. While I says the government has a responsibil-
not the time ity to distribute money It doesn't. That's
looming, the dogma of the socialist thought that
swept over the country during the 20th
aude Strass century, but it's just politicians buying
Homosassa votes. That's my money the government
is distributing and I can do a much bet-
endency ter job of it than the government.
s it breeds Liberals claim the wealthy will not in-
ecome a vest money yet cry over the low tax
s. rates they enjoy You can't claim it both
Scways. They have that 15 percent tax rate
ge career because that is investment income, divi-
apable of dends and capital gains. That money is
ing. They at risk so it is taxed at a lower rate to
they could stimulate investment.
e Heritage A $55,000 family income is considered
t detailing to be a middle-class family income in a
ents have rural county. The average here is $41,000.
n digital Assuming a two-income family, that's
iters, free $20,500 per person. That comes out to
Maybe in $10 an hour. That's poverty-level living.
et back to If I assume the responsibility of my
today retirement plan, it's still my money My
oblem; they problem with government retirement
em is way plans is they are too generous. Govern-
ted welfarement workers, through unions, have
wrong. done too good a job of forcing pay and
working benefits from spineless politicians who
.1 back. You are trying to buy elections. Government
ent value of pay exceeds private pay by 17 percent,
buted in but government benefits packages ex-
oday We ceed the private sector by a whopping
n every 37 percent. That's a crime.


would see
e hell of a


Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


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C6 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


Sound OFF


Confusing light
I'm calling about that new
light on (State Road) 44 and
Meadowcrest (Boulevard) right
near Winn-Dixie. It just seems to
me that, maybe it's legal, but
it's very confusing with that
blinking yellow signal and I know
there's been at least one acci-
dent. Maybe it should be a
blinking red signal or something
different.
Go for CHC's bid
I'm from the Midwest where
everyone worked for General Mo-
tors, Ford, Chrysler or Interna-
tional or another corporation
that has insurance. This is Cit-
rus County. This is not a wealthy
community. Of the five hospitals
that are putting in bids, I believe
Community Hospital Corporation,
which is trying to preserve the
not-for-profit status, should be
the one that should be selected.
Of course we know the trustees
are going for the bucks ... but
that's OK. They can do what they
want. Hopefully somebody will stand
up for the little people and go with
Community Hospital Corporation.
Nourish minds
Why is the Citrus County
School System feeding children
at schools in the summer? I am
not unsympathetic to hunger,
but county education budgets
have cuts every year and parents
have EBT cards to provide food
for their children. Schools were
set up to educate children, not
provide social services such as
two meals a day during school
and in the summer. I am a teacher
and see children with their $20
shoes ... getting free or reduced
lunch every day, and now free
lunch in the summer? I also know
of teachers and staff whom are
not on EBT cards getting laid off
because of budget cuts.


I ITL TMM UCERB TM OER


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against alcohol, tobacco & prescription drug abuse.


Emergency dentistry
Are all dentists the same? We
had (an) emergency last night,
called our dentist, had another
phone number to call for (an)
on-call dentist. Called that num-
ber and it was a dispatch serv-
ice. He took our information and
said that he'd forward it to a
dentist the next morning. It is
now 8:30 and we still have
heard from no dentist. Is there
any dentist that will call you
back and make some sugges-
tions other than be referred to
the emergency hospital?


Nutty request
Whoever is feeding the squir-
rels peanuts shells and all, I say
quit it, stop it and don't. I have
empty shells all over my lawn,
not to mention my driveway and
birdbath.
We all have rights
I think it would be wonderful
if our libraries had a special
section for alternative lifestyles,
especially for children. I believe
it would solve any issues before
they erupt, because all people
have rights.


Not on our side
Scott, Rubio and Nelson are
not on our side.
Don't leave dogs in cars
When are you people ever
going to learn not to take your
dogs with you in the car, leave
them in there on a hot day with
the windows up? That is nothing
but animal cruelty. You guys
ought to go to jail for that. I was
just at (a business) and there
was a moron leaving his dog in
the car. Grow up, people. It's ani-
mal cruelty.


COMMENTARY


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contests, and so much more are
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77,m


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Need used cellphone
I would like to know where
there's a place to buy second-
hand cellphones. My number is
419-8170.
Hungry and smart
In reference to the gray squir-
rels destroying electrical wiring:
I believe that's pretty much im-
possible. I had the squirrels
break in my garage one time
and they were stealing cookies
because I feed them three cook-
ies or snack crackers every
morning and peanuts every
morning. And also I feed them
the crunchy peanut butter. I put
it in a can of cat food, empty a
can of cat food dish and stick
peanuts in that and they come
and eat out of my hand. After
they get used to you, they'll even
come right up and eat out of
your hand. They're a lot more in-
telligent than what you might
think.
Time to wise up
I'm responding to the "Li-
cense hassle" person in today's
paper (June 17). What is your
problem? I went a month be-
fore my date of expiration for
my driver's license, my registra-
tion for my car and my real es-
tate taxes. You go there
prepared with your proof of
documents. I do not have a
birth certificate, but I carry my
U.S. passport with me all the
time. My driver's license, car
registration and my taxes were
taken care of in less than 20
minutes. Your complaint is un-
American. Wise up.
Sloppy neighbors
Don't you just love those "edu-
cated" people who leave their
trash cans lying at the end of
their driveway for days after the
trash has been picked up?









BUSINESS


Inside:
Citing senator's politics, Beretta
declines relocation advances from
West Virginia/D2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ONE YEAR LATER:



MERGER PAYING OFF


Tuesday marks

the one-year

anniversary

of the merger

between

Duke Energy

Corp. and

Progress

Energy Inc.,

creating the

nation's largest

electric

power holding

company


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer


ergy Corp and Progress shareholders became shareholders of
Duke. Under the initially announced $13.7 billon transaction,
each share of Progress stock was worth about 2.6 shares of Duke.
While the merger process took an estimated two years to unfold, the
actual closing sparked months of controversy Plus, the combined
company had to effect a change of top leadership and resolve the fu-
ture of the Crystal River nuclear plant.

Duke today
As the anniversary approaches, the new Duke Energy, under new leader-
ship, appears well positioned to take advantage of its size and financial
strength. It has solidified its identity under a standard logo and name.
The company completed 2012 with operating revenues of $19.6 billion. It
moves forward with $110 billion in total assets and nearly 28,000 employees
serving 7.2 million retail electric customers in North Carolina, South Car-
olina, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Florida. It also has 500,000 gas customers
in Ohio and Kentucky.
At the time of merger, Duke had annual revenues of approximately $10 bil-
lion and Progress Energy had about $9 billion.
Duke Energy Florida, formerly Progress Energy Florida, has 1.7 million
service customers and serves portions of Citrus County.
Duke Energy operates 12 nuclear units at seven sites in the Carolinas and
Florida, including the Crystal River nuclear plant, which is being decommis-
sioned. Duke is still pursuing plans for a nuclear plant in Levy County and
one in South Carolina. It still operates four coal-burning plants at the Crystal
River energy complex.
See Page D2


JULY, 2010 JANUARY, 2011
Duke Energy approaches Duke and Progress
Progress Energy regarding announce merger plans
possible merger


DECEMBER, 2010
Detailed merger plan
discussed


JULY, 2012
Merger closes


AUGUST, 2011
Both company's shareholders
approve merger


For stocks, good first half tough to match


Associated Press
NEW YORK The stock market
just had its best first half of the
year since 1998. Now what?
History suggests stock investors
will make more money the second
half of the year
Since World War II, a big in-
crease in the first half of a year has
almost always been followed by
more gains in the second half.
In the 68 years beginning with
1946, the S&P 500 index has risen
10 percent or more 23 times, ac-
cording to data from S&P Dow
Jones Indices. During those 23
years, the market rose the second
half of the year 19 times. Eleven of
those years, or nearly half, the S&P
500 rose at least 10 percent the sec-
ond half of the year
The best second half was in 1954,
in the middle of the stock market's


longest bull run. Stocks increased
26.2 percent July-December The
worst second half was in 1987. The
"Black Monday" market crash was
Oct. 19, and stocks fell 17.4 percent
the second half of the year
In years like this one, in which
stocks have started with a gain of
between 10 and 15 percent, the av-
erage second-half increase has
been 9.4 percent.
Those numbers suggest that
when a rally gets going, it keeps
going.
Of course, past performance is
no guarantee of the market's fu-
ture, and investors face some hur-
dles in this year's second half. The
Federal Reserve has helped stocks
rally by forcing down interest rates.
But the central bank is considering
reducing that stimulus later this


Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases construction
spending for May, 10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
DETROIT -Automakers
release vehicle sales for June.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Labor
Department releases weekly
jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.;
Freddie Mac, the mortgage
company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.;
Institute for Supply Management
releases its service sector
index for June, 10 a.m.
*FRIDAY
WASHINGTON Labor
Department releases employment
data for June, 8:30 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Pump prices falling;
oil drops below $97

NEW YORK-As the week went
along, Americans' commutes got
cheaper
The average price for a gallon of
gasoline fell by 6 cents from Monday
through Friday, to a two-month low
of $3.51 per gallon. The average fell
at least a penny in 48 states, with
only Hawaii prices gaining a frac-
tion and Idaho's staying flat The
steepest declines were in Indiana
(15 cents) and Michigan (14 cents).
Benchmark oil for August delivery
fell 49 cents to end at $96.56 per bar-
rel on the New York Mercantile Ex-
change. For the April-June quarter,
oil slipped 67 cents, although it rose
11 percent from a low of $86.68 on
April 17.
Brent crude, which is used to set
prices for oil used by many U.S. re-
fineries to make gasoline, fell
66 cents to $102.16 a barrel.


Locks, switches force
recalls by Ford, Honda
DETROIT Ford is recalling
just over 13,000 Explorer, Taurus
and Lincoln MKS cars and SUVs
because the child safety locks may
not work on the rear doors.
The recall affects 2013 model
cars sold mainly in the U.S.,
Canada and Mexico.
Ford says the safety locks can be
turned off when the doors are opened
or closed. That could allow a door to
be opened with the inside handle.
Meanwhile, Honda is urging the
owners of more than 686,000 Fit and
Jazz subcompacts worldwide to park
them outside because the power
window switches can catch fire.
The company said Friday it is re-
calling cars from the 2007 and 2008
model years. It's telling owners not
to park them in garages until the
switches can be inspected.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


Timing


right to


sell lot in


Florida
DEAR BRUCE: My husband
and I were given a half-acre
lot in Florida as a wedding
gift from my parents. My father
paid $500 for it in 1954. We are now
getting offers to purchase this lot
from Realtors and individuals at
the rate of two or three per week.
We recently visited the area and
could see no reason for the sudden
interest. We couldn't even drive on
the street because of the over-
growth of vegetation. So far we've
been offered as much as $30,000.
Two years ago we couldn't sell it
for $5,000.
We currently live in Indiana and
have no plans to use the lot in the
future. It looks to us like a good
time to sell, but won't we pay a
great deal in capital gains tax? Is
there any way to get the best bang
for our buck?
We could always use the extra
cash, but would prefer to invest it.
Can we avoid capital gains by pur-
chasing land elsewhere, or could
we use the money to pay off our
present mortgage? We have heard
of a 1031 exchange, but do not
know how it works. Our adjusted
gross income is less than $50,000.
-J.P, via email
DEAR J.P: The first thing you
should consider is that if you are
being offered $30,000, it's worth
considerably more than that, and
See Page D2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

you may want to try to recover as
much money as possible. That is
going to mean putting it on the
market with a broker, hoping you
can find someone to pay more.
Given the fact that you currently
live in Indiana and you have no
plans to use the lot, I agree that it's
a good time to sell. You won't have
a great deal to pay in capital gains,
but let's assume that your basis is
only $500, which means you would
have roughly $27,000 after commis-
sions. With a rate under current
law of 15 percent, you would have
somewhere around a $4,000 capi-
tal gains tax. Looks to me like you
are going to be OK.
I wouldn't worry about getting
the best bang for your buck. Grab
the money and go out and have a
wonderful meal, maybe a vacation
over the weekend. In other words,
get on with your life.
DEAR BRUCE: My significant
other and I have been together
since 1999. I am in the process of
buying my home, and because of a
little inheritance from my family
and the selling of a home, I have a
little money saved and invested.
We have talked about marriage,
but I need to know if I would ever
be expected to pay back any of his
debts? He filed bankruptcy in Cali-
fornia after having a stroke, but
now he has really worked at get-
ting his credit back. He has really
been doing well.


I guess I just need to know if it will
hurt me financially We won't be
commingling our funds, and the house
is in my name and my son is the
beneficiary Reader, via email
DEAR READER: As long as you
keep your money completely sepa-
rated from his, you won't have any
responsibility for his debts incurred
before the marriage. It's good that
he is working on getting his credit
back, but in terms of financial hurt,
there shouldn't be any unless you
establish a commingling of funds.
If you do marry, he will get one-
third of the house should you pre-
decease him. This could be changed
very easily with a prenuptial agree-
ment indicating that the home is
yours and he will give up any rights
to it. You will both require an at-
torney, and you must be absolutely
candid about everything you own,
otherwise this can be easily upset.
DEAR BRUCE: My home will be
paid off in two years, leaving me with
only an equity loan left to pay in the
amount of $16,000, $360 a month.
After I pay off my mortgage, it will
free up $500 to $600 a month.
I will be retiring approximately
eight to 10 years from now. I told
my wife that I wanted to use the old
house payment to invest in some
sort of retirement account All I have
now is a thrift savings 401(k) based
on my highest three earning years
and Social Security My wife wants
to take that money and add it to the
equity loan and pay it off sooner.
What is your opinion? What would
you recommend as a good investment
with this money for the next six to
eight years? PAM., via email


DEAR PAM.: Let me disabuse
you of something. You say your
mortgage will be paid off in two
years; no, it won't. Your first mort-
gage will be paid off in two years,
but you will still have a second
mortgage of $16,000, $360 a month,
which will be several years.
You didn't tell me what the inter-
est rate is on the second mortgage.
If it is substantial, you would be far
better off to pay off the mortgage
with the extra $500 to $600 a
month that your first mortgage is
no longer collecting. You will find
that not having a mortgage when
you retire is very comforting.
If you feel you can do better in
the marketplace, go for it. I don't
know what your experience is, but
I would suggest that if you are not
going to pay off the mortgage and
you choose to invest in the market,
make sure you start educating
yourself right now.
DEAR BRUCE: How and when
can Medicare claim the recipient
owes them? S.L, via email
DEAR S.L.: Generally speaking,
it would depend on the efficiency
practiced in the state the recipient
is living in, and that can be any-
where from a couple of months to
a year. As long as the house is
transferred to your name, it is
yours, but if the state feels it is
owed money from Medicaid (Med-
icaid, not Medicare, as you asked),
it can move against the house and
sell it to recover as much as possible.
Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered in future
columns.


Beretta cites


senator's politics in


rebuffing relocation


Associated Press


CHARLESTON, WVa.
- U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin's
role in the gun control de-
bate has prompted firearms
maker Beretta USA to
turn down offers from of-
ficials and groups in West
Virginia that it relocate to
the state, a company exec-
utive said Friday
Jeffrey Reh, general
counsel and vice-general
manager, cited comments
from the West Virginia
Democrat targeting high-
capacity ammunition
magazines. He said the
company also has concerns
with a provision in the
measure Manchin has co-
sponsored with Sen. Patrick
Toomey, a Pennsylvania
Republican, to expand
gun buyer background
checks to gun shows and
Internet sales.
Beretta believes Manchin
has joined forces with Sen.
Chuck Schumer, a New York
Democrat and vocal gun
control advocate, leading
the company to question


whether "West Virginia
was a pro-gun as we
thought," Reh said.
"That really caused us
some consternation and
concern," Reh said. "We've
decided not to consider
West Virginia as a site for
future expansion."
The response follows
dueling TV ads from
Manchin and the National
Rifle Association as the
senator seeks additional
support for the background
check proposal, which
failed to advance in an
April vote. Spokesman
Jonathan Kott said
Manchin was aware of
Beretta's position but did
not immediately comment
Then-House Speaker
Rick Thompson, like
Manchin a Democrat, was
among those who wrote
Beretta earlier this year
after it said it would con-
sider moving operations
out of Maryland. That
state was then consider-
ing, and has since en-
acted, a strict gun control
law.


PAYING
Continued from Page D1

Duke Energy Renewables
has 15 solar projects and 15
wind farms. The company is
ranked eighth among electric
holding companies in the
United States for total solar
capacity
Duke's international opera-
tion has generation facilities in
Latin America and interest in a
methanol producer in Saudi
Arabia.
The merger also fulfilled one
of its purposes maintained all
along by Jim Rogers, Duke's
outgoing president and CEO.
He said the transaction gave
Duke an enhanced ability to
grow the dividend.
Last week, Duke declared an
increased quarterly cash divi-
dend on its common stock. This
is the 87th consecutive year
Duke has paid a quarterly cash
dividend on its common stock
and the sixth consecutive year
in which the company has
raised that dividend.
The merger has also affected
employees, with a great deal of
corporate attention to integrat-
ing the two cultures and elimi-
nating duplicate positions.
"We've completed staffing,"
Duke spokesperson Randy
Wheeless said. "The vast major-
ity of the early out offers -
about 800 have been ac-
cepted." The total will be a lit-
tle more than 1,000.


New CEO out
The Duke-Progress marriage
was quickly off to a shaky start
William D. Johnson, Progress
chairman, president and CEO,
was to be president and CEO of
the new Duke. Jim Rogers,
Duke's pre-merger chairman,
president and CEO, would be
chairman.
A Duke board of directors
meeting had been called for
July 2, 2012, to approve the
merger According to an email
from Johnson, he was elected
CEO of the combined company
as part of the agenda and the
meeting ended. The lead Duke
director then called for an ex-
ecutive session and wanted to
see Johnson afterwards.
Johnson was told the board
concluded he was not the per-
son to be CEO, saying Rogers
would keep that role, and John-
son was handed a severance
document. "I was quite shocked
by the turn of events," he wrote.
Johnson's email was part of
nearly 1,000 pages of previously
classified documents pertain-
ing to the merger. The disclo-
sure had been ordered by the
North Carolina Utilities Com-
mission (NCUC), which was in-
vestigating the merger
Johnson's dismissal raised
protests by surprised Progress
officials and shareholders who
maintained their board accepted
the merger with the explicit
agreement that Johnson would
become CEO. Johnson went on
to become president and CEO of
the Tennessee Valley Authority.


The merger also fulfilled one of its purposes
maintained all along by Jim Rogers, Duke's
outgoing president and CEO. He said the
transaction gave Duke an enhanced ability
to grow the dividend. Last week, Duke
declared an increased quarterly cash
dividend on its common stock.


His brief time with Duke re-
sulted in a severance payment
of $7.435 million. His total post-
merger compensation for 2012
was approximately $27.7 million.
During a July 3 conference
call to discuss closing the
merger, no details were pro-
vided on Johnson's departure.
However, the as-yet-undecided
future of the Crystal River nu-
clear plant was discussed.
Rogers labeled it one of the
company's biggest challenges.
Opposition to the merger
brought the NCUC investiga-
tion. It led to a settlement with
Duke resolving all issues under
review, including the ouster of
Johnson. Under the agreement,
Duke would make changes in
top management, with Rogers
retiring at the end of 2013.
Following the Duke-Progress
merger, Rogers became widely
known to Citrus County resi-
dents, as he took an active role
in events surrounding the fu-
ture of the damaged Crystal
River nuclear plant and the
proposed nuclear plant in Levy
County


According to transcripts from
the Florida Public Service
Commission, Rogers was very
aware of the role Progress En-
ergy property taxes play in Cit-
rus County He said Citrus
County was clear in his mind in
respect to economic develop-
ment as was the property tax
implication when plants were
shut down.

New leadership
Earlier this month, the com-
pany announced that Lynn
Good, Duke Energy's executive
vice president and chief finan-
cial officer, will succeed
Rogers. On July 1 she will be-
come president and CEO.
Rogers will continue to serve as
chairman until his retirement
With that announcement,
Wheeless said the main issue
with the NCUC investigation
has been settled and put aside.
"We had to overcome some
large issues," he said, regarding
the overall merger." He ex-
plained that in addition to the
new CEO, Duke was faced with
resolving the future of the Crys-


tal River nuclear plant, while
bringing the Edwardsport Gen-
erating Station (Indiana) online.
The plant is an advanced
technology coal gasification
plant that has been under con-
struction since 2008. Duke
claimed it was one of the
largest construction projects
ever undertaken in Indiana.
While Crystal River will be
decommissioned, cost issues -
insurance coverage, replace-
ment fuel and upgrade ex-
penses are still being
resolved through the Public
Service Commission. Duke En-
ergy Florida President Alex
Glenn said the company is eval-
uating options for a new natu-
ral gas fired plant, but as of last
week, no decision had been
confirmed.
Duke also had to resolve
some federally mandated
power transmission issues and
market power concerns.
Overall, Wheeless believes a
lot of progress has been made
in the past year and the merger
has paid off.
"We've done well on our re-
turns to our shareholders," he
said. "Analysts are starting to
see the progress we made and
starting to recommend us as an
investment tool."
Wheeless said there's a lot
going on, on different fronts, in-
cluding the name change and
new logo, which have gone over
very well.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


WEEK AHEAD
Continued from Page C1

year. Also, concerns about the Chinese
economy, the world's second-largest,
have unsettled markets in recent weeks.
But the factors that drove the market
methodically higher the first five months
of the year remain: The housing market
is strengthening. Auto sales are strong.
Companies continue to earn record prof-
its. Inflation and interest rates are ultra
low. The economy is growing moderately
and may pickup the second half of the year.
Although many investors had expected
stocks to climb this year, they were sur-
prised at the speed of the advance early
on. By May 21, the S&P 500 had climbed
to a record 1,669 and was up 17 percent.
A day later, Fed chairman Ben
Bernanke said the central bank was
considering pulling back on its stimulus.
The market's advance cooled, and the
S&P has lost 3 percent since.
Add dividends to the S&P 500's price
rise and the total return for investors is
13.8 percent the most in 15 years.
"We're not surprised at the positive
performance across U.S. equity markets
this year because the fundamentals of
the economy are improving," said Steve
Rees, head of U.S. Equity Strategy for
JPMorgan Private Bank. "We were sur-
prised, though, at how quickly we achieved
that performance at the start of the year"
Here are the five best first halves for
the S&P 500 since World War II. Data
before 1957, when the S&P 500 was
launched, combine the values for four
earlier S&P indices: the industrials,
utilities, financial and transportation:
1975. First half: up 41.7 percent.
Second half: down 3.2 percent.
The 1970s began with a bull run, but things
soon went sour The oil crisis of 1973-1974
caused oil prices to soar and the economy
entered into what would be a 16-month
recession in November 1973. The annual
rate of inflation began to climb. It surged
as high as 12.2 percent in November
1974 from 3.4 percent a year earlier. The
S&P 500 dropped 48 percent between
Jan. 11, 1973 and Oct 4,1974.


The market soared in the first half of
1975 as inflation moderated and investors
grew hopeful the economy was pulling out
of its slump. The market gave up some of
its gain in the second half of the year as
doubts about the strength of the economic
recovery grew and concern rose that in-
flation might re-emerge. New York City's
fiscal crisis also weighed on markets.
1987. First half: up 27.4 percent.
Second half: down 17.4 percent.
In early 1987, investors were still en-
joying a bull run that had begun in Au-
gust 1982. Unemployment and inflation
had fallen. Tax cuts and low interest
rates had spawned an economic boom.
But things unraveled in a big way
Stocks peaked on Aug. 25, when the
S&P 500 closed at a record 336. Rising
interest rates and concerns about a stock
bubble prompted a sell-off in October.
That culminated in "Black Monday" on
Oct 19, 1987, when the index plunged 57
points, or 20.5 percent, to 224.
1983. First half: up 22.2 percent.
Second half: up 0.25 percent.
In early 1983, the great '80s bull run
was just beginning. It had started the
previous summer after the Fed lowered
its benchmark interest rate from 14.5
percent to 10 percent President Reagan's
tax cuts also got the economy going after
it had contracted for much of 1982.
But the surge in stocks stalled in the
second half. Investors worried that the
expanding economy would revive infla-
tion and compel the Fed to raise rates.
1986. First half: up 20.7 percent.
Second half: down 1.8 percent.
The factors that had given stocks a lift
in 1983 were still in play Also, falling oil
prices helped lower the threat of infla-
tion and allowed the Fed to cut interest
rates. The price of oil dropped as low as
$10.42 a barrel in March, after starting
the year at $26.30 a barrel.
1954. First half: up 20.6 percent.
Second half: up 26.2 percent.
The stock market was on its longest
bull run, from 1949 to 1961. In 1954, an
improving economy and rising confidence
after the Korean War helped stocks. By
November, the market had finally re-
turned to its peak before the Wall Street
Crash of 1929.


S.f EwyA Lytjnny




eISCOVR P CONTEST[f


W e are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among
those chosen to be displayed in the
2013-2014 Discover Magazine. Please
submit only photos taken in Citrus
County and include a brief description
of the photo along with your name,
address and phone number. Photos
must be submitted by July 31, 2013.


