<%BANNER%>

Citrus County chronicle ( 06-29-2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03164

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03164

Full Text

Little League All-Stars junior baseball begins /B1


Partly cloudy. 60
percent chance
of showers.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next
morning


JUNE 29, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500 VOL. 118 ISSUE 326


Trailer tow turns tumultuous


Couple said they were victimized two times


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A Beverly Hills couple is baffled and
outraged by what they consider being
victimized twice. First, they had their 6-
foot by 8-foot trailer stolen. Then, a short
time later, they received word from law
enforcement personnel in another


county that their property had been re-
covered, but they would have to cough
up money to pay for towing and storage.
"We feel like we are in limbo. We can't
retrieve our property because it is being
used as evidence and before we can get
it back we have to pay nearly $400 in fees
to a towing company in Osceola County,"
Marge Maszota said. The couple only


paid $600 for the trailer when it was
new.
Maszota's husband, Richard, cannot
believe what they are going through.
"I am shocked by how the system pe-
nalizes you twice, and it is legal. Any-
thing like this should not be on the
books," Richard said.
He believes people whose property is
recovered be it on the side of a road or
at a residence should get a call from
law enforcement and be given a chance


to retrieve it first.
"If they had called me, I would have
driven to Osceola to get my property. But
having this tow company take it away
and then send me a letter saying that I
have to pay or I can't get it back is wrong.
This is not justice, it's like blackmail or
something like that," he said.
The Maszotas have written to the state
Attorney General's Office and have
See .Page A7


Fireworks
festival today
The Homosassa
River Fireworks Festi-
val and Poker Run is
today.
The poker run be-
gins at 8 a.m. Other
festival events corn
hole contest, pie-eating
contest, blue crab
races, tug-of-war and
other family events -
continue throughout
the day, culminating in
a fireworks display
over the Homosassa
River at dusk.
New this year: a
decorated golf cart
contest at the Monkey
Bar.
Bring a chair or
blanket to the riverfront
or sponsoring business
locations to view
fireworks.
-From staff reports


Firefighter friends


NATIONAL NEWS:


Heat wave
Western states brace for
a scorching weekend of
heat./Page A8


SPECIAL SECTION:


Citrus' best
Read the Chronicle's
annual Best of the Best
section./Sunday


Community .......C5
Classifieds ...... C8
Comics .......... C7
Crossword ....... C6
Editorial .........A6
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ...... A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... C7
Obituaries ........ A7
TV Listings ...... .C6


ABOVE: McKenzie Fisher
shoots water from a fire hose
Friday with help from Brady
Hutchens, a driver/engineer
with Citrus County Fire
Rescue. Each of the campers
had a chance to line up a
target and shoot three orange
traffic cones with the
powerful blast of water. LEFT:
As water falls from above
their heads, children toss
water balloons at each
other.
pe toxs /lfie B


Summer camp kids learn fire safety from the pros

wenty-five junior firefighters-in-training from Ark Angels
Day Camp got a taste Friday of what it takes to be a real
firefighter at the county fire training facility in Lecanto.


The children, ranging in age from 5 to 9, toured
the Fire Safety House, participated in fire escape
drills, played games, inspected a giant fire engine,
watched a movie, learned all about safety and met
real community heroes in person.


Then in the afternoon, the real fun began, as
they put their training to the test, carrying fire
hoses, putting on bunker gear and "crawling to
the rescue," just like real firefighters do.
-From staff reports


Property appraiser offers


'worst-case scenario' tax roll


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The Duke Energy tax situation is forc-
ing Property Appraiser Geoff Greene into
new territory
Greene on Friday certified two tax rolls
for local governments one using what he
believes Duke's taxable value is, and a
"worst case scenario" based on what the


company says it intends in pay in 2013 taxes.
The tax roll is due every year on July 1.
Local governments use the certified roll to
determine tax rates and budgets.
Duke and Greene are miles apart on the
taxable value of the company's energy
complex north of Crystal River.
Greene increased the value from $2.32
billion in 2012 to $3.47 billion in 2013.
See Page A7


Geoff
Greene


Balfour



back on



board

Governor

appoints new

school board

member
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Gov Rick Scott has officially
filled the vacant Citrus County
School Board position.
Scott announced the appoint-
ment of Sandy Balfour to the
board on Friday
When premature word of
Balfour's ap-
pointment was
made by Prop-
erty Appraiser
Geoff Greene at f
a June 15 meet-
ing of the North
Suncoast Re-
publican Club,
Balfour told the Sandy
Chronicle she Balfour





the system forI can manyke a broad im-
watching from the sidelines for
many years. My heart is in the
right place."
Balfour, a Republican, was
defeated in last year's race for
superintendent of schools by
Democratic incumbent Sandra
"Sam" Himmel.
Balfour is a teacher at the
Academy of Environmental Sci-
ence and has taught in Citrus
County elementary, middle and
high schools, plus Withla-
coochee Technical Institute.
She also spent one year as as-
sistant principal at Crystal
River High School.
Balfour is a member of the
College of Central Florida's
Board of Trustees.
She has previously served
with the Association of Commu-
nity College Trustees, Associa-
tion of Supervision and
Curriculum Development,
Florida Association of School
Administrators, Florida Hu-
manities Council, and the
Florida Marine Science Associ-
ation. Balfour received her
bachelor's degree from St. Leo
See Page A7


PAID ADVERTISEMENT
CR) STAL
a I.I "1 1 - .1 .. T I E
Crystal Automotive Group
Homosassa, FL


CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

PAYS CUSTOMERS INTEREST


Crystal Automotive Group has agreed to This time Crystal decided to pay every Ted Nipper, Director of Finance was the most popular models first. To take


pay every customer's interest for the
length of their loan. Every new or used car
sold in the next three days will qualify to
have the entire interest paid by Crystal
Automotive group for the length of the
loan.
"After last month's record-breaking sales
event, I knew that showing customers just
how easy it is to buy a car would make a
difference. So I decided to do even better this
month." states Justin Lamb, Director of
Operations for Crystal Automotive Group.


customer's total interest for the length of quoted, saying "Our goal is to get everyone
their loan. If you are currently paying qualified for this program."*
any interest on your car STOP. Come Regardless of past credit history this is
to Crystal Automotive Group today. Buy the public's chance to stop paying interest
any new or used vehicle, and we will pay on their car loan. "This deal almost sounds
your interest for the term of the loan." like its too good to be true. So Crystal
said Mr. Lamb with a big smile on his Automotive has set up a hotline where you
face. can get all the information at 800-584-8755.
With over 700 new or used vehicles to All interested customers are encouraged
choose from, there is a vehicle in every to call for all information regarding this
price range. With certified vehicles program. With an amazing event like this
starting at only $5,888. Crystal Automotive Group is sure to sell


advantage of having Crystal pay all of your
interest for the term of the loan visit any
one of their five locations in Homosassa,
Inverness, and Brooksville. This offer is so
special it can not be combined with any
other offers.
"Crystal Automotive Group is still just
trying to show people how easy it is to buy
a new vehicle today," stated Mr. Lamb as
he shook the hand of another customer
leaving in their new car.
*Customer must qualify for 5-year financing at 4.99% APR.


C ITRUhS C O NT Y






www.chronicleonline.com


HIGH
88
LOW
74


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


Domestic
battery arrest
Shanna Faulkner, 33, of
Crystal River, at 4:07 p.m. June
19 on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
DUI arrests
Jesse Stevenson, 31, of
East Stevenson Court, Inver-
ness, at 8:29 p.m. June 18 on
misdemeanor charges of driv-
ing under the influence with
property damage and driving
under the influence. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, he is
accused of driving a car into a
ditch off South Camp Trail in
Inverness. He refused to per-
form field sobriety tasks and
refused to submit to a test of
his breath. Bond $1,000.
Shannon Thomas, 38, of
West Oak Park Boulevard,
Homosassa, at 2:43 a.m.
June 19 on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under the in-
fluence. According to her ar-
rest affidavit, she was stopped
after a sheriff's deputy saw
her vehicle traveling the
wrong way on North Pine Av-
enue in Inverness, a one-way
street. She had difficulty per-
forming sobriety tasks and re-
fused to submit to a test of
her breath. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Joshua Rose, 28, of
West Sedalia Court, Ho-
mosassa, at 3:06 p.m. June
18 on felony charges of plan-
ning, managing, supervising
or trafficking in stolen prop-
erty, grand theft, giving false
verification of ownership or
false identification to a pawn-
broker and burglary. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, he is
accused of burglarizing a
home on Beverly Court in Ho-
mosassa and taking cash,
jewelry and personal docu-
ments. He is also accused of
pawning stolen jewelry. Bond
$38,000.
John McGahen, 23, of
West Hawthorne Street, Crys-
tal River, at 5:11 p.m. June 18
on an Alachua County war-
rant for violation of probation
on an original felony charge of
robbery/home invasion with a
firearm. No bond.
Colton Smith, 20, of
East Mercury Street, Inver-
ness, at 5:29 p.m. June 18 on


a misdemeanor charge of
possession of less than
20 grams of cannabis. Bond
$500.
Robb Michaux, 43, of
South Monroe Street, Beverly
Hills, at 5:40 p.m. June 18 on
a felony charge of grand theft.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, he is accused of taking
multiple items with a total
value of more than $300 from
Walmart in Lecanto. Bond
$1,000.
Amanda Huebsch, 26,
of East George Street, Inver-
ness, at 8:21 p.m. June 18 on
a Citrus County warrant for vi-
olation of probation on an
original felony charge of
grand theft. No bond.
Karen Adams, 51, of
South Ridge Point, Ho-
mosassa, at 12:50 p.m. June
19 on a felony charge of
grand theft. According to her
arrest affidavit, she is accused
of taking money from a busi-
ness where she worked on
South Florida Avenue in Floral
City. Bond $2,000.
Elijah Franklin, 41, of
East Scotty Street, Inverness,
at 12:52 p.m. June 19 on a
felony charge of possession
off a controlled substance
(cannabis) with intent to sell.
Bond $5,000.
Travis Burkett, 31, at
3:55 p.m. June 19 on Citrus
County warrants for violation
of probation on an original
felony charge of possession
of a controlled substance
without a prescription and vio-
lation of probation on an origi-
nal misdemeanor charge of
driving while license sus-
pended and failure to appear
in court for an original misde-
meanor charge of driving
while license suspended. No
bond.
Pattie Brown, 55, of
South Falstaff Point, Lecanto,
at 4:01 p.m. June 19 on a
felony charge of grand theft.
According to her arrest affi-
davit, she is accused of steal-
ing money from Beall's Outlet
in Inverness, where she
worked. Bond $2,000.
Heidi Prive, 38, of North
Rose Bay Path, Beverly Hills,
at 8:05 p.m. June 19 on a
misdemeanor charge of disor-


derly intoxication. Bond $150.
Kristen St. Clare, 30, of
East Sioux Canal Drive, Her-
nando, at 9:06 p.m. June 19
on felony charge of grand
theft with a firearm, grand
theft and burglary (becomes
armed). According to her ar-
rest affidavit, she is accused
of burglarizing a home on
North Rio Robel Point in Her-
nando and taking items in-
cluding a firearm. She is also
accused of stealing an alu-
minum boat. She was re-
leased on her own
recognizance.
Dillon Hutchinson, 19,


of South Highlands Avenue,
Inverness, at 8:32 p.m. June
19 on a misdemeanor charge
of petit theft. Bond $250.
Michael Strickland 28,
at 1:06 a.m. June 18 on Citrus
County warrants for violation
of probation on original felony
charges of possession of a
controlled substance without
a prescription and tampering
with evidence. No bond.
Daniel Drawdy, 56, of
East Bow N. Arrow Loop, In-
verness, at 8:04 a.m. June 18
on a Citrus County warrant for
violation of probation on an
original felony charge of gross


fraud or cheat. No bond.
Courtney Taylor, 22, of
WestAbers Court, Crystal
River, at 9:01 a.m. June 18 on
felony charges of planning,
managing, supervising or traf-
ficking in stolen property and
giving false verification of
ownership/false identification
to a pawnbroker. According to
her arrest affidavit, she is ac-
cused of pawning a stolen
ring. Bond $12,000.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was


reported at 6:50 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 27, in the 4200
block of N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, Hernando.
A residential burglary
was reported at 6:59 p.m.
June 27 in the 8200 block of
W. River Glade Court, Crystal
River.
A residential burglary
was reported at 1:53 a.m. Fri-
day, June 28, in the 1200
block of N. Fan Palm Point,
Crystal River.
A vehicle burglary was
reported at 2:30 a.m. June 28
in the 200 block of S.E. 16th
Terrace, Crystal River.


OPEN

HOUSE

Saturday & Sunday
June 29th & 30th 11 am 3 pm
Pointe Vista Carriage Homes
at the Villages of Citrus Hills

Elegant, Resort-Style Living
Gourmet-style kitchen and granite countertops
Screened and open lanai areas to enjoy a
breathtaking sunset, cocktails or romantic dinner
Magnificent water and golf views
Deluxe, spa-like master bathroom suites
Open concept with expansive rooms
World-class amenities at your doorstep


,)D ii "u "so ~7 s

2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd, Citrus Hills, FL
352-746-6121 www.citrushills.com


Stop by our Welcome Center a( the
Terra Vista entrance to receive your map.
GPS: 2400 N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Citrus Hills, FL


Goal


Healthier


Is A




You


New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome
Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


H. Khan, M.D.
Board Certified Family Medicine


B.K. Patel, M.D.
Internal Medicine


Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, P.A. Joseph Starnes, P.A.



Geriatrics

Family & General Medicine

Internal Medicine

Intensive Care (Hospital)

Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)

Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals





Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


Our


000FBOT


MMEMEM


mmmmmi


A2 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


LOCAL






Page A3- SATURDAY, JUNE 29,2013



TATEI3& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Zumba for the Key
slated July 14
Zumba for the Key is
scheduled for Sunday, July
14, beginning at 2 p.m. with
registration starting at
1:15 p.m. at the Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center,
5521 Buster Whitton Way,
Lecanto.
Led by Marilynne Deni-
son, a certified Zumba in-
structor, along with other
local instructors, the two-
hour workout session will
consist of dancing routines
to a variety of international
beats. The event will also
include light refreshments
and prizes.
The afternoon party will
cost $10, which is payable
at the door or by the pur-
chase of advance tickets
sold at county Zumba
classes. All proceeds will
benefit the Key Training
Center Run for the Money
fundraising to provide
scholarships to nearly 60
developmentally disabled
adults, enabling them to re-
ceive a broad scope of es-
sential year-round services.
For information, call 352-
795-5541, ext. 311.
Book signing
scheduled today
Children's author Kyrja,
who pens "Rupert's Tales,"
will be signing books, host-
ing story
time and
sing-
alongs
and pro-
viding
give-
aways at
2 p.m.
today at Kyrja
Practical author
Magick at to sign books
Howard's today.
Flea Mar-
ket on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa.
In "Rupert's Tales,"
Rupert the rabbit learns
about the Wheel of the Year
when he meets people in
the forest celebrating vari-
ous holidays.
Youth Leadership
deadline looms
Leadership Citrus, in
partnership with the YMCA,
is introducing a Youth Lead-
ership Program for students
entering their junior year of
high school in the 2013-14
school year. This program
is the youth version of the
Leadership Citrus Program.
Registration for this pro-
gram has been extended to
June 30. A limited number
of students will be selected
and those interested are
encouraged to apply soon.
For information, go to
http://ymcasuncoast.org/
locations/citrus-county-
branch and scroll to the bot-
tom of the page.
Gill to discuss
changes in laws
Supervisor of Elections
Susan Gill will be the guest
speaker at the next League
of Women Voters of Citrus
County
meeting, -
at 10:15
a.m.
Tuesday, t
July 9, at
Central
Ridge Li-
brary in
Beverly Susan Gill
Hills. She Citrus County
ill supervisor of
will dis- elections.
cuss
changing
voter laws and answer
questions.
Gill has served on the
Florida Help America Vote
Act (HAVA) Planning Com-
mittee and was instrumen-
tal in the Vote by Mail/
Absentee Ballot Election
Management Guidelines.
She has been supervisor of


elections since 1996.
All interested men and
women are invited to at-
tend. The LWV of CC is a
nonpartisan, educational or-
ganization. For information,
call 352-745-0655.
-From staff reports


WalkerFest plans ticket refunds


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

The organizer of the failed Pat
Benatar concert said Friday he
isn't sure a makeup date is an op-
tion and he will begin issuing re-
funds to ticketholders.
Dr. Dennis Walker said in an
email to the Chronicle that the lo-
gistics of setting up a second
WalkerFest seem enormous, con-
sidering the negative publicity
surrounding Benatar's decision to
leave after receiving payment.
"I have concerns about atten-
dance," he said. "There are peo-
ple who came from out of town
and even out of state to see this
show. I'm not sure they will come
back. Also, there may be some an-
imosity toward the artist for


taking the money and not
performing."
Walker, an Inverness cardiolo-
gist, organized WalkerFest as a
fundraiser for United Way of Cit-
rus County, Habitat for Humanity
and the Wounded Warriors.
He said he hopes to have the
walkerfest.org website updated
soon with ticket refund
information.
About 1,000 tickets were sold for
the June 21 concert at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds. Walker had
moved the concert site from the
Citrus County Speedway to the
fairgrounds' covered livestock
pavilion to guard against rain.
Benatar's crew arrived Friday
morning and said the stage wasn't
safe. Despite several modifica-
tions and an engineer certifying


the stage's safety by late after-
noon, Benatar's tour buses rolled
away after her tour manager re-
ceived a check from the concert
producer, Deborah Nader of
Clearwater.
Walker's attorney, Bill Grant,
said earlier this week both Be-
natar and Nader are to blame for
the cancellation. Grant said he
was working with Benatar's rep-
resentatives on rescheduling the
concert.
Walker said he hasn't spoken
with Grant since earlier in the
week. Walker said he would delay
an announcement on whether to
reschedule the concert or not
until after he speaks with Grant.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


Special to the Chronicle
Pat Benatar and husband Nell
Giraldo are shown in an undated
photo from their website. The
organizer of the canceled June 21
concert in Citrus County said he
will issue refunds to ticketholders.


--. .. --.
..- -, -- .....7

MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Citrus County Transit Center, at 1300 S. Lecanto Highway, will open Wednesday, a little more than a
year after groundbreaking.


was allocated for the
transit center's recon-
struction, rather than
refurbishment of the
old one.
The county's match
for the grant is $223,498,
but about $166,000 al-
ready was budgeted for
a proposed refurbish-
ment and another
$46,800 spent on as-
bestos abatement was
allowed to be included
as part of the county
match.
Sometime in the fu-
ture, the county is ex-
pected to be part of a
system of public trans-


portation stretching
from Citrus to Tampa
Bay The 9,000-square-
foot transit center
would be a hub of the
system.
County buses will
enter at a roofed area of
the new building, where
people will be able to
get in and out of the
buses comfortably when
it is raining.
Inside, the building
will offer a large recep-
tion area and waiting
room. It will have a con-
ference area and meet-
ing room, complete with
bathrooms and offices.


The facility will contain
everything related to
transportation at one
site to centralize the
service.
Citrus County Transit
has a door-to-door
reservation-based para-
transit bus service and
the Orange Line, a devi-
ated fixed-route bus sys-
tem, available to all
county residents.
Times for the reserva-
tion-based para-transit
door-to-door service are
from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
and are separate from
the Orange Line devi-
ated fixed-route bus


times. The Orange Line
buses run from 6 a.m. to
7 p.m. Monday through
Friday excluding major
holidays.
To download sched-
ules and maps, go to
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Go to "Departments,"
then "Community Serv-
ice" and click on
"Transportation." Ques-
tions can be emailed to
transit@citruscountyfl.
org, or call 352-527-7630.
Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer can be
reached at cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn
or 352-564-2916.


Federal grant funds


youth training program


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

Workforce Connection, which pro-
vides employment services to Cit-
rus, Levy and Marion counties, has
been awarded a $1.08 million grant
to support academic and occupa-
tional skill training for at-risk
youths.
The U.S. Department of Labor an-
nounced its Youth Build grant
awards Friday, totaling nearly
$72 million.
The grants range from approxi-
mately $600,000 to $1.1 million each
and will fund 68 Youth Build pro-
grams in 33 states. The programs
will help nearly 4,600 young people
obtain the certifications and skills
necessary to achieve economic
self-sufficiency
WorkNet Pinellas in Clearwater,
which was awarded $1.1 million, was
the other Florida project to receive a
grant in this round of funding.
The Workforce Connection grant
will help fund up to four additional
Phoenix Rising Youth Build projects
in Ocala.
Phoenix Rising, spearheaded by
the Ocala Police Department, in-
volves Habitat for Humanity of Mar-
ion County, the city of Ocala,
Workforce Connection and other
community partners.
More than 50 older youths have
been served through Phoenix Rising
to date and the grant will assist an
additional 72 youths, said Kathleen
Woodring, Workforce Connection's


chief operating officer, who worked
on the grant
The grant application was sup-
ported by U.S. Reps. Rich Nugent,
R-Brooksville, and Ted Yoho,
R-Gainesville.
Woodring said more than 90 per-
cent of program graduates have ob-
tained employment, enrolled in
postsecondary programs or enlisted
in the military
"The goal of the Phoenix Rising
partnership is to revitalize an eco-
nomically challenged area of Ocala
while making a difference in the
lives of area youth," Woodring said.
"Workforce Connection supports the
program by funding employment and
classroom training components."
The remainder of Phoenix Ris-
ing's 16-week program is spent
working in partnership with Habitat
for Humanity building affordable
homes for deserving families in
West Ocala.
Phoenix Rising Youth Build has
become a national model. It has
earned recognition from the Florida
League of Cities, National League of
Cities and Harvard's School of Busi-
ness, and last month it received
Habitat for Humanity Interna-
tional's highest honor, the Clarence
E. Jordan Award for creativity and
innovation in building homes and
communities.
The fifth Phoenix Rising project
is set to begin in the fall.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

LECANTO
P public trans-
portation's new
hub is set to
open this com-
ing week.
The replacement
building for the Citrus
County Transit Center
at 1300 S. Lecanto
Highway will open
Wednesday, a little
more than a year after
groundbreaking.
While digging in a
shovel last year at the
site in front of the Cit-
rus County Mainte-
nance Complex,
Commissioner J.J. Ken-
ney said the transit cen-
ter would be a "one-stop
shop for everything
transportation."
Kenney continued:
"This is the perfect ex-
ample of county and
state governments
working together for
the betterment of our
citizens."
The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
(FDOT) funded the new
building through Sec-
tion 5311 grant money
FDOT's $2.338 million


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

INVERNESS Florida's
Teacher of the Year finalist
Nancy Smith shines not only at
Citrus High School but state-
wide in Gov Rick Scott's eyes.
Smith was one of 23
2013-14 District Teach-
ers of the Year ap-
plauded by Scott for
their commitment to
education. For her
commitment, she has
earned the Governor's
Shine Award.
"In acknowledging Na
great teachers, I have Sm
created the Governor's Citrus
Shine Award to high- Scl
light teachers who go edu(
above and beyond the
call of duty in pursuit of edu-
cational excellence," Scott
said in a news release. "I am
proud to present this distin-
guished award to our 2013-14
District Teachers of the Year."
Scott said he believes edu-
cation and commitment from
educators influence the future
workforce.
"Our students should have
access to a high-quality educa-
tion, and Florida's commit-
ment to our teachers plays a
critical role in preparing the
workforce of tomorrow."
Smith has been an educator
for 34 years. She instructs
English for grades 11 and 12 at


CHS. She primarily teaches
Advanced Placement students,
preparing them for college;
however, she also works with
at-risk students, assisting them
daily with graduation
requirements.
"She consistently encour-
ages her students aca-
demically and
personally and works
with her students to
S, help them achieve suc-
cess," Scott said.
7 Receiving the award
Thursday at the Capi-
tol in Tallahassee was
ncy not an opportunity for
ith Smith to relax. In-
High stead, she taught
1ool "We had a round-
;ator. table discussion with
the governor and com-
missioner (of education),"
Smith recalled. "You really
could hear their dedication to
Florida and the educational
system. I had to give a presen-
tation and I taught for a few
minutes at the summit. It was
edifying to listen and hear what
was going on in the state. But
my teaching was my seven min-
utes of fun. It reminded me of
how much I love kids and was
my fuel and reaffirmation for
what I love to do."
The winner of the 2014
Macy's/Florida Department of
Education Teacher of the Year
award will be announced
July 11.


Citrus central station


New transit

center to

open

Wednesday


CHS teacher shines


in governor's eyes


1i
s
h
c




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday In the year ahead, you are
likely to have wonderful opportunities
to assert yourself. Don't stand timidly
on the sidelines.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) You
should be able to weather any financial
problems if you're able to manage your
resources prudently. Take care not to
buy anything you don't need.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -You're in-
clined to be too assertive in your de-
mands, so it's important to use
moderation in your tactics.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Organize
your time by delegating certain assign-
ments that you're unable to handle on
your own. The more efficient the assis-
tance you can get, the better.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You're
likely to fare better doing business with
strangers than you will with your regu-
lar sources. Broaden your horizons.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Manage
things effectively, or you could end up
losing ground. When you make gains,
consolidate your accomplishments.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) It
would smart to walk away from poten-
tial complications that could quickly be-
come insurmountable. Solutions are
likely to be found through those who
oppose you.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Be
protective of your position, especially
when it comes to an important joint en-
deavor. If there is any trouble, it could
be every person for him- or herself.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) To ne-
gotiate an effective agreement, there
must be parity between parties. It won't
stand the test of time if it's a good deal
for you but not for anyone else.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't
delegate important tasks to someone
who might not be able to perform up to
your expectations. Take the long view,
and do things right.
Aries (March 21-April 19) In hopes
of making a good impression, you
could be more generous than you
should be. It's foolish to think you can
buy your way to popularity.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Domestic
issues could be much heavier than
you're prepared to handle. Even if you
do more than is expected, you're not
likely to satisfy everyone.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's best
that you don't discuss your plans be-
fore you have a chance to implement
them. If you can't live up to your claims,
you'll end up feeling like a failure.


!HI L
!89 75


YESTERDAY'S
)PR I HI LO
0 30 92 74 Ir


Mick Jagger as
a schoolteacher?
LONDON Mick Jagger
thinks his original career plan
to become a school teacher
might have provided plenty of
satisfaction.
The Rolling Stones frontman
told BBC
Radio Friday
his music ca-
reer has not
been challeng-
ing intellectu-
ally and teach-
ing might have
been "gratify-
JaggerMik ing" instead.
He also said
he had considered becoming a
politician or a journalist when he
was a teen.
Instead, he has become one
of the most successful rock
singers in history. And despite
his interest in other careers, Jag-
ger said he's "very pleased" with
how things turned out.
The band is marking its 50th
year together with a series of
concerts that includes a first-
ever appearance at the Glaston-
bury festival this weekend and a
return in July to Hyde Park in
central London.
Plans announced for
'Terminator' trilogy
LOS ANGELES The "Ter-
minator" is coming back. Para-
mount announced Thursday it is
rebooting the "Terminator" fran-
chise and planning a new trilogy
of films, but it's keeping mum on
whether Arnold Schwarzeneg-
ger would play a role.
Schwarzenegger starred as
the title character in the original
1984 movie. It spawned a trilogy
that earned more than $1 billion
at the box office worldwide.
Paramount says it will release
the new 'Terminator" in July 2015.


WEATHER
PRI | HIm LO PR
race 189 74 NA


Associated Press
A man dressed as Superman watches Dizzee Rascal perform
on the Pyramid main stage Friday at the Glastonbury music
festival near Pilton, Somerset, England. Thousands of music
fans arrived for the festival to see headliners such as Arctic
Monkeys, Mumford and Sons and the Rolling Stones.


Cole releases Sears, Penney sever
first Spanish album ties with Paula Deen


SANTA MONICA, Calif. It's
been four years since Natalie
Cole received a kidney from a
Salvadorian
donor, and the
singer said it
not only con-
nected her to
Hispanic cul-
ture, it has
given her the
Natalie strength to
Cole record her first
post-operation
album totally in Spanish.
"I don't believe in coinci-
dences. I believe everything
happens for a reason. That this
was a Latin family, I feel like I'm
part Latino now," Cole said re-
cently during a private listening
session of "Natalie Cole En Es-
panol," released this week.
Cole's donor was a young
woman from El Salvador who
died while giving birth to a baby
boy, Cole said.


NEW YORK Sears Hold-
ings Corp and J.C. Penney Co.
said Friday they're cutting ties
with Paula Deen, adding to the
list of companies severing their
relationship following revelations
that the Southern celebrity chef
used racial slurs in the past.
QVC took a more gentle ap-
proach on Friday and announced
that it was "taking a pause" from
Deen. The home shopping net-
work said Deen won't be appear-
ing on any upcoming broadcasts
and it will phase out her product
assortment on its online sales
channels.
"We all think it's important, at
this moment, for Paula, to con-
centrate on responding to the al-
legations against her and her
path forward," said Mike George,
QVC's president and CEO, in a
letter posted on QVC's website.
However, the company left the
door open for Deen to return.
-From wire reports


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch
R. Lauderdale
Fort Myers

Homestead

U,, West
Lakeland
'.1s~l~ll wll !l


F'cast
Is
ts
Is
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala

Pensacola
Sarasata
r ]. l i .... .
Tampa
.. .. Beach
W Palm Bch.


Fcast
is
ts
ts
Is
ts
is
ts
Is
Is


MARINE OUTLOOK


'.,.,i .. :.r winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feel t., and inland
waters will have a moderate chop
Tiiimi ,.'-;:i ir- today


HI LO PR HI LO PR
94 77 liace NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK ",
1 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
., High: 88 Low: 74
... '" P,|;, cloudy: 60% chance of
_ showers and storms
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 75
.... -' ".iiir. cloudy 70% chance of showers and
_....... .'__ storrs,
i MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 75
... .l cloudy: oft and on showers and storms.

ALMANAC
TEMPERATURE* DEW POINT
F y 89 FiJa3 ai 3 () m 75
Record 100/62
Normal 9271 HUMIDITY
Mean temp 81 Friday at 3 p.m 62%
Departure fromi mean f0 POLLEN COUNT**
PRECIPITATION* Today's active pollen:
S he month 12 70 Ragweed, grasses, palm
Total for the ya 1880 i Today's count: 2.6/12
Normal 11r the e-a- 22-92 mi
*Ar. I U:r mlh kwe I Sunday's count: 3.8
UV INDEX: 11 Monday's count: 3.9
0-2 minimal 3-4 low, 5-6 mo1derale,
7-q hriqh Io i ,: i, AIR QUALITY
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday was good with pollutants
.iat 3 p m 2991 i. mainly ozone
SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
I I 'r-I l j '| Tt .,. .J|!
629 SATURDAY 1154 5 42 6.05
6(30 SUNDAY 1217 6 30 1241 6&53


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O SUNSET TONIGHT
i y q) O SUNRISE TOMORROW
MOONRISE TODAY
ME3 .J8 JYIS5 J122 MONSIT TODAY


PM

234 A ~A


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There Is no burn ban.
Foi maro infrirmnitor cat! F lorda Division of Foi str, ao !3f52 4 754 777 FCa more
inIDr a tn on droug? eOitl pje vsaI Iih pwon o' FM c . '- Web s1e

WATERING RULES
.,.-. .', ,,. ,,--,:,. *' ,, 1, i* r week, before 10 am or atet 4 pm1 as follows
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday andc'o Sunday
ODD addresses may, waler on Wednesday andor Saturday.
Hand waren~ig with a shuol1 .._.-. .i.. ... ... .... i non-grass areas such as
vegetable galrdns. owers and shrubs canrl be done on any day adn at any time
:,.. .1 ,1,W Ut~ies' customers should CALL BEFORE YOJ INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. -- ,.. ',* ..... ,,-.- ,r ,. fo add onal

T7 ,' ,.,,-i,-.- please cal: Cty o Invemess @ 352-726-2321, Cityof
-,:-, ,-,..- 352.795-4216ext 313. unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669


TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "Al Kings Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
C0."t! RJvR' 9 B A357 94 4 '4:W p
Withtaro xh'" 720 M 45 731 p;2 28 p
Homriosis "" 10 22 l'5 301 I033 n:';, pp


""At Masons Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
'1 9a4! a 1102 5 p
8 06 f2:29 a r;4 (I'3 38 p
'1 0a6; l! 1.5l ft'7.27 p


Gulf water
temperature


88
Taken a Al peks


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28-34 2 '-.40 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 37.02 37 04 ;" :
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 37 59 37 61 3
Tsala n .i., Ft;,! fit': 38.92 38 97 12 40


THE NATION


I-.



I 'C
n"o


City
A ubse
A Jy ~v -

A~
Au'tli





~ s
G9 i- ii iW



tr


M'n
LI I

B i~io
C'iliilslon Wi
ClarlcDi


[lhli,f~tii SC
Cirncoiil )'

tEs Moinei

E Hal l
HtirnsI sg
K~rttm nph
JacLkson
I.M "egB
Los Aniielea

MaIiiha lie
Mil;aake8
Mutiile
M0s rrIgi3o


.r.'l. o05 U... p. L ,.
0

1.n. it
9 0 *
=

l


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


U~
~ ~4
'4
~ 7?
~,,
94
~ [10
'4
.1 h
B
~ ~ ,q
~ 73 14

~


y~
36


1 '(a
4,


~I3 '8
15S6
j
~


i~
"4 ~


-'$1 ~

~f ~A
.4
~u
ThI
'i ti4


~i~d b~

b ~


~
~& 2
Th ~:
H4


~
I~1 7~
'~ iJ<'
Ii
1)
~

~
31
~1 b~
~


KEY TO CODmTIONS: c=cloudy; dr-dri4e;
Maint h-hazyl pc-parlEy cloudy; r-rani
rsura-isnow mix; sa-unny; sh=showers;
sn=snow: tsthunderstorms; w=winy.
@2013 Woathe Contral, LRP Madison, WLi


" "" ,



FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
No 01<
N Yor f

1 .an
Nair oik

Oi, itr



F i!e.I
NF ro
nina
Pare Spnrnti.


Puil andj Oie
Prnv^^nce. R i

a r3!lter~h
R',i
Rceft ir Nli



S- A't
Sank AJil
S.,ii I.-g
nhmyr i


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


t;- 93 ;26
*3 87 7(1
15i 86 T.4
M- 79 5?
s 120 B&
S 118 92
S r6 61
"i 75 6i3
s 87 63
t 82 67
s. 92 71
(:< 85 6W
s 101 68
c, 104 7f|
1 7B 62
I>r 7 52
l I
nx; 11)1 7[4
s 35 ?ae

8 -8
;c gg 741
s 81 61l
(t 91 6.'
1> 77 60
I: 83 6(1
(s r 7,


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
HaG 2 N .aaie-i cal!
LOW- Smle,, Hh
WORLD CITIES
SATURDAY ismoi 89'7? S
CITY H/ILSKY Lonro 7, 53(
Acapuito M77.'ts Marind 92'f2,s
Amsterdamn 6355pc Me ico. C 2; 52 ;s
AtHens 906 7s Montreal '4 59 tls
Beiin 90"73U Moscow 9/67Tpt
SImlln 7a47/s'a Piris 70454 pC
Beinma 8t75' Ro 79'A ,s
Caio 97 67,s Rome 18.65 's
CJgar; 'S ts Sydnay 59:521sh
Havanra 85f74s Toky y &.'66SAh
lHongKong 870e OiS Toou 7 3 '59 ts
J.lesaieni 84,64.s Ws'sw 76'55 pc


ENTERTAINMENT


BOCC Commission.....................B2

Notice to

Creditors/Administration........CCl


Surplus Property.........................C11


C I T R U S C 0 U NTY


CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney ............................ .................. Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2 94 6
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................ ................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
I' Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, June 29, the
180th day of 2013. There are 185
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 29, 1613, London's orig-
inal Globe Theatre, where many of
Shakespeare's plays were per-
formed, was destroyed by a fire
sparked by a cannon shot during a
performance of "Henry VIII." (No fa-
talities were reported.)
On this date:
In 1993, Joel Rifkin pleaded not
guilty at an arraignment in Mineola,
N.Y., to one count of murder, a day
after police found a woman's body
in his pickup truck. (Rifkin, who has
confessed to killing 17 women, is
serving multiple life sentences for
nine murders.)
Ten years ago: Thirteen people
were killed and dozens injured,
when a third-floor apartment build-
ing porch crowded with guests col-
lapsed onto porches below during a
party in Chicago. Actress Katharine
Hepburn, one of the last stars from
Hollywood's Golden Age, died in
Old Saybrook, Conn., at age 96.
Five years ago: Zimbabwe's
longtime ruler Robert Mugabe was
sworn in as president for a sixth
term after a widely discredited runoff
in which he was the only candidate.
One year ago: Aday after the
House voted to find Attorney Gen-
eral Eric Holder in contempt of Con-
gress, the Justice Department said
Holder's decision to withhold infor-
mation about a bungled gun-track-
ing operation from Congress did not
constitute a crime, and that he
would not be prosecuted.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Gary
Busey is 69. Comedian Richard
Lewis is 66. Rock singer Colin Hay
(Men At Work) is 60. Actress Maria
Conchita Alonso is 56. Actress
Sharon Lawrence is 52. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Stedman Pearson
(Five Star) is 49. Singer Nicole
Scherzinger is 35.
Thought for Today: "Wouldn't it
be great if people could get to live
suddenly as often as they die sud-
denly?" Katharine Hepburn
(1907-2003).


