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Citrus County chronicle ( June 2, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 2, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03137

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 2, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03137

Full Text


Honeymoon Island: Birds, birders flock here


/A13


CITRU-S


Partly cloudy;
40% chance of
afternoon storms.
PAGE A4


COUNTY


TODAY
& next
morning


ONICL.
L wwNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Crommunity leo
% Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $


Experts: No quick fix for murky bay


Michael
Lusk
manager of
Crystal River
National
Wildlife
Refuge.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Water hy-
acinth, longtime bane of freshwater
recreation, might be an unheralded
helper in the battle against lyngbya
in King's Bay
Michael Lusk, Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge manager, said
the Crystal River used to be loaded
with hyacinth, and the canal-chok-
ing plant is now being tested as a
possible tool in controlling lyngbya.
He explained this not so much as a


Grad

on the


Hospital date

doesn 't keep

LHS senior

from ceremony
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
A LECANTO
s the Lecanto High
School class of
2013 lined up to
graduate, Mary
Lumapas was first in line.
"Even though my last
name doesn't start with A,"
she said.
A patient of All Children's
Hospital off and on for most
of her life, first with kidney
cancer at age 5, then a can-
cerous mass in her left lung
at 9 and a bone marrow
transplant at 12, that night
she was on her way to the
emergency room.
Months before, she had
contracted a viral and bac-
terial infection at the same
time, which affected the
same place in her body -
and then she developed
problems with her liver and
See Page A5


believer, but it helps make his case:
"King's Bay is very complicated."
And while some may be still be
convinced removing the lyngbya is
the solution to cleaning up King's
Bay, Lusk says it's not so simple.
"I'm concerned it takes people's
eyes off the bigger issues," he said.
"We need more freshwater and we
need to control what's going into it"
"We have lyngbya because we
have poor water quality," Lusk said.
"We don't have poor water quality
because we have lyngbya."
"There is no science behind the


issue," he said. "No one knows what's
going on." But he is not against the
One Rake at a Time cleanup effort,
in which volunteers have been re-
moving lyngbya from the bay
Ivan Vicente, public relations
specialists with the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge, noted the
importance of community involve-
ment in the lyngbya cleanup effort.
But he also cited the reduction of
water flow into the bay during the
past 40 years.
"King's Bay has become a pond,
with perfect ingredients for lyngbya,"


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Mary Lumapas, who has been recovering from a serious illness, graduated first at Lecanto High
School's ceremony this year on her way to the emergency room at All Children's Hospital in
St. Petersburg, where she has been a patient off and on since age 5.
TUNE IN TO TELETHON: Today Sunday, June 2 Mary Lumapas will be a featured
guest on the annual All Children's Hospital telethon, which can be seen from 7 a.m. until
6:30 p.m. on WFLA, Bright House channel 8, or streaming online at allkids.org/telethon.


he said. "No flush, no flow, salinity-
lyngbya can resist salinity"
He said there used to be enough
fresh water coming in to flush out
the bay, but not anymore.
Lusk who works for the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, as does
Vicente said the need for more
fresh water in King's Bay will soon
have another component: The
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District will be establishing
minimum flows and levels in Crystal
See Page A5



State

lawmakers

could sink

Medicare

plans

Associated Press
WASHINGTON It's Repub-
lican vs. Republican in the lat-
est round of political battles
over health care.
Conservative Republican leg-
islators in
major states
are trying to
block efforts by
more pragmatic P
governors of
their own party -
to accept health
insurance for
more low-in- Gov. Rick
come residents Scott
under Presi- o
dent Barack Medicaid
Obama's health expansion.
care law.
Unlike their congressional
counterparts, who've misfired
in repeated attempts to torpedo
the law, state Republicans may
well sink the expansion of Med-
icaid in populous states such as
Florida and Michigan.
That would mean leaving bil-
lions of dollars in federal
matching funds on the table and
hundreds of thousands of the
poor uninsured.
Expansion opponents con-
tend it's an issue that goes to
their core beliefs.
"It's an ideological principle
piece to us on the conservative
side," said state Rep. David
Gowan, majority leader in the
See Page A6


Adams' ethics complaint targets Michael Bays


Commissioner's husband resigns from new agency


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Commissioner Scott Adams filed a state
ethics complaint in April against Commis-
sioner Rebecca Bays over her husband's
appointment to a new economic-develop-
ment agency
Adams questioned the propriety in


March of Mike Bays' appointment to the
Enterprise Zone Development Agency He
filed the complaint even though Commis-
sioner Bays excused herself from the dis-
cussion and did not vote on the matter.
Because of the complaint, though, Mike
Bays resigned from the group, which has
not yet had its first meeting. The county
commission is expected to fill Bays' va-


cancy at its June 11 meeting.
Adams did not return several calls seek-
ing comment
Ethics Commission complaint coordina-
tor Kye Starling would neither confirm nor
deny Adams' complaint. She said the exis-
tence of a complaint is considered confi-
dential unless the commission hears the
matter in closed session and issues an
order
Mike Bays, a trustee with the Citrus
See PRage A5


.I112 118111 17 o


Classifieds . .
Crossword . .
Excursions . .


.... D4
. .A14
. .A13


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ....... .A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts
Movies ...... .
Obituaries . .


.... B3
. .A14
. .A10


TV Listings ...... A14
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes . .A15


S--CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.1 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM ,
SCHE VROLET 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
%axN +ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES, TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE FOND .RoAS --'-
2 2 $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 75 MONTHS AT3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


.F 118 ISSUE 299


HIGH
90
LOW
70


Scott Rebecca
Adams Bays
Citrus County Citrus County
commissioner. commissioner.


- J





67 m












2 6 UFND AJUEAM 2013 CITRUS COTYl)6ICRNIl








PAYING CA$H FOR GOLD JEWELRY REGARDLESS OF CONDITION

HOT ITEMS INCLUDE:


OLD RINGS & BANDS
ROPE CHAINS
HERRINGBONE
NECKLACES
BRACELETS
DENTAL GOLD
CLASS RINGS
AMERICAN EAGLES


,
\:7

~J
N-. .


^" */.I


w .-
\i, :fl,*,I


rj


CLASS RINGS!!!


4 WATCHES!!

R/ 7 i


GOLD SCRAP JEWELRY


Pi ms M U Lite I Ta* i Dma*lme


U.S. GOLD COINS & BULLION EAGLES MAPLE LEAFS KRUGERRANDS PESOS MARKS FRANCS ESCUDOS PANDAS...

PAYING CA$H FOR SILVER ITEMS REGARDLESS OF CONDITION


STERLING FLATWARE
& SERVICE ITEMS


WATCHES!!!





SILVER SCRAP
JEWELRY


AMERICAN SILVER EAGLES 8
SILVER BULLION


FORLAGECOLECIOS&
. USEC L PLASECL
35-8597


HOW THE PROCESS WORKS:
YOU BRING ANY ITEMSTHATYOU ARE INTERESTED IN
SELLINGTO THE EVENT, YOU WILLTHEN BE ASKED TO
SIT WITH ONE OF OUR EXPERTS. HE WILL SORT YOUR
ITEMS INTO VARIOUS CATEGORIESAND MAKE AN OFFER
ON ANY AND ALL ITEMS THAT WE ARE INTERESTED IN
PURCHASING. IF YOU CHOOSE TO ACCEPT OUR OFFER
WE WILL PAY YOU CASH OR BY CHECKYOUR CHOICE ON
THE SPOT. THERE IS NO OBLIGATIONTO SELL.


PAYING CA$H FOR PRE-1965 U.S. COINS


MERCURY DIMES
1916-1945
UP TO $2,000*


ROOSEVELT DIMES
1946-1964


WASHINGTON
QUARTERS
1932-1964
UP TO $1,200*


LIBERTY
HALF DOLLARS
1916-1947
UP TO $2,000*


KENNEDY
HALF DOLLARS
1964-1970
UP TO $50*


FRANKLIN
HALF DOLLARS
1948-1963


MORGAN & PEACE DOLLARS
1878-1935
UP TO $10,000*


GRADED COIN


*.

JS


WE ARE ALSO BUYING & SELLING:
WHEAT CENTS, INDIAN HEAD CENTS, LARGE CENTS, BUFFALO
NICKELS, V-NICKELS, JEFFERSON WAR-TIME NICKLES, BARBER
COINS, LIBERTY SEATED COINS, PROOF & MINT SETS,
GRADED COINS, COMMEMORATIVE, & FOREIGN COINS!!!!

NO COLLECTION TO LARGE OR SMALL!!!


*PRICE CONTIGENT ON MINTAGE, CONDITION, AND CURRENT MARKET DEMANDS

ALSO PAYING CA$H FOR:


-



ALL WATCHES -
WORKING OR NOT


COIN SETS & COLLECTIONS


ALSO BUYING:
VINTAGE SPORTS MEMORABILIA
MILITARIA- HELMETS, SWORDS, BAYONETS...
VINTAGE TOYS, GRADED COINS & CURRENCY
COMPLETE COIN SETS!!!


WATCHES
HAMILTON BALL- ILLINOIS
ELGIN ROLEX
PATEK PHILIPPE
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BULOVA ACCUTRON.....


PRE-1935 CURRENCY


WORLD COINS COSTUME & ESTATE
JEWELRY


All UNUSED iPhones, BlackBerry,
Android Based Smart Phones
NOT CURRENTLY ON A PLAN


VINTAGE SPORTS MEMORABILIA


NOT-POSTMARKED
VINTAGE STAMPS


IINh1TENI[NAL


F~I1

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A2 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3- SUNDAY, JUNE 2,2013



TATE


C LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CUB concert aims to feed souls and stomachs


* WHAT: Florida Music
Food Initiative (FMFI)
singers/songwriters
concert.
WHEN: 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Saturday, June 8.
WHERE: Upstairs in
the Old Courthouse in
Inverness.
ADMISSION:
Nonperishable food
item to benefit Citrus
United Basket.
ALSO: Proceeds from
sale of FMFI double
CD "Am I My Brothers'
Keeper?" benefit the
Florida Association of
Food Banks and the
Florida Coalition for
the Homeless.
INFO: FloridaMusic
Food Initiative.org.



Around the
COUNTY

Elder abuse seminar
set for June 15
The Citrus Alliance Against
Adult Abuse is hosting a
seminar Saturday, June 15,
to coincide with World
Elder Abuse Day.
The seminar will be
9 a.m. to noon at the Citrus
County Resource Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.
Information and re-
sources regarding elder is-
sues will be provided.
Speakers include repre-
sentatives from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, the
Department of Children
and Families, state Rep.
Jimmie T. Smith, certified
elder law attorney John
Clardy and Dr. John Grace,
a local psychiatrist.
The alliance's mission is
to prevent and end abuse,
neglect and exploitation
through community part-
nerships, education, advo-
cacy, and resource
development.
The seminar is free and
open to the public. There
will be light refreshments
and door prizes. No regis-
tration is required. For in-
formation, call
352-527-5900.
Tornado relief fund
accepting donations
The United Way of Citrus
County is coordinating the
collection of financial contri-
butions for the victims of the
tornadoes in Oklahoma.
Those who would like to
make a contribution can
drop checks off at the of-
fices of the Chronicle in In-
verness or Meadowcrest or
mail them directly to: The
United Way of Citrus
County, Tornado Relief
Fund, 120 N.E. Fifth St.,
Suite A, Crystal River, FL
34429.
For details, call the
United Way office at 352-
795-5483.
Citrus Republicans
to meet Monday
The next meeting of the
Citrus County Republican
Executive Committee will
be at 7p.m. Monday, June 3,
in the Board of Realtors
Building at 714 S. Scarboro
Ave. Lecanto. Guest speaker
will be Ms. Idona Davis of
The Well-Armed Woman.
-From staff reports


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS They're
singing for someone else's
supper.
Members of the Florida
Music Food Initiative
(FMFI), a group of Florida
singer/songwriters, will
present a concert with
songs from their double
CD, '"Am I My Brothers'
Keeper?" from 7 to 10 p.m.
Saturday, June 8, upstairs
in the Old Courthouse in
Inverness.
Admission is a donation
of nonperishable food that
will benefit Citrus United
Basket CUB).
The group's CD will be
for sale at the concert, with
proceeds benefiting the
Florida Association of
Food Banks and the


Florida Coalition for the
Homeless.
"The group approached
us about doing this concert,"
said Jennifer Campbell,
CUB director. "They're a
nonprofit also, and their
mission is to raise money,
food and awareness of
hunger and homelessness."
The need for food is con-
tinual, and CUB depends
on donations.
A concert featuring a va-
riety of musical styles and
artists is a fun way to give
something in return for a
donation.
Campbell said CUB is
currently in a transitional
period.
Several years ago, the
city of Inverness, which
owns the property at 103
N. Mill Ave. where CUB
has been in operation for


Special to me unronicle
John French and The French Connection is one of the
Florida Music Food Initiative groups performing Saturday,
June 8, at the Old Courthouse in Inverness. From left are
Sean Curran, Steve Waters, Joe Ramirez (back row), John


French and Paul Smithson.
the past seven years, gave
the agency a "heads-up"
that there are plans to use
it someday
"The city has been more
than generous in allowing
us to use it," Campbell


said. "But we know we're
in the way of progress, so
to be proactive, we started
looking for property to put
up a building."
Last year, CUB pur-
chased property on U.S. 41


across from Inverness
Middle School. However,
as Campbell explained,
when they learned of the
cost for site work, plan-
ning, permitting, impact
fees and the cost of hiring
an architect, they had a
"reality check."
"We have a building
fund, and it's not the actual
building, but all the cost
for the 'paper and dirt' that
far exceeds what we ex-
pected," Campbell said.
"So, now we're at Plan B.
We'll be taking the sign
down and possibly selling
the property. ... We hope to
get our money back and
look for something else."
Meanwhile, the mission
of feeding families contin-
ues. For information about
Citrus United Basket, call
352-344-2242.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/Chronicle
Jazmine Lee chats with her rescuers Tom Dawiczkowski, left, and Chance VanMatre. Dawiczkowski was first on the scene of the accident
Jazmine was involved in.



Everyone's jumping in


Nature Coast EMS supplies pool for injured girl's


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

INVERNESS
Wearing a green shirt, she
sat outside with a smile that
lit up the overcast skies.
Overwhelmed with excitement, she
kept telling her visitors, "I can't wait."
What Jazmine Lee had been waiting for was a
pool. However, it means more than just a summer
splash it means walking.
"The pool is going to help me walk," Jazmine said
proudly "I love dancing."
Oct 8, Jazmine and her father Thomas Bruce Lee
Jr. were leaving Publix when their motorcycle hit a
patch of wet pavement. Spray from a sprinkler on
Tompkins Street in Inverness splashed her father's
face and he lost control of the motorcycle, ejecting
him and his daughter. Jazmine's father died on the
day of the accident. Meanwhile, she clung to life at
Tampa General Hospital.
After months of surgeries, coma, rehabilitation,
tubes, medications and much more, Jazmine is
home and excelling.
"She is now standing with help," grandma Susan
Lee said. "She no longer has any tubes of any kind.
She is down to three medications. The right side of
her body is real strong. The left side needs work."
Working her body is exactly the purpose of the


pool, and why her doctor prescribed
aquatic therapy
"If we do aquatic therapy, we have
to transport her to a facility," Susan
Lee said. "You have to have transport
come in, leave an hour early and get
picked up an hour later. The thera-
pist said if we got a pool that they
would jump in the pool with her."
Her mother Carrie Connolly went
to buy a pool at Walmart when Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical Serv-
ices (EMS) said they wanted to
supply it.
On Saturday, EMS personnel as-
sembled the 4-foot-by-16-foot pool.
Her eyes widened and her smile
stretched as Citrus County Sheriff's


aquatic therapy

Thirteen-year-old
Jazmine Lee is
surrounded by family,
friends and rescuers
as she watches
her pool get filled.
Pictured, from left:
-- Sarah Greer, Chad
Coleman and Colin
Beagan from the Citrus
County Fire Department
Station 2 and Chance
Van Matre, Jazmine
Lee, Tom, Kristin and
Kaiden Dawiczkowski,
Henry Helwig and
Nicholas Palumbo.


Fire Rescue filled it with 5,000 gal-
lons of water.
Jazmine will begin her daily ther-
apy in the pool, working toward her
goal walking by August
Her mother believes not only in the
goal, but in her daughter's spirit
"No matter how much any of get
stressed out, angry or tired, she al-
ways has something to say that gets us
a cracking up," Carrie Connolly said.
Not wanting to leave the pool's
side, Jazmine said to tell the commu-
nity "They are amazing."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


Summer's coming, and with it mosquitoes


JOEL JACOBSON
Special to the Chronicle
With the onset of sum-
mer and the rainy season,
it's once again time to look
around our property for
places where mosquitoes
like to reproduce.
One essential for all
mosquito breeding is
standing water. The water
need only be calm and
preferably stagnant. Water
in flower pots, buckets,
kiddie toys and even storm
gutters can create an ongo-


ing supply of hungry mos-
quitoes as long as it re-
mains wet. Sagging tarps
filled with leaf litter, low
areas, even crumpled plas-
tic bags can hold enough
water to start a cycle of life
which could lead to illness
and even death.
Mosquitoes in Citrus
County have the potential
to spread dengue fever,
yellow fever, malaria, en-
cephalitis and dog heart-
worm. So even if you can
avoid the bite of one of
these hungry critters, your


Water in flower pots, buckets,
kiddie toys and even storm gutters
can create an ongoing supply of
hungry mosquitoes. Even crumpled
plastic bags can hold enough
water to start a cycle of life which
could lead to illness and even death.


family dog may not fare so
well.
There are inoculations
and monthly medications
available to lessen the


likelihood of disease
transmission, however, we
must remain on guard and
regularly inoculate our
pets and even livestock.


Empty all containers
holding water. If water is
intentionally kept in a dog
bowl or bird bath, flush it
out at least every three
days.
June 23 kicks off Na-
tional Mosquito Aware-
ness Week. On from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday,
June 26, Citrus County
Mosquito Control will be
having an open house for
those who would like to
see and learn more about
district operations. The
public is encouraged to


stop by 968 N. Lecanto
Highway and visit with
district technicians. They
are all trained and certi-
fied in the identification
and control of mosquitoes
and can help residents
solve many mosquito-
related problems.

Joel Jacobson is director
of the Citrus County
Mosquito Control District.
He can be reached at 352-
527-7478. The district's
website is www.citrus
mosquito.org.






A4 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday-Although you might select
a course that is tough to follow in the
months ahead, you'll know better than
most it is a worthy one.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Be more
selective regarding the people whom
you choose to hang out with. Avoid
getting involved with someone who is
always stirring up trouble .
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Usually,
you're good at picking a worthwhile ob-
jective, but today you might stand back
and let another do the selecting. You
won't like what you end up with.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Instead of
belittling someone who is trying to be
productive, speak up and show him or
her how to be more effective. Remem-
ber, talk is cheap, but exemplary action
has much to offer.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Pressure
might prove fruitless when trying to get
another to repay a debt. However, a
softened approach might work.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Extra help-
ings of tact might be required to pla-
cate your mate. Your other choice is
having a direct confrontation that will
only lead to resentment.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You are
likely to have a sharp eye for spotting
the mistakes of others. Unfortunately, if
your comments are critical instead of
constructive, they'll arouse resentment.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) To
gratify an extravagant whim, you are
likely to make an expensive, unwise
purchase.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
take pride in being self-reliant, yet for
some reason, you may put yourself in
a position where you are overly de-
pendent on others. Be careful.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
make the mistake of trying to even up
an old score. Momentary satisfaction
will expose you to huge counterattack.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Upon
occasion, you can be overly generous
to the undeserving while ignoring the
worthy, and this could be one of those
days. Keep priorities in perspective.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -An ob-
jective that you've been knocking your-
self out to reach is likely to be of little
value once it's attained. Before you ex-
pend any additional effort, reassess its
true value.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you
allow your emotions to override your
common sense, you'll become more
confused than you already are.


ENTERTAINMENT




Jean Stapleton dies


TWs Edith

Bunker was 90

Associated Press

NEW YORK Jean Sta-
pleton, the stage-trained
character actress who played
Archie Bunker's far-better
half, the sweetly naive Edith,
in TV's groundbreaking
1970s comedy 'All in the
Family," has died. She was
90.
Stapleton died Friday of
natural causes at her New
York City home surrounded
by friends and family, her
children said Saturday
"It is with great love and
heavy hearts that we say
farewell to our collective
Mother, with a capital M,"
said her son and daughter,
John Putch and Pamela
Putch, in a statement. "Her
devotion to her craft and her
family taught us all great life
lessons."
Little-known to the public
before 'All In the Family,"
Stapleton co-starred with
Carroll O'Connor in the top-
rated CBS sitcom about an
unrepentant bigot, the wife
he churlishly but fondly
called "Dingbat," their
daughter Gloria (Sally
Struthers) and liberal son-in-
law Mike, aka Meathead
(Rob Reiner).
Stapleton received eight
Emmy nominations and won
three times during her eight-
year tenure with 'All in the
Family" Produced by Nor-
man Lear, the series broke
through the timidity of U.S.
TV with social and political
jabs and ranked as the No. 1-


Associated Press
Actress Jean Stapleton speaks during a March 1977 interview
in Washington, saying she will increase speaking out to the
"Edith Bunkers" of the land to muster support for the Equal
Rights Amendment. Stapleton, who played Edith Bunker in the
groundbreaking 1970s TV comedy "All in the Family," has
died. She was 90.


rated program for an un-
precedented five years in a
row. Lear would go on to cre-
ate a run of socially con-
scious sitcoms.
Stapleton also earned
Emmy nominations for play-
ing Eleanor Roosevelt in the
1982 film "Eleanor, First
Lady of the World" and for a
guest appearance in 1995 on
"Grace Under Fire."
Her big-screen films in-
cluded a pair directed by
Nora Ephron: the 1998 Tom
Hanks-Meg Ryan romance
"You've Got Mail" and 1996's
"Michael" starring John
Travolta.
She also turned down the
chance to star in the popular
mystery show, "Murder, She


Wrote," which became a
showcase for Angela Lans-
bury
The theater was Staple-
ton's first love and she com-
piled a rich resume, starting
in 1941 as a New England
stock player and moving to
Broadway in the 1950s and
'60s. In 1964, she originated
the role of Mrs. Strakosh in
"Funny Girl" with Barbra
Streisand. Others musicals
and plays included "Bells
Are Ringing," "Rhinoceros"
and Damn Yankees," in
which her performance -
and the nasal tone she used
in 'All in the Family" at-
tracted Lear's attention and
led to his auditioning her for
the role of Archie's wife.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, June 2, the
153rd day of 2013. There are 212
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 2,1953, the coronation
of Queen Elizabeth II took place in
London's Westminster Abbey, 16
months after the death of her father,
King George VI.
On this date:
In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was
quoted by the New York Journal as
saying from London that "the report
of my death was an exaggeration."
In 1941, baseball's "Iron Horse,"
Lou Gehrig, died in New York of a
degenerative disease, amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis; he was 37.
In 1966, the U.S. space probe
Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and
began transmitting detailed photo-
graphs of the lunar surface.
In 1986, for the first time, the
public could watch the proceedings
of the U.S. Senate on television as
a six-week experiment began.
Ten years ago: The Federal
Communications Commission
eased decades-old limits on media
ownership.
Five years ago: The space shut-
tle Discovery linked up with the in-
ternational space station, and 10
space travelers got ready to install
the Japanese lab Kibo.
One year ago: Ousted Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak was sen-
tenced to life in prison after a court
convicted him on charges of com-
plicity in the killing of protesters dur-
ing a 2011 uprising.
Today's Birthdays: Actress-
singer Sally Kellerman is 76. Actor
Ron Ely is 75. Actor Stacy Keach is
72. Actor Charles Haid is 70. Actor
Jerry Mathers is 65. Actress Joanna
Gleason is 63. Comedian Dana Car-
vey is 58. Rapper B-Real (Cypress
Hill) is 43. Actor-comedian Wayne
Brady is 41. Actor Wentworth Miller
is 41. Actor Zachary Quinto is 36.
Actress Morena Baccarin is 34.
Thought for Today: "Whatever it
is that makes a person charming, it
needs to remain a mystery." Rex
Harrison, English actor (born 1908,
died this date in 1990).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR .'- HI LO PR |I LO PI
91 69 NA I 192 68 NA k J92 70 NA


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
85 73
88 75
90 76
91 69
88 73
87 73
88 78
91 75
86 74


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 1
foot or less. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today.


93 72 NA 90 68 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK exclusive dally
forecast by:

High: 90 Low: 70 40
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of after-
noon storms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 70
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of afternoon storms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 70
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of afternoon storms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 92/69
Record 97/55
Normal 91/67
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 6.10 in.
Normal for the year 15.43 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 57%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, privet
Today's count: 2.4/12
Monday's count: 2.1
Tuesday's count: 2.3
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/2 SUNDAY 1:31 7:43 1:54 8:06
6/3 MONDAY 2:13 8:24 2:36 8:47
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S, ~ SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:25P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:32 A.M.
0 (1 1 MOONRISE TODAY...........................2:33 A.M.
JUNE 8 JUNE 16 JUNE23 JUNE30 MOONSET TODAY............................ 3:17 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:13 a/9:11 a 1:51 p/10:21 p
Crystal River** 12:12 p/6:33 a ---/7:43 p
Withlacoochee* 9:59 a/4:21 a 10:47 p/5:31 p
Homosassa*** 12:23 a/8:10 a 1:01 p/9:20 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
2:39 a/10:12 a 2:40 p/11:26 p
1:00 a/7:34 a 1:01 p/8:48 p
10:48 a/5:22 a /6:36 p
1:49 a9:11 a 1:50 p/10:25 p


Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.64 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.54 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.12 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.93 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 89 66
Albuquerque 85 52
Asheville 80 64
Atlanta 86 68
Atlantic City 89 66
Austin 94 76
Baltimore 90 69
Billings 66 47
Birmingham 85 72
Boise 78 49
Boston 91 70
Buffalo 85 67 .15
Burlington, VT 90 64
Charleston, SC 86 68
Charleston, WV 88 66
Charlotte 85 66
Chicago 74 66 .42
Cincinnati 80 65
Cleveland 82 67
Columbia, SC 90 68
Columbus, OH 85 68
Concord, N.H. 94 60
Dallas 87 77
Denver 68 42
Des Moines 68 56 .07
Detroit 80 64 .09
El Paso 96 72
Evansville, IN 77 64 1.25
Harrisburg 90 65 .01
Hartford 90 64
Houston 93 79
Indianapolis 75 62 .76
Jackson 88 72
Las Vegas 96 75
Little Rock 80 66 2.62
Los Angeles 73 64
Louisville 77 65 .07
Memphis 84 66 .53
Milwaukee 76 62
Minneapolis 72 59 .06
Mobile 86 75 .05
Montgomery 90 70
Nashville 86 69 .51


Sunday
Fcsts H L
ts 86 64
ts 86 62
ts 79 63
ts 85 68
pc 78 66
pc 89 67
ts 91 73
pc 75 51
ts 83 64
s 80 47
pc 86 62
ts 76 54
ts 82 62
pc 86 71
ts 82 62
ts 84 69
pc 64 49
pc 77 54
ts 80 52
ts 87 71
pc 76 55
ts 86 63
pc 84 62
pc 79 54
pc 66 51
pc 75 49
pc 96 72
pc 77 57
ts 85 66
ts 89 65
pc 90 70
pc 72 50
ts 86 64
s 105 79
pc 82 60
pc 74 62
pc 80 59
pc 82 62
pc 51 48
s 66 47
ts 83 72
ts 89 71
ts 82 62


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:bO P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 88 76 ts 88 73
New York City 88 73 ts 82 66
Norfolk 90 71 pc 89 69
Oklahoma City 79 19 .05 pc 78 60
Omaha 63 57 .03 pc 70 51
Palm Springs 10877 s 106 73
Philadelphia 92 71 ts 87 68
Phoenix 107 80 s 109 80
Pittsburgh 85 67 .02 ts 79 58
Portland, ME 90 63 pc 77 61
Portland, Ore 73 49 pc 69 51
Providence, R.I. 89 63 pc 84 62
Raleigh 87 67 pc 87 69
Rapid City 63 45 .02 pc 71 49
Reno 87 50 s 90 55
Rochester, NY 88 68 .34 ts 77 54
Sacramento 95 56 s 95 61
St. Louis 76 66 .03 pc 72 56
St. Ste. Marie 73 59 .20 s 54 40
Salt Lake City 78 48 s 91 60
San Antonio 94 78 pc 90 69
San Diego 69 63 pc 70 62
San Francisco 75 52 .01 s 71 53
Savannah 87 68 pc 86 72
Seattle 70 54 pc 69 52
Spokane 70 46 ts 66 48
Syracuse 90 65 ts 82 57
Topeka 71 60 pc 70 50
Washington 91 72 ts 91 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 111 Thermal, Calif. LOW 18 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/79/ts
Amsterdam 61/44/pc
Athens 83/61/pc
Beijing 93/67/sh
Berlin 71/49/sh
Bermuda 75/71/sh
Cairo 111/73/s
Calgary 57/45/sh
Havana 89/73/ts
Hong Kong 85/78/pc
Jerusalem 95/76/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


87/61/s
66/48/pc
78/50/s
76/54/ts
81/59/sh
78/53/sh
65/41/c
81/68/s
72/59/s
63/50/sh
68/62/sh
72/48/sh
75/55/sh


LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices......................6......

Miscellaneous Notices................D6

Notice to

Creditors/Administration.........D6


C ITRUS LICO UNTY



CHRONICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRAD
Continued from PageAl

pancreas.
In the course of treating
her illness, she wasn't al-
lowed to eat or drink,
which caused the many
medications she takes to
accumulate in her body,
compounding everything
else that was going on.
Then the doctors found
a spot on her liver, which
turned out just to be dead
tissue, but during the
biopsy, her lungs filled up
with blood, her blood
pressure dropped and she
"coded."
As her mom and a doc-
tor prayed, she was
rushed into the operating
room and had a chest tube
inserted to drain the
blood. A week or so later,
her lungs filled with fluid,
so she got another chest
tube for that.
For weeks she went back
and forth from home to
hospital and had already
missed a lot of senior activ-
ities, including prom. She
had gotten her dress and
shoes all ready, had her
ticket and had arranged a
limo ride with friends. But
the day of the prom, she
was in the hospital.
So the day of gradua-
tion, not feeling well and
on her way to All Chil-
dren's yet again, she
called the school and
asked a favor
As Mary explained, "I
told Mr. Buettner that I
missed prom and so much
senior-year stuff, and if
there was any way that I
could graduate first, could



ETHICS
Continued from Page Al

County Hospital Board,
told trustees during a dis-
cussion Wednesday that he
resigned from a board be-
cause of an ethics com-
plaint another commis-
sioner filed against his
wife. He later confirmed to
a reporter that Adams
lodged the complaint.
Mike Bays, a member of
the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil, received the
appoint-
me nt
along with -
seven oth-
ers in
March to '
the Enter-
prise Zone
Develop-
ment
m e n Michael
Agency, a Bays
board de-
resigned from
signed to Enterprise
encourage Zone
job growth Development
in the Agency.
county's
two state-approved enter-
prise zones, one in Ho-
mosassa and another in
northwest Citrus County
The appointments were
on the commission's con-
sent agenda at the March
26 meeting but pulled for
discussion by Adams. Be-
fore the discussion began,
however, Commissioner
Bays excused herself from
the room.
Adams asked if there
was an ethical issue with
Mike Bays being on the en-
terprise board.
"Is there any issues
there?" Adams asked
County Attorney Richard
Wesch.
Wesch said he couldn't
foresee a problem, but that
Commissioner Bays had
excused herself from the
vote "out of an abundance
of caution."
State law requires offi-
cials to abstain from voting
when the vote could bring
a financial gain or loss to
themselves or close
relatives.
Mike Bays owns an in-
surance agency Wesch
said the appointment to an
enterprise zone agency
wouldn't create that kind


of conflict.
"I'm hard-pressed to see
how it would present an
issue," Wesch said.
Commissioner Bays also
excused herself from hear-
ing a presentation in May
from EDC Executive Di-
rector Don Taylor She was
not present when commis-
sioners approved quar-
terly funding for the
agency
Commissioner Bays de-
clined to comment about
the complaint because it is
still open.


I just stop by on my way to
the hospital?" she said, re-
ferring to LHS Interna-
tional Baccalaureate
program coordinator Dar-
rick Buettner.
Mary Lumapas, 18,
graduated, with honors,
on her way to the ER.
"I wore my cap and
gown into the ER," she
said. "The nurses on my
floor loved it, and while I
was asleep they made a
sign in my room that said
'Mary is a graduate."'
Today, Sunday, June 2,
Mary will be a featured
guest on the annual All
Children's Hospital
telethon, which can be
seen from 7 a.m. until
6:30 p.m. on WFLA, Bright
House channel 8, or
streaming online at
allkids.org/telethon.
All Children's is Mary's
home away from home.
MEN
Mary Lumapas has ei-
ther been sick or recover-
ing from sickness most of
her life.
She spent the sixth
grade attending virtual
school at home. She lasted
nine weeks at Lecanto
Middle School for seventh
grade before undergoing a
bone marrow transplant.
"I pretty much didn't do
any more school in sev-
enth and eighth grade
after that, but they passed
me because they knew I
was smart," she said.
She remained home-
bound until the second se-
mester of her junior year
and almost made it
through her senior year,
except for days here and
there when she stayed
home to sleep.


Through it all, she rarely
lost her sly sense of humor,
her quick wit or her deter-
mination to use her ill-
nesses to benefit others.
As a kid, she once
mounted a petition drive
to get ICEE machines in
the hospital cafeteria and
launched an email
fundraising campaign that
brought in more than
$12,000 for the 2007 All
Children's Hospital
telethon.
For her 12th birthday
she organized a yard sale
that raised more than
$4,000 for All Children's
Hospital.
As the youngest mem-
ber of the hospital's Fam-
ily Advisory Council, she
helped design and plan
the new hospital that
opened in 2009, including
helping to evaluate enter-
tainment systems for the
patient rooms and writing
the introduction to the
welcome packet for the
new hospital.
Over the years she has
participated in the local
Relay for Life events
whenever she could. Al-
though she missed this
year's Lecanto event be-
cause she was in the hos-
pital, people at All
Children's made a video of
her, which was shown at
the Relay. It will also be
shown during the
telethon.
"She's such an amazing
young lady," said Ann
Miller, All Children's
media relations manager.
"She's grown up at All
Children's Hospital, and
for all that she and her
mom have been through,
they continue to be so


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grounded and gracious
and so positive. Mary is a
special girl, and they're a
special family"
Mary's mother, Gaythee
Lumapas, has battled can-
cer since 2005 and is cur-
rently cancer-free.
MEN
Graduating high school
is a milestone in anyone's
life, but even more so if
you've spent most of your
life in and out of the
hospital.
"I've been cancer-free
since 2007, but just be-
cause someone is cancer-
free doesn't mean they're
the picture of health,"
Mary said.
Since her most recent
illnesses and incidents,
she is in recovery mode
and feeling better. She
plans to start pre-med
classes in the fall at the
University of South
Florida in Tampa.
At 14, she decided she
wanted to be a pediatric
hematologist oncologist
specializing in blood and
marrow transplantation,
but has since changed her
mind. Now she's thinking
about adult oncology, spe-
cializing in BRCA 1 and 2
genes that csn contribute
to the development of
breast cancer
"When I watched my
own bone marrow trans-


plant doctors, I saw that's
a really, really stressful
job," she said. "When
they're on-call, they get
called a lot just from
me! Plus, all their other
patients. It's a lot of stress
on you and your family"
MEN
For all of her young life,
Mary Lumapas has thought
of her health issues and ill-
nesses and complications
matter-of-factly You get
sick, you go to the hospital,
you throw up, get stuck
with needles, almost die,
take a dozen pills a day, you
lay on the couch, sleep for
days and sometimes you
feel better You find joy and
meaning in your family
and friends and what you
can do for others.
She said she has never
thought of herself as a
"sick person," but simply
someone who is sick, al-
beit a lot
"My mom always told
me that every person has
their own handicap or dis-
ability or something wrong
with them," she said.
"With some people, every-
one can see what's wrong,
and with others you can't
see it at all. But everyone
deals with something."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


BAY
Continued from Page Al

River and King's Bay for
adoption in 2014.
They are concerned
adopting a minimum flow
will further reduce the
available fresh water. But
Lusk said it is a state man-
date, and concerned citi-
zens should voice opposi-
tion to reduced water flows
to legislators, noting water
district officials are simply
following a directive.
"The minimum flows
and levels for King's Bay
started two years ago; it
takes time to collect all the
data," explained Gary
Williams, a senior scientist
with the water district.
"We are near the end of
the data collection."
Williams said they are
also assessing Rainbow
Springs and the Rainbow
River. He expects the re-
port will come out toward
the end of FY2014.
Williams said there are
district activities in King's
Bay, including monitoring
the water quality in the
bay and the springs' shed.
It also monitors aquatic
vegetation.
He expects the report
will come out toward the
end of FY2014.


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SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


POLITICS
Continued from PageAl

Arizona House of Repre-
sentatives. "We don't be-
lieve in the expansion of
Medicaid itself it's
within the process of man-
dating health care. We
don't believe it's the gov-
ernment's duty to do that It
should be open for people
to go get their health care."
Nine Republican gover-
nors supported or accepted
the Medicaid expansion, a
major component of the
health care law taking ef-
fect Jan. 1. It's designed to
provide coverage to about
20 million uninsured peo-
ple if all states accept.
Washington would pick up
the full cost for the first
three years and 90 percent
over the long haul.
Those helped would
mainly be low-income
adults with no children at
home and people working
jobs that pay little and don't
come with health insur-
ance. For uninsured adults
below the poverty line, ex-
panded Medicaid is the
only way to get coverage
under the new law But


middle-class people will be
eligible for subsidized pri-
vate insurance.
Overall, 23 states, plus the
District of Columbia, are
planning to expand their
Medicaid programs. About
a dozen are undecided.
The nine GOP governors
supporting expansion are
Jan Brewer in Arizona,
Rick Scott in Florida,
Terry Branstad in Iowa,
Rick Snyder in Michigan,
Brian Sandoval in Nevada,
Chris Christie in New Jer-
sey, Susana Martinez in
New Mexico, Jack Dalrym-
ple in North Dakota and
John Kasich in Ohio.
Initially, some observers
saw a shift toward prag-
matism among Republi-
cans and predicted the
governors would get their
way. Now experts are not
so sure.
Four of the GOP gover-
nors have run into real
battles. Expansion
prospects are flickering in
Florida and Michigan. In
Ohio, Kasich's legendary
deal-making abilities are
being tested. In Arizona,
Brewer is trying to stare
down Republicans in the
state House, and the com-
ing week may determine


Associated Press
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks at a news
conference Nov. 13, 2012, in Trenton, N.J. Christie is
one of nine Republican governors who support Medicaid
expansion, a major component of President Barack
Obama's health care law taking effect Jan. 1.


who prevails.
"In the past, that much
federal money has brought
reluctant parties to the
table," said economist Gail
Wilensky, a Republican
health policy expert who
sees flaws in Obama's law
but says covering the unin-
sured is worthwhile. "It is
now looking more likely
that a number of states will
sit out 2014."
Legislators can dig in


more easily than gover-
nors, said Alan Weil, exec-
utive director of the
nonpartisan National
Academy for State Health
Policy
"There is a lot of prag-
matism involved in the
Medicaid decision," Weil
explained. "Legislators
don't have operational re-
sponsibility and tend to ad-
here more to ideological
perspectives."


Arizona's Brewer could
be a study in pragmatism.
Once a staunch oppo-
nent of "Obamacare," she
surprised the political
world in January by an-
nouncing she would push
to expand Medicaid to
some 300,000 low-income
Arizonans. She called it a
fiscally prudent move that
would return economic
dividends to the state, and
stressed that Arizona
would back out if Washing-
ton reneged on funding.
But Brewer had to battle
to get legislation through
the Senate, succeeding
only with the help of De-
mocrats. The issue could
come to a head as early as
the coming week in the
Arizona House. Brewer
seems to have the edge,
but her fellow Republi-
cans are unyielding.
"We will continue to
fight tooth and nail as far
as we can," said Gowan.
In Ohio, Kasich has
framed the Medicaid deci-
sion as a moral cause,
using the language of his
Christian beliefs.
The Bible runs his life


"not just on Sunday, but
just about every day," he
said in his annual State of
the State address in
February
"I can't look at the dis-
abled, I can't look at the
poor, I can't look at the
mentally ill, I can't look at
the addicted and think we
ought to ignore them," he
told lawmakers.
But fellow party mem-
bers don't seem willing to
make a leap of faith.
Republicans over-
whelmingly control both
the Ohio House and
Senate.
They're leery of expand-
ing government programs
and fear being stuck with
any long-term costs. The
Senate, where Republi-
cans hold 23 of 33 seats, is
critical.
The Senate President,
Republican Keith Faber,
recently told reporters
that his members were
still divided.
"I have yet to see a pro-
posal that I can tell you
there's a majority of my
caucus that supports," said
Faber


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NATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Home of famous Va. hams ponders foreign buyout


Associated Press

SMITHFIELD, Va. -
You can't go far in this his-
toric southeastern Virginia
town without seeing a pig.
A herd of life-size swine
statues lines its downtown,
an ornament of a piglet
wearing a bandanna
adorns a front lawn, hams
hang in storefronts and a
pickup truck flaunts the li-
cense plate "PIG TIME."
The home of the world's
largest pork producer and
maker of famous Smith-
field hams is divided in its
reaction to news that the
company agreed to be
bought by a Chinese com-
pany The reception is as
mixed as whether the lo-
cals favor salt-cured or
sugar-cured ham.
Smithfield Foods Inc.
agreed to a $4.72 billion
offer from Shuanghui In-
ternational Holdings Ltd.,
the majority shareholder
in China's largest meat
processor The deal, which
would be the largest
takeover of a U.S. com-
pany by a Chinese firm,
still faces a federal regula-
tory review and Smithfield
shareholder approval.
Steps from the site
where the company was
founded in 1936, residents
in the "Ham Capital of the
World" greet each other on
a main street lined with
white picket fences and
Victorian-style homes, and
welcome a neighbor back
from a recent trip out of
town. Just down the road,
workers shuffle into the
company's packing plants
for their shifts.
Looking out on the
street that's lined with an-
tique cars every weekend,
locals frequent Smithfield
Gourmet Bakery and
Beanery, grabbing their
morning coffee and pastry
Some are shocked that
"China would own our
Smithfield," said Carolyn
Burke, a longtime resident
who owns the eatery
"It's Smithfield ham, it's
not China ham," Burke
said.
And she's right: Pork


Associated Press
A Smithfield ham is shown Sept. 6, 2011, at a grocery
store in Richardson, Texas. Chinese meat processor
Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd. agreed Wednesday,
May 29, to buy Smithfield Foods Inc. for approximately
$4.72 billion in a deal that will take the world's biggest


pork producer private.
produced here for more
than 300 years became so
popular that many places
in the 1930s tried to pass
off their ham as Smithfield
ham, which led to brand-
ing each ham so customers
knew it was authentic. The
state even passed a since-
revised law in 1926, stating
the "Smithfield ham"
moniker could only be
used for cuts of peanut-fed
hogs processed and salt-
cured in the town limits.
The town also is home to
the world's oldest cured
ham from 1902 at the Isle
of Wight museum com-
plete with its own brass
collar around the hock.
As important as the pork
itself is Smithfield Foods,
which employs about 3,800
people in Virginia. In its


most recent fiscal year, it
brought in sales of more
than $13 billion and made
a profit of $361 million.
The company, its found-
ing family the Luters -
and those who work there
donate time and money to
the community, funding
parks, public restrooms
and other projects.
"You either have a fam-
ily member who works
there, or has worked there,
or you had a summer job
there. It's just such a part
of our community," said
Sheila Gwaltney, the direc-
tor of a local arts center
and a more-than-40-year
resident whose husband's
family has been in the area
since 1666. "Smithfield has
been so good for the town."
With its namesake and


well-being on the line,
Smithfield native and
Mayor T. Carter Williams,
71, hopes the pending sale
doesn't compromise the
town's identity.
"They say that every-
thing's going to stay the
same, and we all just hope
that it does," he said. His
wife, Connie, works at
Taste of Smithfield, a
hometown restaurant the
company opened about a
year ago to showcase its
products. "We'll just see
where it ends up, time will
tell."
In an interview with The
Associated Press, Smith-
field Foods CEO Larry
Pope said the move
showed "the globalization
of the world and how it af-
fects small-town America."
"But Smithfield, Vir-
ginia, has nothing to worry
about," Pope said. "We're
in a mature market ... and
to continue to grow we
have to look at opportuni-
ties outside the United
States."
Bob Barnes, who
worked as an accountant
at Smithfield Foods for
about 10 years before re-
tiring, sees only "good
things happening" for the
company that has had its
share of ups and downs
over the years.
Pork producers such as
Smithfield have been
caught in a tug of war with
consumers. The company


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needs to raise prices to off-
set rising commodity costs,
namely the corn it uses for
feed. But consumers are
still extremely sensitive to
price changes in the cur-
rent economy. By raising
prices, Smithfield risks
cutting into its sales
should consumers cut
back or buy cheaper
meats, such as chicken. In
2009, Smithfield Foods
posted its first annual loss
since 1975, and again in
2010, but has since re-
bounded. And one of its
largest shareholders had


been pushing Smithfield
to consider splitting itself
up in recent months.
"Somebody's gotta own
it," Barnes said. "It's just
money It doesn't bother
me as long as it doesn't
change our philosophy,
our life, our politics (and)
it doesn't shut down
places."
Gwaltney agreed:
"When you think about it,
that should be very good
economically for the com-
pany... and what's good for
the company is good for
us."


