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Citrus County chronicle ( June 16, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03151

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03151

Full Text



Happy


Father's


Day


C ITR U


Scattered after-
noon storms, rain
chance 50%.
PAGE A4


SU T High scores by all

0Pars few at
U.S. Open as
O N IC Phil Mickelson,
left, holds lead
heading into
OC1 final round ./B
L ..J .. II i Page BI


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118


ISSUE 313


Lane shift to
cause delays
Expect significant traf-
fic delays beginning Mon-
day, June 17, in the area
of the County Road 486
and State Road 44 inter-
section due to a shift in
traffic. Traffic will shift
from the old portion of
C.R. 486 to the recently
constructed roadway. Ex-
pect lane closures
throughout the week on
C.R. 486 and S.R. 44.
Call 352-527-5446 for
information.


BUSINESS:


Balfour named to school board


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
HOMOSASA Gov. Rick
Scott has named Sandy Bal-
four to fill the vacant school
board position.
State Sen. Charlie Dean
announced the appointment
Saturday morning while ad-
dressing the North Suncoast
Republican Club.
The vacancy was created
when board member Susan


Hale resigned in January, cit-
ing family reasons. Subse-
quently, at least eight people,
including Balfour, applied
for the position.
"I'm so proud of Sandy,"
Dean said, after breaking the
news Balfour had been
called by the governor's of-
fice. "I knew a little bit about
it"
Balfour, a Republican, was
defeated in last year's race
for superintendent of schools


by Democrat incumbent San-
dra "Sam" Himmel.
Balfour has taught in Cit-
rus County elementary, mid-
dle and high schools, plus
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute. She also spent one
year as assistant principal at
Crystal River High School
and now teaches at the Acad-
emy of Environmental Sci-
ences in Crystal River.
She is also a member of
the College of Central


Florida's Board of Trustees.
But the good news came at
a sad time.
Balfour was notified
Wednesday while she was at
a hospice in Missouri for her
stepfather, who passed away
Thursday night
"I am very thankful for this Sandy
opportunity to be a role Balfour
where I can make a broad appointed to
impact," she said. "I have Citrus County
School Board
See Page A2 by Gov. Scott.


Still dancing
Dance company
celebrates 30 years in
county./Page Dl
COMMENTARY:









To the core
Columnist Thomas
Kennedy addresses core
testing./Page Cl1
LOCAL NEWS:
Ms. Market
A new manager has big
ideas for Inverness
Farmers' Market.
/Page A3

COMMENTARY:



Dad



Day
Essays
Read the winners of
YMCA of Citrus
County's Father's Day
Essay Contest./Page C3
HOMEFRONT:


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Adam Jones says he has always wanted to be a father and enjoys it almost more than anything. Above, Jones is pictured with his 13-year-
old daughter Sashi, whom he and his wife adopted. The teen is originally from India.

Father finds responsibility comes with challenges, unexpected rewards


s Adam Jones softly swung daughter Sashi
in their front-yard tree swing, her bright
smile was matched only by his. Love at first
sight? Yes, Adam says, but Sashi was
14 months old and 14 pounds at Day 1.


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
LECANTO
Adam and his wife Anne already had
two biological, healthy children Sarah
and Sam when they began looking to
adopt a little girl from India. Anne was in-
spired by Christian missionary Amy
Carmichael, who lived among the out-
casts of India and rescued girls being sold
into slavery
Their adoption conversation initiated
when they were dating in college; how-
ever, it never materialized until they real-
ized more biological children were
improbable.
"I have always wanted to be a dad,"
Adam said. "I enjoy being a dad almost
more than anything. Now, how good I am
at it is a whole anotherr question for my


children."
Financing an adoption, though, was a
barrier that is, until an elder at their
church offered a solution.
'Adoption costs, like, $16,000," Adam
said. "He (the elder) asked, 'What if peo-
ple in the church wanted to help you with
that?' I said, 'That is a ton of money and
you don't ask people for money' He said,
'What if I asked people?' I said, 'You are
crazy'
"Within 24 hours, all of the money was
provided."
Adam had two stipulations the little
girl had to be young and healthy
The Joneses soon received word of a
little girl from India who was available
for adoption and grew to love Sashi be-
fore even meeting her. They had seen her
picture and knew her background of ar-
riving at an orphanage.


HIT THE ROAD
Treat Dad to a Father's Day excursion;
see Excursions./Page All

She did have a lazy eye; however, to the
Joneses this was minor.
That was, until they later learned she
had cerebral palsy
Anne knew Sashi was their daughter no
matter what, but a special-needs child
was not in Adam's plan. It was, however
"God's plan."
MEN
Sashi, now 13, is a highlight of Adam's
life.
"Our culture has an obsession with hav-
ing a healthy child," Adam said. "Having
a broken child is a really good thing and
has changed our life."
The Joneses immediately began ther-
apy for Sashi and continue to travel to St.
Louis for medical appointments and
surgeries.
"St. Louis has a cerebral palsy center,"
Anne said. "There are clinics and special-
ists there that are not anywhere else in
the world. Her neurologist is the top in
See Page A5


Efficiencies
Superefficient "passive"
homes gain ground in
U.S./HomeFront

Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds................ D7
Crossword ............ A12
Editorial .............. C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies .................. A12
Obituaries ............ A6
Together..................A16


6 I0 ~ 118 2007 f1 o1


Uptick of parvo seen in county's canines


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
BEVERLY HILLS -
When it comes to your
brand-new puppy, if you
love it and want it to grow
into a strong, healthy dog,
don't skimp on its booster
shots.
That's the message
local veterinarian Dr.
Jenny Hooper at Country-
side Animal Clinic in Bev-
erly Hills is passionate
about getting out to the
public.
Hooper said in the past


month, Countryside has
seen an increase in pup-
pies between 10 weeks
and 8 months old coming
into the clinic with the
deadly parvovirus.
"It's heartbreaking,"
she said. "People have no
concept of the damage
that parvo does to the
dog's intestinal lining."
Most of the cases have
been fatal.
Countryside serves the
entire county, and the sick
dogs are coming in from
litters in Beverly Hills,
Homosassa and Inverness


WHAT TO WATCH
Symptoms of
parvovirus include:
depression, lethargy,
dehydration, vomiting
and diarrhea.

- the highly contagious
disease isn't limited to
one geographical area.
Citrus County veteri-
narian Dr. Julie Rosen-
berger also said she has
seen an increase of sick
puppies being im-
pounded.
"My staff has a height-


ened awareness for sick
animals because we real-
ize that parvo as a virus
can be highly contagious
and highly fatal," she said.
By "sick," Rosenberger
said the puppies are com-
ing in depressed, lethar-
gic, dehydrated, vomiting
and having diarrhea -
not acting like puppies at
all.
Those are all symptoms
of parvovirus, but the
most telltale symptom is
bloody, liquid diarrhea,
with a distinctive metallic,
bloody smell.


The virus is transmitted
from feces to mouth or
nose and is hardy and
long-lived.
"It's as easy as someone
picking it up on their
shoes and bringing it
home," Hooper said. "You
don't even know it."
Both Hooper and
Rosenberger said it's vital
that puppies get the whole
series of the distem-
per/parvo vaccine, not
just the first shot.
"The cost of a booster
See Page A2


I -SUNDAY II


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
72


Special day, special dad








Hundreds oppose privatization


BOB REICHMAN
Sumter County Times
Sumter County commission-
ers will consider later this
month whether they want to pri-
vatize the county's library sys-
tem as hundreds of county
residents voice their opposition
to the idea.
The possibility was consid-
ered late in April after commis-
sioner Doug Gilpin suggested
the county might want to explore
the possibility of privatizing the


library system because privati-
zation has worked well in other
county departments.
The day following Gilpin's sug-
gestion, County Administrator
Bradley Arnold drafted a letter
to library services personnel
telling them the county was pro-
ceeding with plans to contract
with a private company and ad-
vising employees to start consid-
ering their options.
Since that time, the county has
been pursuing a contract with
LSSI, a private library manage-


ment company based in Orlando,
to provide library services.
The board will decide the
issue when it meets at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25, at the Colony
Cottage Recreations Center, 510
Colony Blvd., The Villages.
Before that meeting, the board
will have a workshop to discuss
library privatization at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, June 18, at The Villages
Sumter County Service Center.
The board will not take public
input during that workshop, but
the public can attend and listen


as the board considers the con-
cept and reviews a presentation
about privatization.
In the meantime, commission-
ers are receiving strong commu-
nity support to keep the county
libraries as they are.
Since the board first broached
the idea of privatization, many
residents began organizing and
voicing their support for contin-
uing with the current system.
Almost 1,500 signatures have
been collected on petitions
channeled through the Lake


Panasoffkee and Villages li-
braries requesting commission-
ers vote against privatization.
The petitions were submitted to
the county commission at its
May 28 meeting.
Arnold told the Sumter
County Times earlier that
Sumter was not the only county
considering privatization. Lake
County was also considering the
possibility.
However, last week, the Lake
County Commission decided not
to privatize its library system.


City forces food pantry


to shut down over traffic

AssociatedPress The food is distributed during
FORT MYERS Fort two-hour windows twice a week,
Myers city officials or-
dered the county's largest and some residents have
food pantry to shut down
amid complaints that the complained that those picking up
shelter is causing traffic
delays on a narrow street donations at the shelter park in
Stpa Vincent de Paul's the wrong place or idle in the
pantry distributes more
than a million pounds of street while food bags are being
food a year and more than
700 families rely on those loaded in the car.
donations, according to
volunteers. The food is dis- .
tribute during two-hour teers began handing out into their vehicle, and we
windows twice a week, fliers and sticking notes on asked them to move, bu
and some residents have car windows reminding we don't have the author
complained that those drivers where to park. The ity to make them move,
picking up donations at shelter also deployed a said volunteer and society
the shelter park in the volunteer with a mega- treasurer Ned Haile
wrong place or idle in the phone to monitor the traf- "Other drivers can signa
street while food bags are fic during the handouts and move around them. I
being loaded in the car each week. is a narrow street, but they
The code enforcement Billy Attwell, spokesman can pass.
board unanimously voted for the Catholic Diocese of "We concede in the past
to close the shelter Thurs Venice, which oversees the there were more parking
day and gave them 30 days pantry, said the new efforts violations than their(
to shut down or face a $100 were working and people should have been, bu
a day fine. The diocese were complying. since we've put the traffic
said it plans to appeal the Volunteers said the shel- supervisor there, I thin
order ter is not in a high-traffic we've cleaned ui
Code enforcement offi- area and that they had considerably"
cials and councilman Mike never received any com- Attwell said "it will hav(
Flanders, whose district plaints from neighbors. a major impact on th(
the pantry is in, did not re- "Some of them waited community" if the fooc
turn phone calls seeking until they loaded the food pantry closes.
comment
The News-Press of Fort Termite Specialists ,
Myers reported the city Termite Spcialst s
cited the nonprofit organi- TERMITES PEST sincel1 67
zation in May .Elimination CONTROL y'
After that, shelter volun- E -nction CONTROL
Treatments Fleas Scorpions
Curative & Preventive Spiders Bees
Treatments Rodents Control
Tent Fumigations -Ants Roaches -
BOARDFree Inspections
USH i Homosassa 621-7700
Continued from Page Al PEST CONTROL ) Crystal River 795-8600
Inverness 860-1037
been in the system for S www.bushhomeservices.com
many years watching
from the sidelines for
many years. My heart is in
the right place." ._ .._
Balfour said she is look- --.... .. .
ing forward to being part The Savings
of the board and antici-
pates being sworn in o A r Yuw
sometime next month. She Because
said the state used a thor-
ough vetting process and The Factor
expressed thanks to peo- Is u rs
ple who had supported her Ours!
application. g -
Himmel said the district Hl ""l
had not been notified by I T" ,Tn"i- "iti
the governor's office, as 1 I
would be expected, but
heard of the appointment -
on the street. re
"I wish her the best," she \ .,
said. "I wish her well. I
know she has had aspira-
tions to get into a political
office.
"We all work together;
we have a strong board
with a lot of tough deci-





1657 W GULF TO LAKE HWY-* LECANTO
R www.72-hourlinds.com U UUIa5210012 "

Continued from Page Al

shot, between $12 and $15, We Welcome Yo
is a drop in the proverbial
bucket compared to the
cost and h athe uncertain out Value De ntal i
come of treatment, she
Treatment involves IV 6824 Gulf To L
fluids, anti-nausea and 62 G l
pain medications, anti- CryStal R
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for up to five days, and the 7
dog may not survive. It's W O i T
the difference between Vu e D
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State BRIEFS


No ticket wins Mega Money;
next jackpot $1.3 M
TALLAHASSEE No tickets matched all
four numbers plus the Mega Ball in the Mega
Money game, so the jackpot rolled over to
$1.3 million, the Florida Lottery said Saturday.
Three tickets won $2,172 for picking 4-of-
4; 47 tickets won $303.50 each for picking 3-
of-4 plus the Mega Ball number; 1,184 tickets
won $35.50 each for picking 3-of-4; 1,335
tickets won $22 each for picking 2-of-4 plus
the Mega Ball; 10,948 won $2.50 each for
matching one number plus the Mega Ball;
29,108 tickets won $2 each for picking 2-of-
4; and 23,973 won a free Quick Pick ticket
for matching the Mega Ball.


The numbers drawn Friday night were 15-
17-19-28 and the Mega Ball was 10.
Two Fantasy 5 players
share $111,804 top prize
TALLAHASSEE Two winners of the
"Fantasy 5" game will collect $111,804.44
each, the Florida Lottery said Saturday.
The winning tickets were bought in Opa-
Locka and Tampa, lottery officials reported.
The 283 tickets matching four numbers
won $127 each. Another 9,474 tickets match-
ing three numbers won $10.50 each, and
94,407 tickets won a Quick Pick ticket.
The numbers drawn Friday night were 11-
21-22-25-32.
-From wire reports


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A2 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










STATE & LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Cutler Spur closed
starting Monday
Cutler Spur Boulevard
will be closed from Fort Is-
land Trail to Southeast Par-
adise Point Road for
approximately three weeks
beginning Monday June 17.
The intersection at Cutler
Spur Boulevard and Para-
dise Point Road will remain
open for access.
Additionally, the intersec-
tion at King's Bay Drive will
be closed from 7 a.m. to
6 p.m. June 17 and June 18
for replacement of storm
drainage.
Historic resources
board seeking four
The Historic Resources
Advisory Board is currently
accepting applications for
four positions. The agency
was formed Oct. 28, 2003.
The board requires a varied
interest of persons to dis-
cuss, review and decide on
specific items.
Vacancies on the Historic
Resources Advisory Board
to represent the following
entities for a two-year term
that will expire Jan. 31,
2015: one member-at-large
position; one archaeologist
position; one historian posi-
tion; and two alternate
member positions.
The application form is
available at http://www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
advboards/advisory_board_
application.pdf.
Send completed applica-
tion together with a recent
resume to: Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners, attn. Amy Pace,
planning coordinator, Geo-
graphic Resources and
Community Planning, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Suite
292, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Enterprise zone
board filling seat
The Enterprise Zone
Development Agency is
currently accepting applica-
tions for one position. The
agency was formed De-
cember 2012. Florida State
Statute 290.0056(2) re-
quires the governing body
appoint a board of commis-
sioners of the agency. The
agency will require a varied
interest of persons to dis-
cuss, review and decide on
specific items.
One vacancy, local
financial or insurance
entities, is available.
The two-year term will
expire on April 30, 2015.
The application form is
available at http://www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
advboards/advisory_board_
application.pdf.
Send completed applica-
tion together with a recent
resume to: Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners, attn. Amy Pace,
planning coordinator,
Geographic Resources
and Community Planning,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Suite 292, Lecanto, FL
34461.
-From staff reports


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Patti Muscaro, the new director of the Inverness Farmers' Market, gets acquainted with sculptor Earl
Hammond of Driftwood Sculptures & Carvings. Muscaro was appointed in May, and her first market day
was June 1.





Ms. Market

For farmers' market's new director, variety the right spice


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS
With a passion for planning and
experience in event staging,
Patti Muscaro is a shot in the
arm for the Inverness Farmers'
Market.
She recently stepped in as
the market's manager when former manager
Leroy Rooks stepped down.
"My goal even though it's a 'farmers' mar-
ket,' it's going to have to be diverse, because our
local farmers are so very, very busy, and Saturday
is a working day for them," Muscaro said.
Instead, she envisions twice-monthly themed
events, with vendors offering goods and services,
with fresh foods for sale, with artisans and culi-
nary artists, with live music and demonstrations,
with hot coffee and cold drinks and fabulous pre-
pared food to enjoy there or bring home all
without a budget to work with.
"That's the challenge," she said, laughing.
As market manager, Muscaro does not have a
salaried position with the city; rather, she gets a
percentage of vendor fees.
Some themes she's working on: "What A Day,
What A Dad," which celebrated dads at the June
15 market; "Dog Days of Summer" in July with
local veterinarians, dog adoptions, someone who
makes dog biscuits, pet groomers, plus all the
regular vendors.
"I'd like to have a farm day and bring in some
tractors, a kids' day, a 'farm to table' day with food
demonstrations," she said. "I've got lots of ideas."
Muscaro said she talked with the manager of
the 130-vendor St. Petersburg farmers' market
for guidance and ideas.
"Not only do I have to recruit vendors to make
it a success, but get the public excited and inter-
ested in coming. You have to provide variety, or
they just won't come," she said.


Allison Griffin, with Camiolo's Market, welcomes
Muscaro to her second Inverness Farmers' Market
since becoming events director.


Upcoming
market dates
8 a.m. to noon,
first and third
Saturday each
month: July 6
and 20; Aug. 3
and 17.


"Patti excels at what she
does for the sheer joy and
satisfaction of doing it well,"
said Sharon Skeele-Hogan,
city of Inverness special
events director "After only
one market under her belt,
Patti increased the number
of vendors by 25 percent and
she's planned out enter-
tainment, events and a mar-


keting program for the next six months. She's looking
forward to the day when the market will expand
beyond the Inverness Government Center and
perhaps be relocated to Liberty Park on the lake."
Look for fresh-cut flowers, more fresh produce
vendors, fresh eggs and grass-fed beef coming to
the market soon.
"I think we can do it," Muscaro said. "I think we
can make this an open market for vendors and the
community to get together and have a good time."
Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy@chronicleonline. com.


State BRIEFS
Stranded, sunburned Deputies: Man hit victim FAA: Group must get new
dolphin rescued with SUV after fight planes to guide cranes


MERRITT ISLAND -Asun-
burned bottlenose dolphin was res-
cued after being stranded in a thick
bed of seagrass at the Merritt Island
National Wildlife Refuge.
A kayaker first spotted the stranded
dolphin and SeaWorld Orlando staff
later went out to free the adult male
bottlenose dolphin Thursday at the
Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.
The dolphin, who weighs about
350 pounds and measures eight feet
long, was suffering from severe sun
exposure and another unknown
sickness. Rescuers covered him in a
white sheet to keep him cool.
Florida Today reported the dolphin
was taken to SeaWorld's Orlando fa-
cility to recover. He's currently in sta-
ble condition and eating. But staff are
concerned something is plaguing
dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon.
SeaWorld's staff has responded
to 47 stranded dolphins this year in
that area, which is about twice the
usual rate. Most of the dolphins
have been dead and emaciated.


SPRING HILL-A man is recov-
ering from serious injuries after au-
thorities said a family member
purposefully struck him with an SUV
following an argument.
Hernando County Sheriff's officials
said 28-year-old Phillip Atkins was
visiting family members in Spring Hill
when he and another male relative
got into a fight Friday night. After the
fight, authorities said Atkins left and
returned a short time later and struck
the victim with his Ford Expedition.
Authorities: Pit bull
attacked baby
HOLIDAY-Animal control offi-
cials in the Tampa Bay area have
taken custody of a pit bull they said
attacked a 10-month old baby.
Sheriff's deputies said the baby's
mother was outside her home Friday
chatting with a neighbor when they
heard the dog growling inside. When
they went into the house, they found
the dog biting the baby on the head
and shoulder.


MADISON, Wis. -A conservation
organization that uses ultralight planes
to lead endangered whooping
cranes from Wisconsin to Florida for
the winter has to replace its aircraft
by next spring to comply with Federal
Aviation Administration regulations.
Operation Migration ran into trou-
ble with the FAA because it pays
salaries to pilots. FAA regulations
say sport planes can only be flown
for personal use.
In addition to buying three new
$20,000 aircraft with support from
donors, pilots were required to ob-
tain private pilot licenses, co-founder
and pilot Joe Duff told the Wisconsin
State Journal.
The FAAallowed Operation Mi-
gration an exemption from the ultra-
light rules until April 30, 2014.
"It was definitely a stressful time
for us," Duff said. "We're fortunate
that the FAA wants to work with us
and wants us to continue what we
were doing. There was just no space
for us in the rules."


House catches fire
twice in two days
CLEARWATER -Authorities now
say they suspect arson may be to
blame after two fires broke out at a
home in two days.
Clearwater Fire and Rescue first
responded to a fire at the two-story
home on Thursday night. It took
about 20 minutes to put out the
blaze. Fire rescue officials returned
to the home Saturday morning to put
out a second fire on the upper por-
tion of the house.
Man faces charges after
leaving dogs in hot car
PORT ST. LUCIE -A man faces
charges after police said he left two
dogs in his car without the engine
running, causing them to die.
Port St. Lucie police said 52-year-
old Carl Castilow parked his car in
the lot at Keiser Golf College just be-
fore noon Thursday. A woman walk-
ing by the vehicle about an hour
later spotted the shepherd mix and
golden retriever. College staff arrived
and helped remove the dogs.


Clues


elude


police in


nearby


murder
BOB REICHMAN
Sumter County Times
It's been more than a
month since the body of an
unidentified woman was
found in woods near Wild-
wood. Investigators say
they are no closer to know-
ing her identity or the cir-
cumstances surrounding
her death.
"It's frustrating, but it's
not going to
stop us," said
sheriff's
Capt. Kevin
S Hofecker.
"We'll do
whatever we
can to move
this case
S forward."
Investiga-
tors are sift-
ing through
information
Special to the collected
Chronicle from the
On April 22, Federal Bu-
the body of an reau of In-
unidentified vestigation's
woman was National
found in the Crime Infor-
woods near nation Cen-
State Road44 ter (NCIC),
and Interstate which pro-
75. vides a com-
puterized database of crimes
and missing persons.
"We've gotten a list of all
missing people in their
system during the time-
frame (of the murder),"
Hofecker said.
The woman's badly de-
composed body was dis-
covered in woods near State
Road 44 and Interstate 75
on the morning of April 22.
The area is known to at-
tract transients.
The woman died from a
gunshot wound. She is be-
lieved to have been 50 to
70 years old, between 5-
foot-4 and 5-foot-9 and with
auburn or brunette hair
worn in a ponytail.
She was heavy and wore
either pink- or red-framed
prescription glasses.
She had multiple rib
fractures on her left side
and several lower verte-
brae had been fused.
The woman did not have
teeth and may have worn
dentures. She is believed
to have been murdered
two to four weeks before
her body was discovered.

Anyone with informa-
tion is urged to
contact the Sumter
County Sheriff's Office
at 352-569-1680 or
call Crimeline (800-
423-8477), where
callers can remain
anonymous and may
be eligible for a re-
ward of up to $1,000.


The dogs were given wet towels
and ice packs, but the shepherd mix
died at the scene from heat exhaus-
tion. The retriever was taken to a
nearby animal hospital but died
sometime that night.
Castilow was arrested and
charged with two animal cruelty
counts. He was later released
$7,500 bail. Jail records didn't say if
he had an attorney.
Firm, men sentenced
in marine trafficking
MIAMI -A Florida company and
two men associated with it have
been convicted and sentenced for il-
legally trafficking in juvenile nurse
sharks and angelfish.
A federal judge this week placed
Aquatic Trading Co. on probation,


fined the firm $3,000 and ordered it
to surrender all state and federal
permits and licenses. In addition,
Walter and Lisa Bloecker of ATC
previously pleaded guilty to conspir-
ing to illegally market wildlife. Each is
serving 90 days of home confinement.
-From wire reports




A4 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Substantial accomplish-
ments can be achieved in the year
ahead, if you are able to stay well-
organized and keep priorities straight.
Don't put the cart before the horse.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If every-
one is going in one direction while
you're headed in another, you'd better
stop and ask who is out of step.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) There is
definitely a line between healthy opti-
mism and wishful thinking. If you can't
tell the difference, you could turn suc-
cess into failure.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't let it
be said of you that you're only nice to
those who can do something for you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your stay-
ing power has its limitations. If the
going gets tough, instead of pushing
yourself, you might throw in the towel.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When
working with others, don't pretend to
be knowledgeable about something
you know little about. The only one
who'll be taken in by this pretense will
be you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Give a
wide berth to any involvement that
could put you in the position of having
to pay for someone else's mistakes. If
you can't call the shots, call a cab.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Be
on guard when having to negotiate
with an individual about whom you
know little. Not everyone has high
standards.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Al-
though you're not likely to have a prob-
lem grasping the big picture, you could
lack an eye for detail. To be on the safe
side, tread carefully and don't trip over
the little things.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you
find yourself involved in some type of
competitive activity, be it physical or
mental, don't make any wagers.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't
jump to conclusions or base your judg-
ment on sketchy information. Make
certain you have all the facts.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -An en-
deavor might prove to be more difficult
than you thought it would be, but that's
no reason to scuttle it. You'll just have
to give it more time.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It might
be one of those rare times when you'll
lack discipline in the management of
your resources. Unless you stop your-
self from being overly extravagant,
you'll regret it.


ENTERTAINMENT


CNN set to debut
morning show
NEW YORK For anyone
watching CNN, it's been hard to
miss the sunny reminders pop-
ping up on the bottom of the
screen that Monday is the debut
of the "New Day" morning show.
"New Day" will feature the
team of Chris Cuomo, Kate
Bolduan and Michaela Pereira
in a three-hour telecast CNN
promises will be newsy but not
drowsy, an attempt to establish a
morning program for a new
generation.
Watching closely, probably
from a New York control room,
will be CNN boss Jeff Zucker.
Not only are morning shows in
his wheelhouse he produced
NBC's "Today" in the 1990s -
but the program also represents
the biggest on-air change at
CNN since the former NBC Uni-
versal chief took on the task of
reshaping the pioneering news
network in January.
On weekday mornings CNN
has lagged behind Fox News
Channel and MSNBC, which
have distinctive shows in "Fox &
Friends" and "Morning Joe."
Even CNN sister network HLN
sometimes does better with
Robin Meade's "Morning
Express."

Elmo puppeteer wins
Emmy awards
LOS ANGELES Kevin
Clash, the Elmo puppeteer who
resigned amid allegations that
he sexually abused underage
boys, won three Daytime Emmy
Awards for his work on "Sesame
Street."
Clash won as outstanding
performer in a children's series
at the creative arts ceremony
Friday night. He shared trophies
for outstanding preschool chil-
dren's series and directing in a


Associated Press
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II smiles as the Guards march past
Saturday outside Buckingham Palace after the "Trooping The
Colour" ceremony at the Horse Guards Parade in London. The
queen is celebrating her birthday with traditional pomp and
circumstance. More than 1,000 soldiers, horses and
musicians took part in the annual event.


children's series, giving Clash 26
Daytime Emmys for his work on
the venerable PBS show.
He played Elmo for 28 years
before quitting last November.
Clash's lawyer has said that re-
lated lawsuits filed against the
entertainer are without merit.
The main Daytime Emmys
ceremony is Sunday in Beverly
Hills, Calif.
Lawyer: Miguel
inviting lawsuit
LOS ANGELES The lawyer
for a woman who Miguel landed
on during a leap while perform-
ing at the Billboard Music
Awards said his client continues
to suffer cognitive difficulties and
hasn't received any help from
the R&B artist.
Vip Bhola represents 21-
year-old Khyati Shah, whose


head was pushed into a stage
when Miguel leaped onto a plat-
form during
last month's
awards show.
Bhola said
representa-
tives for
Miguel and the
awards show
are practically
daring him to Miguel
sue them over
the incident. He said he has
been unable to obtain informa-
tion about whether Miguel's leap
was a planned jump or a sponta-
neous flourish while he per-
formed his hit song "Adorn."
Miguel's representatives have
said they reached out to Bhola
and the singer remains con-
cerned about Shah's well-being.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, June 16, the
167th day of 2013. There are 198
days left in the year. This is Father's
Day.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 16, 1963, the world's
first female space traveler,
Valentina Tereshkova, 26, was
launched into orbit by the Soviet
Union aboard Vostok 6; she spent
71 hours in flight, circling the Earth
48 times before returning safely.
On this date:
In 1567, Mary, Queen of Scots,
was imprisoned in Lochleven Cas-
tle in Scotland. (She escaped al-
most a year later.)
In 1903, Ford Motor Co. was
incorporated.
In 1911, IBM had its beginnings
as the Computing-Tabulating-
Recording Co. was incorporated in
New York State.
In 1959, actor George Reeves,
TV's "Superman," was found dead of
an apparently self-inflicted gunshot
wound in the bedroom of his Beverly
Hills, Calif., home; he was 45.
In 1973, Soviet leader Leonid I.
Brezhnev began an official visit to
the United States.
Ten years ago: A divided U.S.
Supreme Court said, 6-3, the gov-
ernment can force medication on
mentally ill criminal defendants only
in the rarest of circumstances.
Five years ago: Former Vice
President Al Gore announced his
endorsement of Barack Obama for
president.
One year ago: Egyptians began
going to the polls for a two-day
runoff to choose their first freely
elected president; Islamist candi-
date Mohammed Morsi won.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Bill
Cobbs is 78. Actress Joan Van Ark
is 70. Boxing Hall of Famer Roberto
Duran is 62. Actress Laurie Metcalf
is 58. Actor James Patrick Stuart is
45. Actor Clifton Collins Jr. is 43.
Actor John Cho is 41.
Thought for Today: "Not to
know is bad. Not to want to know is
worse. Not to hope is unthinkable.
Not to care is unforgivable." -
Nigerian saying.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR -HI LO PR I| [HLZ
1.30 / Qn 7a 1 n k J87 7.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
ts
ts
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc

ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Partly cloudy with a
chance of thunderstorms today.


96 72 0.25 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xclusivedaily
forecast by:.
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 72
Scattered PM storms, rain chance
50%


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Scattered PM storms, rain chance 40%


=. = .TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
F High: 91 Low: 73
Few PM storms, rain chance 30%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/75
Record 100/64
Normal 92/69
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.70 in.
Total for the month 9.40 in.
Total for the year 15.50 in.
Normal for the year 18.88 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 61%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, nettle
Today's count: 2.7/12
Monday's count: 4.4
Tuesday's count: 4.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/16 SUNDAY 6:10 12:21 6:33
6/17 MONDAY 12:44 6:56 1:08 7:20


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
.- SUNSET TONIGHT............................8:31 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:32 A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY..................... 1:33 P.M.
JUNE 23 JUNE 30 JULY 8 MOONSET TODAY.......................... 1:05A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 11:51 a/7:08 a /8:00 p
Crystal River" 10:12 a/4:30 a 10:28 p/5:22 p
Withlacoochee* 7:59 a/2:18 a 8:15 p/3:10 p
Homosassa*** 11:01 a/6:07 a 11:17 p/6:59 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:07 a/8:04 a 12:43 p/9:15 p
11:04 a/5:26 a 11:59 p/6:37 p
8:51 a3:14 a 9:46 p/4:25 p
11:53 a/7:03a -- /8:14 p


Gulf water
temperature


87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.84 27.89 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.86 36.86 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.55 37.53 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.62 38.60 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION
0


)RECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


ts
ts
.01 pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
s
sh
ts
sh
pc
ts
pc
.06 pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
sh
pc
ts
.08 pc
.01 ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
s
ts
pc
ts
pc
.20 s
.02 s
pc
pc
pc


74 57
95 65
85 62
86 69
76 68
94 75
89 73
77 52
91 74
89 55
77 61
72 60
70 54
86 70
82 65
89 68
85 64
81 67
78 66
92 68
79 66
74 53
97 75
86 59
84 66
81 65
99 79
86 68
83 64
79 60
94 76
79 67
92 72
100 76
92 73
70 60
85 70
95 75
84 59
84 62
89 75
92 73
91 69


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 90 80 .40 pc 90 78
New York City 79 61 ts 83 67
Norfolk 84 61 pc 89 71
Oklahoma City 83 74 .14 ts 90 71
Omaha 82 67 pc 85 66
Palm Springs 10469 s 98 71
Philadelphia 82 59 ts 85 68
Phoenix 105 84 s 108 80
Pittsburgh 77 51 ts 78 64
Portland, ME 74 51 sh 72 55
Portland, Ore 79 52 pc 75 55
Providence, R.I. 78 62 sh 79 59
Raleigh 83 57 pc 88 68
Rapid City 76 54 ts 78 52
Reno 85 50 s 83 52
Rochester, NY 74 52 ts 73 60
Sacramento 87 58 s 89 57
St. Louis 89 70 .18 ts 84 70
St. Ste. Marie 71 43 ts 70 47
Salt Lake City 83 52 s 88 62
San Antonio 89 77 pc 91 75
San Diego 76 51 pc 69 61
San Francisco 62 51 pc 66 52
Savannah 89 67 pc 87 71
Seattle 75 50 pc 73 56
Spokane 77 46 pc 86 55
Syracuse 75 51 ts 74 61
Topeka 90 73 ts 86 68
Washington 85 63 ts 89 69
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 Needles, Calif. LOW 21 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/78/pc
Amsterdam 65/48/pc
Athens 89/71/s
Beijing 88/73/sh
Berlin 72/52/pc
Bermuda 76/68/pc
Cairo 90/67/s
Calgary 64/50/pc
Havana 90/73/pc
Hong Kong 86/78/ts
Jerusalem 76/60/s


Lisbon 77/57/pc
London 68/52/c
Madrid 96/62/s
Mexico City 74/54/ts
Montreal 66/59/ts
Moscow 83/64/pc
Paris 75/56/pc
Rio 76/67/pc
Rome 84/67/s
Sydney 60/46/s
Tokyo 78/68/ts
Toronto 77/59/ts
Warsaw 78/63/s


I LEGAL NOTICES







Miscellaneous Notices.........9D


Self Storage Notices.............9D




S CITRUS LICO UNTY



CHRpNICLE
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C
JUNE 10




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 AS


Our culture has an obsession
with having a healthy child.
Having a broken child is
a really good thing.
Adam Jones
Lecanto father of three.


SPECIAL
Continued from Page Al
the country. Plus, Sashi's
main doctor in St. Louis
also has cerebral palsy
and can relate."
MEN
Sashi said her favorite
color is purple, she loves
dancing, she likes playing
Wii and beating her dad at
cards.
"I win at cards most of
the time," Sashi said.
Her favorite aspect
about her dad is, "he is
very handsome and is al-
ready 50 years old."
Adam belly laughed at
this, and then commented
on how delightful and
pleasant Sashi is. Having
her living with them for
the rest of her life is more
than OK for the Joneses.
His message to other fa-


MORE DADS
A new poll finds most
men aspire to be
dads./Page A7

others of special-needs chil-
dren is to be creative with
connecting with their chil-
dren. Build things for
them so they can do ther-
apy at home, and rethink
situations.
"Raise your kids in a
church community," he
added. "And don't wait
until they are teenagers
when they 'need it.'
"One of the greatest im-
pacts on my children's
lives has been the mentors
they have had in and
through church."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington at
352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online com.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Sashi, 13, talks with her father Adam Jones in the family's front yard as Cash, the teen's black Labrador retriever
support dog, waits.


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* Re-employment and
Training Assistance

* Community Programs

Meet with representatives from
the College of Central Florida,
United Way of Citrus County,
Withlacoochee Technical Institute
and Workforce Connection of
Citrus, Levy and Marion counties.
This workshop is offered in
addition to employee services
provided by Duke Energy.

Refreshments courtesy of Duke Energy.



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A6 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013

James 'Doug'
Phillips, 79
INVERNESS
James Douglas Phillips,
M.D., "Doug," 79, of Inver-
ness, Fla., went home to be
with his Lord and Savior
on June 7,2013, surrounded
by his family and friends,
under the loving care of
Hospice of Citrus County
of the Nature Coast. He
was born in Standing
Rock,
Ala., Feb.
S3,1934.
He at-
S tended
re pre-med
at Mem-
phis State
SCollege,
James Memphis,
Phillips Ten n. ,
from 1952 to 1955 and was
a member of Phi Kappa
Alpha. He continued at the
University of Tennessee,
Memphis, Tenn., was pres-
ident of his senior class
and graduated with an
M.D. degree in 1958. He
did his residency in gen-
eral surgery at Baptist Me-
morial Hospital, Memphis,
Tenn. He completed his
residency in urology and
anatomic and clinical
pathology at John Gaston
Hospital in Memphis,
Tenn. He served as staff
pathologist at the Baptist
Memorial Hospital, Mem-
phis, Tenn., in 1965 and '66.
From 1966 to '71 he served
as associate director of
resident training at
Methodist Memorial Hos-
pital, Memphis, Tenn.
In 1971 he moved to St.
Petersburg, where he
served as associate direc-
tor of the laboratory and
taught medical technology
at Bayfront Medical Cen-
ter, St. Petersburg. During
this time he also served as
associate clinical labora-
tory professor at the Uni-
versity of South Florida
medical school in Tampa.
From 1982 until his retire-
ment in 1996, he was di-
rector of the laboratory at
E.H. White Memorial Hos-
pital, St. Petersburg.
He was a diplomat of
the American Board of
Clinical Pathologists,
emeritus fellow of the Col-
lege of American Patholo-
gists and emeritus fellow
of the College of Clinical
Pathologists. He was a
member of the Pacific Rim
Maltese Club and co-
founder of "Families For
Truth About Gander"
He was preceded in
death by his only son, Sgt.
James D. Phillips Jr; and
his grandson Nicholas
Scott Carter. Left behind to
cherish his memory are
his wife of 32 years, Zona
Lee; daughter Samantha
Phillips, Atlanta, Ga.; step-
daughters Stephanie Hall,
Tampa, and Christi Carter,
Pinellas Park; grand-
daughter Michelle
Phillips, Seoul, Korea;
grandson Warrant Officer
Lee Scott Carter (Katha-
rina); and great-grandson
Soren Carter, Fort Rucker,
Ala.
An avid fisherman and
hunter, he loved boating
and water activities. He
enjoyed his home on the
lake, tending his roses and
gardens. In his retirement
years, he and his wife were
involved in Maltese dog
rescue because of their
love for the breed. He will
be deeply missed by his
four beloved Maltese he
called "his girls." He spent
a great deal of time con-
necting with his past med-
ical school classmates,
students and friends on
the Internet. He loved
teaching family members
anything concerning medi-
cine, fishing, gardening
and things he was passion-
ate about. He was
renowned for his sense of
humor. He was at his best
when surrounded by peo-
ple he could entertain and
make laugh. The stories he
told of his childhood and


college years were many,
and they never failed to
spread humor no matter
how often he told them.
In lieu of flowers, Doug
requested donations be
made to Hospice of Citrus
County of the Nature
Coast, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or
your local SPCA. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home will
be in charge of private cre-
mation. A celebration of
Doug's life will be at 1 p.m.
June 22, 2013, at Calvary
Chapel, 960 S. U.S. 41, In-
verness, FL 34450.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


LECANTO
INVERNESS
OCALA
TIMBER RIDGE
THE VILLAGES




4w^^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Constance
Barton, 94
Constance M. Barton,
94, passed away June 13,
2013, following a short ill-
ness. She was born on Sat-
urday, Oct. 5, 1918, in
Ridgewood Hospital in
New York City. This was
just 21 days prior to the
end of World War I. Her
parents were Antoinette
and Ernest Majer.
She is
survived
by her lov-
ing hus-
r band Bill
(married
for 72
years);
son Bill
Constance and his
Barton wife Mau-
reen; daughter Muriel and
her husband Bob; five
grandchildren; one great-
grandchild and a second
on the way
Over the years Connie
was active in the West
Hempstead, N.Y, school
system, serving on the PTA
as well as the school
board. She was an active
member of Hollis Presby-
terian Church, Hollis, N.Y,
Wesley UMC, Franklin
Square, N.Y, and First
UMC of Homosassa. She
was a true Christian
woman who walked God's
path. Connie was loved by
her family and friends. A
memorial service will be
held at 10 a.m. Thursday,
June 27, at First UMC of
Homosassa. Donations can
be made in Connie's mem-
ory to: Community Hos-
pice, Attn. Bea Murawski,
200 Healthpark Blvd., St.
Augustine, FL 32086.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
Frieda
Sandroni, 97
FLORAL CITY
Frieda Elizabeth San-
droni, 97, Floral City, died
June 15. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory is assisting the family
with private arrangements.
Ethel Sherpey
BEVERLY HILLS
Ethel Thomasey Sher-
pey, of Beverly Hills, died
Friday, June 14, in Lecanto.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory


Margaret
Beale, 89
HOMOSASSA
July 6, 1923 June 12,
2013
Mrs. Margaret Joyce
Beale, age 89, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., passed away
Wednesday, June 12, 2013,
at her son's residence.
Mrs. Beale was born
July 6,
1923, in
Washing-
S.' p She was
preceded
S- in death
by her
father
Margaret James Mc-
Beale Donough
and mother Lynell Cobb
McDonough; husband
George Edwin Beale Jr,;
and sister Helen Caldwell.
She worked for the De-
partment of Agriculture.
Survivors include her
children and their spouses,
George Edwin Beale III
(Alice Norieta), James
William Beale (Gloria
Doreen) and Lynell Mar-
garet Marshall; grandchil-
dren Michelle (Keith) Ellis,
Dawn (William) Smith, James
William (Susan) Beale Jr.,
Robert Edwin (Tonya)
Beale, Kelly (James) Fields,
William Howard Marshall,
James Edwin (Amie) Mar-
shall, Caroline Lynell (Eu-
gene) Plater, Virginia Lee
Larsen, Susan Ann Beale,
Elizabeth Lynn Ray, Nori-
eta Gaye (Mike) Churchin,
Carolyn Sara (Brad) Curtis
and Patricia Elisse (Scott)
Jones. Mrs. Beale had 21
great-grandchildren and
three great-great-
grandchildren; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Conner-Westbury Fu-
neral Home, 1891 W McIn-
tosh Road, Griffin, is in
charge of arrangements.
www.conner-westbury
funeralhome.com.




Donald
Wright, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Donald C. Wright, 86, of
Beverly Hills, died June
11, at Citrus Memorial
hospital, Inverness. Inter-
ment will be at Florida
National Cemetery Veter-
ans Funeral Care.


Rosalie
Sullivan, 74
INVERNESS
Rosalie A. Sullivan, 74,
of Inverness, died Tuesday,
June 11.
Turner Funeral Homes.
See DEATHS/Page A8


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Poll: Most men aspire to be dads


JENNIFER AGIESTA
Associated Press
A recent Associated
Press-WE tv poll found
more than 8 in 10 men said
they have always wanted
to be fathers or think
they'd like to be one
someday
Debates about the dif-
ferent ways women ap-
proach motherhood
dominate news coverage
about parenthood these
days, with fathers' experi-
ences often left
unexamined.
A look at what the poll
found on how men view fa-
therhood, and the changes
it has brought for those
who have become dads:
BECOMING
A DAD
About 8 in 10 fathers sur-
veyed said they always
knew they wanted to have
children, compared with
about 7 in 10 mothers, and
69 percent of dads called
that long-standing desire
to have children an impor-
tant factor in their deci-
sion to have kids.
Dads were more likely
than moms in the poll to
say they saw positive ef-
fects from fatherhood on
their love life and career,
and they are just as likely
as moms to say it improved
their overall happiness,
sense of accomplishment
and sense of purpose.
When weighing whether
to become a parent, moth-
ers and fathers placed
similar levels of impor-
tance on where they stood
in their career and the im-
pact having kids might
have on their social life,
and like mothers, saw hav-
ing found the right person
to have a child with and
the joy of having children
as the most important
considerations.
ASPIRING TO
FATHERHOOD
Men who do not have
children were just as
likely as women without
kids to say they want them


ON THE NET
http://surveys.ap.org

someday Among men
younger than age 35, 91
percent are dads already
or say they think they
would like to have chil-
dren someday
Men were more likely
than women to say the
main reason they'd like to
become fathers someday is
to carry on traditions or
family history
According to the poll, 14
percent of men called that
a top reason compared
with 4 percent of women.
Women place greater em-
phasis on wanting to be a
parent, to care for and
raise a child 22 percent
among women who want
children compared with 2
percent among men.
MARRIED,
WITH KIDS
Three-quarters of dads
said they were married
when their first child was
born.
Among those men who
aren't married and who
would like to have chil-
dren, about one-quarter
say they would consider
having or adopting a child


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without a partner, though
88 percent within this
group say they do want to
get married someday
Men are a bit more skep-
tical than women that a
single mother can do as
good a job raising a child
as two parents can, and
men are more likely to say
an increase in the number
of single mothers is bad for
society.
Still, about half of men
in the survey said the
growing variety in family
arrangements these days
ultimately doesn't make
much difference.
The AP-WE tv poll was
conducted May 15 to 23,
2013, using Knowledge
Panel, GfK's probability-
based online panel.
It involved online inter-
views with 1,277 people
age 18 to 49, including in-
terviews with 637 men.
The survey has a margin
of sampling error of plus
or minus 3.8 percentage
points for all respondents;
it is larger for subgroups.
KnowledgePanel is con-
structed using traditional
telephone and mail sam-
pling methods to randomly
recruit respondents. Peo-
ple selected who had no
Internet access were given
it for free.


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New vet clinic set to open


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
A new low-cost veterinary clinic will
open its doors later this month to help
with the problem of too many unwanted
pets in the county
The name of the new facility, Royal
Skunk Pet Clinic, should stick in the
mind of pet owners seeking affordable
health care and spaying and neutering
to prevent "surprise" litters of dogs and
cats.
One of the organizers, AnnMarie Mar-
shall, told the Chronicle that the clinic's
name was suggested by one of its bene-
factors who once had a pet skunk. The
facility has been put together by a group
of pet lovers who want to offer some
lower costs for treatments.
The mobile clinic will open Friday,
June 28, out of a storefront in Hampton
Plaza at the corner of Norvell Bryant
Highway and Essex Street in Lecanto.
Clinic days will be scheduled on an as-
needed basis, so call 352-201-6701 for an
appointment or more information.
Basic care will be provided by an ex-
perienced veterinarian and a staff of
trained volunteers. Examples of serv-
ices provided are spaying and neutering
of dogs ($60 and up), vaccinations ($8 for


Special to the Chronicle
Oliver Tamposi cradles his Yorkie in front
of the new spaying and neutering facility,
Royal Skunk Pet Clinic, recently in
Lecanto. The nonprofit clinic will open
June 28.
rabies), deep dental cleaning ($75),
heartworm testing and sterilization of
cats ($30).
Marshall asked that pet owners
start calling for appointments at 352-
201-6701.
Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer at 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com.


Fast facts about diabetes
and heart disease
* Heart allack.s and strokes
strike diabeolics more than
twice as ofien as people
Wilhc'ul diabetes.
* People wilh diabeles lend
1i develop hear disease
or have siro.es ,1 aan
earlier age Ihan
olher people.
* Two oul oif ihree people
wilh diabetes die from
some lype of ,
cardiovascular disease.


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AS SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Authories: Girl, 5, saved mom's life


Associated Press


MARION, Iowa A 5-year-old
Marion girl is being credited by
emergency workers with helping
save her mother's life.
Des Moines television station KCCI
reported that Leighlla Andrews
called 911 on Wednesday when her


mother suffered a diabetic seizure.
Stephanie Andrews said she was
diagnosed with diabetes two years
ago. As the mother of three young
children, Andrews decided to write
out directions for medical emergen-
cies and discuss what to do with her
oldest, Leighlla.
Seeing her mother unconscious


Wednesday, Leighlla dialed 911 and
told the dispatcher her mother's
"mouth is bubbling."
Dispatchers had a difficult time
locating the house, where the An-
drews had moved only a week ear-
lier Leighlla stayed on the phone
with dispatcher for 17 minutes until
emergency responders arrived.


