<%BANNER%>

Citrus County chronicle ( June 9, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 9, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03144

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 9, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03144

Full Text


Galloping to victory: Palace Malice wins Belmont


CI T R U S COUNTY





IRONIC lleOnlIe.C
^& ~wwv/.cliroricleonline.can


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH ...
90 Scattered p.m.
LOW storms; 60%
72 chance of rain.
7 i PAGE A4


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 118 ISSUE 306


Chaz springs get scrubbing


scientist at the water district
"We have about 150 springs
in the district, and the springs
restoration team and the dis-
trict felt like it will be benefi-
cial to do this work to help
enhance the economic, recre-
ational and ecological value of
the springs," Rhinesmith said.
Work crews also will separate
any potential Native American


artifacts from the sediment.
Those artifacts will be taken
Tallahassee to be identified,
cataloged and brought back to
the Citrus County for display,
Rhinesmith added.
He said work started this
past week. Citrus County Pub-
lic Works department staff
began preparation work for a
See Page A5


centralize efforts of many groups
centralized Citrus County-based food bank opened,
the longtime dream of the more than 40 local
organizations that feed the county's hungry
"It's made things a lot more efficient we don't
have to go out and collect the food and bring it
back here," said John Bordeaux, director of Serv-
ing Our Savior (SOS) ministry at Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal Church in Lecanto. "Before, we'd
have to go to Land 0' Lakes every week 170
miles round trip. Now, with the money we save in
gas, we can buy more food, which means we can
feed more people."
However, to much of the general public, the
nonprofit food resource is still a relatively
unknown entity.
See Page A10


River with a massive project
currently under way
And with the project,
SWFWMD hopes to improve
the recreational, economic and
ecological value of the water-
way, according to Philip Rhine-
smith, senior environmental


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
(SWFWMD) is poised to bring
back the bubble in the springs
feeding the Chassahowitzka


Community Food Bank works to
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
On any given Monday, Tuesday, Thursday or
Friday, the Community Food Bank in
Homosassa is a whirlwind of activity. Begin-
ning at 6 a.m., a truck goes out to local grocery
stores to pick up their donations of perishable
food items. Then it's back to the warehouse on
Cardinal Street for sorting and repackaging by
food bank volunteers.
Around 10 a.m., volunteers from local agencies,
which include churches, shelters, soup kitchens
and other help organizations, start arriving to load
up on food they'll distribute to the people who
come to them for help.
It's been a little longer than six months since the


Associated Press
Former South African President
Nelson Mandela celebrates his
94th birthday July 18, 2012, in
Qunu, South Africa.


Mandela

has lung

infection

Former leader
ofSouth Africa
senous but stable'
Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG South
Africans on Saturday said their
thoughts were with former
President Nelson Mandela,
who was in "serious but stable"
condition after being taken to a
hospital to be treated for a re-
curring lung infection.
Mandela, who is 94 years old,
was treated in a hospital sev-
eral times in recent months,
with the last discharge coming
on April 6 after doctors diag-
nosed him with pneumonia and
drained fluid from his lung
area. He has been particularly
vulnerable to respiratory prob-
lems since contracting tubercu-
losis during his 27-year
imprisonment under apartheid.
A small girl and her father
stood outside Mandela's Johan-
nesburg home with a stone on
which was written a get-well
message for Mandela, who
helped end white racist rule
and became the country's first
black president in all-race elec-
tions in 1994. A young boy
brought a bouquet of flowers
that he handed over to guards
at the house.
Elsewhere in the city, some
worshippers prayed for Mandela
during an outdoor gathering.
"If the time comes, we wish
for him a good way to go," said
Noel Ngwenya, a security


. Page A5


County's budget can't strip down staff's pay


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
LECANTO -As Citrus County commis-
sioners work the timeline toward setting a
tentative millage rate July 24, one place
they likely can't look for savings will be the
county payroll it's down to the bone.


Last week, the Chronicle asked Sherry
Anderson, county human resources
(H.R.) director, some questions about
workers' pay and learned some interest-
ing information:
The 2007 pay scale has not been
increased.
Twenty-three county employees are


paid minimum wage.
Some county employees have pre-
sented state paperwork to H.R. to indi-
cate intent to apply for such assistance
programs as food, temporary cash and
Medicaid.
"If someone has referenced some of
our employees applying for food stamps,


I can't say, because we're not the state
and the state is the one that runs that
particular program," Anderson told the
Chronicle. 'I will tell you that from time
to time we do get individual employees
that come in with documents from the
See Page A8


7 Il l I84578 20075 o


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword ...... .A14
Excursions ...... .A13


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ....... .A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... .A14
Obituaries ....... .A6


TV Listings ...... A14
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes . .A16


FASTEST GROWING I SAVE UP TO s4800 SUPER STOW GO I SAVE UP TO $8450

15,9881/r 5 8 /1* A 218,98 013 TRUCK/ o:
Im 'I Fm NPR, OF THE-YEAR


CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.3 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
-- ... H O M O S A S S A IN V E R N E S S B R 0 0 K S V IL L E
*IN DISCOUNTS FROM RETAIL PRICE. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INUEN IVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WITH APPROVED CREDIT+ALL PRICES PLUS TAX TAG AND DEALER $599.50 FEE WITH $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSIS-
TANCE OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED .INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES WITH APPROVED CREDIT. ++39 MONTH LEASE, 39K MILES FOR LIFE OF LEASE. WITH $2999TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING, EXCLUDES TAX.TAG,TITLE AND
$599.50 DEALER FEE. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. ^0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS WITH APPROVED CREDIT


/B1


Project could also yield artifacts


Feeding Citrus County


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Community Food Bank of Citrus County Executive Director Tom Chancey hustles through the food bank's warehouse Thursday
morning as hundreds of pounds of food items are loaded, weighed, logged and sorted prior to distribution.


EV





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Depth of water left a
vessel in distress Friday
morning, according to the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Fire Rescue.
Fire Rescue assisted
Florida Wildlife Commis-
sion and U.S. Coast Guard
when they received a call
at 9:59 a.m. to assist two
boaters whose 18-foot Key
West center-console skiff
rested on a spoil bank on
the discharge canal of the
power plant near marine
marker 40.
At the boat ramp, CCSO-
Marine 91 confirmed loca-
tion of vessel with the
Coast Guard. They advised
the vessel was not accessi-
ble due to the depth of the
water.
Marine 91 cleared the
spoil banks of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal. They
encountered 2-foot choppy
waves and murky water.
Upon arrival, the crew
found the vessel's stern to
be taking on water, with ap-
proximately 10 inches of
water already covering the
floor The crew assisted the
owner in removing water
from the vessel. They were
then able to move it to open
water away from the bank
No injuries were re-
ported during the inci-
dent. The vessel and
occupants were trans-
ferred to Coast Guard.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.

CORRECTION
The Love Honda ad on
Page D5 of today's
Chronicle contains an
error. The company
seeks a full-time Service
Manager for Honda or
Accura. Apply in person
at 2219 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa or
phone 352-628-4600.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office Fire Rescue officers help dislodge a vessel stranded
Friday on a spoil bank on the discharge canal of Duke Energy's power plant.


SO YOU KNOW
* Fire Rescue recommends
all boaters leave details
regarding travel plans
with a person not travel-
ing with you. Information
about where you are
going, when you are
leaving and when you plan
to return is vital in the
event a boat is delayed
due to weather
conditions, mechanical
problems or emergencies.


Boaters rescued


Special to the Chronicle
Hundreds of Citrus
County residents have al-
ready registered opinions
about county services
they consider most im-
portant using an online
survey developed by the
Citrus 20/20 Inc. citizen
group.
The goal is to get at
least 1,000 responses, so
those who have not par-
ticipated are encouraged
to do so. Find the survey
online at: https://www.
surveymonkey.com/s/
CitrusBudgetSurvey
The Citrus County
Commission is planning
next fiscal year's budget
and will set the tentative
millage rate on July 24.
Before then, Citrus 20/20
wants commissioners to
hear what taxpayers
value most among county
services, to guide them in
making the tough deci-


sions about priorities and
funding.
The Citrus County 2014
Budget Options Survey
was intended to gather
residents' opinions.
The online survey
closes Monday, June 10.
On June 25, Citrus 20/20
representatives will pres-
ent the survey results
along with recommenda-
tions to the commission.
For background on the
project, see these links to
previous items in the
Chronicle:
Guest column by Cit-
rus 20/20 president Lace
Blue-McLean, published
May 20: www.chronicle
online.com/content/voice-
your-opinion-about-
countys-future.
Chronicle editorial,
published May 25: www
chronicleonline.com/
content/voice-opinion-
about-county%E2%80%
99s-future-functions.


We Welcome You To


Value Dental Care l


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.

Crystal River

352-794-6139


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD &Associates


Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


A OURPRODUCTS AREAMIANAD!Wdnosit


OO590 Cleaning Special
New Patients Only
FREE Exam & E-Rays
5 U w/Cleaning
D0210| D0150* D1110 I
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 5/31/13 I


5790o Porcelain
Fused to
Metal Crowns
7 (For first one)
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 5/31/13 D2751


Dentures $
starting at
Upper & Lower VVV
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 5/31/13 D5510 D5120


FRE Second
Opinion
X-ray & Exam
(New Patients Only)
D0210*D0150
If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 5/31/13


------- ------ --------------------------------------------------- --- ---------
We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance.


SFLORIDACANCER

& Research Institute
& Research Institute


World Class Medicine.


Hometown Care.


I ~L~*~elrlli0


V. Upender Rao, MD


Sunil Gandhi, MD


Gustavo Fonseca, MD


Marion T. Chirayath, MD


521 N. Lecanto Hwy


* Lecanto, FL 34461


* (352) 746.0707


______________Z_________L___S_ _LOCALLY.


Patrick Acevedo, MD
Jorge Ayub, MD
Sawsan G. Bishay, MD
Marion T. Chirayath, MD
Mamta T. Choksi, MD
Jennifer L. Cultrera, MD
Gustavo Fonseca, MD, FACP
Sunil Gandhi, MD, FACP
Larry Gandle, MD
Vivian Griffin, MD
Mary M. Li, MD, PhD
Vikas Malhotra, MD
Arthur Joseph Matzkowitz, MD
V. Upender Rao, MD, FACP
Joseph M. Sennabaum, MD
Gerald H. Sokol, MD, MSc, FCP
Thomas H. Tang, MD
David Wenk, MD
Gail Wright, MD, FACP, FCCP


BROOKSVILLE
7154 Medical Center Dr.
Spring Hill, FL 34608
(352) 596.1926
HUDSON
7651 Medical Dr.
Hudson, FL
(727) 868.9208
INVERNESS
2231 Highway 44 W #203
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400
LAND 0' LAKES
19409 Shumard Oak Dr.
Suite 101
Land O' Lakes, FL 34638
(727) 842.8411


TALLIASSE4


LECANTO
521 N. Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746.0707
NEW PoRT RICHEY
8763 River Crossing Blvd.
New Port Richey, FL 34655
(727) 842.8411
SPRING HILL
11063 County Line Road
Spring Hill, FL 34609
(352) 688.7744
ZEPHYRHILLS
38010 Medical Center Ave.
Zephyrhills, FL 33540
(813) 783.1676


0 E
Gainsville





He, ORLANDO
s ..... ............._................... ,
-- -^* ^


c .,


TAMPA
'II


Sebjing


* Nature Coast
FCS Locations
* Additional
FCS Locations


Napsle


FOOOFI FLnance


Deadline to join


budget survey


is Monday


8 Convenient Nature Coast Locations


A2 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


LOCAL







Page A3- SUNDAY, JUNE 9,2013



TATE


I LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Six-figure short


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer


CRYSTAL RIVER -
The city is facing a
$100,000 shortfall as it fi-
nesses its annual budget
for the upcoming fiscal
year, according to City
Manager Andy Houston.
To add to the financial
pressures, the city is in the
midst of several spend-
now, get-reimbursed-later
capital projects, according
to Houston.
With those issues in
mind, the city council will
convene Monday evening
at 5 p.m. for the Commu-
nity Redevelopment


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
LWV meeting slated
for Tuesday
The newly formed
League of Women Voters of
Citrus County will meet at
10:15 a.m. Tuesday, June
11, at the Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills.
The public is invited to
the nonpartisan, educa-
tional group.
For more information, call
352-746-0655.
Library hosting
Constitution lectures
There are two remaining
sessions of the "Original In-
tent of the U.S. Constitu-
tion" lecture. The sessions
will be from 3:30 to 5:30
p.m. Wednesday, June 12,
and Wednesday, June 19,
at the Homosassa Library,
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa. The sessions
are sponsored by the North
Suncoast Republican Club.
For information, call
director Bruce Bryn at
352-503-7375.
CCC meeting set
for Wednesday
The Citrus County Council
will meet at 9 a.m. Wednesday,
June 12, at the Beverly Hills
Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle.
Commissioner Scott
Adams will be the guest
speaker. Doors open at
8:30 a.m. and refreshments
will be available.
For information, email
freedomwayl@gmail.com.

Odessa
Small plane makes
emergency landing
The Pasco County Sher-
iff's Office reported a Cesna
172 was having trouble with
its landing gear Saturday at
about 10:30 a.m.
Deputies and Pasco Fire
Rescue responded to Tampa
Bay Executive Airport in
Odessa, about 25 miles north
of Tampa. The plane was
able to make a safe landing.
-From staff and wire reports


Agency (CRA) meeting.
At that meeting, the
council, in its capacity as
the CRA board, will con-
sider awarding two con-
tracts to Pave-Rite Inc.,
one for the North Citrus
Streetscape in the amount
of$161,358.72, and the sec-
ond for the new landscape
median on the same
stretch of road in the
amount of $35,078.85.
At 6 p.m., officials will
hear some of the prelimi-
nary conclusions of the a
utility rate study con-
ducted by Public Re-
sources Management
Group, Inc.
The city hired the firm


tfall tops C.R.
in October 2012 to conduct Officials would 1
the study which, in part, see additional s
will analyze the heavy cap- done to define the sc
italinvestments beingpur- the temporary cas
sued by the city in the shortfall and the mo
utilities area, the largest of nomical means of ad
those being the extension ing that shortfall.
of sewer service through As a result, there
the Disadvantaged Small a separate item o
Communities grant pro- agenda seeking auth
gram and the extension of tion to spend an
a reclaimed water line to tional $5,000 for th
the Duke Energy Power study
Generation Complex. The study also s]
According to officials, cally addresses thE
this will create a cash-flow burden currently
problem for the next two borne by high-con
years that the rate study is tion commercial use
intended to address the equity of that bu
through a four-year rate Following the wor.
change model. a presentation has


tu
ic
h
s

IA
dt

w
1n

e

P
e

s
r
r
k


council's
ke to scheduled for the regular
udies city council meeting at 7
)pe of p.m.
1-flow On the agenda for that
t eco- meeting:
Iress- 0 Consideration of a
contract award to Daly &
'ill be Zilch Inc. for the King's
1 the Bay Park Performance
oriza- Stage in the amount of
addi- $98,268;
rate 0 Consideration of a
contract with Page Dixon
ecifi- Chandler Smith LLC for
rate engineering services for
being relocation of utilities along
ump- U.S. 19 to Stantec Inc. for a
s and cost of $97,960;
den. 0 Consideration of a
shop, contract for relocation of
been sewer pipes in the vicinity


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


No small fry


nch by inch, this monster cobia was pulled from a boat Saturday to
resounding applause from the crowd gathered at MacRae's of Homosassa
for the two-day Cobia Big Fish Tournament. Weighing in at 72.7 pounds,
the fish gave a Day 1 lead in the 29th annual tournament to Chiefland resident
Weldon Baillie, left, who caught it "with a little help from my friend, Virgil
Cooper," also of Chiefland and pictured at right. Baillie donated the fish to the
fish fry and party, which will be Sunday. The fish fry will feature cobia, grouper,
red drum and trout and is open to the public.


agenda
of Northeast Sixth Street
to Pospiech Contracting
Inc., at a cost of $151,143;
Consideration of a
contract award to Ad-
vanced Aluminum Inc. for
the construction of a
boardwalk and viewing
platform at the Academy
of Environmental Sci-
ences in the amount of
$54,345;
Discussion of fiscal
year 2013-14 contract for
law enforcement services
with the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
Contact Chronicle
reporter A.B. Sidibe at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.



Meals on


Wheels


hands


keys to


county

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS After 40
years and thousands of
meals delivered to the
homebound in the Inver-
ness area, the Inverness
Meals on Wheels program is
ending Friday, June 14.
Beginning Monday, June
17, the county will be pick-
ing up the Inverness pro-
gram's clients, which is a
big relief to current Meals
on Wheels program direc-
tor Gail Sturtevant, who is
moving to North Carolina.
"With all the new govern-
ment regulations about main-
taining food temperature
and such, plus having a hard
time getting drivers, it's just
time to end," Sturtevant said.
The program, which is
not affiliated with the na-
tional Meals On Wheels As-
sociation ofAmerica, began
in 1973 as a project of the
Inverness Women's Club.
Coles said the county pro-
gram will add a new route,
and the people who have al-
ways expected a noontime
meal will continue to re-
ceive one.
"We can put the ones who
qualify on our grant-funded
program," Coles said. "With
so many cuts going on, we're
thankful we're still able to
help these people."
Sturtevant said she and
the other volunteers are sad
the program is ending -
some have been doing this
for 20 years but at the
same time, it's time.
"The hospital has done a
fabulous job for us, and the
nice part about the county
taking over, they send some-
one out to check on the peo-
ple and see if they qualify for
any other services," she said.


Classes of 2003 hosting reunion June 21 and 22


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Ten years ago, the 300th episode
of the "The Simpsons" aired, the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers won Super
Bowl XXXVII and Outkast topped
the charts with "Hey Ya!"
Members of the the county's
classes of 2003 will commemorate
10 years since they turned their
tassels at a joint Citrus County Re-
union Weekend June 21-22.
The following are a few of the
stories Amanda Whitelaw, coordi-
nator of the reunion, said will be
heard at the weekend:
4 A after graduat-
S ing from CHS,
Nissa Stuart Otero
S'* < attended the Univer-
S sity of Florida and
graduated with a de-
gree in graphic de-
Nissa Stuart sign. In 2008, Nissa
Otero and her husband
moved to Indiana so she could take
a job at Vera Bradley as a Web de-
signer. She's been at the company
for five years and currently directs


the e-commerce marketing cam-
paigns remotely from her home of-
fice in Tampa."


Manuel
Coimbre


4 4M/[ anuel Coim-
.LVI bre was also
recruited to help co-
ordinate the reunion
because he was stu-
dent council secre-
tary in school. He
now works as an
armed nuclear secu-


rity officer at Duke Energy and is a
director for the United Security
Professionals of America, Interna-
tional Union."


Brady
Pratt


"1D ready Pratt
.Dgraduated
from the University
of Florida in 2007
with an honors de-
gree in Bachelor of
Science in microbi-
ology and cell sci-
ence. He attended


Louisiana State University School
of Veterinary Medicine and gradu-
ated in 2011 with Doctor of Veteri-
nary Medicine degree. For the past


two years, Brady has been practic-
ing small-animal medicine and
surgery in Clearwater."


Ryan
Downs


4 D yan Downs
"R was in a car
accident in 2007 that
redirected his ca-
reer from business
school at Florida
State University to
the Connecticut
School of Broadcast-


ing. Ryan is now an afternoon
radio host and program director
for two local radio stations, Citrus
95.3 and the New Fox 96.7. He says
his greatest accomplishment by far,
though, has been raising his 2-year-
old daughter Elle."
4 D ete Yellico en-
I listed in the
SUnited States Navy
for five years as an
aviation ordnance-
man, where he built
bombs and missiles
Pete for F-18s, stationed
Yellico onboard the USS
John C. Stennis. After being dis-


charged, he was offered a job from
1993 French Open doubles cham-
pion Murphy Jensen. Now, he's liv-
ing in Savannah, currently playing
college tennis and working toward
a degree in service design and
a minor in advertising/graphic
design."
4 4 S tephanie Garry
S studied jour-
nalism and English
at the University of
Florida. In 2009, she
became a Peace
Corps volunteer in
Stephanie the Dominican Re-
Garry public. Upon finish-
ing her service in 2011, she moved
to post-earthquake Port-au-Prince,
Haiti, where she worked in com-
munications at Haiti's largest mi-
crofinance institution, Fonkoze. In
2012, she moved to Boston to join
the communications team of Part-
ners In Health, a nonprofit that
provides high-quality medical care
in 10 countries, including Haiti.
The co-founder of Partners In
Health, Dr Paul Farmer, grew up in
Brooksville."


WHAT: Citrus
County Class of
2003 Reunion
Weekend.
WHO: Class of
2003 graduates
of Citrus,
Lecanto and
Crystal River
high schools.
WHEN: 8 p.m.
to midnight
Friday, June 21,
and 7 p.m. to
10:30 p.m.
Saturday,
June 22.
INFO: Tickets
are $35 per
person plus $3
processing fee.
RSVP and pur-
chase tickets at
https://cc2003
reunion.trstickets
.com/ or find
the class on
Facebook.






A4 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday In the year ahead, you
should be able to make a major change
in a project, effectively turning it into
two separate endeavors. Both will do
well, thanks to your innovative ideas.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Two in-
terrelated projects might have a good
potential for profit if they're handled in
tandem. Try to see the big picture, and
act accordingly.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A clever
friend might discuss a new idea. If you
believe it to be a good one and there's
room for you to share in it, do so.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) We all have
varied roles to play in life. You've been
a giver for a while now it's time to
start receiving.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you
take an old venture apart, you should
be able to discover new ways to make
it profitable. Don't be afraid to get a lit-
tle messy.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Your many
accomplishments will not only be for
yourself, but for the benefit of others.
Your efforts will bear much fruit.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Usually,
what we know is more significant than
who we know. However, when it
comes to the present cycle, your social
contacts will be of vital importance.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A ca-
sual acquaintance might ask for help
sorting out a problem. Don't hesitate to
ask for a fee if it falls in your occupa-
tional domain.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -An al-
liance has an excellent chance of
being successful. You're instincts will
tell you who will be productive and who
won't.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're
presently in a cycle where good things
could come without much effort. Reap
the benefits, but don't take anything for
granted.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It isn't
likely you will feel comfortable if you're
allowed to play only a minor role in a
big project. You belong up front, calling
the shots. Find a way to get there.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your
ability to capably balance several en-
deavors at the same time gives you an
edge over the competition.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It can be
unwise to change your mind at the last
minute, but there are plenty of times
when it's necessary. Today, you might
need to call an audible for a good
reason.


ENTERTAINMENT


Spoleto festival
wraps up
CHARLESTON, S.C.- The
Spoleto Festival USA is winding
up its 17-day run this weekend.
This year's festival was the
largest ever and featured 160
performances. It concludes Sun-
day evening with a concert by a
Cajun, honky-tonk and swing en-
semble called the Red Stick
Ramblers at Middleton Place
Plantation outside of Charleston.
The concert is followed by the
traditional closing fireworks
display.
Since the festival was founded
in 1977 by the late composer
Gian Carlo Menotti, it's become
internationally known and has
presented an international slate
of performers.
Perhaps no show demon-
strates that better than this
year's opera "Matsukaze." The
composer is Japanese and the
director is Chinese. The lead
singers are Korean and perform
in German as an American con-
ducts the orchestra.

Bobby Flay cooks
for Obama, Xi
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. -
When President Barack Obama
and Chinese President Xi Jin-
ping sat down for dinner, they
feasted on several dishes pre-
pared by one of America's top
chefs.
The White House said
celebrity chef Bobby Flay pre-
pared a menu for the two lead-
ers that included lobster
tamales, Porterhouse steak and
cherry pie.
The meal was served Friday in
the dining room at Sunnylands,
the sprawling estate in Rancho
Mirage, Calif., where Obama and
Xi met for their talks.
Flay is known for his South-
western cooking. He owns sev-


Blueberry festival


^^*H^^~ ~ ~~~ y- -. 4- .-'--^l^
i
I I





". I
kb. '>/J~l^^ H i k


Associated Press
Faith Creel, 5, admires her facial decoration at a face-painting
booth, one of the numerous vendors along Main Street for the
24th annual Texas Blueberry Festival on Saturday in
Nacogdoches, Texas.


eral restaurants around the
country and stars in several
cooking programs on the Food
Network.

Trinity Rep named
RI state theater
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Rhode
Island now has an official state
theater.
Trinity Repertory Company
was named the state theater of
Rhode Island in a joint resolution
approved by the General As-
sembly this month. The resolu-
tion calls Trinity Rep a "theatrical
treasure" and a "must-see desti-


nation" and says it has served
as a cultural leader and incuba-
tor for other local theater
companies.
Artistic Director Curt Colum-
bus said the theater, which is
celebrating its 50th year, is
thrilled and humbled by the
recognition. He says the com-
pany has been recognized na-
tionally over the years but calls it
"doubly special" to be honored at
home.
The repertory company was
founded in 1963 at Trinity United
Methodist Church.

-From wire reports


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, June 9, the
160th day of 2013. There are 205
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 9, 1973, Secretariat
won the Belmont Stakes, becoming
horse racing's first Triple Crown
winner in 25 years.
On this date:
In A.D. 68, the Roman Emperor
Nero committed suicide, ending a
13-year reign.
In 1863, a two-day meeting
began in New York City to found the
United States Veterinary Medical
Association (now the American Vet-
erinary Medical Association).
In 1940, during World War II,
Norway decided to surrender to the
Nazis, effective at midnight.
In 1943, the federal government
began withholding income tax from
paychecks.
In 1978, leaders of the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
struck down a 148-year-old policy
of excluding black men from the
Mormon priesthood.
Ten years ago: As rebels bore
down on the capital of Liberia,
French helicopters rescued more
than 500 Americans, Europeans
and other foreigners.
Five years ago: Ken Griffey Jr.
became the sixth player in baseball
history to reach 600 homers in the
first inning of the Cincinnati Reds'
9-4 victory over the Florida Marlins.
One year ago: Spain became
the fourth and largest country to ask
Europe to rescue its failing banks
(however, the bailout was averted).
Today's Birthdays: Comedian
Jackie Mason is 85. Actor Joe San-
tos is 82. Sports commentator Dick
Vitale is 74. Retired MLB All-Star
Dave Parker is 62. Mystery author
Patricia Cornwell is 57. Actor
Michael J. Fox is 52. Writer-producer
Aaron Sorkin is 52. Actor Johnny
Depp is 50. Actress Gloria Reuben
is 49. Actress Natalie Portman is 32.
Thought for Today: "Next to the
slanderer, we detest the bearer of
the slander to our ears." Mary
Catherwood, American novelist
(1847-1901).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


93 72 0.00 90 73 0.50

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusivedaly
forecast by: .
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 72
Scattered PM storms, rain chance
S60%
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 71
Scattered PM storms, rain chance 40%

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 71
Scattered PM storms, rain chance 40%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/72
Record 97/62
Normal 92/68
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 4.00 in.
Total for the year 10.10 in.
Normal for the year 16.93 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.04 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 72
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 79%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 2.1/12
Monday's count: 2.2
Tuesday's count: 3.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/9 SUNDAY 6:37 12:25 7:01 12:49
6/10 MONDAY 7:27 1:15 7:51 1:39


JUNE 16


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:8 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:31 A.M.
0 1 0 MOONRISE TODAY..........................7:22 A.M.
JUNE 23 JUNE 30 JULY 8 MOONSET TODAY............................ 9:20 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitka* 7:30 a/2:53 a 6:28 p/2:32 p
Crystal River** 5:51 a/12:15 a 4:49 p/11:54 a
Withlacoochee* 3:38 a/9:42 a 2:36 p/10:36 p
Homosassa*** 6:40 a/1:52 a 5:38 p/1:31 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:04 a/3:26 a 7:02 p/3:08 p
6:25 a/12:48 a 5:23 p/12:30 p
4:12 a/10:18 a 3:10 p/11:08 p
7:14 a/2:25 a 6:12 p/2:07 p


H L
87 73
87 79
92 73
87 71
88 76
86 71
87 81
90 72
88 75


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK
Southeast winds around 10 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will temperature
have a light chop. Scattered showers
and thunderstorms today. 8 3 0


Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.92 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.66 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.17 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.05 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 70 54 .22
Albuquerque 96 62
Asheville 79 60 .12
Atlanta 83 67 .01
Atlantic City 75 62 .22
Austin 91 58
Baltimore 80 64
Billings 77 60
Birmingham 83 64
Boise 84 59
Boston 77 55 .56
Buffalo 62 55 .04
Burlington, VT 63 54 .06
Charleston, SC 89 73 .02
Charleston, WV 79 58
Charlotte 83 66
Chicago 74 49
Cincinnati 78 57
Cleveland 69 57
Columbia, SC 86 70
Columbus, OH 76 55
Concord, N.H. 74 52 .79
Dallas 88 65
Denver 77 61
Des Moines 74 54
Detroit 71 58
El Paso 98 64
Evansville, IN 82 62
Harrisburg 75 64
Hartford 77 53 .33
Houston 91 68
Indianapolis 77 60
Jackson 84 63
Las Vegas 109 83
Little Rock 84 64
Los Angeles 72 63
Louisville 82 67 .04
Memphis 84 61
Milwaukee 64 49
Minneapolis 72 56
Mobile 88 69
Montgomery 88 65
Nashville 84 64


Sunday
Fcst H L
s 80 58
s 95 68
ts 80 64
ts 84 69
pc 78 67
pc 93 73
ts 85 69
s 81 52
ts 85 69
s 95 59
s 75 60
s 80 63
pc 75 53
ts 87 72
ts 82 66
ts 86 69
ts 75 61
ts 82 66
pc 76 63
ts 89 70
ts 83 67
pc 78 55
pc 89 72
s 87 56
sh 71 58
pc 77 63
s 102 76
ts 82 66
pc 85 66
s 80 60
pc 91 74
ts 80 65
ts 88 70
s 108 82
pc 88 70
pc 67 61
pc 83 69
pc 88 71
ts 65 56
sh 64 55
ts 86 71
ts 87 69
ts 86 67


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 87 73 ts 88 76
New York City 75 57 .49 pc 82 65
Norfolk 83 71 ts 87 72
Oklahoma City 81 61 ts 85 70
Omaha 70 58 .31 pc 76 57
Palm Springs 101 77 s 104 71
Philadelphia 78 63 .13 pc 86 67
Phoenix 107 83 s 107 80
Pittsburgh 70 56 pc 83 65
Portland, ME 72 53 .99 pc 73 54
Portland, Ore 74 51 pc 75 51
Providence, R.I. 79 55 .89 s 80 59
Raleigh 83 66 .04 ts 88 70
Rapid City 73 54 .02 pc 78 52
Reno 96 67 pc 100 63
Rochester, NY 64 55 .03 pc 77 61
Sacramento 105 65 pc 87 59
St. Louis 80 59 ts 81 63
St. Ste. Marie 73 40 pc 69 52
Salt Lake City 86 62 s 91 68
San Antonio 88 65 pc 93 74
San Diego 63 59 pc 68 61
San Francisco 76 56 pc 68 53
Savannah 89 72 trace ts 88 72
Seattle 65 55 s 70 51
Spokane 77 47 s 79 50
Syracuse 65 57 .06 pc 78 61
Topeka 83 56 pc 82 60
Washington 81 68 ts 87 70
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 115 Needles, Calif. LOW 28 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/78ts
Amsterdam 67/46/pc
Athens 83/66/s
Beijing 70/61/sh
Berlin 74/56/c
Bermuda 76/70/pc
Cairo 91/66/s
Calgary 55/46/sh
Havana 88/74ts
Hong Kong 84/74ts
Jerusalem 77/62/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


63/55/c
72/47/pc
72/53/c
76/56/ts
68/57/sh
79/58/pc
72/54/r
74/64/pc
70/62/pc
66/52/pc
79/66/pc
77/59/pc
81/61/sh


LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices.........................D7

Miscellaneous Notices...............D7

Notice to

Creditors/Administration.........D7


S CITRUS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ....................................................... ...................... Editor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trlsta Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trlsta Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..........................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content ................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...............................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.cor
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Ph" Phone 352-563-6363
g POSTMASTER: Send address changes to.
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


i?
s~;
:

n





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
In this photo taken from video, ailing anti-apartheid icon
Nelson Mandela is filmed April 29, more than three weeks
after being released from hospital.


MANDELA
Continued from Page Al

officer who was in the
congregation.
"During the past few
days, former President
Nelson Mandela has had a
recurrence of lung infec-
tion," said a statement
from the office of Presi-
dent Jacob Zuma. "This
morning at about 1:30 a.m.,
his condition deteriorated
and he was transferred to
a Pretoria hospital."
It said Mandela was re-
ceiving expert medical
care and "doctors are
doing everything possible
to make him better and
comfortable."
Zuma wished Mandela a
quick recovery on behalf
of the government and the
nation and requested that
the media and the public
respect the privacy of the
former leader and his fam-
ily, the statement said.
Mandela's wife, humani-
tarian activist Graca
Machel, canceled an ap-
pearance at an interna-
tional forum on hunger
and nutrition in London
on Saturday, citing "per-
sonal reasons," said
Colleen Harris, a spokes-
woman for the meeting.
Presidential spokesman
Mac Maharaj said Machel
had canceled her atten-
dance at the London meet-
ing on Thursday, and had
accompanied Mandela to
the hospital on Saturday
morning, the South
African Press Association
reported.
"We need to hold our
thoughts and keep him in
our minds," Maharaj said.
"He is a fighter, he has re-


covered many times from
very serious conditions
and he will be with us.
Let's pray for him and help
him to get better."
The African National
Congress, the ruling party
that has dominated poli-
tics in South Africa since
the end of apartheid, said
it hoped Mandela, known
affectionately by his clan
name Madiba, would get
better soon.
"We will keep President
Mandela and his family in
our thoughts and prayers
at this time and call upon
South Africans and the
peoples of the globe to do
the same for our beloved
statesman and icon,
Madiba," the party said in
a statement
On April 29, state televi-
sion broadcast footage of a
visit by Zuma and other
ANC leaders to Mandela at
his Johannesburg home.
Zuma said at the time that
Mandela was in good
shape, but the footage -
the first public images of
Mandela in nearly a year
- showed him silent and
unresponsive, even when
Zuma tried to hold his
hand.
"Nelson Mandela is a fa-
ther to South Africa and
South Africans; every time
he is admitted to hospital
we feel saddened along
with the rest of our coun-
try," the Democratic Al-
liance, the main political
opposition party, said in a
statement.
South Africans ex-
pressed hope that Man-
dela would recover from
his latest setback.
"He is going to survive,"
said Willie Mokoena, a gar-
dener in Johannesburg.
"He's a strong man."


"We Cater to Cowards!"
General & Cosmetic Dentistry
HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE
FREE SECOND OPINION.
Most Insurance Acceepted Lcense #DN .

P Ledger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.

Ledg erdentistry.com Se HablaEspnol
Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


Has BACK PAIN

prevented you
from your daily

activities?
Get educated about
your health.
Attend a FREE seminar
At this FREE seminar,
you will:
Learn about the anatomy
of the spine
Learn about the latest
treatment options
Have the opportunity to
ask questions


The Villages
Comfort Suites 1202 Avenida Central

Speaker: Paula Jewell

To register for this FREE seminar,
call 1-888-847-8876
or check out the calendar of
events page on LargoMedical.com


SPRINGS
Continued from Page Al

began preparation work
for a dewatering process,
redoing the parking lots
and discharge channel.
Rhinesmith said the de-
watering process involves
the use of vacuum-like
equipment to suck up sed-
iment and other organic
matter and collect it in
fabric bags.
Collected organic mate-
rials will then be trans-
ferred to area farms to be
tilled into the soil.
Next week, the district's
contractor, Underwater
Engineering Services Inc.
(UESI), a marine con-
struction company based
in Fort Pierce, will begin
work on the sediment re-
moval that is expected to
end in September 2013.
The Chassahowitzka
headsprings are report-
edly rich in both prehis-
toric and historic artifacts,
because archaeological
data indicates Native


Google Maps
The Chassahowitzka River in southwestern Citrus County is fed by many springs
along its length.


Americans used to live on
the banks of the freshwa-
ter springs, said Rhine-
smith.
A team from Southeast-
ern Archaeological Re-
search Inc. (SEARCH)
also will be on hand to
survey the springs' basin
and then monitor the sed-
iment removal operation,
according to officials.


Rhinesmith said the
team will identify and
evaluate any cultural re-
sources discovered for
their National Register el-
igibility. Once identified,
the artifacts will be docu-
mented by SEARCH and
cataloged by the state's
Division of Historical Re-
sources in Tallahassee.
He said the items will


then be returned to Citrus
County for public display
SEARCH and the water
district also will conduct a
public archaeology event
at the Chassahowitzka
headsprings to educate
participants about the re-
sources encountered dur-
ing the survey and
promote preservation of
cultural materials found.


New Location Inside Crystal River Mall
FREE I (Next to K-Mart)


V.-
HEARING AIDS'g


&D I ii1


I REE

-I," *HEARING TEST
S*-BATTERY
I REPLACEMENT I
i -HEARING AID
REPAIRS
S C S T I Must present coupon. Any make or model.
In office only. One week only.


S BATTERIES
I PREMIUM ZINC u
I BATTERIES I



ILimit 1 Coupon Per Visit Limit 2 Packs Per Visit.
L Must present coupon. One-week-only.
illllllli

s12 MONTHS
SAME AS CASH
I I

fo n -l I I

1* FINANCING
1ONE WEEK ONLY!
DmuImm m in


MIRACLE-EAR IS
CELEBRATING...

~/J years



Snoww


(Iq
sRree


'h0.
Lmpn Meb w ;. Center


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Herbert
Cochrane, 79
HERNANDO
Herbert R. Cochrane, 79
years, ofArbor Lakes, Her-
nando, Fla., died Thurs-
day, June 6, 2013, under
the care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County
Born Jan. 27, 1934, in
Akron, Ohio, Herb served
in the U.S. Marine Corps
from April 1954 to April
1957 during the Korean
War. Upon return from
Korea, Herb was in the
MPs. After his honorable
discharge from the
Marines, Herb served four
years as
an ap-
S prentice
plasterer
and was a
journey-
man plas-
terer until
retire-
Herbert ment in
Cochrane 1996.
One of 11 siblings, Herb
was predeceased by his
parents Earl and Edith
Cochrane; brothers War-
ren Earl, Charles Ray-
mond and James William;
and sisters Dorothy Mor-
ris, Mary Mullet and
Pauline Ventimiglia. He is
survived by his loving wife
of 59 years, Gerrie; sons
Randall (Kelly) of Jack-
sonville, Fla., and James
(Denise) of Loxahatchee,
Fla. Herb had an all-en-
compassing love for his
four grandsons Austin and
Brandon Cochrane of
Jacksonville and Thomas
and Ryan Cochrane of
Loxahatchee. Each was
"his buddy" He is survived
by brothers Eugene
(Nanci), David, Gordon
(June) and Daniel, all of
the Akron, Ohio area; and
many nieces and nephews
scattered throughout the
United States.
Herb and family resided
in Boca/Delray from 1973
to 2000. They have resided
in Hernando since 2000.
Herb loved to travel and
bowled the amateur ABC
national bowling tourna-
ments held throughout the
United States. Herb had
many ABC awards for
games of 299, 300 and se-
ries over 700. While living
in the Boca Raton area, he
competed in local tourna-
ments and won a car. Herb
also enjoyed the golf out-
ings with the Arbor Lakes
Men's Golf Group. Herb
had been ill the past two to
three years and was no
longer able to participate
in the sports he loved.
However, he loved to
travel and spend time with
his brothers and their fam-
ilies in Ohio.
A Celebration of Life
memorial service for Herb
will be conducted at 1 p.m.
on Wednesday, June 12, at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory of
Inverness, with the Rev.
Randy Hodges officiating.
The family will receive
friends in visitation from
noon until the hour of
service. Inurnment will
follow at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell, with military honors
provided by the Marine
Corps League. In lieu of
flowers, the family sug-
gests memorial donations
to the Alzheimer's
Research Program or
the American Diabetic
Association.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.




Montville
'Monte' Peck Jr.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Montville "Monte" E.
Peck Jr, of Citrus Springs,
died Thursday, June 6,
2013. Memorial Service of
Remembrance, Saturday,
June 22, at 11 a.m. at Fero


Funeral Home. Inurnment
to follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens.

Harold
Owens, 84
HERNANDO
Harold Owens, 84, of
Hernando, died April 12
at Hospice of Citrus
County A memorial serv-
ice will take place at
12:30 p.m. Friday, June 14,
at First Christian Church
of Inverness. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.


Joan
Sheehan, 89
HOMOSASSA
Joan Arens Sheehan,
age 89, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Friday, May
31, 2013, at her home
under the care of her fam-


Joan
Sheehan


ily and
Hospice
of Citrus
County.
She was
born Feb.
5, 1924, in
Dumont,
Minn., to
Joseph
and Mar-


garite (Rohnenkamp)
Arens. She came here 24
years ago from Dumont.
She was a retired elec-
tronics technician for
Unisys Corp. She was a
member of St. Thomas the
Apostle Catholic Church of
Homosassa, Fla. Her
passions were Jesus and
flowers. She helped peo-
ple all over the world with
her loving and giving
heart. She was always
there for her family with
her unconditional love.
Joan was also a champion
bowler.
She was preceded in
death by her husband Ray-
mond and daughter Kath-
leen Sheehan; and siblings
Vernie, Margie, Ruth,
Robert and Peter. She is
survived by her brother
Tony and sisters Jane,
Jean, Reet and Nancy;
grandchildren Stephanie
Sheehan, Simona Escobar,
and Makeda and Rayjone
Teachout-Bibbens; and
great-grandchildren
Aaliyah and Kemoura
Sheehan and Amos and
Asher Escobar
A funeral Mass will be
celebrated at 10 a.m. Tues-
day, June 11, 2013, at St.
Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church in Ho-
mosassa, Fla., with Father
Greg Andrews as cele-
brant. Interment will fol-
low at the Crystal River
Memorial Cemetery in
Crystal River. In lieu of
flowers, the family is ac-
cepting memorial contri-
butions to assist them with
funeral costs. Strickland
Funeral Home Crystal
River, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




Howard
Vineyard, 83
CITRUS SPRINGS
Vineyard, Howard E., 83,
of Citrus Springs, died
Thursday, June 6, 2013, at
the Legacy House, Ocala.
He was born March 17,
1930, in LeFlore City,
Okla., to the late Edward
D. and Rosie Branham
Vineyard.
Mr. Vineyard retired
from J.I. Case, where he
was a mechanical engi-
neer, and served in the
U.S. Army during the Ko-
rean Conflict. He was a
Mason, Shriner and a
member of the VFW
He was preceded in
death by his parents and
two brothers.
Surviving family in-
cludes his wife Virginia
Williams Vineyard of Cit-
rus Springs; son Kevin
(Susan) Vineyard of Vir-
ginia; daughter Carole
Vineyard (James) Collins;
grandchildren Allison,
Jacob and Daniel Vine-
yard of Virginia; sisters
Lorena (Ray) Brown and
Betty Deering, both of
Michigan; brother Gerald
(Iva) Vineyard of Rainbow
Springs; and several
nieces and nephews.
A memorial funeral
service, celebrating the
life of Howard E. Vine-
yard, will be conducted at
11 a.m. Tuesday, June 11,
2013, at the Roberts
Funeral Home of Dunnel-
lon, 19939 East Pennsylva-
nia Ave., with the Rev.
Stan Stewart and the
Rev. Charles Hayes, North
Oak Baptist Church,
officiating.
The family prefers, if
you wish, memorial
contributions to Hospice
of Marion County, Legacy
House, PO. Box 4860,
Ocala, FL 34478-4860 in
memory of Howard E.
Vineyard.
Online expressions of
sympathy may be made
to www.robertsofdunnellon
.com.
Funeral arrangements
are under the careful di-
rection of Roberts Funeral
Home of Dunnellon.


William
Westmoreland, 82
HOMOSASSA
William Henry West-
moreland, 82, of Ho-
mosassa, passed away
Friday, June 7, 2013, at
Hospice House in
Lecanto.
A native of Dyersburg,
Tenn., he was born Jan. 10,
1931, to Rufus and Flora
(Slaughter) Westmoreland,
one of
s e ven
children.
Mr West-
S moreland
was a
draftsman
by profes-
sion and
William moved
Westmoreland here 13
years ago from Lake Sta-
tion, Ind. He was a mem-
ber of The Church ofJesus
Christ (Old Homosassa)
and loved gardening.
He is survived by his
daughters Alta Strickland
(husband Allen), Ho-
mosassa; Peggy Bickers
(husband Robbie), Dyers-
burg, Tenn.; and Flora
Peddycoart (husband
Doyal), Cape Coral, Fla.;
adopted daughter Della
Westmoreland, Portage,
Ind.; sons Richard West-
moreland (wife Jeanetta),
Stanley Westmoreland
(wife Margaret) and
Leonard Westmoreland, all
of Dyersburg, Tenn.; broth-
ers Eris Westmoreland,
Homosassa, and Ronnie
Westmoreland, Dyersburg,
Tenn.; 13 grandchildren;
20 great-grandchildren
and four great-great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
held at 2 p.m. Monday,
June 10, at Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa. Inter-
ment will follow at Foun-
tains Memorial Park,
Homosassa. Friends will
be received from 1 p.m.
until time of service.
www.wilderfuneral.com.




Joseph
McAdams, 78
HOMOSASSA
Joseph H. McAdams, age
78, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Friday, June
7, 2013, at HPH Hospice
Care Center in Lecanto,
Fla.
He was born Oct. 18,
1934, in Twin Falls, Idaho,
to Virgil and Altha (Whit-
ney) McAdams. He came
here 22 years ago from
New York. He was a re-
tired vice president of J.P
Morgan Bank in New York
and a U.S. Navy Korean
War veteran.
Surviving are his wife
Barbara McAdams of
Homosassa, Fla.; three
stepdaughters, Debbie
Rubinich of Charlotte,
N.C., Barbara Murphy of
Citrus Springs, Fla., and
Karen Lystad of Clearwa-
ter, Fla.; and seven grand-
children.
A memorial celebration
of life will be held at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 12, 2013,
at the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, Fla., with HPH
Hospice Chaplain Brian
Baggs officiating. A
private inurnment will
be at the Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell, Fla.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. com.


Richard 'Rick'
Ballard, 68
HOLI DAY
Richard "Rick" Ballard,
68, passed away peacefully
May 10, 2013, in Clearwa-
ter, Fla. He was born Dec.
7, 1944, in Chicago, Ill., to
Alice and Ira Ballard. A
graduate of Southern Illi-
nois University in fine arts,
Rick pursued a career as a
reporter and photographer
for the Citrus County
Chronicle in the '70s and
'80s and maintained a life-
long interest in nature and
photography
Rick is survived by his
two daughters, Kimberly and
Abby; three grandchildren,
Kelly, Ryan and Mackenzie;
his sister Janice; nieces
Lynn and Jennifer; great-
niece Sarah; and various
cousins. He is preceded in
death by his parents Alice
and Ira; and nephewJimmy
A celebration of life will
be at one of his favorite
places, MacRae's in Ho-
mosassa Springs, Satur-
day, June 22, 2013. For
details, call Kimberly 602-
321-3099. All are welcome.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
See Page A7

For information on
submitting an obituary,
call 352-563-5660 or
email obits@chronicle
online.com.


To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


Clsn tm o


CL. E. Sava
Funeral Home
With Crematory
SBurial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323





OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.
www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com


Than Just
Lorrie Verticals

BST 2" Faux Wood
,' -Woven Woods
SCellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
*Top Treatments
Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)




Matthew Shoen
06/09/1964- 01/08/2009


"Pure Joy!"


New Patient Specials


Full Mouth X-Rays, 9S

Comprehensive Exam 9
We Meet All Your Note in ojuction ith i ursance
We Meet All Your Offer expires in 30 days


Dental Needs,
Including Implants


Family Friendly


In house denture lab
Free Denture Consults
Financing available


Most insurance
accepted.


Call today! 352-527-1614
Alexsa Davila,
DMD DN 15390
Walton Van Hoose,
DMD DN 18101f i
Citrus Hills Dental
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mm FeeADAcode D0210, D0150


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

Brown-

Fuerl om &Crmaor


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


sIaB




I V







Ocala
671-537


Hearing in Noise

Comparison

Study
Participants

Sought

Gardner Audiology,
a leader in hearing
satisfaction research, is
seeking participants to
evaluate and compare
a new advanced noise
suppression technology
in hearing aids that hide
inside your ear canal
verses behind the ear
models.
In exchange for
completing a pre and
post-fitting questionnaire
Gardner will loan you the
hearing aid model of your
choice for a free 30 day
field study. Audiologists
with advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.
At the end of 30 days
you will return the loaner
aids or purchase them
with a generous discount.
It is your choice.


Call 1.800.277.1182
to schedule a free
candidate screening

3000 Central Florida
residents have participated
in Gardner Audiology
research studies










Crystal River

and Inverness

Offices
www.gardneraudiology.com


















OOOF3R8


A6 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


OBITUARIES


B





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6




Dean
Mahood, 94
INVERNESS
Dean Mahood, 94, on
June 6, 2013, went home to
be with his Heavenly Fa-
ther and beloved wife
Eloise. Born Feb. 24, 1919,
to Edward George Mahood
and Olive Barrett Mahood
of Troy,
Pa.
He is
preceded
in death
by his par-
ents; his
wife; his
brother;
Dean and a
Mahood grandson.
He is survived by his chil-
dren, Terry Mahood, Den-
nis Mahood, Joyce Dyess;
eight grandchildren; 22
great-grandchildren; and
five great-great-
grandchildren.
Dean was raised in
Troy, Pa. He served in
World War II on the USS
Fulton. He retired from
the Pennsylvania Rail-
road, owned and operated
a Gulf gas station on Can-
ton St. in Troy, Pa., after
which he moved to Horse-
heads, N.Y, and worked
for the A&P plant. In 1979
he moved to Inverness,
Fla., he worked at Florida
Power and Circle K. He
did volunteer work in the
community and at Annie
Johnsons. He helped to es-
tablish and is a member of
North Christian Church of
Citrus Springs.
Visitation will be from 4
to 6 p.m. Sunday, June 9,
2013, followed by a funeral
service at 10 a.m. Monday,
June 10, 2013, at Forest
Lawn Funeral Home, 5740
S. Pine Ave, Ocala, FL
34480.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Dale
Rodgers, 85
HOMOSASSA
Dale E. Rodgers, 85, of
Homosassa, died June 7 at
Hospice of Citrus County,
Lecanto. Arrangements
provided by Heinz Fineral
Home and Cremation,
Inverness.

OBITUARIES
Chronicle policy permits
free and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
a $25 base fee, then
$8.75 per column inch.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 A7



Lunch with Buffett? $1,000,100


Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. The
annual charity auction
of a private lunch with
billionaire investor War-
ren Buffett went for just
more than $1 million Fri-
day night a bargain
price compared to past
years for an opportunity
to sit down with one of
the world's most suc-
cessful philanthropists.
An anonymous donor
had the high bid of
$1,000,100 when the bid-
ding ended Friday night
on eBay The private au-
dience drew bids of more
than $2 million in each of
the past five years, includ-
ing last year's record-set-
ting winning bid of
$3,456,789.
All proceeds go to the
Glide Foundation, which
helps the poor and home-
less in San Francisco. The
nonprofit relies on the
auction to provide a sig-
nificant chunk of its $17
million annual budget.
"It means a lot to us to
make sure we continue
meeting the needs of the
people who need it most,"
said the Rev Cecil Williams,
Glide's founder


HEALTH


SCREENING

Friday, June 21st

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Linda Azwell, OD
Please RSVP 352.795.3317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N Suncoast Blvd
Crystal River, FL 34429
In association with:
CATARACT &
f LASER INSTITUTE
C/ "Excllence...with love"
StLukesEye.com
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


Buffett said he will spend
several hours discussing
whatever the winner
wants to talk about, except


potential investments.
Buffett has raised nearly
$15 million for Glide with
these auctions over the


years. He has supported
Glide ever since his late
first wife, Susan, intro-
duced him to Williams.


Spend Less Time

Findingthe Perfect Candidate


with the job posting that delivers it all on
jobs.chronicleonline.com


Hire Better, Faster, and for Less on
jobs.chronicleonline.com

Reach qualified job seekers on our site-and across thousands of
additional job sites on TheJobNetworkTM
Find passive job seekers instantly in our resume database and
Linkedln too
Save time with Real-Time Job MatchingTM and applicant ranking


Call us today at (352) 563-5966
and ask forTotal Talent Reacht"


iid v Ol.
e,


network
IW___tQFiiiiiiii__...............................
... ......... .. 'n, u


ABRASTAUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


1~





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Alligator shot,
killed by police
DAYTONA BEACH -A
police officer shot and killed
an alligator after it became
aggressive toward children
throwing things at it.
The Daytona Beach News-
Journal reported the incident
happened early Friday after-
noon at a retention pond. The
officer was told several small
children and two older ones
had been throwing things at
the gator.
According to the police re-
port, the officer called a trap-
per who said alligators longer
than 5 feet are usually put
down. When another officer
and a diver showed up to as-
sist, the gator reportedly swam
aggressively toward them.
One of the officers then
fired a shot at the alligator's
head. When they tried to pull
the gator ashore, it thrashed
around again and two more
shots were fired.
The alligator was more
than 10 feet long.