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Feds crack down on foreclosure auction scams


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO At
the height of the financial
crisis, bargain hunters
would gather each week
on county courthouse
steps to bid on foreclosed
properties throughout
Northern and Central Cal-
ifornia. The inventory lists
were long, especially in
hard-hit areas such as
Sacramento and Stockton.
But the auctions were gen-
erally short affairs often
because real estate specu-
lators were illegally fixing
the bidding process.
In the past three years,
federal prosecutors have
charged 54 people and two
companies in three states
for bid-rigging during
courthouse auctions of
foreclosed properties.
Most cases originated in
California, the state with
the highest foreclosure
rate during the financial
crisis. Nearly identical
rings were also broken up
in Raleigh, N.C., and Mo-
bile, Ala.
Working in concert, the
would-be buyers would ap-
point just one person to
bid on each property on
the auction block, thus se-
curing the "winning" bid.
Minutes after the official
proceeding was over, they
would then conduct an
auction among them-
selves, often on the same
courthouse steps.
That's when a property's
true price would emerge.
The conspirators would
then divvy up the differ-
ence paid at the official
auction and the private
one.
Federal prosecutors say
such schemes have oper-
ated for decades, once
earning a few thousand
dollars per property. But
the explosion of foreclo-
sures amid the country's
financial meltdown a few
years ago upped illicit
gains to millions of dollars.
The scammers took money
that otherwise would have
gone to banks selling the
foreclosed properties or
beleaguered homeowners


who should have been
compensated.
The bidding investiga-
tions are being driven by a
special task force estab-
lished at the U.S. Justice
Department in the wake of
the financial crisis to com-
bat mortgage fraud. The
probes aim to "stop those
who engage in illegal con-
duct that thwarts the com-
petitive process, and take
advantage of American
consumers when they are
most vulnerable," said As-
sistant Attorney General
Bill Baer, head of DOJ's
antitrust division in Wash-
ington, D.C.
Prosecutors say the cir-
cle of conspirators gradu-
ally widened at each
courthouse: First-time
buyers would be brought
into the conspiracy as an
increasing number of
speculators attended the
auctions. Those not in on
the schemes were often
pressured not to return by
verbal harassment and, in
some cases, physical
jostling.
In the last two years,
more than 30 people have
pleaded guilty to partici-
pating in a series of court-
house bid-rigging conspira-


HEALTH


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if
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First-time buyers would be brought
into the conspiracy as an
increasing number of speculators
attended the auctions. Those not
in on the schemes were often
pressured not to return by verbal
harassment and, in some cases,
physical jostling.
ies in Northern California tate investment company
counties. Another 11 have in 2003, after Robert Bran-
een busted in Central Cal- non sold a portion of the
ornia. Similar prosecu- family farm. When they
ons have been carried out began attending auctions
n Alabama, where eight to acquire rental proper-
eople have pleaded guilty ties, they discovered some
n Mobile in the past two speculators were rigging
ears. Five others have the bids and joined in the
leaded guilty in North conspiracy, according to
'arolina since 2010 to op- court documents.
rating a bidding conspir- In addition to the jail
cy around Raleigh. time, the Brannons were
For many now going to ordered to pay restitution
rison, this is their first of almost $22,000 each,
rush with the law. their cut from the rigged
Father and son Robert auctions.


and Jason Brannon were
each sentenced to 20
months in prison this
month in Mobile, Ala., after
pleading guilty to partici-
pating in 17 rigged bids.
The two opened a real es-


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In April, real estate in-
vestor Mohammed Reza-
ian pleaded guilty to
participating in similar
scams in Northern Califor-
nia. He has agreed to co-
operate in the prosecution
of other perpetrators and
pay a fine of $213,000. He
also faces a little less than
two years in prison when
sentenced sometime next
year. Neither he nor his
lawyers returned phone
calls.
Federal officials say
they expect to charge a few
more people in the coming
months but that cases are
expected to soon drop off
now that the heated fore-
closure market of late 2008
and 2009 has cooled.
Madeline Schnapp, an
economist with Property
Radar, a company that
tracks foreclosures, said
sales at auctions have
fallen from a height of
about 30,000 a month to
about 5,000 a month in Cal-
ifornia as government pro-


grams and new laws have
made it more difficult for
banks to begin foreclosure
proceedings.
"There's not much of a
supply now," she said.
Paul Pfingst, a lawyer
who represents another
investor charged in partic-
ipating in a Central Cali-
fornia ring, says illegal
temptation got the better
of many speculators who
couldn't resist victimizing
seemingly unsympathetic
banks.
His client, Andrew
Katakis, is accused of par-
ticipating along with four
others in a $2.5 million
conspiracy to rig bids in
the Stockton area, which
has led the nation in
foreclosures.
"The amount of money
and properties that were
changing hands was stag-
gering," said Pfingst, who
maintains his client's in-
nocence. "It caused many
people to cross from legal-
ity to illegality."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IRS: Glory days and checkered past


CALVIN WOODWARD
Associated Press

WASHINGTON For a
time, the Internal Rev-
enue Service inspired awe
and admiration in Ameri-
cans, not just trepidation
and lame jokes about
death and taxes.
Everyone loved the rev-
enue agents when they put
away Al Capone, the
Chicago underworld's
master of brutality and
bribes, in a coup so spec-
tacular it scared other
gangsters straight.
In the year after, federal
coffers swelled as delin-
quent taxpayers stepped
forward to make good on
their debts. Criminals came
out of the woodwork to pay
taxes on their ill-gotten
gains. Authorities in what
was then the Intelligence
Unit of the Bureau of Inter-
nal Revenue nailed the
slippery Public Enemy
No. 1 when no one else
could, scooped up New
York City racketeers by the
dozen and stood tall in pop-
ular imagination as incor-
ruptible, fearless stewards
of the treasury and the law.
Fine, but that was the
1930s. What have they
done for us lately?
Or to us?
The essential mission
hasn't changed. The IRS
still collects the money that
goes back out to build roads,
help look after people in
their old age, fight menaces
from Nazism to terrorism,
and operate the vast levers
of government It still locks
up a few thousand delin-
quents a year, among them
drug kingpins who wouldn't
be caught any other way
But no one loves the IRS
anymore, not for ages. It's
our culture's king-sized
pain that makes you do
hard math, issues nonsen-
sical directions, takes your
money and gives it to
politicians to waste even
as they borrow unspeak-
able sums from China to
waste even more.
On top of that overdrawn
caricature, the agency now
is saddled with its episode
of tea party tumult, expos-
ing IRS behavior that is
memorably bumbling at
best and criminal at worst.
MEN
"Taxes grow without
rain." -Proverb.
More than 97,000 people
work for the IRS, more
than double the workforce
of that other deeply in-
quisitive and all-seeing in-
stitution, Google.
That includes 13,000 rev-
enue agents and more
than 1,500 lawyers, about
as many attorneys as prac-
tice statewide in North
Dakota. It's bigger than
some Cabinet departments
- Transportation for one.
Employment has dropped
by about 10,000 since 2010.
The perception of the
taxmann" probably should
give way to tax woman be-


Associated Press
Chicago mobster Al Capone watches a football game Jan. 19, 1931, in Chicago. For a
time, the Internal Revenue Service inspired awe and admiration in Americans, not just
trepidation and lame jokes about death and taxes. Everyone loved it when revenue
agents put away Capone, the Chicago underworld's master of brutality and bribe, in a
coup so spectacular it scared other gangsters straight. But there's little love for the
IRS anymore, and there hasn't been for ages.


- - K -.. -




This Feb. 18, 2010 file photo shows vehicle traffic on U.S. Highway 183 in front of a
damaged building in Austin, Texas, where authorities said a man flew his small plane
into the building that housed several employees of the IRS.


cause more than six in 10
employees are female, a
substantially higher share
than in both the civil serv-
ice and U.S. labor force at
large.
The IRS is something of
a hybrid in its relationship


with political masters, not
the "independent agency"
claimed by President
Barack Obama when he
dissociated himself from
its discriminatory audits of
conservative groups seek-
ing tax-exempt status dur-


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ing the 2012 campaign.
It is partially independ-
ent, which is not at all like


ON THE NET
The IRS and Al
Capone: http://
tinyurl.com/k39dhr7

being a bit pregnant. On
one hand, the president
and his people at the
White House are barred by
law from pressing the IRS
to start or stop a tax audit.
This is to prevent the pres-
ident from putting the heat
on a political foe or going
easy on a political friend,
both tactics of the past.
The commissioner
serves five-year terms, en-
suring that leadership is
out of synch with four-year
election cycles. The com-
missioner and chief lawyer
are the only political ap-
pointees and must be con-
firmed by the Senate.
But the commissioner
reports to the treasury sec-
retary through the depart-
ment's deputy and can be
fired at will by the presi-
dent, which is not the case
in more hands-off federal
bodies. Indeed, the acting
chief, Steven Miller, was
ousted within days of the
report coming to light
showing the misbegotten
actions of lower level em-
ployees; he was one of
three senior officials to be
sidelined in the continuing
investigation.
SE
"This is too difficult for a
mathematician. It takes a
philosopher" -Nobel
Prize physicist Albert Ein-
stein on preparinghis taxes.
The income tax was
unloved from its inception.
Pushing for it in 1861 to
help pay for the Civil War,
Rep. Thaddeus Stevens
declared, "It is unpleasant
to send the tax gatherer to
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APR/6 MONTH INTRODUCTORY RATE


NATION/LOCAL


4.25%*
APR/CURRENT VARIABLE RATE


> Six Month Introductory APR as low as 2.99%,
and as low as 4.25% thereafter*
> No closing costs on lines up to $250,000**
> Possible tax benefits^
> Fast, easy approval up to 100% LTV
> Interest-only payment option available
Apply for a Home Equity Line of Credit just like a loan, and once you're
approved you can access this cash up to your full available credit limit -
whenever you need it. Stop by today or apply* online at www.ccbg.com.


5 area locations to serve you.
795.6100
www.ccbg.com


Capital City
Bank


More than your bank. Your banker.
BM Member FDIC*Subject to Credit Approval. The introductory rate will be in effect for the first six (6) months
after your account is opened. Upon expiration of the introductory rate, all balances will accrue interest at
the variable standard Annual Percentage Rate, which can range from Prime + 1% to Prime + 4.5% using the
JP Morgan Chase Prime (JPMCP) rate (currently an APR of 3.25%) not to exceed 18% at any time. Information
accurate as of 03/07/2013. Subject to change without notice. After the promotional period, the variable standard
APR will be based on your line amount, combined loan to value ratio, and credit rating. This offer is available to
new equity line clients, and to existing equity line clients with an increase in their existing credit line of at least
$25,000.00, and is subject to change without notice. Hazard insurance required and flood insurance, if applicable.
Exclusions and limitations apply. **No Closing costs for lines up to $250,000 with a Capital City Bank deposit
account. Borrower will participate in closing costs for greater amounts. Minimum line of $10,000 required.
Pre-payment penalty: if you close your Credit Line and we release our lien within two (2) years from the date
of closing, you will owe a prepayment penalty up to $1,500, depending on the line amount, ask for details. Owner-
occupied property only and CCB must be in a valid first or second lien position. Refer to HELOC application or
ask your banker for complete details. This offer may be withdrawn at any time. ^Consult your tax advisor about
possible tax benefits.


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Collectors' Day


& Appraisal Fair

Sat., June 15, 2013 in the Florida Room at Park's Visitor Center


The Park's Visitor Center will be open to the public with free admission.
(Regular admission will apply for entrance into the Wildlife Park.)
Proceeds from appraisal fees will benefit the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park.
COLLECTORS' DAY (from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm) Interesting
collections will be on display and you will be able to learn from those
who understand the joy of collecting. Collectibles will include postage
stamps, greeting and trading cards, steins, decanters, mugs depicting
animals and famous people, and so much more.

APPRAISAL FAIR (from 11:00 am until 4:00 pm) Several know-
ledgeable collectors, dealers, auctioneers, and appraisers will be on
hand to assist you in identifying and placing a value on your
treasures. Their specialties will include, but are not limited to, coins,
military, jewelry, tools, postcards, signatures and other paper, and
string instruments. Many different items can be identified and valued.
Sed 74i to DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S Florida Ave, Inverness n 34450
352-637-9588 www.dudleysauction.com

.d to d Cl iO()NI(LE \


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 A9

For the
RECORD

Arrests
William Lockley, 29, of
N.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal
River, at 2:04 p.m. May 25
on a misdemeanor charge of
trespassing after warning.
Bond $500.
Shayne Parry, 30, of W.
Yulee Drive, Homosassa, at
6:28 p.m. May 25 on a mis-
demeanor charge of boating
under the influence. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit, she
was arrested after someone
alerted a law enforcement of-
ficer patrolling the Ho-
mosassa River to a woman
passed out in a canoe with
one arm hanging over the
side into the water. The officer
saw a beer in the woman's
hand and four empty Four
Loko bottles in the boat. The
officer performed a safety
check of the vessel. Parry's
speech was slurred, she had
difficulty performing sobriety
tasks and she refused to sub-
mit to a test of her breath.
Bond $500.
Ryan Conley, 25, of S.E.
Mayo Drive, Crystal River, at
5:26 p.m. May 25 on a misde-
meanor charge of boating
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, a Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission officer stopped
Conley, who was operating a
boat with six people on board
near the Three Sisters canal in
King's Bay. Tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration at 0.179 percent
and 0.175 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. Bond
$500.
Jarod Liedel, 32, of
S.E. 55th Court, Ocala, at
7:45 p.m. May 25 on a mis-
demeanor charge of boating
under the influence. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, he
was stopped while operating
a boat in near Pete's Pier in
King's Bay. He had difficulty
performing sobriety tasks
and refused to submit to a
test of his breath. Bond $500.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Edna Beltz, 93
FLORAL CITY
Edna Elbon Beltz, 93,
Floral City, died May 31,
2013, in Gainesville at
Haven Hospice. Mrs. Beltz
was born in Marianna,
Fla., on Sept. 5, 1919, the
oldest of 10 children, to the
late Jesse and Bonnie
Pittman
and came
to his area
in 1972
r from St.
Peters-
burg. She
was a
Edna member
Beltz of the Flo-
ral City United Methodist
Church and Chapter No. 65,
Order of The Eastern Star.
Left to mourn her loss
are her four daughters,
Marie Addison of
Gainesville, Fla., Patricia
Bouquet of DeRitter, La.,
Barbara Elbon of Floral
City and Carol Elbon of
Gainesville, Fla.; her
brother and sister Eugene
Pittman and Christine Neal
of Inverness; 13 grandchil-
dren; 10 great-grandchildren;
and several great-great-
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by two
husbands, William Elbon
in 1976 and Spencer Beltz
in 1998.
Edna's life will be cele-
brated on Tuesday, June 4,
at 10 a.m. at the Chas E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Rev Ray Kelley and O.E.S.
Eastern Star Chapter
No. 65 officiating. Burial
will follow in Memorial
Park Cemetery in St. Pe-
tersburg. The family will
receive friends at the fu-
neral home on Monday
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Janie
Dennis, 59
INGLIS
Janie Dennis died May
30, 2013 at the Hospice
House after a one year
fight against lung cancer.
She was born Aug. 8,1953.
She was surrounded by
her family, some of her
many friends and the won-
derful staff at Hospice
House as she passed
peacefully She faced her
death as she lived her life
-- with

and good
h u m o r.
She never
once suc-
cumbed to
pity or
anger,
Janie choosing
Dennis instead to
keep a smile on her face
and a twinkle in her eyes.
She cared little for things
but greatly for those she
loved. She lived by the
words in the song "I Hope
You Dance" and hoped
we'd all learn to live that
way She will be missed by
all who knew her.
She is survived by her
children, Starline Grubbs,
Samantha Williams and
Donald W Dennis Jr; 11
grandchildren; her
brother, David Neighbors;
her sisters, Martha Black-
stone and Sheila Rogers;
and her stepfather, Ole
Olesen. She had many
friends who will miss her
frequent telephone calls.
Her memorial service
will be at her home in In-
glis at 12 p.m. Sunday, June
2, 2013. In lieu of flowers
the family asks that you
donate to Hospice House
of Citrus County who de-
serves special recognition
and thanks for the special
treatment she received
while in their care.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. cornm.

David
Hughey, 64
CRYSTAL RIVER
David Hughey, 64, of
Crystal River, died on May
31, 2013, at Citrus Memo-


rial hospital in Inverness.
Funeral services will be held
at Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

Joan
Sheehan, 89
HOMOSASSA
Joan A. Sheehan, 89, of
Homosassa, died Friday, May
31, 2013, at her residence.
Arrangements are under
the direction of Strickland
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Crystal River.


Irene
French, 90
JACKSONVILLE
Irene Cannon French
passed away peacefully
May 14, 2013, in Jack-
sonville, Fla., at the age of
90.
She was born in Green-
point, Brooklyn, a first-
generation American
daughter of Irish parents
Michael Cannon and Mary
Reilly Irene loved singing
the old Irish songs learned
from her mother's collec-
tion of
e scratchy
78 rpm
records.
She could
make you
cry with a
rendition
of "Danny
Irene Boy" and
French t h e n
laugh with some of the
more risqud Irish drinking
songs. Her love of singing
later translated into mem-
bership and eventual lead-
ership of the singing group
"The Loveable Lambs and
Rams." Irene was also a
long standing member of
the Moose Lodge of Ocala,
Fla., where she met Owen
French and they eventu-
ally married. She and
Owen traveled to nursing
homes around Citrus
County with "The Love-
able Lambs and Rams"
and together they brought
many hours of joy to the
residents until they were
both well into their 80s.
After Owen's passing,
Irene moved to Jack-
sonville in 2011 to live with
family friends Linda and
Jim Stokes, who became
her caregivers.
Irene was the last sur-
viving sibling of six broth-
ers, John, Joseph, James,
William, Thomas and
Lawrence Cannon; and
two sisters Mary Cannon
Thurn and Agnes Cannon
Cheney She was also pre-
ceded in death by hus-
bands Albert Lavin and
William Rumford. Irene
had no biological chil-
dren, but claimed her
many nieces, nephews,
great- and great-great-
nieces and -nephews as
her own who will all
mourn her passing, in-
cluding Florence Fink,
James Fink, Frances An-
druskiewicz, Jeannine
Corey, Lorraine Cheney
and Catherine Dennington.
A memorial Mass will be
celebrated at 8:30 a.m.
Thursday, June 6, 2013, in
Queen of Peace Catholic
Church at 6455 S.W State
Road 200, Ocala, FL 34476,
with Father Patrick J.
O'Doherty as Celebrant.
Irene will be laid to rest at
Forest Lawn Cemetery in
Ocala.
Words of comfort can be
left at wwwhardage-
giddenshendricksave.com.
Arrangements are under
the care and direction of
Hardage-Giddens Funeral
Home, 4115 Hendricks
Ave. Jacksonville, FL
32207; 904-346-3808.

Elbert
Hurley, 70
INVERNESS
Elbert Glenn Hurley, 70,
Inverness, died May 29,
2013. Services will be held
at the Connley Bros. Fu-
neral Home in Covington,
Ky. Chas. E. Davis Fuineral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
local arrangements.

Dorothy
Thelen, 90
FLORAL CITY
Mrs. Dorothy Thelen,
age 90, of Floral City,
Fla., died Saturday, June 1,
2013, in Lecanto, Fla.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the
Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory

Audrey
Wentworth, 78
HOMOSASSA


Audrey Lucille Went-
worth, 78, of Homosassa,
died Friday, May 31, 2013,
at her residence. Private
cremation arrangements
are under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory, Crystal
River.

WANT TO PLACE AN
OBITUARY? Call 352-
563-5660 for details.


Vollis Simpson, creator


of whirligigs, dies at 94


Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. Vol-
lis Simpson, a self-taught
North Carolina artist
famed for his whimsical,
wind-powered whirligigs,
has died. He was 94.
Beth Liles of Joyner's
Funeral Home confirmed
the death Saturday Simp-
son's wife, Jean Simpson,
was quoted by the Wilson
Daily Times as saying that
her husband died Friday
in his sleep at his home in
the town of Lucama.
Jean Simpson also was
quoted by the paper as
saying that her husband
had received a successful
heart valve replacement
in February but experi-
enced complications.
Simpson became known
for his whirligigs, wind-
driven creations that stand
as high as 50 feet and are
constructed from recycled
parts including motor
fans and cotton spindles.
He built the contraptions
on land near his machine
shop in Lucama, about 35
miles east of Raleigh. More
than 30 of them were on
display there until last
year, when an effort to re-
store them began. The
Vollis Simpson Whirligig
Park is scheduled to open
in November in Wilson, about
50 miles east of Raleigh.


Associated Press
Whirligig artist Vollis Simpson sits outside his shop June 21,
2012, in Lucama, N.C. Simpson, a self-taught artist
famed for his whimsical, wind-powered whirligigs, died in
his sleep Friday. He was 94.


People from across the
world visited Simpson,
and he would happily sit
and talk with them.
"What Vollis was doing
mechanically, creatively
and artistically is unpar-
alleled," folklorist Jeffer-
son Currie, who has worked
on the renovation, said
Saturday "He worked on
a scale that was a lot larger
than anyone else. And even
in that scale, he had a lot
of intricacy"
The whirligigs weigh as
much as 3 tons and have
hundreds of moving parts.
They're folk art or what's
also known as outsider art,
works created by someone
without formal arts training


Neither did Simpson
have a formal engineering
degree. But that didn't
stop him from construct-
ing a motorcycle with a bi-
cycle and a stolen motor
when he was an Air Force
staff sergeant on Saipan
during World War II. He
also built tow trucks for
moving houses.
In a 2012 interview,
Simpson told The Associated
Press he was conflicted
about the park in his honor
He said he knew he could
no longer care for his cre-
ations if they stayed at
home with him, but he felt
lonely without them.
"I just hope I live to see
it," he said of the park.


Memorial held for Nancy Lanza,

mother of Newton gunman


Associated Press
KINGSTON, N.H. -
More than 100 family
and friends gathered at a
church Saturday to re-
memberthe woman whose
son massacred 20 first-
graders and six educators
in a Connecticut ele-
mentary school last year.
The service was held
at the First Congrega-
tional Church in
Kingston, where Nancy
Lanza once lived. Police
Chief Donald Briggs had
said only friends and
family were invited.
She was the first vic-
tim of her 20-year-old
son Adam's Dec. 14 ram-
page, shot dead in their
home before he blasted
his way into Sandy Hook
Elementary School in
Newtown. He killed him-
self as police closed in.
Mourners lined up in
92-degree heat to enter
the church and a few of
them cried upon exiting.
A police officer played
the bagpipes outside.
Friends have said
Nancy Lanza loved the
Red Sox and gardening
and talked of a growing

To Place Your
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563-3206
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enthusiasm for target
shooting. The rifle and two
handguns Adam Lanza
took into Sandy Hook were
registered to her.
But friends said she
never talked about her
home life, keeping details
about her son private.

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was held for her in
Kingston on Dec. 20.


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OOOF3R2


Obituaries


A10 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IRS
Continued from Page A9

the door of the farmers,
the mechanics, and the
capitalists ... but these
things must come or this
government must soon be
buried in its grave."
President Abraham Lin-
coln signed into law a 3
percent tax on income
over $800, a sum few peo-
ple made. A progressive
income tax followed a year
later in a law establishing
an enforcement arm, the
office of commissioner of
internal revenue in the
Treasury Department. The
wealthiest Americans paid
5 percent.
Before the end of the
1800s, the income tax was
repealed, revived and
struck down as unconstitu-
tional, only to return in 1913
with the enactment of a
constitutional amendment.
The tax form of 100 years
ago three pages long,
with another page of in-
structions- loosely resem-
bles the short form of today,
except for its provisions for
deducting uninsured ship-
wrecks and its guidance to
a still-agricultural nation
about claiming income
from the wool and hides of
slaughtered animals.
The basic tax rate was 1
percent on personal in-
come over $3,000, and
there was a 6 percent sur-
tax on astronomical in-
comes over $500,000.
Rates would not remain
so benign for long. In 1918,
the top rate soared to 77
percent to help pay for
World War I. During World
War II, compliance leaped
forward when Congress in-
troduced payroll withhold-
ing and quarterly tax
payments.
rEN
"If you drive a car, I'll
tax the street. If you try to


sit, I'll tax your seat Ifyou
get too cold, I'll tax the
heat. Ifyou take a walk, I'll
taxyour feet"-The Beat-
les, "Taxman."
Back to biblical times,
revenue collection was
often contracted out to in-
dependent "tax farmers"
so as to insulate authori-
ties from the howls of an
aggrieved population, At-
lanta accountant Jay
Starkman says in his his-
tory of taxes, "The Sex of a
Hippopotamus," so named
because it's about as hard
to divine whether a hippo
is male or female as it is to
comprehend the tax code.
A certain distance re-
mains. No president vis-
ited the IRS headquarters
until John Kennedy did so
in 1961, embracing the tax
collector as the underpin-
ning of a nation locked in
Cold War competition, a
space race and monumen-
tal obligations at home and
abroad. "We are strongly
behind you," Kennedy told
the agency "We expect the
best from you."
It was a historic, morale-
building visit to the put-
upon agency, but JFK's
record with the IRS is not
entirely noble. Although
the bureau was reorgan-
ized in the 1950s to replace
patronage appointments
with career professionals
(and to rename it the In-
ternal Revenue Service),
Kennedy's administration
used it to try to cower crit-



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Associated Press
This April 29, 1999, photo shows Internal Revenue Service data transcribers putting
data from federal income tax returns into computers at the IRS Cincinnati Service
Center in Covington, Ky.


ics on the right.
Later, President Richard
Nixon's IRS manipulations
against those on his "ene-
mies list" rose to the level


of an impeachable offense
in the eyes of the Senate
Judiciary Committee.
In the 1990s, the IRS
went through another


overhaul, this time to in-
troduce more accountabil-
ity, more recourse for the
taxpayer and a customer-
service ethic.


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MIRACLE-EAR IS
CELEBRATING...


J years


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 All

"Some people believe
that the IRS slogan is,
'We're not happy until
you're not happy,"' Stark-
man writes in his book. Yet
it's probably more respon-
sive to the consumer than
the annoying help lines for
digital gadgets. "Although
IRS is the largest paper-
shuffling organization in
the world," he says, "when
I call, I still get a live Amer-
ican person fairly quickly"
To IRS haters, the over-
haul was not much more
than public relations gloss,
lipstick on a fanged pig.
But it made some
changes that are conse-
quential to this day Among
them, it established the Of-
fice of the Inspector Gen-
eral for Tax Admin-
istration, a more au-
tonomous organization
than existed before to
scrutinize the behavior of
the tax collectors.
That's the outfit that in-
vestigated and exposed
the audits slanted against
conservatives in the 2012
campaign. It's why the IRS
is in such a pickle now.











NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Fire rages
1 ----I-


CI


&
TRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


CHRONICLE


For many, decision to flee the wrong one


Nine people killed in vehicles while trying to


outrun twister-spawning storms


Associated Press
The Powerhouse Fire
burning in the Angeles
National Forest northwest
of Los Angeles sends up
a huge plume of smoke
Saturday. The blaze has
burned thousands of acres
of brush since it erupted
Thursday afternoon near
a utility powerhouse.

For 90th birthday,
pilot plans 90 laps
GRAND ISLAND, N.Y. -
Loved ones of John Lawton
will gaze heavenward on
his 90th birthday Monday.
Again and again and again.
Otherwise, they might
miss his Cessna 172 as he
attempts to make 90 flying
passages across the U.S.-
Canadian border.
"Somehow, I got a wild
idea that I needed to do
something different for my
birthday," said Lawton, who
has been a pilot for 56 years.
Lawton hopes for clear
skies when he takes off
Monday and spends an es-
timated one to two hours at
an altitude of around 3,500
feet, performing a series
of tight, nearly aerobatic,
figure-eight patterns in
his four-seat airplane.
He has asked his non-pilot
daughter, Brenda, along for
the ride. Lawton's son, a
pilot, will stay on the ground
so no one can question who
was really at the controls.
Nutrition labels
for alcohol OK'd
WASHINGTON -Alco-
holic beverages soon could
have nutritional labels like
those on food packaging,
but only if the producers
want to put them there.
The Treasury Department,
which regulates alcohol, said
this week that beer, wine and
spirits companies can use
labels that include serving
size, servings per container,
calories, carbohydrates,
protein and fat per serving.
Such package labels have
never before been approved.
The labels are voluntary,
so it will be up to beverage
companies to decide
whether to use them on
their products.
The decision is a tempo-
rary, first step while the Al-
cohol and Tobacco Trade
and Tax Bureau, or TTB,
continues to consider final
rules on alcohol labels.
Parade marred by
gunfire stages redo
NEW ORLEANS Or-
ganizers of a parade inter-
rupted by a shooting spree
in New Orleans on Mother's
Day are finishing what they
started.
The Times-Picayune re-
ported the Original Big 7
Social Aid and Pleasure
Club held a "re-do" Satur-
day of its second-line pa-
rade along the same route
where 20 people were in-
jured after gunfire erupted
last month.
Led by a brass band, the
crowd danced and sang
when they paused at the in-
tersection where the shoot-
ing broke out on May 12.
Two brothers are ac-
cused of firing into the
crowd last month. They
were arrested on 20 counts
each of attempted second-
degree murder.
Nineteen people were
wounded by gunfire. One
person was hurt while
fleeing.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY -
It's a warning as familiar as
a daily prayer for Tornado
Alley residents: When a
twister approaches, take
shelter in a basement or
low-level interior room or
closet, away from windows
and exterior walls.
But with the powerful
devastation from the May
20 twister that killed 24
and pummeled the Okla-
homa City suburb of
Moore still etched in their
minds, many Oklahomans
instead opted to flee Fri-
day night when a violent
tornado developed and
headed toward the state's
capital city
It was a dangerous deci-
sion to make.


Interstates and roadways
already packed with rush-
hour traffic quickly became
parking lots as people
tried to escape the oncom-
ing storm. Motorists were
trapped in their vehicles
- a place emergency offi-
cials say is one of the worst
to be in a tornado.
"It was chaos. People were
going southbound in the
northbound lanes. Every-
body was running for their
lives," said Terri Black, 51, a
teacher's assistant in Moore.
After seeing last month's
tornado also turn homes into
piles of splintered rubble,
Black said she decided to
try to outrun the tornado
when she learned her
southwest Oklahoma City
home was in harm's way
She quickly regretted it.


Associated Press
Overturned trucks block a frontage road off 1-40 just east
of U.S. 81 on Friday in El Reno, Okla., after a tornado
moved through the area.


When she realized she was
a sitting duck in bumper-to-
bumper traffic, she turned
around and found herself
directly in the path ofthe most
violent part of the storm.


"My car was actually
lifted off the road and then
set back down," Black said.
"The trees were leaning
literally to the ground ...
I'll never do it again."


- k
_; . .. -


a


* I'


a "


U -- S.


Associated Press


Turkish protesters clash with riot police Saturday at the city's main Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey.
Turkish police retreated from the square Saturday, removing barricades and allowing in thousands of protesters
in a move to calm tensions after furious anti-government protests turned the city center into a battlefield.
A second day of national protests over a violent police raid of an anti-development sit-in in Taksim square
has revealed the depths of anger against Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.





Turkey roiling


Protesters swarm Istanbul square after clashes


Associated Press
ISTANBUL
n a scene reminiscent of the Arab
Spring, thousands of people on
Saturday flooded Istanbul's main
square after a crackdown on an anti-
government protest turned city streets
into a battlefield clouded by tear gas.
Though he offered some concessions
to demonstrators, Prime Minister Recep
Tayyip Erdogan remained largely de-
fiant in the face of the biggest popular
challenge to his power in a decade in
office, insisting the protests are unde-
mocratic and illegitimate.
Public anger has flared among urban
and secular Turks after police vio-
lently broke up an anti-development
sit-in in the landmark Taksim Square,
with protests spreading to dozens of
other cities as demonstrators de-
nounced what they see as Erdogan's
increasingly authoritarian style.
As the furious protests entered their
second day, police fired tear gas and
turned water cannons at demonstra-
tors, some of whom threw rocks and
bottles on their march toward Taksim.
In an area normally abuzz with tourists,
stores were shuttered and protesters
fled into hotels for shelter. There
were hundreds of arrests and injured.


A man draped in the Turkish flag walks next to burning debris
Saturday in Ankara, Turkey.


Turkish authorities later re-
moved barricades and allowed
thousands of demonstrators into
the square. Sounding defiant
even as he bowed to protesters
and pulled back police, Erdo-
gan promised to stick to the
government's redevelopment
plans which protesters fear
will remove one of the few green
spaces in the sprawling city


Hundreds of people were in-
jured in the protests, including
four people who permanently
lost their eyesight after being
hit by gas canisters or plastic
bullets, Huseyin Demirdizen
of Turkey's Doctors' Associa-
tion told The Associated Press.
He said at least two people in-
jured in the protests are in life-
threatening condition.


At least nine people were
killed in Friday's storms,
including a mother and her
baby sucked out of their
car as a deadly twister tore
its way along a packed In-
terstate 40 near the town
of El Reno, about 30 miles
from Oklahoma City
"We believe all the victims
were in vehicles when the
storm came through," Cana-
dian County Undersheriff
Chris West said Saturday
Oklahoma wasn't the only
state to see violent weather
Friday In Missouri, areas
west of St. Louis received
significant damage from a
tornado that packed esti-
mated winds of 150 mph. In
St Charles County, at least 71
homes were heavily dam-
aged, county spokeswoman
Colene McEntee said.


World BRIEFS

Blazing bash


Associated Press
Street actors perform dur-
ing a fire show Saturday
in St. Petersburg, Russia,
with a Soviet era MIG-19
fighter jet installed as a
monument in the back-
ground. Young people
gathered in a park late
Saturday to celebrate the
first day of summer.

Rockets from Syria
fired into Lebanon
BEIRUT-- Eighteen
rockets and mortars rounds
from Syria slammed into
Lebanon on Saturday, the
largest cross-border salvo to
hit a Hezbollah stronghold
since Syrian rebels threat-
ened to retaliate for the
Lebanese militant group's
armed support of Syrian
President Bashar Assad.
In Qatar, an influential
Sunni Muslim cleric whose
TV show is watched by mil-
lions across the region
fanned the sectarian flames
ignited by the Syria conflict
and urged all Sunnis to join
the fight against Assad.
"I call on Muslims every-
where to help their brothers
be victorious," Yusuf al-
Qaradawi said in his Friday
sermon in the Qatari capital
of Doha. "If I had the ability I
would go and fight with them."
He denounced Assad's
Alawite sect, an offshoot of
Shiite Islam, as "more infidel
than Christians and Jews."
Italy confirms three
coronavirus cases
ROME -Three people
were being treated Satur-
day for a new respiratory
virus that is alarming global
health officials, in the first
cases in Italy, the country's
health ministry said.
The virus is related to
SARS, which killed about
800 people in a global epi-
demic in 2003. The U.N.
health agency said earlier
Saturday that it had been
informed of 51 confirmed
cases of the new virus
since September. Thirty of
those cases were fatal.
-From wire reports


Al-Shabab undermining vaccination efforts in Somalia


Associated Press


MOGADISHU, Somalia
- Islamic extremist rebels
are fighting a campaign in
Somalia to administer a
polio vaccine, charging that
it contains the virus that
causes AIDS or could make
children sterile, a battle of


words that is frustrating
health workers.
Al-Shabab, the rebels
linked to al-Qaida, have
discouraged many parents
from getting their children
inoculated against polio, a
disease that is an incipient
problem in this Horn of
Africa nation long plagued


by armed conflict and dis-
ease, according to health
workers who spoke to The
Associated Press.
The al-Shabab extrem-
ists have been pushed out
of virtually all of Somalia's
cities and face continued
military pressure from
African Union and govern-


ment troops. Health work-
ers are gaining access to
more children to give the
life-saving polio vaccine.
But some mothers and fa-
thers are refusing the in-
oculation, apparently
heeding the advice of the
Islamic militants.
"Al-Shabab are paranoid


about potential infiltration
by spy agencies disguised
as humanitarian workers.
That's probably a princi-
pal reason for discourag-
ing vaccination," said Abdi
Aynte, the director of the
Somali-based think-tank
Heritage Institute for Pol-
icy Studies.


I









EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes
can be found on "-s
Page A15 of
today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Quick trip south to Dunedin on coast

can yield 'undisclosed pleasures'


r Who
would ever think about going
to a place called
Honeymoon
Island, unless the purpose was,
umm, a honeymoon?
I've lived in Crystal River 28 years and
it wasn't until 2012 that I was introduced
to Honeymoon Island. A couple of British
friends who split their time between
England and New Port Richey invited us to
a picnic and said, "Meet us at the end
of the road on Honeymoon Island."
"What is this," was my immediate thought,
"some kind of reality show,
or are we geocaching?"


On the day of the picnic, after an hour and a half
drive from home, we arrived at a beautiful park
and a forest of pine trees and palms at the end
of the road.
After a festive picnic we were invited to walk the
trail that looped around the remote end of the is-
land. We'd never take more than a few steps before
someone would say, while pointing, "Oh, look!
What kind of bird is that?"
I'm sure Honeymoon Island is on the itinerary of
many birders, as we were rarely out of sight of a
feathery friend.
The ospreys and eagles were in the process of
pushing or enticing their offspring out of their


Neil Sawyer
SPONTANEOUS
TRAVELER


Page A17


Graceful ospreys are common on
Honeymoon Island. : A Rotary Club group
from Argentina regroups after walking the
birding trail.


Holy Land tour
Ron Friesland of Homosassa visited Israel with his sister Pam and brother-in-law
Day Meyer of Blowing Rock, N.C. Here, they pause at a point overlooking old
Jerusalem. In the background is the Dome of the Rock Mosque. The trip, with
Templeton Christian Tours, also included the Sea of Galilee, the Dead Sea,
Masada, the Golan Heights and many more sights. They traveled more than 1,000
miles through Israel.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


NOLA00






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Granddad can


be role model


SUNDAY EVENING JUNE 2, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D1 Comcast~Dunnellon & Inglis F Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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(WGiNA) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay "Eight Men Out"


Dear Annie: Ten
years ago, my
daughter, '"June,"
married a guy I thought
was a little immature.
June thought he would
change after
she married
him. He didn't.
Five years ago,
they had a
child. She
thought he
would change
then. He has
not
My son-in-
law does ab- -
solutely
n o t h i n g
nothing
around the ANN
house unless MAll
June asks him
to. Then he
stomps around like a little
kid and finally does it
halfway He won't even
play with his son unless
June insists. The guy
comes home from work
and plays video games
and watches TV for hours.
Meanwhile, June works
two jobs, pays the bills
and takes care of my
grandson. If something
major needs to be done,
she asks me to do it while
her husband plays Angry
Birds. The guy is 36 years
old and acts like he's 12.
My wife says to stay out
of it, but I know June is
miserable. She refuses to
spend the money on a
marriage counselor What


can or should I do? I hate
to think my grandson is
seeing this. Worried
Dad
Dear Dad: You can't do
anything about your
daughter's
choice to toler-
ate this situa-
tion. If June is
miserable, she
4 can get low-
cost counseling
through her
church, any
graduate
school counsel-
ing depart-
ment United
Way, the YMCA
IE'S and the Samar-
BOX itan Institute
S(samaritan
institute.org).
Otherwise, please be the
mature father figure your
grandson can emulate.
Children find their role
models among their rela-
tives, teachers, friends'
parents and even TV fig-
ures. You don't need
to badmouth your
son-in-law.


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar Email anniesmail
box@comcast.net, or
write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"After Earth" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) 4:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Hangover 3" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13) 1
p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 10:05 p.m.
No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"After Earth" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Epic" (PG) 3:45 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.


"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 1:05 p.m.,
6:45 p.m. No passes.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No
passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
4:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 6:55 p.m.
No passes.
"The Hangover 3" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
4:05 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Now You See Me" (PG-13)
1:35 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:55 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Prepare fish
6 Credit and debit
11 Stop!, at sea
16 Peak
21 Henry-- Lodge
22 Torment
23 Island near Sicily
24 Big artery
25 Loos or Bryant
26 "- is an
island"
27 Sadder
28 Get going
29 Pole
30 Raison d'-
31 Kimono sash
33 Bout
35 Stalemate
36 Touch
38 Field for grazing
39 African antelope
40 Impair
41 Scull
42 Cast a sidelong glance
44 Venus -
48 "The Amazing -"
51 Direct
54 School dance
55 Raines or
Fitzgerald
57 --of Tolu
61 Texas landmark
62 Charges
63 Redden
65 Censure
66 Stiff hair
67 Enduring literary work
70 Smudge
72 Healthy
73 Lanka
74 Witness's promise
75 Seize
77 Alma-
79 Opp. of WSW
80 School in England
82 Twisted
83 Walked with long steps
85 Assistance
87 Recess
89 Toy gun projectile
90 Snood
91 Gift from a new dad
92 of Liberty
94 Polar region
96 Turf
97 Place in
New Mexico
100 Wire measure


101 Kind of rice
104 Make lace
105 A few, not all
106 ---Magnon
107 French friend
108 Reverie
110 Shoved
112 Outer surface
113 Fashionably
old-fashioned
116 Implied
118 Perceive
119 Lustrous quality
120 Audition
122 Gamblers' haven
123 Scoff
124 Somewhat
125 Boast
127 Painter's
workroom
129 Kind of tennis
130 Altar constellation
133 Levin or Gershwin
135 Prov. in Canada
136 A twitching
137 Red gem
141 Sow
142 Vise
144 Big clumsy guy
145 Rational
146 Chinese chairman
147 Missouri river
149 Hollandaise,
for one
151 Let slip
153 Happening
155 Take pleasure in
156 Hat material
157 Peron of
Argentina
158 Trace
159 River in England
160 Cede
161 Prevent from
acting
162 Chose


DOWN
1 Neck wrap
2 Dugout
3 Withstand
4 Parcel of land
5 Greek letter
6 Horse's gait
7 Where Greeks once
assembled
8 European capital
9 Letters in genetics


Thesaurus entry
Both (prefix)
Actor Kilmer
An astringent
Cook a certain way
Cream of-
Money
Decompose
A Muse
Groove in rock
Spud
Gen. Robert--
However
Grouchy one
Andes animal
Shiny appearance
The "I"
Not stale
Johnny -
"- Well That Ends
Well"
Fall
Taxi
Building extension
En -
Wide-awake
Country of origin
Like some soil
Bewildered
Yegg
- acid
Measuring device
Burn brightly
Chapeau
Animal tender
Not impaired
Auto
Lived
Relative
of the tuna
Floor covering
Insect egg
Sunday talk (abbr.)
Calendar abbr.
Popular pet
Baby animal
Cure-all
One with promise
Intelligent
Stopwatch, e.g.
- Mahal
Kind of eclipse
Bay window
Cher's ex
Table scrap
Sport
Direct the
course of
Round candy


White sale item
Climbs
Steal from
"- Town"
Foot digit
Witnessed
Kite appendage
Made a ringing sound
Confront
Verdant


Reed or Gehrig
Straight
To the left, on ship-
board
Stair part
Century plant
Violin name
Liking
Catkin
Kitchen item


Was too fond
Ancient Briton
Unadulterated
Obscene
Rod for roasting
Mil. rank
Ripken of baseball
- Maria
WWII abbr.
Big shot (abbr.)


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


II
LI


A14 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-
7663, or membership
chairman Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For
more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Roast beef dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, June 7. Cost
is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. Karaoke by Mike.
The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 meets at


2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that


we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Cmdr. Richard
Floyd 727-492-0290, Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Visit the website at
http://davfl70.yktc.us.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Cmdr. Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post meets the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. The June 5 meeting
will be preceded by a dinner
for members, spouses and
guests at 6 p.m. The auxiliary
meets at 1 p.m. the first
Wednesday.


The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast has
been suspended until
September.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and
Saturday, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our


community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Cmdr. Norm
Brumett at 352-476-2134 or
Auxiliary president Alice
Brummett at 352-476-7001
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians


welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade, coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7 p.m.
All veterans in the
Homosassa/Homosassa
Springs area are invited to be
a part of American Legion
Post 166. This is open to all
veterans who love to ride and
would be interested in forming
an American Legion Riders
chapter. Riders members are
military men and women from
all branches of service, as
well as children of service
members. For more informa-
tion, call Clay Scott at 928-
848-8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
Cmdr., Robert Scott, at 352-
860-2090. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.


MOAA scholarship awarded





































Special to the Chronicle
The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) met at the Citrus Hills Country Club May 9 for MOAA's
scholarship awards luncheon. Following lunch, Lt. Col. Norm Cooney introduced guest speaker Dr. Vernon
Lawter, provost of the College of Central Florida Citrus Campus. Dr. Lawter spoke about the college's efforts
to enlighten Citrus County about programs available at CF. Winner of the annual $1,000 MOAA scholarship
was Cadet Alexander Sharp, left, of Lecanto High School, pictured with Lt. Col. Cooney and Junior ROTC
program Officer-in-Charge Lt. Col. Dave Brown, U.S. Army. Cadet Sharp was selected from several JROTC
candidates and will attend Florida State University, majoring in mathematics. He will be enrolled in the Army
ROTC program there. MOAA is a professional and social organization open to all current, retired or former
officers of the U.S. uniformed services and their spouses. Its next regular meeting will be in September. For
more information, call Capt. Jim Echlin, U.S. Air Force, at 352-746-0806.


