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Citrus County chronicle ( May 19, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 19, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03126

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 19, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03126

Full Text



Wire to wire: Oxbow wins Preakness from outset /B1


I -UNDAYJIII


Partly cloudy;
30% chance of
p.m. t-stroms.
PAGE A4


C I T R U S ,C 0 U N T Y
CITR-S COUNTY






www.chronicleRONICnline.com
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSI


Thorpe not only one on way out


Three top officials seeking

unrelatedjob prospects
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Brad Thorpe may not be the only high-level Cit-
rus County official vacating the Courthouse.
Three others County Attorney Richard
Wesch, Assistant County Administrator Ken Frink
and Public Information Officer Lindsay Ubinas
- are awaiting calls for potential job opportuni-
ties elsewhere.
All three say their circumstances are unrelated
to Thorpe's, the county administrator who last


week announced his retirement.
Wesch, for example, said Lee County officials
contacted him about the vacant county attorney
job there. Wesch said he applied well before
Thorpe made known his retirement plans.
Same with Frink, who learned about an ad-
ministrative position with the Southwest Florida
Water Management District. Frink said he called
Gary Kuhl, a former county administrator and
water district executive, who encouraged him to
apply
Ubinas, hired two years ago as the county's
spokeswoman, may be in line for the open media
relations specialist job at the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office. Ubinas, whose husband is a sheriff's
detective, said she's always had an interest in law
See Page A7


Eight administrators led Citrus


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

If all goes as planned, Brad
Thorpe will become the first
Citrus County administrator to
retire not resign, be fired or
forced out.
Thorpe is the eighth county
administrator. The average
tenure is four or five years.
Here's a brief look at the
county's administrators:


Legal livestock


.. L.










MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Larry Hearold grooms his horse Judd while Irene Hearold works with Faye. New residents to Leanto, the couple had been led
to believe their horses already were allowed at their new home. However, one more step in paperwork was required.


County code arifies rulesfor keeping large animals on acreage
"-- .. .




to believe their horses already were allowed at their new home. However, one more step in paperwork was required.

C. 1 i .... .... ,. ..., :
O :# ''O'" Clt -CS.," "l'-S ''" 0 71/ O" "'- re" C -""" "


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

read "Bring your animals,"
and that is what Larry and
Irene Hearold did when they
moved to Lecanto from
Massachusetts.
They brought their horses Judd and
Faye to their new home on about 4.8
acres in West Rusk Lane to begin en-
joying their retirement. But they faced
another hurdle when they tried to
build a barn.
"We assumed, based on the title
search and what the Realtor told us,
that (our property) was agricultural
because it had an agriculture exemp-
tion on it at the time we purchased it,"
Larry Hearold told the Citrus County
Planning and Development Commis-
sion (PDC) last month as he made a re-
quest for a conditional use permit to
raise animals for non-commercial
purposes.
Hearold continued: "What we did
not realize, and neither did the Realtor
nor the title company, was that an agri-
cultural exemption ends at the change
of ownership. We did not find this out


ANIMALS ALLOWED PER ACRE IN CITRUS COUNTY


Type of animal
Domestic tropical birds
Parrots


Poultry
Rabbits
Horses and other equines

until we submitted a permit to bi
barn a couple of months ago. Tha
when we found out we were in a
dential area instead of agricultu:
New purchasers may misunde
stand the concept of an agricult
exemption or exception. Simply
stated, an agricultural classifica
that is filed for purposes of tax (
lation under the Florida Right t
Farm Act (Florida Statute 823.14
no effect on the property's land-
designation.
"I'm not necessarily sure the ]
is aware of the regulations until
get an issue, either through code
pliance or through applying for


Max. no.
per acre Type of animal
30 Llamas
10 Cattle


Goats
10
Sheep
10 Swine
2 Ostriches, emus or rheas


Max. no.
per acre
2
1
1
1
1


building permit," said Kerry Parsons,
assistant county attorney "The prop-
erty appraiser decides if you have an
agricultural use on the property and
gives you the exception."
Agricultural classification can't be
transferred to a new property owner
Anyone who buys a property with an
existing agricultural exception for tax
purposes would need to file for a new
one to continue bona fide agricultural
use.
Similarly, the reverse circumstance
works like this: The zoning of property
as agricultural does not automatically


Page A5


Craig Hunter, 1981-1987.
Hunter, former Deerfield
Beach city manager, was the
first Citrus County administra-
tor Before his coming to the
county, each commissioner
oversaw his or her own district
In 1985, Hunter was a finalist
for the Alachua County admin-
istrator's position, but didn't
get the job. He resigned to take
See Page A7




Hospital


prices for


consumers


to compare

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

If you're treated for bronchi-
tis or chest pain, hospital rates
in Citrus County are similar, but
for pancreas problems you may
want to shop around.
Hospital prices for the most
common procedures became
public this month, enabling
consumers to compare costs lo-
cally, at the state level and
nationally
At least that was the intent.
But while the list of charges to
Medicare by procedure (diag-
nosis-related groups) and hos-
pital location appears
straightforward, in reality the
system is a lot more complex,
according to local providers.
The price list of all hospitals
accepting Medicare nationwide
includes Citrus Memorial
Health System and Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cen-
ter, as well as hospitals in Her-
nando and Marion counties.
The vast set of data for 2011
was posted by the Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid Serv-
ices (CMS). According to its
news release, for the first time
consumers have information on
what hospitals charge. It shows
significant variation across the
country and within communi-
ties in what hospitals charge for
common inpatient services.
"Currently, consumers don't
know what a hospital is charg-
ing them or their insurance
company for a given procedure,
like a knee replacement, or how
much of a price difference
there is at different hospitals,
even within the same city,"
Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
said in a statement "This data
will help fill that gap."
The data posted on the CMS
website include information
comparing charges for services
that may be provided during the
100 most common Medicare in-
patient stays. Hospitals deter-
mine what they will charge for
items and services provided to
patients and these "charges"
are the amount the hospital
See Page A6


I6 ll81 I 1 08 211007l5


Classifieds .......D6
Crossword ...... .A14
Excursions ....... A13


Editorial .........C2
Entertainment ... A4
Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers ...B3


Lottery Payouts
Movies .......
Obituaries ....


... .B3
. .A14
.A8, A9


TV Listings ......A14
Together ........A18
Veterans Notes . .A15


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


LOCAL DEALER DECIDES TO

PAY CUSTOMER CAR PAYMENTS


Crystal Automotive Group
Homosassa, FL
Everyone wants a new vehicle, especially if
someone is offering to make those pay-
ments until next year for you.
This is exactly what local car dealer, Crys-
tal Automotive Group has agreed to do.
Making the payments for the customer
until 2014.
During the promotion, if a customer pur-
chases a new or used vehicle prior to
Wednesday, May 22nd, Crystal Automo-
tive Group will make their car payments
for until 2014.
OOEZR


"We just want to show customers how easy
it is to purchase a new vehicle today and we
could not think of a better way than to
agree to make their car payments for
them," said Justin Lamb, Director of Op-
erations for the company.
To qualify for the promotion, customers
must simply purchase a vehicle from one of
the five Crystal Dealerships. They offer
convenient locations: Chevrolet in Ho-
mosassa, Nissan in Homosassa and
Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in Inverness,
Brooksville and Homosassa. Crystal has


set up a hotline so customers can call and
have any and all questions answered. That
number is 1-800-584-8755 ext. 2014.
Skeptical shoppers may think the deal
seems too good to be true. When asked
"What's the catch?", Crystal's Finance Di-
rector, Ted Nipper replied, "The customer
must be able to finance the vehicle for 6
years with an interest rate not exceeding
2.99%. To take advantage of Crystal Au-
tomotive Group making your car payment
for you, you must purchase a vehicle at one
of our five locations by May 22nd. Also re-


member, offers may not be combined." Ac-
cording to Nipper, "There are very few ve-
hicles that do not qualify for the
promotion. However, almost everyone will
qualify for a loan during the promotion."
With an event this large, Crystal is expect-
ing a large customer turnout. When asked
further about the event, Justin Lamb
stated, "It's exciting to offer such a unique
benefit. We're pulling out all the stops to
make this easy for our customers. We've
decided to bring in additional vehicles for
this event to give them the best selection."


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
66


285










Keep safe while boating


Take care when

trailering, towing boat
Editor's note: National Safe Boating
Week is May 18 to 24. This is the first in a
series ofstories about boat safety offered
by members of Flotilla 15-01.
Special to the Chronicle
It is important to take the same pre-
cautions when trailering and towing a
boat as one would while actually being on
the water. First, ask yourself this ques-
tion: Is the plug in the boat? Besides this
important tip, here are some other things
to consider:
Weight distribution Keep the cen-
ter of gravity as low as possible. Heavy
items should be on the lowest deck area
in the center of the boat, not on the seats.
The boat's weight should be distributed
60 percent toward the front of the trailer.
Do not exceed the tongue weight capacity
of the vehicle or trailer
The boat should be secured with at
least two ratchet-type straps, one on each
side to the rear of the trailer This keeps
the boat from rolling or sliding forward
on the trailer. The bow eye should be at-
tached to the trailer wench to keep the
boat from sliding aft.
Tow vehicle: The vehicle should be
equipped to do the job required. Addi-
tional strain will be placed on the cooling
system, transmission and tires. Make
sure the ball size on the trailer matches
the receiver required ball size. When the
trailer is hooked up, connect the safety
chains (crisscrossed). If equipped, attach
the brake safety chain. Check the turn
signals, running lights and brake lights
on the trailer.
Backing: Back slowly, with someone
outside to guide you. Place your hand at
the bottom of the steering wheel and
move it in the direction that you want the
trailer to go. Use your mirrors to check
the trailer
Breaking: Remember your gross
weight has increased considerably; the
distance required to stop your forward


BOATING SAFETY
Free safety check from 7 to 11 a.m.
Sunday, May 26, at Fort Island Trail
Bait and Tackle.
Flotilla 15-01 will staff an
informational booth this week,
May 19 to 24 at West Marine in
Crystal River.
FLOTILLA 15-01
To contact USCGA Crystal River
Flotilla 15-01:
Membership- Vince Maida, 917-
597-6961; email vsm440@aol.com.
Education/safety -Linda Jones,
352-503-6199; email
Ijonesl501@gmail.com.
Free vessel inspections Ed
Hattenback, 352-489-3219; email
ehattenback@tampabay.rr.com.
Visit the website at http://
a0701501.uscgaux.info/index.htm.

motion has also increased. Give yourself
plenty of room. Steer as straight as possi-
ble when stopping; you do not want the
trailer to push the rear of your vehicle
around and cause you to jackknife.
Launching and retrieving: Prepare
your boat in a staging area; do not block
ramp activity Remove all tie-down
straps, check transom boat plugs, and fas-
ten the boat painter (bow line). Do not re-
lease the wench line until the boat is in
the water. Back the trailer to the left if
possible, backing left gives better launch-
ing visibility Avoid dunking wheel bear-
ings when possible. Never leave the
towing vehicle unattended on the ramp
with only the parking break set. If the ve-
hicle must be left while on the ramp, set
the transmission in park. In retrieving
your boat, make sure that the boat is
properly placed on the trailer Secure the
wench line to the bow eye. Pull the trailer
up and out steadily Again, prep the ves-
sel for the trip home in a staging area
away from the ramp.
Is the plug in the boat?


Special to the Chronicle
Federal, state and local laws require
that every vessel have a life jacket for
each person on board a vessel. These
laws go on to say that these life jackets
must be readily accessi-
ble, in case they are
needed in an emer-
gency
The concept of
"readily accessible"
confuses many
boaters. Readily ac-
cessible means that
you can instantly lo-
cate, remove, distrib-
ute and don life jackets
in the fastest time possi-
ble.
The Coast Guard Auxil-
iary, as well as the Coast Special to
Guard and the major recre- Life jack
national boating safety organi- in many
zations, recommends that all functi
everyone wear a life jacket at lives on .
all times while underway,
eliminating the need for this discussion.
But since fewer than one out of four
adult boaters actually wears their life
jacket while underway, the law requires
that your life jacket be readily accessible


th
(e
to
th


in order to comply with the regulations.
What is considered readily accessi-
ble? The concept is often best ex-
plained by looking at examples of what
is considered NOT readily accessible. A
life jacket is not considered readily ac-
cessible when
stored in the bot-
tom of a locker, or
kept in its original
plastic bag, or left
down in the bilge,
where it can be-
come partially de-
stroyed by lack of
proper care.
Remember, with-
out a life jacket, your
chances of survival de-
crease dramatically
Drowning remains the No.
e Chronicl 1 cause of death in boating fa-
ts cometalities, and statistics consis-
form, but tently show that more than
n to save two-thirds of those who per-
he water. ish in boating accidents were
not wearing life jackets
Like having your seat belt on before a
vehicle collision, having your life jacket
on before you are thrown into the water
can mean the difference between life
and death.


EMS slates EMT program


Special to the Chronicle
The next Nature Coast
EMS emergency medical
technician class begins
Thursday, May 23, at the
Nature Coast EMS Admin-
istration building, 3876 W
Country Hill Drive in
Lecanto.
The EMT program
course is 16 weeks and is
designed to prepare stu-
dents to provide basic life-
support measures as a
member of an ambulance
crew, at the scene of an ac-


Boys & Girls

Clubs ready

for camp

Special to the Chronicle
Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County summer camps
will open May 24 and run
10 weeks through Aug. 2 at
all three club sites in In-
verness, Beverly Hills and
halfway between Crystal
River and Homosassa.
Cost is $70 per week
from 7 a.m. until 6 p.m., or
$60 per week from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Special discounts
are available for past
Camp Fusion members.
The clubs expect to have
scholarships available for
income-eligible clients.
Scholarships will be dis-
tributed according to need
and date of application.
The public may make
contributions to the Sum-
mer Camp Scholarship
Fund by donating $70 or
$60 for a week or the
amount for the entire sum-
mer Donations are also
welcome for the Summer
Field Trip Fund. If it were
possible, the clubs would
charge no fees, but they are
necessary to pay staff and
keep programs running.
Daily schedules for all
children will include arts
and crafts, indoor and out-
side games, sports, tech-
nology, cooking activities
and weekly swimming and
bowling sessions. As part
of the sports program,
clubs will play against
each other.
Call the Beverly Hills
Club at 352-270-8841, the
Inverness Club at 352-341-
2507, the Homosassa Club
at 352-795-8624 or the ad-
ministrative office at 352-
621-9225 to register and
find out dates of camp ori-
entation meetings.


* WHAT: Emergency
medical technician
class.
WHEN: 16 weeks
beginning May 23.
CONTACT: Lori
Thompson, 352-601-
7330 or email
Lori.thompson@
naturecopastems.org.
cident, during transport to
a hospital or medical facil-
ity and in the medical fa-
cility It will prepare
students to sit for the


Florida Bureau of EMS
EMT Certification Exam.
Those interested in reg-
istering should contact stu-
dent services and complete
an application. The office
is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday;
however, appointments can
be scheduled after busi-
ness hours if needed.
For more information
and admission require-
ments, call lead instructor
Lori Thompson at 352-601-
7330 or email Lori.thomp-
son@naturecoastems.org.


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When Dr. Royalty says he considers it a privilege to take care of patients,
he means beyond their physical health, giving hope for a better life. Using
technology available at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, he can treat
patients who have blocked arteries, aneurysms and lung or chest issues with
minimally invasive surgical options, so patients have faster, easier recoveries.
Dr. Royalty compares what he does to someone conducting an orchestra,
making sure the right resources, the right players, the right notes and the
right sounds come together, all for the benefit of his patients. That's the
positively pitch-perfect care you deserve.

Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com.


Positively


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0Indepenent member of the medi staff I


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7AL OURPODUCT AREAMERIAN ADE!Wedo otshi*t*Chna


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Always know where the life jackets are


We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
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--------- -
-


A


16 A


A


AL


A2 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











STATE & LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Benefit sale today
for hospitalized child
There is a bake sale/yard
sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, May 19, at Exit Re-
alty in Crystal River to help
offset expenses incurred by
the family of Tiana Corcoran,
a local child being treated at
All Childrens Hospital, suf-
fering from seizures.
Budget workshop
slated for Monday
The Crystal River City
Council will have a budget
workshop at 6 p.m. Mon-
day, May 20, at City Hall on
U.S. 19.
Council members will re-
view department budgets
and updates on revenues
and expenditures.
SOWW committee
to meet Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save
Our Waters Week Commit-
tee will meet at 10 a.m.
Monday, May 20, in Room
219, Lecanto Government
Center, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, off County Road 491.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to plan and coordi-
nate activities for Citrus
County's 18th annual Save
Our Waters Week, Sept. 20
through 28. All interested
organizations and individuals
are welcome to attend and
encouraged to participate.
For more information, call
Lace Blue-McLean at 352-
201-0149.
Democrats to host
Spivey on May 28
Helen Spivey will speak at
the Crystal River Democratic
Club meeting at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, May 28, at Oysters
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Spivey will speak about
manatees, her days in the
state Legislature and restoring
King's Bay. She has received
many prestigious honors for
her conservation contribu-
tions and was the recipient
of the Regional Directors
Conservation Award from
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service Southeast Region.
The Crystal River Demo-
cratic Club meets the fourth
Tuesday each month and
welcomes all Democrats.
For information, call 352-
795-5384.
Veterans case
manager available
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Services Department
has announced a case
manager will be available
during the week to assist
veterans applying for benefits
and to provide information
for other veterans' benefits.
First Wednesday
monthly Lakes Regional
Library, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday
monthly Homosassa Li-
brary, 4100 S. Grandmarch
Ave., Homosassa
Third Wednesday
monthly Coastal Re-
gional Library, 8619 W.
Crystal St., Crystal River.
Hours are 10a.m. to 2
p.m. To make an appoint-
ment, call 352-527-5915.

Lealman
Men rescue disabled
veteran from pond
Two Good Samaritans are
being praised after authorities
said they rescued a disabled
veteran whose wheelchair
rolled into a pond.
Lealman Police said 79-
year-old Robert Lunay was
sitting in his wheelchair over-
looking a pond Friday night
when the chair slipped and
he fell into the water. Lunay
is a double amputee.
Robert Fields and Nor-


man Steers happened to be
nearby and heard Lunay
calling for help. They
jumped into the water and
pulled him to shore.
Lunay was not injured.
-From staff and wire reports


l iF .


4
2~'~
A


Ir'i'


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Bob Krokker, founder and president of the nonprofit Blind Americans in Hernando, works on handmade cypress wood furniture. Currently,
they are making Adirondack and deck chairs.





Seats with soul

For BlindAmericans, building furniture means building character


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HERNANDO
ob Krokker keeps on ticking.
The founder and president of the
nonprofit Blind Americans has
gone through his share of trials and set-
backs, including the death of his wife Eve-
lyn in 2010, an accident that landed him in
rehab for seven months shortly after that
and the organization being dropped from
United Way funding around the same
time.
His dream of a cabinet shop run by the
sight-impaired has been squashed the
state of Florida won't allow blind people
to operate power tools like saws. But
Krokker continues to find ways that he
and other blind people can put their skills
to work making a living.
Currently, the people at Blind Ameri-
cans, located at 6055 N. Carl G. Rose High-
way, Hernando (State Road 200), are
making Adirondack and deck chairs avail-
able to the public for $65 each.
"Everything we do here now is without


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Melissa Balkcom, left, Murphey Balkcom, second left, Tom
Demchak, second right, and Pam Padgett, right, measure the
next piece of siding to put up on a Habitat for Humanity home.
The Citrus County Gator Club celebrated International Gator
Day by volunteering members' time to help work on the house.


Gators help charity


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA Gators
roamed among construc-
tion workers at a Ho-
mosassa home Saturday
Instead of worrying about
becoming dinner, the builders
put the gators to work.
The Citrus County Gator
Club and Habitat for Hu-
manity joined forces to take
a chomp out of the finishing
touches of the homebuild-
ing process. The club cele-
brated International Gator
Day by swinging hammers
to nail up siding.
"We want to give back to
our local community by vol-
unteering," said Melissa
Balkcom, the club's vice
president of athletics. "We
also want the community
to know we are here and
active."


Habitat for Humanity
partners with qualified in-
dividuals and families,
mentoring them, guiding
them, counseling them, en-
couraging them and teach-
ing them to succeed while
they build their own per-
manent home.
Citrus County Gator Club
is a nonprofit organization
under the umbrella of the
University of Florida that
enhances relationships be-
tween its alumni, students
and friends while teaching,
researching and being of
service. It hosts fundraisers
throughout the year to sup-
port scholarships for Citrus
County students.
For more information
about the club, call 352-503-
4263, visit
www.ccgators.com or
search Facebook for "Cit-
rus County Gator Club."


\- \ ...



C -

These chairs are made of cypress by the
Blind Americans organization. For details,
call Blind Americans at 352-637-1739.
the use of heavy equipment," Krokker
said early one morning as he sanded a
chair in the Blind Americans workshop.
"We have a company that cuts everything
for us."
Krokker lost his sight to diabetes and
glaucoma when he was 42.
He and others assemble the chairs with
screws and wood glue. Each chair is
slightly different from the others, each
with a personality given to it by its maker


"They're all made from cypress no
bugs will bother them," Krokker said.
"We're also going to be doing swings and
loveseats, end tables, out of the same ma-
terial. It's easy for us to work with."
Krokker said he wants other blind and
visually impaired people to come and join
him, learn a trade and help make furni-
ture and other wood products.
"We're also making smaller things to sell
on the Internet," said Mike Chapdelaine,
one of the people who comes to the Blind
Americans center to work; he has limited
sight. "We're looking for people not just
with visual disabilities, but with other
types of disabilities as well people who
want to work."
"They can even do this at home,"
Krokker said. "We're having a hard time
getting people out here, and I don't know
why"
For information about Blind Americans
or to learn how to purchase handmade wood
items and furniture, call 352-637-1739.
Contact Chronicle reporterNancyKennedy
at 352-564-2927 or nkennedy@chronicle
online, com.


Take control of mosquito


problem this summer


JOEL JACOBSON
Special to the Chronicle
With the onset of sum-
mer and the rainy season,
it's once again time to look
around your property for
places where mosquitoes
like to reproduce.
One essential for all
mosquito breeding is
standing water. The
water need only be calm,
and preferably stagnant.
Water in flower pots,
buckets, kids' toys and
even storm gutters can
create an ongoing supply
of hungry mosquitoes as
long as it remains wet.
Sagging tarps filled with
leaf litter, low areas, even
crumpled plastic bags
can hold enough water to
start a cycle of life which
could lead to illness and


even death.
Mosquitoes in Citrus
County have the poten-
tial to spread dengue
fever, yellow fever,
malaria, encephalitis and
dog heartworm. So even
if you can avoid the bite
of one of these hungry
critters, your family dog
may not fare so well.
There are inoculations
and monthly medications
available to lessen the
likelihood of disease
transmission; however,
we must remain on guard
and regularly inoculate
our pets and livestock.
Empty all containers
holding water. If water is
intentionally kept in a
dog bowl or birdbath,
flush it out at least every
three days.
June 23 kicks off Na-
State BRIEFS=


Deputies: 86-year-old
mom shoots, kills son
LAKELAND Authorities say an 86-
year-old mother has confessed to fatally
shooting her son in self-defense.
Polk County sheriff's officials said Nancy
Pennypacker ran outside of her home,
screaming for help Friday night. She told a
deputy her 64-year-old son had been drink-
ing and hit her in the face when the fight es-
calated into gunfire. William Pennypacker
was found dead inside the home.
Authorities say Nancy Pennypacker was
shot once. The bullet traveled through her
finger and into her shoulder. She is hospital-
ized in stable condition. Criminal charges
are not expected.


tional Mosquito Aware-
ness Week. From 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Wednesday,
June 26, Citrus County
Mosquito Control will
host an open house for
those who would like to
see and learn more about
district operations. The
public is encouraged to
stop by and visit with dis-
trict technicians. They
are all trained and certi-
fied in the identification
and control of mosqui-
toes and can help resi-
dents solve many
mosquito-related prob-
lems.
Joel Jacobson is direc-
tor of the Citrus County
Mosquito Control Dis-
trict. He can be reached
at 352-527-7478. The dis-
trict's website is www
citrusmosquito. org.


Allen West joins Fox News
as political contributor
WEST PALM BEACH Republican tea
party favorite and former U.S. Congressman
Allen West is joining Fox News as a political
contributor.
The network announced in a statement
this week that West's congressional and mil-
itary experience along with his fearless ap-
proach to voicing key issues will provide
valuable insight.
The former Palm Beach area congress-
man narrowly lost his race for a second
term to Patrick Murphy last November. West
has said he has no interest in running
against Murphy again in 2014.
-From wire reports


pfi






A4 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday The possibility of a nice fi-
nancial surplus for you and those you
love during the year ahead looks un-
usually good. Your gains will not come
from investments alone.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Try not to
come on too strong with someone who
has less money than you. If you do,
you might feel obligated to pick up the
tab for a lavish outing.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) The
probabilities for fulfilling your expecta-
tions look good. However, this may be
due to the efforts of another rather than
yours. Don't take undeserved credit.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Nor-
mally, you're pretty good at keeping se-
crets, but not so today. You aren't likely
to intentionally betray a confidence, but
you could easily do so inadvertently.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -An important
business matter might not live up to ex-
pectations. Don't throw only light jabs
when a knockout punch is required.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You're not
likely to have much trouble accurately
assessing the day's developments.
Problems could enter the picture
through the nature of your response.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It's best
not to listen to the counsel of someone
unfamiliar with your affairs. Even if his
or her advice sounds good, it's coming
from a place of weakness.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A firm
you've been doing business with for a
while might offer you a deal you could
better elsewhere. Don't feel obligated.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) It's
going to be obvious to others, if not to
you, that you're in a very strong bar-
gaining position. Remember, it's not up
to you to make concessions; it's up to
the other guy.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Guard
against tendencies to take strong posi-
tions on issues about which you're not
fully informed.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be ex-
tremely careful to think before you act.
This might be one of those days when
you could create complications despite
your good intentions.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You are
not going to be able to placate every-
one in a group involvement. In fact,
you may end up pleasing no one.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Although
your ability to handle most worldly con-
cerns is unusually good, you may not
do so well when it comes to more aes-
thetic matters.


ENTERTAINMENT


Paul McCartney
kicks off tour in US
ORLANDO Paul McCart-
ney kicked off the North Ameri-
can leg of his "Out There" tour
Saturday in Orlando.
The massive production,
which requires 31 trucks worth
of equipment, includes lasers,
huge pyrotechnics, and state-of-
the-art video displays, according
to the website of the former Bea-
ties star.
McCartney performed the
show to a sold-out crowd of
55,000 people in Brazil earlier
this month, performing "Band on
the Run," "Hey Jude," "Yester-
day" and "Let It Be."
He perform again at Orlando's
Amway Center on Sunday night.
The Orlando Sentinel reports it is
McCartney's only performance
in Florida.
At one point during the show,
McCartney is raised 20 feet
above the stage on a special
riser as he performs "Blackbird"
and "Here Today" acoustically,
according to his website.

Cleveland lands
Hollywood film shoot
CLEVELAND Cleveland
has landed another Hollywood
film shoot, and it could mean de-
lays for motorists.
The city warned drivers to be
aware of staggered street clos-
ings beginning Saturday through
June 18 to accommodate filming
for the new Captain America
film.
Most of the affected streets
are located near the downtown
Cleveland area. A primary clo-
sure in early June will involve the
West Shoreway used by in-
bound commuters.
The city said the production
company will pay for extra police
and traffic controllers to direct
motorists around street closings.


Associated Press
British musician Paul McCartney performs Nov. 21, 2010,
during his "Up And Coming Tour" at the Morumbi Stadium in
Sao Paulo, Brazil. McCartney kicked off the North American
leg of his "Out There" tour Saturday in Orlando.


"Captain America: The Winter
Soldier" stars Chris Evans,
Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L.
Jackson and Robert Redford.
The film shoot also includes
Los Angeles and Washington,
D.C.

Spoleto season
to unfold in SC
CHARLESTON, S.C. -The
Spoleto Festival USA this sea-
son will be the largest ever, of-
fering 160 performances by 45
artists and ensembles.
The internationally known arts
festival founded in Charleston by
the composer Gian Carlo
Menotti begins Friday and runs
through June 9.
Some of the performances will
be staged at a venue that is new
to Spoleto, the College of
Charleston's TD Arena.
Events vary from a perform-
ance of Shakespeare's "A Mid-
summer Night's Dream" by Tom
Morris and the Handspring Pup-
pet Company to a production of
"Oedipus" by the Nottingham
Theatre.


Then there is "The Intergalac-
tic Nemesis," which the festival
describes as a live-action
graphic novel.
Original comic book drawings
are projected on a two-story
screen while actors voice
parts to accompanying sound
effects.
Model A museum
opens in Michigan
HICKORY CORNERS, Mich.
- The Model A Ford Museum
opened Saturday in southwest-
ern Michigan.
Fashioned after a Ford dealer-
ship from 1928, the 12,000-
square-foot museum sits on the
Gilmore Car Museum campus in
Hickory Corners, about 115
miles west of Detroit.
The new facility is the world's
largest public museum dedi-
cated to the Model A, according
to marketing director Jay Follis.
The Model A was built in the
late 1920s and early 1930s fol-
lowing the wild success of Ford's
ModelT.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 19, the
139th day of 2013. There are 226
days left in the year.
Today's Highlights in History:
On May 19, 1943, in his second
wartime address to the U.S. Con-
gress, British Prime Minister Win-
ston Churchill pledged his country's
full support in the fight against
Japan. That same day, top U.S. and
British officials meeting in Washing-
ton reached agreement on May 1,
1944, as the date for the D-Day in-
vasion of France (the operation
ended up being launched June 6).
On this date:
In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the sec-
ond wife of England's King Henry
VIII, was beheaded after being con-
victed of adultery.
In 1909, the Ballets Russes
(Russian Ballet) debuted in Paris.
In 1962, actress Marilyn Monroe
sang "Happy Birthday to You" to
President John F. Kennedy during a
Democratic fundraiser at New
York's Madison Square Garden.
Ten years ago: WorldCom Inc.
agreed to pay investors $500 mil-
lion to settle civil fraud charges.
Five years ago: Chinese stood
still and sirens wailed to mourn
nearly 70,000 earthquake victims.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama and other G-8 leaders held
economic talks at Camp David,
where they declared that their gov-
ernments needed to both spark
growth and cut debt.
Today's Birthdays: PBS news-
caster Jim Lehrer is 79. TV person-
ality David Hartman is 78. Actor
James Fox is 74. Actress Nancy
Kwan is 74. Actor Peter Mayhew is
69. Rock singer-composer Pete
Townshend (The Who) is 68. Rock
singer-musician Dusty Hill (ZZ Top)
is 64. Singer-actress Grace Jones
is 61. Actor Steven Ford is 57. Actor
Drew Fuller is 33.
Thought for Today: "We are torn
between nostalgia for the familiar and
an urge for the foreign and strange.
As often as not, we are homesick
most for the places we have never
known." Carson McCullers, Ameri-
can author (1917-1967).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR L -"HI LO PR | HI L
0.00 | NA NA NA J92 61


94 68 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK exclusive daily
forecast by: .
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 66
SPartly cloudy; 30% chance of PM
t-storms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 67
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of PM t-storms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 66
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of PM t-storms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 91/64
Record 95/52
Normal 90/62
Mean temp. 78
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.50 in.
Total for the year 5.80 in.
Normal for the year 13.71 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 69
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, oak
Today's count: 4.0/12
Monday's count: 3.5
Tuesday's count: 2.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/19 SUNDAY 1:17 7:28 1:40 7:51
5/20 MONDAY 1:59 8:11 2:23 8:35
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
0 ( e ) SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:17P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:36 A.M.
0 j 4 MOONRISE TODAY...........................2:47P.M.
MAY 25 MAY 31 JUNE 8 JUNE 16 MOONSET TODAY............................2:31 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:42 a/9:00 a 1:47 p/9:55 p
Crystal River** 12:08 p/6:22 a ---/7:17 p
Withlacoochee* 9:55 a/4:10 a 10:19 p/5:05 p
Homosassa*** 12:57 p/7:59 a /8:54 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
2:11 a/10:05 a 2:37 p/11:03 p
12:32 a/7:27 a 12:58 p/8:25 p
10:45 a/5:15 a 11:35 p/6:13 p
1:21 a/9:04 a 1:47 p/10:02 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
85 70
85 75
90 71
89 65
88 71
86 69
86 78
88 67
86 73


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK
South winds around 5 knots. Seas Gulf water
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be temperature
smooth. Chance of thunderstorms
today. 81 0


Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.75 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.86 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.49 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.46 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION
- ow


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 72 42 sh 72 56
Albuquerque 78 54 s 82 51
Asheville 67 59 1.07 ts 77 56
Atlanta 81 63 .49 ts 78 65
Atlantic City 66 56 ts 65 60
Austin 95 71 pc 92 72
Baltimore 67 59 .02 ts 73 68
Billings 59 50 .46 sh 58 48
Birmingham 83 69 1.52 pc 86 66
Boise 69 45 ts 69 42
Boston 67 51 sh 65 55
Buffalo 74 51 c 79 61
Burlington, VT 74 41 sh 73 59
Charleston, SC 84 67 ts 83 68
Charleston, WV 83 62 ts 82 65
Charlotte 74 66 .02 ts 80 64
Chicago 80 56 pc 85 70
Cincinnati 78 63 .63 pc 83 65
Cleveland 78 57 pc 76 62
Columbia, SC 82 67 .35 ts 83 66
Columbus, OH 81 63 pc 84 65
Concord, N.H. 74 37 sh 70 50
Dallas 92 73 pc 90 72
Denver 77 51 ts 68 43
Des Moines 85 63 ts 84 66
Detroit 81 56 pc 79 62
El Paso 90 72 s 89 69
Evansville, IN 78 66 pc 85 68
Harrisburg 69 60 .01 ts 70 61
Hartford 71 45 sh 74 55
Houston 91 75 pc 90 73
Indianapolis 78 63 .03 pc 84 67
Jackson 87 70 pc 90 69
Las Vegas 89 65 s 89 66
Little Rock 88 70 pc 89 68
Los Angeles 72 60 s 73 60
Louisville 80 67 .01 pc 86 67
Memphis 85 67 pc 91 72
Milwaukee 67 48 pc 70 56
Minneapolis 81 55 1.47 ts 82 64
Mobile 84 72 pc 81 70
Montgomery 84 71 pc 90 66
Nashville 85 65 pc 86 67
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:.O P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 86 74 pc 88 72
New York City 65 56 .01 sh 67 60
Norfolk 74 60 1.67 ts 79 65
Oklahoma City 89 70 ts 90 69
Omaha 87 62 ts 83 61
Palm Springs 94 65 s 97 69
Philadelphia 70 59 ts 72 63
Phoenix 94 75 s 97 72
Pittsburgh 81 56 ts 77 60
Portland, ME 58 41 sh 59 51
Portland, Ore 58 52 .06 s 66 45
Providence, R.I. 73 45 sh 70 54
Raleigh 78 62 .14 ts 79 65
Rapid City 75 52 ts 62 47
Reno 75 43 s 70 46
Rochester, NY 71 43 sh 78 61
Sacramento 83 50 s 87 57
St. Louis 82 63 pc 91 72
St. Ste. Marie 67 43 pc 71 54
Salt Lake City 65 50 .27 sh 58 44
San Antonio 96 72 pc 94 73
San Diego 70 62 s 70 61
San Francisco 67 52 s 73 53
Savannah 89 64 ts 84 69
Seattle 62 52 s 65 47
Spokane 59 47 sh 68 45
Syracuse 72 41 sh 76 58
Topeka 85 61 ts 86 63
Washington 66 61 .06 ts 73 65
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 104 Vernon, Texas LOW 25 Truckee,
Calif.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/77/s
Amsterdam 75/46/sh
Athens 87/67/pc
Beijing 86/67/s
Berlin 82/56/s
Bermuda 70/63/c
Cairo 103/65/s
Calgary 59/46As
Havana 87/73As
Hong Kong 82/75As
Jerusalem 85/64/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


65/54/sh
60/44/r
64/45/sh
81/57/ts
74/59/pc
74/49/pc
67/47/sh
74/65/c
69/59/s
62/47/s
70/59/c
73/59/pc
81/59/s


LEGAL NOTICES


? X0 I 1V M110"


Fictitious Name Notices.............D8

Meeting Notices...........................D8

Miscellaneous Notices................D8

Self Storage Notices....................D8


S C ITRUS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LIVESTOCK
Continued from Page Al

entitle it to agricultural
classification for taxation
purposes. They are not
one and the same.
On the other hand, the
owner of a property with
an agricultural exception
for tax purposes would not
be constrained by the
Land Development Code's
(LDC) maximum numbers
of animals per acre. So it's
apparent where confusion
could arise.
Tax wasn't the issue for
the Hearolds. They just
wanted to keep their
horses at their residence
and thought they could,
until they tried to build the
barn and discovered their
home was in a medium-
density residential dis-
trict. To proceed, they had
to apply for a conditional-
use permit, which was
granted after a short
hearing.
The conditional-use per-
mit in zoning shares one
characteristic with an
agricultural exception in
taxing: It hangs on the
owner, not the property.
When the property is sold,
the new owner has to get a
new conditional-use per-
mit if one is wanted.
Such a permit takes care
of many types of excep-
tions, but it can be granted
specifically for numbers of
livestock animals if the ap-
plicant meets criteria. In
the Hearolds' case, their
home is set on nearly five
acres in an area that ap-
pears rural in character.
Most of their neighbors
also have livestock. No one
objected.
With the amount of land
they own, the Hearolds'
conditional-use permit re-
quested they be able to
keep four horses, one goat,
10 poultry and five rabbits.
"As for animals, right
now we have two horses
that we brought down with
us from Massachusetts,"
Larry Hearold told the
PDC. "We do not have
chickens, goats or anything
else at this time."
The couple may never
own more than two horses,


ON THE NET
* Land Development Code:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/plandev/landdev/Idc/ldc.htm
* Call the Citrus County Land Development Division
at 352-527-5239.


but they could own up to
that full complement of
permitted animals based
on their acreage.
The livestock schedule
in Section 3730 of the LDC
also has given rise to some
confusion, as it has some-
times been interpreted to
mean that all the numbers
of all the named animals
could be kept on one acre.
The LDC, which was
rewritten last year, actu-
ally did not change the lan-
guage in Section 3730, but
it was found necessary to
include it in a recently
passed "glitch bill" to clar-
ify that one head of cattle
requires one acre of land
in a residential area, and
that accounts for one of the
acres in a parcel.
"It is cumulative as op-
posed to concurrent in re-
gards to acreage," Parsons
said. "Planning (depart-
ment) gets calls to ask:
'How many animals can I
have on my property?"'
The schedule of the
numbers per acre has
been set out on a rational
basis.
"It tells you how many
animals can be on a cer-
tain property per acre for
the safety, protection and
welfare of the public," Par-
sons said. "These regula-
tions are to protect other

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residents."
A few months ago, Par-
sons said, residents in one
area complained about a
great deal of loud bird
noise.
"They swore they heard
birds all night and couldn't
sleep all night."
Code Compliance Divi-
sion investigated and
found a resident had about
40 parrots in the backyard,
Parsons said, showing that
overpopulation creates a
nuisance for neighbors
trying to enjoy the use of
their land.
Potential new residents
who want to keep livestock
and established residents
who would like to start
keeping farm-type animals
should do their homework
first.
"Our Planning and De-
velopment Department is
always a good resource to
start," Parsons said.
"When buying property, al-
ways find out what the
land use designation


7-7 f.,


r ii
..... 7 "



MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Irene Hearold exercises her horse Faye. Irene and her husband Larry retired to Lecanto,
where, like many retired couples, they would like to raise animals.


means to make an edu-
cated decision about the
purchase. If anyone has
any question on what the
zoning means on their
property before buying it,
call Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development
Land Development Divi-
sion at 352-527-5239. They
are available to explain
what the use is and answer
specific questions."


Regardless of keeping
livestock, it is good advice
to talk to the Realtor and
the county to find out if a
variance or a conditional
use process must be com-
pleted before getting to
use the property as
wished.
"That would save them a
lot of time and heartache if
they know ahead of time to
make a knowledgeable de-


cision on it," Parsons said.
For residents who don't
want to keep livestock but
wonder how many dogs
and cats they can be al-
lowed, it's as many as rea-
sonably can be cared for -
but they all must be li-
censed and vaccinated.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 A5





A6 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


PRICES
Continued from PageAl

generally bills for an item
or service.
The data show what
Medicare typically reim-
burses a hospital for the
procedure as well as state
and national averages for
prices and reimburse-
ments. The Medicare re-
imbursement includes
patients' co-payments. It
also lists the number of
discharges by hospital for
each procedure.
Locally, Citrus Memorial
charged $13,457 for chest
pain and was reimbursed
$3,004 by Medicare. In the
same category, Seven
Rivers charged $12,703
and was reimbursed
$3,074.
The figures are $32,709
and $2,928 for Oak Hill
Hospital in Hernando
County.
For Munroe Regional
Medical Center in Marion
County, the figures are
$16,451 and $2,938.
Statewide charges for
"chest pain" averaged
$21,396, with Medicare re-
imbursements averaging
$3,578.
For bronchitis, Citrus
Memorial figures are
$18,651/$4,482. For Seven
Rivers the figures are
$16,259/$4,767. For disor-
ders of the pancreas ex-
cept malignancy, there is a
wider price gap. The fig-
ures for Citrus Memorial
are $27,618 and $5,156.
Seven Rivers is $38,088
and $5,525.
Seven Rivers responded
that the reimbursement
environment for hospitals
is very complex and, un-
fortunately, looking solely












Inv rn s ,l1.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


at charge data does not
provide a full picture.
"CMS publishing the
data reinforces something
that everyone who has had
an experience with the
health care system already
knows hospital bills
often do not appear to
make common sense," said
Dorothy T Pernu, market-
ing and communications
director of Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center.
"It is important to under-
stand that hospitals only
collect a small percentage
of our charges, or 'list
prices.'"'
Medicare requires hos-
pitals give it one level of
discount off "list price,"
Medicaid another and pri-
vate insurers negotiate for
still others, she explained.
And then much of what is
not collected is the result
of providing charity care
or other uncompensated
care this is millions of
dollars per year for most
hospitals. For 2011, Seven
Rivers provided $17.2 mil-
lion in uncompensated
care.
Citrus Memorial Health
System spokeswoman
Katie Mehl said the data
show what hospitals charge
rarely reflects what they
are actually paid by govern-
ment or private insurers. In
fact, she said Medicare and
Medicaid can actually pay
less than the cost of caring
for patients.
The two top groups of in-
patient procedures at Cit-
rus normal newborn
and vaginal delivery with-
out complicating diagnoses
- are not part of the data.
Newborn deliveries are
also among the top proce-
dures at Seven Rivers.
Mehl cited research
from the American Hospi-


tal Association (AHA) that
shows, on the average for
2011, hospitals received
only 91 cents for every dol-
lar spent caring for
Medicare patients. In its
news release responding
to data, AHA supports fed-


eral legislation requiring
states to provide hospital
charge and insurer
information.
"The complex and be-
wildering interplay among
'charges,' 'rates,' 'bills' and
'payments' across dozens


of payers, public and pri-
vate, does not serve any
stakeholder well, includ-
ing hospitals," AHA Presi-
dent and CEO Rich
Umbdenstock said in a
statement. "This is espe-
cially true when what is


most important to a pa-
tient is knowing what his
or her financial responsi-
bility will be."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. com.


BREASTAUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OFFICIALS
Continued from Page Al

enforcement and couldn't
pass up the chance.
But none said their job
circumstances are related
to Thorpe's retirement or
Commissioner Scott
Adams, who took office in
November and is often
publicly critical of the top
administrative staff.
"If this was the same
commission as last year, I
would have gone for the
job," Ubinas said.
Thorpe on Tuesday an-
nounced his retirement
after four years as admin-
istrator. Thorpe has
agreed to stay on until a
new administrator is


hired, county commission
Chairman Joe Meek said
Friday
Thorpe said he had
planned to retire in No-
vember, when he turns 62.
He said he decided to
move up the retirement
date, but said it isn't re-
lated to Adams' criticism
of him or his staff.
Wesch, whose tenure in
county government in-
cludes time as assistant
county attorney and
county administrator, said
he isn't looking for a new
job. He said Lee County
contacted him about its va-
cant county attorney posi-
tion and he applied, given
the career opportunity
"I was sought. I'm not
seeking," Wesch said. "If
I'm successful, I look for-


ward to those chal- step up for Wesch,
lenges; and if not, I who oversees one
look forward to my assistant attorney
continued role as and a legal admin-
Citrus County istrative assistant.
attorney" The Lee County at-
Adams has tried torney's office in-
unsuccessfully to cludes 12 assistant
fire both Wesch Richard attorneys, accord-
and Thorpe, re- Wesch ing to the office's
ceivingnocommis- Citrus County website.
sion support on attorney has Wesch said he
either attempt. applied for a will know by June
Asked if his agree- job as attorney 3 whether he will
ing to apply in Lee for Lee County. be interviewed for
County was related the job.
to Adams' actions, Wesch Frink, who serves a dual
said: role as assistant county ad-
ministrator and public
"Absolutely not. This is a works director, applied for
wonderful opportunity for water district's position of
my career and my family. director of operations,
I'm honored to be thought maintenance and con-
of. struction division and a
It would be a significant lesser position, chiefofop-


rations and land manage-
ment bureau.
"It's their version of a
public works director,"
Frink said.
Like Wesch and Ubinas,
Frink submitted his appli-
cation before Thorpe's re-
tirement announcement.
He said the announce-
ment caught him off guard.
"It adds a whole new
twist," Frink said. "My
heart's in Citrus County I
don't want to be a part of
leaving it in the lurch."
Frink said he hasn't yet
been called for an
interview.
Ubinas has interviewed
for the sheriff's office po-
sition and also taken a pre-
employment drug test.
However, both Ubinas and
sheriff's office spokes-


woman Heather Yates said
there is no job offer on the
table.
Meek, the commission
chairman, said the county
will thrive regardless of
which direction the three
employees take.
"For those individuals
who have an opportunity
to advance their careers,
we as a county and as a
board should be happy for
them and support them in
their efforts," he said. "If
they choose to stay here
because that door does not
open for them, we should
be more than supportive
and happy they're stay-
ing."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


ADMINISTRATORS
Continued from Page Al

a job as a municipal bond consultant in St.
Petersburg.
Chris Chinault, 1987-1991. Chinault
held a similar job in Maryland before ar-
riving in Citrus County He quickly drew
the ire of Inverness officials for his sug-
gestion of moving county offices from the
county seat to Lecanto, an idea he later
dropped. Chinault also was instrumental
in recommending a site for the current
county jail. He lost his job in December
1991 when, on a 3-2 vote, commissioners
called for his resignation. Chinault has
served the past 13 years as city manager
of Indialantic in Brevard County.
Tony Shoemaker, 1992-1996. Shoe-
maker's background included city man-
ager stints in Clearwater and Tarpon
Springs. His tenure ended one day in De-
cember 1996 when then-Commissioner
Jim Fowler walked into his office and de-
manded his resignation. Sensing lack of
support from the full board, Shoemaker
did just that. He left Citrus for an admin-
istrative job in Hillsborough County and


has had several administrative positions
in Florida cities since then.
Gary Kuhl, 1997 to 2000. Kuhl was
one of Citrus County's most respected ad-
ministrators. A former executive director
of the Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District, he came to Citrus County
as the public works director After Shoe-
maker's resignation, the board appointed
Kuhl as county administrator.
One personnel move of note: Kuhl
named Richard Wesch as assistant
county administrator; Wesch had been
assistant county attorney Kuhl resigned
in 2000 to head up the water resources
team in Hillsborough County working,
coincidentally, under Shoemaker, who
was an assistant Hillsborough adminis-
trator at the time.
Another coincidence: Brad Thorpe
was chairman of the county commission
when Kuhl resigned.
Richard Wesch, 2001 to 2006. Wesch,
who grew up in Citrus County, was the
first county administrator with a law de-
gree. He hired former commissioner
Thorpe as director of community serv-
ices. He fired the animal control director,
who shot a feral cat stuck high atop a
tree. While administrator, the county


completed a $7 million addition to the
courthouse.
Commissioners, on a 3-2 vote, fired
Wesch in March 2006. Two months later,
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy hired Wesch for a
newly created office of general counsel.
Wesch stayed there until returning to the
courthouse in 2010 as county attorney
June Fisher, October 2006 to Febru-
ary 2008. Right or wrong, Fisher is best
known for the very public firing of then-
assistant county administrator Tom Dick,
a 25-year-plus county employee. Dick re-
ceived a $195,000 settlement in a federal
lawsuit. Fisher was a former planning di-
rector in Highlands County In February
2008, she took a $27,000 pay cut to return
to Highlands County as its director of
community services.
Anthony Schembri, April 2008 to
March 2009. Schembri brought a rock-star-
like quality to the post. A former secretary
of the Department of Juvenile Justice,
Schembri was hired at the urging of Com-
missioner Dennis Damato, who thought
Schembri's no-nonsense style would be a
fresh approach after Fisher's tenure.
His effect was immediate, forcing out
several top- and mid-level administra-
tors. Schembri also publicly clashed with


Clerk of Courts Betty Strifler, accusing
her of altering an audit to make one of his
employees look bad. He saved his job by
a thread by apologizing to Strifler during
a county commission meeting in January
2009.
Three months later, Schembri was out
of a job after bringing a holstered hand-
gun to his homeowners' association
meeting in someone's garage. His forced
resignation cost taxpayers $80,400 in sev-
erance pay
Brad Thorpe, April 2009 to present.
Thorpe holds one significant distinction:
He is the only administrator to serve on
the county commission (1992 to 2000).
County commissioners praise Thorpe for
streamlining government during difficult
economic years. He also serves as direc-
tor of Port Citrus, a port envisioned for a
canal in the northwest corner of the
county, which is in the study stage.
Thorpe, who has lived in Citrus County
for more than 30 years, announced his re-
tirement last week. Thorpe is expected to
stay onboard until his replacement is
hired.
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 A7





A8 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


Joyce
Becker, 69
HOMOSASSA
Joyce Becker, age 69, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away May 14 at Oak Hill
Hospital Local arrangements
are under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be in Michigan.
Brown Fumeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Fla.




Gladys
Avsec, 73
INGLIS
Gladys Ruth Avsec, re-
tired first sergeant, U.S.
Army, and served in Navy
for one year, passed away
peacefully May 15, 2013.
She was born Jan. 19, 1940.
Gladys was preceded in
death by her father Nelson
Sites; mother Myrtle Lee
Sites; and baby son Ken-
tray Gilbert. She is sur-
vived by her husband of 50
years Alton L. Gilbert of
Inglis; her sons Nelson M.
Gilbert, Chandler, Texas,
Scott L. Gilbert, Inglis, and
Brent J. Gilbert of Hudson,
N.Y; her granddaughter
Chelsea Rae Gilbert and
Christopher Mark Gilbert
of Palestine; and her step-
grandson Travis John
Smith, Oceanside, Calif.
Memorial service will be
held at a later date. Expres-
sions of sympathy can be
made online to robertsof
dunnellon.com. Arrange-
ments are under the careful
direction of Roberts Fu-
neral Home of Dunnellon.

