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Citrus County chronicle ( May 26, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 26, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03130

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 26, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03130

Full Text

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PAGE A4


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SSEE PAGE D12 FOR DETAILS

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MAY 26, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 292


Budget request turns testy


K After inquiry into legal fees, commission chair suggests removal ofCCHB chair rT,


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
It was a seemingly harmless
request for budget information.
Citrus County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek sent an
email in April to Debbie
Ressler, chairwoman of the Cit-
rus County Hospital Board.


In it, Meek asked a series of
questions related to the
CCHB's spending since 2008.
Meek wanted to know about
the money spent on attorney's
fees how much was re-
quested by Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation and the
amount the CCHB provided
the hospital.


To read the email
exchange, see
Page A10.

Meek said his questions were
prompted by Ressler's own in-
quiries into attorney's fees on
county projects.


Ressler referred Meek to the
CCHB website for data, and Il
also asked if Meek's inquiry was ..
a public records request. If so,
she said, she would confer with
CCHB attorney Bill Grant for a Debbie
response. Ressler
And thus began a series of chairwoman,
Citrus County
See Page All Hospital Board.


In uptick of child sexual



abuse, a silver lining


Increase in reports .
a result of victims
comingforward..

say authorities
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
or the past several years, the
number of violent crimes re-
ported across the nation -
rape among them has declined.
And while Citrus County's crime
numbers mostly mirror the national
trend, in one subcategory sexual
crimes against children reports
have been mostly trending upward.
Data provided by the Citrus ,
County Sheriff's Office show 25 peo-
ple were arrested in 2010 for sex
crimes against children younger
than 12 years old. Those numbers
took a slight dip to 16 people in 2011,
but in 2012 the number of arrests
jumped to 35 people.
However, a sergeant and one of
the lead detectives in a unit specifi-
cally charged with investigating sex
crimes for the sheriff's office think
there is a silver lining in the num-
bers it means more victims are
emerging from the shadows and
telling authorities.
"I am not sure the data indicates
that more people in this county com-
mit these types of crimes moreso
than people any other place in the
nation. I think what the data show is
more victims are coming forward
and reporting the crimes," said Sgt.
Mike Kanter of the sheriff's office's -
Sex Crimes Unit.
Kanter said the spike can be
partly attributed to the various sting
operations conducted by the agency.
According to CCSO data, the num-
ber of sexual offenses reported Special to the Chronicle
Sunshine Arnold, team coordinator with the UF Child Protection Team at Jessie's
See Page A5 Place, demonstrates a device used at the center. The child was not a crime victim.

Born out of tragedy, center offers victims respite


Want to help

Oklahoma?

Here's how

you can
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
When disasters strike, no
matter how far away, the people
of Citrus County want to help.
That was the essence of the
message voiced by community
leaders as the Citrus County
Community Action Committee
met to discuss how best to com-
bine local agencies' efforts
without duplication of labor or
stepping on each others' toes.
Representatives from the Red
Cross, Salvation Army, Florida
Baptist Convention, United Way,
Rotary Clubs, the county com-
mission, Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, Citrus County School Board
and U.S. Rep. Richard Nugent's
office were in attendance.
"The way things typically
work, when there's a disaster
everybody wants to rush out
and help and send stuff," said
Capt. Joe Eckstein, head of the
county's emergency operations
center
"We learned a lot from the
2004 hurricane season about
what to do and what rules to fol-
low. As of right now, we have not
See /Page A9


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
BEVERLY HILLS
Jessie's Place has been vari-
ously described as a one-stop
shop and a haven to offer
respite for children affected
by tumult. It is a place where


children can begin to heal.
The support center has
emerged as the place in the
county where children fac-
ing another form of trauma
- sex abuse go to get ex-
amined, interviewed and
made to feel safe.
"I think we do a better job


at anticipating things and
are apt to react proactively
to events," said Melissa Bow-
ermaster, executive director
of the facility.
"In general people, espe-
cially children, are very hes-
itant to talk to strangers, but
we have an excellent staff


that keeps them calm while
they go through the different
processes," Bowermaster said.
She said victims of sex
abuse are referred to the
center by Department of
Children and Families (DCF)


Page A8


Associated Press
Linda Tearl sorts through the
rubble of her home Friday in
Moore, Okla. Tearl moved from
Tulsa to live in Moore, where her
home has an underground storm
shelter.


SI115181 2110011 o


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword ...... .A14
Excursions ....... A13


Editorial .........C2
Entertainment ... A4
Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers ...B3


Lottery Payouts .
M ovies ........
Obituaries .....


...B3
. .A14
.. .A6


TV Listings ......A14
Together ....... .A17
Veterans Notes . .A15


EVENT N


o APR i UE. TO JUST

FOR 6 YEARS $1iOOO *V*58 21' UNTIL


2014'
A


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1035 S.Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S.Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S.Suncoast Blvd.
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AUTOMOTIVE-
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TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
58


Joe
Meek
chairman,
Citrus County
Commission.


I


OOErV




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County women build Habitat home for Mother's Day

Sixth annual Women Build event the biggest yet, as dozens of volunteers team up for charity


Special to the Chronicle

It was the first time that
85-year-old Margaret Whit-
mer had ever stepped foot
on a Habitat for Humanity
job site. She had no expe-
rience wielding a hammer,
painting or putting up sid-
ing. All she knew was that
that she wanted to help the
family receiving this par-
ticular home.
"I read about Habitat for
Humanity's annual
Women Build event in the
paper," Whitmer said. "I
thought that it would be a
fun way for me to cele-
brate Mother's Day, as well
as get out of the house and
meet some folks."
Whitmer, alongside 85
other women (and men)
from Citrus County, ar-
rived at the Habitat lot in
the DeRosa Estates neigh-
borhood of north Crystal
River. They gathered early
in the morning to bless the
site and help build a house
for retired veteran Ken-
neth Benton and his
family
Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County plans to
build 15 homes in the area
by the end of 2013, thus
completing its 100th Habi-
tat home since the organi-
zation's inception in 1993.
The Benton home is the
eighth constructed so far
this year.
"I can't believe that all of
these people came out to
volunteer for us," Benton
said. "I feel truly blessed
to live somewhere with
community support."
The Women Build event
helps support Habitat for
Humanity's mission of a
world where everyone has
a decent place to live. The
program is underwritten
by Lowe's Home Improve-
ment stores. As such,
Lowe's helps to recruit,
train and encourage
women to help build
Habitat homes thou-
sands of them around the
country


Special to the Chronicle
: At 85 years of age, Citrus County resident Margaret Whitmer was the oldest woman to celebrate Mother's Day with Habitat for Humanity
by helping to build a Habitat home in Crystal River. From left: Mary Thomas, Rose Strawn and Cathy Thomas cut aluminum siding for the
side of the structure.


Since the program
started in 1998, Women
Build has built more than
2,000 homes in 50 states
and has reached 30 coun-
tries. This was the sixth
such event in Citrus
County
In addition to volunteers
representing Lowe's, indi-
viduals from local busi-


nesses such as A-Able Sep-
tic, Ken Adams Insulation
& Drywall and the River
Haven Women's Garden
Club also participated.
Volunteers painted walls,
scraped floors and framed
the roof.
Levi Strauss manager
Pat Caulfield presented
Habitat with a donation of


$501 in honor of Levi's
popular 501 denim jeans.
She and her daughter
thought they might make
the Women Build event an
annual tradition.
"What better way to cel-
ebrate Mother's Day than
to be with my daughter
working alongside other
women especially doing


construction-related activ-
ities. It is truly inspiring. I
will definitely be back,"
Caulfield said.
This year's Women
Build event was the largest
yet in Citrus County Habi-
tat for Humanity depends
on corporate sponsor-
ships, donations and vol-
unteer labor to help keep


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A2 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


LOCAL






Page A3 SUNDAY, MAY 26,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

STATE

Citrus County

Offices closing on
Memorial Day
All county government
offices will be closed Mon-
day and resume normal
business hours Tuesday.
This includes the landfill.
All city government of-
fices will be closed.
All federal government
offices will be closed. The
stock market is closed.
The Citrus County
Chronicle's customer serv-
ice phone lines will be open
from 7 to 10 a.m. The busi-
ness office in Crystal River
and Inverness will be
closed.
Groups observe
Memorial Day
Several organizations will
host Memorial Day events
in Citrus County and the
surrounding area.
A number of organiza-
tions will participate at
10 a.m. Monday in the an-
nual Memorial Day remem-
brance at Fero Memorial
Gardens and Funeral
Home, 5891 N. Lecanto
Highway (County Road
491), in Beverly Hills.
The U.S. Coast Guard
Douglas Munro Memorial
Ceremony will be at 9 a.m.
Monday behind Crystal
River City Hall. At least four
active-duty USCG service
members (including a bu-
gler) will attend the short
ceremony along with auxil-
iary members in uniform.
AMVETS William
Crow Post 447, Inglis, is
hosting a ceremony at
noon. The post is on State
Road 40 East. Hamburgers
and hot dogs with all the fix-
ings will be served at 1 p.m.
Call 352-447-1816.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and
Auxiliary invites the public
to a Memorial Day Obser-
vance 11 a.m. Monday at
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Picnic will follow. Call 352-
489-3544.
VFW Edward Penno
Post 4864 will host a Me-
morial Day ceremony
1 p.m. today followed by a
picnic. The public is invited.
The post is at 10199 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.

St. Petersburg

People can still fish
at pier over summer
The St. Petersburg Pier
is scheduled to close soon,
but people will still be able
to fish off the structure until
later this summer.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
ported that the city will con-
tinue to allow people to fish
from the road that leads to the
pier building, at least for sev-
eral weeks. The Pier is sched-
uled for closure on May 31.
Fences will be installed
around the 40-year-old in-
verted pyramid pier on June
1. Boaters will also lose ac-
cess the same day.
Demolition will begin in
the fall.

Tampa

Deputies find 22
dead cats in house
A Tampa man has been
charged with animal cruelty
after authorities discovered
22 dead cats at his home.
The Hillsborough County
Sheriffs Office reported
deputies were executing an
eviction at the home of James
Hopkins when the cats were
discovered Thursday.
Deputies said the de-
ceased felines were being
stored in two freezers.
Investigators also discov-
ered more than two dozen
live cats at the residence.


Hopkins allegedly went out-
side as the eviction was being
conducted and forced 31 cats
into four small carriers. He
then allegedly hid them in two
nearby foreclosed properties
and along a wood line.
-From staff and wire reports


Baby pictures and Bibles


Seven Rivers graduates reflect on their years together and the future


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
LECANTO Bagpipes, baby
pictures and Bible encourage-
ment it wouldn't be a Seven
Rivers Christian School gradua-
tion without them.
With bagpipe player Kathy
Garlock leading the procession,
the 29-member class of 2013 en-
tered the sanctuary at Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church Fri-
day evening.
After a welcoming invocation
by school headmaster Dana
James and an introduction of the
"class that will surely leave an
indelible mark on the world,"
four students delivered
speeches, beginning with Liam
Cash.
The theme of the evening was
"What is greatness?"
"My name is Liam Cash, and
15 years ago I came to this school
as a preschooler," he said.
He went on to sum up the
school's greatness, describing it
in three terms: a library with a
vast and rich source of educa-
tion and knowledge; an armory
that arms and equips its stu-
dents with all they need theolog-
ically to be a light in the
darkness through faith in God;
and as a family.
As his voice broke with emo-
tion, Cash said, "Our headmas-
ter and teacher, Mr. James, has
continually taught us that the
essence of Christian life is rela-
tionships, and there are incred-
ible relationships that have been
formed at SRCS ... and now
standing up here, behind me are
28 people that I love to spend my
time with, and that I will miss
dearly."
Later in the evening Cash was
announced as the Senior Swords-
man, the student who exemplifies
consistent Christian character, in-
tegrity and leadership.
Milenia Deweese-Kacer spoke
of Seven Rivers being a "tight-
knit family of believers who fel-
lowship together, worship
together and go through hard
times together."
"The teachers and faculty
have made it a point to teach us
what a healthy family looks like
and what love is," she said.
Class salutatorian McKenna
Britton talked about how some of
them had their futures planned,
down to the bowtie color of their
future husbands, but that others,
like herself, are fearful of their
future's direction.
"It's easy to get caught up in
what we want, and what we see
ourselves doing in the future,
and it is so easy to forget that,
even when we have no clue and
we don't know what to do or


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Kimberly Strong and Jasmine Fisher pose for a self-portrait Friday prior to the Seven Rivers Christian
School graduation ceremony.


where to begin, our Lord
knows."
Rebecca Wright, class valedic-
torian, singled out personal
qualities of each of her class-
mates and thanked the faculty
for "entwining the truth of the
gospel into each lesson."
"In a world full of lies, our
class has been blessed with the
truth," she said. "My prayer is
that as my class and I continue
to the next stage of our lives, the
truth will be ingrained in our
minds and hearts. ... I believe
that if the truths we have
learned each day in our class-
rooms are applied to our work


ethics, our families and our re-
lationships, the Lord will truly
enable his kingdom to flourish
through this class."
Guest speaker Chad Turner,
former church director of stu-
dent ministry, said he first met
the class of 2013 when they were
in sixth grade and fell in love
with them. He commended them
for their love for each other and
the community and their sheer
exuberance and love of fun.
He told them graduations are
often a time when people tell
the graduates they are destined
for greatness.
"Will you be called to some-


thing great, something big and
phenomenal? The resounding
answer is, probably not," he said.
"Not if you think of greatness as
using your faith to make a name
for yourself so you can feel good
about yourself. Class of 2013,
how do you define greatness? If
it's ... loving Jesus and knowing
the love of God with everything
you have, and loving your neigh-
bor as yourself, loving the poor,
loving the vocation God has
placed you in, loving the church
...and taking the low road of hu-
mility that's gospel greatness,
and I know that's what you're
going to aspire to."


Plaza on track with upgrades, renovations


New facade

design on tap
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS -Despite
tenants moving out of the
Tompkins Street Plaza in
Inverness in recent
months, the remaining
businesses and the plaza
itself are alive and well
and getting prepared for
upgrades and renovations.
"We've had people come
in and say they've heard
rumors that everyone's


closing or leaving the
plaza, but we're not going
anywhere," said Kimberly
Spreckner, owner of the
Hen House.
When the Hen House
opened last September,
the plaza was in foreclo-
sure, which made tenants
skittish about the future.
For the Hen House, the air
conditioning was a major
problem.
In October, Arvana Inc., a
property management com-
pany based in St Peters-
burg, purchased the plaza.
Since then three tenants
have moved out, with one
- Karma Upscale Retail


In October, Arvana Inc., a property
management company based in St.
Petersburg, purchased the plaza.


Boutique relocating to
another place in the down-
town, on North Apopka.
"We got our air condi-
tioner taken care of, and
they put a deck out back
for us, so things are going
good," Spreckner said.
Vincent Smith, from Ar-
vana, said they currently
have at least two prospec-
tive tenants and several in-
quiries for vacant spaces
in the plaza, and the build-


YMCA sponsoring


Father's Day essay contest


Special to the Chronicle

The YMCA is holding its sec-
ond Father's Day Essay Contest.
This year's theme is "The Best
Dad Ever" Essays are being ac-
cepted through June 12.
Prizes will be awarded in
three categories: ages 5 to 7, ages
8 to 10 and ages 11 to 12. First-,
second- and third-place prizes
are awarded in each age group.
Grand prize Charter Fish-
ing Trip for 2 (half day trip).
First place (three prizes) -
Manatee snorkel tour for essay
winner and dad.
Second place (three prizes)


ON THE NET
www.ymcasuncoast.org.

- $50 gift certificate to a local
restaurant.
Third place (three prizes) -
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park family pass.
The Father's Day Essay Con-
test form and rules are available
at the YMCA Beverly Hills ad-
ministrative office, 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, and at
www.ymcasuncoast.org. For
more information, call 352-637-
0132.


ing's roof is scheduled to
be replaced any day now.
"Because of the rumors,
tenants have been afraid
to come back to the plaza,"
Smith said. "But once we
place a couple of new ten-
ants, I think it will attract
more."
Smith said plans for new
facade designs are in the
works, as well as a con-
certed effort to find ten-
ants that will not compete


or conflict with each other
"We know that tenant
mix is very important,"
Smith said.
Linda Van Allen, whose
family owns Connor's Gifts
and who owned the plaza
at one time, said she is
happy with what the new
owners have done to the
plaza so far, including new
lights out back.
"We're looking forward
to seeing new tenants that
will bring new interest to
the plaza," she said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline.cor


Man who killed longest


python gets snakeskin


Associated Press

PALMETTO BAY The South
Florida man who caught and
killed the longest Burmese
python ever found in Florida gets
to keep the snakeskin.
Jason Leon of Palmetto Bay
saw a few feet of the snake stick-
ing out of some bushes alongside
a rural Miami-Dade County road
on May 11. When Leon pulled the
snake out into the open, it turned
out to be 18 feet, 8 inches long.
Leon killed the 128-pound snake
with a knife when it began to wrap
around his legs. He reported his
find to the Florida Fish and


Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Wildlife officials have returned
a roughly 18-foot-long snakeskin
to Leon. The snake's skeleton is
being preserved by University of
Florida researchers.
Leon told WSVN-TV he plans to
have the snakeskin preserved so
he can mount it on a wall. He says
he's awed by its colors.
"Look at the pattern on that
snake," he said. "I see God's cre-
ation, I guess, an artist"
Leon used to own pythons as
pets. He said he wished he could
have kept the one he pulled out of
the bushes, but keeping its hide is
the next best thing.




A4 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


Today s
HOROSCOPES
Birthday There is a good
chance you will establish several
enviable relationships in the year
ahead. Look for people with whom
you have interests in common.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
You will be adept at advancing your
interests and those of others. This
will be due to the unusually sharp
nature of your perceptions.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
You'll get the chance to adjust a
troubling situation. Take the initiative
to turn it into something acceptable.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your fi-
nancial picture should start to look
more encouraging. Conditions are
shifting in your favor.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Find
an acceptable way to make your
feelings known to someone you
fancy. The allure might be mutual.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) To
take control over a frustrating mat-
ter, you need gumption and grit.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
You can become an excellent
salesperson if you truly believe in
your product.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Your competency and flair in finan-
cial matters can be remarkable, if
you put your mind to it.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Companions will find you especially
appealing, if a bit mysterious. You
won't be aware of your charisma,
but this will only add to the appeal.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
The secret to getting people to do
your bidding is to make a direct ap-
peal to their emotions.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
When dealing with a new acquain-
tance, try to evaluate what lies be-
neath the surface.
Aries (March 21-April 19)-
Some days, you conduct yourself
so well that people can't help but
take notice. It could be one of those
days, so be prepared to be in the
spotlight.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
Don't inhibit your imagination, be-
cause your ideas could have won-
derful, far-reaching effects. You're
bringing your 'A' game.


ENTERTAINMENT


Calif. teen takes
supermodel to prom
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -A
Southern California teen turned
heads at his prom when he
showed up with a Sports Illus-
trated model as his date.
Nina Agdal agreed to step in
as Jake Davidson's date Thurs-
day night after he got turned
down for prom by supermodel
Kate Upton.
The Sherman Oaks teen ap-
peared in a YouTube video that
was viewed more than 2.5 million
times asking Upton to be his date.
After Upton declined because
of a scheduling conflict, Agdal
volunteered to go, saying she
never got to attend her own prom.
The Danish model is better
known as the bikini-clad sun-
bather in a Carl's Jr. ad.
Davidson told the Los Angeles
Daily News he had an incredible
night and said Agdal was down-
to-Earth.

Tyler Perry donates
$100K to Ohio schools
COLUMBUS, Ohio Film-
maker and actor Tyler Perry
surprised middle school students
in Ohio by showing up at a musical
concert and donating $100,000
to help student athletes in the
city's South-Western schools.
The Columbus Dispatch re-
ports Perry was drawn to Finland
Middle School on Friday after
seeing a TV report about teacher
Mary Mulvany starting a founda-
tion to raise scholarship money
to cover fees.
South-Western schools
earned national attention when
athletics and extra-curricular ac-
tivities were eliminated after a
failed levy in 2009. The ballot
request was later approved by
voters, and sports, clubs and
other activities were resurrected
for a fee.


Associated Press
Actress Olympia Dukakis reacts Friday as she is honored with
a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles.
Accompanying Dukakis are actress Dianne Ladd, far left, and
actor Ed Asner, standing center.


Stone Temple Pilots sue Report: Yahoo among
ex-frontman Weiland bidders for Hulu


LOS ANGELES The Stone
Temple Pilots accuse former
frontman Scott Weiland of mis-
using the band's name to further
his solo career and want a judge
to strip the rocker of his ability to
use the group's name or songs.
A lawsuit filed Friday in Los
Angeles accuses Weiland of
being chronically late to concerts
while the group was together and
having his lawyer attempt to in-
terfere with the airplay of the
group's new single "Out of Time."
Weiland and Stone Temple Pi-
lots parted ways in February, and
the 45-year-old singer said at the
time he learned of his ouster from
a statement released to the media.
The lawsuit sheds light on the
band's breakup, accusing Weiland
of interacting with bandmates
only through lawyers or managers
and showing up late to the group's
2012 shows. It cites Weiland's
addiction struggles and poor
performances as detriments to
the band's earning potential.


LOS ANGELES Online
video site Hulu is again up for
sale, with Yahoo and pay TV op-
erators DirecTV and Time Warner
Cable among the seven bidders,
according to a person with direct
knowledge of the matter.
The person wasn't authorized
to speak publicly and spoke Fri-
day on condition of anonymity.
The person didn't offer details
on the prices offered. Published
reports have pegged a bid by a
group led by former News Corp.
executive Peter Chernin at $500
million. The other three bidders
were all private equity firms:
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.;
Guggenheim Partners; and Silver
Lake, in partnership with talent
agency William Morris Endeavor,
according to the person.
The Walt Disney Co. and
News Corp. control Hulu through
their broadcast subsidiaries,
ABC and Fox. Comcast Corp.,
owner of NBC, is also an
investor.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 26, the
146th day of 2013. There are 219
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 26, 1913, the Actors' Eq-
uity Association was organized by a
group of actors at the Pabst Grand
Circle Hotel in New York; the union's
first president was Francis Wilson.
On this date:
In 1521, Martin Luther was banned
by the Edict of Worms because of
his religious beliefs and writings.
In 1868, the impeachment trial of
President Andrew Johnson ended
with his acquittal on the remaining
charges.
In 1938, the House Un-American
Activities Committee was estab-
lished by Congress.
In 1941, the American Flag House,
where Betsy Ross once lived, was
donated to the city of Philadelphia.
In 1942, the U.S. War Department
formally established the Armed
Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The
Tule Lake Segregation Center for
Japanese-American wartime in-
ternees opened in California.
In 1972, President Richard M.
Nixon and Soviet leader Leonid
Brezhnev signed the Anti-Ballistic
Missile Treaty in Moscow. (The U.S.
withdrew from the treaty in 2002.)
In 1998, the U.S. Supreme Court
made it far more difficult for police
to be sued by people hurt during
high-speed chases.
One year ago: Gruesome video
showed rows of dead Syrian chil-
dren lying in a mosque in Houla,
haunting images of what activists
called one of the deadliest regime
attacks yet in Syria's 14-month-old
uprising. International space station
astronauts floated into the Dragon,
a day after its heralded arrival as the
world's first commercial supply ship.
Today's birthdays: Sportscaster
Brent Musberger is 74. Singer Ste-
vie Nicks is 65. Actress Pam Grier
is 64. Country singer Hank Williams
Jr. is 64.
Thought for Today: "Life is a
tragedy full of joy." Bernard
Malamud, American author (1914-
1986).


EFRWI STCOOCNER \ ./
HI LO PR _

. ..,.... ... ....
91 63 0.00



HI LO PR HI LO PR
93 65 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excusivedaly
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 58
Mostly sunny, low humidity

... MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 59
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 59
S.. Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
'As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11


90/63
99/54
91/65
77
-1

0.00 in.
0.80 in.
6.10 in.
14.43 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.17 in.


DATE DAY

5/26 SUNDAY
5/27 MONDAY




MAY31 JUNE 8


SOL
MIN

7:1
8:2


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 34%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 4.5/12
Monday's count: 4.8
Tuesday's count: 4.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was moderate with pollut-
ants mainly ozone.


UNAR TABLES
IOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
6 1:01 7
'4 2:09 8


NOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
:48 1:32
1:54 2:39


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 8:21 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW 6:33 A.M.
C O MOONRISE TODAY........................ 10.10 PM.
JUINE 16 a NE 2 MOONSET TODAY ..........................8:01 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.

Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City HighlLow High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:00 a/3:12 a 6:54 p/3:03 p
Crystal River* 6:21 a/1234 a 5:15 p/12 25 p
Withlacoochee* 4:08 a/10:13 a 3:02 p/11.09 p
Hmosassa*** 7:10 a/2:11 a 6:04 pi2:02 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:48 a/3:59 a 7:41 p/3:50 p
7'09 a/1:21 a 6 02 p/1 12 p
4.56 a/11:00 a 3.49 p/11:56 p
7:58 a/2:58 a 6:51 p/2:49 p


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
C, 2ie i ,le
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


East winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Skies :...l be
mostly sunny today.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Ta" I:,Ijj :. eei
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
S
s
s
s
s


Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.80 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.72 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.32 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.17 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the Unted States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION

S -tL.'",' B -
.l., B .,,4; "- -


90s
Inr ....


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 47 44 .76 sh 59 40
Albuquerque 89 57 s 88 58
Asheville 73 44 pc 73 50
Atlanta 76 55 s 82 61
AtlantilcCty 62 45 .01 s 70 46
Austin 79 70 .60 ts 92 72
Baltimore 66 44 s 71 49
Billings 74 46 ts 80 53
Birmingham 82 51 pc 84 62
Boise 73 50 ts 72 46
Boston 54 45 .31 sh 58 46
Buffalo 57 39 s 61 44
Burlington, VT 45 42 .89 sh 50 40
Charleston, SC 79 54 pc 79 60
Charleston, WV 63 37 s 73 53
Charlotte 76 41 pc 77 55
Chicago 57 44 pc 58 52
Cincinnati 66 41 pc 69 50
Cleveland 60 33 s 64 47
Columbia, SC 79 45 pc 82 58
Columbus, OH 64 38 s 68 48
Concord, N.H. 48 43 63 sh 57 40
Dalas 82 67 .15 pc 85 71
Denver 86 53 pc 87 54
Des Moines 61 53 1.06 ts 70 59
Detroit 66 39 s 63 47
El Paso 96 70 s 96 69
Evansville, IN 73 45 pc 74 58
Harrisburg 66 46 s 69 44
Hartford 49 46 31 c 63 41
Houston 85 71 pc 88 70
Indanapolis 64 46 pc 68 55
Jackson 81 58 pc 87 62
Las Vegas 90 68 s 89 68
Litt e Rock 81 57 pc 82 64
Los Angeles 69 59 pc 67 60
Louisville 71 47 pc 73 57
Memphis 79 56 pc 83 65
Milwaukee 54 42 pc 58 47
Minneapolis 62 54 pc 67 53
Mobile 88 59 pc 86 63
Montgomery 86 52 pc 86 61
Nashville 77 48 pc 82 58


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rainisnow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn-snow; ts-thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 86 73 pc 86 68
New York City 53 45 .14 pc 67 51
Norfolk 66 48 s 71 52
Oklahoma City 79 60 pc 82 69
Omaha 78 57 .36 ts 78 64
Palm Springs 92 63 s 93 67
Philadelphia 64 49 s 71 50
Phoenix 96 71 s 97 73
Pittsburgh 62 33 s 67 39
Portland, ME 54 46 .39 sh 59 41
Portland, Ore 66 50 sh 60 51
Providence. R.I. 55 47 .22 sh 62 45
Raleigh 72 41 pc 76 50
Rapid City 82 49 ts 79 59
Reno 75 50 s 71 46
Rochester, NY 59 40 pc 64 42
Sacramento 77 50 s 79 52
St. Louis 69 53 .08 ts 74 61
St. Ste. Marie 60 34 s 61 42
Salt Lake Cty 86 58 pc 85 54
San Antonio 80 67 9.87 ts 91 72
San Diego 68 60 pc 67 61
San Francisco 60 50 pc 60 52
Savannah 86 53 s 83 62
Seattle 63 50 sh 66 51
Spokane 60 40 ts 70 46
Syracuse 55 43 pc 64 39
Topeka 84 64 ts 80 65
Washington 68 46 s 72 50
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 99 Lamar, Colo. LOW 27 Truckee, Calif.


WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapuico 89/79/c
Amsterdam 55/46/c
Athens 83/59/s
Beijing 85/64/sh
Berlin 55/45/sh
Bermuda 70/64/pc
Cairo 91/62/s
Calgary 64/43/sh
Havana 89/71/ts
Hong Kong 84/79/ts
Jerusalem 77/57/s


Lisbon 68/54/s
London 68/43/pc
Madrid 80/51/sh
Mexico City 75/55/ts
Montreal 59/451sh
Moscow 75/56/pc
Parns 63/42/c
Rio 73/64/pc
Rome 67/58/s
Sydney 64/48/pc
Tokyo 72/62/pc
Toronto 64/45/s
Warsaw 67/52/pc


Fictitious Name Notices...........D10

Meeting Notices........................D10

Miscellaneous Notices.............D10

Self Storage Notices.................D10



CITRUS COUNTY




Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ....................................................... ..................... Editor, 5 6 4 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trlsta Stokes.............................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trlsta Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..........................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................................................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
g POSTMASTER: Send address changes to.
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


LEGAL NOTICES


F XffIi I I


MARINE OUTLOOK


I UU5 4.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ABUSE
Continued from Page Al

(founded or not) has gone
up each year since 2010.
In 2010, the number of
offenses reported for al-
leged assaults on children
12 years old and younger
was 105. In 2011, that num-
ber climbed to 111. In 2012,
that number climbed to
130.
Offense reports for
crimes against minors 13
to 17 years old were as fol-
lows: 95 in 2010; 118 in
2011; and 139 in 2012.
In 2011, the Federal Bu-
reau of Investigations
(FBI) put out the following
trend numbers for violent
crimes, which include
rape:
In 2011, an estimated
1,203,564 violent crimes
occurred nationwide, a de-
crease of 3.8 percent from
the 2010 estimate;
When considering
five- and 10-year trends,
the 2011 estimated violent
crime total was 15.4 per-
cent below the 2007 level
and 15.5 percent below the
2002 level.
There were an esti-
mated 386.3 violent crimes
per 100,000 inhabitants in
2011.
Aggravated assaults
accounted for the highest
number of violent crimes
reported to law enforce-
ment at 62.4 percent. Rob-
bery comprised 29.4
percent of violent crimes,
forcible rape accounted
for 6.9 percent, and mur-
der accounted for 1.2 per-
cent of estimated violent
crimes in 2011.
Detective Matt Baird
and Kanter also attribute
the increased reporting to


the agency's School Re-
source Officer (SRO) pro-
gram and their unit's
dedication to getting cases
solved.
"The resource officers
have been teaching the
kids, starting from third
grade, what is appropriate
touching and what is not,"
Baird said.
He said that, combined
with a staff driven by ded-
ication and love for what
they do, has helped instill
in victims the courage to
come forward.
Assistant State Attorney
Brian Trehy, who handles
sex crimes, said he also
has seen an uptick in his
caseload.
Trehy said for the seven
years he has been head of
the sex crimes division,
the numbers seem to keep
climbing each year, but he
welcomes the challenge,
which he said has been
bolstered by the times -
offenders, Trehy said,
have turned to the Inter-
net to contact potential
victims and keep their
crimes from the glare of
parents.
"We know that some
men target single women
with children just to get
close to the kids to abuse
them," he said.
Kanter affirmed that no-
tion, saying his unit also
encounters what he calls
"preferential offenders,"
who prey on single women
with children.
But despite the dangers
facing children, Trehy said
he and his staff are aware
of this hopeful fact: "It is
easier for a child to tell the
truth than an adult."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


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NATIONALLY: YOUTH SEX ABUSE ALARMINGLY HIGH
Crimes Against Children Research Center researchers conducted the Developmental
Victimization Survey to gather data on a range of victimizations from birth until
adulthood over the course of one year. Among the findings:


* Just more than half of youths (530 per 1,000)
experienced a physical assault. The highest rate
of physical assault victimization occurred between
ages 6 and 12.
* One in 12 youths experienced sexual victimization,
including sexual assault (32 per 1,000) and at-
tempted or completed rape (22 per 1,000).
* Youths have higher rates of sexual assault
victimization than adults.
* The sexual assault victimization rate for youths 12
to 17 was 2.1 per 1,000, compared to an adult
rate of .9 per 1,000.


* A majority of sexual assaults reported to the police
occur to juveniles.
* 70 percent of forcible sex offenses and 97 percent
of non-forcible sex offenses occurred against
persons ages 0 through 17.
* Perpetrators of sexual abuse are overwhelmingly male.
* Acquaintances and family members commit most
sexual abuse and assault. Several studies agree that
approximately half of offenders are acquaintances.

SOURCE: Crimes Against Children Research Center.


Live a Luxurious, Care-Free


FLORIDA


LIFESTYLE
Pointe Vista Carriage Homes at
the Villages of Citrus Hills

Elegant, Resort-Style Living
Gourmet-style kitchen and granite countertops
Screened and open lanai areas to enjoy a
breathtaking sunset, cocktails or romantic dinner
Magnificent water and golf views
Deluxe, spa-like master bathroom suites
Open concept with expansive rooms
World-class amenities at your doorstep


2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd, Citrus Hills, FL
352-746-6121 *www.citrushills.com


Stop by our Welcome Center at the
Terra Vista entrance to receive your map.
GPS: 2400 N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Citrus Hills, FL


PY I


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Guillermina
'Mina' Wright,
93
LECANTO
Mina Wright, 93, of
Lecanto, Fla., died on
April 20, 2013, at Citrus
Health and Rehabilitation
Center in Inverness. A
longtime
S resident of
L S Key West,
, Fla., Mina
was born
Sa in Los An-
- geles ,
Calif., on
Aug. 28,
Mina 1919, to
Wright Guillermo
and Maxine Medina. She
graduated from Los Ange-
les City College with a de-
gree in drafting, which she
used in service to her
country In 1942, Mina
joined the U.S. Navy and
was stationed in Washing-
ton, D.C., where she was
the only woman in an of-
fice of men. She proved
herself and enjoyed her
sojourn there. While in
D.C., she met her husband,
Donald Lundy Wright,
marrying him on Ground-
hog Day in 1945. They re-
mained in the D.C. area for
the next few years. In 1947,
in Bethesda, Md., she gave
birth to her first son,
William Donald Wright.
They were later trans-
ferred to Coco de Sol,
Panama, where she gave
birth to Donald Lundy
Wright II, in 1949. Then
they were transferred to
Key West, then between
Key West and Panama, set-
tling, upon Donald's re-
tirement from the Navy, in
Key West. Mina lived in
Key West until the fall of
2003, when she moved first
to Sebring, Fla., and later
to Lecanto.
While in Key West, Mina
worked for civil service
and was a board member
for the credit union. She
and Donald loved to travel,
going frequently to Califor-
nia and Hawaii as well as
abroad. Upon her retire-
ment Mina took the posi-
tion of concierge at the
Casa Marina Resort in Key
West. She was a familiar
and welcome sight in the
lobby for many years,
greeting guests and locals
alike. She received the
honor of becoming the first
Key West member of Les
Clefs d'Or Her Honorary
Conch certificate, pre-
sented to her by Wil-
helmina Harvey, hung in a
place of honor She was an
active Rotarian, volunteer-
ing at many events.
Survivors include her
son William, of Lecanto,
Fla.; her daughter-in-law
Rachel Wright, widow of
Donald II, of Sebring, Fla.;
grandchildren Todd Wright
and his wife Nicole, of
Chicago, Ill., and Robyn
Wright of Key Largo, Fla.;
great-grandchildren Grady
Wright and Susanna
Wright of Chicago and
Makenzie Wright and
Coral DePauw and Caylee
DePauw of Key Largo, Fla.
Mina was preceded in
death by her parents,
Guillermo and Maxine
Medina; husband, Donald
Lundy Wright; brother,
Ruben Medina; and son,
Donald Wright II.
Her life will be cele-
brated with close family
and friends at a later date
in Key West
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


Warren
Adams, 85
BEVERLY HILLS
Warren A. Adams, 85,
Beverly Hills, died May 22,
2013, in the Brentwood
Health Care Center of
Lecanto. Mr. Adams was
born in Orange, Mass., on
July 23, 1927, to the late
Robert and Grace (Field)
Adams
and came
to this
area in
1989. He
retired as
a sales
represen-
tative in
Adars the preci-
sion tool
business from the L. S.
Starrett Company inAthol,
Mass., and served our
country during World War
II in the U.S. Navy. He was
a member of Quabbin Ma-
sonic Lodge, a Shriner and
the Beverly Hills Lions
Club.
He was preceded in
death by his wife of 56
years, Madeline Adams.
He is survived by two chil-
dren, Michael (Denise)
Adams, Strongsville, Ohio;
Maureen Hoye, Beverly
Hills; one brother, Albert
Adams; two sisters, Ethel
Rose and Shirley Alger;
four grandchildren; and
three great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
Thursday, May 30, at
10 a.m. at the Chas E.
Davis Funeral Home. Bur-
ial will follow in Florida
National Cemetery The
family will receive friends
at the funeral home from 4
to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May
29. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials are requested to
Southeast Guide Dogs,
4210 77th Street, East Pal-
metto, FL 34221.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military.




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Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
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352-795-2678
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Mary
Einwich, 73


CRYSTAL RIVER CITRUS SPRINGS


Frank Edward Leibrock,
85, of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Friday, May
24, 2013, at Sunshine Gar-
dens Assisted Living Facil-
ity under the loving care of
his wife Dotte, Hospice of
Citrus County and the staff
at Sunshine Gardens,
Crystal River.
He was born Aug. 20,
1927, in Galloway, Ohio,
the son of the late A.J. and
Elsie Ruffing Leibrock.
Frank and his wife,
Dorothy, sons Dan and
Greg, moved to Pompano
Beach, Fla., in 1960, com-
ing from Ohio by transfer-
ring from the Ohio Bell
Telephone Co. to the Bell
South Telephone Co.,
where he retired after 36
years of service. Frank was
a life member of the Tele-
phone Pioneers of Amer-
ica. The family relocated
to Citrus County in 1994.
Lutheran by faith, Frank
was a member of St. Timo-
thy Lutheran Church in
Crystal River.
Mr. Leibrock was pre-
ceded in death by his son,
Dan Leibrock, and brother,
Paul Leibrock. Survivors
include his wife of 65 years
and high school sweet-
heart, Dorothy; son, Greg
Leibrock; brothers, Bill
Leibrock (Dorothy), Jack
Leibrock (Doris) and
Charley Leibrock; sisters-
in-law, Doris Leibrock and
Helen Bowers; brother-in-
law, Ernie Bowers; and
several nieces and
nephews.
Donations in Frank's
memory may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 or St. Tim-
othy Lutheran Church,
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Private arrangements by
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


SO YOU KNOW


* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
* Email obits@
chronicle online.com
or fax 352-563-3280.
* Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


Mary Elizabeth Ein-
wich, 73, of Citrus Springs,
passed away on May 22,
2013, at Shands Medical
Center in Gainesville.
Mary was born on March 6,
1940, in
Meriden,
Conn., to
George
and So-
phie Rych-
"- lec Bower.
SShe was a
home-
IVary maker and
Einwich a resident
of Citrus Springs, coming
to the area 13 years ago
from Miami. She was a
member of the VFW of Cit-
rus Springs.
Mary is survived by her
three daughters, Lisa Ein-
wich, Hollywood, Fla., Tri-
cia Einwich, Las Vegas,
Nev, and Tracy Einwich
Bridoux, Ormond Beach,
Fla.; three brothers,
George Bower, Dunnellon,
Fla., James Bower, Miami,
Fla., and Peter Bower.
Visitation will be from
10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, May
28, at Roberts Funeral
Home of Dunnellon
Chapel, with services fol-
lowing at 11 a.m. in the
chapel. Father Kevin Mac-
Gabhann of St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church
will officiate.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Death
ELSEWHERE

Haynes
Johnson, 81
JOURNALIST
WASHINGTON -
Haynes Johnson, 81, a
Pulitzer Prize-winning re-
porter died Friday
Johnson was awarded a
Pulitzer in 1966 for report-
ing on the civil rights
struggle in Selma, Ala.,
while with the Washington
Star. He spent about 12
years at the Star before
joining its chief rival, the
Washington Post, in 1969.
He was a columnist for the
Postfrom 1977 to 1994.
-From wire reports

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The bridge went up so
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ized the mistake until
the span was mostly
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"People are saying,
'Thanks for putting that
ugly thing in to devalue
my home,"' said Davie
Councilman Marlon
Luis.
The town isn't pouring
the concrete that would
make its installation per-
manent. Instead, offi-
cials are putting the
bridge up for sale. The
Miami Herald reported
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A6 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Millions march against Monsanto ;


Protests target

genetically

modifiedfood

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Two
million people marched in
protest against seed giant
Monsanto in hundreds of
rallies across the U.S. and
in more than 50 other
countries on Saturday.
"March Against Mon-
santo" protesters said they
wanted to call attention to
the dangers posed by ge-
netically modified food
and the food giants that
produce it. Founder and
organizer Tami Canal said
protests were held in 436
cities in 52 countries.
Genetically modified
plants are grown from
seeds that are engineered
to resist insecticides and
herbicides, add nutri-
tional benefits or other-
wise improve crop yields
and increase the global
food supply. Most corn,
soybean and cotton crops
grown in the United
States today have been ge-
netically modified. But
some say genetically mod-
ified organisms can lead
to serious health condi-
tions and harm the envi-
ronment. The use of
GMOs has been a growing
issue of contention in re-
cent years, with health ad-
vocates pushing for
mandatory labeling of ge-
netically modified prod-
ucts even though the
federal government and
many scientists say the
technology is safe.
The 'March Against
Monsanto' movement
began just a few months
ago, when Canal created a
Facebook page on Feb. 28
calling for a rally against
the company's practices.
"If I had gotten 3,000
people to join me, I would
have considered that a
success," she said Satur-
day Instead, two million
responded to her message.


Associated Press
People chant and carry signs Saturday during a protest against Monsanto in front of
the capitol building in Montpelier, Vt. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto
were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say
they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the
food giants that produce it.


Together with Seattle
blogger and activist Emilie
Rensink and Nick Bern-
abe of Anti-Media.org,
Canal worked with
A-Revolt.org ditigal anar-
chy to promote interna-
tional awareness of the
event. She called the
turnout "incredible," and
credited social media for
being a vehicle for further-
ing opportunities for ac-
tivism. Despite the size of
the gatherings, Canal said
she was grateful that the
marches were uniformly
peaceful and no arrests
have been reported.
"It was empowering and
inspiring to see so many
people, from different
walks of life, put aside


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their differences and come
together today," she said.
The group plans to har-
ness the success of the
event to continue its anti-
GMO cause. "We will con-
tinue until Monsanto
complies with consumer
demand. They are poison-
ing our children, poison-
ing our planet," she said.
"If we don't act, who's
going to?"
Monsanto Co., based in
St. Louis, said Saturday
that it respects people's
rights to express their
opinion on the topic, but
maintains that its seeds im-
prove agriculture by help-
ing farmers produce more
from their land while con-
serving resources such as


water and energy.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration does not re-
quire genetically modified
foods to carry a label, but
organic food companies
and some consumer
groups have intensified
their push for labels, argu-
ing that the modified seeds
are floating from field to
field and contaminating
traditional crops. The
groups have been bol-
stered by a growing net-
work of consumers who
are wary of processed and
modified foods.
The Senate this week
overwhelmingly rejected a
bill that would allow states
to require labeling of ge-
netically modified foods.


Associated Press
Marco Fairchild, left, and Gary Garza help Sueann
Schaller Saturday from her car in San Antonio after she
drove it into floodwaters in the Westwood Village
neighborhood.

Torrential rains cause

massive flooding


More than

100 rescued

Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO -Mas-
sive flooding from torren-
tial rains in the San
Antonio area left at least
one person dead Satur-
day and sent emergency
workers rushing in boats
to rescue more than 100
residents stranded in
cars and homes.
A woman was trapped
in her car, got on the roof
and was swept away in
floodwaters, said San An-
tonio Fire Department
spokesman Christian
Bove. Her body was later
found against a fence, he
said. Her name was not
immediately released.
Rescue workers were
searching for someone
who was missing after


being trapped in another
car, Bove said.
The water was very
deep in some areas and
more flood victims could
be found, so the search will
continue, officials said.
"We'll be out there as
long as daylight permits
and again in the morning if
the water recedes," San
Antonio Fire Chief Charles
Hood said, adding that
going into floodwaters was
more dangerous for fire-
fighters than entering a
burning building.
About 130 people were
plucked from their homes
and cars in the San Anto-
nio area, many by first re-
sponders using inflatable
boats, he said. The water
was up to 4 feet high in
some homes, Bove said.
A city bus was swept
away, but firefighters on a
boat were able to rescue
the three passengers and
driver early Saturday


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SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Age 2010
12 & younger 105
13 to 17 95
18 & older 78


Age
12 & younger
13 to 17
18 & older


2010
25
25


2011
111
118
68


2011
16


19


2012
130
139
97


2012
35
41
31


SOURCE: Citrus County Sheriff's Office


VICTIMS
Continued from Page Al

and law enforcement.
After the child walks
through the doors of the
center, they go through a
forensic interview. There
is a nurse present and, in
cases of alleged familial
abuse, the non-offending
parent.
Center staff use a cam-
era and television screens
so the victims can interact
with a doctor.
"We feel for indicators of
abuse. (In) between 2 (per-
cent) to roughly 20 percent
of cases we will find no
physical indicators of sex-
ual abuse," she said.
Bowermaster said the
lack of physical indicators
is often the beginning of
even more investigation
into the allegations.


SO YOU KNOW
Jessie's Place was
named for 9-year-old
Jessica Lunsford, who
was abducted and
killed in 2005.
The center opened in
2008, becoming the
county's first children's
advocacy center.
This summer, the cen-
ter plans to host a
support group for par-
ents dealing with the
effects of sexual
abuse perpetrated
against their children.
For information or to
make a donation, call
352-270-8814.