LEGAL NOTICES


A4 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


I


Ls


!w -


a9 6 t"




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets


Interestrates


U"


The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
rose to 2.49
percent Friday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MO AGO 3.25 .13
1 YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
The price of
gold rose for
the first time in
a week,
providing at
least a
temporary
respite from its
27 percent
tumble so far in
2013. Prices for
crude oil and
natural gas fell.


OE

EDs


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.05 -0.02 .07
6-month T-bill .09 0.10 -0.01 .15
52-wk T-bill .14 0.15 -0.01 .20
2-year T-note .36 0.36 .. .30
5-year T-note 1.40 1.39 +0.01 .69
10-year T-note 2.49 2.47 +0.02 1.58
30-year T-bond 3.50 3.54 -0.04 2.68


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.26 3.28 -0.02 2.38
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.73 4.77 -0.04 4.38
Barclays USAggregate 2.36 2.43 -0.07 1.96
Barclays US High Yield 6.73 6.87 -0.14 7.50
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.38 4.43 -0.05 3.59
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.55 1.56 -0.01 .94
Barclays US Corp 3.36 3.42 -0.06 3.28


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 96.56
Ethanol (gal) 2.48
Heating Oil (gal) 2.88
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.57
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.75
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1223.80
Silver (oz) 19.45
Platinum (oz) 1336.90
Copper (Ib) 3.05
Palladium (oz) 659.20
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.18
Coffee (Ib) 1.20
Corn (bu) 6.79
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 297.60
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.30
Soybeans (bu) 15.65
Wheat (bu) 6.49


PVS.
97.05
2.48
2.89
3.58
2.74
PVS.
1201.20
18.53
1325.10
3.05
639.85
PVS.
1.21
1.22
6.67
0.83
302.60
1.28
15.49
6.64


%CHG %YTD
-0.50 +5.2
+0.97 +13.1
-0.33 -5.4
-0.47 +6.4
+0.34 -2.1
%CHG %YTD
+1.03 -26.9
+4.95 -35.5
+0.88 -13.1
-0.07 -16.2
+1.57 -6.2
%CHG %YTD
-2.48 -9.1
-1.32 -16.6
+1.80 -2.7
-0.51 +10.1
-1.65 -20.4
+1.76 +11.9
+1.03 +10.3
-2.26 -16.7


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.08 -.04 +9.2 +17.9 +13.7 +7.6
CaplncBuA m 54.48 -.07 +5.1 +12.8 +11.0 +3.8
CpWIdGrIA m 39.35 -.04 +7.3 +23.0 +11.7 +3.0
EurPacGrA m 42.04 +.20 +2.0 +19.6 +7.6 +1.2
FnlnvA m 45.64 -.12 +12.5 +26.1 +15.3 +5.1
GrthAmA m 38.46 -.03 +12.0 +26.2 +14.6 +4.9
IncAmerA m 19.05 -.05 +7.3 +15.7 +12.9 +6.8
InvCoAmA m 33.65 -.08 +12.5 +22.8 +14.4 +5.9
NewPerspA m 33.73 -.03 +7.9 +23.3 +12.9 +5.0
WAMutlnvA m 35.45 -.12 +14.7 +23.4 +17.5 +7.3
Dodge & Cox Income 13.46 ... -1.5 +2.1 +4.7 +6.6
IntlStk 36.46 ... +5.3 +26.9 +9.4 +1.5
Stock 142.18 ... +17.7 +34.4 +17.4 +6.7
Fidelity Contra 85.64 -.26 +11.4 +19.6 +15.1 +6.0
GrowCo 105.07 -.37 +12.7 +21.7 +18.0 +7.4
LowPriStk d 45.54 +.02 +15.3 +30.4 +17.6 +9.7
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 57.18 -.24 +13.8 +23.5 +16.8 +7.0
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.27 ... +4.3 +13.2 +10.8 +6.5
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 12.95 +.05 -1.9 +8.8 +6.2 +9.2
GIBondAdv 12.91 +.05 -1.7 +9.1 +6.4 +9.5
Harbor Intllnstl 62.35 -.27 +0.4 +18.6 +9.4 +0.8
PIMCO TotRetA m 10.76 ... -3.2 +0.7 +4.3 +6.8
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 29.92 -.12 +14.1 +26.7 +15.9 +7.4
GrowStk 41.99 -.17 +11.1 +19.8 +16.5 +7.1
Vanguard 500Adml 148.05 -.63 +13.8 +23.6 +16.8 +7.1
5001nv 148.06 -.63 +13.7 +23.4 +16.7 +6.9
MulntAdml 13.81 ... -2.5 +0.2 +4.1 +4.9
STGradeAd 10.66 ... -0.5 +1.8 +2.8 +3.8
Tgtet2025 14.40 -.02 +6.0 +15.3 +11.2 +5.3
TotBdAdml 10.67 +.01 -2.5 -1.0 +3.5 +5.1
Totlntl 14.68 +.01 -0.5 +17.7 +6.9 -0.8
TotStlAdm 40.31 -.15 +14.1 +24.6 +17.1 +7.5
TotStldx 40.29 -.16 +14.0 +24.4 +16.9 +7.3
Welltn 36.33 -.08 +8.7 +16.7 +12.6 +7.3
WelltnAdm 62.74 -.14 +8.7 +16.9 +12.7 +7.4
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


1,680 ................. S&P 500......... Dow Jones industrials
,:,,0 Close: 1,606.28 14,-, Close: 14,909.60
Change: -6.92 (-0.4%) Change: -114.89 (-0.8%)
1,560 10 DAYS ......... 14,520 ........10 DAYS.........
1 ,6 8 0 ............ .......... .. ............ ................ ......... ............ 1 6 ,0 0 0 ............. ........... ............ ............. ... .......... ............
1,680 16,00 ...................... .....



1,52 0 ... .. ......... .. ..... ...... ..... ........... .. 1 4 00oo ... .. ....... ......... ...

1,440 ................... 6

1,36 0 ; ...... ........... ..... 12 ,8 0 0 ...... ........... ........... ........ ..........


StocksRecap

NYSE I
Vol. (in mil.) 4,371
Pvs. Volume 3,283
Advanced 1551
Declined 1495
New Highs 95
New Lows 23


NASD
2,471
1,634
1317
1177
144
35


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15034.63
6221.41
488.11
9160.57
3422.20
1615.94
1166.70
17086.42
982.44


LOW
14884.80
6170.86
480.75
9080.70
3382.75
1601.06
1155.55
16932.14
974.72


CLOSE
14909.60
6173.86
485.90
9112.69
3403.25
1606.28
1160.82
16992.14
977.48


CHG.
-114.89
-26.01
+3.01
-30.87
+1.39
-6.92
-1.84
-55.70
-2.44


%CHG.
-0.76%
-0.42%
+0.62%
-0.34%
+0.04%
-0.43%
-0.16%
-0.33%
-0.25%


YTD
+13.78%
+16.34%
+7.24%
+7.93%
+12.71%
+12.63%
+13.76%
+13.32%
+15.09%


Stocks
The Standard & Poor's 500 fell
Friday for the first time in four
days, capping a turbulent first
half of the year for stocks. The
index rose 13 percent in the first
six months of 2013, a bigger rise
than it has recorded in four of the
last six full years.


Nike NKE
Close:$63.68A1.36 or 2.2%
The athletic shoe and clothing com-
pany reported fourth-quarter results
that topped Wall Street's expecta-
tions.





52-week range
$42.55 $66.07
Vol.:13.4m (3.6x avg.) PE:25.5
Mkt. Cap:$45.57 b Yield: 1.3%
AZZ AZZ
Close:$38.56V-4.54 or -10.5%
The electrical equipment maker said
that its fiscal first-quarter fell 9 per-
cent and the results fell short of Wall
Street predictions.





52-week range
$28.95 $49.10
Vol.:755.7k (5.0x avg.) PE: 16.3
Mkt. Cap:$982.24 m Yield: 1.5%
Accenture ACN
Close: 71.96V-8.26 or -10.3%
The consulting firm's fiscal third-
quarter net income grew nearly 18
percent, but its outlook fell short of
Wall Street estimates.



''r 1
52-week range
$56.23 $84.23
Vol.:28.3m (8.8x avg.) PE: 45.3
Mkt. Cap:$54.34 b Yield: 2.3%
Molycorp MCP
Close:$6.20A0.59 or 10.5%
The SEC ended a public disclosures
investigation into the rare-earth min-
erals company, recommending no
enforcement action be taken.



4 A M J
52-week range
$4.70 ..... $23.20
Vol.:22.6m (2.8x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$1.17 b Yield:...
Research In Motion BBRY
Close:$10.46V-4.02 or -27.8%
The BlackBerry maker posted a loss
and warned of future losses despite
releasing its make-or-break new
smartphones this year.




J A M J
52-week range
$6.22 $18.32
Vol.:135.8m (5.0x avg.) PE:1.9
Mkt. Cap:$5.48 b Yield:...


Quiet end to bumpy month


Associated Press
Traders Gregory Rowe, left, and Mark Muller, center, work Friday on the floor of the
New York Stock Exchange at the close of trading. Stocks are ending mostly lower on
Wall Street as the market closes out a turbulent month.


Stock market closes mostly lower


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 6.73 3.04 +.03 +1.0 V V V -33.9 -48.5 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0- 39.00 35.40 -.23 -0.6 A A 7 +5.0 +6.3 27 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 -- 43.98 42.30 +.30 +0.7 A V V +12.6 +28.4 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 69.31 --0 101.86 90.26 +.22 +0.2 A V V +3.3 +25.3 2.21 e
Bank of America BAC 6.90 13.99 12.86 -.15 -1.2 A V A +10.8 +68.0 30 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.55 12.64 11.53 +.22 +1.9 A A V +1.4 +56.0 89
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 0-- 43.43 35.35 +.08 +0.2 A A A -9.6 -2.0 25 2.16
Citigroup C 24.91 53.56 47.97 -.31 -0.6 A V A +21.3 +78.3 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 23.12 +.23 +1.0 A A A +46.0 +30.4 96 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 67.89 63.15 -.57 -0.9 A A A +26.8 +34.7 19 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 -+- 75.46 67.50 -.02 ... A A V +5.8 +2.2 20 3.12f
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 -0- 61.18 50.27 -.25 -0.5 A V V +9.0 +32.7 21 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 79.78 93.67 90.35 +.31 +0.3 A V A +4.4 +11.0 9 2.52f
Ford Motor F 8.82 16.09 15.47 -.18 -1.2 A V A +19.5 +59.2 11 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.29 24.45 23.19 -.13 -0.6 V V A +10.5 +19.5 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 49.77 81.56 77.47 +1.20 +1.6 A V A +25.3 +50.6 25 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --0 26.90 24.23 +.18 +0.7 A V A +17.5 -4.8 12 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 0-- 215.90 191.11 -4.54 -2.3 V V V -0.2 +3.2 13 3.80f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 15.72 0 26.58 25.75 -.45 -1.7 A A A +22.0 +54.3 29
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 --0- 43.84 40.90 -.25 -0.6 A V A +15.1 +53.1 24 0.72f
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 103.70 99.00 -.65 -0.7 A A V +12.2 +16.2 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --0- 35.78 34.54 -.08 -0.2 A V A +29.3 +17.7 18 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 --0 64.72 57.73 -.11 -0.2 A V V +3.7 +24.4 18 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 0 82.65 81.48 +1.06 +1.3 A A A +17.8 +22.4 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 13.55 -- 32.55 17.08 +.09 +0.5 A V A -13.3 -22.3 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0- 21.09 17.88 +.02 +0.1 A V V -0.9 +10.5 39 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 0 9.71 9.53 -.18 -1.9 A A A +33.7 +52.4 11 0.12f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 68.77 42.08 -.69 -1.6 V V V +1.7 -18.7 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 105.18 103.15 +.30 +0.3 A A A +19.6 +42.5 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 3.05 --0- 7.50 7.02 +.04 +0.6 A V A +23.8 +123.0 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 37.36 34.85 ... ... V V V +12.8 +32.0 21 1.12
Time Warner TWX 36.57 --0- 61.73 57.82 ... ... A A +20.9 +55.0 18 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 56.93 -0- 100.07 91.25 -.89 -1.0 V V A +24.5 +46.5 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 --0- 54.31 50.34 -.66 -1.3 A A A +16.3 +21.2 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 --0 30.80 28.75 +.33 +1.1 A V A +14.1 +6.2 1.57e
WalMart Strs WMT 67.06 -0- 79.96 74.49 -.77 -1.0 A V V +9.2 +12.3 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 28.82 -- 51.25 44.20 -.70 -1.6 V V V +19.4 +56.4 20 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd- Loss in last 12 months


is


the Chicago area plunged.
"Investors don't know
what to make of the news,"
said John Toohey, vice
president of stock invest-
ments at USAA Investment
Management. "I wouldn't
be surprised to see more
ups and downs."
The S&P 500 stock index
closed down 6.92 points, or
0.4 percent, to 1,606.28.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 114.89 points,
or 0.8 percent, to 14,909.60.
The Nasdaq composite
index rose 1.38 points, or
0.04 percent, to 3,403.25.
Stocks have jumped
around in June. By con-
trast, the first five months
of the year were mostly
calm, marked by small but
steady gains as investors
bought on news of higher
home prices, record cor-
porate earnings and an im-
proving jobs market.
By May 21, the S&P 500
had climbed to a record
1,669. Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke spoke the next
day, and prices began
gyrating.
Investors have long
known that the central
bank would eventually
pull back from its bond


purchases, which are de-
signed to lower interest
rates and get people to
borrow and spend more.
Last week, Bernanke got
more specific about the
timing. He said the Fed
could start purchasing
fewer bonds later this year,
and stop buying them com-
pletely by the middle of
next year, if the economy
continued to strengthen.
Investors dumped
stocks, but then had sec-
ond thoughts this week as
other Fed officials stressed
that the central bank
wouldn't pull back on its
support soon. The Dow
gained 365 points Tuesday-
Thursday For the month,
the Dow moved up or down
at least 100 points 16 of 20
trading days, the most
since September 2011.
Bonds have also been on
a bumpy ride in recent
weeks, mostly down.
In U.S. economic news
Friday, the University of
Michigan said its index of
consumer sentiment
dipped to 84.1 in June from
84.5 the previous month.
But that was still relatively
high. May's reading was
the highest since July 2007.


Too


Associated Press

NEW YORK Given
the wild trading of late, it
was a calm close to the
month.
After flitting between tiny
gains and losses most of Fri-
day, the stock market closed
mostly lower, a peaceful
end to the most volatile
month in nearly two years.
"It's a dull Friday," said
Gary Flam, a stock man-
ager at Bel Air Investment
Advisors. A bull market, he
added, is "rarely a straight
march up."
The Standard & Poor's
500 index ended its bumpy
ride in June down 1.5 per-
cent, the first monthly loss
since October. Still, the
index had its best first half
of a year since 1998 up
12.6 percent.
Investors still seem un-
sure how to react to recent
statements by Federal Re-
serve officials about when
the central bank might end
its support for the economy
Mixed economic news
added to investors' uncer-
tainty Friday An index of
consumer confidence was
almost unchanged, but a
gauge of business activity in


DON'T LET INSECTS d RODENTS RUIN

YOUR SUIMMIER PLANS.



BUSH HOME SERVICES

Specializes in defending your home against

these invaders.

We have customized service plans

S.,. for every home.


Call



BUS


Ca OME SERV2ICE-S



at 352-621-7700


or see us online at

www^bushhomeservice scom


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 A5





Page A6 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013



PINION


"Rivers are roads which move, and which
carry us whither we desire to go."
Pascal, 1670


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ............. publisher
M ike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
m Charlie Brennan.....................managing editor
Curt Ebitz ............... ............ citizen member
M Mac Harris ............................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..... ..............guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


COMPROMISING TIMES





King's Bay




cleanup




to resume

Mechanical harvesters King's Bay. It is counter pro-
should be back in ductive for the groups to fight
King's Bay very soon with each other because in
removing Lyng- truth, no one has
bya. That good the final answer
news is possible THE ISSUE: on how we can
because the turn around the
groups arguing The cleanup of polluted mess we
about the bay King's Bay. have made.
cleanup issue Let's all admit
have reached a OUR OPINION: cleaning up the
compromise that Through Lyngbya is treat-
was brokered by compromise, we ing the symptoms
the Southwest can find common of the disease.
Florida Water ground. Cleaning up the
Management Lyngbya is ter-
District. rific because it
Lyngbya is the filamentous restores some of the beauty
algae that grows in the bay and public use of the water-
because we have permitted way. But it does not stop the
the ecological balance of the causes of the pollution that
world-famous waterway to helped create an eco-system
get out of whack. that is friendly to Lyngbya.
Art Jones and the Kings To really clean up Crystal
Bay Rotary Club started a River we must restore the
volunteer effort to physically flow of water in the springs;
remove the Lyngbya from the we must divert and treat
bay through the One Rake at stormwater runoff; we must
a Time project. That effort put all homes and businesses
became mechanical when on centralized sewer and
funds were raised to get har- treatment systems and get rid
vesters to pull out the Lyng- of septic tanks; we must
bya in areas that were too greatly reduce the use of fer-
deep for volunteers and their tilizers and pesticides; and
rakes. all sorts of other difficult and
The Save the Manatee Club expensive actions.
objected to the use of the har- But cleaning up the Lyng-
vesters because it feared the bya is a great place to start. It
machines were churning up shows people of all political
the bottom of the bay and could persuasions and financial po-
damage small plants that are sitions that by working to-
consumed by manatees. gether we can make a
The dispute appeared to be difference.
headed for the bureaucracy If the infighting of people
after Pat Rose, the leader of all concerned about the fu-
the Manatee Club, filed an of- ture of the bay can stop -
ficial challenge to One Rake and we can actually accom-
at a Time's permit. plish something the suc-
But Steve Lamb of Save cess will reinvigorate the
Crystal River and Rose momentum to work together
agreed to request the water on the large issues causing
management district play a the pollution.
role in finding a compromise. We can have a clean envi-
The district did the job and ronment and a safe haven for
now it appears both sides can the manatee at the same
live with the compromise. time. By working together so-
The harvesting will hap- lutions to the big problems
pen, but tight oversight and can be identified and
testing will be required to conquered.
make sure damage does not The agreement to get back
happen, to the Lyngbya cleanup is the
There are many groups first good sign that we can
very concerned about the fu- work together and make good
ture of Crystal River and things happen.


Confused by directions
I read in the paper all the time
that North or South Citrus Av-
enue is being worked on for a
facelift and so on, when Citrus
Avenue is actually running east
and west. It runs west
from near the Gulf of
Mexico to eastern Dun- V0
nellon. It is (U.S.) 19
that runs north and
south. So why is that
being said that way? I
would like to know.
Editor's note: Citrus
Avenue does run north
and south. Confusion CAL
arises because just 5 QH
south of the State Road Ut."
44/U.S. 19 intersection
U.S. 19 turns to a short
east/west run. Citrus Avenue


I
1
-0


intersects almost perpendicularly
with U.S. 19 during that
east/west run. U.S. 19 straight-
ens out after the intersection with
Citrus Avenue and continues its
north/south run.
No access for locals
|ND Concerning Three Sis-
J LF ters Springs: I believe the
C Wtaxpayers paid $11 mil-
lion for Three Sisters
Springs, which was taken
over by the federal gov-
ernment because all the
manatee huggers wanted
more protection and now
the federal government
\579 owns Three Sisters
)5 7 Springs. They can do
whatever they want to it,
including having no access to the
local people.


Access to ballot box under assault


It's time for everyone to step toward that goal in the ruling.
away from their respective Dramatic demographic shifts
ledges. necessitate it. New populations
A few days have passed since of voters not fully considered in
the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 1965, such as Hispanics, Asians
on one of the most ef- and increasing num-
fective pieces of civil bers of less mobile
rights legislation elderly are bringing
ever passed: the Vot- new challenges to
ing Rights Act of ._ ensuring access to
1965. the polls.
Some of the knee- The Court's 5-4 rul-
jerk liberal oratory, C ing in Shelby v.
the gnashing of teeth, Holder made irrele-
is completely out of vant a portion of the
step with reality The law initially in-
court's decision does Mary Sanchez tended to halt the
not signal a slippage OTHER horrific abuses of the
to Jim Crow antics VOICES civil rights era.
like poll taxes and Alabama's Shelby
hatred so violent that County challenged a
merely registering a black per- section of the Voting Rights Act
son to vote could lead to that mandated so-called pre-
murder. clearance standards. Most of
Likewise, conservatives the states and some of jurisdic-
would do well to cease gloating tions covered are in the South.
about the landmark ruling that Under Section 5 of the Voting
nullified an important part of Rights Act, they must first re-
the act. After all, it's not like the ceive the federal government's
court found that the nine states permission before redrawing
and portions of six others re- legislative maps, shifting
ceiving extra scrutiny have be- polling places or enacting new
come bastions of free and equal rules on voter identification.
treatment for all voters. These jurisdictions must
In fact, records compiled for prove to the Justice Depart-
Congress the last time it re- ment or a panel of federal
newed the Voting Rights Act in judges that planned changes
2006 reflect many examples of will not have a discriminatory
disparate impacts for voters in effect.
recent years. Problem was, the areas were
Clearly, a black man in the chosen by past abuses. Too far
White House does not mean the in the past, the court decided,
nation has eradicated discrimi- nullifying the formula used to
natory problems in voting, in- determine who is covered.
tentional or not. The court wants Congress to
The problem now is Congress. readdress the formula, using
Congress needs to rewrite the more current voting patterns.
guidelines nullified by the rul- Congress failed to do that the
ing to consider new situations last time the Voting Rights Act
across the United States. was renewed.
Supreme Court Chief Justice The Justice Department can
John Roberts tried to nudge and will still pursue abuses.


They'll be busy
Accessibility to the ballot box
is under assault in America.
Legislatures nationwide are
passing changes to voting laws,
often under the guise of stop-
ping voter fraud.
Repeatedly, politicians push-
ing for the measures cannot
prove fraud exists. Often, they
are mislabeling database errors
as fraud. Problems like two peo-
ple with the same name, inac-
curate data entry of addresses
or birthdays. The glitches need
to be eliminated; new technol-
ogy can be employed.
But the goal should always be
to increase access eligible vot-
ers, not making reaching the
ballot box unnecessarily more
difficult and often placing
that burden on older, poorer
and minority voters.
Here is the thing.
Areas affected by pre-clear-
ance standards could have
been exempted from scrutiny
years ago. All they needed to do
was keep a clean slate, not have
any violations for 10 consecu-
tive years. This process, called
"bailout," is included in the act.
But problems continued.
Most of the jurisdictions never
met that mark.
No, they had to wait until a
conservative-leaning court cut
them some slack.
And now an ineffective Con-
gress will make it that much
more difficult to flag modern-
era abuses.

Mary Sanchez is an opinion-
page columnist for The Kansas
City Star Readers may write to
her at: Kansas City Star, 1729
Grand Blvd., Kansas City, Mo.
64108-1413, or via email at
msanchez@kcstarcom.


LETTERS to the Editor


Time for some cuts
Why can't the Citrus County
School Board members and
upper management in the
school system take a
5 percent pay cut?
I know I'm new to this area
(only five years). However, as a
school board member in a dis-
trict as large as this, we didn't
take pay for being on the
school board. Why can't you
give back some of your pay in
this time of economic troubles?
Now to another point If 60 is
passing, then I think we need
to raise the bar a little higher
In talking with children in the
schools, they tell me all they do
is work toward passing the
standardized tests given at the
schools. Raise the bar to 70
percent. If you can't score at
least 70 or above, you fail the
exam. Maybe if you ask for
more from the students you'll
get more from them.
You're asking the employees
of the school to do more with
less; why not ask the students
to do more and score higher on
the work they do? In the real
world, if you want to get ahead,
you have to do more and put
more into your work to ad-
vance and earn more. It's like a
coach told me years ago: If you
want to succeed, you have to
give 110 percent all the time.
That's called a class A person-
ality and it's what most em-


OPINIONS INV
The opinions expressed
Chronicle editorials ar
opinions of the news
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted i
cartoons, columns or
not necessarily repres
opinion of the editorial
We reserve the right t
letters for length, libel
and good taste.
Letters must be no lo
600 words, and writer
limited to four letters
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: T
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Crystal River, FL 3442
to 352-563-3280, or
letters@chronicleonli

players are looking fo
someone to fill a posit
Ra


Process diffi
There have been ma
ple calling in to the S(
stating that consider
should be given to bri:
new businesses to the
River Mall. I believe I
Sporting Goods was oi
there were others.
People fail to realize
just renting a space ai
ing in your goods. In o
set up a proper and su
business, there is muc


front work necessary, such as a
ilTED study of the area in which your
ed in business is to be located and a
e the research study to determine if
Daper's the product you wish to sell
will serve the area well.
letters do The biggest issue people
ent the overlook is the up-front
al board. money to initiate the process
o edit before you unlock the front
I, fairness door. In many cases, start-up
may require monies in the
nger than five- to six-digit range if it is
s will be a product that is to have a
per long future. How many peo-
rhe Editor, ple reading this can go to
t Blvd., their bank account and with-
'9. Or, fax draw these type of funds?
mail to Therefore, you go to a bank,
ne.com. and if your credit is good,
you start out in debt before
r, not just you make your first sale. Suc-
tion. cess is based on the profit
and loss sheet that business
y Speerly owners live by. If the profit is
Inverness not there, your business has
little chance of succeeding.
cult Years ago, I was attempting
this process and was told by
any peo- the leaders of the Small Busi-
ound Off ness Association that seven out
tion of 10 small businesses fail in
nging in the first three years and peo-
Crystal ple who succeed, put in 12 to
Dick's 18 hours a day to make it a suc-
ne and cess. It is a difficult process
and current economic condi-
e it is not tions make it even more
nd mov- difficult.


irder to
successful
ch up-


Michael J. Maksymicz
Pine Ridge


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Scott signs bills on guns,


bunnies and mullet


Obituaries


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott signed a bill
Friday that will close a
loophole that allowed dan-
gerously mentally ill peo-
ple to admit themselves
for treatment, then quickly
check out and buy a gun.
The legislation was one
of the most significant gun
bills to pass this year's leg-
islative session and was
supported by Democrats,
Republicans and the Na-
tional Rifle Association.
The measure was one of 47
bills Scott signed Friday, in-
cluding bills that will out-
law the dyeing of bunnies
and chicks, give citizens the
right to speak at govern-
ment meetings and repeal a
law concerning mullet.
The gun bill addresses
people who doctors say
pose a danger to them-
selves or others. Their
names will be put into
databases to prevent them



TAX
Continued from Page Al

Duke insists the value is
$1.2 billion a difference
of about $35 million in
taxes that would be di-
vided among the county
commission, school board
and other local agencies.
Greene said the county's
taxable value is $10.2 bil-
lion, a 12.7 percent in-
crease over 2012.
However, the "worst-case
scenario" value, based on



BALFOUR
Continued from Page Al

University and her mas-
ter's degree from the



TOW
Continued from Page Al

contacted several regional
politicians asking that the
law that allows for their
situation to be stricken
from statutes.
"We think it's unfair, es-
pecially when they don't
even give you an opportu-
nity to retrieve your prop-
erty before it is towed,"
Marge said.
However, according to
the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, it like a lot of
other law enforcement
agencies does not own a
tow truck nor does it have
an impound yard.
As a result, local tow
companies are used in a
rotation to tow recovered
vehicles, said CCSO
spokeswoman Heather
Yates.
"But since we do not be-
lieve in victimizing the vic-
tim twice, they are given
an opportunity to come
and get the vehicle them-
selves first. We really try to
make sure they don't be-
come victims twice," Yates
said.
The Maszotas' trailer
was stolen May 20 while it
was hitched to a van
parked in front of the fam-
ily's business in Beverly
Hills. According to
Richard, the family re-
ported the theft to the
sheriff's office. A couple of
days later, a CCSO


from buying guns.
If the patient doesn't
agree to be voluntarily ad-
mitted for treatment, an
involuntary commitment
petition would be filed. Pa-
tients who voluntarily
commit themselves would
do so with the understand-
ing that they would be
barred from purchasing
firearms.
Among other bills Scott
signed is a measure that
will guarantee citizens'
rights to speak at govern-
ment meetings. The bill al-
lows governments to set
time limits on public com-
ment and exempts some
meetings of an emergency
or purely ceremonial
nature.
Another bill creates a
public records exemption
for the names of law en-
forcement officers'
spouses and children.
He also signed a bill that
prohibits the sale or giving
away of artificially colored


what Duke says it will base
its 2013 property tax pay-
ment on, is $7.5 billion a
17 percent drop from 2012.
Duke paid $19.4 million
in taxes in 2012 while the
county says it owed $36
million. The company is
suing Greene over the as-
sessment and is expected
to sue again over the 2013
assessment.
Duke is expected to pay
a little more than $20 mil-
lion in taxes this year.
The Duke issue aside,
county property values
continue to drag from a


University of South
Florida.
Balfour was appointed
to fill a vacancy created by
the resignation of Susan
Hale and is appointed for
a term beginning July 16,


bunnies, chicks and duck-
lings. Scott last year signed
a bill to rescind a 45-year-
old animal dyeing ban
after groomers told law-
makers they wanted to dye
their show dogs.
Scott also signed a bill
that will make it illegal to
possess without permis-
sion other people's per-
sonal information like
Social Security and credit
card numbers. It makes it a
first-degree misdemeanor
to possess other people's
Social Security numbers,
driver's licenses, medical
records, passports, bank
account numbers, credit
cards and Medicaid or
food assistance account
numbers unless they have
authorization.
Violators could face a
year in jail.
Another bill signed Fri-
day will repeal a law that
set a minimum size limit
for mullet caught in
Broward County.


recession that started six
years ago and hasn't let up.
Greene said the certi-
fied tax roll with Duke
out of the mix shows a
1.7 percent decline in tax-
able property values.
Greene said he expects
to see a turnaround soon.
"We're getting close," he
said. "We're bouncing on
the bottom. Some areas are
still lagging. Some we're
seeing a little bit better."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.


2013, and ending Nov 11,
2014.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, Ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


I don't like it, but we have
to follow the law.

Cmdr. Buddy Grant
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.


detective returned to tell
them the trailer was recov-
ered in Osceola County,
southeast of Orlando.
Richard said he was ini-
tially elated, but that ela-
tion quickly turned sour
after he received the bill
from a St. Cloud towing
company telling him to pay
up or the trailer could be
auctioned in 35 days.
The trailer has since
been moved back to Citrus
County, but the sheriff's of-
fice has custody of it be-
cause, the Maszotas said, it
could be used as evidence
in a potential trial.
However, the sheriff's of-
fice said the trailer has
been processed and has
not been released because
the Maszotas have not paid
their towing bill in Osceola.
Sheriff's officials said
the trailer was released to
them after negotiations
with the towing company
in Osceola, but the Maszo-
tas have to pay what is
owed the towing company
"I don't like it, but we
have to follow the law,"
said Cmdr. Buddy Grant.
"Our guys have bent over
backwards for this family
and helped lower the
amount they have to pay,
and by bringing it here in


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


Brow


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy .MAE=
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeralr Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhom


the county, they don't have
to pay the daily charge of
the tow company," Grant
added. The company was
charging $21.40 per day,
but CCSO officials were
able to get the trailer out
after eight days.
The towing company
was initially asking $375
per item (trailer and a go-
kart) before they would re-
lease them to CCSO
officials. But Grant said
CCSO personnel talked
the towing company into
dropping one of the
charges because the other
stolen item which be-
longs to the Maszotas'
neighbor was sitting on
the trailer, so therefore the
towing company only
made one tow.
"Like I said, I don't like
it either, but they have to
pay the $375 before we can
release it. It's what's in the
statutes," Grant said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
H orpoolorplan
something
E : completely new!



YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVERSPECIALIST
0 COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
I, d352-400-3188

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


Leonard 'Pete' Mary
Haggerty, 78 Hoffman, 91
HOMOSASSA HERNANDO


Leonard James "Pete"
Haggerty, 78, died June 16,
2013, at his home in Ho-
mosassa, Fla.
Pete was born Jan. 6,
1935, to Josephine Dumas
and Joseph Haggerty in
Nashua, N.H. Pete served
23 years in the U.S. Air
Force in
the explo-
sive ordi-
nance
disposal *
(EOD) di-
vision.
After re-
tirement
from the Leonard
Air Force, Haggerty
Pete worked for PepsiCo,
owned a locksmith busi-
ness and conducted civil-
ian de-mining activity of
military grounds sold to the
public. Pete was active
with the Shriners and
served on the Coast Guard
Auxiliary Pete's hobbies
included flying ultra-light
airplanes, telescopes and
garage sales. Pete was a pa-
triotic man who loved
spending time with his
family and friends.
Pete is survived by his
wife, Virgie; his former
wife, Sonya; five children,
Shawn Haggerty, Scott
Haggerty, Sheryl Lashway,
Sharon Haggerty and
Patrick Haggerty; five
stepchildren, Cheri
Thompson, Kim Moody,
Chris Radtke, Konnie
Hamilton, and Cindy Naff;
19 grandchildren; and 14
great-grandchildren.
Pete was cremated and
will be buried at the
Florida National Ceme-
tery with military hon-
ors. A celebration of his
life will take place at
5 p.m. July 4, at his home
in Homosassa. In lieu of
flowers, donations may
be made to the Vietnam
Veterans of America.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.


Mary Elizabeth Hoff-
man, 91, of Hernando, died
June 25,2013, in Woodland
Terrace of Citrus County.
Miss Hoffman was born
in Quakertown, Pa., May
12, 1922, to the late
Romanus and Mabel
(Angney) Hoffman. She
spent more than 20 years
serving our country in the
U.S. Navy (World War II
and Korean War), retiring
as a senior chief petty of-
ficer. Mary was a member
of Hernando United
Methodist Church, Fleet
Reserve Association, Life
Member of N.C.O.R., and
Chapter 319, Order of
Eastern Star.
Survivors include her
nephew, Richard W
Turner and his wife
Nancy, Tallahassee; and
two great-nephews, Brian
W Turner, Dunnellon, and
Scott K. Turner, Tallahas-
see. She was preceded in
death by a sister, Anna
Martine Turner.
Military graveside serv-
ices will be conducted at
2:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 2,
2013, at Florida National
Cemetery VFW 7122 will
render honors. There are
no calling hours at the fu-
neral home. The proces-
sion will leave the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
Tuesday at 1:45 p.m. Fam-
ily and friends are invited
to attend.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

/SafE. E. baZt
Funeral Home With Crematory
VERNON KAISER
Service: Mon 10:00 AM
Burial: Florida National Cemetery
MARY HOFFMAN
Graveside Service: Tues. 2:30 PM
Florida National Cemetery
VINCENT QUERIPEL
Service: Sat. 4:00 PM
BEVERLY ALDEN
Service: Sun. 3:00 PM Chapel
HEDWIG SIMON
Mass: Tues. 10:00 AM
Our Lady ofFatima
LILLIAN ERMISCH
Private Arrangements
726-8323 000F7ou


Thomas
Martin, 81
HOMOSASSA
Thomas W Martin, 81,
of Homosassa, died June
27, 2013, while under the
care of Hospice House of
Citrus Co. Funeral Serv-
ices will be 2 p.m. Monday,
July 1, 2013, at Wilder Fu-
neral Home with inter-
ment to follow at
Magnolia Cemetery The
family will receive friends
at the funeral home at
1p.m.





Jose
Medina, 59
DUNNELLON
Jose Medina, 59, of Dun-
nellon died Wednesday,
June 26, 2013, at Shands
hospital in Gainesville,
Fla. A memorial service
will be at 1 p.m. Saturday,
June 29, 2013, at the First
Baptist Church of Lake
Rousseau. Strickland Fu-
neral Home of Crystal
River is assisting the fam-
ily with arrangements.

OBITUARIES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Email obits@
chronicle online.com
or fax 352-563-3280.