Paul
LaMesa, 83
OCALA
Paul LaMesa, age 83, of
Ocala, Fla., passed away
May 17 at Ocala Regional
Medical Center. Local
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be Connecticut
Brown Fmueral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Fla.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Dennis
Millard, 66
INVERNESS
Dennis F Millard, age
66, Inverness, died May 10,
2013, at VA hospital in
Gainesville. Dennis was
born on Oct. 4, 1946, in Jer-
sey City, N.J., to the late
James and Anne (Ludlow)
Millard. He served our
country proudly in the
United States Marine
Corps and was a member
of the VFW Post 4337 of In-
verness. Dennis was em-
ployed as a photo
retoucher for magazines
and was an artist. He was
an avid fisherman.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his daughter and
her husband Colleen L.
Millard and Pete Molina
and their children Jailyn,
Iris and Brooklyn. A trib-
ute to Dennis will be held
on Sunday, May 26, 2013, at
3 p.m. at the Chas E. Davis
Funeral Home with mili-
tary honors. The family
will receive friends in vis-
itation from 2 p.m. until
the hour of service. The
family requests memorial
donations in Dennis' mem-
ory to Disabled American
Veterans, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, FL 34453
in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guestbook at
www.chronicleonline.com.
David
Carrasquillo, 64
OCALA
David Carrasquillo, age
64, of Ocala, Fla., passed
away May 15 at Munroe
Regional Medical Center.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be in Puerto
Rico.
Brown Fmueral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Fla.


Charles
Merchant, 90
FLORAL CITY
Charles E Merchant, 90,
of Floral City, passed away
May 17, 2013, in the Citrus
County Hospice Unit at
Citrus Memorial hospital.
chant was
born on
May 22,
1922, in
Winthrop,
Mass., to
S the late
John and
Charles Glad y s
Merchant (Doane)
Merchant and moved to
this area 35 years ago from
Miami. He retired from the
U.S. Air Force as a master
sergeant with 22 years of
service, having served our
country during World War II
and the Korean conflict.
Mr Merchant is survived
by his wife of 68 years, Marie
(Racca) Merchant; three
children, Donna Lorenzo,
Honolulu, Hawaii; Con-
stance Wright, Roanoke,
Va.; Janice Blakely, Pom-
pano Beach, Fla.; seven
grandchildren; and sev-
eral great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by his daughter, Frances
Johnson, on July 28, 2000.
The Mass of Christian
burial will be offered on
Wednesday, May 22, 2013,
at 9:30 a.m. from Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church
with Fr. James Johnson,
celebrant. Burial with mil-
itary honors will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery. The family will re-
ceive friends on Tuesday
from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Chas
E Davis Funeral Home,
where there will be a wake
vigil service offered at 6 p.m.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.
See Page A9


OBITUARIES
* For information on submitting obituaries, call 352-
563-5660 or email obits@chronicleonline.com.


Saudi Arabian woman


among 64 who scale Everest


Associated Press


KATMANDU, Nepal -
Mountaineering officials
say 64 climbers, including
a Saudi Arabian woman,
have successfully scaled
Mount Everestfrom Nepal's
side of the mountain.
Tilak Padney of Nepal's


Mountaineering Depart-
ment said 35 foreigners
accompanied by 29
Nepalese Sherpa guides
reached the 29,035-foot
peak on Saturday morn-
ing after climbing all
night from the highest
camp on South Col. All
were reported to be safe.


Among them was Raha
Moharrak, who became
the first Saudi Arabian
woman to scale the peak.
Everest can be climbed
from either Nepal or Tibet
May is the most popular
month for Everest climbs
because of favorable
weather.


NEED A REPORTER? Call 352-563-3225 and be prepared to leave a message
with your name, phone number and brief description of the story. Approval for
story must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.











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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page AS

Lawrence
Brown, 83
FLORAL CITY
Lawrence Brown, 83, of
Floral City, passed away
Wednesday
He was born to the late
Leland and Elizabeth
Brown on June 16, 1930, in
Tunkhannock, Pa. Raised
in New Jersey, he relo-
cated to Florida in 2001.
He was a retired paint-
ing contractor and avid
bowler who achieved sev-
eral 300 perfect games. Re-
cently he was the founder
and president of the cur-
rent Citrus County Chris-
tian Coalition (C4). His
dream for
this or-
ganization
was to
unite the
churches
and peo-
ple of
Florida
Lawrence (and the
Brown world) to
become truly one nation
under God. His memory
and dedication to the
Lord's work will live on
and hopefully impact oth-
ers and bring them to the
redemption, love and
mercy we have in Christ as
well as, in prayer, lift up
our voices like a trumpet
in Zion. His family will re-
member him as a very lov-
ing family man who would
give you the shirt off his
back if he did not have two
pennies to rub together.
His sense of humor and
smile will live in their
hearts for eternity.
He was preceded in
death by his parents; sister
Louise Fisher; and
brother Michael Brown.
He is survived by his
beloved wife of 65 years
Doris Brown; his brothers
Richard and Leland
Brown; his children Nancy
Anderson, Barbara Duni-
gan and Kenneth Brown;
seven grandchildren; and
16 great-grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, the
family is requesting that
donations be made out to
Doris Brown.
A memorial service will
be held at 10 a.m. at Inver-
ness Calvary Church on
Harley Avenue. Family
and friends are invited to
share brief memories dur-
ing fellowship following
the service.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. com.




Douglas
Hampton, 82
HERNANDO
Douglas Lee Hampton,
age 82, Hernando, died
May 16, 2013, at Leesburg
Regional Medical Center.
Doug was born on June 6,
1930, in
Kennett,
Mo., to the
late Lexie

Mabel
i B. and

(Lucas)
Hampton.
He served
Douglas our coun-
Hampton try in the
U.S. Air Force. Doug was
employed by City Finance
Company as a consumer fi-
nance executive for more
than 28 years. He was an
avid golfer and enjoyed
reading.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 60 years,
Wilma Hampton; two sons,
Keith (Janice) Hampton,
Richland, Wash., and Reid
Hampton, Memphis,
Tenn.; and two grandchil-
dren. He was preceded in
death by a daughter-in-law,
Alexia Stanley Hampton;
and his sister Geraldine
Bennett. A funeral tribute
to Doug will be held on
Tuesday, May 21, 2013, at
2:30 p.m. at Chas. E. Davis


OBITUARIES


Richard 'Dick'
Royer
Richard W "Dick" Royer
passed away Wednesday,
Feb. 13, after a short ill-
ness. Dick was born in
Akron in 1923 to Joseph E.
and Bernice (McGrevey)
Royer and grew up in St.
Vincent's Parish. He grad-
uated from St. Vincent
High School in 1941,
served in the United
States Navy during World
War II and was honorably
discharged in 1946 as an
aviation metalsmith first
class. He married Jacque-
line "Jackie" Nelan in 1947
and became a member of
St. Sebastian Parish. Dick
spent his career as a casu-
alty claims representative
and manager, mostly with
Underwriters Adjusting
Company, and upon retire-
ment from UAC in 1988,
Dick and Jackie moved to
Homossasa, Fla. Jackie
passed away in 1998 and
Dick married Ruth Kelley
in 2001.
Dick loved his family
dearly and will always be
lovingly remembered by
all who knew him as a
good-hearted, kind and
caring man who enjoyed a
good laugh and a dry mar-
tini. He was also an avid
golfer and accomplished
bridge player.
Aside from Jackie's
death, Dick was preceded
by his sister Rita Sear of
Akron and brother Eugene
"Pat" Royer of Pittsburgh,
Pa. He is survived by his
wife Ruth of Sarasota,
Fla.; sisters Barbara
Courtney of Doylestown,
Pa., and Jacqueline Reggie
of Akron; daughters Amy
L. Myer of Akron and Pa-
tricia (Pat) Belch of
Delaware, Ohio; sons
Richard A. (Linda) of Co-
lumbia, Mo., Jeffrey T.
(Theresa) of West Palm
Beach, Fla., and David P
(Patricia) of Fishers, Ind.;
along with nine grandchil-
dren; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Mass will take place at
St. Vincent's Catholic
Church on Saturday, May
25, at 9:30 a.m. immedi-
ately followed by burial at
St. Vincent Cemetery
The family wishes to
thank VNS Hospice Cen-
ter on Ridgewood Road,
Akron, and the staff at
Arden Courts Bath for
their excellent care in
Dick's last days. Donations
in his memory may be
made to VNS Hospice
Center, 3358 Ridgewood
Road, Akron, OH 44333 or
St. Vincent Parish 164 W
Market St., Akron, OH
44303.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. com.

Leo
Grendon, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Leo Gendron, age 86, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., passed
away May 16 at his home.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Fla.

Laura
MacNeill, 61
Laura Lynn MacNeill,
age 61, died May 17, 2013,
under Hospice of Citrus
County care. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.


Calvin
Hilton, 88
Calvin N. Hilton, age 88,
died May 15, 2013, under
the loving care of his fam-
ily and Cypress Cove Care
Center staff and Hospice
of Citrus County Calvin
was born on Oct. 24, 1924,
in Dallas, Texas, to the late
Ivey and Gladys (Willis)
Hilton. He proudly served
our coun-
try as a
U.S. Ma-
rine dur-
ing World
War II.
Calvin
was em-
ployed as
Calvin an electri-
Hilton cal con-
tractor, moving to Miami,
relocating to this area in
2004 from Greenfield, Mo.
He enjoyed spending time
with his family, was known
for the Stetson hat that he
wore and liked watching a
good Western movie. He
was an avid fisherman.
His blue eyes and smile
will be missed by all who
knew him. Calvin was ac-
tive in many church min-
istries during his life. He
was a founding member
and deacon at Cutler
Ridge (Miami) Baptist
Church, a deacon at
Sharon Baptist Church in
Greenfield, Mo., and also
at First Baptist Church of
Crystal River.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his sons Herman
D. (Barbro) Hilton, Lawtey,
Fla., and Jack D. (Peggy)
Hilton, Crystal River;
daughters Nancy (Jeffrey)
Cavalcante, Louisville, Ky,
and Carol Ann Hilton,
Crystal River; 11 grand-
children; and 15 great-
grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by wife
of 62 years, Hulette, on
Feb. 25, 2012; and by his
siblings Frank Hilton, Lor-
raine Atwell and Dolores
Miller.
A celebration of life and
remembrance will be held
on Thursday, June 20,2013,
at 11 a.m. at First Baptist
Church of Crystal River.
Inurnment will follow at a
later date privately at
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. In lieu of
flowers, the family re-
quests donations in his
memory to either Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL,
or First Baptist Church of
Crystal River Deacon's
Fund. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory is assisting the family
with arrangements.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. com.


John B. Alego
7/30/38- 4/4/13


A celebration of
John's life will be held
at The Riverhaven
Club House
11450 W. Riverhaven Dr.
Homosassa, FL
SMay 23, 2p.m-4p.m.


Wolfgang
Edler, 67
FLORAL CITY
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Wolfgang H.
Edler, age 67, of Floral
City, Florida, will be held
2:00 PM, Tuesday, May 21,
2013 at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery. He was
born July 25, 1945 in Italy,
son of the late Horst and
Luise (Gufler) Edler. He
was an
Army vet-
eran and
was a self
employed
mechanic.
He moved
to Floral
City from
Wolfgang Miami 10
Edler years ago.
Survivors include his
son, Richard Edler, daugh-
ter, Erika Edler, brother,
Reinhard Edler, 2 sisters,
Christine Weber and Eva
Matischak, granddaughter,
Leanne, and great grand-
son, Wesley Fernandez.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and
paid obituaries.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.
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563-5660 for
details and pricing
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deceased's face can
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Funeral Home. Burial will
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www chronicleonline. com.


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Victims: Marines failed to safeguard water supply


ALLEN G. BREED
Associated Press

CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.
-A simple test could have
alerted officials that the
drinking water at Camp
Lejeune was contami-
nated, long before authori-
ties determined that as
many as a million Marines
and their families were ex-
posed to a witch's brew of
cancer-causing chemicals.
But no one responsible
for the lab at the base can
recall that the procedure
- mandated by the Navy
- was ever conducted.
The U.S. Marine Corps
maintains that the carbon
chloroform extract (CCE)
test would not have uncov-
ered the carcinogens that
fouled the southeastern
North Carolina base's
water system from at least
the mid-1950s until wells
were capped in the mid-
1980s. But experts say
even this "relatively prim-
itive" test required by
Navy health directives as
early as 1963 would
have told officials that
something was terribly
wrong beneath Lejeune's
sandy soil.
A just-released study
from the federal Agency
for Toxic Substances and
Disease Registry cited a
February 1985 level for
trichloroethylene of 18,900
parts per billion in one
Lejeune drinking water
well nearly 4,000 times
today's maximum allowed
limit of 5 ppb. Given those
kinds of numbers, environ-
mental engineer Marco
Kaltofen said even a test-
ing method as inadequate
as CCE should have raised
some red flags with a
"careful analyst"
"That's knock-your-
socks-off level even
back then," said Kaltofen,
who worked on the infa-
mous Love Canal case in
upstate New York, where
drums of buried chemical
waste leaked toxins into a
local water system. "You
could have smelled it."
Biochemist Michael
Hargett agrees that CCE,
while imperfect, would
have been enough to
prompt more specific test-
ing in what is now recog-
nized as the worst


documented case of
drinking-water contamina-
tion in the nation's history
"I consider it disingenu-
ous of the Corps to say,
'Well, it wouldn't have
meant anything,"' said
Hargett, co-owner of the
private lab that tried to
sound the alarm about the
contamination in 1982.
"The levels of chlorinated
solvent that we discovered
... they would have gotten
something that said,
'Whoops. I've got a prob-
lem.' They didn't do that."
Trichloroethylene
(TCE), tetrachloroethylene
(PCE), benzene and other
toxic chemicals leached
into ground water from a
poorly maintained fuel
depot and indiscriminate
dumping on the base, as
well as from an off-base
dry cleaner.
MEm
Nearly three decades
after the first drinking-
water wells were closed,
victims are still awaiting a
final federal health assess-
ment the original 1997
report having been with-
drawn because faulty or
incomplete data. Results
of a long-delayed study on
birth defects and child-
hood cancers were only
submitted for publication
in late April.
Many former Lejeune
Marines and family mem-
bers who lived there be-
lieve the Corps still has not
come clean about the situ-
ation, and the question of
whether these tests were
conducted is emblematic
of the depth of that
mistrust.
Marine Corps officials
have repeatedly said that
federal environmental
regulations for these can-
cer-causing chemicals
were not finalized under
the Safe Drinking Water
Act until 1989 about four
years after the contami-
nated wells had been iden-
tified and taken out of
service. But victims who
have scoured decades-old
documents say the mili-
tary's own health stan-
dards should have raised
red flags long before.
In 1963, the Navy's Bu-
reau of Medicine and Sur-
gery issued "The Manual
of Naval Preventive Medi-


Toxic legacy at N.C. Marine base
Nearly 30 years after contaminated drinking-water wells at
Camp Lejeune were closed, Marines and their families are
still awaiting answers on the extent of the pollution and its
health effects. A look at significant sites in the pollution case:

NORTH CAROLINA
ABC Cleaners and
S housing area: Dumped
Jacksonville solvents
S _______


SOURCE: ESRI, AP Reporting
cine." Chapter 5 is titled
"Water Supply Ashore."
"The water supply
should be obtained from
the most desirable sources
which is feasible, and ef-
fort should be made to pre-
vent or control pollution of
the source," it reads.
At the time, the Defense
Department adopted
water quality standards set
by the U.S. Public Health
Service. To measure that
quality, the Navy manual
identified CCE "as a tech-
nically practical proce-
dure which will afford a
large measure of protec-
tion against the presence
of undetected toxic mate-
rials in finished drinking
water."
Also referred to as the
"oil and grease test," CCE
was intended to protect
against an "unwarranted
dosage of the water con-
sumer with ill-defined
chemicals," according to
the Navy manual. The CCE
standard set in 1963 was
200 ppb. In 1972, the Navy
further tightened it to no
more than 150 ppb.
In response to a request
from The Associated


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Press, Capt. Kendra Motz
said the Marines could
produce no copies of CCE
test results for Lejeune,
despite searching for
"many hours."
"Some documents that
might be relevant to your
question may no longer be
maintained by the Marine
Corps or the Department
of the Navy in accordance
with records management
policies," she wrote in an
email. "The absence of
records 50 years later does
not necessarily mean ac-
tion was not taken."
mEN
But the two men who
oversaw the base lab told
the AP they were not even
familiar with the
procedure.
'"A what?" asked Julian
Wooten, who was head of
the Lejeune environmen-
tal section during the
1970s, when asked if his
staff had ever performed
the CCE test. "I never saw
anything, unless the


(Navy's) preventive medi-
cine people were doing
some. I don't have any
knowledge of that kind of
operation or that kind of
testing being done. Not
back then."
"I have no knowledge of
it," said Danny Sharpe,
who succeeded Wooten as
section chief and was in
charge when the first
drinking water wells were
shut down in the mid-
1980s. "I don't remember
that at all."
Wooten was an ecologist,
and Sharpe's background
is in forestry and soil con-
servation. But Elizabeth
Betz, the supervisory
chemist at Lejeune from
1979 to 1995, was also at a
loss when asked about the
CCE testing.
"I do not remember any
such test being requested
nor do I remember seeing
any such test results,"
Betz, who later worked for
the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's na-
tional exposure branch at
Research Triangle Park
outside Raleigh, wrote in a
recent email.
Hargett, the former co-
owner of Grainger Labora-
tories in Raleigh, said he
never saw any evidence
that the base was testing
and treating for anything
beyond E. coli and other
bacteria.
"That was a state regula-
tion ... that they had to
maintain a sanitary water
supply," he said. "And they
did a good job at that."
Motz, the Marine
spokeswoman, told the AP
that the method called for
in the manual would not
have detected the toxins at
issue in the Camp Lejeune
case.
"The CCE method in-
cludes a drying step and a
distillation (evaporation)
step where chloroform is
completely evaporated,"
she wrote in an email.
These volatile organic
compounds, "by their
chemical nature, would
evaporate readily as well,"
she wrote.
ATSDR contacted the


EPA about the "utility" of
such testing and con-
cluded it would be of no
value in detecting TCE,
PCE, or benzene, Deputy
Director Tom Sinks wrote
in an email to members of
a community assistance
panel on Lejeune.
"It is doubtful that the
weight of their residue
would be detectable when
subjected to this method,"
Sinks wrote.
Kaltofen, a professor at
Worcester Polytechnic In-
stitute in Massachusetts,
acknowledged that CCE is
"a relatively primitive
test." But in addition to the
water's odor, Kaltofen
said, "there are some
things that a careful ana-
lyst would easily have
noticed."
Hargett agreed.
"It would have
prompted you to simply
say, 'Wow. There is some-
thing here. Let's do some
additional work,"' he told
the AP Any "reputable
chemist ... would have
raised their hands to the
person responsible and
said, 'Guys. You ought to
look at this. There's more
here."'
The Marines have said
such high readings were
merely spikes. But
Kaltofen countered that,
"You can't get that level
even once without having
a very serious problem ...
It's the worst case."
In a recent interview,
Wooten told the AP he
knew something was
wrong with the water as
early as the 1960s, when he
worked in the mainte-
nance department.
"I was usually the first
person in in the big build-
ing that we worked in," he
said. "And I'd cut the water
on and let it run, just go
and flush the commodes
and cut the water on and
let it run for several min-
utes before I'd attempt to
make coffee."
Wooten said he made re-
peated budget requests for
additional equipment and
lab workers. But as Betz
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A10 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LEJEUNE
Continued from Page A10

told a federal fact-finding
group, "the lab was very
low on the priority list at
the base."
She said her group -
the Natural Resources and
Environmental Affairs De-
partment was "like the
'red headed stepchild."'
M.E
Even a series of increas-
ingly urgent reports from
an Army lab at Fort
McPherson, Ga., beginning
in late 1980, failed to
prompt any real action.
"WATER HIGHLY CON-
TAMINATED WITH
OTHER CHLORINATED
HYDROCARBONS (SOL-
VENTS!)" cautioned one
memo from the Army lab
in early 1981.
Because the base water
system drew on a rotating
basis from a number of dif-
ferent wells, subsequent
tests showed no problems,
and officials chalked these
interferencee" up to
flukes. One base employee
told the fact-finding group
that in 1980, "they simply
did not have the money
nor capacity" to test every
drinking-water well on the
base.
"This type of money
would have cost well over
$100,000, and their entire
operating budget was
$100,000," the employee
said, according to a heav-
ily redacted summary ob-
tained by the AP from the
Department of Justice
through the Freedom of
Information Act. "How-
ever, they did not do the
well testing because they
did not think they needed
to."
So, from late 1980
through the summer of
1982, the former employee
told investigators, "this
issue simply laid there. No
attempts were made to
identify ground contami-
nation" at Hadnot Point or
Tarawa Terrace, where
most of the enlisted men
and their families lived.
It wasn't until a letter
from Grainger in August
1982 reported TCE levels
of 1,400 ppb that any kind
of widespread testing
began. Though the EPA
did not yet enforce a limit
for TCE at the time, the
chemical had long been
known to cause serious
health problems.
"That is when the light
bulb went off," Sharpe told
federal investigators in a
2004 interview, obtained
by the AP "That is when


ON THE NET
U ATSDR's Camp
Lejeune page:
www.atsdr.cdc.gov/
sites/lejeune/

we connected the tests of
the 1980, 1981, and 1982
time period where traces
of solvents were detected
to this finding."
Still, it was not until the
final weeks of 1984 that the
first wells were closed
down. Between the receipt
of that 1982 letter and the
well closures, the em-
ployee told the fact-finding
group, "they simply
dropped the ball."
MEN
Each year of delay
meant an additional 10,000
people may have been ex-
posed, according to Ma-
rine estimates.
Municipal utilities
around the country were
using far more sophisti-
cated tests to detect much
lower contaminant levels,
said Kaltofen, while the
people at Camp Lejeune
were doing "the bare min-
imum. And it wasn't
enough."
Last year, President
Obama signed the Camp
Lejeune Veterans and
Family Act to provide
medical care and screen-
ing for Marines and their
families, but not civilians,
exposed between 1957 and
1987 although prelimi-
nary results from water
modeling suggest that date
be pushed back at least an-
other four years. The law
covers 15 diseases or con-
ditions, including female
infertility, miscarriage,
leukemia, multiple
myeloma, as well as blad-
der, breast, esophageal,
kidney and lung cancer.
Jerry Ensminger, a for-
mer drill sergeant, blames
the water for the leukemia
that killed his 9-year-old
daughter, Janey, in 1985.
He and Michael Partain -
a Marine's son who is one
of at least seven dozen
men with Lejeune ties di-
agnosed with a rare form
of breast cancer have
scoured the records, and
he thinks the Corps has yet
to accept responsibility for
its role in this tragedy
"If I hadn't dug in my
heels," Ensminger said,
"this damned issue would
have been dead and
buried along with my child
and everybody else's."
Breed, a national writer,
reported from Camp
Lejeune. Follow him on
Twitter at twitter comr/
AllenGBreed.


This September 1985 family photo shows Jerry
Ensminger, Janey and Janey's mother, Etsuko during a
visit to Duke University in Durham, N.C., a couple of
weeks before Janey died on Sept. 24, 1985. Jerry, a for-
mer drill sergeant, blames contaminated water at Camp
Lejeune for the leukemia that killed his 9-year-old
daughter.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama signs the Honoring America's Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012
on Aug. 6, 2012, in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington. From left are Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., Jerry En-
sminger, former master sergeant, USMC, who served at Camp Lejeune and advocated on behalf of affected
veterans and families, and Rep. Brad Miller, D-N.C. Ensminger blames contaminated water at Camp Lejeune for the
leukemia that killed his 9-year-old daughter.


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NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 All












NATION


CI


&
TRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


CHRONICLE


Jt a sBroken rail eyed in train crash


Associated Press
A hungry Baltimore oriole
stretches to try and get
a sip of nectar from a
hummingbird feeder
Saturday outside a home
near LaPorte, Ind.

Hofstra student
was killed by police
MINEOLA, N.Y. -A New
York college student being
held by an armed home in-
truder was shot and killed
by a Nassau County police
officer who had responded
to a report of a home inva-
sion at an off-campus
home, police said Saturday.
Andrea Rebello was shot
once in the head Friday
morning by an officer who
opened fire after the
masked intruder, Dalton
Smith, pointed a gun at the
officer while holding the 21-
year-old junior in a head-
lock, Nassau County
homicide squad Lt. John
Azzata said.
The Nassau County po-
lice officer fired eight shots
at Smith, who has what po-
lice have described as an
"extensive" criminal back-
ground, Azzata said. Smith
was hit by seven bullets and
died. Rebello was shot once
in the head, Azzata said.
Nassau County Police
Commissioner Thomas Dale
said he had traveled to Re-
bello's Tarrytown, N.Y., home
to explain to Rebello's par-
ents what happened.
Boy dies after being
kicked by pony
NEW HOLLAND, Pa. -
Authorities said a 6-year-old
boy died after he was kicked
in the throat by a pony on a
south-central Pennsylvania
farm.
Police in Lancaster
County told the Intelligencer
Journal/Lancaster New Era
the boy was playing with other
children in a New Holland
pasture Thursday morning.
Lt. Jonathan Heisse said
the boy approached a pony
from behind and the animal
became startled and kicked
the child in the throat, leav-
ing him unable to breathe.
Emergency responders
from New Holland Ambulance
and Ephrata Community
Hospital were called and
the boy was airlifted to Her-
shey Medical Center, where
Heisse said he died Friday.
Apartment scoured
in ricin-letter case
SPOKANE, Wash. -
Authorities in hazardous
materials suits searched a
downtown Spokane apart-
ment Saturday, investigat-
ing the recent discovery of
a pair of letters containing
the deadly poison ricin.
Few details have been
released in the case, and
no arrests have been
made. Federal investigators
have been searching for the
person who sent the letters,
which were postmarked
Tuesday in Spokane.
The letters were ad-
dressed to the downtown
post office and the adjacent
federal building, but authori-
ties have not released a po-
tential motive. They also
have not said whether the
letters targeted anyone in
particular.
Ricin is a highly toxic
substance made from cas-
tor beans. As little as 500
micrograms, the size of the
head of a pin, can kill an
adult if inhaled or ingested.
There have been no
reports of illness connected
to the letters.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. -
The commuter train de-
railment and collision that
left dozens injured outside
New York City was not the
result of foul play, officials
said Saturday, but a frac-
tured section of rail is
being studied to deter-
mine if it is connected to
the accident.
National Transportation
Safety Board member Earl
Weener said Saturday the
broken rail is of substantial
interest to investigators and
a portion of the track will be
sent to a lab for analysis.
Weener said it's not clear
if the accident caused the
fracture or if the rail was
broken before the crash.
He said he won't speculate
on the cause of the derail-
ment and emphasized the
investigation was in its
early stages.


Seventy-two people
were sent to the hospital
Friday evening after a
Metro-North train heading
east from New York City
derailed and was hit by a
train heading west from
New Haven. Most have
been discharged.
Officials earlier described
devastating damage and
said it was fortunate no
one was killed.
'All of the injured people
described the really har-
rowing experience of hav-
ing the train jolt to a stop,
the dust, darkness, other
kinds of factors that made it
particularly frightening,"
said U.S. Sen. Richard
Blumenthal, who visited
patients in the hospital.
Blumenthal said a
Metro-North conductor
helped passengers despite
her own injuries.
"Her story is really one of
great strength and courage


- T7- .
CHRISTIAN ABRAHAM/The Connecticut Post
Injured passengers are removed from the scene of a train
collision Friday in Fairfield, Conn. Two commuter trains
serving New York City collided in Connecticut during
Friday's evening rush hour, injuring dozens of people,
authorities said. There were no reports of fatalities.


helping other passengers
off the train in spite of her
own very severe pain,"
Blumenthal said. "She
eventually had to be
helped off herself."


The crash threatened to
snarl travel in the North-
east Corridor. It also
caused Amtrak to suspend
service between New York
and Boston.


Faulty landing gear forces belly flop in Newark


Associated Press
In this image taken from video and provided to WABC TV News by an airport source, emergency personnel
spray foam on the fuselage of a US Airways Express commuter plane Saturday after it made a belly landing
at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. The turboprop plane reportedly left Philadelphia shortly
before 11 p.m. Friday and landed safely at Newark with its landing gear retracted at about I a.m. Saturday.
There were no injuries.





Dozens injured in parade accident


No fatalities reported after car hits group


Associated Press

DAMASCUS, Va. -
About 50 to 60 people were
injured Saturday when a
driver described by wit-
nesses as an elderly man
drove his car into a group
of hikers marching in a pa-
rade in a small Virginia
mountain town.
Washington County
director of emergency
management Pokey Harris
said no fatalities had been
reported.
The injuries ranged from
critical to superficial, he


said. Three of the victims
were flown by helicopters
to regional hospitals. An-
other 12 to 15 were taken
by ambulance. The rest
were treated at the scene.
The status of the driver
wasn't released.
Authorities are still in-
vestigating, but Harris said
they believe the man
might have suffered a
medical emergency before
the accident.
It happened around
2:10 p.m. during the Hikers
Parade at the Trail Days
festival, an annual celebra-


tion of the Appalachian
Trail in Damascus, near
the Tennessee state line.
What caused the car to
drive into the crowd wasn't
immediately known. It ap-
peared to come from a side
street, and a thud could be
heard. People yelled stop,
and at some point, the car
finally stopped.
Witnesses said the car
had a handicapped park-
ing sticker and it went
more than 100 feet before
coming to a stop.
"He was hitting hikers,"
said Vickie Harmon, a wit-


ofhikers
ness from Damascus. "I saw
hikers just go everywhere."
Damascus resident
Amanda Puckett, who was
watching the parade with
her children, ran to the
car, where she and others
lifted the car off those
pinned underneath.
"Everybody just threw
our hands up on the car
and we just lifted the car
up," she said.
There were ambulances
in the parade ahead of the
hikers and paramedics on
board immediately re-
sponded to the crash.


In Egypt, blasphemy charges on rise


Associated Press


CAIRO The pale, young Chris-
tian woman sat handcuffed in the
courtroom, accused of insulting
Islam while teaching history of reli-
gions to fourth-graders. A team of Is-
lamist lawyers with long beards sang
in unison, 'All except the Prophet
Muhammad."
The case against Dimyana Abdel-
Nour in southern Egypt's ancient city
of Luxor began when parents of three
of her pupils claimed that their chil-
dren, aged 10, complained their
teacher showed disgust when she
spoke of Islam in class. According to
the parents, Abdel-Nour, 24, told the
children that Pope Shenouda, who
led the Egyptian Coptic Church until
his death last year, was better than
the Prophet Muhammad.
Blasphemy charges were not un-
common in Egypt under the now-
ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak's
regime, but there has been a surge
in such cases in recent months, ac-
cording to rights activists. The trend
is widely seen as a reflection of the
growing power and confidence of Is-
lamists, particularly the ultracon-
servative Salafis.


This photo backed constitution that was
provided by adopted in December.
the lawyer Writers, activists and even a fa-
of Dimyana mous television comedian have been
Abdel-Nour accused of blasphemy since then.
shows But Christians seem to be the fa-
Abdel-Nour, vorite target of Islamist prosecutors.
24, a Coptic Their fragile cases the main basis
Christian of the case against Abdel-Nour's
e accused case the testimony of children-are
of insulting greeted with sympathy from court-
Islam. room judges with their own reli-
gious bias or who fear the wrath of
Associated Islamists, according to activists.
Press The result is a growing number of
"Salafis are the engineers of these Egyptians, including many Chris-
stories," said Abdel-Hamid Hassan, tians, who have been convicted and
a Muslim and the head of the par- sent to prison for blasphemy
ents' council at the primary school Freed Tuesday on nearly $3,000
where Abdel-Nour teaches. Has- bail after almost a week in deten-
san's daughter was among several tion, Abdel-Nour is due to stand trial
students who denied any wrongdo- on May 21. Her family refused sev-
ing by Abdel-Nour. eral requests by The Associated Press
"If the pope himself came here to speak to her. Her father, Ebid
from the Vatican and tried to spread Abdel-Nour, said: "She is innocent.
Christianity among us, he would fail. God be with us. She can't talk be-
We learn about our religion starting cause she is in very bad condition."
from the age of 5," he said, alluding Salafis advocate an uncompromising
to the allegation against Abdel-Nour and literal interpretation of the
of "spreading Christianity." Quran, believing society must mirror
Criminalizing blasphemy was en- the waythe prophet and his immediate
shrined in the country's Islamist- successors ruled in the 7th century


"The damage is ab-
solutely staggering," Blu-
menthal said, describing
the shattered interior of
cars and tons of metal
tossed around. "I feel that
we are fortunate that
even more injuries were
not the result of this very
tragic and unfortunate
accident."
U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy
said it was "frankly amaz-
ing" people weren't killed
on scene.
Both said new Metro-
North Railroad cars built
with higher standards may
have saved lives.
Metro-North said train
service will remain sus-
pended between South
Norwalk and New Haven
until further notice. Rail-
road officials said rebuild-
ing the two tracks and
restoring train service
"will take well into next
week."


World BRIEFS

Watchcat


Associated Press
A white cat observes
traffic from behind the
transparent fence of her
owner's yard Friday in
Bucharest, Romania.

Attacks kill 16;
8 police kidnapped
BAGHDAD -A string of
attacks killed at least 16
people in Iraq on Saturday,
while gunmen abducted
eight policemen guarding a
post on the country's main
highway to Jordan and Syria,
the latest in a wave of vio-
lence to grip the country.
The shootings and
bombings follow three days
of attacks that killed 130
people in both Shiite and
Sunni areas in scenes remi-
niscent of retaliatory attacks
between the two groups
that pushed the country to
the brink of civil war in
2006-2007.
Assad: Syria talks
are internal matter
BEIRUT Syrian Presi-
dent Bashar Assad said in a
newspaper interview Satur-
day he won't step down be-
fore elections and that the
United States has no right
to interfere in his country's
politics, raising new doubts
about a U.S-Russian effort
to get Assad and his oppo-
nents to negotiate an end to
the country's civil war.
In the capital Damascus,
a car bomb killed at least
three people and wounded
five, according to Syrian
state TV.
Suspected US drone
kills four militants
SANAA, Yemen -A
suspected U.S. drone strike
killed four al-Qaida militants
Saturday in a southern
Yemeni province once over-
run by the group, according
to security officials.
The officials said the attack
took place around dawn in
an area called Deyqa in
Abyan province. Officials
spoke anonymously be-
cause they were not author-
ized to brief the media.
According to several re-
search groups and Associ-
ated Press reporting, there
has been a dramatic rise in
such drone strikes in Yemen
since the country's new U.S.-
backed president assumed
power early last year.
-From wire reports






* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15
of today's Chronicle.


EXCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'S GI
OF MUSIC, AR
NATURE LIVE
ON IN LAKE
WALES


J rom lush, green rolling
hills dotted with a
kaleidoscope of blooms
juts a singing tower. Its
colored tile windows and
mammoth sculptures catch the
sunlight and seem to rise over
the palms and oak trees and into
the sky. A chorus of 60 bells sings
melodies that fill the gardens.
It seems like a creation from another time and
place and it is.
Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales is the
realization of a dream of Netherlands-born
Edward W Bok, who came to America when he
was 6 years old.
Bok mastered the language and became a
Pulitzer-prize-winning author and noted humani-
tarian, and the tower and gardens were his gifts to
the nation he believed gave him so much.
Bok lived just long enough to see his dream
come to fruition in 1929.
"He built it for the Ameri-
can people, to thank them for
all the opportunities he had
in this
country," said park
spokesman Brian Ososky.
Bok spared no expense
and hired architect
Milton B. Medary and fa-
mous sculptor Lee Lawrie,
among others, for work on
Amanda Mims the tower. The result was a
JOURNEYING neo-Gothic art deco struc-
JOURNALUST ture that
incorporated Florida into
its design.
"It's extraordinary," said Wendy McClesky, one
of a lucky few who toured the
inside of the tower with a small group recently
The group gained admission to the tower by win-
ning various radio, television and online contests.
Though the ornate details inside are a sight to
behold, most of the tower's 23 million visitors to
date have never seen past its great brass door
The tower will never be open to the public, and
it's easy to see why Its tiny elevator carries no
more than four people and a narrow iron and steel
staircase winds up the
205-foot structure, which houses offices, a carillon
library, tower maintenance rooms and, of course,
the many tons of carillon bells.
There are, however, a few ways to get access to
the tower: making a hefty donation to the park or
volunteering at least 50 hours there will do
the trick.
If neither of those is in your future, take
heart- the park is meant to be enjoyed from the
outside. Carillon music can be heard within a
quarter-mile radius, and the ideal place to listen
to the music is 200 yards from the tower
See Page A15


The 205-foot singing tower at
Bok Tower Gardens in Lake
Wales houses a 60-bell carillon.



Photos by
Amanda Mims




Visitors stroll through the park
grounds and enjoy the colorful
blooms.


Bok Tower Gardens' carillonneur Geert D'hollander plays for a group of visitors.


4 i ,A.. I -
'. .'. . ,*.- '.',


Anniversary vacation

Steven and Sydelle Levy of Homosassa celebrated their 43rd anniversary in April
with a South Pacific Oceania Marina Cruise. Here, they are on Hanga Roa
(Easter Island), home of the 887 mystical moai statues, created by the early Rapa
Nui people. The trip also included Tahiti, "the Garden Island" of Huahine and Bora,
Bora.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Aimless son


needs checkup


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(i] 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. See Dad |Wendell ** "Cats & Dogs"(2001) Jeff Goldblum. Friends Friends
[Wii) 103 62 103 Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass
OXY) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped PG Snapped (N) PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
(iW) 340 2411 n340 4 "Twilight- The Big C: Hereafter The Borgias (In Stereo) Nurse Nurse Nurse The Borgias "Relics" The Borgias "Relics"
340 241 340 D4 Dawn" 'MA' m'MA'" Jackie Jackie (N) Jackie (N)'MA'" *'MA'"m
Australian V8 Supercars SPEED Center (N) Wind Inside the Faster Faster My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
732 112 732 Austin. (N) (Live) (Live) Tunnel Headsets Than Than Car TV G'
7 7 7 *** "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade"(1989) Harrison Ford. ** '"Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008,
37 43 37 27 36 ndy's hunt for his missing father leads to the Holy Grail. Adventure) Harrison Ford, Shia La Beouf. (In Stereo)'PG-13'
Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons *** "21 Jump Street" (2012, Comedy) Jonah Da Vinci's Demons
370 271 370 "The Magician" 'MA' "The Tower" "The Devil" 'MA' Hill, Brie Larson. (In Stereo) R'B "The Devil" 'MA'
Inside the Sport Flats Class Ship Sprtsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Florida
36 31 36 Rays Fishing Shape TV Adv Flats Fishing Tournament Series Animals G'
**3 "The Mist"(2007) ** "Underworld: Evolution" (2006, Horror) "Underworld Rise o the Lycans"(2009, ** "Daybreakers"
YY 31 59 31 26 29 Thomas Jane. Kate Beckinsale. R'B Horror) Michael Sheen.'R'B (20/09)F B"
(TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 *** "Blades of Glory" (2007) 'PG-13' *** "The Hangover" (2009, Comedy) 'R' *** "Blades of Glory"(2007) 'PG-13'
*** "Leave Her to Heaven" (1945, Crime **** "Jesse James" (1939, Western) Tyrone ** "The Return of Frank James" (1940,
169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Gene Tierney.'NR' Power, Henry Fonda. GP' Western) Henry Fonda. NR' B
S 53 Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last North America A journey to meet the wildlife North America "Born to
53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14'" Frontier Exposed Frontier (N)'14' that lives in our backyard.'PG' B Be Wild"'PG'
CL 50 46 50 29 30 Breaking Amish: Long Island Medium Long Is Long Is Medium Medium |BreakingAmish: Medium IMedium
i ***3 1 "A Room With a View" (1986) Helena *** "My Week With Marilyn" **+* "The Pianist" (2002) Adrien Brody A Jewish musi-
(I1fl) 350 261 350 Bonham-Carter. (In Stereo) 'NR (2011) Michelle Williams. cian witnesses the horrors of the Holocaust.
n 48 33 48 31 34 *** "The Town" (2010, Crime Drama) Ben ***s "Inglourious Basterds" (2009, War) Brad Pitt, Melanie Laurent. Soldiers seek "The
48 33 48 31 34 Affleck, Rebecca Hall. 'R' (DVS) Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. 'R' (DVS) Town"'R'
TOON 38 58 38 33 ** "Underdog" (2007, Adventure) 'PG' Teen Looney Squidbill. |King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Tastiest Places Hot Movie Sets 'PG' Trip Flip Wat Future Machine Airport Airport Gem Hunt'PG'
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn World's Dumbest...
(9LJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Gids GoldGirs GoldGirls oldGirls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Gids King |King
L Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Suits "He's Back"
CSIl: Miami "Murder in a CSI: Miami A woman is CSI: Miami "Legal" (In CSI: Miami "Hell Night" CSI: Miami Speed-dat- CSI: Miami Team mem-
117 69 117 Flash"'14'" hit by a bus. '14' Stereo) '14' '14'm ing. 14'm ber killed. '14'
[WGN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother IMother News |Replay "4Weddings"


Dear Annie: My 22-
year-old son,
"Nick," spends
most of his time playing
video games. He was
fired from several jobs
last year because he
stopped showing up. We
had no idea.
We finally kicked him
out It was the hardest de-
cision of my life. He lived
with various relatives
and friends
until he
started lying
to them about
work. Nick is
now at his fa- .
their's, who
lets him stay
rent-free, con-
tributing
nothing.
I managed
to get Nick to
see a psychia- ANN
trist briefly. I MAI
went along to MAIL
make sure he
told the truth, but as soon
as the therapist wanted
him to continue on his
own, he canceled the
next appointment, saying
the therapist didn't do
anything but ask him
questions.
I am concerned that
Nick will do something
drastic, like harm him-
self. When I brought it up,
he said he would never
do that. But he's alone so
much and seems so aim-
less. Is there anything I
can do besides pray? -
Worried Mom in Alabama


Dear Mom: There are a
lot of possibilities to con-
sider: Might Nick be
drinking or using drugs?
Is he addicted to video
games and cannot tear
himself away? Is he de-
pressed? And, of course,
there is the "lazy" factor,
in that he has a place to
stay, rent-free, and is not
required to do anything
at all, including grow up.
The fact that
Nick is alone
and aimless
does not make
him suicidal,
but it can feed
on itself and
make him more
lethargic. And
the longer he is
without work,
the harder it
will be to find
E'S the next job.
BOX Please see
whether you
can get Nick to
see a physician for a
checkup. Then talk to
your ex-husband about
your next step.


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Today 'sMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inver-
ness; 637-3377
"The Big Wedding" (R)
12:45 a.m.,4:15 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 12:15, 3:30, 6:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
4 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
11:50 a.m., 3:15 p.m.,
6:45 p.m. No passes.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 3:05 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 12 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 12:30 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m. No
passes.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Big Wedding" (R)
12:35 p.m., 3:55 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)


3:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 12:10 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R)
12:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) 4:10 p.m., 6:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness"
(PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m.,
12:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Tyler Perry Presents
Peeples" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Understandable
6 Unwanted ones
11 Clearing
16 Muscle twitch
21 One of the Marx broth-
ers
22 Benefit
23 Marathoner
24 River horse,
for short
25 Loos or Ekberg
26 Earthy pigment
(2 wds.)
28 Different
29 Kind of show or storm
30 Low
32 The "Iliad" is one
33 Rousseau title
35 Once - while
36 Sleep
38 Frizzy hairdo
41 Basic (abbr.)
43 Compass pt.
44 Whirlpool
45 Armed conflict
48 Walk on
50 Pitch relative
52 Raise in relief
55 One of the states
(abbr.)
57 Edible tuber
58 Mongrels
62 Jane -
63 Self-satisfied
65 Bird of legend
67 Hinged cover
69 Draw out
70 Hodges of
baseball
71 Tit for-
72 Knock
74 Platter
76 Small monkey
77 Greek god
79 Seize
81 Caravan animal
83 Line of stitches
85 Siesta
86 Domain
88 A Great Lake
90 Someone special
92 Squabble
94 Well-behaved
96 Ship part
97 Impair
99 Jumping insect
100 Speak explosively
103 Condensation
105 Poisonous
107 Made tractable


110 Mineral
111 Town in Oklahoma
113 Black bird
115 Opening
117 Talk wildly
118 Golfer's cry
120 Go by boat
122 Liquor
123 Crimson
125 Iota
126 Broad street
128 Chitchat
130 Pea holder
132 Sampras or
Townshend
133 DDE, familiarly
134 "Thinker" sculptor
135 Land of-
137 Hindu prince
139 Texas lawman
141 Perfectly all right
(hyph.)
143 Improvise (hyph.)
145 Contraption
147 Energy type (abbr.)
150 Sixth sense
152 Russian monarch
154 Coral ridge
155 Melt
159 On the-
160 Deadly
162 Western Indian
164 Cereal grass
166 Greek letter
167 Seething
169 Chinese medical prac-
tice
173 Memorize
175 Dame
176 Rock or Farley
177 Wall hanging
178 Flick
179 Fear
180 Wails in grief
181 Cent
182 Golf great Sam-


DOWN
1 Rocker
2 Long weapon
of old
3 Ohio natives
4 Fitting
5 Wander
6 Bribe
7 First woman
8 soda
9 Flooring material
10 Incline


Supermarket
Fond du -, Wis.
Hurt
Judged
"To -- human..."
Moccasin
Orchestra's place
Plant louse
Pay out money
Eel
Droop
Rower
Term in tennis
Playing card
Chimed
Command (abbr.)
Food and drink
Burst out
Aide (abbr.)
Cup handle
In the center of
French friend
- Rice Burroughs
Ripple pattern
Surrounded by trou-
bles
Sacred book
Whatchamacallit
Complete
Marsh bird
Where 101-Down is
Rotating part
Slangy insult
Ascot
Pin
Baste
Opening for coins
Name for a stranger
Cringe
Citrus fruit
Grain for brewing
Speck
Pole
At the most
Approach
Closely packed
Fix fraudulently
Yet (2 wds.)
Place near
Salt Lake City
Estuary
Joker
Certain singer
Concern
Call to mind
Discourage
Delve
Important person
Paralyze with fear
Early computer
Earth


College
administrator
Numero -
Fasten
Water barrier
Step
Speak with others
Jolt
After deductions
New Zealand
parrot


143 Kind of helicopter
144 Storage structure
146 Unorthodox belief
147 Antelope
148 Toil
149 Overact
151 Pile
153 Summarize,
for short
156 Throw
157 Heart chambers


Died down
Ran away
Enticement
Raison d'-
Shade trees
Nest egg letters
Brooch
Samovar
Sprinted
Long, long time


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.I


A14 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
The May 27, Memorial Day,
ceremony will be a noon.
Hamburgers and hot dogs
with all the fixings will be
served at 1 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and din-


ing hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post. El-
igibility in the Auxiliary is open
to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-
7663, or membership chair-
man Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For
more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league


plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 meets at
2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from


9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Visit the website at
http://davfl70.yktc.us.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-


erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at


bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The public is invited to the
Memorial Day Observance at
11 a.m. Monday, May 27.
Picnic will follow.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-

See VETERANS/Page A16


Visitor Mike McClusky of Orlando takes photographs during a rare tour inside the tower.


BOK
Continued from Page A13

Currently, live perform-
ances by carillonneur
Geert D'hollander take
place at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.
Thursday through Sun-
day; carillon recordings
are played on days D'hol-
lander does not perform.
The property is 250
acres in size and includes


a 20-room Mediterranean
mansion, Pinewood Es-
tate, which visitors can
tour
Bok Tower Gardens is a
nonprofit organization,
and ticket proceeds and
donations help preserve
the park for future gener-
ations.
"Bok said to make the
world a bit better or more
beautiful because you
have lived in it," Ososky
said. 'And that's still our


mission today."
For more about the
park or to hear record-
ings of the carillon, visit
http://boktowergardens.org.


Amanda Mims is a
freelance writer and
photographer, RVer and
full-time traveler based
on the Nature Coast.
She can be reached at
amanda.mims
@gmail.com.


AMANDA MIMS/For the Chronicle
A massive eagle statue high in the tower looks down into the gardens.


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SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 A15





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-4

" "

':. 'I r- ,


Withlacoochee SAR
recognizes scouts

Charles Day, president of the Withlacoochee
Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution,
presented several awards April 22 to several
Boy Scouts of Troop 415 at American
Revolution Recognition Night. Life Scout
Jeremiah Lovestrand received the three
Citizenship merit badges and the SAR-favored
three merit badges in American Heritage, Law
and Genealogy. Life Scout Nick Slusser and
Peter Sobel received the three Citizenship merit
badges. Eagle Scout Nathan Lovestrand
received the Florida State SAR second-place
award in the George S. and Stella Knight Essay
Contest and was presented with a certificate
and $250 check. Pictured in front are Charlie
Day, Jeremiah Lovestrand, Nick Slusser, Jacob
Bauer, Peter Sobel, Nathan Lovestrand, Michael
Diaz and Chuckie Roberts; second row, Jakob
Ganci, Chuck Roberts, Robbie Lovestrand, Rick
Stuart and Dave Bauer. Withlacoochee Chapter
of the SAR covers Citrus and Hernando
counties, approximately the same geographical
area the BSA Withlacoochee District covers.
Troop 415 is an active troop and the Crystal
River United Methodist Church is its chartering
organization. To learn more about the SAR, call
Charlie Day at 352-678-2971.
Special to the Chronicle


VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m. Thurs-
days at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Due to the fact there are no
contested positions, there will
be no ballot election on Tues-
day, May 28. Installation of
Legion, Sons of the Legion
and Legion Riders officers will
take place at 7 p.m. on this
date at our regular member-
ship meeting.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-476-
7001 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little


Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. Afish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting
follows at 7 p.m.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at


www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.


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SERVICES & GROUPS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. the second Saturday
each month at the Disabled
American Veteran's Building,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness.. The building is on the
corner of State Road 41 and
Paul Drive.
We are an advocacy group
for current and future veter-
ans, as well as for POWs and
MIAs. Florida Chapter 7 is en-
couraging new members to
join to promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. More than 88,000 com-
bat veterans are still unac-
counted for from all wars. We
fight for them and their fami-
lies. More information is avail-
able at www.rollingthunder
fl7.com. Full membership is
open to all individuals 18
years or older who wish to
dedicate time to the cause.
Come out and join us on
June 29 for the seventh an-
nual Independence Day Golf
Classic. Golf registration and
opportunities to be a sponsor
are available at www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, or call Ray at
813-230-9750.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. If you would like for us
to provide a speaker, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide


information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-


rial. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs
do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call the Citrus Team Of-
fice at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes
to combat veterans are at
several locations and times.
Call her at 352-382-7397.


SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
Due to cancellations of a
few participants, two open
spots still remain for this
year's veterans' trip to
Hawaii. The annual trek, co-
ordinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for
Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Partici-
pants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai
(Marriott), Hawaii (stay in the
KMC inside the volcano) and
Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
McLean will have a per-
sonal meeting at his home
with any interested persons to
cover details and Information.
Also scheduled is a Sept. 10
luncheon meeting at the Rose
& Crown Room of Citrus Hills
Country Club for 2013 partici-
pants to meet and get up-to-
date information.
The 2014 trip will be Feb.
25 through March 14, and
McLean can provide informa-
tion about that trip
Reservations should be
made as soon. Call McLean
at 352-637-5131.