Bowermaster said the
nonprofit child advocacy
center, which depends on
donations for its existence,
has come to play a key part


in efforts to fight child sex
abuse.
She said the center has
seen a spike in the number
of children they counsel.
In data provided by the
center, the child protec-
tion team has seen 121 mi-
nors each year for 2010
and 2011. In 2012, that
number jumped to 142.
"I don't think it shows
that our county is any dif-
ferent from other counties
in the country This hap-
pens everywhere, but I
think it shows more people
feel confident about com-
ing forward," Bowermas-
ter said.
She said another ele-
ment that may be adding to
that confidence is the fact
that the center "works
with the kids and their
families throughout the
legal process. We are there
every step of the way to
offer support"


SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on Page C2 to send a letter to the editor.
* Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four let-
ters per month.
* You can also call the anonymous Sound Off line at 352-563-0579.


REPORTED SEX CRIMES ON THE RISE
In Citrus County, the number of reported sex offenses against
children and adults, regardless of validity, has steadily risen
over the past three years.


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SEX CRIMES ARRESTS JUMP SIGNIFICANTLY
In Citrus County, arrests related to sex crimes have risen
significantly in all age groups. This data includes arrests
made during Internet sting operations.


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A8 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 A9


Associated Press
Southmoore High School senior Jake Spradling hugs a
classmate Saturday as they get ready to attend their
commencement ceremony in Oklahoma City, five days after
a tornado destroyed a large swath of their attendance
area in Moore, Okla. Spradling's home was among those
destroyed.


Graduates in


tornado-raked


town vow to stay
G


HELPING MOORE
Currently, there is no need or call for clothing, diapers, household goods, etc.;
only money. There are a number of ways the public can give:
The Citrus County Community Action Committee has set up a "Help Moore" account at Brannen Bank
to help the community of Moore, Okla. Make checks payable to "Help Moore" and you may bring or
mail them to any branch of Brannen Bank. Cash donations can also be brought into any bank branch as
well no donation is too small.
You may also donate funds to the Salvation Army, designating "Storm" in the memo line, and mail them
to: Salvation Army, RO. Box 1630, Lecanto, FL 34460, go to SalvationArmyUSA.org or text "STORM" to
80888.
To donate to the Red Cross, mail checks to the local office at 4218 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461.
To donate to the United Way, mail checks marked "Tornado Relief Fund" to: United Way of Citrus County,
Tornado Relief Fund, 120 N.E. Fifth St., Suite A, Crystal River, FL 34429. Checks to the United Way can
also be dropped off at the Chronicle offices either in Inverness or Meadowcrest.
To donate through the Florida Baptist Convention, make checks payable to the Florida Baptist
Convention, with "Oklahoma Disaster Relief" in the memo, line and mail them to: 230 Hendricks Ave.,
Jacksonville, FL 32207 or bring or mail to First Baptist Church Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness, FL 34452.

HELP "What they do need, to HancockCounty,Miss. as individuals, but we
and what they say they After the devastating bring the entire commu-
need, is money," he said. earthquake in Haiti in nity together. Citrus
Continued from Page Al Doug Alexander, pastor 2010, the committee was County really gets in-
of the New Church With- able to ship supplies to volved Citrus County
been officially notified by out Walls, said the com- help survivors, really has a good heart."
the state of Oklahoma for munity action committee "When there's a need Contact Chronicle re-
assistance from Florida to was formed after Hurri- like this, the committee porter Nancy Kennedy at
go outthere, butthatdoesn't cane Katrina, raising works well," Alexander 352-564-2927 or nkennedy
mean they don'tneed help. money and sending help said. "We're not doing this @chronicleonline.com.
.U


Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY -
Seven tornadoes have
swept through their town
since they were born, but
as new graduates donned
caps and gowns to say
goodbye to their high
schools Saturday, they
vowed they wouldn't say
goodbye to Moore.
"I wouldn't want to be in
any other place. It's our
roots. Tornadoes are a part
of life here," said 18-year-
old Brooke Potter, whose
current college aspirations
take her to two neighbor-
ing towns.
Saturday's graduations
for Westmoore, Southmoore
and Moore high schools
are another step toward
normalcy for this Okla-
homa City suburb ravaged
by an extremely strong tor-
nado. Monday's twister
killed 24, including seven
children at Plaza Towers
Elementary School.
"I want to end up back
here," Madison Dobbs, 18,
said.


With graduates wearing
red, blue or black caps and
gowns, Westmoore was the
first of three schools to hold
commencement ceremonies
Saturday in Oklahoma City
A teacher in the district
said despite being big
enough to have three high
schools, the 56,000-strong
communityis still tightly knit
"This is such a big district,
but this is a small town,"
said Tammy Glasgow, a
second-grade teacher at
Briarwood Elementary,
which was also destroyed
but didn't have any deaths.
Some students lost
everything in the violent
storm. Southmoore senior
Callie Dosher, 18, said she
sifted through the debris
of her family's destroyed
home in the past few days,
looking to recover precious
possessions her mom's
two Bibles and the teddy
bear Callie's granddad gave
her before he passed away
But Dosher, too, wants to
stay: "These people, I've
grown up with them. I
have all my friends here."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chain of emails reveals rising tempers


Editor's note: Here are
excerpts of emails between
County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek, Citrus
County Hospital Board Chair-
woman Debbie Ressler, and
attorneys for both agencies.
The emails are not printed in
their entirety. The Chronicle
obtained the emails through
public records requests of
both Meek and Ressler.

April 26
From: Joe Meek
To: Debbie Ressler
Your recent questions re-
garding County litigation
costs, and other county
concerns you have asked,
started to make me pon-
der numerous issues that
involve tax payer funded lit-
igation and other expendi-
tures that involve taxpayer
funding. In addition, the
very disturbing news of
Gene Davis resigning, stat-
ing pressure from State
Legislators on the hospital
board of Trustee's has me
very concerned, along with
numerous other issues in-
volving the CMH dispute.
Along those lines, I have a
few questions/concerns for
you as the chairwoman of
the Hospital Board of
Trustees.
1. How much money has
been spent by the Trustees
on legal services since
2008? Please breakdown
by year, to what Law firm,
and also if it is in relation
to the dispute with the
foundation.
2. How much of that has
been from the tax collec-
tion from the Trustees
levied tax?
3. How much money
from taxpayers have been
collected since 2008 from
the tax levied by the
Trustees? Please break
down by year.
4. How much money has
been provided for indigent
care to the community
from the Trustees? Please
provide a breakdown by
year since 2008.
5. What is the difference
between what has been re-
quested by the Foundation
Board to what has actually
been paid by the Trustees?
6. What is the balance of
cash on hand of the
Trustees from money col-
lected by the Trustee levied
tax.
7. What percentage of
the Trustee budget goes to-
wards legal issues, what
percentage to indigent
care, what percentage to
administrative costs?
Please breakdown by year
since 2008 and also in-
clude actual dollar
amounts as well as per-
centages for each category.

April 30
From: Debbie Ressler
To: Joe Meek
Information you have re-
quested is available to you
and to all, realize it may
not be in the format that
you desire. You can find
such information on the
CCHB website: www.citrus
countyhospitalboard.com
However, if you desire in
the format as you re-
quested, this will be ad-
dressed/considered as a
Public Records Request,
since it will involve staff
time. Mr. Grant, per CCHB
policy, is informed of re-
quests. Hopefully, this
helps. Feel free to call me
to discuss if you have ad-
ditional questions.

(Undated)
From: Joe Meek
To: Debbie Ressler
I am a little confused as
to why the General Counsel
for the Trustees will be
evaluating the requests
and authorizing the release
of the information.
Furthermore, why is
your legal counsel even in-
volved with my questions? I
am simply asking basic ac-
counting questions as to
the expenditure of tax-
payer funds.
Furthermore, it should
not be necessary for you or
the Trustees to expend
more taxpayer dollars to
pay your legal counsel to
answer financial questions
that you have voted on and


approved the expenditure of.
It is also not necessary
to take Mr. Grant's valuable
time away from other mat-
ters to address these finan-
cial questions. If the
answers are on the web-
site, and you are privy to
the information, as the
Chairwoman of the Board,
you could just compile it
and send it over.


May 6
From: Bill Grant
To: Richard Wesch
The point of this email is
to confirm our conversa-
tion the other day during
our meeting.
I shared with you the re-
quest by Commissioner
Meek of Chairman Ressler.
During the course of our
meeting you said that the
email inquiry by Commis-
sioner Meek WAS NOT a
public records request. If
this is the case then I will
take no further action. If I
am wrong please advise
and all documents will be
provided pursuant to law.
In addition, it will be my
pleasure to appear before
the BOCC and do a com-
plete analysis of attorney
fees expended by both the
Foundation and the CCHB
and the millions saved due
to CCHB Trustee action.

May 8
From: Richard Wesch
To: Bill Grant
As the request for infor-
mation was authored by
Chairman Meek, you
should confirm your under-
standings directly with
him. I do not believe how-
ever that Mr. Meek is inter-
ested in causing additional
expense to the taxpayers
of Citrus County, which
would logically be incurred
by a presentation by you to
the BOCC. Bill, let us keep
perspective on these is-
sues, Mr. Meek is simply
seeking factual information
regarding the conduct of
the Trustees activity over
the several years. Specific
factual responses are all
that I believe are re-
quested. If it is Ms.
Ressler's position that Mr.
Meek should search the
Trustee website for this in-
formation, rather than pro-
viding the information in
the name of expediency
and transparency, so be it.

May 8
From: Bill Grant
To: Richard Wesch
(copied to Meek and three
outside attorneys who
Grant hires to advise the
CCHB)
Based on your response,
the request by Commis-
sioner Meek ... was it a
public records request pur-
suant to FS 119 or not?
Commissioner Meek is
copied here; I would appre-
ciate a reply to that simple
question. Please resolve
this issue to avoid addi-
tional energy being ex-
pended. If a response is
not made by 5pm today
the matter will be referred
to external counsel for an
official reply to Commis-
sioner Meek's request.

May 8
From: Joe Meek
To: Bill Grant (copies to
Wesch and the three out-
side CCHB attorneys)
I simply sent a list of
questions to Chairwoman
Ressler seeking answers to
financial questions.
While I'm not an attor-
ney, it was not a formal
public records request.
I simply would like Chair-
woman Ressler to answer
the questions. I fail to see
why legal counsel is even
involved. The question is,
is Chairwoman Ressler
going to send me direct
answers to my question or
not?

May 8
From: Debbie Ressler
To: Joe Meek
Good afternoon, have re-
viewed the many email cor-
respondences involving
comments, questions, and
responses from yourself,
Mr. Grant, and Mr. Wesch.
The genesis of such com-
munications began on
April 26, a few days after
my personal and public
commenting during a
BOCC meeting, in a com-
munication that you sent
to me asking questions re-
lated to financial status of
the CCHB over the past few
years.
Most of the information
that you asked for is infor-


mation that can be gath-
ered from the CCHB
database, which is the
same information that is
on the website. So the real
question, then becomes
who prints out the informa-
tion you, as the individual
requesting the information
or the CCHB staff. I do not
generally maintain hard
copies of the data you re-


quested, I too rely on the
website, to which I often
refer to myself when I de-
sire to refresh myself on
some of the "numbers."
So, therefore, based
upon the interpretation of
the many communications,
will consider this matter
resolved, since it appears
your inquiry was not a
Public Records Request
and the information is
readily available to you on
the CCHB website.

May 17
From: Joe Meek
To: Debbie Ressler
While I appreciate the
very lengthy response cov-
ering a whole host of is-
sues, some of which are
completely irrelevant, do
you ever plan on answering
my questions with a direct
answer?
If you cannot answer,
just tell me. If you don't
have the data, just say so.
No need to print any paper,
you can just plug the num-
bers in after the question
and send me an email
back. Some are fairly easy,
some may take research,
but I have confidence you
can do it.

May 17
From: Debbie Ressler
To: Joe Meek
As shared in previous
emails, check the CCHB
website.

May 22
From: Joe Meek
To: Debbie Ressler
So much for open, trans-
parent and accountable
government from you.
While I appreciate the fact
that you may be busy, I
thought you may be able
to find the time to directly
answer my questions, or at
the very least just one of
them. You're response of
"check the website" to my
questions is very telling.
What are you afraid of
by giving me a direct an-
swer? You constantly talk
of open communication
and transparency, yet your
actions have shown other-
wise. For someone who
claims to want open, trans-
parent and accountable
government that serves the


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people, your answers to
date have been pathetic.
So, lets try it again, and
maybe this time you can
put just a little effort into
answering my questions.

May 22
From: Debbie Ressler
To: Joe Meek
The CCHB is OPEN and
TRANSPARENT. Sir, I have
NO fears. And contrary to
your curt statements I am
in no way fearful of direct
answers to your questions
or anyone else's questions.
Your references to open
communication and trans-
parency and accountability
are most interesting.
The subject is closed un-
less CCHB receives a Pub-
lic Records Request.

May 22
From: Joe Meek
To: Debbie Ressler
I believed you would
have had the common
courtesy to respond to me
with direct answers and
without the formality of an
official public records re-
quest. You are obviously


very familiar with the web-
site and the questions I
have asked, and given the
fact that you constantly
talk of open and transpar-
ent government, I figured
you would have been more
than willing to directly an-
swer the questions with a
response. That is obviously
not the case, and while
you may feel this conversa-
tion is over, I want the an-
swers to the questions I
have asked. If that re-
quires an official public
records request because
of your inability or unwill-
ingness to answer the
questions with a direct re-
sponse, so be it.
I cannot fathom why you
simply cannot provide
straightforward answers to
questions without solicit-
ing the help of your legal
counsel and going through
such a detailed, lengthy
and ultimately costly re-
sponse. Perhaps this is
symbolic to why the hospi-
tal board is in the situa-
tion it is in now. It is a
shame that this is re-
quired to get a response
from you.


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May 23
From: Joe Meek
To: Mike Bays, Krista
Joseph, Robert Priselac
(copied to Ressler and
Grant)
For the record, I believe
the three of you care about
this community, and truly
want to do what is right.
However, I am concerned
with Ms. Ressler's actions, or
lack thereof, and I am con-
cerned that as Chairwoman
of your board her actions
are harming your board.
I also want you all to
know I have the utmost re-
spect for the three of you,
the positions you hold, and
the task in front of you. My
concern is with Ms. Ressler
as your chairwoman, you will
not be able to move forward
with the issues you face.
While the request I made,
for answers to my ques-
tions was minor, I believe it
is symbolic of the way in
which she conducts herself
as chairwoman, and as a
Board member. It is very
difficult to move in a forward
manner when you see what
an issue she makes of an-
swering simple questions.


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LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


REQUEST
Continued from Page Al

emails, each growing
more confrontational,
with Meek accusing
Ressler of stalling.
"For someone who
claims to want open,
transparent and account-
able government that
serves the people, your
answers to date have
been pathetic," Meek
wrote in one email. "So,
let's try it again, and
maybe this time you can
put just a little effort into
answering my questions."
Late last week, Meek
sent an email to Ressler's
fellow CCHB trustees -
Mike Bays, Krista Joseph
and Robert Priselac -
saying outright that
Ressler is a failure as the
hospital board chair-
woman.
Meek, attaching the
string of his emails with
Ressler, wrote: "While the
request I made, for an-
swers to my questions was
minor, I believe it is sym-
bolic of the way in which
she conducts herself as
chairwoman, and as a
board member. It is very
difficult to move in a for-
ward manner when you
see what an issue she
makes of answering sim-
ple questions."
Ressler, in an interview
Friday, said she doesn't
know why Meek sent that
email to the other
trustees.
"He's more than wel-
come to come to any
board meeting and ex-
press his opinion," she
said. "I don't know what
his real issue with me is.
I'd be more than happy to
sit down with him one on
one."

Meek requests
followed Ressler
inquiries
Ressler has become a
regular attendee at Citrus
County Commission meet-
ings, but not because of
her role on the hospital
board.
A close ally of Commis-
sioner Scott Adams,
Ressler often inquires
about the same subjects
Adams raises: govern-
ment spending, landfill is-
sues and legal fees
associated with the
County Road 491 project,
which includes widening
the road and building a
medical corridor.
On April 26, Meek sent
an email to Ressler re-
garding the hospital
board's legal fees. He said
Ressler has asked the
county commission ques-
tions about its projects, so
he decided to ask the
same of the hospital
board.
He noted also the re-
cent resignation of CCHB
trustee Gene Davis, whose
non-confirmation was
sealed by Sen. Charlie
Dean.
"Your recent questions
regarding county litiga-
tion costs, and other
county concerns you have
asked, started to make me
ponder numerous issues
that involve tax payer
funded litigation and
other expenditures that
involve taxpayer fund-
ing," Meek wrote. "In ad-
dition, the very disturbing
news of Gene Davis re-
signing, stating pressure
from state legislators on
the hospital board of
trustees has me very con-
cerned, along with numer-
ous other issues involving
the CMH dispute."
He enclosed seven
questions, including a
breakdown by percentage
of spending for legal fees,
administration and indi-
gent health care since
2008.
Ressler responded the
same day. She said Meek's
email would be handled
as a public records re-
quest and that the infor-


mation would be gathered
and shared with Meek in a
timely manner.
Three days later, how-
ever, Ressler sent two
more emails to Meek.
Ressler said the CCHB
policy is for public
records requests to go
through CCHB attorney
Bill Grant, and that Grant
would be following up
through an answer to
County Attorney Richard
Wesch.
Meek, in a responding
email, questioned why


Grant was involved at all.
"I am a little confused
as to why the general
counsel for the trustees
will be evaluating the re-
quests and authorizing
the release of informa-
tion," Meek wrote. "I am
simply asking basic ac-
counting questions as to
the expenditure of tax-
payer funds."
That led to back-and-
forth emails between
Grant and Wesch. Grant
asked if Meek was making
a formal public records
request. Wesch responded
that Meek was simply ask-
ing questions.
Grant then told Wesch
that if he didn't get a
straight answer he would
forward Meek's request to
outside CCHB attorneys
for a response.
Meek said it wasn't a
public records request.
"I simply would like
Chairwoman Ressler to
answer the questions," he
wrote to Grant. "I fail to
see why legal counsel is
even involved. The ques-
tion is, is Chairwoman
Ressler going to send me
direct answers to my
question or not?"
Grant thanked Meek for
his response and said his
office wouldn't be in-
volved since it wasn't a
public records request.
Ressler also responded
with a lengthy explana-
tion of the CCHB's public
records policy and how it
would apply to Meek's re-


quest for information.
Meek said in an inter-
view Friday he thought
Ressler was placing one
roadblock after another to
his questions.
"For somebody that es-
pouses open, transparent
and accountable govern-
ment, she has done any-
thing but that," he said.
"Her actions speak much
louder than her words."
On May 22, Ressler sent
a response to Meek's
email comments that
her efforts in answering
his questions were
"pathetic."
"The CCHB is OPEN
and TRANSPARENT,"
she wrote. "Sir, I have NO
fears. And contrary to
your curt statements, I am
in no way fearful of direct
answers to your questions
or anyone else's ques-
tions."
Ressler then told Meek
she wouldn't answer the
questions without a for-
mal public records re-
quest. On Wednesday,
Meek did just that but
not without a parting
shot.
"I cannot fathom why
you simply cannot provide
straight forward answers
to questions without solic-
iting the help of your legal
counsel and going through
a detailed, lengthy and ul-
timately costly response,"
he wrote. "Perhaps this is
symbolic to why the hospi-
tal board is in the situa-
tion it is in now."


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Ressler: Meek is
retaliating
Ressler sees a connec-
tion between Meek's in-
terest in CCHB finances
and her requests for in-
formation from the
county.
"He's retaliating," she
said. "This came after I
asked him questions. I
asked him simple ques-
tions. As a citizen, I've
been very respectful. I
have never bashed him in
public. I've been ex-
tremely professional with
him as a citizen."
Meek sees it differently
"There's no retalia-
tion," he said. "I'm asking
questions that are impor-


tant to the citizens of this
community. She's the one
making it so difficult. All
she needs to do is answer
the questions."
Meek said he wanted
other CCHB trustees to
understand his frustra-
tion. He said Ressler is an
impediment to progress
between ongoing disputes
between the CCHB and
Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation.
"They're not going to
get where they need to be
with Debbie Ressler as
their chairwoman," he
said. "I think she's a prob-
lem for them."
CCHB trustee Krista
Joseph read Meek's email
and his suggestion that


LOCAL


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SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 All

Ressler be removed as
chairwoman.
"I disagree with that,"
Joseph said. "She's an in-
telligent woman. I didn't
think there was anything
wrong with her response."
The issue is sure to
linger this week. The
county commission meets
Tuesday and the Citrus
County Hospital Board
meets Wednesday.
Ressler blames the con-
frontation on Meek.
"He's in a retaliatory
mood," she said, "because
I asked very distinct
questions."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


OFOEN










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obama: al-Qaida on path to defeat


President refocuses terror threat, national security outlook


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Some call it
wishful thinking, but President
Barack Obama has all but de-
clared an end to the global war
on terror
Obama is not claiming final
victory over extremists who still
seek to kill Americans and other
Westerners. Instead, he is refo-
cusing the long struggle against
terrorism that lies ahead, steer-
ing the United States away from
what he calls an equally fright-
ening threat a country in a
state of perpetual war In doing


so, Obama recasts the Sept. 11 levels. That
image of the terrorists means that with the
themselves, from enemy Afghanistan war winding
warriors to cowardly down, Obama is unlikely
thugs and resets the re- to commit troops in large
lationship between the numbers to any conflict
U.S. and Islam. -in Syria or other coun-
His speech Thursday tries struggling with in-
was designed to move stability in the uncertain
America's mindset away Barack aftermath of the Arab
from a war footing and Obama Spring unless, as his
refine and recalibrate wants to move critics fear, he tragically
his own counterterror- mindset from a has underestimated al-
ism strategy Obama as- war footing. Qaida's staying power
serted that al-Qaida is "Wishing the defeat of
"on the path to defeat," reducing terrorists does not make it so,"
the scale of terrorism to pre- said Rep. Mac Thornberry, a


Texas Republican who is vice
chairman of the House Armed
Services Committee and a mem-
ber of the House Intelligence
Committee.
In Thornberry's view, Obama
is pushing the idea that "we can
simply declare al-Qaida beaten
and go back to the pre-9/11 era."
From the beginning of his
presidency, Obama's center-
piece of his national security
strategy has been a desire to
move beyond the wars he inher-
ited in Iraq and Afghanistan, as
well as in the shadowy spaces
occupied by al-Qaida and its off-
shoots now creeping up in North
Africa and elsewhere.
Those endeavors consumed


enormous amounts of his admin-
istration's time and attention dur-
ing his first term, not to mention
the incalculable costs paid by mil-
itary members and their families.
"This war, like all wars, must
end," he said. "That's what his-
tory advises. That's what our
democracy demands."
As Obama edges toward a new
approach to national security,
his political opponents are quick
to raise doubts.
"Too often, this president has
sought to end combat operations
through rhetoric rather than re-
ality," GOP Rep. Howard P
"Buck" McKeon of California,
chairman of the House Armed
Services Committee, said Friday


Finishing the last mile


Associated Press
Runners who were unable to finish the Boston Marathon on April 15 because of the bombings cross the finish line Saturday on Boylston Street in Boston after the
city allowed them to finish the last mile of the race. About 35 runners from the Midwest who were unable to finish the race will run about a half mile on the track
immediately before the start of the Indianapolis 500.


Key senators tightly control Fragments of Dead

immigration debate Sea Scrolls for sale


Associated Press tives of citizens with an
extreme hardship the
WASHINGTON For same force that had al-
all the soothing words she ready derailed dozens of
heard from fellow other proposals
Democrats on the deemed to violate
Senate Judiciary the delicate trade-
Committee, Sen. offs made by the
Mazie Hirono of b bill's authors.
Hawaii never had The gang the
a chance to win a four Republicans
relatively modest and four Democ-
change to far-
rchang immigr- Mazie rats who forged
reaching immigra- Hirono the plan held
tion legislation, senator from together "amaz-
Instead, the hid- Hawaii. ingly well under
den hand of the Gang of the circumstances," said
Eight reached out and re- one member of the Judici-
jected her attempt to cre- ary Committee who was
ate an immigration not part of the group. "It's
preference for close rela- a very complex bill,"


added Sen. Orrin Hatch,
R-Utah.
The legislation that
now goes to the Senate
floor creates a 13-year
road to citizenship for the
estimated 11.5 million im-
migrants living in the
United States unlawfully,
establishes a new pro-
gram to allow low-skilled
workers into the country
and sharply expands the
number of visas for highly
skilled workers.
It also mandates a costly
new effort to secure U.S.
borders against future il-
legal crossings and re-
makes the existing system
for legal immigration.


Associated Press
JERUSALEM Parts of
the Dead Sea Scrolls are up
for sale in tiny pieces.
Nearly 70 years after the
discovery of the world's
oldest biblical manuscripts,
the Palestinian family who
originally sold them to
scholars and institutions is
now quietly marketing the
leftovers fragments the
family said it has kept in a
Swiss safe deposit box all
these years.
Most of these scraps are
barely postage-stamp-
sized, and some are blank.
But in the last few years,


Nation BRIEFS


Archdiocese leader resigns Rescuers look for pilot in
amid sex scandal deadly Angel Flight crash


NEWARK, N.J. The second-highest offi-
cial in the Archdiocese of Newark, N.J., is
stepping down in the wake of a scandal in-
volving a former priest accused of violating an
agreement with law enforcement barring him
from working with children.
Church officials said Monsignor John Doran re-
signed Friday as vicar general and will no longer
hold a leadership position with the archdiocese.
The move is among several changes the
archdiocese said it's implementing to protect
children. The changes are noted in a letter from
Archbishop John Myers, which will be read in
parishes across the archdiocese this weekend.


evangelical Christian col-
lectors and institutions in
the U.S. have forked out
millions of dollars for a
chunk of this archaeologi-
cal treasure. This angers
Israel's government antiq-
uities authority, which
holds most of the
scrolls, claims that every
last scrap should be recog-
nized as Israeli cultural
property, and threatens to
seize any more pieces that
hit the market.
"I told Kando many
years ago, as far as I'm
concerned, he can die
with those scrolls," said
Amir Ganor, head of the

World BRIEFS


Pakistan bus fire kills 16
children, one adult


EPHRATAH, N.Y Divers searched a large LAHORE, Pakistan Sixteen schoolchild-
pond while investigators combed nearby woods ren and a teacher burned to death in eastern
Saturday for any sign of the pilot of a volunteer Pakistan early Saturday when a short-circuit
Angel Flight that crashed in upstate NewYork. near a leaking gas tank caused their minibus
The plane's passengers were found dead to burst into flames, police said.
Friday night near where the small plane Police officer Ijaz Ahmad said five children
crashed in Ephratah, about an hour west of were also injured, three of whom were listed
Albany, Fulton County Sheriff Thomas Lorey in critical condition, in the blaze in Gujrat
said. The bulk of the plane was found sub- about 120 miles northwest of the capital, Is-
merged in a pond, he said. lamabad. The children were aged between 6
Angel Flight is a nonprofit group that and 12, he said.
arranges free air transportation for sick pa- Earlier, police had blamed an exploding
tients from volunteer pilots, natural gas cylinder for the incident. The bus
-From wire reports was powered with both types of fuel.


authority's anti-looting
squad, speaking of
William Kando, who main-
tains his family's Dead
Sea Scrolls collection.
"The scrolls' only address
is the State of Israel."
Their discovery in 1947,
in caves by the Dead Sea
east ofJerusalem, was one
of the greatest archaeolog-
ical events of the 20th cen-
tury Scholarly debate
over the scrolls' meaning
continues to stir high-
profile controversy, while
the Jordanian and Pales-
tinian governments have
lodged their own claims of
ownership.


Female suicide bomber
injures 11 in Russian region
MAKHACHKALA, Russia Police in the
southern Russian region of Dagestan said a
female suicide bomber has injured at least 11
police officers and civilians.
Dagestan's police spokesman Vyacheslav
Gasanov said the bomber blew herself up
Saturday on the central square in the provin-
cial capital, Makhachkala.
Since 2000, at least two dozen female
suicide bombers, most of them from the
Caucasus, have carried out terrorist attacks
in Russian cities and aboard trains and
planes.
-From wire reports









EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A16 of
today's Chronicle.


2013


best


beaches


East Hampton's

Main Beach

comes in at top

*

Three Florida

spots make cut
FRANK ELTMAN
Associated Press
EAST HAMPTON, N.Y-
This may be hard
to believe in the
aftermath of
superstorm
Sandy, but an annual list
of the best beaches in
the country has a New
York beach ranked No. 1.
Less surprisingly, that beach is in
East Hampton, the vacation play-
ground for the rich and famous.
In an announcement that coin-
cides annually with the unofficial
start of summer, coastal expert
Stephen P Leatherman on Friday re-
leased the 23rd version of his Top 10
Beach List, placing Main Beach in
East Hampton at the top.
"The thing about the Hamptons is
that people are so proud of their
beaches out there," Leatherman told
The Associated Press in an interview
in advance of the release of his list.
"People pick up their litter there, the
bathrooms are clean; they provide
good services."
Leatherman, who goes by the nick-
name Dr Beach, visited Main Beach
earlier this month. He said that un-
like many beaches farther to the
west and in New Jersey, the beaches


Associated Press
This undated file photo provided by KKM Photo shows Main Beach in East Hampton, N.Y. Main Beach is No. 1 on the 2013
list of Top 10 Beaches produced annually by coastal expert Stephen P. Leatherman, also known as "Dr. Beach,"
director of Florida International University's Laboratory for Coastal Research.


on eastern Long Island saw less ero-
sion and flooding from the effects of
Superstorm Sandy.
"Considering the magnitude of the
storm, people will be very pleased to
see that Main Beach is the way they
remember it," he said.
Leatherman, a professor at
Florida International University in
Miami, has visited beaches around
the world and uses criteria like


A woman walks along Barefoot Beach in Bonita Springs. Barefoot Beach is sixth
on the 2013 list of Top 10 Beaches produced annually by coastal expert Stephen
P. Leatherman.


water and sand quality, as well as
safety and environmental manage-
ment, to compile his annual list.
Once a beach reaches the pinnacle of
No. 1, it is retired from future consid-
eration, he said.
Coopers Beach in nearby
Southampton, N.Y, was the No. 1
pick in the 2010 survey Sarasota's
Siesta Beach was tops in 2011 and
Coronado Beach in California
earned the top spot in 2012.
The other nine on Leatherman's
2013 list after Main Beach are: Ka-
hanamoku Beach, Waikiki, Hawaii;
St. George Island State Park, Fla.;
Hamoa Beach, Maui, Hawaii;
Waimanalo Bay State Park, Oahu,
Hawaii; Barefoot Beach Preserve
County Park, Bonita Springs, Fla.;
Cape Florida State Park, Key Bis-
cayne, Fla.; Cape Hatteras, Outer
Banks, N.C.; Coast Guard Beach,
Cape Cod, Mass.; and Beachwalker
Park, Kiawah Island, S.C.
East Hampton village residents
have free access to Main Beach, al-
though parking permits are required
from May 15 to Sept. 15.
Non-residents can buy parking
passes at $25 per day but they are
limited in number, with only 40


non-resident daily parking passes
sold on weekends and holidays.
Max Scainetti, a lifelong East
Hampton resident, said the tiny
grains of tan sand and the cleanli-
ness of the beach are two of the
things that make Main Beach
special.
"This is one of the best beaches in
the country and I've been to a lot of
beaches," Scainetti said. "I think ba-
sically it's a lot to do with the sand. A
lot of Long Island beaches tend to be
rocky, where these are more sandy
beaches."
Javier Baldo, an East Hampton
cook, said he has visited Main Beach
regularly for about eight years.
"It's fairly civilized. It doesn't get
too crowded. The water is deli-
cious," he said. Delicious? "It's re-
ally great water, it's really clean. You
just have a lot of space."
Baldo said celebrities are some-
times seen at the beach, but people
generally keep to themselves.
"It's quiet, there's no loud music
playing. It's obviously very safe;
great lifeguards. There are really
great lifeguards. They're actually fit
and very well experienced. That's a
big thing, just the safety," he said.


Florida fun in Jersey

Margaritaville complex opens in Atlantic City


WAYNE PARRY
Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -
Mitchell Etess thinks he knows
the biggest thing that was wrong
with New Jersey's oldest
casino.
"There weren't a whole lot of
people sitting around New


Jersey or Pennsylvania that
said, 'Let's go party tonight in
Resorts,"' said Etess, whose
Mohegan Tribal Gaming Au-
thority now runs Resorts Casino
Hotel. "I don't even think their
parents were doing that."
But that's all in the past now
that Resorts has one of Atlantic
See Page A15


New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
holds up a pair of bronzed beach
shoes in Atlantic City., N.J.,
Thursday, May 23, at the grand
opening of Jimmy Buffett's
Margaritaville restaurant.
Associated Press


Mediterranean cruise
Jim and Laura Manos of Inverness celebrated their 40th anniversary in March with a
SI Mediterranean cruise. Here, they are pictured in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey.
The trip also included the Greek Islands of Santorini, Rhodes and Mykonos, the
Turkish ports of Mamaris, Izmir and Istanbul. The trip concluded in the city of Athens.
Landmarks included the Great Master Palace in Rhodes; Epheseus and the House of
the Virgin Mary in Izmir, Turkey; the Treasurers of Istanbul; and the Acropolis,
Parthenon, Temple of Zeus and Agora in Athens.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS
r~oto Contest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 26, 2013 C: Comcast Citrus B: Bright House DI: Conmast, Dunnellon Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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BC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly The Voice "Live Top 10 Performances" The art- Smash "The Nominations; The Tonys" Ivy News Paid
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News ists perform; Maroon 5 performs.'PG' receives news; the Tony Awards.'14' Program
S )ABC 20 20 20 News World Ameica's Funniest Wipeout (In Stereo) Motive "Creeping Tom" Rookie Blue "Surprises" News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'c (In Stereo) 'PG' 'PG' cc Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In NCIS: Los Angeles The Good Wife (In The Mentalist "If It 10 News Paid
D C P) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) a "Lone Wolf"'14' Stereo)'14' Bleeds, It Leads"'14' 11pm (N Program
0 [T ) FOX 13 13N 13 13 ASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (N) (In Stereo News News Burn
9 EWTVTJ FOX 13 13 13 13 Live) c es Notice'PG'
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D 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for Believers Daniel Jesse Bidging Great
2 2 2 2222 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Anointing Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
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Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "DWB" (In Law& Order"Bait" (In How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
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WVE) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comed. |Noticiero Aquy Ahora (SS) Premios OYE! 2013 (N) (EnVivo) (SS) Sal yPimienta'PG' Comed. Noticiero
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Storage Storae Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Storae Storage Stora Storae
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IA J 55 64 55 '14' Immediate Release" Plan" i '14'0 Half" (N) c Half" i
SRiver Monsters: Alien Autopsy (N) (In Mermaids: The Body Found: The Extended Cut Mermaids: The New Mermaids: The New
S 52 35 52 19 21 Unhooked 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Half-man, half-fish, all conjecture. 'PG' Evidence (N)'PG' Evidence'PG'
** "For Colored Girls" (2010, Drama) The Sheards (Season The Sheards 'PG' The Game Let's Stay Let'sStay Let'sStay
I1 96 19 96 Kimberly Elise, Janet Jackson.'R' a Finale) (N)'PG' '14' Together Together Together
BAVO 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Married to Medicine Marred to Medicine The Kandi Factory Married to Medicine
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IC 27 61 27 33 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'MA' MA 'MA' 'MA' 'MA' 'MA
Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the Dog and Beth: On the
ICMT 98 45 98 28 37 Hunt'14' Hunt'14' Hunt'14' c Hunt'14'B Hunt'14' Hunt'14'
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CNN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd.
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ESN 33 27 33 21 17 College Softball Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at New York Mets. N) (Live SportsCenter (N)
(ESPN 34 28 34 43 49 CollegeBaseball Update College Softball CrossFit CrossFit MLSSoccer
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AMI 29 52 29 20 28 "A Bug's *** "The Incredibles" (2004, Comedy) Voices of Craig T ** "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" (2009, Comedy) Ameica's Funniest
29 52 29 20 28 Lfe" Nelson, Holly Hunter.'PG' Kevin James, Jayma Mays. PG' HomeVideos'PG'
I 18 1 "Die" ** "Career Opportunities" *** "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless *** "Heavenly Creatures" "The
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FIODl 26 56 26 Diners, Drive Iron Chef America Cupcake Wars 'G' Iron Chef America Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im.
(FSNFL 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker Tour Word Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour Word Poker Tour
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(X) 30 60 30 51 Jr, Terrence Howard.'PG-13 Marine troops fight off alien invaders. 'PG-13' Aaron Eckhart.'PG- 3'
OLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, Final Round. Central
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M2L9 59 68 59 45 54 (2009) NR' (2006) Patty Duke. 'NR' cc Drew Barrymore, Anjelica Huston. 'PC' R n 'G'
Rock and Roll Hall of *** "Magic Mike" (2012, Comedy-Drama) "Behind the Candelabra" (2013) Michael "Behind the
302 201 302 2 2 Fame Channing atum. (In Stereo)'R' B Douglas. Premiere. (In Stereo) N Candelabra"(2013) c
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S 50 119 Luner (In Stereo)'NR a Amber Thiessen, Eric Close. (In Stereo) N Mathison. (In Stereo) 'NR' c
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(WN3A 18 18 18 18 20 30Rock IBloopers! Bloopers! IMother Mother IMother Mother |Mother News IReplay "Swordfish"(2001)


Couple tired



of being 'hotel'


Dear Annie: Nine
years ago, my hus-
band and I bought
a large house with extra
bedrooms so we could
have his ailing, aging par-
ents move in with us. We
cared for them until they
passed away.
The prob-
lem is, now
every family
member, no
matter how
distant, has
decided that
our large
house is their
free vacation l
spot. They in-
vite them-
selves year ANN
round and stay
for days at a MAIL
time, eating
our food, swimming in
our pool, watching our
TV and basically making
themselves at home and
never offering to pay for
anything.
I'm tired of running a
bed and breakfast out of
my home. How can I stop
this trend without offend-
ing our family members?
- Tired of Running a
Hotel in Florida
Dear Florida: You have
to stand firm while being
pleasant. If Cousin Jake
says, "I'll be in town next


month and will stay with
you," reply, "I'm SO sorry,
but we are simply not up
to having people in the
house. I'll be happy to
give you the phone num-
ber of the nearest hotel,
and we can meet for din-
ner. We'd love
to see you."
No matter
how many
times he
protests, stick
to your guns -
but sweetly.
Dear Annie:
"He Just Does-
n't Care" com-
plained that
her husband
smokes outside
the house, and
BOX the smoke on
his clothing
triggers her COPD.
Thank you for suggest-
ing electronic cigarettes.
My uncle smoked for
years and simply could
not quit, even after hav-
ing a heart attack.
He switched to e-ciga-
rettes, which allow him to
get the nicotine he
craves, while emitting an
odorless vapor
My aunt is thrilled that
the house no longer reeks
of smoke, and my uncle is
pleased that his health
has stabilized. -Grateful


Todays MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Epic" (PG) 11:50 a.m.,
4:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No
passes.
"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 2:20 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No
passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 6:45 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 3:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
No passes.
"The Hangover 3" (R)
12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No
passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
4 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:20 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Epic" (PG) 10:45 a.m.,
11:15 a.m., 2 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,


9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Epic" (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Fast & Furious 6" (R)
11:50 a.m., 12:20 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
4:25 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"The Hangover 3" (R)
11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
4:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 4 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 4:30 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 4:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 12:30 p.m.,
1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
7:35 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No
passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Dipper
6 Slanted
11 Light-beam device
16 Exploded
21 Blunder
22 Radar relative
23 Musical passage
24 Cousin to
the giraffe
25 Wide open
26 Disputative
28 Country in the
Himalayas
29 Dim -
30 Hair preparations
31 Cudgel
32 Swiftly
34 Frost
35 Stack
37 Reply (abbr.)
38 Young eel
40 Attempt
41 Moines, Iowa
42 Peel
44 Showed contempt
46 Sign of boredom
49 Opposite
52 Set down
53 Pallet
55 Collared
59 Old cry of woe
60 Hourglass
contents
61 Discernment
64 Fierce look
65 Half gainer
66 Reduce
67 Quarrel
68 capital
70 School in England
71 Genesis name
72 Skidded
73 Blemish
74 Soft and sticky
76 Ames and Asner
77 Inferred
79 Part of Eur.
80 Singer Tori
82 Naval engineer
84 Small bird
85 Jai -
86 Window part
87 Rudd or Newman
88 City in Austria
90 Revolve
91 Western native
92 Exercise session
95 Neighbor of Ind.


96 Plant disease
98 Cabbage
100 Mark Twain's "Huckle-
berry -"
101 Ear(pref.)
102 President
between Tyler and
Taylor
104 Desire
105 Cut
106 Lake
107 In the center of
108 Happening
110 Proust or Marceau
112 Feral
113 Area
114 Peruse again
116 Pasture
117 Storage structure
118 Horse-drawn
carriage
119 Mild oath
121 Worried
124 Traffic barrier
125 Grand Coulee,
for one
128 Crowd
130 Like a house cat
131 Obstruct
132 Pedestal part
136 Mimic
137 Cantaloupe
139 Stage signal
140 River in Ireland
141 Pup
142 Cowboy show
144 Courageous
147 Coral island
149 Tire surface
150 Aflower
151 Ethical
152 Rope of wire
153 Gaze
154 Pass a rope through
155 Stockholm native
156 Blond lock


DOWN
1 Animal restraint
2 Debate
3 Play
4 Cutoff
5 Before
6 Climb
7 of the trade
8 Hotels
9 Dead language (abbr.)
10 Increased


threefold
11 Landscape spoiler
12 Cuckoo
13 Greek colonnade
14 Break forth
15 Prayer beads
16 Rib
17 Guitar cousin
18 Swift
19 "Deep Nine"
20 Flooring pieces
27 Church area
30 Crew
33 Blue shade
36 Cost
38 Town in
Oklahoma
39 Prove false
43 Squid's output
44 Healthy upstairs
45 Certain voter (abbr.)
47 Jokester
48 Long river
49 Dimmed
50 and well
51 Prehistoric man
(2 wds.)
52 Fat
54 Force from office
56 Slow starter's relative
(2 wds.)
57 Eat at
58 Thick
60 Uttered
61 Mil. address part
62 Old weapon
63 Recent (pref.)
66 Complete
67 Rain a little
69 Reply
72 Setting
73 Burn
74 "--With the Wind"
75 Pine
78 Coffee-filled
container
79 Sate
81 Spouse
83 Sea bird
85 Lacking a key,
in music
88 Snake
89 "--Lucy"
92 Gale
93 Serviceable
94 Hot drink with
liquor
97 Jewel
99 Trouble


Pleat
Body joint
Head covering
Multicolored
Expressed
Schoolyard game
Ump's cousin
Milk portion
Enjoyment
Woman of rank
Brooks


Achy
Greenback
Old card game
Faithful
Taper
Pub game
To the left,
nautically
Jason's wife
City in Idaho
Moolah


Sun-dried brick
Playthings
Eyes
Fashion
Observe
Raison d'-
Cup handle
A state (abbr.)
Tier
Behave
- and feather


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


II




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
Look for information
about Memorial Day activities
in the news section of today's
Chronicle.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and din-
ing hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President



JERSEY
Continued from Page A13

City's newest entertain-
ment attractions.
The casino held a grand
opening Thursday for Mar-
garitaville, the $35 million
restaurant, bar and gam-
bling complex that's part
of a $70 million expansion
and renovation of Resorts.
It was 35 years ago this
weekend that Resorts be-
came the first casino in the
United States to open out-
side Nevada.
"This place is an exam-
ple of the fun and enter-
tainment that Atlantic City
can be all about," Gov
Chris Christie said. "New
Jersey is back, we're ready
for summer, and there's
nothing that will keep this
state down if we all work
together."
The Jimmy Buffett-
themed project is ex-
pected to breathe life into
a casino that had struggled
to compete with newer,
bigger casinos in Atlantic
City and in neighboring
states. In announcing the
project last year, Buffett
said the boardwalk and
beach were ideal locations
for the latest of 25 Margar-
itaville complexes he has
helped to open in U.S. and
international resort
destinations.
Buffett, who did not at-
tend the opening, had pre-
dicted that his fans, who
call themselves Parrot-
heads, will feel at home in
the new location.
"Atlantic City has always
historically been a great
beach town and needless
to say I kind of thrive in
those kinds of communi-


ties," Buffett said last
June. "And it certainly
does not go without being
noticed by me and a lot of
people that work for me
that the Jersey Shore has
the largest flock of Parrot-
heads up and down the
Eastern Seaboard. So,
with helping bring back a
great beach town, we are
also giving a flock of mi-
grating birds a nest to
come to."
It features a Margari-


Sandy White at 352-249-
7663, or membership chair-
man Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, behind Cadence
Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Turkey dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 31.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence


taville restaurant, the
LandShark Bar & Grill,
Margaritaville-themed
casino space, the Five
O'Clock Somewhere Bar, a
retail store and a coffee
shop. A giant blender, an
ode to that frozen concoc-
tion made famous in Buf-
fett's signature song, will
welcome guests at its front
entrance.
Pam Foldes of Penndel,
Pa., was one of them. Sit-
ting at the bar with a bal-
loon animal tied to her
head early in the after-
noon, she said Margari-
taville will make her much
more likely to play and
stay at Resorts when she
visits Atlantic City.
"I love it here," she said.
"The bartenders are mar-
velous. They literally jump
to find out what you want
and bring it to you. It feels
very friendly here."
Sitting next to her was
Mari Hehl of Stratford,
N.J. The two had never
met but were well on their
way to becoming good
friends after a short time
at the bar
"The crowd, I think, is
the best indication of
what's going to happen,"
she said. "There's a lot of
people here. I think it's
going to do well."
Margaritaville employs
600 people in Atlantic City.
Twelve Margaritaville-
themed table games and
160 similarly themed slot
machines will be part of
the casino.
It has island-themed
decor, an indoor light-
house, palm trees and
tropical-blue skies and
clouds painted onto the
ceilings. A week of audi-
tions was held to select the
bands and singers that will


perform live there.
The project is part of a
five-year-old effort by At-
lantic City casinos to offer
more than just gambling,
particularly since so-
called "convenience gam-
blers" who would ride the
bus into town, play slots for
a few hours and then go
home, now have casinos
much closer to their
homes in Pennsylvania
and New York.
Smaller projects like


Highway and Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Visit the website at
http://davfl70.yktc.us.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn


Margaritaville will likely
do more to restore Wall
Street's willingness to in-
vest in the resort than
would another large proj-
ect following the bank-
ruptcy of the $2.4 billion
Revel casino hotel project,
an analyst at a major
casino industry confer-
ence held Wednesday in
Atlantic City said.
Other work recently
done at Resorts that is not
part of Margaritaville in-
cludes hotel room renova-
tions, new carpeting for
the entire casino floor, and
a food court.
"It's going to open the
eyes of a lot of entertain-
ment seekers," Etess said.
"To quote Jimmy Buffett,
'It's a complete change of
attitude.' It's not your
mother's Resorts anymore.
We are changing the per-
ception and we are chang-
ing the reality."