DIGNITY & REPC


CARPET CLEANING



3 ROOMS 0790i


1 HALLWAY ServiceMASTERI

Expires 7/29/13 Restore




UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL


COUCH+ $9901


LOVESEAT +


S1 FREE CHAIR ServiceMASTER
Expires 7/29/13 Restore




ServiceMASTER


,BEST..'
-ttI^


/7
/


0An19gfn


Restore


www.smcflorida.com NJ


"We Cater to Cowards!"
General & Cosmetic Dentistry
HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE
FREE SECOND OPINION.
Most InsurLe A license #DN ....

L Ledger Dentistry
0 Jeremy A. Ledger. D.M.D.. P.A.

Ledgerdentistry.com Se Habla Espanol
Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


I


LOCAI/STATE


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 A7


m










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Reveille


Associated Press
George Proulx of
Cumberland, R.I., plays
reveille Friday during
ongoing activities com-
memorating the 150th
anniversary of the Battle
of Gettysburg, at Bushey
Farm in Gettysburg, Pa.


Librarians to help
with health law
CHICAGO The na-
tion's librarians will be re-
cruited to help people get
signed up for insurance
under President Barack
Obama's health care
overhaul.
Up to 17,000 U.S. li-
braries will be part of the ef-
fort to get information and
crucial computer time to the
millions of uninsured Ameri-
cans who need to get cov-
erage under the law.
The undertaking will be
announced Sunday in
Chicago at the annual con-
ference of the American
Library Association, accord-
ing to federal officials who
released the information
early to The Associated
Press.
The initiative starts
Oct. 1, when people without
health coverage will start
shopping for insurance on-
line on new websites where
they can get tax credits to
help pay the cost.
Low-income people will
be enrolled in an expanded
version of Medicaid in
states that adopt it.
Fed OKs horse
slaughterhouse
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
- Federal officials cleared
the way Friday for a return
to domestic horse slaugh-
ter, granting a southeastern
New Mexico company's ap-
plication to convert its cattle
facility into a horse process-
ing plant.
In approving Valley Meat
Co. plans to produce horse
meat, USDA officials also
indicated they would grant
similar permits to compa-
nies in Iowa and Missouri
as early as next week.
NYC's Met doing
away with button
NEW YORK Tiny
metal buttons in delicious-
sounding colors like
poupon, hubba bubba and
piglet have served as The
Metropolitan Museum of
Art's admission ticket for 42
years. But starting Monday,
the 1-inch disks will be re-
placed by a paper ticket
with a detachable sticker.
It's all about the money
- the buttons have be-
come too expensive to
produce.
When the museum first
started using the buttons, it
had about 1 million visitors
annually.
Today it has 6 million.
US warns on
Egypt travel
WASHINGTON -The
Obama administration on
Friday warned Americans
against all but essential
travel to Egypt and moved
to reduce the official U.S.
presence in the country
amid fears of widespread
unrest.
Just hours after Egyptian
officials said an American
had been killed in clashes
between government sup-
porters and opponents in
the city of Alexandria, the
State Department said
Americans should defer
nonessential travel to
Egypt, citing the uncertain
security situation.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Immigration bill faces obstacles


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
focus of hotly contested im-
migration legislation
swung Friday from the Sen-
ate to the House, where
conservative Republicans
hold power, there is no bi-
partisan template to serve
as a starting point and the
two parties stress widely
different priorities.
"It's a very long and
winding road to immigra-
tion reform," said Rep.
Tom Cole, an Oklahoma


Republican who said it
could be late this year or
perhaps early in 2014 be-
fore the outcome is known.
His own constituents are
"very skeptical, mostly op-
posed," he said.
Supporters of the Sen-
ate's approach sought to
rally support for its prom-
ise of citizenship for those
who have lived in the
United States unlawfully, a
key provision alongside
steps to reduce future ille-
gal immigration.
"The Republican Party


still doesn't understand
the depth ... of this move-
ment and just how much
the American people want
comprehensive immigra-
tion reform," Rep. Luis
Gutierrez, D-Ill., said on
Friday "We need to make
sure they come to this un-
derstanding."
But Rep. Matt Salmon,
R-Ariz., said in an inter-
view that any bill that re-
sults in citizenship was a
nonstarter He called the
approach "patently un-
fair" to those trying to "do


it the legal way"
The House Republican
rank and file is scheduled to
hold a closed-door meeting
on the issue shortly after re-
turning from a July 4 vaca-
tion, and House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, has
said previously he hopes
legislation on the topic can
be passed by the end of the
month. Aides also say it is
possible the issue wouldn't
come to the floor until the
leadership had successfully
resurrected a farm bill that
was defeated last week


Western heat wave


Associated Press
Okamura Kazuhiko, of Japan, takes a picture of the thermometer Friday at the Furnace Creek resort in Death
Vally National Park in Furnace Creek, Calif. Excessive heat warnings will continue for much of the Desert
Southwest as building high pressure triggers major warming in eastern California, Nevada and Arizona.


Phoenix, Las

Vegas bake in

scorching heat

Associated Press

PHOENIX
blazing heat wave expected
to send the mercury soar-
ing to nearly 120 degrees in
Phoenix and Las Vegas settled
over the West on Friday, threaten-
ing to ground airliners and rais-
ing fears that people and pets will
get burned on the scalding
pavement
The heat was so punishing that
rangers took up positions at trail-
heads at Lake Mead in Nevada to
persuade people not to hike.
Zookeepers in Phoenix doused
elephants with water and fed
tigers frozen fish snacks. And
tourists at California's Death Val-
ley took photos of the harsh land-
scape and a thermometer that
read 121.
The mercury there was ex-
pected to reach nearly 130 on Fri-
day-just short of the 134-degree
reading from a century ago that
stands as the highest temperature
ever recorded on Earth.
"You have to take a picture of
something like this, otherwise no
one will believe you," said Laura
McAlpine, visiting Death Valley
from Scotland.
The heat presented problems
for airlines because extreme tem-
peratures make it difficult for
smaller planes to lift off. When
the air gets so hot, it becomes less


A squirrel monkey sits atop a mister Friday to keep cool at the Phoenix
Zoo in Phoenix, Ariz.


dense, requiring longer runways
and less fuel in the tanks to re-
duce weight
Officials said big jetliners func-
tion fine in the heat, but smaller
regional airlines may have delays.
The National Weather Service
said Phoenix could reach 118 on
Friday, while Las Vegas could see
the same temperature over the
weekend in what would be a
record for Sin City. The record in
Phoenix is 122.
Temperatures are also ex-
pected to soar across Utah and
into Wyoming and Idaho, with
triple-digit heat forecast for the
Boise area.
Cities in Washington state that
are better known for cool, rainy
weather should break the 90s
next week, while northern Utah
- marketed as having "the


greatest snow on Earth" is ex-
pected to hit triple digits.
The heat wave is not expected
to break until Monday or Tuesday
The heat is the result of a high-
pressure system brought on by a
shift in the jet stream. The jet
stream, the high-altitude air cur-
rent that dictates weather pat-
terns, has been more erratic in
the past few years. Scientists dis-
agree on whether global warming
is the cause.
Health officials warned people
to be extremely careful when ven-
turing outdoors. The risks include
not only dehydration and heat
stroke but burns from the con-
crete and asphalt.
Cooling stations were set up to
shelter the homeless as well as
elderly people who can't afford to
run their air conditioners.


Chicago prepares for new concealed-carry gun law


Associated Press


CHICAGO This city,
where violent street gangs
shoot it out dozens of times
a week despite some of the
nation's toughest restric-
tions on guns, now faces a
new challenge: Well-
meaning citizens with the
legal right to hit the streets
with loaded firearms,
whenever they want.
As Illinois Gov. Pat
Quinn mulls whether to
sign off on eliminating the
country's last concealed-
carry ban, the question in
Chicago is whether it will
matter in the crime-weary
city
Will a place that long


had some of the nation's
tightest restrictions on
handguns be more at risk?
Or will it be safer with a
law that can only add to
the number of guns al-
ready on the street?
Neighborhood leaders,
anti-crime activists and
police officials worry
about additional mayhem
in Chicago. But other resi-
dents, including some who
live in Chicago's more vio-
lent areas, believe more
guns will allow them to de-
fend themselves better
"We just had a weekend
where something like 48
people were shot; seven
died," said Otis McDonald,
79, one of the plaintiffs in


the lawsuit that ended
with the U.S. Supreme
Court tossing out Chicago's
strict gun ban three years
ago. "Now law-abiding cit-
izens like myself ... can
carry them when they
want to and not carry them
when they don't want to,
and the people out there
who will do us harm won't
know when we got them
and when we don't."
At City Hall, where
Chicago's anti-gun cam-
paign has centered for
years, the reaction to con-
cealed carry legislation
has been relatively quiet.
The reasons seem to boil
down to this: The city can
do little about stopping the


law because a federal ap-
peals court ordered Illi-
nois to end its public
possession ban by this
summer
"We would prefer to
have the (gun) bans we've
always enacted ... (but) it's
the best we could do based
upon the mandate we
have," said Alderman
Patrick O'Connor
The legislation requires
state police to issue a
concealed-carry permit to
any gun owner with a
state-issued Firearm Own-
ers Identification card,
and who passes a back-
ground check, pays a $150
fee and undergoes
16 hours of training.


World BRIEFS

Protests


Associated Press
An opponent of Egypt's
Islamist President
Mohammed Morsi has
her face painted Friday
outside of the defense
ministry in Cairo, Egypt.


Mandela family
feud over burial
JOHANNESBURG -As
Nelson Mandela remained
in critical condition in a hos-
pital Friday, a family feud
over
where the
94-year-
old former
presidentL
should be
buried
went to
the Nelson
courts, Mandela
according improving, but
to South still critical.
Africa's
national broadcaster.
Mandela's oldest daugh-
ter, Makaziwe, and 15 other
family members have
pressed a court application
to get Mandela's grandson
to return the bodies of three
of Mandela's children to their
original graves in the eastern
rural village of Qunu, accord-
ing to the SABC.
The grandson, Mandla
Mandela, acknowledges
having reburied the three
bodies 13 miles away in the
Mvezo village, where he
plans to create a Mandela
shrine, hotel and soccer sta-
dium, according to the South
African Press Association.
The family court struggle
came as Mandela's ex-wife
said he had improved in re-
cent days, but remained
critical.
Monsignor of
Vatican arrested
VATICAN CITY -A Vati-
can cleric and two other
people were arrested Friday
by Italian police for allegedly
trying to smuggle $26 mil-
lion in cash into the country
from Switzerland by private
jet. It's the latest scandal to
hit the Holy See and broad-
ens an Italian probe into its
secretive bank.
Monsignor Nunzio
Scarano, already under in-
vestigation in a purported
money-laundering plot in-
volving the Vatican bank, is
accused of corruption and
slander and was being held
at a prison in Rome, prose-
cutor Nello Rossi said.
Scarano's arrest came
just two days after Pope
Francis created a commis-
sion of inquiry into the Vati-
can bank to get to the
bottom of the problems that
have plagued it for decades
and contributed to the im-
pression that it's an unregu-
lated, offshore tax haven.
Puerto Rico
awaits budget
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
- Puerto Rico legislators
on Friday rushed to try to
approve a budget amid de-
bate on how best to revive
the U.S. territory's economy.
The proposed $9.8 billion
operating budget proposes
a flurry of new taxes while
seeking to boost the is-
land's education system
and rescue a crumbling
public pension system.
Puerto Rico is struggling
to emerge from a seven-
year recession while trying
to reduce a $1.2 billion
deficit and $69 billion in
public debt. The island of
3.7 million people also has
a nearly 14 percent unem-
ployment rate, higher than
any U.S. state.
-From wire reports






S SATURTS JUN 29,2013
PORTS


* Park
leads
Women's
US Open
after two
rounds.
/B2


0 Golf/B2
0 Sports briefs/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 Basketball/B5
0 Cycling/B5
0 Auto racing/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Scherzer improves to 12-0 as Tigers top Rays


Associated Press


Longoria


ST PETERSBURG Major game with
league wins leader Max Scherzer ST. PETERS[
became the first starting pitcher Bay slugger Eva
to win 12 consecutive decisions Bay slugger Ev'
to begin a season in 27 years, and Friday night's ge
the Detroit Tigers beat the troit because of
Tampa Bay Rays 6-3 behind a The Rays anr
pair of home runs from Miguel Longoria irritated
Cabrera on Friday night which has both
Scherzer (12-0) allowed three past month. He%
runs, four hits, walked one and the designated t
struck out nine in seven innings few games earli.
to become the first pitcher in cause of the pro
Tigers history to win his first 12 Longoria will I
decisions as a starter today.
The right-hander also became
the first in the majors to begin a
season with at least 12 straight victories since
Roger Clemens did it on the way to starting 14-0
with the Boston Red Sox in 1986.
Cabrera went 4 for 4 and drove in three runs,
boosting his major league-leading batting average


B

a

sr
w

e
tb


to .377 with 24 homers and 81
I leaves RBIs, also tops in the big leagues.
foot injury He hit a two-run homer in the
URG Tampa first inning off Alex Colome (1-1)
to extend his hitting streak to a
SLongoria left season-best 13 games, then
ne against De- added a solo shot off the rookie
sore right foot. for a 3-0 lead in the fourth.
bounced that Cabrera also singled in the
plantarfasciitis, sixth, giving him three of De-
ed him for the troit's four hits off Colome.
vas limited to Prince Fielder doubled in the
tter role for a fourth, tagged up and hustled to
r this month be- third base on Victor Martinez's
ilem. fly ball to right and eventually
e reevaluated scored on a wild pitch to make it
4-0 before the Rays gradually
climbed back into the game.
Ben Zobrist and Wil Myers hit
solo homers for Tampa Bay. Luke Scott's RBI dou-
ble trimmed Scherzer's lead to 4-3 in the seventh.
Fielder gave the Detroit bullpen some breath-
ing room with a towering two-run shot off Cesar
Ramos that struck one of the catwalks.


Associated Press
Detroit starter Max Scherzer delivers a pitch Friday in
St. Petersburg. The Tiger improved to 12-0 on the season with a
6-3 win over the Rays.


wre

Wimbledon fan

favorites Murray,

Robson advance


Associated Press
LONDON When a 19-stroke ex-
change ended with Andy Murray's Wim-
bledon opponent slapping a forehand into
the net, thousands of Centre Court spec-
tators rose in unison.
They applauded Murray's first service
break They screamed for joy They waved
their Union Jacks and Scottish flags. It
was only a third-round match, merely 12
minutes and three games old, yet to some
that tiny early edge seemed massively
meaningful.
So imagine the reaction, louder and
livelier, when the second-seeded Murray
finished off his 6-2, 6-4, 7-5 victory over
32nd-seeded Tommy Robredo of Spain
less than two hours later Friday to ad-
vance to Week 2. And then, for a moment,
try to fathom what would happen if Mur-
ray ever were to win the final point of The
Championships, as the Grand Slam tour-
nament is known around here, and be-
come the first British man in 77 years to
hoist the trophy
"You need to be professional enough to
not let that stuff bother you and just con-
centrate on each match," said Murray,
who has won 20 of his past 21 contests on
grass, including runs to last year's final at
the All England Club and a London
Olympics gold medal. "I did a good job of
that today I played well. My best match of
the tournament, so far"
The locals' hopes that Murray will fol-
low up his 2012 U.S. Open victory with an-
other major title, this time at Wimbledon,
only increased in the aftermath of sur-
prisingly early losses this week by seven-
time champion Roger Federer, two-time
winner Rafael Nadal and two-time semi-
finalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.
All were seeded in the top six, and all
were on Murray's half of the draw. Their
departures mean the most daunting ob-
stacle in Murray's path- until a potential
final against No. 1-ranked Novak
Djokovic, anyway might very well be
surging expectations.
"There's a lot more pressure on me
now, with them being out," Murray ac-
knowledged after compiling 40 winners
and only 14 unforced errors against Ro-
bredo, taking advantage of the zero-wind
conditions under the closed retractable
roof.
"I mean, I don't read the papers and
See /Page B3


Associated Press
Laura Robson reacts Friday after scoring a point against Mariana Duque-Marino in
their second round singles match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in
Wimbledon, London. Robson advanced to the third round with the victory.


CR 13-14


scores


10-0 win
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER The
Crystal River Junior All-Stars
baseball team likely needs to
win two games to advance to the
District 15 tournament champi-
onship game.
The 13- and 14-year-old boys
from the west side of Citrus
County are halfway to that goal
after defeating Lady Lake 10-0
in six innings Friday night at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal
River.
While the 10-run outburst
certainly helped, the Crystal
River pitching was stellar as
Brian Klein and Payton
O'Callaghan combined to no-hit
Lady Lake.
Klein in particular was stout,
needing just 55 pitches to get
through five innings for the win.
See BASEBALL/Page B3



Rogers


leads CR


to 4-2 win
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Caliann
Rogers was a one-girl wrecking
crew Friday night.
The Crystal River 9-10 All-
Stars softball pitcher blasted a
three-run inside-the-park home
run and struck out 14 to lead
her team to a 4-2 victory over
Dunnellon in the Little League
District 15 tournament at the
Harley Levins Softball
Complex.
Crystal River is now 2-1 and
plays Dixie County at 10 a.m.
today
Alissa Kelly had an RBI sin-
gle for Crystal River
"Every player was an asset
tonight," Crystal River manager
Kevin Morton said. "Catcher
See SOT Page B3


IN DISCOUNTS FROM RETAIL PRICE INCUESALL REBAESAND INC EVERYONEE WILL AU W APPROVED ALLPRIS PLUSAXTAANDDEALER FEE WITH $1000
CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. OFFERSCANNOT BE COMBEIN INCLUDES ALL R DEBATES AND INCEN WITH APPAVEDcE. ++39 MONH LEASE. 39K MILES FOR LIFE OF LEASE Wim $2999 TOTAL
DUE ATIGNING, EXCLUDES TATAGTITEAND$59950 DEALER FEE WTlH APPROVED CREDITl 0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS WITH APPROVED CRED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Connecticut man arraigned


in Hernandez murder case


Associated Press

ATTLEBORO, Mass. -An arrested
man from former New England Patri-
ots tight end Aaron Hernandez's
hometown was transferred to Massa-
chusetts on Friday to face a gun
charge connected to the murder case
against Hernandez while a third sus-
pect surrendered to authorities in
Florida.
Carlos Ortiz, who
lives in Bristol,
Conn., and Ernest
Wallace, who walked
into a South Florida
police station, were
the men identified
earlier as being with
Hernandez and the I
victim the night ofhis Carlos Ortiz
shooting death, a
prosecutor said.
Ortiz was charged with carrying an
unlicensed firearm in North Attlebor-
ough, where Hernandez lives, on June
17, the day Boston semi-pro football
player Odin Lloyd was found shot to
death near Hernandez's home. De-
tails of the charge weren't released.
Wallace, whose wanted poster was
released Thursday night, surrendered
in Miramar, police said. Authorities
had been seeking Wallace on a charge
of acting as an accessory after Lloyd's
murder Details of that allegation also
weren't released.
Police arrested Hernandez on
Wednesday at his home and charged
him with orchestrating Lloyd's execu-
tion-style shooting. Prosecutors said
Hernandez orchestrated the killing
because Lloyd talked to the wrong
people at a nightclub.


Patriots offer t
Hernandez je
FOXBOROUGH, Mas
New England Patriots ar
new jersey to all fans wh
rid of the one they bough
Hernandez's name on it.
Hernandez is being he
charges of first-degree m
has pleaded innocent. TI
released him and taken
jerseys off the shelf at its
store at Gillette Stadium.
The team said fans ca
their store at the stadium
weekend of July 6-7 for;
of comparable value.


Hernandez, Ortiz and
in a car with Lloyd shoi
death, Bristol County,
Attorney C. Samuel Sut
"We now have in cusi
individuals who were
Nissan Altima," Sutter
when Ortiz was arraign
charge in Attleboro Dis
All three men have t
Conn.: Hernandez gr
Ortiz had been living t
thorities had conflicting
Wallace there and in M:
Hernandez pleaded
murder and was denied
day Ortiz also was being
bail pending a court he
9. Wallace was taken to
Lauderdale pending ex
ceedings, police said.
Hemandez's lawyer a
that the case is circuit


said Hernandez, who was cut by the
trade for Patriots the day he was arrested,
Drseys wanted to clear his name.
Ortiz's attorney, John Connors, said
s. The he will seek bail for his client at the
e offering a July 9 hearing. He described Ortiz as
0o want to get a "gentle person" and said he will ad-
ht with Aaron vise Ortiz to plead not guilty
"I can say that his charge has noth-
eld in jail on ing to do with homicide," Connors
murder. He said.
he team has It was unclear if Wallace had a
all Hernandez lawyer, and he couldn't be reached for
souvenir comment in jail. His surrender sur-
prised Miramar police.
in come to Wallace walked into the police sta-
on the tion and told officers there was a war-
a free jersey rant for his arrest, which officers
confirmed by checking a computer
-From wire reports database.
"He stated he knew he had a war-
Wallace were rant because he saw himself on Ty"
rtly before his Miramar police Officer Gil Bueno
Mass., District said. "He was very cooperative. It was
ter said. uneventful."
tody the three Earlier Friday, Ortiz appeared in
in the silver Bristol Superior Court in Connecticut,
r said Friday where a judge authorized turning him
ed on the gun over to a Massachusetts state trooper
trict Court and a North Attleborough officer.
ties to Bristol, A friend and a relative of Ortiz said
ew up there, outside the courthouse that they were
here, and au- stunned by his arrest They said Ortiz
addresses for is the devoted father of two girls and a
iramar boy, all under the age of 9. Ortiz was
not guilty to unemployed recently but previously
*d bail Thurs- worked a long time at a Savers cloth-
g held without ing store, they said.
hearing on July Also Friday, authorities said law en-
a jail in Fort forcement officers recovered in Bris-
:tradition pro- tol a car Wallace was seen driving
before he surrendered.
argued in court Lloyd's relatives were preparing for
mstantial. He his funeral in Boston on Saturday.


Say to his Iory
lfway t history


Park leads US

Women's

Open after

two rounds

Associated Press

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y
- Inbee Park leads the
U.S. Women's Open with
the second round sus-
pended by fog.
The top-ranked Park
shot a 4-under 68 on Fri-
day for a 9-under total to
lead fellow South Korean
I.K. Kim by two strokes.
The horn sounded with
Park's group on the 18th
fairway, and they finished
the hole. She calmly sank
a birdie putt from about 12
feet to move closer to
history
Park is seeking to win
the year's first three ma-
jors; no one has accom-
plished that feat in a
season with at least four
Of the players yet to fin-
ish the round, the closest,
England's Jodi Ewart
Shadoff, was five strokes
back with three holes to
go.
A day after Sebonack
played relatively easy by
U.S. Women's Open stan-
dards, the wind picked up.
Mist rolled in off the Great
Peconic Bay late in the af-
ternoon session.
Spieth takes share
of early lead at
Congressional
BETHESDA, Md. Jordan
Spieth, playing with nothing to
lose, gave himself another
chance to win going into the
weekend at the AT&T National.
Spieth hit every green in
regulation Friday and extended
his streak to 29 holes without a
bogey on a tough Congres-
sional course, giving him a
5-under 66 and a share of the
lead with Roberto Castro (69)
before storms halted the sec-
ond round.
They were at 7-under 135,
with the round to be completed
this morning.
Players went back out to the
practice range after a two-hour
delay, only for more storms to
approach and extended the
suspension until the PGATour
called it for the day. Andres
Romero was at 5 under with
five holes remaining.
D.H. Lee had a 66 and was
two shots behind at 5-under
139. Cameron Tringale (67)
and James Driscoll (69) were
another shot behind, while the


Associated Press
Inbee Park tees off Friday on the second hole during the second round of the U.S.
Women's Open in Southampton, N.Y. Park leads the tournament at 9-under par.


group at 3-under 139 included
former British Open champion
Stewart Cink (69), Gary Wood-
land (69) and David Lingmerth,
who went from around the cut
line to contention with a 65.
Couples leads at
rain-drenched
Senior Players
PITTSBURGH -A down-
pour has halted second-
round play of the Senior
Players Championship until
today.
The thunderstorm Friday
afternoon dumped a half-inch
of rain on Fox Chapel Golf
Club in 30 minutes, overflow-
ing creeks and turning fair-
ways into small ponds.
Fred Couples leads the
tournament at 11-under. He is


7-under through 11 holes of
the second round.
John Huston is second at
9-under. The first-round
leader holed out from the
rough on No. 15 just before
officials stopped play.
Jeff Hart shot a season-
best 5-under 65 and is the
leader in the clubhouse at
7-under. Only 15 of 81 play-
ers in the field completed
their rounds.
Officials said the threat of
another storm later Friday led
to the decision to stop for the
day.
Uihlein, Rock share
Irish Open lead;
Mcllory out
MAYNOOTH, Ireland -
Peter Uihlein and Robert


Rock share the lead after the
second round of the Irish
Open, while Rory Mcllroy
missed the cut in his final
tournament before the British
Open.
Uihlein shot a 4-under-par
68 to move to 9-under 135
with England's Rock, who
posted a 6-under 66 at the
Carton House course on the
outskirts of Dublin.
It was a disappointing day
for the home fans, however,
as Mcllroy shot a 72 to remain
at 2 over, missing the cut by
two shots. Fellow major win-
ners Padraig Harrington,
Graeme McDowell and Dar-
ren Clarke also didn't make it
to the weekend in a dismal
showing by the Irish and
Northern Irish contingent.


I S .R.


Rays' Price to
pitch Tuesday
ST. PETERSBURG-AL
Cy Young Award winner
David Price will rejoin the
Tampa Bay Rays' rotation
Tuesday night at Houston.
Rays manager Joe Mad-
don announced the news be-
fore Friday night's game with
Detroit, saying the team feels
"pretty strongly" that the left-
hander is ready to return
from a strained left triceps.
Price went on the disabled
list for the first time in his ca-
reer May 16. He made two
minor league rehab starts
with Class A Charlotte.
Price struggled this year
before getting hurt, going 1-4
with a 5.24 ERA. He was
20-5 with a 2.56 ERA last
season.
Also, right-hander Alex
Cobb, who was struck in the
right ear by a ball hit by
Kansas City's Eric Hosmer
on June 15, played catch
during batting practice.
Derek Jeter joins
Alex Rodriguez
taking at-bats
TAMPA- Derek Jeter has
joined teammate Alex Ro-
driguez in hitting against
minor league pitching.
Coming back from a bro-
ken left ankle, Jeter had an
opposite-field single to right in
six at-bats Friday against a
minor league right-hander.
The Yankees captain said it
was his second day of fadng
live pitching.
Rodriguez, who had hip
surgery in January, had two
doubles and a single in five
plate appearances, and he
also ran the bases after put-
ting the ball in play.


The Yankees have not an-
nounced a date for when
A-Rod will begin a minor
league injury rehabilitation
assignment, but running
bases during the at-bat situa-
tion normally is among the
final preparation steps.
Jeter hasn't played this
season after breaking an
ankle in the playoffs last Oc-
tober and having surgery. An-
other fracture was discovered
during his first rehab in April.
Florida LB
Morrison avoids
prosecution
GAINESVILLE Florida
linebacker Antonio Morrison,
who was accused of punch-
ing a bouncer, will likely not
be prosecuted.
The State Attorney's Office
in Alachua County filed a de-
ferred prosecution form
Thursday. That means Morri-
son won't be prosecuted for
the battery charge as long as
he stays out of trouble for six
months.
Gainesville police say wit-
nesses identified Morrison as
the man who argued with a
bouncer outside Kava
Lounge early earlier this
month regarding a cover
charge. When the bouncer
told Morrison he would have
to pay full price, witnesses
said Morrison punched the
bouncer in the head. Police
say the bouncer and a wit-
ness identified Morrison from
the school's website. Officers
said Morrison told them he
got into a "scuffle," but added
"it wasn't that big of a deal."
Morrison is a sophomore
from Bolingbrook, Ill. He is
expected to be a full-time
starter this fall.
-From wire reports


0629 SACRN
NOTICE OF HEARING TO IMPOSE AND
PROVIDE FOR COLLECTION OF FIRE
PROTECTION SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of
Citrus County will conduct a public hearing to consider the imposition of
fire protection special assessments for the provision of fire protection
services within the Citrus County Municipal Service Benefit Unit for Fire
Protection Services (the "MSBU"), including the unincorporated area of
the County and the City of Inverness, for the Fiscal Year beginning
October 1, 2013. The hearing will be held at 2:30 p.m. on July 23, 2013,
in Room 100 of the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of receiving public comment
on the proposed assessments. All affected property owners have a
right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
Board within 20 days of this notice. If a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at
the hearing, such person will need a record of the proceedings and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, including the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be made. In accordance with
the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should
contact the County Manager's office at (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the
TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
The total annual fire protection assessment revenue to be collected
within the County is estimated to be $5,090,458.00 for fiscal year
October 1, 2013 September 30, 2014.
The assessment for each parcel of property will be based upon
each parcel's classification and the total number of billing units
attributed to that parcel. The following table reflects the proposed fire
protection assessment schedule.
FIRE PROTECTION ASSESSMENTS FOR FY 2013-14


Residential Property
Use Categories
Residential
Non-Residential Property
Use Categories
Commercial
Industrial/Warehouse
Institutional


Rate Per Dwelling Unit
$60.00

Rate Per Square Foot
$0.06
$0.01
$0.09


Land Property
Use Categories
AgriculturalNacant
Land < 160 (per parcel)
Land > 160 (per acre)
MAXIMUM FIRE PROTECTION ASSESSMENTS


Residential Property
Use Categories
Residential
Non-Residential Property
Use Categories
Commercial
Industrial/Warehouse
Institutional
Land Property
Use Categories
AgriculturalNacant
Land < 160 (per parcel)
Land > 160 (per acre)


Rate

$3.10
$0.02


Rate Per Dwelling Unit
$100.00

Rate Per Square Foot
$0.09
$0.02
$0.15


Rate

$5.20
$0.04


Copies of the Ordinance, the Initial Assessment Resolution, and the
updated Assessment Roll for the Fiscal Year commencing October 1,
2013 are available for inspection at the Office of the Board of County
Commissioners, located at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
The assessments will be collected on the ad valorem tax bill to be
mailed in November 2013, as authorized by section 197.3632, Florida
Statutes. Failure to pay the assessments will cause a tax certificate to
be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
If you have any questions, please contact Citrus County Customer
Service at (352) 249-2765, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. or go to www.sheriffcitrus.ora or www.bocc.citrus.fl.us for
additional information.














BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
300FEHO


B2 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Wimbledon
Friday
At The All England Lawn Tennis
& Croquet Club, London
Singles
Men
Second Round
Grega Zemlja, Slovenia, def. Grigor Dimitrov
(29), Bulgaria, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-4, 11-9.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (26), Ukraine, def. Santi-
ago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3.
Jeremy Chardy (28), France, def. Jan-Lennard
Struff, Germany, 6-2, 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (4).
Tommy Haas (13), Germany, def. Jimmy Wang,
Taiwan, 6-3, 6-2, 7-5.
David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Roberto Bautista
Agut, Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 7-5.
Third Round
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky,
Ukraine, 6-2, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3.
Jerzy Janowicz (24), Poland, def. Nicolas Al-
magro (15), Spain, 7-6 (6), 6-3, 6-4.
Andy Murray (2), Britain, def.Tommy Robredo
(32), Spain, 6-2, 6-4, 7-5.
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Dustin Brown,
Germany, 6-4, 6-2, 7-5.
Women
Second Round
Laura Robson, Britain, def. Mariana Duque-
Marino, Colombia, 6-4, 6-1.
Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, def. Angelique Kerber
(7), Germany, 3-6, 7-6 (6), 6-3.
Alison Riske, United States, def. Urszula Rad-
wanska, Poland, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Third Round
Kirsten Flipkens (20), Belgium, def. Vesna
Dolonc, Serbia, 6-4, 6-2.
Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Alize Cornet (29),
France, 0-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2.
Carla Suarez Navarro (19), Spain, def. Eugenie
Bouchard, Canada, 7-5, 6-2.
Marion Bartoli (15), France, def. Camila Giorgi,
Italy, 6-4, 7-5.
Karin Knapp, Italy, def. Michelle Larcher de
Brito, Portugal, 7-5, 6-2.
Ekaterina Makarova (25), Russia, leads Petra
Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-2, 2-1, susp.,
darkness.
Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, leads Monica
Puig, Puerto Rico, 6-4, 2-1, susp., darkness.
Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, vs. Sloane
Stephens (17), United States, 6-7 (3), 6-0, susp.,
darkness.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Marcelo Demoliner and Andre Sa, Brazil, 6-4, 6-
4, 6-1.
Jesse Levine and Vasek Pospisil, Canada, def.
Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, and Rajeev Ram,
United States, 6-2, 6-4, 6-1.
Leader Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (4),
Czech Republic, def. Daniele Bracciali, Italy, and
Jonathan Erlich, Israel, 7-6 (6), 6-4, 6-7 (1), 6-4.
Second Round
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Daniel Nestor
(6), Canada, def. Eduardo Schwank and Horacio
Zeballos, Argentina, 6-1, 7-5, 6-3.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo (12),
Brazil, def. Tomasz Bednarek and Mateusz
Kowalczyk, Poland, 7-6 (2), 7-5, 6-4.
Juan-Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah,
Colombia, def. Sanchai and Sonchat Ratiwatana,
Thailand, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (3),
Brazil, vs. Paul Hanley and John-Patrick Smith,
Australia, 4-6, 6-1, 6-7 (6), 7-5, susp., darkness.
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-
Julien Rojer (5), Netherlands, vs. Xavier Malisse,
Belgium, and Ken Skupski, Britain, 6-3, 6-7 (1),
susp., darkness.
Rohan Bopanna, India, and Edouard Roger-
Vasselin (14), France, lead Daniel Brands, Ger-
many, and Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-3, 5-7,
7-6 (4), susp., darkness.
Women
First Round
Christina McHale, United States, and Tamira
Paszek, Austria, def. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan,
and Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 7-6 (6), 2-6,
6-3.
Second Round
Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua (12), Aus-
tralia, def. Megan Moulton-Levy, United States,
and Zhang Shuai, China, 6-3, 6-2.
Vania King, United States, and Zheng Jie (13),
China, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, and
Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-1, 6-3.
Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (5),
United States, def. Sandra Klemenschits, Austria,
and Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 6-1, 6-1.
Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (1), Italy, def. Na-
talie Grandin, South Africa, and Vladimira Uh-
lirova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-3.
Darija Jurak, Croatia, and Tamarine Tanasug-
arn, Thailand, def. Kristina MIladenovic, France,
and GalinaVoskoboeva (10), Kazakhstan, 1-6,7-
6 (4), 6-4.
Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie Hradecka (2),
Czech Republic, def. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia,
and Oksana Kalashnikova, Georgia, 6-1, 6-1.
Mixed
First Round
Mark Knowles, Bahamas, and Sabine Lisicki,
Germany, def. Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-4.