I I







ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


D2 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


BUSINESS







SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013

Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
Tammy Yale
Optical Department, Walmart
Donnalee Slusser
Tiffany Wigs










... FOR OUTSTANDING

CUSTOMER SERVICE!


BWA welcomes two



new members!


Laura Grady
General Manager
Citrus 95 & Fox
Classic Hits
352-628-4444


he Business Women's Alliance of the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is
a committee of the Chamber for women only.
Their mission is to empower and develop
women through education, networking,
mentoring and partnerships; and to promote
opportunities for all women throughout Cit-
rus County. For more information about the
Business Women's Alliance, find us at Face-
book.com/bwacitrus or contact the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce at 352-795-
3149 or at www.citruscountychamber.com.


Lisa Nash
Sales Manager
FDS Disposal Inc.
352-746-0617


Modern Plumbing joins Chamber!


Owners James and Sirena Lewis of Modern Plumbing Inc. celebrate joining the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce with a ribbon-cutting
ceremony. Although new to the Chamber, Modern has been serving Citrus County for 35 years. They offer all aspects of plumbing, including
service, residential and commercial contracting. For plumbing services, call 352-726-5601 or visit www.modern-plumbing.com to learn
more about their history throughout the county. Pictured are: Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Dennis
Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County; George Bendtsen,
Insurance by George; Pete Retzko, Citrus County Chronicle; Lisa Nash, F.D.S. Disposal; Mary Pericht, Cadence Bank; owners James and
Sirena Lewis and their son Curtis; Nicholle Fernandez, Villages of Citrus Hills; and Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank.


News you

can use

Chamber offices
closed for holiday
The Citrus County Chamber
offices in Inverness and Crystal
River will both be closed on
Thursday, July4. TheCham-
ber offices will resume regular
business hours on Friday.
Industry
Appreciation
Month moved
IAM's monthlong festivities,
the mixer, luncheon and
everyone's favorite barbecue
will be moving to October. We
will be adding anew event, too!
Be on the lookout for details
coming soon!





Upcoming

Chamber

events
Aug. 8 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Suncoast Business Masters
Aug. 9 Chamber
Luncheon, Citrus Hills,
Healthcare Heroes
Awards Ceremony
Aug. 22 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Life Care Center/Comfort
Keepers
Sept. 7 Chamber Busi-
ness Expo, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at Citrus County Auditorium
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com or
follow the QR code to see
the website on your
smartphone!


LI~


K5 "iitus on --
facebook





I-,



On this week's

Chamber Chat ...

This episode of Chamber Chat features
summer fun and summer fashions!
* Teddianne Goshorn, communications
facilitator for the Citrus County Library
Systems, cohosts Chamber Chat and
shares how Citrus County libraries
are keeping summer reading fascinat-
ing and fun through their various
programs.
* The always delightful Sharon Skeele-
Hogan, special events coordinator for
the city of Inverness, shares all of the
patriotic theme events in downtown
Inverness that are sure to make your
Fourth of July festivities safe, fun
and explosive!
* Scott Baggerly of Faith Haven Christian
Retreat returns to share the success
of Camp Soquili and the importance
of team-building and leadership
programs. Find out more at
faithhavencrc.org.
* The local housing market is on the rise
and Kerry Rosselet of the Villages of
Citrus Hills and Ben Branch of BB&T
share with us what you can expect in
this rapidly changing market. Find out
how Terra Vista can meet your home-
buying needs.
You have three chances to watch Cham-
ber Chat: Monday at 6 p.m., Thursday at 8
a.m. and Friday at 1 p.m.
If you would like your business or local
event featured on Chamber Chat at no
cost to you email Melissa Benefield at
spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE" Cham-
ber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly
show!


Congratulations to this year's


Best of the Best winners!

T he Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is proud to
recognize all of the Chamber members that won the Citrus
County Chronicle's Best of the Best Awards. Thank you to all of
the winners for providing quality services for our community.


Accountant
Air Conditioning/
Heat Services
Air Duct Cleaning
Alarm/Security System
Aluminimum Contractor/
Screen Enclosure
Appliance Store
Arts & Crafts Store
Assisted Living Facility
Athletic Equipment Store
Automotive Repair
Bank
Bicycle Shop
Boat Dealer
Boat Tour
Body Shop
Bowling Center
Cabinet Store/Installer
Campground
Carpet & Rug Cleaner
Carpet/Floor Covering
Ceiling Fans
Cellular Telephones
Chiropractor
Country Club
Day Spa
Dive Shop
Florist
Foreign Auto Repair
Funeral Home
Furniture
Garbage Disposal Company
Gift Shop
Glass Repair
Golf Pro Shop
Hair Salon
Hardware Store
Health & Fitness Club
Hearing Aid Store
Home Builder
Home Health Service
Home Remodeling Contractor


Winner Edward J. Serra, CPA
Winner Bay Area Air
Conditioning
Winner Stanley Steamer
Winner Schlabach Security & Sound
Winner Blackshear II Aluminum


Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner


Lowe's
Walmart
Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Citrus Sports & Apparel
Crystal Automotive
SunTrust
Suncoast Bicycles
Apopka Marine
River Safari and Boat Tours
Dave's Body Shop
Manatee Lanes
Deem's Kitchen & Bath
Rock Crusher Canyon RV Park
Stanley Steamer
Joe's Carpet
Lowe's
Verizon
Citrus Chiropractic Group
Citrus Hills G&CC
Abitare Pars Salon & Day Spa
American Pro Dive
Waverley Florist
All Prestige Automotive
Strickland Funeral Home
Badcock Home Furnishings
FD.S. Disposal, Inc.
Connors Gifts
K&K Glass
Plantation on Crystal River
Abitare Paris Salon & Day Spa
Ace Hardware
Anytime Fitness
Audibel Hearing Aid Center
Sweetwater Homes
Comfort Keepers
Pinecrest Builders


Home Repair & Maintenance
Hotel or Motel
Insurance Agency
Interior Decorator
Investment Firm
Kitchen Remodel
Lighting Store
Lighting Store
Local Event
Local Golf Course
Locksmith
Marina
Massage Therapist
Medical Center
Medical Supplies/Equip
Mobile Home Dealer
Movers
Nail Salon
Oil Change Service
Optical/Vision Center
Outdoor/Patio Furniture
Pest Control Service
Pet Grooming
Pharmacy
Plant & Garden Nursery
Plumber
Pool Supplies
Printer
Radio Station
Real Estate Agent
Real Estate Office
Replacement Window
Roofer
RV Dealer
Skilled Nursing Care Facility

Tax Preparation
Thrift Store
Tourist Attraction (Local)

T-Shirt Company
Vacuum Cleaner Dealer
Veterinarian


Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner
Winner

Winner
Winner
Winner

Winner
Winner
Winner


Will Construction
Plantation on Crystal River
State Farm
Smart Interiors
Raymond James
Deem's Kitchen & Bath
Home Depot
Lowe's
Manatee Festival
Plantation on Crystal River
Porter Locksmith
Riverhaven Marina
Abitare Pans Salon & Day Spa
Citrus Memorial Health System
Crystal Home Medical
Taylor Made Homes
Dick's Moving
Abitare Pans Salon & Day Spa
Mobil 1 Lube Express
Mez Mer Eyes
It's a Shore Thing
Citrus Pest Management
Bow Wow Boutique
Walgreens
Color Country
Bob Tsacrios Plumbing
Pinch A Penny
Excel Printing
Citrus 95.3 WXCV
Gene Wade
Exit Realty Leaders
Tropical Window
AAA Roofing
Como RV Auto Sales & Service
Diamond Ridge Health &
Rehabilitation Center
Edward J. Serra, CPA
Key Training Center
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
Citrus Sports & Apparel
Walmart
Lecanto Veterinary Hospital




D4 SUNDAY,JUNE 30, 2013


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tim e


Fax (52.53-66 1Tol Fee .(88 82-34 1Emal:clssfidschonclon ie om0 w-0 0 *chonclonlin 0


Gentleman in his late
60's would like to
meet a lady for some
companionship
and maybe more
(352) 382-5661











Doublewides
Available
in 55+ park in
Lecanto, Exec.
Condition& Pricing
352-563-0500


FORD
1996 250 XL Diesel
Work Truck, Crew
Cab, 8ft bed,Topper,
253,000 mi. $5000.
503-6746


Hens for Sale
great layers, $10 ea.
Quail $3 ea. Rabbits
also, cages & hutches
(352)-212-8590





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Lg BBQ Grills
8ft satellite Dishes
& MORE 352-270-4087





2 KITTENS FREE
Black & White,
blue eyes, Cute
Cl BTN8-9 a.m, or 8-9
p.m. (352) 746-1904

Female Chihuahua.
One yr old. Spayed
but needs shots.
Good w/ dogs and
cats and older kids.
(352) 563-0192


Female Lab/Boxer
mix. Spayed, chip-
ped. shots, 10 months
old, great with kids.
No cats (352) 563-0192


Free
Cat Carrier
352-564-0095


FREE CAT
To good home
very lovable /2
2 Siamese 1/ orange
tabby, litter trained,
full grown 465-4015


FREE KITTENS
10 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061


FREE KITTENS
Siamese
(352) 795-6533


I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onhy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
II11111111I


m
FREE Lawn Mower
42" Riding Murry Mower
Doesn't Work
call (352)860-2565
FREE
Part Bengal Cat
Young Male, neutered,
he is a lap cat and likes
to be held & have lots of
attention. Are you
home most of the time
to give him lots of
love? call for more in-
formation
352-464-1567
Free
Pot Belly Pig &
Baby Turkeys
(352) 726-9573
Large Bird
Breeding Cage
4'tall 2x2' square
2 separate
compartments
352-465-7900




U PICK
BLACKBERRIES
(352) 643-0717
YOU PICK
Tomatoes
.40 a Ibs, $10 per
bucket mm. beside
Walmart in the Villages,
on CR 466 Open
6/23/13



Lost grey male cat,
Buffalo Dr, Pine Ridge,
Bev Hills area, please
call (352) 4334446 or
(518)4610582,
thank you.
White Manx Cat
Blue Eyes, deaf, 10 Ibs,
8 yrs old. Missing since
5/20, Independence
HWY, Inverness
Reward offered
352-726-1019/
352-212-9941



Chihuahia Mix older
dog,male, black and
tan, red collier found
near huddel house on
HWY 41 please call to
identify 352-201-4349









IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onry $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




ADMISSIONS
COORDINATOR

For CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
a Skilled Nursing
Facility in Crystal Riv.
The candidate
should have great
marketing skills. Be
familiar with medi-
cal terminology,
and strong organi-
zational Skills. LPN or
RN would be
preferred Fax
Resume
352-795-0490
or email to:
ccenterl4@tampa
bav.rr.com

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo.cam

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experienced in Front
Desk, Back Office
and Blood Draws.
Fax Resume to:
352-228-4903

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


Podiatric
Assistant
Supervisor

FT M-F. 8:30am-5pm.
Must have Basic
x-ray license or
Podiatry x-ray license.
Two local office
locations. Must have
minimum of two years
experience with em-
ployment references.
Competitive pay with
benefits.
Send resume to;
Citrus Podiatry
Center, Pa, P.O. Box
1120, Lecanto, FL
34460-1120

REHAB AIDE
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

Full-time position
available. Must be a
Florida-certified
nursing assistant.
Healthcare experi-
ence preferred. We
offer great pay and
benefits in a team-
oriented environ-
ment.

Please Apply
in Person to
Melanie Reyna,
Rehab Manager.
352-746-4434,
352-746-6081,Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne
Ln., Lecanto, FL
34461
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
41307



CParoein






AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

DAY PROGRAM
SUPERVISOR

New Horizons Village
a residential care facil-
ity for 48 adult individ-
uals with intellectual
disabilities, is looking
for a dynamic, creative
person to supervise
20+ staff at their
Active Treatment Day
Program. Must have
at least one year
supervisory experi-
ence and one year
working with the
developmentally disa-
bled population. Must
be a team player.
Basic qualifications
include:
I HS diploma, BA
degree preferred
I Ability to pass a
mandatory criminal
background investiga-
tion, reference inquiry,
& a post-hire physical
exam & drug screen.
New Horizons Village
offers:
I Competitive wages,
excellent benefit pack-
age & a tobacco-free
campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at
1275 N. Rainbow
Loop, Lecanto, FL
34461 or send your
resume to
lois@newhorizons
village.us

Homeownership
Specialist

Immediate opening
Provide pre-
& post-purchase
homebuyer counsel-
ing & education, and
assist with all stages
of the lending proc-
ess. BS degree and 3
yrs exp with residen-
tial lending or counsel-
ing, FHFC, FHA, VA,
& RD products, &
affordable housing
industry and programs
req. EOE/AA For
complete info on
position & how to
apply, visit
www.community
housingpartners.org


Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927


The City of Bushnell
is accepting
applications &
resumes for a fulltime
Water Plant
Operator
Class C.

Position involves
tech. work operating
and maintaining water
plants. Salary range
from $28,298 to
$42,448 with excellent
benefits. Minimum
qualifications: High
School Diploma or
G.E.D., Class C
Water certification,
issued by FDEP; with
Class C Wastewater
certification desirable.
Class C FDL or ability
to obtain within 6
months. This position
also provides support
to Electric and Waste-
water Utilities. Manual
labor is involved.
Applications available
on-line at
www.cityofbushnell
fl.com or at Bushnell
City Hall located
at 117 E Joe P
Strickland, JR. Ave,
Bushnell, FL.






CDL CLASS A

WITH TANKER
REQUIRED
Looking to hire
someone to work in
septic industry
352-563-2621


Class A Driver

2 yrs Experience
Flatbed/Lowboy/
Stepdeck home 3/4
weeks $40-60K
334-864-7456


Drivers HIRING
EXPERIENCED
/INEXPERIENCED
TANKER DRIVERS!
Earn up to $.51 per mile!
New Fleet Volvo Tractors!
1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -
Tanker Training
Available. Call
Today! (877)882-6537
www.OaklevTran
sport. corn


EARNING BETTER
PAY IS ONE STEP
AWAY!

Averitt offers
Experienced CDL
-A Drivers
Excellent Benefits
and Weekly
Hometime.
888-362-8608,
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Apply
online at
AverittCareers


Full-time
Supermarket
Refrigeration
and A/C Service
Technician

wanted servicing
Citrus & surrounding
counties. Experience
required. Competitive
wages and benefits.
Fax resume to:
352-860-1830


HR
COORDINATOR

Join an
Exciting Team.
Make a Difference.
Requires leadership,
organizational,
computer and cus-
tomer service skills.
2 Years Exp Req.

Email Resume to:
ATADMIN@
southernltc.com Or
Fax to 352-637-1921.
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D


EXPERIENCED
ROOFING CREW
& ROOFERS

Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
A& lyin Person
AAAROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411

Framers Wanted
352-212-9092

LOCKSMITH
WANTED

WILL TRAIN
AIvpply In Person
593 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto
Marine Service
Writer

F/T Knowledge of Ma-
rine mechanics, apply in
person Mon-Fn at Twin
Rivers Marina, 2880 N.
Seabreeze Pt, Crystal
River, 352-795-3552







NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough & Trim,
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood

PLUMBERS &
HELPERS
WANTED

Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at:
4079 S. Ohio Ave,
Homosassa

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH

Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

SERVICE
PLUMBER

Call (352) 726-5601
or Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1834M
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River 34429




LIFEGUARD
Announcement
#13-33

Skilled duties
lifeguarding at
Bicentennial Park
Pool and Central
Ridge Pool. Assist
with swim lessons,
teaching, marketing
and registration.
WE WILL NOT TRAIN
Must possess and
maintain current
Red Cross Lifeguard,
First Aid and
CPR/AED for the
Professional Rescuer
certifications. Must
possess a valid
Florida Driver
License. Full time,
40 hour work week/
flexible schedule.
$9.99 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

To apply online.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.


B

CITRUS MAIDS

CLEANING PERSON
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lc./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925











































CHRpNiCNJ




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.






Visitor Services
Representative
Announcement
#13-32

Develops and
maintains effective
tourism industry
relations. Thorough
knowledge of
County's tourism
amenities is critical
to be able to an-
swer inquiries and
help tourists. Gradu-
ation from high
school, or GED
required. Minimum
five years experi-
ence in hospitality,
marketing, tourism
preferred. Must
have through
knowledge of
Microsoft Office
programs and be
proficient in Word,
Excel, Adobe Acro-
bat and Access.
Beginning pay rate
$1.107.03 Bi weekly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us .
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, July 12, 2013.
EOE/ADA


WE'RE HIRING!
Housekeeping
Manager

Ft opening. All
qualified applicants
must be
dependable,
reliable and have
AHCA survey
knowledge.
*COMPETITIVE RATES
ARE OFFERED*
stop in and apply at
the Facility:
HEALTHCARE
CENTER OF
BRENTWOOD
2333 North
Brentwood Circle,
Lecanto Or you can
send resume to:
Jobs@cqcare.com
To speak with a
Recruiter you can
contact
800-442-1353


Par-time

MAINTENANCE

RENTAL PROPERTIES
Dunnellon,
Part Time.
Semi Retired
Welcome.
Reply: Frank Boitz
S Box 248,
S Indian Rocks
Beach FL. 33785










SPRING HILL
CLASSES
:-C SC5 SC S5 S5
COSMETOLOGY
DAYS & NIGHTS
w-JULY 1,2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
aAUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATEAPPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294






SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS & NIGHTS
wJULY 1, 2013

BARBER
NIGHTS
*AUGUST 12, 2013

MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR SALE OR
LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
(352) 464-2514 **
1305 Hwy 486



HAULING PLATFORM
2" hitch, black steel, 60"
W x 30" D, custom with
steel mesh bottom.
$100 352-422-1309


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang.
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
S13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15 995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang.
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
T We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




ANTIQUE FAN
McGraw Electric Co.
Model 1265R $20.00
call 352-257-3870




NORMAN ROCKWELL
COLLECTOR PLATES
10 different, limited edi-
tion, 1970s. $100 all
352-422-1309
PORCELAIN DOLLS- 2
Native American, 21"
tall, w/ stands, Paradise
Gallenes. $15 each
352-422-1309

I


I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onhy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




Free flow w/water fall,
4-5 person, like new 1.5
yrs old, cover, steps, ac-
cessoreos & chem., runs
on 110 ele. $1200 OBO
352-746-0853




AC Unit
for Doublewide
Mobile Home
$500
(352) 637-3482
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
COMMERCIAL
FREEZER,2004 Frigid-
aire 20.3 cubic feet
with alarm, like new,
excellent condition,
$250, 352-212-8922
DISHWASHER
TAPPAN..White. Works
well. $50 527-1239
DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
FRIGIDAIRE. 18 cuft.
White. Works great!
$100. 527-1239
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER
$100 In perfect working
condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER & DRYER
NEED WORK $50 FOR
BOTH 352-613-0529
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398




Desk w/ inch
glass top, $125.
House Safe, brand
new, still in box $150.
(352) 795-9146
King Slay Bed
Cherry wood, dresser
w/mirror, armoire, 2
nightstands paid $5500
asking $1500
(678) 621-3517


FI=UIN AB4
DRAWER STEEL 15"W
X 25"D X 52"H Excellent
condition. $50.
(352)563-6410










DUDLEY'S

Tuesday July 2nd.
Auction@ 4pm
Special
Independence
week
Estate Overstock
Auction!!!
Call or web for info
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BPAu2267
AB1667

MOECKER
AUCTIONS
BlueChip Power, LLC
& Advanced Solar
Photonics, LLC.
Tuesday, July 16
@ 10am
400 Rinehart Rd,
Lake Mary, FI 32746
Solar Panel Manufac-
turing Plant Equip-
ment, 6,000+ Panel
Solar Farm,
Forklifts, Vehicles,
Complete Machine
Shop, Fixtures
and more!
Details at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
15%-18%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
Receivership Case
No.:6:13-cv-00657-
JA-KRS
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin

MOECKER
AUCTIONS
Public Auction
Display & Cabinet
Manufacturing Co.
LIVE & ONLINE
Tuesday, July 9 at
10am
16290 NW 13th Ave,
Miami, FI 33169
Wood & Plastic
Fabricating/
Rotating & Cutting
Equip.: CNC
Routers, Fork lift,
Furniture, Fixtures &
Equipment. Details
at www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
15%-18%BP $100 ref.
cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




4 WOOD SHELVES
FOR
GARAGE//WORKSHOP
$20 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
419-5981
Delta 12" Plainer,
Heavy, 220V, $400.
Powermatic Lathe
$750
(352) 637-3482
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HAND
HELD, MADE OF
METAL HEAVY DUTY
INVERNESS 419-5981
Werner 8'
aluminum ladder
$35 (352) 382-1885



60" Sony Wega,
Rear projection TV
6 yrs. old, Plays good
Color a little off
$500
(352) 382-4085
Hitachi, stereo with
tape and record
player in Cabinet
$150.
Disney VHS Library
$100 (352) 527-7223
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $80
352-613-0529



INTERIOR DOOR.
32" 6 Panel with
hardware. $15.00
352-513-5400
INTERIOR DOOR. 6
Panel, 30" $10.00.
352-513-5400
MARBLE
1/2", 30"x30", for
counter top, tan,
good shape,($20)
352-613-7493
Premium Metal
Roofing, Manufac-
turer Direct!
8 Metal Roof profiles
in 40+ colors I
Superior customer
service, same day
pick-up, fast
delivery!
1-888-779-4270 or
visit www.aulfcoast

SCREEN DOOR.
New with frame, 36X80,
Aluminum with scroll
work. $99.00.
352-513-5400
SINK
white, 19"x16", bath-
room, brand-new, ($10)
352-613-7493
SLIDING GLASS
WINDOW.
Horizontal slide, 46W X
69H. $20.00.
352-513-5400


4 a-- i --M- h
P-11 401 0 0 IT 11SHCUE
Building Maintenance Tradesworker
The Citrus County Sheriff's office is
accepting applications for a Building
Maintenance Tradesworker.
Regular full time position working Monday through Friday sharing
on-call with Building Maintenance Coordinator Responsibilities of
this position include constructing, repairing, renovating and
maintaining Sheriff's Office buildings and equipment Responsible
for performing general maintenance, including carpentry plumbing,
painting, electrical, HVAC, and other skills in accordance with
standard practices of the trade Performs carpentry tasks to
include renovations and construction, including drywall installation
and repair Repairs existing plumbing pipes and fixtures, including
installation of supply and drain lines and irrigation systems
Performs HVAC maintenance; installs, repairs and troubleshoots
HVAC systems Performs electrical repairs of receptacles and
switches Performs operational checks on generators Paints
interior buildings Repairs roofs and walls Installs and repairs
locks Moves and assembles furniture Performs routine
paperwork, including filling out work orders and writing up work
summaries Operates power tools such as sanders, circular saws
and power drills
QUALIFICATIONS Requires a minimum of five years of
experience dealing with general maintenance issues Position
requires medium to heavy work that involves walking, standing,
stooping, lifting, digging, pushing and raising objects and involves
exerting between 20 to 50 pounds of force on a regular and
recurring basis and 50 to 100 pounds of force on an occasional
basis Requires the ability to lift up to 100 pounds Position may
be subject to call back in emergency situations HVAC experience
preferred EPA-608 Refrigerant Certification must be completed
within four (4) months of hire
Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450 (352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications are available at
wwwshenffcitrus org
Equal Opportunity Employer MF/D/V


Your News.


Your Town.