Group installs
owl webcam
FORT LAUDERDALE -
South Florida officials are set-
ting up a webcam to provide a
sneak peek into a colony of
burrowing owls and raise
awareness about their habitat.
Burrowing owls are pint-
sized birds that live in open,
treeless areas and are listed
as a species of special
concern.
They spend most of their
time on the ground, where
their sandy brown plumage
provides camouflage from po-
tential predators. Burrowing
owls are most active at dawn
and dusk. The male stands


ON THE NET


BUDGET
Continued from PageAl


* Burrowing owl cam: state, the Department of Children
www.owlslive.com and Families, asking for informa-
tion for them to apply for assis-
guard at the entrance, while tance. What type of assistance that
the female spends more time is, I don't know. That's what we do.
below. We do have some employees that
NatureScape Broward and come in and we do fill in the
other organizations recently paperwork."
installed a camera at an Using numbers compiled in Feb-
undisclosed location in ruary, Anderson said, "We do have
Broward County. 23 current county employees who
Broward County do make minimum wage of $7.79 an
Hatchlings emerge when hour"
they are 2 weeks old and re- Anderson cautioned the numbers
main with their parents until are only good as of the day they are
they are 12 weeks old. Owlets run, because things change.
should be born any day. "People come, people go, people
Bear visits move. They change jobs," Anderson
said.
downtown OrlandO Those figures showed that in Feb-
ORLANDO Residents in ruary, the county had 497 full-time
a downtown Orlando neigh- and 45 part-time employees. As
borhood got a visit from an un- County Administrator Brad Thorpe
usual guest Saturday: A bear. has reported in the past, 104 county
The animal wandered its jobs were cut during the past four
way down a city street and up years, and not replaced.
into a tree near Lake Lorna Anderson's analysis of the
Doone and the Florida Citrus county's payroll found that "in Feb-
Bowl stadium, the Orlando ruary, we had 144 employees make
olie e artment reported t under $25,000 a year," she said.
Police Department reported. It "o hundred and forty-one made
was not threatening anyone between $25,000 and $40,000. The
and had already been tagged largest portion of our employees
by wildlife officials when offi- makes less than $40,000 a year"
cers found it. H.R. has determined an average
Priceless Bar-B-Que owner pay level.
Raymond Price said he didn't "We did the whole gamut from
believe the man who rode by the very lowest paid to the very
his restaurant on his bicycle highest paid," Anderson said. "It
about 2 a.m. and told him a looks like the average for the county
bear was walking up and employee is about $34,300."
down the street. According to data from Workforce
"I thought he was crazy," Florida, the average annual wage
Price said. "I didn't pay him for Citrus County in 2012 was
any attention." $34,560.
Seven hours later, Price Anderson pointed out that a per-
saw the animal resting in a son doesn't have to be on minimum
tree. He estimated the bear wage to qualify for assistance.
weighs between 300 and 350 "People who make more than
pounds. People st and minimum wage might need to apply
pounds. People stopped ad for assistance, too," she said. "Say,
took pictures throughout the if you are making $8 or $9 an hour
afternoon. and your spouse is unemployed and
-From wire reports you have children in the home."


State BRIEFS


BY THE NUMBERS
As of February, the county had
497 full-time and 45 part-time
employees.
Twenty-three county
employees are paid minimum
wage ($7.79 an hour).
In February, 144 employees
were making less than
$25,000 a year; 241 were
making between $25,000 and
$40,000 a year.
Before taxes, a full-time mini-
mum-wage employee in Florida
working 40 hours a week, 52
weeks a year, will earn $62.32
per day, $311.60 per week,
and $16,203.20 per year.
The 2012 national poverty line
for a family unit consisting of
three people is $19,090 per
year.

In the past, Anderson said, the
county's lowest pay grade was more
than minimum wage, but the mini-
mum wage has since caught up and
overtaken it, to the point that the
lowest pay grade has had to drop off
the scale.
As Florida's minimum wage is
modified annually based on a for-
mula that factors in cost of living
and inflation, the county has to ad-
just for it each year. Florida will see
another minimum-wage increase in
January 2014.
At $7.79 per hour, Florida's mini-
mum wage is higher than the fed-
eral minimum wage of $7.25 per
hour. According to law, Florida
workers are entitled to be paid the
higher amount and must be paid
minimum wage unless they are in
an occupation that is specifically
exempt.
Anderson also explained that
county government is not in an ac-
tual no-hire job freeze.
"Let's clarify the freeze," Ander-
son said. "It's not a broad-based hir-
ing freeze. What we did is we
captured a set number of positions
when Duke announced they weren't


I W |INOS


For information on
how your business can
advertise on the
Chronicle Website call

563-5592

C I T U U*S U N T Y





Top Notch Appliance Repair

With any appliance repair.

352-586-9109
Accepting Credit Cards
Robert
Member of Roik
Chamber of Commerce Licensed
& Insured


------ INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
341-0813 "isil MON-FR830-5
-u US SAT 9-4
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
&NSUREDi www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMENT




Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!


wcus


WINDOWl
GENIE,-
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED


1 3352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com



NEVER PAINT AGAIN!

of4 Duration
\ Lifetime Coatings
O f "Everlasting Beauty for your
Some or business"

M.C.A. 352-212-3466
Coatings Co. Licensed Insured References



*Pni rPMAS TOur Services:
SerViCeMASTER Carpet Protector Tile Floor
2417 365 Restore Cleaning Pet Odor Removal
EMERGENCY SERVICE Oriental Rugs Spot Removal

3 ROOMS& $1 f95:: UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
; If|ave acouch and
1 HALLWAY I : IFf : : dF :
i i ~. i..n.. I, i.. ..... i .... .. 1 ....1 recliner cleaned F R E
1 i .n i i...... i 1 ..1 II ($30 Value!) Expires6/30/13

352-794-0270 --
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com


Cr _www.AIIAboutBaths.com

Porcelain Fiberglass
Tile Custom Colors
Acrylic Bath Systems
Chip Repairs & More


call
1325661


Licensed & Insured Jaime Massingill
John Massingill

LAWN

REPLACEMENT
Complete Lawn & Patch Work
Drought Tolerant Lawns

J&J SOD (352) 302-6049



For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
Saralynne at 564-2917
or Yvonne at 563-3273


* WHAT: Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
meeting; fire MSBU initial
assessment will be on agenda.
WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday.
WHERE: Room 100, Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness.

going to pay their full tax bill. We
said, 'OK, we're not filling those po-
sitions.' That was Phase 1. So I think
there were nine positions that we
froze. And we said, 'OK, we're tak-
ing that money and we're not going
to fill those positions.' However, as
with any business, you have to be
able to replace people who leave."
Positions will be brought forward
to be filled. Anderson said those po-
sitions have been scrutinized for
need and for funding at the appro-
priate level.
"The last thing we want to do is
hire more people in just to have a
layoff," Anderson said. "We feel
comfortable that the positions that
we're asking to be replaced they
really are needed."
Anderson explained that 61 per-
cent of the payroll of $17 million -
which amounts to $10,370,000 is
funded by county residents who pay
property taxes, while 39 percent is
paid through fee-based or enter-
prise funds, such as utilities and
solid waste.
"Theoretically, you could lay
every single county employee off,
except those in utilities and solid
waste, and you couldn't meet the
number (to cover the budget short-
fall)," Anderson said.
Anderson also said she has run
the numbers on Commissioner
Scott Adams' suggested county staff
pay cuts of 2 percent for those earn-
ing a $50,000 to $60,000 salary; 4
percent for $60,000 $70,000 salary; 6
to 10 percent for $70,000 to $80,000;
and 8 to 12 percent for $80,000 to
$100,000. The savings would
amount to $167,000, she said.
Contact Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com.


A8 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


STATE/LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'One giant leap' toward a NASA Armstrong center?


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Neil
Armstrong's name is at-
tached to a lunar crater, an
asteroid, more than a
dozen schools and a mu-
seum, but not a single
NASA facility is chris-
tened in honor of the man
whose "giant leap" made
him the first to walk on the
moon.
All that could soon
change on the fringes of
the Mojave Desert, where
leaders at the space
agency's top flight re-
search center are mulling This 1960 in
the consequences of a pro- strong by
posed name change at the the moon. A
place where Armstrong Dryden Flig
was a test pilot, after the Ap
The push by some in a test pilot.
Congress to strike the
name of former NASA ex-
ecutive Hugh Dryden from ing they w
the facility has brought work within
with it some questions: Is lion operate
it justified to substitute pay for the
one accomplished figure would
for another? At a time of rebranding
squeezed budgets, is it facility
worth the cost? And, be- In 1999, t
sides: How long before the search Cen
next space hotshot upends named for
the world's first moon- the first ex
walker? of NASA's
walker?
Managers at the Dryden agency w
Flight Research Center the John
have no say in what they're search Cen
called final approval first Amer
rests with the U.S. House Earth and f
and Senate and so they A daylong c
have left the soul-search- held, comp
ing to others. F-16 flyove
"I'm happy with the filled withfl
name Dryden Flight Re- bands and
search Center, but I'll be pearance b}
equally happy with Arm- Any festive:
strong," center Director Dryden-tc
David McBride said. "Both swap would
men were leaders in the muted to sa
field." A name sv
field."curs to rai
Though not a done deal, curs to rai
brainstorming is already
under way: Welcome signs
bearing the Dryden logo
would have to be updated.
Research aircraft would
need their sides re-
painted. Letterhead and
pamphlets would have to
be recycled. And then
there's the obligatory ded-
ication ceremony
Dryden officials have
not calculated a total
makeover cost but don't
foresee extra funds, mean-


I' ,


Associated Press
iage provided by NASA shows Neil Armstrong
an X-15 rocketplane after a test flight. Arm-
went on to become the first man to walk on
bill in Congress wants to rename the NASA
ht Research Center in Southern California
ollo 11 astronaut to honor his time there as


would have to
i their $65 mil-
ing budget to
changes.
't be the first
of a NASA
the Lewis Re-
ter in Ohio -
George Lewis,
ecutive officer
predecessor
'as changed to
H. Glenn Re-
iter, after the
ican to orbit
former senator.
celebration was
plete with an
r and a parade
oats, marching
a cameo ap-
y Glenn.
cities marking a
)-Armstrong
likely be more
ve money
witch often oc-
se a center's


profile and is not unlike
what happens at universi-
ties, which shuffle the
nameplate on buildings
and stadiums as memories
fade and institutions try to
cash in on a bigger
celebrity or generous
donor.
"Dryden had a tremen-
dous influence on the orig-
inal space program," said
American University
space policy professor
Howard McCurdy Still, he
added: "With few excep-
tions, time diminishes
everyone's legacy"
The Dryden moniker
has existed since 1976. Be-
fore that the center, on the
grounds of Edwards Air
Force Base about 90 miles
north of Los Angeles, was
not named for a specific
person. It was here where
the sound barrier was bro-
ken and where the now-
retired space shuttle fleet


once landed. Experimen-
tal jets routinely buzz the
skies.
Between 1955 and 1962,
Armstrong was a test pilot
at the facility then called
the High-Speed Flight Sta-
tion. He logged 2,400 hours
of flight there, including on
the X-15 rocketplane that
opened the way for
manned spaceflight
Less of a household


name, Dryden was a child
prodigy who enrolled in
college at age 14. An aero-
space engineer, he served
as director of the National
Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics, the predeces-
sor to NASA, and later as
the space agency's first
deputy administrator. He
died in 1965; four years
later, Armstrong stepped
on the moon.


After the House in late
February voted unani-
mously for a Neil A. Arm-
strong Flight Research
Center, Dryden officials
started a checklist of signs
that would need replacing
on buildings, highway exits
and aircraft. This is the
second attempt at a name
change by Republican Rep.
Kevin McCarthy, whose dis-
trict includes Dryden.


-.d




DISOVE PHOT CONTEST!!

W e are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among
those chosen to be displayed in the
2013-2014 Discover Magazine. Please
submit only photos taken in Citrus
County and include a brief description
of the photo along with your name,
address and phone number. Photos
must be submitted by July 31, 2013.









ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


Whatever you do in bed,
Sealy supports it


ico


oS rt
Sleep System by Serta


O$- 'T--
iLTEMPUR-PEDlDIC
Medical Division


fl DRSICANABEDDING, INC.
DEDICATED TO YOUR TOTAL COMFORT


*ALWAYS
Free Deliveryl
w/purchase of mattress set
* ALWAYS
Free Heavy Duty
-B,.Red Frame
w/purchase of mattress set
*ALWAYS
Great Customer Service


ANDORA FIRM
ueen Set 349
Twin Set .................................. $ 24 9
Full Set ............................ ....... $299
King Set ................................ $529

FLORANCE FIRM
Oueen Set $549
Twin Set .................................. $ 3 79
Full Set ........ .............. ... $449
King Set ................................... $ 74 9


VENICE PILLOWTOP
Queen set 399
Twin Set .................................. $299
Full Set ................................. $349
King Set .......................... $599

FLORANCE PLUSH
oueen Set 549
Twin Set ..... ........................ $379
Full Set ........................... ... $449
King Set ... ...................... ... $749


C NORMANDY FIRM
ueen Set 599
Twin Set .................................. $ 4 5 9
Full Set ............................. ...... $559
King Set .................................. $8 9

9 DOWNEY FIRsM
Oueen Set 799
Twin Set ................................. $599
Full Set ............................ ....... $699
King Set ............................... $999


CaB LAKE MOHAVE
$699 FLUSH
Oueen Set 099 EURO P/T
Twin Set .................................. $ 49 9
Full Set ........................ ...... $659
King Set ............................ $959
f^ POSTOREPEDIC

$ Q99 PLUSH
Oueen Set8 9 O FIRM
Twin Set ................................... $749
Full Set ...................... ........ $859
King Set ................................ $1199


I^^^**I I ADJSTBL BED DEALER________
I mmr I- . - . - x _- - -. -~ ~- -- - --


S.


WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTER
Your Hometown Matress Store since 1994


128E.NBRYTHWYTAilHJIJRfcU.L t


OPEN MON. SAT
BEVERLY
HILLS HWy. HERNA
491

WHOLESALE H
SLEEP CENTER


CITRUS *IH"1 4
uI LS


17


r -Immp- ----- -- w-


9 bffmtfwMEN IIVII E E E bll rtll Iww III VIIII All 1111111 In -FWVI lilltlli -l f %N-w-w ELLIR


NATION


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 A9


r:
i

r ~zzi
~.


]





A10 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


FEEDING
Continued from PageAl

Recently, the Chronicle
sat down with Tom
Chancey, Community Food
Bank executive director, to
learn more about this or-
ganization, which will
most likely deliver more
than a million pounds of
food to feed hungry people
in Citrus County this year.
What is a food bank and
how does it work?
A food bank is a non-
profit clearinghouse that
receives donated food
products from grocery
stores and other food sup-
pliers and channels them
through various agencies
that distribute the food to
people in need who come
to them for help.
"As a food bank, we han-
dle perishables, which is
our main source from local
markets, purchased food
products from Save-A-Lot,
dry goods from Feeding
America (food bank) in
Tampa, USDA food prod-
ucts and donated prod-
ucts," Chancey said.
Four mornings a week,
someone from the Com-
munity Food Bank travels
to 12 local grocery stores
- Winn-Dixie, Publix,
Sweetbay and Walmart -
to pick up donated perish-
able food items: meat,
dairy, produce, deli prod-
ucts and bread. When the
food comes back to the
warehouse it's weighed,
inspected, sorted and
repackaged, ready for
local partner agencies to
pick up, along with their
food orders of nonperish-
able items.
The inventory of all non-
perishables is entered into
a computer, so agencies
know exactly what is on
the shelves.
Also, agency volunteers
can "shop" from a desig-
nated area, which may in-
clude "free" items.
Perishable foods not
suitable for human con-
sumption are set aside for
pig and alligator farms.
How much does the food
cost local agencies?
"We do not 'sell' food,
neither does Feeding
America it's donated
food," Chancey said. "But
we are allowed to charge a
maintenance fee to cover


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


the cost of fuel, electricity,
rent, etc."
Food banks are allowed
to charge up to 19 cents
per pound. Chancey said
they pay up to 9 cents per
pound for food they get
from Feeding America in
Tampa.
Citrus County agencies
pay up to 18 cents per
pound. Some items are 5
or 10 cents a pound; some
items are free. The aver-
age cost per pound is
9 cents.
How did the Community
Food Bank come to be?
As Chancey explained,
going back seven or eight
years, local agencies that
fed people in Citrus
County, whether by provid-
ing groceries or meals,
were finding it increas-
ingly difficult to get the
food they need to meet
their demand. Each
agency would travel to
Land O' Lakes, Ocala,
Tampa and wherever they
could, logging hundreds of
miles per week.
The agencies got to-
gether, formed a commit-
tee and talked about
creating a centralized food
bank here in Citrus
County, a local resource
that would save them all
time and money
At the same time, one
agency, We Care Food
Pantry in Homosassa,
under the direction of its
executive director Diane
Toto received a dona-
tion of five acres of prop-
erty on Cardinal Street in
Homosassa and started
raising money to build a
warehouse for her
operation.
The committee saw
what Toto was doing and
approached her with the
idea of using the same
building plans as she used
to build the We Care ware-
house, building the two
buildings at once, side by
side.
As an agency, We Care
Food Pantry is not a food
bank, although some local
agencies receive food from
We Care because it is well-
stocked.
The Community Food
Bank leases the building
from We Care. They
opened in November 2012.
"We are now one of six
Feeding America food
banks in this district,"
Chancey said. "We took


* WHAT: Community Food Bank of Citrus County,
part of the Feeding America food bank network.
* ESTABLISHED: November 2012.
* NUMBER OF AGENCY PARTNERS: 40-plus.
* ANNUAL BUDGET: $250,000.
* PAID STAFF: Three executive director, warehouse
manager and a driver/team member.
* SOURCE OF FUNDING: Donations and fundraisers
and maintenance fees charged to agencies as cost
per pound for food items.
* BIGGEST NEED: Volunteers.
* ONLINE:
www.communityfoodbankofcitruscounty.org.
* PHONE: 352-628-FOOD (3663).


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Winn-Dixie, Publix and Walmart are three businesses that
make donations to the food bank. Once collected, the
food bank distributes the items to a wide variety of
agencies that disseminate the food to those who qualify.


over, through Feeding
America in Tampa, the re-
sponsibility of providing
the local agencies with
food that they were having
to go down to Tampa to get
We get it for them."
Where else does food
come from?
The Community Food
Bank purchases high-
demand items such as
peanut butter, jelly, boxed
macaroni and cheese,
pasta and pasta sauce at
wholesale cost at Save-A-
Lot. It also receives do-
nated nonperishable items
from Feeding America and
local stores and USDA
items.
Bulk items huge
briskets, hams, turkeys,
etc. are set aside in a
freezer for soup kitchens
or shelters.
What has been the effect
of having a local food bank
in Citrus County?
For one thing, food do-
nations from local grocery
stores have increased in
volume and quality.
Chancey has tracked their
donations, which shows a
steady increase.
Prior to the food bank
opening, local stores
would donate food to out-
of-area food banks that
would pick it up from Cit-


rus County stores, take it to
Tampa or Land O' Lakes
or elsewhere and process
it.
Then, local Citrus
County agencies would
drive at least 100 miles
round-trip to pick it up.
By then, the food that
had been in Citrus County
was days older.
Now, the food that is
picked up on Monday by
the Community Food Bank
from the local stores is
processed and sent out the
door the same day by local
agencies.
'All the food picked up
in Citrus County now stays
in Citrus County, which
pleases the local stores,"
Chancey said. "So, the do-
nations have increased
and we have less waste."
How many people does
the food bank feed?
It's estimated that 17
percent of Citrus County
residents live below the
poverty line. If the total
population is 140,000, that
would mean nearly 24,000
could be eligible to be fed
through the Community
Food Bank. However,
Chancey said they're feed-
ing about 60 percent of
that, an estimated 14,400
people.


Can people get food di-
rectly from the food bank?
No, only partner agen-
cies can get food directly
from the Community Food
Bank. People who want to
receive help with hunger
needs should go to a local
help agency such as SOS,
Daystar, the Salvation
Army, a local church, etc.
How is the food bank
funded?
The annual budget is
$250,000. Of that amount,
$100,000 comes from main-
tenance fees (cost per
pound paid by local agen-
cies when they pick up
food). The remainder
comes from donations and
fundraising events.
Does the Community
Food Bank benefit from
local food drives?
No. Local agencies are
encouraged to conduct
their own food drives to
supplement what they re-
ceive from the food bank.
The food bank does not
directly receive donations


from the community, in-
cluding the post office food
drives.
Food collected from that
is divided among local
agencies.
What's next?
Chancey said one of his
main focuses is to find
more nutritional food, es-
pecially food that fits the
specific nutritional needs
of older and elderly
people.
"From the beginning our
goal has been to be the
model food bank," he said.
"Before we started we
went around to food banks
and took the best from
each. Now we want to be
the best
"Also, when we started
and looked at the big pic-
ture, we thought about
how many pounds of food
we could deliver in a year
and thought a half-million
pounds was a big number.
But we'll do well over a
million this year, and
we've just begun."


MONDAY June 10tha



na liP-


Wih all the ixin's $12.99

,FRs s10

BONUS CARD
WithpNrchase ofp Cod4'a Gi Card.


HONOR-- FLIGHT <
I I N t L -1 I J 1 I. Lk




















HONOR FLIGHT, THE MOVIE
A free showing with limited seating available
sponsored by HPH Hospice and
Honor Flight of West Central Florida

Thursday, June 20 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
The Realtor's Association of Citrus County
714 Scarboro Ave., Lecanto, FL

This compelling documentary chronicles four World War II
veterans who travel to Washington, D.C. to see the memorial
that was constructed for them almost 60 years after their
epic battle. No reservations necessary. Questions?
Call HPH Hospice at 527-4600.
HPH Hospice is proud to sponsor a veteran for
The Honor Flight and is a We Honor Veterans partner.





WE HONORVETERANS



HPkhosp ce
.i.t,, ospr, HONOR FLIGHT
...,.h,-,. o ..,n~,o. 1.9o ^i, 94 v iWEST CENTRAl. FI.O BA-II


www.HPH-Hospice.org


LOCAL


)





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nuclear plant closures show industry's struggles


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES The
decision to close Califor-
nia's San Onofre nuclear
plant is the latest setback
for an industry that
seemed poised for growth
not long ago.
In Wisconsin, a utility
shuttered its plant last
month after it couldn't find
a buyer. In Florida and
now California utilities
decided it was cheaper to
close plants rather than
spend big money fixing
them and risk the uncer-
tainty of safety reviews.
Meanwhile, the low cost
of natural gas is discourag-
ing utilities from spending
billions of dollars and lots
of time to build nuclear
reactors.
New technology allows
drillers to extract more gas
within the United States,
increasing the supply and
pushing down prices. In
states were utilities oper-
ate as monopolies, they
are reluctant to ask their
regulators for permission
to build enormously ex-
pensive nuclear plants -
or even fix old ones -
when it so cheap to build
gas-fired plants.
In places where utilities
sell power into the open
market, the low prices
don't offset the financial
risk of building expensive
and time-consuming nu-
clear plants.
"The world has changed
with natural gas prices
being so low and so much
gas being available for so
long," said Mike Haggarty,
a senior utility analyst for
Moody's Investor Service.
Industry supporters ac-
knowledge the challenging
economics, but say nuclear
power still has long-term
possibilities. While the
costs to build plants are
enormous, once online,
the fuel and operating
costs are relatively low.
And reactors can reliably
produce power with little
or no carbon emissions,
said Steve Kerekes, a
spokesman for the Nu-
clear Energy Institute, an


Lyn Harris Hicks, a longtime opponent of the San Onofre nuclear power plant and a near
on her hat Friday as she waits for a news conference in front of the plant in San Onofr
plant on the California coast is closing after a 16-month battle over whether the tw
restarted with millions of people living nearby, officials announced Friday.


industry lobbying group.
Plants fired by gas cost
much more to run when
prices surge.
"When gas prices are
low, that's great," Kerekes
said. "But a lot of people
don't like to put all their
energy eggs in one basket."
On Friday, Southern Cal-
ifornia Edison announced
it would close its San
Onofre plant between San
Diego and Los Angeles
rather than fix damaged
equipment that critics said
could never be safely re-
placed. The twin reactors
were idled in January 2012
when a small radiation
leak led to the discovery of
unusual damage to hun-
dreds of new tubes that
carry radioactive water.
Despite spending more
than $500 million on re-
pairs and replacement
power, the utility, owned
by Edison International,
decided to call it quits. It
faced safety investigations
and regulatory hurdles to


restart the plant.
In February, North
Carolina-based Duke En-
ergy Corp. decided to close
the Crystal River nuclear
plant in Florida after
workers cracked a con-
crete containment build-
ing during an attempt to
upgrade the plant in 2009.
The containment building
is supposed to prevent a
release of radiation in case
of an accident. An attempt
to fix the problem in 2011
resulted in more cracks.
Despite the shutdown,
Duke still wants its cus-
tomers to reimburse the
company for $1.65 billion
in plant investments. The
utility will use $835 million
from an insurance settle-
ment to refund customers
who had to pay for backup
power.
Even working plants are
being scuttled. Dominion
Resources Inc. announced
in October it would close
the Kewaunee Power Sta-
tion in Wisconsin because


it couldn't find a buyer. Do-
minion CEO Thomas F
Farrell II said the plant's
contracts to sell its elec-
tricity were ending while
wholesale electricity
prices are expected to re-
main low. The company is
keeping reactors else-
where in the country
"This decision was
based purely on econom-
ics," Farrell said at the
time. "Dominion was not
able to move forward with
our plan to grow our nu-
clear fleet in the Midwest
to take advantage of
economies of scale."
Just a few years back,
nuclear industry officials
said the time was right for
expanding. A more robust
economy boosted demand
for electricity, natural gas
prices were higher, and it
seemed Congress might
pass legislation restricting
the greenhouse gas emis-
sions, a rule that could
hurt fossil fuel plants and
increase the demand for


them far into the future.
Paul Patterson, a utility
analyst for Glenrock Asso-
ciates LLC, said the idea of
..... a renaissance was "exag-
gerated to begin with," and
low-cost natural gas ended
such talk.
Only three nuclear con-
struction projects have
S moved forward, and they
are all under financial
pressure.
The Tennessee Valley
Authority is finishing a
long-mothballed reactor at
its Watts Bar plant. Ini-
tially budgeted at $2.5 bil-
lion, the utility has said
finishing the project could
cost up to $2 billion more.
Atlanta-based Southern
Co. owns a 46 percent
share of two new reactors
being constructed at Plant
Vogtle in eastern Georgia,
a project originally esti-
mated at $14 billion.
Southern Co. subsidiary
Georgia Power recently
Associated Press asked regulators to raise
rby resident, wears a banner its share of the construc-
e, Calif. The troubled power tion budget by $737 million
iin reactors could be safely to roughly $6.85 billion.
It may cost more. Geor-
gia Power and the compa-
nuclear power. nies designing and
To further sweeten the building the plant are in a
pot, the U.S. government legal fight that may cost the
adopted tax credits and of- utility more money. Sepa-
fered low-cost loans to rately, an independent
subsidize construction. monitor hired by Georgia
The industry called it a regulators has warned of
"nuclear renaissance." It additional potential costs.
was short-lived. SCANA Corp. an-
The Great Recession nounced this week that it
trimmed the demand for expects its costs to rise by
electricity as business and around $200 million and
consumers cut back, and the construction schedule
natural gas prices fell. Sev- to slip while building two
eral utilities have reactors at the VC. Sum-
scrubbed their plans for mer Nuclear Station in
new plants or delayed South Carolina.



Blackshears 11


MAluminum
RESCREEN* SEAMLESS GUTTERS* GARAGE SCREENS
NEW SCREEN ROOM GLASS ROOM CONVERSIONS
HWY. 44 FT} Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER 797 2 RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
9111 6. 11*. 6II~


Why should your dentist inject you with these cosmetic treatments?


* My training was concentrated on head & neck

anatomy.

* I understand where these muscles are located

and how they work.

* We take our time to ensure proper results.


* I take a conservative approach to achieve a

natural appearance, then have you back in

2 weeks for enhancements.

*We purchase directly from the manufacturer, so

no counterfeit products.


Ledger Dentistry

LedgerDentistry.com SE HABLA ESPANOL


Next to ACE

in Homosassa

(352) 628-3443


NATION


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 All












NATION


Nat


Nation BRIEFS

Cultures collide


Associated Press
Scottie McCorsley, left,
from Tennessee, dressed
as Harley Quinn, stands
near Roy Hippie, of
Marshville, N.C., who was
in Charlotte for the N.C.
GOP Convention, on Sat-
urday at the Charlotte
Convention Center in
Charlotte, N.C.

Man who fled 1979
charge arrested
CHICAGO -A former
Chicago store owner who
fled the U.S. in 1979 after
being accused of killing a
shoplifter was arrested at
O'Hare International Airport
while trying to return to the
country to attend a gradua-
tion ceremony, authorities
said Saturday.
Ata Yousef El Ammouri,
65, was taken into custody
Friday after arriving on a
flight from Jordan, where he
has been living, the Cook
County sheriff's office said
in a statement.
In his visa request from a
couple weeks ago, El Am-
mouri stated that the reason
for the visit was to attend a
grandchild's graduation,
said sheriff's spokeswoman
Eleni Demertzis.
El Ammouri is accused of
shooting 31-year-old Joe
Harris on the morning of
July 22, 1979, after Harris
walked out of El Ammouri's
store on Chicago's South
Side without paying for a
can of beer.
Body found may
be missing girl
DAYTON, Iowa Members
of a small central Iowa city
and its surrounding commu-
nities expressed sadness
and said they felt "robbed of
some innocence" on Satur-
day following the discovery
of a body in a river believed
to be that of a 15-year-old
girl who was abducted
more than two weeks ago.
Along streets and busi-
nesses in Dayton, about 60
miles north of Des Moines,
purple ribbons were neatly
tied on trees, blooming flower
pots and utility poles. One
large sign near a grocery store
on the city's main street read,
"PRAY FOR KATHLYNN."
It all signified hope for find-
ing Kathlynn Shepard alive.
But investigators are con-
fident the body a fisherman
found Friday night in the
Des Moines River under a
bridge near Boone is that of
the high school freshman,
who was abducted May 20
along with a 12-year-old girl
who later escaped and
found help.
-From wire reports


CI


TRUST COUNTY
TRUS COUNTY (


CHRONICLE


Americans killed in insider attack in Afghanistan


Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
A man in an Afghan army
uniform turned his weapon
on American trainers
working with him in the
country's east on Saturday,
killing three of them, while
an attacker with a grenade
killed an Italian soldier in
the west, officials said.
The shooting in Paktika
province was the latest in a
string of so-called "insider
attacks" in which Afghan
forces open fire on their


own comrades or interna-
tional troops. The incidents
threaten to shake the con-
fidence and trust of the two
sides as the 2014 withdrawal
of most of the interna-
tional forces approaches.
An argument between
the Afghan soldier and his
trainers appeared to have
led to Saturday's shooting
on anAfghan NationalArmy
base in Paktika's Kher Qot
district, according to a
statement from the provin-
cial governor's office. The
international military


coalition in Afghanistan
said two American service
members and one U.S.
civilian died. It had initially
identified them as three
U.S. military personnel.
The angry Afghan sol-
dier opened fire during
the argument, killing the
three foreign trainers and
wounding three others, ac-
cording to the governor's
statement. The foreigners
returned fire and killed
the Afghan soldier, who
had no known connection
to the insurgency


A second Afghan man was
arrested after the shooting,
and an investigation has
been launched, the coali-
tion said later Saturday
So far this year, there
have been five insider at-
tacks on foreign forces,
with a total of eight troops
and one U.S. contractor
killed. However, the num-
ber of such attacks has
eased after soaring last
year in 2012, there were
at least 29 insider attacks,
killing 62 international
troops.


Associated Press
Dan Blackford, right, shows Rory Strain, 12, how to hold a shotgun May 19 at a shooting range in Houston.
Strain lives in the northwest Houston community of Oak Forest, the first residential area being trained and equipped
by a nonprofit that is giving away free shotguns to single women and neighborhoods with high crime rates.



One group's answer to



crime: Free shotguns


Associated Press

HOUSTON
ouston resident Cheryl
Strain's inexperience
with guns was apparent
as she struggled to load shells
into a 20-gauge shotgun.
Over the piercing blasts of gun-
fire in the shooting range,
Strain's instructor, Dan Black-
ford, patiently directed her on
how to use her thumb to shove a
shell all the way inside the barrel
and feel it click.
"Now we got a round in the
chamber ready to go," Blackford
said as he positioned her body on
the right way to hold the shotgun.
"Look down your sight, put that
BB right in the middle of your
target and press the trigger."
Strain's northwest Houston
community of Oak Forest is the
first neighborhood in the country
being trained and equipped by
the Armed Citizen Project, a
Houston nonprofit that is giving
away free shotguns to single
women and residents of neigh-
borhoods with high crime rates.
While many cities have tried
gun buybacks and other tactics in
the ongoing national debate on


Police: Santa Monica

Associated Press

SANTA MONICA, Calif. The
gunman who went on a chaotic
rampage killing four people be-
fore being fatally shot by police at
a college campus planned the at-
tack and was capable of firing
1,300 rounds of ammunition, the
police chief said Saturday.
'"Any time someone puts on a
vest, of some sort, comes out with a
bag full of loaded magazines, has
an extra receiver, has a handgun
and has a semi-automatic rifle, car-
jacks folks, goes to a college, kills
more people and has to be neutral-
ized at the hands of the police, I
would say that that's premedi-
Associated Press tated," said Chief Jacqueline
A frame grab from a surveillance Seabrooks.
camera reveals the suspect enter- The killer would have turned 24
ing Santa Monica College on Friday on Saturday, but Seabrooks
in Santa Monica, Calif. wouldn't identify him because his


gun control, the nonprofit and its
supporters say gun giveaways to
responsible owners are actually
a better way to deter crime. The
organization, which plans to offer
training classes in Dallas, San
Antonio, and Tucson, Ariz., in the
next few weeks, is working to ex-
pand its giveaways to 15 cities by
the end of the year, including
Chicago and New York.
But others in Houston, while
expressing support for Second
Amendment rights, question
whether more guns will result in
more gun-related deaths rather
than less crime.
Residents of Oak Forest say their
neighborhood, made up of older
one-story houses and a growing
number of new townhomes, has
experienced a recent rash of
driveway robberies and home
burglaries. On a recent Sunday
afternoon, a group of 10 residents,
including Strain, went through
training at Shiloh Shooting, a
northwest Houston gun range.
Kyle Coplen, the project's
29-year-old founder, said his
group expects to train at least 50
Oak Forest residents and put up
signs saying the neighborhood is
armed.


"When we have a crime wave, we
don't just say, 'Let's just increase
police' and that's all we do. We do
multiple things. I see this as one
aspect of what we can do," said
Coplen, who graduated from the
University of Houston with a master's
degree in public administration.
It costs the organization about
$300 to arm and train an individ-
ual and about $20,000 for an entire
neighborhood. All costs are paid
through donations, said Coplen.
Harris County Precinct One
Constable Alan Rosen, whose
deputies patrol Oak Forest, said
that while he believes the best
deterrent to crime is effective
neighborhood watch programs,
he believes people should have
the right to protect themselves.
"In terms of having a shotgun,
after you've been properly
trained on it, to have that in your
home to protect your home, I'm
for it" he said.
Strain, 46, a single mother who
has never owned a gun, said she
was nervous firing the shotgun
but that more training will help.
She also had her 12-year-old son
Rory practice so "if God forbid
something happens, he could be
prepared as well."


killings premeditated

next of kin was out of the country He fired on a city bus where three
Police had an encounter with him women were left with minor in-
seven years ago, but she wouldn't juries. One had shrapnel-type in-
elaborate because he was a juve- juries and the two others had injuries
nile at the time. unrelated to gunfire. They were
The violence started about a mile treated at a hospital and released.
away when the gunman began The gunman also fired on po-
shooting at a house, and it caught lice cars, bystanders and pedes-
on fire. Two bodies were later trians, police said.
found inside. From there, the chaos shifted to
Two officials told The Associ- the college, a two-year school with
ated Press the killings began as a about 34,000 students.
domestic violence incident and In a faculty parking lot on the
the victims in the home were the edge of campus, he fired on two
gunman's father and brother, people in a red Ford Explorer that
As flames rose from the house, crashed through a block wall. The
the man, wearing what appeared driver was killed, police said, and a
to be a ballistic jacket, shot a passenger was in critical condition
woman passing by in a car and after undergoing surgery UCLA
carjacked another woman at gun- Medical Center, doctors said. On
point. He directed her to drive to Saturday, authorities identified
the college campus, having her the driver as Carlos Navarro Franco,
stop so he could shoot along the 68, of West Los Angeles, who
way, police said. worked at the school.


Afghan security forces
also are targets of such at-
tacks. Last month, two re-
cently rehired Afghan police
opened fire on their com-
mander at a checkpoint in
a remote district in the
country's south, killing
him and six of his men.
The Taliban insurgents
claim most of the insider
attacks.
Saturday's deaths
brought to 15 the number
of international troops
killed in Afghanistan this
month.


Word BRIEFS

Elbe cresting
---


Associated Press
A man protects his house
with sandbags Saturday
in Schoenebeck at river
Elbe, south of Magdeburg,
eastern Germany.

Marchers bark for
pooch-friendly Paris
PARIS Some Parisians
want just a little bit more of
their city to go to the dogs.
At least 100 pooches -
with owners in tow, holding
leashes marched near
the Louvre at a demonstra-
tion to demand more park
space and access to public
transportation for the four-
legged friends.
According to the city's
website, two of Paris' 20
sections have only one re-
served public park space for
dogs. Leashes are required.
Boat with up to
60 migrants sinks
CANBERRA, Australia -
Authorities said a boat car-
rying up to 60 asylum seek-
ers capsized in the Indian
Ocean. At least nine bodies
have been recovered and
no survivors have yet been
found.
Australian Customs said
the submerged hull of the
boat was spotted by the
crew of a search plane on
Friday 75 nautical miles
northwest of Christmas Is-
land, an Australian territory
310 miles south of Jakarta.
An Australian navy ship
joined the search and re-
covered nine bodies Satur-
day. No survivors have
been seen.
Pakistan summons
envoy over drones
ISLAMABAD Just
days after taking power,
Pakistan's new government
summoned a top U.S.
envoy Saturday to lodge a
protest over a U.S. drone
strike, suggesting that
Prime Minister Nawaz
Sharif's team fully intends
to make good on its prom-
ise to aggressively push for
an end to such strikes.
Friday night's drone
strike near the Afghan bor-
der, which was said to have
killed seven militants, came
two days after Sharif was
sworn in as premier and the
same day his Cabinet
members took their oaths.
Sharif's Pakistan Muslim
League-N handily won gen-
eral elections last month
and is expected to govern
with a relatively strong man-
date because it doesn't need
to rely on coalition partners.
Sharif, who wants to pur-
sue peace talks with militants
threatening his country, has
insisted the U.S. stop the
strikes, saying they violate
Pakistan's sovereignty and
are counterproductive be-
cause they often kill inno-
cent civilians.
-From wire reports


WORLD



































-- K----r-^
.. .... -. ..
.d'.. *.P "
-. --:........
-.t-^ '^ --' . ;.,
~ ~ ~ *^. ..*__-.=^f^ -^:^ -'
?- dE '^ S^C-i7---i Si- -Js
^*~-?C.-_ L *^ T "^ ^.,- -*'L


SCALING





NEW HEIGHTS


- I









Photos by Associated Press
Climbers make their way to the summit of Mount Everest, in the
Khumbu region of the Nepal Himalayas. Nepal celebrated the 60th
anniversary of the conquest of Mount Everest on May 29 by honoring
climbers who followed in the footsteps of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing
Norgay. Japanese climber Yuichiro Miura, 80, became the oldest
conqueror of Mount Everest on May 23 despite undergoing heart surgery in
January for an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, his fourth heart operation
since 2007.


80-year-old says


he nearly died on


Everest descent

ELAINE KURTENBACH
Associated Press

T he 80-year-old Japanese mountaineer who last week
became the oldest person to reach the top of Mount
Everest said he almost died during his descent and
does not plan another climb of the world's highest
peak, though he hopes to do plenty of skiing.
Yuichiro Miura, who also conquered the 29,035-foot
peak when he was 70 and 75, returned to Japan on
Wednesday looking triumphant but ready for a rest. He was sympathetic
toward an 81-year-old Nepalese climber who on Tuesday abandoned
his attempt to climb Everest, and break Miura's record, due to
worsening weather
Min Bahadur Sherchan, the Nepalese mountaineer, faced difficult
odds due to the brief climbing window remaining after delays in getting
funding for his own ascent, Miura said.
"He is to be pitied," said Miura, who had downplayed any talk of a
rivalry
Sherchan became the oldest Everest climber in 2008 at age 76 and
held the record until Miura's ascent last week.
The Nepalese climber said he slipped and fell just above the base
camp three days earlier, hurting his ribs, so he was airlifted back to
Katmandu, where he saw a doctor
He plans to try again to regain his record, perhaps next year
See Page A15


"You don't need to climb Mount Fuji or travel

overseas. Just get out of the house. Enjoy good

food. Those are the things we should do."


Galapagos adventure


DREAM
VACATIONS
r~aoo Co/( ed'
The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group
sponsor a photo contest
for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with
a brief description of the
trip.
If it's selected as a
winner, it will be
published in the Sunday
Chronicle. At the end of
the year, a judges select
the best photo during the


year and that photograph
will win a prize.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in
Inverness, Crystal River
or any Accent Travel
Office.


Nowhere else in the world can you swim with penguins, marine iguanas and turtles,
sea lions and blue-footed boobies. Here, Howard Geer of Crystal River snorkels the
waters off Isabela Island in the Galapagos Islands. He was accompanied on the trip
by his wife, Nancy. Their eight-day adventure took them to seven islands with 15
hikes and snorkeling excursions. The Galapagos National Park is just as pristine as
when Charles Darwin landed his Beagle there in 1835, Nancy reported.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Be upfront about


family's ancestors


SUNDAY EVENING JUNE 9 2013 C: Comcst, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F Oak Forest H: HolidayHeights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 110:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
S[WESHI NBC 19 19 News News The Voice (In Stereo) PG' Amedca's Got Talent (In Stereo) a News Access
Great Performances Jewish artists excel on Burt Bacharach's Best (My Music ThePianoGuys: Live at Red Butte 3 Steps to Incredible
SWED PBS 3 3 14 6 Broadway (In Stereo) 'PG' c Presents) 'G' Garden G' c Health!-Joel
0 Q Wi) PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin 'PG' NOVA (In Stereo)'G' Breakfast Special 2 Masterpiece Movie Martin
C 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly The Voice (In Stereo) 'PG' Amerca's Got Talent Hopefuls audition for the News Paid
S ENB 8 8 8 8 8 News judges. (In Stereo) N Program
o tWFTj) ABC 20 20 20 NNews Word Jimmy NBA 2013 NBA Finals Game 2: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) a News Sports
B ABC_ 20 20 20 News KimmelNight
S S 10 10 10 10 10 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The 67th Annual Tony Awards Honoring excellence on Broadway (N) (In 10 News Paid
TS)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) N Stereo Live) 'PG' c 11pm (N Program
SFFX 13 1 1 OX13 6:0 News(N) Cleveland American The Bob's Family Guy Family Guy FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
9IVT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) B Show Dad'14' Simpsons Burgers '14' 14' (In Stereo) N Notice'PG'
B WCJ 1) ABC 11 11 4 News ABC J.Kimmel NBA 2013 NBA Finals Game 2: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News Inside Ed.
D 2 2 2 2 2 BrodyFile Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for Believers Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms ChildG' Miracles Anointing Kolinda Duplantis theGap Awaken
n ABC 11 11 11 News World Jimmy NBA 2013 NBA Finals Game 2: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) a News Castle'PG'
S) C 11 11 11News Kimmel
M ND 1 1 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Law & Order Venom" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
S CW IND 12 12 16 '14' 14' Theory Theory "Scrambled" '14' '14' 'PG' 'PG'
SD WT~TA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 70s 70s Scrubs Raymond SeinSeinf eeinfeld Chris Chris ampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
S[WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Dayna Brody
King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Hurricane CSI: Miami "Grand Prix" Cold Case "It's Raining *+ "In the Mix" (2005)
E CWT 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Anthony" '14' '14' Men" 'PG' Usher.'PG-13'
S WYKE)FAM 16 16 16 15 Casita Big Rotary Family Healthy Your Citrus County Court Spy Y' Eye for an FamTeam
IM] FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living __ _____Eye
D WWOiO) FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang BigBang Cleveland American Simpsons |Burgers |Fam.Guy |Fam.Guy FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG'
SWVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Coned. Noticiero AquiyAhora (SS) Parodiando (N)(SS)Sal y Pimienta 'PG' Coned. Noticiero
m WXPX ION 17 ** "Death Race" (2008) 'R' "The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" ** "Fast & Furious" (2009) Vin Diesel. Death
Shippin Shipping Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Storage Storage Storage Storage
M E) 54 48 54 25 27 Wars Wars Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Wars'PG Wars PG Wars PG Wars PG'
(A I) 55 5 "King *** "The Italian Job" (2003) Mark Wahlberg. A thief and The Killing Sarah joins Mad Men "Favors" The Killing Sarah joins
_____ 55 64 55 Kong" his crew plan to steal back their gold. 'PG-13' the task force. (N)B N the task force.
52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced To Hooker (In Stereo) Call- Call- Callof Call- TopHooker Wave Callof Call-
S 52 35 52 19 21 PG'Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Riders" (N)'PG' Wildman Wildman
*** "The Women of Brewster Place" (1989, Drama) Oprah Winfrey Robin Givens, Moses Gunn. Woman helps others Justice The Game
LJ 96 19 96 living in tenement. B Trayvo. '14'
AVO 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Princesses-Lo. Housewives/NJ Fashion Queens '14'
S 7 "Dumb&Dumber"(1994, Comedy)Jim Tosh.O Tos Tosh.O i.. Ii- ** "ZackandMiriMake a Porno"(2008)
S27 61 27 33 Carrey PG-13 '14' 14' '14' :.-,ii Rogen, Traci Lords.'R'
S 9 4 9 2 37 Music Cops Cos Cos Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the CMT Music Awards 2013 Carrie Underwood;
98 45 98 28 37 Awards Rebaded Reloaded Reloaded Hunt(N)4' Hunt'14' George Strait. (In Stereo) N
WCNBl 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess On Cocaine Cowboys '14, D,L,S,V' American Greed Cocaine Cowboys
CNNJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Stroumboulopoulos Anthony Bourd.
SAustin & Shake It Good- Good Dog With a Austin & Shake It Jessie ustin & Austin & Dog With a Dog With a
SN 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up! G' Charlie Charlie BlogG' AllyG' Up! G 'G' Ally'G' AllyG' BlogG' Blog'G'
ESP 33 27 33 21 17 College Baseball Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds. (N) N SportsCenter (N)
(ESPN2 34 28 34 43 49 SportsCenter (N) College Baseball NCAA Super Regonal: Teams TBA. (N) College Baseball
[EWTN 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime G.K. Rosary TheologyRoundtabe God Bookmark
N 29 5 2 2 2 "Miss Congeniality" (2000, Comedy) *** "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do TheFosters "Pilot" (In
29 52 29 20 28 SandraBullock, Michael Caine.'PG-13' whitecouple adopts a homeless black teen.'PG-13' Stereo)'14' B
** "The Ref" (1994, Comedy) Denis Leary, *** "Brassed Off" (1996) Pete Postlethwaite, ***2 "Trainspotting" (1996) "Land of
(IXJ 118 170 Judy Davis. (In Stereo)'R' Tara Fitzgerald. (In Stereo)'R'B Ewan McGregor 'R' Dead"
FNCi 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
[00F 1 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Food Network Star Cupcake Wars 'G' Food Network Star Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
FSNFL 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker Tour World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
0 60 51 ** "Pineapple Express" (2008, Comedy) ** "Step Brothers" (2008, Comedy) Will ** "Step Brothers" (2008, Comedy) Will
) 30 60 30 51 Seth Rogen, James Franco. R' Ferrell, John C. ReillyR' Ferrell, John C. ReillyR'
GOL 727 67 727 LPGA Tour Golf Central PGA Tour Golf |PGA Tour Golf FedEx St. Jude Classic, Final Round.
S 59 "Accidentally in *** "The Wish List" (2010 Romance) "Strawberry Summer" (2012, Drama) Julie Frasier PG Frasier'PG'
59 68 59 45 54 Love" (2010)'NR' Jennifer Esposito, David Sutcliffe. Mond, Trevor Donovan, Shelley Long. N
*** "Behind the ** "Dark Shadows"(2012, Comedy) Johnny Game of Thrones Veep(N) Family Tree Game of Thrones
302 201 302 2 2 Candelabra"(2013) Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13' "Mhysa"'MA' 'MA '14' "Mhysa"'MA' B
HB 303 202 303 Boxing Days: Real Time With Bill *** "Magic Mike" 2012, Comedy-Drama) *** "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" (2011)
303 202 30ennady Maher'MA' c ChanningTatum. (In Stereo) 'R' James Franco.'PG-13' B
([iHGV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters H ter Hunters Huntlntl HGTVStar'G' Love It or List It, Too Hunters |Huntlntl Hunters Hunt ntl
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Mountain Men "Into the Ice Road Truckers Swamp People'PG' B
( I 51 25 51 32 42 PG PG 'PG 'PG PG 'PG Wild'PG' '14'
IE 24 38 24 31 "Stolen Child" (2011) "Ring of Fire" (2013, Docudrama) Jewel, Army Wives "All or he Client List (N) "Ringof Fire" (2013)
E 24 38 24 31 EmmanuelleVaugier. Frances Conroy, John Doe. 'NR' B Notiing"'PG' c 14'm ccJewe['NR'cc
"Lake City" (2008) Sissy Spacek. A young man 'The Bad Son"(2007, Suspense) Catherine "Fatal Desire" (2006, Suspense) Anne Heche,
S 50 119 on the run goes to his childhood home. Dent, Tom McBeath. (In Stereo) NR' Eric Roberts. (In Stereo) NR' B
S** "Sy Game"(2001, Suspense) Robert ** "The Change-Up" (2011, Comedy) Ryan ** "Snow White and the Huntsman" (2012)
20 221 320 3 3 Redford.(In Stereo) R' Reynolds. (In SfereoNR' Kristen Stewart. (In Stereo) NR' B
(MSNBCI 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Lockup |Lockup
Drugs, Inc. "Motor City Drugs, Inc. "Hollywood Ultimate Survival Ultimate Survival Life Below Zero (N) 14 Ultimate Survival
R(" 109 65 109 44 53 Rus"4' High"'14' Alaska: T Alaska (N) PG' Alaska PG'
(NiCK 28 36 28 35 25 "Racing Stripes" Sam & Marvin See Dad |Wendell **'"The Karate Kid"1984) Ralph Macchio.'PG' B
OWN 103 62 103 Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Master Class Oprah's Next
OXYI 44 123 Snapped'PG' Snapped PG' Snapped PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG'
** "Peace, Loe & The Borgias Pilgrims Nurse Nurse Nurse The Borgias (N) (In The Borgias (In Stereo)
LSHDWI 340 241 340 4 Misunderstanding"(2011) Jane Fonda. travel toTome.'MA' Jackie Jackie(N) Jackie Stereo) MA' 'MA' m
Lucas Oil Off Road SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR Moto-Cause: Neale My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
EE 732 112 732 Racing Las Vegas. (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Bayly Rides (N) Car TV
i 37 43 37 27 36 *** "Kick-Ass" (2010) Aaron Johnson. An ordinary teen *** "Batman Begins"(2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine. Bruce Wayne
37KE 43 27 36 decides to become a superhero. (In Stereo) 'R' becomes Gotham City's Dark Knight. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
*** "Friends With Benefits"(2011) Justin ii ... ........ **"Little Man"(2006) Shawn i .. .........
sTTRZ 370 271 370 Timberlake. (In Stereo)'R' T.-i ....-i i- Wayans. (In Stereo)'PG-13' TI.- ... I 1- "Hitch"
S Powerboating Sport Flats Class Ship Sprtsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
Ii 36 31 36 Fishing Shape TV Adv Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue 'G'
S* "Land of the Lost" "Rise of the Dinosaurs" (2013, Science ** "Godzilla"(1998) Matthew Broderick. Nuclear testing in the South
I-F) 31 59 31 26 29 (2009)'PG-13' Fiction) Gary Stretch, Corin Nemec. NR' Pacific produces a giant mutated lizard.'PG-13' c
iTBSl 49 23 49 16 19 "Kicking& Scrm" *+ "Big Daddy"(1999)Adam Sandler. "Big Daddy"(1999) Adam Sandler "Wedding Crashers"
S** "Viva Las Vegas"(1964, Musical) Elvis *** The Lavender Hill Mob" *** "A Slight Case of Murder" * "A Slight Case of
IM 169 53 169 30 35 Presley Ann-Margret. NR' (DVS) (1951) Alec Guinness.'NR' (1938, Comedy) 'NR' N Larceny"
Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last North America (N) (In Great Bear Stakeout North America (In
II 53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14' Frontier'14' Frontier (N)'14' Stereo)'PG' (N)'PG, V' c Stereo) 'PG' c
TLCI 50 46 50 29 30 Medium Medium Breaking Amish: Long Is Long Is Medium Medium Breaking Amish: Medium Medium
*** "Chasing Amy" (1997, Romance- +"The Darkest Hour" (2011) ** "Scream4" (2011, Horror) Neve Campbell. "Wrath of
I 350 261 350 Comedy) Ben Affleck. (In Stereo) 'R' Emile Hirsch.'PG-13' (In Stereo) 'R' Cain"
i 48 3 4 31 "Transformers" (2007,Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson. Two Falling Skies "On Thin Falling Skies "Collateral Falling Skies "On Thin
S48 33 48 31 34 races of robots wagewaron Earth. 'PG-13' (DVS) Ice"'14' c Damage" (N)'14' Ice"'14'B
TO 38 58 38 33 ** "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" (2010) Teen Looney Squidbill. King/Hill King/Hill |Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam.Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Extreme Pools'G' Destina Destina Wat Coaster Rock-RV Rock-RV Extreme Parkin Airport Airport
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storae Storage Storage Storage
(TVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Gids Gold Gids Gold Girls Gold Girls s GoldGirls Gold Gids Gold Gids King
NCIS "Flesh and Blood" NCIS A girl is kid- NCIS A female bomb- NCIS Tony searches for NCIS "Secrets"'14' Burn Notice "New Deal"
USA 47 32 47 17 18 '14'm napped.'PG' N tech isattacked.'PG' answers. 14' (DVS) 'PG'
I 117 69 117 ,I i i II -rom the CSI: Miami "Blood in CSI: Miami "Prey" (In CSI: Miami "48 Hours CSI: Miami "Three- CSI: Miami A death row
117 69 117 i.- i the Water" '14' Stereo)'14' to Life" '14' Way"'14'0 appeal. '14'
(WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bers!ers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Relay *** "Mermaids"


Dear Annie: I have
been doing a lot of
family-tree re-
search and recently
learned that my ances-
tors owned slaves from
the early 18th century
until the end of the Civil
War, when my last slave-
owning ancestor was shot
in the head by Union
troops.
My problem is, one of
my brothers
married an
African-
American c a
woman, and
they have two
young daugh-
ters. I am
close to my
brother and
his wife, and I
adore my
mixed-race
nieces, who
identify as ANNI
black. My MAILI
family consid-
ers me the
repository of ancestral in-
formation. What on Earth
do I tell them? I worry
that it would be terribly
difficult for them to learn
that their ancestors were
slave owners and fought
on the side of the Confed-
eracy Family lore, as well
as official records, indi-
cates that my ancestors
didn't own many slaves
and were not cruel peo-
ple, but still.
I can easily talk to my
nieces about those Euro-
pean ancestors who
never came to America,


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"After Earth" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m.,4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10p.m.
"Epic" (PG) 4:45 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"The Internship" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"The Purge" (R) 2 p.m.,
5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"After Earth" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) 3:50 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 1:20 p.m.,
6:50 p.m. No passes.