DAILY DINE-IN

SPECIALS
TUESDAY GRILLED NY STRIP
W/baked potato & green beans.................................9.95
WEDNESDAY FULL RACK OF BABY BACK RIBS
W/potatoes and vegetable............................................ 14.95
THURSDAY -1 LB. PORK CHOPS
W/potatoes & vegetable.............................................. 9.95
FRIDAY SURF-N-TURF
Prime Rib & Grilled Shrimp w/baked potato & salad........12.95
SATURDAY
BBQ Beef Sandwich w/chips................................................3.95
SUNDAY
Pot Roast w/mashed potatoes & green beans.............. 3.00
NY Strip Sandwich on a hoagie roll w/fries ......................6.95


DAILY $1 HIGH OCTANE
DAILY 1OFF SALOON

LUNCH MONDAY
SPECIALS I LUNCH SI 1,, NESS
i j IlLS nAll Food Menu Items
11am- 3pm Are $100
% I R1i1M i %I Valid Monday-Friday | only
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OPEN HAM-MIDNIGHT MONDAY THROUGH SUNDAY* OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373


.4


-h


A16 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


esp





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Community service: Daisies in the park


Special to the Chronicle
Kayla Grosch, Sara Kirven, Kali Hensley, Danyele
McGeorge (troop leader) and Jaiden Hensley prepare
treats for the animals. LEFT: Kali Hensley, Sara
Kirven, Kimberly McGeorge, Kayla Grosch, Jaiden
Hensley, Hailey Anderson, Alexzandra Nesbitt, Kierra
Bradley and Aiden Blue performed their community
service for Daisy Troop 14100 at Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.


Key Center honored


Special to the Chronicle
The Key Training Center was presented with the John T. Barnes Community Organization Award at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce Pillar Awards on Friday, April 26.
The Key Center received the prestigious award for the more than 90 adults with development disabilities, along with Key Center staff, who contribute to the community
through numerous volunteer opportunities and events. Pictured, from left, are: Terri Simon, Milana Jerrell, Shirl Elder, Kim Williams, Kathleen Lee, Bob Liberman and Melissa
Walker.


Looking at the photos of
Petey, you might think he
is a large powerhouse of a
fellow, but photos can
sometimes be deceiving.
Petey is only 15 inches tall
at the shoulder. He is a
stout little 5-year-old
Staffordshire bull terrier
with a great personality
(you should see how he can
smile). He would love to
travel, go for walks, play on
the beach, or just curl up at
your feet. He just wants to
be loved and he'll return
that love with his whole
heart. Petey will be best as
an only pet. He is doing fine
with the other dogs at the
shelter, but in his previous
home he was attacked by
their other two larger dogs,
so he may not really be


comfortable with other
dogs in the home. To ac-
cess an adoption applica-
tion or view other
adoptable pets, visit
www.roomforonemore.net,
and for additional informa-
tion, call Karron at 352-
560-0051.


SO YOU KNOW
* News briefs submitted by travel clubs associated
with for-profit travel agencies must be run as paid
advertisements in the Chronicle. Nonprofit groups
or churches that plan excursions as social trips
and fundraisers (where all generated funds
benefit that group and its works) are still invited to
submit items as free news briefs. Call Theresa
Savery, 352-563-6363, ext. 1209, for information.


Missing Teeth? Unstable Dentures!


r FREE SEMINAR
Wed., May 22, Starting at 4:30 PM
or Location: 591 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto, FL 34461


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every sem inar participant.


S -~ Refreshments Served -
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* CALL FOR RESERVATIONS NOW!

352-527-8000 :
THE


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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Family REUNION

The DeBusk family


RUTH LEVINS/Special to the Chronicle
The DeBusk siblings are shown at their recent annual
family reunion at the Ozello Community Center. From left
are: Hazel Peebles, Kenneth DeBusk, Carolyn Swearin-
gen, Marsha Philman and Wilma Wiles.


May20 to 24 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
All meals until the
end of the school year
are manager's choice.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbe-
cued chicken, Lyonnaise po-
tatoes, California-blend
vegetables, sugar cookie,
whole-grain wheat bun with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Macaroni and
cheese with turkey ham,
green peas, parslied carrots,
peaches, slice rye bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Lemon pep-
per baked chicken breast, po-
tatoes au gratin, mixed


vegetables, apple juice, gra-
ham crackers, slice rye bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Pork riblet with
barbecue sauce on bun,
baked beans, yellow corn,
mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chef's salad with
ham, cheese, whole boiled
egg and tomato with French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
mixed fruit, slice whole-grain
bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


When I first signed
up for Facebook, I
was thrilled to get
back in touch with old
friends, distant relatives,
high school classmates
and old co-workers. I'd
check in to find out that
they had new children,
new spouses, new lives,
new hobbies,
new kitchens,
new news. It
was like having
a little newspa- .
per that only
printed news
about people I
actually knew.
Who knew Alli-
son would move
to France? Oh,
look, the MUL
Reynoldses
have a new grandkid and
my classmate's niece is
getting married!
It was very exciting. Me,
I never really have much
new going on in my life, so
I don't post on Facebook
very often. Who wants to
hear things like, "Woke up
this morning and my feet
hurt. Is it a bone spur or
plantar fasciitis?" "Played
golf this afternoon. Could
have got a better score
using a shovel." "Burned
burgers on the grill. Ate
cold KFC instead."
Some people have no
problem posting every lit-
tle detail about their lives,
and that doesn't bother
me. It's like keeping a
diary There are worse
things they could be doing
with their time (like the
aforementioned golf). No, I
don't really need to know
what they're having for
dinner tonight, but they're
just chatting like they
were having a phone call
with a friend. But slowly,
over the years, it has be-
come clear that if I knew
certain people from their
Facebook postings alone, I
wouldn't like them at all.
Some, because they
overshare. Yes, I'm sure
your kid is the cutest, most
adorable, fabulous thing
ever to pop out of a human
body But let someone else
say it for a change. It's so
much more believable
coming from an aunt, an
uncle or a random
stranger than from the
parents.
And thanks for posting
that picture of your over-
flowing toilet from your
cruise. Did you use a 3D
camera? Because it looks


so real. Too bad I'll never
be able to unsee it. Really,
I'm sorry you had to spend
five days on a floating port-
a-potty, and I feel your
pain, but I just don't want
to see it
With others, it's the del-
uge of cute cat photos.
Face it, a cat's only job is to
be cute. That,
and leaving
half-eaten dead
things on your
back porch. I
take lots of pic-
tures of my own
cute cats, and I
spoil them silly
and waste all
S kinds of time
with them and a
LEN laser pointer.
But here's the
thing do I really want to
share that with people I
used to work with 25 years
ago? And what does it say
about you when your cat is
more interesting than you
are? It's time to get a
hobby, friend.
People of Earth, listen to
me: Bill Gates is not a fool.
For the millions of you
posting that could-not-
possibly-be-more-
Photoshopped picture of
Bill Gates holding a sign
that says he'll give you
$5,000 if you "share" his
message, let me rip this
Band-Aid off with one
quick pull he won't.
Ain't gonna happen. That
hoax has been going
around since Lindsay
Lohan was sober and I still
haven't gotten my five
grand.
And your politics. Every
day you post five or six
bumper-sticker slogans
that make my blood boil.
It's hard to believe that
once, long ago and far
away, we used to talk about
girls and music and sports
and movies. We were in
perfect agreement all the
time. But now that we've
been out of touch for only
45 years, you've become
one of them. I don't know
who you are anymore,
man.
Now, you may ask, why
don't I just unfriend the
people I don't like? Oh,
sure, like I have so many
friends I can just snap my
fingers and get new ones.
It's hard enough keeping
the three I've got.

ContactJim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


In SERVICE:


Christopher
Bonsanko
Ensign Kyle Christopher
Bosanko, 22, of Dunnellon,
was commissioned May 4,
2013, as an officer in the
U.S. Navy.
Bosanko graduated
Crystal River High School in
2009, where he attended
the NJROTC program

leadership
of Cmdr.
Walker
and Sr.
Chief
Sparkman.
Bosanko
Christopher received a
Bonsanko full schol-
U.S. Navy arship
from the
U.S. Navy
to attend Jacksonville Uni-
versity, where he graduated
cum laude with a Bachelor
of Science Degree.
Bosanko is assigned to
Pensacola Naval Air Station
where he will be trained as
a Naval Aviator.
He is the son of Robert
and Sonya Bosanko.
Greg Cummins
Greg Cummins, a 2009
graduate of Lincoln High
School in Tallahassee, will
graduate from the United
States Naval Academy in
Annapolis, Md., on May 24,
2013.


Divorces 5/6/13 5/12/13
Wesley Allen Hill vs.
Stephanie Elaine Hampton
Hill
Marriages 5/6/13 5/12/13
Joseph John Atkins,
Anchorage, Alaska/Marina
Eleanor Doherty,
Anchorage, Alaska
Jorge Luis Del Riego,
Ocala/Sandra Marie Cunha,
Dunnellon
Dustin James Kelley,
Homosassa/Desiree Booth,
Homosassa
Stephen Lawrence
Leonard, Trego,


Mont./Kathy Jean
Davenport, Rio Rico, Ariz.
Vincent Craig Otis,
Inverness/Carie Ann Young,
Inverness
Jermaine Vonzell Ross,
Citrus Springs/Keiijuana
Denise Gates, Citrus
Springs
Darrell Eugene
Troutman Jr.,
Homosassa/Candice Lee
Bond, Homosassa
William Joel Waldrop,
Beverly Hills/Laura
Elizabeth Shohan,
Beverly Hills


50th ANNIVERSARY


During his time at Lin-
coln, Cummins was an AP
and Honors student as well
as a four-year member of
the
NJROTC
unit.
In his
four years
at the U.S.
Naval
Academy,
he has
Greg served in a
Cummins number of
U.S. Navy leadership
positions
to include: company squad
leader, company financial
officer, company honor ad-
visor, weapons detail
coach, and plebe summer
detailer. Cummins also had
the opportunity to study
abroad by means of an
economics internship at the
London School of Econom-
ics in the United Kingdom
and a language immersion
program at the Goethe
Institute in Berlin, Germany.
He will graduate with a
Bachelor of Science De-
gree in Economics, having
maintained a 3.2 cumula-
tive GPA.
Cummins will commis-
sion as an ensign in the
U.S. Navy and will serve as
a Naval flight officer upon
completion of flight school.
He is the son of Chris
and Tracy Cummins of Cit-
rus County.


The Hild


John and Sally Hild of
Crystal River will cele-
brate their 50th wedding
anniversary on June 8,
2013.
They both grew up in
Southwest Philadelphia,
Pa., and were married in


"J




St. Francis De Sales
Catholic Church on June 8,
1963.
The Hilds have four
sons, five grandsons and
one granddaughter. They
will celebrate with family
and friends later in June.


S100th BIRTHDAY

Sylvia Schettino


DARLENE MANN/For the Chronicle
Sylvia Schettino will celebrate her 100th birthday at
Barrington Place on May 27, 2013. She received roses
from her stepdaughter a bit early and said she wasn't
sure if they were for Mother's Day, her birthday or both.

FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Jsyorbabythe





G utest?









Submit photos May 15th 22nd

Vote May 23rd 31st


baby must have been born aft November0p11


For the RECORD


Why I hate



Facebook



'friends'


A18 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


TOGETHER


i
If











SPORTS


Inclement weather
interrupts Sprint
All-Star Race on
Saturday night./B5



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


i MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
* NBA, auto racing/B5
0 Tennis/B5
0 NHL, NFL, golf/B6


No Triple Crown winner this year


Oxbow dashes to

Preakness win;

Orb takes fourth

Associated Press
BALTIMORE -A pair of not
so over-the-hill Hall of Famers
pulled off a huge upset in the
Preakness and ended any
hopes of a Triple Crown at-
tempt at the Belmont Stakes.
Thanks to Oxbow's wire-to-
wire win Saturday over Ken-
tucky Derby winner Orb,
trainer D. Wayne Lukas and


jockey Gary Stevens have them-
selves another classic to add to
their stellar resumes.
"I get paid to spoil dreams,"
the 77-year-old Lukas said after
his record 14th win in a Triple
Crown race. "Unfortunately we
go over here and you can't mail
'em in. It's a different surface
and a different time. You gotta
line 'em up and win 'em."
Stevens ended his retirement
in January, and won his third
Preakness to go along with
three victories in the Derby and
three in the Belmont.
"At 50 years old, after seven
years retirement, it doesn't get
any better than this," Stevens
said. "This is super, super sweet


and it happened for the right
guy All the stars were aligned.
It's even more special winning it
for Wayne Lukas and his team."
Lukas put Stevens on his first
Triple Crown race winner when
the rider guided the filly Win-
ning Colors to victory in the
1988 Derby
"He supported me," Stevens
said. "A lot of people were
See Page B5
Jockey Gary Stevens celebrates
aboard Oxbow after winning the
138th Preakness Stakes horse
race Saturday at Pimlico Race
Course in Baltimore.
Associated Press


Boys Track Athlete of the Yearfinalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM



Racking up points


Matt Giardino,
Lecanto junior


Corey Pollard, John McAteer,
Crystal River senior Crystal River senior


Pollard Giardino, McAteer do it allfor respective track andfield teams


In the world of track and field, one
athlete can be actually make the dif-
ference between a team winning and
losing a meet
Lecanto's Matt Giardino just missed
out on bringing home the Panthers' sec-
ond straight Class 3A state title in adap-
tive track and field,
but the junior still
snagged an indi-
vidual state crown
in the shot put
while narrowly
Missing another in
the 200-meter
wheelchair race.
He also holds three
state records in the
Jon-Michael two-year-old sport.
Jon-Michael Crystal River's
Soracchi Corey Pollard
ON POINT excelled in five
events (three indi-
vidual and two relays) and made the
Class 2A state meet in both the 800-meter
race and the high jump, snagging a fifth-
place finish in the later event.
Pollard's Pirate teammate John
McAteer filled a similar role as the county's
best in the 300-meter hurdles and was neck
and neck with Gabriel Charles as one of the
best pole vaulters around. McAteer also
competed on two Crystal River relay teams.
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle
sports editor He can be emailed at
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline. com or
reached at 352-564-2928.


All-Chronicle boys
track and field team
100 meters
Ryan Newton, Lecanto.
200 meters
Ryan Newton, Lecanto.
400 meters
Corey Pollard, Crystal River.
800 meters
Corey Pollard, Crystal River.
1,600 meters
Brandon Harris, Crystal River.
3,200 meters
Brandon Harris, Crystal River.
110-meter hurdles
Thomas Roberts, Lecanto.
300-meter hurdles
John McAteer, Crystal River.
4x100-meter relay
Ryan Newton, Justin Dunham, Terrance
Council, Easton Conner, Lecanto.
4x400-meter relay
Corey Pollard, John McAteer, John
Bester, Jared Miller, Crystal River.


4x800-meter relay
Corey Pollard, John McAteer, Brandon
Harris, John Bester, Crystal River.
High jump
Corey Pollard, Crystal River.
Long jump
James Pouncey, Citrus.
Triple jump
Hunter Roessler, Crystal River.
Shot put
Josh Riemer, Lecanto.
Discus
Manuel Henriquez, Crystal River.
Pole vault
Gabriel Charles, Crystal River.
Adaptive Track and Field
200 meters
Matthew Giardino, Lecanto.
800 meters
Matthew Giardino, Lecanto.
Shot put
Matthew Giardino, Lecanto.
Compiled by Jon-Michael Soracchi


Big 9th


inning


for Rays

TB scores six

runs late to sink

Baltimore 10-6

Associated Press
BALTIMORE Matt Joyce
hit a go-ahead, two-run double
in a six-run ninth-inning rally,
lifting the Tampa Bay Rays to a
10-6 victory over the Orioles on
Saturday, ending Baltimore's
franchise-record streak of 109
straight wins when leading
after seven innings.
Joyce also homered and fin-
ished 3 for 5 with five RBIs.
It was the third straight road
victory for the Rays, all of them
come-from-behind wins.
Trailing 6-4, Kelly Johnson hit
a one-out homer off Orioles
closer Jim Johnson (1-4), whose
club-record
streak of 35
straight saves
ended Tuesday.
Johnson then
loaded the
bases on two
walks and a hit
before Joyce hit
a two-run dou-
ble to the right- Matt Joyce
center gap for a went 3 for 5
7-6 lead. Ben with HR and
Zobristfollowed five RBIs.
with a two-run
double off Darren O'Day, who
later issued a bases-loaded walk
to Luke Scott
Adam Jones and Chris Davis
homered for the Orioles, who
have lost four straight.
Alex Torres (1-0) worked four
hitless innings for the victory
The Orioles sent 10 men to
the plate in the first inning and
took a 4-0 lead against Roberto
Hernandez.
Nate McLouth led off with a
single, moved to second on a
groundout and scored when
Nick Markakis doubled over
the head of Joyce. Jones then
ripped a line drive homer to left
off an 0-2 pitch and Davis fol-
lowed with a shot to left-center
Jair Jurrjens retired the first
seven hitters he faced before al-
lowing successive doubles to
Jose Molina and Yunel Escobar


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


New York
Boston
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
8 --
5 1 --
S 3/2 1
S41/2 2
5 10 7/2



East Division
GB WC
1- E
5 12 2
5 42 5
) 7 7/2
6 13/2 14


Str Home
W-2 15-9
W-4 13-10
L-4 9-10
W-2 14-8
L-2 9-12




Str Home
W-2 11-5
L-1 12-9
L-1 10-12
L-1 9-12
L-7 5-16


Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
17 .585 7
17 .575 '2 4- 4
18 .526 2/2 2 3
22 .463 5 4/2 6
21 .462 5 4/2 4


Str Home
W-3 13-8
W-1 13-7
L-1 10-8
L-1 8-9
L-4 9-12


W
Texas 27
Oakland 21
Seattle 20
Los Angeles 16
Houston 12


West Division
L Pct GB WC
15 .643 -
22 .488 6/2 3/2
23 .465 7/2 4/2
27 .372 11/2 8/2
31 .279 15/2 12/2


NATIONAL LEAGUE


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
15 .643 7-3
17 .605 1'/2 8-2
18 .581 2/2 7-3
24 .429 9 6/2 6-4
24 .415 9/2 7 2-8


Arizona
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
GB WC

1/2 1/2
I 2/2 2/2
S5/2 5/2
5 7 7


Str Home
L-1 12-5
W-1 11-10
L-2 11-9
W-1 9-13
W-1 6-16




Str Home
W-4 12-11
L-1 15-7
W-1 12-8
W-1 11-10
L-2 11-13


NL

Braves 3, Dodgers 1


Atlanta


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Crwfrdlf 4 0 0 0 Smmnsss 4 1 1 1
Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 4 00 0
AdGnzllb 3 1 0 0 J.Uptonlf 4 0 0 0
Ethierrf 4 0 0 0 FFrmn b 3 0 0 0
Schmkr2b 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn3b 3 03 0
Fdrwczc 3 0 1 0 R.Penapr-3bO 0 0 0
Punto 3b 2 00 0 McCnnc 3 00 0
DGordn ss 1 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0
Capuanp 1 00 0 BUptoncf 3 1 1 0
Jansenp 0 00 0 Medlenp 2 01 0
Gearrinp 0 0 0 0
Gattisph 1 1 1 2
Kimrelp 0 00 0
Totals 26 12 0 Totals 303 7 3
Los Angeles 000 100 000 1
Atlanta 000 000 03x 3
E-J.Upton (4). DP-Los Angeles 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 4, Atlanta 3.2B-Schumaker (5). HR-
Simmons (5), Gattis (8). CS-D.Gordon (2). S-
Capuano 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Capuano 71/35 1 1 0 5
Jansen L,1-2 2/3 2 2 2 0 1
Atlanta
Medlen 7 2 1 0 3 5
GearrinW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
KimbrelS,13-16 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Medlen (D.Gordon).
T-2:40. A-38,615 (49,586).
Cubs 8, Mets 2


Chicago
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Baxterrf 4 0 1 0 DeJesscf 4 01 2
DnMrp2b 4 0 2 0 SCastross 5 00 0
DWrght3b 4 01 0 Rizzolb 4 2 2 1
I.Davislb 4 0 0 0 ASorinlf 3 1 1 0
Duda If 4 01 0 HRndnp 0 00 0
Buckc 3 1 1 0 Schrhltrf 4 2 2 1
Ankielcf 4 1 2 2 Valuen3b 2 0 1 1
RTejadss 4 0 0 0 Castilloc 4 1 1 1
Hefnerp 0 0 0 0 Barney2b 4 1 1 0
Byrd ph 1 0 1 0 Feldmn p 3 0 1 2
Carsonp 0 00 0 Russellp 0 00 0
Turnerph 1 00 0 Sweenyph-lf 1 1 1 0
McHghp 0 000
Vldspn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 29 2 Totals 34811 8
NewYork 000 000 002 2
Chicago 000 410 03x 8
E-I.Davis (3), S.Castro (6). DP-New York 1,
Chicago 1. LOB-New York 7, Chicago 6. 2B-
A.Soriano (11), Feldman (2), Sweeney (2). HR-
Ankiel (2), Rizzo (10), Schierholtz (5).
SB-D.Wright (10). CS-Dan.Murphy (3). S-
Hefner SF-Valbuena.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
HefnerL,0-5 4 5 4 4 2 3
Carson 2 1 1 1 0 1
McHugh 2 5 3 3 0 1
Chicago
FeldmanW,4-3 62/37 0 0 1 6
Russell 11/30 0 0 0 0
H.Rondon 1 2 2 2 0 0
HBP-by Hefner (A.Soriano).
T-2:51. A-38,766 (41,019).
Reds 10, Phillies 0
Cincinnati Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choocf 5 1 2 0 Rollinsss 3 0 1 0
Cozartss 6 1 1 1 Durbinp 0 00 0
Vottolb 4 24 2 Utley2b 3 00 0
N.Sotolb 0 00 0 MYong3b 4 01 0
Phillips2b 6 1 1 0 Howard lb 4 0 1 0
Bruce rf 4 0 2 1 Revere pr 0 0 0 0
Frazier3b 4 2 2 1 DYong rf 4 0 0 0
Simonp 0 00 0 DBrwnlf 4 02 0
Lutz If 5 1 2 1 Mayrrycf 4 0 0 0
Hanignc 3 2 1 3 Kratzc 3 0 1 0
Arroyop 3 01 0 Kndrckp 2 00 0
Hannhn3b 1 0 0 0 Rosnrgp 0 0 0 0
Horst p 0 0 0 0
Aumontp 0 00 0
Galvis ph-ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 4110169 Totals 32 0 6 0
Cincinnati 030 001 042 10
Philadelphia 000 000 000 0
LOB-Cincinnati 12, Philadelphia 7.2B-Cozart
(6), Votto (10), Bruce (15), Lutz (1), Howard (10),
D.Brown (5). HR-Votto (6), Hanigan (1). SB-
Choo (5). S-Arroyo. SF-Bruce.
IP H RERBBSO


Cincinnati
ArroyoW,4-4 72/35 0 0 2 6
Simon 11/31 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia
K.KendrickL,4-2 6 8 4 4 4 2
Rosenberg 11/34 3 3 1 2
Horst 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Aumont 1/3 2 1 1 0 0
Durbin 1 2 2 2 0 1
HBP-by K.Kendrick (Hanigan).WP-Aumc
T-3:09. A-41,817 (43,651).
Diamondbacks 1,


Marlins 0
Miami


ont.


ab rh bi ab rh bi
GParrarf 3 1 1 1 Pierre If 4 0 0 0
Gregrsss 2 0 0 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 1 0
Gldschlb 4 0 1 0 Dietrch2b 3 0 0 0
ErChvz3b 4 0 0 0 Ozuna rf 3 0 1 0
C.Rosslf 4 0 1 0 Coghlncf 3 0 1 0
MMntrc 3 0 1 0 Dobbs b 3 0 0 0
Prado2b 3 0 0 0 Polanc3b 3 0 0 0
Pollockcf 3 0 0 0 Brantly c 3 0 0 0
McCrthp 3 00 0 Koehlerp 1 00 0
Diazph 1 0 0 0
Webb p 0 00 0
MDunnp 0 00 0
Rugginph 1 0 0 0
Cishekp 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 14 1 Totals 29 3 0
Arizona 100 000 000 1
Miami 000 000 000 0
DP-Miami 1. LOB-Arizona 4, Miami 4. HR-
G.Parra (4). CS-G.Parra (6).
IP H RERBBSO


Arizona
McCarthy W,1-3 9 3
Miami
Koehler L,0-2 6 3
Webb 11/31
M.Dunn 2/3 0
Cishek 1 0
WP-Koehler. PB-M.Mo
McCarthy.
T-2:24. A-18,786 (37,442).


0 0 2 5


1 1
0 0
00
00
ntero.


2 7
0 1
1 0
0 1
Balk-


-- ;





Associated Press
New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano hit a pair of two-run home runs Saturday against the
Toronto Blue Jays during a 7-2 victory at Yankee Stadium in New York.



Cano slugs Yankees to win


Associated Press


NEW YORK Robinson Cano
hit a pair of two-run homers to
back a solid effort by David
Phelps and the New York Yankees
beat the Toronto Blue Jays for the
ninth straight time at Yankee Sta-
dium, 7-2 on Saturday
Phelps (2-2) stuck out eight
while allowing one run in a sea-
son-high seven innings, helping
New York beat the Blue Jays for
the eighth time in nine games this
season.
Cano connected off Brandon
Morrow with two outs in the third
after Brett Gardner drove in the
first run of the game with an RBI
single. Cano also hit one off Mor-
row (1-3) with two out in the fifth,
a shot that gave him his second
multihomer game of the year He
has 12 such games for his career
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Angels 12, White Sox 9
ANAHEIM, Calif.--Alberto
Callaspo hit a three-run homer in Los
Angeles' five-run seventh inning, and
the Angels beat the White Sox 12-9 to
end Chicago's four-game winning
streak.
Callaspo also had a pair of sacrifice
flies to give him five RBIs on the day.
Mark Trumbo also went deep for Los
Angeles, which finished with 17 hits.

Indians 5, Mariners 4
CLEVELAND Mark Reynolds'
fielder's choice with the bases loaded
in the ninth inning lifting the Cleveland
Indians to a 5-4 victory over the Seat-
tle Mariners on Saturday.
The Indians, who began the day
tied with Detroit atop the AL Central,
have won 16 of their last 20.
Seattle tied the score at 4-all with
two-out, solo homers by Raul Ibanez
and Justin Smoak off Indians closer
Chris Perez in the top of the ninth.

Rangers 7, Tigers 2
ARLINGTON, Texas- ElvisAndrus
had a career-high five hits, Mitch
Moreland homered and Texas roughed
upAnibal Sanchez in the Rangers' 7-2
victory over the Detroit Tigers.
Andrus scored three runs, had two
RBIs and stole a pair of bases as he
hit leadoff for the second straight
game in place of ailing second base-
man lan Kinsler. Andrus finished off
his 5-for-5 game with a single to right
in the eighth.
Moreland hit a solo shot off
Sanchez leading off the third, his 10th
home run of the season.

Red Sox 12, Twins 5
MINNEAPOLIS David Ortiz
homered twice and drove in six runs to
torment his former team once again,
leading the Boston Red Sox to a 12-5
victory over the Minnesota Twins.
Dustin Pedroia had two hits, two
walks and an RBI, extending his hit-
ting streak to 10 games. Daniel Nava
also went deep for the Red Sox, who
have won four straight following a
slide in which they had lost 10 of 14.
Scott Diamond (3-4) gave up six
runs on eight hits and walked three in
4 1-3 innings for the Twins, who have
lost four in a row to fall into last place
in the AL Central.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Braves 3, Dodgers 1
ATLANTA- Evan Gattis and An-


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 5, Seattle 4
N.Y Yankees 7, Toronto 2
L.A. Angels 12, Chicago White Sox 9
Tampa Bay 10, Baltimore 6
Houston 4, Pittsburgh 2, 11 innings
Boston 12, Minnesota 5
Detroit at Texas, late
Kansas City at Oakland, late
Today
Seattle (FHernandez 5-2) at Cleveland (Masterson
6-2), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 3-5) at N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 4-3),
1:05 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Locke 3-1), 1:35
p.m.
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 7-0) at Baltimore (Tillman 3-1),
1:35 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 1-4) at Minnesota (PHernandez 2-0),
2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 5-1) at L.A. Angels (Var-
gas 2-3), 3:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Mendoza 1-2) at Oakland (Griffin 4-3),
4:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 5-1) at Texas (D.Holland 3-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Seattle at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 8, N.Y Mets 2
Cincinnati 10, Philadelphia 0
Houston 4, Pittsburgh 2, 11 innings
Arizona 1, Miami 0
Atlanta 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 4, 10 innings
San Diego 2, Washington 1
San Francisco at Colorado, late
Today
Arizona (Miley 3-2) at Miami (Nolasco 2-5), 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 2-3) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 3-
0), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Locke 3-1), 1:35
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Magill 0-0) at Atlanta (Minor 5-2), 1:35
p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 1-4) at St. Louis (Gast 1-0), 2:15
p.m.
N.Y Mets (Gee 2-5) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 4-2),
2:20 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 3-2) at Colorado (Nicasio 3-1),
4:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 4-4) at San Diego (Cashner 2-2),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

drelton Simmons hit consecutive
homers off Kenley Jansen in the
eighth inning, and the Atlanta Braves
rallied to beat the Los Angeles
Dodgers 3-1.
Kris Medlen, Cory Gearrin, and
Craig Kimbrel combined on a two-hit-
ter for Atlanta.
Chris Capuano led 1-0 before he al-
lowed a one-out single to B.J. Upton
in the eighth. Dodgers manager Don
Mattingly brought in Jansen (1-2), the
hard-throwing right-hander, to face
Gattis, a rookie pinch-hitter.
Gattis lined Jansen's 2-2 pitch into
the left-field seats for his eighth homer
to give Atlanta a 2-1 lead.

D'backs 1, Marlins 0
MIAMI Brandon McCarthy
pitched a three-hit complete-game
shutout for his first win since being
struck in the head by a line drive last
season in the Arizona Diamondbacks'
1-0 victory over the Miami Marlins.
Gerardo Parra led off the game with
a home run for Arizona, which has
won four in a row while dealing the
Marlins a season-long seven-game
losing streak.
McCarthy (1-3) struck out five and
walked two while throwing 68 of 99
pitches for strikes.

Reds 10, Phillies 0
PHILADELPHIA- Bronson Arroyo


pitched five-hit ball over 7 2-3 innings,
Joey Votto was 4 for 4 with a homer,
and the Cincinnati Reds beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 10-0.
Arroyo (4-4) struck out six and al-
lowed one runner to reach third in
winning his third straight start against
Philadelphia. He was 1-7 in his first
10 games against the Phillies, but
has figured them out over the last
two seasons.
Votto had a two-run shot and
walked twice to reach safely six times.

Cubs 8, Mets 2
CHICAGO Scott Feldman
pitched shutout ball into the seventh
inning and drove in two runs with a big
two-out double, helping the Chicago
Cubs beat the New York Mets 8-2.
The Cubs have won five of seven
and can win three straight series for
the first time with a victory on Sunday.
Anthony Rizzo had two hits and his
first home run since signing a seven-
year contract on Monday.
Chicago was going for its first
shutout since a victory over Colorado
on Aug. 26, but Rick Ankiel broke it up
with a two-run homer off Hector Ron-
don with one out in the ninth.

Padres 2, Nationals 1
SAN DIEGO Everth Cabrera sin-
gled in the go-ahead run in the eighth
against Jordan Zimmermann, and
Yonder Alonso homered and helped
turn a heads-up double-play as the
San Diego Padres beat the Washing-
ton Nationals 2-1.
Zimmermann (7-2) was trying to be-
come the first to win eight games in
the big leagues this season.

Rockies 10, Giants 2
DENVER Tyler Chatwood threw
into the sixth inning and Wilin Rosario
hit a two-run homer off Tim Lincecum
in the Colorado Rockies' 10-2 rout of
the San Francisco Giants.
Promoted from Triple-A Colorado
Springs before the game for his sec-
ond stint with the Rockies this season,
Chatwood (2-0) had a shaky second
inning but settled in after that and
handcuffed the Giants, who managed
one run and six hits in 5 2-3 innings.

Brewers 6, Cardinals 4,
10 innings
ST. LOUIS Jeff Bianchi drove in
two runs with a 10th-inning single up
the middle, and the Milwaukee Brew-
ers beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-4.
Joe Kelly (0-2) allowed runs for the
first time in five appearances and took
the loss. He allowed two hits and a
walk in one inning for the Cardinals,
who fell to 0-3 in extra-inning games.
John Axford (1-3) gave up one hit
and two walks in 1 1-3 innings to earn
the win.

Astros 4, Pirates 2,
11 innings

PITTSBURGH Jason Castro led
off the 11th inning with a double and
scored the go-ahead run on a close
play at the plate as the Houston As-
tros topped the Pittsburgh Pirates 4-2.
Castro doubled off the top of the
center-field fence against Bryan Mor-
ris (1-2), and Carlos Pena was inten-
tionally walked one out later. The
runners moved up on a wild pitch and
Castro scored when he beat second
baseman Neil Walker's throw home
on Matt Dominguez's fielder's choice
grounder.


AL


Rays 10, Orioles 6


Tampa Bay
ab
Jnnngs cf 5
Joyce rf 5
Zobrist 2b 4
Longori 3b 5
Loney lb 4
Scott dh 3
KJhnsn If 5
Fuld If 0
JMolin c 2
Loaton pr-c 1


Baltimore
r h bi
1 1 0 McLothlf
2 3 5 Machd 3b
1 2 2 Markks rf
0 1 0 A.Jones cf
0 0 0 C.Davislb
0 0 1 Wietersc
1 1 1 Hardy ss
0 0 0 Dickrsn dh
1 2 0 YNavrr2b
2 0 0 Flahrty 2b


ab rh bi
4220
5000
5 1 3 1
4 1 2 3
4 2 2 1
5131
4123
4221
4000
5021
4010
4010
0000
4 0 0 0
5 0 2 1
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
0 0 0 0


YEscorss 3 2 1 1
Totals 37101110 Totals 39613 6
Tampa Bay 003 010 006 10
Baltimore 401 100 000 6
DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 6, Baltimore
10. 2B-Joyce 2 (5), Zobrist 2 (11), Longoria
(12), J.Molina 2 (5), Y.Escobar (8), Markakis (9),
Hardy (6). HR-Joyce (7), K.Johnson (7),
A.Jones (6), C.Davis (12). SB-McLouth 2 (13).
CS-Markakis (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Ro.Hernandez 2 8 5 5 0 1
C.Ramos 2 4 1 1 1 2
AI.TorresW,1-0 4 0 0 0 2 3
Lueke 1 1 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
Jurrjens 5 6 4 4 1 5
Tom.Hunter H,1 22/30 0 0 1 1
MatuszH,7 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Ji.Johnson L,1-4 1/3 3 5 5 2 0
O'Day 2/3 2 1 1 2 0
Ro.Hernandez pitched to 1 batter in the 3rd.
HBP-by Ro.Hernandez (C.Davis). WP-
Jurrjens.
T-3:36. A-34,685 (45,971).
Yankees 7,
Blue Jays 2
Toronto New York
ab rh bi ab rh bi


MeCarr If
Bautist rf
Encrnc dh
Arencii c
Lind lb
Lawrie 3b
Rasms cf
Mlzturs ss
Bonifac 2b
Totals
Toronto
NewYork


4 0 1 0 Gardnrcf
2 0 0 0 Cano 2b
3 1 1 1 V.Wells If
4 0 1 0 Hafnerdh
4 1 2 0 Overaylb
4 0 0 0 Grndrs rf
4 0 1 1 J.Nixss
4 0 1 0 DAdms3b
4 0 1 0 AuRmnc
33 28 2 Totals
000 100 010
003 020 02x


4 1 1 1
4224
4 1 1 0
4 1 1 2
4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0

3 00 0
3 1 1 0
347 8 7
4110
4112
4010
4000
4110
3000
3110
34 7 8 7
-2
-7


E-M.Izturis (5), Lind (1). DP-New York 1.
LOB-Toronto 7, New York 3. 2B-Me.Cabrera
(9), Lind 2 (7). HR-Encarnacion (12), Cano 2
(12), Hafner (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
MorrowL,1-3 5 7 5 5 0 1
Cecil 1 0 0 0 0 1
Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 2
Oliver 1 1 2 1 0 2
NewYork
D.PhelpsW,2-2 7 6 1 1 3 8
D.Robertson 1 2 1 1 0 1
Logan 1 0 0 0 0 2
Angels 12,
White Sox 9


Chicago
ab
Wise cf 5
AIRmrz ss 5
Rios rf 4
C.Wells ph-rf2
A.Dunnlb 3
Kppngrlb 2
Konerkdh 5
Gillaspi 3b 5
Viciedo If 3
Gimenz c 5


Los Angeles
rh bi ab rh bi
00 0 Aybarss 4 00 1
2 3 0 Troutcf 2 1 1 0
1 2 2 Pujolsdh 5 2 2 0
0 0 0 Trumo rf-1b 4 3 2 2
0 1 2 HKndrc2b 5 1 2 1
1 1 0 Callasp3b 3 22 5
1 3 1 BHarrslb 2 1 0 0
00 0 Hamltnrf 1 1 1 0
2 2 1 lannettc 1 1 0 0
2 4 3 Shuck If 4 02 3


Greene2b 5 0 1 0
Totals 44 9179 Totals 31121212
Chicago 000 400 050 9
Los Angeles 000 320 52x 12
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Chicago 12, Los Angeles
9. 2B-Rios (9), Pujols (9), Trumbo (13),
H.Kendrick (5), Shuck (5). HR-Gimenez (2),
Trumbo (10), Callaspo (3). CS-Trout (3). SF-
Aybar, Callaspo 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
H.Santiago 31/34 3 3 4 2
N.Jones L,0-4 31/33 4 4 2 2
Veal 1/3 3 4 4 2 1
Lindstrom 1 2 1 1 2 1
Los Angeles
Blanton 41/311 4 4 2 6
CoelloW,1-0 12/30 0 0 0 3
D.De La Rosa H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1
Richards 2/3 4 4 4 0 2
FrieriS,8-9 11/31 1 1 0 3
Veal pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by H.Santiago (Trout), by Blanton
(AI.Ramirez, Viciedo). WP-H.Santiago. PB-
Gimenez 2.
Red Sox 12, Twins 5


Boston

Ellsury cf
JGoms If
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli lb
Nava rf
Mdlrks 3b
Lvrnwy c
Ciriaco ss
Totals
Boston


Minnesota


ab r h bi
5 1 1 0 Carroll2b
4 2 1 0 Mauerdh
S3 3 2 1 Mornealb
4 3 3 6 Wlngh If
2 2 1 0 Doumitc
4 1 2 3 Arcia rf
4 0 2 0 Plouffe 3b
4 0 1 2 Hickscf
5 0 0 0 Flormn ss
35121312 Totals
301 030 401


ab rh bi
4 0 2 1
5 1 2 0
5 0 2 1
5 0 1 0
4 1 2 0
2 1 0 0

4 1 0 0
5 1 2 2
4021
5120
5021
5010
4120
2100
301 1
4100
5122
37512 5
12


Minnesota 010 130 000 5
DP-Boston 2, Minnesota 2. LOB-Boston 6,
Minnesota 13. 2B-J.Gomes (4), Pedroia (11),
Mauer (17), Willingham (9), Doumit (9). HR-
D.Ortiz 2 (7), Nava (6). SB-Hicks (4), Florimon
(5). SF-Nava, Lavarnway
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Dempster 42/38 5 5 6 2
Mortensen 23 2 0 0 1 0
BreslowW,1-0H,1 12/31 0 0 1 0
A.Wilson 2 1 0 0 0 2
Minnesota
Diamond L,3-4 41/38 6 6 3 1
Swarzak 12/33 4 4 3 0
Fien 1 1 1 1 0 1
Pressly 2 1 1 1 2 1
Swarzak pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Rangers 7, Tigers 2
Detroit Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Dirks If 4 0 0 0 Andrusss 5 3 5 2
TrHntrrf 4 1 2 1 DvMrp If 4 1 0 1
MiCarr3b 4 0 1 0 Brkmndh 4 02 2
Fielderlb 4 0 1 1 Beltre3b 5 0 2 0
VMrtnzdh 3 0 1 0 N.Cruz rf 3 00 0
Avilac 4 0 0 0 Morlndlb 3 1 1 1
JhPerltss 4 0 1 0 Chirinsc 4 1 1 0
Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 LMartn cf 2 1 1 0
AGarcicf 3 1 1 0 Gentryph-cf 1 01 0
LGarci 2b 4 00 0
Totals 33 27 2 Totals 35713 6
Detroit 002 000 000 2
Texas 132 001 OOx 7
E-Ani.Sanchez (1), Avila (1). DP-Detroit 2,
Texas 1. LOB-Detroit 5, Texas 9. 2B-
Tor.Hunter (12), V.Martinez (8), Andrus (6), Berk-
man (10). 3B-Andrus (3). HR--Moreland (10).
SB-Andrus 2 (12), L.Martin (4). S-L.Martin.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Ani.Sanchez L,4-4
Smyly
Coke
Texas
GrimmW,3-3
Kirkman
Scheppers
Nathan
WP-Smyly PB-A


22/39 6 5 2 2
3132 1 1 1 2
220012


62/37
1/3 0
1 0
1 0
ivila.


Los Angeles


New York


Arizona


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Indians 5, Mariners 4


Seattle


Cleveland
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


EnChvz cf 3 0 1 0 Bourn cf 5 0 2 1
Bay ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 5 1 2 1
MSndrscf 0 0 0 0 ACarerss 5 1 3 0
Ackley 2b 4 0 1 0 Swisherdh 3 0 1 0
Seager3b 4 0 0 0 MrRynl3b-lb5 1 2 3
KMorlsdh 4 0 1 0 CSantnlb 4 0 0 0
Morse rf 4 0 0 0 Brantly If 0 0 0 0
Ibanezlf 4 1 1 1 Aviles lf-3b 4 1 2 0
Smoaklb 3 2 2 1 YGomsc 4 1 1 0
JMontrc 4 0 1 0 Stubbsrf 2 0 0 0
Ryan ss 3 1 2 2
Totals 34 49 4 Totals 37513 5
Seattle 000 000 022 4
Cleveland 100 012 001 5
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Seattle 1, Cleveland 1. LOB-Seattle 4, Cleve-
land 12. 2B-En.Chavez (3), Smoak (7), A.Cabrera
(12), Swisher (10), Aviles (3). HR-lbanez (8),
Smoak (2), Ryan (1), Mar.Reynolds (12). SB-
Bourn 2 (5), Kipnis (8). CS-J.Montero (1). S-
Stubbs.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
J.Saunders 51/311 4 4 2 2
Farquhar 22/30 0 0 0 5
O.PerezL,1-1 0 2 1 1 1 0
Medina 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
McAllister 71/36 2 2 1 1
R.HillH,3 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
C.PerezW,2-0 1 2 2 2 0 1
O.Perez pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
Medina pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.

Padres 2, Nationals 1
Washington San Diego
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Spancf 3 0 0 0 EvCarrss 4 0 2 1
Lmrdzz If 3 0 1 1 Venale rf 4 0 0 0
Zmrmn 3b 4 0 0 0 Headly3b 3 0 0 0
LaRoch1b 3 0 1 0 Alonsolb 3 1 2 1
Dsmndss 4 0 0 0 Kotsayl If 3 0 1 0
TMoorerf 3 0 0 0 Streetp 0 00 0
Espinos 2b 3 00 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 0
KSuzukc 2 1 1 0 Denorficf-lf 3 0 1 0
Zmrmnp 1 0 1 0 JoBakrc 3 0 1 0
Stults p 2 0 0 0
Amarst ph-cf 1 1 0 0
Totals 26 1 4 1 Totals 292 7 2
Washington 000 001 000 1
San Diego 010 000 01x 2
E-Zimmermann (1), Gyorko (3). DP-Washington 1,
San Diego 3. LOB-Washington 4, San Diego 4.
HR-Alonso (5). SB-Ev.Cabrera (15). CS-Lombar-
dozzi 2 (2). S-Zimmermann 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Zimmermann L,7-2 8 7 2 1 0 6
San Diego
Stults W,4-3 8 4 1 1 2 5
StreetS,10-11 1 0 0 0 2 1
HBP-by Zimmermann (Headley).

Astros 4, Pirates 2,
11 innings


Houston


Pittsburgh
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Grssmncf-lf3 0 0 0 SMarte If 4 0 1 0
Crowe If-rf 3 1 1 0 Tabata rf 3 0 1 0
Altuve 2b 5 0 3 1 Snider ph-rf 2 0 0 0
JCastro c 5 1 2 0 McCtch cf 4 2 2 0
Carter rf 5 0 2 1 GSnchzlb 5 0 1 1
BBarnscf 0 00 0 RMartnc 5 01 0
C.Penalb 3 0 0 0 lnge3b 5 0 2 1
Dmngz 3b 5 1 0 1 Walker 2b 5 0 0 0
MGnzlzss 5 1 1 0 Mercer ss 5 0 1 0
Bedardp 1 00 0 AJBrntp 2 00 0
Pareds ph 1 00 0 GJonesph 0 00 0
EGnzlz p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0
Wrghtp 0 0 0 0 Grillip 0 0 0 0
Cisnero p 1 0 0 0 McKnr ph 1 0 0 0
JMrtnz ph 1 0 1 1 Morris p 0 0 0 0
Veras p 0 000
Totals 38 4104 Totals 41 2 9 2
Houston 000 010 010 02 4
Pittsburgh 100 001 000 00 2
DP-Houston 1, Pittsburgh 4. LOB-Houston 8, Pitts-
burgh 9. 2B-J.Castro (12), McCutchen 2 (12),
G.Sanchez (6). S-Bedard.
IP H RERBBSO


Houston
Bedard
E.Gonzalez
W.Wright
Cisnero W,1-0
Veras S,6-8
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burnett
Melancon BS,1-1
Grilli
Morris L,1-2


7 5 1
1 3 1
1 0 0
2 2 2


W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Bedard (S.Marte), by W.Wright (G.Jones).
WP-Morris.

Brewers 6, Cardinals 4,
10 innings
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aoki rf 4 2 2 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 0 1 2
Segura ss 4 1 3 2 Jay cf 4 0 1 1
Braun If 5 0 3 2 Hollidy If 5 0 1 0
ArRmr3b 5 1 3 0 Craigrf-lb 3 1 1 0
Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 2 0
CGomzcf 3 1 0 0 MAdmslb 4 0 0 0
YBtncrlb 4 0 0 0 Rosnthlp 0 0 0 0
Axford p 0 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
LSchfrph 1 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0
Hndrsnp 0 0 0 0 J.Kellyp 0 0 0 0
Bianchi2b 5 1 2 2 Freese3b 5 1 1 0
Estrad p 1 0 0 0 Kozma ss 5 1 2 1
McGnzl p 0 00 0 Lynn p 0 00 0
Badnhp p 0 00 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0
Weeks ph 1 0 0 0 Wggntn ph 1 1 1 0
Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0 CMrtnzp 0 0 0 0
AIGnzlzlb 2 0 0 0 Beltran rf 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 6136 Totals 38410 4
Milwaukee 003 010 000 2 6
St. Louis 020 002 000 0 4
DP-Milwaukee 1, St. Louis 3. LOB-Milwaukee 9,
St. Louis 11. 2B-Holliday (7), Craig (12). 3B-Segura
(4). S-Estrada, Lynn.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Estrada 52/37 4 4 4 2
Mic.Gonzalez 0 1 0 0 0 0
Badenhop 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Kintzler 12/31 0 0 0 2
AxfordW,1-3 11/31 0 0 2 3
HendersonS,8-8 1 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Lynn 5 8 4 4 2 3
Salas 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ca.Martinez 12/31 0 0 0 1
Rosenthal 1/3 0 0 0 1 1
Mujica 1 1 0 0 0 2
J.KellyL,0-2 1 3 2 2 1 1
Mic.Gonzalez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Ca.Martinez (Segura, Lucroy). WP-
Rosenthal.
Rockies 10, Giants 2
San Francisco Colorado
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pagan cf 5 0 1 0 Fowlercf 5 3 3 2
Scutaro2b 4 0 2 0 Rutledg2b 4 1 1 0
Sandovl 3b 5 0 1 0 WLopezp 1 00 0
Poseyc 3 0 1 0 CGnzlzl If 3 0 0 1
Pence rf 4 1 1 0 Tlwtzk ss 5 1 4 2
Beltib 3 1 1 0 LeMahipr-ss 0 0 0 0
GBlanclf 4 0 1 1 WRosrc 5 1 2 3
BCrwfrrss 3 0 2 1 Heltonib 4 0 0 0
Linccm p 2 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 1 1 0
Noonan ph 0 0 0 0 Blckmn rf 3 2 1 0
Arias ph 1 0 0 0 Chatwd p 2 0 1 1
Machi p 0 0 0 0 Outmn p 1 0 0 0
AnTrrsph 1 0 0 0 JHerrr2b 1 1 1 0
Kontos p 0 0 00
Totals 35 2102 Totals 3810149
San Francisco 010 000 010 2
Colorado 003 120 13x 10
E-Lincecum (3), Posey (2), B.Crawford (5). DP-Col-
orado 1. LOB-San Francisco 10, Colorado 7. 2B-


SCOREBOARD


Foar thee ri-Qod


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected

Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
10 13 14 22 52
POWER BALL
11


CASH 3 (early)
9-2-4
CASH 3 (late)
8-6-9

PLAY 4 (early)
1-6-7-5
PLAY 4 (late)
1-4-5-6

FANTASY 5
2-14-17 -23-24

LOTTERY
1-11-19-33-37-49
XTRA
4


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 2 4 11 32
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,153.50
3-of-4 MB 52 $291.50
3-of-4 1,076 $42.00
2-of-4 MB 1,630 $19.00
1-of-4 MB 12,062 $2.50
2-of-4 32,124 $2.00


Fantasy 5:1 5 9 16 29
5-of-5 4 winners $58,228.92
4-of-5 371 $101.00
3-of-5 12,091 $8.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Indianapolis 500 qualifying sessions
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Kansas Nationals (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona Diamondbacks at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at Atlanta Braves
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) New York Mets at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Detroit Tigers at Texas Rangers
BASKETBALL
NBA PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE FINALS
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Memphis Grizzlies at San Antonio Spurs game 1
BICYCLING
1 p.m. (NBC) Tour of California, Stage 8
10:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of California, Stage 8 (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
5 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo World Match Play
Championship, Semifinal
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo World Match Play
Championship, Semifinals
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: HP Byron Nelson Championship,
Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: HP Byron Nelson Championship, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) Web.com: BMW Charity Pro-Am, Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Mobile Bay Classic, Final Round
HOCKEY
NHL PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
3 p.m. (NBC) New York Rangers at Boston Bruins game 2
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Pittsburgh Penguins at Ottawa Senators -
game 3
SOCCER
10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Newcastle United vs.
Arsenal.
1:10 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: Los Angeles Galaxy at New York Red Bulls
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
NCAA TOURNAMENT REGIONAL
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA

RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Pence (12), Belt (8), Fowler (6), Tulowitzki (10). HR-
W.Rosario (9). SB-G.Blanco (4), Fowler (6), C.Gon-
zalez (7).
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Lincecum L,3-3 5 7 6 6 2 4
Machi 2 3 1 1 0 2
Kontos 1 4 3 3 1 1
Colorado
ChatwoodW,2-0 52/37 1 1 4 4
Outman 2 3 1 1 0 0
W.Lopez 11/30 0 0 0 1
WP-Chatwood. Balk-Lincecum.