BRIllIANCE
Sof the SEAS
Starting at $589.80 pp
-JANUARY 18,2014-
5-Night Western Caribbean Cruise
All port and Gov't fees included
Motorcoach included from Inverness
All rates are based on double occupan

,a.- 0 0 -


are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
To donate items, call Brice
at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about activities. Men's
Auxiliary meets 7 p.m. first
Wednesday at the post. Call
Neil Huyler at 352-344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. The June 5
meeting will be preceded by a
dinner for members, spouses
and guests at 6 p.m.
The June 5 Auxiliary meet-
ing will begin at 1 p.m.


The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast has
been suspended until
September.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-


daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.

See VETERANS/Page A16


Joseph Buccheri


Foundation


Inaugural Charity 4 Man Scramble

June 8th
AT


Citrs Hlls 7hIOak


Citrus Hills Golf Club
509 E. Hartford Street
Hernando, FL 34442

Contact Info:
Golf Club
352-746-4425

Joseph Buccheri Foundation
JBuccheri@joebuccheri.org
Or
JoeBuccheri.org
Or
972-897-9987

Checks and Credit Cards
will be accepted
at the course.

Donations Welcome!

The Joseph Buccheri
Foundation provides
scholarships to Citrus
County Seniors and awards
a four year benefit!

Please join us in
congratulating our 2013
award winners:

Citrus High School
* Lindsay Connors
* Lissette Toledo

Lecanto High School
* Marissa Folsom
* Kristen Carney


PLANIAIUN Reservation Suggested

9 352.795.5797
Everything Outdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS
C0:

Full ay retal ravani


Caravan
.com
COSTA o5,
COST 10 DAYS!

I / C l Rates starting at
S1095.00 pp
Airfare and transfers
s1 enot included.
i Taxes are additional


The Inaugural Joseph Buccheri Foundation
Charity Golf will be held Saturday, June 8th,
at Citrus Hills Golf Club.

Pre-Register by calling the club or online at
JoeBuccheri.org.

Pre-register by May 31st.

Online and Same day registration available
after if slots remain.

Registration begins at 7:00 am with Tee-off
at 8:00 am

Don't have 4 Don't miss the Fun -
We will pair you up!

Cost of $60.00 per person includes; 18 holes of
golf, riding cart, food, beverages and...

V Grand Prize for Winners!
V Second and Third Place Prizes!
V Longest Drive Winner Taylor Made
Rlls Driver
V Closest to the Pin Winner Ping Putter
V 50/50 Tickets will be sold
V Mulligan Tickets will be Sold ... Can be
used anywhere on the course
V Complimentary Beverage
V Prize Raffle Tickets will be sold, many
items, do not have to be present to win
V Lunch will be provided at the completion
of the Tournament

Thank you for your support and generosity ....
All proceeds from this tournament go to the
Joseph Buccheri Foundation.

Can't make it?

That's OK, donate today!

JoeBuccheri.org.

We are a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation
your donation is tax deductible.


SCALLOPING TO RS
Collecting scallops is like hunting
Easter eggs underwater where sponges
starfish and many other creatures await your visit.
JULY 1 THRU SEPTEMBER 25 Reservalions Required
$65 per person includes Rldetothe G ulf .. I I .



(352) 628.5222 or 800-758-3474 a
www.riversafanis.com



Becky's lb'avel Store

Ship Brilliance of the Seas VIKING
Sailing Sept. 15,2014 RVER CRUISES
7 Night Canada and New England May 27, 2014
Boston to Boston
SENIOR & MILITARY RATES New Destination
Inside...............................74 10 Days River of Gold
Ocean..... .......$800.00
Balcony from...$114.00* for Military 2 NT Lisbon, 7 NT Porto to Porto
Govt taxes05 08 ............er prs........ transfers Prices starting from $3230.50
and air not inc eluded
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 5278855
Located Next to Winn Dixie(352)527-8855
www', beckystr- ve servic-e- com-0OF283


OOOF1YB


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 A15




A16 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

Call 352-726-5206 for
information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Due to the fact there are no
contested positions, there will
be no ballot election on Tues-
day, May 28. Installation of
Legion, Sons of the Legion
and Legion Riders officers will
take place at 7 p.m. on this
date at our regular member-
ship meeting.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norm Brumett at 352-476-


2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-476-
7001 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the


In SERVICE


Special to the Chronicle
P02 Kevin Ray recently re-enlisted in the U.S. Navy.
Leading the ceremony was LTJG Jamie Wallace, right.
Ray, an electrician, is currently stationed at NMCB Gulf-
port, Miss., and will be deploying to Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba for 18 months. He is a graduate of Crystal River
High School.

In SERVICE


Benjamin E. Lytle
Air Force Reserve Airman
Benjamin E. Lytle graduated
from basic military training at
Joint Base San Antonio-
Lackland, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic


Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veter-
ans, lineal descendants, next
of kin, spouses and siblings of
Purple Heart recipients are
invited.
To learn more about Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819


Benjamin
E. Lytle
U.S. Air Force


training earn
four credits
toward an
associate in
applied sci-
ence degree
through the
Community
College of
the Air
Force.


Lytle is
the son of Ronald Lytle of
Citrus Springs. He is a 2006
graduate of Solid Foundations
Academy, Citrus Springs.


meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-


formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.

SERVICES & GROUPS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. the second Saturday
each month at the Disabled
American Veteran's Building,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness.. The building is on the
corner of State Road 41 and
Paul Drive.
We are an advocacy group
for current and future veter-
ans, as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 is en-
couraging new members to
join to promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. More than 88,000 com-
bat veterans are still unac-
counted for from all wars.
We fight for them and their
families.
More information is avail-
able at www.rollingthunder
fl7.com. Full membership is
open to all individuals 18
years or older who wish to
dedicate time to the cause.
Come out and join us on
June 29 for the seventh an-
nual Independence Day Golf
Classic. Golf registration and
opportunities to be a sponsor
are available at www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, or call Ray at
813-230-9750.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. If you would like for us
to provide a speaker, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram. HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect veter-
ans' benefits. Call the Citrus
Team Office at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. She offers
free classes to combat veter-
ans. Call 352-382-7397.


SACRI FICI ES


2'emorial Day is a day of national awareness and
reverence...honoring those Americans who died while
defending our Nation and its values.
On this day, and every day, HPH Hospice and HPH Home
Health honor those who served sacrificially but never
lived to be called a veteran.

Serving Those Who Served Us
in Pasco, Hernando & Citrus counties through
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Engagement

Bass/Toney

Sarah Bass of Ho-
mosassa and Colin Toney
of Crystal River will ex-
change nuptial vows at
4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, 4-
2013.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Jerry and Tammy '
Bass of Homosassa. Her fi-
anc6 is the son of Tonie
and Terrie Toney
The wedding will take
place at the Hernando
Church of the Nazarene.


SMay 28-31 MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Centers closed
for Memorial Day.
Tuesday: Three-bean and
beef chili, parslied rice, yellow
corn, raisins, wheat crackers
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad,
lettuce with carrot and tomato,
marinated broccoli salad,
whole grain bread, fresh
orange, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, garlic
mashed potatoes, green


www.craiiicleonlinenxn -' i


peas, graham crackers, slice
rye bread with margarine
low-fat milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
thigh, brown rice, collard
greens with turkey ham, fresh
orange, cornbread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


For the RECORD


Marriages 5/13/13
to 5/19/13
William Henry Hough III,
Hernando/Christie Ann


Gudridge, Hernando
Guy Joseph Murry,
Inverness/Katherine Lee
Gilliard, Inverness


Humane Society

has new thrift store


Special to the Chronicle
The Humane Society of
Citrus County has a new
thrift store open from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday
and Saturdays.
All funds from items
sold support the pet shel-
ter and rescue at 751 S.
Smith Ave. in Inverness.
Those with gently used
household items that are
no longer needed are wel-
come to donate. Bring
items to the shelter during
business hours, from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, or call
Karron at 352-560-0051 to
make other arrangements.
Items must be clean and
in good repair (no clothing,
please). Crafters are also
welcome to donate items
for sale, and the society
will display contact infor-
mation should someone
want to place an order.
The Humane Society of
Citrus County is a


nonprofit corporation ded-
icated to the protection of
all animals, and has been
operating in Citrus County
for more than 30 years. It is
not associated with or re-
ceiving funding from any
other humane society,
local or national, and is
not associated with Citrus
CountyAnimal Services. It
is supported only through
donations.
If anyone would like to
help the shelter where res-
cues are being housed
until they can be placed in
new homes, there are
many items needed on a
daily basis that could be
donated any time. Some of
the items that are always
needed are paper towels,
liquid laundry detergent,
bleach, household clean-
ers and blankets or quilts
for the animals to sleep on.
For more information,
call the Humane Society of
Citrus County at 352-
341-2222.


Can you help care


for a dog in need?


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County ani-
mal shelter needs loving
homes to care for several
of dogs until they find per-
manent homes.
Fostering a dog offers an
opportunity to make a
huge difference in the life
of that dog. There are all
types of dogs big, small,
old, young, low energy and
high energy. Some dogs
are overlooked by poten-
tial homes and the longer
they sit in a cage, the more


likely they are to become
bored, depressed, etc.
All dogs in foster care
remain the property of the
shelter until adopted. Fos-
ters are given plenty of
support while volunteers
search for permanent
homes for the animals.
Fosters complete a vol-
unteer application and at-
tend volunteer orientation.
Applications can be
found online or at the shel-
ter's office. Call 352-746-
8400 or visit www
citruscritters.com.


Jrfur baby the





Cutest?


through May 31st


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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TOGETHER


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 A17


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A18 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013









SPORTS


The Boston
Bruins try to
close out the
New York
Rangers on
Saturday./B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2
. %6,, Scoreboard/B3
-' TV, lottery/B3
Recreational sports/B4

t" -* NHL playoffs/B6
0 Golf, tennis/B6
0 Soccer/B6


Rays fall in extras


Rodney blows

two-run lead

in the ninth

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Lyle
Overbay homered with two outs
in the 11th inning, and the New
York Yankees rallied late to
beat the Tampa Bay Rays 4-3 on
Saturday
Overbay drilled a 1-0 pitch
from Josh Lueke (0-2) into the
right field seats to give New
York the lead.
Ivan Nova (2-1), who made his
first relief appearance after re-
turning from a right triceps in-
jury and being moved from the
Yankees' rotation to the
bullpen, struck out James
Loney and got an inning-ending
grounder from Matt Joyce with
the bases loaded in the 10th.
Mariano Rivera pitched a
perfect 11th inning for his 18th
straight save to start the season.
The right-hander tied Dennis


Eckersley for fourth place for
games pitched with 1,071. He
had been tied with Hoyt Wil-
helm, who coached Rivera in
the minors.
The Yankees
scored twice in the
ninth against strug- Rays b
gling Tampa Bay U For the
closer Fernando box sco
Rodney to pull even of Satu
at 3. other M
With two outs, see Pag
Overbay walked,
went to second on a
balk, and scored on Brennan
Boesch's pinch-hit RBI double.
Brett Gardner then added a
run-scoring single.
Gardner was caught attempt-
ing to steal second with Robin-
son Cano batting.
Rodney is just 9 for 14 in save
chances this year after convert-
ing 48 of 50 opportunities last
season.
Rays starter Matt Moore,
looking to start the season 9-0,
got a no-decision despite allow-
ing one run and five hits in six
innings. In his other start
against New York this season,
the left-hander gave up one run


and two hits over eight innings
on April 22 in a 5-1 victory
Yankees rookie Vidal Nuno
allowed two runs and five hits
over six-plus innings. The left-


ox score
Tampa Bay
ore and all
Irday's
1LB action,
ge B2.


hander, making his
second start and
fourth appearance,
has given up three
runs in 14 innings
overall.
Loney singled off
Nuno to start the
seventh and went to


third when Joyce
had a pinch-hit double against
Shawn Kelley Kelly Johnson
then put Tampa Bay up 2-1 on a
single off Boone Logan.
The Rays' advantage grew to
3-1 when Joyce slid home safely
under catcher Austin Romine's
tag attempt after Yunel Escobar
hit a grounder to shortstop
Jayson Nix.
Tampa Bay Rays batter Matt
Joyce hits a double off New
York Yankees relief pitcher
Shawn Kelley on Saturday in
St. Petersburg.
Associated Press


Boys Tennis Player of the Yearfinalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM





Overhead smash


Record


crowd


for CR


race

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent


Matt Allen,
Crystal River soph.


Gurnani, Everett, Allen headline top tier of Citrus County boys tennis


ecanto's Rishi Gurnani, Crystal
River's Matt Allen and Citrus' Kyle
Everett were the top dogs for their
boys tennis teams in 2013.
Each advanced
S to at least the semi-
finals of their dis-
trict tournaments
and had some stout
battles during the
regular season.
Read the capsules
for more on each of
these athletes.
The winner will
Jon-Michael be announced at the
Soracchi Chronicle sports
ON POINT banquet on Thurs-
day, May 30, at the
College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle
sports editor He can be emailed at
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or
reached at 352-564-2928.


All-Chronicle boys
tennis team
Rishi Gurnani,
Lecanto
As the Panthers' No. 1 singles player, the
junior made the District 3A-5 final and
did not lose to a county rival at that spot.
Gurnani also played for Lecanto's No. 1
doubles unit with Sam Alford.
Matt Allen,
Crystal River
The Pirates' No. 1 singles player
advanced to the semifinals of the District
2A-5 tournament in 2013, while also
holding a spot on CR's No. 1 doubles team.
Kyle Everett,
Citrus senior
The 'Canes senior battled with his Lecanto


and Crystal River counterparts throughout
the year as Citrus' No. 1 singles player and
half of his school's No. 1 doubles team.
Sam Alford,
Lecanto
The Panthers' No. 2 singles player,
the sophomore also played at No. 1
doubles with teammate Rishi Gurnani.
Lloyd Justo,
Lecanto senior
The Panthers senior didn't lose a match
at No. 3 singles to a county player and also
filled in at No. 2 singles several times.
Dhruv Patel,
Lecanto
The Panthers' regular No. 4 singles
player, Patel's only county loss came
when he played up at No. 3.
Complied by Jon-Michael Soracchi


CRYSTAL RIVER There
were 338 athletes registered for
the Memorial Day Crystal River
Sprint 1 race Saturday, and they
raced on a spectacular day
The record total for this race
made for some major races, ac-
cording to race director Chris
Moling.
"We had fast times on the
run," Moling said. "We had a
strong breeze as a headwind
going out, but it turned into a
nice tailwind coming back. We
had a lot of young athletes from
Talent ID Junior Nationals in
Pinellas County Jennifer
Hutchison (the women's master
winner) brought a good group of
youngsters. I'm happy for the
kids. It's a beautiful morning."
Bob Brockett, who was one of
those to start the triathlons
years ago, loved the weather but
wasn't so crazy about his time.
"It's a beautiful day," said
Brockett, who finished 48th with
a time of 1:12:13. "There's always
someone younger, faster and
stronger David Morrow of Clear-
water is 60 years old and finished
12th. Bruce Mann of Tarpon
Springs is 55 and finished 11th.
Those are achievements."
Patrick High of Lake Placid,
Fla., won the overall race with
a time of 1:00:58. He had to beat
out Groveland's John Hovius,
who was third overall and the
master's winner Hovius had a
time of 1:02:55. Hovius also fin-
ished third in 2012.
"It's a nice course," said
High, 51. "I took the lead about
a half mile into the run."
See Page B5


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2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
oda lovehnonIda.com
iO ta o HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt; 9AM-6PM Sat.; 11AM-4PM Sun.
SSertice 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt.; 8AM-2PM Sat.


Rishi Gurnani, Kyle Everett,
Lecanto junior Citrus senior


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............ i i dI "'--


OOOETP1


------------------- -4mm


Ir


JL v




MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


FFrmnlb 4 3 2 2 Dudalf
McCnnc 5 0 3 0 Byrd rf
JSchafrpr 0 1 0 0 Lyonp
G.Lairdc 0 0 0 0 Buckc
Uggla2b 4 1 2 2 I.Davislb
JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 RTejadss
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Hefnerp
Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 Baxter ph
Gattisph 1 0 1 2 Hwknsp
Varvarp 0 0 0 0 Ricep
CJhnsn ph 1 00 0 Burke p
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Vldspn ph
BUpton cf 4 0 0 1 Parnell p
Medlen p 2 0 0 0 Lagars cf
R.Pena 3b 3 0 2 0 Turner ph
Totals 38 7107 Totals


Atlanta 200 000 120 2 7
NewYork 100 110 020 0 5
E-B.Upton (2), Simmons (1). DP-Atlanta 1,
NewYork 1. LOB-Atlanta 9, NewYork 10.2B-
McCann (1), R.Pena (4), Dan.Murphy (15). HR-
FFreeman (3), Uggla (9), Buck (11).
SB-D.Wright (11). S-Simmons, B.Upton.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Medlen 6 7 3 3 1 9
Avilan 2/30 0 0 1 0
Gearrin 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
VarvaroW,2-0 2 2 2 1 1 4
KimbrelS,15-18 1 1 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Hefner 6 3 2 2 2 7
Hawkins BS,2-2 1 2 1 1 0 1
Rice 2/3 1 2 2 1 2
Burke 1/3 1 0 0 1 1
Parnell 1 1 0 0 1 0
LyonL,1-2 1 2 2 2 1 1
HBP-by Medlen (Dan.Murphy), by Kimbrel
(Buck), by Avilan (D.Wright).WP-Varvaro.
Braves 6, Mets 0


LOB-Atlanta 6, NewYork 9.2B-Simmons (7),
J.Upton (8). HR-Minor (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
MinorW,6-2 71/33 0 0 2 10
D.Carpenter 12/33 0 0 0 2
NewYork
GeeL,2-6 5 8 5 5 0 4
Carson 21/32 1 1 1 0
Burke 12/31 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Minor (Valdespin).
Reds 5, Cubs 2


ab r h bi
3 1 0 0 Choocf
S4 00 0 Cozartss
3 1 3 1 Vottolb
4 0 1 Phillips 2b
3 0 2 0 Bruce rf
0 0 0 0 Frazier3b
1 0 0 0 0 DRonsn If
0 0 0 0 Hanignc
3 0 0 0 HBaily p
3 0 0 0 Clzturs ph
1 00 0 LeCurep
4 0 0 0 Broxtn p
2 00 0 Chpmnp
1 000
1 000
32 26 2 Totals
002 000 000
000 104 OOx


LOB-Chicago 7, Cincinnati 6. 2B-Rizzo 2
(14), Hanigan (1). S-D.Robinson. SF-Frazier.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Tr.Wood L,4-3 52/37 5 5 3 5
Dolis 11/30 0 0 1 0
Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
H.BaileyW,3-3 6 5 2 2 3 8
LeCure H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1
BroxtonH,9 1 1 0 0 1 0
ChapmanS,12-14 1 0 0 0 0 2
Interleague
White Sox 2,
Marlins 1
Miami Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Pierre If 4 0 1 0 DeAza cf-lf 4 1 1 0
Polanc3b 4 0 0 0 AIRmrzss 4 0 2 1
Dietrch2b 4 1 1 1 Rios rf 4 0 0 0
Ozunarf 4 01 0 A.Dunndh 3 00 0
Coghlndh 3 0 2 0 Konerklb 4 0 1 0
Ruggincf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo If 3 0 0 0
Dobbslb 3 0 1 0 Wisecf 1 1 1 0
Hchvrrss 2 0 0 0 Gillaspi3b 4 0 3 1
Brantlyc 3 0 0 0 Kppngr2b 3 0 2 0
Gimenzc 3 00 0
Totals 31 16 1 Totals 33210 2
Miami 000 000 001 1
Chicago 001 000 001 2
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Miami 5, Chicago 8.
2B-Dobbs (5), AI.Ramirez (10), Wise (3). HR-
Dietrich (3). CS-Pierre (3), Keppinger (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Nolasco 72/38 1 1 0 6
M.Dunn 0 0 0 0 1 0
WebbL,1-3 1/3 2 1 1 0 0
Chicago
PeavyW,6-2 9 6 1 1 2 5
M.Dunn pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Webb pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
WP-Nolasco, M.Dunn. Balk-Peavy.


East Division
GB WC


Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
20 .574 5
21 .563 /2 6
24 .489 4 3/2 7
25 .457 5/2 5 2
27 .413 7/2 7 1


Str Home
L-1 15-8
L-2 15-10
W-2 12-10
L-4 10-11
W-1 9-13


L Pct
18 .625
20 .600
22 .551
24 .500
29 .408




L Pct
18 .625
24 .510
25 .490
29 .370
36 .265


Str Home
W-2 15-9
W-2 15-11
W-2 11-12
L-3 14-10
L-2 12-15




Str Home
W-8 15-5
L-1 13-10
W-1 11-12
L-5 9-17
L-4 7-18


West Division
GB WC


New York
Boston
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork
Miami


Str Home
W-2 15-7
W-2 13-10
W-7 12-13
L-7 11-10
L-2 8-19




Str Home
W-1 13-11
L-1 16-9
W-1 18-9
L-3 13-12
W-1 12-14


Associated Press
Cleveland Indians base runner Asdrubal Cabrera slides safely back to first base as Boston Red Sox first
baseman Mike Napoli takes the throw during the seventh inning Saturday at Fenway Park in Boston.



Red Sox overcome Indians


Associated Press

BOSTON Pinch-hitter Mike
Carp drove in the tying run with
an eighth-inning double and then
scored on a double by Dustin Pe-
droia as the Boston Red Sox ral-
lied for a 7-4 victory Saturday over
the Cleveland Indians.
The Red Sox scored four times
off reliever Vinnie Pestano (1-1),
who took over with Cleveland
leading 4-3 in the eighth.
Pedro Ciriaco doubled and
scored the tying run when Carp
batted for Jonny Gomes and hit a
high fly off the Green Monster in
left field. Pedroia's double off
The Wall with two outs gave
Boston its first lead of the game,
and the Red Sox added two more
on Daniel Nava's bloop single
with the bases loaded.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Orioles 6, Blue Jays 5
TORONTO Danny Valencia hit a
two-run homer and Adam Jones
added a solo shot to help the Balti-
more Orioles beat R.A. Dickey and the
Toronto Blue Jays 6-5.
The Orioles won for the fourth time
in five games following a season-long,
six-game losing streak.
Valencia connected off Dickey with
a second-deck drive in the third in-
ning, his second home run of the sea-
son both in the past two days.
Jones chased last year's NL Cy Young
Award winner with an even longer
drive in the seventh, his ninth of the
year and third in three games.

Twins 3, Tigers 2
DETROIT Joe Mauer homered
and had three hits, helping the Min-
nesota Twins snap a 10-game losing
streak with a 3-2 victory over the
Detroit Tigers.
Mauer had already earned the ire of
Detroit fans when he broke upAnibal
Sanchez's no-hit bid in the ninth inning
Friday night. He was booed when
came to bat in the first inning Saturday
- then booed some more after his
solo homer to right field.
The Twins scored three runs in the
first, and that was enough. P.J. Wal-
ters (1-0) went six innings, allowing
two runs and eight hits.

Angels 7, Royals 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Josh Hamil-
ton and Hank Conger homered to
back Billy Buckner's first major league
win since 2009, and the Los Angeles
Angels beat the Kansas City Royals
7-0 for their seventh straight victory.
The resurgent Angels have
outscored opponents 54-18 during their
longest winning streak of the season.
Conger's opposite-field shot leading
off the sixth inning was the first hit off Je-
remy Guthrie, who dropped his third
consecutive outing after going a Royals-
record 18 starts in a row without a loss.

Athletics 11, Astros 5
HOUSTON Josh Donaldson had
four hits and the Oakland Athletics
beat the Houston Astros 11-5.
Chris Young had three hits and
drove in two as Oakland's bats came
alive for a season-high 18 hits, and the
A's scored their most runs in a month.
Jason Castro and Matt Dominguez
each belted two home runs for the
Astros.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Baltimore 6, Toronto 5
Boston 7, Cleveland 4
L.A. Angels 7, Kansas City 0
Minnesota 3, Detroit 2
N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 3, 11 innings
Chicago White Sox 2, Miami 1
Oakland 11, Houston 5
Texas at Seattle, late
Today
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 2-2) at Toronto (Jenkins 1-
0), 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 3-4) at Detroit (Scherzer 6-0), 1:08
p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 3-3) at Boston (Doubront 3-2), 1:35
p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 5-
2), 1:40 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Williams 3-1) at Kansas City (W.Davis
3-3), 2:10 p.m.
Miami (Sanabia 3-6) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod
2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Colon 4-2) at Houston (Keuchel 1-1), 2:10
p.m.
Texas (Tepesch 3-4) at Seattle (Iwakuma 5-1), 4:10
p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
San Francisco 6, Colorado 5, 10 innings
Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 2
Pittsburgh 5, Milwaukee 2
Atlanta 7, N.Y Mets 5, 10 innings, comp. of susp.
game
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 0
Chicago White Sox 2, Miami 1
Philadelphia 5, Washington 3
L.A. Dodgers 5, St. Louis 3
San Diego at Arizona, late
Today
Chicago Cubs (Garza 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 2-0),
1:10p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 1-7) at Washington (Strasburg
2-5), 1:35 p.m.
Miami (Sanabia 3-6) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod
2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 5-2) at Milwaukee (Gallardo
3-4), 2:10 p.m.
Colorado (Garland 3-5) at San Francisco (M.Cain
3-2), 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (Marquis 6-2) atArizona (Corbin 7-0), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (S.Miller 5-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-2),
4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 3-1) at N.Y Mets (Marcum 0-5), 8:05 p.m.
INTERLEAGUE
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 1:08 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Colorado at Houston, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 3:10 p.m.
Texas at Arizona, 3:40 p.m., 1st game
San Francisco at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at Arizona, 9:40 p.m., 2nd game


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 7, Mets 5,
10 innings

Braves 6, Mets 0
NEW YORK Light-hitting pitcher
Mike Minor homered for his first two
RBIs in the majors and struck out 10
as the Atlanta Braves posted their
second win in a matter of hours, beat-
ing the New York Mets 6-0 for their
eighth straight victory.
Earlier, Dan Uggla hit a go-ahead
single in the 10th inning and the Braves
won 7-5 in the resumption of a game
suspended because of rain Friday night
after eight innings with the score tied.
Minor (6-2) then pitched 7 1/3 in-
nings of three-hit ball, sending the
Mets to their fifth loss in a row overall
and eighth straight at Citi Field.

Pirates 5, Brewers 2
MILWAUKEE Pedro Alvarez hit
two home runs, Andrew McCutchen
also went deep, and Jeff Locke
pitched six shutout innings to lead the
Pittsburgh Pirates to a 5-2 win over
the Milwaukee Brewers.


Neil Walker added a solo home run
for the Pirates, who won for a second
time in Milwaukee this season, but for
only the ninth time since 2007 at Miller
Park against 47 losses.
Locke (5-1) gave up three hits and
struck out a season-high seven, to win
his fourth straight game.
Carlos Gomez homered twice for
Milwaukee.

Giants 6, Rockies 5,
10 innings
SAN FRANCISCO--Angel Pagan
hit an inside-the-park home run with a
runner aboard in the bottom of the 10th
inning to give the San Francisco Giants
a 6-5 victory over the Colorado Rockies.
Troy Tulowitzki led off the 10th with
his 10th home run to put the Rockies
ahead 5-4.
Colorado closer Rafael Betancourt
(1-2) walked Brandon Crawford to
open the bottom half. Guillermo
Quiroz sacrificed before Pagan sent a
drive that bounced at the base of the
right-center fence and got away from
Michael Cuddyer.

Reds 5, Cubs 2
CINCINNATI Todd Frazier drove
in a pair of runs with a sacrifice fly and
a single, and the Cincinnati Reds used
another big inning to beat the Chicago
Cubs 5-2 for their fifth straight victory.
The Reds have won 13 of their last
16 games, surging to a season-high
13 games over .500 at 31-18. It's their
best start since 1995.
Cincinnati scored four times in the
sixth off left-hander Travis Wood (4-3),
extending its domination of the NL Cen-
tral's last-place team. Chicago has lost
a season-high six consecutive games.

Nationals 5, Phillies 3
WASHINGTON Michael Young
scored the go-ahead run from first base
on a single in the eighth inning, and
Domonic Brown homered and hit an
RBI double as the Philadelphia Phillies
beat the Washington Nationals 5-3.
The win evened the three-game se-
ries and gives the Phillies another
chance to reach .500 in Sunday's finale
- when they can also catch the Na-
tionals for second place in the NL East.

Dodgers 5, Cardinals 3
LOS ANGELES -Adrian Gonzalez
homered and drove in three runs,
Mark Ellis lined a go-ahead double in
the sixth inning and the Los Angeles
Dodgers defeated St. Louis 5-3 to
snap the Cardinals' three-game win-
ning streak.
The last-place Dodgers, who had
lost five of seven, blew a two-run lead
before Ellis' two-out hit off Seth
Maness (3-1) scored Carl Crawford
from first base to make it 4-3.
Paco Rodriguez (1-2) earned his
first major league victory.

INTERLEAGUE
White Sox 2, Marlins 1
CHICAGO Conor Gillaspie hit a
run-scoring single in the ninth inning to
score Dewayne Wise, lifting the
Chicago White Sox to a 2-1 win over
the Miami Marlins.
Derek Dietrich homered in the top of
the ninth to spoil Jake Peavy's shutout
bid, but in the bottom half, Gillaspie
drove in Wise who had come in as a
defensive replacement to give the
White Sox their eighth win in 11 games.
Peavy (6-2) struck out five and al-
lowed six hits in the complete-game
effort, his longest outing of the season.


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


Texas
Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston





Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego
Los Angeles


6011
5 0 1 0
5010
4000
5020
3000
5 1 1 0
5110
2000
2 1 1 0
2 1 1 0
1 0 1 1
1 0 0 0
5 0 1 1
41 3 9 3
4
2110
2110
1011
1000
5011
413 9 3
-4


NL

Braves 7, Mets 5,
10 innings


Cleveland Boston
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Stubbs cf-rf 3 1 0 0 Ellsury cf 3 00 0
Kipnisph 1 00 0 JGomslf 3 0 0 1
Aviles2b 5 11 0 Carpph-lf 1 1 1
ACarerss 5 13 1 Pedroia2b 4 1 2 1
Swisherlb 4 1 2 1 D.Ortizdh 3 1 0 0
MrRynl3b 3 01 0 Napolilb 4 0 1 0
CSantndh 4 01 1 Navarf 3 1 1 2
YGomsc 4 00 0 D.Rossc 5 00 0
Brantly If 4 0 2 0 Iglesias ss 4 2 3 0
Raburnrf 3 00 0 Ciriaco3b 4 1 3 1
Bourncf 1 01 0
Totals 37 4113 Totals 34711 6
Cleveland 102 000 100 4
Boston 010 101 04x 7
E-Raburn (1), Mar.Reynolds (4), Ciriaco (7).
LOB-Cleveland 8, Boston 12. 2B-A.Cabrera
(15), Swisher (13), Brantley (8), Carp (6), Pe-
droia 2 (14), Iglesias (3), Ciriaco (2). SB-
A.Cabrera 2 (4). SF-J.Gomes.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Kazmir 5 5 2 2 4 6
ShawBS,1-1 1 2 1 1 1 1
J.SmithH,5 1 0 0 0 1 2
PestanoL,1-1 1 4 4 4 2 2
Boston
Lester 7 10 4 4 1 8
TazawaW,4-2 1 0 0 0 0 2
A.BaileyS,6-7 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Lester (Mar.Reynolds). WP-Lester.
Balk-Kazmir.

Twins 3, Tigers 2


Minnesota Detroit
ab r h bi


Carroll 2b
Mauerc
Wlngh If
Mornea lb
Colaell dh
Parmel rf
WRmrz cf
Hicks cf
EEscor 3b
Flormn ss


0 Dirks If
1 TrHntrrf
0 MiCarr 3b
1 Fielder lb
0 VMrtnz dh
1 JhPerlt ss
0 B.Pena c
0 Infante 2b
0 D.Kelly cf
0 AGarci ph-cf


ab r h bi


Totals 34 39 3 Totals 352 9 2
Minnesota 300 000 000 3
Detroit 000 011 000 2
E-Ortega (1). DP-Minnesota 1, Detroit 2.
LOB-Minnesota 7, Detroit 7. 2B-Morneau
(13),Tor.Hunter(14), Infante (7). HR-Mauer (3),
Jh.Peralta (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Walters W,1-0 6 8 2 2 1 3
DuensingH,8 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
RoenickeH,6 1/30 0 0 0 0
BurtonH,10 1 0 0 0 0 0
PerkinsS,9-10 1 1 0 0 0 1
Detroit
FisterL,5-2 7 8 3 3 1 7
Putkonen 0 1 0 0 0 0
Coke 1 0 0 0 0 2
Ortega 1 0 0 0 1 1
Putkonen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Fister (W.Ramirez).


Tampa Bay Rays

schedule
May 27vs Miami
May 28 vs Miami
May 29 at Miami
May 30 at Miami
May 31 at Cleveland
June 1 at Cleveland
June 2 at Cleveland
June 4 at Detroit
June 5 at Detroit
June 6 at Detroit
June 7 vs Baltimore
June 8 vs Baltimore
June 9 vs Baltimore
June 10 vs Boston
June 11 vs Boston


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 31 17 .646 6-4 L-1 14-8 17-9
Cincinnati 31 18 .633 /2 8-2 W-5 18-6 13-12
Pittsburgh 30 19 .612 1/2 8-2 W-1 18-9 12-10
Milwaukee 19 28 .404 11Y2 10 3-7 L-1 12-14 7-14
Chicago 18 30 .375 13 11/2 2-8 L-6 10-14 8-16


East Division
GB WC


West Division
L Pct GB WC
21 .563 -
22 .551 /2 3
22 .551 /2 3
26 .447 5/2 8
27 .426 6/2 9


Gardnrcf 4 12 1 Jnnngscf
Cano2b 3 00 0 RRorts2b
V.Wells If 5 0 0 0 Scott dh
Hafner dh 4 0 1 1 Longori 3b
DAdms3b 5 0 1 0 Zobrist rf
ISuzukirf 5 0 2 0 Loneylb
J.Nixss 5 0 1 0 SRdrgz If
Overay b 4 2 1 1 Joyce ph-lf
AuRmnc 3 00 0 JMolinc
Boeschph 1 1 1 1 KJhnsnph
CStwrt c 1 00 0 Loaton c
YEscor ss
Totals 40 49 4 Totals
NewYork 100 000 002 01


TampaBay000 010 200 00 3
E-R.Roberts (4). DP-NewYork 1, Tampa Bay
1. LOB-New York 8, Tampa Bay 10.2B-Gard-
ner (9), Boesch (2), Jennings (10), Longoria
(16), Joyce (7), J.Molina (6). HR-Overbay (8).
SB-J.Nix (4), Jennings (7). CS-Gardner (4).
S-Lobaton.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Nuno 6 5 2 2 1 2
Kelley 0 1 1 1 0 0
Logan 0 1 0 0 0 0
Claiborne 2 0 0 0 0 2
D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 1 1
NovaW,2-1 1 2 0 0 1 2
RiveraS,18-18 1 0 0 0 0 2
Tampa Bay
M.Moore 6 5 1 1 2 2
McGee 1 1 0 0 0 2
Jo.Peralta H,13 1 0 0 0 1 2
Rodney BS,5-14 1 2 2 2 1 1
LuekeL,0-2 2 1 1 1 1 3
Nuno pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Kelley pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Logan pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Nuno (Scott). Balk-Rodney.
Umpires-Home, John Tumpane; First, Jim
Reynolds; Second, James Hoye; Third, John
Hirschbeck.
T-4:03. A-25,874 (34,078).

Orioles 6,
Blue Jays 5
Baltimore Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
McLothlf 4 02 0 MeCarrlf 5 1 2 1
Machd3b 5 10 0 Gosepr-lf 0 0 0 0
Markksrf 3 1 1 0 Bautistrf 5 1 3 0
A.Jonescf 4 1 1 1 Encrncdh 5 00 0
C.Davisb 4 1 1 1 Lindlb 5 031
Hardy ss 4 1 2 2 Lawrie3b 5 1 2 0
Valenci dh 3 1 1 2 CIRsmscf 4 0 0 0
YNavrr2b 4 0 0 0 Bonifac 2b 4 1 1 1
ACasill2b 0 0 0 0 HBlancc 3 0 1 0
Snyderc 4 0 1 0 Mztursph 0 1 0 0
Arencii c 0 0 0 0
Kawskss 4 0 1 1
Totals 35 69 6 Totals 40513 4
Baltimore 302 000 100 6
Toronto 110 010 020 5
E--FGarcia (1), YNavarro (2). DP--Baltimore 1.
LOB-Baltimore 5, Toronto 9.2B-C.Davis (17),
Hardy (10), Bautista (9), Lawrie (4). HR-
A.Jones (9), Valencia (2), Bonifacio (2). SB-
Lawrie (1), Kawasaki (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
FGarciaW,1-2 5 9 3 2 0 1
S.Johnson H,1 22/33 2 2 1 5
O'DayH,7 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
Ji.JohnsonS,15-18 1 0 0 0 0 1
Toronto
DickeyL,4-6 62/39 6 6 3 4
Cecil 11/30 0 0 0 3
Loup 1 0 0 0 0 0
PB-H.Blanco.

Red Sox 7, Indians 4


Atlanta


Smmns ss
Heywrd rf
J.Upton If


New York
r h bi
0 0 0 DnMrp 2b
0 0 0 Ankiel cf-rf
2 0 0 DWrght 3b


ab r h bi
4 2 3 1
4231
4000
4020
401 1
501 1
0000
321 1
5 0 1 0
5 1 1 0
5010

2000
1000
1 0 0 0
0000
0000
0000
1 0 0 0
1000
0000
0000
1 0 0 0
31000
39510 4


Atlanta


Smmns ss
Heywrd cf
J.Upton rf
FFrmn lb
Gattis If
JSchafr cf
McCnn c
Uggla 2b
CJhnsn 3b
R.Pena 3b
Minor p
DCrpnt p



Totals
Atlanta
NewYork


New York
r h bi
1 2 0 DnMrp2b
2 1 1 RTejad ss
1 2 1 DWrght3b
0 2 2 Byrd rf
0 0 0 Turnerlb
00 0 Duda If
00 0 Reckerc
0 0 0 Baxter ph
1 2 0 Lagars cf
00 0 Burke p
1 2 2 I.Davis ph
0 0 0 Gee p
Ankiel ph
Carson p
Vldspn cf
6116 Totals
000 050 100
000 000 000


ab r h bi
4000
4030
4000
4000

4010
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
2000
1 0 1 0
1010
3000
0000
1000
0000
1000
0000
1000
330 6 0
6
0


38


Cincinnati


Chicago

DeJess cf
SCastro ss
Rizzo b
ASorin If
Schrhlt rf
Dolis p
Sweeny pi
Gregg p
Castillo c
Valuen 3b
Ransm ph
Barney 2b
TrWood p
Borbon rf
Hairstn ph
Totals
Chicago
Cincinnat


ab r h bi
3000
4000



3 1 1 2
2 0 1 1
4 1 2 1
3100
3210
4010
3112

1201 1

0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


295 7 5
4121
2000
1011
0000
0000
0000


2957 5
-2
-5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL


Yankees 4, Rays 3,
11 innings
New York Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi


0
K




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Angels 7, Royals 0
Los Angeles Kansas City
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Aybarss 4 00 0Getz2b 3 00 0
Trout cf 4 2 1 1 EJhnsn2b 1 0 1 0
Pujolslb 3 10 1 AEscorss 4 0 1 0
Trumorf 4 0 1 2 AGordnlf 4 00 0
Hamltndh 4 1 1 1 Butlerdh 2 0 0 0
HKndrc2b 3 01 1 Hosmerlb 3 0 1 0
Callasp3b 4 00 0 L.Caincf 3 0 0 0
Congerc 4 22 1 Loughrf 3 00 0
Shuck If 4 1 2 0 Mostks3b 2 0 1 0
Kottars c 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 78 7 Totals 270 4 0
Los Angeles 000 101 140 7
Kansas City 000 000 000 0
E-Kottaras (2). DP-Los Angeles 2. LOB-Los An-
geles 4, Kansas City 5. 2B-Moustakas (7). HR-
Hamilton (7), Conger (2). SB-Trout (12), A.Escobar
(10). CS-Moustakas (1). S-Aybar, Hosmer.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
BucknerW,1-0 5 2 0 0 3 2
D.De La Rosa H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1
S.DownsH,10 1 1 0 0 0 0
Coello 1 1 0 0 0 2
Kohn 1 0 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
Guthrie L,5-3 71/35 7 6 1 2
Coleman 1/3 2 0 0 0 1
Collins 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
G.Holland 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Buckner (Moustakas), by Guthrie
(H.Kendrick, Pujols). WP-Buckner 2.

Pirates 5, Brewers 2
Pittsburgh Milwaukee
ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMartelf 5 00 0 Aokirf 4 00 0
Sniderrf 4 00 0 Segurass 4 00 0
McCtchcf 4 1 2 1 Braun If 4 0 1 0
GJoneslb 3 0 1 0 ArRmr3b 3 0 0 0
Melncnp 0 00 0Lucroyc 3 00 0
Watsonp 0 00 0CGomzcf 3 22 2
RMartnc 4 01 0 Weeks2b 4 0 1 0
Walker2b 4 22 1 AIGnzlzlb 3 0 0 0
PAIvrz3b 3 2 2 3 Fiersp 1 0 0 0
Barmes ss 4 0 1 0 Grzlny p 0 00 0
Lockep 2 00 0 YBtncrph 1 0 1 0
Ingeph 1 00 0 Badnhpp 0 0 0 0
JuWlsnp 0 00 0 Bianchiph 1 00 0
GSnchzlb 0 0 0 0 Axfordp 0 0 0 0
Figarop 0 00 0
Totals 34 59 5 Totals 31 2 5 2
Pittsburgh 120 100 001 5
Milwaukee 000 000 101 2
E-Ar.Ramirez (3), Lucroy (2). DP-Pittsburgh 1, Mil-
waukee 2. LOB-Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 5. 2B-
Braun (11). HR-McCutchen (7), Walker (2), PAlvarez
2 (10), C.Gomez 2 (8). SB-S.Marte (12). CS-Mc-


Cutchen (2).

Pittsburgh
Locke W,5-1
Ju.Wilson
Melancon H,17
Watson
Milwaukee
FiersL,1-3
Gorzelanny
Badenhop
Axford
Figaro
WP-Badenhop.


IP H RERBBSO


Giants 6, Rockies 5,

10 innings
Colorado San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Fowlercf 3 1 1 0 Pagancf 6 1 2 2
LeMahi2b 5 0 0 0 Scutaro2b 4 0 1 1
CGnzlzlf 5 1 3 2 Sandovl3b 5 0 2 0
Tlwtzkss 5 2 2 1 Poseyc 5 2 3 0
Cuddyrrf 5 1 1 1 Pencerf 4 1 1 1
Arenad3b 5 0 1 0 Beltib 4 1 1 0
Pacheclb 5 01 1 GBlanclf 2 00 0
RBtncrp 0 0 0 0 AnTrrsph-lf 2 01 1
Torrealc 3 0 1 0 BCrwfrss 3 1 2 1
EYongpr 0 00 0 Zitop 2 00 0
WLopezp 0 00 0 Pillph 00 0
Heltonib 0 00 0 Noonanph 0 00 0
Nicasiop 2 00 0 Gaudinp 0 00 0
Outmnp 0 00 0 Ariasph 1 00 0
Ottavinp 0 00 0Machip 0 00 0
Brothrsp 0 00 0 Affeldtp 0 00 0
Belislep 0 00 0 Romop 0 00 0
Blckmnph 0 00 0 Quirozph 0 00 0
WRosrph-cl 0 1 0
Totals 39 5115 Totals 38613 6
Colorado 200 200 000 1 5
SanFran. 000 003 100 2 6
One out when winning run scored.
E-B.Crawford (7). DP-San Francisco 1. LOB-
Colorado 8, San Francisco 12. 2B-Fowler (8), Tu-
lowitzki (12), Cuddyer (10), Pagan (10), Posey (12),
Pence (13), An.Torres (8), B.Crawford 2 (11). HR-
C.Gonzalez (13), Tulowitzki (10), Pagan (3). SB-
C.Gonzalez (9). S-Fowler, Nicasio, Quiroz.
SF-B.Crawford.
IP H RERBB SO
Colorado
Nicasio 5 7 2 2 1 2
OutmanH,3 1/3 1 1 1 10
OttavinoH,2 1 1 1 1 2 1
BrothersBS,1-2 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
Belisle 1 2 0 0 0 0
W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 0
R.Betancourt L,1-2 1/3 1 2 2 1 0
San Francisco
Zito 6 7 4 4 1 3
Gaudin 1 1 0 0 0 1
Machi 1 1 0 0 0 0
Affeldt 1 1 0 0 0 1
RomoW,3-2 1 1 1 1 0 1
Machi pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Nicasio pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Zito (Fowler). WP-Nicasio, Zito.