"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
4:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"The Hangover 3" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"The Internship" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"The Purge" (R) 1:25 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 4 p.m., 10 p.m.
No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Gripping device
6 Henhouse
10 Skinflint
15 Extinct bird
18 Hawaiian porch
19 Pledged an item for
cash
21 Love
22 Body and-
23 Dwelling
24 Highly decorated
25 Approaches
26 Kick
27 Turf
28 Mature
29 Humidor item
31 --Charming
33 Victim
35 Employer
36 French composer
37 Kitchen work
surface
38 Key
40 Apple drink
41 Poker stake
42 Struck gently
44 Bond or Dean
45 "Porgy and-"
47 Field cover,
for short
51 Smile coyly
52 Accepted
53 Orion was one
55 Lillie or Benaderet
56 Fix firmly
57 Authentic
58 Sudden pain
60 Bay window
62 Ready, willing
and -
63 Marion the actor
65 Wall pier
66 Toy
67 Links item
68 Monthly expense
69 Maize
71 Thin and haggard
73 Blvds.
75 Printer's
measures
76 Kind of bear
77 Kind of timer
78 Scalding
81 Violin maker
83 Toward shelter


84 Air pollutant
85 Tractor-trailer
87 Depended
90 Mexican food
92 Table linens
94 Terrible
95 Coral island
96 Limited
98 Zola novel
99 One of Lear's daugh-
ters
100 Cul-de--
101 Gullet
103 On the up-and-up
105 Metalloid
compound
106 Drop
108 A relative
109 Group of witches
110 Containing salt
111 Mata -
113 Discussion group
114 Stormed
115 Certain musician
118 Hold sway
119 Ballet jump
120 For one
124 Column base
125 Ross or Muldaur
126 Student
127 Paid athlete
128 Edgar -
Burroughs
129 Flynn of
old movies
131 Sartor
133 Finch
135 Enthusiastic
136 Ghost
137 "The Strikes Back"
138 Juvenile heroine
139 Until now
140 Pulled
141 Earthy fuel
142 Way


DOWN
1 Hold tightly
2 Work
3 Battery terminal
4 In a huff
5 Dessert item
6 Floor covering
7 Proprietor
8 - even keel


Animal friend
Trough in a stable
Standard of
perfection
Fly high
Goof
Answer
Get on top of
Weight unit
Modify
Balanced
In moral decline
Upright piano
Measuring stick
Currier's partner
Furrow
Hooray!
Hoarfrost
Social standing
Raced
Encrusted
Wood for building
Walked leisurely
Trip
Hit a baseball
Appointment
Jewish month
Film spool
Wan
Love or bucket
Changeover
Mule relative
Horse of a certain
color
English river
Prison official
Babe -
Cover with crumbs
Big cat
Pram
Poem
Greek marketplace
Jib
Implied but unsaid
Source
Harangue
Dissolve
Where Toledo is
Hereditary factor
File
Abbr. in footnotes
In parents
Body structure (abbr.)
Seraph
Disparage
Compote


ingredient
Lengthen
Function
Most severe
Regular
Roll with a hole
Called
Name in Genesis
Lampoon
Little island


Rang out
Account
Fine mist
Martini fruit
Legal
-- la Plata
Child or Roberts
Spring time
Muscle spasm
Something sweet


Sketch
Hookah
Greek letter
Elec. unit
Uncle -
Whitney or Wallach


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


many of whom were
members of the aristoc-
racy But I feel an obliga-
tion to tell the truth about
all of their relatives if
they should ask.
How do I talk to them
about this in a sensitive
way? I know they eventu-
ally could find out on
their own if they bother to
search, because it's in the
public record. Most of all,
I want my
nieces to know
how much we
love them, that
I find the fam-
ily's slavery
past shameful,
and that we are
proud that our
family has be-
come more di-
verse. But it
still doesn't
erase what hap-
E'S opened. Please
BOX help. KC.
Dear KC.:
You are taking
on more blame than nec-
essary for your family's
past. Talk to your sister-
in-law. Tell her what you
discovered in your re-
search, and add what you
told us that you love
your brother's family and
find your slavery past
shameful. Should these
nieces someday become
interested in their family
history, they will want
this information, warts
and all, and are entitled
to have it. The most im-
portant thing is to reas-
sure them of your love.


A14 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


I
|





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Therapy with cold nose, wagging tail


Specially trained airport pups


offer


travelers affection to help alleviate stress, bring a smile


SUE MANNING
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
There's a new breed of air-
port dog. They aren't look-
ing for drugs or bombs -
they are looking for people
who need a buddy, a belly
to rub or a paw to shake.
"His job is to be
touched," volunteer Kyra
Hubis said about Henry
James, her 5-year-old
golden retriever that works
a few hours a week at the
San Jose airport. "I am just
standing there with him.
They are talking to him. If I
need to answer for him, I
do. But I am at the end of
his leash, he's not at the
end of mine."
Mineta San Jose Interna-
tional Airport is widely
credited with introducing
the first airport therapy
dog in the days after Sept.
11, 2001, when flights were
grounded, passengers were
stranded and reaching
friends and relatives in the
East was nearly impossi-
ble. Passengers were anx-
ious and afraid.
Enter Orion, owned by a
volunteer airport chaplain
who got permission to
bring the dog to work. He
made such a difference
that San Jose formal-
ized the program and
now has nine dogs.
Miami International
Airport got onboard
the program with one S
and Los Angeles Inter-
national Airport has 30
and is hoping to ex-
pand its program.
The dogs are in-
tended to take the
stress out of travel the
crowds, long lines and ter-
rorism concerns.
You never know why
people are flying, said
Heidi Huebner, director of
volunteers at LAX, which
launched Pets Unstressing
Passengers (PUPs) in April.
Travelers might be in town
for a vacation, a funeral, to
visit a sick family member
or to attend a business
meeting.
"You can literally feel
the stress levels drop, peo-
ple start smiling, strangers
start talking to each other
and everybody walks away
feeling really, really good,"
Huebner said.
Dogs have to be healthy,



HEIGHTS
Continued from Page A13

"I still have a few more
years to make my at-
tempts. I will try until I
reach 84 and then quit,"
Sherchan said.
Wednesday was also the
60th anniversary of the
conquest of Everest It
was marked in Katmandu,
Nepal, with a ceremony
honoring climbers who
followed in the footsteps
of Edmund Hillary and
Tenzing Norgay
Miura and his son Gota,
who has climbed Everest
twice, said things went
well during their expedi-
tion because they care-
fully paced themselves,
walking only half-days
and resting in the
afternoons.
"We just beat the mon-
soon season, and the ty-
phoons are coming,"
Miura said. "Thanks to
good luck and careful
preparation and plan-
ning, we all returned
without any accidents."
"We took our time. You
get tired when you are
old," he said.
But Miura said he was
dangerously weak at the
beginning of his May 23
descent. Though he felt
fine after he removed his
oxygen mask on the sum-
mit to pose for photos and
enjoy the view, he suf-
fered for it on the way
down.
"I lost strength in my
legs," Miura said. "I could
not move at all."
Helped down by Gota


and others, Miura revived
after having some food
and water at the team's
27,887-foot-high base
camp.
"He just wouldn't give
up. This is the real
strength of Yuichiro


Associated Press
Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUPs) volunteer Brian Valente, left, with his dog, Finn, greet the Bloom family with
their 13-month-old son, Jacob, on May 21 at the Los Angeles International Airport terminal. The Los Angeles
International Airport has 30 therapy dogs and is hoping to expand its program.


skilled, stable, well man-
nered and able to work on
a slack 4-foot leash, said
Billie Smith, executive di-
rector of Wyoming-based
Therapy Dogs, Inc., which
certifies the LAX animals.
They have to be comfort-

... people start
smiling, strangers
start talking to
each other ....

Heidi Huebn
director of volunteers, LA

able with crowds, sounds,
smells and they need to
pass through security like
all airport workers.
Handlers are taught to
watch for people who fear
or dislike dogs or those
who might have allergies.
In most cases, people ap-
proach the dogs, identifi-
able by the vests or
bandannas they wear
Los Angeles' dogs, which
are featured on trading
cards, are as varied as its
airport passengers. There's
a long-haired Dalmatian, a
Lab-pointer mix, a field
spaniel, a poodle, three
Australian Labradoodles, a
Doberman and a 150-
pound Irish wolfhound


Miura," Gota said of his
father's recovery and per-
sistence in traveling an-
other 2 1/2 hours later in
the day to reach their
camp at 8,000 meters.
Miura was a daredevil
speed skier in his youth,
and skied down Everest's
South Col in 1970, using a
parachute to brake his de-
scent. He also has skied
down Mount Fuji.
Though he said he does
not plan another Everest
attempt, Miura said he
hopes to do plenty of ski-
ing and to "live life to the
fullest."
"Before this mission,
we held a family meeting,
and I was really afraid
they'd say 'No.' But they
just said it couldn't be
helped and went along
with it," he said.
"When my father was 99
years old, we went skiing
on Mount Blanc. Three
generations of the Miura
family It would have been
four, but the youngest was
5 and couldn't come," he
said. "I hope to go skiing
with three or four more
generations of my family"
Miura's advice for his
fellow elders?
"It isn't just about stay-
ing healthy, but it's about
having goals," he said.
"You don't need to
climb Mount Fuji or
travel overseas. Just get
out of the house. Enjoy
good food. Those are the
things we should do," said
Miura, who dined on hot
pot and hand-rolled sushi
and enjoyed gourmet
Japanese green tea dur-
ing his climb.
Miura expressed sad-
ness over the disappear-
ance Friday of Chizuko
Kono, a 67-year-old fe-
male climber, while trying
to summit Dhaulagiri, the
world's seventh-highest
peak.
"Apparently, Kono just


named Finn who has two
tricks.
"He looks you in the eye
and lays down on the job,"
said owner Brian Valente.
"When I'm around Finn, it
makes me feel like things
are OK. When Finn's
around other people,
they are OK It's almost
instant, even if just for a
moment," Valente said.
Miami's sole dog,
Casey, a 4-year-old
golden retriever, is a
star. She has her own
website, fan mail, busi-
er ness cards and a role on
"Airport 24/7: Miami," a
weekly reality show on
the Travel Channel.
"Casey is so pure and
genuine," explained Dickie
Davis, director of terminal
operations and customer
service. "She's not asking
for anything or selling any-
thing. She is just a love
magnet"
When Claudia Mc-
Caskill's family recently
flew home from vacation in
Brazil she requested Casey
meet the plane to greet her
5-year-old daughter, Ca-
rina, who is autistic. She
knew Carina would be low
on energy and patience
and they still had a 2.5-hour
drive home to St. Lucie.
Casey and handler Liz
Miller were there with a


exceeded her limits and
lost her strength," he said.
"It's a real shame. It only
takes one misstep. It's re-
ally too bad."


gift basket and Carina fell
in love with the dog.
"Thank you for visiting
us at the airport so I would
be happy," Carina said in a
video the family made for
Casey
Now Carina wants to go
back and see Casey again.
"I can't say how much we
appreciate what they did
for us. It not only helped
our daughter, but us too,"
McCaskill said.
Despite all the smiles,
there are also hard
moments.
Before departing from
San Jose, a soldier kneeled
down and told Henry
James: "OK, buddy, you
take care of the house
while I am gone," Hubis
said.
A woman who said her
husband of 40 years told
her he wanted a divorce
that morning wept on
Henry's shoulder.
"He just sat there,"
Hubis said. "He knew. He
can feel."


Collectors' Day


& Appraisal Fair

Sat., June 15, 2013 in the Florida Room at Park's Visitor Center


Appraisal
fees are $5.00


Eie ScAiole
HOMOEREE5R


per item or t1M
$12.00 for 3 items L
WILDLIFE FFRPF,


4150 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19),
Homosassa, FL
628-5445, ext.1002


The Park's Visitor Center will be open to the public with free admission.
(Regular admission will apply for entrance into the Wildlife Park.)
Proceeds from appraisal fees will benefit the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park.

COLLECTORS' DAY (from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm) Interesting
collections will be on display and you will be able to learn from those
who understand the joy of collecting. Collectibles will include postage
stamps, greeting and trading cards, steins, decanters, mugs depicting
animals and famous people, and so much more.

APPRAISAL FAIR (from 11:00 am until 4:00 pm) Several know-
ledgeable collectors, dealers, auctioneers, and appraisers will be on
hand to assist you in identifying and placing a value on your
treasures. Their specialties will include, but are not limited to, coins,
military, jewelry, tools, postcards, signatures and other paper, and
string instruments. Many different items can be identified and valued.
Specid 7 to DUDLEY'S AUCTION
B. L 4000 S Florida Ave, Inverness n 34450
352-637-9588 www.dudleysauction.com

B ... o Cl'iRONILE l\


4-NIGHT WESTERN CARIBBEAN
S SAILING FROM TAMPA VISITING COZUMEL
Canival'Paradise
Inside Cabin OCT. 10
starting at 2013
s282.13 p 2013
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
AND iNFORMATION
All rates are based on double occupancy
and availability at time of booking.


T I A '


JAMAICA
7 Night All inclusive
at the Grand Palladium
October 2013


ELVIS WEEK
Bus tour to Memphis, TN
5 Day/4 Night
August 2013


ALMU1AtufiW 5390 South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa
n-' .(352) 628-0668
Shttp://travelauthorityofthenaturecoastvacationport.net/
Email: buzzgwen@yahoo.com


INTERNATIONAL
3 Day
WOW Sale *
Must bookJune 10,11 or 12,2013
Book ANY SAILING departing
Sept. 1, 2013 August 31, 2014
5 nights or less sailings-$50 OBC perstateroom
6-9 nights sailings-$100 OBC per stateroom
10+ night sailings-$200 OBC per stateroom


Becky's Travel Store
6 DAY Northern Calif.
& Wine Country Fly & Drive
Includes 5 nights accommodations and 6 day
car rental from $399 (Land Only)
Lead Price Travel Dates:
Oct. 27, Nov. 3, Nov.10 & Dec., 2013
For departures: June 2013 December 2014
Some of what the packages include:
5 nights accommodations
3 nights Napa or Sonoma
S2 nights Monterey
Book by 6/10/13 and
save $50 pp off regular pnce.


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (32) 527-8855
Located Next to Winn Dixie(52)
www IbeIekystravellserv:l I-icekcomI00OF7I


I N .ival 0 COLLETTE
I'llca Wl 1 VACATIONS
15-day Transatlantic CO
London to New York COSTA
SEPTEMBER 25. 201
"'Er.yr,3 .Iir.ir., R ICA
September 11 G:,:. ,:i,, with air from Tampa 0
2013 p FROM OCT 26-NOV, 3,2013
2013 pip 'M -IA FULLY ESCORTED
St. Petersburg via round-trip 4 AA FUYS
motorcoach and orchestra seating Rpp E STEPARATE.RSpp
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
T TTNo
TALLY-HO Hidden 352-860-2805
esI www.tallyhovacations.com
/- dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
I/ ADIVISIONOFEDUCATIONALTOURS FLSellerof Travel 10131


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested


ein O 352-795.5797
EveryhingOutdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS


TRAVEL


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 A15


I










Family Fun Day proves true to mission


The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition's Veterans Fam-
ily Fun Day, held May 25
on the property of the Christ
Way Fellowship Church on In-
dependence High-
way in Inverness,
brought the attention
of notaries and nota-
bles. Free admission,
food and refresh-
ments for veterans
and their families,
along with a list of
special guests,
brought a good crowd
without feeling Barbara
crowded. VETEI
The CCVC had five VIE
acres to use, offering
spacious relaxation
for volunteers and attendees
alike. The breezy atmosphere
was relaxed, safe and secure.
Live music by Citrus County's
Bear Paw Band had everyone
dancing even the older folks!
Door prizes were awarded;
games were played for first-,
second- and third-place prizes;
and we had one heck of a hula
hoop performance. Three
hoops around the neck, all at
once, won one young lady first
prize in that category


R
A


Mary K. Hall, also known as
Jewels the Clown, brought
along Vicky lozzia, also known
as Clown Sunny The ladies
were a bright spot in the shade
as they danced to the
live music and pro-
vided free face paint-
ing for the
youngsters.
Tasty hamburgers,
yummy hot dogs,
condiments and fresh
french fries, fried
right there on the
spot, were provided
Corcoran by the CCVC, as well
ANS' as Elks Lodge 2522,
WS Inverness. The Elks
Lodge members coor-
dinated and con-
ducted the games. Their team
also cooked burgers and hot
dogs that were served with a
generous gift of enthusiasm and
smiles.
A special thanks goes out to
everyone involved, including
the Nature Coast Young Marines
accompanied by their com-
manding officer, Lisa Gonzales,
for jumping in on tasks large
and small without hesitation. I
was amazed with the profes-
sionalism, positive energy and


excellent manners of these
young adults.
One of our special guests,
videographer Roy Zachry, shot
stills and footage throughout the
day. Look for his work on
YouTube, where he publishes
regularly Our own website,
www.ccvcfl.org, will soon fea-
ture photos to share the day
with everyone.
Veterans and their families
were given stickers to wear, in-
dicating what branch of the
service they were connected
with. It was an easy way for mil-
itary branch comrades to recog-
nize each other, make new
friends or reunite with old ones.
Special guests wore yellow
custom-designed pin-back but-
tons designating them as such,
bearing a beautiful rendition of
the American flag upon them.
The stickers and pins also
served as passes for the free
food and cold drinks.
Souvenir pin-back buttons,
also handmade and custom de-
signed were sold for just $1
each. These attractive pins have
white backgrounds, display the
American flag and the recogniz-
able looped yellow ribbon de-
sign in support of our troops,


along with red, white and blue
satin ribbons extending from
the base of the pins. These pins
can still be purchased via Pay-
Pal through at wwwbarbies
buttons.com, with the proceeds
going straight to veterans in
need. So if you missed out on
getting your souvenir pin or
would just like to show your
support for our veterans, this is
a great way to do it.
All veteran-affiliated organi-
zations were invited to join us in
sharing this day for membership
drives, accepting donations and
distributing information about
their purposes to make a perfect
day for all of us to pull together
for our veterans.
That's where the CCVC's mis-
sion comes into play Our mis-
sion is a simple phrase,
"Veterans Helping Veterans,"
but it's so much more than that.
We hope to bring all veteran-
based entities together to work
side by side, to mesh like the
teeth of interlocking gears, in
order to better serve the more
than 23,000 veterans (and their
families) here in Citrus County.
Many vets and their families are
unsure of benefits entitled to
them, or become entangled in


the system and need help find-
ing their way to the answers
they seek. They fought for us;
now it's our turn to fight for
them.
The CCVC food bank, open
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, is
only one of the ways we help
veterans in need. No matter
how small your donation, it
counts more than you know.
Read more about what we do in
next month's column.
I'd like to thank my readers
for their kind words regarding
this column and remind you all
to display your American flag
proudly on Friday, June 14,
which is Flag Day If you're dis-
playing other flags, they should
be raised lower, even slightly, to
follow proper respect and dis-
play etiquette. Be safe and I'll
see you next month!

Barbara L. Corcoran is the
public information officer of
the Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Inc. She may be
contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group
maybe found at wwwccvcfl.org.


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
American Legion Post 155
has announced the installa-
tion of newly elected post offi-
cers and executive board
members on June 4.
The new commander, John
Foster, is a retired Coast
Guard master chief with 26
years of military service. He
and his officers look forward
to the challenges they will
face, the service they can pro-
vide and the camaraderie
they will share with all mem-
bers of the American Legion
family.
For more information re-
garding American Legion Post
155, or any of its programs
and functions, call 352-795-
6526, email blantonthomp-
sonPostl55@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPostl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-
7663, or membership chair-
man Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For
more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The


VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind Ca-
dence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
The post meeting is
changed to the second Mon-
day starting in July (at 7 p.m.
Monday, July 8).
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Pork roast dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, June 14.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Cmdr. Richard
Floyd 727-492-0290, Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Visit the website at
http://davfl70.yktc.us.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'


benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone


Cmdr. Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed


sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-


tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post meets the first

See VETERANS/Page A17


For Your Favorite
Healthcare









Put your thinking caps on and prepare to nominate
your favorite Healthcare Professional.
Don't delay! Deadline for nominations is Thurs., June 27, 2013.




Nominate Someone?

* Go to chronicleonline.com/
HealthcareHeroes2013
* Fill in application information *.
* Complete the online essay.' .
Minimum 200 words, .
Maximum 1,000 words of why .
you are nominating your '
Healthcare Hero.
* Winners chosen by a select
panel of judges.
* Winners will be announced
Friday, August 9, 2013 at the ..
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce Luncheon.
See categories on below



CATEGORIES OF NOMINATION

Lifetime Achievement in Healthcare Award
Innovation in Healthcare Award
Administrative Excellence in Healthcare Award
Physician's Excellence in Healthcare Award
Dental Excellence in Healthcare Award
Nurse's Excellence in Healthcare Award
Healthcare Professional Award
Community Outreach Award

Healthcare Humanitarian Award


Our Partners:


SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES
Of Lecanto
!& MEMORY CARE


Brashear's Pharmacy, Citrus Hills Dental, Citrus Memorial Health Systems,
Comfort Keepers, Complete Family Dentistry, Crystal Community ENT,
Ledger Dentistry, Nature Coast EMS and Suncoast Eye Center


C CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
V www.chronicleonline.com

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., FL 34429 352-563-5592


A16 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


VETERANS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


mim





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A16

Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. The auxiliary meets at
1 p.m. the first Wednesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast has
been suspended until
September.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m. Thurs-
days at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3,1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.


Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Cmdr. Norm
Brumett at 352-476-2134 or
Auxiliary president Alice
Brummett at 352-476-7001
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas


and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade, coffee and soft drink for
$8. All are welcome.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is a
6 p.m.; meeting follows at 7.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military


men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
Cmdr., Robert Scott, at 352-
860-2090. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the


Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit the chapter's
website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at


7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,


VETERANS


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

CLAMP CI OO1 P M I S E R M-OA-
LANAlI PA W N D ADORE SOUL
ABODE ORNATE NEARS PUNT
D R RIPEN C IGAR PRlI NCE
RE Y USER BRA E SL CO NTEA R
IS ET CIDER ANTEME
TAPPED JAMES BESS TARP
S IMPEiRM TAK E UN H TN EIR B E A
EM BWE RU EINGE E O I E L
AB LE BRANDO ANTA BAUBLE
TEE RENT CORN GAUNT
R, S NS TE D Y E G G HO0T
I E D I IEIDN A P, E, RYID I R E
LAMAT I TALE A SM G E G A
SAAC THR T LE G I T BIOR IDE
PLO AU T GCO VEN SAL INE
HIAR I PANEL RAGE
SOLO ST REIGN J ETE EAC
PL I NTH D I-ANA PUP iL PRO
R I CT2E1 .RROL A I LtO RISE R I N
AV I D S HADE EMP I RE AL I CE
YET TOWED PEATI IF LT
6-9 C 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


&


Smartphone Near You!



C CITRUS COUNTY




H RONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


Soon you will be able to subscribe to our new electronic version of the
Chronicle. Available on a smartphone, tablet or computer near you.



Details Coming Soon!


Coming To A Tablet


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 A17

Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call 352-860-1629.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Come for tea at


Hopsice House


Special to the Chronicle
The community is in-
vited to Afternoon Tea at
Hospice House at 2 p.m.
every Friday Afternoon
Tea offers an ideal way to
greet neighbors and
friends and meet Hospice
of Citrus County staff who
will provide information
and tours of the facility.
When a patient is appro-
priate for hospice care and
has symptoms that can be
addressed in an acute care
setting, inpatient hospice
care may be appropriate.
In 2005, Hospice of Citrus
County constructed Hos-
pice House as a 16-bed


inpatient facility on five
acres west of County Road
491 in Lecanto. The Hos-
pice House is a place of
comfort and peace which
emphasizes privacy, dig-
nity and the inclusion of
family members for the
provision of end-of-life
care. The Hospice House
Team includes dedicated
physicians, registered
nurses, nursing assistants,
chaplains, social workers
and volunteers on duty 24
hours a day, seven days a
week.
For more information,
call 352-527-2020. Visit on
Facebook or visit
www.hospiceofcitrus.org.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Hot dog on bun
with mustard, baked beans
with tomato, carrot coins,
mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Vegetable soup,
turkey ham and cheese on
whole-grain bun with
mayonnaise and mustard,
fresh orange, oatmeal raisin
cookie, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday
celebration: Beef rotini pasta,
Neapolitan spinach, Italian
vegetable medley, birthday
cake, dinner roll with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Baked chicken
thigh with coq au vin sauce,


rice pilaf, country vegetable
medley, applesauce, slice
whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Father's Day
celebration: Sausage and
butter bean casserole, but-
tered spinach, yellow corn,
special Father's Day dessert,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Mazzones


John and Patsy Maz-
zone celebrated their
golden wedding anniver-
sary June 1, 2013. They
renewed their vows at St.
Scholastica Church in
Lecanto and followed
with a reception at Tus-
cany on the Meadows.
The Mazzones were
married June 1, 1963, at
Our Lady of Mount


Carmel Church in Sch-
enectady, N.Y. They
moved to Citrus County
from New York in 2000.
They have two sons, John
and David, and a daugh-
ter, Lisa McDougal. They
have four grandchildren.
The couple will cele-
brate with their family in
August in a beach house
in Palm Coast.


68th ANNIVERSARY

The Rollos


Charles and Shirley They have three chil-
Rollo of Citrus Springs dren: Judith Aiken of Cit-
celebrated their 68th rus Springs; Linda
birthday on May 31, 2013. McConnell of Stanton,
The couple were wed on Mich.; and Vicki Clifton
May 31, 1945, in Lynn, of Dunnellon.
Mass., and have lived in They have nine grand-
Citrus County for 29 children and 26 great-
years. grandchildren.


In SERVICE


For the RECORD


5/27 6/2/13 Marriages
Karl Allen Craig, Inverness/
Ali Lyn Madgey, Inverness
Thomas Theo Gruenbacher,
Crystal River/Joelle Claudine
Gourvenec, Crystal River
Anthony Joseph lannucci,
Homosassa/Crystal Lee
Jacob, Homosassa
Randall Lysten Ivey,
Crystal River/Brenda Joyce
Doland, Crystal River


Robert Christopher Martin,
Beverly Hills/Laura Serafina
Ulloa, Beverly Hills
Douglas Jay Potts, Belton,
S.C./Crystal Lynne Sabian
Scott Michael Reeves, Citrus
Springs/Jennifer Dawn
Harrison, Crystal River
Divorces
Kelleen L. Manning,
Inverness vs. James Curtis
Duncan, Inverness


Victor Tad-Y
Army Pvt. Victor Tad-Y
has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness and received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare


and bayonet training, drill
and ceremony, marching,
rifle marksmanship, armed
and unarmed combat, map
reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice sys-
tem, basic first aid, foot
marches and field training
exercises.
Tad-Y is the son of
Darlene and Raymundo
Tad-Y of Homosassa.
He is a 2011 graduate of
Lecanto High School.


* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record, available from each
county's clerk of the courts. Call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Citrus Countyl's


Marn Beth's Bridal
& formal Wear
JUNE 30TH
LAST DAY!
IC.. rylh_ It!I. I III lst1 goll
WA I.\Iliii ,i 11-. Shoes,
( woirkhr-. Inllrinal
DrI' --,- and Fixtures.
ALL OFFERS
CONSIDERED!
Located In
*Dayz Gone By"
Antique Shop
Open Mon.-Sat.
10:00-5:00
652 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
563-0722 000E9GF


6ik our Weddin U

ba RememberS





6rc po i @6a set ting,






Wed,



Corporal

g. *Idal & B

*" CITRUSu

.. GOLF& COL


Timeless pieces to celebrate
your everlasting love.




Jim Green Jewelers
Crystal River Shopping Center
1665 SE Hwy. 19 Next to Sweetbay
Laaway Available Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5:00pm Sat 11am-3:00pm 15 YEARS

Citrus County s





Jaxiiab Jof monnA
-* JyedoA [vrtt 9plnuwAA
For advertising information call
Anne 564-2931 or
Candy 563-3206


i HILLS
UNTRY CLUB


Contact us to discuss your event planning needs: 352-746-6855 or coierlrig@cliruhill.com I


June 10 to 14 MENUS


/







1~


.. I


Ptide


A18 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


TOGETHER


dings
rsorles
idoys /
y Parties
e Meetings
ralsers
functions
nions
bay Showers


I











SPORTS


Rays pitcher
Jeremy Hellickson got
plenty of run support
Saturday./B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
f Recreational sports/B4
0 Auto racing/B4
0 Dr. Ron Joseph column/B4
0 College baseball, golf/B5
0 NBA, NHL/B6


Serena claims second French Open title


American downs

Sharapova in

straight sets

Associated Press
PARIS Serena Williams
knew, of course, that 11 years
had passed since her only
French Open championship.
She also knew, of course,
what happened a year ago in
Paris: the only first-round
Grand Slam loss of her career,
to a woman ranked outside the
top 100, no less.
Eager to repeat the elation of
2002, and motivated by the dis-


appointment of 2012, Williams
used terrific defense and her
usual powerful hitting in Satur-
day's final, closing
with a crescendo of
aces three in the Men's I
last game -for a 6- Open
4, 6-4 victory over Mtchup:
defending cham- Nadal vshup
pion Maria Shara- Ferrer.
pova to collect a
second Roland 0 Time: 9 a
Garros title and 0 TV: NBC.
16th major trophy
overall.
"I'm still a little bit upset
about that loss last year," the
No. 1-ranked Williams said with
a chuckle, her shiny new hard-
ware an arm's length away
"But it's all about, for me,
how you recover," she contin-


ued. "I think I've always said a
champion isn't about how much
they win, but it's about how they
recover from their
downs, whether it's
French an injury or
final whether it's a loss."
As she spoke
Rafael those last few
words, her voice
choked and her
.m. today. eyes welled with
tears. There have
been low moments
for the 31-year-old
American none worse, per-
haps, than a 10-month stretch
ending in 2011 that included
two foot operations and treat-
ment for blood clots in her
See Page B6


Associated Press
Serena Williams holds the trophy after defeating Maria Sharapova in
two sets 6-4, 6-4 in the women's final of the French Open on
Saturday at Roland Garros stadium in Paris.


Associated Press
Palace Malice, left, with jockey Mike Smith up, wins the 145th Belmont Stakes on Saturday at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y.
Smith celebrates while sitting on Palace Malice in the winner's circle.






All Malice at Belmont Staes

Palace Malice claims Triple Crown race O m


Associated Press
NEW YORK- A pair of Hall of
Fame jockeys were just about nose
to nose as their horses hit the mid-
dle of the final turn of the Belmont
Stakes.
Gary Stevens, aboard Preakness
winner Oxbow, was going to relin-
quish the lead to the hard-charging
Palace Malice, and he knew it. He
glanced over to his right and looked
at good friend Mike Smith and told
him: "You go on with him big boy,
you're moving better than me."
Was he ever.
Palace Malice seized the lead
with a quarter-mile to go Saturday
in the final leg of the Triple Crown
and ran off to a 3 1/4-length victory
over Oxbow at Belmont Park, with
Kentucky Derby winner Orb an-
other 1 3/4 lengths back in third.
"Mike rode a superb race,"
Stevens said. "Midway around the
turn, I said, 'Well maybe.' But I
have ridden long enough to know
that he (Oxbow) was going to walk
home. To finish second, I am really
surprised."
Palace Malice, who came into
the race with only one win in


seven starts, vindicated trainer
Todd Pletcher's support of the
3-year-old colt despite a 12th place
finish in the Derby
"It's huge. It's huge," Pletcher
said about his second Belmont
win. "We always felt like he had a
big one in him. We were just wait-
ing for it to finally develop. I told
(owner) Mr (Cot) Campbell this
horse is training unbelievable. I
know he's got a big run, we just
need to put it all together"
The Belmont concludes a Triple
Crown season in which hopes
were high that Orb could break the
35-year drought without a sweep
of the classics. In fact, it's the
fourth time in five years each race
was won by a different horse.
Palace Malice, who skipped the
Preakness, covered the 11/2 miles
in a slow 2:30.70 on a fast track fol-
lowing a 24-hour downpour. A
crowd of 47,562 turned out on a
warm, sunny afternoon as Tropi-
cal Storm Andrea moved out of the
area.
For the second time during this
Triple Crown run, Pletcher sent
See Page B5


NASCAR


race


rained


out

Nationwide Series

will run today

before Sprint Cup

Associated Press
NEWTON, Iowa The
NASCAR Nationwide Series race
at Iowa Speedway was postponed
Saturday night until 10 a.m. CDT
today because of rain.
The race was set to begin at
7p.m., but rain began falling about 40
minutes before the scheduled start
Workers were nearly finished
drying the track before it started to
pour again, forcing officials to
push the race back a day
Austin Dillon will start first after
winning the pole for the third week
in a row, followed by Sam Hornish
Jr, Brian Scott and Brian Vickers.
The postponement, which is the
first for a major race in the six-
year history of Iowa Speedway,
also ensured that field Sunday will
be made up solely of Nationwide
regulars.
Sprint Cup driver Joey Logano,
racing Sunday at Pocono in Penn-
sylvania, will be replaced by team-
mate Ryan Blaney
The threat of bad weather loomed
throughout the day. But the rain
stayed just west of Newton for after-
noon qualifying and the track
hosted its quickest pole session yet
Eleven drivers broke the previ-
ous high of 135.141 mph set by El-
liott Sadler last August, with Dillon
leading the way at 136.737.
Dillon became the sixth Nation-
wide driver to win three consecu-
tive poles. With one more at
Michigan next week, he will break
the series record.

Late NHL game
Game 5 of the NHL Stanley
Cup Western Conference fi-
nals between the Chicago
Blackhawks and Los Angeles
Kings went to overtime tied at
3-3 and was not over at press
time. Please see Monday's
Chronicle for the result.


_-_--------------------------------------------


BRIN U IC


Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check Tire Pressure on All 4 Tires
27-Point Inspection
Battery Test
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere'
L - - - -


I1 M 1 1 I il*ii


I I *I


'"FREE !
SAVE 13% "Alignment
You decide the service you need Check .
ai we l gv ou ih e rd n g ,Valid at Chevy or Love Honda Prices may vary by model
Valid at Love Honda or Love Chevy. Please present coupon during write I ... I ....... ,
up Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires6-30-13 .
L--------------------------. I


I I


I I *I


BUY 3 TIRES Oil Change
AND GET ONE & Tire RotationI

FREEl s$3495
^ ^ .. .. . .. . .. . ... h J _,
.a .----------------------


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453
352.341.0018
lovechevysales.com
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL; 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-FrY.: 8AM-Noon Sat.


Honda


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovehoncla.coxn
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Monr.-FrL; 9AM-6PM Sat.; 11AM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Fri.; 8AM-2PM Sat.


WYahk
CHfEME


000F4F5


I


F



a






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
Toronto


Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
3 --
S1lY2 --
' 3 1Y2
8 3Y2 2
3 10 8Y2


East Division
GB WC
7 --
2 7 61/2
3 7Y2 7
4 12 11Y2
) 20 19Y2


NL

Pirates 6, Cubs 2
Pittsburgh Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMarte If 4 1 2 0 DeJess cf 4 0 1 0
Snider rf 4 0 1 1 Valuen 3b 3 0 0 0
McCtchcf 3 1 1 0 Rizzolb 3 1 1 0
GJoneslb 4 1 1 0 ASorin If 4 1 1 2
GSnchzlb 0 0 0 0 Schrhltrf 4 0 1 0
RMartn c 3 2 1 2 Castillo c 4 0 0 0
PAIvrz 3b 4 1 2 3 SCastro ss 3 0 0 0
Walker 2b 4 0 1 0 Barney 2b 2 0 0 0
Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0
AJBrntp 4 0 0 0 Borbon ph 1 0 0 0
Watson p 0 00 0 Putnm p 0 00 0
HRndn p 0 0 0 0
Sweeny ph 1 00 0
BParkrp 0 00 0
Totals 34 69 6 Totals 29 2 4 2
Pittsburgh 011 200 020 6
Chicago 000 000 002 2
DP-Pittsburgh 1, Chicago 1. LOB-Pittsburgh
3, Chicago 4. 2B-G.Jones (13), Schierholtz
(16). HR-R.Martin (7), PAIvarez (13), A.Sori-
ano (7). SB-S.Marte (16). CS-S.Marte (8).
S-Samardzija.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,4-6 81/34 2 2 3 5
Watson 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Samardzija L,3-7 6 8 4 4 1 7
Putnam 1 0 0 0 0 3
H.Rondon 1 1 2 2 1 0
B.Parker 1 0 0 0 0 1

Marlins 2, Mets 1,
20 innings
Miami NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Pierre If 5 0 1 0 Quntnllss 9 0 1 0
ARamsp 0 00 0 DnMrp2b 9 01 0
Olivo ph 1 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 8 0 3 0
Slowey p 2 0 0 0 Duda If 7 0 1 0
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0
Lucas 1 b-lf 8 01 0 Marcmp 2 00 0
Dietrch2b 8 1 1 0 I.Davis b 2 1 0 0
Ozunarf 8 0 3 0 JuTrnrph-lb 5 0 2 0
Coghln cf 3 0 0 1 Buck c 8 0 2 0
DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Lagars cf 8 0 2 1
Ktchmlb 4 0 0 0 Harvey p 3 0 1 0
Polanc 3b 8 1 1 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0
Brantly c 8 0 4 0 Parnellp 0 0 0 0
Hchvrrss 7 03 1 Baxterph 0 00 0
Frnndzp 2 0 0 0 Reckerph 1 0 0 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 Hwknsp 0 0 0 0
Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 Ricep 0 0 0 0
MDunnp 0 00 0 Burkep 0 00 0
Webbp 0 00 0 Vldspn ph 1 00 0
Ruggincf 5 01 0 Ardsmp 0 00 0
Ankiel rf 4 0 0 0
Totals 69 2152 Totals 71 113 1
Miami 000 100 000 000 000 000 01-2
N.Y. 010 000 000 000 000 000 00-1
DP-Miami 2, NewYork 1. LOB-Miami 10, New
York 22. 2B-Ju.Turner (6), Lagares (3). SB-
Hechavarria (3), D.Wright (12). CS-Ozuna (1),
Hechavarria (3). S-Lagares. SF-Coghlan.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Fernandez 6 3 1 1 3 7
Quails 1 1 0 0 0 0
M.Dunn 2/3 0 0 0 2 1
Webb 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Da.Jennings 11/30 0 0 3 2
A.Ramos 21/30 0 0 1 0
Slowey W,2-5 7 8 0 0 0 8
Cishek S,6-8 1 0 0 0 0 1
NewYork
Harvey 7 6 1 1 0 6
Lyon 1 1 0 0 1 0
Parnell 1 1 0 0 0 1
Hawkins 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
Rice 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Burke 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Aardsma 1 0 0 0 0 1
MarcumL,0-7 8 5 1 1 0 7


HBP--by Quails (Buck), by Slowey (Marcum).
Reds 4, Cardinals 2
St. Louis Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt 2b 4 01 0 Choocf 4 02 0
Beltranrf 5 1 1 0 DRonsn If 4 1 2 0
Hollidylf 4 0 1 0 Vottolb 4 1 2 1
Craig lb 4 0 1 1 Phillips2b 3 0 0 0
YMolinc 3 1 1 0 Brucerf 4 1 2 1
Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 Frazier 3b 2 0 0 0
Jay cf 3 0 1 1 Mesorc c 4 1 2 2
Manessp 0 00 0 Cozart ss 4 00 0
Siegristp 0 0 0 0 Latos p 2 0 0 0
KButIlrp 0 00 0 HRdrgzph 1 00 0
Wggntnph 1 00 0 Broxtnp 0 00 0
Kozma ss 4 02 0 Chpmn p 0 00 0
Lyons p 2 0 0 0
Choatep 0 000
SRonsn cf 2 00 0
Totals 36 29 2 Totals 32410 4
St. Louis 011 000 000 2
Cincinnati 010 012 00x 4


E-Kozma (2). DP-St. Louis 2. LOB-St. Louis
9, Cincinnati 7. 2B-Beltran (6), Y.Molina (18),
Kozma (10), D.Robinson 2 (2), Votto 2 (12).
HR-Bruce (10), Mesoraco (3).
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Lyons L,2-2 51/36 4 4 1 2
Choate 0 1 0 0 0 0
Maness 1 3 0 0 1 1
Siegrist 2/3 0 0 0 1 2
K.Butler 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cincinnati
Latos W,6-0 7 8 2 2 0 5
BroxtonH,11 1 0 0 0 1 1
Chapman S,16-18 1 1 0 0 0 0
Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Chapman (M.Carpenter).WP-Latos.


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
June 9 vs Baltimore
June 10 vs Boston
June 11 vs Boston
June 12 vs Boston
June 13 vs Kansas City
June 14 vs Kansas City
June 15 vs Kansas City
June 16vs Kansas City
June 18 at Boston
June 19 at Boston
June 20 at N.Y Yankees
June 21 at N.Y Yankees
June 22 at N.Y Yankees
June 23 at N.Y.Yankees
June 24 vs Toronto
June 25 vs Toronto
June 26 vs Toronto
June 28 vs Detroit
June 29 vs Detroit
June 30 vs Detroit
July 1 at Houston
July 2 at Houston


Str Home
W-1 20-14
W-1 19-13
W-2 19-10
L-2 15-13
W-3 16-16


Detroit
Cleveland
Minnesota
Kansas City
Chicago


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
26 .567 5
31 .492 4Y2 5Y2 3
31 .466 6 7 7
32 .458 6Y2 7Y2 6
34 .433 8 9 2


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
22 .645 5-5
25 .597 3 4-6
25 .597 3 5-5
35 .407 14Y2 11Y2 5-5
37 .393 15Y2 12Y2 5-5


Str Home
W-3 21-10
L-6 18-12
W-1 13-14
W-4 14-15
W-1 14-13


Str Home
L-1 19-12
W-1 22-10
W-2 21-11
L-2 13-18
W-2 15-20


W
Oakland 38
Texas 36
Los Angeles 27
Seattle 27
Houston 22


Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
L Pct GB WC
26 .594 -
25 .590 Y2 -
35 .435 10 9
36 .429 10Y2 9Y2
41 .349 1512 1412


West Division
GB WC
4 E
I 3 41/2
7 312 5
8 6/2 8
) 7/2 9


Str Home
W-1 17-12
L-1 19-14
L-2 21-11
W-1 16-14
W-2 18-16


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays base runner Ben Zobrist slides into third base ahead of the throw to Baltimore Orioles third
baseman Manny Machado on Saturday in St. Petersburg. The Rays won easily by a score of 8-0.



Rays back pitching with offense


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Jeremy
Hellickson pitched six scoreless in-
nings and six different Tampa Bay
players drove in runs to lead the
surging Rays to an 8-0 victory over
the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday
Taking up where they left off in
allowing just two hits in a 2-1 vic-
tory in the opener of a three-game
series at Tropicana Field, Rays
pitchers limited the Orioles to
four singles to beat their AL East
rivals for the fifth straight time.
Hellickson (4-2) worked through
a fifth-inning jam before watching
the Rays break it open with five
runs in the bottom half of the in-
ning, three on Luke Scott's bases-
loaded double. The Tampa Bay
starter and three relievers com-
bined to retire the last 15 batters
to finish the combined four-hitter.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 3, Mariners 1
SEATTLE -Andy Pettitte allowed
three hits over 7 1-3 innings to earn
his 250th career victory, leading the
Yankees to a 3-1 win over the Seattle
Mariners.
It was Pettitte's 213th victory as
Yankee, putting him third on the fran-
chise's career list behind Whitey Ford
(236) and Red Ruffing (231).
Pettitte (5-3) had six strikeouts and
no walks in his 85-pitch effort. He has
1,940 strikeouts as a Yankee, 16 be-
hind all-time leader Ford.
David Robinson worked out of a
jam in the eighth and Mariano Rivera
took over in the ninth, earning his
630th career save, adding to his major
league record.

Blue Jays 4, Rangers 3,
18 innings
TORONTO Rajai Davis hit a
winning single in the 18th inning and
the Toronto Blue Jays beat the
Texas Rangers 4-3 in a game that
matched the longest in club history
for both teams.
Emilio Bonifacio hit a one-out sin-
gle in the 18th and took third with two
outs on a wild pickoff throw by Ross
Wolf (1-1).
Davis followed with a bouncing sin-
gle down the third base line, sending
the Blue Jays streaming out of their
dugout in celebration.

Tigers 6, Indians 4
DETROIT Prince Fielder hit a
bases-clearing double in the second
inning and the Detroit Tigers held on
to beat the Cleveland Indians 6-4.
The AL Central-leading Tigers have
won the first two games of the series
to build a season-high 4 1/2-game
lead over the Indians.
Rick Porcello (3-3) gave up two runs
- one earned and three hits while
striking out seven over six innings.

White Sox 4, Athletics 1
CHICAGO John Danks pitched
three-hit ball over eight innings for his
first victory in more than a year, and
the Chicago White Sox won for just
the second time in 12 games, beating
the surging Oakland Athletics 4-1.
Adam Dunn and Paul Konerko home-
red. Alex Rios drove in the go-ahead
run, and the White Sox handed the Ath-
letics just their fourth loss in 22 games.

Royals 7, Astros 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Ervin San-
tana pitched seven snappy innings


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
L.A. Angels 9, Boston 5, 1st game
Toronto 4, Texas 3,18 innings
Minnesota 4, Washington 3,n11 innings
Detroit 6, Cleveland 4
Tampa Bay 8, Baltimore 0
N.Y Yankees 3, Seattle 1
Chicago White Sox 4, Oakland 1
Kansas City 7, Houston 2
Boston 7, L.A. Angels 2, 2nd game
Today
Texas (Grimm 5-4) atToronto (Jo.Johnson 0-2), 1:07p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 8-4) at Detroit (Alvarez 0-0),
1:08 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Blanton 1-9) at Boston (Dempster 3-6),
1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Diamond 4-4) at Washington
(Zimmermann 8-3), 1:35 p.m., 1st game
Baltimore (Tillman 5-2) atTampa Bay (M.Moore 8-1),
1:40 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 4-7) at Kansas City (Mendoza 1 -3),
2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Griffin 5-4) at Chicago White Sox
(H.Santiago 1-4), 2:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (D.Phelps 4-3) at Seattle (FHernandez
7-4), 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Deduno 2-1) at Washington (Karns 0-1),
7:05 p.m., 2nd game
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Miami 2, N.Y Mets 1, 20 innings
Minnesota 4, Washington 3, 11 innings
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 4, Philadelphia 3
San Diego 4, Colorado 2
Cincinnati 4, St. Louis 2
Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, late
San Francisco at Arizona, late
Today
Miami (Koehler 0-4) at N.Y Mets (Niese 3-5), 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Diamond 4-4) at Washington
(Zimmermann 8-3), 1:35 p.m., 1st game
Philadelphia (Pettibone 3-1) at Milwaukee (Lohse
1-6), 2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 5-1) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson
1-8), 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor7-2) at LA. Dodgers (Magill 0-1), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 1-5) at Colorado (Nicasio 4-2),
4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Gaudin 1-1) at Arizona (Skaggs 1-0),
4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Deduno 2-1) at Washington (Karns 0-1),
7:05 p.m., 2nd game
St. Louis (Lynn 8-1) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 6-5), 8:10 p.m.


and the Kansas City Royals finally
backed him up with some offense in a
7-2 victory over the Houston Astros.
Santana (4-5) entered the game
with the worst run support among
qualifying pitchers in the American
League, a big reason why he already
had six fruitless tries to win his 100th
career game.
He finally reached the milestone
thanks to a seemingly endless series
of singles and doubles off Astros
starter Erik Bedard (1-3).

Angels 9, Red Sox 5

Red Sox 7, Angels 2
BOSTON David Ortiz rebounded
from a rough first game with a long
two-run homer and drove in three runs
to help Clay Buchholz improve to 9-0,
earning the Boston Red Sox a split of
a day-night doubleheader with a 7-2
win over the Los Angeles Angels.
Ortiz went 0 for 5, struck out twice
and stranded six runners in the opener.
Buchholz gave up two runs on six
hits, striking out four and walking one
over 6 2-3 innings to match Arizona's
Patrick Corbin (9-0) as the majors' only
unbeaten pitcher with at least nine
wins, but he left in the seventh with
what the team called "neck tightness."
In the first game, Mark Trumbo and
ErickAybar each drove in two runs for
the Angels.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Marlins 2, Mets 1,
20 innings
NEW YORK In the longest major
league game in more than three years,
Adeiny Hechavarria hit an RBI single in
the 20th inning and the Miami Marlins
outlasted the New York Mets 2-1, well


after Matt Harvey left with lower back
tightness following another stingy start.
Steve Cishek retired Daniel Murphy
on a fly ball to the left-field warning
track for the final out of a game that
took 6 hours, 25 minutes. It started 51/2
hours before the Belmont Stakes
about 13 miles away and still
ended around an hour after winner
Palace Malice crossed the finish line.
The last big league game to last as
long also involved the Mets, according to
STATS. It came when they beat St.
Louis 2-1 in 20 innings on April 17, 2010.

Pirates 6, Cubs 2
CHICAGO A.J. Burnett pitched
into the ninth inning and Pedro Al-
varez and Russell Martin homered to
lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 6-2
win over the Chicago Cubs.
Burnett (4-6) gave up four hits and
three walks with five strikeouts in 8 1-3
innings to improve to 5-0 at Wrigley
Field.
The Pirates tagged Cubs starter
Jeff Samardzija (3-7) for eight hits, in-
cluding Alvarez's two-run home run in
the fourth, his team-high 13th of the
year. The right-hander struck out
seven in six innings.

Reds 4, Cardinals 2
CINCINNATI Mat Latos turned in
seven solid innings and the Cincinnati
Reds broke out of their slump with a
4-2 win over the St. Louis Cardinals.
Devin Mesoraco homered and
drove in two runs and Jay Bruce also
homered as the Reds snapped a
three-game losing streak and scored
more than two runs against St. Louis
for the first time in the last seven
games between the teams.
Latos (6-0), who got the decision in
Cincinnati's last win over St. Louis on
April 29, allowed eight hits and two
runs with no walks and five strikeouts.

