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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03132


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MAY 28, 2013 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOL. 118 ISSUE 294 50 CITRUS COUNTY Slugfest: Rays beat in-state rival Marlins 10-6 /B1 www.chronicleonline.com HIGH 91 LOW 69 Partly cloudy and hot. PAGE A4 TODAY& next morning TUESDAY INDEX Classifieds . . . .C9 Comics . . . . .C8 Crossword . . . .C7 Community . . . .C6 Editorial . . . .A10 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .Ax TV Listings . . . .C7 000EZAN M IKE W RIGHT Staff writerA potential suitor in the Citrus Memorial hospital sale or lease met with state Sen. Charlie Dean and the hospital boards attorney earlier this month a meeting some board members said showed questionable judgment. Martin Rash, chairman and chief executive officer of RegionalCare Hospital Partners, met May 13 with Dean in Bill Grants law office in Inverness. Former Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum, whose clients in private practice include RegionalCare, arranged the meeting and also attended. McCollum said the discussion was general in nature and not specific to the Citrus Memorial Health System proposal. He said RegionalCare representatives wanted to meet with Dean to learn of local issues related to the hospital and the community. It was a get-acquainted session, McCollum said. Board members Robert Priselac and Mike Bays, however, said CCHB representatives should steer clear of any company that could be bidding on the hospitals sale, lease or merger. We have a mission and I dont want to see it derailed, Priselac said. Bays, who said he spoke with Rash after hearing rumors of the meeting, said he doesnt think anything inappropriate was discussed. Still, Bays said, neither Meeting raises eyebrows Charlie Dean Florida state senator. Bill McCollum arranged meeting. State Sen. Charlie Dean, hospital board attorney talk with potential Citrus Memorial bidder See CMH / Page A2 Solemn celebration marks Memorial Day Crowds honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice M IKE W RIGHT Staff writerBEVERLY HILLS The numbers are staggering. Starting with World War I, through the war on terrorism that still rages and including victims of Sept. 11, 2001, the number of Americans whose lives were lost for the cause of freedom: 436,124. About 250 people came out Monday on a warm Memorial Day morning to honor those who died and celebrate the country for which they sacrificed, during the 34th annual service at Fero Memorial Gardens in Beverly Hills. The solemn ceremony, which included 9-year-old Marleigh Miller singing the National Anthem and Amazing Grace, featured representatives from local Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion posts. Memorial Day, they said, always holds a special meaning in the heart of Americans. The Rev. Stewart Jamison, of Beverly Hills Community Church, paused before the invocation to note: I remember this day well, because my son completes his sixth year in the U.S. Marine Corps. For me this is a special Memorial Day. Deputy Marcial Rodriguez, representing the Citrus County Sheriffs Store turns 125 P AT F AHERTY Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER Workers from Belk in the Crystal River Mall are sharing a company tradition. On Wednesday, Belk stores across 16 Southern states will celebrate the companys 125th anniversary. In honor of that milestone, the Crystal River Belk has launched 125 Days of Service to the community. Nationally, the company commits to give 2.5 percent of its pretax income back to the communities its serves. Last Friday, store manager Katrina Spires and a team of 10 associates helped with some improvements at Crystal River Primary School. Wearing blue Belk T-shirts, they focused on the art room. Projects included building new bookcases and a new picnic table and hand-painting inspirational canvases to hang in the school cafeteria. Using both brushes and fingers, Tina Renwick, Mary Fontenez, Melissa Chirichella and Allison Hilgert prepared the canvases with colorful backgrounds. Inspirational messages were stenciled in place. Cindy Reiland and Jacob Tourbin found the printed directions challenging, but were making progress assembling their Belk employees Tina Renwick, left, Mary Fontenez and Melissa Chirichella work Friday at Crystal River Primary School. PAT FAHERTY /Chronicle Belk celebrates anniversary with community service STEPHEN E. LASKO /for the Chronicle Chief Petty Officer (retired) Robert W. Huscher, from Inverness, pays respect to his late uncle, Peter Radichio, who was a sergeant in the medical corps during World War II. Every year, Huscher places a white rock on the grave marker with the handwritten words, Hi Thank you. See SERVICE / Page A2 See MEMORIAL / Page A2

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A2 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE L OCAL /S TATE 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000ES3O 000EU8M 000EPE3 Office, fought back tears as the days meaning struck him during a brief address. So many gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can live here freely, he said. I have family in the past in wars. I never thought Id be standing up here wearing this uniform, defending our land. The crowd quietly watched Ray Roby, commander of the American Legion Post 237 and past commander Dennis Choke Kocielko fold the flag they would then place at the cemeterys Garden of Honor monument. This flag is a living memorial to all veterans interred here today, Kocielko said. This was their flag, the flag they loved, the flag they served so well. Jonathan Beard, grief services manager for Hospice of Citrus County, said Memorial Days meaning is stamped in American lives. We honor the dead best by treating the living well, he said. Let us focus not on death and war, but life and peace. Today we honor the dead but celebrate the living. Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. MEMORIAL Continued from Page A1 STEPHEN E. LASKO /for the Chronicle Matthew Loehle, an Army veteran of the Korean War, kisses the grave marker of his wife, who died in 1983. trustees nor Grant should be in contact with companies prior to the bids being received in midJune. Were in a process thats very, very important, he said. Youve got to have all caution in this. We cant talk to anybody in the process. As a board we need to make sure it doesnt happen again. Josh Nemzoff, the CCHBs consultant who is overseeing the transaction process, sent trustees a May 22 email saying bidders should have no contact with the board or Grant. Nemzoff said Rash told him that specific deal terms were discussed in the meeting with Grant. I can tell you from my position as transaction advisor that if in fact this is true and other bidders find out about it, we may have a problem, he wrote. Dean, RInverness, said his only role was to introduce Rash to Grant. Bill McCollum said he worked for a law firm that represented a health care agency, Dean said. He said he wanted to come down. I said the only person I can introduce you to is the attorney who represents the trustees for the hospital. Thats it. There were no discussions. Grant agreed with McCollums recollection. Sure, we talked about CMH, but not anything of any substance, Grant said. The meeting was dominated by Charlie Dean and Bill McCollum. Bill talked about his career. Charlie talked about long-term care. It was pretty superfluous. Grant said companies contact him for information about the hospital. Theres nobody for them to call but me, he said. Bids for the hospitals sale, lease, partnership or merger are due in midJune. The hospital board is expected to begin negotiations with a selected firm by late June. Priselac said the issue is one of perception. I dont think anything was done incorrectly, he said. Maybe some people were in places they shouldnt have been.Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. CMH Continued from Page A1 Bill Grant hospital board attorney. second bookcase. The rest of the team worked outside on building the wooden picnic table. Spires said the 125 days of service will run until end of July. Other projects included a book drive. The associates and the stores in the mall helped, she said. We were supposed to collect 125 books and we collected 325. She said the associates who could not come out were paid for two hours of volunteer work and made little magic carpets. The public is invited to help the store mark the 125th anniversary Wednesday with an opening ceremony at 9 a.m. Guest speakers will be Citrus County Commissioner Dennis Damato and Crystal River Vice Mayor Mike Gudis. There will also be entertainment during the ceremony. Refreshments will be served all day in the cosmetics department and Matter of Taste will sing in the department at 10 a.m. At 9:30 a.m. there will be a gift card giveaway to the first 100 customers. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. SERVICE Continued from Page A1 Sure, we talked about CMH, but not anything of any substance Bill Grant hospital board attorney. Craftsmen make urns for veteransLAND OLAKES Woodworkers in the Tampa Bay area are making urns to ensure the remains of indigent veterans are preserved with dignity. The Veterans Urn Project is a collaboration by the Woodcrafters Club of Tampa, the Woodcrafters Club of St. Petersburg and the AMVETS Post 9 in Odessa. The urns are made from donated wood. Each is inscribed with a military emblem. Theyre sent free of charge around the country. The project got its start last year when news reports surfaced about a former soldier buried at the Florida National Cemetery in a cardboard box. Boy shot at school leaves hospital HOMESTEAD A South Florida boy accidentally shot in the leg with a gun a classmate brought to school has been released from the hospital. DAngelo Marte will spend his summer recovering from Fridays accident at Redland Middle School in Homestead. The 12-year-old said hell have to walk on crutches or use a wheelchair because his leg is in a cast, but otherwise hes fine. He was discharged from a Miami hospital Sunday. Police said the gun was in classmates backpack. When the bag was dropped to the floor, the gun fired. No charges were immediately State BRIEFS From wire reports

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Around the STATE Lakeland Man fatally wounded at shooting range Authorities are awaiting the autopsy results for a man fatally wounded at a central Florida shooting range. The Polk County Sheriffs Office said Larry Simpson of Clermont died of a single gunshot wound to the chest while shooting clays with a friend at the Tenoroc Mine Shooting Range in Lakeland. According to detectives, Jaime Gonzalez of Orlando said he was at the shooting station and Simpson was operating the remote control for the clay machine. Gonzalez told detectives he heard a shot directly behind him, and he turned around to find Simpson with a gunshot wound to his chest. Simpsons gun was lying beside him. Deputies said Simpson died at the scene Sunday. Sheriffs office spokesman Scott Wilder said detectives did not know how Simpson was shot. St. Augustine Two killed, one hurt when boat hits dock Two men were killed and a woman was injured when their boat collided with a dock in northeast Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the 16-foot open motor boat collided with the dock Sunday night in St. Augustine. The three people on board were returning from a day of boating. Alicia Babb, Franklin Babb and Warren Hall were ejected into the water. Authorities said another boater rescued Alicia Babb. The bodies of Hall and Franklin Babb were recovered from the water nearby. In a separate incident Sunday night, a man jumped from his boat into the St. Johns River. Wildlife officials said James Ricks passengers tried tossing him a line but he never resurfaced. A search for Ricks continued Monday.Key WestWreck could pose oil pollution threat A federal report said a ship sunk in the Gulf of Mexico off the Florida Keys is among more than a dozen wrecks nationwide that could pose a serious oil pollution threat. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration report was issued to the Coast Guard last week. It listed the Joseph M. Cudahy wreck northwest of Key West among 17 sunken ships recommended for further assessment. Officials at NOAA and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary plan to survey the wreck in June with autonomous underwater vehicles. This report is the most comprehensive assessment to date of the potential oil pollution threats from shipwrecks in U.S. waters, said Lisa Symons, resource protection coordinator for NOAAs Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Now that we have analyzed this data, the Coast Guard will be able to evaluate NOAAs recommendations and determine the most appropriate response to potential threats. The Cudahy was carrying 78,000 barrels of oil, and local divers and boaters know it as the oil wreck due to a sheen routinely observed above it for more than 60 years, according to the report. Symons told The Key West Citizen that divers have reported finding oil residue on the ships surface. From wire reports S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Lending a helping paw MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle ABOVE: Ann Sanders, left, holds certified pet therapy dog Levi and Janet Garvin holds her certified pet therapy dog Penny. Both animal s have served as therapy dogs for several years. BELOW: The animals wear a vest to let the public know they are friendly therapy dogs. C HARLES L AWRENCE For the ChronicleMay is National Pet Month. According to the American Pet Products Association, there are more than 78 million dogs and 86 million cats owned in the United States. Citrus County residents Ann Sanders and Susan Schrader are volunteers with Therapy Dogs Inc., a nonprofit organization with the goal of providing registration, support and insurance for members who are involved in volunteer animal assisted activities. The local chapter has been working out of Inverness for about five years. Sanders and Schrader take their therapy dogs mostly to nursing homes, hospices and hospitals, but they also have a presence at the Homosassa library and the Homosassa Elementary School. Currently, they have more than 40 dogs in the program and owners take them for visits to facilities in Citrus, Hernando, Sumter and Marion counties. We test and observe the dogs to see if they would make good therapy dogs and whether or not they will pass all of our criteria, Schrader said. If you want to visit a facility, you would talk to the recreational director and ask if its OK. Then go in with your dog and meet with them, she said. Therapy Dogs Incorporated has a $5 million insurance policy for therapy dogs enrolled in the program. The dogs go through training and have to know sit, stay and lay down commands and how to walk gently on a lead. They also have to know how to go around wheelchairs, walkers and crutches. The therapy dogs get tested three different ways: twice in a medical facility and once a nonmedical facility. Once the dogs have passed their tests, the owners can send in their $30per-year membership fee and forms. Therapy dogs are different than service dogs that perform specific deeds or services for a person needing help, Schrader explained. There are medic alert dogs who will alert you if you are having a seizure or are diabetic and have problems with your blood sugars, she said. There is no legal right for therapy dogs to go into any facility, but service dogs are allowed to go anywhere. We are really proud that a lot of our dogs are shelter animals. Weve had little Chihuahuas, Pomeranians, all the way up to a 145-pound King Corso who came from the shelter, Schrader said. Sanders and Schrader spend 80 to 100 hours a year volunteering with Pet Therapy. They guide interested pet owners in contacting facilities interested in having therapy dogs come in to provide comfort and care for the residents. We were in a facility in Sumter County and a lady had a stroke, Sanders said. She had not spoken a word in three weeks and her husband was there visiting her. She zeroed in on a Lab we brought and she started patting the bed and saying Good dog. Good dog. Her husband started crying and the nurses were amazed. Those were her first words since she had her stroke. Therapy dogs help people in medical facilities, school, library SO YOU KNOW Potential therapy dogs must know basic commands and walk gently on a leash. Dogs must learn how to go around wheelchairs, walkers and crutches. Dogs must pass multiple tests to work as therapy dogs. Anyone interested in being a part of Therapy Dogs should call Ann Sanders at 352-302-5626. Hospital co-founder dies Staff reportCRYSTAL RIVER Dr. Carlos F. Gonzalez, who with his friend the late Pete DeRosa founded Seven Rivers Community Hospital, died Sunday, May 26, 2013 the day of his 83rd birthday. Dr. Gonzalez, who moved from Michigan to Crystal River in 1971, saw the need for a community hospital in Crystal River. He and DeRosa founded the hospital, now Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, in 1978. Dr. Gonzalez was born May 26, 1930, in Ponce, Puerto Rico. He became a polio victim at age 3 and his family moved to the mountains of Puerto Rico, close to a fast-moving river where he fought to overcome his polio. He was paralyzed and walked with crutches until a freshman in college. He participated in many sports that did not require running, such as shot put, discus and swimming. While attending Tufts University in Boston, Dr. Gonzalez met his wife, Helen, who was attending the Boston Conservatory of Music. They were married in 1952 and later had two daughters. He attended medical school in Puerto Rico and completed his medical residency in Ohio. In 1961, the family moved to St. Clair, Mich., where Dr. Gonzalez founded the River District Hospital. The effects of polio on his leg haunted him, and he had to give up surgery due to the many hours of standing it required. The harsh Michigan winters made walking very difficult and painful and the family, seeking a warmer climate, relocated to Crystal River in 1971. At that time, Citrus Memorial hospital was the only hospital in Citrus County. Dr. Gonzalez often had to spend the night while on-call because there were no emergency room physicians at the time. After the state approved Seven Rivers Community Hospital, Dr. Gonzalez became very involved in the hospital and community. His participation included: Chief of staff at Seven Rivers Community Hospital (now Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center). Chairman of the hospitals governing board. Medical director at Crystal River Geriatric Center. Staff physician at Key Training Center. President of the Crystal River Rotary Club. In his infrequent spare time, Dr. Gonzalez loved fishing, boating, scuba diving and hunting. He had his private pilot license and enjoyed flying even from Crystal River to Inverness to check on his patients. Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Helen; and two daughters, Laura Horn of Crystal River and Gloria Davenport of Asheville, N.C. Funeral Mass is at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River, with the Rev. Ryszard Stradomski celebrating. Entombment will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens, Beverly Hills. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Carols Gonzalez co-founded Seven Rivers hospital. Funeral Mass is at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills.

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Birthday It could be much easier for you to gratify your personal interests in the year ahead. Chances are, your newfound success may even be in an area where you usually meet with failure. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Any venture you undertake could turn out to be more dynamic than anticipated. Play things carefully, because you might have a tiger by the tail. Cancer (June 21-July 22) The key to your success will be your selfless attitude. If youre willing to go all out for people, they, in return, will knock themselves out for you. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be as amicable and outgoing as you can today. Relationships you establish in your current cycle will blossom into enduring friendships. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The rewards youve been anticipating are on the way. Outside events are what have been holding you back, and circumstances have been shifting in your favor. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Whatever knowledge or skills youve acquired recently will not go unused or wasted during the upcoming cycle. Put your experience to use. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) A career opportunity that could be bigger than anything you thought possible could come your way. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Friends will be looking out for your interests and will make things happen for you that you could never do on your own. Be sure to show the proper gratitude. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You might be able to increase your rate of progress if you raise the number of your ambitions. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If youre a member of a club or organization and youre asked to fill a particular post or position, do it. It could lead to something big. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Before you move on to a new enterprise, be sure youve gotten all that you can from your old ones. There could be some hidden payoffs. Aries (March 21-April 19) Positive changes are afoot, especially regarding an area in which you are highly skilled. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Proceed with cautious optimism when it comes to your career. You could be enormously lucky, but youll still need to tread carefully. Todays HOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, May 28, the 148th day of 2013. There are 217 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 28, 1863, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, made up of freed blacks, left Boston to fight for the Union in the Civil War. On this date: In 1533, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared the marriage of Englands King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn valid. In 1892, the Sierra Club was organized in San Francisco. In 1929, the first all-color talking picture, On with the Show, opened in New York. In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt pushed a button in Washington signaling that vehicular traffic could begin crossing the justopened Golden Gate Bridge in California. Neville Chamberlain became prime minister of Britain. In 1959, the U.S. Army launched Able, a rhesus monkey, and Baker, a squirrel monkey, aboard a Jupiter missile for a suborbital flight which both primates survived. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed a 10-year, $350 billion package of tax cuts, saying they already were adding fuel to an economic recovery. Five years ago: Nepals lawmakers abolished the monarchy and declared the country a republic, ending 239 years of royal rule. One year ago: Nineteen people, including 13 children, were killed in a mall fire in Qatar. Todays Birthdays: Actress Carroll Baker is 82. Actor John Karlen is 80. Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani is 69. Singer Gladys Knight is 69. Singer John Fogerty is 68. Actress Christa Miller is 49. Singer Kylie Minogue is 45. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., is 42. Television personality Elisabeth Hasselbeck (The View) is 36. Thought for Today: Intelligence rules the world, ignorance carries the burden. Marcus Garvey, Jamaican black nationalist (1887-1940). Today in HISTORY C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 90 58 NA HI LO PR 90 60 NA HI LO PR 92 60 NA HI LO PR 90 60 NA HI LO PR 89 58 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly Cloudy; hot THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly Cloudy; 30% chance of rain. Scattered storms in the afternoon. 40% chance of rain. High: 91 Low: 69 High: 89 Low: 70 High: 88 Low: 71 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 90/60 Record 101/55 Normal 91/65 Mean temp. 75 Departure from mean -3 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.80 in. Total for the year 6.10 in. Normal for the year 14.68 in.*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 9 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.15 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 58 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 38% POLLEN COUNT** Trees, grasses and weeds were all light. ** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:22 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:33 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY .........................11:55 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:13 A.M. MAY 31JUNE 8JUNE 16JUNE 23 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 85 72 pc Ft. Lauderdale 84 77 ts Fort Myers 90 71 ts Gainesville 90 66 pc Homestead 85 74 ts Jacksonville 83 67 pc Key West 86 77 ts Lakeland 90 70 pc Melbourne 85 75 pc City H L Fcast Miami 85 76 ts Ocala 90 69 pc Orlando 90 69 pc Pensacola 86 72 pc Sarasota 90 71 ts Tallahassee 90 67 pc Tampa 89 73 ts Vero Beach 85 75 ts W. Palm Bch. 83 74 ts FLORIDA TEMPERATURESEast winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy skies today. Gulf water temperature82 LAKE LEVELS Location Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka H L L L L L 86/70 84/68 80/55 95/69 77/64 69/60 62/52 86/68 73/51 62/52 75/60 78/67 84/66 85/76 90/72 82/70 THE NATION Albany 71 40 pc 76 60 Albuquerque 85 59 pc 86 55 Asheville 78 49 pc 82 55 Atlanta 85 62 pc 84 66 Atlantic City 74 40 r 71 63 Austin 90 69 pc 89 73 Baltimore 73 46 ts 78 66 Billings 67 48 .35 pc 73 51 Birmingham 86 63 pc 88 66 Boise 66 45 sh 67 43 Boston 73 47 s 72 57 Buffalo 71 40 r 79 63 Burlington, VT 68 41 s 76 55 Charleston, SC 84 61 pc 83 66 Charleston, WV 78 47 .01 ts 84 62 Charlotte 82 53 pc 85 62 Chicago 62 53 ts 84 68 Cincinnati 83 55 .09 ts 84 63 Cleveland 59 39 .01 ts 75 65 Columbia, SC 87 54 pc 88 65 Columbus, OH 71 53 .10 ts 85 64 Concord, N.H. 70 32 s 75 50 Dallas 85 72 pc 86 70 Denver 85 52 ts 80 55 Des Moines 77 59 .90 ts 82 67 Detroit 61 46 .22 ts 78 67 El Paso 94 64 s 95 69 Evansville, IN 86 60 pc 86 66 Harrisburg 71 41 ts 76 61 Hartford 74 43 r 78 58 Houston 90 70 pc 90 72 Indianapolis 81 56 .19 ts 85 65 Jackson 87 61 pc 87 69 Las Vegas 93 67 s 89 68 Little Rock 87 65 pc 86 68 Los Angeles 71 60 pc 69 60 Louisville 86 61 pc 85 67 Memphis 86 66 pc 88 68 Milwaukee 54 48 .04 ts 71 63 Minneapolis 62 55 .05 ts 77 64 Mobile 86 70 pc 87 69 Montgomery 91 62 pc 91 65 Nashville 88 57 pc 87 65 New Orleans 86 65 pc 87 72 New York City 73 51 r 75 60 Norfolk 77 52 pc 83 65 Oklahoma City 81 70 ts 86 68 Omaha 77 60 .80 pc 85 66 Palm Springs 97 68 s 93 67 Philadelphia 74 49 r 76 66 Phoenix 94 71 s 95 73 Pittsburgh 61 40 ts 79 63 Portland, ME 68 40 s 68 50 Portland, Ore 66 52 .88 sh 62 51 Providence, R.I. 73 41 s 76 58 Raleigh 80 49 pc 84 63 Rapid City 72 55 .26 ts 74 55 Reno 67 43 pc 69 49 Rochester, NY 71 40 r 72 65 Sacramento 69 53 pc 79 57 St. Louis 84 66 .31 ts 88 68 St. Ste. Marie 70 38 ts 65 53 Salt Lake City 74 53 ts 66 47 San Antonio 90 73 pc 89 74 San Diego 74 60 pc 68 62 San Francisco 62 54 pc 64 52 Savannah 85 59 pc 84 67 Seattle 62 53 .21 sh 62 52 Spokane 65 50 sh 65 45 Syracuse 69 47 r 74 60 Topeka 83 62 2.75 ts 86 69 Washington 73 52 ts 82 70YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 103 Wink, Texas LOW 23 Truckee, Calif. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 89/78/ts Amsterdam 75/47/sh Athens 77/65/sh Beijing 84/71/sh Berlin 64/51/sh Bermuda 72/66/pc Cairo 98/72/s Calgary 68/48/sh Havana 86/73/ts Hong Kong 85/79/ts Jerusalem 80/62/s Lisbon 66/49/pc London 61/41/sh Madrid 70/43/pc Mexico City 76/55/ts Montreal 72/57/pc Moscow 79/60/sh Paris 60/45/r Rio 79/68/pc Rome 65/59/sh Sydney 66/54/sh Tokyo 71/66/sh Toronto 66/64/sh Warsaw 68/50/sh WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 9:35 a/4:46 a 8:31 p/4:39 p 10:23 a/5:34 a 9:27 p/5:33 p Crystal River** 7:56 a/2:08 a 6:52 p/2:01 p 8:44 a/2:56 a 7:48 p/2:55 p Withlacoochee* 5:43 a/11:49 a 4:39 p/ 6:31 a/12:44 a 5:35 p/12:43 p Homosassa*** 8:45 a/3:45 a 7:41 p/3:38 p 9:33 a/4:33 a 8:37 p/4:32 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 5/28 TUESDAY 9:30 3:16 10:00 3:45 5/29 WEDNESDAY 10:34 4:20 11:01 4:47 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 94 62 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Today's active pollen:Ragweed, Grasses, Chenopods Todays count: 4.2/12 Wednesdays count: 4.2 Thursdays count: 4.4 E NTERTAINMENT Affleck awarded honorary doctorate PROVIDENCE, R.I. Academy Award-winning actor and director Ben Affleck has received one of six honorary doctorate degrees from Brown University. Affleck was among artists, writers, scientists and educators to receive the degrees from the Ivy League school at commencement exercises Sunday. He received a doctor of fine arts degree. The Massachusetts native directed, produced and starred in Argo, which won this years Oscar for Best Picture. Others getting honorary doctorates were author and MIT Professor Junot Diaz ; retired Stanford University bacteriologist Stanley Falkow ; Tougaloo College President Beverly Wade Hogan ; medical doctor and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation President Risa LavizzoMourey ; and Miami Dade College President Eduardo Padron McCartney leaves pick at Graceland MEMPHIS, Tenn. Paul McCartney made his first visit to the one-time home of the King of Rock n Roll and left a gift behind. According to the official Twitter account of the former Beatle, McCartney dropped a personal guitar pick on Elvis Presleys grave and said this is so Elvis can play in heaven. McCartney, a lifelong Elvis fan, toured Graceland, Elvis Memphis mansion, on Sunday. He was in Memphis to play a show on the North American leg of his Out There tour. The show at FedExForum marked McCartneys first visit to the Bluff City in two decades.Israeli author wins Franz Kafka prize PRAGUE Acclaimed Israeli author Amos Oz has won the prestigious Franz Kafka Prize in the Czech Republic. An international jury that included prominent German literary critic Marcel Reich-Ranicki selected Oz for the prize, which is awarded annually with a $10,000 prize. Past winners have included the American novelist Philip Roth and Nobel laureates Elfriede Jelinek of Austria and Harold Pinter of Britain. It is awarded by the Praguebased Franz Kafka Society to authors whose works appeal to readers regardless of their origin, nationality and culture. The society said in a statement Monday that Oz has agreed to travel to Prague with his wife for an October ceremony to receive the prize. Oz has been said to be among the candidates for the Nobel Prize for literature in the past several years. Daft Punk sets Spotify record NEW YORK Daft Punk has set another record on Spotify. The music service said Monday that the electronic duos new album, Random Access Memories, had the biggest number of streams in its first week in the United States. Spotify wouldnt release the number of streams, but Daft Punk beat the 8 million streams Mumford & Sons set with Babel last year. Random Access Memories was released last week and is the fourth album from the Grammy-winning French group. Daft Punk also set a Spotify record last month when its song Get Lucky had the biggest streaming day for a single track in the U.S. and the United Kingdom. Since its debut, Get Lucky has been streamed more than 27 million times. Spotify launched in 2008. From wire reports Associated Press Actor Ben Affleck speaks Sunday at Brown University graduation after receiving an honoray degree. A4 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68* 1 year: $121.87* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946 Report a news tip: Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken .......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community 000ER89 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Miscellaneous Notices ..................C12 Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices....................C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration............C12 Paul McCartney

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 A5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, MAY 28 TUESDAY, JUNE 4 9:30am-4:30pm. Call for appointment, limited number of appointments available!

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Natasha Barat, 25 LECANTONatasha N. Barat, 25, of Lecanto, Fla., died Friday, May 24, 2013, in the care of her family and HPH Hospice. Arrangements are entrusted to Fero Funeral Home. Rose Genzardi, 88INVERNESS Rose M. Genzardi, age 88, Inverness, died Saturday, May 25, 2013, surrounded by her family and under the care of Hospice of Citrus County. Rose was born Sept. 8, 1924, in New York City to the late Lorenzo and Rose (Griffo) Doino. She worked as a professional caterer. She was Catholic by faith. Rose enjoyed music, dancing and playing cards. Left to cherish her memory are her son and daughter-in-law John and Karen Genzardi, Inverness; her daughter Joanne Rinaldi, St. Cloud, Fla.; five grandchildren, Gina, Nicholas, Lisa, Michael and John; and nine greatgrandchildren. A Funeral Service of Remembrance will be at 3 p.m. Friday, May 31, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home. The family will receive friends in visitation from 1 p.m. until the hour of service. Inurnment will be at a later date at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. The family requests donations in Roses memory to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of flowers. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dr. Carlos Gonzalez, 83 CRYSTAL RIVERCarlos F. Gonzalez, M.D., 83, of Crystal River, died May 26, 2013. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River, with Fr. Ryszard Stradomski, celebrant. Entombment will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens, Beverly Hills. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. www.fero funeralhome.com Mildred Quinlan, 85 HOMOSASSA Mildred M. Quinlan, 85, of Homosassa, Fla., passed away May 25, 2013, under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. She was a reporter for most of her life and moved to the area 19 years ago from New Jersey. Mildred was a member of South Amboy Womens Club, the president of the Hovic League, a member of the Moose Lodge and part of the CCW at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Crystal River, Fla., where she was also a member. She is survived by her loving husband, David Quinlan; children, David (Gabriele) Q. Quinlan Jr., Michael (Joan) Quinlan, Sharon E. Quinlan, Noreen (Tom) Peters and Ellen (Peter) Laul Laramee; grandchildren, Wayne Laul, Alyce Quinlan, Kelly Quinlan, Fiona Quinlan, Shibon Quinlan and Katie Peters. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. A Mass of the Resurrection will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 30, 2013, at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Crystal River, Fla. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Charles Charlie Voyton, 72HOMOSASSA Charles (Charlie) Voyton, age 72, passed away from cancer on May 26. He lived in Homosassa, Fla. He was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Norma Voyton. He graduated from Nanticoke High School, in Nanticoke, Pa., and served three years in the U.S. Army during the Berlin Crisis. He was employed with IBM and transferred to Tampa in 1980. He retired from IBM in 1995 with 30 years of service. He is survived by his loving wife, Linda, of 25 years; three daughters; one stepson; one stepdaughter; and six grandchildren. He has two brothers in New York and five brothers and one sister in Pennsylvania. He attended St. Thomas Catholic Church in Homosassa. He was a member of the Good Sam Chapter, Trail Blazing Sams, since 1991, and enjoyed traveling in his motorhome and working summers at Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. The family will receive friends at the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory, 8495 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, Fla., from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 29, 2013. Friends are welcome to join the family in procession to St. Thomas Catholic Church, 7040 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, Fla., for a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465 in Charlies memory. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.John Hammons, 94 PHILANTHROPIST SPRINGFIELD, Mo. John Q. Hammons, a prominent hotel developer and southwest Missouri philanthropist who rose from a poor Depressionera childhood to build a national real estate empire, has died. He was 94. Hammons, who actively led his company well into his 80s, died peacefully Sunday at a nursing home in Springfield, said Sheri Davidson Smith, a spokeswoman for John Q. Hammons Hotels & Resorts. Hammons first business a company that sold mortar-less bricks went bust in the late 1940s, saddling him with debt. He paid off that debt after two years and recovered to build housing subdivisions in southwest Missouri over the next decade before purchasing 10 Holiday Inn franchises with a partner in 1958 from the companys founder. He went on to build 200 hotels nationwide, including Embassy Suites, Marriotts, Radissons and Holiday Inns. Hammons also developed an expansive real estate portfolio associated with those hotels of golf courses, restaurants, convention centers, a casino and riverboat gambling. He avoided bigcity locations in favor of properties in college towns and state capitals. Along the way, he donated millions of dollars to local hospitals, colleges and public television. His name graces so many buildings and streets in Springfield from the basketball arena at Missouri State University to the citys tallest building that comedian Bob Hope once joked that the city should change its name to Hammonsville. He regularly appeared on Forbes magazines list of the wealthiest Americans and estimated his personal wealth several years ago at $1 billion. He took his company public in 1994 before returning it to private ownership a decade later. During his career, according to the company, Hammons developed 210 hotel properties in 40 states. The hotel magnate was born James Quentin Hammons in 1919 in rural Fairview, about 60 miles southwest of Springfield, to a dairy farmer who lost the 200-acre family farm during the Depression. Ed Shaughnessy, 84 DRUMMER LOS ANGELES Ed Shaughnessy, the jazz drummer who for nearly three decades anchored the rhythm section of Doc Severinsens Tonight Show band, has died in Southern California. He was 84. William Selditz, a close family friend, told the Los Angeles Times that Shaughn essy had a heart attack Friday at his home in Calabasas, outside Los Angeles. The New Jersey native began his jazz career as a teenager, playing with Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman and Count Basie. He replaced Buddy Rich in Tommy Dorseys band. In the mid-1950s Shaughnessy became a staff musician at CBS. From 1963 to 1992, Shaughnessy was a latenight television fixture as part of the house band on NBCs Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. He is survived by a son and three grandchildren. A6 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE For Information and costs, call 726-8323 Burial Shipping Cremation Funeral Home With Crematory 000EHVX 000ET3Q Call 1-800-277-1182 to schedule a free candidate screening www.gardneraudiology.com Crystal River and Inverness Offices Hearing in Noise Comparison Study Participants Sought Gardner Audiology, a leader in hearing satisfaction research, is seeking participants to evaluate and compare a new advanced noise suppression technology in hearing aids that hide inside your ear canal verses behind the ear models. In exchange for completing a pre and post-fitting questionnaire Gardner will loan you the hearing aid model of your choice for a free 30 day field study. Audiologists with advanced university degrees will provide all exams and follow up care free of charge. At the end of 30 days you will return the loaner aids or purchase them with a generous discount. It is your choice. Lend Your Ears 3000 Central Florida residents have participated in Gardner Audiology research studies Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 0 0 0 E T F G 000F15V 000EH62 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000EXBF 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Charles Voyton Mildred Quinlan Dr. Carlos Gonzalez Rose Genzardi Obituaries Deaths ELSEWHERE OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of the arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Obituaries will be posted online at www. chronicleonline.com. Area funeral homes with established accounts with the Chronicle are charged a $25 base fee, then $8.75 per column inch. Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is a $25 base fee, then $10 per column inch. Small photos of the deceaseds face can be included for an additional charge. From wire reports

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Its been nearly eight years since Hurricane Wilma raked the southern end of Florida and caused billions in damages, the last of eight hurricanes to hit the state in 2004 and 2005. Yet even as the state has been spared from additional hurricanes since that time, Floridas fragile property insurance market has resulted in nearly year after year of steadily rising insurance rates for homeowners. We have no choice but to continue to pay it, said Henry Kempf, a New Port Richey homeowner and a customer with statecreated Citizens Property Insurance Corp. We will have to afford it in order to have the peace of mind. Annual reports prepared by Floridas Office of Insurance Regulation show that the department has been approving more than 100 rate hike requests a year since 2009 including requests to hike rates by double-digits. That includes increases for Citizens, the states largest residential property insurer with nearly 1.3 million policyholders. A report released in January by Florida State University concluded that homeowners in the state paid nearly $8 billion in premiums in 2011. And sometimes the financial impact doesnt just come from rate increases. The state-created Citizens, for example, has tightened its policies to cut down on discounts it offers or raised deductibles connected to sinkhole coverage. Citizens is supposed to be for property owners who cant get private policies. For Kempf the whole situation is frustrating: No one is watching out for the people of Florida. Everyone has their own agenda. Hurricane storm season officially starts Saturday and federal forecasters predict it will likely be more active than an average hurricane season. The prediction issued last week calls for 13 to 20 named Atlantic storms, seven to 11 that strengthen into hurricanes and three to six that become major hurricanes. This storm season, however, may prove even more crucial than ever for homeowners in the Sunshine State. Thats because some are predicting Florida may be finally reaching the end of a volatile period for insurance rates if the state can avoid disaster this year. There are some early signs we have reached price equilibrium, Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty said last week. Locke Burt, chairman and president of Security First Insurance, the states fourth-largest residential insurer, predicted his company will likely not ask for a rate hike in the coming year. The reasons for Floridas steadily increasing rates are varied and have triggered endless arguments, especially among state lawmakers and others in the past two decades. The biggest expense remains the cost of reinsurance which is the money an insurer spends with an out-of-state or foreign company to provide the company financial backing in case of major claims. Other causes that have been cited include millions in other types of losses such as sinkholes. A Pulitizer Prize-winning series in 2010 by the Sarasota Herald-Tribunepointed out how insurers paid out millions in bonuses to company executives or had large overhead costs compared to the rest of the nation. Plus, McCarty conceded all rate filings are allowed to include some percentage of profit for private insurers. Sean Shaw, the former insurance consumer advocate for the state, put the blame on the Florida Legislature for siding too often with the insurance industry. The senior citizen living on a fixed income simply cant keep paying increase and increase with no real explanation, said Shaw, who is now an attorney with a Tampa firm that represents policyholders. When will the consumer stop taking it on the chin and when will the Legislature say enough is enough? Insurance industry officials argue insurers in the past did not charge adequate rates to deal with the real risk of covering homes in hurricane-prone Florida. The fragile nature of the market has been exposed by storms such as Hurricane Andrew in 1992, a Category 5 storm that destroyed much of the South Florida city of Homestead, and the series of storms that battered the state in 2004 and 2005. Burt, using data collected by McCartys office, contends that while the average premium has gone up since 2007, the actual coverage provided to homeowners has also gone up. Burt said that means the average premium per $1,000 in property value has actually gone down during that time period. Insurance companies, by law, cannot raise rates in order to recover money paid out during a storm. But practically speaking, a large hurricane can still trigger rate hikes. Large storms and huge damages can prompt reinsurers based outside the state to raise their rates, which translates into higher costs for the insurers covering homeowners. If there are no hurricanes, those guys are happy, happy, happy, said Burt, whose Ormond Beachbased company has about 180,000 policyholders. Burt added that insurers need to purchase adequate reinsurance each year to make sure they have the resources in a case a big storm strikes the state. We dont want to be a thinly capitalized Florida company that is going to blow away when the wind blows, he said. The reason Burt and McCarty predict rates may stabilize is that reinsurance costs declined this year. But that may not be enough for the roughly one in five residential policyholders who belong to Citizens. S TATEC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 A7 000ESD3 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330 Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Fast Braces Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open Fridays Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. NEW PATIENTSPECIAL! $ 150 00 Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion?FREE Consultation With the DentistSenior Citizens Discount (Ask For Details) Value $ 215 EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS$ 1,995 000F1UQ 000EU3P Stone Stucco Columns Decorative Foam Banding Painting & Pressure Washing 352-746-5951 Free Estimates www.ColonyStone.com Are you tired of getting a cheap come on price, only to be told that your hearing loss is too bad for the sale priced hearing aid to work? Its called Bait and Switch advertising, and it is against the law! At Professional Hearing Centers, we can get you those cheap come on aids, but instead, we offer help from the best technology available. Your hearing is too precious to play games with; I know, I have a severe hearing loss and have worn devices for over 40 years. If you want a cheap come on, see our competitors, if you want real, quality solutions for your hearing, give us a call. Youll be glad you did, and youll Hear Better Now GUARANTEED! Denny Dingler, HAS Audioprosthologist 211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness 726-4327 Sin ce 1983 Professional Hearing Centers 000ESL7 www.InvernessHearing.com We Can Sell You a Cheap Hearing Aid Like Our Competitors Offer... But Wed Rather Help You With Something That Will Work! 000ER0R Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol Property insurance up Despite no hurricanes in seven years, rates rise Savoring the sun Memorial Day Dozens of boaters, including a pair on a WaveRunner, enjoy the Memorial Day holiday Monday on a sandbar near Baker's Haulover Inlet in Biscayne Bay in Miami Beach. Associated Press

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A8 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000F1B4 Associated PressSEATTLE By Michael Hills estimation, 90 percent of the people pumping gas at his station just south of the U.S.-Canada border in Washington state are Canadians. Gas north of the 49th parallel, he said, is about $1.30 per gallon more expensive than in the United States. But thats not the only product that Canadians seek in visits to Washington state: Beer, wine and milk are significantly cheaper (beer and wine alone are roughly half the price in the U.S.). Add a strong Canadian dollar and the result is a key element of the economy in the towns of Whatcom County. For example, the town of Blaine, population just shy of 5,000, generates more than $225,000 from a penny-per-gallon gas tax, which is about 30 percent of its street maintenance budget. Thats why Hill and others are troubled by the notion of charging a fee to enter the U.S. by land. Last month, in its 2014 fiscal year budget proposal, the Department of Homeland Security requested permission to study a fee at the nations land border crossings. Its a deterrent, said Hill, whose station is fully stocked with wine and has a reader board that says Thank you Canadians. That lone request sparked wide opposition among members of Congress from northern states, who vowed to stop it. A fee, they said, would hurt communities on the border that rely on people, goods and money moving between the U.S. and Canada. The imposition of such a toll would act as a barrier to the greater economic integration that we seek, and is the absolute last thing we should be doing to grow our economy, stated a letter sent to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano earlier this month signed by 18 Republican and Democratic House lawmakers. Democrat U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont is sponsoring an amendment to the immigration reform bill that bars Homeland Security from conducting the study. The senator has also promised to stop any funding for the study. In the House, Democrat Rep. Suzan DelBene of Washington state introduced a bill to stop the creation of a fee. This week an amendment by Democrat Rep. Bill Owens of New York to stop the study was introduced to the House to the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Bill. Lawmakers and people from the southern border, though, did not show such strong opposition, highlighting a north-south divide on how to pay for border infrastructure. Border entry fee study sparks northern opposition Domestic battery arrest Kristen Kenney 24, of Beverly Hills, at 6:05 p.m. May 20 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. Other arrests Daniel Kester 23, of North Pine Haven Point, Crystal River, at 8:40 p.m. May 20 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Bond $2,000. Tara Pantas 27, of Peyton Place, Brooksville, at 8:42 p.m. May 20 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance (methadone, oxycodone and methamphetamine) and a misdemeanor charge of retail petit theft. Bond $6,250. Kimberly Heater 26, of South Winding Oaks Drive, Homosassa, at 9:47 a.m. May 21 on a Citrus County warrant for violation of probation on an original felony charge of possession of a controlled substance. No bond. Howard Cohen 29, of Northwest 28th Place, Sunrise, at 10:32 a.m. May 21 on a Citrus County warrant for violation of probation on an original felony charge of driving under the influence with serious bodily injury. Bond $2,500. For the RECORD Shooting leaves two dead, five injured Associated PressEDEN, Texas Two people are dead and five injured, including a sheriff, after a gunman in Central Texas opened fire Sunday on several vehicles, apparently at random, authorities said. The Texas Department of Public Safety identified the man as 23-year-old Esteban J. Smith of the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base. In a statement Monday, Department of Public Safety spokesman Tom Vinger said Smith later died in a gunfight with an agency trooper and a state game warden. The Texas Department of Public Safety identified the man as 23-year-old Esteban J. Smith of the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base in North Carolina. DPS said the shootings began about 4:30 a.m. Sunday when the gunman shot a motorist in the Eden area in Concho County, about 40 miles southeast of San Angelo. Over the next 90 minutes, hes suspected of shooting two people who were sitting in a car at a convenience store in McCulloch County and then another motorist back in adjacent Concho County. Shortly after 6 a.m., a 41year-old woman, Alicia Torres, was found dead in her car in Eola, just east of San Angelo. The suspect fired on the vehicle of Concho County Sheriff Richard Doane when the sheriff came upon him north of Eden, according to DPS. Doane was wounded in the gunfire and hospitalized. A state trooper and game warden came upon the scene and exchanged gunfire with the suspect, who was killed. An assault rifle, handgun and hundreds of rounds of ammunition were recovered, DPS said.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 A9 000F1Z0

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Good plan to back Commissioners back County Road 491 plan (May 16). I applaud you. This is much needed. Unfortunately, youre going to get a lot from the oldies and Im an oldie that this is a countryside county. Im sorry, people, but we are growing and are going to have to realize this. I think this is a great opportunity for Citrus County to bring in jobs and money. The only stupid thing I see about it is its going to be four lanes to the south of County Road 486. I would think, look at the cost of it. Youre going to have to widen it eventually anyway. So why not just widen it all the way to (C.R.) 486 to begin with? Thats a stupid thing to stop from going to (C.R.) 486.Growing weedsThe Oak Village Homeowners Association ... cant enforce proper lawn and proper parking regulations according to its own deed restrictions. People are growing weeds in place of grass and parking 15-foot-high-by-30foot-long houseboats anytime they please. The deed restrictions were put in place to deter these things from happening. Calls to the association are treated as non-important and not returned as promised. In return for our $135-a-year membership, we get nothing and are treated as nothing and I guess we should expect nothing. Big mistake if you I just have one thing to say: I was reading the paper this morning. I hope that the people of Citrus County are smart enough not to allow Scott Adams to suggest someone to fill the county (administrators) seat. That would be the biggest mistake you made since you voted him into office.Dog in WalmartFriday afternoon my wife and I were in a local Walmart and we saw a scene that was very disgusting. A couple was walking their Jack Russell dog through the store and through the grocery department. It was not a guide dog; it was just a regular dog, small. But I feel like Walmart was no place, or a regular department store or a grocery store is no place to have a pet going through the store.Good fit Well, it appears from history that David Yulee Levy would have fit right in with Washington today. From what I read about him, the face of politicians hasnt changed much. O PINION Page A10 TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 Gun owners: Us and them Us: 134 million legal and law abiding gun owners. Them: seven to 10 sick individuals inflicting harm on American society in the last three to four years. Who does the government go after? The 90 million legal and law-abiding gun owners. Makes sense doesnt it? Think about that! Wayne C. Sessa Beverly Hills Report all abusers of women Kudos go to Mr. William Young for his excellent article of May 3, 2013, on abuse entitled Hold Thy Tongue. I am sure Mr. Young must be as shocked and sickened as I am by the abuse that went on in Ohio with the three young women. I remember when I was a very young child I overheard my father speaking about a man in Maryland who was abusing his wife/girlfriend. What they did to this man was to severely whip him and then throw him in jail. We dont do that anymore. Perhaps we are making the abusers life too easy ... we are not strict enough. The laws, without going through a judge, should allow our law enforcement people to go into homes where there is suspicion that a man is abusing a woman. If we have nothing to hide we shouldnt be upset to allow it. Too much abuse is happening (even in the military) and it must be stopped. Women should stick up for themselves and report the abuse ... whether it is happening to them personally or to a friend or neighbor. Life is too short and we must not allow women to be degraded in any way by any man who has apparently turned into a demon. Ruth J. Anderson Homosassa Not partners but patsies Am I the only one who sees the arrogance of Duke Energy? First, they throw the county in a tailspin by not paying their taxes and then they have the nerve to ask for tax payers and rate payers to pay for their new proposed plant in Levy County. I always thought if you invested in a project or business you were a partner, not a patsy. Their investors reap profits while we reap bills and expenses to decommission a plant that hasnt been on line for years because they took the lowest bidder to fix problems caused by the last low bidder. Must be ME! John McPhee Inverness WASHINGTONE arly in an opinion issued recently by a unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, Judge A. Raymond Randolph states: Although the parties have not raised it, one issue needs to be resolved before we turn to the merits of the case. The issue he raised but could not resolve that is up to the Supreme Court illuminates the Obama administrations George Wallace-like lawlessness. It also demonstrates the judiciarys duty to restrain presidents who forget the oath they swear to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution. The appeals court was deciding whether the National Labor Relations Board has the power to issue the rule requiring nearly 6 million private-sector employers to post notices informing workers of their right to join a union. Failure to post the notice would be, the NLRB says, an unfair labor practice, equivalent to interfering with, restraining or coercing employees. The regulation of speech about unionization has been tightly restricted for many decades. In 1947, Congress amended the National Labor Relations Act with this: The expressing of any views, argument, or opinion, or the dissemination thereof, whether in written, printed, graphic, or visual form, shall not constitute or be evidence of an unfair labor practice under any of the provisions of this (act), if such expression contains no threat of reprisal or force or promise of benefit. The Supreme Court had already held that employers have First Amendment free-speech rights to engage in non-coercive speech about unionization. In the recent case, the NLRB argued the required posting is its own speech, not the speech of any employer. The appeals court disagreed, and cited some firmly established principles of free-speech law, including the right to decide not to disseminate the speech of others. The Supreme Court has hitherto held it is unconstitutional to force students to salute the flag. And the court has said freedom of speech prohibits the government from telling people what they must say. Otherwise the First Amendment, which guards the individuals right to speak his own mind, left it open to public authorities to compel him to utter what is not in his mind. Just because the NLRB wrote the required posting does not make it merely government speech rather than the coerced speech of employers who are compelled to disseminate it on their premises. So the NLRBs rule requiring the posting was illegitimate. But, then, everything the NLRB, as currently constituted, does is illegitimate because two of its members were put in their seats by an unconstitutional act by President Obama. What Randolph referred to early in the opinion is this: The NLRB has five seats and can act with a quorum of three members. But it does not have three. Seventeen months after the NLRB issued its rule requiring employers to post the notice, the appeals court held that the Senate was not in recess when Obama made three supposed recess appointments to the board. The Constitution states: The president shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate. The Constitution also states the Senate has the power to reject presidential appointments and to determine the rules of its proceedings. The Senate, however, said it was not in recess when Obama said it was. So the D.C. court said those three appointees were not rightfully in office. The NLRB said it respectfully disagreed with the court, and went its merry way, without a quorum. Absent the perfunctory expression of respect, this was pretty much what George Wallace did 50 years ago this year when he stood in the door of Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama to prevent two young blacks from registering as students. Wallace said the district judge who had ordered the admission of the students was entitled to his opinion but that he, Wallace, had a different opinion, so there. Which is essentially what the NLRB said when the D.C. court said the board lacked a quorum to act. The NLRB went on issuing edicts, legitimacy be damned. Courts defeated Wallaces lawlessness. Presumably the Supreme Court will defeat Obamas by telling the NLRB that the D.C. court was right about recess appointments. By such judicial vigilance against the excesses of elected officials, democracy is disciplined and progressivisms agenda unchecked executive power is understood to be unconstitutional. George Wills email address is georgewill@washpost.com. Do not confuse your vested interests with ethics. Do not identify the enemies of your privilege with the enemies of humanity. Max Lerner, 1902-1992 The NLRBs school-door stand CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisherMike Arnold .............................................. editor Charlie Brennan ........................ managing editor Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member Mac Harris ................................ citizen member Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief BRING IT ON County boasts prime setting for sports tourism S ports tourism is getting to be one of those clichd phrases. Especially in economically hard-hit Florida, counties and cities are looking for marketable opportunities, which increasingly often present themselves in the form of ball fields or arenas. Just because everyones looking at sports tourism doesnt mean its not worth a look. And kudos to Rebecca Bays, Citrus County commissioner and chair of the countys Tourism Development Council (TDC), for nudging us in that direction. The TDC has adopted some strategic partnering moves to draw sports events here, for example: the recent regional Dragon Boat competition, several youth sports tournaments and the planned 2014 Florida Horseshoe Pitchers Association championship tournament. Assistant county administrator Cathy Pearson is a strong advocate, too, and supports the partnership of the TDC with the countys Parks & Recreation department to make better use of existing facilities. Making better use of existing facilities is key. The kinds of investments that Citrus County needs to make do not include large new sports facilities, as nice as that might be. We need more infrastructure, convenient and desirable lodging, and more strategic alliances among hospitality partners to ensure availability of attractive packages. We need to make having events here successful for the participants as well as their entourages, which we hope means entire families who want to extend their stays for a few days before or after the sports events. We also need to focus on the things that make Citrus County unique. That includes our nature-oriented and particularly our water-based offerings and we have the unusual advantage of both freshand saltwater venues. Noncompetitive water-based activities are gaining popularity, and active women are a growing sports tourism demographic. All good news for us. We shouldnt compete for the really large sport events, because we just cant support them. Lets look for smaller, specialty activities that fit well with what we have to offer and can take place throughout the year. TDC research indicates a large percentage of those who visit Citrus County say they are satisfied or very satisfied with their experience and plan to return. So lets focus on sports tourism as a niche market to draw visitors to Citrus County. Then lets make sure they have such a good time they want to return. THE ISSUE: Sports tourism as a market niche for Citrus County?OUR OPINION: We have a lot to offer; lets make it happen. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352563-5660. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and h ave less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE George Will OTHER VOICES