AL leaders
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .376; Loney Tampa
Bay, .359; Mauer, Minnesota, .351; Altuve, Houston,
.342; Pedroia, Boston, .341; Machado, Baltimore, .330;
AGordon, Kansas City, .329; Longoria, Tampa Bay, .329.
RUNS-AJackson, Detroit, 33; McLouth, Baltimore,
32; AJones, Baltimore, 31; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 31;
Machado, Baltimore, 31; MiCabrera, Detroit, 30; Pe-
droia, Boston, 30.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 42; CDavis, Baltimore,
40; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 37; Napoli, Boston, 34;
NCruz, Texas, 33; Fielder, Detroit, 33; Cano, New
York, 31; Encarnacion, Toronto, 31.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 62; Machado, Baltimore,
60; Pedroia, Boston, 57; AJones, Baltimore, 56; Al-
tuve, Houston, 54; AGordon, Kansas City, 54; Longo-
ria, Tampa Bay 53; Mauer, Minnesota, 53.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 18; Napoli,
Boston, 18; Mauer, Minnesota, 17; CDavis, Baltimore,
15; Donaldson, Oakland, 14; AJones, Baltimore, 14;
Lowrie, Oakland, 14.
TRIPLES-Ellsbury Boston, 4; Gardner, New York,
3; LMartin, Texas, 3; Trout, Los Angeles, 3; 16 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-Cano, NewYork, 12; CDavis, Balti-
more, 12; Encarnacion, Toronto, 12; MarReynolds,
Cleveland, 12; NCruz, Texas, 11; 6 tied at 10.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 13; McLouth,
Baltimore, 13; Andrus, Texas, 10; Gardner, New York,
9; Crisp, Oakland, 8; RDavis, Toronto, 8; AEscobar,
Kansas City, 8; Kipnis, Cleveland, 8; Pedroia, Boston,
8; Trout, Los Angeles, 8.
PITCHING-MMoore, Tampa Bay, 7-0; Darvish,
Texas, 7-1; Buchholz, Boston, 6-0; Lester, Boston, 6-
0; Kuroda, New York, 6-2; Masterson, Cleveland, 6-2;
8 tied at 5.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 86; Buchholz,
Boston, 69; Scherzer, Detroit, 68; AniSanchez, De-
troit, 66; FHernandez, Seattle, 64; Dempster, Boston,
63; Shields, Kansas City 62.
SAVES-Rivera, New York, 16; JiJohnson, Balti-
more, 14; AReed, Chicago, 14; Nathan, Texas, 12; Wil-
helmsen, Seattle, 11; Janssen, Toronto, 10; Perkins,
Minnesota, 8; Frieri, Los Angeles, 8.

NL leaders
BATTING-Segura, Milwaukee, .361 ;Votto, Cincin-
nati, .346; CGomez, Milwaukee, .345; YMolina, St.
Louis, .335; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .335; AdGonzalez,


Los Angeles, .331; GParra, Arizona, .327; Scutaro,
San Francisco, .327.
RUNS-Choo, Cincinnati, 35; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 35; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 33; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 33; Holliday, St. Louis, 32; JUpton, Atlanta, 32;
Votto, Cincinnati, 32.
RBI-Phillips, Cincinnati, 36; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
35; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 33; Sandoval, San Francisco,
32; Buck, New York, 31; Craig, St. Louis, 30; Rizzo,
Chicago, 30.
HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 57; Votto, Cincinnati,
56; GParra, Arizona, 55; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 54; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 52; YMolina, St. Louis, 52; Scutaro,
San Francisco, 52.
DOUBLES-Bruce, Cincinnati, 15; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 14; GParra, Arizona, 14; Pollock, Arizona, 14;
Desmond, Washington, 13; DanMurphy, New York, 13;
Schierholtz, Chicago, 13.
TRIPLES-Hechavarria, Miami, 5; Segura, Mil-
waukee, 4; ECabrera, San Diego, 3; CGomez, Mil-
waukee, 3; DWright, New York, 3; EYoung, Colorado,
3; 15 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 12; Harper, Washington, 11; Beltran, St.
Louis, 10; Buck, NewYork, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado,
10; Rizzo, Chicago, 10.
STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 15; Se-
gura, Milwaukee, 14; Pierre, Miami, 13; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 10; DWright, New York, 10; CGomez,
Milwaukee, 9; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 9.
PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington, 7-2;
Corbin, Arizona, 6-0; Lynn, St. Louis, 6-1; 8 tied at 5.
STRIKEOUTS-AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 79; Harvey,
New York, 68; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 67; Samardz-
ija, Chicago, 64; Wainwright, St. Louis, 63; Bumgar-
ner, San Francisco, 58; SMiller, St. Louis, 57; Lynn,
St. Louis, 57.
SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 16; Romo, San Fran-
cisco, 13; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 13; Mujica, St. Louis, 12;
RSoriano, Washington, 12; Street, San Diego, 10;
RBetancourt, Colorado, 10.




NHL playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, April 30
Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 1
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 4, Toronto 1
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Islanders 0
San Jose 3, Vancouver 1
Thursday, May 2
Ottawa 4, Montreal 2
Washington 3, N.Y Rangers 1
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1
Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT


Friday, May 3
Montreal 3, Ottawa 1
N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago 5, Minnesota 2
San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT
Saturday, May 4
Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Toronto 4, Boston 2
Anaheim 4, Detroit 0
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0
Sunday, May 5
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT
Ottawa 6, Montreal 1
San Jose 5, Vancouver 2
Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT
Monday, May 6
Boston 5, Toronto 2
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 3
Tuesday, May 7
Ottawa 3, Montreal 2, OT
N.Y. Islanders 6, Pittsburgh 4
Chicago 3, Minnesota 0
San Jose 4, Vancouver 3, San Jose wins series 4-
0
Wednesday, May 8
Boston 4, Toronto 3, OT
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 2, OT
Thursday, May 9
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 0
Ottawa 6, Montreal 1, Ottawa wins series 4-1
Chicago 5, Minnesota 1, Chicago wins series 4-1
Friday, May 10
Toronto 2, Boston 1
Washington 2, NY Rangers 1, OT
Detroit 4, Anaheim 3, OT
Los Angeles 2, St. Louis 1, Los Angeles wins series
4-2
Saturday, May 11
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT, Pittsburgh wins
series 4-2
Sunday, May 12
N.Y. Rangers 1, Washington 0
Toronto 2, Boston 1
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, Detroit wins series 4-3
Monday, May 13
Boston 5, Toronto 4, OT Boston wins series 4-3
N.Y. Rangers 5, Washington 0, N.Y Rangers wins
series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, May 14
Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1
Los Angeles 2, San Jose 0
Wednesday, May 15
Chicago 4, Detroit 1
Thursday, May 16
Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT, Boston leads series
1-0
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3, Los Angeles leads se-
ries 2-0
Friday, May 17
Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3, Pittsburgh leads series 2-0
Saturday, May 18
Detroit 4, Chicago 1, series tied 1-1
Los Angeles at San Jose, late
Today
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, May 20
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 21
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10p.m.
Wednesday, May 22
Pittsburgh at Ottawa. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 23
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 8 p.m.
x-San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, May 24
x-Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 25
x-N.Y. Rangers at Boston TBD
x-Detroit at Chicago, TBD
Sunday, May 26
x-Pittsburgh at Ottawa, TBD
x-Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD
Monday, May 27
x-Boston at N.Y. Rangers, TBD
x-Chicago at Detroit, TBD
Tuesday, May 28
x-Ottawa at Pittsburgh, TBD
x-San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD
Wednesday, May 29
x-N.Y. Rangers at Boston, TBD
x-Detroit at Chicago, TBD




Indy 500 qualifying
Pole Day (Qualifying continues Sunday;
race May 26)
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis
With rank, car number in parentheses, driver,
chassis-engine, time and speed in parentheses
1. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Honda, 2 minutes
37.3689 seconds (228.762 mph)
2. (26) Carlos Munoz, Dallara-Honda, 2:37.6581
(228.342)
3. (25) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 2:37.7139
(228.261)
4. (5) EJ Viso, Dallara-Honda, 2:37.7907 (228.150)
5. (2) AJ Allmendinger, Dallara-Honda, 2:37.8264
(228.099)
6. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 2:37.8342
(228.087)
7. (1) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 2:37.9614
(227.904)
8. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 2:38.0596
(227.762)
9. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 2:38.5411
(227.070)
10. (4) JR Hildebrand, Dallara-Honda, 2:38.2830
(227.441)
11. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 2:38.3209
(227.386)
12. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 2:38.6260
(226.949)
13. (22) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Honda, 2:38.7206
(226.814)
14. (19) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.0318
(226.370)
15. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.1543
(226.196)
16. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.1808
(226.158)
17. (10) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.2434
(226.069)
18. (14) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.3681
(225.892)
19. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.3768
(225.880)
20. (16) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.4268
(225.809)
21. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.5219
(225.674)
22. (60) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.5438
(225.643)
23. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 2:39.8117


(225.265)
24. (78) Simona De Silvestro, Dallara-Honda,
2:39.8398 (225.226)

Sprint Cup
Showdown Results
Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 40 laps, 150 rating,
0 points.
2. (4) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 40, 120, 0.
3. (6) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 40, 97.2, 0.
4. (8) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 40, 102.5, 0.
5. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 40, 110.8, 0.
6. (3) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 40, 98.6, 0.
7. (12) Aric Almirola, Ford, 40, 87, 0.
8. (18) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 40, 75.5, 0.
9. (7) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 40, 78.8, 0.


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 B3


10. (5) Casey Mears, Ford, 40, 78.3, 0.
11. (16) David Reutimann, Toyota, 40, 62.3, 0.
12. (11) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 40, 62.6, 0.
13. (14) David Gilliland, Ford, 40, 65.4, 0.
14. (15) Michael McDowell, Ford, 40, 51, 0.
15. (22) David Stremme, Toyota, 40, 45.2, 0.
16. (10) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 40, 48.7, 0.
17. (17) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 40, 43.5, 0.
18. (21) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 40, 34.5, 0.
19. (23) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 36, 28.4, 0.
20. (9) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, overheating, 27, 52.3, 0.
21. (19) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, brakes, 24, 36.5, 0.
22. (13) Scott Riggs, Ford, vibration, 15, 32.2, 0.
23. (20) Timmy Hill, Ford, overheating, 6, 28.5, 0.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 138.196 mph.
Time of Race: 0 hours, 26 minutes, 3 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.226 seconds.
Caution Flags: 1 for 1 laps.
Lead Changes: 1 among 1 driver.
Lap Leaders: J.McMurray 1-40.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
J.McMurray, 1 time for 40 laps.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 423; 2. C.Edwards,
379; 3. M.Kenseth, 364; 4. D.Earnhardt Jr., 359; 5.
C.Bowyer, 349; 6. K.Kahne, 326; 7. Bra.Keselowski,
326; 8. Ky.Busch, 325; 9. A.Almirola, 317; 10. K.Har-
vick, 315; 11. PMenard, 315; 12. J.Gordon, 311.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins,
Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position
While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green,
Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.




NBA playoffs
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
Saturday, April 20
New York 85, Boston 78
Denver 97, Golden State 95
Brooklyn 106, Chicago 89
L.A. Clippers 112, Memphia 91
Sunday, April 21
Indiana 107, Atlanta 90
San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 79
Miami 110, Milwaukee 87
Oklahoma City 120, Houston 91
Monday, April 22
Chicago 90, Brooklyn 82
L.A. Clippers 93, Memphis 91
Tuesday, April 23
Miami 98, Milwaukee 86
New York 87, Boston 71
Golden State 131, Denver 117
Wednesday, April 24
Oklahoma City 105, Houston 102
Indiana 113, Atlanta 98
San Antonio 102, L.A. Lakers 91
Thursday, April 25
Miami 104, Milwaukee 91
Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76
Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82
Friday, April 26
New York 90, Boston 76
San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89
Golden State 110, Denver 108
Saturday, April 27
Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134, 30T
Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83
Atlanta 90, Indiana 69
Oklahoma City 104, Houston 101
Sunday, April 28
Boston 97, New York 90
Miami 88, Milwaukee 77, Miami wins series 4-0
San Antonio 103, L.A. Lakers 82, San Antonio wins
series 4-0
Golden State 115, Denver 101
Monday, April 29
Brooklyn 110, Chicago 91
Atlanta 102, Indiana 91
Houston 105, Oklahoma City 103
Tuesday, April 30
Denver 107, Golden State 100
Memphis 103, L.A. Clippers 93
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 92, New York 86
Indiana 106, Atlanta 83
Houston 107, Oklahoma City 100
Thursday, May 2
Brooklyn 95, Chicago 92
Golden State 92, Denver 88, Golden State wins se-
ries 4-2
Friday, May 3
New York 88, Boston 80, NewYork wins series 4-2
Indiana 81, Atlanta 73, Indiana wins series 4-2
Oklahoma City 103, Houston 94, Oklahoma City
wins series 4-2
Memphis 118, L.A. Clippers 105, Memphis wins se-
ries 4-2
Saturday, May 4
Chicago 99, Brooklyn 93, Chicago wins series 4-3
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Sunday, May 5
Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91
Indiana 102, New York 95
Monday, May 6
Chicago 93, Miami 86
San Antonio 129, Golden State 127, 20T
Tuesday, May 7
New York 105, Indiana 79
Memphis 99, Oklahoma City 93
Wednesday, May 8
Miami 115, Chicago 78
Golden State 100, San Antonio 91
Friday, May 10
Miami 104, Chicago 94
San Antonio 102, Golden State 92
Saturday, May 11
Memphis 87, Oklahoma City 81
Indiana 82, New York 71
Sunday, May 12
Golden State 97, San Antonio 87, OT
Monday, May 13
Miami 88, Chicago 65
Memphis 103, Oklahoma City 97, OT
Tuesday, May 14
Indiana 93, New York 82
San Antonio 109, Golden State 91
Wednesday, May 15
Miami 94, Chicago 91, Miami wins series 4-1
Memphis 88, Oklahoma City 84, Memphis wins se-
ries 4-1
Thursday, May 16
New York 85, Indiana 75
San Antonio 94, Golden State 82, San Antonio wins
series 4-2
Saturday, May 18
Indiana 106, New York 99, Indiana wins series 4-2
(Best-of-7)
CONFERENCE FINALS
Today
Memphis at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 21
Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 22
Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 24


Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 25
San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m.
Sunday, May 26
Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, May 27
San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 28
Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29
x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Thursday, May 30
x-Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 31
x-San Antonio at Memphis, 9 p.m.
Saturday, June 1
x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 2
x-Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Monday, June 3
x-Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.









Adult rec leagues feature high scores


Special to the Chronicle
Men's softball played once
again on Monday night. The first
game featured strong offensive
showings from both teams, but
Advanced Fitness went on to
beat 01' Guys w/ Help 14-8.
The evening's second game
belonged to Reflections Church,
who downed The Machines 14-1.
The final game was close and
saw 42 combined runs from both
teams. In the end, R.C. Lawn
Care was a little better than
AMS Oil in a 22-20 victory
It was another great night for
all team putting forth their best
to help their team. Teams play
again starting at 6:30 p.m.
Monday at Bicentennial Park.


Men's flag football
Thursday night showcased three
more high-flying contests. Blue pulled
through with a 34-13 win over Gold.
In the middle game, Orange held
on to beat Green 33-27.
In the evening's final contest, Pink
coasted to a 31-13 triumph over Red.
Teams face off again starting
6:30 p.m. Thursday starting at
Homosassa Area Recreational Park
for another round of games.
Men's flag football
tournament
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
is hosting a 4-on-4 Men's Flag Foot-
ball Tournament on Saturday, July
13 at the Homosassa Area Recre-
ational Park beginning at 9 a.m. This


event is for adults aged 18 years
and up. For more information, call
352-527-7540 or visit the website at
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to
start up again on June 28. Games
are played at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River on Thursdays starting
at 6:30 p.m.
Registration for teams is from
May 20 through June 21. For more
information, call 352-527-7540.
Adult co-ed kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kickball
league is for adults 18 and up.
Games are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
and 8:30 p.m. at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River, lasting an hour or


nine innings, whichever comes first.
The new season tentatively starts
July 10. Registration for teams be-
gins June 6 and ends July 5. For
more information, call 352-527-7540.
Beach volleyball
Registration for our second sea-
son of beach volleyball begins for
teams on Monday and runs through
June 14. Games are played starting
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River.
The fee is $15 per player, with a
maximum of seven players per
team. For more information, call
352-527-7540.
Aqua Zumba at
Bicentennial Park Pool
Love the water and want to get


active? Come and join Aqua Zumba
at Bicentennial Pool.
Classes are at 10 a.m. on Satur-
days. The cost is $4 per class.
For more information, contact
Bicentennial Pool at 352-795-
1478.
Swimming lessons
at Bicentennial Pool
Are you interested in having your
children learn how to swim or in
learning to swim yourself? Bicen-
tennial Pool offers swimming les-
sons for all ages, including adult
swim lessons.
Lessons are twice a week and run
for a two-week session. For more in-
formation, call Bicentennial Pool at
352-795-1478.


Undefeated season Youth

bowlers


in state



4 tourney


6. VOWSpecial to the C ro ncle
o v s Youth bowlers from Mana-
tee Lanes and Beverly Hills
Bowl recently represented
S. Citrus County at the state
level in the National Pepsi
S Tournament in Sunrise. In
S. addition to the possibility of
... .-. representing Florida in the
-- national tournament,
p h bowlers were competing for
j scholarship money which is
deposited to their account at
the headquarters of the
United States Bowling Con-
gress and can be used for
any post-high school educa-
,, tional opportunity.
The tournament was run
over four weekends and had
1,946 bowlers participating.
Citrus County was repre-
Special to the Chronicle sented by Jena Williams, who
The Rays team from the Crystal River Little League 11-12 Majors completed an undefeated 20-0 season after defeating the Red Sox in the placed third in her divithplaceion,
final game of the season Thursday night. Next, the team will participate in the District's Top Team Tournament starting May 28 in Dunnellon in his division and Christian
and West Hernando. In front row, from left: Jordan Godfrey, Mason Fox, Greg Dristiliaris and Mark Crawford. In middle row, from left: Jacob Miller who placed 14th.
Behuniak, Hurley Campbell, Caleb Dix, Branden Evans and Johnny Cannuli. Back row, from left: coaches Chris Purnell, David Purnell and Kenny OthMiller who placed 14fromth.
Wightman. Not pictured is player Seth Purnell. county included Joshua
Youth BRIEFS Cook, Cody Miller, Kayla Mi-
Youth BRIEFS cali, Addison Littlefield,
Nikole Richards and
Citrus Hills ley at 352-566-7789 or e-mail at from throughout June and July. Each bins and several of his volunteers. Matthew Rollason. Out of all
Junior Golf Camp ridleym@citrus.kl2.fl.us. week will have two time slots that will During these lessons, participants the competitors, all of Citrus
The 17th annual Citrus Hills Junior Panthers plan accommodate ages 8 to 11 and will learn putting, driving, chipping, County's bowlers performed
The 17th annual Citrus Hills Junior ages 12 to 15 separately. on-course play, and on-course eti- well enough to place in the
Golf Camp starts Wednesday, June 5. volleyball camp During this camp, children will quette. Golf clubs will be provided, top quarter of their divisions.
Ages range from 4 to 17. Our Summer volleyball camp will be of- learn kayak instruction, water and but if your child has their own set, we Beverly Hills Bowl was
PGA professionals (with 67 years of feared by the Lecanto Panthers this boater safety and paddling tech- encourage them to bring them along. the venue for the May Dou-
experience) are dedicated to giving summer. niques. On Friday, children can put For more information, contact bles Sweeper sponsored by
the juniors the best instruction on Open to fourth-graders through en- their skills to the test with a fun filled Crysta Henry, recreation program the Greater Citrus USBC As-
golf fundamentals and having fun in tering ninth-graders, cost is $65. Kayak Adventure down the Chassa- specialist for youth programs at sociation. Fifteen teams
the process. Parents can pick up a registration howitzka River. 352-527-7543, www.citruscounty competed in this monthly
Included in our golf camp is a free form at Lecanto High School or email Kayaks, life preservers, dry boxes, parks.com, or Randy Robbins at handicap doubles bowling
summer membership. You have a Alice Christian at christiana@ whistles and a camp T-shirt will be 352-746-6177. tournament.
choice of five consecutive Wednes- citrus.k12.fl.us for more information provided. Registration is limited to 12 In first place with a com-
days from 9 to 11 a.m. or five consecu- and times. children weekly for each age group Boys & Girls Clubs manding lead was the duo of
tive Thursdays from 5:30 to 8 p.m.. In hso sign up now! ready for camp Brian Craig and Vito Porta.
addition to teaching them golf, we feed CR hoops camp For more information, contact Cit- The second spot was cap-
hem pizza and soda every lesson. tips off in June rus County Parks & Recreation at Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus turned by Amber Krug and
The cost of the camp is $100. We The Crystal River 2013 hoops 352-527-7540 or visit www.citr- County summer camps will open Jacob Reed, while Hans Gon-
also carry junior merchandise and camp has three sessions: June 3-6 uscountyparks.com May 24 and run 10 weeks through dosch and Steve Leclair
equipment in our pro shop. 10-13 and 17-20. Each day goes Archery Camp Aug. 2 at all three club sites in Inver- edged out the forth place
Classes fill up quickly, so please f 3 ant 120m. C rucny Par ness, Beverly Hills and halfway be- team of Marion Steemstra
Ilss H1ills G qulyf Sh teac from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.. Citrus County Parks & Recreation, tween Crystal River and Homosassa. and Rick Rollason by a mere
call Citrus Hills Golf Shop at 352- One session is $49, two sessions in partnership with McPherson's Cost is $70 per week from 7 a. three pins to take third place.
re46-4425 faster our unor nation or to are $79 and all three are $99. The Archery & Outdoor Pro Shop, is until 6 p.m., or $60 per week from 9 Next month's sweeper is
register your junior camp will be led by Crystal River holding an Archery Camp this sum- a.m. to 5 p.m. Special discounts are at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 8 at
Camp Patriot upcoming High School boys basketball coach mer. The camp will be offered on two available for past Camp Fusion mem- Park View Lanes in Holder
for young hoopsters Steve Feldman. different weeks and participants will bers. The clubs expect to have schol-
All pre-registered campers will be separated by age. brshi Thlae clusexet an dhaeduc- ReC BRIIEFS
Coach Tim Ryan, the National receive a camp T-shirt and the first The camps are open to boys and warships available for free and reduced
NJCAA Men's Basketball Coach of 24 campers who register for all girls ages 6 to 15 with the groups lunch income-eligible clients. Scholar-
the Year from the College of Central three weeks will receive an Adidas consisting of ages 6 to 8, 9 to 11, ships will be distributed according to Kyle Sisson Benefit
Florida, is hosting Camp Patriot Bas- basketball. and 12 to 15. The camps will be need and date of application. Golf Tournament
ketball Camp for the 10th straight For more information, contact held at McPherson's Archery in The public may make contributions The Kyle Sisson Benefit Golf
year. The camp is for boys and girls Steve Feldman at feldmans@ Lecanto. Each camp will run Mon- to the Summer Camp Scholarship Tournament will take place Sat-
ages 8 to 18 and located at the citrus.k2.fl.us or 352-601-0870. day through Thursday with two sep- Fund by donating $70 or$60 fora urday, June 15, at Inverness
Ocala campus of the College of Register now for rate classes each day. week or the amount for the entire Golf & Country Club, 3150
Central Florida.
Four sessions are offered, the Camp Soquili Participants will learn about various summer. Donations are also welcome Country Club Drive. The price of
as are:ovnse 1o7e d, J e 2mp o3 a F a e archery equipment, proper shooting for the Summer Field Trip Fund. $75 per person includes cart,
dates are: June 17-20, June 24-27, Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith Haven techniques and equipment safety. Activities for summer fun are range balls and lunch.
July 8-11 and July 22-25. Each day Christian Retreat Center in Crystal At the end of each camp the top weekly themes such as "Ooey The game is a four-person
runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. River will be in June and July at shot of the week will be awarded a Gooey," Splish Splash, "Where the team scramble with an 8:30
The cost is $150 per session. For Soquili Stables. free bow. Wild Things Are," "Myth Busters," a.m. tee time.
more information, please visit Eight weeklong sessions will be of- Registration is now open and can and Super Heroes." Programs will Hole sponsorships are: Silver,
www.camppatriotbasketball.com or fered from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday be completed at the Citrus County include Caged Nation, an anti-bully- $100; Bronze, $250; Gold,
call Tim Ryan at 352-427-7435. through Friday. Campers can learn to Parks & Recreation office. Space will include Caged Nation, an anti-bully- $100; Bronze, $250; Gold,
CRHS Volleyball Camp ride and care for a horse. There will be limited to 25 children per class. ing program, canine demonstration ns, $500; and Platinum $1,000.sp hips
be equine activities, in the saddle For more information contact Cit- Risky Ears, a program about pre- Mail all entries/sponsorships
set for June and on the ground, as well as crafts, rus County Parks & Recreation at serving our hearing, water safety to: Michele Snellings, 5260 W.
The Crystal River Volleyball Camp swimming and more. 352-527-7540, visit www.citruscoun- and visits from Homosassa Springs Angus Drive, Beverly Hills, FL
will be held from June 3 to 7 from 5 For more information and to sign typarks.com or McPherson's Archery Wildlife State Park animals. Florida 34465. Players should make
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Citrus Springs up, visit the website at www.faith at 352-341-2820. State Trooper Todd Cloud will also checks payable to Team Hope,
Middle School. The camp is open to havencrc.org/campsoquili.php, call visit the clubs to talk about safety. ACS.
girls ages 11 to 16 from any county or 352-206-2990, or e-mail soquili. Youth golf lessons Daily schedules for all children will For more information, call
surrounding schools and it is open to stables@gmail.com. Like Camp Citrus County Parks & Recreation, include arts and crafts, indoor and Nick Maltese at 352-464-7511
girls of all skill levels. Soquili on Facebook at www. in partnership with Pine Ridge Golf outside games, sports, technology, or Michele Snellings at
Training will be offered on basic facebook.com/CampSoquili. Course, will hold summer youth golf cooking activities and weekly swim- 352-697-2220.
and improving volleyball skills of set- Kayak Camp lessons. The lessons will be held at ming and bowling sessions. As part Throw shoes
ing, hitting, serving, passing, defen- Citrus County Parks & Recreation, Pine Ridge Golf Course on Wednes- of the sports program, clubs will play in Beverly Hills
sive and team play. T-shirts will be in partnership with 2 Sisters Kayak day mornings from 9:30 to 11:30 ames against each other
available to all campers. Crystal Tours, is holding Kayaking Camps a.m. or Thursday evenings from 5:30 game t eaer Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
River High School players and this summer. Each camp will be held to 7:30 p.m. They begin Wednesday, Call the Beverly Hills Club at meets at 8:30 a.m. each
coaches will be the camp coaches. at Hernando Beach Park from Mon- June 12 and Thursday, June 13, and 352-270-8841, the Inverness Club at Wednesday. Men, women and
The cost of the camp is $55 and day to Thursday and at Chassahow- run for five weeks. 352-341-2507, the Homosassa Club juniors age 10 and older can join.
camp registration forms are available itzka River on Friday. Children ages 6 to 15 are eligible at 352-795-8624 or the administra- There are all levels of play;
at Crystal River High School, Crystal Children ages 8 to 15 are eligible and the cost is $80 per child with $15 tive office at 352-621-9225 to regis- handicapped method. Call Ron
River Middle School, Citrus Springs and the cost is $80 per child. We will off for additional siblings. Instruction ter and find out dates of summer Fair 352-746-3924, or email
Middle School, or contact Mike Rid- offer four different weeks to choose will be given by golf pro Randy Rob- camp orientation meetings. rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pacers move into East finals vs. Heat


Carpenter


earns Indy


500 pole

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Ed
Carpenter turned Pole Day
into a family celebration.
The stepson of IndyCar
founder Tony George became
the first member of the Hul-
man family to win the biggest
pre-race event in the series
- the Indianapolis 500 pole.
Carpenter produced a stun-
ning finish to a day that was
rife with suspense but lacked
surprise. His four-lap average
of 228.762 mph was quick
enough to break up what ap-
peared to be a Team Penske-
Andretti Autosport lock on
the front three rows in the
nine-car shootout for the pole.
Somehow, Carpenter, who
owns his team, beat out the
big-name guys.
"To be a single-car team in
this Chevy shootout, I am
going to call it fighting with
the Penske and Andretti
guys," said Carpenter, whose
pit crew carried him off pit
road on their shoulders after
an agonizing wait to see if
his time would hold up.
The soft-spoken Carpenter
grew up around the world-fa-
mous 2.5-mile Brickyard,
dreaming of the moment he
could stand in Victory Lane.
Perhaps that will happen
May 26.
For now, Carpenter will
savor the highest-profile
achievement of his career
and during a month in which
he has strengthened his area
ties. His sponsor, golfer Fuzzy
Zoeller's Fuzzy's Vodka, is
based in Indiana and this
week Carpenter added de-
cals to his car from his alma
mater, Butler University -
the little school that made
two straight NCAA champi-
onship game appearances.
He also took a little time
out for his family and
friends, who believe this
could be his big year at Indy
After producing the fastest
lap in the opening practice
session last Saturday, Car-
penter gave away his tickets
to watch the Eastern Confer-
ence semifinals between the
hometown Pacers and New
York Knicks so he could
spend some time with his
wife before another working
Mother's Day
And during Friday night's
qualifying draw, Carpenter
had one of his young chil-
dren pull out the number
Then Carpenter went out
and beat all those big-name
guys to the punch, setting off
a celebration that isn't likely
to end any time soon.


OXBOW
Continued from Page B1

trying to get me off. He was
the first guy to call me up
and said 'I'm going to have
a colt for you. His name is
Oxbow."
Orb was unable to find
his rhythm after breaking
slowly from the rail, and
never challenged in finish-
ing fourth.
"After we passed the
half mile, he had a hard
time keeping up and I kind
of worried a little bit,"
Orb's jockey Joel Rosario
said. "He just kind of
steadied after that. He
usually takes you there.
He always runs hard, but
today he never took off."
Orb's loss extends the


Indianapolis'late

run eliminates

Knicks in six games

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Lance
Stephenson scored nine of his
playoff career-high 23 points dur-
ing a late 11-2 run Saturday night,
leading the Indiana Pacers past
the New York Knicks, 106-99 and
into the Eastern Conference fi-
nals for the first time since 2004.
The New York native also had 10
rebounds and the Pacers were
Indiana Pacers center Roy Hibbert is
fouled by New York Knicks center
Tyson Chandler on Saturday in
Indianapolis.
Associated Press


spurred by the return of point
guard George Hill two days after he
was diagnosed with a concussion.
Next up is a rematch with
Miami, the team that eliminated
Indiana last season. Game 1 will
be Wednesday at Miami.
Carmelo Anthony scored 39
points and Iman Shumpert had
19 for New York.
Indiana is 6-0 at home in the
playoffs, but this one sure wasn't
easy
Indiana trailed 92-90 with 5:43
left in the game. The Pacers ral-
lied after Roy Hibbert blocked
Anthony's dunk attempt and
Stephenson scored on a layup
that started the decisive spurt
The big question coming into
the game was whether Hill could
return after missing Game 5 with
a concussion. He did, and it cer-
tainly made a difference as the
Pacers reverted to their brand of
basketball.


Associated Press
Jamie McMurray poses with the trophy in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Showdown auto race
Saturday at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. The Sprint All-Star race was not over at press time,
in part because of a rain delay.






McMurray's Showdown


StenhouseJr.,

Patrick also make

All-Star Race

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. -Jamie Mc-
Murray won the Sprint Show-
down to transfer into the $1
million All-Star Race at Charlotte
Motor Speedway
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. finished
second Saturday night in the 40-
lap race to earn the second trans-
fer spot, and Danica Patrick
moved into the 22-car field by
winning the fan vote.
McMurray dominated both 20-
lap segments to earn a spot in the
Sprint All-Star race for the first
time since 2011. It's only his sev-
enth time making the All-Star race
and he appreciated being part of
Saturday night's main event.
"If you're a full-time Sprint Cup
guy and don't get it, that's hard,"
McMurray said. "You want to feel
like you've been a part of it When
you go home early, it's hard. It's
hard to get in your car and drive out
of here while the race is going on."
Stenhouse made it into his first
All-Star race in his first season
racing the Sprint Cup Series. He
and Patrick, his girlfriend, are rac-
ing each other for Rookie of the
Year honors this season and made
a video earlier this month about


Triple Crown drought to 36
years since Affirmed be-
came the 11th horse to
sweep the races in 1978.
There had been great an-
ticipation the sport would
get another Triple try just
a year after I'll Have An-
other won the first two
races but was scratched
the day before the Bel-
mont with a tendon injury
But nothing could get
past Oxbow.
Lukas won his sixth
Preakness to move one be-
hind Robert Wyndham
Walden for most wins in
the second leg of the
Triple Crown.
The victory was a long
time coming for the dean
of trainers. The last time
he won a Triple Crown
race was the 2000 Belmont
with Commendable. And


Late race
Because of both the start
time and a rain delay, the
Sprint All-Star race was not
over at press time. Please see
Monday's sports section for
the results.

the difficulty in deciding who to
vote for in online fan polling.
After making it into the event by
racing his way in, Stenhouse said
he didn't vote for anyone.
But Patrick, who last year was
voted most popular driver in the
Nationwide Series, made a point
to thank her fan base. Her public
relations crew even had a bumper
sticker made it said "Thank You
Fans" that Patrick said she'd
slap on her car before the race.
Knowing she likely was getting
into the All-Star race regardless
of how she finished, Patrick was
able to take it easy during
stretches of the Showdown.
"I think that it enters your mind
that you don't want to do some-
thing that will put you in position
to crash," she said. "When you get
to the end and I was running
around and clearly wasn't going to
be first or second, so if I was in
fortunate enough position to be
where I am now with the fan vote,
I can't move on with a crashed car.
"There is nothing to be gained
by trying something desperate in
the last five laps. I suppose at that
point in time you say finish the


before that, he was a regu-
lar in the winner's circle
after classic races. At one
point, he ran off six in a
row from the 1994
Preakness through the
1996 Derby. He also was
the first to send out five
horses in one Derby, and
won it with Grindstone in
1996.
The first trainer to gear
his operation to Triple
Crown races, Lukas took a
run at the coveted prize in
1999 with Charismatic.
The unsung 3-year-old
won the Derby and Preak-
ness, but broke his leg in
the stretch of the Belmont
while finishing third.
Oxbow, sent off at odds of
15-1, took charge from the
start out of the No. 6 post
and beat Itsmyluckyday by
1 3/4 lengths. Mylute, with


Rosie Napravnik bidding to
become the first female to
win the Preakness, was
third, followed by Orb,
Goldencents, Departing,
Will Take Charge, Govenor
Charlie and Titletown Five.
Orb's trainer, Shug Mc-
Gaughey, so confident in
the two weeks leading up to
the race, was gracious de-
spite his disappointment
"It was a great opportu-
nity," the Hall of Famer
said. "We were 3-5 and we
finished fourth. We'll pack
it up and go home. Hats off
to Wayne."
He also recalled a brief
conversation with Lukas a
few days before the race.
"Just two days ago, he
said to me 'We got another
one on the agenda,"' Mc-
Gaughey said. "And darn if
two days later he didn't get


race and there is nothing to gain."
Earnhardt has link
to Charlotte track
CONCORD, N.C. -At the height
of his father's success at Charlotte
Motor Speedway, Dale Earnhardt Jr.
would sit in the Turn 1 condos over-
looking the track.
The Earnhardts are from Kannapo-
lis, just one town away, and watching
Dale Earnhardt at the speedway was
a source of pride. Next week marks
the 20th anniversary of the late Earn-
hardt sweeping both the All-Star Race
and the Coca-Cola 600, an event his
son compared to the years his father
dominated NASCAR.
"In '86 and '87, they were really about
as great as you could be, and it was just
a lot of fun to watch," Earnhardt said. "I
know the 600 was a big race and it's still
a big race, but we didn't have Indy and
places like that to share the spotlight.
This was a big event, and it was similar
to Daytona, and everybody was at the
600 and everybody was here.
"We would sit up in those condos and
watch everything. All the practices and
every lap, that every car ran all weekend
long, and it was just a lot of fun, and cer-
tainly a different time and different sport
than it is today. But it was a good experi-
ence for me in just being young and
having the run of the place really."
It's helped create a connection for
Earnhardt with the speedway, where
he won the All-Star race as a rookie in
2000. He's never won the 600 or the
fall race at Charlotte in 26 tries.


it ... When Wayne wasn't
going good, he was still the
first guy out on his pony.
The guy's a credit to rac-
ing. He's always upbeat
and optimistic."
Orb came into the
Preakness with a five-race
winning streak and many
expected him to win easily
But it wasn't to be on an
overcast windy day at Pim-
lico Race Course, where
117,203 fans turned out.
Oxbow went to the lead
ahead of Goldencents and
opened some daylight into
the first turn. Orb, who
broke slowly as expected
from the No. 1 gate, wound
up in a cluster of horses
around the turn and into
the backstretch. While
Oxbow was cruising along
in front, Rosario tried to
find room outside but


Associated Press
Rafael Nadal will meet Roger
Federer today in the men's
final of the Italian Open.


Nadal,


Federer


set for


final


Serena into

Rome final on

women's side

Associated Press

ROME Roger Federer
and Rafael Nadal will
renew their rivalry in the
Italian Open final Sunday
- exactly a week before
the French Open starts.
In Saturday's semifinals
at the Foro Italico, Fed-
erer held off a stiff chal-
lenge from Frenchman
Benoit Paire 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Six-time Rome champion
Nadal defeated sixth-
seeded Tomas Berdych 6-
2, 6-4, a day after Berdych
rallied to beat top-ranked
Novak Djokovic.
It will mark Nadal's
eighth consecutive final
since his return earlier this
year from a seven-month
layoff because of a left
knee injury As for Federer,
who recently returned
from a seven-week break
from the circuit, it will be
his first final of the year
On the women's side,
top-ranked Serena
Williams moved within
one victory of winning her
fourth consecutive title
this year She'll face third-
seeded Victoria Azarenka
in the final.
Williams overcame an
early break of her serve to
ease past Romanian quali-
fier Simona Halep 6-3, 6-0
and extend her career-best
winning run to 23 matches.
Azarenka kept her concen-
tration through two rain
delays to beat seventh-
seeded Sara Errani 6-0,7-5.
Williams is coming off
consecutive titles in Miami,
Charleston and Madrid.


Associated Press
Serena Williams meets
Victoria Azarenka today for
the Italian Open women's
final.

found his path blocked.
Orb dropped back to the
inside, and perhaps frus-
trated without any space to
run free like he did in the
Derby, fell back to seventh
and was never a threat in
the stretch.
"The pace was slower
than I anticipated," Mc-
Gaughey said. "I thought
maybe they would speed it
up a little bit but they did-
n't. I thought we would
close into it but it just was-
n't his day He was just
never real comfortable
once he got down in
there."
Oxbow covered the
1 3/16 miles in a slow
1:57.54 and paid $32.80,
$12 and $8.80. Itsmylucky-
day, 15th in the Derby, re-
turned $7.80 and $5 and
Mylute paid $5.20 to show.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 B5






SPORTS


Red Wings even up series at 1-1


Detroit routs

Chicago 4-1

Associated Press

CHICAGO Damien Brunner
and Brendan Smith scored in
the second period and the De-
troit Red Wings beat the Chicago
Blackhawks 4-1 Saturday in
Game 2 to even their Western


Conference semifinal series.
It was a strong response by the
Red Wings after Chicago han-
dled them easily in the series
opener, 4-1.
Just as the Blackhawks did in
Game 1, Detroit took control in
the second period and put the
game away in the third. Now, the
Red Wings have a chance to take
the lead when this series be-
tween Original Six rivals shifts
to Detroit for Game 3 on Monday


Detroit Red Wing Valtteri Rippula scores against Chicago Blackhawks
goalie Corey Crawford during the third period Saturday in Chicago.
Associated Press


Still on top at Byron


Bradley keeps

lead after three

rounds at Nelson

Associated Press

IRVING, Texas Keegan
Bradley overcame two early bo-
geys and maintained his lead at
the Byron Nelson Championship
with 2-under 68 in the third
round Saturday
Bradley had a 13-under 197
total for a one-stroke lead over
Sang-Moon Bae (66) and two-shot
advantage over Tom Gillis (67).
On Sunday, Bradley will be try-
ing to win at TPC Four Seasons
for the second time in three years.
He could also become the Nel-
son's first wire-to-wire winner
since Tom Watson led alone at the
end of all four rounds in 1980.
After following his opening
course-record 60 with a 69 on
Friday, Bradley started the third
round with a three-stroke lead.
He stayed alone at top of the
leaderboard throughout, even
after consecutive bogeys on the
front nine and his third consecu-
tive bogey this week at No. 18.
Bradley avoided a bogey at
No. 1 for the first time this week.
But not at the 429-yard 18th,
which cost him the opportunity
for a bigger lead.
On the closing hole, where
Bradley went way right off the
tee the first two rounds, he
smashed his drive down the left
side toward the water Saturday
While the ball stayed dry, it set-
tled behind a large rock, forcing
Bradley to punch back into the
fairway before an approach shot
that settled on the front edge of
the green. He almost saved par,
but the ball rolled just over the
lip of the cup and 2 feet past
Scott Piercy's 66 matched Bae
and three others for the best
round on a breezy Texas day
Piercy was fourth at 10 under,
two strokes ahead of Gary Wood-
land (68), Harris English (68),
John Huh (69) and 2011 Masters
champ Charl Schwartzel (69).
When 83 players made the cut
of even par, there were three-
somes instead of traditional two-
somes for the third round. That
put Bradley in the same group
with Bae and Gillis, who started
the round tied for second place.
Choi takes lead at
Mobile LPGA Classic
MOBILE, Ala. Chella Choi shot
her second straight 6-under 66 on Sat-
urday to take a one-stroke lead over
Jessica Korda and Anna Nordqvist,
the Swede who broke the course
record with a 61 in the third round of
the Mobile Bay LPGA Classic.


Associated Press
Keegan Bradley follows his shot off the 15th tee saturday during the third round of the Byron Nelson
Championship in Irving, Texas. Bradley leads by one stroke heading into today's final round.


Choi twice made three straight
birdies to move to 17 under, and has
made only two bogeys in three
rounds on The Crossings course at
the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail's
Magnolia Grove complex.
The South Korean's best finish in
four-plus years on the tour is a tie for
second in the Manulife tournament
in Canada last March.
Choi, who had three top-five fin-
ishes last year, said she started
checking out the leaderboard "every
hole" at the start of the tournament
and feels mentally stronger now in
her bid to finally get a win.
Nordqvist broke the course record
of 62 set by Sydnee Michaels on Fri-
day. Korda, the second-round leader,
shot a 69. The American had a bogey
on No. 11 when the ball landed in a
divot and she tweaked her right wrist,
and a double bogey on No. 12.
She rebounded with a 33-foot
eagle putt on the 16th hole.
Nordqvist, meanwhile, is seeking


her first win since capturing the
LPGA Championship and season-
ending LPGA Tour Championship as
a rookie in 2009. She said this might
have been the first really good put-
ting day she's had since then.
McDowell advances at
World Match Play
KAVARNA, Bulgaria Graeme
McDowell reached the semifinals of
the World Match Play Championship
after knocking out defending cham-
pion Nicolas Colsaerts, whose day
included the bizarre moment of tak-
ing a penalty drop inside a restroom.
McDowell rallied from an early
deficit to win 2 and 1 over his Euro-
pean Ryder Cup teammate on the
oceanside Thracian Cliffs course and
will next face Branden Grace of
South Africa, who beat Chris Wood of
England 2 and 1. The other semifinal
will pit Thomas Aiken of South Africa
against Thailand's Thongchai Jaidee.
Colsaerts had the most memo-


rable moment of the day when his
tee shot on the short par-4 10th hole
flew into a hazard behind a public
restroom in a brick building close to
the green. Because of where the ball
had crossed the hazard line, tourna-
ment officials ruled that the penalty
drop must be made within the rest-
room itself, leading to a comical mo-
ment that had Colsaerts, his caddie
and rules officials all laughing.
"I ain't hitting it out of the loo," Col-
saerts joked.
He didn't have to. Since it was
considered an immovable obstruc-
tion, he was then given free relief to
play from outside.
He ended up saving par and halv-
ing the hole.
"I'm sure now the whole episode
at 10 is going to make all the TV
news programs, Facebook and all
the social media sites with the cap-
tion: 'Here's some Belgium guy play-
ing golf in some toilet block in
Bulgaria,'" Colsaerts joked.


Chargers, Freeney agree to 2-year deal


Former Colts pass

rusher has 107 1/2

career sacks

Associated Press

SAN DIEGO The San Diego
Chargers agreed Saturday to a two-
year deal with aging star pass
rusher Dwight Freeney that could
be worth $13.35 million.
The deal to bring Freeney to the
Chargers came four days after out-
side linebacker Melvin Ingram tore
the anterior cruciate ligament in
his left knee in a padless practice.
The addition of Freeney also
helps cushion the loss of outside
linebackers Antwan Barnes and
Shaun Phillips to free agency
"It's great to add a solid veteran
who brings valuable experience to
our defense," Chargers coach Mike
McCoy said in the release announc-
ing the deal. "His proven pass-rush
ability is a perfect fit for our defense."
Freeney is 33 and entering his
12th season. He will make $5.25
million this season.


He was Indianapolis' career
sacks leader with 107 1/2 but the
Colts decided not to re-sign him in
the offseason. After recording 13
1/2 sacks in 2009, his totals declined
each of the past three years. He
had five in 2012.
Freeney, a seven-time Pro Bowler,
never seemed comfortable after
moving from a 4-3 defensive end,
where he spent his first 10 NFL sea-
sons, to a 3-4 outside linebacker The
Chargers run a 3-4 defense.
Freeney was the 11th overall se-
lection in the 2002 draft During his
time with the Colts, he combined
with Robert Mathis to form one of
the most fearsome pass-rush
tandems in the league. His 44 forced
fumbles are the most by any NFL
player since 2002 and he was one of
13 players in Colts' history to partic-
ipate in more than 100 victories.
Freeney led the NFL with 16
sacks in 2004.
Chargers rookie general man-
ager Tom Telesco was with the
Colts before being hired by San
Diego in January
Dwight Freeney can make up to
$13.35 million in his new deal with
the San Diego Chargers.
Associated Press


-A sk.


B6 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


Jin Young Pak
Jane Park
Katie Burnett
Lorie Kane
Jenny Shin
Lisa McCloskey
Kim Welch
Becky Morgan
Mina Harigae
Azahara Munoz
Chie Arimura
Karine Icher
Mitsuki Katahira
Jennifer Rosales
Veronica Felibert
Sun Young Yoo
Dori Carter
Kristy McPherson
Amelia Lewis
Mo Martin
Angela Stanford
Sue Kim
Nicole Smith
Tiffany Joh
Paige Mackenzie
Katie Futcher
Wendy Ward
Heather Bowie Young
Jodi Ewart Shadoff
Song-Hee Kim
Moira Dunn
Paz Echeverria
Sandra Changkija
Nicole Hage
Laura Diaz
Sarah Jane Smith
Amy Yang
Lauren Doughtie
Sandra Gal
Kris Tamulis
Christina Kim
Jennifer Song
Dewi Claire Schreefel
Vicky Hurst
Nicole Jeray
Jessica Shepley
Mi Hyang Lee
Seon Hwa Lee
Lisa Ferrero
Maria Hjorth
Reilley Rankin
Ryann O'Toole
Brittany Lang
JiYoung Oh
Pat Hurst
Marcy Hart
Silvia Cavalleri
Belen Mozo


70-67-70
73-69-66
73-68-67
72-69-67
71-70-67
69-68-71
70-67-71
71-65-72
67-68-73
71-64-73
72-72-65
73-68-68
71-70-68
71-68-70
70-73-67
73-69-68
68-72-70
69-71-70
68-71-71
70-69-71
71-68-71
71-67-72
69-69-72
72-72-67
71-73-67
70-72-69
72-70-69
71-71-69
72-68-71
69-71-71
72-67-72
69-67-75
73-70-69
69-73-70
71-69-72
71-69-72
74-66-72
68-71-73
68-76-69
72-72-69
70-73-70
70-73-70
67-74-72
68-72-73
68-72-73
71-73-70
71-71-72
71-70-73
74-70-71
73-71-71
74-70-71
70-73-72
72-70-73
72-70-73
70-72-74
68-72-76
72-72-73
73-71-74


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

PGA Tour
Byron Nelson
Saturday
At TPC Four Seasons Resort, Irving, Texas
Purse: $6.7 million
Yardage: 7,166, Par: 70
Third Round
Keegan Bradley 60-69-68-197 -13
Sang-Moon Bae 666-66-66 198 -12
Tom Gillis 69-63-67-199 -11
Scott Piercy 66-68-66 200 -10
Gary Woodland 69-65-68 -202 -8
Harris English 64-70-68 -202 -8
John Huh 69-64-69 202 -8
Charl Schwartzel 63-70-69 202 -8
Nathan Green 67-68-68 203 -7
D.A. Points 69-68-67 204 -6
Marcel Siem 68-68-68 204 -6
Martin Kaymer 68-67-69 204 -6
Graham DeLaet 67-67-70 204 -6
Angel Cabrera 65-69-70 204 -6
Ted Potter, Jr. 64-70-70 204 -6
Jerry Kelly 69-70-66 205 -5
Cameron Percy 68-68-69 205 -5
Marc Leishman 66-70-69 205 -5
D.H. Lee 68-69-69 -206 -4
Justin Bolli 69-69-68 206 -4
William McGirt 68-69-69 206 -4
Charles Howell III 67-69-70 206 -4
Jimmy Walker 68-68-70 -206 -4
Charley Hoffman 68-68-70 206 -4
James Driscoll 67-72-67-206 -4
CamiloVillegas 65-70-71-206 -4
Martin Flores 67-68-71 206 -4
Jason Day 72-68-66 206 -4
Stephen Ames 67-68-71 206 -4
Ryan Palmer 65-68-73 206 -4
Morgan Hoffmann 69-71-66-206 -4
John Daly 71-66-70-207 -3
Freddie Jacobson 68-69-70 207 -3
Steve Marino 68-69-70 207 -3
Brian Harman 68-69-70 207 -3
Louis Oosthuizen 67-70-70 207 -3
Joe Ogilvie 68-69-70 207 -3
Ryo Ishikawa 71-68-68-- 207 -3
Chez Reavie 69-67-71 207 -3
Justin Hicks 69-70-68 -207 -3
Stuart Appleby 69-70-68 -207 -3
Erik Compton 72-63-72 207 -3
Jason Dufner 70-70-67-207 -3
Michael Bradley 68-70-70 208 -2
Jeff Overton 68-70-70 208 -2
John Rollins 74-64-70 208 -2
Gary Christian 69-69-70 208 -2
Henrik Norlander 71-67-70-- 208 -2
Will Claxton 66-73-69 208 -2
Duffy Waldorf 68-67-73 208 -2
Jason Bohn 71-68-69-208 -2
Rory Sabbatini 69-71-68 208 -2
Brendon Todd 69-68-72 -209 -1
Tag Ridings 68-70-71 209 -1
Matt Bettencourt 73-64-72 209 -1
Colt Knost 68-70-71 209 -1
Zack Fischer 73-65-71 209 -1
Ricky Barnes 68-71-70 209 -1
Andrew Svoboda 69-70-70 209 -1
Ben Crane 67-69-73 209 -1
Mike Weir 68-68-73-209 -1
Kenny Perry 71-69-69 209 -1
David Mathis 70-67-73-210 E
Jordan Spieth 69-68-73-210 E
Wes Short, Jr. 68-71-71 -210 E
Matt Kuchar 69-70-71 210 E
Alexandre Rocha 67-68-75-210 E
Justin Leonard 70-70-70 210 E
Scott Langley 71-69-70 210 E
Charlie Beljan 70-69-72 211 +1
Seung-Yul Noh 68-71-72-- 211 +1
Padraig Harrington 70-70-71 211 +1
Qualified but failed to make final cut
Chad Campbell 67-72-73 212 +2
Ted Purdy 70-70-72 212 +2
Jesper Parnevik 70-70-72 212 +2
Charlie Wi 73-67-72 212 +2
Pat Perez 70-69-74 213 +3
Brian Stuard 71-69-73-213 +3
Brad Fritsch 69-71-73-213 +3
VijaySingh 71-67-76-214 +4
Tim Herron 70-70-74-214 +4
Greg Owen 70-70-74 214 +4
Patrick Reed 67-73-76 216 +6
LPGA Tour
Mobile Bay Classic
Saturday
At Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Magnolia
Grove, The Crossings, Mobile, Ala.
Purse: $1.2 million
Yardage: 6,521, Par: 72
Third Round
Chella Choi 67-66 -66-199 -17
Anna Nordqvist 73-66-61 -200 -16
Jessica Korda 66-65-69-200 -16
Karrie Webb 69-63-69-201 -15
Jennifer Johnson 67-70-65 --202 -14
Stacy Lewis 70-70-63 -203 -13
Sydnee Michaels 72-62-69-203 -13
Eun-Hee Ji 65-72-67-204 -12
Nicole Castrale 67-69-68 -204 -12
Ariya Jutanugarn 69-66-69 204 -12
Lexi Thompson 65-70-69-204 -12
Mariajo Uribe 70-67-68 -205 -11
Pornanong Phatlum 69-65-71-205 -11
Meena Lee 70-71-65 -206 -10
Julieta Granada 69-70-67-206 -10
Hee Young Park 67-71-68 -206 -10
Beatriz Recari 68-70-68 -206 -10
Jiyai Shin 72-66-68 -206 -10
Hee Kyung Seo 68-68-70 -206 -10
Thidapa Suwannapura 67-67-72-206 -10
Alison Walshe 69-72-66 -207 -9
Katherine Hull-Kirk 69-69-69 207 -9











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Sometimes facts can get in the way


We Americans love to
celebrate our myths.
A great example
can be found right here in
Citrus County.
One of the most famous
residents of early Citrus
County was David Yulee
Levy, a U.S. senator who had
a plantation in Homosassa.
The sugar mill on Yulee Drive
(named after the senator) is
tied back to his time. Levy
County is named after him.
In 1999, Florida declared
David Levy Yulee a "Great
Floridian."
He is remembered as the


first Jewish man cal purposes.
to be elected to Levy'sfatherwas
the U.S. Senate a wealthy busi-
and as one of the nessman from the
first two senators Caribbean (via
from Florida. Morocco) who
Well, a new came to Florida
book by TD. All- with the intent of
man, "Finding building a Jewish
Florida: The utopian commu-
True History of Gerry Mulligan nity called New
the Sunshine OUT THE Jerusalem near
State" tells a dif- WINDOW New Smyrna
ferent story. Beach.
According to The elder Levy
Allman's book, David Levy was anti-slavery and proud of
was raised as a Jew, but later his religious heritage.
changed his name for politi- But David Levy became an


outspoken proponent of slav-
ery, rejected his Jewish back-
ground and officially changed
his name to David Yulee.
He raised his family Chris-
tian and got elected to the
Senate when Florida offi-
cially joined the union.
According to Allman, David
Levy Yulee was one of the
first special-interest guys in
Florida, and he used pro-
ceeds from Florida taxpayers
to build his private railroad
from Fernandina Beach
down to Cedar Key
See Page C3


"Finding
Florida:
The True
History of
the Sunshine
State," by
T.D. Allman,
was published
in 2013 by
Atlantic
Monthly Press
and is avail-
able in book-
stores and
through
Amazon.com.
MATTHEW BRADY/
Library of Congress


Associated Press


People attend the "Rally for Citizenship" last month on Capitol Hill in Washington in support of immigration reform.