Brewers 4, Phillies 3
MILWAUKEE Jean Segura
homered and Jonathan Lucroy hit a
tiebreaking RBI double in the sixth in-
ning, lifting the Milwaukee Brewers to a
4-3 win over the Philadelphia Phillies.
Domonic Brown hit his NL-leading
19th home run, and had a two-run
double in the eighth to account for all
of the Phillies' runs.
Tyler Thornburg (1-0) pitched two in-
nings of scoreless relief to earn his first
major-league victory. A top prospect for
the Brewers coming into the season,
he joined the team Wednesday de-
spite going 0-7 with a 6.75 ERA in 12
starts for Triple-A Nashville.

Padres 4, Rockies 2
DENVER Kyle Blanks hit a two-
run homer and Eric Stults tossed
seven solid innings, helping the San
Diego Padres to a 4-2 win over the
Colorado Rockies.
Everth Cabrera had three hits and
stole two more bases, running his sea-
son total to a major league-leading 28.
Jeff Francis (2-4) struggled in his first
start since coming off the disabled list
with a strained left groin. He allowed
four runs and six hits in four innings.

INTERLEAGUE

Twins 4, Nationals 3,
11 innings
WASHINGTON Ryan Doumit sin-
gled in the go-ahead run, Joe Mauer
homered, doubled and singled, and the
Minnesota Twins defeated the Wash-
ington Nationals 4-3 in 11 innings.


AL


Rays 8, Orioles 0


Baltimore

McLoth If
Machd 3b
Markks rf
A.Jones cf
Pearce ph
C.Davis lb
Wieters c
Tegrdn c
Hardy ss
ACasill 2b
Dickrsn dh


Tampa Bay
rh bi ab rh bi
0 0 0 Joyce rf 5 00 0
0 1 0 Zobrist2b 5 2 3 1
00 0 KJhnsn If 5 0 0 0
0 1 0 Longori 3b 2 1 1 1
0 0 0 RRorts ph-3b 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 Loneylb 5 1 1 1
0 1 0 DJnngscf 3 1 0 0
00 0 Fuld cf 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 Scott dh 3 2 1 3
0 0 0 Loaton c 4 1 3 1
0 0 0 YEscorss 4 0 3 1


Flahrty 2b-ss3 0 0 0
Totals 31 04 0 Totals 37813 8
Baltimore 000 000 000 0
Tampa Bay 120 050 00x 8
LOB-Baltimore 4, Tampa Bay 9.2B-Zobrist 2
(14), Lobaton (8). 3B-Scott (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
GausmanL,0-3 41/38 7 7 3 6
McFarland 22/34 1 1 1 2
Strop 1 1 0 0 0 2
Tampa Bay
HellicksonW,4-2 6 4 0 0 0 5
AI.Torres 1 0 0 0 0 2
J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1
Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 1
T-2:51. A-21,834 (34,078).
Yankees 3,
Mariners 1
New York Seattle
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gardnrcf 5 1 3 0 Bay rf 4 1 1 0
J.Nixss-3b 4 0 2 2 Seager3b 4 02 0
Teixeirdh 5 1 1 0 KMorlslb 2 0 0 0
Cano2b 4 0 1 1 Liddilb 2 00 0
V.Wellslf 4 0 2 0 Morsedh 3 00 1
Youkilslb 3 0 0 0 Ibanezlf 3 00 0
ISuzuki rf 3 1 0 0 Frnkln 2b 4 0 1 0
DAdms 3b 4 0 0 0 MSndrscf 3 00 0
Brignc ss 0 0 0 0 Ryan ss 2 00 0
CStwrt c 4 0 1 0 Bantz c 2 00 0
EnChvz ph 1 00 0
Shppch c 0 00 0
Totals 36 3103 Totals 30 1 4 1
NewYork 100 010 100 3
Seattle 000 100 000 1
DP-Seattle 1. LOB-New York 9, Seattle 5.
2B-Gardner 2 (13), Teixeira (1). SB-J.Nix (7),
Cano (3). SF-Morse.
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
PettitteW,5-3
D.Robertson H,14
Rivera S,22-23
Seattle


J
F

C


71/33 1 1 0 6
2/3 0 0 0 1 0
1 1 0 0 1 3


.Saunders L,4-6 61/37 3 3 2 4
-arquhar 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
).Perez 2 2 0 0 0 3
apps 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
Blue Jays 4,
Rangers 3, 18 inns.


Texas
ab
Andrus ss 6
Profar 2b 7
Brkmn lb 5
Beltre dh 8
N.Cruz rf 6
JeBakr If-3b 7
G.Soto c 3
LMartn ph-cf4
Gentry cf 3
DvMrp ph-lf 4
LGarci 3b 3
Przyns ph-c 4


Toronto
rh bi ab rh bi
0 1 1 MeCarr If 4 0 0 0
0 1 0 RDavis If 5 0 2 1
00 0 Bautist rf 8 0 1 0
0 1 0 Encrnc1b-3b6 1 1 0
0 0 0 Lind dh 7 1 4 0
1 2 1 Arencii c 8 02 0
0 0 0 CIRsmscf 8 1 3 2
1 1 0 MIzturs 3b-ss 7 0 0 0
0 1 0 Bonifac2b 8 1 2 0
1 1 0 Kawskss 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 DeRosaph-3b2 0 0 0
0 2 1 Tholeph-lb 2 00 0


Totals 60 3103 Totals 68415 3
Texas 000000102 000 000000- 3
Toronto 003000000 000 000001- 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Wolf (1), L.Garcia (2), Profar (3), DeRosa
(2). DP-Texas 1, Toronto 2. LOB-Texas 17,
Toronto 16. 2B-Je.Baker (4), Gentry (4),
Dav.Murphy (10). 3B-Col.Rasmus (1). HR-
Je.Baker (8). SB-Andrus (15), R.Davis (9),
Bonifacio (7). CS-Dav.Murphy (4). S-Profar.
SF-Andrus.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Darvish 7 5 3 2 3 7
Cotts 11/31 0 0 0 2
Frasor 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Ross 12/31 0 0 1 2
WolfL,1-1 62/37 1 0 1 1
Toronto
Buehrle 7 4 1 1 2 3
DelabarH,2 1 1 0 0 1 1
JanssenBS,1-13 1 2 2 2 1 0
McGowan 1/3 0 0 0 1 1
J.Perez 2 1 0 0 1 1
Wagner 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lincoln 4 1 0 0 1 3
LoupW,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by McGowan (N.Cruz), by Lincoln (L.Mar-
tin, Je.Baker), by Loup (Pierzynski). WP-
Buehrle, Delabar. Balk-Wagner.
Tigers 6, Indians 4
Cleveland Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourncf 4 1 1 0 Dirks If 5 1 2 2
Kipnis2b 3 0 1 1 TrHntrrf 4 1 1 0
Swisherlb 4 0 0 0 MiCarr3b 3 1 1 0
Brantlylf 4 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 5 0 2 3
MrRynl3b 4 00 0 VMrtnzdh 4 01 0
CSantndh 3 1 1 0 JhPerltss 4 1 2 0
YGomsc 3 1 1 0 Avilac 2 1 0 0
Raburnrf 4 1 1 3 Infante 2b 4 1 2 0
Aviles ss 4 0 0 0 AGarcicf 4 0 1 0
Totals 33 45 4 Totals 35612 5
Cleveland 100 010 200 4
Detroit 042 000 00x 6
E-Jh.Peralta (4), Mi.Cabrera (5). DP-Cleve-
land 1. LOB-Cleveland 5, Detroit 10. 2B-
Bourn (8), Fielder (15), Jh.Peralta (16), Infante
(10), A.Garcia (2). HR-Raburn (6). SB-Kipnis
2 (13).


Cleveland
Carrasco L,0-2
Langwell
Allen
J.Smith
Detroit
PorcelloW,3-3
Putkonen
Coke H,2


IP H RERBBSO


6 3 2 1 2 7
2/3 1 2 1 0 0
11/30 0 0 0 2


ValverdeS,8-10 1 1 0 0 1 2
Carrasco pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
WP-Carrasco, Allen, Putkonen.
White Sox 4, A's 1
Oakland Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crisp cf 4 1 2 0 DeAzacf-lf 3 1 1 0
Reddck rf 3 0 0 0 AIRmrz ss 3 00 0
Cespds If 4 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 1 1 1
Dnldsn3b 4 0 1 1 Konerkdh 4 1 2 2
Lowrie2b 3 0 0 0 A.DunnIb 3 1 2 1
Freimnib 3 0 1 0 Viciedo If 4 0 0 0
S.Smith dh 3 0 0 0 JrDnks pr-cf 0 0 0 0
DNorrs c 3 0 0 0 Kppngr3b 4 0 1 0
Rosales ss 3 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0
Flowrsc 3 00 0
Totals 30 14 1 Totals 31 4 7 4
Oakland 100 000 000 1
Chicago 010 000 03x 4
E-Milone (1), De Aza (6). DP-Chicago 1.
LOB-Oakland 3, Chicago 6. HR-Konerko (6),
A.Dunn (14). SB-Crisp (13). S-AI.Ramirez.
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Milone
Doolittle L,3-1
Neshek
Chicago
Joh.DanksW,1-2
A.Reed S,18-19


7 4 1 1 1 7
1/3 3 3 3 1 0
2/3 0 0 0 0 0

8 3 1 1 1 6
1 1 0 0 0 0


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE


B2 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Angels 9, Red Sox 5,

first game


Los Angeles Boston
ab r h bi
Trout cf 5 2 3 1 Ellsury cf
Hamltnrf 5 1 1 0 Navarf
Pujolsdh 4 1 1 1 Pedroia 2b
Trumo lb 5 1 1 2 D.Ortiz dh
HKndrc2b 4 2 2 0 Napolilb
Callasp 3b 4 1 2 1 Sltlmch c
lannett c 4 0 0 1 Carp If
Aybarss 4 1 2 2 Drewss
Shuck If 4 0 0 0 Iglesias 3b
Totals 39 9128 Totals
Los Angeles 012 000 402
Boston 000 200 003


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0

4 02 0
5 00 0
5 1 1 0
4 1 1 0
5 23 2
4 0 1 2
4 02 0
40514 5
9
5


E-Hamilton (3), lannetta (1), Napoli (4). DP-Los
Angeles 1. LOB-Los Angeles 12, Boston 14. 2B-
Trout 2 (18), Hamilton (10), Trumbo (16), Callaspo (9),
Pedroia (19), Drew (9). HR-Carp (5). SB-Trout (14),
Hamilton (2), Ellsbury 2 (23). SF-Pujols.
IP H R ER BB SO


Los Angeles
Hanson W,3-2
Kohn H,3
S.Downs
Richards
Frieri S,14-15
Boston
Doubront L,4-3
FMorales
Mortensen
A.Miller
WP-Hanson.


6 6 3
2/3 2 4
12/34 2
2/3 0 0


Red Sox 7, Angels 2,

second game


Los Angeles Boston
ab r h bi
Trout cf 4 0 1 1 Victorn cf
Hamltn rf 4 1 1 0 JGomslIf
Pujols dh 3 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b
Trumo lb 3 0 0 1 D.Ortiz dh
HKndrc2b 4 0 3 0 Napolilb
Hawpelf 4 0 0 Navarf
Callasp3b 4 0 0 0 D.Rossc
Congerc 4 1 2 0 Drewss
Aybarss 3 0 0 0 Iglesias 3b
Totals 33 27 2 Totals
Los Angeles 001 001 000
Boston 210 013 00x


ab r h bi
5 1 1 0
5 2 2 1
4 1 2 2
5 1 2 3
5 1 1 0
3 0 1 0

4 0 1 0
4 1 2 0
37 713 7
2
7


E-Hawpe (1), Callaspo (6), Trumbo (3). LOB-Los
Angeles 6, Boston 10.2B-Hamilton (11), Conger (4),
J.Gomes (6), Pedroia (20), D.Ortiz (13). HR-D.Ortiz
(12). SB-Iglesias (1). S-D.Ross. SF-Trumbo.


Los Angeles
C.Wilson L,4-5
Williams
Boston
Buchholz W,9-0
Breslow
Tazawa
PB-Conger.


IP H R ER BB SO

5 8 4 3 3 5
3 5 3 3 0 3

62/36 2 2 1 4
11/30 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1


Royals 7, Astros 2
Houston Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
BBarnscf 3 1 1 0 Lough If 5 1 2 0
Pareds rf 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 5 00 0
Altuve2b 4 0 1 1 S.Perezc 4 2 1 1
JCastro c 4 0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 1 0
JMrtnzlf 4 0 1 0 Hosmerlb 2 2 2 1
C.Penadh 3 0 0 0 L.Cain cf 3 1 1 2
Carter 1b 3 1 1 1 MTejad3b 4 1 2 1
Crowe rf-cf 3 0 0 0 Francr rf 4 0 1 1
Dmngz3b 3 0 1 0 EJhnsn2b 3 0 0 0
MGnzlzss 3 00 0
Totals 31 26 2 Totals 34710 6
Houston 000 001 100 2
Kansas City 200 310 10x 7
E-Bedard (1), B.Barnes (1), Dominguez (6). DP-
Houston 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-Houston 3, Kansas
City 8. 2B-B.Barnes (7), Hosmer (10), L.Cain (14),
Francoeur (8). HR-Carter (13).
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
BedardL,1-3 42/38 6 6 3 2
Peacock 31/32 1 1 1 2
Kansas City
E.SantanaW,4-5 7 5 2 2 0 6
J.Gutierrez 2 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Peacock (S.Perez), by E.Santana (C.Pena).

Brewers 4, Phillies 3


Philadelphia Milwaukee
ab r h bi
MYong 3b 4 1 3 0 Aoki rf
Frndsnlb 4 1 2 0 Segurass
Rollins ss 4 0 2 0 Braun If
DYongrf 4 0 0 0 ArRmr3b
DBrwn If 4 1 2 3 Lucroyc
Mayrry cf 3 0 0 0 CGomz cf
Howard ph 1 0 0 0 Weeks 2b
Saveryp 0 0 0 0 JFrncslb
Kratz c 4 0 0 0 Grzlny p
CHrndz 2b 4 0 1 0 Thrnrg p
Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 YBtncr ph
L.Nixph 1 0 0 0 Axfordp
Stutes p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p
Revere cf 1 0 0 0 Bianchi ph
FrRdrg p
Totals 36 3103 Totals
Philadelphia 010 000 020
Milwaukee 001 002 10x


ab r h bi
3 0 1 0
4 2 2 1
4 1 3 1
4 1 2 0
3 0 1 1
4 0 1 1
4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
34411 4
3
4


DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-Philadelphia 6, Milwaukee
8. 2B-Frandsen (4), D.Brown (9), Lucroy (5). 3B-
Aoki (1). HR-D.Brown (19), Segura (9).SB-Segura


(17).

Philadelphia
K.Kendrick L,6-4
Stutes
Savery
Milwaukee
Gorzelanny
ThornburgW,1-0
Axford H,9
Kintzler H,10
Fr.Rodriguez S,4-4


IP H R ER BB SO

6 8 3 3 1 6
1 3 1 1 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 0


WP-Stutes.
Padres 4, Rockies 2


San Diego Colorado
ab r h bi
Denorfi rf-lf 4 0 0 0 Fowler cf
EvCarr ss 4 1 3 1 EYong rf
Headly 3b 4 0 1 1 CGnzlz If
Quentin If 4 0 2 0 Tlwtzk ss
Venale pr-rf 0 0 0 0 WRosrc
Gyorko2b 5 1 1 0 Pacheclb
Blanks lb 4 1 2 2 Corpasp
Maybincf 4 1 0 0 Brothrsp
Grandl c 4 0 1 0 JHerrr ph
Stults p 2 0 0 0 Arenad 3b
Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b
Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Francis p
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p
Colvin lb
Totals 36 4104 Totals
San Diego 100 300 000
Colorado 001 000 100


ab r h bi
5 1 2 0
3 020
4 00 0


4 0000
3 0 1 0
0 00 0
0 00
1 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
3 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
2 0 0 1
342 9 1
4
2


E-Stults (1), Ev.Cabrera (4), Grandal (1), Brothers
(1). LOB-San Diego 12, Colorado 8. 2B-Ev.Cabr-
era (10), Quentin (12), Gyorko (17), Blanks (7), Tu-
lowitzki (15), Pacheco (9). 3B-Arenado (1),
LeMahieu (1). HR-Blanks (6). SB-Ev.Cabrera 2
(28), Maybin (4), E.Young (7). S-Stults, E.Young,


LeMahieu.

San Diego
StultsW,5-5
Thayer H,11
Gregerson S,2-3
Colorado
Francis L,2-4
Ottavino
Corpas
Brothers


IP H R ER BB SO


SCOREBOARD


For the, rcoinrd


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
2 11 22 26 32
POWER BALL
19


CASH 3 (early)
7-7-8
CASH 3 (late)
5-2-6

PLAY 4 (early)
8-3-6-1
PLAY 4 (late)
4-2-5-0

FANTASY 5
3-8-9-18-27

LOTTERY
21- 24- 34- 41 47 52
XTRA
4


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 9 21 28 37
Mega Ball: 12
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 3 $2,024.50
3-of-4 MB 41 $324.50
3-of-4 855 $46.00
2-of-4 MB 1,191 $23.00
1-of-4 MB 9,613 $2.50
2-of-4 24,781 $2.00


Fantasy 5:9 11 24 29 31
5-of-5 1 winner $228,218.59
4-of-5 363 $101.00
3-of-5 10,226 $10.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup: Party in the Poconos 400 race
2 p.m. (NBC) Formula One: Canadian Grand Prix race
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Stadium Super Truck Series (Taped)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
NCAA SUPER REGIONAL
1 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina vs. South Carolina (If necessary)
4 p.m. (ESPN) Louisville vs. Vanderbilt
7 p.m. (ESPN2) LSU vs. Oklahoma (If necessary)
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Cal State Fullerton vs. UCLA (If necessary)
MLB
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at New York Mets
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Boston Red Sox
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Pittsburgh Pirates at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds
NBA FINALS
8 p.m. (ABC) San Antonio Spurs at Miami Heat Game 2
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Criterium Dauphine Libere, Stage 8.
(Same-day Tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Lyoness Open, Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: FedEx St. Jude Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour Golf FedEx St. Jude Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Wegmans Championship, Final Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Regions Tradition, Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
TENNIS
9 a.m. (NBC) 2013 French Open Tennis Men's Final

RADIO
MLB
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays


Twins 4, Nationals 3,

11 innings
Minnesota Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Carroll3b 4 0 0 0 Span ocf 5 1 3 0
Mauerc 5 1 3 1 Werth rf 5 1 1 2
Doumitrf 5 0 2 1 Zmrmn3b 5 00 0
Wlnghlf 6 1 1 0 AdLRclb 5 0 1 0
Perkins p 0 0 0 0 Dsmndss 5 0 1 0
Mornealb 3 1 1 0 Rendon2b 5 1 2 0
EEscor2b 2 0 1 0 Berndn If 3 0 1 0
Hicks cf 2 0 1 0 KSuzukc 4 0 1 1
Dozier2b 3 0 1 1 GGnzlzp 2 00 0
Parmellb 2 00 0Abadp 0 00 0
Flormn ss 4 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Correia p 3 0 0 0 Lmrdzz ph 1 0 0 0
Dunsng p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 00 0
Fien p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 00 0
Thoms ph 1 0 1 0 EDavisp 0 00 0
Burton p 0 0 0 0 Krol p 0 0 0 0
Roenck p 0 0 0 0 Tracy ph 1 00 0
CHrmn lf 0 1 0 0 Stmmn p 0 00 0
Totals 40 4113 Totals 41 310 3
Minnesota 000 210 000 01 4
Washington002 000 100 00 3
E-Ad.LaRoche (5). DP-Minnesota 1, Washington
2. LOB-Minnesota 13, Washington 6. 2B-Mauer
(19), Morneau (14), Rendon (3), Bernadina (3),
K.Suzuki (7). HR-Mauer (6), Werth (5). S-Carroll,
Hicks 2, Bernadina.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Correia 61/38 3 3 0 7
Duensing 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Fien 1 0 0 0 0 2
Burton 1 0 0 0 0 1
RoenickeW,2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0
PerkinsS,13-15 1 1 0 0 0 0
Washington
G.Gonzalez 6 5 3 2 4 7
Abad 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Storen 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Clippard 1 0 0 0 1 0
R.Soriano 1 3 0 0 0 1
E.Davis 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
Krol 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
StammenL,3-2 1 1 1 1 2 2
WP-Clippard.

AL leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .368; CDavis, Balti-
more, .345; JhPeralta, Detroit, .338; Pedroia, Boston,
.335; Mauer, Minnesota, .329; Loney, Tampa Bay,
.328; HKendrick, Los Angeles, .328; Donaldson, Oak-
land, .328.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 48; CDavis, Baltimore,
45; Trout, Los Angeles, 44; AJones, Baltimore, 43; Pe-
droia, Boston, 42; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 41; Crisp,
Oakland, 40.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; CDavis, Baltimore,
52; Fielder, Detroit, 51; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50;
Napoli, Boston, 47; DOrtiz, Boston, 45; Trumbo, Los
Angeles, 43.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 89; Machado, Baltimore,
85; Pedroia, Boston, 82; AJones, Baltimore, 78; HK-
endrick, Los Angeles, 78; Donaldson, Oakland, 77;
CDavis, Baltimore, 76.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 26; CDavis, Bal-
timore, 20; Napoli, Boston, 20; Pedroia, Boston, 20;
Mauer, Minnesota, 19; Seager, Seattle, 19; 7 tied at 18.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 20; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 17; Encarnacion, Toronto, 17; Cano, NewYork,


15; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 15; NCruz, Texas, 14;
ADunn, Chicago, 14.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury Boston, 23; McLouth,
Baltimore, 21; Andrus, Texas, 15; Trout, Los Angeles,
14; Crisp, Oakland, 13; Kipnis, Cleveland, 13; Al-
Ramirez, Chicago, 13.
PITCHING-Buchholz, Boston, 9-0; Scherzer, De-
troit, 8-0; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 8-1;Verlander, Detroit,
8-4; Masterson, Cleveland, 8-4; Colon, Oakland, 7-2;
Darvish, Texas, 7-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 7-4; Ham-
mel, Baltimore, 7-4.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 118; Scherzer, De-
troit, 100; AniSanchez, Detroit, 98; FHernandez, Seat-
tle, 95; Verlander, Detroit, 93; Masterson, Cleveland,
88; Shields, Kansas City 84.
SAVES-Rivera, New York, 22; JiJohnson, Balti-
more, 20; Nathan, Texas, 18; AReed, Chicago, 18;
Balfour, Oakland, 15; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 15; Frieri,
Los Angeles, 14.

NL leaders
BATTING-YMolina, St. Louis, .352; Tulowitzki, Col-
orado, .346; Segura, Milwaukee, .342; MCarpenter,
St. Louis, .332; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .332; Scutaro,
San Francisco, .326; Votto, Cincinnati, .325.
RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 51; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 49;Votto, Cincinnati, 48; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
43; Holliday, St. Louis, 43; Choo, Cincinnati, 42;
Fowler, Colorado, 42.
RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 57; Tulowitzki, Col-
orado, 49; DBrown, Philadelphia, 47; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 45; Phillips, Cincinnati, 45; Craig, St. Louis, 44;
AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 43.
HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 82; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 78;YMolina, St. Louis, 77; GParra, Arizona, 76;
Votto, Cincinnati, 76; ECabrera, San Diego, 75; Craig,
St. Louis, 74; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 74.
DOUBLES-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 19; DanMur-
phy, New York, 19; GParra, Arizona, 19; Bruce, Cincin-
nati, 18; YMolina, St. Louis, 18; Rizzo, Chicago, 18;
Desmond, Washington, 17; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 17;
Gyorko, San Diego, 17.
HOME RUNS-DBrown, Philadelphia, 19; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 17; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 15; Tulowitzki,
Colorado, 15; JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Alvarez, Pittsburgh,
13; Beltran, St. Louis, 13; Gattis, Atlanta, 13.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 28; Se-
gura, Milwaukee, 17; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 16; Pierre,
Miami, 16; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 14; Revere,
Philadelphia, 14; CGomez, Milwaukee, 12; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 12; DWright, NewYork, 12.
PITCHING-Corbin, Arizona, 9-0; Wainwright, St.
Louis, 9-3; Lynn, St. Louis, 8-1; Zimmermann, Wash-
ington, 8-3; Lee, Philadelphia, 7-2; Marquis, San
Diego, 7-2; Minor, Atlanta, 7-2; JDe La Rosa, Colorado,
7-3; SMiller, St. Louis, 7-3; Maholm, Atlanta, 7-4.
STRIKEOUTS-AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 99;
Samardzija, Chicago, 98; Harvey New York, 95; Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 91; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 91; Lee,
Philadelphia, 83; SMiller, St. Louis, 81.
SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 23; Mujica, St. Louis, 18;
Kimbrel, Atlanta, 17; Chapman, Cincinnati, 16; Romo,
San Francisco, 16; RSoriano, Washington, 15;
League, Los Angeles, 13.




PGA St. Jude Classic
Saturday
AtTPC Southwind, Memphis, Tenn.
Purse: $5.7 million
Yardage: 7,239, Par: 70


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 B3


Shawn Stefani
Harris English
Patrick Reed
Nicholas Thompson
Scott Stallings
Phil Mickelson
Eric Meierdierks
Padraig Harrington
Ryan Palmer
Roberto Castro
Jonathan Byrd
John Rollins
lan Poulter
Ben Crane
Dustin Johnson
Justin Hicks
Paul Haley II
Brandt Jobe
Brendon Todd
John Merrick
Justin Leonard
Kevin Stadler
Nick O'Hern
Jim Herman
Charles Howell III
Billy Mayfair
Peter Hanson
Rory Sabbatini
Camilo Villegas
Martin Flores
Bob Estes
Chez Reavie
Doug LaBelle II
Glen Day
MarkWilson
David Hearn
Vaughn Taylor
Brendon de Jonge
Boo Weekley
Davis Love III
Robert Allenby
Tag Ridings
Jerry Kelly
Billy Horschel
Robert Karlsson
David Toms
Scott Brown
Jason Bohn
Brad Fritsch
Brian Davis
Scott Verplank
Joe Affrunti
Stuart Appleby
J.J. Henry
Tom Gillis
Steve Flesch
Luke Guthrie
Cameron Tringale
Russell Henley
Andres Gonzales
Tim Petrovic
Robert Streb
Stephen Ames
Gary Woodland
Brian Gay
Jeff Overton
Jeff Maggert
Arjun Atwal
Lee Williams
Ben Kohles
George Coetzee
D.J.Trahan
Chad Campbell
Kevin Sutherland
Russell Knox
Nathan Green
John Daly


Third Round


67-65-66
66-64-69
69-69-64.
67-69-66.
67-68-67.
71-67-65.
68-69-66.
69-70-65.
72-67-65
68-69-67.
70-69-66.
67-71-67.
69-68-68.
69-68-68.
67-70-68.
67-69-69.
67-68-70.
69-71-66.
69-71-66.
69-71-66.
69-71-66.
69-70-67.
68-71-67.
69-69-68.
71-67-68.
68-70-68.
67-71-68.
69-69-68.
69-68-69.
66-72-68.
68-69-69.
69-68-69.
70-66-70.
66-70-70
70-71 -66
69-71-67.
72-67-68
70-69-68
68-69-70.
66-70-71
71-70-67
70-71-67
69-71-68-
71-69-68-
69-69-70.
67-71-70.
69-69-70.
67-70-71
68-73-68.
69-71-69.
74-66-69
68-71-70
66-71-72.
69-72-69
72-69-69
69-72-69
70-67-73.
71-70-70
68-73-70
71-68-72.
67-72-72
72-67-72.
70-68-73.
69-72-71
70-71-71
69-72-71
69-71-72.
71-68-73
72-69-72.
71-70-72.
71-67-75
69-69-75
70-71-73.
70-71-73.
70-68-76.
66-75-74
71-69-76


LPGA Wegmans

Championship
Saturday
At Locust Hill Country Club, Pittsford, N.Y.
Purse: 2.25 million
Yardage: 6,534, Par 72
Second Round
a-denotes amateur
Morgan Pressel 68-70 -138 -6
Inbee Park 72-68 -140 -4
Chella Choi 67-73-140 -4
Sarah Jane Smith 72-69-141 -3
Amy Yang 71-70 -141 -3
Jiyai Shin 68-73 -141 -3
Sun Young Yoo 73-69 -142 -2
Na Yeon Choi 72-70 -142 -2
Catriona Matthew 71-71 -142 -2
Angela Stanford 71-71 -142 -2
Brittany Lincicome 69-73 -142 -2
Caroline Masson 74-69 -143 -1
Chie Arimura 71-72-143 -1
Michelle Wie 76-68 -144 E
Shanshan Feng 74-70 -144 E
Danah Bordner 73-71-144 E
Pernilla Lindberg 73-71 -144 E
Eun-Hee Ji 72-72-144 E
Laura Davies 71-73-144 E
Lexi Thompson 71-73 -144 E
Jessica Korda 70-74-144 E
Se Ri Pak 70-74 -144 E
Beatriz Recari 74-71 -145 +1
Nicole Castrale 73-72 -145 +1
Vicky Hurst 73-72-145 +1
Kristy McPherson 73-72-145 +1
Suzann Pettersen 72-73-145 +1
Mi Jung Hur 71-74 -145 +1
llhee Lee 71-74 -145 +1
Anna Nordqvist 71-74 -145 +1
Carlota Ciganda 75-71 -146 +2
Moira Dunn 75-71 -146 +2
Brittany Lang 75-71 -146 +2
Mi Hyang Lee 75-71 -146 +2
Hee Young Park 75-71 -146 +2
Stacy Lewis 74-72 -146 +2
Lisa McCloskey 74-72-146 +2
Pornanong Phatlum 72-74 -146 +2
Yani Tseng 72-74 -146 +2
a-Lydia Ko 77-70 -147 +3
Paula Creamer 76-71 -147 +3
Jennifer Rosales 76-71 -147 +3
Danielle Kang 75-72 -147 +3
Cristie Kerr 75-72 -147 +3
Ji Young Oh 75-72-147 +3
Haeji Kang 73-74 -147 +3
Jacqui Concolino 78-70 -148 +4
Jenny Shin 78-70-148 +4
Caroline Hedwall 77-71 -148 +4
MikaMiyazato 77-71-148 +4
Belen Mozo 77-71 -148 +4
Giulia Sergas 76-72 -148 +4
Karrie Webb 76-72 -148 +4
Laura Diaz 75-73-148 +4
Moriya Jutanugarn 74-74 -148 +4
Lorne Kane 74-74-148 +4
Amelia Lewis 74-74 -148 +4
Paola Moreno 74-74-148 +4
Jane Park 74-74 -148 +4
Lisa Ferrero 78-71 -149 +5
Marcy Hart 78-71 -149 +5
Tiffany Joh 77-72-149 +5
Ayako Uehara 76-73 -149 +5
Breanna Elliott 75-74 -149 +5
Mina Harigae 75-74 -149 +5
I.K.Kim 75-74 -149 +5
Sue Kim 75-74 -149 +5
Alison Walshe 75-74 149 +5
AiMiyazato 74-75-149 +5
Mo Martin 77-73-150 +6
Kathleen Ekey 76-74-150 +6
Paige Mackenzie 76-74 -150 +6
Melissa Reid 76-74 -150 +6
Mariajo Uribe 76-74 -150 +6
Lauren Doughtie 75-75 -150 +6
Candle Kung 75-75 -150 +6
JeongJang 72-78 -150 +6
Failed to qualify
Silvia Cavalleri 77-74 -151 +7
Kayla Mortellaro 77-74 -151 +7
Stephanie Sherlock 77-74 -151 +7
Jennifer Song 77-74 -151 +7
Paz Echeverria 75-76 -151 +7
Jennifer Johnson 75-76 -151 +7
Lizette Salas 75-76 -151 +7
Christina Kim 74-77-151 +7
Becky Morgan 74-77-151 +7
Jennie Lee 73-78 -151 +7
Austin Ernst 78-74 -152 +8
Jodi Ewart Shadoff 78-74 -152 +8
Natalie Gulbis 78-74 -152 +8
Heather Bowie Young 77-75 -152 +8
Dewi Claire Schreefel 77-75 -152 +8
Lindsey Wright 77-75 -152 +8


Jill McGill
Jane Rah
Ryann O'Toole
Dori Carter
Sandra Gal
Azahara Munoz
Thidapa Suwannapura
Momoko Ueda
Seon Hwa Lee
Maria Hjorth
Katherine Hull-Kirk
So Yeon Ryu
Amy Hung
Hee Kyung Seo
Sarah Kemp
Pat Hurst
Karine Icher
Katie Futcher
Sandra Changkija
Felicity Johnson
Mitsuki Katahira
Sydnee Michaels
KrisTamulis
Julieta Granada
Gerina Piller
Christel Boeljon
Katie M. Burnett
Meena Lee
Nicole Smith
Lisa Grimes
Rebecca Lee-Bentham
Amanda Blumenherst
Daniela lacobelli
Jin Young Pak
Alena Sharp
Juli Inkster
Reilley Rankin
Meaghan Francella
Sue Ginter
Cindy LaCrosse
Wendy Ward
Eunjung Yi
Nicole Jeray
Julia Boland
Mindy Kim
Stefanie Ferguson
Sara-Maude Juneau
Jean Bartholomew
Irene Cho
Sophie Gustafson
Hee-Won Han
Stacy Prammanasudh
Veronica Felibert
Karen Stupples


81-75-156 +12


Sprint Cup

Party in the Poconos

400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Today
At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, owner points.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, owner points.
3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, owner points.
4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, owner points.
5. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, owner points.
6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, owner points.
7. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, owner points.
8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, owner points.
9. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, owner points.
10. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, owner points.
11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, owner points.
12. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, owner points.
13. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, owner points.
14. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, owner points.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, owner points.
16. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, owner points.
17. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, owner points.
18. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, owner points.
19. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, owner points.
20. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, owner points.
21. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, owner points.
22. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, owner points.
23. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, owner points.
24. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, owner points.
25. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, owner points.
26. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, owner points.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, owner points.
28. (34) David Ragan, Ford, owner points.
29. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, owner points.
30. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, owner points.
31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner points.
32. (7) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, owner points.
33. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, owner points.
34. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, owner points.
35. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, owner points.
36. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, owner points.
37. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, attempts.
38. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, attempts.
39. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, attempts.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, attempts.
41. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, attempts.
42. (19) Jason Leffler, Toyota, attempts.
43. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, attempts.

Nationwide

DuPont Pioneer 250

Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race today
At Iowa Speedway
Newton, Iowa
Lap length: .875 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 136.737.
2. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 135.834.
3. (2) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 135.811.
4. (20) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 135.735.
5. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 135.595.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 135.484.
7. (11) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 135.42.
8. (60) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 135.408.
9. (54) Drew Herring, Toyota, 135.274.
10. (32) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 135.205.
11. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 135.147.
12. (77) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 135.118.
13. (29) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 135.089.
14. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 135.019.
15. (99) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 134.979.
16. (5) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 134.892.
17. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 134.397.
18. (43) Michael Annett, Ford, 134.294.
19. (44) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 133.911.
20. (98) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 133.906.
21. (70) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 133.678.
22. (30) Nelson Piquet Jr, Chevrolet, 133.565.
23. (00) Blake Koch, Toyota, 133.48.
24. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 133.418.
25. (33) Max Papis, Chevrolet, 133.356.
26. (92) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 133.243.
27. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 132.973.
28. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 132.928.
29. (46) Jason Bowles, Chevrolet, 132.498.
30. (14) Eric McClure, Toyota, 132.164.
31. (23) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, 132.087.
32. (79) Joey Gase, Ford, 131.91.
33. (15) Carl Long, Ford, 131.899.
34. (10) Jeff Green, Toyota, 131.865.
35. (42) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 131.832.
36. (01) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 131.667.
37. (24) Ken Butler, Toyota, 131.447.
38. (74) Juan Carlos Blum, Chevrolet, 130.923.
39. (4) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (52) Tim Schendel, Chevrolet, 130.727.
Failed to Qualify
41. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 129.71.




NBA Finals
All Times EDT
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
San Antonio 1, Miami 0
Thursday, June 6: San Antonio 92, Miami 88
Today, June 9: San Antonio at Miami, 8 p.m.
Tuesday June 11: Miami at San Antonio 9 p.m.
Thursday, June 13: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
x-Sunday, June 16: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
x-Tuesday, June 18: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m.
x-Thursday, June 20: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m.










Adult softball league showcases offense


MMA event hosted in conjunction

with Citrus County Parks c&Rec


Special to the Chronicle

The first of three adult softball
league games Monday night at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River was a lopsided affair.
01' Guys w/Help had hot bats
against R.C. Lawn Care, jumping
out to a 17-0 lead by the third in-
ning. R.C. Lawn Care finally


scratched out a run, but 01' Guys
w/Help took a 19-1 victory
The second contest matched
Reflections Church against
Ames Oil and was a wild contest.
Ames Oil led 8-0 heading into
the bottom of the first, but Re-
flections Church put up the final
20 runs of the game over the re-
mainder to take a 20-8 triumph.


In the evening's last matchup,
The Machines and The Sons of
Pitches were deadlocked at 8-8
after four complete innings. In a
slugfest, The Sons of Pitches had
a little more pop in their bats,
eventually taking a 17-12 win
over their opponent.
MMA event set for
June 29 in Inverness
Parks & Recreation is teaming up
with Florida Fight Foundation to
present M MA cage fighting in Citrus
County. The event is on Saturday,


June 29, at the Citrus County Audi-
torium in Inverness. Florida Fight
Foundation is based out of
Gainesville and hosts professional
amd amateur fighters who fight in
various styles of jujitsu, muay thai,
wrestling, judo and boxing.
There will be at least 15 bouts,
with three to four title fights.
Come watch History Channel's own
Brad Taylor (of Axe Men), who is the
Florida Fight Foundation 180 cham-
pion. He will be defending his title
against Lexton Steed, a Citrus County
native who fights out of Fierce Fight


Team School in Inverness.
Two local rivals, Sam Esposito
and Jason Dalbow, will fight in the
170-pound class. Garon McClusky
of Inverness will take on Daytona's
Ryder Bray in the 155-pound
class.
Local wrestler Dalton David will
have a wrestling rematch Chase
Curtis. These two rising stars met
before in Orlando a month ago.
For more information on the event
or sponsorships and ring side tables
please contact 904-333-3183 or
386-364-8888.


Kayak Camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with 2 Sisters Kayak Tours,
is holding Kayaking Camps
this summer. Each camp will
be held at Hernando Beach
Park from Monday to Thurs-
day and at Chassahowitzka
River on Friday.
Children ages 8 to 15 are
eligible and the cost is $80
per child. We will offer four
different weeks to choose
from throughout June and
July. Each week will have
two time slots that will ac-
commodate ages 8 to 11 and
ages 12 to 15 separately.
For more information,
contact Citrus County
Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540 or visit www.
citruscounty parks.com
Archery Camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with McPherson's Archery &
Outdoor Pro Shop, is hold-
ing an Archery Camp this
summer. The camp will be
offered on two different
weeks and participants will
be separated by age.
For more information con-
tact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540,
visit www.citruscountyparks.
com or McPherson's Archery
at 352-341-2820.
Youth golf lessons
Citrus County Parks &


Recreation, in partnership
with Pine Ridge Golf
Course, will hold summer
youth golf lessons. The les-
sons will be held at Pine
Ridge Golf Course on
Wednesday mornings from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. or
Thursday evenings from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
They begin Wednesday,
June 12 and Thursday, June
13, and run for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 15 are
eligible and the cost is $80
per child with $15 off for ad-
ditional siblings.
For more information,
contact Crysta Henry,
recreation program specialist
for youth programs at
352-527-7543, www.
citruscountyparks.com,
or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.
Sharks football
has three more
signups
The Crystal River Sharks
football and cheerleading
are holding signups from 10
a.m. to 2 p,.m. on June 15,
22 and 29 at the Crystal
River Mall food court.
The league welcomes ath-
letes ages 5 to 15 across six
divisions. It is $125 per child
for football and $100 for
cheerleading.
Cash, checks and credit
cards are accepted.
From staff reports


Good showing


Local girls basketball team takes second in USSSA tournament


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Wildcats eighth-grade girls travel basketball team placed second in Division 2 at the USSSA state
championships at the University of Tampa over Memorial Day weekend. Front row, from left, are Shirley Kortendick,
Kaite Eichler, Zahria Jenkins, Cameryn Jenkins, Lindsey Wood and Angie Sineus. Back row, from left, are coach Kevin
Campbell, Kaylan Simms, Makenna Campbell, Lauren Della Torre, Danielle Smith and Janiya Devaughn.


First heat of summer


Associated Press
Driver Tony Stewart prepares Saturday for today's NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Pocono
400 auto race in Long Pond, Pa.




Starting new streak


Stewart hopes to build

off victory at Pocono

Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. Tony Stewart
ducked through a tarp-covered tent in
the garage and was off to the No. 14.
"Make it two in a row, Tony!" a fan
yelled as Stewart hustled through the
Pocono Raceway garage.
With a second practice session on tap,
Stewart had little time Saturday to dis-
sect why his car is suddenly one of the
ones to beat.
But it sure is.
Stewart is coming off his first win of
the season at Dover and his second
straight top-10 finish, results that have
thrust the three-time Cup champion into
the No. 1 wild-card spot in the Chase for
the Sprint Cup championship.
For an added boost, Stewart was one
of the few drivers who participated last
month in an open Pocono test in the
Gen-6 race car With practice and quali-
fying washed out Friday, Stewart and
crew chief Steve Addington have addi-
tional resources on hand to help master
the 2 1/2-mile triangle track.
And there are more reasons to think
Stewart can keep the push going at
Pocono. His last win here in 2009 was
his first as a car owner at Stewart-Haas
Racing, and he finished fifth and third
at the two Pocono races last season.
No Cup driver has won consecutive
races this season, but a confident Stew-
art has always been a dangerous Stew-
art. That could be the difference Sunday


"It's definitely momentum that we
need right now," he said. "It's hopefully
quieted some of the rumors that were a
big drama at the shop for us. So, getting
that calmed down was as much of the
problem as anything."
Stewart used his post-race news con-
ference at Dover to sternly deny he was
ever considering giving Addington the
boot because of a slow start that had the
team mired around 20th in the points
standings. Addington, who took over as
Stewart's crew chief last season, appre-
ciated that his boss backed him so pub-
licly Addington made a late pit call to
take two tires at Dover that was one of
the defining decisions at Dover
"It's good to get that hopefully behind
us," Stewart said. "Now we can get back
to work again and worry about stuff that
we should be worrying about."
Like making sure this two-race uptick
is the start of a summer surge and not just
a brief respite from a mediocre season.
For whatever reason, Stewart sputtered
along for most of the season to a series of
middle-of-the-pack finishes. He had seven
straight races of 17th or worse and only
one other top 10 before a seventh two
races ago at Charlotte Motor Speedway
He passed Juan Pablo Montoya with
three laps left last week at Dover to snap
a 30-race winless streak and remind
everyone that it's always a mistake to
count ol' Smoke out of the Chase picture.
His 48th career win pushed him to
16th in the points standings and aided
his cause for a wild-card spot. The two
drivers in the 11th to 20th spot in the
standings with the most wins earn a slot
in the Chase for the Sprint Cup champi-
onship. Stewart is the only driver in
those spots with a victory


Getting a workout outdoors is that
much harder now that Citrus
County temperatures are expected
to be in the 90s with high humidity this
coming week.
My friends always comment
as to why I am wearing so
many clothes when I'm run- ,
ning or paddleboarding. I usu-
ally wear a long-sleeve shirt,
long pants, hat and sunglasses. y.
I do this to avoid bugs and skin <1=
cancer, but to also avoid heat
stress, specifically heat stroke.
Skin cancer and no-see-ums Dr Ron
avoidance are added benefits! DrRoT
These hot and specifically DOCT
humid summer days are a ORD
setup for heat stress while
walking, running, going zip-lining, biking,
doing Disney, fishing or just watching the
kids playing baseball or soccer
From 1979 to 2003, heat exposure
caused 8,015 deaths. During that 24-year
period, more people died from extreme
heat exposure than from hurricanes,
lightning, tornadoes, floods, and earth-
quakes combined.
Heat stress is a range of illnesses, which
have in common your body overheating.
Remember, the higher intensity of activ-
ity, the faster one runs, works out or plays
tennis, the greater amount of heat the
body produces. The more internal heat
produced, the more critical for your body
to get rid of that heat into an environment
that is already hot and humid.
Sweating cools off the body, but only
when the humidity levels are low enough
to allow the sweat to evaporate from the
skin. The water and salts lost through
sweating must be replaced.
Insufficient water and salt replace-
ment results in decreased sweating and
increasing body heat. What follows is the
rapid decline toward heat stress, the
body's inability to regulate its core tem-
perature. If not treated, you can die.
The mildest form is heat exhaustion:
the symptoms are a weak and tired feel-
ing, heavy sweating, nausea, feeling of
being really hot and clammy and occa-
sionally fainting.
Progression to heat stroke rapidly occurs
and is the most serious problem for people
working out, playing or working outdoors
in the heat Mental confusion, fainting and
seizures occur with heat stroke.
Other less serious problems are
painful spasmodic muscle cramps or
heat cramps, resulting from drinking lots


of water but not replacing the salt when
sweating.
A good example of drinking only water
and not a type of drink with electrolytes,
such as Gatorade or Vitamin
Water, is a common problem at
the Grand Canyon in Arizona.
Hikers will take only water and
find out very quickly about
heat stroke when they pass out
or die on the trail due to lack of
drinking fluids without
electrolytes.
Simply standing in an unac-
customed hot, humid environ-
Joseph ment can result in fainting. This
OR'S results from blood pooling in
ERS the legs. Other conditions with
higher risk include age, obesity,
fever, dehydration, heart dis-
ease, prescription drugs and alcohol.
I'm not going to stop taking my daugh-
ter and older kids to the Harry Potter
theme park, kayaking, biking, running
or walking. So this is what I plan on
doing with this week's elevated heat
and humidity
I wear loose-fitting light colored
clothes, preferably lightweight cotton to
allow sweat to evaporate or the newer
fabrics that wick sweat and breathe. Al-
ways wear a hat because your head is a
large per-cent of your skin surface and
you want to shade the brain.
Replacement of fluid and salt is the ab-
solute key to maintaining adequate blood
flow. The fluid must be a sports drink
containing electrolytes or salt.
I try and avoid direct sun light. Run-
ning or walking tree-lined lanes are
great. Remember while the temperature
may be slightly lower at those times, the
humidity may be higher resulting in ele-
vating the real temperature.
I definitely try to pace myself. I don't
run as fast, or as far or work out as well
in the summer. Build your tolerance to
the heat and humidity with easier
workouts.
Lastly, don't forget the dogs. They re-
quire lots of fluid and shade. They do not
sweat but reduce body temperature by
evaporation from their panting and their
tongues.
Most importantly, if you become weak,
tired and have that giddy fainting feeling,
lay down and call 911.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and shoulder
orthopedic surgeon at SeaSpine Ortho-
pedic Institute, may be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net.


Send us your photos
* If you have a youth or adult team, or local single athlete who accomplishes some-
thing noteworthy, please send us a photo. The picture must be high-resolution
and not be time-stamped and include information of what happened. Please
email us at sports@chronicleonline.com with the information.


Rec BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r4
01





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Seminoles drop Game 1 of super regional


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Kyle
Schwarber had a go-ahead two-
run single in a four-run seventh
inning and Indiana went on to
beat Florida State 10-9 in the
first game of the Tallahassee
super regional.
Schwarber, who also had a
two-run homer in the fourth, put
Indiana up 7-6 with his hit in the
seventh.
Indiana (47-14) can advance to
its first College World Series
with a win today. If the Semi-
noles (47-16) win, a deciding
game would be played Monday
The Hoosiers' big inning came
against relievers Gage Smith (4-
2) and Billy Strode, who gave up
just three hits in the inning but
the Seminoles committed two
throwing errors.
John Nogowski's two-run
homer in the eighth trimmed In-
diana's lead to 10-8. DJ Stewart
added an RBI single in the
ninth, but Indiana's Will
Coursen-Carr induced a pair of
flyouts to end the game.
Louisville 5, Vandy 3
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Matt Helms
delivered a two-out, two-run pinch-
hit single to lead Louisville to a 5-3
victory over No. 2 overall seed Van-
derbilt in a NCAA super regional
opener Saturday.
Helms had driven in only three
runs all season. But with the bases
loaded in the seventh, the senior
stepped in and hit a 1-2 pitch from
Vanderbilt closer Brian Miller down
the third-base line.
The Cardinals (50-12) tied the
game just three batters earlier. Zak
Wasserman drove in his second run


-. 11U .i.- -i i . . ..

-,****'"* : .* . . .. ;' ... .. .. .

Associated Press
Florida State right fielder Jameis Winston dives but can't catch the ball hit for a double by Indiana's
Michael Basil in the ninth inning in an NCAA super regional college baseball game Saturday in
Tallahassee. Indiana won the game 10-9.


of the game with a two-out single.
Louisville strung together three two-
out hits and tagged Vanderbilt
starter Kevin Ziomek (11-3) for three
runs in the inning.
Xavier Turner had two hits and
scored two runs for the Com-
modores (54-11). Six of Vanderbilt's
seven hits came in the opening
three innings.
Louisville, playing in its first super
regional since 2009, tied a program-
record for regular-season wins.


UNC 6, South Carolina 5
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Freshman
Skye Bolt hit a game-winning RBI sin-
gle through the right side in the ninth
inning to lift North Carolina past South
Carolina in the opener of the NCAA
super regional best-of-3 series.
Bolt's two-out hit scored Parks
Jordan from second for the Tar
Heels (56-9), putting them within a
win of reaching the College World
Series for the sixth time in eight sea-


sons. It was yet another close win
for the No. 1 overall seed in the
NCAA tournament as North Carolina
shook off a shaky start from top
pitcher Kent Emanuel and an early
two-run deficit.
Reliever Trent Thornton (10-1)
earned the win, allowing one run in
three innings. Tyler Webb (3-3) took
the loss for the Gamecocks (42-19).
The Tar Heels reached the super
regionals with a 12-11, 13-inning win
against Florida Atlantic on Monday.


N.C. State 4, Rice 3
RALEIGH, N.C. Jake Fincher's
two-out single in the bottom of the
ninth capped a rally and lifted N.C.
State to a victory over Rice in Game
1 of the Raleigh super regional.
Rice (44-19) had taken a 3-2 lead
in the top of the ninth, but N.C. State
(48-14) tied it when Brett Williams
slid under a tag after a bunt by
Logan Ratledge. Williams singled to
start the inning, stole second, and
went to third on an error by pitcher
Zech Lemond.
Two batters later, Fincher's single
to left scored Jake Armstrong with
the winning run.
Christian Stringer had doubled in
the go-ahead run for Rice, pulling a
ball down the left-field line to score
pinch-runner John Williamson.
Hunter Kopycinski had three hits, in-
cluding the one that put Williamson
on base.
Miss. St. 11, Virginia 6
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -
Adam Frazier went 6 for 6, Hunter
Renfroe was 4 for 5 and they each
drove in three runs to help Mississippi
State beat Virginia in the first game of
the Charlottesville super regional.
The Bulldogs (47-18) pounded Vir-
ginia pitching for 20 hits and benefited
from uncharacteristic sloppiness by
the Cavaliers, who made four errors
that led to six unearned runs.
Virginia (50-11) had 11 hits, but also
hit into four rally-killing double plays.
Kendall Graveman (7-5) went 5 1-
3 innings for the Bulldogs, allowing
nine hits and all six runs, just four of
them earned. He struck out three
and walked two. Ross Mitchell fin-
ished, allowing just two hits and
three walks in 3 2/3 innings.


Trading places


Associated Press
Shawn Stefani watches his tee shot Saturday on the ninth hole during the third round of the St. Jude Classic golf
tournament in Memphis, Tenn.