You are invited to the
Key Training Center

iual Dinner Auction


FIIda\ July 12, 2013
ole Lite Enrichment Center
Lecanto Campus


'n and S','-,:l Hour at 5:30 p.m.
inner l:,, II- Place at 6:30 p.m.
Mu, i.al Entertainment
I:-, Ciol Corporate Cats
I
Tikt I- .ie $50 per person
To re'-.r, e your ticket call
;52--: 5-5541 Ext. 311








CH...
^^^ ClIROMwl


Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web
at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Cmdr. Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.

See VETERANS/Page A16


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 A15





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mazzone: Knight of the Year


Special to the Chronicle
Presenting John Mazzone, left, with the award for Knight of the Year is Dana Rossignol, council Grand Knight.


Founding leader receives honor from local Council 14485


Special to the Chronicle

John Mazzone, founding Grand
Knight of St. Scholastica Council
14485 in 2008, has functioned as
membership director since the coun-
cil received its charter. He was re-
cently named St. Scholastica Council
Knight of the Year.
As district warden, Mazzone re-
cruited the founding 34 members
and for the next five years led the
council to the achievement of five
consecutive Double Star Member-
ship attainments, including fiscal


year 2012-13. His leadership and per-
sonal efforts have been instrumental
in allowing the council to attain its
fifth consecutive Double Star Award.
From nothing, Mazzone has built a
membership of 144 Catholic men and
provided the enthusiasm and leader-
ship to help motivate these men to
participate in events which brought
the council the coveted Division 2
Council of the Year, competing
against more than 160 councils
statewide.
He has recruited and trained the
council's 1st Degree team, which


hosts many exemplifications for the
council, as well as other district
councils. Mazzone provides the com-
plete package: He schedules,
arranges, notifies other councils, as-
sures setup is correct, provides re-
freshments and more.
Mazzone is an usher at St.
Scholastica Parish and is involved in
many church activities.
In addition, he also volunteers his
time at Daystar Life Center. Maz-
zone volunteers twice a week as an
interviewer of clients requesting
Daystar assistance.


Summer




swimming


YMCA lessons begin this week


Special to the Chronicle

The YMCA has been
teaching swimming les-
sons to people of all ages
for more than 100 years.
Its progressive model of
swimming instruction al-
lows any individual to
learn swimming funda-
mentals and build
aquatic skills gradually
YMCA swim lessons
are provided at Central
Ridge Community Center
Pool in Beverly Hills and
begin the first week of
June. Lessons will be
taught for three different
levels: pre-school, youth
and adult, with parent
and child lessons avail-
able for children ages 6 to
36 months.
With youths especially,
learning how to swim
isn't just about encourag-
ing children to get in the
water. Learning to swim
is about building skills
that will help ensure
their safety and encour-
aging a healthy activity
they can participate in
over a lifetime.
The YMCA wants to in-
crease awareness of the
risks and preventative
measures associated with
pools and water recre-
ation. Florida has double
the national average and
is higher than any other
state in the nation when
it comes to the number of
children younger than 5
who drown. Since drown-
ing often happens in res-


idential swimming pools,
it is vital that parents and
other adults adopt and
practice as many water
safety steps as possible.
Classes are divided
into ability groups with
trained instructors who
emphasize personal
safety, swimming skills,
endurance and social
skills. The Y has proven
techniques to introduce
basic water skills to be-
ginners, allowing them to
adjust in the water and
develop independent
movement. They progress
toward basic stroke and
kicking skills, floating
and pool safety.
For intermediate be-
ginners who are already
swimming a few feet with
no flotation device, they
continue to polish the ba-
sics, as well as form pro-
gressive arm movements.
Intermediate classes
focus on improving over-
all skills and swimming
longer distances.
Instruction is delivered
in a student-centered,
caring atmosphere by
certified instructors who
give students personal-
ized attention. Lessons
are developmentally ap-
propriate and designed
to quickly and effectively
teach aquatic skills.
To register, stop by the
Beverly Hills office, visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org
or call the YMCA admin-
istrative office at 352-
637-0132.


Knights Ladies


give $4,600 to 12


county charities


N1. 7


Special to the Chronicle

The Knights of Colum-
bus Council 6168 Ladies
Auxiliary awarded more
than $4,600 in charitable
gifts to 12 nonprofit organ-
izations in Citrus County at
its annual end-of-year
luncheon in the Knights'
Hall in Lecanto recently
The charitable gifts
went to Camp E-Nini-
Hassee, CASA (Citrus
Abuse Shelter Associa-
tion), Citrus United Bas-
ket, Family Resource
Center, Habitat for Hu-
manity, Hospice of Citrus
County, HPH Hospice,
Knights of Columbus
Council 6168, Our Lady of
Grace Church Christian
Kitchen, Our Lady of
Grace Church Homeless



VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

SERVICES & GROUPS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. the second Saturday
each month at the Disabled
American Veterans Building,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness.. The building is on the
corner of State Road 41 and
Paul Drive.
We are an advocacy group
for current and future veter-
ans, as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 is en-
couraging new members to
join to promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. More than 88,000 com-
bat veterans are still unac-
counted for from all wars.
We fight for them and their
families.
More information is avail-
able at www.rollingthunder
fl7.com. Full membership is
open to all individuals 18
years or older who wish to


Coalition, Pregnancy and
Family Life Center and
Relay For Life.
The luncheon capped
what Ladies Auxiliary
PresidentAnna Palmer la-
beled a "busy and produc-
tive year." It was hosted
and served by Knights for-
mally attired in dark
slacks, white shirts and
black ties, a mark of their
appreciation for the
Ladies Auxiliary and the
support those members
provide.
With proceeds from
fundraising activities, the
Ladies Auxiliary every
year awards charitable
gifts to county nonprofits
and a $1,000 scholarship to
a deserving female Citrus
County Catholic high
school senior


dedicate time to the cause.
Come out and join us on
June 29 for the seventh an-
nual Independence Day Golf
Classic. Golf registration and
opportunities to be a sponsor
are available at www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, or call Ray at
813-230-9750.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. If you would like for us
to provide a speaker, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday-


Special to the Chronicle
Ms. Kenny Lugo (second left) accepts an envelope containing a check for Camp E-Nini-Hassee from Pat Louque, char-
ity committee chairwoman for the Knights of Columbus Council 6168 Ladies Auxiliary. With them for the presenta-
tion are Char Fontaine (second right), treasurer, and Anna Palmer, president of the Ladies Auxiliary.


Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless


Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to
the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans' Me-
morial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams. Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs


(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH


Hospice care and programs
do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. She teaches
free classes to combat veter-
ans at several locations and
times.
For more information, call
her at 352-382-7397.


Sunday's PUZZLER-

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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6-2 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A16 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NY senator: New statue security risky


Associated Press

NEW YORK- New security
plans for the Statue of Liberty could
leave visitors vulnerable when it re-
opens July 4, New York officials
said last week.
Sen. Charles Schumer and New
York Police Commissioner Ray-
mond Kelly called for the National
Park Service to reverse its plan,
which calls for visitors to board
boats in either lower Manhattan or
New Jersey and stop at nearby Ellis
Island for security
"The NYPD and the Park Service
have differences over how to best
protect visitors from a potential ter-
rorist attack," said Kelly, adding
that he has written to the secretary


of the interior about the issue.
"I know the NPS cares deeply
about the monument and its visi-
tors," said Schumer, "but in this
case I think they've made a mistake
and should rethink this policy
change."
Park service representatives did
not immediately respond to com-
ment requests.
The statue was closed after Su-
perstorm Sandy Storm surges
flooded Liberty Island, destroying
boilers and electrical systems, but
the statue on higher ground on
the island remained intact.
Previously, passengers were
screened with airport-style metal
detectors before they boarded boats
for Liberty Island from Battery



SAC cruising


Park in Lower Manhattan and Lib-
erty State Park in New Jersey
"This screening was put in just
after the horrific events of Sept. 11.
And I can tell you, in our judgment,
the threat has not abated," Kelly
said.
Terrorist groups, he added, "have
an interest in targeting locations
that represent America."
Both officials said any additional
costs could be covered with a small
increase in the fee charged to visit
the island. They also advocated
scheduled ticketing to help reduce
lines.
The Ellis Island Immigration Mu-
seum, which suffered severe dam-
age to its infrastructure during the
storm, remains closed for repairs.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Scenes from Honeymoon Island, from top: A chick tries to
work up its courage to fly; Honeymoon Island State Park
sign; one ospey chick waits on the nest as another
surveys the horizon.


SAWYER
Continued from Page A13

nests. On one occasion,
there was a lot of activity
atop a huge snag of a tree.
We watched with awe as a
parent osprey patiently
waited while two fledg-
lings, on the edge of their
nest, flapped their wings
in the light breeze. Time
after time it appeared that
"this was it." We were
about to witness their first
flight, only to be disap-
pointed again and again.
We started to leave, and as
I relaxed and put my cam-
era down, suddenly one of
the fledglings spread its
wings, gave a little hop,
and swoosh! Airborne at
last! Our coaching and an-
ticipation paid off, as we
all gave three cheers for
that brave little chick.
Oh, about Honeymoon
Island known as Hog Is-
land until the name was
changed in 1939 when a
New York developer
seized the opportunity and
built 50 palm-thatched
bungalows for honey-
mooners. Quite a leap in
visioning: Hog Island to
Honeymoon Island. Mar-
keting the destination with
the promise of "undis-
closed pleasures for new-
lyweds" worked for a
while, but the concept was
apparently interrupted by
the social disarray of
World War II. A sad day,
I'm sure, for all future hon-
eymooners.
The island, off the Gulf
Coast near Dunedin, was
turned into a state park
and a causeway was con-
structed in 1964, an exten-
sion of State Road 586.
This opened up the 2.5-
mile-long island to a vari-
ety of outdoor activities
and has been a well-known


"secret" to those who are
lucky enough to live
nearby
Bask in the sun, swim,
snorkel, fish and enjoy the
scenery along this seem-
ingly endless beach.
Shelling is said to be espe-
cially good due to the Gulf
currents. Concessions
along the beach include
showers, necessary facili-
ties, snack bars and a gift
shop.
A bit removed from the
bustling beach is a surpris-
ingly nice picnic area, with
pavilion and facilities, and
ample parking. The next
stage of enjoyment, abut-
ting the picnic area, is the
trailhead, where bird
watching is the key attrac-
tion. Binoculars will make
the experience even more
enjoyable.
As with many Florida
State Parks, equal access
is provided, as are beach-
friendly wheelchairs. Call
the ranger station at 727-
469-5942, option 5.
Our last visit was when
several area Rotary Clubs
had an event at the picnic
pavilion, which incorpo-
rated our customary walk
to check on our osprey
family still there.
You owe yourself a trip
to Honeymoon Island for
enjoyment of at least some
of the varied available ac-
tivities, and may you dis-
cover your own
"undisclosed pleasures."


Neil and Karyn Sawyer
have been residents of
Crystal River for 28 years.
They travel frequently,
having been to 48 states,
66 countries and seven
continents. Neil
welcomes comments and
questions about travel.
Contact him via email to
gobuddy@
tampabay.rrcom.


Special to the Chronicle
The Spanish American Club of Citrus County recently cruised to the Bahamas as part of the club's fundraising
efforts. Pictured are 34 members aboard Royal Caribbean's Enchantment of the Seas.


0C5ara I SINGLE TREKKERS
BRA11 MC 10 DAYS! TRAVEL MEETING
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S aand single travel specials Refreshments and door prizes
5-Night Western Caribbean Cruise Airfare and transfers i Please RSVP 352-860-2805 or dmuir@tallyhovacations corn
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SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Older Americans Month


Holly King Rawlings of
Inverness and Travis Tat-
man of Citrus Springs
will exchange nuptial
vows at 6 p.m. Saturday,
June 22, 2013, at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Mu-
seum. The Rev Dr.
Joshua Yarrow will offici-
ate at the evening
ceremony
The bride-elect is the
daughter of George and
Rena King of Inverness.
She earned her master's
degree from Webster Uni-
versity. Her fiance is the
son of Robert and Rose
Tatman of Citrus Springs.
He earned his master's
degree from the Univer-
sity of Florida.
A reception is to follow


at the Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum. The
couple plan to honey-
moon in Savannah, Ga.,
and reside in Citrus
County.


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed May 2013 as "Older Americans Month" in Citrus
County and encouraged every citizen of Citrus County to take time to engage with older citizens through enjoyable
social interactions such as sports, games, contests and other forms of play. Citrus County is a community that
includes 56,480 citizens age 60 and older. Our older adults in Citrus County play an important role by continuing to
contribute experience, knowledge, wisdom and accomplishments in the community.


Mental Health Awareness Month


Sarah Hardy and
Richard Provost III, both
of Inverness, have an-
nounced their engage-
ment and forthcoming
nuptials. The couple will
exchange wedding vows
at 1 p.m. May 3, 2014, at
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church,
Inverness.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Michael and
Susan Hardy of Floral
City. Her fiance is the son


of Richard Provost Jr,
Kathleen Provost and
Sandra Clutter.


June 3 to 7MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Italian meatball
hoagie, meatballs in mari-
nara sauce, cheesy mashed
potatoes, Italian beans, hot
dog bun, margarine, raisins,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Blended juice,
baked chicken thigh, yellow
rice with tomato and pepper,
black beans, white bread,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Grilled
chicken breast patty in mari-
nara sauce, penne noodles
with garlic oil, Tuscan veg-
etables, peaches, rye bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Flame-broiled


beef patty, potatoes O'Brien,
yellow corn with diced
tomato, hamburger bun with
ketchup and mustard, fresh
orange, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad,
pea/cheese salad, marinated
broccoli salad, graham
crackers, whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.

Senior dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and
South Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed May as "Mental Health Awareness Month" in Citrus
County. Mental Health Court is an essential component of the county's justice system, which saves vast criminal
justice resources and keep individuals out of jail and engaged with their communities. From left are: JJ
Kenney, commissioner; Dennis Damato, commissioner; Kelly Chisman, court alternative supervisor; Rebecca Bays,
commissioner; Samantha Shephard, drug court coordinator; Tim Zub, program assistant; Scott Adams,
commissioner; and Joe Meek, commissioner.


Computer talk cheap


he phone hadn't rung all day, which
was a blessing because we'd been
catching up on a thousand and one
things around the house.
For us, spring cleaning involves some
heavy lifting and that's just the dust
bunnies. As a reward, we'd decided to
treat ourselves to dinner out. Sue went
upstairs to clean up and the moment I
heard her turn on the shower, the phone
rang. Dorothy the Computer from our
prescription-by-mail company was on
the line.
"We have some important
questions about... Sue's ... pre-
scription. Is ... Sue ...there?
Please say 'yes' or 'no."
"Yes, she's here but..."
"Is this ... Sue? Please an-
swer 'yes' or 'no."'
"No, but I'm her husband ..."
"Please have ... Sue ... call 1- "
800-555-5553682973401328876,
extension 12 for some very im- Ji
portant information about MUL
your prescription. Thank
you."
When I think of the 23 hours and 55
minutes a day that neither of us are in
the shower, I wonder how it is possible
that the computer will call the exact mo-
ment one of us turns on the water.
I can see how a computerized phone
call makes it easier for my health care
provider; what I can't see is how it makes
things easier for me. It is a one-way call
disguised as a conversation.
The only time you should have to an-
swer a question with only "yes" or "no"
is when you're on "Judge Judy"
I want my wife to get her medicine,
and I don't want her to have to call 1-800-
555-5553682973401328876, extension 12.
Just let me speak to a human. Or a better
computer program.
When I call someone, the first words
out of my mouth are usually, "Is this a
good time for you to talk?" I'm pretty
sure a computer could learn how to say
that. And if the answer is no, the com-
puter could ask, "When is a good time to
call you?" "Never" should be one of the
choices.
The only good thing about computer
phone calls is that I don't feel guilty
about hanging up on a computer. I don't


II


think that I have hurt its feelings.
What bothers me is that they could be
done so much better.
How many times has this happened to
you? The computer asks you to type in
your account number "for faster serv-
ice." Finally, 20 minutes later when you
finally get to speak to a human, the first
thing out of his mouth is, "Can I please
have your account number?"
I never type in my account number
anymore, and it almost always gets me
faster service. By not typing it
in, the computer says, "I'm
sorry, I don't recognize that.
Let me transfer you to some-
one who can help you."
I have to phone in test re-
sults every few weeks to one
of my health care providers.
The first thing their computer
says to me is to call 911 if this
is an emergency
M Is there someone on this
LEN planet that would call 1-800-
555-5553682973401328876, ex-
tension 12 first if they were
having an emergency?
It's like explaining to plane passen-
gers how to buckle a seat belt. If they
don't already know how to do that, how
are they ever going to figure out the
toilet?
Somehow, we can tell the difference
between a computer's voice and an ac-
tual human. But every day they are get-
ting better and more realistic.
A computer recently ended one call to
me by saying "thank you," and I said
"thank you" back. Was it just out of habit,
or for a moment, could I not tell the dif-
ference? And what happens when the
day comes that we really can't tell the
difference?
I think we'll always be able to tell,
even if the computer voices are perfect.
How many humans are going to start a
conversation by saying, "If you'd like to
speak to me in Spanish, press 9" in per-
fect Spanish?
No matter how human they sound,
that's got to be a dead giveaway

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


= Engagement

Rawlings/King


Engagement

Hardy/Provost


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A18 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


^i W











SPORTS


Tiger
shoots his
worst-ever
output for
9 holes
Saturday.
/B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


. MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
0 NHL playoffs/B5
College baseball, softball/B5
0 Golf, auto racing/B6


Rays blanked 5-0 by Jimenez, Indians


TB's loss follows

9-2 win late

Friday night

Associated Press
CLEVELAND Ubaldo
Jimenez pitched eight scoreless
innings and the Cleveland Indi-
ans defeated the Tampa Bay
Rays 5-0 on Saturday
Jason Giambi and Asdrubal
Cabrera hit two-run homers in
the game that began about 10
hours following the conclusion of
Friday night's contest that ended
at 2:53 a.m. on Saturday after
nearly five hours of rain delays.
Jimenez (4-3) gave the Indi-


ans exactly what they needed.
The right-hander allowed four
hits and struck out seven in
stopping Tampa Bay's six-game
winning streak. The Rays, who
rolled to a 9-2 win earlier Sat-
urday morning, had only two
runners reach second base.
Giambi, homering in his third
straight game, gave the Indians
a 2-0 lead in the second. He
added an RBI single in third
while Cabrera's two-run blast
came in the fifth.
Tampa Bay right-hander
Chris Archer (0-1), called up
from Triple A-Durham before
the game, allowed five runs in
four innings. He faced three bat-
ters in the fifth and was pulled
after Nick Swisher lined a single
off his glove following Cabrera's
home run. The force of the blow


knocked Archer to the ground.
He was uninjured but was re-
moved by manager Joe Maddon.
No one could blame either
team for feeling tired after a long
night at the ballpark Friday
when three rain delays totaling
4:49 pushed a game that began
on the last day of May into the
early hours of the first day in
June. Neihter team took batting
practice on the field Saturday for
the game that began at 1:05 p.m.
Jimenez, winning for the first
time since May 11, came within
three outs of his fourth career
complete game shutout and
first since 2011 while pitching
for Colorado. He was pulled
after throwing 108 pitches. Vin-
nie Pestano pitched the ninth
for Cleveland's eighth shutout
of the season.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Chris Archer hands the ball to
manager Joe Maddon as he leaves the game against the Cleveland
Indians in the fifth inning Saturday in Cleveland.


Keep it moving


Associated Press
Maria Sharapova returns the ball to Jie Zheng during their third round match of the French Open on Saturday at the Roland Garros
stadium in Paris. Sharapova won 6-1, 7-5.

Sharapova, Djokovic, Nadal all advance to fourth round ofFrench Open


Associated Press


PARIS For the third time in three
matches this year in the French Open,
Rafael Nadal hardly looked himself for a
set.
Unlike in the first two rounds, Nadal
won his opening set Saturday, albeit
barely The takeaway, even after another
victory, was the same: The owner of a
record seven titles at Roland Garros is not
the dominant force he usually is at the
clay-court tournament
"If I want to have any chance," Nadal
acknowledged after beating 27th-seeded
Fabio Fognini of Italy 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4, "I re-
ally need to play better."
Hours later, the man Nadal beat in last
year's final and could meet in this year's
semifinals, No. 1 Novak Djokovic, seemed


vulnerable, too. Walking to his changeover
chair at 4-3 in the third set of a 6-2, 6-2, 6-3
win against No. 26 Grigor Dimitrov,
Djokovic stretched his right arm the one
he has used to win six Grand Slam titles -
several times. He then was treated by a
trainer, who applied ointment and gave
Djokovic a massage near the shoulder.
Two games later, the match was done,
Djokovic was into the fourth round, and
he raised that arm in his typical victory
celebration.
His mood would shift dramatically soon.
When Djokovic left the court and went to
the locker room, he was told that his first
coach Jelena Gencic, 76, who began
working with little Nole when he was 6 -
had died in Belgrade, Serbia, earlier Sat-
urday Djokovic issued a statement
through the tournament saying that he


would not be able to attend a post-match
news conference.
"His team kept the news secret from
him until after the match," ATP
spokesman Nicola Arzani said. "He just
broke down. ... He was very, very, very
close to her."
As they approach each other in the
draw, Nadal now meets No. 13 Kei
Nishikori -the first Japanese man in the
fourth round of the French Open in 75
years while Djokovic faces No. 16
Philipp Kohlschreiber. The other
matchups on that half of the bracket after
a wild Saturday in Paris: No. 12 Tommy
Haas against No. 29 Mikhail Youzhny, and
No. 7 Richard Gasquet against No. 9
Stanislas Wawrinka.
See Page B6


Pacers



force



Game 7

Indiana downs

Miami 91-77

Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS Roy Hib-
bert had 24 points and 11 re-
bounds, Paul George finished
with 28 points, and the Indiana
Pacers forced a deciding game
in the Eastern Conference fi-
nals with a 91-77 victory over the
Miami Heat on Saturday night.
LeBron James scored 29
points for the defending NBA
champions, who will host Game
7 on Monday Dwyane Wade was
limited to just 10.
The Pacers opened the third
quarter on a 14-2 run as the
Heat went 1 of 11 from the field.
Indiana led by as much as 66-49
late in the third.
Miami couldn't get closer
than four the rest of the way


Associated Press
Indiana Pacers center Roy
Hibbert shoots against the Miami
Heat during the second half of
Game 6 of the NBA Eastern Con-
ference finals Saturday against
the Miami Heat in Indianapolis.


Lecanto's Atkinson racks up softball accolades


C.J. RISK
Correspondent
It should not have been a surprise,
considering what Amber Atkinson ac-
complished, not only this year but last
year as well.
During her junior season with
Lecanto's softball team, Atkinson set
all sorts of school records in guiding
the Panthers to the final 16 in Class 6A.
Those accomplishments earned her
the Chronicle player of the year award
for softball.
Many of those records lasted just one
year. She broke most of them during
her senior season in guiding Lecanto
to the 6A Region II semifinals.
Atkinson was a Class 6A finalist for
Florida Dairy Farmers Softball Player
of the Year after winning FACA
Lecanto senior catcher Amber Atkinson
was the FACA's Player of the Year in her
district, which led to her being a finalist
for Class 6A Florida Dairy Farmers Soft-
ball Player of the Year.
Chronicle file photo


District Player of the Year which, all
things considered, should be no great
shock. Indeed it might have been ex-
pected, but it wasn't, at least not by
Atkinson.
"That," she said after learning of the
honor, "did come as a surprise. I'm so
happy with the way
things are going
right now." I'm s
Atkinson got her
honors she also the way 1
played in the FACA
all-star game by going right
hitting .441 with 41
runs scored, 45 hits, Amr
13 doubles, four Lecanto senior c
triples and nine several maj
home runs through
the district tournament level. All of
those stats were best on a team that
went 18-13 to finish in the final 16 in
the state, and only her batting average
was lower than what she posted in her
junior season (.488).
As impressive as her offensive num-
bers were, it may have been her de-
fense that got her a scholarship to play


)
tI


t
at
or


for Indian River State College. Atkin-
son's play behind the plate is game-
changing base runners had to go all
out when trying to steal a base, and if
they drifted off the base too far, they
quickly learned Atkinson had the arm
and a strong desire to use it in trying to
pick them off.
Atkinson's six
happy with home runs as a jun-
ior set a Lecanto
things are school record, some-
thing she wasn't at
now. all certain could be
approached at
ber Atkinson least not until
tcher said of earning Lecanto's third
accolades recently. game of her senior
season. In a slugfest
against a very good team from The Vil-
lages, Atkinson slugged two home runs,
both of them grand slams, in the Pan-
thers 17-15 triumph.
"My home runs," Atkinson an-
swered when asked what surprised
her about her season. "Last year I got
See Page B5












Boston
New York
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
6 E
4 2 -
1 2Y2 Y2
5 3 1
8 10 8


East Division
GB WC

) 5Y2 6
4 7Y2 8
5 10 102
8 18/2 19


NL

Cardinals 8, Giants 0,
first game
San Francisco St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GBlanc cf 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 1 1 1
Mijares p 0 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 1 1 1
Quiroz c 0 0 0 0 Hollidy If 4 0 0 0
Scutaro 2b 2 0 1 0 VMarte p 0 0 0 0
Arias3b 1 0 0 0 KButlrp 0 0 0 0
Pence rf 4 0 0 0 Craig rf 4 1 1 1
Poseyc 4 0 1 0 MAdms b 3 2 1 1
Kontos p 0 00 0 TCruz c 4 1 2 2
Beltlb 3 0 0 0 Descals2b 3 1 2 2
AnTrrs If-cf 4 0 1 0 Kozma ss 4 1 2 0
BCrwfrss 4 0 3 0 SMillerp 2 0 0 0
Noonan 3b 4 0 1 0 SRonsn If 0 0 0 0
M.Cain p 2 00 0
Pill ph-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 07 0 Totals 32810 8
San Francisco 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 007 000 01x 8
LOB-San Francisco 9, St. Louis 3. 2B-Posey
(13), T.Cruz 2 (2), Descalso (8). S-S.Miller.
SF-Descalso.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
M.Cain L,4-3 6 9 7 7 0 9
Mijares 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kontos 1 1 1 1 1 0
St. Louis
S.MillerW,6-3 7 6 0 0 1 7
V.Marte 1 0 0 0 0 0
K.Butler 1 1 0 0 1 1
Cardinals 7, Giants 1,
second game
San Francisco St. Louis


ab r hb
GBlanccf 4 0 1
BCrwfrss 4 0 0
Kontos p 0 0 0
Scutaro 2b 4 0 2
Pence rf 4 0 1
Belt lb 4 1 1
AnTrrs If 4 0 1
Arias3b-ss 3 0 1
Quiroz c 3 0 0
Bmgrn p 2 01 0
RRmrzp 0 000
Noonan 3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 18 1
San Francisco 000
St. Louis 003
DP-San Francisco
Francisco 5, St. Louis
(12), Freese (7), Wail
(4). SF-S.Robinson.

San Francisco
Bumgarner L,4-4
R.Ramirez
Kontos
St. Louis
Wainwright W,8-3
HBP-by Bumgarner
Marlins
New York
ab r h b
Quntnll ss 3 0 2 1
JuTrnrph-ssI 0 1 1
DnMrp 2b 4 0 0
DWrght 3b 4 0 0
Duda If 4 0 1
Buckc 4 0 0 1
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I.Davislb 3 0 0 1
Vldspn rf 2 0 0
Byrd ph-rf 1 0 1
McHgh p 2 00 1
Carson p 0 0 0
Burke p 0 0 0 0
Lagarsph 1 1 00
Lyon p 0 000
Totals 31 15 1
New York 000
Miami 110
E-Ju.Turner (2), Da
York 1. LOB-New
Ju.Turner (5), Ferna
CS-Ankiel (1). S-P

New York
McHugh L,0-1
Carson
Burke
Lyon
Miami
Fernandez W,3-3
Da.Jennings
Webb
McHugh pitched to 1
Braves 2,
10 ii
Washington
ab r h b
Span cf 5 0 0
Lmrdzzlf 4 1 0 1
Zmrmn 3b 4 02 1
LaRochib 3 0 1
Dsmndss 4 0 1


Str Home
W-1 17-7
L-1 15-11
L-3 12-15
L-2 12-17
W-2 9-20


Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
24 .556 5
25 .545 Y2 1 4
29 .453 5Y2 6 4
29 .453 5Y2 6 6
30 .434 6Y2 7 2


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
18 .673 8-2
21 .625 212 7-3
22 .607 312 6-4
30 .434 13 912 5-5
33 .389 15/2 12 3-7


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Str Home
W-1 17-9
W-1 18-11
L-5 13-11
W-1 12-14
W-1 10-14


Str Home
W-2 17-9
W-2 20-7
L-2 20-11
W-5 13-14
W-2 12-17


W
Texas 34
Oakland 33
Los Angeles 25
Seattle 24
Houston 18


Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
21 .618 5
24 .579 2 -
30 .455 9 6
32 .429 10Y2 7Y2 ,
37 .327 16 13 !


West Division
L Pct GB WC
24 .556 --
27 .518 2 5
27 .518 2 5
29 .463 5 8
31 .426 7 10


Str Home
L-1 17-8
W-2 17-10
L-1 14-14
L-1 13-12
W-3 9-21



Str Home
L-2 16-12
W-1 17-12
L-2 20-10
W-1 15-13
L-1 14-15


Associated rress
The Boston Red Sox's Mike Napoli watches his grand slam while running toward first base in the third inning
Saturday against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium in New York.




Red Sox slam Yankees 11-1


Associated Press


i ab r h bi NEW YORK-- Mike Napoli hit

SYMolin c 4 1 0 a grand slam right after a mound
0 Beltran rf 4 1 2 2 conference, Felix Doubront sti-
0 Freese 3b 3 1 2 0 fled the Yankees once again and
0 Wggntnib 3 1 2 2 the Boston Red Sox sent New
0 Descals 2b 4 0 1 1 York to its sixth loss in seven
1 SRonsnIf 3 0 0 1 games, 11-1 Saturday night.
0 Kozma ss 3 1 0 0 Daniel Nava added a three-run
0 nwrg p 4 1 1 0 homer in the eighth inning that
emptied the crowd. The aisles
were full of fans streaming to the
Totals 327 9 7 exits by the time Nava touched the
0 000 100 1 plate, and a "Let's go, Red Sox"
002 20x 7 chant erupted when Stephen Drew
1, St. Louis 2. LOB-San homered in a three-run ninth.
s5. 2B-Scutaro (14), Belt The Red Sox stopped Phil
wright (1). SB-Descalso
Hughes' recent run of success
IP H R ER BB SO against them and evened this
three-game series going into Sun-
6 6 5 5 1 6 day night's wrapup. Boston won
1 3 2 2 1 0 on a warm evening, with Yankees
1 0 0 0 0 2 catcher Chris Stewart leaving
after the fourth inning because of
9 8 1 1 0 10 dehydration.
(Wigginton).
8, Mets 1 AMERICAN LEAGUE
Miami Tigers 10, Orioles 3
i ab r h bi BALTIMORE Miguel Cabrera's
0 Pierre lf 41 0 0
i Polanc 3b 4 1 2 0 grand slam capped a wild fourth in-
0 Dietrch 2b 4 1 2 2 ning in which Detroit hit four home
0 Ozuna rf 3 1 0 0 runs and Orioles pitcher Jason Ham-
0 Coghln cf 4 1 3 2 mel was ejected, and the Tigers beat
0 Dobbs 1 b 4 11 0 Baltimore 10-3 to snap a four-game
0 Hchvrrss 3 0 1 2 losing streak.
0 Mathis c 3 1 1 streak.
0 Frnndz p 3 1 2 1 Prince Fielder hit a sixth-inning
0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 drive for the Tigers, whose five
0 JBrown ph 1 0 0 0 homers were a season high.
) Webb p 0 0 0 0 Justin Verlander (7-4) allowed three
runs and eight hits in seven innings to
win his third straight start and improve
Totals 33 812 8 to 8-0 lifetime against Baltimore. But
S000 010 1 his performance was secondary to
0 200 40x 8 that of the Detroit offense, which used
an.Murphy (3). DP-New an eight-run fourth to take a 9-1 lead.
York 4, Miami 7. 2B-
ndez (1). 3B-Mathis (1). Royals 4, Rangers 1,
'ierre. SF-Hechavarria. 10 innings
IP H R ERBBSO 10 innings
ARLINGTON, Texas Robbie
24 6 4 4 3 1 Ross hit David Lough with a pitch with

2/3 2 1 1 1 1 the bases loaded to score the go-
1 1 0 0 0 0 ahead run in the 10th inning Sunday
and the Kansas City Royals beat the
7 3 0 0 1 8 Texas Rangers 4-1.
1 2 1 1 0 0 George Kottaras added a two-run
batter in the 5th0 0 0 1 double in the 10th for Kansas City.

Nationals 1, Ross (2-1) gave up a leadoff single
to Alcides Escobar in the 10th. Eric
innings Hosmer followed with a single and
Atlanta Billy Butler was intentionally walked to
i ab r h bi load the bases. Ross struck out Mike
0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 1 Moustakas and Lorenzo Cain before
0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 Lough came up. Lough was hit on a
) RJhnsnph-rf 1 01 0 2-1 pitch to force in the go-ahead run.
0 J.Upton If 4 0 0 0
i FFrmn ib 4 00 0 Athletics 4, White Sox 3


Berndnrt 4 0 0 0 Gattisc 3 0 0 0
Espinos 2b 4 0 0 0 JSchafrpr 0 1 0 0
KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 0
GGnzlzp 2 0 1 0 R.Penaph 1 0 0 0
Koerns ph 1 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 2 1 0 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 2 1
Abadp 0 00 O THudsnp 1 00 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Avilanp 0 0 0 0
HRdrgz p 0 00 0 McCnnph 1 00 0
Kimrelp 0 00 0
Waldenp 0 00 0
Totals 36 15 1 Totals 31 2 5 2
Wash. 000 100 000 0 1
Atlanta 001 000 000 1 2
One out when winning run scored.
E-FFreeman (5). DP-Washington 1. LOB-
Washington 6, Atlanta 5.2B-LaRoche (6),
C.Johnson (11). SB-J.Schafer (7). S-THud-


Washington
G.Gonzalez
Storen
Abad
H.Rodriguez L,0-1
Atlanta
T.Hudson
Avilan
Kimbrel
Walden W,2-1


IP H RERBBSO


7 3 1
1 0 0
1 1 0
1/3 1 1

71/33 1
2/3 0 0
1 2 0
1 0 0


OAKLAND, Calif. Hector Santi-
ago walked Josh Reddick with the
bases loaded and two outs in the 10th
inning to force in the winning run and
lift the Oakland Athletics over the
Chicago White Sox 4-3.
The A's had 16 hits and failed to
score after loading the bases with no
outs in the ninth before scoring the
game-winner off Santiago (1-4).
Jed Lowrie matched his career high
of four hits for the A's, who have won
seven straight at home and 13 of 15
overall.

Twins 5, Mariners 4
MINNEAPOLIS Ryan Doumit's
two-run triple off Tom Wilhelmsen with
one out in the ninth inning sent the
Minnesota Twins to a 5-4 victory over
the Seattle Mariners.
This was the third blown save of the
season for Wilhelmsen (0-1), all in his
last four tries. The right-hander
pitched a perfect ninth for the save Fri-


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 5, Tampa Bay 0
Minnesota 5, Seattle 4
Oakland 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings
Detroit 10, Baltimore 3
Kansas City 4, Texas 1, 10 innings
Boston 11, N.Y Yankees 1
Houston at L.A. Angels, late
Toronto at San Diego, late
Today
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 2-2) at Cleveland (McAllister
4-4), 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 2-2) at Baltimore (Gausman 0-2),
1:35 p.m.
Seattle (Bonderman 0-0) at Minnesota (Diamond 3-
4), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 3-5) at Texas (Darvish 7-2),
3:05 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 2-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 4-3),
3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-2) at Oakland (Parker 3-
6), 4:05 p.m.
Boston (Buchholz 7-0) at N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 6-3),
8:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Ortiz 1-2) at San Diego (Volquez 4-5),
10:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 8, San Francisco 0, 1st game
Milwaukee 4, Philadelphia 3
Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 6, 10 innings
Miami 8, N.Y Mets 1
Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 0
St. Louis 7, San Francisco 1, 2nd game
Atlanta 2, Washington 1, 10 innings
Arizona at Chicago Cubs, late (delayed)
Toronto at San Diego, late
Today
N.Y Mets (Harvey 5-0) at Miami (Slowey 1-5), 1:10
p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 5-0) at Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0),
1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Fiers 1-3) at Philadelphia (Lee 6-2), 1:35
p.m.
Washington (Karns 0-0) at Atlanta (Maholm 6-4), 1:35
p.m.
San Francisco (Gaudin 0-1) at St. Louis (Lyons 2-0),
2:15 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 8-0) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 1-
7), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 6-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-
3), 4:10 p.m.
Toronto (R.Ortiz 1-2) at San Diego (Volquez 4-5),
10:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

day night, but he walked the first three
batters he faced a day later after in-
heriting a 4-2 lead. Josh Willingham
followed with a sacrifice fly, and
Doumit who missed the cycle by a
home run drove in two more for the
walk-off win.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cardinals 8, Giants 0;
Cardinals 7, Giants 1
ST. LOUIS -Adam Wainwright
struck out 10 in his 14th complete
game and third this season, and the
St. Louis Cardinals completed a day-
night doubleheader sweep of the San
Francisco Giants with a 7-1 win.
Rookie Shelby Miller pitched six-hit
ball for seven innings and backup
catcher Tony Cruz hit two doubles and
drove in a pair of runs for St. Louis in
an 8-0 win in the opener.
Wainwright (8-3) allowed eight hits
and one run without walking a batter
to close out the first doubleheader be-
tween the Giants and Cardinals in St.
Louis since July 16, 1978.

Braves 2, Nationals 1,
10 innings
ATLANTA- B.J. Upton returned to
the lineup with two hits, including a
game-ending single in the 10th inning
that lifted the Atlanta Braves to a 2-1
win over the Washington Nationals.
Upton, hitting only .145 at the start
of the game, had been held out of two


straight starts by manager Fredi Gon-
zalez, who hoped the rest would
jumpstart the center fielder.
And Upton came through with a sin-
gle to right field off Henry Rodriguez
(0-1) to drive in Jordan Schafer from
second base. A sliding Schafer nar-
rowly beat the throw from Roger
Bernadina in right field, and Upton
then was mobbed by his teammates
between first base and second base.

Marlins 8, Mets 1
MIAMI Jose Fernandez pitched
seven scoreless innings and had two
hits with an RBI to help the Miami
Marlins past the New York Mets 8-1.
Fernandez (3-3) allowed just three
hits and struck out eight to give the
Marlins their fourth winning streak of
the season. Miami has won two
straight games three times and three
in a row once.
Fernandez retired his final 11 hitters
and struck out the side in the seventh.
He also had an RBI single in in the
second, and doubled and scored in
the seventh.
Chris Coghlan had three hits, in-
cluding two run-scoring singles.

Reds 2, Pirates 0
PITTSBURGH Mike Leake con-
tinued his recent run of strong pitching
by working six scoreless innings as
the Cincinnati Reds beat the Pitts-
burgh Pirates 2-0.
Leake (5-2) scattered seven hits as
the Pirates stranded seven runners dur-
ing his six innings. He had five strike-
outs and one walk. In his last four starts,
Leake has gone 3-0 with a 0.27 ERA,
allowing only one run in 33 innings.
The Reds shut out Pittsburgh for
the second straight night as the Pi-
rates lost back-to-back games for the
first time since May 8-9. On Friday,
Johnny Cueto pitched eight innings of
a one-hitter.
Francisco Liriano (3-2) struck out 11
in six innings and allowed only one run
but lost his second straight decision.

Rockies 7, Dodgers 6,
10 innings
DENVER Dexter Fowler's RBI
single down the first base line in the
10th inning lifted the Colorado Rock-
ies past the Los Angeles Dodgers 7-6.
The Rockies got their fourth win
this season in their last at-bat, one
night after losing to the Dodgers in
extra innings.
Yorvit Torrealba's two-out single off
Matt Guerrier (1-2) started the rally.
Pinch-hitter Wilin Rosario followed
with an infield single, narrowly beating
the throw to first. Fowler then lined a
hard grounder that shot past first base
into right field, driving in Torrealba with
the winning run and snapping the
Rockies' three-game losing streak.
Matt Belisle (3-2) pitched a score-
less inning for the victory.

Brewers 4, Phillies 3
PHILADELPHIA- Jonathan Lucroy
homered, Wily Peralta pitched seven
strong innings and the Milwaukee Brew-
ers held off a ninth-inning rally for 4-3
victory over the Philadelphia Phillies.
Logan Schafer went 3-for-4 with a
pair of doubles and an RBI for Milwau-
kee, which won its second straight after
finishing May tied for the worst winning
percentage (.214) in club history.
Peralta (4-6) entered on a four-game
losing streak but had one of his best
outings of the season, surrendering
two runs on eight hits with six strike-
outs and a walk.


B2 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


Tampa Bay Cleveland
ab r h bi
Joyce rf 3 0 0 0 Bourn cf
KJhnsn If 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b
Longori3b 4 0 0 0 ACarerss
Loneylb 3 0 0 0 Swisherlb
DJnngs cf 4 0 1 0 Giambi dh
Scott dh 3 0 1 0 CSantnc
RRorts 2b 3 0 0 0 Brantly If
JMolin c 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b
YEscorss 3 0 1 0 Stubbsrf
Totals 30 04 0 Totals


ab rh bi
4 00 0
4 22 0
4 1 1 2
2 1 1 0
4 1 2 3
4 00 0
3 00 0
3 02 0
4 00 0
325 8 5


Tampa Bay 000 000 000 0
Cleveland 021 020 00x 5
E-Kipnis (4). DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Tampa
Bay 5, Cleveland 7.2B-De.Jennings (14), Kip-
nis (11), Aviles (6). HR-A.Cabrera (5), Giambi
(5). SB-Aviles (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
ArcherL,0-1 4 7 5 5 3 4
AI.Torres 4 1 0 0 1 6
Cleveland
U.JimenezW,4-3 8 4 0 0 1 7
Pestano 1 0 0 0 1 1
Archer pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
Umpires-Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Fieldin
Culbreth; Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Bill
Welke.
T-2:49. A-22,748 (42,241).
Red Sox 11,
Yankees 1
Boston New York
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Nava If 6 2 4 4 Gardnr cf 4 0 0 0
Carp rf 3 1 2 1 Youkils dh 3 0 0 0
JGoms rf 2 00 0 Cano 2b 4 01 0
Pedroia2b 5 0 1 0 Teixeirlb 4 0 1 0
D.Ortiz dh 3 1 0 0 V.Wells If 4 0 0 0
Napolilb 5 1 3 4 J.Nixss 3 1 1 0
Drew ss 5 1 2 1 DAdms3b 4 02 0
Sltlmch c 5 1 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0
Iglesias3b 5 2 2 1 CStwrtc 0 0 0 1
BrdlyJr cf 5 2 3 0 AuRmnc 1 00 0
Totals 44111811 Totals 31 1 6 1
Boston 005 000 033 11
NewYork 000 100 000 1
DP-Boston 1, New York 1. LOB-Boston 9,
New York 7. 2B-Carp (8), Saltalamacchia (14),
Bradley Jr.2 (3). HR-Nava (8), Napoli (9), Drew
(4). SF-C.Stewart.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
DoubrontW,4-2 6 6 1 1 3 6
Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 1
Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 1
Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 2
NewYork
PHughes L,2-4 41/37 5 5 2 7
Claiborne 12/33 0 0 0 2
Warren 3 8 6 6 1 3
WP-P.Hughes.
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Vic
Carapazza; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Lance
Barksdale.
T-3:25. A-48,784 (50,291).
Tigers 10, Orioles 3


Detroit
ab
Infante 2b 5
Dirks rf-lf 4
MiCarr 3b 4
Fielder 1b 5
VMrtnz dh 3
JhPerlt ss 5
Avila c 5
Tuiassp If 3
D.Kellycf 1
AGarci cf-rf 3


Baltimore
r h bi
1 2 1 McLoth If
1 1 0 Machd3b
1 1 4 Markksrf
1 1 1 A.Jones cf
2 1 1 C.Davis lb
1 2 1 Wietersc
1 1 1 Hardy ss
1 2 1 Dickrsndh
0 0 0 Valenci ph
1 1 0 Flahrty 2b
ACasill ph


ab rh bi
5020
3 1 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 1
4 0 1 0
3 22 2
3 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


Totals 38101210 Totals 35 3 9 3
Detroit 010 801 000 10
Baltimore 001 110 000 3
DP-Detroit 1, Baltimore 1. LOB-Detroit 7, Bal-
timore 7. 2B-Infante (9), Tuiasosopo (3), Wi-
eters (14). HR-Mi.Cabrera (17), Fielder (10),
V.Martinez (3), Jh.Peralta (6), Avila (5), Hardy 2
(12). SB-McLouth (18), A.Jones (9), Dickerson
(3).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VerlanderW,7-4 7 8 3 3 1 5
Smyly 2 1 0 0 1 2
Baltimore
Hammel L,7-3 3 5 5 5 3 0
McFarland 3 5 5 5 2 2
Patton 2 2 0 0 0 3
Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hammel pitched to 4 batters in the 4th.
HBP-by Hammel (Tuiasosopo).
Umpires-Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First,
Alan Porter; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Greg
Gibson.
T-3:06. A-38,945 (45,971).
Royals 4, Rangers 1,
10 innings
Kansas City Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AGordn If 4 0 0 0 Andrus ss 4 00 0
AEscorss 5 1 1 0 DvMrpl If 5 01 0
Hosmerlb 5 1 3 0 Brkmndh 1 00 0
BButler dh 4 1 0 0 JeBakr ph-dh 3 0 0 0
Mostks 3b 5 0 0 0 Beltre 3b 4 1 1 0
L.Cain cf 4 0 2 0 LGarci3b 0 00 0
Lough rf 4 1 1 1 N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 0
Francrpr-rf 0 0 0 0 Morlndlb 3 0 1 1
AMoore c 3 0 2 0 Przyns c 4 02 0
Kottars ph-c2 0 1 2 Profar2b 4 0 0 0
EJhnsn2b 5 01 0 LMartncf 1 00 0
Gentry ph-cf 2 0 0 0
Totals 41 4113 Totals 351 6 1
Kan.City 000 010 000 3 4
Texas 000 100 000 0 1
E-A.Moore (1), L.Martin (2). LOB-Kansas City
11, Texas 7. 2B-Kottaras (3), Pierzynski (3).
SB-Hosmer (4), A.Moore (1), E.Johnson (8),
L.Martin (8). CS-Pierzynski (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Shields 7 5 1 1 1 5
Collins 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
CrowW,1-1 11/31 0 0 1 0
G.HollandS,9-11 1 0 0 0 0 1
Texas
Tepesch 61/37 1 0 0 2
Cotts 2/3 1 0 0 1 1
Scheppers 1 0 0 0 1 1
Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 2
R.RossL,2-1 1 3 3 3 1 3
Cotts pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by R.Ross (Lough). PB-Pierzynski.
Umpires-Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Bill Miller;
Second, Dale Scott; Third, CB Bucknor.
T-3:19. A-36,107 (48,114).