T A TTT \


XA TT TA '3)


TWO LOCAL VOICES OPINE ON THE MERITS OF
IMMIGRATION, NATURALIZATION AND AMNESTY



No documentation? No citizenship
BOB HAGAMAN
Special to the Chronicle


VVXLL X-&


-1 ArTT T-" X TC


S --


With immigration
the chief issue in
Congress, there
is one thing we need to
know: All Republicans
hate Hispanics.


At least, that is the impression presented by the
various liberal media outlets. The truth is that liber-
als want to make our legal and undocumented His-
panics beholden to their way of life. That is, to make
sure they cannot rise above the mediocre way of life.
Immigration discussions consistently leave off the
qualifier There is nothing wrong with people immi-
grating into our country legally The problem is that
See Page C4


VV I LjlHWle








HOW?


Immigrants a benefit to U.S. society
DONALD WHITAKER
Special to the Chronicle


To the casual observer, im-
migration may seem like
an issue simple to resolve:
just don't let anyone in, because
they take jobs away from people
who need them most.


Many will point to California, Miami
and the Boston bombings as reasons why
immigration needs to be put to an end.
These are areas where immigration is not
perfect, yet instead of trying to seek ways
to resolve these issues, we go to the simple
solution: deportation.
This is not a viable option for either the
See Page C3


Voice your opinion about the county's future


As they hammer out the new
fiscal year budget over the
next weeks, members of the
Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC) need to
know what county residents value
most
Here's your opportunity to make
your opinion known: The Citrus
County 2014 Budget Options Sur-
vey is a grassroots effort to get tax-
payers' opinions on spending
priorities to the BOCC before it
sets a proposed millage rate in July


WANT TO TAKE THE SURVEY? Visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CitrusBudgetSurvey


The survey is online, available
now. It's being spearheaded by the
board of the citizen group Citrus
20/20 Inc., which will make a pres-
entation to the BOCC on survey re-
sults at the June 25 commission
meeting.
How did this come about? In
April, the Citrus 20/20 board in-
vited representatives from a num-


ber of community groups to join a
roundtable discussion regarding
the Duke Energy developments on
the county's situation and ways to
address it. The group met several
times to brainstorm options in the
wake of a still-weak economy, com-
pounded by Duke's decision to
close the CR3 nuclear plant.
It was clear to the roundtable


group that widespread community
input was essential, and needed
quickly, so it devised the survey
A central issue the group wres-
tled with was the concept of
"today vs. tomorrow." How can we
pay current bills in the face of a
multimillion-dollar shortfall,


Page C3


Lace Blue-McLean
GUEST
COLUMN


__ __


I


|


m


I X A L i







Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"Do your duty, and leave the rest to the gods."
Pierre Corneille, "Horace," 1640


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin .........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


JOB WELL DONE




Outgoing




county head




rose to meet




the times


When Brad Thorpe
took the reins as
county administra-
tor four years ago, the Great
Recession had already
knocked the blocks out from
under the housing market.
With that came a deflated tax
base necessitating major
belt-tightening in county gov-
ernment.
It was clear the county's
strong reliance on construc-
tion for employment and
taxes was a thing of the past.
And then came the prob-
lems with the nuclear plant
near Crystal River, ultimately
leading to its
recent closure
and the ongo- THE I
ing exodus of
high-salary Countyad
earners and announces
their families.
Coinciding OUR 01
with that was Brad Thor
the power in toug
company's de-
cision to only
pay taxes on what it thinks its
taxable value is rather than
the county's appraisal and
what the county has histori-
cally budgeted.
Those factors, combined
with a generally crummy
economy, are what Thorpe
was given to work with. While
some contend he and county
leaders should have antici-
pated the power plant
quandary and been ready for
the hit, those critics weren't
vocal until they witnessed the
newly created tax chasm;
and, in addition, they fail to
appreciate the painstaking
efforts Thorpe and crew have
sought to execute.
Taxable values have plum-
meted. As commission Chair-
man Joe Meek noted this past
week, since 2008 taxable val-
ues have dropped 27 percent,
wiping out $18.8 million in ad
valorem tax revenue.
In an effort to commensu-
rately resize government,
Thorpe restructured staff,
shedding more than 100 em-
ployees about 22 percent of
property tax-supported posi-
tions. Just because such ac-
tion was necessary does not
mean it was easy.
Over the past several
months, Thorpe has led the


r



P
h


effort to show citizens that
government services come at
a price. The services people
grew accustomed to are not
sustainable when the bud-
get's been whacked by more
than a quarter He and county
leaders have trudged through
a detailed breakdown of costs
and services and are pursu-
ing alternative financing
means in an effort to fund es-
sential services.
At the same time, Thorpe
has worked with county com-
missioners in pursuing long-
term projects that offer some
hope of rebuilding our crip-
pled tax base.
While subject
SSUE: to scrutiny,
Port Citrus and
ninistrator the County
retirement. Road 491 busi-
ness corridor
'INION: are bold initia-
)e excelled tives and hold
times. potential.
Over the
past four years
we've seen roads widened,
rifts between nonprofit/civic
groups calmed and leader-
ship in county government
strengthened.
True to form, Thorpe has
committed to see the current
budget process through the
critical phase, offering to stay
on beyond his contractual ob-
ligation of 30 days. As he pre-
pares to move on, he has
pledged to work with com-
missioners to solidify a tran-
sition plan.
While the next administra-
tor will have great challenges
in meeting the expectations
of a divided county commis-
sion and public, he or she will
have a strong foundation to
build upon, thanks to the
present administrator.
With Thorpe's departure
goes a wealth of institutional
knowledge. Having served as
a county commissioner, as a
community college official
and in leadership roles in
county administration,
Thorpe has brought signifi-
cant positive change to the
community he loves.
Brad Thorpe truly rose to
the great challenges of the
past four years, and did so
with professionalism, grace
and character.


Wrong priorities Remember at the polls
My wife just came in from When is enough enough? Now
work and informed me you're going to have to
that as a member of OUND pay a fire service fee
the school system, her even if your house is not
job had been elimi- on fire. We are also paying
nated today. And then I a fee for the garbage.
see on the news where 1 We're also paying more
some sports football for gas. If you need more
player is going to get money, charge the person
over $1 million a year AOA using the service. Maybe
and I just think it's sad CA. his insurance company will
that this country thinks 56305 9 pay for it. Please, people,
more of its athletes 5 0 remember this and other
than it does its teach- actions taken by the Cit-
ers. Thank you for letting me get rus County Board of Commis-
that off my chest. sioners at the next election.


Ghosts of Christmas past


WASHINGTON
C harles Dickens' 'A
Christmas Carol" is a
gooey confection of sea-
sonal sentiment. It also is an
economic manifesto that Dick-
ens hoped would hit with
"twenty thousand times the
force" of a political tract It con-
cerned a 19th-century debate
that is pertinent to today's ar-
gument about immigration.
Last week, a dis-
agreement between
two conservative
think tanks erupted
when the Heritage
Foundation excori-
ated the immigration
reform proposed by /
a bipartisan group r
of eight senators.
Heritage's analysis Georg
argues that making OT
11 million illegal im-
migrants eligible, VOI
more than a decade
from now, for welfare state en-
titlements would have net costs
(benefits received minus taxes
paid) of $6.3 trillion over the
next 50 years.
Fifty-year projections about
this or that are not worth the
paper they should never have
been printed on think of
what 1963 did not know about
2013. Why, then, Heritage's 50-
year time horizon? Because 50
years of any significant expen-
diture is an attention-getting
number. And because for more
than a decade legalized immi-
grants would be a net fiscal
plus, paying taxes but not re-
ceiving benefits.
The libertarian Cato Institute
says Heritage insufficiently ac-
knowledges immigration's con-
tributions to economic growth
(new businesses, replenishing
the workforce as baby boomers
retire, etc.). This dynamism,
Cato argues, will propel immi-
grants' upward mobility, reduc-
ing the number eligible for
means-tested entitlements.
Conservatives correctly criti-
cize those who reject "dynamic
scoring" of tax cuts. Such a cal-
culation of the revenue effects
of cuts includes assumptions


H
Ic


about the effect on economic
growth from changed behavior
in response to the cuts espe-
cially increased investment and
consumption. Opponents of dy-
namic scoring usually are op-
ponents of tax cuts. Similarly,
opponents of increased immi-
gration downplay what Cato
stresses immigration's ener-
gizing effects.
Which brings us to Dickens'
revolt against
Thomas Malthus'
pre-capitalist pes-
simism about the
possibility of growth
and abundance. "A
Christmas Carol"
expresses Dickens'
modernist rejection
of Malthus' theory
e Will that population al-
_ER ways grows faster
than the food supply,
DES so the poor must al-
ways be numerous
and miserable.
When told that many of the
poor "would rather die" than go
to the workhouse, Scrooge
replies: "If they would rather
die, they had better do it, and
decrease the surplus popula-
tion." But when Scrooge recog-
nizes that Tiny Tim might be
part of this surplus, he repents,
giving Tim's father, Bob
Cratchit, a raise and a Christ-
mas turkey This was Dickens'
representation of the modern
triumph of economics over fa-
talism about social stasis.
Sentimental? Certainly But
also expressive of the 19th cen-
tury's revolution of expecta-
tions. As Sylvia Nasar says in
"Grand Pursuit: The Story of
Economic Genius" (2011), the
second half of the 19th century
saw "one of the most radical
discoveries of all time," the
recognition that mankind's "cir-
cumstances were not predeter-
mined, immutable, or utterly
impervious to human interven-
tion." This called for "cheer and
activity rather than pessimism
and resignation."
Unfortunately, today's immi-
gration debate occurs during an
uncharacteristic American


mood of pessimism. Next
month, the anemic recovery
from the Great Recession will
be four years old, and many
Americans seem resigned to
slow growth, sluggish job cre-
ation and stalled social mobil-
ity; hence, their forebodings
about immigration.
Economic facts matter. But
the material ascent of humanity
since the 19th century demon-
strates that economic facts are
not constants, like the law of
gravity. Rather, they can re-
spond to induced dynamism, as
from immigration.
America is, however, more
than an economy; it also is a
civic culture. Today's entitle-
ment state, which encourages
an entitlement mentality, may
or may not be a powerful mag-
net for immigration; it certainly
changes the context of immi-
gration. Furthermore, Euro-
pean immigrants crossing the
Atlantic experienced a "psy-
chological guillotine" severing
them from their homeland and
encouraging Americanization.
Crossing the Rio Grande from
a contiguous nation is not a
comparable prod toward assim-
ilation. Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-
Ala., a critic of the proposed
reform, rightly warns of immi-
grants exerting downward pres-
sure on wages at the bottom of
America's social pyramid. And
Yuval Levin, editor of National
Affairs and a supporter of liber-
alized policy, notes: "A huge
amount of American social pol-
icy is directed to reducing the
number of people in our coun-
try who have low levels of skills
and education, and it would be
bizarre to use our immigration
policy to increase that number
significantly"
Complex and consequential,
immigration policy should not
be made hurriedly But neither
should it be made out of a fatal-
istic despair about economic
dynamism that better immigra-
tion policies might foster

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Thank you, doctors
In 1998, I began to develop
several chronic pain conditions.
I went through the gamut of
office visits, tests, ineffective
meds and treatments. By 2006,
my unrelieved, agonizing pains
most often caused total debili-
tation. Pain ruled my life, yet I
continued to be written off
with ineffective medications
and doctors' indifference to
address my pains effectively
However, eventually two out-
standing, dedicated, profes-
sional physicians made a
difference.
In 2011, I was extremely for-
tunate to become a patient of
Robert Ulseth, M.D., Compre-
hensive Pain Management, and
I finally obtained significant
pain relief! Dr. Ulseth exceeds
every standard that chronic
pain patients seek and need
from a pain management doc-
tor, as he combines knowledge,
concern, compassion, respect
and humor. His practice is
perfectly complimented by
Krystina Velez, office manager,
who is ideally efficient and
very personable.
In February 2013, I became a
patient of Frank Bono, D.O.,
Gulfcoast Spinal Institute, who


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
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and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
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surgically relieved a pain con-
dition. Dr. Bono proved to be
very knowledgeable, confident,
and congenial. His superior
qualifications are enhanced by


his office nurse, Amanda Jack-
son, R.N., who was wonder-
fully supportive, kind and
understanding.
With deepest gratitude and
sincerest appreciation, I thank
you, Dr. Ulseth, for your contin-
ued care, Dr. Bono and your
outstanding surgical team, and
also Home Health's Mary and
Roger, and home physical ther-
apists Allen, Nifka and Michelle.
And I thank Judy of Citrus Chi-
ropractic Group for the laser
therapy All of you were superb!
Also, I thank the compas-
sionate staff at Countryside
Animal Hospital, who not only
provides care for my "babies,"
but also offered support to me
during my sorrowful situation,
with special thanks to Donna.
With my utmost appreciation
and gratitude, I thank a very
special person, Renee Snyder, a
vet tech at CAH. With unwaver-
ing dedication, Renee not only
took care of my "babies" at my
home while I recuperated
from surgery, but also helped
me greatly as she truly lives
the word of our Lord.
Most profoundly, I thank God for
all of you! Many blessings to all!
Debbie Littzi
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The mysterious Mr. Tuesday: A


nothing bores read-
ers more than a
columnist moan-
ing about having writer's
block. It happens, but the
readers don't care. I know
- I'm a reader as well as a
writer
Recently, my wife and I
were having lunch at one
of the cozy restaurants in
Inverness. In the midst of
our pleasant conversation,
I dropped it on her. I said,
"Sweet girl, I've got to put
together another column
right away since you and I
are going to Houston next
week to visit our Texans. I
have Mother's Day cov-
ered, but I have no idea
what to offer for Sunday,
May 19. How about you
writing that one for me?"
Cheryl smiled sweetly,



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

He was also known as one
of the most powerful and
manipulative politicians
Florida ever produced. "...
Senator Yulee became
Florida's pre-eminent pub-
lic personality by betraying
his father's moral princi-
ples as well as his religious
heritage. The elder Levy
wrote pamphlets denounc-
ing slavery Converting to
Episcopalianism and mar-
rying the daughter of a
Kentucky governor, his son
became slavery's ardent
proponent while embrac-
ing the Florida tradition of
using the public purse to
build a public fortune,"
writes Allman.
Levy-Yulee used federal
and state land grants to fi-
nance the construction of
the railroad. He was so
passionate about the rail-
road because he believed
it would generate a white
migration to Florida and
avoid the "Africanization"
of the state.
He helped push the
South toward the Civil War
because, according to All-
man, he anticipated mak-
ing an even greater fortune
if the South stood alone.
At one point during the
war, the South wanted to
tear up Levy-Yulee's rail-
road and use the rails on
another railroad that would
have helped the war effort.
Levy-Yulee got a court in-
junction that stopped the
state from dismantling his
property.
During the war, the
North wasn't confused
about Levy-Yulee's loyal-
ties; they came to Ho-
mosassa and burned down
his plantation, where the
old sugar mill now stands
as a historical remnant.
When the Civil War
ended, Levy-Yulee got in-
volved in another scandal
when the property and
money from Jefferson
Davis, the president of the
Confederacy, was shipped
to the Levy-Yulee Cotton-
wood Plantation inAlachua
County near Archer
Levy-Yulee ended up
serving time in a Georgia
prison. Once out of prison
he managed to regain some
political and financial
power, but again went
bankrupt. He died in Man-
hattan in 1886 while court-
ing investors for another
business scheme back in
the great state of Florida.
When Florida papers
printed his obituary in 1886,
it was a Tampa paper which
recounted the devastation
Yulee's manipulations, in
both war and peace, had in-
flicted on Florida.
An editorial at the time
noted: "From beginning to
end Mr. Yulee has shown
himself a trickster."
Citrus County's most fa-
mous 19th-century citizen
had a legacy in Florida
that was obviously not ap-
preciated by everyone.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


SURVEY
Continued from Page C1

while at the same time
planning for needed im-
provements to promote
economic growth and en-
hance our quality of life in
the future?


yet firmly replied, "That's
not happening, but I think
you should write about Mr.
Tuesday"
Mind you, she didn't say
that she would write about
Mr. Tuesday, but that I
should. My response was a
resounding, "There ain't
no way!"
Of course, when you're
desperate, you're desper-
ate, so I continued to mull
her suggestion. And this
morning I'm sitting at my
keyboard writing the saga
of Mr Tuesday I'm sure by
now you're all sitting on
the edges of your seats,
just dying to know all
about this mystery man.
There are certain some-
what sad preliminary facts
which must be put on
record, so here goes: My


A ;;:;




4"
U


S
p


mother and father loved be programmed. I didn't
each other very much and really mind, and it wasn't
were married for 39 years that far from my house to
before my father's un- hers, but those things still
timely death. When he represented additional on-
passed at 60 going chores. A
years of age, fellow who was
my mother was tall enough to
only 55. change the
At that time, IR light bulbs
I was in my without having
early 30s and to use a step-
55 seemed as stool might not
old as dirt. I be so bad.
certainly saw Voila! Enter
no need for her Fred Brannen Mr Tuesday
to consider A SLICE My recollec-
male compan- tion is that
ionship that OF LIFE some two years
is, not right after my
away But then my thinking mother became a widow, a
changed a bit. Light bulbs nice gentleman and I
constantly needed chang- don't use the words lightly
ing, the grass needed to be asked her if he might
cut and the VCR needed to call on her. And call he did.


As;
nai
bec
Tue
out
her
Poe
Tel
tha
reti
a l
day
T
last
yea


bedtime story

an inside joke, the nick- spend together, but there
me Mr. Tuesday stuck are moments a marriage
cause it was always brings that I'm not willing
esday when he took her to share with him. When
. There's no big mystery it's time to go to bed, I'm
re; I'm not Edgar Allen ready for him to be gone."
e and this isn't "The Is there a message here?
1-Tale Heart." It's just Of course, but I'm not alto-
t he was the semi- gether sure what it is.
ired associate pastor at I did tell Cheryl that if I
local church and Tues- should pass first, there'll
y was his free day probably be a Mr. Monday,
'heir quasi-courtship a Mr. Wednesday, a Mr.
ted for a number of Thursday and so on, lined
irs, but it never went be- up at her front door want-


yond going out on Tuesday
nights. My mother can-
didly told me she cared for
Mr. Tuesday, but not
enough. How did she put
it? Delicately but with a
great degree of clarity, she
said, "He's asked me to
marry him, but I said no. I
enjoy every moment we


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"AOSe fTW PrT Fv-*o 1AMiN eiOF S OF s.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Thanks for the trash!
A big thank you to everyone
who participated in the first an-
nual "Free Disposal Day" at the
County Landfill on Saturday,
May 4. This was a terrific part-
nership between the Board of
County Commissioners, Keep
Citrus Beautiful and the Divi-
sion of Solid Waste. We were ex-
cited to see cars lining up
before we opened at 7 a.m. Over
the course of nine hours -
more than 1,200 residents took
advantage of the opportunity to
clean up Citrus County. This
breaks down to about one cus-
tomer every 27 seconds.
At the end of the day, we dis-
posed of 263 tons of garbage and
50 tons of yard waste. We also
collected six tons of household
hazardous waste and disposed
of 28 tons of tires. This all added
up to big savings for the resi-
dents of Citrus County, and we
were able to collect more than
346 tons of garbage! We couldn't



WHITAKER
Continued from Page C1

United States or immigrants.
Immigrants make up a very reli-
able and, in many cases, edu-
cated workforce. Also, immigrants
continue to preserve the Ameri-
can way of life by adding new
ideas and customs to the Ameri-
can culture. Finally, even though
immigration has its faults, the so-
lution is not getting rid of it, but
repairing those faults.
According to politifact.com, 66
percent of all doctorates in the
field of industrial engineering,
during 2009, were earned by tem-
porary residents. As of May 2012,
industrial engineers made up
6.13 percent of employment in
Michigan, with an average wage
of $78,690. These are jobs from
oil and gas extraction to motor
vehicle part production (Bureau
of Labor Statistics, 2013). There
are many more examples of
fields that have a primarily for-
eign-born background. These
aren't jobs that Americans aren't
taking, but rather jobs for which
Americans aren't getting the ed-
ucation. More than three-fourths


Funding, from whatever
source, must be allocated
to efforts that will pre-
serve our "today" our
priority service levels as
well as lay a foundation for
our "tomorrow"- our con-
tinued way of life. The
roundtable group seeks to
understand citizen priori-
ties among the seven func-


have done it without county
staff and the help of volunteers
from Keep Citrus Beautiful.
Thank you to all who partici-
pated in this successful event.
Casey Stephens
Solid Waste Management director

National Hospital Week
A hospital provides more than
medical care; it fosters health
and well-being in the commu-
nity It provides care and com-
fort, brings new life into the
world and educates people on
how to lead healthy lives. A hos-
pital is a trusted health care
partner, a neighbor you can
count on 24/7.
National Hospital Week,
which ran from May 12 to 18, is
a celebration of the history,
technology and dedicated pro-
fessionals that make our hospi-
tals beacons of confidence and
care. This year's theme, "A
Guiding Light for Changing


of all hired workers on crop
farms were born outside of the
United States, and according to
the same report, the average
wage for workers was $9.07 per
hour, compared to $16.75 per
hour for non-farm workers
("Farm Labor Shortages: How
Real? What Response" Philip
Martin, Center for Immigration
Studies, 2007.)
It is hard to argue the impact
immigrants have on the Ameri-
can culture, from Columbus Day
to the foreign cuisines we all
crave. Americans have greatly
benefitted from contributions by
foreign-born citizens. Pizza was
brought to the United States by
Italian immigrants in the early
20th century. Albert Einstein, a
German immigrant, was one of
the world's foremost scientists.
Andrew Carnegie, an immigrant
from Scotland, formed U.S. Steel
and created a number of cultural
and educational venues.
Immigration does have its faults;
particularly, taxing illegal aliens
and the increasingly high crime
rate associated with immigrants.
Most Americans will agree we
need major reform of our tax sys-
tem. It is a highly complicated
system that allows for many er-


tions of local government
as a basis of recommenda-
tion to the BOCC on budg-
eting and planning.
The brief, anonymous
survey asks you to rank
and prioritize the seven
major functions funded by
public dollars and your
willingness to pay more
for priority services if


Times," highlighted the impor-
tant role hospitals play in their
communities.
And what makes a hospital a
trusted partner? The people.
It's the people who give it life,
who make it a place you can
count on. It's the doctors who di-
agnose and treat; the nurses
who provide comfort and care;
the staff members who check
you in or who help keep the hos-
pital clean. These are the peo-
ple who allow the hospital to
deliver high-quality care with
compassion and kindness.
I'd like to recognize the men
and women who make that care
possible at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center it's be-
cause of them that you trust us
with your care. Thank you for
allowing us to serve you.

Joyce Brancato, CEO
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Crystal River


rors and loopholes. Also, every a
state's tax system varies wildly n
from the next. There is an easy q
suggestion; it has worked in both v
Canada and throughout Europe, c
yet has many inherent flaws. t
This is the flat sales tax. Another c
option is to force companies that f
hire illegal immigrants to pay s
hefty fines. We already have laws p
on the books for this, but do not c
enforce them. r
The crime issue offers very a
few easy solutions. However, one v
of the first steps should be to in- v
fuse the bad neighborhoods with s
money and resources to improve c
them. Most of the schools in i:
these areas are rife with drugs,
teen pregnancy and murder The i
students in these neighborhoods t
do not have the means to learn. c
In bad neighborhoods, surviving e
means staying unnoticed and ed- f
ucation is oftentimes the only c
way to a better life. Adding more v
law enforcement will help pro- t
tect those who want to learn and r
can be used to attack crime at the t
source. a
President Obama's new immi- p
ration proposal offers many of
these same solutions and more.
He wants to crack down on com- I
panies using illegal immigrants


needed. A summary of the
budget needs prefaces the
survey
The roundtable group
will collate and summa-
rize survey results and
present them to the BOCC
in June, as well as making
its report available on Cit-
rus 20/20's home page,
http ://citrus2020.org/.


Please help by partici-
pating in this important
survey. Find it at https://
www. surveymonkey com/s/
CitrusBudgetSurvey The
survey will close at mid-
night on Monday, June 10.
Results will be available
from Citrus 20/20 within
days.
Please take this oppor-


ing to take her out ... and
that's OK, so long as they
all follow Mr. Tuesday's
lead and are gone by an
appropriate hour!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


Hot Comer:
MEADOWCREST
ACCIDENT

Another folly
Isn't it interesting that
only after one day, at the
traffic lights at the inter-
section of State Road 44
and Meadowcrest Boulevard
there was a major crash
between a motorcycle and
an SUV. This is another bad
idea where our commis-
sioners spent our taxpay-
ers' dollars for something
that we didn't need.
Editor's note: Traffic at
that intersection increased
significantly following the re-
location of the West Citrus
Government center to Mead-
owcrest Boulevard and the
construction of the Family
Dollar store. The traffic light
was paid for with a cost-
sharing transportation
agreement between the
Board of County Commis-
sioners and the Family Dol-
lar store on State Road 44.
The developer for the Family
Dollar store paid $18,424.
The BOCC paid the remain-
ing $231,000 after Gov.
Rick Scott vetoed FDOT
funds for the signal
Confused by light
Mr. Kennedy from Crys-
tal River is not the only
person confused. I've no-
ticed at a couple of other
places where they have
that and it is confusing.
The yellow flashing light is
very, very confusing even
though we all know the
yellow stands for caution.
But here's another screw-
up by the county.
Scary signals
I'm just concerned. That
flashing yellow light I just
read in the paper about
that accident and yes it is
very confusing. I was going
through that one down at
Walgreens in Inverness fol-
lowing cars through this
yellow flashing light I get
under it and it turns red.
Scared the devil out of me.


md make a database for compa-
lies to verify citizenship status
quickly and easily Obama also
want to make becoming a U.S.
'itizen easier for those who want
o create businesses on Ameri-
'an soil. Also, let's not forget the
irst part to immigration reform
suggested by Obama was not
)assed. This would have reduced
'rime. I am talking about the
mandatory background checks for
ill gun purchases. Finally, Obama
wants to improve the way we deal
with immigrants in our school
systems while at the same time
'reate less obstacles surround-
ng deportation of criminals.
I suggest instead of looking at
immigration as a weakness, let's
urn it into a strength. We should
demand Congress take the nec-
essary steps to create true re-
orm, enabling immigrants to
'ome into this country and excel
while at the same time leaving
he American citizen who is al-
'eady here unharmed. Let's end
he political correctness, and
aim for fixing a system in des-
)erate need of repair.


Donald Whitakerheads the Citrus
County Young Democrats Club.


tunity to help decide Citrus
County's future direction.


Lace Blue-McLean is
chairman of Citrus 20/20,
a volunteergroup
providing visioning for
environment, education,
managed growth and
community since 1995.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HAGAMAN
Continued from Page C1

too many have entered illegally. This
makes it difficult for those who should be
allowed to become citizens of our great
nation.
This situation has been allowed to con-
tinue for years due to failure of our legis-
lators to take appropriate responsibility.
With all of the conversation about illegal
border crossings, Congress should have
acted responsibly and created a pathway
for the "undocumented" to be in our
country if we need them here. Obviously,
Congress believes we need them. Cur-
rently the main impetus for having them
here is that they can be counted on to
vote Democrat This is the most unethi-
cal reasoning possible.
We need all our citizens to become in-
formed and to understand that the gov-
ernment we need is one that does what is
constitutionally correct. Government
cannot long endure by giving takers so-
called free stuff indefinitely Everything
must be paid for, and if we reduce the
wage-earner ranks too far, there will be
nothing for anyone. If those willing to
work have to give all their justifiable
earnings to those who believe free stuff
is their right, eventually there will be no
one willing to work. This basically hap-
pened during the Soviet Union experi-
ment, and if China had not realized the
error of its government policies, collapse
would have happened there as well. It
still may happen.
Even now with all the talk of immigra-
tion reform, in Washington the constant
effort seems to be to ignore the problem
while working toward a solution.
If we have people here illegally, there
will be no solution. There is already the
hint we will not continue to secure our
borders. With plans to make the undocu-
mented already here legal, why would
any others expect to abide by any law we
have to control them?
How could we expect the undocu-
mented to pay large fines? They are often
used to do work others refuse to do and
are not properly paid. As a result, they
have to live in substandard conditions


and remain in fear of becoming docu-
mented, as they may have to leave.
In the meantime, our legal Hispanics
will be further indoctrinated with the
idea that Republicans hate all Hispanics
and gravitate further to the Democratic
Party. As a result, many of them (those
who would honestly take a job and be-
come productive members of our society)
will settle for less by taking government
handouts. This will further erode our na-
tional stability, and as the so-called un-
documented are assimilated into our
society, many of them will also accept the
lesser status, and the underclass will
grow even larger.
If the leadership of the Republican
Party cannot or will not put together a plan
to reverse the impending decline of our
nation, then it will be left to a new lead-
ership group to rise up and save our na-
tion. We need to guarantee the opportunity
for all, not just the politically well-con-
nected, to succeed in our great country
Since the two-party system is so in-
grained, I call for the Republicans to step
up and reverse the current trend. The
Democratic Party's philosophy of giving
the takers what the makers will produce
must be corralled.
Also, the liberal-minded people need
to give some serious thought to what they
are trying to create. Leaders in that
group show no tendency to be willing to
part with the largess they have. Those
who choose to follow liberals who thrive
on promoting class envy need to realize
that their leaders are among the very
wealthy, often gained on the backs of
those who they claim to really care for.
No! It is only Republicans who have
achieved success beyond the average
that the liberals expect to share.
It is time to stop people from entering
our country without legal documenta-
tion. If there are categories of people we
need here who do not meet our current
standards, then Congress has an obliga-
tion to create the proper pathway for
them and put an end to using them as po-
litical fodder


Robert E. Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman.
He resides in Homosassa.


Great read
This is referring to an article in
today, Monday's (May 6) Chronicle, edi-
tor's letters. It's called "Generosity's
timing," by John Read. He wrote a
great, great article and idea. Where are
all these millionaires and billionaires
now to be seen when there's no politi-
cal campaign? They've got money when
it helps themselves but not when it
helps helpless human beings.
Full of barnacles
The Chronicle's article about salt in
King's Bay is a little late. I've had bar-
nacles on my dock post for four, maybe
five years now. Also, we've had har-
vesters for years and they have never
had an encounter with manatees. The
man that wants to stop harvesters
must not live on the bay. My
area is full of spongy green 01
mess right now and I would
welcome a harvester.
Read the instructions
The big green sign attached
to all the new garbage cans
says, "Beginning the week of i
May 6, the garbage will be col- CAL
elected each Thursday." And,
"Recycling collection will be 56
collected on Wednesdays." So
what does 30 percent of the popula-
tion do? They still put their garbage out
on Monday, May 6, except they put it in
the new garbage can. They're going to be
awfully upset when they go out to get
their garbage can Monday night to find
out there's still garbage inside. Some-
one called in recently to say that people
don't read anything anymore and this is
just more proof of that.
Feasibility folly
It's interesting how they're doing a
feasibility study for an athletic field but
they rejected Mike Hampton when he
wanted it. In addition to that, they're
spending money for that feasibility
study but they can't afford to put soap
in the bathroom at Fort Island Gulf
Beach. It's two weekends in a row that
there's been no soap in the ladies'
room or the men's room.


Cheaper dental work
It's interesting in the paper, this Dr.
Frank Vascimini is talking about how to
save a bridge. You redo the root canal
or get surgery. That's good, sound ad-
vice until you go to get the cost of
those procedures and it's almost as
much as buying an old used car. And I
think that in most cases, a lot of peo-
ple can't afford it. But there is a place
that is kind of helpful: the University of
Florida Dental College up in
Gainesville. They're about 50 percent
off on a lot of procedures and I have
used them extensively because I just
don't have the money to pay (for) these
expensive procedures.... So there is
help for people who don't have the
money to pay (for) that kind of work
but need the help.


0579


Editor's note: To request an
appointment, call 352-273-6701.
Leave town with team
As I was reading about the
Miami Dolphins and the multi-
billion-dollar owner wanting
the taxpayers to fix his sta-
dium, I thought, "Man, what is
the matter with this country?"
I'd tell him to take his team to
Mexico if he wasn't happy in
Miami.
Smoky analogy


JJ (Kenney), your comment in the
commissioners meeting was ab-
solutely ridiculous. I'm not a smoker. I
do not buy a carton of cigarettes and
I don't support these MSBUs and I
have no idea what the heck you're
talking about as far as a carton of cig-
arettes. Your analogy is from another
planet.
Fighting back
Thanks, Charlie Dean and Ed Green,
for being concerned about the 750,000
of us that live in manufactured homes.
We need all the help we can get
against mobile home (park owners)
like I have that have raised our lot rent
beyond similar parks and put only pen-
nies back into it. Yes, and we're begin-
ning to fight back.


* ,;-


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday *torday
1 2 3 4


S 6 7 8 9 10 11


12 13 14 15 17 18


19 20 22 23 24 2








Come celebrate the achievements of
Citrus County's Athletes of the Year!


College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus

May 30, 2013


Award Ceremony begins at 6:30 pm.

Tickets available at the Citrus County Chronicle
Meadowcrest office in Crystal River for $10 each.
Cash or check only please.


BUICK C5MC-


COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA


-- Spanish American Club
of Citrus County
Installation Dinner Dance
Saturday June 1,2013

Knights of Columbus Hall #6168 6 PM to Midnight
2389 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Lecanto, FL.

Choice of Dinner-Catering by Brooklyn Dockside Deli
Rosemary Chicken, Red Herb Potatoes, Vegetable Medley, Dinner Roll
Or
Cuban Style Mojo Roast Pork, Yellow Rice, Beans, Garlic Bread


Entertainment by Orlando's Havana Boys Salsa Band
& The Legendary Havana Pete
For Tickets & Info Price Includes Tickets Must Be Purchased
Soda, Water, Ice, Coffee By Friday May 24
Ben 46-3599& Dessert
Jeanette 598-7816 BYOB Formal Attire
Maria 341-0979 Door Prizes-Save Your Jackets/Ties For Men
Ins 201-7901 TicketStub Dress Code Enforced
Carlos 560-3246 Members/Sponsors $30 No Minors
Limited Seating Guests $35 No Refunds on Tickets


www.chronicleonlne.com


JAL


WIN OVER

$14,000
in cash & prizes
Prizesfbasedron
165fboatstentered
Entry Fee
$125per boat
Limit 200 Entri es


Fish out of MacRaeO Bait & Tackle on the Homosassa
River or Twin Rivers Marina on the Crystal River








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1 I
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For tournament information or entry forms call
MacRaeO 628-2602
or Barramundi Corp. 628-0200


C4 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


COMMENTARY


OEOUT











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Ousted IRS Chief Steve Miller takes his seat Friday after a break in testimony during a hearing at the House Ways and Means
Committee on the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) practice of targeting applicants for tax-exempt status based on political leanings on
Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C.


I


Associated Press


WASHINGTON


Revenue Service
is feeling the sort
of heat targeted
taxpayers feel from the tax
agency. It's the sense that
a powerful someone is
breathing down your neck
Republicans in Congress are livid with
the IRS over its systematic scrutiny of
conservative groups during the 2010 and
2012 elections. Democrats agree that
something must be done. President
Barack Obama also isn't at all happy
with the tax collectors.
That kind of commonality in Washing-
ton is about as rare as a budget surplus.
So expect a bumpy ride for the IRS,
unloved in the best of times, as a Justice
Department criminal investigation and
multiple congressional inquiries try to
get to the bottom of it all.
A look at the matter:

IN BRIEF
The central issue is whether IRS
agents who determine whether nonprofit
organizations must pay federal income
taxes played political favorites or even
broke the law when they subjected tea
party groups and other conservative or-
ganizations to special scrutiny
Also foremost in the concerns of Con-
gress: Why senior IRS officials, for many
months, did not disclose what they had
learned about the actions of lower-level
employees despite persistent questions
from Republican lawmakers and howls
from aggrieved organizations.


Members of the audience stand and applaud Friday after House Ways and Means Committee
member Rep. Mike Kelly, R-Pa., criticized ousted IRS chief Steven Miller as Miller testified
before the committee's hearing focusing on the extra scrutiny the IRS gave Tea Party
and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status. Tea Party Patriots
co-founder Jenny Beth Martin sits at front left.


WHY IT MATTERS
The IRS is expected to be pesky,
even intimidating, to miscreants, but
at all times politically neutral. Nonparti-
sanship is the coin of its realm, perhaps
more so than in any other part of
government
"I will not tolerate this kind of behav-
ior in any agency but especially in the
IRS, given the power that it has and the
reach that it has into all of our lives,"
Obama said in ousting the agency's act-
ing chief, Steven T Miller.
On Thursday, on the eve of House
hearings at which Miller has been called
to testify, the president named Daniel
Werfel, a senior White House budget
official, to take charge of the agency
temporarily


IRS actions in the period covering the
2010 congressional elections and the
early going of the 2012 presidential cam-
paign have tattered the perception that
the agency is clean of political leanings.
Whether that was also the reality re-
mains to be discovered.
A report by the Treasury Department's
top investigator for tax matters found no
evidence that sheer partisanship drove
the targeting. But the watchdog dis-
closed Friday that he is still investigat-
ing. His report faulted lax management
for not stopping it sooner
It's a sensitive time for the agency's
professionalism to be in doubt because
the IRS soon will loom even larger in
people's lives. It's to be the enforcer of
See Page D5


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Monetary

gift may

be shared

in divorce
DEAR BRUCE:
My parents are
in their late 80s.
Several years ago they
started to give me
money as part of my in-
heritance for me to ben-
efit from now instead of
when they die. The
money, which is nearly
$120,000, is in an ac-
count in only my name.
My marriage has been
on shaky ground for the
past year and I'm not
sure where we are
headed. If we get a di-
vorce, I don't want my
husband to get his hands
on any of this money
Should I hide it in a
safety deposit box or put
it in my brother's name?
I have heard horror sto-
ries of inheritance
money being taken by
estranged spouses.
Please help me! -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER:
With the money from
your parents in an ac-
count with your name, if
your marriage goes
down the sewer, your
spouse would have a
claim for half of the
money Whether your
husband "should" get
any of the money is an-
other matter. The inher-
itance is a gift to you.
If you wish to put the
money in your brother's
name, that may be an
answer. But, of course, if
he gets into trouble, that
money can be tapped by
whoever is trying to col-
lect from him.
DEAR BRUCE: My
sister was given a life es-
tate in a home. Can you
tell me what my sister
can do? There are two
children sharing in the
estate. Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: I
think you have to under-
stand that there is a dif-
ference between a life
estate and the estate the
two children share. A
life estate is very simple.
It says that your sister
can live in the house as
long as she is alive, as-
suming she meets a cou-
ple of standards, such as
paying the taxes and
paying insurance. The
fact that two children
share in the estate is not
relevant.
Until such time as she
either passes away or
decides to give up the
life estate, your sister
can stay there without
regard to what the oth-
ers who have an inter-
est in the estate wish
her to do. They have no
way to shorten the life
estate.
See Page D4


The nonprofit as a business entity


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


Most of us think of
nonprofit organi-
zations as chari-
ties. This assumption is
understandable; nonprof-
its can be charities but
they can also be a lot more.
They can be organized
under any of the 27-plus
different IRS tax-exempt
categories, all of them cre-
ated and designed to serve
and meet specific needs.
Charities are usually clas-
sified by IRS code as 501 (c)


(3) tax-exempt organizations.
In that particular class, the
IRS also lists charitable,
scientific, educational, re-
search organizations, etc.
In the 501 (c) tax code
grouping the IRS also lists:
civic leagues as 501 (c) (4);
labor and agricultural or-
ganizations as 501 (c) (5);
chambers of commerce as
501 (c) (6) and up the nu-
merical ladder thru 501 (c)
(27), which are state-spon-
sored workers' compensa-


tion boards. Additionally,
there are subsets of some
of the categories that raise
the total number of non-
profits recognized by the
IRS to far more than 27.
Whatever that total number
is, all nonprofits, in order to
be successful, must oper-
ate in many ways just like
their for-profit brethren.
Non- and for-profit
business disciplines
The basics of a business
model of marketing disci-


plines works in the same
way for both non- and for-
profit organizations. Non-
profits search to identify
an unmet need. For-profit
executives search for new
products or services to
offer consumers. In both
cases, it's the careful dis-
covery of what is feasible
and what will bring the de-
sired results.
The legal structuring of a
business organization is
another task required by


both organizations. In the
case of the for-profit, it's a
matter of which corporate
structure may be best: a C
or S corporation or possi-
bly an LLC, etc. There are
others, each slightly differ-
ent in composition of the
principals and/or tax ad-
vantages to the principals
and investors. Sole propri-
etorships and partnerships
represent other forms of


Page D5


f













SUNDAY
MAY 19, 2(


SPromotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






13 Builder's connectionn


Tournament's anglers cash in


The 18th annual Family Fish-
ing Tournament, sponsored by
FDS Disposal Inc., had over 100
boat entries before the Captain's
Meeting even began on Friday,
April 26, 2013. Their first Cap-
tain's Meeting outside ended
with 121 paid boats with a total
of 128 boats and a 97 percent
prize payout, which would in
turn mean a $2,910 check, each,
for the first-place trout and red-
fish winners that weekend.
A beautiful weekend ensued
with more than 360 anglers and
more than $12,100 in cash and
prizes paid out.
The Aaron Monier Memorial
Youth Tournament conducted by
CCBA Youth Partner Coastal
Conservation Association Cit-
rus Chapter had many parents
and onlookers alike beaming
with smiles as the kids did their
learning stations and received
their rewards for a weekend of
hard fishing.
2013 winners of this year's
tournament (pictured) were:
TROUT
First place: Cary Lewis -
4.98 pounds, 25 inches
Second place: Hunter
McPherson 4.92 pounds, 25
inches.
Third place: Mark Brady -
4.38 pounds, 23 3/4 inches.
REDFISH
First place: Brandon Col-
bert 7.56 pounds, 26 3/4
inches.
Second place: Robert
Rowthorn 7.50 pounds, 26 3/4
inches.
Third place: J.T Amoringas
- 7.48 pounds, 26 1/2 inches.
REDFISH MOST SPOTS
First place: Mike Moore -
4.72 pounds 22 1/2 inches, 24
spots.
Second place: Richard
Hunt 3.80 pounds 21 3/4
inches, 9 spots.
COBIA
First place: John Dickey -
32.10 pounds, 40 5/8 inches.
Second place: E.J. Gerrits
- 19 pounds, 36 1/4 inches.
CATFISH
First place: J.R. Atherton
- 4.44 pounds, 23 7/8 inches.
Second place: Rhett Gher-
ing 3.88 pounds, 21 inches.
HOMOSASSA SLAM (trout
aggregate)


Winners of the 18th annual Family Fishing Tournament.


Kelly Kofmehl total
weight: 14.74 pounds.
AARON MONIER MEMO-
RIAL YOUTH TOURNAMENT
First place: Trace Kofmehl
- drum, 24.56 pounds.
Second place: Chase
Burlew cobia, 18.48 pounds.
Third place: Sean
Thatauakorn shark, 13.16
pounds.
Fourth place: Taylor Green
- redfish, 5.98 pounds.
Fifth place: Nathan
Berquon jack, 4.3 pounds.
Sixth place: Matteo La-
sorsa Spanish mack, 2.94
pounds.
Thanks for the help
This tournament would not be
possible without its sponsors,
and we humbly thank each and
every one of you.
Exclusive Platinum Spon-
sor: FDS Disposal Inc.
Official Weigh-In Sponsor:
Florian Masonry
Youth Partner: Coastal
Conservation Association -
Citrus Chapter
Gold Sponsors:
Citrus 95.3.
Sibex.
The Fox 96.3.
True Oldies 106.3.
Silver Sponsor: Sherwin
Williams.
Bronze Sponsors:
Bright House Networks.
Nick Nicholas Ford
Lincoln.
Ro-mac Lumber & Supply
Prize and Goodie Bucket
Sponsors:


SAVE THE DATE
2014 Tournament Dates:
April 26 and 27, 2014, at
the Homosassa Riverside
Resort. (Captain's Meeting
on April 25.)

Advanced Floor Care.
Aylesworth's Fish & Bait.
Bright House Networks.
Cadence Bank.
Citrus Pest Management.
City Electric Supply
Contractor's Institute.
Curry's Roofing.
Dan's Clam Stand.
David M. Rom State Farm.
Dream Custom Homes.
FDS Disposal Inc.
Homosassa Riverside
Resort.
Keep Citrus County
Beautiful.
McPherson's Archery &
Outdoor Pro Shop.
Porter's Locksmithing.
Progressive.
Ryan Lampasona State
Farm.
SeaTow
Sew Be It Embroidery &
Screen Printing.
Sherwin Williams.
Walmart Supercenter,
Inverness.
Tropical Window Inc.
Woods N' Water Magazine.
Woody Wax.
Many thanks to the wonderful
people who helped make this
tournament a success!
Fishing Tournament
Committee:
Chair John Jobe, City Elec-


tric Supply
Co-Chair Erin Ray, FDS
Disposal Inc.
Randy Clark, Clark Con-
struction Inc.
Erin Ray, FDS Disposal
Inc.
Dusty Porter, Porter's
Locksmithing.
John Porter, Porter's
Locksmithing.
Alan Bell, Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart.
James Panetti, Tournament
Weighmaster.
Barbara Branch, Coastal
Conservation Association -
Citrus Chapter
Tournament volunteers:
Eric Swart, Citrus Pest
Management.
Kristina Harding, City
Electric Supply
Dawn Fredricko, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Zackary Roderick, FDS
Disposal Inc.
Suzanne Clemente, FDS
Disposal Inc.
Emma Clemente, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Tim Carpenter, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Mike Nannfeldt, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Donnie Simpson, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Debra Green, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Summer Green, FDS Dis-
posal Inc.
Anjela Wright, Gold Crest
Homes.
John Melchionne, Gold


Crest Homes.
Dolores Bell, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Bud Allen, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Joe McClister, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Bernie Tucker, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Ray Thompson, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Richard Hunt, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Lee Helscel, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Curt Ebitz, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Ann McClister, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Ladies Auxiliary
Mari-elain Ebitz, Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
Ladies Auxiliary
Suzanne Frittle, Coastal
Conservation Association -
Citrus Chapter
Rae Jean Nieland, Coastal
Conservation Association -
Citrus Chapter
Brittany Maxey, Student,
University of Florida.
Special thanks to the FDS Dis-
posal Inc., Porter's Lock-
smithing, and Homosassa
Riverside Resort and staff.


SEBC


welcomes


46 new


exhibitors


New member

discount offered
The 35th annual Southeast
Building Conference (SEBC) will
have an exciting new look this
year with 46 new exhibiting com-
panies for the July 11-13 trade
show at the Orange County Con-
vention
Center in
Orlando.
That's
great
news for 20134
the more SEBC
than
5,000 del-
egates
expected
as well as
new members of the Citrus
County Builders Association, who
can attend the entire show, in-
cluding 60 educational programs,
for just $69 more than a 50 per-
cent discount off the regular
price.
For details on attending or ex-
hibiting, visit www.sebcshow com.
The SEBC is presented by the
Florida Home Builders Associa-
tion (FHBA) and in addition to ed-
ucation and exhibits, includes
tours of the New Southern Home,
the Sales Academy Day, and pres-
entation of the prestigious
Aurora Awards for design
and construction excellence
(www.theauroras.com).
FHBAs Board of Directors will
meet July 13 during the SEBC,
where the 2013 inductees into the
Florida Housing Hall of Fame will
be announced.