Rookie Stefani shoots 4-under to take top spot at St. Jude Classic


Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. Rookie
Shawn Stefani overcame a quadru-
ple bogey and shot a 4-under 66 on
Saturday to take the third-round
lead in the St Jude Classic.
The 31-year-old Texan blew a two-
stroke lead with the quadruple
bogey on No. 11, but rebounded with
four birdies over his final five holes
to move back atop the leaderboard.
He had eight birdies to go with that
quadruple bogey to reach 12-under
198 at TPC Southwind.
Harris English was a stroke back
after a 69, finishing out of the lead
for the first time this week.
Scott Stallings, Patrick Reed and
Nicholas Thompson were 8 under.
Stallings had a 67, Reed shot 64, and
Thompson had a 66. Phil Mickelson
was another stroke back after a 65.
Thirteen players shot at least 4
under on a day with easier pins on
the small, firm greens.
This is just the 16th tour event for
Stefani, who earned his way onto the
PGA Tour by finishing sixth on the


Web.com Tour money list in 2012 in a
two-time win season.
LPGA Championship
PITTSFORD, N.Y. Overcoming rain
and a muddy course, Morgan Pressel
shot a 2-under 70 to take the lead after
two rounds of the LPGA Championship.
At 6-under 138, Pressel had a two-
shot lead over top-ranked Inbee Park
and Chella Choi. Park shot 68, while
Choi, the first-round leader, struggled
with a 73.
The final two rounds will be squeezed
into a 36-hole marathon Sunday at Lo-
cust Hill Country Club to determine the
winner of the tour's second major. The
change in schedule came after nearly
five inches of rain fell Thursday, forcing
officials to postpone the first round.
Pressel hasn't won since the 2008 Ka-
palua LPGA Classic. The American, the
2007 Kraft Nabisco winner, is attempting
to end a string of eight straight majors
won by Asian-born players.
Regions Tradition
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. David Frost
birdied the 16th and 17th holes en route


to a 6-under 66 and a one-stroke lead
over Fred Couples after the third round
of the Regions Tradition.
Frost, the South African who won the
Toshiba Classic in March for his fourth
Champions Tour title, had four birdies on
the final eight holes to move to 12-under
205 in the major championship.
Couples, the Presidents Cup captain
and World Golf Hall of Famer, shot a
bogey-free 68.
Sixty-one-year-old Morris Hatalsky,
third-round leader Duffy Waldorf and
Michael Allen were two strokes back.
Hatalsky had a 67, Waldorf shot 71 and
Allen bogeyed the final hole for a 69.
Two-time defending champion Tom
Lehman was five strokes back after a 69.
Lyoness Open
ATZENBRUGG, Austria Dutchman
Joost Luiten shot a 5-under 67 to extend
his lead to three strokes after the third
round of the Lyoness Open.
Luiten had a 16-under 200 total.
Spain's Jorge Campillo and Eduardo de
la Riva were tied for second. Campillo
shot 66, and de la Riva had a 69.


MALICE
Continued from Page B1

out five horses. He came
up short in the Derby five
weeks ago, skipped the
Preakness and re-
grouped, and came
through at his home track
for an owner who has sup-
ported him from the start.
"It's the mother of all
great moments, I'll tell
you that," the 85-year old
Campbell said. "I'm proud
for Dogwood and proud
for my partners, and I'm
proud of Todd, one of the
greatest horse trainers of
all time."
Sent off at odds of 13-1,
Palace Malice returned
$29.60, $11.20 and $6.70.
Oxbow, trained by D.
Wayne Lukas, returned
$9.90 and $6.10, and Orb,
the 2-1 favorite trained by
Shug McGaughey, paid
$3.30.
"He made a good run
around the turn, but we
had given up so much,"
McGaughey said about
the colt who was still
ninth with a half-mile to
go and just could not
make up the difference. "I
don't think he got tired.
He put up a pretty good
run to get where he was,
and those horses just
weren't coming back."
Incognito was fourth,
followed by Revolution-
ary, the filly Unlimited
Budget, Overanalyze, Vy-
jack, Golden Soul, Will
Take Charge, Giant Fin-
ish, Midnight Taboo, Free-
dom Child and Frac
Daddy
Rosie Napravnik, who
was aboard Unlimited
Budget, became the first
female to ride in all three
Triple Crown races in the
same year She was trying
to become the second fe-
male jockey to win a
Triple Crown race.
Pletcher's other Bel-
mont starters were Revo-
lutionary, Unlimited
Budget, Overanalyze and
Midnight Taboo.
All week, Pletcher ex-
pressed optimism that
Palace Malice was ready


to unleash a big effort. On
June 2, the son of two-
time Horse of the Year
Curlin put in a blazing 4
furlong workout in 47.40
seconds. Pletcher called
it one of the most impres-
sive works he'd ever seen.
And it carried over to
the race and gave the na-
tion's leading trainer his
second Belmont win (he
won the 2007 Belmont
with the filly Rags to
Riches) to go with his
2010 Derby win with
Super Saver. Smith won
his second Belmont, hav-
ing won aboard
Drosselmeyer in 2010.
"The game plan was
mapped out, and it really
went according to plan,"
Smith said. "We were lay-
ing third on the outside of
Oxbow, like we wanted. At
the three-eighths, Gary
said, 'Go on, little brother'
... And we went on it with
it, man."
The 14-horse field -
the largest since 1996 -
got off to an even start.
Frac Daddy and Free-
dom Child set out for the
lead from their inside
posts, with Oxbow not far
behind. As the field came
out of the turn, Oxbow
had the lead heading into
the long backstretch run.
But unlike the Preakness,
he had company up front
and the pace was a bit
quicker. By the time
Oxbow reached the far
turn, Palace Malice
loomed and Orb was be-
ginning to make a run
from way back in the
pack.
And that's when Palace
Malice took charge. The
only question was
whether anyone was
going to catch him. Unlike
the Derby, Orb could not
complete a come from be-
hind victory He couldn't
even reel in the tiring
Oxbow.
"It's been fun. I've got
no problems with any-
thing, everything's fine
with me," McGaughey
said. "I just wish we wold
have showed a little bet-
ter performances in the
Preakness and the
Belmont."


Woods, McIlroy together at U.S. Open


Associated Press


ARDMORE, Pa. Tiger
Woods, Rory Mcllroy and
Adam Scott will play to-
gether the opening two
rounds of the U.S. Open
next week at Merion.
For the third straight
year, U.S. Open officials
have put the top three play-
ers in the world ranking in
the same group. The fea-
ture group will start at 1:14
p.m. Thursday off the first
tee, and then 7:44 a.m. start-


ing on the 11th tee Friday.
The U.S. Open disclosed
the Nos. 1-2-3 group in a
tweet, and Mcllroy immedi-
ately responded on Twitter.
"Decent group for the
first 2 rounds at Merion I
see ..." he tweeted.
Woods is trying to end
five years without a major
title. Mcllroy, who has yet to
win this year, will be trying
to capture a major for the
third straight year. Scott is
the Masters champion, the
only player capable of the


Grand Slam this year
This will be the first time
Woods and Mcllroy have
played together in any
round of a major. They
have played in the opening
two rounds together at five
previous tournaments -
twice in Abu Dhabi, the
Cadillac Championship at
Doral this year (won by
Woods), the BMW Champi-
onship last year (won by
Mcllroy) and The Barclays
last year.
The USGA first went to


the 1-2-3 grouping in the
2008 U.S. Open at Torrey
Pines Woods, San Diego
native Phil Mickelson and
Scott.
Playing in front of that
threesome will be former
U.S. Open champions Jim
Furyk and Graeme McDow-
ell, and former Masters
champion Zach Johnson.
Mickelson is on the
other side of the draw -
starting Thursday morning
on the 11th hole, Friday af-
ternoon on the first hole.


You're invited to

Be a Member B

for a Day.

Play at Plantation on Friday June 14"'
for only a member cart fee.
9:00 AM Shotgun start. After the round enjoy
free lunch and receive a voucher to come back
uall i 7 b I ithe'ide1 I ,. Ia .ll' h lla l*
('all 795-7211 to reser e our spol! .-


PLANTATION
on Crystal River


S9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
S Crystal River
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com
"' 352-795-7211


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 B5










Same group leads Bruins to another Cup final


Associated Press

BOSTON Same
coach. Same players.
Same berth in the Stanley
Cup finals that they
earned two years ago.
And, the Boston Bruins
hope, same result.
Claude Julien still uses a
tight defensive system
that's not particularly ex-
citing but very effective.
He had 16 players from the
2011 champions in uni-
form to execute it in Fri-
day night's 1-0 win that
clinched a four-game
sweep over the Pittsburgh
Penguins in the Eastern
Conference finals.
The return to the Cup fi-
nals reinforces general
manager Peter Chiarelli's
decision to keep the group
together.
"Yeah, absolutely," he
said Saturday "There's a
fine line between unfet-


tered loyalty to the players
and building a good team.
That's my job to find that
line. I'll continue to try
and do it. This team has
showed a lot of character
through this playoff run."
The only four players in
uniform Friday who were
not with the Bruins two
years ago were forwards
Jaromir Jagr and Kaspars
Daugavins, defenseman
Torey Krug and backup
goalie Anton Khudobin.
Daugavins replaced Gre-
gory Campbell, another
2011 holdover who played
15 postseason games be-
fore breaking his leg in
Game 3 against Pittsburgh.
So Chiarelli figures the
Bruins will be better pre-
pared for the finals than
they were two years ago.
The Chicago Blackhawks
led the Los Angeles Kings
3-1 in the best-of-seven
Western finals going into


Associated Press
Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron celebrates Friday
after his team completed a sweep of the Pittsburgh
Penguins in the NHL Stanley Cup Eastern Conference finals.


Saturday night's game.
Unlike in 2011, this year
only one of the Bruins'
first three series went
seven games. And that was
a springboard to their fu-
ture success.
They took a 3-1 lead in


the opening round against
Toronto before losing the
next two games. They
trailed 4-1 with less than
11 minutes left in the third
period of Game 7. Then
Nathan Horton scored for
Boston and, after pulling


their goalie for an extra
skater, the Bruins tied it
with 51 seconds left in reg-
ulation with two goals in
31 seconds.
Then Patrice Bergeron
won it in overtime.
According to the Elias
Sports Bureau, the Bruins
are the first team in NHL
history to win a Game 7
after trailing by three
goals in the third period.
"You can tell in the way
we've been playing since
that game that we were
able to create some mo-
mentum," forward Milan
Lucic said, "and it carried
on into the New York se-
ries and it carried on to
this series. I think once we
won that game, we defi-
nitely started to believe in
what we could accomplish.
And here we are."
The Bruins beat the
Rangers in five games
then swept the NHEs high-


est scoring team, outscor-
ing the Penguins 12-2.
The comeback against
the Maple Leafs "was a
driving force going for-
ward," Chiarelli said. "The
fact that we did that cer-
tainly catapulted us into
our level of play and per-
formance, definitely You
could see the team pick it-
self up. Going back to when
it happened, you could feel
the momentum."
Starting with that game,
the Bruins have won nine
of their last 10 with a 33-16
goal differential. Their de-
fense has given opponents
limited time and space to
control the puck and their
offense has made precise
passes to players in just
the right position. And
goalie Tuukka Rask
stopped 134 of 136 shots by
Sidney Crosby and the rest
of the suddenly punchless
Penguins.


Heat seek retort


Down 1-0 to

Spurs, Miami

looks to even series

Associated Press

MIAMI The NBA Finals. Just
being here can be memorable -
and miserable.
And surprise, it's those suppos-
edly stoic Spurs who are having
more fun, while the South Beach
bunch is a little grumpy and
grouchy
The Miami Heat may be on top
of the basketball world, but
there's no joy unless they stay
there.
"Playoffs ain't fun, man. I'm
sorry to bust anyone on the out-
side's bubble," Dwyane Wade
said. '"As a player in the playoffs,
you have no joy until it's over and
you won. If you don't win, you
have no joy for a while."
Down 1-0 after a record regular
season that goes for naught with-
out another title, the Heat can
turn their moods around with a
victory over San Antonio on Sun-
day night in Game 2.
Back in the finals for a third
straight year, the Heat have lost
some of the ability to enjoy the
ride. With exorbitant expecta-
tions, all that matters is the
destination.
But San Antonio, absent from
this stage for six years, is soaking
up what could be its last shot for
Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and
Manu Ginobili.
After all, Duncan is pretty an-
cient at least, according to
those wise-cracking Spurs.
"Older than dirt," coach Gregg
Popovich called him this week.
Parker listed him at age 50 -
Duncan is actually 37 and the
repeated ribbing appears almost
out of character for a franchise
that was often considered the
definition of basketball
blandness.
"My friends and everybody on
the team, we get like the funny
Instagram doctored-up photos
or jokes where they're making
fun of how old some of the peo-
ple on our team are who shall
remain nameless," reserve Matt
Bonner said. "And we get a kick
out of that."
Despite the notion they're old,
the Spurs are actually overall the
younger, less-experienced team
in these finals. Miami has nine
players in their 30s to the six on
the Spurs, and their Big Three


Associated Pr
Miami shooting guard Dwyane Wade and the Heat need a better late-game performance than the tea
exhibited in a Game I loss to the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals on Friday.


and Bonner are the only Spurs to
have played in the NBA Finals.
That makes it easier for the
Spurs to enjoy this trip more than
when they were the team ex-
pected to be here every year.
"We definitely are having fun,"
Parker said. "I think we appreci-
ate every moment We don't take


anything for granted, because it's
been a long time. It's been six
years. Felt like forever After the
Memphis series, there was a lot of
emotion."
Heat veteran Shane Battier
wasn't exactly sold on the notion
of this Spurs transformation into
a happy-go-lucky group.


"Don't believe them, first
all," he said. "They are extrer
competitors and they have a lev
of self-deprecation I think that
part of them, but don't buy it f
one second. Those guys a
killers. They're cut-throat ai
they will stomp on you if need b
and we're the same way


Spurs


near


milestone

Associated Press

MIAMI Tony Parker,
Manu Ginobili and Tim
Duncan are nearing yet
another milestone.
San Antonio's win in
Game 1 of the NBA Finals
against Miami marked the
99th time that the Spurs'
longtime trio of stars
played in a postseason win
together. Only one other
threesome in NBA history
that being the Los Ange-
les Lakers' Michael
Cooper, Kareem Abdul-
Jabbar, Magic Johnson -
have ever teamed up for
100 postseason victories.
Parker, Ginobili and
Duncan are always quick
to give someone else the
credit for the Spurs' amaz-
ing run of success, which is
probably one of the biggest
reasons why success is still
coming their way
"Well, we've never labeled
it as someone's team," Spurs
coach Gregg Popovich said.
"It's our team. It's not my
team or Tim's team or
Manu's team or Tony's team.
It's our team."
The Spurs' trio would
have a shot next season to
top the all-time mark.
Cooper, Abdul-Jabbar and
Johnson won 110 playoff
games together in their ca-
reers with the Lakers.
Gators meet again
in NBA Finals
The last time Udonis
Haslem, Mike Miller and Matt
Bonner all went to a champi-
onship round together, none
of them got a title.
At least one of them will
this time around.
Haslem, Miller and Bonner
all played for Florida in 1999-
2000, the season where the
Gators went to the NCAA
championship game and lost
to Michigan State. That was
res Miller's final collegiate game;
3m Haslem and Bonner played
together with the Gators for
of two more seasons.
ne Haslem is a fan favorite in
'el Miami for one obvious reason
is it's his hometown. And
or Miller has been embraced by
re Miami fans since his first
nd game with the Heat, surely on
)e, some level because of his ties
to the Gators.


SERENA
Continued from Page BI

lungs but she's enjoying
a high point right now.
Saturday's victory was
her 31st in a row, the
longest single-season
streak in 13 years.
Williams is 43-2 with six ti-
tles this season.
"She is playing ex-
tremely well," Sharapova
said. "She's a competitor."
Sharapova is known for
her grit on a court, too. She
entered Saturday ranked
No. 2, the winner of her
last 13 French Open
matches, and the only ac-
tive woman other than the
Williams sisters with more
than two Grand Slam ti-
tles. But she doesn't seem
to stand a chance against
Serena, who has won their
last 13 encounters.
This was the first major


final between women
ranked 1-2 in more than
nine years the first at
Roland Garros in 18 and
yet it really was not all that
close. Particularly at
crunch time.
Under a cloudy sky, and
amid a breeze that blew
dust in both players' eyes,
Sharapova began well
enough, saving four break
points in the first game,
then breaking in the sec-
ond, prompting plenty of
murmuring in the stands.
The next game went to
40-15 on Sharapova's
serve, one point from a 3-0
lead. That's when Williams
got going. A 13-stroke ex-
change culminated with a
forehand that forced
Sharapova's backhand
error and started a four-
point, break-earning run
for Williams. She got to 2-1
with an overhead smash
she punctuated with a
staredown, a raised left


fist and a loud "Come on!"
That fist was aloft again
a half-hour later, when
Williams' cross-court fore-
hand winner helped her
break to lead 5-4, and she
served out the set.
Sharapova saved five
break points in the second
set's opening game, but
that merely delayed what
everyone expected.
Williams got the last break
she would need two games
later, and it was made pos-
sible by the sort of base-
line scrambling she did all
day Sharapova struck a
forehand down the line
that would have ended the
point against most oppo-
nents, but Williams got the
ball back, and with an
extra shot necessary, the
Russian slapped a fore-
hand into the net.
On break point, Shara-
pova smacked a 109 mph
serve, but Williams' strong
return forced another mis-


take. Now Williams merely
needed to hold serve the
rest of the way, and half of
her 10 aces came in her
last two service games.
Sharapova observed
that Williams serves
"harder than David Fer-
rer," referring to the man
who will face seven-time
champion Rafael Nadal in
the men's final Sunday
Serving at 5-4, Williams
recalled, "I was just so
nervous. I thought, 'I'm not
going to be able to hit
groundstrokes.' No joke.
The one groundstroke I
did hit went, like, 100 feet
out. I thought to myself,
'Look, Serena, you've just
got to hit aces. That's your
only choice."'
Simple as that, huh?
Well, with her, yes.
Serena Williams reacts to
winning her second career
French Open singles title
Saturday in Paris.
Associated Press


B6 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


w" CAUTION --


Photos by Associated Press
Workers use heavy machinery to remove waste in May 2004 in an area near two dormant nuclear reactors on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation
near Richland, Wash. The groundwater at Hanford already is contaminated, but scientists gauge the risks to be minimal because it would
take decades for contaminants already in the soil to reach the Columbia River, the largest waterway in the Pacific Northwest. The closest
tank sits 5 miles from the river, home to endangered fish and a source of drinking water for some 175,000 people immediately downstream.


Handling





Hanford

SHANNON DININNY
Associated Press
RICHLAND, Wash.


basketball court lies buried in the
sandy soil of southeastern Washing-
ton state, an aging remnant of U.S.
efforts to win World War II. The
tank holds enough radioactive waste to fill an
Olympic-sized swimming pool. And it is leaking.
For 42 years, tank AY-102 has stored some of the deadliest material at
one of the most environmentally contaminated places in the country: the
Hanford Nuclear Reservation. This complex along the Columbia River
holds a storied place in American history It was here that workers pro-
duced the plutonium for the atomic bomb dropped by the U.S. on Na-
gasaki, Japan, in 1945 effectively ending the war.
See Page C3


In this undated photo, the Columbia River flows next to the Hanford Atomic
Plant in Richland, Wash. The federal government created Hanford at the
height of World War II, moving 50,000 people near the Washington-Oregon
border for a top-secret construction project. The influx quickly made this area
Washington's fourth-largest city, but most workers didn't even know exactly
what they were building the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor until
the bomb was dropped on Nagasaki.


The Hanford Nuclear Reservation
produced the plutonium for the
atomic bomb dropped by the U.S.
on Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945, effectively
ending World War II. Today the south-
eastern Washington site confronts the
environmental mess left behind and the
federal government's inability, over
nearly a quarter-century, to rid Hanford
of 56 million gallons of toxic waste
cached in aging underground tanks.
Some basic questions and answers:

Q: What is Hanford today?
A: Hanford is the most contaminated
nuclear site in the United States and
one of the most complex environmental
cleanup projects in the world. The 586-
square-mile site borders the Columbia
River, the largest in the Pacific North-
west, and is home to some of the most
dangerous nuclear waste on the planet.
Q: How long did it operate?
A: The federal government began build-
ing the first nuclear reactor at Hanford
in 1943 as part of the top-secret Man-
hattan Project to build the atomic
bomb. Eight more reactors and hun-
dreds of ancillary buildings were built
later as Hanford produced plutonium
for the nation's nuclear weapons arse-
nal. The last reactor shut down in 1987.
Q: When did cleanup begin?
A: The state of Washington, the federal
Environmental Protection Agency and
See Q&A/Page C3
L


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


When a


bluster's


a boon
here was a lot of
wind this week in
Citrus County
Wind can be bad. It
blows down trees, forces
the water up in coastal
areas and creates the oc-
casional tornado.
But there can be a
positive side to wind.
Just maybe, if the wind
is strong enough, it can
blow away all those
things that are bothering
us as a community.
Think about it for a
moment if all it took
was a good, strong storm.
We could start with all
of the pollution in our
waterways blowing
away. Wouldn't that be
great? We have managed
to pollute too many of
our waterways because
we are too comfortable
in our ways to change
our polluting behavior
Speaking of which,
the wind could blow
away the hypocrites who
go around claiming to be
environmentalists until
planned sewer projects
in their neighborhood
would make them per-
sonally pay to correct
their own polluting sep-
tic tank. Suddenly they
are not in favor of pro-
tecting the water.
The wind could blow
away the pollen that has
made this allergy season
one to forget.
The wind could blow
away some of those
lawyers in town who
spend much of their
time stirring up public
disputes that result in
them sending large legal
bills to the taxpayers.
The wind could blow
away those Little
League parents who put
too much pressure on
their children to per-
form on the field and
show too little interest
on their performance in
the classroom.
The wind could blow
away the personal an-
tagonism that has taken
root with our county
commission. Citizens
want elected officials to
disagree on issues and
publicly debate the mer-
its of those different op-
tions. But that does not
mean it's healthy to de-
monize those who have
different opinions and
suggest they are corrupt.
Washington does not
work because the differ-
ent factions have com-
pletely demonized each
other. We do not need
that in Inverness.
See Page C3


D'Alemberte talks life and death, past an


MARGIE MENZEL
The News Service of Florida
TALLAHASSEE Talbot
"Sandy" D'Alemberte cele-
brated his 80th birthday last
week with a bash at the Florida
State University College of Law,
where he was dean and contin-
ues to teach.
His life story also includes
serving as the university's pres-
ident, as a Democratic state
representative from 1966 to
1972, and as president of the
American Bar Association.
While in the Legislature,
D'Alemberte chaired the House
Judiciary Committee that
drafted and passed a major ju-
dicial-reform constitutional
amendment in 1972.


D'Alemberte is married to
Patsy Palmer, who is also his
law partner, and has two chil-
dren. He continues to do pro
bono work and serves on the
board of the Innocence Project.
The News Service of Florida
had five questions for Sandy
D'Alemberte:
NSF: Why is the Innocence
Project so important to you?
D'ALEMBERTE: The Inno-
cence Project is critically im-
portant today because we now
are able to use DNA testing to
show where mistakes are being
made in the criminal justice
system. If a crime is committed
today, police investigators -
unless they're incompetent -
will take DNA tests and will ex-
clude people who are innocent.


"I've come to the conclusion that a
number of Supreme Court justices
have come to, and that is that the
imposition of the death penalty is
random. It's comparable to being


hit by lightning."
But during this period of time
in the '80s on up to the early
'90s, a large number of people
were convicted on evidence
that should never have been ad-
mitted, were convicted because
they had bad lawyers, convicted
because a jailhouse snitch told
lies in order to advance their


own situation. Identifications
were faulty. So-called scientific
evidence wasn't scientific at all.
We now have a chance to look
at a set of cases where DNA was
not used, and we can look and
see that the person who was
convicted was actually inno-
cent. Well, what happened in


id present
those cases? What were the
causes of the conviction? What
things were done wrong? Mis-
conduct by prosecutors. An
awful lot of negligence by de-
fense counsel. Lawyers are part
of the problem here. Bad sci-
ence is part of the problem. Just
stupid things, when you look at
some of the convictions that
took place, but people were
convicted.
What we can tell by taking
some of these cases that were
tried without DNA and where
DNA is now available to us, we
can now analyze some of the
mistakes that were made at
trial, and maybe we can change
the system.


See Page C4


iI







Page C2 SUNDAY, JUNE 9,2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"The fox condemns the trap, not himself."
William Blake,
"The Marriage of Heaven and Hell," 1790


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ..............................................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
M 0 Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CROWD CONTROL




Springs can




no longer be




a free-for-all


Being a responsible
steward doesn't
equate to being uni-
versally loved.
Local officials with the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service al-
ready know they won't be feel-
ing the love when they take
steps to regulate water access
to Three Sisters Springs.
"Nobody is going to like
whatever we do," said Crystal
River Wildlife Refuge Man-


ager Michael
Lusk. "It's going
to affect people's
livelihood and
freedom."
It absolutely
will. It's also ab-
solutely neces-
sary.
There are the
interests of local
and out-of-county


Weekends and holidays in
and around the springs can
be bedlam.
However, visiting the springs
on a weekday offers a relaxing,
enriching eco-experience.
With the increased popu-
larity of the springs resulting
from worldwide publicity and
public access to the surround-
ing land, it is essential that
the Fish and Wildlife Service
(FWS) establish a formula to


THE ISSUE:
Three Sisters
Springs access.

OUR OPINION:
Regulation won't
be popular, but
it's necessary.


commercial tour operators,
as well as locals and people
from around the world who
venture to the springs on
their own, without commer-
cial guides.
The problems is, visiting
the springs is not a world-
class experience when
dozens of boats crowd the ac-
cess area and hordes bump
shoulders, wedging their way
through a sea of humanity to
get a taste of nature.
Intense crowding makes it
difficult to control visitors in
this manatee haven, creating
habitat and law enforcement
concerns.


How much for Vin Scully?
In my opinion, the TV announc-
ers for the Rays, Brian Anderson
and Dewayne Staats, are two of
the worst baseball announcers
and I'm a Rays fan. They talk all
the time and it's distracting to
watch the game. I do attend
four to five games in person.
Great graduates
(A letter to the editor writer)
recently wrote in that our coun-
try has reverted back to a serf
system (that) if
you're born poor, you
cannot advance. Having C
the privilege of meet-
ing a few of our recent
graduates from our dif-
ferent high schools, let
me assure you: This
country is being left in
good hands. These kids
are smart. They're hard CA
workers. They realize 563
when they get out into 56P
life that if they work
very hard, they will achieve their
ultimate goal. They can move up
from poor to very rich. Don't
ever underestimate your young
people in this country. They're
further educated than we were
when we graduated into such
nice people.
Open heart to pets
About the dog in Walmart: You
know, people carry more germs
and bacteria than dogs do. And
maybe the couple couldn't leave
the Jack Russell in the car to fry
or leave him at home because
of circumstances. You need to
open your heart to pets and re-
alize that they're made by God
too for us to take care of.


I
-0


calibrate the in-
flux of visitors, be
that through per-
mits for commer-
cial operators or
other options.
We're spoiled
in that that's not
been necessary in
the past, but with
the preservation
of the springs


area, we've entered a new era.
Reservations and franchise
tours are mechanisms used
widely in high-traffic areas of
national parks, as well as
other high-draw attractions.
The FWS will seek public
comment next month to gain
input on options for control-
ling the numbers of people at
the springs. The goal is to
bring a sense of order to peak
periods for public enjoyment
not to prevent people from
enjoying Three Sisters.
Allowing for appreciation
of the springs and the resi-
dent manatees is what it's all
about.


Misuse of food stamps
I don't begrudge anyone for
using food stamps, but why is it
that food stamp recipients can
purchase the best cuts of meat,
lobster tails, deli-made sand-
wiches, specialty cakes from the
bakery, candy, soda, etc.? If I
can't afford these luxuries for
my family, why do I pay through
my tax dollars for others to af-
ford these? (For the) $8 that
they pay for one sandwich, a
pound of deli meat can be
bought for several
J NDdays. Instead of a spe-
cialty cake for a child's
birthday, a box of cup-
Scake mix and frosting
will work. Food stamps
are supposed to be for
necessities, not
luxuries with my tax
dollars.
He will
)579 be missed
I read the (May 28,
page A3) article of Carlos Gon-
zalez, the cofounder of Seven
Rivers hospital. I'm so sorry to
hear that he passed. He was a
very good friend. We would have
coffee and a sandwich every
morning at McDonald's before
he went to work. He was the
most generous, most kind, most
loving person I've ever met and I
hope God has a special place for
him in heaven. We will miss you
always. Bye-bye.
Thanks for honesty
Left purse on a Sunday in cart
at Publix in Crystal River. Honest
couple gave it to front desk.
Many thanks. Please contact me
at 527-9269. Thank you.


Sugar: Too sweet to kill


WASHINGTON
The steamboat conveying
Andrew Jackson up the
Ohio River toward his tu-
multuous 1829 inauguration
had brooms lashed to its bow,
symbolizing Old Hickory's vow
to clean up Washing-
ton. But sweeping
out Washington's
Augean stables, like
painting the Golden *
Gate Bridge, is W
steady work, so
steady it never ends.
Neither do the poli-
cies that cosset
sugar producers. Georg
These immortal OTI
measures just re-
ceived the Senate's VOI
benediction because
they illustrate the only law
Washington can be counted on
to respect. It is the law of dis-
persed costs but concentrated
benefits.
The provisions by which
Washington transfers wealth
from 316 million American con-
sumers to a few thousand sugar
producers are part of a "tempo-
rary" commodity support pro-
gram created during the Great
Depression. Not even the New
Deal could prolong the Depres-
sion forever. It ended. But sugar
protectionism is forever. The
Senate recently voted 54-45
against even mild reforms of
the baroque architecture of
protections for producers of
sugar cane and sugar beets.
The government guarantees
up to 85 percent of the U.S. sugar
market for U.S.-produced sugar
The remaining portion of the
market is allocated for imports
from particular countries at a
preferential tariff rate. Mini-
mum prices are guaranteed for
sugar from cane and beets. Sur-
plus sugar meaning that
which U.S. producers cannot
profitably sell is bought by
the government and sold at a
loss to producers of ethanol, an-
other program whose irra-
tionalities are ubiquitous.


H
(


All this probably means $3.7
billion in higher sugar costs. It
also means scores of thou-
sands of lost jobs as manufac-
turers of candy and products
with significant sugar content
move jobs to countries where
they can pay the
much lower world
price of sugar. The
big companies like
Mars and Hershey
can locate plants
around the world.
The hundreds of
family-owned
American candy
e Will companies cannot.
IER In the past four
years, the U.S.
CES price has averaged
between 64 percent
to 92 percent higher than the
world price. The costs are dis-
persed to 316 million con-
sumers. The benefits accrue
primarily to 4,700 sugar beet
and sugar cane farms.
What begins in Washington
as simple garden-variety
grasping becomes an entitle-
ment, the argument being that
the longer the benefit has
lived, the more its beneficiar-
ies have built their lives
around it, so ending it would
be disruptive. Again, the Sen-
ate voted not on ending sugar
protectionism but on making it
slightly less irrational.
Sugar protectionism is gov-
ernment planning. It is indus-
trial policy government
picking winners and losers -
applied to agriculture. It is pol-
itics supplanting the market in
allocating wealth and opportu-
nity And it is perfectly all right
with 20 of the 45 Republican
senators.
That many voted against
modest reforms, thereby ren-
dering themselves forever inel-
igible to speak the language of
limited government. One of
them is known as tea-party-
favorite (this compound word is
his first name, judging by the
way he is constantly identified


by the media) Marco Rubio. He
is fluent in that language but he
represents Florida. Actually, he
represents the state's sugar
cane growers better than he
does its 19.3 million sugar con-
sumers, or his own tea party ex-
postulations. Texas, too, has
cane growers but Sen. Ted Cruz,
elected by espousing tea party
principles, voted for those prin-
ciples by voting for reform.
President Lincoln's biggest
blunder was no, not Gen.
George McClellan creating
the Agriculture Department.
Since 1995, 75 percent of all
agriculture subsidies have gone
to the largest and wealthiest 10
percent of farms. Largely be-
cause of steadily loosened eligi-
bility criteria loosened at the
collaborative behest of agricul-
ture interests and the "caring
class" (i.e., welfare workers) -
food stamps are now used by 48
million Americans. The stamps
buy less than they would were
sugar quotas not raising the
price of every edible thing,
from ketchup to bread to yo-
gurt, that contains sugar.
But, then, big government al-
ways is most caring about the
strong, the articulate and the
organized.
About 6,700 generations
(200,000 years of 30-year gener-
ations) ago, the human race ar-
rived. About 400 generations
ago, agriculture began. Seven
generations ago (1800), it took
five American farmers to feed
one non-farmer. Until four gen-
erations ago, a majority of
American workers were in agri-
culture. Today, less than 2 per-
cent of the workforce are
farmers, and one farmworker
feeds 300 people. But 6,700 gen-
erations from now, there will
still be today's web of policies
- not a safety net but a ham-
mock woven for the comfort
of sugar producers.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Financing attorneys
It doesn't take long to figure
this one out; you don't have to
read past the first few paragraphs.
Joe Meek got a little irritated
at a recent commission meet-
ing when asked about lawyer
financing by the chairwoman
of the Citrus County Hospital
Board, and now comes forward
with his own set of questions
for her.
This is nothing more than a
contest between two opposing
political factions who hate
each other, and it is all at the
public's expense. It would
seem that they are simple
questions, but after reading for
a while, one wants to scream,
"What question?" At least I
did. The questions get lost in
the banter. Maybe they should
since, as Ms. Ressler said, the
answers are on the website.
You see, a public records re-
quest involves money, not ex-
plained in the emails or the
attached article, whereas if
you answer questions in an
email there is no lawyer in-
volved and since lawyer/money
is synonymous, email ques-
tions are much more efficient.
That being said, Ms. Ressler
told Mr. Meek the answers to
his questions are on the web-
site. Mr Meek, not being one to
let things go but not wanting to
be blamed for causing the
lawyer to make more money at


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters sent via email.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

the public's expense, hammers
away at 'Just answer the
questions."
Can't we all be a little more
adult or at least try to act like
it, if nothing else? We all talk
about transparency You can't
be more transparent than this.
Richard "Dick" Callahan
Crystal River


Thanks for support
The families of Sgt. Logan T
Harbison want to thank all
who had a part in making our
grief more bearable. The staff
of Davis Funeral Home was
very professional but also had
compassion and care beyond
the call of duty We appreciate
the sheriff's office meeting us at
the county line, escorting the
body to Davis Fumeral Home and
to the people of Citrus County
on the streets with flags or a
hand on their heart as Logan's
body came through town.
Thanks to the Patriot Riders
who stood at the viewing and
escorted us from Cornerstone
Baptist Church to the Bushnell
Cemetery
We are grateful for the sup-
port from the people of First
Baptist and Cornerstone Bap-
tist churches and for Donnie
Seagle and Babb Adams. We
are humbled by the outpouring
of care, support and love for all
who traveled from far away
and the people of Citrus
County
The Army has been great in
helping us with our transition
to our lives without our hero.
May we never forget that no
one wins in war and never for-
get our loved ones who died to
keep us free.
Jordan and Sara Harbison
Shannon and Danita Heathcock
Bob and Nadine Humphries


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Should you fall, we're here to catch you


I'll admit I'm walking
on thin ice.
I'm terribly close to
oversharing.
It has been a very spe-
cial pleasure to watch our
children grow. From the
earliest moments that they
were visible while Cheryl
was carrying them, from
their very first fluttering
kicks until their births,
from their coming together
as a group of little ones
until now, as adults with
children of their own, just
watching Beth, Becky and
Fred 3 be who they were
and become who they are
has been a privilege be-
yond compare.


Moving on to the tough,
"maybe I shouldn't share
this" part: Our family is just
like many others. Things
happen. Things happen
you don't expect and things
happen you wish would go
away, but they don't -
things such as divorce.
During the last couple of
years, we as a familyfaced the
"D" word with our eldest
I admired her for the
way she stuck with it and
tried to make it work, and I
admired her for deciding
enough was enough when
she believed that time had
come.
For several months after
her divorce, Beth chose to


concentrate only on her One of the more inter-
children, her church and testing things about our trio
her work. She seemed to is how very different they
have no inter- are about some
est in dating. things and how
But most re- .' very much
cently, she has alike they are
met someone. about others.
There is no The reactions
certainty as to from Becky
where this is and Fred 3 con-
going, but at cerning Beth's
least she is newfound
having a good Fred Brannen friend were to-
time; and, A SLICE tally different,
being very but neither was
much like her OF LIFE surprising.
father, Bethy- Becky was
Pooh tells everything she true to form. She urged
knows, especially to her caution, insisting that her
brother and sister, sister go slow and generally


being the very protective
sister she always has been.
Son Fred entered the
fray with what I consider
to be one of the most ten-
der and supportive state-
ments ever made by a baby
brother to a big sister:
"OK. As your brother,
there are things I feel I
need to say I want to tell
you not to rush in. I want to
say be careful, be guarded
and protect yourself, but
that's not what I'm going to
say It's not real life and it's
certainly not fun. So, I'll
say this, 'Fall. Fall as fast
and as hard as you are
willing. Be scared, be vul-
nerable and just fall. If


he's worth it, he'll meet
you on the way down and
you'll catch each other. If
not, we're here to catch
you ... and we can always
sic Becky on him!"'
Is it for real? Will it last?
Maybe, maybe not.
But what is absolute is
that we are here to catch
her, not only her brother
and sister, but her mother
and I as well.
PS.: Just so you know, I
cleared this with Beth before
submitting it for publication!


Fred Brannen is an Inver-
ness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


HANFORD
Continued from Page C1

Today Hanford's legacy is less
about what was made here than the
environmental mess left behind -
and the federal government's inabil-
ity, for nearly a quarter-century now,
to rid Hanford once and for all of its
worst hazard: 56 million gallons of
toxic waste cached in aging under-
ground tanks.
Technical problems, mismanage-
ment and repeated delays have
plagued the interminable cleanup of
the 586-square-mile site, prolonging
an effort that has cost taxpayers $36
billion to date and is estimated will
cost $115 billion more.
Add to that the leaks involving AY-
102 and other tanks at the site, and
watchdog groups, politicians and
others are left wondering: Will Han-
ford ever really be free of its waste?
If not, what will its environmental
impact be on important waterways,
towns and generations to come?
"One corner of our country and
my state acted as a stalwart during
World War II and the Cold War and
did the right thing," Washington Gov
Jay Inslee said in a recent interview.
"We want the federal government to
fulfill its obligation to our state."
There is no greater challenge at
Hanford today than its underground
tank waste. The leaks inside AY-102,
a double-walled tank that was sup-
posed to provide more protection
against spillage as well as newer
leaks found this year in six other sin-
gle-walled tanks show how criti-
cal the situation has become.
Put simply: Time is running out
on Hanford's deteriorating tanks
and, in turn, for completing work on
a more permanent solution to store
what's in them.
The federal government created
Hanford at the height of World War
II, moving 50,000 people to sage-
brush fields, dotted with small
farms, near the Washington-Oregon
border for a top-secret construction
project. The influx quickly made
this area Washington's fourth-largest
city, but most workers didn't even
know exactly what they were build-
ing the world's first full-scale nu-
clear reactor until the bomb was
dropped on Nagasaki.
In ensuing years, workers built
eight more reactors to produce plu-
tonium for the nation's nuclear
weapons arsenal. They also built
hundreds of ancillary projects, in-
cluding large canyons where toxic
chemicals were used to reprocess
the plutonium and extract uranium.
All of this work produced massive
amounts of radioactive and toxic
waste, as reprocessing of the spent
nuclear fuel created byproducts that
were far too dangerous for human
contact. Workers poured some of
that waste directly into trenches in
the ground at Hanford, but most of
the deadliest waste was stored in
177 underground tanks, grouped
into areas known as tank farms.
There isn't much to see at these
tank farms. Gravel fields cover the
tanks themselves. Exhaust pipes jut
out of the ground above each of
them. Underground, they hold a
bubbling, brewing stew of radionu-
clides, hazardous chemicals and ni-
trates. Two radionuclides comprise
much of the radioactivity: cesium-
137 and strontium-90. Both take hun-
dreds of years to decay, and
exposure to either would increase a
person's risk of developing cancer.
The first storage tanks, 149 of
them, were built between 1943 and
1964 with just a single stainless-steel
wall. They were designed to last only
10 to 20 years, intended as a stopgap
measure until a more permanent so-
lution could be found to deal with
the waste. Turns out the tanks were
susceptible to corrosion; some even
buckled from the extreme heat radi-
ated by the waste.
As early as 1956, workers sus-
pected one tank was leaking. Be-
tween 1959 and 1968, the U.S.
Energy Department confirmed 12
tanks were leaking.
Around that time, workers started
building 28 double-walled tanks to
provide better protection, then began
pumping the most dangerous liquid
waste out of the leaking tanks into
these vessels. By 1995, they had gotten
as much of the pumpable liquid out
as possible, leaving behind sludge
the consistency of peanut butter.


AY-102 was the first double-walled
tank, put into service in 1971 with an
intended lifespan of 40 years. The
tank contains chunks of solids -
many common metals, including
aluminum, nickel, lead, silver, cop-
per, titanium and zinc as well as
other common elements. It also
holds more than a dozen radionu-
clides, such as plutonium, uranium,
strontium and cesium, all of which
can cause cancers upon contact.
Last fall, at 41 years of age, AY-102
was found to be leaking into the
space between its inner and outer
shells. So far, no waste has escaped
the outer shell to the soil surround-
ing the tank, and a video review of
six other double-shell tanks that
began holding waste in the 1970s
showed none of them was leaking.
"None of these tanks would be ac-
ceptable for use today They are all
beyond their design life, and yet
they're holding two-thirds of the na-
tion's high-level nuclear waste," said
Tom Carpenter of the watchdog
group Hanford Challenge.
There has since been more bad
news involving still more tanks.
On Feb. 15, federal officials re-
vealed that another single-shell tank
was leaking. A week later, the governor
said that actually six of the single-
walled tanks were leaking. Officials
now estimate that those tanks could
be releasing as much as 1,000 gal-
lons of waste a year into the soil.
In all, since that very first leak in
the 1950s, at least 69 tanks are
known to have excreted more than 1
million gallons of waste and pos-
sibly far more into the soil.
Add to that a concern that hydro-
gen gas could build up inside the
tanks and possibly cause an explo-
sion that would release radioactive
material. The Defense Nuclear Fa-
cilities Safety Board recommended
additional monitoring and ventila-
tion of the tanks last fall to avoid
such a disaster, and federal officials
are working to develop a plan to im-
plement the recommendation.
So what does all of this mean for
the environment and the safety of
surrounding communities?
The groundwater at Hanford al-
ready is contaminated, but scientists
gauge the risks to be minimal be-
cause it would take decades for con-
taminants already in the soil to
reach the Columbia River, the
largest waterway in the Pacific
Northwest. The closest tank sits 5
miles from the river, home to endan-
gered fish and a source of drinking
water for some 175,000 people im-
mediately downstream.
"From the standpoint of worrying
about an immediate hazard, we're
not there," said Ken Niles of the
Oregon Department of Energy "But
the problem is that resolving these
issues at Hanford takes so long."
The Energy Department previ-
ously built a $230 million plant to
treat contaminated groundwater
near the tank farms. The agency also
is studying how best to handle the
leak in AY-102, including whether to
empty the tank immediately into an-
other tank, said Kevin Smith, who
heads the Energy Department's Of-
fice of River Protection in Richland.
Smith acknowledged, however, that
the double-shell tanks are nearing
capacity.
One problem is knowing exactly
what is in each tank. A database list-
ing the contents of each is only a
best-guess, relying on historical in-
formation about the site and waste
samples that are very limited, said
Cheryl Whalen of the state Depart-
ment of Ecology.
Drawing a single sample and ana-
lyzing it, which requires exhaustive
safety precautions, costs about $1
million, and it doesn't show every-
thing that's inside, Whalen said. The
sample might include liquid, but not
the solids floating around inside or
the sludge at the bottom.
Whalen also said some elements
that are in very small quantities, but
could be very hazardous, aren't even
recorded. In addition, some of the
radionuclides inside produce alto-
gether new elements under the right
conditions.
"The tanks create their own chem-
ical environment. Between the heat
and the radionuclides and the
chemicals that are already in there,
they're just their own nuclear reac-
tors," Whalen said. "They're gener-
ating their own little world in there."
What officials do know is that the
tanks are so thermally and radioac-


tively hot that workers must wear
white hazmat suits, often with sup-
plied air tanks, when working nearby
To date a total of 10 single-shell
tanks have had their contents emp-
tied into double-walled vessels, and
another five tanks are scheduled to
be emptied by September 2014.
The permanent solution to eradi-
cating Hanford's waste is a plant
being built that would encase the
waste in glass-like logs for disposal
deep underground. The vitrification
plant is among the largest industrial
construction projects nationally,
both in cost and sheer size. Origi-
nally bid at $4.3 billion, the price tag
has since grown to more than $12.3
billion, a figure expected to rise
even further.
The Energy Department fired its
original contractor in 2000 amid
mounting delays and costs. In 2006,
construction was suspended for 22
months after an independent review
concluded the department underes-
timated the force of ground move-
ments at the site should a severe
earthquake occur. Construction has
been put on hold in some areas of
the plant while the Energy Depart-
ment works to resolve problems.
Once targeted for completion in
2011, the plant now won't be operat-
ing before 2019.
That pushes a deadline for treat-
ing all of the waste from 2028, under
the original agreement, to 2047. Re-
moval of contaminants from ground-
water and long-term stewardship of
the site will continue for at least two
decades longer
Ernest Moniz, the nation's new en-
ergy secretary, vowed during his con-
firmation hearings to visit Hanford
and work to get the money needed to
ensure the cleanup job is finished.
The Energy Department spends
roughly $2 billion each year on Han-
ford cleanup, or one-third of its
budget for nuclear waste cleanup
nationally The federal government
also directed $2 billion in stimulus
money to speed up some Hanford
projects.
"Clearly I support trying to meet
the milestones (for completing the
work), and that will require having
the budget to do it," Moniz told the
Senate Energy and Natural Re-
sources Committee in April.
But as part of the federal spend-
ing cuts known as sequestration,
some 250 Hanford workers have re-
ceived pink slips while hundreds of
others will be required to take
weeks-long furloughs.
Despite the many challenges,
there has been some progress in the
24-year cleanup of Hanford. Workers
have removed spent nuclear fuel
from two leak-prone pools near the
Columbia River. They've dug up
hundreds of waste sites and demol-
ished contaminated buildings. Five
of the nine reactors have been moth-
balled, and workers continue to mon-
itor and treat groundwater tainted
by radionuclides and toxic chemicals.
Today, the communities closest to
the Hanford site comprise a science
and technology hub that is among
the fastest-growing regions in the
country, where Hanford cleanup
and a national laboratory drive the
economy.
Locals celebrate their contribution
to the U.S. defense effort In Richland,
brewery offers "Half-Life Hefeweizen"
and "Plutonium Porter" on tap.
Richland High School adopted a
mushroom cloud as its mascot and
students are known as "the Bombers."
The risks that come with the
cleanup project are taken in stride
by those whose livelihoods still de-
pend on Hanford.
"There's an inherent risk to what
we do. But I live here, and I've never
been fearful of anything," said Dave
Molnaa, who has worked at Hanford
for 34 years and serves as president
of the Hanford Atomic Trades Council,
a union representing 2,800 workers.
Inslee, Washington's governor, has
long been a champion of Hanford
cleanup; he was first elected to Con-
gress in 1992 to represent a district
that includes the Hanford site. De-
spite the many leaks and delays, In-
slee maintains the belief that the
project will one day be completed.
Failing to do so, he said, is just not
an option.
"The country does have financial
challenges, but we cannot tell our
grandkids that we are going to allow
pollution that may someday end up
in the Columbia River," said Inslee.
"That's inexcusable."


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

The wind could blow away some of the poverty
that hampers a portion of our population. Too many
people are unemployed or underemployed, have no
health care and can't even muster the transporta-
tion needed to find a job.
Just maybe a strong wind could blow away the ar-
rogance it took for hospital governing board officials
to tell the chairman of our county commission that
he would have to pay for information that explains
how the governing board is spending tax dollars.
Really? None of the governing board members or
their lawyer are elected, but they do raise and
spend tax dollars. Our elected chairman of the
county commission asks for the information and he
can't get it without having to write a big check? This
is transparency of government? Blow, wind, blow.
A good wind could also blow away all of the trash
that litters our highways. How can people still throw
trash out their windows?
The wind could also blow some good will into the
community so we can do a better job of working to-
gether to solve problems without poking each other
in the eye.
Wind can be a good thing, if we can have it in
moderation.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


Associated ress
This 1944 photo, provided by the U.S. Department of
Energy, shows the construction of a "tank farm" to
store nuclear waste on the Hanford Nuclear Reserva-


tion near Richland, Wash.


Q&A
Continued from Page C1
the U.S. Department
of Energy signed a
legally binding agree-
ment in 1989 to clean
up Hanford. The work
entails decontaminat-
ing and tearing down
buildings, mothballing
old reactors, digging
up buried debris,
treating groundwater
and dealing with mil-
lions of gallons of liq-
uid and mud-like
sludge that is highly
toxic and radioactive.
Q: What's been
done there?
A: Workers have made
progress over the
years, completing two
of the three projects
that were deemed sig-
nificant risks to the
environment and pub-
lic safety: All weapons-
grade plutonium has
been removed from
the site, and workers
removed spent nuclear
fuel from two leak-
prone pools of water
near the Columbia
River. They've dug up
hundreds of waste
sites, demolished con-
taminated buildings
and mothballed five of
the nine reactors.
Much of the success
has occurred near the
river in anticipation of
shrinking Hanford's
overall footprint to 15
square miles in 2015.
Q: Why is it taking
so long?
A: The contaminants
at Hanford pose signif-
icant safety risks,
making for tedious
and technically chal-
lenging work. In addi-


tion, Hanford workers
failed to keep detailed
records about waste
disposal when the site
was operating in its
heyday, complicating
cleanup efforts today.
In some cases, new
technologies are still
being developed to
deal with the waste. A
so-called vitrification
plant, which will en-
case the underground
tank waste in glass for
long-term disposal, is
a one-of-a-kind facility
that is being designed
as it's being built. Pro-
ponents of the
method say it was
necessary to get the
project underway, but
critics argue it has re-
sulted in delays, tech-
nical problems and
skyrocketing costs.
The operating dead-
line has been missed
at least five times.
Q: When will the
work be done?
A: The cleanup agree-
ment originally called
for all tank waste to
be treated by 2028
and for most of the re-
maining cleanup to be
completed by 2035.
That date excluded on-
going efforts to treat
contaminated ground-
water, to develop a
permanent plan for
the nuclear reactor
cores, which are being
mothballed for just 75
years, and long-term
stewardship of the
site. The Energy De-
partment's latest
schedule now calls for
tank waste to be
treated by 2047, with
groundwater cleanup
and some other activi-
ties continuing
through 2070.


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SANDY
Continued from Page C1

NSF: That sounds like
an argument against re-
cent efforts to speed up ex-
ecutions, like the Timely
Justice Act
D'ALEMBERTE: I've
come to the conclusion that
a number of Supreme Court
justices have come to, and
that is that the imposition
of the death penalty is ran-
dom. It's comparable to
being hit by lightning.
I've been convinced a
long time, as a number of
other observers have been
convinced, that it tends to
be only poor people and
minorities that wind up
with the death penalty. My
friend Steve Bright from
Atlanta says the death
penalty is reserved not for
the people who've commit-
ted the worst crimes, but
for the people who have
the worst lawyers.
The post-conviction
process that's being criti-
cized so much as taking too
long actually has saved us
from ourselves, because
we've been able to catch
some errors that, had they
remained in place, would
have been just embarrass-
ing. I'm convinced that
when history looks back on
this era in American jus-
tice, they're going to judge
us very harshly.
NSF: In recent years,
we've seen some antago-
nism between the legisla-
tive and judicial branches
of state government. Has
that harmed Florida's
ability to deliver justice?
D'ALEMBERTE: Antag-
onism between the
branches harms all the
branches that are in-


volved. I don't think leg-
islative attacks on the
court have made anybody
respect the Legislature
more. Indeed, all the data
I've seen indicates the leg-
islators individually and
as a group are actually
declining in popularity, in
part because of the fact that
they seem to be so contentious
They are perceived, I
think correctly, to be in-
volved in power struggles
that are inappropriate.
When you hear people
talk about the good old
days, you ought to be sus-
picious. Geezers like me,
when we talk about how
wonderful things were -
they weren't all that great
for people who were living
in a segregated society.
Poverty and medical serv-
ices were even worse in
those days. But there was a
period of time when legis-
lators liked one another,
they got along with one an-
other, they didn't feel like
they had to condemn people
in other branches of gov-
ernment. And they tended
to be very progressive.
When I say "progres-
sive," everybody's going to
read "liberal." Well, I'm
liberal. But the Republi-
cans who were elected
along with me would never
have been called liberal.
But these are the people
who pushed through envi-
ronmental protection laws,
helped with court reform
and had their shoulders to
the wheel when we did ex-
ecutive reorganization.
The idea that you had to
clash with the other party
wasn't part of our culture.
We got along with one an-
other. We had frequent de-
bates about things we
didn't agree on. The Viet-
nam War was going on, and


I used to fight with Repub-
lican leadership that in-
troduced measures to take
away student loans or
other benefits from people
who were involved in anti-
war protest. But that never
ruined our friendship.
Indeed, among my clos-
est friends during the time
I was in the Legislature
were Republicans, and I
still feel that way today.
There are people I just
greatly admire who were
Republican leaders during
that time: Kenny Plante,
who everybody just loves
because he's so competent
and so collegial. Pete Dun-
bar was wonderful. Curt
Kiser Van Poole. If I start
down this list, I could go a
considerable time. They
were colleagues in the
sense of being constructive
and progressive and get-
ting things done.
NSF: Why do you think
being a liberal has become
such a bad thing?
D'ALEMBERTE: (Laughs.)
I don't know. When we look
at other countries, we're glad
to find liberals, because
that means they care about
democracy, they care about
responsible government.
I got the tag of "liberal,"
I think, for two reasons. I'm
- from quite early on a
liberal on civil rights. And
I was very much opposed to
the Vietnam War. I thought
it was a terrible mistake.
Actually, I always was
fairly conservative on fis-
cal matters. I voted against
most bonding. I didn't like
to bond. I don't believe in
borrowing and spending. I
can see a national policy of
borrowing, but in state gov-
ernment, it never made
any sense to me. I really
opposed the increase in
bonding powers that we


put through in the '68 (state)
constitution. I think we're
much better to get our tax
system in shape and go
ahead and tax and pay for
the things we spend now.
But you get to be a lib-
eral for one purpose and
you're regarded as a lib-
eral for all purposes.
NSF: When you look at
the future of the state and
nation, are you optimistic
or depressed?
D'ALEMBERTE: (Laughs.)
Probably a little bit of both.
Gosh, where we are today
just makes you feel dismal.
When I hear people talk-
ing about things that are so
obviously bad ideas, some-
times unconstitutional ideas,
you can get discouraged.
But overall, I feel optimistic.
We always seem to be able
to right the ship at some
point, and I feel optimistic
that'll happen again.