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 B3


OT the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
Aj ~4-2-1
CASH 3 (late)
0 0-3-6
PLAY 4 (early)
4-7-8-9
PLAY 4 (late)

FANTASY 5
1 8 16 22 25
MEGA MONEY

Thursday's winning 12 24 32 43
MEGA BALL
numbers and payouts: 14
Fantasy 5: 1 9 19 28 30 MEGA MILLIONS
5-of-5 2 winners $101,037.06 8 15 35 46 52
4-of-5 319 $102 MEGA BALL
3-of-5 9,514 $9.50 38
Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One British Grand Prix Qualifying
(same-day tape)
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing O'ReillyAuto Parts
Route 66 Nationals, Qualifying (same-day tape)
7:30 p.m. (TNT) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Quaker State 400
MLB BASEBALL
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Cleveland Indians at Chicago White Sox
7 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Tampa Bay Rays
BICYCLING
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 Tour de France Stage 1
BOXING
9:45 p.m. (HBO) Gennady Golovkin vs. Matthew Macklin
CFL FOOTBALL
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Saskatchewan Roughriders at Edmonton
Eskimos
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Irish Open, Third Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour AT&T National, Third Round
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Constellation Senior
Players, Third Round
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Women's Open Championship, Third
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour AT&T National, Third Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Web.com: United Leasing Cham-
pionship, Third Round (same-day tape)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) AMA Moto-X 338 National 450 & 250
Moto II
MLS SOCCER
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) FC Dallas at Philadelphia Union
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN2) National Pro Fastpitch: Chicago Bandits at
Akron Racers
8 p.m. (ESPN2) National Pro Fastpitch: Chicago Bandits at
Akron Racers
TENNIS
8 a.m. (ESPN) 2013 Wimbledon Championships Early Round,
Day 6

RADIO
6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
7:15 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Detroit Tigers at Tampa Bay
Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Chris Williams 78-69 147
Robert Allenby 75-73 148
Scott Stallings 76-72 148
Charles Howell III 76-72 148
Scott Brown 74-74 148
Justin Leonard 78-73 151
J.J. Henry 78-73 151
Bobby Gates 74-77 151
Jeff Maggert 77-75 152
Daniel Summerhays 78-79 157
Second-Round Leaderboard


Thru
PGA AT&T National Roberto Castro -7 F
Friday Jordan Spieth -7 F
At Congressional Country Club D.H. Lee -5 F
Bethesda, Md. Andres Romero -5 13
Yardage: 7,569; Par: 71 Cameron Tringale -4 F
Partial Second Round James Driscoll -4 F
62 players failed to finish the round Gary Woodland -3 F
due to rain Stewart Cink -3 F
Roberto Castro 66-69 135 -7 Russell Henley -3 F
Jordan Spieth 69-66 135 -7 David Lingmerth -3 F
D.H. Lee 71-66 137 -5 Bill Haas -3 8
CameronTringale 71-67 138 -4 NickWatney -3 8
James Driscoll 69-69 138 -4 Ben Kohles -3 12
Gary Woodland 70-69 139 LPGA US OPEN
SteMAwart rCink 7n_ 3 LPe _- Q OPEN


Russell Henley
David Lingmerth
Bud Cauley
Graham DeLaet
Brandt Snedeker
CamiloVillegas
David Mathis
Brendon Todd
Kevin Chappell
Brian Davis
Fabian Gomez
Chez Reavie
Chad Campbell
Tom Gillis
Bryce Molder
Robert Garrigus
Jason Day
Ricky Barnes
Jason Bohn
Charlie Wi
Steve LeBrun
Brandt Jobe
Bob Estes
Brendan Steele
Tommy Gainey
Adam Scott
Martin Laird
Matt Jones
Brad Fritsch
Doug LaBelle II
John Rollins
Charley Hoffman
Dicky Pride
Erik Compton
Casey Wittenberg
Matt Every
Aaron Baddeley
Marc Leishman
Freddie Jacobson
K.J. Choi
William McGirt
Justin Bolli
Stephen Ames
Hunter Mahan
Scott Langley
Brendon de Jonge
Aaron Watkins


69-70
74-65
68-72
68-72
69-71
71-70
71-70
74-67
70-72
70-72
69-73
71-71
72-70
70-72
72-71
72-71
70-73
72-71
73-70
72-71
71-72
71-73
73-71
73-71
73-71
73-71
71-73
72-72
72-72
73-71
73-72
74-71
72-73
73-72
74-72
74-72
74-72
75-71
70-76
70-76
75-72
76-71
73-74
75-72
75-72
74-73
74-73


Friday
At Sebonack Golf Club, Southampton, N.Y.
Yardage: 6,821; Par: 72
Partial Second Round
a-denotes amateur
Note: Play was suspended due to darkness
Inbee Park 67-68 135 -9
I.K. Kim 68-69 137 -7
Lizette Salas 68-72 140 -4
Angela Stanford 73-68 141 -3
Jessica Korda 70-71 141 -3
SoYeon Ryu 73-69 142 -2
Anna Nordqvist 68-74 142 -2
Ha-Neul Kim 66-77 143 -1
Cristie Kerr 72-72 144 E
HaejiKang 71-73 144 E
Lindy Duncan 71-73 144 E
Brittany Lang 76-69 145 +1
Catriona Matthew 70-75 145 +1
Paula Creamer 72-73 145 +1
Amy Meier 74-72 146 +2
Maude-Aimee Leblanc69-77 146 +2
AmyYang 74-72 146 +2
Shanshan Feng 71-75 146 +2
a-B. Mack. Hend. 71-76 147 +3
Morgan Pressel 73-74 147 +3
AzaharaMunoz 73-74 147 +3
D. Claire Schreefel 76-71 147 +3
Stacy Lewis 71-76 147 +3
a-Casie Cathrea 75-73 148 +4
Chella Choi 73-75 148 +4
Pornanong Phatlum 71-77 148 +4
Mo Martin 74-74 148 +4
Cynthia Lacrosse 74-74 148 +4
a-Doris Chen 74-74 148 +4
Thidapa Suwannapura75-74 149 +5
Austin Ernst 75-74 149 +5
Mika Miyazato 72-77 149 +5
Gerina Piller 73-76 149 +5
Hee Kyung Seo 75-74 149 +5
J. Barenborg Stoelting75-74 149 +5
a-YueerFeng 72-77 149 +5
Jenny Shin 78-71 149 +5
Moira Dunn 78-72 150 +6
Julieta Granada 74-76 150 +6
Christina Kim 75-75 150 +6
Laura Diaz 76-74 150 +6
Ayako Uehara 75-75 150 +6


a-Nelly Korda 73-77
Caroline Westrup 74-76
Meena Lee 71-79
Leaderboard


1. Inbee Park
2. I.K. Kim
3. Jodi Ewart Shadoff
3. Lizette Salas
5. Angela Stanford
5. Jessica Korda
7. SoYeon Ryu
7. Anna Nordqvist
9. Caroline Hedwall
9. Ha-Neul Kim


Champions Players
Championship
Friday
At Fox Chapel Golf Club, Pittsburgh
Yardage: 6,696; Par: 70
Partial Second Round
Only 15 players finished the round


Jeff Hart
Joel Edwards
Bart Bryant
Morris Hatalsky
Chien Soon Lu
Steve Jones
BobTway
Mark Mouland
Jeff Freeman
Steve Lowery
Barry Lane
Dick Mast
Mike Reid
Jim Rutledge
Tom Byrum


due to rain
68-65
67-70
70-67
70-67
72-66
70-68
70-71
70-71
71-71
71-71
77-67
72-72
71-73
74-71
70-75


Second-Round Leaderboard
Thru
Fred Couples -11 11
John Huston -9 15
Jeff Hart -7 F
Duffy Waldorf -7 14
Michael Allen -6 12
Mike Goodes -6 14
Fred Funk -6 12
David Frost -5 12
Russ Cochran -5 13
Corey Pavin -4 10
Colin Montgomerie -4 12
Mark Calcavecchia -4 12




NASCAR Sprint Cup
Quaker State 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Kentucky Speedway
Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevy, 183.636 mph.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 183.306.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 183.144.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 182.593.
5. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 182.587.
6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 182.34.
7. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 182.254.
8. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 182.192.
9. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 181.922.


- 150 +6
- 150 +6
- 150 +6

SCORETHRU
-9 F


10. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 181.72.
11.(22)JoeyLogano, Ford, 181.708.
12. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 181.653.
13. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 181.391.
14. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 181.36.
15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 181.159.
16.(20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 181.111.
17. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 180.892.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 180.868.
19. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 180.832.
20. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 180.765.
21. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 180.638.
22. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 180.578.
23. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 180.445.
24. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 179.97.
25. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 179.964.
26. (51)Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 179.802.
27. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 179.39.
28. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 179.075.
29. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 178.944.
30. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 178.265.
31.(13) Casey Mears, Ford, 178.235.
32. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 177.983.
33. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 177.713.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 177.486.
35. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 176.638.
36. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 176.488.
37. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, Owner Points.
40. (93)Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
NASCAR
Nationwide
Feed The Children 300
Friday
At Kentucky Speedway
Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (19) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 170 laps, 130.3
rating, 0 points.
2.(6) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 170, 118.9,43.
3. (8) MattCrafton, Chevrolet, 170, 114.2, 0.
4. (11) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 170, 103.6, 40.
5. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 170, 137.7, 0.
6. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 170, 110.8, 39.
7. (21) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 170, 89.6, 37.
8. (18) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 170, 83.6,
36.
9. (3) Sam Hornish Jr, Ford, 170, 112.8, 36.
10. (10) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 170, 89.5, 34.
11. (17) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 170, 82.3, 34.
12. (4)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 170, 85.7, 32.
13. (7) JustinAllgaier, Chevrolet, 170, 94.9, 31.
14. (16) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 170, 75.6, 30.
15. (2)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 170, 93.8, 29.
16. (12) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 170, 83.1, 28.
17. (15) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 169, 68.9, 27.
18.(13) Michael Annett, Ford, 169, 75.4, 26.
19. (24) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 169, 65.9, 25.
20. (20) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 168, 63.9, 24.
21. (27) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 168, 49.6, 23.
22. (28) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 168, 59.8,
22.
23. (39) Eric McClure, Toyota, 167, 44.4, 21.
24. (29) Ken Butler, Toyota, 167, 44.1, 20.
25. (38) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 166, 53.6,
19.
26. (33) Bryan Silas, Ford, 166,45.6,0.
27. (23) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 165, 50.8,17.
28. (35) Carl Long, Chevrolet, 164, 38.1, 16.
29. (34) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, 164, 37.9, 15.
30. (14) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 153, 77.7, 14.
31. (9) Cole Whitt, Toyota, transmission, 107,
63.5, 13.
32. (32) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, engine, 90, 45.1,
12.
33. (22) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 52,
51.7, 11.
34. (30) Blake Koch,Toyota, brakes, 16, 36.2,10.
35. (40) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, handling,
15, 35.3, 9.
36. (25) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, engine, 14,
40.8, 8.
37. (31) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, transmission, 10,
33.7,0.
38. (36) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, vibration, 7, 33.8,
6.
39. (37) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, rear gear, 3,
32.9,5.
40. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 31.3, 4.




MLB box scores
Rangers 4, Reds 0
Cincinnati Texas


DRonsn If
Choo cf
Votto lb
Phillips 2b
Bruce rf
Frazier 3b
Heisey dh
Mesorc c
Cozart ss
Totals
Cincinnati
Texas


ab r h bi


4 0 0 0 Kinsler2b
4 0 0 0 Andrusdh
4 0 1 0 N.Cruz rf
4 0 2 0 ABeltre 3b
4 0 2 0 Przynsc
4 0 1 0 Morlndlb
3 0 0 0 Profarss
3 0 0 0 DvMrplf
3 02 0 LMartncf
33 080 Totals
000 000 000
120 010 00x


ab r h bi
3 00 0
3 1 1 1
3 0 0 1
4 1 2 1
4 00 0
3 0 1 0
3 1 1 1
3 1 1 0
304 7 4
0
4


DP-Cincinnati 1, Texas 2. LOB-Cincinnati 7,
Texas 8. 2B-Cozart (17). SB-Andrus (17),
Dav.Murphy (1), L.Martin (14).
IP H RERBBSO


Cincinnati
Cueto L,4-2
Cingrani
Simon
LeCure
Texas
M.Perez W,2-1
Frasor H,3
R.Ross
WP-M.Perez.


1 2 1 1 0 1
4 4 3 3 6 3
2 1 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 1


62/36 0
11/31 0
1 1 0


T-2:51. A-41,218 (48,114).


Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at NewYork -130 Washington +120
atAtlanta -145 Arizona +135
at Colorado -130 San Francisco +120
San Diego -115 at Miami +105
at Pittsburgh -200 Milwaukee +185
atLA -115 Philadelphia +105
American League
at Boston -150 Toronto +140
atChicago -110 Cleveland +100
at Minnesota -110 Kansas City +100
Los Angeles -140 at Houston +130
Detroit -145 atTampa Bay +135
at Baltimore -125 NewYork +115
Interleague
St. Louis -110 ateOakland +100
at Texas -115 Cincinnati +105
Chicago (NL) -115 at Seattle +105


BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE Suspended
Cleveland RHP Dillon Howard (AZL Indians) 50
games for testing positive for an amphetamine
in violation of the Minor League Drug Preven-
tion and Treatment Program.
American League
DETROIT TIGERS Assigned RHP Jose
Valverde outright to Toledo (IL). Recalled RHP
Bruce Rondon from Toledo. Agreed to terms
with RHP Will LaMarche and OFs Raphael
Rhymes and Adrian Castano on minor league
contracts.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS-Released RHP Mark
Prior.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Reinstated
OF/1B Scott Van Slyke from the 15-day DL.
Designated INF Luis Cruz for assignment.
NEWYORK METS- SentSS Ruben Tejada
to the Gulf Coast League Mets for a rehab as-
signment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Assigned C
Stephen Lerud outright to Lehigh Valley (IL).


BASEBALL
Continued from Page B1


The tall right-hander faced one batter over the
minimum, striking out four and walking none.
O'Callaghan struck out two batters and walked
one in his inning of relief. In fact, Lady Lake did-
n't hit a ball out of the infield in its 20 plate
appearances.
Two Crystal River errors kept it from being a
perfect game.
"Brian really just started pitching this year,"
Crystal River manager Toby Klein said, "and that
was his best performance of the whole year He
was kind of upset that I took him out but I wanted
to save him for the rest of the tournament"
Offensively, Cole Mann and O'Callaghan each
had two hits for their team, which had six total.
Mann started the scoring by one-hopping a
double to the wall with the bases loaded in the
bottom of the first to clear the bags and put Crys-
tal River up 3-0. Prior to the big hit the team's
only extra-base knock of the contest Crystal
River drew three straight two-out walks.
Klein scored three times by drawing two walks
and singling, and O'Callaghan had two RBIs and
two runs scored as well.
Crystal River added another run in the fourth
inning, before plating a combined six runs in the
fifth and sixth frames to enact the mercy rule.
Despite the 10 runs scored, Toby Klein said
Crystal River needs to improve offensively
Catcher Chris Bull also scored twice for Crys-
tal River, who plays Dunnellon at 10 a.m. today
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle sports
editor He can be emailed at jmsoracchi@
chronicleonline.com or reached at352-564-2928.




SOFTBALL
Continued from Page B1


Kaleigh Thomas did great behind the plate."
9 and 10 Softball
Inverness 13,
South Sumter 1, four inn.
Inverness pitcher Maddie Linhart tossed a
one-hitter and struck out seven in leading her
team to the victory
"Maddie Linhart is always a good pitcher,"
Inverness coach Chris Lewis said. "She throws
hard."
Inverness's Jade Larisy scored three runs.
Ashton Lewis, Jalena Alexander and Linhart
all scored two runs each.
Inverness took advantage of 10 bases on balls
and three errors. Inverness had five hits.
Inverness is now 3-1 in the tournament
South Sumter's Makenzie Lawrence walked
and scored the lone Sumter run on an error.
Senior Softball
Inverness 21,
Dunnellon 2, five inn.
Inverness hurler Courtney Tidwell was the
winning pitcher and had two hits and two runs
batted in.
Angel Hardy had a two-run double and three
RBIs. Moriah Martin also had a two-run dou-
ble. Darian Stephens had three RBIs.
Savannah Banning had three runs and three
runs batted in.
Kira Morgan had an RBI single.
Alyssa Sloan scored three runs and had an
RBI single.
Madison Ogle scored three runs, doubled
and drove in a run.




WIMBLEDON
Continued from Page B1


stuff. But there are papers in the locker room,"
Murray continued with a chuckle, "so you see
some of the headlines and stuff. It's not that
helpful."
Nadal's stunning first-round exit, for example,
was viewed mainly through the prism of how that
result helped Murray, who could have faced the
12-time major champion in the semifinals. "'Adios
Rafa. Hello Andy Wimbledon dreams again,"
read a headline in The Times of London. The
Daily Mail's take: "Great start for Andy Rafa's
out"
All in all, then, Friday was a perfectly British
day, and not simply because Murray won his
third straight-set match in a row. The lone other
remaining singles player from the host country,
19-year-old Laura Robson, made her way into the
third round at Wimbledon for the first time, de-
feating 117th-ranked qualifier Mariana Duque-
Marino of Colombia 6-4, 6-1.
That match, like Murray's, was played with the
Centre Court covered because of rain that played
havoc with the schedule, and Robson heard her
share of rowdy support, too. She also was sere-
naded with the "Awwwwwww" that often accom-
panies a mistake by a player the crowd really
cares about
"I love when people get involved," Robson
said. "Sometimes they do, like, a massive groan if
I hit a double-fault, but I'm doing it as well. So,
yeah, we're just living it together"
Robson eliminated 10th-seeded Maria Kir-
ilenko in the first round, part of a wild first week.
All told, four top-10 men (each on Murray's half,
coincidentally) and six top-10 women lost al-
ready equaling the worst performance by the
highest seeds at any Grand Slam tournament in
the 45-year history of the Open era.
Speaking about the anyone-can-beat-anyone
feel, 37th-ranked Jurgen Melzer of Austria said:
"There has been so much talk about it, you can-
not ignore it"


He did manage to put a stop to it, however, at
least as far as Sergiy Stakhovsky was concerned.
Two days after serving-and-volleying his way past
defending champion Federer, Stakhovsky played
like a guy ranked 116th, losing 6-2, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3 to
Melzer
It's a common sight at major tournaments: An
unknown player knocks out a big name, then fails
to follow it up with another victory
The same thing happened to 66th-ranked Eu-
genie Bouchard of Canada, who went from beat-
ing 12th-seeded Ana Ivanovic, the 2008 French
Open titlist, on Wednesday to losing to No. 19
Carla Suarez Navarro 7-5, 6-2 on Friday. And
131st-ranked qualifier Michelle Larcher de Brito
of Portugal, who eliminated four-time major
champion Maria Sharapova in the second round,
then bowed out 7-5, 6-2 against 104th-ranked
Karin Knapp of Italy in the third.


SCOREBOARD


R
J,
D
c
J
c
s




MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto





Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Braves 3,
Diamondbacks 0
Arizona Atlanta


ab rh bi ab rh bi
GParracf 4 0 0 0 Smmnsss 5 1 1 1
A.Hill2b 4 0 1 0 Heywrdrf 5 1 2 0
Gldschlb 3 0 0 0 J.Uptonlf 3 0 1 1
MMntrc 4 0 0 0 FFrmnlb 3 0 1 0
Prado 3b 2 0 1 0 McCnnc 4 00 0
Kubel If 3 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 4 1 2 0
C.Rossrf 2 0 0 0 BUptoncf 3 0 2 0
Gregrs ss 3 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 2 0 0 0
Delgadp 1 01 0 Janish 3b 0 00 0
WHarrsp 0 00 0 Tehernp 2 0 1 0
Sippp 0 00 0 Pstrnckph 1 00 0
Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0
Spruill p 0 0 0 0 Walden p 0 0 0 0
RJhnsnph 1 0 1 1
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Totals 27 040 Totals 333113
Arizona 000 000 000 0
Atlanta 100 010 01x 3
DP-Arizona 2, Atlanta 2. LOB-Arizona 4, At-
lanta 11. 2B-A.Hill (5), Heyward (10), B.Upton
2 (10). 3B-Uggla (3). HR-Simmons (6). CS-
C.Ross (2). S-Delgado.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
DelgadoL,0-2 6 8 2 2 3 3
W.Harris 2/3 0 0 0 1 1
Sipp 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
Spruill 1 2 1 1 1 1
Atlanta
TeheranW,6-4 6 4 0 0 1 10
Avilan H,13 11/30 0 0 1 0
Walden H,6 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel S.23-26 1 0 0 0 1 0
T-3:00. A-48,282 (49,586).

Padres 9, Marlins 2


San Diego

Forsyth 2b
Amarst cf
Quentin If
BSmith p
Headly 3b
Blanks 1lb
Grandl c
Venale rf
Ciriaco ss
Volquez p
Vincent p
Guzmn ph
Denorfi If

Totals
San Diego
Miami


Miami


ab r h bi
4 1 3 2 Pierre If
5 1 2 1 Polanc3b
5 0 1 0 Stantonrf
0 0 0 0 Morrsn lb
5 22 0 Ozunacf
5 1 1 0 Brantlyc
4 2 2 1 Hchvrr ss
5 1 3 3 Dietrch 2b
4 0 0 0 Nolasco p
2 1 1 0 Webb p
0 0 0 0 JBrown ph
1 0 0 0 DJnngs p
0 0 0 0 ARams p
Dobbs ph
40 9157 Totals
012 003 120
101 000 000


ab r h bi
5 0 1 0

4 01 10
4 1 2 1

4 0 1 0
3 00 0

4020
2000
0000
1 0 0 0
0 00 0
1000

362 9 2
9
2


E-Hechavarria (4). DP-Miami 1. LOB-San
Diego 7, Miami 9.2B-Blanks (11), Grandal (7),
Stanton (8), Dietrich (5). 3B-Amarista (2), Mor-
rison (2). HR-Forsythe (3). SB-Forsythe (2),
Headley (5). S-Volquez.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
VolquezW,6-6 6 7 2 2 1 8
Vincent 1 1 0 0 0 1
B.Smith 2 1 0 0 1 1
Miami
NolascoL,4-8 5 11 6 5 0 6
Webb 2 1 1 0 0 0
Da.Jennings 1 3 2 2 1 1
A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 1
Nolasco pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by A.Ramos (Grandal). PB-Brantly 2.
T-3:21. A-18,347 (37,442).

Nationals 6, Mets 4


Washington NewYork
ab r h bi
Spancf 4 1 2 0 EYonglIf
Rendon2b 3 1 0 0 DnMrp2b
Zmrmn3b 4 0 2 3 DWrght3b
AdLRclb 4 00 0 Byrdrf
Werthrf 4 1 1 0 Satin lb
Dsmnd ss 4 22 2 Buck c
Berndn If 4 1 1 0 Lagars cf
KSuzuk c 3 0 0 1 Quntnll ss
Detwilr p 1 00 0 Harvey p
Lmrdzz ph 1 0 0 0 Ardsm p
Ohlndrfp 0 0 0 0 Edginp
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Lyon p
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Rice p
TMoore ph 1 0 0 0 Vldspn ph
Storen p 0 0 0 0 Parnell p
Totals 34 686 Totals
Washington 000 010 032
NewYork 000 120 100


ab r h bi
5 1 1 0
5 1 1 0
5 1 2 0

3 03 2
4 00 0


00 00
3 0000
0 00 0
0 00 0
0 00
0000
1 0 0 0

374 9 3
6
4


E-Desmond (8), Ohlendorf (2). LOB-Wash-
ington 3, New York 9. 2B-Span (14), Zimmer-
man (16), Werth (6), Desmond (20), D.Wright
(16), Byrd (12), Satin 2 (3), Lagares (8). 3B-
Span (7). HR-Desmond (14). SF-K.Suzuki.


Washington
Detwiler
Ohlendorf
ClippardW,6-1
Storen S,2-5
NewYork
Harvey
Aardsma H,1
Edgin
Lyon BS,3-3
Rice
Parnell L,5-4


IP H R ER BB SO


Pirates 10, Brewers 3
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Aoki rf 3 1 1 0 SMarte If 5 2 3 2
Segurass 4 1 2 0 RMartnc 5 1 0 1
CGomzcf 5 1 2 0 McCtchcf 5 1 3 3
ArRmr3b 3 00 1 GJoneslb-rf 5 1 1 0
YBtncr3b 0 0 0 0 PAIvrz3b 4 1 2 1
Lucroyc 4 0 1 0 Walker 2b 4 1 1 2
JFrncslb 4 02 1 Sniderrf 2 1 0 0
Weeks2b 4 0 1 0 GSnchz 1 b 1 00 0
LSchfr If 3 0 1 0 Mercer ss 4 0 1 0
Hellwg p 1 0O0 0 Cole p 2 2 1 0
Grzlnyp 1 00 0 Reid p 1 0 0 0
Gindlph 1 000
Badnhp p 0 0 0 0
McGnzl p 0 00 0
Halton ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 3102 Totals 3810129
Milwaukee 300 000 000 3
Pittsburgh 071 001 01x 10
E-J.Francisco (5), Segura (7). DP-Pittsburgh
2. LOB-Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2B-Lucroy
(8), S.Marte (14), McCutchen (24), Walker (11).
3B-S.Marte (8). HR-McCutchen (9). CS-


Aoki (8).

Milwaukee
Hellweg L,0-1
Gorzelanny
Badenhop
Mic.Gonzalez
Pittsburgh
Cole W,4-0
Reid S,1-2


IP H R ER BB SO


12/36 7
31/33 1
2 2 1
1 1 1


5 2 1
1 0 5
1 0 0
1 0 2


6 8 3 3 3 3
3 2 0 0 1 4


Str Home Away
W-4 27-15 22-18
W-2 23-17 22-19
L-3 23-18 19-19
L-2 23-18 18-21
L-2 22-17 17-23




Str Home Away
W-1 26-11 20-23
W-1 22-16 18-23
L-1 19-18 19-24
L-1 14-24 18-20
L-1 15-24 12-27


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
35 .551 4
38 .519 2% 3 7
40 .474 6 6% 4
40 .467 6% 7 5
44 .421 10 10% 4


Str Home
W-1 26-16
W-1 24-15
L-1 19-19
W-1 20-17
L-2 17-16


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 49 30 .620 - 8-2 W-7 26-13 23-17
St. Louis 48 30 .615 % 4-6 L-1 22-16 26-14
Cincinnati 45 35 .563 4% 3-7 L-3 26-14 19-21
Chicago 33 44 .429 15 10% 5-5 W-2 17-22 16-22
Milwaukee 32 46 .410 16% 12 4-6 L-3 19-23 13-23


Texas
Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston





Arizona
San Diego
Colorado
San Fran.
Los Angeles


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
33 .588 -
34 .575 1 -- !
43 .456 10% 8 6
45 .430 12% 10 :
49 .380 16% 14 !



West Division
L Pct GB WC


Str Home
W-3 23-15
W-2 24-12
W-3 20-23
L-2 20-20
W-1 16-26




Str Home
L-1 21-16
W-1 25-18
L-3 23-18
L-4 24-15
W-6 23-20


Associated Press
Washington Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki tries to tag out New York's Marion Byrd, who scored in the fifth
inning Friday in New York.


Nats win after Harvey exits


Orioles rally pat AMERICAN LEAGUE the firstinning and hangon after a
nine-run lead dwindled to four.


Yanl eesc 4-.. Cleveland 19, Chicago White Sox 10, 1st game National League
Baltimore 4, N.YYankees 3 Braves 3
Detroit 6, Tampa Bay 3
Associated Prcss Boston 7, Toronto 5 Diamondbacks 0
Assocte ress Texas 4, Cincinnati 0
Kansas City at Minnesota, late ATLANTA Julio Teheran pitched
NEW YORK lan Desmond L.A. Angels at Houston, late six strong innings, Andrelton Simmons
doubled home the go-ahead run in Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, late homered and the Atlanta Braves beat
the ninth inning and the Washing- St. Louis at Oakland, late the Arizona Diamondbacks 3-0.
Chicago Cubs at Seattle, late the Arizona Diamondbacks 3-0.
ton Nationals rallied late after a Today The Braves, who have won three of
dominant Matt Harvey departed, St. Louis (Wainwright 10-5) at Oakland (J.Parker 6-6), four and lead second-place Washing-
overtaking the New York Mets 6-4 4:05 p.m.
Friday night Toronto(Rogers3-3)atBoston(Doubront4-3),4:05p.m. ton by 5 1/2 games in the NL East, re-
Hary struck out 11 and left Cleveland(U.Jimenez6-4)atChicagoWhiteSox(Axel- tired former All-Star third baseman
rod 3-4), 4:10 p.m. Chipper Jones' number before the
with a 4-1 lead after seven innings. Kansas City (WDavis 4-5) at Minnesota (Gibson 0-0), me
It was the latest gem for a pitcher 4:10 p.m. game.
who could start the All-Star game L.A. Angels (Blanton 1-10) at Houston (Lyles 4-2), 4:10 Teheran (6-4) allowed four hits, one
on the same Citi Field mound next p.m. walk and struck out 10.
month. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 5-7) at Seattle (Harang 3-7), The NL West-leading Diamond-
Ryan Zimmerman lined a three- Cincinnati(Leake7-3)atTexas(Tepesch3-6), 7:15 p.m. backs have lost three of four. They
run double with two outs in the Detroit(Verlander8-5)atTampaBay(Archer2-3),7:15 were shut out for the first time since
eighth that made it 4-all. The Mets p.m. losing 5-0 at San Francisco on Sept.
used four relievers in the inning, N.Y Yankees (D.Phelps 5-4) at Baltimore (Britton 1-2), 26, a span of 85 games.
and still couldn't protect the lead. Padres 9, Marlins 2
Jayson Werth, who had struck out NATIONAL LEAGUE Padres 9, Marlins 2
in all three at-bats against Harvey, Friday's Games MIAMI Will Venable drove in
hustled for a leadoff double in the Pittsburgh 10, Milwaukee 3 three runs and saved one with a diving
ninth against closer Bobby Parnell San Diego 9, Miami 2 catch in right field to help the San
Washington 6, N.Y Mets 4 Diego Padres beat Ricky Nolasco and
(5-4). Desmond doubled down the Atlanta 3, Arizona 0 Diego Padres beat Ricky Nolasco and
right-field line and later scored on a Texas 4, Cincinnati 0 the Miami Marlins, 9-2.
sacrifice fly by Kurt Suzuki. San Francisco at Colorado, late Logan Forsythe hit a two-run homer
Tyler Clippard (6-1) won in the re- St. Louis at Oakland, late f the Padres and had three of their
lief and Drew Storen got his second Chicago Cubs atSeattle, late 15 hits. Edinson Volquez (6-6) gave of their
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, late 15 hits. Edinson Volquez (6-6) gave up
save. Today two runs in six innings for the Padres,
The Mets lost after arriving back Washington (Jordan 0-0) at N.Y Mets (Gee 5-7), 1:10 who have outscored Miami 20-3 this
in New York at 4:30 a.m. after a one- p.m.
day trip to Denver for a makeup Arizona (Kennedy 3-4) at Atlanta (Hudson 4-7), 4:05 season while winning all four games.
game caused by an A pril snowout p.m. Nolasco (4-8), the subject of trade
game caused by an April snowou St. Louis (Wainwright 10-5) at Oakland (J.Parker 6-6), speculation, allowed six runs and 11
Harvey, however, had flown back 4:05 p.m.
home from Chicago on Wednesday San Francisco (M.Cain 5-4) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa hits in five-plus innings to match or sur-
night to rest up, and he was plenty 8-4), 4:10 p.m. pass his worst effort of the season in
ready San Diego (Stults 6-5) at Miami (Ja.Turner 1-0), 7:10 all three categories.
ready p.m. The Marlins' loss snapped a three-
Harvey retired the first 14 batters Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 5-7) at Seattle (Harang 3-7), The Marlins'loss snapped a three-
before Desmond homered with two 7:15 p.m. game winning streak that matched
outs in the fifth. The right-hander Cincinnati (Leake 7-3) atTexas (Tepesch 3-6), 7:15 p.m. their longest this year.
permitted just three hits, raised his Milwaukee (D.Hand 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Liriano6-3),7:15 Pirates 10 Brewers 3
NL-leading strikeout total to 132, Philadelphia(Lee9-2)atL.A.Dodgersm(Ryu6-3),10:10
dropped his league-best ERA to p.m. PITTSBURGH Gerrit Cole over-
2.00 and didn't issue a walk came a rocky start to become the first
Josh Satin doubled twice, singled Jays 7-5 after squandering a five-run Pirates pitcher to win his first four ca-
and drove in two runs for the Mets. lead. reer starts in more than a century and
A crowd of 28,363 turned out to The Red Sox had 15 hits, giving them Starling Marte missed the cycle a few
see the team with worst home at least 10 for the sixth time in seven feet short of a home run in Pitts-
record in the majors. But there's a games. They have 93 hits over that burgh's 10-3 victory over the Milwau-
different buzz when Harvey kee Brewers.
clappitchesng in hopes of a strikeout Andrew Miller (1-2) got the win with Cole (4-0) gave up three runs in the

when leadoff man Denard Span fell 1 1/3 scoreless innings. Koji Uehara first inning but no more as he made it
into an 0-2 hole. Harvey fanned pitched the ninth for his fourth save of through six innings, allowing eight hits
him, too. the season and third in three days. He with three walks and three strikeouts.
American League retired all nine batters he faced in that Nick Maddox started 4-0 in his first
American League span, six on strikeouts. four starts in 1907.
Orioles 4, Yankees 3 The Red Sox won their fourth in a Johnny Hellweg (0-1) failed to get
BALTIMORE Nate McLouth hit a row and improved to 49-33, the best out of the second inning in his major
tiebreaking homer off CC Sabathia in the record in the AL. They're 16 games over league debut, giving up seven runs -
seventh inning, Manny Machado had .500 for the first time since they finished five earned in 1 2/3 innings.
two RBIs and the Baltimore Orioles ral- the 2011 season at 90-72. Last season, Marte had a double and triple
lied to beat the New York Yankees 4-3. the Red Sox won just 69 games. among his three hits, and just missed
Orioles rookie Kevin Gausman (1-3) Toronto lost its second game of the a homer in the eighth when he flied
earned his first major league victory, al- series after coming to Boston with 12 out to deep center field.
lowing three hits over 4 1/3 innings as wins in its previous 14 games. Interleague
part of a relief crew that blanked the Yan- Indians 19, Rangers 4, Reds 0
kees over the final six innings. White S 10 ARLINGTON, Texas Martin
Gausman followed Rule 5 draftee T.J. White Sox 10 ARLINGTON, Texas Martin
McFarland, who yielded three runs in 2 CHICAGO Jason Kipnis reached Perez pitched six-hit ball into the sev-
2/3 innings in his first major league start. base six times and scored four runs, enth inning and the AL West-leading
Tommy Hunter got the final six outs Ryan Raburn homered and drove in Texas Rangers beat the scuffling
for his second save. Orioles manager four, and the Cleveland Indians rallied Cincinnati Reds 4-0.
Buck Showalter opted against using from five down early on to pound the The Reds have lost three in a row,
doser Jim Johnson, who has blown five Chicago White Sox 19-10 in Game 1 and six of seven. They also have
save opportunities this season. of a doubleheader on Friday. more concerns about right-hander
Sabathia (8-6) took a no-hitter and a The Indians matched a season high Johnny Cueto (4-2), their opening day
3-0 lead into the sixth. for runs. They also set one with eight starter already on the disabled list
Red Sox 7, Blue Jays5 doubles while falling one hit shy of twice this season who left after a bat-
e ays their season best with 21 in a game ter into the second inning because of
BOSTON Jonny Gomes broke a that lasted just over four hours. rightness in his right lat muscle.
tie with a seventh-inning single and the Yet despite all that, Cleveland had Perez (2-1) struck out three in 6 2/3
Boston Red Sox beat the Toronto Blue to dig itself out of a five-run hole after innings.


B4 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


Detroit Tampa Bay
ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 4 1 0 0 Joyce If
TrHntrrf 4 0 0 0 DJnngscf
MiCarr3b 4 3 4 3 Zobrist2b
Fielder lb 3 2 2 2 Longori 3b
VMrtnzdh 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn3b
JhPerltss 4 0 0 0 Loney lb
D.Kelly If 4 0 1 0 WMyrs rf
Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 Scott dh
B.Penac 2 0 0 0 Loatonc
YEscor ss
Totals 32 68 5 Totals
Detroit 200 200 020


ab rh bi
3 00 0
4 00 0
4 1 1 1
1 0 0 0
3 00 0
4 0 1 0
4 2 2 1
4 0 1 1
3 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
323 5 3
6


Tampa Bay 000 110 100 3
DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Detroit 4, Tampa Bay
4. 2B-Mi.Cabrera (20), Fielder (21), Scott (8).
HR-Mi.Cabrera 2 (24), Fielder (13), Zobrist (5),
WMyers (3). SB-Infante (4), YEscobar (2). S-
B.Pena.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
SchererzW,12-0 7 4 3 3 1 9
Alburquerque H,5 2/3 0 0 0 1 2
SmylyH,8 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
BenoitS,5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2
Tampa Bay
ColomeL,1-1 6 4 4 4 2 2
J.Wright 1 1 0 0 0 2
Farnsworth 1/3 1 1 1 0 0
C.Ramos 12/32 1 1 1 0
HBP-by Colome (B.Pena). WP-Colome.
T-2:59. A-17,645 (34,078).

Orioles 4, Yankees 3
NewYork Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gardnr cf 5 1 2 0 Markks rf 4 00 0
J.Nixss 5 1 1 0 Machd3b 4 1 1 2
Cano 2b 5 1 3 1 Hardy ss 4 00 0
V.Wells dh 3 0 1 1 A.Jones cf 3 0 1 1
Hafnerph 1 0 0 0 C.Davislb 3 0 0 0
ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0 Wieters c 3 00 0
Almont If 4 0 1 0 Valenci dh 3 0 0 0
CStwrtc 4 0 1 1 McLothlf 3 22 1
DAdmslb 2 0 1 0 ACasill2b 3 1 1 0
Overaylb 1 0 1 0
AIGnzlz 3b 4 0 0 0
Totals 38 311 3 Totals 30 4 5 4
NewYork 102 000 000 3
Baltimore 000 003 10x 4
E-Alb.Gonzalez (1). LOB-New York 9, Balti-
more 2.2B-Gardner (18), Machado (37). HR-
McLouth (5). SB-Almonte (2).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Sabathia L,8-6 7 5 4 4 0 6
Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
McFarland 22/37 3 3 1 4
GausmanW,1-3 41/33 0 0 0 4
Tom.HunterS,2-3 2 1 0 0 0 3
T-2:47. A-40,041 (45,971).