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
June 2 at Cleveland
June 4 at Detroit
June 5 at Detroit
June 6 at Detroit
June 7 vs Baltimore
June 8 vs Baltimore
June 9 vs Baltimore
June 10 vs Boston
June 11 vs Boston
June 12vs Boston
June 13 vs Kansas City
June 14 vs Kansas City
June 15 vs Kansas City
June 16 vs Kansas City
June 18 at Boston
June 19 at Boston
June 20 at N.Y. Yankees
June 21 at N.Y. Yankees


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Indians 5, Rays 0


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Twins 5, Mariners 4
Seattle Minnesota
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EnChvzrf 4 0 1 0 EEscor3b 4 1 0 0
Bay If 5 2 2 2 Mauerdh 3 1 1 0
Seager 3b 5 2 2 1 Wlngh If 4 0 0 1
KMorlslb 4 0 1 0 Doumitc 5 1 3 2
Ibanezdh 4 0 1 1 Parmelrf 3 1 1 0
Frnkln2b 3 0 0 0 Colaell lb 4 0 1 0
MSndrscf 4 0 2 0 Dozier2b 3 0 1 1
Shppch c 4 0 0 0 Hicks cf 4 00 0
Ryanss 4 0 1 0 Flormnss 3 1 0 0
Totals 37 4104 Totals 33 5 7 4
Seattle 200 000 200 4
Minnesota 010 001 003 5
One out when winning run scored.
E-Harang (1), Ryan (4), E.Escobar (3). DP-Min-
nesota 1. LOB-Seattle 8, Minnesota 10. 2B-
M.Saunders (6), Doumit (11). 3B-Doumit (1).
HR-Bay 2 (8), Seager (7). SF-Willingham.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Harang 6 4 2 1 2 4
O.PerezH,2 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
CappsH,5 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
FurbushH,3 1 0 0 0 1 1
Wilhelmsen L,0-1 1/3 1 3 3 3 0
Minnesota
Correia 62/37 4 4 2 3
Duensing 2/3 2 0 0 0 0
Fien 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
ThielbarW,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Capps pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-Wilhelmsen.

Rockies 7, Dodgers 6,
10 innings
Los Angeles Colorado
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Crwfrd If 2 0 2 0 Fowler cf 6 1 2 2
VnSlyk pr-lf 2 1 0 0 LeMahi 2b 5 0 0 0
M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 CGnzlz If 5 1 2 2
AdGnzllb 2 0 1 1 Tlwtzkss 5 1 2 0
Ethier rf 5 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 2 2 2
HrstnJr3b 5 1 2 1 Helton lb 5 0 1 0
Guerrirp 0 0 0 0 Arenad3b 5 0 2 1
Schmkrcf 5 1 2 1 Torrealc 4 22 0
Punto ss 5 1 1 0 Chacin p 1 0 0 0
Fdrwcz c 5 1 2 3 Pachec ph 0 00 0
Greinkp 31 1 0 Outmnp 0 00 0
PRdrgzp 0 0 0 0 Escalnp 0 00 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 EYong ph 1 00 0
L.Cruz ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0
Howell p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Uribe3b 0 0 0 0 WRosrph 1 0 1 0
Totals 39 6116 Totals 42714 7
L. Angeles 003 002 100 0 6
Colorado 010 030 200 1 7
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-M.Ellis (2), Federowicz (1), LeMahieu (1). DP-
Los Angeles 1, Colorado 1. LOB-Los Angeles 8,
Colorado 10. 2B-C.Crawford 2 (12), Hairston Jr.
(3), Federowicz (1), Arenado (8). 3B-C.Gonzalez
(3). HR-Federowicz (1), C.Gonzalez (14), Cuddyer
(9). SB-Fowler (10). S-Chacin. SF-Ad.Gonzalez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Greinke 51/39 4 4 3 3
PRodriguez H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1
Belisario BS,3-4 2/3 2 2 2 0 1
Howell 21/30 0 0 0 4
GuerrierL,1-2 1/3 3 1 1 0 0
Colorado
Chacin 6 9 5 5 2 2
Outman 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Escalona 11/32 1 1 0 2
Brothers 1 0 0 0 1 2
Belisle W,3-2 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Chacin (M.Ellis). PB-Federowicz, Torre-
alba.
Brewers 4, Phillies 3
Milwaukee Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Aoki rf 4 1 1 0 Revere cf 4 0 1 0
Segura ss 4 0 1 1 CHrndz 2b 5 0 3 0
Braun If 4 0 0 0 DBrwn If 4 1 1 0
ArRmr3b 3 1 1 0 Howard 1b 3 0 1 0
Lucroy c 4 2 2 1 Mrtnz pr-rf 1 0 0 0
LSchfr cf 4 0 3 1 DYong rf 4 1 1 0
YBtncrlb 4 00 0 Mayrrylb 0 00 0
Bianchi2b 4 0 1 0 Frndsn3b 4 0 1 1
WPerlt p 2 0 0 0 Kratz c 4 0 1 1
Grzlny p 0 0 0 0 Galvis ss 3 1 1 1
KintzIlrp 0 0 00 Cloydp 2 0 0 0
Weeks ph 1 0 0 0 L.Nixph 1 00 0
FrRdrg p 0 00 0 MAdmsp 0 00 0
Bastrd p 0 00 0
Rollins ph 1 0 1 0
Kndrckpr 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 49 3 Totals 36311 3
Milwaukee 020 010 010 4
Philadelphia 000 101 001 3
E-Bianchi (1), D.Young (2). DP-Milwaukee 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 5, Philadelphia 10.2B-Ar.Ramirez
(9), L.Schafer 2 (4), Bianchi (3), Revere (4), C.Her-
nandez (1). 3B-Segura (6). HR-Lucroy (6), Galvis
(4). SB-D.Brown (4). S-W.Peralta, Revere.


Milwaukee
W.PeraltaW,4-6
Gorzelanny
Kintzler H,9
Fr.Rodriguez S,3-3
Philadelphia
Cloyd L,1-2
Mi.Adams
Bastardo


IP H RER BB SO


7 8 3 2 1 3
1 1 1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 2


Gorzelanny pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-W.Peralta, Kintzler.
A's 4, White Sox 3,
10 innings
Chicago Oakland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeAzacf 5 1 2 2 Lowrie2b-ss 5 1 4 0
AIRmrz ss 5 0 1 0 CYoung cf-lf 6 1 3 1
Rios rf 4 0 2 0 Cespds dh 5 02 1
A.Dunnib 5 0 1 1 Dnldsn3b 5 1 2 0
Konerkdh 2 0 0 0 Freimnlb 3 0 1 1
C.Wellsdh 2 0 0 0 Moss ph-1b 1 0 0 0
Viciedo If 4 0 1 0 Reddck rf 5 0 2 1
Gillaspi 3b 4 0 0 0 DNorrs c 4 1 1 0
Kppngr2b 4 1 2 0 S.Smith If 4 0 0 0
Gimenz c 4 1 1 0 Crisp ph-cf 0 0 0 0
Rosales ss 3 0 1 0
Sogard ph-2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 39 3103 Totals 43416 4
Chicago 001 000 200 0 3
Oakland 110 010 000 1 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
DP-Chicago 1, Oakland 1. LOB-Chicago 7, Oak-
land 18.2B-DeAza (11), Gimenez (2), Lowrie (17),
C.Young 2 (8), Cespedes (8), D.Norris (9). 3B-
Freiman (1). SB-De Aza (6). CS-Cespedes (5).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Quintana 51/310 3 3 3 4
Lindstrom 12/31 0 0 0 1
Crain 1 2 0 0 0 1
N.Jones 0 1 0 0 0 0
H.Santiago L,1-4 12/32 1 1 5 1
Oakland
Straily 6 6 1 1 0 8
Doolittle BS,2-2 1 3 2 2 1 0
Cook 1 0 0 0 0 1
Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 0
Neshek 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
BlevinsW,4-0 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
N.Jones pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Balk-Quintana.
Reds 2, Pirates 0
Cincinnati Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo cf 5 1 1 0 Presley If 5 0 3 0
Cozartss 3 1 1 0 Walker 2b 4 0 1 0
Votto lb 4 0 1 1 McCtch cf 4 0 0 0
Phillips2b 3 0 2 1 GJones lb 4 0 2 0
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 JuWIsn p 0 0 0 0
Chpmn p 0 00 0 RMartn c 4 01 0
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 PAIvrz 3b 2 0 0 0
Frazier 3b 3 0 2 0 SMarte ph 1 0 1 0
Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 Snider rf 3 0 0 0
DRonsn If 4 0 1 0 GSnchz ph 1 00 0
Leake p 2 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 1 0
Hannhnph 1 0 0 0 McKnrph 1 0 0 0
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 1 0
Clzturs 2b 1 0 0 0 Mazzar p 0 0 0 0
Inge ph 1 0 0 0
Watson p 0 00 0
Mercerlb 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 28 2 Totals 34010 0


SCOREBOARD


For the r-coird


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
22 28 33 53 59
POWER BALL
14


CASH 3 (early)
4-0-6
CASH 3 (late)
2-0-6

PLAY 4 (early)
9-2-4-9
PLAY 4 (late)
0-3-5-2

FANTASY 5
8 12-19-21-27

LOTTERY
5-15-29-35-40-47
XTRA
5


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 33 35 37 38


Mega Ball: 7
4-of-4 MB 1 winner
4-of-4 12
3-of-4 MB 42
3-of-4 874
2-of-4 MB 1,170
1-of-4 MB 10,955
2-of-4 22,805


$1,300,000
$586.00
$367.00
$52.50
$27.00
$2.50
$2.00


Fantasy 5:19 20 25 27 35
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 293 $555.00
3-of-5 9,058 $22.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: FedEx 400 race
3:30 p.m. (ABC) IndyCar: Indy Dual in Detroit Race 2
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Toyota Summernationals (Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) New York Mets at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Cleveland Indians
2 p.m. (TBS) San Francisco Giants at St. Louis Cardinals
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Arizona Diamondbacks at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees
BICYCLING
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Criterium Dauphine Libere, Stage 1 (Taped)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Nordea Masters Final Round
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Memorial Tournament- Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: ShopRite Classic Final Round
2:30 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Memorial Tournament-- Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Principal Charity Classic Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
NHL PLAYOFFS- WESTERN CONFERENCE FINAL
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Los Angeles Kings at Chicago Blackhawks-
Game 2
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
COLLEGE RUGBY
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Collegiate Sevens Championship: Teams TBA
4 p.m. (NBC) Collegiate Sevens Championship: Teams TBA
SOCCER
2 p.m. (ESPN2) United States vs. Germany
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Los Angeles Galaxy at New England
Revolution
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
NCAA WORLD SERIES
1 p.m. (ESPN) Teams TBA
3 p.m. (ESPN) Teams TBA
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA (If necessary)
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA (If necessary)
TENNIS
1 p.m. (NBC) 2013 French Open Tennis Men's and Women's
Fourth Round

RADIO
BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Cleveland Indians


Cincinnati 000 100 010 2
Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0
DP-Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Cincinnati 8,
Pittsburgh 10. CS-R.Martin (2). S-Cozart, Liriano.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
LeakeW,5-2 6 7 0 0 1 5
LeCureH,9 1 0 0 0 0 0
BroxtonH,10 1 2 0 0 0 0
ChapmanS,14-16 1 1 0 0 1 2
Pittsburgh
Liriano L,3-2 6 4 1 1 1 11
Mazzaro 1 2 0 0 0 0
Watson 1 2 1 1 0 0
Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Watson (Phillips, Frazier).
Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Bob David-
son; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, James Hoye.
T-3:14. A-33,912 (38,362).
Late Friday
Rays 9, Indians 2


Tampa Bay Cleveland
ab r h bi
Zobrist 2b 5 0 2 1 Bourn cf
Joyce rf 4 1 1 2 Aviles 2b
SRdrgz ph-lfl 0 0 0 ACarer ss
KJhnsnIf 2 1 0 0 Swisherlb
Fuld If-rf 1 0 1 1 MrRynl3b
Longori 3b 5 1 1 1 CSantn dh
Loneylb 5 22 3 YGomsc
Scott dh 3 0 0 0 Raburn If
DJnngscf 4 1 1 0 Stubbsrf
Loatonc 4 1 1 0
YEscorss 4 2 2 1


ab rh bi
3 00 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
3 1 0 0
3 1 0 0
3 00 0
2 0 0 1
3 0 1 1
2 00 0


Totals 38 9119 Totals 272 1 2
Tampa Bay 005 000 013 9
Cleveland 000 020 000 2
E-Loney (3), Longoria (5). DP-Tampa Bay 1.
LOB-Tampa Bay 5, Cleveland 2.2B-Longoria (17),
Lobaton (6), Raburn (8). HR-Joyce (10), Loney 2 (7).
CS-Bourn (3). SF-Y.Gomes.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore 1 0 0 0 0 1
J.WrightW,1-1 3 0 2 0 1 4
Lueke 2 1 0 0 1 1
C.RamosS,1-1 3 0 0 0 1 2
Cleveland
Kluber 2 0 0 0 1 3
S.Barnes L,0-1 1 4 5 5 1 2
Albers 2 0 0 0 1 0
Hagadone 2 1 0 0 0 1
Shaw 1 1 1 1 0 1
R.Hill 1 5 3 3 0 3
J.Wright pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
WP-Lueke.
Umpires-Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Brian
O'Nora; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Adrian Johnson.
T-2:59 (Rain delay: 4:49). A-29,603 (42,241).

AL leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .369; CDavis, Balti-


more, .354; Pedroia, Boston, .333; Mauer, Minnesota,
.332; JhPeralta, Detroit, .328; Machado, Baltimore,
.326; Loney, Tampa Bay .326.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 45; AJones, Baltimore,
42; Trout, Los Angeles, 42; CDavis, Baltimore, 41; Pe-
droia, Boston, 38; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 37; Machado,
Baltimore, 37.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 65; CDavis, Baltimore,
51; Encarnacion, Toronto, 46; Napoli, Boston, 44;
Fielder, Detroit, 43; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 41;
NCruz, Texas, 39.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 82; Machado, Baltimore,
79; AJones, Baltimore, 75; Pedroia, Boston, 74; AGor-
don, Kansas City, 71; Markakis, Baltimore, 71;
CDavis, Baltimore, 69.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 25; Napoli,
Boston, 20; ACabrera, Cleveland, 18; CDavis, Balti-
more, 18; Donaldson, Oakland, 18; AJones, Balti-
more, 17; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 17; Lowrie, Oakland,
17; Mauer, Minnesota, 17; Seager, Seattle, 17.
TRIPLES-Trout, Los Angeles, 6; Ellsbury, Boston,
5; Gardner, New York, 4; LMartin, Texas, 4; Andrus,
Texas, 3; Drew, Boston, 3; 25 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 19; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 17; Encarnacion, Toronto, 15; Cano, NewYork,
14; NCruz, Texas, 13; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 13; 5
tied at 12.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 21; McLouth,
Baltimore, 18; Andrus, Texas, 13; Trout, Los Angeles,
12; Crisp, Oakland, 11; AEscobar, Kansas City, 10;
Kipnis, Cleveland, 10; AIRamirez, Chicago, 10.
PITCHING-MMoore, Tampa Bay, 8-0; Masterson,
Cleveland, 8-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 7-0; Buchholz,
Boston, 7-0; Darvish, Texas, 7-2; Hammel, Baltimore,
7-3; Verlander, Detroit, 7-4.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 105; Scherzer, De-
troit, 91; AniSanchez, Detroit, 89; Verlander, Detroit,
87; FHernandez, Seattle, 87; Masterson, Cleveland,
83; Shields, Kansas City 78.
SAVES-Rivera, New York, 19; AReed, Chicago,
17; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 17; Nathan, Texas, 16;
Frieri, Los Angeles, 12; Balfour, Oakland, 12; Wil-
helmsen, Seattle, 12.
NL leaders
BATTING-Segura, Milwaukee, .352; YMolina, St.
Louis, .351; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .339; Votto, Cincin-
nati, .338; Scutaro, San Francisco, .335; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, .330; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, .326.
RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 45; Votto, Cincin-
nati, 45; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 43; Choo, Cincinnati,
41; JUpton, Atlanta, 38; Fowler, Colorado, 37; Phillips,
Cincinnati, 37.
RBI-Phillips, Cincinnati, 45; Tulowitzki, Colorado,
43; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 41; AdGonzalez, Los An-
geles, 41; Craig, St. Louis, 38; Sandoval, San Fran-
cisco, 37; DBrown, Philadelphia, 36; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 36; Rizzo, Chicago, 36.
HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 75; Votto, Cincinnati,
71; Scutaro, San Francisco, 69; YMolina, St. Louis, 68;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 65; GParra, Arizona, 65; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 64; Pence, San Francisco, 64;
Phillips, Cincinnati, 64.


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 B3


DOUBLES-Bruce, Cincinnati, 18; DanMurphy,
New York, 18; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 17; Rizzo,
Chicago, 17; GParra, Arizona, 16; Pollock, Arizona,
16; 5 tied at 15.
TRIPLES-Segura, Milwaukee, 6; Hechavarria,
Miami, 5; Span, Washington, 5; ECabrera, San Diego,
4; DWright, New York, 4; Coghlan, Miami, 3; CGomez,
Milwaukee, 3; CGonzalez, Colorado, 3; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 3; EYoung, Colorado, 3.
HOME RUNS-DBrown, Philadelphia, 15; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Beltran, St.
Louis, 12; Gattis, Atlanta, 12; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
12; Harper, Washington, 12;Tulowitzki, Colorado, 12.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 19; Se-
gura, Milwaukee, 15; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 14; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 14; Pierre, Miami, 13;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 12; CGomez, Milwaukee, 11;
DWright, New York, 11.
PITCHING-Corbin, Arizona, 8-0; Zimmermann,
Washington, 8-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Lynn, St.
Louis, 7-1; Minor, Atlanta, 7-2; 7 tied at 6.
STRIKEOUTS-AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 89; Harvey,
New York, 84; Wainwright, St. Louis, 84; Kershaw, Los
Angeles, 82; Samardzija, Chicago, 80; Bumgarner,
San Francisco, 75; Strasburg, Washington, 73.
SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 22; Mujica, St. Louis, 17;
Kimbrel, Atlanta, 16; RSoriano, Washington, 15;
Romo, San Francisco, 14; Chapman, Cincinnati, 14;
RBetancourt, Colorado, 11; Street, San Diego, 11; Pa-
pelbon, Philadelphia, 11; League, Los Angeles, 11.




Sprint Cup

FedEx 400
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 157.978.
2. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 157.798.
3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 157.756.
4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 157.736.
5. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 157.715.
6. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 157.604.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 157.549.
8. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 157.48.
9. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 157.46.
10. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 157.405.
11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 157.35.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 157.24.
13. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 157.054.
14. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 156.713.
15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 156.556.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 156.175.
17. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 156.169.
18. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 156.054.
19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 155.952.
20. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 155.696.
21. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 155.44.
22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 155.407.
23.(17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 155.239.
24. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 155.206.
25. (51) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 155.146.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 155.086.
27. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 155.059.
28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 154.972.
29. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 154.679.
30. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 154.619.
31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 154.573.
32. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 154.5.
33. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 154.48.
34. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 154.295.
35. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 153.984.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 153.636.
37. (7) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (36) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
Nationwide
5-hour ENERGY 200
Results
Saturday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (6) Joey Logano, Ford, 200 laps, 138.9 rating, 0
points, $43,630.
2. (11) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 112.1, 42, $38,190.
3. (9) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 110.6, 0, $23,565.
4. (12) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 104.1, 41, $27,490.
5. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 133.7, 0, $22,715.
6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 114.1, 0,
$17,465.
7. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 103.8, 37, $22,050.
8. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 113.4, 37,
$27,210.
9. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 96.1, 35, $21,415.
10. (15) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 85.6, 34,
$23,240.
11. (14) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 84.6, 33,
$20,765.
12. (13) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 89.8, 32,
$20,640.
13. (19) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 80.5, 31, $20,540.
14. (10) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 82.7, 30,
$20,415.
15. (16) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200, 77.1, 29, $21,515.
16. (20) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 70.6, 28, $20,265.
17. (4) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 81.8, 27, $20,190.
18. (17) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 71.3, 26, $20,140.
19. (21) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 200, 67.3, 25,
$20,090.
20. (22) Nelson Piquet Jr, Chevrolet, 200, 65.2, 24,
$20,715.
21. (33) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 199, 58.3, 23,
$19,985.
22. (30) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 198, 48.4, 22,
$19,885.
23. (8) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 198, 81.9, 0, $19,810.
24. (32) Eric McClure, Toyota, 195, 45.6, 20, $19,760.
25. (27) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 195, 51.5, 19, $20,185.
26. (34) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, 195, 42.8, 18,
$19,660.
27. (36) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 192, 37.5, 17,
$19,610.
28. (18) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 191, 64, 16, $20,535.
29. (25) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 190, 52.8, 15,
$19,460.
30. (40) Tony Raines, Toyota, fuel pump, 111, 34.2,
14, $19,710.
31. (24) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, accident, 109, 46.4,
13, $19,360.
32. (37) Jason White, Toyota, engine, 62, 40.2, 12,
$19,315.
33. (26) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 43, 53, 11,
$19,245.
34. (35) Joey Gase, Toyota, electrical, 33, 37.3, 10,
$19,200.
35. (29) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 18, 43.7, 9,
$13,155.
36. (38) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, engine, 14,
34.1,8, $12,260.
37. (28) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, overheating, 11, 38, 0,
$12,240.
38. (23) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 9, 34.5, 6,
$12,176.
39. (31) Matt DiBenedetto, Dodge, handling, 6, 31.3,
0, $12,075.
40. (39) Blake Koch, Toyota, brakes, 4, 29.2, 4,
$12,020.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 111.145 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 47 minutes, 58 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.576 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 28 laps.
Lead Changes: 9 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1-35; K.Busch 36-47; A.Dillon


48-52; J.Logano 53-81; A.Dillon 82-84; T.Bayne 85-
89; K.Busch 90-114; K.Kahne 115-128; K.Busch 129-
163; J.Logano 164-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
K.Busch, 3 times for 72 laps; J.Logano, 2 times for 66
laps; A.Dillon, 3 times for 43 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for
14 laps; T.Bayne, 1 time for5 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 411; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
384; 3. B.Vickers, 369; 4. J.Allgaier, 368; 5. A.Dillon,
358; 6. PKligerman, 355; 7. E.Sadler, 347; 8. B.Scott,
343; 9. K.Larson, 322; 10. TBayne, 321.




Memorial par scores
Saturday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club, Dublin, Ohio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,352, Par: 72
Third Round
Matt Kuchar 68-70-70 -208 -8


Kevin Chappell
Kyle Stanley
Matt Jones
Justin Rose
Bill Haas
J.J. Henry
Adam Scott
Scott Piercy
Charl Schwartzel
Gary Woodland
Pat Perez
Bubba Watson
Russell Henley
Jim Furyk
Brian Davis
Davis Love III
Charley Hoffman
Bo Van Pelt
Fred Couples
Michael Thompson
Carl Pettersson
Charles Howell III
Ryan Moore
Chris Stroud
Scott Stallings
Richard H. Lee
Ken Duke
Ben Curtis
Cameron Tringale
Graham DeLaet
George McNeill
David Hearn
Trevor Immelman
K.J. Choi
Hunter Mahan
Roberto Castro
Robert Karlsson
Ernie Els
George Coetzee
David Lingmerth
William McGirt
Martin Laird
Luke Donald
Tom Gillis
Stewart Cink
James Driscoll
Charlie Wi
Luke Guthrie
Henrik Stenson
John Senden
Camilo Villegas
Rickie Fowler
Justin Leonard
Robert Allenby
Jason Day
Bud Cauley
Keegan Bradley
Derek Ernst
Fabian Gomez
Billy Horschel
JoshTeater
Ryo Ishikawa
Mike Weir
Rory Mcllroy
Brandt Jobe
Fernandez-Castano
Marc Leishman
Tiger Woods
Jimmy Walker
Zach Johnson
Jordan Spieth
Justin Hicks


71-71-68-
67-70-73-
69-72-70-
70-70-71 -
68-67-76-
72-72-68 -
73-70-69 -
66-75-71 -
65-71-76-
70-73-70 -
72-69-72-
71-67-75-
67-77-70 -
75-70-69-
75-70-69-
73-69-72-
73-69-72-
73-69-72 -
70-75-70 -
69-76-70 -
71-71-73-
72-70-73 -
70-72-73 -
69-77-69-
70-70-75 -
73-71-72-
75-69-72-
73-70-73-
71-71-74-
70-72-74 -
74-71-71 -
71-71-74-
70-72-74 -
72-74-70 -
73-68-75-
71-70-75-
69-71-76-
73-70-74 -
70-75-72 -
75-70-72-
73-73-71 -
71-75-71 -
73-73-71 -
73-70-75 -
70-72-76 -
70-75-73-
67-74-77-
72-74-72-
71-73-75-
71-72-76-
72-71-76-
72-71-76-
70-76-73-
74-73-72 -
72-75-72 -
71-73-76-
71-74-75-
70-73-78 -
76-68-77-
70-75-76-
67-79-75-
74-73-74 -
75-72-75 -
78-69-75 -
70-75-78 -
72-74-77-
74-72-77-
71-74-79-
72-75-77-
73-72-81 -
72-73-82-
73-73-81 -


NBA playoffs
All Times EDT
CONFERENCE FINALS
Sunday, May 19
San Antonio 105, Memphis 83
Tuesday, May 21
San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT
Wednesday, May 22
Miami 103, Indiana 102, OT
Friday, May 24
Indiana 97, Miami 93
Saturday, May 25
San Antonio 104, Memphis 93
Sunday, May 26
Miami 114, Indiana 96
Monday, May 27
San Antonio 93, Memphis 86, San Antonio wins se-
ries 4-0
Tuesday, May 28
Indiana 99, Miami 92
Thursday, May 30
Miami 90, Indiana 79
Saturday, June 1
Indiana 91, Miami 77, series tied 3-3
Monday, June 3
Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.




NHL playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
CONFERENCE FINALS
Saturday, June 1
Chicago 2, Los Angeles 1, Chicago leads series 1-0
Boston 3, Pittsburgh 0, Boston leads series 1-0
Today
Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Monday, June 3
Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 4
Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, June 5
Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m.
Thursday, June 6
Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Friday, June 7
Pittsburgh at Boston, 8p.m.
Saturday, June 8
x-Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Sunday, June 9
x-Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
Monday, June 10
x-Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, June 11
x-Pittsburgh at Boston
Wednesday, June 12
x-Boston at Pittsburgh, TBD
x-Los Angeles at Chicago, TBD




NCAA Division I
Softball World Series
At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
Thursday, May 30
Washington 4, Nebraska 3, 8 innings
Tennessee 9, Florida 2
Texas 6, Arizona State 3
Oklahoma 7, Michigan 1
Friday, May 31
Washington vs. Tennessee, ppd., tornado
Texas vs. Oklahoma, ppd., tornado
Saturday, June 1
Tennessee 1, Washington 0
Oklahoma 10, Texas 2
Game 7 Nebraska (45-15) vs. Florida (57-8), late
Game 8 Arizona State (50-11) vs. Michigan (50-
12), late


Game 9-
p.m.
Game 10
p.m.
Game 11 -
p.m.
Game 12
9:30 p.m.


Today
Washington (44-16) vs. Game 7 winner, 1

-Texas (50-9) vs. Game 8 winner, 3:30

-Tennessee (51-10) vs. Game 9 winner, 7

- Oklahoma (54-4) vs. Game 10 winner,


Monday, June 4
x-Game 13 Game 11 winner vs. Game 11 loser,
TBA
x-Game 14 Game 12 winner vs. Game 12 loser,
TBA
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday, June 4:TeamsTBD, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 5: TeamsTBD, 8p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 6:TeamsTBD, 8 p.m.










Adult leagues looking for members


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation is hosting a 4-on-4 Men's
Flag Football Tournament on
Saturday, July 13 at the Ho-
mosassa Area Recreational
Park beginning at 9 a.m. This
event is for adults aged 18 years
and up.
For more information, call
352-527-7540 or visit the website
at www.citruscountyparks.com.
Adult co-ed kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kickball
league is for adults 18 and up.
Games are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
and 8:30 p.m. at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River, lasting an hour or


nine innings, whichever comes first.
The new season tentatively starts
July 10. Registration for teams be-
gins June 6 and ends July 5. For
more information, call 352-527-7540.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to
start up again on June 28. Games
are played at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River on Thursdays starting
at 6:30 p.m.
Registration for teams is from
May 20 through June 21. For more
information, call 352-527-7540.
Beach volleyball
Registration for our second sea-
son of beach volleyball begins for


teams on Monday and runs
through June 14. Games are
played starting at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River.
The fee is $15 per player, with a
maximum of seven players per
team. For more information, call
352-527-7540.
Aqua Zumba at
Bicentennial Park Pool
Love the water and want to get
active? Come and join Aqua Zumba
at Bicentennial Pool.
Classes are at 10 a.m. on Satur-
days. The cost is $4 per class.
For more information, contact


Bicentennial Pool at 352-795-1478.
Swimming lessons
at Bicentennial Pool
Are you interested in having your
children learn how to swim or in
learning to swim yourself? Bicen-
tennial Pool offers swimming les-
sons for all ages, including adult
swim lessons.
Lessons are twice a week and run
for a two-week session. For more in-
formation, call Bicentennial Pool at
352-795-1478.
Annunal Independence
Golf Tournament
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7


is holding signups for its seventh an-
nuall Independence Golf Tourna-
ment, which is at 8:30 a.m.
Saturday, June 29 at Citrus Springs
Golf & Country Club.
The entry fee is $60 and includes
green fees and cart, coffee and
donuts, beer, a door prize ticket, a
goodie bag and one free putt in the
putting contest.
Multiple prizes will be available
and a Fourth of July-style picnic will
follow the tournament.
For additional tournament infor-
mation, contact Ray Thompson at
813-230-9750, Citrus Springs
G&CC at 352-489-5045 or visit the
website at www.rollingthunder7.com


at


sne


MEMORIAL DAYMEmAOIRIAL DAY





BETH HOOPER/Special to the Chronicle
Nature Coast Lightning Girls U14 Soccer Team took second place in the Disney Memorial Day Soccer Shootout at the ESPN Wide World of
Sports Complex in Orlando. It is the largest three-day soccer tournament which resulted in more than 900 soccer matches. The girls, led by
coaches Steve Connor and Derrick Smith, went undefeated throughout the tournament and lost by a goal in double overtime during the final.
Front row, from left, is Emily Hooper, Olivia Conner, Emma VanCleef, Sierra Flournoy, Lauren Caffee, Veronica Taboada, Emma Bresson, Faith
McKenna, Dana Houpt, Taylor Falabella and coach Derrick Smith. Back row, from left, is coach Steve Connor, Andrea Javier, Rachel Javier,
Kylie Rice, Christina Ronzo, Taylor Cyr and Kaitlyn Parrow.




Kids camps, events ready to get going


Special to the Chronicle

The Crystal River
Sharks football and cheer-
leading are holding
signups from 10 a.m. to 2
p,.m. on June 8, 15, 22 and
29 at the Crystal River
Mall food court.
The league welcomes
athletes ages 5 to 15 across
six divisions. It is $125 per
child for football and $100
for cheerleading.
Cash, checks and credit
cards are accepted.
Panthers b-ball
camp coming
Come out and enjoy a
week of quality instruction and
competition at the 2013 Pan-
ther Basketball Camp from
June 17-20. The camp will at
the Lecanto High School gym
and each day will run from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.
The cost is $60 per child
through June 1; after that,
each child will cost $75. There
are multiple sibling discounts
($120 for two children, $160
for three.
Panther Camp offers qual-
ity basketball instruction at an
affordable cost to area youth
from ages 6 through 14. We
will be limiting the camp to the
first 100 registered campers,
so register early.
Campers will receive in-
struction in the fundamentals
of dribbling, passing, shooting,
and defending the basketball.
All players should either
bring a bagged lunch to camp
or they will be able to purchase
a lunch at camp for $5 per day
(sandwich, chips and drink). A
concession will also be open
during the day.
Families with multiple sib-
lings will receive a discount
for two or more children. Con-
tact Frank Vilardi at 352-362-
0011 for more information.
USSSA basketball
tournament
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is teaming up with
USSSA Basketball for a last-
chance qualifier for the end of
the year state tournament held
in Melbourne on June 6-9.
Come out and support the


high-energy, fast-paced travel
teams from across Florida and
the Southeast region of the
United States. Entry for the
tournament is $10 per day.
The tournament is at Lecanto
High School & Middle School
on May 31 to June 2.
For more information re-
garding the event, contact Cit-
rus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540
or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com.
Kayak Camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with 2 Sisters Kayak Tours, is
holding Kayaking Camps this
summer. Each camp will be
held at Hernando Beach
Park from Monday to Thurs-
day and at Chassahowitzka
River on Friday.
Children ages 8 to 15 are
eligible and the cost is $80
per child. We will offer four dif-
ferent weeks to choose from
throughout June and July.
Each week will have two time
slots that will accommodate
ages 8 to 11 and ages 12 to
15 separately.
For more information, con-
tact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540
or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com
Archery Camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership with
McPherson's Archery & Out-
door Pro Shop, is holding an
Archery Camp this summer.
The camp will be offered on
two different weeks and partici-
pants will be separated by age.
For more information con-
tact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540,
visit www.citruscountyparks.
com or McPherson's Archery
at 352-341-2820.
Youth golf lessons
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership with
Pine Ridge Golf Course, will
hold summer youth golf les-
sons. The lessons will be held
at Pine Ridge Golf Course on
Wednesday mornings from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. or Thursday
evenings from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. They begin Wednesday,
June 12 and Thursday, June


13, and run for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 15 are
eligible and the cost is $80 per
child with $15 off for additional
siblings.
For more information, con-
tact Crysta Henry, recreation
program specialist for youth
programs at 352-527-7543,
www.citruscountyparks.com,
or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.
Citrus Hills
Junior Golf Camp
The 17th annual Citrus Hills
Junior Golf Camp starts
Wednesday, June 5.
Ages range from 4 to 17.
Included in our golf camp is
a free summer membership.
You have a choice of five con-
secutive Wednesdays from 9 to
11 a.m. or five consecutive
Thursday from 5:30 to 8 p.m..
In addition to teaching them
golf, we feed them pizza and
soda every lesson.
The cost of the camp is
$100. We also carry junior
merchandise and equipment
in our pro shop.
Classes fill up quickly, so
please call Citrus Hills Golf
Shop at 352-746-4425 for
more information or to register
your junior.
CRHS Volleyball
Camp set for June
The Crystal River Volleyball
Camp will be held from June 3
to 7 from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at
Citrus Springs Middle School.
The camp is open to girls ages
11 to 16 from any county or
surrounding schools and it is
open to girls of all skill levels.
The cost of the camp is $55
and camp registration forms
are available at Crystal River
High School, Crystal River
Middle School, Citrus Springs
Middle School, or contact
Mike Ridley at 352-566-7789
or email at ridleym@
citrus.kl2.fl.us. Registration
the day of the camp will also
be accepted.
Panthers plan
volleyball camp
Summer volleyball camp
will be offered by the Lecanto
Panthers this summer.


Open to fourth-graders
through entering ninth-graders,
cost is $65.
Parents can pick up a regis-
tration form at Lecanto High
School or email Alice Christian
at christiana@dtrus.k1l2.fl.us
for more information and times.
CR hoops camp
tips off in June
The Crystal River 2013
hoops camp has three ses-
sions: June 3-6, 10-13 and
17-20. Each day goes from 9
a.m. to 12 p.m..
One session is $49, two
sessions are $79 and all three
are $99.
All pre-registered campers
will receive a camp T-shirt and
the first 24 campers who reg-
ister for all three weeks will re-
ceive an Adidas basketball.
For more information,
contact Steve Feldman at
feldmans@citrus.kl2.fl.us or
352-601-0870.
Register now for
swim lessons
The city of Inverness Sum-
mer Swim Lesson program is
accepting registrations for the
2013 season. To sign up for
swimming classes, visit the
pool office in Whispering Pines
Park, 1700 Forest Drive.
All swimming classes follow
the American Red Cross cur-
riculum and all instructors are
certified Water Safety Instruc-
tors by the ARC. Children from
age 6 months to 3 years will
register for the parent and child
classes. The preschool courses
are for youngsters ranging in
age from 3 to 5 years. The
school-age group starts at age
5 and goes up from there.
There are even classes for
adults who wish to learn how to
swim or improve the ability they
already possess.
Cost for the swim lessons
are $35 per session, which in-
cludes eight class meetings.
There are evening as well as
morning sessions scheduled
at this time. Consult the Swim
Lesson Schedule on the city
website. For more information,
call the pool at 352-726-1995.


Horseshoe club
seeks more youth
involvement
The Beverly Hills Horse-
shoe Club at 54 Civic Circle in
the Beverly Hills Recreation
Park will host free horseshoe
pitching to all ages from 8:30
a.m. to noon Wednesdays
from June 5 until Sept. 4.
Instruction and horseshoes
will be provided.
The Beverly Hills Horse-
shoe Club is a sponsor of the
Florida State Horseshoe
Pitchers' $1,000 Scholarship
Award and also the John
Reynolds $100 J.R. Memorial
Award. The award is pre-
sented to students of any age
up to 18 years. Money is held
in a foundation until they
graduate from high school.
Membership in a horseshoe
club, although recommended,
is not required. They will need
to get a National Horseshoe
Pitchers Association card to
play in tournaments. Sanc-
tioned tournaments are held
on the second Saturday each
month, September through
April at BHHC.
Soda and water will be
available at these events.
Call Eileen Fox at 585-305-
1912 or e-mail Eileen at
eileenffox@gmail.com or
John Bissonnette at 352-270-
3327 for more information.
Camp Patriot
Basketball Camp
Coach Tim Ryan, the Na-
tional NJCAA Men's Basket-
ball Coach of the Year from
the College of Central Florida,
is hosting Camp Patriot Bas-
ketball Camp for the 10th
straight year. The camp is for
boys and girls ages 8 to 18
and located at the Ocala cam-
pus of the College of Central
Florida.
Four sessions are offered,
the dates are: June 17-20,
June 24-27, July 8-11 and
July 22-25. Each day runs
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The cost is $150 per ses-
sion. For more information,
please visit www.camppatriot-
basketball.com or call Tim
Ryan at 352-427-7435.


Sports BRIEFS

Wildlife
Ranger Camps
The Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion's Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park will offer two
weeklong Wildlife Ranger
Camps in June and July.
The Friends of Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
Park sponsor the programs.
June's Wildlife Ranger
Camp is for children ages 8
and 9 years old, and runs
June 17 through June 22.
July's Wildlife Ranger Camp
is for children ages 10
through 12, and runs from
July 15 through July 20.
Applications for the
Wildlife Ranger Camp are
available in the park office.
Each program is limited to
20 campers and will be filled
on a first-come basis with
preference to those who
have never attended before.
Each Wildlife Ranger
Camp includes four half-day
camp sessions from 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m. Monday through
Thursday. The Friday ses-
sion starts at 4 p.m. with an
overnight stay in the park. A
graduation ceremony will be
at 11 a.m. on Saturday. The
cost of the program is $65
per child and includes a T-
shirt and supplies.
Camp topics include
mammals, birds, reptiles,
manatees, the ocean, sea
turtles and saving energy
through alternative sources.
Indoor and outdoor activities
for children include nature
hunts, visiting the wildlife
areas in the park and other
scientific activities.
Applicants will be asked
to write a short essay on an
animal that lives in Florida
and why they think that ani-
mal is important, to attach
to their application. Parents
and guardians may stop by
the park office in the Visitor
Center on U.S. 19 to pick
up an application.
For more information,
call Tricia Fowler at
352-628-5343, ext. 1002.
Inverness Storm
Golf Tourney
The ninth annual Inver-
ness Storm Golf Tourney
will take place at 9 a.m.
Saturday, June 22, at the
Inverness Golf & Country
Club. There will be contests
with prizes awarded for
hole-in-one, longest drive
(women and men), and
closest to the pin. There will
be a 50/50 drawing and
other raffle drawings.
Cost of $50 per golfer in-
cludes lunch and beverages.
Local business owners inter-
ested in sponsoring a hole
on the golf course may call
352-302-7386.
Make checks payable to
(ECYF) East Citrus Youth
Football. All proceeds go to
Inverness Storm football
players and cheerleaders.
For more information,
call Tom Frederick at
352-302-7386 or visit
www.invernessstorm.com.
Golf tourney to
benefit foster
parents
The Citrus County Foster
Parent Association will have
its fourth annual golf tourna-
ment Saturday, June 8, at
Inverness Golf & Country
Club to raise money for the
nonprofit organization.
Tee time will be 8:30 a.m.
Price is $45 and will include
lunch at the club.For more
information and to sign up,
call 352-201-9521.


B4 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oklahoma a game away from CWS final


Gators go into extra innings against

Nebraska; game not over at press time


Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY Callie
Parsons drove in three runs,
Keilani Ricketts threw a three-
hitter and Oklahoma rolled to a
10-2, five-inning victory over Big
12 rival Texas on Saturday in a
winners' bracket game in the
Women's College World Series.
Oklahoma (54-4) won for the
third time in four meetings this
season against its Red River
rival and needs one more win to
make a return trip to the best-of-
3 finals. Texas (50-9) will face
Nebraska or Florida in an elim-
ination game Sunday
Ricketts (33-1) hadn't given up
a hit in the tournament until
Stephanie Ceo and Brejae Wash-
ington singled to key a two-run
third inning for the Longhorns.
The Sooners answered with a
six-run third. Three runs came
on an error by Texas pitcher
Kim Bruins, who overthrew first
base on a bunt attempt by Bri-
anna Turang, allowing Turang
and two other runners to score.
The game ended by the run
rule in the fifth, when Georgia
Casey's single scored Lauren
Chamberlain, who had tripled.


Tennessee 1,
Washington 0
OKLAHOMA CITY No. 9 hitter
Tory Lewis singled up the middle to
score pinch-runner Whitney Ham-
mond with two outs in the bottom of
the seventh inning, and Tennessee
beat Washington 1-0 on Saturday in
the winners' bracket of the Women's
College World Series.
Ellen Renfroe (19-4) allowed two
hits and struck out 10 for Ten-
nessee, which will next face a team
from the losers' bracket.
Tennessee (51-10) stranded 13
runners through six innings against
Washington's Kaitlin Inglesby (23-8),
leaving the bases loaded three
times. In the seventh, Cheyanne
Tarango reached on an infield single
and Hammond ran for her.
Melissa Brown sacrificed Ham-
mond to second base. Rainey Gaffin
walked and Hannah Akamine lined
out to Inglesby, who unsuccessfully
tried to double Gaffin off first base.
Hammond took advantage and
raced to third base, setting up Lewis'
game-winning hit.
Women's CWS
resumes after storms
OKLAHOMA CITY The clear


blue sky above ASA Hall of Fame
Stadium on Saturday offered little
hint of the chaos the night before.
After a harrowing night of severe
storms in central Oklahoma, the
Women's College World Series re-
sumed, beginning with a pair of win-
ners' bracket games, in which
Tennessee beat Washington 1-0
and Oklahoma routed Texas 10-2.
Those games had been sched-
uled for Friday night, but instead, at
least six of the eight teams in the
NCAA softball championship rode
out the storms at the Cox Conven-
tion Center, which has an under-
ground parking garage, and in the
tunnels that connect it to hotels in
downtown Oklahoma City.
"We could kind of tell throughout
the whole week that possibly there
was going to be this happening, so I
think the whole team was mentally
prepared for it," Washington coach
Heather Tarr said. "You just deal with
these things like any sort of team
event that happens or any sort of
adversity in the games. We just deal
with it as a team and compensate
and adjust and work together to stay
together."
The toughest part, Tennessee
third baseman Raven Chavanne
said, might have been trying to
sleep.
"The thunder was booming all
night and I know a bunch of us
heard that," Chavanne said.