Bear rescued after


spending 11 days


with jar on its head


Associated Press

JAMISON CITY, Pa. -
Four central Pennsylvania
residents said they res-
cued a young bear whose
head had been stuck in a
plastic jar for at least 11
days.
The Press Enterprise of
Bloomsburg reported
Saturday the group
managed the feat while
armed only with a rope
and flashlight.
Area residents first spot-
ted the 100-pound bruin



DEATHS
Continued from Page A6





David
Peardon, 76
FLORAL CITY
David Mitchell Peardon,
76, of Floral City, Fla.,
passed away on Friday,
June 7, 2013, at his resi-
dence in Floral City.
He was born in White-
side, Tenn., on June 2,
1937, to the late Thomas
Mitchell and Juanita
Gladys (Parker) Peardon.
David served in the U.S.
Air Force for 16 years, pre-
viously serving in the U.S.
Army for four years, and
was a
technical
sergeant
upon re-
tirement
after serv-
ing in
bboth
Korea and
David Vietnam.
Peardon He was a
very talented musician
who performed with sev-
eral bands while in Myrtle
Beach, S.C., as well as here
in Florida, being a found-
ing member of the "Strictly
Country" band. He served
as a rifleman for VFW Post
7122 Honor Guard, and
was one of its original
members. He was also a
member of the American
Legion Post 225, Floral
City
Survivors include his
loving wife of 22 years,
Peggy F Peardon. Other
survivors include two sons,
Randy Peardon and his
companion Kathy Pitts, of
Floral City, and Danny
Peardon of Goldsboro,
N.C.; daughter Diane
Kennedy of Goldsboro,
N.C.; stepdaughter Jen-
nifer Atwell of Silverhill,
Ala.; brother Robert K.
Peardon of Liberty, Texas;
three grandchildren; and
one great-grandchild.
A graveside service with
military honors is sched-
uled for 10 a.m. Wednes-
day, June 19, 2013, at
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. In lieu of
flowers, the family re-
quests donations to either
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 or the Flo-
ral City Honor Guard, Post
7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City, FL 34436.
Arrangements are under
the care of Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness, Florida.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. cornm.


with its head in a jar on
June 3. But it eluded game
wardens.
Then Thursday night, a
man saw the animal in
Jamison City. He joined
two women and a local
game commissioner on a
wild chase to lasso the
bear and remove the jar
They said the frightened
but powerful bruin fell
into a swimming pool at
least twice during the or-
deal, but the group eventu-
ally yanked off the jar and
set the animal free.


Brian
Rodgers, 47
MORRISTON
Brian Matthew
Rodgers, 47, of Morriston,
died June 12, 2013. A fu-
neral service will be con-
ducted on Wednesday,
June 19, at Roberts Fu-
neral Home of Dunnellon.
Family and friends may
visit Tuesday, June 18,
from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home.

Susan
'Melvan'
Burnett, 56
INVERNESS
Susan L. (Melvan) Bur-
nett, 56, of Inverness, died
Friday, June 14, at Hospice
of Citrus County. Arrange-
ments provided by Heinz
Funeral Home and Crema-
tion, Inverness.

Jean
Hildenstein, 87
COLLI ERVI LLE,
TENN
Jean Hildenstein, 87, of
Collierville, Tenn., for-
merly of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away peacefully
Saturday, April 27, 2013, at
Trinity Baptist Hospice.
She was a member of St.
Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church, Ho-
mosassa. She loved travel-
ling, playing bridge and
golfing.
She will be lovingly re-
membered by her husband
of 13 years, Wendell
"Gabe" Hildenstein of
Germantown, Tenn.; her
brother Frances Figley of
East Palestine, Ohio;
seven stepdaughters,
Cathy Hastings, Teresa
May, Joanne Brown, Susan
Meier, Julie Nash, Liz
Hildenstein and Amy
Ehrhardt; several nieces;
nephews; step-grandchil-
dren; and step-great-
grandchildren. Jean was
preceded in death by her
parents, Florence and
Joseph Figley; sister Mary
Jane Rowe; and brothers
Joseph Figley and Robert
Figley
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions are suggested to
Daystar Life Center, 6751
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Letters of condolences
made be sent to Mr.
Hildenstein, 9293 Poplar
Avenue, Apt. 115, German-
town, TN 38138. Arrange-
ments were made by
Neptune Society.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

U To place an obituary,
call 352-563-5660 or
e-mail obits@chronicle
online.cornm.


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Whales visit Washington waters


Associated Press

SEATTLE The video
shows an exceptional
wildlife sighting for a big
city: A humpback whale
surfaces just yards from
Seattle's busy waterfront
at twilight. The city's port
cranes, Ferris wheel and
car headlights glow in the
background, and a ferry
cruises by while the giant
tail disappears back into
the Puget Sound.
Whale watchers say the
recording, shot in early
May and confirmed by the
conservationist group
Orca Network, highlights
an increase in humpback
sightings in the Puget
Sound and Strait of Juan
de FuRica.
"Fifteen years ago, it
was unheard of," said
Brian Goodremont, who is
the president of the Pacific
Whale Watch Association
and runs San Juan Outfit-
ters. "Now they've become
a regular sighting in spring
and fall."
The ocean mammals
can grow to be 50 feet long
and weigh up to 40 tons.
They visit Washington wa-
ters in the spring and fall
as they migrate from
southern Pacific winter
waters to summer feeding
spots off Alaska.
Decades ago, hump-
backs visiting inland wa-
ters were numerous
enough that whaling oper-
ations were based in the
northern Puget Sound.
Hundreds of the animals
were slaughtered, said
Cascadia Research
Collective's baleen
whale researcher John
Calambokidis.
"It hasn't quite returned
to the numbers from the
1800s," Calambokidis said.
He added that humpback
whales were hunted off
American waters as re-
cently as the 1960s, within
the lifespan of some of
these whales, a practice
that has since been made
illegal.
The whales that make
the north Pacific Ocean


---

Associated Press
A humpback whale breaches into view of a state ferry and a tour boat May 25 in the San Juan Channel near Friday
Harbor, Wash. A video shot in May 2013 shows a rare wildlife sighting in a big city, a lone humpback whale surfacing
at twilight in the Puget Sound just yards from Seattle's busy waterfront.


their home are making a
comeback, and conserva-
tionists say the increased
sightings are proof that
their efforts are working.
According to Cascadia
Research Collective, the
number of humpback
whales off the U.S. West
Coast has increased about
7 percent annually to
about 2,000 animals, while
the whales who visit Wash-
ington's coast can number
in the hundreds.
Experts believe there



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could be more than 22,000
humpbacks in the greater
northern Pacific Ocean, up
from about 1,500 in the
1960s when whale hunting
was banned in the U.S.
The whales visiting
Washington waters mostly
stick to the open ocean,


about 20 miles offshore at
least, or concentrate at the
entrance of the Strait of
Juan de Fuca to feed, but
some, like the animal that
visited Seattle, wander far-
ther in.
Anne Hall, a Canadian
marine zoologist advising


the Pacific Whale Watch
Association, said hump-
back mothers have been
seen bringing their young
to inland waters, suggest-
ing the Puget Sound is
again providing a nursery
habitat function.
"The mothers seem to


ON THE NET
Video of humpback
whale off Seattle
waterfront:
http://bit.ly/10OJxC7M

feel this is a safe place to
take the calves," Hall said.
"There appears to be
plenty of food for her to
sustain herself, while also
weaning her baby, teach-
ing it how to feed."
Over the spring, whale
watchers were spotting
humpbacks almost daily in
the north Puget Sound,
providing the possibility
that whale watching tours
in the future could include
humpbacks sightings as
part of their regular
offerings.
"It's becoming a part of
what we do," Goodremont
said. '"As those sightings of
humpback become a little
more reliable, it kind of
becomes a part of what our
industry does."
Orca Network president
Howard Garrett said that
as long as whale-watching
tours continue to be re-
spectful of the animals,
seeing humpbacks added
to the tours is very
positive.
"It's a good thing for
people to experience the
whales up close," Garrett
said. "They become
advocates."


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BREASTAUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 A9










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Jumbo Jenga


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Shock lingers after SS leader found in US

Nazi officer Michael Karkoc, 94, discovered living in Minneapolis home


Associated Press
Keely Lewis, 21, of Decatur,
Ga., works on an oversized
version of the game Jenga
as her friend Larkin Taylor-
Parker, 20, of Decatur,
looks on Saturday at the
Midsummer Music &
Food Festival in Atlanta.

OSHA to join La.
blast investigation
DONALDSONVILLE, La.
- Federal investigators are
expected in south Louisiana
over the weekend at the
site of an explosion that
killed one worker at chemi-
cal plant in Donaldsonville
- the second such blast in
the area in as many days.
State Police Trooper Jared
Sandifer said Saturday offi-
cials from the Occupational
Safety and Health Adminis-
tration were coming to the
CF Industries facility as soon
as the site was safe. San-
difer said the state police's
hazardous materials unit
was at the plant overnight.
CF Industries manufactures
ammonia and other nitro-
gen fertilizers at the facility.
Officials said there were no
hazardous materials on site.
Chicago introducing
bike-sharing program
CHICAGO The
newest piece of Chicago's
transit puzzle will not rumble
between skyscrapers on its
100-year-old elevated rail
lines or utilize its fleet of hy-
brid buses. The city is turn-
ing to thousands of bicycles
to send commuters and vis-
itors zipping on their way.
Chicago joins New York,
Los Angeles and San Fran-
cisco this year in implement-
ing a bike-sharing program.
The concept is simple:
Grab a bike from a curbside
station, ride for up to 30
minutes, then lock the bike
at any docking point.
Chicago's program,
named Divvy, launches
June 28 with about 750
bikes at 75 solar-powered
stations. It will expand over
the next year to at least
4,000 bikes at 400 stations.
NYC airport builds
turtle barrier
NEW YORK Officials
are building a 4,000-foot-
long barrier to protect a run-
way at New York City's
Kennedy Airport.
But the obstacle isn't for
terrorists. It's for turtles.
The busy airport has been
plagued in recent years by
waves of Diamondback ter-
rapins that climb up out of
Jamaica Bay looking for a
place to nest.
During last year's mating
season, airport employees
had to carry 1,300 turtles off
the tarmac.
The New York Post re-
ported the Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey
is hoping an 8-inch-wide
barrier made of plastic pip-
ing will help keep the turtles
off the runway this year.
Army names Ranger
killed in mishap


ATLANTA-
Ranger killed ii
parachuting m
21-year-old ve
Massachusetts
returned from
officials said Sa
Pfc. Christol
was found dea
after a routine
at Fort Stewart
Georgia. It was
ately clear wha
fatality. Army a
investigating.


Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS The
revelation that a former
commander of a Nazi
SS-led military unit has
lived quietly in Minneapo-
lis for the past six decades
came as a shock to those
who know 94-year-old
Michael Karkoc. World
War II survivors in both
the U.S. and Europe
harshly condemned the
news and prosecutors in
Poland have said they'll
investigate.
An Associated Press in-
vestigation found that
Karkoc served as a top
commander in the Ukrain-
ian Self-Defense Legion
during World War II. The
unit is accused of wartime
atrocities, including the
burning of villages filled
with women and children.


"I know him personally
We talk, laugh. He takes
care of his yard and walks
with his wife," his next-
door neighbor, Gordon
Gnasdoskey, said Friday
"For me, this is a shock.
To come to this country
and take advantage of its
freedoms all of these
years, it blows my mind,"
said Gnasdoskey, the
grandson of a Ukrainian
immigrant himself.
Karkoc told American
authorities in 1949 that he
had performed no military
service during World War
II, concealing his work as
an officer and founding
member of the legion and
later as an officer in the
SS Galician Division, ac-
cording to records ob-
tained by the AP through a
Freedom of Information
Act request.


Associated Press
People walk past the home in Minneapolis, Minn., where
94-year-old Michael Karkoc lives on Friday. Karkoc, a top
commander of a Nazi SS-led unit accused of burning vil-
lages filled with women and children, lied to American im-
migration officials to get into the United States and has
been living in Minnesota since shortly after World War II,
according to evidence uncovered by The Associated Press.
Though records do not his unit and other docu-
show that Karkoc had a di- mentation confirm the
rect hand in war crimes, Ukrainian company he
statements from men in commanded massacred


Associated Press
Allison Ludwig hugs Black Forest Animal Sanctuary staff member Monica Oldenburg on Saturday at a
community meeting regarding the Black Forest wildfire near Colorado Springs, Colo. Oldenburg, who was
helping rescue animals from the burn zone until ordered to stop on Friday, saved Ludwig's cattle and chickens
from the fire. The fire that exploded Tuesday outside of Colorado Springs, amid record-setting heat and
tinder-dry conditions, has destroyed hundreds of homes and killed two people.



'Everything is black'


As firefighters advance containment, residents wait anxiously


Associated Press

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.
A Colorado sheriff said fire-
fighters "are getting the
upper hand" on the most
destructive wildfire in state his-
tory Saturday, an announcement
that came as authorities gained a
clearer picture of the grim land-
scape the blaze has left behind.
No additional homes were de-
stroyed as fire crews expanded
containment lines, El Paso
County Sheriff Terry Maketa
said. Also, there were no new re-
ports of injury or death, he said.
The fire that exploded Tues-
day outside of Colorado Springs,
amid record-setting heat and tin-
der-dry conditions, has destroyed
nearly 500 homes and killed two
people, whose bodies were found
inside their garage Thursday,
their car doors open as though
they had been about to flee.


On Saturday, worried residents
waited for permission to return
to their neighborhoods to see
whether their homes were still
standing.
Maketa said the fire's destruc-
tion has made it difficult for his
deputies to assess damage.
Deputies have said "it looks like
a nuclear bomb went off in some
of those areas, and you can't even
recognize whether it was a house
or some other kind of structure,"
Maketa said. "That is the level of
incineration and destruction that
took place in some areas."
Containment is at 45 percent,
an increase from 30 percent on
Friday. It's unknown what
sparked the blaze, but investiga-
tors believe it was human-
caused. So far, it's cost more than
$3.5 million to fight.
Most mandatory evacuation or-
ders have been lifted, as the fire
zone remained at 25 square miles.


Some residents have already
gotten to see the damage.
Jack and Judy Roe were able
to tour their neighborhood Fri-
day, and saw to their relief that
their house had been spared.
Several other homes on their
block, however, where destroyed.
"Our hearts were breaking for
our neighbors," Judy Roe said.
Describing the scene, she said
she saw charred piles of what re-
mained of homes, with bricks the
only distinguishable feature.
"But other than that, every-
thing is black. The ground, every-
thing is just black," she said.
Some residents were forced to
evacuate so quickly they didn't
have time to pack an extra
change of clothes.
"This is my wardrobe," said Bob
Metzger, signaling to his jeans
and polo shirt. Metzger and his
wife Barbara were among those
who lost their house.


In Iran, reformists dancing in the streets


Associated Press


LLlTEHRAN aIl WViUd


_1jihiNI1, r lan wiU
The U.S. Army celebrations broke out on
n an apparent Tehran streets that were
ishap was a battlefields four years ago
teran from as reformist-backed Hasan
who recently Rowhani capped a stun-
Afghanistan, ning surge to claim Iran's
aturday. presidency on Saturday,
pher P. Dona throwing open the politi-
ad Thursday cal order after relentless
training jump crackdowns by hard-liners
tin southeast to consolidate and safe-
s not immedi- guard their grip on power.
it caused the "Long live Rowhani,"
authorities are tens of thousands of jubi-
lant supporters chanted as
-From wire reports security officials made no


attempt to rein in not equate to poli-
crowds joyous cymakinginfluence.
and even a bit be- All key deci-
wildered by the sions including
scope of his vic- nuclear efforts,
tory with more defense and for-
than three times eign affairs re-
the votes of his main solidly in the
nearest rival. hands of the ruling
In a statement Hasan clerics and their
after the results Rowhani powerful protec-
were announced, new Iranian tors, the Revolu-
Rowhani said "a president, tionary Guard. What
new opportunity has been Rowhani's victory does is
created... for those who truly reopen space for moderate
respect democracy, inter- and liberal voices that have
action and free dialogue." been largely muzzled in
But in Iran, even land- reprisal for massive protests
slides at the ballot box do and clashes in 2009.


Rowhani's supporters
also viewed the election as
a rebuke of uncompromis-
ing policies that have left
the Islamic Republic in-
creasingly isolated and
under biting sanctions
from the West over Tehran's
nuclear program. The 64-
year-old Rowhani is hardly
a radical having served
in governments and in the
highly sensitive role of nu-
clear negotiator but he
has taken a strong stance
against the combative in-
ternational policies of out-
going President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad and others.


civilians, and suggest that
Karkoc was at the scene of
these atrocities as the
company leader. Nazi SS
files say he and his unit
were also involved in the
1944 Warsaw Uprising, in
which the Nazis brutally
suppressed a Polish
rebellion against German
occupation.
Karkoc has declined to
comment on his wartime
service to the AP
Karkoc's name surfaced
when a retired clinical
pharmacologist who re-
searched Nazi war crimes
in his free time came
across it while looking into
members of the SS Gali-
cian Division who immi-
grated to Britain. He
tipped off the AP when an
Internet search showed
an address for Karkoc in
Minnesota.


World BRIEFS

Sea of umbrellas

7911


Associated Press
People make their way
along a crowded street
during heavy rain Saturday
near a train station in
Mumbai, India.

Six Libyan soldiers
killed in Benghazi
TRIPOLI, Libya -
Rooftop snipers and knife-
wielding assailants killed six
soldiers in Libya's eastern
city of Benghazi on Saturday,
officials said, in the largest
attack on the country's new
security forces to date.
The brazen overnight as-
sault by hundreds of plain-
clothed gunmen on security
installations forced soldiers
to withdraw from some of
their bases. In one case,
soldiers fled out the back
door of the First Infantry
Brigade's headquarters in
Benghazi as assailants
stormed the main gate,
torching the building and
two military vehicles.
It was the second deadly
incident to strike the city
this week. Thirty-one peo-
ple, mostly civilians, were
killed days earlier at an anti-
militia protest.
Attacks in Pakistani
southwest kill 22
QUETTA, Pakistan -
Pakistani forces stormed a
hospital that had been taken
over by gunmen Saturday in
a restive southwestern province,
freeing hostages and end-
ing a five-hour standoff that
capped a series of attacks
that killed 22 people.
The deadliest attack Sat-
urday took place in the
provincial capital of Quetta
and appeared to target mi-
nority Shiites. A blast ripped
through a bus carrying fe-
male university students,
killing at least 14 people,
said the head of police op-
erations, Fayaz Sumbal.
Troops capture
Damascus suburb
BEIRUT Syrian gov-
ernment forces captured
the rebel-held suburb of Ah-
madiyeh on Saturday near
the Damascus international
airport, two days after a
mortar round landed near
the airport's runway and
briefly disrupted flights, ac-
cording to the state news
agency. SANA said govern-
ment forces killed several
rebels and destroyed their
hideouts in the area.
-From wire reports










EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE









What is a better way to recharge dad's battery this Father's Day than fresh

sunshine and a little outdoors? The following are five select Citrus County

activities, among many, that summarize local scenery and bring the inner

child alive in dad:


AM ON 'I-


1. Offshore and inshore anglers adventure to Citrus County for the lakes, rivers and the
Gulf of Mexico. Accompanied by a required fishing license, a day full of hooking a fish is
available from west to east no matter the style of fishing rod. A fishing license can be
acquired online at myfwc.org or by phone at 888-486-8356. Floral City and Inverness are
well-known for bass fishing throughout the Tsala Apopka lake chain including Big
Henderson, Little Henderson, Lake South, Lake Todd and Hernando Lake. The Crystal
River and Homosassa River are also beloved fishing locations for many.

2. For the adventurous, fast-moving father, spinning the tires could enable the wind to
thicken his bald spot. Therefore, cycling may be his secret gift wish for free.
Built on the former right-of-way of an abandoned railroad track, the Withlacoochee State
Trail welcomes bikers of all levels. It spans 46 miles through towns, country and river-
banks throughout three counties. On the western side of the county, Withlacoochee Bay
Trail begins at the border of Levy County.
,. *'A &e^ 'iW T "' *


1'
~1


3. If your dad is more of a man who enjoys
siting back, relaxing and enjoying the ride,
then Citrus County horseback riding is the
saddle to be in. Sandy trails throughout the
forest and grassy trails along paved paths
provide a day of unforgettable memories.
Areas to visit by horse include: Withlacoochee State Trail, Felburn
Park Trailhead, Potts Preserve Riding Trail, Flying Eagle Preserve,
Two Mile Prairie, Withlacoochee State Forest and Tillis Hill Equine
Campground. If you don't own a horse, private ranches offer guided
trail rides for a minimal price. For example, Rymar Ranch, Lady
Hawk Farm, Renab Ranch, Sawtooth Horse Trails, Blueberry Hill
Farm and Just Horse 'n Around and more.


"ij


- ~-w


-
-
- ~


4. If you were thinking about fishing plus a water activity, kayaking is your
answer. Citrus County has many estuaries where only a small vessel can
maneuver. Dads will enjoy the scenic river, lake or estuary, while exploring a
paddling trail with his family. Don't forget the fishing pole for fresh fish.
Paddling locations in Citrus County include, but are not limited to:
Chassahowitzka River, Coastal areas near the Gulf of Mexico, Crystal River,
Homosassa River, Tsala Apoka Lake chain and Withlacoochee River.


5. Buried off the beaten track of County Road 491 and in the midst of the
Withlacoochee State Forest, Dames Caves area is filled with free, natural surprises.
Consisting of four named and mapped caves Danger Cave, Vandal Cave, Peace Sign Cave and
Sick Bat Cave the once interconnected caves are believed to be one of the oldest systems in
Florida. After a short hike into the forest, travelers approach Vandal Cave, which is believed to be
a result of an ancient roof collapse. Part of the roof is still connected creating a land bridge for
daring souls. A small side cave allows access into the belly of the Vandal Cave, which has owned its
name from the graffiti and damage the cave has endured throughout years.


Compiled by Eryn Worthington
Chronicle file photos


I. d,., "


w 4ff




A12 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING JUNE 16, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D1: Comcas; Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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WT W 4 4 4 12 12King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Big CSI: Miami "Bait" (In Cold Case "Red Glare" "The Adventures of
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(GOLE 727 67 727 "Greatest Game Ever Played" | Live From (N) (Live) I Live From Live From
D 59 *** "Dad's Home" ** "The Nanny Express" (2009, Drama) "Notes From Dad" (2013, Drama) Eddie FrasierPG' FrasierPG'
59 68 59 45 54 (2010) NIVanessa Marcil, Brennan Elliot. B Cibrian, Michael Beach, Alan Thicke.
S** "The Dark Knight Rises"(2012) Christian Bale. True True Blood (Season Veep(N) Family Tree True Blood (In Stereo)
302 201 302 2 2 Batman faces a masked villain named Bane. 'PG-13' Premiere) (N)'MA' MA' MA' 'MA'm
True Blood "Gone, True Blood True Blood Eric tries to 2 Days: **+ "Trouble With the Curve" (2012) Clint "Abraham Lincoln:
) 303 202 303 Gone, Gone" MA' save Bill. 'MA' Gennady Eastwood. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Vampire Hunter"'R'
(HlTV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl HGTV Star (N)'G' Love It or List It, Too Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl
American Restoration Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Mountain Men "Into the Mountain Men "The Ice Road Truckers "Art Swamp People 'PG' c
Mi) 51 25 51 32 42 PG' 'PG' PG' Wild" 'PG' c Night's Watch" 'PG' Attack" (N) '14'
E 2 "My Best att' -" Comedy) Kate Hudson, The Client List (Season Finale) The client list "Bride Wars"
3E 24 38 24"31 Friend's Wedding" e.- H ,.i iii. i .. has been stolen. (N) '14' cc (2009) Kate Hudson.
"Dangerous Intuition" (2013, Drama) Tricia "Stolen Child" (2011, Suspense) Emmanuelle ** "My Baby Is Missing" (2007, Drama) Gina
MN) 50 119 Heifer, Estella Warren. (In Stereo) 'NR' c Vaugier. (In Stereo) 'NR' N Philips. (In Stereo) 'NR' N
** "The Revenant" (2009, Comedy) David ** "I, Robot" (2004, Science Fiction) Will ** "Project X" (2012) Thomas "Showgirs"
MAXJ 320 221 320 3 3 Anders. (In Stereo) R' N Smith. (In Stereo) PG-13 ci Mann.(InStereo) 'R' a
(iSNBil 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Lockup: Raw | Lockup Orange
109 65 109 44 53 iii~.- oopers Alaska State Troopers Alaska StateTroopers Ultimate Survival Life Below Zero (N) 14' Ultimate Survival
'i ,,,,j ii '14' '14' Alaska (N) 'PG' L e r Alaska'PG'
WiIC 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. Sam & See Dad |Wendell "The Karate KidPartll"(1986) 'PG' |Friends
(DWj) 103 62 103 Master Class Master Class Master Class Master Class Master Class Master Class
DXY) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' c Their Baby
** "Die Another Day"(2002) The Borgias (In Stereo) Nurse Nurse Nurse The Borgias "The The Borgias "The
S 340 241 340 4 Pierce Brosnan. 'PG-13 a 'MA' c Jackie Jackie Jackie Prince" 'MA' Prince" A' M
Lucas Oil Off Road SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR Moto-Cause: Neale My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
732 112 732 Racing Las Vegas. (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Bayly Rides (N) Car TV'G'
rSi) 317 43 3i7 27 i36 Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue A bars owners may Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Chumps" Bar Rescue
37 43 37 27 36 'PG' lose their marriage.'PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
S**3 "Men in Black 3" (2012, Action) Will Magic City (In Stereo) ** "Hidalgo" (2004) Viggo Mortensen. A Westerner races Magic City
i 370 271 370 Smith. (In Stereo) PG-13' 'MA mc a horse across the Arabian desert. 'PG-13' 'MA
Powerboating Sport Flats Class Ship Sprtsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Fishing Shape TV Adv. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue 'G'
c "Catwoman" (2004, Action) Halle Berry, *** "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian" (2008, Fantasy) **+ "The Golden
ISY( YJ 31 59 31 26 29 Benjamin Bratt.PG-13' Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley'PG Compass"
(1SS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (2009) ** "Failure to Launch" (2006) 'PG-13' ** "Failure to Launch" (2006) 'PG-13'
S*** "Smokey and the Bandit" (1977, **** "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962, Drama) *** "Life With Father" (1947, Comedy)
169 53 169 30 35 Comedy) Burf Reynolds.'PG' c Gregory Peck. 'NR' (DVS) William Powell, Irene Dunne. 'NR'
Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last North America North America "Top 10" North America
(l 53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14' Frontier Exposed (N) Frontier'14' N "Revealed" (N) 'PG' (N) 'PG "Revealed" PG' N
ITM 50 46 50 29 30 Breaking Amish: Medium |Medium 19 Kids-Count Medium |Medium Breaking Amish: Medium Medium
in9 350 261 350 +***+ "Sling Blade" (1996) Billy Bob Thornton. *** "Ransom"(1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, *** "Centurion" (2010) Michael "Highlander"
350 261 350 Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' Rene Russo. (In Stereo) 'R' c Fassbender. 'R' c
** "National Treasure"(2004) **+ "Limitless" (2011, Suspense) Bradley Cooper. A writer Falling Skies Falling Skies
MY) 48 33 48 31 34 Nicolas Cage. 'NR' a (DVS) takes a mind-enhancing drug. 'NR' N (DVS) "Badlands" (N) '14' "Badlands" '14' c
TOON 38 58 38 33 "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules" Teen Looney Squidbill. King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
fRAV 9 54 9 44 Pizza Paradise 'PG' Destina Destina Wat Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Toy Hntr Toy Hntr Airport Airport
tiiiV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
TVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls IGold Girls Friends Friends Friends Fiends Friends Friends Friends ends nds Friends Friends
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Burn Notice "Forget Me
(0^) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14' Victims Unit '14' Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit '14 Not" PG'
CSI: Miami "Nailed" (In '. :1 iih i., CSI: Miami "Shattered" CSI: Miami "Payback" CSI: Miami "The Score" CSI: Miami "Under
(WE) 117 69 117 Stereo)'14'm H.- .1. i '14'm c'14'm c'14'm Suspicion" '14' c
1WGNA 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! |Bloopers! |Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay "Man in Moon"


Children need



their dads, too


Dear Annie: Fa-
thers love their
children as much
as mothers do. After a di-
vorce, fathers want to be
a part of their children's
lives, but can find it in-
credibly difficult when
they are viewed as dead-
beats and potential
abusers. But it's the chil-
dren who lose when they
are cut off from their fa-
thers.
So to family court
judges, law guardians, so-
cial workers:
Please help
the children.
Don't automat-
ically believe
everything you
hear. You owe
it to the chil-
dren to investi-
gate and let the
father tell his
side of the
story
And to all ANN
those mothers MAII
who think it's a 'V"I
good idea to re-
move a father from a
child's life or spread false
stories about how bad he
is: Think of your chil-
dren. Please love them
more than you hate their
father They need him as
much as they need you.
Allow them to love him.
They take their cues from
you, and if they see that
you are upset when they
show affection for Daddy,
they will believe it is
wrong and will stop in
order to please you. You


L


think you are punishing
your ex, but you are actu-
ally punishing your chil-
dren.
I've seen two boys cut
off from their fathers and
hurt by their mothers' ha-
tred of the fathers, two
boys who are growing up
fatherless and wondering
why Dad isn't there for
them, two boys whose
Dads don't take them
places, don't help with
school work, aren't there
for games, concerts and
graduations,
two boys with
loving, respon-
sible fathers
.4 who are miss-
ing so much. -
Sad Grandma
D ear
Grandma: We
have often
said in this
column that
fathers are in-
IE'S credibly im-
BOX portant for
their chil-
dren's devel-
opment. Studies have
shown that children who
maintain close relation-
ships with loving fathers
do better in school and
are more likely to stay off
drugs.
Fathers need to remain
in their children's lives,
and it is sometimes up to
the mother to bolster that
relationship.
Both parents are essen-
tial for a child's well-
being. Please, folks, put
your children first.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"After Earth" (PG-13)
12:15p.m.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
3:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m., =
10:15p.m.
"The Internship" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13)
3:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D.
12 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"The Purge" (R) 2 p.m.,
1:15 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"This Is The End" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"After Earth" (PG-13)
12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m.


No passes.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Internship" (PG-13)
12:55 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Man of Steel" (PG-13) In 3D.
12 p.m., 3:10 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:20 p.m.,
10:45 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"The Purge" (R) 12:20 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 4:50 p.m. No
passes.
"This Is The End" (R)
12:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 4:20
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Secret supply
6 In pieces
11 Lukewarm
16 Hornets
21 Eyelashes
22 Jewish sacred writings
23 Clio's sister
24 Relative by
marriage (hyph.)
25 Amid
26 Speechify
27 Stair post
28 Tropical vine
29 Game official
30 Fitting
31 Jacob's twin
33 Ridicule
35 Sawbuck
36 Regard highly
39 Collection of
regulations
43 Caviar
44 Antlered animal
45 Brawl
47 Havana native
49 Cigar residue
51 "- in a name?"
54 Doglike animal
57 Most achy
59 Right angles
63 Owned
64 The "I"
66 --ex machine
68 Give off
69 "Just--"
70 Racetrack shape
72 "- Poetica"
74 Court order
76 Lab gel
78 Be too fond
79 Make laws
82 Conflict in literature
84 Native American hero
86 Foe
87 Fat
89 Niche
91 Pass away
92 Costa del -
93 Layer
95 Encircle with a band
97 German
philosopher
99 Dead lang.
101 Elec. unit
104 Corral
106 Restrain
108 Ring
110 Essential


114 Comedian's
feedback
117 Blunder
119 Girl in a tutu
121 von Bismarck
122 Press
124 Harbor town
126 Kind of camp
127 Leave
unmentioned
128 Sign gas
129 Conceited
131 Wander
133 After deductions
135 Resident: suffix
136 River in Ireland
137 Annoy
139 Mary Tyler -
141 Speed trap device
143 Letter after pi
145 Follow
147 Improve
149 Bribe
152 Flightless bird
154 Living thing
157 With hands on hips
161 Mimic
162 Furnish
164 Parka part
165 Resistance unit
167 Cereal grass
168 Slacken (2 wds.)
170 Henry-- Lodge
173 Oil source
175 Commence
177 Mountain ridge
178 To any degree
(2 wds.)
179 Passover meal
180 Imbue
181 Challenged
182 Rice field
183 Efface
184 Goose genus


DOWN
1 Panic
2 Word in arithmetic
3 High up
4 Transgression
5 Crone
6 On
7 Depict
8 Altar constellation
9 Badgerlike
animal
10 This and this
11 Flimsy


Before
Forefoot
News bit
Grief
John Booth
Black cuckoo
Blackboard
Discussion group
Posh
Doctors' org.
The basics
Jacket
Newt
Gaelic
Secondhand
Woodwind
instrument
Cosmic "payback"
Of a vocal group
Whinny
"- Gabler"
Entire
Refuge
Proverb
Papua Guinea
Unseen
emanation
Serious
Plunders
Color print, for short
Embezzle
Lass
Endorse
Walk with difficulty
Male deer
Accepted
Banister
Graceful girl
Actor Stonestreet
Ark builder
Use a loom
Narcotic
Rounded handle
Bigfoot kin
Fall
Warty creature
Beginner (var.)
Unaccompanied
Alma -
Pretended
(2 wds.)
Boldness
Uncouth one
Earth, for one
Fainthearted
Baker or O'Day
Delayer's motto
Hopeless one
Cook


118 "- Russia With Love"
120 Something caustic
123 An explosive,
for short
125 Chinese "way"
130 Close
132 Crowds
134 "Star -"
137 Fleshy fruit
138 Deservedly
140 Deletes


"Exodus" hero
Aided
Pathet -
Scot's cap
Plate of greens
"Carmen" is one
Falk or Fonda
Open
Loop in a rope
Lazybones
Complains


Flat boat
Weasel relative
- processing
Present!
Western Indian
Naughty
Ancient
Actress Lupino
Depot (abbr.)
A metal


Puzzle answer is on Page A15.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Tourists line up at the normal line at Universal Studios Hollywood in Los Angeles. Many theme parks now have
VIP tours with perks usually reserved for celebrities private tour guides, no waits for the biggest attractions,
reserved seating at shows and parades along with behind-the-scenes peaks at places normally off limits.



Visit a theme park like a



VIP with no waits, no hassles


JOHN SEEWER
Associated Press

America's biggest theme parks
will pack in around 120 million peo-
ple this year.
That's a lot of standing in long
lines for roller coasters, juggling
show schedules and figuring out
when and where to eat. But there's
a way to eliminate the stress of mak-
ing the annual trek to Disney, Uni-
versal, Six Flags and other popular
parks.
Many now have VIP tours with
perks usually reserved for celebri-
ties private tour guides, no waits
for the biggest attractions, reserved
seating at shows and parades along
with behind-the-scenes peeks at
places normally off limits.
All of this, of course, comes at a
steep price.
The VIP tours at Six Flags parks
in New Jersey and near Los Angeles
come in at $299 per person. Cedar
Point in Ohio charges $395 apiece
for a full day of perks that include
front of the line access to its 16 roller
coasters. Disney World's VIP tour
starts at $315 per hour for up to 10
people.
"Time is money and when you're
waiting in line, you're wasting
money," said Joey Ray, of Sparks,
Nev, whose vacations usually re-
volve around theme parks.
The ability to bypass the lines
means he can see everything in a
day instead of staying an extra night
or two at a park. Ray said he's gone
on a few of the VIP tours, including
at Universal Studios Hollywood
where visitors get to see the studio's
costume and prop departments and
walk through the courtyard in the
back lot where "Back to the Future"
was filmed.
Just seeing that was worth the
splurge, he said.
Those in the theme park industry
say there are two distinct types of
visitors now those who closely
watch what they spend and those
who are willing to shell out more but
are limited by time.
Gone are the days when everyone


What to know about VIP treatment
RED CARPET: Disney, Universal, Six Flags and regional theme parks
now offer VIP tours with perks like private tour guides, no waits for
the biggest attractions, reserved seating and behind-the-scenes
peeks at off-limits places.
PRICEY TICKETS: The tours are expensive, but skipping lines can
mean seeing everything in a day, which can save an extra night or
two at a hotel. The tours appeal to people on a budget and those
limited by time.
GROWING TREND: The money generated is small but growing.
Parks are designing new rides with special entrances, so ordinary
ticketholders won't notice when they are bypassed.


pays the same price for a theme
park ticket and waits in the same
lines.
"Everyone is not equal anymore,"
said Dennis Spiegel, a theme-park
consultant and president of Interna-
tional Theme Park Services Inc. in
Cincinnati.
His company found in a survey
just completed that the money parks
make from VIP tours is small, but
growing. It also showed that VIP vis-
itors are moving twice as fast
through the parks with front-of-line
access and that about 70 percent
wouldn't come back without it.
"It became very apparent that this
is something that's going to continue
to grow in the future," said Spiegel,
who noted that parks recognize the
potential for ill will when guests
with high-priced tickets sidestep
lines full of paying customers.
Their solution now is to design
new rides so that people won't no-
tice when they are being bypassed.
Disney was one of the few theme
park operators offering the person-
alized tours up until the past 10
years. Now they can be found re-
gional parks including Hersheypark
in Hershey, Pa., and Kings Island
near Cincinnati.
Six Flags parks nationwide have
several levels of VIP passes depend-
ing on location. At Six Flags Great
America near Chicago, the four-hour
express tour is $225 per person (with
a minimum of four people) while the
ultimate tour for $400 lasts all day
and gets you unlimited games, food,


and a cabana at the water park.
The biggest perk is doing it all
with no waiting, said park
spokesman Brandon Bruce. "You
can definitely cover a lot of ground,"
he said.
Tracy Bates, a roller coaster fan
from Ridgeville, S.C., said he has
shelled out for the VIP tours when
he's making a one-time visit to a
theme park or when crowds are
heavy His wife, Charlene, doesn't do
roller coasters, so skipping the lines
is a big bonus.
"I hate to leave her sitting while
I'm waiting in line for an hour," he
said.
The other benefit is that their per-
sonal guide is always willing to take
photos, he said. "You don't end up
with a bunch of pictures of just one
of you," he said.
While nearly all of theme park
VIP tours allow guests to skip the
lines entirely, the ones at Disney
don't they still must use the Fast-
pass lines that are available to
everyone.
What they do get is a personal
concierge who can monitor wait
times across the parks, make dining
reservations, arrange for the best
seats at shows and make sure every-
one in the group can get autographs
and photos of Cinderella, Mickey
Mouse, Mary Poppins and all their
other favorites.
Guides tailor the tours to what-
ever the guests want to see, whether
it's the princesses or the big ticket
rides.


Patton tapping into

the virtual world

MARTY FINLEY
Associated Press

FORT KNOX, Ky. In a few quick steps, the
Booz Allen Hamilton associate has tapped into a
mobile application designed specifically for the
General George Patton Museum of Leadership. He
then scans an icon featuring Patton's image, affixed
to the case, with the phone's camera.
Within seconds, a three-dimensional image of a
pistol appears on the phone's screen. Pressing
against the digital image with his finger, Miller
moves the pistol around in different directions to
illustrate the benefits of augmented reality and
how this technology has gradually permeated the
Patton Museum.
Alongside its mission to tell stories of leadership
through historical artifacts, the Patton Museum
has deliberately built a sleeker and more modern
facility in the ashes of the U.S. Army Armor
School's departure by taking advantage of the lat-
est in Smartphone and wireless technology.
Through the usage of 3D imagery, video footage
and interactive gaming systems, the museum
hopes to immerse visitors into the history they are
surrounded by no longer relying solely on static
displays to direct the narrative.
Like the digital pistol on the screen, the mu-
seum, which reopens Friday after extensive reno-
vations, believes engaging its viewers in a
multi-sensory, audiovisual bonanza offers the most
payback. The term augmented reality was coined
to describe the augmentation of a real world envi-
ronment with computer-generated input such as
sound, video, graphics or GPS data.
Christopher Kolakowski, the museum's director,
said augmented reality is a new tool for the Army
and has been ambitiously welcomed on post.
"No other museum in DoD (Department of De-
fense) is to the level of the Patton Museum," he
said. When asked if the technology was part of a
growing trend, he said "we are ahead of the trend."
The app can be downloaded by visitors when
they visit the museum, which has no admission fee,
and features hours of operation and a direct link to
contact museum staff.
Most notably, however, it provides the channel in
which those who explore the museum's contents
can tap into the digital extras contained therein.
Instead of simply strolling by an immobile dis-
play of a vehicle or artifacts used by Patton during
a battle, Miller said, visitors can use their phones
to link directly to video taken of the surly general.
Miller said videos of Patton can be unlocked at
several exhibits and was mined from hours of
footage collected by the museum. The videos have
been pared into smaller bites to make it more di-
gestible for visitors, Miller said.
"We don't know how long people will stay at an
exhibit," he said.


Associated Press
The home screen of the General George Patton
Museum of Leadership app is displayed on a phone
at the museum in Fort Knox, Ky. Visitors will be
able to download to their smart devices and use
them to access augmented reality content
throughout the museum.


I


SCALLOPING TOURS
Collecting scallops is like hunting
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JULY 1 THRU SEPTEMBER 25- Reservalions Requiied
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in Barbados in Ft. Lauderdale in Toronto in St. Martin

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] I 14fl .U*J *W. 1111 S I *t. U L..t.19 'Er. *I LJ I IS. 1T


Iw wt rini t yvip t rav -el.C M- -, S3847


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 A13


EXCURSIONS


I~ I C. mi m r ra it2 r~l" iT


I


I




CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Riders
meet the first Thursday of the
month. On the second Thurs-
day, Ladies Auxiliary meets at
4:30 p.m. and AMVET mem-
bers meet at 5:30 p.m. Joe
Hozian is commander.
For more information about
kitchen and canteen hours,
call 352-447-4473. For infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@
comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information re-
garding American Legion Post
155, or any of its programs
and functions, call 352-795-
6526, email blantonthompson
Postl55@gmail.com, or visit
www.flPostl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post. El-
igibility in the Auxiliary is open
to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
The Auxiliary will serve a
fried chicken dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, June 21, at
the post. Everyone is wel-
come. Donation is $7.
All profits support the many
programs of the American
Legion Auxiliary.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers


activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
The post meeting is
changed to the second Mon-
day starting in July (at 7 p.m.
Monday, July 8).
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Chicken parmesan dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday,
June 21. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 meets at
2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Visit the website at
http://davfl70.yktc.us.


Dressing for duty


Special to the Chronicle
Albert, 6, and Eli, 4, Kersey get their uniforms ready for the recent Memorial
Day Ceremony at Bushnell National Cemtery. The boys are the sons of Albert and
Haylei Kersey of Brooksville, and grandsons of Vanita Auville of Citrus County.


Golfers sought for June 29 tourney


Special to the Chronicle

Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter
7 will host its seventh annual
Independence Day Golf Tournament
on Saturday, June 29, at Citrus
Springs Golf and Country Club.
The fundraiser benefits local
veterans and helps to publicize
POW/MIA issues.
The four-person, best-ball
scramble begins with a shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.


Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-


I-I6






ISCOVER PHOTO ONTESTD1

We are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among
those chosen to be displayed in the
2013-2014 Discover Magazine. Please
submit only photos taken in Citrus
County and include a brief description
of the photo along with your name,
address and phone number. Photos
must be submitted by July 31, 2013.


I a ,, 'g .a,(ne t


*' *
or emai]Lz l [Ito: "


I III I I I I I I
ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


Entry is $60 per person, which
includes green fees, cart, coffee and
doughnuts, a door prize ticket, a
goody bag and a free putt in the
putting contest. An old-fashioned
Fourth of July picnic will follow at
the country club.
For more information about
participation and sponsorships, call
Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 or
Citrus Springs Golf & Country Club
at 352-489-5045, or visit
wwwrollingthunder7. com.


portation; 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-


erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership


has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information, call Brice
at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org. Men's Aux-
iliary meets 7 p.m. first
Wednesday at the post. Call
Neil Huyler at 352-344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post meets the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. The auxiliary meets at
1 p.m. the first Wednesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast has
been suspended until
September.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
membership.

See VETERANS/Page A15


HONOR--FLIGHT .
O N, l%, b i I M 1% '1 I 0l, L


HONOR FLIGHT, THE MOVIE
A free showing with limited seating available
sponsored by HPH Hospice and
Honor Flight of West Central Florida


Thursday, June 20


1 p.m. to 3 p.m.


The Realtor's Association of Citrus County
714 Scarboro Ave., Lecanto, FL

This compelling documentary chronicles four World War II
veterans who travel to Washington, D.C. to see the memorial
that was constructed for them almost 60 years after their
epic battle. No reservations necessary. Questions?
Call HPH Hospice at 527-4600.
HPH Hospice is proud to sponsor a veteran for
The Honor Flight and is a We Honor Veterans partner.



V/

WE HONOR VETERANS



HU.hospice
aS.9n.i~ rI Hrr HONOR FFUG HT
noopo i onnztninillyh--nsdi.1984 Sk I il11 1 MI Jt I IdIIHi


www.HPH-Hospice.org


A14 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A14

Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando; 352-
726-3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and
Saturday, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call
352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-476-
7001 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. Afish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-


urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting
follows at 7 p.m.
All veterans in the
Homosassa/Homosassa
Springs area are invited to be


Honoring

veterans

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 15-01 members
Jodi Love and Don Jones carry
the flags while bugler Jimmy
Brown plays during a recent
ceremony to honor veterans at
the U.S. Coast Guard Douglas
Munro monument in Little
Spring Memorial Park, Crystal
River. Douglas Munro is the
only U.S. Coast Guardsman to
be awarded the Congressional
Medal of Honor. About 60
people representing flotillas
and other organizations, as
well as members of the
community, attended the
ceremony.

Special to the Chronicle


Bowling awards presented


Recently, the Early Birds bowling banquet was held at Joe's Family Restaurant and the league team
sponsored by the Fleet Reserve Association Branch 186 was awarded three honors: first place in the league,
series and game. From left are: Jennifer Jones, member; Marianne Suozzi, individual handicap series winner;
Bob Huscher, Branch 186 sponsor; Aldean Jones, team captain; and Martha Shearer, individual handicap


meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 352-860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.