Your Way.
)00EXJS


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITION















BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY,JUNE 30, 2013 D5


BOSE SYSTEM, 3000
watt, mixer board, dual
CD PLAYER,
COMPATIBLE WITH
COMPUTER. GREAT
FOR DJ, all in hard car-
rying cases and porta-
ble stand. $800.00
Call, 304-544-8398
DELL OPTIPLEX
GX150 w/Monitor
keyboard,mouse,
speakers, camera $100
firm 325-601-7816
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
SCANNER CANON
CANOSCAN 4400F with
35mm attachment,
works w/ XP,7 or 8 $25.
(352)563-6410




2 Leather Wing Chairs,
Blue, Brand New,
Office or Home $3,000
(352) 212-2798
3 piece Black Lacquer
oriental wall unit and
matching coffee table
and end table. Shown
by appointment only.
$600. 304-544-8398
4 DINING/KITCHEN
CHAIRS brown tones
perfect condition $40.00
can deliver call
352-257-3870
6 BAR STOOLS wood
painted black great
condition $12 each
can deliver.
call 352-257-3870
Amish Built Solid
Oak pedestal Table
w/Two 12" Leaves,
(36" x 48"/60"
Org. Cost $800
Asking $200
New Condition
Call (352) 637-5227
BOYS BEDROOM SET
locker style, headboard,
nightstand, dresser.
Great condition. $50 all.
352-220-3123
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
DINING ROOM SET
Wrought iron Table, (4)
chairs, 42" glass top
and Baker's rack.
$100.00 Call 637-2193
Dining Room Set,
4 captain chairs,
table w/ 1 leaf,
china closet $350.
Wing Back Chair $60.
(352) 628-3411
DOUBLE STAINLESS
STEEL SINK without
faucet asking $25.00
352-527-3177
Elegant Living Room
set, sofa, love seat and
Chair. Colors browns &
creams, paid $5000
asking $1500.
(678) 621-3517
FLOOR LAMP with
glass globe. $25.00.
352-513-5400


Sa-
GRANDMOTHER
CLOCK NEEDS A
LITTLE REPAIR only
100.00 obo
352464 0316
w- High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LOVE SEAT AND
CHAIR traditional good
condition needs clean-
ing $45.00 can deliver.
call 352-257-3870
MIRROR
Full length, gold frame.
$30.00
352-513-5400
Moving Sale
Entertainment Center
with TV & VCR $40
King Bed rm set 2
dresser one w/mirror
and 2 end tables $175
352-746-0834
Moving Sale
Wingback Chair, Eng-
lish Hunting Material
$25, Breakfast glass ta-
ble with 4 padded chairs
$50 call (352) 382-1885
OAK TABLE
48" round, pedestal
with leaf. $65.00.
352-513-5400
Older Drexel Dining
Room Set
Pedestal Table w/6
chairs & China Cabinet
$350. (352) 489-8095
PICTURE
Gold frame, Paris street
scene, 36"H X48"W.
$60.00
352-513-5400
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
ROCKER-RECLINER
Lazy Boy, tan cloth,
good condition.$80
OBO. 352-628-0698
SHOE STORAGE
CABINET WHITE Ap-
prox. 30W X 39H X 12D
2 bins & 2 drawers. $20.
Must sell (352)563-6410
SOFA BED great condi-
tion light blue $75.00
can deliver, call
352-257-3870
Sofa Bed Queen Size
Blue Flower Print
Perfect Condition
as new $300.
(352) 527-7443
Sofa Sleeper
Queen Sz. $250.
Entertainment Center
Light wood $150
.(352) 628-3411
TABLE LAMPS
Pair of Pineapple lamps
with silk shades. $45.00
352-513-5400
TAN WOOD DRESSER
6-Drawers, looks like
oak, great condition.
Asking $100.
Call 352-233-3227
TWIN FRAME AND
BOX SPRING Twin
Frame and box spring
in EUC... $20.
352-249-7212
WALL HANGING
metal, 60"H X40"W.
$90.00
352-513-5400


White Wicker Furn.
set of 15 pieces with
cushions, table & chairs,
tv stand, coffee table,
$995,Browhill notty pine
Bed dream maker matter,
bx spg $400 503-3210



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman LT 3000
Lawn Tracker 20 HP
42" deck with
mulch kit 6 speed,
exec. cond $475
(352) 726-0230
CRAFTSMAN
RIDING MOWER
15.5 HP, turbo cooled, 6
speed/ 42" Excellent
condition. $375
After 5 pm 513-5134
FERTILIZER/SEED
SPREADER push type
with covered hopper.
like new. $25
352-422-1309
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS SMALL $15
352-613-0529
TORO ZERO TURN
Mower, Kohler eng. 54"
cut, sweeper & grass
catcher, exec. cond.
$2600 OBO 270-8664
Two 42" Riding
Mowers
$250. & $375.
in very good cond.
Citrus Springs
732-597-3910
WEED EATER 1
26" RIDING MOWER
$400.
(352) 527-2981



SPIDER PLANTS Free
to a good home. three
large Spider plants with
babies phone:
352-613-2232



Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352- 613-2944



4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZES 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZES 36X30 & 34X30
$40 EACH
352-613-0529



!!!! LT225/75R 16
TIRE!!!! Good Year
Light Truck Great
Shape 90% Tread
ONLY 60.00 464-0316
2 Automatic Pool
Cleaners, Hayward nav-
igator, zodiac barracuda
with hoses, exec. cond.
$135 each 270-8475


2 End Tables & Coffee
Table $200
Small Freezer
$125.
.(352) 628-3411
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALL COV-
ERING $25 PRE
PASTED VINYL 165 SQ
FT 419-5981
4 CERAMIC KITCHEN
CANISTERS WITH
LIDS $10 COUNTER-
TOP CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
6 WALL MIRRORS NO
FRAMES 23 1/2 X40
TO 40 X 40 INCHES
$50.00 3525270324
Above Ground Pool
24 round, Intex,
includes pump, ladder
& cover. $400 obo
(352) 726-9565
or (352) 419-5466
Air Conditioner, porta-
ble on wheels, window
vented, remote control,
run 110, 10kbtu, room
to room A1 condition
$135 (352) 270-8475
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BLACK @ DECKER
AIR SPRAYER $30
NEW NEVER USED
FOR PAINTS/STAINS
INVERNESS 419-5981
BOYS BICYCLE
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
CEILING FAN
Brushed Steel, 3 lights,
short-black blades. Ideal
Kitchen/Porch Almost
new $55 352-233-3227
Chevy Silverado
Aluminum Running
Boards, great shape
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra for
4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY $80
352-464-0316
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
PAPER SHREDDER
NEW IN THE BOX
shreds all your impt.
papers.prevent identy
theft35.00 464-0316
Pentair Kreepy
Krawly, great white suc-
tion side pool cleaner,
for in ground pool $200
call (352) 382-1885
POOL DECK
CONCRETE STAIN 5
Gal Ivory unopened,
cover 800 sq ft. Bought
too much. Less than
half price at $45
352-212-1827
Pool SAFETY FENCE
4ft X 75ft. Retails $100
per 10 ft section. Asking
100 for entire fence.
Firm. Call 352 233 3227


CHILDREN' IR N "NEW" BANJUKE 2 Trek Bicycles
HEADBOARD Brand MADE IN U.S.A.!WITH 2 Trek Bicyclesoth
New Metal Headboard, NORTH AMERICAN 1 Huffy Beach Bicycle
$10 (352)465-1616 MAPLE & CHERRY $50.
ROCKING HORSE $95 352-601-6625 (352) 637-3482
Black-colored, rocks "NEW" WASHBURN Concealed Weapons
by rubber, ok TRAVEL Permit Course
condition, $50 GUITAR/DULCIMER DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352)465-1616 W/GIGBAG& MORE! (352) 726-5238
RUBBER RIDING $90 352-601-6625 EZ GO Club Car
BOOTS/LAKE BOOTS DRUM CIRCLE? 14" Exec. cond. exec tires,
$15 MADE IN ISRAEL HAND DRUM/IRISH oodBattcanopy
LIKE NEW SIZE 43L BODHRAN WALNUT. g must sell this
EUR 419-5981 PRE TUNED $40 weekend $1200.
Stress Lounger 352-601-6625 352-527-3125
Hassock, leather $50, JR. 3/4 ELECTRIC GUI-
combination TV &Com- TAR STRAT STYLE Fear No-Evil Guns
puter Monitor 15" Color CREAM&WHITE NEW Glocks-S&W-Beretta
$50 352-513-4317 CONDITION $45 Concealed Classes
-Two-New 10x1-352-601-6625 352-447-5595
EasyUp Folding KARAOKE GEM '99 Electric Cart,
Canopies w/4 zipper pro-rack-mount,CAVS, Batteries 1 yr. old
sides, heavy duty dig echo/pitch-shift,good Crystal River $3,000.
$100. ea. obo shape,2CD's($25) obo (352) 564-8166
(352) 503-6977 352-613-7493 GOLF DRIVER
5 2013 Cobra AMP Cell,
White Wood Dining New, Men's Rt Hand,
Rm Table w/ leaf and Houehold stiff shaft,adj tool &
4 upholstered chairs new head cover. $200
$75. (352) 795-2515 COFFEE MAKER & OBO (352) 746-5107
(352) 422-6161 ELECTRIC MIXER $10 GOLF DRIVER
Wooden Swing Set FOR BOTH Tour Edge Exotics.
Gym Play Set, 352-613-0529 XLD, MRH, Senior, Gold
w/ rock climbing wall OVERSIZED 65 shaft. Exc cond w/
& tunnel, small play- RECLINER Dark new grip & HC. $65 obo
house slide & more, burgundy velour. Dunellon 465-8495
needs paint Org. $25.00 352-513-5482 James Anglin
$1,300 Asking $450.
(352) 795-2515 Solar Cover Gunsmith
(352) 422-6161 & Attached Roller. 9 Millimeter new in
You pick and remove Box with 2 mags
M dic l $50. (352) 746-3327 $189.00 352-419-4800
S or (352) 212-7299 RAY'S GUN SHOP
TOASTER OVEN Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
4 Wheeled Walker MAGIC CHEF $15 Ruger LCR 22 Mag
with brakes and seat 352-613-0529 $449 NRA-concealed
ONLY $70.00 classes 586-7516


352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
& Aluminum Walker
both have adjustable
legs 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Golden Companion
Electric Wheel Chair,
and Lift (bruno), exec.
cond $450 for both
352-419-6710
Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464-0316
NEW 4" Toilet Seat
Riser, makes it much
easier to get up
ONLY 20.00
352-464-0316
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps to
the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
TRANSPORT
WHEELCHAIR (SMALL
WHEELS) good shape
with footrests only 90.00
352 464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" 5 STRING
BANJO UKE U.S.A.
MADE NORTH AMERI-
CAN HARDWOODS
$100 352-601-6625


Atlas Cross Bar 65 by
Welder, over 65 exer-
cises, compare to bow
flex. Includes bench and
leg extension. Exc Cond
$85 obo 352-503-2661
BOWFLEX BLAZE
Resistance Rods 210
pounds, 60 exercises,
lat tower, squat
station, aerobic
rowing, leg presses,
good condition,
$300,352-212-8922
ELLIPTICAL
COMPACT SIZE
works fine 100.00
352 464-0316
ELLIPTICAL
EXERCISER Exec
Cond. 1 yr. old. Hardly
Used at all. $250
352-503-2610
ELLIPTICAL
NordicTrack E5vi
Adjustable stride
Pre Set Programs
$300.00 352-527-3589
EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only 90.00
352 464-0316
PILATES
course book, DVD,
2 VCR tapes, ($5)
352-613-7493
PROFORM
Eliptical
good condition
$200. (352) 795-9146
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BIKE
works great only
100.00
352 464 0316


UTILITY TRAILER
2012 Easy Pull
5 x10, beaver tail
extra tie downs
New Cond. $875.
(352) 860-1106



Baby Cradle,high chair
(both wood) car seat,
stroller and play pen,
blankets, all in good
condition all for $200
(352) 795-7254
BABY Einstein PACK
'N PLAY Portable
Crib-good condition.
Asking $25.00 obo.
Call 352-233-3227.
BARBIE HOUSE WITH
ACCESSORIES 3 feet
tall Barbie House. Co-
mes with dolls. Asking
25.00 352-233-3227
BOYS BABY CLOTHES
like new sizes 3 months
- 3 toddler $ .25 $2.00
call 352-257-3870



MUST SELL
/2 Karat
Engagement Ring
Paid $1,100.
Asking $600.
(352) 464-2215
NECKLACE,double
chain,stainless,large
engrave able heart,
new,1/2price,($70)
352-613-7493


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352- 613-2944




P L E X U S


i .

Ambassador

Samantha

Haven
Independent
Plexus Slim
Weight Loss I love
helping people get
healthy and motivated.
I'm so THANKFUL that
I was showed this by a
Dear friend:)
The products have
changed my LIFE
If you would like more
information call me or
send me a text at
352-536-4025
Visit my web site at
www.plexusslim.
com/haven
Can't wait to hear
from you:)




FREE
Need A Home
for a beautiful
purebred Labrador
Retriever, male 41%
yrs old, please call after
5pm (352) 746-3087
Hens for Sale
great layers, $10 ea.
Quail $3 ea. Rabbits
also, cages & hutches
(352)-212-8590


ISm


MIDNIGHT
Midnight, beautiful
black lab mix, 3 y.o.,
weighs 65 lbs, al-
ready neutered,
housebrkn, very
sweet & playful. He
would love a big
fenced yard, good
with other dogs &
people. As a lab,
would be a wonder-
ful, loyal compan-
ion. Adoption fee
$30 includes all vac-
cinations, chip &
tests. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
Toy Chihuahua
Female, 7 months
old, Tan, good health
all shots $375.
(352) 795-2515
(352) 422-6161













VELVET
Velvet, beautiful
female red Chow
mix, perfect size
companion @ 42
Ibs. Appears house-
brkn. Slowly warms
to new people, but
forms strong bond &
is loving, quiet, obe-
dient, clean, travels
well. Great on leash.
Best w/adults as in-
side dog in quiet
home. Low exercise
needed. Call Mike
@352-201-2236
or e-mail Dog-lover@
tampabay.rr.com."





Shamrock Farms
2013 Hay Crop
Round Bales $60 ea.
Call 352-795-1906


S.^I^^


SMITTYS APPLIANCE

Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


LISTINGS
E-BOOKS PUBLISH-
ING E-Books Available
NOW! Guides for
caregivers, Dealing with
Death. Interested in
publishing your story?
Http://www.amazon.com/
author/elainekleid



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Al HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Residential/Commercial
(352) 400-8361
Mention this ad and get
a service call for $19.
Expires 8/31/2013
Lic# CAC1817447


Stretching Cleaning

Removal Repair
Free In Home Estimates
Lifetime Warranty on Stretching
& Repairn
Upholstery Cleaning
Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces
Eli
WMi',


AAA ROOFING
Call the "Ieak6usters"
Free Written Estimate


:100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
SMustpresentcoupon at timecontract assigned I
Lic./Ins.CCC057537 ooF3BF


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
**352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
Peachy Clean
Residential And
Commercial Cleaning
(352)400-8617
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $20
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmaill.com
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


GENIE.U


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


m



White Diamond Limo
Weddings/Sporfing
events/Special
Occasions/Airport
352-341-LIMO (5466)




CLOCK REPAIR
35 Yrs. exp. House
calls, all brands serviced
George 352-794-3512




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996






I
Jeffrey Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
.' Repairs
Small Carpentry
A& Fencing
l Screening
C (lean Dryer
Vents

Eperence lifelongable

52-344-0905
cell' 400-1722
i sured Lic.#37761


PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135








POL.

Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/Insured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


ROOFING
Te&n ce i,,n 6ooft





Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352)639-1024
S LICENSED & INSURED


CRS Contracting
Roofing,Free Estimates
Remodeling and Home
Inspections 414-8693

ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


DRYER START



S Hidden Co tl 6



Lic/is.,Bode


WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
a .fl or pool or plan
0 something
'** -- completelynew!
Often nraed,
| '.1ffi~fe ^ never duplicated"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
&I insured 352-400-3188


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Serv-
ice
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!

T LndowT
Cleaning^^


I THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
.. Pools & Pavers
C* leaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
|l k'>{ Residential &
t ..., Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

General Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized TechniciansI
ER0015377

352-621-124


Lion Head Rabbits,
show quality $10 each
(352) 586-2582




a


I




D6 SUNDAY,JUNE 30, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
II11111111I




Boat Trailer
22'tandam,galv., $1200
OBO 352-794-3603
c 813-244-3945
New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45'Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299




** BUY, SELL"*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*

CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tn-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.


22ft, CC, 225/Suzuki
Dual Axle Trailer
Extras, $5,995.
CONSIGNMENT USA
(352) 461-4518
Classic Mako
20'Honey Pot teak,good
cond. well maint.Trailer
150 Evenrude 1993
Nice! Extra's! $5200
obo 352 795-1546
DOCK SPACE
AVAILABLE
In Crystal River
Deep Water Canal, no
bridges (352) 212-4839
JON BOAT
14 ft.. Trailer,
9.8 HP Nissan.
$1,900 (352) 344-8641
Leave Message
PONTOON
2006 18' Tracker
w/trailer, 25HP Merc, 4
str, hum. bird finder,cd
player, 2 fishing chairs
$6500 352-341-0262
PONTOON
20FT, 60 HP, 4 stoke,
Yamaha, low hours, 6
years young, loaded,
kept in dry storage,
$9,000. (352) 382-8966
(352) 212-0364
Sail Boat
20' with Cabin, & trailer,
new sail, boat needs
some work $1100
(352) 220-6303
SEA EAGLE
2013, 12/2 ft. Inflatable
boat & motor, pump
incl'd. sea worthy,
hard resin flrs. seats 4,
9.9 Yamaha. outbrd
eng. like new, mtr 2
hrs. S3.300 352344-4384


SYLVAN PON-
TOON FOR SALE
2005 820 20' Pontoon
with 50 hp 4-stroke
Yahama. Low hours of
use. Good condition.
Asking Pnce: $8500
Email
warneboat@gmail.com
for questions


I.Liv st


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com










BOUNDER
1999 32 FT Motor
home, Ford V10 engine,
low mileage, new tires,
Sleeps 2-6 220-6303




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




SUNNYBROOK
2005, 36 ft. 5th wheel,
2 slides, king bd, like
new, NADA $29K,
Reduced $19,900
352-382-3298

THE EGG
2007, all Elec; fiber-
glass, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
sleeps 3, $11,500
352-419-8366
256-244-6377

WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945





BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144











AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

2005 Chrysler
PT Cruiser $3950

2001 Plymouth
Neon $2495

1999 Chevy
Venture Van $2300

1995 Toyota
Camry $2275

CALL TED TODAY
(352) 563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, FI

BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

CHEVROLET
1999 White Monte Carlo
Z34,One Owner, 145k
miles, leather intenor,
automatic, CD player,
New Paint Job, asking
$2,000 obo located in
Inglis 352-447-3021


2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2005, Equinox,
extra clean, sunroof
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2006, Impala
$5,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2008, Malibu,
$9,995
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2010, PT Cruiser
$11,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
1990 Tempo, Runs
good, 112k miles,
good tires. $700
(352) 489-5749
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
500 2006 46,937 miles,
red with tan intenor
leather, CD/AM/FM
$8500(352) 860-0164
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2009, Sonata SE,
36k mil
$12,500,
352-382-2457
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100


Mazaa
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
MAZDA 626
1999, 4 cyl, DOHC,
over $5k under hood
this year. $2750 obo.
(352) 513-4932
Toyota
2006 Scion, XA
4 dr, auto, new tires
$28k mi. 1 local owner
$8500. (352) 201-7014




Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
'78 Camaro Z28,
Runs good 350 eng.
hurst shifter. $2,500
(352)634-1764
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560






I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
Hapy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


BIG SALE
*Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44. CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

DODGE
03 Dakota Quad Cab.
new tires, head liner,
bed liner, 23k mi, $8500
(352) 628-1886
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
FORD
1996 250 XL Diesel
Work Truck, Crew
Cab, 8ft bed,Topper,
253,000 mi. $5000.
503-6746
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100




FORD
FORD 2005 EX-
PLORER XLT 89K ONE
OWNER,ALL DEALER
SERVICE
RECORDS,SATELLITE
RADIO,$7700
1-352-527-3498
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100




950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board





321-0630 SUCRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in
business under the




323-0630 SUCRN
Lien Foreclosure Sale 7-11
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described
below under Florida
Statutes 713 78
The undersigned will sell at
public sale by competitive
bidding at 9:00 am on
Thursday, July 11, 2013




rrmJ^


HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2000 Grand Cherokee
V8, leather
$3,995
352-341-0018
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306





of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at





fictitious name of
Handy Randy located at
9909 E Lake Tahoe Drive
Inverness, Florida 34450,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register the
said name with the
Division of Corporations
o f
the Florida Department




on the premises where said
vehicle has been stored and
which are located at,
Smitty's Auto, Inc, 4631 W
Cardinal St, Homosassa,
Citrus County, Florida, the
following'
1966 Ford Galaxy 500
6U68X132457
1950 Ford Custom BOAT
127518




Iamm


320-0630 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote Powell
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Terry P. Powell
5571 S. Scarlet Oak Ter
Homosassa, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of
ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide
voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of
Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle June 30, 2013


321-0630 SUCRN
07/10 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.

Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least
one day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, June 30, 2013.


322-0630 SUCRN
7-23 PUBLIC HEARING
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County,
Florida, will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 23, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Board
of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose to consider the adoption of the
assessment roll prepared for the 2013 Country Oaks Road
Improvement/Maintenance Municipal Service Benefit Unit and to hear public
comment as to the assessment roll. A copy of the preliminary assessment roll as
examined and approved by the Board, is available in the office of the Assessment
Coordinator in the Citrus County Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite #205, Lecanto, Florida, from the 1st day of July, 2013, and shall remain so
available until the day for hearing objections to such assessment roll. At said hearing
the Board will meet and hear comments from all interested persons as to the
assessments, the accuracy and the amount thereof against any lot or parcel of land
owned by such interested persons, and as to the confirmation of the assessment roll.
The Board will also equalize and either annul, sustain or modify, in whole or in part
the special assessment roll according to the special benefits that the Board
determines that each assessment unit (AU) will receive as a result of such
improvements. All interested persons may appear and file written objections to the
confirmation of such roll.
The nature of the improvements to be made consist of construction of roadway
and drainage improvements to improve the public areas (roadways and drainage
areas) to an acceptable standard for the purpose of the County accepting these
roadways and drainage areas for perpetual maintenance. Said improvements are
to be constructed on the streets, roads and common areas of that part of West
Casa Terrace from the north lot line of Lot 8, Block A to the north right-of way line of
West State Park Street plattedd as State Park Drive), all of West Samson Lane and
North Uda Point lying within that portion of the Country Oaks Subdivision described in
Exhibit "A" which is attached hereto and made a part hereof.
If and when the assessment roll becomes final by the confirmation and approval
of the Board, the assessment roll and the Resolution confirming and approving the
same shall be recorded in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, and delivered
to the County Property Appraiser. From the date of such recording the assessment
shall constitute liens upon the properties assessed co-equal with the lien of general
County and district taxes, including ad valorem taxes, and shall be superior in rank
and priority to all other liens, titles and claims.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of
County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, they will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation atthis meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
BY: JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
2013 COUNTRY OAKS ROAD IMPROVEMENT/MAINTENANCE
MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT
EXHIBIT "A"

A Subdivision of a portion of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 7, Township 18 South,
Range 17 East, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the NW corner
of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 7, Township 18 South, Range 17 East, thence N
89 39' 23" E along the north line of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 a distance of 1056.41 feet to
the NW corner of Lot 15, Block A, Carpenter's Country Square Subdivision, Unit 1, as
recorded in Plat Book 11, page 37, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida, thence S
0 03' 20" W along the west line of said Carpenter's Country Square Subdivision, Unit
1, a distance of 326.76 feet to the SW corner of Lot 1, Block C, of said Carpenter's
Country Square Subdivision, Unit 1, said point being on a curve, concaved
southeasterly, having a central angle of 43 38' 25" and a radius of 310 feet, thence
southwesterly along the arc of said curve a distance of 236.12 feet to a point on the
west line of the east 469.56 feet of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 (chord bearing and distance
between said points being S 65 28' 27" W 230.45 feet), thence S 0 03' 20" W along
the west line of said east 469.56 feet a distance of 868.14 feet to a point on the north
right-of-way line of State Park Drive, said point being 50 feet from, measured at right
angles to, the centerline of said State Park Drive, said centerline also being the south
line of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4, thence S 89 59' 25" W along said north right-of-way line a
distance of 842.59 feet to a point on the west line of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4, thence N
0 07 59" W along said west line a distance of 1284.30 feet to the point of beginning.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, Sunday, June 30, 2013.


Harley Davidson
'00, SOFTAIL, Standard
CHEAP $5,500.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047

HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
'02 Lownder 14,000 mi.
1450cc,pristine.$8900
352-560-3731

Harley Davidson
'07, STREET GLIDE
LOADED. FINANCE
AVAILABLE
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047

HONDA
1997 SHADOW 1100
EZ Finance $2,500.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047

HONDA
2006, GOLDWING 1800
$7,995.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047

HONDA
'94 GOLD WING TRIKE
Full Conversion
$12,900.
352-330-0047

SUZUKI
'02, INTRUDER 1400
BUY HERE PAY HERE
http://www.lucky
ucycles.com/
352-330-0047





aovdeals com,
July 1,2013-July31,2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.





o f
State, Tallahassee,
Florida. Dated at
Inverness, Florida, this
2 7 t h
day of June, 2013.
/S/Randall E. Hyatt,
Owner.
Published in the CITRUS
COUNTY CHRONICLE,
JUNE 30, 2013.




1995 Saturn S-Series
1G8ZG1275SZ232346
1994 Isuzu Pickup
4S1CL11L6R4202682
Purchase must be paid for
at the time of purchase in
cash only Vehicle sold as is
and must be removed at the
time of sale Sale is subject
to cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated party
June 30, 2013


^^^^^^


Meeting
I oicesn I


NBo


Men
I Ntics I'




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The all-new 2013 Lincoln MKZ.


What to get the garage that's had everything.


I Newe. 2.01- .6bot n ie rH bi via l Reracabl P normicGlas oof


FOR 36 MONTHS j
LINCOLN AFS CASH DUE AT SIGNING
9 RED CARPET LEASE' AFTER $0,000 CASH BACK.
Security deposit waived. Excludes taxes, title and license fees.
Optional features shown not included in lease price.