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Context still matters Consider the following assertions from Edna Mattos most recent letter (Framers original intent matters more). She is responding to a previous letter of mine (Context matters), which in turn was responding to an earlier letter of hers. She asserts George Mason was Father of the Bill of Rights. This is a stretch. Although Mason first proposed a Bill of Rights during the waning days of the Constitutional Convention, he was largely ignored. It was James Madison who later drafted the document and shepherded it through Congress. As tradition has it, Madison was Father of the Constitution. She asserts, regarding the Bill of Rights, The people gave government only enumerated powers. Madison would disagree. During congressional debate over the wording of the Tenth Amendment (1788), he insisted it was impossible to limit a government to the exercise of enumerated powers only. There must necessarily be admitted powers by implication, unless the Constitution descended to record every minutiae. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall cited this debate when he ruled on the implied powers of Congress to establish a national bank, even though that power is not explicitly authorized by the Constitution (McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819). As for the peoples role in granting these (implied, not enumerated) powers, they gave none. It was largely James Madisons handiwork. She asserts the right of the people, as individuals, to bear arms existed before the Declaration of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights. We should not assume the Framers would agree to transfer the right to the States or national government. This is a half-truth, at best. The right to bear arms, a military term, was indeed granted to most adult white males but only as members of a well-regulated militia that was always under some form of government control, either state or national, or some combination of the two. (During the Colonial period, ultimate authority resided with the Crown.) There was never a natural right to gun ownership in early America public or private as she here implies, so no transfer of this right to anyone. You cant transfer what you dont have and to a government that already had it! She asserts that The sole purpose of the Bill of Rights was ... to further affirm the limited powers of the national government. Quite the contrary. It was the overall weakness of the central government under the Articles of Confederation one noted by George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, among others led to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, where the governments powers were significantly enlarged. In drafting the Bill of Rights, Madison was careful not to compromise any of those Constitutionally derived powers that were so essential to the peace and security of the fledgling Republic. He proudly noted the structure and stamina of the government are as little tainted as possible by the amendments he proposed (Madison to Edmund Randolph, June 15, 1789). She asserts no documents from the founding generation state the right to bear arms was a collective right to be associated only with the militias. Actually, there were several such documents. Two of the most prominent were the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1789) and the Massachusetts Constitution (1789); the language of the former is virtually identical to the language of the Second Amendment which is itself the most prominent document of all. On one issue, Ms. Mattos is correct. In my previous letter, I inadvertently referred to Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution as Section 8, Article 1. It was a copying error, nothing more. Peter Poland Hernando Crunching nuke numbers I have to admit that we cancelled our subscription to the Tampa Bay Timesa couple of months ago. We only took it on the weekend and they were just too liberal for our tastes. Of course, they called us once a week trying to entice us back, so I finally told them to not call again. It still shows up in the driveway on occasion and thank goodness last Sunday was one of those days. If you dont get the paper its worth going online and reading reporter Ivan Penns great article on the true costs of nuclear power partially as it applies to us and Duke Energy and their proposed plant in Levy County. Mr. Penns analysis tells us an entirely different story than we are being fed by the Florida PSC, Duke and the legislature. He says that, using government projections for the future prices of natural gas vs. nuclear full, the nuclear plant will cost $3.8 billion more over a 60-year lifespan, and that 3.8 billion will flow directly into Dukes pockets as profits. PSC Commissar Lisa Edgar, a threeterm member of the commission, says nuclear may save billions over the years compared to gas plants. In looking over her CV, I see nothing to suggest she is capable of that kind of financial analysis. She is a professional regulator first with the EPA and now with PSC. She is a lawyer. You would assume the PSC has staff that is capable of financial analysis but maybe not. When I talk about financial analysis I am talking about the time value of money or as Mr. Penn called it in a conversation with me, the discount rate. Its a concept that most students are introduced to in a managerial accounting course in a MBA program. Its a technique to move amounts and streams of money back and forth in time and assign a proper value to it at any given time. For example, when the Federal Reserve was created back in 1913 with the mission of protecting the value of our money, a dollar was worth a dollar. Today that dollar they were supposed to protect is worth 2 cents in 1913 dollars. The point is that money spent on the production of energy 30 years from now cant be valued in todays dollars. It has less value. Thats why when they estimate the cost of the nuclear plant at 24 billion dollars; it shows up as only 13.9 billion in Mr. Penns analysis including fuel. Fuel bought 30 years down the road is cheap in todays dollars. Costs incurred 30 or 60 years from now have to be brought back to todays dollars. Mr. Penn used 2009 as his base year. Mr. Penn did an excellent sidebar explaining The Times analysis but left out one important fact which generated my phone call to him. What discount rate did you use in your analysis? Because you can make this study come out however you want by fiddling the discount rate. I can see a rate from 0 percent to 12 percent being used. Progress has it somewhere in their rate-setting rules that they can make up to a 12 percent profit on their investment. The rate of inflation is hovering around zero, as is the federal discount rate. The average return on a corporate bond is 4.2 percent. The study was done with a rate ranging from 6.4 to 6.6 percent. That at least sounds reasonable to me. It may be a little high, but a 12-percent ROI? Harley Lawrence Homosassa Late-term abortion In the first week of May, there have been two headlines about 2-year-olds killed by custodial adults. Very likely both adults will have a day in court and serve prison time. The outrage about these incidents is understandable. However, during that same time, an abortion doctor has been on trial for letting babies born through botched abortions die (or killing them) with very little attention and certainly not the public outrage shown over the 2-year-olds. Why? Even our president praised the organization that sponsors such horrific deeds at the same time the trial for Dr. Gosnell was going on. He never even acknowledged this action. If killing an infant at 26 weeks or even 36 or 38 weeks is acceptable, how can anyone fail to understand the mindset of an adult that finds the 2-year-old child to be an inconvenience? Think about it. The value of human life has been drastically reduced. God did not plan it this way.Robert E. Hagaman Homosassa O PINION C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 A11 000F2WJ 000F1VM 000ESKN Visit Us $ 5 99 INSTALLED. MOLDINGS & TRIM EXTRA. 5 COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM. HARDWOOD FLOORING Only sq. ft. $ 2 99 LAMINATE In Stock Only INSTALLED $ 12 99 IN STOCK ONLY CARPET Lifetime Stain & Pet Odor Warranty STARTING AT Tax Included $ 1 12 PORCH/LIGHT COMMERCIAL 4 COLORS TO CHOOSE MOLDINGS & TRIM EXTRA CARPET INCLUDES INSTALLATION AND TAX 3 4 1 0 8 1 3 341-0813 sq. yd. sq. ft. Only sq. ft. 2012 2012 2012 2012 w w w m i c h a e l s f l o o r c o v e r i n g i n c n e t w w w m i c h a e l s f l o o r c o v e r i n g i n c n e t www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net 5 COLORS IN STOCK ONLY 000F2WH Letters to the EDITOR

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Associated PressNEW ORLEANS Before Cpl. Thomas Cotton Jones was killed by a Japanese sniper in the Central Pacific in 1944, he wrote what he called his last life request to anyone who might find his diary: Please give it to Laura Mae Davis, the girl he loved. Davis did get to read the diary but not until nearly 70 years later, when she saw it in a display case at the National World War II Museum. I didnt have any idea there was a diary in there, said the 90-yearold Mooresville, Ind., woman. She said it brought tears to her eyes. Laura Mae Davis Burlingame she married an Army Air Corps man in 1945 had gone to the New Orleans museum on April 24 looking for a display commemorating the young Marine who had been her highschool sweetheart. I figured Id see pictures of him and the fellows hed served with and articles about where he served, she said. She was stunned to find the diary of the 22year-old machine gunner. Curator Eric Rivet let her take a closer look, using white gloves to protect the old papers from skin oils. It was the first time in his 17 years of museum work that someone found themselves mentioned in an artifact in the museum, Rivet said. The diary was a gift to Jones from Davis. They had met in the class of at Winslow High School. He was a basketball player and I was a cheerleader, she said. Jones had given her his class ring but they werent engaged, she said. They had dated through high school. They went to the prom together. He made his first diary entry while a private at Camp Elliott in San Diego, a little less than a year before he was killed. He described it as my life history of my days in the U.S. Marine Corps ... And most of all my love for Laura Mae for whom my heart is completely filled. So if you all get a chance please return it to her. I (am) writing this as my last life request. A snipers bullet between the eyes killed Jones on Sept. 17, 1944, the third day of the U.S. assault on the Pacific island of Peleliu, in Palau. Peleliu was where U.S. forces learned the Japanese had changed their island defense tactics. Instead of concentrating units on the beaches and finishing with reckless banzai charges, the Japanese holed up in bunkers, trenches, pillboxes and caves many of them blasted into the islands hills and mountains that had to be taken one at a time. Jones, nicknamed in high school for his blond hair, was in the 1st Marine Divisions L Company, 3rd Battalion. He was among 1,794 Americans killed on Peleliu and nearby islands in a 2 1/2-month assault that Marine Maj. Gen. William Rupertus had predicted would be over in a few days. Another 7,302 Americans were wounded. An estimated 10,900 Japanese were killed; 19 soldiers and sailors became prisoners of war. Memorial Day Associated Press Jackson Lee Morrow, 11 months old, waves his flag Monday during the Roswell Remembers Memorial Day military ceremony at city hall in Roswell, Ga. Jacksons parents, Jacob & Jonelle Morrow, Alpharetta, both serve in the Army. FBI: Man tried to open door on flight PORTLAND, Ore. A passenger on a commercial flight from Alaska to Oregon was arrested Monday after witnesses said he tried to open an emergency exit during the planes descent and other passengers had to help restrain him using shoelaces and seat-belt extensions. Passengers and crew aboard the Alaska Airlines flight from Anchorage to Portland told investigators that 23-year-old Alexander Michael Herrera made unusual statements before trying to open the planes door Monday morning. Murder suspect is sex offenderANCHORAGE, Alaska A man who has been charged with killing an elderly Alaska couple and raping their 2-year-old great-granddaughter is a registered sex offender convicted of breaking into a home and assaulting an 11year-old girl four years ago. Jerry Andrew Active, 24, was convicted in 2010 of assaulting the girl near Dillingham, Alaska, while her family slept. Authorities said that on Saturday, Active broke into the apartment home of Touch Chea, 71, and his wife Sorn Sreap, 73, and beat the couple to death. He also raped Sreap. Documents show he was supposed to be on probation until at least 2014. Big bike-share program launchedNEW YORK Mayor Michael Bloomberg called a long-awaited bicycle-sharing program a big win for New York City residents and tourists. The privately funded Citi Bike program was launched Monday. It now offers 6,000 bikes at 330 docking stations in Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn, with plans to expand. Man charged in babys slaying CHICAGO Police said a Chicago man charged in the death of a 6-month old girl was a gang member who was retaliating for the theft of a video game console. Koman Willis is charged with first-degree murder and aggravated battery with a firearm. Jonylah Watkins was killed March 11 while sitting in her fathers lap in a minivan. Police said the dad, Jonathan Watkins, was the intended target. Report: Man kills self, daughter OROSI, Calif. Authorities said a man killed one of his adult daughters and critically wounded another before taking his own life while three grandchildren were in the house in California. The Fresno Bee reported on Monday it appears 63year old Anthony Alvarez died of self-inflicted gunshot wounds sometime before 4:39 a.m., when a child called to report gunfire in the home in Orosi. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A12 TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Up in flames Associated Press The fire-damaged exterior of Royal Caribbeans Grandeur of the Seas cruise ship is seen Monday while docked in Freeport, Grand Bahama island. Royal Caribbean said the fire occurred early Monday while on route from Baltimore to the Bahamas. Mali sets date for July election BAMAKO, Mali Malis government said it will have the countrys presidential election July 28. It will be the first ballot since a coup in March 2012 ousted Malis democratically elected president just months before he was due to step down at the end of his last term in office.President backs truce of gangsTEGUCIGALPA, Honduras President Porfirio Lobo said Monday he is backing efforts to arrange a truce between the countrys two largest and most violent gangs. Lobo told The Associated Press he has called Roman Catholic Bishop Romulo Emiliani of San Pedro Sula to offer his support in bringing peace to Honduras, which has one of highest homicide rates in the world. Chile issues alert over volcano SANTIAGO, Chile Chile issued a red alert Monday for the Copahue volcano on the border with Argentina that has become increasingly active. An official said the increased activity could lead to an eruption and officials will soon begin evacuating 2,240 people, or 460 families, in a 15.5 mile radius. U.S.s Biden visits Colombia BOGOTA, Colombia In his first visit to Colombia in more than a decade, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden said hes pleased security concerns can now take a back seat to trade and economic issues in talks with Washingtons longtime ally. Biden praised President Juan Manuel Santos on Monday for helping lead Latin America toward a middle class, democratic and secure future. Russia: Defense offer insufficientMOSCOW A senior Russian diplomat said Washingtons latest moves aimed at easing Moscows concern about NATOs U.S.-led missile defense plans are insufficient. Mondays statement followed an exchange of letters by President Barack Obama and Russias President Vladimir Putin that mentioned the missile defense dispute, a longtime irritant in bilateral ties. Tenth suspect arrested in slayingLONDON British police arrested a 10th suspect Monday in connection with the vicious street killing of a soldier in London, an apparent Islamic extremist attack that has horrified the country and heightened racial tensions. The 50-year-old man was detained in Welling, east of London, on suspicion of conspiring to murder 25-year-old soldier Lee Rigby, Scotland Yard said. World BRIEFS From wire reports No EU deal reached on Syria Associated PressBRUSSELS Austrias foreign minister said Monday that the European Unions top diplomats have failed to agree about how to deal with Syrias civil war, and EU sanctions against Bashar Assads regime are likely to expire on June 1. However, three other European diplomats insisted the 27-member bloc still had a chance to come to an agreement. One said Mondays talks in Brussels were far from over. The three spoke on condition of anonymity as the proceedings continued. During a break from critical EU talks aimed to work out a common position on Syria, Austrian Foreign Minister Michael Spindelegger told reporters he was concerned about what he called a failure to reach a common position and said that after the EU sanctions collapse everybody is entitled to deliver weapons to the Assad regime or to the opposition. But he said he also was holding out hope for a lastminute reversal that could salvage an accord in the talks set to continue deep into the evening. Speaking at an impromptu news conference, Spindelegger said that during the talks France and Britain had agreed not to deliver any weapons until Aug. 1. Those two countries the EUs biggest military powers have been pushing the bloc to lift its embargo on delivery of weapons into Syria to help the embattled opposition. British and French diplomats did not immediately return calls seeking comment after Spindeleggers remarks. British Foreign Minister William Hague left the EU offices for the dinnertime break, saying only that he would return later. French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius left the talks earlier Monday to return to Paris to meet with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov over the issue. The talks had been billed as a pivotal opportunity for the bloc to overcome differences about whether to ease sanctions against Syria to allow arms shipments to the rebels. Earlier, France added urgency to the debate, with Fabius pointing to increasing signs that chemical weapons were being used in the conflict. Diary of a Marine Associated Press ABOVE: A page of out of the diary of 22-year-old Marine Cpl. Thomas Jones featuring a photo of his high school sweetheart, Laura Mae Davis Burlingame, is on display May 23 at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. Behind is a Marine uniform like one Jones, who died in the bloody assault on a Japanese-held island during World War II, would have worn. Before Jones died, he wrote what he called his last life request to anyone who might find his diary: Please give it to Laura Mae Davis, the girl he loved. BELOW: Davis, now Laura Mae Davis Burlingame, holds a photo of herself from high school in her Moorseville, Ind. home. WWII vet gets lost dog tag A long-forgotten dog tag that spent the past 69 years in a farm field in France is back in the hands of the western New York veteran who lost it. Irving Mann said he was skeptical when an email from a French woman recently arrived at his Rochester jewelry store. She said shed found the tag in her barley field and was looking for its owner. The 88-year-old chairman of Manns Jewelers said he thought it might be a scam. But any doubts disappeared when the woman, Sophie LaFollie, sent it to him in the mail, just in time for Memorial Day. Mann said he must have lost the pendant when his 90th Infantry Division stopped for a few days while fighting across Nazi-occupied France in 1944. From wire reports Woman, 90, finds diary meant for her in museum The Marine described the diary as my life history of my days in the U.S. Marine Corps ... And most of all my love for Laura Mae for whom my heart is completely filled. So if you all get a chance please return it to her. I (am) writing this as my last life request.

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Baseball/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Hockey/ B3 Sports briefs/ B3 Auto racing/ B4 Tennis/B4 Olympics/ B4 Nadal begins quest for eighth French Open title. / B4 S PORTS Section B TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE I n 2013, both Citrus and Lecanto were playoff softball teams after completing solid regular season campaigns. A major reason why was the offensive prowess of both the Hurricanes and the Panthers. Lecantos Amber Atkinson and Paige Richards, and Citrus Erica Corlew were important components for their squads successes. All three excelled in nearly every facet of the game. And if offensive numbers are something youre interested in, one has to look no further than Atkinson. The senior catcher holds nearly all of Lecantos school records, among them the career and single season records for home runs after the left-handed batter slugged nine this season. She also batted .441 with 46 RBIs and had 41 runs scored for the Panthers. Richards, for her part, offered a fleetfooted outfielder for Lecanto while also contributing a .372 batting average, 16 RBIs and 12 stolen bases. Both Atkinson and Richards were key pieces of Lecantos District 6A-6 championship team, which advanced to the Class 6A regional semifinals. As a freshman, Corlew led Citrus with 23 RBIs and 15 doubles (the latter leading the county), while stabilizing the middle infield for the Hurricanes. Corlew also scored 19 times as Citrus returned to the playoffs after an extended absence. The winner will be announced at the Chronicle sports banquet on Thursday, May 30, at the College of Central Florida in Lecanto. Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle sports editor. He can be emailed at jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or reached at 352-564-2928. Amber Atkinson, Lecanto senior Erica Corlew, Citrus freshman Paige Richards, Lecanto junior Softball Player of the Year finalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM Atkinson, Corlew, Richards great all-around players for respective squads All-Chronicle softball team Kelly Abramowich, Citrus pitcherHurricanes hurler had a 1.59 ERA with 115 strikeouts in 123 innings pitched and threw a no-hitter against Central on March 12. Tessa Kacer, Seven Rivers pitcher The Warriors best player, Kacer struck out 80 batters in 119 2/3 innings and also contributed offensively with a .438 average, four home runs and 32 RBIs. Also added three doubles and three triples. Amber Atkinson, Lecanto catcher Panther had stellar follow-up to junior season by batting .441 with 9 home runs, 46 RBIs, 41 runs scored, 13 doubles, four triples and 25 stolen bases. On defensive end, teams rarely ran on strong-armed backstop. Amy Abramowich, Citrus first baseBatted .398 with six doubles, 9 RBIs, 23 runs and 10 stolen bases for the Hurricanes. Jordan Martin, Lecanto second base Panthers upperclassman batted .310 with 22 runs scored. Martin added three doubles, nine RBIs and swiped 10 bases. Amber Hopkins, Lecanto third baseFreshman had a .395 batting average, two doubles, two triples, 18 RBIs and 19 runs scored. Erica Corlew, Citrus shortstopFreshman showed good power as 15 of her 24 total hits were doubles. Batted .304 with a home run, 23 RBIs and 19 runs scored for the Hurricanes. Paige Richards, Lecanto outfielder Panthers junior hit .372 with two doubles, a triple, a home run, 16 RBIs and stole 12 bases while patrolling the outfield defensively.Chloe Lane, Crystal River outfielderPirates senior had .397 average with 16 runs scored. Lane added two doubles, a triple, four RBIs and nine stolen bases. Aaron McIntyre, Citrus outfielderHurricanes senior scored 12 runs and batted in 13 runs while posting a .296 batting average. McIntyre also had three doubles, a triple and a home run in 2013. Marissa Pool, Crystal River DHThe Pirates shortstop, Pool batted .371 with 20 RBIs and 17 runs scored in 2013. The Crystal River infielder struck out just once while doubling five times and hitting a triple. Amber Russo, Lecanto utility Panthers sophomore had .386 batting average with six doubles and a triple. Russo added 16 RBIs and 18 runs scored for Lecanto. Danielle Gomez, Crystal River utilityThe Pirates most versatile player, Gomez moved to catcher and played well defensively. On offense, she batted .315 with a home run and 10 RBIs, while adding four doubles, 15 runs and seven stolen bases. Compiled by C.J. Risak Jon-Michael Soracchi ON POINT Chronicle file photos Haslem stuns Pacers Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS The Indiana Pacers didnt see this version of Udonis Haslem coming. There was no reason to. Haslem, a veteran forward who had scored in single digits in six of his previous seven playoff games, finished with 17 points on 8-for-9 shooting to help the Miami Heat beat the Pacers 114-96 in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals on Sunday night. The Heat took a 2-1 lead in the series and regained homecourt advantage with Game 4 set for tonight in Indianapolis. Haslem went a quiet 1-for-7 from the floor in the first two games of the series, but he looked for his shot early and often in Game 3. His mid-range jumpers constantly left 7-foot-2 center Roy Hibbert out of position. Hibbert had been playing slightly loose defense on Haslem and Chris Bosh to help protect the rim and the lane against LeBron James and Dwyane Wade. Hibbert said Haslems effectiveness forced him to change his approach. I think he was really the guy that pushed them, the catalyst for them, he said. Just him hitting those shots really made us have to think on defense. Who do we guard? Do we guard the paint, or do we have to go out to the shooters out in the corner. Pacers coach Frank Vogel was heavily criticized for taking Hibbert out of Game 1 before James game-winning layup. Vogel said he made the move because he was worried Bosh would get open for an easy jumper. The Heat spent 48 minutes showing Pacers fans why Vogels Game 1 decision might not have been such a bad idea. Thats what Miami does, they space you out, he said. They make it difficult to have a rim protector in the game at all times. They challenge you to keep a guy at the rim and still make them close out to an 18-foot jump shooter. We have to account for that. While Haslem and Bosh pulled Hibbert and power forward David West away from the basket, James took over as the Heats post presence, overpowering and dominating All-Star forward Paul George. James, bouncing back after two late turnovers cost Miami in Game 2, had 22 points, four rebounds and three assists. Now its the Pacers turn to adjust. Tar Heels top seed for NCAA baseball tournament Associated PressOMAHA, Neb. North Carolina is the No. 1 seed in the NCAA baseball tournament. The Division I selection committee on Monday rewarded the Tar Heels (52-8) for a strong body of work that included an exhausting run to the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament championship. The 64-team tournament opens Friday with 16 four-team, double-elimination regionals. Best-of-three super regionals will be held next week, with those winners moving to the College World Series in Omaha, Neb. The other national seeds, in order, are: Vanderbilt, Oregon State, LSU, Cal State Fullerton, Virginia, Florida State and Oregon. The 1999 Miami Hurricanes are the only top-seeded team to go on to win the national title, and that was in the first year of the current tournament format. The Southeastern Conference led all leagues with nine bids. The ACC has eight, and the Pac-12 and Sun Belt have four apiece. Arizona (34-21) wont get a chance to defend its national title. The Wildcats were left out of the tournament for the first time in four years despite winning five of their last six to finish 15-15 in Pac-12 play. Miami (36-23) is in the tournament field for the 41st straight year, extending its own record. Florida State (44-15) is making its 36th consecutive appearance. First-time participants will be Bryant, Canisius, Central Arkansas, Savannah State and South Dakota State. Bryant (44-16-1), from Smithfield, R.I., made it in its first year of eligibility since moving from Division II. Thirty-one of the 64 teams were in the field last year. Johnson powers Rays past Marlins 10-6 Fernandez struggles in return to Tampa Bay Associated PressST. PETERSBURG This is the most productive month of Kelly Johnsons career, and Monday was the most productive day. Johnson became the first player in Tampa Bay history to hit two three-run homers in the same game, and the Rays needed them in a 10-6 victory against the Miami Marlins. Kelly drove the offensive engine today, manager Joe Maddon said. The Rays nearly squandered an early six-run lead, and sent Miami to its sixth straight loss. Johnson, who has 24 RBIs in 21 games this month, also doubled, singled and stole a base. He matched his career highs for RBIs and hits during his eighth multihomer game, and first since May 30, 2011, against the Marlins while with Arizona. I feel good and I feel confident, Johnson said. Youre always searching for something thats going to let you feel confident and you try to just roll with it. It could be daily, weekly. Thats the way baseball is. Im not going to sit here and try to figure it out. Johnson homered off rookie Jose Fernandez (2-3) in a six-run second inning. He then broke open the game by hitting his 10th home run of the season in the eighth against A.J. Ramos. Tampa Bays Kelly Johnson, right, high fives teammates Ben Zobrist, left, and Yunel Escobar, after hitting one of his two three-run home runs Monday against Miami in St. Petersburg. Associated Press See RAYS / Page B3 Udonis Haslem

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B2 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE M AJOR L EAGUEB ASEBALL Associated PressKANSAS CITY, Mo. Yadier Molina homered and drove in four runs to help the St. Louis Cardinals beat the slumping Kansas City Royals 6-3 on Monday. Molina hit a two-run homer in the first, doubled home a run in the third and his sacrifice fly in the fourth scored Pete Kozma. While the Cardinals own the best road record, 19-9, in the majors, the Royals dropped their ninth straight home game one shy of the franchise record set last year. The anticipated pitchers duel between Adam Wanwright and James Shields failed to materialize. Wainwright (7-3) allowed 12 hits, the most he has allowed in a game since Sept. 14, 2010 against the Chicago Cubs. Shields (2-6) yielded nine hits and season-highs of six runs and five walks in six innings to lose his fourth straight start. INTERLEAGUE Mets 2, Yankees 1NEW YORK Daniel Murphy hit a go-ahead single in the eighth after being denied a homer two innings earlier, and the New York Mets rallied to beat the rival Yankees 2-1 for their second straight home win after losing eight in a row. David Wright hit his first home run at Citi Field this year to tie it in the seventh. Murphy came through against David Robertson (3-1) to hand the Yankees their first loss in 23 games when leading after six innings. Brandon Lyon (2-2) pitched a scoreless the eighth in relief of an impressive Jonathon Niese. Blue Jays 9, Braves 3 TORONTO Edwin Encarnacion hit a three-run homer, Colby Rasmus and J.P. Arencibia each had a two-run shot and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Atlanta Braves 9-3. Encarnacion went 2 for 5 with five RBIs as the Blue Jays improved to 3-0 in interleague play. Mark Buehrle (2-3) allowed one run and five hits in six innings to snap a seven-start winless streak and earn his 26th career interleague victory.Red Sox 9, Phillies 3 BOSTON Dustin Pedroia and Mike Napoli homered in the first inning as the Boston Red Sox jumped to an early lead and coasted to a 9-3 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies. Substitute starter Alfredo Aceves (2-1) had his best outing of the year, holding the Phillies to one run over six innings. Jacoby Ellsbury had hits in each of the first three innings to help the Red Sox earn their fourth consecutive victory and their 10th in their last 13 games. Tyler Cloyd (1-1) allowed three runs in the first inning and was charged with three more in the third. He lasted just 2 1/3 innings, giving up nine hits and a walk while striking out two. Orioles 6, Nationals 2 WASHINGTON Jason Hammel held the Nationals to two runs in his longest start of the season and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Washington Nationals 6-2. Nick Markakis and Yamaico Navarro each drove in two runs and the Orioles had 15 hits, including three from Manny Machado. Hammel (7-2) improved to 4-0 at Nationals Park, striking out eight without a walk and allowing eight hits. Nationals starter Gio Gonzalez (3-3) kept Baltimore scoreless until the fourth when the Orioles scored three runs. Reds 4, Indians 2 CINCINNATI Joey Votto hit a tiebreaking home run in the eighth inning, lifting the Cincinnati Reds over the Cleveland Indians 4-2 in the opener of their intrastate matchup. Votto won this interleague game with his ninth homer, tagging lefthander Nick Hagadone (0-1). Shin-Soo Choo led off the Reds eighth with a single. Votto followed with an opposite-field shot into the seats in left. Choo, traded from the Indians to the Reds in the offseason, also hit a leadoff homer in the first.Tigers 6, Pirates 5DETROIT Justin Verlander struck out 13 in seven innings, and Jhonny Peralta had four hits to lead the Detroit Tigers over the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-5. It was Peraltas first four-hit game since June 4, 2010, when he was playing for Cleveland. Detroit has won six of seven. Verlander (6-4) hadnt pitched more than five innings in any of his previous three starts, struggling at times with his location. Francisco Liriano (3-1) allowed four runs and eight hits in five innings. Twins 6, Brewers 3MILWAUKEE Joe Mauer wound up with a home run instead of a double after umpires went to video replay, and the Minnesota Twins beat the Milwaukee Brewers 6-3. The Twins led 4-3 when Mauer led off the seventh inning against Tom Gorzelanny with a long fly to left field. Mauer stopped at second base, and the umpires went to review the drive. Astros 3, Rockies 2, 12 inn. HOUSTON Brandon Barnes hit a last at-bat, two-out RBI ground-rule double in the 12th inning to lift the Houston Astros to a 3-2 win over the Colorado Rockies. Matt Dominguez singled off former Astro Wilton Lopez (1-2) to start the inning. He was replaced by pinch-runner Ronny Cedeno and he advanced to second on a sacrifice bunt. The Rockies intentionally walked Jose Altuve with two outs before Barnes connected on a double which sailed into the corner of right field to score Cedeno and give Houston the win. Paul Clemens (2-2) struck out two in a scoreless 12th for the win. Mariners 9, Padres 0SEATTLE Aaron Harang threw a four-hitter, Jason Bay hit his first career leadoff homer and Michael Morse added a three-run shot as part of Seattles four-run first inning as the Mariners beat the San Diego Padres 9-0. Harang (2-5) allowed a leadoff bloop double to Everth Cabrera and then retired 18 of the next 19 batters. It was his first complete game since June 4, 2009 and first shutout since April 12, 2009. He struck out a season-high eight and threw 122 pitches. Diamondbacks 5, Rangers 3 PHOENIX Tyler Skaggs, just called up from the minors, struck out nine in six scoreless innings and the Arizona Diamondbacks held on to beat the Texas Rangers 5-3 in the opener of a doubleheader. Skaggs (1-0) gave up three hits and walked three, one intentionally. Martin Perez (0-1), took the loss in his first start of the season, allowing four runs, three earned, in 5 1/3 innings. Cody Ross hit a solo homer for the Diamondbacks. Adrian Beltre had a two-run single in Texas three-run ninth.Athletics 4, Giants 1 OAKLAND, Calif. Josh Donaldson hit a two-run homer to back Dan Strailys strong start, and the Oakland Athletics beat the San Francisco Giants 4-1 in the Bay Bridge Series opener. Straily (3-2) tossed six innings of one-run ball, allowing four hits and one walk. Buster Poseys groundout in the sixth inning drove in San Franciscos lone run. Donaldson connected against Madison Bumgarner (4-3) in the fourth, and Yoenis Cespedes added a two-run double against George Kontos in the seventh to extend Oaklands lead. Grant Balfour recorded his 11th save of the season for Oakland, which has won four straight and nine of 10. Cubs 7, White Sox 0 CHICAGO Jeff Samardzija threw a complete game, two-hit shutout and Julio Borbon hit a two-run home run and the Chicago Cubs beat the Chicago White Sox 7-0. Samardzija (3-6) pitched the Cubs first complete game shutout since Randy Wells shut out the Giants on Aug. 29, 2011. The first White Sox hit came from Conor Gillaspie in the third inning. Samardzija then got Jeff Keppinger to hit into a double play as he faced the minimum through four innings. Interleague Associated Press St. Louis Cardinal Daniel Descalso beats the tag Monday by Kansas City second baseman Elliot Johnson during the eighth inning at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. Cards take I-70 series opener Murphy comes through in eighth, Mets edge Yankees INTERLEAGUE Mondays Games Baltimore 6, Washington 2 Detroit 6, Pittsburgh 5 Cincinnati 4, Cleveland 2 Houston 3, Colorado 2, 12 innings Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 3 St. Louis 6, Kansas City 3 Tampa Bay 10, Miami 6 Arizona 5, Texas 3, 1st game Oakland 4, San Francisco 1 Seattle 9, San Diego 0 Toronto 9, Atlanta 3 Chicago Cubs 7, Chicago White Sox 0 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Boston 9, Philadelphia 3 L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, late Texas at Arizona, 2nd game, late Today Atlanta (Maholm 6-4) at Toronto (Morrow 2-3), 12:37 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-3) at Houston (Lyles 2-1), 2:10 p.m. Baltimore (Gausman 0-1) at Washington (Undecided), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0) at Detroit (Porcello 2-2), 7:08 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 4-3) at Cincinnati (Latos 4-0), 7:10 p.m. Miami (Slowey 1-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 2-2), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 6-3) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 5-0), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Lee 5-2) at Boston (Dempster 2-5), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 1-7) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-2), 8:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 3-4) at Milwaukee (Undecided), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lyons 1-0) at Kansas City (E.Santana 3-4), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (Kickham 0-0) at Oakland (Parker 2-6), 10:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Blanton 1-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 5-2), 10:10 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 3-5) at Seattle (Maurer 2-6), 10:10 p.m. Rays 10, Marlins 6 MiamiTampa Bay abrhbiabrhbi Coghln lf5021Zobrist 2b4311 Polanc 3b5010Joyce rf4120 Dietrch 2b3110KJhnsn lf5246 Ozuna rf3110Fuld lf0000 Brantly c5110Longori 3b3001 Ruggin cf5111Loney 1b3100 Dobbs 1b4122Scott dh4100 Hchvrr ss4110DJnngs cf2110 JBrown dh4012JMolin c3011 YEscor ss4111 Totals386116Totals32101010 Miami0003300006 Tampa Bay06010003x10 EBrantly (2). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBMiami 9, Tampa Bay 8. 2BCoghlan (6), Hechavarria (3), K.Johnson (5). HRRuggiano (8), K.Johnson 2 (10). SBOzuna (2), Joyce (3), K.Johnson (5). CSDe.Jennings (4). SFLongoria, J.Molina. IPHRERBBSO Miami Fernandez L,2-331/357436 Below12/320011 Da.Jennings11/310012 A.Ramos12/323320 Tampa Bay Odorizzi486612 Lueke120003 McGee W,2-2 H,10210002 Jo.Peralta H,14100000 Rodney100012 Odorizzi pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. HBPby Fernandez (De.Jennings), by Odorizzi (Dietrich, Dietrich). PBJ.Molina 2. UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Jerry Layne. T:39. A,025 (34,078).Blue Jays 9, Braves 3 AtlantaToronto abrhbiabrhbi Smmns ss5011MeCarr lf3110 RJhnsn rf4000Gose pr-lf0100 J.Upton lf3000Bautist rf4210 FFrmn 1b4120Encrnc dh5125 Gattis dh4132Lind 1b3210 McCnn c4000Arencii c4112 Uggla 2b3010ClRsms cf4122 CJhnsn 3b4110Lawrie 3b3020 JSchafr cf3000DeRosa pr-3b1000 Bonifac 2b4010 Kawsk ss4000 Totals343 83Totals359119 Atlanta0000100203 Toronto02200230x9 EF.Freeman (3). DPToronto 1. LOBAtlanta 7, Toronto 6. 2BGattis (11), C.Johnson (10), Me.Cabrera (11), Bautista (10), Lind (10), Col.Rasmus (9), Bonifacio (9). HRGattis (11), Encarnacion (14), Arencibia (12), Col.Rasmus (8). SBLawrie (2). IPHRERBBSO Atlanta T.Hudson L,4-4686621 Cor.Rasmus233320 Toronto Buehrle W,2-3651126 Lincoln222202 Weber110011 UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, John Hirschbeck; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:41. A,808 (49,282).Red Sox 9, Phillies 3 PhiladelphiaBoston abrhbiabrhbi Revere cf4020Ellsury cf5131 MYong 3b5000Nava rf5000 Rollins ss4020Pedroia 2b3112 Howard 1b5020Ciriaco pr-2b1110 DYong dh4110D.Ortiz dh4120 DBrwn lf4112Napoli 1b4222 Mayrry rf3020Drew ss3222 Galvis 2b4000Carp lf5110 Kratz c3111Sltlmch c4021 Iglesias 3b4010 Totals36311 3Totals389158 Philadelphia0010000203 Boston30302001x9 EMayberry (1), Aceves (2). DPBoston 3. LOBPhiladelphia 10, Boston 10. 2BRollins (15), Howard (13), Ellsbury 2 (10), D.Ortiz (11), Napoli (19), Carp (7). HRD.Brown (10), Kratz (5), Pedroia (3), Napoli (8). IPHRERBBSO Philadelphia Cloyd L,1-121/396612 Stutes21/342102 Horst11/310013 Bastardo100000 Mi.Adams2/311131 De Fratus1/300000 Boston Aceves W,2-1671134 Mortensen11/311110 A.Miller12/331103 WPCloyd. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Bill Miller. T:26. A,627 (37,499).Cardinals 6, Royals 3St. LouisKansas City abrhbiabrhbi MCrpnt rf4121Lough cf5140 YMolin c2224AEscor ss5010 Beltran dh3000AGordn lf4121 Craig lf5031Butler dh4120 MAdms 1b5000Hosmer 1b4011 Freese 3b4010MTejad 3b3010 SRonsn pr1000Francr rf4010 Jay cf4000Kottars c4010 Kozma ss5110EJhnsn 2b4000 Descals 2b3230 Totals36612 6Totals373132 St. Louis2021010006 Kansas City1020000003 DPSt. Louis 2, Kansas City 2. LOBSt. Louis 11, Kansas City 8. 2BM.Carpenter (16), Y.Molina (14), Descalso (7), Lough (2). HR Y.Molina (3). SBJay (2). SFY.Molina. IPHRERBBSO St. Louis Wainwright W,7-38123305 Mujica S,15-15110001 Kansas City Shields L,2-6696654 Collins120001 B.Chen210022 HBPby Wainwright (M.Tejada). WP Wainwright. UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Joe West; Second, David Rackley; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:46 (Rain delay: 1:02). A,746 (37,903). Interleague Mets 2, Yankees 1abrhbiabrhbi Gardnr cf4110RTejad ss4000 J.Nix ss4021DnMrp 2b4011 Cano 2b4010DWrght 3b3121 V.Wells lf4010Duda lf4000 DAdms 3b4010Parnell p0000 ISuzuki rf3010Buck c3000 Overay 1b3010Ankiel cf-rf3000 CStwrt c3010I.Davis 1b3000 Hafner ph1000Baxter rf-lf3010 PHughs p2000Niese p2020 DRrtsn p0000Lyon p0000 Logan p0000Vldspn ph0100 Lagars cf0000 Totals321 91Totals29262 New York (A)0000010001 New York (N)00000011x2 DPNew York (A) 1, New York (N) 3. LOB New York (A) 7, New York (N) 5. 2BBaxter (4). 3BGardner (4), D.Wright (4). HRD.Wright (7). SP.Hughes. IPHRERBBSO New York (A) P.Hughes741106 D.Robertson L,3-12/321111 Logan1/300001 New York (N) Niese781114 Lyon W,2-2110000 Parnell S,8-10100012 HBPby D.Robertson (D.Wright). PB C.Stewart. UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Brian ONora; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Adrian Johnson. T:44. A,911 (41,922).Orioles 6, Nationals 2 BaltimoreWashington abrhbiabrhbi Markks rf6022Span cf4110 Machd 3b5130Lmrdzz 2b4000 Hardy ss3010Zmrmn 3b4021 A.Jones cf5121LaRoch 1b4110 C.Davis 1b4220Dsmnd ss4010 Wieters c3121TMoore lf4011 Pearce lf4010Berndn rf4010 Dickrsn lf1000KSuzuk c4000 YNavrr 2b5122GGnzlz p2010 ODay p0000Stmmn p0000 Hamml p3000Abad p0000 ACasill ph1000Tracy ph1000 HRdrgz p0000 Storen p0000 Totals406156Totals35282 Baltimore0003101106 Washington0100010002 EZimmerman (9). DPWashington 1. LOB Baltimore 14, Washington 6. 2BMachado (23), A.Jones (17), T.Moore (5), Bernadina (1), G.Gonzalez (1). 3BSpan (3). SBMachado (5), LaRoche (2). SHammel. SFWieters. IPHRERBBSO Baltimore Hammel W,7-2882208 ODay100001 Washington G.Gonzalez L,3-352/384443 Stammen141102 Abad1/300000 H.Rodriguez121111 Storen110002 WPG.Gonzalez. T:05. A,260 (41,418).Reds 4, Indians 2 ClevelandCincinnati abrhbiabrhbi Bourn cf4000Choo cf4221 Kipnis 2b4110Cozart ss2120 ACarer ss4010Votto 1b4112 Swisher 1b4000Phillips 2b3001 CSantn c3001Bruce rf3000 MrRynl 3b3010Frazier 3b2000 Brantly lf3000Paul lf3010 Stubbs rf3010DRonsn lf0000 UJimnz p1000Mesorc c3000 Giambi ph1111Leake p3000 Hagadn p0000Broxtn p0000 Shaw p0000Chpmn p0000 Totals30252Totals27464 Cleveland0001000102 Cincinnati10000102x4 EShaw (1), Phillips (3). DPCleveland 2, Cincinnati 1. LOBCleveland 3, Cincinnati 5. 2BA.Cabrera (16), Cozart (10). HRGiambi (3), Choo (10), Votto (9). SBA.Cabrera (5). S U.Jimenez, Cozart. SFC.Santana, Phillips. IPHRERBBSO Cleveland U.Jimenez742246 Hagadone L,0-11/322200 Shaw2/300001 Cincinnati Leake71/352107 Broxton W,2-12/300001 Chapman S,13-15100002 WPU.Jimenez. PBC.Santana 2. T:44. A,822 (42,319).Twins 6, Brewers 3MinnesotaMilwaukee abrhbiabrhbi Carroll 3b4000Aoki rf3000 Dozier 2b5110Segura ss4121 Mauer c3311CGomz cf3222 Wlngh lf4010YBtncr 3b4010 Mornea 1b3011Bianchi 2b4010 Doumit rf3012AlGnzlz 1b4000 Roenck p0000LSchfr lf3000 Dunsng p0000Braun ph1000 Burton p0000Maldnd c3000 Colaell ph1000Badnhp p0000 Perkins p0000Axford p0000 Hicks cf4110WPerlt p1000 Flormn ss4021Weeks ph1010 Correia p2000Grzlny p0000 Parmel rf1111McGnzl p0000 Lucroy ph-c1010 Totals34696Totals32383 Minnesota1001201106 Milwaukee0001020003 EAle.Gonzalez (5). DPMinnesota 3. LOB Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 4. 2BHicks (4), Florimon (6), Weeks (7). HRMauer (4), Parmelee (4), Segura (8), C.Gomez 2 (10). SBDozier (5). SCorreia. IPHRERBBSO Minnesota Correia W,5-4673314 Roenicke H,72/310000 Duensing H,91/300000 Burton H,11100000 Perkins S,10-11100002 Milwaukee W.Peralta L,3-6554353 Gorzelanny11/311122 Mic.Gonzalez2/310001 Badenhop111100 Axford110001 HBPby Correia (C.Gomez). T:00. A,627 (41,900). Rays schedule May 28 vs Miami May 29 at Miami May 30 at Miami May 31 at Cleveland June 1 at Cleveland June 2 at Cleveland June 4 at Detroit June 5 at Detroit June 6 at Detroit June 7 vs Baltimore June 8 vs Baltimore June 9 vs Baltimore June 10 vs Boston June 11 vs Boston June 12 vs Boston June 13 vs Kansas City June 14 vs Kansas City June 15 vs Kansas City June 16 vs Kansas City June 18 at Boston June 19 at Boston June 20 at N.Y. Yankees June 21 at N.Y. Yankees West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Texas3219.6275-5L-215-717-12 Oakland2923.55839-1W-414-1015-13 Los Angeles2327.460858-2W-812-1311-14 Seattle2229.4311062-8W-213-119-18 Houston1536.29417134-6W-19-206-16 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Boston3220.6157-3W-417-1115-9 New York3020.60015-5L-215-915-11 Baltimore2823.54935-5W-111-1217-11 Tampa Bay2624.520526-4W-216-1010-14 Toronto2229.431965-5W-214-158-14 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Atlanta3020.6008-2L-215-515-15 Washington2625.510454-6L-114-1112-14 Philadelphia2427.471675-5L-211-1213-15 New York1929.39610104-6W-211-178-12 Miami1338.25517182-8L-67-186-20 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway St. Louis3317.6607-3W-214-819-9 Cincinnati3219.62717-3W-119-713-12 Pittsburgh3120.60827-3L-118-913-11 Chicago2030.40013103-7W-210-1410-16 Milwaukee1930.38813113-7L-312-167-14 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Arizona2922.5696-4W-215-1214-10 San Fran.2823.549134-6L-119-99-14 Colorado2724.529246-4L-316-911-15 San Diego2228.440684-6L-213-129-16 Los Angeles2028.417794-6L-112-158-13 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit2920.5927-3W-217-812-12 Cleveland2723.540214-6L-415-1012-13 Chicago2425.490536-4L-113-1111-14 Kansas City2127.438761-9L-610-1311-14 Minnesota2028.417872-8W-19-1311-15 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE

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S COREBOARD C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE The win made the Rays even with the Marlins at 43-43 in the all-time interleague series. Jake Odorizzi, making his second start for the Rays, gave up eight hits and six runs and couldnt get through the fifth inning to qualify for the win. Its very frustrating not to be able to get through the fifth inning when the team gets you six runs, he said. The offense was awesome today, the bullpen was phenomenal. Kelly did an awesome job today. Its just frustrating to know that I wasnt anywhere near my best stuff. Jake McGee (2-2) got the victory after pitching two scoreless innings of relief. The 20-year-old Fernandez, pitching across the bay from where he pitched in high school in Tampa two years ago, pitched 3 1/3 innings, giving up five hits, three walks and four earned runs while striking out six. After fanning three Rays in the first inning, Fernandez walked the first two batters in the second, then hit Desmond Jennings with a pitch. Jose Molina drove in the first run with a sacrifice fly. Yunel Escobar drove in another run with the Rays first hit, and after Ben Zobrist reached on an error, Johnson made it 6-0 with his home run. I wasnt nervous. I was a little pumped up. I was trying to do a little too much, maybe, Fernandez said. Youre going to have rough games and youre going to have good days. So try to get it more good than bad. The Marlins, who came into the game with a .221 team batting average, collected 10 hits in the first five innings, including Justin Ruggianos eighth home run. Greg Dobbs had two hits and drove in two runs for the Marlins, who had cut Tampa Bays early six-run margin to one before Johnson hit his second homer. We never lost the lead. That was important to us, said Maddon, who has seen his starting pitchers and bullpen give away several big leads this season. Thats the one thing I always try to look at. Once youve lost the lead or even if it gets tied, that puts it back in their corner a little bit, so I thought Jake (McGee) was really important. We keep making this way more dramatic than it needs to be, he said. RAYSContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at New York Mets 7 p.m. (FSNFL, SUN) Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays 10 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Angels at Los Angeles Dodgers NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS 8:30 p.m. (TNT) Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers. Eastern Conference Final, game 4 NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND 9 p.m. (NBCSPT) San Jose Sharks at Los Angeles Kings, game 7 TENNIS 5 a.m. (ESPN2) 2013 French Open First Round 9 a.m. (ESPN2) 2013 French Open First Round RADIO 6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame 7:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. NASCAR Sprint Cup Coca-Cola 600 Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (15) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 112.8 rating, 47 points, $401,811. 2. (6) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 140.4, 44, $286,615. 3. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 117.3, 42, $218,560. 4. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 111.6, 41, $220,915. 5. (31) Joey Logano, Ford, 400, 92.8, 39, $174,823. 6. (10) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 91.8, 39, $174,198. 7. (25) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 85.7, 38, $169,240. 8. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 105.9, 36, $161,323. 9. (17) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 94.8, 35, $150,665. 10. (19) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 79.6, 34, $144,079. 11. (13) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 97, 34, $150,105. 12. (27) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 400, 73.8, 32, $122,030. 13. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 82.1, 32, $142,271. 14. (30) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 398, 69.5, 30, $156,966. 15. (3) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 398, 109.1, 30, $154,971. 16. (29) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 397, 57.3, 0, $108,530. 17. (36) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 397, 65.1, 0, $133,463. 18. (16) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 397, 68.6, 26, $133,319. 19. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 396, 85.3, 26, $131,675. 20. (26) David Gilliland, Ford, 396, 61.6, 24, $121,263. 21. (38) David Reutimann, Toyota, 396, 51.9, 23, $117,038. 22. (12) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 395, 84.1, 22, $147,791. 23. (21) Casey Mears, Ford, 394, 50.7, 21, $120,788. 24. (34) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 394, 48.8, 20, $117,802. 25. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 394, 42.7, 19, $108,105. 26. (43) Josh Wise, Ford, 393, 37.6, 0, $98,355. 27. (40) Timmy Hill, Ford, 391, 37.4, 17, $95,330. 28. (23) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 390, 40.6, 16, $94,805. 29. (24) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 385, 49.1, 15, $94,680. 30. (33) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, accident, 339, 46.5, 14, $96,055. 31. (7) Greg Biffle, Ford, 335, 59.8, 13, $113,005. 32. (39) David Stremme, Toyota, 326, 49.2, 12, $94,280. 33. (18) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 324, 57.5, 11, $131,066. 34. (4) Mark Martin, Toyota, accident, 324, 70.4, 10, $104,505. 35. (14) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 324, 84.3, 9, $140,791. 36. (20) Brad Keselowski, Ford, accident, 317, 61, 9, $149,696. 37. (42) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 303, 30.1, 7, $93,523. 38. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, engine, 257, 100.1, 7, $133,653. 39. (11) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, engine, 256, 69.2, 5, $101,745. 40. (28) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, accident, 253, 42.2, 4, $87,745. 41. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, electrical, 213, 25.4, 0, $75,745. 42. (32) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 50, 30.5, 2, $71,745. 43. (37) Scott Speed, Ford, transmission, 39, 26.8, 1, $68,245. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 130.521 mph. Time of Race: 4 hours, 35 minutes, 49 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.490 seconds. Caution Flags: 11 for 61 laps. Lead Changes: 24 among 12 drivers. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Kahne, 8 times for 161 laps; M.Kenseth, 3 times for 112 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 65 laps; K.Harvick, 3 times for 28 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for 8 laps; C.Edwards, 1 time for 7 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 6 laps; T.Stewart, 1 time for 6 laps; B.Keselowski, 2 times for 3 laps; J.McMurray, 1 time for 2 laps; R.Newman, 1 time for 1 lap; P.Menard, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 445; 2. C.Edwards, 413; 3. M.Kenseth, 394; 4. C.Bowyer, 385; 5. K.Kahne, 370; 6. D.Earnhardt Jr., 364; 7. K.Harvick, 362; 8. P.Menard, 347; 9. M.Truex Jr., 336; 10. Bra.Keselowski, 335; 11. Ky.Busch, 332; 12. A.Almirola, 328.MLB box scores Tigers 6, Pirates 5PittsburghDetroit abrhbiabrhbi Snider lf-rf5131Infante 2b4000 Walker 2b5121TrHntr rf4120 McCtch cf3001MiCarr 3b4100 GJones rf4120Fielder 1b4320 RMartn c3110VMrtnz dh5122 PAlvrz dh4000JhPerlt ss4043 GSnchz 1b4121Tuiassp lf2000 JHrrsn pr-lf0000D.Kelly lf0000 Inge 3b4000B.Pena c3001 Barmes ss3000AGarci cf4000 Mercer ph1000 Totals36510 4Totals346106 Pittsburgh1000002205 Detroit00013020x6 EFielder (3). LOBPittsburgh 7, Detroit 11. 2BWalker (5), G.Jones 2 (12), G.Sanchez 2 (8), Tor.Hunter (15), V.Martinez (9), Jh.Peralta (13). 3BSnider (2), Walker (2). SBMcCutchen 2 (14), R.Martin (2). SFMcCutchen. IPHRERBBSO Pittsburgh Liriano L,3-1584423 Zagurski100011 Contreras1/312240 Watson12/310002 Detroit Verlander W,6-47733213 Benoit H,7122101 Valverde S,6-7110001 T:16. A,416 (41,255).Astros 3, Rockies 2, 12 inn. ColoradoHouston abrhbiabrhbi EYong dh5120Grssmn lf5000 Fowler cf3010Altuve 2b5120 CGnzlz lf6031JCastro c3110 Tlwtzk ss6010BBarns pr-cf1011 WRosr c6020JMrtnz dh5000 Pachec 1b5000C.Pena 1b4012 Arenad 3b6120Crowe cf-rf5010 Blckmn rf3020Pareds rf5010 Cuddyr ph1000Corprn c0000 JHerrr 2b3001Dmngz 3b5010 LeMahi ph1000RCeden pr0100 MGnzlz ss4010 Totals452132Totals42393 Colorado1001000000002 Houston0002000000013 Two outs when winning run scored. EJ.Herrera (4), Chacin (1), W.Rosario (3). DPColorado 1. LOBColorado 15, Houston 10. 2BE.Young (9), C.Gonzalez (13), Arenado (7), Altuve (11), B.Barnes (4), C.Pena (9), Ma.Gonzalez (7). SBBlackmon (1), Altuve 2 (7). SFowler, Pacheco, Blackmon, J.Herrera, Ma.Gonzalez. IPHRERBBSO Colorado Chacin752219 Brothers100021 Belisle100001 Ottavino220012 W.Lopez L,1-22/321111 Houston B.Norris782233 Ambriz120001 Veras100001 Blackley220012 Clemens W,2-2110002 Chacin pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WPB.Norris, Ambriz. PBW.Rosario. T:21. A,044 (42,060).Mariners 9, Padres 0San DiegoSeattle abrhbiabrhbi EvCarr ss3010Bay lf4211 Venale cf4000Seager 3b3200 Headly 3b4010KMorls 1b5232 Quentin dh3000Morse rf4123 Alonso 1b4010Ibanez dh4011 Blanks rf3000Shppch c4111 Kotsay lf3000EnChvz cf4020 Amarst 2b3000Triunfl 2b-ss4000 Hundly c3010Ryan ss3110 Frnkln 2b0000 Totals300 40Totals359118 San Diego0000000000 Seattle40010040x9 EBlanks (1). DPSeattle 1. LOBSan Diego 5, Seattle 6. 2BEv.Cabrera (6), K.Morales (16), Ibanez (5). HRBay (5), Morse (11), Shoppach (3). IPHRERBBSO San Diego Richard L,0-5675513 Bass2/344421 T.Ross11/300012 Seattle Harang W,2-5940028 WPBass. T:29. A,942 (47,476).Athletics 4, Giants 1 San FranciscoOakland abrhbiabrhbi GBlanc cf3100Crisp cf3000 Scutaro 2b4010CYoung rf3100 Sandovl 3b4000Cespds lf3112 Posey dh3001Dnldsn 3b4112 Pence rf4000Lowrie 2b2010 Belt 1b4000Freimn 1b3010 AnTrrs lf3020Moss ph-1b1000 BCrwfr ss3010S.Smith dh3000 Quiroz c3000DNorrs c4110 Rosales ss2000 Totals311 41Totals28454 San Francisco0000010001 Oakland00020020x4 LOBSan Francisco 5, Oakland 8. 2BCespedes (6). HRDonaldson (8). CSCrisp (2). IPHRERBBSO San Francisco Bumgarner L,4-362/344456 Kontos1/310001 S.Rosario100021 Oakland Straily W,3-2641111 Doolittle H,9200002 Balfour S,11-11100012 HBPby Bumgarner (Rosales). T:55. A,067 (35,067).Diamondbacks 5, Rangers 3 TexasArizona abrhbiabrhbi Andrus ss5120Pollock cf4111 Profar 2b4021Gregrs ss4000 Beltre 3b5012Gldsch 1b4121 N.Cruz rf5010C.Ross lf4121 Morlnd 1b5000Prado 3b4011 JeBakr lf2010GParra rf4020 Wolf p0000Nieves c3210 Brkmn ph1000Pnngtn 2b3000 J.Ortiz p0000Skaggs p2010 G.Soto c3110Kubel ph1010 Gentry cf2000WHarrs p0000 MPerez p2000DHrndz p0000 DvMrp lf2110Hinske ph1011 Sipp p0000 Bell p0000 Totals363 93Totals345125 Texas0000000033 Arizona12001001x5 EProfar (2). DPTexas 2. LOBTexas 11, Arizona 8. 2BProfar (1), N.Cruz (7), Je.Baker (3), Pollock (16), Hinske (2). HRC.Ross (2). IPHRERBBSO Texas M.Perez L,0-151/394322 Wolf12/310000 J.Ortiz121110 Arizona Skaggs W,1-0630039 W.Harris110012 D.Hernandez110002 Sipp1/323311 Bell S,9-112/320001 WPSkaggs. T:09. A,638 (48,633).Cubs 7, White Sox 0 abrhbiabrhbi Borbon cf5222De Aza cf4000 SCastro ss4220AlRmrz ss4010 Rizzo 1b5222Rios rf4000 ASorin lf4032A.Dunn dh3000 Hairstn dh3001Konerk 1b2000 Castillo c3000Viciedo lf3000 Ransm 3b4000Gillaspi 3b3010 Sweeny rf3100Kppngr 2b3000 Barney 2b4000Flowrs c2000 Totals35797Totals28020 Chicago (N)1000213007 Chicago (A)0000000000 EFlowers (3). DPChicago (N) 1. LOB Chicago (N) 5, Chicago (A) 3. 2BS.Castro (12), Rizzo (16). 3BRizzo (1). HRBorbon (1). SBS.Castro (3), A.Soriano (6). SF Hairston. IPHRERBBSO Chicago (N) Samardzija W,3-6920028 Chicago (A) Quintana L,3-2644435 N.Jones143301 Omogrosso210002 T:25. A,601 (40,615).NBA playoffsCONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) (x if necessary) Sunday, May 19 San Antonio 105, Memphis 83 Tuesday, May 21 San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT Wednesday, May 22 Miami 103, Indiana 102, OT Friday, May 24 Indiana 97, Miami 93 Saturday, May 25 San Antonio 104, Memphis 93, San Antonio leads series 3-0 Sunday, May 26 Miami 114, Indiana 96, Miami leads series 2-1 Monday, May 27 San Antonio at Memphis, late Today Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 30 Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Friday, May 31 x-San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m. Saturday, June 1 x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, June 2 x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Monday, June 3 x-Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.NHL playoffsCONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) Thursday, May 23 N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT Detroit 2, Chicago 0, Detroit leads series 3-1 Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Friday, May 24 Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh wins series 4-1 Saturday, May 25 Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 1, Boston wins series 4-1 Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Sunday, May 26 San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1, series tied 3-3 Monday, May 27 Chicago 4, Detroit 3, series tied 3-3 Today San Jose at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 1 15 17 23 28 5-of-52 winners$89,843.89 4-of-5272$106.50 3-of-57,976$10 CASH 3 (early) 3 9 9 CASH 3 (late) 8 9 1 PLAY 4 (early) 6 9 5 2 PLAY 4 (late) 5 8 9 9 FANTASY 5 1 10 19 24 33 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 B3 Associated Press Detroit goalie Jimmy Howard stops a shot Monday by Chicagos Michal Handzus during the second period in Game 6 of the Western Conference semifinals in the NHL Stanley Cup playoffs in Detroit. The Blackhawks won to force a Game 7. Blackhawks beat Red Wings, force a Game 7 Associated PressDETROIT Bryan Bickell scored a go-ahead goal early in the third period and the Chicago Blackhawks held on to beat the Detroit Red Wings 4-3 in Game 6 on Monday night, giving the NHL s top-seeded team a shot to advance to the Western Conference finals. The Blackhawks, who trailed the second round series 3-1, began the third down by one and were up by two goals midway through the period after an offensive flurry. They needed the cushion because Damien Brunner scored with 52 seconds left to pull Detroit within one. The Red Wings pulled their goaltender, but they were unable to score with the extra skater. Detroit carried a 2-1 lead into the third but Michal Handzus tied it in the opening minute of the final period. Bickell scored about 5 minutes later. Michael Froliks backhander on a penalty shot at the 9:43 mark put the Blackhawks ahead 4-2 and silenced the once-raucous crowd. The Blackhawks will have the fans on their side Wednesday night in Game 7 against seventh-seeded Detroit. Cy Young winner Price resumes playing catchST. PETERSBURG AL Cy Young Award winner David Price has resumed playing catch as part of his rehab program for a strained left triceps. The Tampa Bay Rays left-hander, who was put on the disabled list for the first time in his career May 16, made 35 throws in right field before Mondays game against Miami. I felt really good ... it felt normal, Price said. It was a very positive day. Feeling as good as I did, its a definitely a relief. There is no timeline for when Price will return, but the injury is not expected to pose a long-term problem. We dont want any setbacks, Price said. I want to be able to come back and stay back, and thats what were doing. Price is 1-4 with a 5.24 ERA after going 20-5 with a 2.56 ERA in 2012. The Rays have lost seven of his nine starts after going 21-10 in his 31 starts last year.From wire report Simon Khan qualifies for US Open at Walton HeathWALTON HEATH, England Simon Khan bounced back from losing the BMW PGA Championship in a playoff to qualify for the U.S. Open. The Englishman, who lost a four-hole playoff to Matteo Manassero at Wentworth on Sunday, qualified in first place Monday by shooting a 5-under 67 on the Old Course and 2-under 70 on the New Course. Three-time Ryder Cup player Paul Casey and Jaco Van Zyl of South Africa are also through to the second major of the year after qualifying a stroke back to tie for second. Australias Marcus Fraser, Englands Eddie Pepperell, Swedens Peter Hedblom and Denmarks Morten Orum Madsen qualified next. There were six players tied for the five remaining spots, forcing a playoff. Jose Maria Olazabal, David Howell and John Parry made birdies on the first extra hole to take three berths. Scotlands Chris Doak and Argentinas Estanislao Goya took the last two slots after three more playoff holes, with Swedens Rikard Karlberg missing out.Matsuyama earns spot in US Open IBARAKI, Japan Hideki Matsuyama had rounds of 67 and 65 on Monday to earn one of five spots in a U.S. Open qualifier in Japan. Matsuyama was a two-time winner of the Asia-Pacific Amateur and twice made the cut at the Masters as a teenager. This will be his first U.S. Open, which is June 13-16 at Merion Golf Club outside Philadelphia. The other four qualifiers were JungGon Hwang of South Korea, Yui Ueda, Yoshinobu Tsukada and Hiroyuki Fujita. Tsukada and Fujita earned the last two spots in a playoff on the West Course at Ohtone Country Club. Hermann not considering resigning as Rutgers ADNEWARK, N.J. Julie Hermann has not considered resigning as Rutgers incoming athletic director following reports that 16 years ago she humiliated and emotionally abused players while coaching Tennessees womens volleyball team. Speaking to reporters on a conference call, Hermann denied having knowledge of a letter that the 16 Tennessee players submitted to the school. Rutgers officials, however, have talked to her about it in recent days. The 49-year-old Hermann acknowledged she was an intense coach and may have made a few mistakes handling her team. Hermann said she has matured and believes she is qualified to lead the scandal-marred Rutgers athletic program. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie plans to examine the appointment before Hermann begins June 17. From wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS

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NASCARs longest race even longer after camera rope snaps Associated PressCONCORD, N.C. Kevin Harvick isnt done surprising people at Charlotte Motor Speedway or Richard Childress Racing. Closing a bizarre night in NASCARs longest event, Harvick pulled away from Kasey Kahne on a restart Sunday with 11 laps left to win the Coca-Cola 600 for the second time in three seasons. The race was stopped nearly 30 minutes at one point when a TV camera support rope snapped and landed on the track and in the grandstands. There were 10 people hurt, according to Charlotte Motor Speedway. Three were taken to hospitals, and have been treated and released. Its Harvicks final season at RCR the only team hes known since filling the seat of the late Dale Earnhardt in 2001 before he switches to Stewart-Haas Racing in 2014. Harvicks already shown with a victory at Richmond this year he wouldnt coast through the year and proved that again as he made it through the broken rope, several crashes and Kahnes dominant machine that led a race-high 156 laps. There was no other course for Harvick than giving his all, saying he and Childress have really focused on whats most important for our sponsors and the guys on this team and this organization. Harvicks pulled off an unlikely win here in 2011, sweeping past an out-of-fuel Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the final lap. Last race (2011) we came off turn two in third and by the time we got to the start-finish line we had won the race, he said. It was one of those nights, he said, where you have to grind it out and keep yourself on the lead lap. Especially when you dont know what youll face. The race stopped suddenly a little more than a quarter of the way into the long event after the nylon rope snapped in the first turn. The cars were brought into the pits and cleanup crews coiled up the long sections of rope as if they were putting away a garden hose. Drivers were allowed back to their pit stalls and crews given 15 minutes to assess and fix damage caused by the failure. Fox Sports announcer Chris Myers apologized to fans and drivers several times for the delay and problems. In a statement, Fox said it had suspended use of the overhead camera indefinitely. It said the drive rope that moves the camera back and forth failed and it had no immediate reason why. A full investigation is planned, the statement said. Harvick couldnt believe hed seen the cable along the track and did his best to avoid problems. And Harvick wasnt the only one surprised. I came off turn four, Kahne said, and I saw it wrapped around Kyles car and it hit mine and I thought I had to be seeing things because theres no way there could be a cable on the race track. Kahne finished second, Kurt Busch third and polesitter Denny Hamlin was fourth in his second full race since returning from injury. Harvicks win was almost as big a surprise as it was in 2011 when the crowd anticipated Earnhardt ending what was then a long, long victory drought. Kahne had the strongest car, quickly moving back to the front each time he fell back. He had a large lead and lots of open track when the final caution flag came out with 16 laps remaining. But Kahne remained on the track while Harvick pitted for two fresh tires. On the restart, Harvick quickly took control and Kahne couldnt catch up. Ryan Newman was sixth followed by Tony Stewart, Clint Bowyer, Martin Truex Jr. and Marcos Ambrose. Harvicks victory ended a long, strange day of racing in the biggest motorsports weekend. Tony Kanaan took a crowd-pleasing win at the Indianapolis 500 before one of NASCARs showcase events was marred by the rope problems. B4 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S PORTS Associated Press Kevin Harvick takes the checkered flag Sunday to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. Harvick pulls away to win Coca-Cola 600 Nadal successfully begins bid for eighth French title Associated PressPARIS Rafael Nadal hopped, spun and threw an overhand punch toward his friends and family, stirring memories of past celebrations on his favorite stage. After more than 90 minutes of tense tennis, Nadal had finally won a set, leaving him only 20 sets from another French Open championship. The Spaniard survived an early scare Monday and successfully began his bid for an eighth title at Roland Garros by rallying past Daniel Brands of Germany, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Nadal, who had lost only 14 sets in 53 previous matches at the French Open, fell behind when he was broken in the ninth game and was on the verge of digging a deeper hole in the red clay. He trailed 3-0 in the tiebreaker, then summoned his best shot-making to salvage the set and soon was in control against the dangerous Brands. He was playing unbelievable, Nadal said. He was trying to hit every ball as hard as he can. Sometimes you feel you are not hitting a bad shot, and every time comes back a bomb. So I am very happy to be through, seriously. Nadal, who won a record seventh French Open title last year, improved to 53-1 at Roland Garros. Hes 37-2 since returning in February after a seven-month layoff because of a left knee injury, reaching the finals at all eight tournaments he played and winning six. Seeded third but a heavy favorite, Nadal won his 16th consecutive match, and he improved to 34-0 in the first round at Grand Slams. Hes trying to become the first man to win eight titles at the same major event. Defending womens champion Maria Sharapova needed only 54 minutes to advance, beating Hsieh Su-wei 6-2, 6-1. The No. 2-seeded Sharapova lost eight points in eight service games. While Nadal took center stage, U.S. women fanned out to remote courts and quietly went 6-1. That included victories by Madison Keys, who won her Roland Garros debut, and by Melanie Oudin, who ousted No. 28 Tamira Paszek 6-4, 6-3. No. 17 Sloane Stephens, who reached the fourth round last year, beat Karin Knapp 6-2, 7-5. American Ryan Harrison won a match at Roland Garros for the first time in three tries, beating Andrey Kuznetsov 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Harrison next plays fellow American and good friend John Isner, who improved to 4-4 at Roland Garros by beating Carlos Berlocq 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Li Na, the 2011 womens champion, beat nemesis Anabel Medina Garrigues in her opening match, 6-3, 6-4. Agnieszka Radwanska, last years runner-up at Wimbledon, defeated Shahar Peer 6-1, 6-1. Li, seeded No. 6, entered her match against Medina Garrigues with an 0-3 record on clay versus the Spaniard, but raced to a 4-0 lead after 20 minutes and broke serve six times. Former top-ranked player Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark ended a five-match losing streak by defeating Laura Robson 6-3, 6-2. No. 4 Radwanska needed less than hour to advance. It was her first match since withdrawing before last weeks Brussels tournament with a recurrence of the right shoulder injury that has bothered her the past couple of years. I decided to have a week of rest and just practice, she said. I think it was a good move. Shell next play American Mallory Burdette, who won in her Roland Garros debut Sunday. Radwanska was asked what she knew about her second-round opponent. To be honest, not much. Nothing at all, actually, she said with a smile. I might Google her. The search for the next generation of U.S. stars has been ongoing, which made Mondays success notable. Keys beat Misaki Doi 6-3, 6-2; Vania King defeated Alexandra Cadantu 7-6 (3), 6-1; Bethanie Mattek-Sands eliminated Lourdes Dominguez Lino 6-4, 6-1; and No. 29 Varvara Lepchenko beat Mirjana LucicBaroni 6-1, 6-2. Its funny, because a couple of years ago, everyone was asking me: Where is womens tennis? Mattek-Sands said. Here we are now. American Christina McHale lost to Jana Cepelova of Slovakia 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-4. On the mens side, Michael Russell of the United States retired with a left hamstring injury trailing Martin Klizan 3-6, 6-3, 6-1. Klizan plays Nadal in the second round. Wild card Gael Monfils of France thrilled a partisan center court crowd by upsetting No. 5 Tomas Berdych in a match that ended at twilight, 7-6 (8), 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-7 (4), 7-5. Nick Kyrgios of Australia, at 18 the youngest player in the mens draw, made a successful Grand Slam debut by beating 34-year-old Radek Stepanek 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 7-6 (11). Associated Press Rafael Nadal celebrates Monday after defeating Daniel Brands in their first-round match of the French Open at Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Nadal won in four sets 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Stakes are high Presidency and 2020 bids the focus at IOC meetings Associated PressST. PETERSBURG, Russia Call it the perfect storm of Olympic politics. With sports leaders gathering in St. Petersburg, Russia, this week for a global convention, three high-profile campaigns will be played out at the same time in an unusual confluence of issues that will set the tone for the future of the Olympic movement. The race for the IOC presidency, the bidding for the 2020 Summer Games and the fate of wrestling will be on full display at the SportAccord conference and executive board meetings of the International Olympic Committee. About 1,500 delegates are expected for the conference, which opens today and will feature an appearance later in the week by Russian President Vladimir Putin. His presence will underscore Russias commitment to its first Winter Games, which will take place in the Black Sea resort of Sochi in less than nine months. The centerpiece of the meetings will be Wednesdays decision by the IOC board on which sport or sports to recommend for inclusion in the 2020 Olympics. Three months after it was surprisingly removed from the list of core sports, wrestling will have a chance to climb back into contention for a spot on the 2020 program. Also competing for the single opening are seven other sports: a combined baseball-softball bid, karate, roller sports, sport climbing, squash, wakeboarding and the Chinese martial art of wushu. The sports will make closed-door presentations to the IOC board, which will then decide on recommendations to submit to the IOC general assembly for a final decision in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in September. There is widespread speculation that the executive board will select a shortlist of three or four finalists, including wrestling. Squash and karate have been cited as other leading contenders, while mens baseball and womens softball have merged to push their bid after having been off the program since the 2008 Beijing Games.

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D uring the past few years, there has been a great deal of debate regarding how effective breast cancer screening and mammography are. I have always stated there is more than enough proof of the benefit of screening with mammography, earlier diagnosis, earlier treatment and a higher chance of cure. Now there is even more data to support this belief. The time between diagnosis of breast cancer among older women and their last mammogram is associated with a Delayed screening can raise death risk See BENNETT / Page C3 Dr. Sunil Gandhi CANCER & BLOOD DISEASE What Jolies choice means for you S uperstar Angelina Jolies headline news about her positive genetic test for the B RCA-1 mutation and subsequent double prophylactic mastectomy has stunned the world. It also shed light into this less common but serious issue in patients with breast cancer. She has a genetic mutation called B RCA-1. V isible or problematic scars frequently occur because we are completely surrounded by skin, and scars have to be one of the least desirable side effects of having an injury or surgery. Visible scars are particularly noticeable in the head and neck area because, if you think about it, the face is in the lead position any time you venture out in your environment, so it is most likely the first area seen, as well as most likely the first area to get injured. In most cases, scars are very minor and are usually a small price to pay for undergoing a procedure to correct a disease process and/or repair damage from trauma. With more than 25 million surgical procedures performed each year, not to mention all the episodes of trauma that occur, the potential for scars is countless. Once the initial procedure and/or trauma I n the past few weeks, we have talked about full dentures. I thought I would take this column to talk about partial dentures. As most of you know, full dentures replace all of your teeth in an arch while partial dentures replace the missing teeth in an arch. A conventional partial uses clasps for retention, while a precision partial uses a system for retention. Precision partials can also be called claspless partials because there are no clasps. Precision partials are the more cosmetic of the two, since there are no clasps. As a matter of fact, it is virtually impossible to see the partial in your mouth when they are made properly. Aside from the benefit of being claspless, they are also kinder to the teeth they attach to. With clasps, you get a torquing motion on the teeth when pressure is applied. With the precision attachment assembly, the torque is minimized as a result of the engineering of the system. Partial dentures explained See VASCIMINI / Page C5 See GRILLO / Page C2 Dr. Denis Grillo EAR, NOSE & THROAT Section C TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE INSIDE Dr. Richard Hoffmann / Page C3 Dr. C. Joseph Bennett NAVIGATING CANCER So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. See GANDHI / Page C2 000F1XC R YANT RARES (Franklin, Ind.) Daily JournalFRANKLIN, Ind.F or patients admitted to Tara Treatment Center, the hope is to recover from the disease that shattered their lives. Alcoholism has cost them their jobs, drug abuse has torn them from their friends and their families, or their addiction has led to arrest or jail time. They are attempting to regain control by working with counselors at Tara at the treatment center south of Franklin. Addiction treatment rarely is covered by health insurance, and many people cannot afford programs needed to recover and manage the disease. That prevents millions from getting the help they need. But that will change next year.Hope for change Health law to open access to addiction treatment Starting in 2014, health insurance companies will be required to pay for substance abuse and addiction treatment. The change means up to 62 million people will receive some kind of coverage for drug and alcohol problems, ranging from paying for weekly counseling sessions to long-term stays in rehabilitation facilities. Local treatment centers are encouraged that addiction is being treated more like a disease than a moral shortcoming. But questions remain about what will be covered and for which people, Tara admissions director Jessica Daugherty told the Daily Journal Were trying to follow along. Its still not really clear how its going to be administered. That hasnt been defined yet, she said. Its Thinkstock See CHANGE / Page C4 Dr. Frank Vascimini SOUND BITES

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Free 20-minute child safety seat inspections available by appointment at the Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast, 1564 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, to be sure a seat is not recalled, damaged or expired; is appropriate for the childs age, height and weight; is used correctly; and installed securely. Contact Sue Littnan at 352-563-9939, ext. 235. Fifth annual Body, Mind & Soul Health Fair, 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, June 6, at First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St. at the intersection of Yulee Drive in Homosassa just down from Burger King. More than 60 businesses and health organizations will be represented, providing health screenings and valuable information. The LifeSouth bloodmobile will be there, as well, plus a Corvette display coordinated by the Touch of Class Corvette Club. All Corvettes are invited to participate. Door prizes, gifts and promotional items will be available. For information, visit www.1umc.org or call 352628-4083. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital will offer a panel discussion, The Wonders of Minimally Invasive Robotic Assisted Surgery, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 11, at the Palace Grand, 275 Della Court, Spring Hill. Oak HillHospitalusesroboticassistedsurgeryintheareas ofgeneralsurgery,gallbladdersurgery,colorectalsurgery andgynecologicalprocedures.Those who attend will hear from experts and learn all the features and benefits of this approach to modern-day surgery. A complimentary hot meal will be served. Admission is free and seating is limited. Reservations are required. Call 352-628-6060 in Citrus or go to OakHillHospital.com/ ForYourHealth to register. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers : During May, donors will receive a moustache T-shirt. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 28, Bealls, 346 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. 11 a.m. to 4:59 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, Cypress Creek Academy, 2855 W. Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto. Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 30, Sumter Electric Cooperative, U.S. 301 and Sumter County Road 471, Sumterville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, May 31, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, June 1, Lowes, 2301 E. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Inverness. Noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 1, Inverness Elks Lodge 2522, 3580 E. Lemmon Drive, Hernando. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 2, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday, June 3, Withlacoochee River Electric Co-Op, 5330 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. 10 a.m. to noon Monday, June 3, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, Cypress Cove Care Center, 700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal River. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospitals For Your Health Community Education Series : 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 28, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis by George D. Giannakopoulos, M.D., at Heritage Pines Country Club, 11524 Scenic Hills Blvd., Hudson, one-half mile east of U.S. 19 on County Line Road. Dr. Giannakopoulos, a neurosurgeon at Oak Hill Hospital, will cover non-surgical and surgical management of lumbar spinal stenosis, including signs and symptoms, causes, diagnosis, medications, nonsurgical treatments, minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation approaches. Admission is free and a complimentary hot meal will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required: Call 352-628-6060 in Citrus or register online at OakHill Hospital.com/ForYourHealth. Citrus Memorial Health System is proud to announce the 25th anniversary of Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center at Allen Ridge, formerly Allen Ridge Medical Mall. This milestone anniversary will be celebrated from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 1. The facility, at 540 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto, includes diagnostic imaging along with an urgent-care clinic and specialty physician offices. It was built in 1988 to serve the needs of the growing population in the center of Citrus County, and now sits at the heart of the proposed County Road 491 medical corridor. The 25th anniversary celebration will offer free health screenings including those for bone density and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Food, health education and seminars will be featured throughout the day, including: Making it to the Top: Why Citrus Memorial was Ranked Top 100 in the Nation for General Surgery presented by Dr. Marc Fernandez, general surgeon with Inverness Surgical Associates. An Inside Look at Radiology presented by Dr. Thomas Ceballos, radiologist with Associated Radiologists of Inverness. Heart Health Q&A featuring Dr. Peter Yung Kim, cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon with Citrus Ocala Heart Institute. For information about the event, call 352-560-6360. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events: The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital.com. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco and Citrus County residents for $20 a year, which includes membership in the HCA national H2U program. May 28 Blood pressure test, 10 a.m. June 3 AARP driving classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 4 Hearing screen/wax removal, 10 a.m. June 5 AARP driving classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The George A. Dame Community Health Center BoardMeetings are at 3 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at the Citrus County Health Department, 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in the first floor conference room. Support GROUPS Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Quarterly meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Caregivers Support and Information meeting, 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Call Charlotte Downing at 352-422-7044 for directions/ information. Refreshments served. OCALA Ocala Health Stroke Support Group meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Senior Wellness Community Center (9850 S.W. 84th Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call 800-530-1188 to register. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. Call Bevin Brayton at 352302-9066. PINELLAS PARK Connections firesidediscussion-style support The average womans lifetime risk of breast cancer is 10 percent to 12 percent. Women with this mutation have a risk of breast cancer of almost 90 percent. It is proven beyond doubt that these women benefit from removal of both breasts. These genetic changes happen in only about 5 percent of women with breast cancer, so every woman with breast cancer need not be worried about it. In the past decade, lots of women have elected to have double mastectomies due to fear of breast cancer, but in most women, it is not medically indicated. It is indicated only in women who have this genetic disorder of BRCA mutation. Not all women are at risk for this mutation and not all need to undergo this $3,000 test. Women who meet the following criteria should be tested: Two first-degree relatives (mother, daughter, or sister) diagnosed with breast cancer, one of whom was younger than 50 years. Three or more firstor second-degree relatives (aunt or grandmother) diagnosed regardless of age. Combination of firstand second-degree relatives diagnosed with breast and ovarian cancer regardless of age. First-degree relative with bilateral breast cancer. Breast cancer in a male relative. Combination of two or more firstor seconddegree relatives with ovarian cancer. For women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent: any first-degree or two seconddegree relatives on the same side of the family diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. If one of these criteria is met, the patient with breast cancer should be tested. Family members should not be tested unless the patient has the gene mutation. This patient also has a very high risk of ovarian cancer too and prophylactic removal of ovaries and fallopian tube is also recommended. Once I knew that this was my reality, I decided to be proactive and to minimize the risk as much I could, wrote Jolie. I started with the breasts, as my risk of breast cancer is higher than my risk of ovarian cancer. In short, this genetic testing should be done in young women with breast cancer or those with a strong family history as mentioned above. Not all women need testing. If testing is positive, removal of both the breasts and ovaries with fallopian tube is important. Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampabay.rr. com or call 352-746-0707. C2 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000F1RE 000F18C Jorge Ruiz Llanes, M.D. an Internal Medicine physician in Crystal River, FL, is relocating his medical practice. He is moving to Texas. He will follow up with his patients until June 10, 2013 After his departure, Angela Acevedo, M.D. will be the custodian of the medical records. If you or any doctor, facility, insurance or agency want to request your medical records, you or they will need to contact Dr. Ruiz Llanes office before June 10 at (352) 794-3882. After June 10, 2013 contact Dr. Acevedos office at (352) 795-9697. Dr. Acevedo has a location in Crystal River at 6202 W. Corporate Oaks Dr. and another location in Inverness at 112 W. Highland Blvd. B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 000ESHJ New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Primary Medical Care Centers CEREC One-Visit Crowns Implants Lumineers and Veneers Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) AAID/ICOI Extractions In-House Specialty Care Root Canal Therapy Periodontal Gum Care Fillings Cleanings Sealants And much more! 352-795-1223 Dr. Richard C. Swanson 1815 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL www.rswansondental.com PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE 000EZ5O New Patients Free Consults Emergency Care Exceptional Dentistry and Your Comfort is Our Number One Priority! is resolved and areas have healed up, psychological injury can arise from a poorly healed scar that can affect ones social and self-image as they go out in the world and interact with society. As a result, selfconfidence, in some instances, is diminished significantly. It is very interesting to note that with todays popular practices of body piercing and tattoos, people still have a strong aversion to scarring, particularly on the face. I suppose if you wish to self-inflict things, it is OK, but if you get something as a result of an accident, it is a far different situation and less acceptable. The one thing I would like you to take away from this article is the fact that once there is a scar, there will always be a scar, but there is always the possibility of improving on that scar, and there are many ways to do that. Living a proactive life where one takes care of his or her skin by avoiding excessive sun, avoiding smoking and having a very healthy diet and lifestyle will help guarantee that the healing process, when it does occur following trauma or surgery, will help the outcome. There are a few exceptions. Some individuals will have enlarged (hypertrophic) scars and cant help it. There are also darker-skinned individuals who form keloid scars. Lastly, there are areas that tend to scar heavier, which includes the chest wall just below the neck and the upper outside part of the arm. Many of us carry the scars of vaccinations at that site to this day. Prophylactic scar therapy means after the surgery and/or injury occurred, measures you can do to prevent the scar from becoming more pronounced. Well-versed and motivated patients try everything from vitamin E to cocoa butter in the posttraumatic period to reduce the appearance of unsightly scars. There are many other home remedies, all of which have no scientific basis. Doctors and scientists are currently working on multiple ways to reduce scar formation, which, as you may know, is inflammation that occurs to the area injured, and there are some great and innovative ideas. Steroids have been tried through the years and have failed miserably. Currently, chemicals found in the extract of onions are being researched as an option. Also, omega oils are being looked at very seriously because of their ability to provide high moisturizing qualities that are transmitted through the skin and likewise have antiinflammatory properties. If successful, this will be great for burn patients. The ideal topical scar therapy should be able to moisturize the skin, be absorbed easily, be hypoallergic, have antiinflammatory qualities and be convenient to apply, so as patients will be likely to be compliant and use it as directed. At present, the gold standard is silicone gel sheeting, which is difficult to get patients to use. Ideally, if we could get the silicone to be delivered in a liquid or gel form, patients would be more likely to use this product. But what if topical measures fail? Unsightly scars can be removed and camouflaged in a multitude of ways. Revision surgery is an option once all conservative measures have failed and a proper amount of time has transpired, ideally six to 12 months. Surgical techniques include using a zigzag pattern to draw the eye away from the scar. sanding the skin with a special instrument to smooth it out and make the scar less noticeable to the surrounding skin, and, to a lesser degree, acid chemical peels and laser devices have been used with success. An adequate source of further information is the Internet, of course. A better one is a board-certified facial plastic surgeon. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit CrystalCommunity ENT.com. GRILLO Continued from Page C1 GANDHI Continued from Page C1 In the past decade, lots of women have elected to have double mastectomies due to fear of breast cancer, but in most women, it is not medically indicated. It is indicated only in women who have this genetic disorder of BRCA mutation. See GROUPS / Page C4 Health NOTES

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Q: Would you please review high blood pressure. A: A recent (2013) patient communication from the FDA provides useful information regarding high blood pressure (also called hypertension), which is known as the silent killer. There are often no symptoms of it until the heart, arteries and other organs are already damaged. High blood pressure increases a persons risk for stroke, heart attack, heart failure, kidney failure and death, according to the National Institutes of Healths Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Blood pressure is the force of blood moving through your arteries, and is measured with two numbers. The first, or top number, is your pressure when your heart beats, called the systolic pressure. The second, or bottom number, measures the force of blood in your arteries while your heart is relaxed (filling with blood between beats). This is called the diastolic pressure. Blood pressure usually varies throughout the day. For adults, a blood pressure reading of lower than 120/80 is considered normal. Readings between 120/80 and 139/89 are considered pre-hypertension. People with prehypertension do not have blood pressure as low as it should be, but are not yet considered to have high blood pressure. Your doctor may tell you that you have high blood pressure if you have two measurements of blood pressure readings, on physician office visits at least one week apart, that are higher than 140/90. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued guidelines recommending people with blood pressure lower than 120/80 be screened every two years. Your doctor may recommend your blood pressure be screened more frequently. It is estimated that almost one in three adults in the United States has high blood pressure. High blood pressure occurs more frequently as people age, with many people developing it when they are in their late 30s or early 40s. As a result of the increase in obesity, more and more children are developing high blood pressure as well. To protect your heart, arteries and other organs from strain and damage over time, controlling your blood pressure should be part of a healthy living plan that includes monitoring your lipids. Treatment of high blood pressure often starts with lifestyle changes, including decreasing salt in your diet, losing weight if necessary, stopping smoking, cutting down on alcohol use and regular exercise. In addition to lifestyle changes, medications are often used to lower blood pressure. There are currently nine types of medications that treat high blood pressure. For example, beta blockers slow the heart rate; calcium-channel blockers directly relax blood vessels. Each type of medication has pluses and minuses that must be carefully weighed by you and your doctor. The optimal medication depends on your other medical conditions and preferences. Most people take more than one medication in order to bring their blood pressure down to their treatment goal. Blood pressure medication should begin to work within days. Once started, the medication should be used until your doctor tells you to stop. It is also a good idea to monitor your blood pressure at home. Because high blood pressure is a chronic medical condition that often has little or no symptoms, remembering to take your medications can be a challenge. Combination therapy and long-acting, once-a-day medications can be used to decrease the number of pills taken per day and help ensure use. If you take more than one high blood pressure medication, ask your doctor if a combination medication can be prescribed. If cost is a concern, generic versions should be considered. Patients need to be proactive regarding high blood pressure medications, monitoring blood pressure, and taking medications as prescribed. Talk to your doctor about any side effects you experience. POSTSCRIPT I have enjoyed writing this weekly column for almost 17 years and have tried to answer each and every question posed. However, this will be my last regular column, since I have decided to take a break from writing. Many readers know my wife has Parkinsons disease and we both serve as Research Advocates for the Parkinsons Disease Foundation (PDF). I also now serve as consumer representative for the FDAs Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee. These activities will keep us busy, but I still hope to submit periodic columns related to important consumer information from the FDA and about Parkinsons disease. Thank you all for your questions, and best wishes for your health and happiness! Richard P Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C3 0 0 0 E Q D F ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE A D V A N C E D H E A L T H Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA 9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 10A, Crystal River . . . . 352-563-2597 ASSISTED LIVING S U P E R I O R R E S I D E N C E S O F L E C A N T O M E M O R Y C A R E 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-5483 S U N F L O W E R S P R I N G S A S S I S T E D L I V I N G C O M M U N I T Y 8733 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8017 CARDIOLOGY C I T R U S C A R D I O L O G Y C O N S U L T A N T S P A Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC Delfin, Luis MD FACC Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC Kannam, Hari MD Miryala, Vinod MD FACC Nerello, Nishant MD Pasupuleti, Suman MD Rivero, Abel MD Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC Trigo, Gisela MD FACC Walker, Dennis J. MD 760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-4165 308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101, Leesburg . . . . . . 352-315-0627 910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages . . . . 352-751-3356 DENTAL C H R I S T I E D E N T A L O F M E A D O W C R E S T Beckton, Tedra DMD Tran, Hang DMD 6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River . . . . 877-290-2818 C I T R U S H I L L S D E N T A L A S S O C I A T E S Davila, Alexa DMD Davila, Jose DDS 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-527-1614 C O M P L E T E F A M I L Y D E N T I S T R Y Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA 1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1223 L E D G E R D E N T I S T R Y Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA 3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-3443 DERMATOLOGY B A Y D E R M A T O L O G Y & C O S M E T I C S U R G E R Y P A Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD Board Certified Esguerra, David DO FAOCD Board Certified Broughton, Brandi PA-C 7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-503-2002 FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE H E A L T H & W E L L C A R E S E R V I C E S O F F L O R I D A I N C DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD McCollough, Barney PA Tzivanis, James PA 5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-746-1818 H E R N A N D O M E D I C A L C E N T E R Patel, Shirish MD Mazur, Barbara ARNP 2669 N. Florida Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-637-2550 S U N C O A S T P R I M A R Y C A R E S P E C I A L I S T S Villacastin, Alex T. MD Co, Alistair W. MD Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC Stawkowski, Lawrence PA 10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs . . . 352-489-2486 ENDOCRINOLOGY C I T R U S D I A B E T E S T R E A T M E N T C E N T E R Christ Medical Center Tawfik, Eihab MD PA 7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-0444 HEALTH EDUCATION T O B A C C O P R E V E N T I O N F L O R I D A H E A L T H 120 N. Montgomery Ave. Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-1731 HEALTH PRODUCTS F U R N I T U R E P A L A C E & M A T T R E S S W A R E H O U S E 3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-2999 W H O L E S A L E S L E E P C E N T E R 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando . . . . . . . . . . 344-8882 HEARING A D V A N C E D F A M I L Y H E A R I N G A I D C E N T E R 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1775 A U D I B E L H E A R I N G A I D C E N T E R S 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8000 2036 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . . 352-586-7599 20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon . . . . . . . 52-789-1559 HEARING CONTINUED M I R A C L E E A R H E A R I N G A I D C E N T E R Lazio, Brian L-HAS 1801 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River Mall . . . 795-1484 HOME HEALTH SERVICES H O M E I N S T E A D S E N I O R C A R E 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-249-1257 S E N I O R H O M E C A R E 494 S Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-0150 HOSPICE H P H H O S P I C E 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-4600 HOSPITALS C I T R U S M E M O R I A L H O S P I T A L 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-1551 M U N R O E R E G I O N A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R 1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala . . . . . . . . . 352-351-7200 R E G I O N A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R B A Y O N E T P O I N T 14000 Fivay Road, Hudson . . . . . . . . 888-741-5119 INDEPENDENT LIVING I N V E R N E S S C L U B S E N I O R APARTMENTS 518 Ella Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-8477 INTERNAL MEDICINE G I R A S S H A H M D 203 S. Seminole Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-7800 NURSING HOMES C Y P R E S S C O V E C A R E C E N T E R 700 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-8832 D I A M O N D R I D G E H E A L T H & R E H A B I L I T A T I O N C E N T E R 2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-9500 L I F E C A R E C E N T E R O F C I T R U S C O U N T Y 3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-4434 ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY R O B E R T B O I S S O N E A U L T O N C O L O G Y I N S T I T U T E Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD Brant, Timothy A. MD Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility 522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-527-0106 OPHTHALMOLOGY S U N C O A S T E Y E C E N T E R Kaplan, George H. OD 221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-2526 ORTHOPEDIC/ SPORTS MEDICINE N A T U R E C O A S T O R T H O P A E D I C S & S P O R T S M E D I C I N E C L I N I C Choung, Walter I. MD Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO 2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-746-5707 520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-2663 2236 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . 352-344-2663 PHARMACIES B R A S H E A R S P H A R M A C Y 206 W. Dampier St., Inverness . . . . . . 352-637-2079 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-3420 G & R H E A L T H M A R T P H A R M A C Y 3791 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-3111 PLASTIC RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY F A R R I O R F A C I A L P L A S T I C A N D C O S M E T I C S U R G E R Y C E N T E R Farrior, Edward H. MD FACS 2908 W. Azeele St., Tampa . . . . . . . . . 813-875-3223 SURGERY P R E M I E R V E I N C E N T E R Sharma, Ravi MD 7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-0777 UROLOGY A D V A N C E D U R O L O G Y S P E C I A L I S T S Desai, Paresh G. MD FACS Desautel, Michael G. MD Kumar, Udaya MD FRCS Seneriz, Manuel A. MD Pulice, Frances A. PA 609 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-9707 3475 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-7671 PAID ADVERTISING Richard Hoffmann ASK THE PHARMACIST What does high blood pressure really mean? marked increased risk of breast cancer death according to data recently presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting. This finding highlights the need for continued mammography screening. In this study, researchers found that, for women age 75 and older, a longer time interval between the last mammogram and the date of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with a greater chance for dying from breast cancer. Yes, even for women age 75 or older, it is important to continue to get yearly mammograms. In order to assess whether the time between mammograms had any effect on the risk of dying from cancer, the researchers analyzed a total of 8,663 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer for a duration of 12.2 years. They identified an increase in the risk of being diagnosed with advanced-stage disease among women who had their mammograms every five years or more compared to those who had them in regular intervals of six months to a year. The researchers found a longer time between breast cancer diagnosis and receiving a mammogram was clearly associated with a higher risk of dying from breast cancer. Compared to women who had an interval of six months to a year between mammogram and diagnosis, women who never had a mammogram or who had one in an interval of more than five years after diagnosis, had a three times greater risk of dying from breast cancer. This study hammers home the importance of yearly mammography, not just for younger women, but for older women as well. Its vital that doctors discuss the risks and benefits of mammography among older patients and encourage screening. These findings suggest that regular mammography should be continued for older women every one or two years; however, as with younger women, mammography screening should be considered in light of the overall health of the individual woman. Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. BENNETT Continued from Page C1

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group for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-343-0600; www.wellspringoncology.org. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at Sandy Oaks RV Resort, 6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call 352-422-5868. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10 a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352-387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. RBOI has begun a monthly survivor group with inspirational guests and strength based topics. Any cancer survivors and family members are welcome to attend. There is no cost to attend. For information, email Tommie Brown at tbrown009 @tampabay. rr.com or call Wendy Hal at 352-527-0106. Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. Weekly meetings R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-563-5182. Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-621-0599. Visit the website: www.ncinter group.com. AC Group 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous : Easy Does It, 8 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday; &:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday; The Recovery Room, 8169 S. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Floral City. It Works How and Why, noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Hospital Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery at Work Mens Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to 9 p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Par sons Point Road, Hernando. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352508-1604. Overeaters Anonymous : Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : support for any hurts, habits, hang-ups or addictions. 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in Oxford. Call 352-748-6124. 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352-746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand small-group time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. Referrals to Celebrate Recovery offered. Call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-6282874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults, where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352688-4537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alz support.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz. org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2 p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program: 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. certainly going to increase peoples ability to access services somewhere and at some level. But thats a whole lot better than nothing. The change is part of the Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010 to expand Medicaid and private insurance coverage to more people. States are allowed to decide whether to make Medicaid available to more people. In Indiana, the General Assembly has not passed legislation to expand that portion, and Gov. Mike Pence has stated that the only expansion would be through the Healthy Indiana Plan already in place, said Marni Lemons, spokeswoman with the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration. We have made that request for the Healthy Indiana Plan to the federal government, and were still waiting to hear back, she said. Theres not much we can do until then. That indecision is making it difficult for health care providers to prepare for additional patients, Daugherty said. But while few solid details have emerged, certain aspects of the law will go into effect regardless of what the legislature does. The Affordable Care Act established 10 mandatory essential health benefits that need to be covered by individual and small group insurance plans. One of those benefits is behavioral health, which includes addiction treatment. Addiction, because it is a chronic illness, its just like heart disease or diabetes, said Cindy Schroeder, clinical supervisor at Tara Treatment Center. The earlier people can get help and treatment, the less overall cost in their lifetime there will be. And it will reduce everyones cost because of that. The National Institute of Health classifies addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that causes the user to act compulsively. Medical experts liken it to long-term illnesses such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Tara Treatment Center has been helping people manage the illness for more than 25 years. Patients address the emotional roots that make them turn to substance abuse. Therapists use individual and group sessions to help change behavior and form new behaviors that dont include alcohol or drugs. But despite being accepted as a disease by the medical community, addiction and mental health problems still often are excluded from insurance coverage. That speaks to a greater stigma placed by society on people who struggle with drugs or alcohol. A lot of people believe that its a behavior of choice, even if its not, Daugherty said. Its taken a long time for society to come around to the fact that it is chronic. Steps were taken in 2008 after a bill was passed to more evenly treat mental and physical health problems. But those guidelines were never fully formed by the government, meaning individual health insurance plans dont have a solid directive to include treatment of mental health issues such as addiction, Schroeder said. Large employers still have the option to not include mental health and addictions benefits at all, she said. They can still say its not part of the benefit package, but if they do include it as part of their package, they cant charge premiums different or impose more deductibles. They have to treat mental health and addictions like any other disease. But the problem is, theyre not treating it like that, Schroeder said. Even though we have parity laws, they dont really say that they have to pay for hospital detox or residential stay. Much of the services at Tara Treatment Center involve a long-term stay at the facility. Research has shown it takes 21 days to break a habit, said Theresa Matthews, CEO of Tara. Outpatient programs, such as support groups and counseling, are good for determining a problem or preventing a relapse. But for someone in the throes of addiction, a few days a week isnt going to solve the problem, Matthews said. Insurers are reluctant to pay for that type of expensive care, which can cost thousands of dollars. Almost always, the most theyll cover is partial hospitalization for a few days. Weve had our clinicians say, Does this person have to be dead to get this authorized to stay? Were giving them enough criteria that would absolutely warrant residential care, Matthews said. Thats like saying you just did heart surgery on someone, then the next day, send them home to take care of themselves. Thats the same mentality we see with addiction. The Affordable Care Act was intended to correct some of those inconsistencies. But because the details of how it will be implemented in Indiana havent been determined, officials with Valle Vista Behavioral Health System, a Greenwood-based addiction treatment, choose not to answer questions regarding the changes in the law and what it will mean for their facility. Tara Treatment Center is anticipating an increase in patients to its outpatient counseling and intensive inpatient programs, Daugherty said. Officials also suspect that when 27 million uninsured people start receiving basic primary care, more people will be identified as having addiction problems. For the staff at Tara, thats a great start. But when those problems are detected, Matthews is concerned about whether theyll get the treatment they need. Those who work in addiction services have a saying, she said. They describe the chains of addiction as being too weak to be felt until theyre too strong to be broken. Thats such a true statement. Its subtle, its progressive, and its powerful, Matthews said. If you can treat something in outpatient or on a prevention stage, thats a lot more cost effective. But with this illness, by the time people go to seek treatment, its too late to prevent the disease. C4 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE Theres no need to leave Citrus County for the Best Rehabilitation www.cypresscovecare.com Post Surgery Care Stroke Rehab Cardiac Program Superior Woundcare I.V. TherapyInpatient & Outpatient Skilled Care A Five-Star Rated Facility (352) 795-8832 700 Southeast 8th Ave. Crystal River*Rating by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 000EQCI Thrivent Sponsored Events Congregational Life and Care Caregiver Support 4th Tuesday of the month at 1 pm at: St. Timothy Lutheran Church 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River Church phone 352-795-5325 *web site: www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com Programs coming up: May 28, 2013 Have Some fun with Randy Hobson Discussion & demonstrations of The Edible Landscape. June 24, 2013 Theressa Foster WEST CENTRAL SOLUTIONS working with you and your family finding the best placement for your loved ones. July 23, 2013 Peg Weston Thrivent Financial discussing various investments options. August 27, 2013 Katie Lucas, Nature Coast EMS Medical Alert Systems September 24, 2013 Katy Mehl Citrus Memorial Share Club Caregiver Support Group is a free, informal and interactive monthly meeting. We are open to the comm unity and all are welcome. For further information contact Gail Sirak at 634-2021 or Deacon Charlotte Downing at 4 22-7044. 000F1HI CHANGE Continued from Page C1 The National Institute of Health classifies addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that causes the user to act compulsively. ... But despite being accepted as a disease by the medical community, addiction and mental health problems still often are excluded from insurance coverage. GROUPS Continued from Page C2 See GROUPS / Page C5

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Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352229-4202 or Sue at 352-5607918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-6420962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club; call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a notfor-profit charitable organization providing comprehen sively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care available. Last Wednesday, 11:30 a.m., Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free respite care available. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Al-Anon meeting 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Lou Block, facilitator. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly, Jerry Fischer, facilitator. Diabetes Support Group 10 a.m. second Monday monthly, with Kim Palmer. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 6 p.m. second Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. ALS Support Group 2 p.m. the third Thursday monthly, with Katie Mitchell. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, with Lillian Rojas. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acutecare beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Some 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. More GROUPS SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Time Out From Cancer, cancer survivors meeting 6 to 7 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at Oysters Restaurant, sponsored by RBOI. Email Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.com or call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106. Guests will discuss a variety of interesting topics including stress management, nutrition and exercise, and other things that promote holistic healing, prevention and renewal. Alzheimers caregiver and family support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. The Area 13 Family Care Council 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday monthly at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities office, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44). All persons interested in issues of those with developmental disabilities (autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, spina bifida and intellectual disabilities) are encouraged to attend. Call Karen Huscher at 352-7261445 or isabelfcc13@ yahoo.com. Area 13 covers Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties. There are 15 Family Care Councils with governor-appointed volunteer members, who are individuals with a developmental disability or are a family member. Seeking new members. Contact Huscher at 352-726-1445 or cbettykay@ aol.com; facebook.com/ groups/331632140186772/. Website: www.FCCFlorida. org. NAMI-Citrus locally chartered group of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, meets the second Monday monthly at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, on County Road 486 in Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All those with an interest in mental health issues are welcome. Call 352-341-2273. SPRING HILL Healthy Hearts support group open to anyone looking for information on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30 p.m. the second Monday monthly in the cafeteria conference room at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville. Admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus, 352-597-6333 in Hernando or visit the website www.OakHill Hospital.com. HIV support group 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at Citrus County Health Department, 3700 Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Open to all affected by HIV. Persons attending remain confidential, testing will be anonymous. Reservation not required. Call 352-527-0068, ext. 281. Bereaved Parents of the USA (BP/USA) grief support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced the death of a child, 7 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call Bernadette Passalacqua at 352-746-4664 or visit www. bereavedparentsusa.org. Look Good ... Feel Better a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-3417741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. SPRING HILL Spinal Cord Injury support group, 5 p.m. second Thursday monthly in the gym at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital. Call Dee Hardee at 352592-7237. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. Womens Breast Cancer Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the second Friday monthly (except July and August), Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in the Allen Ridge Medical Center, County Road 491, Lecanto. Light lunch served. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Let me describe the system. The best way to describe the system is to make it analogous to a lock and a key. The key fits into the lock in a precise manner. With precision dentures, you have a lock half and a key half. One of these halves is in the denture and the other half is attached to crowns that are cemented to your own teeth. Without crowns, you cannot have the other half of the system. If you are wearing partials and you do not like the way the clasps look, or you feel there is too much pressure on your teeth or gums, you may be the perfect candidate for a precision partial. I would suggest you talk to your dentist about precision partials. If your dentist is not familiar with them or doesnt do them regularly, you may want to find someone who is. To make a system like this work properly, both the dentist and the lab he or she uses must be well trained in these systems. If the lab is not familiar with these systems or does not do them regularly, talk to your dentist about a lab that is more familiar with the system. If after reading this column you have questions that were not covered here, please feel free to write to me. Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions or comments to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at FJV@MasterpieceDental Studio.com. H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C5 000EQ56 w w w c h r o n i c l e o n l i n e c o m / s u b s c r i b e r p r o m o w w w c h r o n i c l e o n l i n e c o m / s u b s c r i b e r p r o m o www.chronicleonline.com/subscriberpromo S h h h S h h h Shhh! C a n y o u k e e p a s e c r e t ? W e l o v e o u r s u b s c r i b e r s a n d a s a r e w a r d w e a r e o f f e r i n g m o n t h l y s u b s c r i b e r c o n t e s t s o n o u r w e b s i t e C a n y o u k e e p Can you keep a s e c r e t ? a secret? W e l o v e o u r s u b s c r i b e r s We love our subscribers a n d a s a r e w a r d w e and as a reward we a r e o f f e r i n g m o n t h l y are offering monthly s u b s c r i b e r c o n t e s t s subscriber contests o n o u r w e b s i t e on our website. 000ETQP 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS 000F0T0 Musicians interested in playing may call Tony Caruso at 942-9399 You are invited to an Open Jam Session The Jam Session features local and visiting musicians playing Old Favorites, Jazz, Swing and Dixieland for your listening and dancing pleasure. S u n d a y J u n e 2 2 0 1 3 1:30 to 4 p.m. The public is invited! $7 donation at the door for non-members. LOCATION Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center formerly the Knights of Columbus Hall in Homosassa Springs Bring your own refreshments. VASCMINIContinued from Page C1 GROUPS Continued from Page C4

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES New clinic offers low-cost options Royal Skunk Animal Clinic, a nonprofit veterinary pet clinic, seeks to stop the birth of unwanted cats and dogs by offering low-cost spay and neutering, and wants to give residents of Citrus County another option to turn to for pet care. To this end, the clinic will offer low-cost vaccinations and low-cost teeth cleaning, as well as dog and cat physical examinations. The clinic is in the Hampton Plaza on the corner of Essex Street and Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486). Prodigy Modeling Agency, a benefactor, has allowed the clinic to work out of its offices, which are in the farthest back corner of the plaza. A mobile clinic will be set up on site to carry out procedures. The first clinic day will be Friday, June 28. For more information or to make an appointment for services, call 352201-6701. Scouts to stage car wash Boy Scout Troop 462 will have a car wash from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 1, at Bay Area Air Conditioning & Heating, 8021 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. The car wash is a summer camp fundraiser. For more information, call 352-220-1554. Bonsai club to do display at mall Buttonwood Bonsai Club will have a small display of bonsai trees at the Crystal River Malls Spring Garden Show on Saturday, June 1. A full club display and demonstrations are scheduled for the following Saturday, June 8, at the mall. The club will have its regular meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 8, at the mall. Following a short meeting will be a display of club members bonsai plus demonstrations all day until 4 p.m. in the food court. For more information, call Bob Eskeitz at 352587-4215. C OMMUNITY Page C6 TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Precious Paws ADOPTABLE Corbin Special to the Chronicle Corbin is a 2-year-old black kitty with a coat smooth as satin. She loves to be a part of family life and looks at you with her golden eyes when she is ready to cuddle. She likes to sleep in the bed and loves to look out the window at the outside critters. She is quiet and will make a great family pet. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. Starting in June, the Precious Paws Crystal River Mall adoption center will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. The Floral City adoption site at 7360 S. Florida Ave. is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Call 352-726-4700 for more information or visit www.preciouspaws florida.com. Zen meditation offered at UnityThe public is welcome to Zen meditation sessions at 2:45 p.m. Sundays at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto (off County Road 491). For more information, call 352-464-4955. Friends to have mini book sale Friends of the Floral City Library will have a mini book sale at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 1, at the library, 8360 E. Orange Ave., Floral City. The sale will feature a large selection of hardcover books for $1 and paperbacks for 50 cents each, along with some authorsigned copies, first editions and a large variety of childrens books. There will be a limited number of book bag giveaways, a drawing for a Today Im Reading mug and some other freebies. Childrens book sales will help with the adopt-a-class program. Call the library at 352-726-3671 for more details. Garden Club to do display The Garden Club of Crystal River will have a display with information on how to decorate toad houses for your garden at the Crystal River Malls Spring Garden Show on Saturday, June 1. There is a variety of ways to attract toads and create a garden decoration, and have some creative family fun at the same time. Toad havens are easy to create, using items you may already have around your house. Decorating toad houses is very inexpensive. For more information, call Libby Wentzell at 352257-1211. Dance, drum classes offeredCommunity classes for summertime African dance and drum classes are available. All interested persons are welcome. For information, call 352897-4173 or 352-270-6148. Special to the ChronicleThe Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club at 54 Civic Circle in the Beverly Hills Recreation Park will host free horseshoe pitching to all ages from 8:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays from June 5 until Sept. 4. Instruction and horseshoes will be provided. The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club is a sponsor of the Florida State Horseshoe Pitchers $1,000 Scholarship Award and also the John Reynolds $100 J.R. Memorial Award. The award is presented to students of any age up to 18 years. Money is held in a foundation until they graduate from high school. Membership in a horseshoe club, although recommended, is not required. Participants will need to get a National Horseshoe Pitchers Association card to play in tournaments. Sanctioned tournaments are on the second Saturday each month, September through April, at BHHC. In April 2014, the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club will host the 54th annual Florida State Championship Horseshoe Tournament. Students need only one sanctioned tournament to be eligible to play in the state tournament; however, four sanctioned tournaments are required to be eligible for the $1,000 scholarship award. Call Eileen Fox at 585-305-1912 or email Eileen at eileenffox @gmail.com or John Bissonnette at 352-270-3327 for more information. Come throw a shoe Horseshoe enthusiasts seek more youth involvement in club T he Dunnellon Singers graciously perform all around our area for a mere donation. Robert Cubbage, pianist, was accepted into study at Julliard at age 12, majored in piano at Denison University and worked primarily as a master recording audio engineer for music publishers and record labels, including Columbia and RCA. His keyboard artistry and theatrical style were well known in New York and he has performed in several stock company productions. In retirement, he serves as organist for two Ocala Episcopal churches. Sue Koppler, contralto, serves as Dunnellon Presbyterian Churchs director of music and is a frequent soloist with the Dunnellon Chorale, Citrus Community Concert Choir, Oak Runs Showcase of Stars and the Central Florida Music Chorale. A former jazz quintet professional performer, she also played clarinet with the Nature Coast Community Band. Mary Mahoney, soprano, studied voice at Briar Cliff College in Iowa and in New York where she was a staff singer for Fordham Methodist Church and the Opera San Gabriel Company. A coast-tocoast concert soloist, she is the founder of the Dunnellon Singers. She often solos for local concert choirs. Lowell Smith, tenor, received his vocal training at Anderson University in Indiana and became a soloist with the West Michigan Symphony and has sung leads in more than 20 shows, including Kismet, Showboat and South Pacific. Last summer he wowed local theater audiences with his portrayal of Professor Henry Higgins in the Art Centers production of My Fair Lady. Bill Thomas, baritone, as a youth percussionist in Massachusetts in marching bands, concert, community and dance bands, also sang in choral groups, barbershop quartets and musical productions. At the University of Hartford, he played in the band and sang in the chorale. During his 22year U.S. Navy career, he played trumpet, performed in USO shows and sang in the chapel choir. He performs in local variety shows, the Orange Blossom Opera and the Ocala Civic Theaters Golden Troopers. This amazing collaboration of musicians has been dedicated to enriching the cultural life of the community with their music artistry through their seven-year history. Staged at the Unity Church of Citrus County, their performance of The Great American Songbook included all-time classics from Oklahoma, My Fair Lady, Finians Rainbow, St. Louis Woman and Swingtime, and from George and Ira Gershwin, we thrilled to tunes form Ziegfeld Follies, including Our Love is Here to Stay and Second Hand Rose, from Funny Girl. Songs spanning 1920-1960, all classic standards, we heard solo and duet pieces, People Will Say Were in Love, and Surrey With the Fringe on Top from Oklahoma. The selections are well known for the hope they brought to us in the Depression years and World War II. They built our nation and offered positive values and an optimistic spirit. The values they portrayed are just as applicable today. Ive Got the World on a String (1932), sung by Sue Koppler, and Fly Me to the Moon (1954), sung by Bill Thomas, are fine examples of how a song can lift your spirits. More Than you Know (1929), sung by Mahoney, and Look to the Rainbow (1947), Smiths favorite lines, Youll never grow old with whippoorwills singing in the next hill, and Kopplers take on Hey, Look Me Over (1960) from Wildcat brought Broadway and the Great White Way to our doorstep. We envisioned Fred an Ginger when they performed They Cant Take That Away From Me (1937) from Shall We Dance. Lowell Smith sang Our Love is Here to Stay, George Gershwins final composition of his young life, from the Goldwyn Follies in 1938. The piano artistry of Robert Cubbages intro was a delight. Bravo! Bravo for Mary Mahoneys campy Rockabye Baby (1918). Al Jolson would have applauded. Kopplers Get Happy (1930), a masterful rendition, certainly chased all our blues away and our troubles were forgotten as she performed sans microphone. We were practically swooning as Bill Thomas performed, in true Dean Martin and Perry Como style, memorable tunes like Fly Me to the Moon (1954), a Frank Sinatra hit, and It Had to Be You (1924). We learned that Gordon Jenkins sort of wrote and collected and arranged The Great American Songbook. It was such a delightful way to spend an afternoon with the Dunnellon Singers. Lines like, And Ill be younger than springtime as long as there is a song to sing, and Mahoneys flippant rendition of Aint Misbehavin (1929) and Come Rain or Come Shine (1946) with Days may be rainy or sunny but Ill love you rain or shine, bring such lovely memories to mind. As we were transported to England with A Foggy Day in London Town (1947), and with Cubbages piano interlude, we applaud the generous gift of music that the Dunnellon Singers offer. Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Special to the Chronicle Daystar Life Center had its annual Appreciation Luncheon at St. Benedict Hall in Crystal River. This year, Daystar celebrated its 30th year in Crystal River, helping those in need in Citrus County. Among the guests was Crystal River Mayor Jim Farley, who thanked all the volunteers for their continued and endless work. Pictured, from left, are Jim Farley, Daystar Executive Pastoral Director the Rev. Ryszard Stradomski, Executive Director Denise Kennard and Board Chairman Ron Kornatowski. Appreciation luncheon During the luncheon, Denise Kennard presented Marlene Sissy Carmichael with the Volunteer of the Year Award. Carmichael volunteers in the Daystar Thrift Store. Shortly after, Ron Kornatowski presented Kennard with an Outstanding Service Award for her performance as executive director and for leadership and guidance to the volunteers of Daystar. Dunnellon Singers entertain Citrus audience Ruth Levins AROUND THE COMMUNITY