SERVICES & GROUPS
VFW Riders Group


meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year.
For information, call direc-
tor Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. the second Saturday
each month at the Disabled
American Veteran's Building,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness. The building is on the
corner of State Road 41 and
Paul Drive.
We are an advocacy group
for current and future veter-
ans, as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 is en-
couraging new members to
join to promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help.
More than 88,000 combat
veterans are still unaccounted
for from all wars. We fight for
them and their families.
More information is avail-
able at www.rollingthunder
fl7.com. Full membership is
open to all individuals 18
years or older who wish to
dedicate time to the cause.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event.
If you would like for us to
provide a speaker, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-


game winner.

a part of American Legion
Post 166. This is open to all
veterans who love to ride and
would be interested in forming
an American Legion Riders
chapter.
Riders members are mili-
tary men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
Commander, Robert Scott, at
352-860-2090. Your call will
be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veter-
ans, lineal descendants, next
of kin, spouses and siblings of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited. To learn more about
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at
352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819


day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-


VETERANS


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.
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6-16 'f'P 2013 UFS, Dist. by Unwersal Uclick for UFS


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 A15

tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-
400-8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honor-
ably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and
widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome.
The CCVC is a nonprofit
corporation; donations are tax
deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537, or at the
meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876,
or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org.
The local Service Source
office is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans'
Memorial. Call Shona Cook
at 352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war.
It also provides caregiver
education and a recognition
program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and pro-
grams do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes to
combat veterans at several lo-
cations and times.
For more information, call
her at 352-382-7397.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Killing me



with kisses


In some countries,
greeting friends with
a kiss is the common
custom. France, Italy,
Greece and Hollywood
come to mind. Not full-on,
passionate kissing, but a
quick buss on the cheek.
First on one side, then the
other. Men, women, it
doesn't matter. In some
countries you have to do
each cheek twice or you'll
deeply insult someone,
and before you know it
there's a whole Hatfield-
and-McCoy thing happen-
ing because you ignored a
thousand-year-old
custom.
The French
sign letters be-
tween friends
and family
members, male
or female, with 7
"Big kisses."
They probably
think we sign
our letters with
"Firm hand-
shakes." I grew JI
up when we MUL
were a hand-
shake nation.
Of course, there was al-
ways one aunt who
wanted to kiss me when I
was small. She was from
the "the old country," my
mother would tell me. For
years, I thought that was
the name of the place she
was from, The Old Coun-
try It was somewhere
over the ocean, but I
could never find the place
on a map.
My mother was not a
big kisser; my father was
not a big hugger They
were not cold, unemo-
tional people, it simply
wasn't the custom in our
world at that time. It
would have been way be-
yond my comfort zone if
they had suddenly gone
all touchy-feely on me.
Dad's greeting to almost
all adults who visited our
house was to offer them a
beer. If he really liked
you, he would pop the top
before handing it to you.
Of course, everybody's
family has their own cul-
ture and traditions, and
my family story may seem
stiff compared to yours.
But things have changed.
Through the years we,
too, have become a nation
of kissers and embracers.
Celebrities and socialites


I
11%


are famous for air kisses
- they never actually get
close enough to muss up
each other's hair and
makeup, or to see the
scars from the most re-
cent facelift.
Like soccer, kissing has
snuck up on us. Now even
"regular" people do it.
You go to a dinner party
and by the time you leave,
you're supposed to give
people you just met that
night a peck on the cheek.
Well, worse things could
happen, and often do.
Some people won't set-
tle for a kiss on the cheek
and want one full on the
lips. In a time of
resurging drug-
resistant TB,
the deadly
MERS virus, the
H5N1-type flu
and just plain
icky-ness, what
do you do? Re-
coil in horror?
Scream, "What
M are you trying to
LEN do, kill me?" I
don't want to in-
sult anyone, but
I don't want to catch the
disease of the week, ei-
ther. If you watch the
news, we should all be
walking around in hospi-
tal masks and bathing in
Purell, not kissing each
other. But maybe this per-
son is from The Old Coun-
try, where they do things
differently So I usually
say, "I think I'm getting a
cold." If that doesn't work,
I lean in and say, "I think
my herpes has cleared up.
How's it look to you?"
Like everyone else on
the planet, I've learned
the art of social kissing.
I'm just careful about it.
Or so I thought. I picked
up my cat the other day
and rubbed his face with
mine, and after a few sec-
onds he stuck out his
tongue and kissed me.
"Did you see that?" I
asked Sue. "Wasn't that
cute?"
"Yeah. Very cute," she
said. "You wanna know
what he was licking right
before he kissed you?"
Turns out it's true: A cat
will land on his feet when
you drop him from lip
high.

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks.com.


Companions sought


Special to the Chronicle

The Nature Coast
Volunteer Center is cur-
rently seeking people for
its Senior Companion
Program.
To become a Senior
Companion you must be
55 years of age or older,
not employed, have your
own vehicle, a valid dri-
ver's license and insur-
ance. The positions are
open to income-eligible
people and opportunities
are available in
Inverness, Floral City,
Hernando, Beverly Hills
and Citrus Springs.




Spanish American
Club to gather
The next meeting of the
Spanish American Club will
be at 7 p.m. Thursday, June
20, at the Knights of Colum-
bus Hall, 2389 Norvell Bryant
Highway.
Guest speaker will be
Dr. Ravi Sharma.
For more information, call
SAC President Maria Coim-
bre at 352 341-0979. All are
welcome.
Senior Friends
plan potluck
Senior Friends for Life will
meet at 11:30 a.m. Wednes-
day, June 19, for a potluck at
6435 W Pine Ridge Blvd.
Bring a covered summer
dish to share.
Reservations must be
made by calling Myrna
Hocking at 352-860-0819,
Astrid Grant at 352-341-0346,
or Claire Quigley at
352-563-1998.


Training is provided,
with a commitment to
work a minimum of 20
hours per week, and in
exchange receive a
stipend, mileage al-
lowance, paid vacation
and sick time while help-
ing housebound seniors to
stay independent in their
homes. Training is given.
Senior Companions typ-
ically visit their clients
once a week and assist
with a variety of tasks, in-
cluding doctors' visits,
grocery shopping and
companionship.
For more information,
call Sue at 352-527-5959.

News NOTES


In honor of Independence
Day, the Citrus Shrine Club
will host an outdoor picnic on
Thursday, July 4, at the club-
house, 468 N. Woodlake
Ave., Inverness.
The menu will include ham-
burgers, hot dogs, baked
beans and coleslaw. Tea will
be served outside and other
beverages will be available in
the clubhouse. Donations are
appreciated, but there is no
charge for the meal.
Appetizers and desserts
are welcome.
The celebration begins at
1 p.m. At 2 p.m., the color
guard from Boy Scout Troop
452, Beverly Hills, will present
the colors. Food will be
served after the presentation.
All Masons, Shriners and their
families and friends are
welcome.
For more information, call
352-419-7088.


John and Susan
Colasanti of Lecanto an-
nounce the engagement
of their daughter,
Kylene Laura Colasanti,
to Curtis David Laytart,
son of Beth Klein of
Homosassa and David
Laytart of Leesburg.
Both are 2002 gradu-
ates of Lecanto High
School. Kylene gradu-
ated from the University
of Central Florida in
2007 with a degree in el-
ementary education.
She has been teaching
third grade in Orange
County for the past six
years.
Curtis is a chef and
has managed several
different restaurants in
the Orlando area. He is
currently an executive
chef at Red Eye Bar and
Grill in Ocoee.
The couple will


6/3/13 6/9/13
Divorces
Andrew W. Benefield II,
Inverness vs. Melissa L.
Benefield, Inverness
Mary Caputo, Inglis
vs. Michael Caputo,
Homosassa
Elizabeth M. Creveling,
Hernando vs. Richard W.
Creveling, Hernando
Samantha Graves,
Homosassa vs. Travis
Graves, Crystal River
Stephen K. Hall, Citrus
Springs vs. Joy L. Hall,
Citrus Springs
Debra Hartje, Floral City
vs. Andrew Hartje,
Columbia, Mo.
Kenneth R. Hillerud,
Hernando vs. Patricia A.
Hillerud, Crystal River
Dennis Wayne Lindgren,
Inverness vs. Ritta


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbe-
cued chicken with whole-
grain wheat bun, Lyonnaise
potatoes, California-blend
vegetables, sugar cookie,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Macaroni and
cheese with turkey ham,
green peas, parslied car-
rots, peaches, slice rye
bread, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Lemon pep-
per baked chicken breast,
potatoes au gratin, mixed
vegetables, apple juice, gra-


A free Summer Solstice
Ceremony in the spirit of Na-
tive American traditions will
take place at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, June 22.
A ceremonial entry into the
Wilderness Circle will occur
and prayers will be offered. A
fire will be built in the center.
A potluck dinner follows.
Bring a dish to share and your
drinks. Afternoon music will
follow.
Call Betty Berger at
352-447-2736 or email
bberger@bellsouth.net for
more information.
Model A club
to meet July 2
The Citrus A's Model A
meeting will be at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 2, at the Floral
City Lion's Club.
All interested persons are
welcome. Call Patti Tompkins
at 352-688-3931.


exchange wedding vows
in November 2013 at
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church, Lecanto. A
reception will follow at
Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club,
Hernando, celebrating
with family and friends.
The couple will reside
in Orange County.


New ARRIVAL

Alexa Giuliani Williams


~Ih'


Robert A. Williams
and Kenya Jen-Rios of
Big Spring, Texas, have
announced the birth of
their daughter, Alexa
Giuliani Williams, at
10:31 a.m. April 24, 2013.
Paternal grandparents


-'S. -


are Kim Vice and Rusty
Vice of Lecanto, and
Robert S. Williams of
Crystal River.
Maternal grand-
parents are Arno Weiss
and Teresita Weiss of
Citrus Springs.


Lindgren, Inverness
Justin Ralph Nash,
Inverness vs. Joanne
Ruth Nash, Homosassa

Marriages
Cristian Ismary Bonilla
Reyes, Hernando/Raven
Louise Broniecki, Hernando
Galen Robert Clymer,
Crystal River/Carol Jean
Banker, Tampa
Alfred Gilbert Johnson III,
Homosassa/Wilma Lynne
Frederick-O'Neill,
Crystal River
Robert J. Pelinsky,
Homosassa/Dorothea
Adelle Bull, Homosassa
Jacob Alan Reed, Crystal
River/Krystle Patti Shetler,
Crystal River
Danny Wayne Wills,
Hernando/Angel Marie
White, Hernando


ham crackers, slice rye
bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Pork riblet
with barbecue sauce and
hamburger bun, baked
beans, yellow corn, mixed
fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chef's salad with
ham, cheese, tomato and
whole boiled egg, French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
mixed fruit, slice whole-grain
bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and
South Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at
352-527-5975.


68th ANNIVERSARY

The Rollos


Charles and Shirley
Rollo of Citrus Springs
celebrated their 68th an-
niversary on May 31,
2013. The couple were
wed on May 31, 1945, in
Lynn, Mass., and have
lived in Citrus County
for 29 years.


They have three chil-
dren: Judith Aiken of
Citrus Springs; Linda
McConnell of Stanton,
Mich.; and Vicki Clifton
of Dunnellon.
They have nine grand-
children and 26 great-
grandchildren.


60th ANNIVERSARY

TheAkins


Ed and Jean Akin of
Crystal River will cele-
brate their 60th wedding
anniversary on June 20,
2013.
The couple were mar-
ried June 20, 1953, in Wi-
chita Falls, Texas. Both
retired, they are origi-
nally of Concord, Mich.,
and have lived in Citrus


County for seven years.
They have two daugh-
ters: Debbie Monda of
Seattle, Wash., and
Diane Patterson of Crys-
tal River. They have five
grandchildren and three
great-grandchidren.
The Akins plan to cel-
ebrate with a reception
given by their daughters.


50th ANNIVERSARY


The Windles


Richard and Mary
Ann Windle were mar-
ried June 15, 1963, at
First Baptist Church in
Lock Haven, Pa., by the
groom's father, the Rev
George Windle, and the
Rev Roy Hunter.
Mary Ann is the
daughter of Robert and
Margaret Smart
Nonemaker Richard's
parents were the Rev.
George and Edna Davis
Windle. All parents are
now deceased.
The couple have a
daughter, Beth (Dave)
Cromwell, and two
grandsons, Montana and
Shann Cromwell. All live
in Federal Way, Wash.
The Windles came to


Citrus County in 2004
from McMinnville, Ore.
They are active in the
Hernando Nazarene
Church and the
Republican Party of
Citrus County.
Mary Ann is a regis-
tered nurse, having
graduated from
Germantown Medical
Center School of
Nursing in 1961.
Richard attended
Penn State University
and worked for Allied
Chemical Co. in the
IWDS Laboratory
His career in the med-
ical laboratory and den-
tal (Adec) equipment
companies took them to
various areas of the U.S.


NEWS FOR TOGETHER
* To submit your engagement, wedding,
anniversary, birth and other Together news,
go to www.chronicleonline.com.


Dreaming of a New Job but

S Don't Want the World to Know?



Lucky for me,
Awww.jobs.chronicleonline.com
lets me explore jobs anonymously
so I can get matched to my dream job
without anyone finding out.





Try Real-Time Job Matching and get hired
fast on www.jobs.chronicleonline.com CIII,
AL Is.


Engagement

Colasanti/Laytart


For the RECORD


June 17 to 21 MENUS:


Shrine Club to host Solstice ceremony
al fresco picnic set for June 22


-glammommob.- I


A16 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


TOGETHER


17.


I&F


* ,










SPORTS


Tampa Bay pitcher Alex
Cobb took a line drive off
the head Saturday against
the Kansas City Royals./B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
SGolf/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 College baseball/B5
,I;: Auto racing/B6


Pars hard to come by at U.S. Open


Associated Press
Phil Mickelson, right, reacts after putting on the 12th green with
Luke Donald during the third round of the U.S. Open golf tournament
Saturday at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa.


Mickelson only

golfer under par,

leads major

Associated Press

ARDMORE, Pa. Phil Mick-
elson began his week with a
flight back-and-forth across the
country Even longer might be
the 18 holes that now stand be-
tween him and that U.S. Open
title he has been chasing his en-
tire career
And he's never had a better
opportunity than this one.
Despite a bogey on the final
hole of a taxing Saturday after-


noon, Mickelson was the sole
survivor to par at Merion with an
even-par 70 that gave him a one-
shot lead over Hunter Mahan,
Charl Schwartzel
and Steve Stricker More U.
going into the last
round. 0 Tiger Woo
It's the first his worst
time Mickelson professor
has held the out- U.S. Open
right lead through Saturday.
54 holes in the
U.S. Open, and
the timing could
be right.
Mickelson celebrates his 43rd
birthday Sunday on Father's
Day, no less. He left Merion on
Monday and didn't return until
three hours before his tee time
on Thursday so he could attend


.S
od
ro
na
n c


the eighth-grade graduation of
his oldest daughter
"It's got the makings to be
something special," Mickelson
said. "But I still
S. Open have to go out and
perform, and play
Is played some of my best
found as a golf."
al at the Mickelson, who
on already has a
record five silver
Page B4 medals for being
runner-up at this
demanding major,
was at 1-under 209.
And the fun is just getting
started.
"It's a hard challenge, but it's
a lot of fun," Mickelson said.

See Page B6


Extra time aain
AnnuGolf Tournadementence
Goff Tournament


Associated Press
The Boston Bruins celebrate a second-period goal against Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford (50) as Chicago Blackhawks
defenseman Michal Rozsival (32) watches during Game 2 of the Stanley Cup finals Saturday in Chicago.

Boston takes Game 2 by score of2-1 in overtime to even series with Chicago


Associated Press
CHICAGO Daniel Paille
scored in overtime and the
Boston Bruins beat the Chicago
Blackhawks 2-1 Saturday to tie
the Stanley Cup finals at one
game apiece.
The Blackhawks failed to
clear the puck along the boards.
Tyler Seguin picked it up and
delivered a cross-ice pass to
Paille, who beat Corey Crawford
on his glove side for the winner
at 13:48 of the extra period.
Game 3 is Monday at Boston.
It's the second consecutive
year that the first two games of
the finals have gone to over-
time, this one coming after the
Blackhawks won a triple-OT
thriller 4-3 in Game 1.
Crawford and Boston's
Tuukka Rask were outstanding
in goal again after coming up
big in the opener, turning away


shot after shot in the extra pe-
riod until Paille scored.
Jaromir Jagr just missed
scoring the game-winner in the
opening minutes of OT when
his shot from the right circle hit
the right post, his second near
miss in as many games. Chris
Kelly, who scored in the second
period for Boston, had a shot
from the slot stopped by Craw-
ford at 5:39 of overtime.
Rask also stood his ground
down the stretch, just as he did in
the opening period, when
Chicago simply fired away at him.
It's the second consecutive
year that the first two games of
the finals have gone to overtime.
The Blackhawks swarmed
the Bruins in the early going
after escaping with a 4-3 triple-
overtime victory in the series
opener, taking the lead in the
first on Patrick Sharp's ninth
goal of the postseason.


They continued to dictate the
tempo until Kelly tied it with
just over five minutes remain-
ing in the second.
Boston's Daniel Paille skated
out from behind the net, beating
Nick Leddy with a neat move
for a wraparound shot. Corey
Crawford made the save, but
Kelly crashed the net and
knocked in the rebound to tie it
at 1-all.
The Bruins nearly grabbed
the lead with just over a minute
remaining, after Paille picked
off Duncan Keith's pass and
flipped the puck to a breaking
Brad Marchand. He got pulled
down by Brent Seabrook as his
shot hit the inside of the right
post, preserving the tie.
Either way, the Bruins had to
like the way the period ended
after being dominated most of
the way


They ended up outshooting
Chicago 8-4 in the second after
getting outgunned 19-4 in that
area in the first, with the Black-
hawks holding a 28-19 edge
through regulation.
Rask had 27 saves while
Crawford had 18. The goalies
weren't doing it by themselves,
with Boston players blocking 17
shots and Chicago blocking
seven.
The Bruins nearly took the
lead early in the third when
Jaromir Jagr made a cross-ice
pass to Marchand for a one-
timer. Crawford came across
the crease to block it with his
body Boston also had some
chances in the closing minutes,
with a shot by Jagr getting de-
flected over the net by Duncan
Keith and Johnny Boychuk's at-
tempt from the blue line getting
stopped by Crawford.


Rolling Thunder is hosting its
7th annual Independence Golf
Tournament on Saturday, June
29, at Citrus Springs Golf &
Country Club.
It is a fundraiser to benefit
local veterans and publicize
POW/MIA issues.
The tournament begins with
a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m.
and costs $60 per person. The
fee includes green fees, cart,
coffe and donuts, beer, a door
prize ticket, a goody bag and a
free putt in the putting contest.
For more information, contact
Ray Thompson at 813-230-
9750, Citrus Springs Golf &
Country Club at 352-489-5045
or visit the website at
www.rollingthunder7.com.
Green Bay unveils
Donald Driver Way
GREEN BAY, Wis. -An-
other street in Green Bay is
now renamed after a Packers
player or coach.
City officials unveiled the
sign Saturday changing Pearl
Street to Donald Driver Way,
for the recently retired wide re-
ceiver who spent 14 seasons
with the Packers.
Also unveiled Saturday was
a 28-year-old statue in front of
Titletown Brewery that has
been painted to look like Driver
by the so-called Packers
"Fence Painter" Chris Handler.
Driver retired this winter after
catching 743 passes for 10,137
yards after making the team as
a seventh-round draft pick out
of Alcorn State in 1999.
Hunter-Reay wins
at Milwaukee again
WEST ALLIS, Wis. Ryan
Hunter-Reay continued Andretti
Autosport's domination at the
Milwaukee Mile, winning the In-
dyCar event Saturday for the
second year in a row.
Hunter-Reay became the
first driver to win back-to-back
races at the Mile since Tony
Kanaan in 2006 and 2007
when he was driving for you
guessed it, Andretti.
Andretti drivers have won
five of the last nine races at the
mile oval.
It's the second win of the
season for the defending
IndyCar Series champion.
From staff, wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


52 5/2
71/2 7/2
13% 13/2
19% 19%2


NL

Cubs 5, Mets 2
Chicago NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Barney 2b 6 1 2 0 Vldspn2b 4 0 1 1
Ransm3b 4 02 1 DnMrplb 4 1 1 0
SCastross 6 0 1 2 DWrght3b 3 0 1 1
ASorin If 5 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 0 1 0
Rizzolb 2 1 0 0 Dudalf 4 0 00
Hairstn rf 4 1 1 0 JuTrnr ss 4 0 0 0
Villanv p 0 0 0 0 Reckerc 3 0 0 0
Gregg p 0 00 0 Buck ph 1 0 0 0
Castilloc 4 1 2 0 Lagarscf 4 1 1 0
Sweeny cf 4 0 2 0 Niesep 2 0 0 0
Feldmnp 3 0 1 2 Hwknsp 0 00 0
Schrhlt rf 0 1 0 0 Rice p 0 00
Lyon p 0 0 0 0
Niwnhs ph 1 0 1 0
Burke p 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 5115 Totals 34 2 6 2
Chicago 000 200 030 5
NewYork 000 100 010 2
E-Ransom (7), Hawkins (1), Valdespin (2).
LOB-Chicago 16, New York 6. 2B-S.Castro
(16), Sweeney 2 (6), Dan.Murphy (20), D.Wright
(10). SB-S.Castro (6), Dan.Murphy (3). S-
Sweeney.


Chicago
Feldman W,6-5
Villanueva
Gregg S,9-9
NewYork
Niese L,3-6
Hawkins
Rice
Lyon
Burke


IP H R ER BB SO

7 2 1 1 1 6
1 3 1 1 0 2
1 1 0 0 0 0


Braves 6, Giants 5
San Francisco Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AnTrrs If 5 2 2 1 Smmns ss 5 1 0 0
Abreu 2b 5 23 1 Heywrd rf 4 02 0
Poseylb 3 0 1 1 J.Uptonlf 4 0 1 1
Romop 0 00 0 FFrmnl 1b 5 01 1
Pence rf 4 0 1 2 McCnnc 4 1 2 0
Arias 3b 4 0 1 0 BUptoncf 4 3 2 3
J.Perezcf 4 0 1 0 Uggla2b 3 00 0
Affeldtp 0 00 0 CJhnsn3b 3 02 1
Beltlb 0 0 0 0 R.Penaph 1 0 0 0
BCrwfrss 4 1 1 0 Minor p 2 0 0 0
Quirozc 4 0 0 0 JSchafrph 1 0 1 0
Gaudinp 2 00 0 Varvarp 0 00 0
Machip 0 00 0 Avilanp 0 00 0
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
GBlanc cf 1 0 1 0 Gattis ph 0 0 0 0
RJhnsnpr 0 1 0 0
Totals 36 5115 Totals 36611 6
San Francisco 003 020 000 5
Atlanta 010 102 002 6
One out when winning run scored.
E-Arias (2), Simmons 2 (6). DP-San Fran-
cisco 1. LOB-San Francisco 8, Atlanta 9.2B-
An.Torres (12), Abreu 2 (4), Posey (20),
McCann (2). HR-B.Upton 2 (8). SB-B.Upton
(5). CS-G.Blanco (3). S-Gaudin. SF-Pence.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Gaudin 5 8 4 4 1 0
MachiH,4 12/31 0 0 1 1
J.Lopez H,3 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
AffeldtH,10 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
RomoL,3-3 1/3 2 2 1 2 1
Atlanta
Minor 6 7 5 4 1 7
Varvaro 1 1 0 0 0 0
Avilan 1 1 0 0 0 2
KimbrelW,2-1 1 2 0 0 1 1
Gaudin pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
WP-Gaudin 2, Minor.
Brewers 6, Reds 0


Milwaukee Cincinnati
ab r h bi
Aoki rf 4 0 1 0 Choo cf
Segura ss 4 00 0 Cozart ss
CGomzcf 4 00 0 Votto 1 b
ArRmr 3b 3 1 0 0 Phillips 2b
D.Handp 0 0 0 Bruce rf
Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b
Lucroy c 3 2 2 0 Paul If
LSchfr If 4 2 3 2 Hanign c
JFrncs lb 2 1 1 3 HBaily p
Gennett2b 4 0 0 0 Lutz ph
Gallard p 2 0 1 0 Hoover p
Gindlph 1 0 0 0 MParrp
Grzlny p 0 0 0 0
Rianchi i3b l A 0


Totals 32 68 5
Milwaukee 020
Cincinnati 000
DP-Milwaukee 1, C
kee 3, Cincinnati 7.2
(7), Bruce (22). HF
L.Schafer (1). SF-J.

Milwaukee
Gallardo W,6-6
Gorzelanny
D.Hand
Henderson
Cincinnati
H.Bailey L,4-5
Hoover
M.Parra
Gorzelanny pitched to
WP-H.Bailey 2.
Rockies 1
Philadelphia
ab r h b
Reverecf 5 1 3
Diekmnp 0 0 0
MYong 3b 5 02
Rollinsss 3 0 0 0
Savery p 0 0 0
DeFrts p 0 00 0
L.Nixph-rf 1 1 1 (
DYong ph 1 0 0
Howard lb 4 1 2
DBrwn If 3 0 0
Mayrry rf-cf 3 1 1
Galvis 2b-ss3 0 0 0
Quinterc 4 1 2 0
Pettionp 1 000
Mrtnzph 1 000
Horst p 0 0 0 0
Frndsn 2b 0 0000
Totals 34 5115
Philadelphia 110
Colorado 601
E-Quintero (3), Sa
DP-Philadelphia 1,
phia 8, Colorado 12.
(18), C.Gonzalez 2 (1
W.Rosario (1). HR-
SB-Revere (16), D.
S-Chatwood.

Philadelphia
Pettibone L,3-3
Horst
Savery
De Fratus
Diekman
Colorado
Chatwood W,4-1
Ottavino
Volstad
Outman
HBP-by Volstad (Fra


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3000
4000
3 02 0
4000

3020
2 00 0

0 00 0
0000


Str Home Away
W-1 21-14 21-14
L-1 19-15 20-15
L-5 19-13 18-18
W-1 21-15 15-17
W-4 16-17 15-19



Str Home Away
W-1 22-8 18-20
W-1 18-13 16-20
L-1 16-15 17-21
L-3 13-23 11-16
L-1 12-23 8-24


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
29 .561 6-4 L-1 22-10
34 .493 4% 4% 3-7 L-1 19-13
34 .485 5 5 8-2 L-1 17-16
35 .462 6% 6% 4-6 W-1 16-16
37 .431 8% 8% 4-6 L-3 16-14


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 44 24 .647 6-4 W-1 19-12 25-12
Cincinnati 41 28 .594 3% 5-5 L-1 23-12 18-16
Pittsburgh 40 28 .588 4 5-5 L-1 24-13 16-15
Chicago 28 38 .424 15 11 5-5 W-3 15-21 13-17
Milwaukee 28 39 .418 15% 11% 6-4 W-1 16-20 12-19


W
Oakland 41
Texas 38
Seattle 31
Los Angeles 30
Houston 25


Arizona
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
29 .586 -
30 .559 2 :,
38 .449 9% 7%/2
38 .441 10 8 !
44 .362 15% 13%/2


West Division
L Pct GB WC


Str Home
L-2 21-12
L-5 19-13
W-2 18-17
W-3 17-18
W-3 12-23



Str Home
L-1 17-14
L-1 21-11
W-1 22-17
W-4 20-14
W-1 19-20


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays second baseman Ben Zobrist (18) comes in to comfort the Kansas City Royals' Eric Hos-
mer (35) as they watch medical personnel treat Rays starting pitcher Alex Cobb after Cobb was hit by a line
drive by Hosmer during the fifth inning Saturday in St. Petersburg. Cobb was taken off the field on a stretcher.



Rays get scare in victory


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Tampa
Bay right-hander Alex Cobb was
taken off the field on a stretcher
after he was hit on the right ear by
a liner off the bat of Kansas City's
Eric Hosmer in the fifth inning of
the Rays' 5-3 win over the Royals
on Saturday
The Rays announced that Cobb,
who remained conscious the
whole time, was taken to Bayfront
Medical Center in St. Petersburg
for further examination. Rays
spokesman Rick Vaughn later
said all tests were normal and that
Cobb suffered a mild concussion.
Luke Scott, Matt Joyce and
Evan Longoria homered for the
Rays, who had lost five of six. Alex
Torres (2-0) replaced Cobb and
struck out four over 12/3 scoreless
innings. Fernando Rodney
pitched the ninth for his 14th save
in 19 opportunities.
Joyce hit a solo homer off Je-
remy Guthrie (7-4) in the fifth that
put the Rays up 4-2.
Red Sox 5 Orioles 4
BALTIMORE Mike Carp and
Jonny Gomes homered to back an ef-
fective pitching performance by John
Lackey, and the Boston Red Sox beat
the Orioles 5-4 to end a five-game los-
ing streak in Baltimore.
After dropping the first two games
of the series, the Red Sox fell into an
early 2-0 hole before bouncing back.
Carp's home run snapped an 18-
inning scoring drought in the fourth,
and Gomes made it 5-2 in the sixth
with a solo shot that chased Baltimore
starter Freddy Garcia (3-4).

Blue Jays 6, Rangers 1


Totals 320 7 0 ARLINGTON, Texas-Adam Lind
0 022 000 6 and Colby Rasmus both hit two-run
S000 000 0 homers and the Toronto Blue Jays
incinnati 1. LOB-Milwau-
B-Aoki (11), L.Schafer 2 won their fourth game in a row, beat
R-J.Francisco (6). SB- the sliding Rangers 6-1.
Francisco. Even with the unexpected early re-
IP H R ER BB SO turn of second baseman lan Kinsler

6 3 0 0 2 5 from his rehabilitation assignment, the
1 3 0 0 0 2 Rangers' season-long losing streak
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0 reached five games. All of those
losses are at home, and they've
7 8 6 6 1 4 dropped 10 of 14 overall to fall out of
1 0 0 0 2 0 first place in the AL West.
o1 batter in the 8th. Lind put the Blue Jays ahead to stay
in the first, when his seventh homer of
.0, Phillies 5 the season ricocheted high off pole
Colorado down the right field line. Rasmus hit
i ab r h bi his 12th homer, and second in two
PachRutlecb 511 0 games, in the fourth to make it 4-0.
1 CGnzlzf 4 12 1 Angels 6, Yankees 2
0 Cuddyrrf 4 2 2 1
0 WRosrc 4 3 3 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. ErickAybar
0 Colvin cf 5 2 2 2
0 Arenad3b 5 0 3 2 homered and drove in two runs, and
0 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 0 Albert Pujols added two more RBIs in
1 Chatwd p 2 0 2 1 the Los Angeles Angels' 6-2 victory
0 Ottavin p 1 0 0 0
2 Volstad p 0 0 0 0 over the Yankees that sent New York
0 Torreal ph 1 0 1 0 to its fifth straight defeat.
0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0 Tommy Hanson (4-2) recorded a
season-high eight strikeouts while
pitching five-hit ball into the seventh in-
Totals 411018 9 ning for the Angels, who have won
Soo000 030 5 three straight after a four-game skid.
I 300 00x 10 Josh Hamilton had an RBI double, and

colorado 3. LOB-Philadel- Aybar hit an early homer before deliv-
2B-L.Nix (3), Howard 2 ering a tiebreaking RBI single in the
16), WRosario 2 (8). 3B- sixth.
-Mayberry (5), Colvin (3).
Brown (8), LeMahieu (8). Twins 6, Tigers 3

IP H R ER BB SO MINNEAPOLIS Trevor Plouffe
3 1076 1 1 had three hits, including a two-run
1 4 3 3 2 2 homer, in his return to the Twins
2 1 0 0 1 1 lineup, and Sam Deduno held Detroit
1 1 0 0 0 0 in check over seven innings in Min-
1 2 0 0 0 1
nesota's 6-3 victory over the Tigers.

5 7 2 2 3 1 Plouffe, back after missing 22
2 0 0 0 2 2 games because of a concussion and
1 43 300
1 0 0 0 0 1 left calf strain, was a triple shy of the
andsen).WP-Chatwood. cycle. He drove in three runs in sup-


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Boston 5, Baltimore 4
Toronto 6, Texas 1
Tampa Bay 5, Kansas City 3
Houston 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 6, Detroit 3
L.A. Angels 6, N.Y Yankees 2
Seattle 4, Oakland 0
Washington 7, Cleveland 6
Today
Washington (Strasburg 3-5) at Cleveland (Kluber
4-4), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 6-3) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 4-2),
1:35 p.m.
Kansas City (W.Davis 3-5) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Her-
nandez 4-6), 1:40 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 2-4) at Houston
(Keuchel 3-3), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 5-4) at Minnesota (Walters 2-1), 2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Wang 0-0) at Texas (D.Holland 5-3), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 6-5) at L.A. Angels (Weaver
1-2), 3:35 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 7-1) at Oakland (Colon 8-2), 4:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, N.Y Mets 2
L.A. Dodgers 5, Pittsburgh 3, 11 innings
Atlanta 6, San Francisco 5
Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 0
Colorado 10, Philadelphia 5
St. Louis 13, Miami 7
Washington 7, Cleveland 6
Arizona at San Diego, late
Today
Washington (Strasburg 3-5) at Cleveland (Kluber 4-
4), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 1-1) at N.Y Mets (Hefner 1-6),
1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (W.Peralta 4-7) at Cincinnati (Cueto 3-0),
1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lyons 2-2) at Miami (Nolasco 3-7), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 3-1) at Pittsburgh (Cole 1-0),
1:35 p.m.
Arizona (Kennedy 3-4) at San Diego (Richard 1-5),
4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 2-9) at Colorado (Chacin 4-3),
4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 4-6) at Atlanta (Teheran
4-3), 8:05 p.m.

port of Deduno, who has allowed only
five earned runs in his last five starts.
Deduno (3-1) gave up two runs and
seven hits to win his third straight de-
cision since being recalled in May.
Glen Perkins added his 16th save in
18 chances.

Astros 4, White Sox 3
HOUSTON Jason Castro and
Chris Carter homered in the fourth in-
ning to give Houston the lead and the
Astros held on for their third straight
win, 4-3 over the Chicago White Sox.
The game was tied 1-1 when Cas-
tro launched a solo homer into the
bullpen in right-center to start the
fourth inning. Carter's one-out homer
clanged off the foul pole in left field to
extend the lead to 3-1 and leave
starter John Danks (1-3) shaking his
head. It was the team-leading 14th
homer for Carter, who also leads the
Astros with 36 RBIs.
Brandon Barnes drove in a run with a
double in the fifth inning to make it 4-1.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 6, Giants 5
ATLANTA- Freddie Freeman's
bases-loaded, line-drive single off
closer Sergio Romo capped a two-run
rally in the ninth that lifted the Atlanta
Braves to a 6-5 win over the San
Francisco Giants.
B.J. Upton hit two homers off Chad
Gaudin, but the Braves trailed 5-4 en-
tering the ninth.

Mets 5, Cubs 2
NEW YORK- Scott Feldman al-
lowed two hits in seven innings and
Starlin Castro hit a two-run double to left
in the Cubs' three-run eighth inning and
Chicago beat the New York Mets 5-2.
Feldman (6-5) struck out six and had
an RBI single in the fourth off Jonathon
Niese (3-6) to help himself on the way
to his first win since May 29.
Kevin Gregg got the last three outs


for his ninth straight save and Chicago
beat the Mets for the second day in a
row, after losing five of seven before
getting to Queens.

Brewers 6, Reds 0
CINCINNATI -Juan Francisco
drove in three runs with a sacrifice fly
and homer in a ballpark where he's
had some big moments, and Yovani
Gallardo pitched six innings, leading
the Milwaukee Brewers to a 6-0 vic-
tory over the Cincinnati Reds.
Logan Schafer had three hits off
Homer Bailey (4-5), his second
straight three-hit game. Schafer is fill-
ing in for Ryan Braun, on the DL with
an injured thumb.
Gallardo (6-6) gave up three hits
and a pair of walks in his second
straight impressive start.

Cardinals 13, Marlins 7
MIAMI Carlos Beltran homered
from each side of the plate and tripled
to lead a 17-hit attack, and Lance
Lynn notched his ninth victory when
the St. Louis Cardinals outslugged the
Miami Marlins 13-7.
Swinging left-handed, Beltran hit his
15th home run in the second inning
and tripled for the first time since May
2012 in the eighth. He hit another
home run from the right side in the
ninth the 11th time he has homered
from both sides in a game.

Dodgers 5, Pirates 3,
11 innings
PITTSBURGH Juan Uribe sin-
gled home Andre Ethier in the top of
the 11th inning to rally the Los Angeles
Dodgers to a 5-3 victory over the Pitts-
burgh Pirates.
Ethier doubled off Vin Mazzaro
(3-1) leading off the 11th then raced
home when Uribe's chopper went
over the head of third baseman Pedro
Alvarez. Nick Punto drove in Uribe
with a double to the gap one batter
later to provide some insurance.

Rockies 10, Phillies 5
DENVER Tyler Chatwood
pitched five effective innings in his re-
turn from a triceps injury, Tyler Colvin
homered during Colorado's six-run
first, and the Rockies snapped a
three-game losing streak with a 10-5
victory over the Philadelphia Phillies.
The Rockies also relied on solid de-
fense to end a six-game skid against
the Phillies, turning three double plays
and getting a gem from third baseman
Nolan Arenado, who snared Jonathan
Pettibone's sharply hit grounder in the
second with a diving stop and made a
one-hop throw from his backside to
get the Phillies pitcher.

INTERLEAGUE

Nationals 7, Indians 6
CLEVELAND -Anthony Rendon
hit his first major league home run fol-
lowing Nick Swisher's ninth-inning
error to propel the Washington Nation-
als to a 7-6 win over Cleveland.
Two pitches after his foul popup fell
between the Indians' first baseman
and second baseman Jason Kipnis,
Rendon homered into the Nationals'
bullpen off Vinnie Pestano (1-2) to
stun the Indians and the crowd of
33,307.
Swisher and Kipnis both drifted into
foul territory and it appeared either
could have made the catch, but nei-
ther player appeared to call for it and
the ball fell to the ground. Swisher
was charged with the error.
Drew Storen (1-1) pitched the
eighth for the win while Rafael Soriano
worked the ninth for his 18th save.


AL


Rays 5, Royals 3


Kansas City
ab
AGordn If 4
Hosmer lb 3
S.Perez c 5
BButler dh 3
L.Cain cf 4
Lough rf 4
Mostks 3b 4
EJhnsn 2b 4
AEscor ss 3

Totals 34
Kansas City
Tampa Bay


Tampa Bay
r h bi
0 1 1 Joyce rf
0 0 1 Zobrist 2b
1 2 1 Scott If
0 0 0 Fuld If
0 0 0 Longori dh
0 2 0 Loney lb
1 1 0 DJnngscf
1 1 0 KJhnsn3b
0 1 0 Loatonc
YEscor ss
38 3 Totals
020 000 010
102 011 00x


ab rh bi
3 1 1 1
4 3122 0
3 1 2 2
0 00
3 1 1 2
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
3 00 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
305 8 5
3
5


E-Hosmer (5). LOB-Kansas City 9, Tampa
Bay 6. 3B-A.Escobar (2). HR-S.Perez (3),
Joyce (14), Scott (4), Longoria (14). SF-Hos-
mer, Longoria.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
GuthrieL,7-4 7 8 5 4 3 0
Hochevar 1 0 0 0 1 0
Tampa Bay
Cobb 41/34 2 2 3 3
AI.TorresW,2-0 12/30 0 0 0 4
McGeeH,12 1 1 0 0 0 1
Jo.PeraltaH,17 1 2 1 1 0 2
RodneyS,14-19 1 1 0 0 1 1
WP-Guthrie, Cobb, Rodney.
Umpires-Home, MarkWegner; First, Laz Diaz;
Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Mike Winters.
T-2:52. A-18,593 (34,078).
Red Sox 5, Orioles 4
Boston Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ellsurycf 4 1 1 0 McLoth If 4 1 1 0
Victorn rf 3 0 1 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 1
Pedroia 2b 4 1 1 1 Markks rf 4 0 1 0
D.Ortizdh 4 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 1 2 1
Carplb 3 1 1 2 C.Davislb 4 00 0
JGomsl If 4 22 1 Wietersdh 4 1 1 2
Sltlmch c 4 0 0 0 Hardy ss 3 02 0
Drewss 4 0 1 1 ACasillpr 0 00 0
Iglesiass3b 3 0 1 0 Flahrty2b 4 0 0 0
Tegrdn c 3 0 1 0
Totals 33 59 5 Totals 34 410 4
Boston 000 311 000 5
Baltimore 200 000 002 4
E-Pedroia (1). DP-Boston 2, Baltimore 1.
LOB-Boston 4, Baltimore 4. 2B-Drew (10),
Machado (31). 3B-D.Ortiz (2). HR-Carp (8),
J.Gomes (4), Wieters (9). SB-Ellsbury (31), Vic-
torino (6), Pedroia (10). CS-Iglesias (1),
McLouth (3), Machado (3). S-Victorino.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Lackey W,4-5 7 7 2 2 1 4
UeharaH,12 1 0 0 0 0 3
A.Bailey S,8-10 1 3 2 2 0 1
Baltimore
FGarcia L,3-4 51/38 5 5 1 3
McFarland 32/31 0 0 1 5
WP-Lackey.
Blue Jays 6,
Rangers 1


Toronto

MeCarr If
DeRosa 3b
Bautist rf
RDavis pr-r
Encrnc dh
Lind lb
ClRsms cf
Mlzturs 3b
Thole c
Bonifac 2b
Kawsk ss
Totals
Toronto
Texas


Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
4 00 0 Kinsler2b 4 00 0
S1 00 0 Andrusss 5 00 0
4 1 2 0 Brkmndh 4 00 0
rf 0 0 0 0 Beltre 3b 4 0 2 0
4 0 0 0 Przynsc 4 0 1 0
4 22 2 N.Cruzrf 4 11 0
3 2 1 2DvMrplf 3 01 0
4 1 1 0 McGnslb 4 0 1 0
4 0 1 1 LMartncf 4 03 1
4 000
3 0 1 0
35 68 5 Totals 36 1 9 1
200 200 002 6
000 001 000 1


E-Beltre (6). DP Texas 1. LOB-Toronto 4,
Texas 11. 2B-L.Martin (4). HR-Lind (7),
Col.Rasmus (12). SB-L.Martin (9).
IP H RERBBSO


Toronto
Dickey W,6-8
Wagner H,2
Cecil H,4
McGowan
Texas
Lindblom L,0-2
R.Ross
Frasor
Wolf


52/37 1
1 1 0
11/30 0
1 1 0

6 5 4
12/30 0
2/3 3 2
2/3 0 0


Angels 6, Yankees 2


NewYork

Gardnr cf
J.Nix 3b
Cano 2b
Teixeir1ib
DAdms lb
Overay dh
ISuzuki rf
Neal If
Brignc ss
CStwrt c
Totals
NewYork


Los Angeles
ab r h bi
4 1 1 1 Trout lf
4 0 1 1 Hamltnrf
3 0 0 0 Pujolsdh
2 0 0 0 Trumo lb
2 0 0 0 HKndrc2b
4 0 0 0 Callasp3b
4 02 0 Aybarss
3 0 0 0 Congerc
3 0 0 Bourjoscf

32 25 2 Totals
002 000 000


ab rh bi
2 2 1 0
5 0 1 1
4022
4 1 0 0
3 0 3 1




34612 6
2


LosAngeles 011 001 21x 6
E-Hanson (1). DP-New York 2. LOB-New
York 4, Los Angeles 10.2B-I.Suzuki (6), Hamil-
ton (13). 3B-Gardner (5). HR-Aybar (2). SB-
J.Nix (10), I.Suzuki 2 (8), C.Stewart (3), Trout
(15), Bourjos (2). CS-I.Suzuki (3).
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
D.Phelps L,4-4
Kelley
Chamberlain
Los Angeles
Hanson W,4-2
S.Downs H,12
Kohn H,4
Jepsen H,5
Frieri


6 9 4 4 2 2

1 2 1 1 1 2


D.Phelps pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Twins 6, Tigers 3
Detroit Minnesota
ab rhbi ab rhbi
AJcksn cf 4 02 0 Thoms cf 5 02 0
Dirks If 4 0 0 0 Mauer dh 4 0 1 2
MiCarr3b 3 2 1 0 Doumitc 4 0 1 0
Fielder 1b 4 1 2 0 Mornea lb 4 1 2 0
VMrtnzdh 3 0 0 0 Arcial If 3 11 0
JhPerltss 3 0 1 2 Plouffe3b 3 23 3
D.Kellyrf 3 0 2 0 Parmelrf 4 12 0
TrHntrph 1 0 0 0 Dozier2b 3 1 1 1
Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 Flormn ss 3 0 1 0
Avila c 3 0 0 0
B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 38 2 Totals 33 614 6
Detroit 000 200 010 3
Minnesota 000 203 10x 6
E-Florimon (7). DP-Detroit 2, Minnesota 2.
LOB-Detroit 6, Minnesota 8. 2B-Mi.Cabrera
(16), Fielder (18), D.Kelly (3), Arcia (9), Plouffe
(10), Parmelee (7). HR-Plouffe (5). S-Flori-
mon.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Ani.Sanchez 32/35 2 2 4 3
D.Downs L,0-2 21/35 3 3 0 4
E.Reed 1 3 1 1 0 0
Putkonen 1 1 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
DedunoW,3-1 7 7 2 2 1 2
Burton 1 1 1 0 1 0
PerkinsS,16-18 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Deduno (Mi.Cabrera).WP-Deduno.

Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
June 16 vs Kansas City
June 18 at Boston
June 19 at Boston
June 20 at N.Y Yankees
June 21 at N.Y Yankees
June 22 at N.Y Yankees
June 23 at N.Y Yankees
June 24 vs Toronto


AMERICAN LEAGUE


B2 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cardinals 13, Marlins 7


St. Louis Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jay cf 5 1 1 0 Pierre If 5 1 2 0
Beltranrf 6 3 3 2 Lucas3b-1b 4 2 2 1
SRonsn rf 0 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 1 2 2
Hollidyl If 5 2 2 0 Ozunacf 5 0 0 0
KButr p 0 0 0 0 Dietrch 2b 4 1 0 0
Craig 1 b 4 2 1 1 Hchvrr ss 5 2 2 1
YMolinc 5 1 2 3 Dobbslb 3 0 1 0
Freese 3b 4 3 3 2 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0
Descals 2b 4 1 3 1 Olmos p 0 0 0 0
Kozma ss 5 0 1 1 Brantly c 3 0 2 3
Lynn p 2 0 1 2 Koehler p 2 0 0 0
Manessp 0 00 0 Webbp 0 00 0
MAdmsph 1 00 0 JBrown ph 1 00 0
Choate p 0 00 0 ARamsp 0 00 0
Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Polanc 3b 0 00 0
Wggntn ph-lfl 0 0 0
Totals 42131712 Totals 36711 7
St. Louis 511 020 031 13
Miami 420 010 000 7
DP-St. Louis 1, Miami 2. LOB-St. Louis 8, Miami 8.
2B-Descalso 2 (12), Lucas (2), Dobbs (7), Brantly
(8). 3B-Beltran (1), Pierre (2). HR-Beltran 2 (16),
Freese (4), Stanton (5). S-Lynn. SF-Brantly.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
LynnW,9-1 5 9 7 7 3 6
Maness H,4 1 1 0 0 0 0
ChoateH,8 1 0 0 0 0 2
Rosenthal 1 1 0 0 0 0
K.Butler 1 0 0 0 0 2
Miami
Koehler L,0-5 42/38 9 9 2 3
Webb 1/3 2 0 0 0 0
A.Ramos 2 5 3 3 1 2
Da.Jennings 1 1 0 0 1 0
Olmos 1 1 1 1 0 2
A.Ramos pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Lynn (Dobbs), by Rosenthal (Polanco), by
Koehler (Craig). WP-Da.Jennings.

Dodgers 5, Pirates 3,

11 innings


Los Angeles Pittsburgh
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Schmkr If 6 0 1 1 Presley If 6 1 1 0
Puig rf 5 0 1 0 Mercer ss 4 1 2 0
AdGnzI lb 5 1 1 0 McCtchcf 4 0 1 0
HRmrzss 5 1 1 0 GSnchzlb 4 0 1 0
Ethier cf 5 1 3 1 RMartn c 4 0 0 1
M.Ellis2b 3 0 0 1 Walker2b 5 02 1
Uribe3b 4 1 1 1 PAIvrz3b 4 00 0
A.Ellisc 5 1 1 0 Ingerf 3 0 0 0
Kershwp 0 00 0 JuWlsnp 0 00 0
Withrw p 0 00 0 Watson p 0 00 0
PRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 GJones ph 1 0 0 0
HrstnJr ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0
Jansenp 0 0 0 0 McKnrph 1 00 0
Moylanp 0 0 0 0 Mazzarp 0 00 0
Punto ph 1 0 1 1 Cumptn p 2 00 0
League p 0 0 0 0 Morris p 0 00 0
Snider ph-rf 3 1 2 1
Totals 40 5105 Totals 41 3 9 3
L. Angeles 000 012 000 02 5
Pittsburgh 100 000 011 00 3
E-A.Ellis (2), Presley (1). LOB-Los Angeles 8, Pitts-
burgh 13. 2B-Ad.Gonzalez (13), Ethier (11), Punto
(7), Presley (1), Walker (7). HR-Snider (3). SB-
R.Martin (3). S-M.Ellis, Kershaw, Mercer. SF-
M.Ellis.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Kershaw 7 3 1 1 3 8
WithrowH,1 2/3 1 1 1 1 2
PRodriguez H,9 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
JansenBS,2-5 1 1 1 1 0 1
MoylanW,1-0 1 1 0 0 2 1
League S,14-18 1 2 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Cumpton 5 7 3 3 1 5
Morris 2 0 0 0 2 1
Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 0
MazzaroL,3-1 1 3 2 2 0 2


Cumpton pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
WP-Withrow, League, Mazzaro.