VIN#2LMDJ6JK8DBL33908


Stk#L3T041


2013 LINCOLN MKX FWD
WITH 100A PACKAGE


FOR 36 MONTHS 3 9
LINCOLN AFS CASH DUE AT SIGNING
RED CARPET LEASE' AFTER $0,000 CASH BACK.
Security deposit waived. Excludes taxes, title and license fees.
Optional features shown not included in lease price.


VIN#1LNHL9DK6DG606017


Stk#L3C020


2013 MKS FWD
WITH 100A PACKAGE


Get to know the 2013 Lincoln line up at Lincoln.com


Only Certirled Lincoln De:aler
L Cftrus, a O&pa
for Sales & SenvAce in your 4 County
sco
ZArea: Lev:yCftrusHern:anndo&Pa 3


~~n ;21 C~c ~i-n~~ I


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 D7


LINCOLN




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[IOME


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I] koIKl


I1YJa:


All-New 2014
Chevy Impala 1 LS
36 month lease


p.-


$


New 2013 Chevy Cruze LS
C1245.B SmdTransnmluian
nHIre] e ... L
DEALER DSCOUNT $M56
REBAlL- S S1AOW
PURCHASE BONUS CASH -*00
CAM OR CMADE E.MU" t ~
wbwme '-A ej


New 2013 Chevy Traverse LS
C1321
DEALER DISCOUNIT ... ..----. $865
REBATE: -S1.500
CASH OH TRADE EQWTY--- 52,500


New 2013 Chevy Malibu LS
MSRP W11
DEALER DISOOUN. -$600
REBATE: $2,OO
PURCHASE BONUS CASH:-- 500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY $650


New 2013 Chevy Sonic
MqPP .................11..
DEALER DISCOUNT' .C. $400
REBATE -_.$500
PURCHASE BONUS CASH $500
CASH OR TRAM EQUflr ...$.300


New 2013 Chevy Equinox LS
SULk #C13205, Aula, 4cyl. MSRP: S25.015
$on OOI i


IIAE


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SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 D9


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3RD AllIIUAL
DOG DAYS OF SUMMER
Adoption a Fundraiser
Please Join Us
Sat., July 13, 2013 11am to 3pm
Accrpi;iiq Doollio' And SupplIr. toiw

felt ..


32MPG


NEW 20133066
TOYOTA COROLLA
BUY FOR ONLY
MSRP $17,920
Power Windows,
Power Locks, Auto. Trans. 14 777


COMPLETELY
REDESIGNED


NEW
2013
RAV4


MSRP $24,365
BUY FOR
ONLY

OR PAY ONLY
OR PAY ONLY


4m' -~


NEW 2013 "T130864
TOYOTA CAMRY
BUY FOR ONLY
MSRP $23,095
Power Windows, t
Power Locks,
Cruise Control, Auto. Trans.


OVER
50 HYBRIDS IN
STOCK NOW!


T130994

522,995


/n


T130004
<


NEW 2013
TOYOTA PRIUS


MSRP $25,060
Push Button Start,
Power Windows,
Power Locks,
Cruise Control,
Bluetooth, Auto. Trans.


BUY FOR ONLY

$21,777


VILLAGE TOYOTA
www.villagetoyota.com 352-628-5100
*2,399 due at signing to well qualified buyers, plus lease inception fees with approved credit. Buyer cannot combine offers.


,Jm


0


S'A'


2013 Chevrolet Volt
3K MILES, 1,4L INTERNAL COMBUSION ENGINE, AUTO TRANS. #13060044

$29 999
I


ToyotaCare
I r.I unyr a complimentary maintenance plan
with roadside assistance.


2 year/ 25,000 mile
Complimentary Maintenance Program
when you purchase or lease a new 2012 or 2013 Toyota vehicle


1m


2013 Scion FR-S ""306900
10K MILES, 2.0L DOHC 16 VALVE HORIZONTAL OPPOSED 4-CYLINDER ENGINE

$24.895


- r w.


2007 Cadillac DTS
78K MILES, NORTHSTAR 4.6L DOHC V8, AUTO. TRANS. #13040315

$14,995
h.A


2011 Cadillac DTS
29K MILES, NORTHSTAR 4.6L DOHC V8, AUTO. TRANS. #13040151A

s31,995
L^ Q


36MPG


D10 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


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INSIDE


OME


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUI


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


I) E-


(i~\.
K,
-~ .


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''~


'Ii

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Designer Abigail Edwards evokes nature
in startling and interesting ways in her
'Storm Clouds" wallpaper. It's available in grey
or blue and features metallic lightning bolts.
(abigailedwards.com)


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4749 N. PERRY DR.
PINE RIDGE
*3BD/2BA/2CG w/POOL Private 1.5 Acre Lot
* Many Upgrades, Granite Roof (2008), A/C (2010)
* Solar-Heated POOL Fully-Fenced Pastures
PETER & MARVIA KOROL /
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


1992 built 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 acre with
appliances & roof being 5 to 6 yrs old. Remodeled
baths, new paint, new carpet. Nice open floor plan,
high ceilings, split bedrooms, screened room,
outbuilding, & fenced backyard.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 [
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriveril.com


FLORAL CITY!!
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH SINGLEWIDE
WITH LARGE ROOM ADDITION, SHED,
NEAT AND CLEAN, CARPORT.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com


247INFOLINE
le' 637.282
Enter house #2835




UPDATED HOME ON ALMOST 2 ACRES
* 2 BR, 2 BATH & OFFICE Large Country Patio
* Updated Wood Cabinets Stone Fireplace
* Wood Flooring Updated Baths
* Large Wood Deck Storage Shed
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 5
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com








REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE
637-2828
HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

S12 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


RENTALS

AVAILABLE
Visit
i MlCirMnl l it

1T


OPEN HOUSE JUNE 30 11-3PM


8414 N. CREEK WAY
CITRUS SPRINGS
* Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Great Room
* Dining Room Enclosed Lanai
* Covered Patio Fenced Backyard
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 -
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


2/2 WATERFRONT ON DEEP WATER
This 2 bedroom, 2 bath home sits on one of Crystal
River's widest and deepest canals. Jump on the boat and
head upriver to the springs or downriver to the Gulf of
Mexico. Enjoy the open great room, screened patio,
spacious kitchen. The home has two docks and sea-walled
lot and will get a new roof in July 2013. Must see.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


2421 N. LeconIo Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 www.RIt4AX~com II 10 ..Hw.4 .I I
835S ucns ldHrossa68700 wwHlrIns aIfl cm54N w. 9 rsa Rvr7524


E2 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Unseal stuck


envelopes, and


more frugal tips


Dear Sara: Do you
know of any way to
unseal envelopes? I
bought several at a flea
market.- Linda W, email
Dear Linda: Place an
envelope in the
freezer for at
least an hour
and it should
unseal with
ease once you
take it out. I
wouldn't do all
of them at once;
try one or two at
a time as Sara
needed, so they
don't reseal. FRU
Dear Sara: I LIV
love all your
freezer tips and have used
many I bought bags of
lemons and limes on sale
and have frozen the juice
in ice-cube trays, but how
can I freeze the zest with-
out it drying out? -
Evelyn, email
Dear Evelyn: Use a mi-
croplane to grate the
lemon zest, then place a ta-
blespoon in each cubby of
an ice-cube tray, top it off


I
I


with water and freeze.
Once frozen, transfer to a
freezer storage bag, mak-
ing sure to remove as
much air as possible. To
use, thaw and remove ex-
cess moisture
by patting it dry
with a paper
towel.
Dear Sara:
What do you do
with those little
S bits of leftover
spaghetti, fet-
tuccine, penne,
Noel etc. after a
meal? It's not
GAL enough to save
ING for tomorrow's
lunch, but I hate
to toss it. Being pasta, it
will cook to mush in a
soup. It's covered in sauce,
so it might not be compli-
mentary in a bread or
baked good. Can you sug-
gest any alternative uses?
Leona, Canada
Dear Leona: It might not
be enough for an entire
meal, but you can still eat


Real Estate DIGEST


EXIT agent hits
new milestone
EXIT Re-
alty Leaders
wishes to
congratulate
Nancy Ayres
for closing
more than $1
million so far Nancy
in 2013. Ayres
Nancy is a EXIT Realty
power agent Leaders.
who brings a
wealth of knowledge to every
transaction and is always
committed to providing excel-
lent service to clients.
Reach her at 352-527-
1112 or visit her online at
www.exitrealtyleaders.com.
ERA agents
continue to shine
ERAAmerican Realty &
Investments is proud to an-


352-726-5855.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievements of these fine
real estate professionals.


Sarah
Spencer
ERA American
Realty.


Deb
Infantine
ERA American
Realty.


nounce the latest production
levels achieved by its agents.
Sarah Spencer of the In-
verness office has surpassed
the $1 million mark in closed
sales volume in 2013.
You can reach her at the
Inverness Office 352-
726-5855.
Deb Infantine has also
surpassed the $1 million dol-
lar mark in closed sales vol-
ume in 2013.
She can be reached at the
Inverness office of ERA
American Realty by calling


See FRUGAL/Page E4


3771 Goldencup 228 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Beverly Hills Inverness
1298 sf of living, 2 bedroom 2 bath Great Investment opportunity. Nice 4
Large kitchen Needs TLC Close to family with 2 bedrooms in each unit.
shopping & Library. MLS 702244 Close to Hospitals and shopping.
Priced at 59,900. Coin-op Laundry on site. Off street
Directions: RTE 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd to parking. Can be purchased with 224
left onto Honeylocust Drive to left on Pleasant Grove MLS#700512
Goldencup to #3771. Priced at $149,900.


ROOM FOR YOUR TOYS! GREAT OUTDOOR ENTERTAINING SPACE!
S3/2/2 custom home on 4.85 acres! 3/2/3 Sweetwater Driftwood model
S"New" kitchen has wood cabinetry Heated pool and large lanai
Tile backsplash self closing cabinets AC/heat system new in 2010
Stone fronted fireplace Dual paned windows for efficiency
New cabinets/vanities in both baths Gas fireplace in the family room
SFreshly painted interior/exterior Newly painted interior- new 18" tile
Furnished or unfurnished your choice! Convenient to Suncoast Parkway
Home warranty for the buyers Home warranty for the buyers
#703100 $124,500 #700421 $180,000
See V t Tours I@ I .III ,..i.. IJ IIJ.res Iaehomes.-..I


Dianne
MacDonald
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Linda
Barnes
RE/MAX
Realty One.


pleased to announce that Di-
anne MacDonald has quali-
fied for the 2013 multi-million
dollar club. She joins an elite
group of agents who have
closed more than $2 million
in sales volume this year.
Dianne is a veteran real
estate agent in Citrus County
with almost 20 years of expe-
rience. She works out of the
Crystal River RE/MAX office
on U.S. 19.
Realtor Linda Barnes has
passed the $1 million mark in
sales volume this year.
Linda is 38 year veteran of
the real estate industry and
has a long history of success
in the area. She is an agent
in the Crystal River office of
RE/MAX.


The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.



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R eRtorl
I- 16ao02-1 SOLDNae' 287-9022
K~ 1746.6700
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SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 E3







E4 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


Clinics to look at



drought tolerance


Special to the Chronicle

Regardless of expected weather
patterns, it is always a good idea to
know and properly place plants
that are drought-tolerant.
The free monthly Citrus County
Extension Service Master Gar-
dener Plant Clinic topic for July is
"drought-tolerant trees and
shrubs." There are trees and
shrubs, both native and exotic,
which will perform well in Citrus
County The schedule for the July
free plants clinics is:
2 p.m. Wednesday, July 3, at


000BOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.






NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very
secluded and private setting -
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture
and mature oaks. Take the tour at
ML $379,000



iI, I 0


Floral City Library
S1 p.m. Tuesday, July 9, at Lakes
Region Library, Inverness.
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, at
Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
1:30 p.m. Friday, July 12, at
Coastal Region Library, Crystal River
1 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, at
Citrus Springs Library
2 p.m. Tuesday, July 23, at Ho-
mosassa Library
Questions about landscape, sam-
ples for plant identification or gar-
den-related problems are welcome.
For more information, call the ex-
tension service at 352-527-5700.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
com gbarth@myflorida-house.com






Well known for an active Florida
lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on 1 acre, open LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
floor plan, wood burning fireplace, a 2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
-r-.lir. i--1 and spacious covered community on Lake Tsala Apopka
I .. . .1 .. I you feel at home right Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
away A recent remodel included new floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
paint and flooring, and A/C, range and privacy You will love to call this comfy
the garage door were replaced in 2012 house your home! MLS703427
MLS700472 $142,500 $109,000


p


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

it as a side for lunch or dinner.
Instead of trying to be creative
with such a small amount (es-
pecially difficult because it al-
ready has sauce mixed in), I'd
simply make sure to eat it
later that evening or the fol-
lowing day I would add some
vegetables to it.
Dear Sara: How do you
clean the dryer lint screen?
My husband is constantly on
my back over the lint screen. I
remove the lint regularly (OK,
maybe not often enough), but
cleaning it is a chore. -
Katherine, Arizona
Dear Katherine: There are
lint screen brushes that make
it easier to clean. They cost
less than $15. But you can use
a toothbrush or a dishwashing
brush if you don't want to
spend extra money Put some
dish soap and hot water into
your tub. Place the screen in
the tub and let it soak for a
while to loosen the lint and
residue. Scrub with whichever
brush you decide to use, then
rinse. Let it dry before placing
it back in the dryer slot.
Dear Sara: Sometimes I
make pork chops in cream of
mushroom sauce in the slow
cooker. I always make a veg-
gie and a pot of rice with it.
I'm wondering if I can sim-
plify this even more by tossing
the rice (I use Minute Rice) in


the slow cooker to cook in the
soup. If so, should I toss it in
in the morning when I throw
the soup and chops in, or
should I wait and toss it in
about an hour before dinner?
-Amy New Jersey
Dear Amy: I suggest that
you continue to make the rice
separately. It's not that you
can't add rice to the slow
cooker you can add it to-
ward the end of the cooking
cycle but it tends to get
mushy You have to add extra
liquid for it to cook in, too. For
Minute Rice, I'd add it in the
last 15-30 minutes of cooking
time. You might enjoy a rice
cooker. I love mine. Not that
Minute Rice is hard to cook,
but you can add rice and
water to a rice cooker and
walk away The rice tastes bet-
ter and is cheaper, too. I al-
ways made rice on the
stovetop in a saucepan, but I
was gifted a rice cooker and I
love having perfect rice every
time and not having to watch
over it as it cooks.
MEN
Get a cheaper haircut or
various other salon services
from students at a beauty
school. Visit beautyschoolsdi-
rectorycom to find one close
to you. Along the same lines,
you can find cheaper dental
services at dental schools and
auto repair at vocational
schools, too. Quality isn't com-
promised because profes-
sional faculty members are
on-site.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

The first reader tip shares
another service you can find
for less:
Lower-cost chiropractic
care: After putting it off for far
too long, I called the clinic as-
sociated with the chiropractic
school near me. A visit is $25,
and I had five X-rays for just
$125. For people with very
low incomes, it can be free.
It's a teaching facility, so I had
a "real" chiropractor, an in-
tern and a student all helping
me. I feel 100 percent better
after just two treatments. -
R.N, Florida
Remove labels: I would like
to offer another idea for re-
moving gooey labels and other
substances: mineral spirits. I
find that it quickly and easily
removes all sorts of sub-
stances, including the re-
maining wax in a
candleholder. I buy the un-
scented mineral spirits at the
hardware store. It never fails.
You just have to be sure to let
the used rag or paper towel
dry out completely before
putting it in the trash, in order
to avoid a possible fire haz-
ard. -Janet Q., Arizona
A friend shared this with
me years ago and it does work
well, especially on tricky sur-
faces with a label attached.
Use a hair dryer over the
label, making circular move-
ments over the whole thing.
When you can work an edge
loose, gently pull up and keep


See FRUGAL/Page E7


Bruce R Bunrk. Ptr '.
(352) R 637-2 AuitL isCo nty
www titrusSold .w
;ET YOUR e"
CART READY!
,647 sq ft Mitch Underwood
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me of the Pine Ridge Golf
3e your well deserved haven
n w/granite counters, SS
t 1 smart
-4 $292,000 ER BAI BANK(a
=Hnnrl1mnn,


SWayne Cormier Realtor
352-422-0751


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Homosassa, FL 34446
352-382-1700

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Million Dollar Producer
Real Estate Needs?
352-422-0751
7:00 am to 10:00 pm
7 days a week!


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living. $169,900 MLS#702836 $51,500 MLS#703767
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Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (52 302-6714


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thin fruits for growth, flavor


LEE REICH/Associated Press
A person hand-thins apple fruits on a tree in New Paltz, New York. Now is the time to start looking over your trees and "thinning," that is, removing, excess fruitlets. Focus
your energy on larger fruits, such as apples, pears, and peaches, because thinning would be too tedious and fortunately, has little effect on small fruits such as cherries
and small plums.

For larger fruits such as apples and pears, KAREN E. MORTON
practice is essential to geE-mttinilg best results
practice is essential to getting best results IO 7)A Aa M101 0
i o o dL -i-'mUU m ijaaa \ i-rswiii. R1... i\ 3in-7i~oi Ir w ^ ^^-I'


LEE REICH
Associated Press
Fruit trees that were so full of
blossoms this spring that they
looked like giant snowballs foretell
a heavy crop of fruit later this year.
Too heavy.
Too much, perhaps, for the branches
to support And surely so heavy that
next year's harvest could be paltry.
Some fruit trees are prone to a
feast-and-famine cycle a heavy
crop one year and a light crop the
next My Macoun apple tree is one of
the worst in this regard among the
score or so apple varieties that I grow.
Fortunately, this tendency toward
"biennial bearing" can be reined in.
Blame it on hormones
Hormones produced in fruit seeds
are to blame for biennial bearing.
The hormones suppress flower-bud


formation, which begins in fruit
trees the year before the flowers ac-
tually unfold. So a heavy crop one
year and, hence, a lot of seeds -
quells flower-bud formation that
year, and flowering and fruiting the
next year In a year with few fruits,
hormone levels stay low, so many
flower buds are initiated and in the
next year trees are a riot of blooms.
The way to thwart this feast-and-
famine tendency is to reduce the
number of fruits in a tree's "feast"
year.
Pruning is one way to do it cut-
ting off some stems that would have
flowered and gone on to bear fruit.
The time for pruning most fruit
trees is past, though; it was back in
late winter and early spring, before
growth began again.
Pruning, of course, has effects
See FRUITS/Page E13


r I I


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 E5


:II






E6 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information....................352-563-5966
News information........................ ................ 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Use the right plants



to jazz up landscape


Size, shape, color help add variety to yard

ant to add a little pizazz to your People frequently don't realize that fo-
landscape? Give your landscape liage plants present a kaleidoscope of
a visual makeover by introducing color possibilities, from gold and char-
plants with leaves of different treuse to blue-green, red, bur-
shapes, colors and sizes. gundy and purple. Some plants
Many gardeners understand have leaves of a single color;
the importance of selecting others are variegated with
plants according to their yard's stripes or spots. Color adds vi-
soil type, sun shade patterns brance and visual stimulation
and water requirements, but to a garden but is often a per-
putting it all together in an ap-- sonal choice.
pealing garden design can be In addition to leaf color,
more of a challenge. When de- think leaf shape. The key is to
signing a landscape, it all starts Joan Bradshaw identify the general shape of
with the right plants in the FLORIDA- the leaf and then decide how to
right place. Plants are the Fuse it in garden design. Leaves
building blocks of any garden. FRENDLY may be soft and round, straight
While plants that have color- LIVING and spiky, big, medium or little.
ful blooms definitely make a In other words, you can get al-
statement, how long will they last? Next most any look you imagine. Focusing on
time you hit the local garden center, think foliage can trim time and trouble from
leaves. Flower blossoms may come and go your yard work as well.
as the growing season wears on, but fo-
liage remains vibrant nearly nonstop. See PLANTS/Page E7


Inside...


Natural look
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sizing up a beer stein; an old Batman necklace charm


Dear John: Thirty-one maybe put some things on eBay
years ago, I bought my and put the money in a savings
father a West German account for her, in case she
beer stein. I pur- needs the money
chased it in a huge Could you possibly
mall on Long Island, tell me a little about
N.Y, and I paid $150 the beer stein? I
at that time. Could would really appre-
you possibly tell by ciate it! Did I buy a
the pictures at- copy or the real
tached if it is a real deal? I took a few
one, and if so, how pictures of the bot-
much it would cost tom, where all the
today? markings are.
I do not read Ger- John Sikorski I did look at eBay
man, so I have no SIKORSKI'S and noticed a num-
idea what it says on ATTIC ber of them with the
the beer stein. I read pewter tops, from
your articles, as I am $14.99 to $60, but the


a Chronicle employee of 25
years. My father passed away
three years ago and my mother
has health issues, so I was try-
ing to clean out some things so
she has less to clean, and to


few with ceramic tops were for
more money I did have paper-
work on the beer stein, but
somehow in our move down
here it got misplaced. Greatly
appreciate it if you can look


into this for me. D.B.W,
Internet
Dear D.B.W: I appreciate the
good, clear photographs of your
beer stein.
Antique beer steins have
been a specific category of col-
lecting for decades. You have a
genuine German beer stein in
the style of steins made in the
early 20th century
The mark incised into the
bottom of the stein, with the let-
ter W inside the letter C, indi-
cates it was made by the
Werner Corzelios Company It
was made after World War II
and is currently low on the
totem pole of collector interest.
Currently, it would be better
kept than sold; potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I was hoping that
you could give me a direction in
which to explore, or give me an


estimate for the worth of a
necklace charm.
I have scoured the Internet
for anything even close to this.
It is a 14K gold design of a DC
comics icon for Batman. The
charm is more than 20 years
old. I have some pictures, but
they are not all that clear due to
the charm being so small and
the camera not being a high-
resolution one.
That being the case, I will de-
scribe it the best I can for your
mind's eye. The charm is
slightly smaller than a quarter.
The general design is that of
the classic Batman emblem -
See ATTIC/Page E10
This beer stein was manufac-
tured in West Germany by the
Werner Corzelios Company
sometime after World War II.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PLANTS
Continued from Page E6

Leaf size is another im-
portant factor when
adding some interest to
your landscape. Try using
plants with smaller leaves
in the front with progres-
sively larger leaves in the
back of the landscape to
create added curb appeal.
Begin with small group-
ings of plants that work re-
ally well together and
eventually the entire gar-
den will be planted as
each smaller grouping is
completed.
For those wanting to



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

using the heat on the glue
side to loosen it bit by bit.
Do be careful of your fin-
gertips, however. -Donna
S., email
Coat with Best Foods
mayo and let stand at least
20 minutes. It removes
even what Goo Gone
leaves behind. Norma,
email
Shine old wood furni-
ture: Mix 3 parts oil to 1
part vinegar. Store in a jar.
Apply mixture to furniture
with a soft cloth. Sheri,
Indiana
Chocolate stain on car-
pet: To get the stain off of
carpet, wet a Mr. Clean
Magic Eraser and rub on
the stain, then blot with a
dry towel. -Piney email
Summer craft: Have
kids draw on wax paper
with Sharpie markers of
various colors. Hang their
work in the window. It's
bright and colorful and
looks like stained glass. -
Marnie, Florida
Stain remover: I mix
equal amounts of auto-
matic dishwasher deter-
gent (Cascade) and


transition a little color, tex-
ture and form over time,
experiment with contain-
ers. It may take a little trial
and error with different
types of foliage to create a
long-lasting framework for
your garden. An easy way
to try out your ideas is by
working with plants in
pots.
Containers are easy to
move, replace, rearrange,
turn and tweak, giving you
lots of practice to make
them look good in an area.
Once you feel comfortable
with potted plants, apply
the same principle to the
landscape. Try placing the
pot into an empty space in
the garden border to exper-


laundry detergent to-
gether with the hottest
water the fabric can take
in a big bucket I put all the
clothes that need stains re-
moved in the bucket and
let them sit overnight. In
the morning, I just dump
the whole bucket into the
washer and run it Gets out
all the stains! Tracy Cal-
ifornia
Spaghetti sauce on plas-
tic: I used Windex on a
spaghetti sauce stain on a
plastic plate, and it took
the red color out almost
immediately. I could still
see where it was, but after
washing, it was completely
gone. -M.B., Wisconsin
Note from Sara: Some-
times a denture-cleaning
tablet like Efferdent will
work, too.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or
email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


iment with overall effect
Don't be afraid to make
mistakes. Garden design is
a very forgiving art, and
just because a plant
doesn't work in one setting
doesn't mean you can't use
it in another. Whatever
your choice, select the
"right plant for the right
place" so it will thrive in
its new location.
For more information,
contact UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension at 352-
527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the


University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, re-
search and resources to
address youth, family,
community and agricul-
tural needs. Programs and
activities offered by the
Extension Service are
available to all persons
without regard to race,
color, handicap, sex, reli-
gion or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshawis di-
rector of University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publi-
cation of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle
editors receive submissions, the better chance of
notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of
the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.