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T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C7 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E NTERTAINMENT P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. How responder shows a major two-suiter opposite a one-no-trump opening bid depends upon his high-card count. Yesterday, we learned that if the uncontested auction starts one no-trump two clubs two diamonds two spades, the responder has shown five spades, four hearts and game-invitational values. What does he do with four spades, five hearts and that strength? He responds two diamonds, a transfer to hearts, then rebids two spades, natural and game-invitational but nonforcing. Here, this gives North, the opener, a problem. He knows that his side does not have an eightcard major-suit fit. But he has an excellent 16 points with three fantastic major-suit cards. So he moves toward game with three diamonds (not three no-trump!), wondering if South might be able to convert to three no-trump with a club stopper. Here, though, South rebids three spades to show his powerful four-card suit. And North goes for game in the 4-3 fit. West leads the club jack. What happens? The best defense is three rounds of clubs. To make the contract, South must discard a diamond, eliminating one inevitable loser without reducing his trump length. If East continues with a fourth club, declarer pitches a heart, ruffs or overruffs in the dummy, unblocks the heart ace-king, draws trumps, and claims when whew! the hearts split 3-3. Note that four hearts also makes because of the friendly break. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 T a b oo S ecre t Li ves Th e 80 s: Th e D eca d e That Made Us P o l ygamy, USA Th e Baptism PG P o l ygamy, USA G o d Has Spoken (N) T a b oo F rea k y Remedies P o l ygamy, USA Th e Baptism PG (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.DrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Oprahs NextOprahs NextOprahs NextThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsOprahs Next (OXY) 44 123 Bad GirlsBad Girls All Star Battle Bad Girls-Bat.Find Me My Man Bad Girls-Bat.Find Me My Man (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Broken Flowers (2005) R The School of Rock (2003, Comedy) Jack Black. (In Stereo) PG-13 People Like Us (2012, Drama) Chris Pine, Elizabeth Banks. PG-13 Nurse JackieThe Borgias MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass TimeGearz PGGearz PGDreamsDreamsTranslogicThe ListGearz PGGearz PG (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ink Master Better Than Words? Ink Master The Bigger They Are Ink Master Ink Master Finale Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Never Ever Do Never Ever Do (STARZ) 370 271 370 The Benchwarmers (2006) David Spade. PG-13 Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004) R 10 Years (2011) Channing Tatum. PG-13 Thats My Boy (2012, Comedy) Adam Sandler. R (SUN) 36 31 36 The Game 365 Rays Live! (N) MLB Baseball Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) (Live) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays Inside the Rays Heat Live! (Live) (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Continuum Red Planet (2000) Val Kilmer. Astronauts try to colonize Mars to save mankind. PG-13 Weird or What? A doctor finds carvings. Weird or What? End of the World Weird or What? A doctor finds carvings. (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangLaughBig BangConan (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 The Prodigal (1955, Historical Drama) Lana Turner, Edmund Purdom. NR Hard Times (1975, Drama) Charles Bronson, James Coburn. PG Bullitt (1968, Crime Drama) Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn. PG (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch: On Deck (N) Deadliest Catch Goodbye Jake Backyard Oil PG Backyard Oil Deadliest Catch Goodbye Jake (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Toddlers & TiarasCakeCakeCoupleCoupleFamily S.O.S. With Jo Frost PGCoupleFamily S.O.S. (TMC) 350 261 350 The Thin Blue Line (1988) Randall Adams. Step Into Liquid (2003) (In Stereo) PG The Help (2011) Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. Your Sisters (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle Kill the Messenger PG Castle Love Me Dead PG NBA TipOff (N) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at TBA. Eastern Conference Final, game 4. (N) (Live) Inside the NBA (N) (Live) (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularJohnny TTeenLooneyAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodAirport Airport Airport Airport Extreme ParkingFuture Machine (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops PGCops PGPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnTowTow (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HHome ImHomeClevelandThe ExesRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Chain Reaction CSI: Miami Permanent Vacation CSI: Miami Stand Your Ground CSI: Miami CSI: My Nanny CSI: Miami Guerillas in the Mist CSI: Miami Sunblock (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home Videos Eight Men Out (1988) PG WGN News at NineFunny Home Videos D ear Annie: My bullheaded 50-year-old daughter has taken gossip from 32 years ago to make my life a living hell. I have four grown children. My older daughter called everyoneshe could think of and told them I molested my son when he was 5. My daughter never checked to see whether it was true. I have never been arrested for this or had charges filed against me. She further told all the grandchildren and great-grandchildren that they should never stop at my home. I am 74 years old, have trouble breathing and have cancer that is currently in remission. I want to see my family before its too late. My daughter called my sister-inlaw and told her she will not go to my funeral when I die. I have been denied visits and phone calls from family members for three years. I desperately need my family to visit. Sad and Lonely Dear Sad : You say charges were never filed, nor were you arrested, but you havent said that you are innocent of the accusation. If the gossip is true, we completely understand why your daughter would want everyone to stay away. If it is not true, you need to make it clear to the rest of the family that your daughter is spreading lies. Please ask whether she would be willing to go with you for counseling to clear this up and to see whether there is any possibility of reconciling before it is too late. Dear Annie : Im one of two daughters. Both of us have two sons. Long story short, one of my sisters sons has borrowed thousands of dollars from Grandma, received a nice car and has never paid any money back. The other three boys have never borrowed a penny. I am the executor of Grandmas estate and have power of attorney. When something happens to Grandma, Im in charge. Shes not going to have a million dollars, but when her estate is eventually divided, I believe it would be perfectly fair to exclude the one grandson. What do you think? Trouble in Hubbard Dear Hubbard : It may be fair, but it could estrange you from your sister, not to mention your nephews. What does Grandma think? If she is of sound mind and wants all of her grandsons to receive equal shares, you have an obligation to follow her wishes. You could discuss with her the option of deducting the money her grandson has already borrowed from whatever is left of his share. You also could give the grandson an object of sentimental value in lieu of money, so he doesnt believe his grandmother forgot about him. Whatever the final decision, please discuss it with your sister as a gesture of good faith and ask her opinion. She may or may not agree with your assessment, but at least she wont be shocked and angry when the time comes. Dear Annie : I have a couple of thoughts for Want My Solitude Back, who assumes these drop-in neighbors and relatives are simply intrusive. But they may believe you want company now and then. Most people do. I, too, enjoy solitude, but most of us want it balanced with caring relationships. Recently, my uncle was found dead in his home. The coroner said hed been dead at least 10 days. My uncle may have lain on the floor suffering because no one visited him. He had pushed everyone away. If Want My Solitude Back truly wants to be alone, he can move to a sparsely inhabited rural area far from anyone who may intrude. Or he could stay where he is and stew and complain that should get rid of any friends he might have. Likes People Much of the Time Dear Likes: There is a rather thick line between having no one ever visit and having uninvited guests drop by constantly, especially around mealtime. People need to be respectful of one another.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) VERGE ROBIN REVERTFABRIC Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: Congress designated that Memorial Day would always be the last Monday in May so that wed NEVER FORGET Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. DANTS MOLBO BARTIB SIVINO Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Ans. here: TUESDAY EVENING MAY 28, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessThe Voice (N) The Voice (N) PGTo Be AnnouncedNewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) In Performance at the White House (N) CONSTITUTION USA With Peter Sagal (N) Frontline Outlawed in Pakistan (N) In Search of Myths and Heroes PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41CapitolBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)In Performance...CONSTITUTIONFrontline (N) WorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.The Voice Performance recap. (N) The Voice The artists face elimination. PG To Be AnnouncedNewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Extreme Weight Loss David and Rebecca Twins tackle a weight-loss challenge. PG Body of Proof Daddy Issues Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Detour (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles (DVS) Brooklyn DA (Series Premiere) (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) So You Think You Can Dance Auditions No. 3 Hopefuls perform for the judges. FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Extreme Weight Loss (In Stereo) PG Body of Proof NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningH.Babers Sr. Place for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Extreme Weight Loss David and Rebecca Twins tackle a weight-loss challenge. PG Body of Proof Daddy Issues NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office The Office F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidPaidStudioHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Engagement Hart of Dixie (In Stereo) PG Americas Next Top Model Two and Half Men Engagement Friends PG Friends PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Heartland Poker Tour PG Mobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangSo You Think You Can Dance (N) FOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corazn IndomablePorque el Am.Amores VerdaderosQu Bonito Amor (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars (N) American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers (AMC) 55 64 55 Casualties of War (1989, War) Michael J. Fox, Sean Penn, Don Harvey. R Apocalypse Now Redux (2001, War) Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen. An Army agent goes upriver in Cambodia to kill a renegade. R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedRiver Monsters: Unhooked PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG North America (In Stereo) North America (In Stereo) River Monsters: Unhooked PG (BET) 96 19 96 HusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsReal Husbands of Hollywood Reunion Real Husbands of Hollywood Reunion (BRAVO) 254 51 254 MatchmakerThe Millionaire Matchmaker (In Stereo) To Be AnnouncedTardyTBAHappensMatchmkr (CC) 27 61 27 33Always Sunny Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowAmy Schumer Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Amy Schumer Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Hidalgo (2004, Adventure) Viggo Mortensen. A Westerner races a horse across the Arabian desert. (In Stereo) PG-13 Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportCrowd Rules DebtCrowd Rules (N)American GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers Morgan LiveAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G Dog With a Blog G High School Musical (2006, Musical Comedy) Zac Efron. (In Stereo) Dog With a Blog G GoodCharlie Shake It Up! G A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)MLB Baseball New York Yankees at New York Mets. (Live) MLB Baseball Teams TBA. (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonSportsCenter (N)30 for 3030 for 30SportsCenter (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48FaithFor GodDaily MassMother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopeThoughtWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Wild Hogs (2007) Tim Allen. Four friends take a motorcycle road trip. PG-13 The Pacifier (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham, Faith Ford. PG The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Mennos Mind (1996, Science Fiction) Bill Campbell. (In Stereo) NR Paycheck (2003, Science Fiction) Ben Affleck. (In Stereo) PG-13 Judge Dredd (1995) Sylvester Stallone. R 29 Palms (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX ReportThe OReilly FactorHannity (N)Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped GChopped GChopped GChopped GChopped (N) GChopped G (FSNFL) 35 39 35 GameMarlinsMLB Baseball Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays. (Live)MarlinsUFCWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men The Karate Kid (2010, Drama) Jaden Smith. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts. PG The Karate Kid (2010) PG (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA TourBig BreakLessonsGolfs Greatest Rounds (N)CentralLearning (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 New Years Eve (2011) PG-13 REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel PG Madagascar 3: Europes Most Wanted (2012) 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Inductees include Heart and Rush. (HBO2) 303 202 303 The Hurricane (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Real Time With Bill Maher MA Boxing Carl Froch vs. Mikkel Kessler. (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52First Pla.First Pla.Hunt IntlHuntersFlip or Flip or Income Property GHuntersHunt IntlFlip or Flip or (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG American Restoration (N) PG RestorationRestoration (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap A family has 29 pets. PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap Spolansky/ Bradley PG Extreme Moms Call; Guzman (N) PG Extreme Moms Presta; Laboy Wife Swap Free-spirited mother. PG (LMN) 50 119 Abandoned and Deceived (1995, Docudrama) Lori Loughlin. (In Stereo) Fatal Vows: The Alexandra OHara Story (1994) John Stamos. (In Stereo) Her Desperate Choice (1996, Drama) Faith Ford. (In Stereo) (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Recoil (2011) Steve Austin. R The Watch (2012) Ben Stiller. (In Stereo) R The Apparition (2012, Horror) Ashley Greene. PG-13 Varsity Blues (1999) James Van Der Beek. R The Jump Off (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsAll In With Chris Rachel MaddowThe Last WordAll In With Chris WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8 T UESDAY, M AY 28, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Epic (PG) 11:50 a.m., 4:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. Epic (PG) In 3D. 2:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes. Fast & Furious 6 (R) 12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 6:45 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) In 3D. 3:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes. The Hangover 3 (R) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 7 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 4 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) In 3D. 3:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Epic (PG) 2 p.m., 4:15, 9:45. No passes. Epic (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (R) 11:50 a.m., 12:20 p.m., 3:50, 6:50, 7:20, 10, 10:30. No passes. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 4:25 p.m., 10:25 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes. The Hangover 3 (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 4:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. Oblivion (PG-13) 4 p.m. Pain and Gain (R) 4:30 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) 4:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 3:40, 7:05, 7:35, 10:10. No passes. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix Local RADIO CLLREKW, ILYMFGMY HDYFWZP. KLV HWZW YLF IVPF LYW LB FGW CZWMFP, EVF LYW LB FGW CZWMF CZWMFP. PFWAW NMZFDYPrevious Solution: Heroes take journeys, confront dragons, and discover the treasure of their true selves. Carol Lynn Pearson (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-28

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T UESDAY,M AY 28,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000ER8E 000ER8S I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 KATBUNNFormally from Crystal River Mall, NOW at Kountry Girl Salon, styling for 15+ year, Specializing in color and highlights $39 hair color special $39 Facial special call for an appointment 352-339-4902 or stop in and visit me at 19240 East PennsylvaniaAve. Dunnellon, Fl www.hairbykatbunn. weebly.com Adorable 3yr Male Chihuahua, neutered, micro chipped, to good home only $125. Leave Message (352) 637-6310 BEAGLE PUPPIES$125 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 ENGLISH BULLDOG BEAUTIFULPUPS, 3 Males & 1 Female, Blue Carriers Available AKC and all Shots $1800. C all for info (352) 613-3778 (352) 341-7732 MALTI-POO PUPPIES Addorable, non shed, great disposition Health certificates $350. (352) 795-5204 TOBYToby, a 6-y.o. black/white terrier mix, neutered, housebroken, heartworm-negative, weight 45 lbs. Great w/other dogs, children & even cats. Very gentle, quiet & affectionate. Walks well on leash, ideal companion for anyone. Found as a stray. Very loveable, easy-going boy. Call Michelle @ 352-726-5139. Musical Equipment Mackie Pro FX8 Mixer 6 mos old $150. QSC power amp, GX5 $250. 2 SP2G TV speakers, $400. pair 352-220-3452 SEWING MACHINE White manufacturing, made in USA, heavy duty, excellent condition, ($30) 352-212-1596 Toro Mulching Mower 21 cut, 6.5 H.P $75. Sears Kenmore propane gas dryer heavy duty, $75. 352-507-1490 4 Wheeled Walker with brakes and seat ONLY $70.00 352-464-0316 Bedside Commode &Aluminum Walker both have adjustable legs 20.00 EACH 352-464-0316 Manual Wheelchair with footrests, great shape $100.00 352-464 0316 NEW 4 Toilet Seat Riser, makes it much easier to get up ONLY 20.00 352-464-0316 Safety Bath Tub Grab Bar it clamps to the side of the tub ONLY $25.00, 352-464-0316 WHEELCHAIR Oversized, Manual, Exc Cond. $400 obo(352) 746-3268 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 M-Audio key studio 49 key controller $20. 352-419-4464 Electric Treadmill doesnt fold up, but will give you a workout $100.00 352-464 0316 Exercise Bicycle UprightType, works great $ 85.00 352-464 0316 BowFlex XLTlike new, $1000. obo 352-628-7633 CLUB CAR GOLF CART Excel. batteries, full enclosure, exc. cond. new tires, $1495. 352-527-3125 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Dunnellon Pawn FireArms****Ammo Mags****Since 1987 352-489-4870 EZ Go Golf Cart 1997, runs good, $1,000, Club car Golf Cart $450 352-564-2756 Fear No-Evil Guns Glocks-S&W-Beretta Ammo-concealed classes 352-447-5595 NEW ENCLOSED 8.5x 20 CAR HAULER $3990. 352-564-1299 GLASS TOP END TABLE w/elephant base good condition $40 352-465-1262 HEAD/FOOTBOARD double,sturdy,solid wood,like new, RoomsTo Go ($100) 352-212-1596 LIVING ROOM SUITE :sofa and love seat,coffee,wall,2 end tables and lamp included.Exc.cond.$235. Call 352-382-1154 Lovely Jewelry Chest floor model w/ 6 drawers and 2 side doors that open up, decorative mirror, never used $50. 352-746-2479 MATRESS/BOX SPRING queen size, good shape, 1 owner,very clean, $50. 352-212-1596 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Full $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 Memory Foam Queen Size Mattress used 18mos new $950. sell for $150. 352-726-8021 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg. $75. 352-628-0808 Qu Matt & Box Spring, & frame, w/bedding 2 dressers, $100. Cloth recliner, round patio table, wicker stands $60 will sell separately cash only 560-4247 Sofa and Loveseat dark red and olive good condition $200. for set 352-503-7748 Two Lounge Chairs Olive Green like new, $100 Ea. 352-503-7448 21 Self -Propelled Snapper HiVac Lawn Mower, New, $350. 352-637-6420 46 Riding lawn mower Cub Cadet,$1,350. 6 HP, Self Propelled Mower $224. (352) 564-1106 2535 N Crede Ave, CR AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 CRAFTSMAN 42 riding mower. 19.5 hp, Elec Start. 6 speed transaxle w/grass catcher. $750 (352) 746-7044 Dixon Riding Lawn Mower 0 turn, 30 cut belt driven, $350. 352-382-5149 JOHN DEER LT133 13 HPKohler, 38 mulch cutting deck, 140 total hrs. since new $500 352-465-2459 TILLER Craftsman rear tine, 14 inch w/ reverse. Like New. $350 (352) 621-3929 WizardTiller with front tines, new 6.5 HPmotor, $250,cash only 352-560-4247 !!!! LT225/75R 16 TIRE!!!! Good Year LightTruck Great Shape 90% Tread ONLY 60.00 464 0316 3 VISION CORNING POTS WITH LIDS $ HANDLES-brown, 1.0L, 1.5L& 2.5Lsizes, like new, $25. 352-628-0033 4 WHEELWALKERseat, basket, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $50. 628-0033 Adult Exercise Bike$50, electric scooter $275, walker w/wheels and grocery cart$10, 352-637-3067 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Chevy Silverado Aluminum Running Boards, great shape ONLY 100.00 352-464-0316 Chevy Silverado Bra for 4 headlights Great Shape ONLY $80 352-464-0316 Colman Road Trip Gas Grill Original $200, excellent condition selling for $95 call (352) 746-1821 EMPIRE SAFE 2 doors on wheels 54x 27x 42Great for pawn shops, jewelry stores, call Ray at 352-489-5023 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Delivered Fresh off the Boat!!15ct @ $5.00lb, ** (352) 897-5388** Harley Mufflers Slide on Original NEW 1350/1450 ONLY $90.00 352-464-0316 Luggage cart $10 mirror 271/4 x 43 $25, 2 gal pressure spay & gas hedger wet dry Vac $50.00 for all 352-637-3067 MOVING SALE excercise equip. some furn, kids dvds, barbies Little Pet Shop & acces. 440-610-0327 DISNEYCLOCK large alarm clock, great shape, ($10) 352-212-1596 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I HAYWARD POWER FLO LX POOLPUMP1 HORSEPOWER USED ONLYABOUTAYEAR. $150.00 352-726-0686 AIR CONDITIONER Trane XE 1000, heat pump w/air handler 4 ton model EC $550. 352-628-4210 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 DRYER$100 in perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 GE Washer & Dryer Good Condition $150. for both 352-697-3133 WASHER$100 In perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call or text 352-364-6504 WHIRLPOOLDRYER Excellent condition. $100.00 / 352-637-5969 Double French Doors 2 Sets 2/8 wood interior w/ frames 6/8high, 4/9/16 frame $400. ea set. (352) 503-6537 COMPUTER DESK small student desk, black and grey, like new,($20) 352-212-1596 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HPSCANNER Model G4050 with software & manual. $99.00 obo 352-621-0248 48 round oak claw foot, table w/ 24 leaf, 6 matching spindle back chairs Asking $175. for all (352) 464-0680 Breakfast Room ChromCraft, $1100. when new, very good cond. table w/4 padded chairs, asking $450. 352-726-2903 BroyHill Dining room set med color wood, 2 leaves, 6 uphost. seat chairs; china hutch 50 in. wide, exec. cond. $500 (352) 634-1723 COFFEE TABLE WOOD med. oak nice condition Rectangular $45. 352-270-3909 Dble Mattress Set & Frame like new $50. TV Stand $25. 352-503-7748 DINETTE SET 4 ft Glass top w/4 chairs on casters, good. cond. $150 (352) 897-4739 Extra Long Twin Seally Posturepedic Mattress with/ Wood Headboard & Frame $125. (352) 628-2346 Floral Couch/Loveseat, $175. both.can sell separately.All in good Cond. 352-527-7183 FOR SALE!Fancy pub tables 30 top & 42 tall Wood mahogany color $75 Each Call 352-344-8840 NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehiclepreferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap -Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle NEWSPAPER SALES We offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn the type of income they deserve and set their own work calendar. We encourage our winning team of contracted promotional sales representatives to work as much as they want. Prior sales or Management experience is a plus, but isnt required. A positive attitude and strong work ethic is required! Most new reps start making money immediately while training and develop consistent weekly averages after gaining additional skills & knowledge. We Offer: Flexible hours: mornings, evenings, and weekends available Consistent, yearround earnings Achievable Bonuses and Cash Prize Sales Contests Easy one-day training program: Start earning money right away Positive, professional work environment Prescheduled sales locations provided Unlimited Weekly Income Potential No startup costs No telemarketing No door to door selling No mandatory meetings Qualifications: Professional Appearance & Positive Attitude Enthusiastic, Hardworking, and Reliable Strong Self Management & Communication Skills Willing to work some weekends Minimum two years experience in sales, management, or related fields Business casual attire (No jeans, tshirts, or tennis shoes) DRIVERS LICENSE & RELIABLE VEHICLE REQUIRED This is a contract position. Serious and qualified inquiries only, please. email resume to jmurphy@chronicle online.com SINGLE COPY ROUTES AV AILABLE This is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. come to 1624 Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application SUMMER WORK GREAT PAY! Immediate FT/PT openings, customer sales/serv, will train, conditions apply, all ages 17+, Call ASAP! 352-600-5449 Customer Service SpecialistNeed outstanding phone repor. Good judgement, Experience scheduling mobile work force. Established company w/ great benefits. Please mail resume to: Blind Box 1830p CC Chronicle 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL34429 Eckerd Floral City Cook NeededPlease visit our website: www .eckerd.org to apply. Office Manager/ ClosingAgent5 yrs experience,Title Agent lic. preferred, Please fax resume to 352-746-7222 Business Services Accounting Clerk Citrus County Chronicle Crystal River, FL Minimum two years accounting experience. Proficient with MS Office products. Fast-paced enviornment. High level of attention to detail. Process reports, billing audition functions, excellent customer service, End of Month Closeout Functions. To Apply, Send Resume to: djkamlot@chronicle online.com Drug screen required for final applicant. EOE DIRECTV TECHS 4 spots open. Must pass background, drug and DMV check. Must have Truck, SUV or VAN. Piece work $1k to $2k/week. 80 miles radius. Call 352-201-7219 or 407-738-9463 EXPERIENCED METALCREWSReliable Transportation Apply In Person AAAROOFING 1000 NE 5th St.Crystal River (352) 563-0411 P/T HandyMan few days per week in Ozello 352-228-9631 QUALIFIED SERVICE TECHExperience Only and current FLDrivers License a must. Apply in person: Daniels Heating &Air 4581 S. Florida Ave. Inverness Reliable Lawn Care Person Experienced in bushes, weeds etc. Must have own truck Paul 352-527-7977 TRUCK DRIVER/ YARD PERSONAll applicants must have CDL, health card and clean driving record. Fork lift operator. Must have great customer service parttime position w/ immediate opening. Can be full time. Apply in Person at Nichols Lumber Co. 2915 W. Dunnellon Road. Ask for Darrell Walters CAREGIVERS NEEDED 12 Hr. Shifts, Day & Night Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto CDL DRIVER With Class A license, dry bulk tank, newer equip., paid vac/Ins wkly. minimum pay. $$1,000.$$ SIGN ON BONUS Contact Jerry @ (228) 257-9466 LEEDS Crystal River I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DENTALRECEPTIONIST Part time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com F/T Front Office Receptionist Prior experience in Eye Care or Medical preferred. Apply in person West Coast Eye Institute 240 N Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto FL34461 352 746 2246 x834 NEEDED Experienced, Caring & Dependable CNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE (352) 860-0885 SUNSHINE GARDENS Assisted Living Facility Currently Seeking Applications for Full time Certified CNA for our 7a-3pm Shift with flexibility Same for full time & part time position on Night Shift. This position also requires, certification in medication management. Must have excellent organization skills. Be a team player, and have previous resident care exp. Experience with the Alzheimers and dementia population preferred. Please Apply at SUSHINE GARDENS Crystal River 311 NE 4th Ave. BOOKKEEPER CPA Firm Full-time, Experienced in client write-up, A/R, A/P, depreciation and Quickbooks. Reliability & punctuality very important. Must have excellent customer relation skills. $16 to $18 DOE w/benefits. Fax Resume to 795-1133 or email to ppricecp@ tampabay.rr.com FREE KITTENS 6 weeks old, litter trained 352-212-4061 Free Kittens brown stripes, gray stripes, black & Russian blue, adorable, ready for new home! (352) 601-3662 Free Pine Cones Large, great for Crafts, Bagged, ready to go (352) 621-3929 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Delivered Fresh off the Boat!!15ct @ $5.00lb, ** (352) 897-5388** Misty Meadows U-Pick Blueberries OpenThur-Sun 7am-7pm 352-726-7907 www.mistymeadowsblueberryfarm.com LOST Two Large Tents 40x80 and 40x100 Inverness Rooks Rd. (813) 394-1228 Female Walker Dog vicinity of 491 and Stagecoach.Answers to the name of Julie please call (352) 279-0708 LargeAnatolian Shepherd Male, tan, dark ears and nose, micro chipped 100lbs lost on 4/26/13 in Floral City near S.Turner Ave & StageCoach rd. $500 REWARD (352) 220-2540 Lost 2 Black Calves 1 steer, Tag #312, #283 Rockcrusher Area 352-634-2462 352-422-2076 Lost Calico Cat Dark brown color w/cream/orange markings: with white chest belly & paws, Beverly Hills, Heartbroken, Missing on April 6, REWARD 352-527-0302 White Minx Cat Blue Eyes, deaf, 10 lbs, 8 yrs old. Missing Mon Independence HWY, Inverness 726-1019 Puppy Found Poss. age 6mth-1yr female, found on Cardinal and Georgian Rd, Homosassa. Call to identify 352-628-3829 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Delivered Fresh off the Boat!!15ct @ $5.00lb, ** (352) 897-5388** Cemetery Lot Fountain Memorial Gardens in Homosassa 1 plot 1 casket and 1 vault at 1/2 price $3000. pls. call (352) 628-2936 HAIR STYLIST Full time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. Workers of Miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day, by the eight day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. SB. Todays New Ads Memory Foam Queen Size Mattress used 18mos new $950. sell for $150. 352-726-8021 Musical Equipment Mackie Pro FX8 Mixer 6 mos old $150. QSC power amp, GX5 $250. 2 SP2G TV speakers, $400. pair 352-220-3452 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Riding Mowers, Large Gas/BBQ Grills & MORE 352-270-4087 4 Drawer Steel Filing Cabinet. Very Good Condition (352) 527-4197 HI IM FRANKIE Amale mini apricot poodle, only 5 yrs old, I am very layed back, happy, and hansom pooch now that my saving angles has rescued me. My fur was so matted and full of flea, I was so unhappy and because I liked to bark at the squires my previous owners would hit me in the mouth and I ended up with a jaw infection so I had to have the lower jaw removed. But dont be sad, I eat a little funny but I am happy now. I am looking for my forever home, can you share yours. Call Saving Angles pet rescue at 419-0223 or 726-1006 or visit www.saving anglespetrescue.com Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips

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C10 T UESDAY,M AY 28,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000E5AE Exp. 5/31/13 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior Pressure Washing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000EI6K 000EKOX WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465 Bonded & Insured www.windowgenie.com/springhill 0 0 0 E S I Z HANDYMAN Rons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 000EX7A CARPET CARE C o m p l e t e C a r p e t C a r e L L C C o m p l e t e C a r p e t C a r e L L C Complete Carpet Care,LLC. Lic & Ins o f f i c e 3 5 2 5 4 7 1 6 3 6 c e l l 3 5 2 2 8 2 1 4 8 0 o f f i c e 3 5 2 5 4 7 1 6 3 6 office 352-547-1636 c e l l 3 5 2 2 8 2 1 4 8 0 cell 352-282-1480 Stretching Cleaning Removal Repair Free In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty on Stretching & Repairs Upholstery Cleaning Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces K r i s G e o r g e K r i s G e o r g e Kris George 000ESX4 ROOFING AAA ROOFING Call the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411 Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $ 100 OFF Any Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!! Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827 For a FREE In-Home Estimate! BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELING BATHFITTER000ETFE 0 0 0 E S 3 V TREE SERVICE 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696 Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured352-400-3188 YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND P A VERS Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC000F1QZ Copes Pool & Pavers 000EN86 METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer Satisfaction Lic.#CCC1325497 000EH0P When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile CleanerShowers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Cleaning & Sealing Grout Painting Residential & Commercial 586-1816 746-9868 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248 Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000F238 Stand Alone Generator DOUBLE J Tree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 10% off-Mention Ad Lic/ins. 352-344-2696 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL Licensed/Insured Jimmy 352-212-9067 26 YRS EXP. Tree Serv. Removal, Stump grinding, trim., hauling Tom (352) 726-1875 ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle Follow the ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing-Inc.com Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL Licensed/Insured Jimmy 352-212-9067 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Jeffery Upchurch Painting. Res Painting, interior/ext. Free est. Lic/ins (352) 220-0273 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 **Full Lawn Service *** Hedgetrim, Hauling Available !! Free Estimates. 352-344-9273 AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Cuts Starting $15 Res./Comm., Lic/Ins. 563-9824, 228-7320 AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Quality Cuts Lawn Care Budget Plans, Lic/Ins 352-794-4118 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Helpin Hand Grass Man Cut Clean Mulch Edge FREE ESTIMATES! Russell 352-637-1363 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup,hauling. treework 352-726-9570 ATYOUR HOMEMower and Small Engine 4551 W. Cardinal 352-220-4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 #1 HANDYMAN All Types of Repairs Free EST., SR. DISC. Lic#38893, 201-1483 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 CLEANING BYPENNY Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. 352-503-7800, 352-476-3820 CLEANING BY TABITHA Monthly Occasional, Residential **352-601-2175** NA TURE COAST CLEANING Res. Rate-$20 hr. No Time Wasted! 352-564-3947 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 ROCKYS FENCING FREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Adult Family Care HomeAlzheimer Dementia Incontinency (SL6906450) 503-7052 CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins. Will Care For You & Assist in Daily Needs **352-249-7451** JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 000ER8K Nature Coast Landings: Sale/Trade: Big rig RV Site plus storage lot. $49,500/offer for both. 352-843-5441. See at detailsbyowner.com FOR SALE $89,900 31 S Melborne St. Beverly HIlls owner financing avail. 352-634-1724 PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath. Office Bldg for sale perfect for Accountants, Chiropractor or insurance office. Corner Lot, fences, great location Approx. 1400 sq ft.Listed to sell by owner 352-746-5079 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOU AVIEW TO LOVE www. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Chiefland By Owner -5 FencedAcres, Nice little one bedroom house, Big Pole Barn w/electric & water. Grandaddy Oaks, park like setting, Very Private. $78,500 firm. Call 813-285-0182 Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Your world first.Every Day v automotive Classifieds CRYSTALRIVER2/2/2, $750. mo + sec $500 850-838-7289 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INGLIS Charming furnished effic/cottage all util. incld. $645 no smoking 352-422-2994 HERNANDO Retail/Restaurant* FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf. kitchen ready, up to code, lg. parking lot. **(352)4642514** 1305 Hwy 486 Executive Suite Available, King Bed, high speed internet Direct tv, whole house access, w/d, carport parking, secluded, Christian gentleman $125. wkly call Bruce 352-445-7501 or Ray 828-497-2610 PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. Desertrose ApartmentsRENTAL SPECIAL1 MONTH FREE 2 bed/2 bath Call now for details!! Ensing Properties LLC 352-795-1795 www.ensing properties.com INVERNESS 1/1 $400-$465 Near Hospital 352-422-2393 CRYSTALRIVERHwy 19 Downtown Commercial Storefront clean 1000 SF, exc.loc $795/mo 352-634-2528 Meadowcrest Condo for Rent Will Call back after writing out info 352-220-6754 30 days HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BLACK DIAMOND 2BR/2BA Located on the Eighteenth Fairway of Quarry Course. Great Views. $1200/month includes basic cable & lawn care. Contact Dixie at 352-746-3301. LECANTOCottage 1/1 $450. incls. pwer /water, Dirt Road (352) 220-2958 CITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/2, New Carpet, Near School $725. mo. RIVER LINKS REALTY 352-628-1616 HOMOSASSA 1/1 Duplex $265 2/1 House $575 RIVER LINKS REALTY 352-628-1616 Homosassa Spg2/2 on canal, new paint,flooring, w/d pets ok $800 mthly, 8928 W. White Dogwood Dr. 619-301-5442 INVERNESS 2/1, River House $585. mo. dock, scrn. porch, garage, carport, shed 352-726-5994 INVERNESS 2/2/2, w/ Fl. Rm. CHA, 1st, last & Sec. 700. mo Sr. Disc. 352-249-6227 INVERNESS Highlands close to downtown 3/2/2, Immaculate (352) 400-5723 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 MH 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very N ice Quiet, $36,500. Cash net to seller 352-586-9498 HOME-N-LAND Bring The Dogs Only $69,900, 3/2 like new on acre. Tape-n-texture walls, new carpet & appliances,AC & heat! Warranty, $2,850 down, $349.22/mo P&I, W.A.C. Owner can finance. Call 352-621-9182 HOMOSASSA Dbl.Wide 3/2 95% remodeled inside, 1.25 acres half-fenced, recent roofing & siding, 16x16 workshop,must-see! $65,900(352) 621-0192 HOMOSASSA Owner Financing, 3/2 2000 Sq Ft, comp. remodeled, open fl plan, fenced yard $5k down $525 monthly 302-9217 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $11,000 or Lease to Own from $199/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Lecanto Hills 55+ Park Lot rent $240, 2/1, Clean, Fully furn., shed & carport $6,800 61 S Atkins Ter. Call ofc: 352-746-4648 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 FLORALCITY2/1, Det. Gar. Chad, Hist. Dist., No pets/ non smoking $650mo. 1st/lst/sec. 422-6263 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITY LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE CRYSTAL RIVERSpacious 2/1,W/D Hkup,$550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 New Lot Model2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fireplace, huge Island kitchen, It has to go!! $84,900 includes Del, set-up,A/C, Skirting,steps, Furniture pkg Avail. Call 352-795-2377 Palm Harbor Factory liquidation sale http://www .p almharbor .c om/model center /plantcity/ $39k off select 2012 models (3) John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 REPO FORECLOSURES Bank Owned /must sell Bad Credit No Problem Minimum needed down $5000 dollars Call 352-795-2377 STRETCH YOUR LEGS USED HOMES 32x80 H.O.M. $50,900 28x76 H.O.M. $43,500 28x70 ScotBilt $42,500 40x42 Palm Har. $65k 28X70 Live oak $52,500 We Sell Homes for Under $10,000 Call & View (352) 621-9183 We Will Buy Your Used Manufactured Homes 1976-2013 CASH 4 you, less than 30 DAYS 352-795-1272 INVERNESS 55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 352-476-4964 for details INVERNESS Water Front View Big Lake Henderson 55+ Park 2/2 DWMH in (Harbor lights),carport shed w/d handicap ramp attached, boat slips, priv. dock, pool, club hse, stg rv/trailers, lawn maint. low lot rent, Only $14,900 419-6132 HERNANDO 16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 acres, must see inside, nice & Clean $49,900 (will consider reasonable cash offers) 352-465-1500 HERNANDO 3/2, Country Setting 5025 N Tanglewood Ave. $575. mo. 352-362-5019 HOMOSASSA 2/1 Big Lot, Near 19 $425 mo. + Sec. + Ref. 352-628-3019 HOMOSASSA SeveralAvailable Beautiful Park Pool (352) 628-4441 INVERNESS 1 BR $325. mo. 2 BR $350/mo. Both $500. dep. No Pets 352-726-7951 INVERNESS SW w/add 2/1 near wal-mart $475 mo. non/ smoking 706-473-2184 LECANTO1/1, Furn, all utilities inc. + Direct TV, no smoking or pets, $450. 1st & last, bckgrnd ck. 352-422-6630 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2 JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 DREAM HOME $43,900, 3/2 Dblewide. Delivered & Set up, New Jacobsen. The only home with a 5 yr. warr., only $500 down and $293.40/ mo. P&I W.A.C. Must See 352-621-3807 LOOKING FOR YOUR Is your Credit Score 575 or Higher, several new homes to choose from call for details 352-795-1272 LOT MODEL CLEARANCE!!! All Models Must Go to make room for new models, please call (352) 795-1272 New 2013Lot Model 3/2 DWHM $46,900, Includes Deliver, set-up,A/C, Skirting, Steps Call 352-795-2377 New 2013 Lot Model DWMH 2/2 $42,900 Includes, Delivery, set-up,A/C Skirt, steps NO HIDDEN FEES Call 352-795-1272 Shepherd Mix, Her name is Daisy Color is Blond, 3 yrs old, spayed, UTD on Shots Micro Chipped, lovable, house trained, FenceYard Needed moving cant keep needs loving home (863) 661-6220 Shih Poo Puppies, 5 males, 2 female Ready 6/9 Yorkshire Puppies 2 males, 1 female Ready (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings Shih-Tzu Pups, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors, Beverly Hills, FL (352)270-8827 Yorkshire TerriersMale Puppies, 8 wks $650. Shots, Health cert., parents on site Lecanto 727-242-0732 GOATS FOR SALE Billys & Nannys starting @ $50. 352-220-1025 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 1 Bedroom, 1 bath @$350 inc. H20 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 352-476-4964 For Details! HERNANDO 1 & 2 BEDROOMS $400-$500 Mo. Call Larry 352-201-2428

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T UESDAY,M AY 28,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000ER8Q BUICK 2006 Lacrosse CX 92K MILES, LIKE NEW $8995. 352-628-5100 BUICK 97 LE SABRE loaded 125k mi., very nice cond. asking $1875. 352-637-2588 or 845-588-0759 CHEVROLET 2003 Corvette 50th anniversary model, miilinium yellow, 28,500 miles, immaculate, loaded,call for details. $24,900 Sugarmill 740-705-9004 CHEVROLET 2003, Impala LS $5,995. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 2008, Impala LT $8,750. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 89 Corvette blue, $7500 352-621-0658 CHEVY 2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLERTown & Country 2005 7-Pass Non-Smoking Mini-Van, Stown Go Seats, 3.8ltr V6, 21mpg Leather, 2nd Owner, Impeccably Maint., Records, All Options. Clean Reliable Family Van. $5,999. obo 352-422-3217 FORD 04 Crown Victoria LX, Exec. cond., new tires, 133K mi. $4,200. obo 352-422-1916 FORD 1998 Mustang V-6, 5 spd, Red NewTires, $2350. 352-586-1756 FORD 2002 MUSTANG GT 69K MILES, LEATHER $8995. 352-628-5100 FORD 2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD 93Thunderbird 50k orig. miles, lots of new parts, $1800 OBO 352-527-0181 HONDA 2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 KIA 2008, Spectra, Auto 4 DR, $5,850 352-341-0018 KIA OPTIMAHYBRID EX ONLY3K MILES, LOADED $21995. 352-628-5100 Mazda 2012 3i, 5-door Touring, graphite 7300 mi, ext. warranty exc. cond. $16,388. 727-857-6583 06 Winnebago29site seerer, class A, loaded 19k mi, 2 slides, new tires, exec cond. $46,500 270-8475 Motor Home 06 28Class C, Chateu Sport, 21k miles, exc. cond. used twice per yr. $28,000 352-445-0072 Just Reduced SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, king bd, like new, NADA $29K, Reduced $19,900 352-382-3298 KEYSTONE 5th Wheel, 30 ft, Triple Slide, Exc Condition $16,500. 352-795-1923 or 605-351-1419 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. REAL LITE 1998, 12 ft slide in pickup camper $6900 (352) 795-1923 605-351-1419 STARCRAFT, Pop Up Camper Great Shape, $3,950 obo (352) 341-4152 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 Cadillac Rims & Tires Four for Sale 225/55R16-99V very good tread $225 352-489-7114 Tow Dolly$700. Call Carl (352) 400-6021 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ WE FINANCE ALL RENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Homosassa Springs Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn St. Nice Neighborhood. Asking $12,500. hmr m1999@att.net (904) 757-1012 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Dr., has Wetlands, with River access, but not on river $5,000. 352-621-1664 PINE RIDGE 2.75 Acre Lot. Priced below tax assessment at $30,000. Located in area of nice homes. Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047 TERRAVISTAGOLF COURSE LOT on Red Sox Path. Great vistas. 85 ft. frontage on golf course $53,900. Call 352-638-0905 95 ft on Canal Gulf Access, Inglis Paved Street existing structure Asking $24,900. (352) 423-3414 352)-445-2633 MERCURY 2000, 8HP, Short Shaft Very Clean, $800 (352) 795-1923 605-351-1419 New Boat T railers 16thru 45Alum. EZ Pull Trailers 352-564-1299 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 1994 GRADYWHITE 208ADVENTURE w/cabin,outbd power tilt/trim 150 Yamaha, fish finder, many extras. Very clean, motor needs work, must see. $5,495. 352-503-7928 Classic Mako 20 ft Honey Pot, all teak, good condition, 150 Evenrude 1993, well maintained, good trailer, Nice Boat. Extras. $5200. obo (352) 795-1546 TRIUMPH 190 2002, Center console, 115 yamaha motor $8900 352-795-1923 or 605-351-1419 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com YAMAHA2013 9.9 with V bottom, aluminum & trailer, 50lb trolling motor, never in water new, w/warranty $3k 352-257-8850 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Great Lake home & value!Amust see by Duval Island! 2 Boat docks, 2/2 Fl Rm & more. $159K; Realty Connect. 352-212-1446 www .RealtyConnect.me YOUR High-Tech Water Front Realtor ROD KENNER 352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties I Buy Houses Cash ANY CONDITION Over Financed ok! **call 352-503-3245** SPECIAL New Home in Quiet neighborhd. 3/2/2, on 1 acre 2932 sf. corner lot, $269,900. Call Barney (352) 563-0116 TONY Pauelsen Realtor 352-303-0619 tpauelsen@ hotmail.com NEW LISTINGS TOP PERFORMANCE Real estate Consultant Spruce Creek Pr. 55+, gated, 3/2/2 2370 Liv. area, on GC $159,000. Call Lindsay Paolillo, Foxfire Realty 352-509-1063 Inverness, Regency Pk 2/2, fireplace, 1st floor community pool $48,900 352-637-6993 LAND FOR SALE 20 DOCKABLE ACRES: St. Lucie Waterway, $159,500. 3 Homesites available June 1st Only. 45 mins boat Atlantic; 5mins boat Lake Okeechobee. Gated/Privacy. (888)716-2259. Gulf Atlantic Land, Broker. Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds Dbl-wide, 7.31 ac 9 Paddocks w/water + shelter lit riding ring, $85,000. close to Marion Cty. Call Lindsay Paolillo Foxfire Realty 352-509-1063 I NEED LISTINGS! I SOLD ALMOST 2-HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor (352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican Realty Phone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSE Realtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtor Listing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it! 352-476-9649 sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 GAIL STEARNS your Gale ForceRealtor TROPIC SHORES Realty 352-422-4298 Email: Gail@ gailsellscitrus.com W eb: www. gail sellscitrus.com Low overhead means savings for you! Waterfront, Foreclosures &Owner financing available. BETTY J. POWELL Realtor Your Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417 bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments 4/2.5/2 Htd Pool 30x40 detached gar. wood, tile,carport wood cab, granite Must See! $319,900 lv. msg 352-527-1448 2/1/1Treated with tender loving care. Freshly painted int/ext Near shopping $43,999 209 S Washington ST Cl Bill 301-538-4840 For Sale By Owner 3/2/2, on appox. acre with enclosed large pool new roof, new Hot water heater $125,000, 746-5421 LECANTO (Black Diamond) 3/2/2 Gated Golf Community with amenities $120K (poss rent opt) 352-804-9729 3BD/2BA/2CG, Extra Rm. New Roof, Cathedral Ceilings, Fruit Trees, 2 Lots, $145,000. 352-228-7328 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell 2/2/2, Part time or year round, $82,000 Open plan, carpet, tile, bright, cheerful, clean. Realtor/Owner (352) 697-0295 3/2/2 POOLHOME New Paint and carpet, Updated Kitchen, Quick Sale $119,500352-302-4057 3BR/2BA Pool, New Cage Recently Remodeled, 4/13 New kit & bath, cabinet. w/ granite, New AC Lots of Extras $155,900 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 11A-3P, 352-601-0241 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. HOMOSASSA 211 Pine St 4BD/3BA. 3000 SF, heated pool, Granite, Wood Floors, Tile and Carpet. 2 Car Gar,SS Appl. fireplace $235,000 Call 850-585-4026 SMW 3/3/2, court yard pool home, FSBO $233K call for appt. no realtors 352-503-2978 Phyllis Strickland Realtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle Follow the Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com

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C12 T UESDAY,M AY 28,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 589-0603 TUCRM Medical Practice Closing PUBLIC NOTICE Kings Bay Family Care/Dr. Michael B. Mueller It is with deep regret that I must announce that I am closing my medical practice. Please know that I have been honored to serve each and every patient and that you will be missed. If you would like copies of your medical records, or you have any other concerns, please contact me in writing at: Kings Bay Family Care, po box 2444, Crystal River, Florida 34423. Published five (5) times in The Citrus County Chronice, May 7, 14, 21, 28, & June 3, 2013. 595-0528 Tu-CRN Albro, Richard Case #2012-CA-000434 NOA-Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5th JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, INAND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, CIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000434 Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, -vs.Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Richard John Albro, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under,Against The Named Defendant (s); et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors and Trustees of Richard John Albro, Deceased, and all other Persons Claiming By,Through, Under and Against the Named Defendant(s); ADDRESS UNKNOWN: c/o Rod B. Neuman, Esq., 3321 Henderson Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33609 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOUARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Citrus County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: APORTION OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBEDAS FOLLOWS: COMMENCEAT THE SW CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST,ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 175 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 WEST, PARALLELTO THE WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 580 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 WEST, 70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST, 125 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF THE INVERNESS TO FLORALCITYCANAL; THENCE SOUTH 0010 EAST ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE,ADISTANCE OF 70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH, 89 WEST, 125 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING LOT 69, OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION. AND APORTION OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5 OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBEDAS FOLLOWS: COMMENCEAT THE SW CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST,ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 175 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 WEST, PARALLELTO THE WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 510 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 WEST, 70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST, 125 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF THE INVERNESS TO FLORALCITYCANAL; THENCE SOUTH 00 EAST,ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE,ADISTANCE OF 70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 WEST, 125 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; BEING LOT 70, OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAINYEAR: 1983, MAKE: GREEN BOAT TRAILER, 597-0528 TUCRN Tambasco, Daniel R., 2011-CA-4309 NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-CA-4309 MARIAN MCGEOCH, Plaintiff, v. DANIEL R. TAMBASCO, and HEIDI GREENE, if alive and if dead, his or her unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named defendant(s), or any one of them who are not known to be dead or alive; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against those unknown natural persons, and the several and respective unknown directors, trustees or other claimants, successors in interest, shareholders, assigns and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against any corporation (existing or dissolved, domestic or foreign) or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all other claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or other form of legal entity, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendant(s) or party(ies) or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands hereafter described and involved in this lawsuit. and STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o VIRGINIA T. TAMBASCO; and STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o KELLIE L. CALLAHAN; and KELLIE L. CALLAHAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 3, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-4309, in the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein MARIAN MCGEOCH is the Plaintiff, and DANIEL R. TAMBASCO; HEIDI GREENE; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o VIRGINIA T. TAMBASCO; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o KELLIE L. CALLAHAN; and KELLIE L. CALLAHAN, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on JUNE 6, 2013, at 10:00 a.m.. (ET) at www.citrusr ealfor eclosur e.com in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described property as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure: POTTERFIELDS MAYFAIR GULF STREAM ACRES PB 3 PG 6 LOT 22 BLK D TITLE IN OR BK 1328 PG 601. TOGETHER WITH A 1987 PEAC MOBILE HOME (ID NO. PSHGAA121379). Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450 (p: 352/641-6700) at least seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal this 14th day of May, 2013. By: /S/ JEROME ROTENBERG, Florida Bar No. 0045705, Carney & Associates, P.A. 7655 West Gulf to Lake Highway, Suite 2, Crystal River, Florida 34429, 352/795-8888 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 21 & 28, 2013. VIN#: 15620265AS AND VIN#: 15620265BS, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH, IT IS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTUREANDAPART OF THE REALESTATE. more commonly known as 3135 South Buckley Point, Inverness, FL34450. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP,Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 27th day of September 2012. Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts By: /S/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 110 North Apopka Street, Inverness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. PUBLISHED in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 21 & 28, 2013. 10-196283 FC01 CXE 598-0604 TUCRN The Estate of Eddie Mahon Anderson 2013-CP-38000187 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE dIVISION FILE NO.: 2013CP38000187 IN RE: ESTATE of EDDIE MAHONE ANDERSON DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDDIE MAHONE ANDERSON deceased, File Number 2013CP38000187 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice May 28, 2013. Personal Representative /s/ G. Jean Kevil 2003 Windswept CT., Arlington TX 76012 Attorney for Person Giving Notice /s/ Douglas K. McKoy, Florida Bar #0101744 P.O. Box 1129, Chiefland, FL 32644 (352) 493-1458 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 28 & June 4, 2013. VILLAGE TOYOTA www.villagetoyota.com352-628-5100 *2,399 due at signing to well qualified buyers, plus lease inception fees with approved credit. Buye r cannot combine offers. 2 year / 25,000 mile Complimentary Maintenance Program when you purchase or lease a new 2012 or 2013 Toyota vehicle000F23G ADDITIONAL BONUS! MILITARY DISCOUNT FOR ACTIVE OR INACTIVE MILITARY WITH MILITARY ID NO PAYMENTSUNTIL JAN 2014 SALE EXTENDED THRU JUNE 7th! NEW 2013 COROLLA MSRP $17,920 BUY FOR $14,995* $ 149 /mo.*OR PAY ONLYNEW 2013 CAMRY MSRP $23,095 BUY FOR $19,995* $ 199 /mo.*OR PAY ONLYNEW 2013 PRIUS MSRP $25,060 BUY FOR $22,995* $ 229 /mo.*OR PAY ONLYNEW 2013 RAV4 MSRP $24,365 BUY FOR $22,995* $ 249 /mo.*OR PAY ONLY 000EXJS btn ftr 2013 DODGE Grand Caravan Wheelchair van with 10lowered floor, ramp and tie downs for more info call Tom 352-325-1306 CHEVY 2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLERTown & Country 2005 7-Pass Non-Smoking Mini-Van, Stown Go Seats, 3.8ltr V6, 21mpg Leather, 2nd Owner, Impeccably Maint., Records, All Options. Clean Reliable Family Van. $5,999. obo 352-422-3217 DODGE 1999, Work Van 139k miles, mechanically sound $2,400 obo (352) 344-2132 DODGE 2010 Grand Caravan SXT, 41k mi. auto, roof rack, Sirrus radio. $16,800. 352-634-3333 CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES 352-942-3492 HARLEY Fat Boy 14,843 mi. mint condition, custom paint, Upgrades $12,999, 352-302-1507 Harley Davidson 2004 883 Sportster, w/ screaming eagle pkg, Low Mi, Ex cond $4900 352-563-5552, 464-7005 Honda CBR 1000 RR low miles,garage kept, Adult Owner $5K (352) 257-8850 HONDA 2003 Reflex motor scooter/ 250cc/automatic yellow /70mpg/ 70mph/ windshield/ like new condition/ pictures available /asking $2500/call 352-382-0468 VICTORYCory Ness Special Addition, 1 owner, 1,300 mi, new $25K, asking $15,000. 908-500-4151 JEEP Comanche 1986 4x4, running, needs work, make off (352) 201-2120 TOYOTA2011 TUNDRA CREWMAX 32K MILES, 4WD, LEATHER, S/R $30995. 352-628-5100 CADILLAC 2006 SRX loaded, light platinum, 103k mi.panoramic sun roof, $13,200 352-201-0651 GMC 2009YUKON SLE 32K MILES $24995. 352-628-5100 HONDA 2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP 2006 Sport. Last model year of the TJ. Orig. senior owner no off-road.Automatic 6 cyl. Roof rack & extras. 59,000 miles. $17000. Crystal River area. Silver 352 397-5007 KIA 2008 Sportage low miles, exc cond. $10,000 Firm (352) 697-3373 LEXUS 2010 RX350 LOADED, NAV, PREMIUM RED $29995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2001 4RUNNER SR5 4WD, V6 ONLY73K MILES $9995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA2002 RAV 4 4WD 74,000 MILES, 4CYL $8995 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2005 RAV4 92K MILES, 29 MPG $9995. 352-628-5100 CHEVROLET 2003Astro Van, 113,750 miles, Well maintained, Gold, 4.3L V6, Seats 8, Great for cargo, 6000 pound tow package, Rear air/heat/ speakers, Power windows/locks, Clean, $5395.00 Call 352-212-9395 MAZDA 1994, 626, 63k Miles, $2,995 352-341-0018 MERCEDES SLK, 320, 119k mi. fully loaded $9,900 (352) 503-9447 OLDSMOBILE Intrigue 103k mi. fully loaded $3,800 (352) 503-9447 WE FINANCE ALL RENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE FINANCE ALL RENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JUNE, 2nd 1-800-438-8559 CHEVROLET 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air grille, $100.00 -Front & rear Bumpers -$100.00 each-Tail Light $50.00 -Bumper Guard $50.00 (352)628-1734 FORD 1966 Mustang 289-auto, 67k mi. great. cond. $7200. obo 352-438-8346 MUSTANGGT 03 63,600K, Showcar, Supercharger, lots of goodies! Chrome, $14,500 obo 352-228-4012 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE 2000,Dakota SLT ex cab $2,895. 352-341-0018 DODGE 2004 DAKOTA4WD CLUB CAB, SPORT $8495. 352-628-5100 GMC 2004, PICKUPSierra 1500 $4250 352-341-3988