Phillies 5, Nationals 3
Philadelphia Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollins ss 5 0 1 1 Spancf 5 1 3 1
Galvis2b 5 00 0 Harperrf 4 0 1 0
MYong3b 3 1 0 0 Zmrmn3b 5 0 1 0
Howard b 4 00 0 LaRochlb 4 1 2 2
DYongrf 301 1 Dsmndss 4 0 1 0
Mrtnzpr 0 1 0 0 KSuzukc 4 0 1 0
Mayrry rf 0 0 0 0 TMoore If 3 0 1 0
DBrwnlf 4 1 2 2 Koernspr-lf 0 0 0 0
Kratzc 4 1 1 1 Lmrdzz2b 4 1 1 0
Reverecf 4 00 0Harenp 2 00 0
Pettionp 2 1 1 0 Berndnph 1 00 0
Frndsn ph 0 00 0 HRdrgz p 0 00 0
Bastrd p 0 00 0 Storenp 0 0 0 0
Durbinp 0 00 0 Tracyph 1 0 0 0
Horstp 0 0 0 0 Abadp 0 00 0
Quinterph 0 0 0 0
Papelnp 0 0 00
Totals 34 56 5 Totals 37311 3
Philadelphia 020 010 020 5
Washington 001 110 000 3
E-Rollins (7), T.Moore (1). LOB-Philadelphia 6,
Washington 11. 2B-Rollins (14), D.Brown (7), Petti-
bone (1). HR-D.Brown (9), Kratz (4), LaRoche (8).
SB-Span (6). CS-Span (3).


Philadelphia
Pettibone
Bastardo
Durbin W,1-0
Horst H,2
Papelbon S,9-9
Washington
Haren
H.Rodriguez
Storen L,0-1
Abad


IP H RERBBSO


HBP-by H.Rodriguez (Frandsen). WP-
Bastardo.


6
0
0
0
3

10
0
1
1
-Pettibone,


Fo2r ~tz r-ecord


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
2-6-19-21-27
POWER BALL
25


CASH 3 (early)
9-5-1
CASH 3 (late)
9-9-6

PLAY 4 (early)
1-2-3-3
PLAY 4 (late)
9-0-5-7

FANTASY 5
3-8-19-28-35

LOTTERY
1-21-26-30-46-48
XTRA
5


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 7 8 28 32
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 4
3-of-4 MB 28
3-of-4 1,040
2-of-4 MB 1,291
1-of-4 MB 10,550
2-of-4 28,761


$1,646.00
$515.50
$41.00
$23.00
$2.50
$2.00


Fantasy 5:1 2 10 25 28
5-of-5 3 winners $76,438.04
4-of-5 333 $111.00
3-of-5 10,539 $9.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (NBC) Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix
10:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One Racing Monaco Grand Prix
(Same-day Tape)
12 p.m. (ABC) 2013 Indianapolis 500 race
5:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600 race
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN2) ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament final: Teams TBA
MLB
1:30 p.m. (SUN, TBS) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (FSNFL, WGN-A) Miami Marlins at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at New York Mets
BASKETBALL
NBA PLAYOFFS EASTERN CONFERENCE FINALS
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers Game 3
GOLF
7:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: BMW PGA Championship,
Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial,
Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) Senior PGA Championship, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, Final
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Pure Silk-Bahamas Classic, Final Round
HOCKEY
NHL PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Teams TBA
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Houston Dynamo at Sporting Kansas City
11 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: Seattle Sounders FC at Los Angeles Galaxy
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
NCAA TOURNAMENT SUPER REGIONAL
12 p.m. (ESPN) Alabama-Birmingham vs. Florida
3 p.m. (ESPN) Alabama-Birmingham vs. Florida (If necessary)
5 p.m. (ESPN) Arizona State vs. Kentucky
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Arizona State vs. Kentucky (If necessary)
TENNIS
5 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open Tennis First Round
9 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open Tennis First Round
12 p.m. (NBC) French Open Tennis First Round

RADIO
MLB
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays


Dodgers 5, Cardinals 3


St. Louis Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab
MCrpnt2b 5 1 1 0 Punto3b 4
Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4
Choatep 0 00 0 AdGnzllb 3
Boggs p 0 0 0 0 Kemp cf 3
Wggntnph 1 00 0 Jansenp 0
Hollidy If 3 0 0 0 Uribe ph 1
Craiglb 4 1 0 0 Leaguep 0
YMolinc 4 1 3 1 Ethierrf 4
Freese 3b 3 0 1 1 VnSlyk If 2
Jay cf 3 0 1 0 Belisari p 0
Kozma ss 4 0 1 1 PRdrgzp 0
Gastp 1 0 0 0 Schmkrcf 2
J.Kelly p 1 0 0 0 A.Ellisc 3
CMrtnzp 0 00 0 DGordnss 4
MAdmsph 1 0 0 0 Lilly p 2
Manessp 0 00 0 Crwfrdlf 2
SRonsn rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 37 3 Totals 34
St. Louis 100 002 000


Oakland 060 400 010 11
Houston 101 101 100 5
E-Rosales (4). DP-Houston 2. LOB-Oakland 9,
Houston 6.2B-Crisp (12), Jaso (6), Donaldson (17),
C.Young (6), Altuve (10). HR-Donaldson (7), Moss
(7), J.Castro 2 (6), Dominguez 2 (7).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Griffin W,5-3
Okajima
J.Chavez
Houston
Harrell L,3-6
E.Gonzalez
Blackley
W.Wright
Ambriz


510 5
- 3


Los Angeles 101 011 01x 5
E-M.Carpenter (4), Punto (5). DP-St. Louis 1.
LOB-St. Louis 8, Los Angeles 13. 2B-Y.Molina (12),
Freese (5), Punto (5), M.Ellis (3), Ad.Gonzalez (9),
Uribe (2). HR-Ad.Gonzalez (5).
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Gast 1 1 1 1 2 0
J.Kelly 3 5 2 2 1 6
Ca.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 2
ManessL,3-1 1 1 1 0 1 2
Choate 1 1 0 0 1 0
Boggs 1 2 1 1 2 0
Los Angeles
Lilly 51/32 2 1 1 3
Belisario BS,2-2 1/3 3 1 1 1 0
PRodriguezW,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 0
JansenH,10 11/32 0 0 0 4
LeagueS,10-12 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gast pitched to 1 batter in the 2nd.
J.Kelly pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by J.Kelly (M.Ellis), by Lilly (Freese).

Athletics 11, Astros 5


Oakland
ab rh
Crisp cf 5 2 3
Jaso c 6 1 1
Cespds dh 4 0 1
S.Smith If 5 2 3
Dnldsn 3b 4 2 4
Mosslb 4 2 1
CYoungrf 5 1 3
Sogard2b 5 1 2
Rosales ss 5 0 0


Houston
bi
1 Grssmn cf
1 Altuve 2b
1 JCastro c
1 JMrtnz If
2 Carter dh
1 C.Penalb
2 Pareds rf
1 Dmngz3b
1 MGnzlz ss


Totals 43111811 Totals


ab r h bi
5 0 1 0
5 1 2 0
5120
4233
3000
4000
4000
4 0 1 0
4010
4222
4000
375 9 5


52/35 4 4 1 7
11/33 1 1 0 1
2 1 0 0 0 1


Sprint Cup

Coca-Cola 600 Lineup
AfterThursday qualifying; race today
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1.(11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.624 mph.
2. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 195.221.
3. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.094.
4. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 194.595.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.503.
6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.349.
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.238.
8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 193.952.
9. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 193.694.
10. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 193.639.
11. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 193.444.
12. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 193.292.
13. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 193.271.
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 192.961.
15. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 192.52.
16. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 192.287.
17. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 192.191.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 192.13.
19. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 192.123.
20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 191.884.
21. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 191.884.
22. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 191.727.
23. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 190.988.
24. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 190.826.
25. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 190.792.
26. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 190.665.
27. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 190.49.
28. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 190.416.
29. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.409.
30. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 190.241.


31. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 190.047.
32. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.967.
33. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 189.793.
34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 189.401.
35. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 189.049.
36. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 188.725.
37. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.
38. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 188.659.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 188.219.

Nationwide

History 300 Results
Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200 laps, 150 rating,
0 points, $57,050.
2. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 120.6,
0, $40,950.
3. (6) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 107.1, 0, $31,575.
4. (18) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 98.7, 40, $34,675.
5. (16) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 102.9,
0, $22,925.
6. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 90.8, 38, $25,000.
7. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 86.2, 37,
$23,875.
8. (9) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 92.4, 0, $17,000.
9. (5) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 87.7, 35,
$22,250.
10. (10) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 105.5, 34,
$22,650.
11. (3) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 113.9, 34, $21,025.
12. (7) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 109.6, 33,
$20,375.
13. (20) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 81.7, 31, $20,750.
14. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 96.5, 31,
$27,675.
15. (4) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 90.2, 29, $20,180.
16. (13) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 74, 28,
$18,675.
17. (33) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 68.9, 27, $18,450.
18. (17) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 200, 77.8, 27, $18,225.
19. (15) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 65, 25, $18,150.
20. (8) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 70.7, 24, $18,550.
21. (24) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 199, 59.8, 0,
$12,125.
22. (22) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 198, 61, 22,
$17,900.
23. (36) Hal Martin, Toyota, 197, 50.1, 21, $17,850.
24. (34) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 196, 45.9, 20,
$17,785.
25. (40) Steve Wallace, Ford, 196, 45.1, 19, $12,225.
26. (30) Kyle Fowler, Ford, 196, 48.1,18, $17,715.
27. (29) Dexter Stacey Ford, 194, 42.8, 17, $17,680.
28. (35) Juan Carlos Blum, Chevrolet, 194, 32.6, 16,
$17,645.
29. (27) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 188, 43.7, 15,
$11,600.
30. (32) Eric McClure, Toyota, 186, 41, 14, $17,855.
31. (19) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, accident, 183,
63.6, 0, $11,520.
32. (31) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 174, 48.8, 12,
$17,475.
33. (25) Travis Pastrana, Ford, accident, 163, 60.2,
11, $17,430.
34. (23)Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, electrical, 162, 44.1,
10, $17,400.
35. (26) John Wes Townley, Toyota, accident, 160,
42.5, 0, $11,369.
36. (28) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 155, 44.4, 8,
$16,600.
37. (38) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, engine, 146, 29.3,
7, $16,575.
38. (12) Chris Buescher, Ford, 134, 36, 6, $16,556.
39. (37) Jason White, Toyota, suspension, 110, 23.9,
5, $16,435.
40. (39) Robert Richardson Jr, Chevrolet, accident,
45, 27, 4, $16,330.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 129.917 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 18 minutes, 33 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.939 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 33 laps.
Lead Changes: 9 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1; K.Busch 2-44; S.Hornish Jr.
45-51; K.Busch 52-88; B.Vickers 89-91; K.Busch 92-
148; K.Swindell 149; K.Busch 150-157; S.Hornish Jr.
158-159; K.Busch 160-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
K.Busch, 5 times for 186 laps; S.Hornish Jr, 2 times
for9 laps; B.Vickers, 1 time for 3 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time
for 1 lap; K.Swindell, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 376; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
347; 3. J.Allgaier, 336; 4. E.Sadler, 331; 5. B.Vickers,
327; 6. PKligerman, 322; 7. A.Dillon, 321; 8. B.Scott,
313; 9. K.Larson, 288; 10. A.Bowman, 282.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins,
Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position
While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green,
Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.




Crowne Plaza

Invitational
Saturday
At Colonial Country Club, Fort Worth, Texas
Purse: $6.4 million
Yardage: 7,204, Par: 70
Third Round
Matt Kuchar 65-65-69 -199 -11
Matt Every 65-69-66-200 -10
Chris Stroud 67-66-67-200 -10
Boo Weekley 67-67-66--200 -10
Graham DeLaet 64-67-69-200 -10
Martin Flores 66-70-65 201 -9
Tim Clark 67-69-65 201 -9
John Rollins 63-71-67-201 -9
Steve Flesch 68-64-69 201 -9
Bud Cauley 67-69-66 202 -8
Jonas Blixt 67-68-67-202 -8
Zach Johnson 69-65-68 202 -8
Freddie Jacobson 66-67-69--202 -8
Charley Hoffman 66-70-67--203 -7
J.J. Henry 68-68-67--203 -7
Scott Stallings 69-65-69 203 -7
Chris Kirk 67-66-70 203 -7
Jordan Spieth 65-67-71 203 -7
JoshTeater 65-67-71--203 -7
Ted Potter, Jr. 70-66-68 -204 -6
Brendon de Jonge 66-70-68 204 -6
Tommy Gainey 65-72-67-204 -6
Chez Reavie 70-64-70 204 -6
Hunter Mahan 69-68-68--205 -5
Jason Kokrak 66-71-68- 205 -5
Jim Furyk 69-66-70--205 -5
BoVan Pelt 70-68-67-205 -5
Ben Kohles 67-67-71 --205 -5
Brian Davis 67-68-70 205 -5
Daniel Summerhays 65-73-67--205 -5
Ryan Palmer 62-72-71 205 -5
Kyle Reifers 68-69-69 206 -4
Bryce Molder 67-70-69--206 -4
Brian Stuard 67-70-69 206 -4
Bob Estes 67-68-71 --206 -4
John Peterson 64-71-71 --206 -4
Marc Leishman 66-68-72 206 -4
John Huh 66-68-72 206 -4
Patrick Reed 70-69-67--206 -4
Angel Cabrera 70-67-70 207 -3


CamiloVillegas 70-68-69--207 -3
Richard H. Lee 70-68-69 207 -3
Seung-Yul Noh 69-69-69 -207 -3
Ken Duke 66-68-73 -207 -3
Shawn Stefani 69-70-68 -207 -3
David Lingmerth 72-64-72 -208 -2
CharlieWi 69-66-73--208 -2
Carl Pettersson 66-69-73 208 -2
Rickie Fowler 69-69-70 208 -2
Roberto Castro 67-68-73 208 -2
Scott Piercy 69-69-70 208 -2
Derek Ernst 66-69-73 -208 -2
Luke Guthrie 71-68-69- 208 -2
MichaelThompson 67-72-69-208 -2
Kevin Chappell 69-70-69 -208 -2
John Merrick 68-70-71 209 -1
Jason Dufner 67-71-71 --209 -1
Dicky Pride 69-70-70 209 -1
Bobby Gates 69-70-70 -209 -1
Sang-Moon Bae 69-70-70 -209 -1
Greg Chalmers 67-72-70 -209 -1
Robert Karlsson 69-68-73 210 E


D.J. Trahan 67-70-73 -210
Morgan Hoffmann 64-73-73 210
Justin Hicks 71-64-75 -210
Franklin Corpening 68-70-72 -210
Tim Herron 71-67-72 -210
Henrik Stenson 68-70-72 -210
Vaughn Taylor 71-68-71 210
David Frost 69-70-71 210
Brandt Jobe 68-68-75 211
Cameron Tringale 70-69-72 -211
Erik Compton 68-71-72 -211
Martin Laird 70-69-72 -211

Senior PGA

Championship


Kenny F
Jay Haa
Russ C.
Rod Sp
Kohki Ic
Peter Se
Steve P
Fred Fu
Duffy W
Tommy
Kirk Trip
Joel Ed
Dan Fo
Kiyoshi
Mark O
Tom By
Bruce V
Jay Dor
Sonny
Mark M
RogerC
Joe Oz,
Tom Pe
Jim Car
Brian H
Jeff Cos
Tom Wa
Chien-S
Bernha
Mark M
Peter Ja
Tom Kit
Bart Bry
Gene S
Loren R
Michael
Mike Hi
Rocco I
Jim Rut
Bill Glas
Gary Ri
Don Be
Mike G(
Philip G
Sandy
Jeff Har
Jerry Pa
Neal La
Willie W
Gil Morg
Kazuhir
Jeff Slu
Morris h
Boonch
DesSm
Peter Fo
Andrew
Terry Pr
Hale Irw
Scott H.
Dick Ma
Francisc
lan Woc
Wayne
Bob Ga
Greg Tu
Brad Br
Barry L
Mark W
LannyV
Jay Dels
Gene J
Jim Gal


Saturday
At Bellerive Country Club, St. Louis
Purse: TBA ($2.1 million in 2012)
Yardage: 6,959, Par: 71
Third Round
Perry 69-66-68-203 -10
as 66-72-67--205 -8
ochran 69-66-71-206 -7
little 69-71-67-207 -6
loki 71-69-68--208 -5
senior 68-71-69-208 -5
ate 73-68-68 -209 -4
nk 69-71-69--209 -4
'aldorf 66-72-71 -209 -4
Armour, III 72-70-68-210 -3
plett 70-71-69 -210 -3
wards 72-69-69-210 -3
rsman 69-71-70--210 -3
Murota 67-70-73 -210 -3
'Meara 73-70-68--211 -2
rum 72-71-68--211 -2
'aughan 70-71-70-211 -2
n Blake 71-69-71 -211 -2
Skinner 67-73-71 -211 -2
ielke 69-71-71 -211 -2
Chapman 72-74-66-212 -1
aki 71-74-67- 212 -1
mice, Jr. 72-71-69-212 -1
rter 70-72-70 --212 -1
enninger 73-68-71-212 -1
ston 71-69-72-212 -1
atson 69-71-72 -212 -1
Soon Lu 68-72-72 -212 -1
rd Langer 79-67-67 -213 E
cNulty 71-74-68--213 E
acobsen 75-69-69 --213 E
e 72-71-70 -213 E
yant 73-69-71 -213 E
auers 70-71-72-213 E
loberts 70-68-75 -213 E
Allen 73-70-71-214 +1
ulbert 73-70-71 -214 +1
Mediate 69-74-71 -214 +1
ledge 75-67-72--214 +1
sson 69-73-72--214 +1
usnak 72-69-73-214 +1
rry 72-69-73 -214 +1
oodes 69-77-69-215 +2
holding 73-72-70--215 +2
Lyle 71-74-70 -215 +2
rt 72-72-71 -215 +2
ate 73-71-71 -215 +2
ncaster 73-71-71 -215 +2
food 74-68-73 -215 +2
gan 69-72-74--215 +2
oTakami 76-70-70-216 +3
man 75-71-70-216 +3
Hatalsky 75-70-71 -216 +3


u Ruangkit
lyth
owler
Oldcorn
rice
win
och
ist
co Minoza
osnam
Levi
us
rner
yant
ane
iebe
Vadkins
sing
ones
lagher, Jr.


75-70-71 -216 +3
73-72-71 -216 +3
72-72-72 -216 +3
69-74-73 -216 +3
71-72-73 -216 +3
70-73-73 -216 +3
76-67-73 -216 +3
70-72-74 -216 +3
71-70-75-216 +3
75-71-71 -217 +4
71-75-71 -217 +4
71-74-72 -217 +4
74-70-73 -217 +4
73-71-73-217 +4
75-71-72 -218 +5
70-71-77-218 +5
71-75-73-219 +6
70-76-73 -219 +6
70-74-75-219 +6
73-68-78 --219 +6


NHL playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Tuesday, May 14
Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1
Los Angeles 2, San Jose 0
Wednesday, May 15
Chicago 4, Detroit 1
Thursday, May 16
Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3
Friday, May 17
Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3
Saturday, May 18
Detroit 4, Chicago 1
San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
Sunday, May 19
Boston 5, N.Y. Rangers 2
Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh 1, 20T
Monday, May 20
Detroit 3, Chicago 1
Tuesday, May 21
Boston 2, N.Y Rangers 1
San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1
Wednesday, May 22
Pittsburgh 7, Ottawa 3
Thursday, May 23
N.Y Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT
Detroit 2, Chicago 0, Detroit leads series 3-1
Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0, Los Angeles leads se-
ries 3-2
Friday, May 24
Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh wins series 4-1
Saturday, May 25
Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 1, Boston wins series 4-1
Chicago 4, Detroit 1, Detroit leads series 3-2
Today
Los Angeles at San Jose, 8 p.m.
Monday, May 27
Chicago at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, May 28
x-San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD
Wednesday, May 29
x-Detroit at Chicago, TBD




NBA playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
CONFERENCE FINALS
Sunday, May 19
San Antonio 105, Memphis 83
Tuesday, May 21
San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT, San Antonio
leads series 2-0
Wednesday, May 22
Miami 103, Indiana 102, OT
Friday, May 24
Indiana 97, Miami 93, series tied 1-1
Saturday, May 25
San Antonio at Memphis, late
Today
Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, May 27
San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 28
Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29
x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Thursday, May 30
Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 31
x-San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m.
Saturday, June 1
x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 2
x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Monday, June 3
x-Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 B3


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Athletes make split-second decisions


It is amazing how as we go
through our lives, we make
decisions on a daily basis,
both conscious and unconscious.
Many of those deci-
sions affect our well-
being and survival in
the blink of an eye.
In athletics, these
decisions are fre-
quently made instan-
taneously Whether (._
you are running or
walking the neighbor-
hood block or are the
star quarterback, Dr. Ron
goalie or pitcher on DOCT
your league, high ORD
school or college
team, you have to
make decisions in order to be
competitive, get a good workout
or are crossing the street and
avoiding getting hit by a car
Competing in sports teaches us
from an early age to make a deci-
sion. Not all the decisions are
correct but decisions are made.


I



II
rI
1


These decisions and choices are
frequently learned neuro-motor
responses made instantaneously
but after being learned, re-
hearsed and en-
hanced after long
hours of practice.
There are certainly
different types and
V timing to the deci-
sions with which ath-
letes are faced. The
idea that athletes are
better at making high-
speed sport-specific
Joseph decisions is based on
OR'S what is known about
ERS the brain and how it
changes with deliber-
ate practice. Also, as
kids are introduced to sports and
athletics, this process of deci-
sion-making appears to develop
more acutely
A recent study published in
The Journal of the American Col-
lege of Sports Medicine points to
some very interesting potential


differences in the way that ath-
letes and non-athletes make high-
speed decisions. The outcome
was deemed not to be a result of
athletic ability but was thought
the result of decision making,
based on rapidly gathered data
and rapidly acting on it
It appears athletes those
participating in both team and
individual sports -were able to
quickly gather more information
and process this information
more accurately and rapidly To
these researchers, it appeared
that athletes did not move faster
but that they thought faster.
Again, the point being is that
athletes, in their sport, must rou-
tinely make split-second deci-
sions often in complex
environments. There is no ques-
tion that multiple personality
traits are involved in this
process. The fact is athletes and
sports-active individuals gather
data and make decisions and in
most sports are immediately re-


warded with the results of that
decision whether it was correct
or not. The point to be made:
there is no committee to be pon-
derous and collaborative, a de-
cision has to be made.
Athletes perform better on
tests of processing speed, a test
of how quickly a subject can re-
spond to visual or audio stimuli.
Also, athletes test better on di-
vided attention tests. These dif-
ferences in performance had no
relationship with just how good
or elite an athlete was, the bet-
ter athletes demonstrate in-
significant differences
compared to less expert ones.
There is a great truism for sur-
geons that I learned many years
ago, which is, "you can't do sur-
gery by committee." You have to
make a decision quickly based
on gathered information and the
situation at hand. Belaboring a
decision in most cases results in
a faulty decision and in sports, a
delayed decision is always a


wrong one, because it is too late.
Athletes, soldiers, medical
professionals and countless
other tradesmen and profes-
sionals are educated and
trained to make decisions, many
split-second ones. They do not
have the luxury of committees,
groups and legal beagles, telling
them what the correct and polit-
ically correct decision is.
To segue to tomorrow, Memo-
rial Day, our soldiers in the face
of more and more urban combat
are thrust into the need for in-
stantaneous, life-altering deci-
sions for not only themselves,
but their comrades and their
country as well.
My prayers this Memorial Day
go out to those warriors that
made the decision to serve our
nation. Thank you.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at
SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute,
may be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


Things to do for kids


Special to the Chronicle

Come out and enjoy a
week of quality instruc-
tion and competition at
the 2013 Panther Basket-
ball Camp from June 17-
20. The camp will at the
Lecanto High School gym
and each day will run
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The cost is $60 per child
through June 1; after that,
each child will cost $75.
There are multiple sibling
discounts ($120 for two
children, $160 for three.
Panther Camp offers
quality basketball instruc-
tion at an affordable cost
to area youth from ages 6
through 14. We will be lim-
iting the camp to the first
100 registered campers, so
register early
Campers will receive in-
struction in the funda-
mentals of dribbling,
passing, shooting, and de-
fending the basketball.
All players should either
bring a bagged lunch to
camp or they will be able
to purchase a lunch at
camp for $5 per day (sand-
wich, chips and drink). A
concession will also be
open during the day
Families with multiple
siblings will receive a dis-
count for two or more chil-
dren. Contact Frank
Vilardi at 352-362-0011 for
more information.
USSSA basketball
tournament
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is teaming up with
USSSA Basketball for a last-
chance qualifier for the end of
the year state tournament
held in Melbourne on June 6-
9. Come out and support the
high-energy, fast-paced travel
teams from across Florida
and the Southeast region of
the United States. Entry for
the tournament is $10 per day.
The tournament is at Lecanto
High School & Middle School
on May 31 to June 2.
For more information re-
garding the event, contact
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Kayak Camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with 2 Sisters Kayak Tours, is
holding Kayaking Camps this
summer. Each camp will be
held at Hernando Beach Park


I?~~n~zl~ -~ur g rilim, P


Associated Press
Zyahir Tidwell cools off under a water fountain during a hot afternoon on Tuesday in North Camden, N.J.


from Monday to Thursday
and at Chassahowitzka River
on Friday.
Children ages 8 to 15 are
eligible and the cost is $80
per child. We will offer four
different weeks to choose
from throughout June and
July. Each week will have two
time slots that will accommo-
date ages 8 to 11 and ages
12 to 15 separately.
For more information, con-
tact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540
or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com
Archery Camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership with
McPherson's Archery & Out-
door Pro Shop, is holding an
Archery Camp this summer.
The camp will be offered on
two different weeks and partici-
pants will be separated by age.
For more information con-
tact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540,
visit www.citruscountyparks.
com or McPherson's Archery
at 352-341-2820.
Youth golf lessons
Citrus County Parks &


Recreation, in partnership
with Pine Ridge Golf Course,
will hold summer youth golf
lessons. The lessons will be
held at Pine Ridge Golf
Course on Wednesday morn-
ings from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
or Thursday evenings from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. They begin
Wednesday, June 12 and
Thursday, June 13, and run
for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 15 are
eligible and the cost is $80
per child with $15 off for addi-
tional siblings.
For more information, con-
tact Crysta Henry, recreation
program specialist for youth
programs at 352-527-7543,
www.citruscountyparks.com,
or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.
Citrus Hills
Junior Golf Camp
The 17th annual Citrus Hills
Junior Golf Camp starts
Wednesday, June 5.
Ages range from 4 to 17.
Included in our golf camp is
a free summer membership.
You have a choice of five con-
secutive Wednesdays from 9
to 11 a.m. or five consecutive


Thursday from 5:30 to 8 p.m..
In addition to teaching them
golf, we feed them pizza and
soda every lesson.
The cost of the camp is
$100. We also carry junior
merchandise and equipment
in our pro shop.
Classes fill up quickly, so
please call Citrus Hills Golf
Shop at 352-746-4425 for
more information or to regis-
ter your junior.
CRHS Volleyball
Camp set for June
The Crystal River Volleyball
Camp will be held from June 3
to 7 from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
at Citrus Springs Middle
School. The camp is open to
girls ages 11 to 16 from any
county or surrounding schools
and it is open to girls of all skill
levels.
The cost of the camp is
$55 and camp registration
forms are available at Crystal
River High School, Crystal
River Middle School, Citrus
Springs Middle School, or
contact Mike Ridley at
352-566-7789 or email at
ridleym@citrus.kl2.fl.us.


Panthers plan
volleyball camp
Summer volleyball camp
will be offered by the Lecanto
Panthers this summer.
Open to fourth-graders
through entering ninth-
graders, cost is $65.
Parents can pick up a regis-
tration form at Lecanto High
School or email Alice Christian
at christiana@citrus.kl 2.fl.us
for more information and times.
CR hoops camp
tips off in June
The Crystal River 2013
hoops camp has three ses-
sions: June 3-6, 10-13 and
17-20. Each day goes from 9
a.m. to 12 p.m..
One session is $49, two
sessions are $79 and all
three are $99.
All pre-registered campers
will receive a camp T-shirt
and the first 24 campers who
register for all three weeks will
receive an Adidas basketball.
For more information,
contact Steve Feldman at
feldmans@citrus.kl2.fl.us or
352-601-0870.


Youth


bowlers


win


prizes


16-year-old

rollsperfect

game

Special to the Chronicle

Beverly Hills Bowl was
the venue for the GCUS-
BCAs inaugural Youth
Scholarship Bowling Tour-
nament Bowling in two di-
visions, 12 and under, and 13
and older, youth members of
Citrus County's bowling as-
sociation competed in a
three-game handicap match
on Saturday, May 18.
Josh Cook captured first
place in the 13 and older
division with a 744 handi-
cap series. Alex Alt bowled
the second-best score and
Kayla Micali took third
place. Fourth place was
taken by Hanna Roof.
In the younger division,
Jenna Williams was the
winner with Christen
Miller, Eathan Homes and
Megan Allen coming in sec-
ond, third and fourth, re-
spectively Megan Allen was
also the winner of the draw-
ing for the bowling ball.
Instead of cash prizes,
winnings are deposited
into the youth bowler's
scholarship account main-
tained by the United States
Bowling Congress, which
becomes available to the
bowler for any educational
opportunity after gradua-
tion from high school.
Youth Bowler rolls
perfect game
On Tuesday, May 21, bowl-
ing at Parkview Lanes in the
Summer "Young and Rest-
less" Youth Adult Bowling
League, 16-year-old Matthew
Allen rolled his first 300 game.
Matthew started the match
with a 177 game, then re-
peated that score in his sec-
ond game and finished with a
654 series (218 average) by
bowling 12 strikes in a row in
game three to the cheers of
the other bowlers and a
perfect game.


Men's flag football tournament now open


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation is hosting a 4-on-4 Men's
Flag Football Tournament on
Saturday, July 13 at the Ho-
mosassa Area Recreational Park
beginning at 9 a.m. This event is
for adults aged 18 years and up.
For more information, call 352-
527-7540 or visit the website at
www. citruscountyparks. com.
Adult co-ed kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kickball
league is for adults 18 and up.
Games are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
and 8:30 p.m. at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River, lasting an hour or
nine innings, whichever comes first.
The new season tentatively starts
July 10. Registration for teams be-
gins June 6 and ends July 5. For
more information, call 352-527-7540.


Beach volleyball
Registration for our second sea-
son of beach volleyball begins for
teams on Monday and runs
through June 14. Games are
played starting at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River.
The fee is $15 per player, with a
maximum of seven players per
team. For more information, call
352-527-7540.
Aqua Zumba at
Bicentennial Park Pool
Love the water and want to get
active? Come and join Aqua Zumba
at Bicentennial Pool.
Classes are at 10 a.m. on Satur-
days. The cost is $4 per class.
For more information, contact
Bicentennial Pool at 352-795-1478.


Swimming lessons Annunal Independence C s C
at Bicentennial Pool Golf Tournament Citrs ContyPar
and Recreation


Are you interested in having your
children learn how to swim or in
learning to swim yourself? Bicen-
tennial Pool offers swimming les-
sons for all ages, including adult
swim lessons.
Lessons are twice a week and run
for a two-week session. For more in-
formation, call Bicentennial Pool at
352-795-1478.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to
start up again on June 28. Games
are played at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River on Thursdays starting
at 6:30 p.m.
Registration for teams is from
May 20 through June 21. For more
information, call 352-527-7540.


Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7
is holding signups for its seventh an-
nuall Independence Golf Tourna-
ment, which is at 8:30 a.m.
Saturday, June 29 at Citrus Springs
Golf & Country Club.
The entry fee is $60 and includes
green fees and cart, coffee and
donuts, beer, a door prize ticket, a
goodie bag and one free putt in the
putting contest.
Multiple prizes will be available
and a Fourth of July-style picnic will
follow the tournament.
For additional tournament infor-
mation, contact Ray Thompson at
813-230-9750, Citrus Springs G&CC
at 352-489-5045 or visit the website
at www.rollingthunder7.com


adult league scores
Men's softball
Monday night scores
from Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River
AMS Oil 14, The Machines 8.
O1' Guys w/ Help 17,
Reflections Church 16.
Advanced Fitness 18,
Sons of Pitches 8.
Men's flag football
Thursday night scores
from Homosassa Area
Recreational Park
Blue 26, Green 13.
Pink 53, Purple 7.
Red 48, Orange 12.


..w ..wv. ..w..


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foyt back at track with chance to win Indy 500


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS A.J.
Foyt became a legend at
Indianapolis Motor Speed-
way as much for throwing
caution to the wind as for
becoming the first four-
time winner of
the Indy 500. Indy
Maybe that's
why he's so fond U Time:
ofTakuma Sato. today.
The Japanese U TV: AE
driver is in his
first season with


Foyt's team and will start
on the outside of the sixth
row in Sunday's race. And
just like the owner of his
modest program, Sato has
built a rock star following in
IndyCar with his dramatic
moves, audacious passes
and daring mentality
"I go for it when I see if I
can, and if there's a good
chance, I definitely go for
it, because that's racing,"
Sato said. "But I think the
500 last year, it makes it
pretty clear for the fans, if


I'm given a chance, I'll go
for it for sure."
Sato certainly went for it
last year
He wound up talking
about it after a visit to the
infield care center.
Sato was driving for
Rahal Letter-
S500 man at the
time, and trail-
12 p.m. ing eventual
winner Dario
3C Franchitti
down the front
stretch. Sato


knew the way his car was
handling that his best
chance was to try for the
lead on Turn 1, so even
though he was getting
pinched, that's exactly
what he did.
Sato kept going lower
and lower until his left
tires were in the grass, and
he shot up the banking and
into the outside wall. His
car splintered on impact
-he walked away without
any injuries -while Fran-
chitti was left alone to win


Associated Press
Car owner A.J. Foyt talks with driver Takuma Sato during
practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 13 in Indianapolis.


his third Indianapolis 500.
"I've watched it a hun-
dred times, maybe more,"
Sato said. "I don't know. I
think if there's a similar
chance, I'd go for it, for
sure."
It's that kind of bravado
that's made him such a fan
favorite.
When Sato was intro-


duced during the public
drivers' meeting on Satur-
day morning along the
front stretch, he drew one
of the biggest cheers from
a crowd bundled up
against the chill. Asked
why he was cheering for
Sato, one fan replied, "Be-
cause he went for it."
"Well, dad always told


me that it's easier to calm
a hard-charger down than
prod a guy that doesn't
want to change," ex-
plained Larry Foyt, the
team manager ofA.J. Foyt
Racing and the one most
responsible for giving Sato
a full-time ride this year.
"I think we knew he was
a good race driver," the
elder Foyt said, adding that
he wanted someone who
could bring a "10th-place
car home in 10th and a fifth-
place car home in fifth."
In other words, an ag-
gressive driver who knows
when to be aggressive.
Something that Sato is
slowly beginning to learn.
"I think the obvious thing
is if you keep wrecking
A.J.'s race cars, you have to
tell him," Larry Foyt said
with a smile. "It's a pretty
calming effect on you."
The unlikely pairing of
Sato with the hot-tem-
pered Texan has already
paid off.
Sato is the points leader.


He won the Toyota Grand
Prix of Long Beach in just
his third race with the new
team, the first for Foyt's
program since Airton Dare
won at Kansas in 2002. It
was also the first victory
on a road or street course
for the team since Foyt
was behind the wheel in
1978 at Silverstone.
He was in contention at
the next stop in Brazil,
too, finishing second to
James Hinchcliffe.
The 78-year-old Foyt had
to watch from afar because
of a sciatic nerve. But he
wouldn't miss returning to
the Brickyard for anything,
so he's been walking
around gingerly as his two-
car team rookie Conor
Daly is also in the field
today has prepared for
this year's Indy 500.
"I've been up and down
like a yo-yo. I've been on
top, I've been zero-zero,"
Foyt said. "It's great to see
it's all been pulled
together."


- 41
C,~ -a- Ojh
-1` LS- -~ ii*~ 0..
r- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r 3- 1 j -- w--- Ic

dIr l


Associated Press
Jimmie Johnson drives his car out of the garage to practice Saturday for today's NASCAR Sprint Cup series
Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.






History, not legacy
S 0 legacy


Johnson looking for

race win right now,

not championship

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. Jimmie
Johnson is focused on chasing vic-
tory at the Coca-Cola 600. He said
he's not thinking about his cham-
pionship legacy
A win tonight would be Johnson's
fourth in NASCAR's longest race,
trailing only Darrell Waltrip's five
spring victories at Charlotte Motor
Speedway Johnson could also
strengthen his series points lead
with his third win this season as he
chases his
Coca-Cola sixth Sprint
600 Cup title. And
a win would
Time: be a record
5:30 p.m. seventh at
today. Charlotte.
TV: FOX It's a re-
sume already
worthy of
NASCAR's Hall of Fame- perhaps
even in the running for NASCAR's
greatest driver but that is not
something the 37-year-old Johnson
is ready to think about.
"I just don't pay attention to it all,"
Johnson said. "It's very difficult to
think about where I fit in while I'm
still racing. I think of drivers' ca-
reers ending mid 40s. I still have 10
years or so to even think about that."
He's got plenty of others thinking
about it as Johnson's milestones
pile up. He captured his fourth
Sprint All-Star race at Charlotte last
week, a record.
Hendrick Motorsports teammate
Jeff Gordon, a four-time Sprint Cup
champion, called Johnson's career
phenomenal.
Johnson had won several off-road
racing titles when Gordon backed


RACE
fa,
Continued from Page B1
jo
In second place was Nicholas B]
LeBlanc, 16, of Fernandina Sc
Beach. He had a time of 1:02:26. isl
LeBlanc took off in the first
wave and High and Hovius were co
in the second wave.


Associated Press
Matt Kenseth leads all Sprint Cup
drivers this season with three
victories to date.
him to team owner Rick Hendrick.
Johnson drove his first Sprint Cup
race for the team in 2001 and joined
the series full time the next season.
Combine Johnson's talent with
Hendrick's resources and the skill
of crew chief Chad Knaus and "the
rest is really history in what his ca-
reer has been and the numbers that
he has put up I think speak for
themselves," Gordon said.
Johnson's numbers at Charlotte
speak very loudly, too. He won three
straight Coca-Cola 600s from 2003
through 2005, a stretch that also in-
cluded victories in the fall races in
2004 and 2005. Johnson won here in
October 2009, tying Waltrip and
Bobby Allison for the all-time mark
of six Charlotte victories.
"How do I describe his career?
Do we have that much time?" said
Matt Kesenth, who leads the series
with three victories this season.
Johnson believes his success in
the non-points all-star race gives
him confidence for Sunday His
winning All-Star car is still in
NASCAR's technical section and

"I did better than I expected," was 1
eBlanc said. "It's (the course) was
st and flat." 1:06:
Another young triathlete en- Cr
yed the terrain. Kaileah
lazek, 16, of Clermont and Da
)uth Lake High School, fin-
hed 29th with a time of 1:10:12.
"It's flat," Blazek said of the Me
course. High,
Ashley Thomas of Groveland Wo


the team couldn't get it back in time
to run in the 600.
"We have a lot to work from, but
it's still a new weekend," Johnson
said. "(The) race is much different
than before. We feel like we have a
good direction and we'll see where
things stack up at the end of the
night on Sunday"
NASCAR chairman and CEO
Brian France gave an update on the
sport's Gen-6 car, which was put in
use this year and he says has brought
tighter, closer racing to the tracks.
"That's the hallmark of
NASCAR," France said. "We boldly
say that. We don't talk about that's
sort of part of it, that's the steak on
the plate for us. Our fans have come
to expect us to deliver on that that
as much as possible."
Expect Johnson to get pressured
from many fronts during the race.
Sprint Cup super power Joe
Gibbs Racing has three cars among
the top eight starters, including
pole sitter Denny Hamlin, who led
qualifying with a track record of
195.624 mph Thursday night.
Kenseth, who won at Darlington
two weeks ago, will start third while
Kyle Busch starts eighth. Busch has
won 11 times at Charlotte in the Na-
tionwide and Truck series, but
never on NASCAR's biggest stage.
Defending champion Kasey
Kahne, Johnson's teammate, will
start near the front in sixth.
Kurt Busch of Furniture Row
Racing looked like he had taken his
second straight pole after Darling-
ton before Hamlin caught him by
about five-hundreths of a second for
the top spot. Kurt Busch led 69 of
the first 73 laps at Darlington before
fading to 14th. He'll give it another
go Sunday night.
"We know we've got some good
things going right now," he said.
Dale Earnhardt Jr will start at
No. 11. He was on his way to victory
in this race two years ago when he
famously ran out of gas on the final
lap and got passed by winner Kevin
Harvick.

the top female finisher. She Thomas,
10th overall with a time of Men's
45. ius, Grove
stal River Memorial womer
y Sprint 1 Triathlon nifer Hutc
2013 Results1:10:59.6
n's Overall winner: Patrick 1. Patri
Lake Placid 1:00:58.1. 1:00:58.2
omen's Overall winner: Ashley Fernandir


Kyle Busch


victorious in N.C.


Driver takes

Nationwide

race Saturday

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. Kyle
Busch has shown repeat-
edly he can win at Char-
lotte Motor Speedway on
the Nationwide and Truck
series. The question re-
mains whether he can cap-
ture that elusive first
Sprint Cup victory
Busch dominated Satur-
day, racing to his sixth Na-
tionwide Series victory of
the season and record sev-
enth career win at the 1.5-
mile track. He also was
Truck Series winner at the
track last week, his fifth
victory in that circuit at
Charlotte.
Today, he looks to make
it a clean sweep of all
three series events with a
win in the Coca-Cola 600.
Busch has finished in the
top eight in 10 of the last 11
Sprint Cup races at CMS
but has never won a
clear source of frustration.
"Definitely," Busch said.
"I have been close here so
many years. Two years ago
at the fall race I led a ton
of laps and then Matt
Kenseth passed me with
like eight laps to go. I've
certainly had some devas-
tating moments here at
this race track."
He thinks he has a "top
five" car for today
There was no doubt he


had the top car Saturday
Ten years and a day after
his Nationwide debut,
Busch won for the record
57th time in the series.
And he did it in domi-
nating fashion.
Busch started on the
front row and led 186 of
the 200 laps. That's the
most laps led at this race
since Dale Earnhardt led
194 in 1986.
Busch managed several
late restarts to break a tie
with Mark Martin for the
most Nationwide victories
at the track.
"Mark is really, really
good in the Nationwide se-
ries and there's a lot of
things I'm beating him at,
which is cool," Busch said.
"This is cool for us and
great for this team. It's fun
to come to Charlotte. It's
my favorite track."
With 13 laps to go Busch
beat Kasey Kahne off the
restart and was never
challenged the rest of the
way with the clean air
helping him cruise to the
finish line.
"I got to the outside and
just didn't get the run,"
Kahne said of the final
restart. "It was over at that
point. Kyle Busch is tough
to beat in this series."
Busch actually stole a
page from Kahne's book
late in the race, noticing
his primary competitor
had found success and
was gaining ground on him
- when he moved up to
the top of the track.
"I hadn't been up there
all day, so it was a little
scary," Busch said.


Associated Press
Kyle Busch raises the trophy in Victory Lane after winning
the NASCAR Nationwide Series' History 300 auto race
Saturday at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.


Groveland 1:06:45.1.
Masters winner: John Hov-
eland, 1:02:55.3.
n's Masters winner: Jen-
hison, St. Petersburg

Top 10 Finishers
ck High, Lake Placid
; 2. Nicholas LeBlanc,
na Beach 1:02:26.6; 3.


John Hovius, Groveland, 1:02:55.3;
4. Justin Lewis, Gainesville
1:05:26.7; 5. Scott Matney, Apopka
1:05:36.4; 6. Graham Pimental,
Naples 1:05:46.4; 7. Dave Bracken,
Tarpon Springs 1:05:10.6; 8. Pete
Strawser, Odessa 1:06:15.9; 9.
Park Alsop, Clearwater 1:06:32;
10. Ashley Thomas, Groveland
1:06:45.1.