Nationals 7, Indians 6


Washington Cleveland
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Spancf 5 0 0 0 Bourncf 5 0 0 0
Rendon2b 5 2 3 1 Kipnis2b 3 1 2 1
Zmrmn3b 4 2 1 1 Swisherib 4 1 1 1
Werthrf 3 1 2 1 Brantlyl If 4 0 1 2
AdLRclb 4 00 0 CSantnc 4 1 1 1
Dsmndss 3 1 1 1 MrRynl3b 3 1 1 1
Marrerdh 3 0 0 0 Giambidh 4 00 0
Tracy ph-dh 1 1 1 1 Raburn rf 3 0 0 0
KSuzukc 2 0 0 0 Avilesss 4 23 0
Koerns If 2 0 0 0
Lmrdzz If 2 0 0 0
Berndn If 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 78 5 Totals 34 6 9 6
Washington 212 000 011 7
Cleveland 001 230 000 6
E-Swisher (5), Aviles 2 (4). DP-Washington 1,
Cleveland 2. LOB-Washington 5, Cleveland 4.2B-
Rendon (6), Brantley (9), Aviles 2 (8). HR-Rendon
(1), Zimmerman (8), Werth (6), Desmond (9), Tracy
(2), C.Santana (9), Mar.Reynolds (14). SB-Desmond
(7). CS-Kipnis (5).
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Zimmermann 5 8 6 6 1 6
Stammen 1 0 0 0 2 0
Krol 12/30 0 0 0 3
StorenW,1-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
R.Soriano S,18-21 1 1 0 0 0 2
Cleveland
Kazmir 22/34 5 5 4 2
Albers 12/31 0 0 1 2
Shaw 12/30 0 0 0 1
Allen H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1
J.Smith BS,2-3 1 1 1 1 0 0
PestanoL,1-2 1 1 1 0 0 1
WP-Kazmir, Albers.

Astros 4, White Sox 3


Chicago

De Aza cf
AIRmrz ss
Rios rf
A.Dunn lb
Konerk dh
Gillaspi 3b
Kppngr3b
Viciedo If
JrDnks pr
Bckhm 2b
Flowers c
Totals
Chicago
Houston


Houston


ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 BBarns cf
4 1 2 0 Altuve 2b
3 0 0 0 JCastroc
4 1 1 1 JMrtnzlf
3 0 1 1 Carter dh
3 1 1 0 C.Penalb
1 0 0 0 RCeden ss
3 00 0 Dmngz 3b
0 0 0 0 Crowe rf
4 0 2 1
4 0 1 0
33 38 3 Totals
100 000 200
010 210 00x


ab r h bi
4 0 1 1
4 00 0

3 000
3 1 1 1
1 1 0 0
3 0 1 1
3 1 2 0
3 00 0


284 6 4
3
4


E-Crowe (3). DP-Chicago 1, Houston 1. LOB-
Chicago 6, Houston 2. 2B-AI.Ramirez (13), Beck-
ham (3), B.Barnes (9), R.Cedeno (6), Dominguez
(11). HR-A.Dunn (18), J.Castro (9), Carter (14).
SB-AI.Ramirez (14), Jor.Danks (1). CS-B.Barnes


(5).

Chicago
Joh.Danks L,1-3
Lindstrom
N.Jones
Houston
Harrell W,5-7
Clemens H,6
WWright H,6
Ambriz H,11
Veras S,13-16


IP H R ER BB SO


6 5 4
1 1 0
1 0 0


Joh.Danks pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Joh.Danks (C.Pena).


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
0 91-9-1
CASH 3 (late)
^ 8-1-7


POWERBALL
28 36 40 48 55
POWER BALL
1


PLAY 4 (early)
9-6-2-2
PLAY 4 (late)
4-2-8-2

FANTASY 5
15 16 26 32 33

LOTTERY
3-16-19-20-32-52
XTRA
3


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 15- 17- 19-28
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 3
3-of-4 MB 47
3-of-4 1,184
2-of-4 MB 1,335
1-of-4 MB 10,948
2-of-4 29,108


$2,172.00
$303.50
$35.50
$22.00
$2.50
$2.00


Fantasy 5:11 21 -
5-of-5 2 winner
4-of-5 283
3-of-5 9,474


-22 -25 -32
$111,804.44
$127.00
$10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


Mariners 4, Athletics 0


Seattle


EnChvz rf
Frnkln 2b
Seager 3b
KMorls dh
Ibanez If
Morse lb
MSndrs cf
HBlanc c
Ryan ss


Totals
Seattle
Oakland


36


Oakland
rh bi
0 1 0 Crisp cf
0 1 0 Jasoc
0 0 0 DNorrs ph
1 1 0 Cespdsdh
0 1 0 Moss 1b-If
1 3 0 Dnldsn 3b
1 1 0 Lowrie ss
1 1 4 S.SmithIlf
0 0 0 Freimn ph-lb
CYoung rf
Sogard 2b
49 4 Totals
000 004 000
000 000 000


ab rh bi
4 02 0
2000
0 00 0
4 0 1 0
4 02 0
4 00 0

12 000

3 00 0
3000
300 6 0
4
0


DP-Seattle 3. LOB-Seattle 7, Oakland 5. 2B-
Franklin (6), Morse 2(9), Lowrie (19). HR-H.Blanco
(1).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
FHernandezW,8-4 7 5 0 0 1 8
Furbush 1 1 0 0 0 1
Medina 1 0 0 0 1 1
Oakland
Griffin L,5-6 6 8 4 4 2 3
Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 0
Otero 1 1 0 0 0 0
Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0
Furbush pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-Medina.

AL leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .354; JhPeralta, De-
troit, .333; CDavis, Baltimore, .332; HKendrick, Los
Angeles, .328; Mauer, Minnesota, .327; Machado,
Baltimore, .324; Pedroia, Boston, .319.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 54; AJones, Baltimore,
48; CDavis, Baltimore, 47; Trout, Los Angeles, 47;
Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; Pedroia, Boston, 46;
Machado, Baltimore, 44.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 69; CDavis, Baltimore,
57; Encarnacion, Toronto, 55; Fielder, Detroit, 54;
Napoli, Boston, 49; DOrtiz, Boston, 49; AJones, Bal-
timore, 47.
HITS-Machado, Baltimore, 97; MiCabrera, Detroit,
92; AJones, Baltimore, 87; Pedroia, Boston, 87; HK-
endrick, Los Angeles, 84; CDavis, Baltimore, 82; Lon-
goria, Tampa Bay, 82; Trout, Los Angeles, 82.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 31; CDavis, Bal-
timore, 21; Napoli, Boston, 21; Longoria, Tampa Bay,
20; Mauer, Minnesota, 20; Pedroia, Boston, 20; Trout,
Los Angeles, 20.
TRIPLES-Ellsbury, Boston, 6; Trout, Los Angeles,
6; Gardner, New York, 4; LMartin, Texas, 4; Andrus,
Texas, 3; Drew, Boston, 3; DeJennings, Tampa Bay,
3; Kawasaki, Toronto, 3.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 22; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 18; ADunn, Chicago, 18; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 18; Cano, New York, 16; NCruz, Texas, 16;
Bautista, Toronto, 15; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 15.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 31; McLouth,
Baltimore, 23; Andrus, Texas, 16; Kipnis, Cleveland,
14; AIRamirez, Chicago, 14; Trout, Los Angeles, 14;
Crisp, Oakland, 13.
PITCHING-Buchholz, Boston, 9-0; Scherzer, De-
troit, 9-0; Colon, Oakland, 8-2; MMoore, Tampa Bay,
8-3;Verlander, Detroit, 8-4; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-4;
Masterson, Cleveland, 8-5.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 127; FHernandez,
Seattle, 110; Scherzer, Detroit, 106; Masterson,
Cleveland, 102; Verlander, Detroit, 101; AniSanchez,
Detroit, 101; Shields, Kansas City, 90.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 24; Rivera, New
York, 23; Nathan, Texas, 20; AReed, Chicago, 19; Bal-
four, Oakland, 17; Perkins, Minnesota, 16; Wilhelm-
sen, Seattle, 16.

NL leaders
BATTING-YMolina, St. Louis, .352; Tulowitzki, Col-
orado, .347; Scutaro, San Francisco, .332; Segura,
Milwaukee, .331; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .324; GParra,


Arizona, .321; CGomez, Milwaukee, .319.
RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 55; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 52; Holliday, St. Louis, 52; Votto, Cincinnati, 52;
Choo, Cincinnati, 49; Fowler, Colorado, 47; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 44; JUpton, Atlanta, 44.
RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 59; Phillips, Cincinnati,
55; CGonzalez, Colorado, 54; Craig, St. Louis, 51;Tu-
lowitzki, Colorado, 51; DBrown, Philadelphia, 48;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 46.
HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 88;YMolina, St. Louis,
86; GParra, Arizona, 85; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 83;
Craig, St. Louis, 82; CGonzalez, Colorado, 81; Votto,
Cincinnati, 81.
DOUBLES-Bruce, Cincinnati, 22; GParra, Ari-
zona, 22; YMolina, St. Louis, 21; Pence, San Fran-
cisco, 21; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 20; DanMurphy,
NewYork, 20; Posey, San Francisco, 20.
TRIPLES-CGomez, Milwaukee, 8; Segura, Mil-
waukee, 8; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Span, Washing-
ton, 6; Hechavarria, Miami, 5; ECabrera, San Diego,
4; Galvis, Philadelphia, 4; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 4;
DWright, New York, 4.
HOME RUNS-DBrown, Philadelphia, 19; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 19; Beltran, St. Louis, 16; Tulowitzki,
Colorado, 16; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 15; JUpton, At-
lanta, 15; PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 14; Gattis, Atlanta, 14.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 30;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 20; Segura, Milwaukee, 19;
Pierre, Miami, 18; Revere, Philadelphia, 16; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 15; CGomez, Milwaukee, 13;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 13; Pence, San Francisco, 13.
PITCHING-Wainwright, St. Louis, 10-3; Corbin,
Arizona, 9-0; Lynn, St. Louis, 9-1; Zimmermann,
Washington, 9-3; Lee, Philadelphia, 8-2; Marquis, San
Diego, 8-2; Minor, Atlanta, 8-2.
STRIKEOUTS-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 104;
Samardzija, Chicago, 104; Harvey, New York, 102;
AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 99; Wainwright, St. Louis, 97;
SMiller, St. Louis, 91; Lee, Philadelphia, 89; Bumgar-
ner, San Francisco, 89.
SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 24; Mujica, St. Louis, 19;
Kimbrel, Atlanta, 18; RSoriano, Washington, 18;
Chapman, Cincinnati, 17; Romo, San Francisco, 16;
League, Los Angeles, 14.




U.S. Open par scores
Saturday
At Merion Golf Club (East Course), Ardmore,
Pa.
Purse: TBA ($8 million in 2012)
Yardage: 6,996, Par: 70
Third Round
a-amateur
Phil Mickelson 67-72-70-209 -1
Hunter Mahan 72-69-69- 210 E
Charl Schwartzel 70-71-69-210 E
Steve Stricker 71-69-70 210 E
Justin Rose 71-69-71 -211 +1
Luke Donald 68-72-71-211 +1
Billy Horschel 72-67-72 211 +1
Jason Day 70-74-68-212 +2
Rickie Fowler 70-76-67-213 +3
a-Michael Kim 73-70-71 --214 +4
G. Fernandez-Castano 71-72-72-215 +5
Henrik Stenson 74-68-73-215 +5
lan Poulter 71-71-73- 215 +5
Nicolas Colsaerts 69-72-74 -215 +5
John Senden 70-71-74-- 215 +5
David Lingmerth 74-71-71 -216 +6
Paul Casey 73-72-71-216 +6
Paul Lawrie 76-71-69-216 +6
Lee Westwood 70-77-69- 216 +6
Charley Hoffman 71-73-72-- 216 +6
Bo Van Pelt 73-71-72-216 +6
Ernie Els 71-72-73-216 +6
Bubba Watson 71-76-70-- 217 +7
Edward Loar 73-71-73- 217 +7
Jason Dufner 74-71-73-218 +8
Jerry Kelly 70-73-75-218 +8
Rory Mcllroy 73-70-75- 218 +8


Morten Orum Madsen
Mathew Goggin
Brandt Snedeker
Jamie Donaldson
a-Cheng-Tsung Pan
John Huh
Matt Kuchar
John Parry
Padraig Harrington
Matt Bettencourt
TigerWoods
Hideki Matsuyama
Scott Langley
Adam Scott
Bio Kim
David Hearn
K.J. Choi
Webb Simpson
Sergio Garcia
Carl Pettersson
Marcel Siem
George Coetzee
Russell Knox
Geoff Ogilvy
Kevin Chappell
Josh Teater
Nicholas Thompson
Martin Laird
Scott Stallings
Steven Alker
Dustin Johnson
Mike Weir
Alistair Presnell
Jim Herman
MattWeibring
David Howell
Martin Kaymer
a-Michael Weaver
John Peterson
a-Kevin Phelan
Peter Hedblom
Shawn Stefani
Kyle Stanley
Simon Khan
Kevin Sutherland
Robert Karlsson


74-74-70.
68-74-76
74-74-70
73-73-73.
72-72-75.
71-73-75.
74-73-72.
76-71-72.
73-71-75
72-71-76
73-70-76
71-75-74.
75-70-75.
72-75-73.
72-75-73.
78-69-73.
70-76-75.
71-75-75.
73-73-75.
72-75-74.
73-71-77.
71-73-77.
69-75-77.
74-70-77.
72-76-74.
74-74-74.
72-76-74.
74-73-76.
71-76-76.
73-75-75.
71-77-75.
72-76-75.
73-75-76.
76-72-76.
75-73-76
77-71-77
76-72-77.
74-74-78
73-75-78
71-77-78.
70-78-79.
72-73-85
71-74-85.
74-74-82
73-74-84.
74-72-86


-218 +8
-218 +8
-218 +8
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-220 +10
-220 +10
-220 +10
-220 +10
-220 +10
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-222 +12
-222 +12
-222 +12
-223 +13
-223 +13
-223 +13
-223 +13
-223 +13
-224 +14
-224 +14
-224 +14
-225 +15
-225 +15
-226 +16
-226 +16
-226 +16
-227 +17
-230 +20
-230 +20
-230 +20
-231 +21
-232 +22


U.S. Open tee times


8:44
8:55
9:06
9:17
9:28
9:39
9:50
10:01
10:12
10:23
10:3'
10:45
10:56
11:07
11:18
11:29
11:4(
11:51
12:02
12:13
12:2'
12:35
son
12:46
12:57
1:08
1:19
1:30
1:41
1:52
2:03
2:14
2:25
tano
2:36
2:47
2:58
3:09
3:20


Sunday
At Merion Golf Club (East Course)
Ardmore, Pa.
Yardage: 6,996; Par: 70
All Times EDT
(a-amateur)
Final Round
a.m.- Robert Karlsson
a.m.- Kevin Sutherland, Simon Khan
a.m.- Kyle Stanley, Shawn Stefani
a.m.- Peter Hedblom, a-Kevin Phelan
a.m.- John Peterson, a-Michael Weaver
a.m.- Martin Kaymer, David Howell
a.m.- Matt Weibring, Jim Herman
1 a.m.- Alistair Presnell, Mike Weir
2 a.m. Dustin Johnson, Steven Alker
3 a.m. Scott Stallings, Martin Laird
4 a.m.- Nicholas Thompson, Josh Teater
5 a.m. Kevin Chappell, Geoff Ogilvy
6 a.m. Russell Knox, George Coetzee
7 a.m. Marcel Siem, Carl Pettersson
8 a.m. Sergio Garcia, Webb Simpson
9 a.m. K.J. Choi, David Hearn
0 a.m.- Bio Kim, Adam Scott
1 a.m.- Scott Langley, Hideki Matsuyama
2 p.m. -Tiger Woods, Matt Bettencourt
3 p.m.- Padraig Harrington, John Parry
4 p.m.- Matt Kuchar, John Huh
5 p.m.- a-Cheng-Tsung Pan, Jamie Donald-


6 p.m.-
7p.m.
p.m.-
p.m.
.m.-
p.m.
p.m.
.m.-
p.m.
p.m.-

p.m.-
p.m.-
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.


- Brandt Snedeker, Mathew Goggin
- Morten Orum Madsen, Rory Mcllroy
- Jerry Kelly, Jason Dufner
- Edward Loar, Bubba Watson
- Ernie Els, BoVan Pelt
-Charley Hoffman, Lee Westwood
- Paul Lawrie, Paul Casey
- David Lingmerth, John Senden
- Nicolas Colsaerts, Ian Poulter
SHenrik Stenson, G. Fernandez-Cas-

a-Michael Kim, Rickie Fowler
Jason Day, Billy Horschel
SLuke Donald, Justin Rose
Steve Stricker, Charl Schwartzel
Hunter Mahan, Phil Mickelson


Sprint Cup

Quicken Loans

400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Michigan International Speedway
Brooklyn, Mich.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 202.452 mph.
2. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 201.879.
3. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 201.213.
4. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200.803.
5. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 200.764.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 200.725.
7. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200.63.
8. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200.568.
9. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200.457.
10. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 200.445.
11. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200.406.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 200.1.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200.05.
14. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 199.789.
15. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 199.761.
16. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 199.75.
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 199.689.
18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 199.656.
19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 199.38.
20. (51) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 199.358.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 199.231.
22. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 199.214.
23. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 198.692.
24.(13) Casey Mears, Ford, 198.593.
25. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 198.429.
26. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 198.364.
27. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 198.292.
28. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 198.08.
29. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 197.922.
30. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 197.217.
31.(34) David Ragan, Ford, 196.813.
32. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 196.791.
33.(83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 196.276.
34. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 196.266.
35. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.737.
36. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 195.514.
37. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevy, owner points.
38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, owner points.
39. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, owner points.
40. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, owner points.
41.(93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, owner points.
42. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner points.
43. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, owner points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, 184.393.

Nationwide Series

Alliance Truck Parts

250 Results
Saturday
At Michigan International Speedway
Brooklyn, Mich.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (20) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 125 laps, 116.8 rat-
ing, 47 points, $45,440.
2. (11) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 125, 100.4, 42,
$38,200.
3. (2) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 125, 119, 0, $24,750.
4. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 125, 110.5, 0, $17,800.
5. (4) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 125, 110.1, 39, $23,375.
6. (6) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 125, 96.8, 38, $21,050.
7. (8) Chris Buescher, Ford, 125, 95, 37, $14,810.
8. (19) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 125, 89.7, 36, $21,645.
9. (21) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 125, 83.8, 35,
$20,425.
10. (3) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 125, 87.4, 34, $21,875.
11. (10) Joey Logano, Ford, 125, 109.8, 0, $13,975.
12. (7) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 125, 80.1, 32,
$19,800.


13. (22) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 124, 77.9, 31,
$19,550.
14. (5) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 124, 73.8, 31, $19,675.
15. (23) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 124, 68.1, 29, $20,275.
16. (31) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 124, 61.9, 28,
$19,375.
17.(12)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 124, 68.1, 27, $19,125.
18. (15) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 124, 60.2, 26,
$19,075.
19.(17) MichaelAnnett, Ford, 123, 72.6, 25, $19,025.
20. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 123, 120.2, 26,
$28,550.
21. (28) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 123, 68.8, 23, $18,900.
22. (25) Blake Koch, Toyota, 123, 53.6, 22, $18,850.
23. (34) Scott Riggs, Ford, 123, 48.1, 0, $18,800.
24. (24) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 123, 57.4, 20,
$18,750.
25. (16) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 123, 93.1, 20,
$19,175.
26. (29) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 122, 52.2, 18,
$18,625.
27. (36) Joey Gase, Toyota, 122, 42.4, 17, $12,575.
28. (37) Eric McClure, Toyota, 120, 38.5, 16, $18,500.
29. (27) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 119, 44.2, 15,
$18,450.
30. (38) Juan Carlos Blum, Chevrolet, 119, 37.9, 14,
$18,700.
31. (18) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 85, 27.8, 13,
$18,350.
32. (13) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, engine, 81, 95.7, 12,
$18,305.
33. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 80, 32.7, 11, $18,260.
34. (35) Ken Butler, Toyota, ignition, 21, 35.6, 10,
$18,230.
35. (39) Carl Long, Ford, alternator, 16, 36.2, 9,
$12,196.
36. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 14, 44.2, 8,
$11,375.
37. (30) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 10, 36.9, 7,
$11,355.
38. (32) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, handling, 8, 34.3, 0,
$11,316.
39. (33) Dexter Stacey, Ford, accident, 6, 34.8, 5,
$17,190.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 137.825 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 48 minutes, 50 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.330 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 23 laps.
Lead Changes: 5 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1-41; A.Bowman 42-48; A.Dil-
Ion 49-68; J.Logano 69-98; PKligerman 99-111;
R.Smith 112-125.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
A.Dillon, 2 times for 61 laps; J.Logano, 1 time for 30
laps; R.Smith, 1 time for 14 laps; PKligerman, 1 time
for 13 laps; A.Bowman, 1 time for 7 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 495; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
437; 3. J.Allgaier, 436; 4. A.Dillon, 428; 5. E.Sadler,
424; 6. B.Scott, 415; 7.TBayne, 407; 8. PKligerman,
405; 9. K.Larson, 403; 10. B.Vickers, 395.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins,
Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position
While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green,
Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.




NBA Finals
All Times EDT
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
San Antonio 2, Miami 2
Thursday, June 6: San Antonio 92, Miami 88
Sunday, June 9: Miami 103, San Antonio 84
Tuesday, June 11: San Antonio 113, Miami 77
Thursday, June 13: Miami 109, San Antonio 93
Today, June 16: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 18: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m.
x-Thursday, June 20: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m.




BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES -Optioned LHPTsuyoshi
Wada to Norfolk (IL). Agreed to terms with RHPs
Caleb Kellogg, Nick Cunningham and Jimmy Ya-
cabonis; LHPs Eric Green and Stephen Brault, SSs
Jared Breen and Jeffrey Kemp; C Alex Murphy; and
OF Connor Bierfeldt on minor league contracts.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Agreed to terms with
RHPs Tyler Danish. Andrew Mitchell, Jon Bengard,
James Dykstra, Bradley Goldberg, Alex Powers, Matt
Abramson, Thaddius Lowry, Devin Moore, Tyler Bar-
nette, Matt Ball and Nick Blount; OFs Jacob May, Sam
Macias, Andre Wheeler, Michael Carballo, Nolan Ear-
ley and Jacob Morris; LHPs Chris Freudenberg and
Sean Hagan; Cs Dillon Haupt and Trey Wimmer; 1Bs
Cody Yount and Nick Parent; 3BTrey Michalczewski;
and SS Toby Thomas on minor league contracts.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Agreed to terms with OF
Clint Frazier on a minor league contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS Agreed to terms with OFs
Ronnie Mitchell, Jon Kemmer and Conrad Gregor and
C Jacob Nottingham on minor league contracts.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Agreed to terms with
LHP Kyle Bartsch, LHP Christian Fletcha, C Xavier
Fernandez and OF Alex Newman on minor league
contracts.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Agreed to terms with
LHP Dustin Richardson on a minor league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS Optioned INF Leury Garcia
to Round Rock(PCL). Reinstated 2B lan Kinslerfrom
the 15-day DL.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Placed OF David DeJesus on
the 15-day DL. Reinstated RHP Shawn Camp from
the 15-day DL. Assigned RHP Eduardo Sanchez out-
right to Iowa (PCL).
CINCINNATI REDS-Placed RHP Jonathan Brox-
ton on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Friday. Recalled
RHP Pedro Villarreal from Louisville (IL).
COLORADO ROCKIES Agreed to terms with
RHPs Daniel Palo, Dylan Stamey, Alex Balog and
Blake Shouse; LHPs Sam Moll and William Waltrip;
OF Cole Norton; and 3B Ryan McMahon on minor
league contracts.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS- Sent LHP Chris Ca-
puano to Albuquerque (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
MIAMI MARLINS- Placed C Miguel Olivo on the
restricted list. Recalled OF Jordan Brown from New
Orleans (PCL).
MILWAUKEE BREWERS Placed OF Ryan
Braun on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Monday Re-
called OF Caleb Gindl from Nashville (PCL).
NEWYORK METS-Optioned RHPGreg Burke to
Las Vegas (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Car-
los Torres from Las Vegas. Designated RHP Collin
McHugh for assignment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Sent C Carlos Ruiz
to Lehigh Valley (IL) for a rehab assignment. Agreed
to terms with SS Trey Williams and C Jake Sweaney
on minor league contracts.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES- Designated LHP Mike
Zagurski for assignment. Selected the contract of
RHP Brandon Cumpton from Indianapolis (IL).
American Association
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Signed
RHP Brian Ernst.
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Released
INF Ryan Miller. Signed RHP Billy Spottiswood.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES Signed C Stephen
Yoo. Released C Norberto Susini.
WICHITA WINGNUTS Signed RHP Joshua
Stone, C Scott Dalrymple and OF Mike Mobbs.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES Signed LHP Gabe


Aguilar.
Can-Am League
ROCKLAND BOULDERS Signed INF Robert
Kelly.
TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES- Released C Charlie
Neil.
Frontier League
FLORENCE FREEDOM Signed OF Gary
Owens. Released RHP Jose Velazquez.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS Signed RHPs
Jon Mark Abbey and Ronald Uviedo. Released OF
Ryan Curl and RHP Hayden Simpson.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS Released OF
Blake Helm.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTA HAWKS Named Darvin Ham assis-
tant coach.
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Released DB
Jonathan Hefney.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Ford Thunder Valley Nationals (Taped)
1 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup: Quicken Loans 400 race
11 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Ford Thunder Valley Nationals (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) St. Louis Cardinals at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at New York Mets
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at Pittsburgh Pirates
8 p.m. (ESPN) San Francisco Giants at Atlanta Braves
COLLEGE BASEBALL
NCAA WORLD SERIES
3 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina State vs. North Carolina
8 p.m. (ESPN2) LSU vs. UCLA
BASKETBALL
NBA FINALS
8 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at San Antonio Spurs, Game 5
BOXING
4:45 p.m. (HBOS) Chad Dawson vs. Adonis Stevenson (Taped)
GOLF
12 p.m. (NBC) 2013 U.S. Open Golf Championship Final Round
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) Confederations Cup: Mexico vs. Italy
5:45 p.m. (ESPN) Confederations Cup: Spain vs. Uruguay

RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay Rays


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 B3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inverness MMA event set for June 29


Special to the Chronicle
Parks & Recreation is teaming
up with Florida Fight Founda-
tion to present MMA cage fight-
ing in Citrus County. The event
is on Saturday, June 29, at the
Citrus County Auditorium in In-
verness. Florida Fight Founda-
tion is based out of Gainesville
and hosts professional amd am-
ateur fighters who fight in vari-
ous styles of jujitsu, muay thai,
wrestling, judo and boxing.
There will be at least 15 bouts,
with three to four title fights.
Come watch History Chan-
nel's own Brad Taylor (of Axe
Men), who is the Florida Fight
Foundation 180 champion. He


will be defending his title
against Lexton Steed, a Citrus
County native who fights out of
Fierce Fight Team School in In-
verness.
Two local rivals, Sam Esposito
and Jason Dalbow, will fight in
the 170-pound class. Garon Mc-
Clusky of Inverness will take on
Daytona's Ryder Bray in the 155-
pound class.
Local wrestler Dalton David
will have a wrestling rematch
Chase Curtis. These two rising
stars met before in Orlando a
month ago.
For more information on the
event or sponsorships and ring
side tables please contact 904-
333-3183 or 386-364-8888.


Men's softball
Game 1
01' Guys With Help 25,
The Machines 7
The 01' Guys With Help jumped
out to a 12-2 after two innings and
never stopped scoring against The
Machines, eventually grabbing the
18-run victory.
Game 2
Advance Fitness 21,
RC Lawn Care 4
Advance Fitness was in control
from the beginning, jumping out to a
7-0 advantage after one full inning.
By the end of the second inning, it


was 13-2 Advance Fitness, who won
by a final score of 21-4.
Game 3
Ames Oil 24,
Sons of Pitches 4
Although Sons of Pitches struck
first to go up 1-0 after the top of the
first inning, Ames Oil put any
thoughts of a victory for its opponent
by pushing across 14 runs in the
bottom half.
Men's flag football
Game 1
Green 26, Purple 20
Green scored first and never
looked back despite Purple keeping


the score close throughout.
Game 2
Blue 27, Orange 8
While both teams looked good
early on, Blue had a few tricks up its
sleeves and started scoring at will.
Orange scored late in the contest,
but Blue was just too much during its
19-point win.
Game 3
Red 39, Gold 19
The last game of the night was
action-packed with lead changes at
the beginning. Around the middle of
the game though, Red literally ran
away with the scoring and took the
20-point victory.


Camps, leagues



holding final signups


Associated Press
Tiger Woods tees off on the eighth hole Saturday during the third round of the U.S.
Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa.




Bad match


Woods ties his worst

US. Open round as

a professional golfer

Associated Press

ARDMORE, Pa. -Tiger Woods made
birdie at the first hole, only to watch his
day go racing downhill from there.
Bythe time it was over, Woods skidded to
seven bogeys and a 6-over-par 76 Saturday
tumbling
down the
leader- Basically, I jL
board and speed right this
matching
his worst certainly s
round as a
pro at the
U.S. Open.
That left said of his frustrating
him 10
strokes behind third-round leader Phil
Mickelson, the only player under par at the
short but devilishlytough Merion Golf Club.
Despite leading the PGA Tour in put-
ting in recent weeks, Woods needed 36
putts on the severely undulating greens.
He blamed his inability to gauge the
speed of those baffling putting surfaces
for his three days of uneven play
"It's certainly frustrating because I
was feeling like I was playing well this
week and I just didn't make the putts I
needed to make," he said afterward.
"The first two days, I had, like, three
3-putts and I was four shots off the lead,
and I missed a boatload of putts within
10 feet. So I really wasn't that far off. If I
clean up the round and don't 3-putt, I'm
one shot back starting out today ..."


Woods added.
"Basically, I just didn't have the speed
right this week and it certainly showed."
Woods' toughest stretch came at Nos.
3-6, where he made three bogeys in a
four-hole stretch. He blamed the last of
those for setting the negative tone that
hung over his round like the storm
clouds that rolled over Merion through-
out Thursday's opening round. His trou-
bles at No. 6 included a tee shot that
finished up in another player's divot in
the fairway, as well as a delicate green-
side chip that rolled back and left him
facing his next shot from farther back.
"I think
ust didn't have the (bogey) e
week and it r e a y
turned
showed. my round
around,"
Woods
Tiger Woods said. "I
first three rounds at the U.S. Open. drove it
right in
the middle of the fairway and I end up
in a ball mark from somebody else's ball
mark, so it was kind of the way it went."
This U.S. Open marks exactly five
years since Woods won his last major, at
Torrey Pines, which he captured in a
playoff against Rocco Mediate, despite
hobbling around with ligament dam-
age. His pursuit of Jack Nicklaus' ca-
reer record of 18 majors remains
stalled at 14.
Woods also shot a 76 in the final round
at Shinnecock Hills in 2004, as well as
two rounds of 76 at Winged Foot in 2006
when he missed the cut.
Woods' worst round ever at an Open
was a 77 at Oakland Hills in 1996, when
he was a 19-year-old amateur.


Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club meets at 8:30 a.m. each
Wednesday. Men, women
and juniors age 10 and older
can join.
There are all levels of play;
handicapped method. Call
Ron Fair 352-746-3924, or
email rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
SilverSneakers
location is YMCA
Citrus County YMCA is an
official SilverSneakers loca-
tion for their group exercise
program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise program
designed exclusively for older
adults and is available at little
or no additional cost through
Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers
and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes
meet at the First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
Classes include cardio inter-
val, Pilates, and stability and
strength. To find out if you


are eligible for SilverSneak-
ers, call your health plan
provider. For more informa-
tion, call the YMCA office at
352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for
a community Divine Yoga
class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities. Some of
the benefits of yoga are im-
proved balance, coordina-
tion, strength and flexibility.
Yoga is also helpful in coun-
teracting stress and anxiety.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at
352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers group
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA
offers group exercise in Cit-
rus Springs at the Hope
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 9425 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd.


The location offers classes
in Pilates and cardio circuit
on a regular basis beginning.
The Y currently has three
other areas in the county
where group exercise
classes are offered, including
Homosassa, Inverness and
Crystal River. Financial assis-
tance is available to all those
who qualify. For more infor-
mation, call the YMCA office
in Beverly Hills at 352-637-
0132, or visit online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard
Club plays at 9:30 a.m. Tues-
days and Fridays and at 1
p.m. Wednesday at Floral
Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to
meet people in the commu-
nity, and get some light exer-
cise. We welcome all
newcomers. Yearly dues are
$3 per person, and there is
no need to purchase any
equipment.
Call the vice president of
the Floral City Shuffleboard
Club, Dana Bause, at 352-
726-0670.


Kayak Camp still holding
signups for June, July
Citrus County Parks & Recreation, in part-
nership with 2 Sisters Kayak Tours, is holding
Kayaking Camps this summer. Each camp will
be held at Hernando Beach Park from Mon-
day to Thursday and at Chassahowitzka River
on Friday.
Children ages 8 to 15 are eligible and the
cost is $80 per child. We will offer four different
weeks to choose from throughout June and
July. Each week will have two time slots that
will accommodate ages 8 to 11 and ages 12 to
15 separately.
For more information, contact Citrus County
Parks & Recreation at 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscounty parks.com
Sharks football, cheerleading
have two more signups
The Crystal River Sharks football and
cheerleading are holding signups from 10 a.m.
to 2 p,.m. on June 22 and 29 at the Crystal
River Mall food court.
The league welcomes athletes ages 5 to 15
across six divisions. It is $125 per child for
football and $100 for cheerleading.
Cash, checks and credit cards are accepted.
Panthers plan
volleyball camp
Summer volleyball camp will be offered by
the Lecanto Panthers this summer.
Open to fourth-graders through entering
ninth-graders, cost is $65.
Parents can pick up a registration form at
Lecanto High School or email Alice Christian at
christiana@citrus.kl 2.fl.us for more information
and times.
CR hoops camp holds final
week starting Monday
The Crystal River 2013 hoops camp has a
final session from June 17-20. Each day goes
from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m..
The session is $49 and all pre-registered
campers will receive a camp T-shirt.
For more information, contact Steve
Feldman at feldmans@citrus.k12.fl.us or
352-601-0870.
Panthers b-ball camp coming
Monday; walkups accepted
Come out and enjoy a week of quality in-
struction and competition at the 2013 Panther
Basketball Camp from June 17-20. The camp
will at the Lecanto High School gym and each
day will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The cost is $75 per child. There are multiple
sibling discounts ($120 for two children, $160
for three. Walkup registration is welcome at
8:30 a.m. Monday morning.
Panther Camp offers quality basketball in-
struction at an affordable cost to area youth
from ages 6 through 14. We will be limiting the
camp to the first 100 registered campers, so
register early.
Campers will receive instruction in the fun-
damentals of dribbling, passing, shooting, and
defending the basketball.
All players should either bring a bagged lunch
to camp or they will be able to purchase a lunch at
camp for $5 per day (sandwich, chips and drink).
A concession will also be open during the day.
Families with multiple siblings will receive a
discount for two or more children. Contact Frank
Vilardi at 352-362-0011 for more information.
Register now for swim
lessons in Inverness
The city of Inverness Summer Swim Lesson
program is accepting registrations for the 2013
season. To sign up for swimming classes, visit
the pool office in Whispering Pines Park, 1700
Forest Drive.
All swimming classes follow the American
Red Cross curriculum and all instructors are cer-
tified Water Safety Instructors by the ARC. Chil-
dren from age 6 months to 3 years will register
for the parent and child classes. The preschool
courses are for youngsters ranging in age from 3
to 5 years. The school-age group starts at age 5
and goes up from there. There are even classes
for adults who wish to learn how to swim or im-
prove the ability they already possess.
Cost for the swim lessons are $35 per ses-
sion, which includes eight class meetings.
There are evening as well as morning ses-
sions scheduled at this time. Consult the Swim
Lesson Schedule on the city website. For more
information, call the pool at 352-726-1995.


Horseshoe club seeks
more youth involvement
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club at 54
Civic Circle in the Beverly Hills Recreation
Park will host free horseshoe pitching to all
ages from 8:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays
from June 5 until Sept. 4.
Instruction and horseshoes will be provided.
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club is a spon-
sor of the Florida State Horseshoe Pitchers'
$1,000 Scholarship Award and also the John
Reynolds $100 J.R. Memorial Award. The
award is presented to students of any age up
to 18 years. Money is held in a foundation until
they graduate from high school. Membership
in a horseshoe club, although recommended,
is not required. They will need to get a National
Horseshoe Pitchers Association card to play in
tournaments. Sanctioned tournaments are
held on the second Saturday each month,
September through April at BHHC.
Soda and water will be available at these
events.
Call Eileen Fox at 585-305-1912 or e-mail
Eileen at eileenffox@gmail.com or John
Bissonnette at 352-270-3327 for more
information.
Camp Patriot
Basketball Camp
Coach Tim Ryan, the National NJCAA
Men's Basketball Coach of the Year from the
College of Central Florida, is hosting Camp
Patriot Basketball Camp for the 10th straight
year. The camp is for boys and girls ages 8 to
18 and located at the Ocala campus of the
College of Central Florida.
Four sessions are offered, the dates are:
June 17-20, June 24-27, July 8-11 and July
22-25. Each day runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The cost is $150 per session. For more
information, please visit www.camppatriot
basketball.com or call Tim Ryan at
352-427-7435.
Wildlife Ranger Camps
hosted by Wildlife Park
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection's Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park will offer two weeklong
Wildlife Ranger Camps in June and July.
The Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife
Park sponsor the programs. June's Wildlife
Ranger Camp is for children ages 8 and 9
years old, and runs June 17 through June 22.
July's Wildlife Ranger Camp is for children
ages 10 through 12, and runs from July 15
through July 20.
Applications for the Wildlife Ranger Camp
are available in the park office. Each program
is limited to 20 campers and will be filled on a
first-come basis with preference to those who
have never attended before.
Each Wildlife Ranger Camp includes four
half-day camp sessions from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
Monday through Thursday. The Friday session
starts at 4 p.m. with an overnight stay in the
park. A graduation ceremony will be at 11 a.m.
on Saturday. The cost of the program is $65
per child and includes a T-shirt and supplies.
Camp topics include mammals, birds, rep-
tiles, manatees, the ocean, sea turtles and
saving energy through alternative sources. In-
door and outdoor activities for children include
nature hunts, visiting the wildlife areas in the
park and other scientific activities.
Applicants will be asked to write a short
essay on an animal that lives in Florida and
why they think that animal is important, to at-
tach to their application. Parents and guardians
may stop by the park office in the Visitor Center
on U.S. 19 to pick up an application.
For more information, call Tricia Fowler at
352-628-5343, ext. 1002.
Inverness Storm Golf Tourney
The ninth annual Inverness Storm Golf Tour-
ney will take place at 9 a.m. Saturday, June 22,
at the Inverness Golf & Country Club. There
will be contests with prizes awarded for hole-
in-one, longest drive (women and men), and
closest to the pin. There will be a 50/50 draw-
ing and other raffle drawings.
Cost of $50 per golfer includes lunch and
beverages. Local business owners interested in
sponsoring a hole on the golf course may call
352-302-7386.
Make checks payable to (ECYF) East Cit-
rus Youth Football. All proceeds go to Inver-
ness Storm football players and cheerleaders.
For more information, call Tom Frederick at
352-302-7386 or visit www.invemessstorm.com.
-From staff reports


Rec BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Capitals' Ovechkin named NHL MVP


Associated Press

CHICAGO Alex
Ovechkin capped his great
season with the NHL's
biggest award.
The Washington Capi-
tals right wing won his
third Hart Trophy, given to
the league's MVP on Sat-
urday night, beating out
Pittsburgh's Sidney Crosby
and John Tavares of the
New York Islanders.
Ovechkin led the NHL
with 32 goals during the
regular season, the first
time he's led the league in
scoring since 2009, when
he won his second straight
Hart Trophy
Washington Capitals
forward Alex Ovechkin
capped his great season
with the NHL's biggest
award by winning his third
Hart Trophy, given to the
league's MVP, on Saturday.
Associated Press


Ovechkin is the eighth
player to win three or
more Harts, joining Wayne
Gretzky, Mario Lemieux,
Bobby Clarke, Bobby Orr,
Gordie Howe, Eddie
Shore and Howie Morenz.
The vote was expected to
be close after Ovechkin and
Crosby tied for fourth in the
NHL with 56 points, de-
spite the Penguins center
missing 12 games with a
broken jaw. And it was, with
Ovechkin edging Crosby by
just 32 points (1,090-1,058)
in voting by members of the
Professional Hockey Writ-
ers' Association. It was the
closest Hart vote since
Montreal's Jose Theodore
and Calgary's Jarome
Iginla finished in a virtual
tie in 2002.
Crosby did, however,
win the Ted Lindsay
Award from his fellow
NHL Players' Association
members as the league's


best player.
In other awards an-
nounced before Game 2 of
the Stanley Cup finals,
Montreal's PK. Subban
won his first Norris Tro-
phy, given to the NHEs top
defenseman. Subban
topped the league's de-
fensemen with 11 goals
and 27 assists, and was
largely responsible for
Montreal's resurgence.
Sergei Bobrovsky of the
Columbus Blue Jackets
won the Vezina Trophy,
given to the NHEs top
goaltender.
Bobrovsky, who beat out
Henrik Lundqvist of the
New York Rangers and
Antti Niemi of the San
Jose Sharks for his first
Vezina, was the main rea-
son Columbus was in the
running for a playoff berth
until the very end of the
season. The Blue Jackets
and Minnesota both fin-


ished with 55 points, but
the Wild got the eighth and
final spot in the Western
Conference because of
fewer non-shootout wins.
Bobrovsky finished 21-
11-6, with a 2.00 GAA, .932
save percentage and four
shutouts.
Florida's Jonathan Hu-
berdeau won the Calder
Trophy, given to the NHEs
top rookie.
"There were a lot of
good rookies this year,"
Huberdeau said. "I wasn't
expecting anything and I'd
glad I won it."
The Panthers center
played in all 48 games for
Florida, ranking second
both on the team and
among NHL rookies with
31 points (14 goals, 17 as-
sists). Among first-year
players, he finished third
in goals, fourth in assists
and third in shots on goal
(112).


Pivotal game awaits


Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade loosens up during NBA basketball practice Saturday in San Antonio. The Heat take on the San Antonio Spurs
in Game 5 of the NBA Finals today, with the best-of-seven games series even at 2-2.


Heat, Spurs set

for Game 5 of

NBA Finals

Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO Tony
Parker's hamstring, not Dwyane
Wade's knee, is the current chief
injury concern.
Manu Ginobili, not Chris Bosh, is
mired in the slump of the moment
Things change quickly at the
NBA Finals, and with everything
suddenly seeming right with the
Miami Heat, it's up to the San An-
tonio Spurs to change them back
Sunday night in Game 5.
"It is a must-win. We don't want
to go back down there down a
game with two games remaining
at their house," Spurs star Tim
Duncan said Saturday
"Obviously, we lose this game,
we're not giving up or anything,
but we want to go back up with a
chance to finish there. Huge
pressure if we have to go back
there and try to win two."
The Heat evened the series
with a 109-93 victory Thursday
night, setting up what's often the
pivotal moment of the finals. Of
the 27 times the series was tied at
2-2, the Game 5 winner went on to
win 20 of them.
"I think that's what everyone
would like, 2-2 in the finals for
Game 5," LeBron James said. "We
are excited about the opportu-
nity. We have another opportunity
to win on someone else's floor"
It's the same situation Miami
was in two years ago, losing Game
5 in Dallas. But the Heat also had
dropped the previous game, and
James was struggling through a
poor series by his standards.
Everything looks good for the
Heat as they arrive at this stage
now. James was dominant in
Game 4 with 33 points and 11 re-
bounds, and Wade scored 32
points, not appearing to be both-
ered at all by a painful right knee
that had limited his effectiveness
in the postseason.
With Bosh breaking out with 20
points and 13 rebounds, every-
thing that was a problem for the


Associated Press
San Antonio forward Tim Duncan does drills during Spurs practice on
Saturday in San Antonio.


Heat a few days ago no longer
looks to be the case. Instead, the
obstacles look to be piling up for
the Spurs.
"It's a part of the playoffs,"
Wade said. "There's always high
moments. There's always low mo-
ments. There's moments when
you have guys who are in a slump,
et cetera. Guys who come out of
it. Great story lines. It's all of it"
The teams returned to practice
Saturday after taking a day off, and
though Parker said his strained
right hamstring was feeling better
and he hoped to be close to 100
percent by the game, he later
made that sound impossible.
"My hamstring can tear any time
now," he said. "So if it was the reg-
ular season, I would be resting like
10 days. But now it's the NBA Fi-
nals. If it gets a tear, it's life."
Ginobili is averaging 7.5 points
on 34.5 percent shooting in the se-


ries, making only three of his 16 3-
point attempts. Parker said he's
still confident in his longtime team-
mate, and coach Gregg Popovich
said he wasn't worried about either
player about all he did say on a
day when he was a man of even
fewer words than usual.
During his brief responses to
eight questions, he added that
he wasn't surprised by the
Heat's lineup change in Game 4,
but wouldn't say whether the
Spurs would do anything differ-
ent Sunday
"I'd hate to be trite and say any-
thing is possible. Your question de-
mands my triteness," he answered.
The last three games have all
been blowouts, a somewhat sur-
prising result that wasn't so sur-
prising to James. When their Big
Three all play like they Thurs-
day, the Heat can make even a
good team like the Spurs look


pretty bad.
"If we play our game, if we force
turnovers, we rebound, execute
offensively and don't turn the ball
over, we can win against anybody,"
James said. "We're a confident
bunch. But we're going against a
great team that's going to make
adjustments as well. And that's
why it's a 2-2 series right now."
The Heat won only twice in San
Antonio in their first 24 seasons,
and now can win in back-to-back
games, which would give the de-
fending champions two chances
to close out the Spurs back home.
Game 6 is Tuesday night.
But the team that won 27 con-
secutive games during the regu-
lar season, the second-longest
winning streak in NBA history,
hasn't been able to win two in a
row since taking the last four
games of the second round and
the opener of the Eastern Con-
ference finals.
The Spurs haven't been any
better at maintaining momentum,
following their two victories in
this series with turnover-filled
losses by a combined 35 points,
and Duncan said their focus has
to be sharper.
"That's what it's all about right
now, is that focus for a longer pe-
riod of time. Taking care of the
ball, understanding what you
want to do and less defensive mis-
takes, and for whatever reason it
seems like the team that's coming
off a loss has done a better job of
sustaining that for a longer period
of time," Duncan said.
"I hope that's the case for us to-
morrow, but we have to find a way
to alleviate that, whether it's a
win or a loss."
The Spurs have never lost a
Game 5 in the NBA Finals, in-
cluding victories in 2003 and '05
when the series were tied 2-2.
Sunday's game could be the last
time Duncan, Parker and Gino-
bili play at home in the finals,
and they want to go out a winner.
"This game is huge," Ginobili
said. "We don't want to go to
Miami knowing that we have to
win both. Going there to win one
of the two is a different situation.
So Game 5, regardless of where
you play, it's huge for you at 2-2.
We've seen it too many times. We
really want to win this one."