Some of it's going to hap-
pen because society's chang-
ing. As I look at what's
happened recently- gosh,
I could never have imagined
the movement for gay rights
going as fast as it's gone.
This has been incredible to
me. The civil rights move-
ment took is still taking
- forever. Not that every-
thing has been handled in
terms of gay rights, but an
enormous amount has
happened within a short
period of time. I think
we're blundering our way
to a decent resolution of
immigration problems.
Gosh, think about where
we were with women's
rights. It wasn't all that
long ago. I had a staff di-
rector in the Legislature
named Janet Reno. When
she first graduated from
Harvard Law School, she
went around to law firms


looking for a job. And a
number of law firms, in-
cluding mine, would not
hire her because they did
not hire women.
I look around at Talla-
hassee, which I knew very
well as a segregated town.
And look at it today. Look
at our public officials. Look
at how little people now
dwell on things that used
to just freeze them up. I'm
amazed when I teach in
the area of constitutional
law, and you start talking
to students about going to
a segregated school, having
segregated water fountains.
World War II, soldiers had
segregated blood banks. You
tell people those things,
they look at you like, "You
must be ancient. That's not
part of modern America."
And it's not. The fact that it's
not has got to leave you feel-
ing a little bit optimistic.


Dreaming of a New Job but
Don't Want the World to Know?


Lucky for me,
www.jobs.chronicleonline.com
lets me explore jobs anonymously
so I can get matched to my dream job
without anyone finding out.


Try Real-Time Job Matching and get hired
fast on www.jobs.chronicleonline.com


a a


TheCyAof mission!

Inverness Presents

2013 Patriotic

Evening f
Tuesday, July 3, 5-10 pm
Liberty & Wallace Brooks Parks

*Games*Food*Entertainment*
*Information Booths*Honor Guard* *


CHI ONICLE
( C.TR ......COUMTY.. j III











At home or

on the go...


We got you covered.


^-t

4t" Your News

__ __ Your Town

l5th. Q Your Way

www.chronicleonline.com


Remember your high school Senior prom.....
We are going back in time...to a Happy Place..with
.- ,- j9' l u' ft.. -*.: ,-..--,. .


$


FRIDAY, IUNE IS, 201?
6:00PM-10:00PM
$12 MIMBERI t15 SNONMMBERI
77 CIVIC CIRCLE, BEVERLY HILLt

Dancing to the tunes
Of Di Joe Dube...
Dinner includes:
Baked Ziti, Salad, Bread
& Butter and Ice Tea or For Tick
Coffee. Call: 35

CHRONICLE


ets and Info
2-746-4882


I~ I~


C4 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


COMMENTARY


i












BUSINESS


Inside:
Do you need higher education,
or hire education?/Page D2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Online jewelers offer alternatives


JOSEPH PISANI
Associated Press

NEW YORK
I t's wedding season. And the In-
ternet can be a busy jewelry
buyer's best friend, if you know
what to look for
Engagement rings and wedding
bands from online jewelers can cost
more than 20 percent less, experts
say That's because you're not paying
the extra overhead costs of traditional
retailers. And online retailers, such
as Blue Nile Inc. and James Allen,
usually have more styles to choose
from than their physical rivals.
More people are picking out their
baubles online. The online jewelry
and watch industry has grown to $9.8
billion, increasing an average of 2.9
percent a year for the past five years,
according to IBISWorld, an industry
research firm.
Rachel Hofstetter did most of her
wedding planning and buying online,
so she didn't think twice about buying
her wedding band online too. The 28-
year-old New Yorker bought a $210
14-karat rose-gold wedding ring for
herself on BlueNile.com after doing
an Internet search. "It's faster and
easier," says Hofstetter, who founded
Guesterly, which publishes glossy
magazines for wedding guests.
Tom Brodeforth knew he would ul-
timately buy his fiancee's engage-
ment ring online too, even though
they browsed jewelry stores first. "I
knew I could get a better deal on-
line," says Brodeforth, a 41-year old
bank vice president. Brodeforth, who
lives in Old Bridge, N.J., bought a
$25,000 2-carat diamond engagement
ring that's set in platinum. He thinks
he got a good deal. He had the ring
appraised in New York the week he
received it and was told it was worth
more than $30,000. "I was blown
away," says Brodeforth. He plans to
buy wedding bands for himself and
his future wife from James Allen for
their September wedding.
If you plan to buy a wedding band
or engagement ring online, here's
what you need to know.

MAKE SURE YOU CAN
RETURN IT
Before choosing an online store,
read the store's return policy thor-
oughly A diamond is hard to judge
online, and you might not be happy
with ring. The retailer should offer
free shipping and a full refund. And
it should allow you to send the ring
back within at least 30 days.


Don't get wrung
CLICK FOR DEALS: Engagement
and wedding rings from online jew-
elers can cost more than 20 per-
cent less than those from brick
and mortar stores, experts say.
CAN I RETURN THIS? Make sure
the online store will let you return
the ring for a full refund, at no
extra cost. There's always a chance
you won't love what you bought.
BlueNile.com and JamesAllen.com
offer refunds.
TOUCH IT FIRST: Ocappi.com will
send you six replicas, made of sil-
ver and cubic zirconia, of the rings
you are considering for free. Ri-
tani.com will send up to two rings
you are deciding between to a local
jeweler.
Online jewelry retailers
Blue Nile: www.bluenile.com
James Allen: www.jamesallen.com
Ocappi: ocappi.com
Ritani: www.ritani.com
Online resources
American Gem Society:
www.americangemsociety.org
Gemological Institute of America:
www.gia.edu
Truth About Diamonds:
www.truthaboutdiamonds.com

Most returns or exchanges are easy
Before settling on the $25,000 ring for
his fiancee, Brodeforth bought a
$19,000 from James Allen that he
wasn't happy with. The ring didn't
have that sparkle he was looking for
"I wasn't in love with it," Brodeforth
says. He sent it back, and with the
help of a customer service represen-
tative upgraded the ring with a new
diamond.
To limit returns, try buying from a
website that features high definition
photos. This will better enable you to
clearly see any imperfections in the
stone, says Ira Weissman, the founder
of diamond shopping guide TruthAbout
Diamonds.com. JamesAllen.com has
high definition video for the diamonds
it sells and Ritani.com has the same
for some of its stones.

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS
If you want to get a feel for a ring
before you purchase it, two websites
offer that option. Ritani will send up
to two rings of your choice to a local
jeweler so you can compare them. Ri-
tani works with about 100 stores
around the country It's free to have


the rings sent to a store, and there is
no obligation to buy one. But the on-
line jewelry store does take credit
card information in case you do want
to purchase one after seeing it, says
Kevin Flaherty, vice of president of
marketing at Ritani.
Ocappi, a high-end online jeweler,
will send to your home six replicas
of the rings you are considering buy-
ing for free. The replicas are made
with sterling silver and cubic zirco-
nia, which looks like a diamond. You
can keep the rings for five days, and
then ship them back for free. (But
you will be charged for them if
they're not returned.) There's no ob-
ligation to buy the real diamond
rings after sending the replicas
back, says Shaya Tenenbaum,
Ocappi's chief marketing officer

DIAMONDS NEED
TO BE CERTIFIED
If you're buying a diamond ring, it
should come with paper work from
either the Gemological Institute of
America or the American Gem Soci-
ety The two organizations analyze di-
amonds for what's known as the four
Cs: carat, color, clarity and cut The
certification will grade the stone, and
the criteria will help determine its
value.
Weissman says that other organiza-
tions certify diamonds too, but they
are not as respected in the industry
Other organizations may grade a dia-
mond higher than it is, and you could
end up paying more than it's worth,
says Weissman.

SAVING MONEY
ON A DIAMOND
There are two tricks to saving
money when buying a diamond: Buy
it a little smaller but don't skimp on
the cut.
Of the four Cs, the most important
is the cut, says Russell Shor, a senior
industry analyst at the Gemological
Institute of America. The cut deter-
mines how well the stone will sparkle
when light hits it. Even if the color or
clarity is of an average grade, the dia-
mond can still look great if it has an
excellent cut, says Shor
Another tip: Go a fraction of a carat
smaller A 1 carat diamond that costs
$6,000 can be about 25 percent
cheaper if you buy one that's 0.90
carat, says Jim Schultz, president of
James Allen. It will be hard to tell
any difference. "A fraction of a carat
is the width of a few sheets of paper,"
says Schultz.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS

Oil rises above $96,
tracking stock market
NEW YORK The price of oil closed
above $96 Friday, after the government
said the economy added 175,000 jobs
last month, a good sign for fuel demand.
Benchmark oil for July delivery gained
$1.27, or 1.3 percent, to finish at $96.03
a barrel. Oil ended the week with a gain
of 4.4 percent.
At the pump, the average price for a
gallon of gas remained at $3.63. That's
2 cents higher than a week ago, and 7
cents higher than last year at this time.
Meanwhile, Brent crude, a benchmark
for many international oil varieties, rose
95 cents to finish at $104.56 a barrel on
the ICE Futures exchange in London.
In other energy futures trading on the
Nymex:
Wholesale gasoline rose 2 cents to
end at $2.87 a gallon.
Heating oil gained 2 cents to finish
at $2.89 per gallon.
Natural gas was flat at $3.83 per
1,000 cubic feet.
Chrysler to recall nearly
435,000 SUVs
DETROIT Chrysler is recalling
nearly 435,000 Jeep SUVs to fix air bag
and transmission fluid leaks.
The automaker will recall more than
254,000 Patriots and Compasses from
2010 through 2012 in the U.S. to fix an
air bag problem. It's also is recalling more
than 180,000 Jeep Wranglers from 2012
and 2013 for transmission fluid leaks.
In the Patriots and Compasses, a
software error could cause late deploy-
ment of the side air bags and seat-belt
tightening mechanisms. For Wranglers
with 3.6-liter V-6 engines, Chrysler says
a power steering line can wear a hole in
the transmission oil cooler line. The
SUVs can leak fluid, damaging trans-
missions. Both recalls start in July.
The recalls come just two days after
Chrysler refused a government request
to recall more than 2.7 million older-
model Jeeps.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


\ SMART
MONEY


Car loan an


expensive


lesson
EAR BRUCE: My husband
co-signed for an automobile
for his brother, who swore
that he would keep up with the
payments. He did make one pay-
ment and is now somewhere
across the country with the car.
Now the bank is telling my hus-
band that he has to pay How can
he get out of this? R.J., via email
DEAR RJ.: I don't know how you
get out from under this mess. Your
husband was accepted as a co-
signer because his credit was good
and his brother was not credit wor-
thy Since the brother skipped
town, why should the lender look
any further than your husband?
Unfortunately, he is stuck. I don't
see any way to reduce the obligation.
See Page D3


When building a portfolio, are BRICS still a buy?


CHRISTINA REXRODE
Associated Press

NEW YORK Down,
down, down. That's the direc-
tion of stocks in the BRICS
economies, which were in-
vestment darlings last year
but now seem like dead-
weights.
In stock market terms, it's
been a disappointing year for
the emerging-market power-
houses that make up the cute
acronym: Brazil, Russia, India,
China and South Africa. Al-
most all the major stock indexes
are lower in the five coun-
tries. The market in the U.S.,
by contrast, is up 15 percent
But BRICS, for a lot of rea-
sons, are still a good buy in the


eyes of many investors, who
think this year's declines are
just a temporary blip and not
a long-term trend.
The economy is growing in
every BRICS country China
expanded at a rate of nearly 8
percent last year, lower than
previous years but enviable to
most everyone else, including
the U.S., which grew just a
hair above 2 percent. Growth
in the BRICS countries will
continue to outstrip that of the
developed world, and even
that of overall emerging mar-
kets, for at least the next five
years, according to the Inter-
national Monetary Fund.
Indeed, what made emerg-
ing markets so attractive in
the first place namely, un-


tapped potential is still in
ample supply in the BRICS.
For most, their workforces are
young and expanding; their
poverty rates are falling; their
life expectancy is growing. To-
gether, they account for about
42 percent of the world's pop-
ulation. Their demographics
are "way, way better" than the
developed world's, says Der-
rick Irwin, portfolio manager
at Wells Fargo Advantage
Funds.
And as for the troubling de-
clines in the BRICS stock
markets this year? Not to
worry, say Irwin and others.
The stocks have room to grow.
Irwin says emerging-market

See Page D4


Business events scheduled for this week


TUESDAY, June 11
WASHINGTON -Commerce De-
partment releases wholesale trade
inventories for April, 10 a.m.;
Labor Department releases job
openings and labor turnover sur-
vey for April, 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, June 12
WASHINGTON -Treasury
releases federal budget for
May, 2 p.m.
THURSDAY, June 13
WASHINGTON -Commerce
Department releases retail sales
data for May, 8:30 a.m.; Labor
Department releases weekly
jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.;


Freddie Mac, the mortgage
company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.;
Commerce Department releases
business inventories for April,
10 a.m.
FRIDAY, June 14
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases the Producer Price
Index for May, 8:30 a.m.; Com-
merce Department releases cur-
rent account trade deficit for the
first quarter, 8:30 a.m.; Federal
Reserve releases industrial pro-
duction for May, 9:15 a.m.
Smithfield Foods Inc. reports quar-
terly financial results.










D2


SS C, CITRUS COUNTY
*Coul Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


ATTENTION

All BUSINESSES!

Health care

reform:

You've got

questions,

we've got

answers
Representatives for large
and small businesses
are welcome to join us on
Friday, June 14, for the
Chamber member lunch at
the Plantation on Crystal
River. Our speaker, Richard
Mackiewicz, vice president of
sales for Florida Insurance
Brokers, will make an in-
formative presentation high-
lighting topics such as: the
reform timetable, tax credits
and penalties, eligibility and
benefits. Richard is the
group sales manager with 17
years of employee benefit ex-
perience. He received his ed-
ucation at Valdosta State
University, where he re-
ceived a Bachelor of Fine
Arts degree. He spent most
of his career at Mutual of
America, a Fortune 50 insur-
ance company. During his
tenure with this pension
company, Richard grew his
client base with a variety of
benefit programs. Richard
brought his corporate expe-
rience to Florida Insurance
Brokers in 2005, where he is
responsible for consulting
with prospective clients and
current clients on new prod-
ucts and a variety of compli-
ance issues. In addition to
work, Richard enjoys time
with his wife, Tammy and
their three children. He is
able to serve his community
as a volunteer for the Lutz
Lightning Gold softball team.
Log in to the Members
Only section to reserve your
prepaid reservation at the
discounted price of $18. Reg-
ister at www.citruscounty
chamber.com prior to noon
on Thursday, June 13. Price
at the door or invoiced for
members is $20, nonmem-
bers $22 payable at the door.
Reservations are required.
Call Terry at the Chamber at
352-795-3149 to reserve
your place.



Father's

Day is

June 16!

Stumped for

last-minute

gift ideas?
O ur Chamber directory is
filled with local busi-
nesses that can help you cel-
ebrate your dad.
He might enjoy a gift cer-
tificate to one of the many
fine restaurants in our
county, or
BUy the cafe
R where he
[Oc l likes to grab
SPEND ITHEREKEEPITHERE his favorite
cup ofjoe.
Many dads like their vehi-
cles to be in tip-top shape.
How about a certificate
for vehicle maintenance
like oil changes and
detailing?
A little pampering might
just be the perfect gift, too!
A certificate for a haircut or
even an in-home massage
to relax his hardworking
back might be just what he
needs.
A new fishing pole, hobby
supplies or a night out at the
movies might be a way to
spend quality time together
making memories.
Please visit www.citrus
countychamber.com to view
our directory.


The BWA awarded $1,000 scholarships to four The Business Women's Alliance of the Citrus
deserving female Citrus High School students at County Chamber of Commerce awarded a
the CHS Awards Ceremony on May 9. Pictured at $1,000 scholarship to a deserving woman at
the ceremony, from left, are: Brianne Barten Withlacoochee Technical Institute, who will use
(attending University of Central Florida, majoring the funds to continue her education in a health
in political science); Elizabeth Brannock career. Pictured at the recent check presentation,
(College of Central Florida, education); Jill Isenberg from left, are: Rebecca Martin and Lillian Smith,
(University of Central Florida, business marketing); BWA Scholarship Committee members, Martha
Lissette Toledo (University of Tampa, political Smaine (recipient and student of the LPN
science); and Jodi Billings, BWA Scholarship program) and Sandy VanDervort, WTI guidance
Committee chairperson, counselor.

Chamber's BWA awards scholarships


he BWA's scholarship awards are for women pur-
suing further education in health care careers or
non-health care business careers. The funds awarded
are used for tuition, books and materials. Scholarships
are funded through the organization's networking
luncheons and successful annual Women's HEALTH
and FITNESS Expo, which will be on Sept. 28 this year.
Recipients are chosen in a competitive process from
Citrus County's three public high schools and Withla-
coochee Technical Institute.


The Business Women's Alliance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce is a committee of the Cham-
ber for women only. Our mission is to empower and
develop women through education, networking, men-
toring and partnerships; and to promote opportunities
for all women throughout Citrus County. For more in-
formation about the Business Women's Alliance, find
us at Facebook.com/bwacitrus or contact the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce at 352-795-3149 or at
www.citruscountychamber.com.


Class of 2013 graduates

from Leadership Citrus


Congratulations to the Class of 2013! These local business people have completed their
journey in the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce's Leadership Citrus program.
Front row, from left: Michael Duca, Rockmonster, Inc.; Sherri Parker, Sherri C.
Parker & Assoc. Realtors; Terri Hartman, Crossland Realty; Katie Mehl, Citrus Memorial
Health System; Laura Grady, Citrus 95.3 and The Fox 96.7; Courtney Pollard, Citrus County
Chronicle; Sunshine Arnold, Jessie's Place; Lindsay Blair, BOCC; Cathy Edmisten, Oak Hill
Hospital; Meghan Shay, The Centers; Melissa Benefield, Abitare Paris Salon & Spa; Isaac
Baylon, Century-JW Morgan; and Melissa Wood, Citrus County Health Dept. Back row, from
left: Ray Thompson, Capital City Bank; Ryan Glaze, Citrus County Sheriffs Office; and John
Steelfox, Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office. For more information about being part
of the 2014 class, contact Cira at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce at 352-795-3149.


Program helps turn kids into leaders


A re you an emerging leader who
would like to participate in a
hands-on experiencethatmakes learn-
ing meaningful and interesting?
We are excitedto announce a new
program for Citrus County Students
entering their junior year of high
school. The YMCA, in partnership
with Leadership Citrus, a committee
of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, is introducing the Youth
Leadership Citrus Program. The pro-
gramis designedto be a youth version
of the esteemed Leadership Citrus
Program offered in our community
for more than 20 years.


YLC is a nine-month program
operating from September through
May including five full class-day
sessions plus an orientation retreat


Welcome new May

Chamber members
hese businesses chose to invest in Citrus County
with a membership in the Chamber, and we thank
them. We hope you will support these new members
by visiting their facilities and using their services. The
Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development
Council encourage you to Shop Citrus First!


Archangel Michael
Greek Orthodox
Church
4705 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0766
Families Come First
220 S. Pine Ave.
Inverness, FL 34452
352-419-6508
Hovet Photography
7096 W. Vantage Lane
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-364-3122


Mid-Florida Home-
less Coalition, Inc.
515 W. Main St.
Suite 424
Leesburg, FL 34748
352-860-2308
Nana's Health Foods
8022 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-0911
Point O' Woods Club
9228 E. Gospel Island Rd.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-634-4216


and graduation event. On each class
day, students have the opportunity
to meet decision-makers and engage
them in frank discussions on cur-
rent issues facing our community.
There are a limited number of
students who will be selected for
this opportunity. Candidates must
meet eligibility requirements and
participate in a panel interview. The
program fee is $90. Financial assis-
tance is available. For information,
call the YMCA office at 352-637-
0132 or visit www.ymcasuncoast.org
and select Citrus County under the
Location tab.


Joe's Family
Restaurant of
Inverness receives
New Image Award


News you

can use
RSVP now!
Reservations
close June 14
Rebecca Bays will address
the Business Women's Al-
liance at its June 19 lunch at
Plantation on Crystal River.
Rebecca will be discussing
the Tourist Development
Council. RSVP at www.
citruscountychamber.com
or call 352-795-3149.
Scalloping season
begins July 1
Make sure your summer
guests have made plans to
come enjoy the beauty of the
Nature Coast as the 2013 scal-
lop season begins. Scalloping
information is available at
the Chamber of Commerce
office and the Tourist Devel-
opment Council.
Showcase your
business at
September expo
Celebrate Citrus County
business by exhibiting
and/or attending the Sept. 7
Business Expo. The Cham-
ber will host this event at the
Citrus County Auditorium.
Visit us at www.citruscoun-
tychamber.com/expo for de-
tailed information on
exhibiting and/or sponsor-
ship opportunities for the
Business Expo. Register
prior to June 20 and receive
discounted pricing! Call Jeff
Inglehart at 352-795-3149.
Register for expo
now to secure
your real estate
Make plans to be part of
the Women's HEALTH &
FITNESS Expo, hosted by
the Business Women's Al-
liance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, on
Saturday, Sept. 28, from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River. Take advantage of
paid preregistration until
June 18, and choose your
preferred exhibit space. After
June 18, registration will be
open to health-, fitness- and
wellness-related businesses
and organizations, on a
"first-come, first-served"
basis. Chamber members re-
ceive a discount. Contact Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce at 352-795-3149,
or any Business Women's
Alliance member.




Upcoming
Chamber
events
June 13 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Christie Dental
June 14 Chamber
Member's Lunch, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Planta-
tion on Crystal River
June 19 BWA June
Member Lunch, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Planta-
tion on Crystal River
June 27 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Superior Residences
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com or
follow the QR code to see
the website on your
smartphone!
Wherever you go, what-
ever you do, take Citrus
County along with you!


oining owner Josif Kozevski, his daughter
Joanna Kozevski and Kitchen Manager Eric
Jorgensen are Chamber representatives Gailen
Spinka, Chamber President/CEO Josh Wooten,
and Jennifer Duca of Comfort Keepers.


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 D3


Hire education and higher education


As a consequence, he
should learn from the
experience.
DEAR BRUCE: Occa-
sionally, we find it nec-
essary to rent a car.
Every time we do, we
wonder if we should
sign up for all of the in-
surance offered by the
agency, which we usu-
ally waive. We are a bit
nervous because I keep
hearing nightmarish
tales about someone
having a wreck and it
costing them a ton of
money What are your
thoughts? Reader in
Michigan
DEAR READER:
There is much insur-
ance coverage that of-
fers extras that are not
worth considering, but
some plug up gaps, if
gaps exist. For example,
do you own a regular
car? If you do, and the
insurance you have ex-
tends to any other car
you operate and is suffi-
cient, then you don't
need the extra insur-
ance.
Let's assume you
don't have another car.
Then by all means you
need the extra insur-
ance since the rental
company will carry only
the minimum on you. It
has extra insurance to
cover itself, but gener-
ally, only the minimum
is on you.
DEAR BRUCE: My
fiance had great
credit for over 10 years.
When we got married
I took on the role of
the bill payer. I got
us deeper and deeper
in debt One of them
was our mortgage. My
husband dealt with
them and got us back on
track, but now our
credit is bad.
How are we going to
regain our credit? Is
there any hope? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER:
There may be some
hope down the trail for
you, but the first thing
you should do is turn
the bill-paying over to
your husband. You may
be a wonderful person,
but, for whatever rea-
son, you are not a re-
sponsible bill payer, and
all you are going to do is
make things worse.
The way to regain
your good credit is to do
what you should have
been doing all along:
Pay your bills on time. It
is a time-consuming
process, no pun in-
tended. It may take a
few years to regain your
credit, but it will hap-
pen if the bills are paid
in a proper fashion
from this point forward.
DEAR BRUCE: I am
41, single and work for a
small private company
My title at the company
is director of operations,
and I have been with the
company for 15 years.
I earn $50,000 a year
with a bonus potential
of $10,000 a year. How-
ever, the men here earn
$10,000 to $20,000 more
than women with the
same position. Should I
be content with what I
have, or should I leave
and look for more
money? PR, Read-
ing, Pa.
DEAR PR: You have
two choices. The first is
to be content and do
your job well, but at the
same time explore
other opportunities.
Second, if you are
doing a good job, you
might approach the
boss and say you are
happy working with him
and hope you have a
long-term relationship,
but you know that many
people in the same job
at other companies are
earning 20 percent to 40
percent more. Explain
that you are willing to
stay and do the best job
you can, but you would
like to know when you


can look forward to
earning more money
He may not able to
pay more money, or
maybe he just won't
want to. That's why you
should be looking now.


Send questions to bruce
@brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered.


t this time of year, along
with the pomp and cir-
cumstance of graduation
ceremonies, outstanding and de-
serving students are being recog-
nized for their dedication, talent
and dreams.
For the second year, Workforce
Connection has provided schol-
arships for graduating high
school students throughout Cit-
rus, Levy and Marion counties.
Our board of directors agreed to
provide up to $7,000 for two stu-
dents at each public school, and
this year we've awarded $80,500
in scholarships.
Kudos to Citrus County's class
of 2013 recipients: Arianna
Rudge and Austin Porta, both of
Crystal River High School; and
Tyler Neihoff and ALaura Led-
ford of Lecanto High School.
Organizations have myriad
reasons for honoring students,
whether for academic and/or
athletic prowess as well as finan-
cial need. Workforce Connection
did as well, for those reasons and
more; I mentioned "dreams" ear-
lier, but perhaps the students'
pragmatic plans are more to the
point.
Before I get into that, I need to
take a step back a year. You'll re-
call that in June 2012 we were
contending with the same wet,
nasty weather, but instead of a
tropical storm named Andrea,
we were dealing with Debby
Last June, Workforce Connection
was also launching a series of
Skills Gap forums some had to
be rescheduled, thanks to Debby
- designed to learn what critical
skills employers believed college


Laura

Byrnes


WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


graduates and job candidates
lacked.
The forums were designed to
move us beyond the anecdotal to
the specifics in order to determine
how pervasive the "skills gap"
was in our own backyard, and
then identify which critical skills
were needed in key industries.
Across the country, an esti-
mated 3 million jobs go unfilled
because employers cannot find
qualified workers. This doesn't
mean that our talent pool is un-
skilled, rather that the skills job
seekers have may not match
what's needed in the current or
emerging job market. A "critical
skill" is necessary for work to be
completed satisfactorily
Fast forward several months.
After 10 public forums, in-depth
interviews with business leaders
and a survey of employers, it
came as no surprise that, yes,
there were gaps some would
say chasms between the criti-
cal skills needed in some tar-
geted industry sectors and the
qualifications of job applicants
and recent graduates.
That understanding was cen-
tral to "Addressing the Skills


Gap," a report presented in De-
cember 2012 to Workforce Con-
nection's board of directors.
Starting in January, a Skills Gap
Task Force began prioritizing the
report's recommendations for
implementation, much of which
has been under way
And that brings me back to our
graduates, Arianna, Austin, Tyler
and ALaura.
Arianna and ALaura are both
going into nursing, Austin in-
tends to become a welder and
Tyler plans to become a fire-
fighter And the $3,500 scholar-
ship each received will help
them do that.
Dale French, Workforce Con-
nection's director of training and
counseling, said that all four stu-
dents were "chosen based on
recommendations by their guid-
ance counselors for academic ex-
cellence and commitment to
train in a field that supports our
local economy"
That last point is key: commit-
ment to train in a field that sup-
ports our local economy
If they have made that commit-
ment as have numerous recent
or maybe not-so-recent gradu-
ates who are looking for work in
our communities shouldn't we
commit to connecting them to
employment opportunities?
That's at the heart of Gov Rick
Scott's monthlong "Hire Florida
Grads" initiative, launched May
10 in which he challenged busi-
nesses and workforce and educa-
tion partners to help keep
Florida talent at home, working
for Florida.
As part of that initiative, we


held a "Hire a Grad" forum on
May 31 for college graduates and
employers. The forum was part
onsite and virtual job fair, part
workshop and part networking.
Graduates had the opportunity
to meet face-to-face with several
employers, as well as apply for
more than 50 open positions re-
quiring less than a year's experi-
ence some requiring no
experience at all. They also at-
tended sessions on making the
transition from classroom to ca-
reer and the effective use of so-
cial networking to gain
employment. Lastly, they were
able to network with workforce
experts about Workforce Connec-
tion's full menu of job seeker
services, available at no charge.
By the time you read this, the
statewide initiative will have of-
ficially come to a close, but we
don't intend to let it end with a
date on the calendar.
We will continue to work with
employers to match them with
the talent they need, and strive
to reach those who don't think
our workforce system has that
talent. We will also continue to
work with students and gradu-
ates to help ensure that hire edu-
cation resources, skills and
training isn't missing in their
higher education.


Laura Byrnes, APR, is Workforce
Connection's communications
manager and a Florida Certified
Workforce Professional. Please
contact her at 352-291-9559, 800-
434-5627, ext 1234 orlbyrnes@
workforceconnectionfl.com.


China's top butcher tries to sell US on takeover


Associated Press

LUOHE, China At an
age when most Chinese
executives are long re-
tired, the country's top
hog butcher is taking on a
daunting new job per-
suading Americans to
allow him to complete
China's biggest takeover
of a U.S. company.
Shuanghui Interna-
tional's $4.7 billion bid for
Smithfield Foods Ltd. has
the endorsement of the
American company's board.
But facing anxiety over food
safety scandals in China and
complaints about Chinese
cyber spying, 72-year-old
chairman Wan Long has
launched a charm offen-
sive to reassure Ameri-
cans they have nothing to
fear and possibly much to
gain from the tie-up.
"We want to be vigilant
that Smithfield's brand
doesn't change, its team
doesn't change, its pro-
duction sites don't change,
it doesn't cut jobs," said
Wan in an interview at
Shuanghui's 15-story
headquarters in this east-
ern Chinese city.
As for reassuring Amer-
ican consumers about
quality, Smithfield "already
has a very good food
safety control system," Wan
said. "With our support,
they will do better in qual-
ity and safety controls."
Wan's strategy of talking
to reporters and inviting
them to visit Shuanghui's
packing plants is an unusual
approach in China, where
companies are secretive
and corporate bosses
rarely speak in public.
As Chinese companies
expand abroad, those habits
have hurt some when the
United States, Australia
and other countries
balked at acquisitions by
unfamiliar buyers in oil,
mining and technology in-
dustries. Shuanghui's ap-
proach appears to reflect
an understanding that
success requires not just
money but winning over
politicians and consumers.
"There are plenty of ex-
amples of Chinese compa-
nies that made the largest
offer but were not ulti-
mately accepted," said
Kenneth Jarrett, an ex-
pert on government rela-
tions for consulting firm
APCO Worldwide in
Shanghai. "For any Chi-
nese company looking at
any investment in the
United States, they want
to be aware of the politi-
cal dynamic."
Shuanghui's bid for
Smithfield represents a
big step up on the global
stage for Chinese entre-
preneurs who are emerg-
ing from the shadow of
state-owned corporate gi-
ants. Foreign acquisitions
often are aimed at obtain-


Associated Press
Employees work Tuesday at a pork processing plant owned by Henan Shuanghui Group Ltd., in Luohe, Henan province.
Shuanghui's bid for Smithfield Foods Ltd. represents a big step up on the global stage for Chinese entrepreneurs who
are emerging from the shadow of state-owned corporate giants.


ing brands and skills to
help cash-rich but inexpe-
rienced Chinese buyers
set themselves apart from
rivals and speed their de-
velopment
In an effort to defuse
American concern,
Shuanghui took the un-
usual step for a food com-
pany of announcing in
advance it would submit
the proposed acquisition
for a U.S. government se-
curity review.
The Chinese acquisition
of the biggest U.S. pork
processor "is a bit con-
cerning," said U.S. Sen.
Chuck Grassley in a state-
ment last week. He said
regulators should look
closely at the deal.
Wan, dubbed "China's
Chief Butcher" by his
country's press, stressed
that selling pork loin and
sausage is very different
from the oil and high-tech
companies that have run
afoul of U.S. security
objections.
"Ours is a food industry.
It shouldn't be subject to
controls," he said, sitting
at a desk decorated with
porcelain pig figurines. "I
believe this will go
through without a hitch."
Most Chinese acquisi-
tions in the United States
are completed unevent-
fully, but the few that have
failed and the disclosures
required to obtain regula-
tory approval have made
companies skittish.
The Chinese state press
frequently invokes the
memory of state-owned
oil company CNOOC
Ltd.'s failed attempt in
2005 to buy American oil
and gas producer Unocal
Corp. CNOOC offered


more money than rival
Chevron Corp. and promised
to retain Unocal's work-
force, but withdrew after
some American lawmakers
objected the deal might
jeopardize national security.
Business consultants
said CNOOC, little known
abroad until then, stum-
bled by launching a sur-
prise bid for Unocal
without spending time to
explain itself to American
legislators and the public.
Acting as a high-profile
spokesman is a new role
late in life for Shuanghui's
Wan, who might be the
oldest full-time corporate
boss in China, where
some executives retire as
early as their 50s. Last
month, the founder of e-
commerce giant Alibaba
Group, Jack Ma, stepped
down as CEO at age 48,
saying he was "a bit too
old for the Internet."
Born in 1940, Wan ex-
emplifies the first genera-
tion of entrepreneurs who
scrambled to seize oppor-
tunities after then-
supreme leader Deng
Xiaoping launched mar-
ket-style economic re-
forms in 1979.
A former soldier, he al-
ready was in his 40s when
his coworkers elected him
manager of a struggling
slaughterhouse in 1985. He
is credited with turning
around the facility with
such radical innovations
for the time as operating
three shifts around the
clock, every day of the year.
The government's share
in the company dwindled
as Wan brought in other
investors. It became fully
private in 2006 after the
remaining state stake was


bought by foreign investors
including Goldman Sachs
and Singapore govern-
ment investment company
Temasek Holdings Ltd.
Today, Shuanghui has
70,000 employees and an-
nual sales in excess of
$8 billion. A sign on its
headquarters proclaims
it, "The Biggest Meat Pro-
cessing Base in China."
The company dominates
Luohe, an agricultural
city of 300,000 people on
the broad central China
plain where traffic on
major thoroughfares
pauses to let farmers herd
goats across the street The
city is dotted with the
company's sprawling meat-
packing plants, truck de-
pots and other facilities.
At its flagship slaughter-
house, a long, two-story
white building surrounded
by neat lawns, up to 10,000
pigs a day pass through
what Shuanghui says is
China's biggest meat cut-
ting operation.
In a cavernous hall
chilled to 50 degrees
Fahrenheit, dozens of em-
ployees in hooded white
overalls and face masks
working assembly line-style
at six automated conveyor
belts slice and pack slabs
of fresh pork. In an adja-
cent room, employees op-
erate machines the size of
cars that stuff ground
pork into sausage casings.
Shuanghui's reputation
was battered in 2011 when
state television revealed
its pork contained clen-
buterol, a banned chemi-
cal that makes pork
leaner but can be harmful
to humans. The company
promised to tighten qual-
ity enforcement


Smithfield, with about
46,000 employees, reported
revenue of $13 billion in
its latest fiscal year.
The American company
has said the acquisition
isn't about importing Chi-
nese pork into the U.S. In-
stead, it says this is a
chance to export into new
markets with its brands,
such as Smithfield, Ar-
mour and Farmland.
"We want to support it to
continue to become bigger
and stronger, and to real-
ize its expansion abroad,"
Wan said. "Smithfields has
a good (management) team,
good brands and good
technology. Regardless of
whether it is directed at
the Chinese market or at
the world market, all of
that is very attractive."
A key market will be
China, where pork is the
staple meat This country
consumes half the world's
pork and demand growth
is strong at a time when
consumption is leveling
off or falling in the United
States and other Western
markets.
For Smithfield, the deal
"provides an enhanced
platform for future
growth," said Fitch Rat-
ings analysts in a report
"To make this enter-
prise bigger contributes to
society. This is the respon-
sibility of entrepreneurs
like us," Wan said.
"Smithfield also needs
to make contributions to
the American people," he
said. "I hope this acquisi-
tion can help improve
Chinese-U.S. relations
and broaden trade be-
tween the two countries
and bring more benefits to
their people."





D4 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


CF boards

to meet

in June
Special to the Chronicle

The College of Central
Florida Foundation Exec-
utive Committee will meet
at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday,
June 12, in the Enterprise
Center Foundation Office
at 3001 S.W College Road,
Ocala, to discuss general
business.
The CF Foundation
Board of Directors will
meet at 4:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 19, in the
Founders Hall Boardroom
at 3001 S.W College Road,
Ocala, to discuss general
business.
Both meetings are open
to the public. A copy of the
agenda will be available at
each meeting. For further
information, please con-
tact the CF Foundation of-
fice, 3001 SW College
Road Ocala, FL 34474.



McDonald's

gives night

owls choice

of breakfast
Associated Press

NEW YORK McDon-
ald's is taking a small step
toward offering breakfast
items outside of its usual
breakfast hours.
Starting this month, the
fast-food chain says partic-
ipating 24-hour restau-
rants in select locations
will offer an "After Mid-
night" menu that includes
its oatmeal, Hot Cakes
with Sausage and the
Sausage Burrito. The roll-
out builds on a "Breakfast
After Midnight" menu the
company has been testing.
Customers also will be
able to mix items to create
"Midnight Value Meals,"
with either fries or hash
browns as their side items,
McDonald's says.
Fans of McDonald's
breakfast have long wanted
the chain to make its Egg
McMuffins and biscuits
available later in the day
The 'After Midnight' menu
is already available in
North Delaware, Delaware
and College Station, Texas,
according to McDonald's.


BUSINESS


Associated Press
An attendant demonstrates the game of baccarat May 23 during the Global Gaming Expo Asia in Macau. Almost
all of Macau's $38 billion in gambling revenue last year six times more than the Las Vegas Strip came from
the game, much of it from Chinese high-rollers betting borrowed money and dwarfing the takings from slots,
blackjack or roulette.



Chinese taste for baccarat


driving boom in Macau


Associated Press

MACAU In the nearly three
dozen casinos in Macau, the
world's biggest gambling market,
there's only one game that mat-
ters: baccarat
Almost all of Macau's $38 billion
in gambling revenue last year -
six times more than the Las Vegas
Strip came from card game, much
of it from Chinese high-rollers bet-
ting borrowed money and dwarfing
the takings from slots, blackjack or
roulette. Wherever you go in the
former Portuguese colony, you'll see
chain-smoking Chinese gamblers
crowded around baccarat tables as
players peel back their cards,
banking on their luck.
James Bond's favorite game is
overshadowed by blackjack and
poker in Las Vegas but the prefer-
ences of wealthy Chinese gam-
blers is changing that, and casinos
there have been adding more ta-
bles to attract them.
"Baccarat is simple and it offers
the opportunity to win big or lose
big," said ZhongJun-hei, a busi-
ness owner from eastern Jiangxi
province on one of his frequent
visits to Macau, a tiny self-govern-
ing Chinese region on the coun-
try's southern coast. "I'll know
right away if I put all my money
down in one hand I'll know if I
win or lose," he said as he chewed
on a fried chicken wing in a food
court before a night of wagering at


Two-thirds of Macau's
casino revenue comes
from VIP baccarat,
played by big-time
gamblers in private
rooms using money
lent by junket operators
that collect on debts
when their clients
return home.
the Galaxy casino-resort in the
city's Cotai Strip district.
Zhong and other Chinese gam-
blers said they like baccarat be-
cause it's easy to understand, not
too heavily weighted in favor of the
casino and exciting to play Lucky
rituals also add to the appeal for
mainland Chinese gamblers, most
of whom believe winning is more a
result of fate than skill.
Their tastes help explain how
Macau has risen from a forgotten
ex-colonial outpost into a glitter-
ing boomtown enclave in the
space of a decade. With a propen-
sity to gamble and rising incomes
thanks to red-hot economic
growth, newly wealthy mainland
Chinese have been flooding into
Macau, the only place in China
where gambling is permitted.


With companies including Las
Vegas Sands Corp., Wynn Resorts
Ltd. and MGM Resorts Interna-
tional planning a wave of new re-
sorts that are expected to open
from around 2015, Macau's de-
pendence on baccarat will get
even bigger.
Two-thirds of Macau's casino
revenue comes from VIP bac-
carat, played by big-time gam-
blers in private rooms using
money lent by junket operators
that collect on debts when their
clients return home. The junket
operators, some of which have
been suspected of links with or-
ganized crime, are part of an in-
formal banking system that skirts
Chinese controls on the amount
of cash citizens can take outside
of the country
The game turns on who ends up
with a better hand, the player or
the banker. Gamblers are dealt
two cards and predict whether
they will beat the banker, a posi-
tion that can rotate among the
players at the table. The winning
hand is the one that comes closest
to but not more than a total
of nine. In some cases, a third
card is dealt.
The game's speed is also an at-
traction.
Depending on the version, 40 to
55 games of baccarat can be
played in an hour, compared with
12 to 15 for roulette. It also means
casinos can earn money faster.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weight


loss drug


Belviq


gets US


launch

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Arena Pharmaceuticals
said its weight loss drug
Belviq will be available to
U.S. patients beginning
this coming week, nearly a
year after the drug was of-
ficially approved by fed-
eral regulators.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration approved
Belviq last June for adults
who are obese or who are
overweight and have at
least one serious medical
condition, such as dia-
betes or high cholesterol.
At the time, Belviq was
the first new drug ap-
proved by the FDA for
long-term weight loss in
more than a decade.
Despite only achieving
modest weight loss in clin-
ical studies, the drug was
safe enough to win the
FDAs endorsement, amid
calls from doctors for new
weight-loss treatments.
The drug's launch was
delayed for months by lo-
gistical hurdles, including
classification by the Drug
Enforcement Administra-
tion. According to the
drug's label, Belviq will be
classified as a Schedule
IV controlled substance,
which means it has a low
potential for abuse. A
small segment of patients
in company studies re-
ported experiencing eu-
phoria and hallucinations.
Arena Pharmaceuticals
and partner Eisai Co. said
Friday the drug will be
available beginning Tues-
day Under an agreement
between the companies,
Arena will manufacture
and supply the drug from
its facility in Switzerland
and Eisai will market the
drug in the U.S.
Because of the delays to
its launch, Belviq actually
arrives on the market
10 months after competi-
tor Vivus' Qsymia, which
launched in September
Studies have shown that
Qsymia produces more
weight loss than Belviq.


BRICS
Continued from Page D1

countries, which include BRICS,
represent about 29 percent of
the global economy but just
12 percent of global stock market
value. That means the emerging-
market stocks are "punching be-
neath their weight," he said, and
"still maturing."
The U.S., on the other hand, is
punching above its weight: It
takes up 47 percent of the
world's stock market value, but
makes up less than 24 percent of
the world economy, according to
calculations using the MSCI All
Country World Index.
Luiz Carvalho, managing part-
ner at Tree Capital, thinks that
concerns about the BRICS stock
markets are overblown and are
already accounted for in the
lower stock prices. He believes
that now they're set to grow.
The BRIC term was invented
in 2001 by Jim O'Neill, the well-
known Goldman Sachs econo-
mist He needed a shorthand
way to refer to four big, develop-
ing countries that seemed
poised to drive global growth. It
was just BRIC back then, not
BRICS, because O'Neill didn't
include South Africa.
The acronym caught on and
was embraced by the countries.
Brazil, Russia, India and China
held a BRIC summit in 2009.
Two years later, they invited
South Africa to join.
Investors caught on, too. From
2001 to 2007, the BRICS coun-
tries clocked better stock gains
than the world's most industrial-
ized countries. But the BRICS
beat the developed countries
only twice from 2008 to 2012, as
measured by the MSCI BRIC
index and the MSCI G7 index,
which encompasses the seven
most industrialized countries in
the world.
For investors, it's important
to remember that even if
BRICS are lumped together in
hearts, minds and analyst re-
ports, they still should be exam-
ined individually


Associated Press
An investor reacts Friday as she looks at the stock price monitor at a private securities company in
Shanghai, China. Asian stock markets fell Friday, ignoring a rebound on Wall Street.


"Not all BRIC countries are
created alike," said Anthony
Chan, chief economist for Chase
Private Client For short-term
prospects, he likes China best,
with Brazil a distant second, but
he has concerns about South
Africa.
Still, he's optimistic about all
the BRICS. If they "pursue the
right policy paths," he said,
their growth rates will be
"much more exciting than the
developed markets'."
Here's a quick glance at each
country.
Brazil:
Declining demand for iron ore
and other raw materials has
hurt Brazil. The central bank
has tried to stimulate the econ-
omy and met only limited suc-
cess. Growth was less than 1
percent last year and roughly
3 percent in 2011, a disappoint-
ment after growth of nearly
8 percent in 2010.
Some analysts think a turn-
around is near The government
has been trying to trim energy
costs and strengthen investment
in infrastructure, according to


the World Bank. Much depends
on China, which is Brazil's
biggest trading partner.
Growth is expected to rise to
3 percent this year
Stocks: The Brazil Bovespa is
down 15 percent this year, after
rising 7 percent last year
SRussia:
Russia depends heavily on oil
and gas exploration and produc-
tion, so it has suffered as prices
have flat lined. Labor strikes
and a lack of business invest-
ment have derailed productivity
Its population, unlike in other
BRICS, is shrinking.
Growth has been around 3 or
4 percent for the past three
years, roughly in line with the
world average but still below
where it was before the finan-
cial crisis. Growth is expected to
be about 3 percent this year, un-
changed from 2012. The World
Bank said the country needs to
shrink the government's in-
volvement in the economy,
clamp down on corruption and
map out a plan for its aging pop-
ulation.
Stocks: The MSCI Russia


index is down 13 percent this
year, after rising 5 percent last
year
India:
Growth dipped to 4 percent
last year, which is slow by India
standards. It's possible that the
economy is just taking a
breather after years of blistering
growth, experts say India's
growth eased to 8 percent in
2011 from 11 percent in 2010.
Some investors see deeper
problems, though. There are
worries that the country, despite
some recent changes, hasn't
done enough to open itself up to
foreign investors. Others are
waiting to see how elections fare
next year, and wonder if a new
government could stoke stability
and tamp down corruption. As
more workers move from the
countryside to the cities, it's vital
that the country spend more on
infrastructure like roads and the
electric grid. India's economy is
projected to grow 6 percent this
year.
Stocks: The India SENSEX is
flat this year, after rising 26 per-
cent last year


China:
China has powered forward
as it moves toward more of a
market-based economy It
propped up the world economy
in the depths of the financial
crisis, growing rapidly even
when the economies of most
other countries shrank.
In 2012, China's economy grew
about 8 percent. That was down
from the 9 and 10 percent range
of the previous four years but
still one of the fastest rates in
the world. Chan, from Chase Pri-
vate Client, thinks the slowdown
reflects the country's rebalanc-
ing from an export-based econ-
omy to one more focused on
consumer spending. The govern-
ment is pumping more money
into social programs, which
should also spur consumer
spending. Growth is expected to
be 8 percent this year
Stocks: The Shanghai Com-
posite Index is down 3 percent
this year, after rising 3 percent
last year
South Africa:
South Africa has successfully
transformed itself from
apartheid to a democracy with
modem infrastructure. Growth,
however, has been around just
2 or 3 percent for the past three
years, less than the world aver-
age. It is expected to pick up
slightly this year to 2.8 percent
from 2.5 percent
The country is saddled with a
devastating unemployment rate
of 25 percent, and it's expected
to get worse. The country was
hurt by an electricity crisis in
2007, which was caused by aging
power plants. Then the global fi-
nancial crisis reduced demand
for South Africa's raw materials,
including gold, diamonds and
platinum. This year, the mining
industry has been plagued by vi-
olent strikes. High rates of HIV
and AIDS are straining the
health-care system, and deep in-
equalities between the rich and
poor are hindering growth, ac-
cording to the World Bank
Stocks: The MSCI South
Africa index is down 5 percent
this year, after rising 21 percent
last year


W 0
laM


B^S^^^B!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY,JUNE 9,2013 D5


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


. m. *** .0 .


WWM Libra mid 60's
good looking, physically
fit, various interests ISO
SWF n/s Nice Figure,
weight prop height, a
little extra ok, 58-72 for
LTR. Recent photo, will
rtn. Serious inquiries
only. No games.
Please mail letter of
interest to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429 Blind Box 1831P



BOWFLEX WEIGHT
BENCH pulls 210lbs
very good cond. no
Friday night or Sat calls
$200 obo 352-341-0242







CRYSTAL RIVER
HOME FOR
RENT
3 Bedroom. 2-1/2
bath. Beautiful Newer
Home with 2 Car
Garage. Large Lot.
Laundry Room.
Screened in Patio.
Quiet Neighborhood.
Rent $895. $900
Security Deposit
Contact Connie
(352)293-6223


Look
Patty, formerly of
Rick's Barber Shop is
now cutting hair at
Vinny's Barber Shop
Alesci's Corner
1053 E Norval Bryant
Hwy. Hernando, FI
352-364-1793
Register QH Mare,
Palomino, Awesome
blood lines-Gay Holly
Bars !, $1500 obo
(352) 628-1472



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352)771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Lg BBQ Grills
8ft satellite Dishes
& MORE 352-270-4087



3 Free Kittens
all females, 7 wks old 1
blk, 2 blk and gray with
strips. Mommy needs a
break,they need a lov-
ing home 352-382-0386
5 yr old Chow Mix
up to date on shots
spade, micro-chipped
very loving, not good
with other animals
352-564-0211
FREE
2 Aged Geldings
Great Baby Sitters
Under 100 lb. riders
(352) 628-1472
FREE KITTENS
8 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
FREE KITTENS
striped with white paws,
won't be ready for
2 weeks
pls call, 352-302-0951
Free Mother Cat,
Father Cat
and Baby Cat,
All very sweet, would
like to go together
(352) 795-7513
FREE
Part Bengal Cat
Young Male.
neutered must have
Vet References, free
to a good home
352-464-1567
Gray & White
2 yrs old spayed fe-
male, all shots, micro
chipped, indoor, very
loving, comes with
loads of extras
352-503-2794
KITTENS- 3 WKS old
calico, orange.
blk/wh, blue eyes
Cl BTN8-9 a.m. or 8-9
p.m. (352) 746-1904
Peking Duck
To a good home
(352) 464-1567
Television
Sylvania 23 in. Color
TV. Works OK. U take
away. 352-637-2153





Yoir%\\o ridfiM

Need a jo,)b


qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CrIOaNICLE
Classifieds


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct a $5.001b.
S(352) 897-5388*
Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistymeadows-
blueberryfarm.com




Bull Dog Mix
Male, white with black
spots on ears, 7 mths..
answers to (PIG)
Missing from W. Oliver
St/Yulee, Old
Homosassa. PIs call
352-238-5936
LOST
"Emmy" English Bull
Dog, Female, Brown
nose, S. Lockverness
Pt. Inverness
REWARD
(352) 341-7732
LOST
American Pitt
10 yrs. Female, Rosie
Brown & White,
Near Tuck Point
Inverness
REWARD
Owner Heartbroken
(352) 419-7036

Lost Chinese Pug
Male, Black
Citrus Springs Area
(352) 229-0325
LOST
Sterling Silver
Chain & Cross
has loved ones ashes
Hunters Springs Park
Crystal River Area
REWARD
(352) 322-0314
Lost Yorkie
Male, chipped,
Blue & white collar
Pine Ridge Area
REWARD
352-746-7044
Orange Tabby Cat
female one eye, chip-
ped lost in Brady
Subdivision, 6/6/13
Homosassa reward
352-503-3848
PITBULL
male,chipped,
grey nose
Lost in vicinity of
Croft Road,
REWARD
352-302-9556
Spotted Cat
Female, Golden colors,
declawed, lost 6/1/13
(pretty springs area,
Crystal River)
she is micro chipped
just moved in area, re-
ward offered please
help me find her
352-817-5750
White Female cat, long
hair with red ear tip,
spayed, 3 yrs old lost
around Cardinal and
Elsie pt area Lecanto
352-628-4482
White Manx Cat
Blue Eyes, deaf, 10 Ibs,
8 yrs old. Missing since
5/20, Independence
HWY, Inverness
352-726-1019




All Black Male Dog
Med. hair, long bushy
tail, approx 50lbs,
Found in the area of
SE 12th ave/SE 2nd st
in Crystal River
228-4517 or 212-7740
Found in Meadowcrest
brown, orange, beige
Adult Female Cat
gets along with people
very well, extremely
loving, Please Call
352-795-0842
If you are the who lost
something at TJ Max
on Wednes. June 5th
and can identify
the item
Call (352) 860-0796
Monkey Sighting
End of Gun off Gospel
Island to North.
If looking for your pet
look in that area




PRAYER TO ST
JUDE
May the Sacred Heart
Of Jesus be adored,
glorified, loved and
praised throughout
theworld now and for-
ever, Sacred Heart of
Jesus, pray for us, St.
Jude, worker of mira-
cles, pray for us St.
Jude, helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
Say this prayer 9 times
a day for 7 days and
your prayer will be an-
swered. It has never
been known to fail. Pub-
lication must be prom-
ised. Thank you St.
Jude for your help.
PRN and DJN

Tupperware
Call Fran Smith
June has lots
of great specials
352-746-3652

Tupperware
Call Fran Smith May
is Birthday month lots
of great specials
352-746-3652




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 152ct S5.001b.
S(352) 897-5388**


Construction
Secretary

Must be proficient w/
word, excel, & adobe
acrabot. organized,
personable and able
to multi task. DFWP
Send resume to
applicants@tam-
pabay.rr.com
or Mail to P.O. Box
1053, Lecanto, FL
34460-1053

PIT
Office Assistant

must be professional
have equine
background & be
a team player
Homeowner's Assoc.
exp. helpful, Smoke
-free workplace in
Beverly Hills
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-0875




HAIR STYLIST

Full time Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person









IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




Basic R-Xray/
Medical Office
Team Member

wanted for busy
practice. Cert/State
License required, great
customer service skills,
and positive attitude.
Please fax resume to:
352-746-5605.