AUTO RACING


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kuchar leads Colonial after three rounds


Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas -
Matt Kuchar made a 12-
foot birdie putt at the 16th
hole, the same place
where his long Saturday at
Colonial began, and led
four players by a stroke
after three rounds.
Kuchar had a 1-under 69
that included some near
misses and two nice par-
savers to close his round to
get to 11-under 199. Gra-
ham DeLaet, Boo Weekley,
Chris Stroud and Matt
Every were tied for second.
When the second round
was suspended Friday
night because of an ap-
proaching storm, Kuchar -
WGC-Accenture Match
Play in February had
just hit his tee shot at the
par-3 16th. He resumed
there at 7:13 a.m. Saturday
with a two-putt from about
40 feet That was part of
three quick pars to keep his
one-stroke lead after two
rounds, and he then played


in the final group that fin-
ished just after 5 p.m.
After his go-ahead stroke
in the third round at No. 16
- he had fallen behind by
two strokes during the
round Kuchar's ap-
proach shot at the 379-yard
17th landed in a greenside
bunker and he blasted from
there to 13 feet and saved
par. At the 414-yard 18th,
Kuchar hooked his tee shot
into the left rough and
found tall grass near the
green with his second shot
before pitching to 3 feet.
Weekly and Every shot
66. Stroud had a 67, and
DeLaet, playing with
Kuchar, had three back-
nine bogeys before a
birdie at No. 18 for a 69.
Senior PGA
Championship
ST. LOUIS Kenny Perry
had an eagle, five birdies and
four bogeys, mixing spectacu-
lar shots with stumbles and
doing enough of the right


Associated Press
Matt Kuchar watches his tee shot on the second hole
during the third round of the Colonial golf tournament Sat-
urday in Fort Worth, Texas.


things for a 3-under 68 and a
two-stroke lead after the third
round of the Senior PGA
Championship.
The 52-year-old Perry is
close to an elusive first major
championship in a career
known more agonizing al-
mosts in the 2008 Masters
and 1996 PGA than his 16
total tournament victories and
$34 million in winnings. He
was at 10 under overall at


Bellerive Country Club, which
held up fine after a rain delay
of more than two hours before
the last twosome of Perry and
Russ Cochran teed off.
Two-time champion Jay
Haas was second after clos-
ing with a pair of birdies for a
67. Cochran was three
strokes back after rallying for
two birdies on the back nine
for an even-par 71.
Perry had a two-shot lead


with two holes to go in the 2008
Masters, but lost in a playoff to
Angel Cabrera. The Kentucky
player had a late lead and lost it
in the 1996 PGA, losing in a
playoff to Mark Brooks.
Bahamas
LPGA Classic
PARADISE ISLANDS, Ba-
hamas Paola Moreno of
Colombia played another
bogey-free round on a 12-hole
golf course to take the lead in
the Bahamas LPGA Classic.
Playing in the final group,
with the sun setting over the
ocean along the eighth fairway,
Moreno handled the wind and
increasing darkness to make a
simple par for a 4-under 41 and
9-under 81 total. That gave her
a one-shot lead over Lindsey
Wright, who had seven birdies
for a 38. Cristie Kerr was
among 10 players within three
shots of the lead, though they
won't have as many holes to
make up ground.
Because of flooding on the


Ocean Club earlier in the
week, the tournament is three
rounds of 12 holes. The goal
is to get in 36 holes by Sun-
day to make it official.
BMW PGA
Championship
VIRGINIA WATER, Eng-
land Spain's Alejandro
Canizares shot a 4-under 68
at Wentworth to take a one-
stroke lead over England's
Lee Westwood after the third
round of the BMW PGA
Championship.
Canizares birdied the final
two holes to reach 9 under.
Westwood had a 67.
Italy's Matteo Manassero
and Scotland's Marc Warren
were 7 under. Manassero shot
69, and Warren had a 70.
Sergio Garcia, the Spanish
player whose verbal sparring
with Tiger Woods turned ugly
this week when he said he
would "serve fried chicken" if he
had dinner with Woods, was
four strokes back after a 68.


ore from Paris


Williams wants

to add to French

Open haul

Associated Press

PARIS In the moments
immediately following her
stunningly early exit from the
2012 French Open, as her eyes
welled with tears and she be-
moaned how she's "been
through so much in my life,"
Serena Williams could not
possibly find anything positive
to take from the experience.
How could she?
For the first and, so far,
only time in her career,
Williams lost her opening
match at a Grand Slam tour-
nament. Not merely that, but a
woman many considered the
favorite to leave with the title
lost to a woman ranked 111th
and with 20 first-round losses
in 46 previous major champi-
onships. And, surely adding to
her disappointment, Williams
lost after having been two
points from victory against
France's Virginie Razzano.
When the 31-year-old Ameri-
can returns to Court Philippe
Chatrier to play Anna Tatishvili
today the schedule for Day 1
of the 2013 French Open also
features Williams' older sister,
30th-seeded Venus, and 17-time
Grand Slam champion Roger
Federer- she will do so with a
different understanding of what
went wrong 12 months ago, and
even a bit of appreciation for
the disappointing result
"Sometimes I think, 'Should
I be happy that I lost last year?'
You never know what can hap-
pen in your career and why
things happen," said Williams,
who is ranked and seeded No.
1 in singles and got a wild card
Saturday to play doubles with
her sister. "So it's been great
for me just realizing that every
match counts."
At that point she paused,
perhaps hearing her own
words and what they implied.
"I have always realized
that," Williams continued, "but
also realizing what I need to do
to get better and to stay on top
and to be, you know, the best
tennis player that I can be."
Rare is the professional ath-
lete, no matter the sport, who
readily acknowledges taking


Associated Press
Serena Williams currently has 15 Grand Slam title, which is three behind the 18 both Martina
Navratilova and Chris Evert have.


victory for granted against a
supposedly inferior opponent.
That, though, is what it sounded
like Williams was doing.
There are, to be sure, other
explanations for what she has
done on the court since that
defeat: good health, which her
mother, Oracene Price, calls
the biggest single contributor
to Williams' recent success;
working with a new coach,
Patrick Mouratoglou, who di-
rected her training session Sat-
urday on Court Suzanne
Lenglen; and what Williams
sums up as "really just staying
relaxed and calm" during
matches.


But it certainly can't hurt to
take every match seriously, in-
cluding against players such
as Tatishvili, who is 2-10 this
year, 0-2 at the French Open
for her career and never been
ranked better than 50th.
"You just have to always ...
be ready to play," Williams
said, "and expect anything."
So now she is back at the
French Open, which she won in
2002, and is playing as well as,
or perhaps even better than,
ever Williams is on a 24-match
winning streak, part of a 36-2
record with a tour-leading five
titles this season. Since that
loss to Razzano, Williams is 67-


3, including championships at
Wimbledon and the U.S. Open
that boosted her career haul to
15 Grand Slam titles.
With three more, Williams
would match Hall of Fame
members Martina Navratilova
and Chris Evert at 18.
Evert thinks Williams will
eventually surpass that total,
and continue climbing up the
list that Margaret Smith Court
leads with 24 major champi-
onships, followed by Steffi
Graf's 22, and Helen Wills
Moody's 19.
"It's still a reachable goal for
her to win 22 and match
Steffi," Evert said.


Bayem


claims


Champions


League


Team defeats

Dortmund2-1 in

final on Robbengoal

Associated Press

LONDON -Arjen Robben scored
in the 89th minute to give Bayern Mu-
nich a 2-1 win over German rival
Borussia Dortmund in the Champi-
ons League final Saturday, ending
four years of frustration for his team
in Europe's biggest tournament.
Robben ran onto Franck Ribery's
backheeled flick in the penalty area
and put the ball past goalkeeper
Roman Weidenfeller to send Bayern
to its first Champions League victory
since 2001. The German team had lost
two of the last three finals, including
on penalty kicks to Chelsea last year
in its own stadium in Munich.
In a game that featured a slew of
chances for both teams, Mario
Mandzukic put Bayern ahead in the
60th minute at Wembley Stadium be-
fore Ilkay Gundogan evened the
score on a penalty kick eight minutes
later after defender Dante fouled
Marco Reus in the area.
Robben, who missed two great
chances in the first half, then finally
came through for Bayern to set off
wild celebrations in the red-and-
white end of Wembley It was the per-
fect redemption for Robben, who
missed a penalty in extra time of last
year's final, causing some Bayern fans
to turn against him. A year later, after
the final whistle sounded in London,
he strode with his arms raised toward
the section of jubilant Bayern fans.
Robben also set up the first goal for
Bayern, taking a pass from Ribery
and drawing Weidenfeller out toward
the sideline before squaring for
Mandzukic, who could hardly miss
from a few yards out.
But the lead didn't last long. Dante
clumsily clattered into Reus in the
penalty area, and Italian referee
Nicola Rizzoli pointed to the spot.
Gundogan sent Manuel Neuer the
wrong way before slotting his kick
into the right side of the net.
Bayern entered the game as the
clear favorite, although that message
didn't seem to have filtered through
to Juergen Klopp's Dortmund team,
which seemed intent on dictating
play from the start.


Bruins close out Rangers in five games


Chicago staves

offelimination,

forces Game 6

Associated Press

BOSTON Tuukka Rask
stopped 28 shots, Gregory Camp-
bell scored twice and the Boston
Bruins beat the New York
Rangers 3-1 in Game 5 on Satur-
day to advance to the Eastern
Conference finals.
The Bruins will face the Pitts-
burgh Penguins for the right to
play for the Stanley Cup.
Recent call-up Torey Krug
scored his fourth goal of the se-
ries for Boston, which reached
the third round of the NHL play-
offs for the second time since


1992. The other was 2011, when
the Bruins won the sixth Stanley
Cup in franchise history
Dan Girardi scored and Hen-
rik Lundqvist made 29 saves for
the Rangers, who lost to New
Jersey in last year's East finals.
Campbell broke a 1-1 tie in the
second period, then added an
empty-netter with 51 seconds
left after Lundqvist was pulled
for an extra skater.
The Rangers fell behind 3-0 in
the series before winning Game
4 on Thursday night to avoid a
sweep, thanks in part to a prat-
fall by Rask that helped them
erase a 2-0 deficit. They took an
early lead Saturday, but they
couldn't send the series back to
New York for a sixth game.
Blackhawks 4,
Red Wings 1
CHICAGO Jonathan Toews


and Andrew Shaw scored power-
play goals in the second period, and
the Chicago Blackhawks avoided
elimination with a 4-1 victory over
the Detroit Red Wings in Game 5 of
the second-round playoff series.
Shaw added his third career play-
off goal in the third as the Black-
hawks stopped the Red Wings'
three-game winning streak by creat-
ing chaos in front of Jimmy Howard,
who had shut down Chicago's attack
while moving Detroit to the brink of
the Western Conference finals.
Bryan Bickell scored the first goal
of the game and Corey Crawford had
25 stops for Chicago, which managed
only two goals during its first three-
game losing streak of the season.
Daniel Cleary scored for the sec-
ond straight game for Detroit, which
will have another chance to close
out the top-seeded Blackhawks in
Game 6 on Monday night.


Associated Press
Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask makes a save against the New
York Rangers during the first period in Game 5 of the NHL Eastern
Conference semifinals Saturday in Boston. The Bruins defeated the
Rangers 3-1 to win the series 4-1 and move on to the Eastern Con-
ference finals to meet the Pittsburgh Penguins.


B6as SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


SPORTS










COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Leslie Moonves, left, president and chief executive officer of CBS, talks during a 2006 interview with PBS host Charlie Rose. CEO pay has
been going up. The highest-paid CEO in 2012 was Leslie Moonves of CBS, who made $60.3 million.


I

I/


Median CEO pay rises to $9.7M
CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP business writer

C EO pay has been going in one direction for the past
three years: up.
The head of a typical large public company made
$9.7 million in 2012, a 6.5 percent increase from a


MONEY IN THE BANK
Among the six U.S. megabanks,
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
knocked off JPMorgan Chase's
Jamie Dimon for the title of
best-paid banker. Stumpf's
pay grew 8 percent to $19.3
million. Dimon's board of di-
rectors slashed his pay after
a surprise trading loss led
to regulatory investigations.
Dimon's pay declined
19 percent to $18.7 million.

TV NATION
If CEO pay says anything
about what our country val-
ues, then we like coffee and
online shopping but love TV. In
addition to Moonves and Za-
slav taking the No. 1 and 2
spots, Bob Iger of Disney
($37.1 million) was No. 3;
Philippe Dauman of Viacom,
which owns MTV ($33.4 mil-
lion) was No. 4; and Brian
Roberts of Comcast, which
owns NBCUniversal ($29.1
million) was No. 6.

POWER AND PERKS
Wynn Resorts kept a suite at
its tony Las Vegas resort con-
stantly open for founder and
CEO Steve Wynn, a perk val-
ued at $452,000. IBM, upon
the retirement of CEO Samuel
Palmisano, let him keep an of-
fice and renovated it for $1
million. Constellation Brands,
maker of Corona Light beer
and Paul Masson brandy, gave
CEO Robert Sands a "product
allowance" of up to $10,000,
though he used only $5,532.

THE SHAREHOLDER
REVOLUTION?
So far this year, only 14 U.S.
companies have had share-
holders vote down their execu-
tive pay packages, according
to proxy adviser Glass Lewis.
That compares with 56 com-
panies all last year. Even that
number was tiny in relative
terms because it came from
a sample of 2,100 companies.


year earlier that was aided
by a rising stock market,
according to an analysis by
The Associated Press using
data from Equilar, an exec-
utive pay research firm.
CEO pay, which fell two
years straight during the
Great Recession but rose
24 percent in 2010 and 6
percent in 2011, has never
been higher
Companies say they
need to pay CEOs well so
they can attract the best
talent, and that this is ulti-
mately in the interest of
shareholders. But share-
holder activists and some
corporate governance ex-
perts say many CEOs are
being paid far above what
is reasonable or what their
performance merits.
Pay for all U.S. workers
rose 1.1 percent in 2010, 1.2
percent in 2011 and 1.6
percent last year not
enough to keep up with in-
flation. The median wage
in the U.S. was about
$39,900 in 2012, according
to data from the Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
After years of pressure
from corporate governance
activists unhappy about big
payouts, many companies
have revamped their com-
pensation formulas. They
have awarded a bigger
chunk of compensation in
stock to align pay more
closely to performance, be-
come more transparent
about how compensation
decisions are made and in
some cases promised to
claw back pay from fired
executives.
Shareholder activists say
the changes are a step in
the right direction, yet they
argue that CEO pay re-
mains too high and that
there is still too much in-
centive to focus on short-
term results.
The highest paid CEO
was Leslie Moonves of


CBS, who made $60.3 million. He beat the second-place fin-
isher handily: David Zaslav of Discovery Communications,
who made $49.9 million. Five of the 10 highest-paid CEOs
were from the entertainment and media industry
For the fourth year in five, health care CEOs received the
highest median pay at $11.1 million, while utility CEOs had
the lowest at $7.5 million. The median value is the midpoint;
half the CEOs in that group made more and half less.
See Page C3


Wynn Resorts calls CEO Steve Wynn its "creative and organizational
force," and says having him "in residence" at the Wynn Las Vegas "is
a tremendous benefit to our guests and shareholders."



With big paychecks


come piled-on perks


CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP business writer

NEW YORK
Wynn Resorts kept a
suite open all year at
its tony Las Vegas hotel
and casino for founder and CEO
Steve Wynn, at a cost of nearly
$452,000.
Former IBM CEO Samuel
Palmisano was guaranteed an
administrative assistant and
furnished office for life as a re-
tirement gift plus a $1 million
office renovation.
Chipmaker Advanced Micro
Devices bought the house CEO
Rory Read struggled to sell for
$790,000 and gave him an-
other $180,000 to cover his un-
derwater mortgage.
These are not uncommon ex-
travagances in the exclusive
world of CEO perks, replete
with bodyguards, chauffeurs
and private jets. Last year, the
median value of perks received
by CEOs of big public compa-
nies was nearly $162,000, an in-
crease of more than 9 percent,


according to executive pay re-
search firm Equilar. Perks de-
clined in 2009, but have risen
for three straight years.
Perks are just a small part of
CEO compensation the me-
dian pay for CEOs of S&P 500
companies last year was $9.7
million. And some companies
are cutting back on perks, or at
least getting rid of the ones that
shareholders find most offen-
sive. Still, they're a reminder of
how CEOs' lifestyles are far re-
moved from those of their
shareholders, customers and
employees.
Last year, companies paid for
their CEOs' country club mem-
berships, let them use corporate
planes for personal travel and
gave them health care plans
better than their employees,
among other perks.
Some corporate governance
experts say giving perks to ex-
ecutives already making mil-
lions just exacerbates the
public perception fair or not


See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Things


I should


not do
Those of us in the
newspaper busi-
ness spend a lot of
our time telling other
people what they should
be doing.
It's very easy to criti-
cize members of Con-
gress and tell them they
were wrong about this or
that. It's even easier
telling the county com-
missioners what they
should and should not
do.
It has been suggested
recently that I should
spend less time telling
people what to do. In
fact, a very large mem-
ber of our delegation to
the Florida Senate re-
cently suggested in a
public speech in Talla-
hassee that we would all
be better off if I moved
to Brooksville. But, he
noted, he had checked
with the folks in
Brooksville and they
were opposed to the
idea.
After much introspec-
tion, I have determined
that it is much easier to
tell other people what to
do instead of determin-
ing what it is I should do.
So I thought today I
could do a little soul
searching and tell my-
self some of the things I
should not do.
I should not purchase
peanut butter cookies
from the Girl Scouts.
The Do-si-dos are so
good that once I open a
box I can eat them all in
a single sitting. I pur-
chased five boxes last
month and put them in a
drawer in my office.
There are none left and
I do not have a clear
memory as to what hap-
pened to them. In a re-
lated development, my
favorite pair of pants
has apparently shrunk,
because they are tight.
I should not go to an-
other country where the
native language is Span-
ish and ask questions in
English. I should espe-
cially not complain
about the lack of an an-
swer to my question in
English to a Spanish-
speaking person until I
am absolutely sure said
person does not also
speak English.
I should not tell the
dog that he has already
gone outside enough
times at night unless I
am really willing to deal
with the consequences
of that decision.
I should not make a U-
turn on a one-way street.
I should not drive fast
just to get through a yel-
low light.
I should not get miffed
at politicians espe-
cially those at the local
level who do not
agree with my opinion
on every issue. On some
days I don't even agree
with my strongly held
opinions from yesterday
I should not make fun
of my neighbor Jim just
because it is easy.
I should not write edi-
torials about boring leg-
islative issues, because
no matter how well the
opinion is expressed,
the issue is still boring.
I should not be unkind
to elected officials who
call to complain about
how their photos look in
the newspaper. I should
not remind them that
See Page C3





Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"To be unable to bear an ill is itself a great ill."
Bion of Borysthenes, quoted in Diogenes Laertius'
"Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers,"
circa 3rd century B.C.


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin ......................guest member
Brad Bautista ............... ................ copy chief


Citrus County govern-
ment is about to go
through a significant
change, and the impact
should not be lost on citizens.
County administrator Brad
Thorpe announced his resig-
nation last week. The veteran
county leader and one-time
county commissioner is ready
to retire.
Thorpe's retirement
brought to the surface other
potential departures by key
leaders at the county. County
attorney Richard
Wesch (who once THE I
served as county
administrator) is Chai
being recruited leader
for the same posi-
tion in much OUR 0
larger Lee County
in Southwest Loss of
Florida. County ill hur
assistant adminis-


trator Ken Frink is in line for
a high-level job at the South-
west Florida Water Manage-
ment District in Brooksville.
And finally, Lindsay Ubinas,
the county's public informa-
tion officer, is looking at tak-
ing a job with the county
sheriff's department.
These have not been calm
times in county government,
and it should not be a sur-
prise that key leaders look for
other opportunities. Newly
elected county commissioner
Scott Adams has made unsuc-
cessful efforts to have both
Thorpe and Wesch fired.
While it may have been un-
likely he could have garnered
additional support against
the leadership team before
the next election, public ser-
vants do not operate well in
turmoil.
And in Citrus County, we
have faced a difficult year.
The county's budget was on
life support and financial re-
serves drained as the valua-
tion of housing declined for
five straight years. The lower-
valued homes mean fewer


Reconsider re-entry
This is in reference to Country
Rocks the Canyon. I think that
the promoters and everything
should plan this better for next
time because this no re-entry
when it poured rain and
people were just getting
soaked and soaked and
(they) wouldn't let peo-
ple (who went back)
into their cars come
back in, and allow you
from 2 to 12 o'clock
without having water. A
All this fundraising was
great, but just to make CAL
everybody trapped 563-
there. I think they bet-
ter reorganize this and
do it better next time.
Willing to gamble
If anybody knows whether
that gambling boat in Port
Richey or New Port Richey is in
operation, I would love to go on
that boat again. If you have the
telephone number, please put it
in Sounding Off.


I
n
er

P
op
k
t


tax dollars for government
because local elected leaders
don't like to adjust the actual
millage rate.
On top of that was the dis-
aster of Duke Energy's deci-
sion to fight the county over
its tax bill. The utility only
paid $19 million of its $34 mil-
lion tax bill for the current
fiscal year.
The outlook became even
uglier when Duke decided to
shut down its nuclear power
plant in Crystal River, de-
commissioning a
SSUE: major portion of
the utility's tax
ge in bill.
rship. Despite these
difficulties, citi-
'INION: zens should un-
derstand the loss
knowledge of institutional
county. knowledge and
judgment that
will disappear as the leader-
ship team members exit.
Thorpe, Wesch, Frink and
Ubinas all have deep roots in
the county and understand
the complex problems we
face. They have dedicated a
good portion of their lives to
solving problems and creat-
ing new strategies for our
community.
Everyone in government
has critics, and the current
leadership team of the county
is no exception. But the
knowledge and experience of
the team members will be
very difficult to replicate.
When you factor in the
loss of Gary Maidhof, the
veteran county leader who
died unexpectedly last year,
the problem is even more
significant.
The forthcoming changes
will be disruptive, and we
can only urge the elected
members of the county com-
mission to move forward with
wisdom and insight as they
make the decisions on what
the new leadership team
might look like.


Need public transport
The county needs public
transportation, not the Suncoast
Parkway. We already defeated
the Suncoast Parkway. This is a
rural area.


-0579


Solar and wind
I'm happy to see that
the solar panels are fi-
nally coming to the
Sunshine State. Now we
have to get turbines out
there in the Gulf to re-
place that old decrepit
turbine out there at the
nuclear plant. And we
need more solar panels
and more turbines out
here for green.


New is cheaper
This is for the person looking
for the VCR repair: You can go to
Walmart and get a new one for
like $18 or find one for almost
free at a thrift store. So there's
really no need in a VCR repair-
man anymore. I have a few free
ones if you'd like one.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Founded
by Albert M.
Williamson


LETTERS to the Editor


No overtime
won't work
Since 1938, the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act has required
hourly workers be paid time-
and-a-half for anything over 40
hours per week. This may now
be in trouble since the Repub-
lican-controlled House of Rep-
resentatives has passed the
"Working Families Flexibility
Act" as part of their "Making
Life Work" agenda.
What this bill intends to do is
give interest-free loans to em-
ployers by taking away workers'
overtime pay if they don't have
to pay you, then they get to keep
the money According to this
legislation, if you are an hourly
worker you can "choose" to be
paid in Compp time" instead of
money Apparently House Ma-
jority Leader Eric Cantor
thinks hourly workers would
rather be paid with a day off
sometime in the future while
working for no overtime pay


this week. Does that sound
good to you? It's a real money-
saver for employers.
The problem is the days you
choose to take off will be at the
discretion of your employer For
instance, if you want to take off
next Monday in order to extend
a weekend, your boss has the
option of turning that down and
pushing it further into the future.
Need a comp day to take your
child to the doctor? Good luck.
Employers will supposedly
be banned from forcing work-
ers to chose comp time over
paid time, but I think we can
assume that millions of hourly
workers will be forced to do
just that, thereby saving money
at workers' expense.
Republicans do not have
your back on this or anything
else when it comes to giving
workers a fair shake.
John Read
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Partisan si
The Internal Revenue
Service has been the ob-
ject of jokes for decades.
The one that sticks in my mind,
because it's relevant, is Jerry
Seinfeld's TV character talking
about being called in for a tax
audit. "Have you ever been au-
dited?" he asks Elaine. "It's hell.
It's the financial equivalent of a
complete rectal examination."
What's funny on television is
not at all funny in real life. The
power of the IRS to audit and
investigate tax returns is nothing
short of life-altering. The best
summary comes from the Wash-
ington Post's Ezra Klein and
Evan Soltas: "The story thus far
seems both chilling
and cheering."
It's important to
place this in context
The IRS targeted
conservative politi-
cal groups and a lib-
eral Jewish group,
among others. This
"terrible breach of
law," as Sen. Harry Donna ]
Reid correctly OTH
called it, was uncov-
ered by the U.S. VOI
Treasury Inspector
General for Tax Administration.
Our inspectors general are
part of a system of checks and
balances developed by our
Founding Fathers from their
rich understanding of hu-
mankind. They had witnessed
how power corrupted both
kings and common people, and
they devised built-in safeguards
against corruption.
Injured citizens who wrote
their representatives, who, in
turn, began inquiries that were
picked up on by the press,
which began its own investigat-
ing, were all involved in uncov-
ering this egregious overreach.
That's the cheering part.
The chilling part is that
American citizens exercising
the Constitution's First Amend-
ment right to free speech could
be harassed and intimidated by
the IRS because of their opin-
ions. What needs to be thor-
oughly vetted is if these
unwarranted intrusions were
politically motivated (directed
from outside the IRS), or if they
were overzealous actions by bu-
reaucrats who were blind to po-
litical implications.



Sww.binduffycartoons.com
5/13


scandal, bipartisan fix
President Obama fired the The bipartisan origin: The
acting director of IRS, the De- IRS is an independent agency.
apartment of Justice has opened Former President George W
a criminal investigation, and Bush appointed the prior IRS
the president sent his own chill director for his term of five
down the backs of those impli- years, and Democrats con-
cated during a short, televised firmed him. The bipartisan so-
speech: "I will not tolerate this lution comes from Arent Fox, a
kind of behavior... especially in business-oriented law firm that
the IRS, given the power that it deals with the area where busi-
has and the reach that it has nesses and government regula-
into all of our lives.... It should tions cross.
not matter what political stripe Two of their firm's members,
you're from the fact of the Craig Engle and Brett Kappel
matter is, is that the IRS has to a Democrat and Republican,
operate with absolute integrity" respectively are part ofArent
An important part of the con- Fox's bipartisan Political Law
text of the IRS scandal is the group. They created "numerous
knee-jerk partisan atmosphere 501 (c) (4) organizations one
in which it takes of which was targeted by the
place. Congress has IRS." In an email that landed in
been gridlocked for my inbox, Engle and Kappel of-
S years, but more im- fered bipartisan advice on the
portant, recent polls IRS findings by Treasury's in-
S show the American spector general, including one
S people are allowing that "highlights a failure in
-. themselves to be- management that simply disre-
come more parti- garded the proper way to regu-
sanly divided, late applications."
Brazile In the May 7 issue Here are three of their bipar-
R of Forbes Magazine, tisan solutions:
E"neuromarketer" 1. The IRS has things back-
CES Roger Dooley warns ward: It attempts to determine
about something if an organization is overtly po-
called "confirmation bias." litical before the organization
"That's the tendency that in- has engaged in any political ac-
fluences all of us to put more tivity. "That is like the IRS
faith in information that agrees telling you how much income
with what we already believe, tax you owe before you have
and discount opinions and data earned any income."
that disagree with our beliefs." 2) Engle and Kappel recom-
In short, when we're in a par- mend that nonprofits merely
tisan mode, politicians can ma- register with the IRS and auto-
nipulate us easier than maticallygetthe status of anon-
Jennifer Lopez winking at a guy profit.
But if we allow that to happen, 3) "Many are blaming Citi-
then every scandal will split the zens United but that is not
public into two camps, and each right. What we need to do is see
will believe their partisan bias if people are complying with
on the scandal is right. Citizens United. That's two dif-
Dooley advises us: "Be aware ferent things."
of the danger of confirmation I don't agree with everything
bias, and acknowledge that our in this bipartisan solution, but
judgment can be clouded by it." I'm following Roger Dooley's
He further says that we advice to set aside my partisan
should "aggressively seek out biases, and consider with an
and understand information open mind a bipartisan solution
that disagrees with our existing to the IRS scandal.
belief."
Let me challenge you if
you're convinced Obama has Donna Brazile is a senior
nothing to do with the IRS scan- Democratic strategist, a
dal, or if you believe he di- political commentator and
rected it to consider contributor to CNN and
information that the scandal ABCNews, and a contributing
has a bipartisan origin, as well columnist to Ms. Magazine
as a bipartisan solution. and 0, the Oprah Magazine.


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LOSS FOR ALL




It's a bad




time to lose




good people


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Persons wishing to address
the editorial board should call
352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
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and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Leave behind us footprints on the sands of time


"Lives of great men all
remind us, we can make
our lives sublime, and de-
parting leave behind us,
footprints on the sands of
time."
-Henry Wadsworth
Longfellow,
mid-19th century.
Cheryl and I are now
back from Houston,
where we visited
with daughter Becky and
her family I enjoy these
visits with our middle
child for a lot of reasons,
not the least of which is
her ability to find the best
eateries around, whether
it is Mexican, Italian or
Cajun. In addition, Becky
babies me. At home, I
make my own coffee, but



PAY
Continued from Page C1

The median pay for fe-
male CEOs was higher than
it was for men $11.2 mil-
lion compared with $9.6
million although only 3
percent of the companies
analyzed were run by
women. Irene Rosenfeld
of Mondelez International,
the snack giant that was
spun off from Kraft Foods
last year, was the highest-
paid female CEO, taking in
$22 million.
The biggest changes in
compensation last year
came from stock, which in-
creased 17.2 percent, and
from stock options, which
declined by 16 percent.
Over the past five years,
the amount of compensa-
tion that comes from stock
has risen from 31.7 per-
cent to 44.3 percent, while
the amount from stock op-
tions has fallen from 31.9
percent to 17.6 percent.
Shareholders tend to favor
stock compensation because
it can be tied to metrics
like revenue and earnings.
Salary and perks rose
last year, while bonuses
fell. As a proportion of
total pay, bonuses ac-
counted for 23.8 percent,
salary 10.4 percent and
perks 3.8 percent.
The third straight year
of rising pay coincided
with an improving econ-
omy and an increase in
corporate revenue, profits
and stock prices. The S&P
500 index rose 13.4 percent
last year. The median
profit increase at the com-
panies in the Equilar
study was 6.1 percent, and
the median revenue gain
was 7.6 percent.
With the economy on
steadier footing and the
stock market surging, the
debate over CEO pay is
settling into more of a sim-
mer than a boil. Compa-
nies cut CEO pay in 2008
and 2009 amid investors'
white-hot anger over the
losses they suffered during
the financial crisis. Since
2011 they have been re-
quired by law to hold "say
on pay" votes, which give
shareholders the right to
express whether they ap-
prove of the CEO's pay
The vote is nonbinding,
but companies don't want
to deal with the public em-
barrassment of a "no."



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

these are photographs
of how they actually look.
I should simply agree
with them and their
mothers that they are
much better-looking in


when I'm with her, I smell
coffee cooking while I'm
waking up. And one last
thing which I really enjoy
is that Becky and her 15-
year-old daughter, Emily,
like the TV quiz show
'Jeopardy!" almost as much
as I do, and most evenings
when Cheryl and I are
there, we will watch it to-
gether. While watching the
program one evening, the
answer from which a ques-
tion was to be formulated was
"who gave us the phrase
ending with 'footprints on
the sands of time."' I quickly
answered "Longfellow!"
and rubbed it in by quoting
the full passage.
Becky gave me the typical
look of mock irritation she
uses when I'm an insuffer-


Companies say they are
listening to their share-
holders' concerns. They point
to changes in how CEOs are
rewarded that are meant
to tie pay more closely to
company performance.
Pay is up partly because
a bigger proportion is com-
ing from stock, and stock
markets are hitting all-time
highs. But it's a two-way
street: If stock markets de-
cline, pay could decline or
at least grow more slowly
in future years.
But changing the pay
structure has hardly si-
lenced the critics. They
say formulas for stock
awards, for example, can
drive CEOs to focus on
short-term results. And
they're anxious for the Se-
curities and Exchange
Commission to implement
a rule required under the
Dodd-Frank financial re-
form law that would force
big public companies to
disclose the ratio of their
CEOs' pay compared with
the median pay for their
entire workforce.
"If you're making $10
million a year, you get into
a situation where life isn't
real anymore," said Eleanor
Bloxham, CEO of the Cor-
porate Governance Alliance,
which advises boards.
Charles Elson, a well-
known shareholder rights
expert who is director at
the Weinberg Center for
Corporate Governance at
the University of
Delaware, has been cru-
sading for companies to
stop compensating their
CEOs based on what their
peers at similar compa-
nies are making.
The trouble with peer
groups, Elson said, is that
a CEO could have a terrible
year, "but if my peer's pay
goes up, my pay will too."
To calculate pay, Equilar
looked at salary, bonus,
perks, the potential future
value of stock awards and
option awards, and other
pay that companies have
to report for their top ex-
ecutives in regulatory fil-
ings each year. This year's
study examined pay for
323 CEOs at S&P 500 com-
panies that had filed their
shareholder proxies by
April 30. The sample in-
cludes only CEOs in place
for at least two years.
Sixty percent of CEOs
received a raise, 37 percent
got a pay cut and the rest had
pay that was virtually flat.


person.
I should not move to
Brooksville, even if a spe-
cial act of the Legislature
has paved the way


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


PERKS
Continued from Page C1

- that they're more interested in
lining their pockets than helping the
company
"They might do without a plane," says
Brandon Rees, acting director at the in-
vestment office of the AFL-CIO union
group, referring to CEOs' use of com-
pany planes for personal travel. "And in-
stead invest it in (research and
development)."
Companies tend to defend perks as le-
gitimate business expenses that ulti-
mately benefit shareholders: Flying on
private planes keeps the executives safe.
Country club memberships help them
network. An attractive package helps a
company lure the best talent.
"It is in the company's best interest if
that person doesn't have to think about


able smartaleck and asked, rule of thumb was for four
"How did you know that?" to speak the valedicto-
I hadn't given it thought rian, the salutatorian, the
for many years, student body
but noncha- president and
lantly replied, the president
"I quoted it as 91 of the senior
the closing for class. I was
my high school none of the
graduation above. I was a
speech." very involved
Obviously student, but
surprised, there was cer-
Becky re- Fred Brannen tainly no obvi-
sponded, "You A S ous reason for
gave a speech A those in charge
at your gradua- OF LIFE to select me to
tion? Why?" be a fifth wheel
Why, indeed. a speaker-at-large -
During those days at they did.
Pasco High School, gradu- What did I choose to
ating seniors were the only speak about? I didn't
speakers at the com- choose. I wasn't given a
mencement exercises, and choice. My subject was


"the purpose of man's ex-
istence," and it was chosen
for me by the faculty com-
mencement committee.
Say what? A 17-year-old
boy was to get up in front
of several hundred folks
and pontificate on a two-ton
subject such as the purpose
of man? Yep. That's about
the size of it.
What is a kid to do? If he
has any sense at all, he
asks for help. I asked the
senior class guidance
counselor for suggestions
and she smugly re-
sponded, "Fred, this isn't
about saying what we want
you to say, it is about us lis-
tening to what you have to
say."
She gave me nothing.
Nada. Zilch. Zip.


As most of us Christians
typically do last, I prayed.
It then became clear. The
message for my classmates
and the others in atten-
dance on the evening of
June 5, 1963, was that the
purpose of man is to serve
God, to seek and to do His
will. In doing so, we should
strive to be of value to our
fellow travelers. Few of us
will ever qualify as a truly
great man or woman and
leave a trail for the
masses, but we can all
leave footprints in the
sands of time for the bene-
fit of someone.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


STORYY,
\


Letters to THE EDITOR


Hurricane preparedness
lessons from Oklahoma
On May 20, we were reminded
that natural disasters of all kinds
can bring devastation on a mas-
sive scale. In just a few seconds,
the lives of Moore, Okla., resi-
dents were changed by an EF5
tornado that destroyed entire
buildings while injuring or killing
residents as they took shelter.
We can't prevent natural disas-
ters, but we can prepare for them.
By being ready and knowing what
to do in a disaster, we can mini-
mize risk, reduce the time it takes
to recover and, most importantly,
prevent the loss of life.
As response and recovery con-
tinues in Oklahoma, those of us
who live in hurricane-prone areas
must now turn our attention to
our own preparedness efforts for
the upcoming hurricane season.
This year during National Hur-
ricane Preparedness Week, May
26 to June 1, and throughout the
year, I encourage everyone in hur-
ricane-prone areas to make a
pledge to prepare and then act on
the pledge and be ready in ad-
vance of the hurricane season
that officially begins June 1.
We are asking you to take these
simple steps: know and under-
stand your weather risk, take ac-
tion, and be an example for your
family, friends and neighbors.
Know your risk: Understand
how hurricanes and tropical
storms can directly affect you and
your family where you live, work
and go to school, whether you live
on the coast or inland. Check the
weather forecast regularly, sign up
for local alerts from emergency
management officials, and get and
use a NOAA weather radio.
Take action now: Complete
your emergency preparedness plan,
update your emergency supply kit,
and download the FEMA smartphone
application to access important
safety tips on what to do before,
during and after a hurricane.


daily things as much as you or I might
need to," says Jay Meschke, president of
CBIZ Human Capital Services, a com-
pensation and human resources con-
sultant outside Kansas City, Mo. "You
want to make sure that 100 percent of
this person's efforts are devoted to the
company's success."
Wynn Resorts calls CEO Wynn its "cre-
ative and organizational force," and says
having him "in residence" at the Wynn
Las Vegas "is a tremendous benefit to
our guests and shareholders." The com-
pany says Wynn spends most of his time
at the resort, and doesn't own a home in
Las Vegas.
IBM says that giving the retiring CEO
an office and administrative support is
consistent with past practice, but de-
clined to comment further. Advanced
Micro Devices says that buying Read's
old home helped speed up his transition
to AMD from Lenovo, where he was chief
operating officer.


Be an example: Encourage
your family, friends, colleagues
and neighbors to prepare and in-
spire others by posting your pre-
paredness story on your
Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter
accounts. Post the Hurricane
Widget on your social media pro-
files. Follow us at Twitter and
share our Hurricane Prepared-
ness Week tweets.
Join us today and pledge to pre-
pare at wwwreadygov/hurricanes.
Major P May
FEMA Region IV administrator

Is the U.S. heading
toward a caste system?
When I'm writing about a "caste
system," I'm referring to a system
that one is born into, similar to
the caste systems of India, Nepal,
Pakistan and Sri Lanka. From the
top caste of Brahmin (priest) to
the lowest class of Dalits (un-
touchables), shunned and ostra-
cized by all the upper classes.
These caste systems once oc-
curred in France and Spain. The
lowest of the low were called
Cagots. Born into a class, you re-
mained there forever
Something odd is occurring in
this country The upper class, con-
sisting of the rich and powerful, is
now in control. We could call it
the "corporation class," who have
paid Republican representatives
in Congress to vote as the corpora-
tions dictate. It is obvious who is
running the country when 90 per-
cent of the public favors a law to
identify people (background
checks) who want to purchase
guns and the so-called represen-
tatives of the people vote against
such a measure.
Second: We have an upper mid-
dle class of highly educated afflu-
ent professionals. Then we have a
middle class consisting of college-
educated people employed in
white-collar corporations; a lower
middle class, mostly with high
school diplomas, who work at jobs


A PLACE TO CALL
HOME
Insurer Axis Capital Holdings
gave Albert Benchimol a
housing allowance of
$25,000 when he became
CEO last year. That was in-
cluded as part of a pay
package, mostly in stock
awards, that could be worth
$22.7 million. Axis says it
gives housing allowances
to certain executives to
help them pay for second
homes in Bermuda, where
the company is based, so
"talented executives" won't
be deterred from joining the
company. Shareholders
earlier this month voted
against the pay packages
for Benchimol and other
executives. The company
didn't comment at the time.


AN EXCLUSIVE
CLUB
Diebold, an ATM security
company, got rid of coun-
try club benefits for all its
executives except CEO
Thomas Swidarski, who
Equilar calculated would
earn $6.1 million for 2012.
The company said that
"he, more so than our
other executives, would
benefit from the business
development and network-
ing opportunities." The
company spent $72,280
on memberships for
Swidarski, who stepped
down in January under
pressure from a board un-
happy with the company's
financial results.


usually paying between $30,000
and $50,000. Most Americans are
in this class. At the bottom occurs
a lower class divided between the
working poor and the unemployed.
From what I have been observing,
whatever class your parents were
born into, that is the class you will
remain in. Unfortunately, this was
not always the way things were.
My uncle was able to go from the
lower middle class to a millionaire.
Now we are heading for a society
with two classes: the super rich
and the poor. There are excep-
tions to everything, but what re-
mains of the middle-class is being
wiped out. All one has to do is to
look at statistics as to how many
middle-class folks have slipped
into the poorer classes in 10 years.
L.M. Eastman
Lecanto

Always read
the fine print
Early in the year our homeowners'
insurance renewal arrived. When
my wife opened the envelope, read
the total billing amount, and let out
a shriek, I said, "Let me see that bill."
Under coverage were the follow-
ing ludicrous items: Grave mark-
ers (we do not live in a cemetery);
volcanic eruption (the closest vol-
cano is on a Caribbean island);
damage caused by collapse of roof
due to weight of snow and ice; dog
(we don't own one); landlord's fur-
nishings (we own our home); busi-
ness on premises (this must refer to
the cakes my wife bakes for charity
bake sales); pool liability (no pool);
and trampoline liability.
I went to another insurance
agency and asked them to work
out a quote, minus the comic cov-
erage. We came back the next day
and got proper coverage. Always
read all bills and policies, be-
cause some policywriters are
short common sense.
Robert E. Blum
Homosassa


HOME, SAFE HOME
Las Vegas Sands spent
$2.8 million to provide se-
curity for CEO Sheldon
Adelson and his family. The
company said it was acting
on the advice of an inde-
pendent security consult-
ant for Adelson, a major
donor to the Republican
Party whose total pay for
2012 was about $10.7 mil-
lion. That blew away the
$1.6 million spent on a
home security system by
Amazon for Jeff Bezos,
who is No. 2 in that cate-
gory so far, according to
GMI Ratings.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


Stop drinking and driving
I'm calling the Chronicle in ref-
erence to your article on
"Tougher drunken driving
threshold?" "Drop from .08 to
.05 (recommended)." I've got a
better idea: First-time drunk
driving, mandatory year in
prison (and) $2,000 fine. If it's
your second or third offense, the
fine increases, the years in
prison increase, period. If you
refuse to take a Breathalyzer
test, automatic two years in
prison. Stop the drinking, stop
the driving. Put them in jail be-
hind the bars. No plea bargain-
ing, period. You'll stop it.
Repave Rocky Point
I live on Rocky Point in Old
Homosassa and I need some
help. This road was repaved, I
guess it's been two years ago.
There's already one patch on it
and there's another hole in it. I
understood that they had to
guarantee that for three years.
They need to come repave
Rocky Point. It's a mess down
here.
Good, honest people
I had dropped an envelope at
Pudgee's Hot Dog Stand in Flo-
ral City and it had some money
in there, about a week or so ago,
and a good pedestrian had
picked it up and the girl at the
counter had saw it and knew it
had been mine and they looked
my phone number up in their lit-
tle drawer thing there that they
do and called me and told me
that they had my money. And it
wasn't a whole lot, but to me, on
a limited income, it really made
a lot of difference. There's a lot
of good, honest people in this
world and I really do appreciate
what Pudgee's Hot Dog Stand
did for me in getting me this
back.


IT LOOKS LIKE OUR NEWEST COALITION MEMBER, SPARKY, IS
ALREADY HARD AT WORK SPOTTING DANGERS IN OUR NEIGHBORHOOD.
DON'T LET UNDERAE DRINKING, PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE AND
HARMFUL TOBACCO PRODUCTS GET BY YOU. REMEMBER...
A SUBSTANCE FREE- CITRUS CAN COME TRUE WITH PARTNERS
I-"I- LIKE YOU.



I N c' t A II Al


Condolences to Mr. Little Revamp bus routes


I always look in the Chronicle
for the Opinion page and look at
Jake Little's name because I enjoy
his letters so much. He always told
it like it is and never made any
bones about it. Then on Wednes-
day, May 15, 1 saw his name again,
except this time it was on the
obituaries page. I was so disap-
pointed to see that. I have never
met him in person, but I always
had great admiration for him.
My condolence goes to Mrs. Lit-
tle for her great loss, but also to
all of us readers who've enjoyed
his letters so much. RIP Jake.


My call is about the school
board budget coming up. I live
out on Turner Camp Road. I see
four school buses within minutes
of each other traveling out here in
the evening, afternoon, whatever,
and they all seem to be empty. I
can't understand that we can't
consolidate some of this. I have
in the past followed a bus from
town on Ella out almost to the
river and never make a stop,
which is about a 6-mile distance.
There's something wrong with
this bus schedule and that could
be a big savings, I could think.


Save the mudslinging
The Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners consists
of a group of people elected by
the residents of Citrus County. I
attend the meetings on a regular
basis. I find it appalling that Mr.
Adams attacks and berates other
board members with the rest of
county staff. I have not once
heard any of these other com-
missioners treat him with such
disrespect. The accomplishments
of board members and staff are
never brought to light, yet the
shortfalls (are) emphasized re-
peatedly. Save the mudslinging.


Buy it secondhand
This is to the lady who is looking
for a VCR repair: People don't
repair VCRs anymore. It's really
not worth it. So you may as well
take yourself over to the Key
Center right here in Inverness just
past the Withlacoochee school and
you can get yourself a VCR for
about $10. That's it. No problems.
It's easy to buy a used one sec-
ondhand and they don't even re-
pair them anymore. Have a great day
and I hope you find one you like.
Lottery money's end
I'm reading in the Chronicle
where the Florida State Lottery
had overall sales of $4.45 billion,
an increase of $440 million over
the official fiscal last year. So
why is our education department
looking to cut their budget? Where
is all this lottery money going? I
would love for the Chronicle to
print where the money from the
Florida Lottery is going.
Control your burning
I'd like to know what the ra-
tionale is with this burning, the
controlled burning in the spring
when all the animals in the for-
est are reproducing. There's the
birds on the trees and the ani-
mals on the ground. Why incin-
erate them in the spring? Could
we wait until the fall after the
rainy season when they've all
raised their families?
Stopping progress
What a nice sight Wednesday
(May 15, page A3) in the Chroni-
cle. There's the kids using good
common sense after just raking
up stuff while the Save the Man-
atee Club stands on the side-
lines and boohoos and ties
things up in court. It shows you
who really has common sense
and who really does care about
the bays.


The United Way Women's Leadership Council

POWER of the


You're Invited!
Ladies Luncheon & Designer Purse Auction
June 8th, 2013 at 11 a.m.
Black Diamond Ranch
To reserve you seat/ table now or for
more information call 795-5483 or visit
.w-.v citrus unitedway.org



LIVE UNITED





-:5: ..... ..*.. www .chro.cleonlne.com


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday tMrday
1 2 3 4


6 8 9 10 11


12 13 14 15 17 18


19 20 21 22 23 24 25







Come celebrate the achievements of
Citrus County's Athletes of the Year!


College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus

May 30, 2013


Award Ceremony begins at 6:30 pm.