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MAY 28, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 118 ISSUE 294 50 CITRUS COUNTYSlugfest: Rays beat in-state rival Marlins 10-6 /B1 www.chronicleonline.com HIGH91LOW69Partly cloudy and hot.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY INDEX Classifieds . . . .C9 Comics . . . . .C8 Crossword . . . .C7 Community . . . .C6 Editorial . . . .A10 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .Ax TV Listings . . . .C7 000EZAN MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerA potential suitor in the Citrus Memorial hospital sale or lease met with state Sen. Charlie Dean and the hospital boards attorney earlier this month a meeting some board members said showed questionable judgment. Martin Rash, chairman and chief executive officer of RegionalCare Hospital Partners, met May 13 with Dean in Bill Grants law office in Inverness. Former Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum, whose clients in private practice include RegionalCare, arranged the meeting and also attended. McCollum said the discussion was general in nature and not specific to the Citrus Memorial Health System proposal. He said RegionalCare representatives wanted to meet with Dean to learn of local issues related to the hospital and the community. It was a get-acquainted session, McCollum said. Board members Robert Priselac and Mike Bays, however, said CCHB representatives should steer clear of any company that could be bidding on the hospitals sale, lease or merger. We have a mission and I dont want to see it derailed, Priselac said. Bays, who said he spoke with Rash after hearing rumors of the meeting, said he doesnt think anything inappropriate was discussed. Still, Bays said, neither Meeting raises eyebrows Charlie DeanFlorida state senator. Bill McCollumarranged meeting. State Sen. Charlie Dean, hospital board attorney talk with potential Citrus Memorial bidder See CMH/ Page A2 Solemn celebration marks Memorial Day Crowds honor those who paid the ultimate sacrificeMIKEWRIGHT Staff writerBEVERLY HILLS The numbers are staggering. Starting with World War I, through the war on terrorism that still rages and including victims of Sept. 11, 2001, the number of Americans whose lives were lost for the cause of freedom: 436,124. About 250 people came out Monday on a warm Memorial Day morning to honor those who died and celebrate the country for which they sacrificed, during the 34th annual service at Fero Memorial Gardens in Beverly Hills. The solemn ceremony, which included 9-year-old Marleigh Miller singing the National Anthem and Amazing Grace, featured representatives from local Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion posts. Memorial Day, they said, always holds a special meaning in the heart of Americans. The Rev. Stewart Jamison, of Beverly Hills Community Church, paused before the invocation to note: I remember this day well, because my son completes his sixth year in the U.S. Marine Corps. For me this is a special Memorial Day. Deputy Marcial Rodriguez, representing the Citrus County Sheriffs Store turns 125PATFAHERTY Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER Workers from Belk in the Crystal River Mall are sharing a company tradition. On Wednesday, Belk stores across 16 Southern states will celebrate the companys 125th anniversary. In honor of that milestone, the Crystal River Belk has launched 125 Days of Service to the community. Nationally, the company commits to give 2.5 percent of its pretax income back to the communities its serves. Last Friday, store manager Katrina Spires and a team of 10 associates helped with some improvements at Crystal River Primary School. Wearing blue Belk T-shirts, they focused on the art room. Projects included building new bookcases and a new picnic table and hand-painting inspirational canvases to hang in the school cafeteria. Using both brushes and fingers, Tina Renwick, Mary Fontenez, Melissa Chirichella and Allison Hilgert prepared the canvases with colorful backgrounds. Inspirational messages were stenciled in place. Cindy Reiland and Jacob Tourbin found the printed directions challenging, but were making progress assembling their Belk employees Tina Renwick, left, Mary Fontenez and Melissa Chirichella work Friday at Crystal River Primary School.PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle Belk celebrates anniversary with community service STEPHEN E. LASKO/for the ChronicleChief Petty Officer (retired) Robert W. Huscher, from Inverness, pays respect to his late uncle, Peter Radichio, who was a sergeant in the medical corps during World War II. Every year, Huscher places a white rock on the grave marker with the handwritten words, Hi Thank you. See SERVICE/ Page A2 See MEMORIAL/ Page A2

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A2TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL/STATE 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000ES3O 000EU8M 000EPE3 Office, fought back tears as the days meaning struck him during a brief address. So many gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can live here freely, he said. I have family in the past in wars. I never thought Id be standing up here wearing this uniform, defending our land. The crowd quietly watched Ray Roby, commander of the American Legion Post 237 and past commander Dennis Choke Kocielko fold the flag they would then place at the cemeterys Garden of Honor monument. This flag is a living memorial to all veterans interred here today, Kocielko said. This was their flag, the flag they loved, the flag they served so well. Jonathan Beard, grief services manager for Hospice of Citrus County, said Memorial Days meaning is stamped in American lives. We honor the dead best by treating the living well, he said. Let us focus not on death and war, but life and peace. Today we honor the dead but celebrate the living.Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. MEMORIALContinued from Page A1 STEPHEN E. LASKO/for the ChronicleMatthew Loehle, an Army veteran of the Korean War, kisses the grave marker of his wife, who died in 1983. trustees nor Grant should be in contact with companies prior to the bids being received in midJune. Were in a process thats very, very important, he said. Youve got to have all caution in this. We cant talk to anybody in the process. As a board we need to make sure it doesnt happen again. Josh Nemzoff, the CCHBs consultant who is overseeing the transaction process, sent trustees a May 22 email saying bidders should have no contact with the board or Grant. Nemzoff said Rash told him that specific deal terms were discussed in the meeting with Grant. I can tell you from my position as transaction advisor that if in fact this is true and other bidders find out about it, we may have a problem, he wrote. Dean, RInverness, said his only role was to introduce Rash to Grant. Bill McCollum said he worked for a law firm that represented a health care agency, Dean said. He said he wanted to come down. I said the only person I can introduce you to is the attorney who represents the trustees for the hospital. Thats it. There were no discussions. Grant agreed with McCollums recollection. Sure, we talked about CMH, but not anything of any substance, Grant said. The meeting was dominated by Charlie Dean and Bill McCollum. Bill talked about his career. Charlie talked about long-term care. It was pretty superfluous. Grant said companies contact him for information about the hospital. Theres nobody for them to call but me, he said. Bids for the hospitals sale, lease, partnership or merger are due in midJune. The hospital board is expected to begin negotiations with a selected firm by late June. Priselac said the issue is one of perception. I dont think anything was done incorrectly, he said. Maybe some people were in places they shouldnt have been.Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. CMHContinued from Page A1 Bill Granthospital board attorney. second bookcase. The rest of the team worked outside on building the wooden picnic table. Spires said the 125 days of service will run until end of July. Other projects included a book drive. The associates and the stores in the mall helped, she said. We were supposed to collect 125 books and we collected 325. She said the associates who could not come out were paid for two hours of volunteer work and made little magic carpets. The public is invited to help the store mark the 125th anniversary Wednesday with an opening ceremony at 9 a.m. Guest speakers will be Citrus County Commissioner Dennis Damato and Crystal River Vice Mayor Mike Gudis. There will also be entertainment during the ceremony. Refreshments will be served all day in the cosmetics department and Matter of Taste will sing in the department at 10 a.m. At 9:30 a.m. there will be a gift card giveaway to the first 100 customers.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. SERVICEContinued from Page A1 Sure, we talked about CMH, but not anything of any substanceBill Granthospital board attorney. Craftsmen make urns for veteransLAND OLAKES Woodworkers in the Tampa Bay area are making urns to ensure the remains of indigent veterans are preserved with dignity. The Veterans Urn Project is a collaboration by the Woodcrafters Club of Tampa, the Woodcrafters Club of St. Petersburg and the AMVETS Post 9 in Odessa. The urns are made from donated wood. Each is inscribed with a military emblem. Theyre sent free of charge around the country. The project got its start last year when news reports surfaced about a former soldier buried at the Florida National Cemetery in a cardboard box. Boy shot at school leaves hospitalHOMESTEAD A South Florida boy accidentally shot in the leg with a gun a classmate brought to school has been released from the hospital. DAngelo Marte will spend his summer recovering from Fridays accident at Redland Middle School in Homestead. The 12-year-old said hell have to walk on crutches or use a wheelchair because his leg is in a cast, but otherwise hes fine. He was discharged from a Miami hospital Sunday. Police said the gun was in classmates backpack. When the bag was dropped to the floor, the gun fired. No charges were immediately State BRIEFS From wire reports

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Around theSTATE LakelandMan fatally wounded at shooting rangeAuthorities are awaiting the autopsy results for a man fatally wounded at a central Florida shooting range. The Polk County Sheriffs Office said Larry Simpson of Clermont died of a single gunshot wound to the chest while shooting clays with a friend at the Tenoroc Mine Shooting Range in Lakeland. According to detectives, Jaime Gonzalez of Orlando said he was at the shooting station and Simpson was operating the remote control for the clay machine. Gonzalez told detectives he heard a shot directly behind him, and he turned around to find Simpson with a gunshot wound to his chest. Simpsons gun was lying beside him. Deputies said Simpson died at the scene Sunday. Sheriffs office spokesman Scott Wilder said detectives did not know how Simpson was shot.St. AugustineTwo killed, one hurt when boat hits dockTwo men were killed and a woman was injured when their boat collided with a dock in northeast Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the 16-foot open motor boat collided with the dock Sunday night in St. Augustine. The three people on board were returning from a day of boating. Alicia Babb, Franklin Babb and Warren Hall were ejected into the water. Authorities said another boater rescued Alicia Babb. The bodies of Hall and Franklin Babb were recovered from the water nearby. In a separate incident Sunday night, a man jumped from his boat into the St. Johns River. Wildlife officials said James Ricks passengers tried tossing him a line but he never resurfaced. A search for Ricks continued Monday.Key WestWreck could pose oil pollution threatA federal report said a ship sunk in the Gulf of Mexico off the Florida Keys is among more than a dozen wrecks nationwide that could pose a serious oil pollution threat. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration report was issued to the Coast Guard last week. It listed the Joseph M. Cudahy wreck northwest of Key West among 17 sunken ships recommended for further assessment. Officials at NOAA and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary plan to survey the wreck in June with autonomous underwater vehicles. This report is the most comprehensive assessment to date of the potential oil pollution threats from shipwrecks in U.S. waters, said Lisa Symons, resource protection coordinator for NOAAs Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Now that we have analyzed this data, the Coast Guard will be able to evaluate NOAAs recommendations and determine the most appropriate response to potential threats. The Cudahy was carrying 78,000 barrels of oil, and local divers and boaters know it as the oil wreck due to a sheen routinely observed above it for more than 60 years, according to the report. Symons told The Key West Citizen that divers have reported finding oil residue on the ships surface. From wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Lending a helping paw MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleABOVE: Ann Sanders, left, holds certified pet therapy dog Levi and Janet Garvin holds her certified pet therapy dog Penny. Both animal s have served as therapy dogs for several years. BELOW: The animals wear a vest to let the public know they are friendly therapy dogs. CHARLESLAWRENCE For the ChronicleMay is National Pet Month. According to the American Pet Products Association, there are more than 78 million dogs and 86 million cats owned in the United States. Citrus County residents Ann Sanders and Susan Schrader are volunteers with Therapy Dogs Inc., a nonprofit organization with the goal of providing registration, support and insurance for members who are involved in volunteer animal assisted activities. The local chapter has been working out of Inverness for about five years. Sanders and Schrader take their therapy dogs mostly to nursing homes, hospices and hospitals, but they also have a presence at the Homosassa library and the Homosassa Elementary School. Currently, they have more than 40 dogs in the program and owners take them for visits to facilities in Citrus, Hernando, Sumter and Marion counties. We test and observe the dogs to see if they would make good therapy dogs and whether or not they will pass all of our criteria, Schrader said. If you want to visit a facility, you would talk to the recreational director and ask if its OK. Then go in with your dog and meet with them, she said. Therapy Dogs Incorporated has a $5 million insurance policy for therapy dogs enrolled in the program. The dogs go through training and have to know sit, stay and lay down commands and how to walk gently on a lead. They also have to know how to go around wheelchairs, walkers and crutches. The therapy dogs get tested three different ways: twice in a medical facility and once a nonmedical facility. Once the dogs have passed their tests, the owners can send in their $30per-year membership fee and forms. Therapy dogs are different than service dogs that perform specific deeds or services for a person needing help, Schrader explained. There are medic alert dogs who will alert you if you are having a seizure or are diabetic and have problems with your blood sugars, she said. There is no legal right for therapy dogs to go into any facility, but service dogs are allowed to go anywhere. We are really proud that a lot of our dogs are shelter animals. Weve had little Chihuahuas, Pomeranians, all the way up to a 145-pound King Corso who came from the shelter, Schrader said. Sanders and Schrader spend 80 to 100 hours a year volunteering with Pet Therapy. They guide interested pet owners in contacting facilities interested in having therapy dogs come in to provide comfort and care for the residents. We were in a facility in Sumter County and a lady had a stroke, Sanders said. She had not spoken a word in three weeks and her husband was there visiting her. She zeroed in on a Lab we brought and she started patting the bed and saying Good dog. Good dog. Her husband started crying and the nurses were amazed. Those were her first words since she had her stroke. Therapy dogs help people in medical facilities, school, library SO YOU KNOW Potential therapy dogs must know basic commands and walk gently on a leash. Dogs must learn how to go around wheelchairs, walkers and crutches. Dogs must pass multiple tests to work as therapy dogs. Anyone interested in being a part of Therapy Dogs should call Ann Sanders at 352-302-5626. Hospital co-founder dies Staff reportCRYSTAL RIVER Dr. Carlos F. Gonzalez, who with his friend the late Pete DeRosa founded Seven Rivers Community Hospital, died Sunday, May 26, 2013 the day of his 83rd birthday. Dr. Gonzalez, who moved from Michigan to Crystal River in 1971, saw the need for a community hospital in Crystal River. He and DeRosa founded the hospital, now Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, in 1978. Dr. Gonzalez was born May 26, 1930, in Ponce, Puerto Rico. He became a polio victim at age 3 and his family moved to the mountains of Puerto Rico, close to a fast-moving river where he fought to overcome his polio. He was paralyzed and walked with crutches until a freshman in college. He participated in many sports that did not require running, such as shot put, discus and swimming. While attending Tufts University in Boston, Dr. Gonzalez met his wife, Helen, who was attending the Boston Conservatory of Music. They were married in 1952 and later had two daughters. He attended medical school in Puerto Rico and completed his medical residency in Ohio. In 1961, the family moved to St. Clair, Mich., where Dr. Gonzalez founded the River District Hospital. The effects of polio on his leg haunted him, and he had to give up surgery due to the many hours of standing it required. The harsh Michigan winters made walking very difficult and painful and the family, seeking a warmer climate, relocated to Crystal River in 1971. At that time, Citrus Memorial hospital was the only hospital in Citrus County. Dr. Gonzalez often had to spend the night while on-call because there were no emergency room physicians at the time. After the state approved Seven Rivers Community Hospital, Dr. Gonzalez became very involved in the hospital and community. His participation included:Chief of staff at Seven Rivers Community Hospital (now Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center).Chairman of the hospitals governing board. Medical director at Crystal River Geriatric Center. Staff physician at Key Training Center. President of the Crystal River Rotary Club. In his infrequent spare time, Dr. Gonzalez loved fishing, boating, scuba diving and hunting. He had his private pilot license and enjoyed flying even from Crystal River to Inverness to check on his patients. Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Helen; and two daughters, Laura Horn of Crystal River and Gloria Davenport of Asheville, N.C. Funeral Mass is at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River, with the Rev. Ryszard Stradomski celebrating. Entombment will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens, Beverly Hills. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P.O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Carols Gonzalezco-founded Seven Rivers hospital. Funeral Mass is at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills.

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Birthday It could be much easier for you to gratify your personal interests in the year ahead. Chances are, your newfound success may even be in an area where you usually meet with failure. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Any venture you undertake could turn out to be more dynamic than anticipated. Play things carefully, because you might have a tiger by the tail. Cancer (June 21-July 22) The key to your success will be your selfless attitude. If youre willing to go all out for people, they, in return, will knock themselves out for you. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be as amicable and outgoing as you can today. Relationships you establish in your current cycle will blossom into enduring friendships. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The rewards youve been anticipating are on the way. Outside events are what have been holding you back, and circumstances have been shifting in your favor. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Whatever knowledge or skills youve acquired recently will not go unused or wasted during the upcoming cycle. Put your experience to use. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) A career opportunity that could be bigger than anything you thought possible could come your way. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Friends will be looking out for your interests and will make things happen for you that you could never do on your own. Be sure to show the proper gratitude. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You might be able to increase your rate of progress if you raise the number of your ambitions. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If youre a member of a club or organization and youre asked to fill a particular post or position, do it. It could lead to something big. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Before you move on to a new enterprise, be sure youve gotten all that you can from your old ones. There could be some hidden payoffs. Aries (March 21-April 19) Positive changes are afoot, especially regarding an area in which you are highly skilled. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Proceed with cautious optimism when it comes to your career. You could be enormously lucky, but youll still need to tread carefully. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, May 28, the 148th day of 2013. There are 217 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 28, 1863, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, made up of freed blacks, left Boston to fight for the Union in the Civil War. On this date: In 1533, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared the marriage of Englands King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn valid. In 1892, the Sierra Club was organized in San Francisco. In 1929, the first all-color talking picture, On with the Show, opened in New York. In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt pushed a button in Washington signaling that vehicular traffic could begin crossing the justopened Golden Gate Bridge in California. Neville Chamberlain became prime minister of Britain. In 1959, the U.S. Army launched Able, a rhesus monkey, and Baker, a squirrel monkey, aboard a Jupiter missile for a suborbital flight which both primates survived. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed a 10-year, $350 billion package of tax cuts, saying they already were adding fuel to an economic recovery. Five years ago: Nepals lawmakers abolished the monarchy and declared the country a republic, ending 239 years of royal rule. One year ago: Nineteen people, including 13 children, were killed in a mall fire in Qatar. Todays Birthdays: Actress Carroll Baker is 82. Actor John Karlen is 80. Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani is 69. Singer Gladys Knight is 69. Singer John Fogerty is 68. Actress Christa Miller is 49. Singer Kylie Minogue is 45. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., is 42. Television personality Elisabeth Hasselbeck (The View) is 36. Thought for Today: Intelligence rules the world, ignorance carries the burden. Marcus Garvey, Jamaican black nationalist (1887-1940).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 90 58 NA HI LO PR 90 60 NA HI LO PR 92 60 NA HI LO PR 90 60 NA HI LO PR 89 58 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly Cloudy; hotTHREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly Cloudy; 30% chance of rain. Scattered storms in the afternoon. 40% chance of rain.High: 91 Low: 69 High: 89 Low: 70 High: 88 Low: 71TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 90/60 Record 101/55 Normal 91/65 Mean temp. 75 Departure from mean -3 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.80 in. Total for the year 6.10 in. Normal for the year 14.68 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 9 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.15 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 58 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 38% POLLEN COUNT** Trees, grasses and weeds were all light.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:22 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:33 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY .........................11:55 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:13 A.M. MAY 31JUNE 8JUNE 16JUNE 23 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 85 72 pc Ft. Lauderdale 84 77 ts Fort Myers 90 71 ts Gainesville 90 66 pc Homestead 85 74 ts Jacksonville 83 67 pc Key West 86 77 ts Lakeland 90 70 pc Melbourne 85 75 pc City H L Fcast Miami 85 76 ts Ocala 90 69 pc Orlando 90 69 pc Pensacola 86 72 pc Sarasota 90 71 ts Tallahassee 90 67 pc Tampa 89 73 ts Vero Beach 85 75 ts W. Palm Bch. 83 74 ts FLORIDA TEMPERATURESEast winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy skies today. Gulf water temperature82 LAKE LEVELSLocation Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H L L L L L 86/70 84/68 80/55 95/69 77/64 69/60 62/52 86/68 73/51 62/52 75/60 78/67 84/66 85/76 90/72 82/70 THE NATION Albany 71 40 pc 76 60 Albuquerque 85 59 pc 86 55 Asheville 78 49 pc 82 55 Atlanta 85 62 pc 84 66 Atlantic City 74 40 r 71 63 Austin 90 69 pc 89 73 Baltimore 73 46 ts 78 66 Billings 67 48 .35 pc 73 51 Birmingham 86 63 pc 88 66 Boise 66 45 sh 67 43 Boston 73 47 s 72 57 Buffalo 71 40 r 79 63 Burlington, VT 68 41 s 76 55 Charleston, SC 84 61 pc 83 66 Charleston, WV 78 47 .01 ts 84 62 Charlotte 82 53 pc 85 62 Chicago 62 53 ts 84 68 Cincinnati 83 55 .09 ts 84 63 Cleveland 59 39 .01 ts 75 65 Columbia, SC 87 54 pc 88 65 Columbus, OH 71 53 .10 ts 85 64 Concord, N.H. 70 32 s 75 50 Dallas 85 72 pc 86 70 Denver 85 52 ts 80 55 Des Moines 77 59 .90 ts 82 67 Detroit 61 46 .22 ts 78 67 El Paso 94 64 s 95 69 Evansville, IN 86 60 pc 86 66 Harrisburg 71 41 ts 76 61 Hartford 74 43 r 78 58 Houston 90 70 pc 90 72 Indianapolis 81 56 .19 ts 85 65 Jackson 87 61 pc 87 69 Las Vegas 93 67 s 89 68 Little Rock 87 65 pc 86 68 Los Angeles 71 60 pc 69 60 Louisville 86 61 pc 85 67 Memphis 86 66 pc 88 68 Milwaukee 54 48 .04 ts 71 63 Minneapolis 62 55 .05 ts 77 64 Mobile 86 70 pc 87 69 Montgomery 91 62 pc 91 65 Nashville 88 57 pc 87 65 New Orleans 86 65 pc 87 72 New York City 73 51 r 75 60 Norfolk 77 52 pc 83 65 Oklahoma City 81 70 ts 86 68 Omaha 77 60 .80 pc 85 66 Palm Springs 97 68 s 93 67 Philadelphia 74 49 r 76 66 Phoenix 94 71 s 95 73 Pittsburgh 61 40 ts 79 63 Portland, ME 68 40 s 68 50 Portland, Ore 66 52 .88 sh 62 51 Providence, R.I. 73 41 s 76 58 Raleigh 80 49 pc 84 63 Rapid City 72 55 .26 ts 74 55 Reno 67 43 pc 69 49 Rochester, NY 71 40 r 72 65 Sacramento 69 53 pc 79 57 St. Louis 84 66 .31 ts 88 68 St. Ste. Marie 70 38 ts 65 53 Salt Lake City 74 53 ts 66 47 San Antonio 90 73 pc 89 74 San Diego 74 60 pc 68 62 San Francisco 62 54 pc 64 52 Savannah 85 59 pc 84 67 Seattle 62 53 .21 sh 62 52 Spokane 65 50 sh 65 45 Syracuse 69 47 r 74 60 Topeka 83 62 2.75 ts 86 69 Washington 73 52 ts 82 70YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 103 Wink, Texas LOW 23 Truckee, Calif. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 89/78/ts Amsterdam 75/47/sh Athens 77/65/sh Beijing 84/71/sh Berlin 64/51/sh Bermuda 72/66/pc Cairo 98/72/s Calgary 68/48/sh Havana 86/73/ts Hong Kong 85/79/ts Jerusalem 80/62/s Lisbon 66/49/pc London 61/41/sh Madrid 70/43/pc Mexico City 76/55/ts Montreal 72/57/pc Moscow 79/60/sh Paris 60/45/r Rio 79/68/pc Rome 65/59/sh Sydney 66/54/sh Tokyo 71/66/sh Toronto 66/64/sh Warsaw 68/50/sh WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 9:35 a/4:46 a 8:31 p/4:39 p 10:23 a/5:34 a 9:27 p/5:33 p Crystal River** 7:56 a/2:08 a 6:52 p/2:01 p 8:44 a/2:56 a 7:48 p/2:55 p Withlacoochee* 5:43 a/11:49 a 4:39 p/ 6:31 a/12:44 a 5:35 p/12:43 p Homosassa*** 8:45 a/3:45 a 7:41 p/3:38 p 9:33 a/4:33 a 8:37 p/4:32 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 5/28 TUESDAY 9:30 3:16 10:00 3:45 5/29 WEDNESDAY 10:34 4:20 11:01 4:47 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 94 62 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Today's active pollen:Ragweed, Grasses, Chenopods Todays count: 4.2/12 Wednesdays count: 4.2 Thursdays count: 4.4 ENTERTAINMENT Affleck awarded honorary doctorate PROVIDENCE, R.I. Academy Award-winning actor and director Ben Affleck has received one of six honorary doctorate degrees from Brown University. Affleck was among artists, writers, scientists and educators to receive the degrees from the Ivy League school at commencement exercises Sunday. He received a doctor of fine arts degree. The Massachusetts native directed, produced and starred in Argo, which won this years Oscar for Best Picture. Others getting honorary doctorates were author and MIT Professor Junot Diaz; retired Stanford University bacteriologist Stanley Falkow; Tougaloo College President Beverly Wade Hogan; medical doctor and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation President Risa LavizzoMourey; and Miami Dade College President Eduardo Padron.McCartney leaves pick at GracelandMEMPHIS, Tenn. Paul McCartney made his first visit to the one-time home of the King of Rock n Roll and left a gift behind. According to the official Twitter account of the former Beatle, McCartney dropped a personal guitar pick on Elvis Presleys grave and said this is so Elvis can play in heaven. McCartney, a lifelong Elvis fan, toured Graceland, Elvis Memphis mansion, on Sunday. He was in Memphis to play a show on the North American leg of his Out There tour. The show at FedExForum marked McCartneys first visit to the Bluff City in two decades.Israeli author wins Franz Kafka prizePRAGUE Acclaimed Israeli author Amos Oz has won the prestigious Franz Kafka Prize in the Czech Republic. An international jury that included prominent German literary critic Marcel Reich-Ranicki selected Oz for the prize, which is awarded annually with a $10,000 prize. Past winners have included the American novelist Philip Roth and Nobel laureates Elfriede Jelinek of Austria and Harold Pinter of Britain. It is awarded by the Praguebased Franz Kafka Society to authors whose works appeal to readers regardless of their origin, nationality and culture. The society said in a statement Monday that Oz has agreed to travel to Prague with his wife for an October ceremony to receive the prize. Oz has been said to be among the candidates for the Nobel Prize for literature in the past several years.Daft Punk sets Spotify record NEW YORK Daft Punk has set another record on Spotify. The music service said Monday that the electronic duos new album, Random Access Memories, had the biggest number of streams in its first week in the United States. Spotify wouldnt release the number of streams, but Daft Punk beat the 8 million streams Mumford & Sons set with Babel last year. Random Access Memories was released last week and is the fourth album from the Grammy-winning French group. Daft Punk also set a Spotify record last month when its song Get Lucky had the biggest streaming day for a single track in the U.S. and the United Kingdom. Since its debut, Get Lucky has been streamed more than 27 million times. Spotify launched in 2008. From wire reports Associated PressActor Ben Affleck speaks Sunday at Brown University graduation after receiving an honoray degree. A4TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68* 1 year: $121.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community 000ER89 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICESMiscellaneous Notices..................C12 Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices....................C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration............C12 Paul McCartney

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 A5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, MAY 28 TUESDAY, JUNE 4 9:30am-4:30pm. Call for appointment, limited number of appointments available!

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Natasha Barat, 25LECANTONatasha N. Barat, 25, of Lecanto, Fla., died Friday, May 24, 2013, in the care of her family and HPH Hospice. Arrangements are entrusted to Fero Funeral Home.Rose Genzardi, 88INVERNESSRose M. Genzardi, age 88, Inverness, died Saturday, May 25, 2013, surrounded by her family and under the care of Hospice of Citrus County. Rose was born Sept. 8, 1924, in New York City to the late Lorenzo and Rose (Griffo) Doino. She worked as a professional caterer. She was Catholic by faith. Rose enjoyed music, dancing and playing cards. Left to cherish her memory are her son and daughter-in-law John and Karen Genzardi, Inverness; her daughter Joanne Rinaldi, St. Cloud, Fla.; five grandchildren, Gina, Nicholas, Lisa, Michael and John; and nine greatgrandchildren. A Funeral Service of Remembrance will be at 3 p.m. Friday, May 31, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home. The family will receive friends in visitation from 1 p.m. until the hour of service. Inurnment will be at a later date at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. The family requests donations in Roses memory to Hospice of Citrus County, P.O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of flowers. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dr. Carlos Gonzalez, 83CRYSTAL RIVERCarlos F. Gonzalez, M.D., 83, of Crystal River, died May 26, 2013. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River, with Fr. Ryszard Stradomski, celebrant. Entombment will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens, Beverly Hills. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. www.fero funeralhome.comMildred Quinlan, 85HOMOSASSAMildred M. Quinlan, 85, of Homosassa, Fla., passed away May 25, 2013, under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. She was a reporter for most of her life and moved to the area 19 years ago from New Jersey. Mildred was a member of South Amboy Womens Club, the president of the Hovic League, a member of the Moose Lodge and part of the CCW at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Crystal River, Fla., where she was also a member. She is survived by her loving husband, David Quinlan; children, David (Gabriele) Q. Quinlan Jr., Michael (Joan) Quinlan, Sharon E. Quinlan, Noreen (Tom) Peters and Ellen (Peter) Laul Laramee; grandchildren, Wayne Laul, Alyce Quinlan, Kelly Quinlan, Fiona Quinlan, Shibon Quinlan and Katie Peters. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. A Mass of the Resurrection will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 30, 2013, at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Crystal River, Fla. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Charles Charlie Voyton, 72HOMOSASSACharles (Charlie) Voyton, age 72, passed away from cancer on May 26. He lived in Homosassa, Fla. He was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Norma Voyton. He graduated from Nanticoke High School, in Nanticoke, Pa., and served three years in the U.S. Army during the Berlin Crisis. He was employed with IBM and transferred to Tampa in 1980. He retired from IBM in 1995 with 30 years of service. He is survived by his loving wife, Linda, of 25 years; three daughters; one stepson; one stepdaughter; and six grandchildren. He has two brothers in New York and five brothers and one sister in Pennsylvania. He attended St. Thomas Catholic Church in Homosassa. He was a member of the Good Sam Chapter, Trail Blazing Sams, since 1991, and enjoyed traveling in his motorhome and working summers at Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. The family will receive friends at the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory, 8495 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, Fla., from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 29, 2013. Friends are welcome to join the family in procession to St. Thomas Catholic Church, 7040 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, Fla., for a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465 in Charlies memory. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.John Hammons, 94PHILANTHROPIST SPRINGFIELD, Mo. John Q. Hammons, a prominent hotel developer and southwest Missouri philanthropist who rose from a poor Depressionera childhood to build a national real estate empire, has died. He was 94. Hammons, who actively led his company well into his 80s, died peacefully Sunday at a nursing home in Springfield, said Sheri Davidson Smith, a spokeswoman for John Q. Hammons Hotels & Resorts. Hammons first business a company that sold mortar-less bricks went bust in the late 1940s, saddling him with debt. He paid off that debt after two years and recovered to build housing subdivisions in southwest Missouri over the next decade before purchasing 10 Holiday Inn franchises with a partner in 1958 from the companys founder. He went on to build 200 hotels nationwide, including Embassy Suites, Marriotts, Radissons and Holiday Inns. Hammons also developed an expansive real estate portfolio associated with those hotels of golf courses, restaurants, convention centers, a casino and riverboat gambling. He avoided bigcity locations in favor of properties in college towns and state capitals. Along the way, he donated millions of dollars to local hospitals, colleges and public television. His name graces so many buildings and streets in Springfield from the basketball arena at Missouri State University to the citys tallest building that comedian Bob Hope once joked that the city should change its name to Hammonsville. He regularly appeared on Forbes magazines list of the wealthiest Americans and estimated his personal wealth several years ago at $1 billion. He took his company public in 1994 before returning it to private ownership a decade later. During his career, according to the company, Hammons developed 210 hotel properties in 40 states. The hotel magnate was born James Quentin Hammons in 1919 in rural Fairview, about 60 miles southwest of Springfield, to a dairy farmer who lost the 200-acre family farm during the Depression. Ed Shaughnessy, 84DRUMMERLOS ANGELES Ed Shaughnessy, the jazz drummer who for nearly three decades anchored the rhythm section of Doc Severinsens Tonight Show band, has died in Southern California. He was 84. William Selditz, a close family friend, told the Los Angeles Timesthat Shaughn essy had a heart attack Friday at his home in Calabasas, outside Los Angeles. The New Jersey native began his jazz career as a teenager, playing with Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman and Count Basie. He replaced Buddy Rich in Tommy Dorseys band. In the mid-1950s Shaughnessy became a staff musician at CBS. From 1963 to 1992, Shaughnessy was a latenight television fixture as part of the house band on NBCs Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. He is survived by a son and three grandchildren. A6TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE For Information and costs, call 726-8323 Burial Shipping Cremation Funeral Home With Crematory 000EHVX 000ET3Q Call 1-800-277-1182 to schedule a free candidate screening www.gardneraudiology.com Crystal River and Inverness Offices Hearing in Noise Comparison Study Participants Sought Gardner Audiology, a leader in hearing satisfaction research, is seeking participants to evaluate and compare a new advanced noise suppression technology in hearing aids that hide inside your ear canal verses behind the ear models. In exchange for completing a pre and post-fitting questionnaire Gardner will loan you the hearing aid model of your choice for a free 30 day field study. Audiologists with advanced university degrees will provide all exams and follow up care free of charge. At the end of 30 days you will return the loaner aids or purchase them with a generous discount. It is your choice. Lend Your Ears 3000 Central Florida residents have participated in Gardner Audiology research studies Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000ETFG 000F15V 000EH62 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000EXBF 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Charles Voyton Mildred Quinlan Dr. Carlos Gonzalez Rose Genzardi Obituaries Deaths ELSEWHERE OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of the arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Obituaries will be posted online at www. chronicleonline.com. Area funeral homes with established accounts with the Chronicle are charged a $25 base fee, then $8.75 per column inch. Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is a $25 base fee, then $10 per column inch. Small photos of the deceaseds face can be included for an additional charge. From wire reports

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Its been nearly eight years since Hurricane Wilma raked the southern end of Florida and caused billions in damages, the last of eight hurricanes to hit the state in 2004 and 2005. Yet even as the state has been spared from additional hurricanes since that time, Floridas fragile property insurance market has resulted in nearly year after year of steadily rising insurance rates for homeowners. We have no choice but to continue to pay it, said Henry Kempf, a New Port Richey homeowner and a customer with statecreated Citizens Property Insurance Corp. We will have to afford it in order to have the peace of mind. Annual reports prepared by Floridas Office of Insurance Regulation show that the department has been approving more than 100 rate hike requests a year since 2009 including requests to hike rates by double-digits. That includes increases for Citizens, the states largest residential property insurer with nearly 1.3 million policyholders. A report released in January by Florida State University concluded that homeowners in the state paid nearly $8 billion in premiums in 2011. And sometimes the financial impact doesnt just come from rate increases. The state-created Citizens, for example, has tightened its policies to cut down on discounts it offers or raised deductibles connected to sinkhole coverage. Citizens is supposed to be for property owners who cant get private policies. For Kempf the whole situation is frustrating: No one is watching out for the people of Florida. Everyone has their own agenda. Hurricane storm season officially starts Saturday and federal forecasters predict it will likely be more active than an average hurricane season. The prediction issued last week calls for 13 to 20 named Atlantic storms, seven to 11 that strengthen into hurricanes and three to six that become major hurricanes. This storm season, however, may prove even more crucial than ever for homeowners in the Sunshine State. Thats because some are predicting Florida may be finally reaching the end of a volatile period for insurance rates if the state can avoid disaster this year. There are some early signs we have reached price equilibrium, Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty said last week. Locke Burt, chairman and president of Security First Insurance, the states fourth-largest residential insurer, predicted his company will likely not ask for a rate hike in the coming year. The reasons for Floridas steadily increasing rates are varied and have triggered endless arguments, especially among state lawmakers and others in the past two decades. The biggest expense remains the cost of reinsurance which is the money an insurer spends with an out-of-state or foreign company to provide the company financial backing in case of major claims. Other causes that have been cited include millions in other types of losses such as sinkholes. A Pulitizer Prize-winning series in 2010 by the Sarasota Herald-Tribunepointed out how insurers paid out millions in bonuses to company executives or had large overhead costs compared to the rest of the nation. Plus, McCarty conceded all rate filings are allowed to include some percentage of profit for private insurers. Sean Shaw, the former insurance consumer advocate for the state, put the blame on the Florida Legislature for siding too often with the insurance industry. The senior citizen living on a fixed income simply cant keep paying increase and increase with no real explanation, said Shaw, who is now an attorney with a Tampa firm that represents policyholders. When will the consumer stop taking it on the chin and when will the Legislature say enough is enough? Insurance industry officials argue insurers in the past did not charge adequate rates to deal with the real risk of covering homes in hurricane-prone Florida. The fragile nature of the market has been exposed by storms such as Hurricane Andrew in 1992, a Category 5 storm that destroyed much of the South Florida city of Homestead, and the series of storms that battered the state in 2004 and 2005. Burt, using data collected by McCartys office, contends that while the average premium has gone up since 2007, the actual coverage provided to homeowners has also gone up. Burt said that means the average premium per $1,000 in property value has actually gone down during that time period. Insurance companies, by law, cannot raise rates in order to recover money paid out during a storm. But practically speaking, a large hurricane can still trigger rate hikes. Large storms and huge damages can prompt reinsurers based outside the state to raise their rates, which translates into higher costs for the insurers covering homeowners. If there are no hurricanes, those guys are happy, happy, happy, said Burt, whose Ormond Beachbased company has about 180,000 policyholders. Burt added that insurers need to purchase adequate reinsurance each year to make sure they have the resources in a case a big storm strikes the state. We dont want to be a thinly capitalized Florida company that is going to blow away when the wind blows, he said. The reason Burt and McCarty predict rates may stabilize is that reinsurance costs declined this year. But that may not be enough for the roughly one in five residential policyholders who belong to Citizens.STATECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 A7 000ESD3 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Fast Braces Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open FridaysRaphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. NEW PATIENTSPECIAL! $15000Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion?FREEConsultation With the DentistSenior Citizens Discount(Ask For Details) Value $215EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS$1,995 000F1UQ 000EU3P Stone Stucco Columns Decorative Foam Banding Painting & Pressure Washing 352-746-5951 Free Estimates www.ColonyStone.com Are you tired of getting a cheap come on price, only to be told that your hearing loss is too bad for the sale priced hearing aid to work? Its called Bait and Switch advertising, and it is against the law! At Professional Hearing Centers, we can get you those cheap come on aids, but instead, we offer help from the best technology available. Your hearing is too precious to play games with; I know, I have a severe hearing loss and have worn devices for over 40 years. If you want a cheap come on, see our competitors, if you want real, quality solutions for your hearing, give us a call. Youll be glad you did, and youll Hear Better Now GUARANTEED! Denny Dingler, HAS Audioprosthologist 211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness 726-4327 Sin ce 1983 Professional Hearing Centers 000ESL7 www.InvernessHearing.com We Can Sell You a Cheap Hearing Aid Like Our Competitors Offer... But Wed Rather Help You With Something That Will Work! 000ER0R Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol Property insurance up Despite no hurricanes in seven years, rates rise Savoring the sun Memorial DayDozens of boaters, including a pair on a WaveRunner, enjoy the Memorial Day holiday Monday on a sandbar near Baker's Haulover Inlet in Biscayne Bay in Miami Beach. Associated Press

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A8TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000F1B4 Associated PressSEATTLE By Michael Hills estimation, 90 percent of the people pumping gas at his station just south of the U.S.-Canada border in Washington state are Canadians. Gas north of the 49th parallel, he said, is about $1.30 per gallon more expensive than in the United States. But thats not the only product that Canadians seek in visits to Washington state: Beer, wine and milk are significantly cheaper (beer and wine alone are roughly half the price in the U.S.). Add a strong Canadian dollar and the result is a key element of the economy in the towns of Whatcom County. For example, the town of Blaine, population just shy of 5,000, generates more than $225,000 from a penny-per-gallon gas tax, which is about 30 percent of its street maintenance budget. Thats why Hill and others are troubled by the notion of charging a fee to enter the U.S. by land. Last month, in its 2014 fiscal year budget proposal, the Department of Homeland Security requested permission to study a fee at the nations land border crossings. Its a deterrent, said Hill, whose station is fully stocked with wine and has a reader board that says Thank you Canadians. That lone request sparked wide opposition among members of Congress from northern states, who vowed to stop it. A fee, they said, would hurt communities on the border that rely on people, goods and money moving between the U.S. and Canada. The imposition of such a toll would act as a barrier to the greater economic integration that we seek, and is the absolute last thing we should be doing to grow our economy, stated a letter sent to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano earlier this month signed by 18 Republican and Democratic House lawmakers. Democrat U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont is sponsoring an amendment to the immigration reform bill that bars Homeland Security from conducting the study. The senator has also promised to stop any funding for the study. In the House, Democrat Rep. Suzan DelBene of Washington state introduced a bill to stop the creation of a fee. This week an amendment by Democrat Rep. Bill Owens of New York to stop the study was introduced to the House to the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Bill. Lawmakers and people from the southern border, though, did not show such strong opposition, highlighting a north-south divide on how to pay for border infrastructure. Border entry fee study sparks northern opposition Domestic battery arrest Kristen Kenney, 24, of Beverly Hills, at 6:05 p.m. May 20 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond.Other arrests Daniel Kester 23, of North Pine Haven Point, Crystal River, at 8:40 p.m. May 20 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Bond $2,000. Tara Pantas, 27, of Peyton Place, Brooksville, at 8:42 p.m. May 20 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance (methadone, oxycodone and methamphetamine) and a misdemeanor charge of retail petit theft. Bond $6,250. Kimberly Heater 26, of South Winding Oaks Drive, Homosassa, at 9:47 a.m. May 21 on a Citrus County warrant for violation of probation on an original felony charge of possession of a controlled substance. No bond. Howard Cohen, 29, of Northwest 28th Place, Sunrise, at 10:32 a.m. May 21 on a Citrus County warrant for violation of probation on an original felony charge of driving under the influence with serious bodily injury. Bond $2,500. For theRECORD Shooting leaves two dead, five injured Associated PressEDEN, Texas Two people are dead and five injured, including a sheriff, after a gunman in Central Texas opened fire Sunday on several vehicles, apparently at random, authorities said. The Texas Department of Public Safety identified the man as 23-year-old Esteban J. Smith of the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base. In a statement Monday, Department of Public Safety spokesman Tom Vinger said Smith later died in a gunfight with an agency trooper and a state game warden. The Texas Department of Public Safety identified the man as 23-year-old Esteban J. Smith of the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base in North Carolina. DPS said the shootings began about 4:30 a.m. Sunday when the gunman shot a motorist in the Eden area in Concho County, about 40 miles southeast of San Angelo. Over the next 90 minutes, hes suspected of shooting two people who were sitting in a car at a convenience store in McCulloch County and then another motorist back in adjacent Concho County. Shortly after 6 a.m., a 41year-old woman, Alicia Torres, was found dead in her car in Eola, just east of San Angelo. The suspect fired on the vehicle of Concho County Sheriff Richard Doane when the sheriff came upon him north of Eden, according to DPS. Doane was wounded in the gunfire and hospitalized. A state trooper and game warden came upon the scene and exchanged gunfire with the suspect, who was killed. An assault rifle, handgun and hundreds of rounds of ammunition were recovered, DPS said.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 A9 000F1Z0

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Good plan to backCommissioners back County Road 491 plan (May 16). I applaud you. This is much needed. Unfortunately, youre going to get a lot from the oldies and Im an oldie that this is a countryside county. Im sorry, people, but we are growing and are going to have to realize this. I think this is a great opportunity for Citrus County to bring in jobs and money. The only stupid thing I see about it is its going to be four lanes to the south of County Road 486. I would think, look at the cost of it. Youre going to have to widen it eventually anyway. So why not just widen it all the way to (C.R.) 486 to begin with? Thats a stupid thing to stop from going to (C.R.) 486.Growing weedsThe Oak Village Homeowners Association ... cant enforce proper lawn and proper parking regulations according to its own deed restrictions. People are growing weeds in place of grass and parking 15-foot-high-by-30foot-long houseboats anytime they please. The deed restrictions were put in place to deter these things from happening. Calls to the association are treated as non-important and not returned as promised. In return for our $135-a-year membership, we get nothing and are treated as nothing and I guess we should expect nothing. Big mistake if you I just have one thing to say: I was reading the paper this morning. I hope that the people of Citrus County are smart enough not to allow Scott Adams to suggest someone to fill the county (administrators) seat. That would be the biggest mistake you made since you voted him into office.Dog in WalmartFriday afternoon my wife and I were in a local Walmart and we saw a scene that was very disgusting. A couple was walking their Jack Russell dog through the store and through the grocery department. It was not a guide dog; it was just a regular dog, small. But I feel like Walmart was no place, or a regular department store or a grocery store is no place to have a pet going through the store.Good fitWell, it appears from history that David Yulee Levy would have fit right in with Washington today. From what I read about him, the face of politicians hasnt changed much. OPINION Page A10TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 Gun owners: Us and them Us: 134 million legal and law abiding gun owners. Them: seven to 10 sick individuals inflicting harm on American society in the last three to four years. Who does the government go after? The 90 million legal and law-abiding gun owners. Makes sense doesnt it? Think about that! Wayne C. Sessa Beverly HillsReport all abusers of womenKudos go to Mr. William Young for his excellent article of May 3, 2013, on abuse entitled Hold Thy Tongue. I am sure Mr. Young must be as shocked and sickened as I am by the abuse that went on in Ohio with the three young women. I remember when I was a very young child I overheard my father speaking about a man in Maryland who was abusing his wife/girlfriend. What they did to this man was to severely whip him and then throw him in jail. We dont do that anymore. Perhaps we are making the abusers life too easy ... we are not strict enough. The laws, without going through a judge, should allow our law enforcement people to go into homes where there is suspicion that a man is abusing a woman. If we have nothing to hide we shouldnt be upset to allow it. Too much abuse is happening (even in the military) and it must be stopped. Women should stick up for themselves and report the abuse ... whether it is happening to them personally or to a friend or neighbor. Life is too short and we must not allow women to be degraded in any way by any man who has apparently turned into a demon. Ruth J. Anderson Homosassa Not partners but patsiesAm I the only one who sees the arrogance of Duke Energy? First, they throw the county in a tailspin by not paying their taxes and then they have the nerve to ask for tax payers and rate payers to pay for their new proposed plant in Levy County. I always thought if you invested in a project or business you were a partner, not a patsy. Their investors reap profits while we reap bills and expenses to decommission a plant that hasnt been on line for years because they took the lowest bidder to fix problems caused by the last low bidder. Must be ME!John McPhee Inverness WASHINGTONEarly in an opinion issued recently by a unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, Judge A. Raymond Randolph states: Although the parties have not raised it, one issue needs to be resolved before we turn to the merits of the case. The issue he raised but could not resolve that is up to the Supreme Court illuminates the Obama administrations George Wallace-like lawlessness. It also demonstrates the judiciarys duty to restrain presidents who forget the oath they swear to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution. The appeals court was deciding whether the National Labor Relations Board has the power to issue the rule requiring nearly 6 million private-sector employers to post notices informing workers of their right to join a union. Failure to post the notice would be, the NLRB says, an unfair labor practice, equivalent to interfering with, restraining or coercing employees. The regulation of speech about unionization has been tightly restricted for many decades. In 1947, Congress amended the National Labor Relations Act with this: The expressing of any views, argument, or opinion, or the dissemination thereof, whether in written, printed, graphic, or visual form, shall not constitute or be evidence of an unfair labor practice under any of the provisions of this (act), if such expression contains no threat of reprisal or force or promise of benefit. The Supreme Court had already held that employers have First Amendment free-speech rights to engage in non-coercive speech about unionization. In the recent case, the NLRB argued the required posting is its own speech, not the speech of any employer. The appeals court disagreed, and cited some firmly established principles of free-speech law, including the right to decide not to disseminate the speech of others. The Supreme Court has hitherto held it is unconstitutional to force students to salute the flag. And the court has said freedom of speech prohibits the government from telling people what they must say. Otherwise the First Amendment, which guards the individuals right to speak his own mind, left it open to public authorities to compel him to utter what is not in his mind. Just because the NLRB wrote the required posting does not make it merely government speech rather than the coerced speech of employers who are compelled to disseminate it on their premises. So the NLRBs rule requiring the posting was illegitimate. But, then, everything the NLRB, as currently constituted, does is illegitimate because two of its members were put in their seats by an unconstitutional act by President Obama. What Randolph referred to early in the opinion is this: The NLRB has five seats and can act with a quorum of three members. But it does not have three. Seventeen months after the NLRB issued its rule requiring employers to post the notice, the appeals court held that the Senate was not in recess when Obama made three supposed recess appointments to the board. The Constitution states: The president shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate. The Constitution also states the Senate has the power to reject presidential appointments and to determine the rules of its proceedings. The Senate, however, said it was not in recess when Obama said it was. So the D.C. court said those three appointees were not rightfully in office. The NLRB said it respectfully disagreed with the court, and went its merry way, without a quorum. Absent the perfunctory expression of respect, this was pretty much what George Wallace did 50 years ago this year when he stood in the door of Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama to prevent two young blacks from registering as students. Wallace said the district judge who had ordered the admission of the students was entitled to his opinion but that he, Wallace, had a different opinion, so there. Which is essentially what the NLRB said when the D.C. court said the board lacked a quorum to act. The NLRB went on issuing edicts, legitimacy be damned. Courts defeated Wallaces lawlessness. Presumably the Supreme Court will defeat Obamas by telling the NLRB that the D.C. court was right about recess appointments. By such judicial vigilance against the excesses of elected officials, democracy is disciplined and progressivisms agenda unchecked executive power is understood to be unconstitutional. George Wills email address is georgewill@washpost.com. Do not confuse your vested interests with ethics. Do not identify the enemies of your privilege with the enemies of humanity.Max Lerner, 1902-1992 The NLRBs school-door stand CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief BRING IT ON County boasts prime setting for sports tourism Sports tourism is getting to be one of those clichd phrases. Especially in economically hard-hit Florida, counties and cities are looking for marketable opportunities, which increasingly often present themselves in the form of ball fields or arenas. Just because everyones looking at sports tourism doesnt mean its not worth a look. And kudos to Rebecca Bays, Citrus County commissioner and chair of the countys Tourism Development Council (TDC), for nudging us in that direction. The TDC has adopted some strategic partnering moves to draw sports events here, for example: the recent regional Dragon Boat competition, several youth sports tournaments and the planned 2014 Florida Horseshoe Pitchers Association championship tournament. Assistant county administrator Cathy Pearson is a strong advocate, too, and supports the partnership of the TDC with the countys Parks & Recreation department to make better use of existing facilities. Making better use of existing facilities is key. The kinds of investments that Citrus County needs to make do not include large new sports facilities, as nice as that might be. We need more infrastructure, convenient and desirable lodging, and more strategic alliances among hospitality partners to ensure availability of attractive packages. We need to make having events here successful for the participants as well as their entourages, which we hope means entire families who want to extend their stays for a few days before or after the sports events. We also need to focus on the things that make Citrus County unique. That includes our nature-oriented and particularly our water-based offerings and we have the unusual advantage of both freshand saltwater venues. Noncompetitive water-based activities are gaining popularity, and active women are a growing sports tourism demographic. All good news for us. We shouldnt compete for the really large sport events, because we just cant support them. Lets look for smaller, specialty activities that fit well with what we have to offer and can take place throughout the year. TDC research indicates a large percentage of those who visit Citrus County say they are satisfied or very satisfied with their experience and plan to return. So lets focus on sports tourism as a niche market to draw visitors to Citrus County. Then lets make sure they have such a good time they want to return. THE ISSUE:Sports tourism as a market niche for Citrus County?OUR OPINION:We have a lot to offer; lets make it happen. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE George WillOTHER VOICES