CCBA presents Jim Blackshear Golf Outing funds


The Citrus County Builders Association (CCBA) Board of Directors presented the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County with 50 percent
of the 2013 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing proceeds, in the amount of $2,311.08, on Wednesday, May 8, 2013. The 2013 Golf
Outing, presented by Love Chevrolet and Love Honda and held Feb. 23 at Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club, was the first year of
partnership between the CCBA and the Boys & Girls Clubs, providing opportunity for the Boys & Girls Clubs to raise funds, and for the
CCBA to continue their quest in giving back to the community. The CCBA is pleased to announce that the Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing will partner with the Boys & Girls Clubs again in 2014, having scheduled the next Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing for
Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at the Inverness Golf & Country Club. If you are interested in assisting through participation or sponsorship
for the 2014 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing, please contact the CCBA at 352-746-9028 or the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County at 352-621-9225.


UPCOMING CCBA EVENTS
a June General Membership Luncheon,
scheduled from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, June 27. Featured guest
speakers are representatives of the
National Association of Home Builders
and Florida Home Builders Association
to discuss the benefits of the exclusive
three-in-one membership that your local
home builders association offers. If you
have ever been interested in joining the
CCBA, this is the meeting to attend!
Lunch will be provided. Cost is $10 per
person. Reservations required.
* Save the date! The all-new CCBA Annual
Community Showcase (formerly known
as the Home & Outdoor Show) has been
scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 16, at the
National Guard Armory in Crystal River.
This will be a one-day show packed full
of all types of local businesses and
organizations for our Citrus County
residents to visit and learn about. Mark
the date on your calendar and stay
tuned for more details. Whether a
resident or vendor, this is a showcase of
our community you don't want to miss!


Member SPOTLIGHT


Erin Ray
of FDS Disposal Inc. "Maxwell the
Manatee says the Tides are a Changing."
Number of Years in Business: 16.
Community Organizations: Citrus
County Builders Association (5-year
member, Past Board Director, 2014 Fish-
ing Tournament Chair), Chamber of Com-
merce, Inverness Rotary, Keep Citrus
County Beautiful, Citrus 20/20. Works
closely with Key Training Center, YMCA,
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County and
New Horizons.
Whatyou love aboutyour work: What
I love about my work is the fact that I
work with the community every day, edu-
cating, and that what I teach has an im-
mediate impact on our environment.
What you love about this county:
What is there not to love??!! We have the
best of everything here! The people: a
very close knit community that is always
willing to give a helping hand; if someone
is in need of something, we as a commu-
nity pull together and do our best to help.


The water: fishing, scalloping, boating
and scenic views. The sun setting over the
gulf is one of my favorites. The land: na-
ture walks, caves, hunting, artifacts, you
name it! I love it here, I can't think of a
better place to have grown up or a better
county to live and raise our families in.











D3


SRCITRUS COUNTY
.% Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


News you

can use
Team Up for Tiana
Yard Sale today
Today, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at
the Exit Realty office in Crys-
tal River. Yard and bake sale
to financially assist the Cor-
coran family who have been
at All Children's Hospital in
St. Petersburg by their
daughter Tiana's side.
Three Sisters
Springs on TV
The North American
Wildlife episode that will fea-
ture manatees filmed in
Three Sisters Springs will air
at 9 p.m. June 2 on the Dis-
covery Channel. The pro-
gram is called "The Savage
Edge."
Mixer openings
available
We have a few select dates
still available if your Cham-
ber member company is in-
terested in hosting a mixer.
Contact Jeff Inglehart at
352-795-3149 for more in-
formation regarding dates.
Help wanted
StoreRight Self Storage,
part-time staff position,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
lecantol@storeright.com.
Contact Nancy Wheeler, site
manager, at 352-527-9777.
Heron Publishing, Inc.,
sales representative. Contact
Maria Kretschmar at
maria@heronfla.com.
Manatee Nebula
exhibit
The Manatee Nebula ex-
hibit introduced at the 2013
Florida Manatee Festival will
be on displayforthe next three
years at the Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, 4150 S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa, FL.
Visit their website at
www.floridastateparks.org/
homosassasprings/
Giving back to
the community
Adopt a Rescued Pet, Inc.
recently presented Citrus
County Animal Services with
a check for $2,658 to subsi-
dize the costs involved with
the "My Furry Valentine" an
adoption promotion in Feb-
ruary. More than 11o dogs
were adopted through the
promotion, in which each
dog adoption received a dis-
count equal to their weight in
pounds.
The Citrus County
Builders Association (CCBA)
Board of Directors presented
the Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County with proceeds in
the amount of $2,311.08
from the 2013 Jim Blacks-
hear Memorial Golf Outing.
The 2013 outing, presented
by Love Chevrolet & Love
Honda and held Feb. 23 at
Seven Rivers Golf & Country
Club, was the first year of
partnership between the
CCBA and the Boys & Girls
Clubs, providing opportunity
for the Boys & Girls Clubs to
raise funds, and forthe CCBA
to continue its quest in giv-
ing back to the community.
New employee
Accident Cleaners wel-
comes Chris Suggs to the
team. Chris will be our new
client relations specialist. He
has already proven to be an
excellent team player in
helping with tasks outside of
his original job description.


Some of the people active in this event, from left to right: Jeff West, Leon McClellan, Larry Rucks,
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy and Josh Wooten.


Chamber, EDC honor those

who serve and protect


The Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce and Economic Development
Council hosted their fourth annual
First Responders BBQ to honor the emer-
gency responders in our county. This year
more than 225 members of the sheriffs of-
fice, EMS and fire services enjoyed BBQ by
Leon McClellan, M&B Dairy. Sides of fruit,
rolls, macaroni and cheese, coleslaw and


beans and rice, along with chocolate chip
cookies, complimented the meal. The Cit- Some of the 200-plus emergency-service personnel
who were honored for their service.
rus County Chamber of Commerce thanks
our volunteers from the Business Women's Alliance and Ambassador Program, both com-
mittees of the Chamber. Additionally, we thank the sponsors who donated food, time, energy
and support: CenturyLink, Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home, Insurance Risk and Resource
Management (Commissioner Rebecca Bays), M&B Dairy, Moose Lodge No. 2013, the Citrus
County Chronicle, Corrections Corporation of America, F.D.S. Disposal, Genesis Women's
Center, Joe's Family Restaurant, Powers Protection, Sani-Pot/Job Site Services, Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center and Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Facility.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...


Pam Goodwin
Dollar General,
Hernando


A"b "like" us on
facebook






On this week's
Chamber Chat ...
Ellen Zane with the United Way
Women's Leadership Council co-hosts
Chamber Chat and shares a great upcom-
ing event that benefits the United Way. Be
sure to get your $30 ticket to Power of the
Purse at Black Diamond June 8 at 11 a.m.
Call 352-795-5483.
SScott Baggerly shares all the great
things happening at Soquili Stables. Learn
how you can participate in or volunteer
at Camp Soquili this summer. Visit
faithhavencrc.org.
Teddianne Goshorn, communica-
tions facilitator for the Citrus County Li-
braries System, will tell us about the
great things our local libraries are doing
to encourage students to keep reading
this summer. The Summer Reading
Program kicks off on May 31, and sev-
eral lucky readers could win a brand-
new bicycle!
On our "Chamber Cooks" segment,
Chef Ryan from Superior Residences in
Lecanto prepares a tasty dish!
You have three chances to watch Cham-
ber Chat: Monday at 6 p.m., Thursday at
8 a.m. and Friday at 1 p.m.
If you would like your business or local
event featured on Chamber Chat at no
cost to you email Melissa Benefield at
spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE"
Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of
past segments and updates on our
weekly show!


Bill Healy
Healy's Home Repair,
Floral City


Donna Spaulding-Tiley
Joe's Family Restaurant, Inverness


... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!




Upcoming Chamber
of Commerce events
May 21- 8:30 a.m. ribbon-cutting for new
Homosassa sign by Homosassa Marine
May 23 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Business After Hours
at Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Facility
O May 29 8:30 a.m. to 9:30
R a.m. Business Women's As-
% sociation general meeting
May 29 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
I Business Leaders of
R "jjr Tomorrow members meeting
June 13 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Business After Hours at Christie Dental
Check our complete Chamber and Community
calendar at citruscountychamber.com or follow
the QR code to see the website on your phone!


All About

Nature the

Business of

the Month
All About Nature has been se-
lected as the January business
of the month. Owner Roger Os-
borne took the initiative during the
month of January by handing out
flyers and brochures promoting his
Manatee merchandise at the
Florida Manatee Festival while
running specials for the weekend in
his store. He produced flyers, table
tents and 22-X-28 signs for mall ad-
vertising for the month and also
advertised in publications through-
out Citrus County.
All About Nature moved its pop-
ular store from Citrus Avenue to
the Crystal River Mall Nov. 1, 2012
and continues to focus on local
products while proudly featuring
the addition of several local farm-
produced goods including pepper
jellies, honey, goat-milk soaps,
cedar birdhouses, and more!
Call All About Nature at 352-
563-1425 or visit www.allabout
nature.org for a partial list of prod-
ucts you mayfind atthe store. Hours
are o1 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondayto Sat-
urdayand12 pm. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday.



IL
m -


Ted Kircharr

to address

Chamber at

June lunch
oin us for the June Chamber
member lunch on Friday, June
14, at Plantation on Crystal River.
Our speaker, Mr. Ted Kircharr, is a
knowledgeable and inspirational
business speaker. As vice president
and chiefoperating officerof Landrum
Professional and Landrum Consult-
ing, Ted is responsible for Landrum's
strategic planning, benefits admin-
istration, risk management, human
resources and marketing. He has
helped hundreds of organizations
pursue strategic planning, institute
quality management, hone organi-
zational development, train leader-
ship training and improve employee
engagement.
Landrum Companies has been
recognized as one of the 25 Best Small
Businesses to Work for in America
forfiveyears bythe Societyfor Human
Resource Management, and Mr.
Kircharrcontinuestoleadtheseefforts.
Log in to the Members Only sec-
tion to reserve your prepaid reser-
vation at the discounted price of
$18. Register at www.citruscounty
chamber.com prior to noon on
Thursday, June 13. Price at the
door or invoiced for members is
$20, non-member is $22 payable
at the door. Reservations are re-
quired. Call Terry at the Chamber at
352-795-3149 to reserve your place!


Promote your business at the BWA Women's HEALTH and FITNESS Expo


Since it began in 2007, the
Women's HEALTH and
FITNESS Expo gets better
and better every year. This
late-September event, hosted
by the Business Women's Al-
liance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, typi-
cally attracts more than 70
exhibitors and 1,ooo attendees.
This is a great opportunity
to reach women, the primary
health and wellness decision-
makers. Previous years have
seen nearly 1,ooo attendees
enjoy the information,


screenings and demonstra-
tions. This year's expo will be
on Sept. 28 at the National
GuardArmoryin Crystal River.
Choose the opportunity
that fits best in your promo-
tional plan:
Be an exhibitor: Consider
being an exhibitor if you have
a health-, fitness- or wellness-
related business. Preregistra-
tion, available only to last
year's exhibitors, ends on
June 18. If you didn't exhibit
last year, submit your request
right after that date, as spaces


are on a first-come basis.
Chamber members receive
favored pricing.
Be a sponsor: There are
levels of sponsorship available,
from the $100 "supporter"
level perfect for businesses
not involved in health and
wellness industries through
the $1,ooo level, with appro-
priate promotional benefits
throughout the range.
Donate a door prize: We'll
display your health-and-
wellness-themed basket or
other wellness-themed door


prize item prominently at the
table where attendees regis-
ter, in the exhibit hall. There's
always lots of excitement
about the drawings, and we'll
acknowledge your gift in our
promotional materials.


Proceeds from BWA's
Women's HEALTH and FIT-
NESS Expo fund scholarships
for high school and WTI stu-
dents who are pursuing ca-
reers in health and in
non-health business occupa-


tions. In seven years, we have
awarded more than $39,000
in scholarships to Citrus
County students. Help us
help them, and help yourself
at the same time!
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship
opportunities, and the popu-
lar Spa Zone are available
from Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce office at 28
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River;
by calling 352-795-3149; or
from any Business Women's
Alliance member.


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


Business Women s Alliaoe
^'*t-tt (Ct^^Lt (/fv

'''
".f.Y;~i~o: II I










Don't let hiring test your patience test the candidates


Editor'snote: Due to ed-
itor error this column did
not run in its entirety last
week The Chronicle apol-
ogizes for the mistake, and
is re-running the column
today for the benefit of
those unable to read it last
week
T think about the time
and effort you dedi-
cate to hiring even
one new employee. You
aren't just filling a posi-
tion, you are investing in a
key corporate asset: the
person with the right
skills, attitude and com-
mitment to help your busi-
ness grow, regardless of
what job they do for you.
So what happens when
things don't quite work
out?
According to the Har-
vard Business Review, 80
percent of employee
turnover is caused by bad
hiring decisions.
Estimates vary, but as
any hiring manager knows,
this kind of turnover is in-
deed costly The U.S. De-
partment of Labor tells us


you'll pay about one-third
of a new hire's annual
salary to replace him or
her, and that's just for
starters. A study by the So-
ciety for Human Resource
Management (SHRM) esti-
mated it can cost up to five
times the employee's an-
nual salary, with replace-
ment costs rising
exponentially based on
salary and tenure. Other
studies say it will cost two
to two and a half times the
annual salary
Bottom line: Dealing
with a bad hiring can hurt
your bottom line.
So why is it so costly? Fred
Yager, editor of eFinancial
Careers, notes that ex-
penses associated with
hiring include training
and orientation, termina-
tion costs such as COBRA,
unemployment and poten-
tial litigation, and if you
hire from out of area, pos-
sibly travel, hotel and
meals as well.
There are also hard-to-
quantify costs Yager says
can be lethal to your busi-
ness, such as lower em-


ployee morale, customer
dissatisfaction, lost cus-
tomers, lost sales, reduced
quality of products and
low production, not to
mention the increased
workload on other employ-
ees, which can spiral off
additional ex-
penses.
Most impor-
tantly, Yager
notes, "you
need to repeat
the entire hir-
ing process to
replace the
wrong hire,
which includes
time and ex-
penses." WORK
Despite CONNI
steady im-
provements to the econ-
omy, today's work
environment is still highly
competitive and challeng-
ing. Suffice to say that em-
ployers need to be
strategic in their hiring
strategy yet a recent sur-
vey indicates that might
not be the case.
More than one-third (36
percent) of the 1,400 chief


financial officers (CFOs)
interviewed for a 2011
Robert Half Finance & Ac-
counting survey said the
top factor leading to a
failed hire, aside from per-
formance issues, is a poor
skills match. Another 14
percent cited
"failure to fit
into the corpo-
rate culture."
Clearly, de-
termining a job
Applicant's
skills fit is a
skill in itself
and one that, as
the research
Byrnes suggests, can
FORCE test the pa-
=CTION tience and for-
titude of any
hiring manager
Happily, Workforce Con-
nection can help. We offer
an array of assessment
tools, available at no
charge, to assist you in se-
lecting the best candidate.
These assessments are
used by many large corpo-
rations, are thoroughly
vetted and have proven in-
valuable in identifying


level of skill pertaining to
specific occupations or in-
dustries and in predicting
the success of potential
employees.
The menu of assess-
ments include cognitive
tests, personality tests, in-
tegrity tests, aptitude tests,
mental ability tests, voca-
tional interest inventories
and work sample analysis.
Skills can be gauged via
two popular assessments:
Kenexa's Prove It! and
Florida's Ready-to-Work.
Prove It! is one of the
most versatile testing
methods available, with
more than 1,300 validated,
job-specific and position-
specific assessments, from
AutoCAD 2013 to XML and
everything in between.
Florida Ready-to-Work
is a nationally recognized
credentialing program
that tests job skills and
work habits and awards
candidates a bronze, silver
or gold certificate depend-
ing on their scores. Candi-
dates receive a gold, silver
or bronze certificate from
the state Department of


Education based on their
knowledge of applied
mathematics, reading for
information and locating
information.
Assessments can help
you screen out unsuitable
candidates before you get
to the interview stage and,
more importantly, can help
shape the course of those
interviews and reinforce
the viability of candidates
who meet your needs and
fit your corporate culture.
Ready to get started?
Contact a recruitment spe-
cialist first thing Monday
morning at 352-637-2223 or
800-746-9950. You can also
learn more about Work-
force Connection and our
employer services at www.
WorkforceConnectionFL
.com.


Laura Byrnes, APR, is a
Certified Workforce Pro-
fessional and communica-
tions manager at Workforce
Connection. Contact her
at 352-291-9559, 800-434-
5627, ext 1234 orlbyrnes@
workforceconnectionfl.com.


Going shopping?


The Internet has


deals, answers


early every restau-
rant I visit, every
store I shop in,
every product I buy has
been researched before-
hand. This applies mostly
to the larger items of
course, as I'm not likely to
research a new flavor of
chapstick before I pur-
chase it (chapstick refer-
ence indicative of having a
cold right now, cough,
cough).
There are many Internet
sites that provide reviews.
A go-to site for restaurants
and stores is yelp.com.
People will check in and
rate their experiences at
the stores and
restaurants so
you get a pretty
good idea of
what to expect.
Going away?
Want to know if
a certain hotel
is any good?
Like to plan
every last de- Daniell
tail of your va- IN
cation? Check
out tripadvi- MEME
sorcom. Why
guess at what would be
your perfect or perfectly
horrible anniversary trip?
Make educated decisions.
Buying a digital camera,
lawnmower, washing ma-
chine, tile cutter or
toaster? Amazon.com is a
good resource. Many on-
line store sites provide an
arena for actual con-
sumers like me and you
get to write reviews of the
products purchased. Give
back, to your fellow man
by reviewing. Let people
know the lawnmower you
bought is the best thing
since sliced bread, or
grass. Let them know:
"Nooo! Don't do it the
vacuum broke after five
uses and I now only have
six cats!"
I need to know these
things and so do you. Sites
that let you leave reviews,
bestbuycom, lowes.com,
even bealls.com has re-
views of their products
and about their store in-
terestingly, they have a
very good rating, 4.5 stars,
through bizrate.com with
6,028 people rating. It
means a whole lot more to
have 4.5 stars out of 5 with
that many votes than to
have 4.5 stars out of 5
when there are only three
ratings.
If you are one of those
people that do not shop
online, that's OK. You can
still hide your money in
your mattress and still find
this column useful. Just


e

E


because you are doing
your research online does-
n't mean you have to buy
online. Although, you
should know that purchas-
ing online often means a
discount you wouldn't get
in the stores just read
on.
Say you have decided to
upgrade from the big
heavy 19" tube TV that has
been scrolling horizontal
lines throughout your fa-
vorite reruns of Law and
Order: SVU. You should do
some research. After all,
what do you know about
flat screen televisions?
First thing I would do is
go to cnet.com.
Not only will
you find out
these "experts"
Opinions, but
you will also
learn about dif-
ferent types of
flat-screen
TVs.
Kerese Do you want
THE a LCD or a
LED?
TIME What's the
difference?
120 Hz refresh rate or
240 Hz?
What the heck is a hertz
and do I want more or less
of them?
Research will save you
money on things you may
or may not need. I'm not
going to tell you what kind
of TV to buy, or what a
hertz is I had to do the
research myself, and made
a better decision because
of it. I want you to know
that there is knowledge
out there for free; and
armed with that knowl-
edge when you go shop-
ping online or off you will
have more confidence in
your purchase and even
the ability to haggle de-
pending on where you
shop.
Bottom line when you
are about to make a pur-
chase, be it car or carpet,
Google it, Bing it, or
Yahoo.com it. The Inter-
net has the answers; just
ask.


Danielle Kerese is the
multimedia designer at
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. She has spent count-
less hours designing
websites and other Inter-
net ventures and is happy
to share her knowledge
with you. If there is some-
thingyou have seen on-
line thatyou just don't
understand, email her at
DKerese@chronicle
online, com.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR BRUCE: I own a condo in
California and plan on moving to
another state. I'd like to rent out my
condo until I can be sure that I will
stay at my new location. The mort-
gage at the new place will be $1,100.
The homeowner's fees are $250 and
the property tax is $300 a month. I
can rent out my condo for $1,500 a
month.
What will I be able to deduct from
the rental income? I realize it's a
losing proposition, but I feel it's at
least temporarily necessary -J.C.,
via email
DEAR J.C.: You will be able to
deduct all of your expenses. The
$1,500 a month will be almost com-
pletely offset, but you will have that
loss of the $150 a month, which will
be out of pocket. In my opinion, I
don't see any problems with this.
DEAR BRUCE: I opened a siz-
able money market account at my
local bank. A couple of months later
I noticed an ad in the paper from
this same bank advertising a money
market account with a different
title and an interest rate of 1 per-
cent more. I called the bank to see if
my money market account interest
rate was also increased and they
said no.
I have always thought that money


market accounts adjust to pay the
current short-term interest rate. I
see the above practice as something
of a scam, allowing the bank to at-
tract new money without paying
their existing customers the pre-
vailing rate. I told them so and with-
drew my funds. Am I wrong to be
displeased with this business prac-
tice? RC., via email
DEAR RC.: Oftentimes lenders
will offer a higher rate to attract
new customers. Whether you con-
sider this a scam or not is another
question. It's not an unheard-of
practice.
You could approach the bank
with the proposition that you would
like to continue doing business with
it, but you would like to switch your
accounts without any penalty The
bank could also deny you that priv-
ilege. If so, do as you did and with-
draw your funds. I can understand
your displeasure, but the business
practice is a common one.
DEAR BRUCE: My wife and I
have helped her parents finan-
cially due to their unfortunate de-
cisions in the stock market a few
years ago. We loaned them enough
money to get in a small condo with
payments they can afford in ex-
change for a percentage of owner-
ship based on the percent of value
our loan represented in the pur-
chase price.
Our lawyer drew up a contract we
all signed that would prevent any


haggling with my wife's siblings
after her parents pass. We're to re-
ceive the above percentage of the
ultimate sale price at that time, and
any proceeds would go to her par-
ents' estate.
We have agreed to pay for any im-
provements made to the condo
based on the percent ownership.
The parents pay the entire mort-
gage payment along with taxes and
insurance. Do we have any obliga-
tion to pay the taxes or insurance?
- D.T Owensboro, Ky.
DEAR D.T.: I don't see any obli-
gation other than what the agree-
ment calls for. As long as the
agreement says the parents pay the
entire mortgage payment along
with tax and insurance, case closed.
DEAR BRUCE: I have never read
how income from a reverse mort-
gage is taxed. Is it ordinary income
or is it tax-free? -J.M., Henderson,
Nev.
DEAR J.M.: The reason you never
read about any income tax on re-
verse mortgage proceeds is because
there is no tax. You are borrowing
your own money Any interest that it
earns will be subject to tax.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions of general interest will
be answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be provided


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publi-
cation of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle
editors receive submissions, the better chance of
notes running more than once.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
Photos and stories are published as space is
available. The Chronicle cannot guarantee
placement on color pages.


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I






I
E





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IRS
Continued from Page D1

the individual mandate to carry insur-
ance under Obama's health care law, it-
self an object of suspicion for many
conservatives. To the right, that's insult
upon injury from the left

WHAT WOULD MAKE IT
MATTER EVEN MORE
Any effort from top levels of the ad-
ministration or political operatives to
manipulate the IRS for campaign pur-
poses would put the scandal in the
realm of Nixonian skullduggery
The public record as it is known does
not show interference.
No ties to anyone outside the IRS
have been discovered. At the same time,
early IRS assurances that high-level
people inside the agency did not know
what was going on have been contra-
dicted by evidence that the head of the


agency's tax-exemp-
tion operation and
later its deputy com-
missioner were
briefed about it, and
did not tell Congress.

RED-FLAG
WORDS
To qualify for ex-
emption from federal
income taxes, organi-
zations must show
they are not too polit-
ical in nature to meet
the standard. In the


In short, if
with the t
you were g
a close se
and almost
months mo
If you were
liberal acti
maybe yes,


cases in question, applications that
raised eyebrows were referred to a team
of specialists who took a much closer
look at a group's operations. That's nor-
mal.
But in early 2010, IRS agents in the
Determinations Unit began paying spe-
cial attention to tax-exempt applications
from groups associated with the tea
party or with certain words or phrases
in their materials, according to the IRS
inspector general's report. That's not
normal.
The red-flag keywords came to in-
clude "Patriots," "Take Back the Coun-
try" and "We the People."
That August, agents were given an ex-
plicit "be on the lookout" directive for
"various local organizations in the Tea
Party movement" that are seeking tax-
exempt status. Such organizations saw
their applications languish except when
they were hit with lots of questions,
some of which the IRS was not entitled
to ask, such as the names of donors.
In June 2011, after the congressional
elections, Lois G. Lerner, in charge of
overseeing tax-exempt organizations,
learned of the flagging and ordered the
criteria to be changed right away, the in-
spector general said. The new guidance
was more generic and stripped of any
explicit partisan freight. But it did not
last.
In January 2012, the screening was
modified again, this time to watch for
references to the Constitution or Bill of
Rights, and for "political action type or-
ganizations involved in limiting/ex-
panding government"
The Constitution and Bill of Rights
are touchstones for liberals, too. But in
modern politics, they've been appropri-
ated as rallying cries of conservatives
and libertarians. Finally, that May, such
flagging ended.
Altogether, specialists reviewed a va-
riety of potentially too-political applica-
tions, presumably covering the
liberal-conservative spectrum. But fully
one-third of the cases were of the tea
party-patriot variety. During the height
of the flagging, the inspector general
says, all applications fitting the conser-
vative-focused criteria went to the spe-
cialists while others that should have
stirred concern did not.
In short, if you were with the tea party,
you were guaranteed a close second
look and almost certainly months more
of delay If you were leading a liberal ac-
tivist group, maybe yes, maybe no.

ON THE RECEIVING END
"Dealing with this was like dealing
with tax day every day for 2 1/2 years,"
says Laurence Nordvig, executive di-
rector of the Richmond Tea Party in Vir-
ginia. "Like your worst audit
nightmare."
His group applied for tax-exempt sta-
tus in December 2009 and finally got it
in July 2012.
Tom Zawistowski applied for the tax
exemption for his group, the Ohio Lib-
erty Coalition, in June 2010 when the
flagging was gathering steam. He got it
in December 2012, after the presidential
election.
The IRS asked him for the identity of
the group's members, times and location
of group activities, printouts of its web-
site and Facebook pages, contents of
speeches and the names and credentials
of speakers at forums. He said the IRS
also audited his personal finances and
his wife's.
"The intent of this was to hurt the abil-
ity of tea party groups to function in an
election year," he said.
An Associated Press analysis of 93
"tea party" or "patriot" groups found
that most were shoestring operations,
with only two dozen raising more than
$20,000 a year.


FIVE-OH WHAT?
If the IRS merely rolled over and
played dead when it got an application
for a tax exemption, the government
would be even more broke than it is and
big money would have an even more
pernicious grip on campaigns.
The IRS knows better than most that
politically driven organizations, out to
elect and defeat candidates, can masquer-
ade as "social welfare" or other charita-
ble entities under the tax-exempting
articles of Section 501 (c) of the tax code.
Or they can align themselves with one,
allowing unlimited donations to be raised
and the identities of the contributors to
stay secret as long as the nonprofit enti-
ties don't go too far in overt politicking.
In recent years, advocacy groups have
paired their nonprofit arms with
"super" political action committees,
moves that took hold after a series of
court rulings including the Supreme
Court's 2010 Citizens United decision -
loosened the rules on money in politics.
The rulings gave rise to such pairings
as the American
you were Crossroads super
OU wPAC with its Cross-
tea party, roads GPS nonprofit
on behalf of Republi-
suaranteed cans in the 2012 cam-
S l paign, and the
hCOnd look Priorities USAAction
t certainly super PAC with its
own nonprofit arm,
re of delay. for Obama's benefit.
Section 501 (c) (3)
D leading a can be the most lu-
crative financially for
visit group, organizations because
maybe no. in addition to confer-
ring tax-exempt status,
it allows donations to
qualifying groups to be tax deductible.
Section 501 (c) (4) doesn't permit tax-
deductible donations but gives groups
more latitude to lobby and to dabble
more directly in political campaigns as
long as "social welfare" remains their
primary mission. They can also keep
their donors secret, a big benefit over
more blatantly political super PACs.
It's all complex, squishy and in some
ways subjective, so it might not come as
a shock the IRS would look for shortcuts
such as political buzzwords and slogans
when deciding what a group is really up
to. But the record as yet known does not
show that the scrutiny cut both ways.
In congressional testimony about the
discredited IRS actions, Attorney Gen-
eral Eric Holder said there is good rea-
son to take a skeptical look at some
Section 501 applications but "it has to be
done in a way that does not depend on
the political persuasion of the group."

BY THE NUMBERS
The inspector general's office reviewed
296 tax-exempt applications that had
been flagged as potentially too political.
Of them, 108 were ultimately approved,
28 were withdrawn by the applicant,
none had been rejected and 160 were
still open in December 2012, some lan-
guishing for more than three years.

STONEWALLING?
Hearing complaints of IRS harass-
ment from constituents, lawmakers
began asking a lot of questions of the
agency starting in mid-2011. They got a
lot of answers just not answers re-
vealing what was going on.
In multiple letters, some as long as 45
pages, as well as in meetings and con-
gressional hearings, senior IRS officials
laid out in painstaking detail the
process of checking tax-exempt applica-
tions but did not disclose what they had
come to learn of the flagging.
Miller, for example, was told by staff
in May 2012 about the inappropriate
screening but did not pass that on in
communications with inquiring mem-
bers of Congress or in his appearance
two months later with the House panel
most concerned about the reports.
Lois G. Lerner, in charge of oversee-
ing tax-exempt organizations at the IRS,
was briefed about the screening a year
earlier and ordered an end to explicit
tea party-type flagging. But she did not
tell lawmakers about that when asked
about the constituent complaints.

ABOUT THAT
SKULLDUGGERY
A number of presidents or their oper-
atives have tried to twist the IRS against
"dissidents" or political opponents,
Franklin Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower
and John Kennedy among them.
President Richard Nixon, though,
surely takes the cake here.
The Senate Judiciary Committee cited
his IRS manipulations, including his
pursuit of those on his "enemies list," in
the articles of impeachment accusing the
president of high crimes and misdemeanors
in the Watergate scandal and of actions
"subversive of constitutional government"
Article 2, Abuse of Power, said: "He has,
acting personally and through his sub-
ordinates and agents, endeavored to ob-
tain from the Internal Revenue Service,


in violation of the constitutional rights
of citizens, confidential information
contained in income tax returns for pur-
poses not authorized by law, and to cause,
in violation of the constitutional rights
of citizens, income tax audits or other in-
come tax investigations to be initiated or
conducted in a discriminatory manner."
Nixon resigned after it became clear
that a Senate impeachment trial would


SOUND OFF
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 563-0579. Be prepared to leave a brief
message write it out before calling to make sure you remember everything
you want to say. After the beep, speak loudly, slowly and clearly.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit Sound Off messages.


Business DIGEST


Special to the Chronicle
New attorney Amber Thomas, right, is sworn in recently by Judge Patricia Thomas, left,
and her former boss, attorney James Neal Jr. Amber Thomas graduated from Bluefield
College in Bluefield, Va., in December 2006, returning to Citrus County to work as a
legal assistant at the Law Offices of James A. Neal Jr., P.A. She began law school in
June 2008 at Barry University's Dwayne 0. Andreas School of Law in Orlando,
graduating in May 2012. She sat for the Florida Bar Examination in February 2013 and
recently received her passing results. She has one son.


Workforce bus headed to
mall at month's end
Crystal River Mall events in May:
Saturday, May 25: Try your hand at
karaoke at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29: The Workforce Bus
will be in front of Kmart from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
and Belk will be celebrating its 125th anniver-
sary with activities throughout the day.
For information, 352-795-2585 or www.the-
crystalrivermall.com or like the mall on Face-
book at The Crystal River Mall.
Chiropractor
completes training
Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant has completed
the Palmer Chiropractic College course "Un-
derstanding, Evaluating &
Analyzing Auto-Immune
Disorders." This accredited
course is part of the Internal
Chiropractic Medidne program.
This class taught how to
diagnose via lab work and
how to identify the symp-
Cheryl toms and causes of the en-
McFarland- docrine, gastrointestinal and
Bryant autoimmune disorders.
McFarland-Bryant learned how to prescribe
supportive care using nutritional supplements,
including how to calculate which vitamins,
minerals and supplements are indicated for
these different conditions as well as for
chronic infections, which are often the culprits.
McFarland-Bryant has an active medical tech-
nologist license and the lab diagnosis is part of
her continuing education in laboratory medicine.
Adkisson named CMHS
employee of the year
Dennis Adkisson was recently announced
Employee of the Year at Citrus Memorial Health
System's annual Employee Awards ceremony,
held May 9 at the Citrus Memorial Auditorium.
Citrus Memorial President and CEO Ryan
Beaty made the award announcement at the event,
held each year during National Hospital Week.
In announcing the award, Beaty cited the
Employee of the Year recipient for his dedica-
tion to Citrus Memorial Health System and
staff throughout the hospital. Jack Nichols, Di-


NONPROFIT
Continued from Page D1

the for-profit business or-
ganization. Limited-liabil-
ity protection offered by
the corporate structure is
absent in both of the unin-
corporated forms.
If a nonprofit corpora-
tion is formed, the officers
and directors have lim-
ited-liability protections
under the legal theory of
the "corporate veil." How-
ever, the principal/organiz-
ers of the nonprofit can
decide not to incorporate
and remain unincorpo-
rated. Both forms are rec-
ognized by IRS. The
problem with an unincor-
porated nonprofit is the
exposure to legal risk. The
officers, directors and


Dennis
Adkisson


rector of Plant Operations,
added that "Dennis treats
everyone with the greatest
of respect and stays very
positive." Nichols continued
by saying that Dennis is
"very deserving of the award
and a valuable asset to our
Plant Operations Department."
In addition to the employee


of the year winner, 171 employees were rec-
ognized for five-year milestones at the event.
Topping the list of service award recipients were
Margaret Brest, Leila Johnson, Carol Poteet
and Evelyn Williams with 35 years of service.
30 years of service award recipients in-
cluded: Kathryn Bernquist and Patti Miller.
25 years of service award recipients in-
cluded: Kimberly Capra, June Carpenter,
Susan Henry, Brenda Solomon, Margaret
Swisher, Diana Taylor, Elaine Veler, Sandra
Webb, and Carlette Wright-Barfield.
20 years of service award recipients in-
cluded: Terri Adams, Karen Bigge, David Bow-
man, Claire Delrosso, Cindy Eldredge, Terry
Gentry, Wendy Knack, Henry Mundy, Robert
Olver, Kimberly Perez, Harold Peters, and Ce-
cilia Thompson.
Hooper's Edwards obtains
professional certification
Thomas Richard Edwards, CFSP, a funeral
director with Hooper Funeral Home & Crema-
tory, Inc. in Inverness, has recently qualified
for the designation of certified funeral service
practitioner (CFSP) by the Academy of Profes-
sional Funeral Service Practice.
To initially receive this designation, the prac-
titioner must complete a 180-hour program of
continuing education activities and events. In
addition, the practitioner is required to accu-
mulate 20 hours per year to recertify. Credits
are awarded by the academy for work leading
to personal and/or professional growth in four
areas: academic activities, professional activi-
ties, career review and community and civic
activities. Hooper Funeral Homes & Crema-
tory serves the families of Citrus County with
locations in Inverness, Beverly Hills and Ho-
mosassa. Should you have any questions re-
garding Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory,
call 352-726-2271.


even participating mem-
bers can be personally li-
able for the improper
actions of even one of the
other principals. The best
solution is to incorporate
and pick the correct IRS
tax exemption category
from the inception.
Other management
considerations
There are a whole host
of other management con-
siderations common to
both types of organiza-
tions. Identifying, recruit-
ing and selecting
employees and/or moti-
vated volunteers is crucial
to accomplishing goals.
Management skills may
have some slightly differ-
ent focus in either case,
but the motivation to de-
liver the best possible out-
come remains the same.
Communication skills are


an essential component, as
are organizational skills of
the principals orvolunteers.
If one would list all im-
portant business disci-
plines in two columns, one
with the heading "non-
profit" and the other "for-
profit," parallels could
easily be drawn.
The Nonprofit Resource
Center offers professional
assistance in establishing
nonprofit organizations,
generating appropriate
documents for both state
and federal agencies and
enacting best practices in
nonprofit management.


Dr FrederickJ. Herzog,
PhD, is founder of the
Nonprofit Resource Center
and can be reached via
emailatfherzog@
tampabay.rrcom.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 D5














To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I.Fx:(32)563565 TllFre: .88).52234 1Em0l cass0idschonclen neco I 0ebit: w0ch-,ilenlnec0


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seeking open minded
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& fun times
(352) 949-1657



Disabled SWM 45,
Searching for a Female
Travel Companion to
join me on a 2- 3 Month
cross country journey
around the U.S. I will
provide Transportation,
fuel, Lodging, the Occa-
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entertainment. You will
need to pay your way
on the rest, I will provide
character references,
you must do the same.
View more details
http://ocala.craigslist.org/r
ld/3799757407.html

Seeking Estimates to
update 2 Bathrooms
Lie. & Ins. Call
Gene 352-726-1500

Single Man in 30's look-
ing for Single Woman,
no kids, for friendship,
possible relationship
ages 25-35. cell
352-422-0440




Adorable 3yr Male
Chihuahua, neutered,
micro chipped,
to good home only
$125. Leave Message
(352) 637-6310

BEVERLY HILLS
Sat 5/18 8a-?
Toys, House hold
goods & Misc Items
219S BabourST

Colman Road Trip
Gas Grill Original $200,
excellent condition
selling for $95 call
(352) 746-1821



YARSALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
BAKE SALE
& YARD SALE
with all
proceeds going
to the
Corcoran family
Sunday. May 19
8AM -2PM
at
EXIT REALTY
US HWY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER

Dinette Set w/leather
swivel chairs, $120
Floral Couch/Loveseat,
$175. both. all in good
Cond. 352-527-7183

ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
3 Males & 1 Female,
Blue Carriers Available
AKC and all Shots
$1800. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

FLORAL CITY
1bd/1ba 55+, Remod-
eled, Kitchen & Bath,
Huge L/R, Lg Screened
Patio, Lg. Carport, w/d,
c/h/a, partial furn. $430
mo. includes lot rent,
water, sewer, trash
352-897-4449

FLORAL CITY
Sun & Mon 8-4p
Baby furn, White
crib/changing table;
high chr, 2 swings, 3
car seats, Antiques,
tools, electrical &
plumbing parts, rain-
barrels, dog cage and
much more!!!
1 mi. S. of Stop light
on US 41 S.

I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**

Laundromat for sale
Crystal River, prme
location, well
maintained,offers con-
sidered 352-795-2399


LOOKING FOR YOUR


Is your Credit Score 575
or Higher, several new
homes to choose from
call for details
352-792-1272



LOT MODEL
CLEARANCE!!!
All Models Must Go to
make room for new
models, please call
(352) 795-1272






New 2013
Lot Model 3/2 DWHM
$46,900, Includes
Deliver, set-up, A/C,
Skirting, Steps Call
352-795-2377





New 2013 Lot Model
DWMH 2/2 $42,900
Includes, Delivery,
set-up, A/C Skirt, steps
NO HIDDEN FEES
Call 352-795-1272



MUST SELL


New Lot Model
2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fire-
place, huge Island
kitchen, It has to go!!
$84,900 includes
Del, set-up, A/C,
Skirting,steps,
Furniture pkg Avail.
Call 352-795-2377

NOW OPEN
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Market,
Bldg "A" Rt. 44, 4 mi.
E. of Hwy. 19, CR
ffl#159017015016163
NRA SANCTIONED
CONCEALED CARRY
Course May 24th
Must Pre Register
SPECIAL *
Ruger 10-22
Take Down $349
Your Headquarters
for Guns, Ammo and
Reloading Supplies
Hours: 8am to 2pm
Tuesday-Saturday
352-527-1660
352-586-7516


W0 IT



REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
Large Gas/BBQ Grills
& MORE 352-270-4087




Fancy Tail
Guppies
(352) 560-3019




LOST KEYS
at How ards Flea Mkt or
Hwy 19 heading to
Crystal River. Rubber
ducky key chain that
lights up please call
352-400-2971


Mr Mitchelll Mason's
ring Lost in Inverness
or Dunnellon area.
Please call
352-746-1915
Samsung cell phone,
flip & slide, blk/silver in
a camouflage
clip-on case, lost near
China First Inverness
(352) 527-8336
YELLOW CANE
Lost in Homosassa.
REWARD
(352) 503-2323



Chihuahua, male
brown w/ white chest,
no tail, Around Owl
Point Crystal River
(970) 391-5854
Found presently at Cit-
rus County Animal Shel-
ter:Female Mountain
Cur mix, tan;hound mix,
white/brown male.
also small white neu-
tered male, found at
Arlington in Homosassa.
Judy 352-503-3363




Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397

Tupperware
Call Fran Smith May
is Birthday month lots
of great specials
352-746-3652




P/T STYLIST

352-795-6050




Domestic



IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR

Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a
progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and man-
agement abilities,
great organizational
skills and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
atdon@
SouthernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D

ACTIVITY
MANAGER

Join an exciting
team at Arbor Trail
Rehab & Skilled
Nursing Center.
We are seeking a
career oriented pro-
fessional to develop
and maintain activ-
ity programs. Excel-
lent communication
skills and high en-
ergy level required.
Qualified profes-
sional must have 2
years experience or
be certified as an
Activities Director,
also must have valid
C.N.A. license and
CPR certification.
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

Send resume by fax:
352-637-1921
or email: athrc@
southernLTC.com
Or apply in person
at: 611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness

EXPERIENCED
RN'S
Full time & Part time
Positions Available
RN's needed for
outpatient surgery
center MUST have
experience in
PRE/ POST outpa-
tient surgery center
or hospital experi-
ence in ICU or ER.
Excellent pay, bene-
fits, excellent hours,
no weekends,
nights, or call. Best
place to work in
Citrus County.
Submit Resume to
Fax 527-1827
or in person:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida.


HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

Dietary Aide
Part-time and PRN
positions available.
Two years of dietary
and/or food ser-
vices experience in
a healthcare setting
preferred. Must be
willing to submit to
background check
and drug screening
and be able to lift
30 Ibs floor-to-waist.

We offer
competitive pay in
a team-oriented
environment.

Lisa Shields
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lisa Shields@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
40312




Clmu



MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

w/experience on
Medical Weight Loss
& Gynecology.
DFWP Send resume:
Email: suncoastobl
@earthlink.net
Fax: 352-584-8201


Medical Careers
begin here
Train ONLINE forAllied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

RN / LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Long-term
care experience
preferred. We offer
great pay and
benefits to full-time
associates in a
team-oriented
environment.

Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hannah Mand
@LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
40566



Car0




P/T Chiropractic
ASSISTANT

Busy office, 30-35hrs
week, Must be
outgoing able to multi
task. Have computer
skills. Able to work
Saturday Mornings
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3885



RN or LPN
FIT 3-11shift
Come Join our Team
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832



RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.

HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF


AIRLINE CAREERS -
Train for hands on Avi-
ation Maintenance
Career FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing availa-
ble CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769



COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-

College of
Central Florida

Coordinator -
Criminal Justice
Bachelor's degree
in criminal justice,
management, or re-
lated field required.
Certified or certifia-
ble as an instructor
by Florida Criminal
Justice Standards
and Training Com-
mission. Three years
of experience in
criminal justice
required. Close
date is 6/04/13.

Coordinator -
Food Services
High school diploma
or equivalent re-
quired. Must have
or achieve within six
months of hire the
Food Handler certifi-
cation. Minimum of
four years work ex-
perience in the field
required. At least
one year as a
manager required.
Current Florida
Drivers License is
required. Review
date is 6/04/13.
Position is open until
filled.

Part-time
Childcare Cook -
High school di-
ploma required.
One-year experi-
ence in the field of
food service or nutri-
tion with infants
and/or children re-
quired. Close date is
5/28/13.

How to Apply
Please submit an un-
official copy of tran-
scripts indicating the
degree conferred
with the electronic
application. Educa-
tion must be from a
regionally accred-
ited institution.

Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.

3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala. FL 34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer



Eckerd
Floral City
Cook Needed

Please visit our
website:
www.eckerd.ora
to apply.



Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927


Volunteers
Needed

Cert. Experienced
Dental Asst's
to Assist Dentists
at FreeDental Clinic
Soon to Open -
call 352-422-4376:

Food Bank, Intake,
Thrift Store, Bingo
call 352-216-0012





EXPERIENCED
LINE COOK

lots of Italian cuisine
full time pm.
live within a 10 mile
radius of Inglis
smoke free, dfwp
352-212-1607 or
352-447-2406
for interview





Accounts
Payable Clerk

Deal Processing
Clerk

Two F/T Acounting
positions
for local auto
dealership group.
NO PHONE CALLS
Apply in Person
or by mail/fax to:
Human Resource
Dept., Crystal Nissan
937 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34448
fax (352) 417-0810

DRIVER

OTR DD/LB FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,$45k-60k yr.
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

The City of
Crystal River

Executive
Administrative
Assistant
Position provides
administrative assis-
tance within the
Office of the City
Manager. Duties
include preparing
correspondence.
answering phones,
providing informa-
tion to the public,
coordinating
agenda packet
preparation, con-
ducting internet
research projects,
and updating the
City's website. Also
serves as Deputy
City Clerk, which
periodically involves
attending evening
meetings and
preparing formal
meeting minutes.
Must have a strong
working knowledge
of Microsoft Office
software; not less
than a high school
education, with
some college pre-
ferred; and at least
five (5) years of ap-
plicable experience
in office administra-
tion. Salary range is
$14.25/hr -$15.75/hr

Resumes and letters
of interest should be
sent to: Office of the
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL,
34428.

In order to be
considered,
resumes must be
received by
no later than 2 PM
on June 4, 2013.


Driver Two raises in
first year. Qualify for
any portion of
$.03/mile quarterly
bonus: $.01 Safety,
$.01 Production,
$.01 MPG.
3 months OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
www.drive
knight.com

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

R&R Person/
Auto Mechanic

Experienced ONLY
must be able to R&R
transmissions. Clean
license and own tools
call btwn 7am to 6pm
352-489-5580

Septic Tank Co

Taking applications.
Exp and CDL helpful.
Call 352-302-4977
WASTEWATER
OPERATOR
Requires: HS Diploma,
valid driver lic & safe
driving record, FL class
C Wastewater certifica-
tion, apply online
httD://tinvurl.com/
vwna30871





Animal Services
Technician
Casual,
on call position

Manual labor in the
care of impounded
animals and the
cleaning and
maintaining of the
Citrus County
animal shelter
Must be at least
18 years of age.
$8.45 hourly.
Casual labor
applications may
be completed on
line at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
and returned to
Citrus County
Animal Services,
4030 S. Airport Rd.,
Inverness, FL 34450

This position is open
until filled.
EOE/ADA.

Community
Center Aide
Announcement
#13-25

Full time position
assisting volunteers
and clients at the
Central Ridge
Community Center
in Beverly Hills.
HOURS AND DAYS
OF WORK VARIES
WEEKLY Must be
able to lift at least
fifty (50) pounds and
possess strong com-
puter and customer
service skills. Must
possess valid Florida
Driver License. Start-
ing pay $7.79 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
wwwbocc.ciTus.fl.us You
canalsovisit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path. Suite 178.
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 24, 2013
EOE/ADA


B

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

12 Hr. Shifts, Day &
Night Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto



CDL DRIVER

With Class A license,
dry bulk tank, newer
equip., paid vac/ns
wkly. minimum pay.
$$1,000.$$
SIGN ON BONUS
Contact Jerry @
(228) 352-9466
LEEDS Crystal River



DELIVERY DRIVER

P/T w/ FT potential
must be able to lift
751bs., clean driving
record, reliable
transportation
necessary. Must 21
yrs. or olderCabinet
experience a plus.

Apply in person at
Deem Cabinets
3835 S. Pittsburgh Av
Homosassa Fl. 34448



Exp. appt. set-
ters

Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits, Clean Work
Environment.
Dave (352) 794-6129



HOUSEKEEPER

Prefer Hotel/Motel
Exp., flexible hrs.,
requires wkends
APPLY IN PERSON
May 20th thru 23rd,
between 10S-3P
Camp 'n' Water
Resort
11465 W. Priest Ln.,
Homosassa, FL
NO PHONE CALLS












































CHkONICLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHRONICLE


SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449

Volunteer
Outreach
Coordinator
Announcement
#13-27

Plan, promote,
coordinate, recruit,
administer and
supervise shelter
volunteers and
volunteer related
programs. Two years
experience in volun-
teer management
and experience in
the care and handl-
ing of animals
preferred. Must be
able to safely
handle and restrain
large animals. Must
possess a valid
Florida Driver
License. Beginning
pay $10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 24, 2013
EOE/ADA





RECEPTIONIST

Part time receptionist
wanted for busy medical
office. Computer skills
needed. Approx 20hrs
per week Fax resume
to: 352-795-7063

REGISTERED
TAX PREPARER

Parttime, Wanted for
small Dunnellon
Office. Flex Hours
Email Resume
to:taxtime200@
bellsouth.net

SOLID WASTE
TECHNICIAN I
Announcement
# 13-24

Part time (24 hours
weekly) position
providing customer
service at the Citrus
County Landfill.
Graduation from H.S
or GED certificate.
Heavy public con-
tact. Must have a
valid Florida Driver
License. Some expe-
rience with comput-
ers and cashiering.
Starting pay
$9.22 hourly.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178.
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 24, 2013
EOE/ADA





MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


Sheriffs Ranches

Enterprises


Customer Service

Representative I

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR
GED REQUIRED



$7.79 per hour

Part-Time 18 hrs/wk



Apply in person.
Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 US HWY 19
Crystal River FL 34428
(352) 795-8886
EOE/DFWP
mnn"nng


E COLLEGE of

CENTRAL

FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity college-

College of Central Florida

Chief Fiscal Officer
Foundation

The Chief Fiscal Officer is responsible for
managing the Foundation's fiscal operations,
including supervision of staff, assistance with all
types of fiscal transactions and to monitor, review
and report on the Foundation's fiscal condition to
assure that the Foundation's objectives and
goals are met efficiently and economically.
A Bachelor's degree is required. Five years
accounting experience with three years in a
supervisory capacity required.

Please submit a copy of transcripts indicating the
degree conferred with the electronic application.
Education must be from a regionally accredited
institution.

How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu, click on Quick Links then
Employment at CF. Submit electronic application,
pool authorization card and unofficial transcripts
online. Email copy of transcripts to hr@CF.edu or
fax to 352-873-5885.