Tickets available at the Citrus County Chronicle
Meadowcrest office in Crystal River for $10 each.
Cash or check only please.
L CLL E .LE
CENTRAL
SUICK LRMC


Remember your high school Senior prom.....
We are going back in time...to a Happy Place.with


FRIDAY, JUNE S2, 201T
6:OOPM-10:OOPM
$12 MIMBERI 1 15 NONMEMBERS
77 CIVIC CIRCLE, BEVERLY HILLS

Dancing to the tunes
Of DJ Joe Dube...
Dinner includes,


Baked Ziti, Salad, Bread
& Butter and Ice Tea or
Coffee.


For Tickets and Info
Call: 352-746-4882


CHRomCLE


Spanish American Club
of Citrus County
Installation Dinner Dance .
Saturday June 1,2013

Knight: of Coliihmbui. Hall ul6168 6 PM to Midnqiht
?23.9 'VV Njor'.ell Brant Hio', L-eanto FL


,-,d.,I j ,I,: *T ,. L I,:iri,,,El ,r ,II : I, .: ,: E,, ,-1 l ,.:..Itl









Entertainment by Orlando s Havana Boys Salsa Band
& The Legendary Havana Pete

: I r ... ... 3.. .'. -,
S; raI,

Limited Seating .. I. T.: .


CHiONICLE


C4 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


COMMENTARY









S BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Even without car, insurance advisable


EAR BRUCE: I no longer
own a car. Occasionally, I'll
rent a car or borrow a
friend's car.
Do I need to carry any type of
auto insurance? My agent is advis-
ing me to purchase a policy to
cover other drivers' medical ex-
penses and uninsured drivers. -
VL., via email
DEAR VL.: First of all, how
much insurance does the friend
carry on his/her car? Very likely
it's not adequate. You should have


a separate policy for several mil-
lions of dollars to cover your inter-
ests. That policy should also cover
the rental car for the additional
several millions of dollars.
I don't know what your agent is
advising that the policy should
cover, but the critical item, as I
view it, is liability insurance. The
uninsured drivers coverage would
certainly be a factor with regard to
the borrowed car more so than the
rented car. You should also have
something in this excess policy


that covers the rented car in the
event of any accident that is your
responsibility.
DEAR BRUCE: I am a 41-year-
old married woman who wants to
provide for my children's future.
Please tell me how to get started:
Is a Roth IRA or stocks a better
way to start saving for my chil-
dren? I think that I would get a bet-
ter return from a Roth IRA.
My parents did not teach me
anything about investing. My hus-
band and I are trying to pay down


our debt as quick as possible, but I
want to start something now for my
children. Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I don't see any
reason to start worrying about
your children's future separately
It's a matter of having the savings
in one pocket or another.
I think you are most wise to pay
down your debt as quickly as pos-
sible. There is certainly a lot to be
said for investing as well, but the
See Page D4


[appi


M.L. JOHNSON
Associated Press


ig


death


MILWAUKEE


without even thinking, Joe Ortner rattles off a list of items on his
family's dairy farm that could kill you: 1,000 gallons of diesel,
500 gallons of gas, cleaning chemicals in the milking parlor, oil and
lubricant for repair work and a 6-foot-deep manure pond in which
you could drown. He pauses and adds three bulls to the list.


Agriculture remains one of the nation's most dangerous
professions; accidents on farms kill hundreds and injure
thousands each year. While the deadly blast at a Texas fer-
tilizer plant last month was a sharp reminder of the risks
posed by agricultural chemicals, tractors, stored grain, ani-
mals and power lines are threats, too.
To help rescuers reach people quickly and safely, a hand-
ful of Wisconsin farmers Ortner included have been
working with researchers and firefighters on an online pro-
gram that maps farm hazards. The recently completed pilot
project built upon earlier work done with paper maps, and
researchers at the National Farm Medicine Center hope the
project can expand, with the online program eventually
being used nationwide.
The concept is simple: Farmers enter information into a
password-protected database. A Quick Response, or QR,
code is posted on the farm's mailbox or in another promi-
nent location. Arriving firefighters scan the code with their
smartphones or tablets and receive information about
stored chemicals and other hazards, where to disconnect
power and potential sources of water.
Firefighters responding to emergencies face the same
risks as farmers themselves, said Jerry Minor, chief of the
Pittsville Fire Department in central Wisconsin. His de-
partment has worked for decades with the nearby National
Farm Medicine Center to train rural firefighters.
"We don't have a lot of incidents on farms," Minor said.
"But when we do, they pose a real high threat to rescue per-
sonnel because of unfamiliarity with farms and all the haz-
ards that are present."
State law requires many industries and public places to
let firefighters in for inspections, but most farms are not part
of that list. The program that Minor's department is devel-


oping with the National
Farm Medicine Center helps
bridge that gap.
Farm mapping projects
aren't new. An Illinois pro-
gram creates paper maps of
farms and places them in


tubes secured to
poles. Similar project
in Michigan and Per
nia.
"The downside to
it's readable to anyo
comes along," said I


Keifer, director of the Na-
tional Farm Medicine Cen-
ter "But we can secure the
QR code."
Another advantage to hav-
ing the information in a
database is that firefighters
can access it before they
reach the farm. They might
scan a farm's QR code from
a manual kept in their truck,
or eventually, tie the infor-
mation into the dispatch sys-
tem, so they receive it as
soon as a call comes in,
Keifer said.
Ortner, 50, is one of about
a half-dozen farmers who
have used the program so
far. He said it would have
b been helpful for firefighters
S to have that kind of quick ac-
cess to information in 1989,
when the house on his 700-
acre farm outside Pittsville
caught fire. The line carry-
power ing power to the house
cts exist burned and fell away from
nsylva- the building, but remained
live. Firefighters had to fig-
that is. ure out how to shut off the


ne who
Dr. Matt


Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY








D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


News you -
can use
Memorial Day
closings
All county government
offices, including the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, will be closed Mon-
day, May 27, in observance
of Memorial Day. Offices
will hold normal business
hours starting Tuesday,
May 28.
Hurricane season
starts June 1
Prepare your home, fam-
ily, pets and property. Com-
plete emergency information
can be found at www.
sheriffcitrus.org/EM/
Scalloping season
begins July 1
Make sure your summer Joining Salt
guests have made plans to Kelley Paul,
come enjoythe beauty of the County; Jan
Nature Coast as the 2013
Scalloping Season begins.
Scalloping information is W e
available at the Chamber of
Commerce office and the
Tourist Development
Council.
RSVPnow W
Remember to make your
reservations now for the the Natu:
Chamber lunch on Friday,
June 14, at Plantation on alike the 1
Crystal River. Our guest redfish, t
speaker is
Ted Kar- you and
charr, vice
1 president Contacl
S and COO of
Landrum
Professional.
He wrote the
Ted book "The
Karcharr Busy Busi-
ness Owner's Guide to
Health Care Reform: What
You Need to Know" and will
be discussing the Health
Care Reform act. RSVP at
www.citruscountychamber
.com or call 352-795-3149.
Rebecca Bays will ad-
dress the Business
Women's Alliance at its
June 19 lunch at Plantation The Citru
on Crystal River. Rebecca ourservi
will be discussing the TDC. lives. We
RSVP at www.citruscounty
chamber.com or call 352-
795-3149. H or
Chamber Directory
We invite ALL Chamber
members to participate in
the new Chamber Direc-
tory. Available to all mem-
bers, residents, visitors and
potential relocators, this is
your opportunity to pro-
mote your company. We
brought this in-house this
year to be able to provide 3d
more economical pricing. 1d
If you haven't reserved
your space yet, be sure to
contact Keith Pullias at
352-795-3149 or e-mail him
at keith@citruscounty /
chamber.com before
May 31.
September
Business Expo
Celebrate Citrus County
business by exhibiting
and/or attending the Sept.
7 Business Expo. The The Citrus C
Chamber will host this mosassa te
event at the Citrus County ends of Hon
Fairgrounds and you can U.S. 19. Cel
make a day out of it by tak- Jim Behunia
ing in the weekly flea mar- Chamber Ch
ket and staying for the 5:30 Health Cent
p.m. race at the Speedway. Fernandez,
We will have pet adoptions Hudson, Lan
available also. Bank; Janet
ers, Kiddie V


Upcoming Chamber
of Commerce events
May 29 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Business
Women's Association general meeting
June 5 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Business Leaders
of Tomorrow members meeting
I- June 13 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
SBusiness After Hours at
Christie Dental
II.J une June 14- 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Chamber Member's Lunch at
Plantation on Crystal River
June 19- 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
BWA Member Lunch at Plantation on Crystal River
Check our complete Chamber and Community
calendar at citruscountychamber.com or follow
the QR code to see the website on your phone!


Face owner Michael Ziegler, his son, and wife Cindy are Chamber members and ambassadors from left, Amanda Rowthorn;
WollinkaWikle Title Ins.; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus
et Mayo; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Gailen Spinka, and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


Come new member SaltFace Charter

r welcome to SaltFace Charters. My name is Michael Ziegler. I am a USCG-licensed OUPV
operator, or "Captain," of SaltFace Charters in Homosassa, Fla., not far from King's Bay.
I have lived, fished and explored the rivers, estuaries and bays throughout Citrus County and
re Coast of Florida since childhood. My service to you is to provide novice and expert anglers
best professional Citrus County saltwater fishing experience possible. Whether it's rod-bending
opwater-thrashing trout, shark and cobia or high-flying tarpon, I will work hard to provide
your guests or family the angling experience of a lifetime.
t Captain Ziegler at 352- 628-9848 or visit the website at www.saltfacecharters.com.


s County Chamber of Commerce and EDC remember
cemen and -women this Memorial Day who gave their
are thankful for their service.


nosassa sign gets
ire than a facelift


t -"o


Business W men's Alliace



Register now for

2013 Women's

HEALTH & FITNESS

Expo presented by BWA


ark your calendar the
Women's HEALTH &
FITNESS Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will be back again
for 2013!
This year's expo will be on
Saturday, Sept. 28, from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the National Guard
Armory in Crystal River.
Did your firm participate last
year? Take advantage of paid
preregistration until June 18,
and choose your preferred ex-
hibit space. After June 18, reg-
istration will be open to health-,
fitness- and wellness-related
businesses and organizations
on a "first-come, first-served"
basis. Chamber members re-
ceive a discount.


Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities and the popular Spa
Zone are available from Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce's Crystal River office at
28 N.W. U.S. 19, call 352-795-
3149, or from any Business
Women's Alliance member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those
around them about their
health, fitness and wellness.
Proceeds further the education
of students from Citrus, Crys-
tal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. Proceeds
from last year's expo helped to
fund nine scholarships in
health care and non-health
care business careers.


County Chamber of Commerce and the Rotary Club of Ho-
amed up to have new signs placed on the north and south
losassa. Enjoy the updated, colorful signs as you drive on
lebrating the new sign are Luke Todd, Gregg Mackler and
ik, along with Chamber President/CEO Josh Wooten and
airman John Murphy. Chamber ambassadors Crystal Ashe,
er at Brentwood; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; Nicholle
Villages of Citrus Hills; Jeannie Greene, Inside Citrus; Bill
id Title of Citrus County; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast
Mayo; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control and Jenee Vick-
(ampus Learning Center also joined in the festivities.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
Lynn Coker
Just A Cupcake, Crystal River


... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


Iii"4




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 D3

CCBA presents Boys & Girls Clubs with golf tournament proceeds
I


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Builders Association (CCBA) board of directors presented the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County with 50 percent of the 2013 Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing proceeds, $2,311.08, on May 8. The 2013 Golf Outing, presented by Love Chevrolet & Love Honda and held on Feb. 23 at Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club, was
the first year of partnership between the CCBA and the Boys & Girls Clubs, providing opportunity for the Boys & Girls Clubs to raise funds, and for the CCBA to continue its
quest to give back to the community. The CCBA is pleased to announce the Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing will partner with the Boys & Girls Clubs again in 2014, having
scheduled the next Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing for Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at the Inverness Golf & Country Club. If you are interested in assisting through participation
or sponsorship for the 2014 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing, contact the CCBA at 352-746-9028 or the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County at 352-621-9225.


Walmart to


sell frozen


Fatburger


patties

Associated Press

NEW YORK Fatburger, a chain with a
devoted following on the West Coast, said
Friday it will sell its branded frozen beef
patties in Walmart stores nationwide.
The Beverly Hills, Calif.-based chain said
the beef patties are in select stores now and will
roll out nationally over the next several weeks.
Fatburger, which was founded in 1952, has
about 150 locations globally; half of those are
in the U.S., primarily on the West Coast. The
chain is owned by Fog Cutter Capital Group Inc.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., based in Bentonville,
Ark., has more than 4,000 U.S. locations but
said the Fatburger patties will be available
in 3,100 stores. A Wal-Mart representative
did not immediately know why the remain-
der of the stores wouldn't carry the items.
Andy Wiederhorn, CEO of Fatburger, said
the patties will be sold in packs of six for
about $7 to $8. He said they'll have a higher
fat content of about 30 percent since they're
intended for barbecuing. The burgers sold
in restaurants have a fat content of about 20
percent, he said.
A Fatburger burger with cheese in restau-
rants costs about $5.50.
Wal-Mart will use its own suppliers to cre-
ate the patties; Fatburger is licensing its
name and recipe, which Wiederhorn said
includes a particular type of seasoning and
grinds of beef
Wiederhorn said this is the first licensing
agreement for Fatburger food; the com-
pany's restaurants are primarily owned and
operated by franchisees.



Trustee opposes

$20M payout to

American Air CEO
Associated Press

The Justice Department is objecting to a
proposed $20 million severance payment for
American Airlines CEO Tom Horton, saying
it's bigger than allowed by bankruptcy law.
Horton became CEO when American
filed for Chapter 11 protection in November
2011. The proposed merger of US Airways
Group Inc. and American calls for Horton
to lose that job and become chairman of the
combined company American has pro-
posed giving him severance pay of almost
$20 million and lifetime flight benefits.
The objection filed Friday by the U.S.
trustee's office says bankruptcy law caps such
payments, even if they are agreed to in bank-
ruptcy court but not made until the company
exits bankruptcy protection. Bankruptcy
law limits severance payments to execu-
tives and aims to make sure companies can
repay as much of their debt as possible.
The objection also says previous com-
pany filings showed that Horton would get a
maximum of $6.4 million if he had left at the
end of last year, and raises the question of
why he should get so much more money now.
American has said in filings the money for
Horton is in recognition of his efforts dur-
ing the airline's restructuring and his role
in overseeing the merger with US Airways.
The trustee's objection also says American
should be required to explain how its board
determined that $20 million was the right
amount for Horton, and to say whether in-
dependent directors approved of the payment
The trustee's office is part of the Justice
Department. Its job is to review bankruptcy
cases to make sure bankruptcy laws are
being enforced.
The case is in federal bankruptcy court in
New York. Judge Sean Lane had previously
rejected the same payment for Horton, but
he left the door open for American to pro-
pose the payment in its reorganization plan,
which it has done. The trustee's objection is
set to be heard in bankruptcy court June 4.


Acing one final test: finding


E earlier this month, Gov Rick Scott
launched the Hire Florida
Grads initiative challenging
Florida's employers, workforce system
and education partners to connect post-
secondary graduates to prospective job
opportunities.
It makes good sense for us to channel
Florida's talent supply pipeline back to
our own communities in-
stead of forcing graduates to
seek employment else-
where. This logical link is
something regional work-
force boards have long ad-
vocated and we support the
effort.
Toward that end, Work-
force Connection is holding
a "Hire a Grad" forum Fri- Laura
day, May 31 from 1-5 p.m. at WO
the College of Central W
Florida's campus in Ocala. CONNE
The free forum provides an
opportunity for graduates to network
with workforce experts, apply for jobs
online and learn how to make the tran-
sition from classroom to career includ-
ing ways to use social media to launch a
successful job search.
Workforce Connection CEO Rusty
Skinner said forum is designed to an-
swer the question many graduates and
their parents may have now that grad-
uation celebrations are over: "what
comes next?"
"The 'Hire a Grad' program is all
about providing answers to that ques-
tion," Skinner said, "and, ultimately,
jobs."
So what do we know about the Class
of 2013?
First, we know than it's likely larger.
Based on the most recent Census data,
the number of Americans under age 25
with at least a college degree has in-
creased 38 percent since 2000. We can
also surmise that, with students often
juggling jobs, even families, along with
the demands of the classroom, success-


I
I



I


fully completing a postsecondary pro-
gram is not easy nor is it inexpensive.
Yet, despite the increased competi-
tion and the effort put into their higher
education, the missing component ap-
pears to be hire education: a survey by
Simply Hired conducted last year indi-
cates that only 20 percent of graduates
have a job secured after graduation and
only 45 percent say they
have specific career goals.
Second, there is both in-
trinsic and practical value
in higher education. Con-
sider that the unemploy-
ment rate among 20-24 year
olds is 14.3 percent, yet for
those with an associate's de-
gree or credential from a
Byrnes two-year program, the rate
falls to 7.5 percent, and for
FORCE those with a bachelor's de-
iCTION gree or higher, the rate is
only 4.8 percent- well below
local, state and national rates for gen-
eral job seekers.
Third, a higher education has in-
creasingly become a prerequisite for
many jobs historically held by high
school graduates. A recent Career-
Builder study of more than 2,600 em-
ployers found that one-third say they
are now filling entry-level positions
with educated labor.
Simply Hired notes that for employers,
there are a lot of great reasons to add a new
college graduate to your workplace mix.
"From their energy and enthusiasm,
to their new ideas and recent history of
learning, to their comfort with technol-
ogy and social media, recent college
graduates can provide many benefits to
companies. And since they're new to
the workforce, you can access the best
candidates first, to create long-term em-
ployee assets at a lower salary cost."
Moreover, employers say some of the
positive impacts on their business in
hiring postsecondary graduates include
higher quality of work, increased pro-


employment
ductivity and revenue and greater cus-
tomer loyalty.
That said, employers also say that
graduates are often not prepared for
the job interview, don't know how to
communicate effectively and have trou-
ble adapting, problem solving and mak-
ing decisions.
So let's see if I can boil this all down:
Some form of higher education is nec-
essary for most jobs, even entry-level
positions; employers see many benefits
in hiring postsecondary grads but also
say many lack the interview and soft skills
needed to get them in the door. Mean-
while, the number of young adults with
postsecondary degrees or certifications
continues to grow and, according to a 2011
poll conducted by Twentysomething,
Inc., 85 percent of graduates move back
in with their parents, so many of those
who flew the coop to matriculate else-
where are returning to the nest.
Given all that, the "Hire a Grad"
forum is a great starting off point for our
graduates. If you are an employer and
you'd like to hire a graduate call us at
800-746-9950. If you are a postsecondary
graduate, whether you attended With-
lacoochee Technical Institute, CF or
the University of Florida, and you want
to take that next important step, plan to
attend Friday's forum. You can sign up
online by visiting wwwWorkforceCon-
nectionFL.com and clicking on the
"Hire a Grad" button.
Now that the pomp and circumstance
has faded for yet another graduation
season, let's take up the challenge and
work together to help our grads work
with us, building a stronger economy
here in our own communities.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a Certified
Workforce Professional and communi-
cations manager at Workforce Connec-
tion. Please contact her at 352-291-9559
or 800-434-5627, ext 1234 or
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl. com.


McDonald's can't shake criticism over nutrition


Associated Press

NEW YORK McDon-
ald's once again faced criti-
cism that it's a purveyor of
junk food that markets to
children at its annual share-
holder meeting Thursday -
including some sharp re-
marks from a 9-year-old girl.
The world's biggest ham-
burger chain has been look-
ing to keep up with changing
tastes as people increasingly
opt for foods they feel are
fresh or healthy Customers
can now order egg whites in
its breakfast sandwiches, for
example. McDonald's also
recently introduced chicken
wraps to go after people in
their 20s and 30s looking for
better-for-you options.
But on Thursday, McDonald's
was taken to task by speakers
associated with an advocacy
group about its menu and ad-
vertising toward kids. As with
other shareholder meetings
where critics are given the
rare chance to face execu-
tives, McDonald's Corp. allot-
ted about a half-hour for
attendees to ask CEO Don
Thompson questions.
Among those was a 9-year-
old girl who asked Thompson
to stop "tricking kids into eat-
ing your food." Specifically,
she called out the company's
advertising for getting kids to
"keep bugging their parents"
for the food. The girl's
mother echoed the request
later on, saying McDonald's
undermines parents by mar-
keting to children.
Another speaker asked that
McDonald's remove its loca-
tions from hospitals, while
others asked it to stop target-
ing communities of color by


A McDonald's menu is pictured May 9 in Detroit.


signing stars such as Olympic
gymnast Gabby Douglas and
the NBAs LeBron James.
Three of the individuals
were members of Corporate
Accountability, which has
been critical of the com-
pany's marketing practices.
Others were health profes-
sionals, parents or writers
linked to the group.
Thompson stood by the
company's menu, saying Mc-
Donald's doesn't "sell junk
food," pointing out items such
as the yogurt parfait and side


salad and notir
company has b
more fruits and v
"The way you
is not who we ar
"We're not preda
Thompson, wh
as CEO this pa
also noted that
company's 1.8 r
ployees are pare
his kids eat at M
He tried to offer
perspective on ti
chain, saying tha
couldn't afford :


when he was growing up and
that his grandmother would
promise to make him versions
of the chain's food at home.
Still, he said at one point,
"I do agree we have some is-
sues, and we can be part of
the solution."
The criticism is far from new,
Sbut its persistence illustrates
the uphill battle McDonald's
faces in trying to evolve its
image and stay relevant.
After years of outperforming
its rivals, the company has
been struggling to increase
sales more recently. During
the first quarter, global sales
at restaurants open at least a
year fell 1 percent. That
marked the first quarterly
ee decline in a decade.
758- a. McDonald's is also endur-
0-1370 Cal ing criticism that it still mar-
kets to children.
:S Despite Thompson's claims
that the company doesn't tar-
4 89 get children in schools, Cor-
:h porate Accountability noted
47 ^ that McDonald's has moved
much of its marketing online
S where it's harder for parents
"t,' to monitor what kids see.
Associated Press Nick Guroff, a spokesman for
the group, also said that com-
mercials featuring Gabby
ig that the Douglas and LeBron James
een adding are directed at kids.
vegetables. Corporate Accountability
describe us in recent years had pres-
re," he said. sured McDonald's to stop
tors." using Ronald McDonald to
no took over marketto children. Thompson
.st summer, on Thursday noted that the
many of the company isn't using Ronald
million em- "the way it used to" but nev-
nts and that ertheless stood by the mascot
McDonald's. "Ronald is not a bad guy -
a different he's about fun, he's a clown,"
he fast-food Thompson said. "So I'd ask
it his family all you to let your kids have
McDonald's fun, too."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Workforce Bus headed
to Crystal River Mall
Crystal River Mall events in May:
Saturday, May 25: Try your
hand at karaoke at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29: The
Workforce Bus will be in front of
Kmart from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and
Belk will be celebrating its 125th an-
niversary with activities throughout
the day.
For information, 352-795-2585 or
www.thecrystalrivermall.com or like
the mall on Facebook at The Crystal
River Mall.
Jeck joins
Capital City Bank
Capital City Bank announced
Clayton Jeck has joined its team of
bankers at the Inverness Office, lo-
cated at 1500 N. U.S. 41. As a busi-
ness banker, Clayton is charged with
initiating, developing and managing
business relationships through the
delivery of Bank
products and serv-

that exceptional
client service is
upheld.
Clayton joins
Capital City Bank
Clayton with 27 years of
Jeck prior industry ex-
perience, having held a variety of
positions including branch manager,
loan manager and business banker
during his career. He received his
bachelor's degree in business man-
agement from Florida International
University. Clayton has served on
the board of the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Council, is past
president of Citrus Sertoma and do-
nates his time with a number of
other community organizations. He
is also a member of the Sumter
County Chamber of Commerce and
the treasurer at the Inverness First
Assembly of God.
Clayton lives in Floral City with his
wife Rachel. They have three adult
children and two granddaughters.
Oak Hill Hospital
appoints Romero as CFO
SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital
announced the appointment of
Matthew Romero as its new chief fi-
nancial officer. Romero joins Oak Hill
Hospital from Muskogee, Okla.,
where he served as the system's
CFO for the two-hospital EASTAR


Special to the Chronicle
Cypress Cove Care Center of Crystal River recently received a SHARP award from the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration and USF SafetyFlorida. This is the first time the skilled nursing facility
has earned the SHARP recognition, which is given to small to medium-sized employers with exemplary
safety and health management practices. The company, which has been in operation for more than 20
years, employs 132 workers.


Health System.
Romero has held
a variety of ac-
S counting positions
in the field of
health care in the
Southeastern
United States for
Matthew nearly 20 years.
Romero He holds a bache-
lor of accountancy degree from New
Mexico State University in Las
Cruces, N.M.
Romero fills the position vacated
by Chance Phillips, who was pro-
moted through the HCA health care
system.
Oak Hill Hospital is at 11375
Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles
east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50.
Visit OakHillHospital.com, or like us
on Facebook.
Oak Hill announces
star associates
Oak Hill Hospital has announced
its Star Associates of the Month of
April. Each month hospital associ-
ates are chosen in a process that in-
volves nominations and voting by
their peers, patients, patient families
and physicians. This month's Oak
Hill Hospital stars are:
Judith Babilonia, physical thera-
pist, joined Oak Hill Hospital's physi-
cal therapy department in November


2011. She lives in
Lutz. Although her
goal is to heal, she
said "Most of the
time the patient
and staff heal me."
She sees her job
as helping people
Judith get rehabilitated,
Babilonia but empowers the
patient and family to do the job with
her assistance and to improve their
quality of life. Her nomination came
from her coworkers, who praised her
for her attention to detail and her
ability to play close attention to pa-
tients. They cited one example
where "Judith was working with a
patient when she noticed a change
in the patient's behavior. Judith re-
ported the concern, leading to an
MRI and a glioblastoma being dis-
covered in the patient's brain. The
patient is now under treatment
thanks to her early discovery."
Lisa Bharath, medical critical
care unit (MCCU), is regarded by
patients and their family as a caring
and compassionate human being.
One nomination stated, "We were
grateful that you were working dur-
ing dad's final days and feel blessed
that you were assigned to his care.
You are an exceptional nurse and
showed exemplary professional ex-
cellence, empathy and compassion


in your work." Lisa
also has a reputa-
tion for taking the
time to meet with
family and review
details of the pa-
tient's health sta-
tus and efforts to
Lisa stabilize the pa-
Bharath tient.
"Because of your efforts, we bet-
ter understood the critical nature of
dad's condition and recognized how
hard the Oak Hill Hospital ICU staff
was working to try to address it."
Lisa is considered by patients and
family to go the extra mile and make
a positive difference in the lives of
those entrusted to her care. She is a
role model.
Jessica Root, medical critical
care unit (MCCU), whose nomina-
tion also came from a patient's fam-
ily, praised her for the care their
mother just received at Oak Hill.
"I want to tell you that my family
had nothing but an extremely posi-
tive experience when it came to re-
ceiving care from the employees at
your facility. An exceptional and
completely amazing nurse is Jessica
Root ... she is truly an angel! I have
never met someone with such com-
passion!" All family members wit-
nessed Jessica's caring for their
mother and each person praised her


for her attention not
only to the patient
but to the family's
S concems even after
S her shift was over.
7 "We felt extremely
comfortable knowing
that my mother
Jessica was in the best
Root
hands possible to
be receiving care from that we actually
left the hospital at night to go home and
rest. When we returned my mother
was getting better and better. Oak Hill
Hospital is the place I want to go!"
Seven Rivers Regional
rams ACR accreditation
CRYSTAL RIVER Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center has
been awarded a three-year term of
accreditation in mammography as
the result of a recent review by the
American College of Radiology (ACR).
The ACR gold seal of accredita-
tion represents the highest level of
image quality and patient safety. It is
awarded only to facilities meeting
ACR practice guidelines and techni-
cal standards after a peer-review
evaluation by board-certified physi-
cians and medical physicists who
are experts in the field.
Perrone returns from
financial conference
Local registered investment advi-
sor representative, branch owner, fi-
nancial adviser and 2013 Executive
Council member Gregory Perrone
recently attended the National Con-
ference for Professional Develop-
ment, hosted by Raymond James
Financial Services. The conference
offered educational sessions and
presentations by industry experts and
leaders and a forum for networking.
Perrone, whose office is located at
2657 N. Forest Ridge Blvd. in Her-
nando, found the content of the
meeting to be of particular value. "The
theme for 2013 was 'Building on the
Past, Planning for the Future.' We
explored the unique position we're in
as independent advisers the free-
dom we have to not only build unique
businesses but to serve our clients'
best interests exclusively by using
what we have learned from the past
to plan for our clients future. There
are many ways we can maximize
that power, whether by incorporating
new products and investment strate-
gies or by learning from our fellow
advisors' successes."


Fire Capt. Scott Spata, left, looks at a tablet with the digital map showing I
farm during an April 1 test run with other members of the Pittsville Fire Depa
Pittsvile, Wis. The organization is working with farmers and firefighters in V
develop digital maps that firefighters can use to avoid hazards when they
calls on farms.


MAPPING
Continued from Page D1

power before tackling the blaze.
The house was a complete loss, Ortner
said, but he also knows he was lucky the
fire didn't spread to fuel barrels 60 feet away.
The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics,
which collects data for farms with 11 or
more workers, says
between 430 and 560 The Burea
workers in crop and
livestock production Statistics sa
and support services 430 and 51
for those industries
were killed on the in crop an
job each year from
2003 to 2011. But the production
bureau says those
numbers are likely services
on the low end, since industries
many farms are fam-
ily-run or have only a on the job
few employees.
Bruce Wayerski, from 200:
another Pittsville
dairy farmer who But the bl
helped test the map- those numb(
ping program, knows
that seconds can on the I
count in saving a life.
His 16-year-old nephew was overcome by
gas in a grain silo on Wayerski's brother-
in-law's farm and died before rescuers
could get to him.
Wayerski, 59, listed numerous hazards
on his map for firefighters, but noted that
one of the things that can make their job
tougher is the size of his farm. The build-
ings are spread out over 10 of the 800
acres where he milks 195 cows and grows
crops.


II
a
6
d

i






ul
3


e
lo


"I live in a small community
of people know where my f
said. "But they don't know
shop is, or where the storage
icals or gasoline, diesel fuel.'
Tractor rollovers have lon
leading cause of deaths on
many more farmworkers ar
equipment than killed by fir
sions, so the National Farr
Center has asked some farm
entering
u of Labor tors and o
ments
iys between database
30 workers Minor
tools use
I livestock cate peop
accidents
and support onheavie
chinery;
for those way to fr
were killed can be t
equipment
each year Keifer sa
to eventual
Sto 2011. fighters
codes on t
reau says other equ
.rs are likely immediate
direction
ow end. sembly. T
tion could
to the database later, but rigl
thing beyond the pilot project
while the federal budget is w
President Barack Obama
money for the center and ei
programs overseen by the Na
tute for Occupational Safety
in his budget plan. It's unclea
gress will do, but the centers
previously threatened with
and saw the money restored.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

/ problem in today's world
, is that, in all likelihood,
you are paying more in in-
terest for the debts you
owe than you will earn on
any investment kept sepa-
rately. Until that circum-
stance changes, I would
concentrate on paying off
the debt and worry about
the children's future later
DEAR BRUCE: I have
read several times in your
column that people need
to be careful when getting
into investment properties.
Is it a more viable option
to use a property manage-
ment company to handle
Associated Press the business end of things
hazards on a and therefore "buy" some
irtment near of the expertise needed?
Nisconsin to S.G., via email
y respond to DEAR S.G.: You are
very perceptive. When you
have no idea how to handle
y here, a lot an investment property,
arm is," he using a property manage-
where the ment company to handle
is for chem- the business end of things
makes excellent sense.
ig been the At the same time, you
farms and should be learning the
e caught in business, learning how to
es or explo- handle various circum-
n Medicine stances. As you become
lers to start more experienced, you
their trac- will depend less on the
either imple- property management
into the company Congratulations
as well. on your perception; you
said the are correct.
d to extri- DEAR BRUCE: My cur-
)le from car rent credit rating is 756. I
Don't work want to boost my score by
er farm ma- closing out some of my
the fastest credit cards, but I am not
ee someone sure which would provide
o take the a higher boost.
nt apart. I have one card with a
id he'd like $30,000 limit, which had a
ally see fire- high balance of $29,000
scan QR and is now at $0. I have
reactorss and other cards, such as store
ipment and cards that I use occasion-
;ely receive ally, that have small credit
s for disas- limits ($600 to $1,000).
he informa- Those are always paid in
d be added full and when in use, the
ht now, any- balance never exceeds a
t is on hold couple hundred dollars. I
worked out. always pay my bills on
eliminated time and never go over
eight similar any limits.
tional Insti- Closing some cards is
and Health the only way I can think of
.r what Con- to boost my number Of the
s have been cards I don't use, which
budget cuts should I close out to max-
imize the increase in my


If you are making only minimum
payments, you are already in
trouble. There are many companies
that can help you. You may wish
to consult one of them, but if you
are asked for money up front, run!


score? Which are better to
keep open those with
higher credit lines or
those I've had the longest?
- Susie, via email
DEAR SUSIE: I don't
see any reason for you to
close any credit cards.
The high-balance card
with the $30,000 limit,
which is now at $0, in no
way should be canceled,
in my opinion. That's 90
percent or more of the
credit you have available.
If you are not using it, so
be it. There's no cost to
you, assuming there is no
annual fee.
Any of the other cards
you would like to keep be-
cause of the convenience,
by all means keep them.
Your credit score of 756 is
an acceptable score. I
don't see how closing out
credit cards is going to
give it much of a boost.
The best thing to do is
continue to pay your bills
on a monthly basis. Over a
period of time, that will
provide a certain amount
of increase in your credit
score.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
$50,000 in a savings ac-
count that I'd like to put
into the stock market. In
your opinion, should I put
it all in at one time or dol-
lar-cost average over time?
- B.W, Superior, Wis.
DEAR B.W: I am far
more comfortable with
dollar-cost averaging
rather than just digging a
hole and dumping the
whole $50,000 in it. You
might want to try invest-
ing $10,000 in the stock
market in the next five
months. That would give
you at least a certain
amount of dollar-cost av-
eraging.
You haven't mentioned
how much this $50,000
represents in your total
investments. If you are in
a very high investment
bracket, the $50,000 might
go in all at one time, but
there is nothing wrong


with dollar-cost averag-
ing. With all other things
being equal, that would be
my choice.
DEAR BRUCE: Do you
have any recommenda-
tions for someone who
has credit-card debt? I
have always made just the
minimum payments, but I
am now having a lot of
trouble managing even that
I am making late payments
on some of them and don't
know what to do. Are
there any debt-settlement
companies that are trust-
worthy, and is this some-
thing I should look into?
- S.E, via email
DEAR S.P: Because you
have been making only
minimum payments, you
are already in trouble.
There are many compa-
nies out there that can
help you. You may wish to
consult one of them, but if
you are asked for money
up front, run!
The major problem
here is getting your affairs
in order so you can meet
the minimum payments.
But it will take you many,
many years of making
minimum payments to re-
tire the obligations.
You can consult with
your credit-card compa-
nies and explain the situ-
ation; ask if there is a
possibility of reducing
your monthly payments.
Lenders generally prefer
to have a steady stream of
minimum payments
rather than none at all.
If you choose to consult
with the credit consulting
companies, be 100 per-
cent aware of what they
offer and what their
charges will be.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. co
m. Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing
to the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot
be provided.


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


BUSINESS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(32 53565 1aolF ree :(2 : cliiaedpcrTil. i nI I IIin


70yr WM 6'1" 200lbs
seeking open minded
woman from Crystal
River Area for friendship
& fun times
(352) 949-1657
May the Sacred Heart of
Jesus be adored, glori-
fied, loved and pre-
served throughout the
world now and forever.
Sacred Heart of Jesus,
pray for us. Workers of
Miracles, pray for us.
St. Jude, helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
Say this prayer 9 times
a day, by the eight day
your prayer will be an-
swered. Publication
must be promised. SB.



BLACK DIAMOND
2BR/2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1200/month
includes basic cable &
lawn care. Contact Dixie
at 352-746-3301
CNA, Lie., Exp. Ins.
Will Care For You &
Assist in Daily Needs
"352-249-7451
Extra Long Twin
Seally Posturepedic
Mattress with/
Wood Headboard &
Frame $125.
(352) 628-2346
FLORAL CITY
Sun & Mon 8am-?
30 yrs of collecting An-
tiques & Collectables.
Something 4 everyone
10140 Dollarosa Ct
GE Profile
side by Side 26.6 Cubic
ft, stainless steel, refrig,
water, cubed and
crushed ice on door,
exec. cond. $300 Firm
(352) 527-2729
HOMOSASSA
1/1, in Park $125 wk,
furnished, ele. in-
cluded 621-0601
Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
low miles,garage kept,
Adult Owner, $5K
(352) 257-8850
KEYSTONE
5th Wheel, 30 ft, Triple
Slide, Exc Condition
$16,500. 352-795-1923
or 605-351-1419
MERCURY 2000,
8HP, Short Shaft
Very Clean, $800
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
REAL LITE
1998, 12 ft slide in
pickup camper $6900
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
Sofa and Loveseat
dark red and olive
good condition
$200. for set
352-503-7748
TRIUMPH 190
2002, Center console,
115 yamaha motor
$8900 352-795-1923
or 605-351-1419
Two Lounge Chairs
Olive Green
like new, $100 Ea.
352-503-7448
YAMAHA
2013 9.9 with
V bottom, aluminum &
trailer, 501b trolling
motor, never in water
new, w/warranty $3k
352-257-8850



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
Large Gas/BBQ Grills
& MORE 352-270-4087



4 Drawer Steel Filing
Cabinet. Very Good
Condition
(352) 5274197
FREE KITTENS
6 weeks old, litter
trained 352-212-4061
Free Kittens
brown stripes, gray
stripes, black & Russian
blue, adorable,
ready for new home!
(352) 601-3662
Free Leghorn Rooster
6 months old
friendly to people
(352) 560-3085




'our%\olJd first

Need a jil
ir a

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


6 mo. old
Looking for Loving
home with no kids or
Dogs (352) 527-6902
Free Pine Cones
Large, great for Crafts,
Bagged, ready to go
(352) 621-3929
Free to good home
Bull Dog/ Catahulla
Puppies
7 weeks
(352) 302-6652
Free to good home
with fenced yard only.
2 female adult
shelties, spayed must
stay together. Call
352-422-6310
Free to good loving
home rescued female
adult cat. Spayed &
declawed. No dogs
Call 352-422-6310
HI "M FRANKIE
A male mini apricot poo-
dle, only 5 yrs old, I am
very played back, happy,
and hansom pooch now
that my saving angles
has rescued me. My fur
was so matted and full
of flea, I was so un-
happy and because I
liked to bark at the
squires my previous
owners would hit me in
the mouth and I ended
up with a jaw infection
so I had to have the
lower jaw removed. But
don't be sad, I eat a little
funny but I am happy
now. I am looking for my
forever home, can you
share yours. Call Saving
Angles pet rescue at
419-0223 or 726-1006
or visit www.saving
anglespetrescue.com



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct @ $5.001b.
(352) 897-5388**
Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistvmeadows-


"LOST" Two Large lents
40x80 and 40x100
Inverness Rooks Rd.
(813) 394-1228
Chihuahua, male
brown w/ white chest,
Around Owl Point
Crystal River
(970) 391-5854
Large Anatolian
Shepherd
Male, tan, dark ears and
nose, micro chipped
100lbs lost on 4/26/13 in
Floral City near S.Turner
Ave & StageCoach rd.
$500 REWARD
(352) 220-2540
Lost 2 Black Calves
1 steer,
Tag #312, #283
Rockcrusher Area
352-634-2462
352-422-2076
Lost Calico Cat
Dark brown color
w/cream/orange
markings: with white
chest belly & paws,
Beverly Hills,
Heartbroken,
Missing on
April 6, REWARD
352-527-0302
LOST CAT
Female, gray,
w/
yellow eyes,
Burmese
Between
Hemlock
& Clark Inverness
(352) 637-2039
LOST
Gold Rope Necklace
with 4 charms
McDonalds in Inver-
ness. Lost 5/22/13
(352) 419-5878
RED POMERANIAN
male, 15 yrs old, not
neutered, last seen
Friday on Meadows St.
Homosassa, Family
misses him! please call
Heather 352-419-9451
White Minx Cat
Blue Eyes, deaf, 10 lbs,
8 yrs old. Missing Mon
Independence HWY,
Inverness 726-1019



Puppy Found
Poss. age 6mth-1lyr
female, found on Cardi-
nal and Georgian Rd,
Homosassa. Call to
identify 352-628-3829




Tupperware
Call Fran Smith May
is Birthday month lots
of great specials
352-746-3652



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct (a$5.001b.
(352) 897-5388"



Cemetery Lot
Fountain Memorial Gar-
dens in Homosassa 1
plot 1 casket and 1 vault
at 1/2 price $3000. pls.
call (352) 628-2936


Construction
Secretary
Must be proficient w/
word, excel, & adobe
acrabot. organized,
personable and able
to multi task. DFWP
Send resume to P.O.
Box 1053, Lecanto,
FL 34460-1053

RECEPTIONIST/
OFFICE
COORDINATOR
PT, 35 hrs week.
Must have computer
Microsoft Office exp.
Fax resume to:
352-259-2558
or email:
flhearinacentera)
gmail.com




1 F/T Ex. Barber
1 F/T Exp. Stylist
busy location!
352-220-7260

HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoll@
vahoo.corn

EXPERIENCED
RN'S
Full time & Part time
Positions Available
RN's needed for
outpatient surgery
center. MUST have
experience in
PRE/ POST outpa-
tient surgery center
or hospital experi-
ence in ICU or ER.
Excellent pay, bene-
fits, excellent hours,
no weekends,
nights, or call. Best
place to work in
Citrus County.
Submit Resume to
Fax 527-1827
or in person:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida.

FIT Front Office
Receptionist

Prior experience in
Eye Care or Medical
preferred.
Apply in person
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

Medical Careers
begin here
Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN / LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Long-term
care experience
preferred. We offer
great pay and
benefits to full-time
associates in a
team-oriented
environment.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
HannahMand
@LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
40566



4*.


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


RN/LPN, PT/A
OT/A, CNA & ST.
Psyche RN
Exp. Marketer

for Citrus & Hernando
wanted 352-794-6097


RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.

HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF


SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility

Currently Seeking
Applications
for Full time
Certified CNA
for our 7a-3pm Shift
with flexibility
Same for full time &
part time position
on Night Shift.
This position also re-
quires, certification
in medication
management. Must
have excellent
organization skills.
Be a team player,
and have previous
resident care exp.
Experience with the
Alzheimer's and
dementia popula-
tion preferred.
Please Apply at
SUSHINE GARDENS
Crystal River
311 NE 4th Ave.


SURGICAL
ASSISTANT

Our high quality oral
surgery practice is
seeking a fulltime
surgical assistant.
Must have dental or
medical exp, a
caring attitude and be
computer savy Bene-
fits incl. health
insurance & pension
Mail resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks Dr. Crystal
River, FL. 34429





AIRLINE CAREERS
Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL
Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769


BOOKKEEPER
CPA Firm Full-time,
Experienced in
client write-up, A/R,
A/P, depreciation
and Quickbooks.
Reliability & punctu-
ality very important.
Must have excellent
customer relation
skills. $16to $18
DOE w/benefits.
Fax Resume to
795-1133 or e-mail to
ppricecp@
tampabay.rr.com


Customer
Service
Specialist
Need outstanding
phone report. Good
judgement, Experi-
ence scheduling
mobile work force.
Established company
w/ great benefits.
Please mail resume
to: Blind Box 1830p
CC Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
FL 34429


MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


Office Manager/
Closing Agent

5 yrs experience,Title
Agent lic. preferred,
Please fax resume to
352-746-7222

Real Estate
Property
Manager
Full Time in
Homosassa, FL
Duties include
processing leases,
managing & growing
existing book of
business. Successful
candidate will have
excellent communica-
tion & computer skills
w/2-5 years exp. in
Real Estate/Title
Company. Email Re-
sume to csugarmi@
tampabay.rr.com









Business
Services
Accounting
Clerk
Citrus County
Chronicle
Crystal River, FL
Minimum two years
accounting
experience.
Proficient with MS
Office products.
Fast-paced
enviornment.
High level of atten-
tion to detail.
Process reports,
billing audition
functions, excellent
customer service,
End of Month
Closeout Functions.