Associated Press
Keilani Ricketts pitches for Oklahoma in the Women's College World
Series against Texas on Saturday at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in
Oklahoma City. Oklahoma won 10-2 in five innings.


Blackhawks up


Associated Press
Los Angeles Kings center Trevor Lewis dives for the puck against Chicago Blackhawks center Michael Frolik during the second period of
Game I of the NHL Stanley Cup Western Conference finals Saturday in Chicago.

Chicago nips Los Angeles 2-1; Boston crushes Pittsburgh in final openers


Associated Press

CHICAGO Patrick Sharp
and Marian Hossa scored in the
second period, and the Chicago
Blackhawks beat the Los Ange-
les Kings 2-1 on Saturday in
Game 1 of the Western Confer-
ence finals.
Corey Crawford made 21
saves, and the Blackhawks gen-
erated just enough offense to



ATIKINSON
Continued from Page B1

six and I thought that would be
pretty hard to beat.
"I never plan to hit home
runs, but it happened. I try to hit
my hardest, I always try and
play my hardest."
It wasn't just The Villages that
Atkinson victimized with her


improve to 7-1 at home in the
playoffs.
Game 2 is today
Jonathan Quick stopped 34
shots, and Justin Williams
scored for Los Angeles, which
has won just one of seven road
games in the playoffs.
Williams has scored the last
three goals for the defending
Stanley Cup champion
Kings.

long-ball stroke. In the 6A-6 tour-
nament semifinal against
Brooksville Central, the district's
regular-season champion, Atkin-
son again hit two home runs, one
of them inside the park, as
Lecanto advanced.
As well deserved as her hon-
ors may be Atkinson was also
chosen as the Chronicle's Fe-
male Athlete of the Year, an
honor bestowed upon one ath-
lete who stands out among all


Bruins 3, Penguins 0
PITTSBURGH David Krejci
scored two more goals during his
torrid postseason and the Boston
Bruins shut down the Pittsburgh
Penguins 3-0 in the opening game
of the Eastern Conference finals on
Saturday night.
Nathan Horton added an insur-
ance goal in the third period and
Tuukka Rask stopped 29 shots for

the county's athletes she'll
have little time to dwell on
them. She's already part of the
IRSC summer league team,
which she'll play for in a tour-
nament at Disney World in Or-
lando next weekend.
Atkinson is looking forward to
the transition to college soft-
ball. One reason she chose
IRSC was that she'd be able to
play immediately; another was
the school's excellent softball


the Bruins, who silenced Sidney
Crosby and the rest of the NHL's
top-scoring team.
Pittsburgh came in averaging a
league-high 4.27 goals in the play-
offs but couldn't solve Rask. The
Penguins hit the post six times
and seemed a little bit off following
an eight-day break between
rounds.
The Bruins were coming off a sim-
ilar layoff but had no such issues.

program. Dale Atkinson, the
team's coach and a second
cousin (an oddity that was dis-
covered after Amber's recruit-
ing process was underway),
guided the Pioneers to a 39-15
mark last season, finishing first
in the Southern Conference.
"My first practice with them is
Monday," Amber Atkinson said.
"I had a lot of offers from other
schools, but I felt better with
this school. It's closer to home


NCAA College
Regional
BASEBALL

FSU 11, Troy 0
TALLAHASSEE Luke
Weaver struck out 14 in eight
scoreless innings Saturday to
lead Florida State to an 11-0 vic-
tory over Troy, moving the Semi-
noles within a win of reaching
their sixth straight super regional.
Florida State (46-15) has
outscored its two opponents 21-
0. Troy (41-19) and Alabama
(35-27) play in an elimination
game Sunday, with the winner
needing to defeat Florida State
twice to advance.
Weaver (7-2) scattered four
hits and did not allow a walk be-
fore leaving after throwing a ca-
reer-high 114 pitches.
Valparaiso 5, UF 4
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
Valparaiso won its first NCAA
tournament game since 1966,
scoring four times in the sev-
enth inning and holding on to
eliminate Florida with a 5-4 vic-
tory Saturday in the Blooming-
ton regional.
The Crusaders (32-27) had
only two hits in the seventh, but
took advantage of mistakes by
Florida (29-30), which led 4-1.
Gators third baseman Josh To-
bias made an error with the
bases loaded, allowing Valpo's
first run of the inning. The Cru-
saders got two more on bases-
loaded walks to Tanner Vavra
and John Loeffler. The go-ahead
run came on Chris Manning's
run-scoring fielder's choice.
Louisville 6, Miami 4
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Louisville used a six-run sev-
enth inning to top Miami 6-4 on
Saturday and advance to the
Louisville regional final in the
NCAA baseball tournament.
The Cardinals (48-12) will
face either Miami or Oklahoma
State in Sunday's regional final.
The final score didn't indicate
how much of a pitchers' duel the
game was, with only one player
for each team reaching third
base against Miami's Bryan
Radziewski and Louisville's Jeff
Thompson through the first six
innings.
FAU 14, Canisius 6
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Corey
Keller hit two home runs and
Nathan Pittman added a three-
run homer to help Florida At-
lantic beat Canisius 14-6 on
Saturday in a Chapel Hill Re-
gional elimination game.
Keller hit a three-run homer in
the second, then Pittman fol-
lowed in the third for the sec-
ond-seeded Owls (40-21). Levi
Meyer and Mark Nelson each
drove in two runs.

(in Fort Pierce) and I'll get to
play right away Plus class sizes
are smaller, so I'll be able to ad-
just to it."
Asked if she felt any pressure
in the transition from a high
school program to taking control
of a college team, Atkinson said,
"Once I squat behind the plate,
it's all the same to me."
If she continues to hit like she
did at Lecanto, happy times
should be ahead for IRSC.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 B5










Kuchar assumes top spot at Memorial

dW0& Cr& field here. Most of these The tournament was
WOOdS Ca s holes, you're looking at happy just to complete 54
just getting out with a par" holes with mid-afternoon
worst 9-hole Woods didn't get away storms that avoided Muir-
with anything. field Village.


DUBLIN, Ohio Matt
Kuchar thrived in
tough conditions
that sent Tiger
Woods to the worst [
nine holes of his
PGA Tour career
Saturday in the
morning.
Kuchar survived
a nasty combina- Tig
tion of swirling Woc
wind and fast
greens at Muirfield
Village for a 2-under 70,
giving him a two-shot lead
over Kevin Chappell and
Kyle Stanley going into the
final round.
"It was a bit of survival,"
Kuchar said. "I was fortu-
nate to make a handful of
birdies. I think anytime
you make a birdie in these
conditions, you feel like
you're really up on the


Going ftor his sixth win at
the Memorial, and his
fourth victory in his last
five tournaments, Woods
had two double bogeys and
a triple bogey on the back
nine for a 44,
S.- breaking by one
shot his highest
nine-hole total as a
pro. And he shot
that without a
penalty shot.
"The conditions
were tough and
,rer when I missed it
ods cost me," Woods
said through a PGA
Tour media official. "I
caught the wrong gusts at
the wrong time, made a
couple bad swings and all
in all, it just went the
wrong way"
He wound up 16 shots
out of the lead. Woods will
tee off late Sunday, but on
the opposite side of the
course in the two-tee start
because of weather.


Kuchar was at 8-under
208, among 10 players sep-
arated by only four shots.
Bill Haas, the 36-hole
leader, ran off three
straight bogeys late in his
round for a 76, and he was-
n't all that upset about it.
Haas was still only three
shots back, and it wasn't
hard to determine that par
was a good score.
Waldorf leads by a
shot on Champions
DES MOINES, Iowa -
Duffy Waldorf shot a 5-under
67 on Saturday to take a one-
stroke lead after the second
round of the Champions Tour's
Principal Charity Classic.
Waldorf had an 8-under 136
total. Bart Bryant and Jay Don
Blake were tied for second.
Bryant had a 64, and Blake
shot a 66. Russ Cochran was
6 under after a 67.
The 50-year-old Waldorf is
winless in 12 career starts on


Associated Press
Matt Kuchar watches his drive on the third hole during the third round of the Memorial
golf tournament Saturday in Dublin, Ohio.
the 50-and-over tour after win- Feng shoots 67, whipped Bay Course at the
ning four times on the PGA takes ShopRite Stockton Hotel and Golf Club.
Tour. He took advantage of First-round co-leader
alm cnnditinn at thae LPGA lead Moria nuai it arn of Thai-


Wakonda Club to post a
bogey-free round after open-
ing with a 69 for a share of the
first-round lead.
Jay Haas, a three-time
winner in the event, was 3
under after a 70. Points
leader Bernhard Langer
shot a 75 to drop 11 strokes
back.


GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP,
N.J. Shanshan Feng shot
a marvelous 4-under 67 be-
fore the wind picked up Satur-
day and grabbed a three-shot
lead after two rounds of the
ShopRite LPGA Classic.
Feng matched the best
score of the day. She had a
6-under 136 total on the wind-


land and Haeji Kang of South
Korea shared second at 3
under. Jutanugarn had a 73,
and Kang shot 69.
Defending champion and
second-ranked Stacy Lewis
shot a 9-over 80, matching
her worst round since the
third round of U.S. Women's
Open last year.


Nationwide


all Logano's


Driver takes

third straight

race at Dover

Associated Press

DOVER, Del. Joey Logano
savors the times he led Joe
Gibbs Racing into Victory Lane.
Turns out, he enjoys beating
JGR so much more.
Logano changed his team and
his car, just not the result, and
raced to his third straight Dover
victory in the Nationwide
Series on Saturday
Unlike the
last two, Logano
won for Penske
Racing. His
previous two
Dover victories
came under the
Gibbs banner
This time,
Logano held off
JGR drivers Joey
Brian Vickers, Logano
Matt Kenseth
and Kyle Busch for the check-
ered flag.
"I wanted to beat them really
bad," Logano said.
Busch, who won the Truck
Series race Friday, dominated
most of the race and led 72 of
the 200 laps. But he was 10th off
the final restart, couldn't drive
his way to the front of the field
and was fifth.
Vickers was second, Kenseth
third, and Trevor Bayne fourth.
Logano raced to his first Na-
tionwide victory of the season
after winning nine times last year
"It is amazing to finally win
for the captain, Roger Penske,"
Logano said. "It feels good to get
back in Victory Lane."
Logano won for the 19th time
in 114 career Nationwide starts.
Busch was trying to sweep the
NASCAR tripleheader at Dover
but fell short in trying win all
three for the first time since
2010.
With the race under caution,
Busch took four tires while
Logano went with two on the
final pit stop. Logano led the
field to green and pulled away
"It's my fault I'm aggravated
with myself," Busch said. "I
made the wrong call there. I just
figured more would take four"
The 23-year-old Logano came
into NASCAR with Joe Gibbs
Racing in 2008 with the nick-
name "Sliced Bread." He's yet to
make the leap to the next level
and won only two Cup races.


Associated Press
Denny Hamlin races his car Saturday during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup series race at Dover International Speedway in Dover, Del.




In need of some wins


Hamlin craves

victories to aid

Chasepush

Associated Press

DOVER, Del. Denny Ham-
lin has tried to learn to love
Dover.
He just can't. Not yet, at
least.
Maybe Hamlin has to learn
to win at Dover before he can
truly embrace the mile con-
crete oval.
Hamlin has been tormented
for years by the track and
voiced his disdain for Dover as
finishes in the 30s or worse
piled up. Hamlin also knows
he can't focus on the past dis-
appointments. He has to con-
quer his Dover demons and try
and win there if he wants to
keep his long shot bid to make
Chase alive.
Winning the pole for Sun-
day's race was a nice start.
Hamlin, actually, has won
the last two poles at Dover and
parlayed his top spot into an
eighth-place finish in the Sep-
tember race. The top-10
snapped a streak of three
straight double-digit finishes


MOVING
Continued from Page BI

Haas let a record 12 match
points get away from him in the
fourth set, then saved one in the
fifth. He eventually pulled out a
7-5, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-7 (10), 10-8 vic-
tory over 19th-seeded John Isner,
the last American man in the
field and the player best known
for winning a 70-68 fifth set at
Wimbledon three years ago.
"These long matches seem to
follow me," said Isner, whose last
five Grand Slam appearances
ended with losses in five-setters.
"In hindsight, probably would
have been better to lose in
straight sets," he added, "be-
cause I feel terrible right now."


at the Monster Mile. Hamlin
had a four-race stretch from
2007-09 where he finished no
better than 36th.
Those are usually the results
for a driver like Casey Mears,
not someone like Hamlin, who
is always in the thick of the
championship hunt.
His average Dover finish of
19.6 is the worst of any track.
But two poles and a top 10
could be the start of a new era
for Hamlin.
"We possibly could have
turned the corner here," Ham-
lin said. "We'll actually see the
results on Sunday"
Hamlin needs a big payoff in
the form of a checkered flag at
the 400-mile race. Hamlin's
four-race absence because of
his back injury has him need-
ing wins to make the Chase
and race for his first career
championship.
Hamlin's fourth-place finish
last week at Charlotte Motor
Speedway moved him up three
spots to 24th in the standings,
53 points out of 20th position,
where he'd need to be to be el-
igible for one of two wild-card
slots in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship. He
is 97 points out of the top 10
and an automatic berth in the
Chase.
Hamlin is ready drive for


In Nishikori's victory, his op-
ponent, France's Benoit Paire,
was assessed a point penalty for
getting coached. The same thing
happened to Marina Erakovic
during her loss to No. 17 Sloane
Stephens, one of four U.S.
women into the fourth round.
That's the most since four also
made it in 2004; five made it a
year earlier She's joined by 54th-
ranked Jamie Hampton, who
stunned 2011 Wimbledon cham-
pion Petra Kvitova 6-1, 7-6 (7);
67th-ranked Bethanie Mattek-
Sands, who also won Saturday;
and 15-time major champion
Serena Williams, whose fourth-
round match is today
Stephens gets the most in-
triguing matchup with a quar-
terfinal berth at stake, taking on
defending champion Maria


wins, not just a solid
points day.
"We're going to need to win
races, so we're going to do
everything we can to try to get
that," he said. "I"ll be as ag-
gressive as I can, so I'm treat-
ing this as more of an offensive
race than a defensive one, for
sure."
He's in a hole after being
sidelined for four races with a
compression fracture in his
lower spine following a March
24 crash involving former
teammate Joey Logano. His
Joe Gibbs Racing team has
done all it can to make him
comfortable in the No. 11 Toy-
ota. He switched up his seat
belt configuration, had air
bags stuffed into the driver's
seat to assist with comfort and
there's padding to help sup-
port his still achy back.
"I'm pretty comfortable right
now, really as comfortable as
I've been," Hamlin said.
The adjustments to his seat
certainly haven't affected his
performance. Hamlin has
moved up seven spots to 24th
place in the standings since
his return. JGR teammate Kyle
Busch is the only driver 11th to
20th in the standings with a
victory.
Hamlin, who won five times
last season, has 20th in sight


Sharapova on Monday
Sharapova, who completed a
career Grand Slam in Paris last
year, dealt with eight double-
faults against unseeded Zheng
Jie before winning 6-1, 7-5.
She was most disappointed by
a line call on one of those dou-
ble-faults, which came on break
point and created a 4-1 deficit in
the second set. The chair umpire
climbed down to check the mark
in the clay but, Sharapova
said, the wrong one.
And she said the French Open
should join other Grand Slam
tournaments in using a video re-
play system.
"The umpire did not recog-
nize that the mark he pointed
out was about a foot away from
the actual mark. So that's a huge
question mark, to begin with."


and one of his favorite tracks
up next Pocono Raceway
He has four career wins at
Pocono.
"We're going to have to capi-
talize on our money tracks,"
Hamlin said. "We're going to
have to win at those race
tracks, and sneak a few in here
and there when we don't ex-
pect it. We're doing everything
we can. If we come up short,
then we come up short."
Hamlin and Jimmie Johnson
are the only two drivers to
make the Chase for the Sprint
Cup every year they've been
eligible.
The Chase may as well have
already started for Hamlin.
Not only does he need to
win, he has to hope that many
former Cup champions stuck
in the 11th to 20th spots also
don't drive their way into Vic-
tory Lane. Jeff Gordon, Kurt
Busch and Tony Stewart are
among the drivers who need a
win to help solidify a wild-card
spot.
"If you go for wins, then
you're going to run well and
finish consistent," Busch said.
With the way Hamlin has
been running, he should crack
the top 20.
One big win sure would help.
"We just need to win every-
thing we can," he said.


Associated Press
Rafael Nadal serves against Fabio Fognini in their third round match
of the French Open tennis tournament Saturday at Roland Garros
stadium in Paris.


score ever

Associated Press


I


(


B6 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
With another budget showdown looming in the fall, Congress and the White House will begin digesting the numbers from a report released
Friday on the solvency of Medicare and Social Security.




Questioning the future


TOM RAUM
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
s the U.S. recovery slowly gathers steam,
federal deficits are finally coming down
from their nosebleed $1 trillion-plus
heights. That will postpone until fall a new
budget showdown between Congress and
the White House and also will probably delay the days
of reckoning, feared by millions of aging Americans, when
Social Security and Medicare could become insolvent.
Why does it matter? If those programs' money dries up,
benefits must be reduced.
Some answers on future financial prospects came Fri-
day when trustees overseeing the two popular programs
issued their annual report. Last year they projected that
Medicare funds would run dry in 2024 and Social Secu-
rity's trust funds would follow in 2033.
The trustees have steadily been moving those dates
closer, even as almost 10,000 baby boomers a day have been
reaching retirement age and qualifying for benefits.
What next? Ahead of the new report, here are some
central questions and answers about deficits, the na-
tional debt and the outlook for the government's two


biggest "entitlement" program

. What if no agreement is
reached between the White
House and Congress to guarantee the
future solvency of Social Security and
Medicare?
A If funds become exhausted, the
'. two programs will find them-
selves collecting only enough money
in payroll taxes to pay partial benefits
to the millions of American recipi-
ents. Payroll taxes are in addition to
- and collected along with your
federal income taxes.
Q. What will forced reductions
mean in dollar terms for those
receiving benefits?
A. The Social Security trustees
have suggested that once the re-
serves are gone, incoming payroll
taxes will cover roughly 75 percent of
the program's promised benefits. So
that could mean an immediate 25 per-
cent cut in benefits. That would reduce
the average monthly Social Security
check -now $1,266 to roughly $950 a
month. Medicare's giant hospital fund
could pay only 87 percent of costs.
Q. How likely is it that recipients
will see such cuts?
A Deep mandatory cuts seem
highly unlikely, given the polit-
ical heat that would be sure to rise to
unbearable levels as the deadline
neared and if the White House and
Congress still failed to act. A compro-
mise of some sorts to avoid a cut in
benefits seems inevitable. But as re-
cent events have shown, finding com-
mon ground is becoming increasingly
difficult in partisan and polarized
Washington.
Q Will Friday's report show an im-
provement in light of the gov-
ernment's budget advances?
A. It may but perhaps only a small
one, given continued general
weakness in the economy "I think the


relatively good news on the budget
front could well translate into at least
slightly better projections," said Paul
Van de Water, an analyst with the Cen-
ter on Budget and Policy Priorities, a
liberal-leaning think tank. "There're
so many moving parts to these projec-
tions that I never want to go out on a
limb. But there is certainly some rea-
son to be slightly optimistic." In the
meantime, the economy is far from
healed, with still-sluggish growth and
a 7.5 percent unemployment rate that
is still way above pre-recession levels
of around 5 percent.
. Won't any improvement in So-
cial Security and Medicare fi-
nances just let Congress "kick the can
down the road" again?
A: Today's sharply divided Congress
does have a history of procrasti-
nating. It's inability to find common
ground on spending cuts
by a deadline last March 1
resulted in the "sequester"
of automatic spending Fede
cuts that are trimming
$42 billion from govern- Because
ment programs through spending
Oct. 1. Social Security During o t
and Medicare were ex- projected
empted. But long delays age of G
and squabbles over Pres- 30%.
ident Barack Obama's
2011 request to raise the
national debt ceiling re-
sulted in a first-time-ever 25
credit downgrade on U.S. 18.7/
bonds. 20
Q .With the army of 20
.retiring baby
boomers, what are the fu- 15 .......
ture prospects for Social 17.6/
Security and Medicare?
A "The real problem 10 ,
starts about 2017 or 1973
2018, when the deficits
start going up again," said SOURCE:


veteran budget analyst Stanley Collender. And
there's little in the way of congressional fixes
that are under serious consideration.
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul
Ryan, R-Wis., has proposed some major revisions
in the structure of Medicare. And Obama has
proposed altering the formula for automatic
cost-of-living Social Security increases that
would result in lower future benefit increases.
But neither proposal has gained much traction
on Capitol Hill.
"Deficit" and "debt." Where do budget
deficits come from, anyway, and how do
they relate to the national debt?
A: The deficit, the amount the government
must borrow when its annual spending ex-
ceeds its receipts, is just a one year-slice as if
someone only looked at how much his credit-
card and other household debt increased or de-
creased in a single year without regard to total
debt owed. The budget deficit for 2013 is now
projected by the Congressional Budget Office to
fall to $642 billion from $1.1 trillion last year and
a record $1.4 trillion in 2009. The national debt,
meanwhile, is the nation's total indebtedness,
the still-outstanding amount owed from the ac-
cumulation of many annual deficits going back
to the Revolutionary War, offset only slightly by
rare years of surplus, most recently 1998-2001.
The Treasury's Office of the Public Debt, which keeps
track to the penny, said that as of two days ago,
the national debt stood at $16,737,219,726,401.22
or, rounding off, $16.74 trillion.
Q. How much of this debt has happened on
.Obama's watch compared to other recent
presidents?
A. The national debt first passed the $1 trillion
mark in Ronald Reagan's first year and stood
at just over $3 trillion when he left office. George
H.W Bush, took it to over $4 trillion after serving a
single term. Under Bill Clinton, it grew to nearly
$6 trillion, despite those back-to-back budget sur-
pluses at the end of his second term. By January
2005, as George W Bush began his second term,
the debt was $7.6 trillion. When Obama was sworn
in in January 2009, it stood at $10.6 trillion. So it
has grown by just over $6 trillion so far in his
presidency, which has included two major wars and
the deepest economic downturn since the 1930s.
Finally, what is the debt ceiling that
Washington keeps arguing about?
A. It's the legal limit Congress sets on the al-
lowable size of the national debt Routinely
raising it-frequently-was seldom controversial
until recently Reagan raised the debt limit 18
times, and Congress generally went along obligingly
As a senator, Obama voted against George W Bush's
request to raise the ceiling in 2006, calling the in-
crease "a sign of leadership failure." He later
called his vote a political gesture and a mistake.


ral budget deficit will shrink
e revenues are projected to rise more rapidly than
g in the next two years, deficits continue to shrink.
he next 10 years, both revenues and outlays are
d to be above their 40-year averages as a percent-
DP.
.................................................................. .. ........


'80


'90 2000


'10 '20 '23


When

you're at

the top,

problems

find you
Getting hired as a
county adminis-
trator is like
being invited to a party
where they're serving
two-week-old oysters:
It's only a matter of time
before your stomach
feels uneasy and you
begin spending a lot of
time in the bathroom.
Brad Thorpe knows
the feeling.
County administrator is
an all-powerful job where
you help establish prior-
ities, deal with big issues
and make good things
happen. You pave roads,
build parks, open li-
braries, balance budgets
and oversee a workforce
of more than 500 people.
You are on top of the
world until well, until
you're not.
It is inevitable as the
rising sun that when you
are hired as a county ad-
ministrator, it is only a
matter of time before
your welcome is up. From
Day 1 in a place like Cit-
rus County, there will be
a group of folks who are
shooting arrows at you
because you are sitting
in the big seat. And as
time goes on, you make
daily decisions that anger
your five bosses, the cit-
izens and your staff.
Brad Thorpe an-
nounced his resignation
last week from the ad-
ministrative position in
Citrus County because
things were becoming
dysfunctional. Last year's
election of Scott Adams
as a commissioner put
one of Thorpe's biggest
critics in as one of his
five bosses.
Within weeks of taking
over, Adams made an
unsuccessful motion to
get rid of Thorpe.
While Thorpe still had
the support of the major-
ity of the board, the new
dysfunctional county
commission has created
a stress that is hard for
public employees to
tolerate.
It should be no surprise
that other members of
the county leadership
team are looking for new
employment. Public em-
ployees like the stability
of working for government
The pay may not be as
high as similar positions
in the private sector, but
the benefits are great
and there is stability.
Until there is not
A lawsuit with the
county's largest taxpayer
- Duke Energy has
placed a huge question
mark over future tax
revenues to run county
government. When you
suddenly have a com-
mission that no longer
works together as a team
and you have huge prob-
lems looming ahead, the
job no longer appears
that attractive.
It should be no surprise
that retirement began
looking pretty good.
Brad Thorpe did a
good job as the county
administrator. His peo-
ple liked working for
him and citizens found
him receptive. Thorpe
enjoyed solving prob-
lems, and he got excited


Congressional Budget Office


PageC3







Page C2 SUNDAY, JUNE 2,2013



PINION


"Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it."
George Bernard Shaw, "Man and Superman," 1903


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ........... publisher
M ike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz ..... .................. citizen member
mN l Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ....... ....... guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


FINDING A LEADER



BOCC votes


wisely, though


tribulations await


Citrus County commis-
sioners chose wisely
last Tuesday when they
voted to use the county's
human resources department
to find a successor to Brad
Thorpe.
By doing so, they eschewed
the idea of spending $20,000
to $30,000 on a
consultancy firm
to find a new THE I
county adminis- The se
trator a new
Commissioners admin
and county ad-
ministration have OUR 01
been under in-
creasing financial Good st
and political pres- a tough
sure to reduce
spending. One oft-heard com-
plaint is that the county uses
consultants to do work the
public believes can be done
in-house. This latest decision
shows commissioners are lis-
tening to those complaints.
Process aside, finding a re-
placement might be difficult.
The county has budgetary is-
sues that will not be resolved
during this fiscal year. The
county is still trying to re-
solve the Duke tax issue
while scrambling to institute
other revenue sources, such
as MSTUs and MSBUs, in
order to plug a multimillion-
dollar deficit.
The County Road 491 proj-
ect is just now getting off the
ground, but could go a long
way toward setting the county
up for future growth. In fact,
the economic prospects, if re-
alized, will diversify Citrus
County's economy and pull it
out of debt. Making this proj-
ect a success will be a big task


June flowers?
There is a beat-up old century
plant with a green stem approxi-
mately 20 feet tall rising from
the middle. If it's a bloom stem,
how tall will it get and how long
does it take to blossom? I hope
someone will answer.
High gas tax 0
So what's the deal
with this Citrus County
gasoline? I know our
commissioners signed
us up for a 6-cent hike
on gas, but when we
went to the next CA
county, gas was $3.29.
It's $3.49 here. That's 563-
20 cents. And living
here means we have to travel
twice as far to get to anything.
Where is all that extra money
going?
Service good, food cold
I have a reservation, get
there, wait for the first available
table. We get seated and wait
for the drink and appetizer
order. Before the drinks come
around, he asks the ladies first,
then goes around the table
again and asks the men. They
read the list of daily specials,
which we already read while
waiting. When the drinks arrive,
he goes around the table again
- women first, then the men -
to take the meal orders. When
the meals finally arrive, cold
mashed potatoes and veggies,
meat maybe warm. How much
do I tip?


S
a

is

P
a
h


I


and whoever comes in won't
have much of a grace period
before they will need to put
their stamp on the project.
Another potentially game-
changing project is Port Citrus.
Some see it as an albatross,
while others believe it is an
economic engine with a huge
upside. Consult-
ants are currently
SUE: assessing its fea-
irch for sibility. If given
county the green light,
strator. the new adminis-
trator would have
:INION: to become port
director or name
irt down a port director
1 road. from staff.
The composi-
tion of senior staff could look
a lot different in the coming
year, as several key personnel
may have other jobs offered to
them. This means a great loss
of institutional knowledge -
an important aspect of saving
the county time and money.
Politically, the addition of
Scott Adams to the board has
been unsettling as he seeks to
upset the status quo. With dif-
fering, and strong, opinions
pulling at the new adminis-
trator, it will take someone
with thick skin and a stiff
backbone to hold up under
the political tug-of-war.
The many challenges and
unknowns ahead, coupled
with the short tenures of pre-
vious administrators, will
mean the new administrator
will likely be a risk-taker.
While commissioners
chose correctly in handling
the job search themselves, it
will not be easy these are
large shoes to fill.


Out of business
In answer to the question about
Kracker Shack: You can find that
they're out of business, no longer
running. But some of the Kracker
Shack help has opened two other
places in the Inverness area.
One on the road to Floral
JND City is called Robin's
Sand Kracker Shack's
former cook is there.
And one right in Inver-
ness is where Cock-
adoodles used to be.
It's now called The Hen
House and you'll find
some of your Kracker
\579 Shack faces there too
)579 as well. Both are pretty
good places to eat, but
we do miss Kracker Shack.
Made my life easier
There have been so many neg-
ative calls about the new recycling
bins, that I thought I'd like to make
a positive statement. Before the
bins, I used to have multiple
boxes in my garage to sort out
my recycling. Then I had to pick
them up, put them in my car
and drive them to the recycling
center, unload them and place
them in the appropriate contain-
ers. It was a lot of work. Now all
I have is one bin that is very strong
with very good wheels and easy
to handle. Once a week I wheel
it out to the end of my driveway
for pickup no sorting, no lifting,
no driving. I'd like to thank who-
ever it was who decided to supply
these bins. I'm 83 years old and
it made my life so much easier.


Regulation off the rails


WASHINGTON
Texting while driving is
dangerous, especially if
you are driving a train. A
commuter train engineer was
texting on Sept. 12, 2008, near
Los Angeles, when he missed a
stop signal and crashed into a
freight train. Twenty-five peo-
ple died.
Congress supposedly is inca-
pable of acting quickly, and we
are supposed to re-
gret this. In 2008,
however, Congress
acted with dispatch.
We should regret
that it did. Herewith I,
another lesson
about the costs of /
the regulatory state, r-
especially when it is
excited, eager to Georg
make a gesture, and OTI
propelled by an un-
informed consensus. VOI
On Jan. 6, 2005,
nine people had been killed in
Graniteville, S.C., by chlorine
gas leaking from a derailed
freight train, but Congress did
not spring into action. In 2008,
however, California's 53-person
congressional delegation was
12 percent of the House, and 24
percent of a House majority. So
in less than a month after the
commuter train collision, Con-
gress, with scant opposition
from railroads, and without
meaningful cost-benefit analy-
ses, passed legislation requir-
ing most railroads to
implement, by 2015, Positive
Train Control (PTC), a technol-
ogy to stop trains by overriding
some human mistakes.
So far, railroads have spent
more than $2.7 billion on a sys-
tem estimated to cost $10 bil-
lion to $14 billion plus
perhaps $1 billion in annual
maintenance. PTC has not been
installed, partly because it is
not sufficiently developed. CSX
Corp., which includes railroads
among its assets, says the rail-
road industry is the nation's
most capital-intensive and
the $11 billion combined capi-
tal investments of all U.S. rail-


H
Ic


roads in 2010 were approxi-
mately equal to the cost of PTC.
The 2015 mandate will not be
met.
The Federal Railroad Ad-
ministration estimates that
were PTC to be installed on
thousands of locomotives and
tens of thousands of miles of
track, it would prevent perhaps
2 percent of the approximately
2,000 collisions and derail-
ments, preventing
seven deaths and 22
injuries annually
A But because a dollar
spent on X cannot
be spent on Y, the
PTC mandate must
mean the sacrifice
of other investments
crucial to railroad
e Will safety (and efficiency).
IER Before returning
to Harvard Law
CES School, Cass Sun-
stein was Barack
Obama's administrator of the
Office of Information and Reg-
ulatory Affairs, measuring the
benefits of regulations against
their costs. Testifying to a
House subcommittee on Jan.
26, 2011, Sunstein was asked if
he could identify an adminis-
tration regulation whose "ben-
efits have not justified the cost."
He replied:
"There is only one big one
that comes to mind. It is called
Positive Train Control, and it is
a statutory requirement, and
the Department of Transporta-
tion had to issue it as a matter
of law even though the moneti-
zable benefits are lower than
the monetizable costs. There
aren't a lot like that."
Concerning Sunstein's san-
guine conclusion, skepticism is
permitted. Wayne Crews of the
Competitive Enterprise Insti-
tute has recently published his
"Ten Thousand Command-
ments: An Annual Snapshot of
the Federal Regulatory State."
This year's 20th-anniversary
edition notes that regulation,
the "hidden tax," costs almost
$2 trillion not counted among
the official federal outlays.


Using mostly government data,
Crews concludes:
The cost of regulations
($1.806 trillion) is now more
than half the size of the federal
budget and 11.6 percent of GDP
This costs $14,768 per U.S.
household, equal to 23 percent
of the average household in-
come of $63,685. Regulatory
compliance costs exceed the
combined sum of income taxes
paid by corporations ($237 bil-
lion) and individuals ($1.165
trillion). Then add $61 billion in
on-budget spending by agencies
that administer regulations.
Crews' "Anti-Democracy
Index" measures "the ratio of
regulations issued by agencies
relative to laws passed by Con-
gress." In 2012, the index was
29, meaning that 29 times more
regulations were issued by
agencies than there were laws
passed by Congress. "This dis-
parity," Crews writes, "high-
lights a substantial delegation
of lawmaking power to un-
elected agency officials."
Congress relishes such dele-
gation of lawmaking because
responsibility is time-consum-
ing and potentially hazardous
politically Hence the Senate
refuses to pass legislation the
House passed in 2011 to require
Congress to vote approval of
any "major" regulation, defined
as any with an economic impact
of $100 million or more. If Con-
gress were more clearly re-
sponsible for burdening the
economy with such regulations,
it would be less likely to pass
them as sincerity gestures.
Internal Revenue Service
misbehavior in the regulation
of political advocacy, combined
with the imminent expansion of
the IRS to enable it to adminis-
ter the coercions that are Oba-
macare, is sensitizing
Americans to some of the costs
of the regulatory state. There
are many others, hidden but
huge.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


Warding off gossip
Gossip has wings that never
tire on the longest flights of
fantasy. This extraordinary
vitality is possible because
gossip feeds all day long on
the juicy tidbits that foolish
people routinely feed it. Gos-
sip needs no GPS to guide it
as it makes its rounds to
every land and every ship at
sea. It can circulate through
a big city like Detroit in a
matter of hours. It can engulf
a small town like Beverly
Hills while bacon and eggs
are still in the frying pan.
Gossip will often ring a dozen
phones before the coffee has
finished percolating.
Gossip has many haunts. It
loves to dine with the rich
and famous. It is also just as
comfortable rubbing elbows
with people who work hard
every day and enjoy a cold
beer when it's over. Gossip
won't decline an invitation to
a class reunion in Crystal
River or a church supper on a
cold and windy day in No-
vember in Nebraska.


Although gossip is usually can quickly turn into a vi-
just a silly, harmless gadfly, it cious bird of prey, and it is


very testy about the kind of
reception it receives. It will
not roost where it is not wel-
come. If you give it the cold
shoulder when it first plops
down in front of you, it will
quickly jump up on its
scrawny legs and trot off for
a warmer welcome some-
where else. Need I remind
you that gossip has a bosom
friend who is known the
world over by the name of
slander?
Neither of these birds will
be able to dig their claws into
us if we think before we
speak. An unkind word, spo-
ken in haste, is like an arrow
in flight: It cannot be re-
called. Nor is it enough to
merely refrain from speaking
evil of our sister. If our lips
are sealed, but our ears are
propped open, then our job is
only half done. Whenever we
speak from the heart we
speak the truth. Jesus put it
this way: '"A good man's heart
reveals the rich treasures
within him." (Matthew 12:35,
Living Bible, 1981.)

Franklin Aretz
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS > to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


They're marvelous, but one of each is enough


According to some
recent statistical re-
ports, the likelihood
of having twins is about 1.6
percent. This is based on
today's statistics that 32 out
of 1,000 births are twins. It
is a little bit confusing, but
since the birth of twins in-
volves two new little ba-
bies, the calculated odds
are that 32 twins born in
1,000 births would equate to
an approximate 1.6 percent
chance that any birthing
event will be twins.
Are you now as confused
as I am?
Let it suffice to say the
chance of a couple becom-


ing the parents of twins is
relatively slim, but it's still
almost as good as a 60-to-1
shot at the horse track.
You don't agree with the
numbers? Don't blame me.
I got this from the Internet,
and we all know that -
just like what we read in
the newspaper or what we
see on TV- everything of-
fered online is absolutely
true.
For Cheryl and me,
there was a temporary
panic attack after an eval-
uation by our doctor pre-
dicted Bethy-Pooh might
be twins.
She wasn't.


A few weeks ago, a hand- came fussy and his brother
some young couple with a chimed in.
set of 6-month- My mental
old twin boys journey quickly
came to our .- did an about-
church. The lit- face. While I re-
tle guys were I membered how
adorable and precious our
unusually well- babies were, I
behaved. As I also remembered
watched them, how absolutely
my mind ram- annoying they
bled and I Fred Brannen could be at
began to think A SLICE times.
about how de- I thought
lightful it would OF LIFE about each of
have been to our children
have had a matching pair. individually and how
Then, just for a moment, proud I am of what they
one of the little fellows be- have become and who they


are. Then I allowed my
mind to go back to who and
what they were while
growing up.
Two Beths? Two Beckys?
Two Freds?
Perish the thought. One
at a time was a handful. In
fact, each of them was four
handfuls both of
Cheryl's and both of mine.
After church, I made it a
point to speak to the
mother and brag on her
babies. I told her how God
had certainly smiled on her
and her husband to give
'em a two-for-one blessing.
Lying is a sin, and it is one
with specific consequences.


Have you ever heard about
the lake office? So I convinced
myself I wasn't actually
lying; that God had picked
these young people for such
an adventure because they
were undoubtedly strong
enough to handle it
Still, as I walked away, I
thanked Him for not bless-
ing Cheryl and me with a
duplicate set of any one of
our three.
They're marvelous, but
one of each is enough!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Entitlement tutorial
Today, May 9, there was an
extensive article on the Internet
decrying the fact that entitlements
are increasingly absorbing an
unsustainable portion of our
federal budget In the explanation
of the report, at no point, were
real entitlements discussed.
Instead, Social Security and
Medicare were the targets. Any-
one with even a fraction of a brain
knows that neither Social Security
nor Medicare are entitlements.
Both are federally concocted
insurance programs. While nei-
ther is actuarially sound, they
are still insurance programs.
Every legitimate recipient of
Social Security paid their fair
premium and if the system had
been properly established, there
would never have been any ad-
ditional burden on taxpayers.
Also, Medicare properly estab-
lished, would have been designed
to operate independently
Part of the problem with these
programs is they have been
saddled with so many abusive
riders. Social Security was to
provide a supplemental income
for persons at retirement. Now
there are so many people re-
ceiving benefits who have never,
or only marginally, contributed
to Social Security that the program
is on the path to becoming a
burden. Also, many people are
covered by Medicare or Medicaid
who were originally not intended
to be covered by Medicare. This
has become a problem.


Add to this all the welfare
benefits and unemployment
benefits being paid today It is
no wonder mandatory spending
is taking its toll on our budget.
Welfare and unemployment
benefits properly used are un-
derstandable; however, in today's
society, there is a concerted effort
to add as many people as possible
to these categories. The proper
approach should be to reduce
these costs. Rather than keeping
those people dependent, the goal
should be to help them become
independent. In turn, our enti-
tlement expense would be re-
duced and overall government
revenue would be increased.
One main problem is that cer-
tain political leaders consistently
promise to increase benefits to
more and more unproductive
members of our society The hope
is by giving more of what is not
available to give, recipients will
be encouraged to vote for the
generous politician. Recipients
cannot be fully blamed for ac-
cepting such largess; however, the
politicians should be intelligent
enough to know they are destroy-
ing themselves and their future
generations with such actions.
There is one constant that
can be counted on: When elec-
tion time comes, Democrats
will again claim Republicans
want to take away everyone's
Social Security and a large block
of voters will fall for the lie.
Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa


Flaws in new taxes
I would like to inform Citrus
County residents of BOCC mis-
information. Yes, it is true that
there is a shortfall in taxes due
to the Duke Energy's failure to
meet its tax obligations. We the
people of Citrus County have to
make up this shortfall.
Let's make this perfectly
clear from the get-go. The
county commissioners really
have to explain the difference
in the population growth. First
and foremost, the population of
Citrus County has decreased since
2010. In 2010, the population
was 141,236; in 2011, it jumped
to 141,277; and now in 2012, it
decreased to 139,360. We have
loss a total of 1,876 residents.
If you divide this $16.5 mil-
lion shortfall, you can see it is
going to be a huge increase in


real estate taxes. On top of this,
Duke Energy may raise its rate
to its customers.
I think you all can do the
math and see we are going to
be in for more hard times
ahead. Because of this mess, I
can see people leaving this
county for greener pastures. I
myself am considering leaving.
At the rate we are going, I do
not see this county growing in
the future.
What this county needs to do
is encourage growth by cutting
wasteful spending. Take the
Port Citrus project, for one:
This project should be benched
for now and save us tax dollars.
There are many other projects
that need to be benched also.
Cut projects that are not in the
best interest of the people of
this county, then revise the plan
for a tax increase so that it


reflects the real population
growth. Don't base tax in-
creases on outdated population
growth. Most people come to
Florida to retire and live on
fixed incomes in their golden
years. Citrus County doesn't
have rich people like Marion
County We don't have a place
like The Villages where mil-
lionaires with unlimited re-
sources live and can afford
these increases.
Charles Knecht Sr.
Dunnellon

Life on death row
Does anyone in the United
States know why the penalty
laws have changed? When a
person is killed by another, they
get a trial and get years in
prison. We as taxpayers support
these thousands of people -
clothing, food, medical and a
place to sleep.
Don't judges, lawyers know
about the death penalty?
Within a year after their trials,
they should get a needle in
their arm and be dead. Why
not?
Very, very few people get on
death row and die why?
After the trial, and they are
guilty, why wait until they die in
our support system. As an 89-
year-old citizen, I can't under-
stand why this has taken place.
Leroy W. Loveland
Homosassa


After reading the article in today's
Chronicle, May 23, it appears perhaps
we the people are getting our message
across to the BOCC. Quit throwing our
money away. I am glad to see Meek will
recommend our own human resources
department do its job by finding candi-
dates for the county administrator. We
are tired of not being taken seriously.
We do not want more taxes or fees. We
want the county to operate within the
money they currently have. I haven't
gotten a raise in years. I'm just glad I
have a paycheck. Asking for new fees
is like going to your boss and demand-
ing a raise. He would tell you to find
another job and that is exactly what we
will tell the Board of county commis-
sioners next election, with the excep-
tion of (Scott) Adams, if they don't
start paying attention to the voice of
the people they were elected to serve.
It would be nice to have lots of new
things, but can't they get it through
their heads that there is no money? I
have to live on less now. They are going
to have to do the same. Citrus is a
nice, quiet county. Quit competing with
the counties around us.


I $ SWlEMER TOLO OUT IT!
ITS NOT NVROMR\NTETHAT I
KlO'M MNTM\E UNTIL T \
lflESTl6TfOf \S OVER\


Nominating Andy Houston
This is for the BOCC. I would like to
nominate Andy Houston, city manager
of the city of Crystal River, to replace
Brad Thorpe as county administrator.
Look what Mr. Houston has done for the
city of Crystal River in the last few years.
Hungry thief
This is in regards to "Rotten thing to
do" in the Sound Off, where the people
donated the food on top of their mailbox
and it was stolen. I look at it as some-
body may have needed that food and a
donation is a donation and maybe you
actually fed somebody that needed it.
Great care at CMH
As a recent patient at Citrus Memorial,
I need to comment finally about the
care I received at the hospital over the
last several years. I've been treated in
the emergency room, twice a day in
the outpatient department for IVs for
antibiotics, day surgery outpatient and
inpatient service also. I've also always
received quick and competent care
from compassionate staff and I need
to commend the hospital and its staff
for their good care. Thank you.