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Context still mattersConsider the following assertions from Edna Mattos most recent letter (Framers original intent matters more). She is responding to a previous letter of mine (Context matters), which in turn was responding to an earlier letter of hers. She asserts George Mason was Father of the Bill of Rights. This is a stretch. Although Mason first proposed a Bill of Rights during the waning days of the Constitutional Convention, he was largely ignored. It was James Madison who later drafted the document and shepherded it through Congress. As tradition has it, Madison was Father of the Constitution. She asserts, regarding the Bill of Rights, The people gave government only enumerated powers. Madison would disagree. During congressional debate over the wording of the Tenth Amendment (1788), he insisted it was impossible to limit a government to the exercise of enumerated powers only. There must necessarily be admitted powers by implication, unless the Constitution descended to record every minutiae. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall cited this debate when he ruled on the implied powers of Congress to establish a national bank, even though that power is not explicitly authorized by the Constitution (McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819). As for the peoples role in granting these (implied, not enumerated) powers, they gave none. It was largely James Madisons handiwork. She asserts the right of the people, as individuals, to bear arms existed before the Declaration of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights. We should not assume the Framers would agree to transfer the right to the States or national government. This is a half-truth, at best. The right to bear arms, a military term, was indeed granted to most adult white males but only as members of a well-regulated militia that was always under some form of government control, either state or national, or some combination of the two. (During the Colonial period, ultimate authority resided with the Crown.) There was never a natural right to gun ownership in early America public or private as she here implies, so no transfer of this right to anyone. You cant transfer what you dont have and to a government that already had it! She asserts that The sole purpose of the Bill of Rights was ... to further affirm the limited powers of the national government. Quite the contrary. It was the overall weakness of the central government under the Articles of Confederation one noted by George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, among others led to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, where the governments powers were significantly enlarged. In drafting the Bill of Rights, Madison was careful not to compromise any of those Constitutionally derived powers that were so essential to the peace and security of the fledgling Republic. He proudly noted the structure and stamina of the government are as little tainted as possible by the amendments he proposed (Madison to Edmund Randolph, June 15, 1789). She asserts no documents from the founding generation state the right to bear arms was a collective right to be associated only with the militias. Actually, there were several such documents. Two of the most prominent were the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1789) and the Massachusetts Constitution (1789); the language of the former is virtually identical to the language of the Second Amendment which is itself the most prominent document of all. On one issue, Ms. Mattos is correct. In my previous letter, I inadvertently referred to Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution as Section 8, Article 1. It was a copying error, nothing more. Peter Poland HernandoCrunching nuke numbersI have to admit that we cancelled our subscription to the Tampa Bay Timesa couple of months ago. We only took it on the weekend and they were just too liberal for our tastes. Of course, they called us once a week trying to entice us back, so I finally told them to not call again. It still shows up in the driveway on occasion and thank goodness last Sunday was one of those days. If you dont get the paper its worth going online and reading reporter Ivan Penns great article on the true costs of nuclear power partially as it applies to us and Duke Energy and their proposed plant in Levy County. Mr. Penns analysis tells us an entirely different story than we are being fed by the Florida PSC, Duke and the legislature. He says that, using government projections for the future prices of natural gas vs. nuclear full, the nuclear plant will cost $3.8 billion more over a 60-year lifespan, and that 3.8 billion will flow directly into Dukes pockets as profits. PSC Commissar Lisa Edgar, a threeterm member of the commission, says nuclear may save billions over the years compared to gas plants. In looking over her CV, I see nothing to suggest she is capable of that kind of financial analysis. She is a professional regulator first with the EPA and now with PSC. She is a lawyer. You would assume the PSC has staff that is capable of financial analysis but maybe not. When I talk about financial analysis I am talking about the time value of money or as Mr. Penn called it in a conversation with me, the discount rate. Its a concept that most students are introduced to in a managerial accounting course in a MBA program. Its a technique to move amounts and streams of money back and forth in time and assign a proper value to it at any given time. For example, when the Federal Reserve was created back in 1913 with the mission of protecting the value of our money, a dollar was worth a dollar. Today that dollar they were supposed to protect is worth 2 cents in 1913 dollars. The point is that money spent on the production of energy 30 years from now cant be valued in todays dollars. It has less value. Thats why when they estimate the cost of the nuclear plant at 24 billion dollars; it shows up as only 13.9 billion in Mr. Penns analysis including fuel. Fuel bought 30 years down the road is cheap in todays dollars. Costs incurred 30 or 60 years from now have to be brought back to todays dollars. Mr. Penn used 2009 as his base year. Mr. Penn did an excellent sidebar explaining The Timesanalysis but left out one important fact which generated my phone call to him. What discount rate did you use in your analysis? Because you can make this study come out however you want by fiddling the discount rate. I can see a rate from 0 percent to 12 percent being used. Progress has it somewhere in their rate-setting rules that they can make up to a 12 percent profit on their investment. The rate of inflation is hovering around zero, as is the federal discount rate. The average return on a corporate bond is 4.2 percent. The study was done with a rate ranging from 6.4 to 6.6 percent. That at least sounds reasonable to me. It may be a little high, but a 12-percent ROI?Harley Lawrence Homosassa Late-term abortionIn the first week of May, there have been two headlines about 2-year-olds killed by custodial adults. Very likely both adults will have a day in court and serve prison time. The outrage about these incidents is understandable. However, during that same time, an abortion doctor has been on trial for letting babies born through botched abortions die (or killing them) with very little attention and certainly not the public outrage shown over the 2-year-olds. Why? Even our president praised the organization that sponsors such horrific deeds at the same time the trial for Dr. Gosnell was going on. He never even acknowledged this action. If killing an infant at 26 weeks or even 36 or 38 weeks is acceptable, how can anyone fail to understand the mindset of an adult that finds the 2-year-old child to be an inconvenience? Think about it. The value of human life has been drastically reduced. God did not plan it this way.Robert E. Hagaman HomosassaOPINIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 A11 000F2WJ 000F1VM 000ESKN Visit Us $ 5 99 INSTALLED. MOLDINGS & TRIM EXTRA. 5 COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM. HARDWOOD FLOORING Only sq. ft. $ 2 99 LAMINATE In Stock Only INSTALLED $ 12 99 IN STOCK ONLY CARPET Lifetime Stain & Pet Odor Warranty STARTING AT Tax Included $ 1 12 PORCH/LIGHT COMMERCIAL 4 COLORS TO CHOOSE MOLDINGS & TRIM EXTRA CARPET INCLUDES INSTALLATION AND TAX 341-0813 341-0813 sq. yd. sq. ft. Only sq. ft. 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net 5 COLORS IN STOCK ONLY 000F2WH Letters to theEDITOR

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Associated PressNEW ORLEANS Before Cpl. Thomas Cotton Jones was killed by a Japanese sniper in the Central Pacific in 1944, he wrote what he called his last life request to anyone who might find his diary: Please give it to Laura Mae Davis, the girl he loved. Davis did get to read the diary but not until nearly 70 years later, when she saw it in a display case at the National World War II Museum. I didnt have any idea there was a diary in there, said the 90-yearold Mooresville, Ind., woman. She said it brought tears to her eyes. Laura Mae Davis Burlingame she married an Army Air Corps man in 1945 had gone to the New Orleans museum on April 24 looking for a display commemorating the young Marine who had been her highschool sweetheart. I figured Id see pictures of him and the fellows hed served with and articles about where he served, she said. She was stunned to find the diary of the 22year-old machine gunner. Curator Eric Rivet let her take a closer look, using white gloves to protect the old papers from skin oils. It was the first time in his 17 years of museum work that someone found themselves mentioned in an artifact in the museum, Rivet said. The diary was a gift to Jones from Davis. They had met in the class of at Winslow High School. He was a basketball player and I was a cheerleader, she said. Jones had given her his class ring but they werent engaged, she said. They had dated through high school. They went to the prom together. He made his first diary entry while a private at Camp Elliott in San Diego, a little less than a year before he was killed. He described it as my life history of my days in the U.S. Marine Corps ... And most of all my love for Laura Mae for whom my heart is completely filled. So if you all get a chance please return it to her. I (am) writing this as my last life request. A snipers bullet between the eyes killed Jones on Sept. 17, 1944, the third day of the U.S. assault on the Pacific island of Peleliu, in Palau. Peleliu was where U.S. forces learned the Japanese had changed their island defense tactics. Instead of concentrating units on the beaches and finishing with reckless banzai charges, the Japanese holed up in bunkers, trenches, pillboxes and caves many of them blasted into the islands hills and mountains that had to be taken one at a time. Jones, nicknamed in high school for his blond hair, was in the 1st Marine Divisions L Company, 3rd Battalion. He was among 1,794 Americans killed on Peleliu and nearby islands in a 2 1/2-month assault that Marine Maj. Gen. William Rupertus had predicted would be over in a few days. Another 7,302 Americans were wounded. An estimated 10,900 Japanese were killed; 19 soldiers and sailors became prisoners of war. Memorial Day Associated PressJackson Lee Morrow, 11 months old, waves his flag Monday during the Roswell Remembers Memorial Day military ceremony at city hall in Roswell, Ga. Jacksons parents, Jacob & Jonelle Morrow, Alpharetta, both serve in the Army. FBI: Man tried to open door on flightPORTLAND, Ore. A passenger on a commercial flight from Alaska to Oregon was arrested Monday after witnesses said he tried to open an emergency exit during the planes descent and other passengers had to help restrain him using shoelaces and seat-belt extensions. Passengers and crew aboard the Alaska Airlines flight from Anchorage to Portland told investigators that 23-year-old Alexander Michael Herrera made unusual statements before trying to open the planes door Monday morning.Murder suspect is sex offenderANCHORAGE, Alaska A man who has been charged with killing an elderly Alaska couple and raping their 2-year-old great-granddaughter is a registered sex offender convicted of breaking into a home and assaulting an 11year-old girl four years ago. Jerry Andrew Active, 24, was convicted in 2010 of assaulting the girl near Dillingham, Alaska, while her family slept. Authorities said that on Saturday, Active broke into the apartment home of Touch Chea, 71, and his wife Sorn Sreap, 73, and beat the couple to death. He also raped Sreap. Documents show he was supposed to be on probation until at least 2014.Big bike-share program launchedNEW YORK Mayor Michael Bloomberg called a long-awaited bicycle-sharing program a big win for New York City residents and tourists. The privately funded Citi Bike program was launched Monday. It now offers 6,000 bikes at 330 docking stations in Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn, with plans to expand.Man charged in babys slayingCHICAGO Police said a Chicago man charged in the death of a 6-month old girl was a gang member who was retaliating for the theft of a video game console. Koman Willis is charged with first-degree murder and aggravated battery with a firearm. Jonylah Watkins was killed March 11 while sitting in her fathers lap in a minivan. Police said the dad, Jonathan Watkins, was the intended target.Report: Man kills self, daughterOROSI, Calif. Authorities said a man killed one of his adult daughters and critically wounded another before taking his own life while three grandchildren were in the house in California. The Fresno Bee reported on Monday it appears 63year old Anthony Alvarez died of self-inflicted gunshot wounds sometime before 4:39 a.m., when a child called to report gunfire in the home in Orosi. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Up in flames Associated PressThe fire-damaged exterior of Royal Caribbeans Grandeur of the Seas cruise ship is seen Monday while docked in Freeport, Grand Bahama island. Royal Caribbean said the fire occurred early Monday while on route from Baltimore to the Bahamas. Mali sets date for July electionBAMAKO, Mali Malis government said it will have the countrys presidential election July 28. It will be the first ballot since a coup in March 2012 ousted Malis democratically elected president just months before he was due to step down at the end of his last term in office.President backs truce of gangsTEGUCIGALPA, Honduras President Porfirio Lobo said Monday he is backing efforts to arrange a truce between the countrys two largest and most violent gangs. Lobo told The Associated Press he has called Roman Catholic Bishop Romulo Emiliani of San Pedro Sula to offer his support in bringing peace to Honduras, which has one of highest homicide rates in the world.Chile issues alert over volcanoSANTIAGO, Chile Chile issued a red alert Monday for the Copahue volcano on the border with Argentina that has become increasingly active. An official said the increased activity could lead to an eruption and officials will soon begin evacuating 2,240 people, or 460 families, in a 15.5 mile radius.U.S.s Biden visits ColombiaBOGOTA, Colombia In his first visit to Colombia in more than a decade, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden said hes pleased security concerns can now take a back seat to trade and economic issues in talks with Washingtons longtime ally. Biden praised President Juan Manuel Santos on Monday for helping lead Latin America toward a middle class, democratic and secure future.Russia: Defense offer insufficientMOSCOW A senior Russian diplomat said Washingtons latest moves aimed at easing Moscows concern about NATOs U.S.-led missile defense plans are insufficient. Mondays statement followed an exchange of letters by President Barack Obama and Russias President Vladimir Putin that mentioned the missile defense dispute, a longtime irritant in bilateral ties.Tenth suspect arrested in slayingLONDON British police arrested a 10th suspect Monday in connection with the vicious street killing of a soldier in London, an apparent Islamic extremist attack that has horrified the country and heightened racial tensions. The 50-year-old man was detained in Welling, east of London, on suspicion of conspiring to murder 25-year-old soldier Lee Rigby, Scotland Yard said. World BRIEFS From wire reports No EU deal reached on Syria Associated PressBRUSSELS Austrias foreign minister said Monday that the European Unions top diplomats have failed to agree about how to deal with Syrias civil war, and EU sanctions against Bashar Assads regime are likely to expire on June 1. However, three other European diplomats insisted the 27-member bloc still had a chance to come to an agreement. One said Mondays talks in Brussels were far from over. The three spoke on condition of anonymity as the proceedings continued. During a break from critical EU talks aimed to work out a common position on Syria, Austrian Foreign Minister Michael Spindelegger told reporters he was concerned about what he called a failure to reach a common position and said that after the EU sanctions collapse everybody is entitled to deliver weapons to the Assad regime or to the opposition. But he said he also was holding out hope for a lastminute reversal that could salvage an accord in the talks set to continue deep into the evening. Speaking at an impromptu news conference, Spindelegger said that during the talks France and Britain had agreed not to deliver any weapons until Aug. 1. Those two countries the EUs biggest military powers have been pushing the bloc to lift its embargo on delivery of weapons into Syria to help the embattled opposition. British and French diplomats did not immediately return calls seeking comment after Spindeleggers remarks. British Foreign Minister William Hague left the EU offices for the dinnertime break, saying only that he would return later. French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius left the talks earlier Monday to return to Paris to meet with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov over the issue. The talks had been billed as a pivotal opportunity for the bloc to overcome differences about whether to ease sanctions against Syria to allow arms shipments to the rebels. Earlier, France added urgency to the debate, with Fabius pointing to increasing signs that chemical weapons were being used in the conflict. Diary of a Marine Associated PressABOVE: A page of out of the diary of 22-year-old Marine Cpl. Thomas Jones featuring a photo of his high school sweetheart, Laura Mae Davis Burlingame, is on display May 23 at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. Behind is a Marine uniform like one Jones, who died in the bloody assault on a Japanese-held island during World War II, would have worn. Before Jones died, he wrote what he called his last life request to anyone who might find his diary: Please give it to Laura Mae Davis, the girl he loved. BELOW: Davis, now Laura Mae Davis Burlingame, holds a photo of herself from high school in her Moorseville, Ind. home. WWII vet gets lost dog tagA long-forgotten dog tag that spent the past 69 years in a farm field in France is back in the hands of the western New York veteran who lost it. Irving Mann said he was skeptical when an email from a French woman recently arrived at his Rochester jewelry store. She said shed found the tag in her barley field and was looking for its owner. The 88-year-old chairman of Manns Jewelers said he thought it might be a scam. But any doubts disappeared when the woman, Sophie LaFollie, sent it to him in the mail, just in time for Memorial Day. Mann said he must have lost the pendant when his 90th Infantry Division stopped for a few days while fighting across Nazi-occupied France in 1944.From wire reports Woman, 90, finds diary meant for her in museum The Marine described the diary as my life history of my days in the U.S. Marine Corps ... And most of all my love for Laura Mae for whom my heart is completely filled. So if you all get a chance please return it to her. I (am) writing this as my last life request.

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Baseball/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Hockey/B3 Sports briefs/ B3 Auto racing/B4 Tennis/B4 Olympics/ B4 Nadal begins quest for eighth French Open title. / B4 SPORTSSection BTUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE In 2013, both Citrus and Lecanto were playoff softball teams after completing solid regular season campaigns. A major reason why was the offensive prowess of both the Hurricanes and the Panthers. Lecantos Amber Atkinson and Paige Richards, and Citrus Erica Corlew were important components for their squads successes. All three excelled in nearly every facet of the game. And if offensive numbers are something youre interested in, one has to look no further than Atkinson. The senior catcher holds nearly all of Lecantos school records, among them the career and single season records for home runs after the left-handed batter slugged nine this season. She also batted .441 with 46 RBIs and had 41 runs scored for the Panthers. Richards, for her part, offered a fleetfooted outfielder for Lecanto while also contributing a .372 batting average, 16 RBIs and 12 stolen bases. Both Atkinson and Richards were key pieces of Lecantos District 6A-6 championship team, which advanced to the Class 6A regional semifinals. As a freshman, Corlew led Citrus with 23 RBIs and 15 doubles (the latter leading the county), while stabilizing the middle infield for the Hurricanes. Corlew also scored 19 times as Citrus returned to the playoffs after an extended absence. The winner will be announced at theChroniclesports banquet on Thursday, May 30, at the College of Central Florida in Lecanto.Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle sports editor. He can be emailed at jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or reached at 352-564-2928. Amber Atkinson, Lecanto senior Erica Corlew, Citrus freshman Paige Richards, Lecanto junior Softball Player of the Year finalistsAND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM Atkinson, Corlew, Richards great all-around players for respective squads All-Chronicle softball team Kelly Abramowich, Citrus pitcherHurricanes hurler had a 1.59 ERA with 115 strikeouts in 123 innings pitched and threw a no-hitter against Central on March 12.Tessa Kacer, Seven Rivers pitcherThe Warriors best player, Kacer struck out 80 batters in 119 2/3 innings and also contributed offensively with a .438 average, four home runs and 32 RBIs. Also added three doubles and three triples.Amber Atkinson, Lecanto catcherPanther had stellar follow-up to junior season by batting .441 with 9 home runs, 46 RBIs, 41 runs scored, 13 doubles, four triples and 25 stolen bases. On defensive end, teams rarely ran on strong-armed backstop.Amy Abramowich, Citrus first baseBatted .398 with six doubles, 9 RBIs, 23 runs and 10 stolen bases for the Hurricanes.Jordan Martin, Lecanto second basePanthers upperclassman batted .310 with 22 runs scored. Martin added three doubles, nine RBIs and swiped 10 bases.Amber Hopkins, Lecanto third baseFreshman had a .395 batting average, two doubles, two triples, 18 RBIs and 19 runs scored.Erica Corlew, Citrus shortstopFreshman showed good power as 15 of her 24 total hits were doubles. Batted .304 with a home run, 23 RBIs and 19 runs scored for the Hurricanes.Paige Richards, Lecanto outfielderPanthers junior hit .372 with two doubles, a triple, a home run, 16 RBIs and stole 12 bases while patrolling the outfield defensively.Chloe Lane, Crystal River outfielderPirates senior had .397 average with 16 runs scored. Lane added two doubles, a triple, four RBIs and nine stolen bases.Aaron McIntyre, Citrus outfielderHurricanes senior scored 12 runs and batted in 13 runs while posting a .296 batting average. McIntyre also had three doubles, a triple and a home run in 2013.Marissa Pool, Crystal River DHThe Pirates shortstop, Pool batted .371 with 20 RBIs and 17 runs scored in 2013. The Crystal River infielder struck out just once while doubling five times and hitting a triple.Amber Russo, Lecanto utilityPanthers sophomore had .386 batting average with six doubles and a triple. Russo added 16 RBIs and 18 runs scored for Lecanto.Danielle Gomez, Crystal River utilityThe Pirates most versatile player, Gomez moved to catcher and played well defensively. On offense, she batted .315 with a home run and 10 RBIs, while adding four doubles, 15 runs and seven stolen bases. Compiled by C.J. Risak Jon-Michael SoracchiON POINT Chronicle file photos Haslem stuns Pacers Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS The Indiana Pacers didnt see this version of Udonis Haslem coming. There was no reason to. Haslem, a veteran forward who had scored in single digits in six of his previous seven playoff games, finished with 17 points on 8-for-9 shooting to help the Miami Heat beat the Pacers 114-96 in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals on Sunday night. The Heat took a 2-1 lead in the series and regained homecourt advantage with Game 4 set for tonight in Indianapolis. Haslem went a quiet 1-for-7 from the floor in the first two games of the series, but he looked for his shot early and often in Game 3. His mid-range jumpers constantly left 7-foot-2 center Roy Hibbert out of position. Hibbert had been playing slightly loose defense on Haslem and Chris Bosh to help protect the rim and the lane against LeBron James and Dwyane Wade. Hibbert said Haslems effectiveness forced him to change his approach. I think he was really the guy that pushed them, the catalyst for them, he said. Just him hitting those shots really made us have to think on defense. Who do we guard? Do we guard the paint, or do we have to go out to the shooters out in the corner. Pacers coach Frank Vogel was heavily criticized for taking Hibbert out of Game 1 before James game-winning layup. Vogel said he made the move because he was worried Bosh would get open for an easy jumper. The Heat spent 48 minutes showing Pacers fans why Vogels Game 1 decision might not have been such a bad idea. Thats what Miami does, they space you out, he said. They make it difficult to have a rim protector in the game at all times. They challenge you to keep a guy at the rim and still make them close out to an 18-foot jump shooter. We have to account for that. While Haslem and Bosh pulled Hibbert and power forward David West away from the basket, James took over as the Heats post presence, overpowering and dominating All-Star forward Paul George. James, bouncing back after two late turnovers cost Miami in Game 2, had 22 points, four rebounds and three assists. Now its the Pacers turn to adjust. Tar Heels top seed for NCAA baseball tournament Associated PressOMAHA, Neb. North Carolina is the No. 1 seed in the NCAA baseball tournament. The Division I selection committee on Monday rewarded the Tar Heels (52-8) for a strong body of work that included an exhausting run to the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament championship. The 64-team tournament opens Friday with 16 four-team, double-elimination regionals. Best-of-three super regionals will be held next week, with those winners moving to the College World Series in Omaha, Neb. The other national seeds, in order, are: Vanderbilt, Oregon State, LSU, Cal State Fullerton, Virginia, Florida State and Oregon. The 1999 Miami Hurricanes are the only top-seeded team to go on to win the national title, and that was in the first year of the current tournament format. The Southeastern Conference led all leagues with nine bids. The ACC has eight, and the Pac-12 and Sun Belt have four apiece. Arizona (34-21) wont get a chance to defend its national title. The Wildcats were left out of the tournament for the first time in four years despite winning five of their last six to finish 15-15 in Pac-12 play. Miami (36-23) is in the tournament field for the 41st straight year, extending its own record. Florida State (44-15) is making its 36th consecutive appearance. First-time participants will be Bryant, Canisius, Central Arkansas, Savannah State and South Dakota State. Bryant (44-16-1), from Smithfield, R.I., made it in its first year of eligibility since moving from Division II. Thirty-one of the 64 teams were in the field last year. Johnson powers Rays past Marlins 10-6 Fernandez struggles in return to Tampa Bay Associated PressST. PETERSBURG This is the most productive month of Kelly Johnsons career, and Monday was the most productive day. Johnson became the first player in Tampa Bay history to hit two three-run homers in the same game, and the Rays needed them in a 10-6 victory against the Miami Marlins. Kelly drove the offensive engine today, manager Joe Maddon said. The Rays nearly squandered an early six-run lead, and sent Miami to its sixth straight loss. Johnson, who has 24 RBIs in 21 games this month, also doubled, singled and stole a base. He matched his career highs for RBIs and hits during his eighth multihomer game, and first since May 30, 2011, against the Marlins while with Arizona. I feel good and I feel confident, Johnson said. Youre always searching for something thats going to let you feel confident and you try to just roll with it. It could be daily, weekly. Thats the way baseball is. Im not going to sit here and try to figure it out. Johnson homered off rookie Jose Fernandez (2-3) in a six-run second inning. He then broke open the game by hitting his 10th home run of the season in the eighth against A.J. Ramos. Tampa Bays Kelly Johnson, right, high fives teammates Ben Zobrist, left, and Yunel Escobar, after hitting one of his two three-run home runs Monday against Miami in St. Petersburg.Associated Press See RAYS/ Page B3 Udonis Haslem

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B2TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEMAJORLEAGUEBASEBALL Associated PressKANSAS CITY, Mo. Yadier Molina homered and drove in four runs to help the St. Louis Cardinals beat the slumping Kansas City Royals 6-3 on Monday. Molina hit a two-run homer in the first, doubled home a run in the third and his sacrifice fly in the fourth scored Pete Kozma. While the Cardinals own the best road record, 19-9, in the majors, the Royals dropped their ninth straight home game one shy of the franchise record set last year. The anticipated pitchers duel between Adam Wanwright and James Shields failed to materialize. Wainwright (7-3) allowed 12 hits, the most he has allowed in a game since Sept. 14, 2010 against the Chicago Cubs. Shields (2-6) yielded nine hits and season-highs of six runs and five walks in six innings to lose his fourth straight start.INTERLEAGUE Mets 2, Yankees 1NEW YORK Daniel Murphy hit a go-ahead single in the eighth after being denied a homer two innings earlier, and the New York Mets rallied to beat the rival Yankees 2-1 for their second straight home win after losing eight in a row. David Wright hit his first home run at Citi Field this year to tie it in the seventh. Murphy came through against David Robertson (3-1) to hand the Yankees their first loss in 23 games when leading after six innings. Brandon Lyon (2-2) pitched a scoreless the eighth in relief of an impressive Jonathon Niese.Blue Jays 9, Braves 3TORONTO Edwin Encarnacion hit a three-run homer, Colby Rasmus and J.P. Arencibia each had a two-run shot and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Atlanta Braves 9-3. Encarnacion went 2 for 5 with five RBIs as the Blue Jays improved to 3-0 in interleague play. Mark Buehrle (2-3) allowed one run and five hits in six innings to snap a seven-start winless streak and earn his 26th career interleague victory.Red Sox 9, Phillies 3BOSTON Dustin Pedroia and Mike Napoli homered in the first inning as the Boston Red Sox jumped to an early lead and coasted to a 9-3 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies. Substitute starter Alfredo Aceves (2-1) had his best outing of the year, holding the Phillies to one run over six innings. Jacoby Ellsbury had hits in each of the first three innings to help the Red Sox earn their fourth consecutive victory and their 10th in their last 13 games. Tyler Cloyd (1-1) allowed three runs in the first inning and was charged with three more in the third. He lasted just 2 1/3 innings, giving up nine hits and a walk while striking out two.Orioles 6, Nationals 2WASHINGTON Jason Hammel held the Nationals to two runs in his longest start of the season and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Washington Nationals 6-2. Nick Markakis and Yamaico Navarro each drove in two runs and the Orioles had 15 hits, including three from Manny Machado. Hammel (7-2) improved to 4-0 at Nationals Park, striking out eight without a walk and allowing eight hits. Nationals starter Gio Gonzalez (3-3) kept Baltimore scoreless until the fourth when the Orioles scored three runs.Reds 4, Indians 2CINCINNATI Joey Votto hit a tiebreaking home run in the eighth inning, lifting the Cincinnati Reds over the Cleveland Indians 4-2 in the opener of their intrastate matchup. Votto won this interleague game with his ninth homer, tagging lefthander Nick Hagadone (0-1). Shin-Soo Choo led off the Reds eighth with a single. Votto followed with an opposite-field shot into the seats in left. Choo, traded from the Indians to the Reds in the offseason, also hit a leadoff homer in the first.Tigers 6, Pirates 5DETROIT Justin Verlander struck out 13 in seven innings, and Jhonny Peralta had four hits to lead the Detroit Tigers over the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-5. It was Peraltas first four-hit game since June 4, 2010, when he was playing for Cleveland. Detroit has won six of seven. Verlander (6-4) hadnt pitched more than five innings in any of his previous three starts, struggling at times with his location. Francisco Liriano (3-1) allowed four runs and eight hits in five innings.Twins 6, Brewers 3MILWAUKEE Joe Mauer wound up with a home run instead of a double after umpires went to video replay, and the Minnesota Twins beat the Milwaukee Brewers 6-3. The Twins led 4-3 when Mauer led off the seventh inning against Tom Gorzelanny with a long fly to left field. Mauer stopped at second base, and the umpires went to review the drive.Astros 3, Rockies 2, 12 inn.HOUSTON Brandon Barnes hit a last at-bat, two-out RBI ground-rule double in the 12th inning to lift the Houston Astros to a 3-2 win over the Colorado Rockies. Matt Dominguez singled off former Astro Wilton Lopez (1-2) to start the inning. He was replaced by pinch-runner Ronny Cedeno and he advanced to second on a sacrifice bunt. The Rockies intentionally walked Jose Altuve with two outs before Barnes connected on a double which sailed into the corner of right field to score Cedeno and give Houston the win. Paul Clemens (2-2) struck out two in a scoreless 12th for the win.Mariners 9, Padres 0SEATTLE Aaron Harang threw a four-hitter, Jason Bay hit his first career leadoff homer and Michael Morse added a three-run shot as part of Seattles four-run first inning as the Mariners beat the San Diego Padres 9-0. Harang (2-5) allowed a leadoff bloop double to Everth Cabrera and then retired 18 of the next 19 batters. It was his first complete game since June 4, 2009 and first shutout since April 12, 2009. He struck out a season-high eight and threw 122 pitches.Diamondbacks 5, Rangers 3PHOENIX Tyler Skaggs, just called up from the minors, struck out nine in six scoreless innings and the Arizona Diamondbacks held on to beat the Texas Rangers 5-3 in the opener of a doubleheader. Skaggs (1-0) gave up three hits and walked three, one intentionally. Martin Perez (0-1), took the loss in his first start of the season, allowing four runs, three earned, in 5 1/3 innings. Cody Ross hit a solo homer for the Diamondbacks. Adrian Beltre had a two-run single in Texas three-run ninth.Athletics 4, Giants 1OAKLAND, Calif. Josh Donaldson hit a two-run homer to back Dan Strailys strong start, and the Oakland Athletics beat the San Francisco Giants 4-1 in the Bay Bridge Series opener. Straily (3-2) tossed six innings of one-run ball, allowing four hits and one walk. Buster Poseys groundout in the sixth inning drove in San Franciscos lone run. Donaldson connected against Madison Bumgarner (4-3) in the fourth, and Yoenis Cespedes added a two-run double against George Kontos in the seventh to extend Oaklands lead. Grant Balfour recorded his 11th save of the season for Oakland, which has won four straight and nine of 10.Cubs 7, White Sox 0CHICAGO Jeff Samardzija threw a complete game, two-hit shutout and Julio Borbon hit a two-run home run and the Chicago Cubs beat the Chicago White Sox 7-0. Samardzija (3-6) pitched the Cubs first complete game shutout since Randy Wells shut out the Giants on Aug. 29, 2011. The first White Sox hit came from Conor Gillaspie in the third inning. Samardzija then got Jeff Keppinger to hit into a double play as he faced the minimum through four innings. Interleague Associated PressSt. Louis Cardinal Daniel Descalso beats the tag Monday by Kansas City second baseman Elliot Johnson during the eighth inning at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. Cards take I-70 series opener Murphy comes through in eighth, Mets edge Yankees INTERLEAGUEMondays Games Baltimore 6, Washington 2 Detroit 6, Pittsburgh 5 Cincinnati 4, Cleveland 2 Houston 3, Colorado 2, 12 innings Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 3 St. Louis 6, Kansas City 3 Tampa Bay 10, Miami 6 Arizona 5, Texas 3, 1st game Oakland 4, San Francisco 1 Seattle 9, San Diego 0 Toronto 9, Atlanta 3 Chicago Cubs 7, Chicago White Sox 0 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Boston 9, Philadelphia 3 L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, late Texas at Arizona, 2nd game, late Today Atlanta (Maholm 6-4) at Toronto (Morrow 2-3), 12:37 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-3) at Houston (Lyles 2-1), 2:10 p.m. Baltimore (Gausman 0-1) at Washington (Undecided), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0) at Detroit (Porcello 2-2), 7:08 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 4-3) at Cincinnati (Latos 4-0), 7:10 p.m. Miami (Slowey 1-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 2-2), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 6-3) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 5-0), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Lee 5-2) at Boston (Dempster 2-5), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 1-7) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-2), 8:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 3-4) at Milwaukee (Undecided), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lyons 1-0) at Kansas City (E.Santana 3-4), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (Kickham 0-0) at Oakland (Parker 2-6), 10:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Blanton 1-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 5-2), 10:10 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 3-5) at Seattle (Maurer 2-6), 10:10 p.m. Rays 10, Marlins 6Miami Tampa Bay abrhbi abrhbi Coghln lf5021Zobrist 2b4311 Polanc 3b5010Joyce rf4120 Dietrch 2b3110KJhnsn lf5246 Ozuna rf3110Fuld lf0000 Brantly c5110Longori 3b3001 Ruggin cf5111Loney 1b3100 Dobbs 1b4122Scott dh4100 Hchvrr ss4110DJnngs cf2110 JBrown dh4012JMolin c3011 YEscor ss4111 Totals386116Totals32101010 Miami 0003300006 Tampa Bay06010003x10 EBrantly (2). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBMiami 9, Tampa Bay 8. 2BCoghlan (6), Hechavarria (3), K.Johnson (5). HRRuggiano (8), K.Johnson 2 (10). SBOzuna (2), Joyce (3), K.Johnson (5). CSDe.Jennings (4). SFLongoria, J.Molina. IPHRERBBSO Miami Fernandez L,2-331/357436 Below 12/320011 Da.Jennings11/310012 A.Ramos 12/323320 Tampa Bay Odorizzi 486612 Lueke 120003 McGee W,2-2 H,10210002 Jo.Peralta H,14100000 Rodney 100012 Odorizzi pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. HBPby Fernandez (De.Jennings), by Odorizzi (Dietrich, Dietrich). PBJ.Molina 2. UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Jerry Layne. T:39. A,025 (34,078).Blue Jays 9, Braves 3Atlanta Toronto abrhbi abrhbi Smmns ss5011MeCarr lf3110 RJhnsn rf4000Gose pr-lf0100 J.Upton lf3000Bautist rf4210 FFrmn 1b4120Encrnc dh5125 Gattis dh4132Lind 1b3210 McCnn c4000Arencii c4112 Uggla 2b3010ClRsms cf4122 CJhnsn 3b4110Lawrie 3b3020 JSchafr cf3000DeRosa pr-3b1000 Bonifac 2b4010 Kawsk ss4000 Totals343 83Totals359119 Atlanta0000100203 Toronto02200230x9 EF.Freeman (3). DPToronto 1. LOBAtlanta 7, Toronto 6. 2BGattis (11), C.Johnson (10), Me.Cabrera (11), Bautista (10), Lind (10), Col.Rasmus (9), Bonifacio (9). HRGattis (11), Encarnacion (14), Arencibia (12), Col.Rasmus (8). SBLawrie (2). IPHRERBBSO Atlanta T.Hudson L,4-4686621 Cor.Rasmus233320 Toronto Buehrle W,2-3651126 Lincoln 222202 Weber 110011 UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, John Hirschbeck; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:41. A,808 (49,282).Red Sox 9, Phillies 3PhiladelphiaBoston abrhbiabrhbi Revere cf4020Ellsury cf5131 MYong 3b5000Nava rf5000 Rollins ss4020Pedroia 2b3112 Howard 1b5020Ciriaco pr-2b1110 DYong dh4110D.Ortiz dh4120 DBrwn lf4112Napoli 1b4222 Mayrry rf3020Drew ss3222 Galvis 2b4000Carp lf5110 Kratz c3111Sltlmch c4021 Iglesias 3b4010 Totals36311 3Totals389158 Philadelphia0010000203 Boston30302001x9 EMayberry (1), Aceves (2). DPBoston 3. LOBPhiladelphia 10, Boston 10. 2BRollins (15), Howard (13), Ellsbury 2 (10), D.Ortiz (11), Napoli (19), Carp (7). HRD.Brown (10), Kratz (5), Pedroia (3), Napoli (8). IPHRERBBSO Philadelphia Cloyd L,1-121/396612 Stutes21/342102 Horst11/310013 Bastardo100000 Mi.Adams2/311131 De Fratus1/300000 Boston Aceves W,2-1671134 Mortensen11/311110 A.Miller12/331103 WPCloyd. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Bill Miller. T:26. A,627 (37,499).Cardinals 6, Royals 3St. Louis Kansas City abrhbi abrhbi MCrpnt rf4121Lough cf5140 YMolin c2224AEscor ss5010 Beltran dh3000AGordn lf4121 Craig lf5031Butler dh4120 MAdms 1b5000Hosmer 1b4011 Freese 3b4010MTejad 3b3010 SRonsn pr1000Francr rf4010 Jay cf4000Kottars c4010 Kozma ss5110EJhnsn 2b4000 Descals 2b3230 Totals36612 6Totals373132 St. Louis2021010006 Kansas City1020000003 DPSt. Louis 2, Kansas City 2. LOBSt. Louis 11, Kansas City 8. 2BM.Carpenter (16), Y.Molina (14), Descalso (7), Lough (2). HR Y.Molina (3). SBJay (2). SFY.Molina. IPHRERBBSO St. Louis Wainwright W,7-38123305 Mujica S,15-15110001 Kansas City Shields L,2-6696654 Collins 120001 B.Chen 210022 HBPby Wainwright (M.Tejada). WP Wainwright. UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Joe West; Second, David Rackley; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:46 (Rain delay: 1:02). A,746 (37,903). Interleague Mets 2, Yankees 1abrhbi abrhbi Gardnr cf4110RTejad ss4000 J.Nix ss4021DnMrp 2b4011 Cano 2b4010DWrght 3b3121 V.Wells lf4010Duda lf4000 DAdms 3b4010Parnell p0000 ISuzuki rf3010Buck c3000 Overay 1b3010Ankiel cf-rf3000 CStwrt c3010I.Davis 1b3000 Hafner ph1000Baxter rf-lf3010 PHughs p2000Niese p2020 DRrtsn p0000Lyon p0000 Logan p0000Vldspn ph0100 Lagars cf0000 Totals321 91Totals29262 New York (A)0000010001 New York (N)00000011x2 DPNew York (A) 1, New York (N) 3. LOB New York (A) 7, New York (N) 5. 2BBaxter (4). 3BGardner (4), D.Wright (4). HRD.Wright (7). SP.Hughes. IPHRERBBSO New York (A) P.Hughes 741106 D.Robertson L,3-12/321111 Logan 1/300001 New York (N) Niese 781114 Lyon W,2-2110000 Parnell S,8-10100012 HBPby D.Robertson (D.Wright). PB C.Stewart. UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Brian ONora; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Adrian Johnson. T:44. A,911 (41,922).Orioles 6, Nationals 2Baltimore Washington abrhbi abrhbi Markks rf6022Span cf4110 Machd 3b5130Lmrdzz 2b4000 Hardy ss3010Zmrmn 3b4021 A.Jones cf5121LaRoch 1b4110 C.Davis 1b4220Dsmnd ss4010 Wieters c3121TMoore lf4011 Pearce lf4010Berndn rf4010 Dickrsn lf1000KSuzuk c4000 YNavrr 2b5122GGnzlz p2010 ODay p0000Stmmn p0000 Hamml p3000Abad p0000 ACasill ph1000Tracy ph1000 HRdrgz p0000 Storen p0000 Totals406156Totals35282 Baltimore0003101106 Washington0100010002 EZimmerman (9). DPWashington 1. LOB Baltimore 14, Washington 6. 2BMachado (23), A.Jones (17), T.Moore (5), Bernadina (1), G.Gonzalez (1). 3BSpan (3). SBMachado (5), LaRoche (2). SHammel. SFWieters. IPHRERBBSO Baltimore Hammel W,7-2882208 ODay 100001 Washington G.Gonzalez L,3-352/384443 Stammen141102 Abad 1/300000 H.Rodriguez121111 Storen 110002 WPG.Gonzalez. T:05. A,260 (41,418).Reds 4, Indians 2Cleveland Cincinnati abrhbi abrhbi Bourn cf4000Choo cf4221 Kipnis 2b4110Cozart ss2120 ACarer ss4010Votto 1b4112 Swisher 1b4000Phillips 2b3001 CSantn c3001Bruce rf3000 MrRynl 3b3010Frazier 3b2000 Brantly lf3000Paul lf3010 Stubbs rf3010DRonsn lf0000 UJimnz p1000Mesorc c3000 Giambi ph1111Leake p3000 Hagadn p0000Broxtn p0000 Shaw p0000Chpmn p0000 Totals30252Totals27464 Cleveland0001000102 Cincinnati10000102x4 EShaw (1), Phillips (3). DPCleveland 2, Cincinnati 1. LOBCleveland 3, Cincinnati 5. 2BA.Cabrera (16), Cozart (10). HRGiambi (3), Choo (10), Votto (9). SBA.Cabrera (5). S U.Jimenez, Cozart. SFC.Santana, Phillips. IPHRERBBSO Cleveland U.Jimenez 742246 Hagadone L,0-11/322200 Shaw 2/300001 Cincinnati Leake 71/352107 Broxton W,2-12/300001 Chapman S,13-15100002 WPU.Jimenez. PBC.Santana 2. T:44. A,822 (42,319).Twins 6, Brewers 3MinnesotaMilwaukee abrhbiabrhbi Carroll 3b4000Aoki rf3000 Dozier 2b5110Segura ss4121 Mauer c3311CGomz cf3222 Wlngh lf4010YBtncr 3b4010 Mornea 1b3011Bianchi 2b4010 Doumit rf3012AlGnzlz 1b4000 Roenck p0000LSchfr lf3000 Dunsng p0000Braun ph1000 Burton p0000Maldnd c3000 Colaell ph1000Badnhp p0000 Perkins p0000Axford p0000 Hicks cf4110WPerlt p1000 Flormn ss4021Weeks ph1010 Correia p2000Grzlny p0000 Parmel rf1111McGnzl p0000 Lucroy ph-c1010 Totals34696Totals32383 Minnesota1001201106 Milwaukee0001020003 EAle.Gonzalez (5). DPMinnesota 3. LOB Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 4. 2BHicks (4), Florimon (6), Weeks (7). HRMauer (4), Parmelee (4), Segura (8), C.Gomez 2 (10). SBDozier (5). SCorreia. IPHRERBBSO Minnesota Correia W,5-4673314 Roenicke H,72/310000 Duensing H,91/300000 Burton H,11100000 Perkins S,10-11100002 Milwaukee W.Peralta L,3-6554353 Gorzelanny11/311122 Mic.Gonzalez2/310001 Badenhop111100 Axford110001 HBPby Correia (C.Gomez). T:00. A,627 (41,900). Rays scheduleMay 28 vs Miami May 29 at Miami May 30 at Miami May 31 at Cleveland June 1 at Cleveland June 2 at Cleveland June 4 at Detroit June 5 at Detroit June 6 at Detroit June 7 vs Baltimore June 8 vs Baltimore June 9 vs Baltimore June 10 vs Boston June 11 vs Boston June 12 vs Boston June 13 vs Kansas City June 14 vs Kansas City June 15 vs Kansas City June 16 vs Kansas City June 18 at Boston June 19 at Boston June 20 at N.Y. Yankees June 21 at N.Y. Yankees West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Texas3219.6275-5L-215-717-12 Oakland2923.55839-1W-414-1015-13 Los Angeles2327.460858-2W-812-1311-14 Seattle2229.4311062-8W-213-119-18 Houston1536.29417134-6W-19-206-16 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Boston3220.6157-3W-417-1115-9 New York3020.60015-5L-215-915-11 Baltimore2823.54935-5W-111-1217-11 Tampa Bay2624.520526-4W-216-1010-14 Toronto2229.431965-5W-214-158-14 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Atlanta3020.6008-2L-215-515-15 Washington2625.510454-6L-114-1112-14 Philadelphia2427.471675-5L-211-1213-15 New York1929.39610104-6W-211-178-12 Miami1338.25517182-8L-67-186-20 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway St. Louis3317.6607-3W-214-819-9 Cincinnati3219.62717-3W-119-713-12 Pittsburgh3120.60827-3L-118-913-11 Chicago2030.40013103-7W-210-1410-16 Milwaukee1930.38813113-7L-312-167-14 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Arizona2922.5696-4W-215-1214-10 San Fran.2823.549134-6L-119-99-14 Colorado2724.529246-4L-316-911-15 San Diego2228.440684-6L-213-129-16 Los Angeles2028.417794-6L-112-158-13 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit2920.5927-3W-217-812-12 Cleveland2723.540214-6L-415-1012-13 Chicago2425.490536-4L-113-1111-14 Kansas City2127.438761-9L-610-1311-14 Minnesota2028.417872-8W-19-1311-15 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE The win made the Rays even with the Marlins at 43-43 in the all-time interleague series. Jake Odorizzi, making his second start for the Rays, gave up eight hits and six runs and couldnt get through the fifth inning to qualify for the win. Its very frustrating not to be able to get through the fifth inning when the team gets you six runs, he said. The offense was awesome today, the bullpen was phenomenal. Kelly did an awesome job today. Its just frustrating to know that I wasnt anywhere near my best stuff. Jake McGee (2-2) got the victory after pitching two scoreless innings of relief. The 20-year-old Fernandez, pitching across the bay from where he pitched in high school in Tampa two years ago, pitched 3 1/3 innings, giving up five hits, three walks and four earned runs while striking out six. After fanning three Rays in the first inning, Fernandez walked the first two batters in the second, then hit Desmond Jennings with a pitch. Jose Molina drove in the first run with a sacrifice fly. Yunel Escobar drove in another run with the Rays first hit, and after Ben Zobrist reached on an error, Johnson made it 6-0 with his home run. I wasnt nervous. I was a little pumped up. I was trying to do a little too much, maybe, Fernandez said. Youre going to have rough games and youre going to have good days. So try to get it more good than bad. The Marlins, who came into the game with a .221 team batting average, collected 10 hits in the first five innings, including Justin Ruggianos eighth home run. Greg Dobbs had two hits and drove in two runs for the Marlins, who had cut Tampa Bays early six-run margin to one before Johnson hit his second homer. We never lost the lead. That was important to us, said Maddon, who has seen his starting pitchers and bullpen give away several big leads this season. Thats the one thing I always try to look at. Once youve lost the lead or even if it gets tied, that puts it back in their corner a little bit, so I thought Jake (McGee) was really important. We keep making this way more dramatic than it needs to be, he said. RAYSContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at New York Mets 7 p.m. (FSNFL, SUN) Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays 10 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Angels at Los Angeles Dodgers NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS 8:30 p.m. (TNT) Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers. Eastern Conference Final, game 4 NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND 9 p.m. (NBCSPT) San Jose Sharks at Los Angeles Kings, game 7 TENNIS 5 a.m. (ESPN2) 2013 French Open First Round 9 a.m. (ESPN2) 2013 French Open First Round RADIO 6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame 7:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. NASCAR Sprint CupCoca-Cola 600 Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (15) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 112.8 rating, 47 points, $401,811. 2. (6) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 140.4, 44, $286,615. 3. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 117.3, 42, $218,560. 4. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 111.6, 41, $220,915. 5. (31) Joey Logano, Ford, 400, 92.8, 39, $174,823. 6. (10) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 91.8, 39, $174,198. 7. (25) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 85.7, 38, $169,240. 8. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 105.9, 36, $161,323. 9. (17) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 94.8, 35, $150,665. 10. (19) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 79.6, 34, $144,079. 11. (13) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 97, 34, $150,105. 12. (27) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 400, 73.8, 32, $122,030. 13. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 82.1, 32, $142,271. 14. (30) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 398, 69.5, 30, $156,966. 15. (3) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 398, 109.1, 30, $154,971. 16. (29) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 397, 57.3, 0, $108,530. 17. (36) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 397, 65.1, 0, $133,463. 18. (16) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 397, 68.6, 26, $133,319. 19. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 396, 85.3, 26, $131,675. 20. (26) David Gilliland, Ford, 396, 61.6, 24, $121,263. 21. (38) David Reutimann, Toyota, 396, 51.9, 23, $117,038. 22. (12) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 395, 84.1, 22, $147,791. 23. (21) Casey Mears, Ford, 394, 50.7, 21, $120,788. 24. (34) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 394, 48.8, 20, $117,802. 25. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 394, 42.7, 19, $108,105. 26. (43) Josh Wise, Ford, 393, 37.6, 0, $98,355. 27. (40) Timmy Hill, Ford, 391, 37.4, 17, $95,330. 28. (23) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 390, 40.6, 16, $94,805. 29. (24) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 385, 49.1, 15, $94,680. 30. (33) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, accident, 339, 46.5, 14, $96,055. 31. (7) Greg Biffle, Ford, 335, 59.8, 13, $113,005. 32. (39) David Stremme, Toyota, 326, 49.2, 12, $94,280. 33. (18) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 324, 57.5, 11, $131,066. 34. (4) Mark Martin, Toyota, accident, 324, 70.4, 10, $104,505. 35. (14) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 324, 84.3, 9, $140,791. 36. (20) Brad Keselowski, Ford, accident, 317, 61, 9, $149,696. 37. (42) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 303, 30.1, 7, $93,523. 38. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, engine, 257, 100.1, 7, $133,653. 39. (11) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, engine, 256, 69.2, 5, $101,745. 40. (28) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, accident, 253, 42.2, 4, $87,745. 41. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, electrical, 213, 25.4, 0, $75,745. 42. (32) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 50, 30.5, 2, $71,745. 43. (37) Scott Speed, Ford, transmission, 39, 26.8, 1, $68,245. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 130.521 mph. Time of Race: 4 hours, 35 minutes, 49 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.490 seconds. Caution Flags: 11 for 61 laps. Lead Changes: 24 among 12 drivers. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Kahne, 8 times for 161 laps; M.Kenseth, 3 times for 112 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 65 laps; K.Harvick, 3 times for 28 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for 8 laps; C.Edwards, 1 time for 7 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 6 laps; T.Stewart, 1 time for 6 laps; B.Keselowski, 2 times for 3 laps; J.McMurray, 1 time for 2 laps; R.Newman, 1 time for 1 lap; P.Menard, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 445; 2. C.Edwards, 413; 3. M.Kenseth, 394; 4. C.Bowyer, 385; 5. K.Kahne, 370; 6. D.Earnhardt Jr., 364; 7. K.Harvick, 362; 8. P.Menard, 347; 9. M.Truex Jr., 336; 10. Bra.Keselowski, 335; 11. Ky.Busch, 332; 12. A.Almirola, 328.MLB box scores Tigers 6, Pirates 5PittsburghDetroit abrhbiabrhbi Snider lf-rf5131Infante 2b4000 Walker 2b5121TrHntr rf4120 McCtch cf3001MiCarr 3b4100 GJones rf4120Fielder 1b4320 RMartn c3110VMrtnz dh5122 PAlvrz dh4000JhPerlt ss4043 GSnchz 1b4121Tuiassp lf2000 JHrrsn pr-lf0000D.Kelly lf0000 Inge 3b4000B.Pena c3001 Barmes ss3000AGarci cf4000 Mercer ph1000 Totals36510 4Totals346106 Pittsburgh1000002205 Detroit00013020x6 EFielder (3). LOBPittsburgh 7, Detroit 11. 2BWalker (5), G.Jones 2 (12), G.Sanchez 2 (8), Tor.Hunter (15), V.Martinez (9), Jh.Peralta (13). 3BSnider (2), Walker (2). SBMcCutchen 2 (14), R.Martin (2). SFMcCutchen. IPHRERBBSO Pittsburgh Liriano L,3-1584423 Zagurski100011 Contreras1/312240 Watson12/310002 Detroit Verlander W,6-47733213 Benoit H,7122101 Valverde S,6-7110001 T:16. A,416 (41,255).Astros 3, Rockies 2, 12 inn.Colorado Houston abrhbi abrhbi EYong dh5120Grssmn lf5000 Fowler cf3010Altuve 2b5120 CGnzlz lf6031JCastro c3110 Tlwtzk ss6010BBarns pr-cf1011 WRosr c6020JMrtnz dh5000 Pachec 1b5000C.Pena 1b4012 Arenad 3b6120Crowe cf-rf5010 Blckmn rf3020Pareds rf5010 Cuddyr ph1000Corprn c0000 JHerrr 2b3001Dmngz 3b5010 LeMahi ph1000RCeden pr0100 MGnzlz ss4010 Totals452132Totals42393 Colorado1001000000002 Houston0002000000013 Two outs when winning run scored. EJ.Herrera (4), Chacin (1), W.Rosario (3). DPColorado 1. LOBColorado 15, Houston 10. 2BE.Young (9), C.Gonzalez (13), Arenado (7), Altuve (11), B.Barnes (4), C.Pena (9), Ma.Gonzalez (7). SBBlackmon (1), Altuve 2 (7). SFowler, Pacheco, Blackmon, J.Herrera, Ma.Gonzalez. IPHRERBBSO Colorado Chacin752219 Brothers100021 Belisle100001 Ottavino220012 W.Lopez L,1-22/321111 Houston B.Norris782233 Ambriz120001 Veras100001 Blackley220012 Clemens W,2-2110002 Chacin pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WPB.Norris, Ambriz. PBW.Rosario. T:21. A,044 (42,060).Mariners 9, Padres 0San Diego Seattle abrhbi abrhbi EvCarr ss3010Bay lf4211 Venale cf4000Seager 3b3200 Headly 3b4010KMorls 1b5232 Quentin dh3000Morse rf4123 Alonso 1b4010Ibanez dh4011 Blanks rf3000Shppch c4111 Kotsay lf3000EnChvz cf4020 Amarst 2b3000Triunfl 2b-ss4000 Hundly c3010Ryan ss3110 Frnkln 2b0000 Totals300 40Totals359118 San Diego0000000000 Seattle40010040x9 EBlanks (1). DPSeattle 1. LOBSan Diego 5, Seattle 6. 2BEv.Cabrera (6), K.Morales (16), Ibanez (5). HRBay (5), Morse (11), Shoppach (3). IPHRERBBSO San Diego Richard L,0-5675513 Bass 2/344421 T.Ross 11/300012 Seattle Harang W,2-5940028 WPBass. T:29. A,942 (47,476).Athletics 4, Giants 1San FranciscoOakland abrhbiabrhbi GBlanc cf3100Crisp cf3000 Scutaro 2b4010CYoung rf3100 Sandovl 3b4000Cespds lf3112 Posey dh3001Dnldsn 3b4112 Pence rf4000Lowrie 2b2010 Belt 1b4000Freimn 1b3010 AnTrrs lf3020Moss ph-1b1000 BCrwfr ss3010S.Smith dh3000 Quiroz c3000DNorrs c4110 Rosales ss2000 Totals311 41Totals28454 San Francisco0000010001 Oakland00020020x4 LOBSan Francisco 5, Oakland 8. 2BCespedes (6). HRDonaldson (8). CSCrisp (2). IPHRERBBSO San Francisco Bumgarner L,4-362/344456 Kontos1/310001 S.Rosario100021 Oakland Straily W,3-2641111 Doolittle H,9200002 Balfour S,11-11100012 HBPby Bumgarner (Rosales). T:55. A,067 (35,067).Diamondbacks 5, Rangers 3Texas Arizona abrhbi abrhbi Andrus ss5120Pollock cf4111 Profar 2b4021Gregrs ss4000 Beltre 3b5012Gldsch 1b4121 N.Cruz rf5010C.Ross lf4121 Morlnd 1b5000Prado 3b4011 JeBakr lf2010GParra rf4020 Wolf p0000Nieves c3210 Brkmn ph1000Pnngtn 2b3000 J.Ortiz p0000Skaggs p2010 G.Soto c3110Kubel ph1010 Gentry cf2000WHarrs p0000 MPerez p2000DHrndz p0000 DvMrp lf2110Hinske ph1011 Sipp p0000 Bell p0000 Totals363 93Totals345125 Texas 0000000033 Arizona12001001x5 EProfar (2). DPTexas 2. LOBTexas 11, Arizona 8. 2BProfar (1), N.Cruz (7), Je.Baker (3), Pollock (16), Hinske (2). HRC.Ross (2). IPHRERBBSO Texas M.Perez L,0-151/394322 Wolf12/310000 J.Ortiz121110 Arizona Skaggs W,1-0630039 W.Harris110012 D.Hernandez110002 Sipp1/323311 Bell S,9-112/320001 WPSkaggs. T:09. A,638 (48,633).Cubs 7, White Sox 0abrhbi abrhbi Borbon cf5222De Aza cf4000 SCastro ss4220AlRmrz ss4010 Rizzo 1b5222Rios rf4000 ASorin lf4032A.Dunn dh3000 Hairstn dh3001Konerk 1b2000 Castillo c3000Viciedo lf3000 Ransm 3b4000Gillaspi 3b3010 Sweeny rf3100Kppngr 2b3000 Barney 2b4000Flowrs c2000 Totals35797Totals28020 Chicago (N)1000213007 Chicago (A)0000000000 EFlowers (3). DPChicago (N) 1. LOB Chicago (N) 5, Chicago (A) 3. 2BS.Castro (12), Rizzo (16). 3BRizzo (1). HRBorbon (1). SBS.Castro (3), A.Soriano (6). SF Hairston. IPHRERBBSO Chicago (N) Samardzija W,3-6920028 Chicago (A) Quintana L,3-2644435 N.Jones 143301 Omogrosso210002 T:25. A,601 (40,615).NBA playoffsCONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) (x if necessary) Sunday, May 19 San Antonio 105, Memphis 83 Tuesday, May 21 San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT Wednesday, May 22 Miami 103, Indiana 102, OT Friday, May 24 Indiana 97, Miami 93 Saturday, May 25 San Antonio 104, Memphis 93, San Antonio leads series 3-0 Sunday, May 26 Miami 114, Indiana 96, Miami leads series 2-1 Monday, May 27 San Antonio at Memphis, late Today Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 30 Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Friday, May 31 x-San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m. Saturday, June 1 x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, June 2 x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Monday, June 3 x-Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.NHL playoffsCONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) Thursday, May 23 N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT Detroit 2, Chicago 0, Detroit leads series 3-1 Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Friday, May 24 Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh wins series 4-1 Saturday, May 25 Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 1, Boston wins series 4-1 Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Sunday, May 26 San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1, series tied 3-3 Monday, May 27 Chicago 4, Detroit 3, series tied 3-3 Today San Jose at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 1 15 17 23 28 5-of-52 winners$89,843.89 4-of-5272$106.50 3-of-57,976$10 CASH 3 (early) 3 9 9 CASH 3 (late) 8 9 1 PLAY 4 (early) 6 9 5 2 PLAY 4 (late) 5 8 9 9 FANTASY 5 1 10 19 24 33TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 B3 Associated PressDetroit goalie Jimmy Howard stops a shot Monday by Chicagos Michal Handzus during the second period in Game 6 of the Western Conference semifinals in the NHL Stanley Cup playoffs in Detroit. The Blackhawks won to force a Game 7. Blackhawks beat Red Wings, force a Game 7 Associated PressDETROIT Bryan Bickell scored a go-ahead goal early in the third period and the Chicago Blackhawks held on to beat the Detroit Red Wings 4-3 in Game 6 on Monday night, giving the NHL s top-seeded team a shot to advance to the Western Conference finals. The Blackhawks, who trailed the second round series 3-1, began the third down by one and were up by two goals midway through the period after an offensive flurry. They needed the cushion because Damien Brunner scored with 52 seconds left to pull Detroit within one. The Red Wings pulled their goaltender, but they were unable to score with the extra skater. Detroit carried a 2-1 lead into the third but Michal Handzus tied it in the opening minute of the final period. Bickell scored about 5 minutes later. Michael Froliks backhander on a penalty shot at the 9:43 mark put the Blackhawks ahead 4-2 and silenced the once-raucous crowd. The Blackhawks will have the fans on their side Wednesday night in Game 7 against seventh-seeded Detroit. Cy Young winner Price resumes playing catchST. PETERSBURG AL Cy Young Award winner David Price has resumed playing catch as part of his rehab program for a strained left triceps. The Tampa Bay Rays left-hander, who was put on the disabled list for the first time in his career May 16, made 35 throws in right field before Mondays game against Miami. I felt really good ... it felt normal, Price said. It was a very positive day. Feeling as good as I did, its a definitely a relief. There is no timeline for when Price will return, but the injury is not expected to pose a long-term problem. We dont want any setbacks, Price said. I want to be able to come back and stay back, and thats what were doing. Price is 1-4 with a 5.24 ERA after going 20-5 with a 2.56 ERA in 2012. The Rays have lost seven of his nine starts after going 21-10 in his 31 starts last year.From wire report Simon Khan qualifies for US Open at Walton HeathWALTON HEATH, England Simon Khan bounced back from losing the BMW PGA Championship in a playoff to qualify for the U.S. Open. The Englishman, who lost a four-hole playoff to Matteo Manassero at Wentworth on Sunday, qualified in first place Monday by shooting a 5-under 67 on the Old Course and 2-under 70 on the New Course. Three-time Ryder Cup player Paul Casey and Jaco Van Zyl of South Africa are also through to the second major of the year after qualifying a stroke back to tie for second. Australias Marcus Fraser, Englands Eddie Pepperell, Swedens Peter Hedblom and Denmarks Morten Orum Madsen qualified next. There were six players tied for the five remaining spots, forcing a playoff. Jose Maria Olazabal, David Howell and John Parry made birdies on the first extra hole to take three berths. Scotlands Chris Doak and Argentinas Estanislao Goya took the last two slots after three more playoff holes, with Swedens Rikard Karlberg missing out.Matsuyama earns spot in US OpenIBARAKI, Japan Hideki Matsuyama had rounds of 67 and 65 on Monday to earn one of five spots in a U.S. Open qualifier in Japan. Matsuyama was a two-time winner of the Asia-Pacific Amateur and twice made the cut at the Masters as a teenager. This will be his first U.S. Open, which is June 13-16 at Merion Golf Club outside Philadelphia. The other four qualifiers were JungGon Hwang of South Korea, Yui Ueda, Yoshinobu Tsukada and Hiroyuki Fujita. Tsukada and Fujita earned the last two spots in a playoff on the West Course at Ohtone Country Club.Hermann not considering resigning as Rutgers ADNEWARK, N.J. Julie Hermann has not considered resigning as Rutgers incoming athletic director following reports that 16 years ago she humiliated and emotionally abused players while coaching Tennessees womens volleyball team. Speaking to reporters on a conference call, Hermann denied having knowledge of a letter that the 16 Tennessee players submitted to the school. Rutgers officials, however, have talked to her about it in recent days. The 49-year-old Hermann acknowledged she was an intense coach and may have made a few mistakes handling her team. Hermann said she has matured and believes she is qualified to lead the scandal-marred Rutgers athletic program. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie plans to examine the appointment before Hermann begins June 17.From wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS

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NASCARs longest race even longer after camera rope snaps Associated PressCONCORD, N.C. Kevin Harvick isnt done surprising people at Charlotte Motor Speedway or Richard Childress Racing. Closing a bizarre night in NASCARs longest event, Harvick pulled away from Kasey Kahne on a restart Sunday with 11 laps left to win the Coca-Cola 600 for the second time in three seasons. The race was stopped nearly 30 minutes at one point when a TV camera support rope snapped and landed on the track and in the grandstands. There were 10 people hurt, according to Charlotte Motor Speedway. Three were taken to hospitals, and have been treated and released. Its Harvicks final season at RCR the only team hes known since filling the seat of the late Dale Earnhardt in 2001 before he switches to Stewart-Haas Racing in 2014. Harvicks already shown with a victory at Richmond this year he wouldnt coast through the year and proved that again as he made it through the broken rope, several crashes and Kahnes dominant machine that led a race-high 156 laps. There was no other course for Harvick than giving his all, saying he and Childress have really focused on whats most important for our sponsors and the guys on this team and this organization. Harvicks pulled off an unlikely win here in 2011, sweeping past an out-of-fuel Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the final lap. Last race (2011) we came off turn two in third and by the time we got to the start-finish line we had won the race, he said. It was one of those nights, he said, where you have to grind it out and keep yourself on the lead lap. Especially when you dont know what youll face. The race stopped suddenly a little more than a quarter of the way into the long event after the nylon rope snapped in the first turn. The cars were brought into the pits and cleanup crews coiled up the long sections of rope as if they were putting away a garden hose. Drivers were allowed back to their pit stalls and crews given 15 minutes to assess and fix damage caused by the failure. Fox Sports announcer Chris Myers apologized to fans and drivers several times for the delay and problems. In a statement, Fox said it had suspended use of the overhead camera indefinitely. It said the drive rope that moves the camera back and forth failed and it had no immediate reason why. A full investigation is planned, the statement said. Harvick couldnt believe hed seen the cable along the track and did his best to avoid problems. And Harvick wasnt the only one surprised. I came off turn four, Kahne said, and I saw it wrapped around Kyles car and it hit mine and I thought I had to be seeing things because theres no way there could be a cable on the race track. Kahne finished second, Kurt Busch third and polesitter Denny Hamlin was fourth in his second full race since returning from injury. Harvicks win was almost as big a surprise as it was in 2011 when the crowd anticipated Earnhardt ending what was then a long, long victory drought. Kahne had the strongest car, quickly moving back to the front each time he fell back. He had a large lead and lots of open track when the final caution flag came out with 16 laps remaining. But Kahne remained on the track while Harvick pitted for two fresh tires. On the restart, Harvick quickly took control and Kahne couldnt catch up. Ryan Newman was sixth followed by Tony Stewart, Clint Bowyer, Martin Truex Jr. and Marcos Ambrose. Harvicks victory ended a long, strange day of racing in the biggest motorsports weekend. Tony Kanaan took a crowd-pleasing win at the Indianapolis 500 before one of NASCARs showcase events was marred by the rope problems.B4TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Associated PressKevin Harvick takes the checkered flag Sunday to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. Harvick pulls away to win Coca-Cola 600 Nadal successfully begins bid for eighth French title Associated PressPARIS Rafael Nadal hopped, spun and threw an overhand punch toward his friends and family, stirring memories of past celebrations on his favorite stage. After more than 90 minutes of tense tennis, Nadal had finally won a set, leaving him only 20 sets from another French Open championship. The Spaniard survived an early scare Monday and successfully began his bid for an eighth title at Roland Garros by rallying past Daniel Brands of Germany, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Nadal, who had lost only 14 sets in 53 previous matches at the French Open, fell behind when he was broken in the ninth game and was on the verge of digging a deeper hole in the red clay. He trailed 3-0 in the tiebreaker, then summoned his best shot-making to salvage the set and soon was in control against the dangerous Brands. He was playing unbelievable, Nadal said. He was trying to hit every ball as hard as he can. Sometimes you feel you are not hitting a bad shot, and every time comes back a bomb. So I am very happy to be through, seriously. Nadal, who won a record seventh French Open title last year, improved to 53-1 at Roland Garros. Hes 37-2 since returning in February after a seven-month layoff because of a left knee injury, reaching the finals at all eight tournaments he played and winning six. Seeded third but a heavy favorite, Nadal won his 16th consecutive match, and he improved to 34-0 in the first round at Grand Slams. Hes trying to become the first man to win eight titles at the same major event. Defending womens champion Maria Sharapova needed only 54 minutes to advance, beating Hsieh Su-wei 6-2, 6-1. The No. 2-seeded Sharapova lost eight points in eight service games. While Nadal took center stage, U.S. women fanned out to remote courts and quietly went 6-1. That included victories by Madison Keys, who won her Roland Garros debut, and by Melanie Oudin, who ousted No. 28 Tamira Paszek 6-4, 6-3. No. 17 Sloane Stephens, who reached the fourth round last year, beat Karin Knapp 6-2, 7-5. American Ryan Harrison won a match at Roland Garros for the first time in three tries, beating Andrey Kuznetsov 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Harrison next plays fellow American and good friend John Isner, who improved to 4-4 at Roland Garros by beating Carlos Berlocq 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Li Na, the 2011 womens champion, beat nemesis Anabel Medina Garrigues in her opening match, 6-3, 6-4. Agnieszka Radwanska, last years runner-up at Wimbledon, defeated Shahar Peer 6-1, 6-1. Li, seeded No. 6, entered her match against Medina Garrigues with an 0-3 record on clay versus the Spaniard, but raced to a 4-0 lead after 20 minutes and broke serve six times. Former top-ranked player Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark ended a five-match losing streak by defeating Laura Robson 6-3, 6-2. No. 4 Radwanska needed less than hour to advance. It was her first match since withdrawing before last weeks Brussels tournament with a recurrence of the right shoulder injury that has bothered her the past couple of years. I decided to have a week of rest and just practice, she said. I think it was a good move. Shell next play American Mallory Burdette, who won in her Roland Garros debut Sunday. Radwanska was asked what she knew about her second-round opponent. To be honest, not much. Nothing at all, actually, she said with a smile. I might Google her. The search for the next generation of U.S. stars has been ongoing, which made Mondays success notable. Keys beat Misaki Doi 6-3, 6-2; Vania King defeated Alexandra Cadantu 7-6 (3), 6-1; Bethanie Mattek-Sands eliminated Lourdes Dominguez Lino 6-4, 6-1; and No. 29 Varvara Lepchenko beat Mirjana LucicBaroni 6-1, 6-2. Its funny, because a couple of years ago, everyone was asking me: Where is womens tennis? Mattek-Sands said. Here we are now. American Christina McHale lost to Jana Cepelova of Slovakia 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-4. On the mens side, Michael Russell of the United States retired with a left hamstring injury trailing Martin Klizan 3-6, 6-3, 6-1. Klizan plays Nadal in the second round. Wild card Gael Monfils of France thrilled a partisan center court crowd by upsetting No. 5 Tomas Berdych in a match that ended at twilight, 7-6 (8), 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-7 (4), 7-5. Nick Kyrgios of Australia, at 18 the youngest player in the mens draw, made a successful Grand Slam debut by beating 34-year-old Radek Stepanek 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 7-6 (11). Associated PressRafael Nadal celebrates Monday after defeating Daniel Brands in their first-round match of the French Open at Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Nadal won in four sets 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Stakes are high Presidency and 2020 bids the focus at IOC meetings Associated PressST. PETERSBURG, Russia Call it the perfect storm of Olympic politics. With sports leaders gathering in St. Petersburg, Russia, this week for a global convention, three high-profile campaigns will be played out at the same time in an unusual confluence of issues that will set the tone for the future of the Olympic movement. The race for the IOC presidency, the bidding for the 2020 Summer Games and the fate of wrestling will be on full display at the SportAccord conference and executive board meetings of the International Olympic Committee. About 1,500 delegates are expected for the conference, which opens today and will feature an appearance later in the week by Russian President Vladimir Putin. His presence will underscore Russias commitment to its first Winter Games, which will take place in the Black Sea resort of Sochi in less than nine months. The centerpiece of the meetings will be Wednesdays decision by the IOC board on which sport or sports to recommend for inclusion in the 2020 Olympics. Three months after it was surprisingly removed from the list of core sports, wrestling will have a chance to climb back into contention for a spot on the 2020 program. Also competing for the single opening are seven other sports: a combined baseball-softball bid, karate, roller sports, sport climbing, squash, wakeboarding and the Chinese martial art of wushu. The sports will make closed-door presentations to the IOC board, which will then decide on recommendations to submit to the IOC general assembly for a final decision in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in September. There is widespread speculation that the executive board will select a shortlist of three or four finalists, including wrestling. Squash and karate have been cited as other leading contenders, while mens baseball and womens softball have merged to push their bid after having been off the program since the 2008 Beijing Games.

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During the past few years, there has been a great deal of debate regarding how effective breast cancer screening and mammography are. I have always stated there is more than enough proof of the benefit of screening with mammography, earlier diagnosis, earlier treatment and a higher chance of cure. Now there is even more data to support this belief. The time between diagnosis of breast cancer among older women and their last mammogram is associated with a Delayed screening can raise death risk See BENNETT/ Page C3 Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE What Jolies choice means for you Superstar Angelina Jolies headline news about her positive genetic test for the BRCA-1 mutation and subsequent double prophylactic mastectomy has stunned the world. It also shed light into this less common but serious issue in patients with breast cancer. She has a genetic mutation called BRCA-1. Visible or problematic scars frequently occur because we are completely surrounded by skin, and scars have to be one of the least desirable side effects of having an injury or surgery. Visible scars are particularly noticeable in the head and neck area because, if you think about it, the face is in the lead position any time you venture out in your environment, so it is most likely the first area seen, as well as most likely the first area to get injured. In most cases, scars are very minor and are usually a small price to pay for undergoing a procedure to correct a disease process and/or repair damage from trauma. With more than 25 million surgical procedures performed each year, not to mention all the episodes of trauma that occur, the potential for scars is countless. Once the initial procedure and/or trauma In the past few weeks, we have talked about full dentures. I thought I would take this column to talk about partial dentures. As most of you know, full dentures replace all of your teeth in an arch while partial dentures replace the missing teeth in an arch. A conventional partial uses clasps for retention, while a precision partial uses a system for retention. Precision partials can also be called claspless partials because there are no clasps. Precision partials are the more cosmetic of the two, since there are no clasps. As a matter of fact, it is virtually impossible to see the partial in your mouth when they are made properly. Aside from the benefit of being claspless, they are also kinder to the teeth they attach to. With clasps, you get a torquing motion on the teeth when pressure is applied. With the precision attachment assembly, the torque is minimized as a result of the engineering of the system. Partial dentures explained See VASCIMINI/ Page C5 See GRILLO/ Page C2 Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT Section CTUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE INSIDE Dr. Richard Hoffmann /Page C3 Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER So you know: T he information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. See GANDHI/ Page C2 000F1XC RYANTRARES (Franklin, Ind.) Daily JournalFRANKLIN, Ind.For patients admitted to Tara Treatment Center, the hope is to recover from the disease that shattered their lives. Alcoholism has cost them their jobs, drug abuse has torn them from their friends and their families, or their addiction has led to arrest or jail time. They are attempting to regain control by working with counselors at Tara at the treatment center south of Franklin. Addiction treatment rarely is covered by health insurance, and many people cannot afford programs needed to recover and manage the disease. That prevents millions from getting the help they need. But that will change next year.Hope for changeHealth law to open access to addiction treatmentStarting in 2014, health insurance companies will be required to pay for substance abuse and addiction treatment. The change means up to 62 million people will receive some kind of coverage for drug and alcohol problems, ranging from paying for weekly counseling sessions to long-term stays in rehabilitation facilities. Local treatment centers are encouraged that addiction is being treated more like a disease than a moral shortcoming. But questions remain about what will be covered and for which people, Tara admissions director Jessica Daugherty told theDaily Journal. Were trying to follow along. Its still not really clear how its going to be administered. That hasnt been defined yet, she said. ItsThinkstockSee CHANGE/ Page C4 Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES

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Free 20-minute child safety seat inspections available by appointment at the Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast, 1564 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, to be sure a seat is not recalled, damaged or expired; is appropriate for the childs age, height and weight; is used correctly; and installed securely. Contact Sue Littnan at 352-563-9939, ext. 235. Fifth annual Body, Mind & Soul Health Fair, 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, June 6, at First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St. at the intersection of Yulee Drive in Homosassa just down from Burger King. More than 60 businesses and health organizations will be represented, providing health screenings and valuable information. The LifeSouth bloodmobile will be there, as well, plus a Corvette display coordinated by the Touch of Class Corvette Club. All Corvettes are invited to participate. Door prizes, gifts and promotional items will be available. For information, visit www.1umc.org or call 352628-4083. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital will offer a panel discussion, The Wonders of Minimally Invasive Robotic Assisted Surgery, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 11, at the Palace Grand, 275 Della Court, Spring Hill. Oak HillHospitalusesroboticassistedsurgeryintheareas ofgeneralsurgery,gallbladdersurgery,colorectalsurgery andgynecologicalprocedures.Those who attend will hear from experts and learn all the features and benefits of this approach to modern-day surgery. A complimentary hot meal will be served. Admission is free and seating is limited. Reservations are required. Call 352-628-6060 in Citrus or go to OakHillHospital.com/ ForYourHealth to register. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers: During May, donors will receive a moustache T-shirt. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 28, Bealls, 346 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. 11 a.m. to 4:59 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, Cypress Creek Academy, 2855 W. Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto. Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 30, Sumter Electric Cooperative, U.S. 301 and Sumter County Road 471, Sumterville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, May 31, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, June 1, Lowes, 2301 E. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Inverness. Noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 1, Inverness Elks Lodge 2522, 3580 E. Lemmon Drive, Hernando. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 2, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday, June 3, Withlacoochee River Electric Co-Op, 5330 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. 10 a.m. to noon Monday, June 3, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, Cypress Cove Care Center, 700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal River. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospitals For Your Health Community Education Series: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 28, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis by George D. Giannakopoulos, M.D., at Heritage Pines Country Club, 11524 Scenic Hills Blvd., Hudson, one-half mile east of U.S. 19 on County Line Road. Dr. Giannakopoulos, a neurosurgeon at Oak Hill Hospital, will cover non-surgical and surgical management of lumbar spinal stenosis, including signs and symptoms, causes, diagnosis, medications, nonsurgical treatments, minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation approaches. Admission is free and a complimentary hot meal will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required: Call 352-628-6060 in Citrus or register online at OakHill Hospital.com/ForYourHealth. Citrus Memorial Health System is proud to announce the 25th anniversary of Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center at Allen Ridge, formerly Allen Ridge Medical Mall. This milestone anniversary will be celebrated from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 1. The facility, at 540 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto, includes diagnostic imaging along with an urgent-care clinic and specialty physician offices. It was built in 1988 to serve the needs of the growing population in the center of Citrus County, and now sits at the heart of the proposed County Road 491 medical corridor. The 25th anniversary celebration will offer free health screenings including those for bone density and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Food, health education and seminars will be featured throughout the day, including: Making it to the Top: Why Citrus Memorial was Ranked Top 100 in the Nation for General Surgery presented by Dr. Marc Fernandez, general surgeon with Inverness Surgical Associates. An Inside Look at Radiology presented by Dr. Thomas Ceballos, radiologist with Associated Radiologists of Inverness. Heart Health Q&A featuring Dr. Peter Yung Kim, cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon with Citrus Ocala Heart Institute. For information about the event, call 352-560-6360. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events: The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital.com. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco and Citrus County residents for $20 a year, which includes membership in the HCA national H2U program. May 28 Blood pressure test, 10 a.m. June 3 AARP driving classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 4 Hearing screen/wax removal, 10 a.m. June 5 AARP driving classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The George A. Dame Community Health Center BoardMeetings are at 3 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at the Citrus County Health Department, 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in the first floor conference room.Support GROUPS Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Quarterly meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Caregivers Support and Information meeting, 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Call Charlotte Downing at 352-422-7044 for directions/ information. Refreshments served. OCALA Ocala Health Stroke Support Group meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Senior Wellness Community Center (9850 S.W. 84th Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call 800-530-1188 to register. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. Call Bevin Brayton at 352302-9066. PINELLAS PARK Connections firesidediscussion-style support The average womans lifetime risk of breast cancer is 10 percent to 12 percent. Women with this mutation have a risk of breast cancer of almost 90 percent. It is proven beyond doubt that these women benefit from removal of both breasts. These genetic changes happen in only about 5 percent of women with breast cancer, so every woman with breast cancer need not be worried about it. In the past decade, lots of women have elected to have double mastectomies due to fear of breast cancer, but in most women, it is not medically indicated. It is indicated only in women who have this genetic disorder of BRCA mutation. Not all women are at risk for this mutation and not all need to undergo this $3,000 test. Women who meet the following criteria should be tested:Two first-degree relatives (mother, daughter, or sister) diagnosed with breast cancer, one of whom was younger than 50 years.Three or more firstor second-degree relatives (aunt or grandmother) diagnosed regardless of age.Combination of firstand second-degree relatives diagnosed with breast and ovarian cancer regardless of age.First-degree relative with bilateral breast cancer.Breast cancer in a male relative.Combination of two or more firstor seconddegree relatives with ovarian cancer.For women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent: any first-degree or two seconddegree relatives on the same side of the family diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. If one of these criteria is met, the patient with breast cancer should be tested. Family members should not be tested unless the patient has the gene mutation. This patient also has a very high risk of ovarian cancer too and prophylactic removal of ovaries and fallopian tube is also recommended. Once I knew that this was my reality, I decided to be proactive and to minimize the risk as much I could, wrote Jolie. I started with the breasts, as my risk of breast cancer is higher than my risk of ovarian cancer. In short, this genetic testing should be done in young women with breast cancer or those with a strong family history as mentioned above. Not all women need testing. If testing is positive, removal of both the breasts and ovaries with fallopian tube is important. Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampabay.rr. com or call 352-746-0707. C2TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000F1RE 000F18C Jorge Ruiz Llanes, M.D. an Internal Medicine physician in Crystal River, FL, is relocating his medical practice. He is moving to Texas. He will follow up with his patients until June 10, 2013 After his departure, Angela Acevedo, M.D. will be the custodian of the medical records. If you or any doctor, facility, insurance or agency want to request your medical records, you or they will need to contact Dr. Ruiz Llanes office before June 10 at (352) 794-3882. After June 10, 2013 contact Dr. Acevedos office at (352) 795-9697. Dr. Acevedo has a location in Crystal River at 6202 W. Corporate Oaks Dr. and another location in Inverness at 112 W. Highland Blvd. B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 000ESHJ New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Primary Medical Care Centers CEREC One-Visit Crowns Implants Lumineers and Veneers Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) AAID/ICOI Extractions In-House Specialty Care Root Canal Therapy Periodontal Gum Care Fillings Cleanings Sealants And much more! 352-795-1223 Dr. Richard C. Swanson 1815 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL www.rswansondental.com PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE 000EZ5O New Patients Free Consults Emergency Care Exceptional Dentistry and Your Comfort is Our Number One Priority! is resolved and areas have healed up, psychological injury can arise from a poorly healed scar that can affect ones social and self-image as they go out in the world and interact with society. As a result, selfconfidence, in some instances, is diminished significantly. It is very interesting to note that with todays popular practices of body piercing and tattoos, people still have a strong aversion to scarring, particularly on the face. I suppose if you wish to self-inflict things, it is OK, but if you get something as a result of an accident, it is a far different situation and less acceptable. The one thing I would like you to take away from this article is the fact that once there is a scar, there will always be a scar, but there is always the possibility of improving on that scar, and there are many ways to do that. Living a proactive life where one takes care of his or her skin by avoiding excessive sun, avoiding smoking and having a very healthy diet and lifestyle will help guarantee that the healing process, when it does occur following trauma or surgery, will help the outcome. There are a few exceptions. Some individuals will have enlarged (hypertrophic) scars and cant help it. There are also darker-skinned individuals who form keloid scars. Lastly, there are areas that tend to scar heavier, which includes the chest wall just below the neck and the upper outside part of the arm. Many of us carry the scars of vaccinations at that site to this day. Prophylactic scar therapy means after the surgery and/or injury occurred, measures you can do to prevent the scar from becoming more pronounced. Well-versed and motivated patients try everything from vitamin E to cocoa butter in the posttraumatic period to reduce the appearance of unsightly scars. There are many other home remedies, all of which have no scientific basis. Doctors and scientists are currently working on multiple ways to reduce scar formation, which, as you may know, is inflammation that occurs to the area injured, and there are some great and innovative ideas. Steroids have been tried through the years and have failed miserably. Currently, chemicals found in the extract of onions are being researched as an option. Also, omega oils are being looked at very seriously because of their ability to provide high moisturizing qualities that are transmitted through the skin and likewise have antiinflammatory properties. If successful, this will be great for burn patients. The ideal topical scar therapy should be able to moisturize the skin, be absorbed easily, be hypoallergic, have antiinflammatory qualities and be convenient to apply, so as patients will be likely to be compliant and use it as directed. At present, the gold standard is silicone gel sheeting, which is difficult to get patients to use. Ideally, if we could get the silicone to be delivered in a liquid or gel form, patients would be more likely to use this product. But what if topical measures fail? Unsightly scars can be removed and camouflaged in a multitude of ways. Revision surgery is an option once all conservative measures have failed and a proper amount of time has transpired, ideally six to 12 months. Surgical techniques include using a zigzag pattern to draw the eye away from the scar. sanding the skin with a special instrument to smooth it out and make the scar less noticeable to the surrounding skin, and, to a lesser degree, acid chemical peels and laser devices have been used with success. An adequate source of further information is the Internet, of course. A better one is a board-certified facial plastic surgeon.Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit CrystalCommunity ENT.com. GRILLOContinued from Page C1 GANDHIContinued from Page C1 In the past decade, lots of women have elected to have double mastectomies due to fear of breast cancer, but in most women, it is not medically indicated. It is indicated only in women who have this genetic disorder of BRCA mutation. See GROUPS/ Page C4 HealthNOTES

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Q:Would you please review high blood pressure. A: A recent (2013) patient communication from the FDA provides useful information regarding high blood pressure (also called hypertension), which is known as the silent killer. There are often no symptoms of it until the heart, arteries and other organs are already damaged. High blood pressure increases a persons risk for stroke, heart attack, heart failure, kidney failure and death, according to the National Institutes of Healths Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Blood pressure is the force of blood moving through your arteries, and is measured with two numbers. The first, or top number, is your pressure when your heart beats, called the systolic pressure. The second, or bottom number, measures the force of blood in your arteries while your heart is relaxed (filling with blood between beats). This is called the diastolic pressure. Blood pressure usually varies throughout the day. For adults, a blood pressure reading of lower than 120/80 is considered normal. Readings between 120/80 and 139/89 are considered pre-hypertension. People with prehypertension do not have blood pressure as low as it should be, but are not yet considered to have high blood pressure. Your doctor may tell you that you have high blood pressure if you have two measurements of blood pressure readings, on physician office visits at least one week apart, that are higher than 140/90. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued guidelines recommending people with blood pressure lower than 120/80 be screened every two years. Your doctor may recommend your blood pressure be screened more frequently. It is estimated that almost one in three adults in the United States has high blood pressure. High blood pressure occurs more frequently as people age, with many people developing it when they are in their late 30s or early 40s. As a result of the increase in obesity, more and more children are developing high blood pressure as well. To protect your heart, arteries and other organs from strain and damage over time, controlling your blood pressure should be part of a healthy living plan that includes monitoring your lipids. Treatment of high blood pressure often starts with lifestyle changes, including decreasing salt in your diet, losing weight if necessary, stopping smoking, cutting down on alcohol use and regular exercise. In addition to lifestyle changes, medications are often used to lower blood pressure. There are currently nine types of medications that treat high blood pressure. For example, beta blockers slow the heart rate; calcium-channel blockers directly relax blood vessels. Each type of medication has pluses and minuses that must be carefully weighed by you and your doctor. The optimal medication depends on your other medical conditions and preferences. Most people take more than one medication in order to bring their blood pressure down to their treatment goal. Blood pressure medication should begin to work within days. Once started, the medication should be used until your doctor tells you to stop. It is also a good idea to monitor your blood pressure at home. Because high blood pressure is a chronic medical condition that often has little or no symptoms, remembering to take your medications can be a challenge. Combination therapy and long-acting, once-a-day medications can be used to decrease the number of pills taken per day and help ensure use. If you take more than one high blood pressure medication, ask your doctor if a combination medication can be prescribed. If cost is a concern, generic versions should be considered. Patients need to be proactive regarding high blood pressure medications, monitoring blood pressure, and taking medications as prescribed. Talk to your doctor about any side effects you experience.POSTSCRIPTI have enjoyed writing this weekly column for almost 17 years and have tried to answer each and every question posed. However, this will be my last regular column, since I have decided to take a break from writing. Many readers know my wife has Parkinsons disease and we both serve as Research Advocates for the Parkinsons Disease Foundation (PDF). I also now serve as consumer representative for the FDAs Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee. These activities will keep us busy, but I still hope to submit periodic columns related to important consumer information from the FDA and about Parkinsons disease. Thank you all for your questions, and best wishes for your health and happiness!Richard P. Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442.HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 C3 000EQDF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE ADVANCED HEALTH Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA 9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 10A, Crystal River . . . . 352-563-2597 ASSISTED LIVING SUPERIOR RESIDENCES OF LECANTO MEMORY CARE 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-5483 SUNFLOWER SPRINGS ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY 8733 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8017 CARDIOLOGY CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC Delfin, Luis MD FACC Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC Kannam, Hari MD Miryala, Vinod MD FACC Nerello, Nishant MD Pasupuleti, Suman MD Rivero, Abel MD Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC Trigo, Gisela MD FACC Walker, Dennis J. MD 760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-4165 308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101, Leesburg . . . . . . 352-315-0627 910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages . . . . 352-751-3356 DENTAL CHRISTIE DENTAL OF MEADOWCREST Beckton, Tedra DMD Tran, Hang DMD 6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River . . . . 877-290-2818 CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES Davila, Alexa DMD Davila, Jose DDS 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-527-1614 COMPLETE FAMILY DENTISTRY Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA 1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1223 LEDGER DENTISTRY Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA 3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-3443 DERMATOLOGY BAY DERMATOLOGY & COSMETIC SURGERY PA Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD Board Certified Esguerra, David DO FAOCD Board Certified Broughton, Brandi PA-C 7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-503-2002 FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE HEALTH & WELLCARE SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD McCollough, Barney PA Tzivanis, James PA 5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-746-1818 HERNANDO MEDICAL CENTER Patel, Shirish MD Mazur, Barbara ARNP 2669 N. Florida Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-637-2550 SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS Villacastin, Alex T. MD Co, Alistair W. MD Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC Stawkowski, Lawrence PA 10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs . . . 352-489-2486 ENDOCRINOLOGY CITRUS DIABETES TREATMENT CENTER Christ Medical Center Tawfik, Eihab MD PA 7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-0444 HEALTH EDUCATION TOBACCO PREVENTION FLORIDA HEALTH 120 N. Montgomery Ave. Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-1731 HEALTH PRODUCTS FURNITURE PALACE & MATTRESS WAREHOUSE 3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-2999 WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTER 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando . . . . . . . . . . 344-8882 HEARING ADVANCED FAMILY HEARING AID CENTER 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1775 AUDIBEL HEARING AID CENTERS 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8000 2036 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . . 352-586-7599 20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon . . . . . . . 52-789-1559 HEARING CONTINUED MIRACLE EAR HEARING AID CENTER Lazio, Brian L-HAS 1801 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River Mall . . . 795-1484 HOME HEALTH SERVICES HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-249-1257 SENIOR HOME CARE 494 S Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-0150 HOSPICE HPH HOSPICE 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-4600 HOSPITALS CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-1551 MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala . . . . . . . . . 352-351-7200 REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER BAYONET POINT 14000 Fivay Road, Hudson . . . . . . . . 888-741-5119 INDEPENDENT LIVING INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR APARTMENTS 518 Ella Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-8477 INTERNAL MEDICINE GIRA S. SHAH, MD 203 S. Seminole Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-7800 NURSING HOMES CYPRESS COVE CARE CENTER 700 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-8832 DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH & REHABILITATION CENTER 2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-9500 LIFE CARE CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY 3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-4434 ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY ROBERT BOISSONEAULT ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD Brant, Timothy A. MD Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility 522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-527-0106 OPHTHALMOLOGY SUNCOAST EYE CENTER Kaplan, George H. OD 221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-2526 ORTHOPEDIC/ SPORTS MEDICINE NATURE COAST ORTHOPAEDICS & SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC Choung, Walter I. MD Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO 2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-746-5707 520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-2663 2236 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . 352-344-2663 PHARMACIES BRASHEARS PHARMACY 206 W. Dampier St., Inverness . . . . . . 352-637-2079 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-3420 G & R H EALTHMART PHARMACY 3791 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-3111 PLASTIC RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY FARRIOR FACIAL PLASTIC AND COSMETIC SURGERY CENTER Farrior, Edward H. MD FACS 2908 W. Azeele St., Tampa . . . . . . . . . 813-875-3223 SURGERY PREMIER VEIN CENTER Sharma, Ravi MD 7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-0777 UROLOGY ADVANCED UROLOGY SPECIALISTS Desai, Paresh G. MD FACS Desautel, Michael G. MD Kumar, Udaya MD FRCS Seneriz, Manuel A. MD Pulice, Frances A. PA 609 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-9707 3475 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-7671 PAID ADVERTISING Richard HoffmannASK THE PHARMACIST What does high blood pressure really mean? marked increased risk of breast cancer death according to data recently presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting. This finding highlights the need for continued mammography screening. In this study, researchers found that, for women age 75 and older, a longer time interval between the last mammogram and the date of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with a greater chance for dying from breast cancer. Yes, even for women age 75 or older, it is important to continue to get yearly mammograms. In order to assess whether the time between mammograms had any effect on the risk of dying from cancer, the researchers analyzed a total of 8,663 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer for a duration of 12.2 years. They identified an increase in the risk of being diagnosed with advanced-stage disease among women who had their mammograms every five years or more compared to those who had them in regular intervals of six months to a year. The researchers found a longer time between breast cancer diagnosis and receiving a mammogram was clearly associated with a higher risk of dying from breast cancer. Compared to women who had an interval of six months to a year between mammogram and diagnosis, women who never had a mammogram or who had one in an interval of more than five years after diagnosis, had a three times greater risk of dying from breast cancer. This study hammers home the importance of yearly mammography, not just for younger women, but for older women as well. Its vital that doctors discuss the risks and benefits of mammography among older patients and encourage screening. These findings suggest that regular mammography should be continued for older women every one or two years; however, as with younger women, mammography screening should be considered in light of the overall health of the individual woman.Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. BENNETTContinued from Page C1

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group for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-343-0600; www.wellspringoncology.org. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at Sandy Oaks RV Resort, 6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call 352-422-5868. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10 a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352-387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. RBOI has begun a monthly survivor group with inspirational guests and strength based topics. Any cancer survivors and family members are welcome to attend. There is no cost to attend. For information, email Tommie Brown at tbrown009 @tampabay. rr.com or call Wendy Hal at 352-527-0106. Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. Weekly meetings R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-563-5182. Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous: If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-621-0599. Visit the website: www.ncinter group.com. AC Group, 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: Easy Does It, 8 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday; &:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday; The Recovery Room, 8169 S. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Floral City. It Works How and Why, noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Hospital Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery at Work Mens Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to 9 p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Par sons Point Road, Hernando. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352508-1604. Overeaters Anonymous : Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : support for any hurts, habits, hang-ups or addictions. 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in Oxford. Call 352-748-6124. 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352-746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand small-group time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. Referrals to Celebrate Recovery offered. Call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-6282874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults, where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352688-4537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alz support.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz. org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2 p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program: 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. certainly going to increase peoples ability to access services somewhere and at some level. But thats a whole lot better than nothing. The change is part of the Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010 to expand Medicaid and private insurance coverage to more people. States are allowed to decide whether to make Medicaid available to more people. In Indiana, the General Assembly has not passed legislation to expand that portion, and Gov. Mike Pence has stated that the only expansion would be through the Healthy Indiana Plan already in place, said Marni Lemons, spokeswoman with the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration. We have made that request for the Healthy Indiana Plan to the federal government, and were still waiting to hear back, she said. Theres not much we can do until then. That indecision is making it difficult for health care providers to prepare for additional patients, Daugherty said. But while few solid details have emerged, certain aspects of the law will go into effect regardless of what the legislature does. The Affordable Care Act established 10 mandatory essential health benefits that need to be covered by individual and small group insurance plans. One of those benefits is behavioral health, which includes addiction treatment. Addiction, because it is a chronic illness, its just like heart disease or diabetes, said Cindy Schroeder, clinical supervisor at Tara Treatment Center. The earlier people can get help and treatment, the less overall cost in their lifetime there will be. And it will reduce everyones cost because of that. The National Institute of Health classifies addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that causes the user to act compulsively. Medical experts liken it to long-term illnesses such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Tara Treatment Center has been helping people manage the illness for more than 25 years. Patients address the emotional roots that make them turn to substance abuse. Therapists use individual and group sessions to help change behavior and form new behaviors that dont include alcohol or drugs. But despite being accepted as a disease by the medical community, addiction and mental health problems still often are excluded from insurance coverage. That speaks to a greater stigma placed by society on people who struggle with drugs or alcohol. A lot of people believe that its a behavior of choice, even if its not, Daugherty said. Its taken a long time for society to come around to the fact that it is chronic. Steps were taken in 2008 after a bill was passed to more evenly treat mental and physical health problems. But those guidelines were never fully formed by the government, meaning individual health insurance plans dont have a solid directive to include treatment of mental health issues such as addiction, Schroeder said. Large employers still have the option to not include mental health and addictions benefits at all, she said. They can still say its not part of the benefit package, but if they do include it as part of their package, they cant charge premiums different or impose more deductibles. They have to treat mental health and addictions like any other disease. But the problem is, theyre not treating it like that, Schroeder said. Even though we have parity laws, they dont really say that they have to pay for hospital detox or residential stay. Much of the services at Tara Treatment Center involve a long-term stay at the facility. Research has shown it takes 21 days to break a habit, said Theresa Matthews, CEO of Tara. Outpatient programs, such as support groups and counseling, are good for determining a problem or preventing a relapse. But for someone in the throes of addiction, a few days a week isnt going to solve the problem, Matthews said. Insurers are reluctant to pay for that type of expensive care, which can cost thousands of dollars. Almost always, the most theyll cover is partial hospitalization for a few days. Weve had our clinicians say, Does this person have to be dead to get this authorized to stay? Were giving them enough criteria that would absolutely warrant residential care, Matthews said. Thats like saying you just did heart surgery on someone, then the next day, send them home to take care of themselves. Thats the same mentality we see with addiction. The Affordable Care Act was intended to correct some of those inconsistencies. But because the details of how it will be implemented in Indiana havent been determined, officials with Valle Vista Behavioral Health System, a Greenwood-based addiction treatment, choose not to answer questions regarding the changes in the law and what it will mean for their facility. Tara Treatment Center is anticipating an increase in patients to its outpatient counseling and intensive inpatient programs, Daugherty said. Officials also suspect that when 27 million uninsured people start receiving basic primary care, more people will be identified as having addiction problems. For the staff at Tara, thats a great start. But when those problems are detected, Matthews is concerned about whether theyll get the treatment they need. Those who work in addiction services have a saying, she said. They describe the chains of addiction as being too weak to be felt until theyre too strong to be broken. Thats such a true statement. Its subtle, its progressive, and its powerful, Matthews said. If you can treat something in outpatient or on a prevention stage, thats a lot more cost effective. But with this illness, by the time people go to seek treatment, its too late to prevent the disease.C4TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HEALTH& LIFE Theres no need to leave Citrus County for the Best Rehabilitationwww.cypresscovecare.com Post Surgery Care Stroke Rehab Cardiac Program Superior Woundcare I.V. TherapyInpatient & Outpatient Skilled Care A Five-Star Rated Facility (352) 795-8832700 Southeast 8th Ave. Crystal River*Rating by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.000EQCI Thrivent Sponsored Events Congregational Life and Care Caregiver Support 4th Tuesday of the month at 1 pm at: St. Timothy Lutheran Church 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River Church phone 352-795-5325 *web site: www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com Programs coming up: May 28, 2013 Have Some fun with Randy Hobson Discussion & demonstrations of The Edible Landscape. June 24, 2013 Theressa Foster WEST CENTRAL SOLUTIONS working with you and your family finding the best placement for your loved ones. July 23, 2013 Peg Weston Thrivent Financial discussing various investments options. August 27, 2013 Katie Lucas, Nature Coast EMS Medical Alert Systems September 24, 2013 Katy Mehl Citrus Memorial Share Club Caregiver Support Group is a free, informal and interactive monthly meeting. We are open to the comm unity and all are welcome. For further information contact Gail Sirak at 634-2021 or Deacon Charlotte Downing at 4 22-7044. 000F1HI CHANGEContinued from Page C1 The National Institute of Health classifies addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that causes the user to act compulsively. ... But despite being accepted as a disease by the medical community, addiction and mental health problems still often are excluded from insurance coverage. GROUPSContinued from Page C2 See GROUPS / Page C5

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Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352229-4202 or Sue at 352-5607918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-6420962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club; call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a notfor-profit charitable organization providing comprehen sively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care available. Last Wednesday, 11:30 a.m., Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free respite care available. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Al-Anon meeting 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Lou Block, facilitator. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly, Jerry Fischer, facilitator. Diabetes Support Group 10 a.m. second Monday monthly, with Kim Palmer. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 6 p.m. second Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. ALS Support Group 2 p.m. the third Thursday monthly, with Katie Mitchell. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, with Lillian Rojas. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acutecare beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Some 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. More GROUPS SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Time Out From Cancer, cancer survivors meeting 6 to 7 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at Oysters Restaurant, sponsored by RBOI. Email Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.com or call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106. Guests will discuss a variety of interesting topics including stress management, nutrition and exercise, and other things that promote holistic healing, prevention and renewal. Alzheimers caregiver and family support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. The Area 13 Family Care Council, 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday monthly at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities office, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44). All persons interested in issues of those with developmental disabilities (autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, spina bifida and intellectual disabilities) are encouraged to attend. Call Karen Huscher at 352-7261445 or isabelfcc13@ yahoo.com. Area 13 covers Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties. There are 15 Family Care Councils with governor-appointed volunteer members, who are individuals with a developmental disability or are a family member. Seeking new members. Contact Huscher at 352-726-1445 or cbettykay@ aol.com; facebook.com/ groups/331632140186772/. Website: www.FCCFlorida. org. NAMI-Citrus, locally chartered group of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, meets the second Monday monthly at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, on County Road 486 in Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All those with an interest in mental health issues are welcome. Call 352-341-2273. SPRING HILL Healthy Hearts support group open to anyone looking for information on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30 p.m. the second Monday monthly in the cafeteria conference room at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville. Admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus, 352-597-6333 in Hernando or visit the website www.OakHill Hospital.com. HIV support group 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at Citrus County Health Department, 3700 Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Open to all affected by HIV. Persons attending remain confidential, testing will be anonymous. Reservation not required. Call 352-527-0068, ext. 281. Bereaved Parents of the USA (BP/USA) grief support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced the death of a child, 7 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call Bernadette Passalacqua at 352-746-4664 or visit www. bereavedparentsusa.org. Look Good ... Feel Better, a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-3417741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. SPRING HILL Spinal Cord Injury support group, 5 p.m. second Thursday monthly in the gym at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital. Call Dee Hardee at 352592-7237. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. Womens Breast Cancer Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the second Friday monthly (except July and August), Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in the Allen Ridge Medical Center, County Road 491, Lecanto. Light lunch served. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Let me describe the system. The best way to describe the system is to make it analogous to a lock and a key. The key fits into the lock in a precise manner. With precision dentures, you have a lock half and a key half. One of these halves is in the denture and the other half is attached to crowns that are cemented to your own teeth. Without crowns, you cannot have the other half of the system. If you are wearing partials and you do not like the way the clasps look, or you feel there is too much pressure on your teeth or gums, you may be the perfect candidate for a precision partial. I would suggest you talk to your dentist about precision partials. If your dentist is not familiar with them or doesnt do them regularly, you may want to find someone who is. To make a system like this work properly, both the dentist and the lab he or she uses must be well trained in these systems. If the lab is not familiar with these systems or does not do them regularly, talk to your dentist about a lab that is more familiar with the system. If after reading this column you have questions that were not covered here, please feel free to write to me.Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions or comments to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at FJV@MasterpieceDental Studio.com.HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 C5 000EQ56 www.chronicleonline.com/subscriberpromo www.chronicleonline.com/subscriberpromo www.chronicleonline.com/subscriberpromo Shhh! Shhh! Shhh! Can you keep a secret? We love our subscribers and as a reward we are offering monthly subscriber contests on our website. Can you keep Can you keep a secret? a secret? We love our subscribers We love our subscribers and as a reward we and as a reward we are offering monthly are offering monthly subscriber contests subscriber contests on our website. on our website. 000ETQP 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS 000F0T0 Musicians interested in playing may call Tony Caruso at 942-9399 You are invited to an Open Jam Session The Jam Session features local and visiting musicians playing Old Favorites, Jazz, Swing and Dixieland for your listening and dancing pleasure. Sunday June 2, 2013 1:30 to 4 p.m. The public is invited! $7 donation at the door for non-members. LOCATION Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center formerly the Knights of Columbus Hall in Homosassa Springs Bring your own refreshments. VASCMINIContinued from Page C1 GROUPSContinued from Page C4

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES New clinic offers low-cost optionsRoyal Skunk Animal Clinic, a nonprofit veterinary pet clinic, seeks to stop the birth of unwanted cats and dogs by offering low-cost spay and neutering, and wants to give residents of Citrus County another option to turn to for pet care. To this end, the clinic will offer low-cost vaccinations and low-cost teeth cleaning, as well as dog and cat physical examinations. The clinic is in the Hampton Plaza on the corner of Essex Street and Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486). Prodigy Modeling Agency, a benefactor, has allowed the clinic to work out of its offices, which are in the farthest back corner of the plaza. A mobile clinic will be set up on site to carry out procedures. The first clinic day will be Friday, June 28. For more information or to make an appointment for services, call 352201-6701.Scouts to stage car washBoy Scout Troop 462 will have a car wash from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 1, at Bay Area Air Conditioning & Heating, 8021 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. The car wash is a summer camp fundraiser. For more information, call 352-220-1554.Bonsai club to do display at mallButtonwood Bonsai Club will have a small display of bonsai trees at the Crystal River Malls Spring Garden Show on Saturday, June 1. A full club display and demonstrations are scheduled for the following Saturday, June 8, at the mall. The club will have its regular meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 8, at the mall. Following a short meeting will be a display of club members bonsai plus demonstrations all day until 4 p.m. in the food court. For more information, call Bob Eskeitz at 352587-4215. COMMUNITYPage C6TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Precious PawsADOPTABLE Corbin Special to the ChronicleCorbin is a 2-year-old black kitty with a coat smooth as satin. She loves to be a part of family life and looks at you with her golden eyes when she is ready to cuddle. She likes to sleep in the bed and loves to look out the window at the outside critters. She is quiet and will make a great family pet. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. Starting in June, the Precious Paws Crystal River Mall adoption center will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. The Floral City adoption site at 7360 S. Florida Ave. is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Call 352-726-4700 for more information or visit www.preciouspaws florida.com. Zen meditation offered at UnityThe public is welcome to Zen meditation sessions at 2:45 p.m. Sundays at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto (off County Road 491). For more information, call 352-464-4955.Friends to have mini book saleFriends of the Floral City Library will have a mini book sale at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 1, at the library, 8360 E. Orange Ave., Floral City. The sale will feature a large selection of hardcover books for $1 and paperbacks for 50 cents each, along with some authorsigned copies, first editions and a large variety of childrens books. There will be a limited number of book bag giveaways, a drawing for a Today Im Reading mug and some other freebies. Childrens book sales will help with the adopt-a-class program. Call the library at 352-726-3671 for more details.Garden Club to do displayThe Garden Club of Crystal River will have a display with information on how to decorate toad houses for your garden at the Crystal River Malls Spring Garden Show on Saturday, June 1. There is a variety of ways to attract toads and create a garden decoration, and have some creative family fun at the same time. Toad havens are easy to create, using items you may already have around your house. Decorating toad houses is very inexpensive. For more information, call Libby Wentzell at 352257-1211. Dance, drum classes offeredCommunity classes for summertime African dance and drum classes are available. All interested persons are welcome. For information, call 352897-4173 or 352-270-6148. Special to the ChronicleThe Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club at 54 Civic Circle in the Beverly Hills Recreation Park will host free horseshoe pitching to all ages from 8:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays from June 5 until Sept. 4. Instruction and horseshoes will be provided. The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club is a sponsor of the Florida State Horseshoe Pitchers $1,000 Scholarship Award and also the John Reynolds $100 J.R. Memorial Award. The award is presented to students of any age up to 18 years. Money is held in a foundation until they graduate from high school. Membership in a horseshoe club, although recommended, is not required. Participants will need to get a National Horseshoe Pitchers Association card to play in tournaments. Sanctioned tournaments are on the second Saturday each month, September through April, at BHHC. In April 2014, the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club will host the 54th annual Florida State Championship Horseshoe Tournament. Students need only one sanctioned tournament to be eligible to play in the state tournament; however, four sanctioned tournaments are required to be eligible for the $1,000 scholarship award. Call Eileen Fox at 585-305-1912 or email Eileen at eileenffox @gmail.com or John Bissonnette at 352-270-3327 for more information. Come throw a shoe Horseshoe enthusiasts seek more youth involvement in club The Dunnellon Singers graciously perform all around our area for a mere donation. Robert Cubbage, pianist, was accepted into study at Julliard at age 12, majored in piano at Denison University and worked primarily as a master recording audio engineer for music publishers and record labels, including Columbia and RCA. His keyboard artistry and theatrical style were well known in New York and he has performed in several stock company productions. In retirement, he serves as organist for two Ocala Episcopal churches. Sue Koppler, contralto, serves as Dunnellon Presbyterian Churchs director of music and is a frequent soloist with the Dunnellon Chorale, Citrus Community Concert Choir, Oak Runs Showcase of Stars and the Central Florida Music Chorale. A former jazz quintet professional performer, she also played clarinet with the Nature Coast Community Band. Mary Mahoney, soprano, studied voice at Briar Cliff College in Iowa and in New York where she was a staff singer for Fordham Methodist Church and the Opera San Gabriel Company. A coast-tocoast concert soloist, she is the founder of the Dunnellon Singers. She often solos for local concert choirs. Lowell Smith, tenor, received his vocal training at Anderson University in Indiana and became a soloist with the West Michigan Symphony and has sung leads in more than 20 shows, including Kismet, Showboat and South Pacific. Last summer he wowed local theater audiences with his portrayal of Professor Henry Higgins in the Art Centers production of My Fair Lady. Bill Thomas, baritone, as a youth percussionist in Massachusetts in marching bands, concert, community and dance bands, also sang in choral groups, barbershop quartets and musical productions. At the University of Hartford, he played in the band and sang in the chorale. During his 22year U.S. Navy career, he played trumpet, performed in USO shows and sang in the chapel choir. He performs in local variety shows, the Orange Blossom Opera and the Ocala Civic Theaters Golden Troopers. This amazing collaboration of musicians has been dedicated to enriching the cultural life of the community with their music artistry through their seven-year history. Staged at the Unity Church of Citrus County, their performance of The Great American Songbook included all-time classics from Oklahoma, My Fair Lady, Finians Rainbow, St. Louis Woman and Swingtime, and from George and Ira Gershwin, we thrilled to tunes form Ziegfeld Follies, including Our Love is Here to Stay and Second Hand Rose, from Funny Girl. Songs spanning 1920-1960, all classic standards, we heard solo and duet pieces, People Will Say Were in Love, and Surrey With the Fringe on Top from Oklahoma. The selections are well known for the hope they brought to us in the Depression years and World War II. They built our nation and offered positive values and an optimistic spirit. The values they portrayed are just as applicable today. Ive Got the World on a String (1932), sung by Sue Koppler, and Fly Me to the Moon (1954), sung by Bill Thomas, are fine examples of how a song can lift your spirits. More Than you Know (1929), sung by Mahoney, and Look to the Rainbow (1947), Smiths favorite lines, Youll never grow old with whippoorwills singing in the next hill, and Kopplers take on Hey, Look Me Over (1960) from Wildcat brought Broadway and the Great White Way to our doorstep. We envisioned Fred an Ginger when they performed They Cant Take That Away From Me (1937) from Shall We Dance. Lowell Smith sang Our Love is Here to Stay, George Gershwins final composition of his young life, from the Goldwyn Follies in 1938. The piano artistry of Robert Cubbages intro was a delight. Bravo! Bravo for Mary Mahoneys campy Rockabye Baby (1918). Al Jolson would have applauded. Kopplers Get Happy (1930), a masterful rendition, certainly chased all our blues away and our troubles were forgotten as she performed sans microphone. We were practically swooning as Bill Thomas performed, in true Dean Martin and Perry Como style, memorable tunes like Fly Me to the Moon (1954), a Frank Sinatra hit, and It Had to Be You (1924). We learned that Gordon Jenkins sort of wrote and collected and arranged The Great American Songbook. It was such a delightful way to spend an afternoon with the Dunnellon Singers. Lines like, And Ill be younger than springtime as long as there is a song to sing, and Mahoneys flippant rendition of Aint Misbehavin (1929) and Come Rain or Come Shine (1946) with Days may be rainy or sunny but Ill love you rain or shine, bring such lovely memories to mind. As we were transported to England with A Foggy Day in London Town (1947), and with Cubbages piano interlude, we applaud the generous gift of music that the Dunnellon Singers offer.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Special to the ChronicleDaystar Life Center had its annual Appreciation Luncheon at St. Benedict Hall in Crystal River. This year, Daystar celebrated its 30th year in Crystal River, helping those in need in Citrus County. Among the guests was Crystal River Mayor Jim Farley, who thanked all the volunteers for their continued and endless work. Pictured, from left, are Jim Farley, Daystar Executive Pastoral Director the Rev. Ryszard Stradomski, Executive Director Denise Kennard and Board Chairman Ron Kornatowski. Appreciation luncheon During the luncheon, Denise Kennard presented Marlene Sissy Carmichael with the Volunteer of the Year Award. Carmichael volunteers in the Daystar Thrift Store. Shortly after, Ron Kornatowski presented Kennard with an Outstanding Service Award for her performance as executive director and for leadership and guidance to the volunteers of Daystar. Dunnellon Singers entertain Citrus audience Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY

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TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013 C7CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.How responder shows a major two-suiter opposite a one-no-trump opening bid depends upon his high-card count. Yesterday, we learned that if the uncontested auction starts one no-trump two clubs two diamonds two spades, the responder has shown five spades, four hearts and game-invitational values. What does he do with four spades, five hearts and that strength? He responds two diamonds, a transfer to hearts, then rebids two spades, natural and game-invitational but nonforcing. Here, this gives North, the opener, a problem. He knows that his side does not have an eightcard major-suit fit. But he has an excellent 16 points with three fantastic major-suit cards. So he moves toward game with three diamonds (not three no-trump!), wondering if South might be able to convert to three no-trump with a club stopper. Here, though, South rebids three spades to show his powerful four-card suit. And North goes for game in the 4-3 fit. West leads the club jack. What happens? The best defense is three rounds of clubs. To make the contract, South must discard a diamond, eliminating one inevitable loser without reducing his trump length. If East continues with a fourth club, declarer pitches a heart, ruffs or overruffs in the dummy, unblocks the heart ace-king, draws trumps, and claims when whew! the hearts split 3-3. Note that four hearts also makes because of the friendly break. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 T a b oo S ecre t Li ves Th e 80 s: Th e D eca d e That Made Us P o l ygamy, USA Th e Baptism PG P o l ygamy, USA G o d Has Spoken (N) T a b oo F rea k y Remedies P o l ygamy, USA Th e Baptism PG (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.DrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Oprahs Next Oprahs Next Oprahs Next The Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsOprahs Next (OXY) 44 123 Bad GirlsBad Girls All Star Battle Bad Girls-Bat.Find Me My Man Bad Girls-Bat.Find Me My Man (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Broken Flowers (2005) R The School of Rock (2003, Comedy) Jack Black. (In Stereo) PG-13 People Like Us (2012, Drama) Chris Pine, Elizabeth Banks. PG-13 Nurse JackieThe Borgias MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass TimeGearz PGGearz PGDreamsDreamsTranslogicThe ListGearz PGGearz PG (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ink Master Better Than Words? Ink Master The Bigger They Are Ink Master Ink Master Finale Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Never Ever Do Never Ever Do (STARZ) 370 271 370 The Benchwarmers (2006) David Spade. PG-13 Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004) R 10 Years (2011) Channing Tatum. PG-13 Thats My Boy (2012, Comedy) Adam Sandler. R (SUN) 36 31 36 The Game 365 Rays Live! (N) MLB Baseball Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) (Live) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays Inside the Rays Heat Live! (Live) (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Continuum Red Planet (2000) Val Kilmer. Astronauts try to colonize Mars to save mankind. PG-13 Weird or What? A doctor finds carvings. Weird or What? End of the World Weird or What? A doctor finds carvings. (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangLaughBig BangConan (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 The Prodigal (1955, Historical Drama) Lana Turner, Edmund Purdom. NR Hard Times (1975, Drama) Charles Bronson, James Coburn. PG Bullitt (1968, Crime Drama) Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn. PG (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch: On Deck (N) Deadliest Catch Goodbye Jake Backyard Oil PG Backyard Oil Deadliest Catch Goodbye Jake (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Toddlers & TiarasCakeCakeCoupleCoupleFamily S.O.S. With Jo Frost PGCoupleFamily S.O.S. (TMC) 350 261 350 The Thin Blue Line (1988) Randall Adams. Step Into Liquid (2003) (In Stereo) PG The Help (2011) Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. Your Sisters (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle Kill the Messenger PG Castle Love Me Dead PG NBA TipOff (N) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at TBA. Eastern Conference Final, game 4. (N) (Live) Inside the NBA (N) (Live) (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularJohnny TTeenLooneyAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodAirport Airport Airport Airport Extreme ParkingFuture Machine (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops PGCops PGPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnTowTow (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HHome ImHomeClevelandThe ExesRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Chain Reaction CSI: Miami Permanent Vacation CSI: Miami Stand Your Ground CSI: Miami CSI: My Nanny CSI: Miami Guerillas in the Mist CSI: Miami Sunblock (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home Videos Eight Men Out (1988) PG WGN News at NineFunny Home Videos Dear Annie: My bullheaded 50-year-old daughter has taken gossip from 32 years ago to make my life a living hell. I have four grown children. My older daughter called everyoneshe could think of and told them I molested my son when he was 5. My daughter never checked to see whether it was true. I have never been arrested for this or had charges filed against me. She further told all the grandchildren and great-grandchildren that they should never stop at my home. I am 74 years old, have trouble breathing and have cancer that is currently in remission. I want to see my family before its too late. My daughter called my sister-inlaw and told her she will not go to my funeral when I die. I have been denied visits and phone calls from family members for three years. I desperately need my family to visit. Sad and Lonely Dear Sad: You say charges were never filed, nor were you arrested, but you havent said that you are innocent of the accusation. If the gossip is true, we completely understand why your daughter would want everyone to stay away. If it is not true, you need to make it clear to the rest of the family that your daughter is spreading lies. Please ask whether she would be willing to go with you for counseling to clear this up and to see whether there is any possibility of reconciling before it is too late. Dear Annie: Im one of two daughters. Both of us have two sons. Long story short, one of my sisters sons has borrowed thousands of dollars from Grandma, received a nice car and has never paid any money back. The other three boys have never borrowed a penny. I am the executor of Grandmas estate and have power of attorney. When something happens to Grandma, Im in charge. Shes not going to have a million dollars, but when her estate is eventually divided, I believe it would be perfectly fair to exclude the one grandson. What do you think? Trouble in Hubbard Dear Hubbard: It may be fair, but it could estrange you from your sister, not to mention your nephews. What does Grandma think? If she is of sound mind and wants all of her grandsons to receive equal shares, you have an obligation to follow her wishes. You could discuss with her the option of deducting the money her grandson has already borrowed from whatever is left of his share. You also could give the grandson an object of sentimental value in lieu of money, so he doesnt believe his grandmother forgot about him. Whatever the final decision, please discuss it with your sister as a gesture of good faith and ask her opinion. She may or may not agree with your assessment, but at least she wont be shocked and angry when the time comes. Dear Annie: I have a couple of thoughts for Want My Solitude Back, who assumes these drop-in neighbors and relatives are simply intrusive. But they may believe you want company now and then. Most people do. I, too, enjoy solitude, but most of us want it balanced with caring relationships. Recently, my uncle was found dead in his home. The coroner said hed been dead at least 10 days. My uncle may have lain on the floor suffering because no one visited him. He had pushed everyone away. If Want My Solitude Back truly wants to be alone, he can move to a sparsely inhabited rural area far from anyone who may intrude. Or he could stay where he is and stew and complain that should get rid of any friends he might have. Likes People Much of the Time Dear Likes: There is a rather thick line between having no one ever visit and having uninvited guests drop by constantly, especially around mealtime. People need to be respectful of one another.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) VERGE ROBIN REVERTFABRIC Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: Congress designated that Memorial Day would always be the last Monday in May so that wed NEVER FORGET Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. DANTS MOLBO BARTIB SIVINO Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Ans. here: TUESDAY EVENING MAY 28, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessThe Voice (N) The Voice (N) PGTo Be AnnouncedNewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) In Performance at the White House (N) CONSTITUTION USA With Peter Sagal (N) Frontline Outlawed in Pakistan (N) In Search of Myths and Heroes PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41CapitolBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)In Performance...CONSTITUTIONFrontline (N) WorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.The Voice Performance recap. (N) The Voice The artists face elimination. PG To Be AnnouncedNewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Extreme Weight Loss David and Rebecca Twins tackle a weight-loss challenge. PG Body of Proof Daddy Issues Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Detour (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles (DVS) Brooklyn DA (Series Premiere) (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) So You Think You Can Dance Auditions No. 3 Hopefuls perform for the judges. FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Extreme Weight Loss (In Stereo) PG Body of Proof NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningH.Babers Sr. Place for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Extreme Weight Loss David and Rebecca Twins tackle a weight-loss challenge. PG Body of Proof Daddy Issues NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office The Office F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidPaidStudioHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half MenEngagementHart of Dixie (In Stereo) PG Americas Next Top Model Two and Half MenEngagementFriends PG Friends PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Heartland Poker Tour PG Mobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangSo You Think You Can Dance (N) FOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corazn IndomablePorque el Am.Amores VerdaderosQu Bonito Amor (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars (N) American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers (AMC) 55 64 55 Casualties of War (1989, War) Michael J. Fox, Sean Penn, Don Harvey. R Apocalypse Now Redux (2001, War) Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen. An Army agent goes upriver in Cambodia to kill a renegade. R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedRiver Monsters: Unhooked PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG North America (In Stereo) North America (In Stereo) River Monsters: Unhooked PG (BET) 96 19 96 HusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsReal Husbands of Hollywood Reunion Real Husbands of Hollywood Reunion (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker (In Stereo) To Be AnnouncedTardyTBAHappensMatchmkr (CC) 27 61 27 33Always Sunny Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowAmy Schumer Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Amy Schumer Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Hidalgo (2004, Adventure) Viggo Mortensen. A Westerner races a horse across the Arabian desert. (In Stereo) PG-13 Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportCrowd Rules DebtCrowd Rules (N)American GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers Morgan LiveAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G Dog With a Blog G High School Musical (2006, Musical Comedy) Zac Efron. (In Stereo) Dog With a Blog G GoodCharlie Shake It Up! G A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)MLB Baseball New York Yankees at New York Mets. (Live) MLB Baseball Teams TBA. (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonSportsCenter (N)30 for 30 30 for 30 SportsCenter (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48FaithFor GodDaily Mass Mother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopeThoughtWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Wild Hogs (2007) Tim Allen. Four friends take a motorcycle road trip. PG-13 The Pacifier (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham, Faith Ford. PG The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Mennos Mind (1996, Science Fiction) Bill Campbell. (In Stereo) NR Paycheck (2003, Science Fiction) Ben Affleck. (In Stereo) PG-13 Judge Dredd (1995) Sylvester Stallone. R 29 Palms (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped G Chopped G Chopped G Chopped G Chopped (N) GChopped G (FSNFL) 35 39 35 GameMarlinsMLB Baseball Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays. (Live) MarlinsUFCWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men The Karate Kid (2010, Drama) Jaden Smith. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts. PG The Karate Kid (2010) PG (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA TourBig BreakLessonsGolfs Greatest Rounds (N) CentralLearning (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 New Years Eve (2011) PG-13 REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel PG Madagascar 3: Europes Most Wanted (2012) 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Inductees include Heart and Rush. (HBO2) 303 202 303 The Hurricane (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Real Time With Bill Maher MA Boxing Carl Froch vs. Mikkel Kessler. (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52First Pla.First Pla.Hunt IntlHuntersFlip or Flip or Income Property GHuntersHunt IntlFlip or Flip or (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG American Restoration (N) PG RestorationRestoration (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap A family has 29 pets. PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap Spolansky/ Bradley PG Extreme Moms Call; Guzman (N) PG Extreme Moms Presta; Laboy Wife Swap Free-spirited mother. PG (LMN) 50 119 Abandoned and Deceived (1995, Docudrama) Lori Loughlin. (In Stereo) Fatal Vows: The Alexandra OHara Story (1994) John Stamos. (In Stereo) Her Desperate Choice (1996, Drama) Faith Ford. (In Stereo) (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3Recoil (2011) Steve Austin. R The Watch (2012) Ben Stiller. (In Stereo) R The Apparition (2012, Horror) Ashley Greene. PG-13 Varsity Blues (1999) James Van Der Beek. R The Jump Off (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsAll In With Chris Rachel MaddowThe Last WordAll In With Chris WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8TUESDAY, MAY28, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Epic (PG) 11:50 a.m., 4:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. Epic (PG) In 3D. 2:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes. Fast & Furious 6 (R) 12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 6:45 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) In 3D. 3:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes. The Hangover 3 (R) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 7 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 4 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) In 3D. 3:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Epic (PG) 2 p.m., 4:15, 9:45. No passes. Epic (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (R) 11:50 a.m., 12:20 p.m., 3:50, 6:50, 7:20, 10, 10:30. No passes. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 4:25 p.m., 10:25 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes. The Hangover 3 (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 4:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. Oblivion (PG-13) 4 p.m. Pain and Gain (R) 4:30 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) 4:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 3:40, 7:05, 7:35, 10:10. No passes. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix LocalRADIO CLLREKW, ILYMFGMY HDYFWZP. KLV HWZW YLF IVPF LYW LB FGW CZWMFP, EVF LYW LB FGW CZWMF CZWMFP. PFWAW NMZFDYPrevious Solution: Heroes take journeys, confront dragons, and discover the treasure of their true selves. Carol Lynn Pearson (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-28

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TUESDAY,MAY28,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000ER8E 000ER8S I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 KATBUNNFormally from Crystal River Mall, NOW at Kountry Girl Salon, styling for 15+ year, Specializing in color and highlights $39 hair color special $39 Facial special call for an appointment 352-339-4902 or stop in and visit me at 19240 East PennsylvaniaAve. Dunnellon, Fl www.hairbykatbunn. weebly.com Adorable 3yr Male Chihuahua, neutered, micro chipped, to good home only $125. Leave Message (352) 637-6310 BEAGLE PUPPIES$125 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 ENGLISH BULLDOG BEAUTIFULPUPS, 3 Males & 1 Female, Blue Carriers Available AKC and all Shots $1800. Call for info (352) 613-3778 (352) 341-7732 MALTI-POO PUPPIES Addorable, non shed, great disposition Health certificates $350. (352) 795-5204 TOBYToby, a 6-y.o. black/white terrier mix, neutered, housebroken, heartworm-negative, weight 45 lbs. Great w/other dogs, children & even cats. Very gentle, quiet & affectionate. Walks well on leash, ideal companion for anyone. Found as a stray. Very loveable, easy-going boy. Call Michelle @ 352-726-5139. Musical Equipment Mackie Pro FX8 Mixer 6 mos old $150. QSC power amp, GX5 $250. 2 SP2G TV speakers, $400. pair 352-220-3452 SEWING MACHINE White manufacturing, made in USA, heavy duty, excellent condition, ($30) 352-212-1596 Toro Mulching Mower 21 cut, 6.5 H.P $75. Sears Kenmore propane gas dryer heavy duty, $75. 352-507-1490 4 Wheeled Walker with brakes and seat ONLY $70.00 352-464-0316 Bedside Commode &Aluminum Walker both have adjustable legs 20.00 EACH 352-464-0316 Manual Wheelchair with footrests, great shape $100.00 352-464 0316 NEW 4 Toilet Seat Riser, makes it much easier to get up ONLY 20.00 352-464-0316 Safety Bath Tub Grab Bar it clamps to the side of the tub ONLY $25.00, 352-464-0316 WHEELCHAIR Oversized, Manual, Exc Cond. $400 obo(352) 746-3268 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 M-Audio key studio 49 key controller $20. 352-419-4464 Electric Treadmill doesnt fold up, but will give you a workout $100.00 352-464 0316 Exercise Bicycle UprightType, works great $ 85.00 352-464 0316 BowFlex XLTlike new, $1000. obo 352-628-7633 CLUB CAR GOLF CARTExcel. batteries, full enclosure, exc. cond. new tires, $1495. 352-527-3125 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Dunnellon Pawn FireArms****Ammo Mags****Since 1987 352-489-4870 EZ Go Golf Cart 1997, runs good, $1,000, Club car Golf Cart $450 352-564-2756 Fear No-Evil GunsGlocks-S&W-Beretta Ammo-concealed classes 352-447-5595 NEW ENCLOSED 8.5x 20 CAR HAULER $3990. 352-564-1299 GLASS TOP END TABLE w/elephant base good condition $40 352-465-1262 HEAD/FOOTBOARD double,sturdy,solid wood,like new, RoomsTo Go ($100) 352-212-1596 LIVING ROOM SUITE:sofa and love seat,coffee,wall,2 end tables and lamp included.Exc.cond.$235. Call 352-382-1154 Lovely Jewelry Chest floor model w/ 6 drawers and 2 side doors that open up, decorative mirror, never used $50. 352-746-2479 MATRESS/BOX SPRING queen size, good shape, 1 owner,very clean, $50. 352-212-1596 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Full $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 Memory Foam Queen Size Mattress used 18mos new $950. sell for $150. 352-726-8021 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg. $75. 352-628-0808 Qu Matt & Box Spring, & frame, w/bedding 2 dressers, $100. Cloth recliner, round patio table, wicker stands $60 will sell separately cash only 560-4247 Sofa and Loveseat dark red and olive good condition $200. for set 352-503-7748 Two Lounge Chairs Olive Green like new, $100 Ea. 352-503-7448 21 Self -Propelled Snapper HiVac Lawn Mower, New, $350. 352-637-6420 46 Riding lawn mower Cub Cadet,$1,350. 6 HP, Self Propelled Mower $224. (352) 564-1106 2535 N Crede Ave, CR AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 CRAFTSMAN 42 riding mower. 19.5 hp, Elec Start. 6 speed transaxle w/grass catcher. $750 (352) 746-7044 Dixon Riding Lawn Mower, 0 turn, 30 cut belt driven, $350. 352-382-5149 JOHN DEER LT133 13 HPKohler, 38 mulch cutting deck, 140 total hrs. since new $500 352-465-2459 TILLER Craftsman rear tine, 14 inch w/ reverse. Like New. $350 (352) 621-3929 WizardTiller with front tines, new 6.5 HPmotor, $250,cash only 352-560-4247 !!!! LT225/75R 16 TIRE!!!! Good Year LightTruck Great Shape 90% Tread ONLY 60.00 464 0316 3 VISION CORNING POTS WITH LIDS $ HANDLES-brown, 1.0L, 1.5L& 2.5Lsizes, like new, $25. 352-628-0033 4 WHEELWALKERseat, basket, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $50. 628-0033 Adult Exercise Bike$50, electric scooter $275, walker w/wheels and grocery cart$10, 352-637-3067 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Chevy Silverado Aluminum Running Boards, great shape ONLY 100.00 352-464-0316 Chevy Silverado Bra for 4 headlights Great Shape ONLY $80 352-464-0316 Colman Road Trip Gas Grill Original $200, excellent condition selling for $95 call (352) 746-1821 EMPIRE SAFE 2 doors on wheels 54x 27x 42Great for pawn shops, jewelry stores, call Ray at 352-489-5023 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Delivered Fresh off the Boat!!15ct @ $5.00lb, ** (352) 897-5388** Harley Mufflers Slide on Original NEW 1350/1450 ONLY $90.00 352-464-0316 Luggage cart $10 mirror 271/4 x 43 $25, 2 gal pressure spay & gas hedger wet dry Vac $50.00 for all 352-637-3067 MOVING SALE excercise equip. some furn, kids dvds, barbies Little Pet Shop & acces. 440-610-0327 DISNEYCLOCK large alarm clock, great shape, ($10) 352-212-1596 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I HAYWARD POWER FLO LX POOLPUMP1 HORSEPOWER USED ONLYABOUTAYEAR. $150.00 352-726-0686 AIR CONDITIONER Trane XE 1000, heat pump w/air handler 4 ton model EC $550. 352-628-4210 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 DRYER$100 in perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 GE Washer & Dryer Good Condition $150. for both 352-697-3133 WASHER$100 In perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call or text 352-364-6504 WHIRLPOOLDRYER Excellent condition. $100.00 / 352-637-5969 Double French Doors 2 Sets 2/8 wood interior w/ frames 6/8high, 4/9/16 frame $400. ea set. (352) 503-6537 COMPUTER DESK small student desk, black and grey, like new,($20) 352-212-1596 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HPSCANNER Model G4050 with software & manual. $99.00 obo 352-621-0248 48 round oak claw foot, table w/ 24 leaf, 6 matching spindle back chairs Asking $175. for all (352) 464-0680 Breakfast Room ChromCraft, $1100. when new, very good cond. table w/4 padded chairs, asking $450. 352-726-2903 BroyHill Dining room set med color wood, 2 leaves, 6 uphost. seat chairs; china hutch 50 in. wide, exec. cond. $500 (352) 634-1723 COFFEE TABLE WOOD med. oak nice condition Rectangular $45. 352-270-3909 Dble Mattress Set & Frame like new $50. TV Stand $25. 352-503-7748 DINETTE SET 4 ft Glass top w/4 chairs on casters, good. cond. $150 (352) 897-4739 Extra Long Twin Seally Posturepedic Mattress with/ Wood Headboard & Frame $125. (352) 628-2346 Floral Couch/Loveseat, $175. both.can sell separately.All in good Cond. 352-527-7183 FOR SALE!Fancy pub tables 30 top & 42 tall Wood mahogany color $75 Each Call 352-344-8840 NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehiclepreferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap -Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle NEWSPAPER SALESWe offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn the type of income they deserve and set their own work calendar. We encourage our winning team of contracted promotional sales representatives to work as much as they want. Prior sales or Management experience is a plus, but isnt required. A positive attitude and strong work ethic is required! Most new reps start making money immediately while training and develop consistent weekly averages after gaining additional skills & knowledge. We Offer: Flexible hours: mornings, evenings, and weekends available Consistent, yearround earnings Achievable Bonuses and Cash Prize Sales Contests Easy one-day training program: Start earning money right away Positive, professional work environment Prescheduled sales locations provided Unlimited Weekly Income Potential No startup costs No telemarketing No door to door selling No mandatory meetings Qualifications: Professional Appearance & Positive Attitude Enthusiastic, Hardworking, and Reliable Strong Self Management & Communication Skills Willing to work some weekends Minimum two years experience in sales, management, or related fields Business casual attire (No jeans, tshirts, or tennis shoes) DRIVERS LICENSE & RELIABLE VEHICLE REQUIRED This is a contract position. Serious and qualified inquiries only, please. email resume to jmurphy@chronicle online.com SINGLE COPY ROUTES AV AILABLEThis is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. come to 1624 Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application. SUMMER WORKGREAT PAY! Immediate FT/PT openings, customer sales/serv, will train, conditions apply, all ages 17+, Call ASAP! 352-600-5449 Customer Service SpecialistNeed outstanding phone repor. Good judgement, Experience scheduling mobile work force. Established company w/ great benefits. Please mail resume to: Blind Box 1830p CC Chronicle 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL34429 Eckerd Floral City Cook NeededPlease visit our website: www .eckerd.org to apply. Office Manager/ ClosingAgent5 yrs experience,Title Agent lic. preferred, Please fax resume to 352-746-7222 Business Services Accounting ClerkCitrus County Chronicle Crystal River, FL Minimum two years accounting experience. Proficient with MS Office products. Fast-paced enviornment. High level of attention to detail. Process reports, billing audition functions, excellent customer service, End of Month Closeout Functions. To Apply, Send Resume to: djkamlot@chronicle online.com Drug screen required for final applicant. EOE DIRECTV TECHS4 spots open. Must pass background, drug and DMV check. Must have Truck, SUV or VAN. Piece work $1k to $2k/week. 80 miles radius. Call 352-201-7219 or 407-738-9463 EXPERIENCED METALCREWSReliable Transportation Apply In Person AAAROOFING 1000 NE 5th St.Crystal River (352) 563-0411 P/T HandyManfew days per week in Ozello 352-228-9631 QUALIFIED SERVICE TECHExperience Only and current FLDrivers License a must. Apply in person: Daniels Heating &Air 4581 S. Florida Ave. Inverness Reliable Lawn Care PersonExperienced in bushes, weeds etc. Must have own truck Paul 352-527-7977 TRUCK DRIVER/ YARD PERSONAll applicants must have CDL, health card and clean driving record. Fork lift operator. Must have great customer service parttime position w/ immediate opening. Can be full time. Apply in Person at Nichols Lumber Co. 2915 W. Dunnellon Road. Ask for Darrell Walters CAREGIVERS NEEDED12 Hr. Shifts, Day & Night Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto CDL DRIVERWith Class A license, dry bulk tank, newer equip., paid vac/Ins wkly. minimum pay. $$1,000.$$ SIGN ON BONUS Contact Jerry @ (228) 257-9466 LEEDS Crystal River I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DENTALRECEPTIONISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com F/T Front Office ReceptionistPrior experience in Eye Care or Medical preferred. Apply in person West Coast Eye Institute 240 N Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto FL34461 352 746 2246 x834 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 SUNSHINE GARDENS Assisted Living Facility Currently Seeking Applications for Full timeCertified CNAfor our 7a-3pm Shift with flexibility Same for full time & part time position on Night Shift. This position also requires, certification in medication management. Must have excellent organization skills. Be a team player, and have previous resident care exp. Experience with the Alzheimers and dementia population preferred. Please Apply at SUSHINE GARDENS Crystal River 311 NE 4th Ave. BOOKKEEPERCPA Firm Full-time, Experienced in client write-up, A/R, A/P, depreciation and Quickbooks. Reliability & punctuality very important. Must have excellent customer relation skills. $16 to $18 DOE w/benefits. Fax Resume to 795-1133 or email to ppricecp@ tampabay.rr.com FREE KITTENS 6 weeks old, litter trained 352-212-4061 Free Kittens brown stripes, gray stripes, black & Russian blue, adorable, ready for new home! (352) 601-3662 Free Pine Cones Large, great for Crafts, Bagged, ready to go (352) 621-3929 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Delivered Fresh off the Boat!!15ct @ $5.00lb, ** (352) 897-5388** Misty MeadowsU-Pick Blueberries OpenThur-Sun 7am-7pm 352-726-7907 www.mistymeadowsblueberryfarm.com LOST Two Large Tents 40x80 and 40x100 Inverness Rooks Rd. (813) 394-1228 Female Walker Dog vicinity of 491 and Stagecoach.Answers to the name of Julie please call (352) 279-0708 LargeAnatolian Shepherd Male, tan, dark ears and nose, micro chipped 100lbs lost on 4/26/13 in Floral City near S.Turner Ave & StageCoach rd. $500 REWARD (352) 220-2540 Lost 2 Black Calves 1 steer, Tag #312, #283 Rockcrusher Area 352-634-2462 352-422-2076 Lost Calico Cat Dark brown color w/cream/orange markings: with white chest belly & paws, Beverly Hills, Heartbroken, Missing on April 6, REWARD 352-527-0302 White Minx Cat Blue Eyes, deaf, 10 lbs, 8 yrs old. Missing Mon Independence HWY, Inverness 726-1019 Puppy Found Poss. age 6mth-1yr female, found on Cardinal and Georgian Rd, Homosassa. Call to identify 352-628-3829 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Delivered Fresh off the Boat!!15ct @ $5.00lb, ** (352) 897-5388** Cemetery Lot Fountain Memorial Gardens in Homosassa 1 plot 1 casket and 1 vault at 1/2 price $3000. pls. call (352) 628-2936 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. Workers of Miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day, by the eight day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. SB. Todays New Ads Memory Foam Queen Size Mattress used 18mos new $950. sell for $150. 352-726-8021 Musical Equipment Mackie Pro FX8 Mixer 6 mos old $150. QSC power amp, GX5 $250. 2 SP2G TV speakers, $400. pair 352-220-3452 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Riding Mowers, Large Gas/BBQ Grills & MORE 352-270-4087 4 Drawer Steel Filing Cabinet. Very Good Condition (352) 527-4197 HI IM FRANKIE Amale mini apricot poodle, only 5 yrs old, I am very layed back, happy, and hansom pooch now that my saving angles has rescued me. My fur was so matted and full of flea, I was so unhappy and because I liked to bark at the squires my previous owners would hit me in the mouth and I ended up with a jaw infection so I had to have the lower jaw removed. But dont be sad, I eat a little funny but I am happy now. I am looking for my forever home, can you share yours. Call Saving Angles pet rescue at 419-0223 or 726-1006 or visit www.saving anglespetrescue.com Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips

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C10TUESDAY,MAY28,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000E5AE Exp. 5/31/13 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior Pressure Washing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000EI6K 000EKOX WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill 0 0 0 E S I Z HANDYMANRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 000EX7A CARPET CAREC o m p l e t e C a r p e t C a r e L L C C o m p l e t e C a r p e t C a r e L L C Complete Carpet Care,LLC.Lic & Ins o f f i c e 3 5 2 5 4 7 1 6 3 6 c e l l 3 5 2 2 8 2 1 4 8 0 o f f i c e 3 5 2 5 4 7 1 6 3 6 office 352-547-1636 c e l l 3 5 2 2 8 2 1 4 8 0 cell 352-282-1480Stretching Cleaning Removal Repair Free In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty on Stretching & Repairs Upholstery Cleaning Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces K r i s G e o r g e K r i s G e o r g e Kris George 000ESX4 ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000ETFE 0 0 0 E S 3 V TREE SERVICE 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000F1QZ Copes Pool & Pavers 000EN86 METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer SatisfactionLic.#CCC1325497 000EH0P When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile CleanerShowers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Cleaning & Sealing Grout Painting Residential & Commercial586-1816 746-9868 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000F238 Stand Alone Generator DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 10% off-Mention Ad Lic/ins. 352-344-2696 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL Licensed/Insured Jimmy 352-212-9067 26 YRS EXP. Tree Serv. Removal, Stump grinding, trim., hauling Tom (352) 726-1875 ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing-Inc.com Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL Licensed/Insured Jimmy 352-212-9067 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Jeffery Upchurch Painting. Res Painting, interior/ext. Free est. Lic/ins (352) 220-0273 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 **Full Lawn Service *** Hedgetrim, Hauling Available !! Free Estimates. 352-344-9273 AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Cuts Starting $15 Res./Comm., Lic/Ins. 563-9824, 228-7320 AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Quality Cuts Lawn Care Budget Plans, Lic/Ins 352-794-4118 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Helpin Hand Grass Man Cut Clean Mulch Edge FREE ESTIMATES! Russell 352-637-1363 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup,hauling. treework 352-726-9570 ATYOUR HOMEMower and Small Engine 4551 W. Cardinal 352-220-4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 #1 HANDYMAN All Types of Repairs Free EST., SR. DISC. Lic#38893, 201-1483 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 CLEANING BYPENNY Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. 352-503-7800, 352-476-3820 CLEANING BY TABITHA Monthly Occasional, Residential **352-601-2175** NA TURE COAST CLEANING Res. Rate-$20 hr. No Time Wasted! 352-564-3947 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Adult Family Care HomeAlzheimer Dementia Incontinency (SL6906450) 503-7052 CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins. Will Care For You & Assist in Daily Needs **352-249-7451** JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 000ER8K Nature Coast Landings: Sale/Trade: Big rig RV Site plus storage lot. $49,500/offer for both. 352-843-5441. See at detailsbyowner.com FOR SALE $89,900 31 S Melborne St. Beverly HIlls owner financing avail. 352-634-1724 PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath. Office Bldg for sale perfect for Accountants, Chiropractor or insurance office. Corner Lot, fences, great location Approx. 1400 sq ft.Listed to sell by owner 352-746-5079 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Chiefland By Owner -5 FencedAcres, Nice little one bedroom house, Big Pole Barn w/electric & water. Grandaddy Oaks, park like setting, Very Private. $78,500 firm. Call 813-285-0182 Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds CRYSTALRIVER2/2/2, $750. mo + sec $500 850-838-7289 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INGLISCharming furnished effic/cottage all util. incld. $645 no smoking 352-422-2994 HERNANDO* Retail/Restaurant* FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf. kitchen ready, up to code, lg. parking lot. **(352)4642514** 1305 Hwy 486 Executive Suite Available, King Bed, high speed internet Direct tv, whole house access, w/d, carport parking, secluded, Christian gentleman $125. wkly call Bruce 352-445-7501 or Ray 828-497-2610 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. Desertrose ApartmentsRENTAL SPECIAL1 MONTH FREE2 bed/2 bath Call now for details!! Ensing Properties LLC 352-795-1795 www.ensing properties.com INVERNESS1/1 $400-$465 Near Hospital 352-422-2393 CRYSTALRIVERHwy 19 Downtown Commercial Storefront clean 1000 SF, exc.loc $795/mo 352-634-2528 Meadowcrest Condo for Rent Will Call back after writing out info 352-220-6754 30 days HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BLACK DIAMOND2BR/2BA Located on the Eighteenth Fairway of Quarry Course. Great Views. $1200/month includes basic cable & lawn care. Contact Dixie at 352-746-3301. LECANTOCottage 1/1 $450. incls. pwer /water, Dirt Road (352) 220-2958 CITRUS SPRINGS3/2/2, New Carpet, Near School $725. mo. RIVER LINKS REALTY 352-628-1616 HOMOSASSA1/1 Duplex $265 2/1 House $575 RIVER LINKS REALTY 352-628-1616 Homosassa Spg2/2 on canal, new paint,flooring, w/d pets ok $800 mthly, 8928 W. White Dogwood Dr. 619-301-5442 INVERNESS2/1, River House $585. mo. dock, scrn. porch, garage, carport, shed 352-726-5994 INVERNESS2/2/2, w/ Fl. Rm. CHA, 1st, last & Sec. 700. mo Sr. Disc. 352-249-6227 INVERNESS Highlands close to downtown 3/2/2, Immaculate (352) 400-5723 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 MH 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very Nice Quiet, $36,500. Cash net to seller 352-586-9498 HOME-N-LANDBring The Dogs Only $69,900, 3/2 like new on acre. Tape-n-texture walls, new carpet & appliances,AC & heat! Warranty, $2,850 down, $349.22/mo P&I, W.A.C. Owner can finance. Call 352-621-9182 HOMOSASSADbl.Wide 3/2 95% remodeled inside, 1.25 acres half-fenced, recent roofing & siding, 16x16 workshop,must-see! $65,900(352) 621-0192 HOMOSASSAOwner Financing, 3/2 2000 Sq Ft, comp. remodeled, open fl plan, fenced yard $5k down $525 monthly 302-9217 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $11,000 or Lease to Own from $199/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Lecanto Hills 55+ Park Lot rent $240, 2/1, Clean, Fully furn., shed & carport $6,800 61 S Atkins Ter. Call ofc: 352-746-4648 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 FLORALCITY2/1, Det. Gar. Chad, Hist. Dist., No pets/ non smoking $650mo. 1st/lst/sec. 422-6263 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE CRYSTAL RIVERSpacious 2/1,W/D Hkup,$550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 New Lot Model2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fireplace, huge Island kitchen, It has to go!! $84,900 includes Del, set-up,A/C, Skirting,steps, Furniture pkg Avail. Call 352-795-2377 Palm Harbor Factory liquidation sale http://www .p almharbor .c om/model center /plantcity/ $39k off select 2012 models (3) John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 REPOFORECLOSURES Bank Owned /must sell Bad Credit No Problem Minimum needed down $5000 dollars Call 352-795-2377 STRETCH YOUR LEGS USED HOMES 32x80 H.O.M. $50,900 28x76 H.O.M. $43,500 28x70 ScotBilt $42,500 40x42 Palm Har. $65k 28X70 Live oak $52,500 We Sell Homes for Under $10,000 Call & View (352) 621-9183 We Will Buy Your Used Manufactured Homes 1976-2013 CASH 4 you, less than 30 DAYS 352-795-1272 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 352-476-4964 for details INVERNESSWater Front View Big Lake Henderson 55+ Park 2/2 DWMH in (Harbor lights),carport shed w/d handicap ramp attached, boat slips, priv. dock, pool, club hse, stg rv/trailers, lawn maint. low lot rent, Only $14,900 419-6132 HERNANDO16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 acres, must see inside, nice & Clean $49,900 (will consider reasonable cash offers) 352-465-1500 HERNANDO3/2, Country Setting 5025 N Tanglewood Ave. $575. mo. 352-362-5019 HOMOSASSA2/1 Big Lot, Near 19 $425 mo. + Sec. + Ref. 352-628-3019 HOMOSASSASeveralAvailable Beautiful Park Pool (352) 628-4441 INVERNESS1 BR $325. mo. 2 BR $350/mo. Both $500. dep. No Pets 352-726-7951 INVERNESSSW w/add 2/1 near wal-mart $475 mo. non/ smoking 706-473-2184 LECANTO1/1, Furn, all utilities inc. + Direct TV, no smoking or pets, $450. 1st & last, bckgrnd ck. 352-422-6630 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2 JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 DREAM HOME $43,900, 3/2 Dblewide. Delivered & Set up, New Jacobsen. The only home with a 5 yr. warr., only $500 down and $293.40/ mo. P&I W.A.C. Must See 352-621-3807 LOOKING FOR YOUR Is your Credit Score 575 or Higher, several new homes to choose from call for details 352-795-1272 LOT MODEL CLEARANCE!!! All Models Must Go to make room for new models, please call (352) 795-1272 New 2013Lot Model 3/2 DWHM $46,900, Includes Deliver, set-up,A/C, Skirting, Steps Call 352-795-2377 New 2013 Lot Model DWMH 2/2 $42,900 Includes, Delivery, set-up,A/C Skirt, steps NO HIDDEN FEES Call 352-795-1272 Shepherd Mix, Her name is Daisy Color is Blond, 3 yrs old, spayed, UTD on Shots Micro Chipped, lovable, house trained, FenceYard Needed moving cant keep needs loving home (863) 661-6220 Shih Poo Puppies, 5 males, 2 female Ready 6/9 Yorkshire Puppies 2 males, 1 female Ready (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings Shih-Tzu Pups, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors, Beverly Hills, FL (352)270-8827 Yorkshire TerriersMale Puppies, 8 wks $650. Shots, Health cert., parents on site Lecanto 727-242-0732 GOATS FOR SALE Billys & Nannys starting @ $50. 352-220-1025 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 1 Bedroom, 1 bath @$350 inc. H20 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 352-476-4964 For Details! HERNANDO1 & 2 BEDROOMS $400-$500 Mo. Call Larry 352-201-2428

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TUESDAY,MAY28,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000ER8Q BUICK 2006 Lacrosse CX 92K MILES, LIKE NEW $8995. 352-628-5100 BUICK97 LE SABRE loaded 125k mi., very nice cond. asking $1875. 352-637-2588 or 845-588-0759 CHEVROLET2003 Corvette 50th anniversary model, miilinium yellow, 28,500 miles, immaculate, loaded,call for details. $24,900 Sugarmill 740-705-9004 CHEVROLET2003, Impala LS $5,995. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2008, Impala LT $8,750. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 89 Corvetteblue, $7500 352-621-0658 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLERTown & Country 2005 7-Pass Non-Smoking Mini-Van, Stown Go Seats, 3.8ltr V6, 21mpg Leather, 2nd Owner, Impeccably Maint., Records, All Options. Clean Reliable Family Van. $5,999. obo 352-422-3217 FORD04 Crown Victoria LX, Exec. cond., new tires, 133K mi. $4,200. obo 352-422-1916 FORD1998 Mustang V-6, 5 spd, Red NewTires, $2350. 352-586-1756 FORD2002 MUSTANG GT 69K MILES, LEATHER $8995. 352-628-5100 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD93Thunderbird 50k orig. miles, lots of new parts, $1800 OBO 352-527-0181 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 KIA2008, Spectra, Auto 4 DR, $5,850 352-341-0018 KIAOPTIMAHYBRID EX ONLY3K MILES, LOADED $21995. 352-628-5100 Mazda2012 3i, 5-door Touring, graphite 7300 mi, ext. warranty exc. cond. $16,388. 727-857-6583 06 Winnebago29site seerer, class A, loaded 19k mi, 2 slides, new tires, exec cond. $46,500 270-8475 Motor Home06 28Class C, Chateu Sport, 21k miles, exc. cond. used twice per yr. $28,000 352-445-0072 Just Reduced SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, king bd, like new, NADA $29K, Reduced $19,900 352-382-3298 KEYSTONE5th Wheel, 30 ft, Triple Slide, Exc Condition $16,500. 352-795-1923 or 605-351-1419 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. REAL LITE1998, 12 ft slide in pickup camper $6900 (352) 795-1923 605-351-1419 STARCRAFT, Pop Up Camper Great Shape, $3,950 obo (352) 341-4152 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 Cadillac Rims & Tires Four for Sale 225/55R16-99V very good tread $225 352-489-7114 Tow Dolly$700. Call Carl (352) 400-6021 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ WE FINANCE ALLRENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Homosassa Springs Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn St. Nice Neighborhood. Asking $12,500. hmr m1999@att.net (904) 757-1012 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Dr., has Wetlands, with River access, but not on river $5,000. 352-621-1664 PINE RIDGE 2.75 Acre Lot. Priced below tax assessment at $30,000. Located in area of nice homes. Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047 TERRAVISTAGOLF COURSE LOT on Red Sox Path. Great vistas. 85 ft. frontage on golf course $53,900. Call 352-638-0905 95 ft on Canal Gulf Access, Inglis Paved Street existing structure Asking $24,900. (352) 423-3414 352)-445-2633 MERCURY 2000, 8HP, Short Shaft Very Clean, $800 (352) 795-1923 605-351-1419 New Boat T railers 16thru 45Alum. EZ Pull Trailers 352-564-1299 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 1994 GRADYWHITE 208ADVENTURE w/cabin,outbd power tilt/trim 150 Yamaha, fish finder, many extras. Very clean, motor needs work, must see. $5,495. 352-503-7928 Classic Mako20 ft Honey Pot, all teak, good condition, 150 Evenrude 1993, well maintained, good trailer, Nice Boat. Extras. $5200. obo (352) 795-1546 TRIUMPH 1902002, Center console, 115 yamaha motor $8900 352-795-1923 or 605-351-1419 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com YAMAHA2013 9.9 with V bottom, aluminum & trailer, 50lb trolling motor, never in water new, w/warranty $3k 352-257-8850 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Great Lake home & value!Amust see by Duval Island! 2 Boat docks, 2/2 Fl Rm & more. $159K; Realty Connect. 352-212-1446 www .RealtyConnect.me YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties I Buy Houses Cash ANY CONDITION Over Financed ok! **call 352-503-3245** SPECIAL New Home in Quiet neighborhd. 3/2/2, on 1 acre 2932 sf. corner lot, $269,900. Call Barney (352) 563-0116 TONY PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619 tpauelsen@ hotmail.comNEW LISTINGS TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant Spruce Creek Pr. 55+, gated, 3/2/2 2370 Liv. area, on GC $159,000.Call Lindsay Paolillo, Foxfire Realty 352-509-1063 Inverness, Regency Pk 2/2, fireplace, 1st floor community pool $48,900 352-637-6993 LAND FOR SALE 20 DOCKABLE ACRES: St. Lucie Waterway, $159,500. 3 Homesites available June 1st Only. 45 mins boat Atlantic; 5mins boat Lake Okeechobee. Gated/Privacy. (888)716-2259. Gulf Atlantic Land, Broker. Need a JOB?#1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds Dbl-wide, 7.31 ac9 Paddocks w/water + shelter lit riding ring, $85,000. close to Marion Cty. Call Lindsay Paolillo Foxfire Realty 352-509-1063 I NEEDLISTINGS!I SOLD ALMOST 2-HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 GAIL STEARNSyour Gale ForceRealtorTROPIC SHORES Realty 352-422-4298Email: Gail@ gailsellscitrus.com W eb: www. gail sellscitrus.com Low overhead means savings for you! Waterfront, Foreclosures &Owner financing available. BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments 4/2.5/2 Htd Pool 30x40 detached gar. wood, tile,carport wood cab, granite Must See! $319,900 lv. msg 352-527-1448 2/1/1Treated with tender loving care. Freshly painted int/ext Near shopping $43,999 209 S Washington ST Cl Bill 301-538-4840 For Sale By Owner 3/2/2, on appox. acre with enclosed large pool new roof, new Hot water heater $125,000, 746-5421 LECANTO (Black Diamond) 3/2/2 Gated Golf Community with amenities $120K (poss rent opt) 352-804-9729 3BD/2BA/2CG, Extra Rm. New Roof, Cathedral Ceilings, Fruit Trees, 2 Lots, $145,000. 352-228-7328 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell 2/2/2, Part time or year round, $82,000 Open plan, carpet, tile, bright, cheerful, clean. Realtor/Owner (352) 697-0295 3/2/2 POOLHOME New Paint and carpet, Updated Kitchen, Quick Sale $119,500352-302-4057 3BR/2BA, Pool, New Cage Recently Remodeled, 4/13 New kit & bath, cabinet. w/ granite, New AC Lots of Extras $155,900 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 11A-3P, 352-601-0241 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. HOMOSASSA 211 Pine St 4BD/3BA. 3000 SF, heated pool, Granite, Wood Floors, Tile and Carpet. 2 Car Gar,SS Appl. fireplace $235,000 Call 850-585-4026 SMW3/3/2, court yard pool home, FSBO $233K call for appt. no realtors 352-503-2978 Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com

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C12TUESDAY,MAY28,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 589-0603 TUCRM Medical Practice Closing PUBLIC NOTICE Kings Bay Family Care/Dr. Michael B. Mueller It is with deep regret that I must announce that I am closing my medical practice. Please know that I have been honored to serve each and every patient and that you will be missed. If you would like copies of your medical records, or you have any other concerns, please contact me in writing at: Kings Bay Family Care, po box 2444, Crystal River, Florida 34423. Published five (5) times in The Citrus County Chronice, May 7, 14, 21, 28, & June 3, 2013. 595-0528 Tu-CRN Albro, Richard Case #2012-CA-000434 NOA-Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5th JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, INAND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, CIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000434 Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, -vs.Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Richard John Albro, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under,Against The Named Defendant (s); et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors and Trustees of Richard John Albro, Deceased, and all other Persons Claiming By,Through, Under and Against the Named Defendant(s); ADDRESS UNKNOWN: c/o Rod B. Neuman, Esq., 3321 Henderson Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33609 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOUARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Citrus County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: APORTION OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBEDAS FOLLOWS: COMMENCEAT THE SW CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST,ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 175 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 WEST, PARALLELTO THE WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 580 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 WEST, 70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST, 125 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF THE INVERNESS TO FLORALCITYCANAL; THENCE SOUTH 0010 EAST ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE,ADISTANCE OF 70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH, 89 WEST, 125 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING LOT 69, OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION. AND APORTION OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5 OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBEDAS FOLLOWS: COMMENCEAT THE SW CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST,ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 175 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 WEST, PARALLELTO THE WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5, ADISTANCE OF 510 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 WEST, 70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 EAST, 125 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF THE INVERNESS TO FLORALCITYCANAL; THENCE SOUTH 00 EAST,ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE,ADISTANCE OF 70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 WEST, 125 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; BEING LOT 70, OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAINYEAR: 1983, MAKE: GREEN BOAT TRAILER, 597-0528 TUCRN Tambasco, Daniel R., 2011-CA-4309 NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-CA-4309 MARIAN MCGEOCH, Plaintiff, v. DANIEL R. TAMBASCO, and HEIDI GREENE, if alive and if dead, his or her unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named defendant(s), or any one of them who are not known to be dead or alive; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against those unknown natural persons, and the several and respective unknown directors, trustees or other claimants, successors in interest, shareholders, assigns and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against any corporation (existing or dissolved, domestic or foreign) or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all other claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or other form of legal entity, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendant(s) or party(ies) or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands hereafter described and involved in this lawsuit. and STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o VIRGINIA T. TAMBASCO; and STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o KELLIE L. CALLAHAN; and KELLIE L. CALLAHAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 3, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-4309, in the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein MARIAN MCGEOCH is the Plaintiff, and DANIEL R. TAMBASCO; HEIDI GREENE; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o VIRGINIA T. TAMBASCO; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM o/b/o KELLIE L. CALLAHAN; and KELLIE L. CALLAHAN, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on JUNE 6, 2013, at 10:00 a.m.. (ET) at www.citrusr ealfor eclosur e.com in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described property as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure: POTTERFIELDS MAYFAIR GULF STREAM ACRES PB 3 PG 6 LOT 22 BLK D TITLE IN OR BK 1328 PG 601. TOGETHER WITH A 1987 PEAC MOBILE HOME (ID NO. PSHGAA121379). Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450 (p: 352/641-6700) at least seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal this 14th day of May, 2013. By: /S/ JEROME ROTENBERG, Florida Bar No. 0045705, Carney & Associates, P.A. 7655 West Gulf to Lake Highway, Suite 2, Crystal River, Florida 34429, 352/795-8888 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 21 & 28, 2013. VIN#: 15620265AS AND VIN#: 15620265BS, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH, IT IS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTUREANDAPART OF THE REALESTATE. more commonly known as 3135 South Buckley Point, Inverness, FL34450. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP,Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 27th day of September 2012. Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts By: /S/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 110 North Apopka Street, Inverness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. PUBLISHED in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 21 & 28, 2013. 10-196283 FC01 CXE 598-0604 TUCRN The Estate of Eddie Mahon Anderson 2013-CP-38000187 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE dIVISION FILE NO.: 2013CP38000187 IN RE: ESTATE of EDDIE MAHONE ANDERSON DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDDIE MAHONE ANDERSON deceased, File Number 2013CP38000187 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice May 28, 2013. Personal Representative /s/ G. Jean Kevil 2003 Windswept CT., Arlington TX 76012 Attorney for Person Giving Notice /s/ Douglas K. McKoy, Florida Bar #0101744 P.O. Box 1129, Chiefland, FL 32644 (352) 493-1458 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 28 & June 4, 2013. VILLAGE TOYOTA www.villagetoyota.com352-628-5100*2,399 due at signing to well qualified buyers, plus lease inception fees with approved credit. Buye r cannot combine offers. 2 year / 25,000 mileComplimentary Maintenance Programwhen you purchase or lease a new 2012 or 2013 Toyota vehicle000F23G ADDITIONAL BONUS! MILITARY DISCOUNTFOR ACTIVE OR INACTIVE MILITARY WITH MILITARY ID NO PAYMENTSUNTIL JAN 2014 SALE EXTENDED THRU JUNE 7th! NEW 2013 COROLLAMSRP $17,920BUY FOR $14,995* $ 149 /mo.*OR PAY ONLYNEW 2013 CAMRYMSRP $23,095BUY FOR $19,995* $ 199 /mo.*OR PAY ONLYNEW 2013 PRIUSMSRP $25,060BUY FOR $22,995* $ 229 /mo.*OR PAY ONLYNEW 2013 RAV4MSRP $24,365BUY FOR $22,995* $ 249 /mo.*OR PAY ONLY 000EXJSbtn ftr 2013 DODGEGrand Caravan Wheelchair van with 10lowered floor, ramp and tie downs for more info call Tom 352-325-1306 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLERTown & Country 2005 7-Pass Non-Smoking Mini-Van, Stown Go Seats, 3.8ltr V6, 21mpg Leather, 2nd Owner, Impeccably Maint., Records, All Options. Clean Reliable Family Van. $5,999. obo 352-422-3217 DODGE1999, Work Van 139k miles, mechanically sound $2,400 obo (352) 344-2132 DODGE2010 Grand Caravan SXT, 41k mi. auto, roof rack, Sirrus radio. $16,800. 352-634-3333 CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES352-942-3492 HARLEY, Fat Boy 14,843 mi. mint condition, custom paint, Upgrades $12,999, 352-302-1507 Harley Davidson2004 883 Sportster, w/ screaming eagle pkg, Low Mi, Ex cond $4900 352-563-5552, 464-7005 Honda CBR 1000 RR low miles,garage kept, Adult Owner $5K (352) 257-8850 HONDA 2003Reflex motor scooter/ 250cc/automatic yellow /70mpg/ 70mph/ windshield/ like new condition/ pictures available /asking $2500/call 352-382-0468 VICTORYCory Ness Special Addition, 1 owner, 1,300 mi, new $25K, asking $15,000. 908-500-4151 JEEP Comanche 1986 4x4, running, needs work, make off (352) 201-2120 TOYOTA2011 TUNDRA CREWMAX 32K MILES, 4WD, LEATHER, S/R $30995. 352-628-5100 CADILLAC2006 SRX loaded, light platinum, 103k mi.panoramic sun roof, $13,200 352-201-0651 GMC2009YUKON SLE 32K MILES $24995. 352-628-5100 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP2006 Sport. Last model year of the TJ. Orig. senior owner no off-road.Automatic 6 cyl. Roof rack & extras. 59,000 miles. $17000. Crystal River area. Silver 352 397-5007 KIA2008 Sportage low miles, exc cond. $10,000 Firm (352) 697-3373 LEXUS2010 RX350 LOADED, NAV, PREMIUM RED $29995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2001 4RUNNER SR5 4WD, V6 ONLY73K MILES $9995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA2002 RAV 4 4WD 74,000 MILES, 4CYL $8995 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2005 RAV4 92K MILES, 29 MPG $9995. 352-628-5100 CHEVROLET2003Astro Van, 113,750 miles, Well maintained, Gold, 4.3L V6, Seats 8, Great for cargo, 6000 pound tow package, Rear air/heat/ speakers, Power windows/locks, Clean, $5395.00 Call 352-212-9395 MAZDA1994, 626, 63k Miles, $2,995 352-341-0018 MERCEDES, SLK, 320, 119k mi. fully loaded $9,900 (352) 503-9447 OLDSMOBILE, Intrigue 103k mi. fully loaded $3,800 (352) 503-9447 WE FINANCE ALLRENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE FINANCE ALLRENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JUNE, 2nd 1-800-438-8559 CHEVROLET1956 Chevrolet Bel Air grille, $100.00 -Front & rear Bumpers -$100.00 each-Tail Light $50.00 -Bumper Guard $50.00 (352)628-1734 FORD1966 Mustang 289-auto, 67k mi. great. cond. $7200. obo 352-438-8346 MUSTANGGT 03 63,600K, Showcar, Supercharger, lots of goodies! Chrome, $14,500 obo 352-228-4012 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE2000,Dakota SLT ex cab $2,895. 352-341-0018 DODGE 2004 DAKOTA4WD CLUB CAB, SPORT $8495. 352-628-5100 GMC 2004, PICKUPSierra 1500 $4250 352-341-3988