Bulldogs


nip


Beavers


at CWS

Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. Missis-
sippi State took the lead on
Wes Rea's two-run double
in the eighth inning, closer
Jonathan Holder turned
back two Oregon State
threats, and the Bulldogs
beat the Beavers 5-4 on Sat-
urday in the opening game
of the College World Series.
The Bulldogs (49-18) ad-
vanced to a Monday game
against Indiana or
Louisville. The Beavers
(50-12), the No. 3 national
seed, are one loss from
elimination.
Hunter Renfroe's hard
comebacker off the leg of
Matt Boyd (10-4) put run-
ners on first and second in
the eighth. Rea then sent a
double into the right-cen-
ter gap. Andy Detz scored
easily and Renfroe beat
second baseman Andy Pe-
terson's relay throw home.
Holder got out of a jam
after Oregon State put two
runners on base in the
eighth, getting a flyout and
striking out pinch hitter
Joey Jansen.
The Beavers had two
runners on base again in
the ninth when Danny
Hayes drove a ball to right
that Renfroe caught on the
warning track to end the
game and give Holder his
19th save. Hayes threw his
helmet to the ground as
Renfroe gloved the ball,
and the Bulldogs came
pouring out of the dugout
in celebration.
Ross Mitchell (13-0)
pitched 2 2/3 shutout in-
nings before turning the
game over to Holder.
Oregon State starter An-
drew Moore turned in a
strong performance after
giving up three runs in the
second inning.
Moore, the Pac-12 fresh-
man of the year, came into
the game off wins in seven
straight games and had
worked eight or more in-
nings in five of his previ-
ous six starters.
He Moore missed up
with his fastball early but
settled down to retire 18 of
20 batters before Detz sin-
gled with one out in the
eighth.


Associated Press
Mississippi State closer
Jonathan Holder pumps his
fist Saturday after closing
out the bottom of the
eighth inning against
Oregon State in Game 1 of
the College World Series in
Omaha, Neb.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 B5




B6 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 SPORTS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Smith holds off Larson to win Nationwide race


Associated Press

BROOKLYN, Mich. -
The rain drops splashed
down on the pavement at
Michigan International
Speedway about an hour
after Regan Smith's vic-
tory Saturday
Too late to interrupt the
race and that was fine
with Smith and crew chief
Greg Ives.
"I've had a lot of differ-
ent situations over the
years, of weather and how
it plays into it," Ives said.
"I had the radar on my
screen, and I saw it break-
ing up. None of my strat-
egy really came off the
weather whether or not
the rain was going to come.
... If it would have came
and rained us out, it hap-
pens, but I wasn't going to
guarantee myself anything
on the rain."
Smith won the Nation-
wide Series race, holding
off Kyle Larson in the final


10 laps and more than dou-
bling his lead in the points
standings. He took the lead
with 13 laps remaining
when Parker Kligerman
had to pit The race was run
under threatening weather
conditions, but all 125 laps
and 250 miles were com-
pleted with no delays.
Kligerman led for 13
laps toward the end, but
the rain that might have
helped him didn't arrive in
time.
"We played it perfectly
for that situation," Kliger-
man said. "There was de-
bris everywhere the last 20
laps. Of course, no one
threw a caution, so we ran
out of fuel and finished
wherever we finished."
Kligerman finished
25th. Sam Hornish Jr, who
is second in the standings,
fell from 23 points behind
Smith to 58 points back.
He finished 32nd his
day ended early because
of an oil pump problem.


Associated Press
Nationwide driver Regan Smith kisses his wife Megan
Mayhew after winning the Alliance Truck Parts 250 auto
race Saturday at Michigan International Speedway in
Brooklyn, Mich.


"One of the pieces of de-
bris that were flying
around on the track prob-
ably from one of the cars
that got wrecked early on
came through the nose of
the car and actually broke
the oil pump," Hornish
said. "That basically al-
lowed that front bearing to


dump a bunch of oil out of
the engine."
Smith won for the sec-
ond time this year It was
his 11th straight top-10 fin-
ish, and although Larson
closed the gap a bit toward
the end, he wasn't able to
overtake Smith's No. 7
Chevrolet


Smith's final margin of
victory was 0.33 seconds.
He also won at Talladega
in May but he was un-
satisfied with recent re-
sults despite his lead in
the standings.
"We didn't feel good. I
think every time we go to
the racetrack, we want this
team to be the team that's
up front, that's leading
laps, that's contending for
wins," Smith said. "Unless
we're winning every race,
we're not content."
Smith won last year at
Homestead in his debut
race with JR Motorsports.
He now has three Nation-
wide victories since team-
ing up with co-owner Dale
Earnhardt Jr
"Regan had kind of been
at the top of my list for a
couple years," Earnhardt
said. "I think as a company
that we've actually batted a
pretty good percentage on
tapping into good talent."
Paul Menard finished


third Saturday, followed by
Kyle Busch and Trevor
Bayne. Pole winner Austin
Dillon was 20th.
Larson, a series rookie,
took second for the second
time, but he has yet to win.
"It's not bad, finishing
second," Larson said. "It
would have been nice to get
it today for Jason Leffler"
Leffler died earlier in
the week in a sprint car
crash in New Jersey. Lar-
son's own background is in
sprint cars, and he drives
for Turner Scott Motor-
sports a team Leffler
used to drive for
Smith also acknowledged
Leffler after his victory
"Although I wasn't as
close as some guys
around here were to him
- definitely knew him
and had a lot of conversa-
tions with him," Smith
said. "Certainly, he's
going to be missed, and
we don't want to forget
about his family."


Good memories


Past success

for Earnhardt

at Michigan

Associated Press

BROOKLYN, Mich. A
year ago, Dale Earnhardt
Jr finally snapped his long
losing streak. He left
Michigan International
Speedway with hopes of
more victories to come -
maybe even a Sprint Cup
championship.
He hasn't won since.
"We want to win more
races. We want to win nu-
merous races and multiple
races in a season," Earn-
hardt said. "We want that
to be the norm. We want
that to be what is expected.
When we first started
working together we were
trying to figure out how to
get a 15th-place combina-
tion into the top 10 and we
were happy when we did.
"Now when we run in
the top 10 it's just another
weekend and what do
we have to do to win?"
Whenever NASCAR's
top series comes to Michi-
gan, Earnhardt is at the
center of attention. He
won at MIS last June after
143 races without a vic-
tory His most recent win
before that was also at
Michigan in 2008, so the
Sprint Cup's twice-yearly
visits to the Irish Hills al-
ways seem to present an
opportunity for Earnhardt
and his No. 88 Chevrolet.
Earnhardt's victory last
year wasn't a shock. He'd
been running well for a
while, working his way
back among NASCAR's
elite drivers, so after a
convincing performance at
MIS, stock-car racing's
most popular driver could
credibly eye a run at a se-
ries championship.
But concussion prob-
lems derailed his chances
in the Chase for the Sprint
Cup, and although he
began 2013 with five
straight top-10 finishes
and briefly led the points
standings, he's slipped to
fourth since then.
Earnhardt took a step in
the right direction with a
third-place showing at
Pocono last weekend, but
the pressure is mounting
for him to take advantage
of a return to Michigan.


amwa


I VAM4L
WE a


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s last Sprint Cup victory came at Michigan International Speedway
in 2012. The track is the site of today's Quicken Loans 400 race.


"It's just a simple race
track that has not got a lot of
challenges. It's very easily
laid out and understand-
able for a driver It really
comes down to just getting
your car to work," Earn-
hardt said. "There are no
bumps or bad transitions,
there is nothing really that
you are out there fighting or
worried about or dreading.
It's just a simple race track
and very wide."
Jimmie Johnson has
never won a Cup race at
MIS, but he enters Sun-
day's 400-mile race leading
the standings by 51 points
over Carl Edwards. John-
son has three victories al-
ready this year, and
another spot in the Chase
looks like a formality.
'"A lot can still go wrong
if you hit a stretch of bad
races. I feel like our wins
will lock us in the Chase,
but my mind is still on run-
ning well and getting
ready for the Chase,"
Johnson said. "I really am
shocked that I'm so far out
ahead of everybody"
Edwards won the pole
for Sunday's race. Earn-


hardt qualified 12th, and
defending Cup champion
Brad Keselowski was 16th,
one spot ahead of Johnson.
These two weeks -
Pocono followed by Michi-
gan worked out well for
Earnhardt last year, and
he'd love a repeat.
"I think there are certain
teams that are capable of
getting behind or being off
and climbing their way
back up," said Jeff Gordon,
who is 11th in the stand-
ings and could use a vic-
tory himself. "I think there
are certain teams that are
just right on the brink of
making things really, really
good. I thought Junior had
a very impressive run last
week. He was very compet-
itive and it was great tim-
ing for them because this is
a track that I know he likes
and does well at."
The 38-year-old Earn-
hardt says he doesn't feel
any urgency to break
through soon.
"I feel pretty young still.
I feel like I'm in good
shape. I feel young in my
mind. I feel like I have
good energy," he said. "I


feel like I'm in the best op-
portunity of my career
There is a 'seize the mo-
ment' kind of feeling be-
cause I'm in such good
equipment around such
good people. I don't feel
like there is a clock in the
background ticking away
that is annoying me or any-
thing like that"
But even though that
long losing streak is a thing
of the past, Earnhardt real-
izes the pressure to win
never really subsides es-
pecially for a driver whose
performance over the last
couple years has raised ex-
pectations. He has only the
two Michigan victories in
192 starts for Hendrick Mo-
torsports after winning 17
times in 291 starts for Dale
Earnhardt Inc.
"I think that the percep-
tion from you guys is simi-
lar to how we feel. We are
like a lot of teams trying to
find that extra step," he
said. "It's difficult to win in
this sport. It's really com-
petitive. It's not much
more for us to be able to
get to that level to be able
to win more."


OPEN
Continued from Page B1

"Every shot requires
such great focus because a
penalty can bite you
quickly I can't wait to get
back and playing. I feel
good ball-striking, I feel
good on the greens. I think
it's going to take an under-
par round tomorrow."
Saturday was more
about weeding out the pre-
tenders for this U.S. Open
- and one of them turned
out to be Tiger Woods. He
started out just four shots


Penske disputes


Keselowski's ideas

Owner says driver had some

misinformation'on hires


Associated Press

WEST ALLIS, Wis. -
Roger Penske refuted
Brad Keselowski's claim
that some of their em-
ployees were poached by
other NASCAR teams.
Penske said Saturday
"I think Brad had some
misinformation," when
the defending Sprint Cup
champion accused Hen-
drick Motorsports and
Joe Gibbs Racing of lur-
ing away Penske employ-
ees in an effort to steal
information.
Keselowski's com-
ments led to a stern re-
buke from Rick Hendrick
and Joe Gibbs, as both
team owners blasted the
driver for spreading false
information.
"We didn't lose any em-
ployees who were under
contract or who weren't
free to go elsewhere as
part of our engine reor-
ganization," Penske said
before the IndyCar race
at the Milwaukee Mile.
Keselowski was at Ford
headquarters in Dear-
born, Mich., on Thursday,
when he said his Penske
Racing team has been re-
luctant to share informa-
tion with Roush Fenway
Racing on their Ford cars.
"What keeps it from
going too far is the fact
Hendrick and (Joe Gibbs
Racing) have this nasty
little habit of going to our
teams and outbidding dif-
ferent people and taking
those employees and
stealing our information,"
Keselowski said, accord-
ing to ESPN.com.
Keselowski didn't elab-
orate when asked about
his comments Friday.


"We were just talking
about Ford and specifi-
cally the relationship be-
tween Penske and Roush,
and how strong it was,"
Keselowski said. "I just
commented on, there will
always be limitations to
our relationships com-
pany to company because
of those transactions."
Hendrick was first to
respond, admitting he
hired a backup Penske
tire changer who was no
longer under contract, a
mechanic from the Na-
tionwide Series program
and a handful of engine
shop employees. He also
said Penske Racing hired
a Hendrick tire changer
"Brad misrepresents
the facts and spends a lot
of time making insinua-
tions and accusations
about other teams when
he should be focused on
his own program and
competing at a high
level," Hendrick said in a
statement "I hope he fig-
ures that out and begins
representing himself and
the sport with more
class."
Gibbs said the one em-
ployee Keselowski was
referring to in regard to
his organization was not
working in NASCAR
when hired by JGR.
"We look forward to
competing with Brad on
the racetrack, but hope
that he will use better
judgment in the future
before making such mis-
informed claims and ac-
cusations," Gibbs said.
Penske said Hendrick
called him about Ke-
selowski's comments and
he considered the issue
closed.


Associated Press
Owner Roger Penske said driver Brad Keselowski was
misinformed when saying that Joe Gibbs Racing has
poached Penske employees.


out of the lead, and made a
bending, 12-foot birdie putt
on the opening hole. It
never got any better for the
world's No. 1 player He
made seven bogeys the rest
of the way and didn't add
another birdie, matching
his worst U.S. Open score
as a pro with a 6-over 76.
Woods was 10 shots
behind.
"It certainly is frustrat-
ing," said Woods, who has
been stuck on 14 majors
since winning the 2008
U.S. Open at Torrey
Pines. "I'm playing well
enough to do it, and un-
fortunately just haven't


Hunter Mahan tees off on the ninth hole during the third
tournament Saturday at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa.
Associated Press


gotten it done."
The final hour might
have been a sneak preview
for Sunday. At one point,
there were five players
under par, and suddenly
there was only Mickelson.
Luke Donald had the
outright lead until two bad
swings on the last two
holes a 2-iron into the
bunker on the 17th that led
to bogey, and another 2-
iron into ankle-deep rough
well right of the 18th green
that led to a double bogey
Just like that, one of the
best rounds of the day
turned into a 71, and he
was two shots behind.

round of the U.S. Open golf


I I


I









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


S. Read

memo:

S The

./ world is

. changing


If you are involved in edu-
cation these days, then
the term Common Core
shorthand for Com-
mon Core State Stan-


dards (CCSS)


has become a


regular part of your vocabulary. I
would not consider myself en-
tirely against Common Core, nor
would I consider myself a fan of
Common Core. Therefore, it is
interesting I find myself defend-
ing it against those who misun-
derstand the program, where it
came from and who is behind its
adoption.
Florida's State Board of Education for the De-
partment of Education adopted CCSS in 2010.
Since then, approximately 45 states have adopted
CCSS or parts of it The purpose behind CCSS is
for students in any state to be measured by simi-
lar, rigorous standards, resulting in students at-
taining success in postsecondary schooling and
in their careers.
One of the first myths about CCSS is that it is a
curriculum. It is not CCSS is a standard, just as


the current Florida Next Gener-
ation Sunshine State Standards
(NGSSS) and before that the Sun-
shine State Standards were stan-
dards. Each state and local
school board has autonomy in
adopting and/or developing their
own curriculum, teaching prac-
tices and supportive resources
aligned with those standards.
Another myth is CCSS is a man-
date. This is not the case. The Na-
tional Review, in an April 3,2013,
article titled "The Truth about
Common Core," explained,
"They (CCSS) simply delineate
what children should know at each grade level
and describe the skills that they must acquire to
stay on course toward college or career readi-
ness." The conservative Fordham Institute's
Michael J. Petrilli wrote in "The RNC on the
CCSSI, OMG!" "The Common Core standards are
worth supporting because they're educationally
solid. They are rigorous, they are traditional -
one might even say they are 'conservative.' They
See RPage C3


Smart men do not
write about
women because
we usually get it wrong.
I never claimed to be
smart.
I have to go on record
and say women are
changing. The stay-at-
home mom of the 1950s
has morphed into a
major breadwinner in
most households and
the do-it-all wonder
women of 2013.
Women have so many
more choices today than
they once did, and so
many of them are choos-
ing to become the great
achievers of our time.
Choice is the key word
here. At one point in
time, there were so
many barriers to women
getting ahead. Now,
most of those barriers
have been knocked
down or at least weak-
ened greatly
Women now get to
choose what they want
to do.
Which brings me to
today's contrast in the
choices women make. I
want to compare two
local women and the in-
credible out-of-the box
ways they approach life.
The two women are
county commissioner
Rebecca Bays and re-
cently retired nurse
practitioner Leah
Stringer
On the one hand, you
have Commissioner
Bays. She is one of the
highest-profile women
in our community. She
owns an insurance com-
pany, was elected to a
high-profile public posi-
tion and is the chairman
of the county's Tourist
Development Council.
She is in Washington,
Tallahassee and
Lecanto making things
happen for the commu-
nity she serves.
This past week, Com-
missioner Bays posted
on Facebook some pho-
tos of her recent vaca-
tion. She went
bow-hunting and was
photographed with a
deer she brought down
with an arrow.
The deer is pho-
tographed with its eyes
wide open and a look of
astonishment on its face.
The commissioner
See Page C3


The difference between fathers and dads


ather's Day might be
misnamed. I vote for
Dad's Day
There's a big difference be-
tween being a father and being
a dad. The former is biological,
the latter behavioral. Fathering
is an act of nature; being a dad
is all nurture. It's certainly
much easier to become a father
than to commit to becoming a
dad.
Every child needs a dad who
may or might not be his or her
biological father A dad is some-
one who's there when a child
needs him most, in good times
and bad, when guidance and
the gifts of an open ear and car-
ing heart are most important.


Dads come in all
ages and stages of
life. Grandfathers
and uncles, cousins
and big brothers,
family friends,
teachers, clergy,
coaches and mentors,
and even command-
ing officers can play
the role of dad at Jack
critical moments in GU
a young person's life. COL
Foster and adop-
tive dads are among
the most special people because
their gifts are the most timely in
the life of a child. Opening our
doors and hearts to children
whose needs are great and emo-


E
LU


tions fragile takes a
certain blend of
kindness and leader-
ship. How many of us
have the courage
and commitment to
accept another's
child as our own?
As a family policy
advocate, I've come
evine to believe that the
"ST absence of dads in
SAMN the lives of children,
either physically or
emotionally, is one of
the most obvious factors in con-
tributing to childhood stress.
While it's obvious that most
Moms are heroic and provide a
phenomenal level of care, lov-


ing support, and family leader-
ship, I have learned that chil-
dren need more than one
primary caregiver.
In studying family policy for
more than 35-years, I'm con-
vinced that when a child is not
afforded the advantage of a lov-
ing and caring male model,
problems are more likely Call
me a traditionalist, but I think
children live what they learn,
and who among us has not ben-
efited from the generous gift of
male guidance?
I certainly do not advocate
putting children in peril if a
parent is dangerous or their in-
fluence detrimental to the
child's health and safety. But


given the reality that child rear-
ing is at its best a team sport,
let's develop a consensus to em-
power Dads, support Dads, and
when necessary, recruit Dads to
be there for children who need
them.
I implore you think of the life
lessons we've learned good
or bad from our fathers. Let's
honor them by emulating the
good, overcoming the bad, and
sending a signal to our children,
in both word and action, that
they are valued.
0]
Jack Levine is the founder
of 4Genera tions Institute.
Email him at Jack@4Gen. org.


ROTTEN



to the









Thomas Kennedy guest column






Page C2 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013



PINION


"The wisdom of man never yet
contrived a system of taxation that
would operate with perfect equality."
Andrew Jackson, Dec. 10, 1832


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ............... ............ publisher
M ike Arnold ................... .................. editor
m Charlie Brennan................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz .............. .......... citizen member
M Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


REASONABLE PLAN




Commission


moves forward


with fire funding


When a fire starts, the
natural instinct is to
reach for the phone
and call for help. Funding for
fire response has been a low
priority for an extended pe-
riod of time. But for county
government, paying for fire
protection is a
critical issue, one
that became more THE I1
critical when CoL
Duke Energy re- Co
fused to pay its advance
full tax bill last for fire pr
year.
Fire protection OUR O
in Citrus County OUR
is currently Actio
funded by a Mu- stab
nicipal Services long-tern
Taxing Unit for vital
(MSTU) fee based
on the value of
property and included in the
county tax bill.
When Duke paid only a
portion of its tax bill, the total
dollars collected through the
fire protection MSTU
dropped. This created a fund-
ing crisis since the MSTU is
the sole source of funding for
fire protection services.
In response, county staff
has proposed creating a Mu-
nicipal Services Benefit Unit
(MSBU) that would fund part
of fire protection, while the
existing fire tax would fund
the rest.
Last week, the commission
gave preliminary approval
for a fire services MSBU and
set a July 23 hearing on the
final proposal.
Under the proposal, each
residential unit would be
billed a fire services fee of
$60, and the level of the
MSTU assessment would be
cut from 0.8 mill to 0.75 mill.
Commercial buildings would
be assessed at 6 cents a
square foot, and vacant lots
would pay $3.10 per lot.
According to Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy, revenue from the ex-


isting MSTU would cover
personnel costs for fire pro-
tection, while revenue from
the MSBU would pay for
equipment, fire trucks, fire
stations and administrative
costs.
Because the current fund-


ISSUE:
unty
mission
es MSBU
protection.

PINION:
n will
)ilize
n funding
service.


ing method for
fire protection is
based on the
value of property,
residents whose
taxable value is
very low now pay
little if anything
toward fire pro-
tection, though it
is a vital service
that is provided
to everyone in the
community.
By funding fire
services with a


combination of a fee assessed
against every property in the
county and fees based on the
value of property, higher-
value properties still pay
higher fire taxes, but every-
one in the county contributes
and shares the cost of fire
services.
This will mean an increase
in total taxes for many prop-
erties, particularly for lower-
valued properties the owners
of which now pay little or
nothing. Still, it seems like a
better option than raising the
MSTU millage rate.
The MSBU/MSTU combi-
nation will adequately fund
fire protection now, pay for
the cost of replacing equip-
ment nearing the end of its
useful life, add additional
fire coverage, and put in
place a long-term stable fund-
ing source for this vital
service.
This is a reasonable plan
that spreads the cost of fire
protection and broadens the
tax base supporting it. We en-
courage the commission to
approve this plan when they
conduct the final vote July 23.


Leave animals home
I think it's getting kind of a lit-
tle out of hand in fact, very
seriously out of hand -
with the animals being
brought to the stores. 0
You don't bring them in
the stores. Leave them
at home with their food
like they're supposed
to. You won't have to
worry about them cook-
ing in the cars, dum-
mies. Leave them in the CAL
house. Don't bring them 563
to the stores. It's not 563
healthy and I believe it's
against the law. But we don't
need animals. They put safety
things on them for every reason
-to help the blind, to help the
hearing, to help the sick, to help
this. It's time we stop and don't
give them those passes.
No pets in public
I'm calling about animals in
restaurants and grocery stores
and this person that wrote in
Sunday (June 9) about a Jack
Russell being uncomfortable in
the car. I'd suggest for her to
look in the dictionary and find
the definition of "animal." An


-
.1


animal is an animal. They totally
should leave the animals at
home. I feel animals should not
be in restaurants or grocery
stores and this county
|ND seems to be more con-
cerned with animals'
FF ights than humans. I
suggest something
should be done about
these people taking ani-
mals to restaurants and
grocery stores. And as
far as germs, I don't
know what this person
0579 was talking about. Peo-
ple I know have as
many germs as an ani-
mal does. So I'd really appreci-
ate if these people leave their
pets at home.
Stay home with pets
In today's Sound Off (June 9),
"Open heart for pets." You peo-
ple that are animal lovers, if you
can't leave your dog home and
you have to take it to the store,
then you stay home too. We that
don't have dogs don't want to
put up with your animals. They
are animals. They're not people.
They're not children. Leave your
pets at home when you come to
the store.


Slipping the constitutional leash


WASHINGTON
n May 1918, with America
embroiled in the First
World War, Iowa's Gov.
William Lloyd Harding dealt a
blow against Ger-
many. His Babel -
Proclamation that
was its title; you can-
not make this stuff up
- decreed: "Conver-
sation in public
places, on trains and /
over the telephone
should be in the Eng-
lish language." The
proscription in- Georg
eluded church serv- OTI
ices, funerals and
pretty much every- VOl
thing else.
Iowa's immigrant communi-
ties that spoke Danish, Dutch,
Norwegian and French ob-
jected to this censorship of lan-
guages of America's wartime
allies. Harding, however, said
speaking any foreign language
was an "opportunity (for) the
enemy to scatter propaganda."
Conversations on street corners
and over telephone party lines
- Iowa telephone operators
did the metadata-gathering that
today's National Security
Agency does resulted in ar-
rests. Harding was ridiculed,
but Germany lost the war, so
there.
The war validated Randolph
Bourne's axiom that "war is the
health of the state," but it killed
Bourne, who died in December
1918 from the influenza epi-
demic the war unleashed.
Today, as another war is enlarg-
ing government's intrusiveness
and energizing debate about in-
trusiveness, it is timely to re-
member that war is not the only,
or even primary, cause of this.
Or, more precisely, actual war
is not the only cause. Ersatz
"wars" domestic wars on var-
ious real or imagined vices -
also wound the defense of lim-
ited government. So argue
David B. Kopel and Trevor Bur-
rus in their essay "Sex, Drugs,
Alcohol, Gambling and Guns:
The Synergistic Constitutional


H
4


Effects."
Kopel and Burrus, both asso-
ciated with Washington's liber-
tarian Cato Institute, cite the
1914 Harrison Narcotics Act,
which taxed dealings
involving opium or
coca leaves, as an
early example of
morals legislation
passed using Con-
gress' enumerated
taxing power as a
pretext. In 1919, the
Supreme Court held
that the law "may not
e Will be declared uncon-
IER stitutional because
its effect may be to
CES accomplish another
purpose as well as
the raising of revenue."
Its "effect"? The effect of sup-
pressing the drug business ob-
viously was its purpose.
Nevertheless, the court held
that even if "motives" other
than raising revenue really ex-
plained Congress' exercise of
its enumerated power, the law
still could not be invalidated
"because of the supposed mo-
tives which induced it"
"Supposed"? The court's re-
fusal to reach a reasonable con-
clusion about the pretext
Congress used in this case for
trespassing on territory re-
served to the states enabled the
federal government to begin
slipping out of its constitutional
leash. In 1922, Chief Justice
William Howard Taft warned
that Congress could seize con-
trol of "the great number of sub-
jects" reserved to the states by
the 10th Amendment by impos-
ing a "so-called tax" on any be-
havior it disapproved: "To give
such magic to the word 'tax'
would be to break down all con-
stitutional limitation of the
powers of Congress and com-
pletely wipe out the sovereignty
of the states."
So, a 1934 law imposed a $200
tax on the making and transfer
of certain guns. Supreme Court
Justice Harlan Fiske Stone
complacently said that any act
of Congress "which, on its face,


purports to be an exercise of the
taxing power," should be
treated as such, without judicial
inquiring into any "hidden mo-
tives" Congress had. "Hidden"?
Congress responded to this
"abdication of judicial
scrutiny" (Kopel's and Burrus'
correct characterization) with
the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act,
another supposed tax law actu-
ally designed not to raise rev-
enue but to legislate morality by
changing behavior The 1951
Revenue Act taxed "persons en-
gaged in the business of accept-
ing wagers" and required them
"to register with the Collector of
Internal Revenue." The IRS
was becoming the enforcer of
laws to make Americans better
behaved, as judged by their bet-
ters in the federal government.
There have been equally spu-
rious uses of Congress' enumer-
ated power to regulate
interstate commerce. In 1903,
the court upheld, as a valid ex-
ercise of that power, a law sup-
pressing lotteries by banning
the interstate transportation of
lottery tickets. Dissenting, Chief
Justice Melville Fuller argued
that the power to regulate per-
sons and property in order to
promote "the public health"
and "good order" belongs to the
states.
Seven years later, the Com-
merce Clause was the rationale
for the Mann Act banning the
transportation of females for
the purpose of "prostitution or
debauchery, or for any other
immoral purpose." Including, it
turned out, noncommercial,
consensual sex involving no un-
happy victim.
Today, Congress exercises po-
lice powers never granted by
the Constitution. Conservatives
who favor federal "wars" on
drugs, gambling and other be-
haviors should understand the
damage they have done to the
constitutional underpinnings of
limited government


George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


BiG BROTHER


_ LETTER fto the Editor


House move
lacked motion
A few words about the May
17 Chronicle article "Move
House" about the weird May 14
BOCC meeting: I was there. It
involved a man and his brother
who owned a house along the
planned medical corridor at
County Road 491.
The man told of how grateful
his grandmother was for the
original road being paved. The
man also said the new medical
corridor road project would
not make the house a nice
place to live.
Commissioner J.J. Kenney
said, "Let's move his freakin'
house. Work it out!"
In the first place, the man
did not ask for the house to be
moved. Second, the county
budget is limited almost at
the point of meltdown, so why
leave the county open to
spending thousands of dollars?
Third, what about folks on
past, present and future county


road projects? Will they expect
to be paid if their homes were
or are not moved prepaid?
Fourth, Kenney did not
make a motion for the board to
vote to pay for the move.
Fifth, neither did Kenney
offer to pay for the move out of
out of his pocket. It is easy to
appear generous on the tax-
payer's dime!
Finally, I do not believe the
grandmother would appreciate
that her 1925 house be called
"freakin"' which is slang for
a four-letter word.
The BOCC is in desperate
need of protocol and not wast-
ing the time of the citizens
with sideshows and the sling-


ing of slang. Our budget is in
dire straits!
Now, this man could think
the move of his and his
brother's house will be paid
for, when there was not the
consideration by commission-
ers for a vote nor input al-
lowed by the taxpayers on
what they would or would not
want tax money going for
Only a non-democratic,
military-type order to "move
the freakin' house. Work it
out!"
Sorry, Mr Kenney, this is a
democracy, not a military base.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: ANIMALS


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good
taste.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Community spirit, Citrus County style


ost recently, I have
been a committee
member planning
a reunion for the Pasco
High School class of 1963.
Fifty years. That's a long
time. There are only 99 of
us left. We were a small
group to begin with be-
cause of World War II and
the effect it had on the
birthrate because many of
the potential fathers were
gone in 1944, and unfortu-
nately, 14 of us have
passed away during the
past 50 years.
Nonetheless, we worked
with what we had and on
June 14, we enjoyed a
great reunion.
But, during the time we
were going through our
planning process, I read
an article in the Citrus


County Chronicle con-
cerning a 10th-year re-
union for the classes of
2003, a reunion of all
three of the county's pub-
lic high schools, a reunion
that is to be conducted
jointly. It was an article
that made me both proud
of them and ashamed of
myself.
I'm sure a joint reunion
has happened somewhere
before, but I've before
never heard of such a
thing.
When I was in high
school, we considered the
folks at the other Pasco
County high schools -
Zephyhills High School
and Gulf High School in
New Port Richey to
fit somewhere between
nematodes and the fellows


we beat in football, that is
if we even scheduled
them. Pasco was the
county's largest school and
played in what was at that
time the
vaunted South-
west Florida
Conference
with schools
such as Bartow,
Winter Haven,
Lake Wales,
Plant City,
Haines City ...
all great foot- Fred B
ball schools. A
Not only did A Sl
we play 'em, OF I
more often
than not, we beat 'em. As a
result, we only played the
other in-county schools
occasionally and then
only when we needed a


I

I
L
L


filler on the schedule.
The competition be-
tween the high schools in
Citrus County is as strong
as I've ever seen. And
don't forget, my
family and I
spent time in
S Tallahassee,
where high
school football
is a very big
deal.
What I saw
immediately
rannen upon coming to
Citrus County
CE was something
LIFE else. In Pasco
County, the
rivalry, such as it was,
involved the various
communities. In Tallahas-
see, it was centered
around school districts.


But, in Citrus County, it's
different.
Yes, the three major
high schools in the county
play each other in all
sports and on the athletic
field they give no quarter,
but as one of the planners
of the coming combined
Citrus County High
Schools reunion put it,
"When asked where we
are from,we don't say Crys-
tal River, Lecanto or In-
verness, we say Citrus
County"
Cheryl and I moved our
family to Citrus County 30
years ago, and it didn't
take long for us to realize it
is a special place. It is a
very special place where
people are what is most
important to other people
- things such as unprece-


dented giving when and
where there is a need are
the norm.
Do we have problems in
Citrus County? Of course
we do. We have politicians
who sometimes act like ju-
veniles. (I could have used
another J-word, but Cheryl
would have nixed it.)
Do we have hope?
Do we have what is a
precious and unusually
high hope?
Yes. Our hope is in the
spirit demonstrated by this
group of young people who
see our community, Citrus
County, for what it really
is.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


A celebration of dad


F or the second year in a row, YMCA of Citrus County asked the

county's kids to write an essay explaining why their dad is the

best in the world. After the entries were in and the essays were judged,

winners were selected in three age groups. Below, the winning works:


Elyssa Lee Yarnell,
first place, ages 11 and 12
T he deciding voice in a long fought out argument.
A modem day superhero who stands strong no
matter what. A person who, even when I'm old, I
know I can always come to for assistance. At the end
of the day my dad fulfills all of those aspects and
more. If there was a battle to decide who the uni-
verse's most superlative dad was, hands down, my
dad would easily steal first place.
First of all, my dad makes a ton of personal sacri-
fices so I can live a better life. For instance, every sin-
gle weekday my dad travels to a job that is sometimes
dangerous so he can provide for my sister and I. Plus,
he never purchases things for himself, but is always
spoiling us. Seriously, we had to beg him to accept
the socks we obtained for him on his birthday. Talk
about a noble knight in dinged-up armor.


Furthermore, I know that my dad will never for-
sake me, even when I was a baby and had colic my
dad would spend hours soothing me and comforting
me until I finally fell asleep, even when he had work
the next morning! It was the same story when I was
teething. He never gave up on me and even let me
slobber on his shoulder! To this very day, my dad is
always devoted to my sister and I and NEVER leaves
us behind.
In addition to that, I can always look upon my dad
as a role model. Through thick and through thin, I
know my dad will always do what he thinks is right
so I just automatically copy him. It makes life a lot
easier. I am positive that my dad will never steer me
wrong.
In conclusion, my dad is the best dad ever because
he makes noble sacrifices, never abandons me, and is
the voice in the darkness that guides me. I love you
dad.


Colby Smith, age 7
Y ou are the best dad in the whole world. My dad is nice. I miss my dad so much. My dad is the coolest dad
in the universe. My dad plays with me whenever I want to play. My dad is the coolest dad in the whole
world. My dad is so cool. I love my dad so much and I love my dad more than any other daddy in the whole
world. I want him to come home to our house soon to our mom's house so I can play with you a lot with me
and Tyler. We will have a lot of fun. My dad is than all the other dad in the whole wide world. He is the coolest
dad in the universe really he is the coolest in the world he really is so nice. I miss my dad more than anything
in the whole wide really I do love him more than anything really.


AnnaBelle Mills
Touchton, age 9
I think my dad is the best dad ever. He
feeds us good food like stir fry, gumbo
soup, fried chicken, and fish. He plays
games with us. He takes us to the park
and plays tag with us. He goes outside
and plays flag football with us. He prac-
tices baseball, we play catch, do pop flies,
do grounders, and we practice batting. he
takes us bowling and he always wins. He
takes us roller skating and I have to help
my little sister, Kaitlynn, skate. He takes
us tubing down Rainbow River and we
like going there even though the water is
cold at first. He takes us to Hunter Springs
so we can swim and play. He plays the
GameCube and plays lots of fun games on
the Wii. He takes us to the library so we
can get books. He plays games with us
like Sorry, Magikus, and Rummikub. He
takes us camping and we go hiking with
my brother's Boy Scouts troop. We are
making a garden with him too. Most of all
he loves me and he tells me that he loves
me and, that makes me happy. All these
things he does with us are things I like to
do but all I really need is his love.


CORE
Continued from Page C1

expect students to know their math facts, to
read the nation's founding documents, and
to evaluate evidence and come to inde-
pendent judgments."
It is for the reasons above that I support
CCSS. It infuses the daily technology tools
critical for success in college and career It
was the National Governors Association and
the Council of Chief State School Officers who
worked together to develop CCSS in 2007.
I greatly encourage you to look at the
CCSS. Visit the Florida's DOE CCSS search
page at www.cpalms.org/Standards/FL
StandardSearch.aspx There you will find
all the adopted CCSS for K-12 such as this
one for 6th grade ELA (Reading/Writing):
LACC.6.W1.3: "Write narratives to de-
velop real or imagined experiences or
events using effective technique, relevant
descriptive details, and well-structured
event sequences."
LACC.6.W2.6: "Use technology, includ-
ing the Internet, to produce and publish
writing as well as to interact and collabo-
rate with others; demonstrate sufficient
command of keyboarding skills to type a
minimum of three pages in a single sitting."
The concerns I have with CCSS start with
Florida's CCSS implementation timeline. It
says CCSS will be fully implemented in
kindergarten through second grade by 2013-
14 and will be fully implemented in kinder-
garten through 12th grade by 2014-15. In the
above example of two sixth-grade ELA stan-
dards, you can see the use of individual stu-
dent technology will be necessary for
teaching CCSS. With a 2015 deadline -
which I might add also includes standard-
ized testing of the CCSS our schools and,
more importantly, our teachers and stu-
dents, will not have the time to transition to
these standards and will not have all the
necessary tools in place.
The CCSS in Florida will not be meas-
ured by the FCAT, but rather by the Part-
nership for Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers (PARCC). The PARCC
will be taken entirely on computers from
third grade through 12th. Education Weekly
reports in "Common-Core Tests to Take Up


to 10 Hours," published March 12, 2013, the
PAARCC test requires nearly eight hours for
third-grade students to take and more time
for the other grade levels: "The amount of
time students will have to complete both the
performance-based and end-of-year com-
ponents in math and English/language arts:
Grade 3rd: 8 hours, Grades 4th-5th: 9 hours,
20 minutes, Grades 6th-8th: 9 hours, 25 min-
utes, Grades 9th-10th: 9 hours, 45 minutes,
and Grades llth-12th: 9 hours, 55 minutes."
Keep in mind this is in addition to the mul-
titude of standardized test students are also
required to take such as Advanced Place-
ment (AP), International Baccalaureate
(IB), American College Testing (ACT),
Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT), Florida's
Postsecondary Education Readiness Test
(PERT), and Florida End-of-Courses (EOC).
Many of these tests are being updated to in-
clude CCSS assessments.
In order to accomplish this major shift in
standards and assist teachers in developing
their curriculum to meet CCSS standards, a
tremendous amount of time, funding and
resources are required. At the same time,
teachers must also continue teaching to the
current NGSSS as their students are still
being assessed on these and teacher evalu-
ations are still affected by students' FCAT
test scores. Citrus, through a multitude of
professional developments and initiatives,
has been doing a phenomenal job preparing
for CCSS. One example is the iPad/one-to-one
students devices being introduced into class-
rooms. However, there is just not enough
time let alone funding resources, to properly
implement CCSS. The expectation is by 2015
our students will be formally assessed on CCSS
and their future academic success defined
by the CCSS assessments; in turn, teachers'
evaluations and incomes will be deter-
mined by those students' CCSS assessments.
My hope and efforts are to help the state
legislators provide a statutory balance be-
fore 2015 by providing flexibility for school
districts in order to not remove "common
sense" when implementing CCSS.

Thomas Kennedy is a member of the
Citrus County School Board. Read his blog
at www ThomasTalksOnCitrusSchools. com,
or email him at thomas.kennedy@
citrusschools. org.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

plays hardball politics and bow
hunts in her spare time. Some of her
political opponents might want to
take a close look at the photo and
think twice about getting under her
skin.
Now, Leah Stringer is just as ac-
complished in her own profession.
For many years, she worked with Dr
Brad Rubin and his active practice
in Citrus County
Leah has a very different view of
life.
Leah and her husband Dr Tom
Stringer recently moved from In-
verness to Gainesville, where he
works at the University of Florida
training the next generation of
urologists.
Leah Stringer has retired and
plays tennis and volunteers with the
Alachua County Health Department
to provide health services to people
in need.
Now, she had a very different ani-
mal experience last week, when she
discovered she had mice in her
beautiful new home.
She has found the mice floating in
their courtyard pool, and was morti-
fied by the thought of their drowning
deaths.
In the 1950s, the woman might
have turned to her husband for the
solution. But times have changed.
During a diner conversation, I sug-
gested mouse traps and she got so
mad at me, I thought she was going
to stab me with her fork.
She was not trying to kill the mice;
she was trying to save them.
So Leah dreamed up a "mouse re-
covery plan" for the little rodents. In-
stead of using a mouse trap or letting
them drown in the pool, Leah got a
bucket and put it near the pool. She
then built a little mouse ramp that


runs up to the top of the bucket.
She then smeared the top of the
bucket with globs of peanut butter.
Big globs of peanut butter.
Her idea is that instead of jumping
into the pool and drowning, the mice
will climb up the mouse ramp and
eat large amounts of peanut butter.
When their little mouse bellies get
really stuffed with peanut butter,
their little mouse bodies will fall off
the ramp and land in the bucket.
Being little mice with bellies
stuffed with peanut butter, they
would not be able to climb out of the
bucket. (The Skippy Peanut Butter
Company fully endorses the Stringer
plan).
"So what are you going to do after
you capture them?" I asked.
I could only imagine a bucket of
fat mice with peanut butter all over
their whiskers.
"I am going to set them free," she
said.
"Won't they just come in the house
looking for the peanut butter," I
asked.
"I am going to set them free far
away," she replied.
She really thought this out.
Now, I can't get out of my head the
idea of Leah Stringer driving her
SUV through the streets of
Gainesville with a bucket of fat mice
that smell like peanut butter. We can
only hope she gets pulled over and
has to explain.
In today's world, it is totally ap-
propriate for one woman to go bow-
hunting for deer and for another to
rescue mice with peanut butter
Men are not equipped to figure
these things out. We just look on in
amazement and wonder why we
didn't get the memo that the world
was changing.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of
the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


SOUND OFF Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 352-563-0579.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 COMMENTARY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Comparisons
leave doubt
In Sunday, May 12's Commen-
tary section, School Board
Member Pat Deutschman of-
fered up a piece titled, "Our
world-class schools deserve
world-class support."
I think we all agree when an
elected official addresses the
community through a public
medium, he or she must be
knowledgeable, forthright and
free of dodgy propositions. Oth-
erwise, there's a loss of "public
trust," a point the Chronicle
forcefully made in its May 18
op-ed column concerning an
unrelated matter
Ms. Deutschman writes in
part: "We have been preparing
our homegrown students to
compete in the world so let's
encourage them to do just that.
"Our public schools have
been criticized for falling short
when compared to test scores of
students from other countries.
The truth is that many students
in the United States outperform
those from Finland, Singapore
and Shanghai, while at the same
time other students fall short.
When factoring in poverty, im-
migration and sample sizes (the
United States has far more stu-
dents in its education system,
and all of them are tested) one
can conclude the comparisons
lack credibility and relevance."
Truth is, our schools are
falling woefully short of prepar-
ing students to compete in the
world market. What follows
may be unpleasant but hiding
from it only exacerbates the
problem.
For the past 40 years, our stu-
dents have competed against
students of other countries on
internationally supervised and


Letters to the EDITOR

otA ivte 4anepwsde o ""cRRoeNS,


crafted tests. The Trends in In-
ternational Mathematics and
Science Study (TIMSS) is a sci-
entific project with rigorous
modalities and strict regimens.
It is recognized as the standard
throughout the world. U.S. stu-
dents at the 12th grade level
consistently score at or near the
bottom and have done so for
decades.
Ms. Deutschman said that
many U.S. students outperform
students from Finland, Singa-
pore and Shanghai. I would re-
spectfully ask where I might
find that information. It ap-
pears from my research that all
12th-grade TIMSS scores have
been scrubbed from the Inter-
net. Fourth and eighth grade
are still posted.
Much can be learned from


TIMSS, some of it thought pro-
voking. Over the years, test re-
sults show our fourth-grade
students score near the top; by
the eighth grade, they are
ranked about middle and by the
12th grade they are at or near
the bottom.
Another point: Unless the
test parameters have changed,
TIMSS does not test all stu-
dents but has a specific formula
to select participants. They are
chosen from the advanced
placement or honor student
level of each respective nation.
But TIMSS doesn't stand
alone. Our country's National
Assessment on Educational
Progress test supports the
TIMSS findings. It's adminis-
tered generally every two years
to a large sample of fourth-,


eighth- and 12th-graders. Test
administrators couch the 12th-
grade scores as lagging.
As for Ms. Deutschman's as-
sertion: "Our world-class
schools deserve world-class
support": The U.S. spends more
on public education than any
other country on earth. We have
world-class spending, we just
don't have world-class results!
David M. Motko
Citrus Springs

Thanks for
volunteering
I can't express in words my
thanks to all those who work
and volunteer for Special
Olympics. My adult daughter
has been a Special Olympian


LETTERS POLICY
All letters must be signed
and include a phone
number and hometown,
including letters sent via
email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.

for 36 years, her first at the age
of 3.
The dedication and enthusi-
asm of all those who work so
diligently year-round to give
our children this sense of ac-
complishment, belonging and
joy, are very special indeed,
and deserve the thanks not only
of families, but of every citizen
in our county and state.
This is another example of
volunteerism that blesses the
recipient as well as the
volunteer.
Marsha Shappell
Inverness

The truth about
Christians
I would like to respond to
your printing of the cartoon on
May 19 depicting some crazy
Christian striking down homo-
sexuals. The Bible makes it
clear in Leviticus 18 and 20, Ro-
mans chapter 1, Corinthians
chapter 6, and Timothy 1 chap-
ter 1 that homosexuality goes
against God's will.
Luckily, there's an answer
It's the blood of Jesus. It's being
born again. It's a new life in
Jesus' name. This is what Chris-
tians really believe in, not hurt-
ing people or doing harm unto
others.
Brad L. Block
Homosassa


At home or

on the go...


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02


FRIDAY, JUIM 2t,2017
6:OOPM-10:0PM 0R
f1I MIM fUR i15 NOfi MEMI E
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& Butter and Ice Tea or For Tickets and Info
Coffee. Call: 352-746-4882

CHONidE




Inside:


BUSINESS


Find Dr. Fred Herzog's
Nonprofit Briefs
column/D6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dance company celebrates 30 years in Crystal River


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

I CRYSTAL RIVER
t has been a long dance for
Ryan Bogart and Ronnie Duur-
loo Bogart, and the music is not
over.
They own and operate Ron-
nie's Academy of Dance, a Crystal River
business marking its 30th anniversary
At first it was called Ronnie's Lessons
and Dance back in 1983 when the Crys-
tal River High School Class of'79 grad
was already a veteran in the business.
She started teaching in 1977 at the La
Petite School of Dance in Crystal River
and had been dancing professionally
since age 16.
"I started in very small space," she
said, recalling a small studio across


Inside: For more photos
from Ronnie's Academy of
Dance, see Page D2

from Publix on State Road 44. She
moved to the current Meadowcrest loca-
tion in 1987 and in 2003 expanded.
Their dance students range from age 3
to adults and the number enrolled
varies. He said it's down a little now,
which they attribute to the nuclear plant
closing and people leaving the area.
Most of the students are local, some-
times continuing dance training they
had started somewhere else. She re-
called when the nuclear plant first
started operating and a lot of families
were coming in from out of state.
Born in Inverness, Ryan Bogart also


had an early connection to the La Petite
School, but he moved on with a ballet
scholarship at 13 and went on to per-
form all over the country He started
teaching with her in 1992.
They started and ran Nature Coast
Ballet for five years, a local ballet com-
pany that brought full-length ballet to
Citrus County and performed with a live
orchestra.
And as dance is always evolving, they
continued to expand their repertoire to
accommodate trends.
Last week on break between the acad-
emy's annual recital in June and sum-
mer dance camp, which starts Monday,
they talked about their business and the
art of dance in general.
Their passion is obvious and willingly
shared. There is a little sense of "what


BUSINESS

BRIEFS

Oil price highest since
January on Syria concerns
NEW YORK Oil rose to the highest
level since January amid concerns
about a possible escalation in Syria's
civil war.
Benchmark oil for July delivery rose
$1.16 to close at $97.85 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile Exchange. Oil fin-
ished the week with a gain of $1.82 a
barrel, or 1.9 percent.
President Barack Obama's decision,
revealed Thursday, to provide some
weapons to rebels fighting the forces of
Syrian President BasharAssad came
after the White House said it had con-
vincing evidence that Assad's regime -
which has been supported by Russia,
Iran and Lebanon's Hezbollah had
used chemical weapons against the
opposition.
The Middle East is a key source of
crude oil and important transit routes
cross the region, so conflicts which
threaten disruptions in crude production
or supply usually push oil prices higher.
US factory output rises
0.1 percent in May
WASHINGTON U.S. factories
barely increased their output in May
after two months of declines, a sign that
manufacturing is providing little support
for the economy.
The Federal Reserve said Friday that
factory production rose just 0.1 percent
in May from April. Output fell 0.4 percent
in April and 0.3 percent in March.
Factories produced more autos, com-
puters and wood products last month,
offsetting declines in the production of
furniture and primary metals.
Manufacturing output has risen just
1.7 percent in the past 12 months.
"Manufacturers are still struggling to
cope with the ongoing weakness of
global demand," said Paul Dales, senior
U.S. economist at Capital Economics.
Overall industrial production was flat
in May after a 0.4 percent drop in April.
Utility output, which is heavily influenced
by the weather, fell 1.8 percent after a
3.2 percent April drop. Mining output
I rose 0.7 percent after a 1.1 percent in-
crease in April.