I'd like to thank all the people who
participated in the "Wind, Rain or
Flames" Expo at the armory on May
18. They all did a won-
OUND derful job. My main
WV concern about hurri-
canes is the people
who go back up North
/ for the summer and
A, leave all kinds of loose
things out in their
CA. yards for the wind to
563-0579 blow into a neighbor's
house or car. All the lit-
erature handed out on Saturday said
to clear your yard of any furniture, pot-
ted plants, bikes or trashcans so they
won't blow all over. But I guess this ap-
plies only to the folks who stay here all
year. Snowbirds are exempt because
they're back up North.
Hummingbird sweets
The recipe for the hummingbirds is
not 1 cup of sugar to 2 cups of water.
It is one-fourth cup sugar to one cup
of water or one-half cup sugar to two
cups of water. Otherwise it's too sweet
and they won't come back.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

about big-picture projects.
He even liked the ideas of other people
and worked to see them through to com-
pletion. Under his leadership the county
expanded roads, built libraries and
planned for the future. When Progress
Energy/Duke began to pull back from the
county and eventually announced plans
to close the nuclear plant, Thorpe led the
way to study the proposal of building a
port at the barge canal in northwest Cit-
rus County.
He was not afraid to look at doing big things
to help solve some of our big problems.
Thorpe, like every other administrator
before him, did some dumb things and got
himself in hot water It's easy to get distracted
by the pan/scraper or Ottawa Avenue.
One of the landmark problems Thorpe
faced was the no-win situation with Sen.
Charlie Dean and the impact-fee issue
with the senator's barn. If you remember,
Sen. Dean did not want to pay impact fees
on a barn he was building in east Citrus
County, but the "barn" included residen-
tial amenities and the county staff ruled
that impact fees must be paid.
Thorpe was put in a position of over-
ruling his staff and giving Sen. Dean a
pass on the impact fees or sticking with
the rules. Thorpe stuck with the impact-
fee charge, and thus began one of the
most significant political riffs in our
county's history
The county administration has been in
constant conflict with Sen. Dean, the sen-
ior member of the county's legislative del-
egation, ever since.
Sen. Dean's longtime business partner
is Scott Adams, the newly elected county
commissioner
A counseling session with Dr. Phil and
Oprah could not get the two factions to
work together again.
Thorpe didn't go out looking for the
fight with the powerful senator, but when
you sit in the top seat of county govern-
ment, those fights sometimes find you.
Brad Thorpe took an unusual path to
the county's top job. He was first elected
as a county commissioner and then got
hired as a department director in county
government. When a previous adminis-
trator lost the job, Thorpe served as in-
terim administrator While he was passed
over once for the top job, he eventually
got the post.
For more than two decades he has ded-
icated his life to making good things hap-
pen in Citrus County He will leave a
positive mark and should be proud of
what he has accomplished.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of
the Chronicle. Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


Hear us roar Batten down


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


Letters to THE EDITOR


Wonderful care
I would like to take this op-
portunity to praise the staff of
Sevens Rivers hospital, third
floor north. I spent from April
16 to May 4 in room 315 at
Seven Rivers for a very severe
infection. I was on around the
clock IV I am sorry that I can-
not remember the names of
everyone who cared for me, but
you can all take great pride in
the jobs you do.
The nurses and aides caring
for me were terrific. I could not
have asked for any better care
than I received from this
tremendous group. Whenever I
had to buzz for any member of
this staff, day or night, they
were there to assist me with
whatever it was I needed.
My room was kept clean and I
found the food to be good. My
meals were brought to me
every day at the time stated
they would be and the people
handling the trays were very
courteous and helpful.
I was taken to surgery numer-
ous times during my stay and I
found the operating room staff
to go above and beyond to care
for me. I would like to definitely
commend the gentlemen who
transferred me from my room to
the OR holding area. These men
were so very pleasant and they
helped to keep me calm under
some difficult circumstances.
I would like to recommend
Seven Rivers hospital for any of
your future health care needs.
The people of Citrus County
can be proud of this Hospital
that serves our county.
Once again, I would like to
say thank you to the staff of
Seven Rivers.


"TIHAT oiWNS..YAA T MFP-uATTmurp T 'b'r5TTieoT Ah4 iSw T
094M4... da W WkNttel Y 'Ve 60T AI Re, S4NPAL."


Running out of room
I am a supporter of ZPG
(zero population growth).
Briefly, we are a segment of
the world's inhabitants who
believe the Earth's resources
cannot sustain the human
race at its current growth
rate. Granted, science may ge-
netically modify our food sup-
ply to keep up with demand;
however, the amount of real
estate suitable for habitation
remains constant and dwin-
dles as population grows and
many of its resources are non-
renewable.


Frank Registrato But this letter is not about
Homosassa ZPG. It is about the attitudes


we encounter from people
who do not understand or re-
fuse to consider our view-
point. This very personal and
private decision which we
have made regarding our
lives is often subjected to
thoughtless scrutiny and
ridicule.
The most narrow-minded
and most hurtful response to
our choice not to parent chil-
dren is, "Oh, but you'll never
know selfless love unless you
have children."
Tell that one to the late
Mother Teresa of Calcutta or
tell it to the millions of un-
wanted, the millions of
abused, the millions of starv-


ing offspring who, if they
reach adulthood, will never
have known the love and nur-
turing of a responsible parent.
How about this response to
a woman who has chosen ca-
reer and profession over
child-bearing? "Oh, how sad
you will never be a fulfilled
mother." The recipient of this
comment is an acclaimed ed-
ucator, best in her field and
utterly devoted to the needs
of young people.
The most exasperating com-
ment was recently carried in
a letter to the editor from a
gentleman who attributed a
great deal of our society's ills
to his belief that the govern-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ment, through Planned Par-
enthood, subsidies for the dis-
advantaged and civil rights
for people of all creeds, be-
liefs and persuasions has dis-
regarded the Biblical
command to "Go forth and
populate the Earth." Accord-
ing to the writer, that is man's
sole purpose as mandated by
the God of the Judeo-Christian
tradition.
That edict, actually worded
as "be fruitful and multiply,"
was recorded in the book of
Genesis by writers telling the
story of Adam and Eve. Being
the only earthly inhabitants
in this Old Testament account
of the beginning, certainly
being fruitful and multiplying
was of paramount importance
to a fledgling civilization.
Throughout the ensuing mil-
lennia of growth their sur-
vival depended on having the
strongest and most numerous
young men in their armies to
defend against the warring,
neighboring tribes. It was a
critical directive for those
times but, in today's world, it
is irresponsible and irrele-
vant theology in light of
today's population crisis.
I have the greatest respect
and admiration for people
who live by their convictions.
However, we all sometimes
need to do a reality check,
put our God-given brains in
gear and use our powers of
reasoning. Just because
Grandpa's great-granddaddy's
90-year-old preacher said it
was gospel and it has been ac-
cepted as gospel ever since
does not necessarily mean it's
true. Think, read, meditate.
Figure it out for yourself.
Larry Brown
Homosassa


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Mixed credit scores? Marriage may not help


DEAR BRUCE: My
credit is very good,
but my fiancee has
bad credit. After we marry,
how will that affect my
credit score?
She has a high-interest
mortgage and we want to
refinance. I know banks
are very particular about
mortgage lending and
wondered if we would
qualify for a loan. My other
thought is to purchase her
home in my name before
we get married, in case we
have trouble getting a
loan. -J.W, via email
DEAR J.W.: I think that
your idea of purchasing
her home in your name


has a great deal of validity,
assuming she is comfort-
able with that because it's
going to be in your name
alone, and it's going to be-
long to you. The idea of re-
financing in this fashion
because of your good
credit can get you a lower
interest rate, which makes
a great deal of sense.
You didn't indicate the
size of the mortgage. If it's
very small, it's not neces-
sarily worth pursuing, but
with a decent size mort-
gage, it is very worthwhile.
In any case, you should
consider using a prenup-
tial agreement to protect


decease her might find a home with a
DEAR BRUCE: In 1991, grandfathered second-
I was living in Waunakee, floor rental unit to offset
Wis., newly em- part of the
played as a re- mortgage cost.
cent college I took this
graduate. One advice and
evening, a found an older
caller on your home in Madi-
radio show, son with a sec-
whose life ond floor
sounded quite lock-out that
similar to mine covered over
at that point, Bruce Williams 50 percent of
asked for your SMART the $625 mort-
recommenda- gage. That de-
tion regarding MONEY cision to find a
his desire to relatively low-
purchase a home. You sug- cost older home with an at-
gested he search in older tached rental was a


your wife in case you pre- parts of town where one tremendously positive


step that has led to my
owning, 20 years later,
eight rental homes in the
Dallas area, six free and
clear. Within two more
years I expect to have the
remaining two homes paid
off, and my wife and I will
have nearly $100,000 a
year net income from
these properties almost
certainly a result of hear-
ing your advice.
So, many thanks for your
sound counsel and know
that at least one person
was greatly helped by your
words. R.R, via email
DEAR RR: Thank you
for sharing. It's letters
such as yours that make


writing this column so
worthwhile to me.
DEAR BRUCE: My di-
vorce should be final in
the next few months. Cus-
tody is arranged, and
monies are split. I'm only
really waiting for a hear-
ing on child support. I've
arranged my current
budget as if I will be pay-
ing the maximum allow-
able in my state.
My gross income is a lit-
tle over $60,000 from my
day job and freelance
work. I'd like to buy a
house before the end of
the year and use a VA


JEFF AMY
Associated Press


GULF SHORES, Ala.

hen Stan Virden moved into
his 2,400-square-foot house
overlooking a rock-lined canal
in 1996, he paid less than
$1,000 a year for homeowners
insurance. Now, as he seeks to move to Atlanta
to be near family, Virden says potential buyers
for the house are being scared off by the annual
premium, which has skyrocketed to $5,000.
"We feel like we're prisoners here now because
the market is so screwed up because of this," the
80-year-old retired Navy captain said.


hurricane winds, according to AP cal-
culations using comparisons of
coastal and inland rates in states
where they're available.
The Atlantic hurricane season offi-
cially started Saturday and runs
through Nov 30. Forecasters project
13 to 20 named storms.
Worsening the situation: premiums
for the federally run National Flood
Insurance Program whose policies
many coastal homeowners also must
buy are scheduled to shoot up Oct.
1. A homeowners policy typically cov-
ers wind, but not flood damage.
With the U.S. housing market in a
slow revival, it may be too early to say
what the skyrocketing insurance rates
could do. Some real estate agents in
coastal areas say there are warning
signs.
Starke Irvine, an agent in Daphne,
Ala., said the cost of insurance is driv-
ing down the market value of homes
there. Homebuyers have only so
much to pay toward a mortgage, in-
surance and taxes.
Some critics also say insurers are
inflating the insured value of houses,
saying they would cost more to re-
build, thus raising the total bill each
year without raising rates.
"We've had insurers applying a 10
percent to 12 percent inflation factor
every year to dwelling value," said
Willo Kelly, who lobbies for real
estate agents and homebuilders
on North Carolina's Outer Banks.
"Every increase that company
applies to dwelling value
is an increase in the
premium, an
increase
in


the deductible and an increase in the
agent's commission."
A study by consulting group Towers
Watson showed the cost of the goods
and services insurers typically buy to
pay a homeowners claim has actually
declined from 2009 to 2012. That re-
flects falling building costs, said Tow-
ers Watson risk consultant Jeremy
Pecora.
It's still unclear how the $19 billion
in privately insured damages caused
by Superstorm Sandy in October 2012
will hit policyholders. In the North-
east, insurers started seeking higher
rates after Tropical Storm Irene in
2011 and continue to seek increases
of up to 10 percent.
Industry advocates say the in-
creases were inevitable. "Insurance
rates in hurricane areas were too low
for too long," said libertarian-leaning
Eli Lehrer of the Washington, D.C.-
based R Street Institute.
Robert Hartwig, president of the in-
dustry-backed Insurance Information
Institute in New York, said in-
surers may have sold policies
cheaply to attract cus-
tomers to more prof-
itable auto and life


Labor laws, Part 1 of 3: the federal level


Labor laws that affect busi-
nesses large and small
emanate primarily from
federal and state governments.
There are also regulations and
codes developed and enforced
at county and municipal levels.
These usually come in the form
of licenses or codes related to
safety, health and development.
By and large, it is the state and
the federal government agencies
that impose the major laws re-
lating to employer/employee
work related issues.
The Fair Labor Standards Act
established in 1938 has, over the
years, probably been the most
comprehensive law at the fed-
eral level. It could easily be la-
beled the granddaddy of the
national laws regulating labor
matters. Many others laws have


come into existence since that precedence. State labor laws in
law was promulgated nationally Florida will be discussed in part
These will be discussed in part2 3 of this series.


of this series on labor laws.
Beside federal and
state labor laws,
trade and employee
union contracts have
added many worker f
benefits and protec-
tions. Unions negoti- !
ate with
management for em-
ployees with respect
to compensation, Dr ]
benefits and working
conditions.
Individual states V
also have labor laws.


Frederi
PER
MATI


Those laws come into existence
and can be enforced as long as
they are not in conflict with the
federal laws. Federal law has


The Fair Labor
Standards Act
SThis piece of legis-
lation applies to most
businesses involved
in interstate com-
merce. It requires
employers to pay
hourly employees a
ckHerzog minimum wage and
og overtime wages equal
IENCE to time and one-half
rERS of the hourly wage
after 40 hours of
work in any one work week.
The act also restricts employ-
ment of children under age 16
and forbids employers from hir-


ing those who are 18 years old
for certain hazardous or danger-
ous jobs. There are some ex-
emptions allowed in the
employment of youthful employ-
ees. The best source for this in-
formation is the U.S.
Department of Labor or an at-
torney specializing in labor law.

The Eight Labor Laws
There are currently eight fed-
eral labor laws that impact em-
ployees and employers in the
United States. We will list them
here but discuss them in more
detail in subsequent columns.
Equal opportunity
Civil rights
Age discrimination
Equal pay
MAmericans with DisabilitiesAct


Fair labor standards
Family and medical leave
Occupational safety and
health
Citrus County SCORE is ready
to help any and all business
owners who want the guidance
of certified business mentors to
help start or expand the existing
business.
Office hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday Call
352-249-1236 to request help. If
you call after regular business
hours, leave your contact infor-
mation so we can call you back.
M-
Dr Frederick Herzog,
PhD is the immediate past
chair of Citrus SCORE. He
can be reached via email at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SURGE
Continued from Page Dl

insurance, and regulators may have been unfairly hold-
ing prices down in some states.
And, he said, claims from severe weather have gone up.
The Insurance Research Council found hurricanes and
other weather catastrophes caused 39 percent of na-
tionwide homeowners insurance claims payments from
2004-2011, compared with 25 percent from 1997-2003.
"You have to first accept the fact you live in harm's
way," Hartwig said.
About 16 million households are in coastal counties
along the Gulf and Atlantic.
Company profit margins for all kinds of property and
casualty insurance from 2003-2010 match historic aver-
ages, according to the Insurance Service Office, which
compiles data. Homeowners insur-
ance is generally less profitable Deductible
than the category as a whole.
Despite particularly heavy losses can reach 5
in Louisiana and Mississippi --
mostly from hurricanes Katrina, Of insured
Rita and Gustav their average re- when a hui
turn in the 18 states was 7.4 percent,
higher than the nationwide average hits, raising
for homeowners insurance.
A more important driver of rates about whel
than past losses is what insurers ex- homeownc
pect to lose in the future. homeowner
In the 21 years since Hurricane able to affo
Andrew slammed Florida, insurers,
reinsurers and credit rating agencies have come to rely
on computer models that generate an array of hypo-
thetical storms and try to predict the extent of possible
property damage.
The models' worst-case scenarios are big factors in
driving rates. Companies have to build up enough re-
serves or buy enough backup coverage, called reinsur-
ance, to avoid going broke after a severe storm. If loss
projections look too great, companies may dump coastal
policies to cut risk.
In some states, regulators have been critical of mod-
eling to determine rates.
Even if regulators block their use, policyholders may
still pay for their predictions indirectly Reinsurers use
models to set their prices, and credit rating agencies
may downgrade an insurer's rating if they don't like
what model results show.
"It appears to be a cycle where it drives insurance
companies to purchase even more reinsurance," said
Wayne Goodwin, a Democrat who is North Carolina's
elected insurance commissioner
One way to fight against higher rates is to shop widely
for better prices. Sometimes, though, lower prices mean
higher risks to a homeowner.
Virden said his premium fell by about $400 when he


5
v



It

)r


found a new policy that offered less coverage. But he
said it helped only marginally "That increase to $5,000
a year really put the kibosh on our standard of living."
Virden is a member of the Homeowners' Hurricane
Insurance Initiative, a group seeking lower rates
and more justification for pricing. The group has been
trying to unite similar citizen-led efforts in Florida,
South Carolina, North Carolina, Massachusetts and
elsewhere.
In south Florida, Nancy Loft-Powers is paying $7,300
a year to insure a 1,700-square-foot house in Deerfield
Beach, Fla.
"They're just jacking me and jacking me and jacking
me," she said. "Really, it's horrific."
Loft-Powers, who works as a nutrition consultant,
said she bought additional houses in her neighborhood
in 2000 and 2001 as investments. She said she lost the
houses in short sales because the insurance payments
became too high.
"I had to sell them off," Loft-Pow-
s now ers said.
Complaints also focus on state
percent regulators.
"We do not believe our Division of
Talue Insurance is doing the job that they
ricane should be doing in protecting the
consumer from the greed of the in-
questions dustry," said Paula Aschettino, an
Eastham, Mass., resident who
her some founded Citizens for Homeowners
rs w'ill be Insurance Reform. "If they are not
rs will be denying these increases, they are
rd repairs. part of the problem."
Goodwin, the North Carolina's in-
surance commissioner, said there's more to regulation
than capping rate increases.
"State insurance regulators have a dual role. One is to
protect the consumer from excessive rates and inade-
quate insurance and to have insurance available,"
Goodwin said. 'At the same time, state insurance regu-
lators must balance with those duties the responsibil-
ity for companies to have an opportunity for profit and
be solvent."
One way companies are managing profits is by shift-
ing risk to policyholders with exceptions to coverage
and higher deductibles.
Deductibles now can reach 5 percent of insured value
when a hurricane hits, raising questions about whether
some homeowners will be able to afford repairs.
Alabama's Virden, for example, would have to pay for
the first $18,500 of damage before his insurance kicks in.
Amy Bach, executive director of United Policyhold-
ers, a California-based advocacy group that works with
consumers on claims after disasters, said higher de-
ductibles weaken the value of insurance, especially
when premiums don't go down.
"They've carved so many things out in recent years,"
Bach said of the industry "Why aren't we seeing offsets
for that?


Associated Iress
Nancy Loft-Powers poses May 27 with a sign she made
in front of her home in Deerfield Beach, Ha. Loft-Powers
had to sell other properties she owned because she
could no longer afford the insurance.
How homeowner insurance
rates have spiked
Nationwide, an average homeowner paid $909
for homeowner insurance coverage in 2010, up
36 percent from 2003. Inflation rose 19 percent
during the same period. Here's a look at what
homeowners in states bordering the Atlantic Ocean
or Gulf of Mexico paid, ranked by percentage change
since 2003. The totals do not include flood insurance,
which is sold separately under a federal program.
1. Florida: $1,544, up 90.6 percent.*
2. Rhode Island: $1,092, up 62.3 percent.
3. Louisiana: $1,546, up 58.6 percent.
4. Massachusetts: $1,050, up 56.5 percent.
5. Alabama: $1,050, up 54.2 percent.
6. Mississippi: $1,217, up 53.5 percent.
7. South Carolina: $997, up 48.4 percent.
8. New Jersey: $867, up 48.2 percent.
9. Connecticut: $1,052, up 47.3 percent.
10. New Hampshire: $791, up 46.8 percent.
11. Maine: $676, up 46.3 percent.
12. Georgia: $833, up 46.1 percent.
13. New York: $1,044, up 44.8 percent.
14. Delaware: $636, up 43.9 percent.
15. Virginia: $753, up 34.5 percent.
16. Maryland: $784, up 34.3 percent.
17. North Carolina: $757, up 31.4 percent.
18. Texas: $1,560, up 17.5 percent.*
* Note: The National Association of Insurance Commissioners
warns that Florida data excludes policies from Citizens Prop-
erty Insurance Corp. and may not be directly comparable to
other states. Items covered by policies in Texas can be differ-
ent and can also provide comparison problems.
Source: National Association of Insurance Commissioners.


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SC N I

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Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!
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DON T WALL YOUR BUSINESS

OFF FROM YOUR CUSTOMERS

For more information on how to keep your ITRS CoUNTY
business in front of your customers, C UT
call NICLF
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Licensed & Insured


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D2 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


BUSINESS










D3


Ei pCOCITRUS COUNTY
n, Ic Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Are you

prepared

for an

active

hurricane

season?
On May 12, we reminded
you of some basic "get
ready" procedures and a gave
you a sample Basic Disaster
Supplies Kit list. If you missed
it, and for more information,
visit www.sheriffcitrus.org/EM/.
If we have emergency
weather, these are your basic
guidelines:
Remain indoors in a safe
place do not go outside.
If you lose power, listen to
a battery-operated radio with
local news and updates on the
storm and instructions from
local emergency officials.
Evacuate immediately if
told to do so.
Wear protective clothing
and sturdy shoes.
If leaving, take a disaster
Supplies kit. Lock your home.
Post a note telling others when
you left and where you are going.
Use travel routes specified
by local authorities. Don't use
shortcuts, because certain
areas may be impassable or
dangerous.
For a storm surge flood zone
map of Citrus County and an
evacuation zone map, visit
www.sheriffcitrus.org/EM/.
Remember: Turn off the
utilities only if instructed to do
so. If you turn the gas off, you
will need a professional to turn
it back on.



Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
June 5 5 p.m. to 7
p.m. Business Leaders
of Tomorrow members
meeting
June 13-- 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Business After
Hours at Christie Dental
June 14-- 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Chamber
Member's Lunch at
Plantation on Crystal
River
June 19 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. BWA June
Member Lunch at Plan-
tation on Crystal River
June 27 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Business After
Hours at Superior
Residences
Check our complete
Chamber and Commu-
nity calendar at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com or follow
the QR code to see the
website on your smart-
phone!
Wherever you go, what-
ever you do, take Citrus
County along with you!


M U
SS~int.

i .." t


Sunflower Springs Assisted Living

Facility hosts Business After Hours

About 75 people enjoyed music, food and camaraderie at the May 23
Business After Hours hosted by Sunflower Springs Assisted Living
Facility. The multi-level, vibrant community, located at 8733 W. Yulee
Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448, is known for keeping its residents busy with
indoor and outdoor activities, and attendees also enjoyed indoor gatherings
and outdoor music. The Sunflower staff once again offered wonderful food
in a beautiful presentation, in addition to drawings. If you are interested in
touring Sunflower Springs, please call 352-621-8017.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
Randy Hobson
Hobson's Herbs and More, Beverly Hills
\I / Z


ILj





On this week's
Chamber Chat ...
* Courtney Pollard co-hosts and talks about the
Business Leaders of Tomorrow. She shares
how this great local organization helps young
professionals with personal and professional
development.
* Iris Rodgers demonstrates the benefits of some
of her favorite products by Rodan + Fields. For
more information, visit www.rodgers.myrandf.com/.
* Rocky Hensley from Center State Bank shares
what "relationship banking" is all about and
why faith and family are at the heart of this
local institution.
* When school is over, that means the end of
regular meals for some Citrus County Stu-
dents. Kelly Niblett talks about the Summer
Feeding Program and shares how our children
can get a free breakfast and lunch during the
summer months. For more information, visit
www.cafe.citrus.kl2.fl.us.
You have three chances to watch Chamber
Chat: Monday at 6 p.m., Thursday at 8 a.m. and
Friday at 1 p.m.
If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat at no cost to you
- email Melissa Benefield at spotlightmelissa@
aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for
clips of past segments and updates on our
weekly show!


... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Wishing Cindi Fein
all the best in her
new position
Eighteen months ago, Cindi Fein walked into
our offices and brought excitement and new
programs to our Chamber members. Fueled by
Cindi's sometimes rather strong passion, we in-
troduced a mobile website that puts our members'
information in the hands of residents and visitors.
Another program interacting with the community
is the popular You Caught My Eye program,
where residents acknowledge excellent customer
service they encounter at a Citrus County Busi-
ness. Additionally, Cindi assisted in boosting the
community calendar on our website to drive more
traffic to our members. She will continue to give
back to the community in her new position with
United Way of Citrus County.


News you

can use
Glasswerx hosting
grand opening
Come join new Chamber
member Glasswerx as they
celebrate their new location
in the Shoppes of Heritage
Village, 619 North Citrus
Ave. in the little blue cot-
tage! Live demonstrations,
free raffles for stained glass
items, class of your choice,
games and prizes! Some-
thing for everyone, hope to
see you then! 352-586-8546
RSVP now for
Chamber, BWA
lunches
Remember to make your
reservations before noon
Thursday, June 13, for the
Chamber lunch on Friday,
June 14, at Plantation on
Crystal River. Log in under
the Members Onlytab at www.
citruscountychamber.com to
purchase prepaid tickets at
$18 per person or register to
pay at the door/by invoice
for $20. Nonmembers are
welcome to pay $22 at the
door. Call 352-795-3149.
Rebecca Bays will address
the Business Women's Al-
liance at its June 19 lunch at
Plantation on Crystal River.
Rebecca will be discussing
the Tourist Development
Council. RSVP at www.
citruscountychamber.com
or call 352-795-3149.
Scalloping season
begins July i
Make sure your summer
guests have made plans to
come enjoy the beauty of the
Nature Coast as the 2013
Scalloping Season begins.
Scalloping information is
available at the Chamber of
Commerce office and the TDC.
Register for
Business Expo now
and get a discount
Celebrate Citrus County
business by exhibiting at or
attending the Sept. 7 Busi-
ness Expo. The Chamber will
host this event at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds. Visit us
at www.citruscountychamber
.com/expo for detailed infor-
mation on exhibiting and/or
sponsorship opportunities.
Register prior to June 20
and receive discounted pric-
ing! Call Jeff Inglehart at
352-795-3149.
HEALTH and
FITNESS Expo
taking registration
Make plans to be part of
the Women's HEALTH &
FITNESS Expo, hosted by
the Business Women's Al-
liance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, on
Saturday, Sept. 28, from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River. Take advantage of
paid preregistration until
June 18 and choose your
preferred exhibit space. After
June 18, registration will be
open to health-, fitness- and
wellness-related businesses
and organizations, on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Chamber members receive a
discount. Contact Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce at
352-795-3149, or any Business
Women's Alliance member.


Taverna Manos earns coveted 2013 TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence


T avema Manos has received
a TripAdvisor Certificate of
Excellence. The accolade, which
honors excellence in hospitality,
is given only to establishments
that consistently achieve out-
standing traveler reviews on
TripAdvisor, and is extended to
qualifying businesses world-
wide. Only the top-performing
10 percent of businesses listed
on TripAdvisor receive this
prestigious award.


To qualify for a Certificate of
Excellence, businesses must
maintain an overall rating of
four or higher, out of a possi-
ble five, as reviewed by travel-
ers on TripAdvisor, and must
have been listed on TripAdvi-
sor for at least 12 months. Ad-
ditional criteria include the
volume of reviews received
within the last 12 months.
"Taverna Manos is pleased
to receive a TripAdvisor Cer-


tificate of Excellence," said
Deborah Manos, owner of
Taverna Manos. "We strive
to offer our customers a
memorable experience, and
this accolade is evidence that
our hard work is translating
into positive reviews on Tri-
pAdvisor."
"TripAdvisor is delighted to
celebrate the success of busi-
nesses around the globe, from
Sydney to Chicago, Sao Paulo


to Rome, which are consis-
tently offering TripAdvisor
travelers a great customer ex-
perience," said Alison Copus,
vice president of marketing for
TripAdvisor for Business. "The
Certificate of Excellence award
provides top performing estab-
lishments around the world
the recognition they deserve,
based on feedback from those
who matter most their cus-
tomers."


Certificate of Excellence
-- 2013 WINNER


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


I=ITiave Manos


- y






D4 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


BUSINESS


Business DIGEST


Elder care attorney
Clardy receives
national recognition
Crystal River Elder Law Attorney
John Clardy is the Florida recipient
of the National Academy of Elder
Law Attorneys (naela.org) Outstand-
ing Chapter Mem-
ber Award.
Through com-
mittee and pro-
gram participation,
John has distin-
guished himself by
making excep-
John Clardy tional contributions
to the needs of older Floridians and
by demonstrating an extraordinary
commitment to the Academy of
Florida Elder LawAttomeys (afela.org).
He is recognized by his peers as a model
of an outstanding lawyer and leader.
Clardy is also is the incoming chair-
man of the Florida Bar's Elder Law
Section and is very involved in the
Real Property Probate and Trust Law
Section, ensuring that the elder care
perspective is heard and considered
in many of that section's committees.
John is board certified by the Florida
Bar in elder law, an active member
of his local Rotary club and volun-
teers his time to community service.

Capital City Bank group
donates $7,000
Each year, the Capital City Bank
Group (CCBG) Foundation donates
funds to charitable organizations in
the communities it serves. During
this year's cycle, the CCBG Founda-
tion reinvested $7,000 into the com-
munities of Citrus County by way of
grants awarded to the Citrus Hearing
Impaired Program Services, Eckerd
Youth Alternatives, Friends of the Floral
City Library, Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County, Nature Coast Ministries,
St. Anne's Counseling Center, The


Associated Press
Capital City Bank business banker David Caldwell and Capital City
Bank President of Citrus/Inglis Ray Thompson present a grant award
to E. George Rusaw, president of Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County.


Path of Citrus County, United Way of
Citrus County and We Care Food
Pantry. The grants provided by the
CCBG Foundation help these organ-
izations enhance the lives of thou-
sands of local citizens.
"While our bankers work to build
strong relationships, the Capital City
Bank Group Foundation works to
build strong communities," said Ray
Thompson, Capital City Bank presi-
dent of Citrus/Inglis.

Susan Zimmer earns
tai chi certification
Dr Susan Zimmer has earned cer-
tification as a tai chi instructor, com-
pleting a course sponsored by the
Florida Department of Health taught
by Dr. Fuzong Li from the Oregon
Research Institute.
Dr. Zimmer was first introduced to
tai chi in 1987 while studying acupunc-
ture and herbs in China. Dr. Zimmer
worked in hospitals alongside Chi-
nese doctors, where tai chi is regu-
larly practiced and prescribed.
Dr Zimmer teaches tai chi at the
West Citrus Community Center. For
more information, call 352-795-3831.


This class is ongoing, can be started
anytime, can be done standing or
seated.

Christian Grause
obtains certification
Dr. Christian Grause has obtained
the postgraduate designation of Cer-
tified Chiropractic Sports Physician
(CCSP) by the American Chiroprac-
tic Board of Sports Physicians
(ACBSP). The CCSP certification re-
quires the doctor to attend a mini-
mum of 100 hours of a 120-hour
postgraduate program. This instruc-
tion is specific to physical fitness and
the evaluation and treatment of in-
juries encountered in sports.
This training will aid Dr. Grause in
the prevention and treatment of athletic
injuries by enhancing his diagnostic
skills and patient care. The CCSP ac-
creditation exists to provide a uniform
standard of education that assumes
teams and athletes that the doctor
has met a minimum level of compe-
tency in chiropractic sports medicine.
For more information, call Terry at
Kinnard Chiropractic Clinic at 352-
726-554.


*Chrotn icle





Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


0.
16ax (5)663565 1 ol.re: .88)85-24 1Em il*las0idscho 0ceol 0eco Iw6ste w wchonc 0olie 0o


May the Sacred Heart of
Jesus be adored, glori-
fied, loved and pre-
served throughout the
world now and forever.
Sacred Heart of Jesus,
pray for us. Workers of
Miracles, pray for us.
St. Jude, helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
Say this prayer 9 times
a day, by the eight day
your prayer will be an-
swered. Publication
must be promised. SB.


WWM Libra mid 60's
good looking, physically
fit, various interests ISO
SWF n/s Nice Figure,
weight prop height, a
little extra ok, 58-72 for
LTR. Recent photo, will
rtn. Serious inquiries
only. No games.
Please mail letter of
interest to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429 Blind Box 1831 P





3 Sliding Glass Doors
Heavy Duty, 4ft x 8ft
$50. ea
(352) 212-5747


CLOCK REPAIR
35 Yrs. exp. House
calls, all brands serviced
George 352-794-3512


0-





FOR SALE BY
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
SAT. JUNE 29th,
12 PM
Preview Day of Sale
From 11:00 AM
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctloneers.com


Ne


FORD
94 Lincoln
Continental, White 4
door $900, run good
352-621-4742
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Live in Care Giver
for your loved ones,
Excellent References
Call Joyce Ann (local
res.) 850-661-1312
Sofa
Beige linen, weave, with
end chaise, and queen
pull out bed like new
$425 (352) 795-7424



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Riding
Mowers, Lg BBQ Grills
8ft satellite Dishes
& MORE 352-270-4087



CAT
1 female, short hair,
14 yrs old, fixed, very
loving, needs a good
home, moving
can't take her with us
352-419-5191
Free 2 yr. old
spade, Female Calico
Cat. please call
352-527-1928
FREE KITTENS
6 weeks old, litter
trained 352-212-4061
Free to Good Home
2 Dogs, Jack Russell
mix w/pitbull 1 yr. old
and Lab Mix, 12 wks old
352-249-7491
Free to Good Home
5 yr old female neu-
tered Chatahoula
Leopard, brown multi,
needs acreage to run.
(352) 465-0812
Young Male,
neutered,
Part Bengal Cat
must have Vet
References, free
to a good home
352-464-1567



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct @ $5.001b.
** (352) 897-5388**
Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistymeadows-
blueberryfarm.com


Cocker Spaniel
Female white & tan,
2yrs old, purple collar,
lost on Cardinal on
5/19 (727)-947-0347
Female Cat
Black & White,
Declawed ft.paws, micro
chipped, spayed lost in
the are of Paradise
Point/Cutler Spur in
Crystal River pIs call
352-257-3261
Female Cat
strawberry blond
w/fluffy tail, 1% yr. old
lost in the vicinity of
Seven Rivers & Golf
Course Drive. Please
Return grandkids miss
her! REWARD
352-302-3850
Lost 2 Pitt Bull Mixes
White, Inside dogs
very friendly
off Marlin Point
Floral City Call
Tom352-342-5141
Lost Cockatiel
Yellow head gray
body and orange
cheeks, Citrus Ave
Crystal River Area
Broken Hearted
Call (352) 228-4417
Short hair cat,
Small White with some
gray, Female
Citrus Hills Area
(352) 270-8254
Siamese male cat
(neutered), tan with
brown points and blue
eyes, approximately 7
years old, lost in Pine
Ridge Subdivision,
Beverly Hills, FL.
Please call
512.966.9620.
Thank you!



Found Chihuahua
Mix, white, female,
black harness,
Mini Farms Area
352-257-5670
Found Veteran Cap
on Yulee Drive
Homosassa
Call to Identify
(352) 563-5226
Husky Shephard
Mix, Brown, found
near Dunkin Donuts
in Crystal River,
please call
352-257-4125




Tupperware
Call Fran Smith May
is Birthday month lots
of great specials
352-746-3652




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct @ $5.001b.
** (352) 897-5388**


HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person









I |IIIIIIII |

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On[y $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




Dental Assistant

EFDA Certified,
experienced only,
Excellent Salary
Parttime Only ,
Call or Fax Resume
Call (352) 344-4747
Fax (352) 344-1942

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoll@
yahoo.ocom


Care Givers
Activity Coordinator
forALF must have good
references, must apply
in person call 344-5555
ext 102 for appointment

DOCTORS ASSIST
Needed
Must Draw Blood
EKG & Injections
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1832M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River Fl. 34429

FT/ HYGIENIST
NEEDED
Crystal River Office,
Benefits and Bonus
Offered.
Please Fax Resume
352-263-2756
or Email VDCSH@
hotmail.com

Medical Careers
begin here
Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN/LPN, PTIA
OTIA, CNA & ST.
Psyche RN
Exp. Marketer

for Citrus & Hernando
wanted 352-794-6097


BOOKKEEPER
CPA Firm Full-time,
Experienced in
client write-up, A/R,
A/P, depreciation
and Quickbooks.
Reliability & punctu-
ality very important.
Must have excellent
customer relation
skills. Salary DOE
w/benefits.
Fax Resume to
795-1133 or email to
ppricecp@
tampabay.rr.com



Certified
Activities
Coordinator
The Centers is
seeking an Activities
Coordinator.
Independent Contrac-
tor for up to 20 hours
per week, & may
consider part-time
employment. SIGN
ON BONUS for
availability to start
immediately. Must be
eligible for or have
current ADC Certifica-
tion. This position will
provide direct
services, training &
consultation for Adult
Psychiatric Unit in a
Crisis Stabilization
facility to clients and
staff. Must be skilled
in writing individual-
ized &/or group activity
plans for special
needs population
(mentally ill, substance
abuse, MR).
Please submit salary
requirements.
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


NOW HIRING / ,/. d


One of the top home health care
companies in America is interviewing
candidates for the following position
in Ocala/Citrus, FL:

CERTIFIED BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH NURSE
Excellent Advancement Opportunity
High Competitive Salary Benefits
Apply online at www.angmarholdings.com

For more information contact: Cindy Perdue
P: 352-854-2041 Fax resume's to: 352-854-9012


An gels


AIRLINE CAREERS
Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL
Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769

Citrus County
Clerk of Courts

is seeking a
Financial Analyst
position. Bachelor's
degree required;
CPA is preferred.
55,806-89,523
DOQ/E. Apply on line
httpJ/wvw.derk.citrus.us
Cbsing date
6/12/13. If questions,
call 352-341-6483

Customer
Service
Specialist
Need outstanding
phone report. Good
judgement, Experi-
ence scheduling
mobile work force.
Established company
w/ great benefits.
Please mail resume
to: Blind Box 1830P
CC Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
FL 34429

Engineering
Inspector
Announcement
# 13-28
Advanced and
technical field
inspection and
office related work
in connection with
civil engineering
construction proj-
ects, road and avia-
tion construction
and road resurfac-
ing for Engineering
and Public Works
projects. A minimum
of five years'
experience in civil
engineering and
construction man-
agement. Starting
pay $13.07 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, June 7, 2013
EOE/ADA.


Sheriffs
Ranches
Enterprises

Assistant
Store
Manager

High School
diploma or equal
with 2 yrs.
Retail Mgmt
experience.

Full-time
position
Excellent
benefits

Apply in person.
Thrift Store
in Crystal River
200 US HWY 19
Crystal River FL
34428
e (352) 795-8886
EOE/DFWP






Exp Tree Climber

352-302-5641


Experienced
Stucco Laborers
& Plasterers
352-621-1283


Firework Crew
NEEDED
Training avail. 4 to 5
people. Sales exp.
a plus. Commission,
Background check
Email Application
greenunlimited
@yahoo.com
352-464-1416








NEW
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough & Trim,
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT,
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit4
Wildwood


QUALIFIED
SERVICE TECH

Experience Only and
current FL Driver's Li-
cense a must. Apply in
person: Daniel's Heating
& Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

Scoggins Chevy
Buick,
Chiefland
is growing and we
are looking for a
Transmission Drivea-
bility Issues Techni-
cian. GM training a
plus. We offer Top
Pay, based on ex-
perience, Health,
Dental and Vision
beneifts and No
Weekends..
Email Resume To
kbelfry@ymail.com
or Call Kevin Belfry,
Service Manager at
352-493-4263

Subcontractor
Installer

Must have own tools
& vehicle. Lic/Ins.
w/ workmans comp.
Steady work
needs to be quality
conscious &
a self-starter. Pay
per job. Contact
DEEM CABINETS
Attn: Dave Foley
3835 S Pittsburgh
Ave. Homosassa

YOUR NEW DRIVING
JOB IS ONE PHONE
CALL AWAY!
Experienced CDL-A
Drivers and
Recent Grads -
Excellent Benefits,
Weekly Hometime.
Paid Training.
888-362-8608
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer




CDL DRIVER
With Class A license,
dry bulk tank, newer
equip., paid vac/Ins
wkly. minimum pay.
$$1,000.$$
SIGN ON BONUS
Contact Jerry @
(228) 257-9466
LEEDS Crystal River

P/T
Maintenance
60 Unit Apt complex
Inverness
Must have own tools
and dependable
transportation
352-726-6466
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer
Equal Housing
Opportunity


MONEY
Continued from Page C1

home loan to do so. I also need
to start up a retirement account
again. We exhausted our mea-
ger plans two years ago in the
purchase of our house.
I'm assuming a net income
around $40,000 going forward
(based on child support pay-
ments and the possibility of
freelance work drying up). I
have no car payments or credit
card debt. I still owe $20,000 in
school loans.
What percentage of this in-
come would you suggest for a
mortgage, and how much for re-
tirement savings? Beyond a
Roth IRA, what should I con-
sider? My current job has no
401(k) B.D., via email
DEAR B.D.: Slow down just a
little bit. You want to buy a
home, you want to start a re-
tirement account, but you owe
$20,000 in student loans. Let's
attack these one at a time.
If I were you, I would get into
the least expensive apartment
and concentrate on reducing
the student loans. You might
ask what difference it makes if
you reduce your school loans or
put money into a retirement ac-
count. The end result is the
same, but the likelihood is that,
considering the interest on the
loans, you will be far better off
to attack that problem first.
When you have the school
loans substantially paid down,
then you might want to con-
sider purchasing another home
or apartment.
DEAR BRUCE: Due to
health issues and associated
expenses, I have lost my means
of income and had to file bank-
ruptcy, which has included my
home. I am still in the house


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

awaiting foreclosure, which I
am told can take some time, de-
pending on the bank.
My attorney for the bank-
ruptcy advised that I continue
to pay insurance on the home
as long as I am occupying it. If I
am no longer making payments
on the house, do I still have an
"insurable interest" in the home?
Would it be more appropriate
to obtain coverage just for my
belongings, such as renter's in-
surance, or is that even a possi-
bility in a home that is not
technically being rented?
I don't object to paying the in-
surance, but I am not sure that
I would even be appropriately
covering the asset of the home
or my belongings. M.C., via
email
DEAR M.C.: You bring up an
interesting point: Do you have
an insurable interest? I don't
know the answer to that.
Technically, the home is still
in your name. I don't know how
you can qualify for renters in-
surance since you are not a ten-
ant at this point. The fact is, the
only question you're concerned
about is the building; you're
clearly interested in covering
the contents, and that has noth-
ing to do with the fact that the
home is being foreclosed upon.
You might wish to get an
opinion from a qualified insur-
ance agent or another attorney
Given the fact that this is a rel-
atively short proposition, I
would continue to carry the
regular insurance on the house,
and more important, on your
own property, and of course, li-
ability insurance.
0-
Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


--mm-9









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449

WRECKER
DRIVER

EXP'D ONLY need
apply. Must live in
Inverness area.
_Apply within_
Ed's Auto Repair.
4610 S. Florida Ave




Care Givers
Activity Coordinator

for ALF must have good
references, must apply
in person call 344-5555
ext 102 for appointment

KENNEL
WORKER

20 hrs/wk incl
Saturday/Sunday.
Must be independent
worker and able to
bathe and do nail
clipping on small and
large dogs. Prior
kennel experience
preferred.
Send resume to:
bonnieal5@yahoo.
corn OR to Resume,
PO Box 2283
Inverness FL 34451.

YARD/HOME
MAINTENANCE

Citrus Sorinas Area
PIT 2-3 full days
per week.
Call 352-522-1109
between 6om-9om.
If you called before,
call again. Must be
physically fit.




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294




BEAUTY SALON
FOR SALE
Established & Runn-
ing Fully stocked
Turn key $20,000
352-422-2960


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Longaberger
1993 Wildflower Basket
with Leather Handles
$40 352-628-9838
LONGABERGER
BASKET 1995 Tradi-
tions Family Basket with
Liner $40 628-9838

RECORDS
3 Boxes of 78 RPM
Records $50.00
352-746-5421




i


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
OnIy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


HAYWARD POWER
FLO LX POOL PUMP 1
HORSEPOWER USED
ONLY ABOUT YEAR.
$150.00 352-726-0686




AIR CONDITIONER
Trane XE 1000, heat
pump w/air handler
4 ton model EC
$550. 352-628-4210
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DISHWASHER
Kenmore, 6 years old,
black runs well and in
great condition. $75.00,
352-382-9052
KENMORE WASHING
MACHINE IN GOOD
CONDITION nice size
tub. $100.
352-513-4519
Large
Chest Freezer,
$175.
(352) 613-0539
OLDER MODEL
STOVE ALMOND
COLOR working condi-
tion $75. 352-513-4519
UPRIGHT CLEANER
Eureka Vacuum
Cleaner $10.00
352-746-5421
VACUUM CLEANER
Kenmore Upright
$25.00
352-746-5421
WASHER
$100 In perfect working
condition. 30 day war-
ranty call or text
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each.Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free
Delivery & Setup
352-263-7398




MOECKER
AUCTIONS
Bankruptcy Auction
L & H Electric, Inc.
June 6 @ 10am
9355 W. Okeecho-
bee Rd #13,
Hialeah, FI 33016
Electrical Contract-
ing Company as-
sets: Bobcat,
VehiclesTrailer,
Tools, Greenlee
Cable Puller 6800,
Transfer Switches,
Inventory,
Job Boxes, Testing
Equip., Generators,
Welders & More!
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
10%-13%BP, $100 ref.
cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
Chapter 7
Case No.:
13-14294-RAM
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin


BLACK @ DECKER
AIR SPRAYER $30
NEVER USED IN BOX
INVERNESS 419-5981
DEK 5KW GAS
POWERED PORTA-
BLE GENERATOR.
$200. Bought in 2005,
infrequently run. Phone:
757-617-2285
Little Giant
20 22ft Ext. Ladder
like new $100.
352-382-7115
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HEAVY
DUTY OLDER MODEL
MADE OF METAL IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
ROUTER
Black & Decker Brand
New in Box. Never
used $45 352-746-5421




DISC PLAYER JVC
XL-M Compact Disc Au-
tomatic Changer $40.00
352-746-5421
Home Theatre
amplifier/receiver $20.
352-419-4464
PROJECTOR
8mm Keystone Movie
Projector $100.00
352-746-5421
Speakers
Pair $20.
352-419-4464
Speakers
Pair $5
352-419-4464




Double French Doors
2 Sets 2/8 wood inte-
rior w/ frames
6/8high, 4/9/16 frame
$400. ea set.
(352) 503-6537
SINK
white porcelain, new,
never used, ($20)
352-613-7493
STAINLESS DOUBLE
KITCHEN SINK
W/MOEN FAUCET
W/DISP.R $100.
352/628-0698.