To Apply,
Send Resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.comrn
Drug screen
required for
final applicant.
EOE

DIRECT TECHS

4 spots open. Must pass
background, drug and
DMV check. Must have
Truck, SUV or VAN.
Piece work $1k to
$2k/week. 80 miles ra-
dius. Call 352-201-7219
or 407-738-9463

Driver :
One Cent Raise af-
ter 6 and 12 months.
$0.03 Enhanced
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or Weekly Pay,
Hometime Options.
CDL-A, 3 months
OTR exp.
800-414-9569
www.
drivekniaht.com

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

EXPERIENCED
METAL CREWS

Reliable
Transportation
ADDIV In Person
AAA ROOFING
1000 NE 5th St.
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411

P/T HandyMan

few days per
week in Ozello
352-228-9631

QUALIFIED
SERVICE TECH

Experience Only and
current FL Driver's Li-
cense a must. Apply in
person: Daniel's Heating
&Air 4581 S. Florida
Ave. Inverness

R&R Person/
Auto Mechanic

Experienced ONLY
must be able to R&R
transmissions. Clean
license and own tools
call btwn 7am to 6pm
352-489-5580

Reliable Lawn
Care Person

Experienced in
bushes, weeds etc.
Must have own truck
Paul 352-527-7977


Scoggins Chevy
Buick,
Chiefland
is growing and we
are looking for a
Transmission Drivea-
bility Issues Techni-
cian. GM training a
plus. We offer Top
Pay, based on ex-
perience, Health,
Dental and Vision
benefits and No
Weekends..
Email Resume To
kbelfry@ymail.com
or Call Kevin Belfry,
Service Manager at
352-493-4263


TRUCK DRIVER/
YARD PERSON
All applicants must
have CDL, health
card and clean
driving record.
Fork lift operator.
Must have great
customer service
parttime position w/
immediate opening.
Can be full time.
ADDIy in Person at
Nichols Lumber Co.
2915W. Dunnellon
Road. Ask for
Darrell Walters


YOUR NEW DRIVING
JOB IS ONE PHONE
CALL AWAY!
Experienced CDL-A
Drivers and
Recent Grads -
Excellent Benefits,
Weekly Hometime.
Paid Training.
888-362-8608
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer







CHkONICLE

NEWSPAPER
SALES
We offer motivated
individuals an oppor-
tunity to earn the type
of income they
deserve and set their
own work calendar.
We encourage our
winning team of
contracted
promotional sales
representatives to
work as much as they
want. Prior sales
or Management
experience is a plus,
but isn't required. A
positive attitude and
strong work ethic is
required!
Most new reps start
making money
immediately while
training and develop
consistent weekly
averages after gaining
additional skills &
knowledge.
We Offer:
* Flexible hours:
mornings, evenings,
and weekends availa-
ble
* Consistent, year-
round earnings
* Achievable
Bonuses and Cash
Prize Sales Contests
* Easy one-day
training program: Start
earning money right
away
* Positive,
professional work
environment
* Prescheduled
sales locations
provided
* Unlimited Weekly
Income Potential
* No startup costs
* No telemarketing
* No door to door
selling
* No mandatory
meetings
Qualifications:
* Professional
Appearance
& Positive Attitude
* Enthusiastic, Hard-
working, and Reliable
* Strong Self
Management &
Communication Skills
* Willing to work
some weekends
* Minimum two
years experience in
sales, management,
or related fields
* Business casual
attire (No jeans,
t-shirts, or tennis
shoes)
DRIVER'S LICENSE
& RELIABLE
VEHICLE REQUIRED
This is a contract
position. Serious
and qualified
inquiries only,
please.
email resume to
jmurphy@chronicle
online.com


CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
12 Hr. Shifts, Day &
Night Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

































hCooMele


B
CDL DRIVER
With Class A license,
dry bulk tank, newer
equip., paid vac/Ins
wkly. minimum pay.
$$1,000.$$
SIGN ON BONUS
Contact Jerry @
(228) 257-9466
LEEDS Crystal River


Exp. appt. set-
ters
Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits, Clean Work
Environment.
Dave (352) 794-6129



CHkp"NidE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CIoDNIcLE


SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449





Heavy Equipment
Operator Career!
3 Week Hands On
Training School.
Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Excavators. National
Certifications.
Lifetime Job
Placement Assis-
tance. VA Benefits Eli-
gible! 1-866-362-6497

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS



,- g -- -
e-


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15,995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
SA local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



ANTIQUE FAN MaGraw
Electric Company model
1265R $25.00 call
352-257-3870
Carnival Glass
Fenton fluted bowl
7-1/2 by 5"
vintage $50.00
352-628-4210


Collect ble


11111111I
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


You've Got It!







Somebody








Wants




It!































C I T R U S *.C 0 U N i Y



CHRONICLE




(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com9


Your News.


Your Town.


Your Way.
000EXJS


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 D5




D6 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SDAY SAVINGS During Our...


00 APR

% MONTHS
on select new Honda models
on approved credit.

OVER 90 USED
& Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles!
All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:
6 Mo./ 6,000 Mite
Limited Powertrain Warranty'


Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...for a New 2012 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2CEW, 4WD With
The Trunk In The Bed, Power Pkg,
Cruise Control, V-6 Power
And A Ride Like No Other.

"Check anywhere in the
world first, but CHECK
WITH CHAD LAST!" P


Plus a 5-DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


2005 NISSAN 2007 CHEVY
ALTIMA MAILBU MAXX
S7,037 $7,639


2006 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER
$8,490


2009 CHEVY
IMPALA
$8,786



2012 TOYOTA
COROLLA
$15,022


q.


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of HONDA CERTIFIED Vehicles!


2008 HONDA 2010 HONDA
CMC LX CMC 4DR.LX
$9,900 $S1soo


2010 HONDA
ODYSSEY EX-L
$21500


2010 HONDA
ACCORD EXL
$19,000


2010 HONDA
ACCORD LX
$14,900


2010 HONDA
FIT
$15s,oo


2009 HONDA
RIDGELINE RT
$17 500


2011 HONDA 2011 HONDA
CR-V CR-V EXL
$19,000 $20,500


2010 HONDA
CIVIC LX
$12,900


2011 HONDA
CR-V
$20300


2011 HONDA
ODYSSEY EK-L
$24,900


iWhat LOVE Can Do For You!
miles
Ser 352.628.4600

EHONDA.COM


u sed end lease with approved credit. 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter.
trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment.J and lease and state fees due at signing.
installed equipment at additional cost. Not 36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,976 with approved credit, 12.000 miles
15 cents per mile thereafter. $2500 cash or t is plus tax, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Options at additional cost.
internal lubricant parts See dealer for de include $2000 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.


,,, :.... ..:: ^ |.. O N L ...:.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[I0ATi
EQVIA
i- MIwVI:iRT


IICI


All.&.Z


IT


Ili 3:


oll


All-New 2014
Chevy Impala LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy CruzLS
$4 AC O'


New 2013 Chevy averse LS
36 month lease


New 2013 ChevyMalibu LS
36 month leae


New 2013 Chevy Camaro LS
DRIVETODAY FOR- WfTH.-
$wAm aij 4 v' N


New 2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13205, Auto, 4cyL MSRP: $25,015


IEHIAVliE'
c~iiEvaoi-E0


I'm


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 D7


J, I


:R


m




D8 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW 2013 KIA
SOUL
STK#KD0383


.......... .:....::::::....:a: ::. L .


NEW 2013 KIA
= M MhL = M ."L wl


100,000 MILE


RIO LX WARRANTY
STK#KD0325





MSRP* OR $73 /MONTH LEASE

OR $73 /MONTH LEASE- -rw


NEW 2014 KIA
SORENTOx

STK#KE5014


. .


"w w w w ,r"p ilBn e iw iIn ufl .MW ~ W W W W W W W -w l* lo*l IUE E.I l n f rL.. "lMl-- W W' W Wr
LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS) WITH 12K PER YEAR, TOTAL OF $4,495 DUE AT SIGNING. SMARTPAY IS A ONE TIME LEASE PAYMENT FOR 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS)
WITH $7,956 SOUL, $7,308 RIO LX, $8,676 OPTIMA & $10,440 SORENTO LX DUE AT SIGNING. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. ALL FACTORY REBATES & INCENTIVES TO DEALER.


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
2WD EXT CAB a W
STK#D8012 B


** ** Ul $13 Imj /UN I H LEA
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
EOUINO
LS
STK#D5195
low A


I!


N


* * *OR $185 /MONTH LEASE** ** * U $19slo /MIumT Ii LEAStE* ** *


I- ,';,7 !'*' '- -. 1 r 1 .r i, I 1- .1 I 3-ll.i :,1 [, gT- l l ,,, H -,** ..- l ,rl l l i ^ ~. i i r i .ll I i. l
1 ON ,- F i -r, f ,, I .I F .O 11 .I .- I. i l PE 11 1 .1 1 I r iF'. i r -1-1-11 1 i fi11 ,_-
ON~ l T, r. 1 ,[, L F IF FOR :1 PER [.1 o f. t 1. 11-


'




CLASSIFIED


aerge
alarm clock, great
shape, ($10)
352-212-1596



24" ELECTRIC RANGE
24" TAPPAN Electric
range with power cord.
four burner, like brand
new condition. $195.00
phone 352-726-6518
AIR CONDITIONER
Trane XE 1000, heat
pump w/air handler
4 ton model EC
$550. 352-628-4210
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
GE Washer
& Dryer
Good Condition
$150. for both
352-697-3133
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL DRYER
Excellent
condition.
$100.00 /
352-637-5969



Double cassette deck
$5 352-419-4464
Home theatre amplifier
receiver $20.
352-419-4464
Pair of speakers $5.
352-419-4464
Small Panasonic tv/vcr
combo with
digital converter $5.
352-419-4464
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $85
352-613-0529


-I
Double French Doors
2 Sets 2/8 wood inte-
rior w/ frames
6/8high, 4/9/16 frame
$400. ea set.
(352) 503-6537



COMPUTER DESK
small student desk,
black and grey, like
new,($20)
352-212-1596
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP SCANNER Model
G4050 with software &
manual. $99.00 obo
352-621-0248


#1 Employmentsource is





ww chronicleonline corn


48" round oak claw
foot, table w/ 24" leaf,
6 matching
spindle back chairs
Asking $175. for all
(352) 464-0680
Antique Table
Solid oak with 4 padded
chairs, painted white
$200 OBO
352-422-0463
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$150, Exercise
Stepper $50
352-795-7254
Breakfast Room
ChromCraft, $1100.
when new, very good
cond. table w/4 padded
chairs, asking $450.
352-726-2903
BroyHill Dining room
set, med color wood,
2 leaves, 6 uphost. seat
chairs; china hutch 50
in. wide, exec. cond.
$500 (352) 634-1723
COFFEE TABLE
WOOD med. oak nice
condition Rectangular
$45. 352-270-3909
Dble Mattress Set &
Frame like new $50.
TV Stand $25.
352-503-7748
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
good. cond. $150
(352) 897-4739
Extra Long Twin
Seally Posturepedic
Mattress with/
Wood Headboard &
Frame $125.
(352) 628-2346
Floral Couch/Loveseat,
$175. both.can sell sep-
arately. All in good
Cond. 352-527-7183
;P-


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840
GLASS TOP
END TABLE
w/elephant base
good condition $40
352-465-1262
HEAD/FOOTBOARD
double,sturdy,solid
wood,like new,
Rooms To Go
($100) 352-212-1596
Household & Furniture
High End Items.
All Fine Condition
(352) 746-0011
LIVING ROOM
SUITE:sofa and love
seat,coffee,wall,2 end
tables and lamp
included.Exc.cond.$235.
Call 352-382-1154


Lovely Jewelry Chest
floor model w/ 6 drawers
and 2 side doors that
open up, decorative
mirror, never used
$50. 352-746-2479
MATRESS/BOX
SPRING queen size,
good shape, 1
owner,very clean,
$50. 352-212-1596
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Qu Matt & Box Spring,
& frame, w/bedding 2
dressers, $100. Cloth
recliner, round patio ta-
ble, wicker stands $60
will sell separately
cash only 560-4247
Sofa and Loveseat
dark red and olive
good condition
$200. for set
352-503-7748
Two Lounge Chairs
Olive Green
like new, $100 Ea.
352-503-7448



21" Self Propelled
Snapper HiVac Lawn
Mower, New, $350.
352-637-6420
46" Riding lawn mower
Cub Cadet,$1,350.
6V2 HP, Self Propelled
Mower $224.
(352) 564-1106
2535 N Crede Ave, CR
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
CRAFTSMAN 42" rid-
ing mower. 19.5 hp,
Elec Start. 6 speed
transaxle w/grass
catcher. $750 (352)
746-7044
Dixon Riding Lawn
Mower, 0 turn, 30" cut
belt driven, $350.
352-382-5149
JOHN DEER LT133
13 HP Kohler, 38"
mulch cutting deck, 140
total hrs. since new
$500 352-465-2459
John Deere LT 133
Kohler 13 hsp, 5 spd
geer drive, 38" deck
excellent cond. $675.
352-726-0230
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Snapper Riding Mower
14%/ Briggs & Stratton
Engine, 38" deck,
Good Cond. $300
352-746-7357
TILLER
Craftsman rear tine,
14 inch w/ reverse.
Like New. $350
(352) 621-3929


Wizard Tiller
with front tines, new 6.5
HP motor, $250,cash
only 352-560-4247




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 9am-5pm
Kids Toys, Tires,
Clothes, Much More
No Early Birds
970 N. Fox Meadow

FLORAL CITY
Sun & Mon 8am-?
30 yrs of collecting An-
tiques & Collectables.
Something 4 everyone
10140 Dollarosa Ct



4 MEN'S SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MEN'S 2 PIECE SUITS
SIZE 34X30 & 36X30
$40 EACH
352-613-0529
New Designer
Wedding Dress, size 8,
never worn, simple line,
V back with rhinestone
closures long train $150
352-422-0463



!!!! LT225/75R 16
TIRE!!!! Good Year
Light Truck Great
Shape 90% Tread
ONLY 60.00 464 0316
3 VISION CORNING
POTS WITH LIDS $
HANDLES- brown, 1.0L,
1.5L & 2.5L sizes, like
new, $25. 352-628-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
19" Zenith Color TV
w/ VHS player
& stand $150
Hoover Hepper Filter
Sweeper $75
(352) 527-7223
Adult Exercise Bike$50,
electric scooter $275,
walker w/wheels and
grocery cart$10,
352-637-3067
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Chevy Silverado Alumi-
num Running Boards,
great shape
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316
Chevy Silverado Bra
for 4 headlights Great
Shape ONLY $80
352-464-0316
Colman Road Trip
Gas Grill Original $200,
excellent condition
selling for $95 call
(352) 746-1821
EMPIRE SAFE
2 doors on wheels
54"x 27"x 42" Great for
pawn shops, jewelry
stores, call Ray at
352-489-5023


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
CNA, Lic., Exp. Ins.
Will Care For You &
Assist in Daily Needs
*352-249-7451




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



,tuI \\ill II[st.
L\i) Da)


C H ..piNddAEL


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Paios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
sVRELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
sVRELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
VYRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
C AFFORDABLE
5 RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820

KLo.kc
CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
*352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641


rFull Lawn Service-
Hedgetrim, Mulching
Hauling Available!!
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lie. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine, 4551 W.
Cardinal 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL
Licensed/Insured
Jimmy 352-212-9067
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


and read
ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic/Ins. 352-639-1024





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352 613-0113, Lie/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license number in
all advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL
Licensed/Insured
Jimmy 352-212-9067



26 YRS EXP. Tree Serv.
Removal, Stump
grinding, trim., hauling
Tom (352) 726-1875
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641









# Employment
S source is...







lwww chronicleonline corn


Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
ULc#CCC1#325497


'MJAC JOHNsoN
~ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
or pool or plan




never duplicared"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
CO PES
pPOOL AND PAVER LLC
,I sed 352-400-3188





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
SPools & Pavers
,/' Cleaning & Sealing
S- Grout Painting
| Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


IDREVETCENN


GENERAL'
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians-
ER0015377







Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
-* ALL Home
Repairs
S' Small Carpentry
F ncng
Screening
Clean Dryer
S Vents
lor*dlet & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
sured Lic#37761


WINDOWS'
GENIE,"
We eon Windows and a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
SFr,.- In Homr Eshtimates
SLfetime Warranty on Stirtchin
& Repair
Upholterv Claning
Now Cleaning Til & Hard Surfaces
| L..., I








AAA ROOFING
C7all te "eakh6usaeju
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
',Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic/Ins. CCCO57537 0~~ESX4



S.fiU iU i


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 D9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




DIO SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


FASTEST INTERNET!
Bundles with
DIRECT
30day no risk...no
money down trial.
Let us earn your busi-
ness before you sign
a contract.
2 IstCentury
Communications
386-269-9784
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Delivered Fresh off the
Boat!! 15ct (a $5.001b.
(352) 897-5388**
Garmin GPS,
$75.
RCA VHS
Video Camera
$100
(352) 527-7223
GERBIL CAGE
PETVILLE
ROLLACOASTER $20
352-613-0529
Harley Mufflers
Slide on Original
NEW 1350/1450
ONLY $90.00
352-464-0316
Luggage cart $10
mirror 27" 1/4 x 43"
$25, 2 gal pressure
spay & gas hedger wet
dry Vac $50.00 for all
352-637-3067
MOVING SALE
exercise equip. some
furn, kids dvd's, barbie's
Little Pet Shop & access.
440-610-0327
SEWING MACHINE
White manufacturing,
made in USA, heavy
duty, excellent condition,
($30) 352-212-1596
Toro Mulching Mower
21" cut, 6.5 H.P
$75.
Sears Kenmore
propane gas dryer
heavy duty, $75.
352-507-1490
TRUCK WINDOW
rear solid GMC
factory tint $35.00
352-628-4210
TUB HAND RAIL
Medline Deluxe
Safety rail $25.00
352-628-4210



4 Wheeled Walker
with brakes and seat
ONLY $70.00
352-464-0316
Bedside Commode
& Aluminum Walker
both have adjustable
legs 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Manual Wheelchair
with footrests, great
shape $100.00
352-464 0316
NEW 4" Toilet Seat
Riser, makes it much
easier to get up
ONLY 20.00
352-464-0316
Safety Bath Tub
Grab Bar, it clamps to
the side of the tub
ONLY $25.00,
352-464-0316
WALKER 4 WHEELS
hand brake basket &
seat good condition
$40.00 352-628-4210
WHEELCHAIR
Oversized, Manual,
Exc Cond. $400
obo(352) 746-3268



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS &
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW 3 GUITAR
FOLDING STAND,
VERY STABLE PAD-
DED STEEL$45
352-601-6625
"NEW" IBANEZ
TALMAN ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC, CUSTOM
PICKGUARD TUNER
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" WASHBURN
RO5 MINSTREL DUL-
CIMER EASY PLAY!
W/BAG&BOOK$100
352-602-6625


ACOUSTIC GUITAR
GIGBAG &2Sets of
Strings,Picks,Strap&
ChromaticTuner
$35. 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
NEW W/WARRANTY!
SPRUCE,MAHOGANYGRO
VERSABALONE
$100 352-601-6625
Guitar strap $2.
352-419-4464
M-Audio key studio 49
key controller $20.
352-419-4464
Technics KN-750 music
keyboard $35.
352-419-4464



COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $10
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529
MAGIC CHEF
TOASTER OVEN $20
352-613-0529



Electric Treadmill
doesn't fold up, but will
give you a workout
$100.00
352-464 0316
Exercise Bicycle
Upright Type, works
great $ 85.00
352-464 0316



BowFlex XLT
like new,
$1000. obo
352-628-7633
BOYS BICYCLE
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Excel. batteries, full
enclosure, exc. cond.
new tires, $1495.
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dunnellon Pawn
Fire Arms****Ammo
Mags****Since 1987
352-489-4870
EZ Go Golf Cart
1997, runs good,
$1,000, Club car Golf
Cart $450
352-564-2756
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Ammo-concealed clas-
ses 352-447-5595
James Anglin Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in Box
with 2 mags $189.00
352-419-4800



NEW ENCLOSED
8.5' x 20'
CAR HAULER
$3990. 352-564-1299



Diamond Engagement
Ring, Gold, paid $1200
willing to sell for $400
OBO call anytime
(352) 422-7696


Sel orSw


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Country Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year,
Specializing in color and
highlights $39 hair color
special $39 Facial spe-
cial call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com



Adorable 3yr Male
Chihuahua, neutered,
micro chipped,
to good home only
$125. Leave Message
(352) 637-6310
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






* (352) 634-5039 *k
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
3 Males & 1 Female,
Blue Carriers Available
AKC and all Shots
$1800. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
MALTI-POO PUPPIES
Addorable, non shed,
great disposition
Health certificates
$350.
(352) 795-5204







PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tri color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876
Shepherd Mix,
Her name is Daisy
Color is Blond, 3 yrs old,
spayed, UTD on Shots
Micro Chipped, lovable,
house trained,
Fence Yard Needed
moving can't keep
needs loving home
(863) 661-6220
Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827



Your World






CHRONICLE
CLIXpNKILE


SKY
Sky, a spayed
female black lab
mix, 2 y.o., heart-
worm negative,
microchipped,
housebroken.
Weight 52 lbs. Beau-
tiful, friendly dog,
would be best as
the only dog in the
family. Walks well on
a leash. Looking for
her fur-ever home.
Fenced yard is
preferred.
Call Susie @
352-621-3207 OR
352-422-2787.











TOBY
Toby, a 6-y.o.
black/white terrier
mix, neutered,
housebroken, heart-
worm -negative,
weight 45 lbs. Great
w/other dogs, chil-
dren & even cats.
Very gentle, quiet &
affectionate. Walks
well on leash, ideal
companion for
anyone. Found as a
stray. Very loveable,
easy-going boy.
Call Michelle @
352-726-5139.











WILLY
Willy, a 1-y.o. Chesa-
peake Bay Retriever
mix, wt. 50 Ibs, Heart-
worm negative. Walks
very well on a leash,
stays by your side.
Gets along well
w/other dogs, does
not care about cats.
Walks well on leash.
Sweet nature, needs
work w/house skills.
Should be crated
when alone.
Call Susie @
352-621-3207 or
352-422-2787.

Yorkshire Terriers
Male Puppies, 8 wks
$650. Shots, Health
cert., parents on site
Lecanto 727-242-0732




GOATS FOR SALE
Billy's & Nanny's
starting @ $50.
352-220-1025

,*-


*W*




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


I.et


CLASSIFIED



MERCURY 2000,
8HP, Short Shaft
Very Clean, $800
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45'Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
Classic Mako
20 ft Honey Pot, all teak,
good condition, 150
Evenrude 1993, well
maintained, good trailer,
Nice Boat. Extra's.
$5200. obo
(352) 795-1546
TRIUMPH 190
2002, Center console,
115 yamaha motor
$8900 352-795-1923
or 605-351-1419
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com
YAMAHA
2013 9.9 with
V bottom, aluminum
& trailer, 501b trolling
motor, never in water
new, w/warranty $3k
352-257-8850



06 Winnebago
29' site seerer, class A,
loaded 19k mi, 2 slides,
new tires, exec cond.
$46,500 270-8475
Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072



w Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like
new, NADA $29K,
Reduced $19,900
352-382-3298
KEYSTONE
5th Wheel, 30 ft, Triple
Slide, Exc Condition
$16,500. 352-795-1923
or 605-351-1419
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
REAL LITE
1998, 12 ft slide in
pickup camper $6900
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
STARCRAFT
'06, Pop Up Camper
Great Shape,
$3,950 obo
(352) 341-4152
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



Cadillac Rims & Tires
Four for Sale
225/55R16-99V
very good tread
$225
352-489-7114
Tow Dolly
$700.
Call Carl
(352) 400-6021



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


HowDo


... ....

** *. z* f f ;
." .-' "-* "I";( ;'..
*, ,: ,, ". .. .. / ,. .. .. ,

;:.. . ; ." .': .: .


Chronicle


Classifieds /,

In Print / .


&Online /-
-,^/ __. ..






CH ONICLE C lHONICLIq ,,





(352) 563-566 -


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
BUICK
97 LE SABRE, loaded
125k mi., very nice
cond. asking $1875.
352-637-2588 or
845-588-0759
CADILLAC
97 DeVille, clean,
must see, $3750.
352-746-5965
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th
anniversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles, immaculate,
loaded,call for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2003, Impala LS
$5,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2008, Impala LT
$8,750.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
89 Corvette
blue, $7500
352-621-0658
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
Town & Country 2005
7-Pass Non- Smoking
Mini-Van, Stow'n Go
Seats, 3.81tr V6, 21 mpg
Leather, 2nd Owner,
Impeccably Maint.,
Records, All Options.
Clean Reliable Family
Van. $5,999. obo
352-422-3217
FORD
04 Crown Victoria
LX, Exec. cond., new
tires, 133K mi. $4,200.
obo 352-422-1916
FORD
1998 Mustang
V-6, 5 spd, Red
New Tires, $2350.
352-586-1756
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
93 Thunderbird
50k orig. miles, lots of
new parts, $1800 OBO
352-527-0181
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
2008, Spectra, Auto
4 DR, $5,850
352-341-0018
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
MAZDA
1994, 626,
63k Miles, $2,995
352-341-0018


Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
MERCEDES
'03, SLK, 320, 119k mi.
fully loaded
$9,900
(352) 503-9447
OLDSMOBILE
'99, Intrigue,
103k mi. fully loaded
$3,800
(352) 503-9447
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
1956 Chevrolet Bel Air
grille, $100.00 Front &
rear Bumpers $100.00
each Tail Light $50.00
- Bumper Guard $50.00
(352)628-1734
FORD
1966 Mustang
289-auto, 67k mi.
great, cond. $7200.
obo 352-438-8346
MUSTANG
GT 03 63,600K,
Showcar, Supercharger,
lots of goodies!
Chrome, $14,500 obo
352-228-4012







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVY
1977 Silverado,step
side, rebuit 350 V-8,
Turbo, everyday driver,
needs to be painted
$3000 FIRM, Inglis, Fl
330-428-2499
DODGE
2000,Dakota SLT
ex cab $2,895.
352-341-0018


DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
GMC
2004, PICKUP
Sierra 1500
$4250
352-341-3988
JEEP
Comanche
1986 4x4, running,
needs work, make off
(352) 201-2120
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100



CADILLAC
2006 SRX, loaded, light
platinum, 103k mi.
panoramic sun roof,
$13,200 352-201-0651
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2006 Sport. Last
model year of the TJ.
Orig. senior owner -
no off-road. Auto-
matic 6 cyl. Roof rack
& extras. 59,000 miles.
$17000. Crystal River
area. Silver
352 397-5007
KIA
2008 Sportage
low miles, exc cond.
$10,000 Firm
(352) 697-3373
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
MERCEDES-BENZ
2002 ML500
$7,500.00
(352)-270-7420
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10" lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306

Sl ti -


303-0526 SUCRN
05/30 Sales Pack-N-Stack
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FLA STAT 83.806 Notice is Hereby Given that on 5/30/2013 at 11:00 a.m.,
at PACK-N-STACK MINI STORAGE, 7208 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34446, The Miscellaneous Personal Property contents of your storage shall be sold for
past due rent and fees owed by the tenant:
#9 & 43, BRANDON BOUGHTON, 3337 S. ARUNDEL TERR, HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
#7, DIANNA BOGGS, 3316 S. WESTERN AVE #2, CHICAGO, IL 60608
#30, ANDREW SERRA, P.O. BOX 2721, VALRICO, FL 33595
#21, ANN ELLIS, 5448 S. FROST PT, LECANTO, FL 34461
#34, KEITH VAN ORDEN, P.O. BOX 4402, HOMOSASSA, FL 34447
#94, TERI-AN CONSUAL, P.O. BOX 1370, HOMOSASSA, FL 34447
#97, RHONDA LEON, 5341 W. STATE ST, HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 19 & 26, 2013


308-0616 SUCRN
MEDICAL OFFICE CLOSING
PUBLIC NOTICE
This shall constitute notice pursuant to FL. Admin. Code 64B5-17.001, THURSDAY,
JUNE 20, 2013, DR. NICHOLAS C. PLESKOVICH of WELL ADJUSTED CHIROPRACTIC
located at 6565 W Norvell Bryant Highway, STE B, Crystal River, FL 34429, regretably
announces the closing of his Chiropractic Office. Patients may request a copy of
their medical records or request that records be sent to another provider by calling
24 hours in advance. The patient may be billed for the actual costs incurred for
copying, mailing or delivering the records as permitted by law or insurance carrier.
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 26, June 2,9, & 16, 2013.


305-0526 SUCRN
6/5/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
May 26, 2013


307-0526 SUCRN
BOCC-ITB-06/26/13
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 027-13
Submersible Pump Repair Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
sealed Bid to provide pump repair services, new pumps, and authorized OEM pump
parts, for submersible pumps on an as-needed basis for the County's Department of
Water Resources / Division of Utilities.
Minimum Requirements for Submittina a Bid
This bid shall be awarded to responsive, responsible bidders, qualified by experience
to provide the work specified. Bidders shall submit the following information with
their bid.
1. Vendor/Contractor shall be licensed to perform the type of work stated in this
solicitation. Said licenses shall be in the vendor/contractor's name and as it
appears on the official bid form.
2. Vendor/Contractor shall submit copies of all applicable licenses.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 26, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 26, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 26, 2013.


304-0526 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business
under the fictitious
name of BACKWATERS
OUTDOOR PRODUCTS,
located at 7879 West
Dunnellon Road,
Dunnellon, Florida
34433, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register


said name with Florida
Department of State,
Division of Corporations,
Tallahassee, Florida.
DATED at Crystal River, FL
this 21st day of May,
2013.
/s/John F. Bunts, SR/
Owner
May 26, 2013


CHEVROLET
2003 Astro Van,
113,750 miles, Well
maintained, Gold, 4.3L
V6, Seats 8, Great for
cargo, 6000 pound tow
package, Rear air/heat/
speakers, Power
windows/locks, Clean,
$5395.00 Call
352-212-9395

CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHRYSLER
Town & Country 2005
7-Pass Non- Smoking
Mini-Van, Stow'n Go
Seats, 3.81trV6 21 mpg
Leather, 2nd Owner,
Impeccably Maint.,
Records, All Options.
Clean Reliable Family
Van. $5,999. obo
352-422-3217

DODGE
1999, Work Van
139k miles, mechani-
cally sound $2,400 obo
(352) 344-2132

DODGE
2010 Grand Caravan
SXT, 41k mi. auto,
roof rack, Sirrus radio.
$16,800. 352-634-3333




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492








HARLEY
'04, Fat Boy, 14,843 mi.
mint condition, cus-
tom paint, Upgrades
$12,999, 352-302-1507

Harley Davidson
2004 883 Sportster, w/
screaming eagle pkg,
Low Mi, Ex cond $4900
352-563-5552,
464-7005

Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
low miles,garage kept,
Adult Owner, $5K
(352) 257-8850

HONDA 2003
Reflex motor scooter/
250cc/automatic
yellow /70mpg/ 70mph/
windshield/ like new
condition/ pictures
available/asking
$2500/call
352-382-0468

VICTORY
Cory Ness Special Ad-
dition, I owner, 1,300
mi, new $25K, asking
$15,000. 908-500-4151


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r









J


I Misc. No


Misc. notice


I Misc. No


Metn


Metn


Metn


v - -W


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE


SALES


EVENT


Yot'r'e closer to owning one than you think.


'39,900


2013 MKZ FWD
V6, LEATHER TRIM, CD PLAYER
Excludes taxes, title and license fees.
Optional features shown not included in list price.





2013 LINCOLN MKX FWD
WITH 100A PACKAGE


`379
A MONTH FOP 36 MONTHS
LINCOLN AFS RED CAPPE T LEASE'


Security deposit waived. Excludes taxes, title and license fees.


*414
A MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS
LINCOLN AFS RED CARPET LEASE'


Security :depo~;i waived. E xcluCeS, taxes, title and license fees.



f7iWr :ET=1ar.2 r"phm

L


Ik d L3C020
.in 1LNHL9DK6DG606017


LINCOLN


Get to know the 2013 Lincoln line up at Lincoln.com


stk # L3C043
vin #2LMDJ6JK1DBL27822


"3,679
CASH DUE AT SIGNING
AFTER $3,600 CASH BACK


2013 LINCOLN MKS FWD
WITH 100A PACKAGE


"3,779
CASH DUE AT SIGNING
AFTER $3,850 CASH BACK


n -I t z-. I"


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 D11


--~--liirrY


ImCrystalRive


~2(
.....*;;IL~r*ir~




D12 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013


S


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
v I
rP~F?-


lecial Eventq
MEMORIAL WEEKEND ONLY


SJAN
1 2014


ADDITIONAL BONUS!
MILITARY DISCOUNT
1H '-'I: -I T I. 1- -11:: 111- 1 T I. I [ l IT- I |TH [ l IT-H1 11:


NW 20 OOTS

EW 2013 COROL


BUY FOR $14,995*
0i4Oi/mi


NEW 2013 PRIUS


[-.S-- M^RPS^ %21' 'D
BUY FOR $22,995*
OR PAY ONLY229/m *


NEW 2013 CAMRY


".1S.RP $23 C'95
BUY FOR $19,995*
OR PAY ONLY9 /m.*


i RP $24 32 1
BUY FOR $22,995*
OR PAY ONLY 249mo.


MEMORIAL WEEKEND PREOWNED SPECIALS


2011 TOYOTA AVALON 2011 CADILLAC CTS
228,995 t 1S26,995
14KMiles.$ 25K Miles
Stock# 13040117 2 9 Stock# 13030440 29 9


'4


0


2010 TOYOTA PRIUS
28K Miles. 1
Stock# 13040061


www.villagetoyota.com 352-628-5
4


2011 LEUS GS 350
28K Miles. $3799
Stock# 13040115 9 9 5
ToyotaCare
O1 Featuring a complimentary maintenance plan
with roadside assistance.
2 year/ 25,000 mile
Complimentary Maintenance Program
when you purchase or lease a new 2012 or 2013 Toyota vehicle
0 0 *2,399 due at signing to well qualified buyers, plus lease inception fees
1 0 0 Iwith approved credit. Buyer cannot combine offers.


A


A


EMYOI


111




Section E -SUNDAY, MAY 26,2013



OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE C


Sikorski's
Attic PAGE E4
t2 *PAGE E4


II I) 1 1


- .. .. F :. - ,


Designer Byron Samayoa's neon acrylic
coasters, which are etched with
symbols from the Periodic Table of
Elements. available from BPlusShop.
com. Small accessories like these are a
great way to introduce bold. bright
colors for spring decor.




E2 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SiU i. (<3s2) 637-2823 CjS k r'1
Et er ". "


WIDE OPEN LAKE
SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA HOME WITH A TOTAL OF
2,912 SQ. FT UNDER ROOFE MOVE IN REMODELED
HOME WITH LOTS OF EXTRAS. WOOD KITCHEN
CABINETS, TILE FLOORS, GARDEN TUB
2 FIREPLACES. A MUST SEE HOME.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Emailh barbariajmills@earthlink.net 1


Clean & Neat 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Greenbiar Condo Will Suit Your
Needs For Easy Living. Features Include Cathedral Ceilings,
Skyliht, Split Bedrooms, Tiled Foyer, Ktchen, Dining Area & Baths,
Lg aster Bedroom wWalk-lIn Closet & Master Bath, French Doors
To Screened Lanai, Caoort Turnkey & Fully Fumished! Community
Offers, Heated Pool & Tennis Courts. Make This Your Permanent
Or Part-Time Residence.
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net


Vr '.21INFO LW
'FFOIN


715 E. HARTFORD ST., HERNANDO
* 2BD/2BA Maintenance-Free Villa
* Fully Furnished Citrus Hills Club Available
* Screened Lanai Opens to Unobstructed Views
and Direct Access to Community Heated Pool
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


SHINY NEW METAL ROOF
,145 Feet on the Water 2,200 iving Square Ft.
* Magnificent Open Water View 20x24 Detached Workshop
* Full Acre Lot Inground Pool
* 16x12 Observation Deck Boat House with New Roof
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolls@aol.comin I j
000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


INVERNESS OPEN WATERFRONT!!
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH OVERSIZED 2 CAR
GARAGE WITH WORK AREA, INGROUND
HEATED POOL, FORMAL LIVING AND FAMILY
ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE, DINING ROOM,
COVERED BOAT DOCK WITH SEAWALL.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com


GORGEOUS PRIVATE ESCAPE
*3/2/2 Split Plan Beautiful SS Appl.
Breakfast Nook Master Suite w/Sitting Area
Sparkling Pool 10 X 27 Lanai Area
*NewACin 2010 On 1 Acre/Boat RV Parking
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
ii Al IhiH ,11i i .] :i..]i I.IIH ] :1iJ ".
Enmull elliesullon* lenuxi nel
www.FlonidnLislnllinllo.com IOll r


IMMACULATE POOL HOME IN QUAIL RUN
3 BR, 2 BATH 2 Car Garage
* LRG Kitchen w/Nook Enormous Master BR
* Updated Roof 2011 Updated HVAC 2009
* Large Lot/Shed Beautiful Landscaping

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellstlorida.com





S-/




REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


2421~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ N. Ieaa Hw.Ieel il 2-82wwRMXcm 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


PHICE REDUCED UN A
TRUE FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE!!!
Central water too! Great location dose to Inverness
Golf and Country Club. Fenced yard. Big master
bedroom suite. New carpet in great room. Big 2 car
garage. Awesome neighborhood.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 I
Email: JennifeiStollz@remax.nel
www.CilrusCounlyHomes.com


1687 W. STAFFORD ST., CITRUS HILLS
Gorgeous 4BR/2BA/2CG Home
Lg. Open Great Room
Lots of Nice Ceramic Tile
Gourmet Kitchen w/Wood Cabinets
Granite Counters/Stainless Steel Appliances
Beautiful 12x 17 Master Bath
Nicely Landscaped Private Acre
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net







-iiii.. i, i I .
41313 CUSTOM & LUXURY 2007 BUILT
HOME ON 2+ ACRES Gourmet kitchen with
top-of-the-line S/S appliances, office off of master,
luxury master bath, house wired for sound, spacious
2,900+ S.F liv. area, country setting on Katie off of
Anthony in Citrus Hills area. Short sale.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email. remaxgal22@yahoo.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ins and outs of


bread troughs


De a r
Sara:
read
your recipe for
no-knead
French bread
and am curious
about the bread
trough. I
thought those
were wooden Sara
bowls to knead FRU
dough, not LIVI
something to
put in the oven. Could you
please clarify this for me?
I am anxious to try the
recipe. -Mary, Arizona
Dear Mary: There are
wooden bowls used for
bread dough (for kneading
and rising) that are called
troughs. They come in


I


varying sizes,
and many an-
tique troughs
are collectible
- for home decor.
There are also
French
bread/baguette
pans that have
Noel troughs, too.
Noel rThe pan helps
GAL French bread
NG hold its shape,
offers ventila-
tion (some swear it makes
all the difference for the
crust) and allows the baker
to bake multiple loaves at
a time. These pans are typ-
ically nonstick and perfo-
rated. You can find them at

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Real Estate DIGEST


RE/MAX gives
kudos to agents
The brokers and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
very pleased to announce
that five of their associates
have recently reached the $1
million level in sales volume
this year.
The associates are John
Holloway and Debra Pilny in
the Inverness office, Ellie Sut-
ton in the Central Ridge office,


John
Holloway
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Debra
Pilny
RE/MAX
Realty One.


and Richard Venticinque and
Dianne MacDonald in the
Crystal River office.


Ellie Richard
Sutton Venticinque
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
All five of these agents
have a long history of suc-
cess in the Citrus County real


estate market
and are re-
spected by
their peers.
These
agents have
all been an
Dianne integral part
MacDonald .
MacDonald in allowing
RE/MAX R
Realty One. RE/MAX
Realty One
to close nearly $50 million
in sales volume so far in
2013.


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
r S S


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney -
R ealtor- A HOUSE Realtor I
'_ iB 302-3179 SOLD Name! AAL 9576N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 3050 W. MUSTANG
S 746-6700 o 287 9022 75 Seats 702233 $217,300 3/3/3 702967 $399,900
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD. \*
Thanking Our Fallen 8 .....
Soldiers For Protecting Our M-'
Past Present And Future. 39 DEER 13 APPLE
4/3/3 702561 $299,900 4/3/2 702441 $129,800


I BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL I
4BR in Sugarmill Woods. Over 3000 sq. ft Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
living. $175,000 Must see. $39,900 MLS#701383
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (3s2)726-2471 4
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 3102-6714 "


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 E3




E4 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Making healthy meals


quick and convenient

The busy lives that we lead can be a Cook the patties until they are brown and
barrier to cooking at home. In ad- crispy on both sides. The whole process
edition, many people who should take about 15 minutes.
cook for one or two people may H Use a slow cooker to make
feel it takes too much effort big batches of food. Chop up
and time. This article will pro- lots of vegetables carrots,
vide some ideas and tips to onions, squash, sweet peppers,
help people create healthy or whatever you have on hand.
dinners in a short period of Put the vegetables on the bot-
time. Visit wwwchoosemy tom and then place skinless
plate.gov for research-based chicken breasts or lean beef on
information on creating well- top. Then, add a can of no-salt-
balanced meals. added tomatoes, some
Some tips to assist with Monica Payne oregano, and two cloves of gar-
quick and easy meals: CONSUMER lic. Using a slow cooker will
Keep food items on hand free up your time and provide
that you can use for quick and SCIENCE three tasty, healthy suppers in
easy meals. the time that it takes to make
Use whole-wheat pasta, lean meats, one meal. Follow your slow cooker's rec-
and frozen or leftover vegetables to cre- ommendations for cooking times.
ate a quick and nutritious meal. No-cook recipes may also be helpful
Use canned fish, such as salmon and when you don't feel like cooking. In the
tuna, which have healthy fats, to make up summertime, when it is so hot, many peo-
salmon or tuna cakes. Add chopped ple want to avoid heating up their house
onion, whole-wheat bread crumbs, one by cooking. Try these recipes provided for
beaten egg, and some celery seed to the nutritious and tasty no-cook meals:


canned salmon or tuna. Form patties, and
cook in a pan with non-fat cooking spray


See HEALTHY/Page E6


Inside...


) t


Neon now
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Marketplace just now starting to pick up on artist's work


Dear John: I had a little
Cuban-style cafeteria gro-
cery store in Miami's Co-


conut Grove area.
Anthony Scornavacca
used to come in and
have breakfast and
sometimes lunch often.
He did this charcoal of
an old man that hung
around the place also.
He gave it to me to
hang in the store. When
I sold the place, I took
it with me. I was won-
dering if this would
have any collector's in-
terest or value. -M.S.,
Internet


The picture has a good look; the
fellow looks like a cool Coconut
Grover. The artist Scornavacca,


John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
ATTIC


Dear M.S.: What a cool place to
have a Cuban-style store. I am
sure many of our readers have
pleasant "Remember When" mo-
ments from having visited the Co-
conut Grove area in Miami.


1926-86, was American.
He produced figures,
portraits, and land-
scapes. His works are
starting to show up in
the art market and
have sold in the $100 to
$200 range. It is good
you kept it it is likely
that interest in his
works will increase
over time. I suggest you
hold on to it for a while
longer.
Dear John: This is a
wooden file cabinet


from my wife's family It has
wooden tracks and the drawers
have to fit in certain slots. Is it
worth anything? -B.C., Internet
Dear B.C.: Card file cabinets
like the one you have were manu-


factured in massive quantities
during the early- to mid-20th cen-
tury in the United States. They
are bought and sold in the an-
tiques marketplace generally at
affordable prices. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have a set of Wm.
Rogers silverware from the 1939
World's Fair bought for me by my
grandfather. There are 13 spoons,
six knives, six forks, six butter
knives, six salad forks, two table-
spoons and a butter knife. They

See ATTIC/Page E6
This charming little charcoal
drawing was done by the Miami
artist Scornavacca. The artist's
works are just now beginning to
attract attention; the best bet
would be to hold on to this piece
a little longer.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

stores such as Williams-Sonoma
or on Amazon.com for $15
to $30.
Dear Sara: Someone gave us
a gallon-size can of chili sauce
and I have no idea what to do
with it once opened. Any ideas
would be appreciated. D.M.,
Virginia
Dear D.M.: You can open it
and transfer it to freezer storage
bags, so it's in smaller portions.
Use it in spaghetti sauce, chili,
sloppy joes, for shrimp cocktail
sauce, on top of meatloaf, as a
meat marinade, or in home-
made salad dressing, to name a
few ideas.
Dear Sara: I have a question
about cleaning the dishwasher.


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 E5


There's a persistent idea on the
Internet that you can clean your
dishwasher by running it empty
with two packs of lemon Kool-
Aid. That seems unlikely to me.
If it's a matter of acidity, surely
vinegar would be more effec-
tive. Have you tried the Kool-
Aid thing? If so, how did it turn
out? If not, how do you clean the
inside of your dishwasher? -
R.N, Florida
Dear R.N.: Citric acid works
well to clean dishwashers. Many
of my readers fill the soap dis-
penser with either powdered
Tang or lemonade-flavored
Kool-Aid and run a full cycle.
Lemi Shine dishwasher deter-
gent additive works well, too. I
remove the racks and use a
green 3M Scotch-Brite pad and
an old toothbrush to scrub
around the seal/gasket and
drain, and to clean the interior


walls. I use regular liquid dish-
washing soap in hot water, then
rinse. Then I clean the interior
with bleach and follow up with
another rinse. I pour vinegar in
the dishwasher and let it run on
a hot cycle.
Dear Sara: I somehow wound
up with about 8 ounces each of
candied pineapple and candied
red and green cherries. They're
not fresh or dried; they're the
really sticky kind that goes in
fruitcake. Any ideas how I can
use these without making fruit-
cake? -Jo S., email
Dear Jo S.: I'd make candied
fruit cookies or biscotti. But
fruitcake can be quite delicious
when homemade not at all
like the type you see in the
stores during the holidays. (No
offense to those folks who love

See FRUGAL/Page E6


Composting can


benefit garden

Thile I was traveling in Central
I America in April and May, two
V women from Ottawa, Canada, were
staying in my house. They planned a party
and invited my neighbors to celebrate my re-
turn and birthday They prepared platters
and bowls of deviled eggs, veggies and sour
cream dip, fresh fruit, crackers and cheese,
potato salad, tossed garden salad, chocolate-
covered strawberries and desserts. The buf-
fet table looked tempting and delicious. But
there were heaps of peelings and scraps to
Jane Weber deal with.
JANE'S My patio and path are edged with beds of
GARDEN
See JANE/Page E7


Scli in Terra ViB^ B^ staS ^Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
S2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
TerraVsYaRealtIEEE., LLC Ofceinte
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_2.5 BATH. I CAR,
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Terra Vista maintenance-free villa featuring 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, office/den, giving room with courtyard home with separate in-law/guest suite with full bath. Designer decorated and
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATHS, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS built-in entertainment center, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai and a 2-car painted, Gourmet Kitchen, Formal dining incorporated with an open floor plan is great for
Luxurous Lantna Model. This open floor plan has a beautifully mirrored formal dining room attached garage. Dining area overlooking private backyard. New 15 Seer heaair conditioner closet, dual vanity in mstr bth with spacious shower, office/den area,guest bdrm has plentyof entertaining. Lots of tile, and Wet Bar. Large master suite has hardwood floor, TWO custom
with butler pantry. Large eat-in kitchen. Spacious great room overlooks the private screened in Dec 2012. New energy efficient washer & dryer and dishwasher in Dec 2012. Good curb closet space, laundry room and full bath. This townhome is tastefully decorated and is sure to walk-in closets. You'll be proud to return to this elegant homew/lush landscaping & on a large
lana 2 bedrooms plus a den/office complete this lovely home. MLS352909.......$194,900 l and situated close to all amenities. MLS 703025..........................................$ 184,900 makeyo$115,000 u feel rightat home. M 82..................................................................... 15,OO corner lot. This is a beautiful homewith lots of upgrades. MLS700214.................$384,500
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surround thegas heated pool and spa. Homefeatures a detached guestin-lawsulte.Bright& spectacular Cordova model loaded with upgrades, including granite countertops in your --Terra Vista. Home has all of the upgrades of a custom home including a 12x24 pool, gas
spacious, this home has neutral tile throughout with carpet in the bedrooms. Very energy beautiul gourmet kitchen with built-n sky light, custom window treatments and gorgeous DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS fireplace, built-in entertainment center, upgraded maple cabinets, upgraded stainless steel
efficientwith extra insulation. Master suite features a huge walk-in closets,double sink, jetted ghting fixtures. Formal dining and living areas plus a large family room give great spaces for Stunning pool home with a breathtaking view of the golf course. Perfect for entertaining. appliances, crown molding and double glazed insulated windows/sliders, tray ceilings, tile
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outdoor ving space, hugewalk in pantry, plantation shutters. The ist goes on and on. this plus a 3+ car garage with a separate golf cart entrance. PRICED TO SELL! This home is a fixtures and ceiling fans. Outdoor kitchen and so much more. Come see the quality that went special caror boat. In prestigious condition, this a beautiful home,with great room design. CH
M LS 700517....................................................................................................................$ 5 3 5 ,0 0 0 m ust see.M LS 353 44.................................................................................................... $ 3 5 9 ,0 0 0 into this hom e. M LS700921 ........................................................................................... $ 2 9 9 ,0 0 0 M em bershipRequired M LS 357110 ............................................