Amanda & Kik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
Amai~~~~ia & ikJhsn TmBdo IAeu a t e AtPt


1503 & 1525 W. EVERGREEN UTS T 29 .TCM
5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 137 N. FRESNO 2275 N. EUSTIS PT. 1279 W TACOMA
700929 $259,900 3/2/2. 701884 $124,900 2/2/1. 703801 $89,900 4/3/3. 703783 $279,900
11 .




9142 N. AKOLA WAY 2435 W. ERIC 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR. 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 6910 W. MELISSA ANN PATH
3/2/2 702470 $125,000 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2 703329 $54,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


CITRS SPING


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


V 'I.
L- <'*
cI pI


" .. i .l


E8 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


2


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I! `~
r







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1t Acre Upland, 69 Acres Wetlands/Marsh
Located on the Homosassa River & Gulf of Mendco
* Imme31ale Access l Irie CGll of ideal for Pr.vale Esl3le Fsri-ng Camp,
Mexico & Homosassa River Retreat, Boating, etc.
* Breathtaking 360 Views Public Electric & Septic System in place
S4 000 SF Building on Premises Last Asking Price $1 5 Million!
To be Sold to the Highest Bidder at or above $90.000!
Starts: Monday, July 22 10OAM Ends: Thursday, July 25 i 2PM


rm.


One Half Acre Golf Course Home $137,900
Open floor plan 2/2 with a 2 car garage. Office or sitting area
off the master & a private walled area for a hottub or plants.
MLS 702790. Spacious Screened Area, Nice View.
Drive by: 486 to Essex to 390 E. Eureka Ct.
ALSO FOR SALE: MLS 703002 GOLF COURSE LOT $49,700


9086 Atlas Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
40 unit+ storage facility.
2.8 Acres of outside storage.
5750 sq ft. bldg w/ office on-
site.
Suncoast Industrial Park
$149,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


1259 S. Elmwood Drive
Inverness, Florida 34450
Warehouse/ Office connected
to a 5-unit apartment
complex.
5,400 sq ft. on .63 acre lot
$350,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


W-~~--~~~~ UmklflU-fE Um-i~CfEukk~Cfgu~hLj~f I-LACi


I


A Robert & Holly Jones AM ER I CAN
352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You
ERA hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com
R A 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1 ,


DR Jv ;IV BY*f I


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 E9


I' www~mypropertyhelperrcom -


H i;l : J: ;:







E10 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013


NATURAL
Continued from Page E8

close-up photographs.
West Elm has previously
collaborated with Fried-
man on a pillow collection;
this season they've got his
28-inch, square, white-
framed prints of aloe
plants. The oversize spiky
succulents look like flora
- or perhaps even fauna
- from another planet.
(www.westelm.com)
Brooklyn, N.Y-based
Christine Facella has used
her experience as an illus-
trator and model maker at
New York's Museum of
Natural History to inform
her collection of porcelain
animal skulls. The accu-
racy and intricacy of her
work results from sculpt-
ing up to 20 molds for each
piece.
Facella portrays many
denizens of the North
American wilderness, in-
cluding coyotes, bobcats
and beavers. The skulls
are a compelling meld of
antiquarian curiosity and
contemporary objet d'art.
The teeth on some gleam
with 14-karat-gold luster
(www.beetleandflor.com)
Lighting sculptor David
D'Imperio finds his inspi-
ration in nature's struc-
tures: The organic
geometry of moth wings,
honeycombs and crystals
gets turned into elegant
and unusual lighting in the
old post office in Stony
Run, Pa., that D'Imperio
has turned into a studio.
Pendants and chande-
liers, as well as suspended
linear fixtures, are crafted
out of materials such as
stainless steel and alu-
minum. D'Imperio's Ozone
light is a 5-foot length of
shimmering circles, like
fizzy bubbles lit from
within. Silver powder-
coated steel and frosted
Pyrex glass are trans-
formed into the Neuron
fixture for wall or ceiling.
You can choose the color
of the nucleus. Hydra is an


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


otherworldly chandelier
done in a metallic blue-
green; the designer was in-
spired by the microscopic
denizens of the deep sea.
(www.daviddimperio.com)
At this spring's Interna-
tional Contemporary Fur-
niture Fair in New York
City, local designer Bar-
bara Barran's showed her
Ice rug, inspired by the
surface of frozen water.
The piece's striations and
cool, watery tones gave the
slightly unsettling but
wholly intriguing sense of
standing on actual ice.
That she's rendered this il-
lusion in hand-tufted wool
is even more remarkable.
(www.classicrug.com)
British designer Abigail
Edwards showed her na-
ture-inspired wallpaper at
the fair. She's launched a
new design called Storm
Clouds ominous thun-
derheads printed on a gray
or blue background, with
white or copper metallic
lightning bolts. Her Bram-
bleweb paper depicts an
Art Nouveau-meets-Gothic
swirl of brambles tipped
with tiny metallic thorns.
And Wilson's Crystals are
inspired by the work of
Wilson Bentley, who spent
half a century photograph-
ing snowflakes. The wall-
paper features an intricate
print of 30 snowflakes.
Edwards also does a
mural consisting of 18 ce-
ramic tiles digitally
printed with dragonflies
darting or sitting on lithe,
curling branches.
(www.abigailedwards.com)
Parisian designer Gilles
Caffier uses ceramics as
the medium for pieces like
the Turtle Lamp, whose
earthen-hued base evokes
the plump, ridged profile
of a turtle shell. He makes
textured stools and vases
in matte ivory or graphite
that resemble coral reefs,
or perhaps barnacle-laden
pier posts, or maybe octopi
tentacles.
That's the wonderful
thing about nature: so much
scope for imagination.
(www.gillescaffiercom)


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

that is to say, the black portion in
the shape of a bat in the center is
gold with a thin oval-shaped ring
around that. There are spaces
above the head and below the tail of
the bat. There is a loop that slides
over any chain attached to the ring
over the bat's head.
It is one piece, but it looks as
though the production of it was
originally in two pieces, with the
two being fused together. There is
no damage to the charm.
On the front, the main portion of
the symbol is textured in a random


Collectors of vintage
Batman memorabilia
are not interested
in post-1960s
products.

bumps fashion. The edge is ham-
mered. On the back, the entire de-
sign is impressed with some
markings and abbreviations. They
are, from left to right, top to bottom:
"14K; Dist. MA; DC; N.PT"
Any help would be much appre-
ciated. -B., Internet
Dear B.: Batman memorabilia is
a specific category of collector in-


terest. The reason you have not
found your Batman gold charm on
the Internet is a lack of interest by
collectors.
Collectors of vintage Batman
memorabilia are not interested in
post-1960s products. Your charm was
made in the 1980s or '90s as a deco-
rative jewelry item. Potential dollar
value is based on its gold weight.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL
34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. M 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING


,$ti' MLS 82rii $205,00
Customized 3bd/2ba Villa w/enlarged
garage & Florida room.
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista Blvd
through gate, left on Doerr Path.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING


lCeAc"' 2334 N Alachua Pl ;p 4 3428 N Bravo Dr
SMLS 703786 $97,000 / MLS 702158 $357,000
Updated 2/2/1 Patio home w/pool in REDUCED! Ideal horse property with
beautiful, private setting. beautiful 3/2/3 home.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Tami Mayer 352-341-2700
v... Iu j


NEW LISTING


,f,, 1610 N Essex Ave
MLS 703736 $245,000
Spacious &well maintained 4bd/3ba
pool home on an acre.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


T I 1896 N Ravenwood Pt
MLS 702755 $339,900
3bd/2ba home is perfectfor
entertaining...has spacious lanai &
outdoor area.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


1jcQ 5196 N Sandalwood Dr
MLS 703661 $149,000
Custom 3/2/2 home offering
treed privacy.
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273


J It4 4074 N Indianriver Dr
MLS 700337 $319,000
Stunning 3bd/3ba custom home w/solar
heated pool & spa.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
AW-A


W S H i 4837 w Mohawk Dr fI1 "
5747 N Pecan Way MLS 701122 $169,000 LjlI 3842 W Norihcresi CI '4, lO 3900 E Laguna Loop
MLS 702757 $299,900 REDUCED! Meticulously maintained 1 .1 S159.900 / MLS 701242 $134,900
3/3/3, + office, pool home w/huge inside & out, on a beautiful 3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac, offers REDUCED! Waterfront home designed
detached garage. 1 acre corner lot. spacious indoor living. forfun! 3/2 w/lots of space.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Mike McHale 352-302-3203
,,2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


1?,.4# 5582 N Mock Orange Dr
MLS 703701 $247,900
Brand new 2013 construction 3bd/2ba
with a 3-car garage.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 Ell


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax: 352)563-665 Tol Fre: (88) 82-234 1 E ail:clasiliesZ Thon ceonlne3;o I wbsit: wwR chrniclonlie co


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc H20.
S2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
secbon 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
1BRI1.5BA, $450. mo
352-587-2555

CRYSTAL RIVER
312 SW, CHA
$450.mo., 1st, last
& sec. No Dogs
850-491-8479

HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in Lease,
No pets $450. mo.
$450. +sec. 726-7319









2013 3/2 DW $49,900,
Incl. Delivery, set-up,
A/C, Skirting, steps, &
furn, Decor. Call
352-795-2377

$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181


For Sale l- i
HERNANDO
Ready to move in,
must see 3/2 1.5 acres
$49,000 approved for
FHA/ owner financing
(352) 795-1272

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details





For Sa6% ,

Hernando
DWMH on land,Ready
to move in, Call me for
more information
352-795-1272
Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5' park like acres,
owner financing avail.
59k (941) 778-7980

Homosassa 312
+ den,c/h/a, clean
$7000. mo. fills
352-634-6340


- .

INVERNESS
3/2 on 1% acres
owner financed for
$500. mnth w/10k
down 352-560-4247

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807










Doublewides
Available
in 55+ park in
Lecanto, Exec.
Condition & Pricing
352-563-0500

Lecanto
Lecanto Hills MH Park
55 +comm. 2/2 liv,din,
kit, carport, rec.rm new
apple, furn, never rented
$11,500 352-228-4515
352-746-4648 manager
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
andwatch uswork for your


3/2/1...............$775
2/2/1..............$700
2/1/1............... $650
2/1/1 Poo ........$800

3/2 Doublewide..$700


3/2/1......... $800
2/1.5..............$550
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
a Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010


ACTION -
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
63 .Jffery St. (BH)............. $575
2/2 1, available July I st
1820 Trade Ln (()............... C 850
3/2/2 Nce eweer home
CRYSTAL RIVER
6501W. Cannondle Dr. ....... $815
2//2 Meadowcrest Vlla
11701 (learwaer Ct............$1000
2/2watedront mobile
1245 N 2nd St.............. $1100
3/2 POOL home close to shopping
HOMOSASSA
1650W. Homnsass!aTrL#28...$500
2/1 affordable duplex
6818W. Arigton PL.............
3/2 DW mobile, enced yard
6 Hollylhok ...................... $900
3/2/2 SMW naval July 1




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $4001
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352)344-1025
HOMOSASSA
Small 1BR w/Utilities
$375. mo., $500 sec.
352-563-1033 or
352-601-0819




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Apartments
Available
2 bed / 2 bath
$600/month
Call 352-795-1795
www.ensingproperties.c
om



INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393

Inverness
Homosassa
Government
Subsidized Apts
available.
Must meet eligibility
requirements. Equal
Housing
Opportunity.
Homossassa
(352) 628-6073
Inverness
(352) 726-4397
TTY-800-233-6694


6 1


FLORAL CITY
RETAIL; 2 Storefronts
Corner of US 41 &
Hwy 48, 600sf &1 O00 sf
$495. mo. & $695 mo.
813-310-5391



Commercial Building
Floral City, 800 sq. ft
ample pking, a/c,
prime location on 41
cooler unit in rear,
$1000.mo. 1st, last &
dep. ref. & good credit
352-201-9828



INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Whis.Pines $700
352-464-0919



INVERNESS
2/1,W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BLACK DIAMOND
3BR, 2BA, Golf Villa,
incld's. yard service.
$975. mo. No pets or
smoking. 746-6067
MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116




CRYSTAL OAKS
3/2/2, pet invisible
fence $890 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616


BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month in-
cludes basic cable &
lawn care. Call
746-3301

BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 3/2 wi
Pool $1,200 incl'd soc.
mem. to all amenities,
yrd. maint. & wkly pool
service, avail. July 1st.
(352) 422-4086

CITRUS HILLS
2BR, 2BA, single level
w/carprt, completely
refurbished, brand
new appl's $750. mo.
No pets or smoking
(352) 746-6067

CITRUS HILLS
3/3/2.5 unfurnished w/
pool on golf course,
lawn & pool maint. inc'd
club membership also
included $1500 monthly
352-302-3705

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. 3/2, $675 mo.
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo
352-212-4981

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, % Acre,
Hwy. 200. $875. mo.
352-344-3084

INVERNESS
2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer
non smoking, No Pets
1305 Lakeview Dr.
$700. mo. 422-6263

LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND 3/2/2
includes, cable, water,
garbage $1000mth
352-804-9729





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


HERNANDO
1 BR, 2 BA, Office
% Acre, Hwy. 200.
352-344-3084




HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, / Acre,
Hwy. 200. $875. mo.
352-344-3084




HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 3/2, Manuf.
Home, Rent Possible
Own 352-795-0088








CRYSTAL RIVER
Share my Home
Utilities incl. $95. week
563-1465 /228-1802








Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF,4M
REALTY ONE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUmrv








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pine Ridge
Sunday Only
1 pm to 4pm
1.39 acres, 3 bd,
2% bath, former
model home
many upgrades
2269 sq. ft living area
Pool w/cabana
1709 W Pine Ridge
Blvd.




OPEN
HOUSE


TODAY 1p-4p
INCREDIBLE
RIVERFRONT HOME
Asking $675,000
5464 Cedar Mill Path
Homosassa, 34448
Lyn Hillis, Realtor
ERA American
Realty
352-212 6920




FOR SALE BY
AUCTION




2,240 SF
Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. Jul 11,
12PM
Preview From 1lam
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com








HERNANDO
1 BR, 2 BA, Office
% Acre, Hwy. 200.
352-344-3084




CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf CoursCommunity
3/2/2 Sell for $49,995.
possible owner finance
/options 352-422-1284
or 352-634-3862


BEVERLY HILLS
2 br/2 full bath/1 car gar.
1125 sf. Screen porch.
Move-in ready. $53,900
527-1239

Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buying or Selling


Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish

HUGE HOUSE for Sale
3 Bedroom Possible 4,
2 Car Garage,
Carport, 2 Bath,
228 Monroe Street
(352) 464-2514




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity. $119K Cash
Deal posss rent opt)
352-804-9729




2BR, 1BA, + Den
Open Fl. plan, close to
shopping & town,
new roof, well wtr.
.44 acres $49,900 obo
OWR REALTY, John
352-653-7977
GOSPEL ISLAND
4BD/3BA & GARAGE
For Sale $92,000.
(941) 758-8719
(941)524-6556



FOt

SAIX


Great
Starter
Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
$2,500 down
$788. month
877-500-9517

INVERNESS
Investor Alert
Nice 2/2 Close to town,
nice trees, renter in
place, nice return on
investment $90K
(941) 549-4226


I e u


HINU n/HU I IrUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com

House for Sale
By Owner Open House
Sat. 6/29 & Sun. 6/30
10am-4pm
4100 S. Fireside Way
4BR/2BA/Carport, Pool
2 Acres
352-212-9456


TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


H
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R/MKC
REALTY ONE


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503



I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
"call 352-503-3245*


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMESA MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


JENNIFER
MUNN

352-422-8201
jenmunnera@
yahoo.com
12 Properties Sold
in 3 months
% of every
commissions goes
to help homeless
animals
ERA American
Realty & Investments


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant


a
Citrus Count
IHomsI^J-


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


RAINBOW SPRINGS
Beautiful 3/2/2, 2 lots
Oversized Gar. Open
flrplan, Gas Fireplace
Corian countertops,
New porch, $134,900
352-489-0105




Brand New Luxury
Lakefront Condos
in Florida. New
construction. Was
$349,900, NOW
$199,900. -2 & 3 BR
residences, luxury
interiors, resort-style
amenities. Below
builder cost!
Call now
877-333-0272, x 55




Owner Must Sell!
Nicely wooded lot in
prime recreational
area. Crystal clear
mountain lake, ski
area & brand new
golf course. All
within 1 mile of
property. Only
$79,900. Adjacent lot
sold for $249,900.
Bank will finance.
Call 1-877-888-7581,
x38.


HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906


m

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty








SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCbast
ProDerties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


Fin Your Dreus Howmt

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
WWW.h1 r-) ri i cle, i'n -finder.com


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.



HOMOSASSA
Reduced $199,500
211 Pine St 4BD/3BA.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, Wood Floors,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar,SS Appl. fireplace
Call 850-585-4026


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Los o Sl


E12 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Custodian


uses plants to


beautify school


CELIA
LLOPIS-JEPSEN
The Topeka
Capital-Journal

TOPEKA, Kan. Terry
Stanley is a school custo-
dian with a mission to
make his school more
beautiful.
For years, Stanley, a
Topeka native and em-
ployee at Williams Science
and Fine Arts Magnet, has
been planting eye-popping
displays of spring, summer
and fall flowers around the
schoolyard to bring extra
cheer to the building,
which is in use year round,
The Topeka Capital-
Journal reported.
"I figured teaching the
kids about flowers would
be good, too," said Stanley,
who has worked for
Topeka Unified School
District 501 for almost
three decades, including
17 years at Williams,
where he is head building
operator
That job entails every-
thing from cleaning to
keeping an eye on the
heating, but several years
ago he started caring for
the garden, too.
"When I was a kid, my
grandparents gave me a
big area in the garden and
said, 'Take care of it,"'
Stanley said. "I planted
hollyhocks."
Now hundreds of holly-
hocks line the driveway
and fences of Williams.
Irises welcome families
in the spring; roses, hibis-
cus and daylilies bloom
in the summer; and Russ-
ian sage adds dashes of
blue that last into
winter.
Flower lovers should


visit sooner rather than
later for a chance to see
Stanley's hollyhocks in full
bloom.
Principal Martin Gies
said parents often ask
about the school's eye-
catching blossoms.
"It makes the place
more welcoming," Gies
said. "So much is about
first impressions, and par-
ents see this when they
pull up."
Stanley said he keeps
costs down by only plant-
ing perennials, meaning
the school doesn't have to
replant its flowers each
spring. Lowe's has helped
with a discount, and Home
Depot has made a few do-
nations, too, he said. The
towering rows of holly-
hocks, meanwhile, took
nothing more than packets
of seeds.
Gies said Stanley's gar-
dening fits with the mag-
net school's science
theme because students
get to learn about the
flowers.
The school has a system
for children to earn points
for being on their best be-
havior, and some of the
kids trade those points for
the chance to spend time
with Stanley, helping in
the garden.
In a few weeks, once the
hollyhocks have finished
blooming, the slender
stalks will be covered in
pods of seeds.
Stanley sees that as a
way to give back, too. Each
summer, he collects the
seeds and gives them away
for free.
That way, he hopes, par-
ents and other visitors can
enjoy the flowers at home,


FRUITS
Continued from Page E5

beyond those on biennial
bearing, and each kind of
fruit tree has its own
pruning needs. Still, as
you prune to open a tree
up to light and air, and to
control its size, you are
also removing potential
fruits and seeds. And
shortening branches puts
remaining fruits closer to
the trunk, where they are
less likely to break a
limb.
But pruning alone is
generally not enough to
get a fruit tree out of a bad
habit. Now is the time to
start looking over your
trees and "thinning" -
that is, removing- excess
fruitlets. Focus your en-
ergy on larger fruits, such
as apples, pears and
peaches, because thin-
ning would be too tedious
- and has little effect -


No need to
complete all
the fruit
thinning in
one session.

on small fruits such as
cherries and small plums.
Take matters
in hand
The sooner you begin
thinning, the greater the
benefit next year, espe-
cially with apple trees. I
use my thumbnail or a
pointy pair of flower
shears. If you have a lot of
trees, you might opt for
more labor-saving meth-
ods, such as blasts of
water from a hose or bat-
ting the flowers with a
piece of hose slid over the
end of a broomstick. Many
commercial orchardists
thin their fruits with
chemical sprays.


Jackie Davis
A American Realty & Investments
N E 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA1 (352) 634-2371 cell
EAL ESTATE. jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidaviscom


* 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths 2-Car driveway Lanai
* Maintenance-free Clubhouse/Heated pool
Priced $92,000 to $105,000


SOooo CHARMING
*A villa with 2 master suites Split plan Laminate floors
SNewTRANE C/H/A. Long lanai Maintenance free
Community pool, clubhouse
$82,000 MLS 703251


No need to complete all
the fruit thinning in one
session. Ideally, do it in
two waves. The first is
after fruits begin to form.
The second is right after
June drop.
After carrying extra
fruitlets to get it through
spring frosts and other
early-season calamities, a
tree gives a sigh of relief
that danger has past, and
decides it's OK to shed
some fruits. Once that hap-
pens, look over your trees
and put a few inches of
space between each devel-
oping fruit, selectively sav-
ing those that are largest
and most free of blemishes.
Further rewards
Fruit thinning has other
benefits, too. It reduces


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 E13

pests, such as codling
moth the "worm" in an
apple because Ms.
Codling prefers to lay eggs
in apples that are touch-
ing each other
Fruit thinning also lets
the tree pump more en-
ergy, which translates into
bigger size and better fla-
vor, into those fruits that
remain.
If you grow Asian pears
and want to grow good-
tasting ones, be especially
bold with fruit thinning.
These trees tend to bear
heavily, and without bold
thinning, the fruits are al-
most tasteless.
Put a few inches be-
tween one fruit and the
next, and their taste will
be ambrosial.


000FDR6 e

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 Reaor
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MrL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM
ApGENlT ODi1 S *lAY A:t WEEK!y M


1 bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean w/circular
driveway Halfway between Crystal River
and Homosassa 2 lots, 2 sheds, glassed in
screen porch Fully furnished #703608






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATERING FINES: m Citrus County issues citations that carry with them a fine of
$100 for first offenders of local watering rules. Second violations cost $250, third or more
cost $500. 0 Find watering rules in the weather map on Page A4 daily.


BOB FOWLER/Knoxville News Sentinel
Harry Baumgardner, left, Eddie Martin and Ralph Martin dismantle the pre-
Civil War Daniel Yarnell cabin June 3 in Clinton, Tenn. The structure is to be
moved and restored on property owned by Baumgardner and his wife, Libby.


Historic cabins a family hobby


BOB FOWLER
Knoxville News Sentinel

CLINTON, Tenn. Libby Bum-
gardner has cabin fever.
She and husband Harry are in
the process of dismantling a pre-
Civil War cabin located off Clinton
Highway and moving it to their
Claxton community residence.
When the Daniel Yarnell cabin is
relocated and restored, it will join
four other structures from East
Tennessee's distant past that are
now on the Bumgardners' property
on Old Edgemoor Lane.
"I don't know why I do this,"
Libby Bumgardner said at first. But
then she reconsidered and offered
a compelling reason: "I'm doing
this for future generations and to
preserve the past."
All of the current cabins on their
property are open to the public,
and school groups are welcome.
The Yarnell cabin should be re-
stored and ready for viewing late
this summer, she said.
The Bumgardners' passion for
the past started in 1996 when they
bought their Claxton property,
which included a dilapidated two-
story clapboard building.
Libby peeled back sections of
clapboard on what she called that
"funny-looking old house," saw logs
beneath and realized she'd uncov-
ered a diamond in the rough.


Records show it was owned by
Revolutionary War soldier David
Hall and served as a tavern and inn
on what was part of the main road
between Knoxville and Nashville.
Built between 1798 and 1803, the
property was purchased by Hall in
1803, and he and his wife and their
12 children lived next door in a
similar cabin separated by a
dogtrot.
That's where the connection to
Daniel Yarnell comes in.
David Hall's daughter Elmira
Hall married Yarnell, and they
raised a large family in the cabin
now being restored. The structure
will be moved from Clinton to the
Bumgardners' Claxton property to
become part of their collection.
The Yarnell cabin is steeped in
lore and legend, and the exact date
it was built is unknown, says Ralph
Martin, another local history buff
and member of the John Rice Irwin
Chapter of the Sons of the
Revolution.
The best guess, he said, is it was
built around 1800.
One popular rumor is that Andy
Jackson owned the cabin while he
was a land speculator and before
he became president, Martin said.
Another local historian, Sam Jen-
nings, says it's more likely that
Jackson may have stayed at the
cabin while on his way to his home
in Middle Tennessee.