3001 SW College Road, Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Opportunity Employer


D6 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Salon ForSale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
634-13971637-3733




Laundromat for sale
Crystal River, prime
location, well
maintained,offers con-
sidered 352-795-2399




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS




7 7


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13,995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


Coletb


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


DISNEY CLOCK large
Disney alarm clock,
great condition,($10)
352-212-1596

Ex. Lg. Hess Truck
Collection
Excellent Shape
$500. obo
352-746-2210




HAYWARD POWER
FLO LX POOL PUMP 1
HORSEPOWER USED
ONLY ABOUT A YEAR.
$150.00 352-726-0686




24" ELECTRIC RANGE
24" TAPPAN Electric
range with power cord.
four burner, like brand
new condition. $195.00
phone 352-726-6518

ADMIRAL dryer good
condition. $100.
352-563-2288

ADMIRAL Washer &
dryer good condition.
$100 each.
352-563-2288

ADMIRAL washer good
condition. $100.
352-563-2288

APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

CHEST FREEZER
Woods brand, 7 cubic
feet works great! $100
3524194513

DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504

FROST FREE CHEST
FREEZER white with
lock and key. 90 day
warranty. $100 call/text
352-364-6504

GE Profile
side by Side 26.6 Cubic
ft, stainless steel, refrig,
water, cubed and
crushed ice on door,
exec. cond. $625 OBO
(352) 527-2729

HAIER 5000 BTU
WINDOW AIR CONDI-
TIONER NEVER USED.
$85.00 OBO
352-726-0686

Kenmore Washer
& Electric Dryer,
16 months old
$475. for Set
(352) 344-0544

KITCHEN AID DISH/W
White Ex Cond. Energy
Star. Heavy Duty.
Moving Must Sell. $100
OBO 465-1319

Mag Tag Freezer
white 30 cubic feet, free
standing up right
freezer, exec. cond.
$250 352-382-1959


REFRIGERATOR
G.E.14 cubic feet,
works good ($40)
352-212-1596
SUNBEAM WATER
COOLER Hot/Cold Re-
frig & 5 Gal Water. Ex
Cond. Moving Must Sell.
$35 OBO 465-1319
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Lkie New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL ELEC
RANGE White Self
Cleaning. VG Condition.
Moving Must Sell
$100 OBO 465-1319
WHIRLPOOL REFRIG-
ERATOR White 18CF
&Auto Ice Maker. Very
Cold. Moving Must Sell
$100 OBO 465-1319



2 Small Computer
Desks Formica Top
36"x24" with 2 Drawer
File Cabinet Attached
$25 each 727-463-4411
4 DRAWER FILE
CABINET PreOwned
Commercial Metal $75
727463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL METAL
FILE CABINET 5
Drawers $85
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Gray
Tweed Fabric Commer-
cial PreOwned $15
each 727-463-4411
Executive Desk w/ '/ "
glass top, 6 ftx3ftx25
in, 7 drawers, walnut
color $175;
Cherry color credenza
40inx16in, 2 top draw-
ers, w/2 low doors $75
(352) 795-9146
FILE CABINET 2
Drawer Lateral Com-
mercial Metal Graphite
Color 30"x28"x18" $45
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABI-
NET 3 Drawer Commer-
cial Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-463-4411



Milling Machine
Bridgeport clone, w/vice,
rotary table, $1800.
Lathe, metal, Brand
New 14"x40", $2500.
352-795-5285



COLOR TELEVISION
color television with re-
mote in excellent condi-
tion $10- 352-220-4158
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529


Scaffolding 4-5', 3-4'
pieces, w/some braces
$150. 352-464-0825




COMPUTER DESK
small student computer
desk. like new,($20)
352-212-1596
COPIER /FAX Machine
Brother, fax, scan, blk
& color printer w/ tele.
Exc Cond. $60
(352) 746-6397
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Patio umbrella base
stand, white cast iron
criss cross leaf pattern
$303524194513
SMALL PATIO SET
white aluminum 42"
round table 2 chairs w/
cushions & umbrella.
$100 3524194513
Wicker couch,
2 chairs 3 tables
$125.
2 seat glider & chair
$75.
(352) 503-7748




36" ROUND TABLES
(2) Rugged Formica
Top Sturdy Steel
Pedestal $35 each
727-463-4411
Antique Table
Solid oak with 4 padded
chairs, painted white
$200 OBO
352-422-0463
Bedroom Set
2 night stands, ar-
moire, headboard,
footboard, Kg. size
mattress, $600
(352) 426-2526
BIG MAN'S RECLINER
dark blue fabric,
works perfectly, rocks
too. No stains. $100
3524194513
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$125, Exercise
Stepper $75
352-795-7254
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$150, Exercise
Stepper $50
352-795-7254
CHEST mid-century
modern walnut with
custom glass top.
Quality piece. $70
(352)795-7813
COMPUTER HUTCH /
DESK Oak Finish. New
Condition. Moving Must
Sell. $65 OBO
465-1319
Couch & Love Seat
$250.
2 Recliner Chairs
$110 ea.
(352) 503-7748


CLASSIFIED



Craftmatic,
Automatic Electric
Single Bed
$200.
(352) 344-8067
Dinette Set w/leather
swivel chairs, $120
Floral Couch/Loveseat,
$175. both. all in good
Cond. 352-527-7183
Dining Rm 4 brass
frame char/blue velour
chairs, 43" beveled
glass top $150 obo,
2 Barrel chairs
& ottoman cust made
white cover $75 obo,
352-746-0817
Dining Room.
china cab., buffet, ta-
ble & 6 chairs, maple
color $750 for all
will sell separate
(352) 628-2085
DRESSER walnut
mid-century modern
triple.Custom glass
top.Quality piece.$95
(352)795-7813
Entertainment
Center w/TV
$50. pis call
352-527-7183


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840
Large double bookcase
solid wood, 6' wide x 41"
tallx 11" deep. $100
3524194513
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500*k
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Patio Furniture
white PVC, table &
6 chairs $600.
(352) 628-2085
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Skillfully Designed
Table
32"x 38" A beauty $155
OBO 352-726-7421
Sleeper Love Seat
Black Leather, good
cond. $100 or best of-
fer(352) 795-7513
Sofa
8ft, like new,
beige $400. obo
(352) 220-2542
SOLID MAPLE
DRESSER 6 Drawers &
Lgr Mirror. Great Condi-
tion Moving Must Sell
$95 OBO 465-1319


~s


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 D7


SOLID OAK ARMOIRE
VG Cond. 22w 68h 13d
Moving Must Sell.
$65 OBO 465-1319
SQUARE 36" TABLE
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$30 727-463-4411
TV CABINET Oak
Finish & Glass Doors
48"x70" VG Cond.
Moving Must Sell
$75 OBO 465-1319
TWIN BED, Brass
looking headboard,
boxspring &matress,like
new, xtra-clean,($40)
352-212-1596
WOODGRAIN BAN-
QUET TABLES (2) 6
Foot Long PreOwned
$35 each 727-463-4411


2009 Cub Cadet,
LTX 1045 Riding Mower
Hydrostatic, 46" New
Belts Battery & Blades
$900 obo
352-563-1600



2009 Cub Cadet,
Riding Mower
0 Turn, 50" New Belts
Battery & Blades
$1,000 obo
352-563-1600



38" JD Hydro $450
42" Yardman $325
Very good cond.
Can be delivered
732-597-3910


54" Craftsman, Hyrdo
$550
Very good cond.
Can be dilvered
732-597-3910
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman Kohler
Lawn Mower
17 HP, 42 "cut, only
use 3 seasons, exec.
cond. $450
(352) 527-3442
Grass Catcher for
Weed Eater Lawn
Mower 38" cut, may fit
other mowers $125.
Grass Catcher for
Snapper Lawn Mower
28 & 33" cut, $125.
352-795-5682


John Deer Mower
42 Deck 22 horse, 105
hrs, new blades $1100
OBO, Echo Gas Hedge
trimmer 24" blade $150
OBO 352-489-7114

John Deere LT 133
Kohler 13 hsp, 5 spd
geer drive, 38" deck
excellent cond. $675.
352-726-0230

PREFORMED
GARDEN POND
4'LX3WX18"D INVER-
NESS ASKING 65.00
OBO 352-560-7857

Snapper Riding Mower
14%2 Briggs & Stratton
Engine, 38" deck,
Good Cond. $300
352-746-7357


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drivers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year, $39
hair color special & $39
Facial, Hair cut $10 with
ad. call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com




Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings*Carports,
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
VFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
*k HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
*"352-601-2175"*

NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641



**Full Lawn Servicet*t
Hedgetrim, Mulching
Hauling Available !!
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363


LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine, 4551 W.
Cardinal 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273


Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135






CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570






All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.






COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


~~1~~**


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard Ron's Affordable
orpoolorplan Handyman Services
4.: completely new! ARepairse
Metn, ALL me
S"0 ft in Small Carpentry

V r d*-Fencing
Screening
S'*(lean Dryer
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST .L Alod.t ,e & Dependable

C O P ES3 EApetience lifelong
POOL AND PAVER LLC 03 3.'44-0905
Is '.. 352-400-3188 cell- 400-1722
c nsued 4 3 0.. sured Lic.#37761


AAA ROOFING
call the "I ak6uster"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
:,Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
ic./Ins. CCCO57537 ~ ES X4


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
Free In Home Eshmat -
SLifetime Warranty on Strethina
& Repair
Upholstery Cleaning
Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces
|..i, Ii,
0'


I Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
Lic #C0CC1325497


MIA JOHNSON
M AC ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
.: Pools & Pavers
'j, Cleaning & Sealing
t( Grout Painting
S- Residential &
,2 !,,C Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


DON'T LET YOUR
I DRYER START
I A FIRE! M
J u Flal Rale No -
Wfr Hidden Co.I,^$ Wl


WINDOt
GENIE.
We Clean Windows ond oa Whole Lol More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


GENERAL I
Stand Alone I
Generator 6

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621 i4


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


FORCCRUSCONT REIDNT















E-R


















^^B^M-M-^Beel --~ g^^B~
HOMEOWNER'.'







...S.H.------------




B OO RE S- A


I HANDYOMAI









D8 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


LAWNSPREADER
SCOTTS SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Stihl Electric Trimmer
$150.
Fertilize Spreader
$35.
(352) 527-7223
TODD GAS
CADDY
28 Gal. Portable Fuel
Tank, like new $175
352-270-8902
Yard Equipment
Chain saw, bnd
blower/mulcher, hedge
tnmmer, edger, all for
$100 352-746-0817




BEVERLY HILLS
Moving Sale
Furniture, Rugs, silk
trees, Patio, BBQ
Grill Lots MISC.
613-0539, 249-7521
BEVERLY HILLS
Sat 5/18 8a-?
Toys, House hold
goods & Misc Items
219S BabourST


YARD SALE

CRYSTAL RIVER
BAKE SALE
& YARD SALE
with all
proceeds going
to the
Corcoran family
Sunday. May 19
8AM -2PM
at
EXIT REALTY
US HWY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER

FLORAL CITY
Sun & Mon 8-4p
Baby furn, White
crib/changing table;
high chr, 2 swings, 3
car seats, Antiques,
tools, electrical &
plumbing parts, rain-
barrels, dog cage and
much more!!!
1 mi. S. of Stop light
on US 41 S.
Homosassa
Sat, Sun 5/18 & 5/19
9am to 3pm
tools, garden, golfcart
& much much more
3720 S Alabama Ave
Inverness
Sat & Sun May 18 & 19
8am to 2pm
PS2 w/ games, outdoor
& household items
1312 Poe Street
INVERNESS
Sat 5/18 8:00 am
Moving Sale! All Appli-
ances, Furn, Tools,
Misc. 352-634-3897
6871 E Dogwood
Hammock Dr




DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat, Sun
May 17, 18 & 19
9am to 5pm
Hshld furn, tools,
washer & dryer, 2
bdrm, Ilving& dining
set & other items
4176 SW Dahlia Ct.
Rainbow Lakes Est.




4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS SUITS SIZE
34X30 & 36X30 $40
EACH 352-613-0529
New Designer
Wedding Dress, size 8,
never worn, simple line,
V back with rhinestone
closures long train $150
352-422-0463



6 Stacking Chairs
White plasitc with seat
pads $30.00
352-637-0407
19" Zenith Color TV
w/ VHS player
& stand $150
Hoover Hepper Filter
Sweeper $75
(352) 527-7223
Above Ground Pool
48' x 18' w/sand filter &
pump $250 you remove
Murry 26" ladies bike
$25 352-637-0407
AIR HOCKEY TABLE
doubles as ping pong
table w/ all accessories
$50 3524194513
ALUMINUM RUNNING
BOARDS FOR CHEVY
TAHOE GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOYS BICYCLE SPI-
DERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
Colman Road Trip
Gas Grill Onginal $200,
excellent condition
selling for $95 call
(352) 746-1821
Emerg. Generator
B & S Eng. 5250 watt,
new carborator $300
OBO 352-746-0817
Garmin GPS,
$75.
RCA VHS
Video Camera
$100
(352) 527-7223
GERBIL CAGE
PETVILLE
ROLLACOASTER $20
352-613-0529
HARLEY SLIDE ON
ORIGINAL MUFFLE RS
NEW 1350/1450 ONLY
$90.00, 464-0316
Kenwood Stereo
System AM/FM, 5 CD
player, & cassette in
cabinet w/ 2 large
speakers $150.
Compact Refrigerator
2.7 cu ft.. like New $50.
(352) 586-1694
NEW 3 SPEED


SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX $60.00
352-464 0316
OAK FIRE WOOD
cut to 20" length.
Make an offer
(352) 341-4902
OUTDOOR SHED
10'X12', completely
wired, 1 yr old, exc.
cond. pd $1800. will
sell for $1200.
352-302-8797
Play Ground
Swing Set
4 Swings, nngs,climbing
rope, slide, look out
tower with canopy, con-
struction is western
cedar $800
352-726-3035


WEIN MAHINES
American made in Kan- NOW OPEN
sas by WHITE manu- RAY'S GUN SHOP
factunng, good condi- Stokes Flea Market,
tlon.($30) 352-212-1596 Bldg "A" Rt. 44, 4 mi.
E. of Hwy. 19, CR
Teak shower bench, ffl#159017015016163
paid $150, never used, NRA SANCTIONED
does not fit shower. CONCEALED CARRY
$90 firm 3524194513 Course May 24th
TRUCK WINDOW Must Pre Register
rear-solid GMC SPECIAL *
factory tint Ruger 10-22
$50.00 Take Down $349
352-628-4210 Your Headquarters
TUB HANDRAIL for Guns, Ammo and
Medline Deluxe Reloading Supplies
safety handrail Hours: 8am to 2pm
$30.00 Tuesday-Saturday
352-628-4210 352-527-1660
USED GOODYEAR 352-586-7516
TIRE (REGATTA)
P225/60R 16 $40.00 Raleigh Grand Prix
GOOD TREAD Road Bike, made in
352464-0316 England, $300.
GIANT OCR2 Road
USED TIRES 3 Fire- Bike, under 1 yr. old
stone Forenza-215/55R- $500. 352-464-4955
tires-$15 each firm-good
cond. 352-564-1771 Road Bike for Sale:
WALKER 4WHEELS Specialized Men's
hand brake Bike Model, Sequoia,
basket&seat silver Aluminum. 54.5
basked c itin cm Carbon fork, 24
good condition spd. 27" rims, com-
$50.00 352-628-4210 spd. 27 rims com
puter, tool kit, 2 air
S pumps Like New All for
$$610. 352-586-4630
Walk Behind
TOSHIBA 2060 COP- Lawn Mower
IER & Cab. VG Cond. good condition
Needs Service. Dark $60. 352-341-1714


Copy? Moving Must Sell
$100 OBO465-1319



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 by Pnde $395
1 by Berkline $295
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $70.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
100.00 464 0316
NEW 4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT
MUCH EASIER TO
GET UP ONLY 20.00
464-0316
SAFETY BATHTUB
TUB GRAB BAR IT
CLAMPS TO THE SIDE
OF THE TUB ONLY
$25.00,464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS&
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" IBANEZ
TALMAN ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC "TELE"
STYLE,GIGBAGON-BOARD
TUNER,+MORE!
$145 352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
COPY JT 220DTR
TRANS CHERRY RED
W/BLOCK INLAYS
$100 352-601-6625
Collection of Piano
Music Books
Large collection
Variety of Music books
and Sheets, $75 OBO
352-527-9723



2 DOOR COMMERCIAL
METAL STORAGE
CABINET 50"x36"x18"
PreOwned $75
727-463-4411
BATHTUB/NEW
5 feet,very nice 30.00
OBO LINDA 341-2271
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $6
EACH 352-613-0529
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place setting, 2
light green,1 yellow, 1
pink. $15.00 each place
setting 352-726-9009
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place settings, 2
Dk Blue, 1 lime green, 1
dk green, $15.00 each
setting 352-726-9009
QUEEN BEDSPREAD
Queen sizebread, excel-
lent condition $15-
352-220-4158
Skillfully Designed
Table
32"x 38" A beauty $155
OBO 352-726-7421
TOASTER OVEN
MAGIC CHEF $20
352-613-0529



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
DOESN'T FOLD
UP,BUT WILL GIVE U
AWORKOUTONLY
100.00 464 0316
EXERCISE BICYCLE
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS GREAT 85.00
4640316
Exercise Bike
Schwin, alrdine pro, new
$800 now $175 OBO
Mountain Bike
Mongouse 10 speed,
like new $75.00 OBO
352-746-0817
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE IT'S GONNA
BE TOO HOT TO GET
OUT & EXERCISE
ONLY 100.00 464-0316



2 Ladies Leisure Bikes.
Blue and Pink. Rode
once and just don't use!
$50 each Inverness
(850) 933-9526.
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DAY PACK in excellent
condition,,$10-
352-220-4158
Dunnellon Pawn
Fire Arms****Ammo
Mags****Since 1987
352-489-4870
Excellent Full Set,
Wilson, Fire Stick
Golf Clubs, with Bag,
and Pull cart Pd $1,400
Asking $325
(352) 382-1751
Ez Go Gas
not running,older work
horse, $375, & extra's
$24 315-466-2268
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Ammo-concealed clas-
ses 352-447-5595
kayak blue w/storage
Greatt paddle $150 obo
352-746-0817


NEW ENCLOSED
8.5' x 20'
CAR HAULER
$3990. 352-564-1299




Diamond Engagement
Ring, Gold, paid $1200
willing to sell for $400
OBO call anytime
(352) 422-7696

SelorS a


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Oniy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIII 11




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




Adorable 3yr Male
Chihuahua, neutered,
micro chipped,
to good home only
$125. Leave Message
(352)637-6310
Bird for Sale
Baby Nandays hand
fed $250ea, fisher
lovebird$40,cockatlels
$35 each, pr para-
keets w/cage $20, pr.
breeder Indian ring
necks $250 637-6967
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






k (352) 634-5039 *
ENGLISH BULLDOG
BEAUTIFUL PUPS,
3 Males & 1 Female,
Blue Carners Available
AKC and all Shots
$1800. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

--








LILLY
Lilly, a 4-y.o.
Shepherd mix, weight
about 45 Ibs, is
housebroken,
heartworm-negative,
beautiful & friendly.
She sits on command,
shakes hands, &
gives paw when
asked. Takes treats
gently. Walks well on
leash, gets along
w/other dogs. Fnendly
& affectionate. Call
Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.








PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.&1 s m. male.
All tn color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876








SALLIE
Sallie, 1-y.o. female
terrier/dalmation
mix, weight 35 Ibs.
Heartworm-
negative, gets
along w/other dogs,
sits for treats, ap-
pears housebroken.
Friendly & affec-
tionate, shy at first.
Slim & trim in build.
Sweet & joyful girl,
came to shelter be-
cause owners could
not afford her.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-3444219
FRENCH BULLDOG
Pups, 1 weeks,2Males,house
broken,shots,$800each
adnansmith17@alm.com
352-795-5310
Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827








151


SKY
Sky, a spayed
female black lab
mix, 2 y.o., heart-
worm negative,
microchipped.
housebroken.
Weight 52 Ibs. Beau-
tiful, friendly dog,
would be best as
the only dog in the
family. Walks well on
a leash. Looking for
her fur-ever home.
Fenced yard is
preferred.
Call Susie @
352-621-3207 OR
352-422-2787.







P
r ,






WILLY
Willy, a 1-y.o. Chesa-
peake Bay Retriever
mix, wt. 50 Ibs.
Heartworm nega-
tive. Walks very well
on a leash, stays by
your side. Gets
along well w/other
dogs, does not care
about cats. Walks
well on leash. Sweet
nature, needs work
w/house skills.
Should be crated
when alone.
Call Susie @
352-621-3207 or
352-422-2787.
Yorkshire Terriers
Male Puppies, 8 wks
$650. Shots, Health
cert., parents on site
Lecanto 727-242-0732




GOATS FOR SALE
Mother & 2 Babies
$160 for All
(352) 628-4750
. ..


I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onl $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




2001 Mercury Motor
125 runs great, $1675
Leave Message
561-313-5308
352-270-3859
Cadillac Rims & Tires
Four for Sale
225/55R16-99V
very good tread
$225
352-489-7114
New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45' Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299
Yamaha. 8HP.
2 stroke, new water
pump, $695.
Motor Guide
401b.- New $125.
(352) 422-6956















19' REGAL, $650 &
17' CACCI CRAFT
$500
REGAL HAS GOOD
ENGINE & DRIVE.SS
PROP. NEEDS FLOOR
& SIDES RECOVERED
$600 CACCI GOOD
ENGINE & LOWER
UNIT, NEEDS CARBS
CLEANED, FLOOR RE-
COVERED $500. BOTH
HAVE TITLE AND
TRAILER352-256-8488

Sef Ioag


CLASSIFIED




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
2001 Century
WAC, yam 150 OX66FI
mtr, Windless, wash
down, fish finder,
w/trailer exec, Cond.
$12,900 352-563-5628
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555"*
boatsupercenter.com




06 Winnebago
29' site seerer, class A,
loaded 19k mi, 2 slides,
new tires, exec cond.
$46,500 270-8475
Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK
2006, 26ft.. lite alumi-
num frame, like new
tires, poss. financing
$275 mo., $7,500. or
discount for cash
(352) 726-9369
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518& 795-4440




BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th
anniversary model,
milinium yellow, 28,500
miles, immaculate,
loaded,call for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt LT
$6,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
1993 Stealth ES: black
exterior paint, gray
leather seats, sunroof,
cruise, AC, power win-
dows and locks, 5
speed manual transmis-
sion, 3.0L DOHC V6,
120,500 miles. $3,800.
352-344-0625
FORD
04 Crown Victoria
LX, Exec. cond., new
tires, 133K mi. $4,200.
obo 352-422-1916
FORD
2000, Ranger XLT
Lesabre, $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Focus, Sedan,
SES, 25,000 miles.
$7,500. 352-341-0018
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518& 795-4440


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEVROLET
1956 Chevrolet Bel Air
gnlle, $100.00- Front &
rear Bumpers $100.00
each Tail Light $50.00
Bumper Guard $50.00
(352)628-1734






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




2012 Toyota
Tacoma, pre-runner,
TRD Sport, access Cab,
Char/gray, Loaded 10K
mi, $25K
746-0177 /697-1101
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
1997, Explorer XLT
$3,495
352-341-0018
FORD
1998, Explorer Sport
$4,995.
352-341-0018
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
HYUNDAI
2004 Santa Fe,
new timing belt &
brakes, 227K mi., runs
and drives like new
$2,950. 352-344-0484
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100




JEEP
'98 Grand Cherokee,
6 cyl. 4 wheel drive
$3,000 (352) 628-6702
Cell 364-3122




BUICK
97 LE SABRE, loaded
125k mi., very nice
cond. asking $1875.
352-637-2588 or
845-588-0759
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2004 883 Sportster, w/
screaming eagle pkg,
Low Mi, Ex cond $4900
325-563-5552, 464-7005
Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk, xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12.900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
Honda
06 Shadow Spirit V TW
750 Awesome! Must
See Exec. Cond, burnt
orange $3250 527-7199
HONDA 2003
Reflex motor scooter/
250cc/automatic
yellow /70mpg/ 70mph/
windshield/ like new
condition/ pictures
available/asking
$2500/call
352-382-0468

SUZUKI
1981 GS1100E, Mint
Condition, adult
owned, super fast,
garage kept, new ti-
res, new seat, Italian
fairing, smoke wind-
shield with sissy bar,
only 15k onrg. mi.
many extra's serious
Inquires only $2600.
Call 352-489-5932

SUZUKI
1987, GS450L. Adult
driven & well maint.
Very low miles, Looks
and runs well. $1,200
obo (352) 249-7127


S f .1


303-0526 SUCRN
05/30 Soles Pack-N-Stack
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FLA STAT 83.806 Notice is Hereby Given that on 5/30/2013 at 11:00 a.m.,
at PACK-N-STACK MINI STORAGE, 7208 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34446, The Miscellaneous Personal Property contents of your storage shall be sold for
past due rent and fees owed by the tenant:
#9 & 43 #7 #30
BRANDON BOUGHTON DIANNA BOGGS ANDREW SERRA
3337 S. ARUNDEL TERR 3316 S. WESTERN AVE #2 P.O. BOX 2721
HOMOSASSA. FL 34446 CHICAGO. IL 60608 VALRICO. FL 33595


#21
#94
ANN ELLIS
CONSUAL
5448 S. FROST PT
1370
LECANTO, FL 34461
#97
RHONDA LEON
5341 W. STATE ST


KEITH VAN ORDEN TERI-AN
P.O. BOX 4402 P.O. BOX
HOMOSASSA, FL 34447 HOMOSASSA, FL 34447


HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 19 & 26, 2013


301-0519 SUCRN
Big. To Vote Goldsmith, Scott A
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Scott A. Goldsmith
7766 W. Solar Place
Homosassa, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 19, 2013


935-0519 MIXCRN
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
WIP MODIFICATIONS
Bid #13-B-11
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for modifications to the City's
Water Treatment Plant, located at 1001 NE Crystal Street. You are hereby invited to
submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is City of Crystal River.
Bds will be received untl 10:00 AM, on June 18,2013, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
A Non-Mandatory Re-Bid Conference will be held on June 4,2013 at 10:00 AM
in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally consists of modifications to the exst-
ing City Water Treatment Plant (WTP) located on Crystal Street. Modifications in-
clude, but are not limited to:
1. Mechanical, electrical and instrumentation improvements
Pump Replacement/Pump Rebuild
General Building Rehab
2. Upgrades to motor controls including new VFD drives
3. New WTP SCADA system telemetry
4. Modifications / upgrades to chlorine and fluoride systems, including
new layout, chemical feed systems, and ventilation.
5. Building improvements including general building repairs, louvered
wall, alumi num canopy system, and masonry storage room exten-
sion.
6. Pump Replacement and Repairs
ALL BIDDERS must demonstrate they are qualified for the type of work
for which
the BID is submitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"WTP MODIFICATIONS", BID #13-B-11, AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR
ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
Al contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, and a
copy of the Bid Documents may be obtained from Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.,
95 East Mitchell Hammock Road, Oviedo, FL 32765. The cost of the Bid Documents is
$75.00 (inclusive of sales taxes). A non-refundable $20.00 fee for postage and han-
dling will be assessed if plans are mailed, unless a UPS or FedEx Shipping number is
provided. Return of the document is not required, and the amount paid for the doc-
uments is non-refundable. Bidders must put their official bid set number on the bid
form to be considered for award.
Bdder shall submit all questions about the meaning or intent of the Bd Docu-
ments to Stefano Ceriana (sceriana@hoyletanner.com), Hoyle, Tanner & Associates,
Inc., in written format only, preferably by way of e-mail. Interpretations or clarifica-
tions necessary in response to such questions will be issued by a written Addendum.
Only questions answered by formal Addendum will be binding. Oral and other inter-
pretations or clarifications will be without legal effect. Questions submitted shall not
constitute formal protest of the specifications or of this Invitation to Bid. The deadline
for questions is June 11,2013.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time
scheduled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within one hundred and
eighty (180) days from receipt of the notice to proceed by the owner.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDSfor any reason whatso-
ever and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE
BID RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
May 17 & 19, 2013


302-0519 SUCRN
Notice of Intent
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO FILE AN APPLICATION TO REPLAT
Pursuant to F.S. 177.101 (4) Alton R. Pierce, Sr., Trustee of the Pierce Trust UTD, gives
notice of its intent to apply Citrus County, Florida for a replat of N. Seminole Street
located in Section 31, Township 19S, Range 17E, and more particularly described as
follows:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE NORTHEAST /4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 19SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS;
THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF THE TOWN OF
HOMOSASSA, FLORIDA, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 6, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE "OLD MAP", BOUNDED AS
FOLLOWS: ON THE SOUTH BY A PROLONGATION OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SEMINOLE
AVENUE, ON THE EAST BY BAY STREET, AND ON THE NORTH AND WEST BY HOMOSASSA
RIVER, SAID LANDS BEING SITUATE IN GOVERNMENT LOT 5, OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST.
CONTAINING 1.0 ACRES MORE OR LESS

Notice given by:
Alton R. Pierce, Trustee
Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire
Counsel for Applicant
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle on May 19, 2013.


397-0519 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
A special meeting of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., Treasury Commit-
tee, will be held on Friday, May 24th, 2013, at 1:30 pm, in the Board Room located
on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502
Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to review fund per-
formance for the first quarter of 2013. Any person wishing to appeal any decision
made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must in-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
May 19,2013


398-0519 SU-CRN
May 23, 2013 School Board Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold a Workshop and Special Meeting; 9:00 a.m.
on Thursday, May 23, 2013 in the Board Room of the District Services Center located
at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.

The purpose of the Workshop is to review and gather direction on the proposed
2013-2014 budget and staffing plan. The purpose of the Special Meeting is to
approve the 2013-2014 staffing plan and other items that may need to come before
the School Board.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which
record should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be
based


/s/SandraHinmel

Superintendent

Citrus County School Board
Published in The Citrus County Chronicle, May 19, 2013


399-0519 SUCRN
NOTICE OF HEARING
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will hold a public hearing on the 1 th day of June, 2013, at 2:30 pm
in the Commission Chambers, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, to consider adopting a Resolution approving PV-13-01 for
Timothy C. Pitts on behalf of Crystal Glen Properties, LLC to determine the advisability
of vacating, abandoning, discontinuing and removing the plat dedication of Tract A
to the Crystal Club, Inc. of the plat of Crystal Glen, as recorded in Plat Book 14,
Pages 21 through 27, public records of Citrus County, Florida, as described in the
attached Exhibit "A", renouncing and disclaiming any right of Citrus County and the
public in and to any land described in the attached Exhibit "A".
EXHIBIT "A"
Vacate the following from the dedication in Plat Book 14, Page 21 of the plat of
Crystal Glen:
, AND THAT THE AREA OF THE SUBDIVISION DESIGNATED HEREON AS TRACT "A" IS
HEREBY DEDICATED TO THE PERPETUAL USE OF THE CRYSTAL CLUB, INC., A FLORIDA
CORPORATION, NOT FOR PROFIT, FOR PROPER PURPOSES, RESERVING UNTO
THEMSELVES, THEIR SUCCESSORS OR ASSIGNS, THE REVERSION OR REVERSIONS
THEREOF WHENEVER DISCONTINUED BY LAW

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
BY:/s/ JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time, May 19, 2013.


300-0519 MCRN
Fictitious Name Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.08, F.S.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in
business under the
fictitious name of


CREMATION CENTER OF
THE NATURE COAST
located at
355 SE 10th Avenue,
Crystal River, Florida,
34429,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register the
said name with the
Division of Corporations
of the Florida


Department
of State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL.,
the 14th day of May
2013.
/s/ DWIGHT HOOPER
Owner/President,
Hooper Funeral Homes,
Inc.
Published one (1) time in
Citrus County Chronicle
May 19,2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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L


49,;


- -'
"~ '7


CERTIFIED PRE-OWN ED


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
DIAMOND WHITE, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL
ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3X353A
$18,488
2012 CADILLAC
SRX
BLACK TRICOAT, ONLY 8,800 MILES,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S350A
$s9,988


2007 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLUE, 56,000 MILES, LUXURY II COLLECTION,
LOCAL TRADE, #C3S331C
816,988


2010 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
: HI.A I. 1 ERRi Y :71 :; MILES, I.EATHER,
BRAND NEW,#C383440
*E3,988
2011 CADILLAC
CTS COUPE
[DIAM lrJl WHITE '":l I MILES IL V6L
LEATHER LOADED WITH LUXURY #C3X262G
S29,988


2006 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM
31LAlt, ': .1.i,1: 1 MILE'S (HROAIMEWHEELS 'iulE
OWNER, LOADED WITH LUXURY, #C3X172A
S16,988


2011 CADILLAC
CTS


SILVER, ONLY18,000 MILES, LEATHER, LOCAL
TRADE,#C383430
*E4,988
2011 CADILLAC
STS
PREMIUM
WHITE, 27,000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV,
EXTRA NICE # 0383420
30,488
2006 INFINITI
M35
SPORT
SILVER, NAV SUNROOF, BACK UP CAM, HEATED &
COOLED SEATS, ONE OWNER, #C3S298A
$16,988


2010 CADILLAC
CTS
VANIi[LA IATTE, ifl .fl MILE, LEATHER, ETRA
1LEAJ, LOCALTRACE, sCi10
p24,988
2011 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
MOCHA, 22,067 MILES, SUNROOF,
HEATED SEATS, EXTRA CLEAN
p31,988
2007 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY II
SILKNG GREEN, 54,000 MILES, HEATED AND MEMORY
,II [.1: l 1:1:"A l: l .1.EANJ i;; :
p18,988


2011 CADILLAC
CTS


3A RAVEl INLY 41i1I MILE (lOE IIW1iJER
EXTRA CLEAN #C383470
Sp2,988
2012 CADILLAC
CTS
3.6 PERFORMANCE
BLACKTRICOAT,3,6LV6, LEATHER,
PERFORMANCE COLLECTION, #0383300
p32,588
2010 DODGE
CHARGER
RALLYE
CRYSTAL RED, SPOILER, LOCAL TRADE,
IgRA (LIA:J ul i :Ii
p18,488


2010 CADILLAC
SRX LUXURY
'IAM"BI:I WHITE ylli 1.7i I MILES LEATHER
W.riROjO F LiFE rJ)EW -r'l9 A
826,988
2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
DIAMOND WHITE, NAV, SUNROOF, HEATED AND
COOLED SEATS, #C383370
36, 988

2010 FORD
EDGE
2WD LIMITED
GRAY, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
.iil. r 18,988Ir IRRAIE l iA
f 1B,988


2009 HONDA 2010 NISSAN 2011 CHRYSLER 2008 DODGE 2012 TOYOTA 2010 BUICK
CRV ALTIMA 200 QUAD CAB CAMRY LACROSSE
EX-L 2.5 SL LIMITED CONK 4X4 SLT XLE CSX
SILVER, 32,000 MILES, LEATHER, WHITE, 30,000 MILES, SUNROOF, TAN LEATHER, SILVER, POWER RETRACTIBLE HARDTOP, NAV, GRAY, ONLY 1ii1::1) MILES ;I. V' I.AiHER SILVER, 5,600 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, MOCHA, 32,000 MILES, SUNROOF, LEATHER,
SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3S289G SPOTLESS, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C383390 LEATHER, LOADED, #C3S297A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3A348A NAV, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3X078A NAV, ONE OWNER, #C3S305A
p19,48B p19,988 '21,988 22,988 p22,988 23,988


2008 LEXUS
RX 350


WHITE LEATHER NAV SUNROOF LOCAL ONE
OWNER TRADE #C383290A
*~2,488


2003 FORD
FOCUS
SEDAN
NHITE OIl.Y t,4i1.1J.I MILES I(IL[ Ai R.rJI'
GREAT #3V278C
$3,988


2010 LINCOLN
MKX


CRYSTAL RED, 30,000 MILES, SUNROOF, NAV
ONE OWNER #C3M320A
C25,988


1999 OLDS
INTRIGUE
GLS
RED, RUNS GOOD, COLD NC
#C3S289B
$3,988


2011 BUICK
LACROSSE CXS
BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
SUNROOF, LOADED, #025269G
$6,988


2000 JAGUAR
X-TYPE
BLACK, LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
#C383400A
$4,988


2012 BMW
128i


WHITE ONLY 8000 MILES LEATHE SUNROOF LIKE
NEW #C3A205A
029,988


2000 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
:EDl I. l L' h,1illi MILE', LEATHER,
EXTRA CLEAN, #C3X354A
$6,988


2012 CHEVROLET
AVALANCHE LTZ
WHITE DIAMOND
16000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV DVD
#C3M050A
$43,988


2005 MERCURY
GR MARQUIS
LS
"All, 76,1111 MILES LEATHER,
LOCAL TRADE IN, #C3XO42B
SB, 988


2011 TOYOTA
SEQUOIA
PLATINUM SILVER
22,813 MILES, SUNROOF, NAV, DVDS, LOADED
ONE OWNER TRADE, C3S301A
$47,988


2008 NISSAN
ALTIMA
2.5S
GRAY LOCAL TRADE EXTRA CLEAN
#03S288B
S9,988


W .'' .... . ,, ,~,,,.~.. .... .........

.ETJZ 404 CE RO e IC OLCALA FL 32M7-32-4700


ra


I


SUPER SAVERSrrI # SPE SVES oSUERSAER


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 D9


3 ^^;VAN


r
S;.
Zj


,b "-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


k4i L


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


ModelGE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


.II


a New 2013 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD
ModelRM3H3CEW
ee Why The CR-V Is The Best
ng Compact Suv In America!
Save While They Last!


For a New 2013 Honda
)SSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
ModelTF3H3DJW
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...for a New 2013 Honda ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW
Come See Why The Odyssey Is The Best!

04o9 APR
X60
0U MONTHS
on select new Honda models
on approved credit.

OVER 90 USED
& Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles!


, -- '-
*1a-


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ModelYK1F2CEW, 4WD With
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world first, but CHECK
WITH CHAD LAST!"




is&I


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:
6 Mo./ 6,000 Mile
Limited Powertrain Warrantyt


Plus a 5-DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


Out Our REALLY BIG Selection
of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


9^.-A As B


2007 HYUNDAI
ACCENT
$6,377


7 CHEVY
BU MAXX
T,639


2003 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS
$6,921


2006 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER
$8,490


2007 PONTIAC
G5 5-SPD
$6,973


2009 CHEVY
IMPALA
$8,786


* -.. -.w.
~


2009 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
$11,564


2012 TOYOTA
COROLLA
$15,022


UsedCars


2008 HONDA
CIVIC LX
$9,900


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of HONDA CERTIFIED Vehicles!


2010 HONDA
CIVIC 4DR LX
$11,500


2010 HONDA
FIT
$15,500


2010 HONDA
CIVIC LX
$12,900


gffg;d F


2010 HONDA
ODYSSEY EX-L
$21,500


2010 HONDA
ACCORD LX
$14,900


2009 HONDA
RIDGELINE RT
$17,500


2011 HONDA
CR-V
$20,300


Lo


2010 HONDA
ACCORD EXL
$19,000


2011 HONDA
CR-V
$19,000


2011 HONDA
CR-V EXL
$20,500


2011 HONDA
ODYSSEY EX-L
$24,900


LOVE Can Do For You!

.52.628.4600

INDA.COM


les per year 15 cents per mile thereafter.
nt, tag and lease and state tees due at signing.
se. 2.36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,976 with approved credit, 12,000 miles
ily. Payment is plus lax, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Options at additional cost.
owned vehicles include $2000 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.


3 Honda


nsmission!


i


D10 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


PA.


PM




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ivj ;


II1


All-New 2014
Chevy Impala 1 LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy Crze LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy Traverse LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy Malibu LS
36 month lease A


New 2013 Chevy Camaro LS
DRIVE TODAY FOR... WITH...


New 2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13205, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: $25,015


E


III


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 D11


7!1


=-T =-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW 2013 KIA
SOUL
STK#KD0383


ui
10
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY*


NEW 2013 KIA
RIO LX
STK#KD0325


NEW 2014 KIA
SORENTO
LXK#
STK#KE5014 -Ii

a.-


, ."-'-4


* *-* Un OR$11 /IVIUNI I H LASE' * * * * Un tU$16 4 /IVIUI LIEAS'- -* *
LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS) WITH 12K PER YEAR, TOTAL OF $4,495 DUE AT SIGNING. SMARTPAY IS AONE TIME LEASE PAYMENT FOR 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS)
WITH $7,956 SOUL, $7,308 RIO LX, $8,676 OPTIMA & $10,440 SORENTO LX DUE AT SIGNING. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS EXCLUSIVE. ALL FACTORY REBATES & INCENTIVES TO DEALER.


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
2WD EXT CAB
STK#D8012


* * *U 5$135 /MONTH LEASE * *
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
EQUINE I

STK#D5195

lowS 4 B


* * U $185 /MVIONTH LEASE** * *


* * *OR $185 /MONTH LEASE'* * *- * *uI I O iVri nu I ril I.cawI *

*fl I

LEA : ,i II: 1- I I 39 MONTHS WITH 10K PER YEAF T,-,T F $ -il .II -T I .1 ING. i-- T, -, \ ONE TIME I- I I':l T FOR 39 MONTHS WITH $6,705 MALIBU, $7,729 SILVERADO, $7,738 EQUII I
CRL i- I I .i i UPTO$12,000 .1 I I .II .-1-- II-I I_.EL- I 1. i I- 1201. -- (r F T i I I I I ii. -' F- OF F F -. .1 I F INCLUDES ALL i-r -
MU -. 1IIIF. I 1- EMPLOYEEPROG- l i I I T r : I I I$[1 1 I II, BE .l i IT IE I nI I i f r 1 II11 -. fI 'I I- I 1 T, I 1- 1 I I I, ITI I CREDITWORThlIIEoo.
ON: I 'I. I ITY PICK-UP SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS "$13.39 PER $1000 FINANCED ON SELECT MODELS.


+ *


I i T I II--
II TI I I I


D12 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


03Y


Q!Y






Section E-SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013



OME


RONT


INSIDE
SSikorski's
AtticPAGE
PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUII


I nl l Vs I i


Drapery panels were added to this
small outdoor porch by designer,
Brian Patrick Flynn to emphasize
the house's tall ceiling, minimize
its narrow dimensions and give
the space privacy from neighbors.
Flynn used a few other tricks to
make this small outdoor space ap-
pear larger, including hanging
oversized art and flanking seating
areas with two love seats or sofas
rather than chairs or loungers.
: : :.:, [,l 1 I -, SS


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E2 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


5278 W. YUMA LANE
PINE RIDGE
*3BD/2BA/2CG 2,782 SF Living
* 36'x18' Lanai Gourmet Kitchen
* Luxurious Goldcrest Home Built in 2005
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


SHINY NEW METAL ROOF
* 145 Feet on the Water 2,200 Uving Square Ft.
* Magnificent Open Water View 20x24 Detached Workshop
* Full Acre Lot Inground Pool
* 16x12 Observation Deck Boat House with New Roof
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 I
Email: sherylpolts@aol.coin I
0001d48: www.CryslalRiverLiiing coin


UIIUS IUUIUN I HANGH
Spacious home on 14 fenced acres perfect for the
equestrian. 3 bedroom,, 3 bath house complete with
den, fireplace, summer kitchen and beautiful inground
pool. Huge warehouse for RV and all of your
equipment / supplies. Cross-fenced, stalls, paved
drive and so much more.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


S- -563 7.2
Enter house # 1102





SNOWBIRD RETREAT IN THE MOORINGS...
Perfect reduced maintenance villa in excellent
condition. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, eat-in kitchen,
screened porch & garage. Waterfront
community with pool/cabana and priced to sell.
Call the REAL ESTATE DOCTOR today to see your new home
JOHN HOLLOWAY, SR.
CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: ohnHollorair lampaban ii coin
w* TheHolloayTeanl coin


IMMACULATE POOL HOME IN QUAIL RUN
S3 BR, 2 BATH 2 Car Garage
* LRG Kitchen w/Nook Enormous Master BR
* Updated Roof 2011 Updated HVAC 2009
* Large Lot/Shed Beautiful Landscaping

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsforida.com










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

+
S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


22N.eooHyBvlHis577 2w wR AXc I 101IU.S. Hwy. 41 N., II nvenes 63-6I 0
835S ucns ldHrossa68700 w wHlrIns aIfl cm54N w. 9 rsa Rvr7524


CImus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


x2417 INFO LINE
52)63.8

Enter hou Enter.house -
-se#'f 1#3,


Lovely 3/2/2 pool home, move-in ready Formal living/
dining, 10' ceilings, built-in entertainment center, eat-in
kitchen w/office nook. Large laundry room w/sink.
Master bath dual sinks & vanity, snail shower, walk-in
closet has built-in organizer, cabinets in garage for
storage. Don't miss out on this beauty.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net






.-*- .--aw


GREAT BUY FOR PINE RIDGE
This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has new paint & carpet.
Features a screened room, split bedrooms, great room,
nice kitchen with breakfast nook PLUS the appliances
A/C and roof are 5 to 6 years old. Garage is enclosed for
a game room etc. but the door is still in place should you
want to convert it back to a garage. Nice fenced backyard
and utility shed. Priced tosell.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


6. i ~ .ssa






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To Carol, with love: Notes on a special daphne


LEE REICH/Associated Press
A Carol Mackie daphne in New Paltz, N.Y. Each spring, her small, white flowers infuse the air with a deliciously sweet
perfume.


l "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'

S NANCY Direct:
PONTICOS 3526344225
Multi-Million $$$ Producer ER KEY 1 REALTY INC.
8015S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com
*.i if-, LA -1'I 0![.1iL T a


2005 POOL HOME w/FOUNTAIN! GORGEOUS GOLF COURSE VIEW!
* 4 Bedrooms Living AND Family Rooms 2 Bed/2 Bath Ground Floor Easy Care Condo
* Wood Panel Cabinets & Stainless Fridge 29 x 12 Glass Enclosed (& AC) FL Room
* Masterw/Tub, Separate Shower & 2 Sinks Bring Your 25 Ibs or less Pet With You!
$175,000 MLS#701741 $89,000 MLS#702618
Take my virtual tO I ,P _


II


s KE "Always There For You"
PE0Lr,-.L GAIL COOPER
t IluliIlliliiiiln Dollar Rea3liur
Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3 'mmndsprng.com
-~ri~s I ---- ----1-


EYE CATCHING HARDWOOD FLOORING! SWEEPING CIRCULAR DRIVEWAY!
4 4+office/3/3 pool home on 2 lots 3/2/2 pool home built in 2007
- 2700 sq ft of living built in 2005 2333 sq ft of living on cul de sac
SWell for the yard security system Corian kitchen Stainless appliances
* Separate office Fireplace in the family room
* Fireplace in the living room Well for outside irrigation
* Home warranty for the buyers *18" tile
#702045 $278,000 #354014 $207,000
See VIru Tours @ wwwIUrsa.leomIIIul.I..


LEE REICH
Associated Press

I fell in love with Carol
Mackie almost from the
day she arrived here.
True, she was nothing spe-
cial to look at early on, but
she always had a becoming
daintiness.
And what a looker she
has become, with a full,
round head of stems, along
which fan out like pin-
wheels lance-shaped,
bluish-green leaves, each
with a creamy white mar-
gin tracing its edge.
And Carol a kind of
daphne -doesn't stop at
just looking good. Every
spring, each of her stems
is capped by a tight cluster
of small, white flowers. As
they open and age to pink,
they infuse the air with
a deliciously sweet
perfume.
One more bonus of Carol
Mackie is that she is ever-
green, although in more
northern regions she is
semi-evergreen or decidu-


ous. She does look a bit
ragged each year by win-
ter's end, but it's not long
before she's dressed up
again in new leafery Any-
way, my attention during
that ragged period is dis-
tracted by the colorful
show of daffodils, crocuses
and species tulips at her
feet.
Daphne death
I am thankful each year
that Carol Mackie has
flourished in my garden
because, like other
daphnes, she has the un-
fortunate habit of dying
suddenly Daphnes fre-
quently expire after being
moved; sometimes they
die for no apparent reason
at all.
But my Carol Mackie
has survived and thrived
after being ripped out of
the ground and replanted
to make way for a con-
struction project.
The fact that gardeners

See CAROL/Page E4


|r-- Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
II- Realtor A HOUSE Realtor@
6a1A 00a ? SOLDN7nle0 287-9022
IA ThAfIa0H 1riIl WEEtC DEaRIV E BEuEDIVuililBIUR


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 E3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Murray signs on
with ERA
ERA American Realty and
Invest-
ments is
pleased to
announce
that Bev-
erly Jo
Murray has
recently
joined the
coman' Beverly Jo
company s Murray
Beverly Hills ERAAmerican
office, Realty.
where she
will work as a sales associate.
Murray has served the
needs of buyers and sellers for
more than 15 years, with two
real estate companies in Fort
Lauderdale, and she has lived
in Citrus County for six months.
Before her real estate career,
she worked in law enforcement



CAROL
Continued from Page E3

put up with the threat of
"Daphne Death" is testimo-
nial to the plants' virtues.
And there are other gar-
den-worthy daphnes.
Carol Mackie is a hybrid of
rose daphne, a wide-
spreading evergreen grow-
ing only 6 inches high, and
Caucasian daphne, which
grows 5 feet high. Both
species have fragrant flow-
ers. These species were
mated with an eye to com-
bining their qualities into
one plant
From a good family
The mating resulted in
only three viable seeds,
and of the three resulting
seedlings only two sur-
vived. Those two grew to
become the 3-foot-high va-
rieties Somerset and
Arthur Burkwood. Carol
Mackie originated from a


and as an office manager for a
multi-physician practice.
Contact Murray at the Bev-
erly Hills office at 352-746-
3600 or by email at
beverly.murray@era.com.
Shemet hits
new high
Congratulations to Pamela

with EXIT
Realty
Leaders in
Crystal
River.
Pamela has
won the top
sales agent
award for Pamela
Shemet
April 2013. EXIT Realty
ael EXIT Realty
Pamela Leaders.
has closed
more than $1.4 million in
sales. Give her a call at 352-
794-0888.


chance mutation on one of
those hybrid's branches.
This happy event took
place and was discovered
in the New Jersey garden
of Carolyn Brett, formerly
Carol Mackie.
I've recently learned of
another daphne that I'm
sure to fall in love with.
This one, Briggs Moon-
light, is a close relative of
Carol Mackie. Its leaves
are like a photographic
negative of Carols' leaves,
being, this time, creamy
white with green edges.
Both Carol Mackie and
Briggs Moonlight demand
well-drained soil and some
protection from the full
fury of wind and sun. A
mulch keeps their roots
cool, which they like. Even
better is to mulch and then
underplant these daphnes
with dark plants Purple
Palace coral bells, Bowles'
Black viola, or Aphrodite
hosta, for example the
better to show off the
daphnes' decorative leaves.


A tip for those old coffee cans


Coffee cans are great
storage containers.
They have a tight-fit-
ting lid, come in different
sizes, are portable, and
some even have a wide-grip
handle. Their durability
makes them a smarter
choice than glass jars for
many storage solutions.
The first reader shares
one way to reuse coffee cans:
Reuse containers: This
summer I was wondering
what to do with all of my


plastic coffee cans (I hate to
throw stuff away), and I
came up with a solution.
Wash them well and use
them to send soups, etc.
home with grandkids. You
don't have to worry about
getting the containers back.
-Jackie H., email
Wrap cupcakes: For bake
sales, place individual cup-
cakes inside 9-ounce clear
plastic cups and wrap in cel-
lophane. WJ., Mississippi
Reuse tires: Other than


chipping them up as fake
mulch, tires don't have
much recycle potential.
They do have reuse poten-
tial, though. Many a tractor
and truck tire has been
turned into a flowerbed.
They can be stacked and
then backfilled/covered to
make a retaining wall. Use
one as a swing or sandbox.
They're good for many types
of sports and sports training.