Red Sox 7,
Blue Jays 5


Toronto


Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Reyesss 5 1 1 0 Ellsurycf 5 1 2 2
Bautistrf 4 1 1 1 Victornrf 5 1 1 0
Encrncdh 3 1 2 2 Pedroia2b 5 1 3 0
Lindlb 3 0 1 1 D.Ortizdh 4 0 1 0
CIRsmscf 4 0 0 0 Napolilb 2 1 1 1
RDavis If 4 1 2 0 Nava If 3 1 2 0
Arencii c 4 0 0 0 JGomsph-lf 1 0 1 1
Mlzturs3b 3 1 1 1 Sltlmchc 3 00 1
Bonifac2b 3 0 0 0 Drew ss 2 02 2
BSnydr pr-3b 2 1 0 0
Iglesias3b-ss4 1 2 0
Totals 33 585 Totals 367157
Toronto 000 031 100 5
Boston 021 200 20x 7
E-Drew (3). DP-Toronto 2, Boston 1. LOB-
Toronto 5, Boston 9. 2B-Drew (14). 3B-Pe-
droia (1), Drew (6). HR-Encarnacion (23).
SB-R.Davis 2(16), Iglesias (2). SF-Lind, M.Iz-


Toronto
Jo.Johnson
Loup
Wagner L,1-2
Cecil
Oliver
Janssen
Boston
Webster


IP H RERBBSO

31/38 5 5 2 5
2 2 0 0 0 1
2/3 3 2 2 0 0
1/3 1 0 0 1 1
2/3 0 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 0 0

6 6 4 4 2 3


A.Bailey BS,5-13 2/3 1 1 1 0
A.MillerW,1-2 11/31 0 0 0
UeharaS,4-5 1 0 0 0 0
Wagner pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP-Cecil, Webster. PB-Arencibia.
T-3:22. A-36,383 (37,499).

Indians 19,
White Sox 10


Cleveland
ab
Stubbs cf 6
ACarer ss 7
Kipnis 2b 4
Swisher dh 4
MrRynI lb 4
Raburn rf 5
YGomsc 5
Chsnhll 3b 6
Aviles If 6


Chicago
rhbi ab r h bi
1 2 3 DeAzacf-lf 2 1 1 0
33 0 AIRmrz ss 5 1 1 0
4 3 2 Rios rf 4 00 1
2 2 2 A.Dunnlb 4 22 2
2 1 1 Gillaspilb 0 0 0 0
22 24 Viciedolf 5 1 1 0
23 2 JrDnkscf 0 00 0
1 2 2 Kppngr dh 4 23 2
2 3 2 Morel 3b 5 1 1 0
Bckhm 2b 5 1 3 2
Flowrsc 4 1 1 3


Totals 47192118 Totals 38101310
Cleveland 050 630 230 19
Chicago 500 041 000 10
E-Kipnis (6), AI.Ramirez (14). DP-Cleveland
1, Chicago 1. LOB-Cleveland 11, Chicago 8.
2B-Kipnis 3 (22), Swisher (15), YGomes (5),
Chisenhall 2 (8), Aviles (9), De Aza (14), Viciedo
(9), Beckham (8). 3B-Stubbs (2). HR-Raburn
(9), A.Dunn (21), Keppinger (2), Flowers (8).
SB-Kipnis (18), Aviles (6), Morel (1). SF-Rios.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Bauer 2/3 6 5 5 1 0
AlbersW,2-0 21/32 0 0 0 1
Shaw 12/31 3 3 2 2
Allen 11/32 2 1 1 0
JSmith 1 0 0 0 1 1
Pestano 1 2 0 0 0 1
C.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
H.Santiago 21/37 5 5 3 5
Omogrosso L,0-2 21/39 9 9 2 2
Troncoso 22/33 5 4 3 2
Lindstrom 2/3 2 0 0 0 1
C.Wells 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Bauer (Flowers), by H.Santiago
(Raburn). WP-Bauer, Allen.
T-4:02. A-0 (40,615).


Rays schedule
June 29 vs Detroit
June 30 vs Detroit
July 1 at Houston
July 2 at Houston
July 3 at Houston
July 4 at Houston
July 5 vs Chicago Sox
July 6 vs Chicago Sox
July 7 vs Chicago Sox
July 8 vs Minnesota
July 9 vs Minnesota
July 10 vs Minnesota
July 11 vs Minnesota
July 12 vs Houston
July 13 vs Houston
July 14 vs Houston
July 19 at Toronto
July 20 at Toronto
July 21 at Toronto
July 22 at Boston
July 23 at Boston
July 24 at Boston


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Tigers 6, Rays 3


1 - "I "


**J




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dwyane2.0?


Magic hope

Oladipo lives

up to Wade

comparisons

Associated Press

ORLANDO Fbr Victor
Oladipo, the Orlando
Magic's first-round draft
choice, the comparisons to
Dwyane Wade are in-
evitable, and a little over
the top.
"I don't know whether
it's fair or it's just because
Tom Crean is my coach,"
Oladipo said Friday, the
day after Orlando took him
second overall in the NBA
draft. "We have similar
parts to our game. I'm just
trying to be the best Victor
Oladipo possible."
Wade played for Crean at
Marquette before being
drafted fifth overall by the
Miami Heat in 2003 and
going on to NBA stardom.
Oladipo, who played three
years at Indiana for Crean,
is about an inch shorter, but
similarly athletic and
tenacious.
"I'm not big on compar-
isons because it's not fair to
Dwyane," Crean said.
"Dwyane's one of the best
players in the world, and
Victor just turned 21. When
it comes to the kind of peo-
ple that they are, the kind
of teammates they are, the
way they made their team-
mates better, (the compari-
son) is huge.
"Dwyane came in with
much more of a scorer's
mindset than Victor had,"
added Crean. "Victor didn't
come with a scorer's mind-
set; he came in with energy,
a get-to-the-rim, defensive
mindset, and he became so
much more of a scorer"
Oladipo averaged 13.6
points in his final season at
Indiana and 10.7 over three
years, modest numbers for
the No. 2 pick in the draft
He has never considered
himself a scorer
"Growing up, (playing
defense) was pretty much
all I could do," he said. "My
family and my coaches can
attest to that I had no other
skill. For me to stay on the
court, I had to play defense.
So I was willing to guard


Associated Press
First round draft pick Victor Oladipo displays his new
Orlando Magic jersey Friday at a news conference in
Orlando


the other team's best offen-
sive player just for me to be
on the floor And of course I
wanted to win. It's why I am
here today"
Coming off a 20-62 sea-
son, the Magic are open
about which backcourt po-
sition Oladipo will play
They want him to play like
he played at Indiana.
"When we sat down with
him it became apparent
that he's about what we
want to be about," said gen-
eral manager Rob Henni-
gan. "He views the game
how we want players to
view the game. He has a
sense of urgency and inten-
sity that will bode well for
him and us."
Even in considering
Oladipo's position, the
comparison with Wade
came up.
"What we did with him is
what I did with Dwyane
Wade his last year," Crean
said. "Dwyane played 32
minutes a game and about
six of those minutes were
at the point because he
needed to have that in his
system. And Miami actually
drafted him as a point
guard.
"There's no question


Victor Oladipo is a guard,
but we needed him on the
offensive boards. He's just
such a basketball player
that you don't want to take
his strengths away from
him, but building that
strength of being able to
run an offense is some-
thing we were very con-
scious of."
It is at the defensive end
of the floor that the com-
parison is most valid.
Crean said Wade and
Oladipo are the only play-
ers he has coached to aver-
age more than 12
deflections in a game for a
season. Oladipo also set a
school record with 78 steals
and was the Big Ten De-
fensive Player of the Year
It vaulted him up the draft
charts.
'A year ago, nobody was
saying one word about me
and nobody really knew
who I was," he said. "I
know where I've come
from. I know what kind of
background that I come
from. At the end of the day,
accolades are nice, but if
you don't produce it can all
be taken from you in a
second."


Associated Press
Boston center Kevin Garnett, right, chats with teammate Paul Pierce on the bench
March 13 in Boston. The Brooklyn Nets will acquire Pierce and Garnett from the Celtics.
The trade can't be completed until July 10, after next season's salary cap is set.


Starting over in Boston


End of era as Celtics

rebuild without duo

Associated Press

BOSTON Letting Doc Rivers go to the
Los Angeles Clippers was the first sign.
Getting rid of Paul Pierce and Kevin
Garnett clinched it
The Boston Celtics are rebuilding.
The Celtics have agreed to the terms of a
deal that would send the two remaining
members of the Big Three that won the
2008 NBA title to the Brooklyn Nets for a
package of draft picks and players. Garnett
is a future Hall of Famer, but it's Pierce's
departure that signals the end of an era for
the league's most-decorated franchise.
"It's sad to see everybody leave Boston.
You just want them to go someplace where
they have a chance to win, and they have,"
Rivers said at Clippers draft headquarters
late Thursday night "It's a great trade for
Boston, too; not now, later Danny wanted
to rebuild, and that's what he's doing."
The longest-tenured member of the
Celtics, Pierce is the team's captain, a 10-
time All-Star and a likely Hall of Famer He
is the second-leading scorer in the history
of the NBA's most-decorated franchise, and
also is in the team's top seven in rebounds,
assists, steals, games and minutes played.
Garnett is also a future Hall of Famer,
though only the last six years of his career
were in Boston. It's Pierce, who slipped to
10th in the 1998 draft and has been a Celtic
ever since, who had a chance to spend his
entire career with the franchise and add
his name to a list that includes Hall of
Famers Larry Bird, Bill Russell and John
Havlicek
(But not Bob Cousy, Robert Parish or
even Red Auerbach.)
"(It's) sort of sad. You hate to see it," said
Chicago Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau, who
was an assistant on the Celtics 2008 cham-
pionship team. "But that's the NBA. It's
constant change, and you have to be ready


to adapt I think what Paul Pierce did for
that franchise and Kevin I think's it's
good for them. They have an opportunity to
continue on.
"Good for the Celtics, where they can
start their rebuilding"
Pierce was drafted in the Rick Pitino era
when the Celtics, already in the midst of
the longest championship drought in fran-
chise history, were a year removed from
the second-worst record in the NBA (a
mark that was not good enough to land
them the top prize in the draft, Tim
Duncan).
He helped the team reach the Eastern
Conference finals in 2002. But, convinced
that they were not likely to go farther, Ainge
was brought in the next year to tear things
apart again.
Boston plummeted back into the NBA
lottery and again bad luck prevented them
from landing a franchise player like Kevin
Durant Instead, Ainge swung deals for
Garnett and Allen that earned the Celtics
their NBA-record 17th championship in
the very first year
But Garnett was injured the next year,
and Kendrick Perkins went down in Game
6 of the finals in 2010, when the Celtics lost
to the Los Angeles Lakers in seven games.
Then came two eliminations by Miami and,
after five straight division titles, a third-
place finish and first-round loss to the New
York Knicks.
Ainge was convinced that the time had
come to start over
Rivers' exit was negotiated with the Clip-
pers, landing Boston a first-round draft
choice in 2015 and freeing the Celtics from
the $21 million remaining on his contract
Garnett and Pierce will go to Brooklyn as
soon as the deal can be finalized on July 10.
Yahoo Sports, which first reported the
talks, said the Nets would also get veteran
Jason Terry from Boston and send Gerald
Wallace, Kris Joseph, the expiring deal of
Kris Humphries and first-round picks in
2014,2016 and 2018 to the Celtics. Boston is
left with Rajon Rondo, Jeff Green and
Avery Bradley, along with Jared Sullinger
and first-round draft pick Kelly Olynyk


Cavendish covets Tour de France yellow jersey


Three-week race gets

underway today

Associated Press

PORTO VECCHIO, Corsica Soccer's
World Cup. Football's Vince Lombardi
Trophy Hockey's Stanley Cup.
And, of course, the yellow jersey No
list of the most famous trophies in sports
can be complete if it doesn't include that
gaudy shirt from the Tour de France -
and British speedster Mark Cavendish
aims to get his hands on the first one this
year
Over the next three weeks, 21 of them
will be distributed at the 100th Tour.
None will be more important than the
last one worn by the overall winner on
the Champs-Elysees in Paris on July 21.
Many pundits believe that will be either
Britain's Chris Froome or two-time Tour
champion Alberto Contador of Spain.
But it would be a mistake to reduce the
Tour to a two-horse race. Multiple heart-
breaks, crashes and other dramas await
over the meandering 2,110-mile trek
along wind-swept sea sides, through flat
plains and Alpine and Pyrenean moun-
tain punishment, and even to a medieval
island citadel in the English Channel.
The first story could be written by
Cavendish: the "Manx Missile" is a fa-
vorite to win the mostly flat Stage 1 (132
miles) from Porto Vecchio to Bastia in the
race debut on the French Mediterranean
island of Corsica today
The Briton, whose muscle, timing and
accelerations make him the finest
sprinter of his generation, has already
won other coveted prizes in his sport. In
2011, he won both the green jersey given
to the best Tour sprinter and the rain-
bow-striped jersey awarded to cycling's
road-race world champion.
The yellow jersey, however, has eluded
his grasp.
"It's not just one of the most iconic sym-
bols in cycling, it's one of the most iconic
symbols in the world of sport," Cavendish
said. "To be able to wear that for at least
a day in your life, it's a thing to make any
rider's career. It's a thing you dream
about when you're a child. It would be a
beautiful thing."
Cycling could use some beautiful


Associated Press
Alberto Contador of Spain, left, trains Friday ahead of the start of Tour de France
cycling race in Porto Vecchio, southern Corsica island, France. The race starts in Porto
Vecchio today and the 198-rider peloton, or pack, is to cover 2,110 miles over three
weeks, 21 stages and two rest days, before an unusual nighttime finish July 21 on the
Champs-Elysees in Paris.
things. This is the first Tour since Lance Mediterranean.
Armstrong was stripped of his record Contador predicts an action-packed
seven victories for doping, which he fi- race in this comeback year for him. The
nally acknowledged on U.S. television 30-year-old Spaniard was stripped of his
after years of denials that were exposed 2010 Tour title and missed out last year
as lies by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency over a doping ban. He could be the
Despite millions spent on fighting drug biggest danger for Froome. Both riders
use in the peloton, blasts from cycling's excel in mountain climbs that feature
checkered past keep on coming. Ahead of heavily this year. But Contador said there
this race, French media reported that a would be more to this Tour than simply
Senate investigation into the effective- their rivalry
ness of doping controls pieced together "This year won't just be the story of two
evidence that a urine sample provided by riders; we'll have more actors in this
long-beloved French rider Laurent Jal- film," he said.
abert contained EPO, cycling's designer "This year will see more action than in
drug, at the Tour of 1998. past years," he added. Of Froome, he
Tour organizers will be hoping the rac- said: "I would have no motivation to be
ing drama of the next three weeks will here if I thought I couldn't beat him."
push such miseries to the background. Among longer-shot contenders are 2011
In the traditional pre-race presenta- Tour winner Cadel Evans of Australia -
tion, the 22 teams took a stage one after though at 36, his legs aren't the freshest
the other Thursday in Porto Vecchio, with and his young BMC teammate Tejay
its idyllic mountain backdrop on France's Van Garderen of the United States, plus
"isle of beauty." Hundreds of fans Spaniards Alejandro Valverde of Movis-
clapped politely, as white yachts stuck up tar and Joaquim Rodriguez of Katusha.
like teeth from the shimmering blue Bradley Wiggins, the 2012 Tour winner


and a Sky teammate of Froome, is in-
jured and sitting out this year. Last year,
Froome was more impressive than Wig-
gins in the mountains, but that race was
more heavily weighted to time trials -
Wiggins' specialty than in this year's
edition.
Like Wiggins last year, Froome has had
a nearly flawless run-up to the Tour: the
28-year-old Kenyan-born Briton won four
of five races he started. He said he's con-
fident, but not fond of the "favorite"
moniker
"It's an absolute privilege for me to be
in this position," he said, but "there is a
certain amount of pressure that comes
with it."
"Coming in as the race favorite sets
that precedent of people looking to beat
you ... so it definitely opens doors that
people may be ganging up," he said, ac-
knowledging the possibility that
Valverde, Contador and Rodriguez might
form a Spanish alliance against him.
Contador is high in Froome's mind.
"I don't think we have seen Contador at
his best yet," he said. "His goal was never
to perform well at any of the races build-
ing up to the Tour, but then to come to the
Tour at his absolute best. I believe he'll
be here at his best and that's what we'll
expect."
Andy Schleck, who inherited the 2010
title stripped from Contador for testing
positive for the muscle-building drug
clenbuterol, said this year's mountainous
course would have suited him under nor-
mal circumstances. But he's coming off a
rough year, including a crash injury to his
lower back that kept him out last year.
The Luxembourg rider considers himself
an "outsider," not a favorite.
The race spends three days on Cor-
sica's winding, hilly roads. It then sets off
on a clockwise run through mainland
France along the Mediterranean, into the
Pyrenees, then up to Brittany and the fa-
bled Mont-Saint-Michel island citadel be-
fore a slashing jaunt southeastward
toward the Alps before the Paris finish.
"The Tour's always full of surprises,"
said Garmin-Sharp team director
Jonathan Vaughters, insisting his Ameri-
can squad could have contenders like
Ryder Hesjedal of Canada and Andrew
Talansky of the United States. "The easy
answer is: Yes, it's Chris Froome vs. Al-
berto Contador, but I think we're going to
try and make the answer not as easy"


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Good as new


BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Travis Nichols (51) got sent into the wall on April 27, but rebounded two months later last Saturday by winning his
second Figure 8 feature race of the season at the Citrus County Speedway in Inverness.

Nichols recovers from wreck two months ago with a victory


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Travis Nichols had come a long
way since he and his No. 51 street
stock were forced over the second-
turn wall eight weeks prior on April
27. En route to notching his second
win of the season in last Saturday's
Figure 8 (street and pure stocks) fea-
ture, the 36-year-old began lapping
the back of the field with a runaway
lead in the same blue and silver ma-
chine that lost its body while up-
ended in the earlier crash that drew
a collective gasp from the crowd.
"We've been working on this thing
for quite a while after it got put over
the wall the second race of the year,"
Nichols said after the victory "It got
tore all to pieces, but we've got it
back pretty close now."
Nichols said the wreck came after
a dispute with another driver.
"We didn't have the car ready for
the beginning of the year, so I bor-
rowed the No. 33 car and won the
first race with it," the Brooksville
driver said. "There was an alterca-
tion with another gentleman who got
a flat tire, and they swore up and
down when I bring this (No. 51) out,
they're going to destroy it. I had just
put a new body on it and, sure
enough, they put me over the wall
and the body got tore off.
"The blood started boiling," he
added. "It's the nature of the beast.
The sport and this place in gen-
eral brings out the best and worst
of you. The people who keep it
under control the best are the peo-
ple that come out on top."
Nichols' perspective comes from
21 years of experience as a driver, as
he's part of a 1992 Citrus County
Speedway class that also includes
Street Stock driver Curtis Flanagan
and Modified Mini Stock driver
Chris Allen, both current leaders in
their respective divisions. Several
members of Nichols' extended fam-
ily, including his father John Dry,
who recently competed in the Pure
Stock class, and his uncle Allen
Peckham (Super Late Models and


Street Stocks) have raced at the In-
verness track over the years.
"I've been coming here since I was
2 years old, watching my dad and
everything," Nichols said. "It's been
a family thing. There've been a lot of
people come and go, but there're
still some core people who've been
here since I started racing. I re-
member watching (pace car driver)
Benny Stevenson as a kid when they
called him Gentle Ben, and he used
to wear people out."
Nichols now does double-duty at
the Speedway as a tech official,
which limits his driving opportuni-
ties but offers a balance between his
family life and racing.
"I had some fun traveling around
and racing in the Fast Trucks Series
and Southern Sportsman Series, but
the economy and life happens, so
you can't be spending seven nights a
week in the garage. Stuff gets sold
off, houses and boats get bought, and
everything else.
"I couldn't afford to race here any-
more, but I'd come up here off and
on," Nichols added. "(CCS general
manager Don) 'Critter' (Cretty)
asked me to try my hand at it, and it
was a way for me to stay in the sport
and make some money at it.
"Figure 8s is the only class I'm al-
lowed to run as employee of track.
It's a whole different rush than any-
thing else. You're turning left and
right, and you're trying to pass peo-
ple on the straightaway and avoid
getting clipped or clipping someone
else in the intersection while hitting
your marks."
Nichols remembers one piece of
important advice he received upon
entering the class.
"My dad taught me that when you
come across the corners and you've
got two people in the intersection,
you ask yourself two questions, Are
they faster than me? Or dumber than
me?' and if the answer is yes to either
question then you lift and let 'em go.
I've been put over the wall, but I
haven't had any intersection ordeals."
Nichols' car, which he built in
1995 and revived late last season


with a first- and second-place finish
after it had a 12-year layoff, is owned
by fellow Brooksville Figure 8 driver
Pnut Higginbotham.
Higginbotham also has a feature
win this season, making the team
three for four in Figure 8s.
"He's rough on equipment," Hig-
ginbotham said after last Saturday's
race while jokingly giving his friend
a hard time. "He rents from me too,
so I'll kick him out if he gives me
much trouble.
"No, he did what he was supposed
to do and went up there and got the
money He's a good driver so I'll
keep him another month."
Nichols counts 2001, when he won
a Street Stock championship, and
2003 as his best seasons, and re-
members that time fondly in the
context of his then-car owner and
late father-in-law John Wylie.
"Before my first night out driving
for (Wylie) in 2001, we sat down over
beers and discussed what we each
wanted," Nichols recalled. "He said
he wanted a feature win and I said I
wanted a championship.
"I won the feature the first night
out and he said, 'I guess it's time to
shoot for your goal now'
"He died right before we started the
2003 season, which made that year bit-
tersweet because we pretty much had
the fastest car to beat, but he wasn't
there to enjoy it We were very com-
petitive while traveling around and
winning races at different tracks."
Despite the incident in April,
which likely cost him an otherwise
strong shot at the points champi-
onship with just three races remain-
ing, Nichols feels the good
outweighs the bad due to the com-
radery with fellow drivers.
"There's a group of us that help
each other out, information-wise or
turning some wrenches," he said.
"You meet a lot good people. It's a
cliche, but it's a big family, really
Like anything else where you're
closely affiliated, when people are in
time of need, people pull together"
Regular Figure 8s next race on
July 27.


Earnhardt sets record to take pole


Associated Press

SPARTA, Ky. The
questions during NASCAR
Sprint Cup qualifying Fri-
day were how many driv-
ers would raise Kentucky
Speedway's record and by
how much.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. pro-
vided the answer of the
eight that broke it, clock-
ing 183.636 mph to wrest
the mark from Hendrick
Motorsports teammate
Jimmie Johnson and the
pole for tonight's race.
Earnhardt's speed was
nearly 2 mph faster than
Johnson's 181.818 mph last
June, which he needed to
keep Johnson from keep-
ing the record.
Minutes before, Johnson
had a lap at 183.144 mph to
hold off Ryan Newman
(182.254). Earnhardt set
the standard in the No. 88
Chevy soon after and sur-
vived several furious at-
tempts to unseat him
before coming away with
his 12th career pole and
first at Kentucky.
Carl Edwards (183.306


mph) eventually grabbed
the outside front in the No.
99 Ford. Johnson settled
for third with Kyle Busch
(182.593) fourth in a
Toyota.
Marcos Ambrose
(182.587) qualified fifth in
a Ford and will start along-
side Denny Hamlin, whose
No. 11 Toyota ran 182.340
mph. The final two over
182 mph were Newman
and defending race win-
ner and Cup champion
Brad Keselowski (182.192).
"I thought we had a good
car in practice," Earn-
hardt said, "and we got
some cloud cover. That
gave us an opportunity to
run a good lap."
Drivers felt as if a track
record was possible with
NASCAR's new Gen 6 car,
even on Kentucky's bumpy
surface. Anticipation grew
even more with cooler-
than-expected tempera-
tures and intermittent
clouds, and several drivers
gave chase to Johnson's
mark early in the session.
Johnson, the series
points leader, promptly


raised the bar higher with
a speed that seemed to put
the pole and the record
out of reach even with two-
thirds of qualifying re-
maining. Newman gave
chase and briefly had the
second spot before settling
for a solid berth in the
field.
"I feel good," said John-
son, who checked his No.
48 Chevy for damage after
hitting one of the truck's
bumps and going airborne.
"I felt (turns) one and two
went really well. (Turns)
three and four, I thought
maybe I could have been a
little faster through there."


Earnhardt, sixth after
the final practice, soon
grabbed his up-front view
and the record as all the
elements fell into place for
his first pole since Sep-
tember at Richmond.
"The cloud cover at least
gave us a bit of speed,"
said Earnhardt, who joked
that getting a haircut be-
tween practice and quali-
fying might have made
him more aerodynamic as
well. "Of course, cooler
track temps gives the car
more grip and we defi-
nitely had the better situa-
tion of anyone in practice
with that scenario."


Points standings


Car No.
98
1
23
123
110
Car No.
01
0
2
18
289
Car No.
33
44
24
99
47
Car No.
17
66
114
4
01
Car No.
3
48
16
8
5
Car No.
72
45
32
3
65
Car No.
98
73
11
22


Super Late Models
Name
Herb Neumann Jr.
Dale Sanders
Todd Brown
Jon Brown
Steve Dorer
Open Wheel Modifieds
Name
Herb Neumann Jr.
Troy Robinson
Steven Hise
Shane Butler
Richie Smith
Mod Mini Stocks
Name
Chris Allen
Michael Lawhorn
Phil Edwards
Leroy Moore
Richard Kuhn
Sportsman
Name
Mike Bell
Andy Nicholls
John Buzinec
Jay Witfoth
Tom Posavec
Street Stocks
Name
Curtis Flanagan
DoraThorne
J.D. Goff
Tim Wilson
James Peters
Pure Stocks
Name
Karlin Ray
James Johnston
Mike Autenrieth
Jason Waller
Happy Florian
Mini Stocks
Name
Kevin Stone
Jason Terry
Jerry Daniels
Mark Patterson


Points
520
507
499
451
421
Points
722
711
687
670
414
Points
844
809
782
763
692
Points
732
674
660
615
552
Points
1159
1090
1017
622
600
Points
968
886
856
831
799
Points
1259
1197
1188
1015


Four other

divisions fire

up engines

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

The Daytona Antique
Auto RacingAssociation's
Southern Vintage Series
returns with an old-timey
collection of Speedster,
Midget, Stock and Sprint
classes while street
stocks, pure stocks and
mini stocks roll out regu-
lar season action today
at the Citrus County
Speedway
In last Saturday's Street
Stock feature, Curtis
Flanagan and heat-
winner Dora Thorne sep-
arated from the field,
with the former collecting
his CCS-leading seventh
feature win of the season.
The Inverness driver also
has five heat wins.
Floral City's Travis
Sharrone prevailed in
the most recent Mini
Stock feature on June 15
to collect his second win
of the season. Dade City's
Kevin Stone leads the di-
vision in both feature
wins (four) and points,
while Belleview's Jason
Terry and Weirsdale's
Jerry Daniels follow at
second and third, respec-
tively, in points. Mark Pat-
terson joins Sharrone,
whose No. 32 car also has
a feature win under 2012
champ Jeremy Sharrone,
with a pair of feature vic-
tories in the class.
Karlin Ray (four heat
wins) resisted pressure
from his cousin Camron
Ray, a recent up-and-
comer, to claim his sixth
feature win in last week's


20 Shannon Kennedy 908
Pro Figure 8s
Car No. Name Points
6 Joey Catarelli 298
94 Charlie Meyer 284
85 Thomas Peet 190
15 William Stansbury 188
13 Neil Herne 180
Figure 8s
Car No. Name Points
82 Jimmy Kruse 392
51 Travis Nichols 382
85 Pnut Higginbotham 382
6 Ronnie Schrefiels 382
01 Shannon Lengell 358
Upcoming schedule
Racing key
SLM: Super Late Models (50-lap features)
OWM: Open Wheel Modifieds
SP: Sportsman
MMS: Mod Mini Stocks
SS: Street Stocks
MS: Mini Stocks
PS: Pure Stocks
HD: Hornet Division
PF8: Pro Figure-8s
F8: Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure-8s
FUPS: Florida United Promoters Series
(Super Late Models, 100 Lap Features)
TBARA: Tampa Bay Area Racing Associa-
tion (Sprints)
DAARA: Daytona Antique Auto Racing
Association
S.E.C.K.S.: South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS: Fl 3/4 Midgets
Dates
June 29 SS, PS, MS, HD, DAARA
July 6 CLOSED
July 13 SLM, MMS (50 Laps), SS, PS,
DWARFs, HD
July 20 CLOSED
July 27-SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, HD, F8
Aug. 3- OWM, SP, SS, PS
Aug. 10 FUP, MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs,
HD, LEGENDS, BANDOLEROS
Aug. 17 OWM (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
SS, PS, PF8
Aug. 24 CLOSED


Pure Stock action. Inver-
ness' Jason Waller (three
heat wins, feature win)
finished third.
Georgia's Bobby Jor-
dan and Antioch's Jimmy
Miltner cruised to eight-
lap DAARA feature victo-
ries at the Citrus County
Speedway in May, while
Sarasota's Rick Sanders
mounted a substantial
comeback victory in the
speedster event. Or-
lando's Kelly Jarret took
a late lead for a win in the
6-cylinder/Flatheads
stock class, and Ti-
tusville's Toby Smith
pulled out a win in a
closely-fought DAARA
8-cylinder modified stock
feature.
After seven DAARA
events, Miltner is tied
with Josh Rynd at the top
of the point standings in
the Caged Sprint divi-
sion, and Jordan enjoys
the lead in the Overhead
Midget class. Steve Par-
rish has a commanding
point advantage in the
6-cylinder group, and
Richie Iversen and
Lenny Goding share a
lead among the modified
stocks. Meanwhile, Rich
Sanders and Bill Stelcher
are knotted atop the
Speedster standings.
The rent-a-car Hornet
division is also slated to
run today
Grandstand gates open
at 4 p.m. and heat races
begin at 5:30 p.m. Grand-
stand admission prices
are $13 for adults, $9 for
students and seniors and
$5 for children age 11 and
under (children under 42
inches are free). Family
and pits passes are also
available.
The Citrus County
Speedway is closed next
Saturday, July 6, and re-
turns to action July 13.


Brafs.Lnh.A D ine.


I I
m .^^^^^

lE0l nfiIIB


Hours M-Th V
Breakfast Thu
6 am- 10 am Rih
Lunch Ma
11 am 2 pm Frid
Dinner 1n
5 pm-9 pm Sunw
Fri. & Sat. 11:
5 pm-10 pm cah


We t82
BAR GRILLL


Weekly Specials
rsday
b Eye..................................... $ 19 .9 5
artini Night 4 pm-10 pm
ecialty Martinis........... ......... $5.00
ay
Slb. Live Maine Lobster...$24.95
day
ward Winning Sunday Brunch
30 am-2:00pm..... ............ $15.95
' for reservations or more information.
at Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


Citrus County SPEEDWAY


DAARA returns


to Speedway


tonight


B6 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


AUTO RACING










RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THE DESCENT INTO







MADNESS

In real life, broken is not the worst place to be. It's often the best place,
because Jesus came for broken people, for those who know they are broken
and are out of options to try to fix themselves.


I ason 6 of AMC's "Mad
Men" ended recently
with the main character,
Don Draper, finally
(hopefully) hitting rock
bottom.
For the first five sea-
sons, the Madison Av-
enue ad man of the
1960s was the man every
other man wanted to be
and the man every woman
wanted to be with.
Smooth, handsome, supremely tal-
ented at his job, he could charm his
way into or out of anything.
At the same time, Don Draper lived
a lie. Born Dick Whitman, he grew up
dirt poor in a Pennsylvania
whorehouse, the son of a prostitute.
He served in the Army during the
Korean War alongside the real Don
Draper When the real Draper was
killed in battle, Dick Whitman took
the dead man's dog tags and his
identity and defected.
Dick Whitman dies and Don
Draper lives, but not really
For five seasons he has slowly been
spiraling down. Season 6 opened
with him reading a copy of Dante's
"Inferno," about the nine circles of
hell, and every episode leading to the


Nancy
Kennedy

GRACE NOTES


finale seemed to push Don faster and
further and deeper into the circles of
hell.
His daughter catches him, pants
down, with the neighbor's wife, and
his alcoholism lands him in jail after
punching out a preacher in a bar who
tries to tell him about Jesus.
The woman he's been having an af-
fair with breaks things off with him,
and he begs her not to go. He's finally
not the one in charge. He's grasping,
flailing. He curls up in a fetal posi-
tion, utterly alone, afraid, worn out,
tired from being the man he's
become.
His pain is palpable.
In the finale he pours all his booze
down the drain. Later, in a pitch
meeting at the advertising agency
firm, he first tells the men from Her-
shey's a sweet and schlocky boyhood
"memory" of him and his dad sharing


a Hershey bar together, then he tells
the real truth: that the closest he
ever got to feeling wanted was from a
prostitute who made him dig through
her customers' pants pockets while
they were "busy"
"If I collected more than a dollar
she would buy me a Hershey bar and
I would eat it alone in my room with
great ceremony and feel like a nor-
mal kid," he said. "It was the only
sweet thing in my life."
Don's partners are stunned and
later vote him out as a partner
The one thing Don has been good
at, his job, has been taken from him.
All season has been leading up to
this. He's made a mess of his mar-
riages, his kids and now his career
In a flashback, Don remembers a
preacher who had come to the
whorehouse to share the gospel with
the women who lived there. As the
preacher gets tossed out the door, he
looks at young Dick Whitman and
says, "The only unpardonable sin is
to believe that God cannot forgive
you."
The episode ends with Don taking
his kids to see the (whore)house
where he grew up, now in blighted
disrepair
See .Page C3


Court: Hobby Lobby can challenge health law


KRISTEN WYATT
Associated Press
DENVER -An appeals court said
Thursday that Hobby Lobby and a sis-
ter company that sells Christian books
and supplies can fight the nation's new
health care law on religious grounds,
ruling the portion of the law that re-
quires them to offer certain kinds of
birth control to their employees is par-
ticularly onerous, and suggesting the
companies shouldn't have to pay mil-
lions of dollars in fines while their
claims are considered.
The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals
in Denver said the Oklahoma City-
based arts and crafts chain, along
with Mardel bookstores, not only can
proceed with their lawsuit seeking to
overturn a portion of the Affordable
Care Act, but can probably win.
The judges unanimously sent the
case back to a lower court in Okla-
homa, which had rejected the com-
panies' request for an injunction
to prevent full enforcement of the
new law.
"Hobby Lobby and Mardel have
drawn a line at providing coverage
for drugs or devices they consider to
induce abortions, and it is not for us
to question whether the line is rea-


K--Mi
Associated Pre:
Customers enter and exit a Hobby Lobby store in Denver. A federal appeals
court on Thursday ruled that Hobby Lobby stores have a good case that the
federal health care law violates their religious beliefs in ordering them to pro-
vide birth control to employees, and that they shouldn't be subject to millions
in fines while their claim is considered.


sonable," the judges wrote. "The
question here is not whether the rea-
sonable observer would consider the
plaintiffs complicit in an immoral


act, but rather how the plaintiffs
themselves measure their degree of
complicity."
See Page C2


RELIGION

BRIEFS


Carter says religions
further mistreatment
ATLANTA- Former U.S. Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter said religious
leaders, including those in Christi-
anity and Islam, share the blame
for mistreatment of women and
girls across the world.
The 88-year-old human rights ac-
tivist said Friday that male reli-
gious leaders perpetuate
misguided doctrines of male
superiority, from the Catholic
Church forbidding women from be-
coming priests to some African cul-
tures mutilating the genitals of
young girls.
Carter said the doctrines con-
tribute to a political, social and
economic structure where political
leaders passively accept domestic
violence against women, sexual
trafficking, and inequality in the
workplace and classroom.
The 39th president delivered his
analysis during an international
conference on women and reli-
gion. He's hosting representatives
from 15 countries at The Carter
Center, the human rights organiza-
tion he launched in 1982 after
leaving the White House.


National Cathedral
celebrates gay ruling

WASHINGTON -The National
Cathedral rang its church bells,
along with some other Washington
churches, to celebrate the
Supreme Court's decisions on
gay marriage.
Cathedral spokesman Richard
Weinberg said the bells rang at
noon Wednesday Bells were also
set to ring at other Episcopal,
Methodist, Presbyterian, Unitarian
and other Christian churches.
The cathedral scheduled a
prayer service for gay, lesbian, bi-
sexual and transgender families
Wednesday evening to celebrate
the ruling.
In a statement, the cathedral's
dean, the Rev Gary Hall, says the
church is ringing its bells "to cele-
brate the extension of federal mar-
riage equality to all the same-sex
couples modeling God's love in
lifelong covenants."
Hall said the ruling should serve
as a call for Christians to embrace
religious marriage equality.