U-r
TRUE EYE CATCHER! .. CHUMP CHANGE CAN BUY THIS ONE! i I APPROVED SHORT SALE!!! I'', i11.I, ,,I* |
Gourmet kitchen, fresh paint, breakfast bar, split plan. owned 3/2/2 Inverness pool home w/freplace, fencing, Doublewide w/2,052 living on 1 AC! Fireplace, fenced
#702060. 19465 98th PI Rd $159,900. Km Fuller lanai,, $49,900. #701794. 5941 Carmel. Tomika rear yard & more! $56,000 #355478 Imbery Fuller
352-212-5752. Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598. 352-212-5752


E14 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013










Restored homes show Illinois town's history


ADAM TESTA
(Carbondale) Southern
Illinoisan

CARBONDALE, Ill. -
Potential tenants at D.
Gorton's rental properties
learn about more than
rent and maintenance re-
sponsibilities during vis-
its; they're given a history
lesson, as well.
Gorton has restored
about eight historic
homes in Carbondale,
mostly along Cherry
Street in the city's Arbor
District, through the past
10 years.
He has sold a few and
rents out the others to
SIU professors, graduate


students and members of
the community.
He started the project
not with intent to become
a landlord but out of an
interest to preserve some
of the city's historic
homes. He said the idea
first hit him while attend-
ing a municipal meeting.
"Everyone was con-
cerned about slumlord
encroachment in Carbon-
dale and asking what the
city could do," he said.
"We said, 'What can we
do? What can the people
do?"'
Gorton's philosophy in-
volves taking historic
homes, primarily those
from the 1920s, and


ADAM TESTA/Southern Illinoisan
D. Gorton, left, and Dan Francis talk about repairs June 9
that need to be made to a house in Carbondale, III.

renovating them while appeal and design. This
maintaining their original includes using special


paints and supplies that
match colors and styles
from the original time
period.
It's been an effort
spearheaded on a per-
sonal level without mu-
nicipal support.
Gorton, husband of Car-
bondale City Council-
woman Jane Adams,
credits two of his lead
craftsmen, Dan Francis
and Jeff Jones, with the
success he's found and the
quality of the renovations.
Their efforts haven't gone
unnoticed, either
Gorton recently won his
fifth Historic Preserva-
tion Award from the City
of Carbondale for his


restoration of a house at
700 W Cherry St. The
property was a complete
refurbish, as the roof
and walls of the 1920s
bungalow had caved in.
"It's a good thing," Gor-
ton said of the recogni-
tion. "It recognizes the
hard work we've gone
through and, frankly,
rewards the risks of
investing in Carbondale."
Making an effort to cre-
ate quality rental options
in Carbondale is essential
to the city's future, Gorton
said, noting he'd be willing
to talk to anyone inter-
ested in historic property
reservation about the cost
and benefits of the project.


S

SpeEaTe


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Ril DFCKFR 359.464.0647. SlRlqA Mill I FN 3i5.492.9133. VIlTORIA FRANKI IN 352.427.777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED ,2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Light bright and open describe this fabulous golf course home. Inside you have lots
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS of room with upgrades such as Coran countertops, dual pane windows, energy
Beautiful maintena nce-free pool home, 2 bedrooms with a den, 2 bath, 2-car garage, ope Detached golf course villa on cul-de-sac street. Move right into this beautifully maintained 2 efficient radiant barrier. Nice neutral colors complement this model. You will fall in
floor pan design with a great use of space. All neutral colors, distinguished Berber carpets bedroom plus a den could be 3rd bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage villa in Brentwood. This love with the views from your oversized lanai which overlooks a Kol pond with
create a comfortable, warm, yet sophisticated atmosphere throughout. Superior condition home features hardwood floors,an expanded screened lnaarea and private backyard, just waterfall. The backdrop is a lushes landscape of majestic oaks and greenery
Plantation shutters.Mantenance-free giving at its finest! MLS701578............... $199,000 round the corner from the fitness center and pool complex. MLS 701623............$164,900 Located in a maintenance-free section of Terra Vista. MLS 702401...........$291,000
BRENTWOOD
TOWNHOME,

Very nice 2 bedroom, 2.5
Sth -car garage. Town-
home n the beautiful gated
community of Brentwood.
Great room wth living and
dining combo, eat-in kitchen.
Spacious bedrooms
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLASia upstairs, master suite with
We -maintaned 2 bedroom, 2 bath,2-car garage, plus den. Expanded Laure model, extensive Come savor the best of Forida. Conveniently located near the man entrance o Terra Vsta. walking closet. Leave the
ak molding a round windows, crown molding in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry, oak Well-maintained 2 bed room, 2 bath, 2-car garage, plus den. A totally open floor plan with a yard and exterior maintenance to others while you enoy the new fitness center & spa,
cabinets with crown molding, extra footage in bedrooms and den. A must see at this price in triple sliding door that takes you to the pavered anai with a great hedge in back for extra golf, swimming, restaurants, social activities and much more!
Terra Vista. M LS 357742.......................... .............. ........................................................$23 2,0 00 privacy. Located on a street ith very title traffic. M LS 702296.............................. $ 179 ,90 0 M LS 702404................................................................................... $ 114 ,9 00


-Terms 6 Months or More
Terra Vg~g~iista& BentoodRenals! SoialMeberhp nlue wt alRetl


BRENTWOOD -
TOWNHOME, -
2 .5 B AT H .... .
I 1 CAR .



... -. 1,,h IIIIIII II DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, TERRA VISTA
SI ...lII d.I ls oImIo Very nice fully furnished maintained villa on a less traveled street n Terra Vista. Lovely Exceptional and fabulous describe this3bedroom (plus a den)3 bath, 2 car 5375sq. ft. pool
Se ... . 1. n 2 bedroom with a den, separate eat-in kitchen with pass-through breakfast bar Combination home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island
gated community Dont miss this one. Beautiful view of the pond and fountain from dining and giving area overlooks the paved screened lana. Social Club Membership included, kitchen- greatspace for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened lanai.
your lanai. N o neighbors behind you. #2271 ................................................................ $1,100 #1273.......................................................................................................................................... $ ,2 5 0 Located on the quite st of cul-de-sacs. 5 75 ................................................................. $ 2 ,3 0 0


& d


I


SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


k









CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* I "Pill .I.,.
* I: ,i. l .....l I F.V l...il
* I I. i. l .1.- l I...:. .I V. I
* H.. ih i,, .:a d..- hIr .lp. l,:.L.;
Mit =11i:il:' $229,000
Jeanne ot ll'illard Pichel 352 212 3410
it i i CitlusCounnl Sold con


BANK OWNED CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME


ONLY $159,900 Sptcial Finacing
1605 E Si Charles PI Ineriness
C.ll Ou.de Feeser 352 302 7699


IN BACK OF THE BEYOND . .
H .-. i.1..1.I ima l].al i*..., ir...- P1 .....-

,I,.-l 11 .].a .I .'.' i,,l I .] I.. 1'1' I\l.." ..l.l
l i, ,. I..Iai). al i all') all a. I.) ] M. a.l a
.' ... ."" l" nlh l I I .] I. h.. I. l. I III ',
Mli = ;1 '. $184,000
4slh tlr 4lti. riir Bai. t l,63/ 4.904 O i 202 1121


IN-TOWN HOME 2/2/1 WITH
FAMILY ROOM/FIREPLACE

-,1 , ,, i ,,,,,,,i I .I
I:,6'1,,,I I, ,I '. ,,I , I,,,1 .I .6.I' I FJ,,H I: I 1. I :11
I,, i, 1ii : I 1 ,i rj,.. 6-l, h ....l l
rl: =-i -1 ASKING $89.900
Pit Oi, 4, 352' 212 7280


TRUE COUNTRY LIVING


II 1I ,..,,,..., I 1 II I
.i .. h .- ... I. . h,,... 1.



I .,,,.I ,I ,-I I l ,,,,l I ,,. I ... ,.. 1 ..

ir. =II II S93,000
C 11l l4.lri, Sr.l i r.? J'6"S'?' rt P ell











COMMERCIAL BUILDING



Mi =i11 "'i : ASKING $228,900
Call Jim Motion at 422 2173 to riei
the home of foul new business


CRYSTAL RIVER
VACANT LAND 12.6 ACRES


I... aIro.a ,,ai ...i I i II...aal .. s i ....i- 1


i\l = ;iiiril $99,000
0Di)d h,,ui cn qq. -13J5 6s eii ..- i / if' fees


* R i. .l i l a. l.l
* 1 i A I: 1 1 I.... RI -


Mlit,. = inv. $110,000
Jeanne or Il'illard Pickiel 2/23410
zi''r,' CitinsCounti Sold comn


WUINULrUL NIIUHnunUHnUU
I:1,,. I. ll n ..... ... l In I. ,.il. MJ,,a


. i .. l ....I I. .Inl 3 ... ; l,. i, I.p
aIl. l,,i i, I Mli l = :,':, 3 -. 4: .
Call Dotis Minet 352 422 4627


WATERFRONT HOME
ON LAKE ROUSSEAU!
Nainily .l..I.lv.i l _" I i..:... .. DOUBLE
LO T I:..... inn . . l.n a I...: i .l

Ml, =i h Ih::. ASKING$199,000
Stelan StualI 352 212 0211


WILL CONSIDER EQUITY TRADE
Residence for Motor Home
654j; 1 C~nnonid t Cri l4t Rfll
FJ I H.J10 I.'i #f n l r) do.- ril.
I...... II~ li...1 .... I I.... I V.I "1: '4 II .....]H
. I.:...1 I ~:" ~."h "~o HI I1h,,,] ,I ,,,, I I ..


ii.: =-1: ASKING $135,000
Cill Jm ilrn o. 352 726 6668


STUNNING CRYSTAL RIVER
WATERFRONT HOME

h I. III- I l': h H, 1 1 I 11 111, i 1,,,,, 1,1,
I,,,Ill II ,I rIL : = ,ii I ii

GREAT BUY $499.000
AND LOOKING FOR OFFERS
Cili Ou~de Fe~ai 352-302-.699










INVERNESS HIGHLAND
I..:.i.'. a is, ll..i:.iaa I '.I:II:I i'l II .:. l I...l ,

.'In I I.).:n h. I In ll I. ':':1 l lh..:1I .n I

Ml I =il:-'l:. ASKING $78,500
Call Nancy Jenks
352400 8072 352 266668


COME HOME TO THE FARM

,1 ..,.. l,,,,, 11....,,,,, I hiii ,,I, .

SI I...1. II , .... h ..111... .h . U


.ll ASKING S150,000
ti)) ,l , ii hr r J'I (1: Ji , r ..fr ,urfu< f


* i h Iill. M H ,l .. .. :I.


l =hn: i $95,000

Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
nw'',. CitiusCount Sold. corn


BEST WATERFRONT PRICE TODAY


IIn al I arral Iaaal l I Iaa- O Ian a 'al I,, I
I l.ll ..I I.l 1. .1 Il .I. I 1 .l Wl .il al l larlh I

$61,900
Call Ruth fiedetick 1352 5636866


Il. .' a ... a a II.Ia ...l, ........ ......I I.. . l



l .llll .hll I.,I III I l lllll, I d lll lll
1lh =;I:; ASKING $144,900
PJt D.Ais ,352 212 7280
I'ieil listing p p i c21p.ild.ais com


... .... .... ... ... ... ... .. ....... 1... .

ri = .-i:- ASKING $58.900
Pit Di, s 352'212 ;280


SPACIOUS

I, .... W. I a .hj.. I I 1..) -. I .1 .1 I. j d
I ,,,, .... .. 1 . ..1 .. 1 1 .. l l.... I. l. l. . *,, I I .1 .
I..:.... ,l, ,,,,I,,,,a.
r"h: =i -L ASKING $119.900
Cil F1i. n ra iltl lti 400 2635
1-j iee I1,i Dc.illub uc eirfenidc


* .:.i .8Uh i I. ll
* N,,, A I: --s, il,-n||ll, ;, I:
* h r.. ..| 'i .l
* l l.:. I I l.. In v ... s i ..I I I I

Mti l :1 $118,000
Jeanne ot l.'illard Pichrel 352-212-3410
u1111 CitlusCounil Sold comn


Ii H I IT-H : IV R ill li I .AR I. ARA.il
f Ri iii.1 a iaj i m..l a .1., a h- j.il
h1 ,l.n .ll.il I:l. : i.c h...: .1i: 1,,111I .|I
ASKING $214,900
Pat Davis 13521 212 7280


E16 SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013




















pIr


ii_





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Accidents Happen...

We'll Fix You Up!


* 24 Hr. Towing
* 3 Paint Booths
* 2 Chief Frame Machines
* Auto Refinishing With Spies
Hecker Products
* Computerized Paint Mixing
* Free Estimates
* Full Line Of Truck
Accessories
* Rhino Spray On Bedliners
* Complete Auto Detailing
* Full Time Mechanic On Duty


fL


Thank You Citrus County For
Voting Us The Best Body Shop
SFor 18 Years In A Row!


4870 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL (352) 628-4878
SAfter Hours Towing (352) 942-3284 www.davesbodyshop.net


111


G2 Sunday June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


U

7m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEST OF THE BEST
2014 Jacobsen 3 BR/2 BA This home was built with 2" x 6" construction.
Comes with China Labs sinks, ceiling fan preps in all rooms, 1 pc fiberglass tub and
shower. It is built by the legendary Jacobsen Homes with their 53 year tradition. This is a
limited opportunity. Must see this home to appreciate its value!



[J ... .... .... . . .......,.. .

- - - - - - - -
SALE PRICE
Delivery & Set-up OR S8 5 57
per ma.
s48,900 NLY remo
with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. NO MONEY DOWN
1 A/tA/, "Use Land Equity. A


'WE HAVE- LTl- V NEW
OVER 40 D iLB HOMES
MODELS ON Z~ 1 STARTING i
SDISPLAY, *32,900
JACOBSEN
HOMES
TAYLOR MADE SALE
2460 Sq. Ft. of living 4 bedroom, Playroom & Retreat. Open Great Room
and Beautiful Kitchen with Upgraded Whirlpool Appliances/Fireplace and many more
options. Comes with 2" x 6" walls and 2" x 8" floor ioists.
I -" -,lI





SALE PRICE '1
Delivery & Set-up OR 6 p .
*98,900 ONLY rmo.
S p ( ONLY Uri wac.
S with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. NO MONEY DOWN
Use Land Equity.


Thank You Citrus County For All Of Your Support In Helping Taylor Made Homes Be Successful.


12 TIME WINNER


I lU UJ nwy. 19v ~m Ia nui u ai
1 mile south of Howard's Flea Market

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES


351-20 1-9u11 01
www.taylormade-homes.com
' FREE WASHER
& DRYER
I With ad. Must present coupon prior to purchase. I
-, - - - -i


- I


.4b. -Wi


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday, June 30, 2013 G3


'~"-~9-~
,I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Best of the Best


The ballots have been counted, the win-
ners declared and the coveted Readers
Choice Best of the Best decals have been
distributed and are now proudly and
prominently displayed on marquees, doors
and windows around the county
Special congratulations are definitely de-
served by all those who received the Best
of the Best designation.
This year's voting is the 18th time
( i..... i, i c.i ci. have selected the com-
munity's Reader's Choice Best of the Best
awards.
The annual voting and salute to the win-
ners is now an established and eagerly
awaited tradition that has businesses
around the community hoping to be recog-
nized.
And now, publication of this section
makes it all official and the winners can


take pride in the fact that they are the Best
of the Best.
This section includes the results of the
voting along with advertising messages
from many of the winning businesses
thanking their customers for the patronage
- and votes.
This year's section has a special "The
Best Thing About Citrus County" by
Citrus County Chronicle Publisher Gerry
Mulligan. It begins on Page 8.
A huge thank you is in order to all those
who participated in the 2013 Reader's
Choice Best of the Best contest by select-
ing their favorite businesses and service
providers and saying with their votes they
should be at the top.

A guide to the winners begins on Page 6.


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher

Ken Melton
Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist

Sarah Gatling
Community Editor

/i Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales
Manager

Citrus Publishing

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


G4 Sunday June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


moo


a a.


The Best in the Business For 11 years! 2003 2013


Commercial Residential
24 Hour Emergency Service


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Serving All of Citrus County and Surrounding Counties.
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Homosassa, FL 34446
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Toll Free: 1-888-621-9541
Fax: (3521 621-7708
Email:
service@bobtplumbing.com
Licensed & Insured
l Lic #CFC 1426410


I


I


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday, June 30, 2013 G5


c*
~eD,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What's Inside


And the winners are...


Automotive/Boat/Motorcycle
Auto Parts Store ................ 14 Body Shop.......................... 14 Motorcycle Dealer ..............15
Automotive Repair..............14 CarW ash............................14 Oil Change Service ............15
Boat & Motor Repair ..........14 Foreign Auto Repair ..........14 Tire Dealers........................15
Boat Dealer ........................ 4 Marina ................................ 14


NEED THE BEST

HOSPITAL?


YOU NEED CITR


Electronics
Cellular Telephone..............15 Computer Repair................15


Entertainment/Recreation
Art Gallery .......................... 15 Fishing Guide...................... 17
Bicycle Shop ...................... 16 Golf Pro Shop ....................17
Boat Tour ............................ 16 Hotel or Motel .................... 17
Bowling Center ..............16 Hunting &
Campground ...................... 16 Fishing Supplies ................17
Country Club ...................... 16 Kayak Sales or Rental ........17
Dance Studio ...................... 16 Local Event ........................ 17
Dive Shop ..........................17 Local Golf Course ..............17


Park (Local) ......................18
Radio Station ....................18
RV Dealer ........................18
Satellite Dealer ..................18
Tourist Attraction (Local) ....18
Travel Agency ..................18


Financial
A ccountant..........................1 9 Bank....................................19 Investm ent Firm ..................19


Health/Wellness Beauty


Assisted Living Facility........19
Chiropractor......................19
Day Spa ............................19
D entist ................ .......... ..... 20
Hair Salon ........................20
Health & Fitness Club ........20
Health Food Store .............20


Hearing Aid Store ..............20
Home Health Service..........20
Martial Arts School ............21
Massage Therapist ............21
Medical Center....................21
Medical Supplies/
Equipment ........................21


Home & Garden
Alarm/Security .................. 24 Home Builder .................... 26
Aluminum Contractor/ Home Remodeling
Screen Enclosure .............24 Contractor ........................ 26
Appliance Store ...............25 Hot Tub & Spa Dealer ........26
Cabinet Store/Installer ........25 Interior Decorator................26
Carpet/Floor Covering ........25 Kitchen Remodel ................27
Ceiling Fans...................... 26 Lighting Store...................... 27
Fence Contractor............. 26 Locksm ith............................27


Nail Salon ........................ 21
OpticalNision Center..........21
Pharmacy ....................24
Skilled Nursing
Care Facility......................24
Tanning Salon ..................24
Weight Loss Center............24



Mobile Home Dealer ..........27
M overs .............................. 27
Paint Store ........................27
Picture Framing .............. 28
Plant & Garden Nursery ....28
Pool Supplies....................28
Window Treatment .............28


Thank you Citrus County for voting us the Best Hospital.


Ranked among America's 100 Best Hospitals for Spine Surgery
Ranked among America's 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Services
5 Star Rated in Stroke Treatment
Primary Stroke Center of Excellence
Total Joint Replacement Center of Excellence
Citrus County's Most Comprehensive Heart
and Vascular Center.

CITRUS MEMORIAL



502 W. Highland Blvd. Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-1551 I CitrusMH.com
000F4Q0


G6 Sunday June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


= What's Inside


And the winners are...


Home Service


Air Conditioning/
Heating Services ...............28
Air Duct Cleaning .............28
Appliance Repair................28
Carpet & Rug Cleaner........28
Garage Door Installer ........29
Garbage
Disposal Company ............29
Glass Repair ....................29


Pets
Feed Dealer......................31
K e nne ls ..............................3 1


Home Repair
& Maintenance ................29
Landscaper ......................29
Lawn Care ........................29
Paint Contractor..................30
Pest Control Service ..........30
Plum ber ............................ 30
Pool Builder ......................30
Real Estate Agent .............30


Real Estate Office .............30
Replacement Window ........30
R oofer .......................... .......30
Title Company ..................30
Tree Service ....................31
Water Softening
& Conditioning ........ ...........31


Pet Grooming ..................31 Veterinarian ......................32
Pet Shop ..........................31


Services
Barber Shop ......................32
Child Care Service ............32
Dry Cleaner ........................ 32
Funeral Home .................... 32


Shopping
Antique Store...................... 34
Arts & Crafts Store ............34
Athletic Equipment Store....35
Book Store.......................... 35
Boutique ............................ 35
Candy Shop........................ 35
Children's
Consignment Shop ............35
Clothing Store Children....35


Insurance Agency ............32 Transportation
Photographer....................33 (Taxi, Limo) ......................34
P rinter .......................... ....... 34
Tax Preparation ..................34


Clothing Store Men..........36
Clothing Store -Women ....36
Consignment Shop ............36
Flea Market ......................36
Florist......... ....... .................. 36
Furniture Store ..................36
Gift Shop ..........................37
Hardware Store ..................37
Jewelry ............................37


Liquor Store......................37
Mattress Dealer..................37
Outdoor/Patio Furniture......37
Pawnbroker ......................38
Shoe Store ......................38
Thrift Store........................38
T-Shirt Company ................38
Vacuum Cleaner Dealer ....38
Wedding Store..................38


Thank Y

From Your

Veteri


LW


-B-EST,,V \13fST,


* Hometown -fs
BEST
narians! ?
Offering a full line of care for small and large
animals from "treats" to "orthopedic surgery".
Lecanto Veterinary
Hospital
24 HOUR EMERGENCY
Open Mon.-Fri. 8 am 5 pm
E-mail: LecantoVetHospital@gmail.com
Angela J. Spann, DVM Wade M. Phillips, DVM
Jason M. De La Paz, MS, DVM


I I ZOU1 b i. Lecant H eant,,'M KI, 1I y


FR'L PJI I RRIBE, m.
Lic# CaB-C0660529 | i
I i I Custom' Homes,
SJAdditions,
Fair, H lnesl Garages &
and Dependable Remodeling


II I I I ______ J
E ,- ,fiST
. : ..-. . .... .... ... = 7, ri .. 1 1B E S T
Thank You Citrus County;,- 'ST
for Voting Us -
Best of the Best Again!
HOME
Providing quality construction in B ILDER
Citrus County since 1972- -="I I
I J I i i I r;t
......... ......... ...j.. '" [1 ,1 -

5414 N Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 352-746-5992
00F, www.flynnbuilders.com flynnbld@tampabay.rr.com


I Am


-


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday, June 30, 2013 G7


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


T47eeW (


a4O 16U


e 0 40U


By Gerry Mulligan
Chronicle Publisher
The best of the best.
This is one of my favorite sections published
by the Cli, I.c,, each year.
It's the one time a year that
we stop to celebrate the
best of what we have.
Now I will
admit, the best
is a subjective
thing. We all
have our 4
opinions i
and we
tend to like
them best.
In this
section we -,...
put together
"the best" .
based on the--
votes of thou-
sands of resident "
who look forwa i d t,
offering their op inon n


But let me take a few minutes and share with
you what I think are some of the best things
about Citrus County. You may not agree, but
that's okay, because we each get have our own
opinion.

THE BEST
PLACE
TO
RIDE
A
BIKE:
Citrus
County has
E." .become a
..._ -. destination
., place for
S" -' those who like
-- "to ride bikes and
the best place to
'., do it is along the
see Best Page 9


1Ien2


YEHRS













Over 227 years combined experience in the Raymond James Crystal River branch: (back row) Nanci
Roth, Ned Barry, Larry Masut, Don Rausch, Amy Barbieri, Jim McLaughlin; (front row) Kris
Flanders, Suzanne Pinner, Marie Rausch, Carolyn Caffee, Tracy Vaughn


3 5 or 8
www~aymodja es~cm/cr lo
OOOF33 Mmbe NewYorkStok Exhane / IPC I1,11r,91W


Thank You, Citrus County, for
voting us Best of the Best!


G8 Sunday June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 8

lakes in downtown Inverness.
The Rails to Trails has be-
come the place to be for cy-
clists from around the
country.


THE BEST

STATE PARK:
You may be surprised, but
Fort Cooper State Park be-
tween Inverness and Floral
City is the most underutilized
and beautiful park in the
county. A nice little beach,
beautiful walking trails and
lots of wildlife. And parking.
And restrooms.


see Best Page 10


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday, June 30, 2013 G9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 9

THE BEST AND
SMARTEST COUNTY
COMMISSIONER
OVER THE PAST
30 YEARS:
Wayne Jordan was a county commissioner in --
the 1980s and he had a Ph.D. in economics. He
was too smart for the job and only lasted one ,
term. He understood things that most of us can't
spell. .