Photos by MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Three ballerinas entertain those gathered Sunday at last weekend's Ronnie's Academy of Dance's 30th anniversary
celebration "A Blast from the Past." Academy owner Ronnie Bogart acknowledges the crowd Sunday evening following a
recital that included 31 dances, including one from each of the past 30 years' recitals.


Where to invest in

an uncertain market


CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP business writer

NEW YORK- The in-
vestment landscape can
be a scary place.
This year's stock mar-
ket surge has stalled and
the market is too choppy
to provide any sort of re-
assurance. Savings ac-
counts earn practically
nothing. Bonds, a tradi-
tional haven, seem like a
poor choice because in-
terest rates are likely to
go up. The stocks people
invest in for safe, steady
income, like utilities and
health care, aren't as
cheap as they used to be.
The Associated Press


asked five experts where
they're putting their
money in these uncertain
times. Their suggestions
are opinions, and you
should do your own re-
search before making any
decisions.
Anton Bayer, CEO of Up
Capital Management in
Granite Bay, Calif.
His idea: Floating-rate
and shorter-term bonds.
Pay attention, because
this one is a little
complicated.
The Federal Reserve
has been buying $85 bil-
lion worth of government
bonds each month to try


See Page D7


Business events scheduled this week


MONDAY, June 17
WASHINGTON National Asso-
ciation of Home Builders re-
leases housing market index for
June, 10 a.m.
ENNISKILLEN, Northern Ireland
- President Barack Obama at-
tends the summit meeting in
Northern Ireland of the Group of
Eight leading industrial nations,
through June 18.
TUESDAY, June 18
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases Consumer Price
Index for May, 8:30 a.m.; Com-
merce Department releases
housing starts for May,
8:30 a.m.; Federal Reserve poli-
cymakers begin a two-day meet-
ing to set interest rates.
WEDNESDAY, June 19
WASHINGTON Federal Re-
serve policymakers meet to set
interest rates; statement and


economic forecast due at 2 p.m.;
Chairman Ben Bernanke con-
ducts news conference at
2:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, June 20
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac,
the mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.;
National Association of Realtors
releases existing home sales for
May, 10 a.m.; Conference Board
releases leading indicators for
May, 10 a.m.
LUXEMBOURG European fi-
nance ministers meet to discuss
the current financial crisis.
FRIDAY, June 21
LUXEMBOURG European
Union finance ministers meet to
discuss the current financial
crisis.


-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY




Investments

would support

retirement cottage
DEAR BRUCE: I am 70 years
old, widowed with no chil-
dren. I have no debt and
pay my credit card balance in full
every month. I have investments of
$450,000. I have a nice home worth
about $150,000.
My goal is to buy a cottage in a
retirement community It will cost
me about $150,000 plus $800 a
month in utility fees.
Will this be sufficient, or should I
get a reverse mortgage, stay in my
home and invest the money from
the mortgage?
My monthly income is $1,782 and
my investments for the month usu-
ally provide another $1,000. I have
all my assets and expenses on a
spreadsheet, which I have done for
years, but still wonder what is the
best for me. Tiger, via email
DEAR TIGER: Your situation
seems to be OK to me. Buying the
cottage in the retirement commu-
nity will be a wash against the sale
of your home. No problem there.
The $800 a month in utilities fees
seems rather substantial. That is ap-
proximately $10,000 a year and far
too large a percentage for shelter
On the other side of that, you say
you are earning only $1,000 a
month on investments. If you can
earn 5 percent, you would have
roughly $23,000 coming in a year
You are going to ask, where do I
get 5 percent? With a decent bro-
ker handling your account both for
dividends and appreciation, a 5
percent return is not an unreason-
able amount. If you can increase
your income $12,000 a year, you
should be OK.
DEAR BRUCE: I sold my house
and I would like to invest some of
the money for my grandchildren to
See Page D3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ronnie's Academy of Dance


D2 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


BUSINESS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DANCE
Continued from Page Dl

could have been" in
terms of the county's art
scene, but their story is
more optimistic than
resigned.
And they have reached
a point where the busi-
ness is generational,
teaching children of for-
mer students.
They explained how
students have grown up at
their dance school, start-
ing as preschoolers and
leaving as high school
graduates including
their son, who is heading
off to college on a dance
scholarship.
On June 9, the daughter
of a former student from
30 years back was per-
forming in her sixth
recital. Her mother wrote
a tribute to the couple,
citing the positive, long-
lasting influence the
school has had made on
her life.
But there is another is
another side to their
longevity in the business,
a trend that is not
encouraging.
Dance, they agree, as
with the other fine arts,



MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

get them started. They
range in age from 20 to 30
years old. The 20-year-old
is in his second year of
college, and the others
have good jobs.
I want to invest $10,000
for two of them and $5,000
for the other two. I read
your column every week
and respect your answers
very much and would like
some help from you on
what would be the best
way to go about this for
them for a long term. -
J.R, via email
DEARJ.R: I under-
stand what you are trying
to do for the kids, and
that's terrific. However,
the $30,000 should be put
in a special account in


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Many of the youngsters were recognized and presented trophies for perfect attendance for all of the weeks during the dance academy's year.


does not come easily
"It takes a long time to
see the results of your
work," she said. "Dance is


your name and your name
alone.
As to how that should
be invested, that is an-
other matter I would
want you to be a little on
the aggressive side. Your
grandchildren aren't
going to need the money
right away and if your in-
vestment doesn't make
money, they haven't lost
anything. But in the long
term, they will benefit
from the aggressive
investing.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 34
years old and earn just
over $80,000. My wife is 38
years old and earns
around $95,000. We're
both in good health.
I am currently shopping
life insurance policies to
cover both of us. I've re-
ceived some quotes on-
line, but I'm not sure what
length of term I should be


not instant gratification,
not the expectation of our
microwave society"
"But this is what I do,"


she said. "If consistency is
the key to success, I've
been consistent."
"Citrus County has


If the sticker says it was part of
the option package, you are
entitled to it. I would insist the
dealership fix the problem.


considering. I'd appreci-
ate any guidance you
could provide. -D.R, via
email
DEAR D.R: Term in-
surance makes a lot of
sense, but you haven't
given me much informa-
tion as to why you are
buying the insurance. If
you have a fairly large
mortgage, having insur-
ance on both of your lives
is a good idea because if
either one of you should
pass, your income would
take an enormous hit You
may have children you
are concerned about.
These considerations


make a difference as to
why you want the insur-
ance and how long it will
be necessary
On balance, I would
think a 20-year term
would be helpful. In 20
years, you should have
your debt reduced and
may not need so much
insurance.
You recognize at 54 and
58 years old, your premi-
ums will be considerably
higher. What you want is a
policy that is renewable
without evidence of insur-
ability, which simply
means no matter how
your health is, the policy


been very good to me,"
she concluded. "I
wouldn't have been here
for 30 years if it wasn't."


would have to be renewed
at the current rate when
you turn 54 and 58 years
old. It should also be con-
vertible, which means if
you wish to change to
whole life insurance, you
can do so without
evidence of insurability
DEAR BRUCE: I re-
cently purchased a new
truck. On the sticker was
listed, as part of the op-
tion package, "mirrors -
power heated foldout."
The mirrors are neither
power nor heated.
The dealer said it
wasn't supposed to come
with power heated mir-
rors. That was a mistake
by the factory
What do I do to make
the dealership honor its
sticker? TB., Yucca Val-
ley, Calif.
DEAR TB.: If the
sticker says it was part of


Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 orpfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


the option package, you
are entitled to it I would
insist the dealership fix
the problem. The mistake
was not your mistake.
You have the sticker
and it says, "mirrors -
power heated foldout."
Since the truck was deliv-
ered without these things,
tell the dealer you expect
the full credit payable to
you for the lack of what
the sticker indicates.
If the dealer won't
agree with that, then go to
the manufacturer and
make a very strong
complaint.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
com. Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing
to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot
be provided.


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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 D3


*IIISearch llflo llyour .


OOOF9BI









D4


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Father-son team recognized for


volunteer work by AARP Services Inc.


A rnold Virgilio Sr. and
Arnold Virgilio, III of
Arnold Virgilio Insurance Serv-
ices, were both recognized for a
combined effort of over o100
hours of volunteer work by
AARP Services, Inc. AARP Serv-
ices Inc. is a for-profit sub-
sidiary of AARP that oversees
providers and the products of-
fered to its members. AARP
tracks volunteer hours of agents
who are authorized to offer
AARP branded products and


Advertise
commercial
properties

on EDC site
If you have a commercial
building for sale or lease,
or vacant commercial land
for sale, the EDC wants to
know about it.
"As the economy begins to
recover, the EDC is receiving
more leads on businesses
that may be interested in re-
locating to Citrus County.
Since some of these inquiries
have a quick response time,
it would be helpful for the
EDC to have a current list of
available properties that we
could refer to."
Additionally, businesses
that are members of the EDC
also havethe opportunityto list
their commercial properties
on the EDC website. There
is no charge to do so.
For more information on
EDC membership, contact
Keith Pullias at 352-795-3149
or keith@citruscounty
chamber.com. To submit
property, contact Ardath
Prendergast at 352-795-
2000 or ardath@
citrusedc.com.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
Tracey Montesano
Plantation on Crystal River
Keyla Hobbs
Main Street Restaurant and Lounge


... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


1 'S'- *
S 11p o p





C


who engage and serve the
community.
Arnold Virgilio Sr. is a U.S.
Army Veteran and has served
his country as well as his com-
munity. As a dedicated volun-
teer he has been active in many
organizations and is the recipi-
ent of numerous Outstanding
Community Service Awards.
Arnold believes in "Service
Above Self."
Arnold Virgilio, III enjoys
serving the residents of his com-


munity by assisting clubs and
organizations with fundraisers,
and cooking meals for veterans.
As a former detective he served
his community effectively, and
has continued to do so through
his volunteerism. Arnold be-
lieves "Do the Right Thing."
Both father and son are hon-
ored to be recognized by AARP
for their community service
hours preformed and look for-
ward to continually make a dif-
ference in their community.


r---------------------------------*1

Give a shout out to employees
who focus on customer service
I The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is proud to promote its "You Caught
I My Eye" program. The program allows residents and visitors to recognize
I employees who go beyond in their attention to Customer Service. In addition to
the employee's name appearing in the newspaper, the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce sends a letter to the employee's manager noting the recognition.
YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ... for OUTSTANDING customer service!
PERSON you are nominating
BUSINESS they work for
ADDRESS of business
CITY DATE of contact
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?

YOUR NAME
H_--------------------------------- Al


L K
E1.S2 t.


Do you have or do you know anyone that has children entering
into the 11th grade this Fall?
The Citrus County Leadership Citrus program. famous for giving adults actively
involved in the community a chance to gain "hehind-ihc-scene' knowledge
about Citrus County, is now available to TEENS!
The program has been accepted by the Citrus County School System and will
occur during school class time. This program is open to any Citrus County
school student entering into the 11th grade for the 2013-14 school year that is
actively involved in the community. Only 17 students will be accepted in the
program, so sign up today! Visit wwwwymcasuncoast.org for the application.
This program is a partnership of the Citrus County YMCA and Chamber of
Commerce sponsored Leadership Citrus Program. For more information, please
contact Joanna Castle at (352) 637-0132.


On this week's
Chamber Chat ...
This episode of Chamber Chat features
summer fun and summer fashions!
* Candy Murphy co-hosts Chamber Chat and
gives us all the details on how we can get tick-
ets to WalkerFest. Grammy Award-winning
artist Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo are head-
lining this huge event at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds, and time is getting short to get
tickets for this June 21 event!
* Jennifer Petrella and Holly Peterson share
some of their summer fashions from Off the
Cuff and on the Fly in downtown Crystal
River. Models will be wearing some of their
latest styles during this "on air" fashion
show! Look your very best at your next sum-
mer event.
You have three chances to watch Chamber
Chat: Monday at 6 p.m., Thursday at 8 a.m.
and Friday at 1 p.m.
If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat at no cost to you
- email Melissa Benefield at spotlightmelissa
@aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook
for clips of past segments and updates on our
weekly show!


News you

can use
Scalloping
season begins
July 1
Make sure your summer
guests have made plans to
come enjoythe beauty of the
Nature Coast as the 2013
Scalloping Season begins.
Scalloping information is
available at the Chamber of
Commerce office and the
Tourist Development Council.
Community-wide
Independence Day
celebrations
Homosassa: The 2013
Homosassa River Fireworks
Festival will kick off with a
Poker Run at 8 a.m. Saturday,
June 29, and will conclude
with their fireworks display
scheduled to fill the sky at
dark or about 9:30 p.m. If you
would like to more informa-
tion or to make a donation,
send an email to homosas-
safireworksfestival@gmail.
com or call 352-628-0620.
Inverness: Grab ablan-
ket or lawn chair and bring
the family to enjoy fireworks
over Lake Henderson. There
will be games, food, enter-
tainment, information booths,
and the Honor Guard. The
City of Inverness will pres-
ent its annual fireworks dis-
play on July 3 from 5 p.m.
to 10 p.m. Viewing areas are
Liberty Park and Wallace
Brooks Park. For more in-
formation, call 352-726-2611
or visit www.inverness-fl.gov.
Crystal River: Cele-
brate the Fourth of July at
King's Bay Park. The City of
Crystal River presents its
annual fireworks display on
July 4 at 9 p.m. For more
information, call 352-795-
4216, ext. 301.
Chamber hosts
Business Expo
Come support our local
businesses in the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
Business Expo! See what
valuable goods and services
are represented and take
advantage of the festival at-
mosphere. There will be food
and drinks, a children's play
area, an animal adoption
area and other surprises to
be announced shortly! The
Citrus County Fairgrounds
holds a flea market every
Saturday, plus there's a race
at the fairgrounds that night
- so stop in at the Fair-
grounds when you're done
and see what's going on. See
you at the Expo! Sept. 7 at
the Citrus County Audito-
rium from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.


Upcoming
Chamber
events
June 27 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Superior Residences
Aug. 8 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Suncoast Business Masters
Aug. 9 Chamber
Luncheon, Citrus Hills -
Healthcare Heroes
Awards Ceremony
Aug. 22 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Life Care Center/Comfort
Keepers
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com or
follow the QR code to see
the website on your
smartphone!


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


mEIbill --.-,


yot&





Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's Conneition


D5

SUNDAY
JUNE 16, 2013


SEBC CCBA membership furthers your industry


2013






20B1
SEBC







Riding wave

of construction

rebound
With the Southeast's hous-
ing industry enjoying a
strong recovery in-
cluding 18 improving markets in
Florida according to a national
index the 35th annual South-
east Building Conference (SEBC)
is experiencing a resurgence, as
well.
The July 11-13, 2013, trade
show and educational confer-
ence at the Orange County Con-
vention Center in Orlando is fast
approaching a sellout of its expo-
sition hall. Attendance is ex-
pected to exceed 5,000 builders,
housing and trades professionals
- the largest attendance since
the start of the housing downturn
in 2008.
Exhibitors will display the lat-
est building industry products
and services, including Hurri-
cane Alley, sponsored by the De-
partment of Business and
Professional Regulations
(DBPR) and Building a Safer
Florida Inc. (BASF), which show-
cases resources to protect people
and property from the ravages of
high-wind events.
Delegates to the conference
will attend timely educational
programs taught by some of the
industry's leading experts.
Florida contractors will be able
to attain all 14 hours of their con-
tinuing education requirement
through courses offered by the
Florida Home Builders Associa-
tion (CILB Provider No. 000916)
that include programs on Ad-
vanced Mitigation and programs
on Radon Testing in Residential
Construction.
This year's co-location part-
ners include the Energy and En-
vironmental Building Alliance
(EEBA) and the Florida Masonry
Association Foundation, both of
which will offer specialized edu-
cational courses. EEBA-
sponsored seminars include
Houses That Work, Selling High-
Performance Homes, and Houses
That Work for Existing Homes -
Remodeling for Energy
Efficiency
The SEBC also features tours
of the New Southern Home built
by Nathan Cross of NWC Con-
struction in Orlando a
4-bedroom, 3.5 bath pool home
showcasing the latest innova-
tions in design, luxury and tech-
nology and the presentation of
the 2013 Aurora Awards for de-
sign excellence (www.the
auroras.com).
For details and to register, visit
the SEBC website at www.
sebcshowcom.
The Southeast Building Con-
ference (SEBC), now celebrating
its 35th year, is the largest build-
ing industry trade show in the
southeast.
As the premier trade event, its
key features include outstanding
educational programs including
three days of keynote speakers,
hard-hitting seminars, designa-
tion programs, networking op-
portunities, roundtable
discussions and industry
briefings.
The exhibition includes more
than 100,000 square feet of build-
ing products and services from
nearly 300 leading manufactur-
ers and suppliers. The SEBC is
sponsored by the Florida Home
Builders Association, a building
trade organization in Tallahas-
see, and representing more than
7,500 building industry

ON THE NET
U www.sebcshow.com


"Every man owes a part of
his time and money to busi-
ness or industry in which he is
engaged. No man has the
moral right to withhold sup-
port from an organization that
is striving to improve condi-
tions within his sphere."-
Theodore Roosevelt
Are you a member of the
CCBA? When asked this ques-
tion, often the answer is "Why
should I be?" when in fact, the
better question is ... Why
shouldn't you be? Membership
with your local Home Builders
Association is support of your
industry through and through.
Standing alone, a small busi-
ness is "a voice in the dark,"
but by joining other members
of the team, what can be ac-
complished is nothing short of
amazing.
When you join your local as-
sociation, you automatically
become a full member at the
state and national level. That's
three memberships for the
price of one. Your National
(NAHB), State (FHBA) and
Local (CCBA) Home Builders
Associations offer plenty of re-
sources to help each member
make the most of their invest-
ment and connect with the
benefits they value most.
For more than 60 years,
NAHB has been the nation's


I,



. .. .7


Florida Home Builders Association First Vice President/Treasure,
Ron Lieberman, updates the CCBA membership on the recent
accomplishments of the Florida Home Builders Association.


leading source for housing in-
dustry information. HBA mem-
bers use a variety of ways to
stay connected to industry in-
formation, including publica-
tions, e-newsletters, exclusive


r r rr U


website content, bulletins, spe-
cial reports, email alerts, fi-
nancial data and many other
means. Up-to-date informa-
tion, when you want it, how
you want it!


Renewing members of CCBA


it


x


so special. We love visiting the rivers and the
parks and spending time outdoors. I know
when I take my children out; they are swim-
ming and playing in clean waters and parks.


Membership in your local
Home Builders Association is
more than just networking or
having a special seal on your
business door or stationary, it's
about building relationships.
You may not feel that you need
more business, but every con-
tact a businessperson makes is
a potential asset to them and
their business. That doesn't
just mean more business; it
means better information flow,
more exposure to more inno-
vative and/or more cost effec-
tive materials and services, as
well as more opportunities to
put your advertising dollars to
their most effective use
through local HBA sponsor-
ships and publications.
Put quite simply, it means
that your business is better be-
cause you made an investment
in your industry!
So what are you waiting for?
If you already know that
you've waited too long to sup-
port your industry, then go to
www.citrusbuilders.com, and
click on the "how to join" link
for a printable membership
application.
If you're still not convinced
that you need to make this in-
vestment, then call the CCBA
at 352-746-9028.
The Citrus County Builders
Association: Shouldn't you be
a member?


IMPORTANT
UPCOMING
CCBA EVENTS
The June General Mem-
bership Luncheon, sched-
uled from 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Thursday, June 27,
2013. Featured guest
speakers are representa-
tives of the National Asso-
ciation of Home Builders
and the Florida Home
Builders Association to
discuss the benefits of
the exclusive three-in-one
membership that your
local Home Builders Asso-
ciation offers. If you have
ever been interested in
joining the CCBA, this is
the meeting to attend!
Hot Chinese lunch will be
provided. Cost is $10 per
person. Reservations re-
quired.
The 2013 Florida Public
Utilities Community
Showcase, presented by
the Citrus County
Builders Association, will
be Saturday, Nov. 16, at
the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River. For-
merly known as the Home
& Outdoor Show, the new
Community Showcase will
focus on all community
businesses and organiza-
tions. Vendor space in the
Florida Public Utilities
Showcase will be available
to all businesses starting
in July, with prices rang-
ing from $100 to $200
per space. Please contact
the Citrus County
Builders Association for
more information. Don't
miss this opportunity to
participate in this true
showcase of our commu-
nity and all that it offers.
Save the Dates!
The 2014 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing
has been scheduled for
Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014,
at the Inverness Golf &
Country Club, with a por-
tion of the proceeds to
benefit the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County
Sponsorships and regis-
tration will be open begin-
ning July 1, 2013. Call
Executive Officer Donna
Bidlack at 352-746-9028
with any questions.
The 2014 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment has been scheduled
for April 26 and 27, 2014,
at the Homosassa River-
side Resort, with a por-
tion of the proceeds to
benefit the Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Mili-
tary Order of the Purple
Heart. Sponsorships are
open now, and official reg-
istration is expected to
open in October of this
year. For more informa-
tion, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028.


Melissa Sutherland
of Air Care Heating & Cooling
"We care about your air!"
352-621-3444
Number of Years in Business: 23.
Community Organizations: CCBA member
of 19 years.
m What you love about your work: There is
nothing more miserable than coming home to
a house that is hotter inside than it is outside
- especially when it is over 90 degrees out-
side! When we are able to get a customer going
quickly, they are usually very appreciative. I
love getting those phone calls! We are blessed
to have a crew who care about our customers
and each other and strive to do their best each
day
What you love about this county: I've lived
in Citrus County since I was 5 years old. In that
time I've seen a lot of growth but our county
has retained the natural beauty that makes it


CCBA Banquet Hall available for rental


The Citrus County Builders As
ciation has a Banquet Hall avail-
able to rent, for weddings,
receptions, anniversary parties,
graduation celebrations, club
meetings, etc. and it's open to
the public. Free Internet access.
Please feel free to come and
look at the hall during regular


so- business hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to
Thursday The office is at1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, centrally
located a short drive south of State
Road 44.
9r- If you would like more informa-
_j tion, visit the website at www. cit-
S rusbuilders.com or call Donna
L Bidlack at 352-746-9028.


Renewing members recognized at the April General Membership Meeting luncheon, pictured
left to right are: President Elect Randy Clark of Clark Construction, Melissa Sutherland of Air
Care Heating & Cooling (19 years), Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready Mix (10 years), Jim Loos
of Schlabach Security & Sound (18 years) and FHBA First Vice President/Treasurer
Ron Lieberman of Steel Structures Inc. (2 years). Renewing members not present: Al & Sons
Millwork Inc. (14 years), Bob Tsacrios Plumbing (9 years), Bonded Builders Home Warranty
(18 years), C & S Residential Roofing Inc. (9 years), Capital City Bank (20 years), Citrus 95
& Fox Classic Hits (7 years), Citrus County Chronicle (29 years), Citrus Well Drilling (31
years), ERA American Realty (2 years), ERA American Realty Affiliate Holly Jones (1 yr), FDS
Disposal Inc. (4 years), Florida Public Utilities (14 years), Gaudette Electric Inc. (32 years),
Gerrits-Citrus Inc. (10 years), Goodfella's Roll Off Waste Disposal (10 years), Mark E.
Schroder, P.E. (4 years), Nichols Lumber & Supply (27 years), Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln
Affiliate Ana Cruz (1 yr), ProBuild (5 years), Duke Energy (34 years), Duke Energy Affiliate
Marie Brotnitsky (4 years), Richard A Van Orden (9 years), SanderSon Bay Fine Homes LLC
(11 years), Tropical Window Inc. (18 years), Will Construction Corp. (21 years).


Member SPOTLIGHT


m


u




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Annual IRS filing requirements can apply to nonprofits


Nonprofit organizations
can no longer assume
they are too small to file
an annual information return
with the IRS.
Failure to file an annual re-
port will lead to the automatic
revocation of an organization's
tax exemption after a three-
year period. Nonprofit leader-
ship should not be emboldened
by the most recent legislative
scrutiny of the IRS. The service
remains an independent and
strong agency
Bottom line, small nonprofits
must file their annual informa-
tion return no matter how lim-
ited their annual revenues. If
nonprofit leaders or volunteers
wish to challenge or question
this new enforcement policy -
call the IRS?
IRS rules &
regulations
Prior to 2006, nonprofits with
less than $25,000 in gross re-
ceipts annually were not re-
quired to file a yearly return.


However, starting in 2008,
which covered the 2007 tax
year, submission of an annual
information form became an
obligation. Limited income no
longer offers relief in regular
reporting.
For nonprofits in the limited
yearly income category of
$25,000 or less, annual informa-
tion filing of Form 990 can be
electronic. The 990 does re-
quire additional information
about the organization, but in
any case it must be done and on
time.
Small federated
chapters at risk
Chapters of large national
nonprofits are the most at-risk
nonprofits. These groups are
usually volunteer-led and have
limited annual revenues. The
new filing requirements,
largely unknown by the small
local chapter leadership, can
still lead to loss of their tax
exemption.
As in many instances, igno-


IF



N


rance of the law is:
excuse!
Chapter leaders
the least, review fil
2007. When not con
with your situation
professional to revi
documents to prote
loss of exemptions.
be worst is the poss
formal and involun
tion of the organize
Filing required
revenue categ
Gross Revenue -


Requirement
Less than $25,000 990
Annual Information Form
Dr. U $50,000 or less Form 990-
Frederick N (which is an e-postcard)
Less than $200,000 and
Herzog total assets of less than $500,000
Form 990 or
990-EZ
MONPROFIT 0 $200,000 or greater or total
BRIEFS assets of $500,000 or greater-
Form 990
Please note carefully
not a viable The information herein com-
prises general guidelines to fol-
hip should, at low, as recently published by
ings since the Association Forum. The
nfortable next Nonprofit Briefs will cover
bring in a the balance of additional infor-
iew the filing nation required by the various
ct against levels of nonprofit gross in-
What could come. Watch for it in the Non-
sibility of a profit Briefs column on July 21.
itary dissolu- Helping nonprofits
itional entity in Citrus County
nents by Help with questions on non-
fories profit management is available
-Filing from Dr Frederick J. Herzog,


Ph.D., LLC, executive director
and founder of the Nonprofit
Resource Center in Citrus
County. It should be noted, the
information contained herein
is not presented as legal or
professional tax advice.
Dr. FrederickJ Herzog,
Ph.D., LLC, was certified in
nonprofit and association
management by the American
Society ofAssociation
Executives and the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce. He has
held multiple national
association executive positions,
including professional staff and
consultative assignments.
Dr Herzog holds both
professional and corporate
memberships in the Americana
Society ofAssociation
Executive, The Association
Forum and The National
Society of Non Profit
Organizations. Dr Herzog can
be reached at 847-899-9000 or
via email at fherzog@
tampabay.rrcom.


Business DIGEST


Seven Rivers hosts
awards banquet
CRYSTAL RIVER -Asso-
ciates at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center
gathered for an evening of
fine dining and celebration at
Plantation on Crystal River
during National Hospital
Week to honor 680 years of
service from 59 health care
professionals.
"The dedication and years
of service our associates give
the community and hospital is
to be admired," said Joyce
Brancato, chief executive offi-
cer. "Another level of appreci-
ation is owed to the spouses,


families and significant others
our associates are sur-
rounded by for their under-
standing of the long hours,
the late-night phone calls and
the missed meals that have
occurred over the years.
Tonight, we thank all of you."
Five years: Thomas
Pruitt, Laura McCarthy, Jam-
mie Rhodes, Marcia Haskell,
Elizabeth Rahimi-White,
Danielle Stalvey, Cynthia
Heather, Bruce Joblonicky,
Tracie Hunt, Martha
McKenna, Cindy Buckland,
Faith D'Esposito, Anna Mary
Rodriguez, William Doel,
Donna Simon, Deborah Wiel-
golinski, Deborah Lutzow,


Steven Miller, Heather Fors-
berg, Christine Colegrove,
Carla Beach, Toni Haner,
Kevin Morgan, Mindy Ties-
meyer, Dana Manfredo and
Henry Seibel.
Ten years: Susan Quick-
ley, Donna Austin, Deborah
Bennett, Jason McCauley,
Michelle Breitweg, Kimberly
Posila, Robert Lobianco,
Rachel Nicholson, Loretta
Raynes, Deborah Perry, Kath-
leen Brown, Sheila Hendricks,
Darlene Pensinger and Barry
Lingelbach.
Fifteen years: Theresa
Bodden, Evelu Huffman,
Cathleen Munn, Michael
Bushey, Carol DeFalco and


Donald Dempsey.
Twenty years: Stephen
Troiano, Paula Houseknecht.
Debra Guilmette, James
Finney and Sandra Meier.
Twenty-five years:
Lewis Wilt, Elizabeth Mar-
tynowski, Cynthia Heitzman
and Richard Tomlinson.
Thirty years: Susan
Gibson, Karen Hubbell, Re-
nate Smith and Carla Harber.
Also recognized for their
contribution to health care
were associates who retired
in 2012 and associates who
earned achievement awards
during the year:
Retirees: Karen Barn-
hardt, Elizabeth Barretto, Alia


Bopp, Shirley Dibble, Ronnie
Hamed, Linda Jaskewicz,
Luzthelta Lagasca, Karen
Mikesell, Virginia Sullivan and
Linda Wilburn.
2012 Quarterly Award
winners: (Q1) Kim Rinzel, Si-
mone Leete and Dorothy
Pernu. (Q2) Megan Horak,
Cynthia Davis and Mistie
Newston. (Q3) Eli Romero,
Darlyn Phillips and Bonnie
Coman. (Q4) Christy
Burkhart, Susan Quickly and
Joann Mramor.
2012 Annual Award
winners: Kim Rinzel, Cynthia
Davis and Dorothy Pernu.
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, a 128-bed


general, medical/surgical
acute care facility serving Cit-
rus, Levy and south Marion
counties, opened its doors in
1978. Seven Rivers Regional
is fully accredited by The Joint
Commission and has earned
the Gold Seal of Approval as
a certified primary stroke
center. The medical center
has an innovative alliance
with UF & Shands for stroke
care, is recognized with a
Gold Quality Achievement
Award in Heart Failure from
the American Heart Associa-
tion for its success with Get
With The Guidelines and has
been awarded the national
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BUSINESS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVEST
Continued from Page Dl

to make long-term loans
cheaper and stimulate the
economy. As long as the
Fed is propping up de-
mand for bonds, the
Treasury doesn't have to
worry too much about en-
ticing buyers and can pay
out low interest rates on
them. If the Fed pulls
back on its bond-buying
spree something that
Chairman Ben Bernanke
has said could happen
soon then the interest
rate on bonds will go up.
That's bad for people
who already hold the
Treasury bonds. Here's
why: Most Treasury bonds
pay out a fixed rate. If you
own a 10-year Treasury
note that pays 2 percent
interest, and rates go up
to 3 percent, you're still
going to get paid 2 per-
cent. That means you're
missing out on investing
in a higher-paying bond.
It also means that the un-
derlying value of your
bond is going to go down:
No one wants to buy a
bond with a 2 percent
yield in a 3 percent yield
market. You can get all
your money back if you
wait until the bond ma-
tures, but that will take
10 years.
Bayer recommends
floating-rate bonds, be-
cause the interest rates
they pay change along




DIGEST
Continued from Page D6

designation as a Blue Distinc-
tion Center+ in the areas of
knee and hip replacement by
the Blue Cross and Blue
Shield companies. Learn
more at SevenRiversRegional
.com, Facebook.com/SRRMC
or Twitter.com/SRRMC.

Daystar gets new
executive director
Elaine Bakle of Hernando
will be the 10th executive di-
rector of Daystar since it was
formed 30 years ago. Bakle
brings a multitude of experi-


with the Fed's interest
rate. Be careful, though,
because floating-rate
bonds are often issued by
riskier companies.
Bayer also recommends
fixed-rate bonds with
shorter durations. If you
own a bond paying a fixed
interest rate, and then in-
terest rates rise, it's better
to be able to get your
money back in one year
instead of 10. Keep in
mind that the shorter-
term Treasury bonds will
pay much lower rates: A
10-year Treasury note is
paying about 2.1 percent.
A one-year Treasury note
is paying 0.1 percent.
Bayer said that in-
vestors who were used to
the higher interest rates
of previous decades will
have to retool their in-
vesting strategies.
"That's the biggest mis-
take that investors are
making right now," Bayer
said. "What worked for
the past decade is not
going to work now."
Blake Howells, portfo-
lio manager and analyst
at Becker Capital Man-
agement in Portland, Ore.
His idea: Big-name tech
companies, regional
banks.
Howells likes Microsoft
and Apple, but not neces-
sarily for their best-
known products.
He likes Microsoft not
for the Windows operat-
ing system, which has gar-
nered mixed reviews, but
for the servers it sells


ence with
her. As a
social re-
searcher, t.1. -
certified
community
and conflict
resolution '
mediator Elaine
and social Bakle
therapist, Daystar Life
Bakle un- Center.
derstands
what many of the clients are
going through.
Being a motivational
speaker, Bakle enjoys teach-
ing and was an adjunct pro-
fessor at Ivy Tech College in
Indiana, where she taught so-
ciology, humanities, funda-


"that make big companies
and big data farms run."
He likes Apple not for the
iPhone and iPad after
all, the company's stock is
down 19 percent this year
and it's largely because
people are worried that
Apple can't keep churning
out blockbuster gadgets -
but because of the iOS op-
erating system. He thinks
it will help Apple keep
customers who won't want
to go through the hassle of
switching all the informa-
tion on their iPhones and
iPads to another system.
"That gives it a little bit
more sticking power than
a BlackBerry or a Nokia,"
Howells said.
He likes certain re-
gional banks, like Pitts-
burgh-based PNC
Financial Services Group
and Minneapolis-based
U.S. Bancorp, crediting
their plain-vanilla busi-
nesses of making loans
and accepting deposits.
He said they're "in much
better shape than they
were at the start of the
downturn," before the
2008 financial crisis. But
he's iffy on the mega-
banks, even if some are
selling at prices much
lower than before the fi-
nancial crisis.
"At the end of the day,
we don't know what's in
their trading books,"
Howells said. '"And any
time you have volatile
markets, you can have
some unpleasant
surprises."



mental of English, intercul-
tural and business communi-
cations. Bakle has a
bachelor's degree in general
studies and a master's de-
gree in sociological practice
from Indiana University.
In her recent position of ex-
ecutive director of Nature
Coast Ministries, she worked
with programs that mirror
those of Daystar.

United Way
welcomes Fein
The United Way of Citrus
County is pleased to name
Cindi Fein as its executive
assistant.
Cindi's varied background


Rob Lutts, president
and chief investment offi-
cer of Cabot Money Man-
agement in Salem, Mass.
His idea: Energy stocks.
Lutts predicts that do-
mestic energy production
will continue to expand,
fueled by new technology.
He's especially interested
in companies that make
equipment for specialized
production methods, and
has an eye on a Houston-
based company called
Dril-Quip Inc., which
makes equipment for
deepwater drilling.
The U.S. is producing
more crude and natural
gas. The International En-
ergy Agency predicts the
U.S. will become the
world's biggest oil pro-
ducer by 2017, and will
produce all the energy it
needs by 2035.
"If you're going to pick
one cost that impacts all
of America, it's energy,"
Lutts said. "And it's unap-
preciated how the energy
industry has been turned
upside down by new
innovation."
Margie Patel, senior
portfolio manager at
Wells Fargo Capital Man-
agement in Boston
Her idea: Consumer
stocks.
Patel likes companies
that make "the products
we all consume every day,"
from groceries and cos-
metics to cleaning sup-
plies. Returns can be more
modest than in other sec-
tors, at least when the mar-


provides
her with
eight years
in maga-
zine/news-
paper
publishing,
15 years in
office man-
agement,
and more
than 20


Cindi Fein
United Way of
Citrus County.


years in customer service.
She holds a B.S. in journalism
/public relations from NIU and
currently sits on the Advisory
Board for Coastal Healthy Liv-
ing Magazine and represents
United Way in Florida Public
Relations Association, Nature
Coast Chapter.


ket is rising, but they're
also more stable in bad
times. Lower prices for
some of the commodities
that companies need to
make their products will
trim costs. On Friday, the
Thomson Reuters/Univer-
sity of Michigan monthly
survey reported that while
consumer sentiment came
in slightly below expecta-
tions in June, May was at a
nearly six-year high.
"The population is
growing, and people have
a little bit more money in
their pocket to spend on a
range of products," Patel
said. And while the U.S.
economic growth looks
only moderate, she said,
"it's still positive growth,
and it's still sustainable."
Mickey Segal, managing
partner at Nigro Karlin
Segal & Feldstein in Los
Angeles
His idea: Apartments.
To Segal, it's a great
time to buy apartment-
related investments,
thanks to a combination of
high demand and low sup-
ply
He thinks more people
will have to rent apart-
ments because it's tough
to qualify for a home loan.
And with higher mortgage
rates all but inevitable as
the Fed prepares to pull
back on bond buying,
some lower-income buy-
ers may not be able to af-
ford a home. Already, U.S.
homeownership is at 65
percent, its lowest rate
since 1995, according to



"We are excited to wel-
come Cindi to the United Way
and know she will be a great
addition to our team," said
Amy Meek, CEO. Cindi's par-
ticipation in Leadership Citrus
2013, a program of the
Chamber of Commerce,
helped her to make the deci-
sion to work with United Way
of Citrus County.
"We have great programs
here in Citrus, and many peo-
ple who need access to those
programs so that they may
take care of themselves and
their families not just today,
but in the future," Fein said.
"I've always believed in pay-
ing it forward, and working
with United Way is just one


BUSINESS


To place an ad, call 563"5966


I.a: 32)53-65 1 ol re:(88 5-24 1E ai:cls*iescho*cenln omI0este wwcrnilonie0o


Are you really out
there?
I'm an active widower,
in good shape, like to
engage in social
activities and fun to be
with. Would like to
meet a nice Christian
lady between 70-80+
with an upbeat
personality in aood
health, intelligent,
affectionate, a good
conversationalist &
listener. With an avg
to slim build, hopefully
with mutual chemistry
for companionship
and possibility loving
relationship. Please
only serious minded
widows call me at
527-9632. I'd love to
hear from you.


Gentleman in his late
60's would like to
meet a lady for some
companionship
and maybe more
(352) 382-5661


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


**INVERNESS**
Great Location! 2/2/1
w/scn porch, w/d, pool
$725. 352-726-6567

COMPUTER
OPERATOR
Needed -$10 per hour
part time. Must have
good ebay exp &
reside in Homosassa
area (352) 628-9128

EXP. ROUTE
DRIVER

must have CDL LIC.
w/air brake & tanker
endorsement
APPLY WITHIN:
at 2240 N. Skeeter
Terrace, Hernando
between 8am & 2pm
NO PHONE CALLS

INVERNESS
SWMH w/add 2/1 near
wal-mart $475 mo. non/
smoking 706-473-2184

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Lg BBQ Grills
8ft satellite Dishes
& MORE 352-270-4087


2 Dogs
1 Shih Tzu female
1 Toy poodle female
both are 6 years old,
very playful ok to sepa-
rate free to good home
352-270-4585
2 PIGS
FREE
(352) 228-4302
CAT Rescued, healthy
and good weight. Has a
medical issue that
will not affect his
happiness,Needs good
home, male, 3-6 yrs old.
nurtured, Needs to be
only cat in home please
call 352-476-1148
Chihuahua, Min Pin
Mix, female, approx 7
yrs old.good w/other
small dogs, spayed,
free to good home
352-872-9654
Firewood,red maple
352-344-2321
FREE KITTENS
9 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free
Older German
Shepherd
male, neutered
extremely friendly
don't bark
(352) 201-1559
FREE
Part Bengal Cat
Young Male,
neutered,, free
to a good home
352-464-1567
Free to good loving
home, adult female
cat, spayed
and declawed.
No dogs or cats. Call
352-422-6310
Free to loving home 2
adult male cats. Neu-
tered, must stay
together. Call
352-422-6310
KITTENS- 4 WKS old
calico, orange,
blk/wh, blue eyes
Cl BTN 8-9 a.m. or 8-9
p.m. (352) 746-1904


Mini Pin, male, 2yrs old,
tri color, great with kids
& sm dogs.
Kitten Siamese mix,
male 8 wks old, gray &
white
352-400-6004
Peking Duck
To a good home
(352) 464-1567



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct (a $5.001b.
** (352) 897-5388**
Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistvmeadows-


Black Male C.at
Beverly Hills Area
chewed ears
pls call 352-201-8594
Brown Tabby Cat
8 yrs old, chipped,
spayed, missing teeth
on top, lost in the area
of crystal river mall off
turkey oak. She is not
an outside cat, please
call if you find her or see
her 352-257-9438
Bull Dog Mix
Male, white with black
spots on ears, 7 mths..
answers to (PIG)
Missing from W. Oliver
St/Yulee, Old
Homosassa. PIs call
352-238-5936
CAT LOST
BIk and White, female,
declawed, chipped,
broke loose may have
rope still attached to col-
lier lost in area of
Grayson/Ventura in E
Highlands, Inverness
352-419-4463
CHIHUAHUA
31/2 yr. old, short hair
male, lost on June 8th
on W. Far Hills Lane
Crystal River
352-563-2188


Lecanto / Beverly Hills
Fri 6-7. Disabled Vet
352-465-1319
LOST 11yr. old male
neutered CAT Beverly
Hills, Wash./Penn. St.
area, Cream & copper
Siamese mix, blue
eyes, declawed, micro-
chipped, named Bai-
ley, gentle,small re-
ward, call
352-249-7252
Lost Dog
7 mnth old Chow Mix
she's fluffy, beige
w/brown spot on nose
lost on N Citrus Ave
on Wednesday 6/12
$100 REWARD
PIs Call 352-212-5480
Lost Dog
Chihuahua,
Tan, female at
Barge Canal
Crystal River
Monday. 10th
(352) 795-6943
Lost Miniature Pincher
Female,
Chocolate & Tan
Stage Coach & 581
Floral City
REWARD
(352) 220-8676
LOST
Pomeranian, Male,
Name Harley
by Green Acres
Homosassa
(352) 364-1259
Lost somewhere in the
Floral City/Inverness
area a small gold wedd-
ing band. Owner heart-
broken. This has great
sentimental value for my
good friend. Please call
(352)344-1034 ask for
Sandy
Siamese Cat
Male, Blue eyes lost on
6/7/2013 in SMW cork-
wood and twinberry
Reward Offered
727-744-4891
Solid Grey Cat
male Buffalo Dr area of
Pine Ridge, Beverly
Hills, please call (352)
433-4446. Thank you.


Brindle Pit Bull
found on corner or
Cardnial/Elsie Lecanto
Call to identify
352-621-9810



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct ia$5.001b.
** (352) 897-5388**



TUTOR for FLVS ALG2
(Online Class) Floral
City 352-726-0191




WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for P/T
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.




FIT & PIT
Office Assistant

must be professional
have equine
background & be
a team player
Homeowner's Assoc.
exp. helpful, Smoke
free workplace
in Beverly Hills
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-0875




HAIR STYLIST
Full time/ IPart time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII







BILLING CLERK
FT M-F 8:30am-5pm,
2 Office locations,
competitive salary
with benefits. Mini-
mum 3yrs billing expe-
rience. Resume must
include prior employ-
ment references.
Submit Resume To
Citrus Podiatry Cen-
ter, P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120
FAXES NOT
ACCEPTED




CNA/HHA's
Urgent Need Call or
Apply In Person
INTERIM HEALTH
CARE
581 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Lecanto 34461
(352) 637-3111


CNA'SI
HHA'S H/C
Have level 2 bckgrnd
ck cpr certified &
prior employment
verification
(352) 597-4084


DENTAL HYGIENIST
Part time, digital
office, must have
experience call
(352) 746-3525


DME PERSON

with billing exp. and
good working
knowledge of all
aspects of Durable
Medical Equipment
Please email resume
to hr@cmc-fl.com or
drop off at 7562 W.
Gulf to Lake Hwy
Crystal River.


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
& RECEPTIONIST
Experience req'd for
very busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

Podiatric
Assistant
Supervisor

FT M-F. 8:30am-5pm.
Must have Basic
x-ray license or
Podiatry x-ray license.
Two local office
locations. Must have
minimum of two years
experience with em-
ployment references.
Competitive pay with
benefits.
Send resume to;
Citrus Podiatry
Center, Pa, P.O. Box
110, Lecanto, FL
34460-1120


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITION












BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE



SeeMie0arelI


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 D7

the Census Bureau.
Another trend that
could encourage renting
is the tighter supply of
homes. In some areas, in-
vestor groups are buying
up houses for rental prop-
erties and hoping to sell
them later for a profit.
That limits the number of
homes for sale. The Na-
tional Association of Re-
altors, which advocates
for home buying, said
there aren't enough exist-
ing homes to keep up with
demand.
There also aren't as
many new apartment units
coming on line. Builders
broke ground on new
apartments at an annual-
ized rate of 234,000 in
April, compared with
351,000 at the same period
in 2005. And while con-
struction was up this April
compared with a year ago,
it was still down 40 percent
from the previous month.
Put it all together and
you can expect higher
rental prices. The median
asking rent for a vacant
apartment was $718 per
month in the first quarter,
according to the Census.
That was roughly flat
from the year before, but
up 5 percent from two
years ago.
"You have more people
looking for a place to live
who either lost their
homes or couldn't afford
their homes," Segal said.
"And there's been no new
real development hap-
pening for a few years."



BUSINESS DIGEST

Submit information
via email to newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com
attn: Business Digest.

more avenue to give back
some of the blessings my life
has provided me."
In addition to dispersing
grant money to local qualified
organizations, United Way of
Citrus County works to im-
prove health, education and
incomeissues for county resi-
dences, not through hand
outs, but with hands up. For
information on your local
United Way, visit www.
citrusunitedway.org.