Pope backs further
Legion of Christ reform

VATICAN CITY Pope Francis
is signaling the reform process of
the troubled Legion of Christ reli-
gious order will stretch beyond
next year's target date amid con-
tinued reservations about whether
it has truly changed its ways fol-
lowing revelations its founder was
a pedophile.
In a letter made public Wednes-
day, Francis confirmed the order
would convene a general assembly
in early 2014 to elect a new leader-
ship and approve a revised set of
constitutions.
Then-Pope Benedict XVI took
over the Legion in 2010 after a Vati-
can investigation determined its
Mexican founder led a double life:
The late Rev Marcial Maciel sexu-
ally molested seminarians and fa-
thered three children with two
women. Benedict ordered a whole-
sale reform of the order after finding
serious problems with its culture.


Prison chief: Muslims
can pray in pairs
INDIANAPOLIS The warden
of a federal prison holding high-
risk inmates, including American
Taliban fighter John Walker Lindh,
insisted Thursday that he was
obeying a court order to allow
daily group prayer by permitting
inmates to pray in pairs within
their cells.
Warden John Oliver told a fed-
eral judge Thursday that when the
prison in Terre Haute, Ind., al-
lowed group prayer earlier this
year, Muslim inmates formed gangs
and bullied other prisoners.
Lindh attended the hearing in
Indianapolis by video conference
from the high-security unit that


houses he and about 40 other in-
mates, including several convicted
on terror charges. Lindh did not
testify, but listened silently with
his arms at his sides.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Summer fun
Vacation Bible School
for ages 4 through fifth grade
will take place from 9 to
11:30 a.m. Monday through
Friday, July 8-12, at First
Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills, 4950 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills. Children
will enjoy games, Bible sto-
ries, animals, music, snacks
and more. Call 352-746-2970
for more information.
All children from ages
5 through 12 are invited to
"Find Your Treasure" VBS
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday, July 15 to 19,
at Inverness Church of God,
416 U.S. 41 S. VBS includes
Bible stories, games, crafts,
music and various activities.
There is no charge for VBS.
Lunch and snacks are in-
cluded for the children. To
preregister or for more infor-
mation, call the church office
at 352-726-4524.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host Vacation
Bible School from 5:15 to
8 p.m. Sunday through
Thursday, July 21 to 25. This
year's theme is "God's
Backyard Bible Camp"
where kids discover which
two are the most important
Commandments. All ages
are invited and a nursery is
provided. A supper is served
every night. There is no fee.
Call 352-726-3153 to
register.
Joy Evangelical
Lutheran Church VBS for
children ages 5 through fifth
grade is from 9 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday, July
22-26. The theme is "God's
Backyard Bible Camp." Get
ready for an outdoor adven-
ture that starts in the back-
yard and gets bigger each
day as kids take the love of
Jesus into their homes,
neighborhoods and commu-
nities. Through music,


singing, bible stories, crafts
and games the kids will learn
how to apply God's truths to
serving their family, friends,
neighbors and others in com-
munity. Registration is Mon-
day through Friday from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
church office. The program
planners are looking for stu-
dents in the sixth grade and
older, plus some adults to
volunteer to assist the teach-
ers and help with outdoor
games. Call VBS Coordinator
Joan Greve at 352-304-8711
or the church office at 352-
854-4509, ext. 221. The
church is at 7045 S.W. 83rd
Place at State Road 200,
Ocala.
First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon contin-
ues its third annual "SPARK
Summer Camp," from
9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. through
Aug. 2. This program also ac-
cepts children with special
needs. There are different
themes, crafts and games for
each week. The church is at
21501 W. State Road 40,
Dunnellon.
As part of its annual
Summer Missions Project,
Rock Crusher Road First
Church of God has set a
"God-size" goal of contribut-
ing 500 hours of their time in
community service. Members
can serve as volunteers any-
where in the community. The
reason behind the goal is to
get the church outside of the
building and into the commu-
nity where they can help
make a difference. The
church is at 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road, Crystal River.
Call the church office at 352-
795-5553 or visit www.rock
crusherchurch.com.
Music & more
The Trust Quartet, a
Florida-based Nashville-
recorded group, will minister
with gospel songs at 6 p.m.


today at Mount Zion AME
Church in Hernando and
11 a.m. Sunday at the House
of Power Church on North
Lecanto Highway. Call 352-
344-9454.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellowship
of Citrus County welcomes
Sally Smith-Adams and her
music team at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. They will present,
"Sing a Song of Freedom,"
a musical program in remem-
brance and honor of Inde-
pendence Day, July 4. The
choir and singular members
of the choir will sing and play
musical selections for the
congregation. Come and
enjoy the music. The NCUU
meets at 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus
Springs. Call 352-465-4225.
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs wel-
comes First Christian Church
of Inverness to the fifth Sun-
day "Singspiration" at 6 p.m.
Sunday. Light refreshments
will follow an evening of
gospel singing, special
music, and several songs
presented by the joined
choirs. Call 352-628-5556 or
visit www.fcchomosassa.org.
The church is at 7030 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd. Dan
Wagner is the minister.
The Citrus County
Community Choir will pres-
ent a concert of music by An-
drew Lloyd Webber at
7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, at
First Presbyterian Church of
Crystal River (U.S. 19, next
to Sweetbay Plaza). Admis-
sion donation is $10 for
adults. Children 12 and
younger are free. Call 352-
795-2259.
Sale away
The Altar & Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
See NOTES/Page C3


LOBBY
Continued from Page C1

Hobby Lobby Stores
Inc., Mardel Inc. and their
owners, the Green family,
argue for-profit busi-
nesses not just reli-
gious groups should be
allowed to seek an excep-
tion if the law violates
their religious beliefs.
The owners approve of
most forms of artificial
birth control, but not
those that prevent im-
plantation of a fertilized
egg such as an IUD or
the morning-after pill.
Hobby Lobby is the
largest and best-known of
more than 30 businesses
in several states that have
challenged the contracep-
tion mandate. A number
of Catholic-affiliated in-
stitutions have filed sepa-
rate lawsuits, and the
court suggested faith-
based organizations can
follow for-profit objec-
tives in the secular world.
'A religious individual
may enter the for-profit
realm intending to
demonstrate to the mar-
ketplace that a corpora-
tion can succeed
financially while adher-
ing to religious values. As
a court, we do not see how
we can distinguish this
form of evangelism from
any other," they wrote.
A majority of judges
couldn't decide whether
the Oklahoma court had
sufficiently addressed two
parts of Hobby Lobby's
initial complaint and sent
them back for further re-
view at the local level.
Throughout a ruling
that covered more than
160 pages, the judges
noted Hobby Lobby faced
a difficult choice -vio-
late its religious beliefs,
pay $475 million in fines
for failing to comply with
the law (a $100 fine per


day for each of its 13,000
workers), or pay $26 mil-
lion to the government if
it dropped its health care
plan altogether.
Hobby Lobby and
Mardel won expedited
federal review because
the stores would have
faced fines starting Mon-
day for not covering the
required forms of contra-
ception. The 10th Circuit
judges said the Oklahoma
court was wrong to not
grant the companies an in-
junction in the face of seri-
ous financial penalties.
Hobby Lobby and other
companies challenging
the contraception man-
date say the morning-after
pill is tantamount to abor-
tion because it can pre-
vent a fertilized egg from
becoming implanted in a
woman's womb. The 10th
Circuit heard the case be-
fore eight active judges in-
stead of the typical
three-judge panel, indicat-
ing the case's importance.
The U.S. Department of
Justice argued that allow-
ing for-profit corporations
to exempt themselves from
requirements that violate
their religious beliefs
would be in effect allowing
the business to impose its
religious beliefs on em-
ployees. In its ruling, the
10th Circuit cited a 2010
U.S. Supreme Court con-
clusion that for-profit cor-
porations have rights to
political expression.
"We see no reason the


Supreme Court would
recognize constitutional
protection for a corpora-
tion's political expression
but not its religious ex-
pression," the judges
wrote.
One judge went even
further in a concurring
opinion.
"No one suggests that
organizations, in contrast
to their members, have
souls," Judge Harris Hartz
wrote. "But it does not fol-
low that people must sac-
rifice their souls to engage
in group activities through
an organization."
Hobby Lobby calls itself
a "biblically founded
business" and is closed on
Sunday. Founded in
1972, the company now
operates more than 500
stores in 41 states and em-
ploys more than 13,000
full-time employees who
are eligible for health
insurance.
Emily Hardman, spokes-
woman for the Washing-
ton-based Becket FuRnd for
Religious Liberty, which
represents Hobby Lobby,
called the ruling a "re-
sounding victory for reli-
gious freedom."
But Americans United
for Separation of Church
and State said the judges
were wrong.
"This isn't religious
freedom; it's the worst
kind of religious oppres-
sion," executive director
Barry Lynn said in a
statement.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034-
Rabbi
Lemnny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


Crystal
m aRiver
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
...............10:30 A.M.

][ l ] .t H . I ,
WMSWSBt


0 0

"The




Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"







St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
S- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


S First Baptist
Church of

Homosassa
"Come Worship i ilh Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalrive r.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

THE
SALVATION L_
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Lynn Irish



** /


'" Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call

Theresa

Holland at

564-2940
For Advertising
Information


G ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


( Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

CASUAL
Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30, &
11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 & 10:45 am
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors
A Stephen
Ministry
Church
Office Hours
8:30 am
To
4:30opm
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org


01 Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


r West

Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.0

to




US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Comer of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAKIJNG FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYTXLL
RIVI y -
JNITED
NMACTHODIST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


Action Bible School
Our Lady of Grace Church, Beverly Hills

July 15-19
6:30-8:30 PM
Ages 4-12
Explore and create through
fun-filled crafts, snacks & games
Contact Roxanne at 746-2144


C2 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MAD
Continued from Page C1

Season 7 is suppos-
edly the series' final
season, and its creator,
Matthew Weiner, has
said he's known from
the beginning how it
will end how, or if,
Don will ever be
redeemed.
His life has been one
lie after another, de-
ception upon decep-
tion, saturated in
booze, his heart dulled
to the people he has
used and never knew
how to love.
He's quite despica-
ble, but there's some-
thing about him that
makes me root for him.
Especially now, now
that he sees his own
brokenness.
In real life, broken is
not the worst place to
be. It's often the best
place, because Jesus
came for broken peo-
ple, for those who
know they are broken
and are out of
options to try to fix
themselves.


The psalmist wrote,
"A broken and contrite
heart you, God, will
not despise" (Psalm
51:17).
Jesus said, "Blessed
are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the king-
dom of heaven"
(Matthew 5:3).
When we are at the
end of ourselves, when
there's nowhere else to
turn, when we're
hurtling downward
into the abyss, there's
Jesus.
As the preacher said,
"The only unpardon-
able sin is to believe
that God cannot forgive
you."
Hallelujah! There's
redemption, even for
the Don Drapers of the
world.
Nancy Kennedy is
the author of"Move
Over, Victoria-
I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday,
or via email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

"Christmas in July Craft
Fair" from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, July 13, in the Fa-
ther Stegeman Hall. The
church is on the corner of U.S.
41 and State Road 40 north of
Dunnellon. More than 30
crafters will be there along with
several new skilled artisans
selling a wide variety of hand-
made goods. Light refresh-
ments available for a nominal
fee. Call Pat at 352-489-1984.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church in Dunnellon
will host an outdoor flea mar-
ket the first Saturday monthly
beginning in September. For
space rental, call Maureen in
the office at 352-489-3166.
Spaces begin at $10.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry.
The store accepts donations
of household items, clothing
and small appliances. Call
352-726-1707.


Special events
M Afree event for all ages
will take place from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. today at Citrus County
Community Church, 687 S.
Adoph Point, Lecanto. All are
invited to come enjoy the
bounce house, face painting,
worship, speakers, music and
fellowship. The event is spon-
sored by the Citrus County
Christian Coalition (C4), bring-
ing pastors and churches to-
gether to worship the Lord. For
more information, contact
www.c4christiancoalition.org.
Floral City Methodist
Church invites the community
to a picnic at noon July 4. The
church will serve grill-roasted
pulled pork, baked beans and
drink. Bring a covered dish and
table service. The noon picnic
is on the grounds, weather
permitting, in the spirit of the
many held there by the con-
gregation when it was just the
still standing 1884 church. The
church is on Marvin Street
across from the elementary
school.
"Family Fun Day" is
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
July 13, at Suncoast Baptist
Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs.


There will be a bounce house
and waterslide for children,
and popcorn, snow cones and
cotton candy for all. This is a
kick-of for the church's "Family
Vacation Bible School" on Sun-
day through Wednesday, July
14 to 17. Call Clara at the of-
fice on Tuesday and Wednes-
day at 352-621-3008.
The third Saturday night
supper will take place from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. July 20 in the
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes barbe-
cued pulled pork, potato salad,
baked beans, dessert, coffee
and tea. Tickets are $10 for
adults, $5 for children and can
be purchased at the door.
Takeouts available. Call the
church at 352-489-1260.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church on Fort Island Trail will
consecrate the new statue of
St. Anne, the church's patron
saint, at the 10:15 a.m. Mass
Sunday, July 21. The Rev. Fr.
Gilbert S. Larsen, SSC, will
perform the ceremony in the
sanctuary. The church plans a
week of festivities, prayer and
teaching about St. Anne and
her husband St. Joachim, the


RELIGION


rNORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the corner ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am

Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


, Homosassa Springs
S S^rr..kAir.T-hUCHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am 2
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Liftifi v Up Jess
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

pe,

OpM

pow


...... .. ..ry for Children and Families
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1F miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for allAges.


Sunday
9:30 AM.....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM..................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ................. Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1I mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

Church LCM
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{faw9o;v- tl..et.


Hernando
Clurch of
The1"azarene
Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org




Sherpherd
of the Hills
Episcopal
Church
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Wednesday
Healing Service
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com




o








Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35 -4 -7 6 1


Places of worship that



offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! I

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Heao FL3444


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 C3

Blessed Virgin Mary's parents,
and Lord Jesus Christ's grand-
parents, culminating in a
parish picnic at Rainbow
Springs. There will be a light
meal after mass in the parish
hall. The statue was donated
as a memorial for her husband
by a parishioner, who will be
present to discuss the details
of the gift.
The Summer Book Club
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, Crystal River, meets
at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the fel-
lowship hall. Men and women
of the community are invited.
The club reads and discusses
books relevant to our lives and
our personal spiritual journey.
The first book is "In His Steps,"
by Charles M. Sheldon. First
published in 1897, this book
has sold more than 30 million
copies and ranks as one of the
bestselling books of all time.
Call Gail Sirak at 352-
634-2021.
Community Christian
Karate Club (CCKC) offers a
Citrus County group for learn-
ing karate skills, working on
cardio, and meeting new
friends. Three different classes
for three different age groups

See NOTES/Page C4




C4 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

are offered: the 4- to 7-year-
old class, 8- to 12-year-old
class, and the teen/adult
class. Classes take place
Tuesday evenings at New
Hope Baptist Church, 8635
W. Goodman Lane, Ho-
mosassa. Cost is $25 a
month with discounts for fam-
ilies. For more information,
contact 5th degree black belt
instructor Greg Gunn at 352-
428-6348 or email ggunn14
@gmail.com or visit
www.topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church offers Bingo
at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and
5:30 p.m. Wednesday fea-
turing regular, double and
special bingos, together with
a jackpot and "pickle" game.
Doors open at 10 a.m. Tues-
day and 4 p.m. Wednesday.
Kitchen features "homemade"
soups and sandwiches. The
church is on U.S. 41, three
miles north of Dunnellon.
Come hear Pastor Kevin
as he tells great old stories
from the Bible at 6 p.m. Sat-
urday nights at the Holy
Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


IS



All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness |
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033






Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ground Cafe at Calvary
Chapel of Inverness, 960 S.
U.S. 41. Coffee and desserts
are free. Call 352-726-1480.
Study & support
Abundant Blessings
Messianic Congregation will
sponsor a program titled
"Searching for Rabbi
Jesus in the Parables," at
1 p.m. Saturday, July 6 and
13, at the Coastal Region Li-
brary in Crystal River. The
first program is on the "Sow-
ers Code: Thirty, Sixty, One
Hundred Fold," and three He-
brew letters that explain their
meaning that Rabbi Jesus
taught (and not a polemical
redaction of latter Christian-
ity). The second part of the
program on July 13 is the
"Stewards Code Keys of the
Mysteries of the Kingdom."
The program, "Searching for
Rabbi Jesus in the Parables,"
will be presented by Mes-
sianic Leader Dr. Matthew D.
Carroll, D.D. and doctor of
philosophy in Christianity.
Call 352-544-5700.
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) will
begin a 30-week study of the
book of Romans from 9:45 to
11:45 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 5,
S47 Years of
RST Bringing Christ
IRS 1to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
4ir 9:00 A.M.
726-1637
P Missouri Synod
s www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


l "Firs For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS H
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study




COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH









SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


First Unite First
I Assembly

Methodist of God

4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. i Pastor,
Inverness, FL 34452 Dairold
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's) i Bt
Come as you are. Bettye
(352) 726-2522 Rushing
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


Summer Schedule
8:45 AM 9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Worship Service

10:00 AM
Kidzone Childrens
0 Worship


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


at First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills at the intersec-
tion of Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491) and For-
est Ridge Boulevard. This
class is open to men and
women and includes a pro-
gram for children ages 5 and
younger. CBS is part of an in-
ternational organization that
provides interdenominational
Bible study. Preregistration is
necessary. To register or Call
Annie at 352-795-9307,
Rosemary at 352-564-2813,
Terry at 352-382-2365 or
Linda at 352-746-1698.
Registration for the fall
Faith Formation Classes at
St. Thomas the Apostle
Roman Catholic has started
for children in grades pre-K
and up. Call Alicia between
9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Tuesday
through Thursday at 352-
628-7000 for more informa-
tion or stop by the office on
those days.
People of all religions
are welcome to bring their in-
spirational writings and
prayers to share during "In-
terfaith Devotionals" at
2 p.m. Sunday. Refresh-
ments served. For directions
and/or more information, call
Sandi at 352-364-6035.


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15 AM
Worship Service..10:15 AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and
play yard. 13
Pastor John Fredericksen


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M. \
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Mormon NBC affiliate to


air 'Saturday Night Live'


Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY A
Mormon church-owned
NBC television station in
Utah plans to begin show-
ing first-run "Saturday
Night Live" episodes this
fall after years of refusing
to air the sketch comedy
show.
The decision is part of
the station's plan to make
the lineup stronger and
improve its relationship
with NBC, said Tami Ost-
mark, KSL-TV's vice presi-
dent of marketing,
research and promotion.
KSL is owned by The
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints and has
not aired certain shows
over the years due to con-
tent it deems inappropri-
ate. But Ostmark says
content was never the issue
with "SNL." She says the
station didn't want to bump
a popular sports show that


aired at the same time.
New episodes of "SNE'
will air at 10:30 p.m. Satur-
days on KSL starting Sept.
28, Ostmark said. The sta-
tion has been airing re-
runs for the past year at an
earlier time slot Saturday
evenings.
NBC said in a statement
that it's pleased KSL will
air the 39th season of
"SNL," adding that it val-
ues its partnership with
the Utah affiliate.
First-run episodes of
SNL have previously aired
on Utah's CW network affil-
iate, KUCW KUCW execu-
tive Richard Jones said he
was taking the loss in stride.
"Obviously, we would
have liked to have kept it,"
he said, but added, "Main-
taining a good relationship
with NBC is more impor-
tant than complaining
about this."
The CW affiliate has
been airing NBC's "Hanni-


bal" since May after KSL
dropped it due to graphic
and gory content. The sta-
tion has also been showing
"The New Normal," a sit-
com about a gay couple
who invites a surrogate
mother into their home,
since the fall of 2012.
KSL executives said the
program was inappropri-
ate to air during family
viewing time, saying the
show's dialogue was exces-
sively crude and that
scenes were too explicit.
KSL announced the de-
cision Wednesday on its
Facebook page. The reac-
tion on Facebook was
mixed. Some applauded
the station for finally air-
ing "SNE' while others de-
cried the station's decision
to air a show with foul
humor. Some predicted
the show would be pulled
as soon as "SNL' airs a
crude skit that offends the
audience.


Places of worship that


offerlove, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His"house, your spirits will be lfted


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


5 INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service ...........8:30
Sunday School.................9:30 -
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 -
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes.................... 7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 PM
Teens .............................. 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Firsf Baptist
Ckhwck
of Lake, Rouaseaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email:ck us o.r on F.. .,,, acebook..
Check us out on Facebook


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


SSiidl.., Evening 6:00 PM


Wednesday


7:00 PM


Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to I, t.', I ,'i,,, ,,,


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Cultode Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711






First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com









Hwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services *
Traditional
11:00 AM
. Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service .
* Tapes & CD' s Available U
0 Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
1 Nursery Provided .
SFellowship & Youth Group
0 5 to 7 PM 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
0 Podcast: FPC inv.com 0

Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U


as^^^^^^^


kPastor
Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship..........10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


352.422(,?3\
1I'.Iii I
Todd
Langdon |











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:00 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PM. to 3:15 PM. Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.: .catholicweb.com ."


RELIGION






Page C5 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

CHS to celebrate
30-year reunion
Citrus High School Class
of 1983 will host a 30-year
reunion event Friday and
Saturday, July 12 and 13,
at Twisted Oaks and at the
Quality Inn's Tuscany on
the Meadows.
The event includes a
mixer, a golf outing, a fam-
ily fun day at the pool and a
main event dinner. Special
room rates are available.
For more information,
visit https://www.
facebook.com/events/
457568397610322/. RSVP
or ask questions by email-
ing ahvick@gmail.com or
citrusl983reunion@yahoo.
com.
Don a muumuu
for tea dance
Learn to do the hula and
enjoy pineapple and co-
conut treats at the Hawai-
ian luau tea dance from
1:30 to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
July 10, at the Central Cit-
rus Community Center,
2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Muumuus and Hawaiian
shirts are welcome. The
dance will be hosted by
Sapphire, who will play
mostly Hawaiian music for
dancing enjoyment.
Cost is $5 per person. A
portion of the proceeds will
benefit In-Home Senior
Services.
Call 352-527-5993 for
more information.
Meditation taught
at Unity Church
Need to polish up on
your meditation skills? Just
want to learn how to medi-
tate? New Age Thinkers is
sponsoring free guided
meditation workshops start-
ing July 7, then subse-
quently the first and third
Sunday monthly at Unity
Church.
The sessions will be at
2:30 p.m. at the church,
2628 Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Call Donna at
352-628-3253 or email
miss-donna@tampa
bay.rr.com for information.
The public is also wel-
come to Zen meditation
sessions at 2:45 p.m.
Sunday at Unity Church
491). Call 352-464-4955.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Blizzard


Special to the Chronicle
Blizzard is one cool cat
who can make the heat
of summer fade away.
The sweet cream-colored
kitten is just chillin' while
waiting to be adopted.
Adoption fees include
microchip, spay/neuter
and all required kitten
vaccinations, including
rabies. There are all
varieties of felines to
choose from, and adults
are half price. Drop by
and visit the felines in
their cage-free, homestyle
environment. Visitors are
welcome from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians'
Hardin Haven on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the
Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions,
or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fl186.html.


Bunco Bash for pets


Second event to raise money for low-cost spay/neuter services


Special to the Chronicle
SnippetCitrus will have a second
Bunco Bash Sunday, July 21, at the
Citrus County Resource Center,
2804 W Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
From noon until 12:45 p.m., there
will be snacks and a Bunco Bags
auction. Bunco will begin at
12:45 p.m. There will be help for
those who do not know how to play,


as well as snacks, prizes and loads
of fun. Men and women are
welcome.
The person who registers the
most people will win four free
reservations for the next Bunco
Bash. Entry is a $12 nonrefundable
donation. All proceeds will benefit
SnippetCitrus.
SnippetCitrus is a group of con-
cerned Citrus County citizens seek-
ing to reduce the homeless


Helping Habitat


population of dogs and cats in Cit-
rus County. The Bunco Bash will
raise funds to provide low-cost
spay/neuter services to families
who qualify and to educate the
community on the importance of
spaying and neutering pets.
Only those who make a reserva-
tion will be guaranteed a seat For
reservations and to find out about
volunteering for SnippetCitrus,
call Lois at 352-382-0777.


Special to the Chronicle
During a recent recognition ceremony, Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County was awarded a grant of $1,000 by the
Capital City Bank Group Foundation. Capital City Bank President Ray Thompson, Habitat for Humanity President and
CEO George Rusaw and Senior Bank Vice President David Caldwell were present at the awards ceremony. "At
Capital City Bank, we proudly support organizations that build strong communities by enhancing the quality of life
in the communities where we do business," said Thompson. "We strive to be a catalyst to engage and support
associate volunteerism and involvement especially here in Citrus County." The grant money will go toward the
purchase of an equipment trailer for the construction site. For information about donating time and/or resources to
a Habitat home, call 352-563-2744 or visit www.habitatcc.org.


Safe boaters


Special to the Chronicle
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-01, Crystal River, recently completed another successful safe boating
class. In front, from left, are: George and Cathy Lindell and Richard Dobson. In back, from left, are: Dennis and Dixie
Watkins, Norman Thompson and Austin Treverton.



Plant clinics to focus on drought tolerance


Special to the Chronicle

Regardless of our expected
weather patterns, it is always a
good idea to know and properly
place plants that are drought
tolerant.
The free July monthly Citrus
County Extension Service Master
Gardener Plant Clinic topic will be
"Drought Tolerant Trees &
Shrubs." There are trees and
shrubs, both native and exotic,


which will perform well in Citrus
County. The schedule for the July
free plants clinics is:
Wednesday, July 3, 2 p.m. at
Floral City Library;
Tuesday, July 9, 1 p.m. at Lakes
Region Library, Inverness;
Wednesday, July 10, 1:30 p.m. at
Central Ridge Library, Beverly
Hills;
Friday, July 12, 1:30 p.m. at
Coastal Region Library, Crystal
River;


Wednesday, July 17, 1 p.m. at
Citrus Springs Library;
Tuesday, July 23, 2 p.m. at
Homosassa Library
Questions about landscape, sam-
ples for plant identification or gar-
den-related problems are welcome.
Master gardener volunteers will be
available to address these and
other concerns regarding anything
related to home landscaping.
For more information, call the
Extension Service at 352-527-5700.


News NOTES

Take trip to
see Rays play
The Citrus County Senior
Foundation, sponsored by
the Citrus County Chronicle,
offers a trip to watch the
Tampa Bay Rays play the
Minnesota Twins on
Wednesday, July 10.
Tickets are $45 per per-
son, which includes admis-
sion to the game and
round-trip motor coach
transportation from Lecanto
to Tropicana Field in
St. Petersburg.
Limited seating is still
available; RSVP soon for
tickets and to confirm a
spot.
For more information or
to purchase tickets, call
352-527-5975.
All proceeds go toward
helping seniors in Citrus
County.
'Dog Days' to
benefit rescues
Village Cadillac Toyota
will sponsor its third annual
Dog Days of Summer
fundraiser for local animal
rescue centers from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 13.
The dealership is at 2431
U.S. 19 N., Homosassa.
Several local animal res-
cue centers are in need of
cash donations, as well as
supplies.
Needed items include
laundry detergent, paper
towels, dog and cat treats
(no rawhides), harnesses of
all sizes, as well as dog and
cat toys and beds.
For more information
about the fundraiser, or to
make a donation, call
Charlie DeFreese at 352-
628-5100.
Zumba for the
Key on July 14
Zumba for the Key is
scheduled for Sunday, July
14, beginning at 2 p.m. with
registration starting at
1:15 p.m. at the Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center,
5521 Buster Whitton Way,
Lecanto.
Led by Marilynne
Denison, a certified Zumba
instructor, along with other
local instructors, the two-
hour workout session will
consist of dancing routines
to a variety of international
beats.
The event will also in-
clude light refreshments
and prizes.
The afternoon party will
cost $10, which is payable
at the door or by the pur-
chase of advance tickets
sold at county Zumba
classes.
All proceeds will benefit
the Key Training Center
Run For The Money
fundraising to provide schol-
arships to nearly 60 devel-
opmentally disabled adults,
enabling them to receive a
broad scope of essential
year-round services.
For more information, call
352-795-5541, ext. 311.

Pet SPOTLIGHT


Crystal


Special to the Chronicle
Crystal, who lives with
Carl W. Page Sr. in
Crystal River, spends an
afternoon just chillin' on
the sofa.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




C6 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING JUNE 29, 2013 C: Comcast,Citrus B:Bright House D./l:Comcast, Dunnellon Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 1 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
l WE$S NBC 19 19 News News Entertainment 'Night Crossing Lines '14' a (DVS) Do No Harm (N)'14' News SNL
Royal Memories: Prince The Lawrence Welk Are You Keeping As Time As Time Waiting for Yes Globe Trekker'PG' c
OCWEl PBS 3 3 14 6 Charles Show'G' Served? Up Goes By Goes By God Minister'PG' (DVS)
0 (WiFT) PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Griffith Just Seen Movie 'PG' Austin City Limits Front Row Center 'G'
News Nightly Star Watch Summer Crossing Lines A unique team tracks a serial Do No Harm "Morning, News Saturday
0[WFD NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Movie Spectacular killer (In Stereo)'14' (DVS) Sunshine"' 14' Night Live
News World The Middle Wheel of Zero Hour "Sync" (N) 666 Park Avenue (N) 20/20 (In Stereo) News Hot Topics
0 CWFT ABC 20 20 20 News 'PG' Fortune 'PG' c (In Stereo)'PG' c 'PG' cc
10 News Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! CSI: Crime Scene Brooklyn DA (N) (In 48 Hours (In Stereo) 10 News, Inside
( WTP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 (N) News Fortune 'G' Investigation'14' Stereo) c 'PG' 11pm (N) Edition
FOX13 6:00 News (N) MLB Baseball Regional Coverage. (N) (In Stereo Live) a FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Hell's
SCWTV) FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) Na (In Stereo) Na Kitchen
BD WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News |ABC Entertainment 'Night Zero Hour (N) 'PG' 666 Park Avenue (N) 20/20'PG'B News Crook
Turning Point With Jack Van Prophecy In Touch With Dr. Leslie Hale a 7th Street All Over CTN Pure
B WCF IND 2 2 2 22 22 David Jeremiah 'PG' Impe News Charles Stanley'G' Theater the World Special Passion
News World Paid Let's Ask Zero Hour"Sync" (N) 666 Park Avenue (N) 20/20 (In Stereo) News Private
D WFETS) ABC 11 11 11 News Program America 'PG' c (In Stereo) 'PG' a 'PG' c Practice
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Leverage "The First Leverage Parker gets Movie'PG'
PGWIl)IND 12 12 16 'PG '14' Theory Theory David Job"'PG' jury duty.'14'B
S MWTTI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 House Paid Paid Paid Bloopers Bloopers Futurama Futurama Ring of Honor Wrest. Bones'14'B
CD )WA~X1 TBN 21 21 SMART Gener Jim Raley Life Center Church Rabbi Messer Paid Stop Pain |B. Hinn Chosen IKingdom
King of Two and Two and EngagementiThe First The First Mr. Box Mr. Box Criminal Minds "100" Criminal Minds "Slave
MMWTM) CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men j Family Family Office Office '14', cof Duty"'14'
Ford-Fast School Your Citrus County Court Da Vinci's Inquest (In I Spy 'Y' Eye for an Fam Team
SiWYEFAM 16 16 16 15 Lane Zone Stereo) '14' c Eye
D (~WOVIJ FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang MLB Baseball Regional Coverage. (N) (In Stereo Live) cc FOX 35 News (N) Hell's Kitchen'14'
S(WVE) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comed. Noticiero Noticias Univision Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) Comed. |Noticiero
M (WXPX) ION 17 Monk'PG' c Monk 'PG' B Monk'PG' |Psych 'PG' | Psych 'PG' Psych 'PG' B
*** "The Perfect Storm" (2000, Suspense) **n, "Con Air" (1997, Action) Nicolas Cage. Premiere. Longmire "Party's Over" Shipping
(ME 54 48 54 25 27 George Clooney.'PG-13'B Vicious convicts hijack their flight.'R' c '14' N Wars'PG
-*.5, "S.WA.T." (2003, Action) Samuel L. **Y "The Mummy Returns" (2001) Brendan Fraser. Two evil forces Y** "The Mummy
55 64 55 Jackson, Colin Farrell. 'PG-13' pursue the son of adventurer Rick O'Connell.'PG-13' B Returns"
My Cat From Hell: My Cat From Hell (In My Cat From Hell (N) My Cat From Hell: My Cat From Hell (In My Cat From Hell (In
(Mi 52 35 52 19 21 Scratch Tracks'PG' Stereo) 'PG' (In Stereo) 'PG' Scratch Tracks 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) 'PG'
(HET 96 19 96 "Lakeview' **n "Notorious" (2009, Biography) Angela Bassett. Based on the life of *)i "FridayAfter Next" (2002, Comedy) Ice "White
96 19 96 slain rapper Christopher Wallace.'R'B Cube, Mike Epps.'R'B Chicks"
BRAVO 254 51 254 Housewives/NJ JHousewives/NJ |*** "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" (2005) Steve Carell.'R' "40-Year-Old Vir"
** "Tommy Boy" (1995, Comedy) *** "Get Him to the Greek"(2010, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Gabriel Iglesias: Aloha Fluffy '14, Jeff
(CE 27 61 27 33 Chris Farley PG-13' Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss.'R' BIL[ N Dunham
Hell's Kitchen "10 Hell's Kitchen "9 Chefs Hell's Kitchen "8 Chefs Redneck Island (N) 20 Greatest Redneck Dog and Beth: On the
98 45 98 28 37 Chefs Compete"'14' Compete"'14' Compete"'14' Videos (N) Hunt'14'
[ClNBC 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Ultimate Factories American Greed Suze Orman Show Debt/Part |Debt/Part American Greed
(fil 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) Anderson Cooper Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Stroumboulopoulos
Austin & Austin & Jessie Good- Good- Dog With a A.N.T Shake It Good- Good- Good- Good-
Aly 464046 6 5 Ally'G Ally'G' 'G'm Charlie Charlie Blog'G' Farm'G' Up!'G' Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie
(ELIP14) 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) c X Games Munich. From Munich, Germany (N Same-day Tape) SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 Football NHRA Drag Racing Softball Baseball Tonight (N) NHRA Drag Racing
(EWTi) 95 70 95 48 Pius XII St. Peter & Paul "Under the Roman Sky" (2010) 'NR' Living Right Campus |The Faith
n 29 52 29 20 28 "Zookeeper" U***, "(2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed *** "Despicable Me" (2010, Comedy) Voices "Willy Wonka &
29 52 29 20 28 (2011) Kevin James. Asner, Christopher Plummer. PG of Steve Carell, Jason Segel. PG' Chocolate"
"Billy ** "The Perfect Score" (2004) *** "Stakeout" (1987, Suspense) Richard *** "Another Stakeout" (1993) Richard
(Rl) 118 170 Elliot"'R' Erika Christensen. 'PG-13' Dreyfuss. (In Stereo)'R' c Dreyfuss. (In Stereo)'PG-13'B c
(FITB 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Jeanine Geraldo at Large (N) Red Eye (N)
(TIDll) 26 56 26 Food Network Star Diners IDiners Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. I Iron Chef America
IFj ) 35 39 35 Panthers |Panthers UFC Reloaded Randy Couture comes out of retirement. Boxing Golden Boy Live.
** "The Proposal"(2009, Romance-Comedy) ** "Just Go With It" (2011) Adam Sandier A man's care- *Y "What Happens in Vegas"
FJX) 30 60 30 51 Sandra Bulloc 'PG-13' less lie spins out of control.'PG-13' (2008) Cameron Diaz.
(IILF) 727 67 727 Central |PGA Tour Golf |PGA Tour Golf AT&T National, Third Round. c
iI ) 59 68 59 5 54 ("Strawberry Summer" *** "Your Love Never Fails" (2011, Comedy) "Banner4th of July" 2013, Drama) Brooke "Banner 4th of July"
59 68 59 45 54 2012) ElisaDonovan. NR' White, Mercedes Rueh. Premiere. c (2013) Brooke White.
i**02 "Dark Shadows" (2012, Comedy) Johnny *Y2 "The Watch" (2012, Comedy) Boxing Gennady Golovkin vs. Matthew Macklin. (N) (In
302 201 302 2 2 Depp. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Ben Stiller. 'R' Stereo Live)
S"New *** "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" (2011) Veep MA' The Newsroom Ratings Boardwalk Empire Game of Thrones (In
( 2 303 202 303 Year's" James Franco.'PG-13' m plummet.'MA' 'MA', Stereo)'MA' c
(IITV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It'G' Love It or List It 'G' Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl
Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting Counting
IS 51 25 51 32 42 Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG' Cars'PG'
"JodiArias: DirtyLittle Secret" 2013, "Anna Nicole" (2013, Docudrama) Agnes Devious Maids "Pilot" Drop Dead Diva'PG' B
24 38 24 31 Docudrama) Tania Raymonde. 'NR' Bruckner Premiere.'NR' c 'PG'B
S** "Double Wedding"(2010, Comedy- "Ice Castles"(2010, Drama) Taylor Firth, Rob "Pop Star" (2011, Comedy-Drama) Christian
iil 50 119 Drama) Tia Mowry (In Stereo) N Mayes. (In Stereo)'PG'B Serratos. Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG'B
WiA) 320 221 320 3 3 2n "The Change-Up" **nY "Safe House" (2012, Action) Denzel Banshee "The Kindred" **n2 "Spy Game" (2001, Suspense) Robert
S320 221 320 3 3 (2011)'NR'm Washington. (In Stereo)'R'B 'MA'B Redford.(In Stereo) 'R' B
ISNBC 42 41 42 Documentary Documentary |Documentary Documentary Documentary |Documentary
Area bl Ueclassitied AlasKa state Iroopers AlasKa state Iroopers Ultimate survival Ultimate survival Ultimate survival
PGG109 65 109 44 53 'PG' 14' '14' Alaska'PG' Alaska:T Alaska'PG'
li.IiD 28 36 28 35 25 Sanjay Sponge. Sponge. Sam& Sam& Marvin Big Time Wendell Nanny Nanny Friends Friends
WiJ) 103 62 103 Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Whitley Whitley La Toya LaToya Golden Golden Whitley Whitley
(X 44 123 ** "The Break-Up" (2006) Vince Vaughn. Movie 'PG ** "Made of Honor" (2008)
** "Reindeer Games" (2000) Ben ** "Gone" (2012) Amanda ** "Lawless" (2012, Crime Drama) Shia ** "Drive Angry"
340 241 340 4 Affleck. (In Stereo) 'R' Seyfried. (In Stereo) PG-13' LaBeouf. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' c (2011) Nicolas Cage.
NASCAR Test Drive MotoGP Racing MotoGP Racing TORC:The Off Road Championship Crandon NASCAR Inside the
(PEED) 732 112 732 RaceDay International Off Road Raceway (N) Victory L. Headsets
"The ** "Rambo" (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz, ** "The Expendables" (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone. Mercenaries
i b 37 43 37 27 36 Departed" Matthew Marsden. (In Stereo) embark on a mission to overthrow a dictator (In Stereo) 'R'
Magic City "Adapt or **n2 "Men in Black 3" (2012, Action) Will **Y2 "Hotel Transylvania" (2012) **Y2 "John Carter" (2012) Taylor
(STA ) 370 271 370 Die MA' cc Smith. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Voices of Adam Sandier Kitsch.'PG-13'B
Powerboafng 3 Wide Life XTERRA Fight Sports: Fight Sports: Extreme Extreme Extreme Extreme Transat
(Eii 36 31 36 'PG' Advent. KNOCKOUTS! KNOCKOUTS! Sailing Sailing Sailing Sailing Quebec
** "Godzilla" (1998, Science Fiction) Matthew Sinbad "House of Sinbad "Old Man of the Primeval: New World ** "Godzilla"(1998)
(YFY) 31 59 31 26 29 Broderick.'PG-13'a Games"'PG'm Sea" (N)'PG' 1, ini,i. i 1' 'PG-13' i
(ff$) 49 23 49 16 19 King |King IBigBang |Big Bang Big Bang |BigBang Big Bang |BigBang |Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan |Deon
**** "The Third Man" (1949, Suspense) *** "Auntie Mame"(1958, Comedy) Rosalind Russell, ** "Whatever Happened to
TEND 169 53 169 30 35 Orson Welles.'NR'B Forrest Tucker, Coral Browne.'NR' c Aunt Alice?"(1969)'PG'.
Deadliest Catch Deadliest Catch (In Deadliest Catch (In Deadliest Catch (In Deadliest Catch (In Deadliest Catch (In
(lju 53 34 53 24 26 "Goodbye Jake"'14' Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'c
(tTL 50 46 50 29 30 Cellblock6 Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life
(r ) 350 261 350 -*** "The Game" *** "Ransom" (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, ** "Children of the Corn IV: The "Children of the Corn V: Fields of
(I J 350 261 350 (1997) 'R' c Rene Russo. (In Stereo) R' Gathering" (1996) 'R' Terror"(1998) Stacy Galina.
i 48 33 48 31 34 **n "Red" Countdown to Green NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Quaker State 400. From Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, 72 Hours'14'B
S 48 33 48 31 34 (N) (Live) Nc Ky (N) (Live) cc
II[OiN 38 58 38 33 JohnnyT JohnnyT *** "Surf's Up" (2007, Comedy) 'PG' King/Hill |American Fam. Guy |Fam. Guy Cleveland |Boon
[1TA7) 9 54 9 44 Wat Wat Mysteries-Museum Monumental Myster Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
iiiV) 25 55 25 98 55 Wipeout'PG' cc Wipeout'PG'm Storage St Stora Storage StorStoratoraSto rtorage Most Shocking
[WUL 32 49 32 34 24 'Til Death 'TilDeath 'Til Death 'TilDeath The Exes Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |Raymond
NCIS DiNozzo investi- NCIS "Legend"'14' m NCIS "Legend"'14'B NCIS The death of an NCIS"Aliyah"Tense NCIS Reopened inves-
47 32 47 17 18 gates a suicide.'14' ICE agent.'14' c reunion. 14' tigation.'PG'
Bridezillas "Dekeydra Marriage Boot Camp: Marriage Boot Camp: Marriage Boot Camp: Pregnant & Dating Pregnant & Dating
S 117 69 117 and Joraine"'14' Bridezi las'14' Bridezlilas'14' Bridezi las'14' "Manhunts"'14' "Sweethearts"'14
.WGLA 18 18 18 18 20 MLB Baseball Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine Bones'14'