See FRUGAL/Page E5


PINE RIDGE Pr u deru nal CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744






OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 NEW LISTING



il 400 E Dakota Ct cI 1121 NChanc Wa
MLS 702580 $249,900 S6.00
2bd/3ba pool home w/den on 3bd/2ba home with beautiful pool. 4l LS 2338 E Celina St $1i?9 3428 N Bravo Dr
golf course. Directions: Hwy 486 to south Citrus MLS 702826 $144,900 MLS702158 $399,000
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, Hills Blvd, L on Hartford, R on Meticulously maintained 2bd/2ba + den Equestrian Estate 5.5 acres with
R on Dakota Ct. Chance Way. pool home. Won't disappoint you! beautiful 3/2/3 home.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Tami Mayer 352-341-2700






T141 1 ; tic r,
jNde 4964 W Pine Ridge Blvd 3267 W Blossom Dr & I 116 E Falconry Ct
7 MLS 359650 $329,900 MLS 359551 $219,000 C0 4389 S LeWoods Dr MLS 700569 $195,000
Must see this former model home. 4/3/3 pool home with lovely golf MLS 702204 $199,000 3/2/2 golf course home, beautiful
3/3/3 with pool. course vistas. Spacious & updated 3/3/2 ranch home. and spacious.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Matt Robinson 352-502-3501





7e~ g 4837W Mohawk Dr 3I, o
MLS 701122 $177,000 4 3842 W NorthcrestCt 4,flP 3378 W Naegelia PI t 1 d90 E Gilchrisl CI 212a
Pride of ownership shines thru-out. MLS 352588 $159,900 MLS 359406 $94,900 MLS 357670 $59,900
Many quality features including 3/2/2 pool home on a cul-de-sac. Lovely 3/2/2 home. Immaculately kept, Ground level condo. Tastefully furnished
detached gar/wrkshp. Spacious and inviting, move-in ready. &well maintained.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
S 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
S Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


RealEstate DIGEST


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


E4 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New plants take


a bow for 2013


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

Hang one by a rope to
practice throwing a base-
ball or football through.
Place a pole in the middle
and fill with concrete for
portable volleyball nets.
My granddad would put a
target in the middle of a
tire and then roll it across
the field for target prac-
tice. They can be used as
"bumpers" to soften hard


edges like loading docks.
- Chris, Alabama
Fruit salad: Years ago, I
would add yogurt to my
fruit salad to give it added
flavor. Now I make sure
my fruit salad includes a
can of pineapple (with the
juice) and I add a box of
dry vanilla pudding mix
instead of yogurt. It's deli-
cious. -Julia, Ohio
Party cubes: For party
punch (in a punch bowl or
a large pitcher) that needs
ice cubes, use a muffin tin
to make your ice. Add


lemon or fruit slices and
add to your punch. -
Laura, Indiana
Remove dead skin: Use
Cool Whip. Put it on your
skin (works on faces, too)
and rub in. Let it dry until
it is barely moist. Rub
again and the dead skin
will flake off. I don't sug-
gest buying it for this spe-
cific reason, but if you
have any leftover, put it to
use. Cody Pennsylvania
Store green onions:
Chop and store them in an
old Parmesan cheese con-


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 E5

trainer or keep intact and
store in a jar with a bit of
water and leave on the
counter (or even window
sill) or store in the fridge.
-Melanie, Illinois
Shout laundry spray:
My nephews got into the
shower with terribly dirty
feet, leaving something
black and tarlike all over
the sides of my tub. I
wanted to clean it and
found that I didn't have
any of my favorite cleaner

See FRUGAL/Page E7


Suntory Flowers
A Suntory Flowers Sun Parasol Garden Crimson in a gar-
den bed in Tokyo.

Flowers, veggies highlight

newest offerings


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Whoever believes
there's nothing new under
the sun hasn't seen the
plants being introduced for
the 2013 gardening season.
Think multi-colored
blooms, high-yield vegeta-
bles bred for containers
and ornamental edibles
packing still more nutri-
tion as breeders try to an-
ticipate consumer
demand.
Grafted tomatoes ap-
pear to be the hottest new
trend in home gardening,
while cocktail gardens,
featuring plants that make
or embellish alcoholic
drinks, top this year's
niche category
"We're looking for ear-
lier (maturing) varieties,
things that work in smaller
spaces and plants that are
different," said Kevin
Roethle, head of new
product development for
Ball Seed Co., a division of
Ball Horticultural Co. The


West Chicago-based com-
pany lists 295 new intro-
ductions for 2013.
"We're trying to create
contrasts," Roethle said.
"Deeper colors on leaves
and more vibrant
blossoms."
Those attributes spur
impulse buying, he said.
"You're picking up milk
and bread at a quick-stop
(grocery) and then you
wind up walking away
with some flowers, too."
Another trend sees
many old standbys made
new again. These include
bi-color dahlias (Marissa,
Ball), petunias (Glamou-
flage Grape, Hort Couture)
with deep colored blooms
and variegated foliage,
and shade-loving begonias
(Sparks Will Fly, Ball) with
brilliant flowers above
rich, dark leaves.
Other noteworthy plant
releases for the upcoming
gardening season:
Pint-size vegetables


See PLANTS/Page E11


BROKER/ASSOC.' REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
r =-- d LEV


QUAIL^ R


I CITRUS SPRI






E6 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information....................352-563-5966
News information........................ ................ 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Cif ON ICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sign your family up for


Healthy Kids program


his fall, researchers at the Univer-
sity of Florida will begin a study ex-
amining a healthy lifestyle program
for young children 3 to 7 years of age and
their parents in Citrus County
and surrounding rural areas in
central Florida.
The Healthy Kids Program
is designed to help young chil-
dren at the higher end of the
growth curve and their par- .
ents, improve diet, physical ac-
tivity and the home
environment to promote
healthy lifestyles. The no-cost Joan Br
program helps families work FLOR
together to make gradual FRIE
changes. The study is a joint ef-
fort between researchers at LIV
the UF Health Science Center,
the UF/IFAS Citrus County Cooperative
Extension Service Office, and IFAS Ex-
tension at UE
The Healthy Kids Program is led by
David Janicke, Ph.D., along with a team
that includes physicians, nurses, nutri-
tionists, an exercise physiologist, and be-
havioral health psychologists. The study


is supported by a grant from the National
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases.
"We are beginning to see more and
more young children at the
S higher end of the growth curve
who are not growing out of
their extra weight Young chil-
dren who continue to be at the
higher end of the growth curve
are at greater risk for obesity
and other negative health con-
sequences, such as type II dia-
betes. This program can
adshaw benefit families in rural areas
IDA- by providing a local option to
IDLY help families establish health-
ier eating and activity pat-
ING terns," said Janicke, an
Associate Professor of Clinical
and Health Psychology in the College of
Public Health and Health Professions.
During the Healthy Kids program,
young children and parents will partici-
pate in fun activities and sample healthy
foods during group meetings. The


See HEALTHY/Page E7


I


Inside...






'A-


I P, .14; - If); . /%&-lI
Big and small
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Note on back of picture indicates it's just a reproduction


Dear John: I pur-
chased the pic-
ture in
the attached
file from an
antiques store
at least 20
years ago,
probably
longer, be-
cause I found
it interesting
and I liked it.
It looks old, John S
very old, and SIKOF
is mounted on AT
a piece of old-
style plaster-
board about 1/2 inch
thick. The plasterboard
measures 9 1/2 inches by
8 1/4 inches. The paint-
ing measures 6 3/4
inches by almost 5 1/
inches. A note is taped


on the back of the plas-
terboard. It reads "Paul
Cezanne, Na-
ture Morte
1886-90,
S Nasjonal-
S gallerut, Oslo,
S. Norge."
I cannot re-
m member
where I pur-
chased it, but
the cost was
ikorski less than $1. I
SKI'S am thinking
TIC 50 cents. Any
information
you can give
me would be appreci-
ated. VS., Internet
Dear VS.: Paul
Cezanne, 1839-1906, was
a French artist who pro-
duced a wide range of
pictures including avant-


garde, landscapes, still
life, and figures. He pro-
duced oil on canvas
paintings and works on
paper. It would be won-
derful for you if your pic-
ture were an original by
Cezanne. The note on
the back of your piece
tells us where the origi-
nal work is located. You
have a reproduction of
the original work whose
value is catch-as-catch-
can.
DearJohn: What is the
value of my solid walnut
See ATTIC/Page E10
Painting by Paul
Cezanne are world fa-
mous and highly sought
after. Alas, this one is
merely a reproduction.
Special to the Chronicle


-]
1
I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Zamia pumilla:


The coontie


B before I left for a times a m
three week trip to watered
Central America planting
last April, I had planted pots, butv
native counties
in two new beds
flanking a sandy
trail through
the sandhill
ecosystem be-
hind my home.
These cycads
were more than
15 years old and
had been living
in 14-inch diam- Jane Weber
eter pots in my JANE'S
backyard GARDEN
nursery.
The soil mix
in the pots was a blend of coontie c
half backyard sand and long. Th
half decayed fine mulch leaflet
from Central Land fill on Palatka o
State Road 44 between River. N
Lecanto and Inverness. are prev
These old counties were population
used to 30 minutes of over-
head irrigation three


Teek. They were
well after trans-
from their No. 7
vould get nothing
but dew and
rain while I was
away
The counties
were planted 5
feet apart and 4
feet from the
trail to give
them space to
grow to full size
without en-
croaching on
the trail or
crowding each
other. Leaves on
a 50-year-old
an reach 4 feet
ese were wide-
variety from
n the St John's
narrower leaflets
dent in coontie
ns on the west

See Page E14


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
All counties are correctly called Zamia pumilla: variable species widespread
from Florida and throughout the Caribbean Islands, including Cuba and
Hispanola.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

on hand. Not wanting to give up
without a try, I got the Shout spray
bottle and proceeded to clean my
tub with it. I was very surprised
and pleased when it made short
work of the black rings in the tub.
-M.R., Pennsylvania
MEN
Dear Sara: I have some cream
cheese with an expiration date of
almost two months ago. Is it still
good? Karol, email
Dear Karol: I wouldn't eat it. If
the date is a "use by" date, you can
usually still eat it three to four
weeks after that date, if it has been
stored properly. It can be frozen
and eaten within two months, too
(though the texture will be off
upon thawing). Soft cheeses do not
last as long as hard cheeses.
Dear Sara: I've tried to incorpo-
rate a meatless meal one night per
week. I'm hoping to get some new
ideas before my husband gives up
on my meatless meals entirely! -
Ama, email
Dear Ama: Try veggie stir-fry
with rice, or meatless soup or
stews. Since your requirements
See Page Ell


HEALTHY
Continued from Page E6

program lasts four months. Group
meetings will occur once per week
during the first two months of the
program and then will meet bi-
weekly for the last two months.
Families will also be followed for
six months after the group meetings
end to assess the long-term impact of
the program. All families who par-
ticipate in Healthy Kids will receive
the same intervention. However, half
the families will receive the program
soon after finalizing eligibility and
the other half of participating fami-
lies will receive the intervention ten
months after registration.
Healthy Kids is available to chil-
dren at the higher end of the growth
curve (above the 85th percentile for
weight and height) who are 3 to 7 years
of age, and their parents, who live in
Citrus County and surrounding rural
areas. All visits will be at the Citrus
County Cooperative Extension Office,


at 3650 West Sovereign Path, Suite 1,
Lecanto, FL. Families will be given
$10 per group meeting for travel costs.
Initial visits for the study are currently
underway, with the first group meet-
ings beginning in September
Families interested in signing up
for the program or who have ques-
tions should call the Healthy Kids
office toll free at 866-673-9623. Our
team is taking calls now and will
help parents determine their fam-
ily's eligibility for the program.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of Florida/
IFAS' knowledge, research and re-
sources to address youth, family, com-
munity and agricultural needs. All
programs and related activities spon-
sored for, or assisted by, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences are
open to all persons with non-discrimi-
nation with respect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex, sexual ori-
entation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.
Dr Joan Bradshaw is the County
Extension Director for Citrus
County Extension.


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E I


&M=0


Designers show how to put big

style in a small outdoor space


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
Design magazines and
home decorating catalogs
tend to feature sprawling
backyards with big
wooden decks and room
for everything from deco-
rative fountains to artifi-
cial ponds.
But few of us have that
much outdoor space.
Still, with a few strate-
gic choices, you can cre-
ate something truly
special out of even the
smallest yard or porch,
says Los Angeles-based
designer Brian Patrick
Flynn.


Here, he and two other
design experts small-
space specialist Kyle
Schuneman and land-
scape designer Chris
Lambton offer advice
on the best furnishings,
plants and decorating
strategies for making the
most of a small yard, mod-
est deck or petite patio.
Go flexible
"With a small outdoor
space, I really like to
think double duty," says
Schuneman, author of
"The First Apartment
Book: Cool Design for

See Page E9


Associated Press
A narrow 14-foot by 9-foot outdoor space was turned into a full-fledged living room by the designer Brian Patrick Flynn,
by adding a pergola for shade and suspending outdoor pendant lights, privatizing the area from neighbors with a
planter wall, using a U-shaped sectional for seating up to seven, and creating an indoor feeling with a braided indoor-
outdoor area rug.


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TIGHT
Continued from Page E8

Small Spaces" (Potter Style,
2012). Look for seating that has
hidden storage space inside
and tall planters that add
privacy.
And choose items that can
easily be moved, such as light-
weight flowerpots or planters
on wheels, says Lambton, host
of the gardening design series
"Going Yard" on HGTV "It's an
easy DIY thing," he says, to buy
an assortment of inexpensive
plastic pots and paint them to
match your outdoor d6cor.
If planters are lightweight or
on wheels, you can move them
to get proper sunlight at differ-
ent times of day, and rearrange
them if you're entertaining
guests and need more space.
And, Lambton says, they can be
moved inside to a sunny win-
dow or doorway when cold
weather arrives.
Choose the right
furniture
"The easiest way to make
small outdoor spaces appear
smaller is to fill them with lots
of pieces," says Flynn, founder
of the design website
decordemon.com.
"Instead, go big with section-
als, or flank perfectly square or
rectangular areas with identi-
cal love seats or sofas. This not
only maximizes the seating po-
tential, but it also keeps the
space from becoming too busy


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 E9


or even chopped up. In my out-
door living room, I used a U-
shaped outdoor sectional which
seats up to seven comfortably"
When arranging furniture,
consider the view: If the home's
exterior is more attractive than
the outdoor view, Flynn says,
consider positioning seats so
that you'll face your home rather
than looking away from it.
Plant wisely
All three designers say your
choice of plants is especially im-
portant when space is limited.
Choose plants with a pur-
pose: "Lavender's great,"
Lambton says, because it's at-
tractive, easy to grow and de-
ters bugs. Marigolds will also
help keep insects away
Lambton also suggests putting
up a trellis as a privacy wall,
and planting it with colorful
wisteria or climbing hydrangea.
Or choose a tall holly or cypress
plant in a large planter.
"Holly will be green all year
round," he says, and can help
transform an unappealing view.
None of these plants are hard
to take care of, Lambton says.
"If you're having coffee in the
morning, just go out and dump
a little bit of water in."
Flynn agrees, and also sug-
gests using potted grasses,
which are "low maintenance
and, as they grow, they create a
full wall of privacy"
Think vertically
If you love plants but have
minimal space, add a wall-
mounted garden filled with suc-
culent plants to one wall, says


Schuneman: "It's a great way to
add life and texture without ac-
tually taking any real estate up
on your small balcony or patio."
He also suggests using nar-
row planters to create "long,
narrow, raised flower beds that
go the length of the space."
They provide room for plants to
grow, while also creating a
ledge that's "great for coffee
cups or a casual lunch," he
says.
Flynn suggests playing up the
height of your space by adding
long outdoor curtains or hang-
ing pendant lights.
Drench with color
"I usually paint concrete slabs
(on the floor) a bold color or an
accent color carried out from an
adjacent room," Flynn says.
"This helps the patio feel like an
extension when you look out to
it through a door. On the flip
side, when seated out in the
patio looking inward, the consis-
tent use of color flowing inside
and outside makes the patio it-
self feel much more open."
Flynn also suggests using out-
door curtains for a burst of
color, and to block an unattrac-
tive view or hide items like
See Page E10
A tiny patio appears much larger
as the designer Brian Patrick
Flynn decorates it with the same
grey and purple color scheme as
the adjacent living room, to
create the sense that the patio
is an extension of the larger
room and vice versa.
Associated Press


ImI1


I BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL
4BR in Sugarmill Woods. Over 3000 sq. ft
livinQ $175,000


BANK UWNtLU-LUKAL Ull T, rL
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. S39.900 MLS#701383


OPEN HOUSE 1:00-3:30 PM
SUNDAY, May 19, 2013 5433 S. Carol Terrace
PRIVATE COUNTRY ESTATE A handsome wrought-iron fence and gate guards this 3
acre mol estate, featuring a three bedroom, two bath, two-car garage home, built for
the ages with the finest quality materials and always well maintained by winter visitor
owners. Comfortably elegant. Totally fenced and 3/4 sprinklered. Bring horses!
MLS 701759 $185,000
Your hostess, Marilyn Booth 637-4904, 726-6668 or 201-1121
Directions: Pleasant Grove Road to L. on Anna Jo. Follow Anna Jo
until it curves into Carol Terrace. House on immediate left.


ALL RoyBass TODAY 352)726-2471
Emil: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 3 302-6714 '


Mk~u^^^^IL







E10 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


TIGHT
Continued from Page E9

electrical boxes and storage bins.
"Outdoor draperies are, hands-down,
the easiest way to soften an otherwise
all-concrete and stucco space, while
also being able to control how much
or how little neighbors can see."
Or, he says, order a basic trellis
from an online retailer such as
Hayneedle.com, then "paint it a bold
color and use it to instantly make an
outdoor space feel more room-like."
And for a burst of natural color,
Lambton suggests adding a small,
tabletop fire pit for a golden glow at
night. "Some are small enough, and
they don't put off a lot of heat," he says.
Create your own art
"Most people don't think of using
art outside, but it can be done, espe-
cially in a DIY manner," Flynn says.
"My favorite trick is to use tent can-
vas and stretch it across a DIY frame
made from pressure-treated lumber,
and add some gesso to the surface
for texture."
Once you've created your canvas,
he says, "pick up some exterior latex
paint, then get as abstract as you
want to play with color shape and
texture. Once the art is dry, add a
sealer to protect it from moisture,
then hang it up to create a focal point,
and/or add another layer of privacy"
You can make any outdoor space
more beautiful, Lambton says, with
just a few hours of effort and a small
investment.
"If you get two or three pots and a
couple of bags of planting mix," he
says, "it's easy to do for a couple
hours on a Saturday. ... Just a little
bit of color and life will really dress
up your outdoor space."

I ()CitrusCounty






WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6 million closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
B To Learn More
...a.., (352) 746-9924


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

buffet in the attached photo,
made at Imperial Furniture
Company in Grand Rapids,
Michigan? The buffet meas-
ures 54x16x32 inches. L.M.,
Internet
Dear L.M.: I think your side-
board was made between
World War I and II. The style
reflects Chinese and American
Arts and Crafts. I suggest you
contact David Rago Auctions;
they specialize in this type of
furniture. The website is
www.ragoarts.com. Let us
know what you discover
Dear John: My mother sug-
gested that I contact you. I have
two oil paintings. Both are


signed. We purchased them to-
gether in Boca Raton about 15
to 20 years ago at a garage sale,
ifI remember correctly, with a
few other prints. I would really
like to know if they are worth
selling or if I should just keep
them on my walls as I have for
so many years. I really like
them.
The first painting is of a sail-
boat on water with light colors
and with a "Med" flavor, per-
haps in Europe, France or
Italy It is signed P Gillet.
The second is rather ab-
stract, dark orange, brown and
black, random black thin lines,
a silhouette of a set of build-
ings against a dark orange and
brown background. It is signed
Jackson. -M.J.H., Internet
Dear M.J..: Yes, I would be
glad to help. Make sure your


photographs are good and
clear, include a photo of the
back as well. I did check into
both artists' names you
mention.
I found no information or
track record of sales for the
artist P Gillet. There are nu-
merous listings for Jackson;
without a first name or initial,
it is not possible to go further.
We wait to see the
photographs.
Dear John: Could you point
me in the right direction? I
have a miniature model
Napoleonic coach from the
Fisher Body Craftsman's Guild
Competition from 1932. It was
a kit that has been completed
and I do have some of the orig-
inal plans, instructions, etc.
that came with it. I am inter-
ested in selling the item and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

need to know who to contact.
Thank you for your any assis-
tance you can provide! C.C.,
Internet
Dear C.C.: Since you are in-
terested in selling the model, I
suggest you contact Kraft Auc-
tions at 219-973-9240.
They recently sold a 1933
version of what you have for
$750. The website is
www.kraftauctions. com.
Good luck.


John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Sat-
urdays from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box2513, Ocala, FL
34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute
their expertise to columns in Health & Life./
Tuesday
* Read up on all things school-related in the
Chronicle's Education section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting
recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for
the week in the Religion section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses in the Business
section./Sundays


3771 Goldencup 228 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Beverly Hills Inverness
1298 sf of living, 2 bedroom 2 bath Great Investment opportunity. Nice 4
Large kitchen Needs TLC Close to family with 2 bedrooms in each unit.
shopping & Library. MLS 702244 Close to Hospitals and shopping.
Priced at 59,900. Coin-op Laundry on site. Off street
Directions: RTE 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd to parking. Can be purchased with 224
left onto Honeylocust Drive to left on Pleasant Grove MLS#700512
Goldencup to #3771. Priced at $149,900.


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on5 acre lot quiet neighborhood
estate wool and separate apparent A lifestyle Open and airy with the onAmbndgePt next to the Wlthlacoochee
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you State Forest andthe trails but also very close to
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With2,643 sqft this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129.000


CO DI111. 1
HA Ie-O






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PLANTS
Continued from Page E5

including the first sweet corn you
can grow in a pot. No need to garden
in large rectangles when you can
plant edibles in 24-inch containers.
On Deck Sweet Corn (Burpee) leads
the parade of several high-yield veg-
etables being developed for patios
or tight spaces.
Herbs that are emerging as the
hot new flowers. Many herbal vari-
eties look great as standalones or
when mixed with traditional
blooms. Check out the new Cha Cha
chive (The Cook's Garden) with its
unique "leafettes" and eminently
edible flower heads.
Flowers with a surprising new
look. Throw away the trellises if
adding the Sun Parasol Garden Crim-
son mandevilla to your landscape.
This is the headliner in a new series
of compact bedding plant mandevil-
las from Suntory, the Japanese com-
pany that brought you the first blue
rose in 2009. Excellent branching also


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

aren't vegan and the only restriction
is meat, you can try egg and cheese
dishes, veggie pizzas, sandwiches,
wraps, quesadillas, lasagna, quiche,
salads, soups, loaded baked pota-
toes, cheese ravioli, tortellini or bur-
ritos, to name a few. I enjoy the
website findingvegan.com for meat-
less recipes.
Dear Sara: Does your family like
Brussels sprouts? Will you please
share the recipe you use? FE,
email
Dear EE: Sadly, Brussels sprouts
aren't a favorite in our household,
but when I make them, I roast them
in the oven. I toss them with olive
oil, pepper and sea or kosher salt
and roast them at 400 degrees for 35
minutes. You might enjoy them
browned in a skillet with the same
ingredients (you could add some
grated cheese on top, too). If you
don't like frozen Brussels sprouts,
try roasting fresh ones.
Dear Sara: I'm looking for afford-
able socks for my daughter that
won't leave her feet all sweaty. Any
suggestions? -Leah, Illinois
Dear Leah: My 10-year-old daugh-


makes it a natural for hanging bas-
kets, Suntory breeder Tomoya Misato
said. And then there is Longfield Gar-
dens' new Double Oriental Lily, pro-
ducing petals from the center of the
flower rather than a stamen. A Long-
field spokeswoman says that gives it
the look of a double bloom, while
doing away with pollen stains.
Niche. Cocktail gardening can
be an intoxicating hobby Grow your
own heady mixtures using the
Drunken Botanist plant collection
from Territorial Seed Co. in Cottage
Grove, Ore.
Grafting. Over a billion toma-
toes are grafted annually for im-
proved yields and disease
resistance, industry analysts say.
Many heirlooms are uncommonly
delicious, but produce too few fruit
and are prone to disease and nema-
todes. These varieties become more
vigorous and deliver larger crops for
longer periods when grafted to
proven rootstock. Try the Black
Krim and Big Rainbow tomato heir-
looms (Ball) for grafted combina-
tions that deliver good looks with
good taste.

ter likes Danskin Now socks. They
come in crew and ankle lengths. She
likes the lace cushion guard and es-
pecially the mesh ventilation. She
wears them for normal daily wear
and for sports. They're affordable
socks, and when she's at practice,
many of her friends have asked her
what brand they are because they
like the neon-colored heel and toe.
Dear Sara: I want my kids to eat
more raw vegetables, but we are all
tired of baby carrots, celery and cu-
cumbers. Is there a vegetable your
kids love that isn't too weird? My
kids won't eat chickpeas (hummus),
radishes or cauliflower. Serena,
North Carolina
Dear Serena: Our family loves
sugar snap peas, baby corn, sweet
peppers and cherry or grape toma-
toes. We offer a variety of raw veg-
etables served with dip (and fruit,
too) on a regular basis. I put the left-
over vegetables into a large salad.
I'm not sure how old your kids are,
but my kids think of raw vegetables
and fruits as rainbow food because
of how bright and colorful they are
when they're all together. It helps if
parents lead by example. Give your
kids plenty of opportunities to try
vegetables, allow them to select one


See FRUGAL/Page E14


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 Ell








E12 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013



gChrnoncl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
S1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


CR MINI FARMS
2/1, 2.5 Acr. wkly or
monthly (352)564-1242
CRYSTAL RIVER
1br,1.5ba, $465.
Fridge-Stove,water-
trash, Fenc'd-yard,
pets-ok, 352-587-2555
FLORAL CITY
1 bd/1 ba 55+, Remod-
eled, Kitchen & Bath,
Huge L/R, Lg Screened
Patio, Lg. Carport, w/d,
c/h/a, partial furn. $430
mo. includes lot rent,
water, sewer, trash
352-897-4449

HERNANDO
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
$400 $500 Mo. Call
Larry 352-201-2428


HOMOSASSA
1 bedroom. 1 bath.
furnished, pool, 400
deposit, 450/month
(352)628-4441



INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951



INVERNESS
SWMH w/add 2/1 1.25
Acres, near wal-mart
$500 Mthly nonsmoking
706-473-2184


Home Finder
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Find Your trwA KIHoMe,
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181
DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&l WA.C. Must See
352-621-3807
LOOKING FOR YOUR


Is your Credit Score 575
or Higher, several new
homes to choose from
call for details
352-792-1272



LOT MODEL
CLEARANCE!!!
All Models Must Go to
make room for new
models, please call
(352) 795-1272





New 2013
Lot Model 3/2 DWHM
$46,900, Includes
Deliver, set-up, A/C,
Skirting, Steps Call
352-795-2377





New 2013 Lot Model
DWMH 2/2 $42,900
Includes, Delivery,
set-up, A/C Skirt, steps
NO HIDDEN FEES
Call 352-795-1272
Palm Harbor
4/2 $499/Month
http://www.palmharbor.c
omlmodel-center
/olantcitv/
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


MUST SELL


New Lot Model
2250 Sq Ft, 4/2 Fire-
place, huge Island
kitchen, It has to go!!
$84,900 includes
Del, set-up, A/C,
Skirting,steps,
Furniture pkg Avail.
Call 352-795-2377







REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377

STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183





We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272






INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details


HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182



HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing& siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
HOMOSASSA
Owner Financing, 3/2
2000 Sq Ft, comp. re-
modeled, open fl plan,
fenced yard $5k down
$525 monthly 302-9217




1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vinyl window,
utility & outdoor shed
all appl's and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243
Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A 55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-794-4128

Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648


HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090






-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomieRentals.comn
HOMOSASSA
5641 W. IrvingC......................$ S 50
2/2/1 Nceiome off Rock Crusher
5339 S. Elm St........................ $900
2/1 Furnished with unlites included
CRYSTAL RIVER
9351 W.Wisonsin .............. $825
3/2/1 Beoutful kitchen
1266 N. Seagull P................ $1100
#143 Condo3 m. min.
CITRUS SPRING/BEVERL HILLS/LECANTO
87 S. Adams (H) .....................$625
2/1.5/1 Cute wi h sun porch
1829 W.Androiedaie () ......$8
3/2/2 Lovely reo
1191W.roli Ph (L)....... $1000
Beautiful home
INVERNESS
5525 S. Hine T r.................... $1200
2/2/1 Furn or Unfurn beautiful home









I nc I
33 N. Crof Ave-nue.'


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED
A GOOD
TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/2 POOL....................$900
3/2 ACREAGE
LAWNCARE INCLUDED.....$950
2/1/CARPORT DUPLEX ............. $500
AVAILABLE JUNE
2/1APART STARTING AT $500


2/2/Carpo0rt ........................ $650
B N

Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010





At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio
Apt. $650. All Util.
Inc'd (352)382-7892

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393


Desertrose
Apartments
RENTAL SPECIAL
1 MONTH FREE
2 bed/2 bath
Call now for details!!
Ensing Properties LLC
352-795-1795
www.ensing
properties.com

INVERNESS
2/1water incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom
cabinets, central air &
heat, stove,
refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY







CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Commercial Storefront
clean 1000 SF, exc.loc
$795/mo 352-634-2528





Meadowcrest
Condo for Rent
Will Call back after writ-
ing out info
352-220-6754
30 days








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS Duplex
Sr s Welcome 2BR/1BA
More... No Pets/smoke
$595. mo Avail 6/1/13
(352) 746-2932




At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio
Apt. $650. All Util.
Inc. (352) 422-1933

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Buy 1-3bd Homes
From $1000/mo!
PreForeclosured and
Rent2OWN Homes!
Bad Credit OK! Only
500 Credit Score Min!
To learn more and
access local listings call
1-866-955-0621




MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116




DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes
Estates
2/2, + FL room
fenc'd yd $650/mo.
1st,last. sec
(352) 489-7094
FLORAL CITY
2/1, Det. Gar. Chad,
Hist. Dist., No pets/
non smoking $675mo.
1 st/lst/sec. 422-6263
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paint,flooring, w/d pets
ok $800 mthly, 8928 W.
White Dogwood Dr.
619-301-5442
INVERNESS
Highlands
close to downtown
31212, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723

LECANTO 3/2
Builders Model, FP,
Granite Kit. & Baths
$1,000 352-422-1933




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
*(352)4642514**
1305 Hwy 486


Executive Suite
Available, King Bed,
high speed internet
Direct tv, whole house
access, w/d, carport
parking, secluded,
Christian gentleman
$125. wkly call Bruce
352-445-7501 or Ray
828-497-2610








Wanting to Rent on
Lease 3/2, with Pool
or waterfront, in
Crystal River or
Homosassa
6 mos in advance,
(352) 422-6939









AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/ iX
REALTY ONE




must sell!
Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079



Nature Coast Landings:
Sale/Trade: Big rig RV
Site plus storage lot.
$49,500/offer for both.
352-843-5441. See at
detailsbyowner.com




Specializing in
Acreage, Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Ope Ho


OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods
May 18 & 19th
Sat & Sun 12- 4PM
211 Pine Street
(352) 503-5233


Emmal
2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/3/18' rollups
office tlr & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 % w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840
For Sale By Owner
312/2, on appox. % acre
with enclosed large pool
new roof, new Hot
water heater $125,000,
746-5421




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity with amenities
$120K posss rent
opt)352-804-9729
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 292-1550





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3BD/2BA/2CG,
Extra Rm. New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328


H

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan, carpet,
tile, bright, cheerful,
clean. Realtor/Owner
(352) 697-0295

312/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
REDUCED $129,500
352-302-4057


For Sale" %9
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite. New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241











Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
Wood Floors, Tile and
Carpet. 2 Car Gar,SS
Appl. fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026

SMW
3/3/2, court yard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978


Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503












BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments











GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

SPECIAL *
New Home in
Quiet neighborhd.
3/2/2, on 1 acre
2932 sf. corner lot,
$269,900.
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855



Spruce Creek Pr.
55+, gated.
3/2/2 2370 Liv. area.
on GC $159,000.
Call Lindsay Paolillo,
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant






For Saleso W
Lake Panasoffkee
5BR/2BA 2,200 SF CB
Home w/3 lots, C/H/A,
fenced yd, 2 car gar,
close to lake. $140,000
Call 352/569-4026





Inverness, Regency Pk
2/2, fireplace, 1st floor
community pool
$48,900 352-637-6993





Beautiful Sedona, AZ
Time share for sale
2 weeks annually use,
very low price, 5 Star
Sedona Summit
352-419-4629





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


m
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO


Properties.com
TO www.

"To view
great waterfront
properties"




I Buy Houses Cash
ANY CONDITION
Over Financed ok!
**call 352-503-3245**



Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
hmrml999@att.net
(904) 757-1012

THIS OUT!
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $53,900. Call
352-638-0905


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 E13


Citrs Co


Cit usCou ty







E14 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

type in the store on their
own and provide informa-
tion on the importance of
vegetables. You can get
creative, too: serve them
in smiley-face arrange-
ments or on a special
plate, or spike them with
wooden skewers and
make vegetables kabobs.
You can incorporate veg-
etables into other foods,
too. For example, you can
make green smoothies,
shred vegetables into
ground beef or puree
them into soups.
MEN
Epsom salt can be used
to remove splinters. Soak
the affected area in warm
water and Epsom salt.
The salt will help draw
out the splinter so it's eas-
ier to remove. This is es-
pecially helpful for kids
who get small splinters at
the playground from
mulch or equipment.
The first two reader
tips share more ways to
use Epsom salt:
Help itchy skin: I've
kept dry, itchy skin at bay


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


all winter by using Epsom
salt in my bath at least
twice a week. I buy it at
Costco, and it has made a
huge difference in my
skin! Usually I am flaking
and itching all winter, es-
pecially on my legs. It's
also wonderful if you are
tired and have sore mus-
cles. S.B., email
Combine 1 cup of
Suave shampoo
(whichever variety smells
best to you), 1/2 cup water
and 3 tablespoons Epsom
salt. Whisk until it's kind
of frothy Pour into a recy-
cled liquid soap con-
tainer and you have body
wash at a fraction of the
cost! Tracy, New York
Add fruit to gelatin: I
put fruit in my flavored
gelatin bananas, fruit
cocktail or peaches in
red, canned mandarin or-
anges and crushed
pineapple in orange. -
FR., Alabama
Microwave Fruit Crisp:
6 to 8 medium-sized
apples, peaches or pears.
1/4 cup firmly packed
brown sugar.
2 tablespoons flour.
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon


See FRUGAL/Page E15


JANE
Continued from Page E7

side of the Florida peninsula.
Very narrow rolled
leaflets occur on counties
in the West Florida Pan-
handle. The nursery trade
seems to prefer the wide-
leaf variety. All are cor-
rectly called Zamia
pumilla: variable species
widespread from Florida
and throughout the
Caribbean Islands, includ-
ing Cuba and Hispanola.
Centuries ago, there
were reports from the area
around the St John's river
of counties with leaves
more than 6 feet long hav-
ing wide leaflets. Sixteen
years ago, my grandchil-
dren had gathered seed
from plants at a century-
old Palatka church. Those
parent plants had leaves
over 4 feet long at that time.
My newly planted coon-
ties were from that batch
of seed. All were multi-
crowned, meaning the un-
derground stem had
developed several growth
points. Coonties develop
multi-crowns after about
six to eight years. If cut


E AlAntoniA
ALWAYS THERE FOR
Cell: (352) 220-8
alantoni@era.com


4698 N JADEMOC



/-


Pine Ridge Farms Spectacular!
Find elegance, comfort &
atmosphere on 10 acres. Ride your
horse on the trails nearby or enjoy
comfortable poolside comfort at
home. Challenges Comparison at
$590,000. MLS 702509


GolfAnyone?
Enjoy your Easy and Carefree
Lifestyle in this move-in ready 3/
2/2 home in Terra Vista! Priced
Right at $214,000. MLS 702127


apart, the pieces generally
die, except when under
sterile tissue culture con-
ditions in a laboratory
All cycads are either
male or female plants, so
the genders were alter-
nated to ensure good polli-
nation and seed
production. About six to
eight years after sprouting
from a seed, male counties
will start to produce slim
brown cones, resembling a
corn cob about 6 inches
long in late fall through to
early winter. The cone
scales open slightly to ex-
pose their pollen.
Although pollen can be
dispersed by wind and
passing animals, it is usu-
ally carried from the male
to receptive female cones
by a small native black
beetle. Use of insecticide
will kill the underground
beetle and thus prevent
good pollination.
Female cones are round,
squat and covered in fuzzy
orange-brown velvet. They
start to develop around No-
vember locally and ripen by
late February or early
March. They are receptive
of pollen for about only
three or four days. The
cone plates open slightly


1. % AMERICAN
t1eatr" ERx REALTY & INVESTMENTS
YOU* 4511 N.LemntoHwy.
43 W Bevedy ,FL34465
143 352-746-3600



)R, BEVERLY HILLS
31/22 Beautiful Laurel
R.dg+ E Liates home. Over
12'7m, 1q. ft. living space,
large 2 1 ( 30 great room,
T,.i-edJ Oaks Golf Course
community. Super clean.
M.:.,/e-in ready.
r ..: ,::' $199,900
Direhrlon Forest Ridge Blvd. to
H H,,ll, Ridge, left on N.
Cre-..,'l,,,- ,-:ht on Cresmont Ct.
Il-i t JiJ-moor Home on left.
LAUREL RIDGE ESTATES
3/2/2 2006 Rusaw built
home, 1800 sq. ft. living
space. Features a great room,
split floor plan, 1 1x 33
screened-in lanai, community
pool, smoke and pet free,
surrounded by
Twisted Oaks Golf Gourse.
MLS #702719
$189,900


and a clear sap can be seen.
Male pollen and the bee-
tle can burrow down be-
tween the individual
female cone plates and fer-
tilize it. As many as 100
seeds could develop on
one female cone. But usu-
ally, the cone produces few
or up to 40 seeds. Seeds de-
velop over the summer and
fall, and must stay on the
mother cone until shed-
ding naturally the next De-
cember or January That is
nine months after pollina-
tion and fertilization.
The orange flesh covering
the seed case is toxic to dis-
courage predation. It keeps
the embryo inside the half-
inch, hard-cased seed hy-
drated until the rains arrive
in June. Only then does the
seed sprout its single, first-


000EZPV


[H
MAs



year pair of leaves, with two
pairs of leaflets, and begin
to develop a tap root and
subterranean stem.
When I returned home,
my newly planted counties
were putting out dozens of
new bright green leaves. I
gave each plant a dousing of
water from the fire hose set
on a soft shower. They will
need no further irrigation
for the rest of their long lives.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W .GULF TO LAKE HW Y.
CRYSTAL RVER,FL 34429
OFCE: (352) 795-6633
W W r.raErE fOM E rAL.:R SL.SYALR rfOM


ealtorI


..... .i .......


3 baths, 4 car detached garage (30x52)
1 bedroom, 1 bath 1; 1; ..1;
upstairs Gazebo/sumn., i... .I '
abutting, inground caged pool, secluded/
private but nearby everything #701680
1a -- -


over 5 acres of land, fully fenced,
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, gourmet kitchen
and island, cathedral & vaulted ceilings,
lovely gi: l gas fireplace, inside
laundry J:: $155,000





BEVERLY HILLS 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage home w/office and caged
inground pool Move-in condition, in cul-
de-sac, newer area of homes off Forest
Ridge Blvd 18 x 13 ft deck adjacent to
pool area #354383 $95,000


HERNANDO 2004 Fleetwood DAW M/H 10 acres, fenced, 3 bedrooms, 2 5 baths
4 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres w/ living cathedral & vaulted ceilings, skylights
& family room w/fireplace Needs secluded & private, handyman/womai
refrigerator, dishwasher and some drywall special Needs floor covering, interior
repairs along with A/C and carpet .;..;.... ,, 1;. -. 1 .;.. #70171!
#700236 $49,900 ....1111


I _







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E14

1/4 cup water
Peel and thinly slice fruit.
Combine brown sugar, flour,
cinnamon and water in large
bowl, then add sliced fruit.
Spoon into 8-inch square
glass (microwavable) dish.
Topping:
1/4 cup margarine.
1 cup oats.
1/4 cup firmly packed
brown sugar.
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon.
Melt margarine in small
bowl. Combine with oats,
brown sugar and margarine.
Top fruit mixture.
Microwave topped mixture
uncovered 6 minutes. Turn


SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 E15


and cook 4 minutes more.
Serves 4.
NOTES: I usually double
the topping, since it's so deli-
cious and seems a bit scant
for my liking. -Min, email
Make grapevine wreaths:
Grapevine wreaths are avail-
able in varying sizes at most
craft stores, but you can make
your own if you have access
to a grapevine. Cut the vines
from the plant as soon as the
grapes have been picked
and/or before first frost. Cut
long lengths so you can wrap
long, continuous coils. Snip
off remaining leaves. You can
leave the little curlicues on
for a nice effect on finished
wreaths. If vines dry out and
crack or break while wrap-
ping, soak in water overnight.
If you won't be able to wrap


them right after cutting, coil
them into a laundry basket,
bucket or large tub. Then if
soaking is needed, you can
pour water right into the tub,
and the vines will already
have a coiled shape.
Begin your coil with the
thickest end of one vine. Coil
it into a circle a little smaller
than you want your finished
wreath to be. Use a short
piece of wire to tie the first
coil securely while you con-
tinue wrapping. Wrap one en-
tire length, twining the vine
in and out around itself.
Begin wrapping the next vine
in a different spot and wrap
in and out in the opposite di-
rection. Keep adding vines
until the wreath is as thick as
you want it.
If needed, tie a short length


of wire around the wreath at
intervals to secure vines to-
gether I like to wrap my vines
fairly loosely This leaves me
room to weave ribbons in and
out of the vines easily, which
adds a nice dimensional ef-
fect. I use wild grape vines to
make my wreaths. Peter-
son, Pennsylvania


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St, Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure
timely publication of submitted mate-
rial. The earlier Chronicle editors re-
ceive submissions, the better chance
of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week
in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for
publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for
publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for
publication Saturday.


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Rii I DFCKFR w.2-464-.47 SUIAN Mill I FN s5.499.91. VICTORIA FRANKI IN .35-427-3777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS Terra Vista maintenance-Freevilla with bedrooms plus a den. Looks iake new and is loaded
This lovely home 3/2/2 that has hardly been lived in features Coran counter tops, ceramic tile, with upgrades. It has a built-in entertainment center, custom closets, water softner, reverse
theversatile 3rd BR can function nicely as a den/office and many more upgrades. Located on osmosis system and much more. The lanai has sliders between birdcage and lanai. Formal
a private homesite with close proximity to premiere Skyview Clubhouse. Maintenance-free dining incorporated with an open floor plan is great for entertaining with multi-room surround
ving atits finest. M LS 702783 ..................................................................................... $ 2 2 9 ,0 0 0 so und. M LS 702737....................................................................................................... $ 3 3 9 ,0 0 0


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3 CAR, WOODSIDE
Stunning and elegant DaVinci model boasts of open and flowing floor plan with 14' ceilings
and 18 windows to enjoy the views from the formal living and dining room. You'll feel like
royalty from the first step into the grand foyer, relax or entertain in the grand family room with
pocket doors out to the screened lanai. This home features a large gourmet kitchen with
plenty of cabinets, granite counter top, double pantry. Built-ins in the garage will stay. This
home truly has it all M LS702709............................................... .......................... ... $4 9 9 ,0 0 0


enoyng the Flora estyle.Ope and spcousthereare3bedrooms2 baths,2-cargarage, BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR Very nice 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1-car garage townhome in the beautiful gated community of DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
large great room, dining area & fully appliances kitchen. Upgraded kitchen includes Coran Townhome 2 bed, 2.5 bath, 1-car gar. Completely furnished with high end furniture & decor Brentwood. Great room with living and dining combo, eat-in kitchen. Spacious bedrooms Come savor the best of Florida. Conveniently located near the main entrance of Terra Vista.
counter tops and maple cabinets. Tied entry, kitchen and dining areas overlook this wonderful furniture negotiable. T led in all th e wet areas. Community center with pool, gym, sauna, hot upstairs, master suite with walk in closet. Leave the yard and exterior maintenance to others Well-maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage, plus den. A totally open floor plan with a
open floor plan.Wood blinds add an attractive decorator touch. Veery open & airywith high tub, public golf course all in a gated community. Don't miss this one. Beautiful view of the while you enjoy the new fitness center & spa, golf, swimming, restaurants, social activities triple sliding door that takes you to the pavered lanai with a great hedge in back for extra
ceilings, Nice Brentwood location with private backyard. MLS 702670 ............... $150,000 pond and fountain fromyour lanai. No neighbors behind ou. MLS 702417........$ 110 000 and much more! MLS702404.......................................................................................$114 900 privacy. Located on a street with very little traffic. MLS702296 ............................. $179,900
pond and fountainmfromoyourLlana40No.ne.ghbors.behi.d..ou..MLS.702.17.........10..00.an...uch..ore..MLS.702.0........................................................................................$$114 ,9 0


Terms 6 Months or More
T^^erra Visa & Brentwood Rentals! SociaMmesi icue ih l etl


Wake up each and every day to the early morning light hitting the dew on the rowing hlls of Very nice fully furnished maintained villa on a less traveled street in Terra Vista. Lovely 2
the Sky Vew golf course. 3/2/2 open floor plan with a great room & entertainment niche on a bed room with a den, separate eat-in kitchen with pass through breakfast bar. Combination
unique golf course lot. Ceramic tile flooring in allwet areas plus the great room! Large sliders inning and living area overlooks the paved screened lanai. Social Club Membershp included.
outto a screened lanaiw ith brick pavers. i6750 ............................................................. $ 1 ,4 0 0 1273 ............................................... ........ .......................... .......................................$ 1 ,2 5 0


I


^Speciaflflizingi n Terraist


461 BrjentwodResle


i .. .. i


i rI









E16 SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013


WATERFRONT ACREAGE
_" _" llh Il l..I.i .: 1 h I I.6 1 i...l I l.jl i'
ln.ia. l ai l ii Ii l ai .1.1 .I l i In . ,: .il 1.1
I.lui aJ I ..al J a l h1 I ,ala .a aiJ.
$210,000
Call Ruth fiederick 1352 563 6866


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rEMIILT UUILv. UL/urrEll

"" a1..'.'. ... I....a I ..a a I a j aa ., 1,,aaa

, ...1 ,,,I 1 i, ,, a.. l,* I .l Ii .-., *i*i 1 .. 111 . i

Nl i = I11II ASKING 5305,900
P.Jt D.is 352 2/2 1280
I',ell hslitg II III c2I1.itd.ii s comr


I: d ,,ll ...'i..A d ,' 11 h i .6.1 h,, 1 h i'.,
I m,,,,,',, I, I ,,,I 6,.1 '. 6'. ... I


PRICED AT $110.000 .:., 1,1
Cl E11 G C Krai"ii, 352 400 2635
I.j ni.m r nl'.ni vto.Jn


I I


S199,900 COUNTRY LIVING AT ITS FINEST







l/il Pii- ..352 634 1273


I & .-1
LARGE 3BR, 3BA, BRICK HOME
* I.i ..a I l..p .I acia..,
* l .il' I .. I, iiil II,:-. l I II,. 1
j IIh.I.- h.6.6.,..a l.a I hall ,:il

Mi = 11'll.-. $189,900
Jeanne Pickel 212 3410
Iw'rI'ir. citIuscounti sold. corn


F. I 1,h lll ,- ,, . 1, 1 ,,, l, I ,,u u,,,

, , I ,,, II ,,, I I

, ,h,,, 1,,,, h- , ,,,l,,,,u ,- I iiI, .
NM 1 =- i;: f ASKING S108,900
P.it D.nis ,352l 212 1280
I'iell sling II II I c2/p.ild.nis comr


3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH AND
2 CAR GARAGE HOME
Init. mh .3, l..l .h.l c.:.ll ,p.jfhvna

.ilil.r.-lla- I l a l laal a aaaaaa a aiaa.l .j lI l:

Ml ; = 111 ::: ASKING ONLY S89,000
Call Jim Motion to rielv
this beautiful home 422 2173


CLEAN AS A WHISTLE
* 3BR. 2 balh. 2 car garage
* la-ia-.-. J la. I ,:il
* I nl.i ll l I ll. : l l,
Mt i = 1: 5 : $82,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
wI'rI'ir. citIuscount isold. conm


BEST PRICE IN CELINA HILLS!
i ....a ia I.,,I.... I ...........iII...... a l I ". i II
a..I h,... i ... I i .. h. I ,,i ..,a i ,, -a d
-.II ..... I ll. I. J.. d : i n..I 1] 1 1 l ....... II
i, "'I I "I h1.. I ..-I h.l
M'i = ;.1 ASKING $109,900
CAI N.inc Jenks 352 400 8012


ONLY SUPERLATIVES APPLY!
:1'~ a...'"; ~ i.. 1 : : a ,l-..i
.i l.a i i. i h-i. . I*. i .j 1 I .~1ll i. .. 1 a. ,1 .I I ao
Ii, .I :Iii,, ia. ,, ..... Ih. ,,,., ,, i..a ,, I.i.aaa

rii :,, : $122.100
.4 al Iiji /li, i n Jootji 726 6668









A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION





111i = 1i 11'. ASKING $398,900
Pit Di, ,352212 7280
Ial-i iaitong apa.., .ic2pt dui aini


COMMERCIAL BUILDING
a- aI.j l a .l l a- i -... ala.... ,: .. II lh:a :l
a... Hi..l.ini.iV 11 Ti. nil ni .nii i aalla i : a
:IIh. p lla-ll h. a ll.a. l j I a 6/l l iilla lia i

MlG, : --.I": al .,,,,J $105,900
Call Jim Moilon at 4222173 loi a Iout


PINE RIDGE
* 'U :.i ll.. POOL Inl,-c
* -:-ia. a:- I l..i. ,: d

* IAMll', i.ijiM
MiG = /i:: $200,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
iw'IIt'r. CIIIuscount 'sold. con


CLOSE TO TOWN
IT h e .i a i l l a, I l l .i 6. _" II :
l. l.a i a I-d i l-i h lh. li I .. I,..-


PRICED TO SELL!! $84,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


CITRUS SPRINGS BEAUTY!
I . u n y I :lui l .a B ii. 1 I ia n .I. h l '
.. l ] .Il b iv l I Ij l l I II.1.11 11 in111
p -.al II a ai H. imi l hI a ini li a..I $.. I
Ml = /ll:'] v. $89,900
lottaine 0 Regan 586 0075


I II, h I ........... .-IH .III pl.v ..l,.l.. l Ilhjl

II .. ...i. .-l. ... h.., p -. I h.1.l1l1h.


r11: = -.4:i ASKING $119.900
Pit Dio, ,352 212 7280
I l. sti ''i i capimrds. icjm


16... 1...I . .... .... .
.I I. ,,, ........ l. ,, I j 1hll j 1H. I .6 .I 1.


rI 1. . ........... ., I. .:. ..I I. r.. H110d
C 11 17 ,1,i 4 r,l. 1 ,i' r, r.? '?SSSSS


rI : =-: :I $159.000
Pir.n. Cisa.l /i as it 352 476 6549
.,r C21 .OI lh i t 352 7266668


l.. l ai jia .11a i 'I I. ni ,i 'll i ... I I. a. I

h1: 'I.il 6.1MI .1 1l hi III i I ll Ii ""
ONLY ASKING $185,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


INVERNESS, 7 LAKES AREA
_ b -l....aa L.. ilh ... h ... ,,,, bI u I Ill

l,...lllll .l.il 1 .H.:1.:..1:.. I .I ..h ,, .i.).iOl : .l.ll...1
IIa al II ..... i I.aaa la a ..-.-a I l
,:' ,:- '. i661

Il'-l = /i:I: / $169,000
David K/mIz 954383-8786
Ollice 352-726-6668


P