50" HITACHI TV 1995
Vision. Need truck to
move. 43" W x 51" H.
$50.00 call Ruth
352-382-1000
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




4 GLASS TOP TABLES
1 sofa tbl, 1 coffee tbl,
2 end tbl.s $25
352-860-0444
4 Living Room Chairs,
formal and casual
1 Recliner
$75.ea
(352) 613-0539


CLASSIFIED




CABINETS wood
cabinets great for stor-
age $8.00 each. call
352-257-3870
48" round oak claw
foot, table w/ 24" leaf,
6 matching
spindle back chairs
Reduced $125. for all
(352) 464-0680
Amish Oak
pedestal Table
w/ Two 12" Leaves,
36" x 48"/60" Excellent
Cond. Org. Cost $800
Asking $300
Call (352) 637-5227
BEAUTIFUL TRADI-
TIONAL SOFA perfect
will send pic $100.00.
352-257-3870
BroyHill Dining room
set, med color wood,
2 leaves, 6 uphost. seat
chairs; china hutch 50
in. wide, exec. cond.
$500 (352) 634-1723
DINING TABLE DROP
LEAF NO CHAIRS
heavy oak has nick on
top can be fixed.$45.00
352-513-4519
Entertainment Ctr
Am Signature, 10 ft
wide, black w/coffee
table $900. Elegant
curved cherry com-
puter desk & chair
$300 (352) 746-3417
Extra Long Twin
Seally Posturepedic
Mattress with/
Wood Headboard &
Frame $125.
(352) 628-2346
Furniture for sale
Love Seat $75, Recliner
$20, Couch w/qu bd,
$200, Tbl solid wood,
w/4 chairs w/wheels
$250 or w/matching TV
hutch $325,2 twin bd
$25 ea 863-661-6220
HAND-PAINTED
"ROOSTER" SIDE
CHAIR NEW OAK-
$75.00 352-382-4911
LIVING ROOM
SUITE:sofa and love
seat,coffee,wall,2 end
tables and lamp
included.Exc.cond.$235.
Call 352-382-1154
NICE LIGHT COLORED
FOYER OR SOFA
TABLE will take $30.
352-513-4519
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Sectional Show Case
3 pieces $375, 1 metal
receptionist desk $115
352-270-8503
SOFA BED like new
hardly used $100.00
call 352-257-3870
Sofa
Beige linen, weave, with
end chaise, and queen
pull out bed like new
$425 (352) 795-7424
Sofa Table,
3 End Tables &
Coffee Table,
Lazy Boy Sectional,
$225. for All
(352) 527-0239


SUNDAY,JUNE 2, 2013 D5


SOLID WALNUT
CHILDS ROCKER
REALLY NICE $30.
352-513-4519
Square Dinette
Solid oak table w/4 inlay
padded chairs, unique
design, painted white
$200 OBO 422-0463
TOY ORGANIZER for
kids room, 9 bins, pri-
mary colors, good
shape, ($10)
352-613-7493
TRADITIONAL LOVE
SEAT AND CHAIR
pretty nice for $50.00
call 352-257-3870
Walnut Buffet
with server top, exec.
cond. $500
352-344-9384




SOLD *
JOHN DEER LT133
13 HP Kohler, 38"
mulch cutting deck, 140
total hrs. since new
$500
46" Riding lawn mower
Cub Cadet,$ 1,350.
6V/2 HP, Self Propelled
Mower $224.
(352) 564-1106
2535 N Crede Ave, CR
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Bowlins Riding Mower
38" Deck, 15'/2 HP
Briggs & Straton
Engine
$350.
352-746-7357
CRAFTSMAN
6.0 Briggs & Stratton.
21" cut, self propelled,
walk behind w/ bag.
Excellent Condition
$160 352-422-0584
ELECTRIC
LAWNMOWER.
$100,Heavy-duty 22"
Black & Decker like
new, 352/ 628-0698
PREFORMED
GARDEN POND
4'LX3'WX18"D 50.00
OBO INVERNESS
352-560-7857
TILLER
Craftsman rear tine,
14 inch w/ reverse.
Like New. $350
(352) 621-3929



BOYS BABY CLOTHES
from 3mths to 3T like
new .25 $3. like new.
call 352-257-3870



3 Sliding Glass Doors
Heavy Duty, 4ft x 8ft
$50. ea
(352) 212-5747
Adult Exercise Bike$50,
electric scooter $275,
walker w/wheels and
grocery cart$10,
352-637-3067


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BREADMAKER Good
condition, Otis, hardly
used, $15
(352)465-1616
CAMERA LENS Vivitar,
70-210 MM lens for
Canon 35mm camera,
$25. 352-382-9052
CANON CAMERA
Canon T50 35MM
camera with Sigma
lens. $25, call
352-382-9052
DVD/MP3 PLAYER
KOSS DVD & MP3
PLAYER, SLIM TYPE
352-419-5549
Electric Ceramic Kiln,
200W, $200
19" Zenith Color TV
with VHS player &
Stand $150.
(352) 527-7223
FASTEST INTERNET!
Bundles with
DIRECT
30day no risk...no
money down trial.
Let us earn your
business before you
sign a contract.
21stCentury
Communications
386-269-9784

FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct 0 $5.001b.
(352) 897-5388**
FORD
1994 F150 Pickup.
Extended Cab, 8ft bed
w/ tool box. A/C. PW.
$2300 (352) 489-0194
GENERATOR
Briggs & Stratton
EXL 8000, 13,500.
starting watts, electric
start & charger, 7 gal
fuel tank, 4, 15 amp
outlets 1, 30 amp outlet,
19hrs of runtime, yellow
cord & 3 gas cans,
Like New!
$850. 352-382-7115
GENERATOR
Power Boss 5500
10 hsp, B/S motor
25'cord set, new, never
used, price, $300.
352-613-7493
GENERATOR,
DuroStar DS4000S 7
HP,New never
used,2-20Amp,1-30Amp.3300
Watt
output,69dB,17H,17W,23L,
deal for
RV/Camping. $360,00.
352-637-1613
IRON HEADBOARD
Twin-sized headboard,
brand new, ne er used,
$15 (352)465-1616
KING, FULL, TWIN
METAL BED FRAMES
asking $25 and under.
352-513-4519
Luggage cart $10
mirror 27" 1/4 x 43"
$25, 2 gal pressure
spay & gas hedger wet
dry Vac $50.00 for all
352-637-3067


Medium-sized, ok for
both genders, black,
white, and green, $30
(352)465-1616
Musical Equipment
Mackie Pro FX8 Mixer
6 mo'sold $150.
QSC power amp, GX5
$250. 2 SP2G TV
speakers, $400. pair
352-220-3452
OUTDOOR GRILL
BBQ GnllWare, side
burner w/gas tank
$75. 352-746-7044
PLYLOX HURRICANE
CLIPS $7.50 PKG one
pkg covers 5 windows
352-794-3020 cell
586-4987
ROCKING HORSE Ok
condition, very strong,
lasts long, rocks by
rubber, $50
(352)465-1616



Rascal Scooter
Like New!
4 wheel, electric
w/ auto lift, $900.
352-794-3980
WHEELCHAIR
Oversized, Manual,
Exc Cond. $400
obo(352) 746-3268



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



BLACK IBANEZ
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/TUNER&PEARL
PICKGUARD $100
352-601-6625
BLACK SQUIRE
STRAT AFINITY
W/GIGBAG,STRAP
TUNER&CORD+CD
$85 352-601-6625
Discovery II organ by
Estey $10
352-419-4464
Guitar strap $2.
352-419-4464
HAMMOND ORGAN
300 Series with
matching bench
A-1 condition cabinet &
electronics with built
in Leslie Speaker
$200 will deliver Citrus
County 628-9838 or for
pics email: tommyb@
tampabay.rr.com
M-Audio key studio 49
key controller $15.
352-419-4464
Technics KN-750
music keyboard $30.
352-419-4464
TOP DRUM 14X16
USED IN GOOD
CONDITION Pearl gray
Remco skin. $60. obo
352-513-4519
TROMBONE Conn
Trombone $40.00
352-746-5421


EUREKA ATLANTIS
CARPET SHAMPOO
VAC retails for $280.00
sell for 40.00 call
352-257-3870
KITCHEN CANISTER
SET $10 DECORATIVE
CERAMIC 4 CONTAIN-
ERS WITH LIDS IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
NEW WHITE
VERTICAL BLINDS
SIZE 78X84 sell
individual or all three $25
each. 352-513-4519

-I

LAWN MOWER *
HONDA
21" Self Propelled walk
behind, like new. $200
OBO (352) 527-1287
Bench Mounted Drill
$60. Like New.
Cash only
(352) 341-1714
BowFlex XLT
like new,
$1000. obo
352-628-7633
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Excel. batteries, full
enclosure, exc. cond.
new tires, $1495.
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dunnellon Pawn
Fire Arms****Ammo
Mags****Since 1987
352-4894870
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Ammo-concealed clas-
ses 352-447-5595
Hand Saw
Black & Decker 1HP
$60; Black & Decker
hand Drill $60. Both
good Cond. Cash only
(352) 341-1714
James Anglin
Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in
Box with 2 mags
$189.00 352-419-4800
Lawn Mower
Gas Power $60.
Wheel Chair $60
Both in exc cond
Cash only
352-341-1714
Ocean Kayak
Prowler, Big Game
used very little, has
paddle, 12' 9" long x
34" wide, 691bs, $600.
352-726-1811
SINGLE BIKE RACK IN
GOOD CONDITION
asking $25.
352-513-4519




Heavy Duty Open
Home Made Trailer
fits a Gold Wing
motorcycle has 14"
wide tires $600 OBO
(352) 613-4127


tnieae Dir reo ry


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Care for the Elderly
& Sick in your home,
15 yrs exp. Errands,
Appts. Cleaning
352-637-6729
CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins.
Will Care For You &
Assist in Daily Needs
**352-249-7451**
Home Health Care
position wanted. Pro-
vide services for eld-
erly and disabled. Ref
Avail (352) 419-8387
Live in Care Giver
for your loved ones,
Excellent References
Call Joyce Ann (local
res.) 850-661-1312




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518









#1Employment

S source is...






www chronlcleonlhne cor


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 k**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A1 HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820

Lee k
CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
**352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Ace The Test
Math Tutoring
352-249-6790 acethe
test03@amail.com



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641



"Full Lawn Service**
Hedgetrim, Hauling
Available !! Free Esti-
mates. 352-344-9273


AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-7944118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



CLOCK REPAIR
35 Yrs. exp. House
calls, all brands serviced
George 352-794-3512



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Al HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135











Equipment & Repairs
Heaters & Salt Units
CPC 051584/Insured
352-422-6956




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



26 YRS EXP. Tree Serv.
Removal, Stump
grinding, trim., hauling
Tom (352) 726-1875
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
JH Tree Services
Free Estimates!
TrimmingRemoval,
Dump Runs & More
**352-257-9555**
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S Repairs
S:* Small Carpentry
P Fencing
Screening
(lean Dryer
ft Vents
A.,dat-.le & Dependable
[perience lifelong
3 52344-0905
cell' 400-1722
sured Lic. #37761





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
SPools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
S -1 *. Residential &
. i ... Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


DRYEVENLAING


GENERAL :
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

I Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians"
ER0015377

352-6211 248


&&de nce 'thoi g






Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com l
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429

(352) 639-1024
S LICENSED & INSURED





Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
LLic #0CC1325497

0A JOHNSON

MACROOFING INC




TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
Free In Home- Estimates
Lifetime Warranty on Stretchina

SUoholsterv Cleanina
Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces


0,9. n ,,1-2 Ij


AAA ROOFING
Call the ak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate
-------------------

O$100 OFF:
:Any Re-Roof:
I Must present couponattimecontract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 OOOF3BF


WINDOW
GENIE.
We Ceana Windows and a Whole Lot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnrnghill


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
I or pool or plan
something
i completely new!


never duplicated"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST

SCORPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC

& Insured 352-400-3188









D6 SUNDAY,JUNE 2, 2013


NEWENCLOSED
8.5' x 20'
CAR HAULER
$3990. 352-564-1299



BABY SWING BLUE 5
SPEED like new and
very clean $20.00 call
352-257-3870
Step 2 Deluxe Play
Kitchen New Condition,
REALISTIC SOUNDS
Accessories Included
$100
352-270-3253

Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




BEAUTY SALON
FOR SALE
Established & Runn-
ing Fully stocked
Turn key $20,000
352-422-2960


KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year,
Specializing in color and
highlights $39 hair color
special $39 Facial spe-
cial call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weeblycom




Leeak
2 COCKATIELS FREE
1 male and 1 female.
Non breeding pair,with
cage. Cage is 5 feet x 2
feet x 2 feet. Owners
moving and they need a
loving, attentive home.
Call 352-613-6525 or
352-410-9875
4 Blue Headed
Amazon's $400 obo ;
4 Sun Conure's. $300
obo. All Hand Fed
Babies (352) 382-2233
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
Bunnies for
Sale
All Colors
$15 ea.
352-697-9187
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
3 Males & 1 Female,
Blue Carriers Available
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
MALTI-POO PUPPIES
Addorable, non shed,
great disposition
Health certificates
$350.
(352) 795-5204
Shepherd Mix,
Her name is Daisy
Color is Blond, 3 yrs old,
spayed, UTD on Shots
Micro Chipped, lovable,
house trained,
Fence Yard Needed
moving can't keep
needs loving home
(863) 661-6220
Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
Yorkshire Terriers
Male Puppies, 8 wks
$650. Shots, Health
cert., parents on site
Lecanto 727-242-0732

^^^^^^75


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onmy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



MERCURY 2000,
8HP, Short Shaft
Very Clean, $800
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419


New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45' Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299
TROLLING MOTOR
Bow Mt. Minn Koda,
48" Shaft, 55 lb thrust,
W/ Minn Koda battery
charger, Weedless
Prop. $550
(352) 795-4259




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*"352-563-5510"
21 FT PROLINE CC
Full Transom175 John-
son; with aluminum
trailer, radio, fish finder,
bimini $5500 726-4517
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/tnm 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
Classic Mako
20 ft Honey Pot, all teak,
good condition, 150
Evenrude 1993, well
maintained, good trailer,
Nice Boat. Extra's.
$5200. obo
(352) 795-1546
SEA EAGLE
2008 10.6 SR Inflatable
boat, canopy, foot
pump, oars, hard plastic
floor, bow bag, transom
wheels, cover, carry
bag.$1500
352-601-5545
STAR CRAFT
16ft, Very good cond.
New 15HP Merc. Eng.
electric start $2,995.
(352) 621-0896
Sweetwater
18 Ft Pontoon, 60 HP
yamaha with trailer, &
custom cover $5600
476-1113/513-5135


SYLVAN PON-
TOON FOR SALE
2005 820 20' Pontoon
with 50 hp 4-stroke
Yahama. Low hours of
use. Good condition.
Asking Price: $8500
Email
warneboat@gmail.com
for questions
TRIUMPH 190
2002, Center console,
115 yamaha motor
$8900 352-795-1923
or 605-351-1419


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




06 Winnebago
29' site seerer, class A,
loaded 19k mi, 2 slides,
new tires, exec cond.
$46,500 270-8475
Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072

RV HOTLINE
1-800-262-2182
A's, C's, B's,
B+'s, TT, 5th
WWW.RVWORLD
INC.COM
R.V. World Inc. of
Nokomis
2110 US 41
Nokomis, Fl
1-75 Exit 195W
to 41N

THE EGG
2007, all Elec; fiber-
glass, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
sleeps 3, $12,500
352-419-8366
256-244-6377




WANTED
CLEAN USED VAN
CAMPERS
CASH OR CONSIGN
TOP DOLLAR
CALL MARK
SANTANGELO
1-800-262-2182




AMERICA LITE
'05, Gulfstream, 24 ft.
Sleeps 5, Very nice
$11,000
(352) 795-6361


CAMPER
28 FT. Sleeper, Fixer
upper, toilet, kitchen,
bathrm, Bdrm. Good
cond. $400. 419-5387
e, Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like
new, NADA $29K,
Reduced $19,900
352-382-3298


5th Wheel, 30 ft, Triple
Slide, Exc Condition
$16,500. 352-795-1923
or 605-351-1419
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
REAL LITE
1998, 12 ft slide in
pickup camper $6900
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
TRAVEL TRAILER 26'
2005 Springdale by
Keystone with slide,
queen bed, sleeps 8,
ducted A/C, tub with
shower, good condition.
$6700 352-464-1622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE
$500-$1,500 Down
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




BIG SALE
$500-$1,500 Down
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
BUICK
97 LE SABRE, loaded
125k mi., very nice
cond. asking $1875.
352-637-2588 or
845-588-0759


CLASSIFIED


-m-
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th
anniversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles, immaculate,
loaded,call for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2003, Impala LS
$5,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2008, Impala LT
$8,750.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
89 Corvette
blue, $7500
352-621-0658
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
94 Lincoln
Continental, White 4
door $900, run good
352-621-4742
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
2008, Spectra, Auto
4 DR, $5,850
352-341-0018
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
MAZDA
1994,626,
63k Miles, $2,995
352-341-0018


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JUNE, 2nd
1-800-438-8559

FORD
1966 Mustang
289-auto, 67k mi.
great, cond. $7200.
obo 352-438-8346

FORD
1995 MUSTANG 5.0
Loaded, 56k original
miles, leather interior,
exc. inside/outnew
tires, V8, $12,500
352-527-6988

MUSTANG
GT 03 63,600K,
Showcar, Supercharger,
lots of goodies!
Chrome, $14,500 obo
352-228-4012







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
OnIy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


-m-
BIG SALE
$500-$1,500 Down
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

DODGE
2000,Dakota SLT
ex cab $2,895.
352-341-0018

DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100

TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100




GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100

MERCEDES-BENZ
2002 ML500
$7,500.00
(352)-270-7420


TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100

TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100




JEEP
1982 CJ5, red, 4 spd
new tires, good cond.
2 soft tops, $5000. obo
(352) 322-5509




2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10" lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306

CHEVROLET
2003 Astro Van,
113,750 miles, Well
maintained, Gold, 4.3L
V6, Seats 8, Great for
cargo, 6000 pound tow
package, Rear air/heat/
speakers, Power
windows/locks, Clean,
$5395.00 Call
352-212-9395

CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment




309-0609 SUCRN


DODGE
2010 Grand Caravan
SXT, 41k mi. auto,
roof rack, Sirrus radio.
$16,800. 352-634-3333

FORD
1991 Club Wagon
Equipped with Handi-
capped driver features
w/lift, newer engine
exec. cond. $3500 OBO
305-746-5399




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492








HARLEY
'04, Fat Boy, 14,843 mi.
mint condition, cus-
tom paint, Upgrades
$12,999, 352-302-1507

Harley Davidson
2004 883 Sportster, w/
screaming eagle pkg,
Low Mi, Ex cond $4900
352-563-5552,
464-7005

VICTORY
Cory Ness Special
Edition, 1 owner, 1,300
mi, new $25K, asking
$15,000. 908-500-4251

YAMAHA
'03 V-Star, 1100 CC,
Silverado pkg, 42,000
mi., like new $3600
obo (989) 928-6919


Elliott, William File No: 2013-CP-131 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
IN PROBATE FILE NO.:2013-CP-131
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM EDDY ELLIOTT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of WILLIAM EDDY ELLIOTT, deceased, whose date
of death was November 28, 2012 and whose Social Security Number was
xxx-xx-8184, File Number 2013-CP-131, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
Al creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 2,2013.
/s/ELIZABETH ANN BAYLISS
Personal Representative
DEAN AND DEAN, L.L.P.
BY: /s/Susan E. Dean, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 746827
230 Northeast 25th Avenue, Ocala Florida 34470
(352) 368-2800, eservice@deananddean.net
Attorney for Personal Representative
June 2 & 9, 2013


308-0616 SUCRN
MEDICAL OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE
This shall constitute notice pursuant to FL. Admin. Code 64B5-17.001, THURSDAY,
JUNE 20, 2013, DR. NICHOLAS C. PLESKOVICH of WELL ADJUSTED CHIROPRACTIC
located at 6565 W Norvell Bryant Highway, STE B, Crystal River, FL 34429, regretably
announces the closing of his Chiropractic Office. Patients may request a copy of
their medical records or request that records be sent to another provider by calling
24 hours in advance. The patient may be billed for the actual costs incurred for
copying, mailing or delivering the records as permitted by law or insurance carrier.
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 26, June 2,9, & 16,2013.


*I
I# ..- = -.



each ^ C IT R U S C 0.UCNOU N T Y
jtO f For more information on how to reach CITRUS COUNTYL
Citrus County Readers call
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
S-rbugh 2M


302-0602 SUCRN
Notice of Intent
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO FILE AN APPLICATION TO REPLAT
Pursuant to F.S. 177.101 (4) Alton R. Pierce, Sr., Trustee of the Pierce Trust UTD, gives
notice of its intent to apply Citrus County, Florida for a replat of N. Seminole Street
located in Section 31, Township 19S, Range 17E, and more particularly described as
follows:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE NORTHEAST 14 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 19SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS;
THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF THE TOWN OF
HOMOSASSA, FLORIDA, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 6, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE "OLD MAP", BOUNDED AS
FOLLOWS: ON THE SOUTH BY A PROLONGATION OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SEMINOLE
AVENUE, ON THE EAST BY BAY STREET, AND ON THE NORTH AND WEST BY HOMOSASSA
RIVER, SAID LANDS BEING SITUATE IN GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST.
CONTAINING 1.0 ACRES MORE OR LESS.
Notice given by:
Alton R. Pierce, Trustee
Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Counsel for Applicant
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle on May 19 and June 2, 2013.


306-0602 SUCRN
6/13/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, June 13, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
June 2, 2013

310-0602 SUCRN
06/12 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least
one day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC:
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the
proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of
the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) fime in the Citrus County Chronicle, June 2, 2013

311-0602 SUCRN
TBARTA MEETING NOTICES
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning
Organization (TPO) Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and Citizens
Advisory Committee (CAC) will meet on Wednesday, June 12, 2013 in Room 280 at
the Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461,
to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization. The TAC will meet
at 1:00 pm and the CAC will meet at 3:00 pm.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning
Organization (TPO) Board will hold a meeting on Thursday, June 20, 2013 at 5:15 pm
in Council Chambers at the Inverness Government Center, 212 W. Main Street,
Inverness, Florida 34450, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning
Organization.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodalon at this meelng because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's
Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
(2) days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
Telephone (352) 341-6580.
f a person decides to appeal any dedsion made by the Transportalon Flaming
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY:/S/Sheila Martin, Planning and Administration, TBARTA
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Cronicle May 31 2013.


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PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


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E2 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


g "B I N1 !1 EA5TIOR


DISTINCTIVE WATERFRONT POOL HOME
This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home features gleaming oak floors,
stunning staircase, & inviting giving room leading to the pool 00
spring-ed waters of Crysta River. Kitchen w/quartz counter-
tops, Kraftmaid cabinets, gas cooktop... other features: steam
shower in the master suite, loft, office, formal dining family
room w/gas fireplace, pool, terraced patio, 13,000 boat lift
and ust minutes to the bay and river with access to the Gulf.
Quality and style.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHommerich.com


211 S. JACKSON ST.
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2B CG On Extra Large Lot
* Newer Roof, AC, and Appliances
* Large Screened Patio Nice Neighborhood
* Well-Maintained Circular Driveway
PETER & MARVIA KOROL !Tl
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875








6145 W. RIO GRANDE DR.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG New Construction Now Ready
* Uving RM + Fam. RM *2,464 SF Living Area
* Choose Your Own Appliances, Fans & Fixtures
Call Listing Agent for Details
PETER & MARVIA KOROL -
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Corian counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/16,000 Ib lift Call
for your private showing now
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net








HERNANDO!!
WATER VIEW, 2 BEDROOM,
1 BATH SINGLEWIDE WITH
LARGE ROOM ADDITION, INSIDE
UTILITY, SHED, PAVED ROADS.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com i 1 1


ULtAIVItW :IAlt51 :AUII WIIH PUUL
*Well-kept 3 BR, 2 Bath *2 Car Garage
*2001 Citrus Hills Home Light & Bright Great Rm.
* Garden Tub & Shower Gorgeous Queen Palms
*1/2 Acre Lot Near Golf Course

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


Ii


1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


-1

1519 ROCK CRESS PATH
CRYSTAL RIVER
* Two Mobile Homes On One Lot
SEnd Of The Road and Almost An Acre
* Move-in Condition
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491
Email pjparvi@yahoo.com


1220 E. WHIRL AWAY
INVERNESS
* 3 Bed, 2 Bath Pool Home
* Corner Lot
*Citrus Hills
PAM ZADORIANY (941) 726-3491
Email: pparvi@yahoo.com








47 LENDER DR.
HOMOSASSA
*3 Bed, 3 Bath, Cabana Style Pool Home
* Remodeled
* Sugarmill Woods
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491 I! I
Email: pjparvi@yahoo.com


SHINY NEW METAL ROOF
* 145 Feet on the Water 2,200 Living Square Ft.
* Magnificent Open Water View 20x24 Detached Workshop
* Full Acre Lot Inground Pool
* 16x12 Observation Deck Boat House with New Roof
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolts@aol.com I NI
000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com U


CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcuningham@remax.net


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


SWEETWATER BEAUTY
* New Paint New Kitchen
*New Carpet Updated Baths
*2,290 Living Sq. Ft. Cul-De-Sac
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [
Email: sherylpotts@aol.comi
000dt48: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com U






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The basics of staking tomatoes


Growing them brings benefits,

but also responsibilities


LEE REICH
Associated Press

A month from now, don't
say I didn't warn you.
Tomato seedlings that
were planted neatly near
garden stakes are already
beginning to take matters
into their own hands, and
if allowed to grow willy
nilly will turn into a tan-
gled mass of vines with
tomato fruits many of
them rotting -hidden in a
dark jungle of stems. So, if
you were planning to stake
and prune your tomato
plants, start asserting
yourself now.
Tomatoes do not have to
be staked and pruned to
be grown well, but if you
planted them anything less
than 3 or 4 feet apart and
put stakes beside each
one, that obviously was
your intention.
What's at stake?
Staking is admittedly the
more troublesome way to
grow tomatoes. But in re-
turn for your troubles, you
reap earlier fruits, larger
fruits, cleaner fruits and
more fruits per square foot
of garden space. (Only so-
called indeterminate
tomatoes those whose
stems are forever elongat-
ing, as indicated on the


seed packet can be
staked.)
To keep the plants neat
through the season, the
stake has to be sturdy, no
smaller than an inch-and-
a-half-square piece of
wood, bamboo or metal
pipe. To accommodate
that ever-elongating
growth, a stake also must
be about 7 feet tall, enough
for one end to be plunged
solidly into the ground
while the other extends as
high as you can reach for
pruning, tying and
harvesting.
Ongoing pruning
OK, your stakes are in
the ground. Your tomatoes
are growing well and
you've been pruning them
by snapping off shoots,
called suckers, that appear
wherever a leaf meets the
single stem. So what more
do you need to worry
about?
Those tomato plants are
going to need more atten-
tion than you think. Turn
your back on them for
what seems like a few min-
utes, and already little
new suckers are picking
up steam. Or, the plant has
grown another 12 inches
and is starting to flop over
See STAKING/Page E5


B Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
'Realtor,, A HOUSE Realtor@
746,67 SOLDlame 287-9022L
hi lflan Pil WEEItC DERItV E BEniEDIV 111eBi


LEE REICH/Associated Press
A tomato sucker is shown in New Paltz, New York. Lopping the overgrown sucker off keeps the plant neat and
uncongested, which are long-term benefits that make this option best earlier in the season.


.' JOANN MARTIN
1 Preferredc
REAL ESTA TE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefm.net
I IW ^ I


2848 E Chartwell Cir., Hernando 248 E. Joplin Ct.
Beautiful 3 Bedroom 2 bath home with heated Hernando
caged in-ground pool, 3 car garage wood 1 i t n oi .
flooring, double pane, double hung windows on Elegant 3/3/3 with den/office.
private .47 acre in Canterbury Lakes Estates. Located on 6th fairway of the Oaks
Priced at 169,900.00 MLS #701542 Golf Course. Stainless steel
Directions: From 486 turn into Canterbury Lake appliances, summer kitchen.
Estates entrance. Stay on Canterbury Lake
Drive to left on Chartwell to #2848. Come see it today. $279,900


) "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"' @
NANCY Direct:
PONTICOS 3526344225
Multi-Million $$$ Producer RA KEY1 REALTYINC.
8015 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com


SERENE SOUTHERN WOODS BEAUTY! YOUR CHOICE PRIVATE & WOODED...
HEATED POOL/SPA + NEW SUMMER KITCHEN! OR ... CLEAR FOR GOLF COURSE VIEW!!
*3 Bed + Office/Den / 2-1/2 Baths / 3 CAR Garage New Roof Shingles 2011 $2,500 Bonus to Buyer
* Open Corian Island Kitchen 2012 New Heat Pump 3 Bed Open Great Room 31 x 10 Screened Porch
S$299,000 Mal S#703050 $157,500 MLS#703105
k eyviftualt M I11 On f I Y ? III LffTB


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thompson
tops
at Parsley
Parsley Real -
Estate an-
nounces that
their agent Deb
Thompson has Deb
sold more than Thompson
$1 million in Parsley Real
2013. Working Estate.
out of the Her-
nando office, Deb offers 22 years
of real estate experience.
Hoffmeister hits new
high for 2013
ERA Ameri-
can Realty &
Investments is
proud to an-
nounce the lat-
est production
level achieved
by one of its In-
verness office John
agents for Hoffmeister
2013. ERAAmerican
John Realty.
Hoffmeister
has surpassed $1 million in


closed sales volume in 2013.
ERAAmerican Realty is proud
to recognize the achievement of
this fine real estate professional.
Reach him at the Inverness office
of ERAAmerican Realty by call-
ing 352-726-5855.

FJOPMW I AS }


Tony
Viggiano
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Sherry
Potts
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX taps top
performers
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are proud
to announce that Tony Viggiano
and Sherry Potts have passed
the multimillion sollar mark in
sales volume this year.
Tony and Sherry join an elite
group of agents who have quali-
fied for this prestigious club. Tony


Linda Cheryl
Meahl Lambert
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
is a Realtor in the Homosassa
RE/MAX office and specializes in
Sugarmill Woods and the Ho-
mosassa area. Sherry works out
of the Crystal River office and spe-
cializes in residential real estate.
RE/MAX Realtors Linda
Meahl, Cheryl Lambert and
Dawn Wright have all qualified
for the 2013 million dollar club. All
three of these agents have closed
over a $1 million in sales volume
this year. Linda and Cheryl are
Realtors in the Inverness
RE/MAX office located on U.S.
41. Dawn works out of the Crystal
River office located on U.S. 19.
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One congratulate
these agents on their success.


EXIT recognizes
top agent
EXIT Realty
Leaders wishes
to congratulate
Nancy Little
Lewis for clos-
ing more than
$2 million so far
in 2013. 1
Nancy is a Nancy
powerhouse Little Lewis
broker associ- EXIT Realty.
ate who brings
a wealth of knowledge to every
transaction.
Reach her at 352-447-2595, or
visit her online at www.exit
realtyleaders.com.


Real Estate DIGEST


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MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129.000


I


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help en-
sure timely publication of submitted
material.
* Community notes: At least one week
in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday
for publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday
for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday
for publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publi-
cation Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for pub-
lication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for
publication Saturday.


E4 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


Vol W,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Make kebabs



for the kids


Getting kids to eat
healthy food during
summer can be a
challenge. The days are
longer, and of-
tentimes kids
will grab un-
healthy snacks.
Making and
serving food on
a stick is one
way to get them
to find meals or
snack time
more fun while
providing Sara
healthy options FRU
or a sweet treat LIV
that comes in a
smaller portion than an
ice cream cone or a bag of
chips.
The first reader shares
some ideas:
Kebabs: Using skewers
for food is fun during the
summer. Chunks of beef,
chicken, shrimp and veg-
gies are popular, but you
can make kebabs with
bratwurst, hotdogs or
sausage and veggies, all
fresh fruit, salad fixings
(think: hardboiled egg,
tomato, lettuce, cheese,
radishes, etc.), strawberry
shortcake (strawberries,
angel food cake or waffle
pieces, marshmallow,
chocolate), brownies or
mini muffins and fruit, an-
tipasto salads (use
tortellini or ravioli, olives,
cheese, salami, etc.), or
even sandwich kebabs
with deli meats and bread,
too.
Kids love eating food off
a stick, and a lot of differ-
ent foods don't even have
to be grilled they can be
just cut and layered on
skewers and served. -
Olivia, Maine
Make stock: When I buy
cooked chicken at Costco
(or make it fresh at home) I
strip the meat off and pres-
sure cook the leftover


I
I


bones and fatty parts. After
about an hour, I open it up
and let it cool. Then I
strain the liquid and
freeze it for
soup stock (no
salt).
What's left
over is so soft
that I grind it
down to a pulp
and feed it to
my two dogs
over the next
couple of days.
Noel Harvey H.,
GAL Arizona
ING A quickfix for
a cut or burn:
Use honey Honey has a
natural antibacterial prop-
erty and will prevent
infection.
I carry a small jar in my
backpack because it never
spoils! -M.E, Ohio
Volunteer and learn: I
helped a friend of mine
put new windows into a lit-
tle cottage she was going to
turn into a rental. I en-
joyed myself while learn-
ing some home-building
and construction skills. -
M.H., California
7-Up Biscuits:
4 cups Bisquick Bak-
ing Mix.
1 cup sour cream.
6 ounces 7-Up.
Place baking mix in a
mixing bowl, and cut in
sour cream until mix is
crumbly
Add 7-Up and combine
by hand. Don't over-han-
dle. Roll onto floured sur-
face to about 1/2-inch
thickness.
Drop or cut with biscuit
cutter and place on
greased baking sheet.
Bake at 400 degrees F
for 10 minutes or until
golden brown. Makes 15
biscuits. Holly, New
York


See FRUGALUPage E7


STAKING
Continued from Page E3

Time for another tier of soft twine
or a strip of cloth looped tightly
around the stake, then loosely
around the stem to hold it up.
Most frustrating is when you're
startled by a giant sucker, almost as
robust as the single main stem, on a
plant that otherwise has been so
neatly trained. This common situa-
tion results, ironically, from paying
too close attention to the plants.
While you were staring at small de-
tails like little suckers trying to get


toeholds, a large one that went unno-
ticed kept growing larger It does not
take long for a large sucker to take on
the proportions of the main stem.
There are a few ways to handle
such a delinquent shoot. The first is
to lop it off at its origin. The plant
doesn't like losing all this photosyn-
thesizing greenery, and small toma-
toes might even be forming on it.
Still, lopping the overgrown sucker
off keeps the plant neat and uncon-
gested, which are long-term bene-
fits that make this option best
earlier in the season.
The second option is to let the
shoot grow, tie it up, and now con-
sider your staked plant as having


two main stems instead of one. Dili-
gent pruning from here on can usu-
ally prevent congestion, although
two stems provide twice the oppor-
tunity for delinquent suckers to
sneak up on you.
The third option is just to ignore
the delinquent shoot, except to har-
vest its tomato fruits when the time
comes. This is the best course of ac-
tion near the end of the season,
when it becomes well-nigh impossi-
ble to keep up with suckers anyway
Tomato plants sometimes acquire
odd growth habits, and toward the
end of the season, new shoots even
sometimes start growing from the
ends of leaves.


Amanda & Kik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


QUAI RU


I CITRUS SPRINGS


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 ES






E6 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Feathered friends of


the night: Barred owls


Special to the Chronicle
The barred owl is a large, all-gray to
grayish-brown bird from 17 to 24 inches,
high with white bars on its chest. It is
known to inhabit river woodlands
throughout Central Florida.


pringtime in Citrus County is an es-
pecially enjoyable time outdoors,
with long days and mild evening
breezes. While relaxing during the twi-
light hours, pay particular attention to the
sights and sounds of
dusk. You may have
noticed a distinc-
tive series of eight
loud hoots deliv-
ered in a series of
four: hoohoo,
hoohoo, hoohoo,
hoohoooaw. These
are the sounds of
Joan Bradshaw the elusive barred
FLORIDA- owl.
FRIENDLY The barred owl is
a large, all-gray to
LIVING grayish-brown bird
from 17 to 24
inches, high with white bars on its chest.
It is known to inhabit river woodlands
throughout Central Florida. It has a
round head, no ear tufts and its very
small beak is almost completely covered
up by facial feathers.
See OWlUPage E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Master of light
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Crystal jewelry is attractive, but market interest is soft


D ear John: I have at- Dear G.B.: It is nice you have
tached a few pictures of the complete set Iridized crystal
a crystal jewelry set that sets were all the rage during the
my late mother pur- early- to mid-20th cen-
chased in 1966 while tury They were pro-
in Austria. The dou- duced in massive
ble strand necklace quantities. Currently
measures approxi- potential dollar value
mately 18 inches H 7 I is below $50; it is nice
long, the bracelet is 7 you plan to pass them
inches and the ear- on in the family
rings are clasp style Dear John: The
earrings. There are item in the attached
no markings on any photo was found in
place on any of the John Sikorski Hollywood, Calif., on
pieces. SIKORSKI'S the grounds of a de-
I know she treas- ATTIC molished house. Im-
ured them and only printed on bottom is
wore the set twice on "279 USA, Meriden
very special occasions. I would Company, Quadruple plate."
like to pass them on, but would What can you tell me about it?
also like to know if the set has -M.H., Internet
any value other than "some- Dear M..: You have a figural
thing from great-grammy." napkin ring. Antique napkin
G.B., Internet rings are a specific category of


collecting. They were manufac-
tured in massive quantities dur-
ing the Victorian era
throughout Europe, England,
and the United States. They
were made of glass, porcelain,
silver, silver-plate, gold, ivory
and wood.
Figural napkin rings were
made with people and animals
in various poses holding the
ring itself. These are the most
sought after by collectors. The
one you have depicts two Scot-
tie dogs sitting on their
haunches on a base with the
ring between them.
Your napkin ring is quadru-
ple silver-plated as marked,
See ATTIC/Page E10
Crystal jewelry sets such as
this one were all the rage in the
early to mid-20th century.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OWLS
Continued from Page E6

Barred owls are striking
fliers, with a wingspan of
approximately 44 inches.
When this bird flies, it typ-
ically flaps its wings fre-
quently, instead of soaring
like a vulture. These owls
have special soft feathers
which make it possible for
them to make a stealthy
descent on their prey
It is a well-known fact
that owls see extremely
well at night and also have
excellent day vision. What
you may not know is that
barred owls have dark
brown eyes, while most
other owls have yellow
eyes. They have a special
inner eyelid which blocks
bright sunlight owl sun-
glasses! Owls have both
eyes in the front of their
head, giving them good
depth perception, but lim-
iting their side and rear vi-
sion. To deal with this,
owls can turn their heads
ALMOST all the way
around.
When hunting for food,
these owls typically perch
in trees and watch and lis-
ten for prey Barred owls
like to sit in trees which
have small branches and
moss to hide or camou-
flage them.
Once prey has been
sighted, they swoop down
and grab it with their
talons or claws. Like all
owls, barred owls are car-
nivores, or meat-eaters.
They can eat mice, squir-
rels, foxes, rabbits, bats,
small birds, other owls,
snakes, lizards, fish, fid-
dler crabs and bugs. Since
they eat the whole animal
(except for the wings of
birds), they swallow a lot of
fur and bones they can't
digest.
Owls will regurgitate or
vomit pellets of fur and
bones. If you find a pile of
little furry balls under a
tree, you have found an
owl's perch tree or eating
spot. If you pick the pellet


apart, you can see the tiny
bones and fur from the an-
imals it has eaten.
Barred owls nest in cav-
ities. They normally build
their nests in deciduous
trees, but they also make
use of existing hawk or
crow nests. They also use
nest boxes. When building
a birdhouse for the barred
owl, you can place it on a
high tree.
It is a good idea to en-
sure that one side at the
bottom opens to make for
easy cleaning. Suggested
dimensions are: 25 inches
high by 14.25 inches wide
by 19 inches deep.
The female lays two to
four eggs that are incu-
bated for 28 to 32 days. The
young owls fledge at six
weeks, but may not be-
come completely inde-
pendent of their parents
for several months.
Barred owls start court-
ing around February but
do not mate till March. The
mating season lasts until
August. During courtship,
the male and female
barred owls chase each
other, all the while hoot-
ing. Mutual preening and
courtship feeding also
occurs.
For more information,
contact Citrus County Ex-
tension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, re-
search and resources to
address youth, family,
community and agricul-
tural needs.
Programs and activities
offered by the Extension
Service are available to all
persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex,
religion or national
origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the
natural resource conser-
vation faculty for special-
ized programs in Citrus,
Hernando, Pasco and
Sumter County University
of Florida/IFAS Exten-
sion Service.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

Apple Oatmeal:
E 3 cups quick oats.
0 1/2 cup dehydrated apple bits.
0 1/2 cup powdered milk.
0 1/2 cup brown sugar.
E 2 teaspoons cinnamon.
E 1 teaspoon salt.
Mix all ingredients and store in
quart jar until ready to eat. To pre-
pare, mix a heaping 1/2 cup mix
with 1/2 cup boiling water. Lynn,
Wisconsin
Summer cooking: I love my halo-
gen infrared oven. I can cook so
much in it and not heat up the


kitchen. Cricket, Texas
Dry feet: I get very dry, rough and
cracked feet, and I've been using
coconut oil for about a month now.
The first week, I used it every night
before bed; after that, every other
day. Now I use it about every 2-3
days. My feet look great! -Rhayne,
New Jersey
iME
Dear Sara: Morning is too busy
here to cook, so I am looking for
breakfast items I can make ahead of
time, warm up in the microwave if
necessary and eat on the go. -
Brenda, email
Dear Brenda: You can make
breakfast burritos, pancakes
(spread peanut butter on them and
roll them up), waffles, French toast,


oatmeal or English muffin break-
fast sandwiches ahead of time.
Have foods such as fruit, yogurt and
granola handy Bake up muffins or
quick breads, package fresh fruit in
freezer storage bags and make
quick and easy smoothies to go. Try
string cheese and crackers, hard-
boiled eggs, a bagel or croissant
with spread (peanut butter or
preserves).
Here's a recipe for breakfast
cookies:
3 mashed bananas.
1/3 cup applesauce (flavored or
plain).
2 cups old-fashioned oats.
1/4 cup milk.