North
* K 7 3
V J 9 4
* K9


West
* J 6
V 8 & 3
* A 8 6 4 3
- 9 7 4


4 K J


06-29-13


10 5 2
East
4 Q 10 9 8 2
V A 7 .5
Q 7 2
8 8


South
4 A 5 4
V K Q 10 2
J 10 5
A Q 6
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 4


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Matt Drudge, creator of the Drudge Report,
said, "The Internet feeds off the main press,
and the main press feeds off the Internet.
They're working in tandem."
That sounds like good defenders, who work
in tandem to defeat declarer
The contract is three no-trump. West leads
fourth-highest from his longest and strongest,
the diamond four. How should East and West
card after that?
South starts with seven top tricks: two
spades and five clubs. And since there are
three winners available from hearts, things
look promising for him. However, with dia-
monds 5-3, not 4-4, the defenders can succeed.
Suppose South plays low from the board at
trick one. After East wins with his queen, he
must return the diamond seven, the higher of
two remaining cards. South should now play
his jack, the higher of touching honors from
the closed hand. But West should not be fooled.
He should know that if East had begun with Q-
10-7-2 of diamonds, he would have led back the
two, low from a remaining tripleton. So West,
since he has no entry, should duck this trick,
playing his three and keeping communication
with his partner
South wins on the board and calls for a
heart, but East should grab the trick with his
ace and lead his last diamond, giving his side
one heart and four diamonds.
Even if South wins with dummy's diamond
king at trick one and calls for the heart jack,
trying to look like someone planning a finesse,
East should not be fooled. He should win with
his ace, cash the diamond queen, and play his
third diamond.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, "" ,
to form four ordinary words. r-
CATYK -V -
r -I 1i 1 ....

~ 1 T I ... Services Inc

UIDAO
I; 1I " '


LAFDEW I

SU A W HEN THE REP 50X TOOK A
HUGE LEAP, THE FANS AT
LOG EIA F FENWAY PARK HAP A ---
H---- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Print your "W Y
answer here: L
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: INEPT MIGHT LENGTH TIRADE
Answer: He didn't believe in the inventor's plans for the incan-
descent bulb, so Edison ENLIGHTENED HIM


ACROSS
1 Rolex rival
6 Tusked animal
10 Poise
12 Frolicked
14 Jungle
chargers
15 Flung
16 Clears
18 Frequently
19 Ms, Teasdale
21 "Como ?"
23 Swamp
24 "Wolf Man"
Chaney
26 Twins, e.g.
29 Farm products
31 Multipurpose
truck
33 They may be
sealed
35 Shopping
center
36 Robbins or
Conway
37 Portico
38 Shakespearean
king


40 Worn-down
pencil
42 Kind of
poodle
43 Volcano
goddess
45 Chive relative
47 Environmental
prefix
50 Knee
neighbors
52 Wild feline
54 Pulled ahead
58 Grills
59 Record player
60 Sit-down
occasion
61 Moccasin,
maybe

DOWN
1 Boathouse
gear
2 Speed meas.
3 Yale grad
4 Lost cause
5 Unprincipled
6 Promotes


Answer to Previous Puzzle


BIAIDIDY VOID Kj
BOLERO PA NNE
RIB 0 N T I TIA N
RIBB NNTTA
USI P NA'N'O
TEIEN HU HNUN
K _W AI I yT pIA E
ASISIA Y IP I
OWG L TRAI
LE ED AS Y PE
E;NE S HA L K A FIR
SYRUP NM-E X
EARNMACE H
SG L E A.N IT
T OlU P EE CR AIVA
IN FERS ALDIERI
FN-OONIE DOUIS'E


7 Mantra chants
8 Lhasa -
9 Coral
formation
11 Youth org.
12 Hwys.


I Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OQuillDriver Books.comrn


6-29


13 Insect killer
17 Guard
19 "Love Story
writer
20 Ulterior
motive
22 Runs a feve
23 Not masc.
25 Away
27 Please, to
Hans
28 Frighten
30 Strike
32 Ostrich kin
34 Make a
comment
39 Bring to min
41 Goat sound
44 Back musch
46 German
industrial
center
47 Recede
48 Crocus bulb
49 Reed
instrument
51 CEO aides
53 Hush-hush
org.
55 Mexican Mr;
56 Response tc
a rodent
57 Woodland
creature


('P 2013 LUFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for Urs


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Ai
D


D ear Annie: I'm puzzled
about something. I'm a
straight female senior
citizen with totally white hair
Although I think I am still
quite attractive, I do look like
a senior citizen. I would like


to know whether
L there is any truth
A to a rumor I re-
F cently heard that .
today's lesbians
0 are attracted to
A older women with
T white hair.
S In the past two
years, I have been
approached by
women flirting
with me, most of
them much
younger. I'm stared AN I
r at and followed, MAIL
and rather bold
things have been
said to me. I am uncomfort-
able and fear for my safety
and wish it would stop. I'm
tempted to dye my hair or
wear hats if what's drawing
id this unwanted attention is the
s white hair. If you or your
es readers have any insight,
please let me know. Puz-
zled in Gary, Ind.
Dear Puzzled: We have no
idea whether other women
are attracted to you because
of your hair, your age, your
appearance or your de-
meanor. If our readers have
s any "inside" knowledge, we'll
let you know. Until then, try
covering your hair to see if it
makes any difference. You
should not feel threatened
because people are flirting,
male or female. But if some-
one seems especially aggres-
sive, don't be afraid to call
the police.
DearAnnie: I am a 57-year-
old disabled male who lives


L


alone. My next-door neigh-
bors moved in a year ago and
act as if the area is their own
private island. Every morning
there are children screaming
and hollering, dogs barking
and adults yelling in their
backyard. In the
evening, they are
joined by several
friends and family
members who
drink and talk so
loudly they may as
well be shouting.
This goes on every
k- night until mid-
night and some-
times as late as 2
a.m.
My major
IE'S headache comes
.BOX on the weekends.
Each evening, they
have music playing
outside along with a backyard
full of people. They give me
those "don't you dare say any-
thing" looks as I walk into my
tiny house. I'm fearful for my
safety. I have called the po-
lice repeatedly, and they al-
ways promise to send a car
out, but the noise never stops
until the wee hours of the
morning.
How can they be allowed to
disturb all the houses in the
immediate vicinity? Rude
Neighbors
Dear Neighbors: Could you
speak kindly to your neigh-
bors and ask if they would
keep the sound down after 10
p.m.? Does your city have a
noise ordinance? Are there
other neighbors who are
equally disturbed by this
racket? Would they speak to
the neighbors with you or call
the police every time this
happens, forcing the authori-
ties to issue citations and


fines? Look into white noise
additions such as fans that
might help muffle some of the
noise. Also, please check your
local area resources to see
whether there is a neighbor-
hood organization that helps
resolve disputes.
Dear Annie: I had to laugh
when I read the letter from
"N.Y," whose 17-year-old son
is terrible to travel with. I
can't think of anything more
embarrassing for a 17-year-
old boy than being seen
swimming or shopping with
his family And if I sent a
flight attendant to check on
my son, he would be
mortified.
We include our children in
vacation planning, which
makes it more rewarding. We
also try to find a friend of our
son's to come along. If the
adults want to see museums,
we try to find nearby activi-
ties for the kids.
Our best vacations with
kids have been a houseboat
with a ski boat included and
a condo in the mountains
where the boys could snow-
board. Ten days at a relative's
house would be unbearable
for most teens. And I would
never leave a 17-year-old
home unsupervised for 10
days. Perhaps one of his
friends would take him, de-
spite "the way he dresses."
Seriously? -Mom of Four

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast.net, To
find out more about Annie's
Mailbox visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


*^

r


ANP HE MONSTERS
ENJOY SSIROUL-PN'T
GARPMNIN WEAR SUN
BONwrTz $


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser

VE' m f ABOUT Ws'YOU' Fo P M FI. K w4RK P, O PO
LIKE. TO M 4WE.h-Ok) G.oUP? -. a8 5KE.Tb LL PLN'YE._7
-- ---------- V ----^
1 NA TO BE A KO0
N\ SLiT A' Lu E VNO
JUST LIKE


AND NOW 5H S TOMIXHNG
HIS ARM AND GIGGLING.
WELL,
MAYBE
WE'LL STJIL
GET TO SEE
HER ON


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Kids these days.... Whatever happened to
seeking the answers to life's greatest
mysteries through years of meditation,
isolation and self-deprivation?"


Doonesbury Flashback


se5SOzL6Y. RASP CCt4E
OUf fl4. YOUCMW
Lp~rTWE S4VU4 T~tE
Birgt. Nate









Big Nate --


S- WA,5 JbST z-
* fWS...I MCSW&A
AywCM7
I f^ g-


"Mommy, my hands are sticky!
What am I allowed to touch?"


"PAP PROVPP OUR CONES WATCHING' ThE GIRL.G
PLM VOLLTw5AtL,650 WE -Av TO GET NEW ot4es."


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Fast & Furious 6" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D. 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters University" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG) In 3D. 10:30 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 6:50
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"White House Down" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"World WarZ" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"World WarZ" In 3D (PG-13) 10:20 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Fast & Furious 6" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m.
"The Heat" (R) 1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,


7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) 11:50 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Monsters University" (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters University" (PG) In 3D. 4:55 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"This Is The End" (R) 11:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"White House Down" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No
passes.
"World War Z" (PG-13) 2:10 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
No passes.
"World War Z" In 3D. (PG-13) 12 p.m., 2:40 p.m.,
8 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline. com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A sjnita H


"YKKEXAU XJ B HKWT XLVNWZBAZ


WXZMBR YNW LK. X ENA'Z ZWMJZ


VKNVRK GFN ENA'Z RXPK ZN KBZ."


UXAB UKWJFNA

Previous Solution: "Change is the essence of life. Be willing to surrender what
you are for what you could become." Reinhold Niebuhr
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 6-29


Pickles


rN5TEAD OF WAK INEOH,
UPATT6:'5, r WOKE fl COME TIME TO
UP AT 9:30o!O READJUST


Arlo and Janis


COMICS


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 C7




C8 SATURDAY. TUNE 29. 2013


To place an ad, call 563-5966




f,, CClassifieds



In Print


and


Online


All

SThe Tint e


M -w ..-f i It... .,
Fa: 35)56-565 1Tol re:(88)82-34 1E ai: *asfi0schoic 0olne 0o Iw .ste 0wcho -0lolie 0o


Gentleman in his late
60's would like to
meet a lady for some
companionship
and maybe more
(352) 382-5661
Honest, Sincere
Very lonely older
widower would love
to meet attractive
lonely lady 70-80.
For loving relationship.
Dine out, go places,
do fun things together,
and change our lives.
Please write and tell
me about yourself.
It could be great for
Both of Us
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1835P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl
34429



2 Automatic Pool
Cleaners, Hayward nav-
igator, zodiac barracuda
with hoses, exec. cond.
$135 each 270-8475
Air Conditioner, porta-
ble on wheels, window
vented, remote control,
run 110,10k btu, room
to room Al condition
$135 (352) 270-8475

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 SW, CHA
$450.mo., 1st, last
& sec. No Dogs
850-491-8479
Hernando
Sat Only 7a to 11a
bedroom set, sleeper
household, no clothes
3024 N Stratham PT
or High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Hitachi, stereo with
tape and record
player in Cabinet
$150.
Disney VHS Library
$100 (352) 527-7223
Homosassa 3/2
+ den,c/h/a, clean
$7000. mo. f/l/s
352-634-6340
HYUNDAI
2009, Sonata SE,
36k mil
$12,500,
352-382-2457
Lion Head Rabbits,
show quality $10 each
(352) 586-2582
Moving Sale
Wingback Chair, Eng-
lish Hunting Material
$25, Breakfast glass ta-
ble with 4 padded chairs
$50 call (352) 382-1885
Peachy Clean
Residential And
Commercial Cleaning
(352)400-8617


Pentair Kreepy
Krawly, great white suc-
tion side pool cleaner,
for in ground pool $200
call (352) 382-1885




OPEN
HOUSE

Pine Ridge
Sunday Only
1pm to 4pm
1.39 acres, 3 bd,
2%2 bath, former
model home
many upgrades
2269 sq. ft living area
Pool w/cabana
1709 W Pine Ridge
Blvd.

PLUMBERS &
HELPERS
WANTED

Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at:
4079 S. Ohio Ave,
Homosassa




OPEN
HOUSE


TODAY 1p-4p
INCREDIBLE
RIVERFRONT HOME
Asking $675,000
5464 Cedar Mill Path
Homosassa, 34448

Lyn Hillis, Realtor
ERA American
Realty
352-212 6920
Two 42" Riding
Mowers
$250. & $375.
in very good cond.
Citrus Springs
732-597-3910



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Lg BBQ Grills
8ft satellite Dishes
& MORE 352-270-4087


2 KITTENS FREE
Black & White,
blue eyes, Cute
Cl BTN 8-9a.m. or 8-9
p.m. (352) 746-1904
Female Chihuahua.
One yr. old. Spayed
but needs shots.
Good w/ dogs and
cats and older kids.
(352) 563-0192
Female Lab/Boxer
mix. Spayed, chip-
ped, shots, 10 months
old, great with kids.
No cats (352) 563-0192
FREE BLACK LAB MIX
Free 1 yr old black lab
mix female very nice
needs good home
1-352-503-7684
Free
Cat Carrier
352-564-0095
FREE CAT
To good home
very lovable 1/2
2 Siamese, /2 orange
tabby, litter trained,
full grown 465-4015
Free
Firewood & Mulch
Cut into 3 4 ft sec-
tions. Call for location
(352) 697-1509
FREE KITTENS
10 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
FREE KITTENS
Siamese
(352) 795-6533
FREE Lawn Mower
42" Riding Murry Mower
Doesn't Work
call (352)860-2565
FREE
Part Bengal Cat
Young Male, neutered,
he is a lap cat and likes
to be held & have lots of
attention. Are you
home most of the time
to give him lots of
love? call for more in-
formation
352-464-1567
Free
Pot Belly Pig &
Baby Turkeys
(352) 726-9573
Large Bird
Breeding Cage
4'tall 2x2' square
2 separate
compartments
352-465-7900
Please help, This is my
dog Pluto, He is a really
pretty red bone
hound/mix and is
approx 3 years old, he is
good with children.
Looking for a good,
loving family for him
(352) 228-4078

Thank you St. Jude
for prayers answered.
PCR




U PICK
BLACKBERRIES
(352) 643-0717

YOU PICK
Tomatoes
.40 a Ibs, $10 per
bucket min. beside
Walmart in the Villages,
on CR 466 Open
6/23~/13'


Blue Eyes, deaf, 10 Ibs,
8 yrs old. Missing since
5/20, Independence
HWY, Inverness
Reward offered
352-726-1019/
352-212-9941




Black & White long
haired female dog,
approx 25 lb. Found
off Turner Camp Rd
6/27 during storm.
(352) 637-4526
Black Leather
Comco Holder
for portable radio found
at Winn Dixie, Inverness
06/23/13 call to identify
352-637-0528
Chihuahia Mix older
dog,male, black and
tan, red collier found
near huddel house on
HWY 41 please call to
identify 352-201-4349
Found Pug,
on Saturday
in Lecanto
off Sanction Rd.
(352) 220-1942


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y$28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966

11111111B


DAY PROGRAM
SUPERVISOR

New Horizons Village
a residential care facil-
ity for 48 adult individ-
uals with intellectual
disabilities, is looking
for a dynamic, creative
person to supervise
20+ staff at their
Active Treatment Day
Program. Must have
at least one year
supervisory experi-
ence and one year
working with the
developmentally disa-
bled population. Must
be a team player.
Basic qualifications
include:
I HS diploma, BA
degree preferred
I Ability to pass a
mandatory criminal
background investiga-
tion, reference inquiry,
& a post-hire physical
exam & drug screen.
New Horizons Village
offers:
I Competitive wages,
excellent benefit pack-
age & a tobacco-free
campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at
1275 N. Rainbow
Loop, Lecanto, FL
34461 or send your
resume to
lois@newhorizons
village.us


Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927


Homeownership
Specialist

Immediate opening
Provide pre-
& post-purchase
homebuyer counsel-
ing & education, and
assist with all stages
of the lending proc-
ess. BS degree and 3
yrs exp with residen-
tial lending or counsel-
ing, FHFC, FHA, VA,
& RD products, &
affordable housing
industry and programs
req. EOE/AA For
complete info on
position & how to
apply, visit
www.community
housingpartners.org





CDL CLASS A

WITH TANKER
REQUIRED
Looking to hire
someone to work in
septic industry
352-563-2621


Class A Driver

2 yrs Experience
Flatbed/Lowboy/
Stepdeck home 3/4
weeks $40-60K
334-864-7456


EXPERIENCED
ROOFING CREW
& ROOFERS

Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
ADolv In Person
AAA ROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411


Full-time
Supermarket
Refrigeration
and A/C Service
Technician

wanted servicing
Citrus & surrounding
counties. Experience
required. Competitive
wages and benefits.
Fax resume to:
352-860-1830


LOCKSMITH
WANTED

WILL TRAIN
ApplY In Person
593 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto


Marine Service
Writer

F/T Knowledge of Ma-
rine mechanics, apply in
person Mon-Fri at Twin
Rivers Marina, 2880 N.
Seabreeze Pt, Crystal
River, 352-795-3552







NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough & Trim,
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT,
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124AUnit4
Wildwood

PLUMBERS &
HELPERS
WANTED
Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at:
4079 S. Ohio Ave,
Homosassa

QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH
Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

SERVICE
PLUMBER
Call (352) 726-5601
or Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1834M
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River 34429





CITRUS MAIDS
CLEANING PERSON
Needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925











































SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowerest
Blvd. and fill out an

aCHipaonLE


INOW HIRING FULL.TIMIE POSITION














BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
OP Se -c




HOND *ORACR


SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMETOLOGY
DAYS & NIGHTS
r*JULY 1, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
*mAUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
m*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATEAPPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING










SPRING HILL
CLASSES
C C C C
COSMETOLOGY
DAYS & NIGHTS
rJULY 1, 2013
BARBER
NIGHTS
rAUGUST 12, 2013
MASSAGE
THERAPY
DAYS & NIGHTS
*SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR
LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
(352) 464-2514
1305 Hwy 486




HAULING PLATFORM
2" hitch, black steel, 60"
W x 30" D, custom with
steel mesh bottom.
$100 352-422-1309




ANTIQUE FAN
McGraw Electric Co.
Model 1265R $20.00
call 352-257-3870


NORMAN ROCKWELL
COLLECTOR PLATES
10 different, limited edi-
tion, 1970s. $100 all
352-422-1309
PORCELAIN DOLLS- 2
Native American, 21"
tall, w/ stands, Paradise
Galleries. $15 each
352-422-1309


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




Free flow w/water fall,
4-5 person, like new 1.5
yrs old, cover, steps, ac-
cessories & chem., runs
on 110 ele. $1200 OBO
352-746-0853




AC Unit
for Doublewide
Mobile Home
$500
(352) 637-3482
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
COMMERCIAL
FREEZER,2004 Frigid-
aire 20.3 cubic feet
with alarm, like new,
excellent condition,
$250, 352-212-8922
DISHWASHER
TAPPAN..White. Works
well. $50 527-1239
DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
REFRIGERATOR
FRIGIDAIRE. 18 cu ft.
White. Works great!
$100. 527-1239
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER
$100 In perfect working
condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER
$100 In perfect working
condition. 30 day
warranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER & DRYER
NEED WORK $50 FOR
BOTH 352-613-0529


WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398



Cherry Credenza
Good Condition
$30.(352) 795-9146
Desk w/ /4 inch
glass top, $125.
House Safe, brand
new, still in box $150.
(352) 795-9146
FILING CAB. 4
DRAWER STEEL 15"W
X 25"D X 52"H Excellent
condition. $50.
(352)563-6410
King Slay Bed
Cherry wood, dresser
w/mirror, armoire, 2
nightstands paid $5500
asking $1500
(678) 621-3517




SUMMER
BLOWOUT
Sat, June 29 -6pm- preview lpn
ATM Antiques
& Auctions LLC
811 SEUSH 1yl 19 ystallliver,FL
352-795-2061
Antiques, Collectibles, Jewelry, Art,
Box Lots, Choice Lots & More
Everything MUST Go!
www.charliefudge.com
VS MC DS Cash & Checks 13%BP
AB3279,AE450,AU1593






DUDLEY'S

Tuesday July 2nd.
Auction @ 4pm
Special
Independence
week
Estate Overstock
Auction!!!
Call or web for info
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BPAu2267
AB1667




4 WOOD SHELVES
FOR
GARAGE//WORKSHOP
$20 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
419-5981
Delta 12" Plainer,
Heavy, 220V, $400.
Powermatic Lathe
$750
(352) 637-3482
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HAND
HELD, MADE OF
METAL HEAVY DUTY
INVERNESS 419-5981
Werner 8'
aluminum ladder
$35 (352) 382-1885



60" Sony Wega,
Rear projection TV,
6 yrs. old, Plays good
Color a little off
$500
(352) 382-4085


143 2675 89|
2689153 4 7
975 483162
731849256
492156738
856732 914
319628475
624571893
58739 46 2 1


: ..





At home or


on the go...



We got you covered.






-V Your News


*. -Your Town


ass Your Way


www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 C9


Hitachi, stereo with
tape and record
player in Cabinet
$150.
Disney VHS Library
$100 (352) 527-7223
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $80
352-613-0529




INTERIOR DOOR.
32" 6 Panel with
hardware. $15.00
352-513-5400
INTERIOR DOOR. 6
Panel, 30" $10.00.
352-513-5400
MARBLE
1/2", 30"x30", for
counter top, tan,
good shape,($20)
352-613-7493
PAINT SPRAYER
Sherwin Williams series
4900 Comm. Paint
Sprayer EUC $100.00
352-249-7212
SCREEN DOOR.
New with frame, 36X80,
Aluminum with scroll
work. $99.00.
352-513-5400
SINK
white, 19"x16", bath-
room, brand-new, ($10)
352-613-7493
SLIDING GLASS
WINDOW.
Horizontal slide, 46W X
69H. $20.00.
352-513-5400




BOSE SYSTEM, 3000
watt, mixer board, dual
CD PLAYER,
COMPATIBLE WITH
COMPUTER. GREAT
FOR DJ, all in hard car-
rying cases and porta-
ble stand. $800.00
Call, 304-544-8398
DELL OPTIPLEX
GX150 w/Monitor
keyboard,mouse,
speakers, camera $100
firm 325-601-7816
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
SCANNER CANON
CANOSCAN 4400F with
35mm attachment,
works w/XP,7 or 8 $25.
(352)563-6410




2 Leather Wing Chairs,
Blue, Brand New,
Office or Home $3,000
(352) 212-2798
3 piece Black Lacquer
oriental wall unit and
matching coffee table
and end table. Shown
by appointment only.
$600. 304-544-8398
4 DINING/KITCHEN
CHAIRS brown tones
perfect condition $40.00
can deliver call
352-257-3870
6 BAR STOOLS wood
painted black great
condition $12 each
can deliver.
call 352-257-3870
Amish Built Solid
Oak pedestal Table
w/ Two 12" Leaves,
(36" x 48"/60"
Org. Cost $800
Asking $200
New Condition
Call (352) 637-5227
BOYS BEDROOM SET
locker style, headboard,
nightstand, dresser.
Great condition. $50 all.
352-220-3123
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
DINING ROOM SET
Wrought iron Table, (4)
chairs, 42" glass top
and Baker's rack.
$100.00 Call 637-2193
Dining Room Set,
4 captain chairs,
table w/ 1 leaf,
china closet $350.
Wing Back Chair $60.
(352) 628-3411
Elegant Living Room
set, sofa, love seat and
Chair. Colors browns &
creams, paid $5000
asking $1500.
(678) 621-3517


STEEL SINK without
faucet asking $25.00
352-527-3177
Entertainment Center
3 pcs, 2 side, 1 center
bleached oak, good
cond. $175.
(352) 249-7521
FLOOR LAMP with
glass globe. $25.00.
352-513-5400
GRANDMOTHER
CLOCK NEEDS A
LITTLE REPAIR only
100.00 obo
352 464 0316
0r High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LOVE SEAT AND
CHAIR traditional good
condition needs clean-
ing $45.00 can deliver.
call 352-257-3870
MIRROR
Full length, gold frame.
$30.00
352-513 -5400
Moving Sale
Entertainment Center
with TV & VCR $40
King Bed rm set 2
dresser one w/mirror
and 2 end tables $175
352-746-0834
Moving Sale
Wingback Chair, Eng-
lish Hunting Material
$25, Breakfast glass ta-
ble with 4 padded chairs
$50 call (352) 382-1885
OAK TABLE
48" round, pedestal
with leaf. $65.00.
352-513-5400
Older Drexel Dining
Room Set
Pedestal Table w/6
chairs & China Cabinet
$350. (352) 489-8095
PICTURE
Gold frame, Paris street
scene, 36"H X 48"W.
$60.00
352-513-5400
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
ROCKER-RECLINER
Lazy Boy, tan cloth,
good condition.$80
OBO. 352-628-0698
SHOE STORAGE
CABINET WHITE Ap-
prox. 30W X 39H X 12D
2 bins & 2 drawers. $20.
Must sell (352)563-6410
SOFA BED great condi-
tion light blue $75.00
can deliver, call
352-257-3870
Sofa Bed Queen Size
Blue Flower Print
Perfect Condition
as new $300.
(352) 527-7443
Sofa Sleeper
Queen Sz. $250.
Entertainment Center
Light wood $150
.(352) 628-3411
TABLE LAMPS
Pair of Pineapple lamps
with silk shades. $45.00
352-513-5400
TAN WOOD DRESSER
6-Drawers, looks like
oak, great condition.
Asking $100.
Call 352-233-3227
TWIN FRAME AND
BOX SPRING Twin
Frame and box spring
in EUC... $30.
352-249-7212
TWIN FRAME AND
BOX SPRING Twin
Frame and box spring
in EUC... $20.
352-249-7212
WALL HANGING
metal, 60"H X 40"W.
$90.00
352-513-5400
White Wicker Furn.
set of 15 pieces with
cushions, table & chairs,
tv stand, coffee table,
$995,Browhill notty pine
Bed dream maker matter,
bx spg $400 503-3210



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman LT 3000
Lawn Tracker 20 HP
42" deck with
mulch kit 6 speed,
exec. cond $475
(352) 726-0230
CRAFTSMAN
RIDING MOWER
15.5 HP, turbo cooled, 6
speed/ 42" Excellent
condition. $375
After 5 pm 513-5134


FERTILIZER/SEED
SPREADER push type
with covered hopper.
like new. $25
352-422-1309
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS SMALL $15
352-613-0529
TORO ZERO TURN
Mower, Kohler eng. 54"
cut, sweeper & grass
catcher, exec. cond.
$2600 OBO 270-8664
Two 42" Riding
Mowers
$250. & $375.
in very good cond.
Citrus Springs
732-597-3910
WEED EATER 1
26" RIDING MOWER
$400.
(352) 527-2981




SPIDER PLANTS Free
to a good home. three
large Spider plants with
babies phone:
352-613-2232





MOVIItG.
SALE

BEVERLY

HILLS
Thurs-Fri-Sat 8am-?
German Furn, tools,
hshld, cloth, sewing
mach. pool cleaner, ex-
terior doors and more
4559 N. Grasstree Dr
CITRUS SPRINGS
Moving SaleThur-Fri-Sat
9am-2 Christmas items,
work bench, cab, refrig.
riding mower 2969 W.
Yorkshire PI 897-4681
Serious Buyers Only

CRAWFORDVILLE
Saturday 29th,
7am-2p
Huge 2 Family Sale
159 Mulberry Circle
HOusehold items,
TV, power tools
mens clothes,
sz. 42, shirts 17-18V2
& coats
women clothes
misses 14-18,
women extra large
to size 16, & shoes,
nurse uniforms, extra
large 16 women
Baby clothes.
infant to 2T,
Kerousene heater,
pool stairs,

Many other items
Everything Must Go!
RAIN OR SHINE

CRYSTAL RIVER
6/29 & 6/30
4149 N Concord Dr

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Fri. & Sat, 8a-2p
Furniture, Womens,
Clothes, Gold & Silver,
Wallpaper & Borders,
glassware and MORE.
Behind Olive Tree
Restaurant, US 19,
UNITS 80, 81, 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 7am-lpm
2 FAMILY, Off Fort Is-
land Trail, Follow signs

M, 1 VI 14
A MLE

CRYSTAL

RIVER
Fri-Sat 7am-?
Every Thing Must Go
Every thing is inside
8143 Scotch Pine Ln

Dunnellon
Rainbow Springs
Sat. 6/29th, 8a-2
Another BIG Sale
clearing house
& garage
19790 SW 95th St.
Turn in 93rd Ln. Rd.
2 blocks E of Hwy 41

FLORAL CITY
June 26-29 & July 1-7,
9am-5pm
Retiring from RV'ing.
Blue Ox, great buddy,
sewer equip, wheel
covers, tools, air com-
pressor, & accessories
7969 E. BROOKS LANE
1 BIk West of Old
World Restaruant


DUNNELLON
Sat 8am-12pm
Craft stuff, books,
clothes, jewelry
Fun Stuff!!
3517 W Cyprus Dr
off 488

FLORAL CITY
SUPER SALE
Sat. 29 7am -1 pm
9460 E Tsala Apopka
Ave. Duvall Island
Deer Stands, Hunting,
fishing & Golf, pwr.
tools, some collectibles,
children's car seats,
Chevy truck parts, elec-
tronics MUCH MORE!
Hernando
Sat Only 7a to 11a
bedroom set, sleeper
household, no clothes
3024 N Stratham PT
Homosassa
Estate Sale
Fri, Sat 6/28 & 6/29
8:30a to 1:30p in
Sugarmill Woods
78 Byrsonima Cr 34446

HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8:00AM
MOVING SALE *
antiques, crystal,
fishing supplies,
freezer, washer
dryer, couch, dining
room set, linens,
patio set, dishes,
whole house full
5109 Runningbrooke
"Riverhaven"
HOMOSASSA
Fri-Sat 8am-4pm
Hshld, clothing, jewelry
and too much list
3807 S. Pigeon Ter
(hwy 19, to grover
cleavelan E, to mead-
ows sub division, turn
left on sandpiper, 1st
st. left blackbird, take
right on Pigeon Ter,
2nd hse on right)
HOMOSASSA
Saturday 29th, 8am
Trundle Bed., Recliner,
Kiln & Household items
11625W Rlverhaven Dr
INVERNESS
Moving sale at E. Clayre
Lane. Kids & hshld 8-11
INVERNESS
Sat. 29th, 8a-2p
Furn., Bike, Books
Adj. Bed $800.
202 TROUT AVE.
SUGARMILL
ESTATE SALE
Sat 8-3 45 Corkwood
Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352-613-2944