THE BEST PLACE
TO KAYAK: THE BEST PAINTING EVER Homossasa River at the start of the last century.
The Chassahowitzka River in South Citrus COMPLETED IN CITRUS see Best Page 11
County is peaceful and looks the way Florida
used to. COUNTY:
Winslow Homer's paintings from the


We're Having drawings for

3 CI'Three Free

Butterfly ONOl
$200 Value ea., Includes installation. Purchase
of $10 or more to become eligible for a drawing.
Must bring in ad filled out ad. No reproductions/facsimiles. One winner per
household. Limit ONE entry per person per day! Drawing held 7/6/13

I Name
I Address
I Phone #
E-mail
A Mon.-Sat. 9am-5pm Sunday lO0am-4pm
ok Weather permitting.
HWY. 44 LECANTO Two Miles East Of Hwy. 491

746-6465 m
Visit Us At
n uwww.ColorCountryNursery.com
r SEy Colorcountrynursery@facebook.com


G10 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best THE BEST PLACE THE BEST OLD used to be the
county prop-
continued from Page 10 TO SWIM: GUY IN CITRUS erty appraiser .
and served
Three Sisters Springs in Crystal COUNTY: multiple terms
on the Crystal
THE BEST STORY Ed Tolle in Crys- River City
TELLER WHO helped build
the coLIunty and
HAPPENS TO BE A on good
days can
FORMER COUNTY still tell
great Ed Tolle
ADMINISTRATOR: sto-
Anthony Schembri of Inverness. ries abut early days in
The Commish did not last long in the community.
the difficult world of local politics,
but he can tell a great story. How see Best Page 12
many other county administrators
have had popular television shows
named after them? ..


BES MS



Of Tfff Of Tflf V A C R IO N .r
13-EST 13EST
IT Fv~l~lllI Llr ~ l~ I1L1 ~Ir ~r Il
TURNYOU BACYAR









F -Z-

FAMIY OWED OPEATE
7 ik &Karn anisOwer


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 Gil





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 11

THE BEST
CANOPY OF
TREES:
State Road 48 going through
downtown Floral City.

THE BEST
FORMER
INVERNESS
POLICEMAN
WHO WAS
BORN IN THE
ISLANDS AND
COMPLAINS


A LOT:
Mike Pitts of Inverness.

THE BEST
LETTER TO
THE EDITOR
WRITER TO
THE CHRONICLE
OVER THE LAST
30 YEARS:
L.C. Alexander. He became a
legend.

THE BEST
PLACE TO
PLAY TENNIS:
Skyview at Citrus Hills.

see Best Page 13


Thank you Citrus County
for voting us
Your Carpet & Flooring Store
7 YEARS RUNNING!


Reasons to Shop at
Michael's Flooring
* Friendly, Knowledgeable Staff
* No high pressure sales
* FREE in-home estimates
* Best qualified installers
* Largest selection of laminate
& hardwood flooring
* Michael has served all your
flooring needs for 28 years
* Family owned and operated

341-0813
www.mlchaelsfloorcoverlnglnc.net
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto
(1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44)
SLicensed & Insured
7I 7


S.E.T. HOME HEALTH
Service- 'Ecellence- Trust
I ///, E1, -






71ha- you Citmus Comaty lfa yjr
Fstrng support votee o cQ anfidte-ce!f
S.E.T. Home Health is Citrus County's only locally owned and operated
home health agency. We proudly offer the following services in your home:
Skilled Nursing Medical Social Work
Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
Home Health Aid Behavioral Health
SPhysical Therapy

(352) 564-2738
"Expect More From Home Health Care, Choose The Best!"
Learn more at www.sethomehealth.com :.
LICENSE # HHA299993458


~.~.C

-r
.-


G12 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


V0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Best
continued from Page 12

THE BEST
PLACE TO SEE
A MANATEE:
The Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.

THE BEST
PLACE TO
SEE A
MANATEE
FOR FREE:
The humpback bridge in
Crystal River.


BEST OF THE BEST


THE BEST
PHOTOGRAPHER
WHO HAPPENS TO
BE A FORMER
COUNTY
SADMINIS-
TRATOR:
Gary Kuhl of Floral
sCity.
see Best Page 39


Gary Kuhl


WE WON PAWS DOWN
Thanks To All Of Our 4 & 2 Legged Friends!
Thanks Citrus County For
Honoring Us As The BEST
Pet Shop & Pet Groomer.


1..- ~r ,


A I
1^/v -


w w-*,


SSpecializing In:
Deshedding Dental Care
Skin & Ear Infections State of the Art Grooming
S* 24 Hour Full Care Boarding All Natural Pet Foods
Pet Grooming


Bow Wow vz
Boutique Etc., Inc.
Where your pet is #1 Serving Citrus County
for 25 years
5625 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 795 1684
Mon., Tues., Thus. & Fri. 8 am 5 pm Sun. & Holidays 8 am 5 pm m
Wed. & Sat. 8 am Noon, reopen 5 pm (Pick up and drop off only)


Pet Shop


Thank You
CITRUS COUNTY
,fST For the fourth year in a
gST / row you have chosen us
B St as the best Thrift Store
Sin Citrus County.
Donate and Shop today!



Key Training Center
Thrift Stores
CRYSTAL RIVER 564-9477
crthrift@keytrainingcenter org
LECANTO INVERNESS
527-0037 726-0271 x102
Iks@keytrainingcenter.org iks@keytrainingcenter.org
PICKUP/DELIVERY 726-0271


Sunday June 30, 2013 G13






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Automotive/

Boat/Motorcycle

Auto Parts Store
Winner
Advance Auto Parts
Honorable Mention
Auto Zone
NAPAAuto Parts

Automotive Repair
Winner
Crystal Automotive
Honorable Mention
Firestone Crystal River/
Inverness
George's Wholesale Tire


Jn ,4e Yof ftistoric Downtown Crystal River
We want to say "Thank You"
to everyone who voted for us.
Without your support, we wouldn't succeed.


Boat & Motor Repair
Winner
Gulf Coast Marine
Honorable Mention
Homosassa Marine
Apopka Marine

Boat Dealer
Winner
Apopka Marine
Honorable Mention
Homosassa Marine
Crystal River Marina

Body Shop
Winner
Dave's Body Shop
Honorable Mention
Crystal Motors
Collision Tech


707 N. Citrus Ave., Suite D
352-563-2582


Car Wash
Winner
Mr. B's Full Service Car Wash
Honorable Mention
Inverness Car Wash
B Kleen Car Wash

Foreign Auto Repair
Winner
All Prestige Automotive
Honorable Mention
Crystal Nissan
Village Toyota

Marina
Winner
Riverhaven Marina
Pete's Pier
Honorable Mention
Twin Rivers Marina


652 N. Citrus Ave.


S352-563-0722


SHOP CENiER

ZC1'C ( I CrC-L 63N631 N. Citrus Ave., Suite C
S639 N. Citrus Ave. 352-795-2020
S rcrC 352-564-0311 MFrjy r mymezmereyes.com


14- f
ter At


657 N. Citrus Ave.
352-564-1400


L ,


LLIII:


G14 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


: 0fOTTOR
MR,~t
1t li-61V


1
d
r


~





"I


'. a fe -


PWITI Ttli I,,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Motorcycle Dealer
Winner
Crystal River Harley-Davidson
Honorable Mention
Honda of Crystal River
Love Motorsports
Citrus Cycle

Oil Change Service
Winner
Mobil 1 Lube Express
Honorable Mention
Firestone Crystal River/Inverness
Tire Kingdom


Tire Dealer
Winner
Tire Kingdom
Honorable Mention
Firestone Crystal River/Inverness
Homosassa Tire

Electronics


Cellular Telephones
Winner
Verizon
Honorable Mention
AT&T
Sprint


Computer Repair
Winner
29th Parallel Computer Repair
Honorable Mention
Pcom of Citrus County
Citrus Networking Solutions

Entertainment/

Recreation

Art Gallery
Winner
Lorna Jean Gallery
Honorable Mention
Franklin Anderson Gallery of Arts
Florida Artists Gallery


* WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY PEACE OF MIND ,

SCHLABACH SECURITY
atd --


II I-_I U%#LI VI_
Home
Security


2181 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Lecanto, FL
(352) 527-3201


Cu


ie Theater Surround Sound
stom Audio, Video Installation


Built in Speakers cfd
Burglar Alarms 11i B
LED TV Installation Ir
www.sssonline.biz
-ocally owned & operated in Citrus County Since 1995


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G15






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


INV8fr-
YYYYYYTTVv


Bicycle Shop
Winner
Suncoast Bicycles
Honorable Mention
Lenco Bicycle
Hampton's Edge Trail Side
Bike Shop

Boat Tour
Winner
River Safari and Boat Tours
Honorable Mention
Nature Coast Kayak
Wild Bill's Airboat Tours


Bowling Center
Winner
Manatee Lanes
Honorable Mention
Beverly Hills Bowl
Sportsmen's Bowl

Campground
Winner
Rock Crusher Canyon RV Park
Honorable Mention
Natures Resort Campground
Encore RV Park


Country Club
Winner
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
Honorable Mention
Plantation on Crystal River
Sugarmill Woods Golf
& Country Club

Dance Studio
Winner
Debbie Cole's School of Dance
Honorable Mention
Ronnie's Academy of Dance
Reflections Dance Studio


Oh, the places you'll go...

Don't let pain or ditticulty keep you trom going to extraordinary places and doing
extraordinary things. Improve your ability to live a fulfilling life with inpatient and
outpatient physical, occupational and speech therapy, our rehab-to-home program,
wound care, incontinence management, lymphedema therapy or any of many other
specialized care programs.
Cardiac Rehab, Stroke Rehab, and Orthopedic Rehab
Biodex Infrared System
S ,, ,; ,,,," ... .j L ^


,Aiireditation b) J(C,
I/.' h h i i/.',i i i 1 i
i.. ii 'fj>)il} l a uh lill) llil~l}l "
safe, high quality care and a
to be measured i,;:lr1i il.,
standards ofperforma

352.746.:
3325 W. Jerwayne L
LCCA.COI
Joint Commission


\HO 1


nce. ".. :
rice.


1434
ane,Lecanto
credited
Accredited


I Wo s


---' -


G16 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


~/*\~,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the

winners are...


~jN/\A~


"We Cater to Cowards!"

Experience The Difference

HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE


Dive Shop
Winner
American Pro Dive
Honorable Mention
Bird's Underwater
Crystal Lodge Dive Center

Fishing Guide
Winner
Captain Duane Tibbets
Honorable Mention
Captain Dan Clymer
Captain Kyle Messier

Golf Pro Shop
Winner
Plantation on Crystal River
Honorable Mention
Black Diamond
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club

Hotel or Motel
Winner
Plantation on Crystal River
Honorable Mention
Holiday Inn Express
Best Western
Crystal River Resort


Hunting &
Fishing Supplies
Winner
McPherson Archery
& Outdoor Pro Shop
Honorable Mention
Patriot Sporting Goods
Walmart

Kayak Sales or Rentals
Winner
Aardvarks Florida Kayak
Honorable Mention
Crystal River Kayak Company
Plantation on Crystal River
Adventure Center

Local Event
Winner
Manatee Festival
Honorable Mention
Stone Crab Festival
Cooter Festival

Local Golf Course
Winner
Plantation on Crystal River
Honorable Mention
Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club
Black Diamond


Ledger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.
Ledgerdentistry.com


3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448

(352) 628-3443
Insurance Accepted L.:en:e ii I':.C::


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G17






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


uNI'JV


RV Dealer
Winner
Como RV, Auto Sales & Service
Honorable Mention
Nature Coast RV
Gist RV

Satellite Dealer
Winner
Cellular Depot
Honorable Mention
Dish Network
Direct TV


Tourist Attraction (Local)
Winner
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
Honorable Mention
Homosassa Butterfly
Three Sisters Springs

Travel Agency
Winner
Becky's Travel Store
Honorable Mention
Tally-Ho Vacations
Accent Travel


Thank You Citrus County for
Voting us Best of the Best Again!







Beyond Carpet Cleaning
TILE HARDWOOD CARPET
UPHOLSTERY AIR DUCTS


Ac nT 1


FLCaC IE-f40u
ALJOUq1 [


.I / / T*.*.-1....


Glenn Donnell
and
Candy Murphy

4 Investor's Choice nancial Group, e.
-) Your Trusted Financial Planning Firm
We provide a diverse array of financial services for retirement
planning, income planning, legacy planning, insurance needs
and much more designed for your individual needs.
Goal: To exceed your expectations
Mission: To educate and empower clients
Meadowcrest Office Complex, Crystal River
office: 352-563-0700 www.lnvestorsChoiceFinancial.com
Secure b censed Indiidual Offered Through InvtCorp In
A Regited Broker/Deler Member FINRA, SPIC
nnFASH


*-Dental V
Maintenance Full Line of
JHna Grooming Kenic Shampoo
4d; Cage Free f 0 M Ii., "| & Rinses.
Environment Colognes, Flea
D & t et Hotel wITO PetDay Care Tick
Dpy Care & 6420 S. Suncoast Blvd. P product, oEa
Cleaner, Hot
Boarding Homosassa FL 34446 spot spray,
4' Private Dog www.powfectionranch.com and much
rCiets Dog & Cat Grooming mor
*" Royal Canine Dog Food ~ -
F Blue Buffalo 0 ll W OFF
Dog Food & Cat Food 'M Biv m u iffr
- - - - -

... .. ... ... I
IL AN-
Jk MID Tdrufal 1q/ OF
dde W il


GIFTS FROM THE HEART

Theonly FTD
SI ertified Master Florist
"r in Citrus County


Award Winning Designers

www.flowerbasket-fl.com
S 352-726-9666 800-441-4292
S 2600 HIGHWAY 44 WEST* INVERNESS, FL 34453
S ThankYou for your votes Citrus County!


___Thank you
S Citrus County*
for your
Votes!
..~-. ; ~, /...,su


U M Dj1, IIRE
iO ~ ~ ~ T SCHE BESDR 1" id CE mmrl
WASTE32-7 PR40NW RUL



SEVN YOU NEIGHBORHOOD


Park (Local)
Winner
Whispering Pines Park
Honorable Mention
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
Bicentennial Park

Radio Station
Winner
Citrus 95.3 WXCV
Honorable Mention
93.7 K Country
96.7 The FOX


YYvYYr~vvY,


G18 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


S/,


To scHe i sERvnce
352-726-7440





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Financial


Accountant
Winner
Edward J. Serra CPA
Honorable Mention
Collier, Jernigan & Goedert
Humphrey & Saltmarsh PL

Bank
Winner
SunTrust
Honorable Mention
Capital City Bank
Bank of America


Investment Firm
Winner
Raymond James
Honorable Mention
Edward Jones
Investors Choice Financial Group

Health Wellness

& Beauty

Assisted Living Facility
Winner
Cedar Creek at King's Bay
Honorable Mention
Cedar Creek
Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Community


Chiropractor
Winner
Citrus Chiropractic Group
Honorable Mention
Dr. Michael Bennett
Neck & Back Care Center

Day Spa
Winner
Abitare Paris Salon & Day Spa
Honorable Mention
7th Heaven Salon & Spa
Bella Vita at Citrus Hills


Thank You or

choosing us to be one of the Best!!

"Proud to be Citrus County's choice
for Air Condition Dealer!"


352-795-9685


SlA/pv,/p =. (i/u/, Lou,/,,y '1n, q^'ulnnf /6 L7H ji/ ? /f, ii / 'J


I Providii


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Dentist
Winner
Dr. Ledger
Honorable Mention
Dr. Swanson
NOW! Dental

Hair Salon
Winner
Abitare Paris Salon
& Day Spa
Honorable Mention
7th Heaven Salon
Hot Heads the Art of Hair


YVWW v ft.-


Health & Fitness Club
Winner
Anytime Fitness
Honorable Mention
Bella Vita at Terra Vista
Dynabody

Health Food Store
Winner
Rutabaga's Natural
Food Market
Honorable Mention
Nana's Health Food
Huffman's Heritage
Whole Foods


Hearing Aid Store
Winner
Audibel Hearing Aid Center
Honorable Mention
Gardner Audiology
Father and Son's
Hearing Aid Centers

Home Health Service
Winner
Comfort Keepers
Home Health Service
Honorable Mention
S.E.T Home Health
Hospice of Citrus County


Making Citrus
: Comfortable For
more than 25 Years!


Iw".av., e *!f c


I I Ji





rIeors Funeral Home and Crenatory
ian Strickland '-..1, .n I iii-t-I a inih hi a.. l H. I on, siw, 111
& Tom L. Pace
,ri......... i , i,,ii ,, I n, Burial Crem action Pre-Planning
1901 SE 19, CRYSTAL RIVER 352-795-2678


Best of

the Best

ballot

winners
Mike Hedge
of Homosassa
winner of the
paper submitted
ballots
$50 Gift Card

John Schaeffer
of Beverly Hills
winner of the
online submitted
ballots
$200 Gift Card


ijf1\/\


Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9-5 Saturday 9-3


G20 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


OWNA.,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Martial Arts School
Winner
Schrade's Tae Kwon Do
Honorable Mention
Butin Bik's Combat
Sports Gym
Antonelli Martial Arts

Massage Therapist
Winner
Abitare Paris Salon & Day Spa
Honorable Mention
Dr. Irven Chiropractic
Kelly Waldeck M Hair Studio


Medical Center
Winner
Citrus Memorial
Health System
Honorable Mention
Allen Ridge Medical Center
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center

Medical Supplies/
Equipment
Winner
Crystal Home Medical
Honorable Mention
Brashear's Pharmacy
Don's Pharmacy


Nail Salon
Winner
Abitare Paris Salon
& Day Spa
Honorable Mention
Apex Nails
LA Nails

Optical/Vision Center
Winner
MezMerEyes
Honorable Mention
Dr. Newcomer
Citrus Vision


NOBODY will BABY your

EYES like we do!


Dr. AnneMarie Newcomer
628-3029


Dr. Jay Newcomer
746-0800


* Providing Excellence in Eye Care in Citrus County since 1989
* Full Optical Centers Total Eye Care for the Entire Family


Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


OpticalVision Center


Beverly Hills Eye Clinic
3636 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL


hJ^iu .JjjJL-I Lj w'd ijj
uaijjjj .S j PI)ly Ij eiJdJL0j darden Cente.
A .-l..a&


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G21





G22 Sunday June 30 2013 BEST OF THE BEST ~Imus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Protect our waters Protect our planet Protect our future


Max
the M
' asks that
recycle. Pid
Americans throw
plastic bottle
75% of our
is recy
Recycling 100
could light
for 2 w


(352) 746
711 S. Adolph Pt., L(
P.O. Box 1090 Hern


well
anatee
you please
you know!
away 25 million
es per hour.
taste stream
clable.
aluminum cans
t a room
reeks.


-0617
canto, FL 34461
ando, FL 34441


Call today
check o0


G22 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nc





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BEST OF THE BEST Sunday June 30 2013 G23


Thank you Citrus County

for voting us Best of the Best

for more than a decade.


i TI


. . .


SSorting just put it all in a Bin or Bag.


Boxboard


I|


low


Cans & Foil
Aluminum, steel & tin

S Plastic bottles,
tubs & jugs


F)
~C~.


WU


F Printing & writing
paper, mail, phone
books, newspapers,
magazines & catalogs.
y to learn more or
,ut our web site.


Corrugated cardboard
& paper bags


A


A7fA*is o a *I **coI I I


-J


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G23


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


%o-=


3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Pharmacy
Winner
Walgreen's
Honorable Mention
Brashear's Pharmacy
CVS

Skilled Nursing
Care Facility
Winner
Diamond Ridge Health
& Rehabilitation Center
Honorable Mention
Cypress Cove Care Center
Life Care Center
of Citrus County


Tanning Salon
Winner
Caribbean Tan
Honorable Mention
Electric Beach Tanning
Bronze Beach

Weight Loss Center
Winner
Medical Weight Loss Center -
Dr. Redrick
Honorable Mention
Weight Watchers
Genesis Women's Center


Home & Garden

Alarm/Security System
Winner
Schlabach Security and Sound
Honorable Mention
Al Alarm
Powers Protection

Aluminum Contractor/
Screen Enclosure
Winner
Blackshears II Aluminum
Honorable Mention
White Aluminum
Advanced Aluminum


5SEU S 795-2333
No appointment necessary


* DIAMONDS
* ESTATE JEWELRY
* LARGE BRIDAL SECTION
* GEMSTONES
* 14K, 18K, PLATINUM, SILVER -
* SEIKO & PULSAR WATCHES
* APPRAISALS BY APPOINTMENT Y,..
* RESTORATIONS, REPAIRS, BUYERS
PRECIOUS METALS & ESTATES


Jim Green Jewelers


Crystal River Shopping Center
1665 SE Hwy. 19 Next to Sweetbay, Crystal River


6 ears In ARo,




-


G24 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


F www.jimgreenjewelers.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Appliance Store
Winner
Lowe's
Honorable Mention
Venero & Sons Appliances
Home Depot


Cabinet Store/
Installer
Winner
Deem's Kitchen
& Bath Showrooms
Honorable Mention
Lowe's
Home Depot


Carpet/
Floor Covering
Winner
Joe's Carpet
Honorable Mention
Michael's Floor Covering
LePage Carpet and Tile


BEST OF THE BEST 7 YEARS IN

O[ 10% OFF
YOUR FIRST ORDER
OR IN STORE PURCHASE


A ROW!!
V


SPORTS I APPAREL A
SCREEN PRINTING EMBROIDERY Sodum
352-564-9402
CORPORATE HPPRREL, TERm ulIFORms. TERm SPORTS EQUIPImERT
TRUPHIE i A RIRRUI. LETTERmRln JRCKETB8
NOW LOCATED IN THE CRYSTAL RIVER MALL!


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: Crystal River 795-5350 Inverness 726-4441


CITRUS bEST
CHIROPRACTIC BfST
GAnd Natural Weight Loss Center
And Notural Weight Loss Center -


\pT Thank You Citrus County
For Voting For Me'
PORTER'S
LOCKSMITHING
Mobile Locksmithing Services:
Key Duplication Basic Safe Work
Locks Serviced, Installed & Repaired
Owner John L. Porter Hours: Bus: 564-0668
Cash, Checks, Credit Cards M-F, 9-5 Cell: 634-0029

| CUff&iqR &dmoi, 9ic.
EUROPEAN AUTO SPECIALISTS
Sales Service Repairs Parts Accessories Body Shop

AU HORED We're A 14 Time Winner! Foreign Auto
*47 years experience *Diesel Expert -New CarWarranty Protection
Now Servicing Domestic and Japanese Vehicles Computerized Diagnostic Service
Original Equipment Replacement Parts 12 mo. Unlimited Mileage Warranty on Bosch Parts



THANKS FOR MAKING US #1
GULF COAST MARINE SERVICE
Skip Turvaville Owner
Serving Citrus For 35 Years

MERCURY
Premier Dealer


PETNFA.
|',l = ;{ J ;tu e
OUTBOARDS J
pr',-T M`s Ot


,IL -w
jNt ._T~ T


Thank You For Allowing Us To
Serve Your Family For Over 25 Years

S BRENT w4
WOOD BEST
RETIREMENT COMMUNIT-. BEST
1900 West Alpha Court Lecanto, FL 34461 BE.T K
Phone: (352) 746-6611
www.brentwoodretirement.com ___

THANK YoIu cITRUS aDuNY FoR ~MAKI us


T ks Again -EST

or Your Vote... 4

I 'Ifzuw/ei 4, Z/fwt
I resh & Silk Flowers, Gourmet Baskets
& So Much More.
S;'2 \ 1. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
S95.1424. 800.771.0057 T
v w.waverleyflorist.com I Teleflora.


.- ~ -- -- -
:$25 OFF:
Until 7/31/13


B Sf T Thank You Citrus County
'rfST for voting us Best of the Best
BEST



1655 W Gulf to Lake Hwy. i
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0225 BUILDING CORP.
www.pinecrestbuilding.com St. Cert. Lic. #CB C020998


10918 W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-5885


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G25






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Ceiling Fans
Winner
Lowe's
Honorable Mention
Sonshine Lighting & Fans
Home Depot

Fence Contractor
Winner
Brian Williams Fence
Honorable Mention
Lowe's
Rocky Sparks Fencing


Home Builder
Winner
Sweetwater Homes
Honorable Mention
Flynn Builders
Wheeler Construction

Home Remodeling
Contractor
Winner
Pinecrest Builders
Honorable Mention
Will Construction
Clark Construction


Hot Tub &
Spa Dealer
Winner
Mr. Pool
Honorable Mention
Summit Pool & Spa
Pinch a Penny

Interior Decorator
Winner
Smart Interiors
Home Furnishings
Honorable Mention
Anne Thompson Interiors
Home Stuff Interiors


~-


As Always, FREE Hearing Tests
Sand Tinnitus Evaluations

35-3649 35I1906 35-5233


Shineorf l a _m
Gol YOU
S Covered
Market Open Fri.- Sun.
6373 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
" 800-832-3477


THANK YOU FOR YOUR VOTES CITRUS COUNTY!