BILLING CLERK

FT M-F 8:30am-5pm,
2 Office locations,
competitive salary
with benefits. Mini-
mum 3yrs billing expe-
rience. Resume must
include prior employ-
ment references.
Submit Resume To
Citrus Podiatry Cen-
ter, P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120
FAXES NOT
ACCEPTED
Care Givers
Activity Coordinator

forALF must have good
references, must apply
in person call 344-5555
ext 102 for appointment
DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Emall Resume To:
marvamoll@
vahoo.com

DOCTORS ASSIST
Needed

Must Draw Blood
EKG & Injections
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1832M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River Fl. 34429

Exp. Front End
Associate

for medical office
Computer skills a
must. EMR/Medical
billing a plus.
Fax Resume to:
352-344-8218

F/T RN

Needed w/benefits
Apply In Person
Or Fax Resume
To: 352-746-2952
ADVOCATE HOME
HEALTHCARE
2653 N. Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic#HHA299991842

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

PART TIME
RECEPTIONIST
For Busy Medical
Office. Medical Ex-
perience Required.
Please Send Resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447


RN's/ LPN's/OT's
PTA's & CNA's
NEEDED

For Home Health Visits
In Citrus County Area
Per Diem w/ potential
for Fulltime. Per Diem
rates & mileage paid
Fax Resume to:
All About Home Care
Mgt 352-236-6096

Veterinary Hosp.

Large Veterinary
Hospital seeking a ex-
perienced Technician
or Assistant. Looking
for a positive, Friendly
person to join our
team. e-mail: mhosp
@tampabay.rr.com




Administrative
Assistant

Real Estate Company
has an immed. opening
for highly skilled individ-
ual. Send resume to
H.R. Dept, P.O. Box
522, Crystal River, FI
34428

AIRLINE CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL
Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769

AIRLINE CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL
Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769

Citrus County
Clerk of Courts

is seeking a
Financial Analyst
position. Bachelor's
degree required;
CPA is preferred.
55,806-89,523
DOQ/E. Apply on line
httpJwww.derkcfi.fus
Closing date
6/12/13. If questions,
call 352-341-6483

Closing Agent

Express Title Services
Needs, exper. closing
agent ASAP send re-
sume to H.R. Dept, P.O.
Box 522, Crystal River,
FI 34428 All inquires
kept confidential

Public
Information
Officer
Announcement
#13-23

Professional work
providing staff
assistance to the
Board of County
Commissioners.
County Administra-
tor and other
County Depart-
ments and Offices.
Writes and distrib-
utes press releases.
Serves as liaison
between depart-
ments, officers, news
media, government
entities and other
groups. Graduation
from an accredited
college with a
Bachelor's degree
in Public Adminis-
tration, Business
Administration,
Marketing or closely
related field or an
equivalent combi-
nation of training
and experience.
Minimum of two
years experience
performing similar
duties for a large
organization. Salary
range $1,815.75
-$2,723.63 B/W DOQ
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You may also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online
by Friday, June 14,
2013. EOE/ADA


MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
*Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.

Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

Real Estate
Property
Manager

Full Time in
Homosassa, FL
Duties include
processing leases,
managing & growing
existing book of
business. Successful
candidate must have
excellent communica-
tion & computer skills
Must demonstrate
ability to provide out-
standing customer
service. 1-5 years
exp. in Real Estate
Office "Active Real
Estate License req'd."
Email Resume to
csugarmio
tampabav.rr.com





Servers

Accepting Applcation
10am-1:30pm or 2-4p
ADPly In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19
Next to Mr. B's C.R.
Drug Free Work
Place





FIREWORK
Sales Crew &
Independent Setup
Crew Needed

Start Immediately
Training avail. 4 to 5
people. Sales exp.
a plus. Commission.
Background check
Emall Applcation
greenunllmlted
@yahoo.com
352-464-1416

SALES

Energetic, motivated
sales/clerical person
for Home Furnishing
Center. Prefer sales
exp. & willingness to
learn all facets of op-
eration. Apply in per-
son: Badcock Home
Furnishing Center
3690 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FI





Exp Bucket
Truck Operator
&Tree Climber

CDL License a plus
call 352-344-2696

FABRICATORS
NEEDED

P/T w/ F/T potential,
NO EXP. NEC.Will
train, Must be detail
oriented and have
good hand eye
coord. Drug Free
Workplace

DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
352-794-5460












Scoggins Chevy
Buick,
Chiefland

is growing and we
are looking for a
Transmission Drivea-
bility Issues Techni-
cian. GM training a
plus. We offer Top
Pay, based on ex-
perience, Health,
Dental and Vision
beneifts and No
Weekends..
Email Resume To
kbelfry@ymail.com
or Call Kevin Belfry,
Service Manager at
352-493-4263


Subcontractor
Installer

Must have own tools
& vehicle. Lic/Ins.
w/ workmans comp.
Steady work
needs to be quality
conscious &
a self-starter. Pay
perjob. Contact
DEEM CABINETS
Attn: Dave Foley
3835 S Pittsburgh
Ave. Homosassa


YOUR NEW DRIVING
JOB IS ONE PHONE
CALL AWAY! Experi-
enced CDL-A Drivers
and Excellent Bene-
fits. Weekly
Hometime.
888-362-8608. 1 to 5
Weeks Paid Training.
RecentGrads w/a
CDL-A can apply
online at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Bconsc




Clerk, Part time

Needed for Our
Thrift Store Clothing
Dept. 4 days a wk.
24 hrs. Requires lift
ing up to 30 Ibs, fast
past fun working
environment. retail
experience helpful
but not necessary
ADDpl at
ANNIE W. JOHNSON
THRIFT STORE
Dunnellon


EARN EXTRA
$$MONEY$$
Deliver Phone
Books
Citrus County, FL
4 Flexible Hours
+ Have Insured
Vehicle
4 Have Valid
Driver's License
+ Must Be At Least
18 Yrs. Old
4 No Experience
Necessary
4 Clerks/ Loaders
Needed
855-955-7337
Job Ref #FL05
www.sdds
delivery.com


EXP. ROUTE
DRIVER

must have CDL LIC.
w/air brake & tanker
endorsement
APPLY WITHIN:
at 2240 N. Skeeter
Terrace, Hernando
between 8am & 2pm
NO PHONE CALLS

FARM LABORER

Dalton, OH- Lydell
Steiner- care of sheep,
heifers & crop/hay
farming, using tractors.
Only available from
7/18/13- 4/30/14. Tools
provided at no charge.
Employment guaran-
teed for at least 3/4 of
the work hrs of the total
period in which the work
order is in effect.
Housing is available
(including U.S. workers)
at no cost to workers
who cannot reasonably
return to their perma-
nent residence. Wage
eleven eighty/hr. Trans-
portation & subsistence
expenses to the
worksite will be paid
upon completion of 50%
of the work contract.
Apply at the State Work-
force Agency in
Wooster, OH
330-264-5060 job order
OH559239
NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone?

TELEMARKETERS
Needed
Dally/Weekly Bonuses
Andrea, 352-628-0254

Property
Manager

Needed
immediately.
Seeking a F/T pro-
fessional at Floral
Oaks Apartments.
Candidate must
have excellent
communications
skills, basic math,
ability to work in an
organized manner
and computer
skills. On site apart-
ment available.
Pleasesendresume
or apply at:
Floral Oaks Apts.
8092 S. Floral Oaks
Cir, Floral City, FL
csaunders@
hallmarkco.com

SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449




Care Givers
Activity Coordinator

forALF must have good
references, must apply
in person call 344-5555
ext 102 for appointment

Delivery Person

P/T Requires Drivers
License & lifting up to
100lbs. PIs call
352-628-0808




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294




BEAUTY SALON
FOR SALE
Established & Runn-
ing Fully stocked
Turn key $20,000
352-422-2960



CLOSE IN 12 ACRES
8 MOBILES Busy Hwy.
Good Income,
Finance Arranged
352-212-6182


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


I U


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door. 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
527.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
* All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



DRIFTWOOD CARVED
FISH $80
(352) 527-8993
DRIFTWOOD CARVED
FISH $80
(352) 527-8993



30" GE Profile
Convection Wall Oven
black, new $2500. only
$175. (352)382-4153
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Bedroom Set
5 pc., Queen Size,
w/ box spring & mat-
tress + 42 Visio TV set
w/ table, recliner &
love seat end table &
lamp, all items 9 mos.
old must. Sell $875.
(352) 382-7234
DISHWASHER Ken-
more, runs well, black
$50. or BO.
352-382-9052
DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
FREEZER-UPRIGHT
Sears Kenmore
25"Dx 27 1/2"W x 63"H
Works great, Downsizing
$100 352 746-7232
GAS GRILL
TABLETOP-NEW-4
BOTTLES PROPANE
$65 (352)527-8993


GE Dishwasher
Amana Refrigerator,
bottom freezer
20 Both for $300
Washer/Dryer
Kenmore $180
(352) 246-3500
GE Dishwasher
runs great
$100. obo
352-637-4645
GE Washer, king Size
capacity, AMANA
Dryer,very good
condition, $150. for
pair 352-637-5177
HVY DUTY WASHER
Like New Condition
2 speed,3 wash cycles
3 water levels, 3 temp
$99 270-7127
Large
Chest Freezer,
$175.
(352) 613-0539
MICROWAVE
Sunbeam 750 watt,
white, good shape,
($10) 352-613-7493
TURKEY FRYER
BUTTERBALL
ELECTRIC-14
LB-EXCELLENT $100
(352) 527-8993
TURKEY
FRYER-ELECTRIC
EXCELLENT-$60
(352)527-8993
WASHER
$100 In perfect working
condition. 30 day war-
ranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504



FILING CABINET
Premier4 drawer
52 X15 X 25 Excellent
$100. (352)563-6410




DUDLEY'S






THREE SALES

Thurs 6-6 Walk about
Auction 3pm
in & out- furniture,
box lot, value new
items & fun
Sat 6-8 Estate TAG
sale 8am 1747
SE 5th St Ocala,
FL 34471 Entire
Contents
Sun 6-9-Antique &
Collectible Auction
1 rn 100 lots live
& online. Furniture,
jewelry, rugs, coins,
sterling & more
500+lots
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


You've Got It!





Somebody






Wants


It!


S C I I R LS C N

CHIONiciLE



(32) 563-5966

www.chronicleonline.com
B40980S


Your News.


Your Town.


Your Way.
IOOEXJS


CLASSIFIED







D6 SUNDAY, JUNE 9,2013


HomeTheatre A/V
receiver amplifier $20.
352-4194464
Pair of speakers
$10.
352-4194464
Patio 46" Round glass
top with umbrella,
+ 4 chairs, 2 recliner
$85.
(352) 697-4219
TV STAND $50 Beauti-
ful smoked glass.Paid
$150+ 47Wx14Hx20D
Held a 50"TV
314 607-1607



MIRROR BEVELED
PLATE GLASS MIR-
ROR 39"H X 62"W $30
(352) 527-8993
WOODEN LADDER SIX
FOOT $25
(352) 527-8993



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
SCANNER CANON
CANOSCAN 4400F with
35mm attachment,
works w/ XP $25.
(352)563-6410



AUTO LIFT above
ground lift- $900.00 you
take down, and move.
352-563-1600
DIESEL OIL PURIFICA-
TION SYSTEM bypass
filtration unit never in-
stalled still in box $100
call or text352464-4280



PATIO TABLES AND
CHAIRS $100- match-
ing 5 chairs, 2 round
tables.Crystal River.
314 607-1607
TABLE& 4 CHAIRS
Round 40", 4 high back
chairs with arms. Beige
plastic. Table top weath-
ered. $25 746-7232


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins.
Will Care For You &
Assist in Daily Needs
*352-249-7451"
Licensed Piratical
Nurse Looking for
Private Duty Work
(352) 503-6792




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


i--

3 DRAWER DRESSER
Brown/wood tone for-
mica. 36wx17dx30h.
Excellent condition. $30
527-1239.
3 RATTAN/metal BAR
STOOLS $75
Beautiful. Good
shape. Sugarmill
314 607-1607
4 Living Room Chairs,
formal and casual
1 Recliner
$50.ea
(352) 613-0539

4 Sectional Blond
Oak entertainment
center, with 3 glass
doors 10' x 6' $125, 2
Jensen floor speaker
JP 1500 Series
32"x19" $60
(352) 637-6284

BAR STOOLS
(2)BLACK SWIVEL
W/CUSHIONS $25
EACH (352) 527-8993
Bed, Headboard,
Footboard & Frame,
dark mahogany
sleigh style
$200.
(352) 382-1480
BOOKCASES 2 Oak
finish Approx. 35H, x
24W, 9D Excellent $10.
each (352)563-6410
BUNK BED
Complete Set
& 4 drawer chest
Solid wood-honey clr
incl. linens, $350 OBO
352-503-2256
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
DINING TABLE AND
CHAIRS Solid Oak, six
chairs with upholstered
seats, Table is 42"X
66"(without leaf)78" with
leaf. Golden oak color in
perfect condition. $500.
352-564-8650
Entertainment Center
with 2 towers, 2 glass
doors, 2 shelves, dark
mahogany
$200.
(352) 382-1480
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT Cherry color,fits
27" TVglass door for
DVD player etc. Excel-
lent.$50 746-7232
Full Bed
with head board,
dresser, mirrorone
night stand $650
352-410-6823
352-484-9066
Furniture for sale
Moving Sale
Couch w/qu bd, $200,
Tbl solid wood, w/4
chairs w/wheels $250 or
w/matching TV hutch
$325, 863-661-6220
German Oak
Dinning Room Table
w/6 chairs, inlayed
padded cushions $750
352-410-6823
352-484-9066


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Palios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


Furniture for sale
Love Seat $75, Recliner
$20 863-661-6220
German Oak Furniture
Living room set 3 pieces
sofa, love seat and
chair, coffee table &
side table with tile $1250
352-410-6823
352-484-9066
German Oak Hutch
10' long, glass doors
$950
352-410-6823
352-484-9066
KITCHEN ISLAND
Black,SOLID,glass
topped.Good shape
$200 cash 3146071607
Kitchen Table w/4
padded chairs,
like new, neutral color
perfect for kitchen
nook $80.
352- 489-0818
Leather Sofa,
3 cushions med. tan,
86" Wide with ham-
mock excel. cond.
org $1,400 asking $400
(352) 382-1480
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
RECLINER Tan,
fabric recliner.
$25 352 228 1515
SOFA $250 Like
NEW-poppy color. Per-
fect shape. Moving.
Come see.Sugarmill
314 607-1607
Sofa
Beige linen, weave, with
end chaise, and queen
pull out bed like new
$425 (352) 795-7424
Walnut Buffet
with server top, exec.
cond.$500
352-344-9384
Wood Tble w/ 2 chairs
PCArmoire, flat screen
credenza, hope chest,
shopvac 3.0 HPToro
elect, blowernew lighted
4' xmas tree, 3 drawer
desk, 2 drawer side tble,
$475. 352-746-7074



2009 CUB CADET
RIDING LAWN
MOWER Less than 15
hours, new belt and
blades. $900.00 OBO
352-563-1600
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
BAMBOO STAKES
New 3/4" X 6'
5 for $10 613-5838
www.Rickybobs.com
Hand Saw
Black & Decker 1HP
$60; Black & Decker
hand Drill $60. Both
good Cond. Cash only
(352) 341-1714
LAWN MOWER *
HONDA
21" Self Propelled
walk behind, like new.
$200 OBO (352)
527-1287


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
P FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Toro Mulching Mower
21" cut, 6.5 H.P
$75.
Sears Kenmore
propane gas dryer
heavy duty, $75.
352-507-1490
TROY BILT 42"
Zero Turn Lawn
Tractor, 19 HP,
$1200. leave msg if no
answ er 352-344-2901




Many Varieties 1 gal.
10 at $4.95 each
613-5838 More info
www.Rickybobs.com





MOVIt4G
Sj V. I EG


Crystal River
Many Items
call for appt.
352-364-1255
or 352-364-6794

DUDLEY'S
AUCTIw





THREE SALES

Thurs 6-6 Walk
About Auction 3om
in & out- furniture,
box lot, value new
items & fun
Sat 6-8 Estate TAG
sale 8am 1747
SE 5th St Ocala,
FL 34471 Entire
Contents
Sun 6-9- Antique &
Collectible Auction
1 om 100 lots live
& online. Furniture,
jewelry, rugs, coins,
sterling & more
500+lots
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.comr
10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

INVERNESS
Sat. 8 & Sun. 9, 9a-4p
Tools, lawn equipment
Furniture & Baby items
3863 E. PERRY ST.
PINE RIDGE
3948 N Buckwheat Pt.
Pine Ridge,FL Moving
Sale! 6/8-6/9 8am-?
Furniture, tools, refriger-
ator, Automobile
accessories.
Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352- 613-2944


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
"352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate -$20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
Ace The Test
Math Tutoring
352-249-6790 acethe
test03@amail.com




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




*Full Lawn Service*
Hedgetrim, Hauling
Available !! Free Esti-
mates. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320


CLASSIFIED



LADIES CLOTHING
Sizes 2 4, shorts, tops,
dresses, pants, suits
$5 & UP 352-613-0539



3 Sliding Glass Doors
Heavy Duty, 4ft x 8ft
$50. ea
(352) 212-5747
04 HONDA SHADOW
AREO exhaust stock
pipes,new,50.00
352-621-0142
6 French Doors
not in frames, glass
windows, 2 white and 4
brown $200 for all
352-795-7254
13"PHILLIPS,MAGNAVOX, tv
hardly
used,25.oo
352-621-0142
AIR COMPRESSOR 30
GALLON UPRIGHT
TYPE 5 hp 140 psi 240
volt (can be 110) nearly
new only 265.00
352 464 0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
AREA RUG 8X5, NICE
COLORS,TAN TO
DARK RED IN BIG
SQUARES. $25
352-621-0142
BOX OF CLEANING
SUPPLIES. $10
(352) 527-2085
BREADMAN BREAD
MACHINE Makes up to
2 lb. loaf, includes hard
bound recipe book. VG
Cond. $30 746-7232
Brentwood Rocker
$50.
Sirus XM Satellite
Radio
$75. 352-746-0223
CAST IRON KETTLE
Vintage hanging cast
iron camp fire kettle with
lid. Good Condition.
$40 746-7232
Complete Bose DJ Mo-
bile Set-up2000 watt
amp. Bose speakers,
mixer board, dbl CD
player $900 call Tom
352-249-7266
COMPUTER DESK
$75 corner style.
file drawer printer shelf
563-1073
CRAPE MYRTLE TREE
in a 3 Gallon pot
Muskogee $12
613-5838 more info
www.Rickybobs.com
EZ-ACCESS POWER
WHEELCHAIR RAMP,
$35 OBO. In home use.
Aluminum.
(352) 527-2085
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct l $5.001b.
(352) 897-5388"
FLOOR MATS
WEATHERTECH-GRAY-LEX
US RX CUSTOM
MATS $75
(352) 527-8993


AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118

Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363



LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




CLOCK REPAIR
35 Yrs. exp. House
calls, all brands serviced
George 352-794-3512




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790

JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BOX OF WOODEN
CLOTHES HANGERS.
$5 (352) 527-2085
GAS GRILL 40" wide,
working condition,
includes gas tank and
new cover. $75
746-7232
GENERATOR
Power Boss 5500
10 hsp, B/S motor
25'cord set, new, never
used, % price, $300.
352-613-7493
GENERATOR,
DuroStar DS4000S 7
HP,New never
used,2-20Amp,1-30Amp.3300
Watt
output,69dB,17H,17W,23L,
ideal for
RV/Camping. $360,00.
352-637-1613
GUINEA PIG/RABBIT
CAGE Plastic base with
wire top.40"L*18"W*20"
Plus bowl,bottle,hutch.
$50 746-7232
HEALING GARDEN
7 OZ. BODY
WASH/LOTION. $18
Lavender. Never used.
(352) 527-2085
HEALING GARDEN
FRAGRANCE SET. $18
Set of 6 never used.
(352) 527-2085
HP Computer
w/ monitor, printer
& desk $150.
4 pc. Tan wicker patio
set with cushions $200
19" Sanyo TV $25.
(352) 419-2295
All in very good cond.
can be seen by appt.
only on Saturday
Royal Oaks Subdiv.
Inverness
LA CROSSE BATTERY
THERMOMETER, $15
Indoor/Outdoor
(352)527-2085
LOVE'S BABY SOFT
FRAGRANCE COL-
LECTION. $18 Set of 6
frag. Never used. (352)
527-2085
MICROWAVE
Maytag over oven white
& clean $75 563-1073
Musical Equipment
Mackie Pro FX8 Mixer
6 mo's old $150.
QSC power amp, GX5
$250. 2 SP2G Peavy
speakers, $400. pair
352-220-3452
PARAFFIN BATH
HoMedics Para spa
Plus Paraffin Bath Heat
Therapy System.VG
cond. $40 746-7232
QUILTING FRAME
Quilting frame, light
weight and easily disas-
sembled for storage.
$50. 527-2422
SINK white porcelin,
new never used, ($15)
352-613-7493
SMITH CORONA
ELEC.TYPEWRITER
SC125. Ex. condition,
works perfectly, with
case. 527-1239 $40
SUNBEAM IRON $16
Steamaster LX retract
cord. book
(352) 527-2085


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135











Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
Tile & Spa Repairs
352-422-6956 Lic/Ins




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Swing Set
2 swings, seasaw, slide,
chin bar $50.00 Firm
352-344-1727
TICKETS (2) for JOSH
TURNER concert at Sil-
ver Springs on 6/15
($20 each)
352-613-7493
TOY ORGANIZER 9
bins on 3 shelves, pri-
mary colors,
good shape,($10)
352-613-7493
TRAVEL BAG Can be
used as gym bag as
well..$10- Very good
condition 352-220-4158
(Crystal River)




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
WORKS GREAT, ALL
ELECTRONICS.FOLDS
UP FOR EASY
STORAGE.TOO HOT
OUT !!!!ONLY 285.00


Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc. corn
Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


-m-
BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




BLACK IBANEZ
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
SMALL BODY
"TELE"STYLE! $100
352-601-6625
BLACK"STRAT" PAK
STRAT COPY W/AMP
TUNER,STRAP, C.D.
STRINGS & PICKS $85
352-601-6625
HAMMOND ORGAN
300 Series with
matching bench
A-1 condition cabinet &
electronics with built
in Leslie Speaker
$200 will deliver Citrus
County 628-9838 or for
pics email: tommyb@
tampabay.rr.com


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



26 YRS EXP. Tree Serv.
Removal, Stump
grinding, trim., hauling
Tom (352) 726-1875
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lie. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641


IBANEZ ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC BLACK
AEF18BK1202 AL-
MOST NEW CONDI-
TION! ONLY $150
352-601-6625
M-Audio key studio
49 key usb controller
$10. 3524194464













Wanted
Old Guitars,amps,
pedals, accessories
Private Collector pay-
ing CASH!!!
Call M.J. 257-3261


Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Groundsman

Must have experi-
ence, DL & pass Drug
Test, serious inquires
only Griffin'sTree Care
Joe 352-249-6495
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
S Cleaning & Sealing
G "trout Painting
SResidential &
--= 4".._ Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





GENERAL ,|
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians"
ER0015377

35H-6 FJ12


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
-#Lc 2 LCCC1325497


MAC JOHNSON
WMA ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


AAA ROOFING
Call th "4eak6uste s
Free Written Estimate


:$100 OFF:
SAny Re-Roof |
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
,iciis~cco 7sa o 0F3BF


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START
A FIRE!
S Flal le No 9
I ->HiddenCoi 39


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard Ron's Affordable
& MEorpoolorplan Handyman Services
something ALl Home
-- completely new! Repairs
5 '-^ Oftenirnied : Small Carpentry
Ofen imiatedl, i -. g "Fencing
%.g L E nedupfAd" Screening

a Vents
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST A1lorda.e & Dependable
-' CO PES Expeience lifelong
POOL AND PAVER LLC 3 52.344-o95
& insured 352-400-3188 sured Lc.#3776


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair

Lifhtime Warranty on Stretching

Upholstery Cleaning
Now Cleaning Til, & Hard Surfaceps


















www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


WINDOW.
GENIE.,"
We (leon Windows nd a Whole Lolt More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


ices ir etor


I HANDYTMAI






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Technics KN-750
music keyboard $25.
352-419-4464



BOWFLEX WEIGHT
BENCH pulls 210lbs
very good cond. no
Friday night or Sat calls
$200 obo 352-341-0242
Dynabody Fitness
Club, Membership
over 9 months left
$150.
(352) 257-3542
Pro-Form 585 Perfor-
mance incline treadmill.
Great condition.
$100.00 firm. Inverness.
Phone 352-860-2161
TREADMILL ELECTRIC
West Pro Crosswalk 78
Excellent Inclines $100.
or OBO (352)563-6410



Club Cart Golf Cart
older model, exc. cond.
good tires, full enclosure
priced to sell $800.
352-527-3125
COLEMAN EXPONENT
sleep Mummy Bag
cloudcroft X-0-degree
long.39x92 almost new
$75.00 5134473
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
Lawn Mower
Gas Power $60.
Wheel Chair $60
Both in exc cond
Cash only
352-341-1714
SCUBA TANK 80CUFT.
Aluminum, silver US Di-
vers brand w/J valve &
harness.Good cond.
$50 746-7232



2009 5 x 8 Freedom
custom enclosed mo-
torcycle trailer, red, v
nose w/diamond plate,
full 50" rear ramp, front
tire hold, used once like
new $1450 422-1026
NEW ENCLOSED
8.5' x 20'
CAR HAULER
$3990. 352-564-1299



GIRLS CLOTHING
Sizes from 3-6 mos to
18-24 mos. 42 pieces
in all. $25.00
352-400-5650


Sel orSw


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onli $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted:Yard sale
items- buy all or part;
fishing & hunt equip.;
Antiques & collecti-
bles, war items, power
tools, 352- 613-2944


BEAUTY SALON
FOR SALE
Established & Runn-
ing Fully stocked
Turn key $20,000
352-422-2960










KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year,
Specializing in color and
highlights $39 hair color
special $39 Facial spe-
cial call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com


Patty, formerly of
Rick's Barber Shop is
now cutting hair at
Vinny's Barber Shop
Alesci's Corner
1053 E Norval Bryant
Hwy. Hernando, Fl
352-364-1793




4 Blue Headed
Amazon's $400 obo;
4 Sun Conure's. $300
obo. All Hand Fed
Babies (352) 382-2233
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
Bunnies for
Sale
All Colors
$15 ea.
352-697-9187
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
3 Males & 1 Female,
Blue Carriers Available
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732









HONCHO
Honcho, a 3-y.o.
American Bulldog
mix, had a condi-
tion called Entro-
pion, had surgery &
is now recovered &
needing a home.
Neutered. A very
sweet dog, a 65-lb
"lapdog", gets along
wall other dogs,
good w/kids, but
could knock small
kids over because
he is so strong, best
w/fenced yard.
Loves activity and
exercise. Beautiful
brown &
white in color.
Call Kathy @
352-895-1218.


KENZIE
Kenzie, one & one
half -y.o. Hound mix
female, beautiful
girl, playful, gets
along w/people &
other dogs. Wt. 35
lbs. Full of fun, gives
lots of kisses, would
be a great family
dog, very agile,
could be agility dog
with training. Very
alert & listens
closely. At Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter. Call Pat @
352-586-9344. -


FREE KITTENS 5 free
kittens to good homes.
1 white& light gray
striped, 2 black, 1 light
gray striped, 1 dark gray
striped. 6 weeks old.
dhauger@
tampabay.rr.com


MILEY B
Miley B, an approx.
9-month-old
bulldog/hound mix,
tan in color, weight
48 lbs. Spayed &
HW-negative. Origi-
nally adopted from
shelter & returned
because of the
health of the owner.
Housebroken, gen-
tle, affectionate,
beautiful. Gets
along with other
dogs well, walks well
on leash.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


MINI DACHSHUNDS
CKC Registered, health
certificate,various col-
ours, male and
female.Ready June
15th. Starting at $350.
Call 503-6564
PET SITTING in
Central Citrus County,
Citrus Hills, Lecanto &
Beverly Hills area.
Barbara 352-746-7372
Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
Yorkshire Terriers
Male Puppies, 8 wks
$550. Shots, Health
cert., parents on site
Lecanto 727-242-0732



Register QH Mare,
Palomino, Awesome
blood lines-Gay Holly
Bars I, $1500 obo
(352) 628-1472




2 PIGS
100 lbs ea
$50 obo each ,
(352) 228-4302


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45' Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299
TROLLING MOTOR
Bow Mt. Minn Koda,
48" Shaft, 55 lb thrust,
W/ Minn Koda battery
charger, Weedless
Prop. $550
(352) 795-4259


BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

21 FT PROLINE CC
Full Transom175 John-
son; with aluminum
trailer, radio, fish finder,
bimini $4,900 726-4517
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
CENTURY 3000SC
2000 30 foot center
console with cuddy
cabin. Full Head. Twin
Yamaha ox66, 250's.
Radar, GPS Chart Plot-
ter, Fish Finder, VHF
and complete Coast
Guard package.
Tri-axle trailer. All in ex-
cellant condition. HP:
352-795-4426, Cell
352-601-0560.
Asking $30,000.
Classic Mako
20 ft Honey Pot, all teak,
good condition, 150
Evenrude 1993, well
maintained, good trailer,
Nice Boat. Extra's.
$5200. obo
(352) 795-1546
GHEENOE
15'4" Highsider,2012
Nissan electric start, 9.8
2012, new trailer,
Jack plate, $3600.
(516) 644-8700
PADDLE BOAT
(Water Wheeler)
adjustable sun
lounger,sun top, seats
five, exec. cond. $575
call 352-637-3715
SEA EAGLE
2008 10.6 SR Inflatable
boat, canopy, foot
pump, oars, hard plastic
floor, bow bag, transom
wheels, cover, carry
bag. $1500
352-601-5545
Sweetwater
2003 18 Ft Pontoon, 60
HP yamaha with trailer,
& custom cover $5600
476-1113/513-5135


SYLVAN PON-
TOON FOR SALE
2005 820 20' Pontoon
with 50 hp 4-stroke
Yahama. Low hours of
use. Good condition.
Asking Price: $8500
Email
warneboat@gmail.com
for questions
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21 k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072
RV HOTLINE
1-800-262-2182
A's, C's, B's,
B+'s, TT, 5th
WWW.RVWORLD
INC.COM
R.V. World Inc. of
Nokomis
2110 US41
Nokomis, FI
1-75 Exit 195W
to 41N

Ryalta HD
2002, 32k miles
great shape, new tires
$31,500. 352-563-5653
THE EGG
2007, all Elec; fiber-
glass, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
sleeps 3, $12,500
352-419-8366
256-244-6377


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online


S/-





CHRONICLE Ci opMci





(352) 563-5966 .


CLASSIFIED




WANTED
CLEAN USED VAN
CAMPERS
CASH OR CONSIGN
TOP DOLLAR
CALL MARK
SANTANGELO
1-800-262-2182




Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like
new, NADAS$29K,
Reduced $19,900
352-382-3298
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
TRAVEL TRAILER 26'
2005 Springdale by
Keystone with slide,
queen bed, sleeps 8,
ducted A/C, tub with
shower, good condition.
$6700 352-464-1622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



Black Full Size
Rack
for Full Size Pick Up
Truck $150.00
352-270-1580
Rolling Frame
80's vintage Jeep CJ,
front and rear
diferrentials
$200 obo
(352) 382-3547



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE
$500-$1,500 Down
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



ACURA
2002, TL, leather,
sunroof, loaded,
$4,995
352-341-0018







AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks

2005 Chrysler
PT Cruiser $3950

2001 Plymouth
Neon $2495

1999 Chevy
Venture Van $2300

1995 Toyota
Camry $2275

CALL TED TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 9 0 2
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BIG SALE
$500-$1,500 Down
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


SUNDAY,JUNE 9,2013 D7


BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2003, Impala LS
$4,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2008, Malibu, set up
for towing behind
motorhome $9,995
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
1986 Taurus Wagon
$1,950
352-341-0018
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600



FORD
'93, Taurus, 3.8 litter
engine V6, disc.
brakes, Power All,
cloth interior, beautiful
condition $1,500.
(352)613-2727. Text
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2009, Sonata,
34k mil
$13,800,
352-382-2457
HYUNDAI
2011 Sonata
good condition, 38k mi
new tires, asking
$14,900 (352) 465-7946
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
MERCURY
'05 Sable LS, 4 door
75,160, miles, well
maint, leather, sunrf,
full pwr., $5,300
Needs new home
(352) 344-4614
NISSAN
2007 Versa,
31000 MILES ONE
OWNER $7,900.
352-382-2457
OLDSMOBILE
1994, Silhouette
96,377 miles
$1,850
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
Firebird, 2000, V6,auto
locking T-tops,new a/c
overhaul, runs great
$4995.(352) 746-2027




Chevrolet
1982 Corvette, nice
paint, runs good
$10,500 obo
352-746-5255
CHEVY
1968 Corvette Matching
numbers, convertible,
4-speed, 327CI, 350HP.
Great clean car,
Lemans Blue, first offer
over $25,000 takes it.
352-795-4426 or
352-601-0560
FORD
1966 Mustang
289-auto, 67k mi.
great. cond. $7200.
obo 352-438-8346
FORD
1995 MUSTANG 5.0
Loaded, 56k original
miles, leather interior,
exc. inside/outnew
tires, V8, $12,500
352-527-6988


i 11111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





BIG SALE
$500-$1,500 Down
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100




GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100


HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
1986 Comanche, Blue
4x4, 6 cye, Good body,
running, needs work,
$600 OBO 201-2120
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



JEEP
1982 CJ5, red, 4 spd
new tires, good cond.
2 soft tops, $5000. obo
(352) 322-5509



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




309-0609 SUCRN


DODGE
2010 Grand Caravan
SXT, 41k ml. auto,
roof rack, Sirrus radio.
$16,800. 352-634-3333
TOYOTA
06 Sienna LE, 6 cyc, 8
passenger, 42K mi,
$12k 352-341-2484
352-287-2213




2009 5 x 8 Freedom
custom enclosed mo-
torcycle trailer, red, v
nose w/diamond plate,
full 50" rear ramp, front
tire hold, used once like
new $1450 422-1026
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
'02 Lowrider 14,000 mi.
1450cc,pristine.$8900
352-560-3731
Harley Davidson
2004 883 Sportster, w/
screaming eagle pkg,
Low Mi, Ex cond $4900
352-563-5552,
464-7005
HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
Good Condition
$1200.00 352-637-3254
HONDA
2008 Rebel 250 CC,
less than 4,000 mi.
$2,800, And
GMW, 2011
49 CC Motor Scooter
8,000 mi $800 obo
Both Showroom Cond.
(352) 270-4589
VICTORY
Cory Ness Special
Edition, 1 owner, 1,300
mi, new $25K, asking
$15,000. 908-500-4251


Elliott, William File No: 2013-CP-131 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
IN PROBATE FILE NO.:2013-CP-131
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM EDDY ELLIOTT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of WILLIAM EDDY ELLIOTT, deceased, whose date
of death was November 28, 2012 and whose Social Security Number was
xxx-xx-8184, File Number 2013-CP-131, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creators of the decedent and other persons hang cldms or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 2, 2013.
/s/ELIZABETH ANN BAYLISS
Personal Representative
DEAN AND DEAN, L.L.P.
BY: /s/ Susan E. Dean, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 746827
230 Northeast 25th Avenue Ocala Florida 34470
(352) 368-2800, eservice@deananddean.net
Attorney for Personal Representative
June 2 & 9, 2013


308-0616 SUCRN
MEDICAL OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE
This shall constitute notice pursuant to FL. Admin. Code 64B5-17.001, THURSDAY,
JUNE 20, 2013, DR. NICHOLAS C. PLESKOVICH of WELL ADJUSTED CHIROPRACTIC
located at 6565 W Norvell Bryant Highway, STE B, Crystal River, FL 34429, regretably
announces the closing of his Chiropractic Office. Patients may request a copy of
their medical records or request that records be sent to another provider by calling
24 hours in advance. The patient may be billed for the actual costs incurred for
copying, mailing or delivering the records as permitted by law or insurance carrier.
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 26, June 2,9, & 16, 2013.

312-0609 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
JOINT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
AUDITING SERVICES
The Citrus Levy Marion Regional Workforce Development Board, Inc. dba Workforce
Connection (Workforce), located in Ocala, FL and the North Florida Workforce
Development Board (North Florida Workforce), located in Madison, FL will accept
proposals with Statements of Qualifications from Certified Public Accounting firms for
auditing services (including the preparation of Financial Statements) and Form 990
tax return for up to five audit periods beginning with the fiscal period July 1, 2013
through June 30, 2014, fiscal years ending June 30, 2015, June 30, 2016, June 30,
2017, and June 30, 2018.
Interested firms may obtain a copy of the RFP by contacting:
Val Hinson
Workforce Connection
3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205
Ocala, FL 34474
352 873-7939, ext 1203
FAX: 352 873-7956
vhinson@workforceconnectionfl.com
Closing on this RFP is July 8, 2013 at 4:00 p.m.
Workforce and North Florida Workforce are Equal Opportunity Employers/Programs.
Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities
using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711.
June 9, 2013


313-0609 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 033-13
COUNTRY OAKS SUBDIVISION IMPROVEMENTS
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid for the construction of Country Oaks Subdivision road and drainage improve-
ments. Work to be performed includes but is not limited to resurfacing existing road-
ways, clearing, regarding and sodding drainage right of way, cleaning, re-sodding
of roadway edge, restriping, and tree trimming
Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible bidder at time of submittal:
1. Three years of experience in road and site development.
2. FDOT pre-qualified in asphalt placement.
3. Maintenance of Traffic Certified.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 24, 2013 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 24, 2013 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a disabil-
ity or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at
(352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle June 9, 2013


314-0609 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, 2013 in Room 280 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle June 9, 2013.


How o


Your


em


.. ,I; .. ,


.. /, *: 'f; te ^ :
" ." ". .-
*. *' .". '- *;"

f,... ,, ---' . :". ,.


r. o.V = ". .". "



7.- / *"' :


m


I Srerh'i cUl'e"s"Y I


I an


I Misc. No


I Mis. Noical


Misc. notice


I


Metn


Metn


Metn


F II .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FORD CERTIFIED

PRE-OWNED


SAPR for 60 months
10 0APR for 60 months


*Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing. 60 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment. Offer starts 5/29/13. Take delivery
from deal stock by 7/1/1 3. See dealer for complete qualifications and details. ** See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicle availability varies by dealership.


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED ONLY IN CRYSTAL RIVER


2012 FORD FOCUS
30,000 miles, clean, excellent gas mileage, new tires.
Stk. #GP1632 $ 1 7,950


2011 FUSION
Moon roof, rear camera, V6, leather.
Stk. #GP1614 $21,950


2013 FORD ESCAPE SEL
Leather, 13,000 miles 2.0 4 cyl eco boost eng.
Stk. # GP1638 $25,950


2012 FORD FOCUS
Moon roof, 28,000 miles.
Stk.#GP1635 $ 1 8,950


2012 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED
Leather seats, 27,000 miles.
Stk. #63T17A $22,950


2011 FORD EDGE
Leather, rear camera, trailer/tow, 22,000 miles.
Stk. # GP1240 $26,950


2012 FORD FUSION
4 cyl., leather, keyless entry, 33,000 miles.
Stk. #GP1612 $ 1 9,950


2012 FORD MUSTANG
V6, leather auto.
Stk. #GP1610 $23,950


2013 FORD ESCAPE SEL
Leather, 6,000 miles.
Stk. # GP1634 $27,950


2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Leather seats chrome wheels.
Stk. #GP1630 $ 1 9,950


2012 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED
Leather seats, moon roof.
Stk. # 63C096A $23,950


2013 FORD F150
Crew cab, 13,000 miles, V6.
Stk. #GP1643 $28,950


2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT
One owner, leather, 3rd row seating.
Stk. # 63C069A $29,950


I RELAX, IT'S COVEREDTM
S172-point inspection by Ford factory-
:e trained technicians
7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain
Warranty Coverage**
Backed by :
Ford Motor Company 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited
Warranty coverage**


Nick Nicholas


C


rysta


River


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 7/1/13.


Go Further


ford.com


Call Toll Free
877-795-7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


- LINCOLN


L I C L


b d


D8 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


r
we; ~ul





Section E SUNDAY, JUNE 9,2013



OME


RONT


Sikorski's
S Attic
PAGE E4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


A living room by Lucas
Studio Inc. Done wrong.
a summer-inspired
interior can be a tacky .
disaster. But with a
light touch and careful
choices, summer can
provide ideas for an
interior you'll love
all year long.


, I L


-Wi


u--oMI


d


I .







E2 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5989 N. ORCHIS TER.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


CLEARVIEW ESTATES BEAUTY WITH POOL
* Well-kept 3 BR, 2 Bath *2 Car Garage
*2001 Citrus Hills Home Light & Bright Great Rm.
* Garden Tub & Shower Gorgeous Queen Palms
*1/2 Acre Lot Near Golf Course

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsilorida.com






,IM,



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


OPEN WATERFRONT LIVING!
Great 2 Bedroom 2 Bath End Unit Condo At "The
Islands" Features Include Large Open LRTo Expansive
Florida Room Overlooking Nature At Its Best. Large
Master Bedroom Built-Ins & Steps To Open Water. Lots of
Closets & Storage. Community Has Heated Pool, Tennis
Courts & Clubhouse. A Nature Lovers Paradise!
Gorgeous Sunsets To Die For! See It Today!
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: mnrtlh.salher@emax.net


CRYSTAL RIVER
* Two Mobile Homes On One Lot
* End Of The Road and AlmostAn Acre
* Move-in Condition
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491
Email: pjparvi@yahoo.com


Price Slashed $20,000
* New Roof 2009 3 Full Baths
* Newer Air 2004 Summer Kitchen
* New Pool H/Pump Gorgeous Landscaping
*Vaulted Ceilings
* Priced to sell at $154,500
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolts@aol.conm
Website: www.CryslalRiverliuing.com


2421 N. Ica io Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 www.RIt4AX~com II 10 ..Hw.4 .I I
835S ucns ldHrossa68700 w wHlrIns aIfl cm54N w. 9 rsa Rvr7524


2496 W. BEAMWOOD DR. PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/3BA/4CG Solar Heated Pool
* Detached motorhome/car garage/workshop
* Built in 2002 and total remodeled
* Stone gas fireplace Must see to appreciate
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352 422-3875


INVERNESS
Come take a look at this move in ready 3/2/2 in
Inverness Highlands. Great floor plan, nice family
neighborhood, close to everything Inverness has to
offer. Split bedroom plan, tiled throughout, updated
guest bathroom, roomy kitchen and screened patio.

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


CITRUS COUNTY RANCH
14 acre ranch, fenced and cross fenced with huge
barn and horse stalls. Beautiful rolling property on
paved road. 3BR, 3 BA home with den and
modern kitchen. Gorgeous caged pool with fully-
equipped summer kitchen.
A wonderful package for only $294,900.
STEVE VARHADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevernadoe@remax.net







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recipe to make your own laundry detergent


Dear Sara: I have your
recipe for dry laundry
detergent. Would you
please give the ounces for the
boxes of products used? -
Ginny email
Dear Ginny: I've shared many
laundry detergent recipes
through the years. Most are a
variation of the following:
Powdered Laundry Soap
2 cups finely shredded Fels-
Naptha or Zote soap.
1 cup washing soda.
1 cup Borax.
Combine ingredients and
store in an airtight plastic con-
tainer. Use 2 to 4 tablespoons per
laundry load (depending on the
size of the load and how soiled


the clothing is). You can scale
the recipe up or down according
to how much you want to make
at a time.
For scented laundry detergent:
1 large plastic cat litter tub
or large bucket.
76 ounces Borax.
55 ounces washing soda.
4 pounds baking soda.
3 bars Fels-Naptha soap
(5.5-ounce), fine ground with
food processor or grater
132-load bottle Purex scent
crystals or Downy Unstopables.
24 ounces Gain powder
(optional).
Add some of each and stir,
continuing in layers as it fills the
tub and gets hard to mix. Put


some in the Purex
bottle and use the cap
to measure out about
2 tablespoons per
load.
Dear Sara: My mom
had a stroke. She's
been working hard to
rebuild her strength
and movement Since
her stroke she can't
stand the taste of Sara
meat. My concern is FRU
she's never going to LIV
build muscle if she
doesn't start getting more pro-
tein! Can you recommend some
inexpensive high-protein foods
that aren't meat? H.M., Ohio
Dear H.M.: The majority of


t1
I


people think of meat
first when it comes to
protein. But vegetari-
ans and vegans don't
eat meat, and they are
able to get enough
protein. If your mom's
only restriction is
meat, there are plenty
of sources of protein
for her, and you'll also
Noel discover that many of
GAL these foods will be
NG cheaper.
Try foods such as
cottage cheese, cheddar or moz-
zarella cheese, almonds, eggs,
Greek yogurt, quinoa,
beans/legumes, grains (wheat
germ, oatmeal), dark green veg-


tables, various fruits and seeds.
If she doesn't like beef, she can
still opt to eat fish and poultry I
would ask her doctor for a list of
more specific suggestions to fit
her needs.
Dear Sara: Is it possible to
make potato cakes with mashed
potato but without flour? -
Dawn, Arkansas
Dear Dawn: Yes. You can add
seasoned breadcrumbs instead
of flour. Add an egg to 2 cups
mashed potatoes, add seasoned
breadcrumbs, form into patties
and fry in a pan with a little oil.
You can add Parmesan cheese,
meat, onion, etc., too.

See FRUGAL/Page E5


S In a
&BentwodR.sle
ww .Teraisa *a.y ou.co


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
Maintenance-free villa with an open floor plan design with great use of the space. Beautiful maintenance-free pool home, 2 bedrooms with a den, 2 bath, 2-car garage, open
Driftwood model 3 bedroom, 2 bath villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, living room, family floor plan design with a great use of space. All neutral colors, distinguished Berber carpets
room,formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2 car oversized create a comfortable, warm yet sophisticated atmosphere throughout. Superior condition
garage, all situated in beautiful Terra Vista. Plantation shutters. Maintenance-free living at its finest!
M LS 703250.................................................... ............... ...............................$ 17 9 ,0 0 0 M LS701578..... ........................... . . $ 19 9 ,0 0 0


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

BILL DECKER 352-464-0647* SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777






DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR & DEN, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
ra Vista Maintenance-Free Villa featuring 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Office/Den, Living Room Well-maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage plus den and a pool, an expanded Laurel
h Bullt-in-Entertainment Center, Open Kitchen with Breakfast Bar, Screened Lanai and a model, extensive oak molding around windows, crown molding in tray ceiling, master, extra
ar Attached Garage. Dining Area overlooking Private Backyard. New 15 Seer Heat/Air large pantry, oak cabinets with crown molding, extra footage in bedrooms and den. A must
iditioner in Dec 2012. New Energy EfficientWasher & Dryer and Dishwasher in Dec 2012. see atthis price in Terra Vista.
d Curb Appeal and Situated Close to all Amenities. M LS 703025................ $ 184 ,900 M LS 357742.. .............. ....................................................................... $232,000


rol-ut ad- so -cmr-n----


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, FOXFIRE
STLuxury and storage! With over 3600 square feet of gorgeously appointed iving space this SINCLE FAMI HOME, 3 BED, 4 BATH, 2 CAR, WATERFORD PLACE
home has all the options. The tall cherry cabinets, Corlan countertop, SS appliances and Private courtyard home on an acre of land in prestigious Waterford Place. Nestled among
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS walk in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook. The massive formal the trees on this extra large corner lot you will find a beautiful 3 bedroom, 4 bath, 2-car
Pristine villa with beautiful landscaping features 2 BR, 2 BA, plus den that could be 3rd BR. DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS living area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring garage home plus golf cart garage. Upgraded features include a Kol Pond,woodfloors n
2 car garage, upgraded cabinets in kitchen, tiled counter tops, butlers pantry, whole house Expanded Lantana model perfectly located on 1st tee of the Skyview Golf course. which carries through to the spacious family room. Large master suite w/sitting area & giving room & dining room, a 20x40 (largest in Terra Vista Solar-heated pool with spa and
stereo system in wall, pest control system, spectacular sunsets, and view of driving range. Professionally decorated, Built-ns in Living Room, Surround Sound, Cherry Cabinets with TWO walk in closets, Spitfloor plan, Guest bedrooms w/direct bath access & huge walk-in outdoor kitchen great for entertaining or family gatherings. A large master suite and private
Close to the tennis complex. Skyview clubhouse restaurant and, of course, activity center, roll-outs and so much more. Move-in Ready! closets. A beautiful terrace garden and an oversized 2 car garage with a separate golf cart guest retreat completes this oasis. Loaded with features & upgrades you would expect in
Ow nerfinancin g available. M LS 357521 ............................................................... $ 2 3 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 701779 ................................................................................................................. $ 2 75 ,0 0 0 entrancecom pletethis fabulous home. M LS 700959 .......................................... $ 4 5 9 ,0 0 0 this caliber hom e. M LS 700601................................................................................. $549,000

9 3 .j -IUUfHf w^^^^^^^^R^^^&SS^^Z^^^^^^^^
*g. g 3g~~iaaM i~~^^ B a11^


1 LI MnLLU ILUM, L OI SI DMli, 1 -n, Iv UvI LI,
Very nice fully furnished maintained villa on a less traveled street in Terra
2 bedroom with a den, separate eat-in kitchen with pass-through br
wnstairs. Combination dining and living area overlooks the paved screened lanai.
Membership Included.
9 0 0 1273 ............................................................................ .................. ...............


VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODSIDE -
ista. Lovely Customcourtyard home is located on Skyview golf course with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, Den/ SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, TERRA VISTA
eakfast bar Office, Dining Room, Family Room with double-sided Fireplace, Gourmet kitchen with Exceptionaland fabulousdescbethis3 bedroom,(plus a den,3 bath,2-car5375sq.ft. poo
Social Club upgraded appliances. Wood cabinets and granite counters. Surround sound, security home in the exclusive upscale gated commune of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island
system, 3-zone heating system. Spacious master suite w/sitting area, Split floor plan. kitchen, great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened
... 1.250 Spectacular views. Social Membership included. 791............................................$2 100 Lana. Located on the uietestof cul-de-sacs. 5375....................................................$2,3 00


' '


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 E3






E4 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomneFrontis a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
........................................... advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information.....................352-563-5966
News information.......................... ............... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Put a stake in home Iside...


energy 'vampires'


Silent embezzlers can hurt in your bottom line

surprise your TV uses electricity may not seem like much, standby power
even when turned off. Other house- accounts for about 10 percent of residen-
hold appliances that are tial electricity use nationwide.
also prone to energy embezzle- This concept of electrical en-
ment while in the "off" posi- ergy loss is known as "phantom
tion are microwaves, rice load" and applies to any appli-
cookers, breadmakers and cof- ance or electronic gizmo that
fee makers. uses energy even when turned
The same goes for your | off. Some people call them
stereo, garage-door opener, "vampire appliances" or "en-
oven, clock radio and other ergyvampires." Ifyourhome is
electronics. Yes, even chargers typical, you live with 20 vam-
for cellphones and MP3 play- Joan Bradshaw pires. They add about $200 to
ers siphon energy when FLORIDA- your annual energy bill.
plugged in even if they're That's because the "off" but-
not charging a thing! Don't for- FRIENDY ton doesn't really mean "off"
get to check the garage, as it is LIVING these days; instead, it means
rife with tools that can poten- "standby" In fact, your TV with
tially zap power when not in use. remote control likely uses more energy
These electrical appliances often use during the 20 hours a day that it's turned
10 to 50 watts each time they are in the off and in a "standby power" state than it
"off" or standby mode. This amounts to 6 does during the hours you watch the tube.
to 30 kilowatt-hours a month, if they're off
but not unplugged 20 hours a day While it See ENERGY/Page Ell


Summer breeze
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E12
Beer gear
PAGE E13
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E6

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Old potty chair finds new life as plant stand; cane gun


Dear John: Can you
give me an approxi-
mate value for my old
potty chair? It
measures 17
inches in diame-
ter by 21 1/2
inches wide. The
seat is 18 1/4
inches high. It has
ornate metal han-
dles on both sides,
as well as a slide
lock in the front so
it does not slam John S
shut. The arm SIKOI
linkages are metal AT
also. It has served
as an interesting
plant stand in the open posi-
tion for many years. Thank
you very much. H.D.,
Internet
Dear HD.: Yes indeed, it is
an interesting plant stand and


i
1


a fun conversation starter
when guests are visiting. I
imagine the original owners
would have never
guessed its current
decorative use.
Your relatively
portable potty was
made in America,
likely well more
than 100 years
ago. Although they
were manufac-
tured in large
korski quantities, not
SKI'S many like yours
IC are readily avail-
able you are
fortunate to own
it. Current potential dollar
value is $150 to $300.
Dear John: As I suggested
on your radio show, here is
the information about post-
cards. The Lake County Dis-


cover Museum in Lake
County, Ill., acquired the
archives of the Kurt Teich
Post Card Company on July 4,
1976. I spent seven years res-
urrecting from obscurity the
Nike missile bunkers where
the artifacts had been stored.
In its heyday, 1880-1930, the
company sent photographers
all over the country, and
some parts of the world, to
take photos that were turned
into postcards for sale near
those locations. You can go to
their website and get a list of
images for nearly anywhere
you wish and order copies.
They have thousands of im-
ages online at www
lcfpd.org/teicharchives.
Many might be of interest to
local historical societies or
researchers. Just thought
some of your listeners and


readers might be interested
in this resource. H.,
Internet
Dear H.V: I am glad you
took the time for the infor-
mation about the postcards.
Thanks. As always, helpful
comments and interesting
tidbits about things dis-
cussed on the radio show
and in this column are
encouraged.
Dear John: I have the cane
gun in the attached photo-
graph. I was wondering if
See ATTIC/Page E5
This portable potty
chair makes an interesting
conversation piece; the
current owner has used it
as a planter. The chair
itself is likely more than
100 years old.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

you could tell me anything about it. -
D. W, Internet
Dear D.W: Antique canes are a
large category of collector interest.
They were made in a variety of types,
ranging from self-protection, scien-
tific, musical, sculptural and more.
Cane guns are a subcategory of col-
lecting. The one you have was likely
made in the mid to late 19th century
in America. Potential dollar value is
$600 to $1,200.
Dear John: I am in Homosassa and
read your column in the Chronicle.
Who or where can I get some items
looked at and authenticated to possi-
bly sell some of them? They're mostly
sports items afew possible antiques,
pictures with autographs from the
Yankees, e.g., Yogi, Munson, Gil
Hodges, Phil Esposito, Pete Rose, and
other items. M.C., Internet
Dear M.C.: If you contact an auction
company that specializes in sports
memorabilia it will not be necessary
for you to have your collection authen-
ticated because they have experts who
can tell the difference. One of the big
boys on the block in the sports category
is Lelands in New York State. The web-
site is www.lelands.com. Good luck.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1
FM) Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


,m ,
au2246


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3


Hydrogen peroxide is cheap and
has multiple uses. Combined with
baking soda and Dawn dishwashing
liquid, it makes a great stain fighter
for sweat stains on T-shirts. Simply
apply 1/2 teaspoon of Dawn on each
underarm section of the shirt, 2 ta-
blespoons of hydrogen peroxide on
each side, sprinkle on some baking
soda and scrub with a nylon scrub
brush. Then launder as usual.
The first reader tip shares more


Special to the
Chronicle
This cane, which
contains a gun,
was likely manu-
factured in the
United States
sometime in the
19th century. It
might sell for be-
tween $600 and
$1,200.


www.dudleysauction.com
FRIDAY, JUNE 28,2013
CITRUS HILLS CONDO


Unit 3A 270 E Glassboro Ct '-.
Hernando 34442
Preview: 9 am Auction: 10 am
2/2 condo in Citrus Hills
Community between The
Oaks & The Meadows
Golf Courses. Single story
just under 1,000 sq ft of
easy living area.
Maintenance free.
Great for snow bird,
investment retirement
living. Altkey: 2422416
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 s. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
(1/2mileS. of the Fairgrounds) MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-6379588. Upto-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Ab 667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


ideas for hydrogen peroxide:
Hydrogen peroxide: It's not just
for streaking your hair anymore!
I'm allergic to a lot of cleaning prod-
ucts (ammonia and Pine-Sol give
me an instant sinus infection) and I
would get sinus and breathing prob-
lems when I cleaned house. It was
always a major undertaking to find
products that didn't bother me
much. Hydrogen peroxide has no
odor, and it disinfects. I started
using it for quick bathroom
cleanup. Then I discovered that it
works great for cleaning glass and
mirrors. Next, I tried it on spots on
my carpet, and it worked great
(color-test first, but I've never had a


problem with it taking color out).
I have spray bottles of it all over
the house now. Just spray some on
a stain on the carpet and let it sit for
a minute or two, then wipe with a
cloth. I spray my countertop in the
kitchen each day, and it not only dis-
infects, it also puts a shine on if you
dry it well.
If you get stains on your teeth
from drinking coffee, you can brush
your teeth with hydrogen peroxide.
After a couple of times, it gets rid of
the stains. Some people mix it with
baking soda to brush teeth. Ce-
line, Missouri

See FRUGAL/Page E10


BROKER/ASSOC.' REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
r=4- Eli 1111


75 Seats 70223 $217,30 1 3/3:3 702967399,900 4/2.52+ 702645 279,000





S 396 EE 13 APPLE 7170 N. GRACKLE
4/3/3 702561 $289,900 4/3/2 702441 $129,800 3/2/2 700780 $109,500


1503 & 1525 W. EVERGREEN" '
5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 137 N. FRESNO 213 S. TYLER
700929 $259,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/2. 701884 $124,900 2/1.5/1 702531 $67,500


tI 1 61 II I 0 1 ,1

9142 N. AKOLA WAY 2435W. ERIC 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR. 9328N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 6910 W. MELISSA ANN PATH
3/2/2 702470 $125,000 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 3/2/1 700428 $69,500 3/2 703329 $58,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 E5


m







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Kelly
Goddard
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Geila
English
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX agents
hit new highs
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Lucy
Barnes
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Lou
Nalley
RE/MAX
Realty One.


proud to announce that three
more of their agents have
passed the multimillion dollar
mark in sales volume this
year. Kelly Goddard, Geila


English and Lucy Barnes
have all closed more than $2
million this year.
All three of these agents
are consistent members of
this elite club in Citrus County
and are well known for their
professionalism in real estate.
Kelly and Geila are agents
in the Central Ridge RE/MAX
office located on County Road
491. Lucy works out of the
Crystal River office located on
U.S. 19. The brokers and staff
of RE/MAX congratulate these
three professionals on their


significant accomplishment.
Also, Realtor Lou Nalley
has hit the $1 million mark in
sales volume this year. Lou
joins a select group of agents
who have qualified for this
elite club in 2013.
Lou is a Realtor in the Ho-
mosassa RE/MAX Realty
One office. He specializes in
the Sugarmill Woods area of
Citrus County. He's a veteran
Realtor in the area. The
agents and staff of RE/MAX
congratulate Lou on his con-
tinued success.


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


For a Vr u Tu 0 -o M 6 il hts

6ww.lor6a hocas.roprtie-co


-t V" MLS 703171 $395,000
j.llS Everything you ever wanted
in this 5bd/3.5ba home.
Directions: Route 486 to south on Essex
Ave, Right on Ipswich, left on Abalone,
right on Chase.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING


OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3



q7 1888 N Eagle Chase Dr
MLS 703345 $370,000
'i^2tA Don't miss this! New home
built in 2012 w/many upgrades.
Directions: Gothru main entrance of Terra
Vista, right on the roundabout (Fenway
Dr),first right on Eagle Chase Dr.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


j1ilt N iyrone Ave 7-L s- iN r A
IMLS 703297 $239,900A 55N Fresno Av
MLS 703300 $192,000
3bd/2.5ba pool home situated Great deal on this spacious 3bd/2ba
on 1 acre lot. home w/manyfeatures.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


NEW LISTING


-~CS4 400 E Dakota Ct
lr, MLS 702580 $249,900
2bd/3ba pool home
w/den on golf course.
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to
right on Dakota Ctto #400 on left.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING


it MLS 703227 $273
Don't miss this stand out
3bd/2ba pool home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


a" 25 S Myles Pt 6 ~ tf 801 IN Berlin Pt
MLS 703258 $169,000 MLS 703272 $160,000
Beautiful 3bd/2ba home surrounded by Spacious 3bd/2ba pool home at
trees on 1.67 acres, affordable price.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


400 E Glassboro CI 21 4A -t 675 WDoerr Palh e 1075 S Softwind Ip 3iJ 3709 N Buckwheal PI
MLS 703304 $68,000 6,$1 1075 S SofBukha PI
MLS 703304 $68,000 MLS 358289 $205,000 MLS 352259 $128,000 1.1 .' S89.900
Sought-after end unit that is light, Customized 3/2/2 Antigua model with Spacious 3/2/3 home, corner lot, SERIOUSLY? Afurnished Pine Ridge
bright & clean, nice Florida Rm. friendly neighborhood, pool home on an acre.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Joy Holland 352-464-4952
2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
S Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manyjurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Top Performance
turns in top sales
The Top Performance
Real Estate Consultants
Group is proud to announce
they have closed more than
$5.9 million as of May 31.
This small group attributes
their success to cutting-edge
marketing, communication
and service to their clients.
Reach them at 352-746-9924.


Jennifer
Munn
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Allison
Koster
ERAAmerican
Realty.


New records, new
blood at ERA
ERAAmerican Realty &
Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
levels achieved by its agents.
Jennifer Munn has sur-
passed the $1 million mark in
closed sales volume thus far
in 2013.
Jennifer can be reached at
the Inverness office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-726-5855.
Allison Koster recently
joined ERAAmerican Realty
& Investments. Allison will
work in the company's Inver-
ness office specializing in res-
idential sales.
Allison has resided in Citrus
County for 16 years. Besides


her real estate career, she
works as a bookkeeper and in
office management.
Call Allison at 352-726-
5855 for help with all your real
estate needs.

Captain continues
to climb charts
Charlotte
G Realty &
Investments
LLC is proud
to announce ,
that Realtor
Capt. Chris
Ensing has Chris
surpassed $1 Ensing
million in Charlotte G
sales volume Realty.
for 2013.
Chris's knowledge base
and dedication to his cus-
tomers make him a valuable
team player.
Real
Team
making
it work
EXIT Re-
alty Lead-
ers would
like to con-
The Real
gratulate T eam
The Real Team
EXIT Realty
Team on Leaders.
reaching
the $1 million sales for 2013.
The team specializes in
short sales and effectively
makes each transaction as
smooth as possible.
Reach them at 352-527-
1112, or online at www.exit
realtyleaders.com.


y 7 Jackie Gaffney JaSOn Gaffney7
Realtor,. A HOUSE Realtor@
306167 0 SOLDNanl' 287-9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


Energy efficrnI hurrI.anr
i pani e.noiio a _,d lider$.
Rccf 6 r. ,un.i..
A/C 2 yr; young. Se:ur;ly
Syslem. fhoue-iri re.;cd,.


4 A C


* Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


E6 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chicken coops can add chic touch to yard


Newer poultry owners giving

-, traditional structures a splsh ofstyle


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
To make an original statement
with yard art, think beyond foun-
tains, globes and statuary Add
chicken coops to be chic.
These outbuildings can amuse
and enhance while providing shel-
ter for the family fowl.
"Raising chickens is a different
hobby now than it was in the past,"
said Matthew Wolpe, who with fel-
low designer Kevin McElroy wrote


"Reinventing the Chicken Coop."
(Storey Publishing, 2012).
Many of those who choose to raise
backyard chickens today "are urban
dwellers with no traditional (poul-
try) background people bringing
a fresh approach who want their
chicken coops to be more like acces-
sories to their houses," he said.
"They believe the coops should be at
the front of the house rather than
hidden."
See Page Ell


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


Associated Press
This "Crooked Coop" in Clinton, Wash., is reminiscent of a fairy-tale house of Dr. Seuss.
Designer chicken coops are becoming a new kind of yard art, and many poultry raisers are being
upfront about it using the outbuildings as extensions of their homes.


COLDWOLL
BANK81T


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A bedroom designed by Brian Patrick
Flynn for California Home + Design
Magazine. inspired by a summery.
Floridian palette of white, coral
and teal. Flynn finds this color
S combination the perfect balance of
masculine and feminine, since deep
blues are a popular choice for men.
while coral is a favorite with women.


KARYN MILLET/Associated Press
This interior design image released by Lucas Studio Inc. shows a bar with a
beach-inspired design.

There's no reason to limit bright and

breezy decor to warm-weather months


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

he sun-drenched colors and
inviting textures of summer pro-
vide plenty of decorating ideas.
The trick is doing it right: A sum-
mer-inspired interior can become
a tacky, tropical disaster if it's done
with too heavy a hand.
But with a light touch and strategic
choices, your home can be bright-
ened all year long by the fleeting
beauty of summer.
Above all, "do not be literal with
summer," says Los Angeles-based de-
signer Betsy Burnham. Avoid putting
up a sign that says, "Gone Fishin"' or
displaying a collection of seashells
on a table, she says.
Instead, try examining the colors
inside a handful of shells, then deco-
rating a room in those shades. Or up-
holster one piece of furniture in
crisp, summery linen, rather than


slip-covering an entire room that
way
Designer Joe Lucas of Lucas Stu-
dio in West Hollywood, Calif., agrees:
A life preserver with the words "To
the Beach" painted on it may not be
something you want to hang up, he
says, even if you really live a block
from the beach. But a mix of sand-
colored paint and ocean blue fabrics
can be a tasteful reminder of sum-
mers by the shore.
Here, Burnham, Lucas and
decordemon.com founder Brian
Patrick Flynn offer tips on success-
fully using summer as your design
inspiration.
Summer is relaxation
"Summery interiors are best de-
scribed as relaxed," Flynn says.
"While autumnal and wintry spaces
are packed with rich velvets and


See Page E10


E8 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


z -a~
'T
s
C5
'it
B
O
9






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


8015 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
352-382-1700
ERAK 1 Real


I Wayne Cormier Realtor
352-422-0751


waynecormier.com
Million Dollar Producer
Real Estate Needs?
352-422-0751
7:00 am to 10:00 pm
7 days a week!


I waynecormie~earthlink9--


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.7 million closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
Eo Lear6 4More
S(352) L746-9924
ALTOR"


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 E9


"8 y

LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY

B11-- IN


1ESSVIHU







E10 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

Competitor's coupons:
Craft stores such as Joann
and Michaels accept com-
petitor's coupons. Some-
body always has a 40- or
50-percent-off coupon for
the week, so you should
never get stuck buying at
full price. C.H.,
Missouri
Use your phone: I
downloaded the apps for
the supermarkets I like to
shop at on my Android
phone. I go through their
specials each week and
click on the ones to add to
my shopping list. One
other thing I do is take a
photo of my pantry and
fridge before I go
shopping.
I do this if I haven't had
the time to write a shop-
ping list. Then I just look
at the photos to see what I
have or don't have. -
Brilly forums
Air freshener: Take a
used dryer sheet and put
some essential oil/candle
fragrance, etc. on it. Place
it on your air/heating con-
ditioner filter The house


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


smells nice for much
cheaper than canned air
fresheners.
When it fades, add
more oil, or replace it
with a new sheet if it has
helped filter dust and
dirt. -Krickit, email
Dish squeegee: I got a
dish squeegee scraper
tool as a gift I thought it
was something that I'd
never use, but I love using
it to scrape my dishes be-
fore washing them. While
a rubber spatula can
work almost as well, I like
that the squeegee doesn't
have a handle and you
don't need to pre-rinse
dishes. I use it to scrape
crumbs from my counter
and table, too. Janice,
Ohio
U -
Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas
City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


I l Mi AMERICAN
- i e Reallot ER REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@ 4511 N.Lemnto H.
eBeveuy HlE, FL 34465
Cell: (352) 697,1685 M:N32-146-Wo


SUMMER
Continued from Page E8

earthy palettes, summery
spaces are super-light, un-
structured and pretty darn
casual."
Flynn uses deliberate
contrast to point up that
casual feeling: "I like to
juxtapose super-relaxed
elements such as slipcov-
ers or bedding made from
washed linen with super-
tailored elements such as
tailored tartan or pinstripe
accents. The result is
preppy, but still casual."
Distinctive colors
One option is a palette of
muted summer colors
(sandy beiges, soft drift-
wood grays, nautical
blues), which can be used
throughout a room without
overpowering it.
Lucas is a fan of very
pale gray wall colors that
include just a hint of green
or blue. They look great
alongside natural, pale
wood furniture.
Flynn recommends
"washed-out blue" wall
colors, such as "Krypton"
by Sherwin-Williams or
"Drenched Rain" by Dunn-
Edwards. "Blues with the
perfect amount of gray in
them tend to be timeless
and also work as 'new neu-
trals'- colors with tons of
personality which tend to


work well with almost
every other hue out there,
as opposed to boring
beiges and taupes."
These muted blues pair
beautifully with white, he
says: "The mix of blue and
white together is totally
timeless, plus it can be
mixed up in many differ-
ent ways to update the
look. Almost all colors ac-
cent blue and white well."
The other summery op-
tion is to go vivid, using
grassy greens, geranium
reds, deep corals and the
teal of tropical waters.
Done right, these colors
can elevate the look of a
room.
"I'm a huge fan of teal
and coral," Flynn says. "I
especially love them to-
gether, since it strikes the
perfect balance of femi-
nine and masculine."
But tread carefully. To
balance out these satu-
rated colors, Burnham
suggests bringing in plenty
of crisp white.
Also, Flynn avoids using
very intense yellows,
"probably because grow-
ing up in Florida, yellow
was pretty much every-
where I looked, from the
sun to home's exteriors to
convertibles to swimsuits."
Painted wood
"People always think
that they have to have
their wood finished in a
stain," Burnham says.


"Why not a painted finish?
Paint your bookcases
white ... It's summery, but
livable year-round. Or try
painting a floor some-
where in your house, like a
guest room floor."
Lucas agrees: "We're al-
ways pushing clients to
paint out their dark cabi-
nets," he says. "Everyone
thinks their library has to
be stained a rich ma-
hogany or dark walnut,"
but there are better ap-
proaches. "Paint it an off-
blue-grey or lacquer it a
fun, brighter color."
Naturaltextures
"Summery textures re-
ally make you want to curl
up, kick your sandals off,
and just escape with a
book or magazine," Flynn
says. "I use tons of linen in
summer-inspired spaces,
as well as cotton and tex-
tured wovens." Also, he
says, "sea grass and sisal
are other summery tex-
tures which will never go
out of style."
The key with these ma-
terials, says Burnham, is
moderation. Materials like
rope or weathered wood
are great "as long as you
don't have a room full of
any of those items. One
sisal carpet, a rattan chair
or a rattan seat on a wood
chair," is all you need, says
Burnham.
Also, "glass is summery,"
she says, "but not cut glass.


Not Waterford crystal. Just
really simple, New
England-looking pieces.
Really simple glassware
on a shelf."
Lucas points out that
grasscloth is also both sum-
mery and stylish, as are
faux bois (wood grain
painted on a non-wood sur-
face) and faux shagreen
(artificial shark skin).
A touch of whimsy
Lucas suggests experi-
menting with just a touch of
summer silliness. "There
are some really fun wallpa-
pers," he says, such as Katie
Ridder's crab pattern in a
pale salmon color, that are
"definitely inspired by na-
ture and the sea."
"Yes," he says, "it's
'theme-y,' but she does them
in all sort of kooky colors"
that bring a chic sense of
irony to summer decorat-
ing. "You do a dining room
in that, or a powder room in
that" Lucas says, "and it's
got a much more fun, light
and airy look."
No matter your personal
style or geographic loca-
tion, Flynn says summer
can serve as inspiration.
"Whether you're into the
less-is-more approach and
want to stick with muted
blues, whites and sand
tones, or prefer the high-
energy, Caribbean-colored
side of summer," he says,
"there's certain to be some-
thing out there for you."


I- JOANN MARTIN
SPreferred c
REA L ESTA TE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefm.net
ONEMMMOM 6-, I


(ALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybasstampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (32302-6714


THINKING OF SELLING
OR RENTING?
We Can Help...
Preferred Real Estate of FL. & MA. Now
feature all their Citrus County listings on
MLS PIN. New England's largest MLS.
Property Information Network reaching over
25,000 Real Estate Professionals.


798 W Keller Street
Hernando
One acre building site in
Citrus Hills. Ideal Location.
Offered at $19,900.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COOPS
Continued from Page E7

Once you have the es-
sentials down the egg
boxes, a screened run, a
perch, ventilation and
feeding stations a
chicken coop can be
whatever you want it to
be, Wolpe said in a phone
interview from Oakland,
Calif.
"As long as it functions
well for chickens and
their owners, it can be
anything," he said. "We
think people should go
nuts."
Chicken coops look
best when designed to fit
a particular yard or set-
ting. That also leaves
room for innovative ways
to collect eggs or more
easily move manure into
compost systems.
"Anything from techni-
cal to aesthetic to wacky,"
Wolpe said.
Jenny Patty-Caldwell
used a coffin-shaped door
and cedar shakes remi-
niscent of fairy-tale
houses or Dr. Seuss when
creating her family's
small "Crooked Coop" in
Clinton, Wash.
The Gnome-like home
was a popular stop on a
recent self-guided Whid-
bey Island Coop Tour that
featured a half-dozen eye-


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A moveable chicken coop sold by Williams-Sonoma, built on wheels to make it easy
to maneuver around a lawn. It provides fresh grass for the small, foraging flock, and
it's a good way to fertilize, too.


catching chicken houses
and open-air enclosures
or runs. Some incorpo-
rated folk art, others used
recycled materials (a
homemade truck canopy,
flooring from a former
Seattle department
store), and several fea-
tured skylights and sys-
tems for diverting and
using rainwater
Still others have in-
stalled solar power in
their coops, along with
timers that turn lights on
and off and open and
close doors. Many coops
have been built with
wheels so they can be ma-
neuvered around lawns.
That's an efficient way to


fertilize, too.
"People want interest-
ing coops but still very
utilitarian," said Marci
Ameluxen, a 4-H poultry
club leader and one of
Whidbey Island's annual
coop tour organizers. "In
Portland (Ore.) on their
coop tour, I've seen pic-
tures of Victorian ginger-
bread coops and
Manhattan skyline coops."
Williams-Sonoma, the
San Francisco-based re-
tailer of kitchenware and
home furnishings,
launched an agrarian
product line a year ago
featuring designer
chicken coops.
"We're selling them


from Seattle to Boston to
Florida," said Allison
O'Connor, the company's
vice president of mer-
chandising.
The marketing pro-
gram was developed in
part to satisfy customer
demand for safe, whole-
some foods, O'Connor
said.
"Having farm-fresh
eggs is a new experience
for a great many people,"
she said. "People are
looking at chickens more
as family pets as exten-
sions of their family
We're up to nine coops
(designs) now and will be
introducing a couple
more next month."


ENERGY
Continued from Page E4

According to university
experts, as a nation we're
using the equivalent of
seven electrical generating
plants just to supply vam-
pires that are turned "off."
Here are some clues to
identify your phantom load:
They're appliances with re-
mote controls, such as TVs,
VCRs and audio equip-
ment. They feature a con-
tinuous digital display -
like those glowing clocks on
stoves. They feature
rechargeable batteries,
such as cordless phones
(which use energy even
after the battery is
charged). And they're appli-
ances with external power
supplies, such as inkjet
printers and iPod chargers.
How can you combat
phantom loads?
Kill phantoms by using a
power strip sold at hardware
stores, home-supply super-
stores, discount stores and
the like. Step one: Plug all
components of a computer
or home entertainment sys-
tem into the power strip.
Step two: Turn off the power
strip with a single switch.
Anything plugged into the
strip now is truly turned off.
Unplug "phantoms."
Unplug rarely used appli-
ances. Ditto for chargers


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 Ell

that aren't in use. Unplug
the TV toaster oven and
other well-used appliances
before you leave on vaca-
tion (or more frequently). If
it's not plugged in, it can't
suck energy. Unplugging
appliances doesn't just trim
your utility bill every
kilowatt-hour is equivalent
to 1.55 pounds of C02 emis-
sions. This means if you use
30 to 60 fewer kilowatt
hours each month, 550 to
1,100 pounds less of C02 go
into the air every year.
U Buy energy-efficient
appliances bearing the En-
ergy Star label. That way, at
least your phantoms will
extract less energy. Find a
list of products at www.
EnergyStar.gov
For more information,
contact Citrus County Ex-
tension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address
youth, family, community
and agricultural needs.
Programs and activities of-
fered by the Extension
Service are available to all
persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex,
religion or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshawis the
Director of University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


9086 Atlas Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
40 unit+ storage facility.
2.8 Acres of outside storage.
5750 sq ft. bldg w/ office on-
site.
Suncoast Industrial Park
$149,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


1259 S. Elmwood Drive
Inverness, Florida 34450
Warehouse/ Office connected
to a 5-unit apartment
complex.
5,400 sq ft. on .63 acre lot
$350,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


985 W Silver Meadow Loop, Terra Vista
Directions: Hwy 486 (Norvell Bryant) to N Terra Vista Blvd, past
gate to Rt on Skyview Crossings Dr, left on Silver Meadow Loop
to home on left.
RELAX IN THE TERRA VISTA LIFESTYLE! This home shows like
a model. Just add your furniture and have a cool drink on the
lanai. This has an open floor plan with a 3rd BR that can serve
as an office. Priced to sell quickly at $214,000. MLS 702127.
Host: Sherri Parker 352-527-8090


OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING!
4/2/2 home 2239 sq ft living built 2006
18" tile and pantry in large kitchen
* Tiled lanai with heavy duty screening
* GE whole house water filtration system
* Entire home has gutters
SWell for the outside irrigation
#702870 $157,000


BRING YOUR RV- BOAT- HORSES!
* 3/2/2 custom home on 4.85 acres
* New Kitchen/Glassed Florida Room
* Roof and AC/heat new in 2003
* Stone fronted fireplace in Great Room
* Exterior/interior recently repainted
* Home warranty for the buyers
#703100 $124,500


www~yproertyelpe~co


^JA.JISeeVirtualTo. resalehomesJ..I I m






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Agaves are striking specimens


A gave is a
genus of
s u c c u -
lent, perennial,
herbaceous,
subtropical
plants from
around the
Caribbean and
the warmer
parts of North Jane
and Central
America. There JAI
are about 300 GAR
species with
rosettes of succulent basal
leaves. They grow well in
Florida from cold Zone 9
south. In colder Zone 8 of
north Florida, they must
have a protected microcli-
mate, as longer morning
freezes will kill them to the
ground in harsh winters.
They are often used in cul-


tivated gardens
locally
There are
several species
and varieties
available.
Three in my
backyard nurs-
ery in Zone 8b
are the bluish-
Weber green Century
or Sentry Plant,
E'S the 'Marginata'
DEN variegated giant
Plant and a tidy
variegated one that forms
a tight globe of strap-like
leaves about a foot long.
Agaves are slow-growing
and die after they flower
just once. Flower spikes
rise from the center once
the plant reaches maturity


See JANE/Page E13


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Agave is a genus of succulent, perennial, herbaceous,
subtropical plants from around the Caribbean and the
warmer parts of North and Central America. There are
about 300 species. They are sometimes known as Sentry
Plants, because they were planted around the British,
Dutch and French forts in the Caribbean islands as a de-
fense. The stiff, fat leaves are heavily toothed on the mar-
gins and bear a strong, sharp spike on the tips.

The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


E12 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013




!






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pick the right beer



gear for Father's Day


KIM COOK
Associated Press

Humorist Dave Barry has said, "the
greatest invention in the history of
mankind is beer. The wheel was also a
fine invention, but the wheel does not go
nearly as well with pizza."
Ben Franklin considered beer nectar
from heaven. "Beer is proof that God
wants us to be happy," he said.
These days, beer-making and beer-
drinking is having a moment, if the hip,
hoppy accoutrements being offered by
many major retailers this spring is any
indication. For a Father's Day gift that
hits the spot, consider these items:
At www.uncommongoods.com, there's
a selection of beer soaps from San Fran-
cisco soap maker Hiromi. The essences
of lager, stout, ale and porter are drawn
from the alcohol and then mixed with
oils to make a six-pack of heady
cleansers. The retailer also has a selec-
tion of brewing kits, too. Vermont maple
porter, West Coast India Pale Ale, Texas
Chipotle amber and Southern bourbon
stout kits come with everything you
need to get the beer bubbling.
You'll also find a brew kit from the
Brooklyn Brew Shop at Williams-
Sonoma. There's enough in the starter kit
to make one batch of beer, and flavors in-
clude light Summer Wheat and a Belgian
ale. (www.williams-sonoma.com)
From Portland, Ore., a center of the
craft beer movement, are the stoneware
jugs known as growlers, made by
wwwportlandgrowlercompany com.
At Crate and Barrel, there's a large se-
lection of beer glasses for serving every-
thing from a traditional English pint to
craft brews. There's also a tasting set that
includes an acacia wood tray and four 5-
ounce glasses. Keep track of new beers
with a Moleskine beer journal that has
tabbed sections, pouring tips, a beer glos-
sary and a section for recipes. Or elevate
the kegger with a Krups Beer Tender, a
dispensing chiller that holds several va-
rieties of kegs including a 5-liter
Heineken. (www.crateandbarrel.com)
Crafter Mindy Humphrey of Vancou-
ver, Wash., turns recycled beer packag-
ing into wallets, cuffs, dog collars and
luggage tags that she sells on her Etsy
site, www.etsy com/shop/mindysdesigns.
Beer trivia playing cards and links to a


Associated Press
A wallet by Vancouver-based artist Mindy
Humphrey, who upcycles six pack beer
packaging into accessories like wallets,
luggage tags, dog collars and belts
(www.etsy.com/shop/mindysdesigns).
gallery of beer tap handles are to be found
at www.coolmaterial.com. People can get
surprisingly creative with a beer tap han-
dle. The website's got examples made out
of everything from video game controllers,
antlers, bike gears and light sabers to
steampunk-themed accoutrements.
Colorado-based Breckenridge Brewery
collaborated with Topo Designs on a
smart-looking, limited-edition backpack
with a detachable, insulated, six-pack bag
- handy for hikes, concerts or other out-
door activities where a few brews would
be welcome. (www.breckbrewcom)
On a hot summer day, beer warms
quickly; pop a Chillsner into the bottle
and your drink will stay frosty The gad-
get's an aluminum rod that you freeze
first; on one end is a drink-through
spout. (www.gentsupplyco.com)
From Urban Brewery in Grand
Rapids, Mich., comes a smaller version
of the typical 5-gallon brewing kit. The
scaled-down size takes up less prep
space, so it's a good option for studio
apartment dwellers or those with lim-
ited basement brewing room. All the in-
gredients you'll need are included.
Choose from half a dozen flavors, in-
cluding Blonde Ale, American IPA, Irish
Red and Brown Porter. (www
etsy com/shop/urbanbrewery)


JANE
Continued from Page E12

Propagation is by divi-
sion of basal-rooted suck-
ers or by little plantlets
that sprout on the dying
stem. Fruit and seed are
too slow for propagation
purposes commercially
Agave Americana, com-
monly called Century
Plant, has a life span of 15
to 25 years. It originated in
Mexico. At maturity, leaves
are over 6 feet long, form-
ing a plant shaped like a
half dome. After 15 or more
years, it sprouts a stout-
branched flower stem that
may reach over 20 feet tall.
The clusters of yellow
tubular flowers are
massed at the tips of the
candelabra-like inflores-
cence. They require full
sun sheltered from cold
winter winds and dry, well-
drained sandy or gritty
soil. They need no fertil-
izer, pesticides or supple-
mental irrigation once
established.
The mother plant sends
out suckers from the base
and many plantlets may
grow close to the parent.
These survive after the
parent flowers and dies.
Sometimes plantlets form
on the flower stem and can
be separated and grown on
in pots or garden beds.
Islanders have told me
they are called Sentry
Plants, because they were
planted around the British,
Dutch and French forts in
the Caribbean islands as a
defense. The stiff, fat leaves
are heavily toothed on the
margins and bear a strong,
sharp spike on the tips.
Most home landscapes
have room for only one
Sentry Plant. If planted in
the garden, keep it at least
6 feet from any sidewalk or
driveway Leaf tips can be
snipped off to prevent per-
sonal injury
The variegated form of
Agave americana, 'Mar-
ginata,' has greener leaves
with a yellow stripe and


lines down the edges. Teeth
along the edges are widely
spaced and sharp. There is
an imprint of the edges left
on the unfurled blade. This
plant needs room to grow.
It makes a spectacular
specimen in a ring of soil in
a lawn along a roadside.
If the leaves have a wide
yellowish or creamy stripe
down the center, it is a va-
riety called 'Mediopicta.' I
would like to add one to
my collection, if anyone
has one to spare.
The huge variegated
Agave with thick, dark
green leaves that are
twisted with cream colored
edges isApicta. The strong,
hooked spines are close to-
gether along the leaf mar-
gins. It has a taller 35-foot
flower spike. It is often con-


DO| H Lt Ft 1I FE-T I

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFCE: (352) 795-6633 ealt
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MA: SALES@ALEXRE.COM
AGENO Tlo ll j I DyTSV'NDY A W


CITRUS SPRINGS 3 bedroom, 2 bath LECANTO "SHORT SALE"
home on comer lot w/family rm, huge 3 bedroom, 2 bath, D/A M/H on half acre
laundry & storage rm, chain linked fenced comer lot Couny kitchen well & septic,
rear yard 10 x 17 patio, 8 x 16 metal cathedral ceilings w/ceiling fans Inside
shed, 7 x 16 covered storage area Short 1 1.. large pantry, neat as a pin
sale #359141 $65,000 --i..,: $48,000




CRYSTAL RIVER 1980 waterfront
HOMOSASSA; 1994 2 bdrm, 2 bath, home remodeled in 2010 Corian counter
2-car carport singlewide M/H on tops in kitchen, slate counter tops in baths,
5 beautiful fully fenced acres, cent A/C wooden dock w/boat lift, short water trip
excellent well water; near by to new Wal- to Crystal River & ...i, of Mexico
mart; paved road, #700665 $75,000 4 bedrooms, 2 baths -I:! :: $320,000


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 E13

fused with A americana.
A smaller species of
Agave in my yard has tidy
globes of foot-long leaves
and develops a short stem
when lower leaves die off. I
haven't discovered its scien-
tific name yet Huge Agaves
can be seen west of U.S. 19
and out in the Islands subdi-
vision off Fort Island Trail.


Jane Weberisa
professional gardener
and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows
thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are
welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an
appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


P, i
~*;








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate

Classitieds





. N

I-I
l^^i~rui^ ^-'4"


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc H20.
2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR/1.5BA, $465. mo
2BR/1BA $495. mo
352-587-2555
FLORAL CITY
1bd/lba 55+, Remod-
eled $430 mo. includes
lot rent, water, sewer,
trash 352-897-4449
HERNANDO
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
$400 $500 Mo. Call
Larry 352-201-2428



HOMOSASSA
Several Available
Beautiful Park
Pool
(352) 628-4441
INVERNESS
SWMH w/add 2/1 near
wal-mart $475 mo. non/
smoking 706-473-2184




ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo.. Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


For Sale %o4
HERNANDO
Ready to move in,
must see 3/2 1/.5 acres
$49K approved for FHA
Financing
(352) 795-1272


DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&l W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
LOOKING FOR YOUR


Is your Credit Score 575
or Higher, several new
homes to choose from
call for details
352-795-1272





New 2013
Lot Model 3/2 DWHM
$46,900, Includes
Deliver, set-up, A/C,
Skirting, Steps Call
352-795-2377





New 2013 Lot Model
DWMH 2/2 $42,900
Includes, Delivery,
set-up, A/C Skirt, steps
NO HIDDEN FEES
Call 352-795-1272


MUST SEUI


New Lot Model
2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fire-
place, huge Island
kitchen, It has to go!!




Palm Harbor Homes
Check us out at
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/olantcitv/
New Modular Homes
are here!
John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210

Get
Results in
the
homefront
class fields!


REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377
STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183




Homosassa/Chaz
2/1 CHA Clean,
No pets $485. mo.
727-415-1805

INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details

OZELLO
SW, 2br/lba, Gulf
access. $675 +sec
(352) 564-0925


i17T1f7 1







INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 2/2 DWMH
Handicap ramp at-
tached, large enclosed
porch, with lake view
carport shed, w/d Lot
rent $335 Includes:
pool, club hse, boat
slips, priv. dock,
water/garbage, lawn
maint,RV/Trailer stg,
ONLY $12,500
352-419-6132


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, $36,500.
Cash net to seller
352-586-9498

HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182
HOMOSASSA
Large 2BR/1% BA DW,
AC, Appls., inclds W/D;
W/ Lot, 475/mo
RENT To OWN
3360 Arundel Ter.
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner (727) 385-6330




HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully furn.,
shed & carport $6,800
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
7650W.HomoMssa TrL #28..$500
2/1 Nie duplex
SBumeli ......................... $1,000
3/2/2 Pool home SMW
CRYSTAL RIVER
8160W. Emma Lae.................. $750
2/2/1 Beautful home nice mren
9809W. Sm y Lane.............. $850
2/2 New listing
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
8455S. L o Hwy (L) ........... 00
2/1 Pool home
1161 W. ( dine Pat ()........ $1,000
3/2/1 Beoutful home In Brentwood
8160 N. Duval Dr. (6) ............. $1,300
3/2/2 Poo, aval. urn. or unfurn.
10023 R Atkia Dr. ((S) ...A ila lIsil
3/2/2 .................................. 1,200

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED
A GOOD
TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watchusworkfor you'


2/1/1 .......... $625

3/2/2 .........$800

3/2/1 .......... $775

2/2/1 .........$700


2/2/CONDO $700
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Che ry Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
1 352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375/Mo. $300/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628


C/i'ssified f

In Print

ani

Online

All

The Time


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. Efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $599./mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
N. CRYSTAL RIVER
800sq, ft. 1Bdr
12mi. north of Seven
Rivers Hospital, w/d
Direct TV, non-smoker
(horse-stall available)
$650mo. 352-586-9598






(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
AptS, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Apartments
Available
2 bed / 2 bath
$600/month
Call 352-795-1795
www.ensingproperties.c
om

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1+ 9xl2Rm.CHA,
$425. + F/L/S 697-1680
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, W/D
Hkup, $500mo.+ Sec.
352-634-5499

Look

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393










CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec loc & great visi-
bility 1000 SF, very
clean remodeled
352-634-2528


HERNANDO
1,200 sq. ft. OFFICE
on % acres, with Ig.
bill board sign on
Hwy 200 $497. mo
352-344-3084

HERNANDO
2,200 sq. ft. Office or
Live In, on % Acre,
Asphalt parking
area, Hwy. 200 $795.
mo. 352-344-3084




Commercial Building
Floral City, 800 sq. ft
ample pking, a/c,
prime location on 41
cooler unit in rear,
$1250.mo. 1st, last &
dep. ref. & good credit
352-201-9828




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Condo, Unfurn.
Club membership
included $650 mo.
352-302-3705
CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
3/2 $1,000/mo Bob
Hedick Coldwell Banker
Next Generation
352-634-4286




CRYSTAL RIVER
Opportunity 3/2/2,
$700 month, call for
details (352) 422-5735

LECANTO
Cottage 1/1 $525
incls. power Iwater, Dirt
Road (352) 220-2958


* Chronicle I


CRYSTAL RIVER
HOME FOR
RENT
3 Bedroom. 2-1/2
bath. Beautiful Newer
Home with 2 Car
Garage. Large Lot.
Laundry Room.
Screened in Patio.
Quiet Neighborhood.
Rent $895. $900
Security Deposit
Contact Connie
(352)293-6223

HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 1 bath. Ig
lot, $555. Reflast & se-
curity. 352-464-0919

HERNANDO
2,200 sq. ft. Live In,
on Acre, Asphalt
parking area,
Hwy. 200 $795. mo.
352-344-3084

HERNANDO FL
ARBOR LAKES 3/2/2
w/ caged pool. Active
GATED ADULT lake
community. Immed.
poss. All appl. No
Smoking, pets ok. So-
lar h/w, walk in tub,
lots of storage. 1 yr
lease, $1000. per mo.+
until. You'll like it here.
352-419-4169
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2, Fenced Yard,
Pet OK. $750.
352-382-1373



Homosassa

2/2 on cana, new
paint,flooring, w/d pets
ok $800 mthly, 8928
W. White Dogwood
Dr. 619-301-5442

SUGARMILL
3/2/2 Fla.Rm.Lg.Deck
1st.& Sec. $900/mo.
352-464-4348/503-6794

SUGARMILL
Rentals available now!
2/2, 3/2, Pool Homes
and golf course.
Gate House Realty
352-382- 4500


MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116




BLACK DIAMOND
2BR/2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1200/month in-
cludes basic cable &
lawn care. Contact Dixie
at 746-3301.
Citrus Springs
TWO HOUSES 4/2/2
Newer homes $900
+ sec. 352 302-8265


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Share my home
Free electric satellite
washer dryer $85 wk
wifi avail 352-563-1465




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/4Bk
REALTY ONE
Nature Coast Landings:
Sale/Trade: Big rig RV
Site plus storage lot.
$49,500/offer for both.
352-843-5441. See at
detailsbyowner.com
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Fax: (352 563-566 1 TollPri l88)52-34 I website: wiqIinim I,,nlnl[,]eII


E14 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







17+ Acres (25 Lots)
in Twin Ridges
Subdivision,
Gatlinburg, TN
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION. June 21,
12:00 Noon.
1-800-4FURROW.
www.furrow.com
TN Lie. #62


REAL ESTATE BANK-
RUPTCY AUCTION by
order of US TRUSTEES
June 20 @ 9:00
through June 24
@ 10:00
3362 West C-48 Bush-
nell, Fl 33511 Lovely
Single Family Resi-
dence on 0.5 Acres!
A total of 21 Properties
to choose from.
"bid online only @
www.flemina
auction.com
Fleming & Company,
LLC AU3742/AB2736*
7% BP*(904) 886-9200






FOR SALE
$89,900
31 S Melborne St.
Beverly Hills
owner financing avail.
352-634-1724


3/2/3
Perfect
Location. Ready for
occupancy! Wood
cabinets, granite
tops, stainless
appliances, great
room, den, custom
master design, En-
ergy efficient home
Open for Viewing
Call Joe 302-0910
412.512 Htd Pool
30x40 detached gar.
wood, tile,carpet
wood cab, granite
Must See! $319,900
Iv. msg 352-527-1448
S-r it-- -


FOR SALE BY
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
SAT. JUNE 29th,
12 PM
Preview Day of Sale
From 11:00 AM
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com











2/11 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840
For Sale By Owner
31212, on appox. 1 acre
with enclosed large pool
new roof, new Hot
water heater $125,000,
746-5421


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifiedsI


wes. -
55+ Real Estate
Specialist
Teri Paduano, Broker
15+ Years Exp
Buying or Selling
Real Estate?
Call me today & get
a "Free" Home
Warranty Protection
Plan
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
www.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish




Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Driveby then Call
(800) 292-1550




GOSPEL ISLAND
4bd/3ba & garage
For Sale $92,000.
941-524-6556
INVERNESS
Investor Alert
Nice 2/2 Close to town,
nice trees, renter in
place, nice return on
investment $90K
(941) 549-4226




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7









Buy this Home & Get
CALL 637-222828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

FREE
Buy this Home & Get
FREE PIZZA forta year
2/2/12CP
1174 SE 3rd Street
Call me for details
Nancy J. Wilson
352-422-4137
Waybright
Real Estate, Inc.




3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328


Hme


HOMOSASSA 5+
DEN BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO
A NATURE
PRESERVE. HOME
IS A FORECLOSURE
SHORT SALE AND
THE BANK IS
WORKING WITH
THE SELLERS. THIS
HOME WAS BUILT
IN 2005.dennis neff
@yahoo.com




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan, carpet,
tile, bright, cheerful,
clean. Realtor/Owner


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St 4BD/3BA.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, Wood Floors,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar,SS Appl. fireplace
Reduced $215,000
Call 850-585-4026


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
HOMOSASSA
3/1/1, very clean,
ceramic tile, carpet, dbl
lot. $750. rent. 1st, last,
& sec. 813-335-5277

| iK-' 7


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
"call 352-503-3245**


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


JENNIFER
MUNN

352-422-8201

jenmunnera@
yahoo.com
12 Properties Sold
in 3 months
% of every
commissions goes
to help homeless
animals
ERA American
Realty & Investments


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515









SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


h'cll, l / l\'t

011r \\ 01d first.

Lu) TDa)



CHOIL


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Hme


Cmitru Cou
Homes "I*


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




RAINBOW SPRINGS
Beautiful 3/2/2, 2 lots
Oversized Gar. Open
flrplan. Gas Fireplace
Corian countertops,
New porch, $134,900
352-489-0105




Orlando Luxury
Waterfront Condos!
Brand new 2 & 3 BR
residences. Up to
50% OFF! Own
below builder's cost!
Close to all attrac-
tions! Must see. Call
now 877-333-0272,
x32




BANK REPOSSES-
SION ACQUIRED
$49,900. Crossville,
Tennessee.
Pre-Grand Opening
Sale. 30 Acres,
Wooded on Moun-
tain Stream. Minutes
from 4 State Parks &
TN River. Brand new
to market. Call Now
877/243-9467

ro IM_


Find Your Dreaum Howe&'
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


V THIS OUT!
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $53,900. Call
352-638-0905




20 ACRES FREE!
Buy 40-Get 60 Acres.
$0-Down $198/mo.
Money Back
Guarantee,
NO CREDIT
CHECKS
Beautiful I Views.
Roads/Surveyed.
Near
El Paso, Texas.
1-800-843-7537
www.sunsetranches.co
m




95 ft on Canal
Gulf Access,
Inglis Paved Street
existing structure
Asking $24,900.
(352) 423-3414
352)-445-2633

Lots Fr Sal


Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-





Suncoast Realty has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
S?on river $5,000.
352-621-1664
PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047
SCAN OR GO
TO www. Get
Best Nau oast Results in
ProDer ies.com
"To vew the
great waterfront homefront
properties" classified!


- Home e Finder
www.chron iceh omefinder.com




1A


SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 E15








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.,,i h,,- I lhl h l ,- hl hh q I i h,- 1hhll. ,-lhl.. ......

ri := '. ii ASKING $119.900
Pit DVll, ,35212127280
I', l tilnp c2/pitd ., .co.i


S .ii 11ii 1 i 11ii 1.1. .1111


Mi_ = 3-i:. 3: GREAT BUY S150,000
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 2123410
ii'iirl. CillusCounitSold. comn


I1 5 MAiKn5a HUUSI am1aN1

ill. ,I -i f ,. il- f.,m hI rll H IA -111 1 .. h l l
f..l..l it..l e KV b...I I l I vl.' I-
MlI = il:I "I' ASKING $113,900
Pat Davis i3521 2/2 7280
View sting riviz, c2lpaldaris com


IIL---
VERY NICE AND CLEAN 3/2 MOBILE
..n ,J m .: c, Jl, IhJl i, ,:J 1. h. : 1 1 'I i


IMi : .= -.:l ONLY $54,900
Call Quade Feesei 352 302 7699


* .i i.h _I i ll., .: .ii .i ,li.



Mit =1 hl: $129,900
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'I' irl CillusCountrSold. corn


CELINA HILLS
:1 bedi."ni ';' t i.) n ,l l.). hi.
I i i,' ,,.., Ii.." I,,I l ,



M1i ;ii .; $160,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173
to see this lovely home


SUPER CLEAN INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS HOME
* l II ...i. l :. l. ll II .: I i .. n i i.


* r .:.. -, O E A, ,, .
r 1i: 4- I)1 fi. OFFERED AT ONLY 579,900
Eu-i f,i.i hi l i, o lil rl ,1 o ,r j 55?.Jl77 .?635j5


,,:,,i,, : ,, ,:,,I i I I:II:I i il .I I,:,I h I,1,

IllI: ,:J l:i: ,:j h ,ll Ihi : ,: ,:I t,'lh I
Mi = iill':i. : ASKING $78,500
Call Nancf Jenks
352 400 8072 352 7266668


HELLO HORSE LOVERS
I II,, l,:JW : ',.,ll, '1 1 ,:, i l ,: |l.jll 1| l,,,l h ,Jlll l hIII
Hllli .i 'lPr h., l.l l l Iif ,,l .ii ,l lp.i lIl llIp
., h1 ,,,1 h. II,, l l l,,lll, l,, ,,,,, l,,, :,, .I ,\ I
, lll w l~l ,,.,hlill ll lll.lI
$74,900
Call Ruth fiederick 13525636866


LOOK AT THIS
1981 SINGLEWIDE MOBILE
M I, ,.] ll ',, , 1,i i,,, ,, i 1 I. l
PRICED TO SELL AT $29.500
.il a hilI a. i. 1 I Ii ;i id1i
M i_ = 1:1: 1I:x:
Call Willlad 0o Jeanne Pickiel 201 9871


fill f I .6 .1 l.',:J I..'l .l.i: I -,A.. :
1 1,M I II ,,,,. ..1J I f, h 1l A l I l.I,


MI;, = 71:IIII: $42,000
Call Doris Minre 352422 4627


l-T .il i I .t b ,J, ...it b.ilh h j|: l f.iii.

b.h,.: I,, i..iv i Vl h f JI .il "lJ h"U'q: i.'Jl'lhi:i'i

ONLY ASKING $185,000
Call Ouade feeset 3522302 7699










A REALLY HOT PROPERTY!



,,,lI ,,-j : ri 1.'' -i~, 63, 1 i 'i -
4& I.vr Ali, B 1 B.J.n 637 4904 202 1121
i.. ..I I Ih I. '. .I..I.l .)1


HERNANDO

IIi,,-, II,,,,, 1,1. ,, ,,' ,.,,,il, ,,, 1, Hllq- h 111 h I,,-,,
I1',11 h I 11 ', I I ill,,,,,l llll h,,-,I....

.,A.- d
rl : ='.'-". $99.000
Di ld I(ult.Cte 954-383 8786
O/io 352 726 6668









A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION
i iii ll l i i j i 1 i
.. .. i i i 1 ni,, ,,, i ....... i, ,, i ,. l

,- ,,- I ... ,,.II . -,,- I I .,,,I ,,,... II 1, I'' I..
rlI =,,,"ASKING 5398.900
I C i ),i l 111111 ,s ," n2 ,


rl.: =. I ASKING S97.000
M-, i, ,,i r ,,,,, 11 r h e,,I ,,,,, I,,' ,,, ,,
,, , n e- h s ''U '" s h 'u '" ,ir

. I .... ,, ... 1h 1 I I6. .- ... 6.1- 6
. 6.. 6 i r. Ih .I 1 .. I ...1
PI.i. e I., .eI ie i r, l ,6668Ih e, i -i


1 CAR GARAGE VILLA



ri : = -11 ASKING $58.900
PI Di .- ,352 212 7280
I'll ,lialnp ulip ,1,1,1 c gp arfd .i. cojm












SECLUDED 1985 DOUBLEWIDE



Mit =i h:11i ASKING $49,500
Call II/ll.d or Je.inne P/,rel/ .,i 2019811


3 BEDROOM/2 BATH /1 CAR GARAGE
HIGHLANDS HOME


Mit = i11:i:`: $52,000
Teorn R. Blanco 419 9252


DUPLEX
_, h.1 i-. : n h,:J 116..:.11q.: l:l. ly Ij .j. s
1..o lu. . .. I II. i0n ml l' .:1.I .i l I I

Ml i = ? ':, ASKING $73,000
Call Jim Motion lot a tout ol this
investment piopeily at 422 2173


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACRE


* l_-. aii i' i i I I I,:Ii ,i m i -ii- 'l


Mi C = e 2;217 $259,500
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


P


E16 SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013