D8 SUNDAY,JUNE 16, 2013


FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST

Full time 9:00a-4:30p
Computer knowl-
edge necessary
(352) 637-6300


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly& Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885






Counselor/
Case Manager

Exciting opportunity
for a dedicated pro-
fessional to join our
Family Help
CINS/FINS program
based n C trus
County. We are look-
ing for an experienced
and dynamic profes-
sional with a strong
commitment to work
with youth, families
and community part-
ners to prevent and/or
remediate truancy and
other problems that
place youth at risk for
delinquent behavior.
MA/MSW preferred;
BA/BSW required.
Services will include
both home-based and
school visits. Profes-
sional must be able to
work collaboratively
with the school sys-
tem, law enforcement
and other county offi-
cials to ensure that
the service needs of
youth and families are
met. The successful
candidate will be
responsible for case
staffing and court
processes under the
CINS/FINS statutes.
The position is
responsible for con-
ducting outreach
activities as needed.
Demonstrated case
management skills
and experience work-
ing in a counseling
environment with
children and families a
must.
Knowledge of family
systems preferred.
Requires excellent
verbal and written
communication skills,
documentation skills
and the ability to work
independently and ef-
fectively manage time
Salary based on
education and experi-
ence. Email resume to
carnold@yfainc.org or
Fax to 727-835-4118


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins.
Will Care For You &
Assist in Daily Needs
**352-249-7451"*
Companion Helper
Looking for a position
up to six hrs per day. In
your home. 15 yrs exp
w/ med background
770-854-5903




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


I.eia


Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring Licensed
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352 422-7279 *k
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


Ll


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Al HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
V/FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
P AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& dnve-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Residential/Commercial
(352) 400-8361

Mention this ad and get
a service call for $19.
Expires 8/31/2013


Administrative
Assistant

Real Estate Company
has an immed. opening
for highly skilled individ-
ual. Send resume to
H.R. Dept, P.O. Box
552, Crystal River, Fl
34428



AIRLINE CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL
Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769



Closing Agent

Express Title Services
Needs, expert closing
agent ASAP send re-
sume to H.R. Dept, P.O.
Box 552, Crystal River,
FI 34428 All inquires
kept confidential



COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR

The Board of County
Commissioners for
Citrus County Florida
is seeking an ener-
getic person with
strong leadership
skills for the position
of County Adminis-
trator. Current salary
is $122,500 per
annum, DOQ.
Please submit
current resume,
including salary
history, salary
requirements and
professional
references to the
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department
at: www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us
by Thursday,
August 1,2013
EOE/ADA
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
for a more detailed
description.


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
*"352-601-2175"*
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Ace The Test
Math Tutoring
352-249-6790 acethe
test03@amail.com




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Liclns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




tFull Lawn Service*t
Hedgetrim, Hauling
Available !! Free Esti-
mates. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320


INSURANCE
SALES

Energetic and
Motivated licensed life
and health insurance
agent, base salary
plus commissions
Call 352-746-7008






Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced
* P/T Servers
a Cooks
-e Bartender
w Hostess &
or Dish Washer

Call 352-746-6727
Tue. Sat. 2p -4:30p
For Application
Appointment






Sales/Acct. Rep.

Home Medical
Equip Co seeking
dynamic individual
to join our team.
Knowledge of citrus
county a plus.
Exp in medical field
pref, must be goal
driven, outgoing
and personable.

Send Resume to:
ElizabethClark@YourH
omeMedical.com






Class A Driver

2 yrs Experience
Flatbed/Lowboy/
Stepdeck home 3/4
weeks $40-60K
334-864-7456


Exp. Pool
Service
Tech/Route
only experienced
need apply. clean
drivers license
352-564-8887


RG


GROUND CONTROL
Lawn Service
Pressure washing
Ken 352-316-1571
kenheffley2@gmail.com
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557







White

Diamond

Limo
Weddings/Sporting
events/Special
Occasions/Airport
352-341 -LIMO (5466)




CLOCK REPAIR
35 Yrs. exp. House
calls, all brands serviced
George 352-794-3512




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


P/T LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Exp.Preferred
(352)726-9481


QUALIFIED
A/C SERV TECH

Exp Only & current
FL DR Lic a must.
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

Retired CDL
Drivers Wanted

Looking for occa-
sional runs? Want to
earn extra cash? Do
you love animals?
Sumter Disaster Ani-
mal Response Team
transports companion
animals for humane
organizations to safe
rescues & sanctuaries.
Call Ronnie at
352-793-4477 or
352-603-4249

Scoggins Chevy
Buick,
Chiefland

is growing and we
are looking for a
Transmission Drivea-
bility Issues Techni-
cian. GM training a
plus. We offer Top
Pay, based on ex-
perience, Health,
Dental and Vision
benefits and No
Weekends..
Email Resume To
kbelfry@ymail.com
or Call Kevin Belfry,
Service Manager at
352-493-4263


YOUR NEW DRIVING
JOB IS ONE PHONE
CALL AWAY! Experi-
enced CDL-A Driv-
ers and Excellent
Benefits. Weekly
Hometime.
888-362-8608. 1 to 5
Weeks Paid Training.
RecentGrads w/a
CDL-A can apply
online at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer






COMPUTER
OPERATOR

Needed -$10 per hour
part time. Must have
good ebay exp &
reside in Homosassa
area (352) 628-9128


Al HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Jeffrey Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135











Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
352-422-6956 Lic/Ins




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


CLASSIFIED




Established
Lawn Care Co.

Seeking reliable
person that can
work independtly to
perform various jobs.
Must have drivers lic.
be drug free.
Call btw. 9a-5p
Leave message
(352) 795-5117


EXP. ROUTE
DRIVER

must have CDL LIC.
w/air brake & tanker
endorsement
APPLY WITHIN:
at 2240 N. Skeeter
Terrace, Hernando
between 8am & 2pm
NO PHONE CALLS
















































HOUSE KEEPER
Citrus Springs Area.
Res. include house-
keeping, cooking &
shopping. Owner
Travels 6 mo /year.
Must like animals.
live-in position avail.
Call 352-522-1109
btw 6pm & 9pm only


All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838

IrpN"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOVING
COMPANY
LOOKING FOR

CLASS B DRIVER
& SUMMER HELP
Must Have
Transportion
(352) 621-1220
NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone?

TELEMARKETERS
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
Andrea, 352-628-0254
Part-Time Gate
Security
Coordinators

Neat, energetic and
outgoing persons with
good people and
telephone skills for
part-time work at the
main entrance of
Citrus Hills. You will
greet, identify and log
all visitors. Preferred
experience: customer
service, military
service or law
enforcement. Good
vision, able to stand
for prolonged periods
of time. Starting pay
is $7.79 per hour.
Must be available for
any of the three (3)
shifts of 24/7 operation
or extra daytime
coverage as needed.
Apply in person @
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL.

SERVICE TECH

Family owned and
operated Pest Control
Business Needed
today! Experience
preferred, will train
the right person!clean
driving record and
valid drivers license
a must Email to:
jdsmithpest@
gmail.com or call
(352) 726-3921

SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.



26 YRS EXP. Tree Serv.
Removal, Stump
grinding, trim., hauling
Tom (352) 726-1875
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$S13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
# A local Fl. Manufact.
# We custom build-
We are the factory
# Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
# Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com
OFFICE WAREHOUSE
4000 Sq Ft, Warehouse
w/office $1200/mth
600 Sq Ft Office $450
mth 1st Free W/Last &
Dep 352-302-1935
Storage Local-Secure
10x 20= $65/Mth
10x25 = $75/mth
352-302-1935




FENTON bowl
CARNIVAL GLASS
fluted bowl
7-1/2x5" $40.00
352-628-4210
GOBLETS (6)
Indiana Blue
carnival glass
Harvest Grapes
$55.00 352-628-4210
PITCHER
INDIANA BLUE
Carnival glass
Harvest Grape
$45.00 352-628-4210
TUREEN VINTAGE
Oval serving tureen
Thompson Aladdin
good condition
$20.00 352-628-4210




2 VINTAGE HEMING-
WRAY GLASS INSULA-
TORS $15 CLEAR
GLASS #16 BLUE
GLASS#20 419-5981


Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15Yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178

TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696





Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135





344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
ULc #CCC1325497


JOHNSON
M A C ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943





GENERAL ..
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Techniciansl
ER0015377

352-621-124


AAA ROOFING
Call tie "'e.ak6usters"
Free Written Estimate


100 OFF:
,Any Re-Roof;
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic^./Ins. C^CO5537 ~ ~ F3BF








When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
SPools & Pavers

,/. Cleaning & Sealing
'" Grout Painting
S-' "Residential &
-, ,,-- ojf Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


~~1*


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard Ron's Affordable
S or pool orplan Handyman Services


completelynew! Repairs
S i;1 comleel ew ,. Small Carpentry
Otetnutted, P*Fencing

rC lean Dryer
Vents
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST .iL 'Al,',darle & Dependable
C, COPES n E0 since lifelong
POOL AND PAVER LLC 352.344-0905
Licensed 188 cell 400-1722
& Insured '-4038 1sured-Lic#37761


Stretching Cleaning

Removal Repair
Free In Home E51timatei

&Re l-pair
Upholeray Cleaning
Now Cle-aning Tile .& Hard Surfaces














*OQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices

M I ll l Yf'!. .
www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


W Ew..M uMA M mlt Ia -
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES a
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnrnghill


Your News.


Your Town.



OXJSYour Way.


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111

VINTAGE NESTING
CHICKEN ON BASKET
$8 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981




*"Amana****
Refrigerator,
bottom freezer
20 Both for $250
(352) 219-0805
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Bedroom Set
5 pc., Queen Size,
w/ box spring & mat-
tress + 42 Visio TV set
w/ table, recliner &
love seat end table &
lamp, all items 9 mos.
old must. Sell $875.
(352) 382-7234

GE Refrigerator
18 Cubic ft white New
Oct 05, works fine $200
352-563-2155
KITCHEN AID
300W, white,
with extras, like new
$165
(352) 746-5514


Coletb


REFRIGERATOR 10.6
White with top freezer 6
years old. Runs Great
$95 352-628-5222
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
VACUUM CLEANER
Eureka Upright Cleaner
$10.00 352-746-5421
VACUUM CLEANER
Kenmore Uprght Vac-
uum Cleaner $25.00
352-746-5421
Washer & Dryer
works good
$99. obo
352-621-0437
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398
WASHER$100
In perfect working condi-
tion. 30 day warranty
call or text
352-364-6504
Whirlpool Stove
Glass top, almond, self
cleaning, $100
352-219-0805




Corner Computer
Desk Top shelf, drawer,
CD section, Keyboard
spot $75 OBO no ans.
mach. just keep
trying 352-341-5888




UNITED BUILDING
PRODUCTS LIQUI-
DATION AUCTION.
June 29-July 1st
@10am, preview
June 26-28
11am-7pm.
Inventory, Fixtures,
Equipment. 3510 N.
Monroe St,
Tallhassee.
BP 10% onsite, 15%
online. AaronJoseph
Co.com
Joseph Kikta
AU4236 AB3058


I HANDYOMAI


DR E VENT...C ....IN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY,JUNE 16, 2013 D9


BENCH GRINDER
Bench Geinder $25.00
352-746-5421
DRILL PRESS
Motorized Bench Model
Drill Press 8" $35.00
352-746-5421
ROUTER Brand New,
Still in Box 1 1/2 HP
Router $45.00
32-746-5421
WORK BENCH Work
Bench 54" x 20" x33"
$25.00 352-746-5421



RECORDER PHILLIPS
DVD & Video
with remote
$30.00
352-628-4210
TELEVISION
with remote and DVD
player in good condition
$12- 220-4158
(Crystal River)



SINK white, new, never
used,($10)
352-212-1596



Acer lap top $100
Gateway desk top
windows 7 $150
352-586-6891
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP SCANNER model
G4050 with software &
manual. Like new.
$99.00 obo
352-621-0248



AUTO LIFT above
ground lift- $900.00 you
take down, and move.
352-563-1600



Woodar Metal
Outdoor Furniture
2 settees, table and
Chairs, lamp, and end
tables. $350
352-249-7335
WROUGHT IRON
PATIO SET White. 2
chairs, loveseat swing,
needs paint. $25.
(352)563-6410



Bed Headboard,
Footboard & Frame,
dark mahogany
sleigh style
$200.
(352) 382-1480
BEDROOM
FURNITURE White,
Provincial-style dresser
with mirror, 4 drawer
chest, and matching
nightstand. Included is
a white captain's bed
with bookshelf head-
board. Very good con-
dition. Asking $300
OBO. 726-2872
BUNK BED
Complete Set
& 4 drawer chest
Solid wood-honey clr
incl. linens, $350 OBO
352-503-2256
CHINA CABINET &
BUFFETT
Light wood $175
(352) 860-0939
CHINA CABINET
5' wide, glass doors
w/ 3 glass shelves on
top, & 3 cntr drawers
$350 (352) 795-6260
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
Complete Modern
Blonde finish bedroom
suite imported from It-
aly. Consists of Armoire
with two sliding draws
and 2 doors top half with
3 shelves inside.
3-Lights headboard with
3 drawers each side
acting as night stands.
Mirrored backdrop, Bed
frame, spring mattress.
6' Bureau with 6 draw-
ers and large circular
mirror. Buyer must ar-
range removal. ONLY
$300 Call 352-854-1592
Couch & 2 Recliners
Brown, exc. cond.
1 yr old. $445. obo.
call for appt.
352-746-5307 or
954-647-0472
DINETTE SET
5 pc wood table w/
cream wrought iron
legs, cushioned, arm
chairs wicker backs.
$150 (352) 382-0838
Dining Room Set,
Georgous Like New
hutch, 8 ft table w/
two leaves, 6 chairs
heavy, server w/
black formica inset
plus cover $1,250
(352) 746-7044
DINING TABLE AND
CHAIRS Solid Oak, six
chairs with upholstered
seats, Table is 42"X
66"(without leaf)78" with
leaf. Golden oak color in
perfect condition. $500.
352-564-8650
Dresser w/ mirror
6 drawers, med
brown wood $250
Armoire-3ft wide,
3 shelves, 2 drawers
$250 (352) 795-6260
Entertainment Center
with 2 towers, 2 glass
doors, 2 shelves, dark
mahogany
$200.
(352) 382-1480
Full Bed
with head board,
dresser, mirror,one
night stand $650
352410-6823
352-484-9066
German Oak
Dinning Room Table
w/6 chairs, inlayed
padded cushions $750
352410-6823
352-484-9066
German Oak Furniture


Living room set 3 pieces
sofa, love seat and
chair, coffee table &
side table with tile $1250
352-410-6823
352-484-9066
German Oak Hutch
10' long, glass doors
$950
352-410-6823
352-484-9066
Hall Way Table
w/mirror, metal frame &
glass $100-Cowboy
Boots 11 1/2 and Hat
both BIk $100
352-795-7254
Kitchen Table w/4
padded chairs,
like new, neutral color
perfect for kitchen
nook $80.
352- 489-0818


Leather Sofa,
3 cushions med. tan,
86" Wide with ham-
mock excel, cond.
org $1,400 asking $400
(352) 382-1480
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Sleep Number P5
Twin Bed Mattress,
Less than 1 year old.
New $1,600.
$1,000. obo,
(352) 794-3272
SOLID WOODEN
ROCKING CHAIR Very
sturdy,dark wood
$85.OBO 352-344-2321
Twin Bed w/Trundle &
mattress, Good Cond.
$300. Allen Whitelight
blue/white oversized
chair, $75.
(352) 563-5133




21" Self Propelled
Snapper HiVac Lawn
Mower, 7 hp, Guaran-
teed one pull start New,
$350
352-637-6420
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Bowlins Riding Mower
42" Deck, 15%/ HP
Briggs & Straton
Engine $300.
352-746-7357
John Deere L100
Lawn Tractor
42" cut, good cond.
$500. 352-746-5421
O TURN RIDING
MOWERS dead or
alive, will pay cash
352-746-7357
Toro Mulching Mower
21" cut, 6.5 H.P
$75.
Sears Kenmore
propane gas dryer
heavy duty, $75.
352-507-1490




HIBISCUS IN 3 GAL
POT 3 Different Colors
All 3 for $35
352-613-5818




LECANTO
Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
393 E Buckingham Rd.
Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352- 613-2944




6 French Doors
not in frames, glass
windows, 2 white and 4
brown $200 for all
352-795-7254
AIR HOSE KIT for GM
air suspension on-board
compressor. Fittings,
gauge, bag new. $35.
860-2701
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BEDSPREAD Mauve &
Gray Bedspread & 2
Mauve Pillows $25.00
352-746-5421
BOOKSHELF
(Girl dollhouse style)
Pastel colors $20.00
352-563-5206
Complete Bose DJ Mo-
bile Set-up2000 watt
amp. Bose speakers,
mixer board, dbl CD
player $900 call Tom
352-249-7266
FILE CABINET WITH
LOCK wood grain,like
new condition $35.
352-344-2321
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct (i $5.001b.
(352) 897-5388**
HP Computer
w/ monitor, printer
& desk $150.
4 pc. Tan wicker patio
set with cushions $200
19" Sanyo TV $25.
(352) 419-2295
All in very good cond.
can be seen by appt.
only on Saturday
Royal Oaks Subdiv.
Inverness
HUNTER AIR
PURIFIER excellent
condition $50.
352-344-2321
Kitchenaid side by side
stainless steel, good
cond. $300. obo
5x8 enclosed trailer
exc. cond. $700. obo
(352) 270-8269
LUGGAGE
CARRIER/PERSONAL
DOLLY $10 CLOTH
GARMENT BAG $5
LIKE NEW 419-5981
SANDBOX
with hlid (Step 2, brand)
$20.00
352-563-5206
SINK white porcelain,
new never used,($10)
352-212-1596
TICKETS 2 for Josh
Turner at Silver Springs
on 6/15($20-each)
352-212-1596
TOY BINS Children's, 9
bins on 3 shelves, pri-
mary colors, good
shape,($10)
352-212-1596
TRAVEL BAG
in excellent condition
$9- perfect for carry on..
220-4158 (Crystal River)
TRUCK FLOOR MATS
Tundra Toyota truck
floor mats. Front & rear.
$50 352-344-8212
TRUCK WINDOW
rear solid GMC
factory tint
$35.00
352-628-4210
TUB HANDRAIL
Medline Deluxe
Safety Rail
$25.00


352-628-4210
WEDDING BAND
Gold band 14K
Ladies sz 6-1/2
$100.00
352-628-4210




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Ig, Lux Lift Lazy Boy
$450 1 med. mega
$395 exec. cond. Runs
Great 352-270-8475
Wheel Chair
Folds, fits in trunk
+ 3 wheel walker
with brake 3 ped SS
cane, + portable
commode $165.
(352) 746-5514


m
BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" WASHBURN
"ROVER"DULCIMER
GUITAR STYLE
W/GIGBAG&MORE!
$100 352-601-6625
10' LIGHT TRUSS, 2
CRANK-UP STANDS &
dollies for truss $150
628-9838 or tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
DRUM CIRCLE? 18"
IRISH BOHRAN "HAND
DRUM" LIGHTWEIGHT
BIG SOUND! $25
352-601-6625
GIGBAG 4 ACOUSTIC
GUITAR W/DIGITAL
TUNER,STRAP,2 SETS
STRINGS,+MORE! $35
352-601-6625
GOLD PLATED
BIGSBY/ IBANEZ
VIBRATO TAILPIECE
"NEW&COMPLETE"
$50 352-601-6625
GUITAR Alvarez
RD20S acoustic, peizo
pickup, good
shape,($50)
352-212-1596
Guitar Lessons in your
home. 40+ yrs exp.
Coaching techniques.
(352) 489-7309
Lowrey Pageant
Organ, 2 keyboards
w/bench, approx 4'
wide Exc. Condition
$300. (352) 746-5421
RECORDS 3 Boxes 78
RPM Old Records
$45.00 352-746-5421
TROMBONE Old Con
Trombone $40.00
352-746-5421




i[. I


Wanted
Old Guitars,amps,
pedals, accessories
Private Collector pay-
ing CASH!!!
Call M.J. 257-3261




CERAMIC KITCHEN
CANISTER SET $10
NEW IRIDESCENT
FLUTED QUICHE DISH
$10 419-5981
SOFA BED Sofa Bed
Couch & Love Seat
$100.00 352-746-5421
VINYL PREPASTED
WALLCOVERING $25
3 DOUBLE ROLLS 165
SQ FT FLOWER DE-
SIGN 419-5981



BOWFLEX WEIGHT
BENCH pulls 210lbs
very good cond. no
Friday night or Sat calls
$100. 352-341-0242
TREADMILL
Proform 630 DS
Nice heavy duty,digital
works great $200 firm
Lecanto area 7464620
TREADMILL
PROFORM 630DS
Deluxe unit Excellent
cond. Super buy at
$100. (352)563-6410



COLEMAN camping
Pack-away Kitchen and
a stove stand. excellent
condition. $35 for both.
860-2701
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Concealed Classes
352-447-5595
Golf Clubs
Complete set of PING
G2 clubs-3 thru 9 plus
wedge & utility clubs
$235, also #3 & #5 Ad-
ams "IDEA" woods $35
each-All in Excellent
Condition Call Dan
352-464-4897
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
RCA 7" COLOR TV Dig-
ital TV perfect for camp-
ing, and separate large
antenna with amplifier.
Both for $35. 860-2701



PACK 'N PLAY like
new! Paid $50; sell for
$40. Homosassa Call
228-7372



REAR BUMPER 1956
Chevrolet Bel Air rear
bumper, $100.00
(352)628-1734
*L -


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
OnIy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



Safety Harness for
Roofer, Stereo amphlier
w/sub woofer port
352-726-4521
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352- 613-2944


TOWING MIRROR Uni-
versal clip/strap-on ex-
tension mirror with 2nd
convex mirror at tip. like
new $12. 860-2701


KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year,
Specializing in color and
highlights $39 hair color
special $39 Facial spe-
cial call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com




4 Blue Headed
Amazon's $400 obo ;
4 Sun Conure's. $300
obo. All Hand Fed
Babies (352) 382-2233
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219


BLAZE
Blaze, a beautiful
American Stafford-
shire Terrier mix, is
1 year & 7 months
old, beautiful red
& white in color,
talented, gives his
paw, sits & takes
treats very gently.
He loves to play
catch & play with
the hose. Most of all
he loves to be with
people. Has been
at the shelter since
February. Can you
give this guy a
chance for his
fur-ever home?
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.

Bunnies for
Sale
All Colors
$15 ea.
352-697-9187
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
3 Males & 1 Female,
Blue Carners Available
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
FREE KITTENS 5 free
kittens to good homes.
1 white& light gray
striped, 2 black, 1 light
gray striped, 1 dark gray
strinped. 6 weeks old.
dh enor/S


Hi, my name is
Cooper and I am a
lovable indoor domes-
tic short hair male cat.
I am in search of a
care giver who will
provide me with food,
water, and a safe en-
vironment where I can
sleep and play the
day away in exchange
for attention and af-
fection. I live with
other cats in my foster
home, but I prefer to
be an only child. I'm a
little shy at first, but I
will warm up to you ...
of course, cat treats
help! If you think we
would be a purrfect
match I would enjoy
meeting you. My
English is a little rusty
so if you would like to
arrange a meeting
you can call my care
giver. 352-610-6122

Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827




FOR RENT
BARN & PASTURE
Approx. 10 acres
room for 2-4 horses
Lighted, security.
Water furnished
off Citrus Ave/ 495
(352) 628-0508

Register QH Mare,
Palomino, Awesome
blood lines-Gay Holly
Bars I, $1500 obo
(352) 628-1472


Livestock


*AS





Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onmy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45'Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299





** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"**


1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,150 Yamaha,
many extras. Very
clean, motor needs
work, Reduced $3750
OBO 352-503-7928

14' INFLATABLE
new Saturn KBoat, 55 Ib
electric motor, battery,
Bimini, auto inflator
pump, 72 Ibs. carrybag,
dolly. $750 860-2701.

CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tn-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.

Classic Mako
20 ft Honey Pot, all teak,
good condition, 150
Evenrude 1993, well
maintained, good trailer,
Nice Boat. Extra's.
$5200. obo
(352) 795-1546

GHEENOE
15'4" Highsider, 2012
Nissan electric start, 9.8
2012, new trailer,
Jack plate, $3600.
(516) 644-8700

PONTOON
'06, 15 FT, w/ trailer, 20
HP Honda, 4 stroke,
less than 200 hrs. runn-
ing time, many extras
gar. kept. $7,000 obo
(352) 527-2294


SYLVAN PON-
TOON FOR SALE
2005 820 20' Pontoon
with 50 hp 4-stroke
Yahama. Low hours of
use. Good condition.
Asking Price: $8500
Email
warneboat@gmail.com
for questions

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com





Rialta HD
2002, Winnebago
32k migreat shape,
new tires $31,500.
352-563-5653


RV HOTLINE
1-800-262-2182
A's, C's, B's,
B+'s, TT, 5th
WWW.RVWORLD
INC.COM
R.V. World Inc. of
Nokomis
2110 US 41
Nokomis, Fl
1-75 Exit 195W
to 41N


THE EGG
2007, all Elec; fiber-
glass, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
sleeps 3, $12,500
352-419-8366
256-244-6377





a- Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like
new, NADA $29K,
Reduced $19,900
352-382-3298

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945





MASTER TOW DOLLY
Model #77T14 GVWR
3500 Ibs used one time
$875 352-860-2475

Rolling Frame
80's vintage Jeep CJ,
front and rear
diferrentials
$200 obo
(352) 382-3547





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


BIG SALE
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


Leek
JUNK VEHICLES
We pay the most cash.
No title Liens No
problem! (352)816-0857


Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ











AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

2005 Chrysler
PT Cruiser $3950

2001 Plymouth
Neon $2495

1999 Chevy
Venture Van $2300

1995 Toyota
Camry $2275

CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BIG SALE
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 & US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2005, Equinox,
extra clean, sunroof
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2006, Impala
$5,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2008, Malibu,
$9,995
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHEVY
Silver Malibu LS, 2007,
80,000 mi, Auto, 4 cyl.
$7000 (352) 795-6260
CHRYSLER
2010, PT Cruiser
$11,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
94 Mustg. GT, Cony.
5.0 eng. rebuilt trans.
garg. kept, great body
$4500 Firm 746-4620
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2009, Sonata,
34k mil
$12,499,
352-382-2457
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583




Chevrolet
1982 Corvette, nice
paint, runs good
$10,500 obo
352-746-5255
Chevrolet
2004 Corvette
Convertible Arctic
White, torch red leather,
polished aluminum
wheels, auto heads up
display, bose, senior
owned pristine, 11k
$31,900 OBO
352-513-4257
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560
DODGE
1984 Prospector Step
Side, 6' bed, Black,
Senior Owned $10,000
352-563-2988
FORD
1966 Mustang
289-auto, 67k mi.
great, cond. $7200.
obo 352438-8346
FORD
1995 MUSTANG 5.0
Loaded, 56k original
miles, leather interior,
exc. inside/outnew
tires, V8, $8,500
352-527-6988







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under


Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




BIG SALE
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100


TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100




FORD
98 Explorer, 302 awd
4dr, cold ac, new parts,
$2800 or trade for travel
trailer (352) 628-0173
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2000 Grand Cherokee
V8, leather
$3,995
352-341-0018
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100


2006 Bumper pull stock
trailer $2900
352-410-5406
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
2010 Grand Caravan
SXT, 41k mi. auto,
roof rack, Sirrus radio.
$16,800. 352-634-3333




HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
'02 Lowrder 14,000 mi.
1450cc,pristine.$8900
352-560-3731


a
Harley Davidson
1976 FLH Dresser
all original, 12k mi.
$8500. 330428-2499
Inglis Fl

Harley Davidson
2004 883 Sportster, w/
screaming eagle pkg,
Low Mi, Ex cond $4900
352-563-5552,
464-7005

HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2005 FLHRC Road King
Classic Original Owner.
4,245 Actual Miles. Gar-
age Kept. Mint Condi-
tion. Asking $10,900
Call 302-1502

HONDA
'06, Shadow 600 VLX,
deluxe. New tires,
new battery, 11K mi.
Gar. kept, showroom
cond. EXTRAS $3,200
obo (352) 527-2294

HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
Good Condition
$1200.00 352-637-3254

VICTORY
Cory Ness Special
Edition, 1 owner, 1,300
mi, new $25K, asking
$15,000. 908-500-4251


316-0616 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage 07-03 Uen Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY
RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
#0014 Kristen Stewart, 0046 Pamela Keane, #0049 Michelle Parks, #0102 Daryl Burns
0108 Glenda Girard, #0123 Jack Baker, #0134 Kathleen Zimmerman,
#0233 Donnamae Murphy
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID
ON UNITS. LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, JULY 3,
2013.VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY. PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON 11955 N FLORIDA AVE (HWY41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434, 352-489-6878
June 16 & 23, 2013.


308-0616 SUCRN
MEDICAL OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE

This shall constitute notice pursuant to FL. Admin. Code 64B5-17.001, THURSDAY,
JUNE 20, 2013, DR. NICHOLAS C. PLESKOVICH of WELL ADJUSTED CHIROPRACTIC
located at 6565 W Norvell Bryant Highway, STE B, Crystal River, FL 34429, regretably
announces the closing of his Chiropractic Office. Patients may request a copy of
their medical records or request that records be sent to another provider by calling
24 hours in advance. The patient may be billed for the actual costs incurred for
copying, mailing or delivering the records as permitted by law or insurance carrier.
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 26, June 2,9, & 16, 2013.


315-0616 SUCRN
FDOT Permit Renewal
PUBLIC NOTICE
State of Florida
Department of Environmental Protection
Notice of Application

The Department announces receipt of an application for a permit renewal from the
State of Florida Department of Transportation, for operation and closure of an
existing Construction and Demolition Debris Disposal Facility, subject to Department
rules, at the Citrus Sand & Debris I C&D Debris Facility located at 1590 N.
Quarterback Terrace, Crystal River, Citrus County, Florida.

This application is being processed and is available for public inspection during
normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Southwest District Office,
13051 North Telecom Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, June 16, 2013


317-0616 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have
questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Brona M. Larder Revocable Trust
6980 W William Larder Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18-62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit:
Installed storage container without a permit.

Brona M. Larder Revocable Trust
6980 W William Larder Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Roofing material, tires, hot water heaters,
television, and miscellaneous junk.

Brona M. Larder Revocable Trust
6958 W William Larder Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2406; Storage of construction
materials is not an approved use for MDR districts.

Canova, Joseph & Mark W.
3389 E Buffalo Ln, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household furniture, plastics, metals, papers,
aluminum, tvs, wood, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an
unenclosed area.

Chezem, Nicole
6573 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit:The white four door car, one trailer, one green truck, one grey
Jeep, a white ragtop truck, one grey truck, and one boat parked on the property.

Chezem, Nicole
6573 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, metal, plastic, furniture, car parts,
buckets, garbage, tarps, tires, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an
unenclosed area.

Chezem, Nicole
6573 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: An addition of
a garage to the mobile home.

Clausen, Martin C. & Deborah C.
28 Regina Blvd, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: The car without tires and 3 trailers without visible tags parked on
the property.

Clausen, Martin C. & Deborah C.
28 Regina Blvd, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car parts, tires, metals, an appliance, and
other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Ely, Ronald J.
8048 E Julia St, Floral City, Fl 34436
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered


I Misc.Not


I Misc.Mat


IMiscNtie





DIO SUNDAY,JUNE 16,2013


by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Remodeled
kitchen, bath, and enclosed garage; also built a swimming pool, installed a metal
roof, did extensive electrical work on the interior of the home, and built a detached
garage.
Ely, Ronald J.
8060 E Julia St, Floral City, FI 34436
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Remodeled
kitchen, extensive electrical work, and demolition on the interior of the home.
Ely, Ronald J.
8048 E Julia St, Floral City, FI 34436
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: Three travel trailers, two utility trailers, dark grey Ford pickup, and
a red Harley Davidson motorcycle.
Ely, Ronald J.
8048 E Julia St, Floral City, FI 34436
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, building materials, appliances, boat hulls,
hot water heaters, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
England, Shannon & Charles
4264 S Plumtree Ter, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, plastics, wire, metals, aluminum, pvc
pipe, paint cans, garbage, wood, clothes buckets, tools, and other miscellaneous
materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Ferdowski, Mohammed E. & Blanca I.
1571 N Prospect Ave, Lecanto, FI 34461
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and
undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter
pursuant to Article VI Secton 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Genco, Janice
4920 E Parsons Point Rd, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Mattresses, a tarp covering a pile of some type
of debris, construction materials, wood, plastics, metal, garbage stacked in an open
trailer, piles of logs, cardboard, appliances, and other miscellaneous materials being
stored in an unenclosed area.
Giguere, Stephen
5303 E Live Oak Ln, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Piles of wood, doors, windows, metals,
aluminum, paper, plastics, car parts, tree debris, tarps, and other miscellaneous
materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Giguere, Stephen
5303 E Live Oak Ln, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: The two cars and two vans parked on the property.
Holbrook, Barbara J. & Kathleen
359 S Spice Wood Ter, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: A white Chevrolet Geo Tracker with no tags and 4 flat tires
parked under carport.
Holt EST, Janice
2580 N Junglecamp Rd, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for


ImicN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IMic


IMicN


CLASSIFIED

-1W- "-


junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, household items, propane tanks,
building materials, tires, and miscellaneous items too numerous to list.

Holt EST, Janice
2580 N Junglecamp Rd, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: Travel trailer
Jobe, George & Clarke, Jean M.
1065 N Groveland Way, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: Two untagged/inoperable cars in the front of the residence with
tarps covering the tops of the vehicles.
Karr, Rayven L M
3551 N Alge Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: Travel trailer, white Ford pick up, and a white Ford van.
Karr, Rayven L M
3551 N Alge Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, household items, appliances,
household garbage, building materials, and huge amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Lowry, Michelle J.
5985 N Tsala Apopka Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Garbage and other miscellaneous materials
being stored in an unenclosed area.
Luther, Peter
4 N Monroe St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: The white van parked on the property.
Perez, Marie V. & Acosta, Pedro & Acosta, Sigredo
3594 E Squaw Valley Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause
or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Buckets, household garbage, a toilet,
cardboard, plastics, papers, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an
unenclosed area.
Phillips, James
5422 W Homosassa TrI, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Permit
#200907689 and #200906657 have expired without a final inspection.
Phillips, James
5422 W Homosassa TrI, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Accessory structures
(travel trailers) shall not be occupied as a residence.
Phillips, James
5422 W Homosassa TrI, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: Travel trailer, Ford RV, Ford Ranger truck, white Subaru car,
Mercury Villager van, International box truck, two boats, and two boat trailers.


IMic


Romine, Mark A.
9051 E Floral Park Dr, Floral City, Fl 34436
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause
or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Old furniture, wood, trailer skirting, old bicycle,
fan, 4x8 sheets of rotting fiberboard, and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Romine, Mark A.
9051 E Floral Park Dr, Floral City, Fl 34436
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: 1.) White Pontiac sedan (no tag) 2.) White Buick (no tag)

Schonbrun Trustee, Harvey *FINE APPEAL*
2875 N Bucknell Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, TVs, metal, plastic debris, boxes, bins,
household items, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Sellers, Lester Paul
6578 N Percale Ter, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Old broken couch, broken scooter chair,
broken PVC piping, broken wood pallets, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Vires, John & Barbara *FINE APPEAL*
8898 E Midwater Ct, Inverness, Fl 34453
Construction of a structure (3 windows and a sliding glass door) without a valid
permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which
states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move,
improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code,
including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or
floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having
obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: An addition of 3 windows and a sliding glass
door added to a pre fab shed permitted in 1994.
West, Chris
405 S Spice Wood Ter, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Box springs by back door, trash cans, coolers,
some household furniture under the carport, and miscellaneous junk and debris
around the property.

Wright, Randall L.
8715 E Midwater Ct, Inverness, Fl 34453
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3320, Trucks Parked in Selected
Land Use Districts: A.Trucks, as defined by this LDC, shall not be parked, stopped, or
allowed to stand in an CLR, Coastal and Lakes Residential; HDR, High Density
Residential; PUD, Planned Unit Development (except PUD Industrial, or where
otherwise authorized by ordinance); MHP, Mobile Home Park and RVP, Recreational
Vehicle Park, land use districts other than to load or unload building materials, mer-
chandise, or household goods or while performing maintenance or repair services to
or upon real property or improvements thereon during daylight; nor may any vehicle
of any size, which has operating motorized cooling units, be parked, stopped or
stored in such districts. This section shall not be construed to prohibit trucks upon
lands so designated as described above provided said lands are being utilized to
conduct a lawful nonconforming or approved Conditional Use as defined by this
LDC. Nor shall this section be construed to prohibit trucks upon lands so designated,
as described above, when said lands are the subject to an actve Citrus County
development order, from the date of issuance of said development order until either
its expiration or issuance of a certificate of compliance, nor during the harvesting of
crops in a land use district when
such a use is permitted.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
phone: (352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER, CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time, Sunday, June 16, 2013


Imic


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 D11


P dilrh


.544
>'Jr-jI


II & i


BRING US AN AUTHOR ZED WRITTEN BUYER'S ORDER TO PURCHASE THE IDENTICAL NEW VEHICLE FOR A OWNERR PRICE FROM A iANCHSFO DEA ER WITHIN 50 MILES AND 48 HOURS WE W I BETTER THE PRICE R PAY YOU $ 1,000 PAlM KIA MUST BE ABLE TO
PURCHASE HE OTHER VHILE IMMEDIATELY FROM THE COMPETTOR SS STOC AT THE LOWER PRICE AL PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED INTEREST ACCUS FROM DATE OF PURCHASE.


NEW 2013 KIA
SOUL
STK#KD0409


NEW 2014 KIA
CADENZA
STK#KE0005

10w 1,-
100 000 MILE
S WARRANTY


-


MSRP $149


OR $114/MONTH
NEW 2013 KIA
OPTIMA L,
STK#KD0361 ^i


OR $279/MONTH LEASE*


NEW 2014 KIA
SORENTO

STK#KE9013


- -*4


Np M


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U-)


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BRING US AN AUTHORIZED WRITTEN BUYER'S ORDER TO PURCHASE THE IDENTIAL NEW VEI CLE FOR A LOWER PRICE FROM A RANCHISED DEALER W THIN 50 MILES AND 48 HOURS, WE WiLL BETTER THE PRIE OR PAY YOU $ 000 PALM CHEv MUST BE ABLE TO
PURCHASf THE OTHFR VEHICLE F MMEDATEY FROM THE COMPETITOR'S STOCK AT THE LOWER filCE All PRIOR SAI FS EXCI UDED
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
MALIBU SILVERADO


OR BUY FOR $259/MONTH
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
EOUINO) n .

STK#D5305 e- g


OR BUY FOR $299/MONTH*


a7T2)S."


UP TO 12,000 OFF
MSRP ON CHEVYS!


OR BUY FOR $299/MONTH*
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
CRUZE
LSTK#0114
STK#D0114


OR BUY FOR $199/MONTH*


2YR/I 24,000 MILE SCHEDULED
MAINTENANCE AT NO CHARGE!


SMATPAY A INE T E 1E PAW NTi ,2 FOR 24 MXYR SWi 10[ EBB E F rITH r.3388 IL43 $8888 SI VERAfO, $8f:8 83lNX 3 $7988 CSIZE W 1E AT ITG P TO $12,01 SCl-'0TM CS MBRP ON SUE L MCSV FOR 2013 S' SPD 2WE EXT AB O f ER MFST 2TT A ND


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013 EDGE
MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Challenge Retail Bonus Cash
Retail Bonus Customer Cash
Retail Trade Assistance


1 EN3T407
2013 EXPLORER


$29,995
-500
-2,000


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Discount
Retail Customer Cash


'27,


2013 FOCUS SE


$18,995
-500
-1,750
-500
-500

l a


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Challenge Retail Bonus Cash
Bonus Customer Cash

,741


$25,680
-600
-1,500

*23


,9


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Discount
Retail Customer Cash

1,580


$28,545
-500
-1,500
-1,000
-500
-500


*2


W FN3C180
2013 FUSION SE


D12 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013




Section E SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


OME RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


Sikorski's
Attic PAGE E6


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E2 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


DADS WILL LOVE THIS HOUSE!
*4/3/2 + 3 Car Det. Gar. Plenty of Privacy
* Huge Kit. w/Gas Range 1.91 Acres
' Lg. Concrete Drive Cozy Gas Fireplace
* Golf & Equestrian Comm. Plenty of Privacy!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Emnimi elliesuilioni lei.nx nel


DOES DAD NEED PEACE & QUIET?
4/2 on .40 Acre Huge 14x29 FRw/FP
* Large Deck/Fenced Yard 2 Sheds
* Great Kitchen w/Island Lots of Cabinets
* Almost on Rails to Trails! Great Location


PLENTY OF ROOM FOR A DAD CAVE
* Ride Your Horses Thru Forest 5/3 on 4 Acres
* Room For Lg. Garden Extremely Private
* Lots of Shade Nice Stone FP in GR
* Fenced Paddocks/Pasture Close to Rivers/Gulf
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -1
WEmnuli elIesullon i lenmu nel e
www.FIoIduluislnglnlo.comi


J -_ -


,w.<^


715 E. HARTFORD ST., HERNANDO
* 2BD/2BA Maintenance-Free Villa
* Fully Furnished Citrus Hills Club Available
* Screened Lanai Opens to Unobstructed Views
and Direct Access to Community Heated Pool
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875








2439 W. DEVON DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BD/1.5 BA Secluded Location
* Over 1,600 SF Living *2 Blocks from Park
* Large Family Rm Shed, Fruit Trees
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ru!
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


AVAILABLE

Visit
MI INnllimi


CIlHU5 OUUNIT HANCH
14 acre ranch, fenced and cross fenced with huge
barn and horse stalls. Beautiful rolling property on
paved road. 3BR, 3 BA home with den and
modern kitchen. Gorgeous caged pool with fully-
equipped summer kitchen.
A wonderful package for only $294,900.
STEVE VARHADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


GRANITE COUNTERS!!!
*3 BR, 2 BATH 2 Car Garage
*1,966 Sq. Ft. Living Screened Lanai
* Large Eat-in Kitchen Living & Family Room
* Updated Appliances Corner Lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com









REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

S3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


WORKING HORSE RANCH
Improved acreage Rike this is flying off the shelf Feas your eyes o 15 acres with 5
pastures all fenced and cross fenced with a 2700 sq fool stable that has all the
ameiies TIe spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath residence boasts beamed vauted
ceilings, gorgeous slone double sided fireplace, and a unique master bath with sky
ih and stone accents Relax on the 38 x 15 lana with an outdoor fireplace after a
ay o he Ranch NEW Roof in 2005 Reasonably priced
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpottls@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


Split plan 3/2/2 home on almost 1/2 acre. Big fenced
backyard. 12x32 lanai stretched out in back. All tile floors
inside. Cooks kitchen wth loads of cabinet and counter
space. Breakfast bar. All bedrooms big and roomy
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: JenniferSloll@remax.net
www.CitrusCounlyHomes.com 0


3 BR/2 BA home in the Highlands.
Close to shopping, hospitals and schools.
1440 sq. f. of living area, privacy fenced backyard,
new roof, glassed Florida room. A must see home.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



$55 MILLION

CLOSED








in Citrus County


2/2 SPLIT PLAN
Great room, Wood Laminate flooring, kitchen w/solid
surface breakfast bar, large lanai, 2 car garage +
shed, lawn sprinklers, fully landscaped.


I TEAM
-net


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


.0 S^L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Frugal tips



can add up


Dear Sara: I saw your
tip for raising green
onions from the
roots of store-bought green
onions. I am trying it, but
I'm not sure
how much
water I should
be using. So far
I have just 4 to 5
root ends in a
lot of water, and
I change the
water as it get
cloudy Am I
doing it right? Sara
- CD., email
Dear C.D.: I FRU
use a mason jar LIVI
or drinking
glass roughly 1/3 filled
with water. The water line
hits right above the roots. I
change the water daily
Dear Sara: Thanks for
the tip on soaking in
Epsom salts for splinters.
Can you give me a recipe
for this? I need to know the
saltwater ratio, how long
to soak the affected part,
etc. -Pam, email
Dear Pam: You can mix
a paste of Epsom salt and
tea tree oil. Use 1/2 cup
Epsom salt and 5 drops of
tea tree oil. Remove paste
after a minimum of 10
minutes. You can add two
cups of Epsom salt to your
bath water and soak, too.


Dear Sara: I'm always
looking for good, simple
recipes to make for my
family Your crisp recipe
appeared in my local
paper, and I
thought I would
give it a try The
recipe called
for apples,
peaches or
.7 pears but men-
-- tioned nothing
about strawber-
ries. Could
Noel cherries be
used? How
GAL about canned
NG fruit? (It doesn't
get much easier
than canned.) What other
fruit possibilities are
there, and what quantities
should I use of each? -
Karen K, email
Dear Karen: You can
use any fruit you like, in-
cluding berries. You can
use pie filling, too. If using
canned fruit, be sure to
drain it first. The amount
of fruit used stays the
same. If you prefer more
crisp, you can double the
topping.
Dear Sara: When my
mom went into a nursing
home, we cleared out her
attic and found some

See FRUGAL/Page E5


I


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtorq A HOUSE Realtor@
74746 SOLDName 287-9022

IThe Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.

A241 Hollyrern St. i. -Iei E e,:.., e
I, ,rII,, I -q II t-e -hlIIi lid i I- d ,i.I[
double pane windows. Laige eal-in
kitchen, extra large rooms, new hot
wal;i tank. Totally move-in ready...
Cdall loday for your private showing.


Training to focus on


application techniques


for herbicides


Special to the Chronicle
AmeriCorps, Florida State
Parks and Crystal River Preserve
State Park will host free herbicide
application training from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at Crystal
River Preserve State Park, 3266 N.
Sailboat Ave.
Participants can learn the
proper application techniques
and methods for treating different
types of plants and getting rid of
exotic species. The first part of the
training will consist of safety pre-
cautions, MSDS forms, chemical
labels and mixing instructions.
The second half of the training

GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips
from readers about breaking
news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be pre-
pared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the
news event.
* To submit story ideas for fea-
ture sections, call 563-5660
and ask for Logan Mosby.


vvayne uormler Keaanor
352-422-0751


8015 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
352-382-1700

waynecormier.com
Million Dollar Producer
Real Estate Needs?
352-422-0751
7:00 am to 10:00 pm
7 days a week!


I a ne o m 9.. l i


will be hands-on, with the oppor-
tunity to mix herbicide and then
treat targeted plants with the
proper techniques.
Attendees will also have the op-
portunity to sign up for larger
events to assist the state park in
eradicating invasive exotics on
site as a park volunteer or intern.
Call Tanya Gatwood at 352-563-
0450 no later than 5 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 26, to reserve a spot.