6 MEN'S REG.

Haircut


Tax Professional 30+ Years Experience
Belinda Brown IED SERRA
Gloria Cain Certified Public Accountant
(NY & FL)


Individual Taxes IRS Problem Resolution
Business Taxes E-File Fast & Efficient
Multi state expertise Member FICPA


(352) 794-3879
www.edserra.com
6118 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River, FL


G26 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


,4Jvyi


Kitchen Remodel
Winner
Deem's Kitchen
& Bath Showrooms
Honorable Mention
Home Depot
Lowe's

Lighting Store
Winner
Lowe's
Home Depot
Honorable Mention
Walmart


Locksmith
Winner
Porter Locksmith
Honorable Mention
Wheeler Locksmith
John C. Meyers

Mobile Home Dealer
Winner
Taylor Made Homes
Honorable Mention
Prestige Home Center
Inverness Mobile Home


Movers
Winner
Dick's Moving
Honorable Mention
Atlas Van Lines
SMW Relocation Services

Paint Store
Winner
Sherwin Williams
Honorable Mention
Citrus Paint & D6cor
Lowe's


I


Best Real Estate
Office, Three Years
in a Row!


Dedicated to knowing this market
& understanding your needs; the
very best in the industry.






E

EXIT REALTY LEADERS
730 N. Suncoast Blvd., 5018 Lecanto Hwy., 5 63rd St.,
Crystal River Beverly Hills Yankeetown


REALTOR"
Cell: 352-634-4581


REALTOR?
Cell: 352-302-6082


bparadiso.exitrealtyleaders.com nancylittlelewis@aol.com


REACTOR & RELTOlR/ROI-RASSOCLTE
Nancy Cel 352-279-5058
GanC (ell" 3,52-.3-9329



nancyayres@exitrealtyleaders.com
gary@exitrealtyleaders.com


)ebbie Branson Scott


Cell: 352-665-8282
debbiebransonscott@gmail.com


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G27






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the

winners are...


Picture Framing
Winner
Frame Designs
Honorable Mention
The Cottage Framer
Works of Art

Plant &
Garden Nursery
Winner
Color Country
Honorable Mention
Home Depot
Anson's Nursery

Pool Supplies
Winner
Pinch a Penny
Honorable Mention
Citrus Pool Service
Wrightway Pool

Window Treatment
Winner
Vertical Blinds of Homosassa
Honorable Mention
72 Hour Blinds
Lowe's


Home Service

Air Conditioning/
Heating Services
Winner
Bay Area Air Conditioning
Honorable Mention
Daniels Heating
& Air Conditioning
Senica Air Conditioning

Air Duct Cleaning
Winner
Stanley Steamer
Honorable Mention
Will Construction
Action Air

Appliance Repair
Winner
Welch Appliance Repair
Honorable Mention
Sears
Affordable Appliance Repair

Carpet & Rug Cleaner
Winner
Stanley Steemer
Honorable Mention
ServiceMaster
C&C Carpet Cleaning


G28 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Garage Door Installer
Winner
KC Garage Doors
Honorable Mention
Tri-County Overhead Doors
Discount Garage Doors

Garbage Disposal
Company
Winner
F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.
Honorable Mention
Waste Management
Waste Pro


Glass Repair
Winner
K & K Glass
Honorable Mention
Weber Glass
Midstate Glass

Home Repair
& Maintenance
Winner
Will Construction
Honorable Mention
Clark Construction
Lowe's


Landscaper
Winner
Clover Lawn
Honorable Mention
Connolly's Sod & Nursery
Nick's Lawn Service

Lawn Care
Winner
Clover Lawn
Honorable Mention
Lawn Care Unlimited
Top Hat Lawn Care


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G29


,S~L~






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the

winners are...


Paint Contractor
Winner
Bud Sasada
Honorable Mention
Frick's Painting
George Swedlige Painting

Pest Control Service
Winner
Citrus Pest Management Inc.
Honorable Mention
Florida Pest Control
& Chemical Co.
Bush Home Services

Plumber
Winner
Bob Tsacrios Plumbing
Honorable Mention
Suncoast Plumbing
Mike Scott Plumbing

Pool Builder
Winner
Authentic Pools
Honorable Mention
EML Pools
Mr. Pool


Real Estate Agent
Winner
Gene Wade
Honorable Mention
David Bramblett
Debbie Branson Scott

Real Estate Office
Winner
Exit Realty Leaders
Honorable Mention
ReMax Realty One
Century 21 JW Morton

Replacement Window
Winner
Tropical Window
Honorable Mention
Lowe's
Mid State Glass

Roofer
Winner
AAA Roofing
Honorable Mention
Curry's Roofing Inc.
Boulerice Roofing

Title Company
Winner
Express Title
Honorable Mention
Land Title
Wollinka Wikle Title


5 Star Rated
FEATURING 52 PRIVATE ROOMS **
* Full Service Rehabilitation Department
* Post Surgical Wing
* Medicare Part A & B and Most
Insurances accepted
Specialized Orthopedic Wing
Wound Care Wound Vac.
Certified Nurses
Separate Alzheimer's Unit with
Dementia Programs


5iatawul Ridge

Itea"L & Re&Wiituai Ceutea
2730 W. Marc Knighton Ct., Lecanto, FL
352-746-9500 -
E-mail:
admissions@diamondridgehealthandrehab.com /-rn*--


G30 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


~\nn





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Tree Service
Winner
Dave's Tree Service
Honorable Mention
Jumpers Tree service
Chris Watson Tree Service
Water Softening
& Conditioning
Winner
Culligan Water Conditioning
Honorable Mention
Best Buy Water
Citrus Water Conditioning


Pets

Feed Dealer
Winner
American Farm & Feed
Honorable Mention
Carnahan's Supply
Country Farm & Feed

Kennels
Winner
Lakeside Kennels
Honorable Mention
Citrus Pet Resort
Bow Wow Boutique


Pet Grooming
Winner
Bow Wow Boutique
Honorable Mention
Fancy's Pets
Pawfection Ranch
Pet Shop
Winner
Fancy's Pets
Honorable Mention
Pet Supermarket
Bow Wow Boutique


24/7/365 EMERGENCY
SERVICE
*CARPET& -.s
UPHOLSTERY _IL__ _
CLEANING
* FIRE & WATER DAMAGE
* RESTORATION SPECIALISTS
r ROOMS & r I
S1 HALLWAY 1o OFF
U S 9 95* Uf ANY CLEANING SERVICE p
N OVER $100 0
N ;,,x..r., j N N ,, iCeVMMASTER NE
L _____I L .....
-JMI Ialecammeded yly Insurance Industry
2T ServiceMASTER

Carpet and 352-794-0270 Restore
Rug Cleaner www.smcflorida.com


BEST Thanks
SsT Citrus
| County!

Blackshears ll

Aluminum
36 years as your Hometown Dealer
COMPLETE ALUMINUM SERVICE

13 Time Winner
From generation -I
to generation *
we've always
provided you
with the best. r
Hwy. 44 Crystal River 795-9722 Lics d#RR0042
Toll Free 1-888-474-2269 www.blackshears.com


Mattress Dealer


Thank you for your support.

FREE Local Delivery
FREE Set-up
FREE Removal of Old Set

1675 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
352-628-0808


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G31


r-~~L7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Veterinarian
Winner
Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
Honorable Mention
Midway Animal Hospital
Countryside Animal Hospital

Services

Barber Shop
Winner
Fred's Barber Shop
Honorable Mention
Ron's Barber Shop
Citrus Plaza Barber Shop


Child Care Service
Winner
Little Disciples
Honorable Mention
Today's Child
All About Kids

Dry Cleaner
Winner
Touch of Quality
Honorable Mention
Quality Cleaners
Beverly Hills Cleaners


Funeral Home
Winner
Strickland Funeral Home
Honorable Mention
Hooper Funeral Home
& Crematory
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
& Crematory

Insurance Agency
Winner
State Farm
Honorable Mention
Hagar Group
VanAllen Insurance


OUR "THANK YOU" TO YOU :

BEST
"10 OF fST
SMust present coupon at time of purchase. *
M HU RWELLMEET OR BEAT ANY
72 COMPETITORS PRICE*

BLIND FACTORY FREE
LECANTO-TREETOPS PLAZA I : IS ngonstulting
1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. *BB Valances
527-0012 fwww.72-hourblinds.com
5 2 7 -0 0 1 2 1-877-746-0017 *Mustpresentwrtten estimate from mpetitorfor this price


Thank You, Citrus County!
HUMPHREY & SALTMARSH, PL
SCERTIrFED PUBLC ACCOUNTS BEST
VICKIE J. HUMPHREY, CPA "' ST
JANICE M. SALTMARSH, CPA "-
ACCOUNTANT |
3600 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34453 352-341-3449

Thank you, Citrus County,
for your continued
support in voting us,
Best of the Best gST
two years in a row. BEST

Comfort 'i

^ Independently owned andoperatedoffice. HH299992888
ww.senmiorsericeinveresfoid.com


Come See Our Showroom Of
FURNISHINGS &
AFFORDABLE STYLE
--*COMKCS--- ,
,* TtEi
-f-ST
BEST


"Best Interior Decorator"
You'll know why we were voted best
Window Coverings Accessories
SLighting Design Services
Financing Available
smart interiors

T,- / Open1
Mon. Sat Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
Swww. smartinteriorsfrn com 352-527-4406


~4iV\~


G32 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the
winners are...


%Nt*"


WE'RE MAKING CHANGES
& YOU NOTICED


Photographer
Winner
Dove Photography
Honorable Mention
Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Photography
Kacy's Portrait Studio


Visit

us
US

on the

web

at:


chronicle
online.com


John C. Meyers, Sr.-T
Locksmith Mobile BEST
3084 N. Dewberry Pt., Beverly Hills
Cell: 422-4770 (352) 746-1028
Jacqui Watkins Thank You
"' 11'' Satisfied Customers


Certified & Licensed
Sales Service Repairs


Insured & Bonded
Recycle Existing Locks


W.


KAYAK SALES/RENTALS


PLANTATION mI
9301 W. Fort Island Trail
S7 7 Crystal River
(352) 795-7211 www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G33


~n,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Printer
Winner
Excel Printing
Honorable Mention
Homosassa Printing
Office Max

Tax Preparation
Winner
Edward Serra CPA
Tax Preparation
Honorable Mention
Joe Collabro
Tammy S. Young EA


Transportation
(Taxi, Limo)
Winner
Terri's Taxi
Transportation (Taxi, Limo)
Honorable Mention
AAA Transport
White Diamond Limosine


Shopping

Antique Store
Winner
Heritage Antiques
Antique Store
Honorable Mention
Olde Inverness Antiques
Dayz Gone By

Arts & Crafts Store
Winner
Walmart
Honorable Mention
Kmart
Scrap and Stamp


We'll bring
the closing
right to you!


Titrk
k |I11 11 1 V


Residential Commercial
Short Sale Refinance

SFully licensed office.

title services of citrus, inc.
730 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 352-795-2691
www.expresstitlecitrus.com


n i I P I I r I rl II LII I I t. I

SUMMER SPE CIAL
Double Hung, Both
I Sashes, Tilt for easy
cleaning, for the price
of a single hung. I
And call me crazy...

I$25 OFF I Where we sell windows!
Each New Window! I Visit our showroom:
Coupon cannot be used wth other speaals 1731 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19)
Orders must be placed byAugust 31 2013 Homosassa, FI 34448
I II I


Te aiak Yuif faIMAiUsl
The #lPainting Comany
In Citrus County

0 5ASAPA ^





(+nContractors
23-Year Citrus Licensed &Insured
County Resident Lic#204627-125153
A CARING COMPANY
40 Years in Business
We provide quality craftsmanship and personalized service,
with over 40 years of experience. We use the finest quality materials
available on the market along with the most advanced tools.
352-795-1448
Full Service, Professional Painting Contractor
Residential and commercial Drywall repair
Finish touch ups Property maintenance
Free Estimates available
Interior and exterior paint professional
Paint priming and finishing multiple colors


G34 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


~~r.Jnr,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Athletic
Equipment Store
Winner
Citrus Sports & Apparel
Honorable Mention
Just Sports
Walmart
Book Store
Winner
Poe House Books
Honorable Mention
Cornerstone Christian Supply
Walmart


Boutique
Winner
The Cotton Club
Honorable Mention
Connors Gifts
Val's Boutique
La Te Da Boutique
Candy Shop
Winner
The General Store
Honorable Mention
Ice Cream Dr
Chocolates by Vanessa


Children's
Consignment Shop
Winner
Kids Trading Post
Honorable Mention
Tater Tots
Kiddy Korner
Consignment Shop
Clothing Store -
Children
Winner
Bealls
Honorable Mention
Walmart
Belk


Thank You
Badcock Customers for
voting us


of

BEST e BEST
again this year
we strive to give our customers the
BEST shopping experience


...


/,


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G35





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Clothing Store
Men
Winner
Bealls
Honorable Mention
Belk
JCPenney

Clothing Store
Women
Winner
Bealls
Honorable Mention
Belk
TJ Maxx


Consignment Shop
Winner
Upscale Resale
Honorable Mention
Helen's Consignment
Ivy Lane Consignment
Ritzy Rags & Glitzy Jewels, Etc.

Flea Market
Winner
Howard's Flea Market
Honorable Mention
Inverness Flea Market
Stokes Flea Market


Florist
Winner
Waverley Florist
Honorable Mention
Rich Design Flowers
Flower Basket

Furniture
Winner
Badcock Home Furnishings
Honorable Mention
Farmers Furniture
Easy Livin' Furniture


RV

New & 2013
Aliner
Preowned Aliter
F Sales, Service
& Body Shop
Class B, Class C, Fifth Wheels, Travel Trailers & Pop-up Tent Trailers
2011 Keystone Raptor
ri LI l. ^j N


Thank
For


24x40


You Citrus County
Voting For Us!


GAIL
WHY BUY USED
WHEN NEW STARTS AT

$37,995


Includes Set-Up, Hurricane Anchoring, 2 Sets of Steps, Skirting. A/C with Heat Installed.


PRESTIGE HOME CENTERS
1825 Hwy. 41 North, Inverness, FL 1/4 Mile North of K-Mart Plaza]
M-F 9-6 Sat. 9-5 Sun. 12-5
Call for an appointment 352-726-5009
1-800-841-0592 out Of Area
Visit www.21strepos.com to view more of our Repos.


W5.
S1 iOO; 13
o ~ f HTQOU H-
JI:-"15 Y-

***Tan~ f-^ ^ *


G36 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


vvvvvvyyyY
VNN~'
TTVVTVVT


Gift Shop
Winner
Connors Gifts
Honorable Mention
Rosemary's Hallmark
Heritage House

Hardware Store
Winner
Ace Hardware
Honorable Mention
Home Depot
Lowes


Jewelry Store
Winner
Jim Green Jewelers
Honorable Mention
Specialty Gems
Whalen's Jewelers

Liquor Store
Winner
ABC Liquors
Honorable Mention
Bob's Liquor
Walgreen's


Mattress Dealer
Winner
Comfort Mattress
Honorable Mention
Badcock & More
Home Furnishings
Mattress Giant

Outdoor/
Patio Furniture
Winner
It's a Shore Thing
Honorable Mention
Lowe's
Home Depot


BEST
BEST voting us
Best of the Best

Vertical Blinds of Homosassa
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
(352) 628-7888
""... ,* ..r l.:.:ill:.l r.:. :..: ...: ..: ,:, .,.nY "


1110U Amberjack Ur., Hernando
Hernando 726-0072 Ocala 351-1423


I ftiwi7m(v ANOf2''s '? CLFANM7V
Interior Exterior Residential Commercial
/-. Free Estimates
f--B ST Licensed & Insured
352-794-0400
S* Cell 352-613-4071


7 eest Boat Tours l
Pontoon Boat Tours & Rentals
Seasonal Scallop & Manatee Tours NN
Fast, Fun Airboat Rides
Gallery & Gifts Free Alligator Exhibit

(352) 628-ER 5222


ii: i .:i-1 i ,, ; (352) 628-5222


rFiestoine'
MrlMGESHE. i


Thank You,
Citrus County
For Your Votes!
S,-X, Professional Pest
\fBST Management Solutions
SS For Over 60 Years.
-'J


2020 SE US Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-3614
www.flapest.com


IF1REE1 INSPECTI N&E-TIM.EIS- I


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G37


J)


~JF:


~ls





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And the winners are...


Pawnbroker
Winner
Pat's Pawn & Jewelry
Honorable Mention
American Trading Post
Golddiggers & Gunslingers

Shoe Store
Winner
Bealls
Honorable Mention
Payless Shoe Source
Walmart


or Your Votes! s------
p#S Becky's ravelStore
Leisure and Corporate Travel Service P
Expert Travel Consultants BEST
Specializing In: L.
Cruises &Tours GroupTravel DayTrip BEST
Bus Trips Airline Reservations/Tickets -- -
*Hotels- Cars Rail
Custom Travel Packages ,, -
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Located Next to Winn Dixie (52)5278855


Thank You All

For Voting For Us!


BEST
,s


SKILLED NURSING CARE
FACILITY

Cypress C
5 *


We Are A
Five-Star Rated
Facility *
700 Southeast 8th Ave.
H -e Crystal River
S (52) 795-8832
*Rating by Centers for Medicare
& Medicaid Services.
www.cypresscovecare.com


Thrift Store
Winner
Key Training Center
Honorable Mention
Hospice Thrift
Sheriffs Youth Ranch

T-Shirt Company
Winner
Citrus Sports & Apparel
Honorable Mention
Blue Heron Tees
Sew Be It


.THANK YOU FOI
Aa?. &VOTING US.


Vacuum Cleaner Dealer
Winner
Citrus Sew and Vac
Walmart
Honorable Mention
Sears

Wedding Store
Winner
Mary Beth's Bridal
& Formal Wear
Honorable Mention
Accents by Grace
Simply Elegant Affairs


1 7 BThank you for continuing
3EST to vote us Best of the Best!



ROOFING
Lie/Ins CCCO57537

www.aaaroofingflorida.com 563-0411 726-8917


..O NO. -I,

ALL MAKES
FRIQM ANYPLACE
GardinrAudili ry.co'mi ...

CGardnerAudiology

Crystaliver Inverness 352-795-5700


SThanks For Voting Us
The Best Of The Best!


G38 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


1
4
1


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 13

THE BEST PLACE
TO SPEND FREE
TIME IN THE
SUMMER:
Any branch of the county
library.
THE BEST .,
PLACE i
TO GO
TUBING IN
THE SUMMER:
The Rainbow River in
Dunnellon, which we claim
is really in Citrus County.
see Best Page 40


A m

0e0s Carpeo

Sas Done It Agaiil
IT IS AN HONOR TO SERVE YOU
S *Best Pricing Largest Selection
R* Friendly Staff Professional Installers
Stop in and see our wide selection of
I Carpet, Laminate,Wood, Ceramic Tile,Vinyl
X 18 YEARS IARGESTARE RU DESIONCENTER
0 1996-2013 OVER 200 RUGS IN STOCK.,, n ,,
WWW.JOESCARPET.COM ASK ABOUT OUR MILITARY DISCOUNTS!
0% FINANCING! FREE ESTIMATES
ASK ABOUT OUR SHOP AT HOME SERVICE '
CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9605 INVERNESS 726-4465
6633 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. 138 N. Fla. Ave., US 41
Look for the big Joe's Carpet sign Same located 4,1 years _,.


Swww.apopkamarine.com

I ViYAMAHA


i. P iN,-E 3260 Hwy. 44 West
-V A I Inverness, FL 34453
.,. .. BOAT SALES & SERVICM 352-726-7773
*iboats.com voi cOWAN DRIVE. LEIANON. MO srS3e


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G39





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 39

THE BEST
OTHER
PLACE THAT
IS NOT IN
CITRUS
COUNTY BUT
SHOULD BE:
Inglis and Yankeetown
are in Levy County, but
they should really be in
Citrus. It takes residents
there 40 miles to get to
Chiefland and eight
miles to get to Crystal
River. Let's annex them.
see Best Page 41


Nothing to Lose '
But Pounds & Inches



j SMedical
Weight Loss
Center
Scott Redrick, MD

Need to Lose Weight?
Want to Feel Great? HRST VISIT
What Are You Waiting For? 2 FOR 1
We Can Help.
Try one of our Physician I
Supervised Plans Today... LS150
Our results show our patients:
Lose about 12-20 pounds/month
Have decreased appetite
Have increased metabolism
Dramatically lower body fat 1',
Call Today to Schedule Your /
Free Consult & Evaluation!
We offer 3 diet programs,
a selection of weight loss
supplements and diet injections.


#/I F Weei ou 7 7 2
a s a Row!! 2 01

(352) 564-824 SEspafio
582 SE 7th Ave. Crystal River, FL 34429
www.CitrusMedicalWeightLoss.com


HUNTING FISHING

McPhersons
& O.or
Pro ShoP

GUNS ARCHERY AMMO
From Everyone At McPherson 's
CDRUCOUVCHENCIN

BfST

For Your Business
Chad, Dan, Bo, Logan, Kurt, Brandon, Hunter
641 E. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL
352-341-2820


G40 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 40

THE BEST PLACE
THAT IS NOT IN
CITRUS COUNTY
AND WE ARE
HAPPY ABOUT
IT: -
New Port Richey.

THE BEST
FORMER
OWNER OF Dav
THE
CHRONICLE:
David Arthurs of Inverness, who
came here in the early 1960s and is
still active in the business commu-
nity more than 50 years later.
THE BEST COUNTY
COMMISSIONER
WHO MY WIFE


TAUGHT IN
ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL:
Scott Adams.


id A


THE BEST YOUNG
POWER
COUPLE WHO
WERE BOTH
BORN IN
CITRUS
S COUNTY:
County Commission
rthurs Chairman Joe Meek and
United Way of Citrus
County CEO Amy Meek.

THE BEST PLACE
TO WATCH A
SUNSET:
Fort Island Gulf Beach in Crystal
River.

see Best Page 42


C>


We apprecia
your business
look forward
to serving yo
in the future


te
d
and .
e.


The helpful place.
3 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
Inverness Ace Hardware
465 E. Highland Blvd.352-726-8811
, Homosassa Kanes Ace Hardware
3600 S. Suncoast Blvd. 352-628-3566
Hernando Ace Hardware
2585 N. Florida Avenue352-726-1481


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G41


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Best
continued from Page 41

THE BEST
PLACE
TO LIVE:
Anywhere in Citrus
County.


CASH Y BUY
FOR "AWJy SELL
GOLD 0.L- TRADE


CASH FOR
* Gold Diamonds
* Silver Guns
* Coins Electronics
* Platinum Antiques
Discrete Cash Loans Jewelry Repair
Free No Obligation Quotes


$25 FFL FIREARMS
TRANSFERS
CASH LOANS ON GUNS
Vast selection of quality
nrpnwn nc firemrms


(I / -


on our already highest prices paid
2 0 %for your GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY.
M OWh this cOUpon. Not valid with ony other offers.
| 0 R E I Expires 7/31/13

I I ,..i i.. ,11


Thank You For
Your Support
Citrus County!
DENTIST
New Patients Free Consults Emergency Care
ir 352-795-1223
1815 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
www.rswansondental.com
PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE DrRichardC.Swanson


Ill TI 1111C











5723 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-503-6856
2668 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto 352-270-8868
2010 SE US Hwy 19, Crystal River 352-794-6161
435 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness 352-400-4894

E 7-Day Guest Pass
S GueKt na e____________

Lr- Dates Valid
at waa N years old. No oter isoAnts 0c1 B used st i healthit on
wh Ws o fe Falib~m ad es ny Wvvy per Ica on cGd ony
r iIed hour, VaNd to 1.D. d at t chek-ln N ca*sh aluea i, N*A lk rf
eM t or O Val a] rteaptn Aytr Fne nes e df rt* SeeW C
fu mpwm fttft.


G42 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


R--





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


N


u


S ===- Nature Coast News
CRYSTAL AUTOIS THE BEST OF THE BEST
4Y CRYSTAL AUTOM Local Shuttle rides to and from
Factory trained/ASE Master "Thanks Nature our facility
technicians Coast for naming US Late hours twice a week and
P.7 open Saturdays
diagnostic equipment Best of the Best" o Saturdays
State of the pment BeSt of the Best .wFi in customer lounges
Latest wheel alignment and tire Steve & Jewel Lam We honor all warranties
balancing machines Owners .Night Drop Service
We use factory parts l Ease of making appointments:
engineered for your vehicle Bu most importantly we are hone On-Li or in Person
Parts and Labor guaranteed your neighbors, with a genuine .
competitive pricing concern for you and your vehicle" C ,,|:^,


C RYSTAL d F4Jeep -o-
CA RA I 165. Si. a;un at Blvd 1005 S.Suncoast Blvd 2077 HiYwiAy44W 14358 Cole: BIl,,
S Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Iliveriess, FL Biook, lle. FL
AUTOMOTIVE 352-564-1971 CRYSTALAUT(


937 S.Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL
IS.COM


. ....... ....


BEST OF THE BEST


Sunday June 30, 2013 G43









for voting us your


AC


Company of cho


ce


for


Vaw,/


JlTEIM


888 WOW-COOL
^asfo !


&W~J 5/
VVVVVVVVVVV


AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
.


www.bayareacool.com


SFACIORY -
; AUTHORIZED :
- DEA ER

turn to the experts'


352-795-2095


SiQNI


V


G44 Sunday, June 30, 2013


BEST OF THE BEST


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


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