DETACHED TOWN HOME,
VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Custom courtyard home s locatedon Skyvew golf course wth 3 bedrooms 2.5 baths, den exercise roomslympc-
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTHY
Continued from Page E4

Bean-and-veggie
sandwich
Rinse and mash canned
white beans. Mix with low-
fat plain yogurt. Add spices
as desired (mustard, dill,
parsley, garlic, onion, or
pepper). Spread on whole-
wheat bread or toast and
top with romaine lettuce or
spinach, as well as cucum-
ber and tomato slices.
Fresh fruit salad
Cut up one or more
kinds of fresh or canned
fruit, such as pineapple,
peaches, melon, berries or
bananas. Mix the fruit with
low-fat vanilla yogurt, and
top with chopped walnuts,
pecans, or granola. Serve
with a whole-grain muffin
or bread.
Tortilla wraps
Layer a tortilla (whole
wheat is best) with sliced
deli meat, low-fat cheese,
onions, tomatoes, green


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

are in excellent condition.
Each spoon has a different
building pictured on the
bowl of the spoon. Are
these of current interest?
Can you tell me the ap-
proximate value? L.S.,
Inverness
Dear L.S.: World's Fair
memorabilia is a large cat-
egory of collector interest
There are collectors who
look specifically for items
from the 1939 World's Fair
that took place in New
York. Do just the spoons
have detail, or are all the
pieces decorated, and what
about the box? In order to
help further, I need good
photographs of the set and
the box, if you have it
Dear John: Your article
in the Citrus County Chron-
icle has prompted me to
write. I am the executor of
a friend's estate and have a


leaf lettuce, and chunky
salsa (optional). Fold one
end of the tortilla over the
filling, turn in the sides,
roll up, and enjoy!
Call Monica Payne at the
extension office at 352-527-
5713.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/IFAS'
knowledge, research, and
resources to address youth,
family, community, and
agricultural needs. All pro-
grams and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted
by, the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences are
open to all persons with
non-discrimination with re-
spect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, po-
litical opinions or affilia-
tions.


Monica Payne is the
Family and Consumer
Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.

collection of letter openers
to dispose of. I have no ex-
pertise in this field and I
hope you would be kind
enough to provide the
name of an individual or a
business address of some-
one knowledgeable. -
B.M.L, Holder
Dear B.M.L.: It is good
you saw the article. There
is a large range of poten-
tial dollar values for letter
openers. Divide the collec-
tion into small groups and
send photos and any infor-
mation that might be on
each one, then I will be
glad to help you.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

that kind.) Here's a good recipe
that's more breadlike: kingarthur
flour. com/recipes/90-minute-
fruitcake-recipe.
MEi
A family can manage quite well
using their oven less to save money
Try using a wok, toaster oven, mi-
crowave, electric skillet, George
Foreman grill or slow cooker more
often. You can get creative with ap-
pliances such as waffle irons
(brownies and corn bread) and rice
cookers (stews, macaroni and


cheese), too. For more than 200 rice
cooker recipes, visit aroma-house
wares.com.
The first reader tip shares a cou-
ple more ideas:
Alternative to using the oven: I
use the outdoor grill for cooking in-
stead of the oven. I also have a cou-
ple of Nesco roasters: a 6-quart and
an 18-quart The 6-quart is great for
making stews, soups and chili, and
it will also hold a loaf pan, so that
uses less energy than using the
stovetop or oven. The 18-quart will
hold up to a 13-by-9 baking dish, so
I take it out on my porch to plug in
and use instead of using the oven.
Roasters don't heat the house up as
much as the oven, so the A/C doesn't


have to work as hard to keep the
house cool. Q.M., Florida
Grow potatoes in barrels/garbage
can: I have potatoes planted now in
half barrels. I planted them 3 to 6
inches above the bottom of the bar-
rel and covered them with soil.
After the plant shows above the soil,
you cover it with another 3 to 6
inches of soil. You can do this over
and over in a large container.
Before planting the seed pota-
toes, cut them into pieces with an
eye in each piece. Let them air dry
for a couple of days, then plant.
After the plant dies, you harvest
them. It takes 10 to 16 weeks,

See FRUGAL/Page E10


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. S 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744


Proprtie


," iA 936 W Sun Vista Ct
MLS 702019 $399,900
Spectacular 3bd/2ba home on
oversized lot.
Directions: 486 to Terra Vista Blvd, R
on Fenway Dr, L on Bogey Pt, R on
Skyview Landings Dr, L on Sun Vista Ct.
Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553






2772 IN Crosswaer Path
MLS 702222 $995,000
Custom built property with endless
views of The Ranch Course.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


,- ~2118 W Snowy Egrel PI
MLS 703006 $112,000
3bd/2ba home w/an extra private lot.
Directions: Citrus Springs Blvd, north
on Elkcam, R on Golfview, L on Ryan, R
on Snowy Egret.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


jStA 338 W Redsox Path
MLS 700094 $459,000
Stunning custom detailed home on a
cul-de-sac.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


bM t iL smarK bt
MLS 703017 $119,000
Well maintained 3bd/2ba home w/open
floor plan.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


StAL, 4074 N Indianriver Dr
SMLS 700337 $319,000
Someone built your dream home!
Not a touch forgotten.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


' 102W Honey Palm Loop
MLS 702975 $99,900
Spacious 3/2/2 home w/great floor plan.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


A",'* 1180 E Triple Crown Lp
MLS 356404 $224,900
Spacious 3/3/2 home with many
updated features.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499


1312W Sphere Pi E Laguna Loop 40f 810 E GilchrislCI285a .'fiS' 232 N Loma PI
MLS 357532 $219,000 MLS 701242 $148,500 MLS 356430 $59,900 MLS 358186 $51,000
4/2/2 pool home on 1 acre corner. Waterfront home uniquely designed for 2/2 second floor condo; furnished & Updated and lovely doublewide
Meticulously maintained, fun! 3/2 w/lots of space. move-in ready. on a cul-de-sac.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
S2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential -
" Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


E6 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E5

evergreen strawberry plants as a
ground cover. They produce abun-
dant fruit from January to April and
are still yielding a couple of bowls a
week late in May
Some berries are bitten by
wildlife. I covered the beds with
tulle netting to prevent birds, but the
berries still got nibbled. There were
no trails of slug or snail slime on the
brick pavers, but I set out small
bowls of beer to attract and drown
any that ventured near. No critters
took the bait.
There are many lizards, anoles
and skinks in the garden that I sus-
pect are taking a bite out of the
berries. Since January, I have been
grinding up rinsed eggshells in the
blender and scattering then around
strawberry plants in one bed. Very
few of the berries there get bitten,
while the fruit in the patio bed con-
tinues to be shared with some
species of wild creature. The
eggshells from the party prepara-
tions were promptly ground up and
used around the strawberry plants.
Scraps from the fruit and vegeta-
bles were also blended with a cup of
water and then poured out around
the cedar trees and Simpsons Stop-
per plants across the rear property
line. The nutrients quickly wash
down into the root zone to feed the
plants. After hosing the slop the next
day, no evidence of the different dis-
posal method was visible. The party
scraps yielded five jugs of organic
puree to help amend the sandy soil.
The traditional method of com-
posting is to layer organic scraps
with soil in bottomless wooden, wire
or plastic bins. The materials are
left to decay for months and then
turned to produce finished compost.
Rotting fruit attracts fruit flies, pal-
metto beetles, mice, raccoons and
other wildlife. It smells and be-
comes physically hot while decom-
posing. Temperatures above 130
degrees Fahrenheit kill most weed
seeds, counties and palm seeds ex-
cepted. Finished compost is cool
and ready to add to the soil after
many months.
I prefer to pick up finely milled
yard wastes from the Central Land-
fill on State Road 44 between Inver-
ness and Lecanto. It is still hot and
decomposing, and is straight organic
material with little sand. Spread up


to an inch deep on a lawn or garden
bed; it will quickly wash down into
the soil to release its natural nutri-
ents to plants. I also mix it half with
sand to make a natural potting mix.
After the party, the dishwasher
cleaned the Corelle dishes, platters
and glasses. Glass bottles, plastic
and aluminum cans were taken to
the recycle depot. The few paper
plates were used to start a campfire
to toast marshmallows. Twigs were
added as kindling, then dead
branches fallen from trees com-
pleted the picture. I had buckets of
weeds and their seeds pulled from
the planting beds and lawn. These
were burned and the ashes later
sprinkled into the garden.
I am glad to be home in a healthy,
clean, unlittered environment not
found in some other countries. Re-
duce, reuse and recycle is a motto
easily practiced on site and in our
community.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
U The Chronicle welcomes tips
from readers about breaking
news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to
give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news
event. To submit story ideas for
feature sections, call and ask for
Mike Arnold. Be prepared to
leave a detailed message.


SAY HELLO TO A GOOD BUY .... I... ,. i
Susser, Homosassa. $35,900, #701 978. Debbie Tannery 2.5 AC OF WOODED PRIVACY. Just 5 minutes from downtown Inverness you'll think your miles away. Close to the
352-613-3983. bike trail, swim in your pool. Enjoy summer in your outdoor kitchen. $219,500. #359408


WONDERING IF YOU
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Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.5 million closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
R T b Learn More
o (352) 746-9924


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 E7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 F/S 9$OF


Bright colors bring b

1980s memories

KIM COOK
Associated Press

CT pered the 1980s are back,
in fashion and decor.
Highlighter hues and
glow-in-the-dark tints
provide a shot of adrenaline after a
few seasons of mellow, mushroom-y
color palettes.
Of course, these colors aren't for
everyone. But if you're ready to
play, here are some fun options and
expert advice on how to go sassy
but stylish.
Tanika Nayak, an interior de-
signer and shelter-show host on
HGTV and the Food Network, loves
bright hues. She said the key is to
make them look up-to-the-minute


and noIIt : in:a 1983 lIi
-"Use neon in
small doses," she
advised. "You don't
want to blind any-
one. My favorite use
of neon is against a
crisp white backdrop. In a dining
room, start with a glass table, white
walls and pop it with bold colorful
neon dinnerware, placemats, and
vases affordable and fun! If you
dare to go even bolder, use neon
print accent chairs."
Nayak said balance is everything
when working with these power-
house hues.
"If you have a big, colorful per-
sonality and really want that


Multi-colored picture frames from
Z Gallerie. Intensely colored
accessories add punch to spring
decor. Offset the intensity with crisp
white or darker
hues that will
simultaneously
tone them down
while showing
them off.
Associated Press


See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 E9


NEON
Continued from Page E8

bedroom or bathroom to
glow, then go ahead and
paint the entire room with
your bold color But balance
it with white, black, gray or
even a pastel. For example, a
bedroom painted in bold
green neon can work if the
bedding, rug and window
treatments offset it with a
calming white and/or a pale
soft blue," she suggested.
Take the same tack with a
bathroom; add light-colored
towels and mat to cool things
down.
HomeGoods has some
well-priced accessories, like
bright orange and green ot-


j


A pair of
Z Gallerie
Mariposa
candleholders.
-: : :: ed Press


tomans, a ceramic lamp in
citrus, a large selection of
colorful kitchen tools and
mirrored decorative boxes.
(www.homegoods.com)
Brooke Jones offers an
array of tangerine-hued
home accessories at her on-
line shop. A little elephant
and a set of dinosaur-topped
jars are part of the collection.
Jones said, "I want to make
color accessible to everyone.
Painting a wall a bright color
might not be realistic, but
people can still bring in that
fun, bright pop of the unex-
pected through home acces-
sories. I hope my work
inspires people to take
chances and not take deco-
rating too seriously"
(www.etsy.com/shop/
juxtapositionsc.


Los Angeles-based de-
signer Byron Samayoa's
laser-cut coasters embossed
with elemental information
were not initially intended to
be neon acrylic. "The coast-
ers found their way to neon
via the creative process -
my original Idea was to start
with a wood set and a clear
acrylic set, but every time I
went back to my samples, the
neon ones always stood out
from the rest"
(http://shop.bplusshop.com/).
Canadian textile artist
Christine Skaley Reid works
out of her studio in Mission,
British Columbia, creating
eclectic throw pillows in
color-banded and right-on-
trend '70s-style floral prints.

See Page E10


Sl S-m, AMERICAN
LOU lee Realtor ER REALTY & INVESTMENTS
A ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
SCell: (352) 697-1685 om ar 3'2-746-3o00


Wayne Cormier Realtor*
352-422-0751


8015 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
352-382-1700

waynecormier.com
Million Dollar Producer
Real Estate Needs?
352-422-0751
7:00 am to 10:00 pm
7 days a week!


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-waynec rmi.r rth11 ,1II11.netI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foraging around


finds food at your feet


Common plants

provide tasty,

healthy fare

DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Ellen Zachos is a modern-
day forager, gathering wild
foods to enrich her cuisine.
New York's Central Park
provides the fixings for much
of her larder, which includes
wines, pickles, jams and jel-
lies made from flavorful
weeds.
"Many of the most deli-
cious wild edibles are inva-
sive weeds," said Zachos, an
ethnobotanist, instructor at
the New York Botanical Gar-
den and author of the new
"Backyard Foraging" (Storey
Publishing).


Associated Press
Rose hips growing in a backyard in Langley, Wash. Roses are
cousins of the apple family and rose hips the seed pods that
form on the canes after they bloom are a flavorful wild-food
favorite. They also are a crabapple-sized source of vitamin C.
'Japanese knotweed has stems, when eaten young,
taken over the universe after have a great rhubarb taste.
being planted for windbreaks
in the '70s and '80s. But the See FORAGING/Page Ell


NEON
Continued from Page E9

Fuchsia and pink set the trendy tone
(www. etsy. com/shop/pillow
throwdecor).
At Z Gallerie, find several great
pieces in a zingy chrome yellow, in-
cluding Mariposa candleholders, the
Palmer ceramic stool and Pasadena
picture frames (www.zgallerie.com).
Zazzle.com has a great group of


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E6

depending on the season and the va-
riety you are growing. I planted
mine in mid-February and they
should be ready in mid-June. Google
"growing potatoes" or contact your
local Master Gardeners program or
extension office if you need more
info. -Birdie, California
iPad stand: I use a plate holder as
a stand for my iPad. It works great
on my desk or at the dining room
table. Mine is stable, but be sure to
check if your iPad fits properly and
has a good tilt before buying a plate
holder Sierra, Illinois
Added laundry scent: For those
who like extra scents in your laun-
dry but are concerned about the in-
gredients in some of the scented
crystal laundry products, use Epsom
salt and your favorite essential oil to
create the scented crystals. You can
add it to loads with your regular de-
tergent or mix it with your dry
homemade version. The Epsom salt
has the added effect of softening the
water B.N, email
Cold rice and berry cereal
2 cups cold cooked rice, any
type.
1 to 2 cups berries or soft fruit
(whatever is in season, but don't use


photographic rose prints called the
Neon Collection, tinted in sapphire,
lime and purple (wwwzazzle.com).
And if you're up for outfitting your
home office in some pumped-up
hues, consider CB2's Go-cart furni-
ture series, which includes a rolling
cart, bookcase, task lamp and desk
in vibrant yellow or orange powder-
coated steel. The Eclipse pillow fea-
tures kaleidoscopic mod petals, and
the Ska pillow has a pattern of per-
simmon-on-white abstract figures a
la Keith Haring (www.cb2.com).

citrus, as it could make the cream
curdle).
Honey or agave syrup, to taste.
Cilantro, fresh basil or mint.
Half-and-half, to taste.
Mix and serve. This is filling and
satisfying! -Buffy, Texas
Taco meat Instead of taco season-
ing, I use half a jar of medium salsa
cooked into the meat and the other
half of the jar as salsa. The salsa
tastes great in the taco meat. I like it
better than the usual taco seasoning.
-R.N, Florida
Cheap to cheapest: I used to use
Noxzema razors and Skintimate
cream. To save money, I stepped
down to double blades and generic
shaving cream. Now I go even
cheaper I use bar soap from a
three-for-a-dollar pack at Dollar
Tree and a single-blade razor that I
get for 10 cents per shaver That's as
cheap as I feel comfortable with,
and I still get smooth, non-irritated
results. Starla, Iowa
111---
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Street, Kansas City MO, 64106, or
email sara@frugalvillage.com.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about
upcoming community events.
* Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will
take place and other details.
* Include a contact name and phone number to be printed in the
paper.
* News releases are subject to editing.
* Call 352-563-5660 for details.


E10 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FORAGING
Continued from Page E10

It's good that you can remove
something noxious and eat it at the
same time," she said.
Wild food favorites range from
shellfish to mushrooms, fruit to nuts.
Berries, greens, sea veggies (kelp,
beach asparagus) and garnishes
(wild leeks, garlic) also are high on
the picking order.
Many ornamental plants simply
are beautiful to look at, but some
also find their way into the kitchen.
Zachos is especially fond of substi-
tuting day lily tubers for fingerling
potatoes and preparing hosta shoots
as you would asparagus.
"I look at ornamental plants with
edible parts as the superheroes of
the modern garden," she writes.
"They feed body and soul (with their
deliciousness and beauty, respec-
tively) and cut back on gardening
chores by letting you focus your pre-
cious time on a single space."
Arthur Lee Jacobson of Seattle is
another urban forager who prefers
gathering edibles outside to trekking
to the supermarket He hunts every-
where from alleyways to public
parks, and enjoys finding escaped
ornamentals.
"I generally go out just before din-
ner to see what's in the yard -
planted or wild," he says. "I also go
to nearby parks. If I'm walking home
from an errand and notice some ex-
cellent greens, I'll stop and gather
them."
What you harvest will depend on
the season, the microclimate and
growing conditions.
"In October, you can expect to go
out and gather an abundance of
berries and nuts," Jacobson said.
'About now (early May), you can fig-
ure to come back with lots of salad
material."
Wild foraging brings the flavor of
the land into the kitchen, said Jen-
nifer Hahn, a naturalist who con-
ducts beach walks, leads family
tours and teaches food gathering at
Western Washington University in
Bellingham. Her students are inter-
ested in returning to their figurative
outdoor roots, she said, along with
saving money and adding some un-
usual sources of nutrition to their
diets.
"You can take a dandelion root,
roast it, and mix it with ice cream
and it's almost equivalent to some-


Associated Press
Hostas have shoots that are tasty
and can be prepared in the same way
as asparagus.

thing you'd get at a gelato stand,"
Hahn said.
It's best to have a field guide in
your pocket or, better yet, a mentor
at your side when foraging for wild
foods at least for the first few
trips.
"Don't put anything in your mouth
unless you're 100 percent sure what
it is," Zachos said. "Don't forage on
public land until you have permis-
sion, and don't pick anything that's
been sprayed.
'Ask first," she said. "It's just the
polite and appropriate thing to do."


I 111 L Is 1 1 MI I MIL
M A Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN
*flfl 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
S"Aways ThereFor You"
ER N i 31 A hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com s -
IERA~4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, Fl.34465 L


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


[f, .S A BOATER'S DREAM
MOVE RIGHT IN COME TRUE!
BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
I ,.i ., .. . I ft. of seawall; stationary & float-
.. i .1. ....... .. ... 1 ing dock; spacious modern 3/2.5
of privacy! Very well maintained, new home sits high and dry (never
roof05/09 Just bring your suitcase and flooded) on 2 lots Please visit
move right in! Community features www.mywaterfronthomeforsale.com
golf tennis, clubhouse to find out more about this home!
MLS #358397 $169,000 MLS #358336! $499,000


GET YOUR
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO GOLF CART READY!
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mtch Underwood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home in the center
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET of the back nine of the Pine Ridge Golf
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River Course might be your well-deserved haven
bridges to the Crystal River' Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront Dream kitchen w/granmte counters, SS
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River I.... I ,,. r...ii ... smart
windows; great income potential, tool $199,900 .. ... ......
MLS 359564 $189.000 will buy you this peace of heaven! 1 I -4. $292.000


7 CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
One Half Acre Golf Course Home $137,900 CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
Open floor plan 2/2 with a 2 car garage. Office or sitting area defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront theright setting for living the Florida Anda on 5 acre lot ine etneighborhood
off the master & a private walled area for a hottub or plants. estatew/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the Ambdge Pt nexttotheWthlacoochee
MLS 702790. Spacious Screened Area, Nice View. true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you StateForestandthetrailsbutalsoverycloseto
SDrive by:486 Essex to 390E.Eureka Ct. 000FPB off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sqft this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space
S : : MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129,000


COLDeJL


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 Ell




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For some, home is a canvas


Owners use their properties

as vehicles for self-expression


Associated Press

SEATTLE It's hard to
miss the enormous 20-foot-
wide American flag on the
side of Richard Ormbrek's
home. Comprised of
around 180 tiles painted
with scenes of Americana
against a background of
red and white stripes, the
flag pops from the orange
cedar shingles with traffic-
stopping audacity.
This is actually the sec-
ond major art project that
Ormbrek has put on the
house he shares with
brother-in-law Bruce


Edenso. The first a tra-
ditional Haida Indian
totem house design that
covered the entire side of
the home -was painted in
1975 and made the house
something of a local land-
mark.
Many people know of
one: that neighborhood
house that's quirky or dra-
matic or a bona fide art
project.
But few have the incli-
nation or the guts to
turn their own home into
"that house," to view their


See CANVAS/Page E13


UNIQUE AND REMARKABLE, this home's rooms go on and on. Its core centers around
an umbrella-like design, supported by a round stone fireplace, open in both the dining
room and the family room. The kitchen has the cooktop in the center island, 2 wall ovens.
The split level offers a master suite, 2 bedrooms, a hall bath on the upper floor The lower
level has an in-law suite with a family room, bedroom and bath. The 3-car garage has a
workshop/storage room. The lanai with its deep, heated pool has a half-bath. It all sits up
high with commanding views on1.18 acres. Sold "As Is." $260,000 MLS 703078





I ~ e
WHAT'S AMAZING about this Lakeside villa is that it features a rare 2nd master suite
along with a half-bath for your visitors making a total of 2.5 baths. Each master suite
has a walk-in closet. In addition there's an eat-in kitchen, a formal dining room, a
15" x20" garage, and a 14' Florida room. The C/H/A has been upgraded in'08. Lakeside
Village provides a maintenance-free lifestyle and is a short distance from the popular
Central Ridge Library and shopping. $59,900 MLS702748
e 1


Associated Press
Richard Ormbrek stands next to his house in Seattle, which has been decorated with a 20-foot wide American flag
made up of 180 individually-painted tiles.


CAROLE LISTER |
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
g cell: 422-4620 KE
ERA Office: 382-1700
e- a :_r ,-._ .n m m


ONE ACRE ON THE GOLF COURSE
Pool "Court Yard" spa, fountain, water fall & more. 4 bedrooms SPACIOUS RANCH ADORABLE VILLA
plus a den, 3 baths, master has a jetted tub & separate shower. 3/22 Fam. rm w/FP 2/22 Family room
plusFlorida room Eat-in kitchen I Updated kitchen Huge master bath
2789 Living 4192 Under Roof. Offers Welcomed. $289,900. The ,Side-turn garage -Vaulted ceiling -Shower + tub -Screened atrium
architectural design & deco are a must see. MLS 702574 00F1PH #702308 $134,000 #701366 $119,900


* EC !PRI C *RDUE .iCE REUEDP I .E* R .3D


S Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN
1 f 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
mj ^AlvaysThemeForYou
F R A hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com O amt
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465

fcincy~Ai i 1q^r i


wwwr~ listerlistings~FXcom


E12 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CANVAS
Continued from Page E12

property as a giant canvas
waiting to be explored.
"We needed to paint our
house anyway," said Orm-
brek. "And while we were
mulling over the color, we
decided to make our home
look like a longhouse."
Ormbrek's late wife
Judy, a Tlingit-Haida,
picked the totem design,
which the Ormbreks pro-
jected from atop a car
across the street while
their friend Steve Priestly
painted in the lines.
Neighbors gaped as the
house was transformed,
but only one seemed to
mind, fearing it would
bring down property val-
ues. So far, it seems, the
Totem House has neither
driven down property val-
ues in one of Seattle's
hottest neighborhoods, nor
affected the resale value of
the home itself.
"I get offers every week
to buy my home," said
Ormbrek. "Of course, I'm
not planning on selling the
house it's a very special
place."
Keith Wong, an agent in
San Gabriel, Calif., for the
national real-estate bro-
kerage Redfin said a
home's price and location
are more important than
aesthetics in tight markets.
"We educate our clients
to look past cosmetics,"
said Wong. "If a house has
good bones, it has lots of
potential."
Wong recently took
clients to see an unusual
home in the Highland
Park neighborhood of Los
Angeles and said the cou-
ple were turned off more
by the noise from a nearby
freeway than by the
home's eclectic design,
which included a rainbow
of exterior colors and a
giant statue of an insect in
the front yard.
For those considering a
creative makeover to their
home, remember it's a fine


line between special and
tacky, Wong advised. And
consider how long you'll
be staying there.
"If you're planning on
selling your home anytime
soon, it's best to stick to
cosmetics and keep with
the characteristics of the
neighborhood architec-
turally," he said.
Jay Pennington of New
Orleans put a twist on this
suggestion when he of-
fered his yard to host a
year-long musical art in-
stallation. The double lot
he purchased in 2007
came with a dilapidated,
roughly 250-year-old Cre-
ole cottage on the property,
which Pennington wanted
to use in a creative way be-
fitting the spirit of New
Orleans.
A DJ, performer and
artist manager who also
goes by the name Rusty
Lazer, Pennington is
steeped in the art world
through his work as co-di-
rector of New Orleans Air-
lift, a not-for-profit
organization that provides
opportunities for artists.
Pennington, along with
Brooklyn-based street
artist Swoon and New Or-
leans Airlift Co-Director
Delaney Martin, came up
with the idea of a musical
village made from the sal-
vaged remains of the
cottage.
After obtaining city per-


mits, Martin and artist Tay-
lor Lee Shepherd paired
artists with builders to cre-
ate a lot-size shantytown
with nine shacks that
wheezed, thrummed and
plinked as fully function-
ing instruments.
The neighbors were al-


most univ
ive and t(
project -


A detail of the "It's New Orleans peo-
20-foot-wide ple love music here," said
American flag Pennington. He said neigh-
on the side of bors appreciated that the
Richard cottage wasn't torn down
Ormbrek's and replaced with a new,
home in out-of-character home.
Seattle. The "The area has a rhythm
flag is made up and spirit to it, and that
of around 180 was something we had to
individual try and preserve," he said.
hand-painted He did draw the line at
tiles. Ormbrek friends camping in his
periodically yard for Mardi Gras, insist-
rotates the ing that they build a pri-
tiles and vacy fence to show respect
replaces some for the neighbors. The
with thematic fence was built in a day,
holidays for wheat-pasted with a de-
ys sign by Swoon, and now a
Associated Press piece of it is part of the
archival collection at the
ersally support- New Orleans Museum of
ook part in the Art.
from helping to Performances of "The


dismantle the cottage to
defending Pennington
from the one neighbor who
viewed the project as
"trashy" and tried to shut
it down.


FABULOUS SETTING ON .85 ACRES!
4/2/2 heated pool home
Over 2900 sq ft of living area
*Large lanai with summer kitchen
*Dual pane windows well for irrigation
Elevated with circular driveway
23'x33' garage has AC craft/exercise room
Furnishings available separately
* Home warranty for the buyers
#358452 $349.900


* 3+office/2/2 with solar heated pool
* Set on 2 very private lots!
* Upgraded laminate flooring
*NewAC/heat in Dec 2012
* Pool/lanai deck resurfaced in 2013
*Granite island kitchen 42" wood cabinets
* Pantry and stainless steel appliances
* Home warranty for the buyers
#702682 $219.900


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 E13

Music Box," as the project
was called, drew 15,000
visitors and a host of per-
formers who played the in-
strumental buildings. It
ended in May 2011 after
four months of staggered
performances. Most of it
was dismantled and the
pieces stored to be used in
a permanent musical
building known as
Dithyrambalina.
Pennington still shares
his property with the pro-
ject's art director, Eliza
Zeitlin, who lives in the
permanent structure she
built for the project -
along with her menagerie
of 30 animals.
"My house will never be
just my house again," said
Pennington. "But I love
that"


r it

Realtor


AGENT ON DUT SEVENIDArYS A


INVERNESS 1998 D/W M/H,
4 bedrooms, 2 baths on over half acre,
near lakes, comer lot, well & septic Needs
lot of work #700486 $24,900
s5R ts'H


SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H
handyman/woman special, needs lots of
work, roof does not leak, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, private well & septic, no
appliances or outside a/c unit On 040
acres #702483 $39,900


mm


INVERNESS neat as a pin, 1985 single
wide mobile home with 2 bedrooms,
2 baths, 2 lots, concrete drive, corner lot
w/nice shade trees, newer central heat &
air Newerrefrigerator #357305 $35,000
LM ... n


HERNANDO waterfront 2 bedroom,
HERNANDO 2 bedroom, 1 bath, S/W 1 5 bath SAN M/H, needs some work
M/H Rear yard chain link fence w/dog canal leads to Tsala Apopka out fall canal
pen Metal shed w/concrete floor, central to Withlacoochee river, boat ramp on
electric A/C, propane central heating, gas property Owner financing with 20%
range/oven #702262 $24,900 down #702276 $32,900


CRYSTAL RIVER ready to move in
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is on cul-de-sac has pool &
spa, patio foi 1 ,1 ... ',ll ,, 1
backyard 14 : I. I .... ..
#359466 $104,900


DUNNELLON 1998 Nobility DAW M/H
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres
Master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
shower Country kitchen, vaulted ceilings,
16 x 20 workshop w/electric, inside
laundry #356595 $65,000


REAL ESTATE, INC.
S _. 5569W .GULF TO LAKE HW Y.
M-- CRYSTAL RIER,FL 34429
S o .E: (352) 795-6633
AT wm.FXPF tOM SAn fET.efS A1T.FXPF tOM


S"Always There For You"
KEY
PEJLA GAIL COOPER
4 u In^lt flirillion DollIar Rea liar
SCell: (352) 634-4346
Office! 3521 3B2-17nflflx3f0


I


See.JVirtual .III ..i resalehomesIB.I.. J





E14 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013






Real Estate

Classifieds

, IrmYHtrlea~ il



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To place an ad, call 563-5966



.. Classifieds

In Print


HOMOSASSA
1/1 Duplex $265
2/1 House $575
RIVER LINKS REALTY
352-628-1616
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paintflooring, w/d pets
ok $800 mthly, 8928 W.
White Dogwood Dr.
619-301-5442
INVERNESS
2/2/2, w/ Fl. Rm. CHA,
1st, last& Sec. 700. mo
Sr. Disc. 352-249-6227
INVERNESS
Highlands
close to downtown
3/2/2, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
1lbr, l.5ba, $465.
Fridge-Stove,water-
trash, Fenc'd-yard,
pets-ok, 352-587-2555
FLORAL CITY
1 bd/1 ba 55+, Remod-
eled, Kitchen & Bath,
Huge L/R, Lg Screened
Patio, Lg. Carport, w/d,
c/h/a, partial furn. $430
mo. includes lot rent,
water, sewer, trash
352-897-4449
HERNANDO
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
$400 $500 Mo. Call
Larry 352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
1/1, in Park $125 wk,
furnished, ele. in-
cluded 621-0601
HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019



HOMOSASSA
Several Available
Beautiful Park
Pool
(352) 628-4441

INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951

INVERNESS
SWw/add 2/1 near
wal-mart $475 mo. non/
smoking 706-473-2184


LECANTO
1/1, Furn, all utilities
inc. + Direct TV, no
smoking or pets, $450.
1st & last, bckgrnd ck.
352-422-6630




ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181
DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home wth a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&l W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
LOOKING FOR YOUR


Is your Credit Score 575
or Higher, several new
homes to choose from
call for details
352-795-1272



LOT MODEL
CLEARANCE!!!
All Models Must Go to
make room for new
models, please call
(352) 795-1272





New 2013
Lot Model 3/2 DWHM
$46,900, Includes
Deliver, set-up, A/C,
Skirting, Steps Call
352-795-2377



sit,

New 2013 Lot Model
DWMH 2/2 $42,900
Includes, Delivery,
set-up, A/C Skirt, steps
NO HIDDEN FEES
Call 352-795-1272


MUST SEL


New Lot Model
2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fire-
place, huge Island
kitchen, It has to go!!
$84,900 includes
Del, set-up, A/C,
Skirting,steps,
Furniture pkg Avail.
Call 352-795-2377
Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
http://www.oalmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/
$39k off select 2012
models (3)
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210






REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377
STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183




We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!

2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details





INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 2/2 DWMH in
(Harbor lights),carport
shed w/d handicap
ramp attached, boat
slips, priv. dock, pool,
club hse, stg rv/trailers,
lawn maint. low lot rent,
Only $14,900 419-6132




FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, $36,500.
Cash net to seller
352-586-9498

HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182



HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wlde 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192


HOMOSASSA
Owner Financing, 3/2
2000 Sq Ft, comp. re-
modeled, open fl plan,
fenced yard $5k down
$525 monthly 302-9217




HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $6,800
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL


NEED
A GOOD
TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/2 POOL CARE INCLUDED
AVAILABLE JUNE
2/2 /1 ..................................... $70 0
3/2/1 FENCED BACKYARD. $800
2/1/CARPORT .............................. $500
2/15 TO NHOUSE....................$575
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs.
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

FLORAL CITY
2/1, Det. Gar. Chad,
Hist. Dist., No pets/
non smoking $650mo.
1 st/Ist/sec. 422-6263


-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHoameRentals. om
HOMOSASSA
8 Ja im St. ............................ $775
2/2/1 Vill in SMW
60xhorn 0. E........................$1350
3/2/2 Pool home n SMW
CRYSTAL RIVER
8160 W. Emma Lne .................. $750
2/2/1 Beautful home
6507W. Cnnodale Dr. .......... $875
2/2/2 Villa n Meaowdrest
with amenities
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
1829W. Androedae ().... $875
3/2/2 Lovely mre
1161 W. CrolinePath (L). $1000
3/2/1 Beautiful home in Brentwood
8160 N. Du l Dr. (S) ..............$1300
3/2/2 Pool home fully
furmnshed or unfurnished
45W. Kaetwoo PI. ()........... $1300
Pool home, big open rooms





















FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352)344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, W/D
Hkup, $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499
Desertrose
Apartments
RENTAL SPECIAL
1 MONTH FREE
2 bed/2 bath
Call now for details!!
Ensing Properties LLC
352-795-1795
www.ensing
properties.com
INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/iwater incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms tilled, patio
$525 1st and Sec.
352-344-0238
SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom
cabinets, central air &
heat, stove,
refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD












CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Commercial Storefront
clean 1000 SF, exc.loc
$795/mo 352-634-2528


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


Meadowcrest
Condo for Rent
Will Call back after writ-
ing out info
352-220-6754
30 days
Whispering Pines
Villa Furnished
3/2/1 Liv, Din, Kit, Lanai,
end unitl ots of privacy
$850 mthly, last, sec.
413-478-6396




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
2BR/2BA, Located on
the Eighteenth Fairway
of Quarry Course. Great
Views. $1200/month
includes basic cable &
lawn care. Contact Dixie
at 352-746-3301.




LECANTO
Cottage 1/1 $450.
incls. pwer/water, Dirt
Road (352) 220-2958
MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116




CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New Carpet,
Near School $725. mo.
RIVER LINKS REALTY
352-628-1616
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec
$500 850-838-7289

DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes
Estates
2/2/2, + FL room
fenc'd yd $650/mo.
1st,last. sec
(352) 489-7094


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furnished
effic/cottage all util.
incl'd. $645 no smoking
352-422-2994




HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
**(352)4642514*
1305 Hwy 486




Executive Suite
Available, King Bed,
high speed internet
Direct tv, whole house
access, w/d, carport
parking, secluded,
Christian gentleman
$125. wkly call Bruce
352-445-7501 or Ray
828-497-2610




Wanting to Rent on
Lease 3/2, with Pool
or waterfront, in
Crystal River or
Homosassa
6 mos in advance,
(352) 422-6939





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Chiefland By Owner 5
Fenced Acres, Nice little
one bedroom house,
Big Pole Barn w/electric
& water. Grandaddy
Oaks, park like setting,
Very Private. $78,500
firm. Call 813-285-0182


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


must sell!
Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079

Nature Coast Landings:
Sale/Trade: Big rig RV
Site plus storage lot.
$49,500/offer for both.
352-843-5441. See at
detailsbyowner.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Real Estate Auction.
54+/- acre property,
located Berkeley
County, WV, offers a
historic grand manor
house, in-ground pool
and pool house, multi-
ple structures with
21,000+/- sq. ft. of
heated living space,
a large pond,
private deeded ac-
cess to deep water
Potomac with slips
and ramp. The auc-
tion will be held June
14 at 2:00 PM. Will
sell with a minimum
bid of $995,000. For
details go to _
woltz.com or call
Woltz & Associates,
Inc. (WV# 1000), Real
Estate Brokers &
Auctioneers
800-551-3588.
Roanoke, VA.





FOR SALE
$89,900
31 S Melborne St.
Beverly Hills
owner financing avail.
352-634-1724




4/2.5/2 Htd Pool
30x40 detached gar.
wood, tile,carport
wood cab, granite
Must See! $319,900
Iv. msg 352-527-1448

PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 / w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840
For Sale By Owner
3/212, on appox. % acre
with enclosed large pool
new roof, new Hot
water heater $125,000,
746-5421




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity with amenities
$120K posss rent
opt)352-804-9729
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 292-1550





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF,4k"
REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan, carpet,
tile, bright, cheerful,
clean. Realtor/Owner
(352) 697-0295

312/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
Quick Sale $119,500
352-302-4057


For SaleBvod
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN.
11A-3P, 352-601-0241










Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
Wood Floors, Tile and
Carpet. 2 Car GarSS
Appl. fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026
SMW
3/3/2, court yard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978


^^f


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503







Dbl-wide,

7.31 ac
9 Paddocks
w/water + shelter lit
riding ring, $85,000.
close to Marion Cty.
Call Lindsay Paolillo
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward "

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
biopowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.



I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515









SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855

SPECIAL *
New Home in
Quiet neighborhd.
3/2/2, on 1 acre
2932 sf. corner lot,
$269,900.
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116
Spruce Creek Pr.
55+, gated,
3/2/2, 2370 Liv. area,
on GC $159,000.
Call Lindsay Paolillo,
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063




Your World
















..... hi nI , ,f- U


Hme


latusCu


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
NEW LISTINGS

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





-- -- --




Spmrce Creek
Pr.

55+, gated,

3/2/2
2370 Liv. area,

on

GC

$159,000.
Call Lindsay Paolillo,
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063




Inverness, Regency Pk
2/2, fireplace, 1st floor
community pool
$48,900 352-637-6993




LAND FOR SALE
20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway, $159,500.
3 Homesites availa-
ble June 1st Only. 45
mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Gated/Privacy.
(888)716-2259.
Gulf Atlantic Land,
Broker.






YOU'LL THIS!
Great Lake home &
value! A must see by
Duval Island! 2 Boat
docks, 2/2 Fl Rm &
more. $159K; Realty
Connect. 352-212-1446
www.RealtvConnect.me


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


How To
Make Your
Dining Room Set
Disappear...
Simply adverse m the
Classifieds and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966


wwwchronM loninec
www.chronicteongne.com


Home Finder
www.chroniclehom efinder.com


.14


Fiad Yo"r Dream Homes
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
"call 352-503-3245-



Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
hmrml999@att.net
(904) 757-1012
HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $5,000.
352-621-1664
PINE RIDGE
2.75 Acre Lot. Priced
below tax assessment
at $30,000. Located in
area of nice homes.
Cl Bkr/owner 228-1047

/ THIS OUT!
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $53,900. Call
352-638-0905








W .IN


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013 E15





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


to ieii l this lit ell .cieioge
/In ,tell this /4loe/I .fore.ge


.n.l I.. I -... .... 0 1...... 1.. l s = .. 'I
MOTIVATED SELLER HAS REDUCED PRICE TO S239.000
Da id KHur Cell 954 383 8186
Olhce 352 126 6668


P


m rii r, i. ll I .. i ii
I.. 6 il ,..II.,,., II .'I i....i. I ..I


, ,,h,, 1 ... 6I
ril =-, ASKING S71.900
hesI hIhl Ir i 111111 ,1, II .


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= /ul:I:Iuu $150,000
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
wi'i'nr'. cilluscountisold. corn


BIAU IIPUL nUMIn INblUI & UU I
S: W VVITH I)jVil. iZI TVVO I AF
I AFAIl.A f AMll F.i I)0M IllN I1TiIi'I

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ASKING $214,900
Pal Davis i3521212 7280


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!

H ~,i I ypic i i ,n 11.1 II i .ds, l. l n'i
H ..ij i i. iin 'l .in In.i ill In )l' ill IIl

$149,900
inh ..11 l i t, .lll:. llv.ili.l B ll B ll ill..Wl il
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699











* iBu', B.ill. POOL Huni.:

* AI I .: F il
* hAMII'i F.IJM
= /i:: $200,000
Jeanne or Wilaid Pickiel 212 3410
1i'1'1I. ciUlluscouni sold. comn


HOME, BARN GARDEN. HORSES
S150.000
,i)11 =111 i ) 1. 11 . ... .1 I i d 1.1


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SII I I .1 I I II I .. I I I
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Ci" 'l'/tr'i Snld 6 352 4168727
i ir Ir I .i =358779


* - LIII. ,l E.1 .I -'I
* VV.... I ,'-II, Ilil p l.LJ.
* I ':":"l- u h nl nnllii h1l1

* N. i n- n
=/il:l/. $159,900
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 212 3410









GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY
I " l "

16 1I l.l l 11111 .I I
Il' l-'"'"' ,1 I'" IIla ,J,,,,,,, ,,:,,,, ,,, , ,,1 I" "' I.

I I l...d, -l 11 h1,,
I... al-I i I n nnnl- In
r l =-1,1: ASKING $144,900
Pit Di, ,352' 212 7280
I',.i ht,nili .iLL i pRtdg 1 ,ij ni


SUPER CLEAN
INVERNESS HIGHLANDS HOME



* .II ., I ,I ,,

Mi,- = i:71;I. OFFERED AT ONLY 579,900
C[ II ih, I h rllh l ind1 mi, 11 ]62 J11JO 261~


BREATHE THE CLEAN AIR!

H ,, .Ii A... h i..... .i. ... II ,, I, 1 --


i_'.- = il_'.. $49,900
Ask lot MaIn/ n Booth 637 4904


3/2/2 PLUS DEN
* l.i hl i.C.:: I .V pi.lI
* HI Ih I1p- I:- lll lIu H.rlnl . .:
= 'i_:i"' $229,000
Jeanne Or lWillaid Pickiel 352 2123410
clluscounllsold conm


1h` ll ... I ,, II.. I, i,,, N I l.., h., ,.|

FROM $20.000 TO $29.500
BRING ALL OFFERS
C.all DOns Ihlnei 352 422 4621


MULTI FAMILY
.hl.l' I' lu ll 4 lh- l l ,,m,,l I I I ,l | lli,.l
MI 5 ='1.1', $349,900
Call Jim Morton to ptet en. 422 2173


A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION

II I../II I11 11 / l I l /I r ii l r. Illlll

i l ll I I ii i iiii,-i,-1 1. 1ii1 ii liil, II, I' I h ll,- i
S: = 11111I ASKING $398,900
Pit Di, ,352'212 7280
.I'?l ,ll llng ., capsl.l ll i ll cojni


V -ll illll i.nrnvll



Mi = ::,.li ONLY $54,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


596,900 DOWNTOWN DUNNELLON!
lll. I [L. l I. i I .,l ... % ... I
L.I '.. r .l :. L, ... 1,hl , ..I i l ,,..1




/lIh. Parsons 352 634 12/4


INVERNESS HIGHLAND

l, n ii -Il,- .l n :. ll _


MnI /ii :l':i,. ASKING $78,500
Call Nancy Jenks
352 4008072 352 726 6668


INVERNESS SHORT SALE

. l, ,l i ,inin l I nnI .,,J I ni, nIl _l .1 1 11111 i
l i : h Il l l: I l : i

MI 5 = /:I":i. $89,000
loaname 0 Regan 352 586 0075


SERVING
CITRUS lA
SCOUNTHY
FOR I
OVER 37 eOPEN
YEARS* SUNDAY





ISlleALES 36 AFreare


E16 SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013