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very
secluded and private setting -
perfect retreat' Rolling pasture
and mature oaks. Take the tour at
ML ": $379,000


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 E3

Real Estate
DIGEST


Citrus Hills
taps top
agent
Mary L'Esperance )
has been honored s been honored as
the top sales agent
for May 2013 at the
Villages of Citrus Mary
Hills. L'Esperance
Since the begin- Villages of
ning of this year Citrus Hills.
LEsperance has had
more than $3 million in new home
sales.
The Welcome Center for the Villages
of Citrus Hills is located at 2400 N. Terra
Vista Blvd. in Citrus Hills. More informa-
tion is available at www.
CitrusHills.com.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR@
Cell: (352) 220-0466


VILLAGES OF CITRUS HILLS --
Well known for an active Florida
lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on 1 acre, open LIVE THE ACTIVE LIFE!
floor plan, wood burning fireplace, a 2/2/1 home in Arbor Lakes, gated 55+
.-i-;-.7 --1 and spacious covered community on Lake Tsala Apopka
i... you feel at home right Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile
away A recent remodel included new floors, spacious patio and a nice yard for
paint and flooring, and A/C, range and privacy You will love to call this comfy
the garage door were replaced in 2012 house your home! MLS703427
MLS 700472 $142,500 $109,000


El GET YOUR
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO GOLF CART READY!
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S This enticing 3,64 7 sq ft Mitch Undenvood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home m the center
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET of the back nme of the Pme Ridge Golf
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River Course might be your well-deserved haven
bridges to the Crystal River' Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River 1.... 1 ... i I..... .... smart
windows; great income potential, tool $199,900 ... , .......
MLS 359564 $189.000 will buy you this peace of heaven! 11 -, I $292,000


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATEWITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acre lot in quiet neighborhood
front lifestyle Open and airy with the onAmbrdge Pt next to te Withlacoociee
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the StateFo Pt nextto the Wthlacoochee
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you StateForestandthe railsbutalsoverycloseto
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sq ft this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129,000


IERA Ky 1Reaty





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Watering key



to a healthy



garden


Guidelines to let you know

when to reach for the spigot


LEE REICH
Associated Press

Plants need water to
keep cool, pump minerals
up to their leaves and
grow. And in many regions
and many seasons, they
can fend for themselves
getting water.
Used to be, they had to.
It was less than a hundred

A soil moisture tester in
a garden. A reliable way to
tell whether any plant
needs water is to dig a
hole near it and feel the
soil for moisture. Instead
of pocking your garden full
of test holes, you could in-
stead periodically check
for wetness by probing it
with an (inexpensive) elec-
tronic moisture meter.


years ago that garden
hoses came on the scene.
Before that, rainfall was
pretty much all plants got,
except in arid regions
where periodic "flood irri-
gation" was used.
Still, plants sometimes
could use help getting
water, especially these
days, when more of us are
trying to eke more vegeta-
bles out of less land.
Make the most
out of water
Before you touch that
hose spigot, however, do
what you can to help
plants eke the most out of
natural rainfall and water.
Add compost, leaves and
other organic materials to
your soil to help it retain


LEE REICH/Associated Press See WATER/Page E5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATER
Continued from Page E4

water Laid on top of the
ground as mulch, these
materials slow evapora-
tion from the surface; they
also keep the surface loose
so water seeps in rather
than runs off. Weeds suck
water from the soil, so rip
them out to leave more
water for your plants. And
finally, contour the surface
of sloping ground with low
mounds or terraces to
catch and hold water
Next, find out if your
plants need water Needs
vary with soil type and
weather Sandy soils need
most frequent watering.
Low humidity, wind and
heat all make plants
thirstier
Individual plants also
vary in their water needs.
Those that are lush-
growing use the most
water, and plants recently
set in the ground need help
until their roots venture
out into surrounding soil.
Is water needed?
A reliable way to tell
whether the soil is moist or
dry is to dig a hole and feel
the soil for moisture. Or,
instead of pocking your
garden full of test holes,
you could periodically
check for wetness by prob-
ing the soil with an (inex-

VJVSTM


pensive) electronic mois-
ture meter
Even easier, though less
precise, is to play the aver-
ages. Monitor rainfall and
apply water so plants re-
ceive a 1-inch depth of
water per week, which is
what an average plant
needs in an average sea-
son. A rain gauge or any
straight-sided container
can tell you how much rain
has fallen, and then you
can water to make up the
difference. That inch-
depth of water is equiva-
lent to about a half-gallon
of water per square foot, so
if you want to figure, in-
stead, how many gallons a
plant needs, estimate the
number of square feet cov-
ered by its roots and mul-
tiply by one-half.
One exception to the "1
inch per week" (or "one-
half gallon per square
foot") rule is for plants in
containers. Such plants
may need water every day
- perhaps even twice a
day during their peak of
growth in summer
Not too much,
not too little
For plants in the ground,
you'll be applying that inch
of water either with a
sprinkler or through
"drip" tubing. If you're
sprinkling, water once a
week, preferably some
sunny morning when it's
early enough that the air is


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still calm yet late enough
that leaves soon dry, less-
ening chances for
diseases.
With drip irrigation, use
a timer to spread that inch
of water as much as possi-
ble over all daylight hours
of all seven days of the
week. This is, after all,
how plants use water -
one reason for the good
"bang for the buck" you get
with water merely dripped
slowly into the ground
near a plant. (Drip irriga-
tion typically uses only
about 60 percent of the


water used by sprinklers.)
Don't worry about diseases
from the frequent water-
ing with drip irrigation; it
does plants no harm be-
cause leaves stay dry
No matter what your
proposed method of water-
ing, keep in mind that
many plants grow fine with
little or no supplemental
watering over much of the
season in all but arid re-
gions. Don't be too zealous:
Overwatering wastes water
and, by suffocating roots, is
as harmful to plants as un-
derwatering is.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

magazines and piano
music from the 1930s, '40s
and '50s, in great condi-
tion. Is there anything we
can do to sell them? Any
money we get would be
helpful to pay her bills. -
Jean, email
Dear Jean: I would list
them on eBay You can
compare what you have
with what is listed to help
you price things. There


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 E5

are businesses that buy
old sheet music and mag-
azines. Examples include
shellysvintagemusic.com
and abookman.com.
Dear Sara: My leather
garden gloves are lined
with a red polyester knit.
Can you recommend a
way to clean the inside of
the fingers? -Rita, email
Dear Rita: I would use
a wet toothbrush or small
cloth/sponge (using Woo-
lite and water) and clean
them that way It will be

See FRUGAL/Page E7


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKERASSOC.,- REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR





E6 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiHlpNicLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Be on the lookout for


lubber grasshoppers


Brightly colored bugs make annual appearance


Mention grasshoppers, and many
people recall pleasant childhood
memories of trying to
catch them in meadows or
backyards. Grasshoppers are
both beloved characters in
children's stories and despised
pests that plague gardeners.
Although grasshoppers' ,
songs contribute to the sound-
track of summer, most people
know very little about them. L
This time of year, keep an eye Joan Bi
out for the Eastern lubber FLOE
grasshopper, Romalea mi- FRIE
croptera (Beauvois), which is a
large, colorful flightless LIV
grasshopper that often comes
to the attention of Florida homeowners.
It is native to Florida and the Southeast-
ern Coastal Plain of the U.S.
Because of its size and coloration, even
one individual in a garden is conspicu-
ous, but occasionally local populations


explode to such an extent that the
grasshoppers can seriously damage orna-
mentals, row crops and citrus
1. H groves. Such population explo-
sions are the result of a variety
of factors, such as weather and
rates of parasitism by benefi-
cial insects that normally limit
population growth.
-"The adult Eastern lubber
grasshopper can grow up to
three inches long and is hard
adshaw to miss, flaunting gaudy col-
I|DA- oration of yellow, orange and
black. The bright coloration of
NDLY lubber grasshoppers serves as
ING a warning to birds and other
animals that the lubber
grasshopper contains toxic substances.
When threatened, a lubber may shoot an
irritating spray from its thorax and make
a loud, hissing noise to scare off
See LUBBERS/Page E7


I


Inside...



i Stables
fl7 -]- -


Passive homes
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E14
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Shining light on antique lamps; an old Sears catalog


Dear John: I am hop-
ing you can help me
or point me in the
right direction. I
have enlisted
your help in the
past and you
were very helpful
and it was much
appreciated.
I have
searched the In-
ternet in every
way I can think
of, but cannot John S
find anything SIKOF
that resembles AT
this lamp. It is
heavy, and the
rooster looks to be jade, or
it has the look of jade or
some kind of glass or
marble.
The perch the rooster is
sitting on almost looks Chi-


h


1


nese. I cannot tell if the
base is cast or brass. It is 10
1/2 inches tall up to the base
of the light bulb
and actually still
lights.
The rooster,
from its base to
S ); the tip of tail is
about 4 1/2
Inches. I am
guessing it is
from maybe the
1920s or '30s.
ikorski I would also
SKI'S like to know its
TIC worth, if possi-
ble. Thank you
for your time and
consideration. B.L.,
Internet
Dear B.L.: Generally
speaking, if one is not able
to find any comparable
items, it usually indicates


there is not enough interest
from collectors.
The rooster has the green
color of jade, and the perch
the rooster is standing on
has the color of coral. I
think the rooster is perhaps
soapstone, which has the
look of jade, and is often re-
ferred to as poor man's
jade.
The base appears to be
white metal with a brass or
bronze wash. I agree it was
made in the 1920s or '30s,
likely in China. Potential
dollar value is below $50.
Dear John: I hope you
can give me some info on
this. I have a hardback copy
of the Better Little Book
"Mickey Mouse and the 7
ghosts," by Walt Disney,
copyright 1936, 1940 Whit-
man Publishing Co. All the


pages are there. My guess is
it is in fair condition. Can
you give me any info on
value? E, Internet
Dear E: Mickey Mouse
memorabilia is a large cate-
gory of collector interest,
including the storybooks
and coloring books. In ex-
cellent condition, your book
would sell in the $100-plus
range. In as-is condition,
depending on how bad
the book is, potential
See ATTIC/Page E13
This rooster lamp is likely
made of soapstone, "the
poor man's jade." The base
is probably white metal
with a bronze of brass
wash. It was probably made
in China sometime during
the 1920s or 1930s.
Special to the Chronicle





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LUBBERS
Continued from Page E6

predators. The dark brown
spray can stain clothing.
This time of year, young
grasshoppers called nymphs
can also be seen, but they
are only about a half-inch
long and are almost entirely
black, with red or yellow
"racing stripes." The tiny
grasshoppers that we're see-
ing now are from eggs that
were laid last summer
Each summer, the adult
female lubber lays one to
three egg masses in the
soil, with up to 50 eggs per
egg mass. The eggs remain
in the soil during the fall
and winter, and then begin


hatching in March. The
nymphs go through five in-
stars before they become
adults. During each instar,
they molt (shed their ex-
oskeleton) and develop a
larger exoskeleton.
Unlike other grasshop-
pers, the lubber grasshopper
cannot fly; it can only jump
short distances. Because of
their slow, clumsy move-
ment, they are best con-
trolled with hand removal,
being careful to avoid their
potentially irritating spray
Despite their relatively
large size, lubber grasshop-
pers usually eat less and
cause less damage than
their much smaller rela-
tives. Additionally, lubber
grasshoppers rarely occur
in large enough concentra-


00F9TF F

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5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
EA HS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
oFE: (352) 795-6633
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'-BEST7
I ,_

Lto
R-ato,


GEN. O D ,W


tions to cause significant
landscape damage, so con-
trol is usually not necessary
If using pesticides is ab-
solutely necessary, control-
ling the small
grasshoppers now is much
more effective than wait-
ing until they're full-grown.
Use caution with all pesti-
cides to avoid contamina-
tion of our drinking water.
For more information,
contact UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension at 352-
527-5700, or visit the Uni-
versity of Florida's website
at www.SolutionsFor
YourLife.com and refer to
the article titled "Eastern


Lubber Grasshopper."
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address
youth, family, community
and agricultural needs. Pro-
grams and activities offered
by the Extension Service
are available to all persons
without regard to race,
color, handicap, sex, reli-
gion or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is di-
rector of University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

slow going, but it won't
damage the leather I sug-
gest this because I'm un-
certain if they can be
turned inside out and
then put back without
something going wrong
(fitting, creases, etc.). I
also don't know if it's
washable leather, so I
don't want to suggest any
other methods.
After cleaning, do not
wring them. Hang them to
dry


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 E7

MEN
Flip-flops are worn
often during the summer,
but they get dirty easily
and then can look too ugly
to wear. To clean them,
you can soak them in a
tub of water and pow-
dered laundry detergent.
Use a toothbrush and a
soap bar to scrub them
clean. Mr. Clean Magic
Erasers or Clorox wipes
work well, too.
The first reader has a
couple more ideas:
Wash flip-flops: They
can be tossed right into

See FRUGAL/Page E14


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MLS 703368 $379,900 MLS 703408 $299,000
Custom 3bd/2ba home w/directview 3/3/3 plus an office w/heated pool
of Lake Pastor, on the golf course.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


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MLS 702383 $349,900
Spacious 3bd/2.5ba villa with so many
attractive features. This is a must see!
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
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MLS 702458 $196,900
3bd/2ba home with beautiful pool.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


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Almost new 2bd/2ba Villa plus
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NEW LISTING




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E8 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013

So-called "passive" homes
under construction in The
Stables development in
Philadelphia.
Associated Press


SUPEREFFICIENT 'PASSIVE' HOMES

GAIN GROUND IN U.S.


A.,,ti intI'l 7 ',,


PHILADELPHLA
after det-dale'. 'ot Ilel r -
". t lene. e pa'.'.i ile \:'l'ie I1
^ Ai,,kn, itself heard in
.1 Ael'icall ljt white tillre
t I, S,:,-,: lled Ipassl\ e li,:, Iies.
\' lhitl hA\e been jrol'llI Illn
Ei ir':,)e l it ne\ er reill.


iilt'lht i1n II tile United
Stjte,. are bIias l i bui lt
jro'ind the idea of ''takin,
hIli'.e'. jirtiLht. Sipielr-illinl-
lated lnd ellelr eftti lent
The ',oal a lihis.e thjt Ire-
Ate Ieall,\ j IIIlhl l ellel',_, ja
It con: Mie$ Think ot IeiLn,
able to keel) \oiir hli-e \al 'rii
\ ithliout a traditional r-i2 tiir-


ll ce. cof Il I Itil I, jII Colldil-
tio'niL unit
At this. point there', no rei-
,011 \'vhi.\ l (de\ elo per (11:'t
nII\ billd thills \a ." jid Tiii
I McDoi:nald. \vh'lose frirm lis de-
.[l,,l'e jIm bhi Ilt enler \ -
effticienit \%l ldnrns \ith


m. TIGHT Page E9


Stables
G_* ih 'n ..-0 m* .*
_,n C "'- a .7 iw I FM(
a re C Ra. -o.J w Open, '-ea- Ded
SN..r C ..a ,,O
L. r-j rm .. n. .a *. a. r


I


1 1


a -


I


ri


I


.........





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TIGHT
Continued from Page E8

eco-friendly materials for
more than a decade in
Philadelphia, and re-
cently entered the world
of passive housing.
Signature features
often include thick out-
side walls and roofs,
highly-insulated windows
and frames, and a south-
facing orientation. The
ventilation system pulls in
fresh outdoor air and
pumps out stale indoor
air, but not before it's
used to heat or cool the
incoming air to the same
temperature.
Houses built this way
can stay comfortable
using 90 percent less en-
ergy than traditional con-


struction homes, accord-
ing to the Passive House
Institute US, an Illinois-
based certification, re-
search and consulting
group.
Though the idea was
born in the U.S., the
roughly 20,000 interna-
tionally certified passive
houses worldwide are in
Europe predominantly
Germany, Austria and
Scandinavia.
Fewer than 100 exist in
the U.S. -but that's
changing, from chilly New
England to toasty Arizona
to muggy Baton Rouge,
said Katrin Klingenberg,
Passive House Institute
US co-founder and execu-
tive director.
"People associate the
passive house movement
with Europe, but it comes
out of the (American) oil


embargo and energy cri-
sis in the 1970s," she said.
"Then political change
happened, (energy) prices
came down... but in Eu-
rope that didn't happen,


so they had reason to con-
tinue the research."
The shift was symbol-
ized most clearly, perhaps,


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TIGHT
Continued from Page E9

at the White House, when solar pan-
els installed in 1979 during Presi-
dent Carter's tenure were removed
in 1986 under President Reagan's
administration. (The Obama admin-
istration promised in 2010 to put
them back but hasn't yet done so.)
Going passive isn't solely the
realm of new construction, either.
In McKeesport, outside Pitts-
burgh, a historic YMCA is being
turned into a multi-unit passive
building to house people at risk for
homelessness. In New York City last
year, Julie Torres Moskovitz's firm
Fabrica 718 retrofitted a 110-year-
old Brooklyn brownstone into the
city's first certified passive house.
"There's a whole movement," said
Torres Moskovitz, author of the new
"The Greenest Home" (Princeton
Architectural Press, 2013) on super-
insulated and passive house design.
"It's a hotbed in Brooklyn of doing
these retrofits."
McDonald's firm, Onion Flats,
first tackled a three-home, low-
income housing development com-
pleted last fall Pennsylvania's
first to be certified under guidelines
set by the International Passive
House Institute, based in Germany
The stylish, 1,900-square-foot Bell-
field Homes in north Philadelphia
have a heating and cooling system
one-eighth the size of what similar
traditionally-built homes require,
because they were built with an
"airtight, super-insulated thermal
envelope" that helps reduce energy
use by 90 percent, McDonald said.
"Some passive houses are com-
plex, but we took on the idea that we
could do it ... with everyday con-
struction," he said.
Onion Flats' next effort is The Sta-
bles development, with three of 27
luxury townhouses completed and
passive house certification pending.
Up next will be Ridge Flats, with
shops and 130 apartments that Mc-
Donald's firm wants to make the na-
tion's first passive-certified
mixed-use project of its size.
Critics say passive houses work
better in Europe because tempera-
tures are relatively stable compared
to many parts of the U.S. They also
cite some pricey materials, and pre-


The stylish,
1,900-square-foot
Bellfield Homes in
north Philadelphia
have a heating and
cooling system
one-eighth the size
of what similar
traditionally-built
homes require.
dict it will be tough convincing
Americans to part with their ther-
mostats and let their home regulate
its own temperature.
The Stables homes are selling for
about $700,000: That's for a 2,500-
square-foot luxury town house with
four bedrooms, three baths, garage,
garden, and energy-savvy bells and
whistles like solar panels, green
roofs and airtight construction.
McDonald said the price is compa-
rable to non-passive homes with
similar amenities, in part because of
cost savings from prefabricating the
homes in modular sections and as-
sembling them on-site.
"The way buildings have always
been built is inefficient, so we're
tweaking the ways they're built,"
McDonald said. "If you do it the right
way, it's not more money"
Sasha Best, her husband, and
their 2- and 6-year-olds are moving
from Manhattan's financial district
into one of The Stables townhouses
in late June. After living for a year in
a high-efficiency home in Germany,
they returned last year to New York
- where Hurricane Sandy's de-
structive tear led them to rethink
where they wanted to call home.
"We wanted a house that felt solid,
that was large enough, in an urban
environment that was part of a com-
munity, that feels like it'll last 100
years," she said. "We looked at 25
houses and within 10 seconds of
walking into (our) house, we knew."
Klingenberg said that in general,
passive houses can cost 5 percent to
10 percent more to build. That's
largely because the specialty win-
dows and other materials aren't mass
produced, she said, but prices go
down as they become easier to get.


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY

SUPER DUPER -
900 BANK OWNED BUYS!s l
-P303 Emers tI... 524,900
2156 CR II .... 525,000
PARK-LIKE BACKYARD SETTING! ..ll.......i ..... 915CR 4[ A. I I.- -', t111 529,900 PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP SHOWS l....n. .
3/2/2 Citrus Springs, roomy & close to schools; Must see! 6745 N. Cuilbul, I lunniudu .......... 29,900 i .. .. ... .. .
7501 N. Galena, NEW PRICE $114,900; #702555. 66 Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills .... ....33,900 sewer. 721 Edgewaer Dr., $134,900, #701620. Tonya
Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983. 6 South Iincoln St .................. Koch 352-613-6427.
61 South Lincoln St .... ..... 34,900
806 ShbI I iT I. in S34,900
303S A I .. Hill 539,900
3560: ,'. I,. 539,900
3414W:i A. i.. t .39,900
6242 wi,' i.t t 542,900
103 S i I1 .1, 1111 542,900
MOVE-IN READY at a Great Price! Adorable 1/1 7526 I :,, I"II~ 544,900 THIS HOME IS THE PERFECT FIT., II,
w/Florida room, utility room, shed & fenced yard. New 6320 N. Velveteen, Lecanto ........................544,900 Kensington Estates 3/3/2 Pool home w/2398 living loaded
aint kitchen cabinets. 17 E. Murray. $35,000, 10085 S. Evans Pt., Inverness .... ..... $45,990 with upgrades and ready to move right in! #701079.
#703090. Vicki Love 352-697-0712. 594 Carmel n, Inverness..... $49,900 $229,000. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.
B k w bu o O Y 1 .f 0 2 5941 E. Carmel Ln., Inverness.................$49,900
8691 [II, A.1 In w I .......... .$ 64,900 -_ e
1 at''' i ll:',- ':r ,iiiiii 564,900
230 ,' '. 1,, I'' ,rl r:,.,1, Hill 567,900
603i. I wlln .. I,,,,,- $69,900
38 CI,, nal, I l. l 11... $69,900
53241, bll,,l i, .... .. $69,900
WHEN THE HEAT OF SUMMER IS ON... this 862 I-lliI ,I li l..-.i 572,900 THE DEFINITION OF THIS HOUSE IN THE
fantastic 3/2/2 will be gone! Turn Key Cambridge Greens 4440 Leisure lvd, Lecanto ........ ....... 79,900 DICTIONARY READS GET R DONE! Bank Owned
ank Owne buy for ONLY $169,900. #700862. 2966 E. Buck Ct., Inverness ........ ........... ...$79,900 home ready to be rehabbed! $29,900, #701659. Tomika
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598. 12 Independence Hwy., Inverness ..............$179,900 Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598.
4608 Brooks, Col,:,,,i $79,900
5555S. Leonard I.. hioiii.i 584,900
16 7 lIm ree, Citrus ,n,,,,,i $8 4 ,9 0 0 -'
2328 N. Hendry I i .......... 589,900
950 N. Gardenvice i J, ti 1'1.... 594,900 .
1982 N. Golfvie IIi. Ii,,,,II .. 599,900
12813 SW 617th A. .l,I 599,900
5-1-5-0 ALL YOU NEED IS A LITTLE OUGH Cheap 6110 Coronad, 9900 CUSTOM 3 2 2 ON SHADED LARGE LOT f.
& Adorable BANK OWNED 1935 1/1 in do town Inverness. R E, AuN O n d n wn Ieneli 'gI Pines, 5109,900 Ihis ,,,, ht .
#702076. $24,900. Call Tomika SpiresHanssen. 'i l i r .1 I 5124,900 ....... .- S 47 500 .
.' '.'W l,,l I II, 5126,900
Sil nm I5129,900
'. I li'i.W In I Iull, 5129,900
5134,900
.Ii '.,,,, ', ,,,5144,900
i',ii,,i A n .... SI5149,900
-,,,,,,, 5149,900
,r:, w 1,t ,, ,i i .5159,900
PRITCHARD ISLAND PERFECTION. Wood flooring i I '. W"ll I 5167,500 MOVE-IN READY 3: 2 2 I,, I. ,..d i .,
#700432. 19465 98th Dunnellon ............................ 5169,900 Screen porch. Tile throughout $115,500, #102495.
1643E St. Charles PI, Inverness ..............$169,900
4418 East~nsterdo, ,iiii, 5179,900 ""
1323 W SkyviewC .. 1i1, 111i1 S179,900 X
1652 E Gate Dance, (, . 5. $189,900 ..S.
3467 1W Daffodil Dr I: HIll 5219,900
4920CR 134B, Wil ,I 5244,500 _
2601 CR 243B, Wildwood ....................... $254,900 JOHN'S "ALL SHOOK UP" he says come buy his
YOU'RE GONNA MISS ME WHEN I'M GONE! 1519 Bismark, Hernando ......................... $279,900 beautiful home so he can do the Boot Scoot Boogie on out of
4/2 n uper oe lot, fenced, just waiting u 4 Sl U 7 town Whispering Pines spectacular. 2/2 furnished unit for
$58,900, # 701914. for you- 6854 W. Sentinel Post Pauh, Beverly Hills...5 374,900 ONLY $79,900. #700941.


E10 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 Ell



To place an ad, call 563-5966



- Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


l aThe Time


CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/I.5BA, $465. mo
2BR/I1BA $495. mo
352-587-2555
FLORAL CITY
1bd/1 ba 55+, Remod-
eled $430 mo. includes
lot rent, water, sewer,
trash 352-897-4449


HERNANDO
3/2, Country Setting
5025 N Tanglewood
Ave. $550. mo.
352-362-5019


HOMOSASSA
Several Available
Beautiful Park
Pool
(352) 628-4441


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc H20.
2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!





$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181



For Sale %fls
HERNANDO
Ready to move in,
must see 3/2 1/.5 acres
$49K approved for FHA
Financing
(352) 795-1272


LOOKING FOR YOUR

Is your Credit Score 575
or Higher, several new
homes to choose from
call for details
352-795-1272






New 2013
Lot Model 3/2 DWHM
$46,900, Includes
Deliver, set-up, A/C,
Skirting, Steps Call
352-795-2377





New 2013 Lot Model
DWMH 2/2 $42,900
Includes, Delivery,
set-up, A/C Skirt, steps
NO HIDDEN FEES
Call 352-795-1272



MUST SELL

New Lot Model
2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fire-
place, huge Island
kitchen, It has to go!!
$84,900 includes
Del, set-up, A/C,
Skirting,steps,
Furniture pkg Avail.
Call 352-795-2377

New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,000. Delivered to
your site -
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/polantcitv/
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377
USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60



Homosassa/Chaz
2/1 CHA Clean,
No pets $485. mo.
727-415-1805


sam


INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 2/2 DWMH
Handicap ramp at-
tached, large enclosed
porch, with lake view
carport shed, w/d Lot
rent $335 Includes:
pool, club hse, boat
slips, priv. dock,
water/garbage, lawn
maint,RV/Trailer stg,
ONLY $12,500
352-419-6132




FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, $36,500.
Cash net to seller
352-586-9498

HOMOSASSA
Large 2BR/1Y BA DW,
AC, Appls., inclds W/D;
W/ Lot, 475/mo
RENT To OWN
3360 Arundel Ter.
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330


INVERNESS
3/2 on 11/2 acres
owner financed for
$500. mnth w/10k
down 352-560-4247


TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807


Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $6,800
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounHtyHomeRentals.corn
LECANTO/CITRUS SPRINGS
1820 Trade Ln (CS).......... $850
3/2/2 available July lst!
8455 S Lecanto Hwy (L)....$700
2/1 new listing!
HOMOSASSA
145 Pine St................ $1,800
Gorgeous pool home in SMWi
7 Bumelia (Ct................. $1,000
1692 sq. ft pool home in SMW
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N Crede Ave......... $450
2/1 mobile includes lawn service
9809 Smokey In.............. 850
2/2 1200 sq. ft. new listing!
1245 NE 2nd St...........$1,100
3/2 pool home,fenced yard
11770 W Sunnybrook....$1,300
3/2 w/boat dock on canal





Inv rnesF 45

[ 3,5/ 2 il.-.341o-4663 &


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*iNVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

2/1/1 .......... $625
3/2/2......... $800
3/2/1 .......... $775
2/1 Carport. .$500
2/1.............. $525
2/2/1 ......... $700

2/2 CONDO $700
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010




At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio
Apt $650 All Util
Inc'd (352)382-7892

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/I 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
(352) 628-2815


Find Your brww Htomnc
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chronicleh -,n finder.com


Fax: (352) 563-5665 1 Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 1 Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com I website: www.chronicleonline.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Apartments
Available
2 bed / 2 bath
$600/month
Call 352-795-1795
www.ensingproperties.c
om

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 All Tile, CHA, $425.
+ 1 st/Lst/Sec 697-1680
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, W/D
Hkup, $500 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499
HOMOSASSA
2BR, $500, incls. gar &
H20, no pets 697-0310



INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 & 3 BEDROOM
APTS HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $741. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants:
For rental info.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
352-795-7793
TDD#1 -800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer







Locaion s







CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec loc & great visi-
bility 1000 SF, very
clean remodeled
352-634-2528




Commercial Building
Floral City, 800 sq. ft
ample pking, a/c,
prime location on 41
cooler unit in rear,
$1250.mo. 1st, last &
dep. ref. & good credit
352-201-9828





**INVERNESS**
Great Location! 2/2/1
w/scn porch, w/d, pool
$725. 352-726-6567


CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2/2.5/carport with
fresh paint & carpet,
new appliances.
$750/month.
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
352-364-1947
INVERNESS
Windermere Community
2bed/2bath upgraded
villa across from pool.
$750.00 utilities deposit
no smoking no pets
max.2 people
352 344-0162
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2 w/ Community
Pool. $725/mo
(352) 628-1616
River Links Realty




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570
INVERNESS
Duplex 2BR/1BA Car-
port 352-746-2932




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Studio Effi-
ciency w/ equipped
kitchen. All until cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
3/2 $1,000/mo Bob
Hedick Coldwell Banker
Next Generation
352-634-4286

V THIS OUT!
SUGARMILL
3/2/2 w/ FL. Room,
and Large Deck
$900/mo.
lst.& Sec.
352-464-4348




SUGARMILL
WOODS
4 bedroom. 2 bath.
Like new deluxe
house for rent, home
clean and well main-
tained (954)2545694
or (404)9014804 or
352 228 1220




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299,
352-364-2073
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2, Pool, $1,400 mo
2,000 sf (352) 228-3133


BLACK DIAMOND
2BR/2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1200/month in-
cludes basic cable &
lawn care. Contact Dixie
at 746-3301.

CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
House for rent
Please contact for
details.
$650.00 per month
352-212-9682


CRYSTAL RIVER
HOME FOR
RENT
3 Bedroom. 2-1/2
bath. Beautiful Newer
Home with 2 Car
Garage. Large Lot.
Laundry Room.
Screened in Patio.
Quiet Neighborhood.
Rent $895. $900
Security Deposit
Contact Connie
(352)293-6223

HOMOSASSA
3/2/2, Fenced Yard,
Pet OK. $750.
352-382-1373

INVERNESS
2/1, River House $585.
mo. dock, scrn. porch,
garage, carport, shed
352-726-5994

INVERNESS
2/1/1 Fam. rm CHA 1st,
sec, ref, sr. disc.
$650mo 249-6227





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

INGLIS
Charming furnished
effic/cottage all utilities
incl'd. $645 no smoking
352-422-2994





Share my home
utilities incl. $340. mo
1st wk free
563-1465 / 228-1802


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







At Auction 06/22/13
1,275 ACRES (+/-)
Beautiful Custom
Home in 10 Tracts
Rich Valley Section
of Smyth County,
Virginia. Visit
www.counts
auctions.com
for details. VA#0326


REAL ESTATE BANK-
RUPTCY AUCTION by
order of US TRUSTEES
June 20 @ 9:00
through June 24
@ 10:00
3362 West C-48 Bush-
nell, FI 33511 Lovely
Single Family Resi-
dence on 0.5 Acres!
A total of 21 Properties
to choose from.
'bid online only @
www.fleming
auction.com
Fleming & Company,
LLC AU3742/AB2736*
7% BP*(904) 886-9200






FOR SALE
$89,900
31 S Melborne St.
Beverly Hills
owner financing avail.
352-634-1724


#1 Employment source is


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-28282
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE WWW.Chronicleonline.com


2,240 SF

Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. July 11,
12PM
Preview From 11am
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com












CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf CoursCommunity
3/2/2 Sell for $49,995.
possible owner finance
/options 352-422-1284
or 352-634-3862




4/2.5/2 Htd Pool
30x40 detached gar.
wood, tile,carpet
wood cab, granite
Must See! $319,900
Iv. msg 352-527-1448


I: ri^^Z


FOR SALE BY
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills Fl.
SAT. JUN E 29th,
12 PM
Preview Day of Sale
From 11:00 AM
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com


2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted intlext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840


55+ Real Estate
Specialist
Teri Paduano, Broker
15+ Years Exp

Buying or Selling
Real Estate?

Call me today & get
a "Free" Home
Warranty Protection
Plan

Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
WWW.
RealtvConnect.me

Bilingual/Spanish





GOSPEL ISLAND
4bd/3ba & garage
For Sale $92,000.
941-524-6556

INVERNESS
Investor Alert
Nice 2/2 Close to town,
nice trees, renter in
place, nice return on
investment $90K
(941) 549-4226





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

FREE
Buy this Home & Get
FREE PIZZA for a year!
2/2/1 CP
1174 SE 3rd Street
Call me for details
Nancy J. Wilson
352-422-4137
Waybright
Real Estate, Inc.






AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO
A NATURE
PRESERVE. HOME
IS A FORECLOSURE
SHORT SALE AND
THE BANK IS
WORKING WITH
THE SELLERS. THIS
HOME WAS BUILT
IN 2005.dennis neff
@yahoo.com







4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




IS = 1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.



HOMOSASSA
Reduced $215,000
211 Pine St 4BD/3BA.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, Wood Floors,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar,SS Appl. fireplace
Call 850-585-4026







I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245-


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!

Owner
Financing
Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments





I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Hooss


_I
Citrus County
Homes


E12 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

dollar value is below $50.
Dear John: My dad collected
things "other people didn't
want." This is one of the things
I found boxed up in the lamp
section. Does it look familiar at
all? I am wondering even how
to put it together. Thank you
for any suggestions you might
have. -B.S., Internet
Dear B.S.: I am not sure, but
the parts in your photograph
appear to be pieces of a parlor
lamp. B&P Lamp Supply in
McMinnville, Tenn., special-
izes in reproduction antique
lamps. You might contact them
and get a catalog; it will give
you a look at lamps of the Vic-
torian and early 20th century
Dear John: I so enjoy read-
ing your column, great articles!
I have a very old Sears Roe-
buck Inc. catalog. Ironically,
there is not a date to be found
anywhere in it. The only thing
I can tell you is it is a small cat-
alog, like maybe a sale catalog,
if they had those back then.


JENNIFER
MUNN


352-422-8201
jenmunnera@
yahoo.com
12 Properties Sold
in 3 months
% of every
commissions goes
to help homeless
animals
ERA American
Realty & Investments


OR "
MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 E13


You can buy anything from
plumes and high-button shoes
to a house.
This was given to my mother
around the year 1953. Just
wondering if you have any idea
what I have and if it is worth
anything; if so, where might be
a good outlet to sell it? Thank-
ing you for any information. -
W, Internet
Dear W: Old Sears & Roe-
buck catalogs are fun to look at
and a good way to study vari-
ous products from the past.
There are and have been re-
production catalogs for sale for
decades, I suspect your small
catalog is a reproduction. Most
original period catalogs sell in
the $15 to $50 range, unless in
excellent condition.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


These appear to be pieces from an old parlor lamp.


Orlando Luxury
Waterfront Condos!
Brand new 2 & 3 BR
residences. Up to
50% OFF! Own
below builder's cost!
Close to all attrac-
tions! Must see. Call
now 877-333-0272,
x32_


GEORGIA
MOUNTAIN
BARGAIN!
New 3BR, 2BA,
1,200+ sqft mountain
log cabin kit with
1+ acre streamfront
in Georgia's Blue
Ridge Mtns only
$52,800.
Gorgeous setting,
tremendous 4 sea-
son recreation, great
financing. Must see.
Call now
1-866-952-5303, x15


H
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty






SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCboast
PropDeties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906

HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $5,000.
352-621-1664

PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
CI Bkr/owner 228-1047




20 ACRES FREE!
Buy 40-Get 60 Acres.
$0-Down $198/mo.
Money Back
Guarantee,
NO CREDIT
CHECKS
Beautiful Views.
Roads/Surveyed.
Near
El Paso, Texas.
1-800-843-7537
www.sunsetranches.co
m


Special to the Chronicle





95 ft on Canal
Gulf Access,
Inglis Paved Street
existing structure
Asking $24,900.
(352) 423-3414
352)-445-2633





Yourmw)rld first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


S, ,,E


Ho








TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




RAINBOW SPRINGS
Beautiful 3/2/2, 2 lots
Oversized Gar. Open
firplan, Gas Fireplace
Corian countertops,
New porch, $134,900
352-489-0105


M
Citrus Count
Homes^


E


r


m





E14 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013


Introduction to


Japanese King Sago


One of the most popular cycads
used in landscapes around
the world is King Sago. Cy-
cads are cone-bearing gymnosperms
with male or female cones on sepa-


rate plants. Cycads belong
in one of three families:
Cycadaceae, Zamiaceae
or Strangeriaceae. All are
geologically ancient.
About 60 species occur
naturally in Southeast
Asia, Australia, East
Africa, Madagascar and
on Pacific islands.
King Sago, Cycas revo-
luta, is originally from the
islands of Southern Japan
It grows well in Central
and South Florida in cold
zones 9 to 12. It tolerates


Jane
JAN
GAR


Florida's hot wet summers and is
drought-tolerant, too. Leaves can be
burned by hard frosts or freezes in
Zones 9a and 8b. Winter protection,
such as the shade under evergreen
trees or in close proximity to a build-
ing, is essential in frost-prone areas.
King Sagos will sprout a new ring of
leaves in May locally
Stiff, dark green, prickly leaves
can be more than 4 feet long on a ma-
ture plant Slow-growing, the trunks
can reach 10 feet tall. Keep this in
mind when planting a young plant
from a small container Plant it well
away from sidewalks and windows.
King Sago can live longer than 100
years if sited with adequate room to
grow. Most plants are pulled out and
destroyed when they become too big.
The volcanic islands where King
Sagos evolved have rich soil. Sagos


in Florida require humus-rich soil,
so amend the natural sand with
ample free fine mulch from Central
Landfill on State Road 44. Without
rich or amended soil, the plant will
soon develop nutrient de-
ficiencies. Epsom salt is a
poor substitute for good
soil. The foreign mineral
will quickly leach down
into the aquifer and pol-
lute our drinking water.
Cycads are NOT palms,
but are close relatives of
cone-bearing pines.
Palms are not trees with
Weber bark and cambium layers,
E'S but more akin to big
DEN grasses. Time-released
fertilizers for exotic
palms are formulated to
release the nutrients these foreign
palms would naturally get from their
native soils. Native palms which
evolved in Florida are naturally
adapted to local climate and soil
conditions, so they need no chemi-
cal fertilizers just the correct
ecosystem and the soil type that nat-
urally occurs here.
The right plant needs to be in the
right place. For example, plant
Sabal etonia, Scrub Palmetto, in dry
sandhills or scrub habitats; plant the
wet-loving Blue-stem Palmetto,
Sabal minor, in moist, rich flatwoods
and flood plains. Neither native will
need chemicals to thrive. Exotic
King Sago can get nutrient deficien-
cies if not planted in rich soil. Fer-
tilizer will then be necessary

See JANE/Page E15


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

the washing machine or dish-
washer and they come out
nice and clean. I air-dry
them. Candace, California
Using oxygen bleach:
When you bleach with oxy-
gen bleach, the hotter the
water, the less time it takes
for the bleach to work its
magic. If the water tempera-
ture is below 130 degrees F,
you need to allow soaking
time for the bleach to work. If
using liquid bleach, put a few
drops directly onto an inside
seam to see if there is any
color change. For dry oxygen
bleach, mix a teaspoon to 1
cup of hot water and test the
same way Oxygen bleach is a
good choice to remove
mildew. If your clothes have
visible mold or a mildew
smell, soak them in oxygen
bleach and hot water before
washing as usual. H.M.,
Pennsylvania
Gift card saving:
Week 1: Buy a $10 gift card.
Week 2: When you pay for
your groceries, use the $10


gift card, then purchase an-
other gift card with $20 on it
Week 3: When you pay for
your groceries, use the $20
gift card, then purchase an-
other gift card with $30 on it.
And so on. The end result is
you will have a gift card in
your purse come Christmas-
time with about $400 on it,
and you can use this card for
your Christmas groceries. -
Brilly, email
Crockpot Mac and Cheese:
8 ounces dry elbow mac-
aroni, cooked.
4 cups shredded cheddar
cheese, divided.
13-ounce can evaporated
milk.
11/2 cups milk.
2 eggs.
1 teaspoon salt.
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 finely chopped onion.
Combine all ingredients,
except 1 cup of cheese, in a
greased slow cooker. Sprin-
kle remaining cup of cheese
over top. Cover Cook on low
three to four hours. Don't re-
move lid or stir until the mix-
ture has finished cooking.
Serves four. -Polly Idaho
Camping tip: I took a small
army of kids camping last


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


summer and made tacos and
goulash. I precooked my
hamburger, seasoned it and
froze it in a zip-close bag. I
then put it in a larger zip-
close bag and filled with a lit-
tle water, creating an ice
block around it. (Do not use
slide zippers they leak.) I
am weird about super-cold
food while camping, and this
worked out beautifully
Everything stayed really
cold, and it cut down the
amount of ice I needed in my
cooler. It was also so easy to
throw the meals together, and
a welcome change from the
typical hot dogs and ham-
burgers. I just do as much
prep work at home as possi-
ble. -P Kelly, Connecticut


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o Uni-
versal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Street, Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Headshots of real estate agents and associates submitted for the Real
Estate Digest are kept on file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is
the responsibility of the individuals submitting news notes to ensure
headshots have been sent to the newsroom, and to advise staff of any
name changes.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too light nor too dark.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum-resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E14

In rich soil with good drainage
and not exposed to frigid winds
or hard freezes, King Sago will
grow well in Central and South
Florida. They are so easy to grow
that I have dozens in pots in my
backyard. Now that a winter
wind break and overhead ever-
green protection is growing
taller, I hope to get some King
Sagos planted in spots reserved
for then in my garden. The soil is
already humus-rich from two
years of amendment
Sagos are generally resistant
to Florida's natural pests and
diseases. Asian Scale insects are
a problem introduced about 10
years ago. These tiny insects
looks look a white powder on


SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 E15


leaves, trunk and roots. Scale is
easily killed by two applications
of Bifenthrin insecticide, sold at
John Deere Landscape supply
and recently in some big box
nurseries.. Read and follow the
label. More is not better.
The concentrated creamy
Bifenthrin I buy is 7 percent by
weight. It takes only a quarter-
ounce in a gallon of water for an
effective solution. Bifenthrin
kills insects on contact. Asian
Scale lives in dense colonies on
the undersides of leaves, so
spray underneath to kill as many
as possible.
Bifenthrin enters the plant
leaves, so any scale not killed on
contact will get a dose of poison
as it feeds. The chemical lasts for
several weeks. Be aware that the
dead scale bodies will remain at-
tached by their sucking parts. A
blast from the garden hose may


dislodge some of them. Other-
wise, wipe the leaf surface with
alcohol or dish detergent on a
scrubbing pad and re-rinse. The
eggs and young in the soil will be
killed as they emerge and begin
sucking. A second douse in four
to six weeks should eliminate the
next generation, so no more
treatments should be needed.
Watch for problem infesta-
tions on neighbors' plants. Treat
their sagos, too, before yours get
infested again.

Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows
thousands of native plants.
Visitors are welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment,
call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of
submitted material. The earlier Chronicle editors receive
submissions, the better chance of notes running more than
once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is available. The
Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or by email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


SpcaiigiTerVit
& EeUtodReae

www .Tra it Re ly.o p.. .


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
RII i nc rvcD 1'9.AAA.fAA7 QIICAM MI I i CM 9.A99.9'* VITIIDIA in DAMKII IM '0.A97-1777


Terms 6Months or5More
Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! Social Meberhpicue wt l etl






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I.. .. I ...........I I., . .... lh d . .3 l II.,


l. I. 1 ..11 l I .hl. l l.l.l .\l l l .h I.|I>.l I .hl h I
.... .. ... .. I.. ...... I. .1 11

I 1= i .i I ASKING $119.900
Put D ,S 352' 212 7280










CREATIVE SURPRISES AWAIT
iTllin l2 lh1li VV Hljhn hi.i




Mi. : = ;;; $50,700
Ask lot Maidyn Booth 726 6668


COMMERCIAL BUILDING

.:. H .II.M, ,V T11 /I. i L l. :ll~l ,


M_, ='_.h'-. Al I, $105,900
Call Jim Motion at 122-2173 lot a lout


OPEN WATERFRONT
ON HERNANDO LAKE I.,, .. ...., 1,,

uI,,,'1,,I, h h 1 ,~l ,,,, , ,, ,, I 1
I'h 1 I'" 1" I1'"" '"'1 ,1" .. ... .1. I" I , 1


ri : = -1.- $159.000
CuCui 8a'I- 11t 4766549


WATERFRONT, POOL HOME WITH DOCK
II" ,''i I I: 1.1:11:11 lIrJ I' 11 ,- 1 :1111 II: i ti II l-h r I. .i

S i.., I ,,, i.... ....,,, I

.: ASKING S159,900

he-ll hising IvII .i iv l el l n i .. 11,


SPACIOUS
II ....... .. .. .l ... 1.11 1 ..

.I ....: ... ..- ....... l-.i I ... 'aIl. l Ih. ..


r 1i: : ASKING $119.900
C 7i E11,. 1,ili 1t 4002635
to 4ee ti De I tii, ulsdence


mil II1. n, 1 nI DI d I I, "..
i Ih.,. i 1i., ,I 1 1 I m .h, 1,h ,I

1. d 111m d I.. I ,,,,i ,, ,, 1. I

M'.-, =/i:l';:i: ASKING S175,000
Call Tim Donovan at 220 0328
to see this lor'el/ home


.I i ., .. .. .... ,,-,, , I -
I .1 1.h ..... nh l .- .ll .l.. h ,..i .- .. I. 1


ri 1i i=n-.. ASKING $71,900
Pit D1,' ,35? 212 7280
Il .l1t.t1 i; 2t/lrd?,i C.om


I I ,, .. .I .. ..1 ,h h,,,h

I .... I,,,,,4 I .,,.,I.,jI, l ,,hi 1 , i, ., h II,, I ....i,
i, i,, ., I ., .11 i ....... S 149.900
III 14j Iti Soile, l J.-' 8.-8.-
1i1. s.'i lilt, w lle I


* .l l i l.... I .) I .

Mi1 = 1011i1 $95,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'wi'ir'. ciliuscounlytsold. corn


i HB|UHUUM. z BATH ANU
2 CAR GARAGE HOME




Ml _, '= Iil:, ASKING ONLY S89,000
Call Jim Motion to wiei,
this heautilul home 422 2173


. ll.:...c. I .il I.,l I I V I.i

"11l 11, I .),II il1. I l: i, T V l i
Mi = i:"/li PRICED RIGHT ATS110,000
Call Willaid ot Jeanne Pickiel
to w'ieir at 201 9871


,ROII S/ IL' 'Ll ro 525 L0LL
II1 IER/IESS CSRIS Tl/l IRE Hlt&SO4lS4SS4
INVERNESS PARK 1:1 i,,...i ,.i
.. I I.. I.. .... ..

S11 000
C111 Dovj llt sh loi ippt 352 726 6668


INVERNESS COUNTRY CLUB AREA

1. i i. il,. ill mi n i 1 -i 1nl i li
h i ll. h i ..l ,] l|.:sI ih n. l i
Mi._, =i i"1 PRICED AT $118,000
Call Wi/laid ot Jeanne Pickhiel
on cell = 2019871


WATERFRONT HOME
_i| ..... 41.:.,1 : ':, l lh 1. .. :.i .i. .i,^ i
*~. '~.1)I i II h.l ,l :, IIlI ." II 'h.,.IN


MiG = 1-' iii GREAT BUY 5499,000
.d .i ... ][1 ..i 3. 0 7
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BACKYARD VIEW!

IIIil I- li 1 lii.l d I lin ll h ld, I


Mi_ :, = i:":" ONLY $28,600
Call Stelan Stuail 352 212 0211


INVERNESS RANCHES

:I:III:I .. I n. .l: l.: l .|,. I I l .h l |.,, l. l,

l I :lll :l l lN .ll ,il l lI1 ll II B i.li ll l

Mi:,= iiil )1i ASKING $157,900
Call /Nancy Jenks: 352 400 8072


rl v.: n n, ... i.h .c. I.ca,:p iah l 0 I:I ...:] (l
,: ill .i ll 1.,l i 1...ilnhI ..l 1 ni l ui.l

lA..l.I .hl..I,|.' .:I... .hll.: ._3 hM:I.I.. ..1.1 :, '. 1.1^
MI.,=11,1117. $44,500
Call loraine 0 Regan 586 0075


SOME OF THE BEST RIVERFRONT
MONEY CAN BUY!

l_ Ill' I. : I t. I l i

PRICED TO SELL .1 $149,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BEAUTIFUL, NEW HOME ON LARGER HOMESITE





r: i ,,, ASKING S188,900

I i,,ll hi l ,g 11 .111 ll ', l ll ..,


E16 SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013