See FRUGAL/Page E14


PINE RIDGE Prd e n ial CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744




6w.Fordaho cae-oprtesco


NEW LISTING


___t_______ .______ ,,stis"'" 1835W Nicole Dr
.-lS 435 E Keller CI 1 MLS NUZ6; $119,900
1 v MLa /uu4ol S334,900 2bd/2ba maintenance free villa
Incredible 3/2/2 pool home. w/open floor plan.
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Directions: 486 to Brentwood Cir,
Hills Blvd, left on Keller Ct. thru gate, R on Nicole Dr.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Carl Manucci 352-302-9787


NEW LISTING
111.0 WA*


r f t a 3746 N Yacht Ter ( il 4 vvW uhase:
MLS 703168 $430,000 MLS 703171 $395,0(
Custom built 3/3/3 home-exquisite Everything you ever wanted in this
details throughout. 5bd/3.5ba home.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


S.t3077 N Caves Valley Path "ll 782 E Keller Ct 46 Doerr Path \ 60 EIrelandCt
MLS 02034 350,000 MLS 700636 324,900 ML356086 $310,000 MLS 700370 $247,900
Spacious, well maintained 3/3/2 Fully furnished 3bd/2ba 3bd/2.5ba villa on New 2013 construction on the
home with views of The Ranch Course. pool home. Skyview golf Course. Oaks Golf Course.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Helen Forte 352-220-4764 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146






Tame 5215 N Carnation Dr e'1 2493 N Brentwood Cir r.t4 S 1246 E Cleveland St 130 W Casurina PI
MLS 359357 $189,000 MLS 700534 $123,000 MLS 700297 $99,900 MLS 701745 $66,900
NEW ROOF March 2013.3/2/2 with Move-in ready, this 3bd/2ba home is 2bd/2ba home w/Florida room. Well maintained, pristine 2/2/1 home.
fabulous FL room, hot tub & workshop. dressed & ready for YOU! Peace &tranquility found here. Don't wait...calltoday!
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Joy Holland 352-464-4952
2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential p Ml
" Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SG[ LIKI7DIRr


Noguchi lamps still

a striking addition

to any interior

BETH J. HARPAZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK
light shades sold at Ikea
for $5 are a familiar item
in contemporary interior de-
sign. But these inexpensive
lanterns are knockoffs of light
sculptures created by the
renowned artist Isamu Noguchi in
the early 1950s.
The Noguchi lamps called
akari, the Japanese word for light
were inspired by traditional
Japanese lanterns used in ancestor
worship. Over the decades, the
akari became classics of mid-20th
century modern home decor
Noguchi's original designs are
still handmade in Japan; they come
. in a variety of colors and dozens of
-- geometric designs including the
widely imitated white sphere -
and range in price from $100 to
S'..4 $1,000. And they pop up in some
S pretty cool places, from painter
Georgia O'Keeffe's home in New
Mexico to Tony Stark's bedroom in
"Iron Man 3."
The story of how the late
Noguchi came to create akari is
rooted in the recovery of Japan's
post-World War II economy and the
cross-cultural currents that influ-
enced his spare, bold, modernist
aesthetics.
Noguchi's mother was American;
his father Japanese. They never
married. Born in 1904, Noguchi
spent years in both countries dur-
ing his youth. After World War II,
he was greatly admired by the art
and design community in Japan,
and at some point met the mayor of
the town of Gifu, where local indus-
try centered around making
lanterns for ancestry worship,
using paper from mulberry trees.
"The mayor asked Noguchi, 'Can


See Page E13


E8 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KE Y1 vs "Always There For You"
PEaLruL GAIL COOPER
II- I I0 11"LlU lIn'di li DoIl.lar Re.alior
1 K Er l Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3, mindsprming.com


OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING!
4/2/2 home 2239 sq ft living built 2006
*18" tile and pantry in large kitchen
* Tiled lanai with heavy duty screening
* GE whole house water filtration system
* Entire home has gutters
* Well for the outside irrigation
#702870 $157,000


BRING YOUR RV BOAT HORSES!
* 3/2/2 custom home on 4.85 acres
* New Kitchen/Glassed Florida Room
* Roof and AC/heat new in 2003
* Stone fronted fireplace in Great Room
* Exterior/interior recently repainted
* Home warranty for the buyers
#703100 $124,500


40 unit+ storage facility.
2.8 Acres of outside storage.
5750 sq ft. bldg w/ office on-
site.
Suncoast Industrial Park
$149,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


$350,000 LEASE OPTION -
OWNER FINANCING


I BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL I
4BR in Sugarmill Woods. Over 3000 sq. ft
livin. $175,000


BANI UWNIItU-LUKAL LIIT, tL
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. S39,900 MLS#701383


ALL Roy Bass TODAY 352)726-247
il: royba sstampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (3521302-6714 'LM


www.mypropertyhelper.com


^ J .ISe Virtua .Il T us, w..i..alehIJmIIJ. .I.. oIBJ..


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Napkin rings are a specific category of collecting. This figural napkin ring depicting
two Scotties on was probably made in America in the last quarter of the 19th century.
The poor condition would negatively affect its value.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

though in very bad condi-
tion. It was made in Amer-
ica during the last quarter
of the 19th century Poten-
tial dollar value, as is, is
below $50.
Dear John: Enclosed is a
photo of a cup that might be
of value. I know you cannot
use the photo because of its
quality, but I would like to
know if we made a possibly
valuable purchase.
On the top of the cup is
the date May 12. The photos
are of George VI and Eliza-
beth. Under them it reads
"Coronation 1937." On the
back of the cup, it says
"Princess Elizabeth," with
a picture of a very young
girl. There are no markings
on the underside of the cup.
-R.M. W, Internet
Dear RM.W: Royalty
commemorative ware is a
large category of specific


lOMF47X


[8 }
\


collector interest. King
George VI was crowned
after his brother Edward
VIII abdicated the crown
in 1936. The 1937 corona-
tion cup you have is low on
the totem pole of collector
interest. The potential dol-
lar value is $15 to $30.
Dear John: I have a set
that has six glasses and a
pitcher that were my grand-
mother's. It looks like gold
on green glass. Some of the
cups are chipped, but the
rest are in good to fair con-
dition. Any information you
can give me on what they
are and what they are worth
would be greatly appreci-
ated. L. W, Floral City
Dear LW: The lemonade
set in gold-trimmed green
glass was made in America.
Sets like this were made by


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
.c.: (352) 795-6633
wQwwA1VTlTvtt flr'm ,r IT A1.T 6A XlTr;/?\ iYi r)Mr


T.EST:I

Realtor I


IAGNONDT emVE DAY AW


triplewide on 1 25 acres of land 15 x 40
carport, paved road, well & septic,
country kitchen & formal dining rm Rear
....h,,r ....... " "* # a r a Jo nl


INGLIS 2001 Skyline w/3 bedrooms,
2 baths, newly remodeled, on 2 lots (0 97
acre), cathedral ceilings, inside laundry,
secluded & private Lg living rm, dining
rm, kitchen Easy access to Gulf of
Mexico #702563 $80,000





CRYSTAL RIVER huge workshop,
mobile has been removed, 3 roll up doors,
1 high enough to drive RV in; 18 ft high,
has full bath, washer dryer hookups, half
of upstairs looks like it was planned on
hoinr, living c,__ R1407) tQ4 nIIlIl


I I CRYSTAL RIVER totally renovated
LECANTO nice half acre with well, 2 bdrm, 1 bath home with carport, fully
septic and impact fees paid Mobile not fenced, downtown Crystal River, Ig
livable but, take it off and replace with laundry room, currently rented on month-
new Center of county, Lecanto school to-month basis, make a nice investment,
dist #356605 $18,000 #700696 $53,000


SAmerican BARBARA
investment BANKS
117S. Hwy. 41, 13 F
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855 cell: 352-476.3232
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net











INVERNESS POOL HOME
3/2/2 Pool-Seller's Pride shows in this updated Home-Split floor
plan, Light & bright! Large master, Lovely new kitchen wall
appliances (Bosch range & dishwasher), wood cabinets. Features
porcelain tile & Hardwood flooring, double pane windows all
with Plantation shutters, utility room with storage, workbench in
garage, sprinklers, inground pool with child guard,
newer A/C. Move in and enjoy this like new home.
MLS 702982 ASKING $154,500
Zechariah 4:6 000F4AT


numerous glass houses in
the United States during the
late 19th to early 20th cen-
tury. Although your photo-
graph is not very clear, I
think the set was made by
the Northwood Company
sometime during the early
20th century Due to the con-
dition problems you men-
tion, potential dollar value
is below $50 for the set


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the
antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


E10 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 Ell



To place an ad, call 563-5966 AUTOMAT


. - .'-


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


'Sa:(5)53565 1Tl re 88 85-24 1 Em il clsiid~hoilo n. co I -.sie w .choicenln. c


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

DUNNELLON/488
2/1, Priv Lot, CHA
Clean, Quiet, $450/mo.
+ Sec (352) 795-6970

FLORAL CITY
1bd/1 ba 55+, Remod-
eled $430 mo. includes
lot rent, water, sewer,

HERNANDO
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
$400 $500 Mo. Call
Larry 352-201-2428



HOMOSASSA
Several Available
Beautiful Park
Pool
(352) 628-4441

INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182





ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&l W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


For Sale %9
HERNANDO
Ready to move in,
must see 3/2 1/.5 acres
$49K approved for FHA
Financing
(352) 795-1272

LOOKING FOR YOUR
wilHO il
Is your Credit Score 575
or Higher, several new
homes to choose from
call for details
352-795-1272






New 2013
Lot Model 3/2 DWHM
$46,900, Includes
Deliver, set-up, A/C,
Skirting, Steps Call
352-795-2377


t1_


New 2013 Lot Model
DWMH 2/2 $42,900
Includes, Delivery,
set-up, A/C Skirt, steps
NO HIDDEN FEES
Call 352-795-1272




MUST SELL


New Lot Model
2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fire-
place, huge Island
kitchen, It has to go!!
$84,900 includes
Del, set-up, A/C,
Skirting,steps,
Furniture pkg Avail.
Call 352-795-2377


Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
Homes.
$8500 off, 2/2 & 2/3
free Demo
Call John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/








REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377


STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183






We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272






INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!

2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details


INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 2/2 DWMH
Handicap ramp at-
tached, large enclosed
porch, with lake view
carport shed, w/d Lot
rent $335 Includes:
pool, club hse, boat
slips, priv. dock,
water/garbage, lawn
maint,RV/Trailer stg,
ONLY $12,500
352-419-6132



FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, $36,500.
Cash net to seller
352-586-9498
HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182


HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192




HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $6,800
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




--Z-
MOW
- ATIONt
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCounltyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
5641 W. Irving Ct................... $750
2/2/1 Nice home off Rock Crusher
7 Bunieli C. ................... $1,000
3/2/2 Pool home in SMW
CRYSTAL RIVER
9351 W. Wisonsin ............... $825
3/2/1 Beautiful kitchen, very nice
10023 N. Athena Dr. ........... $1,200
3/2/2 on golf course
CITRUS SPRINGS/BEVERLY HILLS
63 S. Jeffery St. (BH) ................ $575
2/2/1, screen room
34 S. Jeffrsn St. (H) .... RE ED $685
2/2 Nice
8160 N. Duval Dr.KS) ............ S $1,300
3/2/2 Pool, avail.furn. or unfurn.
10023 N. Atenia Dr. ((CS) AVAILILEJULY Isi
3/2/2















FLORAL CITY
2/1, Det. Gar. Chad,
Hist. Dist, No pets/
non smoking $650mo.
1 stlst/sec. 422-6263


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

NEED
A GOOD
TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youA

3/2/1 FENCED BACKYARD,,,,,,$800
2 /1 /1 ............................................. $ 7 0 0
2/1/CARPORTDUPLEX $500
2/2/1 ......................... $650

3/2 DOUBLEWIDE .......................$700
ACREAGE, PARTIAL FENCING IN BACK,
AMUSTSEEII!

2/2/CARPORT CONDO....$700
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
1 Realtor-Associate
8 352-726-9010

FLORAL CITY FL
1/1 $575 Incls.
pwer/H20 nice yd. No
pets. 813- 731-5347




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375/Mo. $300/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, W/D
Hkup, $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499

Desertrose
Apartments
RENTAL SPECIAL
1 MONTH FREE
2 bed/2 bath
Call now for details!!
Ensing Properties LLC
352-795-1795
www.ensing
properties.com

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393







CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Commercial Storefront
clean 1000 SF, exc.loc
$795/mo 352-634-2528




INVERNESS
Commercial Office
Space Near Hospital
Ready to move in, very
clean set up with 3 Med
exam rms, 2 ba,1 stor-
age rm, ft reception, Ig ft
waiting rm $1000. Neg
call for detail 302-0431





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Condo, Unfurn.
Club membership
included $650 mo.
352-302-3705





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


BLACK DIAMOND
2BR/2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1200/month
includes basic cable &
lawn care. Contact Dixie
at 352-746-3301.




CRYSTAL RIVER
Opportunity 3/2/2,
$700 month, call for
details (352) 422-5735


1DM A TTS7 A rTE

HOMOSASSA
1/1 Duplex $260.
2/1 House $525.
RIVER LINKS REALTY
352-628-1616
INVERNESS
2/1, River House $585.
mo. dock, scrn. porch,
garage, carport, shed
352-726-5994
SMWOODS
3/2/2 Fla.Rm.Lg.Deck
1 st.& Sec. $900/mo.
352-464-4348/503-6794
SUGARMILL
Rentals available now!
2/2, 3/2, Pool Homes
and golf course.
Gate House Realty
352-382- 4500




FLORAL CITY
3/1, 1,200 sf, Boat
Dock, Lrg. Lanai, oak
trees, priv., fenced,
$700. mo. incl cable.
352-419-7063
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
Near Pulbix's, Furn.,
Clean, Cable, w/d,
sm rm $110wk; Igr rm
$120/wk 352-563-6428


Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Nature Coast Landings:
Sale/Trade: Big rig RV
Site plus storage lot.
$49,500/offer for both.
352-843-5441. See at
detailsbyowner.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







FOR SALE
$89,900
31 S Melborne St.
Beverly Hills
owner financing avail.
352-634-1724













3/2/3
Perfect
Location. Ready for
occupancy! Wood
cabinets, granite
tops, stainless
appliances, great
room, den, custom
master design, En-
ergy efficient home
Open for Viewing
Call Joe 302-0910



4/2.5/2 Htd Pool
30x40 detached gar.
wood, tile,carpet
wood cab, granite
Must See! $319,900
Iv. msg 352-527-1448



PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 % w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


P -in i


FOR SALE BY
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills Fl.
SAT. JU E 29th,
12 PM
Preview Day of Sale
From 11:00 AM
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com












2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840









55+ Real Estate
Specialist
Teri Paduano, Broker
15+ Years Exp
Buying or Selling
Real Estate?
Call me today & get
a "Free" Home
Warranty Protection
Plan
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
WWW.
RealtvConnect.me
Bilingual/Spanish
For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, on appox. % acre
with enclosed large pool
new roof, new Hot
water heater $125,000,
746-5421




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity with amenities
$120K posss rent
opt)352-804-9729


H
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 282-1550




HERNANDO
3/2/2 with pool, 1 acre
lot, off Bismark $1000
mth $900 Sec.422-1956



GOSPEL ISLAND
4bd/3ba & garage
For Sale $92,000.
941-524-6556




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-282828
and enter the
house number

WMW
REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328
AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
HOMOSASSA
3/1/1, very clean,
ceramic tile, carpet, dbl
lot. $750. rent. 1st, last,
& sec. 813-335-5277


DEN BEDROOMS.
3 BATH. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR
GARAGE IS OVER
3500 SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO
A NATURE
PRESERVE. HOME
IS A FORECLOSURE
SHORT SALE AND
THE BANK IS
WORKING WITH
THE SELLERS. THIS
HOME WAS BUILT
IN 2005.dennis neff
@yahoo.com


4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan, carpet,
tile, bright, cheerful,
clean. Realtor/Owner
(352) 697-0295
3/2/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
Quick Sale $119,500
352-302-4057

For Sle %
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN.
1 1A-3P, 352-601-0241










Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St 4BD/3BA.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, Wood Floors,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar,SS Appl. fireplace
Reduced $215,000
Call 850-585-4026













Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
biowell@
netscaae.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments






Dbl-wide,
7.31 AC
9 Paddocks
w/water + shelter lit
riding ring, $85,000.
close to Marion Cty.
Call Lindsay Paolillo
Foxfire Realty
79-Fo- lnAA


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web- www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**

SPECIAL *
New Home in
Quiet neighborhd.
3/2/2, on I acre
2932 sf. corner lot,
$269,900.
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Hme


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


CitusCouty
Homes I-


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




RAINBOW SPRINGS
Beautiful 3/2/2, 2 lots
Oversized Gar. Open
flrplan, Gas Fireplace
Corian countertops,
New porch, $134,900
352-489-0105









Spruce Creek
Pr.
55+, gated,
3/2/2

2370 Liv. area,
on
GC
$159,000.
Call Lindsay Paolillo,
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063




Inverness, Regency Pk
2/2, fireplace, 1st floor
community pool
$48,900 352-637-6993





LAND FOR SALE
20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway, $159,500.
3 Homesites availa-
ble June 1st Only. 45
mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Gated/Privacy.
(888)716-2259.
Gulf Atlantic Land,
Broker.


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


YOU'LL k THIS!
Great Lake home &
value! A must see by
Duval Island! 2 Boat
docks, 2/2 Fl Rm &
more. $159K; Realty
Connect. 352-212-1446
www.RealtvConnect.me

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047


THIS OUT!
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $53,900. Call
352-638-0905





20 ACRES FREE!
Buy 40-Get 60 Acres.
$0-Down $198/mo.
Money Back
Guarantee,
NO CREDIT
CHECKS
Beautiful Views.
Roads/Surveyed.
Near
El Paso, Texas.
1-800-843-7537
www.sunsetranches.co
m





95 ft on Canal
Gulf Access,
Inglis Paved Street
existing structure
Asking $24,900.
(352) 423-3414
352)-445-2633






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Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
hmrm1999@att.net
(904) 757-1012

HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $5,000.
352-621-1664


E12 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LIGHT
Continued from Page E8

you help us resurrect our lantern
business?"' said Jenny Dixon, di-
rector of the Noguchi Museum in
Long Island City, N.Y "That's how
the akari were first produced. They
were exported as an economic
product and were well-received by
the design community."
She added that Noguchi "pa-
pered them sculpturally He didn't
call them lanterns or lamps; he
called them light sculptures."
Noguchi's concept "stood in
sharp contrast to 1950s contempo-
rary, modern, efficient lighting
trends," said Peter Barna, provost
of Pratt Institute, the art and design
college in Brooklyn, N.Y Popular
lighting options of the day included
track lights, adjustable desk lamps
and "pole lamps with conical
shades," added Barna, a former
president of an international light-
ing design firm.
Noguchi's designs were radically
different, "a sculptor's memory of
the soft magic of material and
light," said Barna.
Eventually, Noguchi developed a
relationship with one family of
lantern makers. The same family
still produces his designs today
"They're all handmade, each one,
individually, from molds. They're
not mass-produced," Dixon said.
"We're now working with the third
generation there, filling our orders.
... Our biggest challenge is meeting
the demand."
Depending on which lamp is or-
dered, "you might hit the jackpot
and get a lamp right away or you
can wait three to six months." She
added: "We lose a lot of business"
from customers who don't want to
wait.
Each lamp has bamboo ribbing
and standard wiring, and can ac-
commodate incandescent or com-
pact fluorescent bulbs (45 watts for
small lamps, 75 watts for large). De-
signs range from spheres, discs and
cylinders to triangles, boxes, trape-
zoids, and other geometric shapes
and combinations. Most shades are
white, but some are decorated in or-
ange, green or black; a few bear ab-
stract designs.
There are hanging lamps, as well
as table lamps and floor lamps with
metal legs or small black circular
bases. Many appear breathtakingly


Associated Press
Two lighting sculptures on display at
the Isamu Noguchi Museum in Long
Island City, N.Y.
elegant; others have a whimsical,
futuristic look.
A large selection of akari can be
seen at the Noguchi Museum, lo-
cated in the studio where he worked
for decades in Long Island City, an
industrial neighborhood in the New
York City borough of Queens. A few
lamps are displayed amid Noguchi's
sculptures, but the best place to see
them is in the cafe and gift shop,
where they line bookshelves, hang
over the cash register, and decorate
a small area where visitors can
relax, using a Noguchi coffee table
to put their snacks on.
Danielle Berman, the production
designer for "Iron Man 3," chose a
tall Noguchi lamp in a stacked box
design to illuminate Tony Stark's
bedroom. "It was such a modernist
home," she explained. "It had a lot
of very round, organic lines. I im-
mediately thought of that lamp be-
cause it was such a geometric
contrast."
Stark, played by Robert Downey
Jr., is a superhero billionaire.
Berman said she imagined his girl-
friend, "the Gwyneth Paltrow char-
acter, putting the lights around
Tony's house when she redeco-
rated. She's a lover of design and
art." Berman has also used Noguchi
lamps on many other sets, from the
TV show "House" to the first film in
the "Hangover" series.
Noguchi's "understanding of
space," she said, is "very organic.
He uses all these natural materials.
It's the simplicity, yet it's very com-
plex. You light it and the paper


gives this beautiful glow. It's a beau-
tiful element to have on any set. I
try to use them whenever I can."
Fans of the 20th century mod-
ernist painter Georgia O'Keeffe will
find Noguchi's classic white sphere
lantern on a tour of her home and
studio in Abiquiu, N.M. Noguchi
"sent Miss O'Keeffe several
lanterns as gifts with his sister," ex-
plained Judy Lopez, director of
Abiquiu Historic Properties for the
Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. "She de-
cided to place this large one in her
dining room."
The lamp hangs from a wooden
ceiling in the inviting, white-walled
space, over a simple table and
chairs.
Cheap imitations of Noguchi
lamps especially the white
sphere have become so ubiqui-
tous that they're almost a cliche of
outdoor party decor and a some-
what bohemian style.
But why spend hundreds on an
original when you can get a knock-
off for a fraction of the price? Aside
from the difference in workman-
ship and materials, Berman points
out that "the knockoffs aren't quite
his designs." Dixon also notes,
"Noguchi made these lamps so that
people could buy them and live
with his sculpture. It was the idea
that you, too, the every man, for
$100, a modest amount of money,
could own an artwork by a promi-
nent person."
One downside: The paper is vul-
nerable to damp climates, though it
does well in dry locations like
O'Keeffe's.
And what if you don't live in a
home defined by modernist aes-
thetics? Would a Noguchi lamp
work with flowered curtains, an
overstuffed sofa and patterned
wallpaper?
Berman thinks "antiques and
modernist pieces can work well to-
gether" But whether you mix the
lamp in with a jumble of interesting
objects or set it off as a special
piece, she said, consider its shape.
In a room with lots of square and
rectangular lines, go for a rounded
lamp; in a room with curves in fur-
niture and decor, go for a linear
lamp.
Barna agreed that the lamps can
work with any style, but noted they
"were conceived as sculptures that
delicately stand as warm friends in
an interior space. They glow, so will
probably be the dominant focus in
any space they are in."


Florida farmers


take second look


at blueberries


LAURA REILEY
The Tampa Bay Times

HUDSON Concealed,
the thieves bide their time.
They know Bob Waldo's
habits, they recognize his
daughter, Nina Lewis, as
she moves along the tidy
rows in a bikini top and
faded cutoffs. As one, the
cedar waxwings take
flight, dive bombing and
knocking ripe blueberries
off dozens of bushes.
Waldo, 66, has had
enough. He reaches into a
pocket and pulls out a
handful of firecrackers.
He lights a tiny fuse and
tosses the pinkie-sized
tube toward the tree line
muttering, "Go back to
Canada already" KA-
BOOM, and about 100
pretty brown birds lift out
of the trees, clearly not
Canada-bound. They are
barely perturbed, ready to
wait out Waldo and his
noisemakers for another
crack at ripe berries.
The cedar waxwings are
a bother at Bob's Blue-
berry Farm & Nursery, but
they're by no means the
only challenge.
"It used to be that cen-
tral Florida was the only
spot in the world that had
ripe blueberries in April,"
says Waldo. "There was a
four- to five-week period
without fruit from any-
where else."
That window is narrow-
ing. Chilean growers are
now shipping berries right
up until the start of the
Florida season, which usu-
ally runs mid-March into
early May And Georgia
growers are increasingly
nipping at the other end,
getting ripe fruit earlier


with the aid of new culti-
vars. But in that sweet
spot, when Florida is king,
growers can command
high prices, getting
roughly $5 per pound for
their blueberries.
Which is why a lot more
farmers are growing blue-
berries these days.
"When I started back in
1996, there were maybe
800 acres in Florida," re-
members Waldo. "Now
there are something like
8,000 acres of blueberries.
What was once a specialty
crop is now a commodity."
Barbara and Tim Flem-
ing are repeat customers.
Sliding bungee cords like
belts around their waists,
they strap white buckets to
their bellies so they can
pick two-handed. Often as
big as olives, the fruit of
Florida's Southern High-
bush species dwarfs its
Northern counterparts.
There are Windsors and
Jewels and Sapphires and
Emeralds. Lewis, 46, who
oversees the U-pick opera-
tion, can identify them all
by their fat, juicy berries.
The Flemings don't seem to
have that discernment, but
their buckets fill up quickly
Barbara owns a wellness
business and these "super
fruits" make good smooth-
ies and snacks. Tim, on the
other hand, seems to enjoy
the Zen-like cycle of reach-
pick-plink, with the occa-
sional pause as a berry gets
popped in a mouth. As af-
ternoon rain begins to fall
gently, it's peaceful in the
rows.
"We should rent pews out
here," Waldo says, the fire-
crackers pocketed for a bit

See BERRIES/Page E15


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 E13







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

1/2 cup raisins.
1/2 teaspoon baking soda.
1 teaspoon vanilla.
1 teaspoon cinnamon.
Combine all ingredients in a
medium bowl. Drop spoonfuls onto
parchment-lined cookie sheets or
Silpat. Bake at 350 degrees F for 15-
20 minutes. Makes 20 soft cookies.
Dear Sara: After reading your col-
umn, I checked Lowe's and Wal-
Mart in the Glendale and Peoria,
Ariz. area. They did not have Super
Grip, nor had they ever heard of it.
- V Dahl, email
Dear V Dahl: You can use the
product locator at
plastidip.com/diy_where to buyphp
to find retailers in your area that
should carry it. Lowe's is listed as a
special-order retailer, which means
you can order it through Lowe's and
have it shipped to the store for pur-
chase. You can order it online
through QCIdirect.com at qcidirect.
com/super-grip-aerosol-ground-
service-only.html. (Note: For those
readers who aren't familiar with this
product, it's an aerosol used on
throw rugs to prevent skidding.)
Dear Sara: I have a frustrating
problem and am hoping you can as-
sist me with a solution. My refriger-
ator door handle and freezer handle
have yellowed. I have tried gasoline,
abrasives and many other products
that promise to clean the handle, but
to no avail. Do you have a solution?
- Ru, Florida
Dear Ru: The handles often yel-
low with age. Some handles turn yel-
low from the oil in your hands; with
others, there is a plastic cover over


gB'eR 2 rCitrusCounty
www.wIt2 uSold.





WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
x For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.5 million closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
(352) 746-9924


the handles that yellows with age.
You can call the manufacturer to
purchase replacement handles, or if
your handles have plastic covers,
find out if the manufacturer sells re-
placement plastic covers so you
wouldn't have to replace the entire
handle. As for cleaning the old ones,
try a Mr Clean Magic Eraser or Soft
Scrub and some elbow grease. You
might even consider painting the
handles with a spray paint made for
plastic, such as Krylon Fusion.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes tips
from readers about breaking
news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be pre-
pared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the
news event.
To submit story ideas for fea-
ture sections, call 352-563-
5660 and ask for Nancy
Kennedy. Again, be prepared to
leave a detailed message.
The Chronicle has forms avail-
able for wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth announce-
ments and first birthdays.


Pine Ridge 31213
Perfect Location
Ready for occupancy! Wood
cabinets, granite tops, stainless
appliances, great room, den,
custom master design.
Energy Award Home features.
Open for viewing.
F3HT Call Joe 302-0910


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY

Sweet & Sour Bank Owned Buys! -.
., $24900
I I S2,000
.. .. .1...... $2 .900
I P I I. .11I I. 1 S29 900
.I .I. S 29 900
1IA1II *"" !' J" .... : n ll 00o o Ku uivll blIvdL., IjCdV lk .............................. $33,900 BEV E I S2 bdm, bath on corner
WOW! Fabulous furnished Whispering Pines Villa o0 evIrwood nl $33,900 BEVERLY HILLS (AT(H on r
$79,900. Blink & it will be gone. 2/2 with garage 903 Siverwood St Inverness ............................... $34,000 lot. Great investment opportunity. Don't let it pass you by.
porch & so many new features. #700941. 61 South Lincoln St ..............................................34,900 ASKING $54,900. #358130.
806 Shelley Terr Inverness $................................. 34,900
1802 Silvewood Inverness ........................ $34,900
303 S. Adams, Beverly Hills .................................... $39,900
3560 West Proverbs Court $3...................................... 9,900
3414 S. Diamond Ave., Inverness ............................ $39,900
6745 N. Castlebury Rd., Hernando ..........................$41,000 m
6242 E. Wingate St., Inverness ...............................$42,900
103 S. Tyler, Beverly Hills i4s.......... ....... $42,900
74 ,' 731526N. BossAve., Dunnellon ................................$44,900 RACIOUS SETTING in area ofnewer homes, 32/2
BASEMENT BARGAIN 3/3/1 on 2+ AC close to 6320 N. Velveteen, Lecanto........................... $44,900 Citrus Sprin is move-n ready & awaiting new owner!
town, featuring HUGE basement. $129,500. 3171 E. 10085 S. Evans P, Inverness .................. 45,990 7501 N. Gal ena, $119,900. #702555. Debbie Tannery
Possum C. #357508. Tonya Koch 3526136427. 615 Red Robin, Inverness .....................................$54,900 352-6133983
9585 W. Berry oLane, Crystal River $5........................... 9,500
S5761 S. Dede Terr, Inverness ................................$. 59,900
916W. Calbrier Lane, Beverly Hills .......................... $62,900
Park P rf 0869 N. Florida Ave., Inverness ................................ $64,900
1 Laurenshire St., Citrus Springs .............................. $64,900
3336 E. Paula Ln., Inverness ..................................$67,500
230 W Stag gerbush Path, Beverly Hills .................... $67,900
S6036 E. Willow, Inverness ...................................... $69,900 OPPORTUNITY IS KNOCKING to have deeded lake
38 Chinaberry, Homeosassa ............... $69900 a wh h l 322 hm in Inverness- water &
FO R R E N T 5324 Isabel err Homosss ................................. $69,900 sewer. 721 Edgewer r, 134,900 #01620
862 Pritchard Isand, Inverness ................................$72,900 Tonya Koch 352-613-6427.
Professional Office suites available at 4440 Leisure Blvd., Lecanto FL $............................... 79,900
Park Place from 700 sq. ft. to 1100 sq. ft. 1032 S. Bel Air Dr., Inverness $................................. 79,900
Starting at $500 per month 2966 E Buck Ct., Inverness ................................... $79,900
Water/sewer/trash collection included. 12 Independence Hwy., Inverness ......................... $79,900
Adjacent to the Citrus County Courthouse. 4608 Brooks Coleman ........................................... $79,900
2328 N. Hendry Pt, Hernando ................................ $89,900
301 W. Main St. 5555 S. Leonard Ter, Inverness ............................. 0,000 .
Historic commercial building. Newly renovated. 950 N Gardenview Ter, Crystal River ...................... 94,900
Corner location, ample parking. 167lmree, CitrusSprings....................................... $99,900 FAIRVIEW ESTATES 1996 3/2/2 Pool home
Excellent exposure. 12813 SW61 Ave., Ocala ........................... 99,900 w/2801 living. One heck of a buy for ONLY
$159,900! 4320 Indianhead. #358696. Tomika
Call for our current list of residential rentals. 18 Douglas St, Homosassa $1.................................. 09,900 Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.
8099 N Hillview Circle, Dunnellon ........................ $119,900
S- i 1l1'l,,t, ,,,l S $126 900
,' i t i r l $129.900
iii l ... .$ 5129,900
S'l,,,,,, Ii $134.900
S Ii iSll 14 900
II II'. il, i i ..... $159 900 EVERYONE LOVES HAPPY HOUR! 2 houses for the
". .. 1', I ... ihl .,I S167 500 price of I Bank owned 1985 2/2/1 w/1,644 living+
DANDY DEAL ON DEDE! 1990 3/11 w/1344 19465 98th, Dunnellon....................................... $169,900 2 car det. gar, & 1987 2/2 singlewide on 1 Acre
living on .54 acres freshly remodeled for ONLY 1643 E St.CharlesPI.,Inverness ......................... $169,900 $79,9001 NEEDS WORK. 2966 Buck Ct. #703165.
$s59 900 0. 1 S179 g Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.
S i. I' ll, ,h,' Jun-. $169 900
S"11 """ ". 199 900
,, , ,900
ii .. I .dI S244 500
2 ,1 I 1 .. I $254 900
,I" I ,, I .. I $299,900
This home will LOVE YOU A LONG TIME! 1/1 built 664 W Senlnel Post Pal, Beverly Hills ............... 5374,900 ITS HAMMER TIME! Break out the tool belt & et to
back in 1935 and staying alive for ONLY $27,900' Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or work. Cheap 2/1/1 in Beverly Hills for $33,900.
#702076. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 66 Roosevel #701661. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


E14 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



BERRIES
Continued from Page E13

Waldo originally kept his day
job in the irrigation business,
buying Hudson property in 1993
and planting just an acre of
blueberries.
"It was a 'let's do this and see
what happens' kind of deal."
Mistakes were made. There
was the time he tidied up the
rangy plants, pruning the bud-
ding blossoms and thus, the
fruit right off the bushes. But
mostly it was planting and polli-
nating and watering and fertiliz-
ing and pruning and hoping.
Now Bob's Blueberry Farm is 28
acres, with a yield upward of
200,000 pounds of berries a year,
most of it sold commercially and
some of it opened up to U-pick.


SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013 E15


According to Florida Blue-
berry Growers Association pres-
ident Bill Braswell, the biggest
change in Florida blueberries in
recent years is not the number of
farms (he says there still aren't
enough blueberries to make a
dent in the demand), but the size
of the farms. When he and Waldo
first started, the average farm
was 3 to 5 acres; now it's closer
to 50, with big players like Dole
getting into the business in the
past 18 months. This year's total
Florida blueberry crop is likely
to hit 20 million pounds.
'"All of this growth has been
very good to us," Braswell says.
"We used to be a niche crop that
may or may not be available.
Now Whole Foods, Publix,
Dollar General Market we're
available and people expect to
see Florida blueberries."
Still, Braswell isn't entirely


bullish about blueberries. Since
2009, freak weather has im-
pacted crops.
This year, not enough chill in
January and February, followed
by a March chill, caused plants
to go back into dormancy, re-
flowering as things heated up
again. This extended the season
a bit, but caused farmers serious
headaches. (Waldo and Lewis
pulled 20 all-nighters in March,
irrigating plants overhead to
protect against potential freeze.)
And while prices for berries
haven't dropped much, ex-
penses have dramatically in-
creased: The cost of fuel, labor
and chemicals has skyrocketed.
"For the 3- to 5-acre farm,
input costs have taken a lot of
the profit," Braswell says.
He predicts smaller farms will
turn more frequently to U-pick
or even to planting other crops.


Lewis walks down a Highbush
row, bending to pull out a thorny,
knee-high weed.
She has always loved working
the blueberries, shuddering
when she thinks of her former
life in retail.
From public relations agent to
nursery manager, she wears a lot
of hats at the farm.
She has just added another:
research and development spe-
cialist. Next to the blueberries
are rows of something else en-
tirely, tall plants with soft green
leaves and a riot of little purple
flowers.
She thinks it may well be the
area's first crop of another super
fruit: goji berries.
Lewis is concerned that the
blossoms are overly fragile, cov-
ering the ground in purple con-
fetti instead of setting fruit But
she's going to wait it out


Meanwhile, she and Waldo are
trying to market the goji plants'
leaves.
Richer in antioxidants than
the fruit itself, they can be
sauteed, juiced or eaten raw in
salads.
Lewis has a bundle of goji
stems in a coffee can by the cash
box.
As Barbara and Tim Fleming
pay for their 8 pounds of blue-
berries, Lewis gives her goji
pitch.
Barbara tucks one leaf into her
cheek and chews thoughtfully
The Flemings seem skeptical
as Lewis wraps a handful of
stems and offers them as a gift to
Barbara, bouquet-style.
But they say they'll be back to
Bob's one more time in the next
couple of weeks to fill a final
bucket before the end of Florida
blueberry season.


Terraw G 'Ts

REALTY GROUP


Speilzn n er it
-I&;retooRs.e
ww .T rai st e tGr upc m


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Ri i DFiKFR 359.464.10647. SIIRAN Mill I FN 359.4929.9213 VIrTORIA FRANKI IN 3.25.47.3777


| SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 4 BATH, 3 CAR, TERRA VISTA
B beautiful custom home located on Legendary Ted Williams Ct. in the desired gated golf and
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH SINGLE FAMILY, 5 BED, 5.5 BATH, 2 CAR, TERRA VISTA tennis country club community of Terra Vista. Amazing panoramic view, situated at one of
Large roomy open split floor plan home featuring 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, office/den, remarkably uniqueMediterranean mansion,2-story home atthe peakofTerra Vista within the highest elevations in Florida. Elegant yet casual. Pride of ownership, lovingly
customized great room floor plan, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai and a amazing view of the Skyview Golf Course. This home features a study, studio, exercise maintained, 1sttime on the market. Shows like a designer model. Move-in condition. Chefs -
extended 2 car attached garage. Dining area overlooking private backyard. Upgrades room, formal living and dining with a double fireplace, gourmet kitchen with breakfast nook kitchen, office/library and great room. Grand dining room and sitting area complete with a DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATHS, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
include Conan countertops, ceramic tile, plantation shuttered windows, lots of custom and a huge family room with wet bar perfect for entertaining. Maid's quarters, 2 staircases, wet bar. 2 firstfloor master suites, large guest bedrooms. 4 Baths. 2nd floor game room and Luxurious Lantana model. This open floor plan has a beautifully-mirrored formal dining room
cabinets in the kitchen. Corner lot with huge trees and lusciously landscaped. Situated 5 bedrooms, and 5.5 baths. Magnificent courtyard and veranda 25x17 heated pool, hot tub office/bedroom. 3-car garage, zoned HVAC. Sec system. Oversized screened pool enclosure with butler pantry. Large eat-in kitchen. Spacious great room overlooks the private screened
close to all amenities. MLS 703129 .......................................................................... $249,900 and cabana house with full bath. MLS 700092........................................................$799,000 on a beautifully landscaped acre homesite. MLS700149.......................................$84 9,000 Lanai. 2 bedrooms plus a den/office complete this lovely home. MLS 35299......$194,900


- % i' BRENTWOOD
TOWN HOME, 3 BED,
2.5 BATH, 1 CAR
This is maintenance free,
Florida living at its BEST! Tis 3

Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Great
room with Iiving and dining
combo, eat-i kitchen. Spacious
bedrooms upstairs, master suite
with walk in closet. Nice open
floorplan, screened lana, pro-
dessioally decorated, furniture
neg o able. 9
MLS 359587 ...........$129,900


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
Bright and cheerful maintenance-free villa in this gated community of Terra Vista. This light
and bright bedroom, 2 bath home with a den.Decorated with all neutral colorsTotallyopen
floor plan with an expansion of tle leading to a triple sliding door that takes you to the
extended anaiwith lots of privacy All combine to make this an outstanding vlla value
M LS 70 224.......................................................................................................$ 2 14 ,9 0 0


-Terms 6 Months or More
T^^erra Visa & Brentwood Rentals! SociaMmesi icue ih l etl


-- r _e- "u..


BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR _.
Nice 2jBd with 2 1/2 baths and 1 car garage. The bedrooms are on the second floor and BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR
there is a half bath on the first floor. Screened Porch. Comeswlth the Citrus Hills Social Club Furnished townhome in Brentwood for rent. Nice 2jBd with 2 1/2 baths. King in master.
M em bershi p. # 32 67....................................... ..... ...... ....... .. ........... ................................... $ 1, 10 0 Conmes w ith the CitrusH H l ls Social Cl ub M enmbershlo 1 g....................$ O


ULIA LUCH VILLA, 2 ULU, 2 bAI' 2 1AK LAKL VILW VILLAS
Beautiful maintenance-free fully furnished villa in Terra Vsta.2 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage.
Bright and open floor plan. Very open and spacious living area. Greatfor everyday giving and
entertaining. Close to all of the amenities so you can experience the active Ifestyle Terra
V sta have to offer. M ove-in ready! # 3296.................................................................... ,5 0 0


...................
,
I


TOWN HOME,
2 BED. 2.5 BATH.
BRENTWOOD
-TOWNHOME$



great room with living and dining combo, half bath, kitchen with wood cabinets and
Conan countertops. Breakfast nook. Large screen lanai. Upstairs hasmaster bedroomwith
walk-in closet, dual vanity in master bath with spacious shower, office/den area, guest
bdrm has plenty of closet space, laundry room and full bath. This townhome is tastefully
decorated and issue to makeyou feel rightathome. MLS 700082...................$115,000


/'DETACHED VILLA,
S.. 3BED, 2.5 BATH,
2 CAR,
SKYVIEW VILLAS

In presigner decorous gated and
community of Terra Vista.
mmacuantedgourmetktchenformaldnng nlate 32.2 wigreat

den.entertaining. Lots of tie, and wet barpaved Large master suite has hardwood floorWO custom
walk-in closets. Youc be proud to return to this elegant home with lush landscaping and home with

large corner lot. This is a beautiful homewith lots of upgrades. MLS 700214......$384,500


I









E16 SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013


Sili i, II . II,. I I.



rII: = REDUCED TO 5S124.900 Malte Ulle
P olli'S I.I i2 28_t
I elil ins rg iu ilil *2 if i s ..>


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ui I* nu arinmu unaMniMum
- .. ....i U I,.. l .,61. 1 1 i .. .:.a l I-, ;...i |
II lI vl ll i1-s.,l(' IJl l. Il lll l(md l .M.) l.ll ,ill
i. .:..,il.ln u l1 .1 i i
Mi = 71P' i ASKING $138,500
Call Nancy Jenks 352400 8072
oa 352 726 6668









BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED



,. .., 1 ,

rii. = -,1 : $135,000
C, Jim illoton it 22 2173
toJ l' i? tll I miitiCu.JuN 11 hept H.jm


BEAUTIFUL, NEW HOME ON LARGER HOMESITE
i, I, .I ,i,, ,i........ ,I ,,,,,, .. Ii .......... ",

I d I.I....... .i I i .. I ,



ri: =,,.i ASKING S188,900

i tS uu l 1111 ,H"1 ,- s ,u


f .ni l l i2 nll.. ..l n iii' n i ll ii] i.. i
I. (c. .,i.1.1(. l i nnII I H ill; i ,i nn.

,ppal. ..I l I.h Ih h iln.nn ,n ill il.: h n6 n.
ll.... iil: $197,900
Call Ruth Fiedeiick 1352 563 6866


* I" u ii2 u2 i i n .II..
* I: ,]. I.: I I F.v I,11

* .il-. ': : 1Pi-LI s- .i.
* I_ i. l.u i h.l IInni II I'.l ,iI
* Hin.,| IlIi cinlIiniq. IliL ul.i, :
Mi =/ h111_7 $229,000
Jeanne 0 l'ildlaid Pickel 352212 3410
ituiit cituscountlsold coan


$145,000 OAK FOREST!

M l I3* *11 *I -

L... n ..u ... 3 9 .. rI l ... ..
*l-lurh.. ru....l I..uh *,, u.. ... ..l u.u1. Imj Ii"l u .'I.


lnl = .i. I
tir PAirsopns 352 634 1273


4 BED/2.5 BATH/2 CAR
ON ONE ACRE!

..l.n ; :,1:1) 1: Innf ,l l nll .1^ .1 N I ..I h nn...1..

$123,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699









SUPER LOCATION
1 f lr J i fr fR, F I f f :L .I 1 f T in 1 1 1 1. 11
I., h I. .j.i n s nn II.i n III anunn n j us,:.i
W in .II I.I m p 1 'i h',.1 Ml ull I..I i...|.n.

II11_'" ASKING $59,900
Pat Davis t35212127280
Viewi sting at wt c21paldalis corn


ph I .. ........ ld,.. h, ., .nl I.
,I"" h i,,,,iii lul hh.n

Call todaj ask lo hie = 703144
Mattha Snj det 352 476 8727


Sl j VV .i i u, I I lJJ _1 IF .-u i i .,.:
bi.:i, nnlu I ,uI nn il,:1.1 l II ni II I, l
Mi = -3,. Ii PRICED TO SELL S134,500
Call Ouade 352-302-7699


[- A *8 1. .ic I .1

* iBH I I .ii$. li l ..:
* IIiin ly ..i nn I. .i iI n.. .I
M_ = /llI1U $200,000
Jeanne at Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'n'ir. ClliusCounntLSold. corn


.-.,, .- I ,, Ih.,. ,

i IIASKING S145,900
l I n, hit h 11 ,l l r J 7 ,












* IK. h l. hi l l um hh.1il
* I" h-I I ,-,, ,-,1 I ,, I I ,. IL h I I I

Mt i =/ 7112l $118,000
Jeanne m l'ilflaid Picrkel 352 2123410
11'w CiltusCountySold. cont


* FAF_ FIVlEFIJNTi il lF
* I _" ii .( ..i .il .lu I...i
* ''u2 u hl i l i .i v.. l
* IL , iul au i u iu i i'iin I -
j I.Iu..u 'u I l ii Ii i l.ul. 11.

M* =I ,.,' ,$395,000
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel 212.3410
I'l'Iwr. clltuscouni'isald. corn


BEAUTIFUL HOME ELEGANTLY SITS
ON CORNER LOT IN CITRUS SPRINGS

'i- I u nlh In l nn. i n ..n I I. u in,' n.


MI_= IIl'hlh $89,000 M.,I l- illii.
loiaaine 0 Regan 586 0075


MORE FOR THE MONEY
iln .. n .1 I nl 1 .... B11, ...... n .... 1 .


A"n .i nidn e,, ,15 1,.1n, 8 I2 I



/II.zrh.d Sil deir 352-476 8727


OWN THIS LOT, GREAT LOCATION
I A ." : li: I ... ..l i i: I.. Hu i 1 1
..iv ni l 'i.,'l II.il M (.." iIIl l h ~ln'; ,ll.l.n .l
nu1: .lljni i n.l l IV i. l u ull. uuu..l..

M1i= i33i::Jl $16,500
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202


NEWER EVERYTHING!

IIIh I,1 1 Inn l 1 h,, .I- l 1. ...u 1 l.Oil .i

I..uuih.:il -I I. h.u lul- IuInl C ,ili ._ '.uhui
MCl=l711:s117 $62,000
Call Doatis Minoe, 422 4627


WATERFRONT, POOL
HOME WITH DOCK \






Pit Dil, 4,3521 212 7280
rl. =.1 -- S IN 15 .0


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

i I ,-, I i . . 1...h ll I. .. .


$75,000
Call Jim Mlaotn ai 35242221/73 lo
I out personal iout of Emetald Hills


P