4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZES 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
DESIGNER SHOES
Giuseppe Zanotti high
heel sandals $100
352-726-0040
MENS 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZES 36X30 & 34X30
$40 EACH
352-613-0529



!!!! LT225/75R 16
TIRE!!!! Good Year
Light Truck Great
Shape 90% Tread
ONLY 60.00 464-0316
2 Automatic Pool
Cleaners, Hayward nav-
igator, zodiac barracuda
with hoses, exec. cond.
$135 each 270-8475
2 End Tables & Coffee
Table $200
Small Freezer
$125.
.(352) 628-3411
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALL COV-
ERING $25 PRE
PASTED VINYL 165 SQ
FT 419-5981
4 CERAMIC KITCHEN
CANISTERS WITH
LIDS $10 COUNTER-
TOP CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
6 WALL MIRRORS NO
FRAMES 23 1/2 X 40
TO 40 X 40 INCHES
$50.00 3525270324
Above Ground Pool
24 round, Intex,
includes pump, ladder
& cover. $400 obo
(352) 726-9565
or (352) 419-5466


Air Conditioner, porta-
ble on wheels, window
vented, remote control,
run 110, 10k btu, room
to room Al condition
$135 (352) 270-8475
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Barbecue
w/side burner
and propane tank
$50. 352-613-0529
BLACK @ DECKER
AIR SPRAYER $30
NEW NEVER USED
FOR PAINTS/STAINS
INVERNESS 419-5981
BOYS BICYCLE
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
CEILING FAN
Brushed Steel, 3 lights,
short-black blades. Ideal
Kitchen/Porch Almost
new $55 352-233-3227
Chevy Silverado
Aluminum Running
Boards, great shape
ONLY 100.00
352464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra for
4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY $80
352464-0316
CHILDREN'S IRON
HEADBOARD Brand
New Metal Headboard,
$10 (352)465-1616
FLORAL CITY
6/28 & 6/29 9a-4p
Hand/power tools,
electronics, hsehold
items, and much more
9219 S. Mtn Lake Ave
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
PAPER SHREDDER
NEW IN THE BOX
shreds all your impt.
papers.prevent identy
theft35.00 464-0316
Pentair Kreepy
Krawly, great white suc-
tion side pool cleaner,
for in ground pool $200
call (352) 382-1885
POOL DECK
CONCRETE STAIN 5
Gal Ivory unopened,
cover 800 sq ft. Bought
too much. Less than
half price at $45
352-212-1827
Pool SAFETY FENCE
4ft X 75ft. Retails $100
per 10 ft section. Asking
100 for entire fence.
Firm. Call 352 233 3227
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok
condition, $50
(352)465-1616
RUBBER RIDING
BOOTS/LAKE BOOTS
$15 MADE IN ISRAEL
LIKE NEW SIZE 43L
EUR 419-5981
Stress Lounger
Hassock, leather $50,
combination TV & Com-
puter Monitor 15" Color
$50 352-513-4317
Two New 10x10
EasyUp Folding
Canopies w/4 zipper
sides, heavy duty
$100. ea. obo
(352) 503-6977
White Wood Dining
Rm Table w/ leaf and
4 upholestered chairs
$75. (352) 795-2515
(352) 422-6161
Wooden Swing Set
Gym Play Set,
w/ rock climbing wall
& tunnel, small play-
house, slide & more,
needs paint Org.
$1,300 Asking $450.
(352) 795-2515
(352) 422-6161



4 Wheeled Walker
with brakes and seat
ONLY $70.00
352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
& Aluminum Walker
both have adjustable
legs 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Golden Companion
Electric Wheel Chair,
and Lift (bruno), exec.
cond $450 for both
352-419-6710


Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464-0316
NEW 4" Toilet Seat
Riser, makes it much
easier to get up
ONLY 20.00
352-464-0316
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps to
the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
TRANSPORT
WHEELCHAIR (SMALL
WHEELS) good shape
with footrests only 90.00
352 464-0316




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" 5 STRING
BANJO UKE U.S.A.
MADE NORTH AMERI-
CAN HARDWOODS
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" BANJO UKE
MADE IN U.S.A.!WITH
NORTH AMERICAN
MAPLE & CHERRY
$95 352-601-6625
"NEW" WASHBURN
TRAVEL
GUITAR/DULCIMER
W/GIGBAG& MORE!
$90 352-601-6625
DRUM CIRCLE? 14"
HAND DRUM/IRISH
BODHRAN WALNUT.
PRE TUNED $40
352-601-6625
JR. 3/4 ELECTRIC GUI-
TAR STRAT STYLE
CREAM&WHITE NEW
CONDITION $45
352-601-6625
KARAOKE
pro-rack-mount,CAVS,
dig echo/pitch-shift,good
shape,2CD's($25)
352-613-7493




COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $10
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529
INTERIOR DOOR
HANDLES Bronze
oil-rubbed like new $15
352-726-0040
OVERSIZED
RECLINER Dark
burgundy velour.
$25.00 352-513-5482
Pitcher with hydrangea
flowers arrangement
$50, napkin
holders made
with broaches $35
352-795-7254
PVC VERTICAL
BLINDS Light blue/light
gray colors $20
352-726-0040
Solar Cover
& Attached Roller.
You pick and remove
$50. (352) 746-3327
or (352) 212-7299
TOASTER OVEN
MAGIC CHEF $15
352-613-0529




Atlas Cross Bar 65 by
Weider, over 65 exer-
cises, compare to bow
flex. Includes bench and
leg extension. Exc Cond
$85 obo 352-503-2661
BOWFLEX BLAZE
Resistance Rods 210
pounds, 60 exercises,
lat tower, squat
station, aerobic
rowing, leg presses,
good condition,
$300,352-212-8922
ELLIPTICAL
COMPACT SIZE
works fine 100.00
352 464-0316
ELLIPTICAL
EXERCISER Exec
Cond. 1 yr. old. Hardly
Used at all. $250
352-503-2610
ELLIPTICAL
NordicTrack E5vi
Adjustable stride
Pre Set Programs
$300.00 352-527-3589
EXERCISE BIKE
(UPRIGHT TYPE) works
great only 90.00
352 464-0316


9 fl I


6 29 @ LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIck for UFS, 2013

"He stole $15 million, your honor.
He wants to plead 'Guilty with
a good excuse.'"





Thank You For 15 ears, of Votes!






EL 1988





3,5 01, 42-1 4_ 2
cai iaZ-s-^S :


PILATES
course book, DVD,
2 VCR tapes, ($5)
352-613-7493
PROFORM
Eliptical
good condition
$200. (352) 795-9146
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BIKE
works great only
100.00
3524640316




2 Trek Bicycles
$100 both
1 Huffy Beach Bicycle
$50.
(352) 637-3482
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ GO Club Car
Exec. cond. exec tires,
good Batty, canopy
must sell this
weekend $1200.
352-527-3125
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
GEM '99 Electric Cart,
Batteries 1 yr. old
Crystal River $3,000.
obo (352) 564-8166
GOLF DRIVER
2013 Cobra AMP Cell,
New, Men's Rt Hand,
stiff shaft,adj tool &
new head cover. $200
OBO (352) 746-5107
GOLF DRIVER
Tour Edge Exotics.
XLD, MRH, Senior, Gold
65 shaft. Exc cond w/
new grip & HC. $65 obo
Dunellon 465-8495
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Ruger LCR 22 Mag
$449 NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516




UTILITY TRAILER
2012 Easy Pull
5 x10, beaver tail
extra tie downs
New Cond. $875.
(352) 860-1106


Baby Cradle,high chair
(both wood) car seat,
stroller and play pen,
blankets, all in good
condition all for $200
(352) 795-7254
BABY Einstein PACK
'N PLAY Portable
Crib-good condition.
Asking $25.00 obo.
Call 352-233-3227.
BARBIE HOUSE WITH
ACCESSORIES 3 feet
tall Barbie House. Co-
mes with dolls. Asking
25.00 352-233-3227
BOYS BABY CLOTHES
like new sizes 3 months
- 3 toddler $ .25 $2.00
call 352-257-3870



MUST SELL
'2 Karat
Engagement Ring
Paid $1,100.
Asking $600.
(352) 464-2215
NECKLACE,double
chain,stainless,large
engrave able heart,
new,1/2price,($70)
352-613-7493

Sell r Swa


*




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;







PL E X U S


m.

Ambassador

Samantha

Haven
Independent
Plexus Slim
Weight Loss I love
helping people get
healthy and motivated.
I'm so THANKFUL that
I was showed this by a
Dear friend:)
The products have
changed my LIFE
If you would like more
information call me or
send me a text at
352-536-4025
Visit my web site at
www.plexusslim.
com/haven
Can't wait to hear
from you :)


MIDNIGHT
Midnight, beautiful
black lab mix, 3 y.o.,
weighs 65 lbs, al-
ready neutered,
housebrkn, very
sweet & playful. He
would love a big
fenced yard, good
with other dogs &
people. As a lab,
would be a wonder-
ful, loyal compan-
ion. Adoption fee
$30 includes all vac-
cinations, chip &
tests. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


^^^3S^ \.....^ ^SSS~A iqmmmisEMW^L n


i;Eft~i S^^ IML I^ F, i fk^ ,
^^wll^f| ^ ?BBl^^^^n-f ^^S 7WH-b I w al11* oBJiiF ^lllMltl^ '111l-^ Wpr ''^rP' '^34 i Blo ^Kl^ i~B|^ J^ ^


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





Yoir torld first

Need a jol)
'Ir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHCONI(LE
Classifieds


LISTINGS
E-BOOKS PUBLISH-
ING E-Books Available
NOW! Guides for
caregivers, Dealing with
Death. Interested in
publishing your story?
Http://www.amazon.com/
author/elainekleid




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Mulch, Stone, Hauling
& Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Liec.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Residential/Commercial
(352) 400-8361
Mention this ad and get
a service call for $19.
Expires 8/31/2013
Lic# CAC1817447




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
*352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
Peachy Clean
Residential And
Commercial Cleaning
(352)400-8617


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $20
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557







White Diamond Limo
Weddings/Sporting
events/Special
Occasions/Airport
352-341-LIMO (5466)




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998





I


Jeffrey Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135











Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
CPC-051584/Insured
352-422-6956


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748



CRS Contracting
Roofing,Free Estimates
Remodeling and Home
Inspections 414-8693
ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.comn
Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.






Employment
source is...


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641


Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Serv-
ice
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


ICmp









WORDY U D Y TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Be acquainted with a paid athlete (1) Every answer isarhymin
pair of words (like FAT CX
and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Mobile phone dropped to the floor (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number afte
definition tells you how m
3. End the nap of actor Gyllenhaal (1) syllables in each word.
1I@I 2013UFS,Dist by UnivUclickf
4. Give up a detective's badge (1)


5. Sheep meat chowhound (2)


6. More wealthy athlete on a mound (2)


7. Flinging fine silver (2)

m-----


g
,AT
), and

rthe
any


orUFS


ONI1HIS 9NIlfaH 'L HHOIHd l H31H IH'9 NOilflm No0flN "
Iams fflaI'f aXV XVA 'T TIa TIa3 Od AMON "I
SHASKNV


3 Dog Travel Crates
Hard Plastic, 25-40 lbs
$40 OBO each
352-419-5503
FREE
Need A Home
for a beautiful
purebred Labrador
Retriever, male 4a
yrs old, please call after
5pm (352) 746-3087
Lion Head Rabbits,
show quality $10 each
(352) 586-2582
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
Toy Chihuahua
Female, 7 months
old, Tan, good health
all shots $375.
(352) 795-2515
(352) 422-6161


VELVET
Velvet, beautiful
female red Chow
mix, perfect size
companion @ 42
lbs. Appears house-
brkn. Slowly warms
to new people, but
forms strong bond &
is loving, quiet, obe-
dient, clean, travels
well. Great on leash.
Best w/adults as in-
side dog in quiet
home. Low exercise
needed. Call Mike
@352-201-2236
or email Dog-lover@
tampabay.rr.com. "




Shamrock Farms
2013 Hay Crop
Round Bales $60 ea.
Call 352-795-1906



Male Goat For Sale
$60.
(352) 628-4750


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc H20.
* 2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!



Your World






CHIkONICI.E


CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA, $450. mo
352-587-2555
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 SW, CHA
$450.mo., 1st, last
& sec. No Dogs
850-491-8479
HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in, Lease,
No pets $450. mo.
$450. +sec. 726-7319








2013 3/2 DW $49,900,
Incl. Delivery, set-up,
A/C, Skirting, steps, &
furn, Decor. Call
352-795-2377
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182
ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

For Sale
HERNANDO
Ready to move in,
must see 3/2 1.5 acres
$49,000 approved for
FHA/owner financing
(352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/
$39k off select 2012
models (3)
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210
USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




For Sale ,oA

Hernando
DWMH on land,Ready
to move in, Call me for
more information
352-795-1272
Hernando, FL
2bd/2ba doublewide
needing some work, on
5% park like acres,
owner financing avail.
59k (941) 778-7980
Homosassa 3/2
+ den,c/h/a, clean
$7000. mo. f/ll/s
352-634-6340
INVERNESS
3/2 on 1/2 acres
owner financed for
$500. mnth w/10k
down 352-560-4247
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




Lecanto
Lecanto Hills MH Park
55 + comm. 2/2 liv,din,
kit, carport, rec.rm new
appl, furn, never rented
$11,500 352-228-4515
352-746-4648 manager


WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





-ACTION-
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.(itrus(ounlyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
63 S Jeffery St. (BH)............. $575
2/2/1, available July 1sti
1820 Trade n.(CS)................ $850
3/2/2 Nie newer home
CRYSTAL RIVER
6507W. Canniondale Dr...........$875
2/2/2 Meadowcrest Villa
11101 ClearwaterCt.............$1000
2/2 waterfront mobile
1245 NE2nd St....................$1100
3/2 POOL home close to shopping
HOMOSASSA
7650 W. Homosassa TrL #28... $500
2/1 affordable duplex
6818 W. Arlington PL............. $775
3/2 DW mobile, fenced yard
6 Hollyik 0......................... $900
3/2/2SMW avail July 11




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
Small IBR w/Utilities
$375. mo., $500 sec.
352-563-1033 or
352-601-0819




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Apartments
Available
2 bed / 2 bath
$600/month
Call 352-795-1795
www.ensingproperties.c
om



INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393

Inverness
Homosassa
Government
Subsidized Apts
available.
Must meet eligibility
requirements. Equal
Housing
Opportunity.
Homossassa
(352) 628-6073
Inverness
(352) 726-4397
TTY-800-233-6694








FLORAL CITY
RETAIL; 2 Storefronts
Corner of US 41 &
Hwy 48,600sf &1,400sf
$495. mo. & $695 mo.
813-310-5391



Commercial Building
Floral City, 800 sq. ft
ample pking, a/c,
prime location on 41
cooler unit in rear,
$1000.mo. 1st, last &
dep. ref. & good credit
352-201-9828



INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Whis.Pines $700
352-464-0919



INVERNESS
2/IW/D Hk -up No
Pets $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio Effi-
ciency w/equipped
kitchen. All until cable,
Internet, & cleaning pro-
vided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BLACK DIAMOND
3BR, 2BA, Golf Villa,
incld's. yard service.
$975. mo. No pets or
smoking. 746-6067
MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116



BLACK DIAMOND
2BR 2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1000/month in-
cludes basic cable &
lawn care. Call
746-3301
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 3/2 w/
Pool $1,200 incl'd soc.
mem. to all amenities,
yrd. maint. & wkly pool
service, avail. July 1st.
(352) 422-4086
CITRUS HILLS
2BR, 2BA, single level
w/carprt, completely
refurbished, brand
new appl's $750. mo.
No pets or smoking
(352) 746-6067
CITRUS HILLS
3/3/2.5 unfurnished w/
pool on golf course,
lawn & pool maint. incl'd
club membership also
included $1500 monthly
352-302-3705


C10 SATURDAY,JUNE 29, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eficincies
Coues I


DiF2TE


CLASSIFIED



CRYSTAL OAKS
3/2/2, pet invisible
fence $890 month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sm. 3/2, $675 mo.
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo
352-212-4981
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, %Acre,
Hwy. 200. $875. mo.
352-344-3084
INVERNESS
2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer
non smoking, No Pets
1305 Lakeview Dr.
$700. mo. 422-6263
LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND 3/2/2
includes, cable, water,
garbage $1000mth
352-804-9729



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO
1 BR, 2 BA, Office
1/ Acre, Hwy. 200.
352-344-3084

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, 1/ Acre,
Hwy. 200. $875. mo.
352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 3/2, Manuf.
Home, Rent Possible
Own 352-795-0088



CRYSTAL RIVER
Share my Home
Utilities incl. $95. week
563-1465 /228-1802


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

You've Got It!


Somebody


Wants


It!


#1 Employment source is










ww.chronicleonline.com


ZN.g


C CITRUS COUNTY E
For more information on how to reachT RI
Citrus County readers call C IHN i\IL
352-563-5592. www.chron line.com
Scarborough 2010


COOWXGZ


k OPEN
HOUSE

Pine Ridge
Sunday Only
1pm to 4pm
1.39 acres, 3 bd,
2% bath, former
model home
many upgrades
2269 sq. ft living area
Pool w/cabana
1709 W Pine Ridge
Blvd.




k OPEN
HOUSE


TODAY 1p-4p
INCREDIBLE
RIVERFRONT HOME
Asking $675,000
5464 Cedar Mill Path
Homosassa, 34448
Lyn Hillis, Realtor
ERA American
Realty
352-212 6920


6-29-13


- -


FOR SALE BY
AUCTION




2,240 SF

Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. July 11,
12PM
Preview From I1 am
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctloneers.com


L m
..., .1' l'"st -A0(I.

(352) 563-5966
CHf ed ,www,.chronicleonline.coi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERNANDO
1 BR, 2 BA, Office
Acre, Hwy. 200.
352-344-3084



CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf CoursCommunity
3/2/2 Sell for $49,995.
possible owner finance
/options 352-422-1284
or 352-634-3862










FOR SALE BY
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
SAT. JUNE 29th,
12 PM
Preview Day of Sale
From 11:00 AM
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctloneers.com











BEVERLY HILLS
2 br/2 full bath/1 car gar.
1125 sf. Screen porch.
Move-in ready. $53,900
527-1239
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buying or Selling
I I


Realty Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish
HUGE HOUSE for Sale
3 Bedroom Possible 4,
2 Car Garage,
Carport, 2 Bath,
228 Monroe Street
(352) 464-2514



LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity. $119K Cash
Deal posss rent opt)
352-804-9729



2BR, IBA, + Den
Open Fl. plan, close to
shopping & town,
new roof, well wtr.
.44 acres $49,900 obo
OWR REALTY, John
352-653-7977




Your World











""WtrtF
UuvJI, ,i


GOSPEL ISLAND
4BD/3BA & GARAGE
For Sale $92,000.
(941) 758-8719
(941) 524-6556






SALE


Great

Starter

Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage
$2,500 down
$788. month
877-500-9517
INVERNESS
Investor Alert
Nice 2/2 Close to town,
nice trees, renter in
place, nice return on
investment $90K
(941) 549-4226



3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328


DEN, BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A
NATURE PRESERVE
HOME ISA FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT-
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005
dennis neff
@yahoo.com

House for Sale
By Owner Open House
Sat. 6/29 & Sun. 6/30
10am-4pm
4100 S. Fireside Way
4BR/2BA/Carport, Pool
2 Acres
352-212-9456


TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


I I


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.corn

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


RAINBOW SPRINGS
Beautiful 3/2/2, 2 lots
Oversized Gar. Open
flrplan, Gas Fireplace
Corian countertops,
New porch, $134,900
352-489-0105


JENNIFER u E
MUNN k -

352-422-8201
jenmunnera@ Office Open
yahoo.com 7 Days a Week
12 Properties Sold
in 3 months LISA
% of every VANDEBOE
commissions goes Broker (R) Owner
to help homeless
animals Plantation Realty
****** "352-634-0129
ERA American www.plantation
Realty & Investments realtylistings.com




#1 Employment source is








www.chronicleonline.com


Reduced $199,500
211 Pine St 4BD/3BA.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, Wood Floors,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar,SS Appl. fireplace
Call 850-585-4026

a ^m


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"



HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906



Boat Trailer
22' tandam,galv., $1200
OBO 352-794-3603
c 813-244-3945
New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45'Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299



BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*
ANGLER
22ft, CC, 225/Suzuki
Dual Axle Trailer
Extras, $5,995.
CONSIGNMENT USA
(352) 461-4518
CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tri-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-7954426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.
Classic Mako
20'Honey Pot teak,good
cond. well maint.Trailer
150 Evenrude 1993
Nice! Extra's! $5200
obo 352 795-1546







Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHRONICLE
Classifieds
buiifjgiy~ijji~i~gaggg


ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
"call 352-503-3245"


CLASSIFIED



YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SYLVAN PON-
TOON FOR SALE
2005 820 20' Pontoon
with 50 hp 4-stroke
Yahama. Low hours of
use. Good condition.
Asking Price: $8500
Email
warneboat@gmail.com
for questions
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com









BOUNDER
1999 32 FT Motor
home, Ford V10 engine,
low mileage, new tires,
Sleeps 2-6 220-6303



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




SUNNYBROOK
2005, 36 ft. 5th wheel,
2 slides, king bd, like
new, NADA $29K,
Reduced $19,900
352-382-3298
THE EGG
2007, all Elec; fiber-
glass, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
sleeps 3, $11,500
352-419-8366
256-244-6377
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE
ifCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


DOCK SPACE
AVAILABLE
In Crystal River
Deep Water Canal, no
bridges (352) 212-4839
JON BOAT
14 ft., Trailer,
9.8 HP Nissan.
$1,900 (352) 344-8641
Leave Message
PONTOON
2006 18' Tracker
w/trailer, 25HP Merc, 4
str, hum. bird finder,cd
player, 2 fishing chairs
$6500 352-341-0262
PONTOON
20FTF, 60 HP, 4 stoke,
Yamaha, low hours, 6
years young, loaded,
kept in dry storage,
$9,000. (352) 382-8966
(352) 212-0364
Sail Boat
20' with Cabin, & trailer,
new sail, boat needs
some work $1100
(352) 220-6303
SEA EAGLE
2013, 12/2 ft, Inflatable
boat & motor, pump
incl'd. sea worthy,
hard resin firs. seats 4,
9.9 Yamaha, outbrd
eng. like new, mtr. 2
hrs. $3,300 352344-4384


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144










AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks
2005 Chrysler
PT Cruiser $3950
2001 Plymouth
Neon $2495
1999 Chevy
Venture Van $2300
1995 Toyota
Camry $2275
CALL TED TODAY
(352) 563-1 902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, FI

BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999 White Monte Carlo
Z34,One Owner, 145k
miles, leather interior,
automatic, CD player,
New Paint Job, asking
$2,000 obo located in
Inglis 352-447-3021
CHEVROLET
2005, Equinox,
extra clean, sunroof
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2006, Impala
$5,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2008, Malibu,
$9,995
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2010, PT Cruiser
$11,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
1990 Tempo, Runs
good, 112k miles,
good tires. $700
(352) 489-5749
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here its,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
500 2006 46,937 miles,
red with tan interior
leather, CD/AM/FM
$8500(352) 860-0164
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444


'04, Elantra, new en-
gine, plugs, hoses, wrtr
pump, premium tires,
maint records avail.
Excel. Cond. $4,200
352382-1088
HYUNDAI
2009, Sonata SE,
36k mil
$12,500,
352-382-2457
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
MAZDA 626
1999, 4 cyl, DOHC,
over $5k under hood
this year. $2750 obo.
(352) 513-4932
Toyota
2006 Scion, XA
4 dr, auto, new tires
$28k mi. 1 local owner
$8500. (352) 201-7014



Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bo senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
'78 Camaro Z28,
Runs good 350 eng.
hurst shifter, $2,500
(352)634-1764
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560
FORD
1995 MUSTANG 5.0
Loaded, 56k original
miles, leather interior,
exc. inside/outnew
tires, V8, $8,500
352-527-6988







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





BIG SALE
,Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
03 Dakota Quad Cab.
new tires, head liner,
bed liner, 23k mi, $8500
(352) 628-1886
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100


955-0719 F/THCRN
De La Cruz 2013-DR-646 NOA-Dissolution
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
Case No. 2013-DR-646
KARL LORENZO,
Petitioner/Husband,
JUANA DE LA CRUZ CEBALLO a/k/a JUANA LORENZO,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT)
TO: JUANA DE LA CRUZ CEBALLO a/k/a JUANA LORENZO
Av Los Procere's 30, Gazque, Santo Domingo, Republica Dominicana
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on
{name of Petitioner} KARL LORENZO. whose address is Law office of Keith Taylor P.A.,
P.O. Box 2016 Lecanto, FL 34460 on or before July 29, 2013 and file the original with
the Clerk of Court, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FI 34450, either before service of
the Plaintiff's Attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on the 19th day of June, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, CLERK OF COURT
(SEAL) By: /s/ VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, June 29, July 5, 12 & 19, 2013.


NEW 2013 EXCURSION
X21FC PONTOON
POWERED BY A YAMAHA F115
1Independence Week Sale: July 1-6, 2013
CALL FOR SAVINGS
.FINANCING AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597|


2002 SHAMROCK 246
OPEN [TUNNEL HULL)
Independence Week Special: July 1-6, 2013

i -- "CALL FOR SAVINGS
FINANCING AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597S


16' CAPE CRAFT CREST 22' FAMILY
16' CAPE CRAFT ._ FISH PONTOON
Johnson 5TL, BiminiTop_ Johnson J50PLEE, oil injected, trim/tilt
Galvanized Trailer $5,850 'Ne w bimini top
=< Fishfinder
4,95 8,995

THREE RIVERS MARINE
563-5510 1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510|


Your News.


Your Town.


Your Way.
OOOEXJS


CALL FOR DETAILS

w r563-3206





As Low As 18 per ad


2013 RANCHER
4X4
Camo,4x4 manual MSRP $6,599
shift. Ready for DISCOUNT $650
fpl anything'! S- Q -'Q
SSALE PRIE PI 5,949
HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832S


SATURDAY,JUNE 29, 2013 ClL


. L


FORD
FORD 2005 EX-
PLORER XLT 89K ONE
OWNER,ALL DEALER
SERVICE
RECORDS,SATELLITE
RADIO ,$7700
1-352-527-3498
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2000 Grand Cherokee
V8, leather
$3,995
352-341-0018
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995 352-628-5100



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306



Harley Davidson
'00, SOFTAIL, Standard
CHEAP $5,500.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
'02 Lowrider 14,000 mi.
1450cc,pristine.$8900
352-560-3731
Harley Davidson
'07, STREET GLIDE
LOADED FINANCE
AVAILABLE
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HONDA
1997 SHADOW 1100
EZ Finance $2,500.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HONDA
2006, GOLDWING 1800
$7,995.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
HONDA
'94 GOLD WING TRIKE
Full Conversion
$12,900.
352-330-0047
SUZUKI
'02, INTRUDER 1400
BUY HERE PAY HERE
http://www.lucky
ucycles.com/
352-330-0047



950-0731 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at
aovdeals. com,
July 1, 2013 July 31, 2013
Pub: June 17 July 31,
2013.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IOlfiE


II k 1K I


All-New 2014
Chevy Impala 1 LS
36 month lease


$


New 2013 Chevy Cruze LS
C13245.6 SpeedTnrainisain
M ........... .. ...... .. . .. .. .S17.T655
DEALER DISCOUNT $96S
RE AT E:.----.............................. 1O
PURCHASE BONUS CASH- $500
CAUH OR TRADE BQtft- ---- $Z |


New 2013 Chevy Traverse LS
C13286
DEALER DISCOUN --............... $665
REBATL- $1,S00
CASH OR TRADE EwQUy- -$2500


New 2013 Chevy Malibu LS
MSRP WIu
DEALER DISCOUNT. -----.- $60D
REBATE 2,000
PURCHASE BONUS CASH $500
CASH O TRADE EoUITvm' -.oo


New 2013 Chevy Sonic
Mt. RP . . .. .. .. $!fi 1i10
DEALER DISCOUN----------- $400
REFATE: $S60
PURCHASE BONUS CASH--..- $500
CASH OR TRADE EQURWf-. 2,S


New 2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13205, Aulo,4cyl. MSRP: $25,015


$


I


IS


I


Ill


2T1


p.-


m


I :I


Ik k


C12 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


1\l


p


Mr


*l 1J H;I:




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


!IH


!IH


UAL


~W~i


lwr^K TT* *M^"^^^i


IL-! -


'VR


4AI


o1 li


l OE.da A


H


I1@


S iA


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 C13


T-7 1' '


F T-,


;g


I I


FA1


rff


D


DOY70
AA Asn1T


s ole ^ r




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I en i s Ac r II


<.1


Safety *


Luxury *


Performance


* Engineering


* Service


ZERO
* DOWN PAYMENT
* PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
* SECURITY DEPOSIT


ZERO. APR
AVAILABLE FINANCING FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS ON NEW Acura'

aest Vahleteh Lkaup t Ammrialm
H*WifawR.W IIHI.B


NEW '13
Acura TL Op
AggWsive 0Yet-ga
3 MONTH LEASE


s299=,130wmo 2 $2s499 DewAt. sq"ax.lr4es Sery Dei D0. |
Payment Exie5sBT Tm& = T4ag WA1 ApeiW4C1 t 5


-datd ,llpl ai..b$g. (SAN) T aled o,-At-G, 24 2013 Rli.Lal VlIB war,, fIW Lu-, Blara. S.ubge,- .E,-l1 ,ma, B tyW TIgq July 8 2013, .c.0-BW -..s t4 A*r Fi.- S.e, DBA 04 4r,.an Nea FAaSee CarpA .
Clos<-cr 1wa2r013 MOXg 0 peed AUW-TWE i;Mal Y02H2DJN1,)' MSAP $"4,15 Aoi~l -"; cap'1, ,, cot SUa,@S4 29 ToaW -.~c"t i> 4 slsfrm O. S!& W la4 Oio"', e-i~s .1 -w $2, S24 286 2S4to-ew fea 2013 Yk 6 pdutml (i-Sd.1 *U [ p-rh.. .B.1. aBrarS 23,184 t1.4,d a... f, 2013 RDX 5 SpeelAu omAl.- i. (1 #TB130:JN6 k4 MSRP4K351215 Aclu.l 'e1 crl co14 $34 786 04 Tl l1 m, lhy pay-,ly S12,9124 Ot v o 0 a14 1 at e$d $21 129 C$14.4 4ea!1for 2014 LX 5 Sp-J A A- 18404. 11F3EJ) 0SRP $27 795 Actual 1 a1 4 -1 $24,3f10 54 To.al
w1111111141411141r111121 $41101114 Se. n, 1 0 4 11 1 4 t4 0 $17,2334 14O 4 A 79di 0na 1 l ,*1i htrm1 th 41111144i41i Is4s10 0a ll 3* 11 4 4a f1r11 1t1r 41 f1 Of .30, 144 .4111 10.41 104 411141 111114111.1 f01 1U14fyN .14B1141 1a11 e 4f4e17wi F 1r 4 1 for e4 4e4tu1i d1a01 0 4 11$tSt 1101194 4011114141 1a-0 44011 41 1419 184014 H1 44 141104 1 1r04011 r$ 4008,1
ra1W1144- $ I M 1- 1118p1111910 MiInt4naNcc B4>1c4B4411#1 a?0l4fa3nd 9404910411494,79911844 101141, 11,4Q1r' ^^Rr(^ 191100 11441141141111, 441111114 18411 e101111 I n. f^.t t^ 111,1520000^^ ol 0 0 0 20.011' 1119 1 4 1 1 11141 10000.1y4 9 $,44 Iaal 00r W1ta.l 04.1at 1010 IL, 1, 800. 201 1a


AVAILABLE ON SEECT CERTIFIED PEWNED MODELS'
*' 0 &ec MokliS. See Deder For Doaail. (God inm (OMI13


7 Yr / 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty'
* 12 Month / 12,000Mile Comprehensive Warranty
150 Point Inspection
24 Hour Emergency Roadside Assistance
Trip Interruption Expense Reimbursement
Rental Vehicle
Reimursement & More
S Powertrain warranty begins from
date of new car sale and
Szero mileage


ACURA
CE RT I F D
S Pre-Owned Vehicles


2011 HONDA
CR-V
A MUST SEE!

$18,995


2011 BMW
328i
NICE!

$20,995


2007 TOYOTA 2009 VW 2011 CHEVY 2010 FORD 2011 HONDA 2012 ACURA 2012 ACURA
COROLLA JETTA EQUINOX EDGE ODYSSEY TSX RDX
#P3922 #AS322A #P3950 #A3537B #AT3SS2A #P3919 #A4017A


mulm


2010 ACURA 2012 CHEVY 2012 ACURA 2011 INFINITI 2011 ACURA 2010 ACURA 2011 ACURA
MDX CAMARO TL G37 MDX MDX MDX
#AT3655A #AT4037A #A3551A #P3915 #P3895 #AT4002A #AT3668A


Thank you for reading this. All prices are plus tax, tag & tide. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Umit I trade4n per purchase. Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers. See dealer for
complete detalls.Programs subject to change without notice. 'With a purchase of a used vehicle. Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details.


First Year
Maintenance
Included With All
Pre-Owned
Vehicles
gtmt-
CBhi-les^g


NEW '13
Acura MDX
Togedhwassi


on*t
4391lE.
,3XMONTH EASE


S439 w 23 nor4. 92.499 Due AI Si Inc8k1 Se1rily Depol.0 Dawn
PrlL Euxls TL 8 Ta.g Wlh Apsp.1hve Cfed&


C14 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


I 1


Nm


m 1


Im


12,9


Im


I Im


Im


Ism


TTNrlrlrlrlrly,7,rr




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


, Family Owned &
SOperated
Go Further


ford.com


YOU


RED


2013 EDGE
$28,545 MSRP
-500 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-1,000 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash
-500 Retail Bonus Customer Cash
-500 Retail Trade Assistance

*24.545


1 EN3T407
2013 EXPLORER


$29,995 MSR
-500 Nick
-2,000 Reta

*2 -,I


P
Nicholas Discount
il Customer Cash


9


W W W N3CO55
2013 FOCUS SE
$18,995 MSRP
-500 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount
-1,750 Retail Customer Cash
-500 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash
-500 Bonus Customer Cash

1 #5,741


w W W N3C180
2013 FUSION SE
$25,680 MSRP
-600 Nick Nicholas Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash

*23,580


SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3RD AlINNUAL
DOG DAYS OF SUMMER
Adoption & Fundraiser
Please Join Us
Sat., July3,2013* 11am to 3pm
Accrpi;iiq Donollo' And Supplr. tow'

felt ..


32MPG


NEW 20131130666
TOYOTA COROLLA
BUY FOR ONLY
MSRP $17,920
Power Windows,
Power Locks, Auto. Trans. 14 777


COMPLETELY
REDESIGNED


NEW
2013
RAV4


MSRP $24,365
BUY FOR
ONLY
OR PAY ONLY
OR PAY ONLY


4m'L -~


NEW 2013 l"T130864
TOYOTA CAMRY
BUY FOR ONLY
MSRP $23,095
Power Windows, $
Power Locks,
Cruise Control, Auto. Trans.


OVER
50 HYBRIDS IN
STOCK NOW!


I T130994

22,995


/n


T1 30004
<


NEW 2013
TOYOTA PRIUS


MSRP $25,060
Push Button Start,
Power Windows,
Power Locks,
Cruise Control,
Bluetooth, Auto. Trans.


BUY FOR ONLY

$21,777


VILLAGE TOYOTA
www.villagetoyota.com 352-628-5100
*2,399 due at signing to well qualified buyers, plus lease inception fees with approved credit. Buyer cannot combine offers.


,Jm


0


'i'


2013 Chevrolet Volt
3K MILES, 1,4L INTERNAL COMBUSION ENGINE, AUTO TRANS. #13060044

$29,999
L. V


ToyotaCare
I- Le.urnm a complimentary maintenance plan
with roadside assistance.


2 year / 25,000 mile
Complimentary Maintenance Program
when you purchase or lease a new 2012 or 2013 Toyota vehicle


1m


2013 Scion FR-S 1306900"
10K MILES, 2.0L DOHC 16 VALVE HORIZONTAL OPPOSED 4-CYLINDER ENGINE

$24.895


- r w.


2007 Cadillac DTS
78K MILES, NORTHSTAR 4.6L DOHC V8, AUTO. TRANS. #13040315

$14,995
h.A


2011 Cadillac DTS
29K MILES, NORTHSTAR 4.6L DOHC V8, AUTO. TRANS. #13040151A
s31,995
L


36MPG


C16 SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013


O10F8TD


^Ipolo--i]&^


11,


II- i


